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Sample records for n-ethyl-n-nitrosourea enu mutagenesis

  1. A Mutant Mouse with a Highly Specific Contextual Fear-Conditioning Deficit Found in an N-Ethyl-N-Nitrosourea (ENU) Mutagenesis Screen

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    Pletcher, Mathew T.; Wiltshire, Tim; Tarantino, Lisa M.; Mayford, Mark; Reijmers, Leon G.; Coats, Jennifer K.

    2006-01-01

    Targeted mutagenesis in mice has shown that genes from a wide variety of gene families are involved in memory formation. The efficient identification of genes involved in learning and memory could be achieved by random mutagenesis combined with high-throughput phenotyping. Here, we provide the first report of a mutagenesis screen that has…

  2. Spontaneous inflammatory pain model from a mouse line with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis

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    Chen Tsung-Chieh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis was used to induce a point mutation in C57BL/6 J mice. Pain-related phenotype screening was performed in 915 G3 mice. We report the detection of a heritable recessive mutant in meiotic recombinant N1F1 mice that caused an abnormal pain sensitivity phenotype with spontaneous skin inflammation in the paws and ears. Methods We investigated abnormal sensory processing, neuronal peptides, and behavioral responses after the induction of autoinflammatory disease. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers and polymerase chain reaction product sequencing were used to identify the mutation site. Results All affected mice developed paw inflammation at 4–8 weeks. Histological examinations revealed hyperplasia of the epidermis in the inflamed paws and increased macrophage expression in the spleen and paw tissues. Mechanical and thermal nociceptive response thresholds were reduced in the affected mice. Locomotor activity was decreased in affected mice with inflamed hindpaws, and this reduction was attributable to the avoidance of contact of the affected paw with the floor. Motor strength and daily activity in the home cage in the affected mice did not show any significant changes. Although Fos immunoreactivity was normal in the dorsal horn of affected mice, calcitonin gene-related peptide immunoreactivity significantly increased in the deep layer of the dorsal horn. The number of microglia increased in the spinal cord, hippocampus, and cerebral cortex in affected mice, and the proliferation of microglia was maintained for a couple of months. Two hundred eighty-five SNP markers were used to reveal the affected gene locus, which was found on the distal part of chromosome 18. A point mutation was detected at A to G in exon 8 of the pstpip2 gene, resulting in a conserved tyrosine residue at amino acid 180 replaced by cysteine (Y180 C. Conclusions The data provide definitive evidence that a mutation

  3. Generation of genetically modified rodents using random ENU mutagenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Boxtel, R.; Cuppen, E.

    2011-01-01

    The generation of genetically modified animals using N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis is a fast and highly effective method. The technique is based on treating male animals with the supermutagen ENU, which randomly introduces mutations in the spermatogonial stem cells. By breeding these

  4. Identification of a rat model for usher syndrome type 1B by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis-driven forward genetics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, B.M.; Peters, T.A.; Mul, J.D.; Croes, H.J.E.; Fransen, J.A.M.; Beynon, A.J.; Guryev, V.; Plasterk, R.H.; Cuppen, E.P.J.G.

    2005-01-01

    The rat is the most extensively studied model organism and is broadly used in biomedical research. Current rat disease models are selected from existing strains and their number is thereby limited by the degree of naturally occurring variation or spontaneous mutations. We have used ENU mutagenesis

  5. Identification of a rat model for usher syndrome type 1B by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis-driven forward genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, B.M.; Peters, T.A.; Mul, J.D.; Croes, H.J.; Fransen, J.A.; Beynon, A.J.; Guryev, V.; Plasterk, R.; Cuppen, E.

    2005-01-01

    The rat is the most extensively studied model organism and is broadly used in biomedical research. Current rat disease models are selected from existing strains and their number is thereby limited by the degree of naturally occurring variation or spontaneous mutations. We have used ENU mutagenesis

  6. Mice with an N-Ethyl-N-Nitrosourea (ENU Induced Tyr209Asn Mutation in Natriuretic Peptide Receptor 3 (NPR3 Provide a Model for Kyphosis Associated with Activation of the MAPK Signaling Pathway.

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    Christopher T Esapa

    Full Text Available Non-syndromic kyphosis is a common disorder that is associated with significant morbidity and has a strong genetic involvement; however, the causative genes remain to be identified, as such studies are hampered by genetic heterogeneity, small families and various modes of inheritance. To overcome these limitations, we investigated 12 week old progeny of mice treated with the chemical mutagen N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU using phenotypic assessments including dysmorphology, radiography, and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. This identified a mouse with autosomal recessive kyphosis (KYLB. KYLB mice, when compared to unaffected littermates, had: thoraco-lumbar kyphosis, larger vertebrae, and increased body length and increased bone area. In addition, female KYLB mice had increases in bone mineral content and plasma alkaline phosphatase activity. Recombination mapping localized the Kylb locus to a 5.5Mb region on chromosome 15A1, which contained 51 genes, including the natriuretic peptide receptor 3 (Npr3 gene. DNA sequence analysis of Npr3 identified a missense mutation, Tyr209Asn, which introduced an N-linked glycosylation consensus sequence. Expression of wild-type NPR3 and the KYLB-associated Tyr209Asn NPR3 mutant in COS-7 cells demonstrated the mutant to be associated with abnormal N-linked glycosylation and retention in the endoplasmic reticulum that resulted in its absence from the plasma membrane. NPR3 is a decoy receptor for C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP, which also binds to NPR2 and stimulates mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling, thereby increasing the number and size of hypertrophic chondrocytes. Histomorphometric analysis of KYLB vertebrae and tibiae showed delayed endochondral ossification and expansion of the hypertrophic zones of the growth plates, and immunohistochemistry revealed increased p38 MAPK phosphorylation throughout the growth plates of KYLB vertebrae. Thus, we established a model of kyphosis due to a novel NPR

  7. Longitudinal evaluation of an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-created murine model with normal pressure hydrocephalus.

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    Ming-Jen Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Normal-pressure hydrocephalus (NPH is a neurodegenerative disorder that usually occurs late in adult life. Clinically, the cardinal features include gait disturbances, urinary incontinence, and cognitive decline. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Herein we report the characterization of a novel mouse model of NPH (designated p23-ST1, created by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU-induced mutagenesis. The ventricular size in the brain was measured by 3-dimensional micro-magnetic resonance imaging (3D-MRI and was found to be enlarged. Intracranial pressure was measured and was found to fall within a normal range. A histological assessment and tracer flow study revealed that the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF pathway of p23-ST1 mice was normal without obstruction. Motor functions were assessed using a rotarod apparatus and a CatWalk gait automatic analyzer. Mutant mice showed poor rotarod performance and gait disturbances. Cognitive function was evaluated using auditory fear-conditioned responses with the mutant displaying both short- and long-term memory deficits. With an increase in urination frequency and volume, the mutant showed features of incontinence. Nissl substance staining and cell-type-specific markers were used to examine the brain pathology. These studies revealed concurrent glial activation and neuronal loss in the periventricular regions of mutant animals. In particular, chronically activated microglia were found in septal areas at a relatively young age, implying that microglial activation might contribute to the pathogenesis of NPH. These defects were transmitted in an autosomal dominant mode with reduced penetrance. Using a whole-genome scan employing 287 single-nucleotide polymorphic (SNP markers and further refinement using six additional SNP markers and four microsatellite markers, the causative mutation was mapped to a 5.3-cM region on chromosome 4. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results collectively demonstrate that the p23-ST1

  8. ENU-induced mutagenesis in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus by treating mature sperm.

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    Xia-Yun Jiang

    Full Text Available N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU mutagenesis is a useful approach for genetic improvement of plants, as well as for inducing functional mutants in animal models including mice and zebrafish. In the present study, mature sperm of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus were treated with a range of ENU concentrations for 45 min, and then wild-type eggs were fertilized. The results indicated that the proportion of embryos with morphological abnormalities at segmentation stage or dead fry at hatching stage increased with increasing ENU dose up to 10 mM. Choosing a dose that was mutagenic, but provided adequate numbers of viable fry, an F1 population was generated from 1 mM ENU-treated sperm for screening purposes. The ENU-treated F1 population showed large variations in growth during the first year. A few bigger mutants with morphologically normal were generated, as compared to the controls. Analysis of DNA from 15 F1 ENU-treated individuals for mutations in partial coding regions of igf-2a, igf-2b, mstn-1, mstn-2, fst-1 and fst-2 loci revealed that most ENU-treated point mutations were GC to AT or AT to GC substitution, which led to nonsense, nonsynonymous and synonymous mutations. The average mutation rate at the examined loci was 0.41%. These results indicate that ENU treatment of mature sperm can efficiently induce point mutations in grass carp, which is a potentially useful approach for genetic improvement of these fish.

  9. Mouse ENU Mutagenesis to Understand Immunity to Infection: Methods, Selected Examples, and Perspectives

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    Grégory Caignard

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Infectious diseases are responsible for over 25% of deaths globally, but many more individuals are exposed to deadly pathogens. The outcome of infection results from a set of diverse factors including pathogen virulence factors, the environment, and the genetic make-up of the host. The completion of the human reference genome sequence in 2004 along with technological advances have tremendously accelerated and renovated the tools to study the genetic etiology of infectious diseases in humans and its best characterized mammalian model, the mouse. Advancements in mouse genomic resources have accelerated genome-wide functional approaches, such as gene-driven and phenotype-driven mutagenesis, bringing to the fore the use of mouse models that reproduce accurately many aspects of the pathogenesis of human infectious diseases. Treatment with the mutagen N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU has become the most popular phenotype-driven approach. Our team and others have employed mouse ENU mutagenesis to identify host genes that directly impact susceptibility to pathogens of global significance. In this review, we first describe the strategies and tools used in mouse genetics to understand immunity to infection with special emphasis on chemical mutagenesis of the mouse germ-line together with current strategies to efficiently identify functional mutations using next generation sequencing. Then, we highlight illustrative examples of genes, proteins, and cellular signatures that have been revealed by ENU screens and have been shown to be involved in susceptibility or resistance to infectious diseases caused by parasites, bacteria, and viruses.

  10. Identification of 17 hearing impaired mouse strains in the TMGC ENU-mutagenesis screen

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    Kermany, Mohammad [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital; Parker, Lisan [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital; Guo, Yun-Kai [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital; Miller, Darla R [ORNL; Swanson, Douglas J [ORNL; Yoo, Tai-June [Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN; Goldowitz, Daniel [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Zuo, Jian [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital

    2006-01-01

    The Tennessee Mouse Genome Consortium (TMGC) employed an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-mutagenesis scheme to identify mouse recessive mutants with hearing phenotypes. We employed auditory brainstem responses (ABR) to click and 8, 16, and 32 kHz stimuli and screened 285 pedigrees (1819 mice of 8-11 weeks old in various mixed genetic backgrounds) each bred to carry a homozygous ENU-induced mutation. To define mutant pedigrees, we measured P12 mice per pedigree in P2 generations and used a criterion where the mean ABR threshold per pedigree was two standard deviations above the mean of all offspring from the same parental strain. We thus identified 17 mutant pedigrees (6%), all exhibiting hearing loss at high frequencies (P16 kHz) with an average threshold elevation of 30-35 dB SPL. Interestingly, four mutants showed sex-biased hearing loss and six mutants displayed wide range frequency hearing loss. Temporal bone histology revealed that six of the first nine mutants displayed cochlear morphological defects: degeneration of spiral ganglia, spiral ligament fibrocytes or inner hair cells (but not outer hair cells) mostly in basal turns. In contrast to other ENU-mutagenesis auditory screens, our screen identified high-frequency, mild and sex-biased hearing defects. Further characterization of these 17 mouse models will advance our understanding of presbycusis and noise-induced hearing loss in humans.

  11. Pilot study of large-scale production of mutant pigs by ENU mutagenesis

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    Hai, Tang; Cao, Chunwei; Shang, Haitao; Guo, Weiwei; Mu, Yanshuang; Yang, Shulin; Zhang, Ying; Zheng, Qiantao; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Xianlong; Liu, Yu; Kong, Qingran; Li, Kui; Wang, Dayu; Qi, Meng; Hong, Qianlong; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Xiupeng; Jia, Qitao; Wang, Xiao; Qin, Guosong; Li, Yongshun; Luo, Ailing; Jin, Weiwu; Yao, Jing; Huang, Jiaojiao; Zhang, Hongyong; Li, Menghua; Xie, Xiangmo; Zheng, Xuejuan; Guo, Kenan; Wang, Qinghua; Zhang, Shibin; Li, Liang; Xie, Fei; Zhang, Yu; Weng, Xiaogang; Yin, Zhi; Hu, Kui; Cong, Yimei; Zheng, Peng; Zou, Hailong; Xin, Leilei; Xia, Jihan; Ruan, Jinxue; Li, Hegang; Zhao, Weiming; Yuan, Jing; Liu, Zizhan; Gu, Weiwang; Li, Ming; Wang, Yong; Wang, Hongmei; Yang, Shiming; Liu, Zhonghua; Wei, Hong; Zhao, Jianguo; Zhou, Qi; Meng, Anming

    2017-01-01

    N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis is a powerful tool to generate mutants on a large scale efficiently, and to discover genes with novel functions at the whole-genome level in Caenorhabditis elegans, flies, zebrafish and mice, but it has never been tried in large model animals. We describe a successful systematic three-generation ENU mutagenesis screening in pigs with the establishment of the Chinese Swine Mutagenesis Consortium. A total of 6,770 G1 and 6,800 G3 pigs were screened, 36 dominant and 91 recessive novel pig families with various phenotypes were established. The causative mutations in 10 mutant families were further mapped. As examples, the mutation of SOX10 (R109W) in pig causes inner ear malfunctions and mimics human Mondini dysplasia, and upregulated expression of FBXO32 is associated with congenital splay legs. This study demonstrates the feasibility of artificial random mutagenesis in pigs and opens an avenue for generating a reservoir of mutants for agricultural production and biomedical research. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.26248.001 PMID:28639938

  12. Hirschsprung disease is associated with an L286P mutation in the fifth transmembrane domain of the endothelin-B receptor in the N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mutant line.

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    Chen, Bing; Ouyang, Hui-Ling; Wang, Wen-Hua; Yin, Yi-Heng; Yan, Lin-Na; Yang, Bin; Xue, Zheng-Feng

    2016-07-29

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), or colonic aganglionosis, is a congenital disorder characterized by the absence of intramural ganglia along variable lengths of the colon, resulting in intestinal obstruction. It is the most common cause of congenital intestinal obstruction, with an incidence of 1 in 5,000 live births. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced mutagenesis is a powerful tool for the study of gene function and the generation of human disease models. In the current study, a novel mutant mouse with aganglionic megacolon and coat color spotting was generated by ENU-induced mutagenesis. Histological and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) whole-mount staining analysis showed a lack of ganglion cells in the colon in mutant mice. The mutation was mapped to chromosome 14 between markers rs30928624 and D14Mit205 (Chr 14 positions 103723921 bp and 105054651 bp). The Ednrb (Chr 14 position 103814625-103844173 bp) was identified as a potential candidate gene in this location. Mutation analysis revealed a T>C missense mutation at nucleotide 857 of the cDNA encoding endothelin receptor B (EDNRB) in which a proline was substituted for the highly conserved Lys-286 residue (L286P) in the fifth transmembrane (TM V) domain of this G protein-coupled receptor. The mutant mouse was named Ednrb(m1yzcm) (Ednrb; mutation 1, Yangzhou University Comparative Medicine Center). The results of the present study implicate the structural importance of the TM V domain in Ednrb function, and the Ednrb(m1yzcm) mouse represents a valuable model for the study of HSCR in humans.

  13. An ENU-mutagenesis screen in the mouse: identification of novel developmental gene functions.

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    Carolien Wansleeben

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutagenesis screens in the mouse have been proven useful for the identification of novel gene functions and generation of interesting mutant alleles. Here we describe a phenotype-based screen for recessive mutations affecting embryonic development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mice were mutagenized with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU and following incrossing the offspring, embryos were analyzed at embryonic day 10.5. Mutant phenotypes that arose in our screen include cardiac and nuchal edema, neural tube defects, situs inversus of the heart, posterior truncation and the absence of limbs and lungs. We isolated amongst others novel mutant alleles for Dll1, Ptprb, Plexin-B2, Fgf10, Wnt3a, Ncx1, Scrib(Scrib, Scribbled homolog [Drosophila] and Sec24b. We found both nonsense alleles leading to severe protein truncations and mutants with single-amino acid substitutions that are informative at a molecular level. Novel findings include an ectopic neural tube in our Dll1 mutant and lung defects in the planar cell polarity mutants for Sec24b and Scrib. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Using a forward genetics approach, we have generated a number of novel mutant alleles that are linked to disturbed morphogenesis during development.

  14. Characterization of a new allele of Ames waltzer generated by ENU mutagenesis.

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    Washington, Jesse L; Pitts, Darrell; Wright, Charles G; Erway, L C; Davis, Rickie R; Alagramam, Kumar

    2005-04-01

    Mutation in the protocadherin 15 (Pcdh15) gene causes hair cell dysfunction and is associated with abnormal stereocilia development. We have characterized the first allele (Pcdh15(av-nmf19)) of Ames waltzer (av) obtained by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis. Pcdh15(av-nmf19) was generated in the Neuroscience Mutagenesis Facility (NMF) at The Jackson Lab (Bar Habor, USA). Pcdh15(av-nmf19) mutants display circling and abnormal swimming behavior along with lack of auditory-evoked brainstem response at the highest intensities tested. Mutation analysis shows base substitution (A--> G) in the consensus splice donor sequence linked to exon 14 resulting in the skipping of exon 14 and the splicing of exon 13-15. This results in the introduction of a stop codon in the coding sequence of exon 15 due to shift in the reading frame. The effect of nmf19 mutation is expected to be severe since the expressed Pcdh15 protein is predicted to truncate in the 5th cadherin domain. Abnormalities of cochlear hair cell stereocilia are apparent in Pcdh15(av-nmf19) mutants near the time of birth and by about P15 (15 days after birth) there is evidence of sensory cell degeneration. Disorganization of outer hair cell stereocilia is observed as early as P2. Inner hair cell stereocilia are also affected, but less severely than those of the outer hair cells. These results are consistent with characteristics of the mutation in the Pcdh15(av-nmf19) allele and they support our previous finding that Protocadherin 15 plays an important role in hair-bundle morphogenesis.

  15. A novel N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mutation in phospholipase Cγ2 causes inflammatory arthritis, metabolic defects, and male infertility in vitro in a murine model.

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    Abe, Koichiro; Fuchs, Helmut; Boersma, Auke; Hans, Wolfgang; Yu, Philipp; Kalaydjiev, Svetoslav; Klaften, Matthias; Adler, Thure; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Mossbrugger, Ilona; Rathkolb, Birgit; Rozman, Jan; Prehn, Cornelia; Maraslioglu, Miriam; Kametani, Yoshie; Shimada, Shin; Adamski, Jerzy; Busch, Dirk H; Esposito, Irene; Klingenspor, Martin; Wolf, Eckhard; Wurst, Wolfgang; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Katan, Matilda; Marschall, Susan; Soewarto, Dian; Wagner, Sibylle; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě

    2011-05-01

    It is difficult to identify a single causative factor for inflammatory arthritis because of the multifactorial nature of the disease. This study was undertaken to dissect the molecular complexity of systemic inflammatory disease, utilizing a combined approach of mutagenesis and systematic phenotype screening in a murine model. In a large-scale N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis project, the Ali14 mutant mouse strain was established because of dominant inheritance of spontaneous swelling and inflammation of the hind paws. Genetic mapping and subsequent candidate gene sequencing were conducted to find the causative gene, and systematic phenotyping of Ali14/+ mice was performed in the German Mouse Clinic. A novel missense mutation in the phospholipase Cγ2 gene (Plcg2) was identified in Ali14/+ mice. Because of the hyperreactive external entry of calcium observed in cultured B cells and other in vitro experiments, the Ali14 mutation is thought to be a novel gain-of-function allele of Plcg2. Findings from systematic screening of Ali14/+ mice demonstrated various phenotypic changes: an abnormally high T cell:B cell ratio, up-regulation of Ig, alterations in body composition, and a reduction in cholesterol and triglyceride levels in peripheral blood. In addition, spermatozoa from Ali14/+ mice failed to fertilize eggs in vitro, despite the normal fertility of the Ali14/+ male mice in vivo. These results suggest that the Plcg2-mediated pathways play a crucial role in various metabolic and sperm functions, in addition to initiating and maintaining the immune system. These findings may indicate the importance of the Ali14/+ mouse strain as a model for systemic inflammatory diseases and inflammation-related metabolic changes in humans. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  16. ENU mutagenesis reveals a novel phenotype of reduced limb strength in mice lacking fibrillin 2.

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    Gaynor Miller

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Fibrillins 1 (FBN1 and 2 (FBN2 are components of microfibrils, microfilaments that are present in many connective tissues, either alone or in association with elastin. Marfan's syndrome and congenital contractural arachnodactyly (CCA result from dominant mutations in the genes FBN1 and FBN2 respectively. Patients with both conditions often present with specific muscle atrophy or weakness, yet this has not been reported in the mouse models. In the case of Fbn1, this is due to perinatal lethality of the homozygous null mice making measurements of strength difficult. In the case of Fbn2, four different mutant alleles have been described in the mouse and in all cases syndactyly was reported as the defining phenotypic feature of homozygotes.As part of a large-scale N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU mutagenesis screen, we identified a mouse mutant, Mariusz, which exhibited muscle weakness along with hindlimb syndactyly. We identified an amber nonsense mutation in Fbn2 in this mouse mutant. Examination of a previously characterised Fbn2-null mutant, Fbn2(fp, identified a similar muscle weakness phenotype. The two Fbn2 mutant alleles complement each other confirming that the weakness is the result of a lack of Fbn2 activity. Skeletal muscle from mutants proved to be abnormal with higher than average numbers of fibres with centrally placed nuclei, an indicator that there are some regenerating muscle fibres. Physiological tests indicated that the mutant muscle produces significantly less maximal force, possibly as a result of the muscles being relatively smaller in Mariusz mice.These findings indicate that Fbn2 is involved in integrity of structures required for strength in limb movement. As human patients with mutations in the fibrillin genes FBN1 and FBN2 often present with muscle weakness and atrophy as a symptom, Fbn2-null mice will be a useful model for examining this aspect of the disease process further.

  17. ENU Mutagenesis Reveals a Novel Phenotype of Reduced Limb Strength in Mice Lacking Fibrillin 2

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    Miller, Gaynor; Neilan, Monica; Chia, Ruth; Gheryani, Nabeia; Holt, Natalie; Charbit, Annabelle; Wells, Sara; Tucci, Valter; Lalanne, Zuzanne; Denny, Paul; Fisher, Elizabeth M. C.; Cheeseman, Michael; Askew, Graham N.; Dear, T. Neil

    2010-01-01

    Background Fibrillins 1 (FBN1) and 2 (FBN2) are components of microfibrils, microfilaments that are present in many connective tissues, either alone or in association with elastin. Marfan's syndrome and congenital contractural arachnodactyly (CCA) result from dominant mutations in the genes FBN1 and FBN2 respectively. Patients with both conditions often present with specific muscle atrophy or weakness, yet this has not been reported in the mouse models. In the case of Fbn1, this is due to perinatal lethality of the homozygous null mice making measurements of strength difficult. In the case of Fbn2, four different mutant alleles have been described in the mouse and in all cases syndactyly was reported as the defining phenotypic feature of homozygotes. Methodology/Principal Findings As part of a large-scale N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis screen, we identified a mouse mutant, Mariusz, which exhibited muscle weakness along with hindlimb syndactyly. We identified an amber nonsense mutation in Fbn2 in this mouse mutant. Examination of a previously characterised Fbn2-null mutant, Fbn2fp, identified a similar muscle weakness phenotype. The two Fbn2 mutant alleles complement each other confirming that the weakness is the result of a lack of Fbn2 activity. Skeletal muscle from mutants proved to be abnormal with higher than average numbers of fibres with centrally placed nuclei, an indicator that there are some regenerating muscle fibres. Physiological tests indicated that the mutant muscle produces significantly less maximal force, possibly as a result of the muscles being relatively smaller in Mariusz mice. Conclusions These findings indicate that Fbn2 is involved in integrity of structures required for strength in limb movement. As human patients with mutations in the fibrillin genes FBN1 and FBN2 often present with muscle weakness and atrophy as a symptom, Fbn2-null mice will be a useful model for examining this aspect of the disease process further. PMID

  18. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced null mutation at the mouse Car-2 locus: An animal model for human carbonic anhydrase II deficiency syndrome

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    Lewis, S.E.; Barnett, L.B. (Research Triangle Institute, Research Triangle Park, NC (USA)); Erickson, R.P.; Venta, P.J.; Tashian, R.E. (Univ. of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor (USA))

    1988-03-01

    Electrophoretic screening of (C57BL/6J x DBA/2J)F{sub 1} progeny of male mice treated with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea revealed a mouse that lacked the paternal carbonic anhydrase II (Ca II). Breeding tests showed that this trait was heritable and due to a null mutation at the Car-2 locus on chromosome 3. Like humans with the same inherited enzyme defect, animals homozygous for the new null allele are runted and have renal tubular acidosis. However, the prominent osteopetrosis found in humans with CA II deficiency could be detected even in very old homozygous null mice. A molecular analysis of the deficient mice shows that the mutant gene is not deleted and is transcribed. The CA II protein, which is normally expressed in most tissues, could not be detected by immunodiffusion analysis in any tissues of the CA II-deficient mice, suggesting a nonsense or a missense mutation at the Car-2 locus.

  19. Relationship between lethal mutation yield and intake of ethylnitrosourea (ENU) in Drosophila melanogaster

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    Ayaki, T.; Ohshima, K.; Okumura, Y.; Yoshikawa, I.; Shiomi, T.

    1984-01-01

    To estimate the absorbed dose of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) ingested in Drosophila melanogaster, males were fed with sucrose solutions containing various concentrations of ENU plus /sup 3/H-labeled sucrose for 24 hr. Flies showed decreasing intakes with increase in ENU concentration when monitored by intake /sup 3/H radio-activity. Average absorbed doses of ENU were 0.064, 0.221, and 0.302 nmol, respectively, for the ENU concentrations of 0.03, 0.3, and 1.0 mM. Sex-linked recessive lethals were measured for males exposed to these sucrose solutions at three different ENU concentrations.

  20. ENU-induced phenovariance in mice: inferences from 587 mutations

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    Arnold Carrie N

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We present a compendium of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU-induced mouse mutations, identified in our laboratory over a period of 10 years either on the basis of phenotype or whole genome and/or whole exome sequencing, and archived in the Mutagenetix database. Our purpose is threefold: 1 to formally describe many point mutations, including those that were not previously disclosed in peer-reviewed publications; 2 to assess the characteristics of these mutations; and 3 to estimate the likelihood that a missense mutation induced by ENU will create a detectable phenotype. Findings In the context of an ENU mutagenesis program for C57BL/6J mice, a total of 185 phenotypes were tracked to mutations in 129 genes. In addition, 402 incidental mutations were identified and predicted to affect 390 genes. As previously reported, ENU shows strand asymmetry in its induction of mutations, particularly favoring T to A rather than A to T in the sense strand of coding regions and splice junctions. Some amino acid substitutions are far more likely to be damaging than others, and some are far more likely to be observed. Indeed, from among a total of 494 non-synonymous coding mutations, ENU was observed to create only 114 of the 182 possible amino acid substitutions that single base changes can achieve. Based on differences in overt null allele frequencies observed in phenotypic vs. non-phenotypic mutation sets, we infer that ENU-induced missense mutations create detectable phenotype only about 1 in 4.7 times. While the remaining mutations may not be functionally neutral, they are, on average, beneath the limits of detection of the phenotypic assays we applied. Conclusions Collectively, these mutations add to our understanding of the chemical specificity of ENU, the types of amino acid substitutions it creates, and its efficiency in causing phenovariance. Our data support the validity of computational algorithms for the prediction of damage caused by

  1. Workshop on ENU Mutagenesis: Planning for Saturation, July 25-28, 2002

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    Nadeau, Joseph H

    2002-07-25

    The goal of the conference is to enhance the development of improved technologies and new approaches to the identification of genes underlying chemically-induced mutant phenotypes. The conference brings together ENU mutagenesis experts from the United States and aborad for a small, intensive workshop to consider these issues.

  2. Neurobehavioral Mutants Identified in an ENU Mutagenesis Project

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    Cook, Melloni N. [University of Memphis; Dunning, Jonathan P [University of Memphis; Wiley, Ronald G [Vanderbilt University and Veterans Administration, Nashville, TN; Chesler, Elissa J [ORNL; Johnson, Dabney K [ORNL; Goldowitz, Daniel [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis

    2007-01-01

    We report on a behavioral screening test battery that successfully identified several neurobehavioral mutants among a large-scale ENU-mutagenized mouse population. Large numbers of ENU mutagenized mice were screened for abnormalities in central nervous system function based on abnormal performance in a series of behavior tasks. We developed and employed a high-throughput screen of behavioral tasks to detect behavioral outliers. Twelve mutant pedigrees, representing a broad range of behavioral phenotypes, have been identified. Specifically, we have identified two open field mutants (one displaying hyper-locomotion, the other hypo-locomotion), four tail suspension mutants (all displaying increased immobility), one nociception mutant (displaying abnormal responsiveness to thermal pain), two prepulse inhibition mutants (displaying poor inhibition of the startle response), one anxiety-related mutant (displaying decreased anxiety in the light/dark test), and one learning and memory mutant (displaying reduced response to the conditioned stimulus) These findings highlight the utility of a set of behavioral tasks used in a high throughput screen to identify neurobehavioral mutants. Further analysis (i.e., behavioral and genetic mapping studies) of mutants is in progress with the ultimate goal of identification of novel genes and mouse models relevant to human disorders as well as the identification of novel therapeutic targets.

  3. A mouse chromosome 4 balancer ENU-mutagenesis screen isolates eleven lethal lines

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    Moskowitz Ivan

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ENU-mutagenesis is a powerful technique to identify genes regulating mammalian development. To functionally annotate the distal region of mouse chromosome 4, we performed an ENU-mutagenesis screen using a balancer chromosome targeted to this region of the genome. Results We isolated 11 lethal lines that map to the region of chromosome 4 between D4Mit117 and D4Mit281. These lines form 10 complementation groups. The majority of lines die during embryonic development between E5.5 and E12.5 and display defects in gastrulation, cardiac development, and craniofacial development. One line displayed postnatal lethality and neurological defects, including ataxia and seizures. Conclusion These eleven mutants allow us to query gene function within the distal region of mouse chromosome 4 and demonstrate that new mouse models of mammalian developmental defects can easily and quickly be generated and mapped with the use of ENU-mutagenesis in combination with balancer chromosomes. The low number of mutations isolated in this screen compared with other balancer chromosome screens indicates that the functions of genes in different regions of the genome vary widely.

  4. ENU-mutagenesis mice with a non-synonymous mutation in Grin1 exhibit abnormal anxiety-like behaviors, impaired fear memory, and decreased acoustic startle response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemori, Juzoh; Takao, Keizo; Koshimizu, Hisatsugu; Hattori, Satoko; Furuse, Tamio; Wakana, Shigeharu; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi

    2013-05-21

    The Grin1 (glutamate receptor, ionotropic, NMDA1) gene expresses a subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors that is considered to play an important role in excitatory neurotransmission, synaptic plasticity, and brain development. Grin1 is a candidate susceptibility gene for neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In our previous study, we examined an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-generated mutant mouse strain (Grin1(Rgsc174)/Grin1+) that has a non-synonymous mutation in Grin1. These mutant mice showed hyperactivity, increased novelty-seeking to objects, and abnormal social interactions. Therefore, Grin1(Rgsc174)/Grin1+ mice may serve as a potential animal model of neuropsychiatric disorders. However, other behavioral characteristics related to these disorders, such as working memory function and sensorimotor gating, have not been fully explored in these mutant mice. In this study, to further investigate the behavioral phenotypes of Grin1(Rgsc174)/Grin1+ mice, we subjected them to a comprehensive battery of behavioral tests. There was no significant difference in nociception between Grin1(Rgsc174)/Grin1+ and wild-type mice. The mutants did not display any abnormalities in the Porsolt forced swim and tail suspension tests. We confirmed the previous observations that the locomotor activity of these mutant mice increased in the open field and home cage activity tests. They displayed abnormal anxiety-like behaviors in the light/dark transition and the elevated plus maze tests. Both contextual and cued fear memory were severely deficient in the fear conditioning test. The mutant mice exhibited slightly impaired working memory in the eight-arm radial maze test. The startle amplitude was markedly decreased in Grin1(Rgsc174)/Grin1+ mice, whereas no significant differences between genotypes were detected in the prepulse inhibition (PPI) test. The mutant mice showed no obvious deficits

  5. New approach for fish breeding by chemical mutagenesis: establishment of TILLING method in fugu (Takifugu rubripes) with ENU mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroyanagi, Miwa; Katayama, Takashi; Imai, Tadashi; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa; Chisada, Shin-ichi; Yoshiura, Yasutoshi; Ushijima, Tomokazu; Matsushita, Tomonao; Fujita, Masashi; Nozawa, Aoi; Suzuki, Yuzuru; Kikuchi, Kiyoshi; Okamoto, Hiroyuki

    2013-11-13

    In fish breeding, it is essential to discover and generate fish exhibiting an effective phenotype for the aquaculture industry, but screening for natural mutants by only depending on natural spontaneous mutations is limited. Presently, reverse genetics has become an important tool to generate mutants, which exhibit the phenotype caused by inactivation of a gene. TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes) is a reverse genetics strategy that combines random chemical mutagenesis with high-throughput discovery technologies for screening the induced mutations in target genes. Although the chemical mutagenesis has been used widely in a variety of model species and also genetic breeding of microorganisms and crops, the application of the mutagenesis in fish breeding has been only rarely reported. In this study, we developed the TILLING method in fugu with ENU mutagenesis and high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis to detect base pair changes in target sequences. Fugu males were treated 3 times at weekly intervals with various ENU concentrations, and then the collected sperm after the treatment was used to fertilize normal female for generating the mutagenized population (F1). The fertilization and the hatching ratios were similar to those of the control and did not reveal a dose dependency of ENU. Genomic DNA from the harvested F1 offspring was used for the HRM analysis. To obtain a fish exhibiting a useful phenotype (e.g. high meat production and rapid growth), fugu myostatin (Mstn) gene was examined as a target gene, because it has been clarified that the mstn deficient medaka exhibited double-muscle phenotype in common with MSTN knockout mice and bovine MSTN mutant. As a result, ten types of ENU-induced mutations were identified including a nonsense mutation in the investigated region with HRM analysis. In addition, the average mutation frequency in fugu Mstn gene was 1 mutant per 297 kb, which is similar to values calculated for zebrafish and medaka TILLING

  6. Enu mutagenesis identifies a novel platelet phenotype in a loss-of-function Jak2 allele.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M Anderson

    Full Text Available Utilizing ENU mutagenesis, we identified a mutant mouse with elevated platelets. Genetic mapping localized the mutation to an interval on chromosome 19 that encodes the Jak2 tyrosine kinase. We identified a A3056T mutation resulting in a premature stop codon within exon 19 of Jak2 (Jak2(K915X, resulting in a protein truncation and functionally inactive enzyme. This novel platelet phenotype was also observed in mice bearing a hemizygous targeted disruption of the Jak2 locus (Jak2(+/-. Timed pregnancy experiments revealed that Jak2(K915X/K915X and Jak2(-/- displayed embryonic lethality; however, Jak2(K915X/K915X embryos were viable an additional two days compared to Jak2(-/- embryos. Our data suggest that perturbing JAK2 activation may have unexpected consequences in elevation of platelet number and correspondingly, important implications for treatment of hematological disorders with constitutive Jak2 activity.

  7. A mouse model of hereditary coproporphyria identified in an ENU mutagenesis screen

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    Ashlee J. Conway

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A genome-wide ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU mutagenesis screen in mice was performed to identify novel regulators of erythropoiesis. Here, we describe a mouse line, RBC16, which harbours a dominantly inherited mutation in the Cpox gene, responsible for production of the haem biosynthesis enzyme, coproporphyrinogen III oxidase (CPOX. A premature stop codon in place of a tryptophan at amino acid 373 results in reduced mRNA expression and diminished protein levels, yielding a microcytic red blood cell phenotype in heterozygous mice. Urinary and faecal porphyrins in female RBC16 heterozygotes were significantly elevated compared with that of wild-type littermates, particularly coproporphyrinogen III, whereas males were biochemically normal. Attempts to induce acute porphyric crises were made using fasting and phenobarbital treatment on females. While fasting had no biochemical effect on RBC16 mice, phenobarbital caused significant elevation of faecal coproporphyrinogen III in heterozygous mice. This is the first known investigation of a mutagenesis mouse model with genetic and biochemical parallels to hereditary coproporphyria.

  8. Efficient gene-driven germ-line point mutagenesis of C57BL/6J mice

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    Hughes Lori A

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis of an allelic series of point mutations in a gene, generated by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU mutagenesis, is a valuable method for discovering the full scope of its biological function. Here we present an efficient gene-driven approach for identifying ENU-induced point mutations in any gene in C57BL/6J mice. The advantage of such an approach is that it allows one to select any gene of interest in the mouse genome and to go directly from DNA sequence to mutant mice. Results We produced the Cryopreserved Mutant Mouse Bank (CMMB, which is an archive of DNA, cDNA, tissues, and sperm from 4,000 G1 male offspring of ENU-treated C57BL/6J males mated to untreated C57BL/6J females. Each mouse in the CMMB carries a large number of random heterozygous point mutations throughout the genome. High-throughput Temperature Gradient Capillary Electrophoresis (TGCE was employed to perform a 32-Mbp sequence-driven screen for mutations in 38 PCR amplicons from 11 genes in DNA and/or cDNA from the CMMB mice. DNA sequence analysis of heteroduplex-forming amplicons identified by TGCE revealed 22 mutations in 10 genes for an overall mutation frequency of 1 in 1.45 Mbp. All 22 mutations are single base pair substitutions, and nine of them (41% result in nonconservative amino acid substitutions. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI of cryopreserved spermatozoa into B6D2F1 or C57BL/6J ova was used to recover mutant mice for nine of the mutations to date. Conclusions The inbred C57BL/6J CMMB, together with TGCE mutation screening and ICSI for the recovery of mutant mice, represents a valuable gene-driven approach for the functional annotation of the mammalian genome and for the generation of mouse models of human genetic diseases. The ability of ENU to induce mutations that cause various types of changes in proteins will provide additional insights into the functions of mammalian proteins that may not be detectable by knockout mutations.

  9. The serotonin transporter knockout rat : A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olivier, Jocelien; Cools, Alexander; Ellenbroek, Bart A.; Cuppen, E.; Homberg, Judith; Kalueff, Allan V.; LaPorte, Justin L.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter dicusses the most recent data on the serotonin transporter knock-out rat, a unique rat model that has been generated by target-selected N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) driven mutagenesis. The knock-out rat is the result of a premature stopcodon in the serotonin transporter gene, and the

  10. ENU Mutagenesis Screen to Establish Motor Phenotypes in Wild-Type Mice and Modifiers of a Pre-Existing Motor Phenotype in Tau Mutant Mice

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    Xin Liu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Modifier screening is a powerful genetic tool. While not widely used in the vertebrate system, we applied these tools to transgenic mouse strains that recapitulate key aspects of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, such as tau-expressing mice. These are characterized by a robust pathology including both motor and memory impairment. The phenotype can be modulated by ENU mutagenesis, which results in novel mutant mouse strains and allows identifying the underlying gene/mutation. Here we discuss this strategy in detail. We firstly obtained pedigrees that modify the tau-related motor phenotype, with mapping ongoing. We further obtained transgene-independent motor pedigrees: (i hyperactive, circling ENU 37 mice with a causal mutation in the Tbx1 gene—the complete knock-out of Tbx1 models DiGeorge Syndrome; (ii ENU12/301 mice that show sudden jerky movements and tremor constantly; they have a causal mutation in the Kcnq1 gene, modelling aspects of the Romano-Ward and Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndromes; and (iii ENU16/069 mice with tremor and hypermetric gait that have a causal mutation in the Mpz (Myelin Protein Zero gene, modelling Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 (CMT1B. Together, we provide evidence for a real potential of an ENU mutagenesis to dissect motor functions in wild-type and tau mutant mice.

  11. Discovery of candidate disease genes in ENU-induced mouse mutants by large-scale sequencing, including a splice-site mutation in nucleoredoxin.

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    Melissa K Boles

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available An accurate and precisely annotated genome assembly is a fundamental requirement for functional genomic analysis. Here, the complete DNA sequence and gene annotation of mouse Chromosome 11 was used to test the efficacy of large-scale sequencing for mutation identification. We re-sequenced the 14,000 annotated exons and boundaries from over 900 genes in 41 recessive mutant mouse lines that were isolated in an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU mutation screen targeted to mouse Chromosome 11. Fifty-nine sequence variants were identified in 55 genes from 31 mutant lines. 39% of the lesions lie in coding sequences and create primarily missense mutations. The other 61% lie in noncoding regions, many of them in highly conserved sequences. A lesion in the perinatal lethal line l11Jus13 alters a consensus splice site of nucleoredoxin (Nxn, inserting 10 amino acids into the resulting protein. We conclude that point mutations can be accurately and sensitively recovered by large-scale sequencing, and that conserved noncoding regions should be included for disease mutation identification. Only seven of the candidate genes we report have been previously targeted by mutation in mice or rats, showing that despite ongoing efforts to functionally annotate genes in the mammalian genome, an enormous gap remains between phenotype and function. Our data show that the classical positional mapping approach of disease mutation identification can be extended to large target regions using high-throughput sequencing.

  12. Novel gene function revealed by mouse mutagenesis screens for models of age-related disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Paul K.; Bowl, Michael R.; Jeyarajan, Prashanthini; Wisby, Laura; Blease, Andrew; Goldsworthy, Michelle E.; Simon, Michelle M.; Greenaway, Simon; Michel, Vincent; Barnard, Alun; Aguilar, Carlos; Agnew, Thomas; Banks, Gareth; Blake, Andrew; Chessum, Lauren; Dorning, Joanne; Falcone, Sara; Goosey, Laurence; Harris, Shelley; Haynes, Andy; Heise, Ines; Hillier, Rosie; Hough, Tertius; Hoslin, Angela; Hutchison, Marie; King, Ruairidh; Kumar, Saumya; Lad, Heena V.; Law, Gemma; MacLaren, Robert E.; Morse, Susan; Nicol, Thomas; Parker, Andrew; Pickford, Karen; Sethi, Siddharth; Starbuck, Becky; Stelma, Femke; Cheeseman, Michael; Cross, Sally H.; Foster, Russell G.; Jackson, Ian J.; Peirson, Stuart N.; Thakker, Rajesh V.; Vincent, Tonia; Scudamore, Cheryl; Wells, Sara; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Petit, Christine; Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham; Nolan, Patrick M.; Cox, Roger; Mallon, Anne-Marie; Brown, Steve D. M.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the genetic bases of age-related disease remains a major challenge requiring a spectrum of approaches from human and clinical genetics to the utilization of model organism studies. Here we report a large-scale genetic screen in mice employing a phenotype-driven discovery platform to identify mutations resulting in age-related disease, both late-onset and progressive. We have utilized N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis to generate pedigrees of mutagenized mice that were subject to recurrent screens for mutant phenotypes as the mice aged. In total, we identify 105 distinct mutant lines from 157 pedigrees analysed, out of which 27 are late-onset phenotypes across a range of physiological systems. Using whole-genome sequencing we uncover the underlying genes for 44 of these mutant phenotypes, including 12 late-onset phenotypes. These genes reveal a number of novel pathways involved with age-related disease. We illustrate our findings by the recovery and characterization of a novel mouse model of age-related hearing loss. PMID:27534441

  13. Modifier action of the chlorophyllin of the mutagenesis induced by the ethyl-nitroso-urea (ENU) in germinal cells of Drosophila melanogaster; Accion modificadora de la clorofilina de la mutagenesis inducida por la etil-nitroso-urea (ENU) en celulas germinales de Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales N, I

    2006-07-01

    The cupro-sodium chlorophyllin (CCS) it is a soluble porphyrin in water that it includes in its it structures a copper atom instead of the magnesium that has the chlorophyll. Diverse experiments have demonstrated that it possesses a potent activity, reducing or inhibiting, the DNA damage caused by physical and chemical agents of direct action or insinuation. Most of the knowledge about their anti genotoxic activity has been obtained using somatic cells of different organisms, on the other hand it is known very little of their effect in germinal cells. At the moment in the Drosophila laboratory of the ININ it is investigating the protective action of the CCS in germinal cells, with these studies has been observed that its administration to females that were crossed with males irradiated with 20 Gy of gamma radiation, promotes the induction of lethal dominant in the embryonic and post-embryonic states causing a diminution in the viability egg-adult. With the test of lethal recessive bound to the sex one has evidence that it increases the basal frequency of lethal recessive and it doesn't reduce those induced by radiation. In contrast, with the present investigation when the CCS was administered to males that later on were treated with ethyl-nitroso-urea (ENU) caused a reduction of the lethal frequency in all the monitored cellular states, but only it was significant in the post-meiotic cells. On the contrary, when the CCS was administered to the female ones and then they crossed with males treaties with ENU, it was observed a tendency to increase the lethal ones in all the cellular types. With both protocols the CCS caused a diminution of the sterility. The fact that the CCS has antagonistic activities, it deserves special attention to investigate with different protocols and systems, the conditions in that this pigment can work as a true antimutagenic and/or anti carcinogenic before being able to him to propose as a chemopreventor. (Author)

  14. Alkylation damage causes MMR-dependent chromosomal instability in vertebrate embryos.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feitsma, H.; Akay, A.; Cuppen, E.

    2008-01-01

    S(N)1-type alkylating agents, like N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) and N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), are potent mutagens. Exposure to alkylating agents gives rise to O(6)-alkylguanine, a modified base that is recognized by DNA mismatch repair (MMR) proteins but is not repairable, resulting in

  15. Unlocking the bottleneck in forward genetics using whole-genome sequencing and identity by descent to isolate causative mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine R Bull

    Full Text Available Forward genetics screens with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU provide a powerful way to illuminate gene function and generate mouse models of human disease; however, the identification of causative mutations remains a limiting step. Current strategies depend on conventional mapping, so the propagation of affected mice requires non-lethal screens; accurate tracking of phenotypes through pedigrees is complex and uncertain; out-crossing can introduce unexpected modifiers; and Sanger sequencing of candidate genes is inefficient. Here we show how these problems can be efficiently overcome using whole-genome sequencing (WGS to detect the ENU mutations and then identify regions that are identical by descent (IBD in multiple affected mice. In this strategy, we use a modification of the Lander-Green algorithm to isolate causative recessive and dominant mutations, even at low coverage, on a pure strain background. Analysis of the IBD regions also allows us to calculate the ENU mutation rate (1.54 mutations per Mb and to model future strategies for genetic screens in mice. The introduction of this approach will accelerate the discovery of causal variants, permit broader and more informative lethal screens to be used, reduce animal costs, and herald a new era for ENU mutagenesis.

  16. Comparative studies of dose-response curves for recessive lethal mutations induced by ethylnitrosourea in spermatogonia and in spermatozoa of Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, I.; Ayaki, T.; Ohshima, K.

    1984-01-01

    Induction of recessive lethal mutation by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) was studied for the second chromosome of spermatogonia and spermatozoa in Drosophila melanogaster. ENU (0.03, 0.3, and 1.0 mM) was given to flies by dissolving it in feeding sucrose solution. When plotted against absorbed doses of ENU, the observed frequencies to recessive lethals showed a linear relationship for induction in spermatozoa but a sigmoidal relationship for induction in spermatogonia. These results suggest that in spermatogonia ENU-induced mutational damage is more repairable in a lower dose range of ENU. Mosaic lethal mutations were induced by ENU but not in spermatogonia.

  17. A hypomorphic mutation in Lpin1 induces progressively improving neuropathy and lipodystrophy in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mul, J.D.; Nadra, K.; Jagalur, N.B.; Nijman, I.J.; Toonen, P.W.; Medard, J.J.; Gres, S.; de Bruin, A.; Han, G.S.; Brouwers, J.F.; Carman, G.M.; Saulnier-Blache, J.S.; Meijer, D.; Chrast, R.; Cuppen, E.

    2011-01-01

    The Lpin1 gene encodes the phosphatidate phosphatase (PAP1) enzyme Lipin 1, which plays a critical role in lipid metabolism. In this study we describe the identification and characterization of a rat model with a mutated Lpin1 gene (Lpin1(1Hubr)), generated by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis.

  18. Zebrafish Model of NF1 for Structure-Function Analysis, Mechanisms of Glial Tumorigenesis, and Chemical Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    agents (italicized) that were used to improve memory or learning in these genotypes, as well as the molecular targets of the agents , are...zebrafish knockout kit Table 1. Somatic lesion frequency and germline transmission rate of ZFN-induced mutagenic alleles Somatic lesion Frequency of...GRD (Fig. 1D,E). In a separate effort, we screened a library of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)- mutagenized zebrafish by targeting induced local lesions

  19. Fat Mass Reduction With Adipocyte Hypertrophy and Insulin Resistance in Heterozygous PPARγ Mutant Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumbilai, Valentino; Ebihara, Ken; Aizawa-Abe, Megumi; Ebihara, Chihiro; Zhao, Mingming; Yamamoto, Yuji; Mashimo, Tomoji; Hosoda, Kiminori; Serikawa, Tadao; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2016-10-01

    Agonist-induced activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) stimulates adipocyte differentiation and insulin sensitivity. Patients with heterozygous PPARγ dominant-negative mutation develop partial lipodystrophy and insulin resistance. Inconsistent with this evidence in humans, it was reported that heterozygous PPARγ knockout mice have increased insulin sensitivity and that mice with heterozygous PPARγ dominant-negative mutation have normal insulin sensitivity and improved glucose tolerance. In the context of the interspecies intranslatability of PPARγ-related findings, we generated a PPARγ mutant rat with a loss-of-function mutation (Pparg(mkyo)) without dominant-negative activity by using the ENU (N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea) mutagenesis method. Heterozygous Pparg(mkyo/+) rats showed reduced fat mass with adipocyte hypertrophy and insulin resistance, which were highly predictable from known actions of PPARγ agonists and phenotypes of patients with the PPARγ mutation. This report is the first in our knowledge to clearly demonstrate that both alleles of PPARγ are required for normal adipocyte development and insulin sensitivity in vivo. Furthermore, the study indicates that PPARγ regulates mainly adipocyte number rather than adipocyte size in vivo. The choice of appropriate species as experimental models is critical, especially for the study of PPARγ. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association.

  20. Tbx20 Is an Essential Regulator of Embryonic Heart Growth in Zebrafish.

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    Steffen Just

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms that regulate cardiomyocyte proliferation during embryonic heart growth are not completely deciphered yet. In a forward genetic N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU mutagenesis screen, we identified the recessive embryonic-lethal zebrafish mutant line weiches herz (whz. Homozygous mutant whz embryos display impaired heart growth due to diminished embryonic cardiomyocyte proliferation resulting in cardiac hypoplasia and weak cardiac contraction. By positional cloning, we found in whz mutant zebrafish a missense mutation within the T-box 20 (Tbx20 transcription factor gene leading to destabilization of Tbx20 protein. Morpholino-mediated knock-down of Tbx20 in wild-type zebrafish embryos phenocopies whz, indicating that the whz phenotype is due to loss of Tbx20 function, thereby leading to significantly reduced cardiomyocyte numbers by impaired proliferation of heart muscle cells. Ectopic overexpression of wild-type Tbx20 in whz mutant embryos restored cardiomyocyte proliferation and heart growth. Interestingly, ectopic overexpression of Tbx20 in wild-type zebrafish embryos resulted, similar to the situation in the embryonic mouse heart, in significantly reduced proliferation rates of ventricular cardiomyocytes, suggesting that Tbx20 activity needs to be tightly fine-tuned to guarantee regular cardiomyocyte proliferation and embryonic heart growth in vivo.

  1. Conserved role of unc-79 in ethanol responses in lightweight mutant mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Speca

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which ethanol and inhaled anesthetics influence the nervous system are poorly understood. Here we describe the positional cloning and characterization of a new mouse mutation isolated in an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU forward mutagenesis screen for animals with enhanced locomotor activity. This allele, Lightweight (Lwt, disrupts the homolog of the Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans unc-79 gene. While Lwt/Lwt homozygotes are perinatal lethal, Lightweight heterozygotes are dramatically hypersensitive to acute ethanol exposure. Experiments in C. elegans demonstrate a conserved hypersensitivity to ethanol in unc-79 mutants and extend this observation to the related unc-80 mutant and nca-1;nca-2 double mutants. Lightweight heterozygotes also exhibit an altered response to the anesthetic isoflurane, reminiscent of unc-79 invertebrate mutant phenotypes. Consistent with our initial mapping results, Lightweight heterozygotes are mildly hyperactive when exposed to a novel environment and are smaller than wild-type animals. In addition, Lightweight heterozygotes exhibit increased food consumption yet have a leaner body composition. Interestingly, Lightweight heterozygotes voluntarily consume more ethanol than wild-type littermates. The acute hypersensitivity to and increased voluntary consumption of ethanol observed in Lightweight heterozygous mice in combination with the observed hypersensitivity to ethanol in C. elegans unc-79, unc-80, and nca-1;nca-2 double mutants suggests a novel conserved pathway that might influence alcohol-related behaviors in humans.

  2. Advances on genetic rat models of epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serikawa, Tadao; Mashimo, Tomoji; Kuramoto, Takashi; Voigt, Birger; Ohno, Yukihiro; Sasa, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    Considering the suitability of laboratory rats in epilepsy research, we and other groups have been developing genetic models of epilepsy in this species. After epileptic rats or seizure-susceptible rats were sporadically found in outbred stocks, the epileptic traits were usually genetically-fixed by selective breeding. So far, the absence seizure models GAERS and WAG/Rij, audiogenic seizure models GEPR-3 and GEPR-9, generalized tonic-clonic seizure models IER, NER and WER, and Canavan-disease related epileptic models TRM and SER have been established. Dissection of the genetic bases including causative genes in these epileptic rat models would be a significant step toward understanding epileptogenesis. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis provides a systematic approach which allowed us to develop two novel epileptic rat models: heat-induced seizure susceptible (Hiss) rats with an Scn1a missense mutation and autosomal dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE) model rats with an Lgi1 missense mutation. In addition, we have established episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1) model rats with a Kcna1 missense mutation derived from the ENU-induced rat mutant stock, and identified a Cacna1a missense mutation in a N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced mutant rat strain GRY, resulting in the discovery of episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) model rats. Thus, epileptic rat models have been established on the two paths: ‘phenotype to gene’ and ‘gene to phenotype’. In the near future, development of novel epileptic rat models will be extensively promoted by the use of sophisticated genome editing technologies. PMID:25312505

  3. Advances on genetic rat models of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serikawa, Tadao; Mashimo, Tomoji; Kuramoro, Takashi; Voigt, Birger; Ohno, Yukihiro; Sasa, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Considering the suitability of laboratory rats in epilepsy research, we and other groups have been developing genetic models of epilepsy in this species. After epileptic rats or seizure-susceptible rats were sporadically found in outbred stocks, the epileptic traits were usually genetically-fixed by selective breeding. So far, the absence seizure models GAERS and WAG/Rij, audiogenic seizure models GEPR-3 and GEPR-9, generalized tonic-clonic seizure models IER, NER and WER, and Canavan-disease related epileptic models TRM and SER have been established. Dissection of the genetic bases including causative genes in these epileptic rat models would be a significant step toward understanding epileptogenesis. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis provides a systematic approach which allowed us to develop two novel epileptic rat models: heat-induced seizure susceptible (Hiss) rats with an Scn1a missense mutation and autosomal dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE) model rats with an Lgi1 missense mutation. In addition, we have established episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1) model rats with a Kcna1 missense mutation derived from the ENU-induced rat mutant stock, and identified a Cacna1a missense mutation in a N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced mutant rat strain GRY, resulting in the discovery of episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) model rats. Thus, epileptic rat models have been established on the two paths: 'phenotype to gene' and 'gene to phenotype'. In the near future, development of novel epileptic rat models will be extensively promoted by the use of sophisticated genome editing technologies.

  4. Measurements of the absolute branching fractions for D-s(+) -> eta e(+)nu(e) and D-s(+) -> eta ' e(+)nu(e)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ahmed, S.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Bakina, O.; Ferroli, R. Baldini; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Berger, N.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chai, J.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, P. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; De Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Dorjkhaidav, O.; Dou, Z. L.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Farinelli, R.; Fava, L.; Fegan, S.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. L.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, L.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, R. P.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, X. Q.; Heinsius, F. H.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Holtmann, T.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, X. Z.; Huang, Y.; Huang, Z. L.; Hussain, T.; Andersson, W. Ikegami; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiang, X. Y.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kiese, P.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kupsc, A.; Kuhn, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leithoff, H.; Leng, C.; Li, C.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, F. Y.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, H. J.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. L.; Li, Q. Y.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Y. B.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, D.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Y. Y.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Long, Y. F.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, M. M.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, Y. M.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Mezzadri, G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales, C. Morales; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Musiol, P.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pan, Y.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prasad, V.; Qi, H. R.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, J. J.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Rosner, Ch.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrie, M.; Schnier, C.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shi, M.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. H.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, Dan; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, W.; Wang, W. P.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, L. J.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, H.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiong, X. A.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, J. J.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. J.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; You, Z. Y.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zeng, Z.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. Q.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zotti, L.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    By analyzing 482 pb(-1) of e(+)e(-) collision data collected at root s = 4.009 GeV with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider, we measure the absolute branching fractions for the semileptonic decays D-s(+) -> eta e(+)nu(e) and D-s(+) -> eta ' e(+)nu(e) to be B(D-s(+) -> eta e(+)nu(e)) = (2.30

  5. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in mice with heterozygous mutation in TMED2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Wenyang; Gupta, Swati; Beauchamp, Marie-Claude; Yuan, Libin; Jerome-Majewska, Loydie A

    2017-01-01

    The transmembrane emp24 domain/p24 (TMED) family are essential components of the vesicular transport machinery. Members of the TMED family serve as cargo receptors implicated in selection and packaging of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) luminal proteins into coatomer (COP) II coated vesicles for anterograde transport to the Golgi. Deletion or mutations of Tmed genes in yeast and Drosophila results in ER-stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR leads to expression of genes and proteins important for expanding the folding capacity of the ER, degrading misfolded proteins, and reducing the load of new proteins entering the ER. The UPR is activated in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in human and mouse and may contribute to the development and the progression of NAFLD. Tmed2, the sole member of the vertebrate Tmed β subfamily, exhibits tissue and temporal specific patterns of expression in embryos and developing placenta but is ubiquitously expressed in all adult organs. We previously identified a single point mutation, the 99J mutation, in the signal sequence of Tmed2 in an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis screen. Histological and molecular analysis of livers from heterozygous mice carrying the 99J mutation, Tmed299J/+, revealed a requirement for TMED2 in liver health. We show that Tmed299J/+ mice had decreased levels of TMED2 and TMED10, dilated endoplasmic reticulum membrane, and increased phosphorylation of eIF2α, indicating ER-stress and activation of the UPR. Increased expression of Srebp1a and 2 at the newborn stage and increased incidence of NAFLD were also found in Tmed299J/+ mice. Our data establishes Tmed299J/+ mice as a novel mouse model for NAFLD and supports a role for TMED2 in liver health.

  6. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in mice with heterozygous mutation in TMED2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyang Hou

    Full Text Available The transmembrane emp24 domain/p24 (TMED family are essential components of the vesicular transport machinery. Members of the TMED family serve as cargo receptors implicated in selection and packaging of endoplasmic reticulum (ER luminal proteins into coatomer (COP II coated vesicles for anterograde transport to the Golgi. Deletion or mutations of Tmed genes in yeast and Drosophila results in ER-stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR. The UPR leads to expression of genes and proteins important for expanding the folding capacity of the ER, degrading misfolded proteins, and reducing the load of new proteins entering the ER. The UPR is activated in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD in human and mouse and may contribute to the development and the progression of NAFLD. Tmed2, the sole member of the vertebrate Tmed β subfamily, exhibits tissue and temporal specific patterns of expression in embryos and developing placenta but is ubiquitously expressed in all adult organs. We previously identified a single point mutation, the 99J mutation, in the signal sequence of Tmed2 in an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU mutagenesis screen. Histological and molecular analysis of livers from heterozygous mice carrying the 99J mutation, Tmed299J/+, revealed a requirement for TMED2 in liver health. We show that Tmed299J/+ mice had decreased levels of TMED2 and TMED10, dilated endoplasmic reticulum membrane, and increased phosphorylation of eIF2α, indicating ER-stress and activation of the UPR. Increased expression of Srebp1a and 2 at the newborn stage and increased incidence of NAFLD were also found in Tmed299J/+ mice. Our data establishes Tmed299J/+ mice as a novel mouse model for NAFLD and supports a role for TMED2 in liver health.

  7. A Splicing Mutation in the Novel Mitochondrial Protein DNAJC11 Causes Motor Neuron Pathology Associated with Cristae Disorganization, and Lymphoid Abnormalities in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioakeimidis, Fotis; Ott, Christine; Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Violitzi, Foteini; Rinotas, Vagelis; Makrinou, Eleni; Eliopoulos, Elias; Fasseas, Costas; Kollias, George; Douni, Eleni

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial structure and function is emerging as a major contributor to neuromuscular disease, highlighting the need for the complete elucidation of the underlying molecular and pathophysiological mechanisms. Following a forward genetics approach with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-mediated random mutagenesis, we identified a novel mouse model of autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease caused by a splice-site hypomorphic mutation in a novel gene of unknown function, DnaJC11. Recent findings have demonstrated that DNAJC11 protein co-immunoprecipitates with proteins of the mitochondrial contact site (MICOS) complex involved in the formation of mitochondrial cristae and cristae junctions. Homozygous mutant mice developed locomotion defects, muscle weakness, spasticity, limb tremor, leucopenia, thymic and splenic hypoplasia, general wasting and early lethality. Neuropathological analysis showed severe vacuolation of the motor neurons in the spinal cord, originating from dilatations of the endoplasmic reticulum and notably from mitochondria that had lost their proper inner membrane organization. The causal role of the identified mutation in DnaJC11 was verified in rescue experiments by overexpressing the human ortholog. The full length 63 kDa isoform of human DNAJC11 was shown to localize in the periphery of the mitochondrial outer membrane whereas putative additional isoforms displayed differential submitochondrial localization. Moreover, we showed that DNAJC11 is assembled in a high molecular weight complex, similarly to mitofilin and that downregulation of mitofilin or SAM50 affected the levels of DNAJC11 in HeLa cells. Our findings provide the first mouse mutant for a putative MICOS protein and establish a link between DNAJC11 and neuromuscular diseases. PMID:25111180

  8. New approach for fish breeding by chemical mutagenesis: establishment of TILLING method in fugu (Takifugu rubripes) with ENU mutagenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Kuroyanagi, Miwa; Katayama, Takashi; Imai, Tadashi; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa; Chisada, Shin-ichi; Yoshiura, Yasutoshi; Ushijima, Tomokazu; Matsushita, Tomonao; Fujita, Masashi; Nozawa, Aoi; Suzuki, Yuzuru; Kikuchi, Kiyoshi; Okamoto, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Background In fish breeding, it is essential to discover and generate fish exhibiting an effective phenotype for the aquaculture industry, but screening for natural mutants by only depending on natural spontaneous mutations is limited. Presently, reverse genetics has become an important tool to generate mutants, which exhibit the phenotype caused by inactivation of a gene. TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes) is a reverse genetics strategy that combines random chemical mutagen...

  9. Phenotypic and genetic analysis of the cerebellar mutant tmgc26, a new ENU-induced ROR-alpha allele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Douglas J; Steshina, Ekaterina Y; Wakenight, Paul; Aldinger, Kimberly A; Goldowitz, Dan; Millen, Kathleen J; Chizhikov, Victor V

    2010-09-01

    ROR-alpha is an orphan nuclear receptor, inactivation of which cell-autonomously blocks differentiation of cerebellar Purkinje cells with a secondary loss of granule neurons. As part of our ENU mutagenesis screen we isolated the recessive tmgc26 mouse mutant, characterized by early-onset progressive ataxia, cerebellar degeneration and juvenile lethality. Detailed analysis of the tmgc26-/- cerebella revealed Purkinje cell and granule cell abnormalities, and defects in molecular layer interneurons and radial glia. Chimera studies suggested a cell-autonomous effect of the tmgc26 mutation in Purkinje cells and molecular layer interneurons, and a non-cell-autonomous effect in granule cells. The mutation was mapped to a 13-Mb interval on chromosome 9, a region that contains the ROR-alpha gene. Sequencing of genomic DNA revealed a T-to-A transition in exon 5 of the ROR-alpha gene, resulting in a nonsense mutation C257X and severe truncation of the ROR-alpha protein. Together, our data identify new roles for ROR-alpha in molecular layer interneurons and radial glia development and suggest tmgc26 as a novel ROR-alpha allele that may be used to further delineate the molecular mechanisms of ROR-alpha action. © 2010 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2010 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. High resolution mapping and positional cloning of ENU-induced mutations in the Rw region of mouse chromosome 5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schimenti Kerry J

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Forward genetic screens in mice provide an unbiased means to identify genes and other functional genetic elements in the genome. Previously, a large scale ENU mutagenesis screen was conducted to query the functional content of a ~50 Mb region of the mouse genome on proximal Chr 5. The majority of phenotypic mutants recovered were embryonic lethals. Results We report the high resolution genetic mapping, complementation analyses, and positional cloning of mutations in the target region. The collection of identified alleles include several with known or presumed functions for which no mutant models have been reported (Tbc1d14, Nol14, Tyms, Cad, Fbxl5, Haus3, and mutations in genes we or others previously reported (Tapt1, Rest, Ugdh, Paxip1, Hmx1, Otoe, Nsun7. We also confirmed the causative nature of a homeotic mutation with a targeted allele, mapped a lethal mutation to a large gene desert, and localized a spermiogenesis mutation to a region in which no annotated genes have coding mutations. The mutation in Tbc1d14 provides the first implication of a critical developmental role for RAB-GAP-mediated protein transport in early embryogenesis. Conclusion This collection of alleles contributes to the goal of assigning biological functions to all known genes, as well as identifying novel functional elements that would be missed by reverse genetic approaches.

  11. Generation of gene knockouts and mutant models in the laboratory rat by ENU-driven target-selected mutagenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Bart M G; Mudde, Josine B; van de Belt, Jose; Verheul, Mark; Olivier, Jocelien; Homberg, Judith; Guryev, Victor; Cools, Alexander R; Ellenbroek, Bart A; Plasterk, Ronald H A; Cuppen, Edwin

    OBJECTIVE: The rat is one of the most important model organisms for biomedical and pharmacological research. However, the generation of novel models for studying specific aspects of human diseases largely depends on selection for specific traits using existing rat strains, thereby solely depending

  12. Genetics and Neurobiology of Circadian Clocks in Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Junghea; Lee, Choogon; Takahashi, Joseph S.

    2013-01-01

    In animals circadian behavior can be analyzed as an integrated system - beginning with genes leading ultimately to behavioral outputs. In the last decade, the molecular mechanism of circadian clocks has been unraveled primarily by the use of phenotype-driven (forward) genetic analysis in a number of model systems. Circadian oscillations are generated by a set of genes forming a transcriptional autoregulatory feedback loop. In mammals, there is a “core” set of circadian genes that form the primary negative feedback loop of the clock mechanism (Clock/Npas2, Bmal1, Per1, Per2, Cry1, Cry2 and CK1ε). Another dozen candidate genes have been identified and play additional roles in the circadian gene network such as the feedback loop involving Rev-erbα. Despite this remarkable progress, it is clear that a significant number of genes that strongly influence and regulate circadian rhythms in mammals remain to be discovered and identified. As part of a large-scale N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis screen using a wide range of nervous system and behavioral phenotypes, we have identified a number of new circadian mutants in mice. Here we describe a new short period circadian mutant, part-time (prtm), which is caused by a loss-of-function mutation in the Cryptochrome1 gene. We also describe a long period circadian mutant named Overtime (Ovtm). Positional cloning and genetic complementation reveal that Ovtm is encoded by the F-box protein FBXL3 a component of the SKP1-CUL1-F-box-protein (SCF) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. The Ovtm mutation causes an isoleucine to threonine (I364T) substitution leading to a loss-of-function in FBXL3 which interacts specifically with the CRYPTOCHROME (CRY) proteins. In Ovtm mice, expression of the PERIOD proteins PER1 and PER2 is reduced; however, the CRY proteins CRY1 and CRY2 are unchanged. The loss of FBXL3 function leads to a stabilization of the CRY proteins, which in turn leads to a global transcriptional repression of the Per and

  13. Study of decay dynamics and CP asymmetry in D+ -> K(L)(0)e(+)nu(e) decay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M.N.; Ai, X.C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D.J.; Amoroso, A.; Haddadi, Z.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Loehner, Herbert; Messchendorp, J.G.; Tiemens, M.

    2015-01-01

    Using 2.92 fb(-1) of electron-positron annihilation data collected at root s = 3.773 GeV with the BESIII detector, we obtain the first measurements of the absolute branching fraction B(D+ -> K(L)(0)e(+)nu(e)) = (4.481 +/- 0.027(stat) +/- 0.103(sys))% and the CP asymmetry A(CP)(D+-> KL0e+nu e) =

  14. INDUCTION OF CHLOROPHYLL MUTANTS IN COMMON BEAN UNDER THE ACTION OF CHEMICAL MUTAGENS ENU AND EMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Lilova SVETLEVA

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Effect of treatment with different concentrations of N-nitroso-N-ethyl urea (ENU and etylmethan sulfonate (ЕМS on seeds of Bulgarian common bean Dobroudjanski 7, Dobroudjanski 2, Plovdiv 10, Plovdiv 11М and snap bean Tcher Starozagorski varieties, for induction of chlorophyll mutants, was studied. It was established that investigated varieties manifested specifi c reactions to the treatment with ENU and EMS. Different mutation frequencies and width of mutation spectra were induced under the action of different concentrations of the two applied mutagens. ENU induced chlorophyll mutants with higher frequency in all studied varieties, in comparison to the action of EMS. Sixteen types of chlorophyll mutants were found, for all studied varieties, and mutagenic treatments. Mutant types chlorina (19,8%, xantha (19,3%, viridissima (15,4% and chimerical leaves (9,1% were with the highest frequency, comparing to the total number of observed mutants. Results were statistically elaborated by the Fisher’s method “ϕ”.

  15. 2004 Mutagenesis Gordon Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sue Jinks-Robertson

    2005-09-16

    Mutations are genetic alterations that drive biological evolution and cause many, if not all, human diseases. Mutation originates via two distinct mechanisms: ''vertical'' variation is de novo change of one or few bases, whereas ''horizontal'' variation occurs by genetic recombination, which creates new mosaics of pre-existing sequences. The Mutagenesis Conference has traditionally focused on the generation of mutagenic intermediates during normal DNA synthesis or in response to environmental insults, as well as the diverse repair mechanisms that prevent the fixation of such intermediates as permanent mutations. While the 2004 Conference will continue to focus on the molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis, there will be increased emphasis on the biological consequences of mutations, both in terms of evolutionary processes and in terms of human disease. The meeting will open with two historical accounts of mutation research that recapitulate the intellectual framework of this field and thereby place the current research paradigms into perspective. The two introductory keynote lectures will be followed by sessions on: (1) mutagenic systems, (2) hypermutable sequences, (3) mechanisms of mutation, (4) mutation avoidance systems, (5) mutation in human hereditary and infectious diseases, (6) mutation rates in evolution and genotype-phenotype relationships, (7) ecology, mutagenesis and the modeling of evolution and (8) genetic diversity of the human population and models for human mutagenesis. The Conference will end with a synthesis of the meeting as the keynote closing lecture.

  16. Mutation assay using single-molecule real-time (SMRT(TM)) sequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Tomonari; Matsuda, Shun; Yamada, Masami

    2015-01-01

    We present here a simple, phenotype-independent mutation assay using a PacBio RSII DNA sequencer employing single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing technology. Salmonella typhimurium YG7108 was treated with the alkylating agent N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) and grown though several generations to fix the induced mutations, the DNA was extracted and the mutations were analyzed by using the SMRT DNA sequencer. The ENU-induced base-substitution frequency was 15.4 per Megabase pair, which is highly consistent with our previous results based on colony isolation and next-generation sequencing. The induced mutation spectrum (95% G:C → A:T, 5% A:T → G:C) is also consistent with the known ENU signature. The base-substitution frequency of the control was calculated to be less than 0.12 per Megabase pair. A current limitation of the approach is the high frequency of artifactual insertion and deletion mutations it detects. Ultra-low frequency base-substitution mutations can be detected directly by using the SMRT DNA sequencer, and this technology provides a phenotype-independent mutation assay.

  17. Sensitivity of Bidens laevis L. to mutagenic compounds. Use of chromosomal aberrations as biomarkers of genotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, D.J. [Laboratorio de Genetica, Estacion Experimental Agropecuaria Balcarce (INTA), Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias, UNMdP, CC 276, 7620 Balcarce (Argentina); Laboratorio de Ecotoxicologia, Departamento de Ciencias Marinas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, UNMdP, Funes 3350, 7600 Mar del Plata (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Lukaszewicz, G. [Laboratorio de Ecotoxicologia, Departamento de Ciencias Marinas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, UNMdP, Funes 3350, 7600 Mar del Plata (Argentina); Menone, M.L., E-mail: lujanm@mdp.edu.a [Laboratorio de Ecotoxicologia, Departamento de Ciencias Marinas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, UNMdP, Funes 3350, 7600 Mar del Plata (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Camadro, E.L. [Laboratorio de Genetica, Estacion Experimental Agropecuaria Balcarce (INTA), Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias, UNMdP, CC 276, 7620 Balcarce (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2011-01-15

    The wetland macrophyte Bidens laevis possesses suitable cytological characteristics for genotoxicity testing. To test its sensitivity as compared to terrestrial plants species currently in use in standardized assays, Methyl Methanesulfonate (MMS), N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) and Maleic Hydrazide (HM) were used. On the other hand, the insecticide Endosulfan (ES) - an environmentally relevant contaminant - was assayed in seeds and two-month old plants. Mitotic Index (MI), frequency of Chromosome Aberrations in Anaphase-Telophase (CAAT) and frequency of Abnormal Metaphases (AM) were analyzed. MH, MMS and ENU caused a significant decrease of the MI. MMS was aneugenic whereas MH and ENU were both aneugenic and clastogenic. ES caused a significant concentration-dependent increase of total- and aneugenic-CAAT in roots and a significant high frequency of AM at high concentrations. Because of its sensitivity to mutagenic substances, B. laevis can be regarded as a reliable and convenient species for genotoxicity assays especially if aquatic contaminants are evaluated. - The wetland macrophyte Bidens laevis is sensitive to genotoxic compounds similarly to terrestrial standardized species.

  18. Classical mutagenesis in higher plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornneef, M.

    2002-01-01

    For a long time, mutagenesis research in plants focused on crop improvement and, especially for crop plants, opimised protocols were developed with barley being one of the favourite species. However, the interest in mutagenesis has shifted to basic plant research in the last 20 years, when the power

  19. Ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenesis in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekwall, Karl; Thon, Genevieve

    2017-01-01

    Here we provide an ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) mutagenesis protocol for Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells.......Here we provide an ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) mutagenesis protocol for Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells....

