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Sample records for mycobacterial catalase-peroxidase profile

  1. The study of ascorbate peroxidase, catalase and peroxidase during in vitro regeneration of Argyrolobium roseum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Darima; Chaudhary, Muhammad Fayyaz; Zia, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate the micropropagation protocol of Argyrolobium roseum (Camb.), an endangered herb exhibiting anti-diabetic and immune-suppressant properties, and antioxidant enzymes pattern is evaluated. Maximum callogenic response (60 %) was observed from leaf explant at 1.0 mg L(-1) 1-nephthalene acetic acid (NAA) and 0.5 mg L(-1) 6-benzyl aminopurine (BA) in Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium using hypocotyl and root explants (48 % each). Addition of AgNO3 and PVP in the culture medium led to an increase in callogenic response up to 86 % from leaf explant and 72 % from hypocotyl and root explants. The best shooting response was observed in the presence of NAA, while maximum shoot length and number of shoots were achieved based on BA-supplemented MS medium. The regenerated shoots were rooted and successfully acclimatized under greenhouse conditions. Catalase and peroxidase enzymes showed ascending pattern during in vitro plant development from seed while ascorbate peroxidase showed descending pattern. Totally reverse response of these enzymes was observed during callus induction from three different explants. During shoot induction, catalase and peroxidase increased at high rate while there was a mild reduction in ascorbate peroxidase activity. Catalase and peroxidase continuously increased; on the other hand, ascorbate peroxidase activity decreased during root development and acclimatization states. The protocol described here can be employed for the mass propagation and genetic transformation of this rare herb. This study also highlights the importance and role of ascorbate peroxidase, catalase, and peroxidase in the establishment of A. roseum in vitro culture through callogenesis and organogenesis.

  2. Purification and characterization of an intracellular catalase-peroxidase from Penicillium simplicissimum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraaije, Marco W.; Roubroeks, Hanno P.; Hagen, Wilfred R.; Berkel, Willem J.H. van

    1996-01-01

    The first dimeric catalase-peroxidase of eucaryotic origin, an intracellular hydroperoxidase from Penicillium simplicissimum which exhibited both catalase and peroxidase activities, has been isolated. The enzyme has an apparent molecular mass of about 170 kDa and is composed of two identical

  3. The Molecular Mechanism of the Catalase-like Activity in Horseradish Peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campomanes, Pablo; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Alfonso-Prieto, Mercedes; Rovira, Carme

    2015-09-02

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is one of the most relevant peroxidase enzymes, used extensively in immunochemistry and biocatalysis applications. Unlike the closely related catalase enzymes, it exhibits a low activity to disproportionate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The origin of this disparity remains unknown due to the lack of atomistic information on the catalase-like reaction in HRP. Using QM(DFT)/MM metadynamics simulations, we uncover the mechanism for reduction of the HRP Compound I intermediate by H2O2 at atomic detail. The reaction begins with a hydrogen atom transfer, forming a peroxyl radical and a Compound II-like species. Reorientation of the peroxyl radical in the active site, concomitant with the transfer of the second hydrogen atom, is the rate-limiting step, with a computed free energy barrier (18.7 kcal/mol, ∼ 6 kcal/mol higher than the one obtained for catalase) in good agreement with experiments. Our simulations reveal the crucial role played by the distal pocket residues in accommodating H2O2, enabling formation of a Compound II-like intermediate, similar to catalases. However, out of the two pathways for Compound II reduction found in catalases, only one is operative in HRP. Moreover, the hydrogen bond network in the distal side of HRP compensates less efficiently than in catalases for the energetic cost required to reorient the peroxyl radical at the rate-determining step. The distal Arg and a water molecule in the "wet" active site of HRP have a substantial impact on the reaction barrier, compared to the "dry" active site in catalase. Therefore, the lower catalase-like efficiency of heme peroxidases compared to catalases can be directly attributed to the different distal pocket architecture, providing hints to engineer peroxidases with a higher rate of H2O2 disproportionation.

  4. Properties of catalase-peroxidase lacking its C-terminal domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, Ruletha D.; Cook, Carma O.; Goodwin, Douglas C.

    2004-01-01

    Catalase-peroxidases have a two-domain structure. The N-terminal domain contains the bifunctional active site, but the function of the C-terminal domain is unknown. We produced catalase-peroxidase containing only its N-terminal domain (KatG Nterm ). Removal of the C-terminal domain did not result in unexpected changes in secondary structure as evaluated by CD, but KatG Nterm had neither catalase nor peroxidase activity. Partial recovery of both activities was achieved by incubating KatG Nterm with the separately expressed and isolated KatG C-terminal domain. Spectroscopic measurements revealed a shift in heme environment from a mixture of high-spin species (wtKatG) to exclusively hexacoordinate, low-spin (KatG Nterm ). Moreover, a >1000-fold lower k on for CN - binding was observed for KatG Nterm . EPR spectra for KatG Nterm and the results of site-specific substitution of active site histidines suggested that the distal histidine was the sixth ligand. Thus, one important role for the C-terminal domain may be to support the architecture of the active site, preventing heme ligation by this catalytically essential residue

  5. Not so monofunctional--a case of thermostable Thermobifida fusca catalase with peroxidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lončar, Nikola; Fraaije, Marco W

    2015-03-01

    Thermobifida fusca is a mesothermophilic organism known for its ability to degrade plant biomass and other organics, and it was demonstrated that it represents a rich resource of genes encoding for potent enzymes for biocatalysis. The thermostable catalase from T. fusca has been cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli with a yield of 400 mg/L. Heat treatment of disrupted cells at 60 °C for 1 h resulted in enzyme preparation of high purity; hence, no chromatography steps are needed for large-scale production. Except for catalyzing the dismutation of hydrogen peroxide, TfuCat was also found to catalyze oxidations of phenolic compounds. The catalase activity was comparable to other described catalases while peroxidase activity was quite remarkable with a k obs of nearly 1000 s(-1) for catechol. Site directed mutagenesis was used to alter the ratio of peroxidase/catalase activity. Resistance to inhibition by classic catalase inhibitors and an apparent melting temperature of 74 °C classifies this enzyme as a robust biocatalyst. As such, it could compete with other commercially available catalases while the relatively high peroxidase activity also offers new biocatalytic possibilities.

  6. A manganese catalase from Thermomicrobium roseum with peroxidase and catecholase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baginski, Robin; Sommerhalter, Monika

    2017-01-01

    An enzyme with catechol oxidase activity was identified in Thermomicrobium roseum extracts via solution assays and activity-stained SDS-PAGE. Yet, the genome of T. roseum does not harbor a catecholase gene. The enzyme was purified with two anion exchange chromatography steps and ultimately identified to be a manganese catalase with additional peroxidase and catecholase activity. Catalase activity (6280 ± 430 IU/mg) clearly dominated over pyrogallol peroxidase (231 ± 53 IU/mg) and catecholase (3.07 ± 0.56 IU/mg) activity as determined at 70 °C. Most enzyme kinetic properties were comparable to previously characterized manganese catalase enzymes. Catalase activity was highest at alkaline pH values and showed inhibition by excess substrate and chloride. The apparent K m and k cat values were 20 mM and 2.02 × 10 4  s -1 subunit -1 at 25 °C and pH 7.0.

  7. Protecting peroxidase activity of multilayer enzyme-polyion films using outer catalase layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haiyun; Rusling, James F; Hu, Naifei

    2007-12-27

    Films constructed layer-by-layer on electrodes with architecture {protein/hyaluronic acid (HA)}n containing myoglobin (Mb) or horseradish peroxidase (HRP) were protected against protein damage by H2O2 by using outer catalase layers. Peroxidase activity for substrate oxidation requires activation by H2O2, but {protein/HA}n films without outer catalase layers are damaged slowly and irreversibly by H2O2. The rate and extent of damage were decreased dramatically by adding outer catalase layers to decompose H2O2. Comparative studies suggest that protection results from catalase decomposing a fraction of the H2O2 as it enters the film, rather than by an in-film diffusion barrier. The outer catalase layers controlled the rate of H2O2 entry into inner regions of the film, and they biased the system to favor electrocatalytic peroxide reduction over enzyme damage. Catalase-protected {protein/HA}n films had an increased linear concentration range for H2O2 detection. This approach offers an effective way to protect biosensors from damage by H2O2.

  8. Effect of γ-radiation on the activities of superoxide dimutase, catalase and peroxidase on the germinating wheat grain (Triticum aestivum,L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborti, M.; Chatterjee, G.C.

    1983-01-01

    Effect of γ-radiation on several enzymes like catalase, peroxidase and superoxide dismutase in different parts of germinating wheat seeds has been studied. It was found that superoxide dismutase activity under the influence of γ-radiation was highest in the embryo part and showed maximum activity, 24 hours after germination. The activity exhibited a gradual decline with time. catalase and peroxidase, the stimulatory efect being maximum in the case of catalase activity. The catalase and peroxidase activities were found to be maximally localised in the embryo part and the highest value was attained after 72 hrs. in the case of catalase and after 48 hrs in the case of peroxidase activity. The results indicate that γ-radiation stimulates free radical generation in the embryo along with subsequent increase in the activities of superoside dismutase, catalase and peroxidase. (author)

  9. Radioimmunoassays for catalase and glutathion peroxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baret, A.; Courtiere, A.; Lorry, D.; Puget, K.; Michelson, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    Specific and sensitive radioimmunoassays for human, bovine and rat catalase (CAT) and glutathion Peroxidase (GPX) are described. The obtained values are expressed as enzymatic units per μg of immunoreactive protein. They appear to closely correspond to specific activities of the purified enzymes determined by colorimetric protein-assay. Indeed, the values of the specific activities of purified human CAT is 57.9 k/mg and that of purified rat GPX is 180 units/mg. This result validates the present RIAs and the association of the two techniques allows the determination of a further parameter. In conclusion, RIAs for CAT and GPX can be applied with great specificity and sensitivity to a wide variety of human, rat and bovine medias

  10. Unprecedented access of phenolic substrates to the heme active site of a catalase: substrate binding and peroxidase-like reactivity of Bacillus pumilus catalase monitored by X-ray crystallography and EPR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewen, Peter C; Villanueva, Jacylyn; Switala, Jacek; Donald, Lynda J; Ivancich, Anabella

    2015-05-01

    Heme-containing catalases and catalase-peroxidases catalyze the dismutation of hydrogen peroxide as their predominant catalytic activity, but in addition, individual enzymes support low levels of peroxidase and oxidase activities, produce superoxide, and activate isoniazid as an antitubercular drug. The recent report of a heme enzyme with catalase, peroxidase and penicillin oxidase activities in Bacillus pumilus and its categorization as an unusual catalase-peroxidase led us to investigate the enzyme for comparison with other catalase-peroxidases, catalases, and peroxidases. Characterization revealed a typical homotetrameric catalase with one pentacoordinated heme b per subunit (Tyr340 being the axial ligand), albeit in two orientations, and a very fast catalatic turnover rate (kcat  = 339,000 s(-1) ). In addition, the enzyme supported a much slower (kcat  = 20 s(-1) ) peroxidatic activity utilizing substrates as diverse as ABTS and polyphenols, but no oxidase activity. Two binding sites, one in the main access channel and the other on the protein surface, accommodating pyrogallol, catechol, resorcinol, guaiacol, hydroquinone, and 2-chlorophenol were identified in crystal structures at 1.65-1.95 Å. A third site, in the heme distal side, accommodating only pyrogallol and catechol, interacting with the heme iron and the catalytic His and Arg residues, was also identified. This site was confirmed in solution by EPR spectroscopy characterization, which also showed that the phenolic oxygen was not directly coordinated to the heme iron (no low-spin conversion of the Fe(III) high-spin EPR signal upon substrate binding). This is the first demonstration of phenolic substrates directly accessing the heme distal side of a catalase. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. The Catalase Activity of Catalase-Peroxidases Is Modulated by Changes in the pKa of the Distal Histidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machuqueiro, Miguel; Victor, Bruno; Switala, Jacek; Villanueva, Jacylyn; Rovira, Carme; Fita, Ignacio; Loewen, Peter C

    2017-05-02

    The unusual Met-Tyr-Trp adduct composed of cross-linked side chains along with an associated mobile Arg is essential for catalase activity in catalase-peroxidases. In addition, acidic residues in the entrance channel, in particular an Asp and a Glu ∼7 and ∼15 Å, respectively, from the heme, significantly enhance catalase activity. The mechanism by which these channel carboxylates influence catalase activity is the focus of this work. Seventeen new variants with fewer and additional acidic residues have been constructed and characterized structurally and for enzymatic activity, revealing that their effect on activity is roughly inversely proportional to their distance from the heme and adduct, suggesting that the electrostatic potential of the heme cavity may be affected. A discrete group of protonable residues are contained within a 15 Å sphere surrounding the heme iron, and a computational analysis reveals that the pK a of the distal His 112 , alone, is modulated within the pH range of catalase activity by the remote acidic residues in a pattern consistent with its protonated form having a key role in the catalase reaction cycle. The electrostatic potential also impacts the catalatic reaction through its influence on the charged status of the Met-Tyr-Trp adduct.

  12. Catalase in peroxidase clothing: Interdependent cooperation of two cofactors in the catalytic versatility of KatG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njuma, Olive J; Ndontsa, Elizabeth N; Goodwin, Douglas C

    2014-02-15

    Catalase-peroxidase (KatG) is found in eubacteria, archaea, and lower eukaryotae. The enzyme from Mycobacterium tuberculosis has received the greatest attention because of its role in activation of the antitubercular pro-drug isoniazid, and the high frequency with which drug resistance stems from mutations to the katG gene. Generally, the catalase activity of KatGs is striking. It rivals that of typical catalases, enzymes with which KatGs share no structural similarity. Instead, catalatic turnover is accomplished with an active site that bears a strong resemblance to a typical peroxidase (e.g., cytochrome c peroxidase). Yet, KatG is the only member of its superfamily with such capability. It does so using two mutually dependent cofactors: a heme and an entirely unique Met-Tyr-Trp (MYW) covalent adduct. Heme is required to generate the MYW cofactor. The MYW cofactor allows KatG to leverage heme intermediates toward a unique mechanism for H2O2 oxidation. This review evaluates the range of intermediates identified and their connection to the diverse catalytic processes KatG facilitates, including mechanisms of isoniazid activation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mutation of katG in a clinical isolate of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: effects on catalase-peroxidase for isoniazid activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purkan; Ihsanawati; Natalia, D; Syah, Y M; Retnoningrum, D S; Kusuma, H S

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in katG gene are often associated with isoniazid (INH) resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain. This research was perfomed to identify the katG mutation in clinical isolate (L8) that is resistant to INH at 1 μg/ml. In addition to characterize the catalase-peroxidase of KatG L8 and perform the ab initio structural study of the protein to get a more complete understanding in drug activation and the resistan­ce mechanism. The katG gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, then followed by characterization of catalase-peroxidase of KatG. The structure modelling was performed to know a basis of alterations in enzyme activity. A substitution of A713G that correspond to Asn238Ser replacement was found in the L8 katG. The Asn238Ser modification leads to a decline in the activity of catalase-peroxidase and INH oxidation of the L8 KatG protein. The catalytic efficiency (Kcat/KM) of mutant KatGAsn238Ser respectively decreases to 41 and 52% for catalase and peroxidase. The mutant KatGAsn238Ser also shows a decrease of 62% in INH oxidation if compared to a wild type KatG (KatGwt). The mutant Asn238Ser might cause instability in the substrate binding­ site of KatG, because of removal of a salt bridge connecting the amine group of Asn238 to the carbo­xyl group of Glu233, which presents in KatGwt. The lost of the salt bridge in the substrate binding site in mutant KatGAsn238Ser created changes unfavorable for enzyme activities, which in turn emerge as INH resistan­ce in the L8 isolate of M. tuberculosis.

  14. Seasonal changes of peroxidase and catalase activities in leaves of several arborescent species subject to different industrial air pollutions in Upper Silesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raczek, E.; Stolarek, J.

    1979-01-01

    Year-round investigations of seasonal patterns of peroxidase and catalase activities in leaves of several deciduous and coniferous arborescent species in forests of Upper Silesia subjected to various amounts of industrial gases and dusts were carried out. The samples of leaves of Betula verrucosa EHRH, Quercus robur L., Q. rubra L., Pinus nigra ARNOLD, and P. silvestris L. were collected at different distances from an iron smelting plant. It was found that raising level of the pollution enhances peroxidase activity in leaves and needles. The induction of peroxidase activity by pollutants exhibited seasonal changes specific for the species and was subjected to the effect of temperature of the environment and was also related to the natural resistivity of a given species. In contrast to peroxidase, the patterns of catalase activity changes did not appear to be specifically influenced by industrial air pollutants. 22 references, 5 figures, 4 tables.

  15. Horizontal gene transfer confers adaptive advantages to phytopathogenic fungi: a case study of catalase-peroxidase in Fusarium verticillioides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT), the exchange and stable integration of genetic material between different evolutionary lineages, is widely observed in fungi. We hypothesize that successful stabilization of HGT elements provides adaptive advantages (e.g., virulence). Catalase/peroxidases (KatGs) are ...

  16. The effects of the sulfonylurea glyburide on glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in the heart tissue of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukan, N; Sancak, B; Bilgihan, A; Kosova, F; Buğdayci, G; Altan, N

    2004-09-01

    Oxygen free radicals have been suggested to be a contributory factor in diabetes complications. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of glyburide on the antioxidant enzyme activities in the heart tissue of diabetic rats. We investigated the activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase) in the hearts of both control and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. In the heart of diabetic rats, the activity of total superoxide dismutase decreased significantly (p < 0.005), whereas the activity of catalase and glutathione peroxidase increased to a large extent (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.05, respectively) at the end of the fourth week compared with the control group. Glyburide treatment of diabetic rats for 4 weeks corrected the changes observed in diabetic heart. In addition, blood glucose levels of untreated diabetic rats decreased following the glyburide treatment. These results demonstrate that the sulfonylurea glyburide is capable of exerting direct insulin-like effect on heart superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities of diabetic rats in vivo.

  17. Effect of low concentrations of ozone on the enzymes catalase, peroxidase, papain and urease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd, G W

    1958-01-01

    The enzymes catalase, peroxidase, papain and urease were treated in vitro with low concentrations of ozone gas. Wide variations were found in the sensitivity of the enzymes to the inhibitory action of the gas. Papain showed the greatest sensitivity; the rest required a much greater amount of ozone for inactivation. Comparisons of ozone and hydrogen peroxide as inhibitors of papain and urease showed ozone to be 30 times as effective as hydrogen peroxide on papain and 3 times as effective on urease. 14 references, 2 figures, 3 tables.

  18. Interaction with the Redox Cofactor MYW and Functional Role of a Mobile Arginine in Eukaryotic Catalase-Peroxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Catalase-peroxidases (KatGs) are unique bifunctional heme peroxidases with an additional posttranslationally formed redox-active Met-Tyr-Trp cofactor that is essential for catalase activity. On the basis of studies of bacterial KatGs, controversial mechanisms of hydrogen peroxide oxidation were proposed. The recent discovery of eukaryotic KatGs with differing pH optima of catalase activity now allows us to scrutinize those postulated reaction mechanisms. In our study, secreted KatG from the fungus Magnaporthe grisea (MagKatG2) was used to analyze the role of a remote KatG-typical mobile arginine that was shown to interact with the Met-Tyr-Trp adduct in a pH-dependent manner in bacterial KatGs. Here we present crystal structures of MagKatG2 at pH 3.0, 5.5, and 7.0 and investigate the mobility of Arg461 by molecular dynamics simulation. Data suggest that at pH ≥4.5 Arg461 mostly interacts with the deprotonated adduct Tyr. Elimination of Arg461 by mutation to Ala slightly increases the thermal stability but does not alter the active site architecture or the kinetics of cyanide binding. However, the variant Arg461Ala lost the wild-type-typical optimum of catalase activity at pH 5.25 (kcat = 6450 s–1) but exhibits a broad plateau between pH 4.5 and 7.5 (kcat = 270 s–1 at pH 5.5). Moreover, significant differences in the kinetics of interconversion of redox intermediates of wild-type and mutant protein mixed with either peroxyacetic acid or hydrogen peroxide are observed. These findings together with published data from bacterial KatGs allow us to propose a role of Arg461 in the H2O2 oxidation reaction of KatG. PMID:27293030

  19. Change in catalase and peroxidase activity in rat blood in case of combined burn and radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramova, L.P.; Simonova, L.N.

    1982-01-01

    The peroxidase activity of blood and catalase activity were studied in white rats, subjected to whole-body X-irradiation with the dose 129 mC/kg and burn injury (20% of body surface) of 3A-3B degree and also combined burn and radiation injury. It is established that catalase activity was decreased in all groups and at all terms of the investigation. The changes in the blood peroxide activity were of phase character and normalized only by 14th day. The peroxide activity restores to intact level only by 30th day in animals with burn and radiation injury, that testifies to heavier course of the desease and to protracted character of recovery processes

  20. Effect of drought stress and subsequent recovery on protein, carbohydrate contents, catalase and peroxidase activities in three chickpea (Cicer arietinum) cultivars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mafakheri, A.; Siosemardeh, A.; Bahramnejad, B.; Struik, P.C.; Sohrabi, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Drought stress is one of the major abiotic stresses in agriculture worldwide. This study was carried out to investigate the effects of drought stress and subsequent recovery on protein, carbohydrate content, catalase (CAT), and peroxidase (POX) activities in three varieties of chickpea (drought

  1. Wild-type catalase peroxidase vs G279D mutant type: Molecular basis of Isoniazid drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Aishwarya; Singh, Aditi; Grover, Sonam; Pandey, Bharati; Kumari, Anchala; Grover, Abhinav

    2018-01-30

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis katG gene is responsible for production of an enzyme catalase peroxidase that peroxidises and activates the prodrug Isoniazid (INH), a first-line antitubercular agent. INH interacts with catalase peroxidase enzyme within its heme pocket and gets converted to an active form. Mutations occurring in katG gene are often linked to reduced conversion rates for INH. This study is focussed on one such mutation occurring at residue 279, where glycine often mutates to aspartic acid (G279D). In the present study, several structural analyses were performed to study the effect of this mutation on functionality of KatG protein. On comparison, mutant protein exhibited a lower docking score, smaller binding cavity and reduced affinity towards INH. Molecular dynamics analysis revealed the mutant to be more rigid and less compact than the native protein. Essential dynamics analysis determined correlated motions of residues within the protein structure. G279D mutant was found to have many residues that showed related motions and an undesirable effect on the functionality of protein. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Specific Function of the Met-Tyr-Trp Adduct Radical and Residues Arg-418 and Asp-137 in the Atypical Catalase Reaction of Catalase-Peroxidase KatG*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiangbo; Khajo, Abdelahad; Jarrett, Sanchez; Suarez, Javier; Levitsky, Yan; Burger, Richard M.; Jarzecki, Andrzej A.; Magliozzo, Richard S.

    2012-01-01

    Catalase activity of the dual-function heme enzyme catalase-peroxidase (KatG) depends on several structural elements, including a unique adduct formed from covalently linked side chains of three conserved amino acids (Met-255, Tyr-229, and Trp-107, Mycobacterium tuberculosis KatG numbering) (MYW). Mutagenesis, electron paramagnetic resonance, and optical stopped-flow experiments, along with calculations using density functional theory (DFT) methods revealed the basis of the requirement for a radical on the MYW-adduct, for oxyferrous heme, and for conserved residues Arg-418 and Asp-137 in the rapid catalase reaction. The participation of an oxyferrous heme intermediate (dioxyheme) throughout the pH range of catalase activity is suggested from our finding that carbon monoxide inhibits the activity at both acidic and alkaline pH. In the presence of H2O2, the MYW-adduct radical is formed normally in KatG[D137S] but this mutant is defective in forming dioxyheme and lacks catalase activity. KatG[R418L] is also catalase deficient but exhibits normal formation of the adduct radical and dioxyheme. Both mutants exhibit a coincidence between MYW-adduct radical persistence and H2O2 consumption as a function of time, and enhanced subunit oligomerization during turnover, suggesting that the two mutations disrupting catalase turnover allow increased migration of the MYW-adduct radical to protein surface residues. DFT calculations showed that an interaction between the side chain of residue Arg-418 and Tyr-229 in the MYW-adduct radical favors reaction of the radical with the adjacent dioxyheme intermediate present throughout turnover in WT KatG. Release of molecular oxygen and regeneration of resting enzyme are thereby catalyzed in the last step of a proposed catalase reaction. PMID:22918833

  3. Characterization of two catalase-peroxidase-encoding genes in Fusarium verticillioides reveals differential responses to in vitro versus in planta oxidative challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalase/peroxidases (KatGs) are a superfamily of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-degrading enzymes believed to be horizontally acquired by ancient Ascomycota from bacteria. Subsequent gene duplication resulted in two KatG paralogs in ascomycetes: the widely distributed intracellular KatG1 group, and ...

  4. Zymogram profiling of superoxide dismutase and catalase activities allows Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces species differentiation and correlates to their fermentation performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamero-Sandemetrio, Esther; Gómez-Pastor, Rocío; Matallana, Emilia

    2013-05-01

    Aerobic organisms have devised several enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant defenses to deal with reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by cellular metabolism. To combat such stress, cells induce ROS scavenging enzymes such as catalase, peroxidase, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione reductase. In the present research, we have used a double staining technique of SOD and catalase enzymes in the same polyacrylamide gel to analyze the different antioxidant enzymatic activities and protein isoforms present in Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces yeast species. Moreover, we used a technique to differentially detect Sod1p and Sod2p on gel by immersion in NaCN, which specifically inhibits the Sod1p isoform. We observed unique SOD and catalase zymogram profiles for all the analyzed yeasts and we propose this technique as a new approach for Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces yeast strains differentiation. In addition, we observed functional correlations between SOD and catalase enzyme activities, accumulation of essential metabolites, such as glutathione and trehalose, and the fermentative performance of different yeasts strains with industrial relevance.

  5. Studies of peroxidase isozyme profile in mungbean mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auti, S.G.; Apparao, B.J.

    2007-01-01

    Peroxidase is an important oxygen-scavenging enzyme. The activity of peroxidase is often correlated with growth, development and hormonal activity. Traditional methods of cultivar identification usually involve observation and recording of morphological characters or description such as yield, height, weight, earliness etc. which vary with environmental conditions and often misleading. So molecular markers like protein and isozymes profiles, RFLP, RAPDs markers etc. are widely employed in varietal identification of cultivars. It plays important role in respiration and is an indicator of oxidative status of plants. Electrophoretic techniques have been used to group species and identify cultivars. Such identification has various advantages including the unique pattern of protein or isozymes bands for each pure cultivar under any set of environmental conditions. Peroxidase isozyme serves as very good marker for any mutational studies. In the present investigation, peroxidase isozyme profiles of various mutants of mungbean was studied employing the technique of electrophoresis

  6. Roles of catalase and glutathione peroxidase in the tolerance of a pulmonate gastropod to anoxia and reoxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welker, Alexis F; Moreira, Daniel C; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo

    2016-07-01

    Humans and most mammals suffer severe damage when exposed to ischemia and reperfusion episodes due to an overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In contrast, several hypoxia/anoxia-tolerant animals survive very similar situations. We evaluated herein the redox metabolism in the anoxia-tolerant land snail Helix aspersa after catalase inhibition by 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (ATZ) injection during a cycle of wide and abrupt change in oxygen availability. The exposure to anoxia for 5 h caused a change of only one of several parameters related to free radical metabolism: a rise in selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase (Se-GPX) activity in muscle of both saline- and ATZ-injected animals (by 1.9- and 1.8-fold, respectively). Catalase suppression had no effect in animals under normoxia or anoxia. However, during reoxygenation catalase suppression kept high levels of muscle Se-GPX activity (twofold higher than in saline-injected snails up to 30 min reoxygenation) and induced the increase in hepatopancreas SOD activity (by 22 %), indicating higher levels of ROS in both organs than in saline-injected animals. Additionally, catalase-suppressed snails showed 12 % higher levels of carbonyl protein-a sign of mild oxidative stress-in muscle during reoxygenation than those animals with intact catalase. No changes were observed in glutathione parameters (GSH, GSSG and GSSG:GSH ratio), TBARS, and GST activity in any of the experimental groups, in both organs. These results indicate that catalase inhibition inflicts changes in the free radical metabolism during reoxygenation, prompting a stress-response that is a reorganization in other enzymatic antioxidant defenses to minimize alterations in the redox homeostasis in land snails.

  7. Respiration triggers heme transfer from cytochrome c peroxidase to catalase in yeast mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathiresan, Meena; Martins, Dorival; English, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    In exponentially growing yeast, the heme enzyme, cytochrome c peroxidase (Ccp1) is targeted to the mitochondrial intermembrane space. When the fermentable source (glucose) is depleted, cells switch to respiration and mitochondrial H2O2 levels rise. It has long been assumed that CCP activity detoxifies mitochondrial H2O2 because of the efficiency of this activity in vitro. However, we find that a large pool of Ccp1 exits the mitochondria of respiring cells. We detect no extramitochondrial CCP activity because Ccp1 crosses the outer mitochondrial membrane as the heme-free protein. In parallel with apoCcp1 export, cells exhibit increased activity of catalase A (Cta1), the mitochondrial and peroxisomal catalase isoform in yeast. This identifies Cta1 as a likely recipient of Ccp1 heme, which is supported by low Cta1 activity in ccp1Δ cells and the accumulation of holoCcp1 in cta1Δ mitochondria. We hypothesized that Ccp1’s heme is labilized by hyperoxidation of the protein during the burst in H2O2 production as cells begin to respire. To test this hypothesis, recombinant Ccp1 was hyperoxidized with excess H2O2 in vitro, which accelerated heme transfer to apomyoglobin added as a surrogate heme acceptor. Furthermore, the proximal heme Fe ligand, His175, was found to be ∼85% oxidized to oxo-histidine in extramitochondrial Ccp1 isolated from 7-d cells, indicating that heme labilization results from oxidation of this ligand. We conclude that Ccp1 responds to respiration-derived H2O2 via a previously unidentified mechanism involving H2O2-activated heme transfer to apoCta1. Subsequently, the catalase activity of Cta1, not CCP activity, contributes to mitochondrial H2O2 detoxification. PMID:25422453

  8. Respiration triggers heme transfer from cytochrome c peroxidase to catalase in yeast mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathiresan, Meena; Martins, Dorival; English, Ann M

    2014-12-09

    In exponentially growing yeast, the heme enzyme, cytochrome c peroxidase (Ccp1) is targeted to the mitochondrial intermembrane space. When the fermentable source (glucose) is depleted, cells switch to respiration and mitochondrial H2O2 levels rise. It has long been assumed that CCP activity detoxifies mitochondrial H2O2 because of the efficiency of this activity in vitro. However, we find that a large pool of Ccp1 exits the mitochondria of respiring cells. We detect no extramitochondrial CCP activity because Ccp1 crosses the outer mitochondrial membrane as the heme-free protein. In parallel with apoCcp1 export, cells exhibit increased activity of catalase A (Cta1), the mitochondrial and peroxisomal catalase isoform in yeast. This identifies Cta1 as a likely recipient of Ccp1 heme, which is supported by low Cta1 activity in ccp1Δ cells and the accumulation of holoCcp1 in cta1Δ mitochondria. We hypothesized that Ccp1's heme is labilized by hyperoxidation of the protein during the burst in H2O2 production as cells begin to respire. To test this hypothesis, recombinant Ccp1 was hyperoxidized with excess H2O2 in vitro, which accelerated heme transfer to apomyoglobin added as a surrogate heme acceptor. Furthermore, the proximal heme Fe ligand, His175, was found to be ∼ 85% oxidized to oxo-histidine in extramitochondrial Ccp1 isolated from 7-d cells, indicating that heme labilization results from oxidation of this ligand. We conclude that Ccp1 responds to respiration-derived H2O2 via a previously unidentified mechanism involving H2O2-activated heme transfer to apoCta1. Subsequently, the catalase activity of Cta1, not CCP activity, contributes to mitochondrial H2O2 detoxification.

  9. Catalase, Peroxidase and Polyphenoloxidase from Pitaya Amarilla (Acanthocereus pitajaya Fruits: Ripening and Senescense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Estrella Baquero Duarte

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate the relation between some symptoms of deterioration and the activity of enzymes entailed with both the browning and the antioxiding system in fruits of yellow pitaya (Acanthocereus pitajaya, harvested in its physiological maturity and stored for 15 days at 24°C and 85% of relative humidity. In the whole fruits, the respiratory intensity and the external colors were evaluated; further, the activity of catalase (CAT, peroxidase (POD and polyphenoloxidase (PPO was studied in the peel of the fruit. The fruit exhibited a climacteric behavior six days after the date of the harvest. The browning of the peel had a direct relation with the activity of POD and PPO. The maximum observed activity of CAT in the climacterium, responds to the proper balance with the high production of H2O2 expected at that moment.

  10. COMPARED ANALYSIS OF CATALASE AND PEROXIDASE ACTIVITY IN CELLULOLYTIC FUNGUS TRICHODERMA REESEI GROWN ON MEDIUM WITH DIFFERENT CONCENTRATIONS OF GRINDED WHEAT AND BARLEY STRAWS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Cristica

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess the evolution of catalase and peroxidase activity in Trichoderma reesei grown on medium containing grinded wheat and barley straws. Carbon source of cultivation medium - glucose was replaced by various concentrations of grinded wheat and barley straws, finally resulting three experimental variants as follows: V1 = 20 g/l, V2 = 30 g/l, V3 = 40 g/l. ĂŽn addition to these variants a control sample was added in which composition remainded unchanged. The catalase activity was determined by spectrophotometric Sinha method (Artenie et al., 2008 while peroxidase activity was assesed using the o-dianisidine method (Cojocaru, 2009. Enzymatic determinations were carried out at 7 and 14 days from inoculation, in both fungus mycelium and culture liquid. The enzymatic assay showed significant differences between determinations intervals and work variants. Enzyme activity is influenced by the age of fungus and by the different nature of the substrate used.

  11. Molecular Characterization of a Catalase from Hydra vulgaris

    OpenAIRE

    Dash, Bhagirathi; Phillips, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    Catalase, an antioxidant and hydroperoxidase enzyme protects the cellular environment from harmful effects of hydrogen peroxide by facilitating its degradation to oxygen and water. Molecular information on a cnidarian catalase and/or peroxidase is, however, limited. In this work an apparent full length cDNA sequence coding for a catalase (HvCatalase) was isolated from Hydra vulgaris using 3’- and 5’- (RLM) RACE approaches. The 1859 bp HvCatalase cDNA included an open reading frame of 1518 bp ...

  12. The effect of alcohol and hydrogen peroxide on liver hepcidin gene expression in mice lacking antioxidant enzymes, glutathione peroxidase-1 or catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison-Findik, Duygu Dee; Lu, Sizhao

    2015-05-06

    This study investigates the regulation of hepcidin, the key iron-regulatory molecule, by alcohol and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in glutathione peroxidase-1 (gpx-1(-/-)) and catalase (catalase(-/-)) knockout mice. For alcohol studies, 10% ethanol was administered in the drinking water for 7 days. Gpx-1(-/-) displayed significantly higher hepatic H2O2 levels than catalase(-/-) compared to wild-type mice, as measured by 2'-7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). The basal level of liver hepcidin expression was attenuated in gpx-1(-/-) mice. Alcohol increased H2O2 production in catalase(-/-) and wild-type, but not gpx-1(-/-), mice. Hepcidin expression was inhibited in alcohol-fed catalase(-/-) and wild-type mice. In contrast, alcohol elevated hepcidin expression in gpx-1(-/-) mice. Gpx-1(-/-) mice also displayed higher level of basal liver CHOP protein expression than catalase(-/-) mice. Alcohol induced CHOP and to a lesser extent GRP78/BiP expression, but not XBP1 splicing or binding of CREBH to hepcidin gene promoter, in gpx-1(-/-) mice. The up-regulation of hepatic ATF4 mRNA levels, which was observed in gpx-1(-/-) mice, was attenuated by alcohol. In conclusion, our findings strongly suggest that H2O2 inhibits hepcidin expression in vivo. Synergistic induction of CHOP by alcohol and H2O2, in the absence of gpx-1, stimulates liver hepcidin gene expression by ER stress independent of CREBH.

  13. Silenced rice in both cytosolic ascorbate peroxidases displays pre-acclimation to cope with oxidative stress induced by 3-aminotriazole-inhibited catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifacio, Aurenivia; Carvalho, Fabrício E L; Martins, Marcio O; Lima Neto, Milton C; Cunha, Juliana R; Ribeiro, Carolina W; Margis-Pinheiro, Marcia; Silveira, Joaquim A G

    2016-08-20

    The maintenance of H2O2 homeostasis and signaling mechanisms in plant subcellular compartments is greatly dependent on cytosolic ascorbate peroxidases (APX1 and APX2) and peroxisomal catalase (CAT) activities. APX1/2 knockdown plants were utilized in this study to clarify the role of increased cytosolic H2O2 levels as a signal to trigger the antioxidant defense system against oxidative stress generated in peroxisomes after 3-aminotriazole-inhibited catalase (CAT). Before supplying 3-AT, silenced APX1/2 plants showed marked changes in their oxidative and antioxidant profiles in comparison to NT plants. After supplying 3-AT, APX1/2 plants triggered up-expression of genes belonging to APX (OsAPX7 and OsAPX8) and GPX families (OsGPX1, OsGPX2, OsGPX3 and OsGPX5), but to a lower extent than in NT plants. In addition, APX1/2 exhibited lower glycolate oxidase (GO) activity, higher CO2 assimilation, higher cellular integrity and higher oxidation of GSH, whereas the H2O2 and lipid peroxidation levels remained unchanged. This evidence indicates that redox pre-acclimation displayed by silenced rice contributed to coping with oxidative stress generated by 3-AT. We suggest that APX1/2 plants were able to trigger alternative oxidative and antioxidant mechanisms involving signaling by H2O2, allowing these plants to display effective physiological responses for protection against oxidative damage generated by 3-AT, compared to non-transformed plants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Nucleotide diversity and gene expression of Catalase and Glutathione peroxidase in irradiated Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) from the Chernobyl exclusion zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vornam, Barbara; Arkhipov, Andrey; Finkeldey, Reiner

    2012-01-01

    In the Chernobyl exclusion zone forest trees have to tolerate and to adapt to ionizing radiation, therefore the molecular basis of their adaptive responses is of the utmost interest. Based on SNP analysis and real time PCR nucleotide diversity and expression profiles of gene fragments of catalase (Cat) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), which are known as radical scavenging genes, were analysed in the needles of irradiated pine trees of the Chernobyl exclusion zone. In acutely and chronically irradiated trees (50 years old) planted before the accident a higher nucleotide diversity of Cat and more somatic mutations were found compared to their control. Chronically irradiated trees (20 years old) planted after the accident showed a similar nucleotide diversity of Cat compared to their control and in both collectives one somatic mutation was found. The nucleotide diversity of GPx was higher in all analysed trees compared to Cat. No somatic mutation events were found in GPx. For both gene fragments, no association between the received dose in a tree and the nucleotide diversity and mutation events was detected. The expression profiles of Cat and GPx in acutely and chronically and in chronically irradiated trees were similar. Compared to their corresponding control collectives, Cat was up-regulated and GPx slightly down-regulated.

  15. Effect of phenol on germination capacity and polyphenol oxidase, peroxidase and catalase activities in lettuce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadić Vojin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we examined the activities of polyphenol oxidase (PPO and antioxidant enzymes, peroxidase (POX and catalase (CAT during lettuce seed germination at different concentrations of phenol. Out of eleven varieties of lettuce, four were chosen according to their germination tolerance to phenol as follows: plants exhibiting high (Ljubljanska ledenka - LJL and Nansen - N and low toleranace (Little Gem - LG and Majska kraljica - MK. A decrease in germination efficiency after exposure to LD50 of phenol was determined for these four varieties. The effects of phenol treatment on POX, CAT and PPO activities were determined after 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 days of growth at LD50 concentrations. A trend of increased peroxidase activity was observed in seeds grown on LD50 of phenol compared to control seeds. A significant increase in CAT activity was observed at the beginning of treatment for MK, LG and N in seeds grown on phenol as well as in control seeds. A trend of increased PPO activity was observed in all control seeds. We also investigated the affinity of PPO for two different substrates that were used for the determination of enzyme activity. Our results show that LJL and N are the varieties most tolerant to growth on phenol. Here we report on the activities of their antioxidant enzymes and PPO during seed germination. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON173017

  16. Understanding the role of the catalase/peroxide genes in H2O2 resistance of E. coli serotype O157:H7 biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: Escherichia coli serotype O157:H7 defenses against H2O2 include the peroxiredoxin AhpC and three catalases: KatG (catalase-peroxidase), KatE (catalase), and the plasmid-encoded KatP (catalase/peroxidase). AhpC, KatG, and KatP are induced by OxyR in exponential phase, while KatE is indu...

  17. Mutual synergy between catalase and peroxidase activities of the bifunctional enzyme KatG is facilitated by electron hole-hopping within the enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njuma, Olive J; Davis, Ian; Ndontsa, Elizabeth N; Krewall, Jessica R; Liu, Aimin; Goodwin, Douglas C

    2017-11-10

    KatG is a bifunctional, heme-dependent enzyme in the front-line defense of numerous bacterial and fungal pathogens against H 2 O 2 -induced oxidative damage from host immune responses. Contrary to the expectation that catalase and peroxidase activities should be mutually antagonistic, peroxidatic electron donors (PxEDs) enhance KatG catalase activity. Here, we establish the mechanism of synergistic cooperation between these activities. We show that at low pH values KatG can fully convert H 2 O 2 to O 2 and H 2 O only if a PxED is present in the reaction mixture. Stopped-flow spectroscopy results indicated rapid initial rates of H 2 O 2 disproportionation slowing concomitantly with the accumulation of ferryl-like heme states. These states very slowly returned to resting ( i.e. ferric) enzyme, indicating that they represented catalase-inactive intermediates. We also show that an active-site tryptophan, Trp-321, participates in off-pathway electron transfer. A W321F variant in which the proximal tryptophan was replaced with a non-oxidizable phenylalanine exhibited higher catalase activity and less accumulation of off-pathway heme intermediates. Finally, rapid freeze-quench EPR experiments indicated that both WT and W321F KatG produce the same methionine-tyrosine-tryptophan (MYW) cofactor radical intermediate at the earliest reaction time points and that Trp-321 is the preferred site of off-catalase protein oxidation in the native enzyme. Of note, PxEDs did not affect the formation of the MYW cofactor radical but could reduce non-productive protein-based radical species that accumulate during reaction with H 2 O 2 Our results suggest that catalase-inactive intermediates accumulate because of off-mechanism oxidation, primarily of Trp-321, and PxEDs stimulate KatG catalase activity by preventing the accumulation of inactive intermediates. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Characterization of a catalase-deficient strain of Neisseria gonorrhoeae: evidence for the significance of catalase in the biology of N. gonorrhoeae.

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, S R; Steiner, B M; Cruce, D D; Perkins, G H; Arko, R J

    1993-01-01

    We obtained a catalase-deficient (Kat-) strain of Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolated from a patient who had been unsuccessfully treated with penicillin. Quantitative enzyme assays and electrophoresis of cell extracts on native polyacrylamide gels subsequently stained for catalase and peroxidase activities failed to detect both enzymes. The strain exhibited no growth anomalies or unusual requirements when grown under ordinary laboratory conditions. However, the Kat- strain proved extremely sensiti...

  19. Ascorbate Peroxidase and Catalase Activities and Their Genetic Regulation in Plants Subjected to Drought and Salinity Stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Sofo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, an important relatively stable non-radical reactive oxygen species (ROS is produced by normal aerobic metabolism in plants. At low concentrations, H2O2 acts as a signal molecule involved in the regulation of specific biological/physiological processes (photosynthetic functions, cell cycle, growth and development, plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Oxidative stress and eventual cell death in plants can be caused by excess H2O2 accumulation. Since stress factors provoke enhanced production of H2O2 in plants, severe damage to biomolecules can be possible due to elevated and non-metabolized cellular H2O2. Plants are endowed with H2O2-metabolizing enzymes such as catalases (CAT, ascorbate peroxidases (APX, some peroxiredoxins, glutathione/thioredoxin peroxidases, and glutathione sulfo-transferases. However, the most notably distinguished enzymes are CAT and APX since the former mainly occurs in peroxisomes and does not require a reductant for catalyzing a dismutation reaction. In particular, APX has a higher affinity for H2O2 and reduces it to H2O in chloroplasts, cytosol, mitochondria and peroxisomes, as well as in the apoplastic space, utilizing ascorbate as specific electron donor. Based on recent reports, this review highlights the role of H2O2 in plants experiencing water deficit and salinity and synthesizes major outcomes of studies on CAT and APX activity and genetic regulation in drought- and salt-stressed plants.

  20. Molecular Characterization of a Catalase from Hydra vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Bhagirathi; Phillips, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    Catalase, an antioxidant and hydroperoxidase enzyme protects the cellular environment from harmful effects of hydrogen peroxide by facilitating its degradation to oxygen and water. Molecular information on a cnidarian catalase and/or peroxidase is, however, limited. In this work an apparent full length cDNA sequence coding for a catalase (HvCatalase) was isolated from Hydra vulgaris using 3’- and 5’- (RLM) RACE approaches. The 1859 bp HvCatalase cDNA included an open reading frame of 1518 bp encoding a putative protein of 505 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 57.44 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence of HvCatalase contained several highly conserved motifs including the heme-ligand signature sequence RLFSYGDTH and the active site signature FXRERIPERVVHAKGXGA. A comparative analysis showed the presence of conserved catalytic amino acids [His(71), Asn(145), and Tyr(354)] in HvCatalase as well. Homology modeling indicated the presence of the conserved features of mammalian catalase fold. Hydrae exposed to thermal, starvation, metal and oxidative stress responded by regulating its catalase mRNA transcription. These results indicated that the HvCatalase gene is involved in the cellular stress response and (anti)oxidative processes triggered by stressor and contaminant exposure. PMID:22521743

  1. Cloning and characterization of an ascorbate peroxidase gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. NJ TONUKARI

    2012-05-29

    May 29, 2012 ... Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to explore expression patterns of. MaAPX1 in ... and the activity of a number of enzymatic systems, including ... peroxidase (APX), glutathione reductase and catalase.

  2. Influence of radiation damage repair inhibitor on superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD) in different sensitive crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Daojun; Xu Dengyi; Wan Zhaoliang; He Shoulin

    1997-01-01

    The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD) were affected remarkably by 60 Co γ-ray irradiation and radiation damage repair inhibitor (Caf, EDTA). SOD, CAT and POD activities showed the similar change pattern in both soybean (sensitive to radiation) and Brassica napus L. (resistant to radiation) seedlings in all treatments. After reaching the maximum value, SOD activity decreased with the increase of doses. CAT activity had the same change pattern as that of SOD in soybean, while with Brassica napus L., CAT activity remained relatively steady from 300 Gy to 1000 Gy. And POD activity increased with the increase of doses. Compared with H 2 O-treatments, CaF, EDAT post-treatments obviously enhanced SOD, CAT and POD activities. With all the treatments, the three enzyme activities were higher in Brassica napus L. than those in soybean seedlings

  3. Influence of Phytophthora capsici L. inoculation on disease severity, necrosis length, peroxidase and catalase activity, and phenolic content of resistant and susceptible pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) plants

    OpenAIRE

    KOÇ, Esra; ÜSTÜN, Ayşen Sülün

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the level of infection caused by different inoculum concentrations (102, 103, and 104 zoospores mL-1) of Phytophthora capsici in 3 pepper cultivars at days 2, 4, and 6. The effect that the infection induced on the peroxidase (POX), catalase (CAT), and phenolics of resistant and sensitive seedlings, as well as the defense mechanism against the pathogen, were also investigated. The resistance of PM-702 against the isolate used was high, whereas KM-Hot and DEM-8 displayed sen...

  4. The euryhaline yeast Debaryomyces hansenii has two catalase genes encoding enzymes with differential activity profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal-Kischinevzky, Claudia; Rodarte-Murguía, Beatriz; Valdés-López, Victor; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; González, Alicia; Alba-Lois, Luisa

    2011-03-01

    Debaryomyces hansenii is a spoilage yeast able to grow in a variety of ecological niches, from seawater to dairy products. Results presented in this article show that (i) D. hansenii has an inherent resistance to H2O2 which could be attributed to the fact that this yeast has a basal catalase activity which is several-fold higher than that observed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under the same culture conditions, (ii) D. hansenii has two genes (DhCTA1 and DhCTT1) encoding two catalase isozymes with a differential enzymatic activity profile which is not strictly correlated with a differential expression profile of the encoding genes.

  5. Genes Important for Catalase Activity in Enterococcus faecalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baureder, Michael; Hederstedt, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Little in general is known about how heme proteins are assembled from their constituents in cells. The Gram-positive bacterium Enterococcus faecalis cannot synthesize heme and does not depend on it for growth. However, when supplied with heme in the growth medium the cells can synthesize two heme proteins; catalase (KatA) and cytochrome bd (CydAB). To identify novel factors important for catalase biogenesis libraries of E. faecalis gene insertion mutants were generated using two different types of transposons. The libraries of mutants were screened for clones deficient in catalase activity using a colony zymogram staining procedure. Analysis of obtained clones identified, in addition to katA (encoding the catalase enzyme protein), nine genes distributed over five different chromosomal loci. No factors with a dedicated essential role in catalase biogenesis or heme trafficking were revealed, but the results indicate the RNA degradosome (srmB, rnjA), an ABC-type oligopeptide transporter (oppBC), a two-component signal transducer (etaR), and NADH peroxidase (npr) as being important for expression of catalase activity in E. faecalis. It is demonstrated that catalase biogenesis in E. faecalis is independent of the CydABCD proteins and that a conserved proline residue in the N-terminal region of KatA is important for catalase assembly. PMID:22590595

  6. MicroRNA in innate immunity and autophagy during mycobacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Kyung; Kim, Tae Sung; Basu, Joyoti; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2017-01-01

    The fine-tuning of innate immune responses is an important aspect of host defenses against mycobacteria. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), small non-coding RNAs, play essential roles in regulating multiple biological pathways including innate host defenses against various infections. Accumulating evidence shows that many miRNAs regulate the complex interplay between mycobacterial survival strategies and host innate immune pathways. Recent studies have contributed to understanding the role of miRNAs, the levels of which can be modulated by mycobacterial infection, in tuning host autophagy to control bacterial survival and innate effector function. Despite considerable efforts devoted to miRNA profiling over the past decade, further work is needed to improve the selection of appropriate biomarkers for tuberculosis. Understanding the roles and mechanisms of miRNAs in regulating innate immune signaling and autophagy may provide insights into new therapeutic modalities for host-directed anti-mycobacterial therapies. Here, we present a comprehensive review of the recent literature regarding miRNA profiling in tuberculosis and the roles of miRNAs in modulating innate immune responses and autophagy defenses against mycobacterial infections. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Catalase anabolism in yeast: loss of regulation by oxygen of catalase apoprotein synthesis after mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berte, C; Sels, A

    1979-04-17

    A mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae which displays catalase activity when grown under strictly anaerobic conditions has been selected on solid media. Although some preformed holoenzyme has accumulated in anaerobic cells, a sharp increase of activity is still measured during adaptation to oxygen in glucose-buffer; however, a striking difference with the wild-type strain is that in the mutant, catalase formation is observed in the presence of cycloheximide that totally inhibits cytoplasmic translation. It is concluded that kat 80 mutant has lost the regulatory control by oxygen of apocatalase synthesis; the later precursor, characterized as apocatalase synthesis; the latter precursor, characterized as apocatalase T, is thought to be activated in vivo, under aerobic conditions, by inclusion of prosthetic group. Regulation of enzyme synthesis by catabolite repression (glucose erfect) persists, unmodified by reference to the wild-type parental strain. Mutation kat 80 specifically hits catalase anabolism, as no significant variations were observed for the edification of the respiratory system and (apo)cytochrome c peroxidase production. Genetic analysis shows that kat 80 phenotype, recessive in heterozygotes, results from a single nuclear mutation.

  8. Catalases are NAD(PH-dependent tellurite reductases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván L Calderón

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species damage intracellular targets and are implicated in cancer, genetic disease, mutagenesis, and aging. Catalases are among the key enzymatic defenses against one of the most physiologically abundant reactive oxygen species, hydrogen peroxide. The well-studied, heme-dependent catalases accelerate the rate of the dismutation of peroxide to molecular oxygen and water with near kinetic perfection. Many catalases also bind the cofactors NADPH and NADH tenaciously, but, surprisingly, NAD(PH is not required for their dismutase activity. Although NAD(PH protects bovine catalase against oxidative damage by its peroxide substrate, the catalytic role of the nicotinamide cofactor in the function of this enzyme has remained a biochemical mystery to date. Anions formed by heavy metal oxides are among the most highly reactive, natural oxidizing agents. Here, we show that a natural isolate of Staphylococcus epidermidis resistant to tellurite detoxifies this anion thanks to a novel activity of its catalase, and that a subset of both bacterial and mammalian catalases carry out the NAD(PH-dependent reduction of soluble tellurite ion (TeO(3(2- to the less toxic, insoluble metal, tellurium (Te(o, in vitro. An Escherichia coli mutant defective in the KatG catalase/peroxidase is sensitive to tellurite, and expression of the S. epidermidis catalase gene in a heterologous E. coli host confers increased resistance to tellurite as well as to hydrogen peroxide in vivo, arguing that S. epidermidis catalase provides a physiological line of defense against both of these strong oxidizing agents. Kinetic studies reveal that bovine catalase reduces tellurite with a low Michaelis-Menten constant, a result suggesting that tellurite is among the natural substrates of this enzyme. The reduction of tellurite by bovine catalase occurs at the expense of producing the highly reactive superoxide radical.

