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Sample records for myosin ii dynamics

  1. The Elastic Properties of the Structurally Characterized Myosin II S2 Subdomain: A Molecular Dynamics and Normal Mode Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The elastic properties (stretching and bending moduli) of myosin are expected to play an important role in its function. Of particular interest is the extended α-helical coiled-coil portion of the molecule. Since there is no high resolution structure for the entire coiled-coil, a study is made of the scallop myosin II S2 subdomain for which an x-ray structure is available (Protein Data Bank 1nkn). We estimate the stretching and bending moduli of the S2 subdomain with an atomic level model by ...

  2. Long-range self-organization of cytoskeletal myosin II filament stacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shiqiong; Dasbiswas, Kinjal; Guo, Zhenhuan; Tee, Yee-Han; Thiagarajan, Visalatchi; Hersen, Pascal; Chew, Teng-Leong; Safran, Samuel A; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen; Bershadsky, Alexander D

    2017-02-01

    Although myosin II filaments are known to exist in non-muscle cells, their dynamics and organization are incompletely understood. Here, we combined structured illumination microscopy with pharmacological and genetic perturbations, to study the process of actomyosin cytoskeleton self-organization into arcs and stress fibres. A striking feature of the myosin II filament organization was their 'registered' alignment into stacks, spanning up to several micrometres in the direction orthogonal to the parallel actin bundles. While turnover of individual myosin II filaments was fast (characteristic half-life time 60 s) and independent of actin filament turnover, the process of stack formation lasted a longer time (in the range of several minutes) and required myosin II contractility, as well as actin filament assembly/disassembly and crosslinking (dependent on formin Fmnl3, cofilin1 and α-actinin-4). Furthermore, myosin filament stack formation involved long-range movements of individual myosin filaments towards each other suggesting the existence of attractive forces between myosin II filaments. These forces, possibly transmitted via mechanical deformations of the intervening actin filament network, may in turn remodel the actomyosin cytoskeleton and drive its self-organization.

  3. Nonmuscle Myosin II helps regulate synaptic vesicle mobility at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction

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    Qiu Xinping

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the mechanistic details of the vesicle transport process from the cell body to the nerve terminal are well described, the mechanisms underlying vesicle traffic within nerve terminal boutons is relatively unknown. The actin cytoskeleton has been implicated but exactly how actin or actin-binding proteins participate in vesicle movement is not clear. Results In the present study we have identified Nonmuscle Myosin II as a candidate molecule important for synaptic vesicle traffic within Drosophila larval neuromuscular boutons. Nonmuscle Myosin II was found to be localized at the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction; genetics and pharmacology combined with the time-lapse imaging technique FRAP were used to reveal a contribution of Nonmuscle Myosin II to synaptic vesicle movement. FRAP analysis showed that vesicle dynamics were highly dependent on the expression level of Nonmuscle Myosin II. Conclusion Our results provide evidence that Nonmuscle Myosin II is present presynaptically, is important for synaptic vesicle mobility and suggests a role for Nonmuscle Myosin II in shuttling vesicles at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction. This work begins to reveal the process by which synaptic vesicles traverse within the bouton.

  4. Roles of an unconventional protein kinase and myosin II in amoeba osmotic shock responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betapudi, Venkaiah; Egelhoff, Thomas T

    2009-12-01

    The contractile vacuole (CV) is a dynamic organelle that enables Dictyostelium amoeba and other protist to maintain osmotic homeostasis by expelling excess water. In the present study, we have uncovered a mechanism that coordinates the mechanics of the CV with myosin II, regulated by VwkA, an unconventional protein kinase that is conserved in an array of protozoa. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-VwkA fusion proteins localize persistently to the CV during both filling and expulsion phases of water. In vwkA null cells, the established CV marker dajumin still localizes to the CV, but these structures are large, spherical and severely impaired for discharge. Furthermore, myosin II cortical localization and assembly are abnormal in vwkA null cells. Parallel analysis of wild-type cells treated with myosin II inhibitors or of myosin II null cells also results in enlarged CVs with impaired dynamics. We suggest that the myosin II cortical cytoskeleton, regulated by VwkA, serves a critical conserved role in the periodic contractions of the CV, as part of the osmotic protective mechanism of protozoa.

  5. Mechanical output of myosin II motors is regulated by myosin filament size and actin network mechanics

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    Stam, Samantha; Alberts, Jonathan; Gardel, Margaret; Munro, Edwin

    2013-03-01

    The interactions of bipolar myosin II filaments with actin arrays are a predominate means of generating forces in numerous physiological processes including muscle contraction and cell migration. However, how the spatiotemporal regulation of these forces depends on motor mechanochemistry, bipolar filament size, and local actin mechanics is unknown. Here, we simulate myosin II motors with an agent-based model in which the motors have been benchmarked against experimental measurements. Force generation occurs in two distinct regimes characterized either by stable tension maintenance or by stochastic buildup and release; transitions between these regimes occur by changes to duty ratio and myosin filament size. The time required for building force to stall scales inversely with the stiffness of a network and the actin gliding speed of a motor. Finally, myosin motors are predicted to contract a network toward stiffer regions, which is consistent with experimental observations. Our representation of myosin motors can be used to understand how their mechanical and biochemical properties influence their observed behavior in a variety of in vitro and in vivo contexts.

  6. Myosin-II-Mediated Directional Migration of Dictyostelium Cells in Response to Cyclic Stretching of Substratum

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    Iwadate, Yoshiaki; Okimura, Chika; Sato, Katsuya; Nakashima, Yuta; Tsujioka, Masatsune; Minami, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Living cells are constantly subjected to various mechanical stimulations, such as shear flow, osmotic pressure, and hardness of substratum. They must sense the mechanical aspects of their environment and respond appropriately for proper cell function. Cells adhering to substrata must receive and respond to mechanical stimuli from the substrata to decide their shape and/or migrating direction. In response to cyclic stretching of the elastic substratum, intracellular stress fibers in fibroblasts and endothelial, osteosarcoma, and smooth muscle cells are rearranged perpendicular to the stretching direction, and the shape of those cells becomes extended in this new direction. In the case of migrating Dictyostelium cells, cyclic stretching regulates the direction of migration, and not the shape, of the cell. The cells migrate in a direction perpendicular to that of the stretching. However, the molecular mechanisms that induce the directional migration remain unknown. Here, using a microstretching device, we recorded green fluorescent protein (GFP)-myosin-II dynamics in Dictyostelium cells on an elastic substratum under cyclic stretching. Repeated stretching induced myosin II localization equally on both stretching sides in the cells. Although myosin-II-null cells migrated randomly, myosin-II-null cells expressing a variant of myosin II that cannot hydrolyze ATP migrated perpendicular to the stretching. These results indicate that Dictyostelium cells accumulate myosin II at the portion of the cell where a large strain is received and migrate in a direction other than that of the portion where myosin II accumulated. This polarity generation for migration does not require the contraction of actomyosin. PMID:23442953

  7. The Role of Structural Dynamics of Actin in Class-Specific Myosin Motility

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    Noguchi, Taro Q. P.; Morimatsu, Masatoshi; Iwane, Atsuko H.; Yanagida, Toshio; Uyeda, Taro Q. P.

    2015-01-01

    The structural dynamics of actin, including the tilting motion between the small and large domains, are essential for proper interactions with actin-binding proteins. Gly146 is situated at the hinge between the two domains, and we previously showed that a G146V mutation leads to severe motility defects in skeletal myosin but has no effect on motility of myosin V. The present study tested the hypothesis that G146V mutation impaired rotation between the two domains, leading to such functional defects. First, our study showed that depolymerization of G146V filaments was slower than that of wild-type filaments. This result is consistent with the distinction of structural states of G146V filaments from those of the wild type, considering the recent report that stabilization of actin filaments involves rotation of the two domains. Next, we measured intramolecular FRET efficiencies between two fluorophores in the two domains with or without skeletal muscle heavy meromyosin or the heavy meromyosin equivalent of myosin V in the presence of ATP. Single-molecule FRET measurements showed that the conformations of actin subunits of control and G146V actin filaments were different in the presence of skeletal muscle heavy meromyosin. This altered conformation of G146V subunits may lead to motility defects in myosin II. In contrast, distributions of FRET efficiencies of control and G146V subunits were similar in the presence of myosin V, consistent with the lack of motility defects in G146V actin with myosin V. The distribution of FRET efficiencies in the presence of myosin V was different from that in the presence of skeletal muscle heavy meromyosin, implying that the roles of actin conformation in myosin motility depend on the type of myosin. PMID:25945499

  8. The role of structural dynamics of actin in class-specific myosin motility.

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    Taro Q P Noguchi

    Full Text Available The structural dynamics of actin, including the tilting motion between the small and large domains, are essential for proper interactions with actin-binding proteins. Gly146 is situated at the hinge between the two domains, and we previously showed that a G146V mutation leads to severe motility defects in skeletal myosin but has no effect on motility of myosin V. The present study tested the hypothesis that G146V mutation impaired rotation between the two domains, leading to such functional defects. First, our study showed that depolymerization of G146V filaments was slower than that of wild-type filaments. This result is consistent with the distinction of structural states of G146V filaments from those of the wild type, considering the recent report that stabilization of actin filaments involves rotation of the two domains. Next, we measured intramolecular FRET efficiencies between two fluorophores in the two domains with or without skeletal muscle heavy meromyosin or the heavy meromyosin equivalent of myosin V in the presence of ATP. Single-molecule FRET measurements showed that the conformations of actin subunits of control and G146V actin filaments were different in the presence of skeletal muscle heavy meromyosin. This altered conformation of G146V subunits may lead to motility defects in myosin II. In contrast, distributions of FRET efficiencies of control and G146V subunits were similar in the presence of myosin V, consistent with the lack of motility defects in G146V actin with myosin V. The distribution of FRET efficiencies in the presence of myosin V was different from that in the presence of skeletal muscle heavy meromyosin, implying that the roles of actin conformation in myosin motility depend on the type of myosin.

  9. Actin dynamics and competition for myosin monomer govern the sequential amplification of myosin filaments.

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    Beach, Jordan R; Bruun, Kyle S; Shao, Lin; Li, Dong; Swider, Zac; Remmert, Kirsten; Zhang, Yingfan; Conti, Mary A; Adelstein, Robert S; Rusan, Nasser M; Betzig, Eric; Hammer, John A

    2017-02-01

    The cellular mechanisms governing non-muscle myosin II (NM2) filament assembly are largely unknown. Using EGFP-NM2A knock-in fibroblasts and multiple super-resolution imaging modalities, we characterized and quantified the sequential amplification of NM2 filaments within lamellae, wherein filaments emanating from single nucleation events continuously partition, forming filament clusters that populate large-scale actomyosin structures deeper in the cell. Individual partitioning events coincide spatially and temporally with the movements of diverging actin fibres, suppression of which inhibits partitioning. These and other data indicate that NM2A filaments are partitioned by the dynamic movements of actin fibres to which they are bound. Finally, we showed that partition frequency and filament growth rate in the lamella depend on MLCK, and that MLCK is competing with centrally active ROCK for a limiting pool of monomer with which to drive lamellar filament assembly. Together, our results provide new insights into the mechanism and spatio-temporal regulation of NM2 filament assembly in cells.

  10. Axon extension in the fast and slow lanes: substratum-dependent engagement of myosin II functions.

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    Ketschek, Andrea R; Jones, Steven L; Gallo, Gianluca

    2007-09-01

    Axon extension involves the coordinated regulation of the neuronal cytoskeleton. Actin filaments drive protrusion of filopodia and lamellipodia while microtubules invade the growth cone, thereby providing structural support for the nascent axon. Furthermore, in order for axons to extend the growth cone must attach to the substratum. Previous work indicates that myosin II activity inhibits the advance of microtubules into the periphery of growth cones, and myosin II has also been implicated in mediating integrin-dependent cell attachment. However, it is not clear how the functions of myosin II in regulating substratum attachment and microtubule advance are integrated during axon extension. We report that inhibition of myosin II function decreases the rate of axon extension on laminin, but surprisingly promotes extension rate on polylysine. The differential effects of myosin II inhibition on axon extension rate are attributable to myosin II having the primary function of mediating substratum attachment on laminin, but not on polylysine. Conversely, on polylysine the primary function of myosin II is to inhibit microtubule advance into growth cones. Thus, the substratum determines the role of myosin II in axon extension by controlling the functions of myosin II that contribute to extension.

  11. Nonmuscle myosin II isoforms coassemble in living cells.

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    Beach, Jordan R; Shao, Lin; Remmert, Kirsten; Li, Dong; Betzig, Eric; Hammer, John A

    2014-05-19

    Nonmuscle myosin II (NM II) powers myriad developmental and cellular processes, including embryogenesis, cell migration, and cytokinesis [1]. To exert its functions, monomers of NM II assemble into bipolar filaments that produce a contractile force on the actin cytoskeleton. Mammalian cells express up to three isoforms of NM II (NM IIA, IIB, and IIC), each of which possesses distinct biophysical properties and supports unique as well as redundant cellular functions [2-8]. Despite previous efforts [9-13], it remains unclear whether NM II isoforms assemble in living cells to produce mixed (heterotypic) bipolar filaments or whether filaments consist entirely of a single isoform (homotypic). We addressed this question using fluorescently tagged versions of NM IIA, IIB, and IIC, isoform-specific immunostaining of the endogenous proteins, and two-color total internal reflection fluorescence structured-illumination microscopy, or TIRF-SIM, to visualize individual myosin II bipolar filaments inside cells. We show that NM II isoforms coassemble into heterotypic filaments in a variety of settings, including various types of stress fibers, individual filaments throughout the cell, and the contractile ring. We also show that the differential distribution of NM IIA and NM IIB typically seen in confocal micrographs of well-polarized cells is reflected in the composition of individual bipolar filaments. Interestingly, this differential distribution is less pronounced in freshly spread cells, arguing for the existence of a sorting mechanism acting over time. Together, our work argues that individual NM II isoforms are potentially performing both isoform-specific and isoform-redundant functions while coassembled with other NM II isoforms.

  12. A new role for myosin II in vesicle fission.

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    Flores, Juan A; Balseiro-Gomez, Santiago; Cabeza, Jose M; Acosta, Jorge; Ramirez-Ponce, Pilar; Ales, Eva

    2014-01-01

    An endocytic vesicle is formed from a flat plasma membrane patch by a sequential process of invagination, bud formation and fission. The scission step requires the formation of a tubular membrane neck (the fission pore) that connects the endocytic vesicle with the plasma membrane. Progress in vesicle fission can be measured by the formation and closure of the fission pore. Live-cell imaging and sensitive biophysical measurements have provided various glimpses into the structure and behaviour of the fission pore. In the present study, the role of non-muscle myosin II (NM-2) in vesicle fission was tested by analyzing the kinetics of the fission pore with perforated-patch clamp capacitance measurements to detect single vesicle endocytosis with millisecond time resolution in peritoneal mast cells. Blebbistatin, a specific inhibitor of NM-2, dramatically increased the duration of the fission pore and also prevented closure during large endocytic events. Using the fluorescent markers FM1-43 and pHrodo Green dextran, we found that NM-2 inhibition greatly arrested vesicle fission in a late phase of the scission event when the pore reached a final diameter of ∼ 5 nm. Our results indicate that loss of the ATPase activity of myosin II drastically reduces the efficiency of membrane scission by making vesicle closure incomplete and suggest that NM-2 might be especially relevant in vesicle fission during compound endocytosis.

  13. Sensitivity of small myosin II ensembles from different isoforms to mechanical load and ATP concentration

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    Erdmann, Thorsten; Bartelheimer, Kathrin; Schwarz, Ulrich S.

    2016-11-01

    Based on a detailed crossbridge model for individual myosin II motors, we systematically study the influence of mechanical load and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration on small myosin II ensembles made from different isoforms. For skeletal and smooth muscle myosin II, which are often used in actomyosin gels that reconstitute cell contractility, fast forward movement is restricted to a small region of phase space with low mechanical load and high ATP concentration, which is also characterized by frequent ensemble detachment. At high load, these ensembles are stalled or move backwards, but forward motion can be restored by decreasing ATP concentration. In contrast, small ensembles of nonmuscle myosin II isoforms, which are found in the cytoskeleton of nonmuscle cells, are hardly affected by ATP concentration due to the slow kinetics of the bound states. For all isoforms, the thermodynamic efficiency of ensemble movement increases with decreasing ATP concentration, but this effect is weaker for the nonmuscle myosin II isoforms.

  14. Comparison of biochemical and immunochemical properties of myosin II in taeniid parasites.

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    Cruz-Rivera, M; Reyes-Torres, A; Reynoso-Ducoing, O; Flisser, A; Ambrosio, J R

    2006-07-01

    Type II myosins are highly conserved proteins, though differences have been observed among organisms, mainly in the filamentous region. Myosin isoforms have been identified in Taenia solium, a helminth parasite of public health importance in many developing countries. These isoforms are probably associated with the physiological requirements of each developmental stage of the parasite. In this paper we extend the characterization of myosin to several other Taenia species. Type II myosins were purified from the larvae (cysticerci) of Taenia solium, T. taeniaeformis and T. crassiceps and the adult stages of T. solium, T. taeniaeformis and T. saginata. Rabbit polyclonal antibodies against some of these myosins were specific at high dilutions but cross-reacted at low dilutions. ATPase activity was evaluated and kinetic values were calculated for each myosin. Homologous actin-myosin interactions increased both the affinity of myosin for ATP and the hydrolysis rate. The results indicate immunological and biochemical differences among taeniid myosins. This variability suggests that different isoforms are found not only in different taeniid species but also at different developmental stages. Further characterization of myosin isoforms should include determination of their amino acid composition.

  15. The Rho kinases I and II regulate different aspects of myosin II activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoneda, Atsuko; Multhaupt, Hinke A B; Couchman, John R

    2005-01-01

    persistent ROCK II and guanine triphosphate-bound RhoA. In contrast, the microfilament cytoskeleton was enhanced by ROCK II down-regulation. Phagocytic uptake of fibronectin-coated beads was strongly down-regulated in ROCK II-depleted cells but not those lacking ROCK I. These effects originated in part from......The homologous mammalian rho kinases (ROCK I and II) are assumed to be functionally redundant, based largely on kinase construct overexpression. As downstream effectors of Rho GTPases, their major substrates are myosin light chain and myosin phosphatase. Both kinases are implicated in microfilament...... bundle assembly and smooth muscle contractility. Here, analysis of fibroblast adhesion to fibronectin revealed that although ROCK II was more abundant, its activity was always lower than ROCK I. Specific reduction of ROCK I by siRNA resulted in loss of stress fibers and focal adhesions, despite...

  16. Slit and Netrin-1 guide cranial motor axon pathfinding via Rho-kinase, myosin light chain kinase and myosin II

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    Drescher Uwe

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the developing hindbrain, cranial motor axon guidance depends on diffusible repellent factors produced by the floor plate. Our previous studies have suggested that candidate molecules for mediating this effect are Slits, Netrin-1 and Semaphorin3A (Sema3A. It is unknown to what extent these factors contribute to floor plate-derived chemorepulsion of motor axons, and the downstream signalling pathways are largely unclear. Results In this study, we have used a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches to identify the components of floor plate chemorepulsion and their downstream signalling pathways. Using in vitro motor axon deflection assays, we demonstrate that Slits and Netrin-1, but not Sema3A, contribute to floor plate repulsion. We also find that the axon pathways of dorsally projecting branchiomotor neurons are disrupted in Netrin-1 mutant mice and in chick embryos expressing dominant-negative Unc5a receptors, indicating an in vivo role for Netrin-1. We further demonstrate that Slit and Netrin-1 signalling are mediated by Rho-kinase (ROCK and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK, which regulate myosin II activity, controlling actin retrograde flow in the growth cone. We show that MLCK, ROCK and myosin II are required for Slit and Netrin-1-mediated growth cone collapse of cranial motor axons. Inhibition of these molecules in explant cultures, or genetic manipulation of RhoA or myosin II function in vivo causes characteristic cranial motor axon pathfinding errors, including the inability to exit the midline, and loss of turning towards exit points. Conclusions Our findings suggest that both Slits and Netrin-1 contribute to floor plate-derived chemorepulsion of cranial motor axons. They further indicate that RhoA/ROCK, MLCK and myosin II are components of Slit and Netrin-1 signalling pathways, and suggest that these pathways are of key importance in cranial motor axon navigation.

  17. Life without double-headed non-muscle myosin II motor proteins

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    Venkaiah eBetapudi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Non-muscle myosin II motor proteins (myosin IIA, myosin IIB, and myosin IIC belong to a class of molecular motor proteins that are known to transduce cellular free-energy into biological work more efficiently than man-made combustion engines. Nature has given a single myosin II motor protein for lower eukaryotes and multiple for mammals but none for plants in order to provide impetus for their life. These specialized nanomachines drive cellular activities necessary for embryogenesis, organogenesis, and immunity. However, these multifunctional myosin II motor proteins are believed to go awry due to unknown reasons and contribute for the onset and progression of many autosomal-dominant disorders, cataract, deafness, infertility, cancer, kidney, neuronal, and inflammatory diseases. Many pathogens like HIV, Dengue, hepatitis C, and Lymphoma viruses as well as Salmonella and Mycobacteria are now known to take hostage of these dedicated myosin II motor proteins for their efficient pathogenesis. Even after four decades since their discovery, we still have a limited knowledge of how these motor proteins drive cell migration and cytokinesis. We need to enrich our current knowledge on these fundamental cellular processes and develop novel therapeutic strategies to fix mutated myosin II motor proteins in pathological conditions. This is the time to think how to relieve the hijacked myosins from pathogens in order to provide a renewed impetus for patients’ life. Understanding how to steer these molecular motors in proliferating and differentiating stem cells will improve stem cell based-therapeutics development. Given the plethora of cellular activities non-muscle myosin motor proteins are involved in, their importance is apparent for human life.

  18. Life without double-headed non-muscle myosin II motor proteins

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    Betapudi, Venkaiah

    2014-07-01

    Non-muscle myosin II motor proteins (myosin IIA, myosin IIB, and myosin IIC) belong to a class of molecular motor proteins that are known to transduce cellular free-energy into biological work more efficiently than man-made combustion engines. Nature has given a single myosin II motor protein for lower eukaryotes and multiple for mammals but none for plants in order to provide impetus for their life. These specialized nanomachines drive cellular activities necessary for embryogenesis, organogenesis, and immunity. However, these multifunctional myosin II motor proteins are believed to go awry due to unknown reasons and contribute for the onset and progression of many autosomal-dominant disorders, cataract, deafness, infertility, cancer, kidney, neuronal, and inflammatory diseases. Many pathogens like HIV, Dengue, hepatitis C, and Lymphoma viruses as well as Salmonella and Mycobacteria are now known to take hostage of these dedicated myosin II motor proteins for their efficient pathogenesis. Even after four decades since their discovery, we still have a limited knowledge of how these motor proteins drive cell migration and cytokinesis. We need to enrich our current knowledge on these fundamental cellular processes and develop novel therapeutic strategies to fix mutated myosin II motor proteins in pathological conditions. This is the time to think how to relieve the hijacked myosins from pathogens in order to provide a renewed impetus for patients’ life. Understanding how to steer these molecular motors in proliferating and differentiating stem cells will improve stem cell based-therapeutics development. Given the plethora of cellular activities non-muscle myosin motor proteins are involved in, their importance is apparent for human life.

  19. Characterization of the minimum domain required for targeting budding yeast myosin II to the site of cell division

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    Tolliday Nicola J

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All eukaryotes with the exception of plants use an actomyosin ring to generate a constriction force at the site of cell division (cleavage furrow during mitosis and meiosis. The structure and filament forming abilities located in the C-terminal or tail region of one of the main components, myosin II, are important for localising the molecule to the contractile ring (CR during cytokinesis. However, it remains poorly understood how myosin II is recruited to the site of cell division and how this recruitment relates to myosin filament assembly. Significant conservation between species of the components involved in cytokinesis, including those of the CR, allows the use of easily genetically manipulated organisms, such as budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in the study of cytokinesis. Budding yeast has a single myosin II protein, named Myo1. Unlike most other class II myosins, the tail of Myo1 has an irregular coiled coil. In this report we use molecular genetics, biochemistry and live cell imaging to characterize the minimum localisation domain (MLD of budding yeast Myo1. Results We show that the MLD is a small region in the centre of the tail of Myo1 and that it is both necessary and sufficient for localisation of Myo1 to the yeast bud neck, the pre-determined site of cell division. Hydrodynamic measurements of the MLD, purified from bacteria or yeast, show that it is likely to exist as a trimer. We also examine the importance of a small region of low coiled coil forming probability within the MLD, which we call the hinge region. Removal of the hinge region prevents contraction of the CR. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP, we show that GFP-tagged MLD is slightly more dynamic than the GFP-tagged full length molecule but less dynamic than the GFP-tagged Myo1 construct lacking the hinge region. Conclusion Our results define the intrinsic determinant for the localization of budding yeast myosin II and show

  20. P-cadherin counteracts myosin II-B function: implications in melanoma progression

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    De Wever Olivier

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant transformation of melanocytes is frequently attended by a switch in cadherin expression profile as shown for E- and N-cadherin. For P-cadherin, downregulation in metastasizing melanoma has been demonstrated, and over-expression of P-cadherin in melanoma cell lines has been shown to inhibit invasion. The strong invasive and metastatic nature of cutaneous melanoma implies a deregulated interplay between intercellular adhesion and migration-related molecules Results In this study we performed a microarray analysis to compare the mRNA expression profile of an invasive BLM melanoma cell line (BLM LIE and the non-invasive P-cadherin over-expression variant (BLM P-cad. Results indicate that nonmuscle myosin II-B is downregulated in BLM P-cad. Moreover, myosin II-B plays a major role in melanoma migration and invasiveness by retracting the tail during the migratory cycle, as shown by the localization of myosin II-B stress fibers relative to Golgi and the higher levels of phosphorylated myosin light chain. Analysis of P-cadherin and myosin II-B in nodular melanoma sections and in a panel of melanoma cell lines further confirmed that there is an inverse relationship between both molecules. Conclusions Therefore, we conclude that P-cadherin counteracts the expression and function of myosin II-B, resulting in the suppression of the invasive and migratory behaviour of BLM melanoma cells

  1. Myosin II controls cellular branching morphogenesis and migration in three dimensions by minimizing cell-surface curvature.

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    Elliott, Hunter; Fischer, Robert S; Myers, Kenneth A; Desai, Ravi A; Gao, Lin; Chen, Christopher S; Adelstein, Robert S; Waterman, Clare M; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2015-02-01

    In many cases, cell function is intimately linked to cell shape control. We used endothelial cell branching morphogenesis as a model to understand the role of myosin II in shape control of invasive cells migrating in 3D collagen gels. We applied principles of differential geometry and mathematical morphology to 3D image sets to parameterize cell branch structure and local cell-surface curvature. We find that Rho/ROCK-stimulated myosin II contractility minimizes cell-scale branching by recognizing and minimizing local cell-surface curvature. Using microfabrication to constrain cell shape identifies a positive feedback mechanism in which low curvature stabilizes myosin II cortical association, where it acts to maintain minimal curvature. The feedback between regulation of myosin II by curvature and control of curvature by myosin II drives cycles of localized cortical myosin II assembly and disassembly. These cycles in turn mediate alternating phases of directionally biased branch initiation and retraction to guide 3D cell migration.

  2. Identification and characterization of the Bombyx mori myosin II essential light chain and its effect in BmNPV infection

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    L Hao

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Myosin, as a type of molecular motor, is mainly involved in muscle contraction. Recently, myosin research has made considerable progress. However, the function of Bombyx mori myosin remains unclear. In this study, we cloned the BmMyosin II essential light chain (BmMyosin II ELC gene from a cDNA library of silkworm, which had an open reading frame (ORF of 444 bp encoding 147 amino acids (about 16 kDa. After analyzing their sequences, BmMyosin II ELC was similar to the ELCs of 27 other Myosin II types, which contained EFh domain that bound Ca2+. In addition, 28 sequences had five motifs, motifs 1 and 3 were relatively conserved. We constructed two vectors with BmMyosin to transfect MGC803 or BmN, monolayer wound healing of cells indicated they can promote cell migration successfully. For three fifth instar silkworms, Bm306, BmNB, BmBC8, we mainly analyzed the change of BmMyosin II ELC from transcription and translation after infecting with nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV. We found that gene expression of resistant strains were higher than susceptible strains at 12 h, while the result of the translation level was opposite that of the transcription level. Through in vitro protein interactions, we found BmMyosin II ELC can interact with BmNPV ubiquitin.

  3. Traction force microscopy in Dictyostelium reveals distinct roles for myosin II motor and actin-crosslinking activity in polarized cell movement.

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    Lombardi, Maria L; Knecht, David A; Dembo, Micah; Lee, Juliet

    2007-05-01

    Continuous cell movement requires the coordination of protrusive forces at the leading edge with contractile forces at the rear of the cell. Myosin II is required to generate the necessary contractile force to facilitate retraction; however, Dictyostelium cells that lack myosin II (mhcA-) are still motile. To directly investigate the role of myosin II in contractility we used a gelatin traction force assay to measure the magnitude and dynamic redistribution of traction stresses generated by randomly moving wild-type, myosin II essential light chain null (mlcE-) and mhcA- cells. Our data show that for each cell type, periods of rapid, directed cell movement occur when an asymmetrical distribution of traction stress is present, in which traction stresses at the rear are significantly higher than those at the front. We found that the major determinants of cell speed are the rate and frequency at which traction stress asymmetry develops, not the absolute magnitude of traction stress. We conclude that traction stress asymmetry is important for rapid, polarized cell movement because high traction stresses at the rear promote retraction, whereas low traction at the front allows protrusion. We propose that myosin II motor activity increases the rate and frequency at which traction stress asymmetry develops, whereas actin crosslinking activity is important for stabilizing it.

  4. Yeast myosin light chain, Mlc1p, interacts with both IQGAP and class II myosin to effect cytokinesis.

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    Boyne, J R; Yosuf, H M; Bieganowski, P; Brenner, C; Price, C

    2000-12-01

    MLC1 (myosin light chain) acts as a dosage suppressor of a temperature sensitive mutation in the gene encoding the S. cerevisiae IQGAP protein. Both proteins localize to the bud neck in mitosis although Mlc1p localisation precedes Iqg1p. Mlc1p is also found at the incipient bud site in G(1) and the growing bud tip during S and G(2) phases of the cell cycle. A dominant negative GST-Mlc1p fusion protein specifically blocks cytokinesis and prevents Iqg1p localisation to the bud neck, as does depletion of Mlc1p. These data support a direct interaction between the two proteins and immunoprecipitation experiments confirm this prediction. Mlc1p is also shown to interact with the class II conventional myosin (Myo1p). All three proteins form a complex, however, the interaction between Mlc1p and Iqg1p can be separated from the Mlc1p/Myo1p interaction. Mlc1p localisation and maintenance at the bud neck is independent of actin, Myo1p and Iqg1p. It is proposed that Mlc1p therefore functions to recruit Iqg1p and in turn actin to the actomyosin ring and that it is also required for Myo1p function during ring contraction.

  5. Two distinct myosin II populations coordinate ovulatory contraction of the myoepithelial sheath in the Caenorhabditis elegans somatic gonad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Kanako; Ono, Shoichiro

    2016-01-01

    The myoepithelial sheath in the somatic gonad of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has nonstriated contractile actomyosin networks that produce highly coordinated contractility for ovulation of mature oocytes. Two myosin heavy chains are expressed in the myoepithelial sheath, which are also expressed in the body-wall striated muscle. The troponin/tropomyosin system is also present and essential for ovulation. Therefore, although the myoepithelial sheath has smooth muscle–like contractile apparatuses, it has a striated muscle–like regulatory mechanism through troponin/tropomyosin. Here we report that the myoepithelial sheath has a distinct myosin population containing nonmuscle myosin II isoforms, which is regulated by phosphorylation and essential for ovulation. MLC-4, a nonmuscle myosin regulatory light chain, localizes to small punctate structures and does not colocalize with large, needle-like myosin filaments containing MYO-3, a striated-muscle myosin isoform. RNA interference of MLC-4, as well as of its upstream regulators, LET-502 (Rho-associated coiled-coil forming kinase) and MEL-11 (a myosin-binding subunit of myosin phosphatase), impairs ovulation. Expression of a phosphomimetic MLC-4 mutant mimicking a constitutively active state also impairs ovulation. A striated-muscle myosin (UNC-54) appears to provide partially compensatory contractility. Thus the results indicate that the two spatially distinct myosin II populations coordinately regulate ovulatory contraction of the myoepithelial sheath. PMID:26864628

  6. Two distinct myosin II populations coordinate ovulatory contraction of the myoepithelial sheath in the Caenorhabditis elegans somatic gonad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Kanako; Ono, Shoichiro

    2016-04-01

    The myoepithelial sheath in the somatic gonad of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has nonstriated contractile actomyosin networks that produce highly coordinated contractility for ovulation of mature oocytes. Two myosin heavy chains are expressed in the myoepithelial sheath, which are also expressed in the body-wall striated muscle. The troponin/tropomyosin system is also present and essential for ovulation. Therefore, although the myoepithelial sheath has smooth muscle-like contractile apparatuses, it has a striated muscle-like regulatory mechanism through troponin/tropomyosin. Here we report that the myoepithelial sheath has a distinct myosin population containing nonmuscle myosin II isoforms, which is regulated by phosphorylation and essential for ovulation. MLC-4, a nonmuscle myosin regulatory light chain, localizes to small punctate structures and does not colocalize with large, needle-like myosin filaments containing MYO-3, a striated-muscle myosin isoform. RNA interference of MLC-4, as well as of its upstream regulators, LET-502 (Rho-associated coiled-coil forming kinase) and MEL-11 (a myosin-binding subunit of myosin phosphatase), impairs ovulation. Expression of a phosphomimetic MLC-4 mutant mimicking a constitutively active state also impairs ovulation. A striated-muscle myosin (UNC-54) appears to provide partially compensatory contractility. Thus the results indicate that the two spatially distinct myosin II populations coordinately regulate ovulatory contraction of the myoepithelial sheath.

  7. Myosin II does not contribute to wound repair in Dictyostelium cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigehiko Yumura

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cells are always subjected to mechanical stresses, resulting in wounds of the cell membrane, but cells are able to repair and reseal their wounded membrane. Previous reports have shown that actin and myosin II accumulate around the wound and that the constriction of this purse-string closes the membrane pore. Here, we developed a microsurgical wound assay to assess wound repair in Dictyostelium cells. Fluorescent dye that had been incorporated into the cells leaked out for only 2–3 sec after wounding, and a GFP-derived, fluorescent Ca2+ sensor showed that intracellular Ca2+ transiently increased immediately after wounding. In the absence of external Ca2+, the cell failed to repair itself. During the repair process, actin accumulated at the wounded sites but myosin II did not. The wounds were repaired even in myosin II null cells to a comparable degree as the wild-type cells, suggesting that myosin II does not contribute to wound repair. Thus, the actomyosin purse-string constriction model is not a common mechanism for wound repair in eukaryotic cells, and this discrepancy may arise from the difference in cell size.

  8. Dynamic myosin activation promotes collective morphology and migration by locally balancing oppositional forces from surrounding tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranjuez, George; Burtscher, Ashley; Sawant, Ketki; Majumder, Pralay; McDonald, Jocelyn A

    2016-06-15

    Migrating cells need to overcome physical constraints from the local microenvironment to navigate their way through tissues. Cells that move collectively have the additional challenge of negotiating complex environments in vivo while maintaining cohesion of the group as a whole. The mechanisms by which collectives maintain a migratory morphology while resisting physical constraints from the surrounding tissue are poorly understood. Drosophila border cells represent a genetic model of collective migration within a cell-dense tissue. Border cells move as a cohesive group of 6-10 cells, traversing a network of large germ line-derived nurse cells within the ovary. Here we show that the border cell cluster is compact and round throughout their entire migration, a shape that is maintained despite the mechanical pressure imposed by the surrounding nurse cells. Nonmuscle myosin II (Myo-II) activity at the cluster periphery becomes elevated in response to increased constriction by nurse cells. Furthermore, the distinctive border cell collective morphology requires highly dynamic and localized enrichment of Myo-II. Thus, activated Myo-II promotes cortical tension at the outer edge of the migrating border cell cluster to resist compressive forces from nurse cells. We propose that dynamic actomyosin tension at the periphery of collectives facilitates their movement through restrictive tissues.

  9. Nonmuscle Myosin II helps regulate synaptic vesicle mobility at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction

    OpenAIRE

    Qiu Xinping; Seabrooke Sara; Stewart Bryan A

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Although the mechanistic details of the vesicle transport process from the cell body to the nerve terminal are well described, the mechanisms underlying vesicle traffic within nerve terminal boutons is relatively unknown. The actin cytoskeleton has been implicated but exactly how actin or actin-binding proteins participate in vesicle movement is not clear. Results In the present study we have identified Nonmuscle Myosin II as a candidate molecule important for synaptic ves...

  10. Myosin II and the Gal-GalNAc lectin play a crucial role in tissue invasion by Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coudrier, Evelyne; Amblard, François; Zimmer, Christophe; Roux, Pascal; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Rigothier, Marie-Christine; Guillén, Nancy

    2005-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the human parasite responsible of amoebiasis, during which highly motile trophozoites invade the intestinal epithelium leading to amoebic colitis, and disseminate via the blood circulation causing liver abscesses. The invasive process, central to the pathogenesis, is known to be driven by parasites motility. To investigate molecules responsible for in vivo motion, we performed a high resolution dynamic imaging analysis using two-photon laser scanning microscopy. Image analysis of the parasites during invasion of Caco-2 cell monolayers, an enterocyte-like model, and hamster liver shows that E. histolytica undergoes non-Brownian motion. However, studies of movements of parasite strains dominant negative for myosin II, a central component of the cytoskeleton, and for Gal-GalNAc lectin, a major adhesion molecule, indicate that myosin II is essential for E. histolytica intercellular motility through intestinal cell monolayers and for its motility in liver. In contrast, the Gal-GalNAc lectin exclusively triggers invasion of the liver. These observations are in agreement with emerging studies that highlight marked differences in the way that cells migrate in vitro in two dimensions versus in vivo in three dimensions. The approach that we have developed should be powerful to identify adhesive complexes required for in vivo cell migration in normal and pathogenic situations and may, thereby, lead to new therapeutic drug, for pathologies based on cell motility and adhesion.

  11. Myosin-II dependent cell contractility contributes to spontaneous nodule formation of mesothelioma cells

    CERN Document Server

    Tárnoki-Zách, Julia; Méhes, Elod; Paku, Sándor; Neufeld, Zoltán; Hegedus, Balázs; Döme, Balázs; Czirok, Andras

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that characteristic nodules emerge in cultures of several malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) cell lines. Instead of excessive local cell proliferation, the nodules arise by Myosin II-driven cell contractility. The aggregation process can be prevented or reversed by suitable pharmacological inhibitors of acto-myosin contractility. A cell-resolved elasto-plastic model of the multicellular patterning process indicates that the morphology and size of the nodules as well as the speed of their formation is determined by the mechanical tension cells exert on their neighbors, and the stability of cell-substrate adhesion complexes. A linear stability analysis of a homogenous, self-tensioned Maxwell fluid indicates the unconditional presence of a patterning instability.

  12. Myosin Assembly, Maintenance and Degradation in Muscle: Role of the Chaperone UNC-45 in Myosin Thick Filament Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Pilgrim

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Myofibrillogenesis in striated muscle cells requires a precise ordered pathway to assemble different proteins into a linear array of sarcomeres. The sarcomere relies on interdigitated thick and thin filaments to ensure muscle contraction, as well as properly folded and catalytically active myosin head. Achieving this organization requires a series of protein folding and assembly steps. The folding of the myosin head domain requires chaperone activity to attain its functional conformation. Folded or unfolded myosin can spontaneously assemble into short myosin filaments, but further assembly requires the short and incomplete myosin filaments to assemble into the developing thick filament. These longer filaments are then incorporated into the developing sarcomere of the muscle. Both myosin folding and assembly require factors to coordinate the formation of the thick filament in the sarcomere and these factors include chaperone molecules. Myosin folding and sarcomeric assembly requires association of classical chaperones as well as folding cofactors such as UNC-45. Recent research has suggested that UNC-45 is required beyond initial myosin head folding and may be directly or indirectly involved in different stages of myosin thick filament assembly, maintenance and degradation.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulation for the reversed power stroke motion of a myosin subfragment-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Tadashi

    2015-06-01

    Myosins are typical molecular motor proteins that convert the chemical energy from the ATP hydrolysis into mechanical work. The fundamental mechanism of this energy conversion is still unknown. To explain the experimental results already obtained, Masuda has proposed a hypothesis called the "Driven by Detachment" theory for the working principle of the myosins. This theory insists that the energy used during the power stroke of the myosins does not directly originate from the chemical energy of ATP, but is converted from the elastic energy within the molecule at the joint between the head and neck domains. One method for demonstrating the validity of this theory is a computational simulation using the molecular dynamics (MD) method. The MD software used was GROMACS. The target of the MD simulations was myosin subfragment-1 (S1), for which the initial structure was obtained from the Protein Data Bank entry 1M8Q. The AFM pull code of GROMACS was used to apply an external force of 17 pN at the end of the neck domain in the direction opposite to the power stroke to observe whether the myosin S1 takes the pre-power stroke conformation. The residues assumed to be engaged in the docking with an actin filament were fixed to the space. Starting from exactly the same initial position, 10 simulations were repeated by varying the random seeds for generating the initial velocities of the atoms. After 64ns of calculations, the myosin S1 took the conformation of the pre-power stroke state in which the neck domain was bent around the joint between the head and the neck domains. This result agrees with the prediction expected by the DbD theory, the validity of which may be established by conducting similar simulations for the other steps of the myosin working processes. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  14. Non-muscle Myosin II Isoforms Co-assemble in Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Jordan R.; Shao, Lin; Remmert, Kirsten; Li, Dong; Betzig, Eric; Hammer, John A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Non-muscle myosin II (NM II) powers myriad developmental and cellular processes, including embryogenesis, cell migration, and cytokinesis [1]. To exert its functions, monomers of NM II assemble into bipolar filaments that produce a contractile force on the actin cytoskeleton. Mammalian cells express up to three isoforms of NM II (NM IIA, IIB and IIC), each of which possesses distinct biophysical properties and supports unique, as well as redundant, cellular functions [2-8]. Despite previous efforts [9-13], it remains unclear if NM II isoforms assemble in living cells to produce mixed (heterotypic) bipolar filaments, or if filaments consist entirely of a single isoform (homotypic). We addressed this question using fluorescently-tagged versions of NM IIA, IIB and IIC, isoform-specific immunostaining of the endogenous proteins, and two-color total internal reflection fluorescence structured-illumination microscopy, or TIRF-SIM, to visualize individual myosin II bipolar filaments inside cells. We show that NM II isoforms co-assemble into heterotypic filaments in a variety of settings, including various types of stress fibers, individual filaments throughout the cell, and the contractile ring. We also show that the differential distribution of NM IIA and NM IIB typically seen in confocal micrographs of well-polarized cells is reflected in the composition of individual bipolar filaments. Interestingly, this differential distribution is less pronounced in freshly-spread cells, arguing for the existence of sorting mechanism acting over time. Together, our work argues that individual NM II isoforms are potentially performing both isoform-specific and isoform-redundant functions while co-assembled with other NM II isoforms. PMID:24814144

  15. Regulation of nonmuscle myosin II during 3-methylcholanthrene induced dedifferentiation of C2C12 myotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, Sumit K.; Saha, Shekhar; Das, Provas; Das, Mahua R.; Jana, Siddhartha S., E-mail: bcssj@iacs.res.in

    2014-08-01

    3-Methylcholanthrene (3MC) induces tumor formation at the site of injection in the hind leg of mice within 110 days. Recent reports reveal that the transformation of normal muscle cells to atypical cells is one of the causes for tumor formation, however the molecular mechanism behind this process is not well understood. Here, we show in an in vitro study that 3MC induces fragmentation of multinucleate myotubes into viable mononucleates. These mononucleates form colonies when they are seeded into soft agar, indicative of cellular transformation. Immunoblot analysis reveals that phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC{sub 20}) is 5.6±0.5 fold reduced in 3MC treated myotubes in comparison to vehicle treated myotubes during the fragmentation of myotubes. In contrast, levels of myogenic factors such as MyoD, Myogenin and cell cycle regulators such as Cyclin D, Cyclin E1 remain unchanged as assessed by real-time PCR array and reverse transcriptase PCR analysis, respectively. Interestingly, addition of the myosin light chain kinase inhibitor, ML-7, enhances the fragmentation, whereas phosphatase inhibitor perturbs the 3MC induced fragmentation of myotubes. These results suggest that decrease in RLC{sub 20} phosphorylation may be associated with the fragmentation step of dedifferentiation. - Highlights: • 3-Methylcholanthrene induces fragmentation of C2C12-myotubes. • Dedifferentiation can be divided into two steps – fragmentation and proliferation. • Fragmentation is associated with rearrangement of nonmuscle myosin II. • Genes associated with differentiation and proliferation are not altered during fragmentation. • Phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain is reduced during fragmentation.

  16. Deletion of Calponin 2 in Mouse Fibroblasts Increases Myosin II-Dependent Cell Traction Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, M Moazzem; Zhao, Guangyi; Woo, Moon-Sook; Wang, James H-C; Jin, Jian-Ping

    2016-11-01

    Cell traction force (CTF) plays a critical role in controlling cell shape, permitting cell motility, and maintaining cellular homeostasis in many biological processes such as angiogenesis, development, wound healing, and cancer metastasis. Calponin is an actin filament-associated cytoskeletal protein in smooth muscles and multiple types of non-muscle cells. An established biochemical function of calponin is the inhibition of myosin ATPase in smooth muscle cells. Vertebrates have three calponin isoforms. Among them, calponin 2 is expressed in epithelial cells, endothelial cells, macrophages, myoblasts, and fibroblasts and plays a role in regulating cytoskeleton activities such as cell adhesion, migration, and cytokinesis. Knockout (KO) of the gene encoding calponin 2 (Cnn2) in mice increased cell motility, suggesting a function of calponin 2 in modulating CTF. In this study, we examined fibroblasts isolated from Cnn2 KO and wild-type (WT) mice using CTF microscopy. Primary mouse fibroblasts were cultured on polyacrylamide gel substrates embedded with fluorescent beads to measure root-mean-square traction, total strain energy, and net contractile movement. The results showed that calponin 2-null fibroblasts exhibit traction force greater than that of WT cells. Adherent calponin 2-null fibroblasts de-adhered faster than the WT control during mild trypsin treatment, consistent with an increased CTF. Blebbistatin, an inhibitor of myosin II ATPase, is more effective upon an alteration in cell morphology when calponin 2 is present in WT fibroblasts than that on Cnn2 KO cells, indicating their additive effects in inhibiting myosin motor activity. The novel finding that calponin 2 regulates myosin-dependent CTF in non-muscle cells demonstrates a mechanism for controlling cell motility-based functions.

  17. The microcephaly protein Asp regulates neuroepithelium morphogenesis by controlling the spatial distribution of myosin II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rujano, Maria A; Sanchez-Pulido, Luis; Pennetier, Carole; le Dez, Gaelle; Basto, Renata

    2013-11-01

    Mutations in ASPM are the most frequent cause of microcephaly, a disorder characterized by reduced brain size at birth. ASPM is recognized as a major regulator of brain size, yet its role during neural development remains poorly understood. Moreover, the role of ASPM proteins in invertebrate brain morphogenesis has never been investigated. Here, we characterized the function of the Drosophila ASPM orthologue, Asp, and found that asp mutants present severe defects in brain size and neuroepithelium morphogenesis. We show that size reduction depends on the mitotic function of Asp, whereas regulation of tissue shape depends on an uncharacterized function. Asp interacts with myosin II regulating its polarized distribution along the apico-basal axis. In the absence of Asp, mislocalization of myosin II results in interkinetic nuclear migration and tissue architecture defects. We propose that Asp regulates neuroepithelium morphogenesis through myosin-II-mediated structural and mechanical processes to maintain force balance and tissue cohesiveness.

  18. Rho/Rho-dependent kinase affects locomotion and actin-myosin II activity of Amoeba proteus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kłopocka, W; Redowicz, M J

    2004-10-01

    The highly motile free-living unicellular organism Amoeba proteus has been widely used as a model to study cell motility. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying its unique locomotion are still scarcely known. Recently, we have shown that blocking the amoebae's endogenous Rac- and Rho-like proteins led to distinct and irreversible changes in the appearance of these large migrating cells as well as to a significant inhibition of their locomotion. In order to elucidate the mechanism of the Rho pathway, we tested the effects of blocking the endogenous Rho-dependent kinase (ROCK) by anti-ROCK antibodies and Y-27632, (+)-(R)-trans-4-(1-aminoethyl)-N-(4-pyridyl)cyclohexanecarboxamide dihydrochloride, a specific inhibitor of ROCK, on migrating amoebae and the effect of the Rho and ROCK inhibition on the actin-activated Mg-ATPase of the cytosolic fraction of the amoebae. Amoebae microinjected with anti-ROCK inhibitors remained contracted and strongly attached to the glass surface and exhibited an atypical locomotion. Despite protruding many pseudopodia that were advancing in various directions, the amoebae could not effectively move. Immunofluorescence studies showed that ROCK-like protein was dispersed throughout the cytoplasm and was also found in the regions of actin-myosin II interaction during both isotonic and isometric contraction. The Mg-ATPase activity was about two- to threefold enhanced, indicating that blocking the Rho/Rho-dependent kinase activated myosin. It is possible then that in contrast to the vertebrate cells, the inactivation of Rho/Rho-dependent kinase in amoebae leads to the activation of myosin II and to the observed hypercontracted cells which cannot exert effective locomotion.

  19. Botulinum Toxin Type A Inhibits α-Smooth Muscle Actin and Myosin II Expression in Fibroblasts Derived From Scar Contracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Minliang; Yan, Tongtong; Ma, Kui; Lai, Linying; Liu, Chang; Liang, Liming; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-09-01

    Scar contracture (SC) is one of the most common complications resulting from major burn injuries. Numerous treatments are currently available but they do not always yield excellent therapeutic results. Recent reports suggest that botulinum toxin type A (BTXA) is effective at reducing SC clinically, but the molecular mechanism for this action is unknown. α-Smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and myosin II are the main components of stress fibers, which are the contractile structures of fibroblasts. The effects of BTXA on α-SMA and myosin II in SC are still unknown. This study aimed to explore the effect of BTXA on α-SMA and myosin II expression in fibroblasts derived from SC and to elucidate its actual mechanism further. Fibroblasts were isolated from tissue specimens of SC. Fibroblasts were cultured in Dulbecco modified Eagle medium with different concentrations of BTXA and their proliferation was analyzed through the tetrazolium-based colorimetric method at 1, 4, and 7 days. Proteins of α-SMA and myosin II were checked using Western blot in fibroblasts treated with different concentrations of BTXA at 1, 4, and 7 days. Fibroblasts without BTXA treatment had a higher proliferation than that in other groups, which indicated that the proliferation of fibroblasts was significantly inhibited by BTXA (P < 0.05). Proteins of α-SMA and myosin II between fibroblasts with BTXA and fibroblasts without BTXA are statistically significant (P < 0.05). These results suggest that BTXA effectively inhibited the growth of fibroblasts derived from SC and reduced the expression of α-SMA and myosin II, which provided theoretical support for the application of BTXA to control SC.

  20. Space exploration by dendritic cells requires maintenance of myosin II activity by IP3 receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanes, Paola; Heuzé, Mélina L; Maurin, Mathieu; Bretou, Marine; Lautenschlaeger, Franziska; Maiuri, Paolo; Terriac, Emmanuel; Thoulouze, Maria-Isabel; Launay, Pierre; Piel, Matthieu; Vargas, Pablo; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria

    2015-03-12

    Dendritic cells (DCs) patrol the interstitial space of peripheral tissues. The mechanisms that regulate their migration in such constrained environment remain unknown. We here investigated the role of calcium in immature DCs migrating in confinement. We found that they displayed calcium oscillations that were independent of extracellular calcium and more frequently observed in DCs undergoing strong speed fluctuations. In these cells, calcium spikes were associated with fast motility phases. IP₃ receptors (IP₃Rs) channels, which allow calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum, were identified as required for immature DCs to migrate at fast speed. The IP₃R1 isoform was further shown to specifically regulate the locomotion persistence of immature DCs, that is, their capacity to maintain directional migration. This function of IP₃R1 results from its ability to control the phosphorylation levels of myosin II regulatory light chain (MLC) and the back/front polarization of the motor protein. We propose that by upholding myosin II activity, constitutive calcium release from the ER through IP₃R1 maintains DC polarity during migration in confinement, facilitating the exploration of their environment.

  1. The role of myosin II in glioma invasion: A mathematical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wanho; Lim, Sookkyung; Kim, Yangjin

    2017-01-01

    Gliomas are malignant tumors that are commonly observed in primary brain cancer. Glioma cells migrate through a dense network of normal cells in microenvironment and spread long distances within brain. In this paper we present a two-dimensional multiscale model in which a glioma cell is surrounded by normal cells and its migration is controlled by cell-mechanical components in the microenvironment via the regulation of myosin II in response to chemoattractants. Our simulation results show that the myosin II plays a key role in the deformation of the cell nucleus as the glioma cell passes through the narrow intercellular space smaller than its nuclear diameter. We also demonstrate that the coordination of biochemical and mechanical components within the cell enables a glioma cell to take the mode of amoeboid migration. This study sheds lights on the understanding of glioma infiltration through the narrow intercellular spaces and may provide a potential approach for the development of anti-invasion strategies via the injection of chemoattractants for localization. PMID:28166231

  2. Possible interrelationship between changes in F-actin and myosin II, protein phosphorylation, and cell volume regulation in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, S F; Hoffmann, E K

    2002-01-01

    Osmotic shrinkage of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (EATC) elicited translocation of myosin II from the cytosol to the cortical region, and swelling elicits concentration of myosin II in the Golgi region. Rho kinase and p38 both appeared to be involved in shrinkage-induced myosin II reorganization....... In contrast, the previously reported shrinkage-induced actin polymerization [Pedersen et al. (1999) Exp. Cell Res. 252, 63-74] was independent of Rho kinase, p38, myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), and protein kinase C (PKC), which thus do not exert their effects on the shrinkage-activated transporters via...... by osmotic shrinkage and by the serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor Calyculin A (CL-A). Both stimuli caused Rho kinase-dependent myosin II relocation to the cortical cytoplasm, but in contrast to the shrinkage-induced F-actin polymerization, CL-A treatment elicited a slight F-actin depolymerization...

  3. Memory Disrupting Effects of Nonmuscle Myosin II Inhibition Depend on the Class of Abused Drug and Brain Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Sherri B.; Blouin, Ashley M.; Young, Erica J.; Rumbaugh, Gavin; Miller, Courtney A.

    2017-01-01

    Depolymerizing actin in the amygdala through nonmuscle myosin II inhibition (NMIIi) produces a selective, lasting, and retrieval-independent disruption of the storage of methamphetamine-associated memories. Here we report a similar disruption of memories associated with amphetamine, but not cocaine or morphine, by NMIIi. Reconsolidation appeared…

  4. Memory Disrupting Effects of Nonmuscle Myosin II Inhibition Depend on the Class of Abused Drug and Brain Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Sherri B.; Blouin, Ashley M.; Young, Erica J.; Rumbaugh, Gavin; Miller, Courtney A.

    2017-01-01

    Depolymerizing actin in the amygdala through nonmuscle myosin II inhibition (NMIIi) produces a selective, lasting, and retrieval-independent disruption of the storage of methamphetamine-associated memories. Here we report a similar disruption of memories associated with amphetamine, but not cocaine or morphine, by NMIIi. Reconsolidation appeared…

  5. Myosin II directly binds and inhibits Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors: a possible link to Rho family GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chan-Soo; Choi, Chang-Ki; Shin, Eun-Young; Schwartz, Martin Alexander; Kim, Eung-Gook

    2010-08-23

    Cell migration requires the coordinated spatiotemporal regulation of actomyosin contraction and cell protrusion/adhesion. Nonmuscle myosin II (MII) controls Rac1 and Cdc42 activation, and cell protrusion and focal complex formation in migrating cells. However, these mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we show that MII interacts specifically with multiple Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Binding is mediated by the conserved tandem Dbl homology-pleckstrin homology module, the catalytic site of these GEFs, with dissociation constants of approximately 0.3 microM. Binding to the GEFs required assembly of the MII into filaments and actin-stimulated ATPase activity. Binding of MII suppressed GEF activity. Accordingly, inhibition of MII ATPase activity caused release of GEFs and activation of Rho GTPases. Depletion of betaPIX GEF in migrating NIH3T3 fibroblasts suppressed lamellipodial protrusions and focal complex formation induced by MII inhibition. The results elucidate a functional link between MII and Rac1/Cdc42 GTPases, which may regulate protrusion/adhesion dynamics in migrating cells.

  6. Independent specialisation of myosin II paralogues in muscle vs. non-muscle functions during early animal evolution: a ctenophore perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayraud Cyrielle

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myosin II (or Myosin Heavy Chain II, MHCII is a family of molecular motors involved in the contractile activity of animal muscle cells but also in various other cellular processes in non-muscle cells. Previous phylogenetic analyses of bilaterian MHCII genes identified two main clades associated respectively with smooth/non-muscle cells (MHCIIa and striated muscle cells (MHCIIb. Muscle cells are generally thought to have originated only once in ancient animal history, and decisive insights about their early evolution are expected to come from expression studies of Myosin II genes in the two non-bilaterian phyla that possess muscles, the Cnidaria and Ctenophora. Results We have uncovered three MHCII paralogues in the ctenophore species Pleurobrachia pileus. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that the MHCIIa / MHCIIb duplication is more ancient than the divergence between extant metazoan lineages. The ctenophore MHCIIa gene (PpiMHCIIa has an expression pattern akin to that of "stem cell markers" (Piwi, Vasa… and is expressed in proliferating cells. We identified two MHCIIb genes that originated from a ctenophore-specific duplication. PpiMHCIIb1 represents the exclusively muscular form of myosin II in ctenophore, while PpiMHCIIb2 is expressed in non-muscle cells of various types. In parallel, our phalloidin staining and TEM observations highlight the structural complexity of ctenophore musculature and emphasize the experimental interest of the ctenophore tentacle root, in which myogenesis is spatially ordered and strikingly similar to striated muscle formation in vertebrates. Conclusion MHCIIa expression in putative stem cells/proliferating cells probably represents an ancestral trait, while specific involvement of some MHCIIa genes in smooth muscle fibres is a uniquely derived feature of the vertebrates. That one ctenophore MHCIIb paralogue (PpiMHCIIb2 has retained MHCIIa-like expression features furthermore suggests that muscular

  7. Myosin II directly binds and inhibits Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors: a possible link to Rho family GTPases

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chan-Soo; Choi, Chang-Ki; Shin, Eun-Young; Schwartz, Martin Alexander; Kim, Eung-Gook

    2010-01-01

    Cell migration requires the coordinated spatiotemporal regulation of actomyosin contraction and cell protrusion/adhesion. Nonmuscle myosin II (MII) controls Rac1 and Cdc42 activation, and cell protrusion and focal complex formation in migrating cells. However, these mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we show that MII interacts specifically with multiple Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Binding is mediated by the conserved tandem Dbl homology–pleckstrin homology modu...

  8. Cofilin Regulates Nuclear Architecture through a Myosin-II Dependent Mechanotransduction Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggan, O’Neil; Schroder, Bryce; Krapf, Diego; Bamburg, James R.; DeLuca, Jennifer G.

    2017-01-01

    Structural features of the nucleus including shape, size and deformability impact its function affecting normal cellular processes such as cell differentiation and pathological conditions such as tumor cell migration. Despite the fact that abnormal nuclear morphology has long been a defining characteristic for diseases such as cancer relatively little is known about the mechanisms that control normal nuclear architecture. Mounting evidence suggests close coupling between F-actin cytoskeletal organization and nuclear morphology however, mechanisms regulating this coupling are lacking. Here we identify that Cofilin/ADF-family F-actin remodeling proteins are essential for normal nuclear structure in different cell types. siRNA mediated silencing of Cofilin/ADF provokes striking nuclear defects including aberrant shapes, nuclear lamina disruption and reductions to peripheral heterochromatin. We provide evidence that these anomalies are primarily due to Rho kinase (ROCK) controlled excessive contractile myosin-II activity and not to elevated F-actin polymerization. Furthermore, we demonstrate a requirement for nuclear envelope LINC (linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton) complex proteins together with lamin A/C for nuclear aberrations induced by Cofilin/ADF loss. Our study elucidates a pivotal regulatory mechanism responsible for normal nuclear structure and which is expected to fundamentally influence nuclear function. PMID:28102353

  9. Non-muscle myosin II in disease: mechanisms and therapeutic opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A. Newell-Litwa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The actin motor protein non-muscle myosin II (NMII acts as a master regulator of cell morphology, with a role in several essential cellular processes, including cell migration and post-synaptic dendritic spine plasticity in neurons. NMII also generates forces that alter biochemical signaling, by driving changes in interactions between actin-associated proteins that can ultimately regulate gene transcription. In addition to its roles in normal cellular physiology, NMII has recently emerged as a critical regulator of diverse, genetically complex diseases, including neuronal disorders, cancers and vascular disease. In the context of these disorders, NMII regulatory pathways can be directly mutated or indirectly altered by disease-causing mutations. NMII regulatory pathway genes are also increasingly found in disease-associated copy-number variants, particularly in neuronal disorders such as autism and schizophrenia. Furthermore, manipulation of NMII-mediated contractility regulates stem cell pluripotency and differentiation, thus highlighting the key role of NMII-based pharmaceuticals in the clinical success of stem cell therapies. In this Review, we discuss the emerging role of NMII activity and its regulation by kinases and microRNAs in the pathogenesis and prognosis of a diverse range of diseases, including neuronal disorders, cancer and vascular disease. We also address promising clinical applications and limitations of NMII-based inhibitors in the treatment of these diseases and the development of stem-cell-based therapies.

  10. Reciprocal and dynamic polarization of planar cell polarity core components and myosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman-Smith, Erin; Kourakis, Matthew J; Reeves, Wendy; Veeman, Michael; Smith, William C

    2015-04-13

    The Ciona notochord displays planar cell polarity (PCP), with anterior localization of Prickle (Pk) and Strabismus (Stbm). We report that a myosin is polarized anteriorly in these cells and strongly colocalizes with Stbm. Disruption of the actin/myosin machinery with cytochalasin or blebbistatin disrupts polarization of Pk and Stbm, but not of myosin complexes, suggesting a PCP-independent aspect of myosin localization. Wash out of cytochalasin restored Pk polarization, but not if done in the presence of blebbistatin, suggesting an active role for myosin in core PCP protein localization. On the other hand, in the pk mutant line, aimless, myosin polarization is disrupted in approximately one third of the cells, indicating a reciprocal action of core PCP signaling on myosin localization. Our results indicate a complex relationship between the actomyosin cytoskeleton and core PCP components in which myosin is not simply a downstream target of PCP signaling, but also required for PCP protein localization.

  11. Myosin types and fiber types in cardiac muscle. II. Atrial myocardium

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    Antibodies were produced against myosins isolated from the left atrial myocardium (anti-bAm) and the left ventricular myocardium (anti-bVm) of the bovine heart. Cross-reactive antibodies were removed by cross- absorption. Absorbed anti-bAm and anti-bVm were specific for the myosin heavy chains when tested by enzyme immunoassay combined with SDS gel electrophoresis. Indirect immunofluorescence was used to determine the reactivity of atrial muscle fibers to the two antibodies. Three populations...

  12. A Collapsin Response Mediator Protein 2 Isoform Controls Myosin II-Mediated Cell Migration and Matrix Assembly by Trapping ROCK II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan-Fisher, Marie; Wait, Robin; Couchman, John R.; Wewer, Ulla M.

    2012-01-01

    Collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP-2) is known as a regulator of neuronal polarity and differentiation through microtubule assembly and trafficking. Here, we show that CRMP-2 is ubiquitously expressed and a splice variant (CRMP-2L), which is expressed mainly in epithelial cells among nonneuronal cells, regulates myosin II-mediated cellular functions, including cell migration. While the CRMP-2 short form (CRMP-2S) is recognized as a substrate of the Rho-GTP downstream kinase ROCK in neuronal cells, a CRMP-2 complex containing 2L not only bound the catalytic domain of ROCK II through two binding domains but also trapped and inhibited the kinase. CRMP-2L protein levels profoundly affected haptotactic migration and the actin-myosin cytoskeleton of carcinoma cells as well as nontransformed epithelial cell migration in a ROCK activity-dependent manner. Moreover, the ectopic expression of CRMP-2L but not -2S inhibited fibronectin matrix assembly in fibroblasts. Underlying these responses, CRMP-2L regulated the kinase activity of ROCK II but not ROCK I, independent of GTP-RhoA levels. This study provides a new insight into CRMP-2 as a controller of myosin II-mediated cellular functions through the inhibition of ROCK II in nonneuronal cells. PMID:22431514

  13. Structural dynamics of myosin 5 during processive motion revealed by interferometric scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrecka, Joanna; Ortega Arroyo, Jaime; Takagi, Yasuharu; de Wit, Gabrielle; Fineberg, Adam; MacKinnon, Lachlan; Young, Gavin; Sellers, James R; Kukura, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Myosin 5a is a dual-headed molecular motor that transports cargo along actin filaments. By following the motion of individual heads with interferometric scattering microscopy at nm spatial and ms temporal precision we found that the detached head occupies a loosely fixed position to one side of actin from which it rebinds in a controlled manner while executing a step. Improving the spatial precision to the sub-nm regime provided evidence for an ångstrom-level structural transition in the motor domain associated with the power stroke. Simultaneous tracking of both heads revealed that consecutive steps follow identical paths to the same side of actin in a compass-like spinning motion demonstrating a symmetrical walking pattern. These results visualize many of the critical unknown aspects of the stepping mechanism of myosin 5 including head–head coordination, the origin of lever-arm motion and the spatiotemporal dynamics of the translocating head during individual steps. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05413.001 PMID:25748137

  14. Myosin types and fiber types in cardiac muscle. II. Atrial myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorza, L; Sartore, S; Schiaffino, S

    1982-12-01

    Antibodies were produced against myosins isolated from the left atrial myocardium (anti-bAm) and the left ventricular myocardium (anti-bVm) of the bovine heart. Cross-reactive antibodies were removed by cross-absorption. Absorbed anti-bAm and anti-bVm were specific for the myosin heavy chains when tested by enzyme immunoassay combined with SDS gel electrophoresis. Indirect immunofluorescence was used to determine the reactivity of atrial muscle fibers to the two antibodies. Three populations of atrial muscle fibers were distinguished in the bovine heart: (a) fibers reactive with anti-bAm and unreactive with anti-bVm, like most fibers in the left atrium; (b) fibers reactive with both antibodies, especially numerous in the right atrium; (c) fibers reactive with anti-bVm and unreactive with anti-bAm, present only in the interatrial septum and in specific regions of the right atrium, such as the crista terminalis. These findings can be accounted for by postulating the existence of two distinct types of atrial myosin heavy chains, one of which is antigenically related to ventricular myosin. The tendency for fibers labeled by anti-bVm to occur frequently in bundles and their preferential distribution in the crista terminalis, namely along one of the main conduction pathways between the sinus node and the atrioventricular node, and in the interatrial septum, where different internodal tracts are known to converge, suggests that these fibers may be specialized for faster conduction.

  15. Angiotensin II induces reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and myosin light-chain phosphorylation in podocytes through rho/ROCK-signaling pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Siyuan; Chen, Cheng; Su, Ke; Zha, Dongqing; Liang, Wei; Hillebrands, J L; van Goor, Harry; Ding, Guohua

    2016-01-01

    Aims In the present study, we have evaluated the effect of angiotensin II (Ang II) on actin cytoskeleton reorganization and myosin light-chain (MLC) phosphorylation in podocytes to demonstrate whether the Rho/Rho-associated coiled kinase (ROCK) pathway is involved podocyte injury. Methods Eighteen

  16. Angiotensin II induces reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and myosin light-chain phosphorylation in podocytes through rho/ROCK-signaling pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Siyuan; Chen, Cheng; Su, Ke; Zha, Dongqing; Liang, Wei; Hillebrands, J L; van Goor, Harry; Ding, Guohua

    2016-01-01

    Aims In the present study, we have evaluated the effect of angiotensin II (Ang II) on actin cytoskeleton reorganization and myosin light-chain (MLC) phosphorylation in podocytes to demonstrate whether the Rho/Rho-associated coiled kinase (ROCK) pathway is involved podocyte injury. Methods Eighteen m

  17. Myosin II ATPase activity mediates the long-term potentiation-induced exodus of stable F-actin bound by drebrin A from dendritic spines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Mizui

    Full Text Available The neuronal actin-binding protein drebrin A forms a stable structure with F-actin in dendritic spines. NMDA receptor activation causes an exodus of F-actin bound by drebrin A (DA-actin from dendritic spines, suggesting a pivotal role for DA-actin exodus in synaptic plasticity. We quantitatively assessed the extent of DA-actin localization to spines using the spine-dendrite ratio of drebrin A in cultured hippocampal neurons, and found that (1 chemical long-term potentiation (LTP stimulation induces rapid DA-actin exodus and subsequent DA-actin re-entry in dendritic spines, (2 Ca(2+ influx through NMDA receptors regulates the exodus and the basal accumulation of DA-actin, and (3 the DA-actin exodus is blocked by myosin II ATPase inhibitor, but is not blocked by myosin light chain kinase (MLCK or Rho-associated kinase (ROCK inhibitors. These results indicate that myosin II mediates the interaction between NMDA receptor activation and DA-actin exodus in LTP induction. Furthermore, myosin II seems to be activated by a rapid actin-linked mechanism rather than slow MLC phosphorylation. Thus the myosin-II mediated DA-actin exodus might be an initial event in LTP induction, triggering actin polymerization and spine enlargement.

  18. Myosin II ATPase activity mediates the long-term potentiation-induced exodus of stable F-actin bound by drebrin A from dendritic spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizui, Toshiyuki; Sekino, Yuko; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Ishizuka, Yuta; Takahashi, Hideto; Kojima, Nobuhiko; Kojima, Masami; Shirao, Tomoaki

    2014-01-01

    The neuronal actin-binding protein drebrin A forms a stable structure with F-actin in dendritic spines. NMDA receptor activation causes an exodus of F-actin bound by drebrin A (DA-actin) from dendritic spines, suggesting a pivotal role for DA-actin exodus in synaptic plasticity. We quantitatively assessed the extent of DA-actin localization to spines using the spine-dendrite ratio of drebrin A in cultured hippocampal neurons, and found that (1) chemical long-term potentiation (LTP) stimulation induces rapid DA-actin exodus and subsequent DA-actin re-entry in dendritic spines, (2) Ca(2+) influx through NMDA receptors regulates the exodus and the basal accumulation of DA-actin, and (3) the DA-actin exodus is blocked by myosin II ATPase inhibitor, but is not blocked by myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) or Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) inhibitors. These results indicate that myosin II mediates the interaction between NMDA receptor activation and DA-actin exodus in LTP induction. Furthermore, myosin II seems to be activated by a rapid actin-linked mechanism rather than slow MLC phosphorylation. Thus the myosin-II mediated DA-actin exodus might be an initial event in LTP induction, triggering actin polymerization and spine enlargement.

  19. Structural Dynamics of Actin during Active Interaction with Myosin Depends on the Isoform of the Essential Light Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochniewicz, Ewa; Guhathakurta, Piyali; Thomas, David D.