  20. Antimicrobials, stress and mutagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandro Rodríguez-Rojas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cationic antimicrobial peptides are ancient and ubiquitous immune effectors that multicellular organisms use to kill and police microbes whereas antibiotics are mostly employed by microorganisms. As antimicrobial peptides (AMPs mostly target the cell wall, a microbial 'Achilles heel', it has been proposed that bacterial resistance evolution is very unlikely and hence AMPs are ancient 'weapons' of multicellular organisms. Here we provide a new hypothesis to explain the widespread distribution of AMPs amongst multicellular organism. Studying five antimicrobial peptides from vertebrates and insects, we show, using a classic Luria-Delbrück fluctuation assay, that cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs do not increase bacterial mutation rates. Moreover, using rtPCR and disc diffusion assays we find that AMPs do not elicit SOS or rpoS bacterial stress pathways. This is in contrast to the main classes of antibiotics that elevate mutagenesis via eliciting the SOS and rpoS pathways. The notion of the 'Achilles heel' has been challenged by experimental selection for AMP-resistance, but our findings offer a new perspective on the evolutionary success of AMPs. Employing AMPs seems advantageous for multicellular organisms, as it does not fuel the adaptation of bacteria to their immune defenses. This has important consequences for our understanding of host-microbe interactions, the evolution of innate immune defenses, and also sheds new light on antimicrobial resistance evolution and the use of AMPs as drugs.

  1. Classical mutagenesis in higher plants

    OpenAIRE

    Koornneef, M.

    2002-01-01

    For a long time, mutagenesis research in plants focused on crop improvement and, especially for crop plants, opimised protocols were developed with barley being one of the favourite species. However, the interest in mutagenesis has shifted to basic plant research in the last 20 years, when the power of mutant approaches in combination with molecular techniques to investigate the molecular nature of the genes became fully appreciated

  2. Promoter analysis by saturation mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baliga Nitin

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression and regulation are mediated by DNA sequences, in most instances, directly upstream to the coding sequences by recruiting transcription factors, regulators, and a RNA polymerase in a spatially defined fashion. Few nucleotides within a promoter make contact with the bound proteins. The minimal set of nucleotides that can recruit a protein factor is called a cis-acting element. This article addresses a powerful mutagenesis strategy that can be employed to define cis-acting elements at a molecular level. Technical details including primer design, saturation mutagenesis, construction of promoter libraries, phenotypic analysis, data analysis, and interpretation are discussed.

  3. Forward and reverse mutagenesis in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutscher, Lena M; Shaham, Shai

    2014-01-17

    Mutagenesis drives natural selection. In the lab, mutations allow gene function to be deciphered. C. elegans is highly amendable to functional genetics because of its short generation time, ease of use, and wealth of available gene-alteration techniques. Here we provide an overview of historical and contemporary methods for mutagenesis in C. elegans, and discuss principles and strategies for forward (genome-wide mutagenesis) and reverse (target-selected and gene-specific mutagenesis) genetic studies in this animal.

  4. ENU mutagenesis reveals that Notchless homolog 1 (Drosophila affects Cdkn1a and several members of the Wnt pathway during murine pre-implantation development

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    Lossie Amy C

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our interests lie in determining the genes and genetic pathways that are important for establishing and maintaining maternal-fetal interactions during pregnancy. Mutation analysis targeted to a 34 Mb domain flanked by Trp53 and Wnt3 demonstrates that this region of mouse chromosome 11 contains a large number of essential genes. Two mutant alleles (l11Jus1 and l11Jus4, which fall into the same complementation group, survive through implantation but fail prior to gastrulation. Results Through a positional cloning strategy, we discovered that these homozygous mutant alleles contain non-conservative missense mutations in the Notchless homolog 1 (Drosophila (Nle1 gene. NLE1 is a member of the large WD40-repeat protein family, and is thought to signal via the canonical NOTCH pathway in vertebrates. However, the phenotype of the Nle1 mutant mice is much more severe than single Notch receptor mutations or even in animals in which NOTCH signaling is blocked. To test the hypothesis that NLE1 functions in multiple signaling pathways during pre-implantation development, we examined expression of multiple Notch downstream target genes, as well as select members of the Wnt pathway in wild-type and mutant embryos. We did not detect altered expression of any primary members of the Notch pathway or in Notch downstream target genes. However, our data reveal that Cdkn1a, a NOTCH target, was upregulated in Nle1 mutants, while several members of the Wnt pathway are downregulated. In addition, we found that Nle1 mutant embryos undergo caspase-mediated apoptosis as hatched blastocysts, but not as morulae or blastocysts. Conclusions Taken together, these results uncover potential novel functions for NLE1 in the WNT and CDKN1A pathways during embryonic development in mammals.

  5. Repairability during G1 of the inductor leisure of exchanges in the sister chromatid induced by alkylating agents in DNA substituted and no substituted with BUDR, in cells of the salivary gland of mouse In vivo; Reparabilidad durante G1 de las lesiones inductoras de intercambios en las cromatidas hermanas inducidos por agentes alquilantes en ADN sustituido y no sustituido con BrdU, en celulas de la glandula salival de raton In vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez B, F

    2004-07-01

    In this work you determines the repair of the lesions inductoras of Sister chromatid exchange (ICHs) generated in the cells of the salivary gland of mouse, for the treatment with the N-Methyl-N-Nitrosourea (MNU), the N-Ethyl-N-Nitrosourea (ENU), the Methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and the Ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) in early and slow G1 of the first one and the second cellular division, that is to say before and after the cells incorporate 5-bromine-2 -Desoxyuridine (BrdU) in the DNA. Groups witness non treaties were included with mutagen. The cells of the salivary gland repaired the generated lesions partially by the MNU, the MMS and the EMS in the 1st division, and only the lesions induced by the ENU and MMS were repaired partially in the 2nd division. The ENU generates injure that they were not repaired in the 1st division and those taken place by the EMS were little repaired in the 2nd division. The methylating agents generated but ICHs that the ethylating. One observes that the BrdU makes to the molecule of the DNA but susceptible to the damage generated by the alkylating agents that induce the formation of the ICHs. This susceptibility was incremented around 150% for the treatment with the MNU, the ENU and the MMS, on the other hand for the EMS it was 3 times minor. It is proposed that the one electronegative atom of this analog of the timine would to work as a nucleophyllic center with which the electrophyllic compounds react. (Author)

  6. Applying the erythrocyte Pig-a assay concept to rat epididymal sperm for germ cell mutagenicity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhiying; LeBaron, Matthew J

    2017-08-01

    The Pig-a assay, a recently developed in vivo somatic gene mutation assay, is based on the identification of mutant erythrocytes that have an altered repertoire of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored cell surface markers. We hypothesized that the erythrocyte Pig-a assay concept could be applied to rat cauda epididymal spermatozoa (sperm) for germ cell mutagenicity evaluation. We used GPI-anchored CD59 as the Pig-a mutation marker and examined the frequency of CD59-negative sperm using flow cytometry. A reconstruction experiment that spiked un-labeled sperm (mutant-mimic) into labeled sperm at specific ratios yielded good agreement between the detected and expected frequencies of mutant-mimic sperm, demonstrating the analytical ability for CD59-negative sperm detection. Furthermore, this methodology was assessed in F344/DuCrl rats administered N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), a prototypical mutagen, or clofibrate, a lipid-lowering drug. Rats treated with 1, 10, or 20 mg/kg body weight/day (mkd) ENU via daily oral garage for five consecutive days showed a dose-dependent increase in the frequency of CD59-negative sperm on study day 63 (i.e., 58 days after the last ENU dose). This ENU dosing regimen also increased the frequency of CD59-negative erythrocytes. In rats treated with 300 mkd clofibrate via daily oral garage for consecutive 28 days, no treatment-related changes were detected in the frequency of CD59-negative sperm on study day 85 (i.e., 57 days after the last dose) or in the frequency of CD59-negative erythrocytes on study day 29. In conclusion, these data suggest that the epidiymal sperm Pig-a assay in rats is a promising method for evaluating germ cell mutagenicity. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 58:485-493, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Genetic background alters the severity and onset of neuromuscular disease caused by the loss of ubiquitin-specific protease 14 (usp14.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea G Marshall

    Full Text Available In this study, we identified and characterized an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU induced mutation in Usp14 (nmf375 that leads to adult-onset neurological disease. The nmf375 mutation causes aberrant splicing of Usp14 mRNA, resulting in a 95% reduction in USP14. We previously showed that loss of USP14 in ataxia (ax (J mice results in reduced ubiquitin levels, motor endplate disease, Purkinje cell axonal dystrophy and decreased hippocampal paired pulse facilitation (PPF during the first 4-6 weeks of life, and early postnatal lethality by two months of age. Although the loss of USP14 is comparable between the nmf375 and ax (J mice, the nmf375 mice did not exhibit these ax (J developmental abnormalities. However, by 12 weeks of age the nmf375 mutants present with ubiquitin depletion and motor endplate disease, indicating a continual role for USP14-mediated regulation of ubiquitin pools and neuromuscular junction (NMJ structure in adult mice. The observation that motor endplate disease was only seen after ubiquitin depletion suggests that the preservation of NMJ structure requires the stable maintenance of synaptic ubiquitin pools. Differences in genetic background were shown to affect ubiquitin expression and dramatically alter the phenotypes caused by USP14 deficiency.

  8. Mutation in archain 1, a subunit of COPI coatomer complex, causes diluted coat color and Purkinje cell degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinjie Xu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular trafficking is critical for delivering molecules and organelles to their proper destinations to carry out normal cellular functions. Disruption of intracellular trafficking has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative disorders. In addition, a number of genes involved in vesicle/organelle trafficking are also essential for pigmentation, and loss of those genes is often associated with mouse coat-color dilution and human hypopigmentary disorders. Hence, we postulated that screening for mouse mutants with both neurological defects and coat-color dilution will help identify additional factors associated with intracellular trafficking in neuronal cells. In this study, we characterized a mouse mutant with a unique N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU-induced mutation, named nur17. nur17 mutant mice exhibit both coat-color dilution and ataxia due to Purkinje cell degeneration in the cerebellum. By positional cloning, we identified that the nur17 mouse carries a T-to-C missense mutation in archain 1 (Arcn1 gene which encodes the delta subunit of the coat protein I (COPI complex required for intracellular trafficking. Consistent with this function, we found that intracellular trafficking is disrupted in nur17 melanocytes. Moreover, the nur17 mutation leads to common characteristics of neurodegenerative disorders such as abnormal protein accumulation, ER stress, and neurofibrillary tangles. Our study documents for the first time the physiological consequences of the impairment of the ARCN1 function in the whole animal and demonstrates a direct association between ARCN1 and neurodegeneration.

  9. Early doors (Edo) mutant mouse reveals the importance of period 2 (PER2) PAS domain structure for circadian pacemaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Militi, Stefania; Maywood, Elizabeth S; Sandate, Colby R; Chesham, Johanna E; Barnard, Alun R; Parsons, Michael J; Vibert, Jennifer L; Joynson, Greg M; Partch, Carrie L; Hastings, Michael H; Nolan, Patrick M

    2016-03-08

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) defines 24 h of time via a transcriptional/posttranslational feedback loop in which transactivation of Per (period) and Cry (cryptochrome) genes by BMAL1-CLOCK complexes is suppressed by PER-CRY complexes. The molecular/structural basis of how circadian protein complexes function is poorly understood. We describe a novel N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced mutation, early doors (Edo), in the PER-ARNT-SIM (PAS) domain dimerization region of period 2 (PER2) (I324N) that accelerates the circadian clock of Per2(Edo/Edo) mice by 1.5 h. Structural and biophysical analyses revealed that Edo alters the packing of the highly conserved interdomain linker of the PER2 PAS core such that, although PER2(Edo) complexes with clock proteins, its vulnerability to degradation mediated by casein kinase 1ε (CSNK1E) is increased. The functional relevance of this mutation is revealed by the ultrashort (Edo/Edo); Csnk1e(Tau/Tau) mice and the SCN. These periods are unprecedented in mice. Thus, Per2(Edo) reveals a direct causal link between the molecular structure of the PER2 PAS core and the pace of SCN circadian timekeeping.

  10. The V-ATPase a3 subunit mutation R740S is dominant negative and results in osteopetrosis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochotny, Noelle; Flenniken, Ann M; Owen, Celeste; Voronov, Irina; Zirngibl, Ralph A; Osborne, Lucy R; Henderson, Janet E; Adamson, S Lee; Rossant, Janet; Manolson, Morris F; Aubin, Jane E

    2011-07-01

    A mouse founder with high bone mineral density and an osteopetrotic phenotype was identified in an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) screen. It was found to carry a dominant missense mutation in the Tcirg1 gene that encodes the a3 subunit of the vacuolar type H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase), resulting in replacement of a highly conserved amino acid (R740S). The +/R740S mice have normal appearance, size, and weight but exhibit high bone density. Osteoblast parameters are unaffected in bones of +/R740S mice, whereas osteoclast number and marker expression are increased, concomitant with a decrease in the number of apoptotic osteoclasts. Consistent with reduced osteoclast apoptosis, expression of Rankl and Bcl2 is elevated, whereas Casp3 is reduced. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that unlike other known mutations in the a3 subunit of V-ATPase, polarization and ruffled border formation appear normal in +/R740S osteoclasts. However, V-ATPases from +/R740S osteoclast membranes have severely reduced proton transport, whereas ATP hydrolysis is not significantly affected. We show for the first time that a point mutation within the a3 subunit, R740S, which is dominant negative for proton pumping and bone resorption, also uncouples proton pumping from ATP hydrolysis but has no effect on ruffled border formation or polarization of osteoclasts. These results suggest that the V(0) complex has proton-pumping-independent functions in mammalian cells. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  11. The anti-tumor effects of calorie restriction are correlated with reduced oxidative stress in ENU-induced gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan A. Mahlke

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The anti-tumor effects of calorie restriction (CR and the possible underlying mechanisms were investigated using ethylnitrosourea (ENU-induced glioma in rats. ENU was given transplacentally at gestational day 15, and male offspring were used in this experiment. The brain from 4-, 6-, and 8-month-old rats fed either ad libitum (AL or calorie-restricted diets (40% restriction of total calories compared to AL rats was studied. Tumor burden was assessed by comparing the number and size of gliomas present in sections of the brain. Immunohistochemical analysis was used to document lipid peroxidation [4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE and malondialdehyde (MDA], protein oxidation (nitrotyrosine, glycation and AGE formation [methylglyoxal (MG and carboxymethyllysine (CML], cell proliferation activity [proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA], cell death [single-stranded DNA (ssDNA], presence of thioredoxin 1 (Trx1, and presence of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 associated with the development of gliomas. The results showed that the number of gliomas did not change with age in the AL groups; however, the average size of the gliomas was significantly larger in the 8-month-old group compared to that of the younger groups. Immunopositivity was observed mainly in tumor cells and reactive astrocytes in all histological types of ENU-induced glioma. Immunopositive areas for HNE, MDA, nitrotyrosine, MG, CML, HO-1, and Trx1 increased with the growth of gliomas. The CR group showed both reduced number and size of gliomas, and tumors exhibited less accumulation of oxidative damage, decreased formation of glycated end products, and a decreased presence of HO-1 and Trx1 compared to the AL group. Furthermore, gliomas of the CR group showed less PCNA positive and more ssDNA positive cells, which are correlated to the retarded growth of tumors. Interestingly, we also discovered that the anti-tumor effects of CR were associated with decreased hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α levels

  12. The caspase-3/p120 RasGAP stress-sensing module reduces liver cancer incidence but does not affect overall survival in gamma-irradiated and carcinogen-treated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanli, Güliz; Sempoux, Christine; Widmann, Christian

    2017-06-01

    Activation of oncogenes is the initial step in cellular transformation. Oncogenes favor aberrant proliferation, which, at least initially, induces cellular stress. This oncogenic stress can act as a safeguard mechanism against further transformation by inducing senescence or apoptosis. Yet, the few premalignant cells that tolerate and escape these senescent or apoptotic responses are those that will ultimately generate tumors. The caspase-3/p120 RasGAP module is a stress-sensing device that promotes survival under mild stress conditions. A point mutation in RasGAP that prevents its cleavage by caspase-3 inactivates the pro-survival capacity of the device. When the mice homozygous for this mutation (D455A knock-in mice) are patho-physiologically challenged, they experience much stronger cellular damage than their wild-type counterparts and the affected organs rapidly lose their functionality. We reasoned that the caspase-3/p120 RasGAP module could help premalignant cells to cope with oncogenic stress and hence favor the development of tumors. Using gamma-irradiation and N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) as tumor initiators, we assessed the survival advantage that the caspase-3/p120 RasGAP module could provide to premalignant cells. No difference in overall mortality between wild-type and D455A knock-in mice were observed. However, the number of ENU-induced liver tumors in the knock-in mice was higher than in control mice. These results indicate that the caspase-3/p120 RasGAP stress-sensing module impacts on carcinogen-induced liver cancer incidence but not sufficiently so as to affect overall survival. Hence, gamma irradiation and ENU-induced tumorigenesis processes do not critically rely on a survival mechanism that contributes to the maintenance of organ homeostasis in stressed healthy tissues. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. A mutation in synaptojanin 2 causes progressive hearing loss in the ENU-mutagenised mouse strain Mozart.

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    Shehnaaz S M Manji

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Hearing impairment is the most common sensory impairment in humans, affecting 1:1,000 births. We have identified an ENU generated mouse mutant, Mozart, with recessively inherited, non-syndromic progressive hearing loss caused by a mutation in the synaptojanin 2 (Synj2, a central regulatory enzyme in the phosphoinositide-signaling cascade.The hearing loss in Mozart is caused by a p.Asn538Lys mutation in the catalytic domain of the inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase synaptojanin 2. Within the cochlea, Synj2 mRNA expression was detected in the inner and outer hair cells but not in the spiral ganglion. Synj2(N538K mutant protein showed loss of lipid phosphatase activity, and was unable to degrade phosphoinositide signaling molecules. Mutant Mozart mice (Synj2(N538K/N538K exhibited progressive hearing loss and showed signs of hair cell degeneration as early as two weeks of age, with fusion of stereocilia followed by complete loss of hair bundles and ultimately loss of hair cells. No changes in vestibular or neurological function, or other clinical or behavioral manifestations were apparent.Phosphoinositides are membrane associated signaling molecules that regulate many cellular processes including cell death, proliferation, actin polymerization and ion channel activity. These results reveal Synj2 as a critical regulator of hair cell survival that is essential for hair cell maintenance and hearing function.

  14. A mutation in synaptojanin 2 causes progressive hearing loss in the ENU-mutagenised mouse strain Mozart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manji, Shehnaaz S M; Williams, Louise H; Miller, Kerry A; Ooms, Lisa M; Bahlo, Melanie; Mitchell, Christina A; Dahl, Hans-Henrik M

    2011-03-15

    Hearing impairment is the most common sensory impairment in humans, affecting 1:1,000 births. We have identified an ENU generated mouse mutant, Mozart, with recessively inherited, non-syndromic progressive hearing loss caused by a mutation in the synaptojanin 2 (Synj2), a central regulatory enzyme in the phosphoinositide-signaling cascade. The hearing loss in Mozart is caused by a p.Asn538Lys mutation in the catalytic domain of the inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase synaptojanin 2. Within the cochlea, Synj2 mRNA expression was detected in the inner and outer hair cells but not in the spiral ganglion. Synj2(N538K) mutant protein showed loss of lipid phosphatase activity, and was unable to degrade phosphoinositide signaling molecules. Mutant Mozart mice (Synj2(N538K/N538K)) exhibited progressive hearing loss and showed signs of hair cell degeneration as early as two weeks of age, with fusion of stereocilia followed by complete loss of hair bundles and ultimately loss of hair cells. No changes in vestibular or neurological function, or other clinical or behavioral manifestations were apparent. Phosphoinositides are membrane associated signaling molecules that regulate many cellular processes including cell death, proliferation, actin polymerization and ion channel activity. These results reveal Synj2 as a critical regulator of hair cell survival that is essential for hair cell maintenance and hearing function.

  15. Second-generation high-throughput forward genetic screen in mice to isolate subtle behavioral mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vivek; Kim, Kyungin; Joseph, Chryshanthi; Thomas, Lisa C; Hong, Heekyung; Takahashi, Joseph S

    2011-09-13

    Forward genetic screens have been highly successful in revealing roles of genes and pathways in complex biological events. Traditionally these screens have focused on isolating mutants with the greatest phenotypic deviance, with the hopes of discovering genes that are central to the biological event being investigated. Behavioral screens in mice typically use simple activity-based assays as endophenotypes for more complex emotional states of the animal. They generally set the selection threshold for a putative mutant at 3 SDs (z score of 3) from the average behavior of normal animals to minimize false-positive results. Behavioral screens using a high threshold for detection have generally had limited success, with high false-positive rates and subtle phenotypic differences that have made mapping and cloning difficult. In addition, targeted reverse genetic approaches have shown that when genes central to behaviors such as open field behavior, psychostimulant response, and learning and memory tasks are mutated, they produce subtle phenotypes that differ from wild-type animals by 1 to 2 SDs (z scores of 1 to 2). We have conducted a second-generation (G2) dominant N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) screen especially designed to detect subtle behavioral mutants for open field activity and psychostimulant response behaviors. We successfully detect mutant lines with only 1 to 2 SD shifts in mean response compared with wild-type control animals and present a robust statistical and methodological framework for conducting such forward genetic screens. Using this methodology we have screened 229 ENU mutant lines and have identified 15 heritable mutant lines. We conclude that for screens in mice that use activity-based endophenotypic measurements for complex behavioral states, this G2 screening approach yields better results.

  16. International Pig-a gene mutation assay trial: evaluation of transferability across 14 laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dertinger, Stephen D; Phonethepswath, Souk; Weller, Pamela; Nicolette, John; Murray, Joel; Sonders, Paul; Vohr, Hans-Werner; Shi, Jing; Krsmanovic, Ljubica; Gleason, Carol; Custer, Laura; Henwood, Andrew; Sweder, Kevin; Stankowski, Leon F; Roberts, Daniel J; Giddings, Amanda; Kenny, Julia; Lynch, Anthony M; Defrain, Céline; Nesslany, Fabrice; van der Leede, Bas-jan M; Van Doninck, Terry; Schuermans, Ann; Tanaka, Kentaro; Hiwata, Yoshie; Tajima, Osamu; Wilde, Eleanor; Elhajouji, Azeddine; Gunther, William C; Thiffeault, Catherine J; Shutsky, Thomas J; Fiedler, Ronald D; Kimoto, Takafumi; Bhalli, Javed A; Heflich, Robert H; MacGregor, James T

    2011-12-01

    A collaborative international trial was conducted to evaluate the reproducibility and transferability of an in vivo mutation assay based on the enumeration of CD59-negative rat erythrocytes, a phenotype that is indicative of Pig-a gene mutation. Fourteen laboratories participated in this study, where anti-CD59-PE, SYTO 13 dye, and flow cytometry were used to determine the frequency of CD59-negative erythrocytes (RBC(CD59-)) and CD59-negative reticulocytes (RET(CD59-)). To provide samples with a range of mutant phenotype cell frequencies, male rats were exposed to N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) via oral gavage for three consecutive days (Days 1-3). Each laboratory studied 0, 20, and 40 mg ENU/kg/day (n = 5 per group). Three sites also evaluated 4 mg/kg/day. At a minimum, blood samples were collected three times: predosing and on Days 15 and 30. Blood samples were processed according to a standardized sample processing and data acquisition protocol, and three endpoints were measured: %reticulocytes, frequency of RET(CD59-) , and frequency of RBC(CD59-) . The methodology was found to be reproducible, as the analysis of technical replicates resulted in experimental coefficients of variation that approached theoretical values. Good transferability was evident from the similar kinetics and magnitude of the dose-related responses that were observed among different laboratories. Concordance correlation coefficients showed a high level of agreement between the reference site and the test sites (range: 0.87-0.99). Collectively, these data demonstrate that with adequate training of personnel, flow cytometric analysis is capable of reliably enumerating mutant phenotype erythrocytes, thereby providing a robust in vivo mutation assay that is readily transferable across laboratories. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. A high-speed congenic strategy using first-wave male germ cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narumi Ogonuki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In laboratory mice and rats, congenic breeding is essential for analyzing the genes of interest on specific genetic backgrounds and for analyzing quantitative trait loci. However, in theory it takes about 3-4 years to achieve a strain carrying about 99% of the recipient genome at the tenth backcrossing (N10. Even with marker-assisted selection, the so-called 'speed congenic strategy', it takes more than a year at N4 or N5. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we describe a new high-speed congenic system using round spermatids retrieved from immature males (22-25 days of age. We applied the technique to three genetically modified strains of mice: transgenic (TG, knockin (KI and N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU-induced mutants. The donor mice had mixed genetic backgrounds of C57BL/6 (B6:DBA/2 or B6:129 strains. At each generation, males used for backcrossing were selected based on polymorphic marker analysis and their round spermatids were injected into B6 strain oocytes. Backcrossing was repeated until N4 or N5. For the TG and ENU-mutant strains, the N5 generation was achieved on days 188 and 190 and the proportion of B6-homozygous loci was 100% (74 markers and 97.7% (172/176 markers, respectively. For the KI strain, N4 was achieved on day 151, all the 86 markers being B6-homozygous as early as on day 106 at N3. The carrier males at the final generation were all fertile and propagated the modified genes. Thus, three congenic strains were established through rapid generation turnover between 41 and 44 days. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This new high-speed breeding strategy enables us to produce congenic strains within about half a year. It should provide the fastest protocol for precise definition of the phenotypic effects of genes of interest on desired genetic backgrounds.

  18. A high-speed congenic strategy using first-wave male germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogonuki, Narumi; Inoue, Kimiko; Hirose, Michiko; Miura, Ikuo; Mochida, Keiji; Sato, Takahiro; Mise, Nathan; Mekada, Kazuyuki; Yoshiki, Atsushi; Abe, Kuniya; Kurihara, Hiroki; Wakana, Shigeharu; Ogura, Atsuo

    2009-01-01

    In laboratory mice and rats, congenic breeding is essential for analyzing the genes of interest on specific genetic backgrounds and for analyzing quantitative trait loci. However, in theory it takes about 3-4 years to achieve a strain carrying about 99% of the recipient genome at the tenth backcrossing (N10). Even with marker-assisted selection, the so-called 'speed congenic strategy', it takes more than a year at N4 or N5. Here we describe a new high-speed congenic system using round spermatids retrieved from immature males (22-25 days of age). We applied the technique to three genetically modified strains of mice: transgenic (TG), knockin (KI) and N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced mutants. The donor mice had mixed genetic backgrounds of C57BL/6 (B6):DBA/2 or B6:129 strains. At each generation, males used for backcrossing were selected based on polymorphic marker analysis and their round spermatids were injected into B6 strain oocytes. Backcrossing was repeated until N4 or N5. For the TG and ENU-mutant strains, the N5 generation was achieved on days 188 and 190 and the proportion of B6-homozygous loci was 100% (74 markers) and 97.7% (172/176 markers), respectively. For the KI strain, N4 was achieved on day 151, all the 86 markers being B6-homozygous as early as on day 106 at N3. The carrier males at the final generation were all fertile and propagated the modified genes. Thus, three congenic strains were established through rapid generation turnover between 41 and 44 days. This new high-speed breeding strategy enables us to produce congenic strains within about half a year. It should provide the fastest protocol for precise definition of the phenotypic effects of genes of interest on desired genetic backgrounds.

  19. Massively parallel single-amino-acid mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitzman, Jacob O; Starita, Lea M; Lo, Russell S; Fields, Stanley; Shendure, Jay

    2015-03-01

    Random mutagenesis methods only partially cover the mutational space and are constrained by DNA synthesis length limitations. Here we demonstrate programmed allelic series (PALS), a single-volume, site-directed mutagenesis approach using microarray-programmed oligonucleotides. We created libraries including nearly every missense mutation as singleton events for the yeast transcription factor Gal4 (99.9% coverage) and human tumor suppressor p53 (93.5%). PALS-based comprehensive missense mutational scans may aid structure-function studies, protein engineering, and the interpretation of variants identified by clinical sequencing.

  20. Massively Parallel Single Amino Acid Mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitzman, Jacob O.; Starita, Lea M.; Lo, Russell S.; Fields, Stanley; Shendure, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Random mutagenesis methods only partially cover the mutational space, and are constrained by DNA synthesis length limitations. Here, we demonstrate PALS, a single-volume, site-directed mutagenesis approach using microarray-programmed oligonucleotides. We created libraries including nearly every missense mutation as singleton events for the yeast transcription factor Gal4 (99.9% coverage) and human tumor suppressor p53 (93.5%). PALS-based comprehensive missense mutational scans may aid structure-function studies, protein engineering, and the interpretation of variants identified by clinical sequencing. PMID:25559584

  1. REPLACR-mutagenesis, a one-step method for site-directed mutagenesis by recombineering

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Trehan, Ashutosh; Kiełbus, Michał; Czapinski, Jakub; Stepulak, Andrzej; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Rivero-Müller, Adolfo

    2016-01-01

    .... Most of the current methods for mutagenesis involve multiple step procedures. One of the most accurate methods for genetically altering DNA is recombineering, which uses bacteria expressing viral recombination proteins...

  2. A splice site mutation in laminin-α2 results in a severe muscular dystrophy and growth abnormalities in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana A Gupta

    Full Text Available Congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited muscle disorders. In patients, muscle weakness is usually present at or shortly after birth and is progressive in nature. Merosin deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (MDC1A is a form of CMD caused by a defect in the laminin-α2 gene (LAMA2. Laminin-α2 is an extracellular matrix protein that interacts with the dystrophin-dystroglycan (DGC complex in membranes providing stability to muscle fibers. In an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis screen to develop zebrafish models of neuromuscular diseases, we identified a mutant fish that exhibits severe muscular dystrophy early in development. Genetic mapping identified a splice site mutation in the lama2 gene. This splice site is highly conserved in humans and this mutation results in mis-splicing of RNA and a loss of protein function. Homozygous lama2 mutant zebrafish, designated lama2(cl501/cl501, exhibited reduced motor function and progressive degeneration of skeletal muscles and died at 8-15 days post fertilization. The skeletal muscles exhibited damaged myosepta and detachment of myofibers in the affected fish. Laminin-α2 deficiency also resulted in growth defects in the brain and eye of the mutant fish. This laminin-α2 deficient mutant fish represents a novel disease model to develop therapies for modulating splicing defects in congenital muscular dystrophies and to restore the muscle function in human patients with CMD.

  3. Mice with alopecia, osteoporosis, and systemic amyloidosis due to mutation in Zdhhc13, a gene coding for palmitoyl acyltransferase.

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    Amir N Saleem

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Protein palmitoylation has emerged as an important mechanism for regulating protein trafficking, stability, and protein-protein interactions; however, its relevance to disease processes is not clear. Using a genome-wide, phenotype driven N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-mediated mutagenesis screen, we identified mice with failure to thrive, shortened life span, skin and hair abnormalities including alopecia, severe osteoporosis, and systemic amyloidosis (both AA and AL amyloids depositions. Whole-genome homozygosity mapping with 295 SNP markers and fine mapping with an additional 50 SNPs localized the disease gene to chromosome 7 between 53.9 and 56.3 Mb. A nonsense mutation (c.1273A>T was located in exon 12 of the Zdhhc13 gene (Zinc finger, DHHC domain containing 13, a gene coding for palmitoyl transferase. The mutation predicted a truncated protein (R425X, and real-time PCR showed markedly reduced Zdhhc13 mRNA. A second gene trap allele of Zdhhc13 has the same phenotypes, suggesting that this is a loss of function allele. This is the first report that palmitoyl transferase deficiency causes a severe phenotype, and it establishes a direct link between protein palmitoylation and regulation of diverse physiologic functions where its absence can result in profound disease pathology. This mouse model can be used to investigate mechanisms where improper palmitoylation leads to disease processes and to understand molecular mechanisms underlying human alopecia, osteoporosis, and amyloidosis and many other neurodegenerative diseases caused by protein misfolding and amyloidosis.

  4. ER stress-mediated apoptosis in a new mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas S Lisse

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Osteogenesis imperfecta is an inherited disorder characterized by increased bone fragility, fractures, and osteoporosis, and most cases are caused by mutations affecting the type I collagen genes. Here, we describe a new mouse model for Osteogenesis imperfecta termed Aga2 (abnormal gait 2 that was isolated from the Munich N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis program and exhibited phenotypic variability, including reduced bone mass, multiple fractures, and early lethality. The causal gene was mapped to Chromosome 11 by linkage analysis, and a C-terminal frameshift mutation was identified in the Col1a1 (procollagen type I, alpha 1 gene as the cause of the disorder. Aga2 heterozygous animals had markedly increased bone turnover and a disrupted native collagen network. Further studies showed that abnormal proalpha1(I chains accumulated intracellularly in Aga2/+ dermal fibroblasts and were poorly secreted extracellularly. This was associated with the induction of an endoplasmic reticulum stress-specific unfolded protein response involving upregulation of BiP, Hsp47, and Gadd153 with caspases-12 and -3 activation and apoptosis of osteoblasts both in vitro and in vivo. These studies resulted in the identification of a new model for Osteogenesis imperfecta, and identified a role for intracellular modulation of the endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated unfolded protein response machinery toward osteoblast apoptosis during the pathogenesis of disease.

  5. Disorders of sex development: new genes, new concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Makoto; Harley, Vincent R

    2013-02-01

    Formerly known as 'intersex' conditions, disorders of sex development (DSDs) are congenital conditions in which chromosomal, gonadal or anatomical sex is atypical. A complete revision of the nomenclature and classification of DSDs has been undertaken, which emphasizes the genetic aetiology of these disorders and discards pejorative terms. Uptake of the new terminology is widespread. DSDs affecting gonadal development are perhaps the least well understood. Unravelling the molecular mechanisms underlying gonadal development has revealed new causes of DSDs, although a specific molecular diagnosis is made in only ∼20% of patients. Conversely, identification of the molecular causes of DSDs has provided insight into the mechanisms of gonadal development. Studies of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis in the mouse, and multigene diagnostic screening and genome-wide approaches, such as array-comparative genomic hybridization and next-generation sequencing, in patients with DSDs are accelerating the discovery of genes involved in gonadal development and DSDs. Furthermore, long-range gene regulatory mutations and multiple gene mutations are emerging as new causes of DSDs. Patients with DSDs, their parents and medical staff are confronted with challenging decisions regarding gender assignment, genital surgery and lifelong care. These advances are refining prognostic prediction and systematically improving the diagnosis and long-term management of children with DSDs.

  6. Ovarian aromatase loss-of-function mutant medaka undergo ovary degeneration and partial female-to-male sex reversal after puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamoto, Masatoshi; Shibata, Yasushi; Ohno, Kaoru; Usami, Takeshi; Kamei, Yasuhiro; Taniguchi, Yoshihito; Todo, Takeshi; Sakamoto, Takashi; Young, Graham; Swanson, Penny; Naruse, Kiyoshi; Nagahama, Yoshitaka

    2018-01-15

    Although estrogens have been generally considered to play a critical role in ovarian differentiation in non-mammalian vertebrates, the specific functions of estrogens during ovarian differentiation remain unclear. We isolated two mutants with premature stops in the ovarian aromatase (cyp19a1) gene from an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-based gene-driven mutagenesis library of the medaka, Oryzias latipes. In XX mutants, gonads first differentiated into normal ovaries containing many ovarian follicles that failed to accumulate yolk. Subsequently, ovarian tissues underwent extensive degeneration, followed by the appearance of testicular tissues on the dorsal side of ovaries. In the newly formed testicular tissue, strong expression of gsdf was detected in sox9a2-positive somatic cells surrounding germline stem cells suggesting that gsdf plays an important role in testicular differentiation during estrogen-depleted female-to-male sex reversal. We conclude that endogenous estrogens synthesized after fertilization are not essential for early ovarian differentiation but are critical for the maintenance of adult ovaries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A mutation in the mitochondrial fission gene Dnm1l leads to cardiomyopathy.

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    Houman Ashrafian

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in a number of genes have been linked to inherited dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM. However, such mutations account for only a small proportion of the clinical cases emphasising the need for alternative discovery approaches to uncovering novel pathogenic mutations in hitherto unidentified pathways. Accordingly, as part of a large-scale N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis screen, we identified a mouse mutant, Python, which develops DCM. We demonstrate that the Python phenotype is attributable to a dominant fully penetrant mutation in the dynamin-1-like (Dnm1l gene, which has been shown to be critical for mitochondrial fission. The C452F mutation is in a highly conserved region of the M domain of Dnm1l that alters protein interactions in a yeast two-hybrid system, suggesting that the mutation might alter intramolecular interactions within the Dnm1l monomer. Heterozygous Python fibroblasts exhibit abnormal mitochondria and peroxisomes. Homozygosity for the mutation results in the death of embryos midway though gestation. Heterozygous Python hearts show reduced levels of mitochondria enzyme complexes and suffer from cardiac ATP depletion. The resulting energy deficiency may contribute to cardiomyopathy. This is the first demonstration that a defect in a gene involved in mitochondrial remodelling can result in cardiomyopathy, showing that the function of this gene is needed for the maintenance of normal cellular function in a relatively tissue-specific manner. This disease model attests to the importance of mitochondrial remodelling in the heart; similar defects might underlie human heart muscle disease.

  8. Histological Characterization of the Dicer1 Mutant Zebrafish Retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Akhtar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DICER1, a multidomain RNase III endoribonuclease, plays a critical role in microRNA (miRNA and RNA-interference (RNAi functional pathways. Loss of Dicer1 affects different developmental processes. Dicer1 is essential for retinal development and maintenance. DICER1 was recently shown to have another function of silencing the toxicity of Alu RNAs in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE cells, which are involved in the pathogenesis of age related macular degeneration. In this study, we characterized a Dicer1 mutant fish line, which carries a nonsense mutation (W1457Ter induced by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis. Zebrafish DICER1 protein is highly conserved in the evolution. Zebrafish Dicer1 is expressed at the earliest stages of zebrafish development and persists into late developmental stages; it is widely expressed in adult tissues. Homozygous Dicer1 mutant fish (DICER1W1457Ter/W1457Ter have an arrest in early growth with significantly smaller eyes and are dead at 14–18 dpf. Heterozygous Dicer1 mutant fish have similar retinal structure to that of control fish; the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE cells are normal with no sign of degeneration at the age of 20 months.

  9. A missense mutation in Rev7 disrupts formation of Polζ, impairing mouse development and repair of genotoxic agent-induced DNA lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaj, Maryam; Abbasi, Abdolrahim; Yamanishi, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Kouyou; Wakitani, Shuso; Kikuchi, Sotaro; Hirose, Michiko; Yuzuriha, Misako; Magari, Masaki; Degheidy, Heba A; Abe, Kuniya; Ogura, Atsuo; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Kunieda, Tetsuo

    2014-02-07

    Repro22 is a mutant mouse produced via N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mutagenesis that shows sterility with germ cell depletion caused by defective proliferation of primordial germ cells, decreased body weight, and partial lethality during embryonic development. Using a positional cloning strategy, we identified a missense mutation in Rev7/Mad2l2 (Rev7(C70R)) and confirmed that the mutation is the cause of the defects in repro22 mice through transgenic rescue with normal Rev7. Rev7/Mad2l2 encodes a subunit of DNA polymerase ζ (Polζ), 1 of 10 translesion DNA synthesis polymerases known in mammals. The mutant REV7 did not interact with REV3, the catalytic subunit of Polζ. Rev7(C70R/C70R) cells showed decreased proliferation, increased apoptosis, and arrest in S phase with extensive γH2AX foci in nuclei that indicated accumulation of DNA damage after treatment with the genotoxic agent mitomycin C. The Rev7(C70R) mutation does not affect the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint. These results demonstrated that Rev7 is essential in resolving the replication stalls caused by DNA damage during S phase. We concluded that Rev7 is required for primordial germ cell proliferation and embryonic viability and development through the translesion DNA synthesis activity of Polζ preserving DNA integrity during cell proliferation, which is required in highly proliferating embryonic cells.

  10. Long-distance effects of insertional mutagenesis.

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    Ruchi Singhal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Most common systems of genetic engineering of mammalian cells are associated with insertional mutagenesis of the modified cells. Insertional mutagenesis is also a popular approach to generate random alterations for gene discovery projects. A better understanding of the interaction of the structural elements within an insertional mutagen and the ability of such elements to influence host genes at various distances away from the insertion site is a matter of considerable practical importance.We observed that, in the context of a lentiviral construct, a transcript, which is initiated at an internal CMV promoter/enhancer region and incorporates a splice donor site, is able to extend past a collinear viral LTR and trap exons of host genes, while the polyadenylation signal, which is naturally present in the LTR, is spliced out. Unexpectedly, when a vector, which utilizes this phenomenon, was used to produce mutants with elevated activity of NF-κB, we found mutants, which owed their phenotype to the effect of the insert on a gene located tens or even hundreds of kilobases away from the insertion site. This effect did not result from a CMV-driven transcript, but was sensitive to functional suppression of the insert. Interestingly, despite the long-distance effect, expression of loci most closely positioned to the insert appeared unaffected.We concluded that a polyadenylation signal in a retroviral LTR, when occurring within an intron, is an inefficient barrier against the formation of a hybrid transcript, and that a vector containing a strong enhancer may selectively affect the function of genes far away from its insertion site. These phenomena have to be considered when experimental or therapeutic transduction is performed. In particular, the long-distance effects of insertional mutagenesis bring into question the relevance of the lists of disease-associated retroviral integration targets, which did not undergo functional validation.

  11. mRNA processing in mutant zebrafish lines generated by chemical and CRISPR-mediated mutagenesis produces unexpected transcripts that escape nonsense-mediated decay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Anderson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available As model organism-based research shifts from forward to reverse genetics approaches, largely due to the ease of genome editing technology, a low frequency of abnormal phenotypes is being observed in lines with mutations predicted to lead to deleterious effects on the encoded protein. In zebrafish, this low frequency is in part explained by compensation by genes of redundant or similar function, often resulting from the additional round of teleost-specific whole genome duplication within vertebrates. Here we offer additional explanations for the low frequency of mutant phenotypes. We analyzed mRNA processing in seven zebrafish lines with mutations expected to disrupt gene function, generated by CRISPR/Cas9 or ENU mutagenesis methods. Five of the seven lines showed evidence of altered mRNA processing: one through a skipped exon that did not lead to a frame shift, one through nonsense-associated splicing that did not lead to a frame shift, and three through the use of cryptic splice sites. These results highlight the need for a methodical analysis of the mRNA produced in mutant lines before making conclusions or embarking on studies that assume loss of function as a result of a given genomic change. Furthermore, recognition of the types of adaptations that can occur may inform the strategies of mutant generation.

  12. Perspective on mutagenesis and repair: the standard model and alternate modes of mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jeffrey H

    2005-01-01

    The basic ideas of replication, mutagenesis, and repair have outlined a picture of how point mutations occur that has provided a valuable framework for theory and experiment, much as the Standard Model of particle physics has done for our concept of fundamental particles. However, alternative modes of mutagenesis are being defined that are changing our perspective of the "Standard Model" of mutagenesis, requiring an expanded model. The genome is now envisioned as being in dynamic equilibrium between a multitude of forces for mutational change and forces that counteract such change. By maintaining a delicate balance between these forces, cells avoid unwanted or excessive mutations. Yet, cells allow mutagenesis to occur under certain conditions. We can define an emerging paradigm. Namely, mechanisms exist that can direct point mutations to specific designated genes or regions of genes. In some cases, this is achieved by specific enzymes, and in other cases high mutability is programmed into the sequence of certain genes to help generate diversity. In yet additional cases, general mutability is increased under stress, and selective forces allow the recovery of favorable mutants.

  13. Novel allelic mutations in murine Serca2 induce differential development of squamous cell tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toki, Hideaki; Minowa, Osamu; Inoue, Maki; Motegi, Hiromi; Karashima, Yuko; Ikeda, Ami [Team for Advanced Development and Evaluation of Human Disease Models, Riken BioResource Center (BRC), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Kaneda, Hideki [Technology and Development Team for Mouse Phenotype Analysis, Riken BRC, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Sakuraba, Yoshiyuki [Mutagenesis and Genomics Team, Riken BRC, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Saiki, Yuriko [Department of Molecular Pathology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan); Wakana, Shigeharu [Technology and Development Team for Mouse Phenotype Analysis, Riken BRC, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Suzuki, Hiroshi [Department of Biochemistry, Asahikawa Medical University, Asahikawa, Hokkaido (Japan); Gondo, Yoichi [Mutagenesis and Genomics Team, Riken BRC, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Shiroishi, Toshihiko [Mammalian Genetics Laboratory, National Institute of Genetics, Mishima, Shizuoka (Japan); Noda, Tetsuo, E-mail: tnoda@jfcr.or.jp [Team for Advanced Development and Evaluation of Human Disease Models, Riken BioResource Center (BRC), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Cell Biology, Cancer Institute, The Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-08-05

    Dominant mutations in the Serca2 gene, which encodes sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase, predispose mice to gastrointestinal epithelial carcinoma [1–4] and humans to Darier disease (DD) [14–17]. In this study, we generated mice harboring N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced allelic mutations in Serca2: three missense mutations and one nonsense mutation. Mice harboring these Serca2 mutations developed tumors that were categorized as either early onset squamous cell tumors (SCT), with development similar to null-type knockout mice [2,4] (aggressive form; M682, M814), or late onset tumors (mild form; M1049, M1162). Molecular analysis showed no aberration in Serca2 mRNA or protein expression levels in normal esophageal cells of any of the four mutant heterozygotes. There was no loss of heterozygosity at the Serca2 locus in the squamous cell carcinomas in any of the four lines. The effect of each mutation on Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase activity was predicted using atomic-structure models and accumulated mutated protein studies, suggesting that putative complete loss of Serca2 enzymatic activity may lead to early tumor onset, whereas mutations in which Serca2 retains residual enzymatic activity result in late onset. We propose that impaired Serca2 gene product activity has a long-term effect on squamous cell carcinogenesis from onset to the final carcinoma stage through an as-yet unrecognized but common regulatory pathway. -- Highlights: •Novel mutations in murine Serca2 caused early onset or late onset of tumorigenesis. •They also caused higher or lower incidence of Darier Disease phenotype. •3D structure model suggested the former mutations led to severer defect on ATPase. •Driver gene mutations via long-range effect on Ca2+ distributions are suggested.

  14. Erythrocytic Iron Deficiency Enhances Susceptibility to Plasmodium chabaudi Infection in Mice Carrying a Missense Mutation in Transferrin Receptor 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelliott, Patrick M.; McMorran, Brendan J.; Foote, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of iron deficiency in areas of high malaria transmission is complicated by evidence which suggests that iron deficiency anemia protects against malaria, while iron supplementation increases malaria risk. Iron deficiency anemia results in an array of pathologies, including reduced systemic iron bioavailability and abnormal erythrocyte physiology; however, the mechanisms by which these pathologies influence malaria infection are not well defined. In the present study, the response to malaria infection was examined in a mutant mouse line, TfrcMRI24910, identified during an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) screen. This line carries a missense mutation in the gene for transferrin receptor 1 (TFR1). Heterozygous mice exhibited reduced erythrocyte volume and density, a phenotype consistent with dietary iron deficiency anemia. However, unlike the case in dietary deficiency, the erythrocyte half-life, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, and intraerythrocytic ferritin content were unchanged. Systemic iron bioavailability was also unchanged, indicating that this mutation results in erythrocytic iron deficiency without significantly altering overall iron homeostasis. When infected with the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium chabaudi adami, mice displayed increased parasitemia and succumbed to infection more quickly than their wild-type littermates. Transfusion of fluorescently labeled erythrocytes into malaria parasite-infected mice demonstrated an erythrocyte-autonomous enhanced survival of parasites within mutant erythrocytes. Together, these results indicate that TFR1 deficiency alters erythrocyte physiology in a way that is similar to dietary iron deficiency anemia, albeit to a lesser degree, and that this promotes intraerythrocytic parasite survival and an increased susceptibility to malaria in mice. These findings may have implications for the management of iron deficiency in the context of malaria. PMID:26303393

  15. B-1a transitional cells are phenotypically distinct and are lacking in mice deficient in IκBNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Gabriel K.; Àdori, Monika; Khoenkhoen, Sharesta; Dosenovic, Pia; Beutler, Bruce; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B.

    2014-01-01

    B-1 cells mediate early protection against infection by responding to T cell-independent (TI) antigens found on the surface of various pathogens. Mice with impaired expression of the atypical IκB protein IκBNS have markedly reduced frequencies of B-1 cells. We used a mouse strain with dysfunctional IκBNS derived from an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) screen, named bumble, to investigate the point in the development of B-1 cells where IκBNS is required. The presence of wild-type (wt) peritoneal cells in mixed wt/bumble chimeras did not rescue the development of bumble B-1 cells, but wt peritoneal cells transferred to bumble mice restored natural IgM levels and response to TI antigens. The bumble and wt mice displayed similar levels of fetal liver B-1 progenitors and splenic neonatal transitional B (TrB) cells, both of which were previously shown to give rise to B-1 cells. Interestingly, we found that a subset of wt neonatal TrB cells expressed common B-1a markers (TrB-1a) and that this cell population was absent in the bumble neonatal spleen. Sorted TrB-1a (CD93+IgM+CD5+) cells exclusively generated B-1a cells when adoptively transferred, whereas sorted CD93+IgM+CD5− cells gave rise to B-2 cells and, to a lesser extent, B-1b and B-1a cells. This study identifies a phenotypically distinct splenic population of TrB-1a cells and establishes that the development of B-1a cells is blocked before this stage in the absence of IκBNS. PMID:25228759

  16. Efficient multi-site-directed mutagenesis directly from genomic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this article, the traditional multi-site-directed mutagenesis method based on overlap extension PCR was improved specifically for complicated templates, such as genomic sequence or complementary DNA. This method was effectively applied for multi-site-directed mutagenesis directly from mouse genomic DNA, as well ...

  17. Scoring function to predict solubility mutagenesis

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    Deutsch Christopher

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutagenesis is commonly used to engineer proteins with desirable properties not present in the wild type (WT protein, such as increased or decreased stability, reactivity, or solubility. Experimentalists often have to choose a small subset of mutations from a large number of candidates to obtain the desired change, and computational techniques are invaluable to make the choices. While several such methods have been proposed to predict stability and reactivity mutagenesis, solubility has not received much attention. Results We use concepts from computational geometry to define a three body scoring function that predicts the change in protein solubility due to mutations. The scoring function captures both sequence and structure information. By exploring the literature, we have assembled a substantial database of 137 single- and multiple-point solubility mutations. Our database is the largest such collection with structural information known so far. We optimize the scoring function using linear programming (LP methods to derive its weights based on training. Starting with default values of 1, we find weights in the range [0,2] so that predictions of increase or decrease in solubility are optimized. We compare the LP method to the standard machine learning techniques of support vector machines (SVM and the Lasso. Using statistics for leave-one-out (LOO, 10-fold, and 3-fold cross validations (CV for training and prediction, we demonstrate that the LP method performs the best overall. For the LOOCV, the LP method has an overall accuracy of 81%. Availability Executables of programs, tables of weights, and datasets of mutants are available from the following web page: http://www.wsu.edu/~kbala/OptSolMut.html.

  18. Fast homozygosity mapping and identification of a zebrafish ENU-induced mutation by whole-genome sequencing.

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    Marianne L Voz

    Full Text Available Forward genetics using zebrafish is a powerful tool for studying vertebrate development through large-scale mutagenesis. Nonetheless, the identification of the molecular lesion is still laborious and involves time-consuming genetic mapping. Here, we show that high-throughput sequencing of the whole zebrafish genome can directly locate the interval carrying the causative mutation and at the same time pinpoint the molecular lesion. The feasibility of this approach was validated by sequencing the m1045 mutant line that displays a severe hypoplasia of the exocrine pancreas. We generated 13 Gb of sequence, equivalent to an eightfold genomic coverage, from a pool of 50 mutant embryos obtained from a map-cross between the AB mutant carrier and the WIK polymorphic strain. The chromosomal region carrying the causal mutation was localized based on its unique property to display high levels of homozygosity among sequence reads as it derives exclusively from the initial AB mutated allele. We developed an algorithm identifying such a region by calculating a homozygosity score along all chromosomes. This highlighted an 8-Mb window on chromosome 5 with a score close to 1 in the m1045 mutants. The sequence analysis of all genes within this interval revealed a nonsense mutation in the snapc4 gene. Knockdown experiments confirmed the assertion that snapc4 is the gene whose mutation leads to exocrine pancreas hypoplasia. In conclusion, this study constitutes a proof-of-concept that whole-genome sequencing is a fast and effective alternative to the classical positional cloning strategies in zebrafish.

  19. Mechanisms of retroviral integration and mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavazza, Alessia; Moiani, Arianna; Mavilio, Fulvio

    2013-02-01

    Gene transfer vectors derived from oncoretroviruses or lentiviruses are the most robust and reliable tools to stably integrate therapeutic transgenes in human cells for clinical applications. Integration of these vectors in the genome may, however, have undesired effects caused by insertional deregulation of gene expression at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level. The occurrence of severe adverse events in several clinical trials involving the transplantation of stem cells genetically corrected with retroviral vectors showed that insertional mutagenesis is not just a theoretical event, and that retroviral transgenesis is associated with a finite risk of genotoxicity. In addressing these issues, the gene therapy community offered a spectacular example of how scientific knowledge and technology can be put to work to understand the causes of unpredicted side effects, design new vectors, and develop tools and models to predict their safety and efficacy. As an added benefit, these efforts brought new basic knowledge on virus-host interactions and on the biology and dynamics of human somatic stem cells. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the interactions between retroviruses and the human genome and addresses the impact of target site selection on the safety of retroviral vector-mediated gene therapy.

  20. History of attempts to quantify environmental mutagenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollaender, A.

    1981-01-01

    It became obvious in the early 1960's that the ready recognition of mutations produced by chemicals could have a profound influence on the refinement of methods to detect environmental mutagens. The experience derived over the previous 30 years in characterizing the effects of ionizing and ultraviolet radiation on the genetic mechanism came to serve us in good stead. Although the effects of chemicals are considerably more complicated and often require the analysis of individual substances, nonetheless, the area has developed rapidly in recent decades. The establishment and historical background of the International Association of Environmental Mutagen Societies (IAEMS) will be discussed. An attempt at the quantitation of chemical effects has been developed in comparison with radiation mutagenesis. As a first step, a definition of the Mutagen Burden or unavoidable exposure to chemicals will be discussed. A mathematical approach (Haynes/Eckhardt) will be considered and finally an outline for the comprehensive investigation of detailed interscience study will be made of less than six chemicals.

  1. A targeted mutagenesis system for Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulks, M H; Buysse, J M

    1995-11-07

    We describe methods for the mutagenesis of cloned Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (Ap) genes and for the construction of Ap mutants by allelic exchange. We used these methods to construct isogenic mutants of Ap which no longer synthesized a 48-kDa outer membrane protein (AopA). The native aopA locus was replaced with a mutated locus that had been inactivated by insertion of a gene (KmR) encoding kanamycin resistance from Tn903. The inactivated aopA locus was cloned into a conjugative, R6K-derived, lambda pir-dependent suicide vector and introduced into Ap using a filtermating technique. Southern and Western blot analyses indicated that the wild-type locus was replaced by the mutated locus through either single- or double-crossover events, and that AopA was no longer produced by either type of mutant. These methods were used successfully to construct AopA- mutants in Ap serotypes 1 and 5. These methods should be generally useful in constructing mutant loci which can be used to analyze the roles of various Ap genes in the pathogenesis of contagious pleuropneumonia in swine.

  2. Genomic approaches to DNA repair and mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrick, John J; Roberts, Steven A

    2015-12-01

    DNA damage is a constant threat to cells, causing cytotoxicity as well as inducing genetic alterations. The steady-state abundance of DNA lesions in a cell is minimized by a variety of DNA repair mechanisms, including DNA strand break repair, mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair, base excision repair, and ribonucleotide excision repair. The efficiencies and mechanisms by which these pathways remove damage from chromosomes have been primarily characterized by investigating the processing of lesions at defined genomic loci, among bulk genomic DNA, on episomal DNA constructs, or using in vitro substrates. However, the structure of a chromosome is heterogeneous, consisting of heavily protein-bound heterochromatic regions, open regulatory regions, actively transcribed genes, and even areas of transient single stranded DNA. Consequently, DNA repair pathways function in a much more diverse set of chromosomal contexts than can be readily assessed using previous methods. Recent efforts to develop whole genome maps of DNA damage, repair processes, and even mutations promise to greatly expand our understanding of DNA repair and mutagenesis. Here we review the current efforts to utilize whole genome maps of DNA damage and mutation to understand how different chromosomal contexts affect DNA excision repair pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Symposium on molecular and cellular mechanisms of mutagenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    These proceedings contain abstracts only of the 21 papers presented at the Sympsoium. The papers dealt with molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis and cellular responses to chemical and physical mutagenic agents. (ERB)

  4. The Roles of UmuD in Regulating Mutagenesis

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    Jaylene N. Ollivierre

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available All organisms are subject to DNA damage from both endogenous and environmental sources. DNA damage that is not fully repaired can lead to mutations. Mutagenesis is now understood to be an active process, in part facilitated by lower-fidelity DNA polymerases that replicate DNA in an error-prone manner. Y-family DNA polymerases, found throughout all domains of life, are characterized by their lower fidelity on undamaged DNA and their specialized ability to copy damaged DNA. Two E. coli Y-family DNA polymerases are responsible for copying damaged DNA as well as for mutagenesis. These DNA polymerases interact with different forms of UmuD, a dynamic protein that regulates mutagenesis. The UmuD gene products, regulated by the SOS response, exist in two principal forms: UmuD2, which prevents mutagenesis, and UmuD2′, which facilitates UV-induced mutagenesis. This paper focuses on the multiple conformations of the UmuD gene products and how their protein interactions regulate mutagenesis.

  5. Environmental stress induces trinucleotide repeat mutagenesis in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Lin, Yunfu; Santillan, Beatriz A.; Yotnda, Patricia; Wilson, John H.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic mutability of microsatellite repeats is implicated in the modification of gene function and disease phenotype. Studies of the enhanced instability of long trinucleotide repeats (TNRs)—the cause of multiple human diseases—have revealed a remarkable complexity of mutagenic mechanisms. Here, we show that cold, heat, hypoxic, and oxidative stresses induce mutagenesis of a long CAG repeat tract in human cells. We show that stress-response factors mediate the stress-induced mutagenesis (SIM) of CAG repeats. We show further that SIM of CAG repeats does not involve mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair, or transcription, processes that are known to promote TNR mutagenesis in other pathways of instability. Instead, we find that these stresses stimulate DNA rereplication, increasing the proportion of cells with >4 C-value (C) DNA content. Knockdown of the replication origin-licensing factor CDT1 eliminates both stress-induced rereplication and CAG repeat mutagenesis. In addition, direct induction of rereplication in the absence of stress also increases the proportion of cells with >4C DNA content and promotes repeat mutagenesis. Thus, environmental stress triggers a unique pathway for TNR mutagenesis that likely is mediated by DNA rereplication. This pathway may impact normal cells as they encounter stresses in their environment or during development or abnormal cells as they evolve metastatic potential. PMID:25775519

  6. The ENU-induced cetus mutation reveals an essential role of the DNA helicase DDX11 for mesoderm development during early mouse embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cota, Christina D; García-García, María J

    2012-08-01

    DDX11 is a DNA helicase of the conserved FANCJ/RAD3/XPD family involved in maintaining genome stability. Studies in yeast and humans have shown requirements for DDX11 in sister chromatid cohesion and DNA repair. In mouse, loss of Ddx11 results in embryonic lethality. However, the developmental defects of Ddx11 mutants are poorly understood. We describe the characterization and positional cloning of cetus, a mouse ENU-induced mutation in Ddx11. We demonstrate that cetus causes a nonconservative amino acid change in DDX11 motif V and that this mutation is a null allele of Ddx11. cetus mutant embryos failed to thrive beyond embryonic day 8.5 and displayed placental defects similar to those described in Ddx11 null embryos. Additionally, our characterization of Ddx11(cetus) mutants identified embryonic phenotypes that had not been previously reported in Ddx11(KO) embryos, including loss of somitic mesoderm, an open kinked neural tube and abnormal heart looping. We show that loss of Ddx11 causes widespread apoptosis from early embryonic stages and that loss of Ddx11 disrupts somitic mesoderm more dramatically than other embryonic cells. Our results identify novel roles of Ddx11 during embryo morphogenesis and demonstrate that the activity of its motif V is essential for DDX11 function. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Genetic and physiological factors affecting repair and mutagenesis in yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemontt, J F

    1979-01-01

    Current views of DNA repair and mutagenesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are discussed in the light of recent data, and with emphasis on the isolation and characterization of genetically well-defined mutations that affect DNA metabolism in general (including replication and recombination). Various pathways of repair are described particularly in relation to their involvement in mutagenic mechanisms. In addition to genetic control, certain physiological factors such as cell age, DNA replication, and the regulatory state of the mating-type locus, are shown to also play a role in repair and mutagenesis.

  8. Genetic and physiological factors affecting repair and mutagenesis in yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemontt, J F

    1979-01-01

    Current views of DNA repair and mutagenesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are discussed in the light of recent data and with emphasis on the isolation and characterization of genetically well-defined mutations that affect DNA metabolism in general (including replication and recombination). Various pathways of repair are described, particularly in relation to their imvolvement in mutagenic mechanisms. In addition to genetic control, certain physiological factors such as cell age, DNA replication, and the regulatory state of the mating-type locus are shown to also play a role in repair and mutagenesis.

  9. Mechanisms of Resistance to NTRK Inhibitors and Therapeutic Strategies in NTRK1-Rearranged Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuse, Miho J; Okada, Koutaroh; Oh-Hara, Tomoko; Ogura, Hayato; Fujita, Naoya; Katayama, Ryohei

    2017-10-01

    Neurotrophic receptor tyrosine kinase 1 ( NTRK1 ) gene rearrangement leads to constitutive activation of NTRK1, which induces high-transforming ability. NTRK-rearranged cancers have been identified in several cancer types, such as glioblastoma, non-small cell lung cancer, and colorectal cancer. Although there are currently no clinically approved inhibitors that target NTRK1, several tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), such as entrectinib and LOXO-101, are in clinical trials. The purpose of this study was to identify potential mechanisms of resistance to NTRK inhibitors and find potential therapeutic strategies to overcome the resistance. We examined the sensitivity of TPM3-NTRK1-transformed Ba/F3 cells and TPM3-NTRK1-harboring KM12 cells to multiple NTRK inhibitors. Acquired NTRK inhibitor-resistant mutations were screened by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis with Ba/F3-TPM3-NTRK1 cells or by the establishment of NTRK-TKI-resistant cells from KM12 cells continuously treated with NTRK-TKIs. We identified multiple novel NTRK-TKI resistance mutations in the NTRK1 kinase domain, including G595R, and insulin growth factor receptor type 1 (IGF1R) bypass pathway-mediated resistance. After identifying the resistance mechanisms, we performed drug screening with small-molecule inhibitors to overcome the resistance. As a result, we found that ponatinib and nintedanib effectively inhibited the survival of TPM3-NTRK1-G667C but not G595R mutants, both of which showed resistance to entrectinib or larotrectinib (LOXO-101). Furthermore, cabozantinib with an IGF1R inhibitor such as OSI-906 could overcome bypass pathway-mediated resistance. We developed a comprehensive model of acquired resistance to NTRK inhibitors in cancer with NTRK1 rearrangement and identified cabozantinib as a therapeutic strategy to overcome the resistance. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(10); 2130-43. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. A mutation in Nischarin causes otitis media via LIMK1 and NF-κB pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Crompton

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Otitis media (OM, inflammation of the middle ear (ME, is a common cause of conductive hearing impairment. Despite the importance of the disease, the aetiology of chronic and recurrent forms of middle ear inflammatory disease remains poorly understood. Studies of the human population suggest that there is a significant genetic component predisposing to the development of chronic OM, although the underlying genes are largely unknown. Using N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis we identified a recessive mouse mutant, edison, that spontaneously develops a conductive hearing loss due to chronic OM. The causal mutation was identified as a missense change, L972P, in the Nischarin (NISCH gene. edison mice develop a serous or granulocytic effusion, increasingly macrophage and neutrophil rich with age, along with a thickened, inflamed mucoperiosteum. We also identified a second hypomorphic allele, V33A, with only modest increases in auditory thresholds and reduced incidence of OM. NISCH interacts with several proteins, including ITGA5 that is thought to have a role in modulating VEGF-induced angiogenesis and vascularization. We identified a significant genetic interaction between Nisch and Itga5; mice heterozygous for Itga5-null and homozygous for edison mutations display a significantly increased penetrance and severity of chronic OM. In order to understand the pathological mechanisms underlying the OM phenotype, we studied interacting partners to NISCH along with downstream signalling molecules in the middle ear epithelia of edison mouse. Our analysis implicates PAK1 and RAC1, and downstream signalling in LIMK1 and NF-κB pathways in the development of chronic OM.

  11. Methods for targetted mutagenesis in gram-positive bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yunfeng

    2014-05-27

    The present invention provides a method of targeted mutagenesis in Gram-positive bacteria. In particular, the present invention provides a method that effectively integrates a suicide integrative vector into a target gene in the chromosome of a Gram-positive bacterium, resulting in inactivation of the target gene.

  12. Stationary-state mutagenesis in Escherichia coli: a model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Stationary-phase mutagenesis in nondividing E. coli cells exposed to a nonlethal stress was, a few years ago, claimed to be a likely case of a Lamarckian mechanism capable of producing exclusively useful mutations in a directed manner. After a heated debate over the last decade it now appears to involve a Darwinian ...

  13. Model building of a thermolysin-like protease by mutagenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frigerio, F; Margarit, [No Value; Nogarotto, R; Grandi, G; Vriend, G; Hardy, F; Veltman, OR; Venema, G; Eijsink, VGH

    The present study concerns the use of site-directed mutagenesis experiments to optimize a three-dimensional model of the neutral protease of Bacillus subtilis (NP-sub), An initial model of NP-sub was constructed using the crystal structures of the homologous neutral proteases of Bacillus

  14. Targeted mutagenesis using CRISPR/Cas in inbred potatoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targeted mutagenesis using sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs) has been well established in several important crop species, but is in need of improvement in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). For over a century, potatoes have been bred as autotetraploids (2n = 4x = 48), relying on F1 selections and clona...

  15. Effect of Colchicine Induced Mutagenesis on Growth and Yield of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemical mutagenesis through the use of colchicine on the seeds of two varieties of sesame (Sesamum indicum L. Var. Ex-Sudan and E-8) with the aim of inducing variability that could be exploited in the genetic improvement of its growth and yield was carried out. The sesame seeds were treated with colchicines at four ...

  16. A mariner transposon vector adapted for mutagenesis in oral streptococci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Martin; Christiansen, Natalia; Høiby, Niels

    2014-01-01

    ATs-pWV01, a selectable kanamycin resistance gene, a Himar1 transposase gene regulated by a xylose-inducible promoter, and an erythromycin resistance gene flanked by himar inverted repeats. The pMN100 plasmid was transformed into Streptococcus mutans UA159 and transposon mutagenesis was performed via...

  17. MtDNA mutagenesis impairs elimination of mitochondria during erythroid maturation leading to enhanced erythrocyte destruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahlqvist, K.J.; Leoncini, S.; Pecorelli, A.; Wortmann, S.B.; Ahola, S.; Forsstrom, S.; Guerranti, R.; Felice, C. De; Smeitink, J.; Ciccoli, L.; Hamalainen, R.H.; Suomalainen, A.

    2015-01-01

    Haematopoietic progenitor cells show special sensitivity to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutagenesis, which suggests that increased mtDNA mutagenesis could underlie anemias. Here we show that elevated mtDNA mutagenesis in mice with a proof-reading deficient mtDNA polymerase (PolG) leads to incomplete

  18. Mutagenesis breeding research of Lactobacillus brevis of nitrite reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Zeli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The pollution of nitrite in food became one of the focus of food safety issues,the use of biotechnology methods degrading nitrite became hotspot.The primitive strain was Lactobacillus brevis C2,preserved in our laboratory,had the ability to degrade nitrite,through composite mutagenesis of 15 W,254 nm,20 cm ultraviolet mutagenesis (UV for 120 s and 0.8% diethyl sulfate(DES in 37℃ mutation for 40 min,after screening,we successfully obtained high efficient strain of nitrite degradation,named UV6-DS2,relative to the starting strain,under the condition of 400 mg/L nitrite,after 12 h degradation,nitrite degradation rate increased from 92.8% to 97.8%,to explore its application in food was able to effectively reduce concentration of nitrite in food.

  19. Targeted mutagenesis in sea urchin embryos using TALENs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoi, Sayaka; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Sakamoto, Naoaki; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing with engineered nucleases such as zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) has been reported in various animals. We previously described ZFN-mediated targeted mutagenesis and insertion of reporter genes in sea urchin embryos. In this study, we demonstrate that TALENs can induce mutagenesis at specific genomic loci of sea urchin embryos. Injection of TALEN mRNAs targeting the HpEts transcription factor into fertilized eggs resulted in the impairment of skeletogenesis. Sequence analyses of the mutations showed that deletions and/or insertions occurred at the HpEts target site in the TALEN mRNAs-injected embryos. The results suggest that targeted gene disruption using TALENs is feasible in sea urchin embryos. © 2013 The Authors Development, Growth & Differentiation © 2013 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  20. UV-Induced DNA Damage and Mutagenesis in Chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Peng; Wyrick, John J; Roberts, Steven A; Smerdon, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    UV radiation induces photolesions that distort the DNA double helix and, if not repaired, can cause severe biological consequences, including mutagenesis or cell death. In eukaryotes, both the formation and repair of UV damage occur in the context of chromatin, in which genomic DNA is packaged with histones into nucleosomes and higher order chromatin structures. Here, we review how chromatin impacts the formation of UV photoproducts in eukaryotic cells. We describe the initial discovery that nucleosomes and other DNA binding proteins induce characteristic "photofootprints" during the formation of UV photoproducts. We also describe recent progress in genomewide methods for mapping UV damage, which echoes early biochemical studies, and highlights the role of nucleosomes and transcription factors in UV damage formation and repair at unprecedented resolution. Finally, we discuss our current understanding of how the distribution and repair of UV-induced DNA damage influence mutagenesis in human skin cancers. © 2016 The American Society of Photobiology.

  1. Oligonucleotide?directed mutagenesis for precision gene editing

    OpenAIRE

    Sauer, Noel J.; Mozoruk, Jerry; Miller, Ryan B.; Warburg, Zachary J.; Walker, Keith A.; Beetham, Peter R.; Sch?pke, Christian R.; Gocal, Greg F. W.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Differences in gene sequences, many of which are single nucleotide polymorphisms, underlie some of the most important traits in plants. With humanity facing significant challenges to increase global agricultural productivity, there is an urgent need to accelerate the development of these traits in plants. oligonucleotide?directed mutagenesis (ODM), one of the many tools of Cibus? Rapid Trait Development System ( RTDS ?) technology, offers a rapid, precise and non?transgenic breeding a...

  2. Environmental mutagenesis and radiation biology: The legacy of William Morgan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jeffrey L

    2017-12-01

    A symposium entitled Environmental Mutagenesis and Radiation Biology was held on September 27, 2016 to honor the memory of Dr. William F. Morgan who passed away unexpectedly on November 13, 2015. The speakers presented the latest reviews on homologous recombination repair, induced genetic instability, bystander effects, and risk estimate development. Their presentations are presented following the introduction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. GATMD: γ-Aminobutyric Acid Transporter Mutagenesis Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Cynthia M.; Kidd, Patrick D.; Eskandari, Sepehr

    2010-01-01

    Since the cloning of the first γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter (GAT1; SLC6A1) from rat brain in 1990, more than 50 published studies have provided structure–function information on investigator-designed rat and mouse GAT1 mutants. To date, more than 200 of 599 GAT1 residues have been subjected to mutagenesis experiments by substitution with different amino acids, and the resulting transporter functional properties have significantly advanced our understanding of the mechanism of Na+- and Cl–-coupled GABA transport by this important member of the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter family. Moreover, many studies have addressed the functional consequences of amino acid deletion or insertion at various positions along the primary sequence. The enormity of this growing body of structure–function information has prompted us to develop GABA Transporter Mutagenesis Database (GATMD), a web-accessible, relational database of manually annotated biochemical, functional and pharmacological data reported on GAT1—the most intensely studied GABA transporter isoform. As of the last update of GATMD, 52 GAT1 mutagenesis papers have yielded 3360 experimental records, which collectively contain a total of ∼100 000 annotated parameters. Database URL: http://physiology.sci.csupomona.edu/GATMD/ PMID:21131297

  4. Directed mutagenesis affects recombination in Azospirillum brasilense nif genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.P. Nunes

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the gene transfer/mutagenesis system for Azospirillum brasilense, gene-cartridge mutagenesis was used to replace the nifD gene with the Tn5 kanamycin resistance gene. The construct was transferred to A. brasilense by electrotransformation. Of the 12 colonies isolated using the suicide plasmid pSUP202 as vector, only four did not show vector integration into the chromosome. Nevertheless, all 12 colonies were deficient in acetylene reduction, indicating an Nif- phenotype. Four Nif- mutants were analyzed by Southern blot, using six different probes spanning the nif and Km r genes and the plasmid vector. Apparently, several recombination events occurred in the mutant genomes, probably caused mainly by gene disruption owing to the mutagenesis technique used: resistance gene-cartridge mutagenesis combined with electrotransformation.Com o objetivo de melhorar os sistemas de transferência gênica e mutagênese para Azospirillum brasilense, a técnica de mutagênese através do uso de um gene marcador ("gene-cartridge mutagenesis" foi utilizada para substituir a região genômica de A. brasilense correspondente ao gene nifD por um segmento de DNA do transposon Tn5 contendo o gene que confere resistência ao antibiótico canamicina. A construção foi transferida para a linhagem de A. brasilense por eletrotransformação. Doze colônias transformantes foram isoladas com o plasmídeo suicida pSUP202 servindo como vetor. Dessas, somente quatro não possuíam o vetor integrado no cromossomo da bactéria. Independentemente da integração ou não do vetor, as 12 colônias foram deficientes na redução do gás acetileno, evidenciando o fenótipo Nif -. Quatro mutantes Nif - foram analisados através da técnica de Southern blot, utilizando-se seis diferentes fragmentos contendo genes nif, de resistência à canamicina e do vetor como sondas. Os resultados sugerem a ocorrência de eventos recombinacionais variados no genoma dos mutantes. A

  5. p21-ras effector domain mutants constructed by "cassette" mutagenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stone, J C; Vass, W C; Willumsen, B M

    1988-01-01

    A series of mutations encoding single-amino-acid substitutions within the v-rasH effector domain were constructed, and the ability of the mutants to induce focal transformation of NIH 3T3 cells was studied. The mutations, which spanned codons 32 to 40, were made by a "cassette" mutagenesis...... technique that involved replacing this portion of the v-rasH effector domain with a linker carrying two BspMI sites in opposite orientations. Since BspMI cleaves outside its recognition sequence, BspMI digestion of the plasmid completely removed the linker, creating a double-stranded gap whose missing ras...

  6. A protocol for chemical mutagenesis in Strongyloides ratti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Li; Chang, Zisong; Dieterich, Christoph; Streit, Adrian

    2015-11-01

    Genetic analysis using experimentally induced mutations has been a most valuable tool in the analysis of various organisms. However, genetic analysis of endoparasitic organisms tends to be difficult because of the limited accessibility of the sexually reproducing adults, which are normally located within the host. Nematodes of the genera Strogyloides and Parastrongyloides represent an exception to this because they can form facultative free-living sexually reproducing generations in between parasitic generations. Here we present a protocol for the chemical mutagenesis of Strongyloides ratti. Further we evaluate the feasibility of identifying the induced mutations by whole genome re-sequencing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Environmental stress and mutagenesis in enteric and non-enteric bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Babudri, Nora; Lancioni, Hovirag; Achilli, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Mutations are fundamental for evolution. For many years it has been thought that mutagenesis occurs only in dividing cells. Now it is clear that mutations arise in non-dividing or slowly dividing microorganisms. Natural populations spend most of the time in stressful environments where their growth rate is highly reduced. Thus, the existence of a mutagenesis process, independent of multiplication (stress-induced mutagenesis, SIM), might have a profound evolutionary role. In the presented pape...