  9. Leaderless Transcripts and Small Proteins Are Common Features of the Mycobacterial Translational Landscape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scarlet S Shell

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available RNA-seq technologies have provided significant insight into the transcription networks of mycobacteria. However, such studies provide no definitive information on the translational landscape. Here, we use a combination of high-throughput transcriptome and proteome-profiling approaches to more rigorously understand protein expression in two mycobacterial species. RNA-seq and ribosome profiling in Mycobacterium smegmatis, and transcription start site (TSS mapping and N-terminal peptide mass spectrometry in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, provide complementary, empirical datasets to examine the congruence of transcription and translation in the Mycobacterium genus. We find that nearly one-quarter of mycobacterial transcripts are leaderless, lacking a 5' untranslated region (UTR and Shine-Dalgarno ribosome-binding site. Our data indicate that leaderless translation is a major feature of mycobacterial genomes and is comparably robust to leadered initiation. Using translational reporters to systematically probe the cis-sequence requirements of leaderless translation initiation in mycobacteria, we find that an ATG or GTG at the mRNA 5' end is both necessary and sufficient. This criterion, together with our ribosome occupancy data, suggests that mycobacteria encode hundreds of small, unannotated proteins at the 5' ends of transcripts. The conservation of small proteins in both mycobacterial species tested suggests that some play important roles in mycobacterial physiology. Our translational-reporter system further indicates that mycobacterial leadered translation initiation requires a Shine Dalgarno site in the 5' UTR and that ATG, GTG, TTG, and ATT codons can robustly initiate translation. Our combined approaches provide the first comprehensive view of mycobacterial gene structures and their non-canonical mechanisms of protein expression.

  10. The role and regulation of catalase in respiratory tract opportunistic bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, Mia M; Fan, Xin

    2014-09-01

    Respiratory tract bacterial pathogens are the etiologic agents of a variety of illnesses. The ability of these bacteria to cause disease is imparted through survival within the host and avoidance of pathogen clearance by the immune system. Respiratory tract pathogens are continually bombarded by reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may be produced by competing bacteria, normal metabolic function, or host immunological responses. In order to survive and proliferate, bacteria have adapted defense mechanisms to circumvent the effects of ROS. Bacteria employ the use of anti-oxidant enzymes, catalases and catalase-peroxidases, to relieve the effects of the oxidative stressors to which they are continually exposed. The decomposition of ROS has been shown to provide favorable conditions in which respiratory tract opportunistic bacterial pathogens such as Haemophilus influenzae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Legionella pneumophila, and Neisseria meningitidis are able to withstand exposure to highly reactive molecules and yet survive. Bacteria possessing mutations in the catalase gene have a decreased survival rate, yet may be able to compensate for the lack of catalatic activity if peroxidatic activity is present. An incomplete knowledge of the mechanisms by which catalase and catalase-peroxidases are regulated still persists, however, in some bacterial species, a regulatory factor known as OxyR has been shown to either up-regulate or down-regulate catalase gene expression. Yet, more research is still needed to increase the knowledge base in relation to this enzyme class. As with this review, we focus on major respiratory tract opportunistic bacterial pathogens in order to elucidate the function and regulation of catalases. The importance of the research could lead to the development of novel treatments against respiratory bacterial infections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Purification and Characterization of Catalase from Marine Bacterium Acinetobacter sp. YS0810

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhua Fu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The catalase from marine bacterium Acinetobacter sp. YS0810 (YS0810CAT was purified and characterized. Consecutive steps were used to achieve the purified enzyme as follows: ethanol precipitation, DEAE Sepharose ion exchange, Superdex 200 gel filtration, and Resource Q ion exchange. The active enzyme consisted of four identical subunits of 57.256 kDa. It showed a Soret peak at 405 nm, indicating the presence of iron protoporphyrin IX. The catalase was not apparently reduced by sodium dithionite but was inhibited by 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, hydroxylamine hydrochloride, and sodium azide. Peroxidase-like activity was not found with the substrate o-phenylenediamine. So the catalase was determined to be a monofunctional catalase. N-terminal amino acid of the catalase analysis gave the sequence SQDPKKCPVTHLTTE, which showed high degree of homology with those of known catalases from bacteria. The analysis of amino acid sequence of the purified catalase by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry showed that it was a new catalase, in spite of its high homology with those of known catalases from other bacteria. The catalase showed high alkali stability and thermostability.

  12. Association of hydrogen peroxide with restriction of ¤Septoria tritici¤ in resistant wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shetty, N.P.; Kristensen, B.K.; Newman, M.-A.

    2003-01-01

    increased in Stakado. The peroxidase activity pattern and transcript accumulation profile suggest a role for peroxidase in resistance, probably in cell wall cross-linking. Accumulation patterns of the gene transcript of a catalase and the total catalase enzyme activity suggest roles for catalase synthesis...

  13. Clinical Assessment of glutathione peroxidase and catalase to the status of malondialdehyde in urolithiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoud, R.H.; Ewadh, M.J.; Al-Hamadani, K.J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the role of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes in serum of urolithiasis patients. Methodology: Glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT) and malondialadehyde (MDA) in serum of urolithiasis patients have been measured. Results: The study has revealed a significant increase in MDA and a significant decrease in GPx and CAT. There have been no significant correlations of serum MDA, GPx and CAT to the size and number of stones with no differences in their levels among patients with one stone, two stones and multiple stones. Anatomically the distributions of urinary stones have been 70.14% renal, 19.30% ureteric and 3.15% urinary bladder. There have been no significant difference in serum levels of neither MDA nor CAT among all the anatomical sites of the stone, while GPx has shown a significant difference in serum of patients with renal calyceal, renal pelvic, ureteric and vesical stones. Patients with recurrent episode of urinary stone have been 63.33%. Family histories of urolithiasis have been negative in 73.33% of the patients. Neither recurrence of urinary stone nor family history of urolithiasis have shown a significant correlation with serum levels of MDA, GPx and CAT. Conclusion: The role of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes is present in the pathogenesis of urinary stone, but their levels don't affect by the size, the number and the anatomical position of stones (apart of GPx which has been affected by the anatomical position of the stone) and the duration, recurrence, and family history of the disease. (author)

  14. Catalase-dependent H2O2 consumption by cardiac mitochondria and redox-mediated loss in insulin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindler, Paul M; Cacciola, Angela; Kinter, Michael; Szweda, Luke I

    2016-11-01

    We have recently demonstrated that catalase content in mouse cardiac mitochondria is selectively elevated in response to high dietary fat, a nutritional state associated with oxidative stress and loss in insulin signaling. Catalase and various isoforms of glutathione peroxidase and peroxiredoxin each catalyze the consumption of H 2 O 2 Catalase, located primarily within peroxisomes and to a lesser extent mitochondria, has a low binding affinity for H 2 O 2 relative to glutathione peroxidase and peroxiredoxin. As such, the contribution of catalase to mitochondrial H 2 O 2 consumption is not well understood. In the current study, using highly purified cardiac mitochondria challenged with micromolar concentrations of H 2 O 2 , we found that catalase contributes significantly to mitochondrial H 2 O 2 consumption. In addition, catalase is solely responsible for removal of H 2 O 2 in nonrespiring or structurally disrupted mitochondria. Finally, in mice fed a high-fat diet, mitochondrial-derived H 2 O 2 is responsible for diminished insulin signaling in the heart as evidenced by reduced insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation. While elevated mitochondrial catalase content (∼50%) enhanced the capacity of mitochondria to consume H 2 O 2 in response to high dietary fat, the selective increase in catalase did not prevent H 2 O 2 -induced loss in cardiac insulin signaling. Taken together, our results indicate that mitochondrial catalase likely functions to preclude the formation of high levels of H 2 O 2 without perturbing redox-dependent signaling. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  15. The effect of seedling chilling on glutathione content, catalase and peroxidase activity in Brassica oleracea L. var. italica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Wojciechowska

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The study was designed to determine the possible relationship between Brassica oleracea var. italica seedlings stored at 2°C in the dark for seven and fourteen days, respectively, and the level of certain antioxidant parameters in particular organs. A parallel objective of the experiment was to determine if the reaction of seedlings to low temperature might be persistent in fully developed plants until harvest time. After 14 days of chilling a significant increase in the glutathione content was observed in the seedling leaves in comparison to the non-chilled plants. During vegetation in field conditions this effect was maintained in leaves up to the stage of formation of flower buds. At harvest the highest content of glutathione was demonstrated in broccoli heads, obtained from plants, which were previously chilled in the seedling phase for two weeks. Peroxidase activity in broccoli seedlings increased each year of the three-year study due to the duration of the cooling time, whereas in the case of catalase the changes were not so distinct. At harvest time the activity of both enzymes in the leaves and flower buds fluctuated according to the particular year of study.

  16. Catalase and ascorbate peroxidase-representative H2O2-detoxifying heme enzymes in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjum, Naser A; Sharma, Pallavi; Gill, Sarvajeet S; Hasanuzzaman, Mirza; Khan, Ekhlaque A; Kachhap, Kiran; Mohamed, Amal A; Thangavel, Palaniswamy; Devi, Gurumayum Devmanjuri; Vasudhevan, Palanisamy; Sofo, Adriano; Khan, Nafees A; Misra, Amarendra Narayan; Lukatkin, Alexander S; Singh, Harminder Pal; Pereira, Eduarda; Tuteja, Narendra

    2016-10-01

    Plants have to counteract unavoidable stress-caused anomalies such as oxidative stress to sustain their lives and serve heterotrophic organisms including humans. Among major enzymatic antioxidants, catalase (CAT; EC 1.11.1.6) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX; EC 1.11.1.11) are representative heme enzymes meant for metabolizing stress-provoked reactive oxygen species (ROS; such as H2O2) and controlling their potential impacts on cellular metabolism and functions. CAT mainly occurs in peroxisomes and catalyzes the dismutation reaction without requiring any reductant; whereas, APX has a higher affinity for H2O2 and utilizes ascorbate (AsA) as specific electron donor for the reduction of H2O2 into H2O in organelles including chloroplasts, cytosol, mitochondria, and peroxisomes. Literature is extensive on the glutathione-associated H2O2-metabolizing systems in plants. However, discussion is meager or scattered in the literature available on the biochemical and genomic characterization as well as techniques for the assays of CAT and APX and their modulation in plants under abiotic stresses. This paper aims (a) to introduce oxidative stress-causative factors and highlights their relationship with abiotic stresses in plants; (b) to overview structure, occurrence, and significance of CAT and APX in plants; (c) to summarize the principles of current technologies used to assay CAT and APX in plants; (d) to appraise available literature on the modulation of CAT and APX in plants under major abiotic stresses; and finally, (e) to consider a brief cross-talk on the CAT and APX, and this also highlights the aspects unexplored so far.

  17. Decrease in catalase activity of Folsomia candida fed a Bt rice diet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Yiyang; Ke, Xin; Chen, Fajun

    2011-01-01

    Here we report the effects of three Bt-rice varieties and their non-Bt conventional isolines on biological traits including survival, reproduction, and the activities of three antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase, in the Collembolan, Folsomia candida. The reproduction...... was significantly lower when fed Kemingdao and Huahui1 than those feeding on their non-GM near-isogenic varieties Xiushui and Minghui63 respectively, this can be explained by the differences of plant compositions depended on variety of rice. The catalase activity of F. candida was significantly lower when fed...

  18. Growth of catalase A and catalase T deficient mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on ethanol and oleic acid: Growth profiles and catalase activities in relation to microbody proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Klei, Ida J. van der; Rytka, Joanna; Kunau, Wolf H.; Veenhuis, Marten

    1990-01-01

    The parental strain (A+T+) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mutants, deficient in catalase T (A+T-), catalase A (A-T+) or both catalases (A-T-), grew on ethanol and oleic acid with comparable doubling times. Specific activities of catalase were low in glucose- and ethanol-grown cells. In the two oleic acid-grown A+-strains (A+T+ and A+T-) high catalase activities were found; catalase activity invariably remained low in the A-T+ strain and was never detected in the A-T- strain. The levels of β-...

  19. Growth of catalase A and catalase T deficient mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on ethanol and oleic acid : Growth profiles and catalase activities in relation to microbody proliferation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klei, Ida J. van der; Rytka, Joanna; Kunau, Wolf H.; Veenhuis, Marten

    The parental strain (A+T+) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mutants, deficient in catalase T (A+T-), catalase A (A-T+) or both catalases (A-T-), grew on ethanol and oleic acid with comparable doubling times. Specific activities of catalase were low in glucose- and ethanol-grown cells. In the two

  20. Wood Utilization Is Dependent on Catalase Activities in the Filamentous Fungus Podospora anserina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdais, Anne; Bidard, Frederique; Zickler, Denise; Berteaux-Lecellier, Veronique; Silar, Philippe; Espagne, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Catalases are enzymes that play critical roles in protecting cells against the toxic effects of hydrogen peroxide. They are implicated in various physiological and pathological conditions but some of their functions remain unclear. In order to decipher the role(s) of catalases during the life cycle of Podospora anserina, we analyzed the role of the four monofunctional catalases and one bifunctional catalase-peroxidase genes present in its genome. The five genes were deleted and the phenotypes of each single and all multiple mutants were investigated. Intriguingly, although the genes are differently expressed during the life cycle, catalase activity is dispensable during both vegetative growth and sexual reproduction in laboratory conditions. Catalases are also not essential for cellulose or fatty acid assimilation. In contrast, they are strictly required for efficient utilization of more complex biomass like wood shavings by allowing growth in the presence of lignin. The secreted CATB and cytosolic CAT2 are the major catalases implicated in peroxide resistance, while CAT2 is the major player during complex biomass assimilation. Our results suggest that P. anserina produces external H2O2 to assimilate complex biomass and that catalases are necessary to protect the cells during this process. In addition, the phenotypes of strains lacking only one catalase gene suggest that a decrease of catalase activity improves the capacity of the fungus to degrade complex biomass. PMID:22558065

  1. Wood utilization is dependent on catalase activities in the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Bourdais

    Full Text Available Catalases are enzymes that play critical roles in protecting cells against the toxic effects of hydrogen peroxide. They are implicated in various physiological and pathological conditions but some of their functions remain unclear. In order to decipher the role(s of catalases during the life cycle of Podospora anserina, we analyzed the role of the four monofunctional catalases and one bifunctional catalase-peroxidase genes present in its genome. The five genes were deleted and the phenotypes of each single and all multiple mutants were investigated. Intriguingly, although the genes are differently expressed during the life cycle, catalase activity is dispensable during both vegetative growth and sexual reproduction in laboratory conditions. Catalases are also not essential for cellulose or fatty acid assimilation. In contrast, they are strictly required for efficient utilization of more complex biomass like wood shavings by allowing growth in the presence of lignin. The secreted CATB and cytosolic CAT2 are the major catalases implicated in peroxide resistance, while CAT2 is the major player during complex biomass assimilation. Our results suggest that P. anserina produces external H(2O(2 to assimilate complex biomass and that catalases are necessary to protect the cells during this process. In addition, the phenotypes of strains lacking only one catalase gene suggest that a decrease of catalase activity improves the capacity of the fungus to degrade complex biomass.

  2. Wood utilization is dependent on catalase activities in the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdais, Anne; Bidard, Frederique; Zickler, Denise; Berteaux-Lecellier, Veronique; Silar, Philippe; Espagne, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Catalases are enzymes that play critical roles in protecting cells against the toxic effects of hydrogen peroxide. They are implicated in various physiological and pathological conditions but some of their functions remain unclear. In order to decipher the role(s) of catalases during the life cycle of Podospora anserina, we analyzed the role of the four monofunctional catalases and one bifunctional catalase-peroxidase genes present in its genome. The five genes were deleted and the phenotypes of each single and all multiple mutants were investigated. Intriguingly, although the genes are differently expressed during the life cycle, catalase activity is dispensable during both vegetative growth and sexual reproduction in laboratory conditions. Catalases are also not essential for cellulose or fatty acid assimilation. In contrast, they are strictly required for efficient utilization of more complex biomass like wood shavings by allowing growth in the presence of lignin. The secreted CATB and cytosolic CAT2 are the major catalases implicated in peroxide resistance, while CAT2 is the major player during complex biomass assimilation. Our results suggest that P. anserina produces external H(2)O(2) to assimilate complex biomass and that catalases are necessary to protect the cells during this process. In addition, the phenotypes of strains lacking only one catalase gene suggest that a decrease of catalase activity improves the capacity of the fungus to degrade complex biomass.

  3. Pseudomonas syringae Catalases Are Collectively Required for Plant Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ming; Block, Anna; Bryan, Crystal D.; Becker, Donald F.

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 must detoxify plant-produced hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in order to survive in its host plant. Candidate enzymes for this detoxification include the monofunctional catalases KatB and KatE and the bifunctional catalase-peroxidase KatG of DC3000. This study shows that KatG is the major housekeeping catalase of DC3000 and provides protection against menadione-generated endogenous H2O2. In contrast, KatB rapidly and substantially accumulates in response to exogenous H2O2. Furthermore, KatB and KatG have nonredundant roles in detoxifying exogenous H2O2 and are required for full virulence of DC3000 in Arabidopsis thaliana. Therefore, the nonredundant ability of KatB and KatG to detoxify plant-produced H2O2 is essential for the bacteria to survive in plants. Indeed, a DC3000 catalase triple mutant is severely compromised in its ability to grow in planta, and its growth can be partially rescued by the expression of katB, katE, or katG. Interestingly, our data demonstrate that although KatB and KatG are the major catalases involved in the virulence of DC3000, KatE can also provide some protection in planta. Thus, our results indicate that these catalases are virulence factors for DC3000 and are collectively required for pathogenesis. PMID:22797762

  4. Purification and characterization of an intracellular peroxidase from Streptomyces cyaneus.

    OpenAIRE

    Mliki, A; Zimmermann, W

    1992-01-01

    An intracellular peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) from Streptomyces cyaneus was purified to homogeneity. The enzyme had a molecular weight of 185,000 and was composed of two subunits of equal size. It had an isoelectric point of 6.1. The enzyme had a peroxidase activity toward o-dianisidine with a Km of 17.8 microM and a pH optimum of 5.0. It also showed catalase activity with a Km of 2.07 mM H2O2 and a pH optimum of 8.0. The purified enzyme did not catalyze C alpha-C beta bond cleavage of 1,3-dihydr...

  5. Peroxidase isozyme profiles in some sweet cherry rootstocks and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PERS

    2012-01-10

    , 2005). Santamour (1980) defined role of peroxidase in graft compatibility as; 1) lignification is essential for a strong and permanent graft union; 2) peroxidase isoenzymes mediate the polymeri- zation of cinnamic alcohols to ...

  6. The role of certain oxidative enzymes, catalase, and beta-glucosidase on virulence of Cephalosporium maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Elrazik, A; Darweish, F A; Rushdi, M H

    1978-01-01

    Isolates of Cephalosporium maydis varied in their pathogenicity to D.C. 67 maize cultivar from highly to weakly pathogenic. Highly pathogenic isolates showed lower activity of polyphenol oxidase, peroxidase, cytochrome oxidase, and beta-glucosidase enzymes and higher activity of catalase and dehydrogenase than weakly pathogenic isolates. Enzymes production by the tested isolates increased as the culture age increased; except in case of catalase enzyme, the reverse action was detected. The role of these enzymes in the virulence of C. maydis is suggested and discussed.

  7. Not so monofunctional-a case of thermostable Thermobifida fusca catalase with peroxidase activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lončar, Nikola; Fraaije, Marco W

    Thermobifida fusca is a mesothermophilic organism known for its ability to degrade plant biomass and other organics, and it was demonstrated that it represents a rich resource of genes encoding for potent enzymes for biocatalysis. The thermostable catalase from T. fusca has been cloned and

  8. Primed Mycobacterial Uveitis (PMU): Histologic and Cytokine Characterization of a Model of Uveitis in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepple, Kathryn L; Rotkis, Lauren; Van Grol, Jennifer; Wilson, Leslie; Sandt, Angela; Lam, Deborah L; Carlson, Eric; Van Gelder, Russell N

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the histologic features and cytokine profiles of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) and a primed mycobacterial uveitis (PMU) model in rats. In Lewis rats, EAU was induced by immunization with interphotoreceptor binding protein peptide, and PMU was induced by immunization with a killed mycobacterial extract followed by intravitreal injection of the same extract. Clinical course, histology, and the cytokine profiles of the aqueous and vitreous were compared using multiplex bead fluorescence immunoassays. Primed mycobacterial uveitis generates inflammation 2 days after intravitreal injection and resolves spontaneously 14 days later. CD68+ lymphocytes are the predominant infiltrating cells and are found in the anterior chamber, surrounding the ciliary body and in the vitreous. In contrast to EAU, no choroidal infiltration or retinal destruction is noted. At the day of peak inflammation, C-X-C motif ligand 10 (CXCL10), IL-1β, IL-18, and leptin were induced in the aqueous of both models. Interleukin-6 was induced 2-fold in the aqueous of PMU but not EAU. Cytokines elevated in the aqueous of EAU exclusively include regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), lipopolysaccharide-induced CXC chemokine (LIX), growth-related oncogene/keratinocyte chemokine (GRO/KC), VEGF, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α), and IL-17A. In the vitreous, CXCL10, GRO/KC, RANTES, and MIP-1α were elevated in both models. Interleukin-17A and IL-18 were elevated exclusively in EAU. Primed mycobacterial uveitis generates an acute anterior and intermediate uveitis without retinal involvement. Primed mycobacterial uveitis has a distinct proinflammatory cytokine profile compared with EAU, suggesting PMU is a good complementary model for study of immune-mediated uveitis. CXCL10, a proinflammatory cytokine, was increased in the aqueous and vitreous of both models and may be a

  9. Change in catalase and peroxidase activity in rat blood in case of combined radiation and mechanical injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkovaya, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    Changes of catalase and peroxide activity of blood in rats in case of irradiation at 2.0 and 7.0 Gy, mechanical injury of animal chest and combined radiation injury were studied. The given data testify to considerable increase of the above enzymes activity in case of all these effects. The less decrease of catalase and peroxide activity was observed after infliction of mechanical injury alone. Aggravating effect of mechanical injury on the irradiated organism leads to more noticeable decrease of catalase activity (at early periods of observation) in comparison with radiation effect. Peroxide changes in case of combined radiation and mechanical injury of rats differ slightly from similar factors observed in case of irradiation alone

  10. Effects of carbon ion irradiation on survival rate, catalase and peroxidase activity of alfalfa M1 under low temperature stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shuyang; Li Jinghua; Jiang Boling

    2014-01-01

    In this study, three kinds of alfalfa including Zhonglan 1, BC-04-477 and Ta Cheng were treated with different doses of "1"2C"6"+ (75 keV) heavy ion radiation, and then the influence of survival rate, catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD) activity of M1 with low temperature stress were tested. The results showed that under the condition of 400 Gy radiation dose, the survival rate and CAT activity of Zhonglan 1 under low temperature stress have increased by 33.3%, 56.3% respectively compared with those of the control group, while there was no difference in POD activity between those two groups. The survival rate, CAT and POD activity of BC-04-477 treated with low temperature have been improved by 33.3%, 69.2%, 5.1% respectively compared with those of the control group when the radiation dose was 400 Gy. Compared with those of the control group, the survival rate, CAT and POD activity of Ta Cheng under low temperature stress have been improved by 25%, 26%,22.8% respectively when the radiation dose was 800 Gy. These results indicate that the viability and the cold resistance ability of Zhong Lan 1, BC-04-477 and Ta Cheng can be improved by "1"2C"6"+ radiation. (authors)

  11. Post-irradiation modification of oxygen-dependent and independent damage by catalase in barley seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sah, N.K.; Kesavan, P.C.

    1987-01-01

    If H 2 O 2 is one of the major mediators of the 'oxygen effect' in biological systems then catalase, which enzymically decomposes H 2 O 2 should have a significant influence on radiation damage, particularly under oxygenated conditions. The post-irradiation (300 Gy gamma rays) effect of catalase was, therefore, assessed on barley seeds of about 4% moisture content under oxygenated and oxygen-free conditions at varying temperatures. Catalase affords concentration-dependent radioprotection under oxygenated condition at both 25 0 C and 4 0 C. The level of protection at 4 0 C is less than at 25 0 C. This is obviously due to a decrease in catalase activity at low temperature. Under oxygen-free conditions, catalase enhances radiation damage at 4 0 C while at 25 0 C it it has no effect. This has been substantiated by data on the frequency of chromosomal aberrations and on peroxidase activity. Sodium azide, a catalase inhibitor, was found to eliminate the radioprotective action of catalase. The study supports the view that the 'oxygen effect' is mediated largely through peroxides in irradiated biological systems. However, the observations made particularly at 4 0 C under oxygen-free condition seem to involve physicochemical reactions. (author)

  12. Progeric effects of catalase inactivation in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepke, Jay I; Wood, Christopher S; Terlecky, Laura J; Walton, Paul A; Terlecky, Stanley R

    2008-10-01

    Peroxisomes generate hydrogen peroxide, a reactive oxygen species, as part of their normal metabolism. A number of pathological situations exist in which the organelle's capacity to degrade the potentially toxic oxidant is compromised. It is the peroxidase, catalase, which largely determines the functional antioxidant capacity of the organelle, and it is this enzyme that is affected in aging, in certain diseases, and in response to exposure to specific chemical agents. To more tightly control the enzymatic activity of peroxisomal catalase and carefully document the effects of its impaired action on human cells, we employed the inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole. We show that by chronically reducing catalase activity to approximately 38% of normal, cells respond in a dramatic manner, displaying a cascade of accelerated aging reactions. Hydrogen peroxide and related reactive oxygen species are produced, protein and DNA are oxidatively damaged, import into peroxisomes and organelle biogenesis is corrupted, and matrix metalloproteinases are hyper-secreted from cells. In addition, mitochondria are functionally impaired, losing their ability to maintain a membrane potential and synthesize reactive oxygen species themselves. These latter results suggest an important redox-regulated connection between the two organelle systems, a topic of considerable interest for future study.

  13. Progeric effects of catalase inactivation in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koepke, Jay I.; Wood, Christopher S.; Terlecky, Laura J.; Walton, Paul A.; Terlecky, Stanley R.

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisomes generate hydrogen peroxide, a reactive oxygen species, as part of their normal metabolism. A number of pathological situations exist in which the organelle's capacity to degrade the potentially toxic oxidant is compromised. It is the peroxidase, catalase, which largely determines the functional antioxidant capacity of the organelle, and it is this enzyme that is affected in aging, in certain diseases, and in response to exposure to specific chemical agents. To more tightly control the enzymatic activity of peroxisomal catalase and carefully document the effects of its impaired action on human cells, we employed the inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole. We show that by chronically reducing catalase activity to approximately 38% of normal, cells respond in a dramatic manner, displaying a cascade of accelerated aging reactions. Hydrogen peroxide and related reactive oxygen species are produced, protein and DNA are oxidatively damaged, import into peroxisomes and organelle biogenesis is corrupted, and matrix metalloproteinases are hyper-secreted from cells. In addition, mitochondria are functionally impaired, losing their ability to maintain a membrane potential and synthesize reactive oxygen species themselves. These latter results suggest an important redox-regulated connection between the two organelle systems, a topic of considerable interest for future study

  14. Oxidative status, in vitro iron-induced lipid oxidation and superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities in rhea meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terevinto, A; Ramos, A; Castroman, G; Cabrera, M C; Saadoun, A

    2010-04-01

    Rhea (Rhea americana) muscles Obturatorius medialis (OM) Iliotibialis lateralis (IL) and Iliofibularis (I), obtained from farmed animals, were evaluated regarding their oxidative/antioxidant status. The mean level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) expressed as malonaldehyde (MDA) content was of 0.84 mg MDA/kg wet tissue for the three muscles. TBARS level was significantly higher in IL than OM and I, with the two latter showing similar levels. The mean level of carbonyl proteins expressed as dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) was 1.59 nmol DNPH mg(-1). Carbonyl protein levels were significantly different (POM>I). Iron-induced TBARS generation was not significantly different between the three muscles at any time, nor for each muscle during the 5 h of the experiment. Superoxide dismutase activity in IL muscle was significantly higher (P<0.05) than in I muscle. However, the difference between IL and OM muscles was not significant. The differences between the three muscles became not significant when the results were expressed by mg of protein contained in the extract, instead by g of wet tissue. No differences were found for catalase (micromol of discomposed H(2)O(2) min(-1) g(-1) wet tissue or by mg of protein contained in the extract) and glutathione peroxidase (micromol ol of oxidized NADPH min(-1) g(-1) of wet tissue or by mg of protein contained in the extract) activities between the three muscles. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Fluorimetry as a Simple and Sensitive Method for Determination of Catalase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Hedayati

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Catalase enzyme plays an important role in the anti-oxidation defense of body so it is important to measure its activity. Nowadays catalase activity measurement is performed by expensive imported kits in various scientific fields. The purpose of this study was to design a sensitive fluorimetry method for measuring catalase activity with improved sensitivity, accuracy and speed. Materials and Methods: In this study, the reaction of hydrogen peroxide with peroxidase (as a reaction accelerator was used in fluorimetry for catalase activity measuring in serum samples in order to increase the sensitivity of the assay. The sensitivity and intra- and inter-assay accuracy, verification test, recovery and parallelism tests, comparison method and correlation and coherence investigation methods were also performed. In order to increase the accuracy and speed of reading, the assay was performed in microplates and reading was done in fluorimetry plates. Results: The percentage of intra- and inter-assay variation coefficients were measured 3.8- 6.6 % and 4.1-7.3%, respectively. Comparison of the results of mentioned method for 50 serum samples with common colorimetric method showed a good correlation (0.917. In assessing the accuracy, the recovery percent was obtained 91% to 107%. The test sensitivity was measured 0.02 IU/ml. Conclusion: The fluorimetry method by microplate reading has a sufficient precision, accuracy and efficiency for catalase activity measuring as well as speed of measurement. Thus it can be an alternative method to conventional imported colorimetric methods.

  16. Nitroxides protect horseradish peroxidase from H2O2-induced inactivation and modulate its catalase-like activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuni, Amram; Maimon, Eric; Goldstein, Sara

    2017-08-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalyzes H 2 O 2 dismutation while undergoing heme inactivation. The mechanism underlying this process has not been fully elucidated. The effects of nitroxides, which protect metmyoglobin and methemoglobin against H 2 O 2 -induced inactivation, have been investigated. HRP reaction with H 2 O 2 was studied by following H 2 O 2 depletion, O 2 evolution and heme spectral changes. Nitroxide concentration was followed by EPR spectroscopy, and its reactions with the oxidized heme species were studied using stopped-flow. Nitroxide protects HRP against H 2 O 2 -induced inactivation. The rate of H 2 O 2 dismutation in the presence of nitroxide obeys zero-order kinetics and increases as [nitroxide] increases. Nitroxide acts catalytically since its oxidized form is readily reduced to the nitroxide mainly by H 2 O 2 . The nitroxide efficacy follows the order 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidine-N-oxyl (TPO)>4-OH-TPO>3-carbamoyl proxyl>4-oxo-TPO, which correlates with the order of the rate constants of nitroxide reactions with compounds I, II, and III. Nitroxide catalytically protects HRP against inactivation induced by H 2 O 2 while modulating its catalase-like activity. The protective role of nitroxide at μM concentrations is attributed to its efficient oxidation by P940, which is the precursor of the inactivated form P670. Modeling the dismutation kinetics in the presence of nitroxide adequately fits the experimental data. In the absence of nitroxide the simulation fits the observed kinetics only if it does not include the formation of a Michaelis-Menten complex. Nitroxides catalytically protect heme proteins against inactivation induced by H 2 O 2 revealing an additional role played by nitroxide antioxidants in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Size-dependent tuning of horseradish peroxidase bioreactivity by gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haohao; Liu, Yi; Li, Meng; Chong, Yu; Zeng, Mingyong; Lo, Y. Martin; Yin, Jun-Jie

    2015-02-01

    Molecules with diverse biological functions, such as heme peroxidases, can be useful tools for identifying potential biological effects of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) at the molecular level. Here, using UV-Vis, circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering, and electron spin resonance spectroscopy, we report tuning of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) bioactivity by reactant-free AuNPs with diameters of 5, 10, 15, 30 and 60 nm (Au-5 nm, Au-10 nm, Au-15 nm, Au-30 nm and Au-60 nm). HRP conjugation to AuNPs was observed with only Au-5 nm and Au-10 nm prominently increasing the α-helicity of the enzyme to extents inversely related to their size. Au-5 nm inhibited both HRP peroxidase activity toward 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine and HRP compound I/II reactivity toward 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide. Au-5 nm enhanced the HRP peroxidase activity toward ascorbic acid and the HRP compound I/II reactivity toward redox-active residues in the HRP protein moiety. Further, Au-5 nm also decreased the catalase- and oxidase-like activities of HRP. Au-10 nm showed similar, but weaker effects, while Au-15 nm, Au-30 nm and Au-60 nm had no effect. Results suggest that AuNPs can size-dependently enhance or inhibit HRP bioreactivity toward substrates with different redox potentials via a mechanism involving extension of the HRP substrate access channel and decline in the redox potentials of HRP catalytic intermediates.Molecules with diverse biological functions, such as heme peroxidases, can be useful tools for identifying potential biological effects of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) at the molecular level. Here, using UV-Vis, circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering, and electron spin resonance spectroscopy, we report tuning of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) bioactivity by reactant-free AuNPs with diameters of 5, 10, 15, 30 and 60 nm (Au-5 nm, Au-10 nm, Au-15 nm, Au-30 nm and Au-60 nm). HRP conjugation to AuNPs was observed with only Au-5 nm and Au-10 nm prominently increasing the

  18. The Thr-His Connection on the Distal Heme of Catalase-Related Hemoproteins: A Hallmark of Reaction with Fatty Acid Hydroperoxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashhadi, Zahra; Newcomer, Marcia E; Brash, Alan R

    2016-11-03

    This review focuses on a group of heme peroxidases that retain the catalase fold in structure, yet show little or no reaction with hydrogen peroxide. Instead of having a role in oxidative defense, these enzymes are involved in secondary metabolite biosynthesis. The prototypical enzyme is catalase-related allene oxide synthase, an enzyme that converts a specific fatty acid hydroperoxide to the corresponding allene oxide (epoxide). Other catalase-related enzymes form allylic epoxides, aldehydes, or a bicyclobutane fatty acid. In all catalases (including these relatives), a His residue on the distal face of the heme is absolutely required for activity. Its immediate neighbor in sequence as well as in 3 D space is conserved as Val in true catalases and Thr in the fatty acid hydroperoxide-metabolizing enzymes. Thr-His on the distal face of the heme is critical in switching the substrate specificity from H 2 O 2 to fatty acid hydroperoxide. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. A peroxidase gene expressed during early developmental stages of the parasitic plant Orobanche ramosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Verdejo, Clara Isabel; Barandiaran, Xabier; Moreno, Maria Teresa; Cubero, José Ignacio; Di Pietro, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    Broomrapes (Orobanche spp.) are holoparasitic weeds that cause devastating losses in many economically important crops. The molecular mechanisms that control the early stages of host infection in Orobanche are poorly understood. In the present study, the role of peroxidase has been examined during pre-infection growth and development of O. ramosa, using an in vitro model system. Peroxidase activity was histochemically localized at the tips of actively growing radicles and nascent attachment organs. Addition of exogenous catalase resulted in a significant reduction in the apical growth rate of the radicle. The prx1 gene encoding a putative class III peroxidase was cloned from a cDNA library of O. ramosa and was found to be expressed specifically during the early stages of the parasitic life cycle. The exogenous addition of sucrose resulted in significantly reduced prx1 transcript levels and in a dramatic change in radicle development from polarized apical growth to isotropic growth and the formation of tubercle-like structures. The results indicate an important role of peroxidases during the early parasitic stages of Orobanche.

  20. Modulation of the Activities of Catalase, Cu-Zn, Mn Superoxide Dismutase, and Glutathione Peroxidase in Adipocyte from Ovariectomised Female Rats with Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca Cambray Guerra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between estrogen removal, antioxidant enzymes, and oxidative stress generated by obesity in a MS female rat model. Thirty two female Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups: Control (C, MS, MS ovariectomized (Ovx, and MS Ovx plus estradiol (E2. MS was induced by administering 30% sucrose to drinking water for 24 weeks. After sacrifice, intra-abdominal fat was dissected; adipocytes were isolated and lipid peroxidation, non-enzymatic antioxidant capacity, and the activities of Cu-Zn and Mn superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx were determined. There were no significant differences in the activities of Cu-Zn, Mn SOD, CAT, and GPx between the C and MS groups, but in the MS Ovx group there was a statistically significant decrease in the activities of these enzymes when compared to MS and MS Ovx+E2. The increased lipid peroxidation and nonenzymatic antioxidant capacity found in MS Ovx was significantly decreased when compared to MS and MS Ovx+E2. In conclusion, the removal of E2 by ovariectomy decreases the activity of the antioxidant enzymes in the intra-abdominal tissue of MS female rats; this is reflected by increased lipid peroxidation and decreased nonenzymatic antioxidant capacity.

  1. Differential expression of catalase genes in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willekens, H; Langebartels, C; Tiré, C; Van Montagu, M; Inzé, D; Van Camp, W

    1994-10-25

    We have analyzed the expression of three catalase (Cat; EC 1.11.1.6) genes from Nicotiana plumbaginifolia by means of RNA blot and in situ hybridizations. Our data demonstrate that the expression of each catalase is associated with a particular H2O2-producing process. Cat1 appears to be specifically involved in the scavenging of photorespiratory H2O2 and is under control of a circadian rhythm, Cat2 is uniformly expressed in different organs with a cellular preference for vascular tissues, and the expression profile of Cat3 points to a role in glyoxysomal processes. Differential expression of these catalases is also manifested in response to temperature changes. DNA sequence comparison with other dicotyledonous catalases led to the identification of at least three distinct classes, which indicates that the functional organization of catalases is generally conserved in dicotyledonous plants.

  2. Decrease in catalase activity of Folsomia candida fed a Bt rice diet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan Yiyang, E-mail: yuanyy@ioz.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Integrated Management of Pest and Rodents, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1 Beichen West Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101 (China); Graduate School, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Ke Xin, E-mail: xinke@sibs.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Plant Physiology and Ecology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 300 Fenglin Road, Shanghai 200032 (China); Chen Fajun, E-mail: fajunchen@njau.edu.cn [College of Plant Protection, Department of Entomology, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Krogh, Paul Henning, E-mail: phk@dmu.dk [Department of Bioscience, University of Aarhus, P.O. Box 314, Vejlsoevej 25, DK-8600 Silkeborg (Denmark); Ge Feng, E-mail: gef@ioz.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Integrated Management of Pest and Rodents, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1 Beichen West Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2011-12-15

    Here we report the effects of three Bt-rice varieties and their non-Bt conventional isolines on biological traits including survival, reproduction, and the activities of three antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase, in the Collembolan, Folsomia candida. The reproduction was significantly lower when fed Kemingdao and Huahui1 than those feeding on their non-GM near-isogenic varieties Xiushui and Minghui63 respectively, this can be explained by the differences of plant compositions depended on variety of rice. The catalase activity of F. candida was significantly lower when fed the Bt-rice variety Kemingdao compared to the near-isogenic non-Bt-rice variety Xiushui. This suggests that some Bt-rice varieties may impose environmental stress to collembolans. We emphasize that changes in activity of antioxidant enzymes of non-target organisms are important in understanding the ecological consequences for organisms inhabiting transgenic Bt-rice plantations. - Highlights: > We examine the effects of Bt-rice on Folsomia candida with laboratory test. > The reproduction of F. candida was decreased by two Bt-rice varieties. > Decreased reproduction caused by the differences of varieties or C/N ratio of rice. > The catalase activity was decreased by Bt-rice Kemingdao. > Some Bt-rice may impose environmental stress on NTOs. - The catalase of the collembolan (Folsomia candida) was decreased when fed Bt-rice, Kemingdao.

  3. Decrease in catalase activity of Folsomia candida fed a Bt rice diet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Yiyang; Ke Xin; Chen Fajun; Krogh, Paul Henning; Ge Feng

    2011-01-01

    Here we report the effects of three Bt-rice varieties and their non-Bt conventional isolines on biological traits including survival, reproduction, and the activities of three antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase, in the Collembolan, Folsomia candida. The reproduction was significantly lower when fed Kemingdao and Huahui1 than those feeding on their non-GM near-isogenic varieties Xiushui and Minghui63 respectively, this can be explained by the differences of plant compositions depended on variety of rice. The catalase activity of F. candida was significantly lower when fed the Bt-rice variety Kemingdao compared to the near-isogenic non-Bt-rice variety Xiushui. This suggests that some Bt-rice varieties may impose environmental stress to collembolans. We emphasize that changes in activity of antioxidant enzymes of non-target organisms are important in understanding the ecological consequences for organisms inhabiting transgenic Bt-rice plantations. - Highlights: → We examine the effects of Bt-rice on Folsomia candida with laboratory test. → The reproduction of F. candida was decreased by two Bt-rice varieties. → Decreased reproduction caused by the differences of varieties or C/N ratio of rice. → The catalase activity was decreased by Bt-rice Kemingdao. → Some Bt-rice may impose environmental stress on NTOs. - The catalase of the collembolan (Folsomia candida) was decreased when fed Bt-rice, Kemingdao.

  4. Erythrocyte superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase activities and risk of coronary heart disease in generally healthy women: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuman; Jensen, Majken K; Rimm, Eric B; Willett, Walter; Wu, Tianying

    2014-11-01

    Erythrocyte antioxidant enzymes are major circulating antioxidant enzymes in the oxidative stress defense system. Few prospective studies have assessed the association between these enzymes and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in generally healthy adults. We conducted a prospective nested case-control study of CHD among 32,826 women at baseline with 15 years of follow-up from 1989 to 2004 in the Nurses' Health Study. We investigated the association of baseline erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase (CAT) activities with the risk of CHD. A total of 365 cases and 728 controls were included in the analysis. Overall, the relative risks of CHD associated with 1-standard deviation higher SOD, GPx, and CAT activities were 1.07 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.94, 1.22), 1.04 (95% CI: 0.91, 1.18), and 1.04 (95% CI: 0.92, 1.17), respectively. Multivariable adjustments did not change the associations appreciably. Fasting status did not modify the associations, with the exception that SOD activity was positively associated with the risk of CHD among participants who provided blood samples within 12 hours of fasting. Overall, activities of SOD, GPx, and CAT were not associated with CHD among women who were generally healthy at the time of blood collection. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Redox regulation of antioxidant enzymes: post-translational modulation of catalase and glutathione peroxidase activity by resveratrol in diabetic rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadi, Gökhan; Bozan, Davut; Yildiz, Huseyin Bekir

    2014-08-01

    Resveratrol is a strong antioxidant that exhibits blood glucose-lowering effects, which might contribute to its usefulness in preventing complications associated with diabetes. The present study aimed to investigate resveratrol effects on catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) gene and protein expression, their phosphorylation states and activities in rat liver of STZ-induced diabetes. Diabetes increased the levels of total protein phosphorylation and p-CAT, while mRNA expression, protein levels, and activity were reduced. Although diabetes induced transcriptional repression over GPx, it did not affect the protein levels and activity. When resveratrol was administered to diabetic rats, an increase in activity was associated with an increase in p-GPx levels. Decrease in Sirtuin1 (SIRT1) and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) and increase in nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) gene expression in diabetes were associated with a decrease in CAT and GPx mRNA expression. A possible compensatory mechanism for reduced gene expression of antioxidant enzymes is proved to be nuclear translocation of redox-sensitive Nrf2 and NFκB in diabetes which is confirmed by the increase in nuclear and decrease in cytoplasmic protein levels of Nrf2 and NFκB. Taken together, these findings revealed that an increase in the oxidized state in diabetes intricately modified the cellular phosphorylation status and regulation of antioxidant enzymes. Gene regulation of antioxidant enzymes was accompanied by nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and NFκB. Resveratrol administration also activated a coordinated cytoprotective response against diabetes-induced changes in liver tissues.

  6. Applying the One Health Concept to Mycobacterial Research - Overcoming Parochialism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirunavukkarasu, S; Plain, K M; de Silva, K; Marais, B J; Whittington, R J

    2017-09-01

    Mycobacterial infections remain a public health problem. Historically important, globally ubiquitous and with a wide host range, we are still struggling to control mycobacterial infections in humans and animals. While previous reviews have focused on individual mycobacterial infections in either humans or animals, a comprehensive review of the zoonotic aspect of mycobacteria in the context of the One Health initiative is lacking. With the purpose of providing a concise and comprehensive resource, we have collated literature to address the zoonotic potential of different mycobacterial species and elaborate on the necessity for an inter-sectorial approach to attain a new vision to combat mycobacterial infections. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  7. Anti-Mycobacterial Peptides: From Human to Phage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tieshan Teng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the major pathogen of tuberculosis (TB. With the growing problem of M. tuberculosis resistant to conventional antibiotics, especially multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB and extensively-drug resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB, the need for new TB drugs is now more prominent than ever. Among the promising candidates for anti-TB drugs, anti-mycobacterial peptides have a few advantages, such as low immunogenicity, selective affinity to prokaryotic negatively charged cell envelopes, and diverse modes of action. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in the anti-mycobacterial peptides, highlighting the sources, effectiveness and bactericidal mechanisms of these antimicrobial peptides. Most of the current anti-mycobacterial peptides are derived either from host immune cells, bacterial extraction, or mycobacteriophages. Besides trans-membrane pore formation, which is considered to be the common bactericidal mechanism, many of the anti-mycobacterial peptides have the second non-membrane targets within mycobacteria. Additionally, some antimicrobial peptides play critical roles in innate immunity. However, a few obstacles, such as short half-life in vivo and resistance to antimicrobial peptides, need overcoming before clinical applications. Nevertheless, the multiple functions of anti-mycobacterial peptides, especially direct killing of pathogens and immune-modulators in infectious and inflammatory conditions, indicate that they are promising candidates for future drug development.

  8. Profiling of wheat class III peroxidase genes derived from powdery mildew-attacked epidermis reveals distinct sequence-associated expression patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guosheng; Sheng, Xiaoyan; Greenshields, David L; Ogieglo, Adam; Kaminskyj, Susan; Selvaraj, Gopalan; Wei, Yangdou

    2005-07-01

    A cDNA library was constructed from leaf epidermis of diploid wheat (Triticum monococcum) infected with the powdery mildew fungus (Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici) and was screened for genes encoding peroxidases. From 2,500 expressed sequence tags (ESTs), 36 cDNAs representing 10 peroxidase genes (designated TmPRX1 to TmPRX10) were isolated and further characterized. Alignment of the deduced amino acid sequences and phylogenetic clustering with peroxidases from other plant species demonstrated that these peroxidases fall into four distinct groups. Differential expression and tissue-specific localization among the members were observed during the B. graminis f. sp. tritici attack using Northern blots and reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analyses. Consistent with its abundance in the EST collection, TmPRX1 expression showed the highest induction during pathogen attack and fluctuated in response to the fungal parasitic stages. TmPRX1 to TmPRX6 were expressed predominantly in mesophyll cells, whereas TmPRX7 to TmPRX10, which feature a putative C-terminal propeptide, were detectable mainly in epidermal cells. Using TmPRX8 as a representative, we demonstrated that its C-terminal propeptide was sufficient to target a green fluorescent protein fusion protein to the vacuoles in onion cells. Finally, differential expression profiles of the TmPRXs after abiotic stresses and signal molecule treatments were used to dissect the potential role of these peroxidases in multiple stress and defense pathways.

  9. Network Analysis of Human Genes Influencing Susceptibility to Mycobacterial Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipner, Ettie M.; Garcia, Benjamin J.; Strong, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections constitute a high burden of pulmonary disease in humans, resulting in over 1.5 million deaths per year. Building on the premise that genetic factors influence the instance, progression, and defense of infectious disease, we undertook a systems biology approach to investigate relationships among genetic factors that may play a role in increased susceptibility or control of mycobacterial infections. We combined literature and database mining with network analysis and pathway enrichment analysis to examine genes, pathways, and networks, involved in the human response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections. This approach allowed us to examine functional relationships among reported genes, and to identify novel genes and enriched pathways that may play a role in mycobacterial susceptibility or control. Our findings suggest that the primary pathways and genes influencing mycobacterial infection control involve an interplay between innate and adaptive immune proteins and pathways. Signaling pathways involved in autoimmune disease were significantly enriched as revealed in our networks. Mycobacterial disease susceptibility networks were also examined within the context of gene-chemical relationships, in order to identify putative drugs and nutrients with potential beneficial immunomodulatory or anti-mycobacterial effects. PMID:26751573

  10. Superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and gluthatione S-transferases M1 and T1 gene polymorphisms in three Brazilian population groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Hiragi, Cássia; Miranda-Vilela, Ana Luisa; Rocha, Dulce Maria Sucena; de Oliveira, Silviene Fabiana; Hatagima, Ana; de Nazaré Klautau-Guimarães, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX1) reduce the oxidation rates in the organism. Gluthatione S-transferases (GSTs) play a vital role in phase 2 of biotransformation of many substances. Variation in the expression of these enzymes suggests individual differences for the degree of antioxidant protection and geographical differences in the distribution of these variants. We described the distribution frequency of CAT (21A/T), SOD2 (Ala9Val), GPX1 (Pro198Leu), GSTM1 and GSTT1 polymorphisms in three Brazilian population groups: Kayabi Amerindians (n = 60), Kalunga Afro-descendants (n = 72), and an urban mixed population from Federal District (n = 162). Frequencies of the variants observed in Kalunga (18% to 58%) and Federal District (33% to 63%) were similar to those observed in Euro and Afro-descendants, while in Kayabi (3% to 68%), depending on the marker, frequencies were similar to the ones found in different ethnic groups. Except for SOD2 in all population groups studied here, and for GPX1 in Kalunga, the genotypic distributions were in accordance with Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium. These data can clarify the contribution of different ethnicities in the formation of mixed populations, such as that of Brazil. Moreover, outcomes will be valuable resources for future functional studies and for genetic studies in specific populations. If these studies are designed to comprehensively explore the role of these genetic polymorphisms in the etiology of human diseases they may help to prevent inconsistent genotype-phenotype associations in pharmacogenetic studies.

  11. The three catalases in Deinococcus radiodurans: Only two show catalase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Sun-Wook [Research Division for Biotechnology, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup, 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biological Sciences, College of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Min-Kyu; Seo, Ho Seong [Research Division for Biotechnology, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup, 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Heon-Man [Department of Biological Sciences, College of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Sangyong, E-mail: saylim@kaeri.re.kr [Research Division for Biotechnology, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup, 580-185 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    Deinococcus radiodurans, which is extremely resistant to ionizing radiation and oxidative stress, is known to have three catalases (DR1998, DRA0146, and DRA0259). In this study, to investigate the role of each catalase, we constructed catalase mutants (Δdr1998, ΔdrA0146, and ΔdrA0259) of D. radiodurans. Of the three mutants, Δdr1998 exhibited the greatest decrease in hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) resistance and the highest increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels following H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatments, whereas ΔdrA0146 showed no change in its H{sub 2}O{sub 2} resistance or ROS level. Catalase activity was not attenuated in ΔdrA0146, and none of the three bands detected in an in-gel catalase activity assay disappeared in ΔdrA0146. The purified His-tagged recombinant DRA0146 did not show catalase activity. In addition, the phylogenetic analysis of the deinococcal catalases revealed that the DR1998-type catalase is common in the genus Deinococcus, but the DRA0146-type catalase was found in only 4 of 23 Deinococcus species. Taken together, these results indicate that DR1998 plays a critical role in the anti-oxidative system of D. radiodurans by detoxifying H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, but DRA0146 does not have catalase activity and is not involved in the resistance to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stress. - Highlights: • The dr1998 mutant strain lost 90% of its total catalase activity. • Increased ROS levels and decreased H{sub 2}O{sub 2} resistance were observed in dr1998 mutants. • Lack of drA0146 did not affect any oxidative stress-related phenotypes. • The purified DRA0146 did not show catalase activity.

