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Sample records for myelinated nerve fiber

  1. Ephaptic coupling of myelinated nerve fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binczak, S.; Eilbeck, J. C.; Scott, Alwyn C.

    2001-01-01

    Numerical predictions of a simple myelinated nerve fiber model are compared with theoretical results in the continuum and discrete limits, clarifying the nature of the conduction process on an isolated nerve axon. Since myelinated nerve fibers are often arranged in bundles, this model is used...

  2. Evaluation of dermal myelinated nerve fibers in diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltier, Amanda C.; Myers, M. Iliza; Artibee, Kay J.; Hamilton, Audra D.; Yan, Qing; Guo, Jiasong; Shi, Yaping; Wang, Lily; Li, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Skin biopsies have primarily been used to study the non-myelinated nerve fibers of the epidermis in a variety of neuropathies. In the present study, we have expanded the skin biopsy technique to glabrous, non-hairy skin to evaluate myelinated nerve fibers in the most highly prevalent peripheral nerve disease, diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN). Twenty patients with DPN (Type I, n=9; Type II, n=11) and sixteen age-matched healthy controls (ages 29–73) underwent skin biopsy of the index finger, nerve conduction studies, and composite neuropathy scoring. In patients with DPN, we found a statistically significant reduction of both mechanoreceptive Meissner corpuscles (MC) and their afferent myelinated nerve fibers (p=0.01). This myelinated nerve fiber loss was correlated with the decreased amplitudes of sensory/motor responses in nerve conduction studies. This study supports the utilization of skin biopsy to quantitatively evaluate axonal loss of myelinated nerve fibers in patients with DPN. PMID:23781963

  3. Study of the Peripheral Nerve Fibers Myelin Structure Changes during Activation of Schwann Cell Acetylcholine Receptors.

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    Ekaterina E Verdiyan

    Full Text Available In the present paper we consider a new type of mechanism by which neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh regulates the properties of peripheral nerve fibers myelin. Our data show the importance of the relationship between the changes in the number of Schwann cell (SC acetylcholine receptors (AChRs and the axon excitation (different intervals between action potentials (APs. Using Raman spectroscopy, an effect of activation of SC AChRs on the myelin membrane fluidity was investigated. It was found, that ACh stimulates an increase in lipid ordering degree of the myelin lipids, thus providing evidence for specific role of the "axon-SC" interactions at the axon excitation. It was proposed, that during the axon excitation, the SC membrane K+- depolarization and the Ca2+-influx led to phospholipase activation or exocytosis of intracellular membrane vesicles and myelin structure reorganization.

  4. Molecular architecture of myelinated nerve fibers: leaky paranodal junctions and paranodal dysmyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbluth, Jack; Mierzwa, Amanda; Shroff, Seema

    2013-12-01

    Myelinated nerve fibers have evolved to optimize signal propagation. Each myelin segment is attached to the axon by the unique paranodal axoglial junction (PNJ), a highly complex structure that serves to define axonal ion channel domains and to direct nodal action currents through adjacent nodes. Surprisingly, this junction does not entirely seal the paranodal myelin sheath to the axon and thus does not entirely isolate the perinodal space from the internodal periaxonal space. Rather the paranode is penetrated by extracellular pathways between the myelin sheath and the axolemma for movement of molecules and the flow of current to and from the internodal axon. This review summarizes past and current studies demonstrating these pathways and considers what functional roles they subserve. In addition, modern genetic engineering methods permit modification of individual PNJ constituents, which provides an opportunity to define their specific functions. One component in particular, the transverse bands, plays a key role in maintaining the structure and function of the PNJ. Loss of transverse bands results not in frank demyelination but rather in subtle dysmyelination, which causes significant functional impairment. The consequences of such subtle defects in the PNJ are considered along with the relevance of these studies to human diseases of myelin.

  5. Morphometric analysis of the diameter and g-ratio of the myelinated nerve fibers of the human sciatic nerve during the aging process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugrenović, Sladjana; Jovanović, Ivan; Vasović, Ljiljana; Kundalić, Braca; Čukuranović, Rade; Stefanović, Vladisav

    2016-06-01

    Myelinated nerve fibers suffer from different degrees of atrophy with age. The success of subsequent regeneration varies. The aim of this research was to analyze myelinated fibers of the human sciatic nerve during the aging process. Morphometric analysis was performed on 17 cases with an age range from 9 to 93 years. The outer and inner diameter of 100 randomly selected nerve fibers was measured in each of the cases evaluated, and the g-ratio (axonal diameter/outer diameter of the whole nerve fiber) of each was calculated. Scatter plots of the diameters and g-ratios of the analyzed fibers were then analyzed. Nerve fibers of each case were classified into three groups according to the g-ratio values: group I (g-ratio lower than 0.6), group II (g-ratio from 0.6 to 0.7) and group III (g-ratio higher than 0.7). Afterwards, nerve fibers of group II were further classified into small and large subgroups. The percentages of each group of nerve fibers were computed for each case and these values were used for correlational and bivariate linear regression analysis. The percentage of myelinated nerve fibers with large diameter and optimal g-ratio of the sciatic nerve declines significantly with age. This is accompanied by a simultaneous significant increase in the percentage of small myelinated fibers with g-ratio values close to 1 that occupy the upper left quadrant of the scatter plot. It can be concluded that aging of the sciatic nerve is associated with significant atrophy of large myelinated fibers. Additionally, a significant increase in regenerated nerve fibers with thinner myelin sheath is observed with age, which, together with the large myelinated fiber atrophy, might be the cause of the age-related decline in conduction velocity. A better understanding of the changes in aging peripheral nerves might improve interpretation of their pathological changes, as well as comprehension of their regeneration in individuals of different age.

  6. Subtle changes in myelination due to childhood experiences: label-free microscopy to infer nerve fibers morphology and myelination in brain (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasecka, Alicja; Tanti, Arnaud; Lutz, Pierre-Eric; Mechawar, Naguib; Cote, Daniel C.

    2017-02-01

    Adverse childhood experiences have lasting detrimental effects on mental health and are strongly associated with impaired cognition and increased risk of developing psychopathologies. Preclinical and neuroimaging studies have suggested that traumatic events during brain development can affect cerebral myelination particularly in areas and tracts implicated in mood and emotion. Although current neuroimaging techniques are quite powerful, they lack the resolution to infer myelin integrity at the cellular level. Recently demonstrated coherent Raman microscopy has accomplished cellular level imaging of myelin sheaths in the nervous system. However, a quantitative morphometric analysis of nerve fibers still remains a challenge. In particular, in brain, where fibres exhibit small diameters and varying local orientation. In this work, we developed an automated myelin identification and analysis method that is capable of providing a complete picture of axonal myelination and morphology in brain samples. This method performs three main procedures 1) detects molecular anisotropy of membrane phospholipids based on polarization resolved coherent Raman microscopy, 2) identifies regions of different molecular organization, 3) calculates morphometric features of myelinated axons (e.g. myelin thickness, g-ratio). We applied this method to monitor white matter areas from suicides adults that suffered from early live adversity and depression compared to depressed suicides adults and psychiatrically healthy controls. We demonstrate that our method allows for the rapid acquisition and automated analysis of neuronal networks morphology and myelination. This is especially useful for clinical and comparative studies, and may greatly enhance the understanding of processes underlying the neurobiological and psychopathological consequences of child abuse.

  7. Myelination and nodal formation of regenerated peripheral nerve fibers following transplantation of acutely prepared olfactory ensheathing cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombrowski, Mary A.; Sasaki, Masanori; Lankford, Karen L.; Kocsis, Jeffery D.; Radtke, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) into injured spinal cord results in improved functional outcome. Mechanisms suggested to account for this functional improvement include axonal regeneration, remyelination and neuroprotection. OECs transplanted into transected peripheral nerve have been shown to modify peripheral axonal regeneration and functional outcome. However, little is known of the detailed integration of OECs at the transplantation site in peripheral nerve. To address this issue cells populations enriched in OECs were isolated from the olfactory bulbs of adult green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing transgenic rats and transplanted into a sciatic nerve crush lesion which transects all axons. Five weeks to six months after transplantation the nerves were studied histologically. GFP-expressing OECs survived in the lesion and distributed longitudinally across the lesion zone. The internodal regions of individual teased fibers distal to the transection site were characterized by GFP expression in the cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments of cells surrounding the axons. Immuno-electron microscopy for GFP indicated that the transplanted OECs formed peripheral type myelin. Immunostaining for sodium channel and Caspr revealed a high density of Nav1.6 at the newly formed nodes of Ranvier which were flanked by paranodal Caspr staining. These results indicate that transplanted OECs extensively integrate into transected peripheral nerve and form myelin on regenerated peripheral nerve fibers, and that nodes of Ranvier of these axons display proper sodium channel organization. PMID:17112480

  8. DC-Evoked Modulation of Excitability of Myelinated Nerve Fibers and Their Terminal Branches; Differences in Sustained Effects of DC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarek, Dominik; Jankowska, Elzbieta

    2018-03-15

    Direct current (DC) evokes long-lasting changes in neuronal networks both presynaptically and postsynaptically and different mechanisms were proposed to be involved in them. Different mechanisms were also suggested to account for the different dynamics of presynaptic DC actions on myelinated nerve fibers stimulated before they entered the spinal gray matter and on their terminal branches. The aim of the present study was to examine whether these different dynamics might be related to differences in the involvement of K + channels. To this end, we compared effects of the K + channel blocker 4-amino-pyridine (4-AP) on DC-evoked changes in the excitability of afferent fibers stimulated within the dorsal columns (epidurally) and within their projection areas in the dorsal horn and motor nuclei (intraspinally). 4-AP was applied systemically in deeply anesthetized rats. DC-evoked increases in the excitability of epidurally stimulated afferent nerve fibers, and increases in field potentials evoked by these fibers, were not affected by 4-AP. In contrast, sustained decreases rather than increases in the excitability of intraspinally stimulated terminal nerve branches were evoked by local application of DC in conjunction with 4-AP. The study leads to the conclusion that 4-AP-sensitive K + channels contribute to the sustained DC-evoked post-polarization increases in the excitability at the level of terminal branches of nerve fibers but not of the nodes of Ranvier nor within the juxta-paranodal regions where other mechanisms would be involved in inducing the sustained DC-evoked changes. Copyright © 2018 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The human dorsal spinocerebellar tract: myelinated fiber spectrum and fiber density in controls, autosomal dominant spinocerebellar atrophy, Huntington's chorea, radiation myelopathy, and diseases with peripheral sensory nerve involvement

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    Ringelstein, E.B.; Schroeder, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    The human dorsal spinocerebellar tract (DSCT) was evaluated morphometrically in 14 control cases of different age and sex using semithin sections of epon-embedded cross sections from the C3, T5, and T10 segments of the spinal cord. A bimodal fiber spectrum was revealed with one peak at 2-3 microns, and a second, broader peak at about 6-8 microns. Fiber density at C3 was 11,188 fibers/mm2 and at T5, 11,156 fibers/mm2. Regression analysis relating fiber density to age disclosed a highly significant loss of myelinated fibers at T5 amounting to about 2.5% per decade. A severe reduction of fiber density and a distinct change in the fiber spectrum with predominant loss of large myelinated fibers were noted in a case of autosomal dominant spinocerebellar atrophy with late onset, and, to a lesser degree, in a case of Huntington's chorea. A subtotal loss of fibers with a persistent normal distribution of fiber sizes was observed rostral to a focus of severe radiation myelopathy, indicating Wallerian degeneration of large numbers of fibers, and a reduction of fiber diameters caudal to the lesion, suggesting retrograde fiber change. By contrast, no primary or transneural changes in the DSCT were detected in six cases of long-term alcoholism, carcinomatous sensory neuropathy, and neurofibromatosis in spite of the involvement of numerous nerve roots.

  10. Electron microscopic study of the myelinated nerve fibres and the perineurial cell basement membrane in the diabetic human peripheral nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBarrany, Wagih G.; Hamdy, Raid M.; AlHayani, Abdulmonem A.; Jalalah, Sawsan M.

    2009-01-01

    To study the quantitative and ultrastructural changes in myelinated nerve fibers and the basement membranes of the perineurial cells in diabetic nerves. The study was performed at the Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, King Abdul-Aziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia from 2003 to 2005. Human sural nerves were obtained from 15 lower limbs and 5 diabetic nerve biopsies. The total mean and density of myelinated nerve fibers per fascicle were calculated, with density of microtubules and mitochondria in the axoplasm. The number of the perineurial cell basement membrane layers was counted, and thickness of the basement membrane was measured. Among the 15 diabetic and 5 normal human sural nerves, the average diameters, number and surface area of myelinated nerve fibers and axonal microtubules density were found to be less in diabetic nerves. Mitochondrial density was higher in diabetic axons. Thickness of the perineurial cell basement membrane had a greater mean, but the number of perineurial cell layers was less than that of the diabetic group. The inner cellular layer of the perineurium of the diabetic nerves contained large vacuoles containing electron-dense degenerated myelin. A few specimens showed degenerated myelinated nerve fibers, while others showed recovering ones. Retracted axoplasms were encountered with albumin extravasation. Diabetes caused an increase in perineurial permeability. The diabetic sural nerve showed marked decrease in the myelinated nerve fibres, increase degenerated mitochondria, and decreased microtubules. (author)

  11. Análise quantitativa das fibras mielínicas dos nervos laríngeos em humanos de acordo com a idade Quantitative analysis of myelinic fibers in human laryngeal nerves according to age

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    Romualdo Suzano Louzeiro Tiago

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO E OBJETIVO: Realizar análise morfométrica das fibras mielínicas dos nervos laríngeos com a finalidade de verificar modificações quantitativas decorrentes do processo de envelhecimento. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Clínico e experimental. Material e Método: Foi coletado fragmento de 1cm dos nervos laríngeos superiores e nervos laríngeos recorrentes de 12 cadáveres do sexo masculino. A amostra foi dividida em dois grupos: idade inferior a 60 anos (Adulto e idade igual ou superior a 60 anos (Idoso. O material foi avaliado em microscópio de luz acoplado a sistema analisador de imagem. RESULTADOS: O número total de fibras mielínicas do nervo laríngeo superior foi semelhante nos dois grupos etários, mas com tendência para o maior número de fibras de 1µm no grupo adulto (p=0,0744. O grupo adulto apresentou maior número total de fibras mielínicas no nervo laríngeo recorrente (p=0,0006, e esta diferença ocorreu nas fibras com diâmetros de 1-3µm (pINTRODUCTION AND AIM: To carry out a morphometric analysis of myelinic fibers in laryngeal nerves aiming to identify quantitative changes as a result of aging. Study design: Clinical and experimental. MATERIAL AND METHOD: A 1cm fragment was collected from the superior laryngeal nerves and recurrent laryngeal nerves taken from twelve male cadavers. The sample was divided into two groups: those aged below 60 years (Adult and those aged 60 years or more (Elderly. The material was evaluated under light microscopy coupled with an image analysis system. RESULTS: The total number of myelinic fibers from the superior laryngeal nerve was similar in both age groups; there was, however, a trend for a higher number of 1μm fibers in the adult group (p=0.0744. The adult group had a higher total number of myelinic fibers in the recurrent laryngeal nerve (p=0.0006, and this difference was seen in fibers with diameters betwee 1-3μm (p<0.007. The adult group had a higher total number of myelinic fibers

  12. Autophagy is involved in the reduction of myelinating Schwann cell cytoplasm during myelin maturation of the peripheral nerve.

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    So Young Jang

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve myelination involves dynamic changes in Schwann cell morphology and membrane structure. Recent studies have demonstrated that autophagy regulates organelle biogenesis and plasma membrane dynamics. In the present study, we investigated the role of autophagy in the development and differentiation of myelinating Schwann cells during sciatic nerve myelination. Electron microscopy and biochemical assays have shown that Schwann cells remove excess cytoplasmic organelles during myelination through macroautophagy. Inhibition of autophagy via Schwann cell-specific removal of ATG7, an essential molecule for macroautophagy, using a conditional knockout strategy, resulted in abnormally enlarged abaxonal cytoplasm in myelinating Schwann cells that contained a large number of ribosomes and an atypically expanded endoplasmic reticulum. Small fiber hypermyelination and minor anomalous peripheral nerve functions are observed in this mutant. Rapamycin-induced suppression of mTOR activity during the early postnatal period enhanced not only autophagy but also developmental reduction of myelinating Schwann cells cytoplasm in vivo. Together, our findings suggest that autophagy is a regulatory mechanism of Schwann cells structural plasticity during myelination.

  13. Transverse Magnetic Waves in Myelinated Nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-25

    IN MYELINATED NERVES M. Mª Villapecellín-Cid1, L. Mª Roa2, and J. Reina-Tosina1 1Área de Teoría de la Señal y Comunicaciones , E.S. de Ingeniería...Element Number Author(s) Project Number Task Number Work Unit Number Performing Organization Name(s) and Address(es) Área de Teoría de la Señal...y Comunicaciones , E.S. de Ingeniería, University of Seville, Seville, Spain Performing Organization Report Number Sponsoring/Monitoring Agency Name(s

  14. Early myelin breakdown following sural nerve crush: a freeze-fracture study

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    Martinez A.M.B.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we describe the early changes of the myelin sheath following surgical nerve crush. We used the freeze-fracture technique to better evaluate myelin alterations during an early stage of Wallerian degeneration. Rat sural nerves were experimentally crushed and animals were sacrificed by transcardiac perfusion 30 h after surgery. Segments of the nerves were processed for routine transmission electron microscopy and freeze-fracture techniques. Our results show that 30 h after the lesion there was asynchrony in the pattern of Wallerian degeneration, with different nerve fibers exhibiting variable degrees of axon disruption. This was observed by both techniques. Careful examination of several replicas revealed early changes in myelin membranes represented by vacuolization and splitting of consecutive lamellae, rearrangement of intramembranous particles and disappearance of paranodal transverse bands associated or not with retraction of paranodal myelin terminal loops from the axolemma. These alterations are compatible with a direct injury to the myelin sheath following nerve crush. The results are discussed in terms of a similar mechanism underlying both axon and myelin breakdown.

  15. Schwann cell autophagy, myelinophagy, initiates myelin clearance from injured nerves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomez-Sanchez, Jose A.; Carty, Lucy; Iruarrizaga-Lejarreta, Marta; Palomo-Irigoyen, Marta; Varela-Rey, Marta; Griffith, Megan; Hantke, Janina; Macias-Camara, Nuria; Azkargorta, Mikel; Aurrekoetxea, Igor; de Juan, Virginia Gutiérrez; Jefferies, Harold B. J.; Aspichueta, Patricia; Elortza, Félix; Aransay, Ana M.; Martínez-Chantar, María L.; Baas, Frank; Mato, José M.; Mirsky, Rhona; Woodhoo, Ashwin; Jessen, Kristján R.

    2015-01-01

    Although Schwann cell myelin breakdown is the universal outcome of a remarkably wide range of conditions that cause disease or injury to peripheral nerves, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that make Schwann cell-mediated myelin digestion possible have not been established. We report that

  16. The effect of DDT and dieldrin on myelinated nerve fibres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bercken, J. van den

    1972-01-01

    The effects of the chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides, DDT and dieldrin, on myelinated nerve fibres of the clawed toad, Xenopus laevis, were studied by recording compound action nerve fibres, and membrane potentials of single nodes of Ranvier. The effect of DDT (5 × 10−4 M) was found to be

  17. A New Method for Automated Identification and Morphometry of Myelinated Fibers Through Light Microscopy Image Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Novas, Romulo Bourget; Fazan, Valeria Paula Sassoli; Felipe, Joaquim Cezar

    2015-01-01

    Nerve morphometry is known to produce relevant information for the evaluation of several phenomena, such as nerve repair, regeneration, implant, transplant, aging, and different human neuropathies. Manual morphometry is laborious, tedious, time consuming, and subject to many sources of error. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a new method for the automated morphometry of myelinated fibers in cross-section light microscopy images. Images from the recurrent laryngeal nerve of adult rats and ...

  18. Histological methods for assessing myelin sheaths and axons in human nerve trunks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miko, T L; Gschmeissner, S E

    1994-03-01

    Although there are many histological techniques for assessing myelin sheaths and axons in paraffin embedded or frozen sections of the peripheral nervous system, modern approaches usually use plastic embedded material. Although plastic embedding is superior for small cutaneous branches, this method has limited value for histological assessment of nerve trunks. We report three methods which together yield a comprehensive approach for thorough and detailed investigation of human nerve trunks. The rapid osmication method permitted assessment of myelinated nerve fibers from frozen sections at operation, thus providing the surgeon with guidance on the extent of nerve resection. The modification presented here resulted in permanent slides, allowing comparison of results with those of the other two procedures. The new osmium-hematoxylin technique could be performed on paraffin embedded nerves. Paraffin, unlike plastic, permitted the study of the whole cross sectional area of the nerve in single sections. Moreover, the sharp image of the myelin permitted computerized morphometry. The significantly modified axonal silver impregnation technique was performed on frozen sections mounted on glass slides, as opposed to the time-consuming impregnation of free-floating sections. The latter technique had a high success rate and permitted semiquantitative assessment of axons in nerve trunks. These methods can be performed in any routine histology laboratory and resulted in greater accuracy compared to conventional methods.

  19. Single myelin fiber imaging in living rodents without labeling by deep optical coherence microscopy

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    Ben Arous, Juliette; Binding, Jonas; Léger, Jean-François; Casado, Mariano; Topilko, Piotr; Gigan, Sylvain; Claude Boccara, A.; Bourdieu, Laurent

    2011-11-01

    Myelin sheath disruption is responsible for multiple neuropathies in the central and peripheral nervous system. Myelin imaging has thus become an important diagnosis tool. However, in vivo imaging has been limited to either low-resolution techniques unable to resolve individual fibers or to low-penetration imaging of single fibers, which cannot provide quantitative information about large volumes of tissue, as required for diagnostic purposes. Here, we perform myelin imaging without labeling and at micron-scale resolution with >300-μm penetration depth on living rodents. This was achieved with a prototype [termed deep optical coherence microscopy (deep-OCM)] of a high-numerical aperture infrared full-field optical coherence microscope, which includes aberration correction for the compensation of refractive index mismatch and high-frame-rate interferometric measurements. We were able to measure the density of individual myelinated fibers in the rat cortex over a large volume of gray matter. In the peripheral nervous system, deep-OCM allows, after minor surgery, in situ imaging of single myelinated fibers over a large fraction of the sciatic nerve. This allows quantitative comparison of normal and Krox20 mutant mice, in which myelination in the peripheral nervous system is impaired. This opens promising perspectives for myelin chronic imaging in demyelinating diseases and for minimally invasive medical diagnosis.

  20. Single myelin fiber imaging in living rodents without labeling by deep optical coherence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Arous, Juliette; Binding, Jonas; Léger, Jean-François; Casado, Mariano; Topilko, Piotr; Gigan, Sylvain; Boccara, A Claude; Bourdieu, Laurent

    2011-11-01

    Myelin sheath disruption is responsible for multiple neuropathies in the central and peripheral nervous system. Myelin imaging has thus become an important diagnosis tool. However, in vivo imaging has been limited to either low-resolution techniques unable to resolve individual fibers or to low-penetration imaging of single fibers, which cannot provide quantitative information about large volumes of tissue, as required for diagnostic purposes. Here, we perform myelin imaging without labeling and at micron-scale resolution with >300-μm penetration depth on living rodents. This was achieved with a prototype [termed deep optical coherence microscopy (deep-OCM)] of a high-numerical aperture infrared full-field optical coherence microscope, which includes aberration correction for the compensation of refractive index mismatch and high-frame-rate interferometric measurements. We were able to measure the density of individual myelinated fibers in the rat cortex over a large volume of gray matter. In the peripheral nervous system, deep-OCM allows, after minor surgery, in situ imaging of single myelinated fibers over a large fraction of the sciatic nerve. This allows quantitative comparison of normal and Krox20 mutant mice, in which myelination in the peripheral nervous system is impaired. This opens promising perspectives for myelin chronic imaging in demyelinating diseases and for minimally invasive medical diagnosis.

  1. Cholecalciferol (vitamin D₃ improves myelination and recovery after nerve injury.

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    Jean-Francois Chabas

    Full Text Available Previously, we demonstrated i that ergocalciferol (vitamin D2 increases axon diameter and potentiates nerve regeneration in a rat model of transected peripheral nerve and ii that cholecalciferol (vitamin D3 improves breathing and hyper-reflexia in a rat model of paraplegia. However, before bringing this molecule to the clinic, it was of prime importance i to assess which form - ergocalciferol versus cholecalciferol - and which dose were the most efficient and ii to identify the molecular pathways activated by this pleiotropic molecule. The rat left peroneal nerve was cut out on a length of 10 mm and autografted in an inverted position. Animals were treated with either cholecalciferol or ergocalciferol, at the dose of 100 or 500 IU/kg/day, or excipient (Vehicle, and compared to unlesioned rats (Control. Functional recovery of hindlimb was measured weekly, during 12 weeks, using the peroneal functional index. Ventilatory, motor and sensitive responses of the regenerated axons were recorded and histological analysis was performed. In parallel, to identify the genes regulated by vitamin D in dorsal root ganglia and/or Schwann cells, we performed an in vitro transcriptome study. We observed that cholecalciferol is more efficient than ergocalciferol and, when delivered at a high dose (500 IU/kg/day, cholecalciferol induces a significant locomotor and electrophysiological recovery. We also demonstrated that cholecalciferol increases i the number of preserved or newly formed axons in the proximal end, ii the mean axon diameter in the distal end, and iii neurite myelination in both distal and proximal ends. Finally, we found a modified expression of several genes involved in axogenesis and myelination, after 24 hours of vitamin supplementation. Our study is the first to demonstrate that vitamin D acts on myelination via the activation of several myelin-associated genes. It paves the way for future randomised controlled clinical trials for peripheral

  2. Exposure to As, Cd and Pb-mixture impairs myelin and axon development in rat brain, optic nerve and retina

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    Rai, Nagendra Kumar; Ashok, Anushruti [Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (India); Developmental Toxicology, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (CSIR-IITR) (India); Rai, Asit; Tripathi, Sachin [Developmental Toxicology, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (CSIR-IITR) (India); Nagar, Geet Kumar [Endocrinology, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute (CSIR-CDRI) (India); Mitra, Kalyan [Electron Microscopy Unit, CSIR-CDRI, Lucknow 226001 (India); Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra, E-mail: sanghmitra@iitr.res.in [Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (India); Developmental Toxicology, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (CSIR-IITR) (India)

    2013-12-01

    Arsenic (As), lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) are the major metal contaminants of ground water in India. We have reported the toxic effect of their mixture (metal mixture, MM), at human relevant doses, on developing rat astrocytes. Astrocyte damage has been shown to be associated with myelin disintegration in CNS. We, therefore, hypothesized that the MM would perturb myelinating white matter in cerebral cortex, optic nerve (O.N.) and retina. We observed modulation in the levels of myelin and axon proteins, such as myelin basic protein (MBP), proteolipid protein, 2′-, 3′-cyclic-nucleotide-3′-phosphodiesterase, myelin-associated glycoprotein and neurofilament (NF) in the brain of developing rats. Dose and time-dependent synergistic toxic effect was noted. The MBP- and NF-immunolabeling, as well as luxol-fast blue (LFB) staining demonstrated a reduction in the area of intact myelin-fiber, and an increase in vacuolated axons, especially in the corpus-callosum. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of O.N. revealed a reduction in myelin thickness and axon-density. The immunolabeling with MBP, NF, and LFB staining in O.N. supported the TEM data. The hematoxylin and eosin staining of retina displayed a decrease in the thickness of nerve-fiber, plexiform-layer, and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) count. Investigating the mechanism revealed a loss in glutamine synthetase activity in the cerebral cortex and O.N., and a fall in the brain derived neurotrophic factor in retina. An enhanced apoptosis in MBP, NF and Brn3b-containing cells justified the diminution in myelinating axons in CNS. Our findings for the first time indicate white matter damage by MM, which may have significance in neurodevelopmental-pediatrics, neurotoxicology and retinal-cell biology. - Highlights: • As, Cd and Pb-mixture, at human relevant dose, demyelinate developing rat CNS. • The attenuation in myelin and axon is synergistic. • The optic nerve and brain demonstrate reduced glutamine synthetase.

  3. Exposure to As, Cd and Pb-mixture impairs myelin and axon development in rat brain, optic nerve and retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, Nagendra Kumar; Ashok, Anushruti; Rai, Asit; Tripathi, Sachin; Nagar, Geet Kumar; Mitra, Kalyan; Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic (As), lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) are the major metal contaminants of ground water in India. We have reported the toxic effect of their mixture (metal mixture, MM), at human relevant doses, on developing rat astrocytes. Astrocyte damage has been shown to be associated with myelin disintegration in CNS. We, therefore, hypothesized that the MM would perturb myelinating white matter in cerebral cortex, optic nerve (O.N.) and retina. We observed modulation in the levels of myelin and axon proteins, such as myelin basic protein (MBP), proteolipid protein, 2′-, 3′-cyclic-nucleotide-3′-phosphodiesterase, myelin-associated glycoprotein and neurofilament (NF) in the brain of developing rats. Dose and time-dependent synergistic toxic effect was noted. The MBP- and NF-immunolabeling, as well as luxol-fast blue (LFB) staining demonstrated a reduction in the area of intact myelin-fiber, and an increase in vacuolated axons, especially in the corpus-callosum. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of O.N. revealed a reduction in myelin thickness and axon-density. The immunolabeling with MBP, NF, and LFB staining in O.N. supported the TEM data. The hematoxylin and eosin staining of retina displayed a decrease in the thickness of nerve-fiber, plexiform-layer, and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) count. Investigating the mechanism revealed a loss in glutamine synthetase activity in the cerebral cortex and O.N., and a fall in the brain derived neurotrophic factor in retina. An enhanced apoptosis in MBP, NF and Brn3b-containing cells justified the diminution in myelinating axons in CNS. Our findings for the first time indicate white matter damage by MM, which may have significance in neurodevelopmental-pediatrics, neurotoxicology and retinal-cell biology. - Highlights: • As, Cd and Pb-mixture, at human relevant dose, demyelinate developing rat CNS. • The attenuation in myelin and axon is synergistic. • The optic nerve and brain demonstrate reduced glutamine synthetase.

  4. Quantitative Microscopic Analysis of Myelinated Nerve Fibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prodanov, D.P.; Feierabend, Hans K.P.; Marani, Enrico; Costa, A.; Villalba, E.

    2010-01-01

    Horizons in Neuroscience Research presents original research results on the leading edge of neuroscience research. Each article has been carefully selected in an attempt to present substantial research results across a broad spectrum

  5. Quantitative Microscopic Analysis of Myelinated Nerve Fibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prodanov, D.P.; Feierabend, Hans K.P.; Marani, Enrico; Flynn, Cian E.; Callaghan, Brandon R.

    2010-01-01

    Neuroanatomy is the study of the anatomical organization of the brain. Reciprocal communication between the brain and the cardiovascular system is important in sustaining neurobehavioral states that allow organisms to cope with their environment. Furthermore, in vertebrate animals, the routes that

  6. Excitation block in a nerve fibre model owing to potassium-dependent changes in myelin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazhe, A R; Maksimov, G V; Mosekilde, E; Sosnovtseva, O V

    2011-02-06

    The myelinated nerve fibre is formed by an axon and Schwann cells or oligodendrocytes that sheath the axon by winding around it in tight myelin layers. Repetitive stimulation of a fibre is known to result in accumulation of extracellular potassium ions, especially between the axon and the myelin. Uptake of potassium leads to Schwann cell swelling and myelin restructuring that impacts the electrical properties of the myelin. In order to further understand the dynamic interaction that takes place between the myelin and the axon, we have modelled submyelin potassium accumulation and related changes in myelin resistance during prolonged high-frequency stimulation. We predict that potassium-mediated decrease in myelin resistance leads to a functional excitation block with various patterns of altered spike trains. The patterns are found to depend on stimulation frequency and amplitude and to range from no block (less than 100 Hz) to a complete block (greater than 500 Hz). The transitional patterns include intermittent periodic block with interleaved spiking and non-spiking intervals of different relative duration as well as an unstable regime with chaotic switching between the spiking and non-spiking states. Intermittent conduction blocks are accompanied by oscillations of extracellular potassium. The mechanism of conductance block based on myelin restructuring complements the already known and modelled block via hyperpolarization mediated by the axonal sodium pump and potassium depolarization.

  7. A New Method for Automated Identification and Morphometry of Myelinated Fibers Through Light Microscopy Image Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novas, Romulo Bourget; Fazan, Valeria Paula Sassoli; Felipe, Joaquim Cezar

    2016-02-01

    Nerve morphometry is known to produce relevant information for the evaluation of several phenomena, such as nerve repair, regeneration, implant, transplant, aging, and different human neuropathies. Manual morphometry is laborious, tedious, time consuming, and subject to many sources of error. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a new method for the automated morphometry of myelinated fibers in cross-section light microscopy images. Images from the recurrent laryngeal nerve of adult rats and the vestibulocochlear nerve of adult guinea pigs were used herein. The proposed pipeline for fiber segmentation is based on the techniques of competitive clustering and concavity analysis. The evaluation of the proposed method for segmentation of images was done by comparing the automatic segmentation with the manual segmentation. To further evaluate the proposed method considering morphometric features extracted from the segmented images, the distributions of these features were tested for statistical significant difference. The method achieved a high overall sensitivity and very low false-positive rates per image. We detect no statistical difference between the distribution of the features extracted from the manual and the pipeline segmentations. The method presented a good overall performance, showing widespread potential in experimental and clinical settings allowing large-scale image analysis and, thus, leading to more reliable results.

  8. Regeneration of unmyelinated and myelinated sensory nerve fibres studied by a retrograde tracer method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lozeron, Pierre; Krarup, Christian; Schmalbruch, Henning

    2004-01-01

    cells that had been labelled, i.e., that had regenerated axons towards or beyond the injection site, were counted in serial sections. Large and small neurons with presumably myelinated and unmyelinated axons, respectively, were classified by immunostaining for neurofilaments. The axonal growth rate......Regeneration of myelinated and unmyelinated sensory nerve fibres after a crush lesion of the rat sciatic nerve was investigated by means of retrograde labelling. The advantage of this method is that the degree of regeneration is estimated on the basis of sensory somata rather than the number...... of axons. Axonal counts do not reflect the number of regenerated neurons because of axonal branching and because myelinated axons form unmyelinated sprouts. Two days to 10 weeks after crushing, the distal sural or peroneal nerves were cut and exposed to fluoro-dextran. Large and small dorsal root ganglion...

  9. Malnutrition and myelin structure: an X-ray scattering study of rat sciatic and optic nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, V.; Vargas, R.; Marquez, G.; Vonasek, E.; Mateu, L.; Luzzati, V.; Borges, J.

    2000-01-01

    Taking advantage of the fast and accurate X-ray scattering techniques recently developed in our laboratory, we tackled the study of the structural alterations induced in myelin by malnutrition. Our work was performed on sciatic and optic nerves dissected from rats fed with either a normal or a low-protein caloric diet, as a function of age (from birth to 60 days). By way of electrophysiological controls we also measured (on the sciatic nerves) the height and velocity of the compound action potential. Malnutrition was found to decrease the amount of myelin and to impair the packing order of the membranes in the sheaths. (orig.)

  10. Regeneration of unmyelinated and myelinated sensory nerve fibres studied by a retrograde tracer method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lozeron, Pierre; Krarup, Christian; Schmalbruch, Henning

    2004-01-01

    of axons. Axonal counts do not reflect the number of regenerated neurons because of axonal branching and because myelinated axons form unmyelinated sprouts. Two days to 10 weeks after crushing, the distal sural or peroneal nerves were cut and exposed to fluoro-dextran. Large and small dorsal root ganglion...

  11. Boric acid reduces axonal and myelin damage in experimental sciatic nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahir Kizilay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of boric acid in experimental acute sciatic nerve injury. Twenty-eight adult male rats were randomly divided into four equal groups (n = 7: control (C, boric acid (BA, sciatic nerve injury (I , and sciatic nerve injury + boric acid treatment (BAI. Sciatic nerve injury was generated using a Yasargil aneurysm clip in the groups I and BAI. Boric acid was given four times at 100 mg/kg to rats in the groups BA and BAI after injury (by gavage at 0, 24, 48 and 72 hours but no injury was made in the group BA. In vivo electrophysiological tests were performed at the end of the day 4 and sciatic nerve tissue samples were taken for histopathological examination. The amplitude of compound action potential, the nerve conduction velocity and the number of axons were significantly lower and the myelin structure was found to be broken in group I compared with those in groups C and BA. However, the amplitude of the compound action potential, the nerve conduction velocity and the number of axons were significantly greater in group BAI than in group I. Moreover, myelin injury was significantly milder and the intensity of nuclear factor kappa B immunostaining was significantly weaker in group BAI than in group I. The results of this study show that administration of boric acid at 100 mg/kg after sciatic nerve injury in rats markedly reduces myelin and axonal injury and improves the electrophysiological function of injured sciatic nerve possibly through alleviating oxidative stress reactions.

  12. Automated characterization of nerve fibers labeled fluorescently: determination of size, class and spatial distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodanov, Dimiter; Feirabend, Hans K P

    2008-10-03

    Morphological classification of nerve fibers could help interpret the assessment of neural regeneration and the understanding of selectivity of nerve stimulation. Specific populations of myelinated nerve fibers can be investigated by retrograde tracing from a muscle followed by microscopic measurements of the labeled fibers at different anatomical levels. Gastrocnemius muscles of adult rats were injected with the retrograde tracer Fluoro-Gold. After a survival period of 3 days, cross-sections of spinal cords, ventral roots, sciatic, and tibial nerves were collected and imaged on a fluorescence microscope. Nerve fibers were classified using a variation-based criterion acting on the distribution of their equivalent diameters. The same criterion was used to classify the labeled axons using the size of the fluorescent marker. Measurements of the axons were paired to those of the entire fibers (axons+myelin sheaths) in order to establish the correspondence between so-established axonal and fiber classifications. It was found that nerve fibers in L6 ventral roots could be classified into four populations comprising two classes of Aalpha (denoted Aalpha1 and Aalpha2), Agamma, and an additional class of Agammaalpha fibers. Cut-off borders between Agamma and Agammaalpha fiber classes were estimated to be 5.00+/-0.09 microm (SEM); between Agammaalpha and Aalpha1 fiber classes to be 6.86+/-0.11 microm (SEM); and between Aalpha1 and Aalpha2 fiber classes to be 8.66+/-0.16 microm (SEM). Topographical maps of the nerve fibers that innervate the gastrocnemius muscles were constructed per fiber class for the spinal root L6. The major advantage of the presented approach consists of the combined indirect classification of nerve fiber types and the construction of topographical maps of so-identified fiber classes.

  13. Splanchnic preganglionic neurons in man. III. Morphometry of myelinated fibers of rami communicantes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, P A; Dyck, P J

    1978-01-01

    The myelinated fiber (MF) composition of T6-T8 Rami Communicantes were obtained in 9 healthy persons of various ages. The textbook picture that distal rami (DR) contain all of the myelinated fibers and therefore are white, while proximal rami (PR) contain none of them and therefore are grey must be modified. We found that DR usually contained abundant MFs and that PR concordance was found between segmental numbers of intermediolateral nuclei cytons, ventral root small myelinated fibers (SMFs), and rami total small MFs to suggest that both rami probably contain the distal myelinated axons of preganglionic autonomic fibers. Finally, there was an attrition of total MFs of rami with age, similar to what we had previously found for ILC cytons and for root SMFs. The decrease in number of pre-ganglionic autonomic neurons with age is thought to be of sufficient magnitude to account for the dysautonomia of the elderly.

  14. NON-INVASIVE EVALUATION OF NERVE CONDUCTION IN SMALL DIAMETER FIBERS IN THE RAT

    OpenAIRE

    Zotova, Elena G.; Arezzo, Joseph C.

    2013-01-01

    A novel non-invasive technique was applied to measure velocity within slow conducting axons in the distal extreme of the sciatic nerve (i.e., digital nerve) in a rat model. The technique is based on the extraction of rectified multiple unit activity (MUA) from in vivo whole nerve compound responses. This method reliably identifies compound action potentials in thinly myelinated fibers conducting at a range of 9-18 m/s (Aδ axons), as well as in a subgroup of unmylinated C fibers conducting at ...

  15. Noninvasive Evaluation of Nerve Conduction in Small Diameter Fibers in the Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Elena G. Zotova; Joseph C. Arezzo

    2013-01-01

    A novel noninvasive technique was applied to measure velocity within slow conducting axons in the distal extreme of the sciatic nerve (i.e., digital nerve) in a rat model. The technique is based on the extraction of rectified multiple unit activity (MUA) from in vivo whole nerve compound responses. This method reliably identifies compound action potentials in thinly myelinated fibers conducting at a range of 9–18 m/s ( axons), as well as in a subgroup of unmyelinated C fibers conducting at ap...

  16. Sensation, mechanoreceptor, and nerve fiber function after nerve regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian; Rosén, Birgitta; Boeckstyns, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Sensation is essential for recovery after peripheral nerve injury. However, the relationship between sensory modalities and function of regenerated fibers is uncertain. We have investigated the relationships between touch threshold, tactile gnosis, and mechanoreceptor and sensory fiber...... function after nerve regeneration. Methods: Twenty-one median or ulnar nerve lesions were repaired by a collagen nerve conduit or direct suture. Quantitative sensory hand function and sensory conduction studies by near-nerve technique, including tactile stimulation of mechanoreceptors, were followed for 2...... years, and results were compared to noninjured hands. Results: At both repair methods, touch thresholds at the finger tips recovered to 81 ± 3% and tactile gnosis only to 20 ± 4% (p nerve action potentials (SNAPs) remained dispersed and areas recovered to 23 ± 2...

  17. Developmental impairment of compound action potential in the optic nerve of myelin mutant taiep rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncagliolo, Manuel; Schlageter, Carol; León, Claudia; Couve, Eduardo; Bonansco, Christian; Eguibar, José R

    2006-01-05

    The taiep rat is a myelin mutant with an initial hypomyelination, followed by a progressive demyelination of the CNS. The neurological correlates start with tremor, followed by ataxia, immobility episodes, epilepsy and paralysis. The optic nerve, an easily-isolable central tract fully myelinated by oligodendrocytes, is a suitable preparation to evaluate the developmental impairment of central myelin. We examined the ontogenic development of optic nerve compound action potentials (CAP) throughout the first 6 months of life of control and taiep rats. Control optic nerves (ON) develop CAPs characterized by three waves. Along the first month, the CAPs of taiep rats showed a delayed maturation, with lower amplitudes and longer latencies than controls; at P30, the conduction velocity has only a third of the normal value. Later, as demyelination proceeds, the conduction velocity of taiep ONs begins to decrease and CAPs undergo a gradual temporal dispersion. CAPs of control and taiep showed differences in their pharmacological sensitivity to TEA and 4-AP, two voltage dependent K+ channel-blockers. As compared with TEA, 4-AP induced a significant increase of the amplitudes and a remarkable broadening of CAPs. After P20, unlike controls, the greater sensitivity to 4-AP exhibited by taiep ONs correlates with the detachment and retraction of paranodal loops suggesting that potassium conductances could regulate the excitability as demyelination of CNS axons progresses. It is concluded that the taiep rat, a long-lived mutant, provides a useful model to study the consequences of partial demyelination and the mechanisms by which glial cells regulate the molecular organization and excitability of axonal membranes during development and disease.

  18. Selective Fiber Degeneration in the Peripheral Nerve of a Patient With Severe Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Yvon

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS is characterized by chronic debilitating pain disproportional to the inciting event and accompanied by motor, sensory, and autonomic disturbances. The pathophysiology of CRPS remains elusive. An exceptional case of severe CRPS leading to forearm amputation provided the opportunity to examine nerve histopathological features of the peripheral nerves.Methods: A 35-year-old female developed CRPS secondary to low voltage electrical injury. The CRPS was refractory to medical therapy and led to functional loss of the forelimb, repeated cutaneous wound infections leading to hospitalization. Specifically, the patient had exhausted a targeted conservative pain management programme prior to forearm amputation. Radial, median, and ulnar nerve specimens were obtained from the amputated limb and analyzed by light and transmission electron microscopy (TEM.Results: All samples showed features of selective myelinated nerve fiber degeneration (47–58% of fibers on electron microscopy. Degenerating myelinated fibers were significantly larger than healthy fibers (p < 0.05, and corresponded to the larger Aα fibers (motor/proprioception whilst smaller Aδ (pain/temperature fibers were spared. Groups of small unmyelinated C fibers (Remak bundles also showed evidence of degeneration in all samples.Conclusions: We are the first to show large fiber degeneration in CRPS using TEM. Degeneration of Aα fibers may lead to an imbalance in nerve signaling, inappropriately triggering the smaller healthy Aδ fibers, which transmit pain and temperature. These findings suggest peripheral nerve degeneration may play a key role in CRPS. Improved knowledge of pathogenesis will help develop more targeted treatments.

  19. Electroactive biodegradable polyurethane significantly enhanced Schwann cells myelin gene expression and neurotrophin secretion for peripheral nerve tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yaobin; Wang, Ling; Guo, Baolin; Shao, Yongpin; Ma, Peter X

    2016-05-01

    Myelination of Schwann cells (SCs) is critical for the success of peripheral nerve regeneration, and biomaterials that can promote SCs' neurotrophin secretion as scaffolds are beneficial for nerve repair. Here we present a biomaterials-approach, specifically, a highly tunable conductive biodegradable flexible polyurethane by polycondensation of poly(glycerol sebacate) and aniline pentamer, to significantly enhance SCs' myelin gene expression and neurotrophin secretion for peripheral nerve tissue engineering. SCs are cultured on these conductive polymer films, and the biocompatibility of these films and their ability to enhance myelin gene expressions and sustained neurotrophin secretion are successfully demonstrated. The mechanism of SCs' neurotrophin secretion on conductive films is demonstrated by investigating the relationship between intracellular Ca(2+) level and SCs' myelination. Furthermore, the neurite growth and elongation of PC12 cells are induced by adding the neurotrophin medium suspension produced from SCs-laden conductive films. These data suggest that these conductive degradable polyurethanes that enhance SCs' myelin gene expressions and sustained neurotrophin secretion perform great potential for nerve regeneration applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Differentiation of Nerve Fibers Storing CGRP and CGRP Receptors in the Peripheral Trigeminovascular System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eftekhari, Sajedeh; Warfvinge, Karin; Blixt, Frank W

    2013-01-01

    Primary headaches such as migraine are postulated to involve the activation of sensory trigeminal pain neurons that innervate intracranial blood vessels and the dura mater. It is suggested that local activation of these sensory nerves may involve dural mast cells as one factor in local inflammation...... and in human dural vessels. The relative distributions of CGRP, CLR, and RAMP1 were evaluated with respect to each other and in relationship to mast cells, myelin, substance P, neuronal nitric oxide synthase, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide, and vasoactive intestinal peptide. CGRP expression...... was found in thin unmyelinated fibers, whereas CLR and RAMP1 were expressed in thicker myelinated fibers coexpressed with an A-fiber marker. CLR and RAMP1 immunoreactivity colocalized with mast cell tryptase in rodent; however, expression of both receptor components was not observed in human mast cells...

  1. Axonal and glial currents activated during the post-tetanic hyperpolarization in non-myelinated nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, A; Jirounek, P

    1998-07-01

    Changes in membrane potential and potassium concentration in the extracellular space ([K+]e) of rabbit vagus nerve were measured simultaneously during electrical activity and during the period of recovery using a modified sucrose-gap method and potassium-sensitive microelectrodes. After stimulation for 15 s at 15 Hz the main activity-induced increase in [K+]e reached 16.9 mM. This increase in [K+]e was paralleled by a depolarization of the preparation. The period of activity was followed by a post-tetanic hyperpolarization (PTH) lasting tens of seconds, generated by the axonal electrogenic Na+-K+ pump and to a lesser extent by the pump of the surrounding Schwann cells. The amplitude of the PTH dramatically increased in experiments in which inward currents were blocked by removal of Cl– or after application of Cs+ or Ba2+, indicating that under normal conditions the current generated by the Na+-K+ pump is strongly short-circuited. A pharmacological and kinetic study showed that these currents are: (1) the hyperpolarization-activated current I h, and (2) the inwardly rectifying I KIR current. The results show that the latter originates from Schwann cells. Our data indicate that in non-myelinated nerves there is a subtle association of inward ionic channels which (1) helps the cell to maintain an optimal membrane potential after a period of activity, and (2) contributes to the removal of excess K+ from the extracellular space.

  2. A Laminin-2, Dystroglycan, Utrophin Axis is Required for Compartmentalization and Elongation of Myelin Segments

    OpenAIRE

    Court, Felipe A.; Hewitt, Jane E.; Davies, Kay; Patton, Bruce L.; Uncini, Antonino; Wrabetz, Lawrence; Feltri, M. Laura

    2009-01-01

    Animal and plant cells compartmentalize to perform morphogenetic functions. Compartmentalization of myelin-forming Schwann cells may favor elongation of myelin segments to the size required for efficient conduction of nerve impulses. Compartments in myelinated fibers were described by Ramon-y-Cajal and depend on periaxin, mutated in the hereditary neuropathy Charcot-Marie-Tooth 4F. Lack of periaxin in mice causes loss of compartments, formation of short myelin segments (internodes) and reduce...

  3. GABA and its B-receptor are present at the node of Ranvier in a small population of sensory fibers, implicating a role in myelination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corell, Mikael; Wicher, Grzegorz; Radomska, Katarzyna J

    2015-01-01

    throughout development and after injury. A small population of myelinated sensory fibers displayed all of these molecules at the node of Ranvier, indicating a role in axon-glia communication. Functional studies using GABAB receptor agonists and antagonists were performed in fetal DRG primary cultures...... to study the function of this receptor during development. The results show that GABA, via its B receptor, is involved in the myelination process but not in Schwann cell proliferation. The data from adult nerves suggest additional roles in axon-glia communication after injury.......The γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type B receptor has been implicated in glial cell development in the peripheral nervous system (PNS), although the exact function of GABA signaling is not known. To investigate GABA and its B receptor in PNS development and degeneration, we studied the expression...

  4. Excitation block in a nerve fibre model owing to potassium-dependent changes in myelin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brazhe, Alexey; Maksimov, G. V.; Mosekilde, Erik

    2011-01-01

    . Uptake of potassium leads to Schwann cell swelling and myelin restructuring that impacts the electrical properties of the myelin. In order to further understand the dynamic interaction that takes place between the myelin and the axon, we have modelled submyelin potassium accumulation and related changes...... in myelin resistance during prolonged high-frequency stimulation. We predict that potassium-mediated decrease in myelin resistance leads to a functional excitation block with various patterns of altered spike trains. The patterns are found to depend on stimulation frequency and amplitude and to range from...

  5. Neurophysiological approach to disorders of peripheral nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crone, Clarissa; Krarup, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Disorders of the peripheral nerve system (PNS) are heterogeneous and may involve motor fibers, sensory fibers, small myelinated and unmyelinated fibers and autonomic nerve fibers, with variable anatomical distribution (single nerves, several different nerves, symmetrical affection of all nerves......, plexus, or root lesions). Furthermore pathological processes may result in either demyelination, axonal degeneration or both. In order to reach an exact diagnosis of any neuropathy electrophysiological studies are crucial to obtain information about these variables. Conventional electrophysiological...

  6. After Nerve Injury, Lineage Tracing Shows That Myelin and Remak Schwann Cells Elongate Extensively and Branch to Form Repair Schwann Cells, Which Shorten Radically on Remyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Sanchez, Jose A; Pilch, Kjara S; van der Lans, Milou; Fazal, Shaline V; Benito, Cristina; Wagstaff, Laura J; Mirsky, Rhona; Jessen, Kristjan R

    2017-09-13

    There is consensus that, distal to peripheral nerve injury, myelin and Remak cells reorganize to form cellular columns, Bungner's bands, which are indispensable for regeneration. However, knowledge of the structure of these regeneration tracks has not advanced for decades and the structure of the cells that form them, denervated or repair Schwann cells, remains obscure. Furthermore, the origin of these cells from myelin and Remak cells and their ability to give rise to myelin cells after regeneration has not been demonstrated directly, although these conversions are believed to be central to nerve repair. Using genetic lineage-tracing and scanning-block face electron microscopy, we show that injury of sciatic nerves from mice of either sex triggers extensive and unexpected Schwann cell elongation and branching to form long, parallel processes. Repair cells are 2- to 3-fold longer than myelin and Remak cells and 7- to 10-fold longer than immature Schwann cells. Remarkably, when repair cells transit back to myelinating cells, they shorten ∼7-fold to generate the typically short internodes of regenerated nerves. The present experiments define novel morphological transitions in injured nerves and show that repair Schwann cells have a cell-type-specific structure that differentiates them from other cells in the Schwann cell lineage. They also provide the first direct evidence using genetic lineage tracing for two basic assumptions in Schwann cell biology: that myelin and Remak cells generate the elongated cells that build Bungner bands in injured nerves and that such cells can transform to myelin cells after regeneration. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT After injury to peripheral nerves, the myelin and Remak Schwann cells distal to the injury site reorganize and modify their properties to form cells that support the survival of injured neurons, promote axon growth, remove myelin-associated growth inhibitors, and guide regenerating axons to their targets. We show that the

  7. NON-INVASIVE EVALUATION OF NERVE CONDUCTION IN SMALL DIAMETER FIBERS IN THE RAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotova, Elena G; Arezzo, Joseph C

    2013-01-01

    A novel non-invasive technique was applied to measure velocity within slow conducting axons in the distal extreme of the sciatic nerve (i.e., digital nerve) in a rat model. The technique is based on the extraction of rectified multiple unit activity (MUA) from in vivo whole nerve compound responses. This method reliably identifies compound action potentials in thinly myelinated fibers conducting at a range of 9-18 m/s (Aδ axons), as well as in a subgroup of unmylinated C fibers conducting at approximately 1-2 m/s. The sensitivity of the method to C-fiber conduction was confirmed by the progressive decrement of the responses in the 1-2 m/s range over a 20-day period following the topical application of capsaicin (ANOVA p <0.03). Increasing the frequency of applied repetitive stimulation over a range of 0.75 Hz to 6.0 Hz produced slowing of conduction and a significant decrease in the magnitude of the compound C-fiber response (ANOVA p <0.01). This technique offers a unique opportunity for the non-invasive, repeatable, and quantitative assessment of velocity in the subsets of Aδ and C fibers in parallel with evaluation of fast nerve conduction.

  8. Curcumin accelerates the repair of sciatic nerve injury in rats through reducing Schwann cells apoptosis and promoting myelinization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhiwei; Li, Xiaoling; Li, Qing

    2017-08-01

    Schwann cells (SCs) play an indispensable role in the repair and regeneration of injured peripheral nerve. Curcumin can reduce SCs apoptosis, and promote the regeneration and functional recovery of injured peripheral nerves. However, the corresponding mechanisms are not clear. The article was aimed to explore the effect and corresponding mechanisms of curcumin on the repair of sciatic nerve injury in rats. After surgery induced sciatic nerve injury, the model rats were divided into three groups and treated with curcumin, curcumin+PD98059 and curcumin+IGF-1 respectively for 4days. The phosphorylation of Erk1/2 and Akt, and the expression of LC3-II, Beclin 1 and p62 were measured using western blotting. After treatment for 60days, myelination of the injured sciatic nerve was evaluated by MBP immunohistochemical staining and the expression of PMP22, Fibrin and S100 were determined using qRT-PCR and western blotting. In vitro, RSC96 cells were starved for 12h to induce autophagy, and received DMSO, curcumin, PD98059+curcumin, IGF-1+curcumin and BFA1 respectively. The phosphorylation of Erk1/2、Akt and the expression of LC3-II, Beclin 1, p62, PMP22, Fibrin and S100 were measured using western blotting, and the cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry. Curcumin could promote injury-induced cell autophagy, remyelination and axon regeneration in sciatic nerve of rats. In vitro, curcumin could accelerate cell autophagy through regulating autophagy related Erk1/2 and Akt pathway, prevent cell apoptosis and promote expression of PMP22 and S100, and reduced deposition of Fibrin in cultured RSC96 SCs. Curcumin could accelerate injured sciatic nerve repair in rats through reducing SCs apoptosis and promoting myelinization. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  9. Structure and function of the contactin-associated protein family in myelinated axons and their relationship with nerve diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Zou; De-en Xu; Wei-feng Zhang; Hai-ying Liu; Xia Li; Xing Zhang; Xiao-fang Ma; Yang Sun; Shi-yi Jiang; Quan-hong Ma

    2017-01-01

    The contactin-associated protein (Caspr) family participates in nerve excitation and conduction, and neurotransmitter release in myelinated axons. We analyzed the structures and functions of the Caspr family–CNTNAP1 (Caspr1), CNTNAP2 (Caspr2), CNTNAP3 (Caspr3), CNTNAP4 (Caspr4) and CNTNAP5 (Caspr5), Caspr1–5 is not only involved in the formation of myelinated axons, but also participates in maintaining the stability of adjacent connections. Caspr1 participates in the formation, differentiation, and proliferation of neurons and astrocytes, and in motor control and cognitive function. We also analyzed the relationship between the Caspr family and neurodegenerative diseases, multiple sclerosis, and autoimmune encephalitis. However, the effects of Caspr on disease course and prognosis remain poorly understood. The effects of Caspr on disease diagnosis and treatment need further investigation.

  10. Structure and function of the contactin-associated protein family in myelinated axons and their relationship with nerve diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The contactin-associated protein (Caspr family participates in nerve excitation and conduction, and neurotransmitter release in myelinated axons. We analyzed the structures and functions of the Caspr family–CNTNAP1 (Caspr1, CNTNAP2 (Caspr2, CNTNAP3 (Caspr3, CNTNAP4 (Caspr4 and CNTNAP5 (Caspr5, Caspr1–5 is not only involved in the formation of myelinated axons, but also participates in maintaining the stability of adjacent connections. Caspr1 participates in the formation, differentiation, and proliferation of neurons and astrocytes, and in motor control and cognitive function. We also analyzed the relationship between the Caspr family and neurodegenerative diseases, multiple sclerosis, and autoimmune encephalitis. However, the effects of Caspr on disease course and prognosis remain poorly understood. The effects of Caspr on disease diagnosis and treatment need further investigation.

  11. Schwann Cell Glycogen Selectively Supports Myelinated Axon Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Angus M; Evans, Richard D; Black, Joel; Ransom, Bruce R

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Interruption of energy supply to peripheral axons is a cause of axon loss. We determined if glycogen was present in mammalian peripheral nerve, and if it supported axon conduction during aglycemia. Methods We used biochemical assay and electron microscopy to determine the presence of glycogen, and electrophysiology to monitor axon function. Results Glycogen was present in sciatic nerve, its concentration varying directly with ambient [glucose]. Electron microscopy detected glycogen granules primarily in myelinating Schwann cell cytoplasm and these diminished after exposure to aglycemia. During aglycemia, conduction failure in large myelinated axons (A fibers) mirrored the time-course of glycogen loss. Latency to CAP failure was directly related to nerve glycogen content at aglycemia onset. Glycogen did not benefit the function of slow-conducting, small diameter unmyelinated axons (C fibers) during aglycemia. Blocking glycogen breakdown pharmacologically accelerated CAP failure during aglycemia in A fibers, but not in C fibers. Lactate was as effective as glucose in supporting sciatic nerve function, and was continuously released into the extracellular space in the presence of glucose and fell rapidly during aglycemia. Interpretation Our findings indicated that glycogen is present in peripheral nerve, primarily in myelinating Schwann cells, and exclusively supports large diameter, myelinated axon conduction during aglycemia. Available evidence suggests that peripheral nerve glycogen breaks down during aglycemia and is passed, probably as lactate, to myelinated axons to support function. Unmyelinated axons are not protected by glycogen and are more vulnerable to dysfunction during periods of hypoglycemia. PMID:23034913

  12. Cranial nerve vascular compression syndromes of the trigeminal, facial and vago-glossopharyngeal nerves: comparative anatomical study of the central myelin portion and transitional zone; correlations with incidences of corresponding hyperactive dysfunctional syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guclu, Bulent; Sindou, Marc; Meyronet, David; Streichenberger, Nathalie; Simon, Emile; Mertens, Patrick

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the anatomy of the central myelin portion and the central myelin-peripheral myelin transitional zone of the trigeminal, facial, glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves from fresh cadavers. The aim was also to investigate the relationship between the length and volume of the central myelin portion of these nerves with the incidences of the corresponding cranial dysfunctional syndromes caused by their compression to provide some more insights for a better understanding of mechanisms. The trigeminal, facial, glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves from six fresh cadavers were examined. The length of these nerves from the brainstem to the foramen that they exit were measured. Longitudinal sections were stained and photographed to make measurements. The diameters of the nerves where they exit/enter from/to brainstem, the diameters where the transitional zone begins, the distances to the most distal part of transitional zone from brainstem and depths of the transitional zones were measured. Most importantly, the volume of the central myelin portion of the nerves was calculated. Correlation between length and volume of the central myelin portion of these nerves and the incidences of the corresponding hyperactive dysfunctional syndromes as reported in the literature were studied. The distance of the most distal part of the transitional zone from the brainstem was 4.19  ±  0.81 mm for the trigeminal nerve, 2.86  ±  1.19 mm for the facial nerve, 1.51  ±  0.39 mm for the glossopharyngeal nerve, and 1.63  ±  1.15 mm for the vagus nerve. The volume of central myelin portion was 24.54  ±  9.82 mm(3) in trigeminal nerve; 4.43  ±  2.55 mm(3) in facial nerve; 1.55  ±  1.08 mm(3) in glossopharyngeal nerve; 2.56  ±  1.32 mm(3) in vagus nerve. Correlations (p  nerves and incidences of the corresponding diseases. At present it is rather well-established that primary trigeminal neuralgia, hemifacial spasm and vago

  13. Conduction block of mammalian myelinated nerve by local cooling to 15–30°C after a brief heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaocun; Lyon, Timothy D.; Kadow, Brian T.; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Lee, Andy; Kang, Audry; Roppolo, James R.; de Groat, William C.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at understanding thermal effects on nerve conduction and developing new methods to produce a reversible thermal block of axonal conduction in mammalian myelinated nerves. In 13 cats under α-chloralose anesthesia, conduction block of pudendal nerves (n = 20) by cooling (5–30°C) or heating (42–54°C) a small segment (9 mm) of the nerve was monitored by the urethral striated muscle contractions and increases in intraurethral pressure induced by intermittent (5 s on and 20 s off) electrical stimulation (50 Hz, 0.2 ms) of the nerve. Cold block was observed at 5–15°C while heat block occurred at 50–54°C. A complete cold block up to 10 min was fully reversible, but a complete heat block was only reversible when the heating duration was less than 1.3 ± 0.1 min. A brief (block at 50–54°C or 15 min of nonblock mild heating at 46–48°C significantly increased the cold block temperature to 15–30°C. The effect of heating on cold block fully reversed within ∼40 min. This study discovered a novel method to block mammalian myelinated nerves at 15–30°C, providing the possibility to develop an implantable device to block axonal conduction and treat many chronic disorders. The effect of heating on cold block is of considerable interest because it raises many basic scientific questions that may help reveal the mechanisms underlying cold or heat block of axonal conduction. PMID:26740534

  14. Evidence for a intimate relationship between mast cells and nerve fibers in the tongue of the frog, Rana esculenta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chieffi Baccari, Gabriella; Minucci, Sergio [Naples, II Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisiologia Umana e Funzioni Biologiche Integrate `Filippo Bottazzi`

    1997-12-31

    Morphological and ultrastructural association of mast cells and nerve fibers were studied in the tongue of the frog Rana esculenta. The number of mast cells in the tongue (253 {+-} 45 / mm{sup 2}) is far the highest of the frog tissue as far as people know. They are distributed throughout the connective tissue among the muscular fibers, near arterioles and venules but predominantly in close association and within the nerves. They are often embedded in the endoneurium within a nerve bundle near to myelinic or unmyelinic fibers and in membrane-to-membrane contact with axonlike processes. Just for the richness of mast cells, the tongue of the frog could represent an useful model to study the relationship between these cells and the peripheral nervous system.

  15. Evidence for a intimate relationship between mast cells and nerve fibers in the tongue of the frog, Rana esculenta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chieffi Baccari, Gabriella; Minucci, Sergio [Naples, II Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisiologia Umana e Funzioni Biologiche Integrate ` Filippo Bottazzi`

    1998-12-31

    Morphological and ultrastructural association of mast cells and nerve fibers were studied in the tongue of the frog Rana esculenta. The number of mast cells in the tongue (253 {+-} 45 / mm{sup 2}) is far the highest of the frog tissue as far as people know. They are distributed throughout the connective tissue among the muscular fibers, near arterioles and venules but predominantly in close association and within the nerves. They are often embedded in the endoneurium within a nerve bundle near to myelinic or unmyelinic fibers and in membrane-to-membrane contact with axonlike processes. Just for the richness of mast cells, the tongue of the frog could represent an useful model to study the relationship between these cells and the peripheral nervous system.

  16. [Ultrastructural changes of myelinated fibers in the brain in continuous and attack-like paranoid schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uranova, N A; Kolomeets, N S; Vikhreva, O V; Zimina, I S; Rakhmanova, V I; Orlovskaya, D D

    Previously the authors have reported the ultrastructural pathology of myelinated fibers (MF) in the brain in schizophrenia. The aim of the present study was to compare the effect of disease course on ultrastructural changes of MF. Postmortem electron microscopic morphometric study of MF was performed in the prefrontal cortex, caudate nucleus and hippocampus in 19 cases of paranoid schizophrenia. Fourteen cases of continuous schizophrenia, 5 cases of attack-like schizophrenia and 25 normal matched control cases were studied. The proportion (percentage) of pathological MF was estimated in the prefrontal cortex, layer 5, CA3 area of hippocampus, pyramidal layer, and in the head of the caudate nucleus. The percentage of MF having axonal atrophy and swelling of periaxonal oligodendrocyte process was significantly higher in both continuous and attack-like schizophrenia in all brain structures studied as compared to the control group. In the hippocampus and caudate nucleus, this parameter was increased significantly in attack-like schizophrenia as compared to continuous schizophrenia. In the prefrontal cortex. The percentage of the pathological MF having signs of deformation and destruction of myelin sheaths increased significantly only in continuous schizophrenia as compared to the control group. MF pathology is similar in attack-like and continuous paranoid schizophrenia but differ by the degree of severity of pathological MF. Abnormalities in MF contribute to the disconnectivity between the prefrontal cortex, caudate nucleus and hippocampus.

  17. What is the optimal value of the g-ratio for myelinated fibers in the rat CNS? A theoretical approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Chomiak

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The biological process underlying axonal myelination is complex and often prone to injury and disease. The ratio of the inner axonal diameter to the total outer diameter or g-ratio is widely utilized as a functional and structural index of optimal axonal myelination. Based on the speed of fiber conduction, Rushton was the first to derive a theoretical estimate of the optimal g-ratio of 0.6 [1]. This theoretical limit nicely explains the experimental data for myelinated axons obtained for some peripheral fibers but appears significantly lower than that found for CNS fibers. This is, however, hardly surprising given that in the CNS, axonal myelination must achieve multiple goals including reducing conduction delays, promoting conduction fidelity, lowering energy costs, and saving space.In this study we explore the notion that a balanced set-point can be achieved at a functional level as the micro-structure of individual axons becomes optimized, particularly for the central system where axons tend to be smaller and their myelin sheath thinner. We used an intuitive yet novel theoretical approach based on the fundamental biophysical properties describing axonal structure and function to show that an optimal g-ratio can be defined for the central nervous system (approximately 0.77. Furthermore, by reducing the influence of volume constraints on structural design by about 40%, this approach can also predict the g-ratio observed in some peripheral fibers (approximately 0.6.These results support the notion of optimization theory in nervous system design and construction and may also help explain why the central and peripheral systems have evolved different g-ratios as a result of volume constraints.

  18. What is the optimal value of the g-ratio for myelinated fibers in the rat CNS? A theoretical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomiak, Taylor; Hu, Bin

    2009-11-13

    The biological process underlying axonal myelination is complex and often prone to injury and disease. The ratio of the inner axonal diameter to the total outer diameter or g-ratio is widely utilized as a functional and structural index of optimal axonal myelination. Based on the speed of fiber conduction, Rushton was the first to derive a theoretical estimate of the optimal g-ratio of 0.6 [1]. This theoretical limit nicely explains the experimental data for myelinated axons obtained for some peripheral fibers but appears significantly lower than that found for CNS fibers. This is, however, hardly surprising given that in the CNS, axonal myelination must achieve multiple goals including reducing conduction delays, promoting conduction fidelity, lowering energy costs, and saving space. In this study we explore the notion that a balanced set-point can be achieved at a functional level as the micro-structure of individual axons becomes optimized, particularly for the central system where axons tend to be smaller and their myelin sheath thinner. We used an intuitive yet novel theoretical approach based on the fundamental biophysical properties describing axonal structure and function to show that an optimal g-ratio can be defined for the central nervous system (approximately 0.77). Furthermore, by reducing the influence of volume constraints on structural design by about 40%, this approach can also predict the g-ratio observed in some peripheral fibers (approximately 0.6). These results support the notion of optimization theory in nervous system design and construction and may also help explain why the central and peripheral systems have evolved different g-ratios as a result of volume constraints.

  19. Cholesterol and myelin biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saher, Gesine; Simons, Mikael

    2010-01-01

    Myelin consists of several layers of tightly compacted membranes wrapped around axons in the nervous system. The main function of myelin is to provide electrical insulation around the axon to ensure the rapid propagation of nerve conduction. As the myelinating glia terminally differentiates, they begin to produce myelin membranes on a remarkable scale. This membrane is unique in its composition being highly enriched in lipids, in particular galactosylceramide and cholesterol. In this review we will summarize the role of cholesterol in myelin biogenesis in the central and peripheral nervous system.

  20. Axonal plasticity elicits long-term changes in oligodendroglia and myelinated fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drøjdahl, Nina; Nielsen, Helle Hvilsted; Gardi, Jonathan E

    2010-01-01

    Axons are linked to induction of myelination during development and to the maintenance of myelin and myelinated tracts in the adult CNS. Currently, it is unknown whether and how axonal plasticity in adult CNS impacts the myelinating cells and their precursors. In this article, we report that newly...... formed axonal sprouts are able to induce a protracted myelination response in adult CNS. We show that newly formed axonal sprouts, induced by lesion of the entorhino-hippocampal perforant pathway, have the ability to induce a myelination response in stratum radiatum and lucidum CA3. The lesion resulted...... in significant recruitment of newly formed myelinating cells, documented by incorporation of the proliferation marker bromodeoxyuridine into chondroitin sulphate NG2 expressing cells in stratum radiatum and lucidum CA3 early after lesion, and the occurrence of a 28% increase in the number of oligodendrocytes...

  1. The occurrence of IgM and complement factors along myelin sheaths of peripheral nerves An immunohistochemical study of the Guillain-Barre syndrome : Preliminary communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijten, J.A.F.M.; Baart de la Faille-Kuyper, E.H.

    In nerve biopsies from 4 of 6 patients with the Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), IgM and complement factors were found, probably localized along myelin sheaths. The possible significance of this phenomenon has been discussed. No such findings were obtained in control subjects.