    2013-01-01

    We have used time-resolved phosphorescence anisotropy (TPA) to investigate the effects of essential light chain (ELC) isoforms (A1 and A2) on the interaction of skeletal muscle myosin with actin, in order to relate structural dynamics to previously reported functional effects. Actin was labeled with a phosphorescent probe at C374, and the myosin head (S1) was separated into isoenzymes S1A1 and S1A2 by ion-exchange chromatography. As previously reported, S1A1 exhibited substantially lower ATPase activity at saturating actin but substantially higher apparent actin affinity, resulting in higher catalytic efficiency. In the absence of ATP, each isoenzyme increased actin’s final anisotropy cooperatively and to a similar extent, indicating similar restriction of the amplitude of intrafilament rotational motions in the strong-binding (S) state of actomyosin. In contrast, in the presence of saturating ATP, S1A1 increased actin anisotropy much more than S1A2 and with greater cooperativity, indicating that S1A1 was more effective in restricting actin dynamics during the active interaction of actin and myosin. We conclude that during the active interaction of actin and ATP with myosin, S1A1 is more effective at stabilizing the S state (probably the force-generating state) of actomyosin, while S1A2 tends to stabilize the weak-binding (non-force-generating) W state. When a mixture of isoenzymes is present, S1A1 is dominant in its effects on actin dynamics. We conclude that ELC of skeletal muscle myosin modulates strong-to-weak structural transitions during the actomyosin ATPase cycle in an isoform-dependent manner, with significant implications for the contractile function of actomyosin. PMID:23339370

  20. Model for processive movement of myosin Ⅴ and myosin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Ping; Dou Shuo-Xing; Wang Peng-Ye

    2005-01-01

    Myosin Ⅴ and myosin Ⅵ are two classes of two-headed molecular motors of the myosin superfamily that move processively along helical actin filaments in opposite directions. Here we present a hand-over-hand model for their processive movements. In the model, the moving direction of a dimeric molecular motor is automatically determined by the relative orientation between its two heads at free state and its head's binding orientation on track filament.This determines that myosin Ⅴ moves toward the barbed end and myosin Ⅵ moves toward the pointed end of actin.During the moving period in one step, one head remains bound to actin for myosin Ⅴ whereas two heads are detached for myosin Ⅵ: the moving manner is determined by the length of neck domain. This naturally explains the similar dynamic behaviours but opposite moving directions of myosin Ⅵ and mutant myosin Ⅴ (the neck of which is truncated to only one-sixth of the native length). Because of different moving manners, myosin Ⅵ and mutant myosin Ⅴ exhibit significantly broader step-size distribution than native myosin Ⅴ. However, all the three motors give the same mean step size of ~36nm (the pseudo-repeat of actin helix). All these theoretical results are in agreement with previous experimental ones.

  1. In Drosophila, RhoGEF2 cooperates with activated Ras in tumorigenesis through a pathway involving Rho1–Rok–Myosin-II and JNK signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peytee Khoo

    2013-05-01

    The Ras oncogene contributes to ∼30% of human cancers, but alone is not sufficient for tumorigenesis. In a Drosophila screen for oncogenes that cooperate with an activated allele of Ras (RasACT to promote tissue overgrowth and invasion, we identified the GTP exchange factor RhoGEF2, an activator of Rho-family signalling. Here, we show that RhoGEF2 also cooperates with an activated allele of a downstream effector of Ras, Raf (RafGOF. We dissect the downstream pathways through which RhoGEF2 cooperates with RasACT (and RafGOF, and show that RhoGEF2 requires Rho1, but not Rac, for tumorigenesis. Furthermore, of the Rho1 effectors, we show that RhoGEF2 + Ras (Raf-mediated tumorigenesis requires the Rho kinase (Rok–Myosin-II pathway, but not Diaphanous, Lim kinase or protein kinase N. The Rho1–Rok–Myosin-II pathway leads to the activation of Jun kinase (JNK, in cooperation with RasACT. Moreover, we show that activation of Rok or Myosin II, using constitutively active transgenes, is sufficient for cooperative tumorigenesis with RasACT, and together with RasACT leads to strong activation of JNK. Our results show that Rok–Myosin-II activity is necessary and sufficient for Ras-mediated tumorigenesis. Our observation that activation of Myosin II, which regulates Filamentous actin (F-actin contractility without affecting F-actin levels, cooperates with RasACT to promote JNK activation and tumorigenesis, suggests that increased cell contractility is a key factor in tumorigenesis. Furthermore, we show that signalling via the Tumour necrosis factor (TNF; also known as Egr-ligand–JNK pathway is most likely the predominant pathway that activates JNK upon Rok activation. Overall, our analysis highlights the need for further analysis of the Rok–Myosin-II pathway in cooperation with Ras in human cancers.

  2. Planar polarization of Vangl2 in the vertebrate neural plate is controlled by Wnt and Myosin II signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Ossipova

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The vertebrate neural tube forms as a result of complex morphogenetic movements, which require the functions of several core planar cell polarity (PCP proteins, including Vangl2 and Prickle. Despite the importance of these proteins for neurulation, their subcellular localization and the mode of action have remained largely unknown. Here we describe the anteroposterior planar cell polarity (AP-PCP of the cells in the Xenopus neural plate. At the neural midline, the Vangl2 protein is enriched at anterior cell edges and that this localization is directed by Prickle, a Vangl2-interacting protein. Our further analysis is consistent with the model, in which Vangl2 AP-PCP is established in the neural plate as a consequence of Wnt-dependent phosphorylation. Additionally, we uncover feedback regulation of Vangl2 polarity by Myosin II, reiterating a role for mechanical forces in PCP. These observations indicate that both Wnt signaling and Myosin II activity regulate cell polarity and cell behaviors during vertebrate neurulation.

  3. AN INTEGRATIVE WAY OF TEACHING MOLECULAR CELL BIOLOGY AND PROTEIN CHEMISTRY USING ACTIN IMMOBILIZATION ON CHITIN FOR PURIFYING MYOSIN II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.G. Souza

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Our intent is to present our experience on teaching Molecular Cell Biology andProtein Chemistry at UNIRIO through an innovative approach that includes myosin IIextraction and purification. We took advantage of the properties of muscle contractionand propose a simple method for purifying myosin II by affinity chromatography. Thisoriginal method is based on the preparation of an affinity column containing actinmolecules covalently bound to chitin particles. We propose a three-week syllabus thatincludes lectures and bench experimental work. The syllabus favors the activelearning of protein extraction and purification, as well as, of scientific concepts suchas muscle contraction, cytoskeleton structure and its importance for the living cell. Italso promotes the learning of the biotechnological applications of chitin and theapplications of protein immobilization in different industrial fields. Furthermore, theactivities also target the development of laboratorial technical abilities, thedevelopment of problem solving skills and the ability to write up a scientific reportfollowing the model of a scientific article. It is very important to mention that thissyllabus can be used even in places where a facility such as ultra-centrifugation islacking.

  4. Cargo recognition and cargo-mediated regulation of unconventional myosins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qing; Li, Jianchao; Zhang, Mingjie

    2014-10-21

    Organized motions are hallmarks of living organisms. Such motions range from collective cell movements during development and muscle contractions at the macroscopic scale all the way down to cellular cargo (e.g., various biomolecules and organelles) transportation and mechanoforce sensing at more microscopic scales. Energy required for these biological motions is almost invariably provided by cellular chemical fuels in the form of nucleotide triphosphate. Biological systems have designed a group of nanoscale engines, known as molecular motors, to convert cellular chemical fuels into mechanical energy. Molecular motors come in various forms including cytoskeleton motors (myosin, kinesin, and dynein), nucleic-acid-based motors, cellular membrane-based rotary motors, and so on. The main focus of this Account is one subfamily of actin filament-based motors called unconventional myosins (other than muscle myosin II, the remaining myosins are collectively referred to as unconventional myosins). In general, myosins can use ATP to fuel two types of mechanomotions: dynamic tethering actin filaments with various cellular compartments or structures and actin filament-based intracellular transport. In contrast to rich knowledge accumulated over many decades on ATP hydrolyzing motor heads and their interactions with actin filaments, how various myosins recognize their specific cargoes and whether and how cargoes can in return regulate functions of motors are less understood. Nonetheless, a series of biochemical and structural investigations in the past few years, including works from our own laboratory, begin to shed lights on these latter questions. Some myosins (e.g., myosin-VI) can function both as cellular transporters and as mechanical tethers. To function as a processive transporter, myosins need to form dimers or multimers. To be a mechanical tether, a monomeric myosin is sufficient. It has been shown for myosin-VI that its cellular cargo proteins can play critical roles

  5. Conditional deletion of nonmuscle myosin II-A in mouse tongue epithelium results in squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Mary Anne; Saleh, Anthony D; Brinster, Lauren R; Cheng, Hui; Chen, Zhong; Cornelius, Shaleeka; Liu, Chengyu; Ma, Xuefei; Van Waes, Carter; Adelstein, Robert S

    2015-09-15

    To investigate the contribution of nonmuscle myosin II-A (NM II-A) to early cardiac development we crossed Myh9 floxed mice and Nkx2.5 cre-recombinase mice. Nkx2.5 is expressed in the early heart (E7.5) and later in the tongue epithelium. Mice homozygous for deletion of NM II-A (A(Nkx)/A(Nkx)) are born at the expected ratio with normal hearts, but consistently develop an invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the tongue (32/32 A(Nkx)/A(Nkx)) as early as E17.5. To assess reproducibility a second, independent line of Myh9 floxed mice derived from a different embryonic stem cell clone was tested. This second line also develops SCC indistinguishable from the first (15/15). In A(Nkx)/A(Nkx) mouse tongue epithelium, genetic deletion of NM II-A does not affect stabilization of TP53, unlike a previous report for SCC. We attribute the consistent, early formation of SCC with high penetrance to the role of NM II in maintaining mitotic stability during karyokinesis.

  6. The Rho family GEF Asef2 regulates cell migration in three dimensional (3D) collagen matrices through myosin II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Léolène; Yang, Lijie; Majumdar, Devi; Gao, Yandong; Shi, Mingjian; Brewer, Bryson M.; Li, Deyu; Webb, Donna J

    2014-01-01

    Cell migration is fundamental to a variety of physiological processes, including tissue development, homeostasis, and regeneration. Migration has been extensively studied with cells on 2-dimensional (2D) substrates, but much less is known about cell migration in 3D environments. Tissues and organs are 3D, which is the native environment of cells in vivo, pointing to a need to understand migration and the mechanisms that regulate it in 3D environments. To investigate cell migration in 3D environments, we developed microfluidic devices that afford a controlled, reproducible platform for generating 3D matrices. Using these devices, we show that the Rho family guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Asef2 inhibits cell migration in 3D type I collagen (collagen I) matrices. Treatment of cells with the myosin II (MyoII) inhibitor blebbistatin abolished the decrease in migration by Asef2. Moreover, Asef2 enhanced MyoII activity as shown by increased phosphorylation of serine 19 (S19). Furthermore, Asef2 increased activation of Rac, which is a Rho family small GTPase, in 3D collagen I matrices. Inhibition of Rac activity by treatment with the Rac-specific inhibitor NSC23766 abrogated the Asef2-promoted increase in S19 MyoII phosphorylation. Thus, our results indicate that Asef2 regulates cell migration in 3D collagen I matrices through a Rac-MyoII-dependent mechanism. PMID:25517435

  7. Effects of pseudophosphorylation mutants on the structural dynamics of smooth muscle myosin regulatory light chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza-Fonseca, L. Michel; Colson, Brett A.; Thomas, David D.

    2014-01-01

    We have performed 50 independent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to determine the effect of pseudophosphorylation mutants on the structural dynamics of smooth muscle myosin (SMM) regulatory light chain (RLC). We previously showed that the N-terminal phosphorylation domain of RLC simultaneously populates two structural states in equilibrium, closed and open, and that phosphorylation at S19 induces a modest shift toward the open state, which is sufficient to activate smooth muscle. However, it remains unknown why pseudophosphorylation mutants poorly mimic phosphorylation-induced activation of SMM. We performed MD simulations of unphosphorylated, phosphorylated, and three pseudophosphorylatedRLC mutants: S19E, T18D/S19D and T18E/S19E. We found that the S19E mutation does not shift the equilibrium toward the open state, indicating that simple charge replacement at position S19 does not mimic the activating effect of phosphorylation, providing a structural explanation for previously published functional data. In contrast, mutants T18D/S19D and T18E/S19E shift the equilibrium toward the open structure and partially activate in vitro motility, further supporting the model that an increase in the mol fraction of the open state is coupled to SMM motility. Structural analyses of the doubly-charged pseudophosphorylation mutants suggest that alterations in an interdomain salt bridge between residues R4 and D100 results in impaired signal transmission from RLC to the catalytic domain of SMM, which explains the low ATPase activity of these mutants. Our results demonstrate that phosphorylation produces a unique structural balance in the RLC. These observations have important implications for our understanding of the structural aspects of activation and force potentiation in smooth and striated muscle. PMID:25091814

  8. Inhibiting myosin-ATPase reveals a dynamic range of mitochondrial respiratory control in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Christopher G R; Kane, Daniel A; Lin, Chien-Te; Kozy, Rachel; Cathey, Brook L; Lark, Daniel S; Kane, Constance L; Brophy, Patricia M; Gavin, Timothy P; Anderson, Ethan J; Neufer, P Darrell

    2011-07-15

    Assessment of mitochondrial ADP-stimulated respiratory kinetics in PmFBs (permeabilized fibre bundles) is increasingly used in clinical diagnostic and basic research settings. However, estimates of the Km for ADP vary considerably (~20-300 μM) and tend to overestimate respiration at rest. Noting that PmFBs spontaneously contract during respiration experiments, we systematically determined the impact of contraction, temperature and oxygenation on ADP-stimulated respiratory kinetics. BLEB (blebbistatin), a myosin II ATPase inhibitor, blocked contraction under all conditions and yielded high Km values for ADP of >~250 and ~80 μM in red and white rat PmFBs respectively. In the absence of BLEB, PmFBs contracted and the Km for ADP decreased ~2-10-fold in a temperature-dependent manner. PmFBs were sensitive to hyperoxia (increased Km) in the absence of BLEB (contracted) at 30 °C but not 37 °C. In PmFBs from humans, contraction elicited high sensitivity to ADP (Km<100 μM), whereas blocking contraction (+BLEB) and including a phosphocreatine/creatine ratio of 2:1 to mimic the resting energetic state yielded a Km for ADP of ~1560 μM, consistent with estimates of in vivo resting respiratory rates of <1% maximum. These results demonstrate that the sensitivity of muscle to ADP varies over a wide range in relation to contractile state and cellular energy charge, providing evidence that enzymatic coupling of energy transfer within skeletal muscle becomes more efficient in the working state.

  9. Inhibiting Myosin-ATPase Reveals Dynamic Range of Mitochondrial Respiratory Control in Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Christopher G.R.; Kane, Daniel A.; Lin, Chien-Te; Kozy, Rachel; Cathey, Brook L.; Lark, Daniel S.; Kane, Constance L.; Brophy, Patricia M.; Gavin, Timothy P; Anderson, Ethan J.; Neufer, P. Darrell

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of mitochondrial ADP-stimulated respiratory kinetics in permeabilized skeletal myofibres (PmFB) is increasingly used in clinical diagnostic and basic research settings. However, estimates of the Km for ADP vary considerably (∼20-300 μM) and tend to overestimate respiration at rest. Noting PmFBs spontaneously contract during respiration experiments, we systematically determined the impact of contraction, temperature and oxygenation on ADP-stimulated respiratory kinetics. Blebbistatin (BLEB), a myosin II ATPase inhibitor, blocked contraction under all conditions and yielded high Km values for ADP of >∼250 and ∼80 μM in red and white rat PmFB, respectively. In the absence of BLEB, PmFB contracted and the Km for ADP decreased by ∼2 to 10-fold in a temperature-dependent manner. PmFB were sensitive to hyperoxia (increased Km) in the absence of BLEB (contracted) at 30°C but not 37°C. In PmFB from humans, contraction elicited high sensitivity to ADP (m <100 μM) whereas blocking contraction (+BLEB) and including PCr:Cr = 2 to mimic the resting energetic state yielded a Km for ADP = ∼1560 μM, consistent with estimates of in vivo resting respiratory rates of <1% maximum. These results demonstrate the sensitivity of muscle to ADP varies over a wide range in relation to contractile state and cellular energy charge, providing evidence that enzymatic coupling of energy transfer within skeletal muscle becomes more efficient in the working state. PMID:21554250

  10. Self-organized podosomes are dynamic mechanosensors

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Podosomes are self-organized dynamic actin-containing structures that adhere to the extracellular matrix via integrins [1–5]. Yet it is not clear what regulates podosome dynamics and whether podosomes can function as direct mechanosensors like focal adhesions [6–9]. We show here that myosin IIs form circular structures outside and at the podosome actin ring to regulate podosome dynamics. Inhibiting myosin II-dependent tension dissipated podosome actin rings before dissipating the myosin ring ...

  11. Internal Motility in Stiffening Actin-Myosin Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Uhde, J; Sackmann, E; Parmeggiani, A; Frey, E; Uhde, Joerg; Keller, Manfred; Sackmann, Erich; Parmeggiani, Andrea; Frey, Erwin

    2003-01-01

    We present a study on filamentous actin solutions containing heavy meromyosin subfragments of myosin II motor molecules. We focus on the viscoelastic phase behavior and internal dynamics of such networks during ATP depletion. Upon simultaneously using micro-rheology and fluorescence microscopy as complementary experimental tools, we find a sol-gel transition accompanied by a sudden onset of directed filament motion. We interpret the sol-gel transition in terms of myosin II enzymology, and suggest a "zipping" mechanism to explain the filament motion in the vicinity of the sol-gel transition.

  12. Blebbistain, a myosin II inhibitor, as a novel strategy to regulate detrusor contractility in a rat model of partial bladder outlet obstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhua Zhang

    Full Text Available Partial bladder outlet obstruction (PBOO, a common urologic pathology mostly caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia, can coexist in 40-45% of patients with overactive bladder (OAB and is associated with detrusor overactivity (DO. PBOO that induces DO results in alteration in bladder myosin II type and isoform composition. Blebbistatin (BLEB is a myosin II inhibitor we recently demonstrated potently relaxed normal detrusor smooth muscle (SM and reports suggest varied BLEB efficacy for different SM myosin (SMM isoforms and/or SMM vs nonmuscle myosin (NMM. We hypothesize BLEB inhibition of myosin II as a novel contraction protein targeted strategy to regulate DO. Using a surgically-induced male rat PBOO model, organ bath contractility, competitive and Real-Time-RT-PCR were performed. It was found that obstructed-bladder weight significantly increased 2.74-fold while in vitro contractility of detrusor to various stimuli was impaired ∼50% along with decreased shortening velocity. Obstruction also altered detrusor spontaneous activities with significantly increased amplitude but depressed frequency. PBOO switched bladder from a phasic-type to a more tonic-type SM. Expression of 5' myosin heavy chain (MHC alternatively spliced isoform SM-A (associated with tonic-type SM increased 3-fold while 3' MHC SM1 and essential light chain isoform MLC(17b also exhibited increased relative expression. Total SMMHC expression was decreased by 25% while the expression of NMM IIB (SMemb was greatly increased by 4.5-fold. BLEB was found to completely relax detrusor strips from both sham-operated and PBOO rats pre-contracted with KCl, carbachol or electrical field stimulation although sensitivity was slightly decreased (20% only at lower doses for PBOO. Thus we provide the first thorough characterization of the response of rat bladder myosin to PBOO and demonstrate complete BLEB-induced PBOO bladder SM relaxation. Furthermore, the present study provides valuable

  13. Two-boundary first exit time of Gauss-Markov processes for stochastic modeling of acto-myosin dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Onofrio, Giuseppe; Pirozzi, Enrica

    2017-05-01

    We consider a stochastic differential equation in a strip, with coefficients suitably chosen to describe the acto-myosin interaction subject to time-varying forces. By simulating trajectories of the stochastic dynamics via an Euler discretization-based algorithm, we fit experimental data and determine the values of involved parameters. The steps of the myosin are represented by the exit events from the strip. Motivated by these results, we propose a specific stochastic model based on the corresponding time-inhomogeneous Gauss-Markov and diffusion process evolving between two absorbing boundaries. We specify the mean and covariance functions of the stochastic modeling process taking into account time-dependent forces including the effect of an external load. We accurately determine the probability density function (pdf) of the first exit time (FET) from the strip by solving a system of two non singular second-type Volterra integral equations via a numerical quadrature. We provide numerical estimations of the mean of FET as approximations of the dwell-time of the proteins dynamics. The percentage of backward steps is given in agreement to experimental data. Numerical and simulation results are compared and discussed.

  14. Dlc1 interaction with non-muscle myosin heavy chain II-A (Myh9 and Rac1 activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad G. Sabbir

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Deleted in liver cancer 1 (Dlc1 gene codes for a Rho GTPase-activating protein that also acts as a tumour suppressor gene. Several studies have consistently found that overexpression leads to excessive cell elongation, cytoskeleton changes and subsequent cell death. However, none of these studies have been able to satisfactorily explain the Dlc1-induced cell morphological phenotypes and the function of the different Dlc1 isoforms. Therefore, we have studied the interacting proteins associated with the three major Dlc1 transcriptional isoforms using a mass spectrometric approach in Dlc1 overexpressing cells. We have found and validated novel interacting partners in constitutive Dlc1-expressing cells. Our study has shown that Dlc1 interacts with non-muscle myosin heavy chain II-A (Myh9, plectin and spectrin proteins in different multiprotein complexes. Overexpression of Dlc1 led to increased phosphorylation of Myh9 protein and activation of Rac1 GTPase. These data support a role for Dlc1 in induced cell elongation morphology and provide some molecular targets for further analysis of this phenotype.

  15. Purification and characterization of the plasmodial phosphatase that hydrolyses the phosphorylated light chain of Physarum myosin II from Physarum polycephalum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Chisa; Nakamura, Akio; Tomioka, Shigeo; Kohama, Kazuhiro; Kaneko, Takako S

    2010-08-01

    A phosphatase was purified through a combination of ion-exchange and hydrophobic chromatography followed by native PAGE from Physarum plasmodia. Recently, we demonstrated that this phosphatase isoform has a hydrolytic activity towards the PMLC (phosphorylated light chain of Physarum myosin II) at pH 7.6. The apparent molecular mass of the purified enzyme was estimated at approximately 50 kDa by means of analytical gel filtration. The enzyme was purified 340-fold to a final phosphatase activity of 400 pkat/mg of protein. Among the phosphorylated compounds tested for hydrolytic activity at pH 7.6, the enzyme showed no activity towards nucleotides. At pH 7.6, hydrolytic activity of the enzyme against PMLC was detected; at pH 5.0, however, no hydrolytic activity towards PMLC was observed. The Km of the enzyme for PMLC was 10 microM, and the V(max) was 1.17 nkat/mg of protein. Ca(2+) (10 microM) inhibited the activity of the enzyme, and Mg(2+) (8.5 microM) activated the dephosphorylation of PMLC. Mn(2+) (1.6 microM) highly stimulated the enzyme's activity. Based on these results, we concluded that the enzyme is likely to be a phosphatase with hydrolytic activity towards PMLC.

  16. Chiral Nuclear Dynamics II

    CERN Document Server

    Rho, Mannque

    2008-01-01

    This is the sequel to the first volume to treat in one effective field theory framework the physics of strongly interacting matter under extreme conditions. This is vital for understanding the high temperature phenomena taking place in relativistic heavy ion collisions and in the early Universe, as well as the high-density matter predicted to be present in compact stars. The underlying thesis is that what governs hadronic properties in a heat bath and/or a dense medium is hidden local symmetry which emerges from chiral dynamics of light quark systems and from the duality between QCD in 4D and

  17. Differences in the ionic interaction of actin with the motor domains of nonmuscle and muscle myosin II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dijk, J; Furch, M; Derancourt, J; Batra, R; Knetsch, M L; Manstein, D J; Chaussepied, P

    1999-03-01

    Changes in the actin-myosin interface are thought to play an important role in microfilament-linked cellular movements. In this study, we compared the actin binding properties of the motor domain of Dictyostelium discoideum (M765) and rabbit skeletal muscle myosin subfragment-1 (S1). The Dictyostelium motor domain resembles S1(A2) (S1 carrying the A2 light chain) in its interaction with G-actin. Similar to S1(A2), none of the Dictyostelium motor domain constructs induced G-actin polymerization. The affinity of monomeric actin (G-actin) was 20-fold lower for M765 than for S1(A2) but increasing the number of positive charges in the loop 2 region of the D. discoideum motor domain (residues 613-623) resulted in equivalent affinities of G-actin for M765 and for S1. Proteolytic cleavage and cross-linking approaches were used to show that M765, like S1, interacts via the loop 2 region with filamentous actin (F-actin). For both types of myosin, F-actin prevents trypsin cleavage in the loop 2 region and F-actin segment 1-28 can be cross-linked to loop 2 residues by a carbodiimide-induced reaction. In contrast with the S1, loop residues 559-565 of D. discoideum myosin was not cross-linked to F-actin, probably due to the lower number of positive charges. These results confirm the importance of the loop 2 region of myosin for the interaction with both G-actin and F-actin, regardless of the source of myosin. The differences observed in the way in which M765 and S1 interact with actin may be linked to more general differences in the structure of the actomyosin interface of muscle and nonmuscle myosins.

  18. Calcium absorption by Cav1.3 induces terminal web myosin II phosphorylation and apical GLUT2 insertion in rat intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, Oliver J; Morgan, Emma L; Affleck, Julie A; Lister, Norma; Kellett, George L

    2007-04-15

    Glucose absorption in rat jejunum involves Ca(2+)- and PKC betaII-dependent insertion of GLUT2 into the apical membrane. Ca(2+)-induced rearrangement of the enterocyte cytoskeleton is thought to enhance paracellular flow. We have therefore investigated the relationships between myosin II regulatory light chain phosphorylation (RLC(20)), absorption of glucose, water and calcium, and mannitol clearance. ML-7, an inhibitor of myosin light chain kinase, diminished the phloretin-sensitive apical GLUT2 but not the phloretin-insensitive SGLT1 component of glucose absorption in rat jejunum perfused with 75 mM glucose. Western blotting and immunocytochemistry revealed marked decreases in RLC(20) phosphorylation in the terminal web and in the levels of apical GLUT2 and PKC betaII, but not SGLT1. Perfusion with phloridzin or 75 mM mannitol, removal of luminal Ca(2+), or inhibition of unidirectional (45)Ca(2+) absorption by nifedipine exerted similar effects. ML-7 had no effect on the absorption of 10 mM Ca(2+), nor clearance of [(14)C]-mannitol, which was less than 0.7% of the rate of glucose absorption. Water absorption did not correlate with (45)Ca(2+) absorption or mannitol clearance. We conclude that the Ca(2+) necessary for contraction of myosin II in the terminal web enters via an L-type channel, most likely Ca(v)1.3, and is dependent on SGLT1. Moreover, terminal web RLC(20) phosphorylation is necessary for apical GLUT2 insertion. The data confirm that glucose absorption by paracellular flow is negligible, and show further that paracellular flow makes no more than a minimal contribution to jejunal Ca(2+) absorption at luminal concentrations prevailing after a meal.

  19. Dictyostelium myosin bipolar thick filament formation: importance of charge and specific domains of the myosin rod.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Hostetter

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Myosin-II thick filament formation in Dictyostelium is an excellent system for investigating the phenomenon of self-assembly, as the myosin molecule itself contains all the information required to form a structure of defined size. Phosphorylation of only three threonine residues can dramatically change the assembly state of myosin-II. We show here that the C-terminal 68 kDa of the myosin-II tail (termed AD-Cterm assembles in a regulated manner similar to full-length myosin-II and forms bipolar thick filament (BTF structures when a green fluorescent protein (GFP "head" is added to the N terminus. The localization of this GFP-AD-Cterm to the cleavage furrow of dividing Dictyostelium cells depends on assembly state, similar to full-length myosin-II. This tail fragment therefore represents a good model system for the regulated formation and localization of BTFs. By reducing regulated BTF assembly to a more manageable model system, we were able to explore determinants of myosin-II self-assembly. Our data support a model in which a globular head limits the size of a BTF, and the large-scale charge character of the AD-Cterm region is important for BTF formation. Truncation analysis of AD-Cterm tail fragments shows that assembly is delicately balanced, resulting in assembled myosin-II molecules that are poised to disassemble due to the phosphorylation of only three threonines.

  20. Site-directed spectroscopy of cardiac myosin-binding protein C reveals effects of phosphorylation on protein structural dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colson, Brett A; Thompson, Andrew R; Espinoza-Fonseca, L Michel; Thomas, David D

    2016-03-22

    We have used the site-directed spectroscopies of time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) and double electron-electron resonance (DEER), combined with complementary molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, to resolve the structure and dynamics of cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C), focusing on the N-terminal region. The results have implications for the role of this protein in myocardial contraction, with particular relevance to β-adrenergic signaling, heart failure, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. N-terminal cMyBP-C domains C0-C2 (C0C2) contain binding regions for potential interactions with both thick and thin filaments. Phosphorylation by PKA in the MyBP-C motif regulates these binding interactions. Our spectroscopic assays detect distances between pairs of site-directed probes on cMyBP-C. We engineered intramolecular pairs of labeling sites within cMyBP-C to measure, with high resolution, the distance and disorder in the protein's flexible regions using TR-FRET and DEER. Phosphorylation reduced the level of molecular disorder and the distribution of C0C2 intramolecular distances became more compact, with probes flanking either the motif between C1 and C2 or the Pro/Ala-rich linker (PAL) between C0 and C1. Further insight was obtained from microsecond MD simulations, which revealed a large structural change in the disordered motif region in which phosphorylation unmasks the surface of a series of residues on a stable α-helix within the motif with high potential as a protein-protein interaction site. These experimental and computational findings elucidate structural transitions in the flexible and dynamic portions of cMyBP-C, providing previously unidentified molecular insight into the modulatory role of this protein in cardiac muscle contractility.

  1. Effects of a myosin-II inhibitor (N-benzyl-p-toluene sulphonamide, BTS) on contractile characteristics of intact fast-twitch mammalian muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinniger, G J; Bruton, J D; Westerblad, H; Ranatunga, K W

    2005-01-01

    We have examined the effects of N-benzyl-p-toluene sulphonamide (BTS), a potent and specific inhibitor of fast muscle myosin-II, using small bundles of intact fibres or single fibres from rat foot muscle. BTS decreased tetanic tension reversibly in a concentration-dependent manner with half-maximal inhibition at approximately approximately 2 microM at 20 degrees C. The inhibition of tension with 10 microM BTS was marked at the three temperatures examined (10, 20 and 30 degrees C), but greatest at 10 degrees C. BTS decreased active muscle stiffness to a lesser extent than tetanic tension indicating that not all of the tension inhibition was due to a reduced number of attached cross-bridges. BTS-induced inhibition of active tension was not accompanied by any change in the free myoplasmic Ca2+ transients. The potency and specificity of BTS make it a very suitable myosin inhibitor for intact mammalian fast muscle and should be a useful tool for the examination of outstanding questions in muscle contraction.

  2. Actin-myosin network is required for proper assembly of influenza virus particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumakura, Michiko; Kawaguchi, Atsushi, E-mail: ats-kawaguchi@md.tsukuba.ac.jp; Nagata, Kyosuke, E-mail: knagata@md.tsukuba.ac.jp

    2015-02-15

    Actin filaments are known to play a central role in cellular dynamics. After polymerization of actin, various actin-crosslinking proteins including non-muscle myosin II facilitate the formation of spatially organized actin filament networks. The actin-myosin network is highly expanded beneath plasma membrane. The genome of influenza virus (vRNA) replicates in the cell nucleus. Then, newly synthesized vRNAs are nuclear-exported to the cytoplasm as ribonucleoprotein complexes (vRNPs), followed by transport to the beneath plasma membrane where virus particles assemble. Here, we found that, by inhibiting actin-myosin network formation, the virus titer tends to be reduced and HA viral spike protein is aggregated on the plasma membrane. These results indicate that the actin-myosin network plays an important role in the virus formation. - Highlights: • Actin-myosin network is important for the influenza virus production. • HA forms aggregations at the plasma membrane in the presence of blebbistatin. • M1 is recruited to the budding site through the actin-myosin network.

  3. Characterization of Amoeba proteus myosin VI immunoanalog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominik, Magdalena; Kłopocka, Wanda; Pomorski, Paweł; Kocik, Elzbieta; Redowicz, Maria Jolanta

    2005-07-01

    Amoeba proteus, the highly motile free-living unicellular organism, has been widely used as a model to study cell motility. However, molecular mechanisms underlying its unique locomotion and intracellular actin-based-only trafficking remain poorly understood. A search for myosin motors responsible for vesicular transport in these giant cells resulted in detection of 130-kDa protein interacting with several polyclonal antibodies against different tail regions of human and chicken myosin VI. This protein was binding to actin in the ATP-dependent manner, and immunoprecipitated with anti-myosin VI antibodies. In order to characterize its possible functions in vivo, its cellular distribution and colocalization with actin filaments and dynamin II during migration and pinocytosis were examined. In migrating amoebae, myosin VI immunoanalog localized to vesicular structures, particularly within the perinuclear and sub-plasma membrane areas, and colocalized with dynamin II immunoanalog and actin filaments. The colocalization was even more evident in pinocytotic cells as proteins concentrated within pinocytotic pseudopodia. Moreover, dynamin II and myosin VI immunoanalogs cosedimented with actin filaments, and were found on the same isolated vesicles. Blocking endogenous myosin VI immunoanalog with anti-myosin VI antibodies inhibited the rate of pseudopodia protrusion (about 19% decrease) and uroidal retraction (about 28% decrease) but did not affect cell morphology and the manner of cell migration. Treatment with anti-human dynamin II antibodies led to changes in directionality of amebae migration and affected the rate of only uroidal translocation (about 30% inhibition). These results indicate that myosin VI immunoanalog is expressed in protist Amoeba proteus and may be involved in vesicle translocation and cell locomotion.

  4. Differential localization of cytoplasmic myosin II isoforms A and B in avian interphase and dividing embryonic and immortalized cardiomyocytes and other cell types in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, A. H.; Jaffredo, T.; Conrad, G. W.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Two principal isoforms of cytoplasmic myosin II, A and B (CMIIA and CMIIB), are present in different proportions in different tissues. Isoform-specific monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies to avian CMIIA and CMIIB reveal the cellular distributions of these isoforms in interphase and dividing embryonic avian cardiac, intestinal epithelial, spleen, and dorsal root ganglia cells in primary cell culture. Embryonic cardiomyocytes react with antibodies to CMIIB but not to CMIIA, localize CMIIB in stress-fiber-like-structures during interphase, and markedly concentrate CMIIB in networks in the cleavage furrow during cytokinesis. In contrast, cardiac fibroblasts localize both CMIIA and CMIIB in stress fibers and networks during interphase, and demonstrate slight and independently regulated concentration of CMIIA and CMIIB in networks in their cleavage furrows. V-myc-immortalized cardiomyocytes, an established cell line, have regained the ability to express CMIIA, as well as CMIIB, and localize both CMIIA and CMIIB in stress fibers and networks in interphase cells and in cleavage furrows in dividing cells. Conversely, some intestinal epithelial, spleen, and dorsal root ganglia interphase cells express only CMIIA, organized primarily in networks. Of these, intestinal epithelial cells express both CMIIA and CMIIB when they divide, whereas some dividing cells from both spleen and dorsal root ganglia express only CMIIA and concentrate it in their cleavage furrows. These results suggest that within a given tissue, different cell types express different isoforms of CMII, and that cells expressing either CMIIA or CMIIB alone, or simultaneously, can form a cleavage furrow and divide.

  5. Site-directed spectroscopic probes of actomyosin structural dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, David D; Kast, David; Korman, Vicci L

    2009-01-01

    Spectroscopy of myosin and actin has entered a golden age. High-resolution crystal structures of isolated actin and myosin have been used to construct detailed models for the dynamic actomyosin interactions that move muscle. Improved protein mutagenesis and expression technologies have facilitated site-directed labeling with fluorescent and spin probes. Spectroscopic instrumentation has achieved impressive advances in sensitivity and resolution. Here we highlight the contributions of site-directed spectroscopic probes to understanding the structural dynamics of myosin II and its actin complexes in solution and muscle fibers. We emphasize studies that probe directly the movements of structural elements within the myosin catalytic and light-chain domains, and changes in the dynamics of both actin and myosin due to their alternating strong and weak interactions in the ATPase cycle. A moving picture emerges in which single biochemical states produce multiple structural states, and transitions between states of order and dynamic disorder power the actomyosin engine.

  6. Distinct functional interactions between actin isoforms and nonsarcomeric myosins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirco Müller

    Full Text Available Despite their near sequence identity, actin isoforms cannot completely replace each other in vivo and show marked differences in their tissue-specific and subcellular localization. Little is known about isoform-specific differences in their interactions with myosin motors and other actin-binding proteins. Mammalian cytoplasmic β- and γ-actin interact with nonsarcomeric conventional myosins such as the members of the nonmuscle myosin-2 family and myosin-7A. These interactions support a wide range of cellular processes including cytokinesis, maintenance of cell polarity, cell adhesion, migration, and mechano-electrical transduction. To elucidate differences in the ability of isoactins to bind and stimulate the enzymatic activity of individual myosin isoforms, we characterized the interactions of human skeletal muscle α-actin, cytoplasmic β-actin, and cytoplasmic γ-actin with human myosin-7A and nonmuscle myosins-2A, -2B and -2C1. In the case of nonmuscle myosins-2A and -2B, the interaction with either cytoplasmic actin isoform results in 4-fold greater stimulation of myosin ATPase activity than was observed in the presence of α-skeletal muscle actin. Nonmuscle myosin-2C1 is most potently activated by β-actin and myosin-7A by γ-actin. Our results indicate that β- and γ-actin isoforms contribute to the modulation of nonmuscle myosin-2 and myosin-7A activity and thereby to the spatial and temporal regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics. FRET-based analyses show efficient copolymerization abilities for the actin isoforms in vitro. Experiments with hybrid actin filaments show that the extent of actomyosin coupling efficiency can be regulated by the isoform composition of actin filaments.

  7. Myosin IIA deficient cells migrate efficiently despite reduced traction forces at cell periphery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa H. Jorrisch

    2013-02-01

    Cell motility is a cornerstone of embryogenesis, tissue remodeling and repair, and cancer cell invasion. It is generally thought that migrating cells grab and exert traction force onto the extracellular matrix in order to pull the cell body forward. While previous studies have shown that myosin II deficient cells migrate efficiently, whether these cells exert traction forces during cell migration in the absence of the major contractile machinery is currently unknown. Using an array of micron-sized pillars as a force sensor and shRNA specific to each myosin II isoform (A and B, we analyzed how myosin IIA and IIB individually regulate cell migration and traction force generation. Myosin IIA and IIB localized preferentially to the leading edge where traction force was greatest, and the trailing edge, respectively. When individual myosin II isoforms were depleted by shRNA, myosin IIA deficient cells lost actin stress fibers and focal adhesions, whereas myosin IIB deficient cells maintained similar actin organization and focal adhesions as wild-type cells. Interestingly, myosin IIA deficient cells migrated faster than wild-type or myosin IIB deficient cells on both a rigid surface and a pillar array, yet myosin IIA deficient cells exerted significantly less traction force at the leading edge than wild-type or myosin IIB deficient cells. These results suggest that, in the absence of myosin IIA mediated force-generating machinery, cells move with minimal traction forces at the cell periphery, thus demonstrating the remarkable ability of cells to adapt and migrate.

  8. Myosin IIA deficient cells migrate efficiently despite reduced traction forces at cell periphery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorrisch, Melissa H; Shih, Wenting; Yamada, Soichiro

    2013-04-15

    Cell motility is a cornerstone of embryogenesis, tissue remodeling and repair, and cancer cell invasion. It is generally thought that migrating cells grab and exert traction force onto the extracellular matrix in order to pull the cell body forward. While previous studies have shown that myosin II deficient cells migrate efficiently, whether these cells exert traction forces during cell migration in the absence of the major contractile machinery is currently unknown. Using an array of micron-sized pillars as a force sensor and shRNA specific to each myosin II isoform (A and B), we analyzed how myosin IIA and IIB individually regulate cell migration and traction force generation. Myosin IIA and IIB localized preferentially to the leading edge where traction force was greatest, and the trailing edge, respectively. When individual myosin II isoforms were depleted by shRNA, myosin IIA deficient cells lost actin stress fibers and focal adhesions, whereas myosin IIB deficient cells maintained similar actin organization and focal adhesions as wild-type cells. Interestingly, myosin IIA deficient cells migrated faster than wild-type or myosin IIB deficient cells on both a rigid surface and a pillar array, yet myosin IIA deficient cells exerted significantly less traction force at the leading edge than wild-type or myosin IIB deficient cells. These results suggest that, in the absence of myosin IIA mediated force-generating machinery, cells move with minimal traction forces at the cell periphery, thus demonstrating the remarkable ability of cells to adapt and migrate.

  9. Shroom3 functions downstream of planar cell polarity to regulate myosin II distribution and cellular organization during neural tube closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica M. McGreevy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural tube closure is a critical developmental event that relies on actomyosin contractility to facilitate specific processes such as apical constriction, tissue bending, and directional cell rearrangements. These complicated processes require the coordinated activities of Rho-Kinase (Rock, to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and actomyosin contractility, and the Planar Cell Polarity (PCP pathway, to direct the polarized cellular behaviors that drive convergent extension (CE movements. Here we investigate the role of Shroom3 as a direct linker between PCP and actomyosin contractility during mouse neural tube morphogenesis. In embryos, simultaneous depletion of Shroom3 and the PCP components Vangl2 or Wnt5a results in an increased liability to NTDs and CE failure. We further show that these pathways intersect at Dishevelled, as Shroom3 and Dishevelled 2 co-distribute and form a physical complex in cells. We observed that multiple components of the Shroom3 pathway are planar polarized along mediolateral cell junctions in the neural plate of E8.5 embryos in a Shroom3 and PCP-dependent manner. Finally, we demonstrate that Shroom3 mutant embryos exhibit defects in planar cell arrangement during neural tube closure, suggesting a role for Shroom3 activity in CE. These findings support a model in which the Shroom3 and PCP pathways interact to control CE and polarized bending of the neural plate and provide a clear illustration of the complex genetic basis of NTDs.

  10. Shroom3 functions downstream of planar cell polarity to regulate myosin II distribution and cellular organization during neural tube closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGreevy, Erica M; Vijayraghavan, Deepthi; Davidson, Lance A; Hildebrand, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-16

    Neural tube closure is a critical developmental event that relies on actomyosin contractility to facilitate specific processes such as apical constriction, tissue bending, and directional cell rearrangements. These complicated processes require the coordinated activities of Rho-Kinase (Rock), to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and actomyosin contractility, and the Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) pathway, to direct the polarized cellular behaviors that drive convergent extension (CE) movements. Here we investigate the role of Shroom3 as a direct linker between PCP and actomyosin contractility during mouse neural tube morphogenesis. In embryos, simultaneous depletion of Shroom3 and the PCP components Vangl2 or Wnt5a results in an increased liability to NTDs and CE failure. We further show that these pathways intersect at Dishevelled, as Shroom3 and Dishevelled 2 co-distribute and form a physical complex in cells. We observed that multiple components of the Shroom3 pathway are planar polarized along mediolateral cell junctions in the neural plate of E8.5 embryos in a Shroom3 and PCP-dependent manner. Finally, we demonstrate that Shroom3 mutant embryos exhibit defects in planar cell arrangement during neural tube closure, suggesting a role for Shroom3 activity in CE. These findings support a model in which the Shroom3 and PCP pathways interact to control CE and polarized bending of the neural plate and provide a clear illustration of the complex genetic basis of NTDs.

  11. Tension Recovery following Ramp-Shaped Release in High-Ca and Low-Ca Rigor Muscle Fibers: Evidence for the Dynamic State of AMADP Myosin Heads in the Absence of ATP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugi, Haruo; Yamaguchi, Maki; Ohno, Tetsuo; Kobayashi, Takakazu; Chaen, Shigeru; Okuyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    During muscle contraction, myosin heads (M) bound to actin (A) perform power stroke associated with reaction, AMADPPi → AM + ADP + Pi. In this scheme, A • M is believed to be a high-affinity complex after removal of ATP. Biochemical studies on extracted protein samples show that, in the AM complex, actin-binding sites are located at both sides of junctional peptide between 50K and 20K segments of myosin heavy chain. Recently, we found that a monoclonal antibody (IgG) to the junctional peptide had no effect on both in vitro actin-myosin sliding and skinned muscle fiber contraction, though it covers the actin-binding sites on myosin. It follows from this that, during muscle contraction, myosin heads do not pass through the static rigor AM configuration, determined biochemically and electron microscopically using extracted protein samples. To study the nature of AM and AMADP myosin heads, actually existing in muscle, we examined mechanical responses to ramp-shaped releases (0.5% of Lo, complete in 5ms) in single skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers in high-Ca (pCa, 4) and low-Ca (pCa, >9) rigor states. The fibers exhibited initial elastic tension drop and subsequent small but definite tension recovery to a steady level. The tension recovery was present over many minutes in high-Ca rigor fibers, while it tended to decrease quickly in low-Ca rigor fibers. EDTA (10mM, with MgCl2 removed) had no appreciable effect on the tension recovery in high-Ca rigor fibers, while it completely eliminated the tension recovery in low-Ca rigor fibers. These results suggest that the AMADP myosin heads in rigor muscle have long lifetimes and dynamic properties, which show up as the tension recovery following applied release. Possible AM linkage structure in muscle is discussed in connection with the X-ray diffraction pattern from contracting muscle, which is intermediate between resting and rigor muscles. PMID:27583360

  12. Tension Recovery following Ramp-Shaped Release in High-Ca and Low-Ca Rigor Muscle Fibers: Evidence for the Dynamic State of AMADP Myosin Heads in the Absence of ATP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugi, Haruo; Yamaguchi, Maki; Ohno, Tetsuo; Kobayashi, Takakazu; Chaen, Shigeru; Okuyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    During muscle contraction, myosin heads (M) bound to actin (A) perform power stroke associated with reaction, AMADPPi → AM + ADP + Pi. In this scheme, A • M is believed to be a high-affinity complex after removal of ATP. Biochemical studies on extracted protein samples show that, in the AM complex, actin-binding sites are located at both sides of junctional peptide between 50K and 20K segments of myosin heavy chain. Recently, we found that a monoclonal antibody (IgG) to the junctional peptide had no effect on both in vitro actin-myosin sliding and skinned muscle fiber contraction, though it covers the actin-binding sites on myosin. It follows from this that, during muscle contraction, myosin heads do not pass through the static rigor AM configuration, determined biochemically and electron microscopically using extracted protein samples. To study the nature of AM and AMADP myosin heads, actually existing in muscle, we examined mechanical responses to ramp-shaped releases (0.5% of Lo, complete in 5ms) in single skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers in high-Ca (pCa, 4) and low-Ca (pCa, >9) rigor states. The fibers exhibited initial elastic tension drop and subsequent small but definite tension recovery to a steady level. The tension recovery was present over many minutes in high-Ca rigor fibers, while it tended to decrease quickly in low-Ca rigor fibers. EDTA (10mM, with MgCl2 removed) had no appreciable effect on the tension recovery in high-Ca rigor fibers, while it completely eliminated the tension recovery in low-Ca rigor fibers. These results suggest that the AMADP myosin heads in rigor muscle have long lifetimes and dynamic properties, which show up as the tension recovery following applied release. Possible AM linkage structure in muscle is discussed in connection with the X-ray diffraction pattern from contracting muscle, which is intermediate between resting and rigor muscles.

  13. Various Themes of Myosin Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heissler, Sarah M; Sellers, James R

    2016-05-01

    Members of the myosin superfamily are actin-based molecular motors that are indispensable for cellular homeostasis. The vast functional and structural diversity of myosins accounts for the variety and complexity of the underlying allosteric regulatory mechanisms that determine the activation or inhibition of myosin motor activity and enable precise timing and spatial aspects of myosin function at the cellular level. This review focuses on the molecular basis of posttranslational regulation of eukaryotic myosins from different classes across species by allosteric intrinsic and extrinsic effectors. First, we highlight the impact of heavy and light chain phosphorylation. Second, we outline intramolecular regulatory mechanisms such as autoinhibition and subsequent activation. Third, we discuss diverse extramolecular allosteric mechanisms ranging from actin-linked regulatory mechanisms to myosin:cargo interactions. At last, we briefly outline the allosteric regulation of myosins with synthetic compounds.

  14. Force-producing ADP state of myosin bound to actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulf, Sarah F; Ropars, Virginie; Fujita-Becker, Setsuko; Oster, Marco; Hofhaus, Goetz; Trabuco, Leonardo G; Pylypenko, Olena; Sweeney, H Lee; Houdusse, Anne M; Schröder, Rasmus R

    2016-03-29

    Molecular motors produce force when they interact with their cellular tracks. For myosin motors, the primary force-generating state has MgADP tightly bound, whereas myosin is strongly bound to actin. We have generated an 8-Å cryoEM reconstruction of this state for myosin V and used molecular dynamics flexed fitting for model building. We compare this state to the subsequent state on actin (Rigor). The ADP-bound structure reveals that the actin-binding cleft is closed, even though MgADP is tightly bound. This state is accomplished by a previously unseen conformation of the β-sheet underlying the nucleotide pocket. The transition from the force-generating ADP state to Rigor requires a 9.5° rotation of the myosin lever arm, coupled to a β-sheet rearrangement. Thus, the structure reveals the detailed rearrangements underlying myosin force generation as well as the basis of strain-dependent ADP release that is essential for processive myosins, such as myosin V.

  15. Mechanical characterization of one-headed myosin-V using optical tweezers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomonobu M Watanabe

    Full Text Available Class V myosin (myosin-V is a cargo transporter that moves along an actin filament with large (approximately 36-nm successive steps. It consists of two heads that each includes a motor domain and a long (23 nm neck domain. One of the more popular models describing these steps, the hand-over-hand model, assumes the two-headed structure is imperative. However, we previously succeeded in observing successive large steps by one-headed myosin-V upon optimizing the angle of the acto-myosin interaction. In addition, it was reported that wild type myosin-VI and myosin-IX, both one-headed myosins, can also generate successive large steps. Here, we describe the mechanical properties (stepsize and stepping kinetics of successive large steps by one-headed and two-headed myosin-Vs. This study shows that the stepsize and stepping kinetics of one-headed myosin-V are very similar to those of the two-headed one. However, there was a difference with regards to stability against load and the number of multisteps. One-headed myosin-V also showed unidirectional movement that like two-headed myosin-V required 3.5 k(BT from ATP hydrolysis. This value is also similar to that of smooth muscle myosin-II, a non-processive motor, suggesting the myosin family uses a common mechanism for stepping regardless of the steps being processive or non-processive. In this present paper, we conclude that one-headed myosin-V can produce successive large steps without following the hand-over-hand mechanism.

  16. Mechanochemical model for myosin V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Erin M; Linke, Heiner

    2009-10-27

    A rigorous numerical test of a hypothetical mechanism of a molecular motor should model explicitly the diffusive motion of the motor's degrees of freedom as well as the transition rates between the motor's chemical states. We present such a Brownian dynamics, mechanochemcial model of the coarse-grain structure of the dimeric, linear motor myosin V. Compared with run-length data, our model provides strong support for a proposed strain-controlled gating mechanism that enhances processivity. We demonstrate that the diffusion rate of a detached motor head during motor stepping is self-consistent with known kinetic rate constants and can explain the motor's key performance features, such as speed and stall force. We present illustrative and realistic animations of motor stepping in the presence of thermal noise. The quantitative success and illustrative power of this type of model suggest that it will be useful in testing our understanding of a range of biological and synthetic motors.

  17. TGF-β1 Causes EMT by regulating N-Acetyl Glucosaminyl Transferases via Downregulation of Non Muscle Myosin II-A through JNK/P38/PI3K pathway in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Ghulam Jilany; Gao, Yingsheng; Gu, Ming; Wang, Lai; Khan, Sara; Naeem, Farah; Yousef, Bashir Alsiddig; Roy, Debmalya; Semukunzi, Herve; Yuan, Shengtao; Sun, Li

    2017-08-07

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a major determinant of cancer metastasis and is closely linked with TGF-β1. Intracellular proteins, including E. Cadherin, N. Cadherin and Vimentin are directly related to EMT that affect cell migration and adhesion; on the other hand, non muscle myosin (NM) has a central role in cytokinesis, migration and adhesion. We aimed to explore the association of EMT and metastasis with TGF-β1 through regulation of non-muscle myosin II-A (NMII-A) and its interaction with Hexosamine Biosynthesis Pathway (HBP). Protein expression changes were assessed by western blotting and immunofluorescent staining while transcription level changes were assessed by qRT-PCR. EMT was assessed by phenotypic analysis, wound healing, proliferation and transwell migration assay in vitro while in vivo studies were conducted in BALB/c nude mice for lung orthotopic and tail vein metastasis models. We demonstrated that regulation of JNK/ P38/PI3K by TGF-β1 led to down expression of NMII-A which promoted EMT and lung cancer metastasis. This down expression of NMII-A conversely upregulated the expression of Core 2 N-acetyl Glucosaminyl Transferase mucin type (C2GnT-M) and further facilitated up and down regulation of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (GnT) -V and -III respectively; moreover, NMII-A K.D cells showed 3 times more tendency to migrate towards brain in vivo. The study reports a novel pathway through which NMII-A negatively regulates EMT and metastasis via up regulation of C2GnT-M, GnT-V and down expression of GnT-III. These findings of lung cancer may further be required to study in other cancer types. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. Vanadate oligomer interactions with myosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aureliano, M

    2000-05-30

    'Monovanadate' containing a mixture of at least four different vanadate species and 'decavanadate' containing apparently only two vanadate species, mainly decameric species, inhibit myosin and actomyosin ATPase activities. The addition of myosin to 'monovanadate' and 'decavanadate' solutions promotes differential increases on the 51V NMR spectral linewidths of vanadate oligomers. The relative order of line broadening upon myosin addition, reflecting the interaction of the vanadate oligomers with the protein, was V10 > V4 > V1 = 1, whereas no changes were observed for monomeric vanadate species. It is concluded that decameric and tetrameric vanadate species interact quite potently with the protein and affect myosin as well actomyosin ATPase activities.

  19. Vortex Dynamics Studies in Type II Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhigang

    1993-03-01

    Vibrating reed, ac susceptibility and resistance measurements have been used to study the dynamics of vortices in type II superconductors. In Nb measurements, in spite of the low T _{c}'s and long coherence lengths compared to the high T_{c} superconductors, we find an extended region of temperature and field over which reversible flux line motion occurs when the Nb reed is oriented with its long dimension perpendicular to the applied field. We observe a strong, frequency-independent depression of the "irreversibility temperature" T _{Q}(H) below the resistively determined critical temperature T_{R}. The results of the ac susceptibility measurements also support these results. We concluded that observation of an extended region of magnetic reversibility is not restricted to high T_{c} or extremely anisotropic materials, and depends upon the geometry of samples with respect to the applied field direction. In NbSe_2 measurements, vibrating reed measurements were performed with the hexagonal c-axis approximately parallel or perpendicular to an applied magnetic field. Field-cooling data revealed an unusual peak in the frequency shift of the reed, accompanied by two peaks in reed dissipation. The upper peak occurs near the temperature where R~ 0, and the lower peak is very sample and amplitude dependent and hysteretic. The ac susceptibility results also show that corresponding features. The interplay of superconductivity and density waves were investigated by comparing data for NbSe _2 with the results for NbS_2 , which has a comparable superconducting T _{c } and crystal structure. In NbS_2 measurements, we did not see such a peak in the frequency shift nor the double peak feature in the dissipation in either vibrating reed measurements or ac susceptibility measurements. We have also studied the (Ba,K)BiO_3 system. It is cubic at its superconducting composition, but exhibits a moderately high T_{c }=30 K that is intermediate between conventional and high T_{rm c

  20. Rho kinase's role in myosin recruitment to the equatorial cortex of mitotic Drosophila S2 cells is for myosin regulatory light chain phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara O Dean

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Myosin II recruitment to the equatorial cortex is one of the earliest events in establishment of the cytokinetic contractile ring. In Drosophila S2 cells, we previously showed that myosin II is recruited to the furrow independently of F-actin, and that Rho1 and Rok are essential for this recruitment [1]. Rok phosphorylates several cellular proteins, including the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we express phosphorylation state mimic constructs of the RLC in S2 cells to examine the role of RLC phosphorylation involving Rok in the localization of myosin. Phosphorylation of the RLC is required for myosin localization to the equatorial cortex during mitosis, and the essential role of Rok in this localization and for cytokinesis is to maintain phosphorylation of the RLC. The ability to regulate the RLC phosphorylation state spatio-temporally is not essential for the myosin localization. Furthermore, the essential role of Citron in cytokinesis is not phosphorylation of the RLC. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that the Rho1 pathway leading to myosin localization to the future cytokinetic furrow is relatively straightforward, where only Rok is needed, and it is only needed to maintain phosphorylation of the myosin RLC.

  1. Dynamic production monitoring in pig herds II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bono, Claudia; Cornou, Cécile; Lundbye-Christensen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Good management in animal production systems is becoming of paramount importance. The aim of this paper was to develop a dynamic monitoring system for farrowing rate. A farrowing rate model was implemented using a dynamic generalized linear model (DGLM). Variance components were pre-estimated using...

  2. NVU dynamics. II. Comparing to four other dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebrigtsen, Trond S; Toxvaerd, Søren; Schrøder, Thomas B; Dyre, Jeppe C

    2011-09-14

    In the companion paper [T. S. Ingebrigtsen, S. Toxvaerd, O. J. Heilmann, T. B. Schrøder, and J. C. Dyre, "NVU dynamics. I. Geodesic motion on the constant-potential-energy hypersurface," J. Chem. Phys. (in press)] an algorithm was developed for tracing out a geodesic curve on the constant-potential-energy hypersurface. Here, simulations of NVU dynamics are compared to results for four other dynamics, both deterministic and stochastic. First, NVU dynamics is compared to the standard energy-conserving Newtonian NVE dynamics by simulations of the Kob-Andersen binary Lennard-Jones liquid, its WCA version (i.e., with cut-off's at the pair potential minima), and the Lennard-Jones Gaussian liquid. We find identical results for all quantities probed: radial distribution functions, incoherent intermediate scattering functions, and mean-square displacement as function of time. Arguments are presented for the equivalence of NVU and NVE dynamics in the thermodynamic limit; in particular, to leading order in 1∕N these two dynamics give identical time-autocorrelation functions. In the final part of the paper, NVU dynamics is compared to Monte Carlo dynamics, to a diffusive dynamics of small-step random walks on the constant-potential-energy hypersurface, and to Nosé-Hoover NVT dynamics. If time is scaled for the two stochastic dynamics to make single-particle diffusion constants identical to that of NVE dynamics, the simulations show that all five dynamics are equivalent at low temperatures except at short times.

  3. Apical domain polarization localizes actin-myosin activity to drive ratchet-like apical constriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Frank M; Tworoger, Michael; Martin, Adam C

    2013-08-01

    Apical constriction promotes epithelia folding, which changes tissue architecture. During Drosophila gastrulation, mesoderm cells exhibit repeated contractile pulses that are stabilized such that cells apically constrict like a ratchet. The transcription factor Twist is required to stabilize cell shape. However, it is unknown how Twist spatially coordinates downstream signals to prevent cell relaxation. We find that during constriction, Rho-associated kinase (Rok) is polarized to the middle of the apical domain (medioapical cortex), separate from adherens junctions. Rok recruits or stabilizes medioapical myosin II (Myo-II), which contracts dynamic medioapical actin cables. The formin Diaphanous mediates apical actin assembly to suppress medioapical E-cadherin localization and form stable connections between the medioapical contractile network and adherens junctions. Twist is not required for apical Rok recruitment, but instead polarizes Rok medioapically. Therefore, Twist establishes radial cell polarity of Rok/Myo-II and E-cadherin and promotes medioapical actin assembly in mesoderm cells to stabilize cell shape fluctuations.

  4. NSLS-II Control of Dynamic Aperture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bengtsson,J.

    2008-10-31

    We have outlined how, by an intuitive approach, the on- and off-momentum dynamic aperture for a synchrotron light source can be estimated from a nonlinear system of algebraic equations for the sextupole/multipole strengths. The approach has only two free parameters: the relative weight for resonance vs. tune shift terms and the tune footprint for stable trajectories in a modern third generation synchrotron light source. In other words, we have established a control theory approach for the medium term (10{sup 3} turns) stability for a dynamic system described by a nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations. Equipped with a predictive, quantitative model for stability, we have then evaluated how to improve the control of the dynamics by analyzing and modifying the properties of the corresponding algebraic system. In particular, by changing the number- and characteristics of the parameters, i.e., we have not evaluated how the underlying (linear) optics could be improved. We have also validated our conjectures by numerical simulations with a realistic model. Presumably, our conclusions, summarized in Section 1.0, are a direct result of the presented analysis and observations.

  5. Structural and molecular conformation of myosin in intact muscle fibers by second harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nucciotti, V.; Stringari, C.; Sacconi, L.; Vanzi, F.; Linari, M.; Piazzesi, G.; Lombardi, V.; Pavone, F. S.

    2009-02-01

    Recently, the use of Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) for imaging biological samples has been explored with regard to intrinsic SHG in highly ordered biological samples. As shown by fractional extraction of proteins, myosin is the source of SHG signal in skeletal muscle. SHG is highly dependent on symmetries and provides selective information on the structural order and orientation of the emitting proteins and the dynamics of myosin molecules responsible for the mechano-chemical transduction during contraction. We characterise the polarization-dependence of SHG intensity in three different physiological states: resting, rigor and isometric tetanic contraction in a sarcomere length range between 2.0 μm and 4.0 μm. The orientation of motor domains of the myosin molecules is dependent on their physiological states and modulate the SHG signal. We can discriminate the orientation of the emitting dipoles in four different molecular conformations of myosin heads in intact fibers during isometric contraction, in resting and rigor. We estimate the contribution of the myosin motor domain to the total second order bulk susceptibility from its molecular structure and its functional conformation. We demonstrate that SHG is sensitive to the fraction of ordered myosin heads by disrupting the order of myosin heads in rigor with an ATP analog. We estimate the fraction of myosin motors generating the isometric force in the active muscle fiber from the dependence of the SHG modulation on the degree of overlap between actin and myosin filaments during an isometric contraction.

  6. Mineral vein dynamics modelling (FRACS II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urai, J.; Virgo, S.; Arndt, M. [RWTH Aachen (Germany); and others

    2016-08-15

    The Mineral Vein Dynamics Modeling group ''FRACS'' started out as a team of 7 research groups in its first phase and continued with a team of 5 research groups at the Universities of Aachen, Tuebingen, Karlsruhe, Mainz and Glasgow during its second phase ''FRACS 11''. The aim of the group was to develop an advanced understanding of the interplay between fracturing, fluid flow and fracture healing with a special emphasis on the comparison of field data and numerical models. Field areas comprised the Oman mountains in Oman (which where already studied in detail in the first phase), a siliciclastic sequence in the Internal Ligurian Units in Italy (closed to Sestri Levante) and cores of Zechstein carbonates from a Lean Gas reservoir in Northern Germany. Numerical models of fracturing, sealing and interaction with fluid that were developed in phase I where expanded in phase 11. They were used to model small scale fracture healing by crystal growth and the resulting influence on flow, medium scale fracture healing and its influence on successive fracturing and healing, as well as large scale dynamic fluid flow through opening and closing fractures and channels as a function of fluid overpressure. The numerical models were compared with structures in the field and we were able to identify first proxies for mechanical vein-hostrock properties and fluid overpressures versus tectonic stresses. Finally we propose a new classification of stylolites based on numerical models and observations in the Zechstein cores and continued to develop a new stress inversion tool to use stylolites to estimate depth of their formation.

  7. NVU dynamics. II. Comparing to four other dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingebrigtsen, Trond; Toxværd, Søren; Schrøder, Thomas;

    2011-01-01

    In the companion paper [T. S. Ingebrigtsen, S. Toxvaerd, O. J. Heilmann, T. B. Schrøder, and J. C. Dyre, “NVU dynamics. I. Geodesic motion on the constant-potential-energy hypersurface,” J. Chem. Phys. (in press)] an algorithm was developed for tracing out a geodesic curve on the constant-potenti...

  8. Structural insight into the UNC-45–myosin complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fratev, Filip; Jonsdottir, Svava Osk; Pajeva, Ilza

    2013-01-01

    in silico methods. Initially, the human UNC-45B binding epitope was identified and the protein was docked to the cardiac myosin (MYH7) motor domain. The final UNC45B–MYH7 structure was obtained by performing of total 630 ns molecular dynamics simulations. The results indicate a complex formation, which...

  9. Identification of signals that facilitate isoform specific nucleolar localization of myosin IC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Ryan S; Ihnatovych, Ivanna; Yunus, Sharifah Z S A; Domaradzki, Tera; Hofmann, Wilma A

    2013-05-01

    Myosin IC is a single headed member of the myosin superfamily that localizes to the cytoplasm and the nucleus, where it is involved in transcription by RNA polymerases I and II, intranuclear transport, and nuclear export. In mammalian cells, three isoforms of myosin IC are expressed that differ only in the addition of short isoform-specific N-terminal peptides. Despite the high sequence homology, the isoforms show differences in cellular distribution, in localization to nuclear substructures, and in their interaction with nuclear proteins through yet unknown mechanisms. In this study, we used EGFP-fusion constructs that express truncated or mutated versions of myosin IC isoforms to detect regions that are involved in isoform-specific localization. We identified two nucleolar localization signals (NoLS). One NoLS is located in the myosin IC isoform B specific N-terminal peptide, the second NoLS is located upstream of the neck region within the head domain. We demonstrate that both NoLS are functional and necessary for nucleolar localization of specifically myosin IC isoform B. Our data provide a first mechanistic explanation for the observed functional differences between the myosin IC isoforms and are an important step toward our understanding of the underlying mechanisms that regulate the various and distinct functions of myosin IC isoforms.

  10. Class I myosins have overlapping and specialized functions in left-right asymmetric development in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Takashi; Sasamura, Takeshi; Inatomi, Momoko; Hozumi, Shunya; Nakamura, Mitsutoshi; Hatori, Ryo; Taniguchi, Kiichiro; Nakazawa, Naotaka; Suzuki, Emiko; Maeda, Reo; Yamakawa, Tomoko; Matsuno, Kenji

    2015-04-01

    The class I myosin genes are conserved in diverse organisms, and their gene products are involved in actin dynamics, endocytosis, and signal transduction. Drosophila melanogaster has three class I myosin genes, Myosin 31DF (Myo31DF), Myosin 61F (Myo61F), and Myosin 95E (Myo95E). Myo31DF, Myo61F, and Myo95E belong to the Myosin ID, Myosin IC, and Myosin IB families, respectively. Previous loss-of-function analyses of Myo31DF and Myo61F revealed important roles in left-right (LR) asymmetric development and enterocyte maintenance, respectively. However, it was difficult to elucidate their roles in vivo, because of potential redundant activities. Here we generated class I myosin double and triple mutants to address this issue. We found that the triple mutant was viable and fertile, indicating that all three class I myosins were dispensable for survival. A loss-of-function analysis revealed further that Myo31DF and Myo61F, but not Myo95E, had redundant functions in promoting the dextral LR asymmetric development of the male genitalia. Myo61F overexpression is known to antagonize the dextral activity of Myo31DF in various Drosophila organs. Thus, the LR-reversing activity of overexpressed Myo61F may not reflect its physiological function. The endogenous activity of Myo61F in promoting dextral LR asymmetric development was observed in the male genitalia, but not the embryonic gut, another LR asymmetric organ. Thus, Myo61F and Myo31DF, but not Myo95E, play tissue-specific, redundant roles in LR asymmetric development. Our studies also revealed differential colocalization of the class I myosins with filamentous (F)-actin in the brush border of intestinal enterocytes. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  11. Collective dynamics of active cytoskeletal networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Köhler

    Full Text Available Self organization mechanisms are essential for the cytoskeleton to adapt to the requirements of living cells. They rely on the intricate interplay of cytoskeletal filaments, crosslinking proteins and molecular motors. Here we present an in vitro minimal model system consisting of actin filaments, fascin and myosin-II filaments exhibiting pulsatile collective dynamics and superdiffusive transport properties. Both phenomena rely on the complex competition of crosslinking molecules and motor filaments in the network. They are only observed if the relative strength of the binding of myosin-II filaments to the actin network allows exerting high enough forces to unbind actin/fascin crosslinks. This is shown by varying the binding strength of the acto-myosin bond and by combining the experiments with phenomenological simulations based on simple interaction rules.

  12. Catalytic strategy used by the myosin motor to hydrolyze ATP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, Farooq Ahmad; Fischer, Stefan

    2014-07-22

    Myosin is a molecular motor responsible for biological motions such as muscle contraction and intracellular cargo transport, for which it hydrolyzes adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). Early steps of the mechanism by which myosin catalyzes ATP hydrolysis have been investigated, but still missing are the structure of the final ADP·inorganic phosphate (Pi) product and the complete pathway leading to it. Here, a comprehensive description of the catalytic strategy of myosin is formulated, based on combined quantum-classical molecular mechanics calculations. A full exploration of catalytic pathways was performed and a final product structure was found that is consistent with all experiments. Molecular movies of the relevant pathways show the different reorganizations of the H-bond network that lead to the final product, whose γ-phosphate is not in the previously reported HPγO4(2-) state, but in the H2PγO4(-) state. The simulations reveal that the catalytic strategy of myosin employs a three-pronged tactic: (i) Stabilization of the γ-phosphate of ATP in a dissociated metaphosphate (PγO3(-)) state. (ii) Polarization of the attacking water molecule, to abstract a proton from that water. (iii) Formation of multiple proton wires in the active site, for efficient transfer of the abstracted proton to various product precursors. The specific role played in this strategy by each of the three loops enclosing ATP is identified unambiguously. It explains how the precise timing of the ATPase activation during the force generating cycle is achieved in myosin. The catalytic strategy described here for myosin is likely to be very similar in most nucleotide hydrolyzing enzymes.

  13. Impact of Vehicle Flexibility on IRVE-II Flight Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, David M.; Toniolo, Matthew D.; Cheatwood, F. M.; Hughes, Stephen J.; Dillman, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    The Inflatable Re-entry Vehicle Experiment II (IRVE-II) successfully launched from Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) on August 17, 2009. The primary objectives of this flight test were to demonstrate inflation and re-entry survivability, assess the thermal and drag performance of the reentry vehicle, and to collect flight data for refining pre-flight design and analysis tools. Post-flight analysis including trajectory reconstruction outlined in O Keefe3 demonstrated that the IRVE-II Research Vehicle (RV) met mission objectives but also identified a few anomalies of interest to flight dynamics engineers. Most notable of these anomalies was high normal acceleration during the re-entry pressure pulse. Deflection of the inflatable aeroshell during the pressure pulse was evident in flight video and identified as the likely cause of the anomaly. This paper provides a summary of further post-flight analysis with particular attention to the impact of aeroshell flexibility on flight dynamics and the reconciliation of flight performance with pre-flight models. Independent methods for estimating the magnitude of the deflection of the aeroshell experienced on IRVE-II are discussed. The use of the results to refine models for pre-flight prediction of vehicle performance is then described.