  8. Direct Mutagenesis of Thousands of Genomic Targets using Microarray-derived Oligonucleotides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Mads; Kosuri, Sriram; Genee, Hans Jasper

    2015-01-01

    Multiplex Automated Genome Engineering (MAGE) allows simultaneous mutagenesis of multiple target sites in bacterial genomes using short oligonucleotides. However, large-scale mutagenesis requires hundreds to thousands of unique oligos, which are costly to synthesize and impossible to scale-up by ...... insertions per cell. MO-MAGE enables cost-effective large-scale targeted genome engineering that should be useful for a variety of applications in synthetic biology and metabolic engineering.......Multiplex Automated Genome Engineering (MAGE) allows simultaneous mutagenesis of multiple target sites in bacterial genomes using short oligonucleotides. However, large-scale mutagenesis requires hundreds to thousands of unique oligos, which are costly to synthesize and impossible to scale...

  9. The pathologic effect of a novel neomorphic Fgf9(Y162C allele is restricted to decreased vision and retarded lens growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Puk

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf signalling plays a crucial role in many developmental processes. Among the Fgf pathway ligands, Fgf9 (UniProt: P54130 has been demonstrated to participate in maturation of various organs and tissues including skeleton, testes, lung, heart, and eye. Here we establish a novel Fgf9 allele, discovered in a dominant N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU screen for eye-size abnormalities using the optical low coherence interferometry technique. The underlying mouse mutant line Aca12 was originally identified because of its significantly reduced lens thickness. Linkage studies located Aca12 to chromosome 14 within a 3.6 Mb spanning interval containing the positional candidate genes Fgf9 (MGI: 104723, Gja3 (MGI: 95714, and Ift88 (MGI: 98715. While no sequence differences were found in Gja3 and Ift88, we identified an A→G missense mutation at cDNA position 770 of the Fgf9 gene leading to an Y162C amino acid exchange. In contrast to previously described Fgf9 mutants, Fgf9(Y162C carriers were fully viable and did not reveal reduced body-size, male-to-female sexual reversal or skeletal malformations. The histological analysis of the retina as well as its basic functional characterization by electroretinography (ERG did not show any abnormality. However, the analysis of head-tracking response of the Fgf9(Y162C mutants in a virtual drum indicated a gene-dosage dependent vision loss of almost 50%. The smaller lenses in Fgf9(Y162C suggested a role of Fgf9 during lens development. Histological investigations showed that lens growth retardation starts during embryogenesis and continues after birth. Young Fgf9(Y162C lenses remained transparent but developed age-related cataracts. Taken together, Fgf9(Y162C is a novel neomorphic allele that initiates microphakia and reduced vision without effects on organs and tissues outside the eye. Our data point to a role of Fgf9 signalling in primary and secondary lens fiber cell growth. The results

  10. A nonsense mutation in mouse Tardbp affects TDP43 alternative splicing activity and causes limb-clasping and body tone defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Ricketts

    Full Text Available Mutations in TARDBP, encoding Tar DNA binding protein-43 (TDP43, cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and frontotemporal dementia (FTD. Attempts to model TDP43 dysfunction in mice have used knockouts or transgenic overexpressors, which have revealed the difficulties of manipulating TDP43, whose level is tightly controlled by auto-regulation. In a complementary approach, to create useful mouse models for the dissection of TDP43 function and pathology, we have identified a nonsense mutation in the endogenous mouse Tardbp gene through screening an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU mutant mouse archive. The mutation is predicted to cause a Q101X truncation in TDP43. We have characterised Tardbp(Q101X mice to investigate this mutation in perturbing TDP43 biology at endogenous expression levels. We found the Tardbp(Q101X mutation is homozygous embryonic lethal, highlighting the importance of TDP43 in early development. Heterozygotes (Tardbp(+/Q101X have abnormal levels of mutant transcript, but we find no evidence of the truncated protein and mice have similar full-length TDP43 protein levels as wildtype littermates. Nevertheless, Tardbp(+/Q101X mice have abnormal alternative splicing of downstream gene targets, and limb-clasp and body tone phenotypes. Thus the nonsense mutation in Tardbp causes a mild loss-of-function phenotype and behavioural assessment suggests underlying neurological abnormalities. Due to the role of TDP43 in ALS, we investigated potential interactions with another known causative gene, mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1. Tardbp(+/Q101X mice were crossed with the SOD1(G93Adl transgenic mouse model of ALS. Behavioural and physiological assessment did not reveal modifying effects on the progression of ALS-like symptoms in the double mutant progeny from this cross. In summary, the Tardbp(Q101X mutant mice are a useful tool for the dissection of TDP43 protein regulation, effects on splicing, embryonic development and neuromuscular

  11. Cell-mediated mutagenesis and cell transformation by chemical carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huberman, E.; Langenbach, R.

    1977-01-01

    Results are reported from studies that showed that mutagenesis of mammalian cells can be achieved by carcinogenic polycyclic hydrocarbons, nitrosamines, and aflatoxins when tested in the presence of fibroblasts and hepatocytes which are able to metabolize these carcinogens. Further, we have found that there is a relationship between the degree of mutant induction and the degree of carcinogenicity of the different chemicals tested. By simultaneously measuring the frequency of cell transformation and the frequency of mutation at one locus (ouabain resistance) in the same cell system, it was possible to estimate the genetic target site for cell transformation. The results indicated that the target site for transformation is approximately 20 times larger than that determined for ouabain resistance. The results suggest that cell transformation may be due to a mutational event and the mutation can occur in one out of a small number of the same or different genes, and that the cell-mediated mutagenesis approach may be a valuable means of detecting tissue-specific carcinogens.

  12. Mariner-based transposon mutagenesis for Bacteroides species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichimura, Minoru; Uchida, Keiko; Nakayama-Imaohji, Haruyuki; Hirakawa, Hideki; Tada, Tomoyo; Morita, Hidetoshi; Yasutomo, Koji; Okazaki, Katsuichiro; Kuwahara, Tomomi

    2014-06-01

    Bacteroides is one of the most predominant groups of human gut microbiota. Recent metagenomic analyses and studies on gnotobiotic mice demonstrated the tight association of Bacteroides with epithelial function, the gut immune system and systemic metabolism in the host. The mariner family transposon shows relatively low target site specificity and has hosts ranging from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. Thereby, random mutagenesis using the mariner family transposon is expected to identify key molecules for human-Bacteroides symbiosis. In this study, we constructed the plasmid pMI07 to deliver the gene cassette (ermF/ITR), which harbors the erythromycin resistant marker (ermF) and the inverted repeat sequences (ITRs) recognized by Himar1 transposase, to Bacteroides via electrotransformation. pMI07 successfully delivered ermF/ITR to the Bacteroides genomes and generated thousands of insertion mutants/μg of pMI07 in B. thetaiotaomicron, B. fragilis, B. ovatus, and also, although to a lesser extent, B. vulgatus. Analyses of the ermF/ITR insertion sites in B. thetaiotaomicron and B. vulgatus revealed that the cassette targeted the dinucleotide TA and integrated into the genomes in an unbiased manner. The data reported here will provide useful information for transposon mutagenesis in Bacteroides species, which will enable identification of the genes responsible for their unique phenotypes. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Lethal Mutagenesis of Hepatitis C Virus Induced by Favipiravir.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana I de Ávila

    Full Text Available Lethal mutagenesis is an antiviral approach that consists in extinguishing a virus by an excess of mutations acquired during replication in the presence of a mutagen. Here we show that favipiravir (T-705 is a potent mutagenic agent for hepatitis C virus (HCV during its replication in human hepatoma cells. T-705 leads to an excess of G → A and C → U transitions in the mutant spectrum of preextinction HCV populations. Infectivity decreased significantly in the presence of concentrations of T-705 which are 2- to 8-fold lower than its cytotoxic concentration 50 (CC50. Passaging the virus five times in the presence of 400 μM T-705 resulted in virus extinction. Since T-705 has undergone advanced clinical trials for approval for human use, the results open a new approach based on lethal mutagenesis to treat hepatitis C virus infections. If proven effective for HCV in vivo, this new anti-HCV agent may be useful in patient groups that fail current therapeutic regimens.

  14. Improving isopropanol tolerance and production of Clostridium beijerinckii DSM 6423 by random mutagenesis and genome shuffling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Máté De Gérando, H.; Fayolle-Guichard, F.; Rudant, L.; Millah, S.K.; Monot, F.; Ferreira, Nicolas Lopes; López-Contreras, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Random mutagenesis and genome shuffling was applied to improve solvent tolerance and isopropanol/butanol/ethanol (IBE) production in the strictly anaerobic bacteria Clostridium beijerinckii DSM 6423. Following chemical mutagenesis with N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (NTG), screening of

  15. Construction of a high-efficiency multi-site-directed mutagenesis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although site-directed mutagenesis has been used in many fields, it still has low rate of success and high cost because of low-yield target products. A modified method for multi-site-directed mutagenesis was developed with shifted primer design and cold-start polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The developed method was ...

  16. Quantitative studies of the mutagenesis of Toxoplasma gondii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfefferkorn, E.R.; Pfefferkorn, L.C.

    1979-06-01

    The induction of mutants resistant to 5-fluorodeoxyuridine (FUDR) was used to measure the efficiency of various physical and chemical mutagens on extracellular and intracellular Toxoplasma gondii. The frequency of resistant mutant was measured by plaque assay in human fibroblast cultures in the presence and absence of FUDR. When considered as a function of lethality, the most efficient mutagenesis was obtained with nitrosoguanidine treatment of extracellular parasites and with ethylmethane sulfonate treatment of actively growing intracellular parasites. Each of these treatments increased the frequency of FUDR-resistant mutants from less than one to more than 200 per million parasites. Ultraviolet irradiation, X-rays, and the alkylating mustard ICR-191 also induced FUDR-resistant mutants in a dose-dependent fashion.

  17. Role of Nicotinamide in DNA Damage, Mutagenesis, and DNA Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devita Surjana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinamide is a water-soluble amide form of niacin (nicotinic acid or vitamin B3. Both niacin and nicotinamide are widely available in plant and animal foods, and niacin can also be endogenously synthesized in the liver from dietary tryptophan. Nicotinamide is also commercially available in vitamin supplements and in a range of cosmetic, hair, and skin preparations. Nicotinamide is the primary precursor of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+, an essential coenzyme in ATP production and the sole substrate of the nuclear enzyme poly-ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1. Numerous in vitro and in vivo studies have clearly shown that PARP-1 and NAD+ status influence cellular responses to genotoxicity which can lead to mutagenesis and cancer formation. This paper will examine the role of nicotinamide in the protection from carcinogenesis, DNA repair, and maintenance of genomic stability.

  18. Precision Targeted Mutagenesis via Cas9 Paired Nickases in Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Masafumi; Toki, Seiichi; Endo, Masaki

    2016-05-01

    Recent reports of CRISPR- (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein 9) mediated heritable mutagenesis in plants highlight the need for accuracy of the mutagenesis directed by this system. Off-target mutations are an important issue when considering functional gene analysis, as well as the molecular breeding of crop plants with large genome size, i.e. with many duplicated genes, and where the whole-genome sequence is still lacking. In mammals, off-target mutations can be suppressed by using Cas9 paired nickases together with paired guide RNAs (gRNAs). However, the performance of Cas9 paired nickases has not yet been fully assessed in plants. Here, we analyzed on- and off-target mutation frequency in rice calli and regenerated plants using Cas9 nuclease or Cas9 nickase with paired gRNAs. When Cas9 paired nickases were used, off-target mutations were fully suppressed in rice calli and regenerated plants. However, on-target mutation frequency also decreased compared with that induced by the Cas9 paired nucleases system. Since the gRNA sequence determines specific binding of Cas9 protein-gRNA ribonucleoproteins at the targeted sequence, the on-target mutation frequency of Cas9 paired nickases depends on the design of paired gRNAs. Our results suggest that a combination of gRNAs that can induce mutations at high efficiency with Cas9 nuclease should be used together with Cas9 nickase. Furthermore, we confirmed that a combination of gRNAs containing a one nucleotide (1 nt) mismatch toward the target sequence could not induce mutations when expressed with Cas9 nickase. Our results clearly show the effectiveness of Cas9 paired nickases in delivering on-target specific mutations. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists.

  19. Cationic Peptides Facilitate Iron-induced Mutagenesis in Bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandro Rodríguez-Rojas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the causative agent of chronic respiratory infections and is an important pathogen of cystic fibrosis patients. Adaptive mutations play an essential role for antimicrobial resistance and persistence. The factors that contribute to bacterial mutagenesis in this environment are not clear. Recently it has been proposed that cationic antimicrobial peptides such as LL-37 could act as mutagens in P. aeruginosa. Here we provide experimental evidence that mutagenesis is the product of a joint action of LL-37 and free iron. By estimating mutation rate, mutant frequencies and assessing mutational spectra in P. aeruginosa treated either with LL-37, iron or a combination of both we demonstrate that mutation rate and mutant frequency were increased only when free iron and LL-37 were present simultaneously. Colistin had the same effect. The addition of an iron chelator completely abolished this mutagenic effect, suggesting that LL-37 enables iron to enter the cells resulting in DNA damage by Fenton reactions. This was also supported by the observation that the mutational spectrum of the bacteria under LL-37-iron regime showed one of the characteristic Fenton reaction fingerprints: C to T transitions. Free iron concentration in nature and within hosts is kept at a very low level, but the situation in infected lungs of cystic fibrosis patients is different. Intermittent bleeding and damage to the epithelial cells in lungs may contribute to the release of free iron that in turn leads to generation of reactive oxygen species and deterioration of the respiratory tract, making it more susceptible to the infection.

  20. The Opdc missense mutation of Pax2 has a milder than loss-of-function phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Cross, Sally H.; McKie, Lisa; West, Katrine; Coghill, Emma L.; Favor, Jack; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Brown, Steve D M; Jackson, Ian J

    2011-01-01

    Renal-coloboma syndrome, also known as papillorenal syndrome, is an autosomal dominant human disorder in which optic disc coloboma is associated with kidney abnormalities. Mutations in the paired domain transcription factor PAX2 have been found to be the underlying cause of this disease. Disease severity varies between patients, and in some cases, renal hypoplasia has been found in the absence of any retinal defects. Here we report an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mouse mutation, Opdc, which ...

  1. The Yeast Environmental Stress Response Regulates Mutagenesis Induced by Proteotoxic Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, Erika; Fox, Catherine A.; Broach, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Conditions of chronic stress are associated with genetic instability in many organisms, but the roles of stress responses in mutagenesis have so far been elucidated only in bacteria. Here, we present data demonstrating that the environmental stress response (ESR) in yeast functions in mutagenesis induced by proteotoxic stress. We show that the drug canavanine causes proteotoxic stress, activates the ESR, and induces mutagenesis at several loci in an ESR-dependent manner. Canavanine-induced mutagenesis also involves translesion DNA polymerases Rev1 and Polζ and non-homologous end joining factor Ku. Furthermore, under conditions of chronic sub-lethal canavanine stress, deletions of Rev1, Polζ, and Ku-encoding genes exhibit genetic interactions with ESR mutants indicative of ESR regulating these mutagenic DNA repair processes. Analyses of mutagenesis induced by several different stresses showed that the ESR specifically modulates mutagenesis induced by proteotoxic stress. Together, these results document the first known example of an involvement of a eukaryotic stress response pathway in mutagenesis and have important implications for mechanisms of evolution, carcinogenesis, and emergence of drug-resistant pathogens and chemotherapy-resistant tumors. PMID:23935537

  2. The yeast environmental stress response regulates mutagenesis induced by proteotoxic stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Shor

    Full Text Available Conditions of chronic stress are associated with genetic instability in many organisms, but the roles of stress responses in mutagenesis have so far been elucidated only in bacteria. Here, we present data demonstrating that the environmental stress response (ESR in yeast functions in mutagenesis induced by proteotoxic stress. We show that the drug canavanine causes proteotoxic stress, activates the ESR, and induces mutagenesis at several loci in an ESR-dependent manner. Canavanine-induced mutagenesis also involves translesion DNA polymerases Rev1 and Polζ and non-homologous end joining factor Ku. Furthermore, under conditions of chronic sub-lethal canavanine stress, deletions of Rev1, Polζ, and Ku-encoding genes exhibit genetic interactions with ESR mutants indicative of ESR regulating these mutagenic DNA repair processes. Analyses of mutagenesis induced by several different stresses showed that the ESR specifically modulates mutagenesis induced by proteotoxic stress. Together, these results document the first known example of an involvement of a eukaryotic stress response pathway in mutagenesis and have important implications for mechanisms of evolution, carcinogenesis, and emergence of drug-resistant pathogens and chemotherapy-resistant tumors.

  3. Genes Necessary for Bacterial Magnetite Biomineralization Identified by Transposon Mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, C. Z.; Komeili, A.; Newman, D. K.; Kirschvink, J. L.

    2004-12-01

    Magnetic bacteria synthesize nanoscale crystals of magnetite in intracellular, membrane-bounded organelles (magnetosomes). These crystals are preserved in the fossil record at least as far back as the late Neoproterozoic and have been tentatively identified in much older rocks (1). This fossil record may provide deep time calibration points for molecular evolution studies once the genes involved in biologically controlled magnetic mineralization (BCMM) are known. Further, a genetic and biochemical understanding of BCMM will give insight into the depositional environment and biogeochemical cycles in which magnetic bacteria play a role. The BCMM process is not well understood, though proteins have been identified from the magnetosome membrane and genetic manipulation and biochemical characterization of these proteins are underway. Most of the proteins currently thought to be involved are encoded within the mam cluster, a large cluster of genes whose products localize to the magnetosome membrane and are conserved among magnetic bacteria (2). In an effort to identify all of the genes necessary for bacterial BCMM, we undertook a transposon mutagenesis of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1. Non-magnetic mutants (MNMs) were identified by growth in liquid culture followed by a magnetic assay. The insertion site of the transposon was identified two ways. First MNMs were screened with a PCR assay to determine if the transposon had inserted into the mam cluster. Second, the transposon was rescued from the mutant DNA and cloned for sequencing. The majority insertion sites are located within the mam cluster. Insertion sites also occur in operons which have not previously been suspected to be involved in magnetite biomineralization. None of the insertion sites have occurred within genes reported from previous transposon mutagenesis studies of AMB-1 (3, 4). Two of the non-mam cluster insertion sites occur in operons containing genes conserved particularly between MS-1 and MC-1. We

  4. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated targeted mutagenesis in grape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Ikuko; Ban, Yusuke; Azuma, Akifumi; Onoue, Noriyuki; Moriguchi, Takaya; Yamamoto, Toshiya; Toki, Seiichi; Endo, Masaki

    2017-01-01

    RNA-guided genome editing using the CRISPR/Cas9 CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein 9) system has been applied successfully in several plant species. However, to date, there are few reports on the use of any of the current genome editing approaches in grape-an important fruit crop with a large market not only for table grapes but also for wine. Here, we report successful targeted mutagenesis in grape (Vitis vinifera L., cv. Neo Muscat) using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. When a Cas9 expression construct was transformed to embryonic calli along with a synthetic sgRNA expression construct targeting the Vitis vinifera phytoene desaturase (VvPDS) gene, regenerated plants with albino leaves were obtained. DNA sequencing confirmed that the VvPDS gene was mutated at the target site in regenerated grape plants. Interestingly, the ratio of mutated cells was higher in lower, older, leaves compared to that in newly appearing upper leaves. This result might suggest either that the proportion of targeted mutagenized cells is higher in older leaves due to the repeated induction of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), or that the efficiency of precise DSBs repair in cells of old grape leaves is decreased.

  5. Overproduction of Clavulanic Acid by UV Mutagenesis of Streptomyces clavuligerus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbekandi, Hassan; Darkhal, Parisa; Hojati, Zohreh; Abedi, Daryoush; Hamedi, Javad; Pourhosein, Meraj

    2010-01-01

    Clavulanic acid is produced industrially by fermentation of Streptomyces clavuligerus and researches have increased its production by strain improvement, recombinant DNA technology, and media composition and growth condition optimization. The main objective of this study was to increase the level of clavulanic acid production from Streptomyces clavuligerus (DSM 738), using UV irradiation. After incubation, the spores and aerial mycelia were scraped off the agar plate by a sterile loop. After passing through a cotton wool, the serially diluted spore suspension was spread on GYM- agar containing caffeine. The plates were irradiated with UV light, wrapped in aluminum foil and incubated. The colonies were sub-cultured again to express the mutations. An aliquot of the spore suspension prepared from the resulted culture was poured in GYM agar plates and incubated. The plates were overlaid with nutrient-agar containing penicillin G and Klebsiela pneumoniae, and incubated. The inhibition zone diameter was measured and compared with the wild type colony. Repeating this procedure, the overproducer mutants were selected. Concentration of clavulanic acid was determined by HPLC analysis. It was concluded that secondary metabolites, mainly antibiotics containing clavulanic acid, were produced about 6-7 days after the growth, and concentration of clavulanic acid was increased up to two-folds after UV mutagenesis.

  6. CRISPR/Cas-mediated targeted mutagenesis in Daphnia magna.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Nakanishi

    Full Text Available The water flea Daphnia magna has been used as an animal model in ecology, evolution, and environmental sciences. Thanks to the recent progress in Daphnia genomics, genetic information such as the draft genome sequence and expressed sequence tags (ESTs is now available. To investigate the relationship between phenotypes and the available genetic information about Daphnia, some gene manipulation methods have been developed. However, a technique to induce targeted mutagenesis into Daphnia genome remains elusive. To overcome this problem, we focused on an emerging genome editing technique mediated by the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated (CRISPR/Cas system to introduce genomic mutations. In this study, we targeted a functionally conserved regulator of eye development, the eyeless gene in D. magna. When we injected Cas9 mRNAs and eyeless-targeting guide RNAs into eggs, 18-47% of the survived juveniles exhibited abnormal eye morphology. After maturation, up to 8.2% of the adults produced progenies with deformed eyes, which carried mutations in the eyeless loci. These results showed that CRISPR/Cas system could introduce heritable mutations into the endogenous eyeless gene in D. magna. This is the first report of a targeted gene knockout technique in Daphnia and will be useful in uncovering Daphnia gene functions.

  7. Combinatorial Mutagenesis and Selection to Understand and Improve Yeast Promoters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Berg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial promoters are important targets both for understanding the global gene expression and developing genetic tools for heterologous expression of proteins and complex biosynthetic pathways. Previously, we have developed and used combinatorial mutagenesis methods to analyse and improve bacterial expression systems. Here, we present for the first time an analogous strategy for yeast. Our model promoter is the strong and inducible promoter in methylotrophic Pichia pastoris. The Zeocin resistance gene was applied as a valuable reporter for mutant promoter activity, and we used an episomal plasmid vector to ensure a constant reporter gene dosage in the yeast host cells. This novel design enabled direct selection for colonies of recombinant cells with altered Zeocin tolerance levels originating solely from randomly introduced point mutations in the promoter DNA sequence. We demonstrate that this approach can be used to select for promoter variants with abolished glucose repression in large mutant libraries. We also selected promoter variants with elevated expression level under induced conditions. The properties of the selected promoter variants were confirmed by expressing luciferase as an alternative reporter gene. The tools developed here should be useful for effective screening, characterization, and improvement of any yeast promoters.

  8. Overproduction of Clavulanic Acid by UV Mutagenesis of Streptomyces clavuligerus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbekandi, Hassan; Darkhal, Parisa; Hojati, Zohreh; Abedi, Daryoush; Hamedi, Javad; Pourhosein, Meraj

    2010-01-01

    Clavulanic acid is produced industrially by fermentation of Streptomyces clavuligerus and researches have increased its production by strain improvement, recombinant DNA technology, and media composition and growth condition optimization. The main objective of this study was to increase the level of clavulanic acid production from Streptomyces clavuligerus (DSM 738), using UV irradiation. After incubation, the spores and aerial mycelia were scraped off the agar plate by a sterile loop. After passing through a cotton wool, the serially diluted spore suspension was spread on GYM- agar containing caffeine. The plates were irradiated with UV light, wrapped in aluminum foil and incubated. The colonies were sub-cultured again to express the mutations. An aliquot of the spore suspension prepared from the resulted culture was poured in GYM agar plates and incubated. The plates were overlaid with nutrient-agar containing penicillin G and Klebsiela pneumoniae, and incubated. The inhibition zone diameter was measured and compared with the wild type colony. Repeating this procedure, the overproducer mutants were selected. Concentration of clavulanic acid was determined by HPLC analysis. It was concluded that secondary metabolites, mainly antibiotics containing clavulanic acid, were produced about 6–7 days after the growth, and concentration of clavulanic acid was increased up to two-folds after UV mutagenesis. PMID:24363725

  9. Recurrent AAV2-related insertional mutagenesis in human hepatocellular carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nault, Jean-Charles; Datta, Shalini; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Franconi, Andrea; Mallet, Maxime; Couchy, Gabrielle; Letouzé, Eric; Pilati, Camilla; Verret, Benjamin; Blanc, Jean-Frédéric; Balabaud, Charles; Calderaro, Julien; Laurent, Alexis; Letexier, Mélanie; Bioulac-Sage, Paulette; Calvo, Fabien; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica

    2015-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) are liver tumors related to various etiologies, including alcohol intake and infection with hepatitis B (HBV) or C (HCV) virus. Additional risk factors remain to be identified, particularly in patients who develop HCC without cirrhosis. We found clonal integration of adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) in 11 of 193 HCCs. These AAV2 integrations occurred in known cancer driver genes, namely CCNA2 (cyclin A2; four cases), TERT (telomerase reverse transcriptase; one case), CCNE1 (cyclin E1; three cases), TNFSF10 (tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 10; two cases) and KMT2B (lysine-specific methyltransferase 2B; one case), leading to overexpression of the target genes. Tumors with viral integration mainly developed in non-cirrhotic liver (9 of 11 cases) and without known risk factors (6 of 11 cases), suggesting a pathogenic role for AAV2 in these patients. In conclusion, AAV2 is a DNA virus associated with oncogenic insertional mutagenesis in human HCC.

  10. Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis for precision gene editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Noel J; Mozoruk, Jerry; Miller, Ryan B; Warburg, Zachary J; Walker, Keith A; Beetham, Peter R; Schöpke, Christian R; Gocal, Greg F W

    2016-02-01

    Differences in gene sequences, many of which are single nucleotide polymorphisms, underlie some of the most important traits in plants. With humanity facing significant challenges to increase global agricultural productivity, there is an urgent need to accelerate the development of these traits in plants. oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis (ODM), one of the many tools of Cibus' Rapid Trait Development System (RTDS(™) ) technology, offers a rapid, precise and non-transgenic breeding alternative for trait improvement in agriculture to address this urgent need. This review explores the application of ODM as a precision genome editing technology, with emphasis on using oligonucleotides to make targeted edits in plasmid, episomal and chromosomal DNA of bacterial, fungal, mammalian and plant systems. The process of employing ODM by way of RTDS technology has been improved in many ways by utilizing a fluorescence conversion system wherein a blue fluorescent protein (BFP) can be changed to a green fluorescent protein (GFP) by editing a single nucleotide of the BFP gene (CAC→TAC; H66 to Y66). For example, dependent on oligonucleotide length, applying oligonucleotide-mediated technology to target the BFP transgene in Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts resulted in up to 0.05% precisely edited GFP loci. Here, the development of traits in commercially relevant plant varieties to improve crop performance by genome editing technologies such as ODM, and by extension RTDS, is reviewed. © 2015 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Mutagenesis of bacteriophage T7 and T7 DNA by alkylation damage.

    OpenAIRE

    Masker, W E; Dodson, L A; Maupin, M

    1985-01-01

    We have developed a new assay for in vitro mutagenesis of bacteriophage T7 DNA that measures the generation of mutations in the specific T7 gene that codes for the phage ligase. This assay was used to examine mutagenesis caused by in vitro DNA synthesis in the presence of O6-methylguanosine triphosphate. Reversion of one of the newly generated ligase mutants by ethyl methanesulfonate was also tested.

  12. Mutagenesis of bacteriophage T7 and T7 DNA by alkylation damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masker, W E; Dodson, L A; Maupin, M

    1985-01-01

    We have developed a new assay for in vitro mutagenesis of bacteriophage T7 DNA that measures the generation of mutations in the specific T7 gene that codes for the phage ligase. This assay was used to examine mutagenesis caused by in vitro DNA synthesis in the presence of O6-methylguanosine triphosphate. Reversion of one of the newly generated ligase mutants by ethyl methanesulfonate was also tested. PMID:3903213

  13. Overexpression of metallothioneins, stem cell niches and field cancerization in experimental gliomagenesis Superexpresión de metalotioneínas, nichos de células madre y campos de cancerización en gliomagénesis experimental A superexpressão de metalotioneínas em células-tronco de áreas cancerígenas na gênese de glioma experimental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio César Fernandes da Silva

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: stem cells may originate and perpetuate the tumor growth, but they are poorly known in gliomagenesis. Metallothioneins (MTs are proteins involved in oncogenesis and immunopositivity, for MT may be used as a stem cell mutation marker. OBJECTIVE: to study the MT expression in the ENU experimental model and to establish an experimental model to track glioma stem cells in early oncogenesis. METHODS: Thirty-six male Wistar rats were divided into two groups; the experimental group was treated within 24 hours after birth (neonate rats with a single dose of subcutaneously injected N-ethyl N-nitrosourea ENU (40 mg/kg body weight. The control animals were injected with the same volume of saline. These experimental animals were subdivided into three groups according to the euthanize time, as follows: the Group 1 (G1 was euthanized at the age of 30 days; the Group 2 (G2, at the age of 180 days and the Group 3 (G3 was euthanized soon after the appearing of signs of the existence of nervous system tumors, at an average age of 321 days. Immunohistochemical detection of MT protein in cold acetone-fixed paraffin embedded spine cord sections was performed by the streptavidin-avidin-biotin-immuno peroxidase complex method. RESULTS: by using the experimental model of gliomagenesis induced by the N-ethyl N-nitrosourea, it was possible to detect putative tumor stem cells in early oncogenesis, to analyze a field cancerization process and to observe a close morphological relationship between MT positive cells and blood vessels. CONCLUSIONS: this reproducible experimental model allows further studies on the origins, development and regulating factors involved in gliomagenesis.INTRODUCCIÓN: células madre pueden originar y perpetuar el crecimiento tumoral, sin embargo son poco conocidas en la gliomagénesis. Las metalotioneínas (MTs son proteínas involucradas en la oncogénesis, y la inmunopositividad de las MTs puede ser utilizada como marcador de

  14. Genome-wide transposon mutagenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Bharucha, Nikë; Kumar, Anuj

    2011-01-01

    Transposon mutagenesis is an effective method for generating large sets of random mutations in target DNA, with applicability toward numerous types of genetic screens in prokaryotes, single-celled eukaryotes, and metazoans alike. Relative to methods of random mutagenesis by chemical/UV treatment, transposon insertions can be easily identified in mutants with phenotypes of interest. The construction of transposon insertion mutants is also less labor-intensive on a genome-wide scale than methods for targeted gene replacement, although transposon insertions are not precisely targeted to a specific residue, and thus coverage of the target DNA can be problematic. The collective advantages of transposon mutagenesis have been well demonstrated in studies of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the related pathogenic yeast Candida albicans, as transposon mutagenesis has been used extensively for phenotypic screens in both yeasts. Consequently, we present here protocols for the generation and utilization of transposon-insertion DNA libraries in S. cerevisiae and C. albicans. Specifically, we present methods for the large-scale introduction of transposon insertion alleles in a desired strain of S. cerevisiae. Methods are also presented for transposon mutagenesis of C. albicans, encompassing both the construction of the plasmid-based transposon-mutagenized DNA library and its introduction into a desired strain of Candida. In total, these methods provide the necessary information to implement transposon mutagenesis in yeast, enabling the construction of large sets of identifiable gene disruption mutations, with particular utility for phenotypic screening in nonstandard genetic backgrounds.

  15. Step-By-Step In Vitro Mutagenesis: Lessons From Fucose-Binding Lectin PA-IIL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrázková, Jana; Malinovská, Lenka; Wimmerová, Michaela

    2017-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis is a powerful technique which is used to understand the basis of interactions between proteins and their binding partners, as well as to modify these interactions. Methods of rational design that are based on detailed knowledge of the structure of a protein of interest are often used for preliminary investigations of the possible outcomes which can result from the practical application of site-directed mutagenesis. Also, random mutagenesis can be used in tandem with site-directed mutagenesis for an examination of amino acid "hotspots."Lectins are sugar-binding proteins which, among other functions, mediate the recognition of host cells by a pathogen and its adhesion to the host cell surface. Hence, lectins and their binding properties are studied and engineered using site-directed mutagenesis.In this chapter, we describe a site-directed mutagenesis method used for investigating the sugar binding pattern of the PA-IIL lectin from the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Moreover, procedures for the production and purification of PA-IIL mutants are described, and several basic methods for characterizing the mutants are discussed.

  16. Defect of Fe-S cluster binding by DNA polymerase δ in yeast suppresses UV-induced mutagenesis, but enhances DNA polymerase ζ - dependent spontaneous mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepchenkova, E I; Tarakhovskaya, E R; Siebler, H M; Pavlov, Y I

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are duplicated by a complex machinery, utilizing high fidelity replicative B-family DNA polymerases (pols) α, δ and ε. Specialized error-prone pol ζ, the fourth B-family member, is recruited when DNA synthesis by the accurate trio is impeded by replication stress or DNA damage. The damage tolerance mechanism dependent on pol ζ prevents DNA/genome instability and cell death at the expense of increased mutation rates. The pol switches occurring during this specialized replication are not fully understood. The loss of pol ζ results in the absence of induced mutagenesis and suppression of spontaneous mutagenesis. Disruption of the Fe-S cluster motif that abolish the interaction of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the catalytic subunit of pol ζ with its accessory subunits, which are shared with pol δ, leads to a similar defect in induced mutagenesis. Intriguingly, the pol3-13 mutation that affects the Fe-S cluster in the CTD of the catalytic subunit of pol δ also leads to defective induced mutagenesis, suggesting the possibility that Fe-S clusters are essential for the pol switches during replication of damaged DNA. We confirmed that yeast strains with the pol3-13 mutation are UV-sensitive and defective in UV-induced mutagenesis. However, they have increased spontaneous mutation rates. We found that this increase is dependent on functional pol ζ. In the pol3-13 mutant strain with defective pol δ, there is a sharp increase in transversions and complex mutations, which require functional pol ζ, and an increase in the occurrence of large deletions, whose size is controlled by pol ζ. Therefore, the pol3-13 mutation abrogates pol ζ-dependent induced mutagenesis, but allows for pol ζ recruitment for the generation of spontaneous mutations and prevention of larger deletions. These results reveal differential control of the two major types of pol ζ-dependent mutagenesis by the Fe-S cluster present in replicative pol δ. Copyright © 2016

  17. Site-specific genomic (SSG and random domain-localized (RDL mutagenesis in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honigberg Saul M

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A valuable weapon in the arsenal available to yeast geneticists is the ability to introduce specific mutations into yeast genome. In particular, methods have been developed to introduce deletions into the yeast genome using PCR fragments. These methods are highly efficient because they do not require cloning in plasmids. Results We have modified the existing method for introducing deletions in the yeast (S. cerevisiae genome using PCR fragments in order to target point mutations to this genome. We describe two PCR-based methods for directing point mutations into the yeast genome such that the final product contains no other disruptions. In the first method, site-specific genomic (SSG mutagenesis, a specific point mutation is targeted into the genome. In the second method, random domain-localized (RDL mutagenesis, a mutation is introduced at random within a specific domain of a gene. Both methods require two sequential transformations, the first transformation integrates the URA3 marker into the targeted locus, and the second transformation replaces URA3 with a PCR fragment containing one or a few mutations. This PCR fragment is synthesized using a primer containing a mutation (SSG mutagenesis or is synthesized by error-prone PCR (RDL mutagenesis. In SSG mutagenesis, mutations that are proximal to the URA3 site are incorporated at higher frequencies than distal mutations, however mutations can be introduced efficiently at distances of at least 500 bp from the URA3 insertion. In RDL mutagenesis, to ensure that incorporation of mutations occurs at approximately equal frequencies throughout the targeted region, this region is deleted at the same time URA3 is integrated. Conclusion SSG and RDL mutagenesis allow point mutations to be easily and efficiently incorporated into the yeast genome without disrupting the native locus.

  18. Hypoxia induces mitochondrial mutagenesis and dysfunction in inflammatory arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Biniecka, Monika

    2012-02-01

    mitochondrial genome mutagenesis, and antioxidants significantly rescue these events.

  19. 2012 Gordon Research Conference on Mutagenesis - Formal Schedule and Speaker/Poster Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demple, Bruce [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). School of Medicine

    2012-08-24

    The delicate balance among cellular pathways that control mutagenic changes in DNA will be the focus of the 2012 Mutagenesis Gordon Research Conference. Mutagenesis is essential for evolution, while genetic stability maintains cellular functions in all organisms from microbes to metazoans. Different systems handle DNA lesions at various times of the cell cycle and in different places within the nucleus, and inappropriate actions can lead to mutations. While mutation in humans is closely linked to disease, notably cancers, mutational systems can also be beneficial. The conference will highlight topics of beneficial mutagenesis, including full establishment of the immune system, cell survival mechanisms, and evolution and adaptation in microbial systems. Equal prominence will be given to detrimental mutation processes, especially those involved in driving cancer, neurological diseases, premature aging, and other threats to human health. Provisional session titles include Branching Pathways in Mutagenesis; Oxidative Stress and Endogenous DNA Damage; DNA Maintenance Pathways; Recombination, Good and Bad; Problematic DNA Structures; Localized Mutagenesis; Hypermutation in the Microbial World; and Mutation and Disease.

  20. MDC-Analyzer: a novel degenerate primer design tool for the construction of intelligent mutagenesis libraries with contiguous sites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tang, Lixia; Wang, Xiong; Ru, Beibei; Sun, Hengfei; Huang, Jian; Gao, Hui

    2014-01-01

    ...) for the automated design of intelligent mutagenesis libraries that can completely cover user-defined randomized sequences, especially when multiple contiguous and/or adjacent sites are targeted...

  1. Autosomal dominant hypercalciuria in a mouse model due to a mutation of the epithelial calcium channel, TRPV5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nellie Y Loh

    Full Text Available Hypercalciuria is a major cause of nephrolithiasis, and is a common and complex disorder involving genetic and environmental factors. Identification of genetic factors for monogenic forms of hypercalciuria is hampered by the limited availability of large families, and to facilitate such studies, we screened for hypercalciuria in mice from an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis programme. We identified a mouse with autosomal dominant hypercalciuria (HCALC1. Linkage studies mapped the Hcalc1 locus to a 11.94 Mb region on chromosome 6 containing the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, members 5 (Trpv5 and 6 (Trpv6 genes. DNA sequence analysis of coding regions, intron-exon boundaries and promoters of Trpv5 and Trpv6 identified a novel T to C transition in codon 682 of TRPV5, mutating a conserved serine to a proline (S682P. Compared to wild-type littermates, heterozygous (Trpv5(682P/+ and homozygous (Trpv5(682P/682P mutant mice had hypercalciuria, polyuria, hyperphosphaturia and a more acidic urine, and ∼10% of males developed tubulointerstitial nephritis. Trpv5(682P/682P mice also had normal plasma parathyroid hormone but increased 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3 concentrations without increased bone resorption, consistent with a renal defect for the hypercalciuria. Expression of the S682P mutation in human embryonic kidney cells revealed that TRPV5-S682P-expressing cells had a lower baseline intracellular calcium concentration than wild-type TRPV5-expressing cells, suggesting an altered calcium permeability. Immunohistological studies revealed a selective decrease in TRPV5-expression from the renal distal convoluted tubules of Trpv5(682P/+ and Trpv5(682P/682P mice consistent with a trafficking defect. In addition, Trpv5(682P/682P mice had a reduction in renal expression of the intracellular calcium-binding protein, calbindin-D(28K, consistent with a specific defect in TRPV5-mediated renal calcium reabsorption. Thus, our findings

  2. Sub-lethal antibiotic treatment leads to multidrug resistance via radical-induced mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohanski, Michael A.; DePristo, Mark A.; Collins, James J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Antibiotic resistance arises through mechanisms such as selection of naturally occurring resistant mutants and horizontal gene transfer. Recently, oxidative stress has been implicated as one of the mechanisms whereby bactericidal antibiotics kill bacteria. Here we show that sub-lethal levels of bactericidal antibiotics induce mutagenesis, resulting in heterogeneous increases in the minimum inhibitory concentration for a range of antibiotics, irrespective of the drug target. This increase in mutagenesis correlates with an increase in ROS, and is prevented by the ROS scavenger thiourea and by anaerobic conditions, indicating that sub-lethal concentrations of antibiotics induce mutagenesis by stimulating the production of ROS. We demonstrate that these effects can lead to mutant strains that are sensitive to the applied antibiotic but resistant to other antibiotics. This work establishes a radical-based molecular mechanism whereby sub-lethal levels of antibiotics can lead to multidrug resistance, which has important implications for the widespread use and misuse of antibiotics. PMID:20159551

  3. Environmental Stress Induces Trinucleotide Repeat Mutagenesis in Human Cells by Alt-Nonhomologous End Joining Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Lin, Yunfu; Yotnda, Patricia; Wilson, John H

    2016-07-31

    Multiple pathways modulate the dynamic mutability of trinucleotide repeats (TNRs), which are implicated in neurodegenerative disease and evolution. Recently, we reported that environmental stresses induce TNR mutagenesis via stress responses and rereplication, with more than 50% of mutants carrying deletions or insertions-molecular signatures of DNA double-strand break repair. We now show that knockdown of alt-nonhomologous end joining (alt-NHEJ) components-XRCC1, LIG3, and PARP1-suppresses stress-induced TNR mutagenesis, in contrast to the components of homologous recombination and NHEJ, which have no effect. Thus, alt-NHEJ, which contributes to genetic mutability in cancer cells, also plays a novel role in environmental stress-induced TNR mutagenesis. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Software-Supported USER Cloning Strategies for Site-Directed Mutagenesis and DNA Assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genee, Hans Jasper; Bonde, Mads Tvillinggaard; Bagger, Frederik Otzen

    2015-01-01

    USER cloning is a fast and versatile method for engineering of plasmid DNA. We have developed a user friendly Web server tool that automates the design of optimal PCR primers for several distinct USER cloning-based applications. Our Web server, named AMUSER (Automated DNA Modifications with USER...... cloning), facilitates DNA assembly and introduction of virtually any type of site-directed mutagenesis by designing optimal PCR primers for the desired genetic changes. To demonstrate the utility, we designed primers for a simultaneous two-position site-directed mutagenesis of green fluorescent protein...

  5. Ultrafast solvation dynamics at internal site of staphylococcal nuclease investigated by site-directed mutagenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Guang-yu, Gao; Wei, Wang; Shu-feng, Wang; Zhong, Dongping; Qi-huang, Gong

    2014-01-01

    Solvation is essential for protein activities. To study internal solvation of protein, site-directed mutagenesis is applied. Intrinsic fluorescent probe, tryptophan, is inserted into desired position inside protein molecule for ultrafast spectroscopic study. Here we review this unique method for protein dynamics researches. We introduce the frontiers of protein solvation, site-directed mutagenesis, protein stability and characteristics, and the spectroscopic methods. Then we present time-resolved spectroscopic dynamics of solvation dynamics inside caves of active sites. The studies are carried out on a globular protein, staphylococcal nuclease. The solvation at internal sites of the caves indicate clear characteristics of local environment. These solvation behaviors correlated to the enzyme activity directly.

  6. Use of the Photoactic Ability of a Bacterium to Teach the Genetic Principles of Random Mutagenesis & Mutant Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Din, Neena; Bird, Terry H.; Berleman, James E.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors present a laboratory activity that relies on the use of a very versatile bacterial system to introduce the concept of how mutagenesis can be used for molecular and genetic analysis of living organisms. They have used the techniques of random mutagenesis and selection/screening to obtain strains of the organism "R.…

  7. Ribozyme Mediated gRNA Generation for In Vitro and In Vivo CRISPR/Cas9 Mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Ashley Shu Mei; Ingham, Philip W.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 is now regularly used for targeted mutagenesis in a wide variety of systems. Here we report the use of ribozymes for the generation of gRNAs both in vitro and in zebrafish embryos. We show that incorporation of ribozymes increases the types of promoters and number of target sites available for mutagenesis without compromising mutagenesis efficiency. We have tested this by comparing the efficiency of mutagenesis of gRNA constructs with and without ribozymes and also generated a transgenic zebrafish expressing gRNA using a heat shock promoter (RNA polymerase II-dependent promoter) that was able to induce mutagenesis of its target. Our method provides a streamlined approach to test gRNA efficiency as well as increasing the versatility of conditional gene knock out in zebrafish. PMID:27832146

  8. Ribozyme Mediated gRNA Generation for In Vitro and In Vivo CRISPR/Cas9 Mutagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Teck Ho Lee

    Full Text Available CRISPR/Cas9 is now regularly used for targeted mutagenesis in a wide variety of systems. Here we report the use of ribozymes for the generation of gRNAs both in vitro and in zebrafish embryos. We show that incorporation of ribozymes increases the types of promoters and number of target sites available for mutagenesis without compromising mutagenesis efficiency. We have tested this by comparing the efficiency of mutagenesis of gRNA constructs with and without ribozymes and also generated a transgenic zebrafish expressing gRNA using a heat shock promoter (RNA polymerase II-dependent promoter that was able to induce mutagenesis of its target. Our method provides a streamlined approach to test gRNA efficiency as well as increasing the versatility of conditional gene knock out in zebrafish.

  9. Effect of dose and dosing rate on the mutagenesis of nitric oxide in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of dose and dosing rate on the mutagenesis of nitric oxide in supF shuttle vector. Ji Hye Kim1 and ... Purpose: To determine how the dose and rate of NO• treatment affects mutagenic responses. Methods: Shuttle vector pSP189 was ... form a strong oxidant and nitrating agent, peroxynitrite (ONOO-), which can initiate.

  10. Highly efficient CRISPR/Cas9-mediated targeted mutagenesis of multiple genes in Populus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting-ting; Fan, Di; Ran, Ling-yu; Jiang, Yuan-zhong; Liu, Rui; Luo, Ke-ming

    2015-10-01

    The typeⅡCRISPR/Cas9 system (Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats /CRISPR-associated 9) has been widely used in bacteria, yeast, animals and plants as a targeted genome editing technique. In previous work, we have successfully knocked out the endogenous phytoene dehydrogenase (PDS) gene in Populus tomentosa Carr. using this system. To study the effect of target design on the efficiency of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene knockout in Populus, we analyzed the efficiency of mutagenesis using different single-guide RNA (sgRNA) that target PDS DNA sequence. We found that mismatches between the sgRNA and the target DNA resulted in decreased efficiency of mutagenesis and even failed mutagenesis. Moreover, complementarity between the 3' end nucleotide of sgRNA and target DNA is especially crucial for efficient mutagenesis. Further sequencing analysis showed that two PDS homologs in Populus, PtPDS1 and PtPDS2, could be knocked out simultaneously using this system with 86.4% and 50% efficiency, respectively. These results indicated the possibility of introducing mutations in two or more endogenous genes efficiently and obtaining multi-mutant strains of Populus using this system. We have indeed generated several knockout mutants of transcription factors and structural genes in Populus, which establishes a foundation for future studies of gene function and genetic improvement of Populus.

  11. Identification of a novel streptococcal gene cassette mediating SOS mutagenesis in Streptococcus uberis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varhimo, Emilia; Savijoki, Kirsi; Jalava, Jari; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Varmanen, Pekka

    Streptococci have been considered to lack the classical SOS response, defined by increased mutation after UV exposure and regulation by LexA. Here we report the identification of a potential self-regulated SOS mutagenesis gene cassette in the Streptococcaceae family. Exposure to UV light was found

  12. Construction of "small-intelligent" focused mutagenesis libraries using well-designed combinatorial degenerate primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lixia; Gao, Hui; Zhu, Xuechen; Wang, Xiong; Zhou, Ming; Jiang, Rongxiang

    2012-03-01

    Site-saturation mutagenesis is a powerful tool for protein optimization due to its efficiency and simplicity. A degenerate codon NNN or NNS (K) is often used to encode the 20 standard amino acids, but this will produce redundant codons and cause uneven distribution of amino acids in the constructed library. Here we present a novel "small-intelligent" strategy to construct mutagenesis libraries that have a minimal gene library size without inherent amino acid biases, stop codons, or rare codons of Escherichia coli by coupling well-designed combinatorial degenerate primers with suitable PCR-based mutagenesis methods. The designed primer mixture contains exactly one codon per amino acid and thus allows the construction of small-intelligent mutagenesis libraries with one gene per protein. In addition, the software tool DC-Analyzer was developed to assist in primer design according to the user-defined randomization scheme for library construction. This small-intelligent strategy was successfully applied to the randomization of halohydrin dehalogenases with one or two randomized sites. With the help of DC-Analyzer, the strategy was proven to be as simple as NNS randomization and could serve as a general tool to efficiently randomize target genes at positions of interest.

  13. Mutagenesis effects of X-irradiation on the germination, growth and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The time of exposure and mutagenesis effects of X-ray on the germination, growth and development of maize (Zea mays) seeds have been investigated employing a nuclear source, (90Sr as X-ray source; 3mA, 70kv). Five sects of zea mays seeds in different packs were irradiated in different times of exposure and later ...

  14. Bromination of deoxycytidine by eosinophil peroxidase: A mechanism for mutagenesis by oxidative damage of nucleotide precursors

    OpenAIRE

    Henderson, Jeffrey P.; Byun, Jaeman; Williams, Michelle V.; McCormick, Michael L.; Parks, William C.; Ridnour, Lisa A.; Heinecke, Jay W.

    2001-01-01

    Oxidants generated by eosinophils during chronic inflammation may lead to mutagenesis in adjacent epithelial cells. Eosinophil peroxidase, a heme enzyme released by eosinophils, generates hypobromous acid that damages tissue in inflammatory conditions. We show that human eosinophils use eosinophil peroxidase to produce 5-bromodeoxycytidine. Flow cytometric, immunohistochemical, and mass spectrometric analyses all demonstrated that 5-bromodeoxycytidine generated by ...

  15. Random mutagenesis of human serine racemase reveals residues important for the enzymatic activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hoffman, Hillary Elizabeth; Jirásková, Jana; Zvelebil, M.; Konvalinka, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 1 (2010), s. 59-79 ISSN 0010-0765 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : D-serine * serine racemase * random mutagenesis Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 0.853, year: 2010

  16. One-Tube-Only Standardized Site-Directed Mutagenesis: An Alternative Approach to Generate Amino Acid Substitution Collections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janire Mingo

    Full Text Available Site-directed mutagenesis (SDM is a powerful tool to create defined collections of protein variants for experimental and clinical purposes, but effectiveness is compromised when a large number of mutations is required. We present here a one-tube-only standardized SDM approach that generates comprehensive collections of amino acid substitution variants, including scanning- and single site-multiple mutations. The approach combines unified mutagenic primer design with the mixing of multiple distinct primer pairs and/or plasmid templates to increase the yield of a single inverse-PCR mutagenesis reaction. Also, a user-friendly program for automatic design of standardized primers for Ala-scanning mutagenesis is made available. Experimental results were compared with a modeling approach together with stochastic simulation data. For single site-multiple mutagenesis purposes and for simultaneous mutagenesis in different plasmid backgrounds, combination of primer sets and/or plasmid templates in a single reaction tube yielded the distinct mutations in a stochastic fashion. For scanning mutagenesis, we found that a combination of overlapping primer sets in a single PCR reaction allowed the yield of different individual mutations, although this yield did not necessarily follow a stochastic trend. Double mutants were generated when the overlap of primer pairs was below 60%. Our results illustrate that one-tube-only SDM effectively reduces the number of reactions required in large-scale mutagenesis strategies, facilitating the generation of comprehensive collections of protein variants suitable for functional analysis.

  17. An efficient method for multiple site-directed mutagenesis using type IIs restriction enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Xu, Kun; Xin, Ying; Zhang, Zhiying

    2015-05-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) methods are very important in modern molecular biology, biochemistry, and protein engineering. Here, we present a novel SDM method that can be used for multiple mutation generation using type IIs restriction enzymes. This approach is faster and more convenient than the overlap polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method due to its having fewer reaction steps and being cheaper than, but as convenient as, enzymatic assembly. We illustrate the usefulness of our method by introducing three mutations into the bacterial Streptococcus thermophilus Cas9 (bStCas9) gene, converting the humanized S. thermophilus Cas9 (hStCas9) gene into nuclease dead or H847A nickase mutants and generating sunnyTALEN mutagenesis from a wild-type TALEN backbone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Transposon Tn5 mutagenesis of pseudomonas fluorescens to isolate mutants deficient in antibacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, N; Jahn, D; Jayaraman, K; Marahiel, M A

    1994-01-15

    Pseudomonas fluorescens was subjected to insertion mutagenesis studies using the transposon Tn5-GM to generate mutants deficient in antibacterial activity minus mutants. The transposon located on the temperature-sensitive plasmid pCHR84 was conjugally transferred into the non-pathogenic pseudomonad using the triparental mating procedure. Random integration of Tn5-GM into the chromosome of P. fluorescens was achieved by heat treatment of the transformed cells at 42 degrees C. Approximately 2% of transconjugants revealed an auxotrophic phenotype indicating efficient integration of the employed transposon into the chromosome of P. fluorescens. One transposon insertion mutant was obtained showing an antibacterial activity minus phenotype. This mutant (MM-7) was found to be defective in the production of an unidentified antibacterial compound against B. subtilis. These results introduce Tn5 transposon mutagenesis as a new useful tool for the molecular analysis of P. fluorescens.

  19. Prediction of enzyme mutant activity using computational mutagenesis and incremental transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basit, Nada; Wechsler, Harry

    2011-01-01

    Wet laboratory mutagenesis to determine enzyme activity changes is expensive and time consuming. This paper expands on standard one-shot learning by proposing an incremental transductive method (T2bRF) for the prediction of enzyme mutant activity during mutagenesis using Delaunay tessellation and 4-body statistical potentials for representation. Incremental learning is in tune with both eScience and actual experimentation, as it accounts for cumulative annotation effects of enzyme mutant activity over time. The experimental results reported, using cross-validation, show that overall the incremental transductive method proposed, using random forest as base classifier, yields better results compared to one-shot learning methods. T2bRF is shown to yield 90% on T4 and LAC (and 86% on HIV-1). This is significantly better than state-of-the-art competing methods, whose performance yield is at 80% or less using the same datasets.

  20. Prediction of Enzyme Mutant Activity Using Computational Mutagenesis and Incremental Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Basit

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Wet laboratory mutagenesis to determine enzyme activity changes is expensive and time consuming. This paper expands on standard one-shot learning by proposing an incremental transductive method (T2bRF for the prediction of enzyme mutant activity during mutagenesis using Delaunay tessellation and 4-body statistical potentials for representation. Incremental learning is in tune with both eScience and actual experimentation, as it accounts for cumulative annotation effects of enzyme mutant activity over time. The experimental results reported, using cross-validation, show that overall the incremental transductive method proposed, using random forest as base classifier, yields better results compared to one-shot learning methods. T2bRF is shown to yield 90% on T4 and LAC (and 86% on HIV-1. This is significantly better than state-of-the-art competing methods, whose performance yield is at 80% or less using the same datasets.

  1. Random transposon mutagenesis of the Saccharopolyspora erythraea genome reveals additional genes influencing erythromycin biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedashchin, Andrij; Cernota, William H; Gonzalez, Melissa C; Leach, Benjamin I; Kwan, Noelle; Wesley, Roy K; Weber, J Mark

    2015-11-01

    A single cycle of strain improvement was performed in Saccharopolyspora erythraea mutB and 15 genotypes influencing erythromycin production were found. Genotypes generated by transposon mutagenesis appeared in the screen at a frequency of ~3%. Mutations affecting central metabolism and regulatory genes were found, as well as hydrolases, peptidases, glycosyl transferases and unknown genes. Only one mutant retained high erythromycin production when scaled-up from micro-agar plug fermentations to shake flasks. This mutant had a knockout of the cwh1 gene (SACE_1598), encoding a cell-wall-associated hydrolase. The cwh1 knockout produced visible growth and morphological defects on solid medium. This study demonstrated that random transposon mutagenesis uncovers strain improvement-related genes potentially useful for strain engineering. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Transposon mutagenesis identifies genes that cooperate with mutant Pten in breast cancer progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Roberto; Lee, Song-Choon; Hon-Kim Ban, Kenneth; Guzman-Rojas, Liliana; Mann, Michael B.; Newberg, Justin Y.; McNoe, Leslie A.; Selvanesan, Luxmanan; Ward, Jerrold M.; Rust, Alistair G.; Chin, Kuan-Yew; Black, Michael A.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Copeland, Neal G.

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) has the worst prognosis of any breast cancer subtype. To better understand the genetic forces driving TNBC, we performed a transposon mutagenesis screen in a phosphatase and tensin homolog (Pten) mutant mice and identified 12 candidate trunk drivers and a much larger number of progression genes. Validation studies identified eight TNBC tumor suppressor genes, including the GATA-like transcriptional repressor TRPS1. Down-regulation of TRPS1 in TNBC cells promoted epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) by deregulating multiple EMT pathway genes, in addition to increasing the expression of SERPINE1 and SERPINB2 and the subsequent migration, invasion, and metastasis of tumor cells. Transposon mutagenesis has thus provided a better understanding of the genetic forces driving TNBC and discovered genes with potential clinical importance in TNBC. PMID:27849608

  3. Back to BAC: The Use of Infectious Clone Technologies for Viral Mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robyn N. Hall

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC vectors were first developed to facilitate the propagation and manipulation of large DNA fragments in molecular biology studies for uses such as genome sequencing projects and genetic disease models. To facilitate these studies, methodologies have been developed to introduce specific mutations that can be directly applied to the mutagenesis of infectious clones (icBAC using BAC technologies. This has resulted in rapid identification of gene function and expression at unprecedented rates. Here we review the major developments in BAC mutagenesis in vitro. This review summarises the technologies used to construct and introduce mutations into herpesvirus icBAC. It also explores developing technologies likely to provide the next leap in understanding these important viruses.

  4. Cell-mediated mutagenesis and cell transformation of mammalian cells by chemical carcinogens. [Rats, hamsters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huberman, E.; Langenbach, R.

    1977-01-01

    We have developed a cell-mediated mutagenesis assay in which cells with the appropriate markers for mutagenesis are co-cultivated with either lethally irradiated rodent embryonic cells that can metabolize carcinogenic hydrocarbons or with primary rat liver cells that can metabolize chemicals carcinogenic to the liver. During co-cultivation, the reactive metabolites of the procarcinogen appear to be transmitted to the mutable cells and induce mutations in them. Assays of this type make it possible to demonstrate a relationship between carcinogenic potency of the chemicals and their ability to induce mutations in mammalian cells. In addition, by simultaneously comparing the frequencies of transformation and mutation induced in normal diploid hamster cells by benzo(a)pyrene (BP) and one of its metabolites, it is possible to estimate the genetic target size for cell transformation in vitro.

  5. Model of SOS-induced mutagenesis in bacteria Escherichia coli under ultraviolet irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, Oleg V; Krasavin, Evgeny A; Parkhomenko, Alexander Yu

    2009-12-07

    A mathematical model of the mutation process in bacteria Escherichia coli induced by ultraviolet radiation is developed. Our model is based on the experimental data characterizing the main processes of the bacterial SOS response. Here we have modeled a whole sequence of the events leading to the fixation of the primary DNA lesion as a point mutation. A quantitative analysis of the key ways of the SOS mutagenesis was performed in terms of modern system biology. The dynamic changes of the basic SOS protein concentrations and the process of the translesion synthesis by the modified replication complex are described quantitatively. We have also demonstrated the applicability of the developed model to the description of the mutagenesis in individual genes. As an example, an estimation of the mutation frequency in E. coli's lacI gene is performed.

  6. Altered lipid accumulation in Nannochloropsis salina CCAP849/3 following EMS and UV induced mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.A. Beacham

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae have potential as a chemical feed stock in a range of industrial applications. Nannochloropsis salina was subject to EMS mutagenesis and the highest lipid containing cells selected using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Assessment of growth, lipid content and fatty acid composition identified mutant strains displaying a range of altered traits including changes in the PUFA content and a total FAME increase of up to 156% that of the wild type strain. Combined with a reduction in growth this demonstrated a productivity increase of up to 76%. Following UV mutagenesis, lipid accumulation of the mutant cultures was elevated to more than 3 fold that of the wild type strain, however reduced growth rates resulted in a reduction in overall productivity. Changes observed are indicative of alterations to the regulation of the omega 6 Kennedy pathway. The importance of these variations in physiology for industrial applications such as biofuel production is discussed.

  7. Bromination of deoxycytidine by eosinophil peroxidase: A mechanism for mutagenesis by oxidative damage of nucleotide precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Jeffrey P.; Byun, Jaeman; Williams, Michelle V.; McCormick, Michael L.; Parks, William C.; Ridnour, Lisa A.; Heinecke, Jay W.

    2001-01-01

    Oxidants generated by eosinophils during chronic inflammation may lead to mutagenesis in adjacent epithelial cells. Eosinophil peroxidase, a heme enzyme released by eosinophils, generates hypobromous acid that damages tissue in inflammatory conditions. We show that human eosinophils use eosinophil peroxidase to produce 5-bromodeoxycytidine. Flow cytometric, immunohistochemical, and mass spectrometric analyses all demonstrated that 5-bromodeoxycytidine generated by eosinophil peroxidase was taken up by cultured cells and incorporated into genomic DNA as 5-bromodeoxyuridine. Although previous studies have focused on oxidation of chromosomal DNA, our observations suggest another mechanism for oxidative damage of DNA. In this scenario, peroxidase-catalyzed halogenation of nucleotide precursors yields products that subsequently can be incorporated into DNA. Because the thymine analog 5-BrUra mispairs with guanine in DNA, generation of brominated pyrimidines by eosinophils might constitute a mechanism for cytotoxicity and mutagenesis at sites of inflammation. PMID:11172002

  8. Altered lipid accumulation in Nannochloropsis salina CCAP849/3 following EMS and UV induced mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beacham, T A; Macia, V Mora; Rooks, P; White, D A; Ali, S T

    2015-09-01

    Microalgae have potential as a chemical feed stock in a range of industrial applications. Nannochloropsis salina was subject to EMS mutagenesis and the highest lipid containing cells selected using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Assessment of growth, lipid content and fatty acid composition identified mutant strains displaying a range of altered traits including changes in the PUFA content and a total FAME increase of up to 156% that of the wild type strain. Combined with a reduction in growth this demonstrated a productivity increase of up to 76%. Following UV mutagenesis, lipid accumulation of the mutant cultures was elevated to more than 3 fold that of the wild type strain, however reduced growth rates resulted in a reduction in overall productivity. Changes observed are indicative of alterations to the regulation of the omega 6 Kennedy pathway. The importance of these variations in physiology for industrial applications such as biofuel production is discussed.

  9. Cloning and mutagenesis of a herpesvirus genome as an infectious bacterial artificial chromosome

    OpenAIRE

    Messerle, Martin; Crnkovic, Irena; Hammerschmidt, Wolfgang; Ziegler, Heike; Koszinowski, Ulrich H

    1997-01-01

    A strategy for cloning and mutagenesis of an infectious herpesvirus genome is described. The mouse cytomegalovirus genome was cloned and maintained as a 230 kb bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) in E. coli. Transfection of the BAC plasmid into eukaryotic cells led to a productive virus infection. The feasibility to introduce targeted mutations into the BAC cloned virus genome was shown by mutation of the immediate-early 1 gene and generation of a mutant virus. Thus, the complete constructi...

  10. Prevention of mutagenesis: new potential mechanisms of metformin action in neoplastic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bost, Frédéric; Ben-Sahra, Issam; Tanti, Jean-François

    2012-04-01

    Several experimental and epidemiologic studies have shown that the antidiabetes drug metformin has antitumor properties. The report by Algire and colleagues in this issue of the journal (beginning on page 536) shows for the first time that metformin reduces mutagenesis induced by reactive oxygen species. This report offers new perspectives on metformin in cancer prevention and provides a new mechanism for the reduction of cancer risk in diabetic patients treated with this drug. 2012 AACR

  11. General Mutagenesis of F Plasmid TraI Reveals Its Role in Conjugative Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Haft, Rembrandt J. F.; Palacios, Gilberto; Nguyen, Tran; Mally, Manuela; Gachelet, Eliora G.; Zechner, Ellen L.; Traxler, Beth

    2006-01-01

    Bacteria commonly exchange genetic information by the horizontal transfer of conjugative plasmids. In gram-negative conjugation, a relaxase enzyme is absolutely required to prepare plasmid DNA for transit into the recipient via a type IV secretion system. Here we report a mutagenesis of the F plasmid relaxase gene traI using in-frame, 31-codon insertions. Phenotypic analysis of our mutant library revealed that several mutant proteins are functional in conjugation, highlighting regions of TraI...

  12. Microarray analyses reveal that plant mutagenesis may induce more transcriptomic changes than transgene insertion

    OpenAIRE

    Batista, Rita; Saibo, Nelson; Lourenço, Tiago; Oliveira, Maria Margarida

    2008-01-01

    Controversy regarding genetically modified (GM) plants and their potential impact on human health contrasts with the tacit acceptance of other plants that were also modified, but not considered as GM products (e.g., varieties raised through conventional breeding such as mutagenesis). What is beyond the phenotype of these improved plants? Should mutagenized plants be treated differently from transgenics? We have evaluated the extent of transcriptome modification occurring ...

  13. A plasmid-transposon hybrid mutagenesis system effective in a broad range of Enterobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita eMonson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Random transposon mutagenesis is a powerful technique used to generate libraries of genetic insertions in many different bacterial strains. Here we develop a system facilitating random transposon mutagenesis in a range of different Gram-negative bacterial strains, including Pectobacterium atrosepticum, Citrobacter rodentium, Serratia sp. ATCC39006, Serratia plymuthica, Dickeya dadantii and many more. Transposon mutagenesis was optimized in each of these strains and three studies are presented to show the efficacy of this system. Firstly, the important agricultural pathogen D. dadantii was mutagenized. Two mutants that showed reduced protease production and one mutant producing the previously cryptic pigment, indigoidine, were identified and characterized. Secondly, the enterobacterium, Serratia sp. ATCC39006 was mutagenized and mutants incapable of producing gas vesicles, proteinaceous intracellular organelles, were identified. One of these contained a β-galactosidase transcriptional fusion within the gene gvpA1, essential for gas vesicle production. Finally, the system was used to mutate the biosynthetic gene clusters of the antifungal, anti-oomycete and anticancer polyketide, oocydin A, in the plant-associated enterobacterium, Dickeya solani MK10. The mutagenesis system was developed to allow easy identification of transposon insertion sites by sequencing, after facile generation of a replicon encompassing the transposon and adjacent DNA, post-excision. Furthermore, the system can also create transcriptional fusions with either β-galactosidase or β-glucuronidase as reporters, and exploits a variety of drug resistance markers so that multiple selectable fusions can be generated in a single strain. This system of various transposons has wide utility and can be combined in many different ways.

  14. mtDNA Mutagenesis Disrupts Pluripotent Stem Cell Function by Altering Redox Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riikka H. Hämäläinen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available mtDNA mutagenesis in somatic stem cells leads to their dysfunction and to progeria in mouse. The mechanism was proposed to involve modification of reactive oxygen species (ROS/redox signaling. We studied the effect of mtDNA mutagenesis on reprogramming and stemness of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs and show that PSCs select against specific mtDNA mutations, mimicking germline and promoting mtDNA integrity despite their glycolytic metabolism. Furthermore, mtDNA mutagenesis is associated with an increase in mitochondrial H2O2, reduced PSC reprogramming efficiency, and self-renewal. Mitochondria-targeted ubiquinone, MitoQ, and N-acetyl-L-cysteine efficiently rescued these defects, indicating that both reprogramming efficiency and stemness are modified by mitochondrial ROS. The redox sensitivity, however, rendered PSCs and especially neural stem cells sensitive to MitoQ toxicity. Our results imply that stem cell compartment warrants special attention when the safety of new antioxidants is assessed and point to an essential role for mitochondrial redox signaling in maintaining normal stem cell function.

  15. Insertional mutagenesis by a hybrid piggyBac and sleeping beauty transposon in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furushima, Kenryo; Jang, Chuan-Wei; Chen, Diane W; Xiao, Ningna; Overbeek, Paul A; Behringer, Richard R

    2012-12-01

    A hybrid piggyBac/Sleeping Beauty transposon-based insertional mutagenesis system that can be mobilized by simple breeding was established in the rat. These transposons were engineered to include gene trap sequences and a tyrosinase (Tyr) pigmentation reporter to rescue the albinism of the genetic background used in the mutagenesis strategy. Single-copy transposon insertions were transposed into the rat genome by co-injection of plasmids carrying the transposon and RNA encoding piggyBac transposase into zygotes. The levels of transgenic Tyr expression were influenced by chromosomal context, leading to transgenic rats with different pigmentation that enabled visual genotyping. Transgenic rats designed to ubiquitously express either piggyBac or Sleeping Beauty transposase were generated by standard zygote injection also on an albino background. Bigenic rats carrying single-copy transposons at known loci and transposase transgenes exhibited coat color mosaicism, indicating somatic transposition. PiggyBac or Sleeping Beauty transposase bigenic rats bred with wild-type albino rats yielded offspring with pigmentation distinct from the initial transposon insertions as a consequence of germline transposition to new loci. The germline transposition frequency for Sleeping Beauty and piggyBac was ∼10% or about one new insertion per litter. Approximately 50% of the insertions occurred in introns. Chimeric transcripts containing endogenous and gene trap sequences were identified in Gabrb1 mutant rats. This mutagenesis system based on simple crosses and visual genotyping can be used to generate a collection of single-gene mutations in the rat.

  16. Improvements to the Kunkel mutagenesis protocol for constructing primary and secondary phage-display libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Renhua; Fang, Pete; Kay, Brian K

    2012-09-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis is routinely performed in protein engineering experiments. One method, termed Kunkel mutagenesis, is frequently used for constructing libraries of peptide or protein variants in M13 bacteriophage, followed by affinity selection of phage particles. To make this method more efficient, the following two modifications were introduced: culture was incubated at 25°C for phage replication, which yielded two- to sevenfold more single-stranded DNA template compared to growth at 37°C, and restriction endonuclease recognition sites were used to remove non-recombinants. With both of the improvements, we could construct primary libraries of high complexity and that were 99-100% recombinant. Finally, with a third modification to the standard protocol of Kunkel mutagenesis, two secondary (mutagenic) libraries of a fibronectin type III (FN3) monobody were constructed with DNA segments that were amplified by error-prone and asymmetric PCR. Two advantages of this modification are that it bypasses the lengthy steps of restriction enzyme digestion and ligation, and that the pool of phage clones, recovered after affinity selection, can be used directly to generate a secondary library. Screening one of the two mutagenic libraries yielded variants that bound two- to fourfold tighter to human Pak1 kinase than the starting clone. The protocols described in this study should accelerate the discovery of phage-displayed recombinant affinity reagents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ionizing radiation-induced bystander mutagenesis and adaptation: Quantitative and temporal aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Zhou, Junqing; Baldwin, Joseph; Held, Kathryn D; Prise, Kevin M; Redmond, Robert W.; Liber, Howard L.

    2009-01-01

    This work explores several quantitative aspects of radiation-induced bystander mutagenesis in WTK1 human lymphoblast cells. Gamma-irradiation of cells was used to generate conditioned medium containing bystander signals, and that medium was transferred onto naïve recipient cells. Kinetic studies revealed that it required up to one hour to generate sufficient signal to induce the maximal level of mutations at the thymidine kinase locus in the bystander cells receiving the conditioned medium. Furthermore, it required at least one hour of exposure to the signal in the bystander cells to induce mutations. Bystander signal was fairly stable in the medium, requiring 12–24 hours to diminish. Medium that contained bystander signal was rendered ineffective by a 4-fold dilution; in contrast a greater than 20-fold decrease in the cell number irradiated to generate a bystander signal was needed to eliminate bystander-induced mutagenesis. This suggested some sort of feedback inhibition by bystander signal that prevented the signaling cells from releasing more signal. Finally, an ionizing radiation-induced adaptive response was shown to be effective in reducing bystander mutagenesis; in addition, low levels of exposure to bystander signal in the transferred medium induced adaptation that was effective in reducing mutations induced by subsequent γ-ray exposures. PMID:19695271

  18. Ionizing radiation-induced bystander mutagenesis and adaptation: Quantitative and temporal aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Ying; Zhou Junqing; Baldwin, Joseph [Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO (United States); Held, Kathryn D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Prise, Kevin M. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Redmond, Robert W. [Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Liber, Howard L., E-mail: howard.liber@colostate.edu [Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO (United States); University of Colorado Cancer Center, Denver, CO (United States)

    2009-12-01

    This work explores several quantitative aspects of radiation-induced bystander mutagenesis in WTK1 human lymphoblast cells. Gamma-irradiation of cells was used to generate conditioned medium containing bystander signals, and that medium was transferred onto naive recipient cells. Kinetic studies revealed that it required up to 1 h to generate sufficient signal to induce the maximal level of mutations at the thymidine kinase locus in the bystander cells receiving the conditioned medium. Furthermore, it required at least 1 h of exposure to the signal in the bystander cells to induce mutations. Bystander signal was fairly stable in the medium, requiring 12-24 h to diminish. Medium that contained bystander signal was rendered ineffective by a 4-fold dilution; in contrast a greater than 20-fold decrease in the cell number irradiated to generate a bystander signal was needed to eliminate bystander-induced mutagenesis. This suggested some sort of feedback inhibition by bystander signal that prevented the signaling cells from releasing more signal. Finally, an ionizing radiation-induced adaptive response was shown to be effective in reducing bystander mutagenesis; in addition, low levels of exposure to bystander signal in the transferred medium induced adaptation that was effective in reducing mutations induced by subsequent {gamma}-ray exposures.

  19. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated mutagenesis of the RIN locus that regulates tomato fruit ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yasuhiro; Nishizawa-Yokoi, Ayako; Endo, Masaki; Mikami, Masafumi; Toki, Seiichi

    2015-11-06

    Site-directed mutagenesis using genetic approaches can provide a wealth of resources for crop breeding as well as for biological research. The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated 9 endonuclease (CRISPR/Cas9) system is a novel strategy used to induce mutations in a specific genome region; the system functions in a variety of organisms, including plants. Here, we report application of the CRISPR/Cas9 system to efficient mutagenesis of the tomato genome. In this study, we targeted the tomato RIN gene, which encodes a MADS-box transcription factor regulating fruit ripening. Three regions within the gene were targeted and mutations consisting either of a single base insertion or deletion of more than three bases were found at the Cas9 cleavage sites in T0 regenerated plants. The RIN-protein-defective mutants produced incomplete-ripening fruits in which red color pigmentation was significantly lower than that of wild type, while heterologous mutants expressing the remaining wild-type gene reached full-ripening red color, confirming the important role of RIN in ripening. Several mutations that were generated at three independent target sites were inherited in the T1 progeny, confirming the applicability of this mutagenesis system in tomato. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. In vitro Inactivation of Latent HSV by Targeted Mutagenesis Using an HSV-specific Homing Endonuclease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine Aubert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Following acute infection, herpes simplex virus (HSV establishes latency in sensory neurons, from which it can reactivate and cause recurrent disease. Available antiviral therapies do not affect latent viral genomes; therefore, they do not prevent reactivation following therapy cessation. One possible curative approach involves the introduction of DNA double strand breaks in latent HSV genomes by rare-cutting endonucleases, leading to mutagenesis of essential viral genes. We tested this approach in an in vitro HSV latency model using the engineered homing endonuclease (HE HSV1m5, which recognizes a sequence in the HSV-1 gene UL19, encoding the virion protein VP5. Coexpression of the 3′-exonuclease Trex2 with HEs increased HE-mediated mutagenesis frequencies up to sixfold. Following HSV1m5/Trex2 delivery with adeno-associated viral (AAV vectors, the target site was mutated in latent HSV genomes with no detectable cell toxicity. Importantly, HSV production by latently infected cells after reactivation was decreased after HSV1m5/Trex2 exposure. Exposure to histone deacetylase inhibitors prior to HSV1m5/Trex2 treatment increased mutagenesis frequencies of latent HSV genomes another two- to fivefold, suggesting that chromatin modification may be a useful adjunct to gene-targeting approaches. These results support the continuing development of HEs and other nucleases (ZFNs, TALENs, CRISPRs for cure of chronic viral infections.