  2. Comparison of the fastest regenerating motor and sensory myelinated axons in the same peripheral nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldovan, Mihai; Sørensen, Jesper; Krarup, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Functional outcome after peripheral nerve regeneration is often poor, particularly involving nerve injuries far from their targets. Comparison of sensory and motor axon regeneration before target reinnervation is not possible in the clinical setting, and previous experimental studies addressing...... the question of differences in growth rates of different nerve fibre populations led to conflicting results. We developed an animal model to compare growth and maturation of the fastest growing sensory and motor fibres within the same mixed nerve after Wallerian degeneration. Regeneration of cat tibial nerve...... after crush (n = 13) and section (n = 7) was monitored for up to 140 days, using implanted cuff electrodes placed around the sciatic and tibial nerves and wire electrodes at plantar muscles. To distinguish between sensory and motor fibres, recordings were carried out from L6-S2 spinal roots using cuff...

  3. Serotonin Immunoreactive Cells and Nerve Fibers in the Mucosa of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hydroxytryptamine) immunoreactivity in the pyloric mucosa of the rat stomach. The immunoreactive elements included the endocrine cells, mast cells and mucosal nerve fibers in the lamina propria. The immunopositive endocrine cells were oval in ...

  4. Modeling the response of small myelinated axons in a compound nerve to kilohertz frequency signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelot, N A; Behrend, C E; Grill, W M

    2017-08-01

    There is growing interest in electrical neuromodulation of peripheral nerves, particularly autonomic nerves, to treat various diseases. Electrical signals in the kilohertz frequency (KHF) range can produce different responses, including conduction block. For example, EnteroMedics' vBloc ® therapy for obesity delivers 5 kHz stimulation to block the abdominal vagus nerves, but the mechanisms of action are unclear. We developed a two-part computational model, coupling a 3D finite element model of a cuff electrode around the human abdominal vagus nerve with biophysically-realistic electrical circuit equivalent (cable) model axons (1, 2, and 5.7 µm in diameter). We developed an automated algorithm to classify conduction responses as subthreshold (transmission), KHF-evoked activity (excitation), or block. We quantified neural responses across kilohertz frequencies (5-20 kHz), amplitudes (1-8 mA), and electrode designs. We found heterogeneous conduction responses across the modeled nerve trunk, both for a given parameter set and across parameter sets, although most suprathreshold responses were excitation, rather than block. The firing patterns were irregular near transmission and block boundaries, but otherwise regular, and mean firing rates varied with electrode-fibre distance. Further, we identified excitation responses at amplitudes above block threshold, termed 're-excitation', arising from action potentials initiated at virtual cathodes. Excitation and block thresholds decreased with smaller electrode-fibre distances, larger fibre diameters, and lower kilohertz frequencies. A point source model predicted a larger fraction of blocked fibres and greater change of threshold with distance as compared to the realistic cuff and nerve model. Our findings of widespread asynchronous KHF-evoked activity suggest that conduction block in the abdominal vagus nerves is unlikely with current clinical parameters. Our results indicate that compound neural or downstream muscle

  5. Modeling the response of small myelinated axons in a compound nerve to kilohertz frequency signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelot, N. A.; Behrend, C. E.; Grill, W. M.

    2017-08-01

    Objective. There is growing interest in electrical neuromodulation of peripheral nerves, particularly autonomic nerves, to treat various diseases. Electrical signals in the kilohertz frequency (KHF) range can produce different responses, including conduction block. For example, EnteroMedics’ vBloc® therapy for obesity delivers 5 kHz stimulation to block the abdominal vagus nerves, but the mechanisms of action are unclear. Approach. We developed a two-part computational model, coupling a 3D finite element model of a cuff electrode around the human abdominal vagus nerve with biophysically-realistic electrical circuit equivalent (cable) model axons (1, 2, and 5.7 µm in diameter). We developed an automated algorithm to classify conduction responses as subthreshold (transmission), KHF-evoked activity (excitation), or block. We quantified neural responses across kilohertz frequencies (5-20 kHz), amplitudes (1-8 mA), and electrode designs. Main results. We found heterogeneous conduction responses across the modeled nerve trunk, both for a given parameter set and across parameter sets, although most suprathreshold responses were excitation, rather than block. The firing patterns were irregular near transmission and block boundaries, but otherwise regular, and mean firing rates varied with electrode-fibre distance. Further, we identified excitation responses at amplitudes above block threshold, termed ‘re-excitation’, arising from action potentials initiated at virtual cathodes. Excitation and block thresholds decreased with smaller electrode-fibre distances, larger fibre diameters, and lower kilohertz frequencies. A point source model predicted a larger fraction of blocked fibres and greater change of threshold with distance as compared to the realistic cuff and nerve model. Significance. Our findings of widespread asynchronous KHF-evoked activity suggest that conduction block in the abdominal vagus nerves is unlikely with current clinical parameters. Our

  6. Normal centrolineal myelination of the callosal splenium reflects the development of the cortical origin and size of its commissural fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, Matthew T. [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); Children' s National Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Washington, DC (United States); Raju, Anand; Choudhri, Asim F. [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Commissural white matter fibers comprising the callosal splenium are diverse. Subsections of the splenium myelinate at different times, in a centrolineal manner. The aims of this study are to depict the normal callosal splenium myelination pattern and to distinguish the transient age-related mid splenium hypointensity from pathology. We reviewed 131 consecutive brain MRIs in patients between ages 3 and 6 months from a single academic children's hospital. Patients that were preterm, hydrocephalic, and/or had volume loss were excluded. Fifty total MR exams that included T1-weighted MR imaging (T1WI), T2-weighted MR imaging (T2WI), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) were reviewed. Regions of callosal splenium myelination manifested by T1 and T2 shortening were evaluated. Tractography was performed with seeds placed over the posterior, mid, and anterior splenium to define the origin, destination, and course of traversing fibers. Splenium signal varied significantly from 3 to 6 months, with distinct age-related trends. On T1WI, the splenium was hypointense at 3 months (12/13), centrally hypointense/peripherally hyperintense at 4 months (15/16), and hyperintense at 6 months (10/11). Tractography revealed three distinct white matter tract populations: medial occipital (posterior); precuneus, posterior cingulate, and medial temporal (middle); and postcentral gyri (anterior). Specific commissural fiber components of the splenium myelinate at different times. The transient developmental mid splenium hypointensity on T1WI corresponds to tracts from the associative cortex, principally the precuneus. Heterogeneous splenium signal alteration in patients ages 3-6 months is a normal developmental phenomenon that should not be confused with pathologic lesions. (orig.)

  7. Growth Factor and Laminin Effect with Muscular Fiber Sheath on Repairing of the Sciatica Nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Torabi

    2014-01-01

    Background & aim: Peripheral nerve injuries which can lead to a physical disability. If the defect is very low, direct suture without tension on both ends of the cut nerve regeneration is considered as a standard procedure. Otherwise, to reconstruct the axons, the gap must be filled by graft material in order to the guidance. Due to the similarity of the matrix tubular skeletal muscle and nerve muscles graft was used to repair in this study. Methods: In the present experimental study, 42 female Wistar rats were divided into three groups and underwent surgery. In the first group a narrow strip of muscle was prepared by freezing – thawing, and later sutured between the distal and proximal sciatic nerve. In the second group, the gap caused by muscle graft was regenerated and the nerve growth factor and laminin was injected into the graft. In the control group, the two ends of the cut nerve were hidden beneath the adjacent muscles. Next, a group of rats with sciatic functional index was investigated for the behavioral. On the other group were examined for histological studies after two months. Results: Sciatic functional index and Mean counts of myelinated fibers in two graft groups compared with the control group was significant p<0.05. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA test. Conclusion: co-axially aligned muscle grafts were an appropriate alternative substitute for repairing. It seems that the nerve growth factor and laminin have a positive role in axonal regeneration and functional recovery acceleration. Key words: Sciatic Functional Index, muscle graft, NGF, Laminin

  8. Parallel changes in structural and functional measures of optic nerve myelination after optic neuritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneke van der Walt

    Full Text Available Visual evoked potential (VEP latency prolongation and optic nerve lesion length after acute optic neuritis (ON corresponds to the degree of demyelination, while subsequent recovery of latency may represent optic nerve remyelination. We aimed to investigate the relationship between multifocal VEP (mfVEP latency and optic nerve lesion length after acute ON.Thirty acute ON patients were studied at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months using mfVEP and at 1 and 12 months with optic nerve MRI. LogMAR and low contrast visual acuity were documented. By one month, the mfVEP amplitude had recovered sufficiently for latency to be measured in 23 (76.7% patients with seven patients having no recordable mfVEP in more than 66% of segments in at least one test. Only data from these 23 patients was analysed further.Both latency and lesion length showed significant recovery during the follow-up period. Lesion length and mfVEP latency were highly correlated at 1 (r = 0.94, p = <0.0001 and 12 months (r = 0.75, p < 0.001. Both measures demonstrated a similar trend of recovery. Speed of latency recovery was faster in the early follow-up period while lesion length shortening remained relatively constant. At 1 month, latency delay was worse by 1.76 ms for additional 1mm of lesion length while at 12 months, 1mm of lesion length accounted for 1.94 ms of latency delay.A strong association between two putative measures of demyelination in early and chronic ON was found. Parallel recovery of both measures could reflect optic nerve remyelination.

  9. Response properties of the refractory auditory nerve fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C A; Abbas, P J; Robinson, B K

    2001-09-01

    The refractory characteristics of auditory nerve fibers limit their ability to accurately encode temporal information. Therefore, they are relevant to the design of cochlear prostheses. It is also possible that the refractory property could be exploited by prosthetic devices to improve information transfer, as refractoriness may enhance the nerve's stochastic properties. Furthermore, refractory data are needed for the development of accurate computational models of auditory nerve fibers. We applied a two-pulse forward-masking paradigm to a feline model of the human auditory nerve to assess refractory properties of single fibers. Each fiber was driven to refractoriness by a single (masker) current pulse delivered intracochlearly. Properties of firing efficiency, latency, jitter, spike amplitude, and relative spread (a measure of dynamic range and stochasticity) were examined by exciting fibers with a second (probe) pulse and systematically varying the masker-probe interval (MPI). Responses to monophasic cathodic current pulses were analyzed. We estimated the mean absolute refractory period to be about 330 micros and the mean recovery time constant to be about 410 micros. A significant proportion of fibers (13 of 34) responded to the probe pulse with MPIs as short as 500 micros. Spike amplitude decreased with decreasing MPI, a finding relevant to the development of computational nerve-fiber models, interpretation of gross evoked potentials, and models of more central neural processing. A small mean decrement in spike jitter was noted at small MPI values. Some trends (such as spike latency-vs-MPI) varied across fibers, suggesting that sites of excitation varied across fibers. Relative spread was found to increase with decreasing MPI values, providing direct evidence that stochastic properties of fibers are altered under conditions of refractoriness.

  10. Specific paucity of unmyelinated C-fibers in cutaneous peripheral nerves of the African naked-mole rat: comparative analysis using six species of Bathyergidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St John Smith, Ewan; Purfürst, Bettina; Grigoryan, Tamara; Park, Thomas J; Bennett, Nigel C; Lewin, Gary R

    2012-08-15

    In mammalian peripheral nerves, unmyelinated C-fibers usually outnumber myelinated A-fibers. By using transmission electron microscopy, we recently showed that the saphenous nerve of the naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber) has a C-fiber deficit manifested as a substantially lower C:A-fiber ratio compared with other mammals. Here we determined the uniqueness of this C-fiber deficit by performing a quantitative anatomical analysis of several peripheral nerves in five further members of the Bathyergidae mole-rat family: silvery (Heliophobius argenteocinereus), giant (Fukomys mechowii), Damaraland (Fukomys damarensis), Mashona (Fukomys darlingi), and Natal (Cryptomys hottentotus natalensis) mole-rats. In the largely cutaneous saphenous and sural nerves, the naked mole-rat had the lowest C:A-fiber ratio (∼1.5:1 compared with ∼3:1), whereas, in nerves innervating both skin and muscle (common peroneal and tibial) or just muscle (lateral/medial gastrocnemius), this pattern was mostly absent. We asked whether lack of hair follicles alone accounts for the C-fiber paucity by using as a model a mouse that loses virtually all its hair as a consequence of conditional deletion of the β-catenin gene in the skin. These β-catenin loss-of function mice (β-cat LOF mice) displayed only a mild decrease in C:A-fiber ratio compared with wild-type mice (4.42 compared with 3.81). We suggest that the selective cutaneous C-fiber deficit in the cutaneous nerves of naked mole-rats is unlikely to be due primarily to lack of skin hair follicles. Possible mechanisms contributing to this unique peripheral nerve anatomy are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Nerve fibers and menstrual cycle in peritoneal endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoyun; Tokushige, Natsuko; Fraser, Ian S

    2011-06-30

    There was no difference in the density of nerve fibers across the menstrual cycle in peritoneal endometriotic lesions. These findings may explain why patients with peritoneal endometriosis often have painful symptoms throughout the menstrual cycle. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Spatial clustering analysis in neuroanatomy: Applications of different approaches to motor nerve fiber distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crunelli, V.; Prodanov, D.P.; Nagelkerke, Nico; Marani, Enrico

    2007-01-01

    Spatial organization of the nerve fibers in the peripheral nerves may be important for the studies of axonal regeneration, the degenerative nerve diseases and the construction of interfaces with peripheral nerves, such as nerve prostheses. Functional topography of motor axons related to the

  13. Myelination and myelin disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knaap, M.S. van der.

    1991-01-01

    The first part of this thesis contains the results of a study into the capabilities of MR in the assessment of normal cerebral development. The process of normal myelination under the age of 1 year is divided into stages with specific MRI characteristics. An indication of normal age limits for each stage is given. The relationships between changes in signal intensities and biochemical background, and between progress of myelination and psychomotor development are discussed. The latter in the light of a study performed in hydrocephalic children, prior to and repeatedly after shunt implantation. Normal changes in 1 H and 31 P spectra of the brain in infants and children are described. The relationship between observed spectral changes and cerebral maturational processes is discussed. The second part deals with assessment of myelin disorders with MRI. Basic information about demyelinating disorders and biochemical background are reviewed. A new classification of myelin disorders, underlying the development of an MRI pattern recognition scheme, is proposed based on the most recent scientific developments. Common histological characteristics are described for all main categories of myelin disorders. Extensive information is presented about MRI patterns of abnormalities in patients in whom the disease is predominantly or exclusively located in the white matter. On the basis of the data of these patients a global MRI pattern recognition scheme has been developed covering all white matter disorders that were encountered. Also an example of an in-depth pattern recognition in a circumscribed category of disorders is presented. Finally a study of MRS in demyelinating disorders as opposed to neuronal disorders is described. While MRI provides information about the extent of the process of demyelination and about the disease category, MRS turns out to provide information about the severity of the demyelination and of the concomitant neuronal damage. (H.W.). 725 refs.; 53 figs

  14. On the nature of the afferent fibers of oculomotor nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manni, E; Draicchio, F; Pettorossi, V E; Carobi, C; Grassi, S; Bortolami, R; Lucchi, M L

    1989-03-01

    The oculogyric nerves contain afferent fibers originating from the ophthalmic territory, the somata of which are located in the ipsilateral semilunar ganglion. These primary sensory neurons project to the Subnucleus Gelatinosus of the Nucleus Caudalis Trigemini, where they make presynaptic contact with the central endings of the primary trigeminal afferents running in the fifth cranial nerve. After complete section of the trigeminal root, the antidromic volleys elicited in the trunk of the third cranial nerve by stimulating SG of NCT consisted of two waves belonging to the A delta and C groups. The area of both components of the antidromic volleys decreased both after bradykinin and hystamine injection into the corresponding cutaneous region and after thermic stimulation of the ipsilateral trigeminal ophthalmic territory. The reduction of such potentials can be explained in terms of collision between the antidromic volleys and those elicited orthodromically by chemical and thermic stimulation. Also, capsaicin applied on the nerve induced an immediate increase, followed by a long lasting decrease, of orthodromic evoked response area. These findings bring further support to the nociceptive nature of the afferent fibers running into the oculomotor nerve.

  15. Effect of diabetic retinopathy and panretinal photocoagulation on retinal nerve fiber layer and optic nerve appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Michele C; Tanimoto, Suzana A; Furlani, Bruno A; Lum, Brent; Pinto, Luciano M; Eliason, David; Prata, Tiago S; Brandt, James D; Morse, Lawrence S; Park, Susanna S; Melo, Luiz A S

    2009-07-01

    To determine if panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) alters retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness and optic nerve appearance. Patients with diabetes who did and did not undergo PRP and nondiabetic control subjects were enrolled in a prospective study. Participants underwent optical coherence tomography of the peripapillary retina and optic nerve. Stereoscopic optic nerve photographs were graded in a masked fashion. Ninety-four eyes of 48 healthy individuals, 89 eyes of 55 diabetic patients who did not undergo PRP, and 37 eyes of 24 subjects with diabetes who underwent PRP were included in this study. Eyes that had been treated with PRP had thinner peripapillary RNFL compared with the other groups; this was statistically significantly different in the inferior (P = .004) and nasal (P = .003) regions. Optic nerve cupping did not increase with severity of disease classification, but the proportion of optic nerves graded as suspicious for glaucoma or as having nonglaucomatous optic neuropathy did (P = .008). These grading categories were associated with thinner RNFL measurements. Diabetic eyes that have been treated with PRP have thinner RNFL than nondiabetic eyes. Optic nerves in eyes treated with PRP are more likely to be graded as abnormal, but their appearance is not necessarily glaucomatous and may be related to thinning of the RNFL.

  16. Chitin biological absorbable catheters bridging sural nerve grafts transplanted into sciatic nerve defects promote nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Jian-Wei; Qin, Li-Hua; Zhang, Wei-Guang; Zhang, Pei-Xun; Jiang, Bao-Guo

    2018-06-01

    To investigate the efficacy of chitin biological absorbable catheters in a rat model of autologous nerve transplantation. A segment of sciatic nerve was removed to produce a sciatic nerve defect, and the sural nerve was cut from the ipsilateral leg and used as a graft to bridge the defect, with or without use of a chitin biological absorbable catheter surrounding the graft. The number and morphology of regenerating myelinated fibers, nerve conduction velocity, nerve function index, triceps surae muscle morphology, and sensory function were evaluated at 9 and 12 months after surgery. All of the above parameters were improved in rats in which the nerve graft was bridged with chitin biological absorbable catheters compared with rats without catheters. The results of this study indicate that use of chitin biological absorbable catheters to surround sural nerve grafts bridging sciatic nerve defects promotes recovery of structural, motor, and sensory function and improves muscle fiber morphology. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Promoting Myelination in an In Vitro Mouse Model of the Peripheral Nerve System: The Effect of Wine Ingredients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stettner, Mark; Wolffram, Kathleen; Mausberg, Anne K.; Albrecht, Philipp; Derksen, Angelika; Methner, Axel; Dehmel, Thomas; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Dietrich, Helmut; Kieseier, Bernd C.

    2013-01-01

    Protective properties of moderate wine consumption against cancers, cardiovascular, metabolic and degenerative diseases have been reported in various clinical studies. Here, we analysed the effect of red wine (RW) and white wine (WW) on myelination using an in vitro embryonic co-culture mouse model. The total amount of myelin was found to be significantly increased after RW and WW treatment, while only RW significantly increased the number of internodes. Both types of wine increased rat Schwann cell- (rSC) expression of the NAD+-dependent deacetylase sirtuin-two-homolog 2 (Sirt2), a protein known to be involved in myelination. Detailed chemical analysis of RW revealed a broad spectrum of anthocyanins, piceids, and phenolics, including resveratrol (RSV). In our assay system RSV in low concentrations induced myelination. Furthermore RSV raised intracellular glutathione concentrations in rSCs and in co-cultures and therefore augmented antioxidant capacity. We conclude that wine promotes myelination in a rodent in vitro model by controlling intracellular metabolism and SC plasticity. During this process, RSV exhibits protective properties; however, the fostering effect on myelinaton during exposure to wine appears to be a complex interaction of various compounds. PMID:23762469

  18. Energy-optimal electrical excitation of nerve fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezernik, Saso; Morari, Manfred

    2005-04-01

    We derive, based on an analytical nerve membrane model and optimal control theory of dynamical systems, an energy-optimal stimulation current waveform for electrical excitation of nerve fibers. Optimal stimulation waveforms for nonleaky and leaky membranes are calculated. The case with a leaky membrane is a realistic case. Finally, we compare the waveforms and energies necessary for excitation of a leaky membrane in the case where the stimulation waveform is a square-wave current pulse, and in the case of energy-optimal stimulation. The optimal stimulation waveform is an exponentially rising waveform and necessitates considerably less energy to excite the nerve than a square-wave pulse (especially true for larger pulse durations). The described theoretical results can lead to drastically increased battery lifetime and/or decreased energy transmission requirements for implanted biomedical systems.

  19. Simulation of multipolar fiber selective neural stimulation using intrafascicular electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meier, J.H.; Meier, Jan H.; Rutten, Wim; Zoutman, Arne E.; Boom, H.B.K.; Bergveld, Piet

    1992-01-01

    A realistic, quantitative model for the excitation of myelinated nerve fibers by intrafascicular electrodes is presented. It predicts the stimulatory regions of any configuration of any number of electrodes, positioned anywhere inside the fascicle. The model has two parts. First, the nerve fiber is

  20. Sleeve bridging of the rhesus monkey ulnar nerve with muscular branches of the pronator teres: multiple amplification of axonal regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-hui Kou; Pei-xun Zhang; Yan-hua Wang; Bo Chen; Na Han; Feng Xue; Hong-bo Zhang; Xiao-feng Yin; Bao-guo Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Multiple-bud regeneration, i.e., multiple amplification, has been shown to exist in peripheral nerve regeneration. Multiple buds grow towards the distal nerve stump during proximal nerve fiber regeneration. Our previous studies have verified the limit and validity of multiple amplification of peripheral nerve regeneration using small gap sleeve bridging of small donor nerves to repair large receptor nerves in rodents. The present study sought to observe multiple amplification of myelinated ne...

  1. Biological conduit small gap sleeve bridging method for peripheral nerve injury: regeneration law of nerve fibers in the conduit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-xun Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical effects of 2-mm small gap sleeve bridging of the biological conduit to repair peripheral nerve injury are better than in the traditional epineurium suture, so it is possible to replace the epineurium suture in the treatment of peripheral nerve injury. This study sought to identify the regeneration law of nerve fibers in the biological conduit. A nerve regeneration chamber was constructed in models of sciatic nerve injury using 2-mm small gap sleeve bridging of a biodegradable biological conduit. The results showed that the biological conduit had good histocompatibility. Tissue and cell apoptosis in the conduit apparently lessened, and regenerating nerve fibers were common. The degeneration regeneration law of Schwann cells and axons in the conduit was quite different from that in traditional epineurium suture. During the prime period for nerve fiber regeneration (2-8 weeks, the number of Schwann cells and nerve fibers was higher in both proximal and distal ends, and the effects of the small gap sleeve bridging method were better than those of the traditional epineurium suture. The above results provide an objective and reliable theoretical basis for the clinical application of the biological conduit small gap sleeve bridging method to repair peripheral nerve injury.

  2. Miconazole enhances nerve regeneration and functional recovery after sciatic nerve crush injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tao; Qiu, Shuai; Yan, Liwei; Zhu, Shuang; Zheng, Canbin; Zhu, Qingtang; Liu, Xiaolin

    2018-05-01

    Improving axonal outgrowth and remyelination is crucial for peripheral nerve regeneration. Miconazole appears to enhance remyelination in the central nervous system. In this study we assess the effect of miconazole on axonal regeneration using a sciatic nerve crush injury model in rats. Fifty Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into control and miconazole groups. Nerve regeneration and myelination were determined using histological and electrophysiological assessment. Evaluation of sensory and motor recovery was performed using the pinprick assay and sciatic functional index. The Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and Western blotting were used to assess the proliferation and neurotrophic expression of RSC 96 Schwann cells. Miconazole promoted axonal regrowth, increased myelinated nerve fibers, improved sensory recovery and walking behavior, enhanced stimulated amplitude and nerve conduction velocity, and elevated proliferation and neurotrophic expression of RSC 96 Schwann cells. Miconazole was beneficial for nerve regeneration and functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury. Muscle Nerve 57: 821-828, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Peptide mimetic of the S100A4 protein modulates peripheral nerve regeneration and attenuates the progression of neuropathy in myelin protein P0 null mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldovan, Mihai; Pinchenko, Volodymyr; Dmytriyeva, Oksana

    2013-01-01

    and mimicked the S100A4-induced neuroprotection in brain trauma. Here, we investigated a possible function of S100A4 and its mimetics in the pathologies of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). We found that S100A4 was expressed in the injured PNS and that its peptide mimetic (H3) affected the regeneration......, these effects were attributed to the modulatory effect of H3 on initial axonal sprouting. In contrast to the modest effect of H3 on the time course of regeneration, H3 had a long-term neuroprotective effect in the myelin protein P0 null mice, a model of dysmyelinating neuropathy (Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1...... disease), where the peptide attenuated the deterioration of nerve conduction, demyelination and axonal loss. From these results, S100A4 mimetics emerge as a possible means to enhance axonal sprouting and survival, especially in the context of demyelinating neuropathies with secondary axonal loss...

  4. Investigation of interactions in a biological membrane using structure factor/pair correlation function approach: a first communication on nerve myelin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gbordzoe, M.K.

    1984-09-01

    Interactions in biological and artificial membranes have been studied by applying mostly the methods of biochemical analysis and determination of thermodynamic parameters related to phase transition phenomena. Structure factor, obtained by measuring scattered intensity from small-angle X-ray or neutron scattering experiments, has been used mainly for determining electron density distribution. Drawing upon the experience of the theory of liquids, where Johnson and March (1963) and Johnson, Hutchinson and March (1964) first established the possibility of deriving interparticle potential from experimental measurement of structure factor, it is suggested that structure factor/distance correlation function approach, can be a useful method for studying interactions between various membrane components. Preliminary experimental data presented for nerve myelin are to demonstrate the possibility of studying interactions from the distance correlation function of a membrane pair. (author)

  5. Diagnostic capability of optic nerve head rim width and retinal nerve fiber thickness in open-angle glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Staso, Silvio; Agnifili, Luca; Di Staso, Federico; Climastone, Hilary; Ciancaglini, Marco; Scuderi, Gian Luca

    2018-03-01

    This study was performed to test the diagnostic capability of the minimum rim width compared to peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in patients with glaucoma. A case control, observer masked study, was conducted. Minimum rim width and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness were assessed using the patient-specific axis traced between fovea-to-Bruch's membrane opening center axis. For both minimum rim width and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, the regionalization in six sectors (nasal, superior-nasal, superior-temporal, temporal, inferior-temporal, and inferior-nasal) was analyzed. Eyes with at least one sector with value below the 5% or 1% normative limit of the optical coherence tomography normative database were classified as glaucomatous. The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve, the accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and predictive positive and negative values were calculated for both minimum rim width and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness. A total of 118 eyes of 118 Caucasian subjects (80 eyes with open-angle glaucoma and 38 control eyes) were enrolled in the study. Accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity were 79.7%, 77.5%, and 84.2%, respectively, for minimum rim width and 84.7%, 82.5%, and 89.5% for retinal nerve fiber layer thickness. The positive predictive values were 0.91% and 0.94% for minimum rim width and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, respectively, whereas the negative predictive values were 0.64% and 0.70%. The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve was 0.892 for minimum rim width and 0.938 for retinal nerve fiber layer thickness. Our results indicated that the sector analysis based on Bruch's membrane opening and fovea to disk alignment is able to detect glaucomatous defects, and that Bruch's membrane opening minimum rim width and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness showed equivalent diagnostic ability.

  6. Influence of oculomotor nerve afferents on central endings of primary trigeminal fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manni, E; Bortolami, R; Pettorossi, V E; Lucchi, M L; Callegari, E; Draicchio, F

    1987-12-01

    Painful fibers running in the third nerve and originating from the ophthalmic trigeminal area send their central projections at level of substantia gelatinosa of nucleus caudalis trigemini. The central endings of these fibers form axoaxonic synapses with trigeminal fibers entering the brain stem through the trigeminal root. The effect of electrical stimulation of the third nerve central stump on the central endings of trigeminal afferent fibers consists in an increased excitability, possibly resulting in a presynaptic inhibition. This inhibitory influence is due to both direct and indirect connections of the third nerve afferent fibers with the trigeminal ones.

  7. Cholesterol: a novel regulatory role in myelin formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saher, Gesine; Quintes, Susanne; Nave, Klaus-Armin

    2011-02-01

    Myelin consists of tightly compacted membranes that form an insulating sheath around axons. The function of myelin for rapid saltatory nerve conduction is dependent on its unique composition, highly enriched in glycosphingolipids and cholesterol. Cholesterol emerged as the only integral myelin component that is essential and rate limiting for the development of CNS and PNS myelin. Experiments with conditional mouse mutants that lack cholesterol biosynthesis in oligodendrocytes revealed that only minimal changes of the CNS myelin lipid composition are tolerated. In Schwann cells of the PNS, protein trafficking and myelin compaction depend on cholesterol. In this review, the authors summarize the role of cholesterol in myelin biogenesis and myelin disease.

  8. Promoting peripheral myelin repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ye; Notterpek, Lucia

    2016-09-01

    Compared to the central nervous system (CNS), peripheral nerves have a remarkable ability to regenerate and remyelinate. This regenerative capacity to a large extent is dependent on and supported by Schwann cells, the myelin-forming glial cells of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). In a variety of paradigms, Schwann cells are critical in the removal of the degenerated tissue, which is followed by remyelination of newly-regenerated axons. This unique plasticity of Schwann cells has been the target of myelin repair strategies in acute injuries and chronic diseases, such as hereditary demyelinating neuropathies. In one approach, the endogenous regenerative capacity of Schwann cells is enhanced through interventions such as exercise, electrical stimulation or pharmacological means. Alternatively, Schwann cells derived from healthy nerves, or engineered from different tissue sources have been transplanted into the PNS to support remyelination. These transplant approaches can then be further enhanced by exercise and/or electrical stimulation, as well as by the inclusion of biomaterial engineered to support glial cell viability and neurite extension. Advances in our basic understanding of peripheral nerve biology, as well as biomaterial engineering, will further improve the functional repair of myelinated peripheral nerves. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Altered metabolic incorporation of fucose and leucine into PNS myelin of 25-week-old diabetic (C57BL/Ks [db/db]) mice: effects of untreated diabetes on nerve metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chez, M.G.; Peterson, R.G.

    1983-01-01

    Sciatic nerves of 25-week-old genetically diabetic (C57BL/Ks [db/db]) mice and their litter-mate controls were removed, and their metabolic incorporation of [ 3 H]fucose and [ 14 C]leucine into myelin was studied in vitro. Untreated diabetic animals showed significant increases (p less than 0.05) in the fucose/leucine incorporation into myelin when compared to values found for their litter-mates. These results correlated well with previous experiments performed on alloxan or streptozotocin-diabetic rats and thus show the in vitro incubation procedure to be a good indicator of altered metabolic conditions in peripheral nerves due to diabetes mellitus. The resulting ratio increases seen in diabetic animals is at variance with the decrease in ratios found in animals undergoing typical Wallerian degeneration. These results suggest that different metabolic processes operate in untreated diabetics than in normals or in those undergoing other degenerative nerve processes

  10. Comparison of probabilistic and deterministic fiber tracking of cranial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolal, Amir; Sobottka, Stephan B; Podlesek, Dino; Linn, Jennifer; Rieger, Bernhard; Juratli, Tareq A; Schackert, Gabriele; Kitzler, Hagen H

    2017-09-01

    OBJECTIVE The depiction of cranial nerves (CNs) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is of great interest in skull base tumor surgery and DTI used with deterministic tracking methods has been reported previously. However, there are still no good methods usable for the elimination of noise from the resulting depictions. The authors have hypothesized that probabilistic tracking could lead to more accurate results, because it more efficiently extracts information from the underlying data. Moreover, the authors have adapted a previously described technique for noise elimination using gradual threshold increases to probabilistic tracking. To evaluate the utility of this new approach, a comparison is provided with this work between the gradual threshold increase method in probabilistic and deterministic tracking of CNs. METHODS Both tracking methods were used to depict CNs II, III, V, and the VII+VIII bundle. Depiction of 240 CNs was attempted with each of the above methods in 30 healthy subjects, which were obtained from 2 public databases: the Kirby repository (KR) and Human Connectome Project (HCP). Elimination of erroneous fibers was attempted by gradually increasing the respective thresholds (fractional anisotropy [FA] and probabilistic index of connectivity [PICo]). The results were compared with predefined ground truth images based on corresponding anatomical scans. Two label overlap measures (false-positive error and Dice similarity coefficient) were used to evaluate the success of both methods in depicting the CN. Moreover, the differences between these parameters obtained from the KR and HCP (with higher angular resolution) databases were evaluated. Additionally, visualization of 10 CNs in 5 clinical cases was attempted with both methods and evaluated by comparing the depictions with intraoperative findings. RESULTS Maximum Dice similarity coefficients were significantly higher with probabilistic tracking (p cranial nerves. Probabilistic tracking with a gradual

  11. Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Protrusion Associated with Tilted Optic Discs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Jaclyn; Yapp, Michael; Ly, Angelica; Hennessy, Michael P; Kalloniatis, Michael; Zangerl, Barbara

    2018-03-01

    This study resulted in the identification of an optic nerve head (ONH) feature associated with tilted optic discs, which might potentially contribute to ONH pathologies. Knowledge of such findings will enhance clinical insights and drive future opportunities to understand disease processes related to tilted optic discs. The aim of this study was to identify novel retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) anomalies by evaluating tilted optic discs using optical coherence tomography. An observed retinal nerve fiber protrusion was further investigated for association with other morphological or functional parameters. A retrospective review of 400 randomly selected adult patients with ONH examinations was conducted in a referral-only, diagnostic imaging center. After excluding other ONH pathologies, 215 patients were enrolled and evaluated for optic disc tilt and/or torsion. Gross anatomical ONH features, including size and rim or parapapillary region elevation, were assessed with stereoscopic fundus photography. Optical coherence tomography provided detailed morphological information of individual retinal layers. Statistical analysis was applied to identify significant changes between individual patient cohorts. A dome-shaped hyperreflective RNFL bulge, protruding into the neurosensory retina at the optic disc margins, was identified in 17 eyes with tilted optic discs. Available follow-up data were inconclusive regarding natural changes with this ONH feature. This RNFL herniation was significantly correlated with smaller than average optic disc size (P = .005), congenital disc tilt (P optic discs, which has not previously been assessed as an independent ONH structure. The feature is predominantly related to congenital crowded, small optic discs and variable between patients. This study is an important first step to elucidate diagnostic capabilities of tilted disc morphological changes and understanding associated functional deficits.

  12. Ultrastructural changes of compressed lumbar ventral nerve roots following decompression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Barrany, Wagih G.; Hamdy, Raid M.; Al-Hayani, Abdulmonem A.; Jalalah, Sawsan M.; Al-Sayyad, Mohammad J.

    2006-01-01

    To study whether there will be permanent lumbar nerve rot scanning or degeneration secondary to continuous compression followed by decompression on the nerve roots, which can account for postlaminectomy leg weakness or back pain. The study was performed at the Department of Anatomy, Faulty of Medicine, king Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia during 2003-2005. Twenty-six adult male New Zealand rabbits were used in the present study. The ventral roots of the left fourth lumbar nerve were clamped for 2 weeks then decompression was allowed by removal of the clips. The left ventral roots of the fourth lumbar nerve were excised for electron microscopic study. One week after nerve root decompression, the ventral root peripheral to the site of compression showed signs of Wallerian degeneration together with signs of regeneration. Schwann cells and myelinated nerve fibers showed severe degenerative changes. Two weeks after decompression, the endoneurium of the ventral root showed extensive edema with an increase in the regenerating myelinated and unmyentilated nerve fibers, and fibroblasts proliferation. Three weeks after decompression, the endoneurium showed an increase in the regenerating myelinated and unmyelinated nerve fibers with diminution of the endoneurial edema, and number of macrophages and an increase in collagen fibrils. Five and 6 weeks after decompression, the endoneurium showed marked diminution of the edema, macrophages, mast cells and fibroblasts. The enoneurium was filed of myelinated and unmyelinated nerve fibers and collagen fibrils. Decompression of the compressed roots of a spinal nerve is followed by regeneration of the nerve fibers and nerve and nerve recovery without endoneurial scarring. (author)

  13. Retinal nerve fiber layer assessment by scanning laser polarimetry and standardized photography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, A. G.; van den Berg, T. J.; Langerhorst, C. T.; Greve, E. L.

    1996-01-01

    To determine whether, in a clinical setting, scanning laser polarimetry and retinal nerve fiber layer photography provide equivalent information on the retinal nerve fiber layer. We prospectively studied 60 patients with glaucoma or ocular hypertension and 24 healthy subjects. With scanning laser

  14. Occurrence of substance P-like immunoreactive nerve fibers in Krause corpuscles of the dog's tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, H; Nishikawa, S; Wakisaka, S; Matsuo, S; Takano, Y; Akai, M

    1988-01-01

    Substance P-like immunoreactive (SPLI) nerve fibers were demonstrated in the Krause corpuscles of the dog's tongue using the indirect immunofluorescence method and cholinesterase histochemistry. SPLI nerve fibers were often in contact with Krause end bulbs and occasionally entered them. From this result it was suggested that substance P might be involved in sensory mechanism of the Krause apparatus.

  15. A mathematical description of nerve fiber bundle trajectories and their variability in the human retina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansonius, N. M.; Nevalainen, J.; Selig, B.; Zangwill, L. M.; Sample, P. A.; Budde, W. M.; Jonas, J. B.; Lagreze, W. A.; Airaksinen, P. J.; Vonthein, R.; Levin, L. A.; Paetzold, J.; Schiefer, U.

    2009-01-01

    We developed a mathematical model wherein retinal nerve fiber trajectories can be described and the corresponding inter-subject variability analyzed. The model was based on traced nerve fiber bundle trajectories extracted from 55 fundus photographs of 55 human subjects. The model resembled the

  16. Ultrastructural relationships between the receptor nerve fiber and surrounding lamellae in Krause end-bulbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spassova, I

    1981-01-01

    The ultrastructural relationship between the receptor nerve fiber and the surrounding lamellae in Krause end-bulbs was discussed. Many sites of specialized junctions of symmetrical or asymmetrical type along the receptor nerve fiber and the surrounding lamellae were found. In addition, in close vicinity to them, spine-like digitations of the receptor nerve fiber, filled mainly with small clear vesicles, were observed. Mitochondrion-like cholinesterase-positive structures bulging in some cytoplasmic lamellae were also found. It is suggested that a functional link might exist between the specialized junctions, digitations and mitochrondrion-like structures in the transformation of external mechanical stimuli into nerve impulses.

  17. The longitudinal epineural incision and complete nerve transection method for modeling sciatic nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing-long Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Injury severity, operative technique and nerve regeneration are important factors to consider when constructing a model of peripheral nerve injury. Here, we present a novel peripheral nerve injury model and compare it with the complete sciatic nerve transection method. In the experimental group, under a microscope, a 3-mm longitudinal incision was made in the epineurium of the sciatic nerve to reveal the nerve fibers, which were then transected. The small, longitudinal incision in the epineurium was then sutured closed, requiring no stump anastomosis. In the control group, the sciatic nerve was completely transected, and the epineurium was repaired by anastomosis. At 2 and 4 weeks after surgery, Wallerian degeneration was observed in both groups. In the experimental group, at 8 and 12 weeks after surgery, distinct medullary nerve fibers and axons were observed in the injured sciatic nerve. Regular, dense myelin sheaths were visible, as well as some scarring. By 12 weeks, the myelin sheaths were normal and intact, and a tight lamellar structure was observed. Functionally, limb movement and nerve conduction recovered in the injured region between 4 and 12 weeks. The present results demonstrate that longitudinal epineural incision with nerve transection can stably replicate a model of Sunderland grade IV peripheral nerve injury. Compared with the complete sciatic nerve transection model, our method reduced the difficulties of micromanipulation and surgery time, and resulted in good stump restoration, nerve regeneration, and functional recovery.

  18. Promoting peripheral myelin repair

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Ye; Notterpek, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Compared to the central nervous system (CNS), peripheral nerves have a remarkable ability to regenerate and remyelinate. This regenerative capacity to a large extent is dependent on and supported by Schwann cells, the myelin-forming glial cells of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). In a variety of paradigms, Schwann cells are critical in the removal of the degenerated tissue, which is followed by remyelination of newly-regenerated axons. This unique plasticity of Schwann cells has been the ...

  19. Short-term observations of the regenerative potential of injured proximal sensory nerves crossed with distal motor nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-xiu Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Motor nerves and sensory nerves conduct signals in different directions and function in different ways. In the surgical treatment of peripheral nerve injuries, the best prognosis is obtained by keeping the motor and sensory nerves separated and repairing the nerves using the suture method. However, the clinical consequences of connections between sensory and motor nerves currently remain unknown. In this study, we analyzed the anatomical structure of the rat femoral nerve, and observed the motor and sensory branches of the femoral nerve in the quadriceps femoris. After ligation of the nerves, the proximal end of the sensory nerve was connected with the distal end of the motor nerve, followed by observation of the changes in the newly-formed regenerated nerve fibers. Acetylcholinesterase staining was used to distinguish between the myelinated and unmyelinated motor and sensory nerves. Denervated muscle and newly formed nerves were compared in terms of morphology, electrophysiology and histochemistry. At 8 weeks after connection, no motor nerve fibers were observed on either side of the nerve conduit and the number of nerve fibers increased at the proximal end. The proportion of newly-formed motor and sensory fibers was different on both sides of the conduit. The area occupied by autonomic nerves in the proximal regenerative nerve was limited, but no distinct myelin sheath was visible in the distal nerve. These results confirm that sensory and motor nerves cannot be effectively connected. Moreover, the change of target organ at the distal end affects the type of nerves at the proximal end.

  20. Peripheral myelin protein 22 alters membrane architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittendorf, Kathleen F.; Marinko, Justin T.; Hampton, Cheri M.; Ke, Zunlong; Hadziselimovic, Arina; Schlebach, Jonathan P.; Law, Cheryl L.; Li, Jun; Wright, Elizabeth R.; Sanders, Charles R.; Ohi, Melanie D.

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) is highly expressed in myelinating Schwann cells of the peripheral nervous system. PMP22 genetic alterations cause the most common forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTD), which is characterized by severe dysmyelination in the peripheral nerves. However, the functions of PMP22 in Schwann cell membranes remain unclear. We demonstrate that reconstitution of purified PMP22 into lipid vesicles results in the formation of compressed and cylindrically wrapped protein-lipid vesicles that share common organizational traits with compact myelin of peripheral nerves in vivo. The formation of these myelin-like assemblies depends on the lipid-to-PMP22 ratio, as well as on the PMP22 extracellular loops. Formation of the myelin-like assemblies is disrupted by a CMTD-causing mutation. This study provides both a biochemical assay for PMP22 function and evidence that PMP22 directly contributes to membrane organization in compact myelin. PMID:28695207

  1. Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Converges More Convexly on Normal Smaller Optic Nerve Head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kyoung In; Shin, Jeong Ah; Park, Hae-Young Lopilly; Park, Chan Kee

    2015-08-01

    To investigate retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) configuration in the optic nerve head (ONH) and peripapillary area according to disc size and to determine whether it explains cup discrepancy among eyes with different disc sizes. Horizontal and vertical RNFL curvature and mean thickness were measured using confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (Heidelberg Retina Tomograph) in 63 normal subjects grouped by disc size. Average and quadrant RNFL thickness, disc size, average cup-to-disc ratio (CDR), and convergence angle at the optic disc were also measured using Cirrus HD-optical coherence tomography. The relationships between disc size and RNFL curvature, thickness, angle at optic disc, and CDR were evaluated. RNFL curvature and convergence angle reflects convexity "on" and "into" the optic disc, respectively. CDR was smaller for small discs and was positively correlated with disc size (Poptic disc were positively correlated with disc size (POptic disc area was negatively correlated with mean RNFL thickness at the optic disc margin measured by HRT (P=0.002), but not in the peripapillary area by optical coherence tomography. Using imaging techniques, we demonstrated that the shape of the RNFLs converging "on" and entering "into" the optic disc was more convex for small optic discs compared with large discs. A low CDR for small discs could be mediated by these RNFL profiles at the ONH, which may guide the clinical evaluation of glaucomatous ONH damage.

  2. EGFR Activation Mediates Inhibition of Axon Regeneration by Myelin and Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koprivica, Vuk; Cho, Kin-Sang; Park, Jong Bae; Yiu, Glenn; Atwal, Jasvinder; Gore, Bryan; Kim, Jieun A.; Lin, Estelle; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc; Chen, Dong Feng; He, Zhigang

    2005-10-01

    Inhibitory molecules associated with myelin and the glial scar limit axon regeneration in the adult central nervous system (CNS), but the underlying signaling mechanisms of regeneration inhibition are not fully understood. Here, we show that suppressing the kinase function of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) blocks the activities of both myelin inhibitors and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in inhibiting neurite outgrowth. In addition, regeneration inhibitors trigger the phosphorylation of EGFR in a calcium-dependent manner. Local administration of EGFR inhibitors promotes significant regeneration of injured optic nerve fibers, pointing to a promising therapeutic avenue for enhancing axon regeneration after CNS injury.

  3. Determination of Nerve Fiber Diameter Distribution From Compound Action Potential: A Continuous Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Un, M Kerem; Kaghazchi, Hamed

    2018-01-01

    When a signal is initiated in the nerve, it is transmitted along each nerve fiber via an action potential (called single fiber action potential (SFAP)) which travels with a velocity that is related with the diameter of the fiber. The additive superposition of SFAPs constitutes the compound action potential (CAP) of the nerve. The fiber diameter distribution (FDD) in the nerve can be computed from the CAP data by solving an inverse problem. This is usually achieved by dividing the fibers into a finite number of diameter groups and solve a corresponding linear system to optimize FDD. However, number of fibers in a nerve can be measured sometimes in thousands and it is possible to assume a continuous distribution for the fiber diameters which leads to a gradient optimization problem. In this paper, we have evaluated this continuous approach to the solution of the inverse problem. We have utilized an analytical function for SFAP and an assumed a polynomial form for FDD. The inverse problem involves the optimization of polynomial coefficients to obtain the best estimate for the FDD. We have observed that an eighth order polynomial for FDD can capture both unimodal and bimodal fiber distributions present in vivo, even in case of noisy CAP data. The assumed FDD distribution regularizes the ill-conditioned inverse problem and produces good results.

  4. Contribución de fibras mielínicas provenientes de los nervios espinales lumbares L4, L5 y L6 al nervio ciático de rata adulta y sus ramas principales Contribution of myelunated fibers from spinal L4, L5 and L6 nerves to the sciatic nerve and its main branches in the adult rat

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    Hernán Hurtado

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available El nervio ciático de la rata está formado por los nervios espinales (ne lumbares L4, L5 y L6. Sin embargo, aún no se ha definido el aporte en fibras mielínicas de estos nervios espinales a lo largo del tronco nervioso. En este estudio se transectaron selectivamente los NE L4, L5 y L4-L5. Luego de una semana se disecaron los nervios ciático, tibial, sural y peroneal. Estas muestras se fijaron y procesaron para microscopía óptica y a partir de cortes coloreados con azul de toluidina se contaron las fibras mielínicas degeneradas y normales. L4 contribuyó con fibras mielínicas principalmente al nervio peroneal y L5 a los nervios ciático, tibial y sural. En general, el aporte de L6 fue menor y variable a lo largo del tronco nervioso comparado con las otras dos ramas espinales. Nuestros resultados brindan información valiosa para posteriores estudios que busquen correlacionar la contribución de los nervios espinales que componen el ciático y sus ramas principales con la función de la extremidad inferior. The rat sciatic nerve is composed by the L4, L5 and L6 lumbar spinal nerves. However, the contribution in myelinated fibers originating from these nerves along this nervous trunk has not yet been defined. In the present study, the L4, L5 and L4-L5 spinal nerves were selectively transected. After one week the sciatic, tibial, sural and peroneal nerves were dissected. These samples were fixed and processed for optical microscopy, and both degenerated and normal myelinated fibers were counted in toluidine blue-stained semi-thin sections. L4 contributed with myelinated fibers mainly to the peroneal nerve, and L5 to the sciatic, tibial and sural nerves. In general, the contribution of L6 was smaller and variable along the nervous trunk in comparison to the other two spinal branches. Our results give key information for further studies looking to correlate the contribution of spinal nerves making part of the sciatic nerve and its main

  5. Human Lymphatic Mesenteric Vessels: Morphology and Possible Function of Aminergic and NPY-ergic Nerve Fibers.

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    D'Andrea, Vito; Panarese, Alessandra; Taurone, Samanta; Coppola, Luigi; Cavallotti, Carlo; Artico, Marco

    2015-09-01

    The lymphatic vessels have been studied in different organs from a morphological to a clinical point of view. Nevertheless, the knowledge of the catecholaminergic control of the lymphatic circulation is still incomplete. The aim of this work is to study the presence and distribution of the catecholaminergic and NPY-ergic nerve fibers in the whole wall of the human mesenteric lymphatic vessels in order to obtain knowledge about their morphology and functional significance. The following experimental procedures were performed: 1) drawing of tissue containing lymphatic vessels; 2) cutting of tissue; 3) staining of tissue; 4) staining of nerve fibers; 5) histofluorescence microscopy for the staining of catecholaminergic nerve fibers; 6) staining of neuropeptide Y like-immune reactivity; 7) biochemical assay of proteins; 8) measurement of noradrenaline; 9) quantitative analysis of images; 10) statistical analysis of data. Numerous nerve fibers run in the wall of lymphatic vessels. Many of them are catecholaminergic in nature. Some nerve fibers are NPY-positive. The biochemical results on noradrenaline amounts are in agreement with morphological results on catecholaminergic nerve fibers. Moreover, the morphometric results, obtained by the quantitative analysis of images and the subsequent statistical analysis of data, confirm all our morphological and biochemical data. The knowledge of the physiological or pathological mechanism regulating the functions of the lymphatic system is incomplete. Nevertheless the catecholaminergic nerve fibers of the human mesenteric lymphatic vessels come from the adrenergic periarterial plexuses of the mesenterial arterial bed. NPY-ergic nerve fibers may modulate the microcirculatory mesenterial bed in different pathological conditions.

  6. Nerve Fiber Flux Analysis Using Wide-Field Swept-Source Optical Coherence Tomography.

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    Tan, Ou; Liu, Liang; Liu, Li; Huang, David

    2018-02-01

    To devise a method to quantify nerve fibers over their arcuate courses over an extended peripapillary area using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Participants were imaged with 8 × 8-mm volumetric OCT scans centered at the optic disc. A new quantity, nerve fiber flux (NFF), represents the cross-sectional area transected perpendicular to the nerve fibers. The peripapillary area was divided into 64 tracks with equal flux. An iterative algorithm traced the trajectory of the tracks assuming that the relative distribution of the NFF was conserved with compensation for fiber connections to ganglion cells on the macular side. Average trajectory was averaged from normal eyes and use to calculate the NFF maps for glaucomatous eyes. The NFF maps were divided into eight sectors that correspond to visual field regions. There were 24 healthy and 10 glaucomatous eyes enrolled. The algorithm converged on similar patterns of NFL tracks for all healthy eyes. In glaucomatous eyes, NFF correlated with visual field sensitivity in the arcuate sectors (Spearman ρ = 0.53-0.62). Focal nerve fiber loss in glaucomatous eyes appeared as uniform tracks of NFF defects that followed the expected arcuate fiber trajectory. Using an algorithm based on the conservation of flux, we derived nerve fiber trajectories in the peripapillary area. The NFF map is useful for the visualization of focal defects and quantification of sector nerve fiber loss from wide-area volumetric OCT scans. NFF provides a cumulative measure of volumetric loss along nerve fiber tracks and could improve the detection of focal glaucoma damage.

  7. Alterations of sympathetic nerve fibers in avascular necrosis of femoral head.

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    Li, Deqiang; Liu, Peilai; Zhang, Yuankai; Li, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Avascular necrosis of the femoral head (ANFH) was mainly due to alterations of bone vascularity. And noradrenaline (NA), as the neurotransmitter of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), leads to the vasoconstriction by activating its α-Receptor. This study was to explore the nerve fiber density of the femoral head in the rabbit model of ANFH. Twenty New Zealand white rabbits were used in this study. The rabbit model of ANFH was established by the injection of methylprednisolone acetate. The nerve fiber density and distribution in the femoral head was determined using an Olympus BH2 microscope. Significant fewer sympathetic nerve fibers was found in the ANFH intertrochanteric bone samples (P = 0.036) with osteonecrosis. The number of sympathetic nerve fibers was compared between the two groups. And less sympathetic nerve fibers were found in later stage ANFH samples in comparison with those of early stages. ANFH might be preceded by an inflammatory reaction, and an inflammatory response might lead to arthritic changes in tissue samples, which in turn reduces the number of sympathetic nerve fibers.

  8. Age, ocular magnification, and circumpapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness

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    Wang, Mengyu; Elze, Tobias; Li, Dian; Baniasadi, Neda; Wirkner, Kerstin; Kirsten, Toralf; Thiery, Joachim; Loeffler, Markus; Engel, Christoph; Rauscher, Franziska G.

    2017-12-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) manufacturers graphically present circumpapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (cpRNFLT) together with normative limits to support clinicians in diagnosing ophthalmic diseases. The impact of age on cpRNFLT is typically implemented by linear models. cpRNFLT is strongly location-specific, whereas previously published norms are typically restricted to coarse sectors and based on small populations. Furthermore, OCT devices neglect impacts of lens or eye size on the diameter of the cpRNFLT scan circle so that the diameter substantially varies over different eyes. We investigate the impact of age and scan diameter reported by Spectralis spectral-domain OCT on cpRNFLT in 5646 subjects with healthy eyes. We provide cpRNFLT by age and diameter at 768 angular locations. Age/diameter were significantly related to cpRNFLT on 89%/92% of the circle, respectively (pointwise linear regression), and to shifts in cpRNFLT peak locations. For subjects from age 42.1 onward but not below, increasing age significantly decreased scan diameter (r=-0.28, p<0.001), which suggests that pathological cpRNFLT thinning over time may be underestimated in elderly compared to younger subjects, as scan diameter decrease correlated with cpRNFLT increase. Our detailed numerical results may help to generate various correction models to improve diagnosing and monitoring optic neuropathies.

  9. Molecular mimicry between Mycobacterium leprae proteins (50S ribosomal protein L2 and Lysyl-tRNA synthetase) and myelin basic protein: a possible mechanism of nerve damage in leprosy.

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    Singh, Itu; Yadav, Asha Ram; Mohanty, Keshar Kunja; Katoch, Kiran; Sharma, Prashant; Mishra, Bishal; Bisht, Deepa; Gupta, U D; Sengupta, Utpal

    2015-04-01

    Autoantibodies against various components of host are known to occur in leprosy. Nerve damage is the primary cause of disability associated with leprosy. The aim of this study was to detect the level of autoantibodies and lympho-proliferative response against myelin basic protein (MBP) in leprosy patients (LPs) and their correlation with clinical phenotypes of LPs. Further, probable role of molecular mimicry in nerve damage of LPs was investigated. We observed significantly high level of anti-MBP antibodies in LPs across the spectrum and a positive significant correlation between the level of anti-MBP antibodies and the number of nerves involved in LPs. We report here that 4 B cell epitopes of myelin A1 and Mycobacterium leprae proteins, 50S ribosomal L2 and lysyl tRNA synthetase are cross-reactive. Further, M. leprae sonicated antigen hyperimmunization was responsible for induction of autoantibody response in mice which could be adoptively transferred to naive mice. For the first time our findings suggest the role of molecular mimicry in nerve damage in leprosy. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and neuropsychiatric manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    Shulman, S; Shorer, R; Wollman, J; Dotan, G; Paran, D

    2017-11-01

    Background Cognitive impairment is frequent in systemic lupus erythematosus. Atrophy of the corpus callosum and hippocampus have been reported in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, and diffusion tensor imaging studies have shown impaired white matter integrity, suggesting that white matter damage in systemic lupus erythematosus may underlie the cognitive impairment as well as other neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus manifestations. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, as assessed by optical coherence tomography, has been suggested as a biomarker for white matter damage in neurologic disorders such as multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Retinal nerve fiber layer thinning may occur early, even in patients with mild clinical symptoms. Aim The objective of this study was to assess the association of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, as a biomarker of white matter damage in systemic lupus erythematosus patients, with neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus manifestations, including cognitive impairment. Methods Twenty-one consecutive patients with systemic lupus erythematosus underwent neuropsychological testing using a validated computerized battery of tests as well as the Rey-Auditory verbal learning test. All 21 patients, as well as 11 healthy, age matched controls, underwent optical coherence tomography testing to assess retinal nerve fiber layer thickness. Correlations between retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and results in eight cognitive domains assessed by the computerized battery of tests as well as the Rey-Auditory verbal learning test were assessed in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, with and without neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus, and compared to retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in healthy controls. Results No statistically significant correlation was found between retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus as compared to healthy

  11. Functional and structural microanatomy of the fetal sciatic nerve.

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    Creze, Maud; Zaitouna, Mazen; Krystel, Nyangoh Timoh; Diallo, Djibril; Lebacle, Cédric; Bellin, Marie-France; Ducreux, Denis; Benoit, Gérard; Bessede, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    The ultrastructure of a nerve has implications for surgical nerve repair. The aim of our study was to characterize the fascicular versus fibrillar anatomy and the autonomic versus somatic nature of the fetal sciatic nerve (SN). Immunohistochemistry for vesicular acetylcholine transporter, tyrosine hydroxylase, and peripheral myelin protein 22 was performed to identify cholinergic, adrenergic, and somatic axons, respectively, in the human fetal SN. Two-dimensional (2D) analysis and 3D reconstructions were performed. The fetal SN is composed of one-third stromal tissue and two-thirds neural tissue. Autonomic fibers are predominant over somatic fibers within the neural tissue. The distribution of somatic fibers is initially random, but then become topographically organized after intra- and interfascicular rearrangements have occurred within the nerve. The fetal model presents limitations but enables illustration of the nature of the nerve fibers and the 3D fascicular anatomy of the SN. Muscle Nerve 56: 787-796, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The role of the renal afferent and efferent nerve fibers in heart failure

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    Booth, Lindsea C.; May, Clive N.; Yao, Song T.

    2015-01-01

    Renal nerves contain afferent, sensory and efferent, sympathetic nerve fibers. In heart failure (HF) there is an increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), which can lead to renal vasoconstriction, increased renin release and sodium retention. These changes are thought to contribute to renal dysfunction, which is predictive of poor outcome in patients with HF. In contrast, the role of the renal afferent nerves remains largely unexplored in HF. This is somewhat surprising as there are multiple triggers in HF that have the potential to increase afferent nerve activity, including increased venous pressure and reduced kidney perfusion. Some of the few studies investigating renal afferents in HF have suggested that at least the sympatho-inhibitory reno-renal reflex is blunted. In experimentally induced HF, renal denervation, both surgical and catheter-based, has been associated with some improvements in renal and cardiac function. It remains unknown whether the effects are due to removal of the efferent renal nerve fibers or afferent renal nerve fibers, or a combination of both. Here, we review the effects of HF on renal efferent and afferent nerve function and critically assess the latest evidence supporting renal denervation as a potential treatment in HF. PMID:26483699

  13. Sleeve bridging of the rhesus monkey ulnar nerve with muscular branches of the pronator teres: multiple amplification of axonal regeneration

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    Yu-hui Kou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple-bud regeneration, i.e., multiple amplification, has been shown to exist in peripheral nerve regeneration. Multiple buds grow towards the distal nerve stump during proximal nerve fiber regeneration. Our previous studies have verified the limit and validity of multiple amplification of peripheral nerve regeneration using small gap sleeve bridging of small donor nerves to repair large receptor nerves in rodents. The present study sought to observe multiple amplification of myelinated nerve fiber regeneration in the primate peripheral nerve. Rhesus monkey models of distal ulnar nerve defects were established and repaired using muscular branches of the right forearm pronator teres. Proximal muscular branches of the pronator teres were sutured into the distal ulnar nerve using the small gap sleeve bridging method. At 6 months after suture, two-finger flexion and mild wrist flexion were restored in the ulnar-sided injured limbs of rhesus monkey. Neurophysiological examination showed that motor nerve conduction velocity reached 22.63 ± 6.34 m/s on the affected side of rhesus monkey. Osmium tetroxide staining demonstrated that the number of myelinated nerve fibers was 1,657 ± 652 in the branches of pronator teres of donor, and 2,661 ± 843 in the repaired ulnar nerve. The rate of multiple amplification of regenerating myelinated nerve fibers was 1.61. These data showed that when muscular branches of the pronator teres were used to repair ulnar nerve in primates, effective regeneration was observed in regenerating nerve fibers, and functions of the injured ulnar nerve were restored to a certain extent. Moreover, multiple amplification was subsequently detected in ulnar nerve axons.

  14. Sleeve bridging of the rhesus monkey ulnar nerve with muscular branches of the pronator teres: multiple amplification of axonal regeneration.

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    Kou, Yu-Hui; Zhang, Pei-Xun; Wang, Yan-Hua; Chen, Bo; Han, Na; Xue, Feng; Zhang, Hong-Bo; Yin, Xiao-Feng; Jiang, Bao-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Multiple-bud regeneration, i.e., multiple amplification, has been shown to exist in peripheral nerve regeneration. Multiple buds grow towards the distal nerve stump during proximal nerve fiber regeneration. Our previous studies have verified the limit and validity of multiple amplification of peripheral nerve regeneration using small gap sleeve bridging of small donor nerves to repair large receptor nerves in rodents. The present study sought to observe multiple amplification of myelinated nerve fiber regeneration in the primate peripheral nerve. Rhesus monkey models of distal ulnar nerve defects were established and repaired using muscular branches of the right forearm pronator teres. Proximal muscular branches of the pronator teres were sutured into the distal ulnar nerve using the small gap sleeve bridging method. At 6 months after suture, two-finger flexion and mild wrist flexion were restored in the ulnar-sided injured limbs of rhesus monkey. Neurophysiological examination showed that motor nerve conduction velocity reached 22.63 ± 6.34 m/s on the affected side of rhesus monkey. Osmium tetroxide staining demonstrated that the number of myelinated nerve fibers was 1,657 ± 652 in the branches of pronator teres of donor, and 2,661 ± 843 in the repaired ulnar nerve. The rate of multiple amplification of regenerating myelinated nerve fibers was 1.61. These data showed that when muscular branches of the pronator teres were used to repair ulnar nerve in primates, effective regeneration was observed in regenerating nerve fibers, and functions of the injured ulnar nerve were restored to a certain extent. Moreover, multiple amplification was subsequently detected in ulnar nerve axons.

  15. Neura, nerves, nerve fibers, neurofibrils, microtubules: multidimensional routes of pain, pleasure, and voluntary action in images across the ages.

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    Frixione, Eugenio

    2013-01-01

    Available records indicate that the human body has always been conceived, in different periods and cultures, as spanned by multiple channels for internal communication and coherent functioning as a unit-"meridians" in treatises of Chinese medicine, metu in Egyptian papyri, srotas in Ayurvedic Indian texts, and neura in the Western scientific heritage from ancient Greece. Unfortunately, the earliest extant figurative depictions of such pathways of general control, complementary to the blood vessels, are late medieval copies of old crude sketches that attempted to show the main anatomico-physiological systems. The scarcity of adequate illustrations was more than compensated in the Renaissance, when the efforts of both artists and anatomists for the first time produced basically correct renditions of the human nervous system and many other bodily structures. As attention was next focused on microscopic structure as a requisite to understand physiological mechanisms, during the Enlightenment the nerves were revealed to consist of numerous thin tubes or fibers aligned in parallel. Improved microscopy techniques in the nineteenth century led to discovering and delineating still finer fibrils coursing along the cores of the nerve fibers themselves. Electron microscopy, developed throughout the twentieth century, recognized some of these fibrils within nerve fibers as being also tubular. All the progressive stages in understanding nerve construction, at increasingly more detailed scales, have been accompanied by technological advances and by debate about the structure and function relationship. And every step has been a source of amazing imagery. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Large A-fiber activity is required for microglial proliferation and p38 MAPK activation in the spinal cord: different effects of resiniferatoxin and bupivacaine on spinal microglial changes after spared nerve injury

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    Decosterd Isabelle

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After peripheral nerve injury, spontaneous ectopic activity arising from the peripheral axons plays an important role in inducing central sensitization and neuropathic pain. Recent evidence indicates that activation of spinal cord microglia also contributes to the development of neuropathic pain. In particular, activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK in spinal microglia is required for the development of mechanical allodynia. However, activity-dependent activation of microglia after nerve injury has not been fully addressed. To determine whether spontaneous activity from C- or A-fibers is required for microglial activation, we used resiniferatoxin (RTX to block the conduction of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1 positive fibers (mostly C- and Aδ-fibers and bupivacaine microspheres to block all fibers of the sciatic nerve in rats before spared nerve injury (SNI, and observed spinal microglial changes 2 days later. Results SNI induced robust mechanical allodynia and p38 activation in spinal microglia. SNI also induced marked cell proliferation in the spinal cord, and all the proliferating cells (BrdU+ were microglia (Iba1+. Bupivacaine induced a complete sensory and motor blockade and also significantly inhibited p38 activation and microglial proliferation in the spinal cord. In contrast, and although it produced an efficient nociceptive block, RTX failed to inhibit p38 activation and microglial proliferation in the spinal cord. Conclusion (1 Blocking peripheral input in TRPV1-positive fibers (presumably C-fibers is not enough to prevent nerve injury-induced spinal microglial activation. (2 Peripheral input from large myelinated fibers is important for microglial activation. (3 Microglial activation is associated with mechanical allodynia.

  17. Alpha-synuclein in cutaneous small nerve fibers

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    Siepmann T

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Timo Siepmann,1 Ben Min-Woo Illigens,2 Kristian Barlinn1 1Department of Neurology, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany; 2Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Despite progression in the development of pharmacological therapy, treatment of alpha synucleinopathies, such as Parkinson’s disease (PD and some atypical parkinsonism syndromes, is still challenging. To date, our knowledge of the mechanisms whereby the pathological form of alpha-synuclein causes structural and functional damage to the nervous system is limited and, consequently, there is a lack of specific diagnostic tools to evaluate pathology in these patients and differentiate PD from other neurodegenerative proteinopathies. Recent studies indicated that alpha-synuclein deposition in cutaneous small nerve fibers assessed by skin biopsies might be a valid disease marker of PD and facilitate early differentiation of PD from atypical parkinsonism syndromes. This observation is relevant since early diagnosis may enable timely treatment and improve quality of life. However, challenges include the necessity of standardizing immunohistochemical analysis techniques and the identification of potential distinct patterns of intraneural alpha-synuclein deposition among synucleinopathies. In this perspective, we explore the scientific and clinical opportunities arising from alpha-synuclein assessment using skin biopsies. These include elucidation of the peripheral nervous system pathology of PD and other synucleinopathies, identification of novel targets to study response to neuroprotective treatment, and improvement of clinical management. Furthermore, we discuss future challenges in exploring the diagnostic value of skin biopsy assessment for alpha-synuclein deposition and implementing the technique in clinical practice. Keywords: Parkinson’s disease, diagnosis, skin

  18. Label-free photoacoustic microscopy of peripheral nerves

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    Matthews, Thomas Paul; Zhang, Chi; Yao, Da-Kang; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common neurological problem that affects millions of people worldwide. Diagnosis and treatment of this condition are often hindered by the difficulties in making objective, noninvasive measurements of nerve fibers. Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) has the ability to obtain high resolution, specific images of peripheral nerves without exogenous contrast. We demonstrated the first proof-of-concept imaging of peripheral nerves using PAM. As validated by both standard histology and photoacoustic spectroscopy, the origin of photoacoustic signals is myelin, the primary source of lipids in the nerves. An extracted sciatic nerve sandwiched between two layers of chicken tissue was imaged by PAM to mimic the in vivo case. Ordered fibrous structures inside the nerve, caused by the bundles of myelin-coated axons, could be observed clearly. With further technical improvements, PAM can potentially be applied to monitor and diagnose peripheral neuropathies.

  19. Relationship Between Optic Nerve Appearance and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness as Explored with Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

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    Aleman, Tomas S.; Huang, Jiayan; Garrity, Sean T.; Carter, Stuart B.; Aleman, Wendy D.; Ying, Gui-shuang; Tamhankar, Madhura A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To study the relationship between the appearance of the optic nerve and the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness determined by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT). Methods Records from patients with spectral domain-OCT imaging in a neuro-ophthalmology practice were reviewed. Eyes with glaucoma/glaucoma suspicion, macular/optic nerve edema, pseudophakia, and with refractive errors > 6D were excluded. Optic nerve appearance by slit lamp biomicroscopy was related to the RNFL thickness by spectral domain-OCT and to visual field results. Results Ninety-one patients (176 eyes; mean age: 49 ± 15 years) were included. Eighty-three eyes (47%) showed optic nerve pallor; 89 eyes (50.6%) showed RNFL thinning (sectoral or average peripapillary). Average peripapillary RNFL thickness in eyes with pallor (mean ± SD = 76 ± 17 μm) was thinner compared to eyes without pallor (91 ± 14 μm, P < 0.001). Optic nerve pallor predicted RNFL thinning with a sensitivity of 69% and a specificity of 75%. Optic nerve appearance predicted RNFL thinning (with a sensitivity and specificity of 81%) when RNFL had thinned by ∼ 40%. Most patients with pallor had RNFL thinning with (66%) or without (25%) visual field loss; the remainder had normal RNFL and fields (5%) or with visual field abnormalities (4%). Conclusions Optic nerve pallor as a predictor of RNFL thinning showed fair sensitivity and specificity, although it is optimally sensitive/specific only when substantial RNFL loss has occurred. Translational Relevance Finding an acceptable relationship between the optic nerve appearance by ophthalmoscopy and spectral domain-OCT RNFL measures will help the clinician's interpretation of the information provided by this technology, which is gaining momentum in neuro-ophthalmic research. PMID:25374773

  20. Cornea nerve fiber quantification and construction of phenotypes in patients with fibromyalgia.

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    Oudejans, Linda; He, Xuan; Niesters, Marieke; Dahan, Albert; Brines, Michael; van Velzen, Monique

    2016-03-23

    Cornea confocal microscopy (CCM) is a novel non-invasive method to detect small nerve fiber pathology. CCM generally correlates with outcomes of skin biopsies in patients with small fiber pathology. The aim of this study was to quantify the morphology of small nerve fibers of the cornea of patients with fibromyalgia in terms of density, length and branching and further phenotype these patients using standardized quantitative sensory testing (QST). Small fiber pathology was detected in the cornea of 51% of patients: nerve fiber length was significantly decreased in 44% of patients compared to age- and sex-matched reference values; nerve fiber density and branching were significantly decreased in 10% and 28% of patients. The combination of the CCM parameters and sensory tests for central sensitization, (cold pain threshold, mechanical pain threshold, mechanical pain sensitivity, allodynia and/or windup), yielded four phenotypes of fibromyalgia patients in a subgroup analysis: one group with normal cornea morphology without and with signs of central sensitization, and a group with abnormal cornea morphology parameters without and with signs of central sensitization. In conclusion, half of the tested fibromyalgia population demonstrates signs of small fiber pathology as measured by CCM. The four distinct phenotypes suggest possible differences in disease mechanisms and may require different treatment approaches.