  14. Collective dynamics of active cytoskeletal networks

    CERN Document Server

    Köhler, Simone; Bausch, Andreas R

    2011-01-01

    Self organization mechanisms are essential for the cytoskeleton to adapt to the requirements of living cells. They rely on the intricate interplay of cytoskeletal filaments, crosslinking proteins and molecular motors. Here we present an in vitro minimal model system consisting of actin filaments, fascin and myosin-II filaments exhibiting pulsative collective long range dynamics. The reorganizations in the highly dynamic steady state of the active gel are characterized by alternating periods of runs and stalls resulting in a superdiffusive dynamics of the network's constituents. They are dominated by the complex competition of crosslinking molecules and motor filaments in the network: Collective dynamics are only observed if the relative strength of the binding of myosin-II filaments to the actin network allows exerting high enough forces to unbind actin/fascin crosslinks. The feedback between structure formation and dynamics can be resolved by combining these experiments with phenomenological simulations base...

  15. Heavy chain of Acanthamoeba myosine IB is a fusion of myosin-like and non-myosin-like sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, G.; Korn, E.D.; Hammer, J.A. III

    1987-10-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii myosins IA and IB demonstrate the catalytic properties of a myosin and can support analogues of contractile and motile activity in vitro, but their single, low molecular weight heavy chains, roughly globular shapes, and inabilities to self-assemble into filaments make them structurally atypical myosins. The authors present the complete amino acid sequence of the 128-kDa myosin IB heavy chain, which they deduced from the nucleotide sequence of the gene and which reveals that the polypeptide is a fusion of myosin-like and non-myosin-like sequences. Specifically, the amino-terminal approx. 76 kDa of amino acid sequence is highly similar to the globular head sequences of conventional myosins. By contrast, the remaining approx. 51 kDa of sequence shows no similarity to any portion of conventional myosin sequences, contains regions that are rich in glycine, proline, and alanine residues, and lacks the distinctive sequence characteristics of an ..cap alpha..-helical, coiled-coil structure. They conclude, therefore, that the protein is composed of a myosin globular head fused not to the typical coiled-coil rod-like myosin tail structure but rather to an unusual carboxyl-terminal domain. These results support the conclusion that filamentous myosin is not required for force generation and provide a further perspective on the structural requirements for myosin function. Finally, they find a striking conservation of intron/exon structure between this gene and a vertebrate muscle myosin gene. They discuss this observation in relation to the evolutionary origin of the myosin IB gene and the antiquity of myosin gene intron/exon structure.

  16. Modulating Beta-Cardiac Myosin Function at the Molecular and Tissue Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wanjian; Blair, Cheavar A.; Walton, Shane D.; Málnási-Csizmadia, András; Campbell, Kenneth S.; Yengo, Christopher M.

    2017-01-01

    Inherited cardiomyopathies are a common form of heart disease that are caused by mutations in sarcomeric proteins with beta cardiac myosin (MYH7) being one of the most frequently affected genes. Since the discovery of the first cardiomyopathy associated mutation in beta-cardiac myosin, a major goal has been to correlate the in vitro myosin motor properties with the contractile performance of cardiac muscle. There has been substantial progress in developing assays to measure the force and velocity properties of purified cardiac muscle myosin but it is still challenging to correlate results from molecular and tissue-level experiments. Mutations that cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are more common than mutations that lead to dilated cardiomyopathy and are also often associated with increased isometric force and hyper-contractility. Therefore, the development of drugs designed to decrease isometric force by reducing the duty ratio (the proportion of time myosin spends bound to actin during its ATPase cycle) has been proposed for the treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Para-Nitroblebbistatin is a small molecule drug proposed to decrease the duty ratio of class II myosins. We examined the impact of this drug on human beta cardiac myosin using purified myosin motor assays and studies of permeabilized muscle fiber mechanics. We find that with purified human beta-cardiac myosin para-Nitroblebbistatin slows actin-activated ATPase and in vitro motility without altering the ADP release rate constant. In permeabilized human myocardium, para-Nitroblebbistatin reduces isometric force, power, and calcium sensitivity while not changing shortening velocity or the rate of force development (ktr). Therefore, designing a drug that reduces the myosin duty ratio by inhibiting strong attachment to actin while not changing detachment can cause a reduction in force without changing shortening velocity or relaxation. PMID:28119616

  17. Identification of signals that facilitate isoform specific nucleolar localization of myosin IC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwab, Ryan S.; Ihnatovych, Ivanna; Yunus, Sharifah Z.S.A.; Domaradzki, Tera [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University at Buffalo—State University of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States); Hofmann, Wilma A., E-mail: whofmann@buffalo.edu [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University at Buffalo—State University of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Myosin IC is a single headed member of the myosin superfamily that localizes to the cytoplasm and the nucleus, where it is involved in transcription by RNA polymerases I and II, intranuclear transport, and nuclear export. In mammalian cells, three isoforms of myosin IC are expressed that differ only in the addition of short isoform-specific N-terminal peptides. Despite the high sequence homology, the isoforms show differences in cellular distribution, in localization to nuclear substructures, and in their interaction with nuclear proteins through yet unknown mechanisms. In this study, we used EGFP-fusion constructs that express truncated or mutated versions of myosin IC isoforms to detect regions that are involved in isoform-specific localization. We identified two nucleolar localization signals (NoLS). One NoLS is located in the myosin IC isoform B specific N-terminal peptide, the second NoLS is located upstream of the neck region within the head domain. We demonstrate that both NoLS are functional and necessary for nucleolar localization of specifically myosin IC isoform B. Our data provide a first mechanistic explanation for the observed functional differences between the myosin IC isoforms and are an important step toward our understanding of the underlying mechanisms that regulate the various and distinct functions of myosin IC isoforms. - Highlights: ► Two NoLS have been identified in the myosin IC isoform B sequence. ► Both NoLS are necessary for myosin IC isoform B specific nucleolar localization. ► First mechanistic explanation of functional differences between the isoforms.

  18. Stochastic dynamics of small ensembles of non-processive molecular motors: the parallel cluster model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, Thorsten; Albert, Philipp J; Schwarz, Ulrich S

    2013-11-07

    Non-processive molecular motors have to work together in ensembles in order to generate appreciable levels of force or movement. In skeletal muscle, for example, hundreds of myosin II molecules cooperate in thick filaments. In non-muscle cells, by contrast, small groups with few tens of non-muscle myosin II motors contribute to essential cellular processes such as transport, shape changes, or mechanosensing. Here we introduce a detailed and analytically tractable model for this important situation. Using a three-state crossbridge model for the myosin II motor cycle and exploiting the assumptions of fast power stroke kinetics and equal load sharing between motors in equivalent states, we reduce the stochastic reaction network to a one-step master equation for the binding and unbinding dynamics (parallel cluster model) and derive the rules for ensemble movement. We find that for constant external load, ensemble dynamics is strongly shaped by the catch bond character of myosin II, which leads to an increase of the fraction of bound motors under load and thus to firm attachment even for small ensembles. This adaptation to load results in a concave force-velocity relation described by a Hill relation. For external load provided by a linear spring, myosin II ensembles dynamically adjust themselves towards an isometric state with constant average position and load. The dynamics of the ensembles is now determined mainly by the distribution of motors over the different kinds of bound states. For increasing stiffness of the external spring, there is a sharp transition beyond which myosin II can no longer perform the power stroke. Slow unbinding from the pre-power-stroke state protects the ensembles against detachment.

  19. Stochastic dynamics of small ensembles of non-processive molecular motors: The parallel cluster model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, Thorsten; Albert, Philipp J.; Schwarz, Ulrich S.

    2013-11-01

    Non-processive molecular motors have to work together in ensembles in order to generate appreciable levels of force or movement. In skeletal muscle, for example, hundreds of myosin II molecules cooperate in thick filaments. In non-muscle cells, by contrast, small groups with few tens of non-muscle myosin II motors contribute to essential cellular processes such as transport, shape changes, or mechanosensing. Here we introduce a detailed and analytically tractable model for this important situation. Using a three-state crossbridge model for the myosin II motor cycle and exploiting the assumptions of fast power stroke kinetics and equal load sharing between motors in equivalent states, we reduce the stochastic reaction network to a one-step master equation for the binding and unbinding dynamics (parallel cluster model) and derive the rules for ensemble movement. We find that for constant external load, ensemble dynamics is strongly shaped by the catch bond character of myosin II, which leads to an increase of the fraction of bound motors under load and thus to firm attachment even for small ensembles. This adaptation to load results in a concave force-velocity relation described by a Hill relation. For external load provided by a linear spring, myosin II ensembles dynamically adjust themselves towards an isometric state with constant average position and load. The dynamics of the ensembles is now determined mainly by the distribution of motors over the different kinds of bound states. For increasing stiffness of the external spring, there is a sharp transition beyond which myosin II can no longer perform the power stroke. Slow unbinding from the pre-power-stroke state protects the ensembles against detachment.

  20. The Association of Myosin IB with Actin Waves in Dictyostelium Requires Both the Plasma Membrane-Binding Site and Actin-Binding Region in the Myosin Tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzeska, Hanna; Pridham, Kevin; Chery, Godefroy; Titus, Margaret A.; Korn, Edward D.

    2014-01-01

    F-actin structures and their distribution are important determinants of the dynamic shapes and functions of eukaryotic cells. Actin waves are F-actin formations that move along the ventral cell membrane driven by actin polymerization. Dictyostelium myosin IB is associated with actin waves but its role in the wave is unknown. Myosin IB is a monomeric, non-filamentous myosin with a globular head that binds to F-actin and has motor activity, and a non-helical tail comprising a basic region, a glycine-proline-glutamine-rich region and an SH3-domain. The basic region binds to acidic phospholipids in the plasma membrane through a short basic-hydrophobic site and the Gly-Pro-Gln region binds F-actin. In the current work we found that both the basic-hydrophobic site in the basic region and the Gly-Pro-Gln region of the tail are required for the association of myosin IB with actin waves. This is the first evidence that the Gly-Pro-Gln region is required for localization of myosin IB to a specific actin structure in situ. The head is not required for myosin IB association with actin waves but binding of the head to F-actin strengthens the association of myosin IB with waves and stabilizes waves. Neither the SH3-domain nor motor activity is required for association of myosin IB with actin waves. We conclude that myosin IB contributes to anchoring actin waves to the plasma membranes by binding of the basic-hydrophobic site to acidic phospholipids in the plasma membrane and binding of the Gly-Pro-Gln region to F-actin in the wave. PMID:24747353

  1. Dynamic phosphorylation patterns of RNA polymerase II CTD during transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidemann, Martin; Hintermair, Corinna; Voß, Kirsten; Eick, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    The eukaryotic RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) catalyzes the transcription of all protein encoding genes and is also responsible for the generation of small regulatory RNAs. RNAPII has evolved a unique domain composed of heptapeptide repeats with the consensus sequence Tyr1-Ser2-Pro3-Thr4-Ser5-Pro6-Ser7 at the C-terminus (CTD) of its largest subunit (Rpb1). Dynamic phosphorylation patterns of serine residues in CTD during gene transcription coordinate the recruitment of factors to the elongating RNAPII and to the nascent transcript. Recent studies identified threonine 4 and tyrosine 1 as new CTD modifications and thereby expanded the "CTD code". In this review, we focus on CTD phosphorylation and its function in the RNAPII transcription cycle. We also discuss in detail the limitations of the phosphospecific CTD antibodies, which are used in all studies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: RNA Polymerase II Transcript Elongation.

  2. MULTIOBJECTIVE DYNAMIC APERTURE OPTIMIZATION AT NSLS-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, L.; Li, Y.; Guo, W.; Krinsky, S.

    2011-03-28

    In this paper we present a multiobjective approach to the dynamic aperture (DA) optimization. Taking the NSLS-II lattice as an example, we have used both sextupoles and quadrupoles as tuning variables to optimize both on-momentum and off-momentum DA. The geometric and chromatic sextupoles are used for nonlinear properties while the tunes are independently varied by quadrupoles. The dispersion and emittance are fixed during tunes variation. The algorithms, procedures, performances and results of our optimization of DA will be discussed and they are found to be robust, general and easy to apply to similar problems.

  3. Myosin II and mechanotransduction: a balancing act.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clark, K.A.; Langeslag, M.; Figdor, C.G.; Leeuwen, F.N. van

    2007-01-01

    Adherent cells respond to mechanical properties of the surrounding extracellular matrix. Mechanical forces, sensed at specialized cell-matrix adhesion sites, promote actomyosin-based contraction within the cell. By manipulating matrix rigidity and adhesion strength, new roles for actomyosin contract

  4. Genome-wide identification, splicing, and expression analysis of the myosin gene family in maize (Zea mays).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guifeng; Zhong, Mingyu; Wang, Jiajia; Zhang, Jushan; Tang, Yuanping; Wang, Gang; Song, Rentao

    2014-03-01

    The actin-based myosin system is essential for the organization and dynamics of the endomembrane system and transport network in plant cells. Plants harbour two unique myosin groups, class VIII and class XI, and the latter is structurally and functionally analogous to the animal and fungal class V myosin. Little is known about myosins in grass, even though grass includes several agronomically important cereal crops. Here, we identified 14 myosin genes from the genome of maize (Zea mays). The relatively larger sizes of maize myosin genes are due to their much longer introns, which are abundant in transposable elements. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that maize myosin genes could be classified into class VIII and class XI, with three and 11 members, respectively. Apart from subgroup XI-F, the remaining subgroups were duplicated at least in one analysed lineage, and the duplication events occurred more extensively in Arabidopsis than in maize. Only two pairs of maize myosins were generated from segmental duplication. Expression analysis revealed that most maize myosin genes were expressed universally, whereas a few members (XI-1, -6, and -11) showed an anther-specific pattern, and many underwent extensive alternative splicing. We also found a short transcript at the O1 locus, which conceptually encoded a headless myosin that most likely functions at the transcriptional level rather than via a dominant-negative mechanism at the translational level. Together, these data provide significant insights into the evolutionary and functional characterization of maize myosin genes that could transfer to the identification and application of homologous myosins of other grasses.

  5. Myosin-I molecular motors at a glance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Betsy B; Ostap, E Michael

    2016-07-15

    Myosin-I molecular motors are proposed to play various cellular roles related to membrane dynamics and trafficking. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and the accompanying poster, we review and illustrate the proposed cellular functions of metazoan myosin-I molecular motors by examining the structural, biochemical, mechanical and cell biological evidence for their proposed molecular roles. We highlight evidence for the roles of myosin-I isoforms in regulating membrane tension and actin architecture, powering plasma membrane and organelle deformation, participating in membrane trafficking, and functioning as a tension-sensitive dock or tether. Collectively, myosin-I motors have been implicated in increasingly complex cellular phenomena, yet how a single isoform accomplishes multiple types of molecular functions is still an active area of investigation. To fully understand the underlying physiology, it is now essential to piece together different approaches of biological investigation. This article will appeal to investigators who study immunology, metabolic diseases, endosomal trafficking, cell motility, cancer and kidney disease, and to those who are interested in how cellular membranes are coupled to the underlying actin cytoskeleton in a variety of different applications.

  6. Drebrin attenuates the interaction between actin and myosin-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Ryoki; Katoh, Kaoru; Takahashi, Ayumi; Xie, Ce; Oseki, Koushi; Watanabe, Michitoshi; Igarashi, Michihiro; Nakamura, Akio; Kohama, Kazuhiro

    2007-07-27

    Drebrin-A is an actin-binding protein localized in the dendritic spines of mature neurons, and has been suggested to affect spine morphology [K. Hayashi, T. Shirao, Change in the shape of dendritic spines caused by overexpression of drebrin in cultured cortical neurons, J. Neurosci. 19 (1999) 3918-3925]. However, no biochemical analysis of drebrin-A has yet been reported. In this study, we purified drebrin-A using a bacterial expression system, and characterized it in vitro. Drebrin-A bound to actin filaments with a stoichiometry of one drebrin molecule to 5-6 actin molecules. Furthermore, drebrin-A decreased the Mg-ATPase activity of myosin V. In vitro motility assay revealed that the attachment of F-actin to glass surface coated with myosin-V was decreased by drebrin-A, but once F-actin attached to the surface, the sliding speed of F-actin was unaffected by the presence of drebrin A. These findings suggest that drebrin-A may affect spine dynamics, vesicle transport, and other myosin-V-driven motility in neurons through attenuating the interaction between actin and myosin-V.

  7. DARHT-II Long-Pulse Beam-Dynamics Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Ekdahl, Carl; Bartsch, Richard; Bender, Howard; Briggs, Richard J; Broste, William; Carlson, Carl; Caudill, Larry; Chan, Kwok-Chi D; Chen Yu Jiuan; Dalmas, Dale; Durtschi, Grant; Eversole, Steven; Eylon, Shmuel; Fawley, William M; Frayer, Daniel; Gallegos, Robert J; Harrison, James; Henestroza, Enrique; Holzscheiter, M H; Houck, Timothy L; Hughes, Thomas P; Jacquez, Edward; Johnson, Douglas; Johnson, Jeffrey; Jones, Kenneth; McCuistian, Brian T; Meidinger, Alfred; Montoya, Nicholas; Mostrom, Chris; Moy, Kenneth; Nath, Subrata; Nielsen, Kurt; Oro, David; Rodriguez, Leroy; Rodriguez, Patrick; Rowton, Larry J; Sanchez, Manolito; Scarpetti, Raymond; Schauer, Martin; Schulze, Martin E; Simmons, David; Studebaker, Jan; Sturgess, Ronald; Sullivan, Gary; Swinney, Charles; Tang, Yan; Temple, Rodney; Tipton, Angela; Tom, C Y; Vernon Smith, H; Yu, Simon

    2005-01-01

    When completed, the DARHT-II linear induction accelerator (LIA) will produce a 2-kA, 18-MeV electron beam with more than 1500-ns current/energy "flat-top." In initial tests DARHT-II has already accelerated beams with current pulse lengths from 500-ns to 1200-ns full-width at half maximum (FWHM) with more than1.2-kA, 12.5-MeV peak current and energy. Experiments are now underway with a ~2000-ns pulse length, but reduced current and energy. These pulse lengths are all significantly longer than any other multi-MeV LIA, and they define a novel regime for high-current beam dynamics, especially with regard to beam stability. Although the initial tests demonstrated absence of BBU, the pulse lengths were too short to test the predicted protection against ion-hose instability. The present experiments are designed to resolve these and other beam-dynamics issues with a ~2000-ns pulse length beam.

  8. Involvement of myosin VI immunoanalog in pinocytosis and phagocytosis in Amoeba proteus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobczak, Magdalena; Wasik, Anna; Kłopocka, Wanda; Redowicz, Maria Jolanta

    2008-12-01

    Recently, we found a 130-kDa myosin VI immunoanalog in amoeba, which bound to actin in an ATP-sensitive manner and in migrating amoebae colocalized to filamentous actin and dynamin II-containing vesicular structures. To further characterize this protein, we assessed its involvement in amoeba pinocytosis and phagocytosis. Confocal immunofluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy of immunogold-stained cells revealed that, in pinocytotic and phagocytotic amoebae, the myosin VI immunoanalog was visible throughout the cells, including pinocytotic channels and pinocytotic vesicles as well as phagosomes and emerging phagocytic cups. Blocking endogenous protein with anti-porcine myosin VI antibody (introduced into cells by means of microinjection) caused severe defects in pinocytosis and phagocytosis. In comparison with control cells, the treated amoebae formed ~75% less pinocytotic channels and phagocytosed ~65% less Tetrahymena cells. These data indicate that the myosin VI immunoanalog has an important role in pinocytosis and phagocytosis in Amoeba proteus (Pal.).

  9. Muscle myosin filaments: cores, crowns and couplings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, John M

    2009-09-01

    Myosin filaments in muscle, carrying the ATPase myosin heads that interact with actin filaments to produce force and movement, come in multiple varieties depending on species and functional need, but most are based on a common structural theme. The now successful journeys to solve the ultrastructures of many of these myosin filaments, at least at modest resolution, have not been without their false starts and erroneous sidetracks, but the picture now emerging is of both diversity in the rotational symmetries of different filaments and a degree of commonality in the way the myosin heads are organised in resting muscle. Some of the remaining differences may be associated with how the muscle is regulated. Several proteins in cardiac muscle myosin filaments can carry mutations associated with heart disease, so the elucidation of myosin filament structure to understand the effects of these mutations has a clear and topical clinical relevance.

  10. Myosin lever arm directs collective motion on cellular actin network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariadi, Rizal F; Cale, Mario; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj

    2014-03-18

    The molecular motor myosin teams up to drive muscle contraction, membrane traffic, and cell division in biological cells. Myosin function in cells emerges from the interaction of multiple motors tethered to a scaffold, with surrounding actin filaments organized into 3D networks. Despite the importance of myosin function, the influence of intermotor interactions on collective motion remains poorly understood. In this study, we used precisely engineered myosin assemblies to examine emergence in collective myosin movement. We report that tethering multiple myosin VI motors, but not myosin V motors, modifies their movement trajectories on keratocyte actin networks. Single myosin V and VI dimers display similar skewed trajectories, albeit in opposite directions, when traversing the keratocyte actin network. In contrast, tethering myosin VI motors, but not myosin V motors, progressively straightens the trajectories with increasing myosin number. Trajectory shape of multimotor scaffolds positively correlates with the stiffness of the myosin lever arm. Swapping the flexible myosin VI lever arm for the relatively rigid myosin V lever increases trajectory skewness, and vice versa. A simplified model of coupled motor movement demonstrates that the differences in flexural rigidity of the two myosin lever arms is sufficient to account for the differences in observed behavior of groups of myosin V and VI motors. In accordance with this model trajectory, shapes for scaffolds containing both myosin V and VI are dominated by the myosin with a stiffer lever arm. Our findings suggest that structural features unique to each myosin type may confer selective advantages in cellular functions.

  11. Localization and mobility of synaptic vesicles in Myosin VI mutants of Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Kisiel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: At the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ, synaptic vesicles are mobile; however, the mechanisms that regulate vesicle traffic at the nerve terminal are not fully understood. Myosin VI has been shown to be important for proper synaptic physiology and morphology at the NMJ, likely by functioning as a vesicle tether. Here we investigate vesicle dynamics in Myosin VI mutants of Drosophila. RESULTS: In Drosophila, Myosin VI is encoded by the gene, jaguar (jar. To visualize active vesicle cycling we used FM dye loading and compared loss of function alleles of jar with controls. These studies revealed a differential distribution of vesicles at the jar mutant nerve terminal, with the newly endocytosed vesicles observed throughout the mutant boutons in contrast to the peripheral localization visualized at control NMJs. This finding is consistent with a role for Myosin VI in restraining vesicle mobility at the synapse to ensure proper localization. To further investigate regulation of vesicle dynamics by Myosin VI, FRAP analysis was used to analyze movement of GFP-labeled synaptic vesicles within individual boutons. FRAP revealed that synaptic vesicles are moving more freely in the jar mutant boutons, indicated by changes in initial bleach depth and rapid recovery of fluorescence following photobleaching. CONCLUSION: This data provides insights into the role for Myosin VI in mediating synaptic vesicle dynamics at the nerve terminal. We observed mislocalization of actively cycling vesicles and an apparent increase in vesicle mobility when Myosin VI levels are reduced. These observations support the notion that a major function of Myosin VI in the nerve terminal is tethering synaptic vesicles to proper sub-cellular location within the bouton.

  12. Motility assays using myosin attached to surfaces through specific binding to monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, D A; Bourdieu, L; Kinose, F; Libchaber, A

    1995-04-01

    We have analyzed the dependence of actin filament movement on the mode of myosin attachment to surfaces. Monoclonal antibodies that bind to three distinct sites were used to tether myosin to nitrocellulose-coated glass. One antibody reacts with an epitope on the regulatory light chain located at the head-rod junction. The other two react with sites in the rod domain, one in the S2 region near the S2-LMM hinge, and the other at the C terminus of the myosin rod. These monoclonal antibodies were used to provide increasing flexibility in the mode of attachment. Fast skeletal muscle myosin monomers were bound to the surfaces through the specific interaction with these monoclonal antibodies and the sliding movement of fluorescently labeled actin filaments analyzed by video microscopy. Each of these antibodies produced stable, myosin-coated surfaces that supported uniform movement of actin over the course of several hours. Attachment of myosin through the anti-S2 and anti-LMM monoclonal antibodies yielded a maximum velocity of 10 microns/s at 30 degrees C, whereas attachment through anti-LC2 produced a lower velocity of 4-5 microns/s. Each antibody showed a characteristic minimum myosin density below which sliding movement was no longer supported and an exponential dependence of actin filament velocity on myosin surface density below Vmax. Maximum sliding velocity was achieved over a range of myosin surface densities. Thus, the specific mode of attachment can influence the characteristic velocity of actin filament movement and the surface density needed to support movement. These data are being used to analyze the dynamics of sliding filament assays and evaluate estimates of the average number of motor molecules per unit length of actin required to support movement.

  13. Nonmuscle Myosin IIA Regulates Platelet Contractile Forces Through Rho Kinase and Myosin Light-Chain Kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feghhi, Shirin; Tooley, Wes W; Sniadecki, Nathan J

    2016-10-01

    Platelet contractile forces play a major role in clot retraction and help to hold hemostatic clots against the vessel wall. Platelet forces are produced by its cytoskeleton, which is composed of actin and nonmuscle myosin filaments. In this work, we studied the role of Rho kinase, myosin light-chain kinase, and myosin in the generation of contractile forces by using pharmacological inhibitors and arrays of flexible microposts to measure platelet forces. When platelets were seeded onto microposts, they formed aggregates on the tips of the microposts. Forces produced by the platelets in the aggregates were measured by quantifying the deflection of the microposts, which bent in proportion to the force of the platelets. Platelets were treated with small molecule inhibitors of myosin activity: Y-27632 to inhibit the Rho kinase (ROCK), ML-7 to inhibit myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK), and blebbistatin to inhibit myosin ATPase activity. ROCK inhibition reduced platelet forces, demonstrating the importance of the assembly of actin and myosin phosphorylation in generating contractile forces. Similarly, MLCK inhibition caused weaker platelet forces, which verifies that myosin phosphorylation is needed for force generation in platelets. Platelets treated with blebbistatin also had weaker forces, which indicates that myosin's ATPase activity is necessary for platelet forces. Our studies demonstrate that myosin ATPase activity and the regulation of actin-myosin assembly by ROCK and MLCK are needed for the generation of platelet forces. Our findings illustrate and explain the importance of myosin for clot compaction in hemostasis and thrombosis.

  14. Direct photoaffinity labeling by nucleotides of the apparent catalytic site on the heavy chains of smooth muscle and Acanthamoeba myosins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruta, H.; Korn, E.D.

    1981-01-10

    The heavy chains of Acanthamoeba myosins, IA, IB and II, turkey gizzard myosin, and rabbit skeletal muscle myosin subfragment-1 were specifically labeled by radioactive ATP, ADP, and UTP, each of which is a substrate or product of myosin ATPase activity, when irradiated with uv light at 0/sup 0/C. With UTP, as much as 0.45 mol/mol of Acanthamoeba myosin IA heavy chain and 1 mol/mol of turkey gizzard myosin heavy chain was incorporated. Evidence that the ligands were associated with the catalytic site included the observations that reaction occurred only with nucleotides that are substrates or products of the ATPase activity; that the reaction was blocked by pyrophosphate which is an inhibitor of the ATPase activity; that ATP was bound as ADP; and that label was probably restricted to a single peptide following limited subtilisin proteolysis of labeled Acanthamoeba myosin IA heavy chain and extensive cleavage with CNBr and trypsin of labeled turkey gizzard myosin heavy chain.

  15. Dynamics of the Special Pair of Chlorophylls of Photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narzi, Daniele; Bovi, Daniele; De Gaetano, Pietro; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2016-01-13

    Cholophylls are at the basis of the photosynthetic energy conversion mechanisms in algae, plants, and cyanobacteria. In photosystem II, the photoproduced electrons leave a special pair of chlorophylls (namely, P(D1) and P(D2)) that becomes cationic. This oxidizing pair [P(D1),P(D2)](+), in turn, triggers a cascade of oxidative events, eventually leading to water splitting and oxygen evolution. In the present work, using quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations, we investigate the electronic structure and the dynamics of the P(D1)P(D2) special pair in both its oxidized and reduced states. In agreement with previously reported static calculations, the symmetry between the two chlorophylls was found to be broken, the positive charge being preferentially located on P(D1). Nevertheless, this study reveals for the first time that large charge fluctuations occur along dynamics, temporarily inverting the charge preference for the two branches. Finally, a vibrational analysis pinpointed that such charge fluctuations are strongly coupled to specific modes of the special pair.

  16. Myosin light-chain phosphatase regulates basal actomyosin oscillations during morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia-Expósito, Andrea; Grosheva, Inna; Míguez, David G; González-Reyes, Acaimo; Martín-Bermudo, María D

    2016-01-01

    Contractile actomyosin networks generate forces that drive tissue morphogenesis. Actomyosin contractility is controlled primarily by reversible phosphorylation of the myosin-II regulatory light chain through the action of myosin kinases and phosphatases. While the role of myosin light-chain kinase in regulating contractility during morphogenesis has been largely characterized, there is surprisingly little information on myosin light-chain phosphatase (MLCP) function in this context. Here, we use live imaging of Drosophila follicle cells combined with mathematical modelling to demonstrate that the MLCP subunit flapwing (flw) is a key regulator of basal myosin oscillations and cell contractions underlying egg chamber elongation. Flw expression decreases specifically on the basal side of follicle cells at the onset of contraction and flw controls the initiation and periodicity of basal actomyosin oscillations. Contrary to previous reports, basal F-actin pulsates similarly to myosin. Finally, we propose a quantitative model in which periodic basal actomyosin oscillations arise in a cell-autonomous fashion from intrinsic properties of motor assemblies.

  17. FR II radio galaxies at low frequencies - II. Spectral ageing and source dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, Jeremy J.; Hardcastle, Martin J.; Morganti, Raffaella; Croston, Judith H.; Brüggen, Marcus; Brunetti, Gianfranco; Röttgering, Huub J. A.; Shulevski, Aleksander; White, Glenn J.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the second in a series investigating Fanaroff-Riley type II (FR II) radio galaxies at low frequencies, we use LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) and Very Large Array (VLA) observations between 117 and 456 MHz, in addition to archival data, to determine the dynamics and energetics of two radio galaxies, 3C 452 and 3C 223, by fitting spectral ageing models on small spatial scales. We provide improved measurements for the physical extent of the two sources, including a previously unknown low surface brightness extension to the northern lobe of 3C 223, and revised energetics based on these values. We find spectral ages of 77.05^{+9.22}_{-8.74} and 84.96^{+15.02}_{-13.83} Myr for 3C 452 and 3C 223, respectively, suggesting a characteristic advance speed for the lobes of around 1 per cent of the speed of light. For 3C 452, we show that, even for a magnetic field strength not assumed to be in equipartition, a disparity of a factor of approximately 2 exists between the spectral age and that determined from a dynamical standpoint. We confirm that the injection index of both sources (as derived from the lobe emission) remains steeper than classically assumed values, even when considered on well-resolved scales at low frequencies. However, we find an unexpected sharp discontinuity between the spectrum of the hotspots and the surrounding lobe emission. We suggest that this discrepancy is a result of the absorption of hotspot emission and/or non-homogeneous and additional acceleration mechanisms; as such, hotspots should not be used in the determination of the underlying initial electron energy distribution.

  18. Structure/Function/Dynamics of Photosystem II Plastoquinone Binding Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambreva, Maya D.; Russo, Daniela; Polticelli, Fabio; Scognamiglio, Viviana; Antonacci, Amina; Zobnina, Veranika; Campi, Gaetano; Rea, Giuseppina

    2014-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) continuously attracts the attention of researchers aiming to unravel the riddle of its functioning and efficiency fundamental for all life on Earth. Besides, an increasing number of biotechnological applications have been envisaged exploiting and mimicking the unique properties of this macromolecular pigment-protein complex. The PSII organization and working principles have inspired the design of electrochemical water splitting schemes and charge separating triads in energy storage systems as well as biochips and sensors for environmental, agricultural and industrial screening of toxic compounds. An intriguing opportunity is the development of sensor devices, exploiting native or manipulated PSII complexes or ad hoc synthesized polypeptides mimicking the PSII reaction centre proteins as bio-sensing elements. This review offers a concise overview of the recent improvements in the understanding of structure and function of PSII donor side, with focus on the interactions of the plastoquinone cofactors with the surrounding environment and operational features. Furthermore, studies focused on photosynthetic proteins structure/function/dynamics and computational analyses aimed at rational design of high-quality bio-recognition elements in biosensor devices are discussed. PMID:24678671

  19. Class I myosins have overlapping and specialized functions in left-right asymmetric development in Drosophila

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Okumura, Takashi; Sasamura, Takeshi; Inatomi, Momoko; Hozumi, Shunya; Nakamura, Mitsutoshi; Hatori, Ryo; Taniguchi, Kiichiro; Nakazawa, Naotaka; Suzuki, Emiko; Maeda, Reo; Yamakawa, Tomoko; Matsuno, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    .... Drosophila melanogaster has three class I myosin genes, Myosin 31DF (Myo31DF), Myosin 61F (Myo61F), and Myosin 95E (Myo95E). Myo31DF, Myo61F, and Myo95E belong to the Myosin ID, Myosin IC, and Myosin IB families, respectively...

  20. Stochastic dynamics of small ensembles of non-processive molecular motors: the parallel cluster model

    CERN Document Server

    Erdmann, Thorsten; Schwarz, Ulrich S

    2013-01-01

    Non-processive molecular motors have to work together in ensembles in order to generate appreciable levels of force or movement. In skeletal muscle, for example, hundreds of myosin II molecules cooperate in thick filaments. In non-muscle cells, by contrast, small groups with few tens of non-muscle myosin II motors contribute to essential cellular processes such as transport, shape changes or mechanosensing. Here we introduce a detailed and analytically tractable model for this important situation. Using a three-state crossbridge model for the myosin II motor cycle and exploiting the assumptions of fast power stroke kinetics and equal load sharing between motors in equivalent states, we reduce the stochastic reaction network to a one-step master equation for the binding and unbinding dynamics (parallel cluster model) and derive the rules for ensemble movement. We find that for constant external load, ensemble dynamics is strongly shaped by the catch bond character of myosin II, which leads to an increase of th...

  1. Field theory of bicritical and tetracritical points. II. Relaxational dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folk, R; Holovatch, Yu; Moser, G

    2008-10-01

    We calculate the relaxational dynamical critical behavior of systems of O(n_||)(plus sign in circle)O(n_perpendicular) symmetry by renormalization group method within the minimal subtraction scheme in two-loop order. The three different bicritical static universality classes previously found for such systems correspond to three different dynamical universality classes within the static borderlines. The Heisenberg and the biconical fixed point lead to strong dynamic scaling whereas in the region of stability of the decoupled fixed point weak dynamic scaling holds. Due to the neighborhood of the stability border between the strong and the weak scaling dynamic fixed point to the dynamical stable fixed point a very small dynamic transient exponent of omega(Beta)_(v) =0.0044 is present in the dynamics for the physically important case n_|| =1 and n_perpendicular =2 in d=3 .

  2. Direct observation of the myosin Va recovery stroke that contributes to unidirectional stepping along actin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuyuki Shiroguchi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Myosins are ATP-driven linear molecular motors that work as cellular force generators, transporters, and force sensors. These functions are driven by large-scale nucleotide-dependent conformational changes, termed "strokes"; the "power stroke" is the force-generating swinging of the myosin light chain-binding "neck" domain relative to the motor domain "head" while bound to actin; the "recovery stroke" is the necessary initial motion that primes, or "cocks," myosin while detached from actin. Myosin Va is a processive dimer that steps unidirectionally along actin following a "hand over hand" mechanism in which the trailing head detaches and steps forward ∼72 nm. Despite large rotational Brownian motion of the detached head about a free joint adjoining the two necks, unidirectional stepping is achieved, in part by the power stroke of the attached head that moves the joint forward. However, the power stroke alone cannot fully account for preferential forward site binding since the orientation and angle stability of the detached head, which is determined by the properties of the recovery stroke, dictate actin binding site accessibility. Here, we directly observe the recovery stroke dynamics and fluctuations of myosin Va using a novel, transient caged ATP-controlling system that maintains constant ATP levels through stepwise UV-pulse sequences of varying intensity. We immobilized the neck of monomeric myosin Va on a surface and observed real time motions of bead(s attached site-specifically to the head. ATP induces a transient swing of the neck to the post-recovery stroke conformation, where it remains for ∼40 s, until ATP hydrolysis products are released. Angle distributions indicate that the post-recovery stroke conformation is stabilized by ≥ 5 k(BT of energy. The high kinetic and energetic stability of the post-recovery stroke conformation favors preferential binding of the detached head to a forward site 72 nm away. Thus, the recovery

  3. Effects of Elliptically Polarizing Undulator on Beam Dynamics in PLS-II

    CERN Document Server

    Shin, S; Huang, J-Y

    2016-01-01

    The non-linear effects caused by the intrinsic field transverse roll-off in an Elliptically Polarizing Undulator with 72-mm period and maximum peak field of 0.72 T (EPU72) on the dynamics aperture of the Pohang Light Source II (PLS-II) were investigated. A kick map and Frequency map analysis both demonstrated that EPU72 will not reduce the lifetime or cause injection problems in PLS-II.

  4. Adsorption dynamics and equilibrium studies of Zn (II) onto chitosan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Karthikeyan; K Anbalagan; N Muthulakshmi Andal

    2004-03-01

    Batch equilibration studies are conducted to determine the nature of adsorption of zinc (II) over chitosan. The factors affecting the adsorption process like particle size, contact time, dosage, pH, effects of chloride and nitrate are identified. The influence of temperature and co-ions on the adsorption process is verified. The fraction of adsorption, and the intraparticle diffusion rate constant, are calculated at different environments and the results are discussed. The nature of adsorption of the zinc (II) - chitosan system is explained using Freundlich, Langmuir isotherms and thermodynamic parameters.

  5. Myosin-Powered Membrane Compartment Drives Cytoplasmic Streaming, Cell Expansion and Plant Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valera V Peremyslov

    Full Text Available Using genetic approaches, particle image velocimetry and an inert tracer of cytoplasmic streaming, we have made a mechanistic connection between the motor proteins (myosins XI, cargo transported by these motors (distinct endomembrane compartment defined by membrane-anchored MyoB receptors and the process of cytoplasmic streaming in plant cells. It is shown that the MyoB compartment in Nicotiana benthamiana is highly dynamic moving with the mean velocity of ~3 μm/sec. In contrast, Golgi, mitochondria, peroxisomes, carrier vesicles and a cytosol flow tracer share distinct velocity profile with mean velocities of 0.6-1.5 μm/sec. Dominant negative inhibition of the myosins XI or MyoB receptors using overexpression of the N. benthamiana myosin cargo-binding domain or MyoB myosin-binding domain, respectively, resulted in velocity reduction for not only the MyoB compartment, but also each of the tested organelles, vesicles and cytoplasmic streaming. Furthermore, the extents of this reduction were similar for each of these compartments suggesting that MyoB compartment plays primary role in cytosol dynamics. Using gene knockout analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana, it is demonstrated that inactivation of MyoB1-4 results in reduced velocity of mitochondria implying slower cytoplasmic streaming. It is also shown that myosins XI and MyoB receptors genetically interact to contribute to cell expansion, plant growth, morphogenesis and proper onset of flowering. These results support a model according to which myosin-dependent, MyoB receptor-mediated transport of a specialized membrane compartment that is conserved in all land plants drives cytoplasmic streaming that carries organelles and vesicles and facilitates cell growth and plant development.

  6. Myosin-Powered Membrane Compartment Drives Cytoplasmic Streaming, Cell Expansion and Plant Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peremyslov, Valera V; Cole, Rex A; Fowler, John E; Dolja, Valerian V

    2015-01-01

    Using genetic approaches, particle image velocimetry and an inert tracer of cytoplasmic streaming, we have made a mechanistic connection between the motor proteins (myosins XI), cargo transported by these motors (distinct endomembrane compartment defined by membrane-anchored MyoB receptors) and the process of cytoplasmic streaming in plant cells. It is shown that the MyoB compartment in Nicotiana benthamiana is highly dynamic moving with the mean velocity of ~3 μm/sec. In contrast, Golgi, mitochondria, peroxisomes, carrier vesicles and a cytosol flow tracer share distinct velocity profile with mean velocities of 0.6-1.5 μm/sec. Dominant negative inhibition of the myosins XI or MyoB receptors using overexpression of the N. benthamiana myosin cargo-binding domain or MyoB myosin-binding domain, respectively, resulted in velocity reduction for not only the MyoB compartment, but also each of the tested organelles, vesicles and cytoplasmic streaming. Furthermore, the extents of this reduction were similar for each of these compartments suggesting that MyoB compartment plays primary role in cytosol dynamics. Using gene knockout analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana, it is demonstrated that inactivation of MyoB1-4 results in reduced velocity of mitochondria implying slower cytoplasmic streaming. It is also shown that myosins XI and MyoB receptors genetically interact to contribute to cell expansion, plant growth, morphogenesis and proper onset of flowering. These results support a model according to which myosin-dependent, MyoB receptor-mediated transport of a specialized membrane compartment that is conserved in all land plants drives cytoplasmic streaming that carries organelles and vesicles and facilitates cell growth and plant development.

  7. Flash-induced structural dynamics in photosystem II membrane fragments of green plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, Jörg; Renger, Gernot

    2009-07-07

    Time-resolved quasielastic neutron scattering with laser excitation is a promising novel pump-probe approach, which opens up new perspectives for the study of protein-membrane dynamics in specific functional states of even complex systems. This is demonstrated here for the case of photosystem II membrane fragments with inhibited electron transfer. In contrast to the case of the model system bacteriorhodopsin, a transient reduction of the dynamics is observed approximately 160 micros after the actinic laser flash. This effect is the first observation of a modulated structural dynamics in photosystem II membrane fragments.

  8. Dynamic and static adsorption and desorption of Hg(II) ions on chitosan membranes and spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Rodrigo S; Beppu, Marisa M

    2006-05-01

    The adsorption and desorption of Hg(II) ions was studied using static and dynamic methods, employing membranes and spheres of chitosan as the adsorbent. The quantity of adsorption was influenced by chitosan crosslinking and by the adsorbent shape. The Langmuir model was applied to fit the experimental equilibrium data. Glutaraldehyde-crosslinked membranes presented a lower desorption capacity, when compared to natural membranes, but could be regenerated for use in successive cycles. Dynamic adsorption experiments suggested that the adsorption capacity depended mainly on adsorbent geometry, due to differences between surface area to mass ratio and initial concentration of Hg(II) ions. The adsorption capacity determined by the dynamic method was 65% and 77% for membranes and spheres, respectively of the value obtained static method results. A process combining dynamic adsorption and static desorption can be used to concentrate the Hg(II) ions by a factor of nearly seven (7x), when compared to the initially treated volume.

  9. Dynamics And Thermodynamics Of Blackholes And Naked Singularities II

    CERN Document Server

    Fatibene, Lorenzo; GiambÒ, Roberto; Magli, Giulio

    2012-01-01

    Proceedings of the second edition of the international Workshop "Dynamics and Thermodynamics of Blackholes and Naked Singularities" (Department of Mathematics of the Politecnico of Milano from May 10-12, 2007.

  10. Alternative S2 Hinge Regions of the Myosin Rod Affect Myofibrillar Structure and Myosin Kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Mark S.; Dambacher, Corey M.; Knowles, Aileen F.; Braddock, Joan M.; Farman, Gerrie P.; Irving, Thomas C.; Swank, Douglas M.; Bernstein, Sanford I.; Maughan, David W.; (RPI); (IIT); (SDSU); (Vermont)

    2009-07-01

    The subfragment 2/light meromyosin 'hinge' region has been proposed to significantly contribute to muscle contraction force and/or speed. Transgenic replacement of the endogenous fast muscle isovariant hinge A (exon 15a) in Drosophila melanogaster indirect flight muscle with the slow muscle hinge B (exon 15b) allows examination of the structural and functional changes when only this region of the myosin molecule is different. Hinge B was previously shown to increase myosin rod length, increase A-band and sarcomere length, and decrease flight performance compared to hinge A. We applied additional measures to these transgenic lines to further evaluate the consequences of modifying this hinge region. Structurally, the longer A-band and sarcomere lengths found in the hinge B myofibrils appear to be due to the longitudinal addition of myosin heads. Functionally, hinge B, although a significant distance from the myosin catalytic domain, alters myosin kinetics in a manner consistent with this region increasing myosin rod length. These structural and functional changes combine to decrease whole fly wing-beat frequency and flight performance. Our results indicate that this hinge region plays an important role in determining myosin kinetics and in regulating thick and thin filament lengths as well as sarcomere length.

  11. Rethinking the neurological examination II: dynamic balance assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péricles A. Maranhão-Filho

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors propose that the neurological exam needs reevaluation with respect to the dynamic balance test (walking. Validated tests such as: preferred and maximum gait speed, dynamic gait index, five-times-sit-to-stand test, timed up & go cognitive and manual, should be part of the neurological examination routine. In the neurological exam of older patients, these same bedside tests bring the plus of evaluation the risk of occasional falling.

  12. Tuning of shortening speed in coleoid cephalopod muscle: no evidence for tissue-specific muscle myosin heavy chain isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Justin F; Kier, William M

    2016-03-01

    The contractile protein myosin II is ubiquitous in muscle. It is widely accepted that animals express tissue-specific myosin isoforms that differ in amino acid sequence and ATPase activity in order to tune muscle contractile velocities. Recent studies, however, suggested that the squid Doryteuthis pealeii might be an exception; members of this species do not express muscle-specific myosin isoforms, but instead alter sarcomeric ultrastructure to adjust contractile velocities. We investigated whether this alternative mechanism of tuning muscle contractile velocity is found in other coleoid cephalopods. We analyzed myosin heavy chain transcript sequences and expression profiles from muscular tissues of a cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis, and an octopus, Octopus bimaculoides, in order to determine if these cephalopods express tissue-specific myosin heavy chain isoforms. We identified transcripts of four and six different myosin heavy chain isoforms in S. officinalis and O. bimaculoides muscular tissues, respectively. Transcripts of all isoforms were expressed in all muscular tissues studied, and thus S. officinalis and O. bimaculoides do not appear to express tissue-specific muscle myosin isoforms. We also examined the sarcomeric ultrastructure in the transverse muscle fibers of the arms of O. bimaculoides and the arms and tentacles of S. officinalis using transmission electron microscopy and found that the fast contracting fibers of the prey capture tentacles of S. officinalis have shorter thick filaments than those found in the slower transverse muscle fibers of the arms of both species. It thus appears that coleoid cephalopods, including the cuttlefish and octopus, may use ultrastructural modifications rather than tissue-specific myosin isoforms to adjust contractile velocities.

  13. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase efficiently phosphorylates serine 15 of cardiac myosin regulatory light chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josephson, Matthew P.; Sikkink, Laura A. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Penheiter, Alan R. [Molecular Medicine Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Burghardt, Thomas P., E-mail: burghardt@mayo.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Department of Physiology and Biomedical Engineering, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Ajtai, Katalin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States)

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cardiac myosin regulatory light chain (MYL2) is phosphorylated at S15. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (smMLCK) is a ubiquitous kinase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is a widely believed that MYL2 is a poor substrate for smMLCK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In fact, smMLCK efficiently and rapidly phosphorylates S15 in MYL2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphorylation kinetics measured by novel fluorescence method without radioactivity. -- Abstract: Specific phosphorylation of the human ventricular cardiac myosin regulatory light chain (MYL2) modifies the protein at S15. This modification affects MYL2 secondary structure and modulates the Ca{sup 2+} sensitivity of contraction in cardiac tissue. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (smMLCK) is a ubiquitous kinase prevalent in uterus and present in other contracting tissues including cardiac muscle. The recombinant 130 kDa (short) smMLCK phosphorylated S15 in MYL2 in vitro. Specific modification of S15 was verified using the direct detection of the phospho group on S15 with mass spectrometry. SmMLCK also specifically phosphorylated myosin regulatory light chain S15 in porcine ventricular myosin and chicken gizzard smooth muscle myosin (S20 in smooth muscle) but failed to phosphorylate the myosin regulatory light chain in rabbit skeletal myosin. Phosphorylation kinetics, measured using a novel fluorescence method eliminating the use of radioactive isotopes, indicates similar Michaelis-Menten V{sub max} and K{sub M} for regulatory light chain S15 phosphorylation rates in MYL2, porcine ventricular myosin, and chicken gizzard myosin. These data demonstrate that smMLCK is a specific and efficient kinase for the in vitro phosphorylation of MYL2, cardiac, and smooth muscle myosin. Whether smMLCK plays a role in cardiac muscle regulation or response to a disease causing stimulus is unclear but it should be considered a potentially significant

  14. Plant-specific myosin XI, a molecular perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoki eTominaga

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic cells, organelle movement, positioning, and communications are critical for maintaining cellular functions and are highly regulated by intracellular trafficking. Directional movement of motor proteins along the cytoskeleton is one of the key regulators of such trafficking. Most plants have developed a unique actin–myosin system for intracellular trafficking. Although the composition of myosin motors in angiosperms is limited to plant-specific myosin classes VIII and XI, there are large families of myosins, especially in class XI, suggesting functional diversification among class XI members. However, the molecular properties and regulation of each myosin XI member remains unclear.To achieve a better understanding of the plant-specific actin–myosin system, the characterization of myosin XI members at the molecular level is essential. In the first half of this review, we summarize the molecular properties of tobacco 175-kDa myosin XI, and in the later half, we focus on myosin XI members in Arabidopsis thaliana.Through detailed comparison of the functional domains of these myosins with the functional domain of myosin V, we look for possible diversification in enzymatic and mechanical properties among myosin XI members concomitant with their regulation.

  15. Dynamical evolution of viscous disks around be stars. II. Polarimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haubois, X. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS UMR 8109, UPMC, Université Paris Diderot, 5 place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon (France); Mota, B. C.; Carciofi, A. C.; Bednarski, D. [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofísica e Ciências Atmosféricas, Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão 1226, Cidade Universitária, São Paulo, SP 05508-090 (Brazil); Draper, Z. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Road, Victoria, BC V8P 5C2 (Canada); Wisniewski, J. P. [H. L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 West Brooks St Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Rivinius, Th., E-mail: xavier.haubois@obspm.fr [European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile)

    2014-04-10

    Be stars exhibit variability for a great number of observables. Putting the pieces of the disk dynamics together is not an easy task and requires arduous modeling before achieving a good fit to the observational data. In order to guide the modeling process and make it more efficient, it is very instructive to investigate reference dynamical cases. This paper focuses on continuum polarimetric quantities and is the second of a series that aims to demonstrate the capacity of deriving the dynamical history and fundamental parameters of a classical Be star through follow-up of various observables. After a detailed study of the different opacities at play in the formation of polarized spectra, we investigate predictions of polarimetric observables in the continuum for different dynamical scenarios. Our models are based on a coupling of a hydrodynamic viscous decretion simulations in a disk and a three-dimensional non-LTE radiative transfer code. Through introduction of the polarization color diagram (PCD), we show that certain combinations of polarimetric observables exhibit features that are characteristic of a mass-loss history. This diagram also enables estimates of fundamental parameters such as the inclination angle, disk density scale, and the α viscous diffusion parameter. We present the PCD as a powerful diagnosis tool to track the dynamical phases of a Be star, such as disk build-up, dissipation, periodic, and episodic outbursts. Finally, we confront our models with observations of four Be stars that exhibited long-term polarimetric activity.

  16. Parallel impurity dynamics in the TJ-II stellarator

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso, J A; Estrada, T; Fontdecaba, J M; García-Regaña, J M; Geiger, J; Landreman, M; McCarthy, K J; Medina, F; Van Milligen, B Ph; Ochando, M A; Parra, F I; Velasco, J L

    2016-01-01

    We review in a tutorial fashion some of the causes of impurity density variations along field lines and radial impurity transport in the moment approach framework. An explicit and compact form of the parallel inertia force valid for arbitrary toroidal geometry and magnetic coordinates is derived and shown to be non-negligible for typical TJ-II plasma conditions. In the second part of the article, we apply the fluid model including main ion-impurity friction and inertia to observations of asymmetric emissivity patterns in neutral beam heated plasmas of the TJ-II stellarator. The model is able to explain qualitatively several features of the radiation asymmetry, both in stationary and transient conditions, based on the calculated in-surface variations of the impurity density.

  17. Parallel impurity dynamics in the TJ-II stellarator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, J. A.; Velasco, J. L.; Calvo, I.; Estrada, T.; Fontdecaba, J. M.; García-Regaña, J. M.; Geiger, J.; Landreman, M.; McCarthy, K. J.; Medina, F.; Van Milligen, B. Ph; Ochando, M. A.; Parra, F. I.; the TJ-II Team; the W7-X Team

    2016-07-01

    We review in a tutorial fashion some of the causes of impurity density variations along field lines and radial impurity transport in the moment approach framework. An explicit and compact form of the parallel inertia force valid for arbitrary toroidal geometry and magnetic coordinates is derived and shown to be non-negligible for typical TJ-II plasma conditions. In the second part of the article, we apply the fluid model including main ion-impurity friction and inertia to observations of asymmetric emissivity patterns in neutral beam heated plasmas of the TJ-II stellarator. The model is able to explain qualitatively several features of the radiation asymmetry, both in stationary and transient conditions, based on the calculated in-surface variations of the impurity density.

  18. Helix dynamics in LacY: helices II/IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenyu; Madej, M. Gregor; Kaback, H. Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Biochemical and biophysical studies based upon crystal structures of both a mutant and wild-type lactose permease from Escherichia coli (LacY) in an inward-facing conformation have led to a model for the symport mechanism in which both sugar- and H+-binding sites are alternatively accessible to either side of the membrane. Previous findings indicate that the face of helix II with Asp68 is important for the conformational changes that occur during turnover. As shown here, replacement of Asp68 at the cytoplasmic end of helix II, particularly with Glu, abolishes active transport, but the mutants retain the ability to bind galactopyranoside. In the x-ray structure, Asp68 and Lys131 (helix IV) lie within ∼4.2 Å of each other. Although a double mutant with Cys replacements at both position 68 and 131 cross-links efficiently, single replacements for Lys131 exhibit very significant transport activity. Site-directed alkylation studies show that sugar binding by the Asp68 mutants causes closure of the cytoplasmic cavity, like wild-type LacY; but strikingly, the probability of opening the periplasmic pathway upon sugar binding is markedly reduced. Taken together with previous mutagenesis and cross-linking studies, the findings lead to a model in which replacement of Asp68 blocks a conformational transition involving helices II and IV that is important for opening the periplasmic cavity. Evidence is also presented suggesting that movements of helices II and IV are coupled functionally with movements in the pseudo-symmetrically paired helices VIII and X. PMID:20043916

  19. An Extension of Godunov SPH II: Application to Elastic Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Sugiura, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    Godunov Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (Godunov SPH) method is a computational fluid dynamics method that utilizes a Riemann solver and achieves the second-order accuracy in space. In this paper, we extend the Godunov SPH method to elastic dynamics by incorporating deviatoric stress tensor that represents the stress for shear deformation or anisotropic compression. Analogously to the formulation of the original Godunov SPH method, we formulate the equation of motion, the equation of energy, and the time evolution equation of deviatoric stress tensor so that the resulting discretized system achieves the second-order accuracy in space. The standard SPH method tends to suffer from the tensile instability that results in unphysical clustering of particles especially in tension-dominated region. We find that the tensile instability can be suppressed by selecting appropriate interpolation for density distribution in the equation of motion for the Godunov SPH method even in the case of elastic dynamics. Several tes...

  20. Dynamic characteristics of peripheral jet ACV. II - Pitching motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, T.; Maeda, H.

    The dynamic pitching characteristics of peripheral jet ACV (Air Cushion Vehicle) which have a stability curtain are investigated analytically and experimentally. The measured values of moment, lift and cushion pressure are compared with numerical results noting applicability to the pitching motion. The response of ACV to the sinusoidal pitching oscillation of the ground is also studied.

  1. An extension of Godunov SPH II: Application to elastic dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Keisuke; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2017-03-01

    Godunov Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (Godunov SPH) method is a computational fluid dynamics method that utilizes a Riemann solver and achieves the second-order accuracy in space. In this paper, we extend the Godunov SPH method to elastic dynamics by incorporating deviatoric stress tensor that represents the stress for shear deformation or anisotropic compression. Analogously to the formulation of the original Godunov SPH method, we formulate the equation of motion, the equation of energy, and the time evolution equation of deviatoric stress tensor so that the resulting discretized system achieves the second-order accuracy in space. The standard SPH method tends to suffer from the tensile instability that results in unphysical clustering of particles especially in tension-dominated region. We find that the tensile instability can be suppressed by selecting appropriate interpolation for density distribution in the equation of motion for the Godunov SPH method even in the case of elastic dynamics. Several test calculations for elastic dynamics are performed, and the accuracy and versatility of the present method are shown.

  2. Arabidopsis Myosins XI1, XI2, and XIK Are Crucial for Gravity-Induced Bending of Inflorescence Stems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talts, Kristiina; Ilau, Birger; Ojangu, Eve-Ly; Tanner, Krista; Peremyslov, Valera V.; Dolja, Valerian V.; Truve, Erkki; Paves, Heiti

    2016-01-01

    Myosins and actin filaments in the actomyosin system act in concert in regulating cell structure and dynamics and are also assumed to contribute to plant gravitropic response. To investigate the role of the actomyosin system in the inflorescence stem gravitropism, we used single and multiple mutants affecting each of the 17 Arabidopsis myosins of class VIII and XI. We show that class XI but not class VIII myosins are required for stem gravitropism. Simultaneous loss of function of myosins XI1, XI2, and XIK leads to impaired gravitropic bending that is correlated with altered growth, stiffness, and insufficient sedimentation of gravity sensing amyloplasts in stem endodermal cells. The gravitropic defect of the corresponding triple mutant xi1 xi2 xik could be rescued by stable expression of the functional XIK:YFP in the mutant background, indicating a role of class XI myosins in this process. Altogether, our results emphasize the critical contributions of myosins XI in stem gravitropism of Arabidopsis. PMID:28066484

  3. Biosorption of nickel(II) from aqueous solution by brown algae: Equilibrium, dynamic and thermodynamic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahlavanzadeh, H., E-mail: pahlavzh@modares.ac.ir [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-111, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Keshtkar, A.R.; Safdari, J. [Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, P.O. Box 11365, 8486 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abadi, Z. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-111, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-03-15

    The biosorption characteristics of nickel(II) ions using the brown algae (Cystoseria indica, Nizmuddinia zanardini, Sargassum glaucescens and Padina australis) were investigated. Experimental parameters affecting the biosorption process such as pH level, contact time, initial metal concentration and temperature were studied. The equilibrium data fitted very well to the Langmuir adsorption model in the concentration range of nickel(II) ions and at all the temperatures studied. Evaluation of the experimental data in terms of biosorption dynamics showed that the biosorption of nickel(II) onto algal biomass followed the pseudo-second-order dynamics well. The calculated thermodynamic parameters ({Delta}G{sup o}, {Delta}H{sup o} and {Delta}S{sup o}) showed that the biosorption of nickel(II) ions were feasible, spontaneous and endothermic at the temperature ranges of 293-313 K.

  4. Modeling fluid dynamics on type II quantum computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoville, James; Weeks, David; Yepez, Jeffrey

    2006-03-01

    A quantum algorithm is presented for modeling the time evolution of density and flow fields governed by classical equations, such as the diffusion equation, the nonlinear Burgers equation, and the damped wave equation. The algorithm is intended to run on a type-II quantum computer, a parallel quantum computer consisting of a lattice of small type I quantum computers undergoing unitary evolution and interacting via information interchanges represented by an orthogonal matrices. Information is effectively transferred between adjacent quantum computers over classical communications channels because of controlled state demolition following local quantum mechanical qubit-qubit interactions within each quantum computer. The type-II quantum algorithm presented in this paper describes a methodology for generating quantum logic operations as a generalization of classical operations associated with finite-point group symmetries. The quantum mechanical evolution of multiple qubits within each node is described. Presented is a proof that the parallel quantum system obeys a finite-difference quantum Boltzman equation at the mesoscopic scale, leading in turn to various classical linear and nonlinear effective field theories at the macroscopic scale depending on the details of the local qubit-qubit interactions.

  5. Analysis of a model for the dynamics of prions II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engler, Hans; Pruss, Jan; Webb, Glenn F.

    2006-12-01

    A new mathematical model for the dynamics of prion proliferation involving an ordinary differential equation coupled with a partial integro-differential equation is analyzed, continuing the work in [J. Pruss, L. Pujo-Menjouet, G.F. Webb, R. Zacher, Analysis of a model for the dynamics of prions, Discrete Contin. Dyn. Syst. 6 (2006) 225-235]. We show the well-posedness of this problem in its natural phase space , i.e., there is a unique global semiflow on Z+ associated to the problem. A theorem of threshold type is derived for this model which is typical for mathematical epidemics. If a certain combination of kinetic parameters is below or at the threshold, there is a unique steady state, the disease-free equilibrium, which is globally asymptotically stable in Z+; above the threshold it is unstable, and there is another unique steady state, the disease equilibrium, which inherits that property.

  6. Fire phenomena and nonlinearity (II). Catastrophic fire dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Z. [University of Science and Technology, Hefei (China). State Key Laboratory of Fire Science

    2000-09-01

    As one of the most important non-linear mechanisms to cause fire or exacerbate fire disaster, there is a great deal of catastrophe behaviours existing in fire processes. The main tasks of the study of catastrophic fire dynamics are: 1) analysis of the catastrophe mechanisms of discontinuity behaviours in fire systems; 2) investigation of the controlling methods of discontinuity behaviours of fire system; 3) qualitative analysis of the dynamical characteristics of fire systems; and 4) catastrophe classifying of discontinuity phenomena in fire system. The other disciplines, such as physics, chemistry, biology, geoscience, astronomy, or even social sciences (for instance, political, economics, strategics and management science), may also take the similar method to establish the corresponding branch discipline of catastrophe science and catastrophe classification method. It is pointed out that an ignition behaviour of the uniform temperature thermal explosion system under the control of radiation has cusp catastrophe mechanism. 10 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Orbit/CLASP is required for myosin accumulation at the cleavage furrow in Drosophila male meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daishi Kitazawa

    Full Text Available Peripheral microtubules (MTs near the cell cortex are essential for the positioning and continuous constriction of the contractile ring (CR in cytokinesis. Time-lapse observations of Drosophila male meiosis showed that myosin II was first recruited along the cell cortex independent of MTs. Then, shortly after peripheral MTs made contact with the equatorial cortex, myosin II was concentrated there in a narrow band. After MT contact, anillin and F-actin abruptly appeared on the equatorial cortex, simultaneously with myosin accumulation. We found that the accumulation of myosin did not require centralspindlin, but was instead dependent on Orbit, a Drosophila ortholog of the MT plus-end tracking protein CLASP. This protein is required for stabilization of central spindle MTs, which are essential for cytokinesis. Orbit was also localized in a mid-zone of peripheral MTs, and was concentrated in a ring at the equatorial cortex during late anaphase. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments indicated that Orbit is closely associated with F-actin in the CR. We also showed that the myosin heavy chain was in close proximity with Orbit in the cleavage furrow region. Centralspindlin was dispensable in Orbit ring formation. Instead, the Polo-KLP3A/Feo complex was required for the Orbit accumulation independently of the Orbit MT-binding domain. However, orbit mutations of consensus sites for the phosphorylation of Cdk1 or Polo did not influence the Orbit accumulation, suggesting an indirect regulatory role of these protein kinases in Orbit localization. Orbit was also necessary for the maintenance of the CR. Our data suggest that Orbit plays an essential role as a connector between MTs and the CR in Drosophila male meiosis.

  8. Myosin VIIA, important for human auditory function, is necessary for Drosophila auditory organ development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokol V Todi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Myosin VIIA (MyoVIIA is an unconventional myosin necessary for vertebrate audition [1]-[5]. Human auditory transduction occurs in sensory hair cells with a staircase-like arrangement of apical protrusions called stereocilia. In these hair cells, MyoVIIA maintains stereocilia organization [6]. Severe mutations in the Drosophila MyoVIIA orthologue, crinkled (ck, are semi-lethal [7] and lead to deafness by disrupting antennal auditory organ (Johnston's Organ, JO organization [8]. ck/MyoVIIA mutations result in apical detachment of auditory transduction units (scolopidia from the cuticle that transmits antennal vibrations as mechanical stimuli to JO. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using flies expressing GFP-tagged NompA, a protein required for auditory organ organization in Drosophila, we examined the role of ck/MyoVIIA in JO development and maintenance through confocal microscopy and extracellular electrophysiology. Here we show that ck/MyoVIIA is necessary early in the developing antenna for initial apical attachment of the scolopidia to the articulating joint. ck/MyoVIIA is also necessary to maintain scolopidial attachment throughout adulthood. Moreover, in the adult JO, ck/MyoVIIA genetically interacts with the non-muscle myosin II (through its regulatory light chain protein and the myosin binding subunit of myosin II phosphatase. Such genetic interactions have not previously been observed in scolopidia. These factors are therefore candidates for modulating MyoVIIA activity in vertebrates. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that MyoVIIA plays evolutionarily conserved roles in auditory organ development and maintenance in invertebrates and vertebrates, enhancing our understanding of auditory organ development and function, as well as providing significant clues for future research.

  9. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. II. Sticking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonfanti, Matteo, E-mail: matteo.bonfanti@unimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Milano, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy); Jackson, Bret [Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Hughes, Keith H. [School of Chemistry, Bangor University, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Burghardt, Irene [Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Goethe University Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Str. 7, 60438 Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Martinazzo, Rocco, E-mail: rocco.martinazzo@unimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Milano, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari, Consiglio Nazionale delle Richerche, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-09-28

    Following our recent system-bath modeling of the interaction between a hydrogen atom and a graphene surface [Bonfanti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 124703 (2015)], we present the results of converged quantum scattering calculations on the activated sticking dynamics. The focus of this study is the collinear scattering on a surface at zero temperature, which is treated with high-dimensional wavepacket propagations with the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. At low collision energies, barrier-crossing dominates the sticking and any projectile that overcomes the barrier gets trapped in the chemisorption well. However, at high collision energies, energy transfer to the surface is a limiting factor, and fast H atoms hardly dissipate their excess energy and stick on the surface. As a consequence, the sticking coefficient is maximum (∼0.65) at an energy which is about one and half larger than the barrier height. Comparison of the results with classical and quasi-classical calculations shows that quantum fluctuations of the lattice play a primary role in the dynamics. A simple impulsive model describing the collision of a classical projectile with a quantum surface is developed which reproduces the quantum results remarkably well for all but the lowest energies, thereby capturing the essential physics of the activated sticking dynamics investigated.

  10. Dynamics of Neptune's Trojans: II. Eccentric orbits and observed ones

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Li-Yong; Sun, Yi-Sui

    2010-01-01

    In a previous paper, we have presented a global view of the stability of Neptune Trojan (NT hereafter) on inclined orbit. We discuss in this paper the dependence of stability of NT orbits on the eccentricity. High-resolution dynamical maps are constructed using the results of extensive numerical integrations of orbits initialized on the fine grids of initial semimajor axis (a0) versus eccentricity (e0). The extensions of regions of stable orbits on the (a0, e0) plane at different inclinations are shown. The maximum eccentricities of stable orbits in three most stable regions at low (0, 12deg.), medium (22,36deg.) and high (51, 59deg.) inclination, are found to be 0.10, 0.12 and 0.04, respectively. The fine structures in the dynamical maps are described. Via the frequency analysis method, the mechanisms that portray the dynamical maps are revealed. The secondary resonances, concerning the frequency of the librating resonant angle and the frequency of the quasi 2:1 mean motion resonance between Neptune and Uran...

  11. A family of microRNAs encoded by myosin genes governs myosin expression and muscle performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooij, Eva; Quiat, Daniel; Johnson, Brett A.; Sutherland, Lillian B.; Qi, Xiaoxia; Richardson, James A.; Kelm, Robert J.; Olson, Eric N.

    2009-01-01

    Myosin is the primary regulator of muscle strength and contractility. Here we show that three myosin genes, Myh6, Myh7, and Myh7b, encode related microRNAs (miRNAs) within their introns, which, in turn, control muscle myosin content, myofiber identity and muscle performance. Within the adult heart, the Myh6 gene, encoding a fast myosin, co-expresses miR-208a, which regulates the expression of two slow myosins and their intronic miRNAs, Myh7/miR-208b and Myh7b/miR-499, respectively. miR-208b and miR-499 are functionally redundant, and play a dominant role in the specification of muscle fiber identity by activating slow and repressing fast myofiber gene programs. The actions of these miRNAs are mediated by a collection of transcriptional repressors of slow myofiber genes. These findings reveal that myosin genes not only encode the major contractile proteins of muscle, but act more broadly to influence muscle function by encoding a network of intronic miRNAs that control muscle gene expression and performance. PMID:19922871

  12. NEUTRON SCATTERING AND LATTICE DYNAMICAL STUDIES OF THE HIGH-PRESSURE PHASE ICE (II)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董顺乐; 王燕

    2001-01-01

    Lattice dynamical calculations have been carried out for ice II based on the force field constructed for ice Ih. In order to fully understand ice II inelastic neutron scattering spectra, the decomposed phonon density of states was shown mode by mode. Calculated results have shown that the hydrogen bond force constant between the six-molecule rings is significantly weaker, 75eV/nm2, compared with the force constant, 220eV/nm2, within the rings. Inelastic neutron scattering spectra of clathrate hydrate H2O+He are almost the same as ice II. This means that the absorption of He atoms cannot affect the bond strengths of the ice II host lattice. Based on the force field model for ice II, the van der Waals interactions between water molecules and helium atoms are considered. The results obtained are consistent with experimental data. Lattice dynamical calculations have been carried out for ice II using seven rigid pairwise potentials.It was found that MCY makes the stretching and bending interactions in ice II too weak and makes the O-O bond length too long (~5%), thus its lattice densities are obviously lower than other potential lattices or experimental values.

  13. Small heat shock protein Hsp27 protects myosin S1 from heat-induced aggregation, but not from thermal denaturation and ATPase inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markov, Denis I; Pivovarova, Anastasia V; Chernik, Ivan S; Gusev, Nikolai B; Levitsky, Dmitrii I

    2008-04-30

    We applied different methods, such as turbidity measurements, dynamic light scattering, differential scanning calorimetry and co-sedimentation assay, to analyze the interaction of small heat shock protein Hsp27 with isolated myosin head (myosin subfragment 1, S1) under heat-stress conditions. Upon heating at 43 degrees C, Hsp27 effectively suppresses S1 aggregation, and this effect is enhanced by mutations mimicking Hsp27 phosphorylation. However, Hsp27 was unable to prevent thermal unfolding of myosin heads and to maintain their ATPase activity under heat-shock conditions.

  14. Cooperative folding of muscle myosins: I. Mechanical model

    CERN Document Server

    Caruel, Matthieu; Truskinovsky, Lev

    2013-01-01

    Mechanically induced folding of passive cross-linkers is a fundamental biological phenomenon. A typical example is a conformational change in myosin II responsible for the power-stroke in skeletal muscles. In this paper we present an athermal perspective on such folding by analyzing the simplest purely mechanical prototype: a parallel bundle of bi-stable units attached to a common backbone. We show that in this analytically transparent model, characterized by a rugged energy landscape, the ground states are always highly coherent, single-phase configurations. We argue that such cooperative behavior, ensuring collective conformational change, is due to the dominance of long- range interactions making the system non-additive. The detailed predictions of our model are in agreement with experimentally observed non-equivalence of fast force recovery in skeletal muscles loaded in soft and hard devices. Some features displayed by the model are also recognizable in the behavior of other biological systems with passiv...