  1. In vitro Inactivation of Latent HSV by Targeted Mutagenesis Using an HSV-specific Homing Endonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, Martine; Boyle, Nicole M; Stone, Daniel; Stensland, Laurence; Huang, Meei-Li; Magaret, Amalia S; Galetto, Roman; Rawlings, David J; Scharenberg, Andrew M; Jerome, Keith R

    2014-02-04

    Following acute infection, herpes simplex virus (HSV) establishes latency in sensory neurons, from which it can reactivate and cause recurrent disease. Available antiviral therapies do not affect latent viral genomes; therefore, they do not prevent reactivation following therapy cessation. One possible curative approach involves the introduction of DNA double strand breaks in latent HSV genomes by rare-cutting endonucleases, leading to mutagenesis of essential viral genes. We tested this approach in an in vitro HSV latency model using the engineered homing endonuclease (HE) HSV1m5, which recognizes a sequence in the HSV-1 gene UL19, encoding the virion protein VP5. Coexpression of the 3'-exonuclease Trex2 with HEs increased HE-mediated mutagenesis frequencies up to sixfold. Following HSV1m5/Trex2 delivery with adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors, the target site was mutated in latent HSV genomes with no detectable cell toxicity. Importantly, HSV production by latently infected cells after reactivation was decreased after HSV1m5/Trex2 exposure. Exposure to histone deacetylase inhibitors prior to HSV1m5/Trex2 treatment increased mutagenesis frequencies of latent HSV genomes another two- to fivefold, suggesting that chromatin modification may be a useful adjunct to gene-targeting approaches. These results support the continuing development of HEs and other nucleases (ZFNs, TALENs, CRISPRs) for cure of chronic viral infections.Molecular Therapy-Nucleic Acids (2014) 3, e1; doi:10.1038/mtna.2013.75; published online 4 February 2014.

  2. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated targeted gene mutagenesis in Spodoptera litura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Hong-Lun; Xu, Jun; Tan, An-Jiang; Huang, Yong-Ping

    2016-06-01

    Custom-designed nuclease technologies such as the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-associated (Cas) system provide attractive genome editing tools for insect functional genetics. The targeted gene mutagenesis mediated by the CRISPR/Cas9 system has been achieved in several insect orders including Diptera, Lepidoptera and Coleoptera. However, little success has been reported in agricultural pests due to the lack of genomic information and embryonic microinjection techniques in these insect species. Here we report that the CRISPR/Cas9 system induced efficient gene mutagenesis in an important Lepidopteran pest Spodoptera litura. We targeted the S. litura Abdominal-A (Slabd-A) gene which is an important embryonic development gene and plays a significant role in determining the identities of the abdominal segments of insects. Direct injection of Cas9 messenger RNA and Slabd-A-specific single guide RNA (sgRNA) into S. litura embryos successfully induced the typical abd-A deficient phenotype, which shows anomalous segmentation and ectopic pigmentation during the larval stage. A polymerase chain reaction-based analysis revealed that the Cas9/sgRNA complex effectively induced a targeted mutagenesis in S. litura. These results demonstrate that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is a powerful tool for genome manipulation in Lepidopteran pests such as S. litura. © 2016 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  3. Insertional Mutagenesis by a Hybrid PiggyBac and Sleeping Beauty Transposon in the Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furushima, Kenryo; Jang, Chuan-Wei; Chen, Diane W.; Xiao, Ningna; Overbeek, Paul A.; Behringer, Richard R.

    2012-01-01

    A hybrid piggyBac/Sleeping Beauty transposon-based insertional mutagenesis system that can be mobilized by simple breeding was established in the rat. These transposons were engineered to include gene trap sequences and a tyrosinase (Tyr) pigmentation reporter to rescue the albinism of the genetic background used in the mutagenesis strategy. Single-copy transposon insertions were transposed into the rat genome by co-injection of plasmids carrying the transposon and RNA encoding piggyBac transposase into zygotes. The levels of transgenic Tyr expression were influenced by chromosomal context, leading to transgenic rats with different pigmentation that enabled visual genotyping. Transgenic rats designed to ubiquitously express either piggyBac or Sleeping Beauty transposase were generated by standard zygote injection also on an albino background. Bigenic rats carrying single-copy transposons at known loci and transposase transgenes exhibited coat color mosaicism, indicating somatic transposition. PiggyBac or Sleeping Beauty transposase bigenic rats bred with wild-type albino rats yielded offspring with pigmentation distinct from the initial transposon insertions as a consequence of germline transposition to new loci. The germline transposition frequency for Sleeping Beauty and piggyBac was ∼10% or about one new insertion per litter. Approximately 50% of the insertions occurred in introns. Chimeric transcripts containing endogenous and gene trap sequences were identified in Gabrb1 mutant rats. This mutagenesis system based on simple crosses and visual genotyping can be used to generate a collection of single-gene mutations in the rat. PMID:23023007

  4. Yeasts acquire resistance secondary to antifungal drug treatment by adaptive mutagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Quinto-Alemany

    Full Text Available Acquisition of resistance secondary to treatment both by microorganisms and by tumor cells is a major public health concern. Several species of bacteria acquire resistance to various antibiotics through stress-induced responses that have an adaptive mutagenesis effect. So far, adaptive mutagenesis in yeast has only been described when the stress is nutrient deprivation. Here, we hypothesized that adaptive mutagenesis in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans as model organisms would also take place in response to antifungal agents (5-fluorocytosine or flucytosine, 5-FC, and caspofungin, CSP, giving rise to resistance secondary to treatment with these agents. We have developed a clinically relevant model where both yeasts acquire resistance when exposed to these agents. Stressful lifestyle associated mutation (SLAM experiments show that the adaptive mutation frequencies are 20 (S. cerevisiae -5-FC, 600 (C. albicans -5-FC or 1000 (S. cerevisiae--CSP fold higher than the spontaneous mutation frequency, the experimental data for C. albicans -5-FC being in agreement with the clinical data of acquisition of resistance secondary to treatment. The spectrum of mutations in the S. cerevisiae -5-FC model differs between spontaneous and acquired, indicating that the molecular mechanisms that generate them are different. Remarkably, in the acquired mutations, an ectopic intrachromosomal recombination with an 87% homologous gene takes place with a high frequency. In conclusion, we present here a clinically relevant adaptive mutation model that fulfils the conditions reported previously.

  5. Combined mutagenesis of Rhodosporidium toruloides for improved production of carotenoids and lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chaolei; Shen, Hongwei; Zhang, Xibin; Yu, Xue; Wang, Han; Xiao, Shan; Wang, Jihui; Zhao, Zongbao K

    2016-10-01

    To improve production of lipids and carotenoids by the oleaginous yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides by screening mutant strains. Upon physical mutagenesis of the haploid strain R. toruloides np11 with an atmospheric and room temperature plasma method followed by chemical mutagenesis with nitrosoguanidine, a mutant strain, R. toruloides XR-2, formed dark-red colonies on a screening plate. When cultivated in nitrogen-limited media, XR-2 cells grew slower but accumulated 0.23 g lipids/g cell dry wt and 0.75 mg carotenoids/g CDW. To improve its production capacity, different amino acids and vitamins were supplemented. p-Aminobenzoic acid and tryptophan had beneficial effects on cell growth. When cultivated in nitrogen-limited media in the presence of selected vitamins, XR-2 accumulated 0.41 g lipids/g CDW and 0.69 mg carotenoids/g CDW. A mutant R. toruloides strain with improved production profiles for lipids and carotenoids was obtained, indicating its potential to use combined mutagenesis for a more productive phenotype.

  6. Targeted Mutagenesis, Precise Gene Editing, and Site-Specific Gene Insertion in Maize Using Cas9 and Guide RNA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Svitashev, Sergei; Young, Joshua K; Schwartz, Christine; Gao, Huirong; Falco, S Carl; Cigan, A Mark

    2015-01-01

    Targeted mutagenesis, editing of endogenous maize (Zea mays) genes, and site-specific insertion of a trait gene using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated (Cas...

  7. Site-directed, Ligase-Independent Mutagenesis (SLIM): a single-tube methodology approaching 100% efficiency in 4 h

    OpenAIRE

    Chiu, Joyce; March, Paul E.; Lee, Ryan; Tillett, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Site-directed, Ligase-Independent Mutagenesis (SLIM) is a novel PCR-mediated mutagenesis approach that can accommodate all three sequence modification types (insertion, deletion and substitution). The method utilizes an inverse PCR amplification of the template by two tailed long primers and two short primers in a single reaction with all steps carried out in one tube. The tailed primers are designed to contain the desired mutation on complementary overhangs at the terminus of PCR products. U...

  8. Tissue-specific mutagenesis by N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine as the basis for urothelial carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhiming; Kosinska, Wieslawa; Zhao, Zhong-Lin; Wu, Xue-Ru; Guttenplan, Joseph B

    2012-02-18

    Bladder cancer is one of the few cancers that have been linked to carcinogens in the environment and tobacco smoke. Of the carcinogens tested in mouse chemical carcinogenesis models, N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) is one that reproducibly causes high-grade, invasive cancers in the urinary bladder, but not in any other tissues. However, the basis for such a high-level tissue-specificity has not been explored. Using mutagenesis in lacI (Big Blue™) mice, we show here that BBN is a potent mutagen and it causes high-level of mutagenesis specifically in the epithelial cells (urothelial) of the urinary bladder. After a 2-6-week treatment of 0.05% BBN in the drinking water, mutagenesis in urothelial cells of male and female mice was about two orders of magnitude greater than the spontaneous mutation background. In contrast, mutagenesis in smooth muscle cells of the urinary bladder was about five times lower than in urothelial tissue. No appreciable increase in mutagenesis was observed in kidney, ureter, liver or forestomach. In lacI (Big Blue™) rats, BBN mutagenesis was also elevated in urothelial cells, albeit not nearly as profoundly as in mice. This provides a potential explanation as to why rats are less prone than mice to the formation of aggressive form of bladder cancer induced by BBN. Our results suggest that the propensity to BBN-triggered mutagenesis of urothelial cells underlies its heightened susceptibility to this carcinogen and that mutagenesis induced by BBN represents a novel model for initiation of bladder carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. [IXR1 and HMO1 genes jointly control the level of spontaneous mutagenesis in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, D V; Koval'tsova, S V; Peshekhonov, V T; Korolev, V G

    2010-06-01

    The yeast genes IXR1 and HMO1 encode proteins belonging to the family of chromatin nonhistone proteins, which are able to recognize and bind to irregular DNA structures. The full deletion of gene IXR1 leads to an increase in cell resistance to the lethal action of UV light, gamma-rays, and MMS, increases spontaneous mutagenesis and significantlly decreases the level of UV-induced mutations. It was earlier demonstrated in our works that the hmo 1 mutation renders cells sensitive to the lethal action of cisplatin and virtually does not affect the sensitivity to UV light. Characteristically, the rates of spontaneous and UV-induced mutagenesis in the mutant are increased. Epistatic analysis of the double mutation hmo 1 ixr1 demonstrated that the interaction of these genes in relation to the lethal effect of cisplatin and UV light, as well as UV-induced mutagenesis, is additive. This suggests that the products of genes HMO1 and IXR1 participate in different repair pathways. The ixr1 mutation significantly increases the rate of spontaneous mutagenesis mediated by replication errors, whereas mutation hmo 1 increases the rate of repair mutagenesis. In wild-type cells, the level of spontaneous mutagenesis was nearly one order of magnitude lower than that obtained in cells of the double mutant. Consequently, the combined activity of the Hmo 1 and the Ixr1 proteins provides efficient correction of both repair and replication errors.

  10. Targeted Mutagenesis of Guinea Pig Cytomegalovirus Using CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Gene Editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierle, Craig J; Anderholm, Kaitlyn M; Wang, Jian Ben; McVoy, Michael A; Schleiss, Mark R

    2016-08-01

    The cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) are among the most genetically complex mammalian viruses, with viral genomes that often exceed 230 kbp. Manipulation of cytomegalovirus genomes is largely performed using infectious bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs), which necessitates the maintenance of the viral genome in Escherichia coli and successful reconstitution of virus from permissive cells after transfection of the BAC. Here we describe an alternative strategy for the mutagenesis of guinea pig cytomegalovirus that utilizes clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9)-mediated genome editing to introduce targeted mutations to the viral genome. Transient transfection and drug selection were used to restrict lytic replication of guinea pig cytomegalovirus to cells that express Cas9 and virus-specific guide RNA. The result was highly efficient editing of the viral genome that introduced targeted insertion or deletion mutations to nonessential viral genes. Cotransfection of multiple virus-specific guide RNAs or a homology repair template was used for targeted, markerless deletions of viral sequence or to introduce exogenous sequence by homology-driven repair. As CRISPR/Cas9 mutagenesis occurs directly in infected cells, this methodology avoids selective pressures that may occur during propagation of the viral genome in bacteria and may facilitate genetic manipulation of low-passage or clinical CMV isolates. The cytomegalovirus genome is complex, and viral adaptations to cell culture have complicated the study of infection in vivo Recombineering of viral bacterial artificial chromosomes enabled the study of recombinant cytomegaloviruses. Here we report the development of an alternative approach using CRISPR/Cas9-based mutagenesis in guinea pig cytomegalovirus, a small-animal model of congenital cytomegalovirus disease. CRISPR/Cas9 mutagenesis can introduce the same types of mutations to the viral genome as bacterial

  11. Modeling insertional mutagenesis using gene length and expression in murine embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex S Nord

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available High-throughput mutagenesis of the mammalian genome is a powerful means to facilitate analysis of gene function. Gene trapping in embryonic stem cells (ESCs is the most widely used form of insertional mutagenesis in mammals. However, the rules governing its efficiency are not fully understood, and the effects of vector design on the likelihood of gene-trapping events have not been tested on a genome-wide scale.In this study, we used public gene-trap data to model gene-trap likelihood. Using the association of gene length and gene expression with gene-trap likelihood, we constructed spline-based regression models that characterize which genes are susceptible and which genes are resistant to gene-trapping techniques. We report results for three classes of gene-trap vectors, showing that both length and expression are significant determinants of trap likelihood for all vectors. Using our models, we also quantitatively identified hotspots of gene-trap activity, which represent loci where the high likelihood of vector insertion is controlled by factors other than length and expression. These formalized statistical models describe a high proportion of the variance in the likelihood of a gene being trapped by expression-dependent vectors and a lower, but still significant, proportion of the variance for vectors that are predicted to be independent of endogenous gene expression.The findings of significant expression and length effects reported here further the understanding of the determinants of vector insertion. Results from this analysis can be applied to help identify other important determinants of this important biological phenomenon and could assist planning of large-scale mutagenesis efforts.

  12. Targeted mutagenesis in tetraploid switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) using CRISPR/Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Merrick, Paul; Zhang, Zhengzhi; Ji, Chonghui; Yang, Bing; Fei, Shui-Zhang

    2018-02-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has become a powerful tool for targeted mutagenesis. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a high yielding perennial grass species that has been designated as a model biomass crop by the U.S. Department of Energy. The self-infertility and high ploidy level make it difficult to study gene function or improve germplasm. To overcome these constraints, we explored the feasibility of using CRISPR/Cas9 for targeted mutagenesis in a tetraploid cultivar 'Alamo' switchgrass. We first developed a transient assay by which a non-functional green-fluorescent protein gene containing a 1-bp frameshift insertion in its 5' coding region was successfully mutated by a Cas9/sgRNA complex resulting in its restored function. Agrobacterium-mediated stable transformation of embryogenic calli derived from mature caryopses averaged a 3.0% transformation efficiency targeting the genes of teosinte branched 1(tb1)a and b and phosphoglycerate mutase (PGM). With a single construct containing two sgRNAs targeting different regions of tb1a and tb1b genes, primary transformants (T0) containing CRISPR/Cas9-induced mutations were obtained at frequencies of 95.5% (tb1a) and 11% (tb1b), respectively, with T0 mutants exhibiting increased tiller production. Meanwhile, a mutation frequency of 13.7% was obtained for the PGM gene with a CRISPR/Cas9 construct containing a single sgRNA. Among the PGM T0 mutants, six are heterozygous and one is homozygous for a 1-bp deletion in the target region with no apparent phenotypical alterations. We show that CRISPR/Cas9 system can generate targeted mutagenesis effectively and obtain targeted homozygous mutants in T0 generation in switchgrass, circumventing the need of inbreeding. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Increased efficiency of targeted mutagenesis by CRISPR/Cas9 in plants using heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Chantal; Zhang, Fei; Mendez, Josefina; Lozano, Yamile; Chatpar, Krishna; Irish, Vivian F; Jacob, Yannick

    2018-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has greatly improved our ability to engineer targeted mutations in eukaryotic genomes. While CRISPR/Cas9 appears to work universally, the efficiency of targeted mutagenesis and the adverse generation of off-target mutations vary greatly between different organisms. In this study, we report that Arabidopsis plants subjected to heat stress at 37°C show much higher frequencies of CRISPR-induced mutations compared to plants grown continuously at the standard temperature (22°C). Using quantitative assays relying on green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter genes, we found that targeted mutagenesis by CRISPR/Cas9 in Arabidopsis is increased by approximately 5-fold in somatic tissues and up to 100-fold in the germline upon heat treatment. This effect of temperature on the mutation rate is not limited to Arabidopsis, as we observed a similar increase in targeted mutations by CRISPR/Cas9 in Citrus plants exposed to heat stress at 37°C. In vitro assays demonstrate that Cas9 from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9) is more active in creating double-stranded DNA breaks at 37°C than at 22°C, thus indicating a potential contributing mechanism for the in vivo effect of temperature on CRISPR/Cas9. This study reveals the importance of temperature in modulating SpCas9 activity in eukaryotes, and provides a simple method to increase on-target mutagenesis in plants using CRISPR/Cas9. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Alleles conferring improved fiber quality from EMS mutagenesis of elite cotton genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jinesh D; Wright, Robert J; Auld, Dick; Chandnani, Rahul; Goff, Valorie H; Ingles, Jennifer; Pierce, Gary J; Torres, Manuel J; Paterson, Andrew H

    2014-04-01

    Genetic improvements for many fiber traits are obtained by mutagenesis of elite cottons, mitigating genetic uniformity in this inbred polyploid by contributing novel alleles important to ongoing crop improvement. The elite gene pool of cotton (Gossypium spp.) has less diversity than those of most other major crops, making identification of novel alleles important to ongoing crop improvement. A total of 3,164 M5 lines resulting from ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) mutagenesis of two G. hirsutum breeding lines, TAM 94L-25 and Acala 1517-99, were characterized for basic components of fiber quality and selected yield components. Across all measured traits, the ranges of phenotypic values among the mutant lines were consistently larger than could be explained by chance (5.27-10.1 for TAM 94 L-25 and 5.29-7.94 standard deviations for Acala 1517-99-derived lines). Multi-year replicated studies confirmed a genetic basis for these differences, showing significant correlations between lines across years and environments. A subset of 157 lines selected for superior fiber qualities, including fiber elongation (22 lines), length (22), lint percent (17), fineness (23), Rd value (21), strength (19), uniformity (21) and multiple attributes in a selection index (26) were compared to 55 control lines in replicated trials in both Texas and Georgia. For all traits, mutant lines showing substantial and statistically significant improvements over control lines were found, in most cases from each of the two genetic backgrounds. This indicates that genetic improvements for a wide range of fiber traits may be obtained from mutagenesis of elite cottons. Indeed, lines selected for one fiber trait sometimes conferred additional attributes, suggesting pleiotropic effects of some mutations and offering multiple benefits for the incorporation of some alleles into mainstream breeding programs.

  15. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated targeted mutagenesis in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugano, Shigeo S; Shirakawa, Makoto; Takagi, Junpei; Matsuda, Yoriko; Shimada, Tomoo; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko; Kohchi, Takayuki

    2014-03-01

    Targeted genome modification technologies are key tools for functional genomics. The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated endonuclease Cas9 system (CRISPR/Cas9) is an emerging technology for targeted genome modification. The CRISPR/Cas9 system consists of a short guide RNA (gRNA), which specifies the target genome sequence, and the Cas9 protein, which has endonuclease activity. The CRISPR/Cas9 system has been applied to model animals and flowering plants, including rice, sorghum, wheat, tobacco and Arabidopsis. Here, we report the application of CRISPR/Cas9 to targeted mutagenesis in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha L., which has emerged as a model species for studying land plant evolution. The U6 promoter of M. polymorpha was identified and cloned to express the gRNA. The target sequence of the gRNA was designed to disrupt the gene encoding auxin response factor 1 (ARF1) in M. polymorpha. Using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, we isolated stable mutants in the gametophyte generation of M. polymorpha. CRISPR/Cas9-based site-directed mutagenesis in vivo was achieved using either the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S or M. polymorpha EF1α promoter to express Cas9. Isolated mutant individuals showing an auxin-resistant phenotype were not chimeric. Moreover, stable mutants were produced by asexual reproduction of T1 plants. Multiple arf1 alleles were easily established using CRIPSR/Cas9-based targeted mutagenesis. Our results provide a rapid and simple approach for molecular genetics in M. polymorpha, and raise the possibility that CRISPR/Cas9 may be applied to a wide variety of plant species.

  16. Mechanism of DNA alkylation-induced transcriptional stalling, lesion bypass, and mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Wang, Wei; Wu, Jiabin; Shin, Ji Hyun; Wang, Pengcheng; Unarta, Ilona Christy; Chong, Jenny; Wang, Yinsheng; Wang, Dong

    2017-08-22

    Alkylated DNA lesions, induced by both exogenous chemical agents and endogenous metabolites, interfere with the efficiency and accuracy of DNA replication and transcription. However, the molecular mechanisms of DNA alkylation-induced transcriptional stalling and mutagenesis remain unknown. In this study, we systematically investigated how RNA polymerase II (pol II) recognizes and bypasses regioisomeric O 2 -, N 3-, and O 4 -ethylthymidine ( O 2 -, N 3-, and O 4 -EtdT) lesions. We observed distinct pol II stalling profiles for the three regioisomeric EtdT lesions. Intriguingly, pol II stalling at O 2 -EtdT and N 3-EtdT sites is exacerbated by TFIIS-stimulated proofreading activity. Assessment for the impact of the EtdT lesions on individual fidelity checkpoints provided further mechanistic insights, where the transcriptional lesion bypass routes for the three EtdT lesions are controlled by distinct fidelity checkpoints. The error-free transcriptional lesion bypass route is strongly favored for the minor-groove O 2 -EtdT lesion. In contrast, a dominant error-prone route stemming from GMP misincorporation was observed for the major-groove O 4 -EtdT lesion. For the N 3-EtdT lesion that disrupts base pairing, multiple transcriptional lesion bypass routes were found. Importantly, the results from the present in vitro transcriptional studies are well correlated with in vivo transcriptional mutagenesis analysis. Finally, we identified a minor-groove-sensing motif from pol II (termed Pro-Gate loop). The Pro-Gate loop faces toward the minor groove of RNA:DNA hybrid and is involved in modulating the translocation of minor-groove alkylated DNA template after nucleotide incorporation opposite the lesion. Taken together, this work provides important mechanistic insights into transcriptional stalling, lesion bypass, and mutagenesis of alkylated DNA lesions.

  17. Construction, characterization, and mutagenesis of an anti-fluorescein single chain antibody idiotype family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denzin, L K; Voss, E W

    1992-05-05

    In addition to crystallographic studies that determined antigen contact residues for monoclonal anti-fluorescein (Fl) antibody 4-4-20 (Ka = 2.5 x 10(10) M-1), primary structure comparisons revealed idiotypically cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) 9-40 (Ka = 4.4 x 10(7) M-1), 12-40 (Ka = 4.0 x 10(8) M-1), and 5-14 (Ka = 2.4 x 10(8) M-1) possessed identical Fl contact residues, with the exception of L34His for L34Arg. Site-specific mutagenesis of single chain antibody (SCA) 4-4-20 in which L34Arg was changed to L34His resulted in approximately 1000- and 3-fold decreases in binding affinity and Qmax (maximum quenching of bound Fl), respectively, which suggested that L34Arg was directly involved in increased binding affinity and fluorescence quenching. Therefore, substitution of Arg for His at residue L34 in mAbs 9-40, 12-40, and 5-14 should result in increased binding affinity and Qmax. To facilitate site-specific mutagenesis studies, single chain derivatives of mAbs 9-40, 12-40, and 5-14 were constructed. Following expression in Escherichia coli, characterization of the SCAs demonstrated that when compared with the respective parental mAb, the SCAs possessed identical binding affinities and similar Qmax and lambda max (absorption profiles of bound Fl) values. These results validated SCA 9-40, 12-40, and 5-14 for use in site-directed mutagenesis studies. Results of mutagenesis studies indicated that substitution of L34Arg into the active sites of 9-40, 12-40, and 5-14 was not enough to produce 4-4-20-like binding characteristics. Therefore, the following single chain mutants were constructed: 9-40L34Arg/L46Val, 12-40L34Arg/L46Val and 5-14L34Arg/L46Val, 9-40L34Arg/L46Val/H101Asp and 4-4-20H101Ala. Results demonstrated that these mutations were not able to render the mutant SCAs with increased binding affinity and fluorescence quenching values. Collectively, these results suggest that the combining sites of mAb 9-40, 12-40, and 5-14 may possess different active

  18. Scaffolding functions of arrestin-2 revealed by crystal structure and mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Shawn K; Pace, Helen C; Kim, You-Me; Brenner, Charles; Benovic, Jeffrey L

    2002-03-12

    Arrestin binding to activated, phosphorylated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represents a critical step in regulation of light- and hormone-dependent signaling. Nonvisual arrestins, such as arrestin-2, interact with multiple proteins for the purpose of propagating and terminating signaling events. Using a combination of X-ray crystallography, molecular modeling, mutagenesis, and binding analysis, we reveal structural features of arrestin-2 that may enable simultaneous binding to phosphorylated receptor, SH3 domains, phosphoinositides, and beta-adaptin. The structure of full-length arrestin-2 thus provides a uniquely oriented scaffold for assembly of multiple, diverse molecules involved in GPCR signal transduction.

  19. The significance of disulfide bonding in biological activity of HB-EGF, a mutagenesis approach

    OpenAIRE

    Hoskins, J.T.; Zhou, Z.; Harding, P A

    2008-01-01

    A site-directed mutagenesis approach was taken to disrupt each of 3 disulfide bonds within human HB-EGF by substituting serine for both cysteine residues that contribute to disulfide bonding. Each HB-EGF disulfide analogue (HB-EGF-Cys/Ser108/121, HB-EGF-Cys/Ser116/132, and HB-EGF-Cys/Ser134/143) was cloned under the regulation of the mouse metallothionein (MT) promoter and stably expressed in mouse fibroblasts. HB-EGF immunoreactive proteins with Mr of 6.5, 21 and 24kDa were observed from lys...

  20. Facile Affinity Maturation of Antibody Variable Domains Using Natural Diversity Mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn E. Tiller

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The identification of mutations that enhance antibody affinity while maintaining high antibody specificity and stability is a time-consuming and laborious process. Here, we report an efficient methodology for systematically and rapidly enhancing the affinity of antibody variable domains while maximizing specificity and stability using novel synthetic antibody libraries. Our approach first uses computational and experimental alanine scanning mutagenesis to identify sites in the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs that are permissive to mutagenesis while maintaining antigen binding. Next, we mutagenize the most permissive CDR positions using degenerate codons to encode wild-type residues and a small number of the most frequently occurring residues at each CDR position based on natural antibody diversity. This mutagenesis approach results in antibody libraries with variants that have a wide range of numbers of CDR mutations, including antibody domains with single mutations and others with tens of mutations. Finally, we sort the modest size libraries (~10 million variants displayed on the surface of yeast to identify CDR mutations with the greatest increases in affinity. Importantly, we find that single-domain (VHH antibodies specific for the α-synuclein protein (whose aggregation is associated with Parkinson’s disease with the greatest gains in affinity (>5-fold have several (four to six CDR mutations. This finding highlights the importance of sampling combinations of CDR mutations during the first step of affinity maturation to maximize the efficiency of the process. Interestingly, we find that some natural diversity mutations simultaneously enhance all three key antibody properties (affinity, specificity, and stability while other mutations enhance some of these properties (e.g., increased specificity and display trade-offs in others (e.g., reduced affinity and/or stability. Computational modeling reveals that improvements in affinity

  1. Induction of apomixis and fixation of heterosis in Egyptian rice Hybrid1 line using colchicine mutagenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Reda M. Gaafar; Adel R. El Shanshoury; Ahmad A. El Hisseiwy; Mahmoud A. AbdAlhak; Aimn F. Omar; Mohammad M. Abd El Wahab; Randa S. Nofal

    2017-01-01

    It is known that hybrid rice yields 15–20% over inbred varieties in first generation because of heterosis. However, heterosis is normally broken due to segregation. Applying apomixis produces plants as a clone of mother plant and overcomes the problem of breaking heterosis. In order to fix heterosis in the Egyptian rice Hybrid1, their seeds were mutagenized in 0.2% colchicine for two time periods 24 and 50 h. After colchicine mutagenesis, rice seedlings were grown in the field till maturation...

  2. Identification of the Gene for Scleroderma in the Tsk/2 Mouse Strain: Implications for Human Scleroderma Pathogenesis and Subset Distinctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    described in 1986, when an offspring of a 101/H mouse exposed to the mutagenic agent ethylnitrosourea was noted to have tight skin in the interscapular...region (Peters and Ball, 1986). The mutagenized gene causing SSc-like signs in Tsk2/þ mice was reported to be located on chromosome 1 between 42.5 and...MJ (2000) The mutagenic action of N-ethyl-N- nitrosourea in the mouse. Mamm Genome 11:478–83 Pendergrass SA, Lemaire R, Francis IP et al. (2012

  3. Molecular evolution of Fome lignosus laccase by ethyl methane sulfonate-based random mutagenesis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Mei-Rong; Chao, Ya-Peng; Zhang, Guo-Qing; Yang, Xiu-Qing; Xue, Zhi-Quan; Qian, Shi-Jun

    2007-12-01

    In order to improve the laccase activity, mutant libraries are constructed through ethyl methane sulfonate-based (EMS) random mutagenesis. Mutagenesis improved expression 3.7-fold to 144 mgl(-1) laccase in yeast, together with a 1.4-fold increase in K(cat). Thus, the total activity is enhanced 5-fold for 2,2'-azino-bis 3-ethylbenzothiaoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS). In the presence of 0.6mM copper, the highest activity value reached 30 Uml(-1) after a 3-day cultivation at a temperature of 30 degrees C(.) In comparison with the wild type, the best mutant enzymatic properties (K(m) for ABTS and guaiacol, thermo- and pH stability, optimal pH) are not changed. Moreover, amino acid sequence analysis indicates that there are four substitutions in the best mutant laccase (Gly160Asp, Ala167Thr, Gly174Asp, and Glu234Gly). The best mutant laccase model showed that the Gly160 and Ala167 are to be found near the water channel; especially the distance of Ala167 to the Cu3a is 14.46 A. This implies that it is likely involved in the formation of water channel and that it helps facilitate the easy incoming and outgoing of water.

  4. Random Mutagenesis of the Aspergillus oryzae Genome Results in Fungal Antibacterial Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Cory A.; Brown, Stacy D.; Hayman, J. Russell

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant bacteria cause severe infections in hospitals and communities. Development of new drugs to combat resistant microorganisms is needed. Natural products of microbial origin are the source of most currently available antibiotics. We hypothesized that random mutagenesis of Aspergillus oryzae would result in secretion of antibacterial compounds. To address this hypothesis, we developed a screen to identify individual A. oryzae mutants that inhibit the growth of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in vitro. To randomly generate A. oryzae mutant strains, spores were treated with ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS). Over 3000 EMS-treated A. oryzae cultures were tested in the screen, and one isolate, CAL220, exhibited altered morphology and antibacterial activity. Culture supernatant from this isolate showed antibacterial activity against Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus, MRSA, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but not Klebsiella pneumonia or Proteus vulgaris. The results of this study support our hypothesis and suggest that the screen used is sufficient and appropriate to detect secreted antibacterial fungal compounds resulting from mutagenesis of A. oryzae. Because the genome of A. oryzae has been sequenced and systems are available for genetic transformation of this organism, targeted as well as random mutations may be introduced to facilitate the discovery of novel antibacterial compounds using this system. PMID:23983696

  5. Random Mutagenesis of the Aspergillus oryzae Genome Results in Fungal Antibacterial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cory A. Leonard

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant bacteria cause severe infections in hospitals and communities. Development of new drugs to combat resistant microorganisms is needed. Natural products of microbial origin are the source of most currently available antibiotics. We hypothesized that random mutagenesis of Aspergillus oryzae would result in secretion of antibacterial compounds. To address this hypothesis, we developed a screen to identify individual A. oryzae mutants that inhibit the growth of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA in vitro. To randomly generate A. oryzae mutant strains, spores were treated with ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS. Over 3000 EMS-treated A. oryzae cultures were tested in the screen, and one isolate, CAL220, exhibited altered morphology and antibacterial activity. Culture supernatant from this isolate showed antibacterial activity against Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus, MRSA, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but not Klebsiella pneumonia or Proteus vulgaris. The results of this study support our hypothesis and suggest that the screen used is sufficient and appropriate to detect secreted antibacterial fungal compounds resulting from mutagenesis of A. oryzae. Because the genome of A. oryzae has been sequenced and systems are available for genetic transformation of this organism, targeted as well as random mutations may be introduced to facilitate the discovery of novel antibacterial compounds using this system.

  6. An inducible tool for random mutagenesis in Aspergillus niger based on the transposon Vader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paun, Linda; Nitsche, Benjamin; Homan, Tim; Ram, Arthur F; Kempken, Frank

    2016-07-01

    The ascomycete Aspergillus niger is widely used in the biotechnology, for instance in producing most of the world's citric acid. It is also known as a major food and feed contaminant. While generation of gene knockouts for functional genomics has become feasible in ku70 mutants, analyzing gene functions or metabolic pathways remains a laborious task. An unbiased transposon-based mutagenesis approach may aid this process of analyzing gene functions by providing mutant libraries in a short time. The Vader transposon is a non-autonomous DNA-transposon, which is activated by the homologous tan1-transposase. However, in the most commonly used lab strain of A. niger (N400 strain and derivatives), we found that the transposase, encoded by the tan1 gene, is mutated and inactive. To establish a Vader transposon-based mutagenesis system in the N400 background, we expressed the functional transposase of A. niger strain CBS 513.88 under the control of an inducible promoter based on the Tet-on system, which is activated in the presence of the antibiotic doxycycline (DOX). Increasing amounts of doxycycline lead to higher Vader excision frequencies, whereas little to none activity of Vader was observed without addition of doxycycline. Hence, this system appears to be suitable for producing stable mutants in the A. niger N400 background.

  7. Evidence for a Rad18-independent frameshift mutagenesis pathway in human cell-free extracts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Régine Janel-Bintz

    Full Text Available Bypass of replication blocks by specialized DNA polymerases is crucial for cell survival but may promote mutagenesis and genome instability. To gain insight into mutagenic sub-pathways that coexist in mammalian cells, we examined N-2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF-induced frameshift mutagenesis by means of SV40-based shuttle vectors containing a single adduct. We found that in mammalian cells, as previously observed in E. coli, modification of the third guanine of two target sequences, 5'-GGG-3' (3G and 5'-GGCGCC-3' (NarI site, induces -1 and -2 frameshift mutations, respectively. Using an in vitro assay for translesion synthesis, we investigated the biochemical control of these events. We showed that Pol eta, but neither Pol iota nor Pol zeta, plays a major role in the frameshift bypass of the AAF adduct located in the 3G sequence. By complementing PCNA-depleted extracts with either a wild-type or a non-ubiquitinatable form of PCNA, we found that this Pol eta-mediated pathway requires Rad18 and ubiquitination of PCNA. In contrast, when the AAF adduct is located within the NarI site, TLS is only partially dependent upon Pol eta and Rad18, unravelling the existence of alternative pathways that concurrently bypass this lesion.

  8. Efficient and Heritable Targeted Mutagenesis in Mosses Using the CRISPR/Cas9 System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Toshihisa; Sakurai, Tetsuya; Osakabe, Yuriko; Osakabe, Keishi; Sakakibara, Hitoshi

    2016-12-01

    Targeted genome modification by RNA-guided nucleases derived from the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated nuclease 9 (Cas9) system has seen rapid development in many organisms, including several plant species. In the present study, we succeeded in introducing the CRISPR/Cas9 system into the non-model organism Scopelophila cataractae, a moss that exhibits heavy metal tolerance, and the model organism Physcomitrella patens Utilizing the process by which moss plants regenerate from protoplasts, we conducted targeted mutagenesis by expression of single-chain guide RNA (sgRNA) and Cas9 in protoplasts. Using this method, the acquisition rate of strains exhibiting phenotypic changes associated with the target genes was approximately 45-69%, and strains with phenotypic changes exhibited various insertion and deletion mutations. In addition, we report that our method is capable of multiplex targeted mutagenesis (two independent genes) and also permits the efficient introduction of large deletions (∼3 kbp). These results demonstrate that the CRISPR/Cas9 system can be used to accelerate investigations of bryology and land plant evolution. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Comparative Analysis of Context-Dependent Mutagenesis Using Human and Mouse Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofya A. Medvedeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Substitution rates strongly depend on their nucleotide context. One of the most studied examples is the excess of C > T mutations in the CG context in various groups of organisms, including vertebrates. Studies on the molecular mechanisms underlying this mutation regularity have provided insights into evolution, mutagenesis, and cancer development. Recently several other hypermutable motifs were identified in the human genome. There is an increased frequency of T > C mutations in the second position of the words ATTG and ATAG and an increased frequency of A > C mutations in the first position of the word ACAA. For a better understanding of evolution, it is of interest whether these mutation regularities are human specific or present in other vertebrates, as their presence might affect the validity of currently used substitution models and molecular clocks. A comprehensive analysis of mutagenesis in 4 bp mutation contexts requires a vast amount of mutation data. Such data may be derived from the comparisons of individual genomes or from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP databases. Using this approach, we performed a systematical comparison of mutation regularities within 2–4 bp contexts in Mus musculus and Homo sapiens and uncovered that even closely related organisms may have notable differences in context-dependent mutation regularities.

  10. Caffeine enhanced measurement of mutagenesis by low levels of [gamma]-irradiation in human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puck, T.P.; Johnson, R.; Waldren, C.A. (Eleanor Roosevelt Institute for Cancer Research, Denver, CO (United States)); Morse, H. (Univ. of Colorado Cancer Center, Denver, CO (United States))

    1993-09-01

    The well-known action of caffeine in synergizing mutagenesis (including chromosome aberrations) of agents like ionizing radiation by inhibition of cellular repair processes has been incorporated into a rapid procedure for detection of mutagenicity with high sensitivity. Effects of 5-10 rads of [gamma]-irradiation, which approximate the human lifetime dose accumulation from background radiation, can be detected in a two-day procedure using an immortalized human WBC culture. Chromosomally visible lesions are scored on cells incubated for 2 h after irradiation in the presence and absence of 1.0 mg/ml of caffeine. An eightfold amplification of scorable lesions is achieved over the action of radiation alone. This approach provides a closer approximation to absolute mutagenicity unmitigated by repair processes, which can vary in different situations. It is proposed that mutagenesis testing of this kind, using caffiene or other repair-inhibitory agents, be employed to identify mutagens in their effective concentrations to which human populations may be exposed; to detect agents such as caffeine that may synergize mutagenic actions and pose epidemiologic threats; and to discover effective anti-mutagens. Information derived from the use of such procedures may help prevent cancer and newly acquired genetic disease.

  11. Improving the activity of the subtilisin nattokinase by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Meizhi; Deng, Xiongwei; Bao, Wei; Zhu, Li; Wu, Jieyuan; Cai, Yongjun; Jia, Yan; Zheng, Zhongliang; Zou, Guolin

    2015-09-25

    Nattokinase (NK), a bacterial serine protease from Bacillus subtilis var. natto, is a potential cardiovascular drug exhibiting strong fibrinolytic activity. To broaden its commercial and medical applications, we constructed a single-mutant (I31L) and two double-mutants (M222A/I31L and T220S/I31L) by site-directed mutagenesis. Active enzymes were expressed in Escherichia coli with periplasmic secretion and were purified to homogeneity. The kinetic parameters of enzymes were examined by spectroscopy assay and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and their fibrinolytic activities were determined by fibrin plate method. The substitution of Leu(31) for Ile(31) resulted in about 2-fold enhancement of catalytic efficiency (Kcat/KM) compared with wild-type NK. The specific activities of both double-mutants (M222A/I31L and T220S/I31L) were significantly increased when compared with the single-mutants (M222A and T220S) and the oxidative stability of M222A/I31L mutant was enhanced with respect to wild-type NK. This study demonstrates the feasibility of improving activity of NK by site-directed mutagenesis and shows successful protein engineering cases to improve the activity of NK as a potent therapeutic agent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Lentiviral vector-based insertional mutagenesis identifies genes associated with liver cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranzani, Marco; Cesana, Daniela; Bartholomae, Cynthia C.; Sanvito, Francesca; Pala, Mauro; Benedicenti, Fabrizio; Gallina, Pierangela; Sergi, Lucia Sergi; Merella, Stefania; Bulfone, Alessandro; Doglioni, Claudio; von Kalle, Christof; Kim, Yoon Jun; Schmidt, Manfred; Tonon, Giovanni; Naldini, Luigi; Montini, Eugenio

    2013-01-01

    Transposons and γ-retroviruses have been efficiently used as insertional mutagens in different tissues to identify molecular culprits of cancer. However, these systems are characterized by recurring integrations that accumulate in tumor cells, hampering the identification of early cancer-driving events amongst bystander and progression-related events. We developed an insertional mutagenesis platform based on lentiviral vectors (LVV) by which we could efficiently induce hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in 3 different mouse models. By virtue of LVV’s replication-deficient nature and broad genome-wide integration pattern, LVV-based insertional mutagenesis allowed identification of 4 new liver cancer genes from a limited number of integrations. We validated the oncogenic potential of all the identified genes in vivo, with different levels of penetrance. Our newly identified cancer genes are likely to play a role in human disease, since they are upregulated and/or amplified/deleted in human HCCs and can predict clinical outcome of patients. PMID:23314173

  13. Mechanisms of mutagenesis: DNA replication in the presence of DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Binyan; Xue, Qizhen; Tang, Yong; Cao, Jia; Guengerich, F Peter; Zhang, Huidong

    2016-01-01

    Environmental mutagens cause DNA damage that disturbs replication and produces mutations, leading to cancer and other diseases. We discuss mechanisms of mutagenesis resulting from DNA damage, from the level of DNA replication by a single polymerase to the complex DNA replisome of some typical model organisms (including bacteriophage T7, T4, Sulfolobus solfataricus, Escherichia coli, yeast and human). For a single DNA polymerase, DNA damage can affect replication in three major ways: reducing replication fidelity, causing frameshift mutations, and blocking replication. For the DNA replisome, protein interactions and the functions of accessory proteins can yield rather different results even with a single DNA polymerase. The mechanism of mutation during replication performed by the DNA replisome is a long-standing question. Using new methods and techniques, the replisomes of certain organisms and human cell extracts can now be investigated with regard to the bypass of DNA damage. In this review, we consider the molecular mechanism of mutagenesis resulting from DNA damage in replication at the levels of single DNA polymerases and complex DNA replisomes, including translesion DNA synthesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Laboratory Activity to Promote Student Understanding of UV Mutagenesis and DNA Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Ernest Kouassi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Changes in DNA molecules are common, due to the effects of UV light and other external and internal mutagens. Cells have a variety of repair mechanisms which serve to maintain the accuracy of the genetic code. This activity includes a low-cost, safe and technically feasible experiment, which allows students to observe the effects of UV mutagenesis and DNA photorepair in the halophilc archaeon, Haloferax volcanii. An optional extension links this activity to topics of immediate concern to students – how exposure to UVC light contributes to skin cancer risk and the protective effects of sunscreen. Students design and carry out an experiment to test whether SPF 15 sunscreen increases the lethal exposure time for H. volcanii by a factor of 15. Throughout the activity, discussion questions engage students in actively thinking about the biological phenomena and experimental procedures and analysis. This activity is designed for students in college or university genetics, microbiology, or introductory biology courses as well as in high school honors biology courses. Teachers report that this activity was valuable in helping students understand mutagenesis and photorepair and in developing student skills in designing and analyzing experiments.

  15. Increased activity of β-glucuronidase variants produced by site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaolei; Sitasuwan, Pongkwan; Horvath, Gary; Yang, Jia; Nie, Yuzhe; Marinova, Margarita; Lee, L Andrew; Wang, Qian

    2018-02-01

    β-glucuronidase (BGus) is an essential glycosyl hydrolase which has been widely used in biological and biomedical applications. In this paper, we report the construction and screening of nineteen Escherichia coli BGus (EBGus) mutants using site-directed mutagenesis. The mutants G559N, G559S and G559T showed a 3-5 fold increase in enzyme activity in comparison to wild type EBGus. In particular, G559S, with the highest activity, showed 2-6 fold enhanced activity compared to abalone and snail BGus extracts. Moreover, the glycine to serine mutagenesis for the same site in Staphylococcus sp. RLH1 BGus (StBGus) exhibited significantly enhanced activity, which indicated the importance of the G559→S mutation on BGus function. Based on this structural analysis, we postulate that the mutation at G559 plays an important role in the stabilization of the enzyme conformation, and thereby facilitates the effective binding of substrate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Site-targeted mutagenesis for stabilization of recombinant monoclonal antibody expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehle, Verena K; Paul, Matthew J; Roberts, Victoria A; van Dolleweerd, Craig J; Ma, Julian K-C

    2016-04-01

    This study examined the degradation pattern of a murine IgG1κ monoclonal antibody expressed in and extracted from transformedNicotiana tabacum Gel electrophoresis of leaf extracts revealed a consistent pattern of recombinant immunoglobulin bands, including intact and full-length antibody, as well as smaller antibody fragments. N-terminal sequencing revealed these smaller fragments to be proteolytic cleavage products and identified a limited number of protease-sensitive sites in the antibody light and heavy chain sequences. No strictly conserved target sequence was evident, although the peptide bonds that were susceptible to proteolysis were predominantly and consistently located within or near to the interdomain or solvent-exposed regions in the antibody structure. Amino acids surrounding identified cleavage sites were mutated in an attempt to increase resistance. Different Guy's 13 antibody heavy and light chain mutant combinations were expressed transiently inN. tabacumand demonstrated intensity shifts in the fragmentation pattern, resulting in alterations to the full-length antibody-to-fragment ratio. The work strengthens the understanding of proteolytic cleavage of antibodies expressed in plants and presents a novel approach to stabilize full-length antibody by site-directed mutagenesis.-Hehle, V. K., Paul, M. J., Roberts, V. A., van Dolleweerd, C. J., Ma, J. K.-C. Site-targeted mutagenesis for stabilization of recombinant monoclonal antibody expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. © The Author(s).

  17. Role of Base Excision Repair (BER) in Transcription-associated Mutagenesis of Nutritionally Stressed Nongrowing Bacillus subtilis Cell Subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambriz-Aviña, Verónica; Yasbin, Ronald E; Robleto, Eduardo A; Pedraza-Reyes, Mario

    2016-11-01

    Compelling evidence points to transcriptional processes as important factors contributing to stationary-phase associated mutagenesis. However, it has not been documented whether or not base excision repair mechanisms play a role in modulating mutagenesis under conditions of transcriptional derepression. Here, we report on a flow cytometry-based methodology that employs a fluorescent reporter system to measure at single-cell level, the occurrence of transcription-associated mutations in nutritionally stressed B. subtilis cultures. Using this approach, we demonstrate that (i) high levels of transcription correlates with augmented mutation frequency, and (ii) mutation frequency is enhanced in nongrowing population cells deficient for deaminated (Ung, YwqL) and oxidized guanine (GO) excision repair, strongly suggesting that accumulation of spontaneous DNA lesions enhance transcription-associated mutagenesis.

  18. piggyBac transposon somatic mutagenesis with an activated reporter and tracker (PB-SMART for genetic screens in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean F Landrette

    Full Text Available Somatic forward genetic screens have the power to interrogate thousands of genes in a single animal. Retroviral and transposon mutagenesis systems in mice have been designed and deployed in somatic tissues for surveying hematopoietic and solid tumor formation. In the context of cancer, the ability to visually mark mutant cells would present tremendous advantages for identifying tumor formation, monitoring tumor growth over time, and tracking tumor infiltrations and metastases into wild-type tissues. Furthermore, locating mutant clones is a prerequisite for screening and analyzing most other somatic phenotypes. For this purpose, we developed a system using the piggyBac (PB transposon for somatic mutagenesis with an activated reporter and tracker, called PB-SMART. The PB-SMART mouse genetic screening system can simultaneously induce somatic mutations and mark mutated cells using bioluminescence or fluorescence. The marking of mutant cells enable analyses that are not possible with current somatic mutagenesis systems, such as tracking cell proliferation and tumor growth, detecting tumor cell infiltrations, and reporting tissue mutagenesis levels by a simple ex vivo visual readout. We demonstrate that PB-SMART is highly mutagenic, capable of tumor induction with low copy transposons, which facilitates the mapping and identification of causative insertions. We further integrated a conditional transposase with the PB-SMART system, permitting tissue-specific mutagenesis with a single cross to any available Cre line. Targeting the germline, the system could also be used to conduct F1 screens. With these features, PB-SMART provides an integrated platform for individual investigators to harness the power of somatic mutagenesis and phenotypic screens to decipher the genetic basis of mammalian biology and disease.

  19. A Mutagenesis Assay for Reporter Gene Screening Using Partially Degenerate Oligonucleotides of the Tandems NNT and NNC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huifen Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Not all proteins are tolerable to mutations. Whether a specific protein can be a mutable target is of importance in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industry. This study reported a novel mutagenesis assay using tandem NNT and NNC oligonucleotides to test the mutability of a candidate gene. These two tandem oligonucleotides avoid the risk of forming nonsense mutations and render flexibility of truncating or expanding the insertion size. As a reporter gene, ZeoR (zeocin resistance gene was confirmed to have a high tolerance for mutagenesis by this new assay.

  20. Ultra-high frequency ultrasound biomicroscopy and high throughput cardiovascular phenotyping in a large scale mouse mutagenesis screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoqin; Francis, Richard; Tobita, Kimimasa; Kim, Andy; Leatherbury, Linda; Lo, Cecilia W.

    2013-02-01

    Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) is ideally suited for phenotyping fetal mice for congenital heart disease (CHD), as imaging can be carried out noninvasively to provide both hemodynamic and structural information essential for CHD diagnosis. Using the UBM (Vevo 2100; 40Hz) in conjunction with the clinical ultrasound system (Acuson Sequioa C512; 15Hz), we developed a two-step screening protocol to scan thousands fetuses derived from ENU mutagenized pedigrees. A wide spectrum of CHD was detected by the UBM, which were subsequently confirmed with follow-up necropsy and histopathology examination with episcopic fluorescence image capture. CHD observed included outflow anomalies, left/right heart obstructive lesions, septal/valvular defects and cardiac situs anomalies. Meanwhile, various extracardiac defects were found, such as polydactyly, craniofacial defects, exencephaly, omphalocele-cleft palate, most of which were associated with cardiac defects. Our analyses showed the UBM was better at assessing cardiac structure and blood flow profiles, while conventional ultrasound allowed higher throughput low-resolution screening. Our study showed the integration of conventional clinical ultrasound imaging with the UBM for fetal mouse cardiovascular phenotyping can maximize the detection and recovery of CHD mutants.

  1. Genetic modification through oligonucleotide-mediated mutagenesis. A GMO regulatory challenge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breyer, Didier; Herman, Philippe; Brandenburger, Annick; Gheysen, Godelieve; Remaut, Erik; Soumillion, Patrice; Van Doorsselaere, Jan; Custers, René; Pauwels, Katia; Sneyers, Myriam; Reheul, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    In the European Union, the definition of a GMO is technology-based. This means that a novel organism will be regulated under the GMO regulatory framework only if it has been developed with the use of defined techniques. This approach is now challenged with the emergence of new techniques. In this paper, we describe regulatory and safety issues associated with the use of oligonucleotide-mediated mutagenesis to develop novel organisms. We present scientific arguments for not having organisms developed through this technique fall within the scope of the EU regulation on GMOs. We conclude that any political decision on this issue should be taken on the basis of a broad reflection at EU level, while avoiding discrepancies at international level.

  2. Highly Efficient Targeted Mutagenesis of Drosophila with the CRISPR/Cas9 System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R. Bassett

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Here, we present a simple and highly efficient method for generating and detecting mutations of any gene in Drosophila melanogaster through the use of the CRISPR/Cas9 system (clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated. We show that injection of RNA into the Drosophila embryo can induce highly efficient mutagenesis of desired target genes in up to 88% of injected flies. These mutations can be transmitted through the germline to make stable lines. Our system provides at least a 10-fold improvement in efficiency over previously published reports, enabling wider application of this technique. We also describe a simple and highly sensitive method of detecting mutations in the target gene by high-resolution melt analysis and discuss how the new technology enables the study of gene function.

  3. Site-directed mutagenesis of substrate binding sites of azoreductase from Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangfei; Zhou, Jiti; Wang, Jing; Yan, Bin; Li, Jingmei; Lu, Hong; Qu, Yuanyuan; Jin, Ruofei

    2008-05-01

    Comparison of three-dimensional structures of flavin-dependent azoreductases revealed two conserved loops around the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor. Tyr74, His75 and Lys109 in the two loops of azoreductase AZR from Rhodobacter sphaeroides were replaced with Trp, Asn and Ala/His by site-directed mutagenesis, respectively. The optimal pH values of K109H and H75N were pH 6, and those of K109A and Y74W were pH 9. The optimal temperature (30 degrees C) was not affected by mutation. Positively charged residues at position 109 is critical for the binding of methyl red. K109 might only be involved in the binding of the 2'-phosphate group of NADPH and have no effect on the binding of NADH. Y74W and H75N mutations decreased the binding of methyl red/nitrofurazone and had no affect on the binding of NADPH.

  4. Improving Antigenicity of the Recombinant Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein via Random Mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Ji Huang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to enhance the sensitivity of diagnosis, a recombinant clone containing domain I of HCV core (amino acid residues 1 to 123 was subjected to random mutagenesis. Five mutants with higher sensitivity were obtained by colony screening of 616 mutants using reverse ELISA. Sequence analysis of these mutants revealed alterations focusing on W84, P95, P110, or V129. The inclusion bodies of these recombinant proteins overexpressed in E. coli BL21(DE3 were subsequently dissolved using 6 M urea and then refolded by stepwise dialysis. Compared to the unfolded wild-type antigen, the refolded M3b antigen (W84S, P110S and V129L exhibited an increase of 66% antigenicity with binding capacity of 0.96 and affinity of 113 μM−1. Moreover, the 33% decrease of the production demand suggests that M3b is a potential substitute for anti-HCV antibody detection.

  5. Highly Efficient Site-Specific Mutagenesis in Malaria Mosquitoes Using CRISPR

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    Ming Li

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Anopheles mosquitoes transmit at least 200 million annual malaria infections worldwide. Despite considerable genomic resources, mechanistic understanding of biological processes in Anopheles has been hampered by a lack of tools for reverse genetics. Here, we report successful application of the CRISPR/Cas9 system for highly efficient, site-specific mutagenesis in the diverse malaria vectors Anopheles albimanus, A. coluzzii, and A. funestus. When guide RNAs (gRNAs and Cas9 protein are injected at high concentration, germline mutations are common and usually biallelic, allowing for the rapid creation of stable mutant lines for reverse genetic analysis. Our protocol should enable researchers to dissect the molecular and cellular basis of anopheline traits critical to successful disease transmission, potentially exposing new targets for malaria control.

  6. Crystal structure and site-directed mutagenesis of a nitroalkane oxidase from Streptomyces ansochromogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanhua; Gao, Zengqiang; Hou, Haifeng; Li, Lei; Zhang, Jihui; Yang, Haihua; Dong, Yuhui; Tan, Huarong

    2011-02-18

    Nitroalkane oxidase (NAO) catalyzes neutral nitroalkanes to their corresponding aldehydes or ketones, hydrogen peroxide and nitrite. The crystal structure of NAO from Streptomyces ansochromogenes was determined; it consists of two domains, a TIM barrel domain bound to FMN and C-terminal domain with a novel folding pattern. Site-directed mutagenesis of His179, which is spatially adjacent to FMN, resulted in the loss of enzyme activity, demonstrating that this amino acid residue is important for catalysis. The crystal structure of mutant H179D-nitroethane was also analyzed. Interestingly, Sa-NAO shows the typical function as nitroalkane oxidase but its structure is similar to that of 2-nitropropane dioxygenase. Overall, these results suggest that Sa-NAO is a novel nitroalkane oxidase with TIM barrel structure. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Glyphosate-Based Herbicide Roundup Does not Elevate Genome-Wide Mutagenesis of Escherichia coli

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    Clayton Tincher

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Mutations induced by pollutants may promote pathogen evolution, for example by accelerating mutations conferring antibiotic resistance. Generally, evaluating the genome-wide mutagenic effects of long-term sublethal pollutant exposure at single-nucleotide resolution is extremely difficult. To overcome this technical barrier, we use the mutation accumulation/whole-genome sequencing (MA/WGS method as a mutagenicity test, to quantitatively evaluate genome-wide mutagenesis of Escherichia coli after long-term exposure to a wide gradient of the glyphosate-based herbicide (GBH Roundup Concentrate Plus. The genome-wide mutation rate decreases as GBH concentration increases, suggesting that even long-term GBH exposure does not compromise the genome stability of bacteria.

  8. Site-Directed Mutagenesis to Improve Sensitivity of a Synthetic Two-Component Signaling System.

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    Audrey Olshefsky

    Full Text Available Two-component signaling (2CS systems enable bacterial cells to respond to changes in their local environment, often using a membrane-bound sensor protein and a cytoplasmic responder protein to regulate gene expression. Previous work has shown that Escherichia coli's natural EnvZ/OmpR 2CS could be modified to construct a light-sensing bacterial photography system. The resulting bacterial photographs, or "coliroids," rely on a phosphotransfer reaction between Cph8, a synthetic version of EnvZ that senses red light, and OmpR. Gene expression changes can be visualized through upregulation of a LacZ reporter gene by phosphorylated OmpR. Unfortunately, basal LacZ expression leads to a detectable reporter signal even when cells are grown in the light, diminishing the contrast of the coliroids. We performed site-directed mutagenesis near the phosphotransfer site of Cph8 to isolate mutants with potentially improved image contrast. Five mutants were examined, but only one of the mutants, T541S, increased the ratio of dark/light gene expression, as measured by β-galactosidase activity. The ratio changed from 2.57 fold in the starting strain to 5.59 in the T541S mutant. The ratio decreased in the four other mutant strains we examined. The phenotype observed in the T541S mutant strain may arise because the serine sidechain is chemically similar but physically smaller than the threonine sidechain. This may minimally change the protein's local structure, but may be less sterically constrained when compared to threonine, resulting in a higher probability of a phosphotransfer event. Our initial success pairing synthetic biology and site-directed mutagenesis to optimize the bacterial photography system's performance encourages us to imagine further improvements to the performance of this and other synthetic systems, especially those based on 2CS signaling.

  9. Directed mutagenesis under the action of mobile elements in unstable lines of Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerasimova, T.I.; Mizrokhi, L.Yu.; Obolenkova, L.A.; Georgiev, P.G.

    1985-07-01

    The unstable mutation ct/sup MR2/, obtained under hybrid dysgenesis and caused by the incorporation of MDG 4 into locus cut, was described earlier. A peculiarity of this line and its derivatives is that multiple transpositions of different mobile elements, the transposition spurts, take place in them with a frequency of 10/sup -2/-10/sup -4/. A consequence of this process is active insertion mutagenesis taking place under the action of different transposons with high locus specifity. The mutations are unstable and frequently revert to wild type. However, there are some unstable revertants in which the mobile element is eliminated almost completely, and yet unstable mutations appear at the same locus at a high rate. In the case of cut locus, this happens due to repeated integration of MDG 4. The authors report cases of such repeated directed mutagenesis for several loci. Reversions were observed in the homozygous line as well as during the process of obtaining homozygous lines of new mutations using the chromosome with multiple inversions FM4, Y/sup 31d/sc/sup 8/ dmB. In situ hybridization with the (/sup 3/H)-labeled DNA was carried out as described earlier. The plasmid DNA containing cloned MDG4 and their long terminal repeats were used as probes for hybridization. Hybridization was done on the salivary gland polytene chromosomes of larvae. The new spontaneous mutations appearing in the process of hybridization were tested for allelism with the standard mutations y, w, cm, ct, D, and g.

  10. The Origin of Mutants Under Selection: How Natural Selection Mimics Mutagenesis (Adaptive Mutation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisnier-Patin, Sophie; Roth, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Selection detects mutants but does not cause mutations. Contrary to this dictum, Cairns and Foster plated a leaky lac mutant of Escherichia coli on lactose medium and saw revertant (Lac+) colonies accumulate with time above a nongrowing lawn. This result suggested that bacteria might mutagenize their own genome when growth is blocked. However, this conclusion is suspect in the light of recent evidence that revertant colonies are initiated by preexisting cells with multiple copies the conjugative F′lac plasmid, which carries the lac mutation. Some plated cells have multiple copies of the simple F′lac plasmid. This provides sufficient LacZ activity to support plasmid replication but not cell division. In nongrowing cells, repeated plasmid replication increases the likelihood of a reversion event. Reversion to lac+ triggers exponential cell growth leading to a stable Lac+ revertant colony. In 10% of these plated cells, the high-copy plasmid includes an internal tandem lac duplication, which provides even more LacZ activity—sufficient to support slow growth and formation of an unstable Lac+ colony. Cells with multiple copies of the F′lac plasmid have an increased mutation rate, because the plasmid encodes the error-prone (mutagenic) DNA polymerase, DinB. Without DinB, unstable and stable Lac+ revertant types form in equal numbers and both types arise with no mutagenesis. Amplification and selection are central to behavior of the Cairns–Foster system, whereas mutagenesis is a system-specific side effect or artifact caused by coamplification of dinB with lac. Study of this system has revealed several broadly applicable principles. In all populations, gene duplications are frequent stable genetic polymorphisms, common near-neutral mutant alleles can gain a positive phenotype when amplified under selection, and natural selection can operate without cell division when variability is generated by overreplication of local genome subregions. PMID:26134316

  11. Mutagenesis in sequence encoding of human factor VII for gene therapy of hemophilia

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    B Kazemi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Current treatment of hemophilia which is one of the most common bleeding disorders, involves replacement therapy using concentrates of FVIII and FIX .However, these concentrates have been associated with viral infections and thromboembolic complications and development of antibodies. "nThe use of recombinant human factor VII (rhFVII is effective  for the treatment of patients with  hemophilia A or B, who develop antibodies ( referred as inhibitors against  replacement therapy , because it induces coagulation independent of FVIII and FIX. However, its short half-life and high cost have limited its use. One potential solution to this problem may be the use of FVIIa gene transfer, which would attain continuing therapeutic levels of expression from a single injection. The aim of this study was to engineer a novel hFVII (human FVII gene containing a cleavage site for the intracellular protease and furin, by PCR mutagenesis "nMethods: The sequence encoding light and heavy chains of hFVII, were amplified by using hFVII/pTZ57R and specific primers, separately. The PCR products were cloned in pTZ57R vector. "nResults and discussion: Cloning was confirmed by restriction analysis or PCR amplification using specific primers and plasmid universal primers. Mutagenesis of sequence encoding light and heavy chain was confirmed by restriction enzyme. "nConclusion: In the present study, it was provided recombinant plasmids based on mutant form of DNA encoding light and heavy chains.  Joining mutant form of DNA encoding light chain with mutant heavy chain led to a new variant of hFVII. This variant can be activated by furin and an increase in the proportion of activated form of FVII. This mutant form of hFVII may be used for gene therapy of hemophilia.

  12. BAX and tumor suppressor TRP53 are important in regulating mutagenesis in spermatogenic cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guogang; Vogel, Kristine S; McMahan, C Alex; Herbert, Damon C; Walter, Christi A

    2010-12-01

    During the first wave of spermatogenesis, and in response to ionizing radiation, elevated mutant frequencies are reduced to a low level by unidentified mechanisms. Apoptosis is occurring in the same time frame that the mutant frequency declines. We examined the role of apoptosis in regulating mutant frequency during spermatogenesis. Apoptosis and mutant frequencies were determined in spermatogenic cells obtained from Bax-null or Trp53-null mice. The results showed that spermatogenic lineage apoptosis was markedly decreased in Bax-null mice and was accompanied by a significantly increased spontaneous mutant frequency in seminiferous tubule cells compared to that of wild-type mice. Apoptosis profiles in the seminiferous tubules for Trp53-null were similar to control mice. Spontaneous mutant frequencies in pachytene spermatocytes and in round spermatids from Trp53-null mice were not significantly different from those of wild-type mice. However, epididymal spermatozoa from Trp53-null mice displayed a greater spontaneous mutant frequency compared to that from wild-type mice. A greater proportion of spontaneous transversions and a greater proportion of insertions/deletions 15 days after ionizing radiation were observed in Trp53-null mice compared to wild-type mice. Base excision repair activity in mixed germ cell nuclear extracts prepared from Trp53-null mice was significantly lower than that for wild-type controls. These data indicate that BAX-mediated apoptosis plays a significant role in regulating spontaneous mutagenesis in seminiferous tubule cells obtained from neonatal mice, whereas tumor suppressor TRP53 plays a significant role in regulating spontaneous mutagenesis between postmeiotic round spermatid and epididymal spermatozoon stages of spermiogenesis.

  13. Somatic mutagenesis with a Sleeping Beauty transposon system leads to solid tumor formation in zebrafish.

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    Maura McGrail

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale sequencing of human cancer genomes and mouse transposon-induced tumors has identified a vast number of genes mutated in different cancers. One of the outstanding challenges in this field is to determine which genes, when mutated, contribute to cellular transformation and tumor progression. To identify new and conserved genes that drive tumorigenesis we have developed a novel cancer model in a distantly related vertebrate species, the zebrafish, Danio rerio. The Sleeping Beauty (SB T2/Onc transposon system was adapted for somatic mutagenesis in zebrafish. The carp ß-actin promoter was cloned into T2/Onc to create T2/OncZ. Two transgenic zebrafish lines that contain large concatemers of T2/OncZ were isolated by injection of linear DNA into the zebrafish embryo. The T2/OncZ transposons were mobilized throughout the zebrafish genome from the transgene array by injecting SB11 transposase RNA at the 1-cell stage. Alternatively, the T2/OncZ zebrafish were crossed to a transgenic line that constitutively expresses SB11 transposase. T2/OncZ transposon integration sites were cloned by ligation-mediated PCR and sequenced on a Genome Analyzer II. Between 700-6800 unique integration events in individual fish were mapped to the zebrafish genome. The data show that introduction of transposase by transgene expression or RNA injection results in an even distribution of transposon re-integration events across the zebrafish genome. SB11 mRNA injection resulted in neoplasms in 10% of adult fish at ∼10 months of age. T2/OncZ-induced zebrafish tumors contain many mutated genes in common with human and mouse cancer genes. These analyses validate our mutagenesis approach and provide additional support for the involvement of these genes in human cancers. The zebrafish T2/OncZ cancer model will be useful for identifying novel and conserved genetic drivers of human cancers.

  14. Role of Ribonucleotide Reductase in Bacillus subtilis Stress-Associated Mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Cerritos, Karla Viridiana; Yasbin, Ronald E; Robleto, Eduardo A; Pedraza-Reyes, Mario

    2017-02-15

    The Gram-positive microorganism Bacillus subtilis relies on a single class Ib ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) to generate 2'-deoxyribonucleotides (dNDPs) for DNA replication and repair. In this work, we investigated the influence of RNR levels on B. subtilis stationary-phase-associated mutagenesis (SPM). Since RNR is essential in this bacterium, we engineered a conditional mutant of strain B. subtilis YB955 (hisC952 metB5 leu427) in which expression of the nrdEF operon was modulated by isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). Moreover, genetic inactivation of ytcG, predicted to encode a repressor (NrdR) of nrdEF in this strain, dramatically increased the expression levels of a transcriptional nrdE-lacZ fusion. The frequencies of mutations conferring amino acid prototrophy in three genes were measured in cultures under conditions that repressed or induced RNR-encoding genes. The results revealed that RNR was necessary for SPM and overexpression of nrdEF promoted growth-dependent mutagenesis and SPM. We also found that nrdEF expression was induced by H2O2 and such induction was dependent on the master regulator PerR. These observations strongly suggest that the metabolic conditions operating in starved B. subtilis cells increase the levels of RNR, which have a direct impact on SPM. Results presented in this study support the concept that the adverse metabolic conditions prevailing in nutritionally stressed bacteria activate an oxidative stress response that disturbs ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) levels. Such an alteration of RNR levels promotes mutagenic events that allow Bacillus subtilis to escape from growth-limited conditions. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  15. Effect of radiation-sensitive mutations and mutagens/carcinogens on bacterial recombination and mutagenesis. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matney, T.S.

    1978-01-01

    Progress is reported on effects of temperature sensitive DNA-initiation mutation in E. coli K-12 mutants; the use of Bacillus subtilis transforming system as an in vitro mutagenesis system; characteristics of the E. coli lysogen used to test the permeability to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; and the genetic toxicology of gentian violet. (PCS)

  16. USP7 Is a Suppressor of PCNA Ubiquitination and Oxidative-Stress-Induced Mutagenesis in Human Cells

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    Shu-ichiro Kashiwaba

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mono-ubiquitinated PCNA activates error-prone DNA polymerases; therefore, strict regulation of PCNA mono-ubiquitination is crucial in avoiding undesired mutagenesis. In this study, we used an in vitro assay system to identify USP7 as a deubiquitinating enzyme of mono-ubiquitinated PCNA. Suppression of USP1, a previously identified PCNA deubiquitinase, or USP7 increased UV- and H2O2-induced PCNA mono-ubiquitination in a distinct and additive manner, suggesting that USP1 and USP7 make different contributions to PCNA deubiquitination in human cells. Cell-cycle-synchronization analyses revealed that USP7 suppression increased H2O2-induced PCNA ubiquitination throughout interphase, whereas USP1 suppression specifically increased ubiquitination in S-phase cells. UV-induced mutagenesis was elevated in USP1-suppressed cells, whereas H2O2-induced mutagenesis was elevated in USP7-suppressed cells. These results suggest that USP1 suppresses UV-induced mutations produced in a manner involving DNA replication, whereas USP7 suppresses H2O2-induced mutagenesis involving cell-cycle-independent processes such as DNA repair.

  17. From Green to Blue: Site-Directed Mutagenesis of the Green Fluorescent Protein to Teach Protein Structure-Function Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giron, Maria D.; Salto, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Structure-function relationship studies in proteins are essential in modern Cell Biology. Laboratory exercises that allow students to familiarize themselves with basic mutagenesis techniques are essential in all Genetic Engineering courses to teach the relevance of protein structure. We have implemented a laboratory course based on the…

  18. Insight into the molecular requirements for pathogenicity of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici through large-scale insertional mutagenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michielse, C.B.; van Wijk, R.; Reijnen, L.; Cornelissen, B.J.C.; Rep, M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici is the causal agent of vascular wilt disease in tomato. In order to gain more insight into the molecular processes in F. oxysporum necessary for pathogenesis and to uncover the genes involved, we used Agrobacterium-mediated insertional mutagenesis to

  19. Insertional Mutagenesis and Deep Profiling Reveals Gene Hierarchies and a Myc/p53-Dependent Bottleneck in Lymphomagenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huser, C.A.; Gilroy, K.L.; De Ridder, J.; Kilbey, A.; Borland, G.; Mackay, N.; Jenkins, A.; Bell, M.; Herzyk, P.; Van der Weyden, L.

    2014-01-01

    Retroviral insertional mutagenesis (RIM) is a powerful tool for cancer genomics that was combined in this study with deep sequencing (RIM/DS) to facilitate a comprehensive analysis of lymphoma progression. Transgenic mice expressing two potent collaborating oncogenes in the germ line (CD2-MYC,

  20. Characterization of the functional epitope on the urokinase receptor. Complete alanine scanning mutagenesis supplemented by chemical cross-linking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Gilquin, Bernard; Le Du, Marie Hélène

    2006-01-01

    a comprehensive alanine scanning mutagenesis of uPAR combined with low resolution distance constraints defined within the complex using chemical cross-linkers as molecular rulers. The kinetic rate constants for the interaction between pro-uPA and 244 purified uPAR mutants with single-site replacements were...

  1. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation: An efficient tool for insertional mutagenesis and targeted gene disruption in Harpophora oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Chen, Guo-Qing; Ning, Guo-Ao; Shi, Huan-Bin; Zhang, Chu-Long; Lu, Jian-Ping; Mao, Li-Juan; Feng, Xiao-Xiao; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Su, Zhen-Zhu; Lin, Fu-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The endophytic filamentous fungus Harpophora oryzae is a beneficial endosymbiont isolated from the wild rice. H. oryzae could not only effectively improve growth rate and biomass yield of rice crops, but also induce systemic resistance against the rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae. In this study, Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) was employed and optimized to modify the H. oryzae genes by either random DNA fragment integration or targeted gene replacement. Our results showed that co-cultivation of H. oryzae conidia with A. tumefaciens in the presence of acetosyringone for 48 h at 22 °C could lead to a relatively highest frequency of transformation, and 200 μM acetosyringone (AS) pre-cultivation of A. tumefaciens is also suggested. ATMT-mediated knockout mutagenesis was accomplished with the gene-deletion cassettes using a yeast homologous recombination method with a yeast-Escherichia-Agrobacterium shuttle vector pKOHo. Using the ATMT-mediated knockout mutagenesis, we successfully deleted three genes of H. oryzae (HoATG5, HoATG7, and HoATG8), and then got the null mutants ΔHoatg5, ΔHoatg7, and ΔHoatg8. These results suggest that ATMT is an efficient tool for gene modification including randomly insertional mutagenesis and gene deletion mutagenesis in H. oryzae. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Incorporation of a lambda phage recombination system and EGFP detection to simplify mutagenesis of Herpes simplex virus bacterial artificial chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weir Jerry P

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeted mutagenesis of the herpesvirus genomes has been facilitated by the use of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC technology. Such modified genomes have potential uses in understanding viral pathogenesis, gene identification and characterization, and the development of new viral vectors and vaccines. We have previously described the construction of a herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2 BAC and the use of an allele replacement strategy to construct HSV-2 recombinants. While the BAC mutagenesis procedure is a powerful method to generate HSV-2 recombinants, particularly in the absence of selective marker in eukaryotic culture, the mutagenesis procedure is still difficult and cumbersome. Results Here we describe the incorporation of a phage lambda recombination system into an allele replacement vector. This strategy enables any DNA fragment containing the phage attL recombination sites to be efficiently inserted into the attR sites of the allele replacement vector using phage lambda clonase. We also describe how the incorporation of EGFP into the allele replacement vector can facilitate the selection of the desired cross-over recombinant BACs when the allele replacement reaction is a viral gene deletion. Finally, we incorporate the lambda phage recombination sites directly into an HSV-2 BAC vector for direct recombination of gene cassettes using the phage lambda clonase-driven recombination reaction. Conclusion Together, these improvements to the techniques of HSV BAC mutagenesis will facilitate the construction of recombinant herpes simplex viruses and viral vectors.