  12. The three catalases in Deinococcus radiodurans: Only two show catalase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Sun-Wook; Jung, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Min-Kyu; Seo, Ho Seong; Lim, Heon-Man; Lim, Sangyong

    2016-01-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans, which is extremely resistant to ionizing radiation and oxidative stress, is known to have three catalases (DR1998, DRA0146, and DRA0259). In this study, to investigate the role of each catalase, we constructed catalase mutants (Δdr1998, ΔdrA0146, and ΔdrA0259) of D. radiodurans. Of the three mutants, Δdr1998 exhibited the greatest decrease in hydrogen peroxide (H_2O_2) resistance and the highest increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels following H_2O_2 treatments, whereas ΔdrA0146 showed no change in its H_2O_2 resistance or ROS level. Catalase activity was not attenuated in ΔdrA0146, and none of the three bands detected in an in-gel catalase activity assay disappeared in ΔdrA0146. The purified His-tagged recombinant DRA0146 did not show catalase activity. In addition, the phylogenetic analysis of the deinococcal catalases revealed that the DR1998-type catalase is common in the genus Deinococcus, but the DRA0146-type catalase was found in only 4 of 23 Deinococcus species. Taken together, these results indicate that DR1998 plays a critical role in the anti-oxidative system of D. radiodurans by detoxifying H_2O_2, but DRA0146 does not have catalase activity and is not involved in the resistance to H_2O_2 stress. - Highlights: • The dr1998 mutant strain lost 90% of its total catalase activity. • Increased ROS levels and decreased H_2O_2 resistance were observed in dr1998 mutants. • Lack of drA0146 did not affect any oxidative stress-related phenotypes. • The purified DRA0146 did not show catalase activity.

  13. Comparative analysis of peroxidase profiles in Chinese kale (Brassica alboglabra L.): evaluation of leaf growth related isozymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lei; Wang, Chenchen; Huang, Jiabao; Zhang, Jianhua; Mao, Zhonggui; Wang, Haiou

    2013-01-15

    Plant peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.7) with different isoforms catalyze various reactions in plant growth and development. However, it is difficult to elucidate the function of each isozyme in one plant. Here, we compared profiles of entire isozyme in young seedling and mature leaves of Chinese kale (Brassica alboglabra L.) on zymogram and ion exchange chromatography in order to investigate leaf growth related peroxidase isozymes. The results showed that four isozymes were constitutively expressed in kale leaves, whereas other two isozymes were induced in the mature leaves. The Mono Q ion exchange chromatography separated the six isozymes into two major groups due to the difference in their isoelectric points. The results suggested that although there were several isozymes in the leaves of Chinese kale, one isozyme functioned mainly through the leaf development. Two anionic isozymes with molecular weights lower than 32 kDa were considered mature related. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The three catalases in Deinococcus radiodurans: Only two show catalase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Sun-Wook; Jung, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Min-Kyu; Seo, Ho Seong; Lim, Heon-Man; Lim, Sangyong

    2016-01-15

    Deinococcus radiodurans, which is extremely resistant to ionizing radiation and oxidative stress, is known to have three catalases (DR1998, DRA0146, and DRA0259). In this study, to investigate the role of each catalase, we constructed catalase mutants (Δdr1998, ΔdrA0146, and ΔdrA0259) of D. radiodurans. Of the three mutants, Δdr1998 exhibited the greatest decrease in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) resistance and the highest increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels following H2O2 treatments, whereas ΔdrA0146 showed no change in its H2O2 resistance or ROS level. Catalase activity was not attenuated in ΔdrA0146, and none of the three bands detected in an in-gel catalase activity assay disappeared in ΔdrA0146. The purified His-tagged recombinant DRA0146 did not show catalase activity. In addition, the phylogenetic analysis of the deinococcal catalases revealed that the DR1998-type catalase is common in the genus Deinococcus, but the DRA0146-type catalase was found in only 4 of 23 Deinococcus species. Taken together, these results indicate that DR1998 plays a critical role in the anti-oxidative system of D. radiodurans by detoxifying H2O2, but DRA0146 does not have catalase activity and is not involved in the resistance to H2O2 stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Disruption of AtWNK8 Enhances Tolerance of Arabidopsis to Salt and Osmotic Stresses via Modulating Proline Content and Activities of Catalase and Peroxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Liao

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available With no lysine kinases (WNKs play important roles in plant growth and development. However, its role in salt and osmotic stress tolerance is unclear. Here, we report that AtWNK8 is mainly expressed in primary root, hypocotyl, stamen and pistil and is induced by NaCl and sorbitol treatment. Compared to the wild-type, the T-DNA knock-out wnk8 mutant was more tolerant to severe salinity and osmotic stresses, as indicated by 27% and 198% more fresh weight in the NaCl and sorbitol treatment, respectively. The wnk8 mutant also accumulated 1.43-fold more proline than the wild-type in the sorbitol treatment. Under NaCl and sorbitol stresses, catalase (CAT activity in wnk8 mutant was 1.92- and 3.7-times of that in Col-0, respectively. Similarly, under salt and osmotic stress conditions, peroxidase (POD activities in wnk8 mutant were 1.81- and 1.58-times of that in Col-0, respectively. Taken together, we revealed that maintaining higher CAT and POD activities might be one of the reasons that the disruption of AtWNK8 enhances the tolerance to salt stress, and accumulating more proline and higher activities of CAT and POD might result in the higher tolerance of WNK8 to osmotic stress.

  16. microRNAs in mycobacterial disease: friend or foe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manali D Mehta

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available As the role of microRNA in all aspects of biology continues to be unraveled, the interplay between microRNAs and human disease is becoming clearer. It should come of no surprise that microRNAs play a major part in the outcome of infectious diseases, since early work has implicated microRNAs as regulators of the immune response. Here, we provide a review on how microRNAs influence the course of mycobacterial infections, which cause two of humanity’s most ancient infectious diseases: tuberculosis and leprosy. Evidence derived from profiling and functional experiments suggests that regulation of specific microRNAs during infection can either enhance the immune response or facilitate pathogen immune evasion. Now, it remains to be seen if the manipulation of host cell microRNA profiles can be an opportunity for therapeutic intervention for these difficult-to-treat diseases.

  17. Mycobacterial infection and atopy in childhood : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obihara, Charles C.; Bollen, Casper W.; Beyers, Nulda; Kimpen, Jan L. L.

    2007-01-01

    The epidemiological relation between mycobacterial infection and the prevalence of atopic disease in humans is still unclear. This is in contrast to studies in murine models in which a clear suppression of atopic symptoms was observed after exposure to mycobacteria or mycobacterial products. We

  18. Catalase activity of IgG antibodies from the sera of healthy donors and patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, Evgeny A; Smirnova, Ludmila P; Bokhan, Nikolay A; Semke, Arkadiy V; Ivanova, Svetlana A; Buneva, Valentina N; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2017-01-01

    We present first evidence showing that some electrophoretically homogeneous IgGs from the sera of patients with schizophrenia (36.4%) and their Fab and F(ab)2 fragments as well as from healthy donors (33.3%) possess catalase activity. The relative catalase activity of IgGs from the sera of individual schizophrenia patients (and healthy donors) significantly varied from patient to patient, but the activity of IgGs from healthy donors is on average 15.8-fold lower than that for schizophrenia patients. After extensive dialysis of purified IgGs against EDTA chelating metal ions, the relative catalase activity of IgGs decreases on average approximately 2.5-3.7-fold; all IgGs possess metal-dependent and independent catalase activity. The addition of external Me2+ ions to dialyzed and non-dialyzed IgGs leads to a significant increase in their activity. The best activator of dialyzed and non-dialyzed IgGs is Co2+, the activation by Cu2+, Mn2+, and Ni2+ ions were rare and always lower than by Co2+. Every IgG preparation demonstrates several individual sets of very well expressed pH optima in the pH range from 4.0 to 9.5. These data speak for the individual repertoire of catalase IgGs in every person and an extreme diversity of abzymes in their pH optima and activation by different metal ions. It is known that antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutases, catalases, and glutathione peroxidases represent critical defense mechanisms preventing oxidative modifications of DNA, proteins, and lipids. Catalase activity of human IgGs could probably also play a major role in the protection of organisms from oxidative stress and toxic compounds.

  19. Rapidly-growing mycobacterial infection: a recognized cause of early-onset prosthetic joint infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jitmuang, Anupop; Yuenyongviwat, Varah; Charoencholvanich, Keerati; Chayakulkeeree, Methee

    2017-12-28

    Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a major complication of total hip and total knee arthroplasty (THA, TKA). Although mycobacteria are rarely the causative pathogens, it is important to recognize and treat them differently from non-mycobacterial infections. This study aimed to compare the clinical characteristics, associated factors and long-term outcomes of mycobacterial and non-mycobacterial PJI. We conducted a retrospective case-control study of patients aged ≥18 years who were diagnosed with PJI of the hip or knee at Siriraj Hospital from January 2000 to December 2012. Patient characteristics, clinical data, treatments and outcomes were evaluated. A total of 178 patients were included, among whom 162 had non-mycobacterial PJI and 16 had mycobacterial PJI. Rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) (11) and M. tuberculosis (MTB) (5) were the causative pathogens of mycobacterial PJI. PJI duration and time until onset were significantly different between mycobacterial and non-mycobacterial PJI. Infection within 90 days of arthroplasty was significantly associated with RGM infection (OR 21.86; 95% CI 4.25-112.30; p infection. RGM were the major pathogens of early onset PJI after THA and TKA. Both a high clinical index of suspicion and mycobacterial cultures are recommended when medically managing PJI with negative cultures or non-response to antibiotics. Removal of infected implants was associated with favorable outcomes.

  20. [Mycobacterial bovis BCG cutaneous infections following mesotherapy: 2 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco-Bonnet, J; Beylot-Barry, M; Texier-Maugein, J; Barucq, J P; Supply, P; Doutre, M S; Beylot, C

    2002-05-01

    Infectious complications following mesotherapy are usually due to ordinary bacteria or atypical mycobacteria. We report two new cases of mycobacterial bovis BCG infections following mesotherapy. To our knowledge only one case has already been reported. A 52 year-old woman developed vaccinal MERIEUX BCG cutaneous abscesses following mesotherapy. Identification was made by a novel class of repeated sequences: Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units. Despite prolonged anti-tuberculous therapy, complete remission was not obtained and surgical excision was performed. The second case was a 49 year-old man who developed a mycobacterial bovis BCG cutaneous abscess (Connaught) after mesotherapy, the regression of which was obtained with anti-tuberculous therapy. The severity of these two mycobacterial infections following mesotherapy illustrate the potential risks of mesotherapy. Identification is possible by molecular biology techniques (PCR and sequencing). The origin of this infection is unclear and therapeutic decision is difficult. Some authors recommend anti-tuberculous therapy but surgical excision may be necessary as in our cases.

  1. Characterization of Catalase from Psychrotolerant Psychrobacter piscatorii T-3 Exhibiting High Catalase Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto, Hideyuki; Yoshimune, Kazuaki; Matsuyma, Hidetoshi; Yumoto, Isao

    2012-01-01

    A psychrotolerant bacterium, strain T-3 (identified as Psychrobacter piscatorii), that exhibited an extraordinarily high catalase activity was isolated from the drain pool of a plant that uses H2O2 as a bleaching agent. Its cell extract exhibited a catalase activity (19,700 U·mg protein−1) that was higher than that of Micrococcus luteus used for industrial catalase production. Catalase was approximately 10% of the total proteins in the cell extract of the strain. The catalase (PktA) was purified homogeneously by only two purification steps, anion exchange and hydrophobic chromatographies. The purified catalase exhibited higher catalytic efficiency and higher sensitivity of activity at high temperatures than M. luteus catalase. The deduced amino acid sequence showed the highest homology with catalase of Psycrobacter cryohalolentis, a psychrotolelant bacterium obtained from Siberian permafrost. These findings suggest that the characteristics of the PktA molecule reflected the taxonomic relationship of the isolate as well as the environmental conditions (low temperatures and high concentrations of H2O2) under which the bacterium survives. Strain T-3 efficiently produces a catalase (PktA) at a higher rate than Exiguobacterium oxidotolerans, which produces a very strong activity of catalase (EktA) at a moderate rate, in order to adapt to high concentration of H2O2. PMID:22408420

  2. Characterization of Catalase from Psychrotolerant Psychrobacter piscatorii T-3 Exhibiting High Catalase Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Kimoto, Hideyuki; Yoshimune, Kazuaki; Matsuyma, Hidetoshi; Yumoto, Isao

    2012-01-01

    A psychrotolerant bacterium, strain T-3 (identified as Psychrobacter piscatorii), that exhibited an extraordinarily high catalase activity was isolated from the drain pool of a plant that uses H2O2 as a bleaching agent. Its cell extract exhibited a catalase activity (19,700 U·mg protein−1) that was higher than that of Micrococcus luteus used for industrial catalase production. Catalase was approximately 10% of the total proteins in the cell extract of the strain. The catalase (PktA) was purif...

  3. Enzymatic biosensor of horseradish peroxidase immobilized on Au-Pt nanotube/Au-graphene for the simultaneous determination of antioxidants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Long; Yin, Wenmin; Tang, Kun; Li, Dian; Shao, Kang; Zuo, Yunpeng; Ma, Jing; Liu, Jiawei; Han, Heyou, E-mail: hyhan@mail.hzau.edu.cn

    2016-08-24

    A new electrochemical method has been proposed for the simultaneous determination of butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and propyl gallate (PG) in food matrices based on enzymatic biosensors. Spiny Au-Pt nanotubes (SAP NTs) was first synthesized and demonstrated to exhibit intrinsic peroxidase and catalase-like activity. The structure of SAP NTs provides large surface area and favorable medium for electron transfer, on which HRP were immobilized and acted as enzymatic biosensor for the simultaneous detection of BHA and PG. The results revealed that BHA and PG both have well-defined oxidation waves with peak potentials of 624 and 655 mV, respectively. Under the optimal conditions, the method behaved satisfactory analytical performance towards BHA and PG with a wide linear range of 0.3–50 mg L{sup −1} and 0.1–100 mg L{sup −1}, as well as a detection limit of 0.046 mg L{sup −1} and 0.024 mg L{sup −1} (3σ/slope), respectively. Besides, the proposed method exhibits good sensitivity, stability and reproducibility, providing an alternative to fabricate electrode and construct sensitive biosensors. - Highlights: • SAP NTs was synthesized and demonstrated to exhibit intrinsic peroxidase and catalase-like activity. • The structure of SAP NTs provides larger surface area and more favorable medium for electron transfer. • Horseradish peroxidase immobilized on Au-Pt nanotube/Au-graphene acted as enzymatic biosensor. • The simultaneous detection of BHA and PG in food matrices was achieved based on enzymatic biosensors.

  4. Heme-coordinated histidine residues form non-specific functional "ferritin-heme" peroxidase system: Possible and partial mechanistic relevance to oxidative stress-mediated pathology in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeili, Sajjad; Kooshk, Mohammad Reza Ashrafi; Asghari, Seyyed Mohsen; Khodarahmi, Reza

    2016-10-01

    Ferritin is a giant protein composed of 24 subunits which is able to sequester up to 4500 atoms of iron. We proposed two kinds of heme binding sites in mammalian ferritins and provided direct evidence for peroxidase activity of heme-ferritin, since there is the possibility that "ferritin-heme" systems display unexpected catalytic behavior like heme-containing enzymes. In the current study, peroxidase activity of heme-bound ferritin was studied using TMB(1), l-DOPA, serotonin, and dopamine, in the presence of H2O2, as oxidant substrate. The catalytic oxidation of TMB was consistent with first-order kinetics with respect to ferritin concentration. Perturbation of the binding affinity and catalytic behavior of heme-bound His-modified ferritin were also documented. We also discuss the importance of the peroxidase-/nitrative-mediated oxidation of vital molecules as well as ferritin-induced catalase inhibition using in vitro experimental system. Uncontrollable "heme-ferritin"-based enzyme activity as well as up-regulation of heme and ferritin may inspire that some oxidative stress-mediated cytotoxic effects in AD-affected cells could be correlated to ferritin-heme interaction and/or ferritin-induced catalase inhibition and describe its contribution as an important causative pathogenesis mechanism in some neurodegenerative disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Mycobacterial growth inhibition is associated with trained innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joosten, Simone A; van Meijgaarden, Krista E; Arend, Sandra M; Prins, Corine; Oftung, Fredrik; Korsvold, Gro Ellen; Kik, Sandra V; Arts, Rob Jw; van Crevel, Reinout; Netea, Mihai G; Ottenhoff, Tom Hm

    2018-05-01

    The lack of defined correlates of protection hampers development of vaccines against tuberculosis (TB). In vitro mycobacterial outgrowth assays are thought to better capture the complexity of the human host/Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) interaction. Here, we used a mycobacterial growth inhibition assay (MGIA) based on peripheral blood mononuclear cells to investigate the capacity to control outgrowth of bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG). Interestingly, strong control of BCG outgrowth was observed almost exclusively in individuals with recent exposure to Mtb, but not in (long-term) latent TB infection, and only modestly in BCG vaccinees. Mechanistically, control of mycobacterial outgrowth strongly correlated with the presence of a CD14dim monocyte population, but also required the presence of T cells. The nonclassical monocytes produced CXCL10, and CXCR3 receptor blockade inhibited the capacity to control BCG outgrowth. Expression of CXCR3 splice variants was altered in recently Mtb-exposed individuals. Cytokines previously associated with trained immunity were detected in MGIA supernatants, and CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11 represent new markers of trained immunity. These data indicate that CXCR3 ligands are associated with trained immunity and are critical factors in controlling mycobacterial outgrowth. In conclusion, control of mycobacterial outgrowth early after exposure to Mtb is the result of trained immunity mediated by a CXCL10-producing nonclassical CD14dim monocyte subset.

  6. Isolation and characterization of a novel catalase-negative, urease-positive Campylobacter from cattle faeces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atabay, H.I.; Corry, J.E.L.; On, S.L.W.

    1997-01-01

    characteristics typical for Campylobacter species. However, they were unusual in that they produced urease and copious H2S in triple sugar iron (TSI) medium, but did not produce catalase. They did not grow aerobically. None of the strains grew on modified cefoperazone charcoal deoxycholate agar (m......CCDA). Macrorestriction profiles of chromosomal DNA were prepared for 15 strains using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Twelve of 15 profiles were identical and all appeared to be closely related. These catalase-negative, urease-positive campylobacters (CNUPC) represent a group not previously reported...

  7. Over-expression of the mycobacterial trehalose-phosphate phosphatase OtsB2 results in a defect in macrophage phagocytosis associated with increased mycobacterial-macrophage adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase (OtsB2 is involved in the OtsAB trehalose synthesis pathway to produce free trehalose and is strictly essential for mycobacterial growth. We wished to determine the effects of OtsB2 expression on mycobacterial phenotypes such as growth, phagocytosis and survival in macrophages. Mycobacterium bovis-BCG (BCG over-expressing OtsB2 were able to better survive in stationary phase. Over-expression of OtsB2 led to a decrease in phagocytosis but not survival in THP-1 macrophage-like cells, and this was not due to a decrease in general macrophage phagocytic activity. Surprisingly, when we investigated macrophage-mycobacterial interactions by flow cytometry and atomic force microscopy, we discovered that BCG over-expressing OtsB2 have stronger binding to THP-1 cells than wild-type BCG. These results suggest that altering OtsB2 expression has implications for mycobacterial host-pathogen interactions. Macrophage-mycobacteria phagocytic interactions are complex and merit further study.

  8. [Catalase gene rs1001179 polymorphism and oxidative stress in patients with chronic hepatitis C and ulcerative colitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulatova, I A; Tretyakova, Yu I; Shchekotov, V V; Shchekotova, A P; Ulitina, P V; Krivtsov, A V; Nenasheva, O Yu

    2015-01-01

    To study the rs1001179 polymorphism of the catalase (CAT) gene and to estimate the serum levels of the enzymes catalase and glutathione peroxidase (GP) in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) and in those with ulcerative colitis (UC) in the Perm Territory. Ninety patients with reactivation-phase CHC and 50 patients with exacerbation-phase UC were examined. The serum levels of catalase and GP were determined and the polymorphic variants of the marker of CAT gene rs1001179 in the DNA isolated from whole blood were found in all the patients. In the CHC and UC groups, the levels of catalase and GP were found to be lower than that in apparently healthy individuals. Furthermore, both groups showed a direct correlation between the activities of the enzymes. In the patients with CHC and in those with UC, the spread of genotypes and alleles generally failed to virtually differ from that in the control group. The G/G genotype was prevalent in all the groups. In the patients with CHC, the minor A allele demonstrated a significant inverse correlation with the enzyme catalase (r = -0.16; p = 0.02) and GP (r = -0.13; p = 0.047). The lower serum levels of catalase and GP are indicative of oxidative stress in the patients with CHC or UC. In the patients with CHC, the significant correlation of the pathological rs1701179 A allele marker with the processes of synthesis of antioxidant enzymes may suggest that CAT gene polymorphism in the A/A homozygotes might affect the regulation mechanism involved in the antioxidant system in the liver.

  9. Catalase and NO CATALASE ACTIVITY1 Promote Autophagy-Dependent Cell Death in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hackenberg, Thomas; Juul, Trine Maxel; Auzina, Aija

    2013-01-01

    Programmed cell death often depends on generation of reactive oxygen species, which can be detoxified by antioxidative enzymes, including catalases. We previously isolated catalase-deficient mutants (cat2) in a screen for resistance to hydroxyurea-induced cell death. Here, we identify...... an Arabidopsis thaliana hydroxyurea-resistant autophagy mutant, atg2, which also shows reduced sensitivity to cell death triggered by the bacterial effector avrRpm1. To test if catalase deficiency likewise affected both hydroxyurea and avrRpm1 sensitivity, we selected mutants with extremely low catalase...... activities and showed that they carried mutations in a gene that we named NO CATALASE ACTIVITY1 (NCA1). nca1 mutants showed severely reduced activities of all three catalase isoforms in Arabidopsis, and loss of NCA1 function led to strong suppression of RPM1-triggered cell death. Basal and starvation...

  10. Guaiacol peroxidase zymography for the undergraduate laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkesman, Jeff; Castro, Diana; Contreras, Lellys M; Kurz, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory exercise presents a novel way to introduce undergraduate students to the specific detection of enzymatic activity by electrophoresis. First, students prepare a crude peroxidase extract and then analyze the homogenate via electrophoresis. Zymography, that is, a SDS-PAGE method to detect enzyme activity, is used to specifically detect peroxidase activity and furthermore, to analyze the total protein profile. After the assay, students may estimate the apparent molecular mass of the enzyme and discuss its structure. After the 4-h experiment, students gain knowledge concerning biological sample preparation, gel preparation, electrophoresis, and the importance of specific staining procedures for the detection of enzymatic activity. Copyright © 2014 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  11. 7 CFR 58.432 - Catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Catalase. 58.432 Section 58.432 Agriculture... Material § 58.432 Catalase. The catalase preparation shall be a stable, buffered solution, neutral in pH, having a potency of not less than 100 Keil units per milliliter. The source of the catalase, its...

  12. Immune Response to Mycobacterial Infection: Lessons from Flow Cytometry

    OpenAIRE

    Rovina, Nikoletta; Panagiotou, Marios; Pontikis, Konstantinos; Kyriakopoulou, Magdalini; Koulouris, Nikolaos G.; Koutsoukou, Antonia

    2013-01-01

    Detecting and treating active and latent tuberculosis are pivotal elements for effective infection control; yet, due to their significant inherent limitations, the diagnostic means for these two stages of tuberculosis (TB) to date remain suboptimal. This paper reviews the current diagnostic tools for mycobacterial infection and focuses on the application of flow cytometry as a promising method for rapid and reliable diagnosis of mycobacterial infection as well as discrimination between active...

  13. The Changing Pattern of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph O Falkinham

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Nontuberculous mycobacteria are human opportunistic pathogens whose source of infection is the environment. These include both slow-growing (eg, Mycobacterium kansasii and Mycobacterium avium and rapid-growing (eg, Mycobacterium abscessus and Mycobacterium fortuitum species. Transmission is through ingestion or inhalation of water, particulate matter or aerosols, or through trauma. The historic presentation of pulmonary disease in older individuals with predisposing lung conditions and in children has been changing. Pulmonary disease in elderly individuals who lack the classic predisposing lung conditions is increasing. Pulmonary disease and hypersensitivity pneumonitis have been linked with occupational or home exposures to nontuberculous mycobacteria. There has been a shift from Mycobacterium scrofulaceum to M avium in children with cervical lymphadenitis. Further, individuals who are immunosuppressed due to therapy or HIV-infection are at a greatly increased risk for nontuberculous mycobacterial infection. The changing pattern of nontuberculous mycobacterial disease is due in part to the ability of these pathogens to survive and proliferate in habitats that they share with humans, such as drinking water. The advent of an aging population and an increase in the proportion of immunosuppressed individuals suggest that the prevalence of nontuberculous mycobacterial disease will increase.

  14. Growth-Dependent Catalase Localization in Exiguobacterium oxidotolerans T-2-2T Reflected by Catalase Activity of Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanaoka, Yoshiko; Takebe, Fumihiko; Nodasaka, Yoshinobu; Hara, Isao; Matsuyama, Hidetoshi; Yumoto, Isao

    2013-01-01

    A psychrotolerant and H2O2-resistant bacterium, Exiguobacterium oxidotolerans T-2-2T, exhibits extraordinary H2O2 resistance and produces catalase not only intracellularly but also extracellularly. The intracellular and extracellular catalases exhibited the same enzymatic characteristics, that is, they exhibited the temperature-dependent activity characteristic of a cold-adapted enzyme, their heat stabilities were similar to those of mesophilic enzymes and very high catalytic intensity. In addition, catalase gene analysis indicated that the bacterium possessed the sole clade 1 catalase gene corresponding to intracellular catalase. Hence, intracellular catalase is secreted into the extracellular space. In addition to intracellular and extracellular catalases, the inner circumference of the cells showed the localization of catalase in the mid-stationary growth phase, which was observed by immunoelectron microscopy using an antibody against the intracellular catalase of the strain. The cells demonstrated higher catalase activity in the mid-stationary growth phase than in the exponential growth phase. The catalase localized in the inner circumference can be dissociated by treatment with Tween 60. Thus, the localized catalase is not tightly bound to the inner circumference of the cells and may play a role in the oxidative defense of the cells under low metabolic state. PMID:24204687

  15. Growth-dependent catalase localization in Exiguobacterium oxidotolerans T-2-2T reflected by catalase activity of cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanaoka, Yoshiko; Takebe, Fumihiko; Nodasaka, Yoshinobu; Hara, Isao; Matsuyama, Hidetoshi; Yumoto, Isao

    2013-01-01

    A psychrotolerant and H2O2-resistant bacterium, Exiguobacterium oxidotolerans T-2-2(T), exhibits extraordinary H2O2 resistance and produces catalase not only intracellularly but also extracellularly. The intracellular and extracellular catalases exhibited the same enzymatic characteristics, that is, they exhibited the temperature-dependent activity characteristic of a cold-adapted enzyme, their heat stabilities were similar to those of mesophilic enzymes and very high catalytic intensity. In addition, catalase gene analysis indicated that the bacterium possessed the sole clade 1 catalase gene corresponding to intracellular catalase. Hence, intracellular catalase is secreted into the extracellular space. In addition to intracellular and extracellular catalases, the inner circumference of the cells showed the localization of catalase in the mid-stationary growth phase, which was observed by immunoelectron microscopy using an antibody against the intracellular catalase of the strain. The cells demonstrated higher catalase activity in the mid-stationary growth phase than in the exponential growth phase. The catalase localized in the inner circumference can be dissociated by treatment with Tween 60. Thus, the localized catalase is not tightly bound to the inner circumference of the cells and may play a role in the oxidative defense of the cells under low metabolic state.

  16. Distribution of a Nocardia brasiliensis Catalase Gene Fragment in Members of the Genera Nocardia, Gordona, and Rhodococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Johnson, Wendy M.; Welsh, Oliverio; Resendiz-Uresti, Francisco L.; Salinas-Carmona, Mario C.

    1999-01-01

    An immunodominant protein from Nocardia brasiliensis, P61, was subjected to amino-terminal and internal sequence analysis. Three sequences of 22, 17, and 38 residues, respectively, were obtained and compared with the protein database from GenBank by using the BLAST system. The sequences showed homology to some eukaryotic catalases and to a bromoperoxidase-catalase from Streptomyces violaceus. Its identity as a catalase was confirmed by analysis of its enzymatic activity on H2O2 and by a double-staining method on a nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel with 3,3′-diaminobenzidine and ferricyanide; the result showed only catalase activity, but no peroxidase. By using one of the internal amino acid sequences and a consensus catalase motif (VGNNTP), we were able to design a PCR assay that generated a 500-bp PCR product. The amplicon was analyzed, and the nucleotide sequence was compared to the GenBank database with the observation of high homology to other bacterial and eukaryotic catalases. A PCR assay based on this target sequence was performed with primers NB10 and NB11 to confirm the presence of the NB10-NB11 gene fragment in several N. brasiliensis strains isolated from mycetoma. The same assay was used to determine whether there were homologous sequences in several type strains from the genera Nocardia, Rhodococcus, Gordona, and Streptomyces. All of the N. brasiliensis strains presented a positive result but only some of the actinomycetes species tested were positive in the PCR assay. In order to confirm these findings, genomic DNA was subjected to Southern blot analysis. A 1.7-kbp band was observed in the N. brasiliensis strains, and bands of different molecular weight were observed in cross-reacting actinomycetes. Sequence analysis of the amplicons of selected actinomycetes showed high homology in this catalase fragment, thus demonstrating that this protein is highly conserved in this group of bacteria. PMID:10325357

  17. Peroxidases in nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria eCarmona-Ribeiro

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Peroxidases are enzymes catalyzing redox reactions that cleave peroxides. Their active redox centers have heme, cysteine thiols, selenium, manganese and other chemical moieties. Peroxidases and their mimetic systems have several technological and biomedical applications such as environment protection, energy production, bioremediation, sensors and immunoassays design and drug delivery devices. The combination of peroxidases or systems with peroxidase-like activity with nanostructures such as nanoparticles, nanotubes, thin films, liposomes, micelles, nanoflowers, nanorods and others is often an efficient strategy to improve catalytic activity, targeting and reusability.

  18. Mn(II) regulation of lignin peroxidases and manganese-dependent peroxidases from lignin-degrading white rot fungi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnarme, P.; Jeffries, T.W.

    1990-01-01

    Two families of peroxidases-lignin peroxidase (LiP) and manganese-dependent lignin peroxidase (MnP)-are formed by the lignin-degrading white rot basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium and other white rot fungi. Isoenzymes of these enzyme families carry out reactions important to the biodegradation of lignin. This research investigated the regulation of LiP and MnP production by Mn(II). In liquid culture, LiP titers varied as an inverse function of and MnP titers varied as a direct function of the Mn(II) concentration. The extracellular isoenzyme profiles differed radically at low and high Mn(II) levels, whereas other fermentation parameters, including extracellular protein concentrations, the glucose consumption rate, and the accumulation of cell dry weight, did not change significantly with the Mn(II) concentration. In the absence of Mn(II), extracellular LiP isoenzymes predominated, whereas in the presence of Mn(II), MnP isoenzymes were dominant. The release of 14 CO 2 from 14 C-labeled dehydrogenative polymerizate lignin was likewise affected by Mn(II). The rate of 14 CO 2 release increased at low Mn(II) and decreased at high Mn(II) concentrations. This regulatory effect of Mn(II) occurred with five strains of P. chrysosporium, two other species of Phanerochaete, three species of Phlebia, Lentinula edodes, and Phellinus pini

  19. Mycobacterial infections: Still a millennium bug - the imaging features of mycobacterial infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, D.M.; Bell, J.R.G.; Burkill, G.J.C.; Padley, S.P.G.; Healy, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    Mycobacterial infection is re-emerging as a major health care concern. Although Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is still the most important pathogen, atypical mycobacterium (AMB) infections are becoming increasingly common. We present a pictorial review of the imaging features of these infections in the chest, abdomen, brain and musculoskeletal system. Imaging similarities and differences between the normal and the immunocompromised host will be highlighted. Koh, D. M. et al. Clinical Radiology (2001)

  20. Daily rhythms of catalase and glutathione peroxidase expression and activity are endogenously driven in the hippocampus and are modified by a vitamin A-free diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navigatore-Fonzo, Lorena S; Delgado, Silvia M; Gimenez, Maria Sofia; Anzulovich, Ana C

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in enzymatic antioxidant defense systems lead to a deficit of cognitive functions and altered hippocampal synaptic plasticity. The objectives of this study were to investigate endogenous rhythms of catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) expression and activity, as well as CREB1 mRNA, in the rat hippocampus, and to evaluate to which extent the vitamin A deficiency could affect those temporal patterns. Rats from control and vitamin A-deficient (VAD) groups received a diet containing 4000 IU of vitamin A/kg diet, or the same diet devoid of vitamin A, respectively, during 3 months. Rats were maintained under 12-hour-dark conditions, during 10 days before the sacrifice. Circadian rhythms of CAT, GPx, RXRγ, and CREB1 mRNA levels were determined by reverse transcriptrase polymerase chain reaction in hippocampus samples isolated every 4 hours during a 24-hour period. CAT and GPx enzymatic activities were also determined by kinetic assays. Regulatory regions of clock and antioxidant enzymes genes were scanned for E-box, RXRE, and CRE sites. E-box, RXRE, and CRE sites were found on regulatory regions of GPx and CAT genes, which display a circadian expression in the rat hippocampus. VAD phase shifted CAT, GPx, and RXRγ endogenous rhythms without affecting circadian expression of CREB1. CAT and GPx expression and enzymatic activity are circadian in the rat hippocampus. The VAD affected the temporal patterns antioxidant genes expression, probably by altering circadian rhythms of its RXR receptors and clock factors; thus, it would impair the temporal orchestration of hippocampal daily cognitive performance.

  1. Zymography Methods to Simultaneously Analyze Superoxide Dismutase and Catalase Activities: Novel Application for Yeast Species Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamero-Sandemetrio, Esther; Gómez-Pastor, Rocío; Matallana, Emilia

    2017-01-01

    We provide an optimized protocol for a double staining technique to analyze superoxide dismutase enzymatic isoforms Cu-Zn SOD (Sod1) and Mn-SOD (Sod2) and catalase in the same polyacrylamide gel. The use of NaCN, which specifically inhibits yeast Sod1 isoform, allows the analysis of Sod2 isoform while the use of H 2 O 2 allows the analysis of catalase. The identification of a different zymography profiling of SOD and catalase isoforms in different yeast species allowed us to propose this technique as a novel yeast identification and classification strategy.

  2. Anti-mycobacterial peptides: made to order with delivery included.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, James; O' Mahony, Jim

    2011-01-01

    "TB is too often a death sentence. It does not have to be this way,"- Nelson Mandela. Despite the success of anti-mycobacterial drugs over the past 70 years, mycobacterial disease, particularly tuberculosis is still responsible for millions of annual deaths worldwide. Additionally, the emergence of Multidrug Resistant (MDR-TB) and Extensively Drug Resistant (XDR-TB) Tuberculosis has motivated calls by the World Health Organization (WHO) for novel drugs, vaccines and diagnostic tests. Consequently, the identification and evaluation of a range of anti-mycobacterial compounds against pathogenic mycobacterial species is of paramount importance. My colleagues and I at Cork Institute of Technology (CIT) and University College Cork (UCC) have tackled this issue through the initial optimization of the rapid, robust and inexpensive microtitre alamarBlue assay (MABA) and subsequent employment of this assay to facilitate the rapid assessment of a new wave of potential therapeutic compounds, namely bacteriocins, in particular type 1 bacteriocins known as lantibiotics. The gene encoded nature of these peptides facilitates their genetic manipulation and consequent activities as anti-microbial agents. In this regard, it may be possible to one day develop diverse populations of anti-mycobacterial bacteriocins with species specific activities. This may in turn provide more targeted therapies, resulting in less side effects, shorter treatment times and thus better patient compliance. Although current drug regimes are effective in the interim, previous lessons have taught us not to be complacent. In the words of the Intel founder Andrew Grove, 'Success breeds complacency. Complacency breeds failure. Only the paranoid survive'. Armed with knowledge of previous failures, it is the duty of the scientific community to anticipate future bacterial resistance and have an arsenal of compounds standing by in such an eventuality.

  3. Catalase and NO CATALASE ACTIVITY1 Promote Autophagy-Dependent Cell Death in Arabidopsis[C][W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackenberg, Thomas; Juul, Trine; Auzina, Aija; Gwiżdż, Sonia; Małolepszy, Anna; Van Der Kelen, Katrien; Dam, Svend; Bressendorff, Simon; Lorentzen, Andrea; Roepstorff, Peter; Lehmann Nielsen, Kåre; Jørgensen, Jan-Elo; Hofius, Daniel; Breusegem, Frank Van; Petersen, Morten; Andersen, Stig Uggerhøj

    2013-01-01

    Programmed cell death often depends on generation of reactive oxygen species, which can be detoxified by antioxidative enzymes, including catalases. We previously isolated catalase-deficient mutants (cat2) in a screen for resistance to hydroxyurea-induced cell death. Here, we identify an Arabidopsis thaliana hydroxyurea-resistant autophagy mutant, atg2, which also shows reduced sensitivity to cell death triggered by the bacterial effector avrRpm1. To test if catalase deficiency likewise affected both hydroxyurea and avrRpm1 sensitivity, we selected mutants with extremely low catalase activities and showed that they carried mutations in a gene that we named NO CATALASE ACTIVITY1 (NCA1). nca1 mutants showed severely reduced activities of all three catalase isoforms in Arabidopsis, and loss of NCA1 function led to strong suppression of RPM1-triggered cell death. Basal and starvation-induced autophagy appeared normal in the nca1 and cat2 mutants. By contrast, autophagic degradation induced by avrRpm1 challenge was compromised, indicating that catalase acted upstream of immunity-triggered autophagy. The direct interaction of catalase with reactive oxygen species could allow catalase to act as a molecular link between reactive oxygen species and the promotion of autophagy-dependent cell death. PMID:24285797

  4. Effect of Pistacia Atlantica Extract on Glutathione Peroxidase Tissue Levels and Total Oxidative Capacity of Liver and Plasma Lipid Profile of Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvin Farzanegi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Exercise causes increased oxygen consumption, leaving cells exposed to oxidative stress. Antioxidants may have a protective effect by inhibiting lipid peroxidation. Thus, this study aims to examine the effect of Pistacia atlantica extract on glutathione peroxidase levels and total oxidative capacity of liver and plasma lipid profile of rats. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 28 female rats’ weight 155.8±2.7 grams were randomly and equally divided into 4 groups of exercise-saline, control-saline, exercise-mastic, and control-mastic. The exercise groups exercised for 8 weeks (5 days per week, 60 minutes daily, 25 meters per minute, on a zero degree slope. The rats received equal volumes of mastic and saline orally for 4 weeks. Blood and tissue samples were taken 72 hours after the last exercise session. Data were analyzed using one-way variance analysis (ANOVA.Results: Consumption of Pistacia atlantica extract together with endurance exercising for 8 weeks did not significantly affect glutathione peroxidase concentration, total oxidative capacity, LDL, triglyceride, or cholesterol, but significantly reduced HDL (p=0.002.Conclusion: Results showed that antioxidant and lipid profile levels were not affected by consumption of supplements and endurance exercising. However, further studies are required to assess the long term effects of this herbal extract.

  5. Mycobacterial species as case-study of comparative genome analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zakham, F.; Belayachi, L.; Ussery, David

    2011-01-01

    . Pasteur 1173P2, M. leprae Br4923, M. marinum M, M. sp. KMS, M. sp. MCS, M. tuberculosis CDC1551, M. tuberculosis F11, M. tuberculosis H37Ra, M. tuberculosis H37Rv, M. tuberculosis KZN 1435 , M. ulcerans Agy99,and M. vanbaalenii PYR—1, For this purpose a comparison has been done based on their length...... defined for twelve Mycobacterial species. We have also introduced the genome atlas of the reference strain M. tuberculosis H37Rv which can give a good overview of this genome. And for examining the phylogenetic relationships among these bacteria, a phylogenic tree has been constructed from 16S rRNA gene...... the evolutionary events of these species and improving drugs, vaccines, and diagnostics tools for controlling Mycobacterial diseases. In this present study we aim to outline a comparative genome analysis of fourteen Mycobacterial genomes: M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis K—10, M. bovis AF2122/97, M. bovis BCG str...

  6. PaCATB, a secreted catalase protecting Podospora anserina against exogenous oxidative stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zintel, Sandra; Bernhardt, Dominik; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2011-01-01

    A differential mass spectrometry analysis of secreted proteins from juvenile and senescentPodospora anserina cultures revealed age-related differences in protein profiles. Among other proteins with decreased abundance in the secretome of senescent cultures a catalase, termed PaCATB, was identified...

  7. In Vitro Assembly of Catalase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baureder, Michael; Barane, Elisabeth; Hederstedt, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Most aerobic organisms contain catalase, which functions to decompose hydrogen peroxide. Typical catalases are structurally complex homo-tetrameric enzymes with one heme prosthetic group buried in each subunit. It is not known how catalase in the cell is assembled from its constituents. The bacterium Enterococcus faecalis cannot synthesize heme but can acquire it from the environment to form a cytoplasmic catalase. We have in E. faecalis monitored production of the enzyme polypeptide (KatA) depending on the availability of heme and used our findings to devise a procedure for the purification of preparative amounts of in vivo-synthesized apocatalase. We show that fully active catalase can be obtained in vitro by incubating isolated apoprotein with hemin. We have characterized features of the assembly process and describe a temperature-trapped hemylated intermediate of the enzyme maturation process. Hemylation of apocatalase does not require auxiliary cell components, but rapid assembly of active enzyme seemingly is assisted in the cell. Our findings provide insight about catalase assembly and offer new experimental possibilities for detailed studies of this process. PMID:25148685

  8. Molecular-based mycobacterial identification in a clinical laboratory setting: a comparison of two methods.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, N

    2012-01-01

    Many mycobacterial species are pathogenic to humans, with infection occurring worldwide. Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a well-described global phenomenon, but other mycobacterial species are increasingly shown to be the cause of both pulmonary and extrapulmonary infection and are managed differently from M. tuberculosis infection. Rapid and accurate differentiation of mycobacterial species is, therefore, critical to guide timely and appropriate therapeutic and public health management. This study evaluates two commercially available DNA strip assays, the Genotype Common Mycobacteria (CM) assay (Hain Lifescience, Nehren, Germany) and the Speed-oligo Mycobacteria assay (Vircell, Spain) for their usefulness in a clinical laboratory setting. Both assays were evaluated on 71 clinical mycobacterial isolates, previously identified using Gen-Probe AccuProbe and through a UK mycobacteriology reference laboratory, as well as 29 non-mycobacterial isolates. Concordant results were obtained for 98% of isolates using both assays. The sensitivity was 97% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 93.3-100%) for the CM assay and 98.6% (95% CI: 95.9-100%) for the Speed-oligo assay. Overall, both assays proved to be useful tools for rapid and sensitive mycobacterial species identification, although interpretation of results was easier with the CM assay. Finally, results were available within one day, compared to current identification times which range between seven days and four weeks.

  9. Activity of Mn-Oxidizing Peroxidases of Ganoderma lucidum Depending on Cultivation Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Ćilerdžić

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Trunks and stumps of various deciduous species act as natural habitats for Ganoderma lucidum. The chemical composition of their cell wall affects the development of fungal ligninolytic enzyme system as well as its ability to degrade lignin from the plant cell wall. Additionally, numerous compounds structurally similar to lignin can be degraded by the G. lucidum enzyme system which could take important roles in various biotechnological processes. The laccases, which are the dominant enzymes synthesized by G. lucidum, have been studied more extensively than the Mn-oxidizing peroxidases. Therefore, this study aimed to create the dynamics profile of Mn-oxidizing peroxidases activities in four G. lucidum strains, classifying and determining their properties depending on the cultivation type and plant residue as a carbon source in the medium, as well as to establish whether intraspecific variety exists. The findings suggest that submerged cultivation appeared to be a more appropriate cultivation type for enzyme activities compared with solid-state cultivation, and oak sawdust was a better carbon source than wheat straw. Under the optimum conditions, on day 14, G. lucidum BEOFB 431 was characterized by the highest levels of both Mn-dependent and Mn-independent peroxidase activities (4795.5 and 5170.5 U/L, respectively. Strain, cultivation type, and carbon source were factors that affected the profiles of Mn-oxidizing peroxidases isoenzymes.

  10. Effects of the hepatocarcinogen nafenopin, a peroxisome proliferator, on the activities of rat liver glutathione-requiring enzymes and catalase in comparison to the action of phenobarbital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, K; Numoto, S; Furuya, K; Furukawa, N T; Williams, G M

    1985-10-01

    The biochemical effects in the livers of male rats of prolonged administration of the experimental hepatocarcinogen nafenopin, a hypolipidemic agent and peroxisome proliferator, were compared to those of another experimental liver carcinogen, phenobarbital, which acts as a neoplasm promoter. Feeding of nafenopin, 0.03 mmol/kg basal diet for up to 24 weeks increased the numbers of hepatic peroxisomes, increased catalase activity, markedly decreased cytosolic glutathione transferase activities toward two substrates, decreased cytosolic glutathione peroxidase activities toward H2O2 and two organic peroxides, and suppressed the age-related increase in gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase activity. In contrast the livers of rats fed an equimolar concentration of phenobarbital displayed increases in cytosolic glutathione transferase activities and enhancement of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase activity but no changes in glutathione peroxidase activities. There was also an enhancement of catalase activity without apparent increase in peroxisome number. Enzyme kinetic analyses revealed that the cytosolic glutathione transferase activities toward two halogenonitrobenzene substrates were inhibited in the rats fed nafenopin and displayed elevated Km and decreased Vmax. Kinetic studies of glutathione transferase activities in which nafenopin was mixed with normal rat liver cytosols in the assay system revealed competitive type inhibition toward 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene and a noncompetitive type of inhibition toward 3,4-dichloronitrobenzene. Likewise activities of glutathione peroxidases toward H2O2 and cumene hydroperoxide were suppressed by in vitro addition. Thus the effects of nafenopin and phenobarbital on liver biochemistry were very different. The inhibition of hepatic biotransformation and scavenger systems by nafenopin is suggested to be relevant to its hepatocarcinogenicity.

  11. In vitro assembly of catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baureder, Michael; Barane, Elisabeth; Hederstedt, Lars

    2014-10-10

    Most aerobic organisms contain catalase, which functions to decompose hydrogen peroxide. Typical catalases are structurally complex homo-tetrameric enzymes with one heme prosthetic group buried in each subunit. It is not known how catalase in the cell is assembled from its constituents. The bacterium Enterococcus faecalis cannot synthesize heme but can acquire it from the environment to form a cytoplasmic catalase. We have in E. faecalis monitored production of the enzyme polypeptide (KatA) depending on the availability of heme and used our findings to devise a procedure for the purification of preparative amounts of in vivo-synthesized apocatalase. We show that fully active catalase can be obtained in vitro by incubating isolated apoprotein with hemin. We have characterized features of the assembly process and describe a temperature-trapped hemylated intermediate of the enzyme maturation process. Hemylation of apocatalase does not require auxiliary cell components, but rapid assembly of active enzyme seemingly is assisted in the cell. Our findings provide insight about catalase assembly and offer new experimental possibilities for detailed studies of this process. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Nosocomial rapidly growing mycobacterial infections following laparoscopic surgery: CT imaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpato, Richard; de Castro, Claudio Campi; Hadad, David Jamil; da Silva Souza Ribeiro, Flavya; Filho, Ezequiel Leal; Marcal, Leonardo P

    2015-09-01

    To identify the distribution and frequency of computed tomography (CT) findings in patients with nosocomial rapidly growing mycobacterial (RGM) infection after laparoscopic surgery. A descriptive retrospective study in patients with RGM infection after laparoscopic surgery who underwent CT imaging prior to initiation of therapy. The images were analyzed by two radiologists in consensus, who evaluated the skin/subcutaneous tissues, the abdominal wall, and intraperitoneal region separately. The patterns of involvement were tabulated as: densification, collections, nodules (≥1.0 cm), small nodules (<1.0 cm), pseudocavitated nodules, and small pseudocavitated nodules. Twenty-six patients met the established criteria. The subcutaneous findings were: densification (88.5%), small nodules (61.5%), small pseudocavitated nodules (23.1 %), nodules (38.5%), pseudocavitated nodules (15.4%), and collections (26.9%). The findings in the abdominal wall were: densification (61.5%), pseudocavitated nodules (3.8%), and collections (15.4%). The intraperitoneal findings were: densification (46.1%), small nodules (42.3%), nodules (15.4%), and collections (11.5%). Subcutaneous CT findings in descending order of frequency were: densification, small nodules, nodules, small pseudocavitated nodules, pseudocavitated nodules, and collections. The musculo-fascial plane CT findings were: densification, collections, and pseudocavitated nodules. The intraperitoneal CT findings were: densification, small nodules, nodules, and collections. • Rapidly growing mycobacterial infection may occur following laparoscopy. • Post-laparoscopy mycobacterial infection CT findings are densification, collection, and nodules. • Rapidly growing mycobacterial infection following laparoscopy may involve the peritoneal cavity. • Post-laparoscopy rapidly growing mycobacterial intraperitoneal infection is not associated with ascites or lymphadenopathy.

  13. Simple sequence repeats in mycobacterial genomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2006-12-18

    Dec 18, 2006 ... Although prokaryotic genomes derive some plasticity due to microsatellite mutations they have in-built mechanisms to arrest undue expansions of microsatellites and one such mechanism is constituted by post-replicative DNA repair enzymes MutL, MutH and MutS. The mycobacterial genomes lack these ...

  14. A Eukaryote without Catalase-Containing Microbodies : Neurospora crassa Exhibits a Unique Cellular Distribution of Its Four Catalases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schliebs, Wolfgang; Würtz, Christian; Kunau, Wolf-Hubert; Veenhuis, Marten; Rottensteiner, Hanspeter; Wuertz, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Microbodies usually house catalase to decompose hydrogen peroxide generated within the organelle by the action of various oxidases. Here we have analyzed whether peroxisomes (i.e., catalase-containing microbodies) exist in Neurospora crassa. Three distinct catalase isoforms were identified by native

  15. Reversible adsorption of catalase onto Fe(3+) chelated poly(AAm-GMA)-IDA cryogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktaş Uygun, Deniz; Uygun, Murat; Akgöl, Sinan; Denizli, Adil

    2015-05-01

    In this presented study, poly(acrylamide-glycidyl methacrylate) [poly(AAm-GMA)] cryogels were synthesized by cryopolymerization technique at sub-zero temperature. Prepared cryogels were then functionalized with iminodiacetic acid (IDA) and chelated with Fe(3+) ions in order produce the metal chelate affinity matrix. Synthesized cryogels were characterized with FTIR, ESEM and EDX analysis, and it was found that the cryogel had sponge like structure with interconnected pores and their pore diameter was about 200 μm. Fe(3+) chelated poly(AAm-GMA)-IDA cryogels were used for the adsorption of catalase and optimum adsorption conditions were determined by varying the medium pH, initial catalase concentration, temperature and ionic strength. Maximum catalase adsorption onto Fe(3+) chelated poly(AAm-GMA)-IDA cryogel was found to be 12.99 mg/g cryogel at 25 °C, by using pH 5.0 acetate buffer. Adsorbed catalase was removed from the cryogel by using 1.0M of NaCl solution and desorption yield was found to be 96%. Additionally, reusability profile of the Fe(3+) chelated poly(AAm-GMA)-IDA cryogel was also investigated and it was found that, adsorption capacity of the cryogels didn't decrease significantly at the end of the 40 reuses. Catalase activity studies were also tested and it was demonstrated that desorbed catalase retained 70% of its initial activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidase N

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Osman Asghar; Henriksen, A; Ostergaard, L

    2000-01-01

    The structure of the neutral peroxidase from Arabidopsis thaliana (ATP N) has been determined to a resolution of 1.9 A and a free R value of 20.5%. ATP N has the expected characteristic fold of the class III peroxidases, with a C(alpha) r.m.s.d. of 0.82 A when compared with horseradish peroxidase C...

  17. catalase

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof.Dr. Saleh

    2012-05-17

    May 17, 2012 ... For the establishment of the enzyme, the rate of catalase activity was linearly increased with increase of the ... toxic by itself, but in a Fenton-type reaction that can ... used to decompose the hydrogen peroxide before the.

  18. Molecular Characterization of Staphylococcus warneri Catalase

    OpenAIRE

    Fukuda, Daisuke; Mizuno, Kouhei; Kohno, Mamiko; Sonomoto, Kenji; Ishizaki, Ayaaki

    2000-01-01

    The catalase gene was cloned by screening a genomic DNA library of S. warneri ISK-1 strain with a strong catalase activity for complementation of the activity in catalase-deficient E. coli strain. Nucleotide sequence analysis of a 2.2-kb DNA fragment revealed an open reading frame, called katA, encoding a peptide of 504 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 58kDa. The predicted amino acid sequence showed high similarities with the monofunctional catalases. No similarities were found...