  1. Schwann cell myelination requires Dynein function

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    Langworthy Melissa M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interaction of Schwann cells with axons triggers signal transduction that drives expression of Pou3f1 and Egr2 transcription factors, which in turn promote myelination. Signal transduction appears to be mediated, at least in part, by cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP because elevation of cAMP levels can stimulate myelination in the absence of axon contact. The mechanisms by which the myelinating signal is conveyed remain unclear. Results By analyzing mutations that disrupt myelination in zebrafish, we learned that Dynein cytoplasmic 1 heavy chain 1 (Dync1h1, which functions as a motor for intracellular molecular trafficking, is required for peripheral myelination. In dync1h1 mutants, Schwann cell progenitors migrated to peripheral nerves but then failed to express Pou3f1 and Egr2 or make myelin membrane. Genetic mosaic experiments revealed that robust Myelin Basic Protein expression required Dync1h1 function within both Schwann cells and axons. Finally, treatment of dync1h1 mutants with a drug to elevate cAMP levels stimulated myelin gene expression. Conclusion Dync1h1 is required for retrograde transport in axons and mutations of Dync1h1 have been implicated in axon disease. Our data now provide evidence that Dync1h1 is also required for efficient myelination of peripheral axons by Schwann cells, perhaps by facilitating signal transduction necessary for myelination.

  2. Gamma knife irradiation of injured sciatic nerve induces histological and behavioral improvement in the rat neuropathic pain model.

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    Yuki Yagasaki

    Full Text Available We examined the effects of gamma knife (GK irradiation on injured nerves using a rat partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSL model. GK irradiation was performed at one week after ligation and nerve preparations were made three weeks after ligation. GK irradiation is known to induce immune responses such as glial cell activation in the central nervous system. Thus, we determined the effects of GK irradiation on macrophages using immunoblot and histochemical analyses. Expression of Iba-1 protein, a macrophage marker, was further increased in GK-treated injured nerves as compared with non-irradiated injured nerves. Immunohistochemical study of Iba-1 in GK-irradiated injured sciatic nerves demonstrated Iba-1 positive macrophage accumulation to be enhanced in areas distal to the ligation point. In the same area, myelin debris was also more efficiently removed by GK-irradiation. Myelin debris clearance by macrophages is thought to contribute to a permissive environment for axon growth. In the immunoblot study, GK irradiation significantly increased expressions of βIII-tubulin protein and myelin protein zero, which are markers of axon regeneration and re-myelination, respectively. Toluidine blue staining revealed the re-myelinated fiber diameter to be larger at proximal sites and that the re-myelinated fiber number was increased at distal sites in GK-irradiated injured nerves as compared with non-irradiated injured nerves. These results suggest that GK irradiation of injured nerves facilitates regeneration and re-myelination. In a behavior study, early alleviation of allodynia was observed with GK irradiation in PSL rats. When GK-induced alleviation of allodynia was initially detected, the expression of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF, a potent analgesic factor, was significantly increased by GK irradiation. These results suggested that GK irradiation alleviates allodynia via increased GDNF. This study provides novel evidence that GK

  3. High-resolution imaging of retinal nerve fiber bundles in glaucoma using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Kohei; Ooto, Sotaro; Hangai, Masanori; Ueda-Arakawa, Naoko; Yoshida, Sachiko; Akagi, Tadamichi; Ikeda, Hanako Ohashi; Nonaka, Atsushi; Hanebuchi, Masaaki; Inoue, Takashi; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2013-05-01

    To detect pathologic changes in retinal nerve fiber bundles in glaucomatous eyes seen on images obtained by adaptive optics (AO) scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO SLO). Prospective cross-sectional study. Twenty-eight eyes of 28 patients with open-angle glaucoma and 21 normal eyes of 21 volunteer subjects underwent a full ophthalmologic examination, visual field testing using a Humphrey Field Analyzer, fundus photography, red-free SLO imaging, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, and imaging with an original prototype AO SLO system. The AO SLO images showed many hyperreflective bundles suggesting nerve fiber bundles. In glaucomatous eyes, the nerve fiber bundles were narrower than in normal eyes, and the nerve fiber layer thickness was correlated with the nerve fiber bundle widths on AO SLO (P fiber layer defect area on fundus photography, the nerve fiber bundles on AO SLO were narrower compared with those in normal eyes (P optic disc, the nerve fiber bundle width was significantly lower, even in areas without nerve fiber layer defect, in eyes with glaucomatous eyes compared with normal eyes (P = .026). The mean deviations of each cluster in visual field testing were correlated with the corresponding nerve fiber bundle widths (P = .017). AO SLO images showed reduced nerve fiber bundle widths both in clinically normal and abnormal areas of glaucomatous eyes, and these abnormalities were associated with visual field defects, suggesting that AO SLO may be useful for detecting early nerve fiber bundle abnormalities associated with loss of visual function. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Fibromyalgia Is Correlated with Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Martin, Elena; Garcia-Campayo, Javier; Puebla-Guedea, Marta; Ascaso, Francisco J; Roca, Miguel; Gutierrez-Ruiz, Fernando; Vilades, Elisa; Polo, Vicente; Larrosa, Jose M; Pablo, Luis E; Satue, Maria

    2016-01-01

    To investigate whether fibromyalgia induces axonal damage in the optic nerve that can be detected using optical coherence tomography (OCT), as the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) is atrophied in patients with fibromyalgia compared with controls. Fibromyalgia patients (n = 116) and age-matched healthy controls (n = 144) were included in this observational and prospective cohort study. All subjects underwent visual acuity measurement and structural analysis of the RNFL using two OCT devices (Cirrus and Spectralis). Fibromyalgia patients were evaluated according to Giesecke's fibromyalgia subgroups, the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), and the European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ5D) scale. We compared the differences between fibromyalgia patients and controls, and analyzed the correlations between OCT measurements, disease duration, fibromyalgia subgroups, severity, and quality of life. The impact on quality of life in fibromyalgia subgroups and in patients with different disease severity was also analyzed. A significant decrease in the RNFL was detected in fibromyalgia patients compared with controls using the two OCT devices: Cirrus OCT ganglion cell layer analysis registered a significant decrease in the minimum thickness of the inner plexiform layer (74.99±16.63 vs 79.36±3.38 μm, respectively; p = 0.023), nasal inferior, temporal inferior and temporal superior sectors (p = 0.040; 0.011 and 0.046 respectively). The Glaucoma application of the Spectralis OCT revealed thinning in the nasal, temporal inferior and temporal superior sectors (p = 0.009, 0.006, and 0.002 respectively) of fibromyalgia patients and the Axonal application in all sectors, except the nasal superior and temporal sectors. The odds ratio (OR) to estimate the size effect of FM in RNFL thickness was 1.39. RNFL atrophy was detected in patients with FIQ scores fibromyalgia (FIQ≥60) compared with patients with mild fibromyalgia (FIQfibromyalgia exhibited significant thinning in the

  5. Nerve endings in the heart of teleosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S

    1979-01-01

    The nerve endings in the heart of fishes were studied using silver impregnation techniques. The heart chambers are profusely innervated by the sympathetic, parasympathetic (vagal) and postganglionic fibers of the intracardiac ganglia situated at the sinuatrial and the atrioventricular junctions. The plexuses are composed of medullated and nonmedullated fibers. The nerve fibers generally end freely and are slightly branched or unbranched terminations of myelinated and unmyelinated fibers. Moreover, a few nerve fibers end redundant in the form of end-rings, bulb-like, bush-like, club-shaped end end-coil like structures. The complex unencapsulated types of endings are also found in the myocardium of the atrium and the ventricle. The encapsulated endings (Vater-Pacinian; Krause end-bulb) could not be observed.

  6. Optic Nerve Head and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Differences Between Caribbean Black and African American Patients as Measured by Spectral Domain OCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Rohini; Dhrami-Gavazi, Elona; Al-Aswad, Lama; Ciarleglio, Adam; Cioffi, George A; Blumberg, Dana M

    2015-01-01

    There are well-established differences in optic nerve morphology between patients of African and European descent. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) scanning has demonstrated these differences with respect to optic disc area (DA), average cup-disc ratio, cup volume, and nerve fiber layer thickness. However, the term "African descent" describes a heterogenous group with considerable variability. This study evaluates differences in optic nerve and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) parameters as measured by Cirrus HD-OCT between Caribbean black and African American patients. A total of 25 African American subjects and 25 Caribbean black subjects with normal ocular examinations were consecutively recruited to this study. All patients received imaging of the optic nerve and nerve fiber layer with Cirrus HD-OCT. Optic nerve and RNFL parameters were evaluated for statistically significant differences using a t test. A mixed effect model for correlated data was then created to adjust outcome variables for (1) repeated measures and (2) optic nerve size. Two one-sided t tests were then utilized to determine equivalence. After adjustment for DA, RNFL thickness, cup volume, DA, inferior nerve fiber layer, and vertical cup-disc ratio demonstrated statistically significant equivalence between the 2 groups (P value fiber layer quadrant was significantly different between the 2 groups and may merit further investigation. Findings of this study suggest that optic nerve and RNFL morphology is markedly similar between Caribbean blacks and African Americans once adjusted for optic nerve size but cannot be considered equivalent in all measures, particularly in the superior nerve fiber layer.

  7. Brain imaging signatures of the relationship between epidermal nerve fibers and heat pain perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Ming-Tsung; Kong, Yazhuo; Chiang, Ming-Chang; Chao, Chi-Chao; Tseng, Wen-Yih I; Hsieh, Sung-Tsang

    2015-11-15

    Although the small-diameter primary afferent fibers in the skin promptly respond to nociceptive stimuli and convey sensory inputs to the central nervous system, the neural signatures that underpin the relationship between cutaneous afferent fibers and pain perception remain elusive. We combined skin biopsy at the lateral aspect of the distal leg, which is used to quantify cutaneous afferent fibers, with fMRI, which is used to assess brain responses and functional connectivity, to investigate the relationship between cutaneous sensory nerves and the corresponding pain perception in the brain after applying heat pain stimulation to the dorsum of the right foot in healthy subjects. During painful stimulation, the degree of cutaneous innervation, as measured by epidermal nerve fiber density, was correlated with individual blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signals of the posterior insular cortex and of the thalamus, periaqueductal gray, and rostral ventromedial medulla. Pain perception was associated with the activation of the anterior insular cortex and with the functional connectivity from the anterior insular cortex to the primary somatosensory cortex during painful stimulation. Most importantly, both epidermal nerve fiber density and activity in the posterior insular cortex showed a positive correlation with the strength of coupling under pain between the anterior insular cortex and the primary somatosensory cortex. Thus, our findings support the notion that the neural circuitry subserving pain perception interacts with the cerebral correlates of peripheral nociceptive fibers, which implicates an indirect role for skin nerves in human pain perception. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness is associated with lesion length in acute optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallenbach, K; Simonsen, Helle Juhl; Sander, B

    2010-01-01

    included 41 patients with unilateral optic neuritis and 19 healthy volunteers. All patients were evaluated and examined within 28 days of onset of symptoms. The peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT), an objective quantitative measure of optic nerve head edema, was measured by optical...... coherence tomography and the length and location of the inflammatory optic nerve lesion were evaluated using MRI. RESULTS: Ophthalmoscopically, 34% of the patients had papillitis. The retinal nerve fiber layer in affected eyes (mean 123.1 microm) was higher during the acute phase than that of fellow eyes......BACKGROUND: Acute optic neuritis occurs with and without papillitis. The presence of papillitis has previously been thought to imply an anterior location of the neuritis, but imaging studies seeking to test this hypothesis have been inconclusive. METHODS: This prospective observational cohort study...

  9. Adaptive myelination from fish to man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraban, Marion; Mensch, Sigrid; Lyons, David A

    2016-06-15

    Myelinated axons with nodes of Ranvier are an evolutionary elaboration common to essentially all jawed vertebrates. Myelin made by Schwann cells in our peripheral nervous system and oligodendrocytes in our central nervous system has been long known to facilitate rapid energy efficient nerve impulse propagation. However, it is now also clear, particularly in the central nervous system, that myelin is not a simple static insulator but that it is dynamically regulated throughout development and life. New myelin sheaths can be made by newly differentiating oligodendrocytes, and mature myelin sheaths can be stimulated to grow again in the adult. Furthermore, numerous studies in models from fish to man indicate that neuronal activity can affect distinct stages of oligodendrocyte development and the process of myelination itself. This begs questions as to how these effects of activity are mediated at a cellular and molecular level and whether activity-driven adaptive myelination is a feature common to all myelinated axons, or indeed all oligodendrocytes, or is specific to cells or circuits with particular functions. Here we review the recent literature on this topic, elaborate on the key outstanding questions in the field, and look forward to future studies that incorporate investigations in systems from fish to man that will provide further insight into this fundamental aspect of nervous system plasticity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Myelin Evolution. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Myelin injury in the central nervous system and Alzheimer's diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sha-Sha; Zhang, Zhao; Zhu, Tian-Bi; Chu, Shi-Feng; He, Wen-Bin; Chen, Nai-Hong

    2018-05-03

    Myelin is a membrane wrapped around the axon of the nerve cell, which is composed of the mature oligodendrocytes. The role of myelin is to insulate and prevent the nerve electrical impulses from the axon of the neurons to the axons of the other neurons, which is essential for the proper functioning of the nervous system. Minor changes in myelin thickness could lead to substantial changes in conduction speed and may thus alter neural circuit function. Demyelination is the myelin damage, which characterized by the loss of nerve sheath and the relative fatigue of the neuronal sheath and axon. Studies have shown that myelin injury may be closely related to neurodegenerative diseases and may be an early diagnostic criteria and therapeutic target. Thus this review summarizes the recent result of pathologic effect and signal pathways of myelin injury in neurodegenerative diseases, especially the Alzheimer's disease to provide new and effective therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. The Association between Serum Cytokines and Damage to Large and Small Nerve Fibers in Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Magrinelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN is a frequent complication of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM and may involve small and large peripheral nerve fibers. Recent evidence suggests a role of cytokines in DPN. The paper is aimed at exploring whether the serum concentration of cytokines is associated with small and large nerve fiber function and with neuropathic pain (NP. We recruited a group of 32 type 2 DM patients who underwent serum cytokines (TNF-α, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, and IL-10 dosage as well as electrodiagnostic and quantitative sensory testing (QST assessment to explore damage to large and small nerve fibers. Raised serum levels of IL-6 and IL-10 correlated with markers of large nerve fiber sensory and motor axonal damage. Raised IL-10 serum level was associated with signs of motor nerve demyelination. No differences were found in pain characteristics and electrodiagnostic and QST markers of small nerve fiber function in relation to cytokines serum levels. IL-6 and IL-10 serum levels were associated with large nerve fiber damage but not to small fibers function or NP. IL-6 and IL-10 cytokines might play a role in the pathogenesis of nerve fiber damage or represent a compensatory or neuroprotective mechanism.

  12. Fibromyalgia Is Correlated with Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thinning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Garcia-Martin

    Full Text Available To investigate whether fibromyalgia induces axonal damage in the optic nerve that can be detected using optical coherence tomography (OCT, as the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL is atrophied in patients with fibromyalgia compared with controls.Fibromyalgia patients (n = 116 and age-matched healthy controls (n = 144 were included in this observational and prospective cohort study. All subjects underwent visual acuity measurement and structural analysis of the RNFL using two OCT devices (Cirrus and Spectralis. Fibromyalgia patients were evaluated according to Giesecke's fibromyalgia subgroups, the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ, and the European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ5D scale. We compared the differences between fibromyalgia patients and controls, and analyzed the correlations between OCT measurements, disease duration, fibromyalgia subgroups, severity, and quality of life. The impact on quality of life in fibromyalgia subgroups and in patients with different disease severity was also analyzed.A significant decrease in the RNFL was detected in fibromyalgia patients compared with controls using the two OCT devices: Cirrus OCT ganglion cell layer analysis registered a significant decrease in the minimum thickness of the inner plexiform layer (74.99±16.63 vs 79.36±3.38 μm, respectively; p = 0.023, nasal inferior, temporal inferior and temporal superior sectors (p = 0.040; 0.011 and 0.046 respectively. The Glaucoma application of the Spectralis OCT revealed thinning in the nasal, temporal inferior and temporal superior sectors (p = 0.009, 0.006, and 0.002 respectively of fibromyalgia patients and the Axonal application in all sectors, except the nasal superior and temporal sectors. The odds ratio (OR to estimate the size effect of FM in RNFL thickness was 1.39. RNFL atrophy was detected in patients with FIQ scores <60 (patients in early disease stages compared with controls in the temporal inferior sector (78.74±17.75 vs 81.65±3

  13. Demyelinating polyneuropathy with focally folded myelin sheaths in a family of Miniature Schnauzer dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhaesebrouck, An E; Couturier, Jérôme; Cauzinille, Laurent; Mizisin, Andrew P; Shelton, G Diane; Granger, Nicolas

    2008-12-15

    A spontaneous demyelinating polyneuropathy in two young Miniature Schnauzer dogs was characterized clinically, electrophysiologically and histopathologically. Both dogs were related and a third dog, belonging to the same family, had similar clinical signs. On presentation, clinical signs were restricted to respiratory dysfunction. Electrophysiological tests showed a dramatic decrease in both motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities. Microscopic examination of peripheral nerve biopsies (light and electron microscopy, teased nerve fibers), showed that this neuropathy was characterized by segmental demyelination and focally folded myelin sheaths. Various clinical syndromes associated with tomacula or focal thickening of the myelin sheath of the peripheral nerves have been described in humans and shown to be caused by gene mutations affecting the myelin proteins, such as the hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies or the demyelinating forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. In animals, a tomaculous neuropathy has been reported in cattle and chickens but not in carnivores. Here we report a demyelinating peripheral neuropathy with tomacula in two Miniature Schnauzer dogs.

  14. Quantifying visual pathway axonal and myelin loss in multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manogaran, Praveena; Vavasour, Irene M; Lange, Alex P; Zhao, Yinshan; McMullen, Katrina; Rauscher, Alexander; Carruthers, Robert; Li, David K B; Traboulsee, Anthony L; Kolind, Shannon H

    2016-01-01

    The optic nerve is frequently injured in multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica, resulting in visual dysfunction, which may be reflected by measures distant from the site of injury. To determine how retinal nerve fiber layer as a measure of axonal health, and macular volume as a measure of neuronal health are related to changes in myelin water fraction in the optic radiations of multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica participants with and without optic neuritis and compared to healthy controls. 12 healthy controls, 42 multiple sclerosis (16 with optic neuritis), and 10 neuromyelitis optica participants (8 with optic neuritis) were included in this study. Optical coherence tomography assessment involved measurements of the segmented macular layers (total macular, ganglion cell layer, inner plexiform layer, and inner nuclear layer volume) and paripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness. The MRI protocol included a 32-echo T2-relaxation GRASE sequence. Average myelin water fraction values were calculated within the optic radiations as a measure of myelin density. Multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica eyes with optic neuritis history had lower retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, total macular, ganglion cell and inner plexiform layer volumes compared to eyes without optic neuritis history and controls. Inner nuclear layer volume increased in multiple sclerosis with optic neuritis history (mean = 0.99 mm(3), SD = 0.06) compared to those without (mean = 0.97 mm(3), SD = 0.06; p = 0.003). Mean myelin water fraction in the optic radiations was significantly lower in demyelinating diseases (neuromyelitis optica: mean = 0.098, SD = 0.01, multiple sclerosis with optic neuritis history: mean = 0.096, SD = 0.01, multiple sclerosis without optic neuritis history: mean = 0.098, SD = 0.02; F3,55 = 3.35, p = 0.03) compared to controls. Positive correlations between MRI and optical coherence tomography measures were also apparent

  15. Peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer and choroidal thickness in cirrhosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Orcun Akdemir

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To evaluate the effect of cirrhosis on peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer and choroidal thickness with enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography. Methods: This cross sectional, single center study was undertaken at Bulent Ecevit University Ophthalmology department with the participation of internal medicine, Gastroenterology department. Patients who were treated with the diagnosis of cirrhosis (n=75 were examined in the ophthalmology clinic. Age and sex matched patients (n=50 who were healthy and met the inclusion, exclusion criteria were included in the study. Complete ophthalmological examination included visual acuity with Snellen chart, intraocular pressure measurement with applanation tonometry, biomicroscopy of anterior and posterior segments, gonioscopy, axial length measurement, visual field examination, peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer, central macular and subfoveal choroidal thickness measurements. Results: The difference between intraocular pressure values was not statistically significant between cirrhosis and control group (p=0.843. However, mean peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness was significantly thinner in cirrhosis group in all regions (p<0.001 and subfoveal choroidal thickness was significantly thinner in cirrhosis group also (p<0.001. Moreover, central macular thickness of cirrhosis group was significantly thicker than the control group (p=0.001. Conclusion: Peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer and subfoveal choroidal thickness was significantly thinner in cirrhosis patients.

  16. Diffusion tensor imaging for nerve fiber bundles in the brain stem and spinocerebellar degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honma, Tsuguo

    2009-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can create an image of the anisotropic nature of diffusion and express it quantitatively. Nerve fibers have a large anisotropic diffusion, and it is possible to obtain images of the nerve fiber bundle. The purpose of this study is to observe the nerve fiber bundles in the brain stem using DTI and study its potential for diagnosing the type of spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD). Fractional anisotropy (FA) maps and 3D-tractography images were obtained for 41 subjects with no brain stem abnormalities. We created an apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map and an FA map using DTI for 16 subjects in the disease group (11 with hereditary SCD and 5 with non-hereditary SCD) and 25 in the control group. The diffusion value of the pons and middle cerebellar peduncle was measured using ADC, and the degree of anisotropic diffusion was measured using FA. The pyramidal tract, superior cerebellar peduncle, and inferior cerebellar peduncle were clearly demonstrated for all cases. ADC for the middle cerebellar peduncle in spinocerebellar ataxin (SCA)1 was significantly higher, similar to that for the pons in dentatorubro-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA). In MSA-C, ADC for both the pons and middle cerebellar peduncle was significantly elevated and FA was significantly decreased. There were no significant changes in SCA3. We could observe the nerve fiber bundles in the brain stem using DTI. FA and ADC measurements with DTI can aid in diagnosing the type of SCD. (author)

  17. Split bundle detection in polarimetric images of the human retinal nerve fiber layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, K. A.; Reus, N. J.; Vos, F. M.; Lemij, H. G.; Vossepoel, A. M.

    2007-01-01

    One method for assessing pathological retinal nerve fiber layer (NFL) appearance is by comparing the NFL to normative values, derived from healthy subjects. These normative values will be more specific when normal physiological differences are taken into account. One common variation is a split

  18. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness map determined from optical coherence tomography images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mujat, M.; Chan, R. C.; Cense, B.; Park, B.H.; Joo, C.; Akkin, T.; Chen, TC; de Boer, JF

    2005-01-01

    We introduce a method to determine the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in OCT images based on anisotropic noise suppression and deformable splines. Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SDOCT) data was acquired at 29 kHz A-line rate with a depth resolution of 2.6 mum and a depth

  19. Reduction in Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness in Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emberti Gialloreti, Leonardo; Pardini, Matteo; Benassi, Francesca; Marciano, Sara; Amore, Mario; Mutolo, Maria Giulia; Porfirio, Maria Cristina; Curatolo, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have seen an increase in the use of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) evaluation as an easy-to-use, reproducible, proxy-measure of brain structural abnormalities. Here, we evaluated RNFL thickness in a group of subjects with high functioning autism (HFA) or with Asperger Syndrome (AS) to its potential as a tool to study autism…

  20. Comparisons of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness changes after macular hole surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Chamma Capelanes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To compare postoperative changes in retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in patients with macular holes treated with vitrectomy with Brilliant Blue-assisted internal limiting membrane peeling. Methods: Twenty-two eyes of 20 patients with macular holes were studied. Each eye was selected to undergo Brilliant Blue-assisted internal limiting membrane peeling. The circumferential retinal nerve fiber layer thickness was determined using spectral domain optical coherence tomography preoperatively and 2 months postoperatively. Mean overall and sectoral retinal nerve fiber layer thicknesses were obtained for each patient. Results: There was no statistically significant difference (p≥0.05 between the pre- and post-treatment measurements in relation to each CFN variable, i.e., on average, pre-treatment measures were the same as post-treatment measures. Furthermore, despite the differences between the pre- and post-treatment measures always being positive (pre-post >0, they are not statistically significant. Conclusions: This study showed no significant decrease in retinal nerve fiber layer thickness measurements after macular holes surgery, regardless of age or sex.

  1. Sound and vibration sensitivity of VIIIth nerve fibers in the grassfrog, Rana temporaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Jørgensen, M B

    1996-01-01

    thresholds from 0.02 cm/s2. The sound and vibration sensitivity was compared for each fiber using the offset between the rate-level curves for sound and vibration stimulation as a measure of relative vibration sensitivity. When measured in this way relative vibration sensitivity decreases with frequency from......We have studied the sound and vibration sensitivity of 164 amphibian papilla fibers in the VIIIth nerve of the grassfrog, Rana temporaria. The VIIIth nerve was exposed using a dorsal approach. The frogs were placed in a natural sitting posture and stimulated by free-field sound. Furthermore......, the animals were stimulated with dorso-ventral vibrations, and the sound-induced vertical vibrations in the setup could be canceled by emitting vibrations in antiphase from the vibration exciter. All low-frequency fibers responded to both sound and vibration with sound thresholds from 23 dB SPL and vibration...

  2. Study of nerve fibers nature reinforcing duodenal contractions by electrical stimulation of sympathetic nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sveshnikov D.S.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the article is to investigate the mechanism of increased reactions by electrical stimulation of the sympathetic nerve. Materials and methods: Experiments on dogs have shown that stimulant reactions during blockade of a-adrenergic by phentolamine and (3-adrenergic receptors with propranolol were completely eliminated by lizer-gol —the blocker of 5-HT12-receptors. Results: Infusion of lizergol did not influence on duodenal motor activity and the function of the vagus nerve. Conclusion: Effector neuron is found out to be serotonergic and its action is provided by 5-HT1 2 receptors

  3. Basic response characteristics of auditory nerve fibers in the grassfrog (Rana temporaria)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Jørgensen, M B; Kanneworff, M

    1998-01-01

    -excitatory suppression (PS) of their spontaneous activity. The duration of PS increased with sound level, also in fibers showing a decrease in firing rate at high intensities. Most fibers showing one-tone suppression did not show PS at their best suppression frequencies. Strong suppression was observed also in very......Responses to free-field sound of 401 fibers from the VIIIth nerve of the grassfrog, Rana temporaria, are described. The spontaneous activities of the fibers ranged from 0 to 75 spikes/s, showing only weak correlation with frequency or sensitivity of the fibers. The highest spontaneous activities...... were approximately twice as high as reported previously for frogs. Best frequencies ranged from 100 to 1600 Hz and thresholds ranged from 21 to 80 dB SPL. The median dynamic range was 20 dB and the slopes of the rate-level curves ranged from 5 to 20 spikes/(s-dB). Most of the units showed post...

  4. Immunodominant fragments of myelin basic protein initiate T cell-dependent pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Huaqing

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The myelin sheath provides electrical insulation of mechanosensory Aβ-afferent fibers. Myelin-degrading matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs damage the myelin sheath. The resulting electrical instability of Aβ-fibers is believed to activate the nociceptive circuitry in Aβ-fibers and initiate pain from innocuous tactile stimulation (mechanical allodynia. The precise molecular mechanisms, responsible for the development of this neuropathic pain state after nerve injury (for example, chronic constriction injury, CCI, are not well understood. Methods and results Using mass spectrometry of the whole sciatic nerve proteome followed by bioinformatics analyses, we determined that the pathways, which are classified as the Infectious Disease and T-helper cell signaling, are readily activated in the nerves post-CCI. Inhibition of MMP-9/MMP-2 suppressed CCI-induced mechanical allodynia and concomitant TNF-α and IL-17A expression in nerves. MMP-9 proteolysis of myelin basic protein (MBP generated the MBP84-104 and MBP68-86 digest peptides, which are prominent immunogenic epitopes. In agreement, the endogenous MBP69-86 epitope co-localized with MHCII and MMP-9 in Schwann cells and along the nodes of Ranvier. Administration of either the MBP84-104 or MBP68-86 peptides into the naïve nerve rapidly produced robust mechanical allodynia with a concomitant increase in T cells and MHCII-reactive cell populations at the injection site. As shown by the genome-wide expression profiling, a single intraneural MBP84-104 injection stimulated the inflammatory, immune cell trafficking, and antigen presentation pathways in the injected naïve nerves and the associated spinal cords. Both MBP84-104-induced mechanical allodynia and characteristic pathway activation were remarkably less prominent in the T cell-deficient athymic nude rats. Conclusions These data implicate MBP as a novel mediator of pain. Furthermore, the action of MMPs expressed within 1

  5. Immunodominant fragments of myelin basic protein initiate T cell-dependent pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huaqing; Shiryaev, Sergey A; Chernov, Andrei V; Kim, Youngsoon; Shubayev, Igor; Remacle, Albert G; Baranovskaya, Svetlana; Golubkov, Vladislav S; Strongin, Alex Y; Shubayev, Veronica I

    2012-06-07

    The myelin sheath provides electrical insulation of mechanosensory Aβ-afferent fibers. Myelin-degrading matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) damage the myelin sheath. The resulting electrical instability of Aβ-fibers is believed to activate the nociceptive circuitry in Aβ-fibers and initiate pain from innocuous tactile stimulation (mechanical allodynia). The precise molecular mechanisms, responsible for the development of this neuropathic pain state after nerve injury (for example, chronic constriction injury, CCI), are not well understood. Using mass spectrometry of the whole sciatic nerve proteome followed by bioinformatics analyses, we determined that the pathways, which are classified as the Infectious Disease and T-helper cell signaling, are readily activated in the nerves post-CCI. Inhibition of MMP-9/MMP-2 suppressed CCI-induced mechanical allodynia and concomitant TNF-α and IL-17A expression in nerves. MMP-9 proteolysis of myelin basic protein (MBP) generated the MBP84-104 and MBP68-86 digest peptides, which are prominent immunogenic epitopes. In agreement, the endogenous MBP69-86 epitope co-localized with MHCII and MMP-9 in Schwann cells and along the nodes of Ranvier. Administration of either the MBP84-104 or MBP68-86 peptides into the naïve nerve rapidly produced robust mechanical allodynia with a concomitant increase in T cells and MHCII-reactive cell populations at the injection site. As shown by the genome-wide expression profiling, a single intraneural MBP84-104 injection stimulated the inflammatory, immune cell trafficking, and antigen presentation pathways in the injected naïve nerves and the associated spinal cords. Both MBP84-104-induced mechanical allodynia and characteristic pathway activation were remarkably less prominent in the T cell-deficient athymic nude rats. These data implicate MBP as a novel mediator of pain. Furthermore, the action of MMPs expressed within 1 day post-injury is critical to the generation of tactile allodynia

  6. Effects of cholinergic compounds on the axon-Schwann cell relationship in the squid nerve fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas, J

    1975-04-01

    The effects of acetylcholine, carbamylcholine, D-tubocurarine, eserine, and alpha-bungarotoxin on the Schwann cell electrical potential of resting and stimulated squid nerve fibers were studied. Acetylcholine (10-7 M) and barbamylcholine (10-6 M) induce a prolonged hyper polarization in the Schwann cells of the unstimulated nerve fiber. In the presence of carbamylcholine (10-6 M) the behavior of the Schwann cell membrane to changes in the external potassium concentration approximates the behavior of an ideal potassium electrode. D-Tubocurarine (10-9 M) blocks the hyperpolarizing effects of nerve impulse trains and carbamylcholine (10-6 M), whereas at the same concentration eserine prolongs the Schwann cell hyperpolarizations induced by axon stimulation or by acetylcholine (10-7 M). alpha-Bungarotoxin (10-9M) also blocks the hyperpolarizing effect of nerve impulse trains and of carbamylcholine. D-Tubocurarine (10-5M) protects the Schwann cells against the irreversible action of alpha-bungarotoxin. These results show the existence of acetylcholine receptors in the Schwann cell membrane. Preliminary measurements of the binding of 125I-alpha bungarotoxin to the plasma membranes isolated from squid nerves also indicate the presence of acetylcholine receptors. These findings support the involvement of cholinergic mechanisms in the axon-Schwann cell relationship previously described.

  7. Short-term low-frequency electrical stimulation enhanced remyelination of injured peripheral nerves by inducing the promyelination effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor on Schwann cell polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Lidan; Xia, Rong; Ding, Wenlong

    2010-09-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES) has been found to aid repair of nerve injuries and have been shown to increase and direct neurite outgrowth during stimulation. However, the effect of ES on peripheral remyelination after nerve damage has been investigated less well, and the mechanism underlying its action remains unclear. In the present study, the crush-injured sciatic nerves in rats were subjected to 1 hr of continuous ES (20 Hz, 100 microsec, 3 V). Electron microscopy and nerve morphometry were performed to investigate the extent of regenerated nerve myelination. The expression profiles of P0, Par-3, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the injuried sciatic nerves and in the dorsal root ganglion neuron/Schwann cell cocultures were examined by Western blotting. Par-3 localization in the sciatic nerves was determined by immunohistochemistry to demonstrate Schwann cell polarization during myelination. We reported that 20-Hz ES increased the number of myelinated fibers and the thickness myelin sheath at 4 and 8 weeks postinjury. P0 level in the ES-treated groups, both in vitro and in vivo, was enhanced compared with the controls. The earlier peak of Par-3 in the ES-treated groups indicated an earlier initiation of Schwann cell myelination. Additionally, ES significantly elevated BDNF expression in nerve tissues and in cocultures. ES on the site of nerve injury potentiates axonal regrowth and myelin maturation during peripheral nerve regeneration. Furthermore, the therapeutic actions of ES on myelination are mediated via enhanced BDNF signals, which drive the promyelination effect on Schwann cells at the onset of myelination.

  8. Transplantation of bone-marrow-derived cells into a nerve guide resulted in transdifferentiation into Schwann cells and effective regeneration of transected mouse sciatic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira Lopes, Fátima Rosalina; Frattini, Flávia; Marques, Suelen Adriani; Almeida, Fernanda Martins de; de Moura Campos, Lenira Camargo; Langone, Francesco; Lora, Silvano; Borojevic, Radovan; Martinez, Ana Maria Blanco

    2010-10-01

    Peripheral nerves possess the capacity of self-regeneration after traumatic injury. Nevertheless, the functional outcome after peripheral-nerve regeneration is often poor, especially if the nerve injuries occur far from their targets. Aiming to optimize axon regeneration, we grafted bone-marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) into a collagen-tube nerve guide after transection of the mouse sciatic nerve. The control group received only the culture medium. Motor function was tested at 2, 4, and 6 weeks after surgery, using the sciatic functional index (SFI), and showed that functional recovery was significantly improved in animals that received the cell grafts. After 6 weeks, the mice were anesthetized, perfused transcardially, and the sciatic nerves were dissected and processed for transmission electron microscopy and light microscopy. The proximal and distal segments of the nerves were compared, to address the question of improvement in growth rate; the results revealed a maintenance and increase of nerve regeneration for both myelinated and non-myelinated fibers in distal segments of the experimental group. Also, quantitative analysis of the distal region of the regenerating nerves showed that the numbers of myelinated fibers, Schwann cells (SCs) and g-ratio were significantly increased in the experimental group compared to the control group. The transdifferentiation of BMDCs into Schwann cells was confirmed by double labeling with S100/and Hoechst staining. Our data suggest that BMDCs transplanted into a nerve guide can differentiate into SCs, and improve the growth rate of nerve fibers and motor function in a transected sciatic-nerve model.

  9. Chronic migraine is associated with reduced corneal nerve fiber density and symptoms of dry eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinard, Krista I; Smith, A Gordon; Singleton, J Robinson; Lessard, Margaret K; Katz, Bradley J; Warner, Judith E A; Crum, Alison V; Mifflin, Mark D; Brennan, Kevin C; Digre, Kathleen B

    2015-04-01

    We used in vivo corneal confocal microscopy to investigate structural differences in the sub-basal corneal nerve plexus in chronic migraine patients and a normal population. We used a validated questionnaire and tests of lacrimal function to determine the prevalence of dry eye in the same group of chronic migraine patients. Activation of the trigeminal system is involved in migraine. Corneal nociceptive sensation is mediated by trigeminal axons that synapse in the gasserian ganglion and the brainstem, and serve nociceptive, protective, and trophic functions. Noninvasive imaging of the corneal sub-basal nerve plexus is possible with in vivo corneal confocal microscopy. For this case-control study, we recruited chronic migraine patients and compared them with a sex- and age-similar group of control subjects. Patients with peripheral neuropathy, a disease known to be associated with a peripheral neuropathy, or prior corneal or intraocular surgery were excluded. Participants underwent in vivo corneal confocal microscopy using a Heidelberg Retinal Tomography III confocal microscope with a Rostock Cornea Module. Nerve fiber length, nerve branch density, nerve fiber density, and tortuosity coefficient were measured using established methodologies. Migraine participants underwent testing of basal tear production with proparacaine, corneal sensitivity assessment with a cotton-tip applicator, measurement of tear break-up time, and completion of a validated dry eye questionnaire. A total of 19 chronic migraine patients and 30 control participants completed the study. There were no significant differences in age or sex. Nerve fiber density was significantly lower in migraine patients compared with controls (48.4 ± 23.5 vs. 71.0 ± 15.0 fibers/mm2 , P dry eye syndrome. We found that in the sample used in this study, the presence of structural changes in nociceptive corneal axons lends further support to the hypothesis that the trigeminal system plays a critical role

  10. Construction of nerve guide conduits from cellulose/soy protein composite membranes combined with Schwann cells and pyrroloquinoline quinone for the repair of peripheral nerve defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lihua; Gan, Li; Liu, Yongming; Tian, Weiqun; Tong, Zan; Wang, Xiong; Huselstein, Celine; Chen, Yun

    2015-02-20

    Regeneration and functional reconstruction of peripheral nerve defects remained a significant clinical challenge. Nerve guide conduits, with seed cells or neurotrophic factors (NTFs), had been widely used to improve the repair and regeneration of injured peripheral nerve. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) was an antioxidant that can stimulate nerve growth factors (NGFs) synthesis and accelerate the Schwann cells (SCs) proliferation and growth. In present study, three kinds of nerve guide conduits were constructed: one from cellulose/SPI hollow tube (CSC), another from CSC combined with SCs (CSSC), and the third one from CSSC combined with PQQ (CSSPC), respectively. And then they were applied to bridge and repair the sciatic nerve defect in rats, using autograft as control. Effects of different nerve guide conduits on the nerve regeneration were comparatively evaluated by general analysis, sciatic function index (SFI) and histological analysis (HE and TEM). Newly-formed regenerative nerve fibers were observed and running through the transparent nerve guide conduits 12 weeks after surgery. SFI results indicated that the reconstruction of motor function in CSSPC group was better than that in CSSC and CSC groups. HE images from the cross-sections and longitudinal-sections of the harvested regenerative nerve indicated that regenerative nerve fibers had been formed and accompanied with new blood vessels and matrix materials in the conduits. TEM images also showed that lots of fresh myelinated and non-myelinated nerve fibers had been formed. Parts of vacuolar, swollen and abnormal axons occurred in CSC and CSSC groups, while the vacuolization and swell of axons was the least serious in CSSPC group. These results indicated that CSSPC group had the most ability to repair and reconstruct the nerve structure and functions due to the comprehensive contributions from hollow CSC tube, SCs and PQQ. As a result, the CSSPC may have the potential for the applications as nerve guide

  11. CAPSAICIN-SENSITIVE SENSORY NERVE FIBERS CONTRIBUTE TO THE GENERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF SKELETAL FRACTURE PAIN

    OpenAIRE

    Jimenez-Andrade, Juan Miguel; Bloom, Aaron P.; Mantyh, William G.; Koewler, Nathan J.; Freeman, Katie T.; Delong, David; Ghilardi, Joseph R.; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2009-01-01

    Although skeletal pain can have a marked impact on a patient’s functional status and quality of life, relatively little is known about the specific populations of peripheral nerve fibers that drive non-malignant bone pain. In the present report, neonatal male Sprague Dawley rats were treated with capsaicin or vehicle and femoral fracture was produced when the animals were young adults (15–16 weeks old). Capsaicin treatment, but not vehicle, resulted in a significant (>70%) depletion in the de...

  12. Normal axonal ion channel function in large peripheral nerve fibers following chronic ciguatera sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vucic, Steve; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2008-03-01

    Although the acute clinical effects of ciguatera poisoning, due to ingestion of ciguatoxin, are mediated by activation of transient Na+ channels, the mechanisms underlying ciguatera sensitization remain undefined. Axonal excitability studies were performed by stimulating the median motor and sensory nerves in two patients with ciguatera sensitization. Excitability parameters were all within normal limits, thereby arguing against dysfunction of axonal membrane ion channels in large-diameter fibers in ciguatera sensitization.

  13. Scanning laser polarimetry retinal nerve fiber layer thickness measurements after LASIK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangwill, Linda M; Abunto, Teresa; Bowd, Christopher; Angeles, Raymund; Schanzlin, David J; Weinreb, Robert N

    2005-02-01

    To compare retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measurements before and after LASIK. Cohort study. Twenty participants undergoing LASIK and 14 normal controls. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness was measured before LASIK and approximately 3 months after surgery in one eye each of 20 patients using a scanning laser polarimeter (GDx Nerve Fiber Analyzer) with fixed corneal compensation (FCC), one with variable corneal compensation (GDx VCC), and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Fourteen normal controls also were tested at baseline and approximately 3 months later. Retinal nerve fiber layer thicknesses measured with the GDx FCC, GDx VCC, and OCT. At baseline, mean (95% confidence interval [CI]) RNFL thicknesses for the GDx FCC, GDx VCC, and OCT were 78.1 microm (72.2-83.9), 54.3 microm (52.7-56.0), and 96.8 microm (93.2-100.5), respectively. In both LASIK and control groups, there were no significant changes between baseline and follow-up examinations in GDx VCC and OCT RNFL thickness measurements globally or in the superior and inferior quadrants (mean change, FCC measurements between baseline and follow-up. In LASIK patients, significant reductions were observed in GDx FCC RNFL measurements. Average absolute values of the mean (95% CI) change in thickness were 12.4 microm (7.7-17.2), 15.3 microm (9.6-20.9), and 12.9 microm (7.6-18.1) for GDx FCC RNFL measurements superiorly, inferiorly, and globally, respectively (all Ps FCC RNFL thickness measurements after LASIK is a measurement artifact and is most likely due to erroneous compensation for corneal birefringence. With scanning laser polarimetry, it is mandatory to compensate individually for change in corneal birefringence after LASIK to ensure accurate RNFL assessment.

  14. Morphometric analysis of the fiber populations of the rat sciatic nerve, its spinal roots, and its major branches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prodanov, D.P.; Feierabend, H.K.P.

    2007-01-01

    Correspondence between the nerve composition and the functional characteristics of its fiber populations is not always evident. To investigate such correspondence and to give a systematic picture of the morphology of the rat hind limb nerves, extensive morphometric study was performed on the sciatic

  15. A simple method for fabrication of electrospun fibers with controlled degree of alignment having potential for nerve regeneration applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vimal, Sunil Kumar; Ahamad, Nadim; Katti, Dhirendra S., E-mail: dsk@iitk.ac.in

    2016-06-01

    In peripheral nerve injuries where direct suturing of nerve endings is not feasible, nerve regeneration has been facilitated through the use of artificially aligned fibrous scaffolds that provide directional growth of neurons to bridge the gap. The degree of fiber alignment is crucial and can impact the directionality of cells in a fibrous scaffold. While there have been multiple approaches that have been used for controlling fiber alignment, however, they have been associated with a compromised control on other properties, such as diameter, morphology, curvature, and topology of fibers. Therefore, the present study demonstrates a modified electrospinning set-up, that enabled fabrication of electrospun fibers with controlled degree of alignment from non-aligned (NA), moderately aligned (MA, 75%) to highly aligned (HA, 95%) sub-micron fibers while keeping other physical properties unchanged. The results demonstrate that the aligned fibers (MA and HA) facilitated directional growth of human astrocytoma cells (U373), wherein the aspect ratio of cells was found to increase with an increase in degree of fibers alignment. In contrast to NA and MA fibers, the HA fibers showed improved contact guidance to U373 cells that was demonstrated by a significantly higher cell aspect ratio and nuclear aspect ratio. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated a modified electrospinning setup to fabricate differentially aligned fibrous scaffolds with the HA fibers showing potential for use in neural tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Modified electrospinning set-up for fabrication of fibers with controlled alignment • Three parameter-based control on the degree of alignment of fibers • The aligned fibers enhanced cell elongation and cell-cell contact. • The aligned fibers show potential for use in nerve regeneration.

  16. Myelination competent conditionally immortalized mouse Schwann cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saavedra, José T.; Wolterman, Ruud A.; Baas, Frank; ten Asbroek, Anneloor L. M. A.

    2008-01-01

    Numerous mouse myelin mutants are available to analyze the biology of the peripheral nervous system related to health and disease in vivo. However, robust in vitro biochemical characterizations of players in peripheral nerve processes are still not possible due to the limited growth capacities of

  17. Renal hemodynamic effects of activation of specific renal sympathetic nerve fiber groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBona, G F; Sawin, L L

    1999-02-01

    To examine the effect of activation of a unique population of renal sympathetic nerve fibers on renal blood flow (RBF) dynamics, anesthetized rats were instrumented with a renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) recording electrode and an electromagnetic flow probe on the ipsilateral renal artery. Peripheral thermal receptor stimulation (external heat) was used to activate a unique population of renal sympathetic nerve fibers and to increase total RSNA. Total RSNA was reflexly increased to the same degree with somatic receptor stimulation (tail compression). Arterial pressure and heart rate were increased by both stimuli. Total RSNA was increased to the same degree by both stimuli but external heat produced a greater renal vasoconstrictor response than tail compression. Whereas both stimuli increased spectral density power of RSNA at both cardiac and respiratory frequencies, modulation of RBF variability by fluctuations of RSNA was small at these frequencies, with values for the normalized transfer gain being approximately 0.1 at >0.5 Hz. During tail compression coherent oscillations of RSNA and RBF were found at 0.3-0.4 Hz with normalized transfer gain of 0.33 +/- 0.02. During external heat coherent oscillations of RSNA and RBF were found at both 0.2 and 0.3-0.4 Hz with normalized transfer gains of 0. 63 +/- 0.05 at 0.2 Hz and 0.53 +/- 0.04 to 0.36 +/- 0.02 at 0.3-0.4 Hz. Renal denervation eliminated the oscillations in RBF at both 0.2 and 0.3-0.4 Hz. These findings indicate that despite similar increases in total RSNA, external heat results in a greater renal vasoconstrictor response than tail compression due to the activation of a unique population of renal sympathetic nerve fibers with different frequency-response characteristics of the renal vasculature.

  18. [Morphology research of the rat sciatic nerve bridged by collage-heparin sulfate scaffold].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-sen; Hu, Yun-yu; Luo, Zhuo-jing; Chen, Liang-wei; Liu, Hui-ling; Meng, Guo-lin; Lü, Rong; Xu, Xin-zhi

    2005-04-15

    To observe the treating effect of collage-heparin sulfate after the 10 mm rat sciatic nerve defect was bridged by it. A new kind of nervous tissue engineering scaffold was produced by freeze-drying technique from collagen-heparin sulfate. Thirty-two SD rats were randomly divided into A, B, C and D groups. Sciatic nerve defect in group A was bridged by collagen-heparin sulfate. In group B, sciatic nerve was bridged by auto-nerve transplantation. Group C was the blank control group. Animals in group D were normal. And 10 mm sciatic nerve defect was bridged in the experiment. Thirty-six weeks after the operation, the experimental animals were detected by HRP labeled retrograde trace, HE staining, toluidine staining, silvering staining, S100, GAP-43 and NF immunohistological staining, MBP immunofluorescence staining and transmission electron microscope to observe the nerve regeneration inducing effect of this new scaffold. Nine months after operation, the collage-heparin sulfate scaffold was replaced by newly regenerated nerve. The number of HRP labeled spinal cord anterior horn cells and the area of sensation nerve fiber at the posterior horn were similar with that was repaired by auto-nerve. GAP-43, NF and S100 labeled regenerated nerve fiber had passed the total scaffold and entered the distal terminal. The regenerated nerve fibers were paralleled, lineage arranged, coincide with the prearranged regenerating "channel" in the collagen-heparin sulfate scaffold. MBP immunofluorescence staining also proved that the newly regenerated nerve fiber could be ensheathed. In the experimental group, the area of myelinated nerve fiber and the thickness of the myelin sheath had no obvious difference with that of the group repaired by auto-nerve, except that the density of the regenerated myelinated sheath fiber was lower than that of the control group. Nervous tissue engineering scaffold produced by collagen-heparin sulfate can guide the regeneration of nerve fibers. The nerve

  19. Survey of Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness in Anisometropic and Strabismic Amblyopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Soltani Moghaddam

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available . To investigate the effect of anisometropic and strabismic amblyopia on the nerve fiber layer thickness. This cross-sectional study was done on 54 amblyopic subjects, equally in both strabismic and anisometropic groups. The thickness otonerve fiber layer measured in superior, inferior, nasal, temporal quadrants and as a whole in both eyes of both groups. The means of thickness were compared in amblyopic and sound eyes. In strabismus group, the average nerve fiber layer thickness of the sound eye , in superior, inferior, nasal and temporal quadrants and as a whole were 113.23±14, 117.37±25, 68.96±6, 69.55±14 and 93.40±8 microns respectively. In amblyopic eyes of the same group, these measurements were 103.11±18, 67.74±11, and 69.59±16 and 89.59±12 microns in superior, inferior, nasal, temporal quadrants and as whole respectively. In anisometropic groups, the sound eye measurements were as 130.96±22, 129.07±29, 80.62±12, and 83.88±20 and 107.7±13 microns in superior, inferior, nasal and temporal quadrants and as a whole orderly. In amblyopic eyes of this group the mean thicknesses were 115.63±29, 133.15±25, 78.8±15, 80.2±16 and 109.17±21 microns in superior, inferior, nasal, temporal quadrants and as a whole respectively. Statistically, there were no significant differences between amblyopic and sound eyes (P>0.5. Our study did not support any significant change in a nerve fiber layer thickness of amblyopic patients; however, decreased thickness in superior and nasal quadrants of strabismic amblyopia and except inferior quadrant and as a whole. These measurements may be a clue for management and prognosis of amblyopia in old age.

  20. NERVE EXCITABILITY CHANGES AFTER NA(V)1.8 CHANNEL BLOCKER TREATMENT IN MICE DEFICIENT OF MYELIN PROTEIN P-0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldovan, M.; Rosberg, M. R.; Alvarez Herrero, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Mice deficient of myelin protein zero (P0) are established models of demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. Recent work form our laboratory indicated that in severely affected P0−/− as well as in P0+/− (modeling CMT1B), the neuropathy is aggravated by associated changes in voltage...... function up to 2 hours after the blockers. Overall, the baseline excitability measures were much more abnormal in P0−/− at 4 months as compared to P0+/− at 20 months. Nevertheless, in both models, the NaV1.8 blockers produced similar deviations in excitability at a dose of 100 mg/Kg. Most notably...

  1. Pulp nerve fibers distribution of human carious teeth: An immunohistochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetiana Haniastuti

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Human dental pulp is richly innervated by trigeminal afferent axons that subserve nociceptive function. Accordingly, they respond to stimuli that induce injury to the pulp tissue. An injury to the nerve terminals and other tissue components in the pulp stimulate metabolic activation of the neurons in the trigeminal ganglion which result in morphological changes in the peripheral nerve terminals. Purpose: The aim of the study was to observe caries-related changes in the distribution of human pulpal nerve. Methods: Under informed consents, 15 third molars with caries at various stages of decay and 5 intact third molars were extracted because of orthodontic or therapeutic reasons. All samples were observed by micro-computed tomography to confirm the lesion condition 3-dimensionally, before decalcifying with 10% EDTA solution (pH 7.4. The specimens were then processed for immunohistochemistry using anti-protein gene products (PGP 9.5, a specific marker for the nerve fiber. Results: In normal intact teeth, PGP 9.5 immunoreactive nerve fibers were seen concentrated beneath the odontoblast cell layer. Nerve fibers exhibited an increased density along the pulp-dentin border corresponding to the carious lesions. Conclusion: Neural density increases throughout the pulp chamber with the progression of caries. The activity and pathogenicity of the lesion as well as caries depth, might influence the degree of neural sprouting.Latar belakang: Pulpa gigi manusia diinervasi oleh serabut saraf trigeminal yang berespon terhadap stimuli penyebab perlukaan dengan menimbulkan rasa sakit. Perlukaan pada akhiran saraf dan komponen lain dari pulpa akan menstimulasi aktivasi metabolik dari neuron pada ganglion trigeminal sehingga mengakibatkan perubahan morfologi pada akhiran saraf perifer. Tujuan: Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengamati perubahan distribusi saraf pada pulpa gigi manusia yang disebabkan oleh proses karies. Metode: Penelitian ini menggunakan

  2. Topiramate improves neurovascular function, epidermal nerve fiber morphology, and metabolism in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyd A

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Amanda L Boyd, Patricia M Barlow, Gary L Pittenger, Kathryn F Simmons, Aaron I VinikDepartment of Internal Medicine, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, VA, USAPurpose: To assess the effects of topiramate on C-fiber function, nerve fiber morphology, and metabolism (including insulin sensitivity, obesity, and dyslipidemia in type 2 diabetes.Patients and methods: We conducted an 18-week, open-label trial treating patients with topiramate. Twenty subjects with type 2 diabetes and neuropathy (61.5 ± 1.29 years; 15 male, 5 female were enrolled and completed the trial. Neuropathy was evaluated by total neuropathy scores, nerve conduction studies, quantitative sensory tests, laser Doppler skin blood flow, and intraepidermal nerve fibers in skin biopsies.Results: Topiramate treatment improved symptoms compatible with C-fiber dysfunction. Weight, blood pressure, and hemoglobin A1c also improved. Laser Doppler skin blood flow improved significantly after 12 weeks of treatment, but returned to baseline at 18 weeks. After 18 weeks of treatment there was a significant increase in intraepidermal nerve fiber length at the forearm, thigh, and proximal leg. Intraepidermal nerve fiber density was significantly increased by topiramate in the proximal leg.Conclusion: This study is the first to demonstrate that it is possible to induce skin intraepidermal nerve fiber regeneration accompanied by enhancement of neurovascular function, translating into improved symptoms as well as sensory nerve function. The simultaneous improvement of selective metabolic indices may play a role in this effect, but this remains to be determined.Keywords: diabetic neuropathy, skin blood flow, skin biopsy, diabetes

  3. Effect of duration and severity of migraine on retinal nerve fiber layer, ganglion cell layer, and choroidal thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellatif, Mona K; Fouad, Mohamed M

    2018-03-01

    To investigate the factors in migraine that have the highest significance on retinal and choroidal layers' thickness. Ninety patients with migraine and 40 age-matched healthy participants were enrolled in this observational, cross-sectional study. After full ophthalmological examination, spectral domain-optical coherence tomography was done for all patients measuring the thickness of ganglion cell layer and retinal nerve fiber layer. Enhanced depth imaging technique was used to measure the choroidal thickness. There was significant thinning in the superior and inferior ganglion cell layers, all retinal nerve fiber layer quadrants, and all choroidal quadrants (except for the central subfield) in migraineurs compared to controls. The duration of migraine was significantly correlated with ganglion cell layer, retinal nerve fiber layer, and all choroidal quadrants, while the severity of migraine was significantly correlated with ganglion cell layer and retinal nerve fiber layer only. Multiregression analysis showed that the duration of migraine is the most important determinant factor of the superior retinal nerve fiber layer quadrant (β = -0.375, p = 0.001) and in all the choroidal quadrants (β = -0.531, -0.692, -0.503, -0.461, -0.564, respectively, p  layer quadrants (β = -0.256, -0.335, -0.308; p  = 0.036, 0.005, 0.009, respectively) and the inferior ganglion cell layer hemisphere (β = -0.377 and p = 0.001). Ganglion cell layer, retinal nerve fiber layer, and choroidal thickness are significantly thinner in patients with migraine. The severity of migraine has more significant influence in the thinning of ganglion cell layer and retinal nerve fiber layer, while the duration of the disease affected the choroidal thickness more.

  4. Chronic cuffing of cervical vagus nerve inhibits efferent fiber integrity in rat model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somann, Jesse P.; Albors, Gabriel O.; Neihouser, Kaitlyn V.; Lu, Kun-Han; Liu, Zhongming; Ward, Matthew P.; Durkes, Abigail; Robinson, J. Paul; Powley, Terry L.; Irazoqui, Pedro P.

    2018-06-01

    Objective. Numerous studies of vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) have been published showing it to be a potential treatment for chronic inflammation and other related diseases and disorders. Studies in recent years have shown that electrical stimulation of the vagal efferent fibers can artificially modulate cytokine levels and reduce systematic inflammation. Most VNS research in the treatment of inflammation have been acute studies on rodent subjects. Our study tested VNS on freely moving animals by stimulating and recording from the cervical vagus with nerve cuff electrodes over an extended period of time. Approach. We used methods of electrical stimulation, retrograde tracing (using Fluorogold) and post necropsy histological analysis of nerve tissue, flow cytometry to measure plasma cytokine levels, and MRI scanning of gastric emptying. This novel combination of methods allowed examination of physiological aspects of VNS previously unexplored. Main results. Through our study of 53 rat subjects, we found that chronically cuffing the left cervical vagus nerve suppressed efferent Fluorogold transport in 43 of 44 animals (36 showed complete suppression). Measured cytokine levels and gastric emptying rates concurrently showed nominal differences between chronically cuffed rats and those tested with similar acute methods. Meanwhile, results of electrophysiological and histological tests of the cuffed nerves revealed them to be otherwise healthy, consistent with previous literature. Significance. We hypothesize that due to these unforeseen and unexplored physiological consequences of the chronically cuffed vagus nerve in a rat, that inflammatory modulation and other vagal effects by VNS may become unreliable in chronic studies. Given our findings, we submit that it would benefit the VNS community to re-examine methods used in previous literature to verify the efficacy of the rat model for chronic VNS studies.

  5. Networks of myelin covariance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melie-Garcia, Lester; Slater, David; Ruef, Anne; Sanabria-Diaz, Gretel; Preisig, Martin; Kherif, Ferath; Draganski, Bogdan; Lutti, Antoine

    2018-04-01

    Networks of anatomical covariance have been widely used to study connectivity patterns in both normal and pathological brains based on the concurrent changes of morphometric measures (i.e., cortical thickness) between brain structures across subjects (Evans, ). However, the existence of networks of microstructural changes within brain tissue has been largely unexplored so far. In this article, we studied in vivo the concurrent myelination processes among brain anatomical structures that gathered together emerge to form nonrandom networks. We name these "networks of myelin covariance" (Myelin-Nets). The Myelin-Nets were built from quantitative Magnetization Transfer data-an in-vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) marker of myelin content. The synchronicity of the variations in myelin content between anatomical regions was measured by computing the Pearson's correlation coefficient. We were especially interested in elucidating the effect of age on the topological organization of the Myelin-Nets. We therefore selected two age groups: Young-Age (20-31 years old) and Old-Age (60-71 years old) and a pool of participants from 48 to 87 years old for a Myelin-Nets aging trajectory study. We found that the topological organization of the Myelin-Nets is strongly shaped by aging processes. The global myelin correlation strength, between homologous regions and locally in different brain lobes, showed a significant dependence on age. Interestingly, we also showed that the aging process modulates the resilience of the Myelin-Nets to damage of principal network structures. In summary, this work sheds light on the organizational principles driving myelination and myelin degeneration in brain gray matter and how such patterns are modulated by aging. © 2017 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Expression patterns and role of PTEN in rat peripheral nerve development and injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Xiang, Jianping; Wu, Junxia; He, Bo; Lin, Tao; Zhu, Qingtang; Liu, Xiaolin; Zheng, Canbin

    2018-05-29

    Studies have suggested that phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) plays an important role in neuroprotection and neuronal regeneration. To better understand the potential role of PTEN with respect to peripheral nerve development and injury, we investigated the expression pattern of PTEN at different stages of rat peripheral nerve development and injury and subsequently assessed the effect of pharmacological inhibition of PTEN using bpV(pic) on axonal regeneration in a rat sciatic nerve crush injury model. During the early stages of development, PTEN exhibits low expression in neuronal cell bodies and axons. From embryonic day (E) 18.5 and postnatal day (P)5 to adult, PTEN protein becomes more detectable, with high expression in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and axons. PTEN expression is inhibited in peripheral nerves, preceding myelination during neuronal development and remyelination after acute nerve injury. Low PTEN expression after nerve injury promotes Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway activity. In vivo pharmacological inhibition of PTEN using bpV(pic) promoted axonal regrowth, increased the number of myelinated nerve fibers, improved locomotive recovery and enhanced the amplitude response and nerve conduction velocity following stimulation in a rat sciatic nerve crush injury model. Thus, we suggest that PTEN may play potential roles in peripheral nerve development and regeneration and that inhibition of PTEN expression is beneficial for nerve regeneration and functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Structure-function relationships with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography retinal nerve fiber layer and optic nerve head measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollet-Villard, Frédéric; Chiquet, Christophe; Romanet, Jean-Paul; Noel, Christian; Aptel, Florent

    2014-05-02

    To evaluate the regional structure-function relationship between visual field sensitivity and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness and optic nerve head (ONH) measurements using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Prospective cross-sectional study conducted on patients with glaucoma, suspected glaucoma, and healthy subjects. Eyes were tested on Cirrus OCT and standard achromatic perimetry. RNFL thickness of 12 peripapillary 30° sectors, neuroretinal rim thickness extracted from 36 neuroretinal rim scans, and Bruch membrane opening minimum rim width (BMO-MRW)-a recently defined parameter-extracted from 36 neuroretinal rim scans were obtained. Correlations between peripapillary RNFL thickness, neuroretinal rim thickness, all six sectors of BMO-MRW, and visual field sensitivity in the six corresponding areas were evaluated using logarithmic regression analysis. Receiver operating curve areas were calculated for each RNFL, ONH, and macular ganglion cell analysis parameter. We included 142 eyes of 142 subjects. The correlations (r(2)) between RNFL thickness, Cirrus-based neuroretinal rim thickness, BMO-MRW and visual field sensitivity ranged from 0.07 to 0.60, 0.15 to 0.49, and 0.24 to 0.66, respectively. The structure-function correlations were stronger with BMO-MRW than with Cirrus-based neuroretinal rim thickness. The largest areas under the receiver operating curve were seen for rim area (0.926 [95% confidence interval 0.875, 0.977]; P function relationship was significantly stronger with BMO-MRW than other ONH SD-OCT parameters. The best diagnostic capabilities were seen with rim area and average RNFL.

  8. Optical Coherence Tomography in Optic Nerve Hypoplasia: Correlation With Optic Disc Diameter, Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness, and Visual Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, John P; Baran, Francine; Phillips, James O; Weiss, Avery H

    2017-12-15

    The correlation between optic disc diameters (DDs) with average retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) and visual function in children with optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) having nystagmus is unknown. Data were obtained from a retrospective review of 28 children (mean age: 9.4 years; ±5.1). Optic DD was defined as the maximal horizontal opening of Bruch membrane with spectral optical coherence tomography combined with a confocal laser ophthalmoscope. Average RNFLT was obtained from circumpapillary b-scans. RNFLT was also remeasured at eccentricities that were proportionate with DD to rule out potential sampling artifacts. Visual function was assessed by visual acuity at last follow-up and by visual evoked potentials (VEP) in 11 patients. The eye with the larger DD, which had better visual acuity, was analyzed to exclude potential effects of amblyopia. DD was correlated with average RNFLT (r = 0.61), visual acuity (r = 0.32), and VEPs (r = 0.66). The relationship between RNFLT and DD was as follows: average RNFLT (μm) = 0.074 * DD (μm) - 18.8. RNFLT also correlated with the ratio of horizontal optic DD to macula-disc-margin distance (DD:DM; r = 0.59). RNFLT measured at eccentricities proportionate with DD showed progressive decrease in thickness only for DDs <1,100 μm. All patients with DD <1,000 μm had subnormal visual acuity, whereas those with DD <1,200 μm had subnormal VEPs. DD correlates with average RNFLT and with visual function in children with ONH. Using OCT imaging, DD can be obtained in children with nystagmus and provides objective information.

  9. Peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer and optic nerve head characteristics in eyes with situs inversus of the optic disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sunah; Jin, Sunyoung; Roh, Kyu Hwa; Hwang, Young Hoon

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and optic nerve head (ONH) characteristics, as determined using a spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT), in eyes with situs inversus of the optic disc. The peripapillary RNFL and the ONH were assessed in 12 eyes belonging to 6 subjects with situs inversus of the optic disc (situs inversus group) and 24 eyes in 12 age-matched, sex-matched, and refractive error-matched healthy subjects (control group) by using OCT. The average, quadrant, and clock-hour RNFL thicknesses (clock-hour 9 on the scan represented the temporal side of the optic disc in both eyes), the superior/inferior RNFL peak locations, and ONH characteristics such as disc area, rim area, cup-to-disc ratio, vertical cup-to-disc ratio, and cup volume were obtained. The differences in RNFL and ONH characteristics between the 2 groups were analyzed. The situs inversus group had a thicker RNFL in the clock-hour sectors 3 and 4, a thinner RNFL in the clock-hour sectors 7, 8, and 11, and more nasally located superior and inferior RNFL peak locations than the control group (P≤0.001). The situs inversus group had a smaller cup-to-disc area ratio, smaller vertical cup-to-disc ratio, and a lesser cup volume than the control group (Poptic disc showed different peripapillary RNFL and ONH characteristics from those without this abnormality. These findings should be considered when assessing eyes with situs inversus of the optic disc.

  10. Somatic modulation of spinal reflex bladder activity mediated by nociceptive bladder afferent nerve fibers in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhiying; Rogers, Marc J; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Schwen, Zeyad; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2014-09-15

    The goal of the present study was to determine if supraspinal pathways are necessary for inhibition of bladder reflex activity induced by activation of somatic afferents in the pudendal or tibial nerve. Cats anesthetized with α-chloralose were studied after acute spinal cord transection at the thoracic T9/T10 level. Dilute (0.25%) acetic acid was used to irritate the bladder, activate nociceptive afferent C-fibers, and trigger spinal reflex bladder contractions (amplitude: 19.3 ± 2.9 cmH2O). Hexamethonium (a ganglionic blocker, intravenously) significantly (P reflex bladder contractions to 8.5 ± 1.9 cmH2O. Injection of lidocaine (2%, 1-2 ml) into the sacral spinal cord or transection of the sacral spinal roots and spinal cord further reduced the contraction amplitude to 4.2 ± 1.3 cmH2O. Pudendal nerve stimulation (PNS) at frequencies of 0.5-5 Hz and 40 Hz but not at 10-20 Hz inhibited reflex bladder contractions, whereas tibial nerve stimulation (TNS) failed to inhibit bladder contractions at all tested frequencies (0.5-40 Hz). These results indicate that PNS inhibition of nociceptive afferent C-fiber-mediated spinal reflex bladder contractions can occur at the spinal level in the absence of supraspinal pathways, but TNS inhibition requires supraspinal pathways. In addition, this study shows, for the first time, that after acute spinal cord transection reflex bladder contractions can be triggered by activating nociceptive bladder afferent C-fibers using acetic acid irritation. Understanding the sites of action for PNS or TNS inhibition is important for the clinical application of pudendal or tibial neuromodulation to treat bladder dysfunctions. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  11. A pilot study to evaluate the clinical relevance of endometriosis-associated nerve fibers in peritoneal endometriotic lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechsner, Sylvia; Kaiser, Andrea; Kopf, Andreas; Gericke, Christine; Ebert, Andreas; Bartley, Julia

    2009-12-01

    To investigate the clinical relevance of endometriosis-associated nerve fibers in the development of endometriosis-associated symptoms. Prospective nonrandomized study. University hospital endometriosis center. Fifty-one premenopausal patients underwent surgical laparoscopy because of chronic pelvic pain, dysmenorrhea, or for ovarian cysts. Endometriosis was diagnosed in 44 patients. The preoperative and postoperative pain scores were determined using a standardized questionnaire with a visual analogue scale from 1-10. Patients with peritoneal endometriosis were divided into two groups depending on their preoperative pain score: group A with a pain score of at least 3 or more and group B with a pain score of 2 or less. Patients without peritoneal endometriosis were classified as group C and patients without endometriosis were classified as group D. Immunohistochemical analysis of neurofilament and protein gene product 9.5 were used for nerve fiber detection. Occurrence of endometriosis-associated nerve fibers was correlated with the severity of pelvic pain and/or dysmenorrhea. Peritoneal endometriosis-associated nerve fibers were found significantly more frequently in group A than in group B (82.6% vs. 33.3%). The present study suggests that the presence of endometriosis-associated nerve fibers in the peritoneum is important for the development of endometriosis-associated pelvic pain and dysmenorrhea.

  12. MR tractography; Visualization of structure of nerve fiber system from diffusion weighted images with maximum intensity projection method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinosada, Yasutomi; Okuda, Yasuyuki (Mie Univ., Tsu (Japan). School of Medicine); Ono, Mototsugu (and others)

    1993-02-01

    We developed a new noninvasive technique to visualize the anatomical structure of the nerve fiber system in vivo, and named this technique magnetic resonance (MR) tractography and the acquired image an MR tractogram. MR tractography has two steps. One is to obtain diffusion-weighted images sensitized along axes appropriate for depicting the intended nerve fibers with anisotropic water diffusion MR imaging. The other is to extract the anatomical structure of the nerve fiber system from a series of diffusion-weighted images by the maximum intensity projection method. To examine the clinical usefulness of the proposed technique, many contiguous, thin (3 mm) coronal two-dimensional sections of the brain were acquired sequentially in normal volunteers and selected patients with paralyses, on a 1.5 Tesla MR system (Signa, GE) with an ECG-gated Stejskal-Tanner pulse sequence. The structure of the nerve fiber system of normal volunteers was almost the same as the anatomy. The tractograms of patients with paralyses clearly showed the degeneration of nerve fibers and were correlated with clinical symptoms. MR tractography showed great promise for the study of neuroanatomy and neuroradiology. (author).

  13. Clinical analysis of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and macular fovea in hyperopia children with anisometropia amblyopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei-Fei Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To analyze the clinical significance of axial length, diopter and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in hyperopia children with anisometropia amblyopia. METHODS: From January 2015 to January 2017 in our hospital for treatment, 103 cases, all unilateral, were diagnosed as hyperopia anisometropia amblyopia. The eyes with amblyopia were as experimental group(103 eyes, another normal eye as control group(103 eyes. We took the detection with axial length, refraction, foveal thickness, corrected visual acuity, diopter and the average thickness of retinal nerve fiber layer. RESULTS: Differences in axial length and diopter and corrected visual acuity were statistically significant between the two groups(PP>0.05. There was statistical significance difference on the foveal thickness(PP>0.05. The positive correlation between diopter with nerve fiber layer thickness of foveal and around the optic disc were no statistically significant difference(P>0.05. CONCLUSION: Retinal thickness of the fovea in the eye with hyperopic anisometropia amblyopia were thicker than those in normal eyes; the nerve fiber layer of around the optic disc was not significantly different between the amblyopic eyes and contralateral eyes. The refraction and axial length had no significant correlation with optic nerve fiber layer and macular foveal thickness.