  3. Mutagenesis of NosM Leader Peptide Reveals Important Elements in Nosiheptide Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Liang; Wu, Xuri; Xue, Yanjiu; Jin, Yue; Wang, Shuzhen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nosiheptide, a typical member of the ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptides (RiPPs), exhibits potent activity against multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacterial pathogens. The precursor peptide of nosiheptide (NosM) is comprised of a leader peptide with 37 amino acids and a core peptide containing 13 amino acids. To pinpoint elements in the leader peptide that are essential for nosiheptide biosynthesis, a collection of mutants with unique sequence features, including N- and C-terminal motifs, peptide length, and specific sites in the leader peptide, was generated by mutagenesis in vivo. The effects of various mutants on nosiheptide biosynthesis were evaluated. In addition to the necessity of a conserved motif LEIS box, native length and the N-terminal 12 amino acid residues were indispensable, and single-site substitutions of these 12 amino acid residues resulted in changes ranging from a greater-than-5-fold decrease to a 2-fold increase of nosiheptide production, depending on the sites and substituted residues. Moreover, although the C-terminal motif is not conservative, significant effects of this portion on nosiheptide production were also evident. Taken together, the present results further highlight the importance of the leader peptide in nosiheptide biosynthesis, and provide new insights into the diversity and specificity of leader peptides in the biosynthesis of various RiPPs. IMPORTANCE As a representative thiopeptide, nosiheptide exhibits excellent antibacterial activity. Although the biosynthetic gene cluster and several modification steps have been revealed, the presence and roles of the leader peptide within the precursor peptide of the nosiheptide gene cluster remain elusive. Thus, identification of specific elements in the leader peptide can significantly facilitate the genetic manipulation of the gene cluster for increasing nosiheptide production or generating diverse analogues. Given the complexity of the

  4. Structure-based mutagenesis of Penicillium griseofulvum xylanase using computational design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André-Leroux, Gwénaëlle; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Georis, Jacques; Arnaut, Filip; Juge, Nathalie

    2008-09-01

    Penicillium griseofulvum xylanase (PgXynA) belongs to family 11 glycoside hydrolase. It exhibits unique amino acid features but its three-dimensional structure is not known. Based upon the X-ray structure of Penicillium funiculosum xylanase (PfXynC), we generated a three-dimensional model of PgXynA by homology modeling. The native structure of PgXynA displayed the overall beta-jelly roll folding common to family 11 xylanases with two large beta-pleated sheets and a single alpha-helix that form a structure resembling a partially closed right hand. Although many features of PgXynA were very similar to previously described enzymes from this family, crucial differences were observed in the loop forming the "thumb" and at the edge of the binding cleft. The robustness of the xylanase was challenged by extensive in silico-based mutagenesis analysis targeting mutations retaining stereochemical and energetical control of the protein folding. On the basis of structural alignments, modeled three-dimensional structure, in silico mutations and docking analysis, we targeted several positions for the replacement of amino acids by site-directed mutagenesis to change substrate and inhibitor specificity, alter pH profile and improve overall catalytic activity. We demonstrated the crucial role played by Ser44(PgXynA) and Ser129(PgXynA), two residues unique to PgXynA, in conferring distinct specificity to P. griseofulvum xylanase. We showed that the pH optimum of PgXynA could be shifted by -1 to +0.5 units by mutating Ser44(PgXynA) to Asp and Asn, respectively. The S44D and S44N mutants showed only slight alteration in K(m) and V(max) whereas a S44A mutant lost both pH-dependence profile and activity. We were able to produce PgXynA S129G mutants with acquired sensitivity to the Xylanase Inhibitor Protein, XIP-I. The replacement of Gln121(PgXynA), located at the start of the thumb, into an Arg residue resulted in an enzyme that possessed a higher catalytic activity. 2008 Wiley

  5. Structural insights from random mutagenesis of Campylobacter jejuni oligosaccharyltransferase PglB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihssen Julian

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein glycosylation is of fundamental importance in many biological systems. The discovery of N-glycosylation in bacteria and the functional expression of the N-oligosaccharyltransferase PglB of Campylobacter jejuni in Escherichia coli enabled the production of engineered glycoproteins and the study of the underlying molecular mechanisms. A particularly promising application for protein glycosylation in recombinant bacteria is the production of potent conjugate vaccines where polysaccharide antigens of pathogenic bacteria are covalently bound to immunogenic carrier proteins. Results In this study capsular polysaccharides of the clinically relevant pathogen Staphylococcus aureus serotype 5 (CP5 were expressed in Escherichia coli and linked in vivo to a detoxified version of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin (EPA. We investigated which amino acids of the periplasmic domain of PglB are crucial for the glycosylation reaction using a newly established 96-well screening system enabling the relative quantification of glycoproteins by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A random mutant library was generated by error-prone PCR and screened for inactivating amino acid substitutions. In addition to 15 inactive variants with amino acid changes within the previously known, strictly conserved WWDYG motif of N-oligosaccharyltransferases, 8 inactivating mutations mapped to a flexible loop in close vicinity of the amide nitrogen atom of the acceptor asparagine as revealed in the crystal structure of the homologous enzyme C. lari PglB. The importance of the conserved loop residue H479 for glycosylation was confirmed by site directed mutagenesis, while a change to alanine of the adjacent, non-conserved L480 had no effect. In addition, we investigated functional requirements in the so-called MIV motif of bacterial N-oligosaccharyltransferases. Amino acid residues I571 and V575, which had been postulated to interact with the acceptor peptide, were

  6. Mutagenesis of NosM Leader Peptide Reveals Important Elements in Nosiheptide Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Liang; Wu, Xuri; Xue, Yanjiu; Jin, Yue; Wang, Shuzhen; Chen, Yijun

    2017-02-15

    Nosiheptide, a typical member of the ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptides (RiPPs), exhibits potent activity against multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacterial pathogens. The precursor peptide of nosiheptide (NosM) is comprised of a leader peptide with 37 amino acids and a core peptide containing 13 amino acids. To pinpoint elements in the leader peptide that are essential for nosiheptide biosynthesis, a collection of mutants with unique sequence features, including N- and C-terminal motifs, peptide length, and specific sites in the leader peptide, was generated by mutagenesis in vivo The effects of various mutants on nosiheptide biosynthesis were evaluated. In addition to the necessity of a conserved motif LEIS box, native length and the N-terminal 12 amino acid residues were indispensable, and single-site substitutions of these 12 amino acid residues resulted in changes ranging from a greater-than-5-fold decrease to a 2-fold increase of nosiheptide production, depending on the sites and substituted residues. Moreover, although the C-terminal motif is not conservative, significant effects of this portion on nosiheptide production were also evident. Taken together, the present results further highlight the importance of the leader peptide in nosiheptide biosynthesis, and provide new insights into the diversity and specificity of leader peptides in the biosynthesis of various RiPPs. As a representative thiopeptide, nosiheptide exhibits excellent antibacterial activity. Although the biosynthetic gene cluster and several modification steps have been revealed, the presence and roles of the leader peptide within the precursor peptide of the nosiheptide gene cluster remain elusive. Thus, identification of specific elements in the leader peptide can significantly facilitate the genetic manipulation of the gene cluster for increasing nosiheptide production or generating diverse analogues. Given the complexity of the biosynthetic process, the

  7. Functional mutagenesis screens reveal the 'cap structure' formation in disulfide-bridge free TASK channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Matthias; Rinné, Susanne; Kiper, Aytug K; Ramírez, David; Netter, Michael F; Bustos, Daniel; Ortiz-Bonnin, Beatriz; González, Wendy; Decher, Niels

    2016-01-22

    Two-pore-domain potassium (K2P) channels have a large extracellular cap structure formed by two M1-P1 linkers, containing a cysteine for dimerization. However, this cysteine is not present in the TASK-1/3/5 subfamily. The functional role of the cap is poorly understood and it remained unclear whether K2P channels assemble in the domain-swapped orientation or not. Functional alanine-mutagenesis screens of TASK-1 and TRAAK were used to build an in silico model of the TASK-1 cap. According to our data the cap structure of disulfide-bridge free TASK channels is similar to that of other K2P channels and is most likely assembled in the domain-swapped orientation. As the conserved cysteine is not essential for functional expression of all K2P channels tested, we propose that hydrophobic residues at the inner leaflets of the cap domains can interact with each other and that this way of stabilizing the cap is most likely conserved among K2P channels.

  8. Defects in the Error Prevention Oxidized Guanine System Potentiate Stationary-Phase Mutagenesis in Bacillus subtilis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidales, Luz E.; Cárdenas, Lluvia C.; Robleto, Eduardo; Yasbin, Ronald E.; Pedraza-Reyes, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies showed that a Bacillus subtilis strain deficient in mismatch repair (MMR; encoded by the mutSL operon) promoted the production of stationary-phase-induced mutations. However, overexpression of the mutSL operon did not completely suppress this process, suggesting that additional DNA repair mechanisms are involved in the generation of stationary-phase-associated mutants in this bacterium. In agreement with this hypothesis, the results presented in this work revealed that starved B. subtilis cells lacking a functional error prevention GO (8-oxo-G) system (composed of YtkD, MutM, and YfhQ) had a dramatic propensity to increase the number of stationary-phase-induced revertants. These results strongly suggest that the occurrence of mutations is exacerbated by reactive oxygen species in nondividing cells of B. subtilis having an inactive GO system. Interestingly, overexpression of the MMR system significantly diminished the accumulation of mutations in cells deficient in the GO repair system during stationary phase. These results suggest that the MMR system plays a general role in correcting base mispairing induced by oxidative stress during stationary phase. Thus, the absence or depression of both the MMR and GO systems contributes to the production of stationary-phase mutants in B. subtilis. In conclusion, our results support the idea that oxidative stress is a mechanism that generates genetic diversity in starved cells of B. subtilis, promoting stationary-phase-induced mutagenesis in this soil microorganism. PMID:19011023

  9. Dopamine D1 receptor-agonist interactions: A mutagenesis and homology modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mente, Scot; Guilmette, Edward; Salafia, Michelle; Gray, David

    2015-01-01

    The dopamine D1 receptor is a G protein-coupled receptor that regulates intracellular signaling via agonist activation. Although the number of solved GPCR X-ray structures has been steadily increasing, still no structure of the D1 receptor exists. We have used site-directed mutagenesis of 12 orthosteric vicinity residues of possible importance to G protein-coupled activation to examine the function of prototypical orthosteric D1 agonists and partial agonists. We find that residues from four different regions of the D1 receptor make significant contributions to agonist function. All compounds studied, which are catechol-amines, are found to interact with the previously identified residues: the conserved D103(3.32), as well as the trans-membrane V serine residues. Additional key interactions are found for trans-membrane VI residues F288(6.51), F289(6.52) and N292(6.55), as well as the extra-cellular loop residue L190(ECL2). Molecular dynamics simulations of a D1 homology model have been used to help put the ligand-residue interactions into context. Finally, we considered the rescaling of fold-shift data as a method to account for the change in the size of the mutated side-chain and found that this rescaling helps to relate the calculated ligand-residue energies with observed experimental fold-shifts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Sleeping Beauty mutagenesis reveals cooperating mutations and pathways in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Karen M; Ward, Jerrold M; Yew, Christopher Chin Kuan; Kovochich, Anne; Dawson, David W; Black, Michael A; Brett, Benjamin T; Sheetz, Todd E; Dupuy, Adam J; Chang, David K; Biankin, Andrew V; Waddell, Nicola; Kassahn, Karin S; Grimmond, Sean M; Rust, Alistair G; Adams, David J; Jenkins, Nancy A; Copeland, Neal G

    2012-04-17

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly cancers affecting the Western world. Because the disease is highly metastatic and difficult to diagnosis until late stages, the 5-y survival rate is around 5%. The identification of molecular cancer drivers is critical for furthering our understanding of the disease and development of improved diagnostic tools and therapeutics. We have conducted a mutagenic screen using Sleeping Beauty (SB) in mice to identify new candidate cancer genes in pancreatic cancer. By combining SB with an oncogenic Kras allele, we observed highly metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Using two independent statistical methods to identify loci commonly mutated by SB in these tumors, we identified 681 loci that comprise 543 candidate cancer genes (CCGs); 75 of these CCGs, including Mll3 and Ptk2, have known mutations in human pancreatic cancer. We identified point mutations in human pancreatic patient samples for another 11 CCGs, including Acvr2a and Map2k4. Importantly, 10% of the CCGs are involved in chromatin remodeling, including Arid4b, Kdm6a, and Nsd3, and all SB tumors have at least one mutated gene involved in this process; 20 CCGs, including Ctnnd1, Fbxo11, and Vgll4, are also significantly associated with poor patient survival. SB mutagenesis provides a rich resource of mutations in potential cancer drivers for cross-comparative analyses with ongoing sequencing efforts in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  11. Rapid fine conformational epitope mapping using comprehensive mutagenesis and deep sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalsky, Caitlin A; Faber, Matthew S; Nath, Aritro; Dann, Hailey E; Kelly, Vince W; Liu, Li; Shanker, Purva; Wagner, Ellen K; Maynard, Jennifer A; Chan, Christina; Whitehead, Timothy A

    2015-10-30

    Knowledge of the fine location of neutralizing and non-neutralizing epitopes on human pathogens affords a better understanding of the structural basis of antibody efficacy, which will expedite rational design of vaccines, prophylactics, and therapeutics. However, full utilization of the wealth of information from single cell techniques and antibody repertoire sequencing awaits the development of a high throughput, inexpensive method to map the conformational epitopes for antibody-antigen interactions. Here we show such an approach that combines comprehensive mutagenesis, cell surface display, and DNA deep sequencing. We develop analytical equations to identify epitope positions and show the method effectiveness by mapping the fine epitope for different antibodies targeting TNF, pertussis toxin, and the cancer target TROP2. In all three cases, the experimentally determined conformational epitope was consistent with previous experimental datasets, confirming the reliability of the experimental pipeline. Once the comprehensive library is generated, fine conformational epitope maps can be prepared at a rate of four per day. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Apparent resistance to mutagenesis by ionizing radiation, and some other unusual responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faberge, A.C.

    1983-11-01

    It is pointed out that in some species it is very difficult or even apparently impossible to get genetic visible marker mutants by means of ionizing radiation. Such results are not as a rule published. Species in which no mutant at all could be obtained, after what seem to be adequate efforts by several geneticists are Limnaea peregra, Rhynchosciara angelae, Coelopa frigida, Oncopeltus fasciatus, Dermestes maculatus. Published data on Sciara, Tribolium, Blattella, in which a relative difficulty in getting mutants is reported, are discussed and compared to many other forms in which obtaining marker mutants is on the contrary easy. What appears to be very abnormal mutagenesis is described in Drosophila busckii, which yielded an unusual frequency of autosomal dominants, and Drosophila nebulosa, in which only very poor mutants could be obtained. Possible reasons for all these departures from the usual are discussed. No firm conclusions are reached, but one is led to consider the possible effects of overall chromosome structure, presence or absence of heterochromatin, and multiplicity at the single locus or single polytene band level. There seems to be no relation between the rates of induction of dominant lethality and of point mutation for visible markers.

  13. CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated In Vitro Mutagenesis in GC-Like B Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Van Trung; Graf, Robin; Rajewsky, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 technology has developed into a powerful tool for genome editing, both in terms of gene silencing and the insertion of precise mutations. However, the application of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated mutagenesis in primary immune cells, in particular in B cells, is still in its infancy because of the difficulty to deliver the CRISPR/Cas9 system into these cells. Here, we describe a new method to use CRISPR/Cas9 for manipulating genes in germinal center (GC)-like B cells in vitro. We isolated Cas9-expressing B cells from R26-Cas9iGFP/+ mice (expressing Cas9 constitutively from the Rosa26 locus) and mixed them with control B cells. Primary B cells were cultured on CD40L- and BAFF-expressing feeder cells and transduced with retroviral particles expressing the sgRNAs of interest. Using this system, we have achieved complete gene knockouts in up to 92% of activated B cells.

  14. Mechanisms of mutagenesis in human cells exposed to 55 MeV protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauny, S.; Wiese, C.; Kronenberg, A.

    2001-01-01

    Protons represent the major type of charged particle radiation in spaceflight environments. The purpose of this study was to assess mutations arising in human lymphoid cells exposed to protons. Mutations were quantitated at the thymidine kinase (TK1) locus in cell lines derived from the same donor: TK6 cells (wt TP53) and WTK1 cells (mutant TP53). WTK1 cells were much more susceptible to mutagenesis following proton exposure than TK6 cells. Intragenic deletions were observed among early-arising TK1 mutants in TK6 cells, but not in WTK1 cells where all of the mutants arose by LOH. Deletion was the predominant mode of LOH in TK6 cells, while allelic recombination was the major mode of LOH in WTK1 cells. Deletions were of variable lengths, from recombination often extended to the telomere. In summary, proton exposures elicited many types of mutations at an autosomal locus in human cells. Most involved large scale loss of genetic information, either through deletion or by recombination.

  15. Enhancement of Biomass and Lipid Productivities of Water Surface-Floating Microalgae by Chemical Mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Nojima

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Water surface-floating microalgae have great potential for biofuel applications due to the ease of the harvesting process, which is one of the most problematic steps in conventional microalgal biofuel production. We have collected promising water surface-floating microalgae and characterized their capacity for biomass and lipid production. In this study, we performed chemical mutagenesis of two water surface-floating microalgae to elevate productivity. Floating microalgal strains AVFF007 and FFG039 (tentatively identified as Botryosphaerella sp. and Chlorococcum sp., respectively were exposed to ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS or 1-methyl-3-nitro-1-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG, and pale green mutants (PMs were obtained. The most promising FFG039 PM formed robust biofilms on the surface of the culture medium, similar to those formed by wild type strains, and it exhibited 1.7-fold and 1.9-fold higher biomass and lipid productivities than those of the wild type. This study indicates that the chemical mutation strategy improves the lipid productivity of water surface-floating microalgae without inhibiting biofilm formation and floating ability.

  16. In vitro mutagenesis in embryogenic cell suspensions of banana cv. Grande naine (Musa AAA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idalmis Bermúdez-Caraballoso

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Somatic embryogenesis is a useful process for clonal propagation and genetic improvement by induction of mutations. This work was carried out with the objective of determining the effect of 60Co source Gamma radiations on embryogenic cell suspensions of banana cv. 'Grande naine' (Musa AAA until conversion to plants. Different doses of radiation (0, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 and 80 Gy were applied to embryogenic cell suspensions in the multiplication phase and the embryos were later formed, matured and germinated. To determine the ex vitro response of the population of plants obtained these were transferred to greenhouse. The results showed that with somatic embryos formed fresh mass no differences were observed between the effect of the different doses of radiation applied and the control. However, the radiation dose affected the percentage of somatic embryo formation and germination. Plants with phenotypic variations were regenerated with 40 Gy. The results at the greenhouse showed that as radiation doses increased up to 50 Gy, the frequency of variations increased. With higher doses of radiation the survival of the plants was affected.   Keywords: Gamma radiation, in vitro mutagenesis, radiation dose, radiosensibility, somatic embryo

  17. Agrobacterium-mediated insertional mutagenesis in the mycorrhizal fungus Laccaria bicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, B I; Alvarez Crespo, M C; Kemppainen, M J; Pardo, A G

    2017-05-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer (AMT) is extensively employed as a tool in fungal functional genomics and accordingly, in previous studies we used AMT on a dikaryotic strain of the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Laccaria bicolor. The interest in this fungus derives from its capacity to establish a symbiosis with tree roots, thereby playing a major role in nutrient cycling of forest ecosystems. The ectomycorrhizal symbiosis is a highly complex interaction involving many genes from both partners. To advance in the functional characterization of fungal genes, AMT was used on a monokaryotic L. bicolor. A collection of over 1200 transgenic strains was produced, of which 200 randomly selected strains were analyzed for their genomic T-DNA insertion patterns. By means of insertional mutagenesis, a number of transgenic strains were obtained displaying differential growth features. Moreover, mating with a compatible strain resulted in dikaryons that retained altered phenotypic features of the transgenic monokaryon. The analysis of the T-DNA integration pattern revealed mostly similar results to those reported in earlier studies, confirming the usefulness of AMT on different genetic backgrounds of L. bicolor. Taken together, our studies display the great versatility and potentiality of AMT as a tool for the genetic characterization of L. bicolor.

  18. Targeted mutagenesis in Zea mays using TALENs and the CRISPR/Cas system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Kang; Chen, Kunling; Gao, Caixia

    2014-02-20

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) systems have emerged as powerful tools for genome editing in a variety of species. Here, we report, for the first time, targeted mutagenesis in Zea mays using TALENs and the CRISPR/Cas system. We designed five TALENs targeting 4 genes, namely ZmPDS, ZmIPK1A, ZmIPK, ZmMRP4, and obtained targeting efficiencies of up to 23.1% in protoplasts, and about 13.3% to 39.1% of the transgenic plants were somatic mutations. Also, we constructed two gRNAs targeting the ZmIPK gene in maize protoplasts, at frequencies of 16.4% and 19.1%, respectively. In addition, the CRISPR/Cas system induced targeted mutations in Z. mays protoplasts with efficiencies (13.1%) similar to those obtained with TALENs (9.1%). Our results show that both TALENs and the CRISPR/Cas system can be used for genome modification in maize. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Random mutagenesis of bacterial luciferase: critical role of Glu175 in the control of luminescence decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Bacterial luciferases (LuxAB) can be readily classed as slow or fast decay luciferases based on their rates of luminescence decay in a single turnover assay. Luciferases from Vibrio harveyi and Xenorhabdus (Photorhabdus) luminescens have slow decay rates, and those from the Photobacterium genus, such as Photobacterium fisheri, P. phosphoreum and P. leiognathi, have rapid decay rates. By substitution of a 67-amino-acid stretch of P. phosphoreum LuxA in the central region of the LuxA subunit, the ‘slow’ X. luminescens luciferase was converted into a chimaeric luciferase with a significantly more rapid decay rate [Valkova, Szittner and Meighen (1999) Biochemistry 38, 13820–13828]. To understand better the role of specific residues in the classification of luciferases as slow and fast decay, we have conducted random mutagenesis on this region. One of the mutants generated by a single mutation on LuxA at position 175 [E175G (Glu175→Gly)] resulted in the ‘slow decay’ X. luminescens luciferase being converted into a luciferase with a significantly more rapid decay rate. These results indicate the importance of Glu175 in LuxA as a critical residue for differentiating between ‘slow’ and ‘fast’ luciferases and show that this distinction is primarily due to differences in aldehyde affinity and in the decomposition of the luciferase–flavin–oxygen intermediate. PMID:15352872

  20. Yellow fluorescent protein phiYFPv (Phialidium): structure and structure-based mutagenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pletneva, Nadya V.; Pletnev, Vladimir Z., E-mail: vzpletnev@gmail.com; Souslova, Ekaterina; Chudakov, Dmitry M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lukyanov, Sergey [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Nizhny Novgorod State Medical Academy, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Martynov, Vladimir I.; Arhipova, Svetlena; Artemyev, Igor [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Wlodawer, Alexander [National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Dauter, Zbigniew [National Cancer Institute, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Pletnev, Sergei [National Cancer Institute, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); SAIC-Frederick, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-06-01

    The yellow fluorescent protein phiYFPv with improved folding has been developed from the spectrally identical wild-type phiYFP found in the marine jellyfish Phialidium. The yellow fluorescent protein phiYFPv (λ{sub em}{sup max} ≃ 537 nm) with improved folding has been developed from the spectrally identical wild-type phiYFP found in the marine jellyfish Phialidium. The latter fluorescent protein is one of only two known cases of naturally occurring proteins that exhibit emission spectra in the yellow–orange range (535–555 nm). Here, the crystal structure of phiYFPv has been determined at 2.05 Å resolution. The ‘yellow’ chromophore formed from the sequence triad Thr65-Tyr66-Gly67 adopts the bicyclic structure typical of fluorophores emitting in the green spectral range. It was demonstrated that perfect antiparallel π-stacking of chromophore Tyr66 and the proximal Tyr203, as well as Val205, facing the chromophore phenolic ring are chiefly responsible for the observed yellow emission of phiYFPv at 537 nm. Structure-based site-directed mutagenesis has been used to identify the key functional residues in the chromophore environment. The obtained results have been utilized to improve the properties of phiYFPv and its homologous monomeric biomarker tagYFP.

  1. Mutagenesis and functional analysis of the pore-forming toxin HALT-1 from Hydra magnipapillata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Yvonne Jing Mei; Soh, Wai Tuck; Jiemy, William Febry; Hwang, Jung Shan

    2015-02-03

    Actinoporins are small 18.5 kDa pore-forming toxins. A family of six actinoporin genes has been identified in the genome of Hydra magnipapillata, and HALT-1 (Hydra actinoporin-like toxin-1) has been shown to have haemolytic activity. In this study, we have used site-directed mutagenesis to investigate the role of amino acids in the pore-forming N-terminal region and the conserved aromatic cluster required for cell membrane binding. A total of 10 mutants of HALT-1 were constructed and tested for their haemolytic and cytolytic activity on human erythrocytes and HeLa cells, respectively. Insertion of 1-4 negatively charged residues in the N-terminal region of HALT-1 strongly reduced haemolytic and cytolytic activity, suggesting that the length or charge of the N-terminal region is critical for pore-forming activity. Moreover, substitution of amino acids in the conserved aromatic cluster reduced haemolytic and cytolytic activity by more than 80%, suggesting that these aromatic amino acids are important for attachment to the lipid membrane as shown for other actinoporins. The results suggest that HALT-1 and other actinoporins share similar mechanisms of pore formation and that it is critical for HALT-1 to maintain an amphipathic helix at the N-terminus and an aromatic amino acid-rich segment at the site of membrane binding.

  2. Mutagenesis and Functional Analysis of the Pore-Forming Toxin HALT-1 from Hydra magnipapillata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Jing Mei Liew

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Actinoporins are small 18.5 kDa pore-forming toxins. A family of six actinoporin genes has been identified in the genome of Hydra magnipapillata, and HALT-1 (Hydra actinoporin-like toxin-1 has been shown to have haemolytic activity. In this study, we have used site-directed mutagenesis to investigate the role of amino acids in the pore-forming N-terminal region and the conserved aromatic cluster required for cell membrane binding. A total of 10 mutants of HALT-1 were constructed and tested for their haemolytic and cytolytic activity on human erythrocytes and HeLa cells, respectively. Insertion of 1–4 negatively charged residues in the N-terminal region of HALT-1 strongly reduced haemolytic and cytolytic activity, suggesting that the length or charge of the N-terminal region is critical for pore-forming activity. Moreover, substitution of amino acids in the conserved aromatic cluster reduced haemolytic and cytolytic activity by more than 80%, suggesting that these aromatic amino acids are important for attachment to the lipid membrane as shown for other actinoporins. The results suggest that HALT-1 and other actinoporins share similar mechanisms of pore formation and that it is critical for HALT-1 to maintain an amphipathic helix at the N-terminus and an aromatic amino acid-rich segment at the site of membrane binding.

  3. General mutagenesis of F plasmid TraI reveals its role in conjugative regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haft, Rembrandt J F; Palacios, Gilberto; Nguyen, Tran; Mally, Manuela; Gachelet, Eliora G; Zechner, Ellen L; Traxler, Beth

    2006-09-01

    Bacteria commonly exchange genetic information by the horizontal transfer of conjugative plasmids. In gram-negative conjugation, a relaxase enzyme is absolutely required to prepare plasmid DNA for transit into the recipient via a type IV secretion system. Here we report a mutagenesis of the F plasmid relaxase gene traI using in-frame, 31-codon insertions. Phenotypic analysis of our mutant library revealed that several mutant proteins are functional in conjugation, highlighting regions of TraI that can tolerate insertions of a moderate size. We also demonstrate that wild-type TraI, when overexpressed, plays a dominant-negative regulatory role in conjugation, repressing plasmid transfer frequencies approximately 100-fold. Mutant TraI proteins with insertions in a region of approximately 400 residues between the consensus relaxase and helicase sequences did not cause conjugative repression. These unrestrictive TraI variants have normal relaxase activity in vivo, and several have wild-type conjugative functions when expressed at normal levels. We postulate that TraI negatively regulates conjugation by interacting with and sequestering some component of the conjugative apparatus. Our data indicate that the domain responsible for conjugative repression resides in the central region of TraI between the protein's catalytic domains.

  4. Crizotinib-resistant mutants of EML4-ALK identified through an accelerated mutagenesis screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sen; Wang, Frank; Keats, Jeffrey; Zhu, Xiaotian; Ning, Yaoyu; Wardwell, Scott D; Moran, Lauren; Mohemmad, Qurish K; Anjum, Rana; Wang, Yihan; Narasimhan, Narayana I; Dalgarno, David; Shakespeare, William C; Miret, Juan J; Clackson, Tim; Rivera, Victor M

    2011-12-01

    Activating gene rearrangements of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) have been identified as driver mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors, and other cancers. Crizotinib, a dual MET/ALK inhibitor, has demonstrated promising clinical activity in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer and inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors harboring ALK translocations. Inhibitors of driver kinases often elicit kinase domain mutations that confer resistance, and such mutations have been successfully predicted using in vitro mutagenesis screens. Here, this approach was used to discover an extensive set of ALK mutations that can confer resistance to crizotinib. Mutations at 16 residues were identified, structurally clustered into five regions around the kinase active site, which conferred varying degrees of resistance. The screen successfully predicted the L1196M, C1156Y, and F1174L mutations, recently identified in crizotinib-resistant patients. In separate studies, we demonstrated that crizotinib has relatively modest potency in ALK-positive non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines. A more potent ALK inhibitor, TAE684, maintained substantial activity against mutations that conferred resistance to crizotinib. Our study identifies multiple novel mutations in ALK that may confer clinical resistance to crizotinib, suggests that crizotinib's narrow selectivity window may underlie its susceptibility to such resistance and demonstrates that a more potent ALK inhibitor may be effective at overcoming resistance. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Sleeping Beauty insertional mutagenesis in mice identifies drivers of steatosis-associated hepatic tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschida, Barbara R; Temiz, Nuri A; Kuka, Timothy P; Lee, Lindsey A; Riordan, Jesse D; Tierrablanca, Carlos A; Hullsiek, Robert; Wagner, Sandra; Hudson, Wendy A; Linden, Michael A; Amin, Khalid; Beckmann, Pauline J; Heuer, Rachel A; Sarver, Aaron L; Yang, Ju Dong; Roberts, Lewis R; Nadeau, Joseph H; Dupuy, Adam J; Keng, Vincent W; Largaespada, David

    2017-10-09

    Hepatic steatosis is a strong risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), yet little is known about the molecular pathology associated with this factor. In this study, we performed a forward genetic screen using Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon insertional mutagenesis in mice treated to induce hepatic steatosis, and compared the results to human HCC data. In humans, we determined that steatosis increased the proportion of female HCC patients, a pattern also reflected in mice. Our genetic screen identified 203 candidate steatosis-associated HCC genes, many of which are altered in human HCC and are members of established HCC-driving signaling pathways. The protein kinase A/cyclic AMP signaling pathway was altered frequently in mouse and human steatosis-associated HCC. We found that activated PKA expression drove steatosis-specific liver tumorigenesis in a mouse model. Another candidate HCC driver, the N-acetyltransferase NAT10, which we found to be overexpressed in human steatosis-associated HCC and associated with decreased survival in human HCC, also drove liver tumorigenesis in a steatotic mouse model. This study identifies genes and pathways promoting HCC that may represent novel targets for prevention and treatment in the context of hepatic steatosis, an area of rapidly growing clinical significance. Copyright ©2017, American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Radiation-induced mutagenesis of antifungal metabolite producing bacillus sp. HKA-17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Keun; Senthilkumar, M. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    Bacillus sp. Strain HKA-17, isolated from the surface sterilized root nodule of Glycine max, inhibited several fungal plant pathogens. It produced a diffusible extracellular antifungal metabolite that was extracted with n-butanol. The crude extract was purified through Superdex{sup TM} 75 10/300 GL FPLC column. FT-IR spectrum of the FPLC purified-antifungal metabolite confirmed the presence of peptide and glycosidic bonds in its structure. Gamma induced mutagenesis of HKA-17 was carried out at an LD{sub 99} dose (8.46 kGy) to generate a mutant library. By screening the mutant library through a duel plate assay with Alternaria alternata, we selected one mutant with enhanced biocontrol activity (HKA-17e1) and two defective mutants (HKA-17d1 and HKA-17d2). Overproducing mutant recorded the largest inhibition zone (16.25 {+-} 0.86 mm) compared to any other mutant clone as well as wild type, and could be used as a potential biocontrol agent for plant disease suppression. The effect of HKA-17 antifungal metabolite on hyphal morphology was clearly demonstrated through scanning electron microscopy. The crude extract of defective mutant HKA-17 d1 did not induce any changes in hyphal morphology of A. alternata. However, antifungal metabolites of HKA-17 induced abnormal hyphal structures such as hyphal shrivelling, the bulging and swelling of intercalary cells, fragmentation, and cell lysis.

  7. Activity-enhancing mutations in an E3 ubiquitin ligase identified by high-throughput mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starita, Lea M; Pruneda, Jonathan N; Lo, Russell S; Fowler, Douglas M; Kim, Helen J; Hiatt, Joseph B; Shendure, Jay; Brzovic, Peter S; Fields, Stanley; Klevit, Rachel E

    2013-04-02

    Although ubiquitination plays a critical role in virtually all cellular processes, mechanistic details of ubiquitin (Ub) transfer are still being defined. To identify the molecular determinants within E3 ligases that modulate activity, we scored each member of a library of nearly 100,000 protein variants of the murine ubiquitination factor E4B (Ube4b) U-box domain for auto-ubiquitination activity in the presence of the E2 UbcH5c. This assay identified mutations that enhance activity both in vitro and in cellular p53 degradation assays. The activity-enhancing mutations fall into two distinct mechanistic classes: One increases the U-box:E2-binding affinity, and the other allosterically stimulates the formation of catalytically active conformations of the E2∼Ub conjugate. The same mutations enhance E3 activity in the presence of another E2, Ube2w, implying a common allosteric mechanism, and therefore the general applicability of our observations to other E3s. A comparison of the E3 activity with the two different E2s identified an additional variant that exhibits E3:E2 specificity. Our results highlight the general utility of high-throughput mutagenesis in delineating the molecular basis of enzyme activity.

  8. Identification of Pasteurella multocida virulence genes in a septicemic mouse model using signature-tagged mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, T E; Kennedy, M J; Lowery, D E

    2000-07-01

    P. multocida is the causative agent of several economically significant veterinary diseases occurring in numerous species worldwide. Signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) is a powerful genetic technique used to simultaneously screen multiple transposon mutants of a pathogen for their inability to survive in vivo. We have designed an STM system based on a mini-Tn10 transposon, chemiluminescent detection and semi-quantitative analysis and have identified transposon insertions into genes of Pasteurella multocida that attenuate virulence in a septicemic mouse model. A bank of 96 transposons containing strongly-hybridizing tags was used to create 19 pools of P. multocida transposon mutants containing approximately 70-90 mutants/pool. A total of 62 mutants were attenuated when checked individually, and 25 unique single transposon insertion mutations were identified from this group. The sequence of the disrupted ORF for each attenuated mutant was determined by either cloning or PCR-amplifying and sequencing the flanking regions. The attenuated mutants contained transposon insertions in genes encoding biosynthetic enzymes, virulence factors, regulatory components and unknown functions. This study should contribute to an understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms by which P. multocida and other pathogens in the Pasteurellaceae family cause disease and identify novel live vaccine candidates and new potential antibiotic targets. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  9. Molecular Mechanisms for High Hydrostatic Pressure-Induced Wing Mutagenesis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua; Wang, Kai; Xiao, Guanjun; Ma, Junfeng; Wang, Bingying; Shen, Sile; Fu, Xueqi; Zou, Guangtian; Zou, Bo

    2015-10-08

    Although High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) as an important physical and chemical tool has been increasingly applied to research of organism, the response mechanisms of organism to HHP have not been elucidated clearly thus far. To identify mutagenic mechanisms of HHP on organisms, here, we treated Drosophila melanogaster (D. melanogaster) eggs with HHP. Approximately 75% of the surviving flies showed significant morphological abnormalities from the egg to the adult stages compared with control flies (p melanogaster induced by HHP were used to investigate the mutagenic mechanisms of HHP on organism. Thus 285 differentially expressed genes associated with wing mutations were identified using Affymetrix Drosophila Genome Array 2.0 and verified with RT-PCR. We also compared wing development-related central genes in the mutant flies with control flies using DNA sequencing to show two point mutations in the vestigial (vg) gene. This study revealed the mutagenic mechanisms of HHP-induced mutagenesis in D. melanogaster and provided a new model for the study of evolution on organisms.

  10. Promoter mutagenesis for fine-tuning expression of essential genes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldrin, Francesca; Degiacomi, Giulia; Serafini, Agnese; Kolly, Gaëlle S; Ventura, Marcello; Sala, Claudia; Provvedi, Roberta; Palù, Giorgio; Cole, Stewart T; Manganelli, Riccardo

    2018-01-01

    A range of regulated gene expression systems has been developed for mycobacteria in the last few years to facilitate the study of essential genes, validate novel drug targets and evaluate their vulnerability. Among these, the TetR/Pip-OFF repressible promoter system was successfully used in several mycobacterial species both in vitro and in vivo. In the first version of the system, the repressible promoter was Pptr , a strong Pip-repressible promoter of Streptomyces pristinaespiralis, which might hamper effective downregulation of genes with a low basal expression level. Here, we report an enhanced system that allows more effective control of genes expressed at low level. To this end, we subjected Pptr to targeted mutagenesis and produced 16 different promoters with different strength. Three of them, weaker than the wild-type promoter, were selected and characterized showing that they can indeed improve the performances of TetR/Pip-OFF repressible system both in vitro and in vivo increasing its stringency. Finally, we used these promoters to construct a series of bacterial biosensors with different sensitivity to DprE1 inhibitors and developed a whole-cell screening assay to identify inhibitors of this enzyme. © 2017 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. Insertional Mutagenesis Identifies a STAT3/Arid1b/β-catenin Pathway Driving Neurofibroma Initiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianqiang Wu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available To identify genes and signaling pathways that initiate Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 neurofibromas, we used unbiased insertional mutagenesis screening, mouse models, and molecular analyses. We mapped an Nf1-Stat3-Arid1b/β-catenin pathway that becomes active in the context of Nf1 loss. Genetic deletion of Stat3 in Schwann cell progenitors (SCPs and Schwann cells (SCs prevents neurofibroma formation, decreasing SCP self-renewal and β-catenin activity. β-catenin expression rescues effects of Stat3 loss in SCPs. Importantly, P-STAT3 and β-catenin expression correlate in human neurofibromas. Mechanistically, P-Stat3 represses Gsk3β and the SWI/SNF gene Arid1b to increase β-catenin. Knockdown of Arid1b or Gsk3β in Stat3fl/fl;Nf1fl/fl;DhhCre SCPs rescues neurofibroma formation after in vivo transplantation. Stat3 represses Arid1b through histone modification in a Brg1-dependent manner, indicating that epigenetic modification plays a role in early tumorigenesis. Our data map a neural tumorigenesis pathway and support testing JAK/STAT and Wnt/β-catenin pathway inhibitors in neurofibroma therapeutic trials.

  12. Structure and mutagenesis of the DNA modification-dependent restriction endonuclease AspBHI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, John R; Nugent, Rebecca L; Li, Andrew; Mabuchi, Megumu Yamada; Fomenkov, Alexey; Cohen-Karni, Devora; Griggs, Rose M; Zhang, Xing; Wilson, Geoffrey G; Zheng, Yu; Xu, Shuang-yong; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2014-03-07

    The modification-dependent restriction endonuclease AspBHI recognizes 5-methylcytosine (5mC) in the double-strand DNA sequence context of (C/T)(C/G)(5mC)N(C/G) (N = any nucleotide) and cleaves the two strands a fixed distance (N12/N16) 3' to the modified cytosine. We determined the crystal structure of the homo-tetrameric AspBHI. Each subunit of the protein comprises two domains: an N-terminal DNA-recognition domain and a C-terminal DNA cleavage domain. The N-terminal domain is structurally similar to the eukaryotic SET and RING-associated (SRA) domain, which is known to bind to a hemi-methylated CpG dinucleotide. The C-terminal domain is structurally similar to classic Type II restriction enzymes and contains the endonuclease catalytic-site motif of DX20EAK. To understand how specific amino acids affect AspBHI recognition preference, we generated a homology model of the AspBHI-DNA complex, and probed the importance of individual amino acids by mutagenesis. Ser41 and Arg42 are predicted to be located in the DNA minor groove 5' to the modified cytosine. Substitution of Ser41 with alanine (S41A) and cysteine (S41C) resulted in mutants with altered cleavage activity. All 19 Arg42 variants resulted in loss of endonuclease activity.

  13. Effects of protein engineering and rational mutagenesis on crystal lattice of single chain antibody fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyoncu, Sibel; Hyun, Jeongmin; Pai, Jennifer C; Johnson, Jennifer L; Entzminger, Kevin; Jain, Avni; Heaner, David P; Morales, Ivan A; Truskett, Thomas M; Maynard, Jennifer A; Lieberman, Raquel L

    2014-09-01

    Protein crystallization is dependent upon, and sensitive to, the intermolecular contacts that assist in ordering proteins into a three-dimensional lattice. Here we used protein engineering and mutagenesis to affect the crystallization of single chain antibody fragments (scFvs) that recognize the EE epitope (EYMPME) with high affinity. These hypercrystallizable scFvs are under development to assist difficult proteins, such as membrane proteins, in forming crystals, by acting as crystallization chaperones. Guided by analyses of intermolecular crystal lattice contacts, two second-generation anti-EE scFvs were produced, which bind to proteins with installed EE tags. Surprisingly, although noncomplementarity determining region (CDR) lattice residues from the parent scFv framework remained unchanged through the processes of protein engineering and rational design, crystal lattices of the derivative scFvs differ. Comparison of energy calculations and the experimentally-determined lattice interactions for this basis set provides insight into the complexity of the forces driving crystal lattice choice and demonstrates the availability of multiple well-ordered surface features in our scFvs capable of forming versatile crystal contacts. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Contribution of increased mutagenesis to the evolution of pollutants-degrading indigenous bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilmjärv, Tanel; Naanuri, Eve; Kivisaar, Maia

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria can rapidly evolve mechanisms allowing them to use toxic environmental pollutants as a carbon source. In the current study we examined whether the survival and evolution of indigenous bacteria with the capacity to degrade organic pollutants could be connected with increased mutation frequency. The presence of constitutive and transient mutators was monitored among 53 pollutants-degrading indigenous bacterial strains. Only two strains expressed a moderate mutator phenotype and six were hypomutators, which implies that constitutively increased mutability has not been prevalent in the evolution of pollutants degrading bacteria. At the same time, a large proportion of the studied indigenous strains exhibited UV-irradiation-induced mutagenesis, indicating that these strains possess error-prone DNA polymerases which could elevate mutation frequency transiently under the conditions of DNA damage. A closer inspection of two Pseudomonas fluorescens strains PC20 and PC24 revealed that they harbour genes for ImuC (DnaE2) and more than one copy of genes for Pol V. Our results also revealed that availability of other nutrients in addition to aromatic pollutants in the growth environment of bacteria affects mutagenic effects of aromatic compounds. These results also implied that mutagenicity might be affected by a factor of how long bacteria have evolved to use a particular pollutant as a carbon source.

  15. Contribution of increased mutagenesis to the evolution of pollutants-degrading indigenous bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanel Ilmjärv

    Full Text Available Bacteria can rapidly evolve mechanisms allowing them to use toxic environmental pollutants as a carbon source. In the current study we examined whether the survival and evolution of indigenous bacteria with the capacity to degrade organic pollutants could be connected with increased mutation frequency. The presence of constitutive and transient mutators was monitored among 53 pollutants-degrading indigenous bacterial strains. Only two strains expressed a moderate mutator phenotype and six were hypomutators, which implies that constitutively increased mutability has not been prevalent in the evolution of pollutants degrading bacteria. At the same time, a large proportion of the studied indigenous strains exhibited UV-irradiation-induced mutagenesis, indicating that these strains possess error-prone DNA polymerases which could elevate mutation frequency transiently under the conditions of DNA damage. A closer inspection of two Pseudomonas fluorescens strains PC20 and PC24 revealed that they harbour genes for ImuC (DnaE2 and more than one copy of genes for Pol V. Our results also revealed that availability of other nutrients in addition to aromatic pollutants in the growth environment of bacteria affects mutagenic effects of aromatic compounds. These results also implied that mutagenicity might be affected by a factor of how long bacteria have evolved to use a particular pollutant as a carbon source.

  16. ADA1 and NET1 Genes of Yeast Mediate Both Chromosome Maintenance and Mitochondrial $\\rho^{-}$ Mutagenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Koltovaya, N A; Tchekhouta, I A; Devin, A B

    2002-01-01

    An increase in the mitochondrial (mt) rho^- mutagenesis is a well-known respose of yeast cells to mutations in the numerous nuclear genes as well as to various kinds of stress. Notwithstanding the extensive studies during several decades the biological significance of this response is not yet fully understood. The genetic approach to solution of this subject includes the study of genes that are required for the high incidence of spontaneous rho^- mutants. Previously we found that mutations in certain nuclear genes including CDC28, the central cell-cycle regulation gene, may decrease the spontaneous rho^- mutability and simultaneously affect maintenance of the yeast chromosomes and plasmids. The present work provides data on identification of two more genes, resembling CDC28 in this respect. These genes NET1 and ADA1 mediate important regulatory protein-protein interactions in the yeast cell. The effects of net1 and ada1 mutations on the maintenance of yeast mt genome, chromosomes and plasmids as well as on ce...

  17. FHIT loss-induced DNA damage creates optimal APOBEC substrates: Insights into APOBEC-mediated mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Catherine E; Saldivar, Joshua C; Amin, Zaynab A; Schrock, Morgan S; Huebner, Kay

    2015-02-20

    APOBEC cytidine deaminase activity is a major source of hypermutation in cancer. But previous studies have shown that the TC context signature of these enzymes is not observed in sizable fractions of cancers with overexpression of APOBEC, suggesting that cooperating factors that contribute to this mutagenesis should be identified. The fragile histidine triad protein (Fhit) is a tumor suppressor and DNA caretaker that is deleted or silenced in >50% of cancers. Loss of Fhit protein activity causes replication stress through reduced Thymidine Kinase 1 expression, increased DNA breaks, and global genome instability in normal and cancer cells. Using data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we show that FHIT-low/APOBEC3B-high expressing lung adenocarcinomas display significantly increased numbers of APOBEC signature mutations. Tumor samples in this cohort with normal FHIT expression do not exhibit APOBEC hypermutation, despite having high APOBEC3B expression. In vitro, silencing Fhit expression elevates APOBEC3B-directed C > T mutations in the TP53 gene. Furthermore, inhibition of Fhit loss-induced DNA damage via thymidine supplementation decreases the TP53 mutation burden in FHIT-low/APOBEC3B-high cells. We conclude that APOBEC3B overexpression and Fhit-loss induced DNA damage are independent events that, when occurring together, result in a significantly increased frequency of APOBEC-induced mutations that drive cancer progression.

  18. Processing closely spaced lesions during Nucleotide Excision Repair triggers mutagenesis in E. coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Régine Janel-Bintz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available It is generally assumed that most point mutations are fixed when damage containing template DNA undergoes replication, either right at the fork or behind the fork during gap filling. Here we provide genetic evidence for a pathway, dependent on Nucleotide Excision Repair, that induces mutations when processing closely spaced lesions. This pathway, referred to as Nucleotide Excision Repair-induced Mutagenesis (NERiM, exhibits several characteristics distinct from mutations that occur within the course of replication: i following UV irradiation, NER-induced mutations are fixed much more rapidly (t ½ ≈ 30 min than replication dependent mutations (t ½ ≈ 80-100 min ii NERiM specifically requires DNA Pol IV in addition to Pol V iii NERiM exhibits a two-hit dose-response curve that suggests processing of closely spaced lesions. A mathematical model let us define the geometry (infer the structure of the toxic intermediate as being formed when NER incises a lesion that resides in close proximity of another lesion in the complementary strand. This critical NER intermediate requires Pol IV / Pol II for repair, it is either lethal if left unrepaired or mutation-prone when repaired. Finally, NERiM is found to operate in stationary phase cells providing an intriguing possibility for ongoing evolution in the absence of replication.

  19. Site-directed, Ligase-Independent Mutagenesis (SLIM): a single-tube methodology approaching 100% efficiency in 4 h.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Joyce; March, Paul E; Lee, Ryan; Tillett, Daniel

    2004-12-07

    Site-directed, Ligase-Independent Mutagenesis (SLIM) is a novel PCR-mediated mutagenesis approach that can accommodate all three sequence modification types (insertion, deletion and substitution). The method utilizes an inverse PCR amplification of the template by two tailed long primers and two short primers in a single reaction with all steps carried out in one tube. The tailed primers are designed to contain the desired mutation on complementary overhangs at the terminus of PCR products. Upon post-amplification denaturation and re-annealing, heteroduplex formation between the mixed PCR products creates the desired clonable mutated plasmid. The technique is highly robust and suitable for applications in high-throughput gene engineering and library constructions. In this study, SLIM was employed to create sequence insertions, deletion and substitution within bacteriophage T7 gene 5. The overall efficiency for obtaining the desired product was >95%.

  20. Selection of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii strains resistant to cadmium with improved removal abilities through ultraviolet-diethyl sulfate cooperative mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Xu, Ying; Wang, Dongfeng; Jiang, Wei

    2017-08-01

    Cd 2+ resistance and bioaccumulation capacity were selected from parental Zygosaccharomyces rouxii (CRZ-0) while maintaining NaCl tolerance using protoplast mutagenesis technology. Ultraviolet-diethyl sulfate (UV-DES) cooperative mutagenesis, followed by preliminary screening and rescreening, was used to select the mutant strain CRZ-9. CRZ-9 grew better than CRZ-0 in YPD medium with 20 or 50 mg L -1 of Cd 2+ . Scanning electron microscopy observations and flow cytometry tests indicated that CRZ-9 was more effective at eliminating reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by Cd 2+ , which led to less cellular structural damage and lower lethality. Furthermore, compared with CRZ-0, CRZ-9 exhibited increased potential for application with higher Cd 2+ removal ratio, wider working pH range, and lower biomass dosage in Cd 2+ bioaccumulation. The mutant strain CRZ-9 possessed improved Cd 2+ resistance and bioaccumulation capacity and therefore is a promising strain to remove Cd 2+ from wastewater.

  1. Signature-Tagged Mutagenesis of Pasteurella multocida Identifies Mutants Displaying Differential Virulence Characteristics in Mice and Chickens

    OpenAIRE

    Harper, Marina; Boyce, John D.; Wilkie, Ian W.; Adler, Ben

    2003-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida is the causative agent of fowl cholera in birds. Signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) was used to identify potential virulence factors in a mouse septicemia disease model and a chicken fowl cholera model. A library of P. multocida mutants was constructed with a modified Tn916 and screened for attenuation in both animal models. Mutants identified by the STM screening were confirmed as attenuated by competitive growth assays in both chickens and mice. Of the 15 mutants ident...

  2. Systematic identification of genetic loci required for polymyxin resistance in Campylobacter jejuni using an efficient in vivo transposon mutagenesis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jun; Wang, Ying; Hoang, Ky Van

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to identify genetic loci required for polymyxin (PM) resistance in Campylobacter jejuni using an efficient in vivo random mutagenesis system. PM has been widely used as a model peptide to examine mechanisms of bacterial resistance to antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), the major effectors of host innate immunity and also candidates for a new generation of antibiotics. In this study, a commercially available transposon mutagenesis approach (EZ-Tn5 Transposome; Epicentre, Madison, WI) was evaluated and used to systematically identify Campylobacter mutants with increased susceptibility to PM. This simple, yet efficient, transposon mutagenesis approach identified 12 mutants representing seven different genes of C. jejuni 81-176 involved in acquired PM resistance. Backcrossing of the transposon mutations into the parent strain confirmed that the PM-sensitive phenotype in each mutant was linked to the gene with a specific transposon insertion. The genes are identified as being involved in the synthesis of cell-surface carbohydrates, modification of intracellular targets, signal transduction, and modulation of transmembrane potential. The mutant with the highest susceptibility to PM contains a transposon insertion in a putative galU gene that is essential for production of uridine diphosphate glucose (UDP)-glucose, a precursor required for lipooligosaccharide (LOS) synthesis. LOS analysis by tricine SDSPAGE showed significant truncation of the LOS core structure in the galU mutant. Susceptibility assays also indicated that GalU contributed C. jejuni resistance to some natural AMPs. Complementation of the galU mutant in trans fully restored LOS synthesis and resistance to the levels of the parent strain. Together, these results define seven C. jejuni genetic loci that will be useful for characterizing the molecular basis of Campylobacter resistance to PM and natural AMPs, and also highlight the usefulness of the in vivo mutagenesis approach for

  3. The role of Dbf4-dependent protein kinase in DNA polymerase ζ-dependent mutagenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Luis N; Ferguson, Rebecca; Santoro, Irma; Jinks-Robertson, Sue; Sclafani, Robert A

    2014-08-01

    The yeast Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK) (composed of Dbf4 and Cdc7 subunits) is an essential, conserved Ser/Thr protein kinase that regulates multiple processes in the cell, including DNA replication, recombination and induced mutagenesis. Only DDK substrates important for replication and recombination have been identified. Consequently, the mechanism by which DDK regulates mutagenesis is unknown. The yeast mcm5-bob1 mutation that bypasses DDK's essential role in DNA replication was used here to examine whether loss of DDK affects spontaneous as well as induced mutagenesis. Using the sensitive lys2ΔA746 frameshift reversion assay, we show DDK is required to generate "complex" spontaneous mutations, which are a hallmark of the Polζ translesion synthesis DNA polymerase. DDK co-immunoprecipitated with the Rev7 regulatory, but not with the Rev3 polymerase subunit of Polζ. Conversely, Rev7 bound mainly to the Cdc7 kinase subunit and not to Dbf4. The Rev7 subunit of Polζ may be regulated by DDK phosphorylation as immunoprecipitates of yeast Cdc7 and also recombinant Xenopus DDK phosphorylated GST-Rev7 in vitro. In addition to promoting Polζ-dependent mutagenesis, DDK was also important for generating Polζ-independent large deletions that revert the lys2ΔA746 allele. The decrease in large deletions observed in the absence of DDK likely results from an increase in the rate of replication fork restart after an encounter with spontaneous DNA damage. Finally, nonepistatic, additive/synergistic UV sensitivity was observed in cdc7Δ pol32Δ and cdc7Δ pol30-K127R,K164R double mutants, suggesting that DDK may regulate Rev7 protein during postreplication "gap filling" rather than during "polymerase switching" by ubiquitinated and sumoylated modified Pol30 (PCNA) and Pol32. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  4. Differences in temporal aspects of mutagenesis and cytotoxicity in Chinese hamster cells treated with methylating agents and thymidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, A R; Peterson, H

    1982-01-01

    Equitoxic concentrations of N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) and methyl methanesulfonate (MeMes) produced different frequencies of 8-azaguanine-resistant mutants and different amounts of N7-methylguanine, O6-methylguanine (m6G), and N3-methyladenine in the DNA of V79 Chinese hamster cells. Thus, neither the cytotoxicities nor the mutagenicities of these methylating agents could be attributed solely to nitrogen or to oxygen methylations in the DNA. However, MNNG produced 12-fold more m6G and 5-fold more mutants than did MeMes, indicating that a substantial part of the MNNG-induced mutations resulted from m6G--thymine mispairing during DNA replication. The expression as mutants of mutagenic oxygen methylations in the DNA of cells treated with MNNG was enhanced by thymidine (dThd) and deoxycytidine (dCyd), but these nucleosides did not significantly enhance MeMes-induced mutagenesis. The cytotoxicities of MNNG and MeMes were also increased by 10 microM dThd in proportion to the amount of m6G in the DNA. These increases in cytotoxicity were abolished by dCyd, which did not greatly reduce the dThd-induced enhancements of mutagenesis. Moreover, when dThd was present only during the 2-hr treatment with MNNG, maximal cytotoxicity occurred, but MNNG-induced mutagenesis was not increased. Maximal mutagenesis occurred when the dThd was present throughout the first doubling time of the MNNG-treated cells. Thus, the expression of the cytotoxicity and the mutagenicity associated with m6G in the DNA of V79 cells occurred by quite different mechanisms. PMID:6951203

  5. Sleeping Beauty Transposon Mutagenesis as a Tool for Gene Discovery in the NOD Mouse Model of Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elso, Colleen M; Chu, Edward P F; Alsayb, May A; Mackin, Leanne; Ivory, Sean T; Ashton, Michelle P; Bröer, Stefan; Silveira, Pablo A; Brodnicki, Thomas C

    2015-10-04

    A number of different strategies have been used to identify genes for which genetic variation contributes to type 1 diabetes (T1D) pathogenesis. Genetic studies in humans have identified >40 loci that affect the risk for developing T1D, but the underlying causative alleles are often difficult to pinpoint or have subtle biological effects. A complementary strategy to identifying "natural" alleles in the human population is to engineer "artificial" alleles within inbred mouse strains and determine their effect on T1D incidence. We describe the use of the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mutagenesis system in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse strain, which harbors a genetic background predisposed to developing T1D. Mutagenesis in this system is random, but a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-polyA gene trap within the SB transposon enables early detection of mice harboring transposon-disrupted genes. The SB transposon also acts as a molecular tag to, without additional breeding, efficiently identify mutated genes and prioritize mutant mice for further characterization. We show here that the SB transposon is functional in NOD mice and can produce a null allele in a novel candidate gene that increases diabetes incidence. We propose that SB transposon mutagenesis could be used as a complementary strategy to traditional methods to help identify genes that, when disrupted, affect T1D pathogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elso et al.

  6. Sleeping Beauty Transposon Mutagenesis as a Tool for Gene Discovery in the NOD Mouse Model of Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elso, Colleen M.; Chu, Edward P. F.; Alsayb, May A.; Mackin, Leanne; Ivory, Sean T.; Ashton, Michelle P.; Bröer, Stefan; Silveira, Pablo A.; Brodnicki, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    A number of different strategies have been used to identify genes for which genetic variation contributes to type 1 diabetes (T1D) pathogenesis. Genetic studies in humans have identified >40 loci that affect the risk for developing T1D, but the underlying causative alleles are often difficult to pinpoint or have subtle biological effects. A complementary strategy to identifying “natural” alleles in the human population is to engineer “artificial” alleles within inbred mouse strains and determine their effect on T1D incidence. We describe the use of the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mutagenesis system in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse strain, which harbors a genetic background predisposed to developing T1D. Mutagenesis in this system is random, but a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-polyA gene trap within the SB transposon enables early detection of mice harboring transposon-disrupted genes. The SB transposon also acts as a molecular tag to, without additional breeding, efficiently identify mutated genes and prioritize mutant mice for further characterization. We show here that the SB transposon is functional in NOD mice and can produce a null allele in a novel candidate gene that increases diabetes incidence. We propose that SB transposon mutagenesis could be used as a complementary strategy to traditional methods to help identify genes that, when disrupted, affect T1D pathogenesis. PMID:26438296

  7. Genome-wide maps of alkylation damage, repair, and mutagenesis in yeast reveal mechanisms of mutational heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Peng; Brown, Alexander J; Malc, Ewa P; Mieczkowski, Piotr A; Smerdon, Michael J; Roberts, Steven A; Wyrick, John J

    2017-10-01

    DNA base damage is an important contributor to genome instability, but how the formation and repair of these lesions is affected by the genomic landscape and contributes to mutagenesis is unknown. Here, we describe genome-wide maps of DNA base damage, repair, and mutagenesis at single nucleotide resolution in yeast treated with the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Analysis of these maps revealed that base excision repair (BER) of alkylation damage is significantly modulated by chromatin, with faster repair in nucleosome-depleted regions, and slower repair and higher mutation density within strongly positioned nucleosomes. Both the translational and rotational settings of lesions within nucleosomes significantly influence BER efficiency; moreover, this effect is asymmetric relative to the nucleosome dyad axis and is regulated by histone modifications. Our data also indicate that MMS-induced mutations at adenine nucleotides are significantly enriched on the nontranscribed strand (NTS) of yeast genes, particularly in BER-deficient strains, due to higher damage formation on the NTS and transcription-coupled repair of the transcribed strand (TS). These findings reveal the influence of chromatin on repair and mutagenesis of base lesions on a genome-wide scale and suggest a novel mechanism for transcription-associated mutation asymmetry, which is frequently observed in human cancers. © 2017 Mao et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  8. A new Penicillium echinulatum strain with faster cellulase secretion obtained using hydrogen peroxide mutagenesis and screening with 2‐deoxyglucose

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dillon, A.J.P; Bettio, M; Pozzan, F.G; Andrighetti, T; Camassola, M

    2011-01-01

    Aims:  The aim of this study is to improve cellulase production and secretion by Penicillium echinulatum using mutagenesis and selection in association with microfermentation and microanalysis methods...

  9. Structure-Based and Random Mutagenesis Approaches Increase the Organophosphate-Degrading Activity of a Phosphotriesterase Homologue from Deinococcus radiodurans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawwa, Renda; Larsen, Sonia D.; Ratia, Kiira; Mesecar, Andrew D.; (UIC)

    2010-11-09

    An enzyme from the amidohydrolase family from Deinococcus radiodurans (Dr-OPH) with homology to phosphotriesterase has been shown to exhibit activity against both organophosphate (OP) and lactone compounds. We have characterized the physical properties of Dr-OPH and have found it to be a highly thermostable enzyme, remaining active after 3 h of incubation at 60 C and withstanding incubation at temperatures up to 70 C. In addition, it can withstand concentrations of at least 200 mg/mL. These properties make Dr-OPH a promising candidate for development in commercial applications. However, compared to the most widely studied OP-degrading enzyme, that from Pseudomonas diminuta, Dr-OPH has low hydrolytic activity against certain OP substrates. Therefore, we sought to improve the OP-degrading activity of Dr-OPH, specifically toward the pesticides ethyl and methyl paraoxon, using structure-based and random approaches. Site-directed mutagenesis, random mutagenesis, and site-saturation mutagenesis were utilized to increase the OP-degrading activity of Dr-OPH. Out of a screen of more than 30,000 potential mutants, a total of 26 mutant enzymes were purified and characterized kinetically. Crystal structures of w.t. Dr-OPH, of Dr-OPH in complex with a product analog, and of 7 mutant enzymes were determined to resolutions between 1.7 and 2.4 {angstrom}. Information from these structures directed the design and production of 4 additional mutants for analysis. In total, our mutagenesis efforts improved the catalytic activity of Dr-OPH toward ethyl and methyl paraoxon by 126- and 322-fold and raised the specificity for these two substrates by 557- and 183-fold, respectively. Our work highlights the importance of an iterative approach to mutagenesis, proving that large rate enhancements are achieved when mutations are made in already active mutants. In addition, the relationship between the kinetic parameters and the introduced mutations has allowed us to hypothesize on those

  10. Principle and application of plant mutagenesis in crop improvement: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuff Oladosu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The first step in plant breeding is to identify suitable genotypes containing the desired genes among existing varieties, or to create one if it is not found in nature. In nature, variation occurs mainly as a result of mutations and without it, plant breeding would be impossible. In this context, the major aim in mutation-based breeding is to develop and improve well-adapted plant varieties by modifying one or two major traits to increase their productivity or quality. Both physical and chemical mutagenesis is used in inducing mutations in seeds and other planting materials. Then, selection for agronomic traits is done in the first generation, whereby most mutant lines may be discarded. The agronomic traits are confirmed in the second and third generations through evident phenotypic stability, while other evaluations are carried out in the subsequent generations. Finally, only the mutant lines with desirable traits are selected as a new variety or as a parent line for cross breeding. New varieties derived by induced mutatgenesis are used worldwide: rice in Vietnam, Thailand, China and the United States; durum wheat in Italy and Bulgaria; barley in Peru and European nations; soybean in Vietnam and China; wheat in China; as well as leguminous food crops in Pakistan and India. This paper integrates available data about the impact of mutation breeding-derived crop varieties around the world and highlights the potential of mutation breeding as a flexible and practicable approach applicable to any crop provided that appropriate objectives and selection methods are used.

  11. A high-throughput colorimetric assay for screening halohydrin dehalogenase saturation mutagenesis libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lixia; Li, Yang; Wang, Xiong

    2010-06-01

    Here we have reported a high throughput pH indicator-based assay to measure the activity of halohydrin dehalogenases (HheC). The assay relies upon the absorbance change at 560nm and the visual color change of phenol red in a weakly buffered system, due to the release of protons from the enzyme-catalyzed ring-closure reactions. The assay can be performed in a microplate format using whole cells, making the assay simple and robust. Thus, it is suitable for library screening. The assay has been further validated using two previously studied HheC variants, D80N and W249F, which exhibit 200-fold lower and 2-fold higher k(cat) values, respectively, toward 1,3-dichloro-2-propanol than the wild-type HheC. In addition, a saturation mutagenesis library of HheC was screened using the developed assay for its ability to efficiently catalyze the conversion of 1,3-dichloro-2-propanol. After screening of 500 colonies, one mutant W139C was identified and was further purified and characterized. Kinetic analysis indicates that the resulting mutant shows 2- and 5-fold improvement in k(cat) value toward 1,3-DCP and (R,S)-p-nitro-2-bromo-1-phenylethanol, respectively, although it exhibits higher K(m) values than the wild-type enzyme. The method described herein represents a useful tool given the need for the high throughput screening of halohydrin dehalogenase mutants. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Mapping the HLA-DO/HLA-DM complex by FRET and mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Taejin; Macmillan, Henriette; Mortimer, Sarah E; Jiang, Wei; Rinderknecht, Cornelia H; Stern, Lawrence J; Mellins, Elizabeth D

    2012-07-10

    HLA-DO (DO) is a nonclassic class II heterodimer that inhibits the action of the class II peptide exchange catalyst, HLA-DM (DM), and influences DM localization within late endosomes and exosomes. In addition, DM acts as a chaperone for DO and is required for its egress from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). These reciprocal functions are based on direct DO/DM binding, but the topology of DO/DM complexes is not known, in part, because of technical limitations stemming from DO instability. We generated two variants of recombinant soluble DO with increased stability [zippered DOαP11A (szDOv) and chimeric sDO-Fc] and confirmed their conformational integrity and ability to inhibit DM. Notably, we found that our constructs, as well as wild-type sDO, are inhibitory in the full pH range where DM is active (4.7 to ∼6.0). To probe the nature of DO/DM complexes, we used intermolecular fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and mutagenesis and identified a lateral surface spanning the α1 and α2 domains of szDO as the apparent binding site for sDM. We also analyzed several sDM mutants for binding to szDOv and susceptibility to DO inhibition. Results of these assays identified a region of DM important for interaction with DO. Collectively, our data define a putative binding surface and an overall orientation of the szDOv/sDM complex and have implications for the mechanism of DO inhibition of DM.

  13. Gene-trap mutagenesis identifies mammalian genes contributing to intoxication by Clostridium perfringens ε-toxin.

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    Susan E Ivie

    Full Text Available The Clostridium perfringens ε-toxin is an extremely potent toxin associated with lethal toxemias in domesticated ruminants and may be toxic to humans. Intoxication results in fluid accumulation in various tissues, most notably in the brain and kidneys. Previous studies suggest that the toxin is a pore-forming toxin, leading to dysregulated ion homeostasis and ultimately cell death. However, mammalian host factors that likely contribute to ε-toxin-induced cytotoxicity are poorly understood. A library of insertional mutant Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK cells, which are highly susceptible to the lethal affects of ε-toxin, was used to select clones of cells resistant to ε-toxin-induced cytotoxicity. The genes mutated in 9 surviving resistant cell clones were identified. We focused additional experiments on one of the identified genes as a means of validating the experimental approach. Gene expression microarray analysis revealed that one of the identified genes, hepatitis A virus cellular receptor 1 (HAVCR1, KIM-1, TIM1, is more abundantly expressed in human kidney cell lines than it is expressed in human cells known to be resistant to ε-toxin. One human kidney cell line, ACHN, was found to be sensitive to the toxin and expresses a larger isoform of the HAVCR1 protein than the HAVCR1 protein expressed by other, toxin-resistant human kidney cell lines. RNA interference studies in MDCK and in ACHN cells confirmed that HAVCR1 contributes to ε-toxin-induced cytotoxicity. Additionally, ε-toxin was shown to bind to HAVCR1 in vitro. The results of this study indicate that HAVCR1 and the other genes identified through the use of gene-trap mutagenesis and RNA interference strategies represent important targets for investigation of the process by which ε-toxin induces cell death and new targets for potential therapeutic intervention.

  14. Genome-wide mutagenesis reveals that ORF7 is a novel VZV skin-tropic factor.

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    Zhen Zhang

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV is a ubiquitous human alpha-herpesvirus that is the causative agent of chicken pox and shingles. Although an attenuated VZV vaccine (v-Oka has been widely used in children in the United States, chicken pox outbreaks are still seen, and the shingles vaccine only reduces the risk of shingles by 50%. Therefore, VZV still remains an important public health concern. Knowledge of VZV replication and pathogenesis remains limited due to its highly cell-associated nature in cultured cells, the difficulty of generating recombinant viruses, and VZV's almost exclusive tropism for human cells and tissues. In order to circumvent these hurdles, we cloned the entire VZV (p-Oka genome into a bacterial artificial chromosome that included a dual-reporter system (GFP and luciferase reporter genes. We used PCR-based mutagenesis and the homologous recombination system in the E. coli to individually delete each of the genome's 70 unique ORFs. The collection of viral mutants obtained was systematically examined both in MeWo cells and in cultured human fetal skin organ samples. We use our genome-wide deletion library to provide novel functional annotations to 51% of the VZV proteome. We found 44 out of 70 VZV ORFs to be essential for viral replication. Among the 26 non-essential ORF deletion mutants, eight have discernable growth defects in MeWo. Interestingly, four ORFs were found to be required for viral replication in skin organ cultures, but not in MeWo cells, suggesting their potential roles as skin tropism factors. One of the genes (ORF7 has never been described as a skin tropic factor. The global profiling of the VZV genome gives further insights into the replication and pathogenesis of this virus, which can lead to improved prevention and therapy of chicken pox and shingles.

  15. Pre-breeding of lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) for herbicide resistance through seed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizwan, Muhammad; Aslam, Muhammad; Asghar, Muhammad Jawad; Abbas, Ghulam; Shah, Tariq Mahmud; Shimelis, Hussein

    2017-01-01

    Lentil is a poor competitor of weeds and its sensitivity to herbicides is a major hurdle for large scale production. The present study was conducted to select herbicide resistant lentil genotypes through seed mutagenesis. Seeds of three advanced lentil genotypes (LPP 11001, LPP 11100 and LPP 11116) were treated with two different concentrations of ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS; 0.1 and 0.2%), hydrazine hydrate (HH; 0.02 and 0.03%) and sodium azide (SA; 0.01 and 0.02%) to develop M1 seed. The M2 was screened against two herbicides including Ally Max 28.6% SG (X = 34.58 g/ha and 1.5X = 51.87 g/ha) and Atlantis 3.6% WG (X = 395.2 g/ha and 1.5X = 592.8 g/ha) using the following three screening methods: post plant emergence (PPE), pre-plant incorporation (PPI) and seed priming (SP). Data were recorded on survival index and survival percentage from each experimental unit of every population. Plants in all populations were categorized following their reaction to herbicides. The newly developed populations showed greater variation for herbicide resistance when compared to their progenitors. Phenotypic traits were significantly reduced in all the screening environments. Overall, 671 herbicide resistant mutants were selected from all testing environments. The seeds from selected plants were re-mutagenized at 150 Gy of gamma radiation and evaluated against higher dose of herbicides. This allowed selection of 134 herbicide resistant mutants. The selected mutants are useful germplasm for herbicide resistance breeding of lentil.

  16. WR-2721 protects against cytoxan-induced hprt mutagenesis without affecting therapeutic effectiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kataoka, Yasushi [Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Radiation and Cellular Oncology; Perrin, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Hunter, N.; Milas, L. [Univ. of Texas, Houston, TX (United States); Grdina, D. [Univ. of Chicago, Chicadgo, IL (United States). Dept. of Radiation and Cellular Oncology]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The radioprotector S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721) was evaluated for its ability to protect against cytoxan-induced mutagenesis at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus in mouse splenocytes under conditions that would not interfere with the therapeutic effectiveness of cytoxan in the treatment of fibrosarcoma lung tumors. Mutations at the hprt locus increase in frequency as a function of the dose of cytoxan used. With a spontaneous mutation frequency in C3H mice of 1.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}, mutation frequencies increased from 6.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} to 2.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} as the dose of cytoxan increased from 50 to 200 mg/kg. C3H male mice were injected in their tail veins with 3.5 {times} 10{sup 5} viable fibrosarcoma (FSa) cells. This protocol gave rise to an average of 68 tumor colonies per mouse. Four days following injection animals were treated with cytoxan at a dose of 100 mg/kg, which gave rise to significant tumor cell killing and a reduction in tumor colony number to less than an average of one per animal. WR-2721 at a concentration of 100 mg/kg did not affect on cytoxan`s therapeutic effectiveness. However, a 100 mg/kg dose of WR-2721 was effective in reducing the cytoxan induced hprt mutation frequency in mice from 160 to 35 per 10{sup 5} viable cells regardless of whether it was administered 30 min before or 2 h following cytoxan treatment.

  17. Transposon mutagenesis identifies genes and cellular processes driving epithelial-mesenchymal transition in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Takahiro; Newberg, Justin Y.; Kodama, Michiko; Rangel, Roberto; Yoshihara, Kosuke; Tien, Jean C.; Parsons, Pamela H.; Wu, Hao; Finegold, Milton J.; Copeland, Neal G.; Jenkins, Nancy A.

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is thought to contribute to metastasis and chemoresistance in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), leading to their poor prognosis. The genes driving EMT in HCC are not yet fully understood, however. Here, we show that mobilization of Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposons in immortalized mouse hepatoblasts induces mesenchymal liver tumors on transplantation to nude mice. These tumors show significant down-regulation of epithelial markers, along with up-regulation of mesenchymal markers and EMT-related transcription factors (EMT-TFs). Sequencing of transposon insertion sites from tumors identified 233 candidate cancer genes (CCGs) that were enriched for genes and cellular processes driving EMT. Subsequent trunk driver analysis identified 23 CCGs that are predicted to function early in tumorigenesis and whose mutation or alteration in patients with HCC is correlated with poor patient survival. Validation of the top trunk drivers identified in the screen, including MET (MET proto-oncogene, receptor tyrosine kinase), GRB2-associated binding protein 1 (GAB1), HECT, UBA, and WWE domain containing 1 (HUWE1), lysine-specific demethylase 6A (KDM6A), and protein-tyrosine phosphatase, nonreceptor-type 12 (PTPN12), showed that deregulation of these genes activates an EMT program in human HCC cells that enhances tumor cell migration. Finally, deregulation of these genes in human HCC was found to confer sorafenib resistance through apoptotic tolerance and reduced proliferation, consistent with recent studies showing that EMT contributes to the chemoresistance of tumor cells. Our unique cell-based transposon mutagenesis screen appears to be an excellent resource for discovering genes involved in EMT in human HCC and potentially for identifying new drug targets. PMID:27247392

  18. Intensive mutagenesis of the nisin hinge leads to the rational design of enhanced derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Brian; Field, Des; O'Connor, Paula M; Hill, Colin; Cotter, Paul D; Ross, R Paul

    2013-01-01

    Nisin A is the most extensively studied lantibiotic and has been used as a preservative by the food industry since 1953. This 34 amino acid peptide contains three dehydrated amino acids and five thioether rings. These rings, resulting from one lanthionine and four methyllanthionine bridges, confer the peptide with its unique structure. Nisin A has two mechanisms of action, with the N-terminal domain of the peptide inhibiting cell wall synthesis through lipid II binding and the C-terminal domain responsible for pore-formation. The focus of this study is the three amino acid 'hinge' region (N 20, M 21 and K 22) which separates these two domains and allows for conformational flexibility. As all lantibiotics are gene encoded, novel variants can be generated through manipulation of the corresponding gene. A number of derivatives in which the hinge region was altered have previously been shown to possess enhanced antimicrobial activity. Here we take this approach further by employing simultaneous, indiscriminate site-saturation mutagenesis of all three hinge residues to create a novel bank of nisin derivative producers. Screening of this bank revealed that producers of peptides with hinge regions consisting of AAK, NAI and SLS displayed enhanced bioactivity against a variety of targets. These and other results suggested a preference for small, chiral amino acids within the hinge region, leading to the design and creation of producers of peptides with hinges consisting of AAA and SAA. These producers, and the corresponding peptides, exhibited enhanced bioactivity against Lactococcus lactis HP, Streptococcus agalactiae ATCC 13813, Mycobacterium smegmatis MC2155 and Staphylococcus aureus RF122 and thus represent the first example of nisin derivatives that possess enhanced activity as a consequence of rational design.