  19. Immunomodulating microRNAs of mycobacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettencourt, Paulo; Pires, David; Anes, Elsa

    2016-03-01

    MicroRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs that have emerged as key regulators of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level by sequence-specific binding to target mRNAs. Some microRNAs block translation, while others promote mRNA degradation, leading to a reduction in protein availability. A single miRNA can potentially regulate the expression of multiple genes and their encoded proteins. Therefore, miRNAs can influence molecular signalling pathways and regulate many biological processes in health and disease. Upon infection, host cells rapidly change their transcriptional programs, including miRNA expression, as a response against the invading microorganism. Not surprisingly, pathogens can also alter the host miRNA profile to their own benefit, which is of major importance to scientists addressing high morbidity and mortality infectious diseases such as tuberculosis. In this review, we present recent findings on the miRNAs regulation of the host response against mycobacterial infections, providing new insights into host-pathogen interactions. Understanding these findings and its implications could reveal new opportunities for designing better diagnostic tools, therapies and more effective vaccines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Encoded library technology as a source of hits for the discovery and lead optimization of a potent and selective class of bactericidal direct inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis InhA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encinas, Lourdes; O'Keefe, Heather; Neu, Margarete; Remuiñán, Modesto J; Patel, Amish M; Guardia, Ana; Davie, Christopher P; Pérez-Macías, Natalia; Yang, Hongfang; Convery, Maire A; Messer, Jeff A; Pérez-Herrán, Esther; Centrella, Paolo A; Alvarez-Gómez, Daniel; Clark, Matthew A; Huss, Sophie; O'Donovan, Gary K; Ortega-Muro, Fátima; McDowell, William; Castañeda, Pablo; Arico-Muendel, Christopher C; Pajk, Stane; Rullás, Joaquín; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Alvarez-Ruíz, Emilio; Mendoza-Losana, Alfonso; Ballell Pages, Lluís; Castro-Pichel, Julia; Evindar, Ghotas

    2014-02-27

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the world's oldest and deadliest diseases, killing a person every 20 s. InhA, the enoyl-ACP reductase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is the target of the frontline antitubercular drug isoniazid (INH). Compounds that directly target InhA and do not require activation by mycobacterial catalase peroxidase KatG are promising candidates for treating infections caused by INH resistant strains. The application of the encoded library technology (ELT) to the discovery of direct InhA inhibitors yielded compound 7 endowed with good enzymatic potency but with low antitubercular potency. This work reports the hit identification, the selected strategy for potency optimization, the structure-activity relationships of a hundred analogues synthesized, and the results of the in vivo efficacy studies performed with the lead compound 65.

  1. Using superoxide dismutase/catalase mimetics to manipulate the redox environment of neural precursor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limoli, C. L.; Giedzinski, E.; Baure, J.; Doctrow, S. R.; Rola, R.; Fike, J. R.

    2006-01-01

    potentially deleterious. Our results also show that the ability of catalase mimetics, like true catalases, to catalyse peroxidase reactions can complicate the interpretation of data obtained with certain fluorescent ROS-indicator dyes. (authors)

  2. Effect of catalase-specific inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole on yeast peroxisomal catalase in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Mitsuyoshi; Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Tomoko; Kamasawa, Naomi; Osumi, Masako; Tanaka, Atsuo

    2003-02-14

    3-Amino-1,2,4-triazole (3-AT) is known as an inhibitor of catalase to whose active center it specifically and covalently binds. Subcellular fractionation and immunoelectronmicroscopic observation of the yeast Candida tropicalis revealed that, in 3-AT-treated cells in which the 3-AT was added to the n-alkane medium from the beginning of cultivation, catalase transported into peroxisomes was inactivated and was present as insoluble aggregated forms in the organelle. The aggregation of catalase in peroxisomes occurred only in these 3-AT-treated cells and not in cells in which 3-AT was added at the late exponential growth phase. Furthermore, 3-AT did not affect the transportation of catalase into peroxisomes. The appearance of aggregation only in cells to which 3-AT was added from the beginning of cultivation suggests that, in the process of catalase transportation into yeast peroxisomes, some conformational change may take place and that correct folding may be inhibited by the binding of 3-AT to the active center of catalase. Accordingly, 3-AT will be an interesting compound for investigation of the transport machinery of the peroxisomal tetrameric catalase.

  3. Molecular identification of catalases from Nicotiana plumbaginifolia (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willekens, H; Villarroel, R; Van Montagu, M; Inzé, D; Van Camp, W

    1994-09-19

    We have isolated three different catalase cDNAs from Nicotiana plumbaginifolia (cat1, cat2, and cat3) and a partial sequence of a fourth catalase gene (cat4) that shows no discernible expression based on Northern analysis. The catalase sequences were used to determine the similarity with other plant catalases and to study the transcriptional response to paraquat, 3-aminotriazole, and salicylic acid. 3-Aminotriazole induces mRNA levels of cat1, cat2 and cat3, indicating that a reduction in catalase activity positively affects catalase mRNA abundance. Salicylic acid that binds catalase in vitro, had no effect on catalase transcript levels at physiological concentrations. Paraquat resulted in the induction of cat1.

  4. microRNA-146a promotes mycobacterial survival in macrophages through suppressing nitric oxide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Miao; Wang, Jinli; Fang, Yimin; Gong, Sitang; Li, Meiyu; Wu, Minhao; Lai, Xiaomin; Zeng, Gucheng; Wang, Yi; Yang, Kun; Huang, Xi

    2016-03-30

    Macrophages play a crucial role in host innate anti-mycobacterial defense, which is tightly regulated by multiple factors, including microRNAs. Our previous study showed that a panel of microRNAs was markedly up-regulated in macrophages upon mycobacterial infection. Here, we investigated the biological function of miR-146a during mycobacterial infection. miR-146a expression was induced both in vitro and in vivo after Mycobacterium bovis BCG infection. The inducible miR-146a could suppress the inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS) expression and NO generation, thus promoting mycobacterial survival in macrophages. Inhibition of endogenous miR-146a increased NO production and mycobacterial clearance. Moreover, miR-146a attenuated the activation of nuclear factor κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases signaling pathways during BCG infection, which in turn repressed iNOS expression. Mechanistically, miR-146a directly targeted tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) at post-transcriptional level. Silencing TRAF6 decreased iNOS expression and NO production in BCG-infected macrophages, while overexpression of TRAF6 reversed miR-146a-mediated inhibition of NO production and clearance of mycobacteria. Therefore, we demonstrated a novel role of miR-146a in the modulation of host defense against mycobacterial infection by repressing NO production via targeting TRAF6, which may provide a promising therapeutic target for tuberculosis.

  5. Characterization of partially purified catalase from camel ( Camelus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The liver of camel has high level of catalase (32,225 units/g tissue) as commercially used bovine liver catalase. For the establishment of the enzyme, the rate of catalase activity was linearly increased with increase of the catalase concentration and incubation time. The procedure of partial purification of catalase from camel ...

  6. Immune response to mycobacterial infection: lessons from flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovina, Nikoletta; Panagiotou, Marios; Pontikis, Konstantinos; Kyriakopoulou, Magdalini; Koulouris, Nikolaos G; Koutsoukou, Antonia

    2013-01-01

    Detecting and treating active and latent tuberculosis are pivotal elements for effective infection control; yet, due to their significant inherent limitations, the diagnostic means for these two stages of tuberculosis (TB) to date remain suboptimal. This paper reviews the current diagnostic tools for mycobacterial infection and focuses on the application of flow cytometry as a promising method for rapid and reliable diagnosis of mycobacterial infection as well as discrimination between active and latent TB: it summarizes diagnostic biomarkers distinguishing the two states of infection and also features of the distinct immune response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) at certain stages of infection as revealed by flow cytometry to date.

  7. Immune Response to Mycobacterial Infection: Lessons from Flow Cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikoletta Rovina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Detecting and treating active and latent tuberculosis are pivotal elements for effective infection control; yet, due to their significant inherent limitations, the diagnostic means for these two stages of tuberculosis (TB to date remain suboptimal. This paper reviews the current diagnostic tools for mycobacterial infection and focuses on the application of flow cytometry as a promising method for rapid and reliable diagnosis of mycobacterial infection as well as discrimination between active and latent TB: it summarizes diagnostic biomarkers distinguishing the two states of infection and also features of the distinct immune response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb at certain stages of infection as revealed by flow cytometry to date.

  8. A natural xanthone increases catalase activity but decreases NF-kappa B and lipid peroxidation in U-937 and HepG2 cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Binay K; Zaidi, Adeel H; Gupta, Pankaj; Mokhamatam, Raveendra B; Raviprakash, Nune; Mahali, Sidhartha K; Manna, Sunil K

    2015-10-05

    Mangiferin, a C-glycosyl xanthone, has shown anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-tumorigenic activities. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanism for the antioxidant property of mangiferin. Considering the role of nuclear transcription factor kappa B (NF-κB) in inflammation and tumorigenesis, we hypothesized that modulating its activity will be a viable therapeutic target in regulating the redox-sensitive ailments. Our results show that mangiferin blocks several inducers, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF), lypopolysaccharide (LPS), phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) mediated NF-κB activation via inhibition of reactive oxygen species generation. In silico docking studies predicted strong binding energy of mangiferin to the active site of catalase (-9.13 kcal/mol), but not with other oxidases such as myeloperoxidase, glutathione peroxidase, or inducible nitric oxide synthase. Mangiferin increased activity of catalase by 44%, but had no effect on myeloperoxidase activity in vitro. Fluorescence spectroscopy further revealed the binding of mangiferin to catalase at the single site with binding constant and binding affinity of 3.1×10(-7) M(-1) and 1.046 respectively. Mangiferin also inhibits TNF-induced lipid peroxidation and thereby protects apoptosis. Hence, mangiferin with its ability to inhibit NF-κB and increase the catalase activity may prove to be a potent therapeutic. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidase N

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Osman Asghar; Henriksen, A; Ostergaard, L

    2000-01-01

    The structure of the neutral peroxidase from Arabidopsis thaliana (ATP N) has been determined to a resolution of 1.9 A and a free R value of 20.5%. ATP N has the expected characteristic fold of the class III peroxidases, with a C(alpha) r.m.s.d. of 0.82 A when compared with horseradish peroxidase C...... (HRP C). HRP C is 54% identical to ATP N in sequence. When the structures of four class III plant peroxidases are superimposed, the regions with structural differences are non-randomly distributed; all are located in one half of the molecule. The architecture of the haem pocket of ATP N is very similar...... to that of HRP C, in agreement with the low small-molecule substrate specificity of all class III peroxidases. The structure of ATP N suggests that the pH dependence of the substrate turnover will differ from that of HRP C owing to differences in polarity of the residues in the substrate-access channel. Since...

  10. national jalma institute for leprosy & other mycobacterial diseases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. NATIONAL JALMA INSTITUTE FOR LEPROSY & OTHER MYCOBACTERIAL DISEASES : MAJOR THRUST AREAS. LEPROSY : Understanding the disease better using electrophysiological, immunological, molecular and electron-microscopic tools. Developing better ...

  11. Mycobacterial Species Identification and Public Health Implications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mycobacterial Species Identification and Public Health Implications of Tuberculosis Among Nomadic Pastoralists in Three Local Governments of Plateau State, North ... Bovine and human tuberculosis is endemic in Nigeria, and apart from meat inspection at the abattoir, which is not very effective, no control measures are ...

  12. Radiation immobilization of catalase and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guanghui; Ha Hongfei; Wang Xia; Wu Jilan

    1988-01-01

    Catalase was immobilized by a chemical method on porous polyacrylamide particles produced by radiation polymerization of acrylamide monomer at low temperature (-78 0 C). Activity of immobilized catalase was enhanced distinctly by joining a chemical arm to the support. The method of recovery of catalase activity on immobilized polymer was found by soaking it in certain buffer. The treatment of H 2 O 2 both in aqueous solution and alcoholic solution by using the immobilized catalase was performed. (author)

  13. Mitochondrial-Targeted Catalase: Extended Longevity and the Roles in Various Disease Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, D-F; Chiao, Y-A; Martin, G M; Marcinek, D J; Basisty, N; Quarles, E K; Rabinovitch, P S

    2017-01-01

    The free-radical theory of aging was proposed more than 50 years ago. As one of the most popular mechanisms explaining the aging process, it has been extensively studied in several model organisms. However, the results remain controversial. The mitochondrial version of free-radical theory of aging proposes that mitochondria are both the primary sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the primary targets of ROS-induced damage. One critical ROS is hydrogen peroxide, which is naturally degraded by catalase in peroxisomes or glutathione peroxidase within mitochondria. Our laboratory developed mice-overexpressing catalase targeted to mitochondria (mCAT), peroxisomes (pCAT), or the nucleus (nCAT) in order to investigate the role of hydrogen peroxide in different subcellular compartments in aging and age-related diseases. The mCAT mice have demonstrated the largest effects on life span and healthspan extension. This chapter will discuss the mCAT phenotype and review studies using mCAT to investigate the roles of mitochondrial oxidative stresses in various disease models, including metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis, cardiac aging, heart failure, skeletal muscle pathology, sensory defect, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer. As ROS has been increasingly recognized as essential signaling molecules that may be beneficial in hormesis, stress response and immunity, the potential pleiotropic, or adverse effects of mCAT are also discussed. Finally, the development of small-molecule mitochondrial-targeted therapeutic approaches is reviewed. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Overexpression of Catalase Enhances Benzo(a)pyrene Detoxification in Endothelial Microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang; Yang, Hong; Ramesh, Aramandla; Goodwin, J Shawn; Okoro, Emmanuel U; Guo, ZhongMao

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that overexpression of catalase upregulated xenobiotic- metabolizing enzyme (XME) expression and diminished benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) intermediate accumulation in mouse aortic endothelial cells (MAECs). Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the most active organelle involved in BaP metabolism. To examine the involvement of ER in catalase-induced BaP detoxification, we compared the level and distribution of XMEs, and the profile of BaP intermediates in the microsomes of wild-type and catalase transgenic endothelial cells. Our data showed that endothelial microsomes were enriched in cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1, CYP1B1 and epoxide hydrolase 1 (EH1), and contained considerable levels of quinone oxidoreductase-1 (NQO1) and glutathione S-transferase-pi (GSTP). Treatment of wild-type MAECs with 1μM BaP for 2 h increased the expression of microsomal CYP1A1, 1B1 and NQO1 by ~300, 64 and 116%, respectively. However, the same treatment did not significantly alter the expression of EH1 and GSTP. Overexpression of catalase did not significantly increase EH1, but upregulated BaP-induced expression of microsomal CYP1A1, 1B1, NQO1 and GSTP in the following order: 1A1>NQO1>GSTP>1B1. Overexpression of catalase did not alter the distribution of each of these enzymes in the microsomes. In contrast to our previous report showing lower level of BaP phenols versus BaP diols/diones in the whole-cell, this report demonstrated that the sum of microsomal BaP phenolic metabolites were ~60% greater than that of the BaP diols/diones after exposure of microsomes to BaP. Overexpression of catalase reduced the concentrations of microsomal BaP phenols and diols/diones by ~45 and 95%, respectively. This process enhanced the ratio of BaP phenol versus diol/dione metabolites in a potent manner. Taken together, upregulation of phase II XMEs and CYP1 proteins, but not EH1 in the ER might be the mechanism by which overexpression of catalase reduces the levels of all the BaP metabolites, and

  15. Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Tenosynovitis in the Hand: Two Case Reports with the MR Imaging Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hyun Jung; Kwon, Jong Won; Yoon, Young Cheol; Choi, Sang Hee

    2011-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacterial infections can cause destructive tenosynovitis of the hand. We report on and discuss the clinical course and distinctive radiologic findings of two patients with hand tenosynovitis secondary to M. marinum and intracellulare infection, which are different from those of the nontuberculous mycobacterial infections reported in the previous literature.

  16. Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Tenosynovitis in the Hand: Two Case Reports with the MR Imaging Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hyun Jung; Kwon, Jong Won; Yoon, Young Cheol; Choi, Sang Hee [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Nontuberculous mycobacterial infections can cause destructive tenosynovitis of the hand. We report on and discuss the clinical course and distinctive radiologic findings of two patients with hand tenosynovitis secondary to M. marinum and intracellulare infection, which are different from those of the nontuberculous mycobacterial infections reported in the previous literature.

  17. Recurrent nontuberculous mycobacterial endophthalmitis: a diagnostic conundrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkateswaran N

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Nandini Venkateswaran,1 Gabrielle Yeaney,2 Mina Chung,3,4 Holly B Hindman3,41University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester, 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, 3Flaum Eye Institute, 4Center for Visual Science, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY, USAObjective: To report a case of recurrent nontuberculous mycobacterial endophthalmitis in the context of neurotrophic keratopathy secondary to herpes zoster ophthalmicus that had an atypical presentation and complex course, and highlights the challenges of causative organism identification and therapeutic interventions in this condition.Methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted to determine the visual outcomes of the patient.Results: A 68-year-old pseudophakic male with long-standing neurotrophic keratopathy and perforated descemetocele managed with cyanoacrylate glue and a contact bandage lens in the left eye, began experiencing recurrent episodes of endophthalmitis after undergoing a penetrating keratoplasty. Several therapeutic procedures including an anterior chamber washout, two pars plana vitrectomies, explantation of the posterior chamber intraocular lens and capsular bag, and multiple intravitreal antimicrobial injections, were performed to which he has ultimately responded favorably, with no signs of infection to date and stable visual acuity. The causative organism of his recurrent infections was initially identified as Mycobacterium abscessus through biochemical testing and 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid gene sequencing; however, repeat polymerase chain reaction (PCR and sequencing of the 65 kDa heat shock protein (hsp65 gene for experimental purposes confirmed the accurate identification of the organism to be Mycobacterium chelonae. Given the greater reliability of PCR and sequencing of the hsp65 gene over traditional biochemical tests and culture techniques, M. chelonae was likely the

  18. Mycobacterial Infection of the Gallbladder Masquerading as Gallbladder Cancer with a False Positive Pet Scan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeeb Majid

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Isolated mycobacterial infection of gall bladder is an extremely rare entity. Only anecdotal reports are evident in the literature. A preoperative diagnosis of mycobacterial infection of gallbladder is therefore very difficult. The case of a 72-year-old male who underwent surgery for suspected gallbladder cancer is presented. The diagnosis of cancer was based on radiological findings and an abnormal uptake of fluorine-18-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG on positron emission tomography (PET scan whilst being followed up for colorectal cancer. He underwent cholecystectomy and gallbladder bed resection. Histopathology was consistent with mycobacterial infection of the gallbladder.

  19. Molecular identification and characterisation of catalase and catalase-like protein genes in urease-positive thermophilic Campylobacter (UPTC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, T; Kuribayashi, T; Moore, J E; Millar, B C; Yamamoto, S; Matsuda, Motoo

    2016-01-01

    Thermophilic Campylobacter are important bacterial pathogens of foodborne diseases worldwide. These organisms' physiology requires a microaerophilic atmosphere. To date, little is known about the protective catalase mechanism in urease-positive thermophilic campylobacters (UPTC); hence, it was the aim of this study to identify and characterise catalase and catalase-like protein genes in these organisms. Catalase (katA) and catalase (Kat)-like protein genes from the Japanese UPTC CF89-12 strain were molecularly analysed and compared with C. lari RM2100 and other C. lari and thermophilic Campylobacter reference isolates. A possible open reading frame of 1,422 base pairs, predicted to encode a peptide of 474 amino acid residues, with calculated molecular weight of 52.7 kilo Daltons for katA, was identified within UPTC CF89-12. A probable ribosome binding site, two putative promoters and a putative ρ-independent transcription terminator were also identified within katA. A similar katA cluster also existed in the C. lari RM2100 strain, except that this strain carries no DcuB genes. However, the Kat-like protein gene or any other homologue(s) were never identified in the C. lari RM2100 strain, or in C. jejuni and C. upsaliensis. This study demonstrates the presence of catalase/catalase-like protein genes in UPTC organisms. These findings are significant in that they suggest that UPTC organisms have the protective genetic capability of helping protect the organisms from toxic oxygen stress, which may help them to survive in physiologically harsh environments, both within human and animal hosts, as well as in the natural environment.

  20. 21 CFR 184.1034 - Catalase (bovine liver).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Catalase (bovine liver). 184.1034 Section 184.1034... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1034 Catalase (bovine liver). (a) Catalase (bovine liver) (CAS Reg. No. 81457-95-6) is an enzyme preparation obtained from extracts of bovine liver. It is...

  1. [Serological and cellular reactivity to mycobacterial proteins in Hansen's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rada, Elsa; Aranzazu, Nacarid; Rodríguez, Vestalia; Borges, Rafael; Convit, Jacinto

    2010-09-01

    The study was designed for evaluating immunological reactivity to various mycobacterial protein preparations using serological and cell-mediated immunological tests in patients with clinical leprosy signs, predominantly, with the multibacillary forms. All patients were adults with ages between 20 and 30 years. Fifty eight (n = 81) percent corresponded to Lepromatous Leprosy (LL), 29% (n = 41) to Borderline Lepromatous Leprosy (BL) and 10% (n = 41) to Borderline Borderline Leprosy (BB); only 3% were Borderline Tuberculoid (BT) patients: 74% males and 26% females. The most frequent reactional phenomenon was of the Erythema Nodosum (ENL) type. The mycobacterial proteins tested were: total crude Mycobacterium leprae antigens (MISA); Mycobacterium bovis (MbSA and excretion MbSA); partially purified excretion protein antigen, with a 30 kDa relative movility (Ml30); and recombinant M. leprae proteins (Mt70, Mb 65, Ml 36, 28, 18 and 10 kDa). Two of the recombinant proteins (Ml10 and Ml 36 kDa) presented a statiscally significant higher serological reactivity, directly related with a larger bacillary load (p = 0.0051 and 0.050 respectively). The 30 kDa protein was predominantly recognized by antibodies from multibacillary patients. Results show that mean antibody values were higher in non reactional patients when tested against complete proteins (MbSA and ex MbSA) when compared with the group of patients who presented reactional phenomena (p = 0.000567 and 0.000061, respectively). Comparing reactional with non reactional patients, it was seen that mean antibody values against complete proteins (MbSA and ex MbSA) were higher in non reactional individuals (p = 0.000567 and 0.000061, respectively). This same behavior occurred towards individual mycobacterial proteins (30, 10 and 36 kDa). The T lymphocyte prolypherative response in reactional and non reactional patients towards mycobacterial proteins (MlSA, Ml 10 kDa, MbSA, ex MbSA) was negative.

  2. Resuscitation effects of catalase on airborne bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Marthi, B; Shaffer, B T; Lighthart, B; Ganio, L

    1991-01-01

    Catalase incorporation into enumeration media caused a significant increase (greater than 63%) in the colony-forming abilities of airborne bacteria. Incubation for 30 to 60 min of airborne bacteria in collection fluid containing catalase caused a greater than 95% increase in colony-forming ability. However, catalase did not have any effects on enumeration at high relative humidities (80 to 90%).

  3. Mycobacterial laminin-binding histone-like protein mediates collagen-dependent cytoadherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Alves Dias

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available When grown in the presence of exogenous collagen I, Mycobacterium bovis BCG was shown to form clumps. Scanning electron microscopy examination of these clumps revealed the presence of collagen fibres cross-linking the bacilli. Since collagen is a major constituent of the eukaryotic extracellular matrices, we assayed BCG cytoadherence in the presence of exogenous collagen I. Collagen increased the interaction of the bacilli with A549 type II pneumocytes or U937 macrophages, suggesting that BCG is able to recruit collagen to facilitate its attachment to host cells. Using an affinity chromatography approach, we have isolated a BCG collagen-binding protein corresponding to the previously described mycobacterial laminin-binding histone-like protein (LBP/Hlp, a highly conserved protein associated with the mycobacterial cell wall. Moreover, Mycobacterium leprae LBP/Hlp, a well-characterized adhesin, was also able to bind collagen I. Finally, using recombinant fragments of M. leprae LBP/Hlp, we mapped the collagen-binding activity within the C-terminal domain of the adhesin. Since this protein was already shown to be involved in the recognition of laminin and heparan sulphate-containing proteoglycans, the present observations reinforce the adhesive activities of LBP/Hlp, which can be therefore considered as a multifaceted mycobacterial adhesin, playing an important role in both leprosy and tuberculosis pathogenesis.

  4. An essential nonredundant role for mycobacterial DnaK in native protein folding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Fay

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Protein chaperones are essential in all domains of life to prevent and resolve protein misfolding during translation and proteotoxic stress. HSP70 family chaperones, including E. coli DnaK, function in stress induced protein refolding and degradation, but are dispensable for cellular viability due to redundant chaperone systems that prevent global nascent peptide insolubility. However, the function of HSP70 chaperones in mycobacteria, a genus that includes multiple human pathogens, has not been examined. We find that mycobacterial DnaK is essential for cell growth and required for native protein folding in Mycobacterium smegmatis. Loss of DnaK is accompanied by proteotoxic collapse characterized by the accumulation of insoluble newly synthesized proteins. DnaK is required for solubility of large multimodular lipid synthases, including the essential lipid synthase FASI, and DnaK loss is accompanied by disruption of membrane structure and increased cell permeability. Trigger Factor is nonessential and has a minor role in native protein folding that is only evident in the absence of DnaK. In unstressed cells, DnaK localizes to multiple, dynamic foci, but relocalizes to focal protein aggregates during stationary phase or upon expression of aggregating peptides. Mycobacterial cells restart cell growth after proteotoxic stress by isolating persistent DnaK containing protein aggregates away from daughter cells. These results reveal unanticipated essential nonredunant roles for mycobacterial DnaK in mycobacteria and indicate that DnaK defines a unique susceptibility point in the mycobacterial proteostasis network.

  5. Embryonic catalase protects against ethanol embryopathies in acatalasemic mice and transgenic human catalase-expressing mice in embryo culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller-Pinsler, Lutfiya; Wells, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the mechanism of ethanol (EtOH) teratogenicity, but the protective role of the embryonic antioxidative enzyme catalase is unclear, as embryonic activity is only about 5% of maternal levels. We addressed this question in a whole embryo culture model. C57BL/6 mouse embryos expressing human catalase (hCat) or their wild-type (C57BL/6 WT) controls, and C3Ga.Cg-Cat b /J catalase-deficient, acatalasemic (aCat) mouse embryos or their wild-type C3HeB/FeJ (C3H WT) controls, were explanted on gestational day (GD) 9 (plug = GD 1), exposed for 24 h to 2 or 4 mg/mL EtOH or vehicle, and evaluated for functional and morphological changes. hCat and C57BL/6 WT vehicle-exposed embryos developed normally, while EtOH was embryopathic in C57BL/6 WT embryos, evidenced by decreases in anterior neuropore closure, somites developed, turning and head length, whereas hCat embryos were protected (p < 0.001). Maternal pretreatment of C57BL/6 WT dams with 50 kU/kg PEG-catalase (PEG-cat) 8 h prior to embryo culture, which increases embryonic catalase activity, blocked all EtOH embryopathies (p < 0.001). Vehicle-exposed aCat mouse embryos had lower yolk sac diameters compared to WT controls, suggesting that endogenous ROS are embryopathic. EtOH was more embryopathic in aCat embryos than WT controls, evidenced by reduced head length and somite development (p < 0.01), and trends for reduced anterior neuropore closure, turning and crown–rump length. Maternal pretreatment of aCat dams with PEG-Cat blocked all EtOH embryopathies (p < 0.05). These data suggest that embryonic catalase is a determinant of risk for EtOH embryopathies. - Highlights: • Ethanol (EtOH) exposure causes structural embryopathies in embryo culture. • Genetically enhanced catalase (hCat) protects against EtOH embryopathies. • Genetically deficient catalase (aCat) exacerbates EtOH embryopathies. • Embryonic catalase is developmentally important. • EtOH developmental

  6. Embryonic catalase protects against ethanol embryopathies in acatalasemic mice and transgenic human catalase-expressing mice in embryo culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller-Pinsler, Lutfiya [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Wells, Peter G., E-mail: pg.wells@utoronto.ca [Division of Biomolecular Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the mechanism of ethanol (EtOH) teratogenicity, but the protective role of the embryonic antioxidative enzyme catalase is unclear, as embryonic activity is only about 5% of maternal levels. We addressed this question in a whole embryo culture model. C57BL/6 mouse embryos expressing human catalase (hCat) or their wild-type (C57BL/6 WT) controls, and C3Ga.Cg-Cat{sup b}/J catalase-deficient, acatalasemic (aCat) mouse embryos or their wild-type C3HeB/FeJ (C3H WT) controls, were explanted on gestational day (GD) 9 (plug = GD 1), exposed for 24 h to 2 or 4 mg/mL EtOH or vehicle, and evaluated for functional and morphological changes. hCat and C57BL/6 WT vehicle-exposed embryos developed normally, while EtOH was embryopathic in C57BL/6 WT embryos, evidenced by decreases in anterior neuropore closure, somites developed, turning and head length, whereas hCat embryos were protected (p < 0.001). Maternal pretreatment of C57BL/6 WT dams with 50 kU/kg PEG-catalase (PEG-cat) 8 h prior to embryo culture, which increases embryonic catalase activity, blocked all EtOH embryopathies (p < 0.001). Vehicle-exposed aCat mouse embryos had lower yolk sac diameters compared to WT controls, suggesting that endogenous ROS are embryopathic. EtOH was more embryopathic in aCat embryos than WT controls, evidenced by reduced head length and somite development (p < 0.01), and trends for reduced anterior neuropore closure, turning and crown–rump length. Maternal pretreatment of aCat dams with PEG-Cat blocked all EtOH embryopathies (p < 0.05). These data suggest that embryonic catalase is a determinant of risk for EtOH embryopathies. - Highlights: • Ethanol (EtOH) exposure causes structural embryopathies in embryo culture. • Genetically enhanced catalase (hCat) protects against EtOH embryopathies. • Genetically deficient catalase (aCat) exacerbates EtOH embryopathies. • Embryonic catalase is developmentally important. • Et

  7. Mycobacterial mutants with defective control of phagosomal acidification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of mycobacterial infection is associated with an ability to interfere with maturation of the phagosomal compartment after ingestion by macrophages. Identification of the mycobacterial components that contribute to this phenomenon will allow rational design of novel approaches to the treatment and prevention of tuberculosis. Microarray-based screening of a transposon library was used to identify mutations that influence the fate of Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG following uptake by macrophages. A screen based on bacterial survival during a 3-d infection highlighted genes previously implicated in growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in macrophages and in mice, together with a number of other virulence genes including a locus encoding virulence-associated membrane proteins and a series of transporter molecules. A second screen based on separation of acidified and non-acidified phagosomes by flow cytometry identified genes involved in mycobacterial control of early acidification. This included the KefB potassium/proton antiport. Mutants unable to control early acidification were significantly attenuated for growth during 6-d infections of macrophages. Early acidification of the phagosome is associated with reduced survival of BCG in macrophages. A strong correlation exists between genes required for intracellular survival of BCG and those required for growth of M. tuberculosis in mice. In contrast, very little correlation exists between genes required for intracellular survival of BCG and those that are up-regulated during intracellular adaptation of M. tuberculosis. This study has identified targets for interventions to promote immune clearance of tuberculosis infection. The screening technologies demonstrated in this study will be useful to the study of pathogenesis in many other intracellular microorganisms.

  8. Wound-induced expression of horseradish peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaoka, A; Kawamoto, T; Ohta, H; Sekine, M; Takano, M; Shinmyo, A

    1994-01-01

    Peroxidases have been implicated in the responses of plants to physiological stress and to pathogens. Wound-induced peroxidase of horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) was studied. Total peroxidase activity was increased by wounding in cell wall fractions extracted from roots, stems and leaves of horseradish. On the other hand, wounding decreased the peroxidase activity in the soluble fraction from roots. The enzyme activities of the basic isozymes were induced by wounding in horseradish leaves based on data obtained by fractionation of crude enzyme in isoelectric focusing gel electrophoresis followed by activity staining. We have previously isolated genomic clones for four peroxidase genes, namely, prxC1a, prxC1b, prxC2 and prxC3. Northern blot analysis using gene-specific probes showed that mRNA of prxC2, which encodes a basic isozyme, accumulated by wounding, while the mRNAs for other peroxidase genes were not induced. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants were transformed with four chimeric gene constructs, each consisting of a promoter from one of the peroxidase genes and the β-glucuronidase (GUS) structural gene. High level GUS activity induced in response to wounding was observed in tobacco plants containing the prxC2-GUS construct.

  9. Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infection in Children A Prospective National Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blyth, Christopher C.; Best, Emma J.; Jones, Cheryl A.; Nourse, Clare; Goldwater, Paul N.; Daley, Andrew J.; Burgner, David; Henry, Guy; Palasanthiran, Pamela

    Background: The epidemiology and management of nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infection in Australian children is unknown. Methods: From July 2004 to June 2007, clinicians identified children with NTM infection as part of a nationwide active surveillance network. Following notification, detailed

  10. Catalase-Negative Staphylococcus lugdunensis Strain with a Novel Point Mutation in the Catalase Gene Isolated from a Patient with Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Yong; Wang, Yiping; Ling, Buzhi; Ke, Xianfu; Ying, Jianfei; Yu, Yanhong; He, Mingyang; Li, Xiangyang

    2013-01-01

    This report describes the results of the sequence analysis of a methicillin-susceptible strain of catalase-negative Staphylococcus lugdunensis. Molecular characterization of the deduced sequence revealed a novel point mutation in the catalase gene. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a catalase-negative S. lugdunensis strain, although catalase-negative isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis have been previously reported.

  11. Peroxidase enzymes regulate collagen extracellular matrix biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeNichilo, Mark O; Panagopoulos, Vasilios; Rayner, Timothy E; Borowicz, Romana A; Greenwood, John E; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    Myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase are heme-containing enzymes often physically associated with fibrotic tissue and cancer in various organs, without any direct involvement in promoting fibroblast recruitment and extracellular matrix (ECM) biosynthesis at these sites. We report herein novel findings that show peroxidase enzymes possess a well-conserved profibrogenic capacity to stimulate the migration of fibroblastic cells and promote their ability to secrete collagenous proteins to generate a functional ECM both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic studies conducted using cultured fibroblasts show that these cells are capable of rapidly binding and internalizing both myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase. Peroxidase enzymes stimulate collagen biosynthesis at a post-translational level in a prolyl 4-hydroxylase-dependent manner that does not require ascorbic acid. This response was blocked by the irreversible myeloperoxidase inhibitor 4-amino-benzoic acid hydrazide, indicating peroxidase catalytic activity is essential for collagen biosynthesis. These results suggest that peroxidase enzymes, such as myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase, may play a fundamental role in regulating the recruitment of fibroblast and the biosynthesis of collagen ECM at sites of normal tissue repair and fibrosis, with enormous implications for many disease states where infiltrating inflammatory cells deposit peroxidases. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison of defence responses to Botrytis cinerea infection in tomato plants propagated in vitro and grown in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Patykowski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Defence reactions: O2 - generation, superoxide dismutase, catalase, guaiacol peroxidase and ascorbate peroxidase activities after B. cinerea infection in tomato plants propagated in vitro and grown in vivo have been compared. Infection resulted in rapid O2 - generation. Superoxide dismutase activity increase was slower than O2 - response. In plants propagated in vitro catalase and guaiacol peroxidase activities after infection were induced less strongly than in plants grown in vivo. K2HPO4 pretreatment of plants grown in vitro enhanced significantly the activities of catalase and guaiacol peroxidase after infection. Slight restriction of B. cinerea infection development in in vitro propagated plants pretreated with K2HP04 was observed.

  13. Peroxidase activity as a marker for estrogenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, J.; Liel, Y.; Glick, S.M.

    1981-01-01

    We examined the possibility that peroxidase activity might be a marker for estrogen activity in established estrogen-dependent tissues: dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced rat mammary tumours and human breast cancer. In DMBA-induced tumours undergoing regression after ovariectomy or tamoxifen treatment, tumour size decreased by 50%, estradiol receptors (ER) and progesterone receptors (PgR) decreased by 25 and 20%, respectively, but peroxidase activity paradoxically increased six- to sevenfold. In DMBA tumours stimulated by estradiol treatment or by the cessation of tamoxifen administration in intact rats, tumour size increased threefold. ER and PgR increased two- and threefold, respectively, while peroxidase activity decreased 50%. These data indicate an inverse relation between tumour growth, ER and PgR on the one hand, and peroxidase activity on the other. In the human breast cancers there was a singificant negative relation between the presence of ER and peroxidase activity. By using a calibrated Sephadex G-100 column it was shown that uterine peroxidase differs in molecular weight from the peroxidase of rat mammary tumours and that of human breast cancer. (author)

  14. Towards uncovering the roles of switchgrass peroxidases in plant processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron eSaathoff

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Herbaceous perennial plants selected as potential biofuel feedstocks had been understudied at the genomic and functional genomic levels. Recent investments, primarily by the U.S. Department of Energy, have led to the development of a number of molecular resources for bioenergy grasses, such as the partially annotated genome for switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L., and some related diploid species. In its current version, the switchgrass genome contains 65,878 gene models arising from the A and B genomes of this tetraploid grass. The availability of these gene sequences provides a framework to exploit transcriptomic data obtained from next generation sequencing platforms to address questions of biological importance. One such question pertains to discovery of genes and proteins important for biotic and abiotic stress responses, and how these components might affect biomass quality and stress response in plants engineered for a specific end purpose. It can be expected that production of switchgrass on marginal lands will expose plants to diverse stresses, including herbivory by insects. Class III plant peroxidases have been implicated in many developmental responses such as lignification and in the adaptive responses of plants to insect feeding. Here, we have analyzed the class III peroxidases encoded by the switchgrass genome, and have mined available transcriptomic datasets to develop a first understanding of the expression profiles of the class III peroxidases in different plant tissues. Lastly, we have identified switchgrass peroxidases that appear to be orthologs of enzymes shown to play key roles in lignification and plant defense responses to hemipterans.

  15. Salt stress-induced changes in antioxidative defense system and proteome profiles of salt-tolerant and sensitive Frankia strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Amrita; Singh, Anumeha; Singh, Satya S; Mishra, Arun K

    2017-04-16

    An appreciation of comparative microbial survival is most easily done while evaluating their adaptive strategies during stress. In the present experiment, antioxidative and whole cell proteome variations based on spectrophotometric analysis and SDS-PAGE and 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis have been analysed among salt-tolerant and salt-sensitive Frankia strains. This is the first report of proteomic basis underlying salt tolerance in these newly isolated Frankia strains from Hippophae salicifolia D. Don. Salt-tolerant strain HsIi10 shows higher increment in the contents of superoxide dismutase, catalase and ascorbate peroxidase as compared to salt-sensitive strain HsIi8. Differential 2-DGE profile has revealed differential profiles for salt-tolerant and salt-sensitive strains. Proteomic confirmation of salt tolerance in the strains with inbuilt efficiency of thriving in nitrogen-deficient locales is a definite advantage for these microbes. This would be equally beneficial for improvement of soil nitrogen status. Efficient protein regulation in HsIi10 suggests further exploration for its potential use as biofertilizer in saline soils.

  16. Production of IFN-γ and IL-4 Against Intact Catalase and Constructed Catalase Epitopes of Helicobacter pylori From T-Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemian Safaei, Hajieh; Faghri, Jamshid; Moghim, Sharareh; Nasr Esfahani, Bahram; Fazeli, Hossein; Makvandi, Manoochehr; Adib, Minoo; Rashidi, Niloufar

    2015-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is highly prevalent in the developing countries. It causes gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastrocarcinoma. Treatment with drugs and antibiotics is problematic due to the following reasons: cost, resistance to antibiotics, prolonged treatment and using multiple drugs. Catalase is highly conserved among the Helicobacter species and is important to the survival of the organism. It is expressed in high amounts and is exposed to the surface of this bacterium; therefore it represents a suitable candidate vaccine antigen. A suitable approach in H. pylori vaccinology is the administration of epitope based vaccines. Therefore the responses of T-cells (IFN-γ and IL-4 production) against the catalase of H. pylori were determined. Then the quality of the immune responses against intact catalase and three epitopes of catalase were compared. In this study, a composition of three epitopes of the H. pylori catalase was selected based on Propred software. The effect of catalase epitopes on T-cells were assayed and immune responses identified. The results of IFN-γ, IL-4 production against antigens, epitopes, and recombinant catalase by T-cells were compared for better understanding of epitope efficiency. The current research demonstrated that epitope sequence stimulates cellular immune responses effectively. In addition, increased safety and potency as well as a reduction in time and cost were advantages of this method. Authors are going to use this sequence as a suitable vaccine candidate for further research on animal models and humans in future.

  17. Oxidation of NAD dimers by horseradish peroxidase.

    OpenAIRE

    Avigliano, L; Carelli, V; Casini, A; Finazzi-Agrò, A; Liberatore, F

    1985-01-01

    Horseradish peroxidase catalyses the oxidation of NAD dimers, (NAD)2, to NAD+ in accordance with a reaction that is pH-dependent and requires 1 mol of O2 per 2 mol of (NAD)2. Horseradish peroxidase also catalyses the peroxidation of (NAD)2 to NAD+. In contrast, bacterial NADH peroxidase does not catalyse the peroxidation or the oxidation of (NAD)2. A free-radical mechanism is proposed for both horseradish-peroxidase-catalysed oxidation and peroxidation of (NAD)2.

  18. Role of vitamin C and E supplementation on IL-6 in response to training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yfanti, Christina; Fischer, Christian P.; Nielsen, Søren

    2012-01-01

    , including catalase, copper-zinc superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase 1 mRNA expression in the VT group. However, skeletal muscle protein content of catalase, copper-zinc superoxide dismutase, or glutathione peroxidase 1 was not affected by training or supplementation. In conclusion, our results...

  19. Catalytic properties of three catalases from Kohlrabi ( Brassica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) was extracted from kohlrabi bulbs (Brassica oleracea gongylodes) with 0.05 M phosphate buffer, pH 7.0. On the basis of kinetic studies and activity stain for catalase, only three isoenzymes of catalases were detected in kohlrabi bulbs extract with pH optima at 4.5, 6.5 and 10. Highest catalytic ...

  20. Catalytic properties of three catalases from Kohlrabi (Brassica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-02-19

    Feb 19, 2008 ... active at pH 4.5. Heat inactivation studies showed a decrease in catalases activity at temperatures ... Catalase (EC 1.11.1.6), which degrades H2O2 into water and oxygen, is .... bulbs extract in the presence of 10 mM H2O2 at different .... properties of catalase from Wheat germ (Triticum aestivum L.). J. Agric.

  1. A Chaperone Function of NO CATALASE ACTIVITY1 Is Required to Maintain Catalase Activity and for Multiple Stress Responses in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Liu, Juntao; Wang, Guoqiang; Cha, Joon-Yung; Li, Guannan; Chen, She; Li, Zhen; Guo, Jinghua; Zhang, Caiguo; Yang, Yongqing; Kim, Woe-Yeon; Yun, Dae-Jin; Schumaker, Karen S.; Chen, Zhongzhou; Guo, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Catalases are key regulators of reactive oxygen species homeostasis in plant cells. However, the regulation of catalase activity is not well understood. In this study, we isolated an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant, no catalase activity1-3 (nca1-3) that is hypersensitive to many abiotic stress treatments. The mutated gene was identified by map-based cloning as NCA1, which encodes a protein containing an N-terminal RING-finger domain and a C-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat-like helical domain. NCA1 interacts with and increases catalase activity maximally in a 240-kD complex in planta. In vitro, NCA1 interacts with CATALASE2 (CAT2) in a 1:1 molar ratio, and the NCA1 C terminus is essential for this interaction. CAT2 activity increased 10-fold in the presence of NCA1, and zinc ion binding of the NCA1 N terminus is required for this increase. NCA1 has chaperone protein activity that may maintain the folding of catalase in a functional state. NCA1 is a cytosol-located protein. Expression of NCA1 in the mitochondrion of the nca1-3 mutant does not rescue the abiotic stress phenotypes of the mutant, while expression in the cytosol or peroxisome does. Our results suggest that NCA1 is essential for catalase activity. PMID:25700484

  2. The effect of red ginseng extract on superoxide dismutase activity in the kidney of gamma-ray irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yong Soon

    1992-01-01

    This study was prepared to observe the change of enzyme activities in kidney treated with red ginseng extract in the gamma ray irradiated mice. Determine the activity of SOD, peroxidase, catalase in the kidney a period of 1 day, 2 day, 3 day, 4 day, 5 day after a saline injection or injection of red ginseng extract or gamma ray irradiated group into four classify. The activity SOD and catalase showed a tendency to increase and recovery at the early state but pay no regard. Where ase, the activity of peroxide restored and increased pay regard. A physiological saline injection group after gamma ray irradiation showed a tendency to diminish after remarkable increase of activity of SOD, peroxidase and catalase than control group. Injection group of red ginseng extract after gamma ray irradiation observed rapid recovery on activity of SOD, peroxidase, catalase than a saline injection group. Experimental result suggested that injection of red ginseng extract after irradiation have the recovery effect on the changed of activity of SOD, peroxidase and catalase against radiation injury

  3. Metallic mercury uptake by catalase Part 1 In Vitro metallic mercury uptake by various kind of animals' erythrocytes and purified human erythrocyte catalase

    OpenAIRE

    劒持,堅志

    1980-01-01

    The uptake of metallic mercury was studied using erythrocytes with different catalase activities taken from various kind of animals. The results were: 1) The uptake of metallic mercury by erythrocytes paralleled the activity of catalase in the erythrocytes with and without hydrogen peroxide, suggesting that the erythrocyte catalase activity is related to the uptake of metallic mercury. 2) The uptake of metallic mercury occurred not only with purified human erythrocyte catalase but also with h...

  4. Nickel toxicity on seed germination and growth in radish (Raphanus sativus) and its recovery using copper and boron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Shiv Shankar; Shukla, Rajni; Sharma, Y K

    2009-05-01

    Effect of various concentrations of nickel (100, 200, 500 and 1000 microM) and recovery treatments of boron (50 and 100 microM) and copper (15 and 75 microM) each with 200 microM and 500 microM of nickel on germination, growth, biomass, chlorophyll, carotenoids, pheophytin, amylase, protein, sugar as well as activity of catalase and peroxidase were studied in radish (Raphanus sativus cv. Early menu) seedlings. Nickel treatments caused a considerable reduction in germination percentage, growth and biomass. The different pigments were also decreased with nickel treatments. However boron addition with nickel recovered the negative effect on pigment contents. Among biochemical estimations, amylase activity and total proteins were found to be reduced in nickel treatments. Peroxidase and catalase activity were induced other than higher total sugar with nickel treatments. The combination of nickel with boron resulted into increased protein contents. This combination also reduced the catalase and peroxidase activity. The influence of nickel with copper failed to produce significant recovery except 200 microM nickel in combination with 15 microM copper with regard to catalase and peroxidase activity. The effect of nickel on hydrolyzing enzyme amylase was observed to be inhibitory resulting into poor germination followed by poor seedlings growth. The stress protecting enzymes peroxidase and catalase seem to be induced under the influence of nickel, and providing protection to the seedlings. The application of boron with nickel showed improved germination and growth. The level of catalase and peroxidase were found to be significantly reduced showing normal growth and biomass of seedlings.

  5. "Chitin-specific" peroxidases in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimov, I V; Cherepanova, E A; Khairullin, R M

    2003-01-01

    The activity of various plant peroxidases and the ability of their individual isoforms to bind chitin was studied. Some increase in peroxidase activity was observed in crude extracts in the presence of chitin. Activated peroxidases of some species fell in the fraction not sorbed on chitin and those of other species can bind chitin. Only anionic isoperoxidases from oat (Avena sativa), rice (Oryza sativa), horseradish (Armoracia rusticana), garden radish (Raphanus sativus var. radicula), peanut (Arachis hypogaea), and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum Link et Otto) were sorbed on chitin. Both anionic and cationic isoforms from pea (Pisum sativum), galega(Galega orientalis), cucumber (Cucumis sativus), and zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) were sorbed on chitin. Peroxidase activation under the influence of chitin was correlated to the processes that occur during hypersensitive reaction and lignification of sites, in which pathogenic fungus penetrates into a plant. The role of chitin-specific isoperoxidases in inhibition of fungal growth and connection of this phenomenon with structural characteristics of isoperoxidases are also discussed.

  6. Peroxide reduction by a metal-dependent catalase in Nostoc punctiforme (cyanobacteria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudek, L; Torriero, A A J; Michalczyk, A A; Neilan, B A; Ackland, M L; Bräu, Lambert

    2017-05-01

    This study investigated the role of a novel metal-dependent catalase (Npun_R4582) that reduces hydrogen peroxide in the cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that npun_R4582 relative mRNA levels were upregulated by over 16-fold in cells treated with either 2 μM added Co, 0.5 μM added Cu, 500 μM Mn, 1 μM Ni, or 18 μM Zn. For cells treated with 60 μM H 2 O 2 , no significant alteration in Npun_R4582 relative mRNA levels was detected, while in cells treated with Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, or Zn and 60 μM peroxide, relative mRNA levels were generally above control or peroxide only treated cells. Disruption or overexpression of npun_R4582 altered sensitivity to cells exposed to 60 μM H 2 O 2 and metals for treatments beyond the highest viable concentrations, or in a mixed metal solution for Npun_R4582 - cells. Moreover, overexpression of npun_R4582 increased cellular peroxidase activity in comparison with wild-type and Npun_R4582 - cells, and reduced peroxide levels by over 50%. The addition of cobalt, manganese, nickel, and zinc increased the capacity of Npun_R4582 to reduce the rate or total levels of peroxide produced by cells growing under photooxidative conditions. The work presented confirms the function of NpunR4582 as a catalase and provides insights as to how cells reduce potentially lethal peroxide levels produced by photosynthesis. The findings also show how trace elements play crucial roles as enzymatic cofactors and how the role of Npun_R4582 in hydrogen peroxide breakdown is dependent on the type of metal and the level available to cells.

  7. Mycobacterial species as case-study of comparative genome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakham, F; Belayachi, L; Ussery, D; Akrim, M; Benjouad, A; El Aouad, R; Ennaji, M M

    2011-02-08

    The genus Mycobacterium represents more than 120 species including important pathogens of human and cause major public health problems and illnesses. Further, with more than 100 genome sequences from this genus, comparative genome analysis can provide new insights for better understanding the evolutionary events of these species and improving drugs, vaccines, and diagnostics tools for controlling Mycobacterial diseases. In this present study we aim to outline a comparative genome analysis of fourteen Mycobacterial genomes: M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis K—10, M. bovis AF2122/97, M. bovis BCG str. Pasteur 1173P2, M. leprae Br4923, M. marinum M, M. sp. KMS, M. sp. MCS, M. tuberculosis CDC1551, M. tuberculosis F11, M. tuberculosis H37Ra, M. tuberculosis H37Rv, M. tuberculosis KZN 1435 , M. ulcerans Agy99,and M. vanbaalenii PYR—1, For this purpose a comparison has been done based on their length of genomes, GC content, number of genes in different data bases (Genbank, Refseq, and Prodigal). The BLAST matrix of these genomes has been figured to give a lot of information about the similarity between species in a simple scheme. As a result of multiple genome analysis, the pan and core genome have been defined for twelve Mycobacterial species. We have also introduced the genome atlas of the reference strain M. tuberculosis H37Rv which can give a good overview of this genome. And for examining the phylogenetic relationships among these bacteria, a phylogenic tree has been constructed from 16S rRNA gene for tuberculosis and non tuberculosis Mycobacteria to understand the evolutionary events of these species.

  8. Original Mycobacterial Sin, a consequence of highly homologous antigens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, A O; Michel, A; Rutten, V

    2017-05-01

    The role of antigens shared between Mycobacteria in in-vivo cross-reactive immune responses in host animals, have been reported to be responsible for reduced BCG vaccination efficacy as well reduced specificity of routine immunological diagnostic tests. This presents with significant disease control challenges in humans and animals. The present review highlights the results of previous studies on the effect of pre-sensitization to environmental mycobacteria on either pathogenic mycobacteria and/or M. bovis BCG, in experimental animals. It also takes an in-depth view into assessing the genetic similarities and relationships between atypical mycobacteria and Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) and how they might explain the immunological imprint of environmental mycobacteria in directing the hosts' immune response upon subsequent exposure to other classes of mycobacteria. The outcome of this review suggests that genetic closeness between particular atypical mycobacteria and MTBC usually indicate a higher level of homology for certain shared protective antigens. This ultimately results in a higher level of cross reactive immune responses as compared with other atypical mycobacteria that are further away genetically. This would explain the different effects of environmental mycobacteria on MTBC that have been reported in the different studies. In other words the direction of the host immune system in response to exposure to MTBC would depend on the type of environmental mycobacteria that was encountered in the initial exposure. We also explain these mycobacterial interactions in the context of the phenomenon of "Original Mycobacterial Sin". The effects of these inevitable mycobacterial interactions on field diagnosis and control by vaccination and how to circumvent them are discussed. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Enhancement of catalase activity by repetitive low-grade H2O2 exposures protects fibroblasts from subsequent stress-induced apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, Prosenjit; Mukherjee, Sebanti; Bhaumik, Gayaram; Das, Pradeep; Ganguly, Sandipan; Choudhury, Nandini; Raha, Sanghamitra

    2003-01-01

    Exposure of Chinese hamster V79 fibroblasts to mild and repetitive H 2 O 2 doses in culture for 15 weeks produced no change in lipid peroxidation status, GSH/GSSG ratio and glutathione peroxidase activity of these cells (VST cells). In contrast, in VST cells catalase levels underwent a prominent increase which could be significantly inhibited and brought down to control levels after treatment with the catalase inhibitor 3-aminotriazole (3-AT). When control (VC) cells were exposed to UV radiation (UVC 5 J/m 2 ) or H 2 O 2 (7.5 mM, 15 min), intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels rose prominently with significant activation of caspase-3. Marked nuclear fragmentation and lower cell viability were also noted in these cells. In contrast, VST cells demonstrated a significantly lower ROS level, an absence of nuclear fragmentation and an unchanged caspase-3 activity after exposure to UVC or H 2 O 2 . Cell viability was also significantly better preserved in VST cells than VC cells after UV or H 2 O 2 exposures. Following 3-AT treatment of VST cells, UVC radiation or H 2 O 2 brought about significantly higher elevations in intracellular ROS, increases in caspase-3 activity, significantly lowered cell viability and marked nuclear fragmentation, indicating the involvement of high catalase levels in the cytoprotective effects of repetitive stress. Therefore, upregulation of the antioxidant defense after repetitive oxidative stress imparted a superior ability to cope with subsequent acute stress and escape apoptotic death and loss of viability

  10. Structure of soybean seed coat peroxidase: a plant peroxidase with unusual stability and haem-apoprotein interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, A; Mirza, O; Indiani, C

    2001-01-01

    Soybean seed coat peroxidase (SBP) is a peroxidase with extraordinary stability and catalytic properties. It belongs to the family of class III plant peroxidases that can oxidize a wide variety of organic and inorganic substrates using hydrogen peroxide. Because the plant enzyme is a heterogeneous...... glycoprotein, SBP was produced recombinant in Escherichia coli for the present crystallographic study. The three-dimensional structure of SBP shows a bound tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane molecule (TRIS). This TRIS molecule has hydrogen bonds to active site residues corresponding to the residues that interact...... with the small phenolic substrate ferulic acid in the horseradish peroxidase C (HRPC):ferulic acid complex. TRIS is positioned in what has been described as a secondary substrate-binding site in HRPC, and the structure of the SBP:TRIS complex indicates that this secondary substrate-binding site could...