  15. Myosin IIA participates in docking of Glut4 storage vesicles with the plasma membrane in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Le Thi Kim, E-mail: ngocanh@nutr.med.tokushima-u.ac.jp [Department of Nutrition and Metabolism, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, 3-18-15 Kuramoto-cho, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan); Hosaka, Toshio [Department of Public Health and Applied Nutrition, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima (Japan); Harada, Nagakatsu; Jambaldorj, Bayasgalan; Fukunaga, Keiko; Nishiwaki, Yuka [Department of Nutrition and Metabolism, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, 3-18-15 Kuramoto-cho, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan); Teshigawara, Kiyoshi [Clinical Research Center for Diabetes, Tokushima University Hospital, 2-50-1 Kuramoto-cho, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan); Sakai, Tohru [Department of Public Health and Applied Nutrition, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima (Japan); Nakaya, Yutaka [Department of Nutrition and Metabolism, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, 3-18-15 Kuramoto-cho, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan); Funaki, Makoto, E-mail: m-funaki@clin.med.tokushima-u.ac.jp [Clinical Research Center for Diabetes, Tokushima University Hospital, 2-50-1 Kuramoto-cho, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan)

    2010-01-01

    In adipocytes and myocytes, insulin stimulation translocates glucose transporter 4 (Glut4) storage vesicles (GSVs) from their intracellular storage sites to the plasma membrane (PM) where they dock with the PM. Then, Glut4 is inserted into the PM and initiates glucose uptake into these cells. Previous studies using chemical inhibitors demonstrated that myosin II participates in fusion of GSVs and the PM and increase in the intrinsic activity of Glut4. In this study, the effect of myosin IIA on GSV trafficking was examined by knocking down myosin IIA expression. Myosin IIA knockdown decreased both glucose uptake and exposures of myc-tagged Glut4 to the cell surface in insulin-stimulated cells, but did not affect insulin signal transduction. Interestingly, myosin IIA knockdown failed to decrease insulin-dependent trafficking of Glut4 to the PM. Moreover, in myosin IIA knockdown cells, insulin-stimulated binding of GSV SNARE protein, vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP2) to PM SNARE protein, syntaxin 4 was inhibited. These data suggest that myosin IIA plays a role in insulin-stimulated docking of GSVs to the PM in 3T3-L1 adipocytes through SNARE complex formation.

  16. Myosin 18A coassembles with nonmuscle myosin 2 to form mixed bipolar filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billington, Neil; Beach, Jordan R; Heissler, Sarah M; Remmert, Kirsten; Guzik-Lendrum, Stephanie; Nagy, Attila; Takagi, Yasuharu; Shao, Lin; Li, Dong; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Yingfan; Barzik, Melanie; Betzig, Eric; Hammer, John A; Sellers, James R

    2015-03-30

    Class-18 myosins are most closely related to conventional class-2 nonmuscle myosins (NM2). Surprisingly, the purified head domains of Drosophila, mouse, and human myosin 18A (M18A) lack actin-activated ATPase activity and the ability to translocate actin filaments, suggesting that the functions of M18A in vivo do not depend on intrinsic motor activity. M18A has the longest coiled coil of any myosin outside of the class-2 myosins, suggesting that it might form bipolar filaments similar to conventional myosins. To address this possibility, we expressed and purified full-length mouse M18A using the baculovirus/Sf9 system. M18A did not form large bipolar filaments under any of the conditions tested. Instead, M18A formed an ∼ 65-nm-long bipolar structure with two heads at each end. Importantly, when NM2 was polymerized in the presence of M18A, the two myosins formed mixed bipolar filaments, as evidenced by cosedimentation, electron microscopy, and single-molecule imaging. Moreover, super-resolution imaging of NM2 and M18A using fluorescently tagged proteins and immunostaining of endogenous proteins showed that NM2 and M18A are present together within individual filaments inside living cells. Together, our in vitro and live-cell imaging data argue strongly that M18A coassembles with NM2 into mixed bipolar filaments. M18A could regulate the biophysical properties of these filaments and, by virtue of its extra N- and C-terminal domains, determine the localization and/or molecular interactions of the filaments. Given the numerous, fundamental cellular and developmental roles attributed to NM2, our results have far-reaching biological implications.

  17. Selection-driven extinction dynamics for group II introns in Enterobacteriales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, Sébastien; Cordaux, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are one of the major driving forces of genome evolution, raising the question of the long-term dynamics underlying their evolutionary success. Some TEs were proposed to evolve under a pattern of periodic extinctions-recolonizations, in which elements recurrently invade and quickly proliferate within their host genomes, then start to disappear until total extinction. Depending on the model, TE extinction is assumed to be driven by purifying selection against colonized host genomes (Sel-DE model) or by saturation of host genomes (Sat-DE model). Bacterial group II introns are suspected to follow an extinction-recolonization model of evolution, but whether they follow Sel-DE or Sat-DE dynamics is not known. Our analysis of almost 200 group II intron copies from 90 sequenced Enterobacteriales genomes confirms their extinction-recolonization dynamics: patchy element distributions among genera and even among strains within genera, acquisition of new group II introns through plasmids or other mobile genetic elements, and evidence for recent proliferations in some genomes. Distributions of recent and past proliferations and of their respective homing sites further provide strong support for the Sel-DE model, suggesting that group II introns are deleterious to their hosts. Overall, our observations emphasize the critical impact of host properties on TE dynamics.

  18. Selection-driven extinction dynamics for group II introns in Enterobacteriales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Leclercq

    Full Text Available Transposable elements (TEs are one of the major driving forces of genome evolution, raising the question of the long-term dynamics underlying their evolutionary success. Some TEs were proposed to evolve under a pattern of periodic extinctions-recolonizations, in which elements recurrently invade and quickly proliferate within their host genomes, then start to disappear until total extinction. Depending on the model, TE extinction is assumed to be driven by purifying selection against colonized host genomes (Sel-DE model or by saturation of host genomes (Sat-DE model. Bacterial group II introns are suspected to follow an extinction-recolonization model of evolution, but whether they follow Sel-DE or Sat-DE dynamics is not known. Our analysis of almost 200 group II intron copies from 90 sequenced Enterobacteriales genomes confirms their extinction-recolonization dynamics: patchy element distributions among genera and even among strains within genera, acquisition of new group II introns through plasmids or other mobile genetic elements, and evidence for recent proliferations in some genomes. Distributions of recent and past proliferations and of their respective homing sites further provide strong support for the Sel-DE model, suggesting that group II introns are deleterious to their hosts. Overall, our observations emphasize the critical impact of host properties on TE dynamics.

  19. Dynamic Behaviors of Holling Type II Predator-Prey System with Mutual Interference and Impulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongli Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A class of Holling type II predator-prey systems with mutual interference and impulses is presented. Sufficient conditions for the permanence, extinction, and global attractivity of system are obtained. The existence and uniqueness of positive periodic solution are also established. Numerical simulations are carried out to illustrate the theoretical results. Meanwhile, they indicate that dynamics of species are very sensitive with the period matching between species’ intrinsic disciplinarians and the perturbations from the variable environment. If the periods between individual growth and impulse perturbations match well, then the dynamics of species periodically change. If they mismatch each other, the dynamics differ from period to period until there is chaos.

  20. Dynamical evolution of star forming regions - II. Basic kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    We follow the dynamical evolution of young star-forming regions with a wide range of initial conditions and examine how the radial velocity dispersion, $\\sigma$, evolves over time. We compare this velocity dispersion to the theoretically expected value for the velocity dispersion if a region were in virial equilibrium, $\\sigma_{\\rm vir}$ and thus assess the virial state ($\\sigma / \\sigma_{\\rm vir}$) of these systems. We find that in regions that are initially subvirial, or in global virial equilibrium but subvirial on local scales, the system relaxes to virial equilibrium within several million years, or roughly 25 - 50 crossing times, according to the measured virial ratio. However, the measured velocity dispersion, $\\sigma$, appears to be a bad diagnostic of the current virial state of these systems as it suggests that they become supervirial when compared to the velocity dispersion estimated from the virial mass, $\\sigma_{\\rm vir}$. We suggest that this discrepancy is caused by the fact that the regions ar...

  1. Dynamic spreading of nanofluids on solids part II: modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kuan-Liang; Kondiparty, Kirtiprakash; Nikolov, Alex D; Wasan, Darsh

    2012-11-27

    Recent studies on the spreading phenomena of liquid dispersions of nanoparticles (nanofluids) have revealed that the self-layering and two-dimensional structuring of nanoparticles in the three-phase contact region exert structural disjoining pressure, which drives the spreading of nanofluids by forming a continuous wedge film between the liquid (e.g., oil) and solid surface. Motivated by the practical applications of the phenomenon and experimental results reported in Part I of this two-part series, we thoroughly investigated the spreading dynamics of nanofluids against an oil drop on a solid surface. With the Laplace equation as a starting point, the spreading process is modeled by Navier-Stokes equations through the lubrication approach, which considers the structural disjoining pressure, gravity, and van der Waals force. The temporal interface profile and advancing inner contact line velocity of nanofluidic films are analyzed through varying the effective nanoparticle concentration, the outer contact angle, the effective nanoparticle size, and capillary pressure. It is found that a fast and spontaneous advance of the inner contact line movement can be obtained by increasing the nanoparticle concentration, decreasing the nanoparticle size, and/or decreasing the interfacial tension. Once the nanofluidic film is formed, the advancing inner contact line movement reaches a constant velocity, which is independent of the outer contact angle if the interfacial tension is held constant.

  2. Rice caryopsis development II:Dynamic changes in the endosperm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoba Wu; Jinxin Liu; Dongqi Li; Chun-Ming Liu

    2016-01-01

    The rice endosperm plays crucial roles in nourishing the embryo during embryogenesis and seed germination. Although previous studies have provided the general information about rice endosperm, a systematic investigation throughout the entire endosperm developmental process is still lacking. In this study, we examined in detail rice endosperm development on a daily basis throughout the 30-day period of post-fertilization development. We observed that coenocytic nuclear division occurred in the first 2 days after pollination (DAP), cellularization occurred between 3 and 5 DAP, differentiation of the aleurone and starchy endosperm occurred between 6 and 9 DAP, and accumulation of storage products occurred concurrently with the aleurone/starchy endosperm differentiation from 6 DAP onwards and was accomplished by 21 DAP. Changes in cytoplasmic membrane permeability, possibly caused by programmed cell death, were observed in the central region of the starchy endosperm at 8 DAP, and expanded to the whole starchy endosperm at 21 DAP when the aleurone is the only living component in the endosperm. Further, we observed that a distinct multi-layered dorsal aleurone formed near the dorsal vascular bundle, while the single- or occasionally two-cell layered aleurone was located in the lateral and ventral positions of endosperm. Our results provide in detail the dynamic changes in mitotic divisions, cellularization, cell differentiation, storage product accumulation, and programmed cell death that occur during rice endosperm development.

  3. Molecular-dynamics study of detonation. II. The reaction mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Betsy M.; Mattson, William; Grosh, John; Trevino, S. F.

    1996-01-01

    In this work, we investigate mechanisms of chemical reactions that sustain an unsupported detonation. The chemical model of an energetic crystal used in this study consists of heteronuclear diatomic molecules that, at ambient pressure, dissociate endothermically. Subsequent association of the products to form homonuclear diatomic molecules provides the energy release that sustains the detonation. A many-body interaction is used to simulate changes in the electronic bonding as a function of local atomic environment. The consequence of the many-body interaction in this model is that the intramolecular bond is weakened with increasing density. The mechanism of the reaction for this model was extracted by investigating the details of the molecular properties in the reaction zone with two-dimensional molecular dynamics. The mechanism for the initiation of the reaction in this model is pressure-induced atomization. There was no evidence of excitation of vibrational modes to dissociative states. This particular result is directly attributable to the functional form and choice of parameters for this model, but might also have more general applicability.

  4. Rice caryopsis development II: Dynamic changes in the endosperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoba; Liu, Jinxin; Li, Dongqi; Liu, Chun-Ming

    2016-09-01

    The rice endosperm plays crucial roles in nourishing the embryo during embryogenesis and seed germination. Although previous studies have provided the general information about rice endosperm, a systematic investigation throughout the entire endosperm developmental process is still lacking. In this study, we examined in detail rice endosperm development on a daily basis throughout the 30-day period of post-fertilization development. We observed that coenocytic nuclear division occurred in the first 2 days after pollination (DAP), cellularization occurred between 3 and 5 DAP, differentiation of the aleurone and starchy endosperm occurred between 6 and 9 DAP, and accumulation of storage products occurred concurrently with the aleurone/starchy endosperm differentiation from 6 DAP onwards and was accomplished by 21 DAP. Changes in cytoplasmic membrane permeability, possibly caused by programmed cell death, were observed in the central region of the starchy endosperm at 8 DAP, and expanded to the whole starchy endosperm at 21 DAP when the aleurone is the only living component in the endosperm. Further, we observed that a distinct multi-layered dorsal aleurone formed near the dorsal vascular bundle, while the single- or occasionally two-cell layered aleurone was located in the lateral and ventral positions of endosperm. Our results provide in detail the dynamic changes in mitotic divisions, cellularization, cell differentiation, storage product accumulation, and programmed cell death that occur during rice endosperm development.

  5. Molecular simulation of protein dynamics in nanopores. II. Diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javidpour, Leili; Tabar, M Reza Rahimi; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2009-02-28

    A novel combination of discontinuous molecular dynamics and the Langevin equation, together with an intermediate-resolution model of proteins, is used to carry out long (several microsecond) simulations in order to study transport of proteins in nanopores. We simulated single-domain proteins with the alpha-helical native structure. Both attractive and repulsive interaction potentials between the proteins and the pores' walls are considered. The diffusivity D of the proteins is computed not only under the bulk conditions but also as a function of their "length" (the number of the amino-acid groups), temperature T, pore size, and interaction potentials with the walls. Compared with the experimental data, the computed diffusivities under the bulk conditions are of the correct order of magnitude. The diffusivities both in the bulk and in the pores follow a power law in the length [script-l] of the proteins and are larger in pores with repulsive walls. D(+)/D(-), the ratio of the diffusivities in pores with attractive and repulsive walls, exhibits two local maxima in its dependence on the pore size h, which are attributed to the pore sizes and protein configurations that induce long-lasting simultaneous interactions with both walls of the pores. Far from the folding temperature T(f), D increases about linearly with T, but due to the thermal fluctuations and their effect on the proteins' structure near T(f), the dependence of D on T in this region is nonlinear. We propose a novel and general "phase diagram," consisting of four regions, that describes qualitatively the effect of h, T, and interaction potentials with the walls on the diffusivity D of a protein.

  6. Size and speed of the working stroke of cardiac myosin in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caremani, Marco; Pinzauti, Francesca; Reconditi, Massimo; Piazzesi, Gabriella; Stienen, Ger J M; Lombardi, Vincenzo; Linari, Marco

    2016-03-29

    The power in the myocardium sarcomere is generated by two bipolar arrays of the motor protein cardiac myosin II extending from the thick filament and pulling the thin, actin-containing filaments from the opposite sides of the sarcomere. Despite the interest in the definition of myosin-based cardiomyopathies, no study has yet been able to determine the mechanokinetic properties of this motor protein in situ. Sarcomere-level mechanics recorded by a striation follower is used in electrically stimulated intact ventricular trabeculae from the rat heart to determine the isotonic velocity transient following a stepwise reduction in force from the isometric peak force TP to a value T(0.8-0.2 TP). The size and the speed of the early rapid shortening (the isotonic working stroke) increase by reducing T from ∼3 nm per half-sarcomere (hs) and 1,000 s(-1) at high load to ∼8 nm⋅hs(-1) and 6,000 s(-1) at low load. Increases in sarcomere length (1.9-2.2 μm) and external [Ca(2+)]o (1-2.5 mM), which produce an increase of TP, do not affect the dependence on T, normalized for TP, of the size and speed of the working stroke. Thus, length- and Ca(2+)-dependent increase of TP and power in the heart can solely be explained by modulation of the number of myosin motors, an emergent property of their array arrangement. The motor working stroke is similar to that of skeletal muscle myosin, whereas its speed is about three times slower. A new powerful tool for investigations and therapies of myosin-based cardiomyopathies is now within our reach.

  7. Modulating myosin restores muscle function in a mouse model of nemaline myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindqvist, Johan; Levy, Yotam; Pati-Alam, Alisha; Hardeman, Edna C; Gregorevic, Paul; Ochala, Julien

    2016-02-17

    Nemaline myopathy, one of the most common congenital myopathies is associated with mutations in various genes including ACTA1. This disease is also characterised by various forms/degrees of muscle weakness with most cases being severe and resulting in death in infancy. Recent findings have provided valuable insight into the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. Mutations in ACTA1 directly disrupt binding interactions between actin and myosin, and consequently the intrinsic force-generating capacity of muscle fibres. ACTA1 mutations are also associated with variations in myofibre size, the mechanisms of which have been unclear. In the present study, we sought to test the hypotheses that the compromised functional and morphological attributes of skeletal muscles bearing ACTA1 mutations (i) would directly be due to the inefficient actomyosin complex, and (ii) could be restored by manipulating myosin expression. We used a knock-in mouse model expressing the ACTA1 His40Tyr actin mutation found in human patients. We then performed in vivo intramuscular injections of recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors harbouring a myosin transgene known to facilitate muscle contraction. We observed that in presence of the transgene, the intrinsic force-generating capacity was restored and myofibre size was normal. This demonstrates a direct link between disrupted attachment of myosin molecules to actin monomers and muscle fibre atrophy. These data also suggest that further therapeutic interventions should primarily target myosin dysfunction to alleviate the pathology of ACTA1-related nemaline myopathy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2016 American Neurological Association.

  8. Non-muscle myosin as target antigen for human autoantibodies in patients with hepatitis C virus-associated chronic liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Mühlen, C A; Chan, E K; Peebles, C L; Imai, H; Kiyosawa, K; Tan, E M

    1995-04-01

    Three patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related chronic liver disease were shown to have autoantibodies strongly reacting with cytoskeletal fibres of non-muscle cells. The heavy chain of non-muscle myosin microfilament was the main target for those autoantibodies, as determined by (i) cell and tissue immunofluorescence studies showing colocalization with an anti-myosin antibody prototype; (ii) primary reactivity in immunoblotting with a 200-kD protein, using either MOLT-4 cells, human platelets, or affinity-purified non-muscle myosin as antigen extract; and (iii) immunoblotting of similar immunoreactive fragments in papain-digested MOLT-4 cell extracts, by using those human sera and antibody prototype. Autoantibodies to non-muscle myosin heavy chain were not previously reported in patients with chronic liver diseases, especially in those associated with HCV infection.

  9. Inference of RNA polymerase II transcription dynamics from chromatin immunoprecipitation time course data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciira wa Maina

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Gene transcription mediated by RNA polymerase II (pol-II is a key step in gene expression. The dynamics of pol-II moving along the transcribed region influence the rate and timing of gene expression. In this work, we present a probabilistic model of transcription dynamics which is fitted to pol-II occupancy time course data measured using ChIP-Seq. The model can be used to estimate transcription speed and to infer the temporal pol-II activity profile at the gene promoter. Model parameters are estimated using either maximum likelihood estimation or via Bayesian inference using Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling. The Bayesian approach provides confidence intervals for parameter estimates and allows the use of priors that capture domain knowledge, e.g. the expected range of transcription speeds, based on previous experiments. The model describes the movement of pol-II down the gene body and can be used to identify the time of induction for transcriptionally engaged genes. By clustering the inferred promoter activity time profiles, we are able to determine which genes respond quickly to stimuli and group genes that share activity profiles and may therefore be co-regulated. We apply our methodology to biological data obtained using ChIP-seq to measure pol-II occupancy genome-wide when MCF-7 human breast cancer cells are treated with estradiol (E2. The transcription speeds we obtain agree with those obtained previously for smaller numbers of genes with the advantage that our approach can be applied genome-wide. We validate the biological significance of the pol-II promoter activity clusters by investigating cluster-specific transcription factor binding patterns and determining canonical pathway enrichment. We find that rapidly induced genes are enriched for both estrogen receptor alpha (ERα and FOXA1 binding in their proximal promoter regions.

  10. Inference of RNA polymerase II transcription dynamics from chromatin immunoprecipitation time course data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciira wa Maina

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Gene transcription mediated by RNA polymerase II (pol-II is a key step in gene expression. The dynamics of pol-II moving along the transcribed region influence the rate and timing of gene expression. In this work, we present a probabilistic model of transcription dynamics which is fitted to pol-II occupancy time course data measured using ChIP-Seq. The model can be used to estimate transcription speed and to infer the temporal pol-II activity profile at the gene promoter. Model parameters are estimated using either maximum likelihood estimation or via Bayesian inference using Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling. The Bayesian approach provides confidence intervals for parameter estimates and allows the use of priors that capture domain knowledge, e.g. the expected range of transcription speeds, based on previous experiments. The model describes the movement of pol-II down the gene body and can be used to identify the time of induction for transcriptionally engaged genes. By clustering the inferred promoter activity time profiles, we are able to determine which genes respond quickly to stimuli and group genes that share activity profiles and may therefore be co-regulated. We apply our methodology to biological data obtained using ChIP-seq to measure pol-II occupancy genome-wide when MCF-7 human breast cancer cells are treated with estradiol (E2. The transcription speeds we obtain agree with those obtained previously for smaller numbers of genes with the advantage that our approach can be applied genome-wide. We validate the biological significance of the pol-II promoter activity clusters by investigating cluster-specific transcription factor binding patterns and determining canonical pathway enrichment. We find that rapidly induced genes are enriched for both estrogen receptor alpha (ERα and FOXA1 binding in their proximal promoter regions.

  11. Complex dynamics in diatomic molecules. Part II: Quantum trajectories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, C.-D. [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: cdyang@mail.ncku.edu.tw; Weng, H.-J. [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: principlex@yahoo.com.tw

    2008-10-15

    The second part of this paper deals with quantum trajectories in diatomic molecules, which has not been considered before in the literature. Morse potential serves as a more accurate function than a simple harmonic oscillator for illustrating a realistic picture about the vibration of diatomic molecules. However, if we determine molecular dynamics by integrating the classical force equations derived from a Morse potential, we will find that the resulting trajectories do not consist with the probabilistic prediction of quantum mechanics. On the other hand, the quantum trajectory determined by Bohmian mechanics [Bohm D. A suggested interpretation of the quantum theory in terms of hidden variable. Phys. Rev. 1952;85:166-179] leads to the conclusion that a diatomic molecule is motionless in all its vibrational eigen-states, which also contradicts probabilistic prediction of quantum mechanics. In this paper, we point out that the quantum trajectory of a diatomic molecule completely consistent with quantum mechanics does exist and can be solved from the quantum Hamilton equations of motion derived in Part I, which is based on a complex-space formulation of fractal spacetime [El Naschie MS. A review of E-Infinity theory and the mass spectrum of high energy particle physics. Chaos, Solitons and Fractals 2004;19:209-36; El Naschie MS. E-Infinity theory - some recent results and new interpretations. Chaos, Solitons and Fractals 2006;29:845-853; El Naschie MS. The concepts of E-infinity. An elementary introduction to the cantorian-fractal theory of quantum physics. Chaos, Solitons and Fractals 2004;22:495-511; El Naschie MS. SU(5) grand unification in a transfinite form. Chaos, Solitons and Fractals 2007;32:370-374; Nottale L. Fractal space-time and microphysics: towards a theory of scale relativity. Singapore: World Scientific; 1993; Ord G. Fractal space time and the statistical mechanics of random works. Chaos, Soiltons and Fractals 1996;7:821-843] approach to quantum

  12. Locally dispersing populations in heterogeneous dynamic landscapes with spatiotemporal correlations. II. Habitat driven by voter dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebeler, David E; Hill, Jack L

    2016-10-21

    We examine a spatially explicit population model on a dynamic landscape with suitable and unsuitable habitat driven by voter or contagion dynamics. We consider four cases, consisting of all combinations of local and global interactions for both population dispersal and habitat dynamics. For both local and global population dispersal, using local habitat dynamics always increases population density relative to the case with global habitat dynamics, due to the resulting segregation of habitat turnover, decrease in effective habitat turnover rate, and presence of stable habitat corridors. With global habitat dynamics, a population using local dispersal exhibits lower density than one with global dispersal due to local crowding as well as frequent disturbance due to habitat transitions. On the other hand, with local habitat dynamics, a population using local dispersal can exploit suitable habitat patches and use dynamic corridors to colonize new regions. The latter effect is not seen with static landscapes, where clustered habitat can lead to the isolation of suitable patches due to surrounding unsuitable habitat.

  13. Precise positioning of myosin VI on endocytic vesicles in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Altman

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Myosin VI has been studied in both a monomeric and a dimeric form in vitro. Because the functional characteristics of the motor are dramatically different for these two forms, it is important to understand whether myosin VI heavy chains are brought together on endocytic vesicles. We have used fluorescence anisotropy measurements to detect fluorescence resonance energy transfer between identical fluorophores (homoFRET resulting from myosin VI heavy chains being brought into close proximity. We observed that, when associated with clathrin-mediated endocytic vesicles, myosin VI heavy chains are precisely positioned to bring their tail domains in close proximity. Our data show that on endocytic vesicles, myosin VI heavy chains are brought together in an orientation that previous in vitro studies have shown causes dimerization of the motor. Our results are therefore consistent with vesicle-associated myosin VI existing as a processive dimer, capable of its known trafficking function.

  14. Doppler coherence imaging of ion dynamics in VINETA.II and ASDEX-upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gradic, Dorothea; Ford, Oliver; Wolf, Robert [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Greifswald (Germany); Lunt, Tilmann [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    In magnetically confining plasma experiments, diagnosis of ion flows is of great importance to measure the plasma response to the magnetic field or the exhaust particle flows in the divertor areas. Doppler coherence imaging spectroscopy (CIS) is a relatively new technique for the observation of plasma bulk ion dynamics. It is a passive optical diagnostic enabling line-integrated measurements to obtain 2D images of the ion flow and ion temperature. The general principle is similar to traditional Doppler spectroscopy, however CIS uses an imaging interferometer to perform narrow-bandwidth Fourier spectroscopy. A major advantage of the coherence imaging technique is the large amount of spatial information recovered. This allows tomographic inversion of the line-integrated measurements. With existing CIS setups, scrape-off-layer and high field side edge impurity flows could be observed in the MAST, core and edge poloidal He II flows in the WEGA stellarator and divertor impurity flows in DIII-D. The main objective of this study is the research of ion dynamics in the small linear plasma experiment VINETA.II and ASDEX-Upgrade. First Doppler CIS measurements from Ar-II plasma discharges in VINETA.II and He-II, C-III divertor flows in ASDEX-Upgrade and their preliminary interpretation will be presented.

  15. Spatiotemporal dynamics of condensins I and II: evolutionary insights from the primitive red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Takayuki; Tanaka, Kan; Kuroiwa, Tsuneyoshi; Hirano, Tatsuya

    2013-01-01

    Condensins are multisubunit complexes that play central roles in chromosome organization and segregation in eukaryotes. Many eukaryotic species have two different condensin complexes (condensins I and II), although some species, such as fungi, have condensin I only. Here we use the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae as a model organism because it represents the smallest and simplest organism that is predicted to possess both condensins I and II. We demonstrate that, despite the great evolutionary distance, spatiotemporal dynamics of condensins in C. merolae is strikingly similar to that observed in mammalian cells: condensin II is nuclear throughout the cell cycle, whereas condensin I appears on chromosomes only after the nuclear envelope partially dissolves at prometaphase. Unlike in mammalian cells, however, condensin II is confined to centromeres in metaphase, whereas condensin I distributes more broadly along arms. We firmly establish a targeted gene disruption technique in this organism and find, to our surprise, that condensin II is not essential for mitosis under laboratory growth conditions, although it plays a crucial role in facilitating sister centromere resolution in the presence of a microtubule drug. The results provide fundamental insights into the evolution of condensin-based chromosome architecture and dynamics. PMID:23783031

  16. Cargo binding activates myosin VIIA motor function in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Tsuyoshi; Umeki, Nobuhisa; Ikebe, Reiko; Ikebe, Mitsuo

    2011-04-26

    Myosin VIIA, thought to be involved in human auditory function, is a gene responsible for human Usher syndrome type 1B, which causes hearing and visual loss. Recent studies have suggested that it can move processively if it forms a dimer. Nevertheless, it exists as a monomer in vitro, unlike the well-known two-headed processive myosin Va. Here we studied the molecular mechanism, which is currently unknown, of activating myosin VIIA as a cargo-transporting motor. Human myosin VIIA was present throughout cytosol, but it moved to the tip of filopodia upon the formation of dimer induced by dimer-inducing reagent. The forced dimer of myosin VIIA translocated its cargo molecule, MyRip, to the tip of filopodia, whereas myosin VIIA without the forced dimer-forming module does not translocate to the filopodial tips. These results suggest that dimer formation of myosin VIIA is important for its cargo-transporting activity. On the other hand, myosin VIIA without the forced dimerization module became translocated to the filopodial tips in the presence of cargo complex, i.e., MyRip/Rab27a, and transported its cargo complex to the tip. Coexpression of MyRip promoted the association of myosin VIIA to vesicles and the dimer formation. These results suggest that association of myosin VIIA monomers with membrane via the MyRip/Rab27a complex facilitates the cargo-transporting activity of myosin VIIA, which is achieved by cluster formation on the membrane, where it possibly forms a dimer. Present findings support that MyRip, a cargo molecule, functions as an activator of myosin VIIA transporter function.

  17. Influence of the cardiac myosin hinge region on contractile activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Margossian, S S; Krueger, J W; Sellers, J R; Cuda, G; Caulfield, J B; Norton, P.; Slayter, H. S.

    1991-01-01

    The participation of cardiac myosin hinge in contractility was investigated by in vitro motility and ATPase assays and by measurements of sarcomere shortening. The effect on contractile activity was analyzed using an antibody directed against a 20-amino acid peptide within the hinge region of myosin. This antibody bound specifically at the hinge at a distance of 55 nm from the S1/S2 junction, was specific to human, dog, and rat cardiac myosins, did not crossreact with gizzard or skeletal myos...

  18. In vivo definition of cardiac myosin-binding protein C's critical interactions with myosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuiyan, Md Shenuarin; McLendon, Patrick; James, Jeanne; Osinska, Hanna; Gulick, James; Bhandary, Bidur; Lorenz, John N; Robbins, Jeffrey

    2016-10-01

    Cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C) is an integral part of the sarcomeric machinery in cardiac muscle that enables normal function. cMyBP-C regulates normal cardiac contraction by functioning as a brake through interactions with the sarcomere's thick, thin, and titin filaments. cMyBP-C's precise effects as it binds to the different filament systems remain obscure, particularly as it impacts on the myosin heavy chain's head domain, contained within the subfragment 2 (S2) region. This portion of the myosin heavy chain also contains the ATPase activity critical for myosin's function. Mutations in myosin's head, as well as in cMyBP-C, are a frequent cause of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC). We generated transgenic lines in which endogenous cMyBP-C was replaced by protein lacking the residues necessary for binding to S2 (cMyBP-C(S2-)). We found, surprisingly, that cMyBP-C lacking the S2 binding site is incorporated normally into the sarcomere, although systolic function is compromised. We show for the first time the acute and chronic in vivo consequences of ablating a filament-specific interaction of cMyBP-C. This work probes the functional consequences, in the whole animal, of modifying a critical structure-function relationship, the protein's ability to bind to a region of the critical enzyme responsible for muscle contraction, the subfragment 2 domain of the myosin heavy chain. We show that the binding is not critical for the protein's correct insertion into the sarcomere's architecture, but is essential for long-term, normal function in the physiological context of the heart.

  19. Structural Basis for the Allosteric Interference of Myosin Function by Reactive Thiol Region Mutations G680A and G680V*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preller, Matthias; Bauer, Stefanie; Adamek, Nancy; Fujita-Becker, Setsuko; Fedorov, Roman; Geeves, Michael A.; Manstein, Dietmar J.

    2011-01-01

    The cold-sensitive single-residue mutation of glycine 680 in the reactive thiol region of Dictyostelium discoideum myosin-2 or the corresponding conserved glycine in other myosin isoforms has been reported to interfere with motor function. Here we present the x-ray structures of myosin motor domain mutants G680A in the absence and presence of nucleotide as well as the apo structure of mutant G680V. Our results show that the Gly-680 mutations lead to uncoupling of the reactive thiol region from the surrounding structural elements. Structural and functional data indicate that the mutations induce the preferential population of a state that resembles the ADP-bound state. Moreover, the Gly-680 mutants display greatly reduced dynamic properties, which appear to be related to the recovery of myosin motor function at elevated temperatures. PMID:21841195

  20. At the Start of the Sarcomere: A Previously Unrecognized Role for Myosin Chaperones and Associated Proteins during Early Myofibrillogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Layne Myhre

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of striated muscle in vertebrates requires the assembly of contractile myofibrils, consisting of highly ordered bundles of protein filaments. Myofibril formation occurs by the stepwise addition of complex proteins, a process that is mediated by a variety of molecular chaperones and quality control factors. Most notably, myosin of the thick filament requires specialized chaperone activity during late myofibrillogenesis, including that of Hsp90 and its cofactor, Unc45b. Unc45b has been proposed to act exclusively as an adaptor molecule, stabilizing interactions between Hsp90 and myosin; however, recent discoveries in zebrafish and C. elegans suggest the possibility of an earlier role for Unc45b during myofibrillogenesis. This role may involve functional control of nonmuscle myosins during the earliest stages of myogenesis, when premyofibril scaffolds are first formed from dynamic cytoskeletal actin. This paper will outline several lines of evidence that converge to build a model for Unc45b activity during early myofibrillogenesis.

  1. Effect of Cement Asphalt Mortar Debonding on Dynamic Properties of CRTS II Slab Ballastless Track

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The debonding of cement emulsified asphalt mortar (CA mortar is one of the main damage types in China railway track system II slab ballastless track. In order to analyze the influence of mortar debonding on the dynamic properties of CRTS II slab ballastless track, a vertical coupling vibration model for a vehicle-track-subgrade system was established on the base of wheel/rail coupling dynamics theory. The effects of different debonding lengths on dynamic response of vehicle and track system were analyzed by using the finite element software. The results show that the debonding of CA mortar layer will increase the dynamic response of track. If the length of debonding exceeds 1.95 m, the inflection point will appear on the vertical displacement curve of track. The vertical vibration acceleration of slab increases 4.95 times and the vertical dynamic compressive stress of CA mortar near the debonding region increases 15 times when the debonding length reaches 3.9 m. Considering the durability of ballastless track, once the length of debonding reaches 1.95 m, the mortar debonding should be repaired.

  2. Ultrafast dynamics of type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komolibus, K.; Piwonski, T.; Gradkowski, K. [Centre for Advanced Photonics and Process Analysis, Cork Institute of Technology, Cork (Ireland); Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Lee Maltings, Cork (Ireland); Reyner, C. J.; Liang, B.; Huffaker, D. L. [Department of Electrical Engineering and California NanoSystems Institute, University of California - Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Huyet, G. [Centre for Advanced Photonics and Process Analysis, Cork Institute of Technology, Cork (Ireland); Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Lee Maltings, Cork (Ireland); National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Houlihan, J. [School of Science, Waterford Institute of Technology, Waterford (Ireland)

    2015-01-19

    In this paper, room temperature two-colour pump-probe spectroscopy is employed to study ultrafast carrier dynamics in type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum dots. Our results demonstrate a strong dependency of carrier capture/escape processes on applied reverse bias voltage, probing wavelength and number of injected carriers. The extracted timescales as a function of both forward and reverse bias may provide important information for the design of efficient solar cells and quantum dot memories based on this material. The first few picoseconds of the dynamics reveal a complex behaviour with an interesting feature, which does not appear in devices based on type-I materials, and hence is linked to the unique carrier capture/escape processes possible in type-II structures.

  3. RNA Pol II Dynamics Modulate Co-transcriptional Chromatin Modification, CTD Phosphorylation, and Transcriptional Direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Nova; Saldi, Tassa; Sheridan, Ryan M; Cortazar, Michael A; Bentley, David L

    2017-05-18

    Eukaryotic genes are marked by conserved post-translational modifications on the RNA pol II C-terminal domain (CTD) and the chromatin template. How the 5'-3' profiles of these marks are established is poorly understood. Using pol II mutants in human cells, we found that slow transcription repositioned specific co-transcriptionally deposited chromatin modifications; histone H3 lysine 36 trimethyl (H3K36me3) shifted within genes toward 5' ends, and histone H3 lysine 4 dimethyl (H3K4me2) extended farther upstream of start sites. Slow transcription also evoked a hyperphosphorylation of CTD Ser2 residues at 5' ends of genes that is conserved in yeast. We propose a "dwell time in the target zone" model to explain the effects of transcriptional dynamics on the establishment of co-transcriptionally deposited protein modifications. Promoter-proximal Ser2 phosphorylation is associated with a longer pol II dwell time at start sites and reduced transcriptional polarity because of strongly enhanced divergent antisense transcription at promoters. These results demonstrate that pol II dynamics help govern the decision between sense and divergent antisense transcription. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Direct photoaffinity labeling of gizzard myosin with ( sup 3 H)uridine diphosphate places Glu185 of the heavy chain at the active site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garabedian, T.E.; Yount, R.G. (Washington State Univ., Pullman (USA))

    1990-12-25

    The active site of chicken gizzard myosin was labeled by direct photoaffinity labeling with ({sup 3}H)UDP. ({sup 3}H) UDP was stably trapped at the active site by addition of vanadate (Vi) and Co{sup 2+}. The extraordinary stability of the myosin.Co2+.(3H)UDP.Vi complex (t1/2 greater than 5 days at 0{degrees}C) allowed it to be purified free of extraneous ({sup 3}H)UDP before irradiation began. Upon UV irradiation, greater than 60% of the trapped ({sup 3}H)UDP was photoincorporated into the active site. Only the 200-kDa heavy chain was labeled, confirming earlier results using ({sup 3}H)UTP. Extensive tryptic digestion of photolabeled myosin subfragment 1 followed by high performance liquid chromatography separations and removal of nucleotide phosphates by treatment with alkaline phosphatase allowed two labeled peptides to be isolated. Sequencing of the labeled peptides and radioactive counting showed that Glu185 was the residue labeled. Since UDP is a zero-length cross-linker, Glu185 is located at the purine-binding pocket of the active site of smooth myosin and adjacent to the glycine-rich loop which binds the polyphosphate portion of ATP. This Glu residue is conserved in smooth and nonmuscle myosins and is the same residue identified previously by ({sup 3}H)UTP photolabeling in Acanthamoeba myosin II.

  5. Leading-process actomyosin coordinates organelle positioning and adhesion receptor dynamics in radially migrating cerebellar granule neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Niraj; Ramahi, Joseph S; Karakaya, Mahmut; Howell, Danielle; Kerekes, Ryan A; Solecki, David J

    2014-12-02

    During brain development, neurons migrate from germinal zones to their final positions to assemble neural circuits. A unique saltatory cadence involving cyclical organelle movement (e.g., centrosome motility) and leading-process actomyosin enrichment prior to nucleokinesis organizes neuronal migration. While functional evidence suggests that leading-process actomyosin is essential for centrosome motility, the role of the actin-enriched leading process in globally organizing organelle transport or traction forces remains unexplored. We show that myosin ii motors and F-actin dynamics are required for Golgi apparatus positioning before nucleokinesis in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) migrating along glial fibers. Moreover, we show that primary cilia are motile organelles, localized to the leading-process F-actin-rich domain and immobilized by pharmacological inhibition of myosin ii and F-actin dynamics. Finally, leading process adhesion dynamics are dependent on myosin ii and F-actin. We propose that actomyosin coordinates the overall polarity of migrating CGNs by controlling asymmetric organelle positioning and cell-cell contacts as these cells move along their glial guides.

  6. UNDERSTANDING THE MG II AND Hα SPECTRA IN A HIGHLY DYNAMICAL SOLAR PROMINENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinzel, P. [Astronomical Institute, The Czech Academy of Sciences, 25165 Ondřejov (Czech Republic); Schmieder, B.; Mein, N. [Observatoire de Paris, LESIA, UMR 8109 (CNRS), F-92195 Meudon (France); Gunár, S., E-mail: pheinzel@asu.cas.cz [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY 16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-10

    Mg ii h and k and Hα spectra in a dynamical prominence have been obtained along the slit of the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) and with the Meudon Multi-channel Subtractive Double Pass spectrograph on 2013 September 24, respectively. Single Mg ii line profiles are not much reversed, while at some positions along the IRIS slit the profiles show several discrete peaks that are Doppler-shifted. The intensity of these peaks is generally decreasing with their increasing Doppler shift. We interpret this unusual behavior as being due to the Doppler dimming effect. We discuss the possibility to interpret the unreversed single profiles by using a two-dimensional (2D) model of the entire prominence body with specific radiative boundary conditions. We have performed new 2D isothermal–isobaric modeling of both Hα and Mg ii lines and show the ability of such models to account for the line profile variations as observed. However, the Mg ii line-center intensities require the model with a temperature increase toward the prominence boundary. We show that even simple one-dimensional (1D) models with a prominence-to-corona transition region (PCTR) fit the observed Mg ii and Hα lines quite well, while the isothermal–isobaric models (1D or 2D) are inconsistent with simultaneous observations in the Mg ii h and k and Hα lines, meaning that the Hα line provides a strong additional constraint on the modeling. IRIS far-UV detection of the C ii lines in this prominence seems to provide a direct constraint on the PCTR part of the model.

  7. Finite-size effects on the lattice dynamics in spin crossover nanomaterials. II. Molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolasek, Mirko; Nicolazzi, William; Terki, Férial; Molnár, Gábor; Bousseksou, Azzedine

    2017-07-01

    In the first part of this work, an experimental study of the lattice dynamics of spin crossover nanoparticles was performed using the nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS). A size dependence of low energy phonon modes appears under 10 nm, but its origin is not well understood. In this paper, we investigate the phonon confinement effects in the framework of molecular dynamics simulations by modeling three-dimensional nanoparticles considering a cubic lattice with an octahedral pattern. The vibrational density of states is computed and compared to the experiment. The simulations allow one to highlight both the role of the phonon quantification and the role of the size and shape distributions of particles on the extracted parameters leading to a better understanding of the experimental results.

  8. A programmable DNA origami nanospring that reveals force-induced adjacent binding of myosin VI heads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaki, M.; Wickham, S. F.; Ikezaki, K.; Yanagida, T.; Shih, W. M.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanosensitive biological nanomachines such as motor proteins and ion channels regulate diverse cellular behaviour. Combined optical trapping with single-molecule fluorescence imaging provides a powerful methodology to clearly characterize the mechanoresponse, structural dynamics and stability of such nanomachines. However, this system requires complicated experimental geometry, preparation and optics, and is limited by low data-acquisition efficiency. Here we develop a programmable DNA origami nanospring that overcomes these issues. We apply our nanospring to human myosin VI, a mechanosensory motor protein, and demonstrate nanometre-precision single-molecule fluorescence imaging of the individual motor domains (heads) under force. We observe force-induced transitions of myosin VI heads from non-adjacent to adjacent binding, which correspond to adapted roles for low-load and high-load transport, respectively. Our technique extends single-molecule studies under force and clarifies the effect of force on biological processes. PMID:27941751

  9. Importance of salt and temperature in myosin polymerization during surimi gelation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez-Flores, Ruth; Cando, Deysi; Borderías, A Javier; Moreno, Helena M

    2018-01-15

    To address the effect of absence of NaCl on myosin heavy chain polymerization during two-step surimi gelation (different setting temperatures/times -5°C/24h and 30°C/30min-followed by heating at 90°C/30min) were considered. In gel samples made without salt (Lot A), no myosin heavy chain (MHC) polymerization was observed, only aggregation, as indicated by the electrophoresis in polyacrylamide/agarose gel profile. Moreover, these gels were characterized by weakly stabilized protein networks as denoted by the dynamic oscillatory measurement and FTIR analysis, resulting in poor quality gels. On the other hand, in gels made with added salt, MHC polymerization occurred, as evidenced by the electrophoresis, and the gelation resulted in a well-stabilized protein network with good physicochemical properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A programmable DNA origami nanospring that reveals force-induced adjacent binding of myosin VI heads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaki, M; Wickham, S F; Ikezaki, K; Yanagida, T; Shih, W M

    2016-12-12

    Mechanosensitive biological nanomachines such as motor proteins and ion channels regulate diverse cellular behaviour. Combined optical trapping with single-molecule fluorescence imaging provides a powerful methodology to clearly characterize the mechanoresponse, structural dynamics and stability of such nanomachines. However, this system requires complicated experimental geometry, preparation and optics, and is limited by low data-acquisition efficiency. Here we develop a programmable DNA origami nanospring that overcomes these issues. We apply our nanospring to human myosin VI, a mechanosensory motor protein, and demonstrate nanometre-precision single-molecule fluorescence imaging of the individual motor domains (heads) under force. We observe force-induced transitions of myosin VI heads from non-adjacent to adjacent binding, which correspond to adapted roles for low-load and high-load transport, respectively. Our technique extends single-molecule studies under force and clarifies the effect of force on biological processes.

  11. Folding of SAM-II riboswitch explored by replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xu; Yongjun, Wang; Zhihong, Li

    2015-01-21

    Riboswitches are cis-acting RNA fragments that function via a conformational transition mechanism when a specific target molecule binds to its binding pocket, representing an inviting new class of biomolecular target for the development of antibiotics. To understand the folding mechanism of SAM-II riboswitch, occurring predominantly in proteobacteria, a 100ns replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulation in explicit solvent is performed. Our results show that this RNA pseudoknot has multiple folding pathways, and various intermediate structures. The resultant riboswitch conformational transition map is well consistent with the recent fluorescence measurement, which confirms the dynamical properties of this pseudoknot. Moreover, a novel transition pathway is predicted. The global folding dynamics is mainly coupled with the helix rather than the loop region. The potential folding pathways of the riboswitch presented here should lead to a deeper understanding of the folding mechanism of the riboswitch, as well as the conformational change of RNA pseudoknot.

  12. Structure and dynamics of cationic van-der-Waals clusters. II. Dynamics of protonated argon clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritschel, T.; Zuhrt, Ch.; Zülicke, L.; Kuntz, P. J.

    2007-01-01

    A diatomics-in-molecules (DIM) model with ab-initio input data, which in part I successfully described the structure and bonding properties of protonated argon clusters ArnH+, is used here to investigate some aspects of the dynamics of such aggregates for n up to 30. The simple triatomic ionic fragment, Ar2H+, is studied in some detail with respect to normal vibrations, characteristics of classical intramolecular dynamics as reflected in the Fourier spectra of dynamical variables, and accurate quantum states of the vibrational motion. For larger clusters ArnH+ (n ≤30), the normal vibrational frequencies (and displacement eigenvectors) are calculated and related to the cluster structure. In addition, the Fourier spectra are analyzed with respect to their variation with changing internal energy and cluster size. As expected, the clusters show some floppy character. Even a little vibrational excitation can lead to internal rearrangement and to Ar-atom evaporation from the clusters; this is studied in more detail for one small complex (n = 3). Electronic excitation to one of the low-lying excited states, which are all globally repulsive, leads to complete fragmentation (atomization) of the clusters. A variety of conceivable elementary collision processes involving protonated argon clusters are discussed. Some of these may play a role in the gas-phase formation of medium-sized ArnH+ aggregates.

  13. Vibrational dynamics of the bifluoride ion. II. Adiabatic separation and proton dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epa, V. C.; Thorson, W. R.

    1990-01-01

    Vibrational dynamics of the bifluoride ion FHF-, which exhibits strongly anharmonic and nonseparable vibrations, is studied using the extended ab initio model potential surface described in the first paper of this series. Adiabatic separation of the proton motion from the F-F (ν1) motion forms a zero-order basis for description, although strong coupling of adiabatic states by the ν1 motion is important in higher vibrational levels and must be considered to understand the spectrum. The adiabatic protonic eigenstates at F-F separations R from 3.75 to 6.40 a.u. have been determined using the self-consistent field approximation in prolate spheroidal coordinates to provide a basis set for configuration interaction expansion of the exact eigenstates. 78 SCF eigenstates (21 σg, 21 σu, 21 πu, and 15 πg) were computed by ``exact'' numerical solution of the SCF equations. The adiabatic CI eigenstates are shown to be converged in energy to better than 1.0 cm-1 for the ground state of each symmetry type and usually better than 10 cm-1 for the lowest three to five states, and pass critical tests of accuracy such as the Hellmann-Feynman theorem. The resulting CI potential energy curves closely resemble corresponding SCF energy curves and justify the concept of mode separation even in this very anharmonic system. The adiabatic CI potential energy curves explain most aspects of the dynamics relevant to the IR and Raman spectra of FHF- (e.g., in KHF2), and calculations of ν1 dynamics within the adiabatic approximation suffice to assign most of the observed IR spectrum of KHF2(s) (to about 6000 cm-1). States corresponding qualitatively to modal overtone and combination levels such as 3ν2 and (ν2+2ν3) however exhibit avoided crossings in the neighborhood of the equilibrium configuration and ``Fermi resonance'' involving interactions of two or more such adiabatic states via the ν1 motion must be treated by close-coupling to predict both frequencies and intensities in the

  14. Protein dynamics tunes excited state positions in light-harvesting complex II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrandecic, Kamarniso; Rätsep, Margus; Wilk, Laura; Rusevich, Leonid; Golub, Maksym; Reppert, Mike; Irrgang, Klaus-Dieter; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Pieper, Jörg

    2015-03-12

    Light harvesting and excitation energy transfer in photosynthesis are relatively well understood at cryogenic temperatures up to ∼100 K, where crystal structures of several photosynthetic complexes including the major antenna complex of green plants (LHC II) are available at nearly atomic resolution. The situation is much more complex at higher or even physiological temperatures, because the spectroscopic properties of antenna complexes typically undergo drastic changes above ∼100 K. We have addressed this problem using a combination of quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) and optical spectroscopy on native LHC II and mutant samples lacking the Chl 2/Chl a 612 pigment molecule. Absorption difference spectra of the Chl 2/Chl a 612 mutant of LHC II reveal pronounced changes of spectral position and their widths above temperatures as low as ∼80 K. The complementary QENS data indicate an onset of conformational protein motions at about the same temperature. This finding suggests that excited state positions in LHC II are affected by protein dynamics on the picosecond time scale. In more detail, this means that at cryogenic temperatures the antenna complex is trapped in certain protein conformations. At higher temperature, however, a variety of conformational substates with different spectral position may be thermally accessible. At the same time, an analysis of the widths of the absorption difference spectra of Chl 2/Chl a 612 reveals three different reorganization energies or Huang-Rhys factors in different temperature ranges, respectively. These findings imply that (dynamic) pigment-protein interactions fine-tune electronic energy levels and electron-phonon coupling of LHC II for efficient excitation energy transfer at physiological temperatures.

  15. Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions alter the dynamics and distribution of Mn(II) in cultured chick glial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedler, F.C.; Ley, B.W. (Dept. of Molecular Cell Biology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park (USA))

    1990-12-01

    Previous studies revealed that Mn(II) is accumulated in cultured glial cells to concentrations far above those present in whole brain or in culture medium. The data indicated that Mn(II) moves across the plasma membrane into the cytoplasm by facilitated diffusion or counter-ion transport with Ca(II), then into mitochondria by active transport. The fact that 1-10 microM Mn(II) ions activate brain glutamine synthetase makes important the regulation of Mn(II) transport in the CNS. Since Cu(II) and Zn(II) caused significant changes in the accumulation of Mn(II) by glia, the mechanisms by which these ions alter the uptake and efflux of Mn(II) ions has been investigated systematically under chemically defined conditions. The kinetics of (54MN)-Mn(II) uptake and efflux were determined and compared under four different sets of conditions: no adducts, Cu(II) or Zn(II) added externally, and with cells preloaded with Cu(II) or Zn(II) in the presence and absence of external added metal ions. Zn(II) ions inhibit the initial velocity of Mn(II) uptake, increase total Mn(II) accumulated, but do not alter the rate or extent Mn(II) efflux. Cu(II) ions increase both the initial velocity and the net Mn(II) accumulated by glia, with little effect on rate or extent of Mn(II) efflux. These results predict that increases in Cu(II) or Zn(II) levels may also increase the steady-state levels of Mn(II) in the cytoplasmic fraction of glial cells, which may in turn alter the activity of Mn(II)-sensitive enzymes in this cell compartment.

  16. A dynamical model for FR II type radio sources with terminated jet activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuligowska, Elżbieta

    2017-02-01

    Context. The extension of the KDA analytical model of FR II-type source evolution originally assuming a continuum injection process in the jet-IGM interaction towards a case of the jet's termination is presented and briefly discussed. Aims: The dynamical evolution of FR II-type sources predicted with this extended model, hereafter referred to as KDA EXT, and its application to the chosen radio sources. Methods: Following the classical approach based on the source's continuous injection and self-similarity, I propose the effective formulae describing the length and luminosity evolution of the lobes during an absence of the jet flow, and present the resulting diagrams for the characteristics mentioned. Results: Using an algorithm based on the numerical integration of a modified formula for jet power, the KDA EXT model is fitted to three radio galaxies. Their predicted spectra are then compared to the observed spectra, proving that these fits are better than the best spectral fit provided by the original KDA model of the FR II-type sources dynamical evolution.

  17. Salt—Water Dynamics in Soils:II.Effect of Precipitation on SaltWater Dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOUWEN-RUI; MENGFAN-HUA

    1992-01-01

    Through a simulation test carried out with soil columns (61.8cm in diameter),the effect of precipitation on salt-water dynamics in soils was studied by in-situ monitoring of salt-water dynamics using soil salinity sensors and tensioneters.The results show that in the profile of whole silty loam soil,the surface runoff volume due to precipitation and the salt-leaching role of infiltrated precipitation increased with the depth of ground water;and in the profile with an intercalated bed of clay or with a thick upper layer of clay,the amount of surface runoff was greater but the salt-leaching role of precipitation was smaller than those in the profile of whole silty loam soil.In case of soil water being supplemented by precipitation,the evaporation of groundwater in the soil columns reduced,resulting in a great decline of salt accumulation from soil profile to surface soil.The effect of precipitation on the water regime of soil profile was performed via both water infiltration and water pressure transfer.The direct infiltration depth of precipitation was less than 1m in general,but water pressure transfer could go up to groundwater surface directly.

  18. High-NaCl intake impairs dynamic autoregulation of renal blood flow in ANG II-infused rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saeed, Aso; Dibona, Gerald F; Marcussen, Niels

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate dynamic autoregulation of renal blood flow (RBF) in ANG II-infused rats and the influence of high-NaCl intake. Sprague-Dawley rats received ANG II (250 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1) sc) or saline vehicle (sham) for 14 days after which acute renal clearance experiments...

  19. Molecular dynamics simulation study of conformational changes of transcription factor TFIIS during RNA polymerase II transcriptional arrest and reactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changsun Eun

    Full Text Available Transcription factor IIS (TFIIS is a protein known for catalyzing the cleavage reaction of the 3'-end of backtracked RNA transcript, allowing RNA polymerase II (Pol II to reactivate the transcription process from the arrested state. Recent structural studies have provided a molecular basis of protein-protein interaction between TFIIS and Pol II. However, the detailed dynamic conformational changes of TFIIS upon binding to Pol II and the related thermodynamic information are largely unknown. Here we use computational approaches to investigate the conformational space of TFIIS in the Pol II-bound and Pol II-free (unbound states. Our results reveal two distinct conformations of TFIIS: the closed and the open forms. The closed form is dominant in the Pol II-free (unbound state of TFIIS, whereas the open form is favorable in the Pol II-bound state. Furthermore, we discuss the free energy difference involved in the conformational changes between the two forms in the presence or absence of Pol II. Additionally, our analysis indicates that hydrophobic interactions and the protein-protein interactions between TFIIS and Pol II are crucial for inducing the conformational changes of TFIIS. Our results provide novel insights into the functional interplay between Pol II and TFIIS as well as mechanism of reactivation of Pol II transcription by TFIIS.

  20. Molecular dynamic simulations of iron (II) hydroxide in high temperature and supercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yuanliang

    In this study, the iron (II) hydroxide -- water system has been investigated at high temperatures by using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The simulation results reveal that at infinite dilution both Fe2+ cation and OH- anion have 6 water molecules within their first hydration shell and both types of ionic species experience a dramatic increase in their diffusion coefficients at near and supercritical conditions. The process of iron (II) hydroxide cluster formation has been simulated. The nano-clusters of larger sizes formed in supercritical water tend to be in an amorphous state. After having been quenched by an inert gas bath, iron (II) hydroxide nano-clusters with various structures have been produced. The geometries and associated binding energies of these species are given in detail. The vibrational spectra of iron (II) hydroxide clusters are also derived and compared with the spectrum of a bulk solid. The obtained results have a practical value for the analysis of potential corrosion products in supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) which is employed in the new generation nuclear power plant design (GEN IV). This work also illustrates the process of hydrothermal synthesis of oxide nano-particles.

  1. Structure and Dynamics of Isolated Internetwork Ca II H Bright Points Observed by Sunrise

    CERN Document Server

    Jafarzadeh, S; Feller, A; Lagg, A; Pietarila, A; Danilovic, S; Riethmüller, T L; Pillet, V Martínez

    2012-01-01

    We aim to improve our picture of the low chromosphere in the quiet-Sun internetwork by investigating the intensity, horizontal velocity, size and lifetime variations of small bright points (BPs; diameter smaller than 0.3 arcsec) observed in the Ca II H 3968 {\\AA} passband along with their magnetic field parameters, derived from photospheric magnetograms. Several high-quality time series of disc-centre, quiet-Sun observations from the Sunrise balloon-borne solar telescope, with spatial resolution of around 100 km on the solar surface, have been analysed to study the dynamics of BPs observed in the Ca II H passband and their dependence on the photospheric vector magnetogram signal. Parameters such as horizontal velocity, diameter, intensity and lifetime histograms of the isolated internetwork and magnetic Ca II H BPs were determined. Mean values were found to be 2.2 km/s, 0.2 arcsec (150 km), 1.48 average Ca II H quiet-Sun and 673 sec, respectively. Interestingly, the brightness and the horizontal velocity of B...

  2. Dynamic architecture of a minimal RNA polymerase II open promoter complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treutlein, Barbara; Muschielok, Adam; Andrecka, Joanna; Jawhari, Anass; Buchen, Claudia; Kostrewa, Dirk; Hög, Friederike; Cramer, Patrick; Michaelis, Jens

    2012-04-27

    The open promoter complex (OC) is a central intermediate during transcription initiation that contains a DNA bubble. Here, we employ single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer experiments and Nano-Positioning System analysis to determine the three-dimensional architecture of a minimal OC consisting of promoter DNA, including a TATA box and an 11-nucleotide mismatched region around the transcription start site, TATA box-binding protein (TBP), RNA polymerase (Pol) II, and general transcription factor (TF)IIB and TFIIF. In this minimal OC, TATA-DNA and TBP reside above the Pol II cleft between clamp and protrusion domains. Downstream DNA is dynamically loaded into and unloaded from the Pol II cleft at a timescale of seconds. The TFIIB core domain is displaced from the Pol II wall, where it is located in the closed promoter complex. These results reveal large overall structural changes during the initiation-elongation transition, which are apparently accommodated by the intrinsic flexibility of TFIIB.

  3. Jamming dynamics of stretch-induced surfactant release by alveolar type II cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Arnab; Arold, Stephen P; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Suki, Béla

    2012-03-01

    Secretion of pulmonary surfactant by alveolar epithelial type II cells is vital for the reduction of interfacial surface tension, thus preventing lung collapse. To study secretion dynamics, rat alveolar epithelial type II cells were cultured on elastic membranes and cyclically stretched. The amounts of phosphatidylcholine, the primary lipid component of surfactant, inside and outside the cells, were measured using radiolabeled choline. During and immediately after stretch, cells secreted less surfactant than unstretched cells; however, stretched cells secreted significantly more surfactant than unstretched cells after an extended lag period. We developed a model based on the hypothesis that stretching leads to jamming of surfactant traffic escaping the cell, similar to vehicular traffic jams. In the model, stretch increases surfactant transport from the interior to the exterior of the cell. This transport is mediated by a surface layer with a finite capacity due to the limited number of fusion pores through which secretion occurs. When the amount of surfactant in the surface layer approaches this capacity, interference among lamellar bodies carrying surfactant reduces the rate of secretion, effectively creating a jam. When the stretch stops, the jam takes an extended time to clear, and subsequently the amount of secreted surfactant increases. We solved the model analytically and show that its dynamics are consistent with experimental observations, implying that surfactant secretion is a fundamentally nonlinear process with memory representing collective behavior at the level of single cells. Our results thus highlight the importance of a jamming dynamics in stretch-induced cellular secretory processes.

  4. Decavanadate binding to a high affinity site near the myosin catalytic centre inhibits F-actin-stimulated myosin ATPase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiago, Teresa; Aureliano, Manuel; Gutiérrez-Merino, Carlos

    2004-05-11

    Decameric vanadate (V(10)) inhibits the actin-stimulated myosin ATPase activity, noncompetitively with actin or with ATP upon interaction with a high-affinity binding site (K(i) = 0.27 +/- 0.05 microM) in myosin subfragment-1 (S1). The binding of V(10) to S1 can be monitored from titration with V(10) of the fluorescence of S1 labeled at Cys-707 and Cys-697 with N-iodo-acetyl-N'-(5-sulfo-1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine (IAEDANS) or 5-(iodoacetamido) fluorescein, which showed the presence of only one V(10) binding site per monomer with a dissociation constant of 0.16-0.7 microM, indicating that S1 labeling with these dyes produced only a small distortion of the V(10) binding site. The large quenching of AEDANS-labeled S1 fluorescence produced by V(10) indicated that the V(10) binding site is close to Cys-697 and 707. Fluorescence studies demonstrated the following: (i) the binding of V(10) to S1 is not competitive either with actin or with ADP.V(1) or ADP.AlF(4); (ii) the affinity of V(10) for the complex S1/ADP.V(1) and S1/ADP.AlF(4) is 2- and 3-fold lower than for S1; and (iii) it is competitive with the S1 "back door" ligand P(1)P(5)-diadenosine pentaphosphate. A local conformational change in S1 upon binding of V(10) is supported by (i) a decrease of the efficiency of fluorescence energy transfer between eosin-labeled F-actin and fluorescein-labeled S1, and (ii) slower reassociation between S1 and F-actin after ATP hydrolysis. The results are consistent with binding of V(10) to the Walker A motif of ABC ATPases, which in S1 corresponds to conserved regions of the P-loop which form part of the phosphate tube.

  5. Microscopic model for the neutron dynamic structure factor of solid methane in phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin Yunchang, E-mail: yunchang.shin@yale.ed [Department of Physics, Indiana University Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Mike Snow, W.; Liu, C.Y.; Lavelle, C.M.; Baxter, David V. [Department of Physics, Indiana University Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States)

    2010-08-21

    We have constructed a microscopic model for the neutron dynamic structure factor S(Q,{omega}) of solid methane in phase II. We expect this model to apply for neutron energies below 1 eV at pressures near 1 bar and temperatures below 20 K where methane possesses both free rotation and hindered rotation modes of the tetrahedral molecules in the unit cell. The model treats the motions of molecular translations, intra-molecular vibrations and the free and hindered rotations of methane molecule as independent. Total scattering cross-sections calculated from the model agree with the cross-section measurements for incident neutron energies of 0.5 meV-1 eV. The effective density of states is extracted from the model. We also present the quantitative calculation of the separate contributions of the two different rotational modes to the inelastic cross-section for different methane temperatures in phase II.

  6. Crystal structure and encapsulation dynamics of ice II-structured neon hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaohui; Zhu, Jinlong; Du, Shiyu; Xu, Hongwu; Vogel, Sven C; Han, Jiantao; Germann, Timothy C; Zhang, Jianzhong; Jin, Changqing; Francisco, Joseph S; Zhao, Yusheng

    2014-07-22

    Neon hydrate was synthesized and studied by in situ neutron diffraction at 480 MPa and temperatures ranging from 260 to 70 K. For the first time to our knowledge, we demonstrate that neon atoms can be enclathrated in water molecules to form ice II-structured hydrates. The guest Ne atoms occupy the centers of D2O channels and have substantial freedom of movement owing to the lack of direct bonding between guest molecules and host lattices. Molecular dynamics simulation confirms that the resolved structure where Ne dissolved in ice II is thermodynamically stable at 480 MPa and 260 K. The density distributions indicate that the vibration of Ne atoms is mainly in planes perpendicular to D2O channels, whereas their distributions along the channels are further constrained by interactions between adjacent Ne atoms.

  7. A Method for Selecting Software for Dynamic Event Analysis II: the Taylor Anvil and Dynamic Brazilian Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. D. Richins; J. M. Lacy; T. K. Larson; S. R. Novascone

    2008-05-01

    New nuclear power reactor designs will require resistance to a variety of possible malevolent attacks as well as traditional dynamic accident scenarios. The design/analysis team may be faced with a broad range of phenomena including air and ground blasts, high-velocity penetrators or shaped charges, and vehicle or aircraft impacts. With a host of software tools available to address these high-energy events, the analysis team must evaluate and select the software most appropriate for their particular set of problems. The accuracy of the selected software should then be validated with respect to the phenomena governing the interaction of the threat and structure. Several software codes are available for the study of blast, impact, and other shock phenomena. At the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), a study is underway to investigate the comparative characteristics of a group of shock and high-strain rate physics codes including ABAQUS, LS-DYNA, CTH, ALEGRA, and ALE-3D. In part I of this report, a series of five benchmark problems to exercise some important capabilities of the subject software was identified. The benchmark problems selected are a Taylor cylinder test, a split Hopkinson pressure bar test, a free air blast, the dynamic splitting tension (Brazilian) test, and projectile penetration of a concrete slab. Part II-- this paper-- reports the results of two of the benchmark problems: the Taylor cylinder and the dynamic Brazilian test. The Taylor cylinder test is a method to determine the dynamic yield properties of materials. The test specimen is a right circular cylinder which is impacted against a theoretically rigid target. The cylinder deforms upon impact, with the final shape depending upon the dynamic yield stress, in turn a function of strain and strain rate. The splitting tension test, or Brazilian test, is a method to measure the tensile strength of concrete using a cylindrical specimen. The specimen is loaded diametrically in compression, producing a

  8. The role of stellar feedback in the dynamics of H II regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, Laura A.; Castro, Daniel [MIT-Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, 37-664H, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Krumholz, Mark R.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95060 (United States); Bolatto, Alberto D., E-mail: lopez@space.mit.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2014-11-10

    Stellar feedback is often cited as the biggest uncertainty in galaxy formation models today. This uncertainty stems from a dearth of observational constraints as well as the great dynamic range between the small scales (≲1 pc) where the feedback originates and the large scales of galaxies (≳1 kpc) that are shaped by this feedback. To bridge this divide, in this paper we aim to assess observationally the role of stellar feedback at the intermediate scales of H II regions (∼10-100 pc). In particular, we employ multiwavelength data to examine several stellar feedback mechanisms in a sample of 32 H II regions (with ages ∼3-10 Myr) in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, respectively. Using optical, infrared, radio, and X-ray images, we measure the pressures exerted on the shells from the direct stellar radiation, the dust-processed radiation, the warm ionized gas, and the hot X-ray-emitting gas. We find that the warm ionized gas dominates over the other terms in all of the sources, although two have comparable dust-processed radiation pressures to their warm gas pressures. The hot gas pressures are comparatively weak, while the direct radiation pressures are one to two orders of magnitude below the other terms. We discuss the implications of these results, particularly highlighting evidence for hot gas leakage from the H II shells and regarding the momentum deposition from the dust-processed radiation to the warm gas. Furthermore, we emphasize that similar observational work should be done on very young H II regions to test whether direct radiation pressure and hot gas can drive the dynamics at early times.

  9. Myosin-10 independently influences mitotic spindle structure and mitotic progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandquist, Joshua C; Larson, Matthew E; Hine, Ken J

    2016-06-01

    The iconic bipolar structure of the mitotic spindle is of extreme importance to proper spindle function. At best, spindle abnormalities result in a delayed mitosis, while worse outcomes include cell death or disease. Recent work has uncovered an important role for the actin-based motor protein myosin-10 in the regulation of spindle structure and function. Here we examine the contribution of the myosin tail homology 4 (MyTH4) domain of the myosin-10 tail to the protein's spindle functions. The MyTH4 domain is known to mediate binding to microtubules and we verify the suspicion that this domain contributes to myosin-10's close association with the spindle. More surprisingly, our data demonstrate that some but not all of myosin-10's spindle functions require microtubule binding. In particular, myosin-10's contribution to spindle pole integrity requires microtubule binding, whereas its contribution to normal mitotic progression does not. This is demonstrated by the observation that dominant negative expression of the wild-type MyTH4 domain produces multipolar spindles and an increased mitotic index, whereas overexpression of a version of the MyTH4 domain harboring point mutations that abrogate microtubule binding results in only the mitotic index phenotype. Our data suggest that myosin-10 helps to control the metaphase to anaphase transition in cells independent of microtubule binding. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Molecular dynamics studies of pathways of water movement in cyanobacterial photosystem II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabdulkhakov, A. G., E-mail: azat@vega.protres.ru; Kljashtorny, V. G.; Dontsova, M. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Protein Research (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-15

    Photosystem II (PSII) catalyzes the light-induced generation of oxygen from water. The oxygen-evolving complex is buried deep in the protein on the lumenal side of PSII, and water molecules need to pass through protein subunits to reach the active site—the manganese cluster. Previous studies on the elucidation of water channels in PSII were based on an analysis of the cavities in the static PSII structure determined by X-ray diffraction. In the present study, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of the water movement in the transport system of PSII.

  11. Numerical simulations of granular dynamics II. Particle dynamics in a shaken granular material

    CERN Document Server

    Murdoch, Naomi; Richardson, Derek C; Nordstrom, Kerstin; Berardi, Christian R; Green, Simon F; Losert, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Surfaces of planets and small bodies of our Solar System are often covered by a layer of granular material that can range from a fine regolith to a gravel-like structure of varying depths. Therefore, the dynamics of granular materials are involved in many events occurring during planetary and small-body evolution thus contributing to their geological properties. We demonstrate that the new adaptation of the parallel N-body hard-sphere code pkdgrav has the capability to model accurately the key features of the collective motion of bidisperse granular materials in a dense regime as a result of shaking. As a stringent test of the numerical code we investigate the complex collective ordering and motion of granular material by direct comparison with laboratory experiments. We demonstrate that, as experimentally observed, the scale of the collective motion increases with increasing small-particle additive concentration. We then extend our investigations to assess how self-gravity and external gravity affect collect...

  12. Smooth muscle myosin inhibition: a novel therapeutic approach for pulmonary hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ho

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Pulmonary hypertension remains a major clinical problem despite current therapies. In this study, we examine for the first time a novel pharmacological target, smooth muscle myosin, and determine if the smooth muscle myosin inhibitor, CK-2019165 (CK-165 ameliorates pulmonary hypertension. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Six domestic female pigs were surgically instrumented to measure pulmonary blood flow and systemic and pulmonary vascular dynamics. Pulmonary hypertension was induced by hypoxia, or infusion of the thromboxane analog (U-46619, 0.1 µg/kg/min, i.v.. In rats, chronic pulmonary hypertension was induced by monocrotaline. RESULTS: CK-165 (4 mg/kg, i.v. reduced pulmonary vascular resistance by 22±3 and 28±6% from baseline in hypoxia and thromboxane pig models, respectively (p<0.01 and 0.01, while mean arterial pressure also fell and heart rate rose slightly. When CK-165 was delivered via inhalation in the hypoxia model, pulmonary vascular resistance fell by 17±6% (p<0.05 while mean arterial pressure and heart rate were unchanged. In the monocrotaline model of chronic pulmonary hypertension, inhaled CK-165 resulted in a similar (18.0±3.8% reduction in right ventricular systolic pressure as compared with sildenafil (20.3±4.5%. CONCLUSION: Inhibition of smooth muscle myosin may be a novel therapeutic target for treatment of pulmonary hypertension.