  19. Intensive mutagenesis of the nisin hinge leads to the rational design of enhanced derivatives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Healy

    Full Text Available Nisin A is the most extensively studied lantibiotic and has been used as a preservative by the food industry since 1953. This 34 amino acid peptide contains three dehydrated amino acids and five thioether rings. These rings, resulting from one lanthionine and four methyllanthionine bridges, confer the peptide with its unique structure. Nisin A has two mechanisms of action, with the N-terminal domain of the peptide inhibiting cell wall synthesis through lipid II binding and the C-terminal domain responsible for pore-formation. The focus of this study is the three amino acid 'hinge' region (N 20, M 21 and K 22 which separates these two domains and allows for conformational flexibility. As all lantibiotics are gene encoded, novel variants can be generated through manipulation of the corresponding gene. A number of derivatives in which the hinge region was altered have previously been shown to possess enhanced antimicrobial activity. Here we take this approach further by employing simultaneous, indiscriminate site-saturation mutagenesis of all three hinge residues to create a novel bank of nisin derivative producers. Screening of this bank revealed that producers of peptides with hinge regions consisting of AAK, NAI and SLS displayed enhanced bioactivity against a variety of targets. These and other results suggested a preference for small, chiral amino acids within the hinge region, leading to the design and creation of producers of peptides with hinges consisting of AAA and SAA. These producers, and the corresponding peptides, exhibited enhanced bioactivity against Lactococcus lactis HP, Streptococcus agalactiae ATCC 13813, Mycobacterium smegmatis MC2155 and Staphylococcus aureus RF122 and thus represent the first example of nisin derivatives that possess enhanced activity as a consequence of rational design.

  20. Properties of the Mechanosensitive Channel MscS Pore Revealed by Tryptophan Scanning Mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Tim; Rasmussen, Akiko; Singh, Shivani; Galbiati, Heloisa; Edwards, Michelle D; Miller, Samantha; Booth, Ian R

    2015-07-28

    Bacterial mechanosensitive channels gate when the transmembrane turgor rises to levels that compromise the structural integrity of the cell wall. Gating creates a transient large diameter pore that allows hydrated solutes to pass from the cytoplasm at rates close to those of diffusion. In the closed conformation, the channel limits transmembrane solute movement, even that of protons. In the MscS crystal structure (Protein Data Bank entry 2oau ), a narrow, hydrophobic opening is visible in the crystal structure, and it has been proposed that a vapor lock created by the hydrophobic seals, L105 and L109, is the barrier to water and ions. Tryptophan scanning mutagenesis has proven to be a highly valuable tool for the analysis of channel structure. Here Trp residues were introduced along the pore-forming TM3a helix and in selected other parts of the protein. Mutants were investigated for their expression, stability, and activity and as fluorescent probes of the physical properties along the length of the pore. Most Trp mutants were expressed at levels similar to that of the parent (MscS YFF) and were stable as heptamers in detergent in the presence and absence of urea. Fluorescence data suggest a long hydrophobic region with low accessibility to aqueous solvents, extending from L105/L109 to G90. Steady-state fluorescence anisotropy data are consistent with significant homo-Förster resonance energy transfer between tryptophan residues from different subunits within the narrow pore. The data provide new insights into MscS structure and gating.

  1. Effect of mutagenesis on the stereochemistry of enoyl-CoA hydratase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yuguo; Hofstein, Hilary A; Zwahlen, Jacque; Tonge, Peter J

    2002-10-22

    Enoyl-CoA hydratase catalyzes the hydration of trans-2-crotonyl-CoA to 3(S)-HB-CoA, 3(S)-hydroxybutyryl-CoA with a stereospecificity (k(S)/k(R)) of 400000 to 1 [Wu, W. J., Feng, Y., He, X., Hofstein, H. S., Raleigh, D. P., and Tonge, P. J. (2000) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 122, 3987-3994]. Replacement of E164, one of the catalytic glutamates in the active site, with either aspartate or glutamine reduces the rate of formation of the 3(S) product enantiomer (k(S)) without affecting the rate of formation of the 3(R) product (k(R)). Consequently, k(S)/k(R) is 1000 and 0.33 for E164D and E164Q, respectively. In contrast, mutagenesis of E144, the second catalytic glutamate, reduces the rate of formation of both product enantiomers. Thus, only E144 is required for the formation of 3(R)-HB-CoA, 3(R)-hydroxybutyryl-CoA. Modeling studies together with analysis of alpha-proton exchange rates and experiments with crotonyl-oxyCoA, a substrate analogue in which the alpha-proton acidity has been reduced 10000-fold, support a mechanism of 3(R)-hydroxybutyryl-CoA formation that involves the E144-catalyzed stepwise addition of water to crotonyl-CoA which is bound in an s-trans conformation in the active site. Finally, we also demonstrate that hydrogen bonds in the oxyanion hole, provided by the backbone amide groups of G141 and A98, are important for the formation of both product enantiomers.

  2. Cytadherence-deficient mutants of Mycoplasma gallisepticum generated by transposon mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudahi-Orenstein, Sigalit; Levisohn, Sharon; Geary, Steven J; Yogev, David

    2003-07-01

    Cytadherence-related molecules of Mycoplasma gallisepticum strain R-low were identified by Tn4001 transposon mutagenesis with the hemadsorption (HA) assay as an indicator for cytadherence. Three Gm(r) HA-negative (HA(-)) colonies displaying a stable HA(-) phenotype through several successive generations in which gentamicin selection was maintained were isolated from four independent transformation experiments and characterized. Southern blot analysis showed that the transposon was inserted as a single copy within the genome of each of the HA(-) mutants, suggesting that the transposon insertion was directly responsible for their inability to attach to erythrocytes. Sequence analysis of the transposon insertion sites revealed that in two mutants, the transposon was inserted at two distinct sites within the gapA structural gene. In the third mutant, the insertion was mapped within the crmA gene, which is located immediately downstream of the gapA gene as part of the same operon. In vitro attachment experiments with the MRC-5 human lung fibroblast cell line showed that the cytadherence capabilities of the HA(-) mutants were less than 25% those of original strain R. Experimental infection of chickens, the natural host of M. gallisepticum, with each of the three mutants demonstrated significantly impaired colonization and host responses. These data demonstrate conclusively the role of both GapA and CrmA proteins in the adherence of M. gallisepticum to host cells in model systems and in vivo colonization. Furthermore, these results underscore the relevance of in vitro cytadherence model systems for studying the pathogenesis of natural infections in chickens.

  3. Random mutagenesis reveals residues of JAK2 critical in evading inhibition by a tyrosine kinase inhibitor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R Marit

    Full Text Available The non-receptor tyrosine kinase JAK2 is implicated in a group of myeloproliferative neoplasms including polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and primary myelofibrosis. JAK2-selective inhibitors are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Data from drug-resistant chronic myeloid leukemia patients demonstrate that treatment with a small-molecule inhibitor generates resistance via mutation or amplification of BCR-ABL. We hypothesize that treatment with small molecule inhibitors of JAK2 will similarly generate inhibitor-resistant mutants in JAK2.In order to identify inhibitor-resistant JAK2 mutations a priori, we utilized TEL-JAK2 to conduct an in vitro random mutagenesis screen for JAK2 alleles resistant to JAK Inhibitor-I. Isolated mutations were evaluated for their ability to sustain cellular growth, stimulate downstream signaling pathways, and phosphorylate a novel JAK2 substrate in the presence of inhibitor.Mutations were found exclusively in the kinase domain of JAK2. The panel of mutations conferred resistance to high concentrations of inhibitor accompanied by sustained activation of the Stat5, Erk1/2, and Akt pathways. Using a JAK2 substrate, enhanced catalytic activity of the mutant JAK2 kinase was observed in inhibitor concentrations 200-fold higher than is inhibitory to the wild-type protein. When testing the panel of mutations in the context of the Jak2 V617F allele, we observed that a subset of mutations conferred resistance to inhibitor, validating the use of TEL-JAK2 in the initial screen. These results demonstrate that small-molecule inhibitors select for JAK2 inhibitor-resistant alleles, and the design of next-generation JAK2 inhibitors should consider the location of mutations arising in inhibitor-resistant screens.

  4. Mutagenesis and functional studies with succinate dehydrogenase inhibitors in the wheat pathogen Mycosphaerella graminicola.

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    Gabriel Scalliet

    Full Text Available A range of novel carboxamide fungicides, inhibitors of the succinate dehydrogenase enzyme (SDH, EC 1.3.5.1 is currently being introduced to the crop protection market. The aim of this study was to explore the impact of structurally distinct carboxamides on target site resistance development and to assess possible impact on fitness. We used a UV mutagenesis approach in Mycosphaerella graminicola, a key pathogen of wheat to compare the nature, frequencies and impact of target mutations towards five subclasses of carboxamides. From this screen we identified 27 amino acid substitutions occurring at 18 different positions on the 3 subunits constituting the ubiquinone binding (Qp site of the enzyme. The nature of substitutions and cross resistance profiles indicated significant differences in the binding interaction to the enzyme across the different inhibitors. Pharmacophore elucidation followed by docking studies in a tridimensional SDH model allowed us to propose rational hypotheses explaining some of the differential behaviors for the first time. Interestingly all the characterized substitutions had a negative impact on enzyme efficiency, however very low levels of enzyme activity appeared to be sufficient for cell survival. In order to explore the impact of mutations on pathogen fitness in vivo and in planta, homologous recombinants were generated for a selection of mutation types. In vivo, in contrast to previous studies performed in yeast and other organisms, SDH mutations did not result in a major increase of reactive oxygen species levels and did not display any significant fitness penalty. However, a number of Qp site mutations affecting enzyme efficiency were shown to have a biological impact in planta.Using the combined approaches described here, we have significantly improved our understanding of possible resistance mechanisms to carboxamides and performed preliminary fitness penalty assessment in an economically important plant pathogen

  5. Gene transfer and genome-wide insertional mutagenesis by retroviral transduction in fish stem cells.

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    Qizhi Liu

    Full Text Available Retrovirus (RV is efficient for gene transfer and integration in dividing cells of diverse organisms. RV provides a powerful tool for insertional mutagenesis (IM to identify and functionally analyze genes essential for normal and pathological processes. Here we report RV-mediated gene transfer and genome-wide IM in fish stem cells from medaka and zebrafish. Three RVs were produced for fish cell transduction: rvLegfp and rvLcherry produce green fluorescent protein (GFP and mCherry fluorescent protein respectively under control of human cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter upon any chromosomal integration, whereas rvGTgfp contains a splicing acceptor and expresses GFP only upon gene trapping (GT via intronic in-frame integration and spliced to endogenous active genes. We show that rvLegfp and rvLcherry produce a transduction efficiency of 11~23% in medaka and zebrafish stem cell lines, which is as 30~67% efficient as the positive control in NIH/3T3. Upon co-infection with rvGTgfp and rvLcherry, GFP-positive cells were much fewer than Cherry-positive cells, consistent with rareness of productive gene trapping events versus random integration. Importantly, rvGTgfp infection in the medaka haploid embryonic stem (ES cell line HX1 generated GTgfp insertion on all 24 chromosomes of the haploid genome. Similar to the mammalian haploid cells, these insertion events were presented predominantly in intergenic regions and introns but rarely in exons. RV-transduced HX1 retained the ES cell properties such as stable growth, embryoid body formation and pluripotency gene expression. Therefore, RV is proficient for gene transfer and IM in fish stem cells. Our results open new avenue for genome-wide IM in medaka haploid ES cells in culture.

  6. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Guignardia citricarpa: an efficient tool to gene transfer and random mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Maria Beatriz Calderan; Fávaro, Léia Cecília de Lima; Pallu, Ana Paula de Souza; Ferreira, Anderson; Sebastianes, Fernanda de Souza; Rodrigues, Maria Juliana Calderan; Spósito, Marcel Bellato; de Araújo, Welington Luiz; Pizzirani-Kleiner, Aline Aparecida

    2013-01-01

    Guignardia citricarpa is the causal agent of Citrus Black Spot (CBS), an important disease in Citriculture. Due to the expressive value of this activity worldwide, especially in Brazil, understanding more about the functioning of this fungus is of utmost relevance, making possible the elucidation of its infection mechanisms, and providing tools to control CBS. This work describes for the first time an efficient and successful methodology for genetic transformation of G. citricarpa mycelia, which generated transformants expressing the gene encoding for the gfp (green fluorescent protein) and also their interaction with citrus plant. Mycelia of G. citricarpa were transformed via Agrobacterium tumefaciens, which carried the plasmid pFAT-gfp, contains the genes for hygromycin resistance (hph) as well as gfp. The optimization of the agrotransformation protocol was performed testing different conditions (type of membrane; inductor agent concentration [acetosyringone - AS] and cocultivation time). Results demonstrated that the best condition occurred with the utilization of cellulose's ester membrane; 200 μM of AS and 96 h as cocultivation time. High mitotic stability (82 %) was displayed by transformants using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) technique to confirm the hph gene insertion. In addition, the presence of gfp was observed inside mycelia by epifluorescence optical microscopy. This technique easy visualization of the behaviour of the pathogen interacting with the plant for the first time, allowing future studies on the pathogenesis of this fungus. The establishment of a transformation method for G. citricarpa opens a range of possibilities and facilitates the study of insertional mutagenesis and genetic knockouts, in order to identify the most important genes involved in the pathogenesis mechanisms and plant-pathogen interaction. Copyright © 2013 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Mutagenesis of catalytically important residues of cupin type phosphoglucose isomerase from Archaeoglobus fulgidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Thomas; Schlichting, Bettina; Grötzinger, Joachim; Swan, Michael K; Davies, Christopher; Schönheit, Peter

    2005-12-01

    Recently, cupin type phosphoglucose isomerases have been described as a novel protein family representing a separate lineage in the evolution of phosphoglucose isomerases. The importance of eight active site residues completely conserved within the cPGI family has been assessed by site-directed mutagenesis using the cPGI from Archaeoglobus fulgidus (AfcPGI) as a model. The mutants T63A, G79A, G79L, H80A, H80D, H82A, E93A, E93D, Y95F, Y95K, H136A, and Y160F were constructed, purified, and the impact of the respective mutation on catalysis and/or metal ion binding as well as thermostability was analyzed. The variants G79A, G79L, and Y95F exhibited a lower thermostability. The catalytic efficiency of the enzyme was reduced by more than 100-fold in the G79A, G79L, H80A, H80D, E93D, Y95F variants and more than 15-fold in the T63A, H82A, Y95K, Y160F variants, but remained about the same in the H136A variant at Ni2+ saturating conditions. Further, the Ni2+ content of the mutants H80A, H80D, H82A, E93A, E93D and their apparent Ni2+ binding ability was reduced, resulting in an almost complete loss of activity and thus underlining the crucial role of the metal ion for catalysis. Evidence is presented that H80, H82 and E93 play an additional role in catalysis besides metal ion binding. E93 appears to be the key catalytic residue of AfcPGI, as the E93A mutant did not show any catalytic activity at all.

  8. Enhancement of Lutein Production in Chlorella sorokiniana (Chorophyta by Improvement of Culture Conditions and Random Mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Angeles Vargas

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Chlorella sorokiniana has been selected for lutein production, after a screening of thirteen species of microalgae, since it showed both a high content in this carotenoid and a high growth rate. The effects of several nutritional and environmental factors on cell growth and lutein accumulation have been studied. Maximal specific growth rate and lutein content were attained at 690 µmol photons m−2 s−1, 28 °C, 2 mM NaCl, 40 mM nitrate and under mixotrophic conditions. In general, optimal conditions for the growth of this strain also lead to maximal lutein productivity. High lutein yielding mutants of C. sorokiniana have been obtained by random mutagenesis, using N-methyl-N′-nitro-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG as a mutagen and selecting mutants by their resistance to the inhibitors of the carotenogenic pathway nicotine and norflurazon. Among the mutants resistant to the herbicides, those exhibiting both high content in lutein and high growth rate were chosen. Several mutants exhibited higher contents in this carotenoid than the wild type, showing, in addition, either a similar or higher growth rate than the latter strain. The mutant MR-16 exhibited a 2.0-fold higher volumetric lutein content than that of the wild type, attaining values of 42.0 mg L−1 and mutants DMR-5 and DMR-8 attained a lutein cellular content of 7.0 mg g−1 dry weight. The high lutein yield exhibited by C. sorokiniana makes this microalga an excellent candidate for the production of this commercially interesting pigment.

  9. Enhancement of Lutein Production in Chlorella sorokiniana (Chorophyta) by Improvement of Culture Conditions and Random Mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, Baldo F.; Obraztsova, Irina; Couso, Inmaculada; Leon, Rosa; Vargas, Maria Angeles; Rodriguez, Herminia

    2011-01-01

    Chlorella sorokiniana has been selected for lutein production, after a screening of thirteen species of microalgae, since it showed both a high content in this carotenoid and a high growth rate. The effects of several nutritional and environmental factors on cell growth and lutein accumulation have been studied. Maximal specific growth rate and lutein content were attained at 690 μmol photons m−2 s−1, 28 °C, 2 mM NaCl, 40 mM nitrate and under mixotrophic conditions. In general, optimal conditions for the growth of this strain also lead to maximal lutein productivity. High lutein yielding mutants of C. sorokiniana have been obtained by random mutagenesis, using N-methyl-N′-nitro-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) as a mutagen and selecting mutants by their resistance to the inhibitors of the carotenogenic pathway nicotine and norflurazon. Among the mutants resistant to the herbicides, those exhibiting both high content in lutein and high growth rate were chosen. Several mutants exhibited higher contents in this carotenoid than the wild type, showing, in addition, either a similar or higher growth rate than the latter strain. The mutant MR-16 exhibited a 2.0-fold higher volumetric lutein content than that of the wild type, attaining values of 42.0 mg L−1 and mutants DMR-5 and DMR-8 attained a lutein cellular content of 7.0 mg g−1 dry weight. The high lutein yield exhibited by C. sorokiniana makes this microalga an excellent candidate for the production of this commercially interesting pigment. PMID:22131961

  10. Efficiency and Inheritance of Targeted Mutagenesis in Maize Using CRISPR-Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinjie; Song, Ning; Sun, Silong; Yang, Weilong; Zhao, Haiming; Song, Weibin; Lai, Jinsheng

    2016-01-20

    CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated proteins) is an adaptive immune system in bacteria and archaea to defend against invasion from foreign DNA fragments. Recently, it has been developed as a powerful targeted genome editing tool for a wide variety of species. However, its application in maize has only been tested with transiently expressed somatic cells or with a limited number of stable transgenic T0 plants. The exact efficiency and specificity of the CRISPR/Cas system in the highly complex maize genome has not been documented yet. Here we report an extensive study of the well-studied type II CRISPR-Cas9 system for targeted genome editing in maize, with the codon-optimized Cas9 protein and the short non-coding guide RNA generated through a functional maize U6 snRNA promoter. Targeted gene mutagenesis was detected for 90 loci by maize protoplast assay, with an average cleavage efficiency of 10.67%. Stable knockout transformants for maize phytoene synthase gene (PSY1) were obtained. Mutations occurred in germ cells can be stably inherited to the next generation. Moreover, no off-target effect was detected at the computationally predicted putative off-target loci. No significant difference between the transcriptomes of the Cas9 expressed and non-expressed lines was detected. Our results confirmed that the CRISPR-Cas9 could be successfully applied as a robust targeted genome editing system in maize. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Genetics Society of China. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Interconversion of Anthozoa GFP-like fluorescent and non-fluorescent proteins by mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulina, Maria E; Chudakov, Dmitry M; Mudrik, Nikolay N; Lukyanov, Konstantin A

    2002-01-01

    Background Within the family of green fluorescent protein (GFP) homologs, one can mark two main groups, specifically, fluorescent proteins (FPs) and non-fluorescent or chromoproteins (CPs). Structural background of differences between FPs and CPs are poorly understood to date. Results Here, we applied site-directed and random mutagenesis in order to to transform CP into FP and vice versa. A purple chromoprotein asCP (asFP595) from Anemonia sulcata and a red fluorescent protein DsRed from Discosoma sp. were selected as representatives of CPs and FPs, respectively. For asCP, some substitutions at positions 148 and 165 (numbering in accordance to GFP) were found to dramatically increase quantum yield of red fluorescence. For DsRed, substitutions at positions 148, 165, 167, and 203 significantly decreased fluorescence intensity, so that the spectral characteristics of these mutants became more close to those of CPs. Finally, a practically non-fluorescent mutant DsRed-NF was generated. This mutant carried four amino acid substitutions, specifically, S148C, I165N, K167M, and S203A. DsRed-NF possessed a high extinction coefficient and an extremely low quantum yield (< 0.001). These spectral characteristics allow one to regard DsRed-NF as a true chromoprotein. Conclusions We located a novel point in asCP sequence (position 165) mutations at which can result in red fluorescence appearance. Probably, this finding could be applied onto other CPs to generate red and far-red fluorescent mutants. A possibility to transform an FP into CP was demonstrated. Key role of residues adjacent to chromophore's phenolic ring in fluorescent/non-fluorescent states determination was revealed. PMID:11972899

  12. Phenotypic and biochemical profile changes in calendula (Calendula officinalis L.) plants treated with two chemical mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Nashar, Y I; Asrar, A A

    2016-05-06

    Chemical mutagenesis is an efficient tool used in mutation-breeding programs to improve the vital characters of the floricultural crops. This study aimed to estimate the effects of different concentrations of two chemical mutagens; sodium azide (SA) and diethyl sulfate (DES). The vegetative growth and flowering characteristics in two generations (M1 and M2) of calendula plants were investigated. Seeds were treated with five different concentrations of SA and DES (at the same rates) of 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, and 5000 ppm, in addition to a control treatment of 0 ppm. Results showed that lower concentrations of SA mutagen had significant effects on seed germination percentage, plant height, leaf area, plant fresh weight, flowering date, inflorescence diameter, and gas-exchange measurements in plants of both generations. Calendula plants tended to flower earlier under low mutagen concentrations (1000 ppm), whereas higher concentrations delayed flowering significantly. Positive results on seed germination, plant height, number of branches, plant fresh weight, and leaf area were observed in the M2-generation at lower concentrations of SA (1000 ppm), as well as at 4000 ppm DES on number of leaves and inflorescences. The highest total soluble protein was detected at the concentrations of 1000 ppm SA and 2000 ppm DES. DES showed higher average of acid phosphatase activity than SA. Results indicated that lower concentrations of SA and DES mutagens had positive effects on seed germination percentage, plant height, leaf area, plant fresh weight, flowering date, inflorescence diameter, and gas-exchange measurements. Thus, lower mutagen concentrations could be recommended for better floral and physio-chemical performance.

  13. Gene transfer and genome-wide insertional mutagenesis by retroviral transduction in fish stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qizhi; Wang, Yunzhi; Lin, Fan; Zhang, Lei; Li, Yan; Ge, Ruowen; Hong, Yunhan

    2015-01-01

    Retrovirus (RV) is efficient for gene transfer and integration in dividing cells of diverse organisms. RV provides a powerful tool for insertional mutagenesis (IM) to identify and functionally analyze genes essential for normal and pathological processes. Here we report RV-mediated gene transfer and genome-wide IM in fish stem cells from medaka and zebrafish. Three RVs were produced for fish cell transduction: rvLegfp and rvLcherry produce green fluorescent protein (GFP) and mCherry fluorescent protein respectively under control of human cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter upon any chromosomal integration, whereas rvGTgfp contains a splicing acceptor and expresses GFP only upon gene trapping (GT) via intronic in-frame integration and spliced to endogenous active genes. We show that rvLegfp and rvLcherry produce a transduction efficiency of 11~23% in medaka and zebrafish stem cell lines, which is as 30~67% efficient as the positive control in NIH/3T3. Upon co-infection with rvGTgfp and rvLcherry, GFP-positive cells were much fewer than Cherry-positive cells, consistent with rareness of productive gene trapping events versus random integration. Importantly, rvGTgfp infection in the medaka haploid embryonic stem (ES) cell line HX1 generated GTgfp insertion on all 24 chromosomes of the haploid genome. Similar to the mammalian haploid cells, these insertion events were presented predominantly in intergenic regions and introns but rarely in exons. RV-transduced HX1 retained the ES cell properties such as stable growth, embryoid body formation and pluripotency gene expression. Therefore, RV is proficient for gene transfer and IM in fish stem cells. Our results open new avenue for genome-wide IM in medaka haploid ES cells in culture.

  14. Charged particle mutagenesis at low dose and fluence in mouse splenic T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grygoryev, Dmytro [Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239 (United States); Gauny, Stacey [Biological Systems and Engineering Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lasarev, Michael; Ohlrich, Anna [Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239 (United States); Kronenberg, Amy [Biological Systems and Engineering Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Turker, Mitchell S., E-mail: turkerm@ohsu.edu [Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239 (United States); Molecular and Medical Genetics, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Densely ionizing forms of space radiation induce mutations in splenic T cells at low fluence. • Large interstitial deletions and discontinuous LOH patterns are radiation signature mutations. • Space radiation mutagenesis suggests a cancer risk from deep space travel. - Abstract: High-energy heavy charged particles (HZE ions) found in the deep space environment can significantly affect human health by inducing mutations and related cancers. To better understand the relation between HZE ion exposure and somatic mutation, we examined cell survival fraction, Aprt mutant frequencies, and the types of mutations detected for mouse splenic T cells exposed in vivo to graded doses of densely ionizing {sup 48}Ti ions (1 GeV/amu, LET = 107 keV/μm), {sup 56}Fe ions (1 GeV/amu, LET = 151 keV/μm) ions, or sparsely ionizing protons (1 GeV, LET = 0.24 keV/μm). The lowest doses for {sup 48}Ti and {sup 56}Fe ions were equivalent to a fluence of approximately 1 or 2 particle traversals per nucleus. In most cases, Aprt mutant frequencies in the irradiated mice were not significantly increased relative to the controls for any of the particles or doses tested at the pre-determined harvest time (3–5 months after irradiation). Despite the lack of increased Aprt mutant frequencies in the irradiated splenocytes, a molecular analysis centered on chromosome 8 revealed the induction of radiation signature mutations (large interstitial deletions and complex mutational patterns), with the highest levels of induction at 2 particles nucleus for the {sup 48}Ti and {sup 56}Fe ions. In total, the results show that densely ionizing HZE ions can induce characteristic mutations in splenic T cells at low fluence, and that at least a subset of radiation-induced mutant cells are stably retained despite the apparent lack of increased mutant frequencies at the time of harvest.

  15. Tryptophan Scanning Mutagenesis Identifies the Molecular Determinants of Distinct Barttin Functions*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowski, Daniel; Fischer, Martin; Fahlke, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    CLC-K chloride channels are expressed in the kidney and in the inner ear and require the accessory subunit barttin for proper function and membrane insertion. Barttin exerts multiple functions on CLC-proteins: it modifies protein stability and intracellular trafficking as well as channel activity, ion conduction, and gating. So far, the molecular determinants of these distinct barttin functions have remained elusive. Here we performed serial perturbation mutagenesis to identify the sequence determinants of barttin function. Barttin consists of two transmembrane helices followed by a long intracellular carboxyl terminus, and earlier work demonstrated that the transmembrane core of barttin suffices for most effects on the α-subunit. We individually substituted every amino acid of the predicted transmembrane core (amino acids 9–26 and 35–55) with tryptophan, co-expressed mutant barttin with hClC-Ka or V166E rClC-K1, and characterized CLC-K/barttin channels by patch clamp techniques, biochemistry, and confocal microscopy. The majority of mutations left the chaperone function of barttin, i.e. the effects on endoplasmic reticulum exit and surface membrane insertion, unaffected. In contrast, tryptophan insertion at multiple positions resulted in impaired activity of hClC-Ka/barttin and changes in gating of V166E rClC-K1/barttin. These results demonstrate that mutations in a cluster of hydrophobic residues within transmembrane domain 1 affect barttin-CLC-K interaction and impair gating modification by the accessory subunit. Whereas tight interaction is necessary for functional modification, even impaired association of barttin and CLC-K suffices for normal intracellular trafficking. Our findings allow definition of a likely interaction surface and clarify the mechanisms underlying CLC-K channel modification by barttin. PMID:26063802

  16. Improved somatic mutagenesis in zebrafish using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finola E Moore

    Full Text Available Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs made by Context-Dependent Assembly (CoDA and Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs provide robust and user-friendly technologies for efficiently inactivating genes in zebrafish. These designer nucleases bind to and cleave DNA at particular target sites, inducing error-prone repair that can result in insertion or deletion mutations. Here, we assess the relative efficiencies of these technologies for inducing somatic DNA mutations in mosaic zebrafish. We find that TALENs exhibited a higher success rate for obtaining active nucleases capable of inducing mutations than compared with CoDA ZFNs. For example, all six TALENs tested induced DNA mutations at genomic target sites while only a subset of CoDA ZFNs exhibited detectable rates of mutagenesis. TALENs also exhibited higher mutation rates than CoDA ZFNs that had not been pre-screened using a bacterial two-hybrid assay, with DNA mutation rates ranging from 20%-76.8% compared to 1.1%-3.3%. Furthermore, the broader targeting range of TALENs enabled us to induce mutations at the methionine translation start site, sequences that were not targetable using the CoDA ZFN platform. TALENs exhibited similar toxicity to CoDA ZFNs, with >50% of injected animals surviving to 3 days of life. Taken together, our results suggest that TALEN technology provides a robust alternative to CoDA ZFNs for inducing targeted gene-inactivation in zebrafish, making it a preferred technology for creating targeted knockout mutants in zebrafish.

  17. Induction of apomixis and fixation of heterosis in Egyptian rice Hybrid1 line using colchicine mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reda M. Gaafar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available It is known that hybrid rice yields 15–20% over inbred varieties in first generation because of heterosis. However, heterosis is normally broken due to segregation. Applying apomixis produces plants as a clone of mother plant and overcomes the problem of breaking heterosis. In order to fix heterosis in the Egyptian rice Hybrid1, their seeds were mutagenized in 0.2% colchicine for two time periods 24 and 50 h. After colchicine mutagenesis, rice seedlings were grown in the field till maturation and the resulted M1 seeds were sown in season 2 and plants were selected based on yield and homogeneity. Then, seeds were sown to be evaluated in season 3. Pollen fertility test, esterase isozyme analysis, and flow cytometry seed screening were performed to confirm the results of field selection of populations identical to control. Pollen fertility examination was performed on the populations of the third season. Pollens of populations 304, 298, 292, 284, 281, 154 and 149 were found to be completely sterile. However, these plants had high seed set percentage. The flow cytometry screening of the six yield-based identical populations and the control seeds showed that populations 220, 339, 351 and 298 have higher nuclear DNA content (C2 than untreated hybrid (C2 & C3. Results of flow cytometry clearly showed that population 298 has one peak (C2 and its endosperm was formed autonomously without fertilization. Although its pollen grains were sterile, it showed high seed set percentage. This indicates that heterosis was completely fixed by apomixis in this population.

  18. The HIV mutation browser: a resource for human immunodeficiency virus mutagenesis and polymorphism data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman E Davey

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Huge research effort has been invested over many years to determine the phenotypes of natural or artificial mutations in HIV proteins--interpretation of mutation phenotypes is an invaluable source of new knowledge. The results of this research effort are recorded in the scientific literature, but it is difficult for virologists to rapidly find it. Manually locating data on phenotypic variation within the approximately 270,000 available HIV-related research articles, or the further 1,500 articles that are published each month is a daunting task. Accordingly, the HIV research community would benefit from a resource cataloguing the available HIV mutation literature. We have applied computational text-mining techniques to parse and map mutagenesis and polymorphism information from the HIV literature, have enriched the data with ancillary information and have developed a public, web-based interface through which it can be intuitively explored: the HIV mutation browser. The current release of the HIV mutation browser describes the phenotypes of 7,608 unique mutations at 2,520 sites in the HIV proteome, resulting from the analysis of 120,899 papers. The mutation information for each protein is organised in a residue-centric manner and each residue is linked to the relevant experimental literature. The importance of HIV as a global health burden advocates extensive effort to maximise the efficiency of HIV research. The HIV mutation browser provides a valuable new resource for the research community. The HIV mutation browser is available at: http://hivmut.org.

  19. Enhancing activity and thermostability of lipase A from Serratia marcescens by site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Mohsen; Sepehrizadeh, Zargham; Ebrahim-Habibi, Azadeh; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza; Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali; Setayesh, Neda

    2016-11-01

    Lipases as significant biocatalysts had been widely employed to catalyze various chemical reactions such as ester hydrolysis, ester synthesis, and transesterification. Improving the activity and thermostability of enzymes is desirable for industrial applications. The lipase of Serratia marcescens belonging to family I.3 lipase has a very important pharmaceutical application in production of chiral precursors. In the present study, to achieve improved lipase activity and thermostability, using computational predictions of protein, four mutant lipases of SML (MutG2P, MutG59P, Mut H279K and MutL613WA614P) were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. The recombinant mutant proteins were over-expressed in E. coli and purified by affinity chromatography on the Ni-NTA system. Circular dichroism spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and kinetic parameters (Km and kcat) were determined. Our results have shown that the secondary structure of all lipases was approximately similar to one another. The MutG2P and MutG59P were more stable than wild type by approximately 2.3 and 2.9 in T1/2, respectively. The catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of MutH279K was enhanced by 2-fold as compared with the wild type (p<0.05). These results indicate that using protein modeling program and creating mutation, can enhance lipase activity and/or thermostability of SML and it also could be used for improving other properties of enzyme to the desired requirements as well as further mutations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Interconversion of Anthozoa GFP-like fluorescent and non-fluorescent proteins by mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mudrik Nikolay N

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Within the family of green fluorescent protein (GFP homologs, one can mark two main groups, specifically, fluorescent proteins (FPs and non-fluorescent or chromoproteins (CPs. Structural background of differences between FPs and CPs are poorly understood to date. Results Here, we applied site-directed and random mutagenesis in order to to transform CP into FP and vice versa. A purple chromoprotein asCP (asFP595 from Anemonia sulcata and a red fluorescent protein DsRed from Discosoma sp. were selected as representatives of CPs and FPs, respectively. For asCP, some substitutions at positions 148 and 165 (numbering in accordance to GFP were found to dramatically increase quantum yield of red fluorescence. For DsRed, substitutions at positions 148, 165, 167, and 203 significantly decreased fluorescence intensity, so that the spectral characteristics of these mutants became more close to those of CPs. Finally, a practically non-fluorescent mutant DsRed-NF was generated. This mutant carried four amino acid substitutions, specifically, S148C, I165N, K167M, and S203A. DsRed-NF possessed a high extinction coefficient and an extremely low quantum yield ( Conclusions We located a novel point in asCP sequence (position 165 mutations at which can result in red fluorescence appearance. Probably, this finding could be applied onto other CPs to generate red and far-red fluorescent mutants. A possibility to transform an FP into CP was demonstrated. Key role of residues adjacent to chromophore's phenolic ring in fluorescent/non-fluorescent states determination was revealed.

  1. Bidirectional promoter trapping T-DNA for insertional mutagenesis in Verticillium dahliae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Sheng; Wang, Cai-yue; Zhang, Xin; Lin, Ling

    2014-07-01

    Transfer DNA (T-DNA)-based random insertional mutagenesis is a universal forward genetic approach for gene identification and cloning in many phytopathogenic fungi. In a large number of randomly selected transformants, screening for mutants with a specific phenotype is laborious, especially for pathogenicity-defective mutants. To accelerate mutant screening and gene identification, a bidirectional promoter-trapping Ti binary vector, 1300-bisGFP-hyg, was constructed and deployed in this study. More than 6000 Verticillium dahliae transformants were obtained by the mediation of Agrobacterium tumefaciens carrying the vector. One thousand randomly selected transformants were cultured on Czapek-Dox and on Czapek-Dox plus cotton root extract media plates. The cultured transformants with green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression or changes in phenotype were selected and used in virulence or promoter-trapping assays. Based on the virulence assay of 60 transformants, the pathogenicity of 17 of these mutants was compromised. Ten pathogenicity-defective mutants were found with GFP expression, and 6 with expression in Czapek-Dox plus cotton root extract media specifically. Using TAIL-PCR (thermal asymmetric interlaced polymerase chain reaction), the T-DNA insertion sites were identified in 8 GFP-expressing transformants, including 5 pathogenicity-defective mutants and 3 unaffected transformants. Promoters of 6 genes were successfully trapped using the T-DNA method in this study. The nonpathogenic transformant 24C9 was the subject of additional investigation. It displayed strong GFP expression on water agar medium supplemented with cotton root extracts and on cotton seedling stems. The results obtained by Southern blot and quantitative real-time PCR confirmed that the transcription level of VdUGPU (encoding UTP-glucose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase) was significantly reduced owing to T-DNA insertion in the gene promoter region. These results indicate that the bidirectional

  2. Comprehensive Essentiality Analysis of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Genome via Saturating Transposon Mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJesus, Michael A; Gerrick, Elias R; Xu, Weizhen; Park, Sae Woong; Long, Jarukit E; Boutte, Cara C; Rubin, Eric J; Schnappinger, Dirk; Ehrt, Sabine; Fortune, Sarah M; Sassetti, Christopher M; Ioerger, Thomas R

    2017-01-17

    For decades, identifying the regions of a bacterial chromosome that are necessary for viability has relied on mapping integration sites in libraries of random transposon mutants to find loci that are unable to sustain insertion. To date, these studies have analyzed subsaturated libraries, necessitating the application of statistical methods to estimate the likelihood that a gap in transposon coverage is the result of biological selection and not the stochasticity of insertion. As a result, the essentiality of many genomic features, particularly small ones, could not be reliably assessed. We sought to overcome this limitation by creating a completely saturated transposon library in Mycobacterium tuberculosis In assessing the composition of this highly saturated library by deep sequencing, we discovered that a previously unknown sequence bias of the Himar1 element rendered approximately 9% of potential TA dinucleotide insertion sites less permissible for insertion. We used a hidden Markov model of essentiality that accounted for this unanticipated bias, allowing us to confidently evaluate the essentiality of features that contained as few as 2 TA sites, including open reading frames (ORF), experimentally identified noncoding RNAs, methylation sites, and promoters. In addition, several essential regions that did not correspond to known features were identified, suggesting uncharacterized functions that are necessary for growth. This work provides an authoritative catalog of essential regions of the M. tuberculosis genome and a statistical framework for applying saturating mutagenesis to other bacteria. Sequencing of transposon-insertion mutant libraries has become a widely used tool for probing the functions of genes under various conditions. The Himar1 transposon is generally believed to insert with equal probabilities at all TA dinucleotides, and therefore its absence in a mutant library is taken to indicate biological selection against the corresponding mutant

  3. Insertional mutagenesis enables cleistothecial formation in a non-mating strain of Histoplasma capsulatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laskowski Meggan C

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histoplasma capsulatum is a pathogenic ascomycete fungus that rapidly loses mating ability in culture. Loss of mating ability, as well as the organism's low rate of targeted gene replacement, limits techniques available for genetic studies in H. capsulatum. Understanding molecular mechanisms regulating mating in this organism may allow us to reverse or prevent loss of mating in H. capsulatum strains, introducing a variety of classical genetics techniques to the field. We generated a strain, UC1, by insertional mutagenesis of the laboratory strain G217B, and found that UC1 acquired the ability to form mating structures called cleistothecia. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanism by which UC1 gained the ability to form cleistothecia. We also present initial studies demonstrating that UC1 can be used as a tool to determine molecular correlates of mating in H. capsulatum. Results The strain UC1 was found to have increased RNA levels of the mating locus transcription factor (MAT1-1-1, and the putative alpha pheromone (PPG1 compared to G217B. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and integration of T-DNA from the vector pCB301-GFP-HYG were found to be partially responsible for the increased RNA levels of these genes; however, the site of integration appeared to play the largest role in the strain's ability to form cleistothecia. Silencing HMK1, a putative FUS3/KSS1 homolog, had no effect on cleistothecial production by UC1. Protein kinase C (PKC1 RNA and protein levels were increased in UC1 compared to G217B, and pheromone production was found to be linked with Pkc1 activity in H. capsulatum. Conclusions The site of the T-DNA integration event appears to play the largest role in UC1's ability to form cleistothecia. We show that the UC1 strain can be used as a tool to study cleistothecia production in H. capsulatum by manipulating the strain, or by identifying differences between UC1 and G217B. Using these approaches

  4. Implementation of a loss-of-function system to determine growth and stress-associated mutagenesis in Bacillus subtilis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norberto Villegas-Negrete

    Full Text Available A forward mutagenesis system based on the acquisition of mutations that inactivate the thymidylate synthase gene (TMS and confer a trimethoprim resistant (Tmpr phenotype was developed and utilized to study transcription-mediated mutagenesis (TMM. In addition to thyA, Bacillus subtilis possesses thyB, whose expression occurs under conditions of cell stress; therefore, we generated a thyB- thyA+ mutant strain. Tmpr colonies of this strain were produced with a spontaneous mutation frequency of ~1.4 × 10-9. Genetic disruption of the canonical mismatch (MMR and guanine oxidized (GO repair pathways increased the Tmpr frequency of mutation by ~2-3 orders of magnitude. A wide spectrum of base substitutions as well as insertion and deletions in the ORF of thyA were found to confer a Tmpr phenotype. Stationary-phase-associated mutagenesis (SPM assays revealed that colonies with a Tmpr phenotype, accumulated over a period of ten days with a frequency of ~ 60 ×10-7. The Tmpr system was further modified to study TMM by constructing a ΔthyA ΔthyB strain carrying an IPTG-inducible Pspac-thyA cassette. In conditions of transcriptional induction of thyA, the generation of Tmpr colonies increased ~3-fold compared to conditions of transcriptional repression. Further, the Mfd and GreA factors were necessary for the generation of Tmpr colonies in the presence of IPTG in B. subtilis. Because GreA and Mfd facilitate transcription-coupled repair, our results suggest that TMM is a mechanim to produce genetic diversity in highly transcribed regions in growth-limited B. subtilis cells.

  5. An Agrobacterium-delivered CRISPR/Cas9 system for high-frequency targeted mutagenesis in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Char, Si Nian; Neelakandan, Anjanasree K; Nahampun, Hartinio; Frame, Bronwyn; Main, Marcy; Spalding, Martin H; Becraft, Philip W; Meyers, Blake C; Walbot, Virginia; Wang, Kan; Yang, Bing

    2017-02-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 is a powerful genome editing tool in many organisms, including a number of monocots and dicots. Although the design and application of CRISPR/Cas9 is simpler compared to other nuclease-based genome editing tools, optimization requires the consideration of the DNA delivery and tissue regeneration methods for a particular species to achieve accuracy and efficiency. Here, we describe a public sector system, ISU Maize CRISPR, utilizing Agrobacterium-delivered CRISPR/Cas9 for high-frequency targeted mutagenesis in maize. This system consists of an Escherichia coli cloning vector and an Agrobacterium binary vector. It can be used to clone up to four guide RNAs for single or multiplex gene targeting. We evaluated this system for its mutagenesis frequency and heritability using four maize genes in two duplicated pairs: Argonaute 18 (ZmAgo18a and ZmAgo18b) and dihydroflavonol 4-reductase or anthocyaninless genes (a1 and a4). T 0 transgenic events carrying mono- or diallelic mutations of one locus and various combinations of allelic mutations of two loci occurred at rates over 70% mutants per transgenic events in both Hi-II and B104 genotypes. Through genetic segregation, null segregants carrying only the desired mutant alleles without the CRISPR transgene could be generated in T 1 progeny. Inheritance of an active CRISPR/Cas9 transgene leads to additional target-specific mutations in subsequent generations. Duplex infection of immature embryos by mixing two individual Agrobacterium strains harbouring different Cas9/gRNA modules can be performed for improved cost efficiency. Together, the findings demonstrate that the ISU Maize CRISPR platform is an effective and robust tool to targeted mutagenesis in maize. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Quest of novel GH20 N-acetyl hexosaminidasetransglycosylating catalysts: functional screening, data mining and semi-rational mutagenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teze, David; Visnapuu, Triinu; Kjeldsen, Christian

    and the fact that the products are also substrates, thus needing a kinetic control of the reaction. Several approaches have been developed to overcome these, including mechanism modifications (e.g. glycosynthases, chemical rescue), functional screening and data mining to find natural transglycosidases...... been reported. Thus, we turned to discovery and characterization of new GH20s and performing a systematic mutagenesis study. Several new GH20s of bacterial origin were isolated and described by functional screening and data mining, including transglycosidases able to synthesize lacto...

  7. Random mutagenesis of Luciola mingrelica firefly luciferase. Mutant enzymes with bioluminescence spectra showing low pH sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koksharov, M I; Ugarova, N N

    2008-08-01

    Most firefly luciferases demonstrate a strong pH-dependence of bioluminescence spectra. Gene region encoding first 225 residues of Luciola mingrelica luciferase was subjected to random mutagenesis, and four mutants with altered pH-sensitivity of bioluminescence spectra were isolated. F16L substitution showed distinctly lower pH-dependence of bioluminescence spectra, and Y35N,H and F16L/A40S substitutions resulted in the enzymes with bioluminescence spectra virtually independent from pH in the range of 6.0-7.8. The structural explanation is proposed for the effect of mutations on pH-sensitivity of bioluminescence spectra.

  8. Chemical mutagenesis of Gluconobacter frateurii to construct methanol-resistant mutants showing glyceric acid production from methanol-containing glycerol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shun; Kitamoto, Dai; Habe, Hiroshi

    2014-02-01

    To produce glyceric acid (GA) from methanol-containing glycerol, resistance to methanol of Gluconobacter frateurii NBRC103465 was improved by chemical mutagenesis using N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. The obtained mutant Gf398 produced 6.3 g/L GA in 5% (v/v) methanol-containing 17% (w/v) glycerol medium, in which the wild-type strain neither grew nor produced GA. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Improving the Thermostability of Raw-Starch-Digesting Amylase from a Cytophaga sp. by Site-Directed Mutagenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Shiau, Rong-Jen; Hung, Hui-Chen; Jeang, Chii-Ling

    2003-01-01

    A heat-stable raw-starch-digesting amylase (RSDA) was generated through PCR-based site-directed mutagenesis. At 65°C, the half-life of this mutant RSDA, which, compared with the wild-type RSDA, lacks amino acids R178 and G179, was increased 20-fold. While the wild type was inactivated completely at pH 3.0, the mutant RSDA still retained 41% of its enzymatic activity. The enhancement of RSDA thermostability was demonstrated to be via a Ca2+-independent mechanism.

  10. Improving the Thermostability of Raw-Starch-Digesting Amylase from a Cytophaga sp. by Site-Directed Mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiau, Rong-Jen; Hung, Hui-Chen; Jeang, Chii-Ling

    2003-01-01

    A heat-stable raw-starch-digesting amylase (RSDA) was generated through PCR-based site-directed mutagenesis. At 65°C, the half-life of this mutant RSDA, which, compared with the wild-type RSDA, lacks amino acids R178 and G179, was increased 20-fold. While the wild type was inactivated completely at pH 3.0, the mutant RSDA still retained 41% of its enzymatic activity. The enhancement of RSDA thermostability was demonstrated to be via a Ca2+-independent mechanism. PMID:12676725

  11. Description of a PCR-based technique for DNA splicing and mutagenesis by producing 5' overhangs with run through stop DNA synthesis utilizing Ara-C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silverman Mel

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Splicing of DNA molecules is an important task in molecular biology that facilitates cloning, mutagenesis and creation of chimeric genes. Mutagenesis and DNA splicing techniques exist, some requiring restriction enzymes, and others utilize staggered reannealing approaches. Results A method for DNA splicing and mutagenesis without restriction enzymes is described. The method is based on mild template-dependent polymerization arrest with two molecules of cytosine arabinose (Ara-C incorporated into PCR primers. Two rounds of PCR are employed: the first PCR produces 5' overhangs that are utilized for DNA splicing. The second PCR is based on polymerization running through the Ara-C molecules to produce the desired final product. To illustrate application of the run through stop mutagenesis and DNA splicing technique, we have carried out splicing of two segments of the human cofilin 1 gene and introduced a mutational deletion into the product. Conclusion We have demonstrated the utility of a new PCR-based method for carrying out DNA splicing and mutagenesis by incorporating Ara-C into the PCR primers.

  12. Photo-Oxidative Stress-Driven Mutagenesis and Adaptive Evolution on the Marine Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum for Enhanced Carotenoid Accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqian Yi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Marine diatoms have recently gained much attention as they are expected to be a promising resource for sustainable production of bioactive compounds such as carotenoids and biofuels as a future clean energy solution. To develop photosynthetic cell factories, it is important to improve diatoms for value-added products. In this study, we utilized UVC radiation to induce mutations in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum and screened strains with enhanced accumulation of neutral lipids and carotenoids. Adaptive laboratory evolution (ALE was also used in parallel to develop altered phenotypic and biological functions in P. tricornutum and it was reported for the first time that ALE was successfully applied on diatoms for the enhancement of growth performance and productivity of value-added carotenoids to date. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS was utilized to study the composition of major pigments in the wild type P. tricornutum, UV mutants and ALE strains. UVC radiated strains exhibited higher accumulation of fucoxanthin as well as neutral lipids compared to their wild type counterpart. In addition to UV mutagenesis, P. tricornutum strains developed by ALE also yielded enhanced biomass production and fucoxanthin accumulation under combined red and blue light. In short, both UV mutagenesis and ALE appeared as an effective approach to developing desired phenotypes in the marine diatoms via electromagnetic radiation-induced oxidative stress.

  13. A Practical Strategy to Discover New Antitumor Compounds by Activating Silent Metabolite Production in Fungi by Diethyl Sulphate Mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Ming Fang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Many fungal biosynthetic pathways are silent in standard culture conditions, and activation of the silent pathways may enable access to new metabolites with antitumor activities. The aim of the present study was to develop a practical strategy for microbial chemists to access silent metabolites in fungi. We demonstrated this strategy using a marine-derived fungus Penicillium purpurogenum G59 and a modified diethyl sulphate mutagenesis procedure. Using this strategy, we discovered four new antitumor compounds named penicimutanolone (1, penicimutanin A (2, penicimutanin B (3, and penicimutatin (4. Structures of the new compounds were elucidated by spectroscopic methods, especially extensive 2D NMR analysis. Antitumor activities were assayed by the MTT method using human cancer cell lines. Bioassays and HPLC-photodiode array detector (PDAD-UV and HPLC-electron spray ionization (ESI-MS analyses were used to estimate the activated secondary metabolite production. Compounds 2 and 3 had novel structures, and 1 was a new compound belonging to a class of very rare natural products from which only four members are so far known. Compounds 1–3 inhibited several human cancer cell lines with IC50 values lower than 20 μM, and 4 inhibited the cell lines to some extent. These results demonstrated the effectiveness of this strategy to discover new compounds by activating silent fungal metabolic pathways. These discoveries provide rationale for the increased use of chemical mutagenesis strategies in silent fungal metabolite studies.

  14. System-dependent regulations of colour-pattern development: a mutagenesis study of the pale grass blue butterfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Masaki; Hiyama, Atsuki; Otaki, Joji M

    2013-01-01

    Developmental studies on wing colour patterns have been performed in nymphalid butterflies, but efficient genetic manipulations, including mutagenesis, have not been well established. Here, we have performed mutagenesis experiments in a lycaenid butterfly, the pale grass blue Zizeeria maha, to produce colour-pattern mutants. We fed the P-generation larvae an artificial diet containing the mutagen ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS), and the F1- and F2-generation adults showed various aberrant colour patterns: dorsoventral transformation, anterioposterior background colouration gap, weak contrast, disarrangement of spots, reduction of the size of spots, loss of spots, fusion of spots, and ectopic spots. Among them, the disarrangement, reduction, and loss of spots were likely produced by the coordinated changes of many spots of a single wing around the discal spot in a system-dependent manner, demonstrating the existence of the central symmetry system. The present study revealed multiple genetic regulations for system-dependent and wing-wide colour-pattern determination in lycaenid butterflies.

  15. Effects of vitamins A and E on methylazoxymethanol-induced mutagenesis in Salmonella typhimurium strain TA100.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavan, E; Maziere, S; Narbonne, J F; Cassand, P

    1997-07-03

    The aim of this study is to report the antimutagenic effect of vitamin A and vitamin E towards methylazoxymethanol (MAM)-induced mutagenesis in Salmonella typhimurium strain TA100 sensitive to alkylating agents. In order to characterize different levels of action of these two fat-soluble vitamins towards the mutagenicity of MAM, several assays have been considered to show the antimutagenic effect and the possible interactions of vitamins with MAM or with the bacteria. Thus, for each vitamin, three different assays with three different incubations have been conducted: (i) MAM, bacteria and vitamins together, (ii) MAM and vitamins, (iii) bacteria and vitamins. The results showed that both vitamins A and E present an antimutagenic effect towards MAM induced mutagenesis. alpha-Tocopherol seems to have an action directly on to the mutagenic agent, whereas the action of retinol is likely due to a protection of the bacterial genoma against MAM. These in vitro results could help to interpret results of colon carcinogenesis studies using animals induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine and fed vitamins supplemented diet.

  16. The roles of cytochrome b559 in assembly and photoprotection of Photosystem II revealed by site-directed mutagenesis studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-An eChu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytochrome b559 (Cyt b559 is one of the essential components of the Photosystem II reaction center (PSII. Despite recent accomplishments in understanding the structure and function of PSII, the exact physiological function of Cyt b559 remains unclear. Cyt b559 is not involved in the primary electron transfer pathway in PSII but may participate in secondary electron transfer pathways that protect PSII against photoinhibition. Site-directed mutagenesis studies combined with spectroscopic and functional analysis have been used to characterize Cyt b559 mutant strains and their mutant PSII complex in higher plants, green algae and cyanobacteria. These integrated studies have provided important in vivo evidence for possible physiological roles of Cyt b559 in the assembly and stability of PSII, protecting PSII against photoinhibition, and modulating photosynthetic light harvesting. This mini-review presents an overview of recent important progress in site-directed mutagenesis studies of Cyt b559 and implications for revealing the physiological functions of Cyt b559 in PSII.

  17. Mutation breeding of extracellular polysaccharide-producing microalga Crypthecodinium cohnii by a novel mutagenesis with atmospheric and room temperature plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Sun, Zheng; Ma, Xiaonian; Yang, Bo; Jiang, Yue; Wei, Dong; Chen, Feng

    2015-04-13

    Extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) produced by marine microalgae have the potential to be used as antioxidants, antiviral agents, immunomodulators, and anti-inflammatory agents. Although the marine microalga Crypthecodinium cohnii releases EPS during the process of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) production, the yield of EPS remains relatively low. To improve the EPS production, a novel mutagenesis of C. cohnii was conducted by atmospheric and room temperature plasma (ARTP). Of the 12 mutants obtained, 10 mutants exhibited significantly enhanced EPS yield on biomass as compared with the wild type strain. Among them, mutant M7 was the best as it could produce an EPS volumetric yield of 1.02 g/L, EPS yield on biomass of 0.39 g/g and EPS yield on glucose of 94 mg/g, which were 33.85%, 85.35% and 57.17% higher than that of the wild type strain, respectively. Results of the present study indicated that mutagenesis of the marine microalga C. cohnii by ARTP was highly effective leading to the high-yield production of EPS.

  18. Tailoring of global transcription sigma D factor by random mutagenesis to improve Escherichia coli tolerance towards low-pHs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xi; Jiang, Ling; Zhu, Liying; Xu, Qing; Xu, Xian; Huang, He

    2016-04-20

    Bioconversion processes of organic acid or acid hydrolysis of raw material for microbial metabolism often suffer limitations as a result of microbial sensitivity in low-pH conditions. We adopted a three-step method called RAndom Insertional-deletional Strand Exchange mutagenesis (RAISE) to engineer the components of global regulator Sigma D factor (RpoD) of Escherichia coli to improve its acid tolerance. The best strain Mutant VII was identified from random mutagenesis libraries based on the growth performance, which exhibited much higher growth rate than the control (0.22h(-1) vs. 0.15h(-1)) at pH as low as 3.17. Combined transcriptome and phenome analysis of E. coli was carried out to better understand the global effects of RpoD on the regulatory networks. Our analysis showed that 95 (2.1%) of all E. coli genes were induced and 178 (4.0%) genes were repressed, including those for trehalose biosynthesis, nucleotides biosynthesis, carbon metabolism, amino acid utilization, except for acid resistance. Also regulated were the master regulators (ArcA, EvgA, H-NS and RpoS) and gene/operon-specific transcription factors (GadX, GadW, AppY, YdeO, KdgR). These results demonstrated that RpoD acts as global regulator in the growth phase of E. coli and consequently improves acid tolerances. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Mutation Breeding of Extracellular Polysaccharide-Producing Microalga Crypthecodinium cohnii by a Novel Mutagenesis with Atmospheric and Room Temperature Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Liu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular polysaccharides (EPS produced by marine microalgae have the potential to be used as antioxidants, antiviral agents, immunomodulators, and anti-inflammatory agents. Although the marine microalga Crypthecodinium cohnii releases EPS during the process of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA production, the yield of EPS remains relatively low. To improve the EPS production, a novel mutagenesis of C. cohnii was conducted by atmospheric and room temperature plasma (ARTP. Of the 12 mutants obtained, 10 mutants exhibited significantly enhanced EPS yield on biomass as compared with the wild type strain. Among them, mutant M7 was the best as it could produce an EPS volumetric yield of 1.02 g/L, EPS yield on biomass of 0.39 g/g and EPS yield on glucose of 94 mg/g, which were 33.85%, 85.35% and 57.17% higher than that of the wild type strain, respectively. Results of the present study indicated that mutagenesis of the marine microalga C. cohnii by ARTP was highly effective leading to the high-yield production of EPS.

  20. High efficiency of targeted mutagenesis in arabidopsis via meiotic promoter-driven expression of Cas9 endonuclease

    KAUST Repository

    Eid, Ayman

    2016-05-28

    Key message: The use of a meiosis I-specific promoter increased the efficiency of targeted mutagenesis and will facilitate the manipulation of homologous recombination. Abstract: The CRISPR/Cas9 system has been harnessed for targeted engineering of eukaryotic genomes, including plants; however, CRISPR/Cas9 efficiency varies considerably in different plant tissues and species. In Arabidopsis, the generation of homozygous or bi-allelic mutants in the first (T1) generation is inefficient. Here, we used specific promoters to drive the expression of Cas9 during meiosis to maximize the efficiency of recovering heritable mutants in T1 plants. Our data reveal that the use of a promoter active in meiosis I resulted in high-efficiency (28 %) recovery of targeted mutants in the T1 generation. Moreover, this method enabled efficient simultaneous targeting of three genes for mutagenesis. Taken together, our results show that the use of meiosis-specific promoters will improve methods for functional genomic analysis and studying the molecular underpinnings of homologous recombination. © 2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  1. Radiation-induced in vitro mutagenesis system for salt tolerance and other agronomic characters in sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok A. Nikam

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Gamma ray-induced in vitro mutagenesis and selection for salt (NaCl tolerance were investigated in sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.. Embryogenic callus cultures were irradiated (10 to 80 Gy and subjected to in vitro selection by exposure of irradiated callus to NaCl (0, 50, 100, 150, 200, and 250 mmol L− 1. Increasing NaCl concentrations resulted in growth reduction and increased membrane damage. Salt-selected callus lines were characterized by the accumulation of proline, glycine betaine, and Na+ and K+ concentration. Higher accumulation of proline and glycine betaine was observed in NaCl stressed callus irradiated at 20 Gy. Na+ concentration increased and K+ concentration decreased with increasing salt level. Irradiated callus showed 50–60% regeneration under NaCl stress, and in vitro-regenerated plants were acclimatized in the greenhouse, with 80–85% survival. A total of 138 irradiated and salt-selected selections were grown to maturity and their agronomic performance was evaluated under normal and saline conditions. Of these, 18 mutant clones were characterized for different agro-morphological characters and some of the mutant clones exhibited improved sugar yield with increased Brix%, number of millable canes, and yield. The result suggest that radiation-induced mutagenesis offers an effective way to enhance genetic variation in sugarcane.

  2. Site-directed Mutagenesis Switching a Dimethylallyl Tryptophan Synthase to a Specific Tyrosine C3-Prenylating Enzyme*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Aili; Zocher, Georg; Stec, Edyta; Stehle, Thilo; Li, Shu-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The tryptophan prenyltransferases FgaPT2 and 7-DMATS (7-dimethylallyl tryptophan synthase) from Aspergillus fumigatus catalyze C4- and C7-prenylation of the indole ring, respectively. 7-DMATS was found to accept l-tyrosine as substrate as well and converted it to an O-prenylated derivative. An acceptance of l-tyrosine by FgaPT2 was also observed in this study. Interestingly, isolation and structure elucidation revealed the identification of a C3-prenylated l-tyrosine as enzyme product. Molecular modeling and site-directed mutagenesis led to creation of a mutant FgaPT2_K174F, which showed much higher specificity toward l-tyrosine than l-tryptophan. Its catalytic efficiency toward l-tyrosine was found to be 4.9-fold in comparison with that of non-mutated FgaPT2, whereas the activity toward l-tryptophan was less than 0.4% of that of the wild-type. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on an enzymatic C-prenylation of l-tyrosine as free amino acid and altering the substrate preference of a prenyltransferase by mutagenesis. PMID:25477507

  3. Improving the solubility of anti-LINGO-1 monoclonal antibody Li33 by isotype switching and targeted mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepinsky, R Blake; Silvian, Laura; Berkowitz, Steven A; Farrington, Graham; Lugovskoy, Alexey; Walus, Lee; Eldredge, John; Capili, Allan; Mi, Sha; Graff, Christilyn; Garber, Ellen

    2010-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) are a favorite drug platform of the biopharmaceutical industry. Currently, over 20 Mabs have been approved and several hundred others are in clinical trials. The anti-LINGO-1 Mab Li33 was selected from a large panel of antibodies by Fab phage display technology based on its extraordinary biological activity in promoting oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination in vitro and in animal models of remyelination. However, the Li33 Fab had poor solubility when converted into a full antibody in an immunoglobulin G1 framework. A detailed analysis of the biochemical and structural features of the antibody revealed several possible reasons for its propensity to aggregate. Here, we successfully applied three molecular approaches (isotype switching, targeted mutagenesis of complementarity determining region residues, and glycosylation site insertion mutagenesis) to address the solubility problem. Through these efforts we were able to improve the solubility of the Li33 Mab from 0.3 mg/mL to >50 mg/mL and reduce aggregation to an acceptable level. These strategies can be readily applied to other proteins with solubility issues.

  4. Targeted mutagenesis of the Clostridium acetobutylicum acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooksley, Clare M; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Hengzheng; Redl, Stephanie; Winzer, Klaus; Minton, Nigel P

    2012-11-01

    The production of the chemical solvents acetone and butanol by the bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum was one of the first large-scale industrial processes to be developed, and in the first part of the last century ranked second in importance only to ethanol production. After a steep decline in its industrial use, there has been a recent resurgence of interest in the acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation process, with a particular emphasis on butanol production. In order to generate strains suitable for efficient use on an industrial scale, metabolic engineering is required to alter the AB ratio in favour of butanol, and eradicate the production of unwanted products of fermentation. Using ClosTron technology, a large-scale targeted mutagenesis in C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 was carried out, generating a set of 10 mutants, defective in alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenases 1 and 2 (adhE1, adhE2), butanol dehydrogenases A and B (bdhA, bdhB), phosphotransbutyrylase (ptb), acetate kinase (ack), acetoacetate decarboxylase (adc), CoA transferase (ctfA/ctfB), and a previously uncharacterised putative alcohol dehydrogenase (CAP0059). However, inactivation of the main hydrogenase (hydA) and thiolase (thl) could not be achieved. Constructing such a series of mutants is paramount for the acquisition of information on the mechanism of solvent production in this organism, and the subsequent development of industrial solvent producing strains. Unexpectedly, bdhA and bdhB mutants did not affect solvent production, whereas inactivation of the previously uncharacterised gene CAP0059 resulted in increased acetone, butanol, and ethanol formation. Other mutants showed predicted phenotypes, including a lack of acetone formation (adc, ctfA, and ctfB mutants), an inability to take up acids (ctfA and ctfB mutants), and a much reduced acetate formation (ack mutant). The adhE1 mutant in particular produced very little solvents, demonstrating that this gene was indeed the main contributor to

  5. ENU Mutagenic Screen for Susceptibility and Resistance to Streptococcus Pneumoniae

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kindy, Mark S

    2005-01-01

    .... The genetic pathways that control susceptibility and resistance to bacterial infection have remained poorly understood, because of the lack of expertise in the development of techniques capable...

  6. Ultra-wide band electromagnetic radiation does not affect UV-induced recombination and mutagenesis in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhomova, O N; Belt, M L; Mathur, S P; Lee, J C; Akyel, Y

    1998-01-01

    Cell samples of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were exposed to 100 J/m2 of 254 nm ultraviolet (UV) radiation followed by a 30 min treatment with ultra-wide band (UWB) electromagnetic pulses. The UWB pulses (101-104 kV/m, 1.0 ns width, 165 ps rise time) were applied at the repetition rates of 0 Hz (sham), 16 Hz, or 600 Hz. The effect of exposures was evaluated from the colony-forming ability of the cells on complete and selective media and the number of aberrant colonies. The experiments established no effect of UWB exposure on the UV-induced reciprocal and non-reciprocal recombination, mutagenesis, or cell survival.

  7. The antimutagenic effect of monoterpenes against UV-irradiation-, 4NQO- and t-BOOH-induced mutagenesis in coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Biljana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to investigate the antimutagenic potential of monoterpenes from sage and basil in Escherichia coli. The mutagenic potential of monoterpenes was pre-screened with Salmonella/microsome reversion assay in strain TA100 and no mutagenic effect was detected. The antimutagenic potential against UV- 4NQO- and t-BOOH induced mutagenesis was evaluated in E. coli K12 and E. coli WP2 by reversion assays. The obtained results indicate that camphor and thujone reduce UV- and 4NQO-induced mutations; myrcene reduces t-BOOH-induced mutations, while eucalyptol and linalool reduce mutagenicity by all tested mutagens. Considering evolutionary conservation of DNA repair and antioxidative protection, the obtained results indicate that further antigenotoxicity studies should be undertaken in eukaryotes.

  8. Mutagenesis and Genome Engineering of Epstein-Barr Virus in Cultured Human Cells by CRISPR/Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Kit-San; Chan, Chi-Ping; Kok, Kin-Hang; Jin, Dong-Yan

    2017-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR associated protein 9 nuclease (Cas9) system is a powerful genome-editing tool for both chromosomal and extrachromosomal DNA. DNA viruses such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), which undergoes episomal replication in human cells, can be effectively edited by CRISPR/Cas9. We have demonstrated targeted editing of the EBV genome by CRISPR/Cas9 in several lines of EBV-infected cells. CRISPR/Cas9-based mutagenesis and genome engineering of EBV provides a new method for genetic analysis, which has some advantages over bacterial artificial chromosome-based recombineering. This approach might also prove useful in the cure of EBV infection. In this chapter, we use the knockout of the BART promoter as an example to detail the experimental procedures for construction of recombinant EBV in human cells.

  9. Random mutagenesis MAPPIT analysis identifies binding sites for Vif and Gag in both cytidine deaminase domains of Apobec3G.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Uyttendaele

    Full Text Available The mammalian two-hybrid system MAPPIT allows the detection of protein-protein interactions in intact human cells. We developed a random mutagenesis screening strategy based on MAPPIT to detect mutations that disrupt the interaction of one protein with multiple protein interactors simultaneously. The strategy was used to detect residues of the human cytidine deaminase Apobec3G that are important for its homodimerization and its interaction with the HIV-1 Gag and Vif proteins. The strategy is able to identify the previously described head-to-head homodimerization interface in the N-terminal domain of Apobec3G. Our analysis further detects two new potential interaction surfaces in the N-and C-terminal domain of Apobec3G for interaction with Vif and Gag or for Apobec3G dimerization.

  10. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation as an efficient tool for insertional mutagenesis of Cercospora zeae-maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yuanyuan; Xiao, Shuqin; Wang, Fen; Sun, Jiaying; Zhao, Likun; Yan, Libin; Xue, Chunsheng

    2017-02-01

    An efficient Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) approach was developed for the plant pathogenic fungus, Cercospora zeae-maydis, which is the causative agent of gray leaf spot in maize. The transformation was evaluated with five parameters to test the efficiencies of transformation. Results showed that spore germination time, co-cultivation temperature and time were the significant influencing factors in all parameters. Randomly selected transformants were confirmed and the transformants were found to be mitotically stable, with single-copy T-DNA integration in the genome. T-DNA flanking sequences were cloned by thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR. Thus, the ATMT approach is an efficient tool for insertional mutagenesis of C. zeae-maydis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Signature-tagged mutagenesis of Pasteurella multocida identifies mutants displaying differential virulence characteristics in mice and chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Marina; Boyce, John D; Wilkie, Ian W; Adler, Ben

    2003-09-01

    Pasteurella multocida is the causative agent of fowl cholera in birds. Signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) was used to identify potential virulence factors in a mouse septicemia disease model and a chicken fowl cholera model. A library of P. multocida mutants was constructed with a modified Tn916 and screened for attenuation in both animal models. Mutants identified by the STM screening were confirmed as attenuated by competitive growth assays in both chickens and mice. Of the 15 mutants identified in the chicken model, only 5 were also attenuated in mice, showing for the first time the presence of host-specific virulence factors and indicating the importance of screening for attenuation in the natural host.

  12. Systems Biology-Based Investigation of Cellular Antiviral Drug Targets Identified by Gene-Trap Insertional Mutagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feixiong Cheng

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Viruses require host cellular factors for successful replication. A comprehensive systems-level investigation of the virus-host interactome is critical for understanding the roles of host factors with the end goal of discovering new druggable antiviral targets. Gene-trap insertional mutagenesis is a high-throughput forward genetics approach to randomly disrupt (trap host genes and discover host genes that are essential for viral replication, but not for host cell survival. In this study, we used libraries of randomly mutagenized cells to discover cellular genes that are essential for the replication of 10 distinct cytotoxic mammalian viruses, 1 gram-negative bacterium, and 5 toxins. We herein reported 712 candidate cellular genes, characterizing distinct topological network and evolutionary signatures, and occupying central hubs in the human interactome. Cell cycle phase-specific network analysis showed that host cell cycle programs played critical roles during viral replication (e.g. MYC and TAF4 regulating G0/1 phase. Moreover, the viral perturbation of host cellular networks reflected disease etiology in that host genes (e.g. CTCF, RHOA, and CDKN1B identified were frequently essential and significantly associated with Mendelian and orphan diseases, or somatic mutations in cancer. Computational drug repositioning framework via incorporating drug-gene signatures from the Connectivity Map into the virus-host interactome identified 110 putative druggable antiviral targets and prioritized several existing drugs (e.g. ajmaline that may be potential for antiviral indication (e.g. anti-Ebola. In summary, this work provides a powerful methodology with a tight integration of gene-trap insertional mutagenesis testing and systems biology to identify new antiviral targets and drugs for the development of broadly acting and targeted clinical antiviral therapeutics.

  13. Mutagenesis of tGCN5 core region reveals two critical surface residues F90 and R140

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, Kinjal Rajesh; Chan, Yan M.; Lee, Man X.; Yang, Ching Yao; Voloshchuk, Natalya [Department of Chemical and Biological Sciences, Polytechnic Institute of New York University, 6 MetroTech Center, Brooklyn, NY 11201 (United States); Montclare, Jin Kim, E-mail: jmontcla@poly.edu [Department of Chemical and Biological Sciences, Polytechnic Institute of New York University, 6 MetroTech Center, Brooklyn, NY 11201 (United States); Department of Biochemistry, SUNY-Downstate Medical Center, 450 Clarkson Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11203 (United States)

    2010-09-24

    Research highlights: {yields} Mutagenesis of the tGCN5 core region reveals two residues important for function. {yields} Developed a fluorescent lysate-based activity assay to assess mutants. {yields} Surface-exposed residues F90 and R140 of tGCN5 are critical for H3 acetylation. -- Abstract: Tetrahymena General Control Non-Derepressor 5 (tGCN5) is a critical regulator of gene transcription via acetylation of histones. Since the acetylation ability has been attributed to the 'core region', we perform mutagenesis of residues within the tGCN5 'core region' in order to identify those critical for function and stability. Residues that do not participate in catalysis are identified, mutated and characterized for activity, structure and thermodynamic stability. Variants I107V, Q114L, A121T and A130S maintain the acetylation function relative to wild-type tGCN5, while variants F90Y, F112R and R140H completely abolish function. Of the three non-functional variants, since F112 is mutated into a non-homologous charged residue, a loss in function is expected. However, the remaining two variants are mutated into homologous residues, suggesting that F90 and R140 are critical for the activity of tGCN5. While mutation to homologous residue maintains acetylation of histone H3 for the majority of the variants, the two surface-exposed residues, F90 and R140, appear to be essential for tGCN5 function, structure or stability.