  11. Tetra(p-tolyl)borate-functionalized solvent polymeric membrane: a facile and sensitive sensing platform for peroxidase and peroxidase mimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuewei; Qin, Wei

    2013-07-22

    The determination of peroxidase activities is the basis for enzyme-labeled bioaffinity assays, peroxidase-mimicking DNAzymes- and nanoparticles-based assays, and characterization of the catalytic functions of peroxidase mimetics. Here, a facile, sensitive, and cost-effective solvent polymeric membrane-based peroxidase detection platform is described that utilizes reaction intermediates with different pKa values from those of substrates and final products. Several key but long-debated intermediates in the peroxidative oxidation of o-phenylenediamine (o-PD) have been identified and their charge states have been estimated. By using a solvent polymeric membrane functionalized by an appropriate substituted tetraphenylborate as a receptor, those cationic intermediates could be transferred into the membrane from the aqueous phase to induce a large cationic potential response. Thus, the potentiometric indication of the o-PD oxidation catalyzed by peroxidase or its mimetics can be fulfilled. Horseradish peroxidase has been detected with a detection limit at least two orders of magnitude lower than those obtained by spectrophotometric techniques and traditional membrane-based methods. As an example of peroxidase mimetics, G-quadruplex DNAzymes were probed by the intermediate-sensitive membrane and a label-free thrombin detection protocol was developed based on the catalytic activity of the thrombin-binding G-quadruplex aptamer. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Investigation of Catalase, Proxidase and Total Protein Level in Some Cold Treated Grapevine Cultivars Cold Stress Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Karimi Alavijeh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Chilling is an important environmental stress that influences the yield and quality of many agricultural crops. Different plants use different systems to endure this stress and minimize its effects. One of these systems is enzymatic reaction. To find out more about responses of different grapevine species and cultivars to the low temperature conditions, their enzymatic changes were evaluated in a factorial experiment based on randomized complete design with 3 replication during different periods after chilling stress. Leaf samples of plants under cold stress had been taken and maintained in -80 °C until enzyme extraction. Low temperature around 4 °C is sufficient to induce genes that produce chilling acclimatization proteins. In the present study, leaf samples were collected from the plants that were kept at 4 °C during different time intervals, and then total proteins as well as two main antioxidant enzymes (catalase and guaiacolperoxidase activities were measured. Results showed that as temperature decreased, enzymatic activities were increased in six Iranian grapevine cultivars (‘Atabaki’, ‘Khalili-Danedar’, ‘Shahroodi’, ‘Rajabi-Siah’, ‘Askari’ and ‘Bidane-Sefid’ as well as ‘Riparia’, an American species. The highest enzymatic activities of catalase and ceroxidase were recorded in ‘Khalili-Danedar’ and ‘Riparia’. However,the lowest activities were recorded in ‘Rajabi-Siah’, ‘Bidane-Sefid’ and ‘Shahroodi’. For all studied cultivars, peroxidase showed its highest activity at 12 h after chilling stress, then remained constant, while, the highest activity of catalase were recorded at 8 h. In addition, cold stress increased the total protein content for all studied cultivars, in which ‘Khalili-Danedar’ had the highest protein content amongstudied cultivars. Also, the highest proteins content were recorded at 12 h after exposing plants to cold.

  13. Naive helper T cells from BCG-vaccinated volunteers produce IFN-gamma and IL-5 to mycobacterial antigen-pulsed dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JoĂŤl Pestel

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-GuĂŠrin (BCG is a live vaccine that has been used in routine vaccination against tuberculosis for nearly 80 years. However, its efficacy is controversial. The failure of BCG vaccination may be at least partially explained by the induction of poor or inappropriate host responses. Dendritic cells (DCs are likely to play a key role in the induction of immune response to mycobacteria by polarizing the reactivity of T lymphocytes toward a Th1 profile, contributing to the generation of protective cellular immunity against mycobacteria. In this study we aimed to investigate the production of Th1 and Th2 cytokines by naive CD4+ T cells to mycobacterial antigen-pulsed DCs in the group of young, healthy BCG vaccinated volunteers. The response of naive helper T cells was compared with the response of total blood lymphocytes. Our present results clearly showed that circulating naive CD45RA+CD4+ lymphocytes from BCG-vaccinated subjects can become effector helper cells producing IFN-gamma and IL-5 under the stimulation by autologous dendritic cells presenting mycobacterial protein antigen-PPD or infected with live M. bovis BCG bacilli.

  14. Naive helper T cells from BCG-vaccinated volunteers produce IFN-gamma and IL-5 to mycobacterial antigen-pulsed dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalewicz-Kulbat, Magdalena; Kaźmierczak, Dominik; Donevski, Stefan; Biet, Franck; Pestel, Joël; Rudnicka, Wiesława

    2008-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is a live vaccine that has been used in routine vaccination against tuberculosis for nearly 80 years. However, its efficacy is controversial. The failure of BCG vaccination may be at least partially explained by the induction of poor or inappropriate host responses. Dendritic cells (DCs) are likely to play a key role in the induction of immune response to mycobacteria by polarizing the reactivity of T lymphocytes toward a Th1 profile, contributing to the generation of protective cellular immunity against mycobacteria. In this study we aimed to investigate the production of Th1 and Th2 cytokines by naive CD4+ T cells to mycobacterial antigen-pulsed DCs in the group of young, healthy BCG vaccinated volunteers. The response of naive helper T cells was compared with the response of total blood lymphocytes. Our present results clearly showed that circulating naive CD45RA+CD4+ lymphocytes from BCG-vaccinated subjects can become effector helper cells producing IFN-gamma and IL-5 under the stimulation by autologous dendritic cells presenting mycobacterial protein antigen-PPD or infected with live M. bovis BCG bacilli.

  15. Recombinant gamma interferon for the treatment of pulmonary and mycobacterial diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Idrian; Milanes, Maria T; Cayon, Isis; Santos, Yamilet et. al

    2009-01-01

    An increased antibiotic resistance is described for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and atypical mycobacterial species; therefore, new treatments are required. Immunocompromised patients have increased risk, as demonstrated by complications after BCG vaccination. On the other hand, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a fatal disease, with no therapy available to modify course of the disease. Gamma interferon (IFN-γ) plays an essential role as main activator of cytokine secretion in macrophages, also showing a potent anti-fibrotic effects. To evaluate the adjuvant effect of IFN-γ on these three clinical scenarios, five clinical trials were carried out. Patients treated with IFN gamma had satisfactory response according to clinical, imaging and functional criteria since their first evaluations, significantly improving when compared to the control group receiving placebo in a study of pulmonary atypical mycobacteriosis. Fast sputum conversion was obtained in mycobacterial infections, including tuberculosis. In the idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis study, 75% of treated patients were considered as responders (improvement + stable). Here we report the cases of two nursing babies with suppurative regional lymphadenitis caused by BCG, who were successfully treated with recombinant human IFN-γ. Treatment was well tolerated, with most of the adverse reactions corresponding to classical flu-like symptoms produced by the cytokine. We can conclude that IFN-γ is useful and well tolerated as adjuvant therapy in patients with pulmonary mycobacterial diseases or idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. (author)

  16. Catalytic Properties and Immobilization Studies of Catalase from Malva sylvestris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Arabaci

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalase was partially purified from Malva sylvestris L. and immobilized onto chitosan. Then, its catalytic properties were investigated. (NH42SO4 precipitation and dialysis were performed in the extracted enzyme. Further purification was performed with sephadex G-200 column. Kinetic studies of the purified enzyme activity were measured and characterized. The inhibitory effects of KCN, NaN3, CuSO4, and EDTA on M. sylvestris L. catalase activity were observed except NaCl. Furthermore, M. sylvestris L. catalase was immobilized covalently with glutaraldehyde onto chitosan particles. The pH and temperature optima as well as the changes in the kinetics (Km, Vmax of the immobilized and free M. sylvestris L. catalase were determined. The Km value for immobilized catalase (23.4 mM was higher than that of free enzyme (17.6 mM. Optimum temperature was observed higher than that of the free enzyme. The optimum pH was the same for both free and immobilized catalases (pH 7.50. Immobilized catalase showed higher storage and thermal stabilities than free catalases. Free catalase lost all its activity within 60 days whereas immobilized catalase lost 45% of its activity during the same incubation period at 4°C. The remaining immobilized catalase activity was about 70% after 8 cycles of batch operations.

  17. Regulation of catalase expression in healthy and cancerous cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glorieux, Christophe; Zamocky, Marcel; Sandoval, Juan Marcelo; Verrax, Julien; Calderon, Pedro Buc

    2015-10-01

    Catalase is an important antioxidant enzyme that dismutates hydrogen peroxide into water and molecular oxygen. The catalase gene has all the characteristics of a housekeeping gene (no TATA box, no initiator element sequence, high GC content in promoter) and a core promoter that is highly conserved among species. We demonstrate in this review that within this core promoter, the presence of DNA binding sites for transcription factors, such as NF-Y and Sp1, plays an essential role in the positive regulation of catalase expression. Additional transcription factors, such as FoxO3a, are also involved in this regulatory process. There is strong evidence that the protein Akt/PKB in the PI3K signaling pathway plays a major role in the expression of catalase by modulating the activity of FoxO3a. Over the past decade, other transcription factors (PPARγ, Oct-1, etc.), as well as genetic, epigenetic, and posttranscriptional processes, have emerged as crucial contributors to the regulation of catalase expression. Altered expression levels of catalase have been reported in cancer tissues compared to their normal counterparts. Deciphering the molecular mechanisms that regulate catalase expression could, therefore, be of crucial importance for the future development of pro-oxidant cancer chemotherapy. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Altered methanol embryopathies in embryo culture with mutant catalase-deficient mice and transgenic mice expressing human catalase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Lutfiya; Wells, Peter G.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the teratogenicity of methanol (MeOH) in rodents, unlike its acute toxicity in humans, are unclear, but may involve reactive oxygen species (ROS). Embryonic catalase, although expressed at about 5% of maternal activity, may protect the embryo by detoxifying ROS. This hypothesis was investigated in whole embryo culture to remove confounding maternal factors, including metabolism of MeOH by maternal catalase. C57BL/6 (C57) mouse embryos expressing human catalase (hCat) or their wild-type (C57 WT) controls, and C3Ga.Cg-Catb/J acatalasemic (aCat) mouse embryos or their wild-type C3HeB/FeJ (C3H WT) controls, were explanted on gestational day (GD) 9 (plug = GD 1), exposed for 24 h to 4 mg/ml MeOH or vehicle, and evaluated for functional and morphological changes. hCat and C57 WT vehicle-exposed embryos developed normally. MeOH was embryopathic in C57 WT embryos, evidenced by decreases in anterior neuropore closure, somites developed and turning, whereas hCat embryos were protected. Vehicle-exposed aCat mouse embryos had lower yolk sac diameters compared to C3H WT controls, suggesting that endogenous ROS are embryopathic. MeOH was more embryopathic in aCat embryos than WT controls, with reduced anterior neuropore closure and head length only in catalase-deficient embryos. These data suggest that ROS may be involved in the embryopathic mechanism of methanol, and that embryonic catalase activity may be a determinant of teratological risk.

  19. Amyloid-beta binds catalase with high affinity and inhibits hydrogen peroxide breakdown.

    OpenAIRE

    Milton, N G

    1999-01-01

    Amyloid-beta (Abeta) specifically bound purified catalase with high affinity and inhibited catalase breakdown of H(2)O(2). The Abeta-induced catalase inhibition involved formation of the inactive catalase Compound II and was reversible. CatalaseAbeta interactions provide rapid functional assays for the cytotoxic domain of Abeta and suggest a mechanism for some of the observed actions of Abeta plus catalase in vitro.

  20. Combined cross-linked enzyme aggregates of horseradish peroxidase and glucose oxidase for catalyzing cascade chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Le Truc; Yang, Kun-Lin

    2017-05-01

    Cascade reactions involved unstable intermediates are often encountered in biological systems. In this study, we developed combined cross-linked enzyme aggregates (combi-CLEA) to catalyze a cascade reaction which involves unstable hydrogen peroxide as an intermediate. The combi-CLEA contains two enzymes̶ glucose oxidase (GOx) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) which are cross-linked together as solid aggregates. The first enzyme GOx catalyzes the oxidation of glucose and produces hydrogen peroxide, which is used by the second enzyme HRP to oxidize 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS). The apparent reaction rate of the cascade reaction reaches 10.5±0.5μM/min when the enzyme ratio is 150:1 (GOx:HRP). Interestingly, even in the presence of catalase, an enzyme that quickly decomposes hydrogen peroxide, the reaction rate only decreases by 18.7% to 8.3±0.3μM/min. This result suggests that the intermediate hydrogen peroxide is not decomposed by catalase due to a short diffusion distance between GOx and HRP in the combi-CLEA. Scanning electron microscopy images suggest that combi-CLEA particles are hollow spheres and have an average diameter around 250nm. Because of their size, combi-CLEA particles can be entrapped inside a nylon membrane for detecting glucose by using the cascade reaction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Influence of catalase on the radiation sensitizing effect of misonidazole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazso, G.L.; Dam, A.

    1985-01-01

    The radiation modifying action of misonidazole and catalase was investigated in Bacillus megaterium spores at various oxygen concentrations. Catalase (120 μg/ml) decreased the radiation sensitizing action of misonidazole. Misonidazole as an electron affinic radiation sensitizer enhanced the build up of H 2 O 2 , thus promoting the reaction with catalase. Protection by catalase was not enough to eliminate the total radiation sensitizing effect of misonidazole. (orig.)

  2. Immunohistological Analysis of In Situ Expression of Mycobacterial Antigens in Skin Lesions of Leprosy Patients Across the Histopathological Spectrum : Association of Mycobacterial Lipoarabinomannan (LAM) and Mycobacterium leprae Phenolic Glycolipid-I (PGL-I) with Leprosy Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Verhagen, Claudia; Faber, William; Klatser, Paul; Buffing, Anita; Naafs, Ben; Das, Pranab

    1999-01-01

    The presence of mycobacterial antigens in leprosy skin lesions was studied by immunohistological methods using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to Mycobacterium leprae-specific phenolic glycolipid I (PGL-I) and to cross-reactive mycobacterial antigens of 36 kd, 65 kd, and lipoarabinomannan (LAM). The staining patterns with MAb to 36 kd and 65 kd were heterogeneous and were also seen in the lesions of other skin diseases. The in situ staining of PGL-I and LAM was seen only in ...

  3. A high constitutive catalase activity confers resistance to methyl viologen-promoted oxidative stress in a mutant of the cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moirangthem, Lakshmipyari Devi; Bhattacharya, Sudeshna; Stensjö, Karin; Lindblad, Peter; Bhattacharya, Jyotirmoy

    2014-04-01

    A spontaneous methyl viologen (MV)-resistant mutant of the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133 was isolated and the major enzymatic antioxidants involved in combating MV-induced oxidative stress were evaluated. The mutant displayed a high constitutive catalase activity as a consequence of which, the intracellular level of reactive oxygen species in the mutant was lower than the wild type (N. punctiforme) in the presence of MV. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity that consisted of a SodA (manganese-SOD) and a SodB (iron-SOD) was not suppressed in the mutant following MV treatment. The mutant was, however, characterised by a lower peroxidase activity compared with its wild type, and its improved tolerance to externally added H₂O₂ could only be attributed to enhanced catalase activity. Furthermore, MV-induced toxic effects on the wild type such as (1) loss of photosynthetic performance assessed as maximal quantum yield of photosystem II, (2) nitrogenase inactivation, and (3) filament fragmentation and cell lysis were not observed in the mutant. These findings highlight the importance of catalase in preventing MV-promoted oxidative damage and cell death in the cyanobacterium N. punctiforme. Such oxidative stress resistant mutants of cyanobacteria are likely to be a better source of biofertilisers, as they can grow and fix nitrogen in an unhindered manner in agricultural fields that are often contaminated with the herbicide MV, also commonly known as paraquat.

  4. Protection of Bacillus pumilus spores by catalases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checinska, Aleksandra; Burbank, Malcolm; Paszczynski, Andrzej J

    2012-09-01

    Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032, isolated at spacecraft assembly facilities of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Jet Propulsion Laboratory, is difficult to kill by the sterilization method of choice, which uses liquid or vapor hydrogen peroxide. We identified two manganese catalases, YjqC and BPUM_1305, in spore protein extracts of several B. pumilus strains by using PAGE and mass spectrometric analyses. While the BPUM_1305 catalase was present in six of the B. pumilus strains tested, YjqC was not detected in ATCC 7061 and BG-B79. Furthermore, both catalases were localized in the spore coat layer along with laccase and superoxide dismutase. Although the initial catalase activity in ATCC 7061 spores was higher, it was less stable over time than the SAFR-032 enzyme. We propose that synergistic activity of YjqC and BPUM_1305, along with other coat oxidoreductases, contributes to the enhanced resistance of B. pumilus spores to hydrogen peroxide. We observed that the product of the catalase reaction, gaseous oxygen, forms expanding vesicles on the spore surface, affecting the mechanical integrity of the coat layer, resulting in aggregation of the spores. The accumulation of oxygen gas and aggregations may play a crucial role in limiting further exposure of Bacilli spore surfaces to hydrogen peroxide or other toxic chemicals when water is present.

  5. Production of matrix metalloproteinases in response to mycobacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiding-Järbrink, M; Smith, D A; Bancroft, G J

    2001-09-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) constitute a large family of enzymes with specificity for the various proteins of the extracellular matrix which are implicated in tissue remodeling processes and chronic inflammatory conditions. To investigate the role of MMPs in immunity to mycobacterial infections, we incubated murine peritoneal macrophages with viable Mycobacterium bovis BCG or Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and assayed MMP activity in the supernatants by zymography. Resting macrophages secreted only small amounts of MMP-9 (gelatinase B), but secretion increased dramatically in a dose-dependent manner in response to either BCG or M. tuberculosis in vitro. Incubation with mycobacteria also induced increased MMP-2 (gelatinase A) activity. Neutralization of tumor necrosis alpha (TNF-alpha), and to a lesser extent interleukin 18 (IL-18), substantially reduced MMP production in response to mycobacteria. Exogenous addition of TNF-alpha or IL-18 induced macrophages to express MMPs, even in the absence of bacteria. The immunoregulatory cytokines gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), IL-4, and IL-10 all suppressed BCG-induced MMP production, but through different mechanisms. IFN-gamma treatment increased macrophage secretion of TNF-alpha but still reduced their MMP activity. Conversely, IL-4 and IL-10 seemed to act by reducing the amount of TNF-alpha available to the macrophages. Finally, infection of BALB/c or severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice with either BCG or M. tuberculosis induced substantial increases in MMP-9 activity in infected tissues. In conclusion, we show that mycobacterial infection induces MMP-9 activity both in vitro and in vivo and that this is regulated by TNF-alpha, IL-18, and IFN-gamma. These findings indicate a possible contribution of MMPs to tissue remodeling processes that occur in mycobacterial infections.

  6. One-pot synthesis of porphyrin functionalized γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposites as peroxidase mimics for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and glucose detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qingyun, E-mail: qyliu@sdust.edu.cn; Zhang, Leyou; Li, Hui; Jia, Qingyan; Jiang, Yanling; Yang, Yanting; Zhu, Renren

    2015-10-01

    Meso-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)-porphyrin-functionalized γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles (H{sub 2}TCPP-γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were successfully prepared by one-pot method under hydrothermal conditions and were found to possess intrinsic peroxidase-like activity. The H{sub 2}TCPP-γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposites can catalytically oxidize peroxidase substrate 3,3′,5,5′-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to produce a blue color reaction, which can be easily observed by the naked eye. Furthermore, kinetic studies indicate that the H{sub 2}TCPP-γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposites have an even higher affinity to TMB than that of the natural enzyme, horseradish peroxidase (HRP). On the basis of the high activity, the reaction provides a simple, sensitive and selective method for colorimetric detection of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} over a range of 10–100 μM with a minimum detection limit of 1.73 μM. Moreover, H{sub 2}TCPP-γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/glucose oxidase (GOx)/TMB system provides a novel colorimetric sensor for glucose and shows good response toward glucose detection over a range of 5–25 μM with a minimum detection limit of 2.54 μM. The results indicated that it is a simple, cheap, convenient, highly selective, sensitive and easy handling colorimetric assay. Results of a fluorescent probe suggest that the catalase-mimic activity of the H{sub 2}TCPP-γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposites effectively catalyze the decomposition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} into H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2}. - Graphical abstract: 5,10,15,20-Tetrakis(4-carboxyl phenyl)-porphyrin (H{sub 2}TCPP)-γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposites were demonstrated to possess intrinsic peroxidase-like activity and showed a higher catalytic activity, compared to that of γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles alone. - Highlights: • Porphyrin-functionalized γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles were prepared by one-pot method. • The porphyrin-γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposites were found to possess

  7. Antioxidant enzymes expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa exposed to UV-C radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salma, Kloula Ben Ghorbal; Lobna, Maalej; Sana, Khefacha; Kalthoum, Chourabi; Imene, Ouzari; Abdelwaheb, Chatti

    2016-07-01

    It was well known that, UV-C irradiation increase considerably the reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. In the enzymatic ROS-scavenging pathways, superoxide dismutase (SOD), Catalase (CAT), and peroxidase (POX) were developed to deal with oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated the effects of UV-C radiations on antioxidant enzymes (catalase, superoxide dismutase, and peroxidases) expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Catalase, superoxide dismutase, and peroxidases activities were determined spectrophotometrically. Isozymes of superoxide dismutase were revealed by native gel activity staining method. Lipid peroxidation was determined by measuring malondialdehyde formation. Our results showed that superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase activities exhibited a gradual increase during the exposure time (30 min). However, the superoxide dismutase activity was maximized at 15 min. Native gel activity staining assays showed the presence of three superoxide dismutase isozymes. The iron-cofactored isoform activity was altered after exposure to UV-C stress. These finding suggest that catalase and peroxidase enzymes have the same importance toward UV-C rays at shorter and longer exposure times and this may confer additional protection to superoxide dismutase from damage caused by lipid peroxidation. Moreover, our data demonstrate the significant role of the antioxidant system in the resistance of this important human pathogen. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Catalase-only nanoparticles prepared by shear alone: Characteristics, activity and stability evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiao-Nan; Du, Xin-Ying; Xing, Jin-Feng; Ge, Zhi-Qiang

    2016-09-01

    Catalase is a promising therapeutic enzyme; however, it carries risks of inactivation and rapid degradation when it is used in practical bioprocess, such as delivery in vivo. To overcome the issue, we made catalase-only nanoparticles using shear stress alone at a moderate shear rate of 217s(-1) in a coaxial cylinder flow cell. Properties of nanoparticles, including particle size, polydispersity index and zeta potential, were characterized. The conformational changes of pre- and post-sheared catalase were determined using spectroscopy techniques. The results indicated that the conformational changes of catalase and reduction in α-helical content caused by shear alone were less significant than that by desolvation method. Catalase-only nanoparticles prepared by single shear retained over 90% of its initial activity when compared with the native catalase. Catalase nanoparticles lost only 20% of the activity when stored in phosphate buffer solution for 72h at 4°C, whereas native catalase lost 53% under the same condition. Especially, the activity of nanogranulated catalase was decreased only slightly in the simulated intestinal fluid containing α-chymotrypsin during 4h incubation at 37°C, implying that the catalase nanoparticle was more resistant to the degradation of proteases than native catalase molecules. Overall, catalase-only nanoparticles offered a great potential to stabilize enzymes for various pharmaceutical applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Shifts in Mycobacterial Populations and Emerging Drug-Resistance in West and Central Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Gehre

    Full Text Available In this study, we retrospectively analysed a total of 605 clinical isolates from six West or Central African countries (Benin, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Guinea-Conakry, Niger and Senegal. Besides spoligotyping to assign isolates to ancient and modern mycobacterial lineages, we conducted phenotypic drug-susceptibility-testing for each isolate for the four first-line drugs. We showed that phylogenetically modern Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains are more likely associated with drug resistance than ancient strains and predict that the currently ongoing replacement of the endemic ancient by a modern mycobacterial population in West/Central Africa might result in increased drug resistance in the sub-region.

  10. Blood superoxiddismutase and catalase: enzymes activity under oxidative stress conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Каріна Леонідівна Шамелашвілі

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase depends not only on the used compounds of rhenium, and also on their dimensional structure and form of applying. It is established that the cis- and trans-isomers of complex compounds of rhenium did countervailing effect on superoxide dismutase and catalase activities. Cis-isomers of Rhenium dycarboxylats agreed increased activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase. While under the action of trans-isomers, where increased activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase activity decreased

  11. [Biologics and mycobacterial diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuyuguchi, Kazunari; Matsumoto, Tomoshige

    2013-03-01

    Various biologics such as TNF-alpha inhibitor or IL-6 inhibitor are now widely used for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Many reports suggested that one of the major issues is high risk of developing tuberculosis (TB) associated with using these agents, which is especially important in Japan where tuberculosis still remains endemic. Another concern is the risk of development of nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) diseases and we have only scanty information about it. The purpose of this symposium is to elucidate the role of biologics in the development of mycobacterial diseases and to establish the strategy to control them. First, Dr. Tohma showed the epidemiologic data of TB risks associated with using biologics calculated from the clinical database on National Database of Rheumatic Diseases by iR-net in Japan. He estimated TB risks in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients to be about four times higher compared with general populations and to become even higher by using biologics. He also pointed out a low rate of implementation of QuantiFERON test (QFT) as screening test for TB infection. Next, Dr. Tokuda discussed the issue of NTM disease associated with using biologics. He suggested the airway disease in RA patients might play some role in the development of NTM disease, which may conversely lead to overdiagnosis of NTM disease in RA patients. He suggested that NTM disease should not be uniformly considered a contraindication to treatment with biologics, considering from the results of recent multicenter study showing relatively favorable outcome of NTM patients receiving biologics. Patients with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) should receive LTBI treatment before starting biologics. Dr. Kato, a chairperson of the Prevention Committee of the Japanese Society for Tuberculosis, proposed a new LTBI guideline including active implementation of LTBI treatment, introducing interferon gamma release assay, and appropriate selection of persons at high risk for

  12. Fungal peroxidases : molecular aspects and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conesa, A.; Punt, P.J.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J.

    2002-01-01

    Peroxidases are oxidoreductases that utilize hydrogen peroxide to catalyze oxidative reactions. A large number of peroxidases have been identified in fungal species and are being characterized at the molecular level. In this manuscript we review the current knowledge on the molecular aspects of this

  13. Experienced and Perceived Risks of Mycobacterial Diseases: A Cross Sectional Study among Agropastoral Communities in Northern Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilale, Andrew Martin; Ngadaya, Esther; Kagaruki, Gibson Benard; Lema, Yakobo Leonard; Muhumuza, Julius; Ngowi, Bernard James; Mfinanga, Sayoki Godfrey; Hinderaker, Sven Gudmund

    2015-01-01

    The current study was conducted to assess experienced risk factors and perceptions of mycobacterial diseases in communities in northern Tanzania. We conducted a cross-sectional study in Arusha and Manyara regions in Northern Tanzania. We enrolled tuberculosis (TB) patients attending Mount Meru Hospital, Enduleni Hospital and Haydom Lutheran Hospitals in Arusha municipality, Ngorongoro and Mbulu districts, respectively. Patient addresses were recorded during their first visit to the hospitals. Patients with confirmed diagnosis of TB by sputum smear microscopy and/or culture at central laboratory were followed up and interviewed using pre-tested questionnaires, and selected relatives and neighbors were also interviewed. The study was conducted between June 2011 and May 2013. The study involved 164 respondents: 41(25%) were TB patients, 68(41.5%) were their relatives and 55(33.5%) their neighbors. Sixty four (39%) knew a risk factor for mycobacterial disease. Overall, 64(39%) perceived to be at risk of mycobacterial diseases. Exposure to potential risks of mycobacterial diseases were: keeping livestock, not boiling drinking water, large family, smoking and sharing dwelling with TB patients. Rural dwellers were more often livestock keepers (p<0.01), more often shared dwelling with livestock (p<0.01) than urban dwellers. More primary school leavers reported sharing dwelling with TB patients than participants with secondary and higher education (p = 0.01). Livestock keeping, sharing dwelling with livestock, sharing household with a TB patient were perceived risk factors for mycobacterial diseases and the participants were exposed to some of these risk factors. Improving knowledge about the risk factors may protect them from these serious diseases.

  14. Catalase deletion promotes prediabetic phenotype in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heit, Claire; Marshall, Stephanie; Singh, Surrendra; Yu, Xiaoqing; Charkoftaki, Georgia; Zhao, Hongyu; Orlicky, David J; Fritz, Kristofer S; Thompson, David C; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2017-02-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is produced endogenously and can be toxic to living organisms by inducing oxidative stress and cell damage. However, it has also been identified as a signal transduction molecule. By metabolizing hydrogen peroxide, catalase protects cells and tissues against oxidative damage and may also influence signal transduction mechanisms. Studies suggest that acatalasemic individuals (i.e., those with very low catalase activity) have a higher risk for the development of diabetes. We now report catalase knockout (Cat -/- ) mice, when fed a normal (6.5% lipid) chow, exhibit an obese phenotype that manifests as an increase in body weight that becomes more pronounced with age. The mice demonstrate altered hepatic and muscle lipid deposition, as well as increases in serum and hepatic triglycerides (TGs), and increased hepatic transcription and protein expression of PPARγ. Liver morphology revealed steatosis with inflammation. Cat -/- mice also exhibited pancreatic morphological changes that correlated with impaired glucose tolerance and increased fasting serum insulin levels, conditions consistent with pre-diabetic status. RNA-seq analyses revealed a differential expression of pathways and genes in Cat -/- mice, many of which are related to metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and obesity, such as Pparg and Cidec. In conclusion, the results of the present study show mice devoid of catalase develop an obese, pre-diabetic phenotype and provide compelling evidence for catalase (or its products) being integral in metabolic regulation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Potential enzyme toxicity of oxytetracycline to catalase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhenxing, Chi; Rutao, Liu; Zhang Hao, E-mail: Trutaoliu@sdu.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, China-America CRC for Environment and Health, Shandong Province, 27 Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2010-10-15

    Oxytetracycline (OTC) is a kind of widely used veterinary drugs. The residue of OTC in the environment is potentially harmful. In the present work, the non-covalent toxic interaction of OTC with catalase was investigated by the fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-vis absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy at physiological pH 7.4. OTC can interact with catalase to form a complex mainly by van der Waals' interactions and hydrogen bonds with one binding site. The association constants K were determined to be K{sub 293K} = 7.09 x 10{sup 4} L mol{sup -1} and K{sub 311K} = 3.31 x 10{sup 4} L mol{sup -1}. The thermodynamic parameters ({Delta}H{sup o}, {Delta}G{sup o} and {Delta}S{sup o}) of the interaction were calculated. Based on the Foerster theory of non-radiative energy transfer, the distance between bound OTC and the tryptophan residues of catalase was determined to be 6.48 nm. The binding of OTC can result in change of the micro-environment of the tryptophan residues and the secondary structure of catalase. The activity of catalase was also inhibited for the bound OTC. This work establishes a new strategy to probe the enzyme toxicity of veterinary drug residues and is helpful for clarifying the molecular toxic mechanism of OTC in vivo. The established strategy can be used to investigate the potential enzyme toxicity of other small organic pollutants and drugs.

  16. Potential enzyme toxicity of oxytetracycline to catalase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi Zhenxing; Liu Rutao; Zhang Hao

    2010-01-01

    Oxytetracycline (OTC) is a kind of widely used veterinary drugs. The residue of OTC in the environment is potentially harmful. In the present work, the non-covalent toxic interaction of OTC with catalase was investigated by the fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-vis absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy at physiological pH 7.4. OTC can interact with catalase to form a complex mainly by van der Waals' interactions and hydrogen bonds with one binding site. The association constants K were determined to be K 293K = 7.09 x 10 4 L mol -1 and K 311K = 3.31 x 10 4 L mol -1 . The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH o , ΔG o and ΔS o ) of the interaction were calculated. Based on the Foerster theory of non-radiative energy transfer, the distance between bound OTC and the tryptophan residues of catalase was determined to be 6.48 nm. The binding of OTC can result in change of the micro-environment of the tryptophan residues and the secondary structure of catalase. The activity of catalase was also inhibited for the bound OTC. This work establishes a new strategy to probe the enzyme toxicity of veterinary drug residues and is helpful for clarifying the molecular toxic mechanism of OTC in vivo. The established strategy can be used to investigate the potential enzyme toxicity of other small organic pollutants and drugs.

  17. Effects of rs769217 and rs1001179 polymorphisms of catalase gene on blood catalase, carbohydrate and lipid biomarkers in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Góth, László; Nagy, Teréz; Kósa, Zsuzsanna; Fejes, Zsolt; Bhattoa, Harjit Pal; Paragh, György; Káplár, Miklós

    2012-10-01

    Oxidative stress and deficiency of the enzyme catalase, which is the primary scavenger of the oxidant H(2)O(2), may contribute to diabetes. The current study examined two polymorphisms in the catalase gene, -262C>nT in the promoter and 111C>T in exon 9, and their effects on blood catalase activity as well as on concentrations of blood glucose, haemoglobin A1c, triglyceride, cholesterol, HDL, LDL, ApoA-I and ApoB. Subjects were type-1 and type-2 diabetics. We evaluated PCR-single strand conformational polymorphism for 111C>T and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism for - 262C>T. TT genotype frequency of 111C>T polymorphism was increased in type-1 diabetes. Type-2 diabetics with the CC or CT genotypes had decreased catalase and increased glucose, hemoglobinA1c and ApoB. Type-2 diabetics who have TT genotype in -262C>T may have elevated risk for diabetes complications; these patients had the lowest mean catalase and HDL, as well as the highest glucose, haemoglobin A1c, cholesterol and ApoB.

  18. Spectral studies of intermediate species formed in one-electron reactions of bovine liver catalase at room and low temperatures. A comparison with peroxidase reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metodiewa, D.; Dunford, H.B.

    1992-01-01

    The reactions of native bovine catalase with superoxide and solvated electrons have been investigated using three different methods for generating these reducing substrates: γ-radiolysis of oxygenated or deaerated buffer solutions in the presence of an OH radical scavenger; either xanthine or acetaldehyde with xanthine oxidase; and low-temperature (77 K) γ-radiolysis of buffered ethylene glycol/water solutions with subsequent annealing of samples at 183 K. (Author)

  19. Peroxidase of Brazilian Cerrado grass as an alternative for agro industrial waste treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Pinheiro Reis Souza Ramalho

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Decontamination of wastewater continues to be a challenge for society and the scientific community. Despite the availability of various materials for study, enzymes stand out due to their specificity for decomposition and biodegradability for disposal. New sources of enzymes may represent efficient and low-cost alternatives compared to routinely used techniques. In this survey, the peroxidase profile from Echinolaena inflexa fruits was studied for possible applications in the treatment of wastewater. The protein content was found to be 5.33 mg g-1. The optimum reaction conditions were: 50°C, pH 7.5 at 0.1 mol L-1 of phosphate buffer for 15 min. The enzyme was inactivated after 5 min at 94°C and was inhibited when incubated with ascorbic acid at 10 mmol L-1. In tests using phenols and agro industrial waste, the peroxidase was able to oxidase 87.5% of catechol, 67.8% of pyrogallol, 39.1% of resorcinol and still presented 29.1% of the degradation capacity of raw wastewater phenolic compounds. The results showed that the Echinolaena inflexa peroxidase, a new source of enzymes, is a potential alternative to wastewater treatment.

  20. [Fermentation production of microbial catalase and its application in textile industry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongxu; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2010-11-01

    Microbial catalase is an important industrial enzyme that catalyzes the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen. This enzyme has great potential of application in food, textile and pharmaceutical industries. The production of microbial catalase has been significantly improved thanks to advances in bioprocess engineering and genetic engineering. In this paper, we review the progresses in fermentation production of microbial catalase and its application in textile industry. Among these progresses, we will highlight strain isolation, substrate and environment optimization, enzyme induction, construction of engineering strains and application process optimization. Meanwhile, we also address future research trends for microbial catalase production and its application in textile industry. Molecular modification (site-directed mutagenesis and directed revolution) will endue catalase with high pH and temperature stabilities. Improvement of catalase production, based on the understanding of induction mechanism and the process control of recombinant stain fermentation, will further accelerate the application of catalase in textile industry.

  1. Enhancement of catalase activity by repetitive low-grade H{sub 2}O{sub 2} exposures protects fibroblasts from subsequent stress-induced apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Prosenjit; Mukherjee, Sebanti; Bhaumik, Gayaram; Das, Pradeep; Ganguly, Sandipan; Choudhury, Nandini; Raha, Sanghamitra

    2003-08-28

    Exposure of Chinese hamster V79 fibroblasts to mild and repetitive H{sub 2}O{sub 2} doses in culture for 15 weeks produced no change in lipid peroxidation status, GSH/GSSG ratio and glutathione peroxidase activity of these cells (VST cells). In contrast, in VST cells catalase levels underwent a prominent increase which could be significantly inhibited and brought down to control levels after treatment with the catalase inhibitor 3-aminotriazole (3-AT). When control (VC) cells were exposed to UV radiation (UVC 5 J/m{sup 2}) or H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (7.5 mM, 15 min), intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels rose prominently with significant activation of caspase-3. Marked nuclear fragmentation and lower cell viability were also noted in these cells. In contrast, VST cells demonstrated a significantly lower ROS level, an absence of nuclear fragmentation and an unchanged caspase-3 activity after exposure to UVC or H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Cell viability was also significantly better preserved in VST cells than VC cells after UV or H{sub 2}O{sub 2} exposures. Following 3-AT treatment of VST cells, UVC radiation or H{sub 2}O{sub 2} brought about significantly higher elevations in intracellular ROS, increases in caspase-3 activity, significantly lowered cell viability and marked nuclear fragmentation, indicating the involvement of high catalase levels in the cytoprotective effects of repetitive stress. Therefore, upregulation of the antioxidant defense after repetitive oxidative stress imparted a superior ability to cope with subsequent acute stress and escape apoptotic death and loss of viability.

  2. Catalase-positive microbial detection by using different ultrasonic parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, S K; Durán, C; Elvira, L

    2012-01-01

    A method for rapid detection of catalase enzyme activity using ultrasonic parameters is presented in this work. It is based on the detection of the hydrolysis of hydrogen peroxide molecule into water and oxygen induced by the enzyme catalase. A special medium was made to amplify changes produced by catalase enzyme during the hydrolysis process. Enzymatic process can be monitored by means of ultrasonic parameters such as wave amplitude, time of flight (TOF), and backscattering measurements which are sensitive to oxygen bubble production. It is shown that catalase activity of the order of 10 −3 unit/ml can be detected using different ultrasonic parameters. The sensitivity provided by them is discussed.

  3. Evaluation of Potential Mechanisms Controlling the Catalase Expression in Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Glorieux

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of cancer cell resistance against prooxidant drugs limits its potential clinical use. MCF-7 breast cancer cells chronically exposed to ascorbate/menadione became resistant (Resox cells by increasing mainly catalase activity. Since catalase appears as an anticancer target, the elucidation of mechanisms regulating its expression is an important issue. In MCF-7 and Resox cells, karyotype analysis showed that chromosome 11 is not altered compared to healthy mammary epithelial cells. The genomic gain of catalase locus observed in MCF-7 and Resox cells cannot explain the differential catalase expression. Since ROS cause DNA lesions, the activation of DNA damage signaling pathways may influence catalase expression. However, none of the related proteins (i.e., p53, ChK was activated in Resox cells compared to MCF-7. The c-abl kinase may lead to catalase protein degradation via posttranslational modifications, but neither ubiquitination nor phosphorylation of catalase was detected after catalase immunoprecipitation. Catalase mRNA levels did not decrease after actinomycin D treatment in both cell lines. DNMT inhibitor (5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine increased catalase protein level in MCF-7 and its resistance to prooxidant drugs. In line with our previous report, chromatin remodeling appears as the main regulator of catalase expression in breast cancer after chronic exposure to an oxidative stress.

  4. Interactions of nitrite with catalase: Enzyme activity and reaction kinetics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krych-Madej, Justyna; Gebicka, Lidia

    2017-06-01

    Catalase, a heme enzyme, which catalyzes decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to water and molecular oxygen, is one of the main enzymes of the antioxidant defense system of the cell. Nitrite, used as a food preservative has long been regarded as a harmful compound due to its ability to form carcinogenic nitrosamines. Recently, much evidence has been presented that nitrite plays a protective role as a nitric oxide donor under hypoxic conditions. In this work the effect of nitrite on the catalytic reactions of catalase was studied. Catalase was inhibited by nitrite, and this process was pH-dependent. IC 50 values varied from about 1μM at pH5.0 to about 150μM of nitrite at pH7.4. The presence of chloride significantly enhanced nitrite-induced catalase inhibition, in agreement with earlier observations. The kinetics of the reactions of nitrite with ferric catalase, its redox intermediate, Compound I, and catalase inactive form, Compound II, was also studied. Possible mechanisms of nitrite-induced catalase inhibition are analyzed and the biological consequences of the reactions of catalase with nitrite are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Decoding the similarities and differences among mycobacterial species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sony Malhotra

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacteriaceae comprises pathogenic species such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M. leprae and M. abscessus, as well as non-pathogenic species, for example, M. smegmatis and M. thermoresistibile. Genome comparison and annotation studies provide insights into genome evolutionary relatedness, identify unique and pathogenicity-related genes in each species, and explore new targets that could be used for developing new diagnostics and therapeutics. Here, we present a comparative analysis of ten-mycobacterial genomes with the objective of identifying similarities and differences between pathogenic and non-pathogenic species. We identified 1080 core orthologous clusters that were enriched in proteins involved in amino acid and purine/pyrimidine biosynthetic pathways, DNA-related processes (replication, transcription, recombination and repair, RNA-methylation and modification, and cell-wall polysaccharide biosynthetic pathways. For their pathogenicity and survival in the host cell, pathogenic species have gained specific sets of genes involved in repair and protection of their genomic DNA. M. leprae is of special interest owing to its smallest genome (1600 genes and ~1300 psuedogenes, yet poor genome annotation. More than 75% of the pseudogenes were found to have a functional ortholog in the other mycobacterial genomes and belong to protein families such as transferases, oxidoreductases and hydrolases.

  6. Enzyme Technology of Peroxidases: Immobilization, Chemical and Genetic Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longoria, Adriana; Tinoco, Raunel; Torres, Eduardo

    An overview of enzyme technology applied to peroxidases is made. Immobilization on organic, inorganic, and hybrid supports; chemical modification of amino acids and heme group; and genetic modification by site-directed and random mutagenesis are included. Different strategies that were carried out to improve peroxidase performance in terms of stability, selectivity, and catalytic activity are analyzed. Immobilization of peroxidases on inorganic and organic materials enhances the tolerance of peroxidases toward the conditions normally found in many industrial processes, such as the presence of an organic solvent and high temperature. In addition, it is shown that immobilization helps to increase the Total Turnover Number at levels high enough to justify the use of a peroxidase-based biocatalyst in a synthesis process. Chemical modification of peroxidases produces modified enzymes with higher thermostability and wider substrate variability. Finally, through mutagenesis approaches, it is possible to produce modified peroxidases capable of oxidizing nonnatural substrates with high catalytic activity and affinity.

  7. Production and Purification of Peroxidase from Aspergillus niger.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Jebor

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in the laboratories of Biology Department, College of Science, which deals with isolation and purification of peroxidase and optimization of process parameters to achieve maximum yield of peroxidase by Aspergillus niger. Solid-state fermentation of Aspergillus niger was carried out for enhanced production of peroxidase using hydrogen peroxide as the substrate of enzyme maximum activity of the enzyme was achieved under optimum growth conditions. The optimum conditions were the isolated of Aspergillus niger from soil and growth in synthetic medium, it gave high titer of peroxidase activity, the fructose as carbon source, peptone as nitrogen source, after 12 days of incubation, incubation temperature 25 °C and pH = 6.5. Peroxidase purified in four purification steps; precipitation with 70% saturation of ammonium sulfate, step of dialysis, the third by ion exchange chromatography using DEAE-Cellulose and fourth by gel filtration throughout Sephadex G-100. The specific activity of the purified enzyme was 150U/mg with 7.75 folds. The peroxidase was shown to have molecular weight of 40kDa in SDS-PAGA and about 40kDa in gel filtration.The optimum pH and temperature for peroxidase activity 7 and 35 C0 respectively.

  8. Anti-mycobacterial screening of five Indian medicinal plants and partial purification of active extracts of Cassia sophera and Urtica dioica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rambir Singh; Shariq Hussain; Rajesh Verma; Poonam Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To find out the anti-mycobacterial potential of Cassia sophera (C. sophera), Urticadioica (U. dioica), Momordica dioica, Tribulus terrestris and Coccinia indica plants against multi-drug resistant (MDR) strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis). Methods: Plant materials were extracted successively with solvents of increasing polarity. Solvent extracts were screened for anti-mycobacterial activity against fast growing, non-pathogenic mycobacterium strain, Mycobacterium semegmatis, by disk diffusion method. The active extracts were tested against MDR and clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis by absolute concentration and proportion methods. The active extracts were subjected to bio-autoassay on TLC followed by silica column chromatography for isolation of potential drug leads. Results: Hexane extract of U. dioica (HEUD) and methanol extract of C. sophera (MECS) produced inhibition zone of 20 mm in disc diffusion assay and MIC of 250 and 125 μg/mL respectively in broth dilution assay against Mycobacteriumsemegmatis. Semipurified fraction F2 from MECS produced 86% inhibition against clinical isolate and 60% inhibition against MDR strain of M. tuberculosis. F18 from HEUD produced 81% inhibition against clinical isolate and 60% inhibition against MDR strain of M. tuberculosis. Phytochemical analysis indicated that anti-mycobacterial activity of MECS may be due to presence of alkaloids or flavonoids and that of HEUD due to terpenoids. Conclusions: C. sophera and U. dioica plant extracts exhibited promising anti-mycobacterial activity against MDR strain of M. tuberculosis. This is the first report of anti-mycobacterial activity form C. sophera. This study showed possibility of purifying novel anti-mycobacterial compound(s) from C. sophera and U. dioica.

  9. Pulse radiolysis of catalase in solution: Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebicka, Lidia; Metodiewa, Diana; Gebicki, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    The time-course of absorption changes of oxygen-saturated solutions of bovine-liver catalase after pulse radiolysis have been studied. The rate constant of formation of Compound I due to the reaction of catalase with hydrogen peroxide has been estimated to be 2.0 x 10 7 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 . Radiation generated super-oxide radicals reduce Compound I to Compound II with a rate constant of 5.0 x 10 6 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 . The formation of Compound III in the direct reaction of O 2 - with catalase has also been observed. (author)

  10. Dietary Supplementation with Virgin Coconut Oil Improves Lipid Profile and Hepatic Antioxidant Status and Has Potential Benefits on Cardiovascular Risk Indices in Normal Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Famurewa, Ademola C; Ekeleme-Egedigwe, Chima A; Nwali, Sophia C; Agbo, Ngozi N; Obi, Joy N; Ezechukwu, Goodness C

    2018-05-04

    Research findings that suggest beneficial health effects of dietary supplementation with virgin coconut oil (VCO) are limited in the published literature. This study investigated the in vivo effects of a 5-week VCO-supplemented diet on lipid profile, hepatic antioxidant status, hepatorenal function, and cardiovascular risk indices in normal rats. Rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: 1 control and 2 treatment groups (10% and 15% VCO-supplemented diets) for 5 weeks. Serum and homogenate samples were used to analyze lipid profile, hepatorenal function markers, hepatic activities of antioxidant enzymes, and malondialdehyde level. Lipid profile of animals fed VCO diets showed significant reduction in total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels; high-density lipoprotein (HDL) level increased significantly (p risk indices. The level of malondialdehyde (MDA), a lipid peroxidation marker, remarkably reduced and activities of hepatic antioxidant enzymes-superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx)-were markedly increased in VCO diet-fed rats. The VCO diet significantly modulated creatinine, sodium (Na + ), potassium (K + ), chloride (Cl - ), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) compared to control. The findings suggest a beneficial effect of VCO on lipid profile, renal status, hepatic antioxidant defense system, and cardiovascular risk indices in rats.

  11. Expression and Immunogenicity of the Mycobacterial Ag85B/ESAT-6 Antigens Produced in Transgenic Plants by Elastin-Like Peptide Fusion Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doreen Manuela Floss

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explored a novel system combining plant-based production and the elastin-like peptide (ELP fusion strategy to produce vaccinal antigens against tuberculosis. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing the mycobacterial antigens Ag85B and ESAT-6 fused to ELP (TBAg-ELP were generated. Purified TBAg-ELP was obtained by the highly efficient, cost-effective, inverse transition cycling (ICT method and tested in mice. Furthermore, safety and immunogenicity of the crude tobacco leaf extracts were assessed in piglets. Antibodies recognizing mycobacterial antigens were produced in mice and piglets. A T-cell immune response able to recognize the native mycobacterial antigens was detected in mice. These findings showed that the native Ag85B and ESAT-6 mycobacterial B- and T-cell epitopes were conserved in the plant-expressed TBAg-ELP. This study presents the first results of an efficient plant-expression system, relying on the elastin-like peptide fusion strategy, to produce a safe and immunogenic mycobacterial Ag85B-ESAT-6 fusion protein as a potential vaccine candidate against tuberculosis.

  12. Embryonic catalase protects against ethanol embryopathies in acatalasemic mice and transgenic human catalase-expressing mice in embryo culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Pinsler, Lutfiya; Wells, Peter G

    2015-09-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the mechanism of ethanol (EtOH) teratogenicity, but the protective role of the embryonic antioxidative enzyme catalase is unclear, as embryonic activity is only about 5% of maternal levels. We addressed this question in a whole embryo culture model. C57BL/6 mouse embryos expressing human catalase (hCat) or their wild-type (C57BL/6 WT) controls, and C3Ga.Cg-Cat(b)/J catalase-deficient, acatalasemic (aCat) mouse embryos or their wild-type C3HeB/FeJ (C3H WT) controls, were explanted on gestational day (GD) 9 (plug=GD 1), exposed for 24h to 2 or 4mg/mL EtOH or vehicle, and evaluated for functional and morphological changes. hCat and C57BL/6 WT vehicle-exposed embryos developed normally, while EtOH was embryopathic in C57BL/6 WT embryos, evidenced by decreases in anterior neuropore closure, somites developed, turning and head length, whereas hCat embryos were protected (pcatalase (PEG-cat) 8h prior to embryo culture, which increases embryonic catalase activity, blocked all EtOH embryopathies (pcatalase is a determinant of risk for EtOH embryopathies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Experienced and Perceived Risks of Mycobacterial Diseases: A Cross Sectional Study among Agropastoral Communities in Northern Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Martin Kilale

    Full Text Available The current study was conducted to assess experienced risk factors and perceptions of mycobacterial diseases in communities in northern Tanzania.We conducted a cross-sectional study in Arusha and Manyara regions in Northern Tanzania. We enrolled tuberculosis (TB patients attending Mount Meru Hospital, Enduleni Hospital and Haydom Lutheran Hospitals in Arusha municipality, Ngorongoro and Mbulu districts, respectively. Patient addresses were recorded during their first visit to the hospitals. Patients with confirmed diagnosis of TB by sputum smear microscopy and/or culture at central laboratory were followed up and interviewed using pre-tested questionnaires, and selected relatives and neighbors were also interviewed. The study was conducted between June 2011 and May 2013.The study involved 164 respondents: 41(25% were TB patients, 68(41.5% were their relatives and 55(33.5% their neighbors. Sixty four (39% knew a risk factor for mycobacterial disease. Overall, 64(39% perceived to be at risk of mycobacterial diseases. Exposure to potential risks of mycobacterial diseases were: keeping livestock, not boiling drinking water, large family, smoking and sharing dwelling with TB patients. Rural dwellers were more often livestock keepers (p<0.01, more often shared dwelling with livestock (p<0.01 than urban dwellers. More primary school leavers reported sharing dwelling with TB patients than participants with secondary and higher education (p = 0.01.Livestock keeping, sharing dwelling with livestock, sharing household with a TB patient were perceived risk factors for mycobacterial diseases and the participants were exposed to some of these risk factors. Improving knowledge about the risk factors may protect them from these serious diseases.