  14. No change in total length of white matter fibers in Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, A.M.; Marner, L.; Pakkenberg, B.

    2008-01-01

    White matter changes have been reported as part of Alzheimer dementia. To investigate this, the total subcortical myelinated nerve fiber length was estimated in postmortem brains from eight females (age 79-88 years) with severe Alzheimer's disease (AD) and compared with brains from 10 female...

  15. [Progression of nerve fiber layer defects in retrobulbar optic neuritis by the macular ganglion cell complex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, D; Bosc, C; Chiambaretta, F

    2017-11-01

    Recent studies with SD OCT had shown early axonal damage to the macular ganglion cell complex (which consists of the three innermost layers of the retina: Inner Plexiform Layer [IPL], Ganglion Cell Layer [GCL], Retinal Nerve Fibre layer [RNFL]) in optic nerve pathology. Retrobulbar optic neuritis (RBON), occurring frequently in demyelinating diseases, leads to atrophy of the optic nerve fibers at the level of the ganglion cell axons, previously described in the literature. The goal of this study is to evaluate the progression of optic nerve fiber defects and macular ganglion cell complex defects with the SPECTRALIS OCT via a reproducible method by calculating a mean thickness in each quadrant after an episode of retrobulbar optic neuritis. This is a prospective monocentric observational study including 8 patients at the Clermont-Ferrand university medical center. All patients underwent ocular examination with macular and disc OCT analysis and a Goldmann visual field at the time of inclusion (onset or recurrence of RBON), at 3 months and at 6 months. Patients were 40-years-old on average at the time of inclusion. After 6 months of follow-up, there was progression of the atrophy of the macular ganglion cell complex in the affected eye on (11.5% or 11μm) predominantly inferonasally (13.9% or 16μm) and superonasally (12.9% or 14μm) while the other eye remained stable. The decrease in thickness occurred mainly in the most internal 3 layers of the retina. On average, the loss in thickness of the peripapillary RNFL was predominantly inferotemporal (24.9% or 39μm) and superotemporal (21.8% or 28μm). In 3 months of progression, the loss of optic nerve fibers is already seen on macular and disc OCT after an episode of RBON, especially in inferior quadrants in spite of the improvement in the Goldmann visual field and visual acuity. Segmentation by quadrant was used here to compare the progression of the defect by region compared to the fovea in a global and reproducible

  16. Optic Nerve Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Us Donate In This Section Optic Nerve Imaging email Send this article to a friend ... measurements of nerve fiber damage (or loss). The Nerve Fiber Analyzer (GDx) uses laser light to measure ...

  17. Morphometric analysis of the phrenic nerve in male and female Wistar-Kyoto (WKY and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Rodrigues

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Ventilatory differences between rat strains and genders have been described but the morphology of the phrenic nerve has not been investigated in spontaneously hypertensive (SHR and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY rats. A descriptive and morphometric study of the phrenic nerves of male (N = 8 and female (N = 9 SHR, and male (N = 5 and female (N = 6 WKY is presented. After arterial pressure and heart rate recordings, the phrenic nerves of 20-week-old animals were prepared for epoxy resin embedding and light microscopy. Morphometric analysis performed with the aid of computer software that took into consideration the fascicle area and diameter, as well as myelinated fiber profile and Schwann cell nucleus number per area. Phrenic nerves were generally larger in males than in females on both strains but larger in WKY compared to SHR for both genders. Myelinated fiber numbers (male SHR = 228 ± 13; female SHR = 258 ± 4; male WKY = 382 ± 23; female WKY = 442 ± 11 for proximal right segments and density (N/mm²; male SHR = 7048 ± 537; female SHR = 10355 ± 359; male WKY = 9457 ± 1437; female WKY = 14351 ± 1448 for proximal right segments were significantly larger in females of both groups and remarkably larger in WKY than SHR for both genders. Strain and gender differences in phrenic nerve myelinated fiber number are described for the first time in this experimental model of hypertension, indicating the need for thorough functional studies of this nerve in male and female SHR.

  18. Development and evaluation of spatial point process models for epidermal nerve fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsbo, Viktor; Myllymäki, Mari; Waller, Lance A; Särkkä, Aila

    2013-06-01

    We propose two spatial point process models for the spatial structure of epidermal nerve fibers (ENFs) across human skin. The models derive from two point processes, Φb and Φe, describing the locations of the base and end points of the fibers. Each point of Φe (the end point process) is connected to a unique point in Φb (the base point process). In the first model, both Φe and Φb are Poisson processes, yielding a null model of uniform coverage of the skin by end points and general baseline results and reference values for moments of key physiologic indicators. The second model provides a mechanistic model to generate end points for each base, and we model the branching structure more directly by defining Φe as a cluster process conditioned on the realization of Φb as its parent points. In both cases, we derive distributional properties for observable quantities of direct interest to neurologists such as the number of fibers per base, and the direction and range of fibers on the skin. We contrast both models by fitting them to data from skin blister biopsy images of ENFs and provide inference regarding physiological properties of ENFs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Stimulation of adult oligodendrogenesis by myelin-specific T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsted Nielsen, Helle; Toft-Hansen, Henrik; Lambertsen, Kate Lykke

    2011-01-01

    of calretinergic associational/commissural fibers within the dentate gyrus. These results have implications for the perception of MS pathogenesis because they show that infiltrating myelin-specific T cells can stimulate oligodendrogenesis in the adult central nervous system....

  20. Functional recovery of denervated skeletal muscle with sensory or mixed nerve protection: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Tian Li

    Full Text Available Functional recovery is usually poor following peripheral nerve injury when reinnervation is delayed. Early innervation by sensory nerve has been indicated to prevent atrophy of the denervated muscle. It is hypothesized that early protection with sensory axons is adequate to improve functional recovery of skeletal muscle following prolonged denervation of mixed nerve injury. In this study, four groups of rats received surgical denervation of the tibial nerve. The proximal and distal stumps of the tibial nerve were ligated in all animals except for those in the immediate repair group. The experimental groups underwent denervation with nerve protection of peroneal nerve (mixed protection or sural nerve (sensory protection. The experimental and unprotected groups had a stage II surgery in which the trimmed proximal and distal tibial nerve stumps were sutured together. After 3 months of recovery, electrophysiological, histological and morphometric parameters were assessed. It was detected that the significant muscle atrophy and a good preserved structure of the muscle were observed in the unprotected and protective experimental groups, respectively. Significantly fewer numbers of regenerated myelinated axons were observed in the sensory-protected group. Enhanced recovery in the mixed protection group was indicated by the results of the muscle contraction force tests, regenerated myelinated fiber, and the results of the histological analysis. Our results suggest that early axons protection by mixed nerve may complement sensory axons which are required for promoting functional recovery of the denervated muscle natively innervated by mixed nerve.

  1. A Novel Approach for Studying the Physiology and Pathophysiology of Myelinated and Non-Myelinated Axons in the CNS White Matter.

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    Lijun Li

    Full Text Available Advances in brain connectomics set the need for detailed knowledge of functional properties of myelinated and non-myelinated (if present axons in specific white matter pathways. The corpus callosum (CC, a major white matter structure interconnecting brain hemispheres, is extensively used for studying CNS axonal function. Unlike another widely used CNS white matter preparation, the optic nerve where all axons are myelinated, the CC contains also a large population of non-myelinated axons, making it particularly useful for studying both types of axons. Electrophysiological studies of optic nerve use suction electrodes on nerve ends to stimulate and record compound action potentials (CAPs that adequately represent its axonal population, whereas CC studies use microelectrodes (MEs, recording from a limited area within the CC. Here we introduce a novel robust isolated "whole" CC preparation comparable to optic nerve. Unlike ME recordings where the CC CAP peaks representing myelinated and non-myelinated axons vary broadly in size, "whole" CC CAPs show stable reproducible ratios of these two main peaks, and also reveal a third peak, suggesting a distinct group of smaller caliber non-myelinated axons. We provide detailed characterization of "whole" CC CAPs and conduction velocities of myelinated and non-myelinated axons along the rostro-caudal axis of CC body and show advantages of this preparation for comparing axonal function in wild type and dysmyelinated shiverer mice, studying the effects of temperature dependence, bath-applied drugs and ischemia modeled by oxygen-glucose deprivation. Due to the isolation from gray matter, our approach allows for studying CC axonal function without possible "contamination" by reverberating signals from gray matter. Our analysis of "whole" CC CAPs revealed higher complexity of myelinated and non-myelinated axonal populations, not noticed earlier. This preparation may have a broad range of applications as a robust

  2. Evaluating Glaucomatous Retinal Nerve Fiber Damage by GDx VCC Polarimetry in Taiwan Chinese Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Yi; Huang, Mei-Ling; Huang, Wei-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To study the capability of scanning laser polarimetry with variable corneal compensation (GDx VCC) to detect differences in retinal nerve fiber layer thickness between normal and glaucomatous eyes in a Taiwan Chinese population. Methods This study included 44 normal eyes and 107 glaucomatous eyes. The glaucomatous eyes were divided into three subgroups on the basis of its visual field defects (early, moderate, severe). Each subject underwent a GDx-VCC exam and visual field testing. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AROC) of each relevant parameter was used to differentiate normal from each glaucoma subgroup, respectively. The correlation between visual field index and each parameter was evaluated for the eyes in the glaucoma group. Results For normal vs. early glaucoma, the parameter with the best AROC was Nerve fiber indicator (NFI) (0.942). For normal vs. moderate glaucoma, the parameter showing the best AROC was NFI (0.985). For normal vs. severe glaucoma, the parameter that had the best AROC was NFI (1.000). For early vs. moderate glaucoma, the parameter with the best AROC was NFI (0.732). For moderate vs. severe, the parameter showing the best AROC was temporal-superior-nasal-inferior-temporal average (0.652). For early vs. severe, the parameter with the best AROC was NFI (0.852). Conclusions GDx-VCC-measured parameters may serve as a useful tool to distinguish normal from glaucomatous eyes; in particular, NFI turned out to be the best discriminating parameter.

  3. Evoked bioelectrical activity of efferent fibers of the sciatic nerve of white rats in experimental menopause

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    Rodinsky A.G.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our work was analysis of the bioelectrical activity of efferent fibers of the sciatic nerve in experimental menopause condition. Experiments were performed on 25 female white rats, divided into experimental and control groups. Menopause was modeled by total ovariohysterectomy. In 120 days after modeling we had recorded evoked action potentials of fibers of isolated ventral root L5 induced by stimulation of sciatic nerve with rectangular pulses. Threshold, chronaxia, latency, amplitude and duration of the action potential (AP were analysed. Refractory phenomenon was investigated by applying paired stimuli at intervals of 2 to 20 ms. In the context of long-term hypoestrogenemy threshold of AP appearance was 55,32±7,69%, chronaxy – 115,09±2,67%, latent period – 112,62±1,74% as compared with the control animals (p<0.01. In conditions of paired stimuli applying the amplitude of response to the testing stimulus in animals with ovariohysterectomy at intervals 3 and 4 ms was 61,25±36,45% and 53,48±18,64% (p<0.05 respectively.

  4. The Effects of Smoking on Anterior Segment Parameters, Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer, and Pupillary Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bengü Ekinci Köktekir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the alterations in the anterior segment parameters, retinal nerve fiber layer, and pupillary functions in smokers. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study, 45 eyes of 45 smokers and 45 eyes of 45 non-smoker control subjects were evaluated. All patients underwent measurement of anterior segment parameters with optical low coherence reflectometry (OLCR, mesopic and photopic pupillary diameter with an aberrometer device, retinal nerve fiber layer thickness with optical coherence tomography, and dry-eye assessment with Schirmer’s test. The results were compared with independent t-test by SPSS 16.0 Inc., and a p-value lower than 0.05 was determined as significant. Results: There was a significant difference between both groups in terms of mesopic pupil diameters that were measured with both OLCR and aberrometer device (p=0.03 and 0.02, respectively. Schirmer scores were also significantly decreased in smokers (p=0.001. The other measured parameters demonstrated no difference between smokers and non-smokers (p>0.05 for all. Conclusion: Smoking may affect pupillary functions, especially the mesopic pupillary diameter, and may cause a deficiency in pupil response under dark circumstances. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 11-4

  5. Biosynthesis of fatty acids and cholesterol in squid giant nerve fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, T.; Kishimoto, Y.; Gould, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    The giant nerve fiber of squid 3 (loligo pealel) was incubated with [1- 14 C]acetate and ( 3 H)myristate. Fifty-five percent of the radioactivity incorporated from acetate was recovered in fatty acid methyl esters (FAME). The FAME was fractionated by AgNO 3 -impregnated TLC plate; and 52%, 31%, 0.3%, 5%, and 11% of the radioactivity was recovered in spots associated with saturated, monoenes, dienes, trienes, and polyenes, respectively. The saturated FAME was further fractionated by reverse-phase HPLC; and 4, 47, 1, and 48% of the radioactivity was recovered in 14:0, 16:0, 17:0, and 18:0, respectively. Most radioactivity from polyenes migrated to the spot containing saturated FAME, after catalytical hydrogenation. Cholesterol was isolated and converted to dibromoderivative and the derivative was recrystallized. No radioactivity was found in purified dibromocholesterol. Nearly all radioactivity from myristate-labeled tissue was recovered in saturated FAME. Reverse-phase HPLC showed that 71%, 25%, and 3% of radioactivity was associated with 14:0, 16:0, and 18:0, respectively. These results indicate that the squid giant nerve fibers can synthesize fatty acids by de novo and also by chain elongation and desaturation, though at a slower rate

  6. Whole mount preparation of the adult Drosophila ventral nerve cord for giant fiber dye injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerner, Jana; Godenschwege, Tanja A

    2011-06-04

    To analyze the axonal and dendritic morphology of neurons, it is essential to obtain accurate labeling of neuronal structures. Preparing well labeled samples with little to no tissue damage enables us to analyze cell morphology and to compare individual samples to each other, hence allowing the identification of mutant anomalies. In the demonstrated dissection method the nervous system remains mostly inside the adult fly. Through a dorsal incision, the abdomen and thorax are opened and most of the internal organs are removed. Only the dorsal side of the ventral nerve cord (VNC) and the cervical connective (CvC) containing the big axons of the giant fibers (GFs) are exposed, while the brain containing the GF cell body and dendrites remains in the intact head. In this preparation most nerves of the VNC should remain attached to their muscles. Following the dissection, the intracellular filling of the giant fiber (GF) with a fluorescent dye is demonstrated. In the CvC the GF axons are located at the dorsal surface and thus can be easily visualized under a microscope with differential interference contrast (DIC) optics. This allows the injection of the GF axons with dye at this site to label the entire GF including the axons and their terminals in the VNC. This method results in reliable and strong staining of the GFs allowing the neurons to be imaged immediately after filling with an epifluorescent microscope. Alternatively, the fluorescent signal can be enhanced using standard immunohistochemistry procedures suitable for high resolution confocal microscopy.

  7. Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Segmentation on FD-OCT Scans of Normal Subjects and Glaucoma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Markus A; Hornegger, Joachim; Mardin, Christian Y; Tornow, Ralf P

    2010-11-08

    Automated measurements of the retinal nerve fiber layer thickness on circular OCT B-Scans provide physicians additional parameters for glaucoma diagnosis. We propose a novel retinal nerve fiber layer segmentation algorithm for frequency domain data that can be applied on scans from both normal healthy subjects, as well as glaucoma patients, using the same set of parameters. In addition, the algorithm remains almost unaffected by image quality. The main part of the segmentation process is based on the minimization of an energy function consisting of gradient and local smoothing terms. A quantitative evaluation comparing the automated segmentation results to manually corrected segmentations from three reviewers is performed. A total of 72 scans from glaucoma patients and 132 scans from normal subjects, all from different persons, composed the database for the evaluation of the segmentation algorithm. A mean absolute error per A-Scan of 2.9 µm was achieved on glaucomatous eyes, and 3.6 µm on healthy eyes. The mean absolute segmentation error over all A-Scans lies below 10 µm on 95.1% of the images. Thus our approach provides a reliable tool for extracting diagnostic relevant parameters from OCT B-Scans for glaucoma diagnosis.

  8. Neuronal Regulation of Schwann Cell Mitochondrial Ca2+ Signaling during Myelination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Ino

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Schwann cells (SCs myelinate peripheral neurons to promote the rapid conduction of action potentials, and the process of myelination is known to be regulated by signals from axons to SCs. Given that SC mitochondria are one of the potential regulators of myelination, we investigated whether SC mitochondria are regulated by axonal signaling. Here, we show a purinergic mechanism that sends information from neurons to SC mitochondria during myelination. Our results show that electrical stimulation of rat sciatic nerve increases extracellular ATP levels enough to activate purinergic receptors. Indeed, electrical stimulation of sciatic nerves induces Ca2+ increases in the cytosol and the mitochondrial matrix of surrounding SCs via purinergic receptor activation. Chronic suppression of this pathway during active myelination suppressed the longitudinal and radial development of myelinating SCs and caused hypomyelination. These results demonstrate a neuron-to-SC mitochondria signaling, which is likely to have an important role in proper myelination.

  9. An Exceptional Case of Intraparotid Plexiform Neurofibroma Originating from Autonomic Fibers of the Auriculotemporal Nerve

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    Sarantis Blioskas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Plexiform neurofibromas are benign tumors that tend to occur in patients suffering from neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1. This report addresses a rare case where the tumor affected the parotid gland, deriving almost exclusively from the peripheral portion of the facial nerve. A 6-year-old male was referred to us complaining about a gradually enlarging swelling over the right parotid area. Imaging localized the lesion to the superficial lobe of the parotid gland, suggesting a neurofibroma. Cosmetic disfigurement and a functional deficit led us to perform complete surgical resection. Meticulous surgical dissection as well as auriculotemporal nerve origin made complete extirpation possible with almost zero morbidity and ensured alleviation of both aesthetic impairment and pain. This is the first case of an intraparotid PN in a pediatric NF-1 patient, which originated from branches of the auriculotemporal nerve and particularly from fibers of the autonomic nervous system. Radical surgical excision was decided according to established decision-making algorithms.

  10. Nano-scale Biophysical and Structural Investigations on Intact and Neuropathic Nerve Fibers by Simultaneous Combination of Atomic Force and Confocal Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Rosso

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The links between neuropathies of the peripheral nervous system (PNS, including Charcot-Marie-Tooth1A and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies, and impaired biomechanical and structural integrity of PNS nerves remain poorly understood despite the medical urgency. Here, we present a protocol describing simultaneous structural and biomechanical integrity investigations on isolated nerve fibers, the building blocks of nerves. Nerve fibers are prepared from nerves harvested from wild-type and exemplary PNS neuropathy mouse models. The basic principle of the designed experimental approach is based on the simultaneous combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM and confocal microscopy. AFM is used to visualize the surface structure of nerve fibers at nano-scale resolution. The simultaneous combination of AFM and confocal microscopy is used to perform biomechanical, structural, and functional integrity measurements at nano- to micro-scale. Isolation of sciatic nerves and subsequent teasing of nerve fibers take ~45 min. Teased fibers can be maintained at 37°C in a culture medium and kept viable for up to 6 h allowing considerable time for all measurements which require 3–4 h. The approach is designed to be widely applicable for nerve fibers from mice of any PNS neuropathy. It can be extended to human nerve biopsies.

  11. Transfer of obturator nerve for femoral nerve injury: an experiment study in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Depeng; Zhou, Jun; Lin, Yaofa; Xie, Zheng; Chen, Huihao; Yu, Ronghua; Lin, Haodong; Hou, Chunlin

    2018-07-01

    Quadriceps palsy is mainly caused by proximal lesions in the femoral nerve. The obturator nerve has been previously used to repair the femoral nerve, although only a few reports have described the procedure, and the outcomes have varied. In the present study, we aimed to confirm the feasibility and effectiveness of this treatment in a rodent model using the randomized control method. Sixty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into two groups: the experimental group, wherein rats underwent femoral neurectomy and obturator nerve transfer to the femoral nerve motor branch; and the control group, wherein rats underwent femoral neurectomy without nerve transfer. Functional outcomes were measured using the BBB score, muscle mass, and histological assessment. At 12 and 16 weeks postoperatively, the rats in the experimental group exhibited recovery to a stronger stretch force of the knee and higher BBB score, as compared to the control group (p nerve with myelinated and unmyelinated fibers was observed in the experimental group. No significant differences were observed between groups at 8 weeks postoperatively (p > 0.05). Obturator nerve transfer for repairing femoral nerve injury was feasible and effective in a rat model, and can hence be considered as an option for the treatment of femoral nerve injury.

  12. Remarkable Stability of Myelinating Oligodendrocytes in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richa B. Tripathi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available New myelin-forming oligodendrocytes (OLs are generated in the mouse central nervous system during adulthood. These adult-born OLs might augment the existing population, contributing to neural plasticity, or else replace OLs that die in use (turnover. To distinguish between these alternatives, we induced genetic labeling of mature myelinating OLs in young adult mice and tracked their subsequent survival. OL survival rates were region dependent, being higher in corpus callosum (∼90% survival over 20 months and motor cortex (∼70% survival than in corticospinal tract or optic nerve (50%–60% survival. Survival rates over the first 8 months were 90%–100% in all regions except the optic nerve. In the corpus callosum, new OLs accumulate during young adulthood and are therefore likely to participate in adaptive myelination. We also found that the number of myelin internodes maintained by individual cortical OLs is stable for at least 8 months but declines ∼12% in the following year.

  13. Effect of Surface Pore Structure of Nerve Guide Conduit on Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Se Heang; Kim, Jin Rae; Kwon, Gu Birm; Namgung, Uk; Song, Kyu Sang

    2013-01-01

    Polycaprolactone (PCL)/Pluronic F127 nerve guide conduits (NGCs) with different surface pore structures (nano-porous inner surface vs. micro-porous inner surface) but similar physical and chemical properties were fabricated by rolling the opposite side of asymmetrically porous PCL/F127 membranes. The effect of the pore structure on peripheral nerve regeneration through the NGCs was investigated using a sciatic nerve defect model of rats. The nerve fibers and tissues were shown to have regenerated along the longitudinal direction through the NGC with a nano-porous inner surface (Nanopore NGC), while they grew toward the porous wall of the NGC with a micro-porous inner surface (Micropore NGC) and, thus, their growth was restricted when compared with the Nanopore NGC, as investigated by immunohistochemical evaluations (by fluorescence microscopy with anti-neurofilament staining and Hoechst staining for growth pattern of nerve fibers), histological evaluations (by light microscopy with Meyer's modified trichrome staining and Toluidine blue staining and transmission electron microscopy for the regeneration of axon and myelin sheath), and FluoroGold retrograde tracing (for reconnection between proximal and distal stumps). The effect of nerve growth factor (NGF) immobilized on the pore surfaces of the NGCs on nerve regeneration was not so significant when compared with NGCs not containing immobilized NGF. The NGC system with different surface pore structures but the same chemical/physical properties seems to be a good tool that is used for elucidating the surface pore effect of NGCs on nerve regeneration. PMID:22871377

  14. Prevalence of Split Nerve Fiber Layer Bundles in Healthy People Imaged with Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirel Gür Güngör

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The presence of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL split bundles was recently described in normal eyes scanned using scanning laser polarimetry and by histologic studies. Split bundles may resemble RNFL loss in healthy eyes. The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of nerve fiber layer split bundles in healthy people. Materials and Methods: We imaged 718 eyes of 359 healthy persons with the spectral domain optical coherence tomography in this cross-sectional study. All eyes had intraocular pressure of 21 mmHg or less, normal appearance of the optic nerve head, and normal visual fields (Humphrey Field Analyzer 24-2 full threshold program. In our study, a bundle was defined as ‘split’ when there is localized defect not resembling a wedge defect in the RNFL deviation map with a symmetrically divided RNFL appearance on the RNFL thickness map. The classification was performed by two independent observers who used an identical set of reference examples to standardize the classification. Results: Inter-observer consensus was reached in all cases. Bilateral superior split bundles were seen in 19 cases (5.29% and unilateral superior split was observed in 15 cases (4.16%. In 325 cases (90.52% there was no split bundle. Conclusion: Split nerve fiber layer bundles, in contrast to single nerve fiber layer bundles, are not common findings in healthy eyes. In eyes with normal optic disc appearance, especially when a superior RNFL defect is observed in RNFL deviation map, the RNLF thickness map and graphs should also be examined for split nerve fiber layer bundles.

  15. MR neurography of the median nerve at 3.0 T: Optimization of diffusion tensor imaging and fiber tractography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guggenberger, Roman; Eppenberger, Patrick; Markovic, Daniel; Nanz, Daniel; Chhabra, Avneesh; Pruessmann, Klaas P.; Andreisek, Gustav

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to systematically assess the optimal b-value and reconstruction parameters for DTI and fiber tractography of the median nerve at 3.0 T. Methods: Local ethical board approved study with 45 healthy volunteers (15 men, 30 women; mean age, 41 ± 3.4 years) who underwent DTI of the right wrist at 3.0 T. A single-shot echo-planar-imaging sequence (TR/TE 10123/40 ms) was acquired at four different b-values (800, 1000, 1200, and 1400 s/mm 2 ). Two independent readers performed post processing and fiber-tractography. Fractional anisotropy (FA) maps were calculated. Fiber tracts of the median nerve were generated using four different algorithms containing different FA thresholds and different angulation tolerances. Data were evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively. Results: Tracking algorithms using a minimum FA threshold of 0.2 and a maximum angulation of 10° were significantly better than other algorithms. Fiber tractography generated significantly longer fibers in DTI acquisitions with higher b-values (1200 and 1400 s/mm 2 versus 800 s/mm 2 ; p 2 (p 2 for DTI of the median nerve at 3.0 T. Optimal reconstruction parameters for fiber tractography should encompass a minimum FA threshold of 0.2 and a maximum angulation tolerance of 10.

  16. Sox10 Expression in Goldfish Retina and Optic Nerve Head in Controls and after the Application of Two Different Lesion Paradigms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Parrilla

    Full Text Available The mammalian central nervous system (CNS is unable to regenerate. In contrast, the CNS of fish, including the visual system, is able to regenerate after damage. Moreover, the fish visual system grows continuously throughout the life of the animal, and it is therefore an excellent model to analyze processes of myelination and re-myelination after an injury. Here we analyze Sox10+ oligodendrocytes in the goldfish retina and optic nerve in controls and after two kinds of injuries: cryolesion of the peripheral growing zone and crushing of the optic nerve. We also analyze changes in a major component of myelin, myelin basic protein (MBP, as a marker for myelinated axons. Our results show that Sox10+ oligodendrocytes are located in the retinal nerve fiber layer and along the whole length of the optic nerve. MBP was found to occupy a similar location, although its loose appearance in the retina differed from the highly organized MBP+ axon bundles in the optic nerve. After optic nerve crushing, the number of Sox10+ cells decreased in the crushed area and in the optic nerve head. Consistent with this, myelination was highly reduced in both areas. In contrast, after cryolesion we did not find changes in the Sox10+ population, although we did detect some MBP- degenerating areas. We show that these modifications in Sox10+ oligodendrocytes are consistent with their role in oligodendrocyte identity, maintenance and survival, and we propose the optic nerve head as an excellent area for research aimed at better understanding of de- and remyelination processes.

  17. Characterization of nerve and microvessel damage and recovery in type 1 diabetic mice after permanent femoral artery ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozeron, Pierre; Mantsounga, Chris S; Broqueres-You, Dong; Dohan, Anthony; Polivka, Marc; Deroide, Nicolas; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien; Kubis, Nathalie; Lévy, Bernard I

    2015-09-01

    Neuropathy is the most common complication of the peripheral nervous system during the progression of diabetes. The pathophysiology is unclear but may involve microangiopathy, reduced endoneurial blood flow, and tissue ischemia. We used a mouse model of type 1 diabetes to study parallel alterations of nerves and microvessels following tissue ischemia. We designed an easily reproducible model of ischemic neuropathy induced by irreversible ligation of the femoral artery. We studied the evolution of behavioral function, epineurial and endoneurial vessel impairment, and large nerve myelinated fiber as well as small cutaneous unmyelinated fiber impairment for 1 month following the onset of ischemia. We observed a more severe hindlimb dysfunction and delayed recovery in diabetic animals. This was associated with reduced density of large arteries in the hindlimb and reduced sciatic nerve epineurial blood flow. A reduction in sciatic nerve endoneurial capillary density was also observed, associated with a reduction in small unmyelinated epidermal fiber number and large myelinated sciatic nerve fiber dysfunction. Moreover, vascular recovery was delayed, and nerve dysfunction was still present in diabetic animals at day 28. This easily reproducible model provides clear insight into the evolution over time of the impact of ischemia on nerve and microvessel homeostasis in the setting of diabetes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Chemoattractive capacity of different lengths of nerve fragments bridging regeneration chambers for the repair of sciatic nerve defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiren Zhang; Yubo Wang; Jincheng Zhang

    2012-01-01

    A preliminary study by our research group showed that 6-mm-long regeneration chamber bridging is equivalent to autologous nerve transplantation for the repair of 12-mm nerve defects.In this study,we compared the efficacy of different lengths (6,8,10 mm) of nerve fragments bridging 6-mm regeneration chambers for the repair of 12-mm-long nerve defects.At 16 weeks after the regeneration chamber was implanted,the number,diameter and myelin sheath thickness of the regenerated nerve fibers,as well as the conduction velocity of the sciatic nerve and gastrocnemius muscle wet weight ratio,were similar to that observed with autologous nerve transplantation.Our results demonstrate that 6-,8-and 10-mm-long nerve fragments bridging 6-mm regeneration chambers effectively repair 12-mm-long nerve defects.Because the chemoattractive capacity is not affected by the length of the nerve fragment,we suggest adopting 6-mm-long nerve fragments for the repair of peripheral nerve defects.

  19. Construction of nerve guide conduits from cellulose/soy protein composite membranes combined with Schwann cells and pyrroloquinoline quinone for the repair of peripheral nerve defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Lihua [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Center of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Hubei University of Arts and Sciences, Xiangyang 441053 (China); Gan, Li; Liu, Yongming; Tian, Weiqun; Tong, Zan [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Wang, Xiong; Huselstein, Celine [Ingénierie Moléculaire et Physiopathologie Articulaire (IMoPA), UMR 7365 CNRS – Université de Lorraine, Biopôle, 54500 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Chen, Yun, E-mail: yunchen@whu.edu.cn [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2015-02-20

    Regeneration and functional reconstruction of peripheral nerve defects remained a significant clinical challenge. Nerve guide conduits, with seed cells or neurotrophic factors (NTFs), had been widely used to improve the repair and regeneration of injured peripheral nerve. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) was an antioxidant that can stimulate nerve growth factors (NGFs) synthesis and accelerate the Schwann cells (SCs) proliferation and growth. In present study, three kinds of nerve guide conduits were constructed: one from cellulose/SPI hollow tube (CSC), another from CSC combined with SCs (CSSC), and the third one from CSSC combined with PQQ (CSSPC), respectively. And then they were applied to bridge and repair the sciatic nerve defect in rats, using autograft as control. Effects of different nerve guide conduits on the nerve regeneration were comparatively evaluated by general analysis, sciatic function index (SFI) and histological analysis (HE and TEM). Newly-formed regenerative nerve fibers were observed and running through the transparent nerve guide conduits 12 weeks after surgery. SFI results indicated that the reconstruction of motor function in CSSPC group was better than that in CSSC and CSC groups. HE images from the cross-sections and longitudinal-sections of the harvested regenerative nerve indicated that regenerative nerve fibers had been formed and accompanied with new blood vessels and matrix materials in the conduits. TEM images also showed that lots of fresh myelinated and non-myelinated nerve fibers had been formed. Parts of vacuolar, swollen and abnormal axons occurred in CSC and CSSC groups, while the vacuolization and swell of axons was the least serious in CSSPC group. These results indicated that CSSPC group had the most ability to repair and reconstruct the nerve structure and functions due to the comprehensive contributions from hollow CSC tube, SCs and PQQ. As a result, the CSSPC may have the potential for the applications as nerve guide

  20. Functional recovery of regenerating motor axons is delayed in mice heterozygously deficient for the myelin protein P(0) gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosberg, Mette Romer; Alvarez, Susana; Krarup, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Mice with a heterozygous knock-out of the myelin protein P0 gene (P0+/-) develop a neuropathy similar to human Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. They are indistinguishable from wild-types (WT) at birth and develop a slowly progressing demyelinating neuropathy. The aim of this study was to investigate...... whether the regeneration capacity of early symptomatic P0+/- is impaired as compared to age matched WT. Right sciatic nerves were lesioned at the thigh in 7-8 months old mice. Tibial motor axons at ankle were investigated by conventional motor conduction studies and axon excitability studies using...... threshold tracking. To evaluate regeneration we monitored the recovery of motor function after crush, and then compared the fiber distribution by histology. The overall motor performance was investigated using Rotor-Rod. P0+/- had reduced compound motor action potential amplitudes and thinner myelinated...

  1. Changes in retinal nerve fiber layer thickness after spinal surgery in the prone position: a prospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Gencer, Baran; Cosar, Murat; Tufan, Hasan Ali; Kara, Selcuk; Arikan, Sedat; Akman, Tarik; Kiraz, Hasan Ali; Comez, Arzu Taskiran; Hanci, Volkan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Changes in ocular perfusion play an important role in the pathogenesis of ischemic optic neuropathy. Ocular perfusion pressure is equal to mean arterial pressure minus intraocular pressure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in the intraocular pressure and the retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in patients undergoing spinal surgery in the prone position. ...

  2. Loss of temporal peripapillary retinal nerve fibers in prediabetes or type 2 diabetes without diabetic retinopathy: The Maastricht Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Clerck, E.E.B.; Schouten, J.S.A.G.; Berendschot, T.T.J.M.; Beckers, H.J.M.; Schaper, N.C.; Schram, M.T.; Stehouwer, C.D.A.; Webers, C.A.B.

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess thinning of the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) in prediabetes or type 2 diabetes without diabetic retinopathy (DM2 w/o DRP) compared with that in individuals with normal glucose metabolism (NGM). Methods: We measured sectoral and mean

  3. Optical coherence tomography in retinitis pigmentosa: reproducibility and capacity to detect macular and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Martin, Elena; Pinilla, Isabel; Sancho, Eva; Almarcegui, Carmen; Dolz, Isabel; Rodriguez-Mena, Diego; Fuertes, Isabel; Cuenca, Nicolas

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the ability of time-domain and Fourier-domain optical coherence tomographies (OCTs) to detect macular and retinal nerve fiber layer atrophies in retinitis pigmentosa (RP). To test the intrasession reproducibility using three OCT instruments (Stratus, Cirrus, and Spectralis). Eighty eyes of 80 subjects (40 RP patients and 40 healthy subjects) underwent a visual field examination, together with 3 macular scans and 3 optic disk evaluations by the same experienced examiner using 3 OCT instruments. Differences between healthy and RP eyes were compared. The relationship between measurements with each OCT instrument was evaluated. Repeatability was studied by intraclass correlation coefficients and coefficients of variation. Macular and retinal nerve fiber layer atrophies were detected in RP patients for all OCT parameters. Macular and retinal nerve fiber layer thicknesses, as determined by the different OCTs, were correlated but significantly different (P < 0.05). Reproducibility was moderately high using Stratus, good using Cirrus and Spectralis, and excellent using the Tru-track technology of Spectralis. In RP eyes, measurements showed higher variability compared with healthy eyes. Differences in thickness measurements existed between OCT instruments, despite there being a high degree of correlation. Fourier-domain OCT can be considered a valid and repeatability technique to detect retinal nerve fiber layer atrophy in RP patients.

  4. Taste bud-derived BDNF maintains innervation of a subset of TrkB-expressing gustatory nerve fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tao; Rios-Pilier, Jennifer; Krimm, Robin

    2017-07-01

    Taste receptor cells transduce different types of taste stimuli and transmit this information to gustatory neurons that carry it to the brain. Taste receptor cells turn over continuously in adulthood, requiring constant new innervation from nerve fibers. Therefore, the maintenance of innervation to taste buds is an active process mediated by many factors, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Specifically, 40% of taste bud innervation is lost when Bdnf is removed during adulthood. Here we speculated that not all gustatory nerve fibers express the BDNF receptor, TrkB, resulting in subsets of neurons that vary in their response to BDNF. However, it is also possible that the partial loss of innervation occurred because the Bdnf gene was not effectively removed. To test these possibilities, we first determined that not all gustatory nerve fibers express the TrkB receptor in adult mice. We then verified the efficiency of Bdnf removal specifically in taste buds of K14-CreER:Bdnf mice and found that Bdnf expression was reduced to 1%, indicating efficient Bdnf gene recombination. BDNF removal resulted in a 55% loss of TrkB-expressing nerve fibers, which was greater than the loss of P2X3-positive fibers (39%), likely because taste buds were innervated by P2X3+/TrkB- fibers that were unaffected by BDNF removal. We conclude that gustatory innervation consists of both TrkB-positive and TrkB-negative taste fibers and that BDNF is specifically important for maintaining TrkB-positive innervation to taste buds. In addition, although taste bud size was not affected by inducible Bdnf removal, the expression of the γ subunit of the ENaC channel was reduced. So, BDNF may regulate expression of some molecular components of taste transduction pathways. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. The application of fuzzy-based methods to central nerve fiber imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axer, Hubertus; Jantzen, Jan; Keyserlingk, Diedrich Graf v.

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses the potential of fuzzy logic methods within medical imaging. Technical advances have produced imaging techniques that can visualize structures and their functions in the living human body. The interpretation of these images plays a prominent role in diagnostic and therapeutic...... decisions, so physicians must deal with a variety of image processing methods and their applications.This paper describes three different sources of medical imagery that allow the visualization of nerve fibers in the human brain: (1) an algorithm for automatic segmentation of some parts of the thalamus....... Fuzzy logic methods were applied to analyze these pictures from low- to high-level image processing. The solutions presented here are motivated by problems of routine neuroanatomic research demonstrating fuzzy-based methods to be valuable tools in medical image processing....

  6. Waveform efficiency analysis of auditory nerve fiber stimulation for cochlear implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navaii, Mehdi Lotfi; Sadhedi, Hamed; Jalali, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of the electrical stimulation efficiency of various stimulating waveforms is an important issue for efficient neural stimulator design. Concerning the implantable micro devices design, it is also necessary to consider the feasibility of hardware implementation of the desired waveforms. In this paper, the charge, power and energy efficiency of four waveforms (i.e. square, rising ramp, triangular and rising ramp-decaying exponential) in various durations have been simulated and evaluated based on the computational model of the auditory nerve fibers. Moreover, for a fair comparison of their feasibility, a fully integrated current generator circuit has been developed so that the desired stimulating waveforms can be generated. The simulation results show that stimulation with the square waveforms is a proper choice in short and intermediate durations while the rising ramp-decaying exponential or triangular waveforms can be employed for long durations.

  7. Retinal nerve fiber layer measurements by scanning laser polarimetry with enhanced corneal compensation in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Harsha L; Venkatesh, Chirravuri R; Vidyasagar, Kelli; Yadav, Ravi K; Addepalli, Uday K; Jude, Aarthi; Senthil, Sirisha; Garudadri, Chandra S

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the (i) effects of biological (age and axial length) and instrument-related [typical scan score (TSS) and corneal birefringence] parameters on the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) measurements and (ii) repeatability of RNFL measurements with the enhanced corneal compensation (ECC) protocol of scanning laser polarimetry (SLP) in healthy subjects. In a cross-sectional study, 140 eyes of 73 healthy subjects underwent RNFL imaging with the ECC protocol of SLP. Linear mixed modeling methods were used to evaluate the effects of age, axial length, TSS, and corneal birefringence on RNFL measurements. One randomly selected eye of 48 subjects from the cohort underwent 3 serial scans during the same session to determine the repeatability. Age significantly influenced all RNFL measurements. RNFL measurements decreased by 1 µm for every decade increase in age. TSS affected the overall average RNFL measurement (β=-0.62, P=0.003), whereas residual anterior segment retardance affected the superior quadrant measurement (β=1.14, P=0.01). Axial length and corneal birefringence measurements did not influence RNFL measurements. Repeatability, as assessed by the coefficient of variation, ranged between 1.7% for the overall average RNFL measurement and 11.4% for th nerve fiber indicator. Age significantly affected all RNFL measurements with the ECC protocol of SLP, whereas TSS and residual anterior segment retardance affected the overall average and the superior average RNFL measurements, respectively. Axial length and corneal birefringence measurements did not influence any RNFL measurements. RNFL measurements had good intrasession repeatability. These results are important while evaluating the change in structural measurements over time in glaucoma patients.

  8. Scanning Laser Polarimetry and Optical Coherence Tomography for Detection of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jong-Hyun

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To compare the ability of scanning laser polarimetry with variable corneal compensation (GDx-VCC) and Stratus optical coherence tomography (OCT) to detect photographic retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) defects. Methods This retrospective cross-sectional study included 45 eyes of 45 consecutive glaucoma patients with RNFL defects in red-free fundus photographs. The superior and inferior temporal quadrants in each eye were included for data analysis separately. The location and presence of RNFL defects seen in red-free fundus photographs were compared with those seen in GDx-VCC deviation maps and OCT RNFL analysis maps for each quadrant. Results Of the 90 quadrants (45 eyes), 31 (34%) had no apparent RNFL defects, 29 (32%) had focal RNFL defects, and 30 (33%) had diffuse RNFL defects in red-free fundus photographs. The highest agreement between GDx-VCC and red-free photography was 73% when we defined GDx-VCC RNFL defects as a cluster of three or more color-coded squares (p<5%) along the traveling line of the retinal nerve fiber in the GDx-VCC deviation map (kappa value, 0.388; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.195 to 0.582). The highest agreement between OCT and red-free photography was 85% (kappa value, 0.666; 95% CI, 0.506 to 0.825) when a value of 5% outside the normal limit for the OCT analysis map was used as a cut-off value for OCT RNFL defects. Conclusions According to the kappa values, the agreement between GDx-VCC deviation maps and red-free photography was poor, whereas the agreement between OCT analysis maps and red-free photography was good. PMID:19794943

  9. Long-term retinal nerve fiber layer changes following nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dotan G

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Gad Dotan,1 Michaella Goldstein,1 Anat Kesler,1 Barry Skarf21Department of Ophthalmology, Tel Aviv Medical Center, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel; 2Eye Care Services, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI, USABackground: In cases of nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION, retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL thickness changes have been described during the first 12 months following the acute event. The purpose of this study was to report on the long-term RNFL changes in these eyes beyond the first year following onset of NAION.Methods: Fourteen eyes of 13 patients with NAION were analyzed in this retrospective observational case series study. Uninvolved eyes served as controls. All patients underwent a complete neuro-ophthalmological examination and repeat measurements of peripapillary RNFL thickness using Stratus optical coherence tomography.Results: On optical coherence tomography scan performed on average 6 months following onset of NAION, the mean global RNFL thickness (59.8 ± 11.8 μm was significantly thinner (P < 0.001 compared with uninvolved eyes (95.1 ± 13.9 μm. In a second optical coherence tomography scan performed on average 13 (range 12–23 months later, the mean global RNFL thickness (58.9 ± 6.5 μm was not significantly different (P = 0.702 from the first scan.Conclusion: There appears to be no further RNFL loss beyond the first 6 months following an acute event of NAION.Keywords: optical coherence tomography, retinal nerve fiber layer, nonartertic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy

  10. In-vivo imaging of retinal nerve fiber layer vasculature: imaging – histology comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libby Richard T

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although it has been suggested that alterations of nerve fiber layer vasculature may be involved in the etiology of eye diseases, including glaucoma, it has not been possible to examine this vasculature in-vivo. This report describes a novel imaging method, fluorescence adaptive optics (FAO scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO, that makes possible for the first time in-vivo imaging of this vasculature in the living macaque, comparing in-vivo and ex-vivo imaging of this vascular bed. Methods We injected sodium fluorescein intravenously in two macaque monkeys while imaging the retina with an FAO-SLO. An argon laser provided the 488 nm excitation source for fluorescence imaging. Reflectance images, obtained simultaneously with near infrared light, permitted precise surface registration of individual frames of the fluorescence imaging. In-vivo imaging was then compared to ex-vivo confocal microscopy of the same tissue. Results Superficial focus (innermost retina at all depths within the NFL revealed a vasculature with extremely long capillaries, thin walls, little variation in caliber and parallel-linked structure oriented parallel to the NFL axons, typical of the radial peripapillary capillaries (RPCs. However, at a deeper focus beneath the NFL, (toward outer retina the polygonal pattern typical of the ganglion cell layer (inner and outer retinal vasculature was seen. These distinguishing patterns were also seen on histological examination of the same retinas. Furthermore, the thickness of the RPC beds and the caliber of individual RPCs determined by imaging closely matched that measured in histological sections. Conclusion This robust method demonstrates in-vivo, high-resolution, confocal imaging of the vasculature through the full thickness of the NFL in the living macaque, in precise agreement with histology. FAO provides a new tool to examine possible primary or secondary role of the nerve fiber layer vasculature in retinal

  11. Peripheral origins and functional characteristics of vibration-sensitive VIIIth nerve fibers in the frog Rana temporaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jøgensen, Morten Buhl; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob

    1991-01-01

    were studied. 2) Vibration-sensitive fibers were found in both the anterior and posterior branch of the VIIIth nerve. 3) No vibration-sensitive fibers were found in the lagenar nerve. 4) The vibration-sensitive fibers in the posterior branch probably innervated the amphibian papilla and many...... of these fibers also responded to low-frequency sound. 5) The vibration-sensitive fibers in the anterior branch probably innervated the sacculus and the utriculus. 6) Hence, the grassfrog has at least two, and probably three, vibration-sensitive organs in the inner ear. 7) All fibers had V-shaped vibrational...... tuning curves. In the posterior branch best frequencies (BFs) ranged from 10 to 300 Hz, in the anterior branch from 10 to 100 Hz. In the posterior branch spike-rate thresholds at BF ranged from 0.04 to 1.28 cm/s2, in the anterior branch from 0.02 to 1.28 cm/s2. All fibers showed strong synchronization...

  12. Optical coherence tomography evaluation of retinal nerve fiber layer in longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico C. Moura

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare optical coherence tomography (OCT measurements on the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL of healthy controls and patients with longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM without previous optic neuritis. METHOD: Twenty-six eyes from 26 patients with LETM and 26 control eyes were subjected to automated perimetry and OCT for comparison of RNFL measurements. RESULTS: The mean deviation values from perimetry were significantly lower in patients with LETM than in controls (p<0.0001. RNFL measurements in the nasal quadrant and in the 3-o'clock segment were significantly smaller in LETM eyes than in controls. (p=0.04 and p=0.006, respectively. No significantly differences in other RNFL measurements were found. CONCLUSION: Patients with LETM may present localized RNFL loss, particularly on the nasal side of the optic disc, associated with slight visual field defects, even in the absence of previous episodes of optic neuritis. These findings emphasize the fact that patients with LETM may experience attacks of subclinical optic nerve damage.

  13. Post-evaluation of the neurophaties treatment post-trauma with therapeutic laser. Model in sciatic nerve of frog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Antonio S.; Ocampo, Arcelia F. M.; Hernández, María G. H.; Jasso, José L. C.; Lira, Maricela O. F.; Flores, Mariana A.; Balderrama, Vicente L.

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the compound nerve action potential amplitude and latency measured to determine the degree of myelination and the number of fibers stimulated in a model of stimulated frog sciatic nerve laser at 810 nm as perioperative treatment after injury. It used 30 bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana) to obtain 60 sciatic nerves forming four groups, groups 1 and 2 worked with nerves in vitro, were dissected in humid chambers for placing isolated organ, was recorded on compound nerve action potential, the second group laser was applied at 24, 48, 72, 96 and 120 hours and at the same time were placed in 10% formalin. Groups 3 and 4 are worked in vivo localizing the nerve and causing damage through compression, occurred over the compound nerve action potential to assess the degree of myelination and the number of fibers stimulated, the group 4 was applied to 810 nm laser (500 Hz, 10 J, 200 mW) after injury, after 48 hours, three frogs were sacrificed by introducing the nerves in 10% formalin. The latency recorded by stimulating the sciatic nerve of frog to 0.5 mA and 100 ms in groups 1 and 2 show significant differences (p000), as to the extent, if any statistically significant difference. (pparesthesia (post-traumatic neuropathy).

  14. Post-evaluation of the neurophaties treatment post-trauma with therapeutic laser. Model in sciatic nerve of frog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar, Antonio S.; Ocampo, Arcelia F. M.; Hernandez, Maria G. H.; Jasso, Jose L. C.; Lira, Maricela O. F.; Flores, Mariana A.; Balderrama, Vicente L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the compound nerve action potential amplitude and latency measured to determine the degree of myelination and the number of fibers stimulated in a model of stimulated frog sciatic nerve laser at 810 nm as perioperative treatment after injury. It used 30 bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana) to obtain 60 sciatic nerves forming four groups, groups 1 and 2 worked with nerves in vitro, were dissected in humid chambers for placing isolated organ, was recorded on compound nerve action potential, the second group laser was applied at 24, 48, 72, 96 and 120 hours and at the same time were placed in 10% formalin. Groups 3 and 4 are worked in vivo localizing the nerve and causing damage through compression, occurred over the compound nerve action potential to assess the degree of myelination and the number of fibers stimulated, the group 4 was applied to 810 nm laser (500 Hz, 10 J, 200 mW) after injury, after 48 hours, three frogs were sacrificed by introducing the nerves in 10% formalin. The latency recorded by stimulating the sciatic nerve of frog to 0.5 mA and 100 ms in groups 1 and 2 show significant differences (p 000), as to the extent, if any statistically significant difference. (p<0.001 and p<0.000). The laser produces a favorable response in the treatment of paresthesia (post-traumatic neuropathy).

  15. Myelin-associated proteins labelled by slow axonal transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giorgi, P.P.; DuBois, H.

    1981-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of protein metabolism and provides evidence that the neuronal contribution to myelin metabolism may be restricted to lipids only. On the other hand this line of research led to the partial characterization of a group of neuronal proteins probably involved in axo-glial interactions subserving the onset of myelination and the structural maintenance of the mature myelin sheath. Intraocular injection of radioactive amino acids allows the study of the anterograde transport of labelled proteins along retinofugal fibres which are well myelinated. Myelin extracted from the optic nerve and tract under these conditions also contains labelled proteins. Three hypotheses are available to explain this phenomenon. To offer an explanation for this phenomenon the work was planned as follows. a) Characterization of the spatio-temporal pattern of labelling of myelin, in order to define the experimental conditions (survival time and region of the optic pathway to be studied) necessary to obtain maximal labelling. b) Characterization (by gel electrophoresis) of the myelin-associated proteins which become labelled by axonal transport, in order to work on a consistent pattern of labelling. c) Investigation of the possible mechanism responsible for the labelling of myelin-associated proteins. (Auth.)

  16. Expression of growth-associated protein 43 in the skin nerve fibers of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursova, Sarka; Dubovy, Petr; Vlckova-Moravcova, Eva; Nemec, Martin; Klusakova, Ilona; Belobradkova, Jana; Bednarik, Josef

    2012-04-15

    The growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43) is known as a marker of regenerating nerve fibers and their continuous remodeling in the adult human skin. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate a possible role for GAP-43 in the detection of the early stages of small-fiber neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) as compared with a well- established and validated parameter - intra-epidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD) of protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5) immunoreactive intra-epidermal C fibers. In a group of 21 patients with DM2 within three years of diagnosis (13 men, 8 women; mean age 53.9±12.8; range 30-74) and a group of 17 healthy volunteers (8 men, 9 women; mean age 55.8±8.5; range 45-70 years), skin punch biopsies were taken from a distal calf and double immunostained with both PGP 9.5 and GAP-43. In healthy controls, 96.8% of 629 PGP 9.5 immunoreactive fibers were immunostained with GAP-43; the proportion of PGP 9.5 intra-epidermal nerve fibers immunoreactive for GAP-43 in control subjects ranged from 86.5 to 100%. In DM2 patients, IENFD was significantly lower compared to controls (median, 1.5 vs. 11.2/mm; pDM2 patients compared to healthy controls (73.6% of 337 PGP 9.5 positive fibers; p<0.001); ranged from 0 to 98.1%. In conclusion, these results show that impaired regeneration of intra-epidermal C fibers in the early stages of type 2 diabetes mellitus, as indicated by GAP-43, might be a marker of incipient diabetic neuropathy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Human primordial germ cells migrate along nerve fibers and Schwann cells from the dorsal hind gut mesentery to the gonadal ridge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllgård, Kjeld; Jespersen, Åse; Lutterodt, Melissa Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the spatiotemporal development of autonomic nerve fibers and primordial germ cells (PGCs) along their migratory route from the dorsal mesentery to the gonadal ridges in human embryos using immunohistochemical markers and electron microscopy. Autonomic nerve...... arrive at the gonadal ridge between 29 and 33 days pc. In conclusion, our data suggest that PGCs in human embryos preferentially migrate along autonomic nerve fibers from the dorsal mesentery to the developing gonad where they are delivered via a fine nerve plexus....

  18. Nerve fiber layer (NFL) degeneration associated with acute q-switched laser exposure in the nonhuman primate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwick, Harry; Zuclich, Joseph A.; Stuck, Bruce E.; Gagliano, Donald A.; Lund, David J.; Glickman, Randolph D.

    1995-01-01

    We have evaluated acute laser retinal exposure in non-human primates using a Rodenstock scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) equipped with spectral imaging laser sources at 488, 514, 633, and 780 nm. Confocal spectral imaging at each laser wavelength allowed evaluation of the image plane from deep within the retinal vascular layer to the more superficial nerve fiber layer in the presence and absence of the short wavelength absorption of the macular pigment. SLO angiography included both fluorescein and indocyanine green procedures to assess the extent of damage to the sensory retina, the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), and the choroidal vasculature. All laser exposures in this experiment were from a Q-switched Neodymium laser source at an exposure level sufficient to produce vitreous hemorrhage. Confocal imaging of the nerve fiber layer revealed discrete optic nerve sector defects between the lesion site and the macula (retrograde degeneration) as well as between the lesion site and the optic disk (Wallerian degeneration). In multiple hemorrhagic exposures, lesions placed progressively distant from the macula or overlapping the macula formed bridging scars visible at deep retinal levels. Angiography revealed blood flow disturbance at the retina as well as at the choroidal vascular level. These data suggest that acute parafoveal laser retinal injury can involve both direct full thickness damage to the sensory and non-sensory retina and remote nerve fiber degeneration. Such injury has serious functional implications for both central and peripheral visual function.

  19. Retinal nerve fiber and optic disc morphology using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography in scleroderma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin-Atik, Sevinc; Koc, Feray; Akin-Sari, Sirin; Ozmen, Mustafa

    2017-05-11

    To evaluate the optic nerve head parameters and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in a systemic sclerosis (SSc) cohort and age-matched controls to determine whether SSc patients have an increased risk of normal-tension glaucoma (NTG). We examined 30 patients (3 male, 27 female) with SSc and 28 age- and sex-matched controls. Retinal nerve fiber and optic disc morphology were evaluated using Cirrus SD-OCT. Optic disc morphology measurements including disc area, rim area, average and vertical cup/disc (C/D) ratio, and cup volume were not significantly different between the study groups. The average and 4-quadrant retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) measurements of the C/D >0.3 subgroups were not significantly different in the patients and controls. These values were also similar for the C/D >0.5 subgroups except that the average inferior quadrant RNFL thickness of the right eyes in the patient subgroup was significantly thinner than in the control subgroup (p<0.05). Our SSc cohort had relatively shorter disease duration but increased prevalence of early glaucomatous damage signs. Our findings indicate that SSc is a risk factor for developing normal-tension glaucoma. Further studies combined with visual field evaluation are necessary to identify the long-term glaucomatous effects of SSc.

  20. Networks of myelin covariance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, David; Ruef, Anne; Sanabria‐Diaz, Gretel; Preisig, Martin; Kherif, Ferath; Draganski, Bogdan; Lutti, Antoine

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Networks of anatomical covariance have been widely used to study connectivity patterns in both normal and pathological brains based on the concurrent changes of morphometric measures (i.e., cortical thickness) between brain structures across subjects (Evans, 2013). However, the existence of networks of microstructural changes within brain tissue has been largely unexplored so far. In this article, we studied in vivo the concurrent myelination processes among brain anatomical structures that gathered together emerge to form nonrandom networks. We name these “networks of myelin covariance” (Myelin‐Nets). The Myelin‐Nets were built from quantitative Magnetization Transfer data—an in‐vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) marker of myelin content. The synchronicity of the variations in myelin content between anatomical regions was measured by computing the Pearson's correlation coefficient. We were especially interested in elucidating the effect of age on the topological organization of the Myelin‐Nets. We therefore selected two age groups: Young‐Age (20–31 years old) and Old‐Age (60–71 years old) and a pool of participants from 48 to 87 years old for a Myelin‐Nets aging trajectory study. We found that the topological organization of the Myelin‐Nets is strongly shaped by aging processes. The global myelin correlation strength, between homologous regions and locally in different brain lobes, showed a significant dependence on age. Interestingly, we also showed that the aging process modulates the resilience of the Myelin‐Nets to damage of principal network structures. In summary, this work sheds light on the organizational principles driving myelination and myelin degeneration in brain gray matter and how such patterns are modulated by aging. PMID:29271053

  1. Regeneration of peripheral nerve fibres following Haloxon-induced degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Veronica de Souza

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available Delayed neurotoxicity has been associated with organophosphorus poisoning for years. In order to study such condition in sheep, 11 animals were given either one or two high doses of Haloxon. Exposed sheep were observed daily and between 16 and 25 days after administration neurological signs as incoordination and ataxia were detected in six of them. Biopsies of tibial and laryngeal nerves were performed as soon as neurotoxicity was diagnosed, and after death fragments of selected nerves were collected together with CNS tissues for light and electron microscopy and teased fiber studies. Laryngeal, tibial and sciatic nerves showed the most pronouced changes, consisting chiefly of wallerian degeneration that was seen either as a single fiber or as a complete fascicle feature. Exams performed after death clearly showed regenerating fascicles with axonal sprouts growing within a Schwann cell old basal lamina, and some thinly myelinated axonal sprouts.

  2. MORPHOLOGICAL ADJUSTMENTS OF THE RADIAL NERVE ARE INTENSITY-DEPENDENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Oliva Carbone

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Peripheral nerve adaptation is critical for strength gains. However, information about intensity effects on nerve morphology is scarce. Objective: To compare the effects of different intensities of resistance training on radial nerve structures. Methods: Rats were divided into three groups: control (GC, training with 50% (GF1 and training 75% (GF2 of the animal’s body weight. The morphological analysis of the nerve was done by light and transmission electron microscopy. One-way ANOVA and the Tukey’s post hoc test were applied and the significance level was set at p≤0.05. Results: Training groups had an increase of strength compared to GC (p≤0.05. All measured nerve components (mean area and diameter of myelin fibers and axons, mean area and thickness of the myelin sheath, and of neurofilaments and microtubules were higher in GF2 compared to the other (p≤0.05. Conclusion: Results demonstrated greater morphological changes on radial nerve after heavier loads. This can be important for rehabilitation therapies, training, and progression.

  3. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in normals measured by spectral domain OCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendschneider, Delia; Tornow, Ralf P; Horn, Folkert K; Laemmer, Robert; Roessler, Christopher W; Juenemann, Anselm G; Kruse, Friedrich E; Mardin, Christian Y

    2010-09-01

    To determine normal values for peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFL) measured by spectral domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SOCT) in healthy white adults and to examine the relationship of RNFL with age, gender, and clinical variables. The peripapillary RNFL of 170 healthy patients (96 males and 74 females, age 20 to 78 y) was imaged with a high-resolution SOCT (Spectralis HRA+OCT, Heidelberg Engineering) in an observational cross-sectional study. RNFL thickness was measured around the optic nerve head using 16 automatically averaged, consecutive circular B-scans with 3.4-mm diameter. The automatically segmented RNFL thickness was divided into 32 segments (11.25 degrees each). One randomly selected eye per subject entered the study. Mean RNFL thickness in the study population was 97.2 ± 9.7 μm. Mean RNFL thickness was significantly negatively correlated with age (r = -0.214, P = 0.005), mean RNFL decrease per decade was 1.90 μm. As age dependency was different in different segments, age-correction of RNFL values was made for all segments separately. Age-adjusted RNFL thickness showed a significant correlation with axial length (r = -0.391, P = 0.001) and with refractive error (r = 0.396, P<0.001), but not with disc size (r = 0.124). Normal RNFL results with SOCT are comparable to those reported with time-domain OCT. In accordance with the literature on other devices, RNFL thickness measured with SOCT was significantly correlated with age and axial length. For creating a normative database of SOCT RNFL values have to be age adjusted.

  4. Imaging retinal nerve fiber bundles using optical coherence tomography with adaptive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocaoglu, Omer P; Cense, Barry; Jonnal, Ravi S; Wang, Qiang; Lee, Sangyeol; Gao, Weihua; Miller, Donald T

    2011-08-15

    Early detection of axonal tissue loss in retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) is critical for effective treatment and management of diseases such as glaucoma. This study aims to evaluate the capability of ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography with adaptive optics (UHR-AO-OCT) for imaging the RNFL axonal bundles (RNFBs) with 3×3×3μm(3) resolution in the eye. We used a research-grade UHR-AO-OCT system to acquire 3°×3° volumes in four normal subjects and one subject with an arcuate retinal nerve fiber layer defect (n=5; 29-62years). Cross section (B-scans) and en face (C-scan) slices extracted from the volumes were used to assess visibility and size distribution of individual RNFBs. In one subject, we reimaged the same RNFBs twice over a 7month interval and compared bundle width and thickness between the two imaging sessions. Lastly we compared images of an arcuate RNFL defect acquired with UHR-AO-OCT and commercial OCT (Heidelberg Spectralis). Individual RNFBs were distinguishable in all subjects at 3° retinal eccentricity in both cross-sectional and en face views (width: 30-50μm, thickness: 10-15μm). At 6° retinal eccentricity, RNFBs were distinguishable in three of the five subjects in both views (width: 30-45μm, thickness: 20-40μm). Width and thickness RNFB measurements taken 7months apart were strongly correlated (p<0.0005). Mean difference and standard deviation of the differences between the two measurement sessions were -0.1±4.0μm (width) and 0.3±1.5μm (thickness). UHR-AO-OCT outperformed commercial OCT in terms of clarity of the microscopic retina. To our knowledge, these are the first measurements of RNFB cross section reported in the living human eye. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Persistent alterations in active and passive electrical membrane properties of regenerated nerve fibers of man and mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldovan, Mihai; Alvarez Herrero, Susana; Rosberg, Mette R.

    2016-01-01

    Excitability of regenerated fibers remains impaired due to changes in both passive cable properties and alterations in the voltage-dependent membrane function. These abnormalities were studied by mathematical modeling in human regenerated nerves and experimental studies in mice. In three adult male...... activity protocol triggered partial Wallerian degeneration in regenerated nerves but not in control nerves from age-matched mice. The current data suggest that the nodal voltage-gated ion channel machinery is restored in regenerated axons, although the electrical separation from the internodal compartment...... remains compromised. Due to the persistent increase in number of nodes, the increased activity-dependent Na+ influx could lead to hyperactivity of the Na+/K+ pump resulting in membrane hyperpolarization and neurotoxic energy insufficiency during strenuous activity....

  6. Diffusion tensor imaging with quantitative evaluation and fiber tractography of lumbar nerve roots in sciatica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Yin; Zong, Min; Xu, Xiaoquan; Zou, Yuefen; Feng, Yang; Liu, Wei; Wang, Chuanbing; Wang, Dehang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •In the present study, we first elected ROIs corresponding to the proximal, medial, and distal levels of the lumbar foraminal zone. •The ROC analysis for FA values of distal nerves indicated a high level of reliability in the diagnosis of sciatica. •The declining trend of FA values from proximal to distal along the nerve tract may correlate with the disparity of axonal regeneration at different levels. •DTI is able to quantitatively evaluate compressed nerve roots and has a higher sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing sciatica than conventional MR imaging. •DTT enables visualization of abnormal nerve tracts, providing vivid anatomic information and probable localization of nerve compression. -- Abstract: Objective: To quantitatively evaluate nerve roots by measuring fractional anisotropy (FA) values in healthy volunteers and sciatica patients, visualize nerve roots by tractography, and compare the diagnostic efficacy between conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and DTI. Materials and methods: Seventy-five sciatica patients and thirty-six healthy volunteers underwent MR imaging using DTI. FA values for L5–S1 lumbar nerve roots were calculated at three levels from DTI images. Tractography was performed on L3–S1 nerve roots. ROC analysis was performed for FA values. Results: The lumbar nerve roots were visualized and FA values were calculated in all subjects. FA values decreased in compressed nerve roots and declined from proximal to distal along the compressed nerve tracts. Mean FA values were more sensitive and specific than MR imaging for differentiating compressed nerve roots, especially in the far lateral zone at distal nerves. Conclusions: DTI can quantitatively evaluate compressed nerve roots, and DTT enables visualization of abnormal nerve tracts, providing vivid anatomic information and localization of probable nerve compression. DTI has great potential utility for evaluating lumbar nerve compression in sciatica

  7. Diffusion tensor imaging with quantitative evaluation and fiber tractography of lumbar nerve roots in sciatica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Yin; Zong, Min; Xu, Xiaoquan; Zou, Yuefen; Feng, Yang; Liu, Wei; Wang, Chuanbing; Wang, Dehang, E-mail: njmu_wangdehang@126.com

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •In the present study, we first elected ROIs corresponding to the proximal, medial, and distal levels of the lumbar foraminal zone. •The ROC analysis for FA values of distal nerves indicated a high level of reliability in the diagnosis of sciatica. •The declining trend of FA values from proximal to distal along the nerve tract may correlate with the disparity of axonal regeneration at different levels. •DTI is able to quantitatively evaluate compressed nerve roots and has a higher sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing sciatica than conventional MR imaging. •DTT enables visualization of abnormal nerve tracts, providing vivid anatomic information and probable localization of nerve compression. -- Abstract: Objective: To quantitatively evaluate nerve roots by measuring fractional anisotropy (FA) values in healthy volunteers and sciatica patients, visualize nerve roots by tractography, and compare the diagnostic efficacy between conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and DTI. Materials and methods: Seventy-five sciatica patients and thirty-six healthy volunteers underwent MR imaging using DTI. FA values for L5–S1 lumbar nerve roots were calculated at three levels from DTI images. Tractography was performed on L3–S1 nerve roots. ROC analysis was performed for FA values. Results: The lumbar nerve roots were visualized and FA values were calculated in all subjects. FA values decreased in compressed nerve roots and declined from proximal to distal along the compressed nerve tracts. Mean FA values were more sensitive and specific than MR imaging for differentiating compressed nerve roots, especially in the far lateral zone at distal nerves. Conclusions: DTI can quantitatively evaluate compressed nerve roots, and DTT enables visualization of abnormal nerve tracts, providing vivid anatomic information and localization of probable nerve compression. DTI has great potential utility for evaluating lumbar nerve compression in sciatica.

  8. Variations in retinal nerve fiber layer measurements on optical coherence tomography after implantation of trifocal intraocular lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Bella, Javier; Martínez de la Casa, José M; Talavero González, Paula; Fernández-Vigo, José I; Valcarce Rial, Laura; García-Feijóo, Julián

    2018-01-01

    To establish the changes produced after implantation of a trifocal intraocular lens (IOL) on retinal nerve fiber layer measurements performed with Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT). This prospective study included 100 eyes of 50 patients with bilateral cataract in surgical range, no other associated ocular involvement, refractive errors between +5 and -5 spherical diopters, and less than 1.5 D of corneal astigmatism. The eyes were operated by phacoemulsification with implantation of 2 different trifocal IOLs (FineVision and AT LISA tri 839MP) in randomized equal groups. Cirrus OCT and Spectralis OCT were performed before surgery and 3 months later. Both analyzed the thickness of the nerve fiber layer and thickness divided by quadrants (6 in case of Spectralis and 4 in case of Cirrus HD). The mean age of patients was 67.5 ± 5.8 years. The global nerve fiber layer thickness measured with Spectralis OCT was 96.77 μm before surgery and 99.55 μm after. With Cirrus OCT, the global thickness was 85.29 μm before surgery and 89.77 μm after. Statistically significant differences in global thickness measurements between preimplantation and postimplantation of the IOL were found with both OCT in the 2 groups. Statistically significant differences were also found in temporal and superior quadrants. The implantation of a diffractive trifocal IOL alters the results of the optic nerve fiber layer on Fourier-domain OCT in these patients, which should be taken into account in the posterior study of these patients.

  9. Paradoxical thinning of the retinal nerve fiber layer after reversal of cupping: A case report of primary infantile glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ta Chen Chang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The circumpapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL thickness was assessed by spectral domain optical coherent tomography (SD-OCT before and after surgical reduction of intraocular pressure in an eye with primary infantile glaucoma. In this case, a postoperative reduction of cupping and a subsequent increase in neuroretinal rim area is associated with a paradoxical thinning of the RNFL. This is the first-known characterization of cupping reversal using SD-OCT.

  10. Changes in retinal nerve fiber layer thickness after spinal surgery in the prone position: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baran Gencer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Changes in ocular perfusion play an important role in the pathogenesis of ischemic optic neuropathy. Ocular perfusion pressure is equal to mean arterial pressure minus intraocular pressure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in the intraocular pressure and the retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in patients undergoing spinal surgery in the prone position. METHODS: This prospective study included 30 patients undergoing spinal surgery. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness were measured one day before and after the surgery by using optical coherence tomography. Intraocular pressure was measured by tonopen six times at different position and time-duration: supine position (baseline; 10 min after intubation (Supine 1; 10 (Prone 1, 60 (Prone 2, 120 (Prone 3 min after prone position; and just after postoperative supine position (Supine 2. RESULTS: Our study involved 10 male and 20 female patients with the median age of 57 years. When postoperative retinal nerve fiber layer thickness measurements were compared with preoperative values, a statistically significant thinning was observed in inferior and nasal quadrants (p = 0.009 and p = 0.003, respectively. We observed a statistically significant intraocular pressure decrease in Supine 1 and an increase in both Prone 2 and Prone 3 when compared to the baseline. Mean arterial pressure and ocular perfusion pressure were found to be significantly lower in Prone 1, Prone 2 and Prone 3, when compared with the baseline. CONCLUSIONS: Our study has shown increase in intraocular pressure during spinal surgery in prone position. A statistically significant retinal nerve fiber layer thickness thinning was seen in inferior and nasal quadrants one day after the spinal surgery.