  14. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated targeted mutagenesis of GmFT2a delays flowering time in soya bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yupeng; Chen, Li; Liu, Xiujie; Guo, Chen; Sun, Shi; Wu, Cunxiang; Jiang, Bingjun; Han, Tianfu; Hou, Wensheng

    2017-05-16

    Flowering is an indication of the transition from vegetative growth to reproductive growth and has considerable effects on the life cycle of soya bean (Glycine max). In this study, we employed the CRISPR/Cas9 system to specifically induce targeted mutagenesis of GmFT2a, an integrator in the photoperiod flowering pathway in soya bean. The soya bean cultivar Jack was transformed with three sgRNA/Cas9 vectors targeting different sites of endogenous GmFT2a via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Site-directed mutations were observed at all targeted sites by DNA sequencing analysis. T1-generation soya bean plants homozygous for null alleles of GmFT2a frameshift mutated by a 1-bp insertion or short deletion exhibited late flowering under natural conditions (summer) in Beijing, China (N39°58', E116°20'). We also found that the targeted mutagenesis was stably heritable in the following T2 generation, and the homozygous GmFT2a mutants exhibited late flowering under both long-day and short-day conditions. We identified some 'transgene-clean' soya bean plants that were homozygous for null alleles of endogenous GmFT2a and without any transgenic element from the T1 and T2 generations. These 'transgene-clean' mutants of GmFT2a may provide materials for more in-depth research of GmFT2a functions and the molecular mechanism of photoperiod responses in soya bean. They will also contribute to soya bean breeding and regional introduction. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. From classical mutagenesis to nuclease-based breeding - directing natural DNA repair for a natural end-product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacher, Michael; Puchta, Holger

    2017-05-01

    Production of mutants of crop plants by the use of chemical or physical genotoxins has a long tradition. These factors induce the natural DNA repair machinery to repair damage in an error-prone way. In the case of radiation, multiple double-strand breaks (DSBs) are induced randomly in the genome, leading in very rare cases to a desirable phenotype. In recent years the use of synthetic, site-directed nucleases (SDNs) - also referred to as sequence-specific nucleases - like the CRISPR/Cas system has enabled scientists to use exactly the same naturally occurring DNA repair mechanisms for the controlled induction of genomic changes at pre-defined sites in plant genomes. As these changes are not necessarily associated with the permanent integration of foreign DNA, the obtained organisms per se cannot be regarded as genetically modified as there is no way to distinguish them from natural variants. This applies to changes induced by DSBs as well as single-strand breaks, and involves repair by non-homologous end-joining and homologous recombination. The recent development of SDN-based 'DNA-free' approaches makes mutagenesis strategies in classical breeding indistinguishable from SDN-derived targeted genome modifications, even in regard to current regulatory rules. With the advent of new SDN technologies, much faster and more precise genome editing becomes available at reasonable cost, and potentially without requiring time-consuming deregulation of newly created phenotypes. This review will focus on classical mutagenesis breeding and the application of newly developed SDNs in order to emphasize similarities in the context of the regulatory situation for genetically modified crop plants. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Generation of peanut drought tolerant plants by pingyangmycin-mediated in vitro mutagenesis and hydroxyproline-resistance screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Jiongming; Wang, Ya; Wang, Peng; Qiao, Lixian; Sun, Shimeng; Hu, Xiaohui; Chen, Jing; Wang, Jingshan

    2015-01-01

    In order to enlarge the potential resources of drought-tolerant peanuts, we conducted in vitro mutagenesis with Pingyangmycin (PYM) as the mutagen as well as directed screening on a medium supplemented with Hydroxyproline (HYP). After being extracted from mature seeds (cv. Huayu 20), the embryonic leaflets were cultured on somatic embryogenesis-induction medium with 4 mg/L PYM and the generated embryos were successively transferred to a germination medium with 4 and then 8 mmol/L HYP to screen HYP-tolerant plantlets. After that, these plantlets were grafted and transplanted to the experimental field. In the next generation, all seeds were sown in the field, and phenotype variation and trait segregation can be observed in most of the offspring (M2 generation). The M3 generation individuals were subjected to drought stress at the seedling stages. The activities of SOD and POD were substantially increased in eight offspring of 11 HYP-tolerant, regenerated plants than in their mutagenic parents. To determine the correlation between mutant phenotypes and genomic modification, we carried out a comparison of the DNA polymorphisms between the mutagenic parents and 13 M3 generation individuals from different HYP-tolerant, regenerated plants with SSR primers. Results showed that most mutants and parent plants had signs of polymorphisms. Under drought stress, some M3 generation individuals of 10 original HYP-tolerant, regenerated plants produced more pods than the mutagenic parent; twenty individuals among them produced >60 g pods/plant. M4-generation seeds were tested for quality characteristics by Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIS) and nine individuals with higher protein content (>30%) and 21 individuals with higher oil content (>58%) were screened. We concluded that the use of PYM-based in vitro mutagenesis in combination with directed screening with HYP is effective for the creation of potential drought-tolerant mutants of peanut.

  17. CRISPR/Cas9 Mutagenesis Reveals Versatile Roles of Hox Genes in Crustacean Limb Specification and Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Arnaud; Serano, Julia M; Jarvis, Erin; Bruce, Heather S; Wang, Jennifer; Ray, Shagnik; Barker, Carryn A; O'Connell, Liam C; Patel, Nipam H

    2016-01-11

    Crustaceans possess a diverse array of specialized limbs. Although shifts in Hox gene expression domains have been postulated to play a role in generating this limb diversity, little functional data have been provided to understand the precise roles of Hox genes during crustacean development. We used a combination of CRISPR/Cas9-targeted mutagenesis and RNAi knockdown to decipher the function of the six Hox genes expressed in the developing mouth and trunk of the amphipod Parhyale hawaiensis. These experimentally manipulated animals display specific and striking homeotic transformations. We found that abdominal-A (abd-A) and Abdominal-B (Abd-B) are required for proper posterior patterning, with knockout of Abd-B resulting in an animal with thoracic type legs along what would have been an abdomen, and abd-A disruption generating a simplified body plan characterized by a loss of specialization in both abdominal and thoracic appendages. In the thorax, Ubx is necessary for gill development and for repression of gnathal fate, and Antp dictates claw morphology. In the mouth, Scr and Antp confer the part-gnathal, part-thoracic hybrid identity of the maxilliped, and Scr and Dfd prevent antennal identity in posterior head segments. Our results allow us to define the role Hox genes play in specifying each appendage type in Parhyale, including the modular nature by which some appendages are patterned by Hox gene inputs. In addition, we define how changes in Hox gene expression have generated morphological differences between crustacean species. Finally, we also highlight the utility of CRISPR/Cas9-based somatic mutagenesis in emerging model organisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Casting epPCR (cepPCR): A simple random mutagenesis method to generate high quality mutant libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianhua; Ruff, Anna J; Arlt, Marcus; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2017-09-01

    During the last decade, directed evolution has become a standard protein engineering strategy to reengineer proteins for industrial applications under high stress conditions (e.g., high temperature, extreme pH, ionic liquids, or organic solvents). The most commonly employed method for diversity generation to improve biocatalysts for these properties is random mutagenesis by error-prone polymerase chain reaction (epPCR). However, recent reports show that epPCR often fails to produce >70% of beneficial positions/amino acid exchanges which improve enzyme properties such as organic solvent or ionic liquid resistance. In this report, bsla (543 bp, small lipase gene from Bacillus subtilis) was divided into three fragments (147, 192, 204 bp). Each fragment was subjected to an epPCR with a high mutation load (22, 31, and 33 mutations per kb) in order to increase the number of identified beneficial positions while maintaining a fraction of active population which can efficiently be screened in agar plate or microtiter plate format. The use of this "casting epPCR" process termed as (cepPCR), doubles the number of identified beneficial positions (from 14% to 29%), when compared to standard epPCR for the BSLA enzyme model. A further increase to 39% of beneficial positions is obtainable through combination of cepPCR with the transversion biased sequence saturation mutagenesis (SeSaM) method. Furthermore, sequencing of up to 600 mutations per fragment provided valuable insights into the correlation of total throughput and number of identified beneficial positions as well as how an efficient balance of screening efforts to obtainable results can be achieved in directed evolution campaigns. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 1921-1927. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Transposon Mutagenesis of the Zika Virus Genome Highlights Regions Essential for RNA Replication and Restricted for Immune Evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Benjamin O; Sachs, David; Schwarz, Megan C; Palese, Peter; Evans, Matthew J

    2017-08-01

    The molecular constraints affecting Zika virus (ZIKV) evolution are not well understood. To investigate ZIKV genetic flexibility, we used transposon mutagenesis to add 15-nucleotide insertions throughout the ZIKV MR766 genome and subsequently deep sequenced the viable mutants. Few ZIKV insertion mutants replicated, which likely reflects a high degree of functional constraints on the genome. The NS1 gene exhibited distinct mutational tolerances at different stages of the screen. This result may define regions of the NS1 protein that are required for the different stages of the viral life cycle. The ZIKV structural genes showed the highest degree of insertional tolerance. Although the envelope (E) protein exhibited particular flexibility, the highly conserved envelope domain II (EDII) fusion loop of the E protein was intolerant of transposon insertions. The fusion loop is also a target of pan-flavivirus antibodies that are generated against other flaviviruses and neutralize a broad range of dengue virus and ZIKV isolates. The genetic restrictions identified within the epitopes in the EDII fusion loop likely explain the sequence and antigenic conservation of these regions in ZIKV and among multiple flaviviruses. Thus, our results provide insights into the genetic restrictions on ZIKV that may affect the evolution of this virus.IMPORTANCE Zika virus recently emerged as a significant human pathogen. Determining the genetic constraints on Zika virus is important for understanding the factors affecting viral evolution. We used a genome-wide transposon mutagenesis screen to identify where mutations were tolerated in replicating viruses. We found that the genetic regions involved in RNA replication were mostly intolerant of mutations. The genes coding for structural proteins were more permissive to mutations. Despite the flexibility observed in these regions, we found that epitopes bound by broadly reactive antibodies were genetically constrained. This finding may explain

  20. Generation of peanut drought tolerant plants by pingyangmycin-mediated in vitro mutagenesis and hydroxyproline-resistance screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiongming Sui

    Full Text Available In order to enlarge the potential resources of drought-tolerant peanuts, we conducted in vitro mutagenesis with Pingyangmycin (PYM as the mutagen as well as directed screening on a medium supplemented with Hydroxyproline (HYP. After being extracted from mature seeds (cv. Huayu 20, the embryonic leaflets were cultured on somatic embryogenesis-induction medium with 4 mg/L PYM and the generated embryos were successively transferred to a germination medium with 4 and then 8 mmol/L HYP to screen HYP-tolerant plantlets. After that, these plantlets were grafted and transplanted to the experimental field. In the next generation, all seeds were sown in the field, and phenotype variation and trait segregation can be observed in most of the offspring (M2 generation. The M3 generation individuals were subjected to drought stress at the seedling stages. The activities of SOD and POD were substantially increased in eight offspring of 11 HYP-tolerant, regenerated plants than in their mutagenic parents. To determine the correlation between mutant phenotypes and genomic modification, we carried out a comparison of the DNA polymorphisms between the mutagenic parents and 13 M3 generation individuals from different HYP-tolerant, regenerated plants with SSR primers. Results showed that most mutants and parent plants had signs of polymorphisms. Under drought stress, some M3 generation individuals of 10 original HYP-tolerant, regenerated plants produced more pods than the mutagenic parent; twenty individuals among them produced >60 g pods/plant. M4-generation seeds were tested for quality characteristics by Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIS and nine individuals with higher protein content (>30% and 21 individuals with higher oil content (>58% were screened. We concluded that the use of PYM-based in vitro mutagenesis in combination with directed screening with HYP is effective for the creation of potential drought-tolerant mutants of peanut.

  1. Enhancement of oxidative stability of the subtilisin nattokinase by site-directed mutagenesis expressed in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, MeiZhi; Zheng, ZhongLiang; Bao, Wei; Cai, YongJun; Yin, Yan; Zou, GuoLin; Zou, GouLin

    2009-11-01

    Nattokinase (subtilisin NAT, NK) is a bacterial serine protease with strong fibrinolytic activity and it is a potent cardiovascular drug. In medical and commercial applications, however, it is susceptible to chemical oxidation, and subsequent inactivation or denaturation. Here we show that the oxidative stability of NK was substantially increased by optimizing the amino acid residues Thr(220) and Met(222), which were in the vicinity of the catalytic residue Ser(221) of the enzyme. Two nonoxidative amino acids (Ser and Ala) were introduced at these sites using site-directed mutagenesis. Active enzymes were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli with periplasmic secretion and enzymes were purified to homogeneity. The purified enzymes were analyzed with respect to oxidative stability, kinetic parameters, fibrinolytic activity and thermal stability. M222A mutant was found to have a greatly increased oxidative stability compared with wild-type enzyme and it was resistant to inactivation by more than 1 M H(2)O(2), whereas the wild-type enzyme was inactivated by 0.1 M H(2)O(2) (t(1/2) approximately 11.6 min). The other mutant (T220S) also showed an obvious increase in antioxidative ability. Molecular dynamic simulations on wild-type and T220S mutant proteins suggested that a hydrogen bond was formed between Ser(220) and Asn(155), and the spatial structure of Met(222) was changed compared with the wild-type. The present study demonstrates the feasibility of improving oxidative stability of NK by site-directed mutagenesis and shows successful protein engineering cases to improve stability of NK as a potent therapeutic agent.

  2. Genomic saturation mutagenesis and polygenic analysis identify novel yeast genes affecting ethyl acetate production, a non-selectable polygenic trait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abt, Tom Den; Souffriau, Ben; Foulquié-Moreno, Maria R.; Duitama, Jorge; Thevelein, Johan M.

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of mutants in populations of microorganisms has been a valuable tool in experimental genetics for decades. The main disadvantage, however, is the inability of isolating mutants in non-selectable polygenic traits. Most traits of organisms, however, are non-selectable and polygenic, including industrially important properties of microorganisms. The advent of powerful technologies for polygenic analysis of complex traits has allowed simultaneous identification of multiple causative mutations among many thousands of irrelevant mutations. We now show that this also applies to haploid strains of which the genome has been loaded with induced mutations so as to affect as many non-selectable, polygenic traits as possible. We have introduced about 900 mutations into single haploid yeast strains using multiple rounds of EMS mutagenesis, while maintaining the mating capacity required for genetic mapping. We screened the strains for defects in flavor production, an important non-selectable, polygenic trait in yeast alcoholic beverage production. A haploid strain with multiple induced mutations showing reduced ethyl acetate production in semi-anaerobic fermentation, was selected and the underlying quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were mapped using pooled-segregant whole-genome sequence analysis after crossing with an unrelated haploid strain. Reciprocal hemizygosity analysis and allele exchange identified PMA1 and CEM1 as causative mutant alleles and TPS1 as a causative genetic background allele. The case of CEM1 revealed that relevant mutations without observable effect in the haploid strain with multiple induced mutations (in this case due to defective mitochondria) can be identified by polygenic analysis as long as the mutations have an effect in part of the segregants (in this case those that regained fully functional mitochondria). Our results show that genomic saturation mutagenesis combined with complex trait polygenic analysis could be used successfully to

  3. Functional expression enhancement of Bacillus pumilus CotA-laccase mutant WLF through site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Quan; Chen, Yu; Xia, Jing; Wang, Kai-Qiang; Cai, Yu-Jie; Liao, Xiang-Ru; Guan, Zheng-Bing

    2018-02-01

    Bacterial laccases are potential enzymes for biotechnological applications, such as detoxification of industrial effluents, decolorization of textile, and dimerization of phenolic acids, due to their remarkable advantages, including broad substrate spectrum, high thermostability, wide pH scope, and tolerance to alkaline environments. L386W/G417L/G57F (abbreviated as WLF), a good mutant of CotA-laccase from Bacillus pumilus W3, has been constructed and reported by our laboratory with highly improved catalytic efficiency. However, the low-functional expression level of mutant WLF in Escherichia coli was a shortcoming. Three mutants, namely, K317N/WLF, D501G/WLF, and K317N/D501G/WLF, were constructed through site-directed mutagenesis to improve the functional expression of WLF in this study. The soluble and active expression of D501G/WLF and K317N/D501G/WLF in E. coli enhanced 4.48-fold and 3.63-fold level, respectively. The K317N/WLF failed to increase the soluble expression level, but slightly improved the stability of CotA-laccase. Results showed that not only the position 501 is significant for functional expression of B. pumilus W3 CotA, but also these mutants still remained its high thermostability, resistance of alkaline with salt, and conspicuous decolorizing efficiency. This work is the first to improve the soluble expression of B. pumilus CotA-laccase in E. coli by site-directed mutagenesis. The D501G/WLF and K317N/D501G/WLF will be suitable candidates for biotechnological applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Relationship of DNA repair processes to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in mammalian cells. Progress report, November 1, 1979-October 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, H.H.

    1980-10-01

    The objective of this research is to determine the role of DNA repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in mammalian cells. Use of the host-cell reactivation viral suicide enrichment procedure was initiated in the isolation of repair-deficient mutants. Lightly mutagenized BHK cells were infected with irradiated Herpes simplex virus (HSV); several radiation-sensitive strains were isolated among the survivors of the infection. The characterization of these strains is progressing and the enrichments are continuing. That alterations in the frequency of mutation of C3H/10T 1/2 cells, occurring as a result of holding the cells in a confluent state following treatment with ethylmethane sulfonate, parallel the alterations in the frequency of neoplastic transformation was found. The repair capabilities of BHK cells were found to be intermediate in comparison to repair-proficient and -deficient human cells with regard to the reactivation of HSV treated with various inactivating agents. The effect of confluency and of low serum levels on DNA synthesis, as well as the response to the cytotoxic effects of MNNG and acriflavin were determined in BHK cells in preparation for the investigation of the role of DNA repair in mutagenesis and transformation. It was also found that C3H/10T 1/2 cells partially recover from the toxic effects of 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide if they are held in a confluent state for 6 to 22 hrs following treatment. Addition of catalase did not alleviate the toxic effects of 4-NQO. The cells contain a relatively high endogenous level of this enzyme. (ERB)

  5. Microspore induced doubled haploids production from ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) soaked flower buds is an efficient strategy for mutagenesis in Chinese cabbage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Yin; Dai, Shuangyan; Gu, Aixia; Liu, Mengyang; Wang, Yanhua; Luo, Shuangxia; Zhao, Yujing; Wang, Shan; Xuan, Shuxin; Chen, Xueping; Li, Xiaofeng; Bonnema, Guusje; Zhao, Jianjun; Shen, Shuxing

    2016-01-01

    Chinese cabbage buds were soaked with Ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) to induce mutagenesis. The influence of different EMS concentrations and treatment durations on microspore development, embryo production rate and seedling rate were evaluated in five Chinese cabbage genotypes. Mutations in four

  6. Abstracts of the Conference on Mechanisms of DNA Repair and Mutagenesis on the 100. Anniversary of the Discovery of Polonium and Radium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The conference covered various aspects of mutagenesis and mechanisms of DNA repair. UV and ionizing radiation were use to induce DNA lesions in bacteria, yeast and cell cultures of higher organisms. This allows study of influence of mutations on particular processes in the cell. Mechanisms of resistance were also investigated. Biological investigations were performed using labelled compounds.

  7. Use of an EZ-Tn5-based random mutagenesis system to identify a novel toxin regulatory locus in Clostridium perfringens strain 13.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge E Vidal

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Although useful for probing bacterial pathogenesis and physiology, current random mutagenesis systems suffer limitations for studying the toxin-producing bacterium Clostridium perfringens.An EZ-Tn5-based random mutagenesis approach was developed for use in C. perfringens. This mutagenesis system identified a new regulatory locus controlling toxin production by strain 13, a C. perfringens type A strain. The novel locus, encoding proteins with homology to the AgrB and AgrD components of the Agr quorum sensing system of Staphylococcus aureus and two hypothetical proteins, was found to regulate early production of both alpha toxin and perfringolysin O (PFO by strain 13. PFO production by the strain 13 DeltaagrB mutant could be restored by genetic complementation or by physical complementation, i.e. by co-culture of the strain 13 DeltaagrB mutant with a pfoA mutant of either strain 13 or C. perfringens type C CN3685. A similar AgrB- and AgrD-encoding locus is identifiable in all sequenced C. perfringens strains, including type B, C, D, and E isolates, suggesting this regulatory locus contributes to toxin regulation by most C. perfringens strains. In strain 13, the agrB and agrD genes were found to be co-transcribed in an operon with two upstream genes encoding hypothetical proteins.The new Tn5-based random mutagenesis system developed in this study is more efficient and random than previously reported C. perfringens random mutagenesis approaches. It allowed identification of a novel C. perfringens toxin regulatory locus with homology to the Agr system of S. aureus and which functions as expected of an Agr-like quorum sensing system. Since previous studies have shown that alpha toxin and perfringolysin O are responsible for strain 13-induced clostridial myonecrosis in the mouse model, the new agr regulatory locus may have importance for strain 13 virulence.

  8. Mutagenesis Objective Search and Selection Tool (MOSST: an algorithm to predict structure-function related mutations in proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asenjo Juan A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functionally relevant artificial or natural mutations are difficult to assess or predict if no structure-function information is available for a protein. This is especially important to correctly identify functionally significant non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs or to design a site-directed mutagenesis strategy for a target protein. A new and powerful methodology is proposed to guide these two decision strategies, based only on conservation rules of physicochemical properties of amino acids extracted from a multiple alignment of a protein family where the target protein belongs, with no need of explicit structure-function relationships. Results A statistical analysis is performed over each amino acid position in the multiple protein alignment, based on different amino acid physical or chemical characteristics, including hydrophobicity, side-chain volume, charge and protein conformational parameters. The variances of each of these properties at each position are combined to obtain a global statistical indicator of the conservation degree of each property. Different types of physicochemical conservation are defined to characterize relevant and irrelevant positions. The differences between statistical variances are taken together as the basis of hypothesis tests at each position to search for functionally significant mutable sites and to identify specific mutagenesis targets. The outcome is used to statistically predict physicochemical consensus sequences based on different properties and to calculate the amino acid propensities at each position in a given protein. Hence, amino acid positions are identified that are putatively responsible for function, specificity, stability or binding interactions in a family of proteins. Once these key functional positions are identified, position-specific statistical distributions are applied to divide the 20 common protein amino acids in each position of the protein

  9. Dietary flavonoids bind to mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 in nuclei, and inhibit chemical induced mutagenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirata, Fusao, E-mail: fhirata@wayne.edu; Harada, Takasuke; Corcoran, George B.; Hirata, Aiko

    2014-01-15

    Highlight: • Nuclear mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 is involved in DNA damage induced mutagenesis. • Dietary flavonoids bind to and inhibit purified mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 helicase. • Dietary flavonoids show anti-mutagenic action. • Annexin A1 may serve as a putative target of cancer chemoprevention by flavonoids. - Abstract: In order to investigate the mechanisms of anti-mutagenic action by dietary flavonoids, we investigated if they inhibit mutation of the thymidine kinase (tk) gene in L5178Ytk(±) lymphoma cells. Silibinin, quercetin and genistein suppressed mutation of the tk gene induced in L5178Ytk(±) lymphoma cells by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and As{sup 3+}. Flavone and flavonol were less effective. To establish that mutation of the tk gene in L5178Ytk(±) lymphoma cells by MMS and As{sup 3+} is mediated through mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1, L5178Ytk(±) lymphoma cells were treated with annexin A1 anti-sense oligonucleotide. The treatment reduced mRNA as well as protein levels of annexin A1, and suppressed mutation of the tk gene. Nuclear extracts from L5178Ytk(±) lymphoma cells catalyzed translesion DNA synthesis with an oligonucleotide template containing 8-oxo-guanosine in an annexin A1 dependent manner. This translesion DNA synthesis was inhibited by the anti-mutagenic flavonoids, silibinin, quercetin and genistein, in a concentration dependent manner, but only slightly by flavone and flavonol. Because these observations implicate involvement of annexin A1 in mutagenesis, we examined if flavonoids suppress nuclear annexin A1 helicase activity. Silibinin, quercetin and genistein inhibited ssDNA binding, DNA chain annealing and DNA unwinding activities of purified nuclear mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1. Flavone and flavonol were ineffective. The apparent direct binding of anti-mutagenic flavonoids to the annexin A1 molecule was supported by fluorescence quenching. Taken together, these findings illustrate that nuclear annexin A1 may be

  10. Mutagenesis-mediated decrease of pathogenicity as a feature of the mutant spectrum of a viral population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Sanz-Ramos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: RNA virus populations are heterogeneous ensembles of closely related genomes termed quasispecies. This highly complex distribution of variants confers important properties to RNA viruses and influences their pathogenic behavior. It has been hypothesized that increased mutagenesis of viral populations, by treatment with mutagenic agents, can induce alterations in the pathogenic potential of a virus population. In this work we investigate whether mutagenized foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV populations display changes in their virulence in mice. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: FMDV C-S8c1 was passaged in BHK cells in the presence of the mutagenic agent ribavirin. Decline in viral titer and viral RNA progeny was observed in the first passage, fluctuating around a constant value thereafter. Hence, the specific infectivity remained stable during the passages. The viral population harvested from passage 9 (P9 R showed decreased virulence in mice, with a lethal dose 50 (LD(50 >10(4 PFU, as compared with LD(50 of 50 PFU of the parental population FMDV C-S8c1. This decrease in virulence was associated to a 20-fold increase in the mutation frequency of the P9 R population with respect to C-S8c1. Interestingly, individual biological clones isolated from the attenuated population P9 R were as virulent as the parental virus C-S8c1. Furthermore, a mixed population of C-S8c1 and P9 R was inoculated into mice and showed decreased virulence as compared to C-S8c1, suggesting that population P9 R is able to suppress the virulent phenotype of C-S8c1. CONCLUSION: Ribavirin-mediated mutagenesis of an FMDV population resulted in attenuation in vivo, albeit a large proportion of its biological clones displayed a highly virulent phenotype. These results, together with the suppression of C-S8c1 by mutagenized P9 R population, document a suppressive effect of mutagenized viral quasispecies in vivo, and suggest novel approaches to the treatment and

  11. Site-directed mutagenesis, kinetic and inhibition studies of aspartate ammonia lyase from Bacillus sp. YM55-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthan Veetil, Vinod; Raj, Hans; Quax, Wim J; Janssen, Dick B; Poelarends, Gerrit J

    2009-06-01

    Aspartate ammonia lyases (also referred to as aspartases) catalyze the reversible deamination of L-aspartate to yield fumarate and ammonia. In the proposed mechanism for these enzymes, an active site base abstracts a proton from C3 of L-aspartate to form an enzyme-stabilized enediolate intermediate. Ketonization of this intermediate eliminates ammonia and yields the product, fumarate. Although two crystal structures of aspartases have been determined, details of the catalytic mechanism have not yet been elucidated. In the present study, eight active site residues (Thr101, Ser140, Thr141, Asn142, Thr187, His188, Lys324 and Asn326) were mutated in the structurally characterized aspartase (AspB) from Bacillus sp. YM55-1. On the basis of a model of the complex in which L-aspartate was docked manually into the active site of AspB, the residues responsible for binding the amino group of L-aspartate were predicted to be Thr101, Asn142 and His188. This postulate is supported by the mutagenesis studies: mutations at these positions resulted in mutant enzymes with reduced activity and significant increases in the K(m) for L-aspartate. Studies of the pH dependence of the kinetic parameters of AspB revealed that a basic group with a pK(a) of approximately 7 and an acidic group with a pK(a) of approximately 10 are essential for catalysis. His188 does not play the typical role of active site base or acid because the H188A mutant retained significant activity and displayed an unchanged pH-rate profile compared to that of wild-type AspB. Mutation of Ser140 and Thr141 and kinetic analysis of the mutant enzymes revealed that these residues are most likely involved in substrate binding and in stabilizing the enediolate intermediate. Mutagenesis studies corroborate the essential role of Lys324 because all mutations at this position resulted in mutant enzymes that were completely inactive. The substrate-binding model and kinetic analysis of mutant enzymes suggest that Thr187 and Asn326

  12. Interactions between amiodarone and the hERG potassium channel pore determined with mutagenesis and in silico docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yihong; Colenso, Charlotte K; El Harchi, Aziza; Cheng, Hongwei; Witchel, Harry J; Dempsey, Chris E; Hancox, Jules C

    2016-08-01

    The antiarrhythmic drug amiodarone delays cardiac repolarisation through inhibition of hERG-encoded potassium channels responsible for the rapid delayed rectifier potassium current (IKr). This study aimed to elucidate molecular determinants of amiodarone binding to the hERG channel. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were made at 37°C of ionic current (IhERG) carried by wild-type (WT) or mutant hERG channels expressed in HEK293 cells. Alanine mutagenesis and ligand docking were used to investigate the roles of pore cavity amino-acid residues in amiodarone binding. Amiodarone inhibited WT outward IhERG tails with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of ∼45nM, whilst inward IhERG tails in a high K(+) external solution ([K(+)]e) of 94mM were blocked with an IC50 of 117.8nM. Amiodarone's inhibitory action was contingent upon channel gating. Alanine-mutagenesis identified multiple residues directly or indirectly involved in amiodarone binding. The IC50 for the S6 aromatic Y652A mutation was increased to ∼20-fold that of WT IhERG, similar to the pore helical mutant S624A (∼22-fold WT control). The IC50 for F656A mutant IhERG was ∼17-fold its corresponding WT control. Computational docking using a MthK-based hERG model differentiated residues likely to interact directly with drug and those whose Ala mutation may affect drug block allosterically. The requirements for amiodarone block of aromatic residues F656 and Y652 within the hERG pore cavity are smaller than for other high affinity IhERG inhibitors, with relative importance to amiodarone binding of the residues investigated being S624A∼Y652A>F656A>V659A>G648A>T623A. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Optimization of liquid-state fermentation conditions for the glyphosate degradation enzyme production of strain Aspergillus oryzae by ultraviolet mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Gui-Ming; Li, Ru-Yi; Li, Kai-Min; Hu, Ming; Yuan, Xiao-Qiang; Li, Bin; Wang, Feng-Xue; Liu, Cheng-Mei; Wan, Yin

    2016-11-16

    This study aimed to obtain strains with high glyphosate-degrading ability and improve the ability of glyphosate degradation enzyme by the optimization of fermentation conditions. Spore from Aspergillus oryzae A-F02 was subjected to ultraviolet mutagenesis. Single-factor experiment and response surface methodology were used to optimize glyphosate degradation enzyme production from mutant strain by liquid-state fermentation. Four mutant strains were obtained and named as FUJX 001, FUJX 002, FUJX 003, and FUJX 004, in which FUJX 001 gave the highest total enzyme activity. Starch concentration at 0.56%, GP concentration at 1,370 mg/l, initial pH at 6.8, and temperature at 30°C were the optimum conditions for the improved glyphosate degradation endoenzyme production of A. oryzae FUJX 001. Under these conditions, the experimental endoenzyme activity was 784.15 U/100 ml fermentation liquor. The result (784.15 U/100 ml fermentation liquor) was approximately 14-fold higher than that of the original strain. The result highlights the potential of glyphosate degradation enzyme to degrade glyphosate.

  14. Sulforaphane induces phase II detoxication enzymes in mouse skin and prevents mutagenesis induced by a mustard gas analog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abel, E.L. [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States); Boulware, S. [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States); Fields, T.; McIvor, E.; Powell, K.L. [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States); DiGiovanni, J.; Vasquez, K.M. [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States); MacLeod, M.C., E-mail: mcmacleod@mdanderson.org [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Mustard gas, used in chemical warfare since 1917, is a mutagenic and carcinogenic agent that produces severe dermal lesions for which there are no effective therapeutics; it is currently seen as a potential terrorist threat to civilian populations. Sulforaphane, found in cruciferous vegetables, is known to induce enzymes that detoxify compounds such as the sulfur mustards that react through electrophilic intermediates. Here, we observe that a single topical treatment with sulforaphane induces mouse epidermal levels of the regulatory subunit of glutamate-cysteine ligase, the rate-limiting enzyme in glutathione biosynthesis, and also increases epidermal levels of reduced glutathione. Furthermore, a glutathione S-transferase, GSTA4, is also induced in mouse skin by sulforaphane. In an in vivo model in which mice are given a single mutagenic application of the sulfur mustard analog 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide (CEES), we now show that therapeutic treatment with sulforaphane abolishes the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency in the skin, measured four days after exposure. Sulforaphane, a natural product currently in clinical trials, shows promise as an effective therapeutic against mustard gas. -- Highlights: ► Sulforaphane induces increased levels of glutathione in mouse skin. ► Sulforaphane induces increased levels of GSTA4 in mouse skin. ► Sulforaphane, applied after CEES-treatment, completely abolishes CEES-mutagenesis. ► The therapeutic effect may suggest a long biological half-life for CEES in vivo.

  15. Construction, characterization, and selected site-specific mutagenesis of an anti-single-stranded DNA single-chain autoantibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumbley, C A; Denzin, L K; Yantz, L; Tetin, S Y; Voss, E W

    1993-06-25

    Single-chain antibodies are comprised of immunoglobulin light and heavy chain variable domains joined through a polypeptide linker. A single-chain autoantibody, containing the 14-amino acid 212-polypeptide linker (GSTSGSGKSSEGKG), was constructed based on the light and heavy chain variable region gene sequences of anti-single-stranded DNA autoantibody BV04-01 (IgG2b, kappa). Following protein expression in Escherichia coli, denaturation, refolding, and affinity purification, single-chain autoantibody 04-01 binding with single-stranded DNA and poly(dT) was characterized in solid-phase and solution-phase assays. Homopolymer ligand binding results demonstrated that single-chain autoantibody 04-01 possessed anti-DNA binding properties similar to BV04-01 IgG and Fab fragments. Based on x-ray crystallographic analyses of BV04-01, site-specific mutagenesis studies were conducted on 2 residues (L32Tyr and H100aTrp) involved in aromatic stacking interactions with the middle thymidine of a (dT)3 ligand.

  16. TALEN-Based Mutagenesis of Lipoxygenase LOX3 Enhances the Storage Tolerance of Rice (Oryza sativa Seeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Ma

    Full Text Available The deterioration of rice grain reduces the quality of rice, resulting in serious economic losses for farmers. Lipoxygenases (LOXs catalyze the dioxygenation of polyunsaturated fatty acids with at least one cis,cis-1,4-pentadiene to form hydroperoxide, which is a major factor influencing seed longevity and viability. Recently, genome editing, an essential tool employed in reverse genetics, has been used experimentally to investigate basic plant biology or to modify crop plants for the improvement of important agricultural traits. In this study, we performed targeted mutagenesis in rice using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs to improve seed storability. A modified ligation-independent cloning method (LIC was employed to allow for the quick and efficient directional insertion of TALEN monomer modules into destination vectors used in plants. We demonstrated the feasibility and flexibility of the technology by developing a set of modular vectors for genome editing. After construction and validation, the TALEN pairs were used to create stable transgenic rice lines via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. One heterozygous mutant (4% was recovered from 25 transgenic NPTII-resistant lines, and the mutation was transmitted to the next generation. Further molecular and protein level experiments verified LOX3 deficiency and demonstrated the improvement of seed storability. Our work provides a flexible genome editing tool for improving important agronomic traits, as well as direct evidence that Lox3 has only a limited impact on seed longevity.

  17. Functional mutagenesis screens reveal the ‘cap structure’ formation in disulfide-bridge free TASK channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Matthias; Rinné, Susanne; Kiper, Aytug K.; Ramírez, David; Netter, Michael F.; Bustos, Daniel; Ortiz-Bonnin, Beatriz; González, Wendy; Decher, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Two-pore-domain potassium (K2P) channels have a large extracellular cap structure formed by two M1-P1 linkers, containing a cysteine for dimerization. However, this cysteine is not present in the TASK-1/3/5 subfamily. The functional role of the cap is poorly understood and it remained unclear whether K2P channels assemble in the domain-swapped orientation or not. Functional alanine-mutagenesis screens of TASK-1 and TRAAK were used to build an in silico model of the TASK-1 cap. According to our data the cap structure of disulfide-bridge free TASK channels is similar to that of other K2P channels and is most likely assembled in the domain-swapped orientation. As the conserved cysteine is not essential for functional expression of all K2P channels tested, we propose that hydrophobic residues at the inner leaflets of the cap domains can interact with each other and that this way of stabilizing the cap is most likely conserved among K2P channels. PMID:26794006

  18. Coherent wavepackets in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex are robust to excitonic-structure perturbations caused by mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiuri, Margherita; Ostroumov, Evgeny E.; Saer, Rafael G.; Blankenship, Robert E.; Scholes, Gregory D.

    2018-02-01

    Femtosecond pulsed excitation of light-harvesting complexes creates oscillatory features in their response. This phenomenon has inspired a large body of work aimed at uncovering the origin of the coherent beatings and possible implications for function. Here we exploit site-directed mutagenesis to change the excitonic level structure in Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complexes and compare the coherences using broadband pump-probe spectroscopy. Our experiments detect two oscillation frequencies with dephasing on a picosecond timescale—both at 77 K and at room temperature. By studying these coherences with selective excitation pump-probe experiments, where pump excitation is in resonance only with the lowest excitonic state, we show that the key contributions to these oscillations stem from ground-state vibrational wavepackets. These experiments explicitly show that the coherences—although in the ground electronic state—can be probed at the absorption resonances of other bacteriochlorophyll molecules because of delocalization of the electronic excitation over several chromophores.

  19. Saturation mutagenesis of lysine 12 leads to the identification of derivatives of nisin A with enhanced antimicrobial activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn M Molloy

    Full Text Available It is becoming increasingly apparent that innovations from the "golden age" of antibiotics are becoming ineffective, resulting in a pressing need for novel therapeutics. The bacteriocin family of antimicrobial peptides has attracted much attention in recent years as a source of potential alternatives. The most intensively studied bacteriocin is nisin, a broad spectrum lantibiotic that inhibits gram-positive bacteria including important food pathogens and clinically relevant antibiotic resistant bacteria. Nisin is gene-encoded and, as such, is amenable to peptide bioengineering, facilitating the generation of novel derivatives that can be screened for desirable properties. It was to this end that we used a site-saturation mutagenesis approach to create a bank of producers of nisin A derivatives that differ with respect to the identity of residue 12 (normally lysine; K12. A number of these producers exhibited enhanced bioactivity and the nisin A K12A producer was deemed of greatest interest. Subsequent investigations with the purified antimicrobial highlighted the enhanced specific activity of this modified nisin against representative target strains from the genera Streptococcus, Bacillus, Lactococcus, Enterococcus and Staphylococcus.

  20. Saturation Mutagenesis of Lysine 12 Leads to the Identification of Derivatives of Nisin A with Enhanced Antimicrobial Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, Evelyn M.; Field, Des; Connor, Paula M. O'.; Cotter, Paul D.; Hill, Colin; Ross, R. Paul

    2013-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that innovations from the “golden age” of antibiotics are becoming ineffective, resulting in a pressing need for novel therapeutics. The bacteriocin family of antimicrobial peptides has attracted much attention in recent years as a source of potential alternatives. The most intensively studied bacteriocin is nisin, a broad spectrum lantibiotic that inhibits Gram-positive bacteria including important food pathogens and clinically relevant antibiotic resistant bacteria. Nisin is gene-encoded and, as such, is amenable to peptide bioengineering, facilitating the generation of novel derivatives that can be screened for desirable properties. It was to this end that we used a site-saturation mutagenesis approach to create a bank of producers of nisin A derivatives that differ with respect to the identity of residue 12 (normally lysine; K12). A number of these producers exhibited enhanced bioactivity and the nisin A K12A producer was deemed of greatest interest. Subsequent investigations with the purified antimicrobial highlighted the enhanced specific activity of this modified nisin against representative target strains from the genera Streptococcus, Bacillus, Lactococcus, Enterococcus and Staphylococcus. PMID:23505531

  1. MDC-Analyzer: a novel degenerate primer design tool for the construction of intelligent mutagenesis libraries with contiguous sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lixia; Wang, Xiong; Ru, Beibei; Sun, Hengfei; Huang, Jian; Gao, Hui

    2014-06-01

    Recent computational and bioinformatics advances have enabled the efficient creation of novel biocatalysts by reducing amino acid variability at hot spot regions. To further expand the utility of this strategy, we present here a tool called Multi-site Degenerate Codon Analyzer (MDC-Analyzer) for the automated design of intelligent mutagenesis libraries that can completely cover user-defined randomized sequences, especially when multiple contiguous and/or adjacent sites are targeted. By initially defining an objective function, the possible optimal degenerate PCR primer profiles could be automatically explored using the heuristic approach of Greedy Best-First-Search. Compared to the previously developed DC-Analyzer, MDC-Analyzer allows for the existence of a small amount of undesired sequences as a tradeoff between the number of degenerate primers and the encoded library size while still providing all the benefits of DC-Analyzer with the ability to randomize multiple contiguous sites. MDC-Analyzer was validated using a series of randomly generated mutation schemes and experimental case studies on the evolution of halohydrin dehalogenase, which proved that the MDC methodology is more efficient than other methods and is particularly well-suited to exploring the sequence space of proteins using data-driven protein engineering strategies.

  2. Improved PCR method for the creation of saturation mutagenesis libraries in directed evolution: application to difficult-to-amplify templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchis, Joaquin; Fernández, Layla; Carballeira, J Daniel; Drone, Jullien; Gumulya, Yosephine; Höbenreich, Horst; Kahakeaw, Daniel; Kille, Sabrina; Lohmer, Renate; Peyralans, Jérôme J-P; Podtetenieff, John; Prasad, Shreenath; Soni, Pankaj; Taglieber, Andreas; Wu, Sheng; Zilly, Felipe E; Reetz, Manfred T

    2008-11-01

    Saturation mutagenesis constitutes a powerful method in the directed evolution of enzymes. Traditional protocols of whole plasmid amplification such as Stratagene's QuikChange sometimes fail when the templates are difficult to amplify. In order to overcome such restrictions, we have devised a simple two-primer, two-stage polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method which constitutes an improvement over existing protocols. In the first stage of the PCR, both the mutagenic primer and the antiprimer that are not complementary anneal to the template. In the second stage, the amplified sequence is used as a megaprimer. Sites composed of one or more residues can be randomized in a single PCR reaction, irrespective of their location in the gene sequence.The method has been applied to several enzymes successfully, including P450-BM3 from Bacillus megaterium, the lipases from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida antarctica and the epoxide hydrolase from Aspergillus niger. Here, we show that megaprimer size as well as the direction and design of the antiprimer are determining factors in the amplification of the plasmid. Comparison of the results with the performances of previous protocols reveals the efficiency of the improved method.

  3. Engineering a Chemical Switch into the Light-driven Proton Pump Proteorhodopsin by Cysteine Mutagenesis and Thiol Modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Daniel; Hirschi, Stephan; Ucurum, Zöhre; Goers, Roland; Meier, Wolfgang; Müller, Daniel J; Fotiadis, Dimitrios

    2016-07-25

    For applications in synthetic biology, for example, the bottom-up assembly of biomolecular nanofactories, modules of specific and controllable functionalities are essential. Of fundamental importance in such systems are energizing modules, which are able to establish an electrochemical gradient across a vesicular membrane as an energy source for powering other modules. Light-driven proton pumps like proteorhodopsin (PR) are excellent candidates for efficient energy conversion. We have extended the versatility of PR by implementing an on/off switch based on reversible chemical modification of a site-specifically introduced cysteine residue. The position of this cysteine residue in PR was identified by structure-based cysteine mutagenesis combined with a proton-pumping assay using E. coli cells overexpressing PR and PR proteoliposomes. The identified PR mutant represents the first light-driven proton pump that can be chemically switched on/off depending on the requirements of the molecular system. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Mcm10 deficiency causes defective-replisome-induced mutagenesis and a dependency on error-free postreplicative repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Jordan R; Nguyen, Hai Dang; Wang, Xiaohan; Bielinsky, Anja-Katrin

    2014-01-01

    Mcm10 is a multifunctional replication factor with reported roles in origin activation, polymerase loading, and replication fork progression. The literature supporting these variable roles is controversial, and it has been debated whether Mcm10 has an active role in elongation. Here, we provide evidence that the mcm10-1 allele confers alterations in DNA synthesis that lead to defective-replisome-induced mutagenesis (DRIM). Specifically, we observed that mcm10-1 cells exhibited elevated levels of PCNA ubiquitination and activation of the translesion polymerase, pol-ζ. Whereas translesion synthesis had no measurable impact on viability, mcm10-1 mutants also engaged in error-free postreplicative repair (PRR), and this pathway promoted survival at semi-permissive conditions. Replication gaps in mcm10-1 were likely caused by elongation defects, as dbf4-1 mutants, which are compromised for origin activation did not display any hallmarks of replication stress. Furthermore, we demonstrate that deficiencies in priming, induced by a pol1-1 mutation, also resulted in DRIM, but not in error-free PRR. Similar to mcm10-1 mutants, DRIM did not rescue the replication defect in pol1-1 cells. Thus, it appears that DRIM is not proficient to fill replication gaps in pol1-1 and mcm10-1 mutants. Moreover, the ability to correctly prime nascent DNA may be a crucial prerequisite to initiate error-free PRR.

  5. Improvement of Coenzyme Q10 Production: Mutagenesis Induced by High Hydrostatic Pressure Treatment and Optimization of Fermentation Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahong Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, ubiquinone, a potent antioxidative dietary supplement, was produced by submerged fermentation using Agrobacterium tumefaciens instead of chemical synthesis or solvent extraction. Agrobacterium tumefaciens 1.2554 was subjected to mutagenesis using a series of treatments including high hydrostatic pressure (HHP treatment, UV irradiation, and diethyl sulfate (DES treatment to obtain mutant strains showing higher CoQ10 production than wild-type strains. A mutant strain PK38 with four genetic markers was isolated: the specific CoQ10 content of the mutant strain increased by 52.83% compared with the original strain. Effects of carbon and nitrogen sources on CoQ10 production with PK38 were studied. Sucrose at concentration of 30 g/l was tested as the best carbon source, and yeast extract at concentration of 30 g/l supplemented with 10 g/l of ammonium sulfate was identified to be the most favorable for CoQ10 production using PK38. Fed-batch culture strategy was then used for increasing production of CoQ10 in 5-l fermentor. Using the exponential feeding fed-batch culture of sucrose, cell growth and CoQ10 formation were significantly improved. With this strategy, the final cell biomass, CoQ10 production, and specific CoQ10 production increased by 126.11, 173.12, and 22.76%, respectively, compared to those of batch culture.

  6. [Control levels of Sin3 histone deacetylase for spontaneous and UV-induced mutagenesis in yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebovka, I Iu; Kozhina, T N; Fedorova, I V; Peshekhonov, V T; Evstiukhina, T A; Chernenkov, A Iu; Korolev, V G

    2014-01-01

    SIN3 gene product operates as a repressor for a huge amount of genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Sin3 protein with a mass of about 175 kDa is a member of the RPD3 protein complex with an assessed mass of greater than 2 million Da. It was previously shownthat RPD3 gene mutations influence recombination and repair processes in S. cerevisiae yeasts. We studied the impacts of the sin3 mutation on UV-light sensitivity and UV-induced mutagenesis in budding yeast cells. The deletion ofthe SIN3 gene causes weak UV-sensitivity of mutant budding cells as compared to the wild-type strain. These results show that the sin3 mutation decreases both spontaneous and UV-induced levels of levels. This fact is hypothetically related to themalfunction of ribonucleotide reductase activity regulation, which leads to a decrease in the dNTP pool and the inaccurate error-prone damage bypass postreplication repair pathway, which in turn provokes a reduction in the incidence of mutations.

  7. TALEN-Based Mutagenesis of Lipoxygenase LOX3 Enhances the Storage Tolerance of Rice (Oryza sativa) Seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lei; Zhu, Fugui; Li, Zhenwei; Zhang, Jianfu; Li, Xin; Dong, Jiangli; Wang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    The deterioration of rice grain reduces the quality of rice, resulting in serious economic losses for farmers. Lipoxygenases (LOXs) catalyze the dioxygenation of polyunsaturated fatty acids with at least one cis,cis-1,4-pentadiene to form hydroperoxide, which is a major factor influencing seed longevity and viability. Recently, genome editing, an essential tool employed in reverse genetics, has been used experimentally to investigate basic plant biology or to modify crop plants for the improvement of important agricultural traits. In this study, we performed targeted mutagenesis in rice using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) to improve seed storability. A modified ligation-independent cloning method (LIC) was employed to allow for the quick and efficient directional insertion of TALEN monomer modules into destination vectors used in plants. We demonstrated the feasibility and flexibility of the technology by developing a set of modular vectors for genome editing. After construction and validation, the TALEN pairs were used to create stable transgenic rice lines via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. One heterozygous mutant (4%) was recovered from 25 transgenic NPTII-resistant lines, and the mutation was transmitted to the next generation. Further molecular and protein level experiments verified LOX3 deficiency and demonstrated the improvement of seed storability. Our work provides a flexible genome editing tool for improving important agronomic traits, as well as direct evidence that Lox3 has only a limited impact on seed longevity.

  8. Improving ethanol fermentation performance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in very high-gravity fermentation through chemical mutagenesis and meiotic recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jing-Jing; Ding, Wen-Tao; Zhang, Guo-Chang; Wang, Jing-Yu [Tianjin Univ. (China). Dept. of Biochemical Engineering

    2011-08-15

    Genome shuffling is an efficient way to improve complex phenotypes under the control of multiple genes. For the improvement of strain's performance in very high-gravity (VHG) fermentation, we developed a new method of genome shuffling. A diploid ste2/ste2 strain was subjected to EMS (ethyl methanesulfonate) mutagenesis followed by meiotic recombination-mediated genome shuffling. The resulting haploid progenies were intrapopulation sterile and therefore haploid recombinant cells with improved phenotypes were directly selected under selection condition. In VHG fermentation, strain WS1D and WS5D obtained by this approach exhibited remarkably enhanced tolerance to ethanol and osmolarity, increased metabolic rate, and 15.12% and 15.59% increased ethanol yield compared to the starting strain W303D, respectively. These results verified the feasibility of the strain improvement strategy and suggested that it is a powerful and high throughput method for development of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with desired phenotypes that is complex and cannot be addressed with rational approaches. (orig.)

  9. The Structure of Urease Activiation Complexes Examined by Flexibility Analysis, Mutagenesis, and Small-angle X-ray Scattering Approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quiroz, Soledad [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Sukuru, Sai Chetan K. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Hausinger, Robert P. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Kuhn, Leslie A. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Heller, William T [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    Conformational changes of Klebsiella aerogenes urease apoprotein (UreABC){sub 3} induced upon binding of the UreD and UreF accessory proteins were examined by a combination of flexibility analysis, mutagenesis, and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). ProFlex analysis of urease provided evidence that the major domain of UreB can move in a hinge-like motion to account for prior chemical cross-linking results. Rigidification of the UreB hinge region, accomplished through a G11P mutation, reduced the extent of urease activation, in part by decreasing the nickel content of the mutant enzyme, and by sequestering a portion of the urease apoprotein in a novel activation complex that includes all of the accessory proteins. SAXS analyses of urease, (UreABC-UreD){sub 3}, and (UreABC-UreDF){sub 3} confirm that UreD and UreF bind near UreB at the periphery of the (UreAC){sub 3} structure. This study supports an activation model in which a domain-shifted UreB conformation in (UreABC-UreDF){sub 3} allows CO{sub 2} and nickel ions to gain access to the nascent active site.

  10. Rapid generation of drug-resistance alleles at endogenous loci using CRISPR-Cas9 indel mutagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan J Ipsaro

    Full Text Available Genetic alterations conferring resistance to the effects of chemical inhibitors are valuable tools for validating on-target effects in cells. Unfortunately, for many therapeutic targets such alleles are not available. To address this issue, we evaluated whether CRISPR-Cas9-mediated insertion/deletion (indel mutagenesis can produce drug-resistance alleles at endogenous loci. This method takes advantage of the heterogeneous in-frame alleles produced following Cas9-mediated DNA cleavage, which we show can generate rare alleles that confer resistance to the growth-arrest caused by chemical inhibitors. We used this approach to identify novel resistance alleles of two lysine methyltransferases, DOT1L and EZH2, which are each essential for the growth of MLL-fusion leukemia cells. We biochemically characterized the DOT1L mutation, showing that it is significantly more active than the wild-type enzyme. These findings validate the on-target anti-leukemia activities of existing DOT1L and EZH2 inhibitors and reveal a simple method for deriving drug-resistance alleles for novel targets, which may have utility during early stages of drug development.

  11. Attempting to remove the substrate inhibition of L-lactate dehydrogenase from Bacillus stearothermophilus by site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binay, Bariş; Karagüler, Nevin Gül

    2007-01-01

    L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) catalyzes the interconversion of an oxoacid (pyruvate) and hydroxy-acid (lactate) using the NADH/NAD+ pair as a redox cofactor. The enzyme has a commercial significance, as it can be used to produce chiral building blocks for the synthesis of key pharmaceuticals and agrochemicals. However, the substrate inhibition which is due to an abortive NAD+-pyruvate complex reducing the steady state concentration of functional LDH limits its use in industry. This substrate inhibition can be overcome by weaking the binding of NAD+. The conserved aspartic acid residue at position 38 was replaced by the longer basic arginine side chain (D38R) using PCR based overlap extension mutagenesis technique in the hope of weakening NAD+-binding. The mutant gene was overexpressed in the Escherichia coli high-expression vector pKK223-3 in JM105 cells; then, the mutant protein was produced. Comparing the effect of substrate inhibition in the arginine-38 mutant with wild-type, substrate inhibition is decreased threefold.

  12. Identification of residues involved in nucleotidyltransferase activity of JHP933 from helicobacter pyloriby site-directed mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Xianren

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a well-known bacterial pathogen involved in the development of peptic ulcer, gastric adenocarcinoma and other forms of gastric cancer. Evidence has suggested that certain strain-specific genes in the plasticity region may play key roles in the pathogenesis of H. pylori-associated gastroduodenal diseases. Therefore there is considerable interest in the strain-specific genes located in the plasticity regions of H. pylori. JHP933 is encoded by the gene in the plasticity region of H. pylori strain J99. Recently, the crystal structure of JHP933 has confirmed it as a nucleotidyltransferase (NTase superfamily protein and a putative active site has been proposed. However, no evidence from direct functional assay has been presented to confirm the active site and little is known about the functional mechanism of JHP933. Here, through superimposition with Cid1/NTP complex structures, we modelled the complex structures of JHP933 with different NTPs. Based on the models and using rational site-directed mutagenesis combined with enzymatic activity assays, we confirm the active site and identify several residues important for the nucleotidyl transferring function of JHP933. Furthermore, mutations of these active site residues result in the abolishment of the nucleotidyltransferase activity of JHP933. This work provides preliminary insight into the molecular mechanism underlying the pathophysiological role in H. pylori infection of JHP933 as a novel NTase superfamily protein.

  13. Underlying role of mitochondrial mutagenesis in the pathogenesis of a disease and current approaches for translational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraskevaidi, Maria; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L; Kyrgiou, Maria; Martin, Francis L

    2017-05-01

    Mitochondrial diseases have been extensively investigated over the last three decades, but many questions regarding their underlying aetiologies remain unanswered. Mitochondrial dysfunction is not only responsible for a range of neurological and myopathy diseases but also considered pivotal in a broader spectrum of common diseases such as epilepsy, autism and bipolar disorder. These disorders are a challenge to diagnose and treat, as their aetiology might be multifactorial. In this review, the focus is placed on potential mechanisms capable of introducing defects in mitochondria resulting in disease. Special attention is given to the influence of xenobiotics on mitochondria; environmental factors inducing mutations or epigenetic changes in the mitochondrial genome can alter its expression and impair the whole cell's functionality. Specifically, we suggest that environmental agents can cause damage in mitochondrial DNA and consequently lead to mutagenesis. Moreover, we describe current approaches for handling mitochondrial diseases, as well as available prenatal diagnostic tests, towards eliminating these maternally inherited diseases. Undoubtedly, more research is required, as current therapeutic approaches mostly employ palliative therapies rather than targeting primary mechanisms or prophylactic approaches. Much effort is needed into further unravelling the relationship between xenobiotics and mitochondria, as the extent of influence in mitochondrial pathogenesis is increasingly recognised. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the UK Environmental Mutagen Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Relationship of DNA repair processes to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in mammalian cells. Progress report, August 1, 1977-October 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, H.H.

    1980-10-01

    The objective of this research is to determine the role of DNA repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in mammalian cells. More specifically, mutant strains will be selected which are deficient in various DNA repair pathways. These strains will be studied with regard to (1) the nature of the defect in repair, and (2) the mutability and transformability of the defective cells by various agents as compared to the wild type parental cells. The results to date include progress in the following areas: (1) determination of optimum conditions for growth and maintenance of cells and for quantitative measurement of various cellular parameters; (2) investigation of the effect of holding mutagenized cells for various periods in a density inhibited state on survival and on mutation and transformation frequencies; (3) examination of the repair capabilities of BHK cells, as compared to repair-proficient and repair-deficient human cells and excision-deficient mouse cells, as measured by the reactivation of Herpes simplex virus (HSV) treated with radiation and ethylmethane sulfonate (EMS); (4) initiation of host cell reactivation viral sucide enrichment and screening of survivors of the enrichment for sensitivity to ionizing radiation; and (5) investigation of the toxicity, mutagenicity, and carcinogenicity of various metabolites of 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO). (ERB)

  15. A high-throughput functional genomics workflow based on CRISPR/Cas9-mediated targeted mutagenesis in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, Gaurav K; Carrington, Blake; Pei, Wuhong; Bishop, Kevin; Chen, Zelin; Fan, Chunxin; Xu, Lisha; Jones, Marypat; LaFave, Matthew C; Ledin, Johan; Sood, Raman; Burgess, Shawn M

    2016-12-01

    The zebrafish is a popular model organism for studying development and disease, and genetically modified zebrafish provide an essential tool for functional genomic studies. Numerous publications have demonstrated the efficacy of gene targeting in zebrafish using CRISPR/Cas9, and they have included descriptions of a variety of tools and methods for guide RNA synthesis and mutant identification. However, most of the published techniques are not readily scalable to increase throughput. We recently described a CRISPR/Cas9-based high-throughput mutagenesis and phenotyping pipeline in zebrafish. Here, we present a complete workflow for this pipeline, including target selection; cloning-free single-guide RNA (sgRNA) synthesis; microinjection; validation of the target-specific activity of the sgRNAs; founder screening to identify germline-transmitting mutations by fluorescence PCR; determination of the exact lesion by Sanger or next-generation sequencing (including software for analysis); and genotyping in the F1 or subsequent generations. Using these methods, sgRNAs can be evaluated in 3 d, zebrafish germline-transmitting mutations can be identified within 3 months and stable lines can be established within 6 months. Realistically, two researchers can target tens to hundreds of genes per year using this protocol.

  16. High-Throughput Sequencing and Mutagenesis to Accelerate the Domestication of Microlaena stipoides as a New Food Crop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapter, Frances M.; Cross, Michael; Ablett, Gary; Malory, Sylvia; Chivers, Ian H.; King, Graham J.; Henry, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Global food demand, climatic variability and reduced land availability are driving the need for domestication of new crop species. The accelerated domestication of a rice-like Australian dryland polyploid grass, Microlaena stipoides (Poaceae), was targeted using chemical mutagenesis in conjunction with high throughput sequencing of genes for key domestication traits. While M. stipoides has previously been identified as having potential as a new grain crop for human consumption, only a limited understanding of its genetic diversity and breeding system was available to aid the domestication process. Next generation sequencing of deeply-pooled target amplicons estimated allelic diversity of a selected base population at 14.3 SNP/Mb and identified novel, putatively mutation-induced polymorphisms at about 2.4 mutations/Mb. A 97% lethal dose (LD97) of ethyl methanesulfonate treatment was applied without inducing sterility in this polyploid species. Forward and reverse genetic screens identified beneficial alleles for the domestication trait, seed-shattering. Unique phenotypes observed in the M2 population suggest the potential for rapid accumulation of beneficial traits without recourse to a traditional cross-breeding strategy. This approach may be applicable to other wild species, unlocking their potential as new food, fibre and fuel crops. PMID:24367532

  17. Improving the Catalytic Behavior of DFA I-Forming Inulin Fructotransferase from Streptomyces davawensis with Site-Directed Mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shuhuai; Zhang, Yanmin; Zhu, Yingying; Zhang, Tao; Jiang, Bo; Mu, Wanmeng

    2017-08-30

    Previously, a α-d-fructofuranose-β-d-fructofuranose 1,2':2,1'-dianhydride (DFA I)-forming inulin fructotransferase (IFTase), namely, SdIFTase, was identified. The enzyme does not show high performances. In this work, to improve catalytic behavior including activity and thermostability, the enzyme was modified using site-directed mutagenesis on the basis of structure. The mutated residues were divided into three groups. Those in group I are located at central tunnel including G236, A257, G281, T313, and A314S. The group II contains residues at the inner edge of substrate binding pocket including I80, while group III at the outer edge includes G121 and T122. The thermostability was reflected by the melting temperature (T m ) determined by Nano DSC. Finally, the T m values of G236S/G281S/A257S/T313S/A314S in group I and G121A/T122L in group III were enhanced by 3.2 and 4.5 °C, and the relative activities were enhanced to 140.5% and 148.7%, respectively. The method in this work may be applicable to other DFA I-forming IFTases.

  18. Coherent wavepackets in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex are robust to excitonic-structure perturbations caused by mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiuri, Margherita; Ostroumov, Evgeny E; Saer, Rafael G; Blankenship, Robert E; Scholes, Gregory D

    2018-02-01

    Femtosecond pulsed excitation of light-harvesting complexes creates oscillatory features in their response. This phenomenon has inspired a large body of work aimed at uncovering the origin of the coherent beatings and possible implications for function. Here we exploit site-directed mutagenesis to change the excitonic level structure in Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complexes and compare the coherences using broadband pump-probe spectroscopy. Our experiments detect two oscillation frequencies with dephasing on a picosecond timescale-both at 77 K and at room temperature. By studying these coherences with selective excitation pump-probe experiments, where pump excitation is in resonance only with the lowest excitonic state, we show that the key contributions to these oscillations stem from ground-state vibrational wavepackets. These experiments explicitly show that the coherences-although in the ground electronic state-can be probed at the absorption resonances of other bacteriochlorophyll molecules because of delocalization of the electronic excitation over several chromophores.

  19. Enhancement of the lipid productivity and fatty acid methyl ester profile of Chlorella vulgaris by two rounds of mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarayloo, Ehsan; Simsek, Salim; Unlu, Yigit Sabri; Cevahir, Gul; Erkey, Can; Kavakli, Ibrahim Halil

    2017-12-02

    In this study, we applied a second round of random mutagenesis using ethyl methanesulfonate to further increase the lipid productivity of a Chlorella vulgaris mutant strain. We generated a mutant (UV715-EMS25) with a lipid content and biomass that were respectively 67% and 35% higher than those of the wild type (WT). The highest achieved lipid productivity in UV715-EMS25 was 91 mg L-1 day-1. Gas chromatography-mass spectrophotometric analysis revealed that the fatty acid methyl ester content of the mutant was 3.9-fold higher compared with that of WT cells. Amounts of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids were also higher in the mutant, while the total amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids were lower. Finally, the mutant displayed superior lipid productivity compared with the WT during pilot-scale cultivation in a flat panel photobioreactor. All these results demonstrate that UV715-EMS25 is highly suitable for biodiesel production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Site directed mutagenesis of amino acid residues at the active site of mouse aldehyde oxidase AOX1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Schumann

    Full Text Available Mouse aldehyde oxidase (mAOX1 forms a homodimer and belongs to the xanthine oxidase family of molybdoenzymes which are characterized by an essential equatorial sulfur ligand coordinated to the molybdenum atom. In general, mammalian AOs are characterized by broad substrate specificity and an yet obscure physiological function. To define the physiological substrates and the enzymatic characteristics of mAOX1, we established a system for the heterologous expression of the enzyme in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein showed spectral features and a range of substrate specificity similar to the native protein purified from mouse liver. The EPR data of recombinant mAOX1 were similar to those of AO from rabbit liver, but differed from the homologous xanthine oxidoreductase enzymes. Site-directed mutagenesis of amino acids Val806, Met884 and Glu1265 at the active site resulted in a drastic decrease in the oxidation of aldehydes with no increase in the oxidation of purine substrates. The double mutant V806E/M884R and the single mutant E1265Q were catalytically inactive enzymes regardless of the aldehyde or purine substrates tested. Our results show that only Glu1265 is essential for the catalytic activity by initiating the base-catalyzed mechanism of substrate oxidation. In addition, it is concluded that the substrate specificity of molybdo-flavoenzymes is more complex and not only defined by the three characterized amino acids in the active site.

  1. Chimeric cytochromes P450 engineered by domain swapping and random mutagenesis for producing human metabolites of drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ji-Yeon; Ryu, Sang Hoon; Park, Sun-Ha; Cha, Gun Su; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Keon-Hee; Hong, Austin W; Ahn, Taeho; Pan, Jae-Gu; Joung, Young Hee; Kang, Hyung-Sik; Yun, Chul-Ho

    2014-07-01

    Human drug metabolites produced by cytochrome P450 enzymes are critical for safety testing and may themselves act as drugs or leads in the drug discovery and development process. Here, highly active chimeric fusion proteins (chimeras) were obtained by reductase domain swapping of mutants at key catalytic residues of the heme domain with that of a natural variant (CYP102A1.2) of P450 BM3 (CYP102A1.1) from Bacillus megaterium. Random mutagenesis at the heme domain of the chimera was also used to generate chimeric mutants that were more active and diverse than the chimeras themselves. To determine whether the chimeras and several mutants of the highly active chimera displayed enhanced catalytic activity and, more importantly, whether they acquired activities of biotechnological importance, we measured the oxidation activities of the chimeras and chimeric mutants toward human P450 substrates, mainly drugs. Some of the chimeric mutants showed high activity toward typical human P450 substrates including drugs. Statin leads, especially chiral products, with inhibitory effects toward HMG-CoA reductase could be obtained from metabolites of statin drugs generated using these chimeric mutants. This study reveals the critical role of the reductase domain for the activity of P450 BM3 and shows that chimeras generated by domain swapping can be used to develop industrial enzymes for the synthesis of human metabolites from drugs and drug leads. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Site-directed Mutagenesis of Cysteine Residues in Phi-class Glutathione S-transferase F3 from Oryza sativa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Hyunjoo; Lee, Juwon; Noh, Jinseok; Kong, Kwanghoon [Chung-Ang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    To elucidate the roles of cysteine residues in rice Phi-class GST F3, in this study, all three cysteine residues were replaced with alanine by site-directed mutagenesis in order to obtain mutants C22A, C73A and C77A. Three mutant enzymes were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to electrophoretic homogeneity by affinity chromatography on immobilized GSH. The substitutions of Cys73 and Cys77 residues in OsGSTF3 with alanine did not affect the glutathione conjugation activities, showing non-essentiality of these residues. On the other hand, the substitution of Cys22 residue with alanine resulted in approximately a 60% loss of specific activity toward ethacrynic acid. Moreover, the K{sub m}{sup CDNB} value of the mutant C22A was approximately 2.2 fold larger than that of the wild type. From these results, the evolutionally conserved cysteine 22 residue seems to participate rather in the structural stability of the active site in OsGSTF3 by stabilizing the electrophilic substrates-binding site's conformation than in the substrate binding directly.

  3. Transposon mutagenesis identifies chromatin modifiers cooperating with Ras in thyroid tumorigenesis and detects ATXN7 as a cancer gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero-Conde, Cristina; Leandro-Garcia, Luis J; Chen, Xu; Oler, Gisele; Ruiz-Llorente, Sergio; Ryder, Mabel; Landa, Iñigo; Sanchez-Vega, Francisco; La, Konnor; Ghossein, Ronald A; Bajorin, Dean F; Knauf, Jeffrey A; Riordan, Jesse D; Dupuy, Adam J; Fagin, James A

    2017-06-20

    Oncogenic RAS mutations are present in 15-30% of thyroid carcinomas. Endogenous expression of mutant Ras is insufficient to initiate thyroid tumorigenesis in murine models, indicating that additional genetic alterations are required. We used Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mutagenesis to identify events that cooperate with Hras(G12V) in thyroid tumor development. Random genomic integration of SB transposons primarily generated loss-of-function events that significantly increased thyroid tumor penetrance in Tpo-Cre/homozygous FR-Hras(G12V) mice. The thyroid tumors closely phenocopied the histological features of human RAS-driven, poorly differentiated thyroid cancers. Characterization of transposon insertion sites in the SB-induced tumors identified 45 recurrently mutated candidate cancer genes. These mutation profiles were remarkably concordant with mutated cancer genes identified in a large series of human poorly differentiated and anaplastic thyroid cancers screened by next-generation sequencing using the MSK-IMPACT panel of cancer genes, which we modified to include all SB candidates. The disrupted genes primarily clustered in chromatin remodeling functional nodes and in the PI3K pathway. ATXN7, a component of a multiprotein complex with histone acetylase activity, scored as a significant SB hit. It was recurrently mutated in advanced human cancers and significantly co-occurred with RAS or NF1 mutations. Expression of ATXN7 mutants cooperated with oncogenic RAS to induce thyroid cell proliferation, pointing to ATXN7 as a previously unrecognized cancer gene.

  4. Statistical optimization and mutagenesis for high level of phytase production by Rhizopus oligosporus MTCC 556 under solid state fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, S; Radha, K V

    2016-03-01

    The present study deals with production of phytase from Rhizopus oligosporus MTCC 556 by solid state fermentation (SSF) using different (ADT27, IR20, PAIYUR1, KG, and RASI) rice bran varieties, in which ADT27 rice bran yield maximum of 6.2 U gds⁻¹ phytase. Statistical optimization was employed by Central Composite Design (CCD); the results showed that 3.0 g dextrose, 2.5 g ammonium nitrate, substrate size of 80 mesh, 10 mg calcium chloride was 116 hr at optimal for phytase production by SSF, with maximum of 23.14 U gds'. Phytase production improved by 4 fold (31.3 U/gds) due to chemical mutagenesis (mutant Rhizopus oligosporus MTCC 1116) in optimized media composition. Partially purified phytase showed approximately 90 kDa of molecular mass and was optimally active at 5.5 pH and 50°C temperature. Substrate specificity exhibited in sodium phytic acid and phytase activity was stimulated by Zn²⁺ and Ca²⁺.

  5. CRISPR/Cas9-induced Targeted Mutagenesis and Gene Replacement to Generate Long-shelf Life Tomato Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qing-Hui; Wang, Baike; Li, Ning; Tang, Yaping; Yang, Shengbao; Yang, Tao; Xu, Juan; Guo, Chunmiao; Yan, Peng; Wang, Qiang; Asmutola, Patiguli

    2017-09-19

    Quickly and precisely gain genetically enhanced breeding elites with value-adding performance traits is desired by the crop breeders all the time. The present of gene editing technologies, especially the CRISPR/Cas9 system with the capacities of efficiency, versatility and multiplexing provides a reasonable expectation towards breeding goals. For exploiting possible application to accelerate the speed of process at breeding by CRISPR/Cas9 technology, in this study, the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated CRISPR/Cas9 system transformation method was used for obtaining tomato ALC gene mutagenesis and replacement, in absence and presence of the homologous repair template. The average mutation frequency (72.73%) and low replacement efficiency (7.69%) were achieved in T 0 transgenic plants respectively. None of homozygous mutation was detected in T 0 transgenic plants, but one plant carry the heterozygous genes (Cas9/*-ALC/alc) was stably transmitted to T 1 generations for segregation and genotyping. Finally, the desired alc homozygous mutants without T-DNA insertion (*/*-alc/alc) in T 1 generations were acquired and further confirmed by genotype and phenotype characterization, with highlight of excellent storage performance, thus the recessive homozygous breeding elites with the character of long-shelf life were generated. Our results support that CRISPR/Cas9-induced gene replacement via HDR provides a valuable method for breeding elite innovation in tomato.

  6. Scanning mutagenesis of the amino acid sequences flanking phosphorylation site 1 of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagib eAhsan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is regulated by reversible seryl-phosphorylation of the E1α subunit by a dedicated, intrinsic kinase. The phospho-complex is reactivated when dephosphorylated by an intrinsic PP2C-type protein phosphatase. Both the position of the phosphorylated Ser-residue and the sequences of the flanking amino acids are highly conserved. We have used the synthetic peptide-based kinase client assay plus recombinant pyruvate dehydrogenase E1α and E1α-kinase to perform scanning mutagenesis of the residues flanking the site of phosphorylation. Consistent with the results from phylogenetic analysis of the flanking sequences, the direct peptide-based kinase assays tolerated very few changes. Even conservative changes such as Leu, Ile, or Val for Met, or Glu for Asp, gave very marked reductions in phosphorylation. Overall the results indicate that regulation of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex by reversible phosphorylation is an extreme example of multiple, interdependent instances of co-evolution.

  7. Relationship of DNA repair processes to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in mammalian cells. Progress report, August 1, 1977--October 31, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, H H

    1978-10-01

    The objective of this research is to compare repair-proficient and repair-deficient mammalian cells with regard to the frequencies of mutation and oncogenic transformation following treatment with mutagenic/carcinogenic agents or environmental pollutants. During the past 15 months we have established methods and conditions for the growth, maintenance, and assay of the mouse embryo cell line C3H/10T1/2 and for infection of this cell with polyoma virus. We have determined the levels of various mutagens and selectants to be used with this cell line. Following treatment of the cells with 0.06% ethylmethane sulfonate (EMS), no cell killing results, but the number of ouabain-resistant (oua/sup R/) mutants induced is higher than the number of spontaneous oua/sup R/ mutants. The frequency of mutation ranged from 4 x 10/sup -8/ to 2.8 x 10/sup -6/. The higher frequencies were obtained when the selectant was applied to cells plated at a low density and when a three-day expression time was allowed between the mutagenic treatment and the application of the selectant. The frequency of oncogenic transformation was higher than the frequency of mutagenesis, by several orders of magnitude, perhaps because of problems with the morphological transformation assay. We are investigating the use of growth in soft agar as an assay for transformation.

  8. Partial identification by site-directed mutagenesis of a cell growth inhibitory site on the human galectin-1 molecule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jialiang

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous work, by us and others, has shown that mammalian galectins-1 have a growth-inhibitory activity for mammalian cells which is apparently independent of their β-galactoside binding site. Results We have made recombinant human galectin-1 as a bacterial fusion protein with an N-terminal hexahistidine tag. This protein displays both haemagglutination and growth-inhibitory activities, even in the presence of the hexahistidine tag. Site-directed mutagenesis of this protein has confirmed the independent nature of the protein sites responsible for the two biological activities. Mutant proteins were created, which displayed each activity in the absence of the other. Conclusions Human galectin-1 possesses a growth-inhibitory site, which is not part of the β-galactoside binding site. A surface loop, comprising amino acid residues 25–30, and joining two internal β-strands, forms part of the growth-inhibitory site. This region is relatively close to the N-terminus of the protein, and N-terminal substitutions or extensions also affect growth-inhibitory activity. Further experiments will be necessary to fully define this site.

  9. High-throughput sequencing and mutagenesis to accelerate the domestication of Microlaena stipoides as a new food crop.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances M Shapter

    Full Text Available Global food demand, climatic variability and reduced land availability are driving the need for domestication of new crop species. The accelerated domestication of a rice-like Australian dryland polyploid grass, Microlaena stipoides (Poaceae, was targeted using chemical mutagenesis in conjunction with high throughput sequencing of genes for key domestication traits. While M. stipoides has previously been identified as having potential as a new grain crop for human consumption, only a limited understanding of its genetic diversity and breeding system was available to aid the domestication process. Next generation sequencing of deeply-pooled target amplicons estimated allelic diversity of a selected base population at 14.3 SNP/Mb and identified novel, putatively mutation-induced polymorphisms at about 2.4 mutations/Mb. A 97% lethal dose (LD₉₇ of ethyl methanesulfonate treatment was applied without inducing sterility in this polyploid species. Forward and reverse genetic screens identified beneficial alleles for the domestication trait, seed-shattering. Unique phenotypes observed in the M2 population suggest the potential for rapid accumulation of beneficial traits without recourse to a traditional cross-breeding strategy. This approach may be applicable to other wild species, unlocking their potential as new food, fibre and fuel crops.

  10. Diverse responses to UV light exposure in Acinetobacter include the capacity for DNA damage-induced mutagenesis in the opportunistic pathogens Acinetobacter baumannii and Acinetobacter ursingii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, James A.; Lin, Ching-li; Elam, Tyler J.