  14. Catalytic and physical properties of γ-irradiated catalase in dilute solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasyna, Z.; Bachman, S.

    1974-01-01

    The catalytic and physical properties of irradiated beef liver catalase have been studied. Modification of the enzyme by γ-rays brings about its reducibility by dithionite. The decrease of the catalytic activity is found to correspond to the decrease in the content of nonreducible catalase. Microaggregates of catalase molecules induced by irradiation have been fractionated. The results lead to the conclusion that aggregates are composed of active and modified catalase monomers. (author)

  15. Radiation induced deactivation, post deactivation of horse radish peroxidase, glucose oxidase and the protective effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi Min; Zhong Qun; Chen Yiqing; Ha Hongfei

    1993-01-01

    In order to check the fact if the radiation induced post deactivation are possessed by all the enzymes, the radiation effects of horse radish peroxidase (HRP) and glucose oxidase (GOD) were investigated. It was found that in dilute aqueous solution the irradiated HRP has the post deactivation also. The effects of absorbed dose, initial HRP concentration in solution, atmosphere, temperature and additives (three kinds of complex agents: EDTA, CDTA and D) on the post deactivation of HRP were investigated. The regularity of post deactivation of HRP is similar with the catalase. Oxygen in enzyme samples is necessary for the post deactivation. 5 x 10 -3 mol/l of the three additives could control the phenomenon efficiently. Of course, the radiation deactivation of HRP was given as well. In the case of GOD the post deactivation was not found, although it's radiation deactivation is serious. It means that the radiation induced post deactivation is not a common phenomenon for all enzymes

  16. Playing hide-and-seek with host macrophages through the use of mycobacterial cell envelope phthiocerol dimycocerosates and phenolic glycolipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ainhoa eARBUES

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterial pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiological agent of tuberculosis (TB, have evolved a remarkable ability to evade the immune system in order to survive and to colonize the host. Among the most important evasion strategies is the capacity of these bacilli to parasitize host macrophages, since these are major effector cells against intracellular pathogens that can be used as long-term cellular reservoirs. Mycobacterial pathogens employ an array of virulence factors that manipulate macrophage function to survive and establish infection. Until recently, however, the role of mycobacterial cell envelope lipids as virulence factors in macrophage subversion has remained elusive. Here, we will address exclusively the proposed role for phthiocerol dimycocerosates (DIM in the modulation of the resident macrophage response and that of phenolic glycolipids (PGL in the regulation of the recruitment and phenotype of incoming macrophage precursors to the site of infection. We will provide a unique perspective of potential additional functions for these lipids, and highlight obstacles and opportunities to further understand their role in the pathogenesis of TB and other mycobacterial diseases.

  17. Increased microglial catalase activity in multiple sclerosis grey matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Elizabeth; Kemp, Kevin; Hares, Kelly; Redondo, Julianna; Rice, Claire; Scolding, Neil; Wilkins, Alastair

    2014-04-22

    Chronic demyelination, on-going inflammation, axonal loss and grey matter neuronal injury are likely pathological processes that contribute to disease progression in multiple sclerosis (MS). Although the precise contribution of each process and their aetiological substrates is not fully known, recent evidence has implicated oxidative damage as a major cause of tissue injury in MS. The degree of tissue injury caused by oxidative molecules, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS), is balanced by endogenous anti-oxidant enzymes which detoxify ROS. Understanding endogenous mechanisms which protect the brain against oxidative injury in MS is important, since enhancing anti-oxidant responses is a major therapeutic strategy for preventing irreversible tissue injury in the disease. Our aims were to determine expression and activity levels of the hydrogen peroxide-reducing enzyme catalase in MS grey matter (GM). In MS GM, a catalase enzyme activity was elevated compared to control GM. We measured catalase protein expression by immune dot-blotting and catalase mRNA by a real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Protein analysis studies showed a strong positive correlation between catalase and microglial marker IBA-1 in MS GM. In addition, calibration of catalase mRNA level with reference to the microglial-specific transcript AIF-1 revealed an increase in this transcript in MS. This was reflected by the extent of HLA-DR immunolabeling in MS GM which was significantly elevated compared to control GM. Collectively, these observations provide evidence that microglial catalase activity is elevated in MS grey matter and may be an important endogenous anti-oxidant defence mechanism in MS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Myths, perceptions knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) linked to mycobacterial infection management among the pastoralist communities of Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Kankya, Clovice; Muwonge, Adrian; Skjerve, Eystein

    2011-01-01

    The present study was conducted to assess community myths, perceptions, knowledge, attitudes, practices (KAP) of the pastoral farmers and explore mycobacterial infection management practices. Both structured questionnaire survey and participatory rural appraisal approaches were used. This study revealed that mycobacterial infection especially tuberculosis as referred to in vernacular as akakonko, akasubba or akafuba because of the persistent cough and other respiratory symptoms. Knowledge att...

  19. Anti-mycobacterial screening of five Indian medicinal plants and partial purification of active extracts of Cassia sophera and Urtica dioica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rambir; Hussain, Shariq; Verma, Rajesh; Sharma, Poonam

    2013-05-13

    To find out the anti-mycobacterial potential of Cassia sophera (C. sophera), Urtica dioica (U. dioica), Momordica dioica, Tribulus terrestris and Coccinia indica plants against multi-drug resistant (MDR) strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis). Plant materials were extracted successively with solvents of increasing polarity. Solvent extracts were screened for anti-mycobacterial activity against fast growing, non-pathogenic mycobacterium strain, Mycobacterium semegmatis, by disk diffusion method. The active extracts were tested against MDR and clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis by absolute concentration and proportion methods. The active extracts were subjected to bio-autoassay on TLC followed by silica column chromatography for isolation of potential drug leads. Hexane extract of U. dioica (HEUD) and methanol extract of C. sophera (MECS) produced inhibition zone of 20 mm in disc diffusion assay and MIC of 250 and 125 μ g/mL respectively in broth dilution assay against Mycobacterium semegmatis. Semipurified fraction F2 from MECS produced 86% inhibition against clinical isolate and 60% inhibition against MDR strain of M. tuberculosis. F18 from HEUD produced 81% inhibition against clinical isolate and 60% inhibition against MDR strain of M. tuberculosis. Phytochemical analysis indicated that anti-mycobacterial activity of MECS may be due to presence of alkaloids or flavonoids and that of HEUD due to terpenoids. C. sophera and U. dioica plant extracts exhibited promising anti-mycobacterial activity against MDR strain of M. tuberculosis. This is the first report of anti-mycobacterial activity form C. sophera. This study showed possibility of purifying novel anti-mycobacterial compound(s) from C. sophera and U. dioica. Copyright © 2013 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The in vivo toxicity of hydroxyurea depends on its direct target catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juul, Trine; Malolepszy, Anna; Dybkaer, Karen; Kidmose, Rune; Rasmussen, Jan Trige; Andersen, Gregers Rom; Johnsen, Hans Erik; Jørgensen, Jan-Elo; Andersen, Stig Uggerhøj

    2010-07-09

    Hydroxyurea (HU) is a well tolerated ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor effective in HIV, sickle cell disease, and blood cancer therapy. Despite a positive initial response, however, most treated cancers eventually progress due to development of HU resistance. Although RNR properties influence HU resistance in cell lines, the mechanisms underlying cancer HU resistance in vivo remain unclear. To address this issue, we screened for HU resistance in the plant Arabidopsis thaliana and identified seventeen unique catalase mutants, thereby establishing that HU toxicity depends on catalase in vivo. We further demonstrated that catalase is a direct HU target by showing that HU acts as a competitive inhibitor of catalase-mediated hydrogen peroxide decomposition. Considering also that catalase can accelerate HU decomposition in vitro and that co-treatment with another catalase inhibitor alleviates HU effects in vivo, our findings suggests that HU could act as a catalase-activated pro-drug. Clinically, we found high catalase activity in circulating cells from untreated chronic myeloid leukemia, offering a possible explanation for the efficacy of HU against this malignancy.

  1. Natural resistance to ascorbic acid induced oxidative stress is mainly mediated by catalase activity in human cancer cells and catalase-silencing sensitizes to oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klingelhoeffer Christoph

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ascorbic acid demonstrates a cytotoxic effect by generating hydrogen peroxide, a reactive oxygen species (ROS involved in oxidative cell stress. A panel of eleven human cancer cell lines, glioblastoma and carcinoma, were exposed to serial dilutions of ascorbic acid (5-100 mmol/L. The purpose of this study was to analyse the impact of catalase, an important hydrogen peroxide-detoxifying enzyme, on the resistance of cancer cells to ascorbic acid mediated oxidative stress. Methods Effective concentration (EC50 values, which indicate the concentration of ascorbic acid that reduced the number of viable cells by 50%, were detected with the crystal violet assay. The level of intracellular catalase protein and enzyme activity was determined. Expression of catalase was silenced by catalase-specific short hairpin RNA (sh-RNA in BT-20 breast carcinoma cells. Oxidative cell stress induced apoptosis was measured by a caspase luminescent assay. Results The tested human cancer cell lines demonstrated obvious differences in their resistance to ascorbic acid mediated oxidative cell stress. Forty-five percent of the cell lines had an EC50 > 20 mmol/L and fifty-five percent had an EC50 50 of 2.6–5.5 mmol/L, glioblastoma cells were the most susceptible cancer cell lines analysed in this study. A correlation between catalase activity and the susceptibility to ascorbic acid was observed. To study the possible protective role of catalase on the resistance of cancer cells to oxidative cell stress, the expression of catalase in the breast carcinoma cell line BT-20, which cells were highly resistant to the exposure to ascorbic acid (EC50: 94,9 mmol/L, was silenced with specific sh-RNA. The effect was that catalase-silenced BT-20 cells (BT-20 KD-CAT became more susceptible to high concentrations of ascorbic acid (50 and 100 mmol/L. Conclusions Fifty-five percent of the human cancer cell lines tested were unable to protect themselves

  2. Rapid activation of catalase followed by citrate efflux effectively improves aluminum tolerance in the roots of chick pea (Cicer arietinum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manorma; Sharma, Vinay; Tripathi, Bhumi Nath

    2016-05-01

    The present study demonstrates the comparative response of two contrasting genotypes (aluminum (Al) tolerant and Al sensitive) of chick pea (Cicer arietinum) against Al stress. The Al-tolerant genotype (RSG 974) showed lesser inhibition of root growth as well as lower oxidative damages, measured in terms of the accumulation of H2O2 and lipid peroxidation compared to the Al-sensitive genotype (RSG 945). The accumulation of Al by roots of both genotypes was almost equal at 96 and 144 h after Al treatment; however, it was higher in Al-tolerant than Al-sensitive genotype at 48 h after Al treatment. Further, the Al-mediated induction of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was significantly higher in Al-tolerant than Al-sensitive genotype. Ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity was almost similar in both genotypes. Al treatment promptly activated catalase activity in Al-tolerant genotype, and it was remarkably higher than that of Al-sensitive genotype. As another important Al detoxification mechanism, citrate efflux was almost equal in both genotypes except at 1000 μM Al treatment for 96 and 144 h. Further, citrate carrier and anion channel inhibitor experiment confirmed the contribution of citrate efflux in conferring Al tolerance in Al-tolerant genotype. Based on the available data, the present study concludes that rapid activation of catalase (also SOD) activity followed by citrate efflux effectively improves Al tolerance in chick pea.

  3. Novel Insights in Mammalian Catalase Heme Maturation: Effect of NO and Thioredoxin-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarti, Ritu; Gupta, Karishma; Majors, Alana; Ruple, Lisa; Aronica, Mark; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    2016-01-01

    Catalase is a tetrameric heme-containing enzyme with essential antioxidant functions in biology. Multiple factors including nitric oxide (NO) have been shown to attenuate its activity. However, the possible impact of NO in relation to the maturation of active catalase, including its heme acquisition and tetramer formation, has not been investigated. We found that NO attenuates heme insertion into catalase in both short-term and long-term incubations. The NO inhibition in catalase heme incorporation was associated with defective oligomerization of catalase, such that inactive catalase monomers and dimers accumulated in place of the mature tetrameric enzyme. We also found that GAPDH plays a key role in mediating these NO effects on the structure and activity of catalase. Moreover, the NO sensitivity of catalase maturation could be altered up or down by manipulating the cellular expression level or activity of thioredoxin-1, a known protein-SNO denitrosylase enzyme. In a mouse model of allergic inflammatory asthma, we found that lungs from allergen-challenged mice contained a greater percentage of dimeric catalase relative to tetrameric catalase in the unchallenged control, suggesting that the mechanisms described here are in play in the allergic asthma model. Together, our study shows how maturation of active catalase can be influenced by NO, S-nitrosylated GAPDH, and thioredoxin-1, and how maturation may become compromised in inflammatory conditions such as asthma. PMID:25659933

  4. Effect of TiO₂ nanoparticles on the structure and activity of catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Mei; Cao, Jian; Tang, Bo-Ping; Wang, Yan-Qing

    2014-08-05

    TiO₂ nanoparticles are the most widely used metal oxide nanoparticles and have oxidative toxicity. Catalase is an important antioxidant enzyme. Here the understanding of an effect of TiO₂ nanoparticles on the activity and structure of catalase is crucial to characterize the toxicity of TiO₂ nanoparticles. These experimental data revealed that TiO₂ nanoparticles could bind to catalase by the electrostatic and hydrogen bonding forces. On binding TiO₂ nanoparticles, catalase got destabilized with the decrease of α-helices content, the solvent polarity of environment around the fluorescence chromophores on catalase were also affected. In addition, TiO₂ nanoparticles also affected the activity of catalase. TiO₂ nanoparticles acted as an activator of catalase activity at a low molar concentration and as an inhibitor at a higher molar concentration. With regard to human health, the present study could provide a better understanding of the potential nanotoxicity of TiO₂ nanoparticles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The relevance of the non-canonical PTS1 of peroxisomal catalase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, Chris; Aksam, Eda Bener; Gunkel, Katja; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J.

    Catalase is sorted to peroxisomes via a C-terminal peroxisomal targeting signal 1 (PTS1), which binds to the receptor protein Pex5. Analysis of the C-terminal sequences of peroxisomal catalases from various species indicated that catalase never contains the typical C-terminal PTS1 tripeptide-SKL,

  6. Comparative study of peroxidase purification from apple and orange ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports the isolation and purification of peroxidase from low cost material; moreover, no significant work has been done on the isolation and purification of peroxidase from such cost effective sources (apple and orange seeds). Peroxidases had attracted considerable interest in recent years because of their ...

  7. Catalase inhibits ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xia; Luo, Hongmei; Vanek, Kenneth N; LaRue, Amanda C; Schulte, Bradley A; Wang, Gavin Y

    2015-06-01

    Hematologic toxicity is a major cause of mortality in radiation emergency scenarios and a primary side effect concern in patients undergoing chemo-radiotherapy. Therefore, there is a critical need for the development of novel and more effective approaches to manage this side effect. Catalase is a potent antioxidant enzyme that coverts hydrogen peroxide into hydrogen and water. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of catalase as a protectant against ionizing radiation (IR)-induced toxicity in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). The results revealed that catalase treatment markedly inhibits IR-induced apoptosis in murine hematopoietic stem cells and hematopoietic progenitor cells. Subsequent colony-forming cell and cobble-stone area-forming cell assays showed that catalase-treated HSPCs can not only survive irradiation-induced apoptosis but also have higher clonogenic capacity, compared with vehicle-treated cells. Moreover, transplantation of catalase-treated irradiated HSPCs results in high levels of multi-lineage and long-term engraftments, whereas vehicle-treated irradiated HSPCs exhibit very limited hematopoiesis reconstituting capacity. Mechanistically, catalase treatment attenuates IR-induced DNA double-strand breaks and inhibits reactive oxygen species. Unexpectedly, we found that the radioprotective effect of catalase is associated with activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway and pharmacological inhibition of STAT3 abolishes the protective activity of catalase, suggesting that catalase may protect HSPCs against IR-induced toxicity via promoting STAT3 activation. Collectively, these results demonstrate a previously unrecognized mechanism by which catalase inhibits IR-induced DNA damage and apoptosis in HSPCs.

  8. Catalase epitopes vaccine design for Helicobacter pylori : A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Catalase, an important enzyme in the virulence of H. pylori, could be a suitable candidate for vaccine design because it is highly conserved, which is important for the survival of H. pylori; it is expressed in high level and it is exposed on the surface of the bacteria. In this study, we designed epitope-based vaccine for catalase ...

  9. Endothelin-1 stimulates catalase activity through the PKCδ mediated phosphorylation of Serine 167

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafikov, Ruslan; Kumar, Sanjiv; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Hou, Yali; Kangath, Archana; Pardo, Daniel; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Black, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown that endothelin-1 (ET-1) stimulates catalase activity in endothelial cells and lambs with acute increases in pulmonary blood flow (PBF), without altering gene expression. The purpose of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanism by which this occurs. Exposing pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAEC) to ET-1 increased catalase activity and decreased cellular hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels. These changes correlated with an increase in serine phosphorylated catalase. Using the inhibitory peptide δV1.1, this phosphorylation was shown to be PKCδ dependent. Mass spectrometry identified serine167 as the phosphorylation site. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to generate a phospho-mimic (S167D) catalase. Activity assays using recombinant protein purified from E.coli or transiently transfected COS-7 cells, demonstrated that S167D-catalase had an increased ability to degrade H2O2 compared to the wildtype enzyme. Using a phospho-specific antibody, we were able to verify that pS167 catalase levels are modulated in lambs with acute increases in PBF in the presence and absence of the ET receptor antagonist, tezosentan. S167 is being located on the dimeric interface suggesting it could be involved in regulating the formation of catalase tetramers. To evaluate this possibility we utilized analytical gel-filtration to examine the multimeric structure of recombinant wildtype- and S167D-catalase. We found that recombinant wildtype catalase was present as a mixture of monomers and dimers while S167D catalase was primarily tetrameric. Further, the incubation of wildtype catalase with PKCδ was sufficient to convert wildtype catalase into a tetrameric structure. In conclusion, this is the first report indicating that the phosphorylation of catalase regulates its multimeric structure and activity. PMID:24211614

  10. Induction of Laccase, Lignin Peroxidase and Manganese Peroxidase Activities in White-Rot Fungi Using Copper Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Vrsanska

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ligninolytic enzymes, such as laccase, lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase, are biotechnologically-important enzymes. The ability of five white-rot fungal strains Daedaleopsis confragosa, Fomes fomentarius, Trametes gibbosa, Trametes suaveolens and Trametes versicolor to produce these enzymes has been studied. Three different copper(II complexes have been prepared ((Him[Cu(im4(H2O2](btc·3H2O, where im = imidazole, H3btc = 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid, [Cu3(pmdien3(btc](ClO43·6H2O and [Cu3(mdpta3(btc](ClO43·4H2O, where pmdien = N,N,N′,N′′,N′′-pentamethyl-diethylenetriamine and mdpta = N,N-bis-(3-aminopropylmethyl- amine, and their potential application for laccase and peroxidases induction have been tested. The enzyme-inducing activities of the complexes were compared with that of copper sulfate, and it has been found that all of the complexes are suitable for the induction of laccase and peroxidase activities in white-rot fungi; however, the newly-synthesized complex M1 showed the greatest potential for the induction. With respect to the different copper inducers, this parameter seems to be important for enzyme activity, which depends also on the fungal strains.

  11. Peroxidase activity in root hairs of cress (lepidium sativum L.) Cytochemical localization and radioactive labelling of wall bound peroxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaar, K.

    1979-01-01

    The ultrastructural localization of peroxidase activity in young, growing root hairs of cress (Lepidium sativum L.) after assay with 3,3'-diaminobenzidine is reported. Prominent peroxidase activity has been found in the dictyosomes and the associated vesicles, in ribosomes on ER-cisternae, as well as in the cell wall. On the basis of both ultrastructural and cytochemical evidence it is proposed that peroxidase in root hairs is synthesized on the ER- and within dictyosome cisternae packaged and transported in secretory vesicles and extruded into the cell wall particularily at the tip region of a root hair. The kinetic of Golgi apparatus mediated peroxidasesecretion was monitored by measuring the 55 Fe protoheme content of primary cell walls. Peroxidase secretion seems to be enhanced during stress incubation in destilled water. Secretory activity in root hairs is 20 times higher than in cells of the root body. (author)

  12. Protection of Bacillus pumilus Spores by Catalases

    OpenAIRE

    Checinska, Aleksandra; Burbank, Malcolm; Paszczynski, Andrzej J.

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032, isolated at spacecraft assembly facilities of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Jet Propulsion Laboratory, is difficult to kill by the sterilization method of choice, which uses liquid or vapor hydrogen peroxide. We identified two manganese catalases, YjqC and BPUM_1305, in spore protein extracts of several B. pumilus strains by using PAGE and mass spectrometric analyses. While the BPUM_1305 catalase was present in six of the B. pumilus strains teste...

  13. Dibromine radical anion reactions with heme enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebicka, L.; Gebicki, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    Reactions of Br 2 radical anion with heme enzymes, catalase horseradish peroxidase, have been studied by pulse radiolysis. It has been found that Br 2 - does not react with the heme centre of investigated enzymes. Dibromine radical anion reacts with tryptophan residues of catalase without any influence on the activity of catalase. It is suggested that in pulse radiolysis studies, where horseradish peroxidase is at about tenfold excess toward Br 2 - , the enzyme is modified rather by Br 2 , than by Br 2 - . (author). 26 refs., 3 figs

  14. Novel insights in mammalian catalase heme maturation: effect of NO and thioredoxin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarti, Ritu; Gupta, Karishma; Majors, Alana; Ruple, Lisa; Aronica, Mark; Stuehr, Dennis J

    2015-05-01

    Catalase is a tetrameric heme-containing enzyme with essential antioxidant functions in biology. Multiple factors including nitric oxide (NO) have been shown to attenuate its activity. However, the possible impact of NO in relation to the maturation of active catalase, including its heme acquisition and tetramer formation, has not been investigated. We found that NO attenuates heme insertion into catalase in both short-term and long-term incubations. The NO inhibition in catalase heme incorporation was associated with defective oligomerization of catalase, such that inactive catalase monomers and dimers accumulated in place of the mature tetrameric enzyme. We also found that GAPDH plays a key role in mediating these NO effects on the structure and activity of catalase. Moreover, the NO sensitivity of catalase maturation could be altered up or down by manipulating the cellular expression level or activity of thioredoxin-1, a known protein-SNO denitrosylase enzyme. In a mouse model of allergic inflammatory asthma, we found that lungs from allergen-challenged mice contained a greater percentage of dimeric catalase relative to tetrameric catalase in the unchallenged control, suggesting that the mechanisms described here are in play in the allergic asthma model. Together, our study shows how maturation of active catalase can be influenced by NO, S-nitrosylated GAPDH, and thioredoxin-1, and how maturation may become compromised in inflammatory conditions such as asthma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. 21 CFR 173.135 - Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus... Micrococcus lysodeikticus. Bacterial catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus by a pure culture... cheese, in accordance with the following conditions. (a) The organism Micrococcus lysodeikticus from...

  16. Blood superoxiddismutase and catalase: enzymes activity under oxidative stress conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Каріна Леонідівна Шамелашвілі; Інга Володимирівна Леус; Тетяна Іванівна Сергієнко; Марина Вячеславівна Горіла; Наталія Іванівна Штеменко

    2015-01-01

    The activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase depends not only on the used compounds of rhenium, and also on their dimensional structure and form of applying. It is established that the cis- and trans-isomers of complex compounds of rhenium did countervailing effect on superoxide dismutase and catalase activities. Cis-isomers of Rhenium dycarboxylats agreed increased activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase. While under the action of trans-isomers, where increased activity of superox...

  17. Central reinforcing effects of ethanol are blocked by catalase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizhnikov, Michael E; Molina, Juan C; Spear, Norman E

    2007-11-01

    Recent studies have systematically indicated that newborn rats are highly sensitive to ethanol's positive reinforcing effects. Central administrations of ethanol (25-200mg %) associated with an olfactory conditioned stimulus (CS) promote subsequent conditioned approach to the CS as evaluated through the newborn's response to a surrogate nipple scented with the CS. It has been shown that ethanol's first metabolite, acetaldehyde, exerts significant reinforcing effects in the central nervous system. A significant amount of acetaldehyde is derived from ethanol metabolism via the catalase system. In newborn rats, catalase levels are particularly high in several brain structures. The present study tested the effect of catalase inhibition on central ethanol reinforcement. In the first experiment, pups experienced lemon odor either paired or unpaired with intracisternal (IC) administrations of 100mg% ethanol. Half of the animals corresponding to each learning condition were pretreated with IC administrations of either physiological saline or a catalase inhibitor (sodium-azide). Catalase inhibition completely suppressed ethanol reinforcement in paired groups without affecting responsiveness to the CS during conditioning or responding by unpaired control groups. A second experiment tested whether these effects were specific to ethanol reinforcement or due instead to general impairment in learning and expression capabilities. Central administration of an endogenous kappa opioid receptor agonist (dynorphin A-13) was used as an alternative source of reinforcement. Inhibition of the catalase system had no effect on the reinforcing properties of dynorphin. The present results support the hypothesis that ethanol metabolism regulated by the catalase system plays a critical role in determination of ethanol reinforcement in newborn rats.

  18. CD1 and mycobacterial lipids activate human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rhijn, Ildiko; Moody, D Branch

    2015-03-01

    For decades, proteins were thought to be the sole or at least the dominant source of antigens for T cells. Studies in the 1990s demonstrated that CD1 proteins and mycobacterial lipids form specific targets of human αβ T cells. The molecular basis by which T-cell receptors (TCRs) recognize CD1-lipid complexes is now well understood. Many types of mycobacterial lipids function as antigens in the CD1 system, and new studies done with CD1 tetramers identify T-cell populations in the blood of tuberculosis patients. In human populations, a fundamental difference between the CD1 and major histocompatibility complex systems is that all humans express nearly identical CD1 proteins. Correspondingly, human CD1 responsive T cells show evidence of conserved TCRs. In addition to natural killer T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT cells), conserved TCRs define other subsets of human T cells, including germline-encoded mycolyl-reactive (GEM) T cells. The simple immunogenetics of the CD1 system and new investigative tools to measure T-cell responses in humans now creates a situation in which known lipid antigens can be developed as immunodiagnostic and immunotherapeutic reagents for tuberculosis disease. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Chlorpyrifos-induced biochemical changes in Cyprinus carpio: Ameliorative effect of curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonar, M Enis

    2018-04-30

    The aim of this study was to determine protective effects of curcumin on some haematological values and oxidant/antioxidant status in Cyprinus carpio exposed to chlorpyrifos. The fish were exposed to two sublethal concentrations of chlorpyrifos (0.040 and 0.080mgL), and curcumin (100mg per kg of fish weight) was simultaneously administered for 14 days. Blood and tissue (liver, kidney, and gill) samples were collected at the end of the experiment and analysed to determine the haematological profile (red blood cell count, white blood cell count, haemoglobin concentration, and haematocrit level) and oxidant/antioxidant status (malondialdehyde level and superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione-S-transferase activities) of the fish. There was a significant decrease in the red blood cell count, the haemoglobin concentration, and the haematocrit level and a increase in the white blood cell count of CPF-treated fish. The results revealed a significant increase in the malondialdehyde levels of the groups that were exposed to CPF. Conversely, the MDA levels were significantly decreased by curcumin. Also, CPF exposure caused a significant increase in the superoxide dismutase and glutathione-S-transferase activities and a significant decrease in the catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities. However, curcumin reversed the superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione-S-transferase activities. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that CPF had a negative effect on the haematological values and the oxidant/antioxidant status of the fish. The simultaneous administration of curcumin was neutralised CPF-induced toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparative kinetic characterization of catalases from Candida boidinii yeast and bovine liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metelitza, D I; Eryomin, A N; Artzukevich, I M; Chernikevich, I P

    1997-04-01

    Catalase with molecular weight 230 +/- kD was isolated and purified from methylotrophic yeasts Candida boidinii by ion-exchange chromatography. The kinetic characteristics of yeast and bovine liver catalases were compared in the reaction of H2O2 decomposition using a wide range of H2O2 concentrations (up to 0.12 M) and PH (2-10). First order rates constants (k, sec-1) were determined for both enzymes from semi-logarithmic anamorphoses of kinetic curves of H2O2 utilization. Anamorphoses of complete kinetic curves as a function of 1/ln([H2O2]0/[H2O2]t) versus 1/t were used for calculation of the effective rate constants of catalase inactivation during the reaction (k(in), sec-1) and the rate constants of interaction of catalase complex I with the second molecule of H2O2 (k2, M-1.sec-1). The effects of initial catalase concentrations, H2O2, and pH on k, k2, and k(in) were similar for both enzymes. Catalytic constant, k2, and the efficacy expressed as a ratio kcat/Km were 1.87-, 1.45-, and 1.3-fold, respectively, higher for bovine catalase than that of yeast catalase. Operational stability of yeast catalase is 3.5-fold higher than the stability of bovine catalase and much higher during cyclic decomposition of 50 mM H2O2. Enhanced operational stability and inexpensive source of its preparation open prospects for practical applications of yeast catalase for co-immobilization with superoxide dismutase on non-toxic carriers.

  1. Helicobacter Catalase Devoid of Catalytic Activity Protects the Bacterium against Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Stéphane L; Maier, Robert J

    2016-11-04

    Catalase, a conserved and abundant enzyme found in all domains of life, dissipates the oxidant hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori undergoes host-mediated oxidant stress exposure, and its catalase contains oxidizable methionine (Met) residues. We hypothesized catalase may play a large stress-combating role independent of its classical catalytic one, namely quenching harmful oxidants through its recyclable Met residues, resulting in oxidant protection to the bacterium. Two Helicobacter mutant strains ( katA H56A and katA Y339A ) containing catalase without enzyme activity but that retain all Met residues were created. These strains were much more resistant to oxidants than a catalase-deletion mutant strain. The quenching ability of the altered versions was shown, whereby oxidant-stressed (HOCl-exposed) Helicobacter retained viability even upon extracellular addition of the inactive versions of catalase, in contrast to cells receiving HOCl alone. The importance of the methionine-mediated quenching to the pathogen residing in the oxidant-rich gastric mucus was studied. In contrast to a catalase-null strain, both site-change mutants proficiently colonized the murine gastric mucosa, suggesting that the amino acid composition-dependent oxidant-quenching role of catalase is more important than the well described H 2 O 2 -dissipating catalytic role. Over 100 years after the discovery of catalase, these findings reveal a new non-enzymatic protective mechanism of action for the ubiquitous enzyme. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Relationship between catalase activity and uptake of elemental mercury by rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eide, I.; Syversen, T.L.M.

    1983-01-01

    Uptake of mercury by brain after intravenous injection of elemental mercury was investigated in the rat. Catalase activity was inhibited by aminotriazole either by intraperitoneal affecting catalase in most tissues of the animal or by intraventricular injections affecting catalase in the brain selectively. Uptake of elemental mercury by rat brain was not influenced by intraperitoneal administration of aminotriazole resulting in 50% inhibition of brain catalase. However, when the inhibitor was injected intraventricularly in concentrations to give a 50% inhibition of brain catalase, it was shown that the mercury uptake by brain was significantly decreased. In the latter case when only brain catalase was inhibited and the supply of elemtal mercury to brain was maintained, mercury uptake by brain was proportional to the activity of catalase in brain tissue and to the injected amount of elemental mercury. Contrary to the intraventricular injection of aminotriazole, in animals recieving aminotriazole intraperitoneally prior to elemental mercury injection, we suggest that the lower activity of brain catalse is compensated by an increased supply of elemtal mercury caused by the generally lower oxidation rate in the animal. This view is supported by the finding that mercury uptake by liver increased due to aminotriazole intraperitoneally although activity of catalase was depressed. (author)

  3. Catalase in Leishmaniinae: With me or against me?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraeva, Natalya; Horáková, Eva; Kostygov, Alexei Y; Kořený, Luděk; Butenko, Anzhelika; Yurchenko, Vyacheslav; Lukeš, Julius

    2017-06-01

    The catalase gene is a virtually ubiquitous component of the eukaryotic genomes. It is also present in the monoxenous (i.e. parasitizing solely insects) trypanosomatids of the subfamily Leishmaniinae, which have acquired the enzyme by horizontal gene transfer from a bacterium. However, as shown here, the catalase gene was secondarily lost from the genomes of all Leishmania sequenced so far. Due to the potentially key regulatory role of hydrogen peroxide in the inter-stagial transformation of Leishmania spp., this loss seems to be a necessary prerequisite for the emergence of a complex life cycle of these important human pathogens. Hence, in this group of protists, the advantages of keeping catalase were uniquely outweighed by its disadvantages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The relationship between lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase production capacities and cultivation periods of mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian Z; Zhang, Jun L; Hu, Kai H; Zhang, Wei G

    2013-05-01

    Mushrooms are able to secrete lignin peroxidase (LiP) and manganese peroxidase (MnP), and able to use the cellulose as sources of carbon. This article focuses on the relation between peroxidase-secreting capacity and cultivation period of mushrooms with non-laccase activity. Methylene blue and methyl catechol qualitative assay and spectrophotometry quantitative assay show LiP secreting unvaryingly accompanies the MnP secreting in mushroom strains. The growth rates of hyphae are detected by detecting the dry hyphal mass. We link the peroxidase activities to growth rate of mushrooms and then probe into the relationship between them. The results show that there are close relationships between LiP- and/or MnP-secretory capacities and the cultivation periods of mushrooms. The strains with high LiP and MnP activities have short cultivation periods. However, those strains have long cultivation periods because of the low levels of secreted LiP and/or MnP, even no detectable LiP and/or MnP activity. This study provides the first evidence on the imitate relation between the level of secreted LiP and MnP activities and cultivation periods of mushrooms with non-laccase activity. Our study has significantly increased the understanding of the role of LiP and MnP in the growth and development of mushrooms with non-laccase activity. © 2012 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Catalase expression impairs oxidative stress-mediated signalling in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Anna Cláudia Guimarães; Alves, Ceres Luciana; Goes, Grazielle Ribeiro; Resende, Bruno Carvalho; Moretti, Nilmar Silvio; Nunes, Vinícius Santana; Aguiar, Pedro Henrique Nascimento; Tahara, Erich Birelli; Franco, Glória Regina; Macedo, Andréa Mara; Pena, Sérgio Danilo Junho; Gadelha, Fernanda Ramos; Guarneri, Alessandra Aparecida; Schenkman, Sergio; Vieira, Leda Quercia; Machado, Carlos Renato

    2017-09-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is exposed to oxidative stresses during its life cycle, and amongst the strategies employed by this parasite to deal with these situations sits a peculiar trypanothione-dependent antioxidant system. Remarkably, T. cruzi's antioxidant repertoire does not include catalase. In an attempt to shed light on what are the reasons by which this parasite lacks this enzyme, a T. cruzi cell line stably expressing catalase showed an increased resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) when compared with wild-type cells. Interestingly, preconditioning carried out with low concentrations of H2O2 led untransfected parasites to be as much resistant to this oxidant as cells expressing catalase, but did not induce the same level of increased resistance in the latter ones. Also, presence of catalase decreased trypanothione reductase and increased superoxide dismutase levels in T. cruzi, resulting in higher levels of residual H2O2 after challenge with this oxidant. Although expression of catalase contributed to elevated proliferation rates of T. cruzi in Rhodnius prolixus, it failed to induce a significant increase of parasite virulence in mice. Altogether, these results indicate that the absence of a gene encoding catalase in T. cruzi has played an important role in allowing this parasite to develop a shrill capacity to sense and overcome oxidative stress.

  6. Cell wall bound anionic peroxidases from asparagus byproducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo-Carmona, Sara; López, Sergio; Vazquez-Castilla, Sara; Jimenez-Araujo, Ana; Rodriguez-Arcos, Rocio; Guillen-Bejarano, Rafael

    2014-10-08

    Asparagus byproducts are a good source of cationic soluble peroxidases (CAP) useful for the bioremediation of phenol-contaminated wastewaters. In this study, cell wall bound peroxidases (POD) from the same byproducts have been purified and characterized. The covalent forms of POD represent >90% of the total cell wall bound POD. Isoelectric focusing showed that whereas the covalent fraction is constituted primarily by anionic isoenzymes, the ionic fraction is a mixture of anionic, neutral, and cationic isoenzymes. Covalently bound peroxidases were purified by means of ion exchange chromatography and affinity chromatography. In vitro detoxification studies showed that although CAP are more effective for the removal of 4-CP and 2,4-DCP, anionic asparagus peroxidase (AAP) is a better option for the removal of hydroxytyrosol (HT), the main phenol present in olive mill wastewaters.

  7. Glycosylation and thermodynamic versus kinetic stability of horseradish peroxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tams, J.W.; Welinder, Karen G.

    1998-01-01

    Glycoprotein stability, glycoprotein unfolding, horseradish peroxidase, thermodynamic stability, kinetik stability......Glycoprotein stability, glycoprotein unfolding, horseradish peroxidase, thermodynamic stability, kinetik stability...

  8. Evaluation on the Toxic Effects of NanoAg to Catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Zhai, Wenxin; Liu, Rutao; Yu, Zehua; Shen, Hengmei; Hu, Xinxin

    2015-02-01

    Protein is the functional actor of life. Research on protein damage induced by nanomaterials may give insight into the toxicity mechanisms of nanoparticles. Studying nano silver over the impact of the structure and function of catalase (CAT) at the molecular level, is of great significance for a comprehensive evaluation of their toxic effects. The toxic effects of nanoAg on catalase were thoroughly investigated using steady state and time resolved fluorescence quenching measurements, ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, resonance light scattering spectroscopy (RLS), circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). NanoAg could decrease the amount of alpha-helix and increase the beta sheet structure, leading to loose the skeleton structure of catalase. The characteristic fluorescence of catalase was obviously quenched, which showed the exposal of internal hydrophobic amino acids enhanced, and its quenching type is dynamic quenching. The result of RLS and TEM showed that the distribution and size of nanoAg become more uniform and smaller after their interaction, resulting in a decrease of RLS intensity. NanoAg could make the activity of catalase rise. By changing the structure of catalase, nanoAg increases its enzymatic activity to a certain extent, breaking down its balance in vivo, thereby affecting the normal physiological activities. NanoAg has obvious toxic effects on catalase. This paper provided a new perspective and method for the toxic effects of nanoAg to biological macromolecules; provided basic data and reference gist for the hygienics and toxicology studies of nanoAg. It is conducive to the toxicity prevention and control work of nanoAg, promoting nano-technology applied to human production and living better.

  9. Piper betle shows antioxidant activities, inhibits MCF-7 cell proliferation and increases activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrahim Noor

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer and the focus on finding chemotherapeutic agents have recently shifted to natural products. Piper betle is a medicinal plant with various biological activities. However, not much data is available on the anti-cancer effects of P. betle on breast cancer. Due to the current interest in the potential effects of antioxidants from natural products in breast cancer treatment, we investigated the antioxidant activities of the leaves of P. betle and its inhibitory effect on the proliferation of the breast cancer cell line, MCF-7. Methods The leaves of P. betle were extracted with solvents of varying polarities (water, methanol, ethyl acetate and hexane and their phenolic and flavonoid content were determined using colorimetric assays. Phenolic composition was characterized using HPLC. Antioxidant activities were measured using FRAP, DPPH, superoxide anion, nitric oxide and hyroxyl radical scavenging assays. Biological activities of the extracts were analysed using MTT assay and antioxidant enzyme (catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase assays in MCF-7 cells. Results Overall, the ethyl acetate extract showed the highest ferric reducing activity and radical scavenging activities against DPPH, superoxide anion and nitric oxide radicals. This extract also contained the highest phenolic content implying the potential contribution of phenolics towards the antioxidant activities. HPLC analyses revealed the presence of catechin, morin and quercetin in the leaves. The ethyl acetate extract also showed the highest inhibitory effect against the proliferation of MCF-7 cells (IC50=65 μg/ml. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with the plant extract increased activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase. Conclusions Ethyl acetate is the optimal solvent for the extraction of compounds with antioxidant and anti-proliferative activities. The increased activities of catalase and superoxide

  10. Piper betle shows antioxidant activities, inhibits MCF-7 cell proliferation and increases activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahim, Noor Nazirahanie; Kanthimathi, M S; Abdul-Aziz, Azlina

    2012-11-15

    Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer and the focus on finding chemotherapeutic agents have recently shifted to natural products. Piper betle is a medicinal plant with various biological activities. However, not much data is available on the anti-cancer effects of P. betle on breast cancer. Due to the current interest in the potential effects of antioxidants from natural products in breast cancer treatment, we investigated the antioxidant activities of the leaves of P. betle and its inhibitory effect on the proliferation of the breast cancer cell line, MCF-7. The leaves of P. betle were extracted with solvents of varying polarities (water, methanol, ethyl acetate and hexane) and their phenolic and flavonoid content were determined using colorimetric assays. Phenolic composition was characterized using HPLC. Antioxidant activities were measured using FRAP, DPPH, superoxide anion, nitric oxide and hyroxyl radical scavenging assays. Biological activities of the extracts were analysed using MTT assay and antioxidant enzyme (catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase) assays in MCF-7 cells. Overall, the ethyl acetate extract showed the highest ferric reducing activity and radical scavenging activities against DPPH, superoxide anion and nitric oxide radicals. This extract also contained the highest phenolic content implying the potential contribution of phenolics towards the antioxidant activities. HPLC analyses revealed the presence of catechin, morin and quercetin in the leaves. The ethyl acetate extract also showed the highest inhibitory effect against the proliferation of MCF-7 cells (IC50=65 μg/ml). Treatment of MCF-7 cells with the plant extract increased activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase. Ethyl acetate is the optimal solvent for the extraction of compounds with antioxidant and anti-proliferative activities. The increased activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase in the treated cells could alter the antioxidant defense

  11. Atypical mycobacterial infection resembles sporotrichosis in elderly patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Nurani Fauziah

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Atypical mycobacterial (AM infection is caused by Mycobacterium species other than M.tuberculosis. AM skin infection has clinical manifestations that resemble M. tuberculosis infection and deep fungal infection. Laboratory workup is necessary to confirm the diagnosis. An 83-year old female came with a painful lump and swelling on her right lower extremity since three months before admission. Physical examination revealed a plaque consisting, of multiple erythematous and hyperpigmented papules and nodules, diffuse erythematous lesion, and shallow ulcers partially covered with pus and crust. Histopathological features showed tuberculoid granuloma. Direct test and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS staining of the skin biopsy found no fungal element nor acid-fast bacilli (AFB. Culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR of M. tuberculosis were negative. The working diagnosis was atypical mycobacterial infection and treatment with 450 mg rifampicin and 100 mg minocycline daily were administered accordingly. In two months observation following the treatment, the pain was no longer exist, the ulcers were completely healed, and some nodules were in the process of healing Among other Mycobacterium spp, M.marinum is the most common cause of AM infrections. Clinical manifestation of M. marinum infection may present as solitary or multiple nodules on the hands, feet, elbows and knees with sporotrichoid spreading patern. The diagnosis of AM was established based on clinical and laboratory examination. The diagnosis was also confirmed by good clinical response to minocycline and rifampicin.

  12. Hepatic catalase activity after whole-body irradiation of the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neveux, Y.; Drouet, J.; Guillouzo, A.; Rault, H.; Picard, G.

    Using biochemical techniques, the effect of irradiation on catalase rate of different tissues is studied. With cytochemistry, the decrease of catalase activity is studied in situ, after exposure to great ionizing radiation doses [fr

  13. Formation of a tyrosine adduct involved in lignin degradation by Trametopsis cervina lignin peroxidase: a novel peroxidase activation mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuta Miki; Rebecca Pogni; Sandra Acebes; Fatima Lucas; Elena Fernandez-Fueyo; Maria Camilla Baratto; Maria I. Fernandez; Vivian De Los Rios; Francisco J. Ruiz-duenas; Adalgisa Sinicropi; Riccardo Basosi; Kenneth E. Hammel; Victor Guallar; Angel T. Martinez

    2013-01-01

    LiP (lignin peroxidase) from Trametopsis cervina has an exposed catalytic tyrosine residue (Tyr181) instead of the tryptophan conserved in other lignin-degrading peroxidases. Pristine LiP showed a lag period in VA (veratryl alcohol) oxidation. However, VA-LiP (LiP after treatment with H2O2...

  14. Mycobacterial panniculitis caused by in a cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polina Vishkautsan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Case summary A domestic shorthair cat was evaluated for chronic, bilateral, ulcerative dermatitis affecting the inguinal region and lateral aspects of both pelvic limbs. Histopathologic examination of skin biopsies collected throughout the course of disease revealed chronic pyogranulomatous ulcerative dermatitis. Aerobic bacterial skin cultures yielded growth of a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Corynebacterium amycolatum . Upon referral the clinical findings were suggestive of a non-tuberculous Mycobacterium species infection. Previously obtained skin cultures failed to yield growth of mycobacterial organisms. A deep skin biopsy was collected and submitted for mycobacterial culture. At 5 weeks of incubation Mycobacterium thermoresistibile was isolated. In previous reports, M thermoresistibile has been isolated after 2–4 days of incubation, suggesting that this strain may have been a slower growing variant, or other factors (such as prior antimicrobial therapy inhibited rapid growth of this isolate. The cat was hospitalized for intravenous antibiotic therapy, surgical debridement of wounds, vacuum-assisted wound closure therapy and reconstruction procedures. The wounds were ultimately primarily closed and the cat was discharged to the owner after 50 days of hospitalization. Seven months after hospitalization, the ulcerative skin lesions had healed. Relevance and novel information To our knowledge, only two cases of M thermoresistibile panniculitis have been reported in cats. In the only detailed report of feline M thermoresistibile panniculitis, treatment was not attempted. The second case only reported detection of M thermoresistibile by PCR without a clinical description of the case. In our case report, severe chronic skin infection with M thermoresistibile was addressed using prolonged specific antibiotic therapy, surgical debridement and reconstructions, and treatment of secondary bacterial infections.

  15. Catalase induction in normal and tumorigenic mice using x-rays, clofibrate, ethanol, or hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, L.; Oberley, L.

    1985-01-01

    The authors studied catalase induction in normal male Swiss mice as well as in male mice harboring H-6 hepatomas. The induction patterns many suggest reasons why tumor cells have lower catalase activity than normal cells. X-rays, hydrogen peroxide, ethanol, and clofibrate were used as inducing agents. X-rays interact with tissue and cause free radical formation. This results in an increase in hydrogen peroxide concentration, which ought to induce catalase. Oral administration of hydrogen peroxide should induce catalase similarly. Ethanol can be a substrate for catalase, forming acetalehyde; and as such may induce catalase. Ethanol can also restore inactive catalase compound II to useful catalase. Clofibrate is a hypolipidemic agent which induces catalase, most likely because of its ability to accelerate lipid breakdown, which raises peroxide concentration

  16. Tratamento pós-menopausa reduz a atividade da catalase e atenua o risco cardiovascular Postmenopausal therapy reduces catalase activity and attenuates cardiovascular risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera S. Castanho

    2012-11-01

    enzyme activities is limited. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of HT on catalase activity; concentrations of lipids and lipoprotein, cholesteryl ester transfer protein, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, nitrates, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and carotid thickness in postmenopausal women. METHODS: Ninety-four consecutive women were allocated to one of four groups, without HT and with HT. The latter group was subdivided into women using estrogen and those using estrogen plus progestogen therapy. Plasma biochemical parameters and common carotid intima-media thickness measurements were performed. RESULTS: HT antagonized the decrease in catalase activity after menopause, but had no effect on the levels of cholesteryl ester transfer protein, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, lipid peroxide, nitrate, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, or on the common carotid intima-media thickness. Multivariate analysis showed that estrogen-based HT attenuated the relationship between cardiovascular risk factors and the intima-media thickness of the common carotid. CONCLUSION: This study indicates that HT in postmenopausal women produces beneficial antioxidant and anti-atherosclerotic effects by ameliorating the plasma lipid and lipoprotein profiles, increasing plasma catalase activity and attenuating the association between cardiovascular risk factors and early atherosclerosis.

  17. Effect of Vitamin C on Glutathione Peroxidase Activities in Pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Glutathione peroxidase is one of the most important antioxidant enzymes in humans. We studied the relationship between serum glutathione peroxidase activity and vitamin C ingestion during normal pregnancy in women attending antenatal clinic in the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin. Glutathione peroxidase ...

  18. Reduction of Aspergillus niger Virulence in Apple Fruits by Deletion of the Catalase Gene cpeB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng-Ke; Tang, Jun; Huang, Zhong-Qin; Hu, Kang-Di; Li, Yan-Hong; Han, Zhuo; Chen, Xiao-Yan; Hu, Lan-Ying; Yao, Gai-Fang; Zhang, Hua

    2018-05-30

    Aspergillus niger, a common saprophytic fungus, causes rot in many fruits. We studied the role of a putative catalase-peroxidase-encoding gene, cpeB, in oxidative stress and virulence in fruit. The cpeB gene was deleted in A. niger by homologous recombination, and the Δ cpeB mutant showed decreased CAT activity compared with that of the wild type. The cpeB gene deletion caused increased sensitivity to H 2 O 2 stress, and spore germination was significantly reduced; in addition, the reactive-oxygen-species (ROS) metabolites superoxide anions (·O 2 - ), hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), and malondialdehyde (MDA) accumulated in the Δ cpeB mutant during H 2 O 2 stress. Furthermore, ROS metabolism in A. niger infected apples was determined, and our results showed that the Δ cpeB mutant induced an attenuated response in apple fruit during the fruit-pathogen interaction; the cpeB gene deletion significantly reduced the development of lesions, suggesting that the cpeB gene in A. niger is essential for full virulence in apples.

  19. 7.5-Å cryo-em structure of the mycobacterial fatty acid synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehringer, Daniel; Ban, Nenad; Leibundgut, Marc

    2013-03-11

    The mycobacterial fatty acid synthase (FAS) complex is a giant 2.0-MDa α(6) homohexameric multifunctional enzyme that catalyzes synthesis of fatty acid precursors of mycolic acids, which are major components of the cell wall in Mycobacteria and play an important role in pathogenicity. Here, we present a three-dimensional reconstruction of the Mycobacterium smegmatis FAS complex at 7.5Å, highly homologous to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis multienzyme, by cryo-electron microscopy. Based on the obtained structural data, which allowed us to identify secondary-structure elements, and sequence homology with the fungal FAS, we generated an accurate architectural model of the complex. The FAS system from Mycobacteria resembles a minimized version of the fungal FAS with much larger openings in the reaction chambers. These architectural features of the mycobacterial FAS may be important for the interaction with mycolic acid processing and condensing enzymes that further modify the precursors produced by FAS and for autoactivation of the FAS complex. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparative genomic and phylogenetic approaches to characterize the role of genetic recombination in mycobacterial evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Silvia E; Showers-Corneli, Patrice; Dardenne, Caitlin N; Harpending, Henry H; Martin, Darren P; Beiko, Robert G

    2012-01-01

    The genus Mycobacterium encompasses over one hundred named species of environmental and pathogenic organisms, including the causative agents of devastating human diseases such as tuberculosis and leprosy. The success of these human pathogens is due in part to their ability to rapidly adapt to their changing environment and host. Recombination is the fastest way for bacterial genomes to acquire genetic material, but conflicting results about the extent of recombination in the genus Mycobacterium have been reported. We examined a data set comprising 18 distinct strains from 13 named species for evidence of recombination. Genomic regions common to all strains (accounting for 10% to 22% of the full genomes of all examined species) were aligned and concatenated in the chromosomal order of one mycobacterial reference species. The concatenated sequence was screened for evidence of recombination using a variety of statistical methods, with each proposed event evaluated by comparing maximum-likelihood phylogenies of the recombinant section with the non-recombinant portion of the dataset. Incongruent phylogenies were identified by comparing the site-wise log-likelihoods of each tree using multiple tests. We also used a phylogenomic approach to identify genes that may have been acquired through horizontal transfer from non-mycobacterial sources. The most frequent associated lineages (and potential gene transfer partners) in the Mycobacterium lineage-restricted gene trees are other members of suborder Corynebacterinae, but more-distant partners were identified as well. In two examined cases of potentially frequent and habitat-directed transfer (M. abscessus to Segniliparus and M. smegmatis to Streptomyces), observed sequence distances were small and consistent with a hypothesis of transfer, while in a third case (M. vanbaalenii to Streptomyces) distances were larger. The analyses described here indicate that whereas evidence of recombination in core regions within the genus is

  1. Blood neutrophil counts in HIV-infected patients with pulmonary tuberculosis: association with sputum mycobacterial load.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D Kerkhoff

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that neutrophils play a role in the host response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We determined whether neutrophil counts in peripheral blood are associated with tuberculosis (TB and with mycobacterial load in sputum in HIV-infected patients.Adults enrolling in an antiretroviral treatment (ART clinic in a Cape Town township were screened for TB regardless of symptoms. Paired sputum samples were examined using liquid culture, fluorescence microscopy, and the Xpert MTB/RIF assay. Absolute neutrophil counts (ANC were measured in blood samples. Of 602 HIV-infected patients screened, 523 produced one or more sputum samples and had complete results available for analysis. Among these 523 patients, the median CD4 count was 169×10(9/L (IQR, 96-232 and median ANC was 2.6×10(9/L (IQR, 1.9-3.6. Culture-positive pulmonary tuberculosis was diagnosed in 89 patients. Patients with TB had a median ANC of 3.4×10(9/L (IQR, 2.4-5.1 compared to 2.5×10(9/L (IQR, 1.8-3.4 among those who were culture negative (p7.5×10(9/L; p = 0.0005. Patients were then classified into four mutually exclusive groups with increasing sputum mycobacterial load as defined by the results of culture, Xpert MTB/RIF and sputum smear microscopy. Multivariable analyses demonstrated that increasing sputum mycobacterial load was positively associated with blood ANC ≥2.6×10(9/L and with neutrophilia.Increased blood neutrophil counts were independently associated with pulmonary TB and sputum mycobacterial burden in this HIV-infected patient group. This observation supports the growing body of literature regarding the potential role for neutrophils in the host response to TB.