  13. Harmonic force spectroscopy reveals a force-velocity curve from a single human beta cardiac myosin motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Jongmin; Nag, Suman; Vestergaard, Christian; Mortensen, Kim; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Spudich, James

    2014-03-01

    A muscle contracts rapidly under low load, but slowly under high load. Its molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated, however. During contraction, myosins in thick filaments interact with actin in thin filaments in the sarcomere, cycling between a strongly bound (force producing) state and a weakly bound (relaxed) state. Huxley et al. have previously proposed that the transition from the strong to the weak interaction can be modulated by a load. We use a new method we call ``harmonic force spectroscopy'' to extract a load-velocity curve from a single human beta cardiac myosin II motor. With a dual-beam optical trap, we hold an actin dumbbell over a myosin molecule anchored to the microscope stage that oscillates sinusoidally. Upon binding, the motor experiences an oscillatory load with a mean that is directed forward or backward, depending on binding location We find that the bound time at saturating [ATP] is exponentially correlated with the mean load, which is explained by Arrhenius transition theory. With a stroke size measurement, we obtained a load-velocity curve from a single myosin. We compare the curves for wild-type motors with mutants that cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathies, to understand the effects on the contractile cycle

  14. Dynamics of zonal flow-like structures in the edge of the TJ-II stellarator

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso, J A; Arévalo, J; Hidalgo, C; Pedrosa, M A; Van Milligen, B Ph; Carralero, D

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of fluctuating electric field structures in the edge of the TJ-II stellarator, that display zonal flow-like traits, is studied. These structures have been shown to be global and affect particle transport dynamically [J.A. Alonso et al., Nucl. Fus. 52 063010 (2012)]. In this article we discuss possible drive (Reynolds stress) and damping (Neoclassical viscosity, geodesic transfer) mechanisms for the associated ExB velocity. We show that: (a) while the observed turbulence-driven forces can provide the necessary perpendicular acceleration, a causal relation could not be firmly established, possibly because of the locality of the Reynolds stress measurements, (b) the calculated neoclassical viscosity and damping times are comparable to the observed zonal flow relaxation times, and (c) although an accompanying density modulation is observed to be associated to the zonal flow, it is not consistent with the excitation of pressure side-bands, like those present in geodesic acoustic oscillations, caused b...

  15. Conspray dynamic sleeve piston coal feeder. Phase II. Verification tests. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-26

    This report details the performance of Phase II: Verification Tests of the Conspray dynamic sleeve piston coal feeder. The machine performed for 200 hours at 700 psi backpressure, utilizing a 70% to 200 mesh Utah bituminous coal as feedstock. All test work was satisfactorily completed. A post-test inspection was performed. A report of component wear and failures incurred in testing is included as well as suggestions for machine upgrades. The overall conclusion is that the dynamic sleeve piston feeder has proven its ability to operate safely and reliably. When problems have occurred, the machine has demonstrated inherent safety by shutting down without endangering process or personnel. With the recommended improvements incorporated into the feeder, the unit will be ready for installation on a pilot scale coal gasifier. 9 figures, 11 tables.

  16. Inter-cage dynamics in structure I, II, and H fluoromethane hydrates as studied by NMR and molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trueba, Alondra Torres [Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0R6 (Canada); Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, Separation Technology Group, Den Dolech 2, 5612 AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Kroon, Maaike C. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, Separation Technology Group, Den Dolech 2, 5612 AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Peters, Cor J. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, Separation Technology Group, Den Dolech 2, 5612 AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); The Petroleum Institute, Chemical Engineering Department, P. O. Box 2533, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Moudrakovski, Igor L.; Ratcliffe, Christopher I.; Ripmeester, John A., E-mail: John.Ripmeester@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0R6 (Canada); Alavi, Saman [Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0R6 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2014-06-07

    Prospective industrial applications of clathrate hydrates as materials for gas separation require further knowledge of cavity distortion, cavity selectivity, and defects induction by guest-host interactions. The results presented in this contribution show that under certain temperature conditions the guest combination of CH{sub 3}F and a large polar molecule induces defects on the clathrate hydrate framework that allow intercage guest dynamics. {sup 13}C NMR chemical shifts of a CH{sub 3}F/CH{sub 4}/TBME sH hydrate and a temperature analysis of the {sup 2}H NMR powder lineshapes of a CD{sub 3}F/THF sII and CD{sub 3}F/TBME sH hydrate, displayed evidence that the populations of CH{sub 4} and CH{sub 3}F in the D and D{sup ′} cages were in a state of rapid exchange. A hydrogen bonding analysis using molecular dynamics simulations on the TBME/CH{sub 3}F and TBME/CH{sub 4} sH hydrates showed that the presence of CH{sub 3}F enhances the hydrogen bonding probability of the TBME molecule with the water molecules of the cavity. Similar results were obtained for THF/CH{sub 3}F and THF/CH{sub 4} sII hydrates. The enhanced hydrogen bond formation leads to the formation of defects in the water hydrogen bonding lattice and this can enhance the migration of CH{sub 3}F molecules between adjacent small cages.

  17. Numerical simulations of granular dynamics II: Particle dynamics in a shaken granular material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, Naomi; Michel, Patrick; Richardson, Derek C.; Nordstrom, Kerstin; Berardi, Christian R.; Green, Simon F.; Losert, Wolfgang

    2012-05-01

    Surfaces of planets and small bodies of our Solar System are often covered by a layer of granular material that can range from a fine regolith to a gravel-like structure of varying depths. Therefore, the dynamics of granular materials are involved in many events occurring during planetary and small-body evolution thus contributing to their geological properties. We demonstrate that the new adaptation of the parallel N-body hard-sphere code pkdgrav has the capability to model accurately the key features of the collective motion of bidisperse granular materials in a dense regime as a result of shaking. As a stringent test of the numerical code we investigate the complex collective ordering and motion of granular material by direct comparison with laboratory experiments. We demonstrate that, as experimentally observed, the scale of the collective motion increases with increasing small-particle additive concentration. We then extend our investigations to assess how self-gravity and external gravity affect collective motion. In our reduced-gravity simulations both the gravitational conditions and the frequency of the vibrations roughly match the conditions on asteroids subjected to seismic shaking, though real regolith is likely to be much more heterogeneous and less ordered than in our idealised simulations. We also show that collective motion can occur in a granular material under a wide range of inter-particle gravity conditions and in the absence of an external gravitational field. These investigations demonstrate the great interest of being able to simulate conditions that are to relevant planetary science yet unreachable by Earth-based laboratory experiments.

  18. The plastoquinol-plastoquinone exchange mechanism in photosystem II: insight from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobnina, Veranika; Lambreva, Maya D; Rea, Giuseppina; Campi, Gaetano; Antonacci, Amina; Scognamiglio, Viviana; Giardi, Maria Teresa; Polticelli, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    In the photosystem II (PSII) of oxygenic photosynthetic organisms, the reaction center (RC) core mediates the light-induced electron transfer leading to water splitting and production of reduced plastoquinone molecules. The reduction of plastoquinone to plastoquinol lowers PSII affinity for the latter and leads to its release. However, little is known about the role of protein dynamics in this process. Here, molecular dynamics simulations of the complete PSII complex embedded in a lipid bilayer have been used to investigate the plastoquinol release mechanism. A distinct dynamic behavior of PSII in the presence of plastoquinol is observed which, coupled to changes in charge distribution and electrostatic interactions, causes disruption of the interactions seen in the PSII-plastoquinone complex and leads to the "squeezing out" of plastoquinol from the binding pocket. Displacement of plastoquinol closes the second water channel, recently described in a 2.9 Å resolution PSII structure (Guskov et al. in Nat Struct Mol Biol 16:334-342, 2009), allowing to rule out the proposed "alternating" mechanism of plastoquinol-plastoquinone exchange, while giving support to the "single-channel" one. The performed simulations indicated a pivotal role of D1-Ser264 in modulating the dynamics of the plastoquinone binding pocket and plastoquinol-plastoquinone exchange via its interaction with D1-His252 residue. The effects of the disruption of this hydrogen bond network on the PSII redox reactions were experimentally assessed in the D1 site-directed mutant Ser264Lys.

  19. Electron microscopic evidence for the myosin head lever arm mechanism in hydrated myosin filaments using the gas environmental chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minoda, Hiroki [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganeishi, Tokyo184-8588 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Okabe, Tatsuhiro; Inayoshi, Yuhri [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganeishi, Tokyo184-8588 (Japan); Miyakawa, Takuya; Miyauchi, Yumiko; Tanokura, Masaru [Department of Applied Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Katayama, Eisaku [Graduate School of Medicine, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Wakabayashi, Takeyuki [Department of Biosciences, School of Science and Engineering, Teikyo University, Utsunomiya, Tochigiken 320-8551 (Japan); Akimoto, Tsuyoshi [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Teikyo University, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan); Sugi, Haruo, E-mail: sugi@kyf.biglobe.ne.jp [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Teikyo University, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan)

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} We succeeded in recording structural changes of hydrated myosin cross-bridges. {yields} We succeeded in position-marking the cross-bridges with site-directed antibodies. {yields} We recorded cross-bridge movement at different regions in individual cross-bridge. {yields} The movement was smallest at the cross-bridge-subfragment two boundary. {yields} The results provide evidence for the cross-bridge lever arm mechanism. -- Abstract: Muscle contraction results from an attachment-detachment cycle between the myosin heads extending from myosin filaments and the sites on actin filaments. The myosin head first attaches to actin together with the products of ATP hydrolysis, performs a power stroke associated with release of hydrolysis products, and detaches from actin upon binding with new ATP. The detached myosin head then hydrolyses ATP, and performs a recovery stroke to restore its initial position. The strokes have been suggested to result from rotation of the lever arm domain around the converter domain, while the catalytic domain remains rigid. To ascertain the validity of the lever arm hypothesis in muscle, we recorded ATP-induced movement at different regions within individual myosin heads in hydrated myosin filaments, using the gas environmental chamber attached to the electron microscope. The myosin head were position-marked with gold particles using three different site-directed antibodies. The amplitude of ATP-induced movement at the actin binding site in the catalytic domain was similar to that at the boundary between the catalytic and converter domains, but was definitely larger than that at the regulatory light chain in the lever arm domain. These results are consistent with the myosin head lever arm mechanism in muscle contraction if some assumptions are made.

  20. Design and Construction of the TOPAZ II Reactor System Real-Time Dynamic Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Kwan S.

    1994-07-01

    A dynamic simulator of the TOPAZ II reactor system has been developed for the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program. The simulator is a self-contained IBM-PC compatible based system that executes at a speed faster than real-time. The CPU is an 80486 DX2 processor operating at 66 MHz. The data acquisition system also employs an 80486 processor at 24 MHz on board. The data acquisition system is capable of providing 128 channels of analog-to-digital inputs at 1.3 MHz simultaneously, 64 channels of digital inputs at 1.6 MHz on a single channel, 64 channels of digital outputs at 1.6 MHz on a single channel, and 66 digital-to-analog channels at 1.6 MHz on a single channel. The simulator software operates in the Windows environment. The overall execution time of the simulator for each time step is 15 ms when no data is written to the disk, and 18 ms when nine double precision data points are written to the disk once in every time step. The simulator combines first-principle modeling and empirical correlations in its algorithm to attain the modeling accuracy and computational through-put that are required for real-time execution. It has been found to provide realistic real-time dynamic response of the TOPAZ II reactor system.

  1. A protein dynamics study of photosystem II: the effects of protein conformation on reaction center function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'ev, Sergej; Bruce, Doug

    2006-05-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to study photosystem II structure and function. Structural information obtained from simulations was combined with ab initio computations of chromophore excited states. In contrast to calculations based on the x-ray structure, the molecular-dynamics-based calculations accurately predicted the experimental absorbance spectrum. In addition, our calculations correctly assigned the energy levels of reaction-center (RC) chromophores, as well as the lowest-energy antenna chlorophyll. The primary and secondary quinone electron acceptors, Q(A) and Q(B), exhibited independent changes in position over the duration of the simulation. Q(B) fluctuated between two binding sites similar to the proximal and distal sites previously observed in light- and dark-adapted RC from purple bacteria. Kinetic models were used to characterize the relative influence of chromophore geometry, site energies, and electron transport rates on RC efficiency. The fluctuating energy levels of antenna chromophores had a larger impact on quantum yield than did their relative positions. Variations in electron transport rates had the most significant effect and were sufficient to explain the experimentally observed multi-component decay of excitation in photosystem II. The implications of our results are discussed in the context of competing evolutionary selection pressures for RC structure and function.

  2. Constructing kinetic models to elucidate structural dynamics of a complete RNA polymerase II elongation cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jin; Da, Lin-Tai; Huang, Xuhui

    2015-02-01

    The RNA polymerase II elongation is central in eukaryotic transcription. Although multiple intermediates of the elongation complex have been identified, the dynamical mechanisms remain elusive or controversial. Here we build a structure-based kinetic model of a full elongation cycle of polymerase II, taking into account transition rates and conformational changes characterized from both single molecule experimental studies and computational simulations at atomistic scale. Our model suggests a force-dependent slow transition detected in the single molecule experiments corresponds to an essential conformational change of a trigger loop (TL) opening prior to the polymerase translocation. The analyses on mutant study of E1103G and on potential sequence effects of the translocation substantiate this proposal. Our model also investigates another slow transition detected in the transcription elongation cycle which is independent of mechanical force. If this force-independent slow transition happens as the TL gradually closes upon NTP binding, the analyses indicate that the binding affinity of NTP to the polymerase has to be sufficiently high. Otherwise, one infers that the slow transition happens pre-catalytically but after the TL closing. Accordingly, accurate determination of intrinsic properties of NTP binding is demanded for an improved characterization of the polymerase elongation. Overall, the study provides a working model of the polymerase II elongation under a generic Brownian ratchet mechanism, with most essential structural transition and functional kinetics elucidated.

  3. Myosin and Actin Filaments in Muscle: Structures and Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, John M; Paul, Danielle M; Morris, Edward P

    2017-01-01

    In the last decade, improvements in electron microscopy and image processing have permitted significantly higher resolutions to be achieved (sometimes <1 nm) when studying isolated actin and myosin filaments. In the case of actin filaments the changing structure when troponin binds calcium ions can be followed using electron microscopy and single particle analysis to reveal what happens on each of the seven non-equivalent pseudo-repeats of the tropomyosin α-helical coiled-coil. In the case of the known family of myosin filaments not only are the myosin head arrangements under relaxing conditions being defined, but the latest analysis, also using single particle methods, is starting to reveal the way that the α-helical coiled-coil myosin rods are packed to give the filament backbones.

  4. Axial disposition of myosin heads in isometrically contracting muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juanhuix, J; Bordas, J; Campmany, J; Svensson, A; Bassford, M L; Narayanan, T

    2001-03-01

    Meridional x-ray diffraction diagrams, recorded with high angular resolution, from muscles contracting at the plateau of isometric tension show that the myosin diffraction orders are clusters of peaks. These clusters are due to pronounced interference effects between the myosin diffracting units on either side of the M-line. A theoretical analysis based on the polarity of the myosin (and actin) filaments shows that it is possible to extract phase information from which the axial disposition of the myosin heads can be determined. The results show that each head in a crown pair has a distinct structural disposition. It appears that only one of the heads in the pair stereospecifically interacts with the thin filament at any one time.

  5. Actin filaments on myosin beds: The velocity distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdieu, L.; Magnasco, M. O.; Winkelmann, D. A.; Libchaber, A.

    1995-12-01

    In vitro studies of actin filaments sliding on a myosin-coated surface are analyzed, filament by filament, at a sampling rate of 30 per second. For each filament, the mean arc length coordinate is computed and histograms of instantaneous velocities, along the arc length, are established. Two types of motion are observed, depending on the experimental conditions. The first one is characterized by a homogeneous flow, with well defined velocities. In this regime, specific defects are a constitutive part of the flow. It is observed at high temperature, at high myosin coverage, and with a particular mode of attachment of myosin to the surface. The second regime shows no clear velocity selection, but a broadband distribution. It is characterized by high friction and is observed at low temperature or low myosin density. (c) 1995 The American Physical Society

  6. Kinetic Adaptations of Myosins for Their Diverse Cellular Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heissler, Sarah M; Sellers, James R

    2016-08-01

    Members of the myosin superfamily are involved in all aspects of eukaryotic life. Their function ranges from the transport of organelles and cargos to the generation of membrane tension, and the contraction of muscle. The diversity of physiological functions is remarkable, given that all enzymatically active myosins follow a conserved mechanoenzymatic cycle in which the hydrolysis of ATP to ADP and inorganic phosphate is coupled to either actin-based transport or tethering of actin to defined cellular compartments. Kinetic capacities and limitations of a myosin are determined by the extent to which actin can accelerate the hydrolysis of ATP and the release of the hydrolysis products and are indispensably linked to its physiological tasks. This review focuses on kinetic competencies that - together with structural adaptations - result in myosins with unique mechanoenzymatic properties targeted to their diverse cellular functions.

  7. Arginylation of Myosin Heavy Chain Regulates Skeletal Muscle Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anabelle S. Cornachione

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Protein arginylation is a posttranslational modification with an emerging global role in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton. To test the role of arginylation in the skeletal muscle, we generated a mouse model with Ate1 deletion driven by the skeletal muscle-specific creatine kinase (Ckmm promoter. Ckmm-Ate1 mice were viable and outwardly normal; however, their skeletal muscle strength was significantly reduced in comparison to controls. Mass spectrometry of isolated skeletal myofibrils showed a limited set of proteins, including myosin heavy chain, arginylated on specific sites. Atomic force microscopy measurements of contractile strength in individual myofibrils and isolated myosin filaments from these mice showed a significant reduction of contractile forces, which, in the case of myosin filaments, could be fully rescued by rearginylation with purified Ate1. Our results demonstrate that arginylation regulates force production in muscle and exerts a direct effect on muscle strength through arginylation of myosin.

  8. Myosin IIb activity and phosphorylation status determines dendritic spine and post-synaptic density morphology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Hodges

    Full Text Available Dendritic spines in hippocampal neurons mature from a filopodia-like precursor into a mushroom-shape with an enlarged post-synaptic density (PSD and serve as the primary post-synaptic location of the excitatory neurotransmission that underlies learning and memory. Using myosin II regulatory mutants, inhibitors, and knockdowns, we show that non-muscle myosin IIB (MIIB activity determines where spines form and whether they persist as filopodia-like spine precursors or mature into a mushroom-shape. MIIB also determines PSD size, morphology, and placement in the spine. Local inactivation of MIIB leads to the formation of filopodia-like spine protrusions from the dendritic shaft. However, di-phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain on residues Thr18 and Ser19 by Rho kinase is required for spine maturation. Inhibition of MIIB activity or a mono-phosphomimetic mutant of RLC similarly prevented maturation even in the presence of NMDA receptor activation. Expression of an actin cross-linking, non-contractile mutant, MIIB R709C, showed that maturation into a mushroom-shape requires contractile activity. Loss of MIIB also leads to an elongated PSD morphology that is no longer restricted to the spine tip; whereas increased MIIB activity, specifically through RLC-T18, S19 di-phosphorylation, increases PSD area. These observations support a model whereby myosin II inactivation forms filopodia-like protrusions that only mature once NMDA receptor activation increases RLC di-phosphorylation to stimulate MIIB contractility, resulting in mushroom-shaped spines with an enlarged PSD.

  9. Minimal Mechanochemical Model for the Processivity of Myosin VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yubo; Lowe, Ian; Tehver, Riina

    2014-03-01

    Myosin VI is an ATPase responsible for force generation in cells. It dimerizes upon actin binding, and is proposed to walk along the actin filament. Single headed reaction mechanism of myosin VI is well understood but much of its walking mechanism remains unclear. We aim to construct a minimum model for the myosin VI walking mechanism and explore the minimal requirements for processivity. We constructed a kinetic model for the stepping mechanism of Myosin VI using minimum assumptions. The kinetics of the myosin VI dimer is modeled as a three state linear reaction network with reaction rates extracted from relevant experiments. The time limiting step in in-vitro experiments (low APT concentration) is the diffusion of detached head. In this process the myosin dimer is modeled as a tethered polymer with a flexible joint at the dimerization site. The relevance of this polymer model is checked with coarse-grained simulation. We found that the motor maintains processivity for a wide range of kinetic parameters, however long persistence length for the lever arm is crucial for processivity especially under resistive load.

  10. Cooperative regulation of myosin-S1 binding to actin filaments by a continuous flexible Tm-Tn chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijailovich, Srboljub M; Kayser-Herold, Oliver; Li, Xiaochuan; Griffiths, Hugh; Geeves, Michael A

    2012-12-01

    The regulation of striated muscle contraction involves cooperative interactions between actin filaments, myosin-S1 (S1), tropomyosin (Tm), troponin (Tn), and calcium. These interactions are modeled by treating overlapping tropomyosins as a continuous flexible chain (CFC), weakly confined by electrostatic interactions with actin. The CFC is displaced locally in opposite directions on the actin surface by the binding of either S1 or Troponin I (TnI) to actin. The apparent rate constants for myosin and TnI binding to and detachment from actin are then intrinsically coupled via the CFC model to the presence of neighboring bound S1s and TnIs. Monte Carlo simulations at prescribed values of the CFC stiffness, the CFC's degree of azimuthal confinement, and the angular displacements caused by the bound proteins were able to predict the stopped-flow transients of S1 binding to regulated F-actin. The transients collected over a large range of calcium concentrations could be well described by adjusting a single calcium-dependent parameter, the rate constant of TnI detachment from actin, k(-I). The resulting equilibrium constant K(B) ≡ 1/K(I) varied sigmoidally with the free calcium, increasing from 0.12 at low calcium (pCa >7) to 12 at high calcium (pCa Hill coefficient of ~2.15. The similarity of the curves for excess-actin and excess-myosin data confirms their allosteric relationship. The spatially explicit calculations confirmed variable sizes for the cooperative units and clustering of bound myosins at low calcium concentrations. Moreover, inclusion of negative cooperativity between myosin units predicted the observed slowing of myosin binding at excess-myosin concentrations.

  11. Oxidation of myosin by haem proteins generates myosin radicals and protein cross-links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lametsch, Marianne Lund; Luxford, Catherine; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt

    2008-01-01

    as a result of the reaction with activated haem proteins (horseradish peroxidase/H2O2) and met-myoglobin/H2O2) has been investigated by EPR spectroscopy and amino-acid consumption, product formation has been characterized by HPLC, and changes in protein integrity have been determined by SDS/PAGE. Multiple...... of thiyl and tyrosyl radicals is consistent with the observed consumption of cysteine and tyrosine residues, the detection of di-tyrosine by HPLC and the detection of both reducible (disulfide bond) and non-reducible cross-links between myosin molecules by SDS/PAGE. The time course of radical formation...

  12. Striking dynamics of II-VI microcavity polaritons after linearly polarized excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, M.D.; Ballarini, D.; Amo, A.; Klopotowsi, L.; Vina, L. [Grupo de Semiconductores (SEMICUAM), Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, C/ Francisco Tomas y Valiente 7, 28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Kavokin, A.V. [Laboratoire des Sciences et Materiaux pour l' Electronique, et d' Automatique, Universite Blaise Pascal - Clermont-Ferrand II, 63177 Aubiere Cedex (France); Andre, R. [Laboratoire de Spectrometrie Physique (CNRS UMR5588), Universite Joseph Fourier, 38042 Grenoble (France)

    2005-11-01

    We present a detailed study of the polariton spin dynamics in a II-VI microcavity after linearly polarized excitation. We have found that the vertically polarized (i.e. TE) emission is systematically larger than the horizontally polarized one (i.e. TM) for both, vertically and horizontally polarized excitation. Furthermore, a persistent difference between the two components of the emission is observed, leading to a net and constant (within the duration of the emission) linear polarization degree. Additionally, we have observed marked oscillations of the linear polarization degree once the excitation power is raised above the polariton-polariton stimulated scattering threshold. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Dynamics of stochastic predator-prey models with Holling II functional response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qun; Zu, Li; Jiang, Daqing

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we consider the dynamics of stochastic predator-prey models with Holling II functional response. For the stochastic systems, we firstly establish sufficient conditions for the existence of the globally positive solutions. Then we investigate the asymptotic moment estimations of the positive solutions and study the ultimately bounded in the mean of them. Thirdly, by constructing some suitable Lyapunov functions, we verify that there are unique stationary distributions and they are ergodic. The obtained results show that the systems still retain some stability in the sense of weak stability provided that the intensity of the white noise is relatively small. Finally, some numerical simulations are introduced to illustrate our main results.

  14. Study of the adsorption of mercury (II) on lignocellulosic materials under static and dynamic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias Arias, Fabian E; Beneduci, Amerigo; Chidichimo, Francesco; Furia, Emilia; Straface, Salvatore

    2017-08-01

    WHO has declared mercury as one of the most dangerous pollutants for human health. Unfortunately, several cases of rivers and aquifers contaminated by mercury inevitably poses the problem on how to remediate them. Considerable efforts are being addressed to develop cost-effective methodologies, among which the use of low-cost adsorbing materials. In this paper, the adsorption performances of an alternative lignocellulosic material derived from the Spanish broom plant, are presented. This plant is widely diffused in the world and its usage for Hg(II) removal from water in real working conditions requires only minimal pretreatment steps. A thoroughly investigation on the kinetics and thermodynamics of Hg(II) adsorption on Spanish broom is presented, by using Hg(II) polluted aqueous solutions specifically prepared in order to simulate typical groundwater conditions. Several batch experiments, under static conditions, were carried out in order to evaluate the effect of pH, contact time, adsorbent dosage, initial concentration, temperature. A maximum adsorption capacity of 20 mg L(-1) can be obtained at pH 5, following a pseudo second order kinetics. Moreover, adsorption experiments in dynamic conditions were carried out using Spanish broom filters. Interestingly, a systematic, unconventional double S-shape breakthrough curve was observed under different experimental conditions, revealing the occurrence of two adsorption processes with different time scales. This behavior has been fitted by a bimodal Thomas model which, unlike the single Thomas fitting, gives satisfactory results with the introduction of a new parameter related to the fraction of surface active sites involved in the adsorption processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Conformational dynamics of stem II of the U2 snRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Margaret L; Tretbar, U Sandy; Dehaven, Alexander; Alwan, Amir A; Luo, George; Mast, Hannah M; Hoskins, Aaron A

    2016-02-01

    The spliceosome undergoes dramatic changes in both small nuclear RNA (snRNA) composition and structure during assembly and pre-mRNA splicing. It has been previously proposed that the U2 snRNA adopts two conformations within the stem II region: stem IIa or stem IIc. Dynamic rearrangement of stem IIa into IIc and vice versa is necessary for proper progression of the spliceosome through assembly and catalysis. How this conformational transition is regulated is unclear; although, proteins such as Cus2p and the helicase Prp5p have been implicated in this process. We have used single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) to study U2 stem II toggling between stem IIa and IIc. Structural interconversion of the RNA was spontaneous and did not require the presence of a helicase; however, both Mg(2+) and Cus2p promote formation of stem IIa. Destabilization of stem IIa by a G53A mutation in the RNA promotes stem IIc formation and inhibits conformational switching of the RNA by both Mg(2+) and Cus2p. Transitioning to stem IIa can be restored using Cus2p mutations that suppress G53A phenotypes in vivo. We propose that during spliceosome assembly, Cus2p and Mg(2+) may work together to promote stem IIa formation. During catalysis the spliceosome could then toggle stem II with the aid of Mg(2+) or with the use of functionally equivalent protein interactions. As noted in previous studies, the Mg(2+) toggling we observe parallels previous observations of U2/U6 and Prp8p RNase H domain Mg(2+)-dependent conformational changes. Together these data suggest that multiple components of the spliceosome may have evolved to switch between conformations corresponding to open or closed active sites with the aid of metal and protein cofactors. © 2016 Rodgers et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  16. Analysis and compensation for code Doppler effect of BDS II signal under high dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Xiaofeng; Zeng, Fangling

    2016-01-01

    In high dynamic circumstances, the acquisition of BDS (BeiDou Navigation Satellite System) signal would be affected by the pseudo-code Doppler. The pseudo-code frequency shift is more prominent and complex when BOC modulation has been adopted by BDS-II, but is not yet involved in current compensation algorithm. In addition, the most frequently used code Doppler compensation algorithm is modifying the sampling rate or local bit rate, which not only increases the complexity of the acquisition and tracking, but also is barely realizable for the hardware receiver to modify the local frequency. Therefore, this paper proposes a code Doppler compensation method based on double estimator receiver, which simultaneously controls NCO delay of code tracking loop and subcarrier tracking loop to compensate for pseudo-code frequency shift. The simulation and test are implemented with BDS-II BOC signal. The test results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can effectively compensate for pseudo-code Doppler of BOC signal and has detection probability 3dB higher than the uncompensated situation when the false alarm rate is under 0.01 and the coherent integration time is 1ms.

  17. Allosteric regulation by cooperative conformational changes of actin filaments drives mutually exclusive binding with cofilin and myosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Kien Xuan; Umeki, Nobuhisa; Kijima, Saku T; Kodera, Noriyuki; Ueno, Hiroaki; Furutani-Umezu, Nozomi; Nakajima, Jun; Noguchi, Taro Q P; Nagasaki, Akira; Tokuraku, Kiyotaka; Uyeda, Taro Q P

    2016-10-20

    Heavy meromyosin (HMM) of myosin II and cofilin each binds to actin filaments cooperatively and forms clusters along the filaments, but it is unknown whether the two cooperative bindings are correlated and what physiological roles they have. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that HMM-GFP and cofilin-mCherry each bound cooperatively to different parts of actin filaments when they were added simultaneously in 0.2 μM ATP, indicating that the two cooperative bindings are mutually exclusive. In 0.1 mM ATP, the motor domain of myosin (S1) strongly inhibited the formation of cofilin clusters along actin filaments. Under this condition, most actin protomers were unoccupied by S1 at any given moment, suggesting that transiently bound S1 alters the structure of actin filaments cooperatively and/or persistently to inhibit cofilin binding. Consistently, cosedimentation experiments using copolymers of actin and actin-S1 fusion protein demonstrated that the fusion protein affects the neighboring actin protomers, reducing their affinity for cofilin. In reciprocal experiments, cofilin-actin fusion protein reduced the affinity of neighboring actin protomers for S1. Thus, allosteric regulation by cooperative conformational changes of actin filaments contributes to mutually exclusive cooperative binding of myosin II and cofilin to actin filaments, and presumably to the differential localization of both proteins in cells.

  18. Molecular mechanism for preQ1-II riboswitch function revealed by molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytenfisu, Asaminew H.; Liberman, Joseph A.; Wedekind, Joseph E.; Mathews, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Riboswitches are RNA molecules that regulate gene expression using conformational change, affected by binding of small molecule ligands. A crystal structure of a ligand-bound class II preQ1 riboswitch has been determined in a previous structural study. To gain insight into the dynamics of this riboswitch in solution, eight total molecular dynamic simulations, four with and four without ligand, were performed using the Amber force field. In the presence of ligand, all four of the simulations demonstrated rearranged base pairs at the 3′ end, consistent with expected base-pairing from comparative sequence analysis in a prior bioinformatic analysis; this suggests the pairing in this region was altered by crystallization. Additionally, in the absence of ligand, three of the simulations demonstrated similar changes in base-pairing at the ligand binding site. Significantly, although most of the riboswitch architecture remained intact in the respective trajectories, the P3 stem was destabilized in the ligand-free simulations in a way that exposed the Shine–Dalgarno sequence. This work illustrates how destabilization of two major groove base triples can influence a nearby H-type pseudoknot and provides a mechanism for control of gene expression by a fold that is frequently found in bacterial riboswitches. PMID:26370581

  19. Cu(II adsorption on modified bentonitic clays: different isotherm behaviors in static and dynamic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambrósio Florêncio de Almeida Neto

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Cu (II removal equilibrium from aqueous solutions using calcined clays "Bofe" and "Verde-lodo" has been studied by batch and fixed-bed in static and dynamic systems, respectively. Analyses were performed for physicochemical characterization of clays using the techniques: X-ray fluorescence (XRF, thermogravimetry (TG, N2 adsorption (BET and Cationic Exchange Capacity (CEC. Batch experiments were performed at a constant temperature, adjusting the pH of the solution in contact with clays. Adsorption assays in fixed bed were conducted at the flow rate determined through mass transfer zone (MTZ. Langmuir and Freundlich models were adjusted to equilibrium data. The results of characterization indicated that the temperature of 500ºC is best suited for the calcination of the clays. The maximum adsorption capacity was higher for dynamic system than fixed bed compared to static system, enhancing from 0.0748 to 0.1371 and from 0.0599 to 0.22 mmol.g-1 of clay for "Bofe" and "Verde-lodo", respectively.

  20. Molecular mechanism for preQ1-II riboswitch function revealed by molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytenfisu, Asaminew H; Liberman, Joseph A; Wedekind, Joseph E; Mathews, David H

    2015-11-01

    Riboswitches are RNA molecules that regulate gene expression using conformational change, affected by binding of small molecule ligands. A crystal structure of a ligand-bound class II preQ1 riboswitch has been determined in a previous structural study. To gain insight into the dynamics of this riboswitch in solution, eight total molecular dynamic simulations, four with and four without ligand, were performed using the Amber force field. In the presence of ligand, all four of the simulations demonstrated rearranged base pairs at the 3' end, consistent with expected base-pairing from comparative sequence analysis in a prior bioinformatic analysis; this suggests the pairing in this region was altered by crystallization. Additionally, in the absence of ligand, three of the simulations demonstrated similar changes in base-pairing at the ligand binding site. Significantly, although most of the riboswitch architecture remained intact in the respective trajectories, the P3 stem was destabilized in the ligand-free simulations in a way that exposed the Shine-Dalgarno sequence. This work illustrates how destabilization of two major groove base triples can influence a nearby H-type pseudoknot and provides a mechanism for control of gene expression by a fold that is frequently found in bacterial riboswitches.

  1. Global fit analysis of myosin-5b motility reveals thermodynamics of Mg2+-sensitive acto-myosin-ADP states.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Chizhov

    Full Text Available Kinetic and thermodynamic studies of the mechanochemical cycle of myosin motors are essential for understanding the mechanism of energy conversion. Here, we report our investigation of temperature and free Mg(2+-ion dependencies of sliding velocities of a high duty ratio class-5 myosin motor, myosin-5b from D. discoideum using in vitro motility assays. Previous studies have shown that the sliding velocity of class-5 myosins obeys modulation by free Mg(2+-ions. Free Mg(2+-ions affect ADP release kinetics and the dwell time of actin-attached states. The latter determines the maximal velocity of actin translocation in the sliding filament assay. We measured the temperature dependence of sliding velocity in the range from 5 to 55°C at two limiting free Mg(2+-ion concentrations. Arrhenius plots demonstrated non-linear behavior. Based on this observation we propose a kinetic model, which explains both sensitivity towards free Mg(2+-ions and non-linearity of the temperature dependence of sliding velocity. According to this model, velocity is represented as a simple analytical function of temperature and free Mg(2+-ion concentrations. This function has been applied to global non-linear fit analysis of three data sets including temperature and magnesium (at 20°C dependence of sliding velocity. As a result we obtain thermodynamic parameters (ΔH(Mg and ΔS(Mg of a fast equilibrium between magnesium free (AM·D and magnesium bound acto-myosin-ADP (AM· Mg(2+D states and the corresponding enthalpic barriers associated with ADP release (ΔH1(‡ and ΔH2(‡. The herein presented integrative approach of data analysis based on global fitting can be applied to the remaining steps of the acto-myosin ATPase cycle facilitating the determination of energetic parameters and thermodynamics of acto-myosin interactions.

  2. Calcium-regulated import of myosin IC into the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maly, Ivan V; Hofmann, Wilma A

    2016-06-01

    Myosin IC is a molecular motor involved in intracellular transport, cell motility, and transcription. Its mechanical properties are regulated by calcium via calmodulin binding, and its functions in the nucleus depend on import from the cytoplasm. The import has recently been shown to be mediated by the nuclear localization signal located within the calmodulin-binding domain. In the present paper, it is demonstrated that mutations in the calmodulin-binding sequence shift the intracellular distribution of myosin IC to the nucleus. The redistribution is displayed by isoform B, described originally as the "nuclear myosin," but is particularly pronounced with isoform C, the normally cytoplasmic isoform. Furthermore, experimental elevation of the intracellular calcium concentration induces a rapid import of myosin into the nucleus. The import is blocked by the importin β inhibitor importazole. These findings are consistent with a mechanism whereby calmodulin binding prevents recognition of the nuclear localization sequence by importin β, and the steric inhibition of import is released by cell signaling leading to the intracellular calcium elevation. The results establish a mechanistic connection between the calcium regulation of the motor function of myosin IC in the cytoplasm and the induction of its import into the nucleus. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Influence of the cardiac myosin hinge region on contractile activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margossian, S S; Krueger, J W; Sellers, J R; Cuda, G; Caulfield, J B; Norton, P; Slayter, H S

    1991-06-01

    The participation of cardiac myosin hinge in contractility was investigated by in vitro motility and ATPase assays and by measurements of sarcomere shortening. The effect on contractile activity was analyzed using an antibody directed against a 20-amino acid peptide within the hinge region of myosin. This antibody bound specifically at the hinge at a distance of 55 nm from the S1/S2 junction, was specific to human, dog, and rat cardiac myosins, did not crossreact with gizzard or skeletal myosin, and had no effect on ATPase activity of purified S1 and myofibrils. However, it completely suppressed the movement of actin filaments in in vitro motility assays and reduced active shortening of sarcomeres of skinned cardiac myocytes by half. Suppression of motion by the anti-hinge antibody may reflect a mechanical constraint imposed by the antibody upon the mobility of the S2 region of myosin. The results suggest that the steps in the mechanochemical energy transduction can be separately influenced through S2.

  4. Simulating dynamic and mixed-severity fire regimes: a process-based fire extension for LANDIS-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian R. Sturtevant; Robert M. Scheller; Brian R. Miranda; Douglas. Shinneman; Alexandra. Syphard

    2009-01-01

    Fire regimes result from reciprocal interactions between vegetation and fire that may be further affected by other disturbances, including climate, landform, and terrain. In this paper, we describe fire and fuel extensions for the forest landscape simulation model, LANDIS-II, that allow dynamic interactions among fire, vegetation, climate, and landscape structure, and...

  5. Impact of Mercury(II) on proteinase K catalytic center: investigations via classical and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panek, Jarosław J; Mazzarello, Riccardo; Novič, Marjana; Jezierska-Mazzarello, Aneta

    2011-02-01

    Mercury(II) has a strong affinity for the thiol groups in proteins often resulting in the disruption of their biological functions. In this study we present classical and first-principles, DFT-based molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a complex of Hg(II) and proteinase K, a well-known serine protease with a very broad and diverse enzymatic activity. It contains a catalytic triad formed by Asp39, His69, and Ser224, which is responsible for its biological activity. It was found previously by X-ray diffraction experiments that the presence of Hg(II) inhibits the enzymatic action of proteinase K by affecting the stereochemistry of the triad. Our simulations predict that (i) the overall structure as well as the protein backbone dynamics are only slightly affected by the mercury cation, (ii) depending on the occupied mercury site, the hydrogen bonds of the catalytic triad are either severely disrupted (both bonds for mercury at site 1, and the His69-Ser224 contact for mercury at site 2) or slightly strengthened (the Asp39-His69 bond when mercury is at site 2), (iii) the network of hydrogen bonds of the catalytic triad is not static but undergoes constant fluctuations, which are significantly modified by the presence of the Hg(II) cation, influencing in turn the triad's ability to carry out the enzymatic function--these facts explain the experimental findings on the inhibition of proteinase K by Hg(II).

  6. Copper(II) ions increase plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 dynamics in key structural regions that govern stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucci, Joel C; Trelle, Morten Beck; McClintock, Carlee S;

    2016-01-01

    demonstrated that Cu(II) and other transition metals modulate the stability of PAI-1, exhibiting effects that are dependent on the presence or absence of the somatomedin B (SMB) domain of VN. The study presented here dissects the changes in molecular dynamics underlying the destabilizing effects of Cu...... effects are not a result of coordination of Cu(II) to these histidine residues. Finally, addition of Cu(II) results in an acceleration of the local unfolding kinetics of PAI-1 presumed to be on pathway to the latency conversion. The effect of ligands on the dynamics of PAI-1 adds another intriguing......Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) regulates the fibrinolysis pathway by inhibiting the protease activity of plasminogen activators. PAI-1 works in concert with vitronectin (VN), an extracellular protein that aids in localization of active PAI-1 to tissues. The Peterson laboratory...

  7. Secretory vesicle transport velocity in living cells depends on the myosin-V lever arm length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Daniel H; Collins, Ruth N; Bretscher, Anthony

    2002-01-01

    Myosins are molecular motors that exert force against actin filaments. One widely conserved myosin class, the myosin-Vs, recruits organelles to polarized sites in animal and fungal cells. However, it has been unclear whether myosin-Vs actively transport organelles, and whether the recently challenged lever arm model developed for muscle myosin applies to myosin-Vs. Here we demonstrate in living, intact yeast that secretory vesicles move rapidly toward their site of exocytosis. The maximal speed varies linearly over a wide range of lever arm lengths genetically engineered into the myosin-V heavy chain encoded by the MYO2 gene. Thus, secretory vesicle polarization is achieved through active transport by a myosin-V, and the motor mechanism is consistent with the lever arm model.

  8. Association of six YFP-myosin XI-tail fusions with mobile plant cell organelles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanson Maureen R

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myosins are molecular motors that carry cargo on actin filaments in eukaryotic cells. Seventeen myosin genes have been identified in the nuclear genome of Arabidopsis. The myosin genes can be divided into two plant-specific subfamilies, class VIII with four members and class XI with 13 members. Class XI myosins are related to animal and fungal myosin class V that are responsible for movement of particular vesicles and organelles. Organelle localization of only one of the 13 Arabidopsis myosin XI (myosin XI-6; At MYA2, which is found on peroxisomes, has so far been reported. Little information is available concerning the remaining 12 class XI myosins. Results We investigated 6 of the 13 class XI Arabidopsis myosins. cDNAs corresponding to the tail region of 6 myosin genes were generated and incorporated into a vector to encode YFP-myosin tail fusion proteins lacking the motor domain. Chimeric genes incorporating tail regions of myosin XI-5 (At MYA1, myosin XI-6 (At MYA2, myosin XI-8 (At XI-B, myosin XI-15 (At XI-I, myosin XI-16 (At XI-J and myosin XI-17 (At XI-K were expressed transiently. All YFP-myosin-tail fusion proteins were targeted to small organelles ranging in size from 0.5 to 3.0 μm. Despite the absence of a motor domain, the fluorescently-labeled organelles were motile in most cells. Tail cropping experiments demonstrated that the coiled-coil region was required for specific localization and shorter tail regions were inadequate for targeting. Myosin XI-6 (At MYA2, previously reported to localize to peroxisomes by immunofluorescence, labeled both peroxisomes and vesicles when expressed as a YFP-tail fusion. None of the 6 YFP-myosin tail fusions interacted with chloroplasts, and only one YFP-tail fusion appeared to sometimes co-localize with fluorescent proteins targeted to Golgi and mitochondria. Conclusion 6 myosin XI tails, extending from the coiled-coil region to the C-terminus, label specific vesicles and

  9. Cytoskeletal turnover and Myosin contractility drive cell autonomous oscillations in a model of Drosophila Dorsal Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, P. F.; Blanchard, G. B.; Duque, J.; Gorfinkiel, N.

    2014-06-01

    Oscillatory behaviour in force-generating systems is a pervasive phenomenon in cell biology. In this work, we investigate how oscillations in the actomyosin cytoskeleton drive cell shape changes during the process of Dorsal Closure (DC), a morphogenetic event in Drosophila embryo development whereby epidermal continuity is generated through the pulsatile apical area reduction of cells constituting the amnioserosa (AS) tissue. We present a theoretical model of AS cell dynamics by which the oscillatory behaviour arises due to a coupling between active myosin-driven forces, actin turnover and cell deformation. Oscillations in our model are cell-autonomous and are modulated by neighbour coupling, and our model accurately reproduces the oscillatory dynamics of AS cells and their amplitude and frequency evolution. A key prediction arising from our model is that the rate of actin turnover and Myosin contractile force must increase during DC in order to reproduce the decrease in amplitude and period of cell area oscillations observed in vivo. This prediction opens up new ways to think about the molecular underpinnings of AS cell oscillations and their link to net tissue contraction and suggests the form of future experimental measurements.

  10. Myosin domain evolution and the primary divergence of eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Thomas A; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2005-08-25

    Eukaryotic cells have two contrasting cytoskeletal and ciliary organizations. The simplest involves a single cilium-bearing centriole, nucleating a cone of individual microtubules (probably ancestral for unikonts: animals, fungi, Choanozoa and Amoebozoa). In contrast, bikonts (plants, chromists and all other protozoa) were ancestrally biciliate with a younger anterior cilium, converted every cell cycle into a dissimilar posterior cilium and multiple ciliary roots of microtubule bands. Here we show by comparative genomic analysis that this fundamental cellular dichotomy also involves different myosin molecular motors. We found 37 different protein domain combinations, often lineage-specific, and many previously unidentified. The sequence phylogeny and taxonomic distribution of myosin domain combinations identified five innovations that strongly support unikont monophyly and the primary bikont/unikont bifurcation. We conclude that the eukaryotic cenancestor (last common ancestor) had a cilium, mitochondria, pseudopodia, and myosins with three contrasting domain combinations and putative functions.

  11. Preliminary research on myosin light chain kinase in rabbit liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Ren; Hua-Qing Zhu; Zhao-Feng Luo; Qing Zhou; Yuan Wang; Yu-Zhen Wang

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To study preliminarily the properties of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) in rabbit liver. METHODS: The expression of MLCK was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR);the MLCK was obtained from rabbit liver, and its activity was analyzed by γ-32P incorporation technique to detect the phosphorylation of myosin light chain. RESULTS: MLCK was expressed in rabbit liver, and the activity of the enzyme was similar to rabbit smooth muscle MLCK, and calmodulin-dependent. When the concentration was 0.65 mg-L-1, the activity was at the highest level. CONCLUSION: MLCK expressed in rabbit liver may catalyze the phosphorylation of myosin light chain, which may play important roles in the regulation of hepatic cell functions.

  12. Role of myosin light chain and myosin light chain kinase in advanced glycation end product-induced endothelial hyperpermeability in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fan; Guo, Xiaohua; Xu, Jing; Wang, Weiju; Li, Bingling; Huang, Qiaobing; Su, Lei; Xu, Qiulin

    2016-03-01

    We have previously reported that advanced glycation end products activated Rho-associated protein kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, causing endothelial hyperpermeability. However, the mechanisms involved were not fully clarified. Here, we explored the role of myosin light chain kinase in advanced glycation end product-induced endothelial hyperpermeability. Myosin light chain phosphorylation significantly increased by advanced glycation end products in endothelial cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner, indicating that myosin light chain phosphorylation is involved in the advanced glycation end product pathway. Advanced glycation end products also induced myosin phosphatase-targeting subunit 1 phosphorylation, and small interfering RNA knockdown of the receptor for advanced glycation end products, or blocking myosin light chain kinase with its inhibitor, ML-7, or small interfering RNA abated advanced glycation end product-induced myosin light chain phosphorylation. Advanced glycation end product-induced F-actin rearrangement and endothelial hyperpermeability were also diminished by inhibition of receptor for advanced glycation end product or myosin light chain kinase signalling. Moreover, inhibiting myosin light chain kinase with ML-7 or blocking receptor for advanced glycation end product with its neutralizing antibody attenuated advanced glycation end product-induced microvascular hyperpermeability. Our findings suggest a novel role for myosin light chain and myosin light chain kinase in advanced glycation end product-induced endothelial hyperpermeability.

  13. Switching of myosin-V motion between the lever-arm swing and brownian search-and-catch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Keisuke; Iwaki, Mitsuhiro; Iwane, Atsuko H; Marcucci, Lorenzo; Yanagida, Toshio

    2012-07-17

    Motor proteins are force-generating nanomachines that are highly adaptable to their ever-changing biological environments and have a high energy conversion efficiency. Here we constructed an imaging system that uses optical tweezers and a DNA handle to visualize elementary mechanical processes of a nanomachine under load. We apply our system to myosin-V, a well-known motor protein that takes 72 nm 'hand-over-hand' steps composed of a 'lever-arm swing' and a 'brownian search-and-catch'. We find that the lever-arm swing generates a large proportion of the force at low load (high load (1.9 pN), however, the contribution of the brownian search-and-catch increases to dominate, reaching 13 k(B)T of work. We believe the ability to switch between these two force-generation modes facilitates myosin-V function at high efficiency while operating in a dynamic intracellular environment.

  14. Detection of myosin immunoanalogue in the yeast Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, M; Rodier, M H; el Moudni, B; Quellard, N; Jacquemin, J L

    1995-06-01

    Detection and localization of myosin immunoanalogue protein in the yeast Candida albicans were achieved by immunoblotting, indirect immunofluorescence assay, and immunoelectron microscopy. A polypeptide with an M(r) about 110,000, from cytosolic extract and insoluble fraction in the corresponding membrane pellet, was reacted with polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies raised against vertebrate muscle myosin. This protein was located by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy in the cell cortex along the plasmalemma, in the cytoplasm, and in the septum corresponding to bud scar region situated between the yeast-mother cell and the bud.

  15. Antibodies covalently immobilized on actin filaments for fast myosin driven analyte transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroj Kumar

    Full Text Available Biosensors would benefit from further miniaturization, increased detection rate and independence from external pumps and other bulky equipment. Whereas transportation systems built around molecular motors and cytoskeletal filaments hold significant promise in the latter regard, recent proof-of-principle devices based on the microtubule-kinesin motor system have not matched the speed of existing methods. An attractive solution to overcome this limitation would be the use of myosin driven propulsion of actin filaments which offers motility one order of magnitude faster than the kinesin-microtubule system. Here, we realized a necessary requirement for the use of the actomyosin system in biosensing devices, namely covalent attachment of antibodies to actin filaments using heterobifunctional cross-linkers. We also demonstrated consistent and rapid myosin II driven transport where velocity and the fraction of motile actin filaments was negligibly affected by the presence of antibody-antigen complexes at rather high density (>20 µm(-1. The results, however, also demonstrated that it was challenging to consistently achieve high density of functional antibodies along the actin filament, and optimization of the covalent coupling procedure to increase labeling density should be a major focus for future work. Despite the remaining challenges, the reported advances are important steps towards considerably faster nanoseparation than shown for previous molecular motor based devices, and enhanced miniaturization because of high bending flexibility of actin filaments.

  16. Myosin light chain kinase accelerates vesicle endocytosis at the calyx of Held synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Hai-Yuan; Xu, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal activity triggers endocytosis at synaptic terminals to retrieve efficiently the exocytosed vesicle membrane, ensuring the membrane homeostasis of active zones and the continuous supply of releasable vesicles. The kinetics of endocytosis depends on Ca(2+) and calmodulin which, as a versatile signal pathway, can activate a broad spectrum of downstream targets, including myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). MLCK is known to regulate vesicle trafficking and synaptic transmission, but whether this kinase regulates vesicle endocytosis at synapses remains elusive. We investigated this issue at the rat calyx of Held synapse, where previous studies using whole-cell membrane capacitance measurement have characterized two common forms of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent endocytosis, i.e., slow clathrin-dependent endocytosis and rapid endocytosis. Acute inhibition of MLCK with pharmacological agents was found to slow down the kinetics of both slow and rapid forms of endocytosis at calyces. Similar impairment of endocytosis occurred when blocking myosin II, a motor protein that can be phosphorylated upon MLCK activation. The inhibition of endocytosis was not accompanied by a change in Ca(2+) channel current. Combined inhibition of MLCK and calmodulin did not induce synergistic inhibition of endocytosis. Together, our results suggest that activation of MLCK accelerates both slow and rapid forms of vesicle endocytosis at nerve terminals, likely by functioning downstream of Ca(2+)/calmodulin.

  17. SLIT2/ROBO2 signaling pathway inhibits nonmuscle myosin IIA activity and destabilizes kidney podocyte adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xueping; Yang, Hongying; Kumar, Sudhir; Tumelty, Kathleen E.; Pisarek-Horowitz, Anna; Sharma, Richa; Chan, Stefanie; Tyminski, Edyta; Shamashkin, Michael; Belghasem, Mostafa; Henderson, Joel M.; Coyle, Anthony J.; Berasi, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    The repulsive guidance cue SLIT2 and its receptor ROBO2 are required for kidney development and podocyte foot process structure, but the SLIT2/ROBO2 signaling mechanism regulating podocyte function is not known. Here we report that a potentially novel signaling pathway consisting of SLIT/ROBO Rho GTPase activating protein 1 (SRGAP1) and nonmuscle myosin IIA (NMIIA) regulates podocyte adhesion downstream of ROBO2. We found that the myosin II regulatory light chain (MRLC), a subunit of NMIIA, interacts directly with SRGAP1 and forms a complex with ROBO2/SRGAP1/NMIIA in the presence of SLIT2. Immunostaining demonstrated that SRGAP1 is a podocyte protein and is colocalized with ROBO2 on the basal surface of podocytes. In addition, SLIT2 stimulation inhibits NMIIA activity, decreases focal adhesion formation, and reduces podocyte attachment to collagen. In vivo studies further showed that podocyte-specific knockout of Robo2 protects mice from hypertension-induced podocyte detachment and albuminuria and also partially rescues the podocyte-loss phenotype in Myh9 knockout mice. Thus, we have identified SLIT2/ROBO2/SRGAP1/NMIIA as a potentially novel signaling pathway in kidney podocytes, which may play a role in regulating podocyte adhesion and attachment. Our findings also suggest that SLIT2/ROBO2 signaling might be a therapeutic target for kidney diseases associated with podocyte detachment and loss. PMID:27882344

  18. Model of myosin node aggregation into a contractile ring: the effect of local alignment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojkic, Nikola; Vavylonis, Dimitrios [Department of Physics, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); Wu Jianqiu, E-mail: vavylonis@lehigh.edu [Department of Molecular Genetics and Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2011-09-21

    Actomyosin bundles frequently form through aggregation of membrane-bound myosin clusters. One such example is the formation of the contractile ring in fission yeast from a broad band of cortical nodes. Nodes are macromolecular complexes containing several dozens of myosin-II molecules and a few formin dimers. The condensation of a broad band of nodes into the contractile ring has been previously described by a search, capture, pull and release (SCPR) model. In SCPR, a random search process mediated by actin filaments nucleated by formins leads to transient actomyosin connections among nodes that pull one another into a ring. The SCPR model reproduces the transport of nodes over long distances and predicts observed clump-formation instabilities in mutants. However, the model does not generate transient linear elements and meshwork structures as observed in some wild-type and mutant cells during ring assembly. As a minimal model of node alignment, we added short-range aligning forces to the SCPR model representing currently unresolved mechanisms that may involve structural components, cross-linking and bundling proteins. We studied the effect of the local node alignment mechanism on ring formation numerically. We varied the new parameters and found viable rings for a realistic range of values. Morphologically, transient structures that form during ring assembly resemble those observed in experiments with wild-type and cdc25-22 cells. Our work supports a hierarchical process of ring self-organization involving components drawn together from distant parts of the cell followed by progressive stabilization.

  19. Age- and Activity-Related Differences in the Abundance of Myosin Essential and Regulatory Light Chains in Human Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James N. Cobley

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Traditional methods for phenotyping skeletal muscle (e.g., immunohistochemistry are labor-intensive and ill-suited to multixplex analysis, i.e., assays must be performed in a series. Addressing these concerns represents a largely unmet research need but more comprehensive parallel analysis of myofibrillar proteins could advance knowledge regarding age- and activity-dependent changes in human muscle. We report a label-free, semi-automated and time efficient LC-MS proteomic workflow for phenotyping the myofibrillar proteome. Application of this workflow in old and young as well as trained and untrained human skeletal muscle yielded several novel observations that were subsequently verified by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM. We report novel data demonstrating that human ageing is associated with lesser myosin light chain 1 content and greater myosin light chain 3 content, consistent with an age-related reduction in type II muscle fibers. We also disambiguate conflicting data regarding myosin regulatory light chain, revealing that age-related changes in this protein more closely reflect physical activity status than ageing per se. This finding reinforces the need to control for physical activity levels when investigating the natural process of ageing. Taken together, our data confirm and extend knowledge regarding age- and activity-related phenotypes. In addition, the MRM transitions described here provide a methodological platform that can be fine-tuned to suite multiple research needs and thus advance myofibrillar phenotyping.

  20. Dynamics in steady state in vitro acto-myosin networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonn-Segev, Adar; Bernheim-Groswasser, Anne; Roichman, Yael

    2017-04-01

    It is well known that many biochemical processes in the cell such as gene regulation, growth signals and activation of ion channels, rely on mechanical stimuli. However, the mechanism by which mechanical signals propagate through cells is not as well understood. In this review we focus on stress propagation in a minimal model for cell elasticity, actomyosin networks, which are comprised of a sub-family of cytoskeleton proteins. After giving an overview of th actomyosin network components, structure and evolution we review stress propagation in these materials as measured through the correlated motion of tracer beads. We also discuss the possibility to extract structural features of these networks from the same experiments. We show that stress transmission through these networks has two pathways, a quickly dissipative one through the bulk, and a long ranged weakly dissipative one through the pre-stressed actin network.

  1. Discrimination between glioma grades II and III in suspected low-grade gliomas using dynamic contrast-enhanced and dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion MR imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Anna; Fahlström, Markus; Rostrup, Egill;

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used in the pre-operative assessment of brain tumours. The aim of this prospective study was to identify the perfusion parameters from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion imaging...... that could best discriminate between grade II and III gliomas. METHODS: MRI (3 T) including morphological ((T2 fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T1-weighted (T1W)+Gd)) and perfusion (DCE and DSC) sequences was performed in 39 patients with newly diagnosed suspected low-grade glioma after...

  2. Influence of Trace Amount of Calponin on Smooth Muscle Myosin in Different States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-Xian YANG; Xiao-Hua FENG; Ying ZHANG; Yuan LIN

    2004-01-01

    Calponin(CaP),a thin filament-associated protein,is thought to be involved in modulating smooth muscle contractile activity,but the role and mechanism keep unknown.In this study,trace amount of calponin(TAC)was found to obviously influence myosin in different states in Ca2+-independent manner,suggesting a high efficient interaction between TAC and myosin.In this assay,the lowest ratio of CaP vs.myosin was 1:10,000,with the concentration of CaP 10,000-fold lower than that used previously.Myosin phosphorylation,myosin Mg2+-ATPase activity and protein binding activity were detected to determine the effects of TAC on the myosin in different states.The amount of precipitated myosin that bound to TAC was used as the index to determine the interaction between myosin and TAC in binding assay.Our data showed that in the absence of actin,TAC significantly increased the precipitation of unphosphorylated myosin,Ca2+-dependently or independently phosphorylated myosin by MLCK,and stimulated the Mg2+-ATPase activities of these myosins slightly but significantly.However,no obvious change of precipitation of myosin phosphorylated by PKA was observed,indicating the relatively selective effect of TAC.In the presence of actin,the increase of myosin precipitations was abolished,and no obvious change of actin precipitations and actinactivated myosin Mg2+-ATPase activities were observed implicating the high efficiency of TAC on myosin being present in the absence of actin.Although we can not give conclusive comments to our results,we propose that the high efficiency of TAC-myosin interaction is present when actin is dissociated from myosin,even if CaP/myosin ratio is very low;this high efficient interaction can be abolished by actin.However,why and how TAC can possess such a high efficiency to influence myosin and how the physiological significance of the high efficiency of TAC is in regulating the interaction between myosin and actin remain to be investigated.

  3. Kinetic properties and small-molecule inhibition of human myosin-6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heissler, Sarah M.; Selvadurai, Jayashankar; Bond, Lisa M.; Fedorov, Roman; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma; Manstein, Dietmar J.

    2012-01-01

    Myosin-6 is an actin-based motor protein that moves its cargo towards the minus-end of actin filaments. Mutations in the gene encoding the myosin-6 heavy chain and changes in the cellular abundance of the protein have been linked to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer. Here, we present a detailed kinetic characterization of the human myosin-6 motor domain, describe the effect of 2,4,6-triiodophenol on the interaction of myosin-6 with F-actin and nucleotides, and show how addition of the drug reduces the number of myosin-6-dependent vesicle fusion events at the plasma membrane during constitutive secretion. PMID:22884421

  4. Surface complexation of heavy metal cations on clay edges: insights from first principles molecular dynamics simulation of Ni(II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Liu, Xiandong; Lu, Xiancai; He, Mengjia; Jan Meijer, Evert; Wang, Rucheng

    2017-04-01

    Aiming at an atomistic mechanism of heavy metal cation complexing on clay surfaces, we carried out systematic first principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) simulations to investigate the structures, free energies and acidity constants of Ni(II) complexes formed on edge surfaces of 2:1 phyllosilicates. Three representative complexes were studied, including monodentate complex on the tbnd SiO site, bidentate complex on the tbnd Al(OH)2 site, and tetradentate complex on the octahedral vacancy where Ni(II) fits well into the lattice. The complexes structures were characterized in detail. Computed free energy values indicate that the tetradentate complex is significantly more stable than the other two. The calculated acidity constants indicate that the tetradentate complex can get deprotonated (pKa = 8.4) at the ambient conditions whereas the other two hardly deprotonate due to extremely high pKa values. By comparing with the 2 Site Protolysis Non Electrostatic Surface Complexation and Cation Exchange (2SPNE SC/CE) model, the vacant site has been assigned to the strong site and the other two to the weak site, respectively. Thus a link has been built between atomistic simulations and macroscopic experiments and it is deduced that this should also apply to other heavy metal cations based on additional simulations of Co(II) and Cu(II) and previous simulations of Fe(II) and Cd(II)). This study forms a physical basis for understanding the transport and fixation of heavy metal elements in many geologic environments.

  5. Adsorption of Zn(II) on the kaolinite(001) surfaces in aqueous environment: A combined DFT and molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Kong, Xiang-Ping; Zhang, Bao-Hua; Wang, Juan

    2017-08-01

    Adsorption of Zn(II) on two types of neutral (001) surfaces of kaolinite, tetrahedral Si(t) and octahedral Al(o), was studied by means of DFT calculations and classical molecular dynamics simulations. The position and structure for both outer-sphere and mono-/bi-dentate inner-sphere complexes of Zn(II) in aqueous environment were examined, with binding energy and radial distribution function calculated. Outer-sphere complex on the Si(t) surface, monodentate inner-sphere complex of ;Ou; (surface oxygen with ;upright; hydrogen) site and bidentate complex of ;Ou-Ou; site of neighboring Al centers on the Al(o) surface are considered to be the dominant adsorption species. The outer-sphere complex is found six-coordinated with distorted octahedral geometry, while both the inner-sphere complexes exhibit the tetrahedral structure with coordination number of four. Hydrogen bonding interactions between oxygen or hydrogen of the kaolinite(001) surfaces and the aqua ligands of Zn(II) act as the key role for the structure and stability of adsorption complexes. Upon the Mulliken population analysis and partial density of states, both Zn(II) and surface oxygen accept electrons from aqua oxygens, and coupling of O 2p with the sp3d2 or sp3 hybridization states of Zn(II) is the primary bonding nature of Zn(II) with oxygen in outer- and inner-sphere complexes, respectively.

  6. Engineering controllable bidirectional molecular motors based on myosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lu; Nakamura, Muneaki; Schindler, Tony D; Parker, David; Bryant, Zev

    2012-02-19

    Cytoskeletal motors drive the transport of organelles and molecular cargoes within cells and have potential applications in molecular detection and diagnostic devices. Engineering molecular motors with controllable properties will allow selective perturbation of mechanical processes in living cells and provide optimized device components for tasks such as molecular sorting and directed assembly. Biological motors have previously been modified by introducing activation/deactivation switches that respond to metal ions and other signals. Here, we show that myosin motors can be engineered to reversibly change their direction of motion in response to a calcium signal. Building on previous protein engineering studies and guided by a structural model for the redirected power stroke of myosin VI, we have constructed bidirectional myosins through the rigid recombination of structural modules. The performance of the motors was confirmed using gliding filament assays and single fluorophore tracking. Our strategy, in which external signals trigger changes in the geometry and mechanics of myosin lever arms, should make it possible to achieve spatiotemporal control over a range of motor properties including processivity, stride size and branchpoint turning.

  7. Myosin light chain genes in the turkey (Meleagris gallopavo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, L D; Ostroski, B J; Reed, K M

    2003-01-01

    Myosin light chains associate with the motor protein myosin and are believed to play a role in the regulation of its actin-based ATPase activity. Myosin light chain cDNA clones from the turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) were isolated and sequenced. One sequence corresponded to an alternative transcript, the skeletal muscle essential light chain (MYL1 isoform 1) and a second to the smooth muscle isoform of myosin light chain (MYL6). The DNA and predicted amino acid sequences of both light chain genes were compared to that of the chicken. Based on the cDNA sequence, oligonucleotide primers were designed to amplify genomic DNA from six of the seven introns of the MYL1 gene. Approximately 5 kb of DNA was sequenced (introns and 3' UTR) and evaluated for the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). SNPs were verified by sequencing common intron regions from multiple individuals and three polymorphisms were used to genotype pedigreed families. MYL1 is assigned to a turkey linkage group that corresponds to a region of chicken chromosome 7 (GGA7). The results of this study provide genomic reagents for comparative studies of avian muscle components and muscle biology.

  8. MyosinV controls PTEN function and neuronal cell size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Diepen, Michiel T; Parsons, Maddy; Downes, C Peter; Leslie, Nicholas R; Hindges, Robert; Eickholt, Britta J

    2009-10-01

    The tumour suppressor PTEN can inhibit cell proliferation and migration as well as control cell growth, in different cell types. PTEN functions predominately as a lipid phosphatase, converting PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) to PtdIns(4,5)P(2), thereby antagonizing PI(3)K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) and its established downstream effector pathways. However, much is unclear concerning the mechanisms that regulate PTEN movement to the cell membrane, which is necessary for its activity towards PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) (Refs 3, 4, 5). Here we show a requirement for functional motor proteins in the control of PI3K signalling, involving a previously unknown association between PTEN and myosinV. FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer) measurements revealed that PTEN interacts directly with myosinV, which is dependent on PTEN phosphorylation mediated by CK2 and/or GSK3. Inactivation of myosinV-transport function in neurons increased cell size, which, in line with known attributes of PTEN-loss, required PI(3)K and mTor. Our data demonstrate a myosin-based transport mechanism that regulates PTEN function, providing new insights into the signalling networks regulating cell growth.

  9. Impact of resistance exercise during bed rest on skeletal muscle sarcopenia and myosin isoform distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamman, M. M.; Clarke, M. S.; Feeback, D. L.; Talmadge, R. J.; Stevens, B. R.; Lieberman, S. A.; Greenisen, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    Because resistance exercise (REx) and bed-rest unloading (BRU) are associated with opposing adaptations, our purpose was to test the efficacy of REx against the effects of 14 days of BRU on the knee-extensor muscle group. Sixteen healthy men were randomly assigned to no exercise (NoEx; n = 8) or REx (n = 8). REx performed five sets of leg press exercise with 80-85% of one repetition maximum (1 RM) every other day during BRU. Muscle samples were removed from the vastus lateralis muscle by percutaneous needle biopsy. Myofiber distribution was determined immunohistochemically with three monoclonal antibodies against myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms (I, IIa, IIx). MHC distribution was further assessed by quantitative gel electrophoresis. Dynamic 1-RM leg press and unilateral maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) were determined. Maximal neural activation (root mean squared electromyogram) and rate of torque development (RTD) were measured during MVC. Reductions (P training-specific strength. Unlike spaceflight, BRU did not induce shifts in myosin phenotype. The reported benefits of REx may prove useful in prescribing exercise for astronauts in microgravity.

  10. Globular tail of myosin-V is bound to vamp/synaptobrevin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, A; Komiya, Y; Igarashi, M

    2001-02-01

    VAMP/synaptobrevin is one of a number of v-SNAREs involved in vesicular fusion events in neurons. In a previous report, VAMP was shown to form a complex with synaptophysin and myosin V, a motor protein based on the F-actin, and that myosin V was then released from the complex in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Here, we found that VAMP alone is bound to myosin V in a Ca(2+)-independent manner, and determined that the globular tail domain of myosin V is its binding site. The syntaxin-VAMP-myosin V formed in the presence of Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM). In the absence of CaM, only syntaxin-VAMP, or VAMP-myosin V complex was formed. Our results suggest that VAMP acts as a myosin V receptor on the vesicles and regulates formation of the complex.

  11. Structural Basis of Cargo Recognition by Unconventional Myosins in Cellular Trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianchao; Lu, Qing; Zhang, Mingjie

    2016-08-01

    Unconventional myosins are a superfamily of actin-based molecular motors playing diverse roles including cellular trafficking, mechanical supports, force sensing and transmission, etc. The variable neck and tail domains of unconventional myosins function to bind to specific cargoes including proteins and lipid vesicles and thus are largely responsible for the diverse cellular functions of myosins in vivo. In addition, the tail regions, together with their cognate cargoes, can regulate activities of the motor heads. This review outlines the advances made in recent years on cargo recognition and cargo binding-induced regulation of the activity of several unconventional myosins including myosin-I, V, VI and X in cellular trafficking. We approach this topic by describing a series of high-resolution structures of the neck and tail domains of these unconventional myosins either alone or in complex with their specific cargoes, and by discussing potential implications of these structural studies on cellular trafficking of these myosin motors.

  12. Myosin superfamily: The multi-functional and irreplaceable factors in spermatogenesis and testicular tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-Ruide; Yang, Wan-Xi

    2016-01-15

    Spermatogenesis is a fundamental process in sexual development and reproduction, in which the diploid spermatogonia transform into haploid mature spermatozoa. This process is under the regulation of multiple factors and pathway. Myosin has been implicated in various aspects during spermatogenesis. Myosins constitute a diverse superfamily of actin-based molecular motors that translocate along microfilament in an ATP-dependent manner, and six kinds of myosins have been proved that function during spermatogenesis. In mitosis and meiosis, myosins play an important role in spindle assembly and positioning, karyokinesis and cytokinesis. During spermiogenesis, myosins participate in acrosomal formation, nuclear morphogenesis, mitochondrial translocation and spermatid individualization. In this review, we summarize current understanding of the functions of myosin in spermatogenesis and some reproductive system diseases such as testicular tumors and prostate cancer, and discuss the roles of possible upstream molecules which regulate myosin in these processes.

  13. I. Advances in NMR Signal Processing. II. Spin Dynamics in Quantum Dissipative Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yung-Ya [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-11-01

    Part I. Advances in IVMR Signal Processing. Improvements of sensitivity and resolution are two major objects in the development of NMR/MRI. A signal enhancement method is first presented which recovers signal from noise by a judicious combination of a priordmowledge to define the desired feasible solutions and a set theoretic estimation for restoring signal properties that have been lost due to noise contamination. The effect of noise can be significantly mitigated through the process of iteratively modifying the noisy data set to the smallest degree necessary so that it possesses a collection of prescribed properties and also lies closest to the original data set. A novel detection-estimation scheme is then introduced to analyze noisy and/or strongly damped or truncated FIDs. Based on exponential modeling, the number of signals is detected based on information estimated using the matrix pencil method. theory and the spectral parameters are Part II. Spin Dynamics in body dipole-coupled systems Quantum Dissipative Systems. Spin dynamics in manyconstitutes one of the most fundamental problems in magnetic resonance and condensed-matter physics. Its many-spin nature precludes any rigorous treatment. ‘Therefore, the spin-boson model is adopted to describe in the rotating frame the influence of the dipolar local fields on a tagged spin. Based on the polaronic transform and a perturbation treatment, an analytical solution is derived, suggesting the existence of self-trapped states in the. strong coupling limit, i.e., when transverse local field >> longitudinal local field. Such nonlinear phenomena originate from the joint action of the lattice fluctuations and the reaction field. Under semiclassical approximation, it is found that the main effect of the reaction field is the renormalization of the Hamiltonian of interest. Its direct consequence is the two-step relaxation process: the spin is initially localized in a quasiequilibrium state, which is later detrapped by

  14. Recombination dynamics of type-II excitons in (Ga,In)As/GaAs/Ga(As,Sb) heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gies, S.; Holz, B.; Fuchs, C.; Stolz, W.; Heimbrodt, W.