  11. Localization of substance P, calcitonin gene related peptide and galanin in the nerve fibers of porcine cystic ovaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Majewski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In a previous study, we showed that both the noradrenergic and cholinergic component of ovarian innervation is markedly changed in porcine cystic ovaries. The present study is aimed at elucidating the distribution pattern of substance P- (SP, calcitonin gene related peptide CGRP- and/or galanin (GAL-containing nerve fibers within porcine cystic ovaries. The status polycysticus was induced by dexamethasone phosphate disodium salt i.m. injections performed from the 7th until the 21st day of the first studied estrous cycle. During the same period of time, gilts of the control group received saline. All animals were slaughtered on the expected 11th day of the second studied estrous cycle, and their ovaries were collected. When compared to control gonad, a distinct difference in the distribution pattern and the density of SP-, CGRP- and/or GAL-immunoreactive (GAL-IR nerve fibers was observed. Thus, unlike in the control gonad, SP- and/or CGRP-IR perivascular nerve fibers were found to supply medullar blood vessels of polycystic ovary. Furthermore, the number of GAL-IR nerve fibers contributing to the ground plexus in polycystic ovaries was higher than that observed in the control gonads. Thus, as may be judged from the profound changes in the distribution pattern of differently chemically coded afferent terminals within polycystic gonads, it appears possible that neuropeptides released from these terminals may take part in the etiopathogenesis of this disorder. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011; Vol. 49, No. 4, pp. 622–630

  12. High Spatial Resolution Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Human Optic Nerve Lipids and Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David M. G.; Spraggins, Jeffrey M.; Rose, Kristie L.; Schey, Kevin L.

    2015-06-01

    The human optic nerve carries signals from the retina to the visual cortex of the brain. Each optic nerve is comprised of approximately one million nerve fibers that are organized into bundles of 800-1200 fibers surrounded by connective tissue and supportive glial cells. Damage to the optic nerve contributes to a number of blinding diseases including: glaucoma, neuromyelitis optica, optic neuritis, and neurofibromatosis; however, the molecular mechanisms of optic nerve damage and death are incompletely understood. Herein we present high spatial resolution MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) analysis of lipids and proteins to define the molecular anatomy of the human optic nerve. The localization of a number of lipids was observed in discrete anatomical regions corresponding to myelinated and unmyelinated nerve regions as well as to supporting connective tissue, glial cells, and blood vessels. A protein fragment from vimentin, a known intermediate filament marker for astrocytes, was observed surrounding nerved fiber bundles in the lamina cribrosa region. S100B was also found in supporting glial cell regions in the prelaminar region, and the hemoglobin alpha subunit was observed in blood vessel areas. The molecular anatomy of the optic nerve defined by MALDI IMS provides a firm foundation to study biochemical changes in blinding human diseases.

  13. Diffusion tensor imaging with quantitative evaluation and fiber tractography of lumbar nerve roots in sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yin; Zong, Min; Xu, Xiaoquan; Zou, Yuefen; Feng, Yang; Liu, Wei; Wang, Chuanbing; Wang, Dehang

    2015-04-01

    To quantitatively evaluate nerve roots by measuring fractional anisotropy (FA) values in healthy volunteers and sciatica patients, visualize nerve roots by tractography, and compare the diagnostic efficacy between conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and DTI. Seventy-five sciatica patients and thirty-six healthy volunteers underwent MR imaging using DTI. FA values for L5-S1 lumbar nerve roots were calculated at three levels from DTI images. Tractography was performed on L3-S1 nerve roots. ROC analysis was performed for FA values. The lumbar nerve roots were visualized and FA values were calculated in all subjects. FA values decreased in compressed nerve roots and declined from proximal to distal along the compressed nerve tracts. Mean FA values were more sensitive and specific than MR imaging for differentiating compressed nerve roots, especially in the far lateral zone at distal nerves. DTI can quantitatively evaluate compressed nerve roots, and DTT enables visualization of abnormal nerve tracts, providing vivid anatomic information and localization of probable nerve compression. DTI has great potential utility for evaluating lumbar nerve compression in sciatica. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Optic Nerve Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    The optic nerve is a bundle of more than 1 million nerve fibers that carry visual messages. You have one connecting ... retina) to your brain. Damage to an optic nerve can cause vision loss. The type of vision ...

  15. Automated retinal nerve fiber layer defect detection using fundus imaging in glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Rashmi; Puhan, N B; Rao, Aparna; Padhy, Debananda; Panda, Ganapati

    2018-06-01

    Retinal nerve fiber layer defect (RNFLD) provides an early objective evidence of structural changes in glaucoma. RNFLD detection is currently carried out using imaging modalities like OCT and GDx which are expensive for routine practice. In this regard, we propose a novel automatic method for RNFLD detection and angular width quantification using cost effective redfree fundus images to be practically useful for computer-assisted glaucoma risk assessment. After blood vessel inpainting and CLAHE based contrast enhancement, the initial boundary pixels are identified by local minima analysis of the 1-D intensity profiles on concentric circles. The true boundary pixels are classified using random forest trained by newly proposed cumulative zero count local binary pattern (CZC-LBP) and directional differential energy (DDE) along with Shannon, Tsallis entropy and intensity features. Finally, the RNFLD angular width is obtained by random sample consensus (RANSAC) line fitting on the detected set of boundary pixels. The proposed method is found to achieve high RNFLD detection performance on a newly created dataset with sensitivity (SN) of 0.7821 at 0.2727 false positives per image (FPI) and the area under curve (AUC) value is obtained as 0.8733. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Macular and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in children with hyperopic anisometropic amblyopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang-Qing Wu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To compare the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL thickness and macular thickness in the amblyopic eye with that in the sound eye of children with hyperopic anisometropic amblyopia using optical coherence tomography (OCT.METHODS: A prospective, nonrandom, intraindividual comparative cohort study includes 72 children with hyperopic anisometropic amblyopia in a single center. Macular thickness, macular foveola thickness, and peripapillary RNFL thickness were compared between the amblyopia eyes and the contralateral sound eyes.RESULTS:There were 38 male and 34 female patients, with a mean age as 9.7±1.9 years (range, 5–16 years. Hyperopic was +3.62±1.16D (range +2.00D to +6.50D in the amblyopic eyes, which was significantly higher in the control eyes with +0.76±0.90D (range 0D to +2.00D (P P = 0.02. The mean macular foveola thickness was significantly thicker in the amblyopic eyes than the contralateral sound eyes (181.4±14.2µm vs 175.2±13.3µm, P CONCLUSION:Eyes with hyperopic anisometropic amblyopia are found thicker macular foveola and peripapillary RNFL than the contralateral eyes in children.

  17. Perimetric and retinal nerve fiber layer findings in patients with Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsironi Evangelia E

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Visual dysfunction is common in Parkinson’s disease (PD. It remains, however, unknown whether it is related to structural alterations of the retina. The aim of this study is to compare visual field (VF findings and circumpapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL thickness in a series of PD patients and normal controls, in order to assess possible retinal anatomical changes and/or functional damage associated with PD. Methods PD patients and controls were recruited and underwent VF testing with static automated perimetry and RNFL examination with optical coherence tomography (OCT. Cognitive performance using Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE, PD staging using modified Hoehn and Yahr (H-Y scale and duration of the disease was recorded in PD patients. Results One randomly selected eye from each of 24 patients and 24 age-matched controls was included. OCT RNFL thickness analysis revealed no difference in the inferior, superior, nasal or temporal sectors between the groups. The average peripapillary RNFL was also similar in the two groups. However, perimetric indices of generalized sensitivity loss (mean deviation and localized scotomas (pattern standard deviation were worse in patients with PD compared to controls (p  Conclusion PD patients may demonstrate glaucomatous-like perimetric defects even in the absence of decreased RNFL thickness.

  18. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Can Induce Angiogenesis and Regeneration of Nerve Fibers in Traumatic Brain Injury Patients

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    Sigal Tal

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent clinical studies in stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI victims suffering chronic neurological injury present evidence that hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT can induce neuroplasticity.Objective: To assess the neurotherapeutic effect of HBOT on prolonged post-concussion syndrome (PPCS due to TBI, using brain microstructure imaging.Methods: Fifteen patients afflicted with PPCS were treated with 60 daily HBOT sessions. Imaging evaluation was performed using Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast-Enhanced (DSC and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI MR sequences. Cognitive evaluation was performed by an objective computerized battery (NeuroTrax.Results: HBOT was initiated 6 months to 27 years (10.3 ± 3.2 years from injury. After HBOT, DTI analysis showed significantly increased fractional anisotropy values and decreased mean diffusivity in both white and gray matter structures. In addition, the cerebral blood flow and volume were increased significantly. Clinically, HBOT induced significant improvement in the memory, executive functions, information processing speed and global cognitive scores.Conclusions: The mechanisms by which HBOT induces brain neuroplasticity can be demonstrated by highly sensitive MRI techniques of DSC and DTI. HBOT can induce cerebral angiogenesis and improve both white and gray microstructures indicating regeneration of nerve fibers. The micro structural changes correlate with the neurocognitive improvements.

  19. Agreement of Two Different Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Instruments for Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Measurements

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    Hooshang Faghihi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To determine the agreement between Spectralis and Cirrus spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT measurements of peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL thickness. Methods: Suspected or confirmed cases of glaucoma who met the inclusion criteria underwent peripapillary RNFL thickness measurement using both the Spectralis and Cirrus on the same day within a few minutes. Results: Measurements were performed on 103 eyes of 103 patients with mean age of 50.4±17.7 years. Mean RNFL thickness was 89.22±15.87 versus 84.54±13.68 μm using Spectralis and Cirrus, respectively. The difference between measurements and the average of paired measurements with the two devices showed a significant linear relationship. Bland-Altman plots demonstrated that Spectralis thickness values were systematically larger than that of Cirrus. Conclusion: Spectralis OCT generates higher peripapillary RNFL thickness readings as compared to Cirrus OCT; this should be kept in mind when values obtained with different instruments are compared during follow-up.

  20. Cone dysfunctions in retinitis pigmentosa with retinal nerve fiber layer thickening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobacı, Güngör; Ozge, Gökhan; Gündoğan, Fatih Ç

    2012-01-01

    To investigate whether or not thicker retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) in retinitis pigmentosa (RP) patients relates to functional abnormalities of the photoreceptors. Optical coherence tomography-based RNFL thickness was measured by Stratus-3™ (Zeiss, Basel, Switzerland) optical coherence tomography and electroretinogram (ERG) recordings made using the RETI-port(®) system (Roland, Wiesbaden, Germany) in 27 patients with retinitis pigmentosa and in 30 healthy subjects. Photopic ERG b-wave amplitude, cone ERG b-wave latency, 30 Hz flicker amplitude, and 30 Hz flicker latency had significant correlations to the RNFL-temporal (r = -0.55, P = 0.004, r = 0.68, P = 0.001, r = -0.65, P = 0.001, and r = -0.52, P = 0.007, respectively). Eyes with thicker RNFL (ten eyes) differed significantly from those with thinner RNFL (eight eyes) regarding cone ERG b-wave latency values only (P = 0.001). Thicker RNFL in patients with retinitis pigmentosa may be associated with functional abnormality of the cone system.

  1. Retina nerve fiber layer and choroidal thickness changes in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozge, Gokhan; Dogan, Deniz; Koylu, Mehmet Talay; Ayyildiz, Onder; Akincioglu, Dorukcan; Mumcuoglu, Tarkan; Mutlu, Fatih Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) on the submacular and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and choroidal thickness (ChT). Eighty-four eyes of 42 male patients with OSAS and 112 eyes of 56 aged-matched and body mass index-matched healthy male subjects were enrolled in this case-control study. The ChT and peripapillary RNFL thickness was measured using enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography. The ChT and RNFL thickness measurements of the groups were compared, and correlations among the Apnea Hypopnea Index (AHI) values and these measurements were calculated. Right and left eyes were separately evaluated. There were no significant differences in the subfoveal and temporal ChT between the groups (p > 0.05). The OSAS group had significantly thicker ChT at 0.5 and 1.5 mm nasal to the fovea in both eyes than the control group (p 0.05). Between AHI and mean RNFL thickness showed a median negative correlation (r = - 0.411, p = 0.001). The choroidal thickening in patients with OSAS may be associated with the pathophysiology of the neurodegeneration process of the disease.

  2. Retinal nerve fiber layer and ganglion cell complex thickness in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Demir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the following study is to evaluate the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL and ganglion cell complex (GCC thickness in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM. Materials and Methods: Average, inferior, and superior values of RNFL and GCC thickness were measured in 123 patients using spectral domain optical coherence tomography. The values of participants with DM were compared to controls. Diabetic patients were collected in Groups 1, 2 and 3. Group 1 = 33 participants who had no diabetic retinopathy (DR; Group 2 = 30 participants who had mild nonproliferative DR and Group 3 = 30 participants who had moderate non-proliferative DR. The 30 healthy participants collected in Group 4. Analysis of variance test and a multiple linear regression analysis were used for statistical analysis. Results: The values of RNFL and GCC in the type 2 diabetes were thinner than controls, but this difference was not statistically significant. Conclusions: This study showed that there is a nonsignificant loss of RNFL and GCC in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  3. Detection of retinal nerve fiber layer defects in retinal fundus images using Gabor filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yoshinori; Nakagawa, Toshiaki; Hatanaka, Yuji; Aoyama, Akira; Kakogawa, Masakatsu; Hara, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Tetsuya

    2007-03-01

    Retinal nerve fiber layer defect (NFLD) is one of the most important findings for the diagnosis of glaucoma reported by ophthalmologists. However, such changes could be overlooked, especially in mass screenings, because ophthalmologists have limited time to search for a number of different changes for the diagnosis of various diseases such as diabetes, hypertension and glaucoma. Therefore, the use of a computer-aided detection (CAD) system can improve the results of diagnosis. In this work, a technique for the detection of NFLDs in retinal fundus images is proposed. In the preprocessing step, blood vessels are "erased" from the original retinal fundus image by using morphological filtering. The preprocessed image is then transformed into a rectangular array. NFLD regions are observed as vertical dark bands in the transformed image. Gabor filtering is then applied to enhance the vertical dark bands. False positives (FPs) are reduced by a rule-based method which uses the information of the location and the width of each candidate region. The detected regions are back-transformed into the original configuration. In this preliminary study, 71% of NFLD regions are detected with average number of FPs of 3.2 per image. In conclusion, we have developed a technique for the detection of NFLDs in retinal fundus images. Promising results have been obtained in this initial study.

  4. Thickness related textural properties of retinal nerve fiber layer in color fundus images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odstrcilik, Jan; Kolar, Radim; Tornow, Ralf-Peter; Jan, Jiri; Budai, Attila; Mayer, Markus; Vodakova, Martina; Laemmer, Robert; Lamos, Martin; Kuna, Zdenek; Gazarek, Jiri; Kubena, Tomas; Cernosek, Pavel; Ronzhina, Marina

    2014-09-01

    Images of ocular fundus are routinely utilized in ophthalmology. Since an examination using fundus camera is relatively fast and cheap procedure, it can be used as a proper diagnostic tool for screening of retinal diseases such as the glaucoma. One of the glaucoma symptoms is progressive atrophy of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) resulting in variations of the RNFL thickness. Here, we introduce a novel approach to capture these variations using computer-aided analysis of the RNFL textural appearance in standard and easily available color fundus images. The proposed method uses the features based on Gaussian Markov random fields and local binary patterns, together with various regression models for prediction of the RNFL thickness. The approach allows description of the changes in RNFL texture, directly reflecting variations in the RNFL thickness. Evaluation of the method is carried out on 16 normal ("healthy") and 8 glaucomatous eyes. We achieved significant correlation (normals: ρ=0.72±0.14; p≪0.05, glaucomatous: ρ=0.58±0.10; p≪0.05) between values of the model predicted output and the RNFL thickness measured by optical coherence tomography, which is currently regarded as a standard glaucoma assessment device. The evaluation thus revealed good applicability of the proposed approach to measure possible RNFL thinning. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Neutron scattering from myelin revisited: bilayer asymmetry and water-exchange kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denninger, Andrew R. [Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 (United States); Demé, Bruno; Cristiglio, Viviana [Institut Laue–Langevin (ILL), CS 20156, F-38042 Grenoble CEDEX 9 (France); LeDuc, Géraldine [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), CS 40220, F-38043 Grenoble CEDEX 9 (France); Feller, W. Bruce [NOVA Scientific Inc., Sturbridge, MA 01566 (United States); Kirschner, Daniel A., E-mail: kirschnd@bc.edu [Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The structure of internodal myelin in the rodent central and peripheral nervous systems has been determined using neutron diffraction. The kinetics of water exchange in these tissues is also described. Rapid nerve conduction in the central and peripheral nervous systems (CNS and PNS, respectively) of higher vertebrates is brought about by the ensheathment of axons with myelin, a lipid-rich, multilamellar assembly of membranes. The ability of myelin to electrically insulate depends on the regular stacking of these plasma membranes and on the presence of a number of specialized membrane-protein assemblies in the sheath, including the radial component, Schmidt–Lanterman incisures and the axo–glial junctions of the paranodal loops. The disruption of this fine-structure is the basis for many demyelinating neuropathies in the CNS and PNS. Understanding the processes that govern myelin biogenesis, maintenance and destabilization requires knowledge of myelin structure; however, the tight packing of internodal myelin and the complexity of its junctional specializations make myelin a challenging target for comprehensive structural analysis. This paper describes an examination of myelin from the CNS and PNS using neutron diffraction. This investigation revealed the dimensions of the bilayers and aqueous spaces of myelin, asymmetry between the cytoplasmic and extracellular leaflets of the membrane, and the distribution of water and exchangeable hydrogen in internodal multilamellar myelin. It also uncovered differences between CNS and PNS myelin in their water-exchange kinetics.

  6. Myelin repair by Schwann cells in the regenerating goldfish visual pathway: regional patterns revealed by X-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nona, S.N.; Stafford, C.A.; Cronly-Dillon, J.R. (Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Inst. of Science and Technology); Duncan, A. (Guy' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Anatomy); Scholes, J. (University Coll., London (United Kingdom))

    1994-07-01

    In the regenerating goldfish optic nerves, Schwann cells of unknown origin reliably infiltrate the lesion site forming a band of peripheral-type myelinating tissue by 1-2 months, sharply demarcated form the adjacent new CNS myelin. To investigate this effect, we have interfered with cell proliferation by locally X-irradiating the fish visual pathway 24 h after the lesion. As assayed by immunohistochemistry and EM, irradiation retards until 6 months formation of new myelin by Schwann cells at the lesion site, and virtually abolishes oligodendrocyte myelination distally, but has little or no effect on nerve fibre regrowth. Optic nerve astrocyte processes normally fail to re-infiltrate the lesion, but re-occupy it after irradiation, suggesting that they are normally excluded by early cell proliferation at this site. Moreover, scattered myelinating Schwann cells also appear in the oligodendrocyte-depleted distal optic nerve after irradiation, although only as far as the optic tract. (Author).

  7. Maternal exposure to hexachlorophene targets intermediate-stage progenitor cells of the hippocampal neurogenesis in rat offspring via dysfunction of cholinergic inputs by myelin vacuolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itahashi, Megu; Abe, Hajime; Tanaka, Takeshi; Mizukami, Sayaka; Kimura, Masayuki; Yoshida, Toshinori; Shibutani, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The effect of maternal exposure to HCP on rat hippocampal neurogenesis was examined. • HCP induces myelin vacuolation of nerve tracts in the septal–hippocampal pathway. • Myelin changes suppress Chrnb2-mediated cholinergic inputs to the dentate gyrus. • SGZ apoptosis occurs via the mitochondrial pathway and targets type-2b cells. • Dysfunction of cholinergic inputs is related to type-2b SGZ cell apoptosis. - Abstract: Hexachlorophene (HCP) is known to induce myelin vacuolation corresponding to intramyelinic edema of nerve fibers in the central and peripheral nervous system in animals. This study investigated the effect of maternal exposure to HCP on hippocampal neurogenesis in rat offspring using pregnant rats supplemented with 0 (controls), 100, or 300 ppm HCP in the diet from gestational day 6 to day 21 after delivery. On postnatal day (PND) 21, the numbers of T box brain 2 + progenitor cells and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling + apoptotic cells in the hippocampal subgranular zone (SGZ) decreased in female offspring at 300 ppm, which was accompanied by myelin vacuolation and punctate tubulin beta-3 chain staining of nerve fibers in the hippocampal fimbria. In addition, transcript levels of the cholinergic receptor, nicotinic beta 2 (Chrnb2) and B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (Bcl2) decreased in the dentate gyrus. HCP-exposure did not alter the numbers of SGZ proliferating cells and reelin- or calcium-binding protein-expressing γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic interneuron subpopulations in the dentate hilus on PND 21 and PND 77. Although some myelin vacuolation remained, all other changes observed in HCP-exposed offspring on PND 21 disappeared on PND 77. These results suggest that maternal HCP exposure reversibly decreases type-2b intermediate-stage progenitor cells via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in offspring hippocampal neurogenesis at 300 ppm HCP. Neurogenesis may be affected by dysfunction

  8. A multiparametric assay for quantitative nerve regeneration evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Weyn, Barbara; Van Remoortere, M; Nuydens, R; Meert, Theo; Van de Wouwer, G

    2005-01-01

    We introduce an assay for the semi-automated quantification of nerve regeneration by image analysis. Digital images of histological sections of regenerated nerves are recorded using an automated inverted microscope and merged into high-resolution mosaic images representing the entire nerve. These are analysed by a dedicated image-processing package that computes nerve-specific features (e.g. nerve area, fibre count, myelinated area) and fibre-specific features (area, perimeter, myelin sheet t...

  9. Retinal ganglion cell-inner plexiform and nerve fiber layers in neuromyelitis optica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Sai-Jing; Lu, Pei-Rong

    2018-01-01

    To determine the thickness of the retinal ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer (GCIPL) and the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) in patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO). We conducted a cross-sectional study that included 30 NMO patients with a total of 60 eyes. Based on the presence or absence of optic neuritis (ON), subjects were divided into either the NMO-ON group (30 eyes) or the NMO-ON contra group (10 eyes). A detailed ophthalmologic examination was performed for each group; subsequently, the GCIPL and the RNFL were measured using high-definition optical coherence tomography (OCT). In the NMO-ON group, the mean GCIPL thickness was 69.28±21.12 µm, the minimum GCIPL thickness was 66.02±10.02 µm, and the RNFL thickness were 109.33±11.23, 110.47±3.10, 64.92±12.71 and 71.21±50.22 µm in the superior, inferior, temporal and nasal quadrants, respectively. In the NMO-ON contra group, the mean GCIPL thickness was 85.12±17.09 µm, the minimum GCIPL thickness was 25.39±25.1 µm, and the RNFL thicknesses were 148.33±23.22, 126.36±23.45, 82.21±22.30 and 83.36±31.28 µm in the superior, inferior, temporal and nasal quadrants, respectively. In the control group, the mean GCIPL thickness was 86.98±22.37 µm, the minimum GCIPL thickness was 85.28±10.75 µm, and the RNFL thicknesses were 150.22±22.73, 154.79±60.23, 82.33±7.01 and 85.62±13.81 µm in the superior, inferior, temporal and nasal quadrants, respectively. The GCIPL and RNFL were thinner in the NMO-ON contra group than in the control group ( P deviation (MD) and corrected pattern standard deviation (PSD) in the NMO-ON group ( P <0.05). The thickness of the GCIPL and RNFL, as measured using OCT, may indicate optic nerve damage in patients with NMO.

  10. Engineering a multimodal nerve conduit for repair of injured peripheral nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, A. F.; Bulluss, K. J.; Kyratzis, I. L. B.; Gilmore, K.; Mysore, T.; Schirmer, K. S. U.; Kennedy, E. L.; O'Shea, M.; Truong, Y. B.; Edwards, S. L.; Peeters, G.; Herwig, P.; Razal, J. M.; Campbell, T. E.; Lowes, K. N.; Higgins, M. J.; Moulton, S. E.; Murphy, M. A.; Cook, M. J.; Clark, G. M.; Wallace, G. G.; Kapsa, R. M. I.

    2013-02-01

    Injury to nerve tissue in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) results in long-term impairment of limb function, dysaesthesia and pain, often with associated psychological effects. Whilst minor injuries can be left to regenerate without intervention and short gaps up to 2 cm can be sutured, larger or more severe injuries commonly require autogenous nerve grafts harvested from elsewhere in the body (usually sensory nerves). Functional recovery is often suboptimal and associated with loss of sensation from the tissue innervated by the harvested nerve. The challenges that persist with nerve repair have resulted in development of nerve guides or conduits from non-neural biological tissues and various polymers to improve the prognosis for the repair of damaged nerves in the PNS. This study describes the design and fabrication of a multimodal controlled pore size nerve regeneration conduit using polylactic acid (PLA) and (PLA):poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) fibers within a neurotrophin-enriched alginate hydrogel. The nerve repair conduit design consists of two types of PLGA fibers selected specifically for promotion of axonal outgrowth and Schwann cell growth (75:25 for axons; 85:15 for Schwann cells). These aligned fibers are contained within the lumen of a knitted PLA sheath coated with electrospun PLA nanofibers to control pore size. The PLGA guidance fibers within the nerve repair conduit lumen are supported within an alginate hydrogel impregnated with neurotrophic factors (NT-3 or BDNF with LIF, SMDF and MGF-1) to provide neuroprotection, stimulation of axonal growth and Schwann cell migration. The conduit was used to promote repair of transected sciatic nerve in rats over a period of 4 weeks. Over this period, it was observed that over-grooming and self-mutilation (autotomy) of the limb implanted with the conduit was significantly reduced in rats implanted with the full-configuration conduit compared to rats implanted with conduits containing only an alginate

  11. Analysis of White Matter Damage in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis via a Novel In Vivo MR Method for Measuring Myelin, Axons, and G-Ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, A; Hori, M; Yokoyama, K; Nakazawa, M; Ueda, R; Horita, M; Andica, C; Abe, O; Aoki, S

    2017-10-01

    Myelin and axon volume fractions can now be estimated via MR imaging in vivo, as can the g-ratio, which equals the ratio of the inner to the outer diameter of a nerve fiber. The purpose of this study was to evaluate WM damage in patients with MS via this novel MR imaging technique. Twenty patients with relapsing-remitting MS with a combined total of 149 chronic plaques were analyzed. Myelin volume fraction was calculated based on simultaneous tissue relaxometry. Intracellular and CSF compartment volume fractions were quantified via neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging. Axon volume fraction and g-ratio were calculated by combining these measurements. Myelin and axon volume fractions and g-ratio were measured in plaques, periplaque WM, and normal-appearing WM. All metrics differed significantly across the 3 groups ( P ratio between periplaque WM and normal-appearing WM). Those in plaques differed most from those in normal-appearing WM. The percentage changes in plaque and periplaque WM metrics relative to normal-appearing WM were significantly larger in absolute value for myelin volume fraction than for axon volume fraction and g-ratio ( P ratio may potentially be useful for evaluating WM damage in patients with MS. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  12. A phenomenological model of the electrically stimulated auditory nerve fiber: temporal and biphasic response properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin eHorne

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a phenomenological model of electrically stimulated auditory nerve fibers (ANFs. The model reproduces the probabilistic and temporal properties of the ANF response to both monophasic and biphasic stimuli, in isolation. The main contribution of the model lies in its ability to reproduce statistics of the ANF response (mean latency, jitter, and firing probability under both monophasic and cathodic-anodic biphasic stimulation, without changing the model’s parameters. The response statistics of the model depend on stimulus level and duration of the stimulating pulse, reproducing trends observed in the ANF. In the case of biphasic stimulation, the model reproduces the effects of pseudomonophasic pulse shapes and also the dependence on the interphase gap (IPG of the stimulus pulse, an effect that is quantitatively reproduced. The model is fitted to ANF data using a procedure that uniquely determines each model parameter. It is thus possible to rapidly parameterize a large population of neurons to reproduce a given set of response statistic distributions.Our work extends the stochastic leaky integrate and fire (SLIF neuron, a well-studied phenomenological model of the electrically stimulated neuron. We extend the SLIF neuron so as to produce a realistic latency distribution by delaying the moment of spiking. During this delay, spiking may be abolished by anodic current. By this means, the probability of the model neuron responding to a stimulus is reduced when a trailing phase of opposite polarity is introduced. By introducing a minimum wait period that must elapse before a spike may be emitted, the model is able to reproduce the differences in the threshold level observed in the ANF for monophasic and biphasic stimuli. Thus, the ANF response to a large variety of pulse shapes are reproduced correctly by this model.

  13. Evaluation of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and choroidal thickness in pseudoexfoliative glaucoma and pseudoexfoliative syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozge, Gokhan; Koylu, Mehmet Talay; Mumcuoglu, Tarkan; Gundogan, Fatih Cakir; Ozgonul, Cem; Ayyildiz, Onder; Kucukevcilioglu, Murat

    2016-05-01

    To compare retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) and choroidal thickness (ChT) measurements in eyes with pseudoexfoliative (PEX) glaucoma, PEX syndrome and healthy control eyes. Eighteen patients with PEX glaucoma in one eye and PEX syndrome in the fellow eye were included. The right eyes of thirty-nine age- and sex-matched healthy subjects were included as control group. All participants underwent a detailed biomicroscopic and funduscopic examination. RNFLT and ChT measurements were performed with a commercially available spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). ChT measurements were performed by using enhanced depth imaging (EDI) mode. Patients with PEX underwent diurnal IOP measurements with 4-hour intervals before inclusion in the study. RNFLT results included the average measurement and 6 quadrants (temporal, inferotemporal, inferonasal, nasal, superonasal and supero-temporal). ChT measurements were performed in the subfoveal region and around the fovea (500µm and 1500 µm nasal and temporal to the fovea), as well as around the optic disc (average peripapillary and eight quadrants in the peripapillary region (temporal, inferotemporal, inferior, inferonasal, nasal, superonasal, superior, supero-temporal)). RNFLT in all quadrants and average thickness were significantly lower in PEX glaucoma eyes compared to PEX syndrome eyes and healthy control eyes (p0.05) except the inferotemporal quadrant. ChT measurements were similar between groups (p>0.05). Thinning of the RNFL in association with unchanged ChT may mean that the presence of PEX material is a much more significant risk factor than choroidal changes in the progression of PEX syndrome to PEX glaucoma.

  14. Additive diagnostic role of imaging in glaucoma: optical coherence tomography and retinal nerve fiber layer photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ko Eun; Kim, Seok Hwan; Oh, Sohee; Jeoung, Jin Wook; Suh, Min Hee; Seo, Je Hyun; Kim, Martha; Park, Ki Ho; Kim, Dong Myung

    2014-11-20

    To investigate the additive diagnostic role of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and red-free retinal nerve fiber layer photography (RNFLP) in making clinical glaucoma diagnosis. Four diagnostic combination sets, including the most recent image from each measurement of 196 glaucoma eyes (including the 44 preperimetric glaucoma eyes) and 101 healthy eyes, were prepared: (1) stereo disc photography and Humphrey visual field (SH), (2) SH and SD-OCT (SHO), (3) SH and RNFLP (SHR), and (4) SHR and SD-OCT (SHRO). Each randomly sorted set was serially presented at 1-month intervals to five glaucoma specialists who were asked to evaluate them in a subjective and independent manner. The specialists' glaucoma-diagnostic performances based on the sets were then compared. For each specialist, adding SD-OCT to SH or SHR increased the glaucoma-diagnostic sensitivity but not to a level of statistical significance. For one specialist, adding RNFLP to SH significantly increased the sensitivity. Each specialist showed a high level of specificity regardless of the diagnostic set. The overall sensitivity of all specialists' assessments was significantly increased by adding RNFLP or the combination of SD-OCT and RNFLP to SH (P < 0.001); however, adding SD-OCT to SH or SHR did not significantly increase the sensitivity. A similar relationship was noted also for the preperimetric glaucoma subgroup. In contrast to RNFLP, SD-OCT did not significantly enhance the diagnostic accuracy of detecting glaucoma or even of preperimetric glaucoma. Our results suggest that, at least for glaucoma specialists, the additive diagnostic role of OCT is limited. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  15. Evaluation of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thinning in Myopic Glaucoma: Impact of Optic Disc Morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Kyeong Ik; Lee, Won June; Kim, Young Kook; Park, Ki Ho; Jeoung, Jin Wook

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of optic disc torsion on the rate of progressive retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thinning in patients with myopic open-angle glaucoma. We included 102 patients with myopic open-angle glaucoma accompanied by glaucomatous damage confined to a single hemiretina who were followed up over a 5-year period. We divided the subjects into three groups according to the presence or absence of optic disc torsion and the correspondence between the direction of optic disc torsion and the location of glaucomatous damage: torsion with reverse correspondence group (eyes showing inferior optic disc torsion with glaucomatous damage in the superior quadrant or eyes showing superior torsion with damage in the inferior quadrant), no torsion group, and torsion with correspondence group (eyes showing inferior optic disc torsion with glaucomatous damage in the inferior quadrant or eyes showing superior torsion with damage in the superior quadrant). Changes in the peripapillary RNFL thickness (pRNFLT), evaluated using linear mixed model analysis, were compared among the three groups to determine the relationship between optic disc torsion and pRNFLT changes. Among the total of 102 subjects, 13 eyes (12.7%) exhibited optic disc torsion with reverse correspondence, 59 (57.8%) did not exhibit optic disc torsion, and 30 (29.4%) exhibited optic disc torsion with correspondence. pRNFL thinning in the quadrant with glaucomatous damage was significantly faster in the torsion with correspondence group (-1.66 μm/y) than those in the no torsion (-1.14 μm/y; P = 0.032) and torsion with reverse correspondence (-0.50 μm/y; P optic disc torsion-glaucomatous damage correspondence is an important prognostic factor for patients with myopic open-angle glaucoma.

  16. Are All Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Defects on Optic Coherence Tomography Glaucomatous?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gür Güngör, Sirel; Ahmet, Akman

    2017-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the patients who were referred to our clinic with a prediagnosis of glaucoma based on retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) defects on optic coherence tomography (OCT) but were determined to have nonglaucomatous RNLF defects upon detailed examination. The ophthalmic examination notes, OCT images, Heidelberg retinal tomography (HRT) II and fundus photographs of 357 patients were retrospectively evaluated. Final diagnoses of these patients were investigated. Of the 357 patients, 216 (60.5%) were diagnosed as open angle glaucoma, 33 (9.2%) as low-tension glaucoma, 39 (10.9%) as pre-perimetric glaucoma. The ophthalmic examinations of 14 patients (3.9%) were normal and there were no RNFL defects in OCT examinations after dilatation. In 39 patients (10.9%), the ophthalmic and optic disc examinations were completely normal and no etiologic factor explaining RNFL defects was found. Twenty-two eyes of 16 patients (4.5%) were included in this study (the mean age was 53.8±11.5 years; 9 men and 7 women). After detailed questioning of the medical history and systemic and neurologic examinations, a diagnosis of ischemic optic neuropathy was made in 11 eyes (10 patients) (2.8%), optic neuritis in 3 eyes (2 patients) (0.6%), optic disc drusen in 4 eyes (2 patients) (0.6%), pseudotumor cerebri in 2 eyes (1 patient) (0.3%), and cerebral palsy in 2 eyes (1 patient) (0.3%). Decrease in RNFL thickness on OCT images alone may be misleading in glaucoma examination. In cases where optic disc cupping is not evident, diagnosis should not be based on OCT RNFL examinations alone, and the patient's medical history, detailed ophthalmic examination, OCT optic disc parameters, HRT, and visual field tests should all be carefully evaluated together.

  17. Significant correlations between optic nerve head microcirculation and visual field defects and nerve fiber layer loss in glaucoma patients with myopic glaucomatous disk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yokoyama Y

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Yu Yokoyama, Naoko Aizawa, Naoki Chiba, Kazuko Omodaka, Masahiko Nakamura, Takaaki Otomo, Shunji Yokokura, Nobuo Fuse, Toru NakazawaDepartment of Ophthalmology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, JapanBackground: Eyes with glaucoma are characterized by optic neuropathy with visual field defects in the areas corresponding to the optic disk damage. The exact cause for the glaucomatous optic neuropathy has not been determined. Myopia has been shown to be a risk factor for glaucoma. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a significant correlation existed between the microcirculation of the optic disk and the visual field defects and the retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT in glaucoma patients with myopic optic disks.Methods: Sixty eyes of 60 patients with myopic disks were studied; 36 eyes with glaucoma (men:women = 19:17 and 24 eyes with no ocular diseases (men:women = 14:10. The mean deviation (MD determined by the Humphrey field analyzer, and the peripapillary RNFLT determined by the Stratus-OCT were compared between the two groups. The ocular circulation was determined by laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG, and the mean blur rate (MBR was compared between the two groups. The correlations between the RNFLT and MBR of the corresponding areas of the optic disk and between MD and MBR of the optic disk in the glaucoma group were determined by simple regression analyses.Results: The average MBR for the entire optic disk was significantly lower in the glaucoma group than that in the control group. The differences of the MBR for the tissue in the superior, inferior, and temporal quadrants of the optic disk between the two groups were significant. The MBR for the entire optic disk was significantly correlated with the MD (r = 0.58, P = 0.0002 and the average RNFLT (r = 0.53, P = 0.0008. The tissue MBR of the optic disk was significantly correlated with the RNFLT in the superior, inferior, and temporal quadrants

  18. Formation of compact myelin is required for maturation of the axonal cytoskeleton

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    Brady, S. T.; Witt, A. S.; Kirkpatrick, L. L.; de Waegh, S. M.; Readhead, C.; Tu, P. H.; Lee, V. M.

    1999-01-01

    Although traditional roles ascribed to myelinating glial cells are structural and supportive, the importance of compact myelin for proper functioning of the nervous system can be inferred from mutations in myelin proteins and neuropathologies associated with loss of myelin. Myelinating Schwann cells are known to affect local properties of peripheral axons (de Waegh et al., 1992), but little is known about effects of oligodendrocytes on CNS axons. The shiverer mutant mouse has a deletion in the myelin basic protein gene that eliminates compact myelin in the CNS. In shiverer mice, both local axonal features like phosphorylation of cytoskeletal proteins and neuronal perikaryon functions like cytoskeletal gene expression are altered. This leads to changes in the organization and composition of the axonal cytoskeleton in shiverer unmyelinated axons relative to age-matched wild-type myelinated fibers, although connectivity and patterns of neuronal activity are comparable. Remarkably, transgenic shiverer mice with thin myelin sheaths display an intermediate phenotype indicating that CNS neurons are sensitive to myelin sheath thickness. These results indicate that formation of a normal compact myelin sheath is required for normal maturation of the neuronal cytoskeleton in large CNS neurons.

  19. Allograft pretreatment for the repair of sciatic nerve defects: green tea polyphenols versus radiation

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    Sheng-hu Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pretreatment of nerve allografts by exposure to irradiation or green tea polyphenols can eliminate neuroimmunogenicity, inhibit early immunological rejection, encourage nerve regeneration and functional recovery, improve tissue preservation, and minimize postoperative infection. In the present study, we investigate which intervention achieves better results. We produced a 1.0 cm sciatic nerve defect in rats, and divided the rats into four treatment groups: autograft, fresh nerve allograft, green tea polyphenol-pretreated (1 mg/mL, 4°C nerve allograft, and irradiation-pretreated nerve allograft (26.39 Gy/min for 12 hours; total 19 kGy. The animals were observed, and sciatic nerve electrophysiology, histology, and transmission electron microscopy were carried out at 6 and 12 weeks after grafting. The circumference and structure of the transplanted nerve in rats that received autografts or green tea polyphenol-pretreated nerve allografts were similar to those of the host sciatic nerve. Compared with the groups that received fresh or irradiation-pretreated nerve allografts, motor nerve conduction velocity in the autograft and fresh nerve allograft groups was greater, more neurites grew into the allografts, Schwann cell proliferation was evident, and a large number of new blood vessels was observed; in addition, massive myelinated nerve fibers formed, and abundant microfilaments and microtubules were present in the axoplasm. Our findings indicate that nerve allografts pretreated by green tea polyphenols are equivalent to transplanting autologous nerves in the repair of sciatic nerve defects, and promote nerve regeneration. Pretreatment using green tea polyphenols is better than pretreatment with irradiation

  20. Pure neuritic leprosy: Resolving diagnostic issues in acid fast bacilli (AFB)-negative nerve biopsies: A single centre experience from South India.

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    Hui, Monalisa; Uppin, Megha S; Challa, Sundaram; Meena, A K; Kaul, Subhash

    2015-01-01

    Demonstration of lepra bacilli is essential for definite or unequivocal diagnosis of pure neuritic leprosy (PNL) on nerve biopsy. However, nerves always do not show bacilli owing to the changes of previous therapy or due to low bacillary load in tuberculoid forms. In absence of granuloma or lepra bacilli, other morphologic changes in endoneurium and perineurium can be of help in making a probable diagnosis of PNL and treating the patient with multidrug therapy. Forty-six biopsies of PNL were retrospectively reviewed and histologic findings were compared with 25 biopsies of non leprosy neuropathies (NLN) including vasculitic neuropathy and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). The distribution of endoneurial infiltrate and fibrosis, perineurial thickening, and myelin abnormalities were compared between PNL and NLN biopsies and analyzed by Chi-square test. Out of 46 PNL casses, 24 (52.17 %) biopsies were negative for acid fast bacilli (AFB). In these cases, the features which favor a diagnosis of AFB-negative PNL were endoneurial infiltrate (51.1%), endoneurial fibrosis (54.2%), perineurial thickening (70.8%), and reduced number of myelinated nerve fibers (75%). Nerve biopsy is an efficient tool to diagnose PNL and differentiate it from other causes of NLN. In absence of AFB, the diagnosis of PNL is challenging. In this article, we have satisfactorily evaluated the various hisopthological features and found that endoneurial inflammation, dense fibrosis, and reduction in the number of myelinated nerve fibers are strong supportive indicators of PNL regardless of AFB positivity.

  1. Raman spectroscopic detection of peripheral nerves towards nerve-sparing surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamikawa, Takeo; Harada, Yoshinori; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2017-02-01

    The peripheral nervous system plays an important role in motility, sensory, and autonomic functions of the human body. Preservation of peripheral nerves in surgery, namely nerve-sparing surgery, is now promising technique to avoid functional deficits of the limbs and organs following surgery as an aspect of the improvement of quality of life of patients. Detection of peripheral nerves including myelinated and unmyelinated nerves is required for the nerve-sparing surgery; however, conventional nerve identification scheme is sometimes difficult to identify peripheral nerves due to similarity of shape and color to non-nerve tissues or its limited application to only motor peripheral nerves. To overcome these issues, we proposed a label-free detection technique of peripheral nerves by means of Raman spectroscopy. We found several fingerprints of peripheral myelinated and unmyelinated nerves by employing a modified principal component analysis of typical spectra including myelinated nerve, unmyelinated nerve, and adjacent tissues. We finally realized the sensitivity of 94.2% and the selectivity of 92.0% for peripheral nerves including myelinated and unmyelinated nerves against adjacent tissues. Although further development of an intraoperative Raman spectroscopy system is required for clinical use, our proposed approach will serve as a unique and powerful tool for peripheral nerve detection for nerve-sparing surgery in the future.

  2. A novel rat model of brachial plexus injury with nerve root stumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jintao; Yang, Jiantao; Yang, Yi; Li, Liang; Qin, Bengang; He, Wenting; Yan, Liwei; Chen, Gang; Tu, Zhehui; Liu, Xiaolin; Gu, Liqiang

    2018-02-01

    The C5-C6 nerve roots are usually spared from avulsion after brachial plexus injury (BPI) and thus can be used as donors for nerve grafting. To date, there are no appropriate animal models to evaluate spared nerve root stumps. Hence, the aim of this study was to establish and evaluate a rat model with spared nerve root stumps in BPI. In rupture group, the proximal parts of C5-T1 nerve roots were held with the surrounding muscles and the distal parts were pulled by a sudden force after the brachial plexus was fully exposed, and the results were compared with those of sham group. To validate the model, the lengths of C5-T1 spared nerve root stumps were measured and the histologies of the shortest one and the corresponding spinal cord were evaluated. C5 nerve root stump was found to be the shortest. Histology findings demonstrated that the nerve fibers became more irregular and the continuity decreased; numbers and diameters of myelinated axons and thickness of myelin sheaths significantly decreased over time. The survival of motoneurons was reduced, and the death of motoneurons may be related to the apoptotic process. Our model could successfully create BPI model with nerve root stumps by traction, which could simulate injury mechanisms. While other models involve root avulsion or rupturing by distal nerve transection. This model would be suitable for evaluating nerve root stumps and testing new therapeutic strategies for neuroprotection through nerve root stumps in the future. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Quantification of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness using spectral domain optical coherence tomography in normal Indian population

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    Tarannum Mansoori

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to measure peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT in normal Indian eyes, for which, 210 normal volunteers were recruited. One eye of each subject underwent RNFL scanning at 3.4 mm circle diameter around optic nerve using SD OCT. The data were analyzed to determine RNFLT in the sample population and its variation with age and gender. The average peripapillary RNFLT was 114.03 ± 9.59 μm. There was no effect of gender on RNFLT parameters. Age had significant negative correlation with average (P = 0.005, superior (P = 0.04, temporal (P = 0.049, and nasal quadrants (P = 0.01 RNFLT. Inferior quadrant RNFLT also had a negative correlation with age, but it was not statistically significant (P = 0.15.

  4. An artificial arm/hand system with a haptic sensory function using electric stimulation of peripheral sensory nerve fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabuchi, Kunihiko

    2013-01-01

    We are currently developing an artificial arm/hand system which is capable of sensing stimuli and then transferring these stimuli to users as somatic sensations. Presently, we are evoking the virtual somatic sensations by electrically stimulating a sensory nerve fiber which innervates a single mechanoreceptor unit at the target area; this is done using a tungsten microelectrode that was percutaneously inserted into the use's peripheral nerve (a microstimulation method). The artificial arm/hand system is composed of a robot hand equipped with a pressure sensor system on its fingers. The sensor system detects mechanical stimuli, which are transferred to the user by means of the microstimulation method so that the user experiences the stimuli as the corresponding somatic sensations. In trials, the system worked satisfactorily and there was a good correlation between the pressure applied to the pressure sensors on the robot fingers and the subjective intensities of the evoked pressure sensations.

  5. The influence of botulinum toxin type A (BTX) on the immunohistochemical characteristics of noradrenergic and cholinergic nerve fibers supplying the porcine urinary bladder wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepiarczyk, E; Bossowska, A; Kaleczyc, J; Majewski, M

    2011-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BTX) belongs to a family of neurotoxins which strongly influence the function of autonomic neurons supplying the urinary bladder. Accordingly, BTX has been used as an effective drug in experimental therapies of a range of neurogenic bladder disorders. However, there is no detailed information dealing with the influence of BTX on the morphological and chemical properties of nerve fibres supplying the urinary bladder wall. Therefore, the present study investigated, using double-labeling immunohistochemistry, the distribution, relative frequency and chemical coding of cholinergic and noradrenergic nerve fibers supplying the wall of the urinary bladder in normal female pigs (n = 6) and in the pigs (n = 6) after intravesical BTX injections. In the pigs injected with BTX, the number of adrenergic (DbetaH-positive) nerve fibers distributed in the bladder wall (urothelium, submucosa and muscle coat) was distinctly higher while the number of cholinergic (VAChT-positive) nerve terminals was lower than that found in the control animals. Moreover, the injections of BTX resulted in some changes dealing with the chemical coding of the adrenergic nerve fibers. In contrast to the normal pigs, in BTX injected animals the number of DbetaH/NPY- or DbetaH/CGRP-positive axons was higher in the muscle coat, and some fibres distributed in the urothelium and submucosa expressed immunoreactivity to CGRP. The results obtained suggest that the therapeutic effects of BTX on the urinary bladder might be dependent on changes in the distribution and chemical coding of nerve fibers supplying this organ.

  6. Evaluation of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness parameters in myopic population using scanning laser polarimetry (GDxVCC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dada, Tanuj; Aggarwal, A; Bali, S J; Sharma, A; Shah, B M; Angmo, D; Panda, A

    2013-01-01

    Myopia presents a significant challenge to the ophthalmologist as myopic discs are often large, tilted, with deep cups and have a thinner neuroretinal rim all of which may mimic glaucomatous optic nerve head changes causing an error in diagnosis. To evaluate the retinal fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in low, moderate and high myopia using scanning laser polarimetry with variable corneal compensation (GDxVCC). One hundred eyes of 100 emmetropes, 30 eyes of low myopes (0 to - 4 D spherical equivalent(SE), 45 eyes with moderate myopia (- 4 to - 8D SE), and 30 eyes with high myopia (- 8 to - 15D SE) were subjected to retinal nerve fiber layer assessment using the scanning laser polarimetry (GDxVCC) in all subjects using the standard protocol. Subjects with IOP > 21 mm Hg, optic nerve head or visual field changes suggestive of glaucoma were excluded from the study. The major outcome parameters were temporal-superior-nasal-inferiortemporal (TSNIT) average, the superior and inferior average and the nerve fibre indicator (NFI). The TSNIT average (p = 0.009), superior (p = 0.001) and inferior average (p = 0.008) were significantly lower; the NFI was higher (P less than 0.001) in moderate myopes as compared to that in emmetropes. In high myopia the RNFL showed supranormal values; the TSNIT average, superior and inferior average was significantly higher(p less than 0.001) as compared to that in emmetropes. The RNFL measurements on scanning laser polarimetry are affected by the myopic refractive error. Moderate myopes show a significant thinning of the RNFL. In high myopia due to peripapillary chorioretinal atrophy and contribution of scleral birefringence, the RNFL values are abnormally high. These findings need to be taken into account while assessing and monitoring glaucoma damage in moderate to high myopes on GDxVCC. © NEPjOPH.

  7. Hypoxia-induced increases in serotonin-immunoreactive nerve fibers in the medulla oblongata of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morinaga, Ryosuke; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Yamamoto, Yoshio

    2016-10-01

    Hypoxia induces respiratory responses in mammals and serotonergic neurons in the medulla oblongata participate in respiratory control. However, the morphological changes in serotonergic neurons induced by hypoxia have not yet been examined and respiratory controls of serotonergic neurons have not been clarified. We herein investigated the distribution of immunoreactivity for serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) in the medulla oblongata of control rats and rats exposed to 1-6h of hypoxia (10% O 2 ). We also examined the medulla oblongata by multiple immunofluorescence labeling for 5-HT, neurokinin 1 receptors (NK1R), a marker for some respiratory neurons in the pre-Bötzinger complex (PBC), and dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH), a marker for catecholaminergic neurons. The number of 5-HT-immunoreactive nerve cell bodies in the raphe nuclei was higher in rats exposed to hypoxia than in control rats. The number of 5-HT-immunoreactive nerve fibers significantly increased in the rostral ventrolateral medulla of rats exposed to 1-6h of hypoxia, caudal ventrolateral medulla of rats exposed to 2-6h of hypoxia, and lateral part of the nucleus of the solitary tract and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve of rats exposed to 1-2h of hypoxia. Multiple immunofluorescence labeling showed that 5-HT-immunoreactive nerve fibers were close to NK1R-immunoreactive neurons in ventrolateral medulla and to DBH-immunoreactive neurons in the medulla. These results suggest that serotonergic neurons partly regulate respiratory control under hypoxic conditions by modulating the activity of NK1R-expressing and catecholaminergic neurons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Endurance training induces structural and morphoquantitative changes in rat vagus nerve

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    Eduardo Pianca

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTIntroduction:Many nervous system tissues and cells suffers positive changes when faced to exercise training. However, data on vagus nerve adaptation from exercise-induced study is absent.Objective:To analyze the effect of an endurance training on the vagus nerve morphology of rats.Methods:Wistar rats (6 months of age were divided into two groups: control group (CG, n=8, and aerobic trained group (AT, n=8. AT was submitted to a treadmill training program of five times per week during 12 weeks. The maximum speed stipulated in the training protocol corresponded to 60% of the mean maximum intensity achieved by the group in the test of maximum effort.Results:Twelve weeks of treadmill training resulted in left ventricular hypertrophy in the AT group com-pared to CG. There was a significant increase in the area of both the myelinated and unmyelinated axons, and in the area of myelin sheath with training. The number of neurotubules and neurofilaments in myelinated fibers of aerobic trained group was significantly greater than CG (p≤0.05.Conclusion:Endurance training promoted significant increase in morphometric parameters of the vagus nerve in the same way it affect somatic nerves.

  9. Correlation between local glaucomatous visual field defects and loss of nerve fiber layer thickness measured with polarimetry and spectral domain OCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Folkert K; Mardin, Christian Y; Laemmer, Robert; Baleanu, Delia; Juenemann, Anselm M; Kruse, Friedrich E; Tornow, Ralf P

    2009-05-01

    To study the correlation between local perimetric field defects and glaucoma-induced thickness reduction of the nerve layer measured in the peripapillary area with scanning laser polarimetry (SLP) and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SOCT) and to compare the results with those of a theoretical model. The thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer was determined in 32 sectors (11.25 degrees each) by using SLP with variable cornea compensation (GDxVCC; Laser Diagnostics, San Diego, CA) and the newly introduced high-resolution SOCT (Spectralis; Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany). Eighty-eight healthy subjects served as control subjects, to determine the thickness deviation in patients with glaucoma. The relationship between glaucomatous nerve fiber reduction and visual field losses was calculated in six nerve fiber bundle-related areas. Sixty-four patients at different stages of open-angle glaucoma and 26 patients with ocular hypertension underwent perimetry (Octopus G1; Haag-Streit, Köniz, Switzerland) and measurements with the two morphometric techniques. Sector-shaped analyses between local perimetric losses and reduction of the retinal nerve fiber layer thickness showed a significant association for corresponding areas except for the central visual field in SLP. Correlation coefficients were highest in the area of the nasal inferior visual field (SOCT, -0.81; SLP, -0.57). A linear model describes the association between structural and functional damage. Localized perimetric defects can be explained by reduced nerve fiber layer thickness. The data indicate that the present SOCT is useful for determining the functional-structural relationship in peripapillary areas and that association between perimetric defects and corresponding nerve fiber losses is stronger for SOCT than for the present SLP. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00494923.).

  10. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells accelerate nerve regeneration and functional recovery in a rat model of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury

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    Yun Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Medialization thyroplasty or injection laryngoplasty for unilateral vocal fold paralysis cannot restore mobility of the vocal fold. Recent studies have shown that transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells is effective in the repair of nerve injuries. This study investigated whether adipose-derived stem cell transplantation could repair recurrent laryngeal nerve injury. Rat models of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury were established by crushing with micro forceps. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs; 8 × 105 or differentiated Schwann-like adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (dADSCs; 8 × 105 or extracellular matrix were injected at the site of injury. At 2, 4 and 6 weeks post-surgery, a higher density of myelinated nerve fiber, thicker myelin sheath, improved vocal fold movement, better recovery of nerve conduction capacity and reduced thyroarytenoid muscle atrophy were found in ADSCs and dADSCs groups compared with the extracellular matrix group. The effects were more pronounced in the ADSCs group than in the dADSCs group. These experimental results indicated that ADSCs transplantation could be an early interventional strategy to promote regeneration after recurrent laryngeal nerve injury.

  11. An Evaluation of Peripapillary Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness in Children With Epilepsy Receiving Treatment of Valproic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereci, Selim; Koca, Tuğba; Akçam, Mustafa; Türkyilmaz, Kemal

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness with optical coherence tomography in epileptic children receiving valproic acid monotherapy. The study was conducted on children aged 8-16 years who were undergoing valproic acid monotherapy for epilepsy. The study group comprised a total of 40 children who met the inclusion criteria and 40 healthy age- and sex-matched children as a control group. Children with at least a 1-year history of epilepsy and taking 10-40 mg/kg/day treatment were included in the study. Peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness measurements were performed using Cirrus HD optical coherence tomography. All children and parents were informed about the study and informed consent was obtained from the parents of all the participants. The study group included 21 girls and 19 boys with a mean age of 10.6 ± 2.3 years. According to the results of optical coherence tomography measurements, the mean peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness was 91.6 ± 9.7 in the patient group and 95.5 ± 7.4 μm in the control group (P epilepsy who were receiving valproic acid monotherapy compared with healthy children. This situation can lead to undesirable results in terms of eye health. New studies are needed to investigate whether these findings are the result of epilepsy or can be attributed to valproic acid and whether there are adverse effects of valproic acid later in life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Distribution of serotonergic and dopaminergic nerve fibers in the salivary gland complex of the cockroach Periplaneta americana

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    Kühnel Dana

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cockroach salivary gland consists of secretory acini with peripheral ion-transporting cells and central protein-producing cells, an extensive duct system, and a pair of reservoirs. Salivation is controled by serotonergic and dopaminergic innervation. Serotonin stimulates the secretion of a protein-rich saliva, dopamine causes the production of a saliva without proteins. These findings suggest a model in which serotonin acts on the central cells and possibly other cell types, and dopamine acts selectively on the ion-transporting cells. To examine this model, we have analyzed the spatial relationship of dopaminergic and serotonergic nerve fibers to the various cell types. Results The acinar tissue is entangled in a meshwork of serotonergic and dopaminergic varicose fibers. Dopaminergic fibers reside only at the surface of the acini next to the peripheral cells. Serotonergic fibers invade the acini and form a dense network between central cells. Salivary duct segments close to the acini are locally associated with dopaminergic and serotonergic fibers, whereas duct segments further downstream have only dopaminergic fibers on their surface and within the epithelium. In addition, the reservoirs have both a dopaminergic and a serotonergic innervation. Conclusion Our results suggest that dopamine is released on the acinar surface, close to peripheral cells, and along the entire duct system. Serotonin is probably released close to peripheral and central cells, and at initial segments of the duct system. Moreover, the presence of serotonergic and dopaminergic fiber terminals on the reservoir indicates that the functions of this structure are also regulated by dopamine and serotonin.

  13. Findings of Optical Coherence Tomography of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer in Two Common Types of Multiple Sclerosis

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    Gholamali Yousefipour

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is the most prevalent disease caused by the inflammatory demyelinating process that causes progressive nervous system degeneration over the time. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT is a non-invasive optical imaging technology, which can measure the thickness of retinal nerve fiber layer as well as the diameter of the macula. The purpose of the study is evaluation OCT findings in two common types of multiple sclerosis. For doing the cross-sectional study, 63 patients with two prevalent types of multiple sclerosis (35 patients with Relapse Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS and 28 patients with Secondary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis (SPMS were evaluated for 6 months. Exclusion criteria of the study were a history of optic neuritis, suffering from diabetes mellitus, hypertension, ocular disease, and the presence of other neurologic degenerative diseases. Then, the thickness of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL, as well as thickness and volume of the macula, were measured in the patients using OCT technology. The disability rate of patients was evaluated according to Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS. Finally, data was analyzed by means of SPSS software. Overall, 35 patients with RRMS (with mean age of 32.37+10.01, average disease period of 3.81+3.42 and mean EDSS of 1.84+0.45 and 28 patients with SPMS (with mean age of 39.21+9.33, average disease period of 11.32+5.87 and mean EDSS of 5.12+1.46 were assessed and compared in terms of retinal nerve fiber layer and size and thickness of macula. In all of these sections, the thicknesses were smaller in SPMS patients than patients with RRMS. But, there was a significant difference in total thickness (81.82µm versus 96.03µm with P=0.04 and thickness of temporal sector (54.5 µm versus 69.34 µm with P=0.04 of retinal nerve fiber layer and macular size at the superior sector of external ring (1.48 mm³ versus 1.58 mm³ with P=0.03, and nasal sector of external ring surrounding

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging and myelin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamsbaum, C.; Andre, C.; Rolland, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Postnatal development of the brain is characterized by growth and by myelination. Myelination of the brain normally extends from birth until about two years of age. MRI changes corresponding to the various myelination stages are due mainly to changes in the water content of the cerebral parenchyma. Myelination kinetics follow a fairly precise timetable, with variations across areas of the brain. Abnormalities of white matter are responsible for relatively stereotyped, nonspecific manifestations, which are mainly due to an increase in the amount of water contained in diseased white matter, whatever the cause of the disorder. Interpretation is based on the location, distribution, and progression of lesions. (authors). 7 refs., 5 figs

  15. Retinal ganglion cell-inner plexiform and nerve fiber layers in neuromyelitis optica

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    Sai-Jing Hu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To determine the thickness of the retinal ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer (GCIPL and the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL in patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study that included 30 NMO patients with a total of 60 eyes. Based on the presence or absence of optic neuritis (ON, subjects were divided into either the NMO-ON group (30 eyes or the NMO-ON contra group (10 eyes. A detailed ophthalmologic examination was performed for each group; subsequently, the GCIPL and the RNFL were measured using high-definition optical coherence tomography (OCT. RESULTS: In the NMO-ON group, the mean GCIPL thickness was 69.28±21.12 μm, the minimum GCIPL thickness was 66.02±10.02 μm, and the RNFL thickness were 109.33±11.23, 110.47±3.10, 64.92±12.71 and 71.21±50.22 μm in the superior, inferior, temporal and nasal quadrants, respectively. In the NMO-ON contra group, the mean GCIPL thickness was 85.12±17.09 μm, the minimum GCIPL thickness was 25.39±25.1 μm, and the RNFL thicknesses were 148.33±23.22, 126.36±23.45, 82.21±22.30 and 83.36±31.28 μm in the superior, inferior, temporal and nasal quadrants, respectively. In the control group, the mean GCIPL thickness was 86.98±22.37 μm, the minimum GCIPL thickness was 85.28±10.75 μm, and the RNFL thicknesses were 150.22±22.73, 154.79±60.23, 82.33±7.01 and 85.62±13.81 μm in the superior, inferior, temporal and nasal quadrants, respectively. The GCIPL and RNFL were thinner in the NMO-ON contra group than in the control group (P<0.05; additionally, the RNFL was thinner in the inferior quadrant in the NMO-ON group than in the control group (P<0.05. Significant correlations were observed between the GCIPL and RNFL thickness measurements as well as between thickness measurements and the two visual field parameters of mean deviation (MD and corrected pattern standard deviation (PSD in the NMO-ON group (P<0.05. CONCLUSION: The thickness of the GCIPL

  16. Correlation between glycemic control and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in Saudi type II diabetics

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    Fahmy RM

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Rania M Fahmy,1,2 Ramesa S Bhat,3 Manar Al-Mutairi,4 Feda S Aljaser,5 Afaf El-Ansary4 1Department of Optometry, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt; 3Biochemistry Department, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 4Central Laboratory, Female Center for Medical Studies and Scientific Section, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 5Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Objective: To evaluate the effect of diabetes mellitus (DM, diabetic retinopathy, and degree of glycemic control (glycosylated hemoglobin [HbA1c] on peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT using optical coherence tomography.Methods: The study included 126 eyes of healthy controls (n=32 and diabetics patients (n=31, whose ages ranged from 40 to 70 years. The diabetic group was divided into: Subgroup 1: with HbA1c <7% and Subgroup 2: with HbA1c ≥7%. All patients underwent full ophthalmic examination. HbA1c level was obtained with the A1cNow+ system and the peripapillary RNFLT was measured using 3D-OCT 2000 Topcon (360-degree circular scan with 3.4 mm diameter centered on optic disc.Results: The obtained data demonstrates significant decrease in peripapillary RNFLT in superior and inferior quadrants of the right eye (p=0.000 and p=0.039, respectively, and in superior quadrant of the left eye (p=0.002 with impairment of glycemic control. Pearson’s correlation test showed significant negative correlation of RNFLT with HbA1c in the superior quadrant in both eyes.Conclusion: Impairment of glycemic control affects the peripapillary RNFLT mainly in the superior quadrant. This thickness also tends to decrease with long-standing DM, use of DM medications, and development of diabetic retinopathy. The measurement of peripapillary RNFLT

  17. Depth-sensing nano-indentation on a myelinated axon at various stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Wei-Chin; Liao, Jiunn-Der; Lin, Chou-Ching K; Ju, Ming-Shaung

    2011-01-01

    A nano-mechanical characterization of a multi-layered myelin sheath structure, which enfolds an axon and plays a critical role in the transmission of nerve impulses, is conducted. Schwann cells co-cultured in vitro with PC12 cells for various co-culture times are differentiated to form a myelinated axon, which is then observed using a transmission electron microscope. Three major myelination stages, with distinct structural characteristics and thicknesses around the axon, can be produced by varying the co-culture time. A dynamic contact module and continuous depth-sensing nano-indentation are used on the myelinated structure to obtain the load-on-sample versus measured displacement curve of a multi-layered myelin sheath, which is used to determine the work required for the nano-indentation tip to penetrate the myelin sheath. By analyzing the harmonic contact stiffness versus the measured displacement profile, the results can be used to estimate the three stages of the multi-layered structure on a myelinated axon. The method can also be used to evaluate the development stages of myelination or demyelination during nerve regeneration.

  18. Spider silk constructs enhance axonal regeneration and remyelination in long nerve defects in sheep.

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    Christine Radtke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Surgical reapposition of peripheral nerve results in some axonal regeneration and functional recovery, but the clinical outcome in long distance nerve defects is disappointing and research continues to utilize further interventional approaches to optimize functional recovery. We describe the use of nerve constructs consisting of decellularized vein grafts filled with spider silk fibers as a guiding material to bridge a 6.0 cm tibial nerve defect in adult sheep. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The nerve constructs were compared to autologous nerve grafts. Regeneration was evaluated for clinical, electrophysiological and histological outcome. Electrophysiological recordings were obtained at 6 months and 10 months post surgery in each group. Ten months later, the nerves were removed and prepared for immunostaining, electrophysiological and electron microscopy. Immunostaining for sodium channel (NaV 1.6 was used to define nodes of Ranvier on regenerated axons in combination with anti-S100 and neurofilament. Anti-S100 was used to identify Schwann cells. Axons regenerated through the constructs and were myelinated indicating migration of Schwann cells into the constructs. Nodes of Ranvier between myelin segments were observed and identified by intense sodium channel (NaV 1.6 staining on the regenerated axons. There was no significant difference in electrophysiological results between control autologous experimental and construct implantation indicating that our construct are an effective alternative to autologous nerve transplantation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates that spider silk enhances Schwann cell migration, axonal regrowth and remyelination including electrophysiological recovery in a long-distance peripheral nerve gap model resulting in functional recovery. This improvement in nerve regeneration could have significant clinical implications for reconstructive nerve surgery.

  19. Staining Methods for Normal and Regenerative Myelin in the Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriel, Víctor; Campos, Antonio; Alaminos, Miguel; Raimondo, Stefania; Geuna, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Histochemical techniques enable the specific identification of myelin by light microscopy. Here we describe three histochemical methods for the staining of myelin suitable for formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded materials. The first method is conventional luxol fast blue (LFB) method which stains myelin in blue and Nissl bodies and mast cells in purple. The second method is a LBF-based method called MCOLL, which specifically stains the myelin as well the collagen fibers and cells, giving an integrated overview of the histology and myelin content of the tissue. Finally, we describe the osmium tetroxide method, which consist in the osmication of previously fixed tissues. Osmication is performed prior the embedding of tissues in paraffin giving a permanent positive reaction for myelin as well as other lipids present in the tissue.

  20. Nerve Regeneration in the Peripheral Nervous System versus the Central Nervous System and the Relevance to Speech and Hearing after Nerve Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Tessa; Gordon, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Schwann cells normally form myelin sheaths around axons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and support nerve regeneration after nerve injury. In contrast, nerve regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) is not supported by the myelinating cells known as oligodendrocytes. We have found that: 1) low frequency electrical stimulation can be…

  1. N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate promotes oxidative stress prior to myelin structural changes and increases myelin copper content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viquez, Olga M.; Lai, Barry; Ahn, Jae Hee; Does, Mark D.; Valentine, Holly L.; Valentine, William M.

    2009-01-01

    Dithiocarbamates are a commercially important class of compounds that can produce peripheral neuropathy in humans and experimental animals. Previous studies have supported a requirement for copper accumulation and enhanced lipid peroxidation in dithiocarbamate-mediated myelinopathy. The study presented here extends previous investigations in two areas. Firstly, although total copper levels have been shown to increase within the nerve it has not been determined whether copper is increased within the myelin compartment, the primary site of lesion development. Therefore, the distribution of copper in sciatic nerve was characterized using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy to determine whether the neurotoxic dithiocarbamate, N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate, increases copper levels in myelin. Secondly, because lipid peroxidation is an ongoing process in normal nerve and the levels of lipid peroxidation products produced by dithiocarbamate exposure demonstrated an unusual cumulative dose response in previous studies the biological impact of dithiocarbamate-mediated lipid peroxidation was evaluated. Experiments were performed to determine whether dithiocarbamate-mediated lipid peroxidation products elicit an antioxidant response through measuring the protein expression levels of three enzymes, superoxide dismutase 1, heme oxygenase 1, and glutathione transferase α, that are linked to the antioxidant response element promoter. To establish the potential of oxidative injury to contribute to myelin injury the temporal relationship of the antioxidant response to myelin injury was determined. Myelin structure in peripheral nerve was assessed using multi-exponential transverse relaxation measurements (MET 2 ) as a function of exposure duration, and the temporal relationship of protein expression changes relative to the onset of changes in myelin integrity were determined. Initial assessments were also performed to explore the potential contribution of dithiocarbamate

  2. Fast negative feedback enables mammalian auditory nerve fibers to encode a wide dynamic range of sound intensities.

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    Mark Ospeck

    Full Text Available Mammalian auditory nerve fibers (ANF are remarkable for being able to encode a 40 dB, or hundred fold, range of sound pressure levels into their firing rate. Most of the fibers are very sensitive and raise their quiescent spike rate by a small amount for a faint sound at auditory threshold. Then as the sound intensity is increased, they slowly increase their spike rate, with some fibers going up as high as ∼300 Hz. In this way mammals are able to combine sensitivity and wide dynamic range. They are also able to discern sounds embedded within background noise. ANF receive efferent feedback, which suggests that the fibers are readjusted according to the background noise in order to maximize the information content of their auditory spike trains. Inner hair cells activate currents in the unmyelinated distal dendrites of ANF where sound intensity is rate-coded into action potentials. We model this spike generator compartment as an attenuator that employs fast negative feedback. Input current induces rapid and proportional leak currents. This way ANF are able to have a linear frequency to input current (f-I curve that has a wide dynamic range. The ANF spike generator remains very sensitive to threshold currents, but efferent feedback is able to lower its gain in response to noise.

  3. A novel approach to 32-channel peripheral nervous system myelin imaging in vivo, with single axon resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grochmal, Joey; Teo, Wulin; Gambhir, Hardeep; Kumar, Ranjan; Stratton, Jo Anne; Dhaliwal, Raveena; Brideau, Craig; Biernaskie, Jeff; Stys, Peter K; Midha, Rajiv

    2018-01-19

    OBJECTIVE Intravital spectral imaging of the large, deeply situated nerves in the rat peripheral nervous system (PNS) has not been well described. Here, the authors have developed a highly stable platform for performing imaging of the tibial nerve in live rodents, thus allowing the capture of high-resolution, high-magnification spectral images requiring long acquisition times. By further exploiting the qualities of the topically applied myelin dye Nile red, this technique is capable of visualizing the detailed microenvironment of peripheral nerve demyelination injury and recovery, while allowing us to obtain images of exogenous Schwann cell myelination in a living animal. METHODS The authors caused doxorubicin-induced focal demyelination in the tibial nerves of 25 Thy-1 GFP rats, of which 2 subsets (n = 10 each) received either BFP-labeled SKP-SCs or SCs to the zone of injury. Prior to acquiring images of myelin recovery in these nerves, a tibial nerve window was constructed using a silicone hemitube, a fast drying silicone polymer, and a small coverslip. This construct was then affixed to a 3D-printed nerve stage, which in turn was affixed to an external fixation/microscope stage device. Myelin visualization was facilitated by the topical application of Nile red. RESULTS The authors reliably demonstrated intravital peripheral nerve myelin imaging with micron-level resolution and magnification, and minimal movement artifact. The detailed microenvironment of nerve remyelination can be vividly observed, while exogenously applied Schwann cells and skin-derived precursor Schwann cells can be seen myelinating axons. CONCLUSIONS Topically applied Nile red enables intravital study of myelin in the living rat PNS. Furthermore, the use of a tibial nerve window facilitates stable intravital peripheral nerve imaging, making possible high-definition spectral imaging with long acquisition times.