  2. Luffa aegyptiaca (Gourd) Fruit Juice as a Source of Peroxidase

    OpenAIRE

    Yadav, R. S. S.; Yadav, K. S.; Yadav, H. S.

    2011-01-01

    Peroxidases have turned out to be potential biocatalyst for a variety of organic reactions. The research work reported in this communication was done with the objective of finding a convenient rich source of peroxidase which could be used as a biocatalyst for organic synthetic reactions. The studies made have shown that Luffa aegyptiaca (gourd) fruit juice contains peroxidase activity of the order of 180 enzyme unit/mL. The K m values of this peroxidase for the substrates guaiacol and hydroge...

  3. Adventitial gene transfer of catalase attenuates angiotensin II-induced vascular remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cun-Fei; Zhang, Jia; Shen, Kai; Gao, Ping-Jin; Wang, Hai-Ya; Jin, Xin; Meng, Chao; Fang, Ning-Yuan

    2015-04-01

    Vascular adventitia and adventitia‑derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to vascular remodeling following vascular injury. A previous ex vivo study in adventitial fibroblasts showed that catalase, one of most important anti‑oxide enzymes, was downregulated by angiotensin II (AngII). The aim of the present study was to investigate whether adventitial gene transfer of catalase affects AngII‑induced vascular remodeling in vivo. Adenoviruses co‑expressing catalase and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) or expressing eGFP only were applied to the adventitial surface of common carotid arteries of Sprague‑Dawley rats. Alzet minipumps administering AngII (0.75 mg/kg/day) were then implanted subcutaneously for 14 days. Systolic blood pressure and biological parameters of vascular remodeling were measured in each group. Adventitial fibroblasts were cultured and p38 mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation was measured using western blot analysis. The results showed that adventitial gene transfer of catalase had no effect on AngII‑induced systolic blood pressure elevation. However, catalase adenovirus transfection significantly inhibited AngII‑induced media hypertrophy compared with that of the control virus (Padventitial α‑smooth muscle actin expression. Furthermore, catalase transfection significantly inhibited the AngII‑induced increase in p38MAPK phosphorylation. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that adventitial gene transfer of catalase significantly attenuated AngII‑induced vascular remodeling in rats via inhibition of adventitial p38MAPK phosphorylation.

  4. Catalase characterization and implication in bleaching of a symbiotic sea anemone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merle, Pierre-Laurent; Sabourault, Cécile; Richier, Sophie; Allemand, Denis; Furla, Paola

    2007-01-15

    Symbiotic cnidarians are marine invertebrates harboring photosynthesizing microalgae (named zooxanthellae), which produce great amounts of oxygen and free radicals upon illumination. Studying antioxidative balance is then crucial to understanding how symbiotic cnidarians cope with ROS production. In particular, it is suspected that oxidative stress triggers cnidarian bleaching, i.e., the expulsion of zooxanthellae from the animal host, responsible for symbiotic cnidarian mass mortality worldwide. This study therefore investigates catalase antioxidant enzymes and their role in bleaching of the temperate symbiotic sea anemone Anemonia viridis. Using specific separation of animal tissues (ectoderm and endoderm) from the symbionts (zooxanthellae), spectrophotometric assays and native PAGE revealed both tissue-specific and activity pattern distribution of two catalase electrophoretypes, E1 and E2. E1, expressed in all three tissues, presents high sensitivity to the catalase inhibitor aminotriazole (ATZ) and elevated temperatures. The ectodermal E1 form is responsible for 67% of total catalase activity. The E2 form, expressed only within zooxanthellae and their host endodermal cells, displays low sensitivity to ATZ and relative thermostability. We further cloned an ectodermal catalase, which shares 68% identity with mammalian monofunctional catalases. Last, 6 days of exposure of whole sea anemones to ATZ (0.5 mM) led to effective catalase inhibition and initiated symbiont expulsion. This demonstrates the crucial role of this enzyme in cnidarian bleaching, a phenomenon responsible for worldwide climate-change-induced mass mortalities, with catastrophic consequences for marine biodiversity.

  5. Extracellular localization of catalase is associated with the transformed state of malignant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Britta; Heinzelmann, Sonja; Motz, Manfred; Bauer, Georg

    2015-12-01

    Oncogenic transformation is dependent on activated membrane-associated NADPH oxidase (NOX). However, the resultant extracellular superoxide anions are also driving the NO/peroxynitrite and the HOCl pathway, which eliminates NOX-expressing transformed cells through selective apoptosis induction. Tumor progression is dependent on dominant interference with intercellular apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling through membrane-associated catalase, which decomposes H2O2 and peroxynitrite and oxidizes NO. Particularly, the decomposition of extracellular peroxynitrite strictly requires membrane-associated catalase. We utilized small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of catalase and neutralizing antibodies directed against the enzyme in combination with challenging H2O2 or peroxynitrite to determine activity and localization of catalase in cells from three distinct steps of multistage oncogenesis. Nontransformed cells did not generate extracellular superoxide anions and only showed intracellular catalase activity. Transformed cells showed superoxide anion-dependent intercellular apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling in the presence of suboptimal catalase activity in their membrane. Tumor cells exhibited tight control of intercellular apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling through a high local concentration of membrane-associated catalase. These data demonstrate that translocation of catalase to the outside of the cell membrane is already associated with the transformation step. A strong local increase in the concentration of membrane-associated catalase is achieved during tumor progression and is controlled by tumor cell-derived H2O2 and by transglutaminase.

  6. Nitrite and nitroso compounds can serve as specific catalase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, Vladimir Yu; Osipov, Anatoly N

    2017-03-01

    We present evidence that nitrite and nitrosothiols, nitrosoamines and non-heme dinitrosyl iron complexes can reversibly inhibit catalase with equal effectiveness. Catalase activity was evaluated by the permanganatometric and calorimetric assays. This inhibition is not the result of chemical transformations of these compounds to a single inhibitor, as well as it is not the result of NO release from these substances (as NO traps have no effect on the extent of inhibition). It was found that chloride and bromide in concentration above 80 mM and thiocyanate in concentration above 20 μM enhance catalase inhibition by nitrite and the nitroso compounds more than 100 times. The inhibition degree in this case is comparable with that induced by azide. We propose that the direct catalase inhibitor is a positively charged NO-group. This group acquires a positive charge in the active center of enzyme by interaction of nitrite or nitroso compounds with some enzyme groups. Halides and thiocyanate protect the NO + group from hydration and thus increase its inhibition effect. It is probable that a comparatively low chloride concentration in many cells is the main factor to protect catalase from inhibition by nitrite and nitroso compounds.

  7. Radiation-induced inactivation of bovine liver catalase in nitrous oxide-saturated solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebicka, L.; Metodiewa, D.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation-induced inactivation of catalase by . OH/H . radicals was studied. It was found that inactivation yield of catalase depended on the dose. Optical spectrum of irradiated catalase showed that no redox processes in active site of enzyme occurred as a result of . OH/H . interaction. (author) 19 refs.; 3 figs

  8. Effect of menadione and hydrogen peroxide on catalase activity in Saccharomyces yeast strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadejda EFREMOVA

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available It has been studied the possibility of utilization of two important oxidant factors as regulators of catalase activity in Saccharomyces yeasts. In this paper results of the screening of some Saccharomyces yeast strains for potential producers of catalase are presented. Results of the screening for potential catalase producer have revealed that Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNMN-Y-11 strain possesses the highest catalase activity (2900 U/mg protein compared with other samples. Maximum increase of catalase activity with 50-60% compared to the reference sample was established in the case of hydrogen peroxide and menadione utilization in optimal concentrations of 15 and 10 mM. This research has been demonstrated the potential benefits of application of hydrogen peroxide and menadione as stimulatory factors of catalase activity in Saccharomyces yeasts.

  9. Effects of peroxisomal catalase inhibition on mitochondrial function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eWalton

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisomes produce hydrogen peroxide as a metabolic by-product of their many oxidase enzymes, but contain catalase that breaks down hydrogen peroxide in order to maintain the organelle’s oxidative balance. It has been previously demonstrated that, as cells age, catalase is increasingly absent from the peroxisome, and resides instead as an unimported tetrameric molecule in the cell cytosol; an alteration that is coincident with increased cellular hydrogen peroxide levels. As this process begins in middle-passage cells, we sought to determine whether peroxisomal hydrogen peroxide could contribute to the oxidative damage observed in mitochondria in late-passage cells. Early-passage human fibroblasts (Hs27 treated with aminotriazole (3-AT, an irreversible catalase inhibitor, demonstrated decreased catalase activity, increased levels of cellular hydrogen peroxide, protein carbonyls, and peroxisomal numbers. This treatment increased mitochondrial ROS levels, and decreased the mitochondrial aconitase activity by approximately 85% within 24 hours. In addition, mitochondria from 3-AT treated cells show a decrease in inner membrane potential. These results demonstrate that peroxisome-derived oxidative imbalance may rapidly impair mitochondrial function, and considering that peroxisomal oxidative imbalance begins to occur in middle-passage cells, supports the hypothesis that peroxisomal oxidant release occurs upstream of, and contributes to, the mitochondrial damage observed in aging cells.

  10. Effects of peroxisomal catalase inhibition on mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Paul A; Pizzitelli, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisomes produce hydrogen peroxide as a metabolic by-product of their many oxidase enzymes, but contain catalase that breaks down hydrogen peroxide in order to maintain the organelle's oxidative balance. It has been previously demonstrated that, as cells age, catalase is increasingly absent from the peroxisome, and resides instead as an unimported tetrameric molecule in the cell cytosol; an alteration that is coincident with increased cellular hydrogen peroxide levels. As this process begins in middle-passage cells, we sought to determine whether peroxisomal hydrogen peroxide could contribute to the oxidative damage observed in mitochondria in late-passage cells. Early-passage human fibroblasts (Hs27) treated with aminotriazole (3-AT), an irreversible catalase inhibitor, demonstrated decreased catalase activity, increased levels of cellular hydrogen peroxide, protein carbonyls, and peroxisomal numbers. This treatment increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species levels, and decreased the mitochondrial aconitase activity by ∼85% within 24 h. In addition, mitochondria from 3-AT treated cells show a decrease in inner membrane potential. These results demonstrate that peroxisome-derived oxidative imbalance may rapidly impair mitochondrial function, and considering that peroxisomal oxidative imbalance begins to occur in middle-passage cells, supports the hypothesis that peroxisomal oxidant release occurs upstream of, and contributes to, the mitochondrial damage observed in aging cells.

  11. Direct measurement of catalase activity in living cells and tissue biopsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaglione, Christine N.; Xu, Qijin; Ramanujan, V. Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Spatiotemporal regulation of enzyme-substrate interactions governs the decision-making steps in biological systems. Enzymes, being functional units of every living cell, contribute to the macromolecular stability of cell survival, proliferation and hence are vital windows to unraveling the biological complexity. Experimental measurements capturing this dynamics of enzyme-substrate interactions in real time add value to this understanding. Furthermore these measurements, upon validation in realistic biological specimens such as clinical biopsies – can further improve our capability in disease diagnostics and treatment monitoring. Towards this direction, we describe here a novel, high-sensitive measurement system for measuring diffusion-limited enzyme-substrate kinetics in real time. Using catalase (enzyme) and hydrogen peroxide (substrate) as the example pair, we demonstrate that this system is capable of direct measurement of catalase activity in vitro and the measured kinetics follows the classical Michaelis-Menten reaction kinetics. We further demonstrate the system performance by measuring catalase activity in living cells and in very small amounts of liver biopsies (down to 1 μg total protein). Catalase-specific enzyme activity is demonstrated by genetic and pharmacological tools. Finally we show the clinically-relevant diagnostic capability of our system by comparing the catalase activities in liver biopsies from young and old mouse (liver and serum) samples. We discuss the potential applicability of this system in clinical diagnostics as well as in intraoperative surgical settings. - Highlights: • A novel, direct measurement of Catalase enzyme activity via, oxygen sensing method. • Steady-stateprofiles of Catalase activity follow the Michaelis-Menten Kinetics. • Catalase-specific activity demonstrated using genetic and pharmacological tools. • Overcomes limitations of spectroscopic methods and indirect calorimetric approaches. • Clear

  12. Direct measurement of catalase activity in living cells and tissue biopsies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaglione, Christine N.; Xu, Qijin; Ramanujan, V. Krishnan, E-mail: Ramanujanv@csmc.edu

    2016-01-29

    Spatiotemporal regulation of enzyme-substrate interactions governs the decision-making steps in biological systems. Enzymes, being functional units of every living cell, contribute to the macromolecular stability of cell survival, proliferation and hence are vital windows to unraveling the biological complexity. Experimental measurements capturing this dynamics of enzyme-substrate interactions in real time add value to this understanding. Furthermore these measurements, upon validation in realistic biological specimens such as clinical biopsies – can further improve our capability in disease diagnostics and treatment monitoring. Towards this direction, we describe here a novel, high-sensitive measurement system for measuring diffusion-limited enzyme-substrate kinetics in real time. Using catalase (enzyme) and hydrogen peroxide (substrate) as the example pair, we demonstrate that this system is capable of direct measurement of catalase activity in vitro and the measured kinetics follows the classical Michaelis-Menten reaction kinetics. We further demonstrate the system performance by measuring catalase activity in living cells and in very small amounts of liver biopsies (down to 1 μg total protein). Catalase-specific enzyme activity is demonstrated by genetic and pharmacological tools. Finally we show the clinically-relevant diagnostic capability of our system by comparing the catalase activities in liver biopsies from young and old mouse (liver and serum) samples. We discuss the potential applicability of this system in clinical diagnostics as well as in intraoperative surgical settings. - Highlights: • A novel, direct measurement of Catalase enzyme activity via, oxygen sensing method. • Steady-stateprofiles of Catalase activity follow the Michaelis-Menten Kinetics. • Catalase-specific activity demonstrated using genetic and pharmacological tools. • Overcomes limitations of spectroscopic methods and indirect calorimetric approaches. • Clear

  13. Effects of Peroxisomal Catalase Inhibition on Mitochondrial Function

    OpenAIRE

    Walton, Paul A.; Pizzitelli, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisomes produce hydrogen peroxide as a metabolic by-product of their many oxidase enzymes, but contain catalase that breaks down hydrogen peroxide in order to maintain the organelle’s oxidative balance. It has been previously demonstrated that, as cells age, catalase is increasingly absent from the peroxisome, and resides instead as an unimported tetrameric molecule in the cell cytosol; an alteration that is coincident with increased cellular hydrogen peroxide levels. As this process begi...

  14. Effects of peroxisomal catalase inhibition on mitochondrial function.

    OpenAIRE

    Paul eWalton

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisomes produce hydrogen peroxide as a metabolic by-product of their many oxidase enzymes, but contain catalase that breaks down hydrogen peroxide in order to maintain the organelle’s oxidative balance. It has been previously demonstrated that, as cells age, catalase is increasingly absent from the peroxisome, and resides instead as an unimported tetrameric molecule in the cell cytosol; an alteration that is coincident with increased cellular hydrogen peroxide levels. As this process be...

  15. Helicobacter Catalase Devoid of Catalytic Activity Protects the Bacterium against Oxidative Stress*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Stéphane L.; Maier, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Catalase, a conserved and abundant enzyme found in all domains of life, dissipates the oxidant hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori undergoes host-mediated oxidant stress exposure, and its catalase contains oxidizable methionine (Met) residues. We hypothesized catalase may play a large stress-combating role independent of its classical catalytic one, namely quenching harmful oxidants through its recyclable Met residues, resulting in oxidant protection to the bacterium. Two Helicobacter mutant strains (katAH56A and katAY339A) containing catalase without enzyme activity but that retain all Met residues were created. These strains were much more resistant to oxidants than a catalase-deletion mutant strain. The quenching ability of the altered versions was shown, whereby oxidant-stressed (HOCl-exposed) Helicobacter retained viability even upon extracellular addition of the inactive versions of catalase, in contrast to cells receiving HOCl alone. The importance of the methionine-mediated quenching to the pathogen residing in the oxidant-rich gastric mucus was studied. In contrast to a catalase-null strain, both site-change mutants proficiently colonized the murine gastric mucosa, suggesting that the amino acid composition-dependent oxidant-quenching role of catalase is more important than the well described H2O2-dissipating catalytic role. Over 100 years after the discovery of catalase, these findings reveal a new non-enzymatic protective mechanism of action for the ubiquitous enzyme. PMID:27605666

  16. Effects of pergolide mesylate on transduction efficiency of PEP-1-catalase protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Eun Jeong; Kim, Dae Won; Kim, Young Nam; Kim, So Mi; Lim, Soon Sung; Kang, Tae-Cheon; Kwon, Hyeok Yil; Kim, Duk-Soo; Cho, Sung-Woo; Han, Kyu Hyung; Park, Jinseu; Eum, Won Sik; Hwang, Hyun Sook; Choi, Soo Young

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We studied effects of pergolide mesylate (PM) on in vitro and in vivo transduction of PEP-1-catalase. → PEP-1-catatase inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced inflammation. → PM enhanced the transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT cells and skin tissue. → PM increased anti-inflammatory activity of PEP-1-catalase. → PM stimulated therapeutic action of anti-oxidant enzyme catalase in oxidative-related diseases. -- Abstract: The low transduction efficiency of various proteins is an obstacle to their therapeutic application. However, protein transduction domains (PTDs) are well-known for a highly effective tool for exogenous protein delivery to cells. We examined the effects of pergolide mesylate (PM) on the transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT human keratinocytes and mice skin and on the anti-inflammatory activity of PEP-1-catatase against 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced inflammation using Western blot and histological analysis. PM enhanced the time- and dose-dependent transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT cells without affecting the cellular toxicity. In a mouse edema model, PEP-1-catalase inhibited the increased expressions of inflammatory mediators and cytokines such as cyclooxygenase-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase, interleukin-6 and -1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α induced by TPA. On the other hand, PM alone failed to exert any significant anti-inflammatory effects. However, the anti-inflammatory effect of co-treatment with PEP-1-catalase and PM was more potent than that of PEP-1-catalase alone. Our results indicate that PM may enhance the delivery of PTDs fusion therapeutic proteins to target cells and tissues and has potential to increase their therapeutic effects of such drugs against various diseases.

  17. Effects of pergolide mesylate on transduction efficiency of PEP-1-catalase protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Eun Jeong; Kim, Dae Won; Kim, Young Nam; Kim, So Mi [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Soon Sung [Department of Food Science and Nutrition and RIC Center, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Tae-Cheon [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Hyeok Yil [Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Duk-Soo [Department of Anatomy, College of Medicine, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan-Si 330-090 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sung-Woo [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Kyu Hyung; Park, Jinseu; Eum, Won Sik [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Hyun Sook, E-mail: wazzup@hallym.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Soo Young, E-mail: sychoi@hallym.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-18

    Research highlights: {yields} We studied effects of pergolide mesylate (PM) on in vitro and in vivo transduction of PEP-1-catalase. {yields} PEP-1-catatase inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced inflammation. {yields} PM enhanced the transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT cells and skin tissue. {yields} PM increased anti-inflammatory activity of PEP-1-catalase. {yields} PM stimulated therapeutic action of anti-oxidant enzyme catalase in oxidative-related diseases. -- Abstract: The low transduction efficiency of various proteins is an obstacle to their therapeutic application. However, protein transduction domains (PTDs) are well-known for a highly effective tool for exogenous protein delivery to cells. We examined the effects of pergolide mesylate (PM) on the transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT human keratinocytes and mice skin and on the anti-inflammatory activity of PEP-1-catatase against 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced inflammation using Western blot and histological analysis. PM enhanced the time- and dose-dependent transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT cells without affecting the cellular toxicity. In a mouse edema model, PEP-1-catalase inhibited the increased expressions of inflammatory mediators and cytokines such as cyclooxygenase-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase, interleukin-6 and -1{beta}, and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} induced by TPA. On the other hand, PM alone failed to exert any significant anti-inflammatory effects. However, the anti-inflammatory effect of co-treatment with PEP-1-catalase and PM was more potent than that of PEP-1-catalase alone. Our results indicate that PM may enhance the delivery of PTDs fusion therapeutic proteins to target cells and tissues and has potential to increase their therapeutic effects of such drugs against various diseases.

  18. The influence of culture conditions on the identification of Mycobacterium species by MALDI-TOF MS profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balážová, Tereza; Makovcová, Jitka; Šedo, Ondrej; Slaný, Michal; Faldyna, Martin; Zdráhal, Zbyněk

    2014-04-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) represents a simple reliable approach for rapid bacterial identification based on specific peptide/protein fingerprints. However, cell-wall characteristics of mycobacterial species, and their well known stability, complicate MALDI-TOF MS profiling analysis. In this study, we tested two recently published protocols for inactivation and disruption of mycobacteria, and we also examined the influence of different culture conditions (four culture media and five cultivation times) on mass spectral quality and the discriminatory power of the method. We found a significant influence of sample pretreatment method and culture medium on species identification and differentiation for a total of 10 strains belonging to Mycobacterium phlei and Mycobacterium smegmatis. Optimum culture conditions yielding the highest identification success rate against the BioTyper database (Bruker Daltonics) and permitting the possibility of automatic acquisition of mass spectra were found to be distinct for the two mycobacterial species examined. Similarly, individual changes in growth conditions had diverse effects on the two species. For these reasons, thorough control over cultivation conditions should always be employed to maximize the performance and discriminatory power of MALDI-TOF MS profiling, and cultivation conditions must be optimized separately for individual groups of mycobacterial species/strains. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Factors Affecting Catalase Expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms and Planktonic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Frederick, Jesse R.; Elkins, James G.; Bollinger, Nikki; Hassett, Daniel J.; McDermott, Timothy R.

    2001-01-01

    Previous work with Pseudomonas aeruginosa showed that catalase activity in biofilms was significantly reduced relative to that in planktonic cells. To better understand biofilm physiology, we examined possible explanations for the differential expression of catalase in cells cultured in these two different conditions. For maximal catalase activity, biofilm cells required significantly more iron (25 μM as FeCl3) in the medium, whereas planktonic cultures required no addition of iron. However, ...

  20. Fluorescence spectrometry of the interaction of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with catalase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Y.; Cai, H.; Miao, J.; Yang, Q.; Li, Y.; Li, J.; Fu, D.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with catalase is investigated using fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic techniques. The results of the fluorescence experiments suggest that MWCNTs quench the intrinsic fluorescence of catalase via a static quenching mechanism. The circular dichroism spectral results reveal the unfolding of catalase with a significant decrease in the α-helix content in the presence of MWCNTs, which indicates that the conformation of catalase is changed in the binding process, thereby remarkably decreasing its activity. The binding constants and the number of binding sites of the MWCNT to the catalase are calculated at different temperatures. The thermodynamic parameters, such as the changes in free energy (ΔG), enthalpy (ΔH), and entropy (ΔS), are calculated using thermodynamic equations. The fact that all negative values of ΔG, ΔH, and ΔS are obtained suggests that the interaction of the MWCNTs with catalase is spontaneous, and that hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions play an important role in the binding process. (authors)

  1. Luffa aegyptiaca (Gourd) Fruit Juice as a Source of Peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, R S S; Yadav, K S; Yadav, H S

    2011-01-01

    Peroxidases have turned out to be potential biocatalyst for a variety of organic reactions. The research work reported in this communication was done with the objective of finding a convenient rich source of peroxidase which could be used as a biocatalyst for organic synthetic reactions. The studies made have shown that Luffa aegyptiaca (gourd) fruit juice contains peroxidase activity of the order of 180 enzyme unit/mL. The K(m) values of this peroxidase for the substrates guaiacol and hydrogen peroxide were 2.0 and 0.2 mM, respectively. The pH and temperature optima were 6.5 and 60°C, respectively. Like other peroxidases, it followed double displacement type mechanism. Sodium azide inhibited the enzyme competitively with K(i) value of 3.35 mM.

  2. Luffa aegyptiaca (Gourd Fruit Juice as a Source of Peroxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. S. Yadav

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxidases have turned out to be potential biocatalyst for a variety of organic reactions. The research work reported in this communication was done with the objective of finding a convenient rich source of peroxidase which could be used as a biocatalyst for organic synthetic reactions. The studies made have shown that Luffa aegyptiaca (gourd fruit juice contains peroxidase activity of the order of 180 enzyme unit/mL. The Km values of this peroxidase for the substrates guaiacol and hydrogen peroxide were 2.0 and 0.2 mM, respectively. The pH and temperature optima were 6.5 and 60°C, respectively. Like other peroxidases, it followed double displacement type mechanism. Sodium azide inhibited the enzyme competitively with Ki value of 3.35 mM.

  3. Novel Insights in Mammalian Catalase Heme Maturation: Effect of NO and Thioredoxin-1

    OpenAIRE

    Chakravarti, Ritu; Gupta, Karishma; Majors, Alana; Ruple, Lisa; Aronica, Mark; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    2015-01-01

    Catalase is a tetrameric heme-containing enzyme with essential antioxidant functions in biology. Multiple factors including nitric oxide (NO) have been shown to attenuate its activity. However, the possible impact of NO in relation to the maturation of active catalase, including its heme acquisition and tetramer formation, has not been investigated. We found that NO attenuates heme insertion into catalase in both short-term and long-term incubations. The NO inhibition in catalase heme incorpo...

  4. Self-Assembled Complexes of Horseradish Peroxidase with Magnetic Nanoparticles Showing Enhanced Peroxidase Activity

    KAUST Repository

    Corgié , Sté phane C.; Kahawong, Patarawan; Duan, Xiaonan; Bowser, Daniel; Edward, Joseph B.; Walker, Larry P.; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.

    2012-01-01

    Bio-nanocatalysts (BNCs) consisting of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) self-assembled with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) enhance enzymatic activity due to the faster turnover and lower inhibition of the enzyme. The size and magnetization of the MNPs

  5. Time course of cerebellar catalase levels after neonatal ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Meglio, A.; Caceres, L.; Zieher, L.M.; Guelman, L.R.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Reactive oxygen species are physiologically generated as a consequence of aerobic respiration, but this generation is increased in response to external stimuli, including ionizing radiation. The central nervous system (CNS) is vulnerable to oxidative stress due to its high oxygen consumption rate, its high level of polyunsaturated fatty acids and low levels of antioxidant defences. An important compound of this defence system is the antioxidant enzyme catalase, an heme protein that removes hydrogen peroxide from the cell by catalyzing its conversion to water. The aim of the present work was to study if catalase is susceptible to oxidative stress generated by ionizing radiation on the cerebellum. Neonatal rats were irradiated with 5 Gy of X rays and the levels of catalase were measured at 15, 30 and 60 days of age. Results show that there is a decrease in the activity of catalase in irradiated cerebellum at 15 (% respect the control, 65.6 ± 14.8), 30 (51.35± 5.8%), and 60 days (9.3 ± 0.34%). Catalase activity at 15 and 30 days has shown to be positively correlated with the radiation-induced decrease in tissue's weight, while at 60 days there is an extra decrease. It would be suggested that, at long term, radiation exposure might induce, in addition to cerebellar atrophy, the oxidation of the radiosensitive heme group of the enzyme, leading to its inactivation. In conclusion, the antioxidant enzyme catalase has shown to be especially sensitive to ionizing radiation. (author)

  6. Physiological Role of a Multigrain Diet in Metabolic Regulations of Lipid and Antioxidant Profiles in Hypercholesteremic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupal A. Vasant

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives:The objective of the present study was to investigate the lipid and the antioxidant regulatory potential of a multigrain diet in laboratory animals with reference to lipid profiles, tissue lipid peroxidation and antioxidant status. Methods: Two types of diets, with or without addition of cholesterol, were used in the study – a commercial diet and a formulated multigrain diet (with Sorghum vulgare, Avena sativa, Pennisetum typhoideum, Oryza sativa, Eleusine coracana and Zea mays grains. After a 10-week period of feeding the diets to albino rats the plasma, liver and fecal lipid profiles and the hepatic and renal antioxidant status of the animals that were fed the commercial and the formulated diets (with and without cholesterol addition were assessed. Results: The commercial diet supplemented with cholesterol elevated the levels of plasma total lipids, total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, and very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-C, as well as the atherogenic index (AI. The high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C content and the antioxidant profiles (total ascorbic acid, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase reduced glutathione declined along with increases in lipid peroxidation. The formulated diet (with and without addition of cholesterol was found to be more efficient than the commercial diet in controlling plasma, hepatic and fecal lipid profiles, as well as hepatic and renal lipid peroxidation and antioxidant status, than of the hypercholesteremic animals. Conclusion:The multigrain diet used in the present study is effective in countering the hyperlipidemia and oxidative stress caused by high cholesterol intake.

  7. Immobilization of catalase on chitosan and amino acid- modified chitosan beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Başak, Esra; Aydemir, Tülin

    2013-08-01

    Bovine liver catalase was covalently immobilized onto amino acid-modified chitosan beads. The beads were characterized with SEM, FTIR, TGA and the effects of immobilization on optimum pH and temperature, thermostability, reusability were evaluated. Immobilized catalase showed the maximal enzyme activity at pH 7.0 at 30°C. The kinetic parameters, Km and Vmax, for immobilized catalase on alanine-chitosan beads and lysine-chitosan beads were estimated to be 25.67 mM, 27 mM and 201.39 μmol H2O2/min, 197.50 μmol H2O2/min, respectively. The activity of the immobilized catalase on Ala-CB and Lys-CB retained 40% of its high initial activity after 100 times of reuse.

  8. Peroxisomal catalase deficiency modulates yeast lifespan depending on growth conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kawalek, Adam; Lefevre, Sophie D.; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J.

    We studied the role of peroxisomal catalase in chronological aging of the yeast Hansenula polymorpha in relation to various growth substrates. Catalase-deficient (cat) cells showed a similar chronological life span (CLS) relative to the wild-type control upon growth on carbon and nitrogen sources

  9. Arrhenius activation energy of damage to catalase during spray-drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Joachim; Lee, Geoffrey

    2015-07-15

    The inactivation of catalase during spray-drying over a range of outlet gas temperatures could be closely represented by the Arrhenius equation. From this an activation energy for damage to the catalase could be calculated. The close fit to Arrhenius suggests that the thermally-induced part of inactivation of the catalase during the complex drying and particle-formation processes takes place at constant temperature. These processes are rapid compared with the residence time of the powder in the collecting vessel of the cyclone where dried catalase is exposed to a constant temperature equal to approximately the drying gas outlet temperature. A lower activation energy after spray drying with the ultrasonic nozzle was found than with the 2-fluid nozzle under otherwise identical spray drying conditions. It is feasible that the ultrasonic nozzle when mounted in the lid of the spray dryer heats up toward the drying gas inlet temperature much more that the air-cooled 2-fluid nozzle. Calculation of the Arrhenius activation energy also showed how the stabilizing efficacy of trehalose and mannitol on the catalase varies in strength across the range of drying gas inlet and outlet temperatures examined. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Cd1b-Mediated T Cell Recognition of a Glycolipid Antigen Generated from Mycobacterial Lipid and Host Carbohydrate during Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, D. Branch; Guy, Mark R.; Grant, Ethan; Cheng, Tan-Yun; Brenner, Michael B.; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Porcelli, Steven A.

    2000-01-01

    T cells recognize microbial glycolipids presented by CD1 proteins, but there is no information regarding the generation of natural glycolipid antigens within infected tissues. Therefore, we determined the molecular basis of CD1b-restricted T cell recognition of mycobacterial glycosylated mycolates, including those produced during tissue infection in vivo. Transfection of the T cell receptor (TCR) α and β chains from a glucose monomycolate (GMM)-specific T cell line reconstituted GMM recognition in TCR-deficient T lymphoblastoma cells. This TCR-mediated response was highly specific for natural mycobacterial glucose-6-O-(2R, 3R) monomycolate, including the precise structure of the glucose moiety, the stereochemistry of the mycolate lipid, and the linkage between the carbohydrate and the lipid. Mycobacterial production of antigenic GMM absolutely required a nonmycobacterial source of glucose that could be supplied by adding glucose to media at concentrations found in mammalian tissues or by infecting tissue in vivo. These results indicate that mycobacteria synthesized antigenic GMM by coupling mycobacterial mycolates to host-derived glucose. Specific T cell recognition of an epitope formed by interaction of host and pathogen biosynthetic pathways provides a mechanism for immune response to those pathogenic mycobacteria that have productively infected tissues, as distinguished from ubiquitous, but innocuous, environmental mycobacteria. PMID:11015438

  11. Catalase degradation in sunflower cotyledons during peroxisome transition from glyoxysomal to leaf peroxisomal function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eising, R.; Gerhardt, B.

    1987-01-01

    First order rate constant for the degradation (degradation constants) of catalase in the cotyledons of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) were determined by measuring the loss of catalase containing 14 C-labeled heme. During greening of the cotyledons, a period when peroxisomes change from glyoxysomal to leaf peroxisomal function, the degradation of glyoxysomal catalase is significantly slower than during all other stages of cotyledon development in light or darkness. The degradation constant during the transition stage of peroxisome function amounts to 0.205 day -1 in contrast to the constants ranging from 0.304 day -1 to 0.515 day -1 during the other developmental stages. Density labeling experiments comprising labeling of catalase with 2 H 2 O and its isopycnic centrifugation on CsCl gradients demonstrated that the determinations of the degradation constants were not substantially affected by reutilization of 14 C-labeled compounds for catalase synthesis. The degradation constants for both glyoxysomal catalase and catalase synthesized during the transition of peroxisome function do not differ. This was shown by labeling the catalases with different isotopes and measuring the isotope ratio during the development of the cotyledons. The results are inconsistent with the concept that an accelerated and selective degradation of glyoxysomes underlies the change in peroxisome function. The data suggest that catalase degradation is at least partially due to an individual turnover of catalase and does not only result from a turnover of the whole peroxisomes

  12. Novel Role of Endogenous Catalase in Macrophage Polarization in Adipose Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ye Seul; Uddin, Md Jamal; Piao, Lingjuan; Hwang, Inah; Lee, Jung Hwa; Ha, Hunjoo

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are important components of adipose tissue inflammation, which results in metabolic diseases such as insulin resistance. Notably, obesity induces a proinflammatory phenotypic switch in adipose tissue macrophages, and oxidative stress facilitates this switch. Thus, we examined the role of endogenous catalase, a key regulator of oxidative stress, in the activity of adipose tissue macrophages in obese mice. Catalase knockout (CKO) exacerbated insulin resistance, amplified oxidative stress, and accelerated macrophage infiltration into epididymal white adipose tissue in mice on normal or high-fat diet. Interestingly, catalase deficiency also enhanced classical macrophage activation (M1) and inflammation but suppressed alternative activation (M2) regardless of diet. Similarly, pharmacological inhibition of catalase activity using 3-aminotriazole induced the same phenotypic switch and inflammatory response in RAW264.7 macrophages. Finally, the same phenotypic switch and inflammatory responses were observed in primary bone marrow-derived macrophages from CKO mice. Taken together, the data indicate that endogenous catalase regulates the polarization of adipose tissue macrophages and thereby inhibits inflammation and insulin resistance.

  13. Anti-Mycobacterial Activity of Marine Fungus-Derived 4-Deoxybostrycin and Nigrosporin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomin Lai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available 4-Deoxybostrycin is a natural anthraquinone compound isolated from the Mangrove endophytic fungus Nigrospora sp. collected from the South China Sea. Nigrosporin is the deoxy-derivative of 4-deoxybostrycin. They were tested against mycobacteria, especially Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion susceptibility test, they both had inhibition zone sizes of over 25 mm. The results of the absolute concentration susceptibility test suggested that they had inhibitory effects against mycobacteria. Moreover, 4-deoxybostrycin exhibited good inhibition which was even better than that of first line anti-tuberculosis (TB drugs against some clinical multidrug-resistant (MDR M. tuberculosis strains. The gene expression profile of M. tuberculosis H37Rv after treatment with 4-deoxybostrycin was compared with untreated bacteria. One hundred and nineteen out of 3,875 genes were significantly different in M. tuberculosis exposed to 4-deoxybostrycin from control. There were 46 functionally known genes which are involved in metabolism, information storage and processing and cellular processes. The differential expressions of six genes were further confirmed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. The present study provides a useful experiment basis for exploitation of correlative new drugs against TB and for finding out new targets of anti-mycobacterial therapy.

  14. Anti-mycobacterial activity of marine fungus-derived 4-deoxybostrycin and nigrosporin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong; Wang, Juan; Huang, Yuhong; Chen, Hong; Li, Yan; Zhong, Lili; Chen, Yi; Chen, Shengping; Wang, Jun; Kang, Juling; Peng, Yi; Yang, Bin; Lin, Yongcheng; She, Zhigang; Lai, Xiaomin

    2013-01-29

    4-Deoxybostrycin is a natural anthraquinone compound isolated from the Mangrove endophytic fungus Nigrospora sp. collected from the South China Sea. Nigrosporin is the deoxy-derivative of 4-deoxybostrycin. They were tested against mycobacteria, especially Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion susceptibility test, they both had inhibition zone sizes of over 25 mm. The results of the absolute concentration susceptibility test suggested that they had inhibitory effects against mycobacteria. Moreover, 4-deoxybostrycin exhibited good inhibition which was even better than that of first line anti-tuberculosis (TB) drugs against some clinical multidrug-resistant (MDR) M. tuberculosis strains. The gene expression profile of M. tuberculosis H37Rv after treatment with 4-deoxybostrycin was compared with untreated bacteria. One hundred and nineteen out of 3,875 genes were significantly different in M. tuberculosis exposed to 4-deoxybostrycin from control. There were 46 functionally known genes which are involved in metabolism, information storage and processing and cellular processes. The differential expressions of six genes were further confirmed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The present study provides a useful experiment basis for exploitation of correlative new drugs against TB and for finding out new targets of anti-mycobacterial therapy.

  15. Streptococcus didelphis sp. nov., a streptococcus with marked catalase activity isolated from opossums (Didelphis virginiana) with suppurative dermatitis and liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rurangirwa, F R; Teitzel, C A; Cui, J; French, D M; McDonough, P L; Besser, T

    2000-03-01

    beta-Haemolytic, catalase-positive, Gram-positive cocci that formed chains in broth media but did not react with Lancefield group antisera were isolated from skin lesions, spleen, liver and lungs of nine opossums, including eight from a research colony and one from a wildlife rehabilitation organization. The isolates had vigorous catalase activity that was retained on initial passage on non-blood-containing media, but this activity was lost in subsequent passages. The use of standard phenotypic tests did not lead to satisfactory identification of these organisms beyond the genus level, even if the aberrant catalase reaction was not considered. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of the isolates was most similar (96%) to Streptococcus dysgalactiae, but distinct from that species as 16S rRNA gene similarity of different strains of S. dysgalactiae was > 99%. Characterization of biochemical reactions and cell-wall fatty acid profiles also revealed significant differences between the opossum isolates and all other known Streptococcus spp., thus it is proposed as a new species with the name Streptococcus didelphis, sp. nov. The type strain is ATCC 700828T.

  16. High Dietary Fat Selectively Increases Catalase Expression within Cardiac Mitochondria*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindler, Paul M.; Plafker, Scott M.; Szweda, Luke I.; Kinter, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a predictor of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. One consequence of obesity is dyslipidemia characterized by high blood triglycerides. It has been proposed that oxidative stress, driven by utilization of lipids for energy, contributes to these diseases. The effects of oxidative stress are mitigated by an endogenous antioxidant enzyme network, but little is known about its response to high fat utilization. Our experiments used a multiplexed quantitative proteomics method to measure antioxidant enzyme expression in heart tissue in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. This experiment showed a rapid and specific up-regulation of catalase protein, with subsequent assays showing increases in activity and mRNA. Catalase, traditionally considered a peroxisomal protein, was found to be present in cardiac mitochondria and significantly increased in content and activity during high fat feeding. These data, coupled with the fact that fatty acid oxidation enhances mitochondrial H2O2 production, suggest that a localized catalase increase is needed to consume excessive mitochondrial H2O2 produced by increased fat metabolism. To determine whether the catalase-specific response is a common feature of physiological conditions that increase blood triglycerides and fatty acid oxidation, we measured changes in antioxidant expression in fasted versus fed mice. Indeed, a similar specific catalase increase was observed in mice fasted for 24 h. Our findings suggest a fundamental metabolic process in which catalase expression is regulated to prevent damage while preserving an H2O2-mediated sensing of diet composition that appropriately adjusts insulin sensitivity in the short term as needed to prioritize lipid metabolism for complete utilization. PMID:23204527

  17. Characterization of the transcriptional profile in primary astrocytes after oxidative stress induced by Paraquat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Birgitte S. M. Thuesen; Clausen, Jørgen; Vang, Ole

    2008-01-01

    the antioxidative enzymes Mn- and CuZn superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase as well as the transcription factor component AP-1. Paraquat induced the expression of Mn- and CuZn SOD, catalase and decreases the expression of c-jun (a part of AP-1). Furthermore, the gene expression profiles were investigated after...

  18. Rapid susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by bioluminescence assay of mycobacterial ATP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, L.E.; Hoffner, S.E.; Ansehn, S.

    1988-01-01

    Mycobacterial growth was monitored by bioluminescence assay of mycobacterial ATP. Cultures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and of 25 clinical isolates of the same species were exposed to serial dilutions of ethambutol, isoniazid, rifampin, and streptomycin. A suppression of ATP, indicating growth inhibition, occurred for susceptible but not resistant strains within 5 to 7 days of incubation. Breakpoint concentrations between susceptibility and resistance were determined by comparing these results with those obtained by reference techniques. Full agreement was found in 99% of the assays with the resistance ratio method on Lowenstein-Jensen medium, and 98% of the assays were in full agreement with the radiometric system (BACTEC). A main advantage of the bioluminescence method is its rapidity, with results available as fast as with the radiometric system but at a lower cost and without the need for radioactive culture medium. The method provides kinetic data concerning drug effects within available in vivo drug concentrations and has great potential for both rapid routine susceptibility testing and research applications in studies of drug effects on mycobacteria

  19. Incorporation of carbohydrate residues into peroxidase isoenzymes in horseradish roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, J Y; Shannon, L M

    1973-11-01

    Sliced root tissue of the horseradish plant (Armoracia rusticana), when incubated with mannose-U-(14)C, incorporated radioactivity into peroxidase isoenzymes. Over 90% of the radioactivity in the highly purified peroxidase isoenzymes was present in the neutral sugar residues of the molecule, i.e. fucose, arabinose, xylose, mannose. When the root slices were incubated simultaneously with leucine-4,5-(3)H and mannose-U-(14)C, cycloheximide strongly inhibited leucine incorporation into the peptide portion of peroxidase isoenzymes but had little effect on the incorporation of (14)C into the neutral sugars. These results indicated that synthesis of the peptide portion of peroxidase was completed before the monosaccharide residues were attached to the molecule. This temporal relationship between the synthesis of protein and the attachment of carbohydrate residues in the plant glycoprotein, horseradish peroxidase, appears to be similar to that reported for glycoprotein biosynthesis in many mammalian systems.

  20. Macrophage and T cell dynamics during the development and disintegration of mycobacterial granulomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egen, Jackson G; Rothfuchs, Antonio Gigliotti; Feng, Carl G; Winter, Nathalie; Sher, Alan; Germain, Ronald N

    2008-02-01

    Granulomas play a key role in host protection against mycobacterial pathogens, with their breakdown contributing to exacerbated disease. To better understand the initiation and maintenance of these structures, we employed both high-resolution multiplex static imaging and intravital multiphoton microscopy of Mycobacterium bovis BCG-induced liver granulomas. We found that Kupffer cells directly capture blood-borne bacteria and subsequently nucleate formation of a nascent granuloma by recruiting both uninfected liver-resident macrophages and blood-derived monocytes. Within the mature granuloma, these myeloid cell populations formed a relatively immobile cellular matrix that interacted with a highly dynamic effector T cell population. The efficient recruitment of these T cells was highly dependent on TNF-alpha-derived signals, which also maintained the granuloma structure through preferential effects on uninfected macrophage populations. By characterizing the migration of both innate and adaptive immune cells throughout the process of granuloma development, these studies provide a new perspective on the cellular events involved in mycobacterial containment and escape.

  1. Arabidopsis ATP A2 peroxidase. Expression and high-resolution structure of a plant peroxidase with implications for lignification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, L; Teilum, K; Mirza, O

    2000-01-01

    Lignins are phenolic biopolymers synthesized by terrestrial, vascular plants for mechanical support and in response to pathogen attack. Peroxidases have been proposed to catalyse the dehydrogenative polymerization of monolignols into lignins, although no specific isoenzyme has been shown...... to be involved in lignin biosynthesis. Recently we isolated an extracellular anionic peroxidase, ATP A2, from rapidly lignifying Arabidopsis cell suspension culture and cloned its cDNA. Here we show that the Atp A2 promoter directs GUS reporter gene expression in lignified tissues of transgenic plants. Moreover......-coumaryl and coniferyl alcohols are preferred by ATP A2, while the oxidation of sinapyl alcohol will be sterically hindered in ATP A2 as well as in all other plant peroxidases due to an overlap with the conserved Pro-139. We suggest ATP A2 is involved in a complex regulation of the covalent cross-linking in the plant...

  2. Cloning, Expression, and Characterization of a Novel Thermophilic Monofunctional Catalase from Geobacillus sp. CHB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xianbo; Chen, Jichen; Lin, Chenqiang; Lin, Xinjian

    2016-01-01

    Catalases are widely used in many scientific areas. A catalase gene (Kat) from Geobacillus sp. CHB1 encoding a monofunctional catalase was cloned and recombinant expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli), which was the first time to clone and express this type of catalase of genus Geobacillus strains as far as we know. This Kat gene was 1,467 bp in length and encoded a catalase with 488 amino acid residuals, which is only 81% similar to the previously studied Bacillus sp. catalase in terms of amino acid sequence. Recombinant catalase was highly soluble in E. coli and made up 30% of the total E. coli protein. Fermentation broth of the recombinant E. coli showed a high catalase activity level up to 35,831 U/mL which was only lower than recombinant Bacillus sp. WSHDZ-01 among the reported catalase production strains. The purified recombinant catalase had a specific activity of 40,526 U/mg and K m of 51.1 mM. The optimal reaction temperature of this recombinant enzyme was 60°C to 70°C, and it exhibited high activity over a wide range of reaction temperatures, ranging from 10°C to 90°C. The enzyme retained 94.7% of its residual activity after incubation at 60°C for 1 hour. High yield and excellent thermophilic properties are valuable features for this catalase in industrial applications.

  3. Cloning, Expression, and Characterization of a Novel Thermophilic Monofunctional Catalase from Geobacillus sp. CHB1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Catalases are widely used in many scientific areas. A catalase gene (Kat) from Geobacillus sp. CHB1 encoding a monofunctional catalase was cloned and recombinant expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli), which was the first time to clone and express this type of catalase of genus Geobacillus strains as far as we know. This Kat gene was 1,467 bp in length and encoded a catalase with 488 amino acid residuals, which is only 81% similar to the previously studied Bacillus sp. catalase in terms of amino acid sequence. Recombinant catalase was highly soluble in E. coli and made up 30% of the total E. coli protein. Fermentation broth of the recombinant E. coli showed a high catalase activity level up to 35,831 U/mL which was only lower than recombinant Bacillus sp. WSHDZ-01 among the reported catalase production strains. The purified recombinant catalase had a specific activity of 40,526 U/mg and K m of 51.1 mM. The optimal reaction temperature of this recombinant enzyme was 60°C to 70°C, and it exhibited high activity over a wide range of reaction temperatures, ranging from 10°C to 90°C. The enzyme retained 94.7% of its residual activity after incubation at 60°C for 1 hour. High yield and excellent thermophilic properties are valuable features for this catalase in industrial applications. PMID:27579320

  4. Plasma interleukin-6 levels, glutathione peroxidase and isoprostane in obese women before and after weight loss. Association with cardiovascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougoulia, Maria; Triantos, Athanassios; Koliakos, George

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the levels of Interleukin-6 (IL-6), glutathione peroxidase and isoprostane in obese women and their association with markers of cardiovascular risk factors before and after weight loss. 36 healthy obese women of reproductive age (group A: age (mean+/-SD) 35.4+/-9.2 years, Body Mass Index (BMI) 38.5+/-7 kg/m2) and 30 healthy, normal weight women (group B: age mean+/-SD 34.9+/-7.4 y., BMI 24+/-1.1 kg/m2) were included in the study. Glucose tolerance was normal in all participating women. Il-6, glutathione peroxidase and isoprostane, C-Reactive Protein (CRP), insulin, fasting plasma glucose, HOMA-IR as well as the lipid profile were evaluated. Body weight, BMI, Waist to Hip ratio (W/H) ratio, Waist Circumference (WC), %free fat mass and the %fat mass were also measured. A hypo-caloric diet was prescribed for the obese women and all participants were re-examined after six months. In obese women after weight loss, anthropometric obesity markers (BMI, W/H ratio), %fat, lipid profile, insulin levels and inflammation indices such as IL-6 and CRP, the oxidative stress index isoprostane, as well as glutathione peroxidase were significantly ameliorated. The levels of serum glutathione peroxidase activity were negatively correlated with IL-6 levels and were significantly increased after weight reduction. In obese women there was an association between IL-6 levels and the values of %fat, %free fat mass, insulin and HOMA-IR before and after weight loss. Weight loss is related to reduction of oxidative stress and inflammation; this beneficial effect could possibly be translated into reduction of cardiovascular risk in obese individuals.

  5. Identification of drug susceptibility pattern and mycobacterial species in sputum smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients with and without HIV co-infection in north west Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mekonen, Mekdem; Abate, Ebba; Aseffa, Abraham

    2010-01-01

    Ethiopia is among the high-burden countries of tuberculosis (TB) in the world Since mycobacterial culture and susceptibility testing are not routinely performed in Ethiopia, recent data on susceptibility patterns and the mycobacterial species cultured from sputum smear positive patients are limited....

  6. Mechanism of inhibition of catalase by nitro and nitroso compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, V Yu; Petrenko, Yu M; Vanin, A F

    2008-01-01

    Dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNIC) with thiolate ligands and S-nitrosothiols, which are NO and NO+ donors, share the earlier demonstrated ability of nitrite for inhibition of catalase. The efficiency of inhibition sharply (by several orders in concentration of these agents) increases in the presence of chloride, bromide, and thiocyanate. The nitro compounds tested--nitroarginine, nitroglycerol, nitrophenol, and furazolidone--gained the same inhibition ability after incubation with ferrous ions and thiols. This is probably the result of their transformation into DNIC. None of these substances lost the inhibitory effect in the presence of the well known NO scavenger oxyhemoglobin. This fact suggests that NO+ ions rather than neutral NO molecules are responsible for the enzyme inactivation due to nitrosation of its structures. The enhancement of catalase inhibition in the presence of halide ions and thiocyanate might be caused by nitrosyl halide formation. The latter protected nitrosonium ions against hydrolysis, thereby ensuring their transfer to the targets in enzyme molecules. The addition of oxyhemoglobin plus iron chelator o-phenanthroline destroying DNIC sharply attenuated the inhibitory effect of DNIC on catalase. o-Phenanthroline added alone did not influence this effect. Oxyhemoglobin is suggested to scavenge nitrosonium ions released from decomposing DNIC, thereby preventing catalase nitrosation. The mixture of oxyhemoglobin and o-phenanthroline did not affect the inhibitory action of nitrite or S-nitrosothiols on catalase.