    2017-01-01

    (Ga,In)As/GaAs/Ga(As,Sb) multi-quantum well heterostructures have been investigated using continuous wave and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy at various temperatures. A complex interplay was observed between the excitonic type-II transitions with electrons in the (Ga,In)As well and holes in the Ga(As,Sb) well and the type-I excitons in the (Ga,In)As and Ga(As,Sb) wells. The type-II luminescence exhibits a strongly non-exponential temporal behavior below a critical temperature of T c = 70 K. The transients were analyzed in the framework of a rate-equation model. It was found that the exciton relaxation and hopping in the localized states of the disordered ternary Ga(As,Sb) are the decisive processes to describe the dynamics of the type-II excitons correctly.

  15. Spontaneous Tl(I)-to-Tl(III) oxidation in dynamic heterobimetallic Hg(II)/Tl(I) porphyrin complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndoyom, Victoria; Fusaro, Luca; Roisnel, Thierry; Le Gac, Stéphane; Boitrel, Bernard

    2016-01-11

    Strapped heterobimetallic Hg(II)/Tl(I) porphyrin complexes, with both metal ions bridged by the N-core in a dynamic way, undergo spontaneous Tl(I)-to-Tl(III) oxidation leading to a mono-Tl(III) complex and a mixed valence Tl(I)/Tl(III) bimetallic complex. It provides a new opportunity to tune metal ion translocations in bimetallic porphyrin systems.

  16. Dilated cardiomyopathy mutation (R134W in mouse cardiac troponin T induces greater contractile deficits against α-myosin heavy chain than against β-myosin heavy chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sampath K Gollapudi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have demonstrated that depressed myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity is common to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM in humans. However, it remains unclear whether a single determinant — such as myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity — is sufficient to characterize all cases of DCM because the severity of disease varies widely with a given mutation. Because dynamic features dominate in the heart muscle, alterations in dynamic contractile parameters may offer better insight on the molecular mechanisms that underlie disparate effects of DCM mutations on cardiac phenotypes. Dynamic features are dominated by myofilament cooperativity that stem from different sources. One such source is the strong tropomyosin binding region in troponin T (TnT, which is known to modulate crossbridge (XB recruitment dynamics in a myosin heavy chain (MHC-dependent manner. Therefore, we hypothesized that the effects of DCM-linked mutations in TnT on contractile dynamics would be differently modulated by α- and β-MHC. After reconstitution with the mouse TnT equivalent (TnTR134W of the human DCM mutation (R131W, we measured dynamic contractile parameters in detergent-skinned cardiac muscle fiber bundles from normal (α-MHC and transgenic mice (β-MHC. TnTR134W significantly attenuated the rate constants of tension redevelopment, XB recruitment dynamics, XB distortion dynamics, and the magnitude of length-mediated XB recruitment only in α-MHC fiber bundles. TnTR134W decreased myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity to a greater extent in α-MHC (0.14 pCa units than in β-MHC fiber bundles (0.08 pCa units. Thus, our data demonstrate that TnTR134W induces a more severe DCM-like contractile phenotype against α-MHC than against β-MHC background.

  17. Hydrogen-bond vibrational and energetic dynamical properties in sI and sII clathrate hydrates and in ice Ih: Molecular dynamics insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Somendra Nath; English, Niall J

    2015-10-21

    Equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed on cubic (sI and sII) polymorphs of methane hydrate, and hexagonal ice (ice Ih), to study the dynamical properties of hydrogen-bond vibrations and hydrogen-bond self-energy. It was found that hydrogen-bond energies are greatest in magnitude in sI hydrates, followed by sII, and their energies are least in magnitude in ice Ih. This is consistent with recent MD-based findings on thermal conductivities for these various materials [N. J. English and J. S. Tse, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 015901 (2009)], in which the lower thermal conductivity of sI methane hydrate was rationalised in terms of more strained hydrogen-bond arrangements. Further, modes for vibration and energy-transfer via hydrogen bonds in sI hydrate were found to occur at higher frequencies vis-à-vis ice Ih and sII hydrate in both the water-librational and OH⋯H regions because of the more strained nature of hydrogen bonds therein.

  18. Analysis of the dynamic response in the railway vehicles to the track vertical irregularities. Part II: The numerical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dumitriu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the dynamic response of a two-bogie vehicle to the symmetrical and antisymmetrical excitations, due to bounce and pitch of the axles’ planes, derived from the track vertical irregularities. Part I introduced the theoretical model and the response functions of the vehicle, as well as the theoretical elements required for the analysis of the dynamic response of the vehicle to the track stochastic irregularities. Part II comprises the results of the numerical analysis of the vehicle dynamic response in three reference points of the carbody, based on which a series of properties of the vertical vibrations behaviour of the railway vehicle is pointed out at. The excitation modes that trigger the carbody response in its reference points are identified. Hence, the influence of the geometrical filtering effect of the excitation modes upon the ride quality and ride comfort is established.

  19. Fluid mechanics of dynamic stall. II - Prediction of full scale characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericsson, L. E.; Reding, J. P.

    1988-01-01

    Analytical extrapolations are made from experimental subscale dynamics to predict full scale characteristics of dynamic stall. The method proceeds by establishing analytic relationships between dynamic and static aerodynamic characteristics induced by viscous flow effects. The method is then validated by predicting dynamic test results on the basis of corresponding static test data obtained at the same subscale flow conditions, and the effect of Reynolds number on the static aerodynamic characteristics are determined from subscale to full scale flow conditions.

  20. Fluid mechanics of dynamic stall. II - Prediction of full scale characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericsson, L. E.; Reding, J. P.

    1988-01-01

    Analytical extrapolations are made from experimental subscale dynamics to predict full scale characteristics of dynamic stall. The method proceeds by establishing analytic relationships between dynamic and static aerodynamic characteristics induced by viscous flow effects. The method is then validated by predicting dynamic test results on the basis of corresponding static test data obtained at the same subscale flow conditions, and the effect of Reynolds number on the static aerodynamic characteristics are determined from subscale to full scale flow conditions.

  1. Kinetic characterization of the sole nonmuscle myosin-2 from the model organism Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heissler, Sarah M; Chinthalapudi, Krishna; Sellers, James R

    2015-04-01

    Nonmuscle myosin-2 is the primary enzyme complex powering contractility of the F-actin cytoskeleton in the model organism Drosophila. Despite myosin's essential function in fly development and homeostasis, its kinetic features remain elusive. The purpose of this in vitro study is a detailed steady-state and presteady-state kinetic characterization of the Drosophila nonmuscle myosin-2 motor domain. Kinetic features are a slow steady-state ATPase activity, high affinities for F-actin and ADP, and a low duty ratio. Comparative analysis of the overall enzymatic signatures across the nonmuscle myosin-2 complement from model organisms indicates that the Drosophila protein resembles nonmuscle myosin-2s from metazoa rather than protozoa, though modulatory aspects of myosin motor function are distinct. Drosophila nonmuscle myosin-2 is uniquely insensitive toward blebbistatin, a commonly used myosin-2 inhibitor. An in silico modeling approach together with kinetic studies indicate that the nonconsensus amino acid Met466 in the Drosophila nonmuscle myosin-2 active-site loop switch-2 acts as blebbistatin desensitizer. Introduction of the M466I mutation sensitized the protein for blebbistatin, resulting in a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of 36.3 ± 4.1 µM. Together, these data show that Drosophila nonmuscle myosin-2 is a bona fide molecular motor and establish an important link between switch-2 and blebbistatin sensitivity.

  2. Photosystem II function and dynamics in three widely used Arabidopsis thaliana accessions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Yin

    Full Text Available Columbia-0 (Col-0, Wassilewskija-4 (Ws-4, and Landsberg erecta-0 (Ler-0 are used as background lines for many public Arabidopsis mutant collections, and for investigation in laboratory conditions of plant processes, including photosynthesis and response to high-intensity light (HL. The photosystem II (PSII complex is sensitive to HL and requires repair to sustain its function. PSII repair is a multistep process controlled by numerous factors, including protein phosphorylation and thylakoid membrane stacking. Here we have characterized the function and dynamics of PSII complex under growth-light and HL conditions. Ws-4 displayed 30% more thylakoid lipids per chlorophyll and 40% less chlorophyll per carotenoid than Col-0 and Ler-0. There were no large differences in thylakoid stacking, photoprotection and relative levels of photosynthetic complexes among the three accessions. An increased efficiency of PSII closure was found in Ws-4 following illumination with saturation flashes or continuous light. Phosphorylation of the PSII D1/D2 proteins was reduced by 50% in Ws-4 as compared to Col-0 and Ler-0. An increase in abundance of the responsible STN8 kinase in response to HL treatment was found in all three accessions, but Ws-4 displayed 50% lower levels than Col-0 and Ler-0. Despite this, the HL treatment caused in Ws-4 the lagest extent of PSII inactivation, disassembly, D1 protein degradation, and the largest decrease in the size of stacked thylakoids. The dilution of chlorophyll-protein complexes with additional lipids and carotenoids in Ws-4 may represent a mechanism to facilitate lateral protein traffic in the membrane, thus compensating for the lack of a full complement of STN8 kinase. Nevertheless, additional PSII damage occurs in Ws-4, which exceeds the D1 protein synthesis capacity, thus leading to enhanced photoinhibition. Our findings are valuable for selection of appropriate background line for PSII characterization in Arabidopsis

  3. Molecular Dynamics Simulations Reveal the Conformational Flexibility of Lipid II and Its Loose Association with the Defensin Plectasin in the Staphylococcus aureus Membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witzke, Sarah; Petersen, Michael; Carpenter, Timothy S.

    2016-01-01

    Lipid II is critical for peptidoglycan synthesis, which is the main component of the bacterial cell wall. Lipid II is a relatively conserved and important part of the cell wall biosynthesis pathway and is targeted by antibiotics such as the lantibiotics, which achieve their function by disrupting...... of Lipid II mediated by cations. In the presence of the defensin peptide plectasin, the conformational lability of Lipid II allows it to form loose complexes with the protein, via a number of different binding modes....... dynamics simulation study of the conformational dynamics of Lipid II within a detailed model of the Staphylococcus aureus cell membrane. We show that Lipid II is able to adopt a range of conformations, even within the packed lipidic environment of the membrane. Our simulations also reveal dimerization...

  4. Rich spectroscopic and molecular dynamic studies on the interaction of cytotoxic Pt(II) and Pd(II) complexes of glycine derivatives with calf thymus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami Moghadam, Mahboube; Saidifar, Maryam; Divsalar, Adeleh; Mansouri-Torshizi, Hassan; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Farhangian, Hossein; Ghadamgahi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Some amino acid derivatives, such as R-glycine, have been synthesized together with their full spectroscopic characterization. The sodium salts of these bidentate amino acid ligands have been interacted with [M(bpy)(H2O)2](NO3)2 giving the corresponding some new complexes with formula [M(bpy)(R-gly)]NO3 (where M is Pt(II) or Pd(II), bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine and R-gly is butyl-, hexyl- and octyl-glycine). Due to less solubility of octyl derivatives, the biological activities of butyl and hexyl derivatives have been tested against chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line, K562. The interaction of these complexes with highly polymerized calf thymus DNA has been extensively studied by means of electronic absorption, fluorescence and other measurements. The experimental results suggest that these complexes positive cooperatively bind to DNA presumably via groove binding. Molecular dynamic results show that the DNA structure is largely maintained its native structure in hexylglycine derivative-water mixtures and at lower temperatures. The simulation data indicates that the more destabilizing effect of butylglycine is induced by preferential accumulation of these molecules around the DNA and due to their more negative free energy of binding via groove binding.

  5. New Ru(II)/Os(II)-polypyridyl complexes for coupling to TiO2 surfaces through acetylacetone functionality and studies on interfacial electron-transfer dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Tanmay; Biswas, Abul Kalam; Sahu, Tuhin Subhra; Ganguly, Bishwajit; Das, Amitava; Ghosh, Hirendra Nath

    2014-09-28

    New Ru(ii)- and Os(ii)-polypyridyl complexes have been synthesized with pendant acetylacetone (acac) functionality for anchoring on nanoparticulate TiO2 surfaces with a goal of developing an alternate sensitizer that could be utilized for designing an efficient dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC). Time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopic studies in the femtosecond time domain have been carried out. The charge recombination rates are observed to be very slow, compared with those for strongly coupled dye molecules having catechol as the anchoring functionality. The results of such studies reveal that electron-injection rates from the metal complex-based LUMO to the conduction band of TiO2 are faster than one would expect for an analogous complex in which the chromophoric core and the anchoring moiety are separated with multiple saturated C-C linkages. Such an observation is rationalized based on computational studies, and a relatively smaller spatial distance between the dye LUMO and the TiO2 surface accounted for this. Results of this study are compared with those for analogous complexes having a gem-dicarboxy group as the anchoring functionality for covalent binding to the TiO2 surface to compare the role of binding functionalities on electron-transfer dynamics.

  6. Reverse actin sliding triggers strong myosin binding that moves tropomyosin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekyarova, T.I.; Reedy, M.C.; Baumann, B.A.J.; Tregear, R.T.; Ward, A.; Krzic, U.; Prince, K.M.; Perz-Edwards, R.J.; Reconditi, M.; Gore, D.; Irving, T.C.; Reedy, M.K. (IIT); (EMBL); (Scripps); (Duke); (Prince); (FSU); (MRC); (U. Florence)

    2008-09-03

    Actin/myosin interactions in vertebrate striated muscles are believed to be regulated by the 'steric blocking' mechanism whereby the binding of calcium to the troponin complex allows tropomyosin (TM) to change position on actin, acting as a molecular switch that blocks or allows myosin heads to interact with actin. Movement of TM during activation is initiated by interaction of Ca{sup 2+} with troponin, then completed by further displacement by strong binding cross-bridges. We report x-ray evidence that TM in insect flight muscle (IFM) moves in a manner consistent with the steric blocking mechanism. We find that both isometric contraction, at high [Ca{sup 2+}], and stretch activation, at lower [Ca{sup 2+}], develop similarly high x-ray intensities on the IFM fourth actin layer line because of TM movement, coinciding with x-ray signals of strong-binding cross-bridge attachment to helically favored 'actin target zones.' Vanadate (Vi), a phosphate analog that inhibits active cross-bridge cycling, abolishes all active force in IFM, allowing high [Ca{sup 2+}] to elicit initial TM movement without cross-bridge attachment or other changes from relaxed structure. However, when stretched in high [Ca{sup 2+}], Vi-'paralyzed' fibers produce force substantially above passive response at pCa {approx} 9, concurrent with full conversion from resting to active x-ray pattern, including x-ray signals of cross-bridge strong-binding and TM movement. This argues that myosin heads can be recruited as strong-binding 'brakes' by backward-sliding, calcium-activated thin filaments, and are as effective in moving TM as actively force-producing cross-bridges. Such recruitment of myosin as brakes may be the major mechanism resisting extension during lengthening contractions.

  7. Dynamical Expansion of H II Regions from Ultracompact to Compact Sizes in Turbulent, Self-Gravitating Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    MacLow, M M; Oishi, J S; Abel, T; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; Toraskar, Jayashree; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Abel, Tom

    2006-01-01

    The nature of ultracompact H II regions (UCHRs) remains poorly determined. In particular, they are about an order of magnitude more common than would be expected if they formed around young massive stars and lasted for one dynamical time, around 10^4 yr. We here perform three-dimensional numerical simulations of the expansion of an H II region into self-gravitating, radiatively cooled gas, both with and without supersonic turbulent flows. In the laminar case, we find that H II region expansion in a collapsing core produces nearly spherical shells, even if the ionizing source is off-center in the core. This agrees with analytic models of blast waves in power-law media. In the turbulent case, we find that the H II region does not disrupt the central collapsing region, but rather sweeps up a shell of gas in which further collapse occurs. Although this does not constitute triggering, as the swept-up gas would eventually have collapsed anyway, it does expose the collapsing regions to ionizing radiation. We suggest...

  8. Covalent immobilization of myosin for in-vitro motility of actin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ellis Bagga; Sunita Kumari; Rajesh Kumar; Rakesh Kumar; R P Bajpai; Lalit M Bharadwaj

    2005-11-01

    The present study reports the covalent immobilization of myosin on glass surface and in-vitro motility of actin-myosin biomolecular motor. Myosin was immobilized on poly-L-lysine coated glass using heterobifunctional cross linker EDC and characterized by AFM. The in-vitro motility of actin was carried out on the immobilized myosin. It was observed that velocity of actin over myosin increases with increasing actin concentration (0.4-1.0 mg/ml) and was found in the range of 0.40-3.25 m/s. The motility of actin-myosin motor on artificial surfaces is of immense importance for developing nanodevices for healthcare and engineering applications.

  9. Actin-myosin contractility is responsible for the reduced viability of dissociated human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guokai; Hou, Zhonggang; Gulbranson, Daniel R; Thomson, James A

    2010-08-06

    Human ESCs are the pluripotent precursor of the three embryonic germ layers. Human ESCs exhibit basal-apical polarity, junctional complexes, integrin-dependent matrix adhesion, and E-cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesion, all characteristics shared by the epiblast epithelium of the intact mammalian embryo. After disruption of epithelial structures, programmed cell death is commonly observed. If individualized human ESCs are prevented from reattaching and forming colonies, their viability is significantly reduced. Here, we show that actin-myosin contraction is a critical effector of the cell death response to human ESC dissociation. Inhibition of myosin heavy chain ATPase, downregulation of myosin heavy chain, and downregulation of myosin light chain all increase survival and cloning efficiency of individualized human ESCs. ROCK inhibition decreases phosphorylation of myosin light chain, suggesting that inhibition of actin-myosin contraction is also the mechanism through which ROCK inhibitors increase cloning efficiency of human ESCs.

  10. The kinetics of bivalent metal ion dissociation from myosin subfragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, A J; Bagshaw, C R

    1986-01-01

    Bivalent metal ions have multiple roles in subunit association and ATPase regulation in scallop adductor-muscle myosin. To help elucidate these functions, the rates of Ca2+ and Mg2+ dissociation from the non-specific high-affinity sites on the regulatory light chains were measured and compared with those of rabbit skeletal-muscle myosin subfragments. Ca2+ dissociation had a rate constant of about 0.7 s-1 in both species, as measured by the time course of the pH change on EDTA addition. Mg2+ dissociation had a rate constant of 0.05 s-1, as monitored by its displacement with the paramagnetic Mn2+ ion. It is concluded that the exchange between Ca2+ and Mg2+ at the non-specific site, on excitation of both skeletal and adductor muscles, is too slow to contribute to the activation itself. The release of bivalent metal ions from the non-specific site is, however, the first step in release of the scallop regulatory light chain (Bennett & Bagshaw (1986) Biochem. J. 233, 179-186). In scallop myosin additional specific sites are present, which can bind Ca2+ rapidly, to effect activation of the ATPase. In the course of this work, Ca2+ dissociation from EGTA was studied as a model system. This gave rates of 1 s-1 and 0.3 s-1 at pH 7.0 and pH 8.0 respectively.

  11. Comparative study of normal and branched alkane monolayer films adsorbed on a solid surface. II. Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevoldsen, Ann Dorrit; Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Diama, A.;

    2007-01-01

    The dynamics of monolayer films of the n-alkane tetracosane (n-C24H52) and the branched alkane squalane (C30H62) adsorbed on graphite have been studied by quasielastic and inelastic neutron scattering and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Both molecules have 24 carbon atoms along their carbon...

  12. Evaluation of the Voorhof II building refurbishment: A dynamic behaviour view-point

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhout, G.P.C. van

    1997-01-01

    The paper discusses the effectiveness of stiffening an existing building to improve the dynamic behaviour. The evaluation was part of a Ph.D. studies on the wind-induced dynamic behaviour of tall buildings. Sensitivity analyses by means of a computer model suggested that stiffening tall buildings ma

  13. Study of thermodynamics and dynamics of removing Cu(II) by biosorption membrane of Penicillium biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xin [Beijing Key Laboratory of Bioprocess, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, College of Life Science and Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Su, Haijia, E-mail: suhj@mail.buct.edu.cn [Beijing Key Laboratory of Bioprocess, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, College of Life Science and Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Tan, Tianwei; Xiao, Gang [Beijing Key Laboratory of Bioprocess, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, College of Life Science and Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2011-10-15

    Based on the integration of biosorption and membrane-separation, a novel biosorption membrane with good mechanical property was prepared by immobilizing Penicillium biomass with cross-linked chitosan on fabric. The ability of the low cost biosorption membrane to remove Cu(II) ions from a solution was studied through batch and continuous experiments. Langmuir adsorption isotherm models were found to accurately fit the batch experimental data (R{sup 2} > 0.99) indicating that sorption was of monolayer-mode. The uptake of Cu(II) could reach 38 mg/g at its initial concentration of 200 mg/L in the solution. Continuous biosorption was investigated in a column and the effects of the height, flow rate and initial concentration of Cu(II) were studied. The Bed Depth Service Time model (BDST) was applied to simulate column adsorption data. The breakthrough time at different flow rates and initial concentrations was accurately predicted by the model (error < 8%). The uptake of Cu(II) could reach 38.3 mg/g at height 30 cm, flow rate 5 mL/min, initial concentration of Cu(II) 200 mg/L. The biosorption membrane was regenerated by washing with 0.05 mol/L solution of HCl, and breakthrough curves remained fairly unchanged after 10 cycles of adsorption-desorption.

  14. Myosin VI regulates actin structure specialization through conserved cargo-binding domain sites.

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    Mamiko Isaji

    Full Text Available Actin structures are often stable, remaining unchanged in organization for the lifetime of a differentiated cell. Little is known about stable actin structure formation, organization, or maintenance. During Drosophila spermatid individualization, long-lived actin cones mediate cellular remodeling. Myosin VI is necessary for building the dense meshwork at the cones' fronts. We test several ideas for myosin VI's mechanism of action using domain deletions or site-specific mutations of myosin VI. The head (motor and globular tail (cargo-binding domains were both needed for localization at the cone front and dense meshwork formation. Several conserved partner-binding sites in the globular tail previously identified in vertebrate myosin VI were critical for function in cones. Localization and promotion of proper actin organization were separable properties of myosin VI. A vertebrate myosin VI was able to localize and function, indicating that functional properties are conserved. Our data eliminate several models for myosin VI's mechanism of action and suggest its role is controlling organization and action of actin assembly regulators through interactions at conserved sites. The Drosophila orthologues of interaction partners previously identified for vertebrate myosin VI are likely not required, indicating novel partners mediate this effect. These data demonstrate that generating an organized and functional actin structure in this cell requires multiple activities coordinated by myosin VI.

  15. Evolutionary traces decode molecular mechanism behind fast pace of myosin XI

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    Syamaladevi Divya P

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytoplasmic class XI myosins are the fastest processive motors known. This class functions in high-velocity cytoplasmic streaming in various plant cells from algae to angiosperms. The velocities at which they process are ten times faster than its closest class V homologues. Results To provide sequence determinants and structural rationale for the molecular mechanism of this fast pace myosin, we have compared the sequences from myosin class V and XI through Evolutionary Trace (ET analysis. The current study identifies class-specific residues of myosin XI spread over the actin binding site, ATP binding site and light chain binding neck region. Sequences for ET analysis were accumulated from six plant genomes, using literature based text search and sequence searches, followed by triple validation viz. CDD search, string-based searches and phylogenetic clustering. We have identified nine myosin XI genes in sorghum and seven in grape by sequence searches. Both the plants possess one gene product each belonging to myosin type VIII as well. During this process, we have re-defined the gene boundaries for three sorghum myosin XI genes using fgenesh program. Conclusion Molecular modelling and subsequent analysis of putative interactions involving these class-specific residues suggest a structural basis for the molecular mechanism behind high velocity of plant myosin XI. We propose a model of a more flexible switch I region that contributes to faster ADP release leading to high velocity movement of the algal myosin XI.

  16. Myosin inhibitors block accumulation movement of chloroplasts in Arabidopsis thaliana leaf cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paves, H; Truve, E

    2007-01-01

    Chloroplasts alter their distribution within plant cells depending on the external light conditions. Myosin inhibitors 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM), N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), and 1-(5-iodonaphthalene-1-sulfonyl)-1H-hexahydro-1,4-diazepine hydrochloride (ML-7) were used to study the possible role of myosins in chloroplast photorelocation in Arabidopsis thaliana mesophyll cells. None of these agents had an effect on the chloroplast high-fluence-rate avoidance movement but all of the three myosin inhibitors blocked the accumulation movement of chloroplasts after a high-fluence-rate irradiation of the leaves. The results suggest that myosins have a role in A. thaliana chloroplast photorelocation.

  17. Myosin VI contributes to synaptic transmission and development at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction

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    Campbell Shelagh

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myosin VI, encoded by jaguar (jar in Drosophila melanogaster, is a unique member of the myosin superfamily of actin-based motor proteins. Myosin VI is the only myosin known to move towards the minus or pointed ends of actin filaments. Although Myosin VI has been implicated in numerous cellular processes as both an anchor and a transporter, little is known about the role of Myosin VI in the nervous system. We previously recovered jar in a screen for genes that modify neuromuscular junction (NMJ development and here we report on the genetic analysis of Myosin VI in synaptic development and function using loss of function jar alleles. Results Our experiments on Drosophila third instar larvae revealed decreased locomotor activity, a decrease in NMJ length, a reduction in synaptic bouton number, and altered synaptic vesicle localization in jar mutants. Furthermore, our studies of synaptic transmission revealed alterations in both basal synaptic transmission and short-term plasticity at the jar mutant neuromuscular synapse. Conclusions Altogether these findings indicate that Myosin VI is important for proper synaptic function and morphology. Myosin VI may be functioning as an anchor to tether vesicles to the bouton periphery and, thereby, participating in the regulation of synaptic vesicle mobilization during synaptic transmission.

  18. Microscopic model of the actin-myosin interaction in muscular contractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaveau, B.; Moreau, M.; Schuman, B.

    2004-01-01

    We define and study a detailed many body model for the muscular contraction taking into account the various myosin heads. The state of the system is defined by the position of the actin and by an internal coordinate of rotation for each myosin head. We write a system of Fokker-Planck equations and calculate the average for the position, the number of attached myosin heads, and the total force exerted on the actin. We also study the correlation between these quantities, in particular between the number of attached myosin heads and the force on the actin.

  19. Differential patterns of myosin Va expression during the ontogenesis of the rat hippocampus

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    L.S. Brinn

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Myosin Va is an actin-based, processive molecular motor protein highly enriched in the nervous tissue of vertebrates. It has been associated with processes of cellular motility, which include organelle transport and neurite outgrowth. The in vivo expression of myosin Va protein in the developing nervous system of mammals has not yet been reported. We describe here the immunolocalization of myosin Va in the developing rat hippocampus. Coronal sections of the embryonic and postnatal rat hippocampus were probed with an affinity-purified, polyclonal anti-myosin Va antibody. Myosin Va was localized in the cytoplasm of granule cells in the dentate gyrus and of pyramidal cells in Ammon's horn formation. Myosin Va expression changed during development, being higher in differentiating rather than already differentiated granule and pyramidal cells. Some of these cells presented a typical migratory profile, while others resembled neurons that were in the process of differentiation. Myosin Va was also transiently expressed in fibers present in the fimbria. Myosin Va was not detected in germinative matrices of the hippocampus proper or of the dentate gyrus. In conclusion, myosin Va expression in both granule and pyramidal cells showed both position and time dependency during hippocampal development, indicating that this motor protein is under developmental regulation.

  20. Myosin individualized: single nucleotide polymorphisms in energy transduction

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    Wieben Eric D

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myosin performs ATP free energy transduction into mechanical work in the motor domain of the myosin heavy chain (MHC. Energy transduction is the definitive systemic feature of the myosin motor performed by coordinating in a time ordered sequence: ATP hydrolysis at the active site, actin affinity modulation at the actin binding site, and the lever-arm rotation of the power stroke. These functions are carried out by several conserved sub-domains within the motor domain. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs affect the MHC sequence of many isoforms expressed in striated muscle, smooth muscle, and non-muscle tissue. The purpose of this work is to provide a rationale for using SNPs as a functional genomics tool to investigate structurefunction relationships in myosin. In particular, to discover SNP distribution over the conserved sub-domains and surmise what it implies about sub-domain stability and criticality in the energy transduction mechanism. Results An automated routine identifying human nonsynonymous SNP amino acid missense substitutions for any MHC gene mined the NCBI SNP data base. The routine tested 22 MHC genes coding muscle and non-muscle isoforms and identified 89 missense mutation positions in the motor domain with 10 already implicated in heart disease and another 8 lacking sequence homology with a skeletal MHC isoform for which a crystallographic model is available. The remaining 71 SNP substitutions were found to be distributed over MHC with 22 falling outside identified functional sub-domains and 49 in or very near to myosin sub-domains assigned specific crucial functions in energy transduction. The latter includes the active site, the actin binding site, the rigid lever-arm, and regions facilitating their communication. Most MHC isoforms contained SNPs somewhere in the motor domain. Conclusions Several functional-crucial sub-domains are infiltrated by a large number of SNP substitution sites suggesting these

  1. Heterogeneous filament network formation by myosin light chain isoforms effects on contractile energy output of single cardiomyocytes derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

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    Takeomi Mizutani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cardiomyocytes derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC-CMs are expected to play an important role in heart therapies, in which hiPSC-CMs should generate sufficient contractile force to pump blood. However, recent studies have shown that the contractility of myocardial mimics composed of hiPSC-CMs is lower than that of adult human myocardium. To examine the mechanism by which contractile force output of hiPSC-CMs is weakened, we measured the contractile force of single hiPSC-CMs and observed the fibrous distribution of myosin II regulatory light chain (MRLC of cardiac (contributes to beating and non-cardiac (does not contribute to beating isoforms. Single hiPSC-CMs were cultured on an extracellular matrix gel, and the contractile force and strain energy exerted on the gel were measured. Strain energy was not uniform between cells and ranged from 0.2 to 5.8 pJ. The combination of contractile force measurement and immunofluorescent microscopy for MRLC isoforms showed that cells with higher strain energy expressed the weakened non-cardiac myosin II fibers compared to those of cells with lower strain energy. Observation of cardiac and non-cardiac MRLC showed that the MRLC isoforms formed heterogeneous filament networks. These results suggest that strain energy output from single hiPSC-CMs depends both cardiac and non-cardiac myosin fibers, which prevent deformation of the cell body.

  2. Data set for comparison of cellular dynamics between human AAVS1 locus-modified and wild-type cells

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    Takeomi Mizutani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This data article describes cellular dynamics, such as migration speed and mobility of the cytoskeletal protein, of wild-type human fibroblast cells and cells with a modified adeno-associated virus integration site 1 (AAVS1 locus on human chromosome 19. Insertion of exogenous gene into the AAVS1 locus has been conducted in recent biological researches. Previously, our data showed that the AAVS1-modification changes cellular contractile force (Mizutani et al., 2015 [1]. To assess if this AAVS1-modification affects cell migration, we compared cellular migration speed and turnover of cytoskeletal protein in human fibroblasts and fibroblasts with a green fluorescent protein gene knocked-in at the AAVS1 locus in this data article. Cell nuclei were stained and changes in their position attributable to cell migration were analyzed. Fluorescence recovery was observed after photobleaching for the fluorescent protein-tagged myosin regulatory light chain. Data here are related to the research article “Transgene Integration into the Human AAVS1 Locus Enhances Myosin II-Dependent Contractile Force by Reducing Expression of Myosin Binding Subunit 85” [1].

  3. Data set for comparison of cellular dynamics between human AAVS1 locus-modified and wild-type cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Takeomi; Haga, Hisashi; Kawabata, Kazushige

    2016-03-01

    This data article describes cellular dynamics, such as migration speed and mobility of the cytoskeletal protein, of wild-type human fibroblast cells and cells with a modified adeno-associated virus integration site 1 (AAVS1) locus on human chromosome 19. Insertion of exogenous gene into the AAVS1 locus has been conducted in recent biological researches. Previously, our data showed that the AAVS1-modification changes cellular contractile force (Mizutani et al., 2015 [1]). To assess if this AAVS1-modification affects cell migration, we compared cellular migration speed and turnover of cytoskeletal protein in human fibroblasts and fibroblasts with a green fluorescent protein gene knocked-in at the AAVS1 locus in this data article. Cell nuclei were stained and changes in their position attributable to cell migration were analyzed. Fluorescence recovery was observed after photobleaching for the fluorescent protein-tagged myosin regulatory light chain. Data here are related to the research article "Transgene Integration into the Human AAVS1 Locus Enhances Myosin II-Dependent Contractile Force by Reducing Expression of Myosin Binding Subunit 85" [1].

  4. Phosphorylation of cardiac myosin binding protein C releases myosin heads from the surface of cardiac thick filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kensler, Robert W.; Craig, Roger; Moss, Richard L.

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMyBP-C) has a key regulatory role in cardiac contraction, but the mechanism by which changes in phosphorylation of cMyBP-C accelerate cross-bridge kinetics remains unknown. In this study, we isolated thick filaments from the hearts of mice in which the three serine residues (Ser273, Ser282, and Ser302) that are phosphorylated by protein kinase A in the m-domain of cMyBP-C were replaced by either alanine or aspartic acid, mimicking the fully nonphosphorylated and the fully phosphorylated state of cMyBP-C, respectively. We found that thick filaments from the cMyBP-C phospho-deficient hearts had highly ordered cross-bridge arrays, whereas the filaments from the cMyBP-C phospho-mimetic hearts showed a strong tendency toward disorder. Our results support the hypothesis that dephosphorylation of cMyBP-C promotes or stabilizes the relaxed/superrelaxed quasi-helical ordering of the myosin heads on the filament surface, whereas phosphorylation weakens this stabilization and binding of the heads to the backbone. Such structural changes would modulate the probability of myosin binding to actin and could help explain the acceleration of cross-bridge interactions with actin when cMyBP-C is phosphorylated because of, for example, activation of β1-adrenergic receptors in myocardium. PMID:28167762

  5. Dynamics of glucose-induced membrane recruitment of protein kinase C beta II in living pancreatic islet beta-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinton, Paolo; Tsuboi, Takashi; Ainscow, Edward K; Pozzan, Tullio; Rizzuto, Rosario; Rutter, Guy A

    2002-10-01

    The mechanisms by which glucose may affect protein kinase C (PKC) activity in the pancreatic islet beta-cell are presently unclear. By developing adenovirally expressed chimeras encoding fusion proteins between green fluorescent protein and conventional (betaII), novel (delta), or atypical (zeta) PKCs, we show that glucose selectively alters the subcellular localization of these enzymes dynamically in primary islet and MIN6 beta-cells. Examined by laser scanning confocal or total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, elevated glucose concentrations induced oscillatory translocations of PKCbetaII to spatially confined regions of the plasma membrane. Suggesting that increases in free cytosolic Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)](c)) were primarily responsible, prevention of [Ca(2+)](c) increases with EGTA or diazoxide completely eliminated membrane recruitment, whereas elevation of cytosolic [Ca(2+)](c) with KCl or tolbutamide was highly effective in redistributing PKCbetaII both to the plasma membrane and to the surface of dense core secretory vesicles. By contrast, the distribution of PKCdelta.EGFP, which binds diacylglycerol but not Ca(2+), was unaffected by glucose. Measurement of [Ca(2+)](c) immediately beneath the plasma membrane with a ratiometric "pericam," fused to synaptic vesicle-associated protein-25, revealed that depolarization induced significantly larger increases in [Ca(2+)](c) in this domain. These data demonstrate that nutrient stimulation of beta-cells causes spatially and temporally complex changes in the subcellular localization of PKCbetaII, possibly resulting from the generation of Ca(2+) microdomains. Localized changes in PKCbetaII activity may thus have a role in the spatial control of insulin exocytosis.

  6. A Myo6 mutation destroys coordination between the myosin heads, revealing new functions of myosin VI in the stereocilia of mammalian inner ear hair cells.

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    Ronna Hertzano

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Myosin VI, found in organisms from Caenorhabditis elegans to humans, is essential for auditory and vestibular function in mammals, since genetic mutations lead to hearing impairment and vestibular dysfunction in both humans and mice. Here, we show that a missense mutation in this molecular motor in an ENU-generated mouse model, Tailchaser, disrupts myosin VI function. Structural changes in the Tailchaser hair bundles include mislocalization of the kinocilia and branching of stereocilia. Transfection of GFP-labeled myosin VI into epithelial cells and delivery of endocytic vesicles to the early endosome revealed that the mutant phenotype displays disrupted motor function. The actin-activated ATPase rates measured for the D179Y mutation are decreased, and indicate loss of coordination of the myosin VI heads or 'gating' in the dimer form. Proper coordination is required for walking processively along, or anchoring to, actin filaments, and is apparently destroyed by the proximity of the mutation to the nucleotide-binding pocket. This loss of myosin VI function may not allow myosin VI to transport its cargoes appropriately at the base and within the stereocilia, or to anchor the membrane of stereocilia to actin filaments via its cargos, both of which lead to structural changes in the stereocilia of myosin VI-impaired hair cells, and ultimately leading to deafness.

  7. The speed of mitochondrial movement is regulated by the cytoskeleton and myosin in Picea wilsonii pollen tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Maozhong; Wang, Qinli; Teng, Yan; Wang, Xiaohua; Wang, Feng; Chen, Tong; Samaj, Jozef; Lin, Jinxing; Logan, David C

    2010-03-01

    Strategic control of mitochondrial movements and cellular distribution is essential for correct cell function and survival. However, despite being a vital process, mitochondrial movement in plant cells is a poorly documented phenomenon. To investigate the roles of actin filaments and microtubules on mitochondrial movements, Picea wilsonii pollen tubes were treated with two microtubule-disrupting drugs, two actin-disrupting drugs and a myosin inhibitor. Following these treatments, mitochondrial movements were characterized by multiangle evanescent wave microscopy and laser-scanning confocal microscopy. The results showed that individual mitochondria underwent three classes of linear movement: high-speed movement (instantaneous velocities >5.0 microm/s), low-speed movement (instantaneous velocities variable-speed movement (instantaneous velocities ranging from 0.16 to 10.35 microm/s). 10 nM latrunculin B induced fragmentation of actin filaments and completely inhibited mitochondrial vectorial movement. Jasplakinolide treatment induced a 28% reduction in chondriome motility, and dramatically inhibition of high-speed and variable-speed movements. Treatment with 2,3-butanedione 2-monoxime caused a 61% reduction of chondriome motility, and the complete inhibition of high-speed and low-speed movements. In contrast to actin-disrupting drugs, microtubule-disrupting drugs caused mild effects on mitochondrial movement. Taxol increased the speed of mitochondrial movement in cortical cytoplasm. Oryzalin induced curved mitochondrial trajectories with similar velocities as in the control pollen tubes. These results suggest that mitochondrial movement at low speeds in pollen tubes is driven by myosin, while high-speed and variable-speed movements are powered both by actin filament dynamics and myosin. In addition, microtubule dynamics has profound effects on mitochondrial velocity, trajectory and positioning via its role in directing the arrangement of actin filaments.

  8. A role for phosphorylated Pol II CTD in modulating transcription coupled histone dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spain, Marla M; Govind, Chhabi K

    2011-03-01

    Histone acetylation modulates histone occupancy both at promoters and in coding sequences. Based on our recent observation that HDACs in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are co-transcriptionally recruited to coding regions by elongating polymerases, we propose a model in which Pol II facilitates recruitment of chromatin remodeling complexes as well as other factors required for productive elongation.

  9. Photosystem II functionality in barley responds dynamically to changes in leaf manganese status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund; Powikrowska, Marta; Krogholm, Ken Suszkiewicz

    2016-01-01

    A catalytic manganese (Mn) cluster is required for the oxidation of water in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) in plants. Despite this essential role of Mn in generating the electrons driving photosynthesis, limited information is available on how Mn deficiency affects PSII...

  10. Comparative study of normal and branched alkane monolayer films adsorbed on a solid surface. II. Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enevoldsen, A. D.; Hansen, F. Y.; Diama, A.; Taub, H.; Dimeo, R. M.; Neumann, D. A.; Copley, J. R. D.

    2007-03-01

    The dynamics of monolayer films of the n-alkane tetracosane (n-C24H52) and the branched alkane squalane (C30H62) adsorbed on graphite have been studied by quasielastic and inelastic neutron scattering and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Both molecules have 24 carbon atoms along their carbon backbone, and squalane has an additional six methyl side groups symmetrically placed along its length. The authors' principal objective has been to determine the influence of the side groups on the dynamics of the squalane monolayer and thereby assess its potential as a nanoscale lubricant. To investigate the dynamics of these monolayers they used both the disk chopper spectrometer (DCS) and the high flux backscattering spectrometer (HFBS) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. These instruments made it possible to study dynamical processes such as molecular diffusive motions and vibrations on very different time scales: 1-40ps (DCS) and 0.1-4ns (HFBS). The MD simulations were done on corresponding time scales and were used to interpret the neutron spectra. The authors found that the dynamics of the two monolayers are qualitatively similar on the respective time scales and that there are only small quantitative differences that can be understood in terms of the different masses and moments of inertia of the two molecules. In the course of this study, the authors developed a procedure to separate out the low-frequency vibrational modes in the spectra, thereby facilitating an analysis of the quasielastic scattering. They conclude that there are no major differences in the monolayer dynamics caused by intramolecular branching. It remains to be seen whether this similarity in monolayer dynamics also holds for the lubricating properties of these molecules in confined geometries.

  11. Vortex dynamics equation in type-II superconductors in a temperature gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega Monroy, R.; Sarmiento Castillo, J. [Universidad del Atlantico, Barranquilla (Colombia). Facultad de Ciencias Basicas; Puerta Torres, D. [Universidad de Cartagena (Colombia). Facultad de Ciencias Exactas

    2010-12-15

    In this work we determined a vortex dynamics equation in a temperature gradient in the frame of the time dependent Ginzburg-Landau equation. In this sense, we derived a local solvability condition, which governs the vortex dynamics. Also, we calculated the explicit form for the force coefficients, which are the keys for the understanding of the balance equation due to vortex interactions with the environment. (author)

  12. Analysis on Supporting Stability for Track Subgrade Dynamic Response In-situ Test Device Based on NSGA-II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feilong Zheng

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic response test to the subgrade plays a very important role in railway construction and a new in-situ test system is proposed. This paper presents the application of non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm-II (NSGA-II to analyze the stability of the supporting equipment for track subgrade dynamic response in-situ test device. Its stability is related with the extension length of the hydraulic cylinders and the backward condition of the supporting equipment - the hydraulic excavator. The problem is formulated as a multi-objective optimization problem with the objective of maximizing  the supporting force for the test device. An 85 tons excavator is picked as the case to study. The first optimal results show the excavator may not support the test system successfully. After redesigning the boom and adding its weight and length as new parameters, the second optimize results indicate the test device can work normally.

  13. Insight into the interactive residues between two domains of human somatic Angiotensin-converting enzyme and Angiotensin II by MM-PBSA calculation and steered molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Shan-shan; Han, Wei-wei; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Song; Shan, Ya-ming

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), a membrane-bound zinc metallopeptidase, catalyzes the formation of Angiotensin-II (AngII) and the deactivation of bradykinin in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and kallikrein-kinin systems. As a hydrolysis product of ACE, AngII is regarded as an inhibitor and displays stronger competitive inhibition in the C-domain than the N-domain of ACE. However, the AngII binding differences between the two domains and the mechanisms behind AngII dissociation from the C-domain are rarely explored. In this work, molecular docking, Molecular Mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area calculation, and steered molecular dynamics (SMD) are applied to explore the structures and interactions in the binding or unbinding of AngII with the two domains of human somatic ACE. Calculated free energy values suggest that the C-domain-AngII complex is more stable than the N-domain-AngII complex, consistent with available experimental data. SMD simulation results imply that electrostatic interaction is dominant in the dissociation of AngII from the C-domain. Moreover, Gln106, Asp121, Glu123, and Tyr213 may be the key residues in the unbinding pathway of AngII. The simulation results in our work provide insights into the interactions between the two domains of ACE and its natural peptide inhibitor AngII at a molecular level. Moreover, the results provide theoretical clues for the design of new inhibitors.

  14. Direct Measurements of Local Coupling between Myosin Molecules Are Consistent with a Model of Muscle Activation.

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    Sam Walcott

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Muscle contracts due to ATP-dependent interactions of myosin motors with thin filaments composed of the proteins actin, troponin, and tropomyosin. Contraction is initiated when calcium binds to troponin, which changes conformation and displaces tropomyosin, a filamentous protein that wraps around the actin filament, thereby exposing myosin binding sites on actin. Myosin motors interact with each other indirectly via tropomyosin, since myosin binding to actin locally displaces tropomyosin and thereby facilitates binding of nearby myosin. Defining and modeling this local coupling between myosin motors is an open problem in muscle modeling and, more broadly, a requirement to understanding the connection between muscle contraction at the molecular and macro scale. It is challenging to directly observe this coupling, and such measurements have only recently been made. Analysis of these data suggests that two myosin heads are required to activate the thin filament. This result contrasts with a theoretical model, which reproduces several indirect measurements of coupling between myosin, that assumes a single myosin head can activate the thin filament. To understand this apparent discrepancy, we incorporated the model into stochastic simulations of the experiments, which generated simulated data that were then analyzed identically to the experimental measurements. By varying a single parameter, good agreement between simulation and experiment was established. The conclusion that two myosin molecules are required to activate the thin filament arises from an assumption, made during data analysis, that the intensity of the fluorescent tags attached to myosin varies depending on experimental condition. We provide an alternative explanation that reconciles theory and experiment without assuming that the intensity of the fluorescent tags varies.

  15. Myosin Va is developmentally regulated and expressed in the human cerebellum from birth to old age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.C.R. Souza

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Myosin Va functions as a processive, actin-based motor molecule highly enriched in the nervous system, which transports and/or tethers organelles, vesicles, and mRNA and protein translation machinery. Mutation of myosin Va leads to Griscelli disease that is associated with severe neurological deficits and a short life span. Despite playing a critical role in development, the expression of myosin Va in the central nervous system throughout the human life span has not been reported. To address this issue, the cerebellar expression of myosin Va from newborns to elderly humans was studied by immunohistochemistry using an affinity-purified anti-myosin Va antibody. Myosin Va was expressed at all ages from the 10th postnatal day to the 98th year of life, in molecular, Purkinje and granular cerebellar layers. Cerebellar myosin Va expression did not differ essentially in localization or intensity from childhood to old age, except during the postnatal developmental period. Structures resembling granules and climbing fibers in Purkinje cells were deeply stained. In dentate neurons, long processes were deeply stained by anti-myosin Va, as were punctate nuclear structures. During the first postnatal year, myosin Va was differentially expressed in the external granular layer (EGL. In the EGL, proliferating prospective granule cells were not stained by anti-myosin Va antibody. In contrast, premigratory granule cells in the EGL stained moderately. Granule cells exhibiting a migratory profile in the molecular layer were also moderately stained. In conclusion, neuronal myosin Va is developmentally regulated, and appears to be required for cerebellar function from early postnatal life to senescence.

  16. Analysis of Organelle Targeting by DIL Domains of the Arabidopsis Myosin XI Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattarzadeh, Amirali; Schmelzer, Elmon; Hanson, Maureen R.

    2011-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes 13 myosin XI motor proteins. Previous insertional mutant analysis has implicated substantial redundancy of function of plant myosin XIs in transport of intracellular organelles. Considerable information is available about the interaction of cargo with the myosin XI-homologous yeast myosin V protein myo2p. We identified a region in each of 12 myosin XI sequences that correspond to the yeast myo2p secretory-vesicle binding domain (the “DIL” domain). Structural modeling of the myosin DIL domain region of plant myosin XIs revealed significant similarity to the yeast myo2p and myo4p DIL domains. Transient expression of YFP fusions with the Arabidopsis myosin XI DIL domain resulted in fluorescent labeling of a variety of organelles, including the endoplasmic reticulum, peroxisomes, Golgi, and nuclear envelope. With the exception of the YFP::MYA1 DIL fusion, expression of the DIL–YFP fusions resulted in loss of motility of labeled organelles, consistent with a dominant-negative effect. Certain fusions resulted in localization to the cytoplasm, plasma membrane, or to unidentified vesicles. The same YFP-domain fusion sometimes labeled more than one organelle. Expression of a YFP fusion to a yeast myo2p DIL domain resulted in labeling of plant peroxisomes. Fusions with some of the myosin XI domains resulted in labeling of known cargoes of the particular myosin XI; however, certain myosin XI YFP fusions labeled organelles that had not previously been found to be detectably affected by mutations nor by expression of dominant-negative constructs. PMID:22645548

  17. Communication: Librational dynamics in water, sI and sII clathrate hydrates, and ice Ih: Molecular-dynamics insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Christian J; English, Niall J

    2016-02-01

    Equilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations have been performed for liquid water, and on metastable sI and sII polymorphs of empty hydrate lattices, in addition to ice Ih, in order to study the dynamical properties of librational motion (rotation oscillation) depicted by protons in water molecules. In particular, hydrate lattices were found to display prominent "bifurcated" features, or peaks, at circa 70 and 80-95 meV (or ∼560 and 640-760 cm(-1), respectively), also displayed by ice, in essentially quantitative agreement with experimental neutron-scattering data. However, observed differences in dispersion between these librational modes between these two structures (both hydrate polymorphs vis-à-vis ice), owing primarily to density effects, have been decomposed into contributions arising from angular-velocity dynamics about axes in the local molecular frame of water molecules, with in-plane "wagging" and "twisting" rationalising one mode at ∼70 meV, and out-of-plane motion for the higher-frequency band. This was confirmed explicitly by a type of de facto normal-mode analysis, in which only immediate layers of water molecules about the one under consideration were allowed to move. In contrast, liquid water displayed no marked preference for such local in- or out-of-plane modes characterising librational motion, owing to the marked absence of rigid, pentamers or hexamers therein.

  18. Communication: Librational dynamics in water, sI and sII clathrate hydrates, and ice Ih: Molecular-dynamics insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Christian J.; English, Niall J.

    2016-02-01

    Equilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations have been performed for liquid water, and on metastable sI and sII polymorphs of empty hydrate lattices, in addition to ice Ih, in order to study the dynamical properties of librational motion (rotation oscillation) depicted by protons in water molecules. In particular, hydrate lattices were found to display prominent "bifurcated" features, or peaks, at circa 70 and 80-95 meV (or ˜560 and 640-760 cm-1, respectively), also displayed by ice, in essentially quantitative agreement with experimental neutron-scattering data. However, observed differences in dispersion between these librational modes between these two structures (both hydrate polymorphs vis-à-vis ice), owing primarily to density effects, have been decomposed into contributions arising from angular-velocity dynamics about axes in the local molecular frame of water molecules, with in-plane "wagging" and "twisting" rationalising one mode at ˜70 meV, and out-of-plane motion for the higher-frequency band. This was confirmed explicitly by a type of de facto normal-mode analysis, in which only immediate layers of water molecules about the one under consideration were allowed to move. In contrast, liquid water displayed no marked preference for such local in- or out-of-plane modes characterising librational motion, owing to the marked absence of rigid, pentamers or hexamers therein.

  19. Biochemical and molecular dynamic simulation analysis of a weak coiled coil association between kinesin-II stalks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harinath Doodhi

    Full Text Available DEFINITION: Kinesin-2 refers to the family of motor proteins represented by conserved, heterotrimeric kinesin-II and homodimeric Osm3/Kif17 class of motors. BACKGROUND: Kinesin-II, a microtubule-based anterograde motor, is composed of three different conserved subunits, named KLP64D, KLP68D and DmKAP in Drosophila. Although previous reports indicated that coiled coil interaction between the middle segments of two dissimilar motor subunits established the heterodimer, the molecular basis of the association is still unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we present a detailed heterodimeric association model of the KLP64D/68D stalk supported by extensive experimental analysis and molecular dynamic simulations. We find that KLP64D stalk is unstable, but forms a weak coiled coil heteroduplex with the KLP68D stalk when coexpressed in bacteria. Local instabilities, relative affinities between the C-terminal stalk segments, and dynamic long-range interactions along the stalks specify the heterodimerization. Thermal unfolding studies and independent simulations further suggest that interactions between the C-terminal stalk fragments are comparatively stable, whereas the N-terminal stalk reversibly unfolds at ambient temperature. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Results obtained in this study suggest that coiled coil interaction between the C-terminal stalks of kinesin-II motor subunits is held together through a few hydrophobic and charged interactions. The N-terminal stalk segments are flexible and could uncoil reversibly during a motor walk. This supports the requirement for a flexible coiled coil association between the motor subunits, and its role in motor function needs to be elucidated.

  20. Altered Expression of Human Smooth Muscle Myosin Phosphatase Targeting (MYPT) Isovariants with Pregnancy and Labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lartey, Jon; Taggart, Julie; Robson, Stephen; Taggart, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Myosin light-chain phosphatase is a trimeric protein that hydrolyses phosphorylated myosin II light chains (MYLII) to cause relaxation in smooth muscle cells including those of the uterus. A major component of the phosphatase is the myosin targeting subunit (MYPT), which directs a catalytic subunit to dephosphorylate MYLII. There are 5 main MYPT family members (MYPT1 (PPP1R12A), MYPT2 (PPP1R12B), MYPT3 (PPP1R16A), myosin binding subunit 85 MBS85 (PPP1R12C) and TIMAP (TGF-beta-inhibited membrane-associated protein (PPP1R16B)). Nitric oxide (NO)-mediated smooth muscle relaxation has in part been attributed to activation of the phosphatase by PKG binding to a leucine zipper (LZ) dimerization domain located at the carboxyl-terminus of PPP1R12A. In animal studies, alternative splicing of PPP1R12A can lead to the inclusion of a 31-nucleotide exonic segment that generates a LZ negative (LZ-) isovariant rendering the phosphatase less sensitive to NO vasodilators and alterations in PPP1R12ALZ- and LZ+ expression have been linked to phenotypic changes in smooth muscle function. Moreover, PPP1R12B and PPP1R12C, but not PPP1R16A or PPP1R16B, have the potential for LZ+/LZ- alternative splicing. Yet, by comparison to animal studies, the information on human MYPT genomic sequences/mRNA expressions is scant. As uterine smooth muscle undergoes substantial remodeling during pregnancy we were interested in establishing the patterns of expression of human MYPT isovariants during this process and also following labor onset as this could have important implications for determining successful pregnancy outcome. We used cross-species genome alignment, to infer putative human sequences not available in the public domain, and isovariant-specific quantitative PCR, to analyse the expression of mRNA encoding putative LZ+ and LZ- forms of PPP1R12A, PPP1R12B and PPP1R12C as well as canonical PPP1R16A and PPP1R16B genes in human uterine smooth muscle from non-pregnant, pregnant and in

  1. Dynamical systems game theory II. A new approach to the problem of the social dilemma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Eizo; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2002-07-01

    The “social dilemma” is a problem inherent in forming and maintaining cooperation among selfish individuals, and is of fundamental importance in the biological and social sciences. From the viewpoint of traditional game theory, the existence of the social dilemma necessarily implies degeneration into selfish behavior as the numbers of members in a community increases, unless there exists some external power. In the real world, however, cooperation is often formed and maintained merely through mutual interactions, without the influence of an external power. To answer questions concerning appearance and maintenance of cooperative behavior in societies, we study what we call the “Lumberjacks’ Dilemma (LD) game”, as an application of the dynamical systems (DS) game theory presented in [Physica D 147 (2000) 221], which can naturally deal with the dynamic aspects of games. Dynamical processes that lead to the formation and maintenance of cooperation, which is often observed in the real communities, are realized in our model. The mechanism underlying this formation and maintenance is explained from the DS game point of view, by analyzing the functional dependence of the attractor of the game dynamics on a parameter characterizing the strategy. It is demonstrated that norms for cooperation are formed as strategies that are manifested as specific attractors of game dynamics. The change in the stability of this cooperative behavior as the number of members increases is also discussed. Finally, the relevance of our study to cooperation seen in the real world is discussed.

  2. Dynamic architecture of a minimal RNA polymerase II open promoter complex

    OpenAIRE

    Treutlein, B.; Muschielok, A.; Andrecka, J.; Jawhari, A.; Buchen, C.; Kostrewa, D.; Hög, F.; Cramer, P.; Michaelis, J.

    2012-01-01

    The open promoter complex (OC) is a central intermediate during transcription initiation that contains a DNA bubble. Here, we employ singlemolecule Fo¨ rster resonance energy transfer experiments and Nano-Positioning System analysis to determine the three-dimensional architecture of a minimal OC consisting of promoter DNA, including a TATA box and an 11-nucleotide mismatched region around the transcription start site, TATA box-binding protein (TBP), RNA polymerase (Pol) II, and general transc...

  3. Studies on femtosecond fluorescence dynamics of photosystem II Particle complex at low temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Liu Xiao; He, Jun Fang; Cai, Xia; Peng Jun Fang; Kuang Ting Yun

    2004-01-01

    In order to understanding the diversity of energy transfer in PS II at different temperatures, PS II particle complex purified from spinach was investigated with femtosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy in the case of excitation 507 nm at 83 K, 160 K, 273 K. The data were analyzed by Gauss analysis and fluorescence decay time- fitting. Some results were achieved. (1) Increase of the temperature results in a broadening of the fluorescence emission spectra due to the temperature-dependent expressions for nonradiative transitions between two electronic states. (2) There are at least several characteristic Chl molecules exist in PS II particle complex, i.e. Chl b/sub 639//sup 640/, Chl b/sub 640//sup 645/, Chl a/sub 660//sup 663/, Chl a/sub 667//sup 668/, Chl a/sub 673//sup 676/, Chl a/sub 680 //sup 681/, Chl a/sub 680/681//sup 682/, Chl a/sub 684,685//sup 668 /689/, Chl a/sub 688//sup 698/, (Chl a/b/sub a//sup e/: a represents the peak of absorption, e represents the peak of emission). (3) Though the ...

  4. Chronic sleep deprivation alters the myosin heavy chain isoforms in the masseter muscle in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ruihua; Huang, Fei; Wang, Peihuan; Chen, Chen; Zhu, Guoxiong; Chen, Lei; Wu, Gaoyi

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the changes in myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms of rat masseter muscle fibres caused by chronic sleep deprivation and a possible link with the pathogenesis of disorders of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A total of 180 male rats were randomly divided into three groups (n=60 in each): cage controls, large platform controls, and chronic sleep deprivation group. Each group was further divided into three subgroups with different observation periods (7, 14, and 21 days). We investigated he expression of MyHC isoforms in masseter muscle fibres by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Western blotting, and immunohistochemical staining. In rats with chronic sleep deprivation there was increased MyHC-I expression in layers of both shallow and deep muscles at 7 and 21 days compared with the control groups, whereas sleep deprivation was associated with significantly decreased MyHC-II expression. At 21 days, there were no differences in MyHC-I or MyHC-II expression between the groups and there were no differences between the two control groups at any time point. These findings suggest that chronic sleep deprivation alters the expression of MyHC isoforms, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of disorders of the TMJ.

  5. Line Emission from Radiation-Pressurized HII Region II: Dynamics and Population Synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Verdolini, Silvia; Krumholz, Mark R; Matzner, Christopher D; Tielens, Alexander G G M

    2013-01-01

    Optical and infrared emission lines from HII regions are an important diagnostic used to study galaxies, but interpretation of these lines requires significant modeling of both the internal structure and dynamical evolution of the emitting regions. Most of the models in common use today assume that HII region dynamics are dominated by the expansion of stellar wind bubbles, and have neglected the contribution of radiation pressure to the dynamics, and in some cases also to the internal structure. However, recent observations of nearby galaxies suggest that neither assumption is justified, motivating us to revisit the question of how HII region line emission depends on the physics of winds and radiation pressure. In a companion paper we construct models of single HII regions including and excluding radiation pressure and winds, and in this paper we describe a population synthesis code that uses these models to simulate galactic collections of HII regions with varying physical parameters. We show that the choice...

  6. Origin and Dynamical Evolution of Neptune Trojans - II: Long Term Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Lykawka, Patryk Sofia; Jones, Barrie W; Mukai, Tadashi

    2010-01-01

    We present results examining the fate of the Trojan clouds produced in our previous work. We find that the stability of Neptunian Trojans seems to be strongly correlated to their initial post-migration orbital elements, with those objects that survive as Trojans for billions of years displaying negligible orbital evolution. The great majority of these survivors began the integrations with small eccentricities (e 20{\\deg}. Dynamical integrations of the currently observed Trojans show that five out of the seven are dynamically stable on 4 Gyr timescales, while 2001 QR322, exhibits significant dynamical instability. The seventh Trojan object, 2008 LC18, has such large orbital uncertainties that only future studies will be able to determine its stability.

  7. Dynamic flexibility in the structure and function of photosystem II in higher plant thylakoid membranes: the grana enigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jan M; Chow, Wah Soon; De Las Rivas, Javier

    2008-01-01

    Grana are not essential for photosynthesis, yet they are ubiquitous in higher plants and in the recently evolved Charaphyta algae; hence grana role and its need is still an intriguing enigma. This article discusses how the grana provide integrated and multifaceted functional advantages, by facilitating mechanisms that fine-tune the dynamics of the photosynthetic apparatus, with particular implications for photosystem II (PSII). This dynamic flexibility of photosynthetic membranes is advantageous in plants responding to ever-changing environmental conditions, from darkness or limiting light to saturating light and sustained or intermittent high light. The thylakoid dynamics are brought about by structural and organizational changes at the level of the overall height and number of granal stacks per chloroplast, molecular dynamics within the membrane itself, the partition gap between appressed membranes within stacks, the aqueous lumen encased by the continuous thylakoid membrane network, and even the stroma bathing the thylakoids. The structural and organizational changes of grana stacks in turn are driven by physicochemical forces, including entropy, at work in the chloroplast. In response to light, attractive van der Waals interactions and screening of electrostatic repulsion between appressed grana thylakoids across the partition gap and most probably direct protein interactions across the granal lumen (PSII extrinsic proteins OEEp-OEEp, particularly PsbQ-PsbQ) contribute to the integrity of grana stacks. We propose that both the light-induced contraction of the partition gap and the granal lumen elicit maximisation of entropy in the chloroplast stroma, thereby enhancing carbon fixation and chloroplast protein synthesizing capacity. This spatiotemporal dynamic flexibility in the structure and function of active and inactive PSIIs within grana stacks in higher plant chloroplasts is vital for the optimization of photosynthesis under a wide range of environmental and

  8. [Clinical relevance of myosin isoforms in the diaphragm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayan-Ramirez, G; Decramer, M

    2000-06-01

    The diaphragm as a striated muscle is characterized by the repetition of a single element arranged in series: the sarcomere containing two kinds of myofilaments: a thick one constituted by the myosin, and a thin one primarily composed of actin. The myosin molecule consists of two heads where two myosin heavy chains (MHC) are fixed, a flexible hinge with two light (MLC) chains, and long rod-shaped tails. The diaphragm contains 4 MHC isoforms (MHC-slow, MHC-2A, MHC-2B, MHC-2X) and 6 MLC isoforms (MLC-1f, MLC-3f, MLC-1sa, MLC-1sb, MLC-2f, MLC-2s/v). In humans, the diaphragm contains mainly fibers expressing the isoforms MHC-slow, MHC-2A, and MLC-2f, MLC-2s et MLC-1f. For the mechanical properties of the different isoforms, there is a gradient from the MHC-slow to the MHC-2A, MHC-2B and MHC-2X/2B. According to the circumstances, the diaphragm will adapt towards a slow profile (COPD, cardiac failure and in animals: Duchenne muscular dystrophy, denervation-1 week, age-female, corticosteroids, chronic stimulation), or a fast profile (in animals: chronic hypoxia, denervation-2 weeks, age-males) or a more oxidative profile (in animals: cachexia, obesity). The reasons why the diaphragm adapts towards a slower or a faster muscle are not known. In fact, for a given pathological situation, several factors are able to influence the fiber composition of the diaphragm. Therefore, the net result of the influence of these different factors in terms of MHC and MLC diaphragm adaptation is difficult to predict.

  9. A role for myosin VI in the localization of axonal proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommy L Lewis

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In neurons polarized trafficking of vesicle-bound membrane proteins gives rise to the distinct molecular composition and functional properties of axons and dendrites. Despite their central role in shaping neuronal form and function, surprisingly little is known about the molecular processes that mediate polarized targeting of neuronal proteins. Recently, the plus-end-directed motor Myosin Va was shown to play a critical role in targeting of transmembrane proteins to dendrites; however, the role of myosin motors in axonal targeting is unknown. Here we show that Myosin VI, a minus-end-directed motor, plays a vital role in the enrichment of proteins on the surface of axons. Engineering non-neuronal proteins to interact with Myosin VI causes them to become highly concentrated at the axonal surface in dissociated rat cortical neurons. Furthermore, disruption of either Myosin VI function or expression leads to aberrant dendritic localization of axonal proteins. Myosin VI mediates the enrichment of proteins on the axonal surface at least in part by stimulating dendrite-specific endocytosis, a mechanism that has been shown to underlie the localization of many axonal proteins. In addition, a version of Channelrhodopsin 2 that was engineered to bind to Myosin VI is concentrated at the surface of the axon of cortical neurons in mice in vivo, suggesting that it could be a useful tool for probing circuit structure and function. Together, our results indicate that myosins help shape the polarized distributions of both axonal and dendritic proteins.

  10. Myosin Ⅷ Regulates Protonemal Patterning and Developmental Timing in the Moss Physcomitrella patens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Zon Wua; Julie A. Ritchie; Ai-Hong Pan; Ralph S. Quatrano; Magdalena Bezanilla

    2011-01-01

    Plants have two classes of myosins.While recent work has focused on class Ⅺ myosins showing that myosin Ⅺ is responsible for organelle motility and cytoplasmic streaming,much less is known about the role of myosin Ⅷ in plant growth and development.We have used a combination of RNAi and insertional knockouts to probe myosin Ⅷ function in the moss Physcomitrella patens.We isolated △myo8ABCDE plants demonstrating that myosin Ⅷ is not required for plant viability.However,myosin Ⅷ mutants are smaller than wild-type plants in part due to a defect in cell size.Additionally,△myo8ABCDE plants produce more side branches and form gametophores much earlier than wild-type plants.In the absence of nutrient media,△myo8ABCDE plants exhibit significant protonemal patterning defects,including highly curved protonemal filaments,morphologically defective side branches,as well as an increase in the number of branches.Exogenous auxin partially rescues protonemal defects in △myo8ABCDE plants grown in the absence of nutrients.This result,together with defects in protonemal branching,smaller caulonemal cells,and accelerated development in the △myo8ABCDE plants,suggests that myosin Ⅷ is involved in hormone homeostasis in P patens.

  11. My oh my(osin): Insights into how auditory hair cells count, measure, and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Lana M; Chou, Shih-Wei; McDermott, Brian M

    2016-01-18

    The mechanisms underlying mechanosensory hair bundle formation in auditory sensory cells are largely mysterious. In this issue, Lelli et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201509017) reveal that a pair of molecular motors, myosin IIIa and myosin IIIb, is involved in the hair bundle's morphology and hearing.

  12. Activated dynamics in dense fluids of attractive nonspherical particles. II. Elasticity, barriers, relaxation, fragility, and self-diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Mukta; Schweizer, Kenneth S

    2011-04-01

    In paper II of this series we apply the center-of-mass version of Nonlinear Langevin Equation theory to study how short-range attractive interactions influence the elastic shear modulus, transient localization length, activated dynamics, and kinetic arrest of a variety of nonspherical particle dense fluids (and the spherical analog) as a function of volume fraction and attraction strength. The activation barrier (roughly the natural logarithm of the dimensionless relaxation time) is predicted to be a rich function of particle shape, volume fraction, and attraction strength, and the dynamic fragility varies significantly with particle shape. At fixed volume fraction, the barrier grows in a parabolic manner with inverse temperature nondimensionalized by an onset value, analogous to what has been established for thermal glass-forming liquids. Kinetic arrest boundaries lie at significantly higher volume fractions and attraction strengths relative to their dynamic crossover analogs, but their particle shape dependence remains the same. A limited universality of barrier heights is found based on the concept of an effective mean-square confining force. The mean hopping time and self-diffusion constant in the attractive glass region of the nonequilibrium phase diagram is predicted to vary nonmonotonically with attraction strength or inverse temperature, qualitatively consistent with recent computer simulations and colloid experiments.

  13. A cycling state that can lead to glassy dynamics in intracellular transport

    CERN Document Server

    Scholz, Monika; Weirich, Kimberly L; Scholz, Bjorn J; Tabei, S M Ali; Gardel, Margaret L; Dinner, Aaron R

    2016-01-01

    Power-law dwell times have been observed for molecular motors in living cells, but the origins of these trapped states are not known. We introduce a minimal model of motors moving on a two-dimensional network of filaments, and simulations of its dynamics exhibit statistics comparable to those observed experimentally. Analysis of the model trajectories, as well as experimental particle tracking data, reveals a state in which motors cycle unproductively at junctions of three or more filaments. We formulate a master equation for these junction dynamics and show that the time required to escape from this vortex-like state can account for the power-law dwell times. We identify trends in the dynamics with the motor valency for further experimental validation. We demonstrate that these trends exist in individual trajectories of myosin II on an actin network. We discuss how cells could regulate intracellular transport and, in turn, biological function, by controlling their cytoskeletal network structures locally.

  14. Small-scale topology of solar atmosphere dynamics : II : granulation, K2v grains and waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekzema, N.M.; Rutten, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    We continue studying the small-scale topology of dynamical phenomena in the quiet-sun internetwork atmosphere throug statistical estimation of the co-location probability of different fine-structure elements and wave modes.In this paper we chart spatial alignments between the granular brig tness st

  15. Light detection and ranging measurements of wake dynamics. Part II: two-dimensional scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trujillo, Juan-José; Bingöl, Ferhat; Larsen, Gunner Chr.;

    2011-01-01

    A nacelle-mounted lidar system pointing downstream has been used to measure wind turbine wake dynamics. The new measurement and data analysis techniques allow estimation of quasi-instantaneous wind fields in planes perpendicular to the rotor axis. A newly developed wake tracking procedure delivers...

  16. Critical Analysis of Underground Coal Gasification Models. Part II: Kinetic and Computational Fluid Dynamics Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Żogała

    2014-01-01

    Originality/value: This paper presents state of art in the field of coal gasification modeling using kinetic and computational fluid dynamics approach. The paper also presents own comparative analysis (concerned with mathematical formulation, input data and parameters, basic assumptions, obtained results etc. of the most important models of underground coal gasification.

  17. Small-scale topology of solar atmosphere dynamics : II : granulation, K2v grains and waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekzema, N.M.; Rutten, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    We continue studying the small-scale topology of dynamical phenomena in the quiet-sun internetwork atmosphere throug statistical estimation of the co-location probability of different fine-structure elements and wave modes.In this paper we chart spatial alignments between the granular brig tness st

  18. Luminescence dynamics in type-II GaAs/AlAs superlattices near the type-I to type-II crossover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langbein, Wolfgang Werner; Kalt, H.; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1996-01-01

    We report on a study of the time-resolved luminescence of type-II GaAs/AlAs superlattices near the type-I to type-II crossover. In spite of the slight type-II band alignment, the luminescence is dominated by the type-I transition. This is due to the inhomogeneous broadening of the type-I transiti...