  4. Metabolic Changes in the Visual Cortex Are Linked to Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thinning in Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Florian; Bock, Markus; Walaszek, Bernadeta; Waiczies, Helmar; Schwenteck, Thomas; Dörr, Jan; Bellmann-Strobl, Judith; Mohr, Christian; Weinges-Evers, Nicholetta; Ittermann, Bernd; Wuerfel, Jens T.; Paul, Friedemann

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the damage to the retinal nerve fiber layer as part of the anterior visual pathway as well as an impairment of the neuronal and axonal integrity in the visual cortex as part of the posterior visual pathway with complementary neuroimaging techniques, and to correlate our results to patients' clinical symptoms concerning the visual pathway. Design, Subjects and Methods Survey of 86 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis that were subjected to retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) measurement by optical coherence tomography, to a routine MRI scan including the calculation of the brain parenchymal fraction (BPF), and to magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3 tesla, quantifying N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) concentrations in the visual cortex and normal-appearing white matter. Results RNFLT correlated significantly with BPF and visual cortex NAA, but not with normal-appearing white matter NAA. This was connected with the patients' history of a previous optic neuritis. In a combined model, both BPF and visual cortex NAA were independently associated with RNFLT. Conclusions Our data suggest the existence of functional pathway-specific damage patterns exceeding global neurodegeneration. They suggest a strong interrelationship between damage to the anterior and the posterior visual pathway. PMID:21494672

  5. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells versus adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells for peripheral nerve regeneration

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    Marcela Fernandes

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have confirmed that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can be used for treatment of several nervous system diseases. However, isolation of bone marrow-derived MSCs (BMSCs is an invasive and painful process and the yield is very low. Therefore, there is a need to search for other alterative stem cell sources. Adipose-derived MSCs (ADSCs have phenotypic and gene expression profiles similar to those of BMSCs. The production of ADSCs is greater than that of BMSCs, and ADSCs proliferate faster than BMSCs. To compare the effects of venous grafts containing BMSCs or ADSCs on sciatic nerve injury, in this study, rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham (only sciatic nerve exposed, Matrigel (MG; sciatic nerve injury + intravenous transplantation of MG vehicle, ADSCs (sciatic nerve injury + intravenous MG containing ADSCs, and BMSCs (sciatic nerve injury + intravenous MG containing BMSCs groups. Sciatic functional index was calculated to evaluate the function of injured sciatic nerve. Morphologic characteristics of nerves distal to the lesion were observed by toluidine blue staining. Spinal motor neurons labeled with Fluoro-Gold were quantitatively assessed. Compared with sham-operated rats, sciatic functional index was lower, the density of small-diameter fibers was significantly increased, and the number of motor neurons significantly decreased in rats with sciatic nerve injury. Neither ADSCs nor BMSCs significantly improved the sciatic nerve function of rats with sciatic nerve injury, increased fiber density, fiber diameters, axonal diameters, myelin sheath thickness, and G ratios (axonal diameter/fiber diameter ratios in the sciatic nerve distal to the lesion site. There was no significant difference in the number of spinal motor neurons among ADSCs, BMSCs and MG groups. These results suggest that neither BMSCs nor ADSCs provide satisfactory results for peripheral nerve repair when using MG as the conductor for

  6. Sciatic nerve regeneration in rats subjected to ketogenic diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liśkiewicz, Arkadiusz; Właszczuk, Adam; Gendosz, Daria; Larysz-Brysz, Magdalena; Kapustka, Bartosz; Łączyński, Mariusz; Lewin-Kowalik, Joanna; Jędrzejowska-Szypułka, Halina

    2016-01-01

    Ketogenic diet (KD) is a high-fat-content diet with insufficiency of carbohydrates that induces ketogenesis. Besides its anticonvulsant properties, many studies have shown its neuroprotective effect in central nervous system, but its influence on peripheral nervous system has not been studied yet. We examined the influence of KD on regeneration of peripheral nerves in adult rats. Fifty one rats were divided into three experimental (n = 15) and one control (n = 6) groups. Right sciatic nerve was crushed and animals were kept on standard (ST group) or ketogenic diet, the latter was introduced 3 weeks before (KDB group) or on the day of surgery (KDA group). Functional (CatWalk) tests were performed once a week, and morphometric (fiber density, axon diameter, and myelin thickness) analysis of the nerves was made after 6 weeks. Body weight and blood ketone bodies level were estimated at the beginning and the end of experiment. Functional analysis showed no differences between groups. Morphometric evaluation showed most similarities to the healthy (uncrushed) nerves in KDB group. Nerves in ST group differed mostly from all other groups. Ketone bodies were elevated in both KD groups, while post-surgery animals' body weight was lower as compared to ST group. Regeneration of sciatic nerves was improved in KD - preconditioned rats. These results suggest a neuroprotective effect of KD on peripheral nerves.

  7. Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography in Glaucoma: Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of the Optic Nerve Head and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer (An AOS Thesis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Teresa C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate that video-rate spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) can qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate optic nerve head (ONH) and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) glaucomatous structural changes. To correlate quantitative SDOCT parameters with disc photography and visual fields. Methods: SDOCT images from 4 glaucoma eyes (4 patients) with varying stages of open-angle glaucoma (ie, early, moderate, late) were qualitatively contrasted with 2 age-matched normal eyes (2 patients). Of 61 other consecutive patients recruited in an institutional setting, 53 eyes (33 patients) met inclusion/exclusion criteria for quantitative studies. Images were obtained using two experimental SDOCT systems, one utilizing a superluminescent diode and the other a titanium:sapphire laser source, with axial resolutions of about 6 μm and 3 μm, respectively. Results: Classic glaucomatous ONH and RNFL structural changes were seen in SDOCT images. An SDOCT reference plane 139 μm above the retinal pigment epithelium yielded cup-disc ratios that best correlated with masked physician disc photography cup-disc ratio assessments. The minimum distance band, a novel SDOCT neuroretinal rim parameter, showed good correlation with physician cup-disc ratio assessments, visual field mean deviation, and pattern standard deviation (P values range, .0003–.024). RNFL and retinal thickness maps correlated well with disc photography and visual field testing. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this thesis presents the first comprehensive qualitative and quantitative evaluation of SDOCT images of the ONH and RNFL in glaucoma. This pilot study provides basis for developing more automated quantitative SDOCT-specific glaucoma algorithms needed for future prospective multicenter national trials. PMID:20126502

  8. Influence of corneal power on circumpapillary retinal nerve fiber layer and optic nerve head measurements by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

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    Kazunori Hirasawa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the influence of corneal power on circumpapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (cpRNFL and optic nerve head (ONH measurements by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT. METHODS: Twenty-five eyes of 25 healthy participants (mean age 23.6±3.6y were imaged by SD-OCT using horizontal raster scans. Disposable soft contact lenses of different powers (from −11 to +5 diopters including 0 diopter were worn to induce 2-diopter changes in corneal power. Differences in the cpRNFL and ONH measurements per diopter of change in corneal power were analyzed. RESULTS: As corneal power increased by 1 diopter, total and quadrant cpRNFL thicknesses, except for the nasal sector, decreased by −0.19 to −0.32 μm (P<0.01. Furthermore, the disc, cup, and rim areas decreased by −0.017, −0.007, and −0.015 mm2, respectively (P<0.001; the cup and rim volumes decreased by −0.0013 and −0.006 mm3, respectively (P<0.01; and the vertical and horizontal disc diameters decreased by −0.006 and −0.007 mm, respectively (P<0.001. CONCLUSION: For more precise OCT imaging, the ocular magnification should be corrected by considering both the axial length and corneal power. However, the effect of corneal power changes on cpRNFL thickness and ONH topography are small when compare with those of the axial length.

  9. Does optic nerve head surface topography change prior to loss of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness: a test of the site of injury hypothesis in experimental glaucoma.

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    Brad Fortune

    Full Text Available To test the hypothesis that optic nerve head (ONH deformation manifesting as changes in its mean surface height precedes thinning of the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL in experimental glaucoma (EG.68 rhesus macaque monkeys each had three or more baseline imaging sessions under manometric intraocular pressure (IOP control to obtain average RNFL thickness (RNFLT and the ONH surface topography parameter mean position of the disc (MPD. Laser photocoagulation was then applied to the trabecular meshwork of one eye to induce chronic, mild-to-moderate IOP elevation and bi-weekly imaging continued. Event analysis was applied to determine for each parameter when an 'endpoint' occurred (signficant change from baseline for eight different endpoint criteria. Specificity was assessed in the group of 68 fellow control eyes. Classical signal detection theory and survival analysis were used to compare MPD with RNFLT.Regardless of the endpoint criterion, endpoints were always more frequent for MPD than for RNFLT. The discriminability index (d' was 2.7 ± 0.2 for MPD and 1.9 ± 0.2 for RNFLT (p<0.0001. Endpoints were reached by MPD an average of 1-2 months earlier than by RNFLT (p<0.01. At the onset of the first specific, detectable MPD change in EG eyes, there was still no significant change in RNFLT on average (p=0.29 and only 25% of individual eyes exhibited signficant reduction. In contrast, at onset of signficant RNFLT change, MPD had already changed an average of 101 µm from baseline (p<0.0001 and 71% of the individual eyes had exhibited significant change. The magnitude of MPD change was more than could be explained on the basis of axon loss alone.This study demonstrates that the average surface height of the ONH changes prior to any detectable loss of average peripapillary RNFL thickness in non-human primate eyes with experimental glaucoma.

  10. Optic Nerve Head and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Analysis in Ocular Hypertension and Early-Stage Glucoma Using Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Copernicus

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    Nilgün Solmaz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Evaluation of structural alterations of the optic nerve head (ONH and the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL in patients with ocular hypertension (OHT and early-stage glaucoma and assessment of the discriminatory diagnostic performance of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT Copernicus (Optopol Technology S.A.. Materials and Methods: This study included 59 eyes of a total of 59 patients, 29 of whom were diagnosed with OHT (Group 1 and 30 with early-stage glaucoma (Group 2. The differentiation of early-stage glaucoma and OHT was carried out on the basis of standard achromatic visual field test results. Analysis of the ONH and RNFL thickness of all cases was made using SD-OCT. Group 1 and Group 2 were compared with respect to the ONH parameters and RNFL thickness. The diagnostic sensitivity of the OCT parameters was evaluated by the area under the receiver operating characteristics curves (AUC. Results: The average, superior, inferior, and nasal RNFL thicknesses in early-stage glaucoma cases were approximately 10% (12-14 µm less compared to the OHT eyes, with differences being highly significant (p≤0.001. However, there was no statistically significant difference in the temporal RNFL thicknesses. The most sensitive parameter in the early diagnosis of glaucoma was average RNFL thickness corresponding to AUC: 0.852, followed by AUC: 0.816 and AUC: 0.773 values in superior and inferior RNFL thickness, respectively. In localized RNFL defects, the highest sensitivity corresponded to superior and superonasal quadrants (ACU: 0.805 and ACU: 0.781, respectively. There were not any statistically significant differences between the ONH morphological parameters of the two groups. Conclusion: RNFL analysis obtained using SD-OCT Copernicus is able to discriminate early-stage glaucoma eyes from those with OHT. However, ONH morphological parameters do not have the same diagnostic sensitivity. Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 35-41

  11. Cervical vagus nerve stimulation augments spontaneous discharge in second- and higher-order sensory neurons in the rat nucleus of the solitary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Eric; Campbell, Regenia P; Andresen, Michael C; Scofield, Stephanie; Singh, Krishna; Libbus, Imad; KenKnight, Bruce H; Snyder, Logan; Cantrell, Nathan

    2017-08-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) currently treats patients with drug-resistant epilepsy, depression, and heart failure. The mild intensities used in chronic VNS suggest that primary visceral afferents and central nervous system activation are involved. Here, we measured the activity of neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) in anesthetized rats using clinically styled VNS. Our chief findings indicate that VNS at threshold bradycardic intensity activated NTS neuron discharge in one-third of NTS neurons. This VNS directly activated only myelinated vagal afferents projecting to second-order NTS neurons. Most VNS-induced activity in NTS, however, was unsynchronized to vagal stimuli. Thus, VNS activated unsynchronized activity in NTS neurons that were second order to vagal afferent C-fibers as well as higher-order NTS neurons only polysynaptically activated by the vagus. Overall, cardiovascular-sensitive and -insensitive NTS neurons were similarly activated by VNS: 3/4 neurons with monosynaptic vagal A-fiber afferents, 6/42 neurons with monosynaptic vagal C-fiber afferents, and 16/21 polysynaptic NTS neurons. Provocatively, vagal A-fibers indirectly activated C-fiber neurons during VNS. Elevated spontaneous spiking was quantitatively much higher than synchronized activity and extended well into the periods of nonstimulation. Surprisingly, many polysynaptic NTS neurons responded to half the bradycardic intensity used in clinical studies, indicating that a subset of myelinated vagal afferents is sufficient to evoke VNS indirect activation. Our study uncovered a myelinated vagal afferent drive that indirectly activates NTS neurons and thus central pathways beyond NTS and support reconsideration of brain contributions of vagal afferents underpinning of therapeutic impacts. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Acute vagus nerve stimulation elevated activity in neurons located in the medial nucleus of the solitary tract. Such stimuli directly activated only myelinated vagal afferents

  12. Nanoscale Correlated Disorder in Out-of-Equilibrium Myelin Ultrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campi, Gaetano; Di Gioacchino, Michael; Poccia, Nicola; Ricci, Alessandro; Burghammer, Manfred; Ciasca, Gabriele; Bianconi, Antonio

    2018-01-23

    Ultrastructural fluctuations at nanoscale are fundamental to assess properties and functionalities of advanced out-of-equilibrium materials. We have taken myelin as a model of supramolecular assembly in out-of-equilibrium living matter. Myelin sheath is a simple stable multilamellar structure of high relevance and impact in biomedicine. Although it is known that myelin has a quasi-crystalline ultrastructure, there is no information on its fluctuations at nanoscale in different states due to limitations of the available standard techniques. To overcome these limitations, we have used scanning micro X-ray diffraction, which is a unique non-invasive probe of both reciprocal and real space to visualize statistical fluctuations of myelin order of the sciatic nerve of Xenopus laevis. The results show that the ultrastructure period of the myelin is stabilized by large anticorrelated fluctuations at nanoscale, between hydrophobic and hydrophilic layers. The ratio between the total thickness of hydrophilic and hydrophobic layers defines the conformational parameter, which describes the different states of myelin. Our key result is that myelin in its out-of-equilibrium functional state fluctuates point-to-point between different conformations showing a correlated disorder described by a Levy distribution. As the system approaches the thermodynamic equilibrium in an aged state, the disorder loses its correlation degree and the structural fluctuation distribution changes to Gaussian. In a denatured state at low pH, it changes to a completely disordered stage. Our results aim to clarify the degradation mechanism in biological systems by associating these states with ultrastructural dynamic fluctuations at nanoscale.

  13. Incorporation of parallel electrospun fibers for improved topographical guidance in 3D nerve guides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffries, Eric M; Wang Yadong

    2013-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) conduits facilitate nerve regeneration. Parallel microfibers have been shown to guide axon extension and Schwann cell migration on flat sheets via topographical cues. However, incorporation of aligned microfibers into 3D conduits to accelerate nerve regeneration has proven challenging. We report an electrospinning technique to incorporate parallel microfibers into 3D constructs at high surface areas while retaining an open architecture. The nerve guide consists of many microchannels lined with a thin layer of longitudinally-aligned microfibers. This design aims to maximize benefits of topographical cues without inhibiting cellular infiltration. We support this hypothesis by demonstrating efficient cell infiltration in vitro. Additionally, this new technique reduces wall thickness compared to our previous design, providing a greater total area for tissue growth. This approach results in an architecture that very closely mimics the structure of decellularized nerve but with larger microchannel diameters to encourage cell infiltration. We believe that reproducing the native architecture is the first step toward matching autograph efficacy. Furthermore, this design can be combined with other biochemical cues to promote nerve regeneration. (paper)

  14. Local Xenotransplantation of Bone Marrow Derived Mast Cells (BMMCs) Improves Functional Recovery of Transected Sciatic Nerve in Cat: A Novel Approach in Cell Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Rahim; Anousheh, Dana; Alaei, Mohammad-Hazhir; Nikpasand, Amin; Rostami, Hawdam; Shahrooz, Rasoul

    2018-04-01

    To determine the effects of bone marrow derived mast cells (BMMCs) on functional recovery of transected sciatic nerve in animal model of cat. A 20-mm sciatic nerve defect was bridged using a silicone nerve guide filled with BMMCs in BMMC group. In Sham-surgery group (SHAM), the sciatic nerve was only exposed and manipulated. In control group (SILOCONE) the gap was repaired with a silicone nerve guide and both ends were sealed using sterile Vaseline to avoid leakage and the nerve guide was filled with 100 μL of phosphate-buffered saline alone. In cell treated group ([SILOCONE/BMMC) the nerve guide was filled with 100 μL BMMCs (2× 106 cells/100 μL). The regenerated nerve fibers were studied, biomechanically, histologically and immunohiscochemically 6 months later. Biomechanical studies confirmed faster recovery of regenerated axons in BMMCs transplanted animals compared to control group ( p <0.05). Morphometric indices of the regenerated fibers showed that the number and diameter of the myelinated fibers were significantly higher in BMMCs transplanted animals than in control group ( p <0.05). In immunohistochemistry, location of reactions to S-100 in BMMCs transplanted animals was clearly more positive than that in control group. BMMCs xenotransplantation could be considered as a readily accessible source of cells that could improve recovery of transected sciatic nerve.

  15. Neutron scattering studies on protein dynamics using the human myelin peripheral membrane protein P2

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    Laulumaa Saara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myelin is a multilayered proteolipid membrane structure surrounding selected axons in the vertebrate nervous system, which allows the rapid saltatory conduction of nerve impulses. Deficits in myelin formation and maintenance may lead to chronic neurological disease. P2 is an abundant myelin protein from peripheral nerves, binding between two apposing lipid bilayers. We studied the dynamics of the human myelin protein P2 and its mutated P38G variant in hydrated powders using elastic incoherent neutron scattering. The local harmonic vibrations at low temperatures were very similar for both samples, but the mutant protein had increased flexibility and softness close to physiological temperatures. The results indicate that a drastic mutation of proline to glycine at a functional site can affect protein dynamics, and in the case of P2, they may explain functional differences between the two proteins.

  16. Neutron scattering studies on protein dynamics using the human myelin peripheral membrane protein P2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laulumaa, Saara; Kursula, Petri; Natali, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Myelin is a multilayered proteolipid membrane structure surrounding selected axons in the vertebrate nervous system, which allows the rapid saltatory conduction of nerve impulses. Deficits in myelin formation and maintenance may lead to chronic neurological disease. P2 is an abundant myelin protein from peripheral nerves, binding between two apposing lipid bilayers. We studied the dynamics of the human myelin protein P2 and its mutated P38G variant in hydrated powders using elastic incoherent neutron scattering. The local harmonic vibrations at low temperatures were very similar for both samples, but the mutant protein had increased flexibility and softness close to physiological temperatures. The results indicate that a drastic mutation of proline to glycine at a functional site can affect protein dynamics, and in the case of P2, they may explain functional differences between the two proteins.

  17. Is it necessary to use the entire root as a donor when transferring contralateral C7 nerve to repair median nerve?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Kai-Ming; Lao, Jie; Guan, Wen-Jie; Hu, Jing-Jing

    2018-01-01

    If a partial contralateral C 7 nerve is transferred to a recipient injured nerve, results are not satisfactory. However, if an entire contralateral C 7 nerve is used to repair two nerves, both recipient nerves show good recovery. These findings seem contradictory, as the above two methods use the same donor nerve, only the cutting method of the contralateral C 7 nerve is different. To verify whether this can actually result in different repair effects, we divided rats with right total brachial plexus injury into three groups. In the entire root group, the entire contralateral C 7 root was transected and transferred to the median nerve of the affected limb. In the posterior division group, only the posterior division of the contralateral C 7 root was transected and transferred to the median nerve. In the entire root + posterior division group, the entire contralateral C 7 root was transected but only the posterior division was transferred to the median nerve. After neurectomy, the median nerve was repaired on the affected side in the three groups. At 8, 12, and 16 weeks postoperatively, electrophysiological examination showed that maximum amplitude, latency, muscle tetanic contraction force, and muscle fiber cross-sectional area of the flexor digitorum superficialis muscle were significantly better in the entire root and entire root + posterior division groups than in the posterior division group. No significant difference was found between the entire root and entire root + posterior division groups. Counts of myelinated axons in the median nerve were greater in the entire root group than in the entire root + posterior division group, which were greater than the posterior division group. We conclude that for the same recipient nerve, harvesting of the entire contralateral C 7 root achieved significantly better recovery than partial harvesting, even if only part of the entire root was used for transfer. This result indicates that the entire root should be used as a

  18. Structural insight into the function of myelin basic protein as a ligand for integrin αMβ2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stapulionis, Romualdas; Oliveira, Cristiano; Gjelstrup, Mikkel Carstensen

    2008-01-01

    protein (MBP), a major autoantigen in MS, is a potent and specific ligand for the integrin αMβ2 (Mac-1, CD11b/CD18) expressed mainly on phagocytic cells. MBP undergoes a dramatic conformational change when liberated from the lipid-rich environment of the myelin sheath. The MS drug glatiramer acetate......Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease where phagocytic cells infiltrate the nerve tissue and act as terminal agents in destruction of the myelin sheath. However, the mechanism that triggers the ability of these cells to recognize myelin remains obscure. We show that myelin basic...

  19. Protective effect of mulberry flavonoids on sciatic nerve in alloxan-induced diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Song-Tao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mulberry leaves (Morus alba L. are a traditional Chinese medicine for blood serum glucose reduction. This study evaluated the protective effects of mulberry flavonoids on sciatic nerve in alloxan-induced diabetic rats. In this study, 80 Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into five groups: A (control, B (diabetic treated with saline, C-D (diabetic treated with 0.3, 0.1 g/kg mulberry flavonoids once a day for 8 weeks and E (diabetic treated with 0.3 mg/kg methycobal. The diabetic condition was induced by intraperitoneal injection of 200 mg/kg alloxan dissolved in saline. At the end of the experimental period, blood, and tissue samples were obtained for biochemical and histopathological investigation. Treatment with 0.3 g/kg mulberry flavonoids significantly inhibited the elevated serum glucose (P< 0.01. The increased myelin sheath area (P< 0.01, myelinated fiber cross-sectional area and extramedullary fiber number (P< 0.05 were also reduced in alloxan-induced rats treated with 0.3 g/kg mulberry flavonoids. 0.3 g/kg mulberry flavonoids also markedly decreased onion-bulb type myelin destruction and degenerative changes of mitochondria and Schwann cells. These findings demonstrate that mulberry flavonoids may improve the recovery of a severe peripheral nerve injury in alloxan-induced diabetic rats and is likely to be useful as a potential treatment on peripheral neuropathy (PN in diabetic rats.

  20. Optical coherence tomography, scanning laser polarimetry and confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy in retinal nerve fiber layer measurements of glaucoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanihagh, Farsad; Kremmer, Stephan; Anastassiou, Gerasimos; Schallenberg, Maurice

    2015-01-01

    To determine the correlations and strength of association between different imaging systems in analyzing the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) of glaucoma patients: optical coherence tomography (OCT), scanning laser polarimetry (SLP) and confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (CSLO). 114 eyes of patients with moderate open angle glaucoma underwent spectral domain OCT (Topcon SD-OCT 2000 and Zeiss Cirrus HD-OCT), SLP (GDx VCC and GDx Pro) and CSLO (Heidelberg Retina Tomograph, HRT 3). Correlation coefficients were calculated between the structural parameters yielded by these examinations. The quantitative relationship between the measured RNFL thickness globally and for the four regions (superior, inferior, nasal, temporal) were evaluated with different regression models for all used imaging systems. The strongest correlation of RNFL measurements was found between devices using the same technology like GDx VCC and GDx Pro as well as Topcon OCT and Cirrus OCT. In glaucoma patients, the strongest associations (R²) were found between RNFL measurements of the two optical coherence tomography devices Topcon OCT and Cirrus OCT (R² = 0.513) and between GDx VCC and GDx Pro (R² = 0.451). The results of the OCTs and GDX Pro also had a strong quantitative relationship (Topcon OCT R² = 0.339 and Cirrus OCT R² = 0.347). GDx VCC and the OCTs showed a mild to moderate association (Topcon OCT R² = 0.207 and Cirrus OCT R² = 0.258). The confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (HRT 3) had the lowest association to all other devices (Topcon OCT R² = 0.254, Cirrus OCT R² = 0.158, GDx Pro R² = 0.086 and GDx VCC R² = 0.1). The measurements of the RNFL in glaucoma patients reveal a high correlation of OCT and GDx devices because OCTs can measure all major retinal layers and SLP can detect nerve fibers allowing a comparison between the results of this devices. However, CSLO by means of HRT topography can only measure height values of the retinal surface but it cannot distinguish

  1. Evaluation of neuroprotection by melatonin against adverse effects of prenatal exposure to a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug during peripheral nerve development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Ilknur; Kaplan, Suleyman; Kalkan, Serpil; Sutcu, Mustafa; Ulkay, M Basak; Esener, O Burak

    2015-04-01

    The potential ability of melatonin to protect against impairment of the fetal peripheral nerve system due to maternal consumption of diclofenac sodium (DS) was investigated. Eighty-four pregnant rats were divided into seven groups: control (CONT), saline administered (PS), DS administered (DS), DS with low-dose melatonin administered (DS+MLT10), DS with high-dose melatonin administered (DS+MLT50), low-dose melatonin administered (MLT10), and high-dose melatonin administered (MLT50). After the pregnancy, six male newborn rats from each group were sacrificed at 4 and 20 weeks of age. Their right sciatic nerves were harvested, and nerve fibers were evaluated using stereological techniques. Mean numbers of myelinated axons, axon cross-section areas and the mean thickness of the myelin sheet were estimated. Four-week-old prenatally DS-exposed rats had significantly fewer axons, a smaller myelinated axonal area, and a thinner myelin sheath compared to CONT group (pmelatonin at both doses significantly increased axon numbers, only a high dose of melatonin increased the diameter of those axons (pmelatonin prophylaxis can prevent these effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Directionality of auditory nerve fiber responses to pure tone stimuli in the grassfrog, Rana temporaria. II. Spike timing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, M B; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J

    1997-01-01

    We studied the directionality of spike timing in the responses of single auditory nerve fibers of the grass frog, Rana temporaria, to tone burst stimulation. Both the latency of the first spike after stimulus onset and the preferred firing phase during the stimulus were studied. In addition, the ...

  3. Spatiotemporal dynamics of re-innervation and hyperinnervation patterns by uninjured CGRP fibers in the rat foot sole epidermis after nerve injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.S. Duraku (Liron); S.M. Hossaini (Mehdi); S. Hoendervangers (Sieske); H.E. Falke; S. Kambiz (Shoista); V. Mudera (Vivek); J.C. Holstege (Jan); E.T. Walbeehm (Erik); T.J.H. Ruigrok (Tom)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe epidermis is innervated by fine nerve endings that are important in mediating nociceptive stimuli. However, their precise role in neuropathic pain is still controversial. Here, we have studied the role of epidermal peptidergic nociceptive fibers that are located adjacent to injured

  4. Spatiotemporal dynamics of re-innervation and hyperinnervation patterns by uninjured CGRP fibers in the rat foot sole epidermis after nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duraku Liron S

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The epidermis is innervated by fine nerve endings that are important in mediating nociceptive stimuli. However, their precise role in neuropathic pain is still controversial. Here, we have studied the role of epidermal peptidergic nociceptive fibers that are located adjacent to injured fibers in a rat model of neuropathic pain. Using the Spared Nerve Injury (SNI model, which involves complete transections of the tibial and common peroneal nerve while sparing the sural and saphenous branches, mechanical hypersensitivity was induced of the uninjured lateral (sural and medial (saphenous area of the foot sole. At different time points, a complete foot sole biopsy was taken from the injured paw and processed for Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP immunohistochemistry. Subsequently, a novel 2D-reconstruction model depicting the density of CGRP fibers was made to evaluate the course of denervation and re-innervation by uninjured CGRP fibers. The results show an increased density of uninjured CGRP-IR epidermal fibers on the lateral and medial side after a SNI procedure at 5 and 10 weeks. Furthermore, although in control animals the density of epidermal CGRP-IR fibers in the footpads was lower compared to the surrounding skin of the foot, 10 weeks after the SNI procedure, the initially denervated footpads displayed a hyper-innervation. These data support the idea that uninjured fibers may play a considerable role in development and maintenance of neuropathic pain and that it is important to take larger biopsies to test the relationship between innervation of injured and uninjured nerve areas.

  5. The effect of methylprednisolone on facial nerve paralysis with different etiologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Mehmet Akif; Karlidag, Turgut; Akpolat, Nusret; Kaygusuz, Irfan; Keles, Erol; Yalcin, Sinasi; Akyigit, Abdulvahap

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of methylprednisolone (MP) in models of facial nerve paralysis obtained by nerve section, compression, or inoculation with herpes simplex virus (HSV). Experimental controlled animal study. Tertiary referral center. A total of 30 female New Zealand rabbits weighing 1200-3000 g were used for the study. They were randomly assigned to one of 6 groups of 5 animals each. A nerve section injury was realized in Groups 1a (section and MP) and 1b (section, control) rabbits. A compression-type injury was inflicted to rabbits in Groups 2a (compression and MP) and 2b (compression, control). As for animals in Groups 3a (Type 1 HSV and MP) and 3b (Type 1 HSV, controls), facial nerve paralysis resulting from viral infection was obtained. Animals in the 3 treatment groups, designated with the letter "a", were administered MP, 1 mg/kg/d, whereas those in control groups "b" received 1 mL normal saline, both during 3 weeks. All subjects were followed up for 2 months. At the end of this period, all animals had the buccal branch of the facial nerve excised on the operated side. Semi-thin sections of these specimens were evaluated under light microscopy for the following: perineural fibrosis, increase in collagen fibers, myelin degeneration, axonal degeneration, Schwann cell proliferation, and edema. No significant difference was observed (P > 0.05) between the MP treatment group and the control group with regard to perineural fibrosis, increase in collagen fibers, myelin degeneration, axonal degeneration, edema, or Schwann cell proliferation. In the group with a compressive lesion (Group 2), controls were no different from MP-treated animals as to perineural fibrosis, increase in collagen fibers, or Schwann cell proliferation, whereas axonal degeneration, myelin degeneration, and edema were significantly higher (P facial nerve palsy, we may say that this drug was without effect on nerve healing in paralysis due to nerve

  6. Neuronal Regulation of Schwann Cell Mitochondrial Ca(2+) Signaling during Myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ino, Daisuke; Sagara, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Junji; Kanemaru, Kazunori; Okubo, Yohei; Iino, Masamitsu

    2015-09-29

    Schwann cells (SCs) myelinate peripheral neurons to promote the rapid conduction of action potentials, and the process of myelination is known to be regulated by signals from axons to SCs. Given that SC mitochondria are one of the potential regulators of myelination, we investigated whether SC mitochondria are regulated by axonal signaling. Here, we show a purinergic mechanism that sends information from neurons to SC mitochondria during myelination. Our results show that electrical stimulation of rat sciatic nerve increases extracellular ATP levels enough to activate purinergic receptors. Indeed, electrical stimulation of sciatic nerves induces Ca(2+) increases in the cytosol and the mitochondrial matrix of surrounding SCs via purinergic receptor activation. Chronic suppression of this pathway during active myelination suppressed the longitudinal and radial development of myelinating SCs and caused hypomyelination. These results demonstrate a neuron-to-SC mitochondria signaling, which is likely to have an important role in proper myelination. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. FIBER-OPTIC BIOSENSOR FOR DIRECT DETERMINATION OF ORGANOPHOSPHATE NERVE AGENTS. (R823663)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A fiber-optic enzyme biosensor for the direct measurement of organophosphate nerveagents was developed. The basic element of this biosensor is organophosphorus hydrolaseimmobilized on a nylon membrane and attached to the common end of a bifurcated optical fiberbundle....

  8. Influence of myelin proteins on the structure and dynamics of a model membrane with emphasis on the low temperature regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoll, W. [University Joseph Fourier, UFR PhiTEM, Grenoble (France); Institut Laue–Langevin, Grenoble (France); Peters, J. [University Joseph Fourier, UFR PhiTEM, Grenoble (France); Institut Laue–Langevin, Grenoble (France); Institut de Biologie Structurale, Grenoble (France); Kursula, P. [University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); CSSB–HZI, DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Gerelli, Y. [Institut Laue–Langevin, Grenoble (France); Natali, F., E-mail: natali@ill.fr [Institut Laue–Langevin, Grenoble (France); CNR–IOM–OGG, c/o Institut Laue–Langevin, Grenoble (France)

    2014-11-28

    Myelin is an insulating, multi-lamellar membrane structure wrapped around selected nerve axons. Increasing the speed of nerve impulses, it is crucial for the proper functioning of the vertebrate nervous system. Human neurodegenerative diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, are linked to damage to the myelin sheath through demyelination. Myelin exhibits a well defined subset of myelin-specific proteins, whose influence on membrane dynamics, i.e., myelin flexibility and stability, has not yet been explored in detail. In a first paper [W. Knoll, J. Peters, P. Kursula, Y. Gerelli, J. Ollivier, B. Demé, M. Telling, E. Kemner, and F. Natali, Soft Matter 10, 519 (2014)] we were able to spotlight, through neutron scattering experiments, the role of peripheral nervous system myelin proteins on membrane stability at room temperature. In particular, the myelin basic protein and peripheral myelin protein 2 were found to synergistically influence the membrane structure while keeping almost unchanged the membrane mobility. Further insight is provided by this work, in which we particularly address the investigation of the membrane flexibility in the low temperature regime. We evidence a different behavior suggesting that the proton dynamics is reduced by the addition of the myelin basic protein accompanied by negligible membrane structural changes. Moreover, we address the importance of correct sample preparation and characterization for the success of the experiment and for the reliability of the obtained results.

  9. A Model of Electrically Stimulated Auditory Nerve Fiber Responses with Peripheral and Central Sites of Spike Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Suyash Narendra; Dau, Torsten; Epp, Bastian

    2017-01-01

    . A single ANF is modeled as a network of two exponential integrateand-fire point-neuron models, referred to as peripheral and central axons of the ANF. The peripheral axon is excited by the cathodic charge, inhibited by the anodic charge, and exhibits longer spike latencies than the central axon......A computational model of cat auditory nerve fiber (ANF) responses to electrical stimulation is presented. The model assumes that (1) there exist at least two sites of spike generation along the ANF and (2) both an anodic (positive) and a cathodic (negative) charge in isolation can evoke a spike......; the central axon is excited by the anodic charge, inhibited by the cathodic charge, and exhibits shorter spike latencies than the peripheral axon. The model also includes subthreshold and suprathreshold adaptive feedback loops which continuously modify the membrane potential and can account for effects...

  10. Analysis of visual appearance of retinal nerve fibers in high resolution fundus images: a study on normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolar, Radim; Tornow, Ralf P; Laemmer, Robert; Odstrcilik, Jan; Mayer, Markus A; Gazarek, Jiri; Jan, Jiri; Kubena, Tomas; Cernosek, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    The retinal ganglion axons are an important part of the visual system, which can be directly observed by fundus camera. The layer they form together inside the retina is the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL). This paper describes results of a texture RNFL analysis in color fundus photographs and compares these results with quantitative measurement of RNFL thickness obtained from optical coherence tomography on normal subjects. It is shown that local mean value, standard deviation, and Shannon entropy extracted from the green and blue channel of fundus images are correlated with corresponding RNFL thickness. The linear correlation coefficients achieved values 0.694, 0.547, and 0.512 for respective features measured on 439 retinal positions in the peripapillary area from 23 eyes of 15 different normal subjects.

  11. Analysis of Visual Appearance of Retinal Nerve Fibers in High Resolution Fundus Images: A Study on Normal Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radim Kolar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The retinal ganglion axons are an important part of the visual system, which can be directly observed by fundus camera. The layer they form together inside the retina is the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL. This paper describes results of a texture RNFL analysis in color fundus photographs and compares these results with quantitative measurement of RNFL thickness obtained from optical coherence tomography on normal subjects. It is shown that local mean value, standard deviation, and Shannon entropy extracted from the green and blue channel of fundus images are correlated with corresponding RNFL thickness. The linear correlation coefficients achieved values 0.694, 0.547, and 0.512 for respective features measured on 439 retinal positions in the peripapillary area from 23 eyes of 15 different normal subjects.

  12. Nerves and nerve endings in the skin of tropical cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amakiri, S F; Ozoya, S E; Ogunnaike, P O

    1978-01-01

    The nerves and nerve endings in the skin of tropical cattle were studied using histological and histochemical techniques. Many nerve trunks and fibres were present in the reticular and papillary dermis in both hairy and non-hairy skin sites. In non-hairy skin locations such as the muzzle and lower lip, encapsulated endings akin to Krause and Ruffini end bulbs, which arise from myelinated nerve trunks situated lower down the dermis were observed at the upper papillary layer level. Some fibre trunks seen at this level extended upwards to terminate within dermal papillae as bulb-shaped longitudinally lamellated Pacinian-type endings, while other onion-shaped lamellated nerve structures were located either within dermal papillae or near the dermo-epidermal area. Intraepidermal free-ending nerve fibres, appearing non-myelinated were observed in areas with thick epidermis. Intraepidermal free-ending nerve fibres, appearing non-myelinated were observed in areas with thick epidermis. On hairy skin sites, however, organized nerve endings or intraepidermal nerve endings were not readily identifiable.

  13. Effect of cataract surgery on retinal nerve fiber layer thickness parameters using scanning laser polarimetry (GDxVCC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dada, Tanuj; Behera, Geeta; Agarwal, Anand; Kumar, Sanjeev; Sihota, Ramanjit; Panda, Anita

    2010-01-01

    To study the effect of cataract extraction on the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, and assessment by scanning laser polarimetry (SLP), with variable corneal compensation (GDx VCC), at the glaucoma service of a tertiary care center in North India. Thirty-two eyes of 32 subjects were enrolled in the study. The subjects underwent RNFL analysis by SLP (GDx VCC) before undergoing phacoemulsification cataract extraction with intraocular lens (IOL) implantation (Acrysof SA 60 AT) four weeks following cataract surgery. The RNFL thickness parameters evaluated both before and after surgery included temporal, superior, nasal, inferior, temporal (TSNIT) average, superior average, inferior average, and nerve fiber index (NFI). The mean age of subjects was 57.6 +/- 11.7 years (18 males, 14 females). Mean TSNIT average thickness (microm) pre- and post-cataract surgery was 49.2 +/- 14.1 and 56.5 +/- 7.6 ( P = 0.001). There was a statistically significant increase in RNFL thickness parameters (TSNIT average, superior average, and inferior average) and decrease in NFI post-cataract surgery as compared to the baseline values. Mean NFI pre- and post-cataract surgery was 41.3 +/- 15.3 and 21.6 +/- 11.8 ( P = 0.001). Measurement of RNFL thickness parameters by scanning laser polarimetry is significantly altered following cataract surgery. Post the cataract surgery, a new baseline needs to be established for assessing the longitudinal follow-up of a glaucoma patient. The presence of cataract may lead to an underestimation of the RNFL thickness, and this should be taken into account when analyzing progression in a glaucoma patient.

  14. Correlation between peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and fundus autofluorescence in primary open-angle glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reznicek L

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Lukas Reznicek,* Florian Seidensticker,* Thomas Mann, Irene Hübert, Alexandra Buerger, Christos Haritoglou, Aljoscha S Neubauer, Anselm Kampik, Christoph Hirneiss, Marcus Kernt Department of Ophthalmology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: To investigate the relationship between retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL thickness and retinal pigment epithelium alterations in patients with advanced glaucomatous visual field defects. Methods: A consecutive, prospective series of 82 study eyes with primary open-angle glaucoma and advanced glaucomatous visual field defects were included in this study. All study participants underwent a full ophthalmic examination followed by visual field testing with standard automated perimetry as well as spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT for peripapillary RNFL thickness and Optos wide-field fundus autofluorescence (FAF images. A pattern grid with corresponding locations between functional visual field sectors and structural peripapillary RNFL thickness was aligned to the FAF images at corresponding location. Mean FAF intensity (range: 0 = black and 255 = white of each evaluated sector (superotemporal, temporal, inferotemporal, inferonasal, nasal, superonasal was correlated with the corresponding peripapillary RNFL thickness obtained with SD-OCT. Results: Correlation analyses between sectoral RNFL thickness and standardized FAF intensity in the corresponding topographic retina segments revealed partly significant correlations with correlation coefficients ranging between 0.004 and 0.376 and were statistically significant in the temporal inferior central field (r = 0.324, P = 0.036 and the nasal field (r = 0.376, P = 0.014. Conclusion: Retinal pigment epithelium abnormalities correlate with corresponding peripapillary RNFL damage, especially in the temporal inferior sector of patients with advanced glaucomatous visual field defects. A

  15. High-resolution imaging of the retinal nerve fiber layer in normal eyes using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Kohei; Ooto, Sotaro; Hangai, Masanori; Arakawa, Naoko; Oshima, Susumu; Shibata, Naohisa; Hanebuchi, Masaaki; Inoue, Takashi; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2012-01-01

    To conduct high-resolution imaging of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) in normal eyes using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO). AO-SLO images were obtained in 20 normal eyes at multiple locations in the posterior polar area and a circular path with a 3-4-mm diameter around the optic disc. For each eye, images focused on the RNFL were recorded and a montage of AO-SLO images was created. AO-SLO images for all eyes showed many hyperreflective bundles in the RNFL. Hyperreflective bundles above or below the fovea were seen in an arch from the temporal periphery on either side of a horizontal dividing line to the optic disc. The dark lines among the hyperreflective bundles were narrower around the optic disc compared with those in the temporal raphe. The hyperreflective bundles corresponded with the direction of the striations on SLO red-free images. The resolution and contrast of the bundles were much higher in AO-SLO images than in red-free fundus photography or SLO red-free images. The mean hyperreflective bundle width around the optic disc had a double-humped shape; the bundles at the temporal and nasal sides of the optic disc were narrower than those above and below the optic disc (Poptical coherence tomography correlated with the hyperreflective bundle widths on AO-SLO (Pfiber bundles and Müller cell septa. The widths of the nerve fiber bundles appear to be proportional to the RNFL thickness at equivalent distances from the optic disc.

  16. Functional role of peripheral opioid receptors in the regulation of cardiac spinal afferent nerve activity during myocardial ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Thinly myelinated Aδ-fiber and unmyelinated C-fiber cardiac sympathetic (spinal) sensory nerve fibers are activated during myocardial ischemia to transmit the sensation of angina pectoris. Although recent observations showed that myocardial ischemia increases the concentrations of opioid peptides and that the stimulation of peripheral opioid receptors inhibits chemically induced visceral and somatic nociception, the role of opioids in cardiac spinal afferent signaling during myocardial ischemia has not been studied. The present study tested the hypothesis that peripheral opioid receptors modulate cardiac spinal afferent nerve activity during myocardial ischemia by suppressing the responses of cardiac afferent nerve to ischemic mediators like bradykinin and extracellular ATP. The nerve activity of single unit cardiac afferents was recorded from the left sympathetic chain (T2–T5) in anesthetized cats. Forty-three ischemically sensitive afferent nerves (conduction velocity: 0.32–3.90 m/s) with receptive fields in the left and right ventricles were identified. The responses of these afferent nerves to repeat ischemia or ischemic mediators were further studied in the following protocols. First, epicardial administration of naloxone (8 μmol), a nonselective opioid receptor antagonist, enhanced the responses of eight cardiac afferent nerves to recurrent myocardial ischemia by 62%, whereas epicardial application of vehicle (PBS) did not alter the responses of seven other cardiac afferent nerves to ischemia. Second, naloxone applied to the epicardial surface facilitated the responses of seven cardiac afferent nerves to epicardial ATP by 76%. Third, administration of naloxone enhanced the responses of seven other afferent nerves to bradykinin by 85%. In contrast, in the absence of naloxone, cardiac afferent nerves consistently responded to repeated application of ATP (n = 7) or bradykinin (n = 7). These data suggest that peripheral opioid peptides suppress the

  17. Local delivery of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor improves facial nerve regeneration after late repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barras, Florian M; Kuntzer, Thierry; Zurn, Anne D; Pasche, Philippe

    2009-05-01

    Facial nerve regeneration is limited in some clinical situations: in long grafts, by aged patients, and when the delay between nerve lesion and repair is prolonged. This deficient regeneration is due to the limited number of regenerating nerve fibers, their immaturity and the unresponsiveness of Schwann cells after a long period of denervation. This study proposes to apply glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) on facial nerve grafts via nerve guidance channels to improve the regeneration. Two situations were evaluated: immediate and delayed grafts (repair 7 months after the lesion). Each group contained three subgroups: a) graft without channel, b) graft with a channel without neurotrophic factor; and c) graft with a GDNF-releasing channel. A functional analysis was performed with clinical observation of facial nerve function, and nerve conduction study at 6 weeks. Histological analysis was performed with the count of number of myelinated fibers within the graft, and distally to the graft. Central evaluation was assessed with Fluoro-Ruby retrograde labeling and Nissl staining. This study showed that GDNF allowed an increase in the number and the maturation of nerve fibers, as well as the number of retrogradely labeled neurons in delayed anastomoses. On the contrary, after immediate repair, the regenerated nerves in the presence of GDNF showed inferior results compared to the other groups. GDNF is a potent neurotrophic factor to improve facial nerve regeneration in grafts performed several months after the nerve lesion. However, GDNF should not be used for immediate repair, as it possibly inhibits the nerve regeneration.

  18. Association between retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and magnetic resonance imaging findings and intelligence in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashtari, Fereshteh; Emami, Parisa; Akbari, Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a neurological disease in which demyelination and axonal loss leads to progressive disability. Cognition impairment is among the most common complication. Studying axonal loss in the retina is a new marker for MS. The main goal of our study is to search for correlations between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness at the macula and head of the optic nerve and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) Scores that assess multiple domains of intelligence, and to explore the relationship between changes in the RNFL thickness with intellectual and cognitive dysfunction. A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted at the University Hospital of Kashani, Isfahan, Iran, from September to December 2013. All patients were assessed with a full-scale intelligence quotient (IQ) on the WAIS-R. An optical coherence tomography study and brain MRI were performed in the same week for all the patients. Statistical analysis was conducted by using a bivariate correlation, by utilizing SPSS 20.0. A P value ≤ 0.05 was the threshold of statistical significance. Examination of a 100 patients showed a significant correlation between the average RNFL thickness of the macula and the verbal IQ (P value = 0.01) and full IQ (P value = 0.01). There was a significant correlation between brain atrophy and verbal IQ. The RNFL loss was correlated with verbal IQ and full IQ.

  19. Direct visualization of membrane architecture of myelinating cells in transgenic mice expressing membrane-anchored EGFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yaqi; Kim, BongWoo; He, Xuelian; Kim, Sunja; Lu, Changqing; Wang, Haibo; Cho, Ssang-Goo; Hou, Yiping; Li, Jianrong; Zhao, Xianghui; Lu, Q Richard

    2014-04-01

    Myelinogenesis is a complex process that involves substantial and dynamic changes in plasma membrane architecture and myelin interaction with axons. Highly ramified processes of oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS) make axonal contact and then extrapolate to wrap around axons and form multilayer compact myelin sheathes. Currently, the mechanisms governing myelin sheath assembly and axon selection by myelinating cells are not fully understood. Here, we generated a transgenic mouse line expressing the membrane-anchored green fluorescent protein (mEGFP) in myelinating cells, which allow live imaging of details of myelinogenesis and cellular behaviors in the nervous systems. mEGFP expression is driven by the promoter of 2'-3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP) that is expressed in the myelinating cell lineage. Robust mEGFP signals appear in the membrane processes of oligodendrocytes in the CNS and Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system (PNS), wherein mEGFP expression defines the inner layers of myelin sheaths and Schmidt-Lanterman incisures in adult sciatic nerves. In addition, mEGFP expression can be used to track the extent of remyelination after demyelinating injury in a toxin-induced demyelination animal model. Taken together, the membrane-anchored mEGFP expression in the new transgenic line would facilitate direct visualization of dynamic myelin membrane formation and assembly during development and process remodeling during remyelination after various demyelinating injuries.

  20. Interocular symmetry of retinal nerve fiber layer and optic nerve head parameters measured by Cirrus high-definition optical coherence tomography in a normal pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Neelam; Maheshwari, Devendra; Ravindran, Meenakshi; Ramakrishnan, Renagappa

    2017-10-01

    To determine interocular differences in the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and optic nerve head (ONH) parameters in a pediatric population using Cirrus high-definition optical coherence tomography (HD-OCT). Seventy normal Indian children aged 5-17 years presenting to the Pediatric Clinic were included in this observational cross-sectional study. All subjects underwent a comprehensive ophthalmologic examination and an evaluation of the RNFL and ONH by Cirrus HD-OCT. Differences between the right and left eyes were calculated and values were compared by means of a paired t-test. Subjects were also divided into two groups based on age (under or over 10 years of age). Interocular differences in RNFL and ONH parameters together with sex and age variations for these differences were determined. The mean age of studied pediatric population was 11.83 ± 3.3 years (range 5-17). Average RNFL thickness was 94.46 ± 8.7 μm (± SD) (range 77-111). Differences in the average RNFL between right and left eyes were not statistically significant (P = 0.060). Superior quadrant RNFL was thicker in the left eye and temporal quadrant was thicker in the right eye. Among ONH parameters, there were no statistically significant differences in any parameters, except vertical cup-disc (CD) ratio which was significant (P = 0.007). The 2.5%-97.5% limits of asymmetry were 9 μm for average RNFL, 0.14 for average CD ratio, and 0.22 for vertical CD ratio. Mean interocular RNFL thickness differences in superior, superior nasal, and temporal superior quadrants were 10.61 (P sex, while only significant differences with age were observed in 12 clock hour sector analysis, mainly in nasal inferior and inferior quadrant. We report the degree of interocular symmetry of RNFL and ONH parameters measured by Cirrus HD-OCT in a healthy pediatric population. The normal interocular RNFL asymmetry should not exceed 9 μm and vertical CD ratio beyond 0.22 should be considered for further investigations. The

  1. The effect of aging on efferent nerve fibers regeneration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdú, E; Butí, M; Navarro, X

    1995-10-23

    This study evaluates the influence of aging on nerve regeneration and reinnervation of target organs in mice aged 2, 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24 months. In animals of each age group the sciatic nerve was subjected to crush, section or section and suture. Reinnervation of plantar muscles and sweat glands (SG) was evaluated over three months after operation by functional methods. Reappearance of SG secretion and motor responses occurred slightly earlier in young than older mice. The degree of motor and sudomotor reinnervation, with respect to preoperative control values, was also significantly higher in young than old animals. The differences were more pronounced after 12 months of age. The degree of recovery progressively decreased with the severity of the lesion, differences being more marked in older mice. Neurorraphy improved recovery, comparatively more in older than in young mice. These results indicate that, after injuries of peripheral nerves, axonal regeneration and reinnervation are maintained throughout life, but tend to be more delayed and slightly less effective with aging.

  2. End-to-side neurorrhaphy repairs peripheral nerve injury: sensory nerve induces motor nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qing; Zhang, She-Hong; Wang, Tao; Peng, Feng; Han, Dong; Gu, Yu-Dong

    2017-10-01

    End-to-side neurorrhaphy is an option in the treatment of the long segment defects of a nerve. It involves suturing the distal stump of the disconnected nerve (recipient nerve) to the side of the intimate adjacent nerve (donor nerve). However, the motor-sensory specificity after end-to-side neurorrhaphy remains unclear. This study sought to evaluate whether cutaneous sensory nerve regeneration induces motor nerves after end-to-side neurorrhaphy. Thirty rats were randomized into three groups: (1) end-to-side neurorrhaphy using the ulnar nerve (mixed sensory and motor) as the donor nerve and the cutaneous antebrachii medialis nerve as the recipient nerve; (2) the sham group: ulnar nerve and cutaneous antebrachii medialis nerve were just exposed; and (3) the transected nerve group: cutaneous antebrachii medialis nerve was transected and the stumps were turned over and tied. At 5 months, acetylcholinesterase staining results showed that 34% ± 16% of the myelinated axons were stained in the end-to-side group, and none of the myelinated axons were stained in either the sham or transected nerve groups. Retrograde fluorescent tracing of spinal motor neurons and dorsal root ganglion showed the proportion of motor neurons from the cutaneous antebrachii medialis nerve of the end-to-side group was 21% ± 5%. In contrast, no motor neurons from the cutaneous antebrachii medialis nerve of the sham group and transected nerve group were found in the spinal cord segment. These results confirmed that motor neuron regeneration occurred after cutaneous nerve end-to-side neurorrhaphy.

  3. Cholesterol in myelin biogenesis and hypomyelinating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saher, Gesine; Stumpf, Sina Kristin

    2015-08-01

    The largest pool of free cholesterol in mammals resides in myelin membranes. Myelin facilitates rapid saltatory impulse propagation by electrical insulation of axons. This function is achieved by ensheathing axons with a tightly compacted stack of membranes. Cholesterol influences myelination at many steps, from the differentiation of myelinating glial cells, over the process of myelin membrane biogenesis, to the functionality of mature myelin. Cholesterol emerged as the only integral myelin component that is essential and rate-limiting for the development of myelin in the central and peripheral nervous system. Moreover, disorders that interfere with sterol synthesis or intracellular trafficking of cholesterol and other lipids cause hypomyelination and neurodegeneration. This review summarizes recent results on the roles of cholesterol in CNS myelin biogenesis in normal development and under different pathological conditions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Brain Lipids. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Functional and structural nerve fiber findings in heterozygote patients with Fabry disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torvin, Moller A.; Winther, Bach F.; Feldt-Rasmussen, U.

    2009-01-01

    recently disease manifestations in female carriers of Fabry disease have been questioned. To explore the frequency of symptoms and the functional and structural involvement of the nervous system in female patients we examined the presence of pain, manifestations of peripheral neuropathy and nerve density......Fabry disease is an X-linked inherited lysosomal disorder with dysfunction of the lysosomal enzyme alpha-galactosidase A causing accumulation of glycolipids in multiple organs including the nervous system. Pain and somatosensory disturbances are prominent manifestations of this disease. Until...

  5. [Experimental study on regeneration of sciatic nerve injury with physical therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Juan; Yu, Hong; Xu, Yiming; Bai, Yuehong

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a common clinical disease, to study the effects of the physical therapy on the regeneration of the injured sciatic nerve, and provide a reference for clinical treatment. Sixty-four female adult Wistar rats (weighing 252-365 g) were chosen and randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 16): group A, group B, group C, and group D. The experimental model of sciatic nerve defect was established by crushing the right sciatic nerve in groups B, C, and D; group A served as the control group without crushing. At 2 days after injury, no treatment was given in group B, electrical stimulation in group C, and combined physical therapies (decimeter and infrared ray) in group D. At 0, 7, 14, and 30 days after treatment, the sciatic nerve function index (SFI) and the motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) were measured, and morphological and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examinations were done; at 30 days after treatment, the morphological evaluation analysis of axons was performed. At 0 and 7 days after treatment, the SFI values of groups B, C, and D were significantly higher than that of group A (P 0.05) at 30 days; whereas the SFI values of groups B and C decreased, showing significant difference when compared with the value of group A (P 0.05). At 0 and 7 days, only collagen and lipid were observed by TEM; at 14 and 30 days, many Schwann cells and perineurial cells in regeneration axon were observed in groups B, C, and D, especially in group D. Automated image analysis of axons showed that there was no significant difference in the number of myelinated nerve fibers, axon diameter, and myelin sheath thickness between group D and group A (P > 0.05), and the number of myelinated nerve fibers and axon diameter of group D were significantly higher than those of groups B and C (P < 0.05). Physical therapy can improve the regeneration of the injured sciatic nerve of rats.

  6. Assessing the neurotoxic effects of palytoxin and ouabain, both Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase inhibitors, on the myelinated sciatic nerve fibres of the mouse: an ex vivo electrophysiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagiava, Alexia; Aligizaki, Katerina; Katikou, Panagiota; Nikolaidis, Georgios; Theophilidis, George

    2012-03-01

    Palytoxin (PlTX) is a marine toxin originally isolated from the zoantharians of the genus Palythoa. It is considered to be one of the most lethal marine toxins that block the Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase. This study was designed to investigate the acute effects of PlTX and ouabain, also an Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase blocker, on the mammalian peripheral nervous system using an ex vivo electrophysiological preparation: the isolated mouse sciatic nerve. Amplitude of the evoked nerve compound action potential (nCAP) was used to measure the proper functioning of the sciatic nerve fibres. The half-vitality time of the nerve fibres (the time required to inhibit the nCAP to 50% of its initial value: IT₅₀) incubated in normal saline was 24.5 ± 0.40 h (n = 5). Nerves incubated continuously in 50.0, 10.0, 1.0, 0.5, 0.250 and 0.125 nM of PlTX had an IT₅₀ of 0.06 ± 0.00, 0.51 ± 0.00, 2.1 ± 0.10, 8.9 ± 0.30, 15.1 ± 0.30 h, and 19.5 ± 0.20 h, respectively (n = 5, 3, 4, 4, 10). PlTX was extremely toxic to the sciatic nerve fibres, with a minimum effective concentration (mEC) of 0.125 nM (n = 5) and inhibitory concentration to 50% (IC₅₀) of 0.32 ± 0.08 nM (incubation time 24 h). Ouabain was far less toxic, with a mEC of 250.0 μM (n = 5) and IC₅₀ of 370.0 ± 18.00 μM (incubation 24.5 h). Finally, when the two compounds were combined--e.g. pre-incubation of the nerve fibre in 250.0 μM ouabain for 1 h and then exposure to 1.0 nM PlTX--ouabain offered minor a neuroprotection of 9.1-17.6% against PlTX-induced neurotoxicity. Higher concentrations of ouabain (500.0 μM) offered no protection. The mouse sciatic nerve preparation is a simple and low-cost bioassay that can be used to assess and quantify the neurotoxic effects of standard PlTX or PlTX-like compounds, since it appears to have the same sensitivity as the haemolysis of erythrocytes assay--the standard ex vivo test for PlTX toxicity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. HLA-DR-expressing cells and T-lymphocytes in sural nerve biopsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, H D; Olsson, T; Solders, G

    1988-01-01

    was confirmed. HLA-DR expression was found in all biopsies and thus was not restricted to any particular type of neuropathy. The HLA-DR expression appeared to correlate with severity and activity of the neuropathy. HLA-DR-expressing macrophages wrapping myelinated fibers were prominent in primary demyelinating......Thirty-five sural nerve biopsies were stained immunohistochemically for HLA-DR antigen. HLA-DR was expressed on nonmyelinating Schwann cells, macrophages, vascular endothelium, and perineurium. By means of double immunofluorescence staining the identity of the HLA-DR presenting structures...

  8. Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness Changes in the Pseudoexfoliation Syndrome: A Meta-Analysis of Case-Control Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ji-Guo; Huang, Qing; Zhou, Xiao-Fang; Ding, Yi; Li, Jing; Xiang, Yi

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate and compare changes in retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in patients with the pseudoexfoliation syndrome (PXS) and healthy controls. Case-control studies were selected through an electronic search of the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, PubMed, and Embase. Results were reviewed to ensure that the included studies met prespecified inclusion/exclusion criteria, and the quality of each study was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. All included studies measured average and 4-quadrant (temporal, superior, nasal, and inferior) RNFL thickness using optical coherence tomography (OCT). For the continuous outcomes, we calculated the weighted mean difference (WMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Eight case-control studies were included in this meta-analysis involving 225 eyes of PXS patients and 208 eyes of healthy controls in total. Statistical analysis revealed that the average RNFL thickness in PXS patients was significantly reduced compared to healthy controls (WMD = -6.91, 95% CI: -9.99 to -3.82, p < 0.0001). Additionally, differences in RNFL thickness in the superior quadrant (WMD = -10.68, 95% CI: -16.40 to -4.95, p = 0.0003), inferior quadrant (WMD = -8.20, 95% CI: -10.85 to -5.55, p < 0.00001), nasal quadrant (WMD = -3.05, 95% CI: -5.21 to -0.90, p = 0.005), and temporal quadrant (WMD = -6.39, 95% CI: -9.98 to -2.80, p = 0.0005) were all significant between the two groups. These results suggest that it is important to evaluate RNFL thickness and the optic nerve head through OCT in patients with PXS in order to determine early glaucomatous damage and start timely intervention prior to visual field loss. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Macular Ganglion Cell Inner Plexiform Layer Thickness in Glaucomatous Eyes with Localized Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunwei Zhang

    Full Text Available To investigate macular ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer (mGCIPL thickness in glaucomatous eyes with visible localized retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL defects on stereophotographs.112 healthy and 149 glaucomatous eyes from the Diagnostic Innovations in Glaucoma Study (DIGS and the African Descent and Glaucoma Evaluation Study (ADAGES subjects had standard automated perimetry (SAP, optical coherence tomography (OCT imaging of the macula and optic nerve head, and stereoscopic optic disc photography. Masked observers identified localized RNFL defects by grading of stereophotographs.47 eyes had visible localized RNFL defects on stereophotographs. Eyes with visible localized RNFL defects had significantly thinner mGCIPL thickness compared to healthy eyes (68.3 ± 11.4 μm versus 79.2 ± 6.6 μm respectively, P<0.001 and similar mGCIPL thickness to glaucomatous eyes without localized RNFL defects (68.6 ± 11.2 μm, P = 1.000. The average mGCIPL thickness in eyes with RNFL defects was 14% less than similarly aged healthy controls. For 29 eyes with a visible RNFL defect in just one hemiretina (superior or inferior mGCIPL was thinnest in the same hemiretina in 26 eyes (90%. Eyes with inferior-temporal RNFL defects also had significantly thinner inferior-temporal mGCIPL (P<0.001 and inferior mGCIPL (P = 0.030 compared to glaucomatous eyes without a visible RNFL defect.The current study indicates that presence of a localized RNFL defect is likely to indicate significant macular damage, particularly in the region of the macular that topographically corresponds to the location of the RNFL defect.

  10. Perimetric measurements with flicker-defined form stimulation in comparison with conventional perimetry and retinal nerve fiber measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Folkert K; Tornow, Ralf P; Jünemann, Anselm G; Laemmer, Robert; Kremers, Jan

    2014-04-11

    We compared the results of flicker-defined form (FDF) perimetry with standard automated perimetry (SAP) and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measurements using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT). A total of 64 healthy subjects, 45 ocular hypertensive patients, and 97 "early" open-angle glaucoma (OAG) patients participated in this study. Definition of glaucoma was based exclusively on glaucomatous optic disc appearance. All subjects underwent FDF perimetry, SAP, and peripapillary measurements of the RNFL thickness. The FDF perimetry and SAP were performed at identical test locations (G1 protocol). Exclusion criteria were subjects younger than 34 years, SAP mean defect (SAP MD) > 5 dB, eye diseases other than glaucoma, or nonreliable FDF measurements. The correlations between the perimetric data on one hand and RNFL thicknesses on the other hand were analyzed statistically. The age-corrected sensitivity values and the local results from the controls were used to determine FDF mean defect (FDF MD). The FDF perimetry and SAP showed high concordance in this cohort of experienced patients (MD values, R = -0.69, P < 0.001). Of a total of 42 OAG patients with abnormal SAP MD, 38 also displayed abnormal FDF MD. However, FDF MD was abnormal in 28 of 55 OAG patients with normal SAP MD. The FDF MD was significantly (R = -0.61, P < 0.001) correlated with RNFL thickness with a (nonsignificantly) larger correlation coefficient than conventional SAP MD (R = -0.48, P < 0.001). The FDF perimetry is able to uncover functional changes concurrent with the changes in RNFL thickness. The FDF perimetry may be an efficient functional test to detect early glaucomatous nerve atrophy. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00494923.).

  11. Epitope diversity of N-glycans from bovine peripheral myelin glycoprotein P0 revealed by mass spectrometry and nano probe magic angle spinning 1H NMR spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Gutiérrez Gallego, R.; Jiménez Blanco, J.L.; Thijssen-van Zuylen, C.W.E.M.; Gotfredsen, C.H.; Voshol, H.; Duus, J.Ø.; Schachner, M.

    2001-01-01

    The carbohydrate structures present on the glycoproteins in the central and peripheral nerve systems are essential in many cell adhesion processes. The P0 glycoprotein, expressed by myelinating Schwann cells, plays an important role during the formation and maintenance of myelin, and it is the most

  12. Relevance Vector Machine and Support Vector Machine Classifier Analysis of Scanning Laser Polarimetry Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowd, Christopher; Medeiros, Felipe A.; Zhang, Zuohua; Zangwill, Linda M.; Hao, Jiucang; Lee, Te-Won; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Weinreb, Robert N.; Goldbaum, Michael H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To classify healthy and glaucomatous eyes using relevance vector machine (RVM) and support vector machine (SVM) learning classifiers trained on retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measurements obtained by scanning laser polarimetry (SLP). Methods Seventy-two eyes of 72 healthy control subjects (average age = 64.3 ± 8.8 years, visual field mean deviation =−0.71 ± 1.2 dB) and 92 eyes of 92 patients with glaucoma (average age = 66.9 ± 8.9 years, visual field mean deviation =−5.32 ± 4.0 dB) were imaged with SLP with variable corneal compensation (GDx VCC; Laser Diagnostic Technologies, San Diego, CA). RVM and SVM learning classifiers were trained and tested on SLP-determined RNFL thickness measurements from 14 standard parameters and 64 sectors (approximately 5.6° each) obtained in the circumpapillary area under the instrument-defined measurement ellipse (total 78 parameters). Tenfold cross-validation was used to train and test RVM and SVM classifiers on unique subsets of the full 164-eye data set and areas under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve for the classification of eyes in the test set were generated. AUROC curve results from RVM and SVM were compared to those for 14 SLP software-generated global and regional RNFL thickness parameters. Also reported was the AUROC curve for the GDx VCC software-generated nerve fiber indicator (NFI). Results The AUROC curves for RVM and SVM were 0.90 and 0.91, respectively, and increased to 0.93 and 0.94 when the training sets were optimized with sequential forward and backward selection (resulting in reduced dimensional data sets). AUROC curves for optimized RVM and SVM were significantly larger than those for all individual SLP parameters. The AUROC curve for the NFI was 0.87. Conclusions Results from RVM and SVM trained on SLP RNFL thickness measurements are similar and provide accurate classification of glaucomatous and healthy eyes. RVM may be preferable to SVM, because it provides a

  13. Retinal nerve fiber layer analysis with scanning laser polarimetry and RTVue-OCT in patients of retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Kang; Wang, Min; Chen, Junyi; Huang, Xin; Xu, Gezhi

    2013-01-01

    To measure the thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) of patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and that of normal controls by scanning laser polarimetry with enhanced corneal compensation (GDxECC) and RTVue-optical coherence tomography (OCT). Fifty-two eyes of 26 patients were included. All patients underwent complete ophthalmological examinations and testing with GDxECC. Twenty-eight of 52 eyes of RP patients underwent RTVue-OCT measurements. A group of 50 eyes of 25 normal subjects (controls) was also included. GDxECC measured RNFL thickness in the peripapillary area in all subjects as well as temporal-superior-nasal-inferior-temporal (TSNIT) parameters, including TSNIT means, superior and inferior region means, TSNIT standard deviation (SD), inter-eye symmetry and nerve fiber indicator (NFI). RTVue-OCT measured the mean, superior, inferior, temporal and nasal quadrant RNFL thickness. In RP patients and controls, TSNIT means by GDxECC were, respectively, 65.00 ± 7.35 and 55.32 ± 5.20. Mean superior quadrant thicknesses were 80.56 ± 10.93 and 69.54 ± 7.45. Mean inferior thicknesses were 80.58 ± 9.34 and 69.12 ± 7.78. SDs were 27.92 ± 5.21 and 28.23 ± 4.01. Inter-eye symmetries were 0.82 ± 0.17 and 0.87 ± 0.09. NFIs were 9.74 ± 8.73 and 16.81 ± 8.13. The differences between mean TSNIT, mean superior and mean inferior quadrant thicknesses and NFIs were statistically significant (p < 0.001). In RTVue-OCT measurements, the differences between mean, superior, inferior and temporal quadrant RNFL thicknesses were statistically significant (p = 0.0322, 0.0213, 0.0387, 0.0005). The RNFL measured by GDxECC was significantly thicker in RP patients than in controls. RNFL thickness measured by RTVue-OCT was significantly greater in RP patients than in controls in the superior, inferior and temporal regions. This contribution provides information on RNFL thickness and discusses the mechanism underlying this phenomenon. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG

  14. Measurement and simulation of unmyelinated nerve electrostimulation: Lumbricus terrestris experiment and numerical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šarolić, A; Živković, Z; Reilly, J P

    2016-06-21

    The electrostimulation excitation threshold of a nerve depends on temporal and frequency parameters of the stimulus. These dependences were investigated in terms of: (1) strength-duration (SD) curve for a single monophasic rectangular pulse, and (2) frequency dependence of the excitation threshold for a continuous sinusoidal current. Experiments were performed on the single-axon measurement setup based on Lumbricus terrestris having unmyelinated nerve fibers. The simulations were performed using the well-established SENN model for a myelinated nerve. Although the unmyelinated experimental model differs from the myelinated simulation model, both refer to a single axon. Thus we hypothesized that the dependence on temporal and frequency parameters should be very similar. The comparison was made possible by normalizing each set of results to the SD time constant and the rheobase current of each model, yielding the curves that show the temporal and frequency dependencies regardless of the model differences. The results reasonably agree, suggesting that this experimental setup and method of comparison with SENN model can be used for further studies of waveform effect on nerve excitability, including unmyelinated neurons.

  15. A role for myelin-associated peroxisomes in maintaining paranodal loops and axonal integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassmann, Celia M; Quintes, Susanne; Rietdorf, Jens; Möbius, Wiebke; Sereda, Michael Werner; Nientiedt, Tobias; Saher, Gesine; Baes, Myriam; Nave, Klaus-Armin

    2011-07-21

    Demyelinating diseases of the nervous system cause axon loss but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Here we show by confocal and electron microscopy that in myelin-forming glia peroxisomes are associated with myelin membranes. When peroxisome biogenesis is experimentally perturbed in Pex5 conditional mouse mutants, myelination by Schwann cells appears initially normal. However, in nerves of older mice paranodal loops become physically unstable and develop swellings filled with vesicles and electron-dense material. This novel model of a demyelinating neuropathy demonstrates that peroxisomes serve an important function in the peripheral myelin compartment, required for long-term axonal integrity. Copyright © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Hypodense regions (holes) in the retinal nerve fiber layer in frequency-domain OCT scans of glaucoma patients and suspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Daiyan; Talamini, Christine L; Raza, Ali S; de Moraes, Carlos Gustavo V; Greenstein, Vivienne C; Liebmann, Jeffrey M; Ritch, Robert; Hood, Donald C

    2011-09-09

    To better understand hypodense regions (holes) that appear in the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) of frequency-domain optical coherence tomography (fdOCT) scans of patients with glaucoma and glaucoma suspects. Peripapillary circle (1.7-mm radius) and cube optic disc fdOCT scans were obtained on 208 eyes from 110 patients (57.4 ± 13.2 years) with glaucomatous optic neuropathy (GON) and 45 eyes of 45 controls (48.0 ± 12.6 years) with normal results of fundus examination. Holes in the RNFL were identified independently by two observers on the circle scans. Holes were found in 33 (16%) eyes of 28 (25%) patients; they were not found in any of the control eyes. Twenty-four eyes had more than one hole. Although some holes were relatively large, others were small. In general, the holes were located adjacent to blood vessels; only three eyes had isolated holes that were not adjacent to a vessel. The holes tended to be in the regions that are thickest in healthy controls and were associated with arcuate defects in patients. Holes were not seen in the center of the temporal disc region. They were more common in the superior (25 eyes) than in the inferior (15 eyes) disc. Of the 30 eyes with holes with reliable visual fields, seven were glaucoma suspect eyes with normal visual fields. The holes in the RNFL seen in patients with GON were probably due to a local loss of RNFL fibers and can occur in the eyes of glaucoma suspects with normal visual fields.

  17. A role of peripheral myelin protein 2 in lipid homeostasis of myelinating Schwann cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zenker, J.; Stettner, M.; Ruskamo, S.; Domenech-Estevez, E.; Baloui, H.; Medard, J.J.; Verheijen, M.H.G.; Brouwers, J.F.; Kursula, P.; Kieseier, B.C.; Chrast, R.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral myelin protein 2 (Pmp2, P2 or Fabp8), a member of the fatty acid binding protein family, was originally described together with myelin basic protein (Mbp or P1) and myelin protein zero (Mpz or P0) as one of the most abundant myelin proteins in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Although

  18. A role of peripheral myelin protein 2 in lipid homeostasis of myelinating Schwann cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zenker, Jennifer; ruskamo, salla; domenech-estevez, Enric; medard, jean-jacques; Verheijen, M.H.; Brouwers, Jos|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/173812694; Kursula, Petri; kieseier, bernd; Chrast, Roman

    Peripheral myelin protein 2 (Pmp2, P2 or Fabp8), a member of the fatty acid binding protein family, was originally described together with myelin basic protein (Mbp or P1) and myelin protein zero (Mpz or P0) as one of the most abundant myelin proteins in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Although

  19. Confocal Cornea Microscopy Detects Involvement of Corneal Nerve Fibers in a Patient with Light-Chain Amyloid Neuropathy Caused by Multiple Myeloma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietrich Sturm

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the subbasal corneal plexus detected by confocal cornea microscopy (CCM have been described for various types of neuropathy. An involvement of these nerves within light-chain (AL amyloid neuropathy (a rare cause of polyneuropathy has never been shown. Here, we report on a case of a patient suffering from neuropathy caused by AL amyloidosis and underlying multiple myeloma. Small-fiber damage was detected by CCM.

  20. Age and Glaucoma-Related Characteristics in Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer and Choroid: Localized Morphometrics and Visualization Using Functional Shapes Registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sieun Lee

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Optical coherence tomography provides high-resolution 3D imaging of the posterior segment of the eye. However, quantitative morphological analysis, particularly relevant in retinal degenerative diseases such as glaucoma, has been confined to simple sectorization and averaging with limited spatial sensitivity for detection of clinical markers. In this paper, we present point-wise analysis and visualization of the retinal nerve fiber layer and choroid from cross-sectional data using functional shapes (fshape registration. The fshape framework matches two retinas, or generates a mean of multiple retinas, by jointly optimizing the surface geometry and functional signals mapped on the surface. We generated group-wise mean retinal nerve fiber layer and choroidal surfaces with the respective layer thickness mapping and showed the difference by age (normal, younger vs. older and by disease (age-matched older, normal vs. glaucomatous in the two layers, along with a more conventional sector-based analysis for comparison. The fshape results visualized the detailed spatial patterns of the differences between the age-matched normal and glaucomatous retinal nerve fiber layers, with the glaucomatous layers most significantly thinner in the inferior region close to Bruch's membrane opening. Between the young and older normal cases, choroid was shown to be significantly thinner in the older subjects across all regions, but particularly in the nasal and inferior regions. The results demonstrate a comprehensive and detailed analysis with visualization of morphometric patterns by multiple factors.

  1. Cytoskeletal Linker Protein Dystonin Is Not Critical to Terminal Oligodendrocyte Differentiation or CNS Myelination.

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    Samantha F Kornfeld

    Full Text Available Oligodendrocyte differentiation and central nervous system myelination require massive reorganization of the oligodendrocyte cytoskeleton. Loss of specific actin- and tubulin-organizing factors can lead to impaired morphological and/or molecular differentiation of oligodendrocytes, resulting in a subsequent loss of myelination. Dystonin is a cytoskeletal linker protein with both actin- and tubulin-binding domains. Loss of function of this protein results in a sensory neuropathy called Hereditary Sensory Autonomic Neuropathy VI in humans and dystonia musculorum in mice. This disease presents with severe ataxia, dystonic muscle and is ultimately fatal early in life. While loss of the neuronal isoforms of dystonin primarily leads to sensory neuron degeneration, it has also been shown that peripheral myelination is compromised due to intrinsic Schwann cell differentiation abnormalities. The role of this cytoskeletal linker in oligodendrocytes, however, remains unclear. We sought to determine the effects of the loss of neuronal dystonin on oligodendrocyte differentiation and central myelination. To address this, primary oligodendrocytes were isolated from a severe model of dystonia musculorum, Dstdt-27J, and assessed for morphological and molecular differentiation capacity. No defects could be discerned in the differentiation of Dstdt-27J oligodendrocytes relative to oligodendrocytes from wild-type littermates. Survival was also compared between Dstdt-27J and wild-type oligodendrocytes, revealing no significant difference. Using a recently developed migration assay, we further analysed the ability of primary oligodendrocyte progenitor cell motility, and found that Dstdt-27J oligodendrocyte progenitor cells were able to migrate normally. Finally, in vivo analysis of oligodendrocyte myelination was done in phenotype-stage optic nerve, cerebral cortex and spinal cord. The density of myelinated axons and g-ratios of Dstdt-27J optic nerves was normal, as

  2. Automatic computer-aided diagnosis of retinal nerve fiber layer defects using fundus photographs in optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ji Eun; Yang, Hee Kyung; Kim, Kwang Gi; Hwang, Jeong-Min

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the validity of an automatic computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system for detection of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) defects on fundus photographs of glaucomatous and nonglaucomatous optic neuropathy. We have proposed an automatic detection method for RNFL defects on fundus photographs in various cases of glaucomatous and nonglaucomatous optic neuropathy. In order to detect the vertical dark bands as candidate RNFL defects, the nonuniform illumination of the fundus image was corrected, the blood vessels were removed, and the images were converted to polar coordinates with the center of the optic disc. False positives (FPs) were reduced by using knowledge-based rules. The sensitivity and FP rates for all images were calculated. We tested 98 fundus photographs with 140 RNFL defects and 100 fundus photographs of healthy normal subjects. The proposed method achieved a sensitivity of 90% and a 0.67 FP rate per image and worked well with RNFL defects with variable depths and widths, with uniformly high detection rates regardless of the angular widths of the RNFL defects. The average detection accuracy was approximately 0.94. The overall diagnostic accuracy of the proposed algorithm for detecting RNFL defects among 98 patients and 100 healthy individuals was 86% sensitivity and 75% specificity. The proposed CAD system successfully detected RNFL defects in optic neuropathies. Thus, the proposed algorithm is useful for the detection of RNFL defects.

  3. Ability of spectral domain optical coherence tomography peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness measurements to identify early glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarannum Mansoori

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To evaluate the ability of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT parameters to distinguish normal eyes from those with early glaucoma in Asian Indian eyes. Design : Observational cross-sectional study. Materials and Methods : One hundred and seventy eight eyes (83 glaucoma patients and 95 age matched healthy subjects of subjects more than 40 years of age were included in the study. All subjects underwent RNFLT measurement with spectral OCT/ scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO after dilatation. Sensitivity, specificity and area under the receiving operating characteristic curve (AROC were calculated for various OCT peripapillary RNFL parameters. Results: The mean RNFLT in healthy subjects and patients with early glaucoma were 105.7 ± 5.1 μm and 90.7 ± 7.5 μm, respectively. The largest AROC was found for 12 o′clock- hour (0.98, average (0.96 and superior quadrant RNFLT (0.9. When target specificity was set at ≥ 90% and ≥ 80%, the parameters with highest sensitivity were 12 o′clock -hour (91.6%, average RNFLT (85.3% and 12 o′ clock- hour (96.8 %, average RNFLT (94.7% respectively. Conclusion : Our study showed good ability of spectral OCT/ SLO to differentiate normal eyes from patients with early glaucoma and hence it may serve as an useful adjunct for early diagnosis of glaucoma.

  4. Reproducibility of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness measures using eye tracking in children with nonglaucomatous optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajjoub, Raneem D; Trimboli-Heidler, Carmelina; Packer, Roger J; Avery, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    To determine the intra- and intervisit reproducibility of circumpapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measures using eye tracking-assisted spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT) in children with nonglaucomatous optic neuropathy. Prospective longitudinal study. Circumpapillary RNFL thickness measures were acquired with SD OCT using the eye-tracking feature at 2 separate study visits. Children with normal and abnormal vision (visual acuity ≥ 0.2 logMAR above normal and/or visual field loss) who demonstrated clinical and radiographic stability were enrolled. Intra- and intervisit reproducibility was calculated for the global average and 9 anatomic sectors by calculating the coefficient of variation and intraclass correlation coefficient. Forty-two subjects (median age 8.6 years, range 3.9-18.2 years) met inclusion criteria and contributed 62 study eyes. Both the abnormal and normal vision cohort demonstrated the lowest intravisit coefficient of variation for the global RNFL thickness. Intervisit reproducibility remained good for those with normal and abnormal vision, although small but statistically significant increases in the coefficient of variation were observed for multiple anatomic sectors in both cohorts. The magnitude of visual acuity loss was significantly associated with the global (ß = 0.026, P < .01) and temporal sector coefficient of variation (ß = 0.099, P < .01). SD OCT with eye tracking demonstrates highly reproducible RNFL thickness measures. Subjects with vision loss demonstrate greater intra- and intervisit variability than those with normal vision. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects on auditory-nerve fibers of opening the otic capsule at the apex of the chinchilla cochlea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recio-Spinoso, Alberto; Temchin, Andrei N.; Ruggero, Mario A.

    2015-12-01

    Vibration responses to clicks measured at the apex of chinchilla cochleae with open otic capsules have onsets much shorter than those of responses of auditory-nerve fibers (ANFs) corrected for synaptic and neural delays. Apical vibration responses to tones in open cochleae also differ in other respects from the responses to tones of ANFs with low characteristic frequency (CF) in normal chinchilla cochleae. To further specify the origin(s) of these differences, we recorded from chinchilla ANFs after delicately opening a small hole in the otic capsule overlying scala vestibuli in the cochlear apex. In those cochleae, the earliest ANF responses to clicks are often evoked by condensation (rather than rarefaction) clicks and responses to tones often exhibit level-dependent phase changes different from those in normal cochleae. These findings are largely consistent with, and seem to account for, apical vibration responses of cochleae with open otic capsules. An unexpected finding is that the tuning curves of ANFs with moderately high CF and normal CF thresholds often had hypersensitive tails.

  6. Glaucomatous retinal nerve fiber layer thickness loss is associated with slower reaction times under a divided attention task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatham, Andrew J; Boer, Erwin R; Rosen, Peter N; Della Penna, Mauro; Meira-Freitas, Daniel; Weinreb, Robert N; Zangwill, Linda M; Medeiros, Felipe A

    2014-11-01

    To examine the relationship between glaucomatous structural damage and ability to divide attention during simulated driving. Cross-sectional observational study. Hamilton Glaucoma Center, University of California San Diego. Total of 158 subjects from the Diagnostic Innovations in Glaucoma Study, including 82 with glaucoma and 76 similarly aged controls. Ability to divide attention was investigated by measuring reaction times to peripheral stimuli (at low, medium, or high contrast) while concomitantly performing a central driving task (car following or curve negotiation). All subjects had standard automated perimetry (SAP) and optical coherence tomography was used to measure retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness. Cognitive ability was assessed using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment and subjects completed a driving history questionnaire. Reaction times to the driving simulator divided attention task. The mean reaction times to the low-contrast stimulus were 1.05 s and 0.64 s in glaucoma and controls, respectively, during curve negotiation (P divide attention, RNFL thickness measurements provided additional information. Information from structural tests may improve our ability to determine which patients are likely to have problems performing daily activities, such as driving. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. PERIPAPILLARY RETINAL NERVE FIBER THICKNESS CHANGES AFTER VITRECTOMY FOR EPIRETINAL MEMBRANE IN EYES WITH AND WITHOUT VITREOUS DETACHMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariotti, Cesare; Nicolai, Michele; Longo, Antonio; Viti, Francesca; Bambini, Elisa; Saitta, Andrea; Pirani, Vittorio; Orsini, Emanuele; Baruffa, Daniela; Reibaldi, Michele

    2017-12-01

    To compare the changes in postoperative peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (p-RNFL) thickness after vitrectomy for epiretinal membrane in eyes with preexisting posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) and eyes with surgically induced PVD. This study included consecutive patients who underwent 25-gauge vitrectomy for epiretinal membrane. Eyes were divided, according to intraoperative PVD status, into a preexisting PVD group and surgically induced PVD group. Best-corrected visual acuity, p-RNFL thickness, and central retinal thickness were performed before and at 1, 3, and 6 months after surgery. One hundred and twenty eyes of 120 patients were enrolled: 64 eyes in the preexisting PVD group and 56 eyes in the surgically induced PVD group. In the preexisting PVD group at 6 months, the mean global p-RNFL thickness did not change, whereas it was reduced in the temporal sector (P = 0.034). In the surgically induced PVD group at 6 months, significant decreases were observed in global p-RNFL thickness (P = 0.027), temporal (P = 0.021), temporal inferior (P = 0.030), and nasal inferior sectors (P = 0.010). At 6 months, the two groups differed significantly in temporal (P PVD.

  8. Optic disc and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer characteristics associated with glaucomatous optic disc in young myopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Eun; Sung, Kyung Rim; Park, Ji Min; Yoon, Joo Young; Kang, Sung Yong; Park, Sung Bae; Koo, Hyung Jin

    2017-03-01

    To explore optic disc and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) features associated with glaucomatous optic disc (GOD) in young myopia. Presence of GOD, optic disc tilt, and disc torsion were determined using fundus photographs. If the measured disc tilt ratio was >1.3, the optic disc was classified as tilted. Optic disc torsion was defined as a >15° deviation in the long axis of the optic disc from the vertical meridian. The average and four quadrants RNFL thicknesses were assessed using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Logistic regression analyses were performed to identify factors associated with the presence of GOD. Nine hundred and sixty myopic subjects were recruited from four refractive surgery clinic databases. The mean age was 26.6 ± 5.7 years and spherical equivalent (SE) was -5.5 ± 2.5 diopters. Among 960 eyes, 26 (2.7%) received GOD group classification. Among 934 normal eyes, 290 (31.0%) had titled optic discs. Eighteen eyes (69.2%) in the GOD group had tilted optic discs. When compared to normal eyes, the GOD group had significantly higher tilt ratios (1.4 ± 0.2 vs. 1.2 ± 0.1, p Optic disc tilt was found in approximately one-third of young myopic eyes and was independently associated with the presence of GOD.

  9. Optical coherence tomography detection of characteristic retinal nerve fiber layer thinning in nasal hypoplasia of the optic disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruta, M; Kodama, R; Yamakawa, R

    2017-12-01

    PurposeTo determine the clinical usefulness of optical coherence tomography (OCT) for detecting thinning of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) in eyes with nasal hypoplasia of the optic discs (NHOD).Patients and methodsThe medical records of five patients (eight eyes) with NHOD were reviewed. The ratio of the disc-macula distance to the disc diameter (DM/DD) and the disc ovality ratio of the minimal to maximal DD were assessed using fundus photographs. The RNFL thicknesses of the temporal, superior, nasal, and inferior quadrants were evaluated using OCT quadrant maps.ResultsAll eight eyes had temporal visual field defects that respected the vertical meridians that needed to be differentiated from those related to chiasmal compression. The mean DM/DD ratio was 3.1 and the mean disc ovality ratio was 0.81. The mean RNFL thicknesses of the temporal, superior, nasal, and inferior quadrants were 90.3, 103.1, 34.8, and 112.8 microns, respectively.ConclusionSmall optic discs and tilted discs might be associated with NHOD. Measurement of the RNFL thickness around the optic disc using OCT scans clearly visualized the characteristic RNFL thinning of the nasal quadrants corresponding to the temporal sector visual field defects in eyes with NHOD. OCT confirmed the presence of NHOD and might differentiate eyes with NHOD from those with chiasmal compression.

  10. Evaluation of peripheral compression and auditory nerve fiber intensity coding using auditory steady-state responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Encina Llamas, Gerard; M. Harte, James; Epp, Bastian

    2015-01-01

    . Evaluation of these properties provides information about the health state of the system. It has been shown that a loss of outer hair cells leads to a reduction in peripheral compression. It has also recently been shown in animal studies that noise over-exposure, producing temporary threshold shifts, can....... The results indicate that the slope of the ASSR level growth function can be used to estimate peripheral compression simultaneously at four frequencies below 60 dB SPL, while the slope above 60 dB SPL may provide information about the integrity of intensity coding of low-SR fibers.......The compressive nonlinearity of the auditory system is assumed to be an epiphenomenon of a healthy cochlea and, particularly, of outer-hair cell function. Another ability of the healthy auditory system is to enable communication in acoustical environments with high-level background noises...

  11. Deficiency in monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) in mice delays regeneration of peripheral nerves following sciatic nerve crush

    KAUST Repository

    Morrison, Brett M.; Tsingalia, Akivaga; Vidensky, Svetlana; Lee, Youngjin; Jin, Lin; Farah, Mohamed H.; Lengacher, Sylvain; Magistretti, Pierre J.; Pellerin, Luc; Rothsteinb, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve regeneration following injury occurs spontaneously, but many of the processes require metabolic energy. The mechanism of energy supply to axons has not previously been determined. In the central nervous system, monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1), expressed in oligodendroglia, is critical for supplying lactate or other energy metabolites to axons. In the current study, MCT1 is shown to localize within the peripheral nervous system to perineurial cells, dorsal root ganglion neurons, and Schwann cells by MCT1 immunofluorescence in wild-type mice and tdTomato fluorescence in MCT1 BAC reporter mice. To investigate whether MCT1 is necessary for peripheral nerve regeneration, sciatic nerves of MCT1 heterozygous mice are crushed and peripheral nerve regeneration was quantified electrophysiologically and anatomically. Compound muscle action potential (CMAP) recovery is delayed from a median of 21. days in wild-type mice to greater than 38. days in MCT1 heterozygote mice. In fact, half of the MCT1 heterozygote mice have no recovery of CMAP at 42. days, while all of the wild-type mice recovered. In addition, muscle fibers remain 40% more atrophic and neuromuscular junctions 40% more denervated at 42. days post-crush in the MCT1 heterozygote mice than wild-type mice. The delay in nerve regeneration is not only in motor axons, as the number of regenerated axons in the sural sensory nerve of MCT1 heterozygote mice at 4. weeks and tibial mixed sensory and motor nerve at 3. weeks is also significantly reduced compared to wild-type mice. This delay in regeneration may be partly due to failed Schwann cell function, as there is reduced early phagocytosis of myelin debris and remyelination of axon segments. These data for the first time demonstrate that MCT1 is critical for regeneration of both sensory and motor axons in mice following sciatic nerve crush.

  12. Factors Associated with the Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Loss after Acute Primary Angle Closure: A Prospective EDI-OCT Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Ji Lee

    Full Text Available To determine the factors associated with retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL loss in eyes with acute primary angle-closure (APAC, particularly focusing on the influence of the change in the anterior lamina cribrosa surface depth (LCD.After the initial presentation, 30 eyes with unilateral APAC were followed up at the following specific time points over a 12-month period: 1 week, 1~2 months, 2~3 months, 5~6 months, and 11~12 months. These follow-ups involved intraocular pressure measurements, enhanced depth-imaging spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT scanning of the optic disc, and measurements of the circumpapillary RNFL thickness. The prelaminar tissue thickness (PLT and LCD were determined in the SD-OCT images obtained at each follow-up visit.Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed a significant pattern of decrease in the global RNFL thickness, PLT, and LCD (all p<0.001. The global RNFL thickness decreased continuously throughout the follow-up period, while the PLT decreased until 5~6 months and did not change thereafter. The LCD reduced until 2~3 months and then also remained steady. Multivariable regression analysis revealed that symptoms with a longer duration before receiving laser peripheral iridotomy (LI (p = 0.049 and a larger LCD reduction (p = 0.034 were significant factors associated with the conversion to an abnormal RNFL thickness defined using OCT normative data.Early short-term decreases in the PLT and LCD and overall long-term decrease in the peripapillary RNFL were observed during a 12-month follow-up after an APAC episode. A longer duration of symptoms before receiving LI treatment and larger LCD reduction during follow-up were associated with the progressive RNFL loss. The LCD reduction may indicate a prior presence of significant pressure-induced stress that had been imposed on the optic nerve head at the time of APAC episode. Glaucomatous progression should be suspected in eyes showing LCD reduction

  13. Bone Marrow-Derived, Neural-Like Cells Have the Characteristics of Neurons to Protect the Peripheral Nerve in Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-lei Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective repair of peripheral nerve defects is difficult because of the slow growth of new axonal growth. We propose that “neural-like cells” may be useful for the protection of peripheral nerve destructions. Such cells should prolong the time for the disintegration of spinal nerves, reduce lesions, and improve recovery. But the mechanism of neural-like cells in the peripheral nerve is still unclear. In this study, bone marrow-derived neural-like cells were used as seed cells. The cells were injected into the distal end of severed rabbit peripheral nerves that were no longer integrated with the central nervous system. Electromyography (EMG, immunohistochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM were employed to analyze the development of the cells in the peripheral nerve environment. The CMAP amplitude appeared during the 5th week following surgery, at which time morphological characteristics of myelinated nerve fiber formation were observed. Bone marrow-derived neural-like cells could protect the disintegration and destruction of the injured peripheral nerve.

  14. Repair of facial nerve defects with decellularized artery allografts containing autologous adipose-derived stem cells in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fei; Zhou, Ke; Mi, Wen-Juan; Qiu, Jian-Hua

    2011-07-20

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a decellularized artery allograft containing autologous adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) on an 8-mm facial nerve branch lesion in a rat model. At 8 weeks postoperatively, functional evaluation of unilateral vibrissae movements, morphological analysis of regenerated nerve segments and retrograde labeling of facial motoneurons were all analyzed. Better regenerative outcomes associated with functional improvement, great axonal growth, and improved target reinnervation were achieved in the artery-ADSCs group (2), whereas the cut nerves sutured with artery conduits alone (group 1) achieved inferior restoration. Furthermore, transected nerves repaired with nerve autografts (group 3) resulted in significant recovery of whisking, maturation of myelinated fibers and increased number of labeled facial neurons, and the latter two parameters were significantly different from those of group 2. Collectively, though our combined use of a decellularized artery allograft with autologous ADSCs achieved regenerative outcomes inferior to a nerve autograft, it certainly showed a beneficial effect on promoting nerve regeneration and thus represents an alternative approach for the reconstruction of peripheral facial nerve defects. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Relationship of distraction rate with inferior alveolar nerve degeneration-regeneration shift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-hua Zhao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Distraction osteogenesis is an important technique for the treatment of maxillofacial abnormities and defects. However, distraction osteogenesis may cause the injury of the inferior alveolar nerve. The relationship between distraction rate and nerve degeneration-regeneration shift remains poorly understood. In this study, 24 rabbits were randomly divided into four groups. To establish the rabbit mandibular distraction osteogenesis model, the mandibles of rabbits in distraction osteogenesis groups were subjected to continuous osteogenesis distraction at a rate of 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mm/d, respectively, by controlling rounds of screwing each day in the distractors. In the sham group, mandible osteotomy was performed without distraction. Pin-prick test with a 10 g blunt pin on the labium, histological and histomorphometric analyses with methylene blue staining, Bodian's silver staining, transmission electron microscopy and myelinated fiber density of inferior alveolar nerve cross-sections were performed to assess inferior alveolar nerve conditions. At 28 days after model establishment, in the pin-prick test, the inferior alveolar nerve showed no response in the labium to a pin pricks in the 2 mm/d group, indicating a severe dysfunction. Histological and histomorphometric analyses indicated that the inferior alveolar nerve suffered more degeneration and injuries at a high distraction rate (2 mm/d. Importantly, the nerve regeneration, indicated by newborn Schwann cells and axons, was more abundant in 1.0 and 1.5 mm/d groups than in 2.0 mm/d group. We concluded that the distraction rate was strongly associated with the inferior alveolar nerve function, and the distraction rates of 1.0 and 1.5 mm/d had regenerative effects on the inferior alveolar nerve. This study provides an experimental basis for the relationship between distraction rate and nerve degeneration-regeneration shift during distraction osteogenesis, and may facilitate reducing nerve

  16. 142 Key words: Brachialis, radial nerve, musculocutaneous nerve.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AWORI KIRSTEEN

    The innervation of brachialis muscle by the musculocutaneous nerve has been described as either type I or type II and the main trunk to this muscle is rarely absent. The contribution .... brachialis muscle by fiber analysis of supply nerves].

  17. Glaucoma progression detection by retinal nerve fiber layer measurement using scanning laser polarimetry: event and trend analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Byung Gil; Sung, Kyung Rim; Cho, Jung Woo; Kang, Sung Yong; Yun, Sung-Cheol; Na, Jung Hwa; Lee, Youngrok; Kook, Michael S

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the use of scanning laser polarimetry (SLP, GDx VCC) to measure the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in order to evaluate the progression of glaucoma. Test-retest measurement variability was determined in 47 glaucomatous eyes. One eye each from 152 glaucomatous patients with at least 4 years of follow-up was enrolled. Visual field (VF) loss progression was determined by both event analysis (EA, Humphrey guided progression analysis) and trend analysis (TA, linear regression analysis of the visual field index). SLP progression was defined as a reduction of RNFL exceeding the predetermined repeatability coefficient in three consecutive exams, as compared to the baseline measure (EA). The slope of RNFL thickness change over time was determined by linear regression analysis (TA). Twenty-two eyes (14.5%) progressed according to the VF EA, 16 (10.5%) by VF TA, 37 (24.3%) by SLP EA and 19 (12.5%) by SLP TA. Agreement between VF and SLP progression was poor in both EA and TA (VF EA vs. SLP EA, k = 0.110; VF TA vs. SLP TA, k = 0.129). The mean (±standard deviation) progression rate of RNFL thickness as measured by SLP TA did not significantly differ between VF EA progressors and non-progressors (-0.224 ± 0.148 µm/yr vs. -0.218 ± 0.151 µm/yr, p = 0.874). SLP TA and EA showed similar levels of sensitivity when VF progression was considered as the reference standard. RNFL thickness as measurement by SLP was shown to be capable of detecting glaucoma progression. Both EA and TA of SLP showed poor agreement with VF outcomes in detecting glaucoma progression.

  18. Detection of Progressive Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Loss in Glaucoma Using Scanning Laser Polarimetry with Variable Corneal Compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Felipe A.; Alencar, Luciana M.; Zangwill, Linda M.; Bowd, Christopher; Vizzeri, Gianmarco; Sample, Pamela A.; Weinreb, Robert N.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the ability of scanning laser polarimetry with variable corneal compensation to detect progressive retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) loss in glaucoma patients and patients suspected of having the disease. Methods This was an observational cohort study that included 335 eyes of 195 patients. Images were obtained annually with the GDx VCC scanning laser polarimeter, along with optic disc stereophotographs and standard automated perimetry (SAP) visual fields. The median follow-up time was 3.94 years. Progression was determined using commercial software for SAP and by masked assessment of optic disc stereophotographs performed by expert graders. Random coefficient models were used to evaluate the relationship between RNFL thickness measurements over time and progression as determined by SAP and/or stereophotographs. Results From the 335 eyes, 34 (10%) showed progression over time by stereophotographs and/or SAP. Average GDx VCC measurements decreased significantly over time for both progressors as well as non-progressors. However, the rate of decline was significantly higher in the progressing group (−0.70 μm/year) compared to the non-progressing group (−0.14 μm/year; P = 0.001). Black race and male sex were significantly associated with higher rates of RNFL loss during follow-up. Conclusions The GDx VCC scanning laser polarimeter was able to identify longitudinal RNFL loss in eyes that showed progression in optic disc stereophotographs and/or visual fields. These findings suggest that this technology could be useful to detect and monitor progressive disease in patients with established diagnosis of glaucoma or suspected of having the disease. PMID:19029038

  19. Normative spectral domain optical coherence tomography data on macular and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in Indians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu Appukuttan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To provide the normative data of macular and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL thickness in Indians using spectral domain OCT (Spectralis OCT, Heidelberg Engineering, Germany and to evaluate the effects of age, gender, and refraction on these parameters. Design: Observational, cross-sectional study. Materials and Methods: The eyes of 105 healthy patients aged between 20-75 years, with no ocular disease and best corrected visual acuity of 20/20, were scanned using standard scanning protocols by a single examiner. Exclusion criteria included glaucoma, retinal diseases, diabetes, history of prior intraocular surgery or laser treatment. The mean macular and RNFL thickness were recorded, and the effects of age, gender, and refraction on these parameters were evaluated. This data was compared with published literature on Caucasians to assess the ethnic variations of these parameters. Results: The normal central foveal thickness in healthy Indian eyes measured using Spectralis OCT was 260.1 ± 18.19 ΅m. The nasal inner quadrant showed maximum retinal thickness (338.88 ± 18.17 ΅m.The mean RNFL thickness was 101.43 ± 8.63 ΅m with maximum thickness in the inferior quadrant. The central foveal thickness showed a gender-based difference (P = 0.005 but did not correlate significantly with age (P = 0.134, whereas the parafoveal, perifoveal thickness, macular volume, and RNFL thickness showed significant negative correlation with age. Conclusions: Our study provides the normative database for Indians on Spectralis OCT. It also suggests that age should be considered while interpreting the macular thickness and RNFL, whereas gender should also be given consideration in central foveal thickness.

  20. Visual field defects and retinal nerve fiber imaging in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and in healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Paula; Ascaso, Francisco J; Vicente, Eugenio; Tejero-Garcés, Gloria; Adiego, María I; Cristóbal, José A

    2018-03-02

    To assess the retinal sensitivity in obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) patients evaluated with standard automated perimetry (SAP). And to correlate the functional SAP results with structural parameters obtained with optical coherence tomography (OCT). This prospective, observational, case-control study consisted of 63 eyes of 63 OSAHS patients (mean age 51.7 ± 12.7 years, best corrected visual acuity ≥20/25, refractive error less than three spherical or two cylindrical diopters, and intraocular pressure < 21 mmHg) who were enrolled and compared with 38 eyes of 38 age-matched controls. Peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness was measured by Stratus OCT and SAP sensitivities and indices were explored with Humphrey Field Analyzer perimeter. Correlations between functional and structural parameters were calculated, as well as the relationship between ophthalmologic and systemic indices in OSAHS patients. OSAHS patients showed a significant reduction of the sensitivity for superior visual field division (p = 0.034, t-student test). When dividing the OSAHS group in accordance with the severity of the disease, nasal peripapillary RNFL thickness was significantly lower in severe OSAHS than that in controls and mild-moderate cases (p = 0.031 and p = 0.016 respectively, Mann-Whitney U test). There were no differences between groups for SAP parameters. We found no correlation between structural and functional variables. The central visual field sensitivity of the SAP revealed a poor Pearson correlation with the apnea-hipopnea index (0.284, p = 0.024). Retinal sensitivity show minor differences between healthy subjects and OSAHS. Functional deterioration in OSAHS patients is not easy to demonstrate with visual field examination.

  1. Adaptive optics imaging of healthy and abnormal regions of retinal nerve fiber bundles of patients with glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Monica F; Chui, Toco Y P; Alhadeff, Paula; Rosen, Richard B; Ritch, Robert; Dubra, Alfredo; Hood, Donald C

    2015-01-08

    To better understand the nature of glaucomatous damage of the macula, especially the structural changes seen between relatively healthy and clearly abnormal (AB) retinal regions, using an adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AO-SLO). Adaptive optics SLO images and optical coherence tomography (OCT) vertical line scans were obtained on one eye of seven glaucoma patients, with relatively deep local arcuate defects on the 10-2 visual field test in one (six eyes) or both hemifields (one eye). Based on the OCT images, the retinal nerve fiber (RNF) layer was divided into two regions: (1) within normal limits (WNL), relative RNF layer thickness within mean control values ±2 SD; and (2) AB, relative thickness less than -2 SD value. As seen on AO-SLO, the pattern of AB RNF bundles near the border of the WNL and AB regions differed across eyes. There were normal-appearing bundles in the WNL region of all eyes and AB-appearing bundles near the border with the AB region. This region with AB bundles ranged in extent from a few bundles to the entire AB region in the case of one eye. All other eyes had a large AB region without bundles. However, in two of these eyes, a few bundles were seen within this region of otherwise missing bundles. The AO-SLO images revealed details of glaucomatous damage that are difficult, if not impossible, to see with current OCT technology. Adaptive optics SLO may prove useful in following progression in clinical trials, or in disease management, if AO-SLO becomes widely available and easy to use. Copyright 2015 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  2. Localized Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Defects in Red-free Photographs Versus En Face Structural Optical Coherence Tomography Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae Hoon; Park, Ji-Hye; Yoo, Chungkwon; Kim, Yong Yeon

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to compare the locations of localized retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) defects in red-free fundus photographs and optical coherence tomography (OCT) en face images. We performed a retrospective, comparative study on 46 eyes from 46 glaucoma patients with localized RNFL defects observed in red-free fundus photographs. En face structural images were obtained in the superficial and whole retinal layers using OCT and were overlaid on the corresponding red-free fundus photographs. The proximal/distal angular locations and angular width of each RNFL defect in red-free photos (red-free defects) and in en face structural images (en face defects) were compared. In the superficial retinal layer, there were no significant differences between red-free and en face defects on the proximal/distal angular location and angular width. In the whole retinal layer, the degree of the distal angular location of the en face defects was significantly larger than that of the red-free defects (71.85±18.26 vs. 70.87±17.90 degrees, P=0.003). The correlations of clinical variables with the differences in angular parameters between red-free and en face defects were not significant in the superficial retinal layer. The average RNFL thickness was negatively correlated with the difference in the distal angular location in the whole retinal layer (Pearson correlation coefficient=-0.401, P=0.006). Localized RNFL defects detected in OCT en face structural images of the superficial retinal layer showed high topographic correlation with defects detected in red-free photographs. OCT en face structural images in the superficial layer may be an alternative to red-free fundus photography for the identification of localized RNFL defects in glaucomatous eyes.

  3. Confocal Adaptive Optics Imaging of Peripapillary Nerve Fiber Bundles: Implications for Glaucomatous Damage Seen on Circumpapillary OCT Scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Donald C; Chen, Monica F; Lee, Dongwon; Epstein, Benjamin; Alhadeff, Paula; Rosen, Richard B; Ritch, Robert; Dubra, Alfredo; Chui, Toco Y P

    2015-04-01

    To improve our understanding of glaucomatous damage as seen on circumpapillary disc scans obtained with frequency-domain optical coherence tomography (fdOCT), fdOCT scans were compared to images of the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber (RNF) bundles obtained with an adaptive optics-scanning light ophthalmoscope (AO-SLO). The AO-SLO images and fdOCT scans were obtained on 6 eyes of 6 patients with deep arcuate defects (5 points ≤-15 db) on 10-2 visual fields. The AO-SLO images were montaged and aligned with the fdOCT images to compare the RNF bundles seen with AO-SLO to the RNF layer thickness measured with fdOCT. All 6 eyes had an abnormally thin (1% confidence limit) RNF layer (RNFL) on fdOCT and abnormal (hyporeflective) regions of RNF bundles on AO-SLO in corresponding regions. However, regions of abnormal, but equal, RNFL thickness on fdOCT scans varied in appearance on AO-SLO images. These regions could be largely devoid of RNF bundles (5 eyes), have abnormal-appearing bundles of lower contrast (6 eyes), or have isolated areas with a few relatively normal-appearing bundles (2 eyes). There also were local variations in reflectivity of the fdOCT RNFL that corresponded to the variations in AO-SLO RNF bundle appearance. Relatively similar 10-2 defects with similar fdOCT RNFL thickness profiles can have very different degrees of RNF bundle damage as seen on fdOCT and AO-SLO. While the results point to limitations of fdOCT RNFL thickness as typically analyzed, they also illustrate the potential for improving fdOCT by attending to variations in local intensity.

  4. Optic Disc and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness Evaluation of the Fellow Eyes in Non-Arteritic Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medine Yılmaz Dağ

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To examine the fellow eyes in unilateral non-arteritic ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION and to compare their optic disc parameters and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL thickness with age-and refraction-matched normal controll subjects, using Heidelberg Retinal Tomograph 2 (HRT II. Materials and Methods: The fellow eyes of 40 patients with typical unilateral NAION (study group and one randomly chosen eye of 42 age-, sex-, and refraction-matched normal control subjects were enrolled in the study. Optic disc morphologic features (average disc area, cup area, rim area, disc volume, rim volume, cup/disc area ratio, cup depth and peripapillary RNFL thickness were evaluated using HRT II, a confoal scanning ophtalmoscopy. Results: In the study group, there were 26 (65% men and 14 (35% women, whereas there were 27 (64% men and 15 (36% women in the control group (Chi square test, p=0.89. Mean age of the patients in the study and control groups was 59.4±10.3 and 57.7±9.1 years, respectively (T test, p=0.72. There was not any statistically significant difference regarding mean spheric equivalent between the two groups (Mann-Whitney U-test, p=0.203. The NAION unaffected fellow eyes had significantly smaller disc areas, cup areas, cup volumes, cup-disc area ratios (vertical and lineer, and cup depths than the control eyes (Mann-Whitney U-test; p<0.05, whereas there was no significant difference in the RNFL thickness between the two. Conclusion: A comparison of the fellow eyes in patients with unilateral NAION and the control eyes showed a significant difference in optic disc parameters and the morphology of RNFL. These differences could be important in the pathogenesis of NAION and needs to have further investigated. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2015; 45: 111-114

  5. Macular ganglion cell complex and retinal nerve fiber layer comparison in different stages of age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchiatti, Ilaria; Parodi, Maurizio Battaglia; Pierro, Luisa; Cicinelli, Maria Vittoria; Gagliardi, Marco; Castellino, Niccolò; Bandello, Francesco

    2015-09-01

    To employ optical coherence tomography (OCT) to analyze the morphologic changes in the inner retina in different categories of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Observational cross-sectional study. Single-center study. Inclusion criteria were age over 50, diagnosis of Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) category 2 and 3, naïve neovascular AMD, and atrophic AMD. Healthy patients of similar age acted as a control group. Primary outcome measures were the changes in ganglion cell complex (GCC) and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL). Secondary outcomes included modifications of rim area and cup-to-disc ratio. One hundred and thirty eyes of 130 patients were recruited: 26 eyes for AREDS category 2, 26 for AREDS category 3, 26 for neovascular AMD, 26 with atrophic AMD, and 26 controls. Mean peripapillary RNFL thickness was significantly lower in neovascular AMD, compared to controls (P = .004); peripapillary RNFL did not significantly vary among AREDS category 2 and 3 and atrophic AMD groups, compared to controls. Mean GCC thickness was higher in the control group, becoming progressively thinner up to neovascular and atrophic AMD groups (P < .0001). Rim area was significantly thinner in the neovascular AMD group compared with controls (P = .047); cup-to-disc ratio was higher in the neovascular AMD group compared with the control group (P = .047). This study demonstrates that eyes with neovascular AMD display reduced RNFL and GCC thickness. RNFL is partially spared in atrophic advanced AMD. The identification of alteration in RNFL and GCC thickness may reveal useful for future therapeutic implications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Abnormal retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and macula lutea in patients with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, LiYan; Liu, Ying; Li, XiaoHong; Bai, QuanHao; Liu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    We investigated possible abnormalities in the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and macula lutea of patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and tested for any correlation with the severity of dementia. A total of 72 subjects, comprising 25 AD patients, 26 MCI patients and 21 healthy individuals (controls) were enrolled in this study. The thickness of the RNFL and volume of the macula lutea was determined using optical coherence tomography (OCT). When compared with controls, we found statistically significant thinning of the RNFL in AD patients at all clock-hour positions except 12:00, and nasal quadrant, 2:00, 3:00 and 4:00. After adjusting several risk factors, the average thickness of the RNFL was reduced in MCI patients compared to AD patients, with specific reductions at inferior quadrant, 5:00 and 6:00. Compared to controls, MCI patients showed a significant decrease in RNFL thickness only in the temporal quadrant, 8:00, 9:00 and 10:00. We found significant reduction in the volume of the macula lutea both in AD and MCI patients. Finally, we could not establish any correlation between patient Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores (an estimation of the severity of cognitive impairment) and any OCT parameter. Retinal degeneration in AD and MCI patients results in decreased thickness of the RNFL, and reduced macular volume in AD and MCI patients. However, there seems to be no correlation between these changes and the severity of dementia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Peripapillary Retinal Nerve Fiber Measurement with Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon K. Law

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the relationship between the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL measurements with Spectral-domain Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT and Age-related macular degeneration (AMD. Methods: Patients >60 years of age without glaucoma or record of intraocular pressure >21 mmHg and no systemic or intraocular diseases or treatment or surgical intervention that affected the RNFL underwent OCT measurement of the RNFL. The severity of AMD was staged with the Clinical Age-Related Maculopathy Staging System. The relationship between RNFL measurements and AMD stages of one eye per patient was analyzed. Results: Eighty-six eyes (46 patients with AMD and no glaucoma or other exclusion criteria received OCT RNFL measurements. Nine eyes (10.5% were excluded because of distorted peripapillary anatomy from exudative AMD (7 eyes or failure of the RNFL segmentation algorithm (2 eyes. Mean age ± S.D. of the 43 patients analyzed was 81.2 ± 7.3 years. The mean stage ± S.D. of AMD of the 77 eyes was 3.77 ± 1.05. Higher stages of AMD were statistically significantly associated with lower average RNFL and inferior sector RNFL (p = 0.049, 0 0015, respectively. The association of inferior sector RNFL and AMD stage remained statistically significant after adjusting for age. Conclusions: Spectral domain OCT is generally useful in measuring the peripapillary RNFL in eyes with different stages of AMD. Higher stage of AMD is associated with thinner peripapillary RNFL, which may masquerade as early glaucomatous damage.

  8. Evaluation of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in vernal keratoconjunctivitis patients under long-term topical corticosteroid therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cingu, Abdullah Kursat; Cinar, Yasin; Turkcu, Fatih Mehmet; Sahinoglu-Keskek, Nedime; Sahin, Alparslan; Sahin, Muhammed; Yuksel, Harun; Caca, Ihsan

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC) patients who were under long-term topical corticosteroid therapy. Thirty-six eyes of 36 VKC patients with clear cornea and normal videokeratography and 40 eyes of 40 age- and gender-matched normal children were included in the study. Clinical and demographic characteristics of the patients were noted and detailed ophthalmological examination was performed. Visual acuity (VA), spherical equivalent (SE), axial length (AL) and RNFL thickness measurements were compared between the groups. To correct ocular magnification effect on RNFL, we used Littmann's formula. All VKC patients had history of topical corticosteroid use and the mean duration of the topical corticosteroid use was 23.8 ± 9.09 months. There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of intraocular pressure (IOP). VKC group had significantly worse VA, greater SE and AL and thinner mean global, superior and inferior RNFL thickness. There were significant negative correlations between the duration of topical corticosteroid use and the mean global, superior and temporal RNFL thickness in VKC group. After correction of magnification effect, VKC group still had thinner mean global, superior and inferior RNFL thickness, and significant difference between the groups in inferior RNFL thickness did not disappear. Significant RNFL thickness difference between the groups suggests a possible effect of long-term corticosteroid use in VKC patients. Because visual field (VF) analysis in pediatric patients is difficult to perform and IOP may be illusive, RNFL thickness measurements in addition to routine examinations in VKC patients may help clinicians in their practice.

  9. Neurotoxocarosis alters myelin protein gene transcription and expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Lea; Beyerbach, Martin; Lühder, Fred; Beineke, Andreas; Strube, Christina

    2015-06-01

    Neurotoxocarosis is an infection of the central nervous system caused by migrating larvae of the common dog and cat roundworms (Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati), which are zoonotic agents. As these parasites are prevalent worldwide and neuropathological and molecular investigations on neurotoxocarosis are scare, this study aims to characterise nerve fibre demyelination associated with neurotoxocarosis on a molecular level. Transcription of eight myelin-associated genes (Cnp, Mag, Mbp, Mog, Mrf-1, Nogo-A, Plp1, Olig2) was determined in the mouse model during six time points of the chronic phase of infection using qRT-PCR. Expression of selected proteins was analysed by Western blotting or immunohistochemistry. Additionally, demyelination and neuronal damage were investigated histologically. Significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) between transcription rates of T. canis-infected and uninfected control mice were detected for all analysed genes while T. cati affected five of eight investigated genes. Interestingly, 2', 3 ´-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (Cnp) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (Mog) were upregulated in both T. canis- and T. cati-infected mice preceding demyelination. Later, CNPase expression was additionally enhanced. As expected, myelin basic protein (Mbp) was downregulated in cerebra and cerebella of T. canis-infected mice when severe demyelination was present 120 days post infectionem (dpi). The transcriptional pattern observed in the present study appears to reflect direct traumatic and hypoxic effects of larval migration as well as secondary processes including host immune reactions, demyelination and attempts to remyelinate damaged areas.

  10. Proliferation of Schwann cells induced by axolemmal and myelin membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinneen, M.

    1985-01-01

    Purified Schwann Cells were cultured from neonatal rat sciatic nerve using a modification of the method of Brockes. Schwann cells and contaminating fibroblasts were unambiguously identified using fluorescent antibodies of 2'3' cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase and the thy 1.1 antigen respectively. The Schwann cells were quiescent unless challenged with mitogens. They proliferated rapidly in response to the soluble mitogen, cholera toxin, or to membrane fractions from rat CNS or PNS, prepared by the method of DeVries. Mitogenic activity was present in both axolemmal and myelin enriched fractions and promoted a 10-15 fold increase in the rate of 3 H-thymidine uptake. The axolemmal mitogen was sensitive to heat (80 0 C for 10 minutes), trypsin digestion (0.05% x 30 mins) or to treatment with endoglycosidase D, suggesting that it could be a glycoprotein. Fifty percent of the axolemmal mitogenic activity was solubilized in 1% octyl-glucoside. The solubilized material, however, was very unstable and further purification was not possible. The myelin associated mitogenic activity was markedly different. It was resistant to freeze thaw cycles, trypsin digestion of endoglycosidase treatment and the activity was actually enhanced by heating at 100 0 C for two hours. It is proposed that the axolemmal activity is responsible for Schwann cell proliferation during development and that the myelin associated activity promotes Schwann cell proliferation during Wallerian degeneration

  11. Baseline effects of lysophosphatidylcholine and nerve growth factor in a rat model of sciatic nerve regeneration after crush injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan L Wood

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwann cells play a major role in helping heal injured nerves. They help clear debris, produce neurotrophins, upregulate neurotrophin receptors, and form bands of Büngner to guide the healing nerve. But nerves do not always produce enough neurotrophins and neurotrophin receptors to repair themselves. Nerve growth factor (NGF is an important neurotrophin for promoting nerve healing and lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC has been shown to stimulate NGF receptors (NGFR. This study tested the administration of a single intraneural injection of LPC (1 mg/mL for single LPC injection and 10 mg/mL for multiple LPC injections at day 0 and one (day 7, two (days 5 and 7, or three (days 5, 7, and 9 injections of NGF (160 ng/mL for single injections and 80 ng/mL for multiple injections to determine baseline effects on crushed sciatic nerves in rats. The rats were randomly divided into four groups: control, crush, crush-NGF, and crush-LPC-NGF. The healing of the nerves was measured weekly by monitoring gait; electrophysiological parameters: compound muscle action potential (CMAP amplitudes; and morphological parameters: total fascicle areas, myelinated fiber counts, fiber densities, fiber packing, and mean g-ratio values at weeks 3 and 6. The crush, crush-NGF, and crush-LPC-NGF groups statistically differed from the control group for all six weeks for the electrophysiological parameters but only differed from the control group at week 3 for the morphological parameters. The crush, crush-NGF, and crush-LPC-NGF groups did not differ from each other over the course of the study. Single injections of LPC and NGF one week apart or multiple treatments of NGF at 5, 7 and 9 days post-injury did not alter the healing rate of the sciatic nerves during weeks 1-6 of the study. These findings are important to define the baseline effects of NGF and LPC injections, as part of a larger effort to determine the minimal dose regimen of NGF to regenerate peripheral nerves.

  12. Schwann cell-mediated delivery of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor restores erectile function after cavernous nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Florian; Buchner, Alexander; Schlenker, Boris; Gratzke, Christian; Arndt, Christian; Stief, Christian; Weidner, Norbert; Matiasek, Kaspar

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the time-course of functional recovery after cavernous nerve injury using glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-transduced Schwann cell-seeded silicon tubes. Sections of the cavernous nerves were excised bilaterally (5 mm), followed by immediate bilateral surgical repair. A total of 20 study nerves per group were reconstructed by interposition of empty silicon tubes and silicon tubes seeded with either glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-overexpressing or green fluorescent protein-expressing Schwann cells. Control groups were either sham-operated or received bilateral nerve transection without nerve reconstruction. Erectile function was evaluated by relaparotomy, electrical nerve stimulation and intracavernous pressure recording after 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 weeks. The animals underwent re-exploration only once, and were killed afterwards. The nerve grafts were investigated for the maturation state of regenerating nerve fibers and the fascular composition. Recovery of erectile function took at least 4 weeks in the current model. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-transduced Schwann cell grafts restored erectile function better than green fluorescent protein-transduced controls and unseeded conduits. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-transduced grafts promoted an intact erectile response (4/4) at 4, 6, 8 and 10 weeks that was overall significantly superior to negative controls (P cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-transduced grafts compared with negative controls (P = 0.018) and unseeded tubes (P = 0.034). Return of function was associated with the electron microscopic evidence of preganglionic myelinated nerve fibers and postganglionic unmyelinated axons. Schwann cell-mediated delivery of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor presents a viable approach for the treatment of erectile dysfunction after cavernous nerve injury. © 2013 The Japanese Urological Association.

  13. Stabilization, Rolling, and Addition of Other Extracellular Matrix Proteins to Collagen Hydrogels Improve Regeneration in Chitosan Guides for Long Peripheral Nerve Gaps in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Perez, Francisco; Cobianchi, Stefano; Heimann, Claudia; Phillips, James B; Udina, Esther; Navarro, Xavier

    2017-03-01

    Autograft is still the gold standard technique for the repair of long peripheral nerve injuries. The addition of biologically active scaffolds into the lumen of conduits to mimic the endoneurium of peripheral nerves may increase the final outcome of artificial nerve devices. Furthermore, the control of the orientation of the collagen fibers may provide some longitudinal guidance architecture providing a higher level of mesoscale tissue structure. To evaluate the regenerative capabilities of chitosan conduits enriched with extracellular matrix-based scaffolds to bridge a critical gap of 15 mm in the rat sciatic nerve. The right sciatic nerve of female Wistar Hannover rats was repaired with chitosan tubes functionalized with extracellular matrix-based scaffolds fully hydrated or stabilized and rolled to bridge a 15 mm nerve gap. Recovery was evaluated by means of electrophysiology and algesimetry tests and histological analysis 4 months after injury. Stabilized constructs enhanced the success of regeneration compared with fully hydrated scaffolds. Moreover, fibronectin-enriched scaffolds increased muscle reinnervation and number of myelinated fibers compared with laminin-enriched constructs. A mixed combination of collagen and fibronectin may be a promising internal filler for neural conduits for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries, and their stabilization may increase the quality of regeneration over long gaps. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  14. One-Step Synthesis of Hollow Titanate (Sr/Ba Ceramic Fibers for Detoxification of Nerve Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satya R. Agarwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Poly(vinyl pyrrolidone(PVP/(strontium/barium acetate/titanium isopropoxide composite fibers were prepared by electrospinning technique via sol-gel process. Diameters of fibers prepared by calcinations of PVP composite fibers were 80–140 nm (solid and 1.2-2.2 μm (hollow fibers prepared by core-shell method. These fibers were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and transmission electron microscope (TEM analytical techniques. XRD results showed better crystalline nature of the materials when calcined at higher temperatures. SEM and TEM results clearly showed the formation of hollow submicrometer tubes. The surface area of the samples determined by BET analysis indicated that hollow fibers have ~20% higher surface area than solid fibers. The UV studies indicate better detoxification properties of the hollow fibers compared to solid fibers.

  15. Biological conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix to treat long-segment sciatic nerve defects

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    Yang Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The transplantation of polylactic glycolic acid conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix gel for the repair of sciatic nerve injury is effective in some respects, but few data comparing the biomechanical factors related to the sciatic nerve are available. In the present study, rabbit models of 10-mm sciatic nerve defects were prepared. The rabbit models were repaired with autologous nerve, a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, or a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel. After 24 weeks, mechanical testing was performed to determine the stress relaxation and creep parameters. Following sciatic nerve injury, the magnitudes of the stress decrease and strain increase at 7,200 seconds were largest in the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel group, followed by the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group, and then the autologous nerve group. Hematoxylin-eosin staining demonstrated that compared with the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group and the autologous nerve group, a more complete sciatic nerve regeneration was found, including good myelination, regularly arranged nerve fibers, and a completely degraded and resorbed conduit, in the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel group. These results indicate that bridging 10-mm sciatic nerve defects with a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel construct increases the stress relaxation under a constant strain, reducing anastomotic tension. Large elongations under a constant physiological load can limit the anastomotic opening and shift, which is beneficial for the regeneration and functional reconstruction of sciatic nerve. Better

  16. MRI assessment of myelination: an age standardization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staudt, M. (Kinderklinik Dritter Orden, Passau (Germany)); Schropp, C. (Kinderklinik Dritter Orden, Passau (Germany)); Staudt, F. (Kinderklinik Dritter Orden, Passau (Germany)); Obletter, N. (Radiologische Praxis, Klinikum Ingolstadt (Germany)); Bise, K. (Neuropathologisches Inst., Muenchen Univ. (Germany)); Breit, A. (MR Tomographie, Klinikum Passau (Germany)); Weinmann, H.M. (Kinderklinik Schwabing, Muenchen (Germany))

    1994-04-01

    777 cerebral MRI examinations of children aged 3 days to 14 years were staged for myelination to establish an age standardization. Staging was performed using a system proposed in a previous paper, separately ranking 10 different regions of the brain. Interpretation of the results led to the identification of foue clinical diagnoses that are frequently associated with delays in myelination: West syndrome, cerebral palsy, developmental retardation, and congenital anomalies. In addition, it was found that assessment of myelination in children with head injuries was not practical as alterations in MRI signal can simulate earlier stages of myelination. Age limits were therefore calculated from the case material after excluding all children with these conditions. When simplifications of the definition of the stages are applied, these age limits for the various stages of myelination of each of the 10 regions of the brain make the staging system applicable for routine assessment of myelination. (orig.)

  17. Fish oil supplementation prevents diabetes-induced nerve conduction velocity and neuroanatomical changes in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbi, A; Maixent, J M; Ansaldi, J L; Pierlovisi, M; Coste, T; Pelissier, J F; Vague, P; Raccah, D

    1999-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy has been associated with a decrease in nerve conduction velocity, Na,K-ATPase activity and characteristic histological damage of the sciatic nerve. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential effect of a dietary supplementation with fish oil [(n-3) fatty acids] on the sciatic nerve of diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced by intravenous streptozotocin injection. Diabetic animals (n = 20) were fed a nonpurified diet supplemented with either olive oil (DO) or fish oil (DM), and control animals (n = 10) were fed a nonpurified diet supplemented with olive oil at a daily dose of 0.5 g/kg by gavage for 8 wk. Nerves were characterized by their conduction velocity, morphometric analysis and membrane Na, K-ATPase activity. Nerve conduction velocity, as well as Na,K-ATPase activity, was improved by fish oil treatment. A correlation was found between these two variables (R = 0.999, P < 0.05). Moreover, a preventive effect of fish oil was observed on nerve histological damage [endoneurial edema, axonal degeneration (by 10-15%) with demyelination]. Moreover, the normal bimodal distribution of the internal diameter of myelinated fibers was absent in the DO group and was restored in the DM group. These data suggest that fish oil therapy may be effective in the prevention of diabetic neuropathy.

  18. Role of Schwann cells in the regeneration of penile and peripheral nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwann cells (SCs are the principal glia of the peripheral nervous system. The end point of SC development is the formation of myelinating and nonmyelinating cells which ensheath large and small diameter axons, respectively. They play an important role in axon regeneration after injury, including cavernous nerve injury that leads to erectile dysfunction (ED. Despite improvement in radical prostatectomy surgical techniques, many patients still suffer from ED postoperatively as surgical trauma causes traction injuries and local inflammatory changes in the neuronal microenvironment of the autonomic fibers innervating the penis resulting in pathophysiological alterations in the end organ. The aim of this review is to summarize contemporary evidence regarding: (1 the origin and development of SCs in the peripheral and penile nerve system; (2 Wallerian degeneration and SC plastic change following peripheral and penile nerve injury; (3 how SCs promote peripheral and penile nerve regeneration by secreting neurotrophic factors; (4 and strategies targeting SCs to accelerate peripheral nerve regeneration. We searched PubMed for articles related to these topics in both animal models and human research and found numerous studies suggesting that SCs could be a novel target for treatment of nerve injury-induced ED.

  19. EFFECT OF INTRAVITREAL RANIBIZUMAB ON GANGLION CELL COMPLEX AND PERIPAPILLARY RETINAL NERVE FIBER LAYER IN NEOVASCULAR AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION USING SPECTRAL DOMAIN OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchiatti, Ilaria; Cicinelli, Maria V; Parodi, Maurizio Battaglia; Pierro, Luisa; Gagliardi, Marco; Accardo, Agostino; Bandello, Francesco

    2017-07-01

    To analyze the changes in ganglion cell complex and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, in central macular thickness and choroidal thickness on spectral domain optical coherence tomography in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration treated with intravitreal ranibizumab injections. All consecutive patients with untreated neovascular age-related macular degeneration received loading phase of three monthly intravitreal ranibizumab, followed by retreatments on a pro re nata protocol for 12 months. changes in ganglion cell complex and retinal nerve fiber layer at the end of follow-up. Secondary outcome: changes in best-corrected visual acuity, central macular thickness, and choroidal thickness at the end of follow-up. Choroidal thickness was measured at 500 μm, 1000 μm, and 1,500 μm intervals nasally, temporally, superiorly, and inferiorly to the fovea, respectively, on horizontal and vertical line scans centered on the fovea. Twenty-four eyes were included. Ganglion cell complex and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness did not show statistically significant changes through 12 months (55.6 ± 18.5 and 81.9 ± 9.9 μm at baseline, 52.7 ± 19.3 and 84.6 ± 15.5 μm at month 12, P > 0.05). Central macular thickness showed progressive decrease from baseline to month 12, with maximum reduction at month 3 (P macular thickness was significantly reduced at the end of treatment. Further studies, with larger sample, longer follow-up, and greater number of injections, are warranted.

  20. Nerve conduction in relation to vibration exposure - a non-positive cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsson Tohr

    2010-07-01

    distal neuropathy of the large myelinated fibers in a cohort of male office and manual workers.

  1. Enhancement of Median Nerve Regeneration by Mesenchymal Stem Cells Engraftment in an Absorbable Conduit: Improvement of Peripheral Nerve Morphology with Enlargement of Somatosensory Cortical Representation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Teixeira Oliveira

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We studied the morphology and the cortical representation of the median nerve (MN, 10 weeks after a transection immediately followed by treatment with tubulization using a polycaprolactone (PCL conduit with or without bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC transplant. In order to characterize the cutaneous representation of MN inputs in primary somatosensory cortex (S1, electrophysiological cortical mapping of the somatosensory representation of the forepaw and adjacent body parts was performed after acute lesion of all brachial plexus nerves, except for the MN. This was performed in ten adult male Wistar rats randomly assigned in 3 groups: MN Intact (n=4, PCL-Only (n=3 and PCL+MSC (n=3. Ten weeks before mapping procedures in animals from PCL-Only and PCL+MSC groups, animal were subjected to MN transection with removal of a 4-mm-long segment, immediately followed by suturing a PCL conduit to the nerve stumps with (PCL+MSC group or without (PCL-Only group injection of MSC into the conduit. After mapping the representation of the MN in S1, animals had a segment of the regenerated nerve processed for light and transmission electron microscopy. For histomorphometric analysis of the nerve segment, sample size was increased to 5 animals per experimental group. The PCL+MSC group presented a higher number of myelinated fibers and a larger cortical representation of MN inputs in S1 (3,383±390 fibers; 2.3 mm2, respectively than the PCL-Only group (2,226±575 fibers; 1.6 mm2. In conclusion, MSC-based therapy associated with PCL conduits can improve MN regeneration. This treatment seems to rescue the nerve representation in S1, thus minimizing the stabilization of new representations of adjacent body parts in regions previously responsive to the MN.

  2. Crystal structure of the extracellular domain of human myelin protein zero

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Yong; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Sohi, Jasloveleen; Kamholz, John; Kovari, Ladislau C. (WSU-MED); (NWU)

    2012-03-27

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), a hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy, is the most common genetic neuropathy with an incidence of 1 in 2600. Several forms of CMT have been identified arising from different genomic abnormalities such as CMT1 including CMT1A, CMT1B, and CMTX. CMT1 with associated peripheral nervous system (PNS) demyelination, the most frequent diagnosis, demonstrates slowed nerve conduction velocities and segmental demyelination upon nerve biopsy. One of its subtypes, CMT1A, presents a 1.5-Mb duplication in the p11-p12 region of the human chromosome 17 which encodes peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22). CMT1B, a less common form, arises from the mutations in the myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene on chromosome 1, region q22-q23, which encodes the major structural component of the peripheral myelin. A rare type of CMT1 has been found recently and is caused by point mutations in early growth response gene 2 (EGR2), encoding a zinc finger transcription factor in Schwann cells. In addition, CMTX, an X-linked form of CMT, arises from a mutation in the connexin-32 gene. Myelin protein zero, associated with CMT1B, is a transmembrane protein of 219 amino acid residues. Human MPZ consists of three domains: 125 residues constitute the glycosylated immunoglobulin-like extracellular domain; 27 residues span the membrane; and 67 residues comprise the highly basic intracellular domain. MPZ makes up approximately 50% of the protein content of myelin, and is expressed predominantly in Schwann cells, the myelinating cell of the PNS. Myelin protein zero, a homophilic adhesion molecule, is a member of the immunoglobulin super-family and is essential for normal myelin structure and function. In addition, MPZ knockout mice displayed abnormal myelin that severely affects the myelination pathway, and overexpression of MPZ causes congenital hypomyelination of peripheral nerves. Myelin protein zero mutations account for {approx}5% of patients with CMT. To date, over 125

  3. Sodium Channel Nav1.8 Underlies TTX-Resistant Axonal Action Potential Conduction in Somatosensory C-Fibers of Distal Cutaneous Nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Amanda H; Vyshnevska, Alina; Hartke, Timothy V; De Col, Roberto; Mankowski, Joseph L; Turnquist, Brian; Bosmans, Frank; Reeh, Peter W; Schmelz, Martin; Carr, Richard W; Ringkamp, Matthias

    2017-05-17

    Voltage-gated sodium (Na V ) channels are responsible for the initiation and conduction of action potentials within primary afferents. The nine Na V channel isoforms recognized in mammals are often functionally divided into tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive (TTX-s) channels (Na V 1.1-Na V 1.4, Na V 1.6-Na V 1.7) that are blocked by nanomolar concentrations and TTX-resistant (TTX-r) channels (Na V 1.8 and Na V 1.9) inhibited by millimolar concentrations, with Na V 1.5 having an intermediate toxin sensitivity. For small-diameter primary afferent neurons, it is unclear to what extent different Na V channel isoforms are distributed along the peripheral and central branches of their bifurcated axons. To determine the relative contribution of TTX-s and TTX-r channels to action potential conduction in different axonal compartments, we investigated the effects of TTX on C-fiber-mediated compound action potentials (C-CAPs) of proximal and distal peripheral nerve segments and dorsal roots from mice and pigtail monkeys ( Macaca nemestrina ). In the dorsal roots and proximal peripheral nerves of mice and nonhuman primates, TTX reduced the C-CAP amplitude to 16% of the baseline. In contrast, >30% of the C-CAP was resistant to TTX in distal peripheral branches of monkeys and WT and Na V 1.9 -/- mice. In nerves from Na V 1.8 -/- mice, TTX-r C-CAPs could not be detected. These data indicate that Na V 1.8 is the primary isoform underlying TTX-r conduction in distal axons of somatosensory C-fibers. Furthermore, there is a differential spatial distribution of Na V 1.8 within C-fiber axons, being functionally more prominent in the most distal axons and terminal regions. The enrichment of Na V 1.8 in distal axons may provide a useful target in the treatment of pain of peripheral origin. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT It is unclear whether individual sodium channel isoforms exert differential roles in action potential conduction along the axonal membrane of nociceptive, unmyelinated peripheral nerve

  4. Alterations in retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in early stages of diabetic retinopathy and potential risk factors.

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    Shi, Rui; Guo, Zhonglan; Wang, Feng; Li, Rong; Zhao, Lei; Lin, Rong

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the loss of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) in type-2 diabetic patients with early-stage diabetic retinopathy (DR) and to identify potential risk factors accounting for these alterations. In this cross-sectional study, 158 type-2 diabetic patients were divided into three groups based on their DR status. RNFL thickness and other optic disc parameters were obtained by optical coherence tomography (OCT) and then compared among different groups. We investigated the potential association between RNFL loss and systemic risk factors for DR, including diabetes duration, body mass index (BMI), serum lipids, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR). One-way ANOVA was carried out to compare RNFL thickness among different groups, Pearson correlation and multivariate linear regression analysis were performed to determine potential risk factors related to RNFL thickness in these patients. There were significant differences in the average (F = 8.872, P = 0.003), superior (F = 8.769, P = 0.004), and inferior (F = 8.857, P = 0.003) RNFL thickness of both eyes among the groups, but no obvious difference in optic disc parameters was found. Diabetic duration, BMI, TG, High density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL), HbA1c, and ACR were found negatively related to the RNFL thickness in both or single eye according to Pearson correlation analysis. After controlling for age, gender, and axis length (AL) in multivariate linear regression analysis, the diabetic duration was associated significantly with RNFL thickness of superior in both eye (right eye: p = 0.016, left eye: p = 0.024), BMI was related to the nasal quadrant of the right eye (p = 0.034), and TG was related to the inferior of the right eye (p = 0.037), HbA1c (p = 0.026) was associated significantly with the average RNFL thickness of the right eye. In addition, ACR was found negatively related to average (p = 0.042) and inferior quadrant (p = 0.014) of the left eye

  5. Systemic and Ocular Determinants of Peripapillary Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness Measurements in the European Eye Epidemiology (E3) Population.

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    Mauschitz, Matthias M; Bonnemaijer, Pieter W M; Diers, Kersten; Rauscher, Franziska G; Elze, Tobias; Engel, Christoph; Loeffler, Markus; Colijn, Johanna Maria; Ikram, M Arfan; Vingerling, Johannes R; Williams, Katie M; Hammond, Christopher J; Creuzot-Garcher, Catherine; Bron, Alain M; Silva, Rufino; Nunes, Sandrina; Delcourt, Cécile; Cougnard-Grégoire, Audrey; Holz, Frank G; Klaver, Caroline C W; Breteler, Monique M B; Finger, Robert P

    2018-04-28

    To investigate systemic and ocular determinants of peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (pRNFLT) in the European population. Cross-sectional meta-analysis. A total of 16 084 European adults from 8 cohort studies (mean age range, 56.9±12.3-82.1±4.2 years) of the European Eye Epidemiology (E3) consortium. We examined associations with pRNFLT measured by spectral-domain OCT in each study using multivariable linear regression and pooled results using random effects meta-analysis. Determinants of pRNFLT. Mean pRNFLT ranged from 86.8±21.4 μm in the Rotterdam Study I to 104.7±12.5 μm in the Rotterdam Study III. We found the following factors to be associated with reduced pRNFLT: Older age (β = -0.38 μm/year; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.57 to -0.18), higher intraocular pressure (IOP) (β = -0.36 μm/mmHg; 95% CI, -0.56 to -0.15), visual impairment (β = -5.50 μm; 95% CI, -9.37 to -1.64), and history of systemic hypertension (β = -0.54 μm; 95% CI, -1.01 to -0.07) and stroke (β = -1.94 μm; 95% CI, -3.17 to -0.72). A suggestive, albeit nonsignificant, association was observed for dementia (β = -3.11 μm; 95% CI, -6.22 to 0.01). Higher pRNFLT was associated with more hyperopic spherical equivalent (β = 1.39 μm/diopter; 95% CI, 1.19-1.59) and smoking (β = 1.53 μm; 95% CI, 1.00-2.06 for current smokers compared with never-smokers). In addition to previously described determinants such as age and refraction, we found that systemic vascular and neurovascular diseases were associated with reduced pRNFLT. These may be of clinical relevance, especially in glaucoma monitoring of patients with newly occurring vascular comorbidities. Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of multiple intravitreal anti-VEGF injections on retinal nerve fiber layer and intraocular pressure: a comparative clinical study.