  7. Atividade relativa da catalase de losna-branca (Parthenium hysterophorus comparada à de outras espécies daninhas Catalase relative activity of ragweed (Parthenium hysterophorus compared to that of other weed species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.J.P. Carvalho

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho foi desenvolvido com o objetivo de avaliar a atividade relativa da catalase em extrato aquoso de losna-branca (Parthenium hysterophorus, bem como comparála à atividade da catalase de outras espécies daninhas. O trabalho constou de três fases, que envolveram a padronização do método, comparação da atividade relativa da catalase de plantas da família Asteraceae e comparação com outras 11 espécies daninhas, sendo estas: Euphorbia heterophylla, Alternanthera tenella, Cenchrus echinatus, Panicum maximum, Amaranthus viridis, Ipomoea hederifolia, Galinsoga parviflora, Bidens pilosa, Sonchus oleraceus, Cyperus rotundus e Commelina benghalensis. Observou-se resposta linear crescente da reação entre extrato aquoso de losna-branca e peróxido de hidrogênio, em razão da concentração do extrato vegetal. Em todas as fases, a atividade relativa da catalase de extrato de losna-branca foi superior à atividade da catalase das demais espécies daninhas. Com os dados obtidos nas três fases, conclui-se que a maior atividade relativa observada para a catalase da losnabranca contribui significativamente para a tolerância dessa espécie ao herbicida paraquat. Essa maior atividade pode ser consequência da maior concentração enzimática nas células ou devido à maior atividade intrínseca da enzima (afinidade enzima-substrato, havendo necessidade de estudos mais precisos para essa conclusão.This work was carried out to evaluate catalase relative activity of ragweed (Parthenium hysterophorus aqueous extract, as well as to compare it with catalase activity of other weed species. It consisted of three phases, involving method standardization, comparison of the catalase relative activity in Asteraceae family plants and that of ragweed catalase activity with the following 11 weed species: Euphorbia heterophylla, Alternanthera tenella, Cenchrus echinatus, Panicum maximum, Amaranthus viridis, Ipomoea hederifolia, Galinsoga parviflora

  8. Hydrogen peroxide scavenger, catalase, alleviates ion transport dysfunction in murine colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Kim E; McCole, Declan F

    2016-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) contribute to epithelial damage and ion transport dysfunction (key events in inflammatory diarrhoea) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aim of this study was to identify if H 2 O 2 mediates suppression of colonic ion transport function in the murine dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) colitis model by using the H 2 O 2 degrading enzyme, catalase. Colitis was induced by administering DSS (4%) in drinking water for 5 days followed by 3 days on normal H 2 O. Mice were administered either pegylated catalase or saline at day -1, 0 and +1 of DSS treatment. Ion transport responses to the Ca 2+ -dependent agonist, carbachol (CCh), or the cAMP-dependent agonist, forskolin, were measured across distal colonic mucosa mounted in Ussing chambers. Parameters of DSS-induced inflammation (loss in body weight, decreased colon length, altered stool consistency), were only partially alleviated by catalase while histology was only minimally improved. However, catalase significantly reversed the DSS-induced reduction in baseline ion transport as well as colonic I sc responses to CCh. However, ion transport responses to forskolin were not significantly restored. Catalase also reduced activation of ERK MAP kinase in the setting of colitis, and increased expression of the Na + -K + -2Cl - cotransporter, NKCC1, consistent with restoration of ion transport function. Ex vivo treatment of inflamed colonic mucosae with catalase also partially restored ion transport function. Therefore, catalase partially prevents, and rescues, the loss of ion transport properties in DSS colitis even in the setting of unresolved tissue inflammation. These findings indicate a prominent role for ROS in ion transport dysfunction in colitis and may suggest novel strategies for the treatment of inflammatory diarrhoea. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Sequence and RT-PCR expression analysis of two peroxidases from Arabidopsis thaliana belonging to a novel evolutionary branch of plant peroxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjaersgård, I V; Jespersen, H M; Rasmussen, S K; Welinder, K G

    1997-03-01

    cDNA clones encoding two new Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidases, ATP 1a and ATP 2a, have been identified by searching the Arabidopsis database of expressed sequence tags (dbEST). They represent a novel branch of hitherto uncharacterized plant peroxidases which is only 35% identical in amino acid sequence to the well characterized group of basic plant peroxidases represented by the horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) isoperoxidases HRP C, HRP E5 and the similar Arabidopsis isoperoxidases ATP Ca, ATP Cb, and ATP Ea. However ATP 1a is 87% identical in amino acid sequence to a peroxidase encoded by an mRNA isolated from cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). As cotton and Arabidopsis belong to rather diverse families (Malvaceae and Crucifereae, respectively), in contrast with Arabidopsis and horseradish (both Crucifereae), the high degree of sequence identity indicates that this novel type of peroxidase, albeit of unknown function, is likely to be widespread in plant species. The atp 1 and atp 2 types of cDNA sequences were the most redundant among the 28 different isoperoxidases identified among about 200 peroxidase encoding ESTs. Interestingly, 8 out of totally 38 EST sequences coding for ATP 1 showed three identical nucleotide substitutions. This variant form is designated ATP 1b. Similarly, six out of totally 16 EST sequences coding for ATP 2 showed a number of deletions and nucleotide changes. This variant form is designated ATP 2b. The selected EST clones are full-length and contain coding regions of 993 nucleotides for atp 1a, and 984 nucleotides for atp 2a. These regions show 61% DNA sequence identity. The predicted mature proteins ATP 1a, and ATP 2a are 57% identical in sequence and contain the structurally and functionally important residues, characteristic of the plant peroxidase superfamily. However, they do show two differences of importance to peroxidase catalysis: (1) the asparagine residue linked with the active site distal histidine via hydrogen bonding is absent

  10. Role of antioxidant scavenging enzymes and extracellular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ChithrashreeGS

    2012-08-23

    Aug 23, 2012 ... peroxidase are two important antioxidant scavenging enzymes involved in ... Catalase was assayed using the method of Beers and Sizer. (1951) with .... yeast dextrose calcium carbonate agar (YDC) medium. Catalase and ...

  11. Inhibition of Catalase by Tea Catechins in Free and Cellular State: A Biophysical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Sandip; Dey, Subrata Kumar; Saha, Chabita

    2014-01-01

    Tea flavonoids bind to variety of enzymes and inhibit their activities. In the present study, binding and inhibition of catalase activity by catechins with respect to their structure-affinity relationship has been elucidated. Fluorimetrically determined binding constants for (−)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and (−)-epicatechin gallate (ECG) with catalase were observed to be 2.27×106 M−1 and 1.66×106 M−1, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters evidence exothermic and spontaneous interaction between catechins and catalase. Major forces of interaction are suggested to be through hydrogen bonding along with electrostatic contributions and conformational changes. Distinct loss of α-helical structure of catalase by interaction with EGCG was captured in circular dichroism (CD) spectra. Gallated catechins demonstrated higher binding constants and inhibition efficacy than non-gallated catechins. EGCG exhibited maximum inhibition of pure catalase. It also inhibited cellular catalase in K562 cancer cells with significant increase in cellular ROS and suppression of cell viability (IC50 54.5 µM). These results decipher the molecular mechanism by which tea catechins interact with catalase and highlight the potential of gallated catechin like EGCG as an anticancer drug. EGCG may have other non-specific targets in the cell, but its anticancer property is mainly defined by ROS accumulation due to catalase inhibition. PMID:25025898

  12. Overexpression of Catalase in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Prevents the Formation of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parastatidis, Ioannis; Weiss, Daiana; Joseph, Giji; Taylor, W Robert

    2013-01-01

    Objective Elevated levels of oxidative stress have been reported in abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), but which reactive oxygen species (ROS) promotes the development of AAA remains unclear. Here we investigate the effect of the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) degrading enzyme catalase on the formation of AAA. Approach and Results AAA were induced with the application of calcium chloride (CaCl2) on mouse infrarenal aortas. The administration of PEG-catalase, but not saline, attenuated the loss of tunica media and protected against AAA formation (0.91±0.1 mm vs. 0.76±0.09 mm). Similarly, in a transgenic mouse model, catalase over-expression in the vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) preserved the thickness of tunica media and inhibited aortic dilatation by 50% (0.85±0.14 mm vs. 0.57±0.08 mm). Further studies showed that injury with CaCl2 decreased catalase expression and activity in the aortic wall. Pharmacologic administration or genetic over-expression of catalase restored catalase activity and subsequently decreased matrix metalloproteinase activity. In addition, a profound reduction in inflammatory markers and VSMC apoptosis was evident in aortas of catalase over-expressing mice. Interestingly, as opposed to infusion of PEG-catalase, chronic over-expression of catalase in VSMC did not alter the total aortic H2O2 levels. Conclusions The data suggest that a reduction in aortic wall catalase activity can predispose to AAA formation. Restoration of catalase activity in the vascular wall enhances aortic VSMC survival and prevents AAA formation primarily through modulation of matrix metalloproteinase activity. PMID:23950141

  13. Destructive effect of non-enzymatic glycation on catalase and remediation via curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mofidi Najjar, Fayezeh; Taghavi, Fereshteh; Ghadari, Rahim; Sheibani, Nader; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2017-09-15

    Non-enzymatic glycation of proteins is a post-translational modification that is produced by a covalent binding between reducing sugars and amino groups of lysine and arginine residues. In this paper the effect of pathological conditions, derived from hyperglycemia on bovine liver catalase (BLC) as a model protein was considered by measuring enzyme activity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and changes in catalase conformational properties. We observed that in the presence of glucose, the catalase activity gradually decreased. ROS generation was also involved in the glycation process. Thus, decreased BLC activity was partly considered as a result of ROS generation through glycation. However, in the presence of curcumin the amount of ROS was reduced resulting in increased activity of the glycated catalase. The effect of high glucose level and the potential inhibitory effect of curcumin on aggregation and structural changes of catalase were also investigated. Molecular dynamic simulations also showed that interaction of catalase with curcumin resulted in changes in accessible surface area (ASA) and pKa, two effective parameters of glycation, in potential glycation lysine residues. Thus, the decrease in ASA and increase in pKa of important lysine residues were considered as predominant factors in decreased glycation of BLC by curcumin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Expression, purification and characterization of a peroxidase from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Peroxidase is one of the key enzymes of the cellular antioxidant defense system, which is mostly involved in the reduction of hydrogen peroxide. Here, a peroxidase gene, named ThPOD1 was isolated from a cDNA library, which was generated from root tissue of Tamarix hispida that was exposed to 0.4 M NaCl. The cDNA ...

  15. Location of catalase in crystalline peroxisomes of methanol-grown Hansenula polymorpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keizer, Ineke; Roggenkamp, Rainer; Harder, Willem; Veenhuis, Marten

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the intraperoxisomal location of catalase in peroxisomes of methanol-grown Hansenula polymorpha by (immuno)cytochemical means. In completely crystalline peroxisomes, in which the crystalline matrix is composed of octameric alcohol oxidase (AO) molecules, most of the catalase protein

  16. Optimization of lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase, and Lac production from Ganoderma lucidum under solid state fermentation of pineapple leaf

    OpenAIRE

    Sudha Hariharan; Padma Nambisan

    2013-01-01

    This study was undertaken to isolate ligninase-producing white-rot fungi for use in the extraction of fibre from pineapple leaf agriwaste. Fifteen fungal strains were isolated from dead tree trunks and leaf litter. Ligninolytic enzymes (lignin peroxidase (LiP), manganese peroxidase (MnP), and laccase (Lac)), were produced by solid-state fermentation (SSF) using pineapple leaves as the substrate. Of the isolated strains, the one showing maximum production of ligninolytic enzymes was identified...

  17. Improving catalase-based propelled motor endurance by enzyme encapsulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmchen, Juliane; Baeza, Alejandro; Ruiz-Molina, Daniel; Vallet-Regí, Maria

    2014-07-01

    Biocatalytic propulsion is expected to play an important role in the future of micromotors as it might drastically increase the number of available fuelling reactions. However, most of the enzyme-propelled micromotors so far reported still rely on the degradation of peroxide by catalase, in spite of being vulnerable to relatively high peroxide concentrations. To overcome this limitation, herein we present a strategy to encapsulate the catalase and to graft the resulting enzyme capsules on motor particles. Significant improvement of the stability in the presence of peroxide and other aggressive agents has been observed.Biocatalytic propulsion is expected to play an important role in the future of micromotors as it might drastically increase the number of available fuelling reactions. However, most of the enzyme-propelled micromotors so far reported still rely on the degradation of peroxide by catalase, in spite of being vulnerable to relatively high peroxide concentrations. To overcome this limitation, herein we present a strategy to encapsulate the catalase and to graft the resulting enzyme capsules on motor particles. Significant improvement of the stability in the presence of peroxide and other aggressive agents has been observed. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02459a

  18. Bioactive constituents from "triguero" asparagus improve the plasma lipid profile and liver antioxidant status in hypercholesterolemic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Castilla, Sara; De la Puerta, Rocío; Garcia Gimenez, María Dolores; Fernández-Arche, María Angeles; Guillén-Bejarano, Rafael

    2013-10-24

    We have previously shown that the Andalusian-cultivated Asparagus officinalis L. "triguero" variety produces hypocholesterolemic and hepatoprotective effects on rats. This asparagus is a rich source of phytochemicals although we hypothesized there would be some of them more involved in these functional properties. Thus, we aimed to study the effects of asparagus (500 mg/kg body weight (bw)/day) and their partially purified fractions in flavonoids (50 mg/kg bw/day), saponins (5 mg/kg bw/day) and dietary fiber (500 mg/kg bw/day) on oxidative status and on lipid profile in rats fed a cholesterol-rich diet. After 5 weeks treatment, plasma lipid values, hepatic enzyme activities and liver malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations were measured. With the exception of the saponin fraction (SF), the administration of lyophilized asparagus (LA), fiber fraction (FF), and flavonoid fraction (FVF) to hypercholesterolemic rats produced a significant hypolipidemic effect compare to a high-cholesterol diet (HCD). In addition, the LA and FVF groups exhibited a significant increase in enzyme activity from multiple hepatic antioxidant systems including: superoxide dismutase, catalase, and gluthatione reductase/peroxidase as well as a decrease in MDA concentrations compared to HCD group. These results demonstrate that "triguero" asparagus possesses bioactive constituents, especially dietary fiber and flavonoids, that improve the plasma lipid profile and prevent hepatic oxidative damage under conditions of hypercholesterolemia.

  19. A Twist on Measuring Catalase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryer, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    "Catalase," an enzyme found in both plant and animal cells, prevents the accumulation of toxic levels of hydrogen peroxide (H[subscript 2]O[subscript 2]) by catalyzing its decomposition to water and oxygen gas. Because this enzyme is ubiquitous, it is frequently used in high school biology laboratories to explore enzyme reactions. This…

  20. Peroxidase gene discovery from the horseradish transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Näätsaari, Laura; Krainer, Florian W; Schubert, Michael; Glieder, Anton; Thallinger, Gerhard G

    2014-03-24

    Horseradish peroxidases (HRPs) from Armoracia rusticana have long been utilized as reporters in various diagnostic assays and histochemical stainings. Regardless of their increasing importance in the field of life sciences and suggested uses in medical applications, chemical synthesis and other industrial applications, the HRP isoenzymes, their substrate specificities and enzymatic properties are poorly characterized. Due to lacking sequence information of natural isoenzymes and the low levels of HRP expression in heterologous hosts, commercially available HRP is still extracted as a mixture of isoenzymes from the roots of A. rusticana. In this study, a normalized, size-selected A. rusticana transcriptome library was sequenced using 454 Titanium technology. The resulting reads were assembled into 14871 isotigs with an average length of 1133 bp. Sequence databases, ORF finding and ORF characterization were utilized to identify peroxidase genes from the 14871 isotigs generated by de novo assembly. The sequences were manually reviewed and verified with Sanger sequencing of PCR amplified genomic fragments, resulting in the discovery of 28 secretory peroxidases, 23 of them previously unknown. A total of 22 isoenzymes including allelic variants were successfully expressed in Pichia pastoris and showed peroxidase activity with at least one of the substrates tested, thus enabling their development into commercial pure isoenzymes. This study demonstrates that transcriptome sequencing combined with sequence motif search is a powerful concept for the discovery and quick supply of new enzymes and isoenzymes from any plant or other eukaryotic organisms. Identification and manual verification of the sequences of 28 HRP isoenzymes do not only contribute a set of peroxidases for industrial, biological and biomedical applications, but also provide valuable information on the reliability of the approach in identifying and characterizing a large group of isoenzymes.

  1. Comparable effects in the radiolysis and ultrasound sonolysis of aqueous solutions of catalase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarrach, D.; Siefke, B.

    1987-01-01

    Catalase was desactivated in aqueous solution by irradiation with gamma-rays or ultrasound with nearly equal yields, if the applied doses were related to the response of a chemical dosimeter. The decrease of the enzymatic activity proceeded in parallel to the release of 125 iodine from 125 I-(iodo)-catalase. The same competition kinetics were observed in the radiolytic and sonolytic bleaching of p-nitrosodimethylaniline in the presence of catalase. It is concluded that OH-radicals were responsible for the sonolytic destruction of catalase. Phospholipids exerted a protective effect which may be useful in the preparation of liposomes as carriers of macromolecules. (author)

  2. KatB, a cyanobacterial Mn-catalase with unique active site configuration: Implications for enzyme function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihani, Subhash C; Chakravarty, Dhiman; Ballal, Anand

    2016-04-01

    Manganese catalases (Mn-catalases), a class of H2O2 detoxifying proteins, are structurally and mechanistically distinct from the commonly occurring catalases, which contain heme. Active site of Mn-catalases can serve as template for the synthesis of catalase mimetics for therapeutic intervention in oxidative stress related disorders. However, unlike the heme catalases, structural aspects of Mn-catalases remain inadequately explored. The genome of the ancient cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC7120, shows the presence of two Mn-catalases, KatA and KatB. Here, we report the biochemical and structural characterization of KatB. The KatB protein (with a C-terminal his-tag) was over-expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography. On the addition of Mn(2+) to the E. coli growth medium, a substantial increase in production of the soluble KatB protein was observed. The purified KatB protein was an efficient catalase, which was relatively insensitive to inhibition by azide. Crystal structure of KatB showed a hexameric assembly with four-helix bundle fold, characteristic of the Ferritin-like superfamily. With canonical Glu4His2 coordination geometry and two terminal water ligands, the KatB active site was distinctly different from that of other Mn-catalases. Interestingly, the KatB active site closely resembled the active sites of ruberythrin/bacterioferritin, bi-iron members of the Ferritin-like superfamily. The KatB crystal structure provided fundamental insights into the evolutionary relationship within the Ferritin-like superfamily and further showed that Mn-catalases can be sub-divided into two groups, each with a distinct active site configuration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Catalase inhibition an anti cancer property of flavonoids: A kinetic and structural evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Debashis; Das, Asmita; Saha, Chabita

    2017-11-01

    Flavonoids are dietary polyphenols that present abundantly in fruits and vegetables. Flavonoids have inhibitory effects on enzymes and catalase is one among them. Catalase is a common enzyme ubiquitously found in all living organisms exposed to oxygen. It catalyzes the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen (2H 2 O 2 →2H 2 O+O 2 ) . Inhibition of pure and cellular catalase from K562 cells by flavonoids was similar and exhibited the following efficacy; Myrecetin>Quercetin>Kaempferol and Quercetin>Luteolin>Apigenin demonstrating structure activity relationship. Circular Dichroism (CD) spectra have shown distinct loss in α-helical structure of the catalase on interaction with the flavonoids. All flavonoids inhibited the catalase activity by uncompetitive mechanism. The K m and V max values of pure catalase were observed to be 294mM -1 and 0.222mM -1 s -1 respectively and on inhibition with myrecetin the values decreased to a minimum of 23mM -1 and 0.014mM -1 s -1 respectively. Inhibition of catalase will directly results in increased production of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and pro-oxidant property of flavonoids. This inhibition was reversed in presence of Cu 2+ ions because of the chelating affect of flavonoids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy for IFNγR1 deficiency protects mice from mycobacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzel, Miriam; Mucci, Adele; Blank, Patrick; Nguyen, Ariane Hai Ha; Schiller, Jan; Halle, Olga; Kühnel, Mark-Philipp; Billig, Sandra; Meineke, Robert; Brand, Daniel; Herder, Vanessa; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Bange, Franz-Christoph; Goethe, Ralph; Jonigk, Danny; Förster, Reinhold; Gentner, Bernhard; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Bustamante, Jacinta; Schambach, Axel; Kalinke, Ulrich; Lachmann, Nico

    2018-02-01

    Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease is a rare primary immunodeficiency characterized by severe infections caused by weakly virulent mycobacteria. Biallelic null mutations in genes encoding interferon gamma receptor 1 or 2 ( IFNGR1 or IFNGR2 ) result in a life-threatening disease phenotype in early childhood. Recombinant interferon γ (IFN-γ) therapy is inefficient, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has a poor prognosis. Thus, we developed a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy approach using lentiviral vectors that express Ifnγr1 either constitutively or myeloid specifically. Transduction of mouse Ifnγr1 -/- HSCs led to stable IFNγR1 expression on macrophages, which rescued their cellular responses to IFN-γ. As a consequence, genetically corrected HSC-derived macrophages were able to suppress T-cell activation and showed restored antimycobacterial activity against Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) in vitro. Transplantation of genetically corrected HSCs into Ifnγr1 -/- mice before BCG infection prevented manifestations of severe BCG disease and maintained lung and spleen organ integrity, which was accompanied by a reduced mycobacterial burden in lung and spleen and a prolonged overall survival in animals that received a transplant. In summary, we demonstrate an HSC-based gene therapy approach for IFNγR1 deficiency, which protects mice from severe mycobacterial infections, thereby laying the foundation for a new therapeutic intervention in corresponding human patients. © 2018 by The American Society of Hematology.

  5. ESTHETIC OUTCOME OF SURGICAL EXCISION VERSUS ANTIBIOTIC THERAPY FOR NONTUBERCULOUS MYCOBACTERIAL CERVICOFACIAL LYMPHADENITIS IN CHILDREN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindeboom, Jerome A.; Lindeboom, Robert; Bruijnesteijn van Coppenraet, Elisabeth S.; Kuijper, Ed J.; Tuk, Jacco; Prins, Jan M.

    2009-01-01

    One hundred children with microbiologically proven nontuberculous mycobacterial cervicofacial lymphadenitis were randomly assigned to excision of the involved lymph nodes, or antibiotic therapy consisting of clarithromycin and rifabutin. The esthetic outcome was rated using a revised and weighted

  6. Esthetic outcome of surgical excision versus antibiotic therapy for nontuberculous mycobacterial cervicofacial lymphadenitis in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindeboom, J.A.; Lindeboom, R.; Bruijnesteijn van Coppenraet, E.S.; Kuijper, E.J.; Tuk, J.; Prins, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    One hundred children with microbiologically proven nontuberculous mycobacterial cervicofacial lymphadenitis were randomly assigned to excision of the involved lymph nodes, or antibiotic therapy consisting of clarithromycin and rifabutin. The esthetic outcome was rated using a revised and weighted

  7. Catalase reverses tumorigenicity in a malignant cell line by an epidermal growth factor receptor pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Joanne S; Tome, Margaret E; Kwei, Kevin A; Bowden, G Tim

    2006-03-01

    We have used a keratinocyte in vivo/in vitro cell model to test the hypothesis that hydrogen peroxide acts as a signaling molecule, contributing to proliferation and tumorigenesis. A cell line, 6M90, that produces squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), has high levels of ROS and low levels of catalase. A new cell line, MTOC2, generated from parental 6M90 cells by introduction of a Tet-responsive catalase transgene, effectively expressed higher peroxisomal catalase. Increased catalase expression diminished constitutive ROS and enhanced viability after treatment with hydrogen peroxide. Protein tyrosine phosphatase activity was higher in the MTOC2 cells with high catalase, consistent with detection of a lower level of phosphorylation at tyrosine 1068 of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R). Transcription of downstream c-fos, AP-1 transactivation and cell proliferation were higher in the low catalase cells. An EGF-R inhibitor, AG1478, blocks the higher AP-1 transactivation and cell proliferation of the low catalase 6M90 cells. Tumorigenesis in SCID mice was greatly diminished in the high catalase cells. Our data suggest that hydrogen peroxide functions as a signaling molecule that can modulate activity of a protein tyrosine phosphatase/(s) resulting in phosphorylation of tryrosine/(s) on the EGF-R. Therefore, catalase acts as a tumor-suppressor gene in part by decreasing EGF-R signaling.

  8. Soluble epoxide hydrolase contamination of specific catalase preparations inhibits epoxyeicosatrienoic acid vasodilation of rat renal arterioles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Lauren; Harder, Adam; Isbell, Marilyn; Imig, John D.; Gutterman, David D.; Falck, J. R.; Campbell, William B.

    2011-01-01

    Cytochrome P-450 metabolites of arachidonic acid, the epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), are important signaling molecules in the kidney. In renal arteries, EETs cause vasodilation whereas H2O2 causes vasoconstriction. To determine the physiological contribution of H2O2, catalase is used to inactivate H2O2. However, the consequence of catalase action on EET vascular activity has not been determined. In rat renal afferent arterioles, 14,15-EET caused concentration-related dilations that were inhibited by Sigma bovine liver (SBL) catalase (1,000 U/ml) but not Calbiochem bovine liver (CBL) catalase (1,000 U/ml). SBL catalase inhibition was reversed by the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitor tAUCB (1 μM). In 14,15-EET incubations, SBL catalase caused a concentration-related increase in a polar metabolite. Using mass spectrometry, the metabolite was identified as 14,15-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid (14,15-DHET), the inactive sEH metabolite. 14,15-EET hydrolysis was not altered by the catalase inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (3-ATZ; 10–50 mM), but was abolished by the sEH inhibitor BIRD-0826 (1–10 μM). SBL catalase EET hydrolysis showed a regioisomer preference with greatest hydrolysis of 14,15-EET followed by 11,12-, 8,9- and 5,6-EET (Vmax = 0.54 ± 0.07, 0.23 ± 0.06, 0.18 ± 0.01 and 0.08 ± 0.02 ng DHET·U catalase−1·min−1, respectively). Of five different catalase preparations assayed, EET hydrolysis was observed with two Sigma liver catalases. These preparations had low specific catalase activity and positive sEH expression. Mass spectrometric analysis of the SBL catalase identified peptide fragments matching bovine sEH. Collectively, these data indicate that catalase does not affect EET-mediated dilation of renal arterioles. However, some commercial catalase preparations are contaminated with sEH, and these contaminated preparations diminish the biological activity of H2O2 and EETs. PMID:21753077

  9. The critical role of catalase in prooxidant and antioxidant function of p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, M Y; Kim, H-B; Piao, C; Lee, K H; Hyun, J W; Chang, I-Y; You, H J

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is an important regulator of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, although downstream mediators of p53 remain to be elucidated. Here, we show that p53 and its downstream targets, p53-inducible ribonucleotide reductase (p53R2) and p53-inducible gene 3 (PIG3), physically and functionally interact with catalase for efficient regulation of intracellular ROS, depending on stress intensity. Under physiological conditions, the antioxidant functions of p53 are mediated by p53R2, which maintains increased catalase activity and thereby protects against endogenous ROS. After genotoxic stress, high levels of p53 and PIG3 cooperate to inhibit catalase activity, leading to a shift in the oxidant/antioxidant balance toward an oxidative status, which could augment apoptotic cell death. These results highlight the essential role of catalase in p53-mediated ROS regulation and suggest that the p53/p53R2–catalase and p53/PIG3–catalase pathways are critically involved in intracellular ROS regulation under physiological conditions and during the response to DNA damage, respectively. PMID:22918438

  10. Bioactive Constituents from “Triguero” Asparagus Improve the Plasma Lipid Profile and Liver Antioxidant Status in Hypercholesterolemic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Castilla, Sara; De la Puerta, Rocío; Giménez, María Dolores García; Fernández-Arche, María Angeles; Guillén-Bejarano, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that the Andalusian-cultivated Asparagus officinalis L. “triguero” variety produces hypocholesterolemic and hepatoprotective effects on rats. This asparagus is a rich source of phytochemicals although we hypothesized there would be some of them more involved in these functional properties. Thus, we aimed to study the effects of asparagus (500 mg/kg body weight (bw)/day) and their partially purified fractions in flavonoids (50 mg/kg bw/day), saponins (5 mg/kg bw/day) and dietary fiber (500 mg/kg bw/day) on oxidative status and on lipid profile in rats fed a cholesterol-rich diet. After 5 weeks treatment, plasma lipid values, hepatic enzyme activities and liver malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations were measured. With the exception of the saponin fraction (SF), the administration of lyophilized asparagus (LA), fiber fraction (FF), and flavonoid fraction (FVF) to hypercholesterolemic rats produced a significant hypolipidemic effect compare to a high-cholesterol diet (HCD). In addition, the LA and FVF groups exhibited a significant increase in enzyme activity from multiple hepatic antioxidant systems including: superoxide dismutase, catalase, and gluthatione reductase/peroxidase as well as a decrease in MDA concentrations compared to HCD group. These results demonstrate that “triguero” asparagus possesses bioactive constituents, especially dietary fiber and flavonoids, that improve the plasma lipid profile and prevent hepatic oxidative damage under conditions of hypercholesterolemia. PMID:24284391

  11. Bioactive Constituents from “Triguero” Asparagus Improve the Plasma Lipid Profile and Liver Antioxidant Status in Hypercholesterolemic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Guillén-Bejarano

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that the Andalusian-cultivated Asparagus officinalis L. “triguero” variety produces hypocholesterolemic and hepatoprotective effects on rats. This asparagus is a rich source of phytochemicals although we hypothesized there would be some of them more involved in these functional properties. Thus, we aimed to study the effects of asparagus (500 mg/kg body weight (bw/day and their partially purified fractions in flavonoids (50 mg/kg bw/day, saponins (5 mg/kg bw/day and dietary fiber (500 mg/kg bw/day on oxidative status and on lipid profile in rats fed a cholesterol-rich diet. After 5 weeks treatment, plasma lipid values, hepatic enzyme activities and liver malondialdehyde (MDA concentrations were measured. With the exception of the saponin fraction (SF, the administration of lyophilized asparagus (LA, fiber fraction (FF, and flavonoid fraction (FVF to hypercholesterolemic rats produced a significant hypolipidemic effect compare to a high-cholesterol diet (HCD. In addition, the LA and FVF groups exhibited a significant increase in enzyme activity from multiple hepatic antioxidant systems including: superoxide dismutase, catalase, and gluthatione reductase/peroxidase as well as a decrease in MDA concentrations compared to HCD group. These results demonstrate that “triguero” asparagus possesses bioactive constituents, especially dietary fiber and flavonoids, that improve the plasma lipid profile and prevent hepatic oxidative damage under conditions of hypercholesterolemia.

  12. Identification of protective postexposure mycobacterial vaccine antigens using an immunosuppression-based reactivation model in the zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henna Myllymäki

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Roughly one third of the human population carries a latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, with a 5-10% lifetime risk of reactivation to active tuberculosis and further spreading the disease. The mechanisms leading to the reactivation of a latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection are insufficiently understood. Here, we used a natural fish pathogen, Mycobacterium marinum, to model the reactivation of a mycobacterial infection in the adult zebrafish (Danio rerio. A low-dose intraperitoneal injection (∼40 colony-forming units led to a latent infection, with mycobacteria found in well-organized granulomas surrounded by a thick layer of fibrous tissue. A latent infection could be reactivated by oral dexamethasone treatment, which led to disruption of the granuloma structures and dissemination of bacteria. This was associated with the depletion of lymphocytes, especially CD4+ T cells. Using this model, we verified that ethambutol is effective against an active disease but not a latent infection. In addition, we screened 15 mycobacterial antigens as postexposure DNA vaccines, of which RpfB and MMAR_4207 reduced bacterial burdens upon reactivation, as did the Ag85-ESAT-6 combination. In conclusion, the adult zebrafish-M. marinum infection model provides a feasible tool for examining the mechanisms of reactivation in mycobacterial infections, and for screening vaccine and drug candidates. This article has an associated First Person interview with the first author of the paper.

  13. Increased serum anti-mycobacterial antibody titers in rheumatoid arthritis patients: Is there any specific antigenic target?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cetin, Emel S.; Aksoy, Ali M

    2007-01-01

    Objective was to investigate the presence of immunoreactivity against mycobacterial antigens in the sera of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (Ra) and to detect the target of the immune reaction. This study was carried out on 60 patients with RA, and 25 patients with no joint diseases in the laboratory of Clinical Microbiology Department of Ankara University Medical Faculty, Ankara, Turkey between July 2003 to January 2004. Secreted and cellular antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) H37Rv and Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) were isolated and purified by high performance liquid chromatography to antigenic fractions. The immunoreactivity of patient and control sera against these antigens were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Immunoreactivity against mycobacterial antigens in RA patients were significantly higher than controls. Significant difference between patients and controls has been determined with M. bovis Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) culture fluid and sonicate antigens, but not with M. tuberculosis H37Rv. This suggests that the antigen triggering immune response in patients with RA may belong to or mainly expressed on M. bovis BCG. The ELISA results showed significant difference between RA patients and controls with all antigenic fractions. Presence of increased immunoreactivity against mycobacterial antigens in the sera of patients with RA was detected. When statistical analysis was considered, we cannot put forward any antigenic fraction alone as the one responsible for the increased reactivity. (author)

  14. Low dose X -ray effects on catalase activity in animal tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focea, R.; Nadejde, C.; Creanga, D.; Luchian, T.

    2012-12-01

    This study was intended to investigate the effect of low-dose X ray-irradiation upon the activity of catalase (CAT) in freshly excised chicken tissues (liver, kidney, brain, muscle). The tissue samples were irradiated with 0.5Gy and 2Gy respectively, in a 6 MV photon beam produced by a clinical linear accelerator (VARIAN CLINAC 2100SC). The dose rate was of 260.88cGy/min. at 100 cm source to sample distance. The catalase level was assayed spectrophotometrically, based on reaction kinetics, using a catalase UV assay kit (SIGMA). Catalase increased activity in various tissue samples exposed to the studied X ray doses (for example with 24 % in the liver cells, pbonds that ensure the specificity of CAT active site) but the resulted balance of the two concurrent processes indicates the cell ability of decomposing the hydrogen peroxide-with benefits for the cell physiology restoration for the chosen low dose radiation.

  15. Conservative Wait-and-See Therapy Versus Antibiotic Treatment for Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Cervicofacial Lymphadenitis in Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindeboom, Jerome A.

    2011-01-01

    Background. In this explorative study, 50 children with microbiologically confirmed nontuberculous mycobacterial cervicofacial lymphadenitis were randomized to either receive antibiotic therapy or follow a conservative wait-and-see approach. Our primary objective was to assess the time for all

  16. GenoMycDB: a database for comparative analysis of mycobacterial genes and genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catanho, Marcos; Mascarenhas, Daniel; Degrave, Wim; Miranda, Antonio Basílio de

    2006-03-31

    Several databases and computational tools have been created with the aim of organizing, integrating and analyzing the wealth of information generated by large-scale sequencing projects of mycobacterial genomes and those of other organisms. However, with very few exceptions, these databases and tools do not allow for massive and/or dynamic comparison of these data. GenoMycDB (http://www.dbbm.fiocruz.br/GenoMycDB) is a relational database built for large-scale comparative analyses of completely sequenced mycobacterial genomes, based on their predicted protein content. Its central structure is composed of the results obtained after pair-wise sequence alignments among all the predicted proteins coded by the genomes of six mycobacteria: Mycobacterium tuberculosis (strains H37Rv and CDC1551), M. bovis AF2122/97, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis K10, M. leprae TN, and M. smegmatis MC2 155. The database stores the computed similarity parameters of every aligned pair, providing for each protein sequence the predicted subcellular localization, the assigned cluster of orthologous groups, the features of the corresponding gene, and links to several important databases. Tables containing pairs or groups of potential homologs between selected species/strains can be produced dynamically by user-defined criteria, based on one or multiple sequence similarity parameters. In addition, searches can be restricted according to the predicted subcellular localization of the protein, the DNA strand of the corresponding gene and/or the description of the protein. Massive data search and/or retrieval are available, and different ways of exporting the result are offered. GenoMycDB provides an on-line resource for the functional classification of mycobacterial proteins as well as for the analysis of genome structure, organization, and evolution.

  17. Immune defects in active mycobacterial diseases in patients with primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-I Lee

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural human immunity to the mycobacteria group, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG or nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM, and/or Salmonella species, relies on the functional IL-12/23-IFN-γ integrity of macrophages (monocyte/dendritic cell connecting to T lymphocyte/NK cells. Patients with severe forms of primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs have more profound immune defects involving this impaired circuit in patients with severe combined immunodeficiencies (SCID including complete DiGeorge syndrome, X-linked hyper IgM syndrome (HIGM (CD40L mutation, CD40 deficiency, immunodeficiency with or without anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (NEMO and IKBA mutations, chronic granulomatous disease (CGD and hyper IgE recurrent infection syndromes (HIES. The patients with severe PIDs have broader diverse infections rather than mycobacterial infections. In contrast, patients with an isolated inborn error of the IL-12/23-IFN-γ pathway are exclusively prone to low-virulence mycobacterial infections and nontyphoid salmonella infections, known as Mendelian susceptibility to the mycobacterial disease (MSMD phenotype. Restricted defective molecules in the circuit, including IFN-γR1, IFN-γR2, IL-12p40, IL-12R-β1, STAT-1, NEMO, IKBA and the recently discovered CYBB responsible for autophagocytic vacuole and proteolysis, and interferon regulatory factor 8 (IRF8 for dendritic cell immunodeficiency, have been identified in around 60% of patients with the MSMD phenotype. Among all of the patients with PIDs referred for investigation since 1985, we have identified four cases with the specific defect (IFNRG1 for three and IL12RB for one, presenting as both BCG-induced diseases and NTM infections, in addition to some patients with SCID, HIGM, CGD and HIES. Furthermore, manifestations in patients with autoantibodies to IFN-γ (autoAbs-IFN-γ, which is categorized as an anticytokine autoantibody syndrome, can resemble the relatively

  18. Production of lignin peroxidase by Ganoderma leucidum using solid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main objectives of this study were to optimize the culture conditions for the production of lignin peroxidase by Ganoderma leucidum, economic utilization of waste corn cobs as inducers substrate by pollution free fermentation technology and to optimize the solid state fermentation (SSF) process for lignin peroxidase ...

  19. Hydrogen peroxide homeostasis: activation of plant catalase by calcium/calmodulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    Environmental stimuli such as UV, pathogen attack, and gravity can induce rapid changes in hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) levels, leading to a variety of physiological responses in plants. Catalase, which is involved in the degradation of H(2)O(2) into water and oxygen, is the major H(2)O(2)-scavenging enzyme in all aerobic organisms. A close interaction exists between intracellular H(2)O(2) and cytosolic calcium in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Studies indicate that an increase in cytosolic calcium boosts the generation of H(2)O(2). Here we report that calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein, binds to and activates some plant catalases in the presence of calcium, but calcium/CaM does not have any effect on bacterial, fungal, bovine, or human catalase. These results document that calcium/CaM can down-regulate H(2)O(2) levels in plants by stimulating the catalytic activity of plant catalase. Furthermore, these results provide evidence indicating that calcium has dual functions in regulating H(2)O(2) homeostasis, which in turn influences redox signaling in response to environmental signals in plants.

  20. Active site of mycobacterial dUTPase: Structural characteristics and a built-in sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varga, Balazs; Barabas, Orsolya; Takacs, Eniko; Nagy, Nikolett; Nagy, Peter; Vertessy, Beata G.

    2008-01-01

    dUTPases are essential to eliminate dUTP for DNA integrity and provide dUMP for thymidylate biosynthesis. Mycobacterium tuberculosis apparently lacks any other thymidylate biosynthesis pathway, therefore dUTPase is a promising antituberculotic drug target. Crystal structure of the mycobacterial enzyme in complex with the isosteric substrate analog, α,β-imido-dUTP and Mg 2+ at 1.5 A resolution was determined that visualizes the full-length C-terminus, previously not localized. Interactions of a conserved motif important in catalysis, the Mycobacterium-specific five-residue-loop insert and C-terminal tetrapeptide could now be described in detail. Stacking of C-terminal histidine upon the uracil moiety prompted replacement with tryptophan. The resulting sensitive fluorescent sensor enables fast screening for binding of potential inhibitors to the active site. K d for α,β-imido-dUTP binding to mycobacterial dUTPase is determined to be 10-fold less than for human dUTPase, which is to be considered in drug optimization. A robust continuous activity assay for kinetic screening is proposed

  1. Development of lyophilization cycle and effect of excipients on the stability of catalase during lyophilization

    OpenAIRE

    Lale, Shantanu V; Goyal, Monu; Bansal, Arvind K

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of the present study was to screen excipients such as amino acids and non-aqueous solvents for their stabilizing effect on catalase, a model protein, for lyophilization. The present study also includes optimization of lyophilization cycle for catalase formulations, which is essential from the commercial point of view, since lyophilization is an extremely costly process. Materials and Methods: Activity of catalase was determined using catalase activity assay. Differen...

  2. Response of antioxidant system of tomato to water deficit stress and its interaction with ascorbic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Daneshmand

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Environmental stresses including water deficit stress may produce oxidants such as reactive oxygen species that damage the membrane structure in plants. Among the antioxidants, ascorbic acid has a critical role in the cell and scavenges reactive oxygen species. In this research, effects of ascorbic acid at two levels (0 and 10 mM and water deficit stress based on 3 levels of field capacity (100, 60 and 30% were studied in tomato plants. Both levels of stress increased lipid peroxidation, reduced the amount of ascorbic acid and glutathione and increased the activity of enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione reductase, guaiacol peroxidase and reduced the growth parameters. Ascorbic acid treatment, reduced lipid peroxidation, increased ascorbic acid and glutathione levels and decreased the activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione peroxidase and guaiacol peroxidase and positive effects of ascorbic acid treatment appeared to improve the plant growth parameters.

  3. Catalase therapy corrects oxidative stress-induced pathophysiology in incipient diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Courtney R; Roberts, Robin; Krentz, Kendra A; Bissig, David; Talreja, Deepa; Kumar, Ashok; Terlecky, Stanley R; Berkowitz, Bruce A

    2015-05-01

    Preclinical studies have highlighted retinal oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. We evaluated whether a treatment designed to enhance cellular catalase reduces oxidative stress in retinal cells cultured in high glucose and in diabetic mice corrects an imaging biomarker responsive to antioxidant therapy (manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging [MEMRI]). Human retinal Müller and pigment epithelial cells were chronically exposed to normal or high glucose levels and treated with a cell-penetrating derivative of the peroxisomal enzyme catalase (called CAT-SKL). Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels were measured using a quantitative fluorescence-based assay. For in vivo studies, streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic C57Bl/6 mice were treated subcutaneously once a week for 3 to 4 months with CAT-SKL; untreated age-matched nondiabetic controls and untreated diabetic mice also were studied. MEMRI was used to analytically assess the efficacy of CAT-SKL treatment on diabetes-evoked oxidative stress-related pathophysiology in vivo. Similar analyses were performed with difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), an irreversible inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase. After catalase transduction, high glucose-induced peroxide production was significantly lowered in both human retinal cell lines. In diabetic mice in vivo, subnormal intraretinal uptake of manganese was significantly improved by catalase supplementation. In addition, in the peroxisome-rich liver of treated mice catalase enzyme activity increased and oxidative damage (as measured by lipid peroxidation) declined. On the other hand, DFMO was largely without effect in these in vitro or in vivo assays. This proof-of-concept study raises the possibility that augmentation of catalase is a therapy for treating the retinal oxidative stress associated with diabetic retinopathy.

  4. Scattering of neutrons by catalase: a study of molecules, subunits, and tubules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randall, J.; Starling, D.; Baldwin, J.P.; Ibel, K.

    1976-01-01

    The paper deals with small-angle scattering of neutrons by catalase tetramers, dimers, and monomers and with neutron diffraction by helical assemblies of tetramers in the form of tubules. A preliminary study of catalase is described

  5. Gaharu Leaf Extract Water Reduce MDA and 8-OHdG Levels and Increase Activities SOD and Catalase in Wistar Rats Provided Maximum Physical Activity

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    I Made Oka Adi Parwata

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oxidative stress occurs due to an imbalance of the number of free radicals by the number of endogenous antioxidant produced by the body i.e. Superoxide Dismutase (SOD, Gluthathione Peroxidase (GPx, and Catalase. The imbalance between the number of free radicals and antioxidants can be overcome with the endogenous antioxidant intake that exogenous oxidative stress can be reduced. One of exogenous antioxidants is natural Gaharu leaf water extract. Objective: This research focus on the effect of Gaharu leaf water extract in reducing MDA and 8-OHdG and increase the activity of SOD and Catalase. Methods: This study was an experimental with post only controls group design. Experiment was divided  into 5 groups of wistar rats, each consisting of 5 animals, i.e. negative control group without extract [K (-], treatment 1 treated 50 mg/kg BW/day of the extract (T1, treatment 2 treated 100 mg/kg BW/day of the extract (T2, treatment 3 treated 200 mg/ kg BW/day of the extract (T3, and positive control group [K (+] treated with vitamin Cat a dose 50 mg/kg BW/day. All groups treated for 10 weeks. Every day, before treatment, each group was given a maximum swimming activity for 1.5 hours for 10 weeks. ELISA was used to measure MDA, 8-OHdG, SOD, and Catalase activities. Result: The research results showed that treatment of extract of  leaves of Gaharu with an higher dose from 50 mg/kg BW up to 200 mg/ kg BW significantly decline (p <0.05 levels of MDA with the average ranging from 6.37±0.23, 5,56±0.27 and 4.32±0.27, 8-OHdG with a mean of 1.64±0.11, 1.26±0.46, and 1.09±0.17. On the other hand the treatment also increase SOD activity with less ranging from 12.15±1.04, 15.70±2.02, and 18.84±1.51, and Catalase ranging from 6,68±0.63, 8.20±1.14 and 9.29±0,79 in the blood of Wistar rats were given a maximum activity compared to the negative control group. This is probably higher phenol compounds (bioflavonoids quantity content of the extract

  6. Heat stable peroxidases from Vigna species (V) | Mbassi | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shoots of three landraces of a Vigna species from two climatic areas of Cameroon were evaluated for their content of heat-resistant peroxidases. The peroxidase activity in the three landraces was detected with a greater catalytic efficiency for oxidation of O-dianisidine relative to ABTS (2, 2'-azino-bis-(3- ...

  7. Do pH and flavonoids influence hypochlorous acid-induced catalase inhibition and heme modification?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krych-Madej, Justyna; Gebicka, Lidia

    2015-09-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), highly reactive oxidizing and chlorinating species, is formed in the immune response to invading pathogens by the reaction of hydrogen peroxide with chloride catalyzed by the enzyme myeloperoxidase. Catalase, an important antioxidant enzyme, catalyzing decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to water and molecular oxygen, hampers in vitro HOCl formation, but is also one of the main targets for HOCl. In this work we have investigated HOCl-induced catalase inhibition at different pH, and the influence of flavonoids (catechin, epigallocatechin gallate and quercetin) on this process. It has been shown that HOCl-induced catalase inhibition is independent on pH in the range 6.0-7.4. Preincubation of catalase with epigallocatechin gallate and quercetin before HOCl treatment enhances the degree of catalase inhibition, whereas catechin does not affect this process. Our rapid kinetic measurements of absorption changes around the heme group have revealed that heme modification by HOCl is mainly due to secondary, intramolecular processes. The presence of flavonoids, which reduce active catalase intermediate, Compound I to inactive Compound II have not influenced the kinetics of HOCl-induced heme modification. Possible mechanisms of the reaction of hypochlorous acid with catalase are proposed and the biological consequences are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Magnetic resonance spectral characterization of the heme active site of Coprinus cinereus peroxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukat, G.S.; Rodgers, K.R.; Jabro, M.N.; Goff, H.M.

    1989-01-01

    Examination of the peroxidase isolated from the inkcap Basidiomycete Coprinus cinereus shows that the 42,000-dalton enzyme contains a protoheme IX prosthetic group. Reactivity assays and the electronic absorption spectra of native Coprinus peroxidase and several of its ligand complexes indicate that this enzyme has characteristics similar to those reported for horseradish peroxidase. In this paper, the authors characterize the H 2 O 2 -oxidized forms of Coprinus peroxidase compounds I, II, and III by electronic absorption and magnetic resonance spectroscopies. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of this Coprinus peroxidase indicate the presence of high-spin Fe(III) in the native protein and a number of differences between the heme site of Coprinus peroxidase and horseradish peroxidase. Carbon-13 (of the ferrous CO adduct) and nitrogen-15 (of the cyanide complex) NMR studies together with proton NMR studies of the native and cyanide-complexed Caprinus peroxidase are consistent with coordination of a proximal histidine ligand. The EPR spectrum of the ferrous NO complex is also reported. Protein reconstitution with deuterated hemin has facilitated the assignment of the heme methyl resonances in the proton NMR spectrum

  9. Roles of Catalase and Trehalose in the Protection from Hydrogen Peroxide Toxicity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, Takuto; Watanabe, Takeru; Furuta, Masakazu; Kataoka, Michihiko; Kishida, Masao

    2016-01-01

    The roles of catalase and trehalose in Saccharomyces cerevisiae subject to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatment were examined by measuring the catalase activity and intracellular trehalose levels in mutants lacking catalase or trehalose synthetase. Intracellular trehalose was elevated but the survival rate after H2O2 treatment remained low in mutants with deletion of the Catalase T gene. On the other hand, deletion of the trehalose synthetase gene increased the catalase activity in mutated yeast to levels higher than those in the wild-type strain, and these mutants exhibited some degree of tolerance to H2O2 treatment. These results suggest that Catalase T is critical in the yeast response to oxidative damage caused by H2O2 treatment, but trehalose also plays a role in protection against H2O2 treatment.

  10. The Hydrogen Peroxide Scavenger, Catalase, Alleviates Ion Transport Dysfunction in Murine Colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Kim E.; McCole, Declan F.

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) contribute to epithelial damage and ion transport dysfunction (key events in inflammatory diarrhea) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aim of this study was to identify if H2O2 mediates suppression of colonic ion transport function in the murine dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) colitis model by using the H2O2 degrading enzyme, catalase. Colitis was induced by administering DSS (4%) in drinking water for 5 days followed by 3 days on normal H2O. Mice were administered either pegylated-catalase or saline at day −1, 0 and +1 of DSS treatment. Ion transport responses to the Ca2+-dependent agonist, carbachol (CCh), or the cAMP-dependent agonist, forskolin, were measured across distal colonic mucosa mounted in Ussing chambers. Parameters of DSS-induced inflammation (loss in body weight, decreased colon length, altered stool consistency), were only partially alleviated by catalase while histology was only minimally improved. However, catalase significantly reversed the DSS-induced reduction in baseline ion transport as well as colonic Isc responses to CCh. However, ion transport responses to forskolin were not significantly restored. Catalase also reduced activation of ERK MAP kinase in the setting of colitis, and increased expression of the Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter, NKCC1, consistent with restoration of ion transport function. Ex vivo treatment of inflamed colonic mucosae with catalase also partially restored ion transport function. Therefore, catalase partially prevents, and rescues, the loss of ion transport properties in DSS colitis even in the setting of unresolved tissue inflammation. These findings indicate a prominent role for ROS in ion transport dysfunction in colitis and may suggest novel strategies for the treatment of inflammatory diarrhea. PMID:27543846

  11. Kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition by catalase: hydroxylic solvent effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raducan, Adina; Cantemir, Anca Ruxandra; Puiu, Mihaela; Oancea, Dumitru

    2012-11-01

    The effect of water-alcohol (methanol, ethanol, propan-1-ol, propan-2-ol, ethane-1,2-diol and propane-1,2,3-triol) binary mixtures on the kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition in the presence of bovine liver catalase is investigated. In all solvents, the activity of catalase is smaller than in water. The results are discussed on the basis of a simple kinetic model. The kinetic constants for product formation through enzyme-substrate complex decomposition and for inactivation of catalase are estimated. The organic solvents are characterized by several physical properties: dielectric constant (D), hydrophobicity (log P), concentration of hydroxyl groups ([OH]), polarizability (α), Kamlet-Taft parameter (β) and Kosower parameter (Z). The relationships between the initial rate, kinetic constants and medium properties are analyzed by linear and multiple linear regression.

  12. Production and characterisation of monoclonal antibodies against native and disassembled human catalase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiemer, E. A.; Ofman, R.; Middelkoop, E.; de Boer, M.; Wanders, R. J.; Tager, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    Catalase isolated from human erythrocytes was used to immunise mice, in order to generate hybridomas producing specific monoclonal antibodies to the enzyme. Hybridomas secreting anti-(catalase) antibodies were identified by a modified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using either

  13. Downregulation of catalase by reactive oxygen species via PI 3 kinase/Akt signaling in mesangial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Balachandar; Mahimainathan, Lenin; Das, Falguni; Ghosh-Choudhury, Nandini; Ghosh Choudhury, Goutam

    2007-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to many glomerular diseases by targeting mesangial cells. ROS have been shown to regulate expression of many antioxidant enzymes including catalase. The mechanism by which the expression of catalase protein is regulated by ROS is not precisely known. Here we report that increased intracellular ROS level by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) reduced the expression of catalase. H(2)O(2) increased phosphorylation of Akt kinase in a dose-dependent and sustained manner with a concomitant increase in the phosphorylation of FoxO1 transcription factor. Further analysis revealed that H(2)O(2) promoted rapid activation of phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3 kinase. The PI 3 kinase