  19. Modeling Hand-Over-Hand and Inchworm Steps in Myosin VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Amanda; Lowe, Ian; Tehver, Riina

    Myosin VI is a molecular motor protein that moves along actin filaments to transport cargo within a cell. There is much experimental evidence that the myosin VI dimer moves ``hand-over-hand'' along actin; however, recent experiments suggest that the protein can also move via an ``inchworm'' mechanism. We created a mechanochemical kinetic model to predict myosin VI's behavior under different ATP, ADP, and force conditions, taking these alternative mechanisms into account. Our model's calculations agree well with experimental results and can also be used to predict myosin VI's behavior outside experimentally tested regimes, such as under forward force. We also predict an optimized motor function for the protein around physiological (-2 pN) load and anchoring under -3 pN load. By using our model to predict myosin VI's response to environmental change, we can gain insight into the behavior of a protein that can be difficult to observe experimentally.

  20. Peroxynitrite-mediated oxidative modifications of myosin and implications on structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiago, Teresa; Palma, Pedro S; Gutierrez-Merino, Carlos; Aureliano, Manuel

    2010-11-01

    Abstract The peroxynitrite-induced functional impairment of myosin was studied in different reaction conditions, known to alter the oxidative chemistry of peroxynitrite, to better understand the molecular mechanisms of this interaction. It is shown that peroxynitrite is able to enhance the basal MgATPase activity up to 2-fold while inhibiting the actin-stimulated ATPase activity of myosin and that the extent of these functional alterations is dependent on the reaction medium. The observed changes in the stimulation of the MgATPase activity correlate with the extent of carbonyl formation in myosin. The enzyme inhibition is more potent in conditions where the efficiency of tyrosine nitration and peroxynitrite reactivity towards sulphydryls are lower. Together with the observation that reversion of sulphydryl oxidation did not lead to the recovery of myosin functional and structural impairments, these results point out to the importance of protein carbonylation as a post-translational modification in the peroxynitrite-induced myosin functional impairment.

  1. Expression of muscle-specific myosin heavy chain and myosin light chain 1 in the electric tissue of Electrophorus electricus (L.) in comparison with other vertebrate species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres Sá, L; Menezes, M A; dos Santos Mermelstein, C

    2001-08-01

    Myosin light and heavy chains from skeletal and cardiac muscles and from the electric organ of Electrophorus electricus (L.) were characterised using biochemical and immunological methods, and compared with myosin extracted from avian, reptilian, and mammalian skeletal and cardiac muscles. The results indicate that the electric tissue has a myosin light chain 1 (LC1) and a muscle-specific myosin heavy chain. We also show that monoclonal antibody F109-12A8 (against LC1 and LC2) recognizes LC1 of myosin from human skeletal and cardiac muscles as well as those of rabbit, lizard, chick, and electric eel. However, only cardiac muscles from humans and rabbits have LC2, which is recognized by antibody F109-16F4. The data presented confirm the muscle origin of the electric tissue of E. electricus. This electric tissue has a profile of LC1 protein expression that resembles the myosin from cardiac muscle of the eel more than that from eel skeletal muscle. This work raises an interesting question about the ontogenesis and differentiation of the electric tissue of E. electricus. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Antiperiodic dynamical 6-vertex model by separation of variables II: Functional equations and form factors

    CERN Document Server

    Levy-Bencheton, D; Terras, V

    2015-01-01

    We pursue our study of the antiperiodic dynamical 6-vertex model using Sklyanin's separation of variables approach, allowing in the model new possible global shifts of the dynamical parameter. We show in particular that the spectrum and eigenstates of the antiperiodic transfer matrix are completely characterized by a system of discrete equations. We prove the existence of different reformulations of this characterization in terms of functional equations of Baxter's type. We notably consider the homogeneous functional $T$-$Q$ equation which is the continuous analog of the aforementioned discrete system and show, in the case of a model with an even number of sites, that the complete spectrum and eigenstates of the antiperiodic transfer matrix can equivalently be described in terms of a particular class of its $Q$-solutions, hence leading to a complete system of Bethe equations. Finally, we compute the form factors of local operators for which we obtain determinant representations in finite volume.

  3. A new perspective on the irregular satellites of Saturn - II Dynamical and physical origin

    CERN Document Server

    Turrini, D; Tosi, F; 10.1111/j.1365-2966.2008.14100.x

    2010-01-01

    The origin of the irregular satellites of the giant planets has been long debated since their discovery. Their dynamical features argue against an in-situ formation suggesting they are captured bodies, yet there is no global consensus on the physical process at the basis of their capture. In this paper we explore the collisional capture scenario, where the actual satellites originated from impacts occurred within Saturn's influence sphere. By modeling the inverse capture problem, we estimated the families of orbits of the possible parent bodies and the specific impulse needed for their capture. The orbits of these putative parent bodies are compared to those of the minor bodies of the outer Solar System to outline their possible region of formation. Finally, we tested the collisional capture hypothesis on Phoebe by taking advantage of the data supplied by Cassini on its major crater, Jason. Our results presented a realistic range of solutions matching the observational and dynamical data.

  4. CO2 selective dynamic two-dimensional Zn(II) coordination polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, In Hong; Bae, Jeong Mi; Hwang, Yong-Kyung; Kim, Ha-Yeong; Kim, Cheal; Huh, Seong; Kim, Sung-Jin; Kim, Youngmee

    2013-11-28

    A CO2 selective dynamic two-dimensional (2D) MOF system, [Zn(glu)(μ-bpe)]·2H2O (·2H2O) (glu = glutarate, bpe = 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethylene), is prepared. Based on variable temperature PXRD patterns, I·2H2O exhibits a structural transformation of the framework upon desolvation. Various gas sorption analyses at low temperatures reveal that solvent-free I selectively adsorbs CO2 over N2, H2, and CH4. Stepped CO2 isotherms for solvent-free I with a large hysteresis between adsorption and desorption branches at 196 K indicate that I is a dynamic framework. Moreover, I·2H2O shows efficient heterogeneous catalytic reactivity for transesterification of various esters. The catalyst can be recycled multiple times without losing its original activity.

  5. Dynamics and chaos in the unified scalar field cosmology II - in a box

    CERN Document Server

    Acquaviva, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the global dynamics of unified dark matter cosmological models and analyze it in a new dynamical system setting. In particular, by defining a suitable set of variables we obtain a bounded variable space, a feature that allows a better control of the critical elements of the system. First, we give a comprehensive cosmological interpretation of the critical points. Then, we turn our focus on particular representative trajectories with physically motivated initial conditions studied in the first paper of the series, and we discuss how the scale factor relates to the equation of state parameter. We review and complement these results in the light of the new variable approach by discussing the issue whether the system is chaotic or not.

  6. Wettability of Sanded and Aged Fast-growing Poplar Wood Surfaces: II. Dynamic Wetting Models

    OpenAIRE

    Zhiyong Qin; Qian Zhang; Qiang Gao; Shifeng Zhang; Jianzhang Li

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic wettability of adhesive on sanded and aged wood surfaces was measured using the sessile drop method. Four different models were used to evaluate and compare the wetting process. It was shown that the wettability of freshly sanded wood and aged wood both decreased compared to the control wood. There was no evidence of change in wettability with increasing grit number. Aging reduced the wettability of the wood surface. The coefficients of determination (R2) for all four models were ...

  7. Inchworm Monte Carlo for exact non-adiabatic dynamics. II. Benchmarks and comparison with established methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsing-Ta; Cohen, Guy; Reichman, David R.

    2017-02-01

    In this second paper of a two part series, we present extensive benchmark results for two different inchworm Monte Carlo expansions for the spin-boson model. Our results are compared to previously developed numerically exact approaches for this problem. A detailed discussion of convergence and error propagation is presented. Our results and analysis allow for an understanding of the benefits and drawbacks of inchworm Monte Carlo compared to other approaches for exact real-time non-adiabatic quantum dynamics.

  8. Inchworm Monte Carlo for exact non-adiabatic dynamics. II. Benchmarks and comparison with established methods

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Hsing-Ta; Reichman, David R

    2016-01-01

    In this second paper of a two part series, we present extensive benchmark results for two different inchworm Monte Carlo expansions for the spin-boson model. Our results are compared to previously developed numerically exact approaches for this problem. A detailed discussion of convergence and error propagation is presented. Our results and analysis allow for an understanding of the benefits and drawbacks of inchworm Monte Carlo compared to other approaches for exact real-time non-adiabatic quantum dynamics.

  9. Molecular dynamical studies of the dissociation of a diatomic molecular crystal. II. Equilibrium kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino, S. F.; Tsai, D. H.

    1984-07-01

    The properties of a molecular dynamical model undergoing equilibrium chemical reactions are reported. It is shown that the kinetics of the modeled reaction is consistent with established thermodynamic considerations. Further, at constant pressure, the relation between the Arrhenius energy of reaction ΔE, the potential energy change upon dissociation Δɛ, and the work done due to the volume change PΔV, viz, -ΔE=-(Δɛ+PΔV), is satisfied.

  10. Approximate but accurate quantum dynamics from the Mori formalism. II. Equilibrium time correlation functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya-Castillo, Andrés; Reichman, David R.

    2017-02-01

    The ability to efficiently and accurately calculate equilibrium time correlation functions of many-body condensed phase quantum systems is one of the outstanding problems in theoretical chemistry. The Nakajima-Zwanzig-Mori formalism coupled to the self-consistent solution of the memory kernel has recently proven to be highly successful for the computation of nonequilibrium dynamical averages. Here, we extend this formalism to treat symmetrized equilibrium time correlation functions for the spin-boson model. Following the first paper in this series [A. Montoya-Castillo and D. R. Reichman, J. Chem. Phys. 144, 184104 (2016)], we use a Dyson-type expansion of the projected propagator to obtain a self-consistent solution for the memory kernel that requires only the calculation of normally evolved auxiliary kernels. We employ the approximate mean-field Ehrenfest method to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach. Via comparison with numerically exact results for the correlation function Cz z(t ) =Re ⟨σz(0 ) σz(t ) ⟩ , we show that the current scheme affords remarkable boosts in accuracy and efficiency over bare Ehrenfest dynamics. We further explore the sensitivity of the resulting dynamics to the choice of kernel closures and the accuracy of the initial canonical density operator.

  11. On the dynamical state of galaxy clusters: insights from cosmological simulations II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Weiguang; Power, Chris; Borgani, Stefano; Knebe, Alexander; Lewis, Geraint F.; Murante, Giuseppe; Poole, Gregory B.

    2016-10-01

    Using a suite of cosmology simulations of a sample of >120 galaxy clusters with log (MDM, vir) ≤ 14.5. We compare clusters that form in purely dark matter run and their counterparts in hydro runs and investigate 4 independent parameters, that are normally used to classify dynamical state. We find that the virial ratio η in hydro-dynamical runs is ˜10 per cent lower than in the DM run, and there is no clear separation between the relaxed and unrelaxed clusters for any parameter. Further, using the velocity dispersion deviation parameter ζ, which is defined as the ratio between cluster velocity dispersion σ and the theoretical prediction σ _t = √{G M_{total}/R}, we find that there is a linear correlation between the virial ratio η and this ζ parameter. We propose to use this ζ parameter, which can be easily derived from observed galaxy clusters, as a substitute of the η parameter to quantify the cluster dynamical state.

  12. Black-hole horizons as probes of black-hole dynamics II: geometrical insights

    CERN Document Server

    Jaramillo, José Luis; Moesta, o Philipp; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2011-01-01

    In a companion paper [1], we have presented a cross-correlation approach to near-horizon physics in which bulk dynamics is probed through the correlation of quantities defined at inner and outer spacetime hypersurfaces acting as test screens. More specifically, dynamical horizons provide appropriate inner screens in a 3+1 setting and, in this context, we have shown that an effective-curvature vector measured at the common horizon produced in a head-on collision merger can be correlated with the flux of linear Bondi-momentum at null infinity. In this paper we provide a more sound geometric basis to this picture. First, we show that a rigidity property of dynamical horizons, namely foliation uniqueness, leads to a preferred class of null tetrads and Weyl scalars on these hypersurfaces. Second, we identify a heuristic horizon news-like function, depending only on the geometry of spatial sections of the horizon. Fluxes constructed from this function offer refined geometric quantities to be correlated with Bondi f...

  13. Approximate but accurate quantum dynamics from the Mori formalism. II. Equilibrium time correlation functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya-Castillo, Andrés; Reichman, David R

    2017-02-28

    The ability to efficiently and accurately calculate equilibrium time correlation functions of many-body condensed phase quantum systems is one of the outstanding problems in theoretical chemistry. The Nakajima-Zwanzig-Mori formalism coupled to the self-consistent solution of the memory kernel has recently proven to be highly successful for the computation of nonequilibrium dynamical averages. Here, we extend this formalism to treat symmetrized equilibrium time correlation functions for the spin-boson model. Following the first paper in this series [A. Montoya-Castillo and D. R. Reichman, J. Chem. Phys. 144, 184104 (2016)], we use a Dyson-type expansion of the projected propagator to obtain a self-consistent solution for the memory kernel that requires only the calculation of normally evolved auxiliary kernels. We employ the approximate mean-field Ehrenfest method to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach. Via comparison with numerically exact results for the correlation function Czz(t)=Re⟨σz(0)σz(t)⟩, we show that the current scheme affords remarkable boosts in accuracy and efficiency over bare Ehrenfest dynamics. We further explore the sensitivity of the resulting dynamics to the choice of kernel closures and the accuracy of the initial canonical density operator.

  14. Higher order explicit solutions for nonlinear dynamic model of column buckling using variational approach and variational iteration algorithm-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagheri, Saman; Nikkar, Ali [University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    This paper deals with the determination of approximate solutions for a model of column buckling using two efficient and powerful methods called He's variational approach and variational iteration algorithm-II. These methods are used to find analytical approximate solution of nonlinear dynamic equation of a model for the column buckling. First and second order approximate solutions of the equation of the system are achieved. To validate the solutions, the analytical results have been compared with those resulted from Runge-Kutta 4th order method. A good agreement of the approximate frequencies and periodic solutions with the numerical results and the exact solution shows that the present methods can be easily extended to other nonlinear oscillation problems in engineering. The accuracy and convenience of the proposed methods are also revealed in comparisons with the other solution techniques.

  15. Complex dynamics of Holling type II Lotka-Volterra predator-prey system with impulsive perturbations on the predator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Xianning; Chen Lansun

    2003-03-01

    This paper develops the Holling type II Lotka-Volterra predator-prey system, which may inherently oscillate, by introducing periodic constant impulsive immigration of predator. Condition for the system to be extinct is given and permanence condition is established via the method of comparison involving multiple Liapunov functions. Further influences of the impulsive perturbations on the inherent oscillation are studied numerically, which shows that with the increasing of the amount of the immigration, the system experiences process of quasi-periodic oscillating{yields}cycles{yields}periodic doubling cascade{yields}chaos{yields}periodic halfing cascade{yields}cycles, which is characterized by (1) quasi-periodic oscillating, (2) period doubling, (3) period halfing, (4) non-unique dynamics, meaning that several attractors coexist.

  16. Electron beam dynamics in the long-pulse, high-current DARHT-II linear induction accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekdahl, Carl A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Abeyta, Epifanio O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aragon, Paul [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Archuleta, Rita [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cook, Gerald [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dalmas, Dale [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Esquibel, Kevin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gallegos, Robert A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garnett, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harrison, James F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Jeffrey B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jacquez, Edward B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mccuistian, Brian T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Montoya, Nicholas A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nath, Subrato [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nielsen, Kurt [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oro, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Prichard, Benjamin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rowton, Lawrence [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sanchez, Manolito [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scarpetti, Raymond [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schauer, Martin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Seitz, Gerald [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schulze, Martin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bender, Howard A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Broste, William B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Carlson, Carl A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Frayer, Daniel K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Douglas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tom, C Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hughes, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Anaya, Richard [LLNL; Caporaso, George [LLNL; Chambers, Frank [LLNL; Chen, Yu - Jiuan [LLNL; Falabella, Steve [LLNL; Guethlein, Gary [LLNL; Raymond, Brett [LLNL; Richardson, Roger [LLNL; Trainham, C [NSTEC/STL; Watson, Jim [LLNL; Weir, John [LLNL; Genoni, Thomas [VOSS; Toma, Carsten [VOSS

    2009-01-01

    The DARHT-II linear induction accelerator (LIA) now accelerates 2-kA electron beams to more than 17 MeV. This LIA is unique in that the accelerated current pulse width is greater than 2 microseconds. This pulse has a flat-top region where the final electron kinetic energy varies by less than 1% for more than 1.5 microseconds. The long risetime of the 6-cell injector current pulse is 0.5 {micro}s, which can be scraped off in a beam-head cleanup zone before entering the 68-cell main accelerator. We discuss our experience with tuning this novel accelerator; and present data for the resulting beam transport and dynamics. We also present beam stability data, and relate these to previous stability experiments at lower current and energy.

  17. Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 Mediates Myosin-Dependent Collagen Contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno M. Coelho

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1 is a tyrosine kinase collagen adhesion receptor that mediates cell migration through association with non-muscle myosin IIA (NMIIA. Because DDR1 is implicated in cancer fibrosis, we hypothesized that DDR1 interacts with NMIIA to enable collagen compaction by traction forces. Mechanical splinting of rat dermal wounds increased DDR1 expression and collagen alignment. In periodontal ligament of DDR1 knockout mice, collagen mechanical reorganization was reduced >30%. Similarly, cultured cells with DDR1 knockdown or expressing kinase-deficient DDR1d showed 50% reduction of aligned collagen. Tractional remodeling of collagen was dependent on DDR1 clustering, activation, and interaction of the DDR1 C-terminal kinase domain with NMIIA filaments. Collagen remodeling by traction forces, DDR1 tyrosine phosphorylation, and myosin light chain phosphorylation were increased on stiff versus soft substrates. Thus, DDR1 clustering, activation, and interaction with NMIIA filaments enhance the collagen tractional remodeling that is important for collagen compaction in fibrosis.

  18. The adsorption of lead(II) ions by dynamic high pressure micro-fluidization treated insoluble soybean dietary fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Huang, Tao; Tu, Zong-Cai; Ruan, Chuan-Ying; Lin, Derong

    2016-06-01

    Insoluble dietary fiber from soybean residue (SIDF) was treated with dynamic high-pressure microfluidization (DHPM) and used as adsorbent for Pb(II) ion. The effects of pressure on the Pb(II) adsorption capacity, primary cilia structure and surface topography of SIDF were determined using a gastrointestinal simulated model in vitro. SIDF (at pH 7.0) showed maximum binding capacity (261.42 ± 2.77 μmol/g), which was about 1.13 times higher than that of untreated sample (233.47 ± 1.84 μmol/g), when pressure reached 80 MPa. However, the net adsorption value of SIDF in a simulated small intestine (~ 9 μmol/g) was significantly lower than that in the stomach (~ 48 μmol/g), because of the competitive adsorption of Pb(2+) by pancreatin, cholate and several enzymes in the small intestine. In addition, the adsorption capacity of SIDF exhibited good linear relationship with the physicochemical properties of total negative charges, and the adsorption behavior presumably occurred on the surface area of granules fiber.

  19. Remarkable conformational flexibility of aqueous 18-crown-6 and its strontium(II) complex-ab initio molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canaval, Lorenz R; Hadisaputra, Saprizal; Hofer, Thomas S

    2015-07-07

    Ab initio QMCF-MD simulations of aqueous 18-crown-6 (18C6) and strontium(II)-18-crown-6 (18C6-Sr) were performed to gather insight into their hydration properties. Strongly different characteristics were found for the two solutes in terms of structure and dynamics such as H-bonding. They, however, have in common that their backbone shows high flexibility in aqueous medium, adopting structures significantly differing from idealized gas phase geometries. In particular, planar oxyethylene units stable in the picosecond range occurred in 18C6, while the strontium complex readily exhibits a bent structure. Detailed analysis of this high flexibility was done via two dimensional root mean square deviation plots as well as the evolution of dihedral angles and angles within the simulation trajectory. The vibrational spectra obtained from the QMCF-MD simulations are in excellent agreement with experimental data and show a pronounced blueshift upon complexation of the strontium(II) ion in 18C6.

  20. Ultrafast carrier dynamics in type II ZnSe/CdS/ZnSe nanobarbells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewa-Kasakarage, Nishshanka N; El-Khoury, Patrick Z; Tarnovsky, Alexander N; Kirsanova, Maria; Nemitz, Ian; Nemchinov, Alexander; Zamkov, Mikhail

    2010-04-27

    We employ femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy to get an insight into ultrafast processes occurring at the interface of type II ZnSe/CdS heterostructured nanocrystals fabricated via colloidal routes and comprising a barbell-like arrangement of ZnSe tips and CdS nanorods. Our study shows that resonant excitation of ZnSe tips results in an unprecedently fast transfer of excited electrons into CdS domains of nanobarbells (ZnSe tips (tau(h)= 95 ps). A qualitative thermodynamic description of observed electron processes within the classical limit of Marcus theory was used to identify a specific charge transfer regime associated with the ultrafast electron injection into CdS. Potential photocatalytic applications of the observed fast separation of carriers along the main axis of ZnSe/CdS barbells are discussed.

  1. Dynamical Models for the Formation of Elephant Trunks in H II Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Mackey, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    The formation of pillars of dense gas at the boundaries of H II Regions is investigated with hydrodynamical numerical simulations including ionising radiation from a point source. We show that shadowing of ionising radiation by an inhomogeneous density field is capable of forming so-called elephant trunks (pillars of dense gas as in e.g. M16) without the assistance of self-gravity, or of ionisation front and cooling instabilities. A large simulation of a density field containing randomly generated clumps of gas is shown to naturally generate elephant trunks with certain clump configurations. These configurations are simulated in isolation and analysed in detail to show the formation mechanism and determine possible observational signatures. Pillars formed by the shadowing mechanism are shown to have rather different velocity profiles depending on the initial gas configuration, but asymmetries mean that the profiles also vary significantly with perspective, limiting their ability to discriminate between format...

  2. Neuromuscular partitioning, architectural design, and myosin fiber types of the M. vastus lateralis of the llama (Lama glama).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziotti, Guillermo H; Palencia, Pablo; Delhon, Gustavo; Rivero, José-Luis L

    2004-11-01

    The llama (Lama glama) is one of the few mammals of relatively large body size in which three fast myosin heavy chain isoforms (i.e., IIA, IIX, IIB) are extensively expressed in their locomotory muscles. This study was designed to gain insight into the morphological and functional organization of skeletal musculature in this peculiar animal model. The neuromuscular partitioning, architectural design, and myosin fiber types were systematically studied in the M. vastus lateralis of adult llamas (n = 15). Four nonoverlapping neuromuscular partitions or compartments were identified macroscopically (using a modified Sihler's technique for muscle depigmentation), although they did not conform strictly to the definitions of "neuromuscular compartments." Each neuromuscular partition was innervated by primary branches of the femoral nerve and was arranged within the muscle as paired partitions, two in parallel (deep-superficial compartmentalization) and the other two in-series (proximo-distal compartmentalization). These neuromuscular partitions of the muscle varied in their respective architectural designs (studied after partial digestion with diluted nitric acid) and myosin fiber type characteristics (identified immunohistochemically with specific anti-myosin monoclonal antibodies, then examined by quantitative histochemistry and image analysis). The deep partitions of the muscle had longer fibers, with lower angles of pinnation, and higher percentages of fast-glycolytic fibers than the superficial partitions of the muscle. These differences clearly suggest a division of labor in the whole M. vastus lateralis of llamas, with deep partitions exhibiting features well adapted for dynamic activities in the extension of stifle, whereas superficial portions seem to be related to the antigravitational role of the muscle in preserving the extension of the stifle during standing and stance phase of the stride. This peculiar structural and functional organization of the llama M

  3. SU(N) Gauge Theories with C-Periodic Boundary Conditions II. Small Volume Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kronfeld, Andreas S

    1993-01-01

    The dynamics of SU(N) gauge theories, especially for N=3, in a small C-periodic box are investigated. We identify the fields that mimimize the energy---the torons---and determine which of these ``classical'' vacua are stable quantum mechanically. The stable torons break cubic symmetry, which has interesting consequences on the spectrum. At any of the stable torons there are also quartic modes. Since all C-periodic boundary conditions are gauge-equivalent, we choose a convenient version, for which the quartic modes are constant modes, and compute the effective Hamiltonian to one loop in perturbation theory.

  4. Nonminimal Macroscopic Models of a Scalar Field Based on Microscopic Dynamics. II. Transport Equations

    CERN Document Server

    Ignat'ev, Yu G

    2015-01-01

    The article proposes generalizations of the macroscopic model of plasma of scalar charged particles to the cases of inter-particle interaction with multiple scalar fields and negative effective masses of these particles. The model is based on the microscopic dynamics of a particle at presence of scalar fields. The theory is managed to be generalized naturally having strictly reviewed a series of its key positions depending on a sign of particle masses. Thereby, it is possible to remove the artificial restriction contradicting the more fundamental principle of action functional additivity. Additionally, as a condition of internal consistency of the theory, particle effective mass function is found.

  5. The structure and appearance of winds from supercritical accretion disks. II - Dynamical theory of supercritical winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    A general analytic theory is presented of winds driven by super-Eddington luminosities. The relevant parameters are the mass of the central object, the radius at which the luminosity and matter are injected, the ratio of the free-fall time to the heating time at this radius, and the total luminosity injected at the radius. Several different regimes of dynamical wind structure are identified, and the analytic expressions are shown to agree with the numerical results in Meier (1979) in the appropriate case. It is noted that, in its general form, the theory is the optically thick (to electron scattering) counterpart to optically thin radiation pressure-driven stellar winds.

  6. DYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF A CRIMPING DEVICE WITH MULTIPLE CAMS USING MSC ADAMS II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Popescu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Through the present paper, the author presents the results of the dynamic analysis with MSC ADAMS of the mechanism with a crimping device with 12 tightening cams, designed and used in the technological process of assembly of the indigenous electrical detonators. In this sense, the mechanism with multiple cams is considered a mechanical system and is treated as an assembly of rigid bodies connected by mechanical connections and elastic elements. For shaping and simulation of the mechanism with multiple cams using ADAMS program, the author got through the following stages: construction of the pattern, its testing and simulation, validation, finishing, parametrization, optimization of the pattern.

  7. The AquaDEB project: Physiological flexibility of aquatic animals analysed with a generic dynamic energy budget model (phase II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alunno-Bruscia, Marianne; van der Veer, Henk W.; Kooijman, Sebastiaan A. L. M.

    2011-11-01

    This second special issue of the Journal of Sea Research on development and applications of Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) theory concludes the European Research Project AquaDEB (2007-2011). In this introductory paper we summarise the progress made during the running time of this 5 years' project, present context for the papers in this volume and discuss future directions. The main scientific objectives in AquaDEB were (i) to study and compare the sensitivity of aquatic species (mainly molluscs and fish) to environmental variability within the context of DEB theory for metabolic organisation, and (ii) to evaluate the inter-relationships between different biological levels (individual, population, ecosystem) and temporal scales (life cycle, population dynamics, evolution). AquaDEB phase I focussed on quantifying bio-energetic processes of various aquatic species ( e.g. molluscs, fish, crustaceans, algae) and phase II on: (i) comparing of energetic and physiological strategies among species through the DEB parameter values and identifying the factors responsible for any differences in bioenergetics and physiology; (ii) considering different scenarios of environmental disruption (excess of nutrients, diffuse or massive pollution, exploitation by man, climate change) to forecast effects on growth, reproduction and survival of key species; (iii) scaling up the models for a few species from the individual level up to the level of evolutionary processes. Apart from the three special issues in the Journal of Sea Research — including the DEBIB collaboration (see vol. 65 issue 2), a theme issue on DEB theory appeared in the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B (vol 365, 2010); a large number of publications were produced; the third edition of the DEB book appeared (2010); open-source software was substantially expanded (over 1000 functions); a large open-source systematic collection of ecophysiological data and DEB parameters has been set up; and a series of DEB

  8. Fuel cell-gas turbine hybrid system design part II: Dynamics and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLarty, Dustin; Brouwer, Jack; Samuelsen, Scott

    2014-05-01

    Fuel cell gas turbine hybrid systems have achieved ultra-high efficiency and ultra-low emissions at small scales, but have yet to demonstrate effective dynamic responsiveness or base-load cost savings. Fuel cell systems and hybrid prototypes have not utilized controls to address thermal cycling during load following operation, and have thus been relegated to the less valuable base-load and peak shaving power market. Additionally, pressurized hybrid topping cycles have exhibited increased stall/surge characteristics particularly during off-design operation. This paper evaluates additional control actuators with simple control methods capable of mitigating spatial temperature variation and stall/surge risk during load following operation of hybrid fuel cell systems. The novel use of detailed, spatially resolved, physical fuel cell and turbine models in an integrated system simulation enables the development and evaluation of these additional control methods. It is shown that the hybrid system can achieve greater dynamic response over a larger operating envelope than either individual sub-system; the fuel cell or gas turbine. Results indicate that a combined feed-forward, P-I and cascade control strategy is capable of handling moderate perturbations and achieving a 2:1 (MCFC) or 4:1 (SOFC) turndown ratio while retaining >65% fuel-to-electricity efficiency, while maintaining an acceptable stack temperature profile and stall/surge margin.

  9. Path-integral Monte Carlo simulations for electronic dynamics on molecular chains. II. Transport across impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlbacher, Lothar; Ankerhold, Joachim

    2005-05-01

    Electron transfer (ET) across molecular chains including an impurity is studied based on a recently improved real-time path-integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) approach [L. Mühlbacher, J. Ankerhold, and C. Escher, J. Chem. Phys. 121 12696 (2004)]. The reduced electronic dynamics is studied for various bridge lengths and defect site energies. By determining intersite hopping rates from PIMC simulations up to moderate times, the relaxation process in the extreme long-time limit is captured within a sequential transfer model. The total transfer rate is extracted and shown to be enhanced for certain defect site energies. Superexchange turns out to be relevant for extreme gap energies only and then gives rise to different dynamical signatures for high- and low-lying defects. Further, it is revealed that the entire bridge compound approaches a steady state on a much shorter time scale than that related to the total transfer. This allows for a simplified description of ET along donor-bridge-acceptor systems in the long-time range.

  10. Dynamical Models of Elliptical Galaxies -- II. M87 and its Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Agnello, A; Romanowsky, A J; Brodie, J P

    2014-01-01

    We study the Globular Cluster (GC) system of the nearby elliptical galaxy M87 using the newly available dataset with accurate kinematics (Strader et al.2011). We find evidence for three distinct sub-populations of GCs in terms of colours, kinematics and radial profiles. We show that a decomposition into three populations (blue, intermediate and red GCs) is statistically preferred to one with two or four populations, and relate them to the stellar profile. We exploit the sub-populations to derive dynamical constraints on the mass and Dark Matter (DM) content of M87 out to $\\sim100$ kpc. We use a class of global mass-estimators (from Paper I), obtaining mass measurements at different locations. M87's DM fraction changes from $\\approx$0.2 at the starlight's effective radius (6 kpc) to $\\approx$0.95 at the distance probed by the most extended, blue GCs (135 kpc). We supplement this with \\textit{virial decompositions}, exploiting the dynamical model to produce a separation into multiple components. These yield the...

  11. Application of Gas Dynamical Friction for Planetesimals: II. Evolution of Binary Planetesimals

    CERN Document Server

    Grishin, Evgeni

    2015-01-01

    One of first the stages of planet formation is the growth of small planetesimals and their accumulation into large planetesimals and planetary embryos. This early stage occurs much before the dispersal of most of the gas from the protoplanetary disk. At this stage gas-planetesimal interactions play a key role in the dynamical evolution of \\emph{single} intermediate-mass planetesimals ($m_{p}\\sim10^{21}-10^{25}g$) \\emph{through gas dynamical friction} (GDF). A significant fraction of all Solar system planetesimals (asteroids and Kuiper-belt objects) are known to be binary planetesimals (BPs). Here, we explore the effects of GDF on the evolution of \\emph{binary} planetesimals embedded in a gaseous disk using an N-body code with a fiducial external force accounting for GDF. We find that GDF can induce binary mergers on timescales shorter than the disk lifetime for masses above $m_{p}\\gtrsim10^{22}g$ at 1AU, independent of the binary initial separation and eccentricity. Such mergers can affect the structure of me...

  12. Column dynamic studies and breakthrough curve analysis for Cd(II) and Cu(II) ions adsorption onto palm oil boiler mill fly ash (POFA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Abdul Shukor Abdul; Manaf, Latifah Abd; Man, Hasfalina Che; Kumar, Nadavala Siva

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the adsorption characteristics of palm oil boiler mill fly ash (POFA) derived from an agricultural waste material in removing Cd(II) and Cu(II) from aqueous solution via column studies. The performance of the study is described through the breakthrough curves concept under relevant operating conditions such as column bed depths (1, 1.5, and 2 cm) and influent metal concentrations (5, 10, and 20 mg/L). The Cd(II) and Cu(II) uptake mechanism is particularly bed depth- and concentration-dependant, favoring higher bed depth and lower influent metal concentration. The highest bed capacity of 34.91 mg Cd(II)/g and 21.93 mg Cu(II)/g of POFA was achieved at 20 mg/L of influent metal concentrations, column bed depth of 2 cm, and flow rate of 5 mL/min. The whole breakthrough curve simulation for both metal ions were best described using the Thomas and Yoon–Nelson models, but it is apparent that the initial region of the breakthrough for Cd(II) was better described using the BDST model. The results illustrate that POFA could be utilized effectively for the removal of Cd(II) and Cu(II) ions from aqueous solution in a fixed-bed column system.

  13. Ultrafast excited state dynamics of Pt(II) chromophores bearing multiple infrared absorbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glik, Elena A; Kinayyigit, Solen; Ronayne, Kate L; Towrie, Michael; Sazanovich, Igor V; Weinstein, Julia A; Castellano, Felix N

    2008-08-04

    The paper reports the synthesis, structural characterization, electrochemistry, ultrafast time-resolved infrared (TRIR) and transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy associated with two independent d (8) square planar Pt(II) diimine chromophores, Pt(dnpebpy)Cl 2 ( 1) and Pt(dnpebpy)(C[triple bond]Cnaph) 2 ( 2), where dnpebpy = 4,4'-(CO 2CH 2- (t) Bu) 2-2,2'-bipyridine and CCnaph = naphthylacetylide. The neopentyl ester substitutions provided markedly improved complex solubility relative to the corresponding ethyl ester which facilitates synthetic elaboration as well as spectroscopic investigations. Following 400 nm pulsed laser excitation in CH 2Cl 2, the 23 cm (-1) red shift in the nu C=O vibrations in 1 are representative of a complex displaying a lowest charge-transfer-to-diimine (CT) excited state. The decay kinetics in 1 are composed of two time constants assigned to vibrational cooling of the (3)CT excited-state concomitant with its decay to the ground state (tau = 2.2 +/- 0.4 ps), and to cooling of the formed vibrationally hot ground electronic state (tau = 15.5 +/- 4.0 ps); we note that an assignment of the latter to a ligand field state cannot be excluded. Ultrafast TA data quantitatively support these assignments yielding an excited-state lifetime of 2.7 +/- 0.4 ps for the (3)CT excited-state of 1 and could not detect any longer-lived species. The primary intention of this study was to develop a Pt (II) complex ( 2) bearing dual infrared spectroscopic tags (C[triple bond]C attached to the metal and CO (ester) attached to the diimine ligand) to independently track the movement of charge density in different segments of the molecule following pulsed light excitation. Femtosecond laser excitation of 2 in CH 2Cl 2 at 400 nm simultaneously induces a red-shift in both the nu C=O (-30 cm (-1)) and the nu C[triple bond]C (-61 cm (-1)) vibrations. The TRIR data in 2 are consistent with a charge transfer assignment, and the significant decrease of the energy of the nu

  14. Loss of cargo binding in the human myosin VI deafness mutant (R1166X) leads to increased actin filament binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arden, Susan D; Tumbarello, David A; Butt, Tariq; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma

    2016-10-01

    Mutations in myosin VI have been associated with autosomal-recessive (DFNB37) and autosomal-dominant (DFNA22) deafness in humans. Here, we characterise an myosin VI nonsense mutation (R1166X) that was identified in a family with hereditary hearing loss in Pakistan. This mutation leads to the deletion of the C-terminal 120 amino acids of the myosin VI cargo-binding domain, which includes the WWY-binding motif for the adaptor proteins LMTK2, Tom1 as well as Dab2. Interestingly, compromising myosin VI vesicle-binding ability by expressing myosin VI with the R1166X mutation or with single point mutations in the adaptor-binding sites leads to increased F-actin binding of this myosin in vitro and in vivo As our results highlight the importance of cargo attachment for regulating actin binding to the motor domain, we perform a detailed characterisation of adaptor protein binding and identify single amino acids within myosin VI required for binding to cargo adaptors. We not only show that the adaptor proteins can directly interact with the cargo-binding tail of myosin VI, but our in vitro studies also suggest that multiple adaptor proteins can bind simultaneously to non-overlapping sites in the myosin VI tail. In conclusion, our characterisation of the human myosin VI deafness mutant (R1166X) suggests that defects in cargo binding may leave myosin VI in a primed/activated state with an increased actin-binding ability.

  15. Local pulsatile contractions are an intrinsic property of the myosin 2A motor in the cortical cytoskeleton of adherent cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Michelle A.; Billington, Neil; Wang, Aibing; Adelstein, Robert S.; Sellers, James R.; Fischer, Robert S.; Waterman, Clare M.

    2017-01-01

    The role of nonmuscle myosin 2 (NM2) pulsatile dynamics in generating contractile forces required for developmental morphogenesis has been characterized, but whether these pulsatile contractions are an intrinsic property of all actomyosin networks is not known. Here we used live-cell fluorescence imaging to show that transient, local assembly of NM2A “pulses” occurs in the cortical cytoskeleton of single adherent cells of mesenchymal, epithelial, and sarcoma origin, independent of developmental signaling cues and cell–cell or cell–ECM interactions. We show that pulses in the cortical cytoskeleton require Rho-associated kinase– or myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) activity, increases in cytosolic calcium, and NM2 ATPase activity. Surprisingly, we find that cortical cytoskeleton pulses specifically require the head domain of NM2A, as they do not occur with either NM2B or a 2B-head-2A-tail chimera. Our results thus suggest that pulsatile contractions in the cortical cytoskeleton are an intrinsic property of the NM2A motor that may mediate its role in homeostatic maintenance of tension in the cortical cytoskeleton of adherent cells. PMID:27881665

  16. The dynamics of Neptune Trojans - II. Eccentric orbits and observed objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li-Yong; Dvorak, Rudolf; Sun, Yi-Sui

    2011-01-01

    In a previous paper, we presented a global view of the stability of Neptune Trojans (NTs hereafter) on inclined orbits. As the continuation of the investigation, we discuss in this paper the dependence of the stability of NT orbits on the eccentricity. For this task, high-resolution dynamical maps are constructed using the results of extensive numerical integrations of orbits initialized on fine grids of initial semimajor axis (a0) versus eccentricity (e0). The extensions of regions of stable orbits on the (a0, e0) plane at different inclinations are shown. The maximum eccentricities of stable orbits in the three most stable regions at low (0°, 12°), medium (22°, 36°) and high (51°, 59°) inclination are found to be 0.10, 0.12 and 0.04, respectively. The fine structures in the dynamical maps are described. Via the frequency-analysis method, the mechanisms that portray the dynamical maps are revealed. The secondary resonances, at the frequency of the librating resonant angle λ-λ8 and the frequency of the quasi 2:1 mean-motion resonance (MMR hereafter) between Neptune and Uranus, are found to be deeply involved in the motion of NTs. Secular resonances are detected and they also contribute significantly to the triggering of chaos in the motion. In particular, the effects of the secular resonance ν8, ν18 are clarified. We also investigate the orbital stabilities of six observed NTs by checking the orbits of hundreds of clones generated within the observing error bars. We conclude that four of them are deeply inside the stable region, with 2001 QR322 and 2005 TO74 being the exceptions. 2001 QR322 is in the close vicinity of the most significant secondary resonance. 2005 TO74 is located close to the boundary separating stable orbits from unstable ones, and it may be influenced by a secular resonance. This article was published online on 2010 October 25. Some errors were subsequently identified. This notice is included in the online and print versions to indicate

  17. Approaches to myosin modelling in a two-phase flow model for cell motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimpton, L. S.; Whiteley, J. P.; Waters, S. L.; Oliver, J. M.

    2016-04-01

    A wide range of biological processes rely on the ability of cells to move through their environment. Mathematical models have been developed to improve our understanding of how cells achieve motion. Here we develop models that explicitly track the cell's distribution of myosin within a two-phase flow framework. Myosin is a small motor protein which is important for contracting the cell's actin cytoskeleton and enabling cell motion. The two phases represent the actin network and the cytosol in the cell. We start from a fairly general description of myosin kinetics, advection and diffusion in the two-phase flow framework, then identify a number of sub-limits of the model that may be relevant in practice, two of which we investigate further via linear stability analyses and numerical simulations. We demonstrate that myosin-driven contraction of the actin network destabilizes a stationary steady state leading to cell motion, but that rapid diffusion of myosin and rapid unbinding of myosin from the actin network are stabilizing. We use numerical simulation to investigate travelling-wave solutions relevant to a steadily gliding cell and we consider a reduction of the model in which the cell adheres strongly to the substrate on which it is crawling. This work demonstrates that a number of existing models for the effect of myosin on cell motility can be understood as different sub-limits of our two-phase flow model.

  18. Spectroscopy and dynamics of charge transfer excitons in type-II band aligned quantum confined heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushavah, Dushyant; Mohapatra, P. K.; Rustagi, K. C.; Bahadur, D.; Vasa, P.; Singh, B. P.

    2015-05-01

    We illustrate effect of charge transfer (CT) in type-II quantum confined heterostructure by comparing CdSe quantum dots (QDs), CdSe/CdTe heterostructure quantum dots (HQDs) and CdSe/CdTe/CdSe quantum well-quantum dots (QWQDs) heterostructures. CdSe core QDs were synthesized using a kinetic growth method where QD size depends on reaction time. For shell coating we used modified version of successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR). Size of different QDs ˜5 to 7 nm were measured by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Strong red shift from ˜597 to ˜746 nm in photoluminescence (PL) spectra from QDs to QWQDs shows high tunability which is not possible with single constituent semiconductor QDs. PL spectra have been recorded at different temperatures (10K-300K). Room temperature time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) measurements for QDs to QWQDs show three exponential radiative decay. The slowest component decay constant in QWQDs comes around eight fold to ˜51 ns as compared to ˜6.5 ns in HQD suggesting new opportunities to tailor the radiative carrier recombination rate of CT excitons.

  19. Spectroscopy and dynamics of charge transfer excitons in type-II band aligned quantum confined heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushavah, Dushyant [Centre for Research in Nanotechnology and Science, IIT Bombay-400076, Mumbai (India); Mohapatra, P. K.; Vasa, P.; Singh, B. P., E-mail: bhanups@iitb.ac.in [Department of physics, IIT Bombay, Mumbai-400076 (India); Rustagi, K. C. [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Bhopal-462066, Bhopal (India); Bahadur, D. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, IIT Bombay, Mumbai-400076 (India)

    2015-05-15

    We illustrate effect of charge transfer (CT) in type-II quantum confined heterostructure by comparing CdSe quantum dots (QDs), CdSe/CdTe heterostructure quantum dots (HQDs) and CdSe/CdTe/CdSe quantum well-quantum dots (QWQDs) heterostructures. CdSe core QDs were synthesized using a kinetic growth method where QD size depends on reaction time. For shell coating we used modified version of successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR). Size of different QDs ∼5 to 7 nm were measured by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Strong red shift from ∼597 to ∼746 nm in photoluminescence (PL) spectra from QDs to QWQDs shows high tunability which is not possible with single constituent semiconductor QDs. PL spectra have been recorded at different temperatures (10K-300K). Room temperature time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) measurements for QDs to QWQDs show three exponential radiative decay. The slowest component decay constant in QWQDs comes around eight fold to ∼51 ns as compared to ∼6.5 ns in HQD suggesting new opportunities to tailor the radiative carrier recombination rate of CT excitons.

  20. Dynamics of the Solar Magnetic Network. II. Heating the Magnetized Chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, S. S.; van Ballegooijen, A. A.

    2008-06-01

    We consider recent observations of the chromospheric network and argue that the bright network grains observed in the Ca II H and K lines are heated by an as-yet-unidentified quasi-steady process. We propose that the heating is caused by dissipation of short-period magnetoacoustic waves in magnetic flux tubes (periods less than 100 s). Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of such waves are presented. We consider wave generation in the network due to two separate processes: (1) transverse motions at the base of the flux tube and (2) the absorption of acoustic waves generated in the ambient medium. We find that the former mechanism leads to efficient heating of the chromosphere by slow magnetoacoustic waves propagating along magnetic field lines. This heating is produced by shock waves with a horizontal size of a few hundred kilometers. In contrast, acoustic waves excited in the ambient medium are converted into transverse fast modes that travel rapidly through the flux tube and do not form shocks, unless the acoustic sources are located within 100 km from the tube axis. We conclude that the magnetic network may be heated by magnetoacoustic waves that are generated in or near the flux tubes.

  1. Dynamics of the Solar Magnetic Network. II. Heating the Magnetized Chromosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Hasan, S S

    2008-01-01

    We consider recent observations of the chromospheric network, and argue that the bright network grains observed in the Ca II H & K lines are heated by an as yet unidentified quasi-steady process. We propose that the heating is caused by dissipation of short-period magnetoacoustic waves in magnetic flux tubes (periods less than 100 s). Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of such waves are presented. We consider wave generation in the network due to two separate processes: (a) by transverse motions at the base of the flux tube; and (b) by the absorption of acoustic waves generated in the ambient medium. We find that the former mechanism leads to an efficient heating of the chromosphere by slow magnetoacoustic waves propagating along magnetic field lines. This heating is produced by shock waves with a horizontal size of a few hundred kilometers. In contrast, acoustic waves excited in the ambient medium are converted into transverse fast modes that travel rapidly through the flux tube and do not form shocks, unl...

  2. Complementary and dynamic type II cadherin expression associated with development of the primate visual system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Eiji; Nambu, Sanae; Oka, Mariko; Iriki, Atsushi

    2014-10-01

    The middle temporal visual area (MT, also known as V5) is a visual association area that is particularly evolved in the primate brain. The MT receives input from the primary visual area (V1), constitutes part of the dorsal visual pathway, and plays an essential role in processing motion. Connections between the MT and V1 in the primate brain are formed after birth, and are related to the maturation of visual system. However, it remains to be determined what molecular mechanisms control the formation and maturation of the visual system. Cadherins are transmembrane proteins, originally isolated as cell adhesion molecules, which have multiple roles in synapse formation and function. To investigate potential involvement of cadherins in development of the primate visual system, we examined type II cadherin expression (cadherin-6, -8, -12) in cortical and thalamic visual areas of pre- and postnatal brains of the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus). In the prenatal brain, cadherin-6 was dominantly expressed in the pulvino-MT pathway whereas cadherin-8 was dominant in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN)-V1 pathway. During postnatal development, there was a downregulation of cadherin-6 and upregulation of cadherin-8 expression in the MT. The timing of this cadherin exchange preceded the development of V1-MT connections. Our results suggest the possibility that changes in cadherin expression are involved in the development of the primate visual system, and that a switch in cadherin expression may be a general mechanism to control neural plasticity of highly cognitive abilities.

  3. Approximate but accurate quantum dynamics from the Mori formalism: II. Equilibrium correlation functions

    CERN Document Server

    Montoya-Castillo, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    The ability to efficiently and accurately calculate equilibrium time correlation functions of many-body condensed phase quantum systems is one of the outstanding problems in theoretical chemistry. The Nakajima-Zwanzig-Mori formalism coupled to the self-consistent solution of the memory kernel has recently proven to be highly successful for the computation of nonequilibrium dynamical averages. Here, we extend this formalism to treat symmetrized equilibrium time correlation functions for the spin-boson model. Following the first paper in this series [A. Montoya-Castillo and D. R. Reichman, J. Chem. Phys. $\\bf{144}$, 184104 (2016)], we use a Dyson-type expansion of the projected propagator to obtain a self-consistent solution for the memory kernel that requires only the calculation of normally evolved auxiliary kernels. We employ the approximate mean-field Ehrenfest method to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach. Via comparison with numerically exact results for the correlation function $\\mathcal{C}_{zz}...

  4. Dynamics of magnetic flux tubes in close binary stars II. Nonlinear evolution and surface distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Holzwarth, V R

    2003-01-01

    Observations of magnetically active close binaries with orbital periods of a few days reveal the existence of starspots at preferred longitudes (with respect to the direction of the companion star). We numerically investigate the non-linear dynamics and evolution of magnetic flux tubes in the convection zoneof a fast-rotating component of a close binary system and explore whether the tidal effects are able to generate non-uniformities in the surface distribution of erupting flux tubes. Assuming a synchronised system with a rotation period of two days and consisting of two solar-type components, both the tidal force and the deviation of the stellar structure from spherical shape are considered in lowest-order perturbation theory. The magnetic field is initially stored in the form of toroidal magnetic flux rings within the stably stratified overshoot region beneath the convection zone. Once the field has grown sufficiently strong, instabilities initiate the formation of rising flux loops, which rise through the...

  5. An Improved Control Vector Iteration Approach for Nonlinear Dynamic Optimization. II. Problems with Path Constraints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡云卿; 刘兴高; 薛安克

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers dealing with path constraints in the framework of the improved control vector it-eration (CVI) approach. Two available ways for enforcing equality path constraints are presented, which can be di-rectly incorporated into the improved CVI approach. Inequality path constraints are much more difficult to deal with, even for small scale problems, because the time intervals where the inequality path constraints are active are unknown in advance. To overcome the challenge, the l1 penalty function and a novel smoothing technique are in-troduced, leading to a new effective approach. Moreover, on the basis of the relevant theorems, a numerical algo-rithm is proposed for nonlinear dynamic optimization problems with inequality path constraints. Results obtained from the classic batch reactor operation problem are in agreement with the literature reports, and the computational efficiency is also high.

  6. First stage of LISA data processing. II. Alternative filtering dynamic models for LISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Heinzel, Gerhard; Danzmann, Karsten

    2015-08-01

    Space-borne gravitational wave detectors, such as (e)LISA, are designed to operate in the low-frequency band (mHz to Hz), where there is a variety of gravitational wave sources of great scientific value [arXiv:1305.5720 and S. Babak et al., Classical Quantum Gravity 28, 114001 (2011)]. To achieve the extraordinary sensitivity of these detectors, the precise synchronization of the clocks on the separate spacecraft and the accurate determination of the interspacecraft distances are important ingredients. In our previous paper [Y. Wang et al., Phys. Rev. D 90, 064016 (2014)], we have described a hybrid-extend Kalman filter with a full state vector to do this job. In this paper, we explore several different state vectors and their corresponding (phenomenological) dynamic models to reduce the redundancy in the full state vector, to accelerate the algorithm, and to make the algorithm easily extendable to more complicated scenarios.

  7. First stage of LISA data processing II: Alternative filtering dynamic models for LISA

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yan; Danzmann, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    Space-borne gravitational wave detectors, such as (e)LISA, are designed to operate in the low-frequency band (mHz to Hz), where there is a variety of gravitational wave sources of great scientific value. To achieve the extraordinary sensitivity of these detector, the precise synchronization of the clocks on the separate spacecraft and the accurate determination of the interspacecraft distances are important ingredients. In our previous paper (Phys. Rev. D 90, 064016 [2014]), we have described a hybrid-extend Kalman filter with a full state vector to do this job. In this paper, we explore several different state vectors and their corresponding (phenomenological) dynamic models, to reduce the redundancy in the full state vector, to accelerate the algorithm, and to make the algorithm easily extendable to more complicated scenarios.

  8. Application of Gas Dynamical Friction for Planetesimals. II. Evolution of Binary Planetesimals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishin, Evgeni; Perets, Hagai B.

    2016-04-01

    One of the first stages of planet formation is the growth of small planetesimals and their accumulation into large planetesimals and planetary embryos. This early stage occurs long before the dispersal of most of the gas from the protoplanetary disk. At this stage gas-planetesimal interactions play a key role in the dynamical evolution of single intermediate-mass planetesimals (mp ˜ 1021-1025 g) through gas dynamical friction (GDF). A significant fraction of all solar system planetesimals (asteroids and Kuiper-belt objects) are known to be binary planetesimals (BPs). Here, we explore the effects of GDF on the evolution of BPs embedded in a gaseous disk using an N-body code with a fiducial external force accounting for GDF. We find that GDF can induce binary mergers on timescales shorter than the disk lifetime for masses above mp ≳ 1022 g at 1 au, independent of the binary initial separation and eccentricity. Such mergers can affect the structure of merger-formed planetesimals, and the GDF-induced binary inspiral can play a role in the evolution of the planetesimal disk. In addition, binaries on eccentric orbits around the star may evolve in the supersonic regime, where the torque reverses and the binary expands, which would enhance the cross section for planetesimal encounters with the binary. Highly inclined binaries with small mass ratios, evolve due to the combined effects of Kozai-Lidov (KL) cycles with GDF which lead to chaotic evolution. Prograde binaries go through semi-regular KL evolution, while retrograde binaries frequently flip their inclination and ˜50% of them are destroyed.

  9. APPLICATION OF GAS DYNAMICAL FRICTION FOR PLANETESIMALS. II. EVOLUTION OF BINARY PLANETESIMALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grishin, Evgeni; Perets, Hagai B. [Physics Department, Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, 3200003 (Israel)

    2016-04-01

    One of the first stages of planet formation is the growth of small planetesimals and their accumulation into large planetesimals and planetary embryos. This early stage occurs long before the dispersal of most of the gas from the protoplanetary disk. At this stage gas–planetesimal interactions play a key role in the dynamical evolution of single intermediate-mass planetesimals (m{sub p} ∼ 10{sup 21}–10{sup 25} g) through gas dynamical friction (GDF). A significant fraction of all solar system planetesimals (asteroids and Kuiper-belt objects) are known to be binary planetesimals (BPs). Here, we explore the effects of GDF on the evolution of BPs embedded in a gaseous disk using an N-body code with a fiducial external force accounting for GDF. We find that GDF can induce binary mergers on timescales shorter than the disk lifetime for masses above m{sub p} ≳ 10{sup 22} g at 1 au, independent of the binary initial separation and eccentricity. Such mergers can affect the structure of merger-formed planetesimals, and the GDF-induced binary inspiral can play a role in the evolution of the planetesimal disk. In addition, binaries on eccentric orbits around the star may evolve in the supersonic regime, where the torque reverses and the binary expands, which would enhance the cross section for planetesimal encounters with the binary. Highly inclined binaries with small mass ratios, evolve due to the combined effects of Kozai–Lidov (KL) cycles with GDF which lead to chaotic evolution. Prograde binaries go through semi-regular KL evolution, while retrograde binaries frequently flip their inclination and ∼50% of them are destroyed.

  10. Genetic Variation in Myosin 1H Contributes to Mandibular Prognathism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassopoulou-Fishell, Maria; Deeley, Kathleen; Harvey, Erika M.; Sciote, James; Vieira, Alexandre R.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Several candidate loci have been suggested as influencing mandibular prognathism (1p22.1, 1p22.2, 1p36, 3q26.2, 5p13-p12, 6q25, 11q22.2-q22.3, 12q23, 12q13.13, and 19p13.2). The goal of this study was to replicate these results in a well-characterized homogeneous sample set. Methods Thirty-three single nucleotide polymorphisms spanning all candidate regions were studied in 44 prognathic and 35 Class I subjects from the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine Dental Registry and DNA Repository. The 44 mandibular prognathism subjects had an average age of 18.4 years, 31 were females and 13 males, and 24 were White, 15 African American, two Hispanic, and three Asian. The 35 Class I subjects had an average age of 17.6 years, 27 were females and 9 males, and 27 were White, six African Americans, one Hispanic, and two Asian. Skeletal mandibular prognathism diagnosis included cephalometric values indicative of Class III such as ANB smaller than two degrees, negative Witts appraisal, and positive A–B plane. Additional mandibular prognathism criteria included negative OJ and visually prognathic (concave) profile as determined by the subject's clinical evaluation. Orthognathic subjects without jaw deformations were used as a comparison group. Mandibular prognathism and orthognathic subjects were matched based on race, sex and age. Genetic markers were tested by polymerase chain reaction using TaqMan chemistry. Chi-square and Fisher exact tests were used to determine overrepresentation of marker allele with alpha of 0.05. Results An association was unveiled between a marker in MYO1H (rs10850110) and the mandibular prognathism phenotype (p=0.03). MYO1H is a Class-I myosin that is in a different protein group than the myosin isoforms of muscle sarcomeres, which are the basis of skeletal muscle fiber typing. Class I myosins are necessary for cell motility, phagocytosis and vesicle transport. Conclusions More strict clinical definitions may increase

  11. NMR investigation of dynamic processes in complexes of nickel(II) and zinc(II) with iminodiacetate, n-methyliminodiacetate and n-ethyliminodiacetate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, M.R.

    1985-11-01

    Analysis of oxygen-17 bulk water relaxation rates with an aqueous solution of 1:1 Ni(II):ida reveals that two rate-limiting processes are involved with solvent exchange. Analysis of carbon-13 longitudinal relaxation rates of the bis-ligand complexes with zinc(II) are used to determine molecular tumbling rates and methyl rotation rates. The carbon-13 transverse relaxation rates for the carbons in the bis-ligand complex with Ni(II) are adequately fitted to the Solomon-Bloembergen equation. Three carboxylate carbon peaks are seen with the /sup 13/C spectrum of the 1:2 Ni(II):ida complex, which coalesce into a single peak above about 360 K. The mechanism and rate of ligand exchange are determined for the complexes Zn(II)L/sub 2//sup -2/ (L = mida, eida) in aqueous solution by total lineshape analysis of the proton spectrum at 500 MHz.

  12. Dynamics of tropomyosin in muscle fibers as monitored by saturation transfer EPR of bi-functional probe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roni F Rayes

    Full Text Available The dynamics of four regions of tropomyosin was assessed using saturation transfer electron paramagnetic resonance in the muscle fiber. In order to fully immobilize the spin probe on the surface of tropomyosin, a bi-functional spin label was attached to i,i+4 positions via cysteine mutagenesis. The dynamics of bi-functionally labeled tropomyosin mutants decreased by three orders of magnitude when reconstituted into "ghost muscle fibers". The rates of motion varied along the length of tropomyosin with the C-terminus position 268/272 being one order of magnitude slower then N-terminal domain or the center of the molecule. Introduction of troponin decreases the dynamics of all four sites in the muscle fiber, but there was no significant effect upon addition of calcium or myosin subfragment-1.

  13. Myosin Binding Protein-C Slow: An Intricate Subfamily of Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maegen A. Ackermann

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Myosin binding protein C (MyBP-C consists of a family of thick filament associated proteins. Three isoforms of MyBP-C exist in striated muscles: cardiac, slow skeletal, and fast skeletal. To date, most studies have focused on the cardiac form, due to its direct involvement in the development of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Here we focus on the slow skeletal form, discuss past and current literature, and present evidence to support that: (i MyBP-C slow comprises a subfamily of four proteins, resulting from complex alternative shuffling of the single MyBP-C slow gene, (ii the four MyBP-C slow isoforms are expressed in variable amounts in different skeletal muscles, (iii at least one MyBP-C slow isoform is preferentially found at the periphery of M-bands and (iv the MyBP-C slow subfamily may play important roles in the assembly and stabilization of sarcomeric M- and A-bands and regulate the contractile properties of the actomyosin filaments.

  14. Segmental distribution of myosin heavy chain isoforms within single muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming; Gould, Maree

    2017-02-18

    Despite many studies looking at the distribution of myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms across a transverse section of muscle, knowledge of MHC distribution along the longitudinal axis of a single skeletal muscle fiber has been relatively overlooked. Immunocytochemistry was performed on serial sections of rat extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle to identify MHC types I, IIA, IIX, IIY and IIB. Sixteen fascicles which contained a total of 362 fibers were randomly and systematically sampled from the 3 EDL muscles. All MHC type I and type II isoforms were expressed. Segmental expression occurred within a very limited segment. MHC isoform expression followed the accepted traditional order from I&cenveo_unknown_entity_wingdings_F0F3;IIA&cenveo_unknown_entity_wingdings_F0F3;IIX&cenveo_unknown_entity_wingdings_F0F3;IIB, however in some samples expression of an isoform was circumvented from IIB to I or from I to IIB directly. Segmental distribution of MHC isoforms along a single muscle fiber may be due to the myonuclear domain. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. The relationship between the occurrence of type II spicules and the dynamics of underlying magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurchyshyn, V.; Abramenko, V.; Goode, P. R.

    2012-12-01

    Type II spicules are thought to be small-scale chromospheric up-flows. When observed against the solar disk they can be identified as rapid blue shifted events (or excursions, RBE, Rouppe van der Voort et al.). While their nature is being questioned and their associated driving mechanism remains elusive, these up-flows may be instrumental in the processes of coronal heating and solar wind. We use high resolution photospheric, chromospheric and magnetic field data from the New Solar Telescope operating at Big Bear Solar Observatory to further determine the properties of these events and refine the role that they may play. We find that the majority of RBEs, occurring around network clusters of bright points, can be linked to episodes of small flux emergence, in particular appearance of opposite polarity fields. Case studies further indicate that some of the RBEs appear to have kink and inverted "Y" shaped roots. The data thus suggest that magnetic reconnection may be responsible for at least some fraction of observed RBEs. We will present these observations in details and discuss possible implications.Sequence of H-alpha-0.075nm images spanning 7 min showing evolution of RBE activity near a cluster of network fields. The two yellow circles enclose the area where multipolar fields rapidly appeared. Comparing panels 19:05:11 UT and 19:05:55 UT one may notice that a new magnetic dipole and a dark jet appeared in the encircled area. The same is true about the encircled area in 19:07:26UT panel. The RBE activity ceased as soon as the the field of view was cleared from small-scale magnetic elements.

  16. The dynamics of magnetic vortices in type II superconductors with pinning sites studied by the time dependent Ginzburg–Landau model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Peter; Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Ögren, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of magnetic vortices in type II superconductors with normal state pinning sites using the Ginzburg–Landau equations. Simulation results demonstrate hopping of vortices between pinning sites, influenced by external magnetic fields and external currents. The system...

  17. Imaging the bipolarity of myosin filaments with Interferometric Second Harmonic Generation microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivard, Maxime; Couture, Charles-André; Miri, Amir K; Laliberté, Mathieu; Bertrand-Grenier, Antony; Mongeau, Luc; Légaré, François

    2013-01-01

    We report that combining interferometry with Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) microscopy provides valuable information about the relative orientation of noncentrosymmetric structures composing tissues. This is confirmed through the imaging of rat medial gastrocnemius muscle. The inteferometric Second Harmonic Generation (ISHG) images reveal that each side of the myosin filaments composing the A band of the sarcomere generates π phase shifted SHG signal which implies that the myosin proteins at each end of the filaments are oriented in opposite directions. This highlights the bipolar structural organization of the myosin filaments and shows that muscles can be considered as a periodically poled biological structure.

  18. Dynamical models of elliptical galaxies - II. M87 and its globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnello, A.; Evans, N. W.; Romanowsky, A. J.; Brodie, J. P.

    2014-08-01

    We study the globular cluster (GC) system of the nearby elliptical galaxy M87 using the newly available data set with accurate kinematics provided by Strader et al. We find evidence for three distinct subpopulations of GCs in terms of colours, kinematics and radial profiles. A decomposition into three populations - blue, intermediate and red GCs - is statistically preferred to one with two or four populations. The existence of three components has been suggested before, but here we are able to identify them robustly and relate them to the stellar profile. We exploit the subpopulations to derive dynamical constraints on the mass and dark matter (DM) content of M87 out to ˜100 kpc. We deploy a class of global mass estimators, developed in Paper I, obtaining mass measurements at different locations. The DM fraction in M87 changes from ≈0.2 at the effective radius of the stellar light (0.02° or 6 kpc) to ≈0.95 at the distance probed by the most extended, blue GCs (0.47° or 135 kpc). We complete this analysis with virial decompositions, in which the dynamical model is used to produce velocity dispersions, which in turn are used to separate the GC populations. This ensures that the three subpopulations are simultaneously consistent with the same underlying mass profile. These yield the luminous mass as 5.5^{+1.5}_{-2.0} × 10^{11} M_{⊙} and the DM within 135 kpc as 8.0^{+1.0}_{-4.0} × 10^{12} M_{⊙}. The inner DM density behaves as ρ ˜ r-γ with γ ≈ 1.6. This is steeper than the cosmologically preferred cusp of ρ ˜ r-1 and may provide evidence of DM contraction. Finally, we combine the GC separation into three subpopulations with the Jeans equations, obtaining information on the orbital structure of the GC system. The centrally concentrated red GCs exhibit tangential anisotropy, consistent with the depletion of radial orbits by tidal shredding. The most extended blue GCs have an isotropic velocity-dispersion tensor in the central parts, which becomes

  19. Chaos and universality in the dynamics of inflationary cosmologies. II. The role of nonextensive statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, H. P.; Damião Soares, I.; Tonini, E. V.

    2003-03-01

    We discuss universal statistical patterns in the chaotic dynamics of closed inflationary cosmologies, associated with the presence of a saddle-center critical point in the phase space of the models. We extend and complete the analysis made in a previous paper [H. P. de Oliveira, S. L. Sautu, I. Damião Soares, and E. V. Tonini, Phys. Rev. D 60, 121301 (1999)], including also other inflationary models. The statistical distribution connected to orbits that visit a neighborhood of the saddle center is shown to be in the realm of Tsallis nonextensive statistics that generalizes the Boltzmann-Gibbs statistics for systems in which long-range interactions are present. The value of the entropic index q of the distribution function determines the dimension of the fractal basin boundaries in the ensemble of initial conditions, with respect to the code recollapse/escape into inflation. In a regime of high nonintegrability, this distribution is universal in the sense that it is scale invariant, independent of the parameters of the model and independent of the particular system where the saddle-center is present. Also it does not depend on the specific model where the saddle-center is present. The consequences for the physics of the early stages of inflation are discussed.

  20. Asteroid flux towards circumprimary habitable zones in binary star systems: II. Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bancelin, D; Bazso, A

    2015-01-01

    Secular and mean motion resonances (hearafter MMR) are effective perturbations to shape planetary systems. In binary star systems, they play a key role during the early and late phases of planetary formation as well as the dynamical stability of a planetary system. In this study, we aim to correlate the presence of orbital resonances with the rate of icy asteroids crossing the habitable zone (hearafter HZ), from a circumprimary disk of planetesimals in various binary star systems. We modelled a belt of small bodies in the inner and outer regions, respectively below and beyond the orbit of a gas giant planet. The planetesimals are equally placed around a primary G-type star and move under the gravitational influence of the two stars and the gas giant. We numerically integrated the system for 50 Myr considering various parameters for the secondary star. Its stellar type varies from a M- to F-type; its semimajor axis is either 50 au or 100 au and its eccentricity is either 0.1 or 0.3. Our simulations highlight t...

  1. Interfacial electron transfer dynamics of ru(II)-polypy6ridine sensitized TiO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakubikova, Elena [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martin, Richard L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batista, Enrique R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Snoeberger, Robert C [YALE UNIV.; Batista, Victor S [YALE UNIV.

    2009-01-01

    Quantum dynamics simulations combined with density functional theory calculations are applied to study interfacial electron transfer (IET) from pyridine-4-phosphonic acid, [Ru(tpy)(tpy(PO{sub 3}H{sub 2}))]{sup 2+} and [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(H{sub 2}O)-Ru(tpy)(tpy(PO{sub 3}H{sub 2}))]{sup 4+} into the (101) surface of anatase TiO{sub 2}. IET rate from pyridine-4-phosphonic acid attached to the nanoparticle in bidentate mode ({tau} {approx} 100 fs) is an order of magnitude faster than the IET rate of the adsorbate attached in the monodentate mode ({tau} {approx} 1 ps). Upon excitation with visible light, [Ru(tpy)(tpy(PO{sub 3}H{sub 2}))]{sup 2+} attached to TiO{sub 2} in bidentate binding mode will undergo IET with the rate of {approx} 1-10 ps, which is competitive with the excited state decay into the ground state. The probability of electron injection from [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(H{sub 2}O)-Ru(tpy)(tpy(PO{sub 3}H{sub 2}))]{sup 4+} is rather low, as the excitation with visible light localizes the excited electron in the tpy-tpy bridge, which does not have favorable coupling with the TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle. The results are relevant to better understanding of the adsorbate features important for promoting efficient interfacial electron transfer into the semiconductor.

  2. Dynamical analysis of a cubic Liénard system with global parameters (II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hebai; Chen, Xingwu

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we continue to study the global dynamics of a cubic Liénard system for global parameters in the case of three equilibria to follow (2015 Nonlinearity 28 3535-62), which deals with the case of two equilibria. We first analyse qualitative properties of all equilibria and judge the existences of limit cycles and homoclinic loops and their numbers. Then we obtain the bifurcation diagram and all phase portraits as our main results. Based on these results, in the case of three equilibria a positive answer to conjecture 3.2 of (1998 Nonlinearity 11 1505-19), which is about the existence of some function whose graph is exactly the surface of double limit cycles, is obtained. Moreover, a parameter region for the nonexistence of figure-eight loops is given theoretically to compensate for previous numerical results and is illustrated numerically. Supported by NSFC 11471228, 11572263, the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities and Cultivation Foundation of Excellent Doctoral Dissertation of Southwest Jiaotong University (2015).

  3. Multifluid, Magnetohydrodynamic Shock Waves with Grain Dynamics II. Dust and the Critical Speed for C Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Ciolek, G E; Mouschovias, T C

    2004-01-01

    This is the second in a series of papers on the effects of dust on multifluid, MHD shock waves in weakly ionized molecular gas. We investigate the influence of dust on the critical shock speed, v_crit, above which C shocks cease to exist. Chernoff showed that v_crit cannot exceed the grain magnetosound speed, v_gms, if dust grains are dynamically well coupled to the magnetic field. We present numerical simulations of steady shocks where the grains may be well- or poorly coupled to the field. We use a time-dependent, multifluid MHD code that models the plasma as a system of interacting fluids: neutral particles, ions, electrons, and various ``dust fluids'' comprised of grains with different sizes and charges. Our simulations include grain inertia and grain charge fluctuations but to highlight the essential physics we assume adiabatic flow, single-size grains, and neglect the effects of chemistry. We show that the existence of a phase speed v_phi does not necessarily mean that C shocks will form for all shock s...

  4. An effective field theory during inflation II: stochastic dynamics and power spectrum suppression

    CERN Document Server

    Boyanovsky, D

    2015-01-01

    We obtain the non-equilibrium effective action of an inflaton like scalar field --the system-- by tracing over sub Hubble degrees of freedom of ``environmental'' light scalar fields. The effective action is stochastic leading to effective Langevin equations of motion for the fluctuations of the inflaton-like field, with self-energy corrections and stochastic noise correlators that obey a de Sitter space-time analog of a fluctuation dissipation relation. We solve the Langevin equation implementing a dynamical renormalization group resummation of the leading secular terms and obtain the corrections to the power spectrum of super Hubble fluctuations of the inflaton field, $\\mathcal{P}(k;\\eta) = \\mathcal{P}_0(k)\\,e^{-\\gamma(k;\\eta)}$ where $\\mathcal{P}_0(k)$ is the nearly scale invariant power spectrum in absence of coupling. $\\gamma(k;\\eta)>0$ describes the suppression of the power spectrum, it features Sudakov-type double logarithms and entails violations of scale invariance. We also obtain the effective action...

  5. A dynamical study on the habitability of terrestrial exoplanets II: The super Earth HD 40307 g

    CERN Document Server

    Brasser, R; Kokubo, E

    2014-01-01

    HARPS and it Kepler results indicate that half of solar-type stars host planets with periods P<100 d and masses M < 30 M_E. These super Earth systems are compact and dynamically cold. Here we investigate the stability of the super Earth system around the K-dwarf HD40307. It could host up to six planets, with one in the habitable zone. We analyse the system's stability using numerical simulations from initial conditions within the observational uncertainties. The most stable solution deviates 3.1 sigma from the published value, with planets e and f not in resonance and planets b and c apsidally aligned. We study the habitability of the outer planet through the yearly-averaged insolation and black-body temperature at the pole. Both undergo large variations because of its high eccentricity and are much more intense than on Earth. The insolation variations are precession dominated with periods of 40 kyr and 102 kyr for precession and obliquity if the rotation period is 3 d. A rotation period of about 1.5 d ...

  6. Connecting the dots II: Phase changes in the climate dynamics of tidally locked terrestrial exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Carone, Ludmila; Decin, Leen

    2015-01-01

    We investigate 3D atmosphere dynamics for tidally locked terrestrial planets with an Earth-like atmosphere and irradiation for different rotation periods ($P_{rot}=1-100$ days) and planet sizes ($R_P=1-2 R_{Earth}$) with unprecedented fine detail. We could precisely identify three climate state transition regions that are associated with phase transitions in standing tropical and extra tropical Rossby waves. We confirm that the climate on fast rotating planets may assume multiple states ($P_{rot}\\leq 12$ days for $R_P=2 R_{Earth}$). Our study is, however, the first to identify the type of planetary wave associated with different climate states: The first state is dominated by standing tropical Rossby waves with fast equatorial superrotation. The second state is dominated by standing extra tropical Rossby waves with high latitude westerly jets with slower wind speeds. For very fast rotations ($P_{rot}\\leq 5$~days for $R_P=2 R_{Earth}$), we find another climate state transition, where the standing tropical and ...

  7. Modeling reverberation mapping data II: dynamical modeling of the Lick AGN Monitoring Project 2008 dataset

    CERN Document Server

    Pancoast, Anna; Treu, Tommaso; Park, Daeseong; Barth, Aaron J; Bentz, Misty C; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2013-01-01

    We present dynamical modeling of the broad line region (BLR) for a sample of five Seyfert 1 galaxies using reverberation mapping data taken by the Lick AGN Monitoring Project (LAMP) in 2008. The sample includes Arp 151, Mrk 1310, NGC 5548, NGC 6814, and SBS 1116+583A. By modeling the continuum light curve and H$\\beta$ line profiles directly we are able to constrain the geometry and kinematics of the BLR. Modeling the kinematics also allows us to make a measurement of the black hole mass that does not depend upon the virial coefficient or normalizing factor needed in traditional reverberation mapping analysis. We find that the geometry of the BLR is generally a thick disk viewed close to face-on, but a more spherical geometry is not ruled out for two of the five AGNs. While the H$\\beta$ is found to come preferentially from the far side of the BLR, the mean size of the BLR is consistent with the lags measured with cross-correlation analysis. The BLR kinematics are generally found to be consistent with either in...

  8. Modelling reverberation mapping data - II. Dynamical modelling of the Lick AGN Monitoring Project 2008 data set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancoast, Anna; Brewer, Brendon J.; Treu, Tommaso; Park, Daeseong; Barth, Aaron J.; Bentz, Misty C.; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2014-12-01

    We present dynamical modelling of the broad-line region (BLR) for a sample of five Seyfert 1 galaxies using reverberation mapping data taken by the Lick AGN Monitoring Project in 2008. By modelling the AGN continuum light curve and Hβ line profiles directly, we are able to constrain the geometry and kinematics of the BLR and make a measurement of the black hole mass that does not depend upon the virial factor, f, needed in traditional reverberation mapping analysis. We find that the geometry of the BLR is generally a thick disc viewed close to face-on. While the Hβ emission is found to come preferentially from the far side of the BLR, the mean size of the BLR is consistent with the lags measured with cross-correlation analysis. The BLR kinematics are found to be consistent with either inflowing motions or elliptical orbits, often with some combination of the two. We measure black hole masses of log _{10}(M_ BH/M_{odot })=6.62^{+0.10}_{-0.13} for Arp 151, 7.42^{+0.26}_{-0.27} for Mrk 1310, 7.59^{+0.24}_{-0.21} for NGC 5548, 6.37^{+0.21}_{-0.16} for NGC 6814, and 6.99^{+0.32}_{-0.25} for SBS 1116+583A. The f factors measured individually for each AGN are found to correlate with inclination angle, although not with M BH, L5100, or FWHM/σ of the emission line profile.

  9. Chandra view of the dynamically young cluster of galaxies A1367 II. point sources

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, M

    2002-01-01

    A 40 ks \\emph{Chandra} ACIS-S observation of the dynamically young cluster A1367 yields new insights on X-ray emission from cluster member galaxies. We detect 59 point-like sources in the ACIS field, of which 8 are identified with known cluster member galaxies. Thus in total 10 member galaxies are detected in X-rays when three galaxies discussed in paper I (Sun & Murray 2002; NGC 3860 is discussed in both papers) are included. The superior spatial resolution and good spectroscopy capability of \\chandra allow us to constrain the emission nature of these galaxies. Central nuclei, thermal halos and stellar components are revealed in their spectra. Four new low luminosity nuclei (LLAGN) are found, including an absorbed one (NGC 3861). This discovery makes the LLAGN/AGN content in this part of A1367 very high ($\\sim$ 20%). Thermal halos with temperatures around 0.5 - 0.8 keV are revealed in the spectra of two elliptical galaxies NGC 3842 and NGC 3837, which suggests that galactic coronae can survive in cluster...

  10. New Limits on an Intermediate Mass Black Hole in Omega Centauri: II. Dynamical Models

    CERN Document Server

    van der Marel, Roeland P

    2009-01-01

    We present a detailed dynamical analysis of the projected density and kinematical data available for the globular cluster Omega Cen. We solve the spherical anisotropic Jeans equation to predict the projected profiles of the RMS velocity in each of the three orthogonal coordinate directions (line of sight, proper motion radial, and proper motion tangential). We fit the models to new HST star count and proper motion data near the cluster center presented in Paper I, combined with existing ground-based measurements. We also derive and model the Gauss-Hermite moments of the observed proper motion distributions. The projected density profile is consistent with being flat near the center, with an upper limit gamma=0.07 on the central logarithmic slope. The RMS proper motion profile is also consistent with being flat near the center, and there are no unusually fast-moving stars. The models provide a good fit and yield a 1-sigma upper limit MBH < 1.2E4 solar masses on the mass of a possible intermediate-mass black...

  11. Lee-Yang-Fisher zeros for DHL and 2D rational dynamics, II. Global Pluripotential Interpretation

    CERN Document Server

    Bleher, Pavel; Roeder, Roland

    2011-01-01

    In a classical work of the 1950's, Lee and Yang proved that for fixed nonnegative temperature, the zeros of the partition functions of a ferromagnetic Ising model always lie on the unit circle in the complex magnetic field. Zeros of the partition function in the complex temperature were then considered by Fisher, when the magnetic field is set to zero. Limiting distributions of Lee-Yang and of Fisher zeros are physically important as they control phase transitions in the model. One can also consider the zeros of the partition function simultaneously in both complex magnetic field and complex temperature. They form an algebraic curve called the Lee-Yang-Fisher (LYF) zeros. In this paper we study their limiting distribution for the Diamond Hierarchical Lattice (DHL). In this case, it can be described in terms of the dynamics of an explicit rational function $R$ in two variables (the Migdal-Kadanoff renormalization transformation). We prove that the Lee-Yang-Fisher zeros are equidistributed with respect to a dyn...

  12. Electrostatics of proteins in dielectric solvent continua. II. Hamiltonian reaction field dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Sebastian; Tavan, Paul; Mathias, Gerald

    2014-03-14

    In Paper I of this work [S. Bauer, G. Mathias, and P. Tavan, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 104102 (2014)] we have presented a reaction field (RF) method, which accurately solves the Poisson equation for proteins embedded in dielectric solvent continua at a computational effort comparable to that of polarizable molecular mechanics (MM) force fields. Building upon these results, here we suggest a method for linearly scaling Hamiltonian RF/MM molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which we call "Hamiltonian dielectric solvent" (HADES). First, we derive analytical expressions for the RF forces acting on the solute atoms. These forces properly account for all those conditions, which have to be self-consistently fulfilled by RF quantities introduced in Paper I. Next we provide details on the implementation, i.e., we show how our RF approach is combined with a fast multipole method and how the self-consistency iterations are accelerated by the use of the so-called direct inversion in the iterative subspace. Finally we demonstrate that the method and its implementation enable Hamiltonian, i.e., energy and momentum conserving HADES-MD, and compare in a sample application on Ac-Ala-NHMe the HADES-MD free energy landscape at 300 K with that obtained in Paper I by scanning of configurations and with one obtained from an explicit solvent simulation.

  13. DYNAMICS OF CORONAL RAIN AND DESCENDING PLASMA BLOBS IN SOLAR PROMINENCES. II. PARTIALLY IONIZED CASE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, R.; Soler, R.; Terradas, J. [Departament de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Zaqarashvili, T. V., E-mail: ramon.oliver@uib.es [Institute of Physics, IGAM, University of Graz, Universitätsplatz 5, 8010, Graz (Austria)

    2016-02-20

    Coronal rain clumps and prominence knots are dense condensations with chromospheric to transition region temperatures that fall down in the much hotter corona. Their typical speeds are in the range 30–150 km s{sup −1} and of the order of 10–30 km s{sup −1}, respectively, i.e., they are considerably smaller than free-fall velocities. These cold blobs contain a mixture of ionized and neutral material that must be dynamically coupled in order to fall together, as observed. We investigate this coupling by means of hydrodynamic simulations in which the coupling arises from the friction between ions and neutrals. The numerical simulations presented here are an extension of those of Oliver et al. to the partially ionized case. We find that, although the relative drift speed between the two species is smaller than 1 m s{sup −1} at the blob center, it is sufficient to produce the forces required to strongly couple charged particles and neutrals. The ionization degree has no discernible effect on the main results of our previous work for a fully ionized plasma: the condensation has an initial acceleration phase followed by a period with roughly constant velocity, and, in addition, the maximum descending speed is clearly correlated with the ratio of initial blob to environment density.

  14. A study of the properties of twin radio arms of FR-II extragalactic radio sources within z≤1-II (dynamical properties)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onuchukwu, C. C.; Ubachukwu, A. A.

    2017-04-01

    We carried out a comparative study on the dynamical properties of the Longer Arm (LA) and the Shorter Arm (SA) of different classes of FR-II radio sources (Broad Line Radio Galaxies (BLRG), Quasars (Q), Narrow Line Radio Galaxies (NLRG) and Low Excitation Radio Galaxies (LERG)) based on self-similar model of time evolution of the radio lobes and hotspot properties of radio sources, using the power-law expression for the dependence of hotspot size (D_{hs}), the advance velocity of the hotspot (v_{hs}) and hotspot luminosity (PL) on the core-lobe length (DL). Using observational values of D_{hs}, PL and DL we constrained the exponents of these power-law relations for the LA and SA. We also estimated the hotspot pressure, (p_{hs}), cocoon pressure within the lobe (p_{cc}), the ratio of the hotspot pressure to the cocoon pressure (p_{hc}), the cocoon volume (Vcc), the energy density within the cocoon (u_{cc}), the equipartition magnetic field (B_{em}) in the lobe, the particle number density at the hotspot (n_{hs}), the external density profile (ρ _{ext}) and the kinetic jet power (Q_{jet}) for the LA and the SA. Linear regression analyses indicate a tight correlation between the D_{hs} and the DL of LA for all classes of radio sources with r˜0.5-0.8. Similar result was obtained for SA except for that of Q with r˜ 0.2. For P_{hs} and DL correlation, the result indicates a mild negative correlation that seems stronger for the SA (r˜-0.3 to -0.6) than LA (r˜-0.2 to -0.4) for all the different classes of radio sources. Comparing the values of ρ_{ext}, B_{em}, uB, p_{hs}, p_{cc}, Vcc, and u_{cc} between SA side and LA side, indicate that the SA values of the parameters are higher than those of LA; while (p_{hs}) showed higher values in LA than SA for all the different classes of radio sources. Generally, the hotspot has a larger volume on the LA side than on the SA side except for NLRG, while the hotspot of the SA side contains more particle per unit volume than the

  15. Protein film voltammetry and co-factor electron transfer dynamics in spinach photosystem II core complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun; Magdaong, Nikki; Frank, Harry A; Rusling, James F

    2014-05-01

    Direct protein film voltammetry (PFV) was used to investigate the redox properties of the photosystem II (PSII) core complex from spinach. The complex was isolated using an improved protocol not used previously for PFV. The PSII core complex had high oxygen-evolving capacity and was incorporated into thin lipid and polyion films. Three well-defined reversible pairs of reduction and oxidation voltammetry peaks were observed at 4 °C in the dark. Results were similar in both types of films, indicating that the environment of the PSII-bound cofactors was not influenced by film type. Based on comparison with various control samples including Mn-depleted PSII, peaks were assigned to chlorophyll a (Chl a) (Em = -0.47 V, all vs. NHE, at pH 6), quinones (-0.12 V), and the manganese (Mn) cluster (Em = 0.18 V). PFV of purified iron heme protein cytochrome b-559 (Cyt b-559), a component of PSII, gave a partly reversible peak pair at 0.004 V that did not have a potential similar to any peaks observed from the intact PSII core complex. The closest peak in PSII to 0.004 V is the 0.18 V peak that was found to be associated with a two-electron process, and thus is inconsistent with iron heme protein voltammetry. The -0.47 V peak had a peak potential and peak potential-pH dependence similar to that found for purified Chl a incorporated into DMPC films. The midpoint potentials reported here may differ to various extents from previously reported redox titration data due to the influence of electrode double-layer effects. Heterogeneous electron transfer (hET) rate constants were estimated by theoretical fitting and digital simulations for the -0.47 and 0.18 V peaks. Data for the Chl a peaks were best fit to a one-electron model, while the peak assigned to the Mn cluster was best fit by a two-electron/one-proton model.

  16. Sarcomere lattice geometry influences cooperative myosin binding in muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand C W Tanner

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In muscle, force emerges from myosin binding with actin (forming a cross-bridge. This actomyosin binding depends upon myofilament geometry, kinetics of thin-filament Ca(2+ activation, and kinetics of cross-bridge cycling. Binding occurs within a compliant network of protein filaments where there is mechanical coupling between myosins along the thick-filament backbone and between actin monomers along the thin filament. Such mechanical coupling precludes using ordinary differential equation models when examining the effects of lattice geometry, kinetics, or compliance on force production. This study uses two stochastically driven, spatially explicit models to predict levels of cross-bridge binding, force, thin-filament Ca(2+ activation, and ATP utilization. One model incorporates the 2-to-1 ratio of thin to thick filaments of vertebrate striated muscle (multi-filament model, while the other comprises only one thick and one thin filament (two-filament model. Simulations comparing these models show that the multi-filament predictions of force, fractional cross-bridge binding, and cross-bridge turnover are more consistent with published experimental values. Furthermore, the values predicted by the multi-filament model are greater than those values predicted by the two-filament model. These increases are larger than the relative increase of potential inter-filament interactions in the multi-filament model versus the two-filament model. This amplification of coordinated cross-bridge binding and cycling indicates a mechanism of cooperativity that depends on sarcomere lattice geometry, specifically the ratio and arrangement of myofilaments.

  17. Myosin Vc Is Specialized for Transport on a Secretory Superhighway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sladewski, Thomas E; Krementsova, Elena B; Trybus, Kathleen M

    2016-08-22

    A hallmark of the well-studied vertebrate class Va myosin is its ability to take multiple steps on actin as a single molecule without dissociating, a feature called "processivity." Therefore, it was surprising when kinetic and single-molecule assays showed that human myosin Vc (MyoVc) was not processive on single-actin filaments [1-3]. We explored the possibility that MyoVc is processive only under conditions that resemble its biological context. Recently, it was shown that zymogen vesicles are transported on actin "superhighways" composed of parallel actin cables nucleated by formins from the plasma membrane [4]. Loss of these cables compromises orderly apical targeting of vesicles. MyoVc has been implicated in transporting secretory vesicles to the apical membrane [5]. We hypothesized that actin cables regulate the processive properties of MyoVc. We show that MyoVc is unique in taking variable size steps, which are frequently in the backward direction. Results obtained with chimeric constructs implicate the lever arm/rod of MyoVc as being responsible for these properties. Actin bundles allow single MyoVc motors to move processively. Remarkably, even teams of MyoVc motors require actin bundles to move continuously at physiological ionic strength. The irregular stepping pattern of MyoVc, which may result from flexibility in the lever arm/rod of MyoVc, appears to be a unique structural adaptation that allows the actin track to spatially restrict the activity of MyoVc to specialized actin cables in order to co-ordinate and target the final stages of vesicle secretion.

  18. Mean-field modeling of the basal ganglia-thalamocortical system. II Dynamics of parkinsonian oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Albada, S J; Gray, R T; Drysdale, P M; Robinson, P A

    2009-04-21

    Neuronal correlates of Parkinson's disease (PD) include a shift to lower frequencies in the electroencephalogram (EEG) and enhanced synchronized oscillations at 3-7 and 7-30 Hz in the basal ganglia, thalamus, and cortex. This study describes the dynamics of a recent physiologically based mean-field model of the basal ganglia-thalamocortical system, and shows how it accounts for many key electrophysiological correlates of PD. Its detailed functional connectivity comprises partially segregated direct and indirect pathways through two populations of striatal neurons, a hyperdirect pathway involving a corticosubthalamic projection, thalamostriatal feedback, and local inhibition in striatum and external pallidum (GPe). In a companion paper, realistic steady-state firing rates were obtained for the healthy state, and after dopamine loss modeled by weaker direct and stronger indirect pathways, reduced intrapallidal inhibition, lower firing thresholds of the GPe and subthalamic nucleus (STN), a stronger projection from striatum to GPe, and weaker cortical interactions. Here it is shown that oscillations around 5 and 20 Hz can arise with a strong indirect pathway, which also causes increased synchronization throughout the basal ganglia. Furthermore, increased theta power with progressive nigrostriatal degeneration is correlated with reduced alpha power and peak frequency, in agreement with empirical results. Unlike the hyperdirect pathway, the indirect pathway sustains oscillations with phase relationships that coincide with those found experimentally. Alterations in the responses of basal ganglia to transient stimuli accord with experimental observations. Reduced cortical gains due to both nigrostriatal and mesocortical dopamine loss lead to slower changes in cortical activity and may be related to bradykinesia. Finally, increased EEG power found in some studies may be partly explained by a lower effective GPe firing threshold, reduced GPe-GPe inhibition, and/or weaker

  19. A dynamical systems analysis of afferent control in a neuromechanical model of locomotion: II. Phase asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spardy, Lucy E; Markin, Sergey N; Shevtsova, Natalia A; Prilutsky, Boris I; Rybak, Ilya A; Rubin, Jonathan E

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we analyze a closed loop neuromechanical model of locomotor rhythm generation. The model is composed of a spinal central pattern generator (CPG) and a single-joint limb, with CPG outputs projecting via motoneurons to muscles that control the limb and afferent signals from the muscles feeding back to the CPG. In a preceding companion paper (Spardy et al 2011 J. Neural Eng. 8 065003), we analyzed how the model generates oscillations in the presence or absence of feedback, identified curves in a phase plane associated with the limb that signify where feedback levels induce phase transitions within the CPG, and explained how increasing feedback strength restores oscillations in a model representation of spinal cord injury; from these steps, we derived insights about features of locomotor rhythms in several scenarios and made predictions about rhythm responses to various perturbations. In this paper, we exploit our analytical observations to construct a reduced model that retains important characteristics from the original system. We prove the existence of an oscillatory solution to the reduced model using a novel version of a Melnikov function, adapted for discontinuous systems, and also comment on the uniqueness and stability of this solution. Our analysis yields a deeper understanding of how the model must be tuned to generate oscillations and how the details of the limb dynamics shape overall model behavior. In particular, we explain how, due to the feedback signals in the model, changes in the strength of a tonic supra-spinal drive to the CPG yield asymmetric alterations in the durations of different locomotor phases, despite symmetry within the CPG itself.

  20. The molecular dynamics of crawling migration in microtubule-disrupted keratocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Hitomi; Okimura, Chika; Iwadate, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Cell-crawling migration plays an essential role in complex biological phenomena. It is now generally believed that many processes essential to such migration are regulated by microtubules in many cells, including fibroblasts and neurons. However, keratocytes treated with nocodazole, which is an inhibitor of microtubule polymerization - and even keratocyte fragments that contain no microtubules - migrate at the same velocity and with the same directionality as normal keratocytes. In this study, we discovered that not only these migration properties, but also the molecular dynamics that regulate such properties, such as the retrograde flow rate of actin filaments, distributions of vinculin and myosin II, and traction forces, are also the same in nocodazole-treated keratocytes as those in untreated keratocytes. These results suggest that microtubules are not in fact required for crawling migration of keratocytes, either in terms of migrating properties or of intracellular molecular dynamics.

  1. The short-time intramolecular dynamics of solutes in liquids. II. Vibrational population relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodyear, Grant; Stratt, Richard M.

    1997-08-01

    Events such as the vibrational relaxation of a solute are often well described by writing an effective equation of motion—a generalized Langevin equation—which expresses the surrounding medium's influence on the intramolecular dynamics in terms of a friction and a fluctuating force acting on the solute. These quantities, though, can be obtained from the instantaneous normal modes (INMs) of the system when the relaxation takes place in a fluid, suggesting that we should be able to analyze in some detail the solvent motions driving the relaxation, at least for short times. In this paper we show that this promise can indeed be realized for the specific case of a vibrating diatomic molecule dissolved in an atomic solvent. Despite the relatively long times typical of vibrational population relaxation, it turns out that understanding the behavior of the vibrational friction at the short times appropriate to INMs (a few hundred femtoseconds) often suffices to predict T1 times. We use this observation to probe the dependence of these relaxation rates on thermodynamic conditions and to look at the molecular mechanisms underlying the process. We find that raising the temperature at any given density or raising the density at any given temperature will invariably increase the rate of energy relaxation. However, since these two trends may be in conflict in a typical constant-pressure laboratory experiment, we also find that it is possible to make sense of the "anomalous" inverted temperature dependence recently seen experimentally. We find, as well, that the INM theory—which has no explicit collisions built into it—predicts exactly the same density dependence as the venerable independent-binary-collision (IBC) theory (an intriguing result in view of recent claims that experimental observations of this kind of dependence provide support for the IBC theory). The actual mechanisms behind vibrational population relaxation are revealed by looking in detail at the

  2. A dynamically bi-orthogonal method for time-dependent stochastic partial differential equations II: Adaptivity and generalizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Mulin, E-mail: mulinch@caltech.edu [Computing and Mathematical Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Hou, Thomas Y., E-mail: hou@cms.caltech.edu [Computing and Mathematical Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Zhang, Zhiwen, E-mail: zhangzw@caltech.edu [Computing and Mathematical Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2013-06-01

    This is part II of our paper in which we propose and develop a dynamically bi-orthogonal method (DyBO) to study a class of time-dependent stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs) whose solutions enjoy a low-dimensional structure. In part I of our paper [9], we derived the DyBO formulation and proposed numerical algorithms based on this formulation. Some important theoretical results regarding consistency and bi-orthogonality preservation were also established in the first part along with a range of numerical examples to illustrate the effectiveness of the DyBO method. In this paper, we focus on the computational complexity analysis and develop an effective adaptivity strategy to add or remove modes dynamically. Our complexity analysis shows that the ratio of computational complexities between the DyBO method and a generalized polynomial chaos method (gPC) is roughly of order O((m/N{sub p}){sup 3}) for a quadratic nonlinear SPDE, where m is the number of mode pairs used in the DyBO method and N{sub p} is the number of elements in the polynomial basis in gPC. The effective dimensions of the stochastic solutions have been found to be small in many applications, so we can expect m is much smaller than N{sub p} and computational savings of our DyBO method against gPC are dramatic. The adaptive strategy plays an essential role for the DyBO method to be effective in solving some challenging problems. Another important contribution of this paper is the generalization of the DyBO formulation for a system of time-dependent SPDEs. Several numerical examples are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of our method, including the Navier–Stokes equations and the Boussinesq approximation with Brownian forcing.

  3. Characterization and localization of dynein and myosins V and VI in the ovaries of queen bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricio, Karina; Calábria, Luciana Karen; Peixoto, Pablo Marco; Espindola, Foued Salmen; Da Cruz-Landim, Carminda

    2010-10-01

    The presence of myosin and dynein in the ovaries of both Apis mellifera and Scaptotrigona postica was investigated in extracts and in histological sections. In the ovary extracts, motor proteins, myosins V, VI and dynein were detected by Western blot. In histological sections, they were detected by immunocytochemistry, using a mouse monoclonal antibody against the intermediary chain of dynein and a rabbit polyclonal antibody against the myosin V head domain. The myosin VI tail domain was recognized by a pig polyclonal antibody. The results show that these molecular motors are expressed in the ovaries of both bee species with few differences in location and intensity, in regions where movement of substances is expected during oogenesis. The fact that antibodies against vertebrate proteins recognize proteins of bee species indicates that the specific epitopes are evolutionarily well preserved.

  4. Drosophila PATJ supports adherens junction stability by modulating Myosin light chain activity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sen, Arnab; Nagy-Zsvér-Vadas, Zsanett; Krahn, Michael P

    2012-01-01

    ... (Pals1-associated tight junction protein) was not per se crucial for the maintenance of apical-basal polarity in Drosophila melanogaster epithelial cells but rather regulated Myosin localization and phosphorylation...

  5. Expression of Calmodulin and Myosin Light Chain Kinase during Larval Settlement of the Barnacle Balanus amphitrite

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Zhang-Fan

    2012-02-13

    Barnacles are one of the most common organisms in intertidal areas. Their life cycle includes seven free-swimming larval stages and sessile juvenile and adult stages. The transition from the swimming to the sessile stages, referred to as larval settlement, is crucial for their survivor success and subsequent population distribution. In this study, we focused on the involvement of calmodulin (CaM) and its binding proteins in the larval settlement of the barnacle, Balanus (= Amphibalanus) amphitrite. The full length of CaM gene was cloned from stage II nauplii of B. amphitrite (referred to as Ba-CaM), encoding 149 amino acid residues that share a high similarity with published CaMs in other organisms. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that Ba-CaM was highly expressed in cyprids, the stage at which swimming larvae are competent to attach and undergo metamorphosis. In situ hybridization revealed that the expressed Ba-CaM gene was localized in compound eyes, posterior ganglion and cement glands, all of which may have essential functions during larval settlement. Larval settlement assays showed that both the CaM inhibitor compound 48/80 and the CaM-dependent myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor ML-7 effectively blocked barnacle larval settlement, whereas Ca 2+/CaM-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibitors did not show any clear effects. The subsequent real-time PCR assay showed a higher expression level of Ba-MLCK gene in larval stages than in adults, suggesting an important role of Ba-MLCK gene in larval development and competency. Overall, the results suggest that CaM and CaM-dependent MLCK function during larval settlement of B. amphitrite. © 2012 Chen et al.

  6. Expression of calmodulin and myosin light chain kinase during larval settlement of the Barnacle Balanus amphitrite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang-Fan Chen

    Full Text Available Barnacles are one of the most common organisms in intertidal areas. Their life cycle includes seven free-swimming larval stages and sessile juvenile and adult stages. The transition from the swimming to the sessile stages, referred to as larval settlement, is crucial for their survivor success and subsequent population distribution. In this study, we focused on the involvement of calmodulin (CaM and its binding proteins in the larval settlement of the barnacle, Balanus ( = Amphibalanus amphitrite. The full length of CaM gene was cloned from stage II nauplii of B. amphitrite (referred to as Ba-CaM, encoding 149 amino acid residues that share a high similarity with published CaMs in other organisms. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that Ba-CaM was highly expressed in cyprids, the stage at which swimming larvae are competent to attach and undergo metamorphosis. In situ hybridization revealed that the expressed Ba-CaM gene was localized in compound eyes, posterior ganglion and cement glands, all of which may have essential functions during larval settlement. Larval settlement assays showed that both the CaM inhibitor compound 48/80 and the CaM-dependent myosin light chain kinase (MLCK inhibitor ML-7 effectively blocked barnacle larval settlement, whereas Ca(2+/CaM-dependent kinase II (CaMKII inhibitors did not show any clear effects. The subsequent real-time PCR assay showed a higher expression level of Ba-MLCK gene in larval stages than in adults, suggesting an important role of Ba-MLCK gene in larval development and competency. Overall, the results suggest that CaM and CaM-dependent MLCK function during larval settlement of B. amphitrite.

  7. Kinetics of myosin light chain kinase activation of smooth muscle myosin in an in vitro model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Feng; Facemyer, Kevin C; Carter, Michael S; Jackson, Del R; Haldeman, Brian D; Ruana, Nick; Sutherland, Cindy; Walsh, Michael P; Cremo, Christine R; Baker, Josh E

    2013-11-26

    During activation of smooth muscle contraction, one myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) molecule rapidly phosphorylates many smooth muscle myosin (SMM) molecules, suggesting that muscle activation rates are influenced by the kinetics of MLCK-SMM interactions. To determine the rate-limiting step underlying activation of SMM by MLCK, we measured the kinetics of calcium-calmodulin (Ca²⁺CaM)-MLCK-mediated SMM phosphorylation and the corresponding initiation of SMM-based F-actin motility in an in vitro system with SMM attached to a coverslip surface. Fitting the time course of SMM phosphorylation to a kinetic model gave an initial phosphorylation rate, kp(o), of ~1.17 heads s⁻¹ MLCK⁻¹. Also, we measured the dwell time of single streptavidin-coated quantum dot-labeled MLCK molecules interacting with surface-attached SMM and phosphorylated SMM using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. From these data, the dissociation rate constant from phosphorylated SMM was 0.80 s⁻¹, which was similar to the kp(o) mentioned above and with rates measured in solution. This dissociation rate was essentially independent of the phosphorylation state of SMM. From calculations using our measured dissociation rates and Kd values, and estimates of SMM and MLCK concentrations in muscle, we predict that the dissociation of MLCK from phosphorylated SMM is rate-limiting and that the rate of the phosphorylation step is faster than this dissociation rate. Also, association with SMM (11-46 s⁻¹) would be much faster than with pSMM (SMM is 55-460 times greater. This would avoid sequestering MLCK to unproductive interactions with previously phosphorylated SMM, potentially leading to faster rates of phosphorylation in muscle.

  8. Interaction of Myosin Phosphatase Target Subunit (MYPT1) with Myosin Phosphatase-RhoA Interacting Protein (MRIP): A Role of Glutamic Acids in the Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunhee; Stafford, Walter F

    2015-01-01

    Scaffold proteins bind to and functionally link protein members of signaling pathways. Interaction of the scaffold proteins, myosin phosphatase target subunit (MYPT1) and myosin phosphatase-RhoA interacting protein (MRIP), causes co-localization of myosin phosphatase and RhoA to actomyosin. To examine biophysical properties of interaction of MYPT1 with MRIP, we employed analytical ultracentrifugation and surface plasmon resonance. In regard to MRIP, its residues 724-837 are sufficient for the MYPT1/MRIP interaction. Moreover, MRIP binds to MYPT1 as either a monomer or a dimer. With respect to MYPT1, its leucine repeat region, LR (residues 991-1030) is sufficient to account for the MYPT1/MRIP interaction. Furthermore, point mutations that replace glutamic acids 998-1000 within LR reduced the binding affinity toward MRIP. This suggests that the glutamic acids of MYPT1 play an important role in the interaction.

  9. Myosin phosphorylation and force potentiation in skeletal muscle: evidence from animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenboom, Rene; Gittings, William; Smith, Ian C; Grange, Robert W; Stull, James T

    2013-12-01

    The contractile performance of mammalian fast twitch skeletal muscle is history dependent. The effect of previous or ongoing contractile activity to potentiate force, i.e. increase isometric twitch force, is a fundamental property of fast skeletal muscle. The precise manifestation of force potentiation is dependent upon a variety of factors with two general types being identified; staircase potentiation referring to the progressive increase in isometric twitch force observed during low frequency stimulation while posttetanic potentiation refers to the step-like increase in isometric twitch force observed following a brief higher frequency (i.e. tetanic) stimulation. Classic studies established that the magnitude and duration of potentiation depends on a number of factors including muscle fiber type, species, temperature, sarcomere length and stimulation paradigm. In addition to isometric twitch force, more recent work has shown that potentiation also influences dynamic (i.e. concentric and/or isotonic) force, work and power at a range of stimulus frequencies in situ or in vitro, an effect that may translate to enhanced physiological function in vivo. Early studies performed on both intact and permeabilized models established that the primary mechanism for this modulation of performance was phosphorylation of myosin, a modification that increased the Ca(2+) sensitivity of contraction. More recent work from a variety of muscle models indicates, however, the presence of a secondary mechanism for potentiation that may involve altered Ca(2+) handling. The primary purpose of this review is to highlight these recent findings relative to the physiological utility of force potentiation in vivo.

  10. Nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA mediates integrin LFA-1 de-adhesion during T lymphocyte migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Nicole A; Oakes, Patrick W; Hyun, Young-Min; Lee, Dooyoung; Chin, Y Eugene; Chin, Eugene Y; King, Michael R; Springer, Timothy A; Shimaoka, Motomu; Tang, Jay X; Reichner, Jonathan S; Kim, Minsoo

    2008-01-21

    Precise spatial and temporal regulation of cell adhesion and de-adhesion is critical for dynamic lymphocyte migration. Although a great deal of information has been learned about integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 adhesion, the mechanism that regulates efficient LFA-1 de-adhesion from intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 during T lymphocyte migration is unknown. Here, we show that nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (MyH9) is recruited to LFA-1 at the uropod of migrating T lymphocytes, and inhibition of the association of MyH9 with LFA-1 results in extreme uropod elongation, defective tail detachment, and decreased lymphocyte migration on ICAM-1, without affecting LFA-1 activation by chemokine CXCL-12. This defect was reversed by a small molecule antagonist that inhibits both LFA-1 affinity and avidity regulation, but not by an antagonist that inhibits only affinity regulation. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of the contact zone between migrating T lymphocytes and ICAM-1 substrate revealed that inactive LFA-1 is selectively localized to the posterior of polarized T lymphocytes, whereas active LFA-1 is localized to their anterior. Thus, during T lymphocyte migration, uropodal adhesion depends on LFA-1 avidity, where MyH9 serves as a key mechanical link between LFA-1 and the cytoskeleton that is critical for LFA-1 de-adhesion.

  11. Single-Molecule Measurement of the Stiffness of the Rigor Myosin Head

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The force-extension curve of single myosin subfragment-1 molecules, interacting in the rigor state with an actin filament, has been investigated at low [ATP] by applying a slow triangle-wave movement to the optical traps holding a bead-actin-bead dumbbell. In combination with a measurement of the overall stiffness of the dumbbell, this allowed characterization of the three extensible elements, the actin-bead links and the myosin. Simultaneously, another method, based on an analysis of bead po...

  12. Structure-based de novo design, molecular docking and molecular dynamics of primaquine analogues acting as quinone reductase II inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murce, Erika; Cuya-Guizado, Teobaldo Ricardo; Padilla-Chavarria, Helmut Isaac; França, Tanos Celmar Costa; Pimentel, Andre Silva

    2015-11-01

    Primaquine is a traditional antimalarial drug with low parasitic resistance and generally good acceptance at higher doses, which has been used for over 60 years in malaria treatment. However, several limitations related to its hematotoxicity have been reported. It is believed that this toxicity comes from the hydroxylation of the C-5 and C-6 positions of its 8-aminoquinoline ring before binding to the molecular target: the quinone reductase II (NQO2) human protein. In this study we propose primaquine derivatives, with substitution at position C-6 of the 8-aminoquinoline ring, planned to have better binding to NQO2, compared to primaquine, but with a reduced toxicity related to the C-5 position being possible to be oxidized. On this sense the proposed analogues were suggested in order to reduce or inhibit hydroxylation and further oxidation to hemotoxic metabolites. Five C-6 substituted primaquine analogues were selected by de novo design and further submitted to docking and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results suggest that all analogues bind better to NQO2 than primaquine and may become better antimalarials. However, the analogues 3 and 4 are predicted to have a better activity/toxicity balance.

  13. Nickel(II) Complexation with Nitrate in Dry [C4mim][Tf2N] Ionic Liquid: A Spectroscopic, Microcalorimetric, and Molecular Dynamics Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchior, Andrea; Gaillard, Clotilde; Gràcia Lanas, Sara; Tolazzi, Marilena; Billard, Isabelle; Georg, Sylvia; Sarrasin, Lola; Boltoeva, Maria

    2016-04-04

    The complex formation of nitrate ions with nickel(II) in dry [C4mim][Tf2N] ionic liquid (IL) was investigated by means of UV-visible spectrophotometry, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS), and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. EXAFS spectroscopy and MD simulations show that the solvated Ni(II) cation is initially coordinated by the oxygens of the [Tf2N](-) anion of IL, which can behave either as mono- or bidentate. Spectroscopic and thermodynamic data show that Ni(II) is able to form up to three stable mononuclear complexes with nitrate in this solvent. The stability constants for Ni(NO3)j complexes (j = 1-3) calculated from spectrophotometry and ITC experiments decrease in the order log K1 > log K2 > log K3. The formation of the first two species is enthalpy-driven, while the third species is entropy-stabilized. The UV-vis spectra of solutions containing different nitrate/Ni(II) ratios show that the metal ion retains the six-coordinate geometry. Furthermore, the EXAFS evidences that nitrate is always bidentate. Molecular dynamics simulations show that the [Tf2N](-) anions bind Ni(II) through the sulfonyl oxygen atoms and can coordinate either as monodentate or chelate. The analysis of the MD data shows that introduction of nitrates in the first coordination sphere of the metal ion results in remarkable structural rearrangement of the ionic liquid.

  14. PREFACE: Cooperative dynamics Cooperative dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gov, Nir

    2011-09-01

    The dynamics within living cells are dominated by non-equilibrium processes that consume chemical energy (usually in the form of ATP, adenosine triphosphate) and convert it into mechanical forces and motion. The mechanisms that allow this conversion process are mostly driven by the components of the cytoskeleton: (i) directed (polar) polymerization of filaments (either actin or microtubules) and (ii) molecular motors. The forces and motions produced by these two components of the cytoskeleton give rise to the formation of cellular shapes, and drive the intracellular transport and organization. It is clear that these systems present a multi-scale challenge, from the physics of the molecular processes to the organization of many interacting units. Understanding the physical nature of these systems will have a large impact on many fundamental problems in biology and break new grounds in the field of non-equilibrium physics. This field of research has seen a rapid development over the last ten years. Activities in this area range from theoretical and experimental work on the underlying fundamental (bio)physics at the single-molecule level, to investigations (in vivo and in vitro) of the dynamics and patterns of macroscopic pieces of 'living matter'. In this special issue we have gathered contributions that span the whole spectrum of length- and complexity-scales in this field. Some of the works demonstrate how active forces self-organize within the polymerizing cytoskeleton, on the level of cooperative cargo transport via motors or due to active fluxes at the cell membrane. On a larger scale, it is shown that polar filaments coupled to molecular motors give rise to a huge variety of surprising dynamics and patterns: spontaneously looping rings of gliding microtubules, and emergent phases of self-organized filaments and motors in different geometries. All of these articles share the common feature of being out-of-equilibrium, driven by metabolism. As demonstrated here

  15. Class III myosins shape the auditory hair bundles by limiting microvilli and stereocilia growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelli, Andrea; Michel, Vincent; Boutet de Monvel, Jacques; Cortese, Matteo; Bosch-Grau, Montserrat; Aghaie, Asadollah; Perfettini, Isabelle; Dupont, Typhaine; Avan, Paul; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Petit, Christine

    2016-01-18

    The precise architecture of hair bundles, the arrays of mechanosensitive microvilli-like stereocilia crowning the auditory hair cells, is essential to hearing. Myosin IIIa, defective in the late-onset deafness form DFNB30, has been proposed to transport espin-1 to the tips of stereocilia, thereby promoting their elongation. We show that Myo3a(-/-)Myo3b(-/-) mice lacking myosin IIIa and myosin IIIb are profoundly deaf, whereas Myo3a-cKO Myo3b(-/-) mice lacking myosin IIIb and losing myosin IIIa postnatally have normal hearing. Myo3a(-/-)Myo3b(-/-) cochlear hair bundles display robust mechanoelectrical transduction currents with normal kinetics but show severe embryonic abnormalities whose features rapidly change. These include abnormally tall and numerous microvilli or stereocilia, ungraded stereocilia bundles, and bundle rounding and closure. Surprisingly, espin-1 is properly targeted to Myo3a(-/-)Myo3b(-/-) stereocilia tips. Our results uncover the critical role that class III myosins play redundantly in hair-bundle morphogenesis; they unexpectedly limit the elongation of stereocilia and of subsequently regressing microvilli, thus contributing to the early hair bundle shaping.

  16. Kinetic characterization of the ATPase and actin-activated ATPase activities of Acanthamoeba castellanii myosin-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heissler, Sarah M; Liu, Xiong; Korn, Edward D; Sellers, James R

    2013-09-13

    Phosphorylation of Ser-639 in loop-2 of the catalytic motor domain of the heavy chain of Acanthamoeba castellanii myosin-2 and the phosphomimetic mutation S639D have been shown previously to down-regulate the actin-activated ATPase activity of both the full-length myosin and single-headed subfragment-1 (Liu, X., Lee, D. Y., Cai, S., Yu, S., Shu, S., Levine, R. L., and Korn, E. D. (2013) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 110, E23-E32). In the present study we determined the kinetic constants for each step in the myosin and actomyosin ATPase cycles of recombinant wild-type S1 and S1-S639D. The kinetic parameter predominantly affected by the S639D mutation is the actin-activated release of inorganic phosphate from the acto myosin·ADP·Pi complex, which is the rate-limiting step in the steady-state actomyosin ATPase cycle. As consequence of this change, the duty ratio of this conventional myosin decreases. We speculate on the effect of Ser-639 phosphorylation on the processive behavior of myosin-2 filaments.

  17. Class III myosins shape the auditory hair bundles by limiting microvilli and stereocilia growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelli, Andrea; Michel, Vincent; Boutet de Monvel, Jacques; Cortese, Matteo; Bosch-Grau, Montserrat; Aghaie, Asadollah; Perfettini, Isabelle; Dupont, Typhaine; Avan, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The precise architecture of hair bundles, the arrays of mechanosensitive microvilli-like stereocilia crowning the auditory hair cells, is essential to hearing. Myosin IIIa, defective in the late-onset deafness form DFNB30, has been proposed to transport espin-1 to the tips of stereocilia, thereby promoting their elongation. We show that Myo3a−/−Myo3b−/− mice lacking myosin IIIa and myosin IIIb are profoundly deaf, whereas Myo3a-cKO Myo3b−/− mice lacking myosin IIIb and losing myosin IIIa postnatally have normal hearing. Myo3a−/−Myo3b−/− cochlear hair bundles display robust mechanoelectrical transduction currents with normal kinetics but show severe embryonic abnormalities whose features rapidly change. These include abnormally tall and numerous microvilli or stereocilia, ungraded stereocilia bundles, and bundle rounding and closure. Surprisingly, espin-1 is properly targeted to Myo3a−/−Myo3b−/− stereocilia tips. Our results uncover the critical role that class III myosins play redundantly in hair-bundle morphogenesis; they unexpectedly limit the elongation of stereocilia and of subsequently regressing microvilli, thus contributing to the early hair bundle shaping. PMID:26754646

  18. Smooth muscle actin and myosin expression in cultured airway smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, J Z; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Rippetoe, P; White, S; Absher, M; Baldor, L; Evans, J; McHugh, K M; Low, R B

    1998-05-01

    In this study, the expression of smooth muscle actin and myosin was examined in cultures of rat tracheal smooth muscle cells. Protein and mRNA analyses demonstrated that these cells express alpha- and gamma-smooth muscle actin and smooth muscle myosin and nonmuscle myosin-B heavy chains. The expression of the smooth muscle specific actin and myosin isoforms was regulated in the same direction when growth conditions were changed. Thus, at confluency in 1 or 10% serum-containing medium as well as for low-density cells (50-60% confluent) deprived of serum, the expression of the smooth muscle forms of actin and myosin was relatively high. Conversely, in rapidly proliferating cultures at low density in 10% serum, smooth muscle contractile protein expression was low. The expression of nonmuscle myosin-B mRNA and protein was more stable and was upregulated only to a small degree in growing cells. Our results provide new insight into the molecular basis of differentiation and contractile function in airway smooth muscle cells.

  19. Role of plant myosins in motile organelles:Is a direct interaction required?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Limor Buchnik; Mohamad Abu-Abied; Einat Sadot

    2015-01-01

    Plant organel es are highly motile, with speed values of 3–7 mm/s in cel s of land plants and about 20–60 mm/s in characean algal cel s. This movement is believed to be important for rapid distribution of materials around the cel , for the plant’s ability to respond to environmental biotic and abiotic signals and for proper growth. The main machinery that propels motility of organel es within plant cel s is based on the actin cytoskeleton and its motor proteins the myosins. Most plants express multiple members of two main classes:myosin VIII and myosin XI. While myosin VIII has been characterized as a slow motor protein, myosins from class XI were found to be the fastest motor proteins known in al kingdoms. Paradoxical y, while it was found that myosins from class XI regulate most organel e movement, it is not quite clear how or even if these motor proteins attach to the organel es whose movement they regulate.

  20. Cytoskeletal dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    I worked with reconstitutted contractile acto-myosin systems containing mainly actin, actin cross-linkers and myosin motors. Contractility and rheology of such systems was studied using confocal microscopy and rheology....

  1. Dynamics and control at feedback vertex sets. II: a faithful monitor to determine the diversity of molecular activities in regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Atsushi; Fiedler, Bernold; Kurosawa, Gen; Saito, Daisuke

    2013-10-21

    Modern biology provides many networks describing regulations between many species of molecules. It is widely believed that the dynamics of molecular activities based on such regulatory networks are the origin of biological functions. However, we currently have a limited understanding of the relationship between the structure of a regulatory network and its dynamics. In this study we develop a new theory to provide an important aspect of dynamics from information of regulatory linkages alone. We show that the "feedback vertex set" (FVS) of a regulatory network is a set of "determining nodes" of the dynamics. The theory is powerful to study real biological systems in practice. It assures that (i) any long-term dynamical behavior of the whole system, such as steady states, periodic oscillations or quasi-periodic oscillations, can be identified by measurements of a subset of molecules in the network, and that (ii) the subset is determined from the regulatory linkage alone. For example, dynamical attractors possibly generated by a signal transduction network with 113 molecules can be identified by measurement of the activity of only 5 molecules, if the information on the network structure is correct. Our theory therefore provides a rational criterion to select key molecules to control a system. We also demonstrate that controlling the dynamics of the FVS is sufficient to switch the dynamics of the whole system from one attractor to others, distinct from the original.

  2. Evaluation of hydrogen bond networks in cellulose Iβ and II crystals using density functional theory and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Daichi; Nishiyama, Yoshiharu; Mazeau, Karim; Ueda, Kazuyoshi

    2017-09-08

    Crystal models of cellulose Iβ and II, which contain various hydrogen bonding (HB) networks, were analyzed using density functional theory and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations. From the CPMD trajectories, the power spectra of the velocity correlation functions of hydroxyl groups involved in hydrogen bonds were calculated. For the Iβ allomorph, HB network A, which is dominant according to the neutron diffraction data, was stable, and the power spectrum represented the essential features of the experimental IR spectra. In contrast, network B, which is a minor structure, was unstable because its hydroxymethyl groups reoriented during the CPMD simulation, yielding a different crystal structure to that determined by experiments. For the II allomorph, a HB network A is proposed based on diffraction data, whereas molecular modeling identifies an alternative network B. Our simulations showed that the interaction energies of the cellulose II (B) model are slightly more favorable than model II(A). However, the evaluation of the free energy should be waited for the accurate determination from the energy point of view. For the IR calculation, cellulose II (B) model reproduces the spectra better than model II (A). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Monodomain dynamics for rigid rod and platelet suspensions in strongly coupled coplanar linear flow and magnetic fields. II. Kinetic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest, M. Gregory; Sircar, Sarthok; Wang, Qi; Zhou, Ruhai

    2006-10-01

    We establish reciprocity relations of the Doi-Hess kinetic theory for rigid rod macromolecular suspensions governed by the strong coupling among an excluded volume potential, linear flow, and a magnetic field. The relation provides a reduction of the flow and field driven Smoluchowski equation: from five parameters for coplanar linear flows and magnetic field, to two field parameters. The reduced model distinguishes flows with a rotational component, which map to simple shear (with rate parameter) subject to a transverse magnetic field (with strength parameter), and irrotational flows, for which the reduced model consists of a triaxial extensional flow (with two extensional rate parameters). We solve the Smoluchowski equation of the reduced model to explore: (i) the effect of introducing a coplanar magnetic field on each sheared monodomain attractor of the Doi-Hess kinetic theory and (ii) the coupling of coplanar extensional flow and magnetic fields. For (i), we show each sheared attractor (steady and unsteady, with peak axis in and out of the shearing plane, periodic and chaotic orbits) undergoes its own transition sequence versus magnetic field strength. Nonetheless, robust predictions emerge: out-of-plane degrees of freedom are arrested with increasing field strength, and a unique flow-aligning or tumbling/wagging limit cycle emerges above a threshold magnetic field strength or modified geometry parameter value. For (ii), irrotational flows coupled with a coplanar magnetic field yield only steady states. We characterize all (generically biaxial) equilibria in terms of an explicit Boltzmann distribution, providing a natural generalization of analytical results on pure nematic equilibria [P. Constantin, I. Kevrekidis, and E. S. Titi, Arch. Rat. Mech. Anal. 174, 365 (2004); P. Constantin, I. Kevrekidis, and E. S. Titi, Discrete and Continuous Dynamical Systems 11, 101 (2004); P. Constantin and J. Vukadinovic, Nonlinearity 18, 441 (2005); H. Liu, H. Zhang, and P

  4. Myosin Va participates in acrosomal formation and nuclear morphogenesis during spermatogenesis of Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis.

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    Xiao Sun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis belongs to the Class Crustacea, Decapoda, Brachyura. The spermatozoon of this species is of aflagellated type, it has a spherical acrosome surrounded by the cup-shaped nucleus, which are unique to brachyurans. For the past several decades, studies on the spermatogenesis of the mitten crab mainly focus on the morphology. Compared with the extensive study of molecular mechanism of spermatogenesis in mammals, relatively less information is available in crustacean species. Myosin Va, a member of Class V myosin, has been implicated in acrosome biogenesis and vesicle transport during spermatogenesis in mammals. In the present study we demonstrate the expression and cellular localization of myosin Va during spermatogenesis in E. sinensis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Western blot demonstrated that myosin Va is expressed during spermatogenesis. Immunocytochemical and ultrastructural analyses showed that myosin Va mainly localizes in the cytoplasm in spermatocytes. At the early stage of spermiogenesis, myosin Va binds to the endoplasmic reticulum vesicle (EV and proacrosomal granule (PG. Subsequently, myosin Va localizes within the proacrosomal vesicle (PV formed by PG and EV fusion and locates in the membrane complex (MC at the mid spermatid stage. At the late spermatid stage, myosin Va is associated with the shaping nucleus and mitochondria. In mature spermatozoon, myosin Va predominates in acrosomal tubule (AT and nucleus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study demonstrates that myosin Va may be involved in acrosome biogenesis and nuclear morphogenesis during spermatogenesis in E. sinensis. Considering the distribution and molecular characteristics of myosin Va, we also propose a hypothesis of AT formation in this species. It is the first time to uncover the role of myosin Va in crustacean spermatogenesis.

  5. Competing dynamic phases of active polymer networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Simon; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Dinner, Aaron R.

    Recent experiments on in-vitro reconstituted assemblies of F-actin, myosin-II motors, and cross-linking proteins show that tuning local network properties can changes the fundamental biomechanical behavior of the system. For example, by varying cross-linker density and actin bundle rigidity, one can switch between contractile networks useful for reshaping cells, polarity sorted networks ideal for directed molecular transport, and frustrated networks with robust structural properties. To efficiently investigate the dynamic phases of actomyosin networks, we developed a coarse grained non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of model semiflexible filaments, molecular motors, and cross-linkers with phenomenologically defined interactions. The simulation's accuracy was verified by benchmarking the mechanical properties of its individual components and collective behavior against experimental results at the molecular and network scales. By adjusting the model's parameters, we can reproduce the qualitative phases observed in experiment and predict the protein characteristics where phase crossovers could occur in collective network dynamics. Our model provides a framework for understanding cells' multiple uses of actomyosin networks and their applicability in materials research. Supported by the Department of Defense (DoD) through the National Defense Science & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG) Program.

  6. Exploration of flexible phenylpropylurea scaffold as novel cardiac myosin activators for the treatment of systolic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manickam, Manoj; Jalani, Hitesh B; Pillaiyar, Thanigaimalai; Sharma, Niti; Boggu, Pulla Reddy; Venkateswararao, Eeda; Lee, You-Jung; Jeon, Eun-Seok; Jung, Sang-Hun

    2017-07-07

    A series of flexible urea derivatives have been synthesized and demonstrated as selective cardiac myosin ATPase activator. Among them 1-phenethyl-3-(3-phenylpropyl)urea (1, cardiac myosin ATPase activation at 10 μM = 51.1%; FS = 18.90; EF = 12.15) and 1-benzyl-3-(3-phenylpropyl)urea (9, cardiac myosin ATPase activation = 53.3%; FS = 30.04; EF = 18.27) showed significant activity in vitro and in vivo. The change of phenyl ring with tetrahydropyran-4-yl moiety viz., 1-(3-phenylpropyl)-3-((tetrahydro-2H-pyran-4-yl)methyl)urea (14, cardiac myosin ATPase activation = 81.4%; FS = 20.50; EF = 13.10), and morpholine moiety viz., 1-(2-morpholinoethyl)-3-(3-phenylpropyl)urea (21, cardiac myosin ATPase activation = 44.0%; FS = 24.79; EF = 15.65), proved to be efficient to activate the cardiac myosin. The potent compounds 1, 9, 14 and 21 were found to be selective for cardiac myosin over skeletal and smooth myosins. Thus, these urea derivatives are potent scaffold to develop as a newer cardiac myosin activator for the treatment of systolic heart failure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification, modeling, and characterization studies of Tetrahymena thermophila myosin FERM domains suggests a conserved core fold but functional differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Che L; Singh, Shaneen M

    2015-11-01

    Myosins (MYO) define a superfamily of motor proteins which facilitate movement along cytoskeletal actin filaments in an ATP-dependent manner. To date, over 30 classes of myosin have been defined that vary in their roles and distribution across different taxa. The multidomain tail of myosin is responsible for the observed functional differences in different myosin classes facilitating differential binding to different cargos. One domain found in this region, the FERM domain, is found in several diverse proteins and is involved in many biological functions ranging from cell adhesion and actin-driven cytoskeleton assembly to cell signaling. Recently, new classes of unconventional myosin have been identified in Tetrahymena thermophila. In this study, we have identified, modeled, and characterized eight FERM domains from the unconventional T. thermophila myosins as their complete functional MyTH4-FERM cassettes. Our results reveal notable sequence, structural, and electrostatic differences between T. thermophila and other characterized FERM domains. Specifically, T. thermophila FERM domains contain helical inserts or extensions, which contribute to significant differences in surface electrostatic profiles of T. thermophila myosin FERMs when compared to the conventional FERM domains. Analyses of the modeled domains reveal differences in key functional residues as well as phosphoinositide-binding signatures and affinities. The work presented here broadens the scope of our understanding of myosin classes and their inherent functions, and provides a platform for experimentalists to design rational experimental studies to test the functional roles for T. thermophila myosins.

  8. Dynamical Spin II

    CERN Document Server

    Freund, Peter G O

    2008-01-01

    The possibility of building all particles from spinless constituents is explored. Composite fermions are formed from bosonic carriers of electric and magnetic charge of a composite abelian gauge field. Internal attributes are accounted for by dimensional reduction from a higher-dimensional space-time in which the abelian gauge field is replaced by a composite higher-rank antisymmetric tensor field. The problem of building magnetically neutral fermions is considered.

  9. Energy transfer dynamics in trimers and aggregates of light-harvesting complex II probed by 2D electronic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enriquez, Miriam M.; Zhang, Cheng; Tan, Howe-Siang, E-mail: howesiang@ntu.edu.sg [Division of Chemistry and Biological Chemistry, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Akhtar, Parveen; Garab, Győző; Lambrev, Petar H., E-mail: lambrev@brc.hu [Institute of Plant Biology, Biological Research Centre, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 521, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary)

    2015-06-07

    The pathways and dynamics of excitation energy transfer between the chlorophyll (Chl) domains in solubilized trimeric and aggregated light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) are examined using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). The LHCII trimers and aggregates exhibit the unquenched and quenched excitonic states of Chl a, respectively. 2DES allows direct correlation of excitation and emission energies of coupled states over population time delays, hence enabling mapping of the energy flow between Chls. By the excitation of the entire Chl b Q{sub y} band, energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a states is monitored in the LHCII trimers and aggregates. Global analysis of the two-dimensional (2D) spectra reveals that energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a occurs on fast and slow time scales of 240–270 fs and 2.8 ps for both forms of LHCII. 2D decay-associated spectra resulting from the global analysis identify the correlation between Chl states involved in the energy transfer and decay at a given lifetime. The contribution of singlet–singlet annihilation on the kinetics of Chl energy transfer and decay is also modelled and discussed. The results show a marked change in the energy transfer kinetics in the time range of a few picoseconds. Owing to slow energy equilibration processes, long-lived intermediate Chl a states are present in solubilized trimers, while in aggregates, the population decay of these excited states is significantly accelerated, suggesting that, overall, the energy transfer within the LHCII complexes is faster in the aggregated state.

  10. Energy transfer dynamics in trimers and aggregates of light-harvesting complex II probed by 2D electronic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enriquez, Miriam M; Akhtar, Parveen; Zhang, Cheng; Garab, Győző; Lambrev, Petar H; Tan, Howe-Siang

    2015-06-07

    The pathways and dynamics of excitation energy transfer between the chlorophyll (Chl) domains in solubilized trimeric and aggregated light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) are examined using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). The LHCII trimers and aggregates exhibit the unquenched and quenched excitonic states of Chl a, respectively. 2DES allows direct correlation of excitation and emission energies of coupled states over population time delays, hence enabling mapping of the energy flow between Chls. By the excitation of the entire Chl b Qy band, energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a states is monitored in the LHCII trimers and aggregates. Global analysis of the two-dimensional (2D) spectra reveals that energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a occurs on fast and slow time scales of 240-270 fs and 2.8 ps for both forms of LHCII. 2D decay-associated spectra resulting from the global analysis identify the correlation between Chl states involved in the energy transfer and decay at a given lifetime. The contribution of singlet-singlet annihilation on the kinetics of Chl energy transfer and decay is also modelled and discussed. The results show a marked change in the energy transfer kinetics in the time range of a few picoseconds. Owing to slow energy equilibration processes, long-lived intermediate Chl a states are present in solubilized trimers, while in aggregates, the population decay of these excited states is significantly accelerated, suggesting that, overall, the energy transfer within the LHCII complexes is faster in the aggregated state.

  11. Myosin MyTH4-FERM structures highlight important principles of convergent evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planelles-Herrero, Vicente José; Blanc, Florian; Sirigu, Serena; Sirkia, Helena; Clause, Jeffrey; Sourigues, Yannick; Johnsrud, Daniel O; Amigues, Beatrice; Cecchini, Marco; Gilbert, Susan P; Houdusse, Anne; Titus, Margaret A

    2016-05-24

    Myosins containing MyTH4-FERM (myosin tail homology 4-band 4.1, ezrin, radixin, moesin, or MF) domains in their tails are found in a wide range of phylogenetically divergent organisms, such as humans and the social amoeba Dictyostelium (Dd). Interestingly, evolutionarily distant MF myosins have similar roles in the extension of actin-filled membrane protrusions such as filopodia and bind to microtubules (MT), suggesting that the core functions of these MF myosins have been highly conserved over evolution. The structures of two DdMyo7 signature MF domains have been determined and comparison with mammalian MF structures reveals that characteristic features of MF domains are conserved. However, across millions of years of evolution conserved class-specific insertions are seen to alter the surfaces and the orientation of subdomains with respect to each other, likely resulting in new sites for binding partners. The MyTH4 domains of Myo10 and DdMyo7 bind to MT with micromolar affinity but, surprisingly, their MT binding sites are on opposite surfaces of the MyTH4 domain. The structural analysis in combination with comparison of diverse MF myosin sequences provides evidence that myosin tail domain features can be maintained without strict conservation of motifs. The results illustrate how tuning of existing features can give rise to new structures while preserving the general properties necessary for myosin tails. Thus, tinkering with the MF domain enables it to serve as a multifunctional platform for cooperative recruitment of various partners, allowing common properties such as autoinhibition of the motor and microtubule binding to arise through convergent evolution.

  12. The cortical acto-myosin network: from diffusion barrier to functional gateway in the transport of neurosecretory vesicles to the plasma membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas ePapadopulos

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of regulated exocytosis is linked to an array of pathological conditions, including neurodegenerative disorders, asthma and diabetes. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underpinning neuroexocytosis including the processes that allow neurosecretory vesicles to access and fuse with the plasma membrane and to recycle post-fusion, is therefore critical to the design of future therapeutic drugs that will efficiently tackle these diseases. Despite considerable efforts to determine the principles of vesicular fusion, the mechanisms controlling the approach of vesicles to the plasma membrane in order to undergo tethering, docking, priming, and fusion remain poorly understood. All these steps involve the cortical actin network, a dense mesh of actin filaments localized beneath the plasma membrane. Recent work overturned the long-held belief that the cortical actin network only plays a passive constraining role in neuroexocytosis functioning as a physical barrier that partly breaks down upon entry of Ca2+ to allow secretory vesicles to reach the plasma membrane. A multitude of new roles for the cortical actin network in regulated exocytosis have now emerged and point to highly dynamic novel functions of key myosin molecular motors. Myosins are not only believed to help bring about dynamic changes in the actin cytoskeleton, tethering and guiding vesicles to their fusion sites, but they also regulate the size and duration of the fusion pore, thereby directly contributing to the release of neurotransmitters and hormones.Here we discuss the functions of the cortical actin network, myosins and their effectors in controlling the processes that lead to tethering, directed transport, docking, and fusion of exocytotic vesicles in regulated exocytosis.

  13. Regulation of myosin light chain phosphorylation in the trabecular meshwork: role in aqueous humour outflow facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, P Vasantha; Deng, Peifeng; Sasaki, Yasuharu; Epstein, David L

    2005-02-01

    Cellular contraction and relaxation and integrity of the actin cytoskeleton in trabecular meshwork (TM) tissue have been thought to influence aqueous humour outflow. However, the cellular pathways that regulate these events in TM cells are not well understood. In this study, we investigated physiological agonist-mediated regulation of myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation in the TM, and correlated such effects with alterations in aqueous outflow facility, since MLC phosphorylation is a critical biochemical determinant of cellular contraction in TM cells. Treatment of serum starved human TM cells with endothelin-1 (0.1 microM), thromboxane A2 mimetic U-46619 (1.0 microM), or angiotensin II (1 microM), all of which are agonists of G-protein coupled receptors, triggered activation of MLC phosphorylation, as determined by urea/glycerol-based Western blot analysis. Agonist-stimulated increase in MLC phosphorylation was associated with activation of Rho GTPase in TM cells, as determined in pull-down assays. In contrast, treatment of human TM cells with a novel Rho-kinase inhibitor H-1152 (0.1-2 microM), in the presence of serum reduced basal MLC phosphorylation. H-1152 also increased aqueous outflow facility significantly in a dose-dependent fashion, in perfusion studies with cadaver porcine eyes. This effect of H-1152 on outflow facility was associated with decreased MLC phosphorylation in TM tissue of drug-perfused eyes. Collectively, this study identifies potential physiological regulators of MLC phosphorylation in human TM cells and demonstrates the significance of Rho/Rho-kinase pathway-mediated MLC phosphorylation in modulation of aqueous outflow facility through TM.

  14. Regulation of myosin light chain kinase during insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelly Woody

    Full Text Available Myosin II (MyoII is required for insulin-responsive glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4-mediated glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Our previous studies have shown that insulin signaling stimulates phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain (RLC of MyoIIA via myosin light chain kinase (MLCK. The experiments described here delineate upstream regulators of MLCK during insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Since 3T3-L1 adipocytes express two MyoII isoforms, we wanted to determine which isoform was required for insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Using a siRNA approach, we demonstrate that a 60% decrease in MyoIIA protein expression resulted in a 40% inhibition of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. We also show that insulin signaling stimulates the phosphorylation of MLCK. We further show that MLCK can be activated by calcium as well as signaling pathways. We demonstrate that adipocytes treated with the calcium chelating agent, 1,2-b (iso-aminophenoxy ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra acetic acid, (BAPTA (in the presence of insulin impaired the insulin-induced phosphorylation of MLCK by 52% and the RLC of MyoIIA by 45% as well as impairing the recruitment of MyoIIA to the plasma membrane when compared to cells treated with insulin alone. We further show that the calcium ionophore, A23187 alone stimulated the phosphorylation of MLCK and the RLC associated with MyoIIA to the same extent as insulin. To identify signaling pathways that might regulate MLCK, we examined ERK and CaMKII. Inhibition of ERK2 impaired phosphorylation of MLCK and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. In contrast, while inhibition of CaMKII did inhibit phosphorylation of the RLC associated with MyoIIA, inhibition of CAMKIIδ did not impair MLCK phosphorylation or translocation to the plasma membrane or glucose uptake. Collectively, our results are the first to delineate a role for calcium and ERK in the activation of MLCK and thus MyoIIA during insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

  15. Actomyosin content of Physarum plasmodia and detection of immunological cross-reactions with myosins from related species

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    The content of myosin in plasmodia of the myxomycete Physarum polycephalum was measured by an immunological technique, quantitative microcomplement (C') fixation. Migrating plasmodia (starved after growth on rolled oats) contained 0.60 +/- 0.08 (SD) mg myosin per g fresh plasmodia. Myosin comprised 0.77% +/- 0.05 (SD) of the total plasmodial protein. When total plasmodial proteins were separated by electrophoresis on SDS-polyacrylamide gels, a large amount of protein appeared in a band comigrating with muscle actin. Densitometry performed after Coomassie blue staining indicated that as much as 15- 25% of the total protein in the plasmodium could be actin. This gives an actin/myosin ratio by weight in the myxomycete plasmodium as high as 19-33, a very "actin-rich" actomyosin compared with rabbit skeletal muscle actomyosin with an actin/myosin ratio of 0.6. Starvation stimulates rapid migration and is correlated with a higher percent of both myosin and actin in the total protein of the plasmodium compared with normally growing cultures. Immunological cross-reaction of myosins from a variety of species was measured by C' fixation using an antiserum produced against purified native myosin from P. polycephalum. Although myxomycete and vertebrate striated muscle myosins have very similar morphological and biochemical properties, and apparently possess similar binding properties to F-actin, only myosins from myxomycetes in the order Physarales, rather closely related to P. polycephalum, gave detectable cross-reactions. This finding suggests that many amino acid sequences in myosin have been variable during evolution. PMID:944188

  16. Increased Association of Dynamin Ⅱ with Myosin Ⅱ in Ras Transformed NIH3T3 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Soon-Jeong JEONG; Su-Gwan KIM; Jiyun YOO; Mi-Young HAN; Joo-Cheol PARK; Heung-Joong KIM; Seong Soo KANG; Baik-Dong CHOI; Moon-Jin JEONG

    2006-01-01

    Dynamin has been implicated in the formation of nascent vesicles through both endocytic and secretory pathways. However, dynamin has recently been implicated in altering the cell membrane shape during cell migration associated with cytoskeleton-related proteins. Myosin Ⅱ has been implicated in maintaining cell morphology and in cellular movement. Therefore, reciprocal immunoprecipitation was carried out to identify the potential relationship between dynamin Ⅱ and myosin Ⅱ. The dynamin Ⅱ expression level was higher when co-expressed with myosin Ⅱ in Ras transformed NIH3T3 cells than in normal NIH3T3 cells.Confocal microscopy also confirmed the interaction between these two proteins. Interestingly, exposing the NIH3T3 cells to platelet-derived growth factor altered the interaction and localization of these two proteins.The platelet-derived growth factor treatment induced lamellipodia and cell migration, and dynamin Ⅱ interacted with myosin Ⅱ. Grb2, a 24 kDa adaptor protein and an essential element of the Ras signaling pathway,was found to be associated with dynamin Ⅱ and myosin Ⅱ gene expression in the Ras transformed NIH3T3 cells. These results suggest that dynamin Ⅱ acts as an intermediate messenger in the Ras signal transduction pathway leading to membrane ruffling and cell migration.

  17. Myosin VI deafness mutation prevents the initiation of processive runs on actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pylypenko, Olena; Song, Lin; Shima, Ai; Yang, Zhaohui; Houdusse, Anne M; Sweeney, H Lee

    2015-03-17

    Mutations in the reverse-direction myosin, myosin VI, are associated with deafness in humans and mice. A myosin VI deafness mutation, D179Y, which is in the transducer of the motor, uncoupled the release of the ATP hydrolysis product, inorganic phosphate (Pi), from dependency on actin binding and destroyed the ability of single dimeric molecules to move processively on actin filaments. We observed that processive movement is rescued if ATP is added to the mutant dimer following binding of both heads to actin in the absence of ATP, demonstrating that the mutation selectively destroys the initiation of processive runs at physiological ATP levels. A drug (omecamtiv) that accelerates the actin-activated activity of cardiac myosin was able to rescue processivity of the D179Y mutant dimers at physiological ATP concentrations by slowing the actin-independent release of Pi. Thus, it may be possible to create myosin VI-specific drugs that rescue the function of deafness-causing mutations.

  18. Identification and characterization of an unusual class I myosin involved in vesicle traffic in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Spitznagel

    Full Text Available Myosins are a multimember family of motor proteins with diverse functions in eukaryotic cells. African trypanosomes possess only two candidate myosins and thus represent a useful system for functional analysis of these motors. One of these candidates is an unusual class I myosin (TbMyo1 that is expressed at similar levels but organized differently during the life cycle of Trypanosoma brucei. This myosin localizes to the polarized endocytic pathway in bloodstream forms of the parasite. This organization is actin dependent. Knock down of TbMyo1 results in a significant reduction in endocytic activity, a cessation in cell division and eventually cell death. A striking morphological feature in these cells is an enlargement of the flagellar pocket, which is consistent with an imbalance in traffic to and from the surface. In contrast TbMyo1 is distributed throughout procyclic forms of the tsetse vector and a loss of approximately 90% of the protein has no obvious effects on growth or morphology. These results reveal a life cycle stage specific requirement for this myosin in essential endocytic traffic and represent the first description of the involvement of a motor protein in vesicle traffic in these parasites.

  19. Identification and characterization of an unusual class I myosin invol