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    Sobacı, Güngör; Güngör, Rıza; Ozge, Gökhan

    2013-01-01

    To determine the effect of multiple injections of ranibizumab or bevacizumab on retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and intraocular pressure (IOP) in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This retrospective study includes 35 eyes of 35 patients treated with intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB, 1.25mg/0.05mL) and 30 eyes of 30 patients with intravitreal ranibizumab (IVR, 0.5mg/0.05mL) who had Fast RNFL analysis (Stratus™); IOP measurements were taken 30 minutes and 24 hours after each injection. The mean ages were 68.0±7.5 and 69.1±7.7 years in the IVR and IVB groups, respectively (P=0.55). They underwent (6.3±1.9) and (5.1±1.3) injections (P=0.07) over (13.6±2.1) and (14.05±2.6) months (P=0.45) in the IVR and IVB groups, respectively. Changes in overall and temporal RNFL thickness in IVR-treated eyes (105.3±6.9µm and 74.4±11.2µm) were not different from those in untreated eyes in the IVR group (104.6± 8.4µm and 75.1±12.6µm) (P=0.57 and P=0.41, respectively). Similarly, overall and temporal RNFL thickness in IVB-treated eyes (105.8±8.1µm and 74.5±11.8µm) were not different from those in untreated eyes in the IVB group (104.6±8µm and 74.8±12.9µm) (P=0.42 and P=0.80, respectively). The frequencies of IOP rise (P=0.60) and changes in RNFL thickness from baseline (P=0.16) were comparable between groups. Repeated intravitreal injection of ranibizumab or bevacizumab does not seem have adverse effects on RNFL thickness or IOP in wet AMD patients.

  7. Retina ganglion cell/inner plexiform layer and peripapillary nerve fiber layer thickness in patients with acromegaly.

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    Şahin, Muhammed; Şahin, Alparslan; Kılınç, Faruk; Yüksel, Harun; Özkurt, Zeynep Gürsel; Türkcü, Fatih Mehmet; Pekkolay, Zafer; Soylu, Hikmet; Çaça, İhsan

    2017-06-01

    Increased secretion of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 in acromegaly has various effects on multiple organs. However, the ocular effects of acromegaly have yet to be investigated in detail. The aim of the present study was to compare retina ganglion cell/inner plexiform layer (GCIPL) and peripapillary nerve fiber layer thickness (pRNFL) between patients with acromegaly and healthy control subjects using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). This cross-sectional, comparative study included 18 patients with acromegaly and 20 control subjects. All participants underwent SD-OCT to measure pRNFL (in the seven peripapillary areas), GCIPL (in the nine ETDRS areas), and central macular thickness (CMT). Visual field (VF) examinations were performed using a Humphrey field analyzer in acromegalic patients. Measurements were compared between patients with acromegaly and control subjects. A total of 33 eyes of 18 patients with acromegaly and 40 eyes of 20 control subjects met the inclusion criteria of the present study. The overall calculated average pRNFL thickness was significantly lower in patients with acromegaly than in control subjects (P = 0.01), with pRNFL thickness significantly lower in the temporal superior and temporal inferior quadrants. Contrary to our expectations, pRNFL thickness in the nasal quadrant was similar between acromegalic and control subjects. The mean overall pRNFL thickness and superonasal, nasal, inferonasal, and inferotemporal quadrant pRNFL thicknesses were found to correlate with the mean deviation (MD) according to Spearman's correlation. However, other quadrants were not correlated with VF sensitivity. No significant difference in CMT values was observed (P = 0.6). GCIPL thickness was significantly lower in all quadrants of the inner and outer macula, except for central and inferior outer quadrants, in the acromegaly group than that in the control group (P acromegaly compared with that in control subjects

  8. Quantitative analysis of the myelin g-ratio from electron microscopy images of the macaque corpus callosum

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    Nikola Stikov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We provide a detailed morphometric analysis of eight transmission electron micrographs (TEMs obtained from the corpus callosum of one cynomolgus macaque. The raw TEM images are included in the article, along with the distributions of the axon caliber and the myelin g-ratio in each image. The distributions are analyzed to determine the relationship between axon caliber and g-ratio, and compared against the aggregate metrics (myelin volume fraction, fiber volume fraction, and the aggregate g-ratio, as defined in the accompanying research article entitled ‘In vivo histology of the myelin g-ratio with magnetic resonance imaging’ (Stikov et al., NeuroImage, 2015.

  9. An autologously generated platelet-rich plasma suturable membrane may enhance peripheral nerve regeneration after neurorraphy in an acute injury model of sciatic nerve neurotmesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannessi, Elisabetta; Coli, Alessandra; Stornelli, Maria Rita; Miragliotta, Vincenzo; Pirone, Andrea; Lenzi, Carla; Burchielli, Silvia; Vozzi, Giovanni; De Maria, Carmelo; Giorgetti, Margherita

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of suturable platelet-rich plasma (PRP) membrane to promote peripheral nerve regeneration after neurotmesis and neurorraphy. A total of 36 rats were used: 32 animals underwent surgery and were split in two groups. An interim sacrifice was performed at 6 weeks postsurgery and final sacrifice at 12 weeks; four animals did not sustain nerve injury and served as control. Clinical, electromyographic (EMG), gross, and histological changes were assessed. The EMG signal was evaluated for its amplitude and frequency spectrum. Number of regenerating fibers, their diameter, and myelin thickness were histologically analyzed. Both EMG parameters showed a significant (p neurorraphy improves the nerve regeneration process in a rat sciatic nerve model. The use of PRP as a suturable membrane could perform an action not only as a source of bioactive proteins but also as a nerve guide to hold the scar reaction and thus improve axonal regeneration. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  10. Repeatability and Reproducibility of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Parameters Measured by Scanning Laser Polarimetry with Enhanced Corneal Compensation in Normal and Glaucomatous Eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ara, Mirian; Ferreras, Antonio; Pajarin, Ana B; Calvo, Pilar; Figus, Michele; Frezzotti, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    To assess the intrasession repeatability and intersession reproducibility of peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness parameters measured by scanning laser polarimetry (SLP) with enhanced corneal compensation (ECC) in healthy and glaucomatous eyes. One randomly selected eye of 82 healthy individuals and 60 glaucoma subjects was evaluated. Three scans were acquired during the first visit to evaluate intravisit repeatability. A different operator obtained two additional scans within 2 months after the first session to determine intervisit reproducibility. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), coefficient of variation (COV), and test-retest variability (TRT) were calculated for all SLP parameters in both groups. ICCs ranged from 0.920 to 0.982 for intravisit measurements and from 0.910 to 0.978 for intervisit measurements. The temporal-superior-nasal-inferior-temporal (TSNIT) average was the highest (0.967 and 0.946) in normal eyes, while nerve fiber indicator (NFI; 0.982) and inferior average (0.978) yielded the best ICC in glaucomatous eyes for intravisit and intervisit measurements, respectively. All COVs were under 10% in both groups, except NFI. TSNIT average had the lowest COV (2.43%) in either type of measurement. Intervisit TRT ranged from 6.48 to 12.84. The reproducibility of peripapillary RNFL measurements obtained with SLP-ECC was excellent, indicating that SLP-ECC is sufficiently accurate for monitoring glaucoma progression.

  11. Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer and Peripapillary Choroidal Thicknesses in Non-Glaucomatous Unilateral Optic Atrophy Compared with Unilateral Advanced Pseudoexfoliative Glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucukevcilioglu, Murat; Ayyildiz, Onder; Aykas, Seckin; Gokce, Gokcen; Koylu, Mehmet Talay; Ozgonul, Cem; Ozge, Gokhan; Mumcuoglu, Tarkan; Yumusak, Erhan

    2017-02-01

    To investigate retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFL-T) and peripapillary choroidal thickness (PC-T) in non-glaucomatous optic atrophy (OA) patients in comparison with unaffected and control eyes, furthermore, to compare thickness profiles with unilateral pseudoexfoliative advanced glaucoma. Thirty-three eyes with OA (Group A), 33 unaffected fellow eyes (Group B), 25 right eyes of 25 control subjects (Group C), and 15 eyes with advanced glaucoma (Group D) were enrolled. RNFL-T was measured in six regions by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography was obtained to evaluate PC-T in corresponding regions. RNFL-T was significantly lower in Group A than in Groups B and C globally and at all peripapillary regions (all p temporal > nasal > inferior) profiles were almost identical to that in unaffected fellow eyes and control eyes. However, Group D showed different patterns with less regional differences in RNFL-T, and the greatest value of PC-T in nasal quadrant. Besides retinal nerve fiber layer thinning, non-glaucomatous OA is associated with choroidal thinning. The RNFL-T and PC-T profiles in advanced glaucoma eyes differed from the common patterns seen among OA eyes, unaffected fellow eyes, and control eyes.

  12. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Aggressive or Protective Factor for the Retina? Evaluation of Macular Thickness and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layers Using High-Definition Optical Coherence Tomography

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    José Edvan de Souza-Júnior

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare macular thickness (MT and retinal nerve fiber layers (RNFL between women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS and healthy women. Materials and Methods. The study included 45 women with PCOS and 47 ovulatory women undergoing clinical-gynecological and ophthalmic evaluations, including measurement of MT, RNFL, and optic disc parameters using optical coherence tomography. Results. The superior RNFL around the optic nerve was significantly thicker in PCOS than in healthy volunteers (P=0.036. After stratification according to insulin resistance, the temporal inner macula (TIM, the inferior inner macula (IIM, the nasal inner macula (NIM, and the nasal outer macula (NOM were significantly thicker in PCOS group than in control group (P<0.05. Both the presence of obesity associated with insulin resistance (P=0.037 and glucose intolerance (P=0.001 were associated with significant increase in the PC1 mean score, relative to MT. A significant increase in the PC2 mean score occurred when considering the presence of metabolic syndrome (P<0.0001. There was a significant interaction between obesity and inflammation in a decreasing mean PC2 score relative to macular RNFL thickness (P=0.034. Conclusion. Decreased macular RNFL thickness and increased total MT are associated with metabolic abnormalities, while increased RNFL thickness around the optic nerve is associated with hormonal changes inherent in PCOS.

  13. Morphological Changes and Immunohistochemical Expression of RAGE and its Ligands in the Sciatic Nerve of Hyperglycemic Pig (Sus Scrofa

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    Judyta K. Juranek

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our project was to study the effect of streptozotocin (STZ—induced hyperglycemia on sciatic nerve morphology, blood plasma markers and immunohistochemical expression of RAGE (the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-products, and its ligands—S100B and Carboxymethyl Lysine (CML-advanced glycation endproduct (AGE in the laboratory pig. Six months after STZ—injections, blood plasma measurements, morphometric analysis of sciatic nerve fiber density, immunofluorescent distribution of potential molecular neuropathy contributors, ELISA measurement of plasma AGE level and HPLC analysis of sciatic nerve levels of one of the pre-AGE and the glycolysis intermediate products—methyl-glyoxal (MG were performed. The results of our study revealed that STZ—injected animals displayed elevated levels of plasma glucose, gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT and triglycerides. The sciatic nerve of STZ-injected pigs revealed significantly lower numbers of small-diameter myelinated fibers, higher immunoreactivity for RAGE and S100B and increased levels of MG as compared to control animals. Our results correspond to clinical findings in human patients with hyperglycemia/diabetes-evoked peripheral neuropathy and suggest that the domestic pig may be a suitable large animal model for the study of mechanisms underlying hyperglycemia-induced neurological complications in the peripheral nerve and may serve as a relevant model for the pre-clinical assessment of candidate drugs in neuropathy.

  14. Morphological Changes and Immunohistochemical Expression of RAGE and its Ligands in the Sciatic Nerve of Hyperglycemic Pig (Sus Scrofa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judyta K. Juranek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our project was to study the effect of streptozotocin (STZ–-induced hyperglycemia on sciatic nerve morphology, blood plasma markers and immunohistochemical expression of RAGE (the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-products, and its ligands–-S100B and Carboxymethyl Lysine (CML-advanced glycation endproduct (AGE in the laboratory pig. Six months after STZ–-injections, blood plasma measurements, morphometric analysis of sciatic nerve fiber density, immunofluorescent distribution of potential molecular neuropathy contributors, ELISA measurement of plasma AGE level and HPLC analysis of sciatic nerve levels of one of the pre-AGE and the glycolysis intermediate products–-methylglyoxal (MG were performed. The results of our study revealed that STZ–-injected animals displayed elevated levels of plasma glucose, gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT and triglycerides. The sciatic nerve of STZ-injected pigs revealed significantly lower numbers of small-diameter myelinated fibers, higher immunoreactivity for RAGE and S100B and increased levels of MG as compared to control animals. Our results correspond to clinical findings in human patients with hyperglycemia/diabetes-evoked peripheral neuropathy and suggest that the domestic pig may be a suitable large animal model for the study of mechanisms underlying hyperglycemia-induced neurological complications in the peripheral nerve and may serve as a relevant model for the pre-clinical assessment of candidate drugs in neuropathy.

  15. Effects of Schwann cell alignment along the oriented electrospun chitosan nanofibers on nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Itoh, Soichiro; Konno, Katsumi; Kikkawa, Takeshi; Ichinose, Shizuko; Sakai, Katsuyoshi; Ohkuma, Tsuneo; Watabe, Kazuhiko

    2009-12-15

    We have constructed a chitosan nonwoven nanofiber mesh tube consisting of oriented fibers by the electrospinning method. The efficacy of oriented nanofibers on Schwann cell alignment and positive effect of this tube on peripheral nerve regeneration were confirmed. The physical properties of the chitosan nanofiber mesh sheets prepared by electrospinning with or without fiber orientation were characterized. Then, immortalized Schwann cells were cultured on these sheets. Furthermore, the chitosan nanofiber mesh tubes with or without orientation, and bilayered chitosan mesh tube with an inner layer of oriented nanofibers and an outer layer of randomized nanofibers were bridgegrafted into rat sciatic nerve defect. As a result of fiber orientation, the tensile strength along the axis of the sheet increased. Because Schwann cells aligned along the nanofibers, oriented fibrous sheets could exhibit a Schwann cell column. Functional recovery and electrophysiological recovery occurred in time in the oriented group as well as in the bilayered group, and approximately matched those in the isograft. Furthermore, histological analysis revealed that the sprouting of myelinated axons occurred vigorously followed by axonal maturation in the isograft, oriented, and bilayered group in the order. The oriented chitosan nanofiber mesh tube may be a promising substitute for autogenous nerve graft.

  16. Peripheral Nerve Regeneration by Secretomes of Stem Cells from Human Exfoliated Deciduous Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimura-Wakayama, Yukiko; Katagiri, Wataru; Osugi, Masashi; Kawai, Takamasa; Ogata, Kenichi; Sakaguchi, Kohei; Hibi, Hideharu

    2015-11-15

    Peripheral nerve regeneration across nerve gaps is often suboptimal, with poor functional recovery. Stem cell transplantation-based regenerative therapy is a promising approach for axon regeneration and functional recovery of peripheral nerve injury; however, the mechanisms remain controversial and unclear. Recent studies suggest that transplanted stem cells promote tissue regeneration through a paracrine mechanism. We investigated the effects of conditioned media derived from stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED-CM) on peripheral nerve regeneration. In vitro, SHED-CM-treated Schwann cells exhibited significantly increased proliferation, migration, and the expression of neuron-, extracellular matrix (ECM)-, and angiogenesis-related genes. SHED-CM stimulated neuritogenesis of dorsal root ganglia and increased cell viability. Similarly, SHED-CM enhanced tube formation in an angiogenesis assay. In vivo, a 10-mm rat sciatic nerve gap model was bridged by silicon conduits containing SHED-CM or serum-free Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium. Light and electron microscopy confirmed that the number of myelinated axons and axon-to-fiber ratio (G-ratio) were significantly higher in the SHED-CM group at 12 weeks after nerve transection surgery. The sciatic functional index (SFI) and gastrocnemius (target muscle) wet weight ratio demonstrated functional recovery. Increased compound muscle action potentials and increased SFI in the SHED-CM group suggested sciatic nerve reinnervation of the target muscle and improved functional recovery. We also observed reduced muscle atrophy in the SHED-CM group. Thus, SHEDs may secrete various trophic factors that enhance peripheral nerve regeneration through multiple mechanisms. SHED-CM may therefore provide a novel therapy that creates a more desirable extracellular microenvironment for peripheral nerve regeneration.

  17. The beneficial effect of genetically engineered Schwann cells with enhanced motility in peripheral nerve regeneration: review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravvanis, A I; Lavdas, A A; Papalois, A; Tsoutsos, D A; Matsas, R

    2007-01-01

    The importance of Schwann cells in promoting nerve regeneration across a conduit has been extensively reported in the literature, and Schwann cell motility has been acknowledged as a prerequisite for myelination of the peripheral nervous system during regeneration after injury. Review of recent literature and retrospective analysis of our studies with genetically modified Schwann Cells with increased motility in order to identify the underlying mechanism of action and outline the future trends in peripheral nerve repair. Schwann cell transduction with the pREV-retrovirus, for expression of Sialyl-Transferase-X, resulting in conferring Polysialyl-residues (PSA) on NCAM, increases their motility in-vitro and ensures nerve regeneration through silicone tubes after end-to-side neurorraphy in the rat sciatic nerve model, thus significantly promoting fiber maturation and functional outcome. An artificial nerve graft consisting of a type I collagen tube lined with the genetically modified Schwann cells with increased motility, used to bridge a defect in end-to-end fashion in the rat sciatic nerve model, was shown to promote nerve regeneration to a level equal to that of a nerve autograft. The use of genetically engineered Schwann cells with enhanced motility for grafting endoneural tubes promotes axonal regeneration, by virtue of the interaction of the transplanted cells with regenerating axonal growth cones as well as via the recruitment of endogenous Schwann cells. It is envisaged that mixed populations of Schwann cells, expressing PSA and one or more trophic factors, might further enhance the regenerating and remyelinating potential of the lesioned nerves.

  18. Subtle paranodal injury slows impulse conduction in a mathematical model of myelinated axons.

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    Charles F Babbs

    Full Text Available This study explores in detail the functional consequences of subtle retraction and detachment of myelin around the nodes of Ranvier following mild-to-moderate crush or stretch mediated injury. An equivalent electrical circuit model for a series of equally spaced nodes of Ranvier was created incorporating extracellular and axonal resistances, paranodal resistances, nodal capacitances, time varying sodium and potassium currents, and realistic resting and threshold membrane potentials in a myelinated axon segment of 21 successive nodes. Differential equations describing membrane potentials at each nodal region were solved numerically. Subtle injury was simulated by increasing the width of exposed nodal membrane in nodes 8 through 20 of the model. Such injury diminishes action potential amplitude and slows conduction velocity from 19.1 m/sec in the normal region to 7.8 m/sec in the crushed region. Detachment of paranodal myelin, exposing juxtaparanodal potassium channels, decreases conduction velocity further to 6.6 m/sec, an effect that is partially reversible with potassium ion channel blockade. Conduction velocity decreases as node width increases or as paranodal resistance falls. The calculated changes in conduction velocity with subtle paranodal injury agree with experimental observations. Nodes of Ranvier are highly effective but somewhat fragile devices for increasing nerve conduction velocity and decreasing reaction time in vertebrate animals. Their fundamental design limitation is that even small mechanical retractions of myelin from very narrow nodes or slight loosening of paranodal myelin, which are difficult to notice at the light microscopic level of observation, can cause large changes in myelinated nerve conduction velocity.

  19. Surface microstructures on planar substrates and textile fibers guide neurite outgrowth: a scaffold solution to push limits of critical nerve defect regeneration?

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    Stefan Weigel

    Full Text Available The treatment of critical size peripheral nerve defects represents one of the most serious problems in neurosurgery. If the gap size exceeds a certain limit, healing can't be achieved. Connection mismatching may further reduce the clinical success. The present study investigates how far specific surface structures support neurite outgrowth and by that may represent one possibility to push distance limits that can be bridged. For this purpose, growth cone displacement of fluorescent embryonic chicken spinal cord neurons was monitored using time-lapse video. In a first series of experiments, parallel patterns of polyimide ridges of different geometry were created on planar silicon oxide surfaces. These channel-like structures were evaluated with and without amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H coating. In a next step, structured and unstructured textile fibers were investigated. All planar surface materials (polyimide, silicon oxide and a-C:H proved to be biocompatible, i.e. had no adverse effect on nerve cultures and supported neurite outgrowth. Mean growth cone migration velocity measured on 5 minute base was marginally affected by surface structuring. However, surface structure variability, i.e. ridge height, width and inter-ridge spacing, significantly enhanced the resulting net velocity by guiding the growth cone movement. Ridge height and inter-ridge distance affected the frequency of neurites crossing over ridges. Of the evaluated dimensions ridge height, width, and inter-ridge distance of respectively 3, 10, and 10 µm maximally supported net axon growth. Comparable artificial grooves, fabricated onto the surface of PET fibers by using an excimer laser, showed similar positive effects. Our data may help to further optimize surface characteristics of artificial nerve conduits and bioelectronic interfaces.

  20. Comparison of peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer loss and visual outcome in fellow eyes following sequential bilateral non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy.

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    Dotan, Gad; Kesler, Anat; Naftaliev, Elvira; Skarf, Barry

    2015-05-01

    To report on the correlation of structural damage to the axons of the optic nerve and visual outcome following bilateral non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy. A retrospective review of the medical records of 25 patients with bilateral sequential non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy was performed. Outcome measures were peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness measured with the Stratus optical coherence tomography scanner, visual acuity and visual field loss. Median peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, mean deviation (MD) of visual field, and visual acuity of initially involved NAION eyes (54.00 µm, -17.77 decibels (dB), 0.4, respectively) were comparable to the same parameters measured following development of second NAION event in the other eye (53.70 µm, p = 0.740; -16.83 dB, p = 0.692; 0.4, p = 0.942, respectively). In patients with bilateral NAION, there was a significant correlation of peripapillary RNFL thickness (r = 0.583, p = 0.002) and MD of the visual field (r = 0.457, p = 0.042) for the pairs of affected eyes, whereas a poor correlation was found in visual acuity of these eyes (r = 0.279, p = 0.176). Peripapillary RNFL thickness following NAION was positively correlated with MD of visual field (r = 0.312, p = 0.043) and negatively correlated with logMAR visual acuity (r = -0.365, p = 0.009). In patients who experience bilateral NAION, the magnitude of RNFL loss is similar in each eye. There is a greater similarity in visual field loss than in visual acuity between the two affected eyes with NAION of the same individual.

  1. [Changes in facial nerve function, morphology and neurotrophic factor III expression following three types of facial nerve injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lili; Wang, Haibo; Fan, Zhaomin; Han, Yuechen; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Haiyan

    2011-01-01

    To study the changes in facial nerve function, morphology and neurotrophic factor III (NT-3) expression following three types of facial nerve injury. Changes in facial nerve function (in terms of blink reflex (BF), vibrissae movement (VM) and position of nasal tip) were assessed in 45 rats in response to three types of facial nerve injury: partial section of the extratemporal segment (group one), partial section of the facial canal segment (group two) and complete transection of the facial canal segment lesion (group three). All facial nerves specimen were then cut into two parts at the site of the lesion after being taken from the lesion site on 1st, 7th, 21st post-surgery-days (PSD). Changes of morphology and NT-3 expression were evaluated using the improved trichrome stain and immunohistochemistry techniques ,respectively. Changes in facial nerve function: In group 1, all animals had no blink reflex (BF) and weak vibrissae movement (VM) at the 1st PSD; The blink reflex in 80% of the rats recovered partly and the vibrissae movement in 40% of the rats returned to normal at the 7th PSD; The facial nerve function in 600 of the rats was almost normal at the 21st PSD. In group 2, all left facial nerve paralyzed at the 1st PSD; The blink reflex partly recovered in 40% of the rats and the vibrissae movement was weak in 80% of the rats at the 7th PSD; 8000 of the rats'BF were almost normal and 40% of the rats' VM completely recovered at the 21st PSD. In group 3, The recovery couldn't happen at anytime. Changes in morphology: In group 1, the size of nerve fiber differed in facial canal segment and some of myelin sheath and axons degenerated at the 7th PSD; The fibres' degeneration turned into regeneration at the 21st PSD; In group 2, the morphologic changes in this group were familiar with the group 1 while the degenerated fibers were more and dispersed in transection at the 7th PSD; Regeneration of nerve fibers happened at the 21st PSD. In group 3, most of the fibers

  2. LONGITUDINAL CHANGES IN THICKNESSES OF THE MACULA, GANGLION CELL-INNER PLEXIFORM LAYER, AND RETINAL NERVE FIBER LAYER AFTER VITRECTOMY: A 12-Month Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyung-Bin; Lee, Min-Woo; Kwak, Baek-Soo; Jo, Young-Joon; Kim, Jung-Yeul

    2018-01-01

    To analyze longitudinal changes in the thicknesses of the macula, ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer (GC-IPL), and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) after vitrectomy. Thirty-eight patients diagnosed with intraocular lens (IOL) dislocation without evidence of other vitreoretinal diseases were included. They underwent conventional vitrectomy and IOL transscleral fixation, with a follow-up of 12 months. Using spectral domain optical coherence tomography, the thicknesses of the macula, GC-IPL, and peripapillary RNFL in the vitrectomized and fellow control eyes were measured. Various optic nerve head parameters were also determined. Optical coherence tomography showed that there were no significant differences in postoperative central macular thickness compared with baseline values. The average GC-IPL thickness increased 1 month after surgery from baseline (P = 0.038). The average RNFL thickness increased from baseline at 1 month (P = 0.001) and 3 months (P = 0.011) after vitrectomy. The mean foveal, GC-IPL, and RNFL thicknesses of the study eyes compared with the fellow control eyes increased at 1 month (P = 0.034), 1 month (P = 0.048), and 1 month (P = 0.013) to 3 months (P = 0.038), respectively, after surgery. However, no significant differences were found in intraocular pressure or optic nerve head parameters between the study and fellow control eyes at 12 months after surgery. Transient increases in the thickness of the macula and GC-IPL were observed at 1 month after vitrectomy, and the postoperative RNFL thickness increased until 3 months after surgery, after which it returned to preoperative levels. There was no significant change in intraocular pressure or optic nerve head parameters before and after surgery.

  3. Size of the Optic Nerve Head and Its Relationship with the Thickness of the Macular Ganglion Cell Complex and Peripapillary Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer in Patients with Primary Open Angle Glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuko Enomoto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate the relationships among the optic nerve head (ONH area, macular ganglion cell complex (mGCC thickness, circumpapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (cpRNFL thickness, and visual field defects in patients with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG. Methods. This retrospective study included 90 eyes of 90 patients with POAG. The ONH area, rim area, mGCC thickness, and cpRNFL thickness were measured using optical coherence tomography. Mean deviation (MD was measured using standard automated perimetry. The relationships among clinical factors including age, refraction, the ONH area, the rim area, the mGCC thickness, the cpRNFL thickness, and MD were evaluated using correlation coefficients and multiple regression analyses. Results. The significant correlation of the ONH area with refraction (r=0.362, P<0.001, the mGCC thickness (r=0.225, P=0.033, and the cpRNFL thickness (r=0.253, P=0.016 was found. Multiple regression analysis showed that the ONH area, rim area, and MD were selected as significant contributing factors to explain the mGCC thickness and cpRNFL thickness. No factor was selected to explain MD. Conclusions. The ONH area, in other words, the disc size itself may affect the mGCC thickness and cpRNFL thickness in POAG patients.

  4. Afferent fibers and sensory ganglion cells within the oculomotor nerve in some mammals and man. II. Electrophysiological investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manni, E; Bortolami, R; Pettorossi, V E; Lucchi, M L; Callegari, E

    1978-01-01

    The main aim of the present study was to localize with electrophysiological techniques the central projections and terminations of the aberrant trigeminal fibres contained in the oculomotor nerve of the lamb. After severing a trigeminal root, single-shock electrical stimulation of the trigeminal axons present in the central stump of the ipsilateral oculomotor nerve evoked field potentials in the area of, i) the subnucleus gelatinosus of the nucleus caudalis trigemini at the level of C1-C2; ii) the main sensory trigeminal nucleus; iii) the descending trigeminal nucleus and tract; iv) the adjacent reticular formation. Units whose discharge rate was influenced by such a stimulation were also found in the same territories. These regions actually exhibited degenerations after cutting an oculomotor nerve. We conclude, therefore, that the trigeminal fibres which leave the Vth nerve at the level of the cavernous sinus and enter the brain stem through the IIIrd nerve, end in the same structures which receive the terminations of the afferent fibres entering the brain stem through the sensory trigeminal root.

  5. The formation of lipid droplets favors intracellular Mycobacterium leprae survival in SW-10, non-myelinating Schwann cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Song-Hyo; An, Sung-Kwan; Lee, Seong-Beom

    2017-06-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease that is caused by the obligate intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium leprae (M.leprae), which is the leading cause of all non-traumatic peripheral neuropathies worldwide. Although both myelinating and non-myelinating Schwann cells are infected by M.leprae in patients with lepromatous leprosy, M.leprae preferentially invades the non-myelinating Schwann cells. However, the effect of M.leprae infection on non-myelinating Schwann cells has not been elucidated. Lipid droplets (LDs) are found in M.leprae-infected Schwann cells in the nerve biopsies of lepromatous leprosy patients. M.leprae-induced LD formation favors intracellular M.leprae survival in primary Schwann cells and in a myelinating Schwann cell line referred to as ST88-14. In the current study, we initially characterized SW-10 cells and investigated the effects of LDs on M.leprae-infected SW-10 cells, which are non-myelinating Schwann cells. SW-10 cells express S100, a marker for cells from the neural crest, and NGFR p75, a marker for immature or non-myelinating Schwann cells. SW-10 cells, however, do not express myelin basic protein (MBP), a marker for myelinating Schwann cells, and myelin protein zero (MPZ), a marker for precursor, immature, or myelinating Schwann cells, all of which suggests that SW-10 cells are non-myelinating Schwann cells. In addition, SW-10 cells have phagocytic activity and can be infected with M. leprae. Infection with M. leprae induces the formation of LDs. Furthermore, inhibiting the formation of M. leprae-induced LD enhances the maturation of phagosomes containing live M.leprae and decreases the ATP content in the M. leprae found in SW-10 cells. These facts suggest that LD formation by M. leprae favors intracellular M. leprae survival in SW-10 cells, which leads to the logical conclusion that M.leprae-infected SW-10 cells can be a new model for investigating the interaction of M.leprae with non-myelinating Schwann cells.

  6. Nonenzymatic glycosylation of bovine myelin basic protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hitz, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    In the CNS myelin sheath the nonenzymatic glycosylation reaction (at the early stage of the Amadori product) occurs only with the myelin basic protein and not with the other myelin proteins. This was observed in isolated bovine myelin by in vitro incubation with [ 14 C]-galactose and [ 14 C]-glucose. The respective in-vitro incorporation rates for purified bovine myelin basic protein with D-galactose, D-glucose and D-mannose were 7.2, 2.4 and 2.4 mmoles/mole myelin basic protein per day at 37 0 C. A more rapid, HPLC method was devised and characterized to specifically analyze for the Amadori product. The HPLC method was correlated to the [ 14 C]-sugar incorporation method for myelin basic protein under a set of standard reaction conditions using [ 14 C]-glucose and [ 14 C]-mannose with HPLC values at 1/6 and 1/5 of the [ 14 C]-sugar incorporation method. A novel myelin basic protein purification step has been developed that yields a relativity proteolytic free preparation that is easy to work with, being totally soluble at a neutral pH. Nine new spots appear for a trypsinized glycosylated MBP in the paper peptide map of which eight correspond to positions of the [ 3 H]-labeled Amadori product in affinity isolated peptides. These studies provide a general characterization of and a structural basis for investigations on nonenzymatically glycosylated MBP as well as identifying MBP as the only nonenzymatically glycosylated protein in the CNS myelin sheath which may accumulate during aging, diabetes, and demyelinating diseases in general

  7. Nerve Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Nerve Blocks A nerve block is an injection to ... the limitations of Nerve Block? What is a Nerve Block? A nerve block is an anesthetic and/ ...

  8. Asymptomatic loss of intraepidermal nerve fibers with preserved thermal detection thresholds after repeated exposure to severe cold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøigård, Thomas; Wirenfeldt, Martin; Svendsen, Toke K.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Cold-induced peripheral neuropathy has been described in individuals exposed to severe cold resulting in pain, hypersensitivity to cold, hyperhidrosis, numbness, and skin changes. Nerve conduction studies and thermal detection thresholds are abnormal in symptomatic patients......-induced peripheral neuropathy may be prevalent in subjects living in or near polar regions which could have implications for the recruitment of healthy subjects....

  9. A mathematical model for describing the retinal nerve fiber bundle trajectories in the human eye : Average course, variability, and influence of refraction, optic disc size and optic disc position

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansonius, Nomdo M.; Schiefer, Julia; Nevalainen, Jukka; Paetzold, Jens; Schiefer, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Previously we developed a mathematical model for describing the retinal nerve fiber bundle trajectories in the superior-temporal and inferior-temporal regions of the human retina, based on traced trajectories extracted from fundus photographs. Aims of the current study were to (i) validate the

  10. Local translation in primary afferent fibers regulates nociception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Jiménez-Díaz

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of local protein synthesis for neuronal plasticity. In particular, local mRNA translation through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR has been shown to play a key role in regulating dendrite excitability and modulating long-term synaptic plasticity associated with learning and memory. There is also increased evidence to suggest that intact adult mammalian axons have a functional requirement for local protein synthesis in vivo. Here we show that the translational machinery is present in some myelinated sensory fibers and that active mTOR-dependent pathways participate in maintaining the sensitivity of a subpopulation of fast-conducting nociceptors in vivo. Phosphorylated mTOR together with other downstream components of the translational machinery were localized to a subset of myelinated sensory fibers in rat cutaneous tissue. We then showed with electromyographic studies that the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin reduced the sensitivity of a population of myelinated nociceptors known to be important for the increased mechanical sensitivity that follows injury. Behavioural studies confirmed that local treatment with rapamycin significantly attenuated persistent pain that follows tissue injury, but not acute pain. Specifically, we found that rapamycin blunted the heightened response to mechanical stimulation that develops around a site of injury and reduced the long-term mechanical hypersensitivity that follows partial peripheral nerve damage--a widely used model of chronic pain. Our results show that the sensitivity of a subset of sensory fibers is maintained by ongoing mTOR-mediated local protein synthesis and uncover a novel target for the control of long-term pain states.

  11. Myelin down-regulates myelin phagocytosis by microglia and macrophages through interactions between CD47 on myelin and SIRPα (signal regulatory protein-α on phagocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reichert Fanny

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traumatic injury to axons produces breakdown of axons and myelin at the site of the lesion and then further distal to this where Wallerian degeneration develops. The rapid removal of degenerated myelin by phagocytosis is advantageous for repair since molecules in myelin impede regeneration of severed axons. Thus, revealing mechanisms that regulate myelin phagocytosis by macrophages and microglia is important. We hypothesize that myelin regulates its own phagocytosis by simultaneous activation and down-regulation of microglial and macrophage responses. Activation follows myelin binding to receptors that mediate its phagocytosis (e.g. complement receptor-3, which has been previously studied. Down-regulation, which we test here, follows binding of myelin CD47 to the immune inhibitory receptor SIRPα (signal regulatory protein-α on macrophages and microglia. Methods CD47 and SIRPα expression was studied by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy, and myelin phagocytosis by ELISA. Results We first document that myelin, oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells express CD47 without SIRPα and further confirm that microglia and macrophages express both CD47 and SIRPα. Thus, CD47 on myelin can bind to and subsequently activate SIRPα on phagocytes, a prerequisite for CD47/SIRPα-dependent down-regulation of CD47+/+ myelin phagocytosis by itself. We then demonstrate that phagocytosis of CD47+/+ myelin is augmented when binding between myelin CD47 and SIRPα on phagocytes is blocked by mAbs against CD47 and SIRPα, indicating that down-regulation of phagocytosis indeed depends on CD47-SIRPα binding. Further, phagocytosis in serum-free medium of CD47+/+ myelin is augmented after knocking down SIRPα levels (SIRPα-KD in phagocytes by lentiviral infection with SIRPα-shRNA, whereas phagocytosis of myelin that lacks CD47 (CD47-/- is not. Thus, myelin CD47 produces SIRPα-dependent down-regulation of CD47+/+ myelin phagocytosis in phagocytes

  12. Comparison of Ganglion Cell and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness in Pigment Dispersion Syndrome, Pigmentary Glaucoma, and Healthy Subjects with Spectral-domain OCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arifoglu, Hasan Basri; Simavli, Huseyin; Midillioglu, Inci; Berk Ergun, Sule; Simsek, Saban

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the ganglion cell complex (GCC) and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in pigment dispersion syndrome (PDS) and pigmentary glaucoma (PG) with RTVue spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). A total of 102 subjects were enrolled: 29 with PDS, 18 with PG, and 55 normal subjects. Full ophthalmic examination including visual field analysis was performed. SD-OCT was used to analyze GCC superior, GCC inferior, and average RNFL thickness. To compare the discrimination capabilities, the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves were assessed. Superior GCC, inferior GCC, and RNFL thickness values of patients with PG were statistically signicantly lower than those of patients with PDS (p  0.05). The SD-OCT-derived GCC and RNFL thickness parameters can be useful to discriminate PG from both PDS and normal subjects.

  13. Evaluation of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness measurements using optical coherence tomography in patients with tobacco-alcohol-induced toxic optic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moura Frederico

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Three patients with progressive visual loss, chronic alcoholism and tabagism were submitted to a complete neuro-ophthalmic examination and to retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL measurements using optical coherence tomography (OCT scanning. Two patients showed marked RNFL loss in the temporal sector of the optic disc. However, a third patient presented RNFL measurements within or above normal limits, based on the Stratus-OCT normative database. Such findings may be due to possible RNFL edema similar to the one that may occur in the acute phase of toxic optic neuropathies. Stratus-OCT was able to detect RNFL loss in the papillomacular bundle of patients with tobacco-alcohol-induced toxic optic neuropathy. However, interpretation must be careful when OCT does not show abnormality in order to prevent diagnostic confusion, since overestimation of RNFL thickness measurements is possible in such cases.

  14. Schwann cell-derived Apolipoprotein D controls the dynamics of post-injury myelin recognition and degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia eGarcía-Mateo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Management of lipids, particularly signaling lipids that control neuroinflammation, is crucial for the regeneration capability of a damaged nervous system. Knowledge of pro- and anti-inflammatory signals after nervous system injury is extensive, most of them being proteins acting through well-known receptors and intracellular cascades. However, the role of lipid binding extracellular proteins able to modify the fate of lipids released after injury is not well understood.Apolipoprotein D (ApoD is an extracellular lipid binding protein of the Lipocalin family induced upon nervous system injury. Our previous study shows that axon regeneration is delayed without ApoD, and suggests its participation in early events during Wallerian degeneration. Here we demonstrate that ApoD is expressed by myelinating and non-myelinating Schwann cells and is induced early upon nerve injury. We show that ApoD, known to bind arachidonic acid (AA, also interacts with lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC in vitro. We use an in vivo model of nerve crush injury, a nerve explant injury model, and cultured macrophages exposed to purified myelin, to uncover that: (i ApoD regulates denervated Schwann cell-macrophage signaling, dampening MCP1- and Tnf-dependent macrophage recruitment and activation upon injury; (ii ApoD controls the over-expression of the phagocytosis activator Galectin-3 by infiltrated macrophages; (iii ApoD controls the basal and injury-triggered levels of LPC and AA; (iv ApoD modifies the dynamics of myelin-macrophage interaction, favoring the initiation of phagocytosis and promoting myelin degradation.Regulation of macrophage behaviour by Schwann-derived ApoD is therefore a key mechanism conditioning nerve injury resolution. These results place ApoD as a lipid binding protein controlling the signals exchanged between glia, neurons and blood-borne cells during nerve recovery after injury, and open the possibility for a therapeutic use of ApoD as a regeneration

  15. Comparison of the nerve fiber layer of type 2 diabetic patients without glaucoma with normal subjects of the same age and sex

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    Takis A

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Alexandros Takis,1 Dimitrios Alonistiotis,1 Dimitrios Panagiotidis,1 Nikolaos Ioannou,1 Dimitris Papaconstantinou,2 Panagiotis Theodossiadis1 1Ophthalmological University Clinic of Athens, Attikon Hospital, Athens, Greece; 2Ophthalmological University Clinic of Athens, Geniko Kratiko Hospital, Athens, Greece Background: The retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL thickness in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 was compared to normal subjects of similar age and sex, having first excluded any risk factors for glaucoma. The correlation between the RNFL thickness and the severity of diabetic retinopathy was investigated at its primary stages and with other ocular and diabetic parameters. Methods: A prospective, case series study was carried out. Twenty-seven diabetic patients without diabetic retinopathy, 24 diabetic patients with mild retinopathy, and 25 normal, age-matched subjects underwent a complete ophthalmological examination and imaging with scanning laser polarimetry for the evaluation of the RNFL. Multivariate analysis was applied in order to investigate the correlation between RNFL and diabetic parameters, such as age, duration of diabetes, insulin therapy, levels of glycosylated hemoglobin; and ocular parameters, such as cup to disc ratio, levels of normal intraocular pressure, and central corneal thickness. Results: The mean inferior average of RNFL and the temporal-superior-nasal-inferior-temporal standard deviation were statistically significantly lower in both diabetic groups, and the nerve fiber index was higher (P=0.04 compared to the normal group. There was no statistically significant difference between the diabetic groups. The factor analysis showed no significant correlation between the RNFL and the previously mentioned diabetic and ocular parameters. Conclusion: The existence of diabetes should be seriously considered in evaluating the results of scanning laser polarimetry. Multivariate analysis for RNFL was used for the first

  16. Analysis of macular and nerve fiber layer thickness in multiple sclerosis patients according to severity level and optic neuritis episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler García, A; Padilla Parrado, F; Figueroa-Ortiz, L C; González Gómez, A; García-Ben, A; García-Ben, E; García-Campos, J M

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of macular and nerve fibre layer thickness in multiple sclerosis patients with regard to expanded disability status scale (EDSS) and presence or absence of previous optic neuritis episodes. We recruited 62 patients with multiple sclerosis (53 relapsing-remitting and 9 secondary progressive) and 12 disease-free controls. All patients underwent an ophthalmological examination, including quantitative analysis of the nerve fibre layer and macular thickness using optical coherence tomography. Patients were classified according to EDSS as A (lower than 1.5), B (between 1.5 and 3.5), and C (above 3.5). Mean nerve fibre layer thickness in control, A, B, and C groups was 103.35±12.62, 99.04±14.35, 93.59±15.41, and 87.36±18.75μm respectively, with statistically significant differences (P<.05). In patients with no history of optic neuritis, history of episodes in the last 3 to 6 months, or history longer than 6 months, mean nerve fibre layer thickness was 99.25±13.71, 93.92±13.30 and 80.07±15.91μm respectively; differences were significant (P<.05). Mean macular thickness in control, A, B, and C groups was 220.01±12.07, 217.78±20.02, 217.68±20.77, and 219.04±24.26μm respectively. Differences were not statistically significant. The mean retinal nerve fibre layer thickness in multiple sclerosis patients is related to the EDSS level. Patients with previous optic neuritis episodes have a thinner retinal nerve fibre layer than patients with no history of these episodes. Mean macular thickness is not correlated to EDSS level. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of Macular Ganglion Cell Complex and Peripapillary Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer in Primary Craniopharyngioma by Fourier-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Qu, Yuanzhen; Lu, Wen; Liu, Fengjun

    2016-07-03

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to compare the differences in macular ganglion cell complex (GCC) and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (pRNFL) in child and adult patients with primary craniopharyngioma by Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) and to evaluate their significance in the diagnosis of primary craniopharyngioma. MATERIAL AND METHODS Ninety-six participants were divided into 3 groups: 32 in the child craniopharyngioma group (CCG) and 32 in the adult craniopharyngioma group (ACG) who were treated in Beijing Tiantan Hospital between November 2013 and October 2014, and 32 in the normal group (NG). All subjects were scanned by FD-OCT to map GCC and pRNFL thicknesses. Spearman correlation coefficient was used to assess the correlation between GCC and pRNFL thickness, and pRNFL thickness and optic nerve head (ONH) parameters, including horizontal cup-disc ratio (HCDR), vertical cup-disc ratio (VCDR), optic disc area (ODA), and cup area (CA), respectively. RESULTS The correlation between GCC and pRNFL thickness in the CCG was slightly stronger compared with the ACG. A significant difference in GCC thickness was observed among the CCG, ACG, and NG. Although the pRNFL thickness in both the CCG and ACG was significantly higher than that in NG, no significant difference in pRNFL thickness was detected between the 2 craniopharyngioma groups. The average, superior, and inferior pRNFL thicknesses were negatively correlated with VCDR in the CCG (in double eyes) and ACG (only in left eyes). CONCLUSIONS GCC was more sensitive than pRNFL in detecting optic nerve damage in the eyes of craniopharyngioma patients. A thinner pRNFL was especially correlated with VCDR in child craniopharyngioma patients.

  18. Peripapillary Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness Corresponds to Drusen Location and Extent of Visual Field Defects in Superficial and Buried Optic Disc Drusen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmqvist, Lasse; Wegener, Marianne; Sander, Birgit A; Hamann, Steffen

    2016-03-01

    Optic disc drusen (ODD) are hyaline deposits located within the optic nerve head. Peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thinning is associated with the high prevalence of visual field defects seen in ODD patients. The goal of this study was to investigate the characteristics of patients with ODD and to compare the peripapillary RNFL thickness to the extent of visual field defects and anatomic location (superficial or buried) of ODD. Retrospective, cross sectional study. A total of 149 eyes of 84 ODD patients were evaluated. Sixty-five percent were female and 76% had bilateral ODD. Of 149 eyes, 109 had superficial ODD and 40 had buried ODD. Peripapillary RNFL thinning was seen in 83.6% of eyes, where optical coherence tomography was performed (n = 61). Eyes with superficial ODD had greater mean peripapillary RNFL thinning (P ≤ 0.0001) and visual field defects (P = 0.002) than eyes with buried ODD. There was a correlation between mean peripapillary RNFL thinning and visual field defects as measured by perimetric mean deviation (R-0.66; P = 0.0001). The most frequent visual field abnormalities were arcuate and partial arcuate defects. Peripapillary RNFL thickness correlates with anatomic location (superficial or buried) of ODD. Frequency and extent of visual field defects corresponded with anatomic location of ODD and peripapillary RNFL thickness, suggesting increased axonal damage in patients with superficial ODD.

  19. Development of a mouse model of neuropathic pain following photochemically induced ischemia in the sciatic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, J X; Blakeman, K H; Yu, W; Hultenby, K; Xu, X J; Wiesenfeld-Hallin, Z

    2000-05-01

    A mouse model of neuropathic pain was developed by a photochemically induced ischemic nerve injury in normal male C57/BL6 mice. The ischemia was induced by unilateral irradiation of the sciatic nerve with an argon ion laser after intravenous administration of a photosensitizing dye, erythrosin B. The nerve injury resulted in a significant decrease in withdrawal threshold of the hindpaws to mechanical stimulation with von Frey hairs, as well as increased responsiveness to cold and heat stimulation. The mice, however, did not exhibit overt spontaneous pain-like behaviors. The evoked pain-related behaviors were observed bilaterally, although the ipsilateral changes were greater than on the contralateral side. The extent and time course of the behavioral changes were related to the duration of laser irradiation, with 1-min exposure producing the most consistent effect. Morphological examination at the light microscopic level revealed partial demyelination and axonal degeneration of the large myelinated fibers at the epicenter of the lesion 1 week postirradiation. The extent of the damage was correlated with the duration of irradiation. Injury and loss of unmyelinated fibers were also observed at the electronmicroscopic level. We conclude that an intravascular photochemical reaction leading to ischemia results in graded damage to the sciatic nerve in mice. Moreover, the nerve injury is associated with the development of abnormal pain-related behaviors. Both the behavioral and the morphological changes are correlated with the duration of irradiation. These results establish a mouse model of partial nerve injury with neuropathic pain-like behaviors which may be useful in studies using genetically modified mice. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  20. Na(v)1.8 channelopathy in mutant mice deficient for myelin protein zero is detrimental to motor axons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldovan, Mihai; Alvarez Herrero, Susana; Pinchenko, Volodymyr

    2011-01-01

    Myelin protein zero mutations were found to produce Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease phenotypes with various degrees of myelin impairment and axonal loss, ranging from the mild 'demyelinating' adult form to severe and early onset forms. Protein zero deficient homozygous mice ( ) show a severe and prog......Myelin protein zero mutations were found to produce Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease phenotypes with various degrees of myelin impairment and axonal loss, ranging from the mild 'demyelinating' adult form to severe and early onset forms. Protein zero deficient homozygous mice ( ) show a severe...... and progressive dysmyelinating neuropathy from birth with compromised myelin compaction, hypomyelination and distal axonal degeneration. A previous study using immunofluorescence showed that motor nerves deficient of myelin protein zero upregulate the Na(V)1.8 voltage gated sodium channel isoform, which...... is normally present only in restricted populations of sensory axons. The aim of this study was to investigate the function of motor axons in protein zero-deficient mice with particular emphasis on ectopic Na(V)1.8 voltage gated sodium channel. We combined 'threshold tracking' excitability studies...

  1. Bony fish myelin: evidence for common major structural glycoproteins in central and peripheral myelin of trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeserich, G; Waehneldt, T V

    1986-02-01

    Peripheral nervous system (PNS) myelin from the rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) banded at a density of 0.38 M sucrose. The main myelin proteins consisted of (1) two basic proteins, BPa and BPb (11,500 and 13,000 MW, similar to those of trout central nervous system (CNS) myelin proteins BP1 and BP2), and (2) two glycosylated components, IPb (24,400 MW) and IPc (26,200 MW). IPc comigrated with trout CNS myelin protein IP2 in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, whereas trout CNS myelin protein IP1 had a lower molecular weight (23,000). Following two-dimensional separation, however, both IPb and IPc from PNS showed two components; the more acidic component of IPc comigrated with IP2 from CNS. PNS tissue autolysis led to the formation of IPa (20,000 MW), consisting of two components in isoelectric focusing of which again the more acidic one comigrated with the CNS autolysis product IP0. Limited enzymatic digestion of isolated IP proteins from PNS and CNS led to closely similar degradation patterns, being most pronounced in the case of IP2 and IPc. Immunoblotting revealed that all IP components from trout PNS and CNS myelins reacted with antibodies to trout IP1 (CNS) and bovine P0 protein (PNS) whereas antibodies to rat PLP (CNS) were entirely unreactive. All BP components from trout PNS and CNS myelins bound to antibodies against human myelin basic protein. On the basis of these studies trout PNS and CNS myelins contain at least one common IP glycoprotein, whereas other members of the IP myelin protein family appear closely related. In the CNS myelin of trout the IP components appear to replace PLP.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Morphology of Donor and Recipient Nerves Utilised in Nerve Transfers to Restore Upper Limb Function in Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurora Messina

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Loss of hand function after cervical spinal cord injury (SCI impacts heavily on independence. Multiple nerve transfer surgery has been applied successfully after cervical SCI to restore critical arm and hand functions, and the outcome depends on nerve integrity. Nerve integrity is assessed indirectly using muscle strength testing and intramuscular electromyography, but these measures cannot show the manifestation that SCI has on the peripheral nerves. We directly assessed the morphology of nerves biopsied at the time of surgery, from three patients within 18 months post injury. Our objective was to document their morphologic features. Donor nerves included teres minor, posterior axillary, brachialis, extensor carpi radialis brevis and supinator. Recipient nerves included triceps, posterior interosseus (PIN and anterior interosseus nerves (AIN. They were fixed in glutaraldehyde, processed and embedded in Araldite Epon for light microscopy. Eighty percent of nerves showed abnormalities. Most common were myelin thickening and folding, demyelination, inflammation and a reduction of large myelinated axon density. Others were a thickened perineurium, oedematous endoneurium and Renaut bodies. Significantly, very thinly myelinated axons and groups of unmyelinated axons were observed indicating regenerative efforts. Abnormalities exist in both donor and recipient nerves and they differ in appearance and aetiology. The abnormalities observed may be preventable or reversible.

  3. Role of Demyelination Efficiency within Acellular Nerve Scaffolds during Nerve Regeneration across Peripheral Defects

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    Meiqin Cai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hudson’s optimized chemical processing method is the most commonly used chemical method to prepare acellular nerve scaffolds for the reconstruction of large peripheral nerve defects. However, residual myelin attached to the basal laminar tube has been observed in acellular nerve scaffolds prepared using Hudson’s method. Here, we describe a novel method of producing acellular nerve scaffolds that eliminates residual myelin more effectively than Hudson’s method through the use of various detergent combinations of sulfobetaine-10, sulfobetaine-16, Triton X-200, sodium deoxycholate, and peracetic acid. In addition, the efficacy of this new scaffold in repairing a 1.5 cm defect in the sciatic nerve of rats was examined. The modified method produced a higher degree of demyelination than Hudson’s method, resulting in a minor host immune response in vivo and providing an improved environment for nerve regeneration and, consequently, better functional recovery. A morphological study showed that the number of regenerated axons in the modified group and Hudson group did not differ. However, the autograft and modified groups were more similar in myelin sheath regeneration than the autograft and Hudson groups. These results suggest that the modified method for producing a demyelinated acellular scaffold may aid functional recovery in general after nerve defects.

  4. Degeneration and regeneration of motor and sensory nerves: a stereological study of crush lesions in rat facial and mental nerves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barghash, Ziad; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard; Al-Bishri, Awad

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the degeneration and regeneration of a sensory nerve and a motor nerve at the histological level after a crush injury. Twenty-five female Wistar rats had their mental nerve and the buccal branch of their facial nerve compressed unilaterally against a glass rod...... for 30 s. Specimens of the compressed nerves and the corresponding control nerves were dissected at 3, 7, and 19 days after surgery. Nerve cross-sections were stained with osmium tetroxide and toluidine blue and analysed using two-dimensional stereology. We found differences between the two nerves both...... in the normal anatomy and in the regenerative pattern. The mental nerve had a larger cross-sectional area including all tissue components. The mental nerve had a larger volume fraction of myelinated axons and a correspondingly smaller volume fraction of endoneurium. No differences were observed...

  5. Phosphorylation of myelin basic proteins and its relevance to myelin biogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulmer, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    Age-related differences in the in vivo incorporation of (32-P) into mouse myelin basic proteins (MBPs) of the central nervous system were observed. The resulting specific radioactivity (S.A.) of the MBPs appeared to be related to the S.A. of the acid-soluble pool of phosphates of myelin. In development, MBPs were phosphorylated in vivo prior to the onset of myelination in the brain, indicating that MBPs are phosphorylated prior to their deposition in the myelin sheath. The incorporation of (32-P) into MBPs and the turnover rates of MBP phosphates were studied in vivo in developmentally-related myelin compartments. The results suggest that there are two separate events in MBP phosphorylation and that the turnover rates of the MBP phosphates derived from these two events are different. A model for MBP phosphorylation, that could explain in these observations, is postulated and discussed in the light of existing information.

  6. Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... meals instead of white rice. Add beans (kidney, black, navy, and pinto) to rice dishes for even more fiber. Spice up salads with berries and almonds, chickpeas, cooked artichokes, and beans (kidney, black, navy, or pinto). Use whole-grain (corn or ...

  7. Análise da camada de fibras nervosas da retina em portadores de enxaqueca com aura Retinal nerve fiber layer measurements in patients with migraine with aura

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    Felipe Andrade Medeiros

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Avaliar as possíveis alterações na camada de fibras nervosas da retina (CFNR em pacientes com enxaqueca com aura, detectada por meio da polarimetria de varredura a laser. Métodos: Vinte pacientes com enxaqueca com aura e vinte indivíduos normais foram estudados. Os critérios de inclusão para os dois grupos compreenderam: idade de pelo menos 18 anos; ausência de história de doenças oculares, exceto erro refracional ou estrabismo; e ausência de história familiar de hipertensão ocular ou glaucoma. Foram excluídos pacientes com erro refracional maior que 5 DE e/ou 2 DC; acuidade visual corrigida menor que 20/40; pressão intra-ocular maior que 21 mmHg; discos ópticos anômalos ou com escavação maior que 0,5 ou assimetria de escavação maior que 0,2; ou com presença de doenças retinianas concomitantes. Os pacientes foram submetidos a exame de campo visual (Humphrey 30-2 e análise da CFNR com a polarimetria a laser (GDx - Nerve Fiber Analyzer. Um olho de cada paciente foi randomizado para análise estatística. Resultados: Nenhum dos pacientes do grupo controle apresentou defeitos de campo visual. Nove olhos (45% dos pacientes com enxaqueca tiveram anormalidades de campo visual além de 95% do intervalo de confiança do normal, como indicado pelos índices MD, CPSD ou GHT. Os valores de retardo no setor superior da CFNR dos pacientes com enxaqueca foram significativamente menor que no grupo controle (p=0,005. Não houve diferença significativa entre os valores de retardo dos dois grupos nas medidas globais e nos setores inferior, nasal e temporal. Conclusão: As medidas de retardo obtidas com a polarimetria a laser foram significativamente menores na porção superior da CFNR dos pacientes com enxaqueca com aura, sugerindo possível dano isquêmico às fibras nervosas, relacionadas à enxaqueca.Purpose: To evaluate the possible alterations of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL, as detected by scanning laser polarimetry

  8. [Effect of deep electroacupuncture stimulation of "Huantiao" (GB 30) on changes of function and nerve growth factor expression of the injured sciatic nerve in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Li; Li, Ye; Ren, Lu; Dai, Li-Li; Bai, Zeng-Hua; Bai, Ru; Ma, Tie-Ming

    2014-04-01

    OBJECTIVE; To observe the effect of deep electroacupuncture (EA) stimulation of "Huantiao"(GB 30) on the functional and pathological changes and nerve growth factor (NGF) expression of the damaged sciatic nerve in rats, so as to study its mechanisms underlying reliving sciatica. Forty-eight SD rats were randomly divided into normal, model, deep EA and shallow EA groups (n = 12 in each group). The sciatic nerve injury model was established by mechanical clamp of the sciatic nerve stem. For deep and shallow EA, the acupuncture needles were inserted into GB 30 about 16 mm and 7 mm, respectively. The EA treatment was given 20 min, once daily for 14 days. The evoked potentials of the injured sciatic nerve stem responding to electrical stimulation were recorded by using a biophysiological experimental system for calculating the motor conduction velocity. Pathological changes of the sciatic nerve were displayed by H. E. stain. The expression of NGF and Fos proteins was detected by immunohistochemistry. In comparison with the normal group, the conduction velocity and the amplitude of the evoked potentials of the sciatic nerve were significantly decreased in the model group (P 0.05), and no significant changes of latencies of the evoked potentials inthe four groups (P > 0.05). In the model group, the disorganized nerve fibers axons, myelin and Schwann cells of the damaged sciatic nerve were found, which became milder in the EA groups particularly in the deep EA group. In regard to the NGF and Fos immunoactivity of the injured sciatic nerve, the expression levels of both NGF and Fos proteins were obviously higher in the model group than in the normal group (P stimulation, NGF expression was further significantly up-regulated in both deep and shallow EA groups (P stimulation of GB 30 can improve the pathological changes and function of the injured sciatic nerve in the rat, which is closely associated with its effects in up-regulating NGF expression and down-regulating Fos

  9. Regeneration of Optic Nerve

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    Kwok-Fai So

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The optic nerve is part of the central nervous system (CNS and has a structure similar to other CNS tracts. The axons that form the optic nerve originate in the ganglion cell layer of the retina and extend through the optic tract. As a tissue, the optic nerve has the same organization as the white matter of the brain in regard to its glia. There are three types of glial cells: Oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and microglia. Little structural and functional regeneration of the CNS takes place spontaneously following injury in adult mammals. In contrast, the ability of the mammalian peripheral nervous system (PNS to regenerate axons after injury is well documented. A number of factors are involved in the lack of CNS regeneration, including: (i the response of neuronal cell bodies against the damage; (ii myelin-mediated inhibition by oligodendrocytes; (iii glial scarring, by astrocytes; (iv macrophage infiltration; and (v insufficient trophic factor support. The fundamental difference in the regenerative capacity between CNS and PNS neuronal cell bodies has been the subject of intensive research. In the CNS the target normally conveys a retrograde trophic signal to the cell body. CNS neurons die because of trophic deprivation. Damage to the optic nerve disconnects the neuronal cell body from its target-derived trophic peptides, leading to the death of retinal ganglion cells. Furthermore, the axontomized neurons become less responsive to the peptide trophic signals they do receive. On the other hand, adult PNS neurons are intrinsically responsive to neurotrophic factors and do not lose trophic responsiveness after axotomy. In this talk different strategies to promote optic-nerve regeneration in adult mammals are reviewed. Much work is still needed to resolve many issues. This is a very important area of neuroregeneration and neuroprotection, as currently there is no cure after traumatic optic nerve injury or retinal disease such as glaucoma, which

  10. Interaction between the C-terminal region of human myelin basic protein and calmodulin: analysis of complex formation and solution structure

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    Hayashi Nobuhiro

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The myelin sheath is a multilamellar membrane structure wrapped around the axon, enabling the saltatory conduction of nerve impulses in vertebrates. Myelin basic protein, one of the most abundant myelin-specific proteins, is an intrinsically disordered protein that has been shown to bind calmodulin. In this study, we focus on a 19-mer synthetic peptide from the predicted calmodulin-binding segment near the C-terminus of human myelin basic protein. Results The interaction of native human myelin basic protein with calmodulin was confirmed by affinity chromatography. The binding of the myelin basic protein peptide to calmodulin was tested with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC in different temperatures, and Kd was observed to be in the low μM range, as previously observed for full-length myelin basic protein. Surface plasmon resonance showed that the peptide bound to calmodulin, and binding was accompanied by a conformational change; furthermore, gel filtration chromatography indicated a decrease in the hydrodynamic radius of calmodulin in the presence of the peptide. NMR spectroscopy was used to map the binding area to reside mainly within the hydrophobic pocket of the C-terminal lobe of calmodulin. The solution structure obtained by small-angle X-ray scattering indicates binding of the myelin basic protein peptide into the interlobal groove of calmodulin, while calmodulin remains in an extended conformation. Conclusion Taken together, our results give a detailed structural insight into the interaction of calmodulin with a C-terminal segment of a major myelin protein, the myelin basic protein. The used 19-mer peptide interacts mainly with the C-terminal lobe of calmodulin, and a conformational change accompanies binding, suggesting a novel mode of calmodulin-target protein interaction. Calmodulin does not collapse and wrap around the peptide tightly; instead, it remains in an extended conformation in the solution structure

  11. Effect of anti-GM2 antibodies on rat sciatic nerve: electrophysiological and morphological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Nicolau; Sabaté, M Mar; Garcia, Neus; Santafe, Manel M; Lanuza, M Angel; Tomàs, Marta; Tomàs, Josep

    2009-03-31

    We found that a monoclonal human IgM anti-GM2 was fixed in rat sciatic axons and Schwann cells and was able to activate human complement. The passive transfer of IgM and complement in sciatic nerves can induce an acute alteration in nerve conduction. When the transfer of IgM plus complement was repeated for 10 days, the compound action motor potential amplitude was very low and the morphological study showed axons and myelin damage. Without human complement, IgM can only slightly disorganize the myelin by separating some layers, probably by interfering with the functional role of gangliosides in the myelin package.

  12. Comparative data on SD-OCT for the retinal nerve fiber layer and retinal macular thickness in a large cohort with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, WanWan; Kurup, Sudhi P; Fawzi, Amani A; Durbin, Mary K; Maumenee, Irene H; Mets, Marilyn B

    2017-01-01

    To report the distribution of macular and optic nerve topography in the eyes of individuals with Marfan syndrome aged 8-56 years using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Thirty-three patients with Marfan syndrome underwent a full eye examination including slit-lamp biomicroscopy, indirect ophthalmoscopy, and axial length measurement; and SD-OCT measurements of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and macular thickness. For patients between the ages of 8 and 12 years, the average RNFL thickness is 98 ± 9 μm, the vertical cup to disc (C:D) ratio is 0.50 ± 0.10, the central subfield thickness (CST) is 274 ± 38 μm, and the macular volume is 10.3 ± 0.6 mm 3 . For patients between the ages of 13 and 17 years, the average RNFL is 86 ± 16 μm, the vertical C:D ratio is 0.35 ± 0.20, the CST is 259 ± 15 μm, and the macular volume is 10.1 ± 0.5 mm 3 . For patients 18 years or older, the average RNFL is 89 ± 12 μm, the vertical C:D ratio is 0.46 ± 0.18, the CST is 262 ± 20 μm, and the macular volume is 10.2 ± 0.4 mm 3 . When the average RNFL data are compared to a normative, age-adjusted database, 6 of 33 (18%) were thinner than the 5% limit. This study reports the distribution of SD-OCT data for patients with Marfan syndrome. Compared to a normative database, 18% of eyes with Marfan syndrome had RNFL thickness < 5% of the population.

  13. Effect of neurotrophic factor, MDP, on rats’ nerve regeneration

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    A.A. Fornazari

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to determine the immune-modulating effects of the neurotrophic factor N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine (MDP on median nerve regeneration in rats. We used male Wistar rats (120-140 days of age, weighing 250-332 g and compared the results of three different techniques of nerve repair: 1 epineural neurorrhaphy using sutures alone (group S - 10 rats, 2 epineural neurorrhaphy using sutures plus fibrin tissue adhesive (FTA; group SF - 20 rats, and 3 sutures plus FTA, with MDP added to the FTA (group SFM - 20 rats. Functional assessments using the grasp test were performed weekly for 12 weeks to identify recovery of flexor muscle function in the fingers secondary to median nerve regeneration. Histological analysis was also utilized. The total number and diameter of myelinated fibers were determined in each proximal and distal nerve segment. Two indices, reported as percentage, were calculated from these parameters, namely, the regeneration index and the diameter change index. By the 8th week, superiority of group SFM over group S became apparent in the grasping test (P = 0.005. By the 12th week, rats that had received MDP were superior in the grasping test compared to both group S (P < 0.001 and group SF (P = 0.001. Moreover, group SF was better in the grasping test than group S (P = 0.014. However, no significant differences between groups were identified by histological analysis. In the present study, rats that had received MDP obtained better function, in the absence of any significant histological differences.

  14. Retinal nerve fiber layer in primary open-angle glaucoma with high myopia determined by optical coherence tomography and scanning laser polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-en; Wang, Xiao-yu; Gu, Yang-shun; Huang, Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Fundus changes associated with high myopia (HM) may mask those associated with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). This study aim to determine the characteristics of RNFL thickness changes in patients with both POAG and HM and compare these to changes in patients with only HM. The diagnostic capabilities of both OCT and GDxVCC in this subset of patients are also evaluated. Twenty-two eyes with POAG and HM (spherical equivalent (SE) between -6.0 and -12.0 D) were evaluated, and 22 eyes with HM were used for comparison. Characteristic retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness profiles in patients with POAG and HM were examined using optical coherence tomography (OCT) and scanning laser polarimetry with variable corneal compensation (GDxVCC), and the diagnostic capabilities of these imaging modalities were compared. RNFL parameters evaluated included superior average (Savg-GDx), inferior average (Iavg-GDx), temporal-superior-nasal- inferior-temporal (TSNIT) average, and nerve fiber indicator (NFI) on GDxVCC and superior average (Savg-OCT), inferior average (Iavg-OCT), nasal average (Navg-OCT), temporal average (Tavg-OCT), and average thickness (AvgThick-OCT) on OCT (fast RNFL scan). Visual field testing was performed and defects were evaluated using mean defect (MD) and pattern standard deviation (PSD). The RNFL parameters (P < 0.05) significantly different between groups included Savg-GDx, Iavg-GDx, TSNIT average, NFI, Savg-OCT, Iavg-OCT, Tavg-OCT, and AvgThick-OCT. Significant correlations existed between TSNIT average and AvgThick-OCT (r = 0.778), TSNIT average and MD (r = 0.749), AvgThick-OCT and MD (r = 0.647), TSNIT average and PSD (r = -0.756), and AvgThick-OCT and PSD (r = -0.784). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) values of TSNIT average, Savg-GDx, Iavg-GDx, NFI, Savg-OCT, Iavg-OCT, Navg-OCT, Tavg-OCT, and AvgThick-OCT were 0.947, 0.962, 0.973, 0.994, 0.909, 0.917, 0.511, 0.906, and 0.913, respectively. The NFI AUROC was the

  15. Pre-differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells in combination with a microstructured nerve guide supports peripheral nerve regeneration in the rat sciatic nerve model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boecker, Arne Hendrik; van Neerven, Sabien Geraldine Antonia; Scheffel, Juliane; Tank, Julian; Altinova, Haktan; Seidensticker, Katrin; Deumens, Ronald; Tolba, Rene; Weis, Joachim; Brook, Gary Anthony; Pallua, Norbert; Bozkurt, Ahmet

    2016-02-01

    Many bioartificial nerve guides have been investigated pre-clinically for their nerve regeneration-supporting function, often in comparison to autologous nerve transplantation, which is still regarded as the current clinical gold standard. Enrichment of these scaffolds with cells intended to support axonal regeneration has been explored as a strategy to boost axonal regeneration across these nerve guides Ansselin et al. (1998). In the present study, 20 mm rat sciatic nerve defects were implanted with a cell-seeded microstructured collagen nerve guide (Perimaix) or an autologous nerve graft. Under the influence of seeded, pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells, axons regenerated well into the Perimaix nerve guide. Myelination-related parameters, like myelin sheath thickness, benefitted from an additional seeding with pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells. Furthermore, both the number of retrogradely labelled sensory neurons and the axon density within the implant were elevated in the cell-seeded scaffold group with pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells. However, a pre-differentiation had no influence on functional recovery. An additional cell seeding of the Perimaix nerve guide with mesenchymal stromal cells led to an extent of functional recovery, independent of the differentiation status, similar to autologous nerve transplantation. These findings encourage further investigations on pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells as a cellular support for peripheral nerve regeneration. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Alteração da camada de fibras nervosas da retina em usuários crônicos de cloroquina Retinal nerve fiber layer alteration in chronic users of chloroquine

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    Daniela de Almeida Lyra Antunes

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Avaliar a camada de fibras nervosas da retina (CFN por meio da polarimetria a laser, em pacientes em uso crônico de cloroquina. MÉTODOS: Foram estudados 44 olhos de 22 pacientes em uso de cloroquina por doenças reumatológicas, por pelo menos um ano. Como controle, foram incluídos vinte indivíduos sem uso de cloroquina com idade, gênero e raça similares. Foram excluídos os pacientes que apresentavam história familiar de hipertensão ocular ou glaucoma. Ambos os olhos foram submetidos à análise da camada de fibras nervosas da retina, com o aparelho GDx® Nerve Fiber Analyser, pelo mesmo examinador. RESULTADOS: Nos usuários crônicos de cloroquina, verificou-se alteração em mais de dois parâmetros do GDx em 28 olhos (63,6%. Ocorreu também alteração no gráfico "Deviation from normal" com perda de fibras nervosas em 11 olhos (25%. Quando comparado com o grupo controle, os parâmetros que demonstraram diferença estatisticamente significante foram: Superior Ratio, Inferior Ratio, Superior Nasal, Elipse Modulation, The Number, Superior Average e Superior Integral. Houve também associação estatisticamente significante entre o tempo de uso de cloroquina e perda da CFN. CONCLUSÕES: Comprovou-se a associação entre o uso crônico da cloroquina e a alteração da CFN detectada pelo GDx. Desta forma, esses resultados podem contribuir para o diagnóstico precoce da perda de fibras nervosas na retinopatia por cloroquina.PURPOSES: To evaluate the retina nerve fiber layer by laser polarimetry in patients in chronic use of chloroquine. METHODS: Forty-four eyes of twenty-two patients were studied. These were in use of chloroquine due to rheumatic diseases during at least one year. As a control group, twenty patients without use of chloroquine with similar characteristics (