    2012-01-01

    Error-prone and error-free DNA damage repair responses that are induced in most bacteria after exposure to various chemicals, antibiotics or radiation sources were surveyed across the genus Acinetobacter. The error-prone SOS mutagenesis response occurs when DNA damage induces a cell’s umuDC- or dinP-encoded error-prone polymerases. The model strain Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 possesses an unusual, regulatory umuD allele (umuDAb) with an extended 5′ region and only incomplete fragments of umuC. Diverse Acinetobacter species were investigated for the presence of umuDC and their ability to conduct UV-induced mutagenesis. Unlike ADP1, most Acinetobacter strains possessed multiple umuDC loci containing either umuDAb or a umuD allele resembling that of Escherichia coli. The nearly omnipresent umuDAb allele was the ancestral umuD in Acinetobacter, with horizontal gene transfer accounting for over half of the umuDC operons. Despite multiple umuD(Ab)C operons in many strains, only three species conducted UV-induced mutagenesis: Acinetobacter baumannii, Acinetobacter ursingii and Acinetobacter beijerinckii. The type of umuDC locus or mutagenesis phenotype a strain possessed was not correlated with its error-free response of survival after UV exposure, but similar diversity was apparent. The survival of 30 Acinetobacter strains after UV treatment ranged over five orders of magnitude, with the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus–A. baumannii (Acb) complex and haemolytic strains having lower survival than non-Acb or non-haemolytic strains. These observations demonstrate that a genus can possess a range of DNA damage response mechanisms, and suggest that DNA damage-induced mutation could be an important part of the evolution of the emerging pathogens A. baumannii and A. ursingii. PMID:22117008

  11. Essential roles for imuA′- and imuB-encoded accessory factors in DnaE2-dependent mutagenesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Digby F.; Ndwandwe, Duduzile E.; Abrahams, Garth L.; Kana, Bavesh D.; Machowski, Edith E.; Venclovas, Česlovas; Mizrahi, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    In Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), damage-induced mutagenesis is dependent on the C-family DNA polymerase, DnaE2. Included with dnaE2 in the Mtb SOS regulon is a putative operon comprising Rv3395c, which encodes a protein of unknown function restricted primarily to actinomycetes, and Rv3394c, which is predicted to encode a Y-family DNA polymerase. These genes were previously identified as components of an imuA-imuB-dnaE2–type mutagenic cassette widespread among bacterial genomes. Here, we confirm that Rv3395c (designated imuA′) and Rv3394c (imuB) are individually essential for induced mutagenesis and damage tolerance. Yeast two-hybrid analyses indicate that ImuB interacts with both ImuA′ and DnaE2, as well as with the β-clamp. Moreover, disruption of the ImuB-β clamp interaction significantly reduces induced mutagenesis and damage tolerance, phenocopying imuA′, imuB, and dnaE2 gene deletion mutants. Despite retaining structural features characteristic of Y-family members, ImuB homologs lack conserved active-site amino acids required for polymerase activity. In contrast, replacement of DnaE2 catalytic residues reproduces the dnaE2 gene deletion phenotype, strongly implying a direct role for the α-subunit in mutagenic lesion bypass. These data implicate differential protein interactions in specialist polymerase function and identify the split imuA′-imuB/dnaE2 cassette as a compelling target for compounds designed to limit mutagenesis in a pathogen increasingly associated with drug resistance. PMID:20615954

  12. Transcription coupled repair deficiency protects against human mutagenesis and carcinogenesis: Personal Reflections on the 50th anniversary of the discovery of xeroderma pigmentosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleaver, James E

    2017-10-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients who lack the main damage recognition protein for global genome repair (GGR), XPC, have greatly increased skin cancer rates and elevated mutation frequencies originating from unrepaired ultraviolet photoproducts in the nontranscribed regions of the genome and in nontranscribed strands of expressed genes. But they show no increased mutations in transcribed strands. In contrast, cancer is absent from Cockayne syndrome (CS) patients that have defective transcription coupled repair (TCR) despite severe photosensitivity, CS patients remarkably show no elevation of UV induced mutagenesis implying that defective TCR may be protective against mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. Mutation avoidance in CS is postulated to occur through arrested transcription that generates a tripled stranded R loop consisting of DNA double strands and a nascent mRNA strand. R loops result in S phase apoptosis or activation of ATM kinase that causes a delay in DNA replication until TCR, or transcript cleavage by TFIIS or RNAaseH, relieves the transcription block. Resumption of replication then occurs on repaired DNA without concomitant mutagenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. [Dot1 and Set2 Histone Methylases Control the Spontaneous and UV-Induced Mutagenesis Levels in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yeasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhina, T N; Evstiukhina, T A; Peshekhonov, V T; Chernenkov, A Yu; Korolev, V G

    2016-03-01

    In the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts, the DOT1 gene product provides methylation of lysine 79 (K79) of hi- stone H3 and the SET2 gene product provides the methylation of lysine 36 (K36) of the same histone. We determined that the dot1 and set2 mutants suppress the UV-induced mutagenesis to an equally high degree. The dot1 mutation demonstrated statistically higher sensitivity to the low doses of MMC than the wild type strain. The analysis of the interaction between the dot1 and rad52 mutations revealed a considerable level of spontaneous cell death in the double dot1 rad52 mutant. We observed strong suppression of the gamma-in- duced mutagenesis in the set2 mutant. We determined that the dot1 and set2 mutations decrease the sponta- neous mutagenesis rate in both single and d ouble mutants. The epistatic interaction between the dot1 and set2 mutations and almost similar sensitivity of the corresponding mutants to the different types of DNA damage allow one to conclude that both genes are involved in the control of the same DNA repair pathways, the ho- mologous-recombination-based and the postreplicative DNA repair.

  14. 2,6-Dithiopurine blocks toxicity and mutagenesis in human skin cells exposed to sulfur mustard analogs, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide and 2-chloroethyl methyl sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, K. Leslie; Boulware, Stephen; Thames, Howard; Vasquez, Karen M.; MacLeod, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (bis-(2-chloroethyl)sulfide) is a well known chemical warfare agent that induces debilitating cutaneous toxicity in exposed individuals. It is also known to be carcinogenic and mutagenic due to its ability to damage DNA via electrophilic attack. We previously showed that a nucleophilic scavenger, 2,6-dithiopurine (DTP), reacts chemically with several electrophilic carcinogens, blocking DNA damage in vitro and in vivo and abolishing tumor formation in a two-stage mouse skin carcinogenesis model. To assess the potential of DTP as an antagonist of sulfur mustard, we have utilized monofunctional chemical analogs of sulfur mustard, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) and 2-chloroethyl methyl sulfide (CEMS), to induce toxicity and mutagenesis in a cell line, NCTC2544, derived from a human skin tumor. We show that DTP blocks cytotoxicity in CEMS- and CEES-treated cells when present at approximately equimolar concentration. A related thiopurine, 9-methyl-6-mercaptopurine, is similarly effective. Correlated with this, we find that DTP is transported into these cells, and that adducts between DTP and CEES are found intracellularly. Using a shuttle vector-based mutagenesis system, which allows enumeration of mutations induced in the skin cells by a blue/white colony screen, we find that DTP completely abolishes mutagenesis induced by CEMS and CEES in the human cells. PMID:20050631

  15. 2,6-Dithiopurine blocks toxicity and mutagenesis in human skin cells exposed to sulfur mustard analogues, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide and 2-chloroethyl methyl sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, K Leslie; Boulware, Stephen; Thames, Howard; Vasquez, Karen M; MacLeod, Michael C

    2010-03-15

    Sulfur mustard (bis-(2-chloroethyl)sulfide) is a well-known chemical warfare agent that induces debilitating cutaneous toxicity in exposed individuals. It is also known to be carcinogenic and mutagenic because of its ability to damage DNA via electrophilic attack. We previously showed that a nucleophilic scavenger, 2,6-dithiopurine (DTP), reacts chemically with several electrophilic carcinogens, blocking DNA damage in vitro and in vivo and abolishing tumor formation in a two-stage mouse skin carcinogenesis model. To assess the potential of DTP as an antagonist of sulfur mustard, we have utilized monofunctional chemical analogues of sulfur mustard, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) and 2-chloroethyl methyl sulfide (CEMS), to induce toxicity and mutagenesis in a cell line, NCTC2544, derived from a human skin tumor. We show that DTP blocks cytotoxicity in CEMS- and CEES-treated cells when present at approximately equimolar concentration. A related thiopurine, 9-methyl-6-mercaptopurine, is similarly effective. Correlated with this, we find that DTP is transported into these cells and that adducts between DTP and CEES are found intracellularly. Using a shuttle vector-based mutagenesis system, which allows enumeration of mutations induced in the skin cells by a blue/white colony screen, we find that DTP completely abolishes the mutagenesis induced by CEMS and CEES in human cells.

  16. Germ cell regeneration-mediated, enhanced mutagenesis in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis reveals flexible germ cell formation from different somatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Keita; Hozumi, Akiko; Treen, Nicholas; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Shirae-Kurabayashi, Maki; Sasakura, Yasunori

    2017-03-15

    The ascidian Ciona intestinalis has a high regeneration capacity that enables the regeneration of artificially removed primordial germ cells (PGCs) from somatic cells. We utilized PGC regeneration to establish efficient methods of germ line mutagenesis with transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). When PGCs were artificially removed from animals in which a TALEN pair was expressed, somatic cells harboring mutations in the target gene were converted into germ cells, this germ cell population exhibited higher mutation rates than animals not subjected to PGC removal. PGC regeneration enables us to use TALEN expression vectors of specific somatic tissues for germ cell mutagenesis. Unexpectedly, cis elements for epidermis, neural tissue and muscle could be used for germ cell mutagenesis, indicating there are multiple sources of regenerated PGCs, suggesting a flexibility of differentiated Ciona somatic cells to regain totipotency. Sperm and eggs of a single hermaphroditic, PGC regenerated animal typically have different mutations, suggesting they arise from different cells. PGCs can be generated from somatic cells even though the maternal PGCs are not removed, suggesting that the PGC regeneration is not solely an artificial event but could have an endogenous function in Ciona. This study provides a technical innovation in the genome-editing methods, including easy establishment of mutant lines. Moreover, this study suggests cellular mechanisms and the potential evolutionary significance of PGC regeneration in Ciona. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Three New and Eleven Known Unusual C25 Steroids: Activated Production of Silent Metabolites in a Marine-Derived Fungus by Chemical Mutagenesis Strategy using Diethyl Sulphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Wen Xia

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Three new (1–3 and 11 known (4–14 C25 steroids with an unusual bicyclo[4.4.1]A/B ring system were isolated by tracing newly produced metabolites in the EtOAc extract of an antitumor mutant AD-1-2 obtained by the diethyl sulphate (DES mutagenesis of a marine-derived Penicillium purpurogenum G59. HPLC-PDAD-UV and HPLC-ESI-MS analyses indicated that the G59 strain did not produce these metabolites and the production of 1–14 in the mutant AD-1-2 extract was caused by the activation of silent metabolites in the original G59 strain by DES mutagenesis. The structures of the new compounds, named antineocyclocitrinols A (1 and B (2 and 23-O-methylantineocyclocitrinol (3, including their absolute configurations were determined by various spectroscopic methods, especially the NMR and Mo2-induced CD analyses. Compounds 1–3 provide the first examples of the C25 bicyclo[4.4.1]A/B ring steroids with the Z-configuration of 20,22-double bond. All of 1–14 weakly inhibited several human cancer cell lines to varying extents. These results provided additional examples for the successful application of the chemical mutagenesis strategy using DES to discover new compounds by activating silent metabolites in fungal isolates and supported also the effectiveness and usefulness of this new strategy.

  18. Three new and eleven known unusual C25 steroids: activated production of silent metabolites in a marine-derived fungus by chemical mutagenesis strategy using diethyl sulphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ming-Wen; Cui, Cheng-Bin; Li, Chang-Wei; Wu, Chang-Jing

    2014-03-13

    Three new (1-3) and 11 known (4-14) C25 steroids with an unusual bicyclo[4.4.1]A/B ring system were isolated by tracing newly produced metabolites in the EtOAc extract of an antitumor mutant AD-1-2 obtained by the diethyl sulphate (DES) mutagenesis of a marine-derived Penicillium purpurogenum G59. HPLC-PDAD-UV and HPLC-ESI-MS analyses indicated that the G59 strain did not produce these metabolites and the production of 1-14 in the mutant AD-1-2 extract was caused by the activation of silent metabolites in the original G59 strain by DES mutagenesis. The structures of the new compounds, named antineocyclocitrinols A (1) and B (2) and 23-O-methylantineocyclocitrinol (3), including their absolute configurations were determined by various spectroscopic methods, especially the NMR and Mo2-induced CD analyses. Compounds 1-3 provide the first examples of the C25 bicyclo[4.4.1]A/B ring steroids with the Z-configuration of 20,22-double bond. All of 1-14 weakly inhibited several human cancer cell lines to varying extents. These results provided additional examples for the successful application of the chemical mutagenesis strategy using DES to discover new compounds by activating silent metabolites in fungal isolates and supported also the effectiveness and usefulness of this new strategy.

  19. A mariner transposon-based signature-tagged mutagenesis system for the analysis of oral infection by Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Joanne; Casey, Pat G; Joyce, Susan A; Gahan, Cormac G M

    2013-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive foodborne pathogen and the causative agent of listerosis a disease that manifests predominately as meningitis in the non-pregnant individual or infection of the fetus and spontaneous abortion in pregnant women. Common-source outbreaks of foodborne listeriosis are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. However, relatively little is known concerning the mechanisms that govern infection via the oral route. In order to aid functional genetic analysis of the gastrointestinal phase of infection we designed a novel signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) system based upon the invasive L. monocytogenes 4b serotype H7858 strain. To overcome the limitations of gastrointestinal infection by L. monocytogenes in the mouse model we created a H7858 strain that is genetically optimised for oral infection in mice. Furthermore our STM system was based upon a mariner transposon to favour numerous and random transposition events throughout the L. monocytogenes genome. Use of the STM bank to investigate oral infection by L. monocytogenes identified 21 insertion mutants that demonstrated significantly reduced potential for infection in our model. The sites of transposon insertion included lmOh7858_0671 (encoding an internalin homologous to Lmo0610), lmOh7858_0898 (encoding a putative surface-expressed LPXTG protein homologous to Lmo0842), lmOh7858_2579 (encoding the HupDGC hemin transport system) and lmOh7858_0399 (encoding a putative fructose specific phosphotransferase system). We propose that this represents an optimised STM system for functional genetic analysis of foodborne/oral infection by L. monocytogenes.

  20. Positive signature-tagged mutagenesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: tracking patho-adaptive mutations promoting airways chronic infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Bianconi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa can establish life-long chronic infections in the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF patients. Persistent lifestyle is established with P. aeruginosa patho-adaptive variants, which are clonal with the initially-acquired strains. Several reports indicated that P. aeruginosa adapts by loss-of-function mutations which enhance fitness in CF airways and sustain its clonal expansion during chronic infection. To validate this model of P. aeruginosa adaptation to CF airways and to identify novel genes involved in this microevolution, we designed a novel approach of positive-selection screening by PCR-based signature-tagged mutagenesis (Pos-STM in a murine model of chronic airways infection. A systematic positive-selection scheme using sequential rounds of in vivo screenings for bacterial maintenance, as opposed to elimination, generated a list of genes whose inactivation increased the colonization and persistence in chronic airways infection. The phenotypes associated to these Pos-STM mutations reflect alterations in diverse aspects of P. aeruginosa biology which include lack of swimming and twitching motility, lack of production of the virulence factors such as pyocyanin, biofilm formation, and metabolic functions. In addition, Pos-STM mutants showed altered invasion and stimulation of immune response when tested in human respiratory epithelial cells, indicating that P. aeruginosa is prone to revise the interaction with its host during persistent lifestyle. Finally, sequence analysis of Pos-STM genes in longitudinally P. aeruginosa isolates from CF patients identified signs of patho-adaptive mutations within the genome. This novel Pos-STM approach identified bacterial functions that can have important clinical implications for the persistent lifestyle and disease progression of the airway chronic infection.

  1. Endoglucanase enzyme protein engineering by site-directed mutagenesis to improve the enzymatic properties and its expression in yeast

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    Farnaz Nikzad Jamnani

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fossil fuel is an expensive and finite energy source. Therefore, the use of renewable energy and biofuels production has been taken into consideration. One of the most suitable raw materials for biofuels is cellulosic compounds. Only microorganisms that contain cellulose enzymes can decompose cellulose and fungus of Trichodermareesei is the most important producer of this enzyme. Methods: In this study the nucleotide sequence of endoglucanase II, which is the starter of attack to cellulose chains, synthesized from amino acid sequence of this enzyme in fungus T.reesei and based on codon usage in the host; yeast Pichiapastoris. To produce optimized enzyme and to decrease the production time and enzyme price, protein engineering will be used. There are some methods to improve the enzymatic properties like site-directed mutagenesis in which amino-acid replacement occur. In this study two mutations were induced in endoglucanase enzyme gene by PCR in which free syctein positions 169 and 393 were switched to valine and histidine respectively. Then this gene was inserted into the pPinka expression vector and cloned in Escherichia coli. The recombinant plasmids were transferred into P.pastoris competent cells with electroporation, recombinant yeasts were cultured in BMMY medium and induced with methanol. Results: The sequencing of gene proved the induction of the two mutations and the presence of recombinant enzyme was confirmed by dinitrosalicilic acid method and SDS-PAGE. Conclusion: Examination of biochemical properties revealed that the two mutations simultaneously decreased catalytic power, thermal stability and increased the affinity of enzyme and substrate.

  2. Cerium oxide nanoparticles, combining antioxidant and UV shielding properties, prevent UV-induced cell damage and mutagenesis

    KAUST Repository

    Caputo, Fanny

    2015-08-20

    Efficient inorganic UV shields, mostly based on refracting TiO2 particles, have dramatically changed the sun exposure habits. Unfortunately, health concerns have emerged from the pro-oxidant photocatalytic effect of UV-irradiated TiO2, which mediates toxic effects on cells. Therefore, improvements in cosmetic solar shield technology are a strong priority. CeO2 nanoparticles are not only UV refractors but also potent biological antioxidants due to the surface 3+/4+ valency switch, which confers anti-inflammatory, anti-ageing and therapeutic properties. Herein, UV irradiation protocols were set up, allowing selective study of the extra-shielding effects of CeO2vs. TiO2 nanoparticles on reporter cells. TiO2 irradiated with UV (especially UVA) exerted strong photocatalytic effects, superimposing their pro-oxidant, cell-damaging and mutagenic action when induced by UV, thereby worsening the UV toxicity. On the contrary, irradiated CeO2 nanoparticles, via their Ce3+/Ce4+ redox couple, exerted impressive protection on UV-treated cells, by buffering oxidation, preserving viability and proliferation, reducing DNA damage and accelerating repair; strikingly, they almost eliminated mutagenesis, thus acting as an important tool to prevent skin cancer. Interestingly, CeO2 nanoparticles also protect cells from the damage induced by irradiated TiO2, suggesting that these two particles may also complement their effects in solar lotions. CeO2 nanoparticles, which intrinsically couple UV shielding with biological and genetic protection, appear to be ideal candidates for next-generation sun shields. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015.

  3. Site-directed mutagenesis and footprinting analysis of the interaction of the sunflower KNOX protein HAKN1 with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tioni, Mariana F; Viola, Ivana L; Chan, Raquel L; Gonzalez, Daniel H

    2005-01-01

    The interaction of the homeodomain of the sunflower KNOX protein HAKN1 with DNA was studied by site-directed mutagenesis, hydroxyl radical footprinting and missing nucleoside experiments. Binding of HAKN1 to different oligonucleotides indicated that HAKN1 prefers the sequence TGACA (TGTCA), with changes within the GAC core more profoundly affecting the interaction. Footprinting and missing nucleoside experiments using hydroxyl radical cleavage of DNA showed that HAKN1 interacts with a 6-bp region of the strand carrying the GAC core, covering the core and nucleotides towards the 3' end. On the other strand, protection was observed along an 8-bp region, comprising two additional nucleotides complementary to those preceding the core. Changes in the residue present at position 50 produced proteins with different specificities. An I50S mutant showed a preference for TGACT, while the presence of lysine shifted the preference to TGACC, suggesting that residue 50 interacts with nucleotide(s) 3' to GAC. Mutation of Lys54-->Val produced a protein with reduced affinity and relaxed specificity, able to recognize the sequence TGAAA, while the conservative change of Arg55-->Lys completely abolished binding to DNA. Based on these results, we propose a model for the interaction of HAKN1 with DNA in which helix III of the homeodomain accommodates along the major groove with Arg55, Asn51, Lys54 and Ile50, establishing specific contacts with bases of the GACA sequence or their complements. This model can be extended to other KNOX proteins given the conservation of these amino acids in all members of the family.

  4. Potential high-frequency off-target mutagenesis induced by CRISPR/Cas9 in Arabidopsis and its prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Xing, Hui-Li; Wang, Zhi-Ping; Zhang, Hai-Yan; Yang, Fang; Wang, Xue-Chen; Chen, Qi-Jun

    2018-02-23

    We present novel observations of high-specificity SpCas9 variants, sgRNA expression strategies based on mutant sgRNA scaffold and tRNA processing system, and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated T-DNA integrations. Specificity of CRISPR/Cas9 tools has been a major concern along with the reports of their successful applications. We report unexpected observations of high frequency off-target mutagenesis induced by CRISPR/Cas9 in T1 Arabidopsis mutants although the sgRNA was predicted to have a high specificity score. We also present evidence that the off-target effects were further exacerbated in the T2 progeny. To prevent the off-target effects, we tested and optimized two strategies in Arabidopsis, including introduction of a mCherry cassette for a simple and reliable isolation of Cas9-free mutants and the use of highly specific mutant SpCas9 variants. Optimization of the mCherry vectors and subsequent validation found that fusion of tRNA with the mutant rather than the original sgRNA scaffold significantly improves editing efficiency. We then examined the editing efficiency of eight high-specificity SpCas9 variants in combination with the improved tRNA-sgRNA fusion strategy. Our results suggest that highly specific SpCas9 variants require a higher level of expression than their wild-type counterpart to maintain high editing efficiency. Additionally, we demonstrate that T-DNA can be inserted into the cleavage sites of CRISPR/Cas9 targets with high frequency. Altogether, our results suggest that in plants, continuous attention should be paid to off-target effects induced by CRISPR/Cas9 in current and subsequent generations, and that the tools optimized in this report will be useful in improving genome editing efficiency and specificity in plants and other organisms.

  5. Gene-scrambling mutagenesis: generation and analysis of insertional mutations in the alginate regulatory region of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, C D; Deretic, V

    1990-11-01

    A novel method for random mutagenesis of targeted chromosomal regions in Pseudomona aeruginosa was developed. This method can be used with a cloned DNA fragment of indefinite size that contains a putative gene of interest. Cloned DNA is digested to produce small fragments that are then randomly reassembled into long DNA inserts by using cosmid vectors and lambda packaging reaction. This DNA is then transferred into P. aeruginosa and forced into the chromosome via homologous recombination, producing in a single step a random set of insertional mutants along a desired region of the chromosome. Application of this method to extend the analysis of the alginate regulatory region, using a cloned 6.2-kb fragment with the algR gene and the previously uncharacterized flanking regions, produced several insertional mutations. One mutation was obtained in algR, a known transcriptional regulatory of mucoidy in P. aeruginosa. The null mutation of algR was generated in a mucoid derivative of the standard genetic strain PAO responsive to different environmental factors. This mutation was used to demonstrate that the algR gene product was not essential for the regulation of its promoters. Additional insertions were obtained in regions downstream and upstream of algR. A mutation that did not affect mucoidy was generated in a gene located 1 kb upstream of algR. This gene was transcribed in the direction opposite that of algR transcription and encoded a polypeptide of 47 kDa. Partial nucleotide sequence analysis revealed strong homology of its predicted gene product with the human and yeast argininosuccinate lyases. An insertion downstream of algR produced a strain showing reduced induction of mucoidy in response to growth on nitrate as the nitrogen source.

  6. Mechanism of porcine liver xanthine oxidoreductase mediated N-oxide reduction of cyadox as revealed by docking and mutagenesis studies.

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    Chigang Chen

    Full Text Available Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR is a cytoplasmic molybdenum-containing oxidoreductase, catalyzing both endogenous purines and exogenous compounds. It is suggested that XOR in porcine hepatocytes catalyzes the N-oxide reduction of quinoxaline 1,4-di-N-oxides (QdNOs. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this metabolism, the cDNA of porcine XOR was cloned and heterologously expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells. The bovine XOR, showing sequence identity of 91% to porcine XOR, was employed as template for homology modeling. By docking cyadox, a representative compound of QdNOs, into porcine XOR model, eight amino acid residues, Gly47, Asn352, Ser360, Arg427, Asp430, Asp431, Ser1227 and Lys1230, were located at distances of less than 4Å to cyadox. Site-directed mutagenesis was performed to analyze their catalytic functions. Compared with wild type porcine XOR, G47A, S360P, D431A, S1227A, and K1230A displayed altered kinetic parameters in cyadox reduction, similarly to that in xanthine oxidation, indicating these mutations influenced electron-donating process of xanthine before subsequent electron transfer to cyadox to fulfill the N-oxide reduction. Differently, R427E and D430H, both located in the 424-434 loop, exhibited a much lower K(m and a decreased V(max respectively in cyadox reduction. Arg427 may be related to the substrate binding of porcine XOR to cyadox, and Asp430 is suggested to be involved in the transfer of electron to cyadox. This study initially reveals the possible catalytic mechanism of porcine XOR in cyadox metabolism, providing with novel insights into the structure-function relationship of XOR in the reduction of exogenous di-N-oxides.

  7. Cerium oxide nanoparticles, combining antioxidant and UV shielding properties, prevent UV-induced cell damage and mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Fanny; de Nicola, Milena; Sienkiewicz, Andrzej; Giovanetti, Anna; Bejarano, Ignacio; Licoccia, Silvia; Traversa, Enrico; Ghibelli, Lina

    2015-09-01

    Efficient inorganic UV shields, mostly based on refracting TiO2 particles, have dramatically changed the sun exposure habits. Unfortunately, health concerns have emerged from the pro-oxidant photocatalytic effect of UV-irradiated TiO2, which mediates toxic effects on cells. Therefore, improvements in cosmetic solar shield technology are a strong priority. CeO2 nanoparticles are not only UV refractors but also potent biological antioxidants due to the surface 3+/4+ valency switch, which confers anti-inflammatory, anti-ageing and therapeutic properties. Herein, UV irradiation protocols were set up, allowing selective study of the extra-shielding effects of CeO2vs. TiO2 nanoparticles on reporter cells. TiO2 irradiated with UV (especially UVA) exerted strong photocatalytic effects, superimposing their pro-oxidant, cell-damaging and mutagenic action when induced by UV, thereby worsening the UV toxicity. On the contrary, irradiated CeO2 nanoparticles, via their Ce3+/Ce4+ redox couple, exerted impressive protection on UV-treated cells, by buffering oxidation, preserving viability and proliferation, reducing DNA damage and accelerating repair; strikingly, they almost eliminated mutagenesis, thus acting as an important tool to prevent skin cancer. Interestingly, CeO2 nanoparticles also protect cells from the damage induced by irradiated TiO2, suggesting that these two particles may also complement their effects in solar lotions. CeO2 nanoparticles, which intrinsically couple UV shielding with biological and genetic protection, appear to be ideal candidates for next-generation sun shields.

  8. Mutagenesis and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses of the fusion peptide of Helicoverpa armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus F protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ying; Jiang, Ling; Wang, Manli; Yin, Feifei; Deng, Fei; Liu, Maili; Hu, Zhihong; Wang, Hualin

    2008-08-01

    The entry of enveloped viruses into cells is normally mediated by fusion between viral and cellular membranes, in which the fusion peptide plays a crucial role. The fusion peptides of group II nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV) F proteins are quite conserved, with a hydrophobic region located at the N terminal of the F(1) fragment. For this report, we used mutagenesis and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to study the structure and function of the fusion peptide of the Helicoverpa armigera single-nucleocapsid NPV (HearNPV) F protein (HaF). Five mutations in the fusion peptide of HaF, N(1)G, N(1)L, I(2)N, G(3)L, and D(11)L, were generated separately, and the mutated f genes were transformed into the f-null HearNPV bacmid. The mutations N(1)L, I(2)N, and D(11)L were found to completely abolish the ability of the recombinant bacmids to produce infectious budded virus, while the mutations N(1)G and G(3)L did not. The low-pH-induced envelope fusion assay demonstrated that the N(1)G substitution increased the fusogenicity of HaF, while the G(3)L substitution reduced its fusogenicity. NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the structure of a synthetic fusion peptide of HaF in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles at pH 5.0. The fusion peptide appeared to be an amphiphilic structure composed of a flexible coil in the N terminus from N(1) to N(5), a 3(10)-helix from F(6) to G(8), a turn at S(9), and a regular alpha-helix from V(10) to D(19). The data provide the first NMR structure of a baculovirus fusion peptide and allow us to further understand the relationship of structure and function of the fusion peptide.

  9. Insertional mutagenesis and deep profiling reveals gene hierarchies and a Myc/p53-dependent bottleneck in lymphomagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille A Huser

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Retroviral insertional mutagenesis (RIM is a powerful tool for cancer genomics that was combined in this study with deep sequencing (RIM/DS to facilitate a comprehensive analysis of lymphoma progression. Transgenic mice expressing two potent collaborating oncogenes in the germ line (CD2-MYC, -Runx2 develop rapid onset tumours that can be accelerated and rendered polyclonal by neonatal Moloney murine leukaemia virus (MoMLV infection. RIM/DS analysis of 28 polyclonal lymphomas identified 771 common insertion sites (CISs defining a 'progression network' that encompassed a remarkably large fraction of known MoMLV target genes, with further strong indications of oncogenic selection above the background of MoMLV integration preference. Progression driven by RIM was characterised as a Darwinian process of clonal competition engaging proliferation control networks downstream of cytokine and T-cell receptor signalling. Enhancer mode activation accounted for the most efficiently selected CIS target genes, including Ccr7 as the most prominent of a set of chemokine receptors driving paracrine growth stimulation and lymphoma dissemination. Another large target gene subset including candidate tumour suppressors was disrupted by intragenic insertions. A second RIM/DS screen comparing lymphomas of wild-type and parental transgenics showed that CD2-MYC tumours are virtually dependent on activation of Runx family genes in strong preference to other potent Myc collaborating genes (Gfi1, Notch1. Ikzf1 was identified as a novel collaborating gene for Runx2 and illustrated the interface between integration preference and oncogenic selection. Lymphoma target genes for MoMLV can be classified into (a a small set of master regulators that confer self-renewal; overcoming p53 and other failsafe pathways and (b a large group of progression genes that control autonomous proliferation in transformed cells. These findings provide insights into retroviral biology, human cancer

  10. A mariner transposon-based signature-tagged mutagenesis system for the analysis of oral infection by Listeria monocytogenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Cummins

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive foodborne pathogen and the causative agent of listerosis a disease that manifests predominately as meningitis in the non-pregnant individual or infection of the fetus and spontaneous abortion in pregnant women. Common-source outbreaks of foodborne listeriosis are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. However, relatively little is known concerning the mechanisms that govern infection via the oral route. In order to aid functional genetic analysis of the gastrointestinal phase of infection we designed a novel signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM system based upon the invasive L. monocytogenes 4b serotype H7858 strain. To overcome the limitations of gastrointestinal infection by L. monocytogenes in the mouse model we created a H7858 strain that is genetically optimised for oral infection in mice. Furthermore our STM system was based upon a mariner transposon to favour numerous and random transposition events throughout the L. monocytogenes genome. Use of the STM bank to investigate oral infection by L. monocytogenes identified 21 insertion mutants that demonstrated significantly reduced potential for infection in our model. The sites of transposon insertion included lmOh7858_0671 (encoding an internalin homologous to Lmo0610, lmOh7858_0898 (encoding a putative surface-expressed LPXTG protein homologous to Lmo0842, lmOh7858_2579 (encoding the HupDGC hemin transport system and lmOh7858_0399 (encoding a putative fructose specific phosphotransferase system. We propose that this represents an optimised STM system for functional genetic analysis of foodborne/oral infection by L. monocytogenes.

  11. Proximity of transmembrane segments 5 and 8 of the glutamate transporter GLT-1 inferred from paired cysteine mutagenesis.

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    Xiuping Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: GLT-1 is a glial glutamate transporter which maintains low synaptic concentrations of the excitatory neurotransmitter enabling efficient synaptic transmission. Based on the crystal structure of the bacterial homologue Glt(Ph, it has been proposed that the reentrant loop HP2, which connects transmembrane domains (TM 7 and 8, moves to open and close access to the binding pocket from the extracellular medium. However the conformation change between TM5 and TM8 during the transport cycle is not clear yet. We used paired cysteine mutagenesis in conjunction with treatments with Copper(II(1,10-Phenanthroline(3 (CuPh, to verify the predicted proximity of residues located at these structural elements of GLT-1. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To assess the proximity of transmembrane domain (TM 5 relative to TM8 during transport by the glial glutamate transporter GLT-1/EAAT2, cysteine pairs were introduced at the extracellular ends of these structural elements. A complete inhibition of transport by Copper(II(1,10-Phenanthroline(3 is observed in the double mutants I295C/I463C and G297C/I463C, but not in the corresponding single mutants. Glutamate and potassium, both expected to increase the proportion of inward-facing transporters, significantly protected against the inhibition of transport activity of I295C/I463C and G297C/I463C by CuPh. Transport by the double mutants I295C/I463C and G297C/I463C also was inhibited by Cd(2+. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that TM5 (Ile-295, Gly-297 is in close proximity to TM8 (Ile-463 in the mammalian transporter, and that the spatial relationship between these domains is altered during the transport cycle.

  12. Flexibility in MuA transposase family protein structures: functional mapping with scanning mutagenesis and sequence alignment of protein homologues.

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    Tiina S Rasila

    Full Text Available MuA transposase protein is a member of the retroviral integrase superfamily (RISF. It catalyzes DNA cleavage and joining reactions via an initial assembly and subsequent structural transitions of a protein-DNA complex, known as the Mu transpososome, ultimately attaching transposon DNA to non-specific target DNA. The transpososome functions as a molecular DNA-modifying machine and has been used in a wide variety of molecular biology and genetics/genomics applications. To analyze structure-function relationships in MuA action, a comprehensive pentapeptide insertion mutagenesis was carried out for the protein. A total of 233 unique insertion variants were generated, and their activity was analyzed using a quantitative in vivo DNA transposition assay. The results were then correlated with the known MuA structures, and the data were evaluated with regard to the protein domain function and transpososome development. To complement the analysis with an evolutionary component, a protein sequence alignment was produced for 44 members of MuA family transposases. Altogether, the results pinpointed those regions, in which insertions can be tolerated, and those where insertions are harmful. Most insertions within the subdomains Iγ, IIα, IIβ, and IIIα completely destroyed the transposase function, yet insertions into certain loop/linker regions of these subdomains increased the protein activity. Subdomains Iα and IIIβ were largely insertion-tolerant. The comprehensive structure-function data set will be useful for designing MuA transposase variants with improved properties for biotechnology/genomics applications, and is informative with regard to the function of RISF proteins in general.

  13. HYPOTHESIS: PARALOG FORMATION FROM PROGENITOR PROTEINS AND PARALOG MUTAGENESIS SPUR THE RAPID EVOLUTION OF TELOMERE BINDING PROTEINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur J Lustig

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Through elegant studies in fungal cells and complex organisms, we propose a unifying paradigm for the rapid evolution of telomere binding proteins (TBPs that associate with either (or both telomeric DNA and telomeric proteins. TBPs protect and regulate telomere structure and function. Four critical factors are involved. First, TBPs that commonly bind to telomeric DNA include the c-Myb binding proteins, OB-fold single-stranded binding proteins, and G-G base paired Hoogsteen structure (G4 binding proteins. Each contributes independently or, in some cases, cooperatively, to provide a minimum level of telomere function. As a result of these minimal requirements and the great abundance of homologs of these motifs in the proteome, DNA telomere-binding activity may be generated more easily than expected. Second, telomere dysfunction gives rise to genome instability, through the elevation of recombination rates, genome ploidy, and the frequency of gene mutations. The formation of paralogs that diverge from their progenitor proteins ultimately can form a high frequency of altered TBPs with altered functions. Third, TBPs that assemble into complexes (e.g. mammalian shelterin derive benefits from the novel emergent functions. Fourth, a limiting factor in the evolution of TBP complexes is the formation of mutually compatible interaction surfaces amongst the TBPs. These factors may have different degrees of importance in the evolution of different phyla, illustrated by the apparently simpler telomeres in complex plants. Selective pressures that can utilize the mechanisms of paralog formation and mutagenesis to drive TBP evolution along routes dependent on the requisite physiologic changes.

  14. Proton transfers in a channelrhodopsin-1 studied by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) difference spectroscopy and site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogren, John I; Yi, Adrian; Mamaev, Sergey; Li, Hai; Spudich, John L; Rothschild, Kenneth J

    2015-05-15

    Channelrhodopsin-1 from the alga Chlamydomonas augustae (CaChR1) is a low-efficiency light-activated cation channel that exhibits properties useful for optogenetic applications such as a slow light inactivation and a red-shifted visible absorption maximum as compared with the more extensively studied channelrhodopsin-2 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CrChR2). Previously, both resonance Raman and low-temperature FTIR difference spectroscopy revealed that unlike CrChR2, CaChR1 under our conditions exhibits an almost pure all-trans retinal composition in the unphotolyzed ground state and undergoes an all-trans to 13-cis isomerization during the primary phototransition typical of other microbial rhodopsins such as bacteriorhodopsin (BR). Here, we apply static and rapid-scan FTIR difference spectroscopy along with site-directed mutagenesis to characterize the proton transfer events occurring upon the formation of the long-lived conducting P2 (380) state of CaChR1. Assignment of carboxylic C=O stretch bands indicates that Asp-299 (homolog to Asp-212 in BR) becomes protonated and Asp-169 (homolog to Asp-85 in BR) undergoes a net change in hydrogen bonding relative to the unphotolyzed ground state of CaChR1. These data along with earlier FTIR measurements on the CaChR1 → P1 transition are consistent with a two-step proton relay mechanism that transfers a proton from Glu-169 to Asp-299 during the primary phototransition and from the Schiff base to Glu-169 during P2 (380) formation. The unusual charge neutrality of both Schiff base counterions in the P2 (380) conducting state suggests that these residues may function as part of a cation selective filter in the open channel state of CaChR1 as well as other low-efficiency ChRs. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Dissecting the Catalytic Mechanism of Betaine-Homocysteine S-Methyltransferase Using Intrinsic Tryptophan Fluorescence and Site-Directed Mutagenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, C.; Gratson, A.A.; Evans, J.C.; Jiracek, J.; Collinsova, M.; Ludwig, M.L.; Garrow, T.A. (ASCR); (UIUC); (Michigan)

    2010-03-05

    Betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (BHMT) is a zinc-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from glycine betaine (Bet) to homocysteine (Hcy) to form dimethylglycine (DMG) and methionine (Met). Previous studies in other laboratories have indicated that catalysis proceeds through the formation of a ternary complex, with a transition state mimicked by the inhibitor S-({delta}-carboxybutyl)-l-homocysteine (CBHcy). Using changes in intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence to determine the affinity of human BHMT for substrates, products, or CBHcy, we now demonstrate that the enzyme-substrate complex reaches its transition state through an ordered bi-bi mechanism in which Hcy is the first substrate to bind and Met is the last product released. Hcy, Met, and CBHcy bind to the enzyme to form binary complexes with K{sub d} values of 7.9, 6.9, and 0.28 {micro}M, respectively. Binary complexes with Bet and DMG cannot be detected with fluorescence as a probe, but Bet and DMG bind tightly to BHMT-Hcy to form ternary complexes with K{sub d} values of 1.1 and 0.73 {micro}M, respectively. Mutation of each of the seven tryptophan residues in human BHMT provides evidence that the enzyme undergoes two distinct conformational changes that are reflected in the fluorescence of the enzyme. The first is induced when Hcy binds, and the second, when Bet binds. As predicted by the crystal structure of BHMT, the amino acids Trp44 and Tyr160 are involved in binding Bet, and Glu159 in binding Hcy. Replacing these residues by site-directed mutagenesis significantly reduces the catalytic efficiency (V{sub max}/K{sub m}) of the enzyme. Replacing Tyr77 with Phe abolishes enzyme activity.

  16. Mutagenesis after cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, K T; Caggana, M; Mauch, P M; Coleman, C N; Clark, J R; Liber, H L

    1993-01-01

    A subset of Hodgkin's disease (HD) and breast cancer patients have been reported to have elevated hprt mutant frequencies in peripheral blood lymphocytes after cessation of therapy. A subset of these patients are also known to develop second therapy-related malignancies. Therefore, it is clearly important to determine if these elevations in mutant frequency represent true, persistently elevated mutation frequencies. As a follow-up to our study of patients previously treated for HD, we recruited for a prospective study six previously treated HD patients and five patients who had been treated for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. These individuals were studied several times over a 6-7 months. The results confirmed that a subset of patients have persistently high mutant frequencies when compared to 71 previously studied controls. The study was designed to determine if the elevated mutant frequencies of treated patients represented independent mutations or resulted from the in vivo expansion of single mutant cells. We used the polymerase chain reaction to examine DNA single strand conformation polymorphisms at the T-cell receptor-gamma locus of individual mutant clones. This analysis showed that 20.1% of the mutants from Hodgkin's disease patients and 17.5% of the mutants from squamous cell carcinoma patients were siblings. The sibling mutants generally did not persist over time. However, one patient had one mutant clone that persisted, but slowly decreased in prevalence over a 7 month sampling period. The data demonstrate that treatments for cancer result in persistently elevated mutation frequencies at the hprt locus in some, but not all, patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8143613

  17. Directed mutagenesis of the strongly conserved aspartate 242 in the beta-subunit of Escherichia coli proton-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shawi, M K; Parsonage, D; Senior, A E

    1988-12-25

    Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis was used to substitute Asn or Val for residue Asp-242 in the beta-subunit of Escherichia coli F1-ATPase. Asp-242 is strongly conserved in beta-subunits of F1-ATPase enzymes, in a region of sequence which shows homology with numerous nucleotide-binding proteins. By analogy with adenylate kinase (Fry, D.C., Kuby, S.A., and Mildvan, A.S. (1986) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 83, 907-911), beta-Asp-242 of F1-ATPase might participate in catalysis through electrostatic effects on the substrate Mg2+ or through hydrogen bonding to the substrate(s); an acid-base catalytic role is also plausible. The substitutions Asn and Val were chosen to affect the charge, hydrogen-bonding ability, and hydrophobicity of residue beta-Asp-242. Both mutations significantly impaired oxidative phosphorylation rates in vivo and membrane ATPase and ATP-driven proton-pumping activities in vitro. Asn-242 was more detrimental than Val-242. Purified soluble mutant F1-ATPases had normal molecular size and subunit composition, and displayed 7% (beta-Asn-242) and 17% (beta-Val-242) of normal specific Mg-ATPase activity. The relative MgATPase activities of both mutant enzymes showed similar pH dependence to normal. Relative MgATPase and CaATPase activities of normal and mutant enzymes were compared at widely varied pMg and pCa. The mutations had little effect on KM MgATP, but KM CaATP was reduced. The data showed that the carboxyl side-chain of beta-Asp-242 is not involved in catalysis either as a general acid-base catalyst or through direct involvement in any protonation/deprotonation-linked mechanism, nor is it likely to be directly involved in liganding to substrate Mg2+ during the reaction. Specificity constants (kcat/KM) for MgATP and CaATP were reduced in both mutant enzymes, showing that the mutations destabilized interactions between the catalytic nucleotide-binding domain and the transition state.

  18. Site-directed mutagenesis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase at amino acid position 138.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelemans, H; Aertsen, A; Van Laethem, K; Vandamme, A M; De Clercq, E; Pérez-Pérez, M J; San-Félix, A; Velázquez, S; Camarasa, M J; Balzarini, J

    2001-02-01

    TSAO derivatives represent a class of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) that consistently select for the Glu138Lys resistance mutation in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). Seven RT mutants (i.e., Ala, Asp, Gln, Gly, Lys, Phe, and Tyr) were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. The mutant Glu138Asp, Glu138Lys, Glu138Gln, Glu138Ala, and Glu138Gly RTs retained marked catalytic activity. In contrast, the Glu138Phe and Glu138Tyr RT mutants showed poor RNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity (30 and 4% of wild-type, respectively). TSAO derivatives lost their inhibitory activity against all mutant enzymes, except against the closely related Glu138Asp RT mutant that remained as sensitive to TSAOs as did wild-type RT. Other NNRTIs, including delavirdine, emivirine, and UC-781, and the NRTI ddGTP retained pronounced inhibitory activity against all mutant enzymes. When the amino acid mutations at position 138 of RT were introduced in recombinant virus clones, the sensitivity/resistance spectrum obtained toward the TSAOs and other NNRTIs was similar to those observed for the isolated recombinant mutant enzymes. The Glu138Lys RT mutant virus had the most marked resistance to TSAOs, followed by the Glu138Gln, Glu138Phe, Glu138Gly, Glu138Tyr, and Glu138Ala virus mutants. The Glu138Asp RT mutant virus kept full sensitivity to the TSAO derivatives. Mixtures of Glu138Lys RT mutant virus with the other virus clones mutated at the 138 position resulted in all cases, except for the Glu138Asp and Glu138Gly RT mutant viruses, in an outgrowth of the Glu138Lys RT mutant virus. Since the Glu138Lys RT proved most resistant to TSAO derivatives, was among the most catalytically efficient enzymes, and resulted in highly replication-competent virus, our data explain why the Glu138Lys RT mutant virus strains but not virus strains containing other amino acids at position 138 invariably emerge in cell cultures under TSAO drug pressure. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  19. Effects of site-directed mutagenesis in the N-terminal domain of thermolysin on its stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Yuichi; Yasukawa, Kiyoshi; Inouye, Kuniyo

    2013-01-01

    The thermolysin variant G8C/N60C/S65P in which the triple mutation in the N-terminal domain, Gly8→Cys/Asn60→Cys/Ser65→Pro, is undertaken increases stability [Yasukawa, K. and Inouye, K. (2007) Improving the activity and stability of thermolysin by site-directed mutagenesis. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1774, 1281-1288] and its mechanism is examined in this study. The apparent denaturing temperatures based on ellipticity at 222 nm of the wild-type thermolysin (WT), G8C/N60C, S65P and G8C/N60C/S65P were 85, >95, 88 and >95°C, respectively. The first-order rate constants, k(obs), of the thermal inactivation of WT and variants at 10 mM CaCl₂ increased with increasing thermal treatment temperatures (70-95°C), and those at 80°C decreased with increasing CaCl₂ concentrations (1-100 mM). The k(obs) values were in the order of WT > S65P > G8C/N60C≒G8C/N60C/S65P at all temperatures and CaCl₂ concentrations. These results indicate that the mutational combination, Gly8→Cys/Asn60→Cys and Ser65→Pro, increases stability only as high as Gly8→Cys/Asn60→Cys does. Assuming that irreversible inactivation of thermolysin occurs only in the absence of calcium ions, the dissociation constants, K(d), to the calcium ions of WT, G8C/N60C, S65P and G8C/N60C/S65P were 47, 8.9, 17 and 7.2 mM, respectively, suggesting that Gly8→Cys/Asn60→Cys and Ser65→Pro stabilize thermolysin by improving its affinity to calcium ions, most probably the one at the Ca²⁺-binding site III in the N-terminal domain.

  20. Directed evolution and targeted mutagenesis to murinize Listeria monocytogenes Internalin A for enhanced infectivity in the murine oral infection model

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Monk, Ian R

    2010-12-13

    Abstract Background Internalin A (InlA) is a critical virulence factor which mediates the initiation of Listeria monocytogenes infection by the oral route in permissive hosts. The interaction of InlA with the host cell ligand E-cadherin efficiently stimulates L. monocytogenes entry into human enterocytes, but has only a limited interaction with murine cells. Results We have created a surface display library of randomly mutated InlA in a non-invasive heterologous host Lactococcus lactis in order to create and screen novel variants of this invasion factor. After sequential passage through a murine cell line (CT-26), multiple clones with enhanced invasion characteristics were identified. Competitive index experiments were conducted in mice using selected mutations introduced into L. monocytogenes EGD-e background. A novel single amino acid change was identified which enhanced virulence by the oral route in the murine model and will form the basis of further engineering approaches. As a control a previously described EGD-InlAm murinized strain was also re-created as part of this study with minor modifications and designated EGD-e InlA m*. The strain was created using a procedure that minimizes the likelihood of secondary mutations and incorporates Listeria-optimized codons encoding the altered amino acids. L. monocytogenes EGD-e InlA m* yielded consistently higher level murine infections by the oral route when compared to EGD-e, but did not display the two-fold increased invasion into a human cell line that was previously described for the EGD-InlAm strain. Conclusions We have used both site-directed mutagenesis and directed evolution to create variants of InlA which may inform future structure-function analyses of this protein. During the course of the study we engineered a murinized strain of L. monocytogenes EGD-e which shows reproducibly higher infectivity in the intragastric murine infection model than the wild type, but does not display enhanced entry into human

  1. The bis-electrophile diepoxybutane cross-links DNA to human histones but does not result in enhanced mutagenesis in recombinant systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loecken, Elisabeth M; Dasari, Surendra; Hill, Salisha; Tabb, David L; Guengerich, F Peter

    2009-06-01

    1,2-Dibromoethane and 1,3-butadiene are cancer suspects present in the environment and have been used widely in industry. The mutagenic properties of 1,2-dibromoethane and the 1,3-butadiene oxidation product diepoxybutane are thought to be related to the bis-electrophilic character of these chemicals. The discovery that overexpression of O(6)-alkylguanine alkyltransferase (AGT) enhances bis-electrophile-induced mutagenesis prompted a search for other proteins that may act by a similar mechanism. A human liver screen for nuclear proteins that cross-link with DNA in the presence of 1,2-dibromoethane identified histones H2b and H3 as candidate proteins. Treatment of isolated histones H2b and H3 with diepoxybutane resulted in DNA-protein cross-links and produced protein adducts, and DNA-histone H2b cross-links were identified (immunochemically) in Escherichia coli cells expressing histone H2b. However, heterologous expression of histone H2b in E. coli failed to enhance bis-electrophile-induced mutagenesis. These results are similar to those found with the cross-link candidate glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) [ Loecken , E. M. and Guengerich , F. P. ( 2008 ) Chem. Res. Toxicol. 21 , 453 - 458 ], but in contrast to GAPDH, histone H2b bound DNA with even higher affinity than AGT. The extent of DNA cross-linking of isolated histone H2b was similar to that of AGT, suggesting that differences in postcross-linking events explain the difference in mutagenesis.

  2. The PCNA binding domain of Rad2p plays a role in mutagenesis by modulating the cell cycle in response to DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Sung-Lim; Kang, Mi-Sun; Kim, Ho-Yeol; Gorospe, Choco Michael; Kim, Tong-Soo; Lee, Sung-Keun

    2014-04-01

    The xeroderma pigmentosum group G (XPG) gene, encoding an essential element in nucleotide excision repair (NER), has a proliferating cell nuclear antigen-binding domain (PCNA-BD) at its C-terminal region. However, the role of this domain is controversial because its presence does not affect NER. Using yeast RAD2, a homolog of human XPG, we show that Rad2p interacts with PCNA through its PCNA-BD and the PCNA-BD of Rad2p plays a role in UV-induced mutagenesis. While a mutation of Rad2p endonuclease activity alone causes dramatically increased mutation rates and UV sensitivity, as well as growth retardation after UV irradiation, a mutation of the Rad2p PCNA-BD in the same mutant causes dramatically decreased mutation rates, reduced UV sensitivity and increased growth rate after UV irradiation. After UV irradiation, large-budded cells of Rad2p endonuclease defective mutants wane due to a mutation of the Rad2p PCNA-BD. Besides, the Rad2p PCNA-BD mutant protein exhibits alleviated PCNA-binding efficiency. These results show a hitherto unsuspected role of the Rad2p PCNA-BD that controls mutagenesis via cell cycle modulation together with PCNA. Furthermore, the high mutation rate of cells with other NER gene mutations was also decreased by the mutation of the Rad2p PCNA-BD, which indicates that the Rad2p-PCNA interaction might be responsible for mutagenesis control in the general NER pathway. Our results suggest that the drastically increased incidence of skin cancer in xeroderma pigmentosum patients could arise from the synergistic effects between cell cycle arrest due to the XPG-PCNA interaction and the accumulation of damaged DNA via defects in DNA damage repair. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Improved thermostability and enzyme activity of a recombinant phyA mutant phytase from Aspergillus niger N25 by directed evolution and site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zizhong; Jin, Weiqiong; Sun, Rong; Liao, Yan; Zhen, Tianrun; Chen, Hui; Wu, Qi; Gou, Lin; Li, Chenlei

    2018-01-01

    We previously constructed three recombinant phyA mutant strains (PP-NPm-8, PP-NPep-6A and I44E/T252R-PhyA), showing improved catalytic efficiency or thermostability of Aspergillus niger N25 phytase, by error-prone PCR or site-directed mutagenesis. In this study, directed evolution and site-directed mutagenesis were further applied to improve the modified phytase properties. After one-round error-prone PCR for phytase gene of PP-NPep-6A, a single transformant, T195L/Q368E/F376Y, was obtained with the significant improvements in catalytic efficiency and thermostability. The phytase gene of T195L/Q368E/F376Y, combined with the previous mutant phytase genes of PP-NPep-6A, PP-NPm-8 and I44E/T252R-PhyA, was then sequentially modified by DNA shuffling. Three genetically engineered strains with desirable properties were then obtained, namedQ172R, Q172R/K432R andQ368E/K432R. Among them, Q172R/K432R showed the highest thermostability with the longest half-life and the greatest remaining phytase activity after heat treatment, while Q368E/K432R showed the highest catalytic activity. Five substitutions (Q172R, T195L, Q368E, F376Y, K432R) identified from random mutagenesis were added sequentially to the phytase gene of PP-NPep-6A to investigate how the mutant sites influence the properties of phytase. Characterization and structural analysis demonstrated that these mutations could produce cumulative or synergistic improvements in thermostability or catalytic efficiency of phytase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The role of base excision repair genes OGG1, APN1 and APN2 in benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dione induced p53 mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedin, Zahidur; Louis-Juste, Melissa; Stangl, Melissa; Field, Jeffrey

    2013-01-20

    Lung cancer is primarily caused by exposure to tobacco smoke. Tobacco smoke contains numerous carcinogens, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). The most common PAH studied is benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P). B[a]P is metabolically activated through multiple routes, one of which is catalyzed by aldo-keto reductase (AKR) to B[a]P-7,8-dione (BPQ). BPQ undergoes a futile redox cycle in the presence of NADPH to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS, in turn, damages DNA. Studies with a yeast p53 mutagenesis system found that the generation of ROS by PAH o-quinones may contribute to lung carcinogenesis because of similarities between the patterns (types of mutations) and spectra (location of mutations) and those seen in lung cancer. The patterns were dominated by G to T transversions, and the spectra in the experimental system have mutations at lung cancer hotspots. To address repair mechanisms that are responsible for BPQ induced damage we observed the effect of mutating two DNA repair genes OGG1 and APE1 (APN1 in yeast) and tested them in a yeast reporter system for p53 mutagenesis. There was an increase in both the mutant frequency and the number of G:C/T:A transversions in p53 treated with BPQ in ogg1 yeast but not in apn1 yeast. Knocking out APN2 increased mutagenesis in the apn1 cells. In addition, we did not find a strand bias on p53 treated with BPQ in ogg1 yeast. These studies suggest that Ogg1 is involved in repairing the oxidative damage caused by BPQ, Apn1 and Apn2 have redundant functions and that the stand bias seen in lung cancer may not be due to impaired repair of oxidative lesions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Essential roles for imuA′- and imuB-encoded accessory factors in DnaE2-dependent mutagenesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Warner, Digby F.; Ndwandwe, Duduzile E.; Abrahams, Garth L.; Kana, Bavesh D.; Machowski, Edith E.; Venclovas, Česlovas; Mizrahi, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    In Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), damage-induced mutagenesis is dependent on the C-family DNA polymerase, DnaE2. Included with dnaE2 in the Mtb SOS regulon is a putative operon comprising Rv3395c, which encodes a protein of unknown function restricted primarily to actinomycetes, and Rv3394c, which is predicted to encode a Y-family DNA polymerase. These genes were previously identified as components of an imuA-imuB-dnaE2–type mutagenic cassette widespread among bacterial genomes. Here, we c...

  6. CRISPR-Cas9 Targeted Mutagenesis Leads to Simultaneous Modification of Different Homoeologous Gene Copies in Polyploid Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braatz, Janina; Harloff, Hans-Joachim; Mascher, Martin; Stein, Nils; Himmelbach, Axel; Jung, Christian

    2017-06-01

    In polyploid species, altering a trait by random mutagenesis is highly inefficient due to gene redundancy. We have stably transformed tetraploid oilseed rape (Brassica napus) with a CRISPR-Cas9 construct targeting two ALCATRAZ (ALC) homoeologs. ALC is involved in valve margin development and, thus, contributes to seed shattering from mature fruits. Knocking out ALC would increase shatter resistance to avoid seed loss during mechanical harvest. We obtained a transgenic T1 plant with four alc mutant alleles by the use of a single target sequence. All mutations were stably inherited to the T2 progeny. The T2 generation was devoid of any wild-type alleles, proving that the underlying T1 was a nonchimeric double heterozygote. T-DNA and ALC loci were not linked, as indicated by random segregation in the T2 generation. Hence, we could select double mutants lacking the T-DNA already in the first offspring generation. However, whole-genome sequencing data revealed at least five independent insertions of vector backbone sequences. We did not detect any off-target effects in two genome regions homologous to the target sequence. The simultaneous alteration of multiple homoeologs by CRISPR-Cas9 mutagenesis without any background mutations will offer new opportunities for using mutant genotypes in rapeseed breeding. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  7. [Analysis and characterization of Belamcanda chinensis with space mutagenesis breeding by X-ray fluorescence analysis and X-ray diffraction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Ying; Ding, Xi-Feng; Wang, Wen-Jing; Guo, Xi-Hua; Zhu, Yan-Ying

    2008-02-01

    The contents of various elements in the fourth generation Belamcanda chinensis (L.) DC. with space mutagenesis breeding were analyzed and characterized. X-ray fluorescence spectrum analysis (XRF) and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) were applied jointly. It was found that the content of K element in the space flight mutagenesis increases 1.03 and 0.31 times, Mg enhances 1.44 and 0.06 times, but Al reduces 38.5% and 85.5% respectively compared to the contents in the ground group and the comparison group, while those of Ca, Mn and Fe enhance 0.95, 0.30 and 0.29 times respectively contrasted to the ground group. Besides, there was discovered the crystal of whewellite in the Belamcanda chinensis (L.) DC. and the content in the ground group is less than that of the outer space and the outer space group, which in turn is less than that of the comparison group. It is concluded that the contents of mineral elements indispensable to body in the space group are closer or superior to the comparison, group as compared to the ground group. In the present paper, a quick and simple appraising method is offered, which may be of great significance to the popularization of the planting outer space Chinese traditional medicine to filtrate more excellent breed and set up norm of quality appraisal.

  8. A large-scale mutant panel in wheat developed using heavy-ion beam mutagenesis and its application to genetic research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murai, Koji, E-mail: murai@fpu.ac.jp [Department of Bioscience, Fukui Prefectural University, 4-1-1 Matsuoka-Kenjojima, Eiheiji-cho, Yoshida-gun, Fukui 910-1195 (Japan); Nishiura, Aiko [Department of Bioscience, Fukui Prefectural University, 4-1-1 Matsuoka-Kenjojima, Eiheiji-cho, Yoshida-gun, Fukui 910-1195 (Japan); Kazama, Yusuke [RIKEN, Innovation Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Abe, Tomoko [RIKEN, Innovation Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); RIKEN, Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    Mutation analysis is a powerful tool for studying gene function. Heavy-ion beam mutagenesis is a comparatively new approach to inducing mutations in plants and is particularly efficient because of its high linear energy transfer (LET). High LET radiation induces a higher rate of DNA double-strand breaks than other mutagenic methods. Over the last 12 years, we have constructed a large-scale mutant panel in diploid einkorn wheat (Triticum monococcum) using heavy-ion beam mutagenesis. Einkorn wheat seeds were exposed to a heavy-ion beam and then sown in the field. Selfed seeds from each spike of M{sub 1} plants were used to generate M{sub 2} lines. Every year, we obtained approximately 1000 M{sub 2} lines and eventually developed a mutant panel with 10,000 M{sub 2} lines in total. This mutant panel is being systematically screened for mutations affecting reproductive growth, and especially for flowering-time mutants. To date, we have identified several flowering-time mutants of great interest: non-flowering mutants (mvp: maintained vegetative phase), late-flowering mutants, and early-flowering mutants. These novel mutations will be of value for investigations of the genetic mechanism of flowering in wheat.

  9. Changes in transcript levels of starch hydrolysis genes and raising citric acid production via carbon ion irradiation mutagenesis of Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Li, Wenjian; Chen, Hao; Liu, Jing; Wang, Shuyang; Chen, Jihong

    2017-01-01

    The filamentous ascomycete Aspergillus niger is well known for its ability to accumulate citric acid for the hydrolysis of starchy materials. To improve citric acid productivity, heavy ion beam mutagenesis was utilized to produce mutant A.niger strains with enhanced production of citric acid in this work. It was demonstrated that a mutant HW2 with high concentration of citric acid was isolated after carbon ion irradiation with the energy of 80Mev/μ, which was obvious increase higher than the original strain from liquefied corn starch as a feedstock. More importantly, with the evidence from the expression profiles of key genes and enzyme activity involved in the starch hydrolysis process between original strain and various phenotype mutants, our results confirmed that different transcript levels of key genes involving in starch hydrolysis process between original strain and mutants could be a significant contributor to different citric acid concentration in A.niger, such as, amyR and glaA, which therefore opened a new avenue for constructing genetically engineered A.niger mutants for high-yield citric acid accumulation in the future. As such, this work demonstrated that heavy ion beam mutagenesis presented an efficient alternative strategy to be developed to generate various phenotype microbe species mutants for functional genes research.

  10. Changes in transcript levels of starch hydrolysis genes and raising citric acid production via carbon ion irradiation mutagenesis of Aspergillus niger.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Hu

    Full Text Available The filamentous ascomycete Aspergillus niger is well known for its ability to accumulate citric acid for the hydrolysis of starchy materials. To improve citric acid productivity, heavy ion beam mutagenesis was utilized to produce mutant A.niger strains with enhanced production of citric acid in this work. It was demonstrated that a mutant HW2 with high concentration of citric acid was isolated after carbon ion irradiation with the energy of 80Mev/μ, which was obvious increase higher than the original strain from liquefied corn starch as a feedstock. More importantly, with the evidence from the expression profiles of key genes and enzyme activity involved in the starch hydrolysis process between original strain and various phenotype mutants, our results confirmed that different transcript levels of key genes involving in starch hydrolysis process between original strain and mutants could be a significant contributor to different citric acid concentration in A.niger, such as, amyR and glaA, which therefore opened a new avenue for constructing genetically engineered A.niger mutants for high-yield citric acid accumulation in the future. As such, this work demonstrated that heavy ion beam mutagenesis presented an efficient alternative strategy to be developed to generate various phenotype microbe species mutants for functional genes research.

  11. Use of pentapeptide-insertion scanning mutagenesis for functional mapping of the plum pox virus helper component proteinase suppressor of gene silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varrelmann, Mark; Maiss, Edgar; Pilot, Ruth; Palkovics, Laszlo

    2007-03-01

    Helper component proteinase (HC-Pro) of Plum pox virus is a multifunctional potyvirus protein that has been examined intensively. In addition to its involvement in aphid transmission, genome amplification and long-distance movement, it is also one of the better-studied plant virus suppressors of RNA silencing. The first systematic analysis using pentapeptide-insertion scanning mutagenesis of the silencing suppression function of a potyvirus HC-Pro is presented here. Sixty-three in-frame insertion mutants, each containing five extra amino acids inserted randomly within the HC-Pro protein, were analysed for their ability to suppress transgene-induced RNA silencing using Agrobacterium infiltration in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants expressing green fluorescent protein. A functional map was obtained, consisting of clearly defined regions with different classes of silencing-suppression activity (wild-type, restricted and disabled). This map confirmed that the N-terminal part of the protein, which is indispensable for aphid transmission, is dispensable for silencing suppression and supports the involvement of the central region in silencing suppression, in addition to its role in maintenance of genome amplification and synergism with other viruses. Moreover, evidence is provided that the C-terminal part of the protein, previously known to be necessary mainly for proteolytic activity, also participates in silencing suppression. Pentapeptide-insertion scanning mutagenesis has been shown to be a fast and powerful tool to functionally characterize plant virus proteins.

  12. ESCRT-II/Vps25 constrains digit number by endosome-mediated selective modulation of FGF-SHH signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handschuh, Karen; Feenstra, Jennifer; Koss, Matthew; Ferretti, Elisabetta; Risolino, Maurizio; Zewdu, Rediet; Sahai, Michelle A.; Bénazet, Jean-Denis; Peng, Xiao P.; Depew, Michael J.; Quintana, Laura; Sharpe, James; Wang, Baolin; Alcorn, Heather; Rivi, Roberta; Butcher, Stephen; Manak, J Robert; Vaccari, Thomas; Weinstein, Harel; Anderson, Kathryn V.; Lacy, Elizabeth; Selleri, Licia

    2014-01-01

    Summary Sorting and degradation of receptors and associated signaling molecules maintain homeostasis of conserved signaling pathways during cell specification and tissue development. Yet, whether machineries that sort signaling proteins act preferentially on different receptors and ligands in different contexts remains mysterious. Here we show that Vacuolar protein sorting 25, Vps25, a component of ESCRT-II (Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport II), directs preferential endosome-mediated modulation of FGF signaling in limbs. By ENU-induced mutagenesis we isolated a polydactylous mouse line carrying a hypomorphic mutation of Vps25 (Vps25ENU). Unlike Vps25-null embryos we generated, Vps25ENU/ENU mutants survive until late gestation. Their limbs display FGF signaling enhancement and consequent hyper-activation of the FGF-SHH feedback loop causing polydactyly, whereas WNT and BMP signaling remain unperturbed. Notably, Vps25ENU/ENU Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts exhibit aberrant FGFR trafficking and degradation; however SHH signaling is unperturbed. These studies establish that the ESCRT-II machinery selectively limits FGF signaling in vertebrate skeletal patterning. PMID:25373905

  13. Study of a High-Yield Cellulase System Created by Heavy-Ion Irradiation-Induced Mutagenesis of Aspergillus niger and Mixed Fermentation with Trichoderma reesei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-Yang; Jiang, Bo-Ling; Zhou, Xiang; Chen, Ji-Hong; Li, Wen-Jian; Liu, Jing; Hu, Wei; Xiao, Guo-Qing; Dong, Miao-Yin; Wang, Yu-Chen

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and validate the efficiency of 12C6+ irradiation of Aspergillus niger (A. niger) or mutagenesis via mixed Trichoderma viride (T. viride) culturing as well as a liquid cultivation method for cellulase production via mixed Trichoderma reesei (T. reesei) and A. niger culture fermentation. The first mutagenesis approach was employed to optimize yield from a cellulase-producing strain via heavy-ion mutagenesis and high-throughput screening, and the second was to effectively achieve enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulase from a mixed culture of mutant T. viride and A. niger. We found that 12C6+-ion irradiation induced changes in cellulase biosynthesis in A. niger but had no effect on the time course of the synthesis. It is notable that the exoglucanases (CBH) activities of A. niger strains H11-1 and H differed (6.71 U/mL vs. 6.01 U/mL) and were significantly higher than that of A. niger mutant H3-1. Compared with strain H, the filter paper assay (FPA), endoglucanase (EG) and β-glucosidase (BGL) activities of mutant strain H11-1 were increased by 250.26%, 30.26% and 34.91%, respectively. A mixed culture system was successfully optimized, and the best ratio of T. reesei to A. niger was 5:1 for 96 h with simultaneous inoculation. The BGL activity of the mixed culture increased after 72 h. At 96 h, the FPA and BGL activities of the mixed culture were 689.00 and 797.15 U/mL, respectively, significantly higher than those of monocultures, which were 408.70 and 646.98 U/mL for T. reesei and 447.29 and 658.89 U/mL for A. niger, respectively. The EG activity of the mixed culture was 2342.81 U/mL, a value that was significantly higher than that of monocultures at 2206.57 U/mL for T. reesei and 1727.62 U/mL for A. niger. In summary, cellulose production and hydrolysis yields were significantly enhanced by the proposed combination scheme.

  14. Efficient generation of recombinant RNA viruses using targeted recombination-mediated mutagenesis of bacterial artificial chromosomes containing full-length cDNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Risager, Peter Christian; Fahnøe, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    Background Infectious cDNA clones are a prerequisite for directed genetic manipulation of RNA viruses. Here, a strategy to facilitate manipulation and rescue of classical swine fever viruses (CSFVs) from full-length cDNAs present within bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) is described....... This strategy allows manipulation of viral cDNA by targeted recombination-mediated mutagenesis within bacteria. Results A new CSFV-BAC (pBeloR26) derived from the Riems vaccine strain has been constructed and subsequently modified in the E2 coding sequence, using the targeted recombination strategy to enable...... rescue of chimeric pestiviruses (vR26_E2gif and vR26_TAV) with potential as new marker vaccine candidates. Sequencing of the BACs revealed a high genetic stability during passages within bacteria. The complete genome sequences of rescued viruses, after extensive passages in mammalian cells showed...

  15. Expanding the Lotus japonicus reverse genetics toolbox – Development of LORE1 retrotransposon mutagenesis and artificial miRNA-mediated silencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urbanski, Dorian Fabian

    2011-01-01

    . The protocols developed in the current project are now the cornerstone of a new LORE1 reverse genetics resource characterized by efficient mutant line generation and accurate mutation annotation. In parallel, artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs) were designed based on both Arabidopsis and Lotus backbones......Currently, the most common approach to studying Lotus japonicus (Lotus) genes is forward genetics in which a gene responsible for the studied phenotype is identified through map-based cloning. In reverse genetics, the activity of a gene of interest is modified to discover its mutant phenotype....... Prior to this project, the only reverse genetics resource available in Lotus was the TILLING resource. In an attempt to advance Lotus genetic studies, present study is focused on the development of two additional resources. The first is based on insertional mutagenesis and the second on harnessing post...

  16. Genotoxic fungicide methyl thiophanate as an oxidative stressor inducing 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2' -deoxyguanosine adducts in DNA and mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Singh, Braj R; Arif, Jamal M; Musarrat, Javed

    2010-01-01

    Dimethyl 4,4' -(O-phenylene)bis(3-thioallophanate), commonly known as methyl thiophanate (MT), is a systemic fungicide and suspected carcinogen to humans. In this study, the oxidative potential of this category-III acute toxicant has been ascertained based on its capacity of inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and promutagenic 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2' -deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) adducts in DNA. The discernible MT dose-dependent reduction in fluorescence intensity of a cationic dye rhodamine (Rh-123) in human lymphocytes and increased fluorescence intensity of 2',7'-Dichlorodihydro fluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) treated cells signifies decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (Delta Psi m) due to intracellular ROS generation. The (32)P-post-labeling assay demonstrated the MT-induced 8-oxodG adduct formation in calf thymus DNA. Thus, it is concluded that MT, as a potent oxidative stressor, produces ROS leading to mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative DNA damage and mutagenesis.

  17. Site-directed mutagenesis around the CuA site of a polyphenol oxidase from Coreopsis grandiflora (cgAUS1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaintz, Cornelia; Mayer, Rupert L; Jirsa, Franz; Halbwirth, Heidi; Rompel, Annette

    2015-03-24

    Aurone synthase from Coreopsis grandiflora (cgAUS1), catalyzing conversion of butein to sulfuretin in a type-3 copper center, is a rare example of a polyphenol oxidase involved in anabolism. Site-directed mutagenesis around the CuA site of AUS1 was performed, and recombinant enzymes were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Replacement of the coordinating CuA histidines with alanine resulted in the presence of a single copper and loss of diphenolase activity. The thioether bridge-building cysteine and a phenylalanine over the CuA site, exchanged to alanine, have no influence on copper content but appear to play an important role in substrate binding. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Determination of the binding mode for the cyclopentapeptide CXCR4 antagonist FC131 using a dual approach of ligand modifications and receptor mutagenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiele, Stefanie; Mungalpara, J; Steen, A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The cyclopentapeptide FC131 (cyclo(-L-Arg(1) -L-Arg(2) -L-2-Nal(3) -Gly(4) -D-Tyr(5) -)) is an antagonist at the CXC chemokine receptor CXCR4, which plays a role in human immunodeficiency virus infection, cancer and stem cell recruitment. Binding modes for FC131 in CXCR4...... activation) of FC131 and three analogues were performed on wild-type CXCR4 and 25 receptor mutants. Computational modelling was used to rationalize the experimental data. KEY RESULTS: The Arg(2) and 2-Nal(3) side chains of FC131 interact with residues in TM-3 (His(113) , Asp(171) ) and TM-5 (hydrophobic......-bond in CXCR4 crystal structures and mutation of either residue to Ala abolishes CXCR4 activity. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: Ligand modification, receptor mutagenesis and computational modelling approaches were used to identify the binding mode of FC131 in CXCR4, which was in agreement with binding modes...

  19. Efficient CRISPR-mediated mutagenesis in primary immune cells using CrispRGold and a C57BL/6 Cas9 transgenic mouse line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Van Trung; Graf, Robin; Wirtz, Tristan; Weber, Timm; Favret, Jeremy; Li, Xun; Petsch, Kerstin; Tran, Ngoc Tung; Sieweke, Michael H; Berek, Claudia; Kühn, Ralf; Rajewsky, Klaus

    2016-11-01

    Applying clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR associated protein 9 (Cas9)-mediated mutagenesis to primary mouse immune cells, we used high-fidelity single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) designed with an sgRNA design tool (CrispRGold) to target genes in primary B cells, T cells, and macrophages isolated from a Cas9 transgenic mouse line. Using this system, we achieved an average knockout efficiency of 80% in B cells. On this basis, we established a robust small-scale CRISPR-mediated screen in these cells and identified genes essential for B-cell activation and plasma cell differentiation. This screening system does not require deep sequencing and may serve as a precedent for the application of CRISPR/Cas9 to primary mouse cells.

  20. Creation of Novel Protein Variants with CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Mutagenesis: Turning a Screening By-Product into a Discovery Tool.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine F Donovan

    Full Text Available CRISPR/Cas9 screening has proven to be a versatile tool for genomics research. Based on unexpected results from a genome-wide screen, we developed a CRISPR/Cas9-mediated approach to mutagenesis, exploiting the allelic diversity generated by error-prone non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ to identify novel gain-of-function and drug resistant alleles of the MAPK signaling pathway genes MEK1 and BRAF. We define the parameters of a scalable technique to easily generate cell populations containing thousands of endogenous allelic variants to map gene functions. Further, these results highlight an unexpected but important phenomenon, that Cas9-induced gain-of-function alleles are an inherent by-product of normal Cas9 loss-of-function screens and should be investigated during analysis of data from large-scale positive selection screens.

  1. Loss of BRCA1 or BRCA2 markedly increases the rate of base substitution mutagenesis and has distinct effects on genomic deletions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zamborszky, J.; Szikriszt, B.; Gervai, J. Z.

    2017-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes increase the risk of cancer. Owing to their function in homologous recombination repair, much research has focused on the unstable genomic phenotype of BRCA1/2 mutant cells manifest mainly as large-scale rearrangements. We used whole......-genome sequencing of multiple isogenic chicken DT40 cell clones to precisely determine the consequences of BRCA1/2 loss on all types of genomic mutagenesis. Spontaneous base substitution mutation rates increased sevenfold upon the disruption of either BRCA1 or BRCA2, and the arising mutation spectra showed strong...... and specific correlation with a mutation signature associated with BRCA1/2 mutant tumours. To model endogenous alkylating damage, we determined the mutation spectrum caused by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), and showed that MMS also induces more base substitution mutations in BRCA1/2-deficient cells...

  2. Chronic inflammation as a promotor of mutagenesis in essential thrombocythemia, polycythemia vera and myelofibrosis. A human inflammation model for cancer development?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Hans K

    2013-01-01

    -risk microenvironment for induction of mutations due to the persistent inflammation-induced oxidative damage to DNA in hematopoietic cells. Alterations in the epigenome induced by the chronic inflammatory drive may likely elicit a "epigenetic switch" promoting persistent inflammation. The perspectives of chronic......The Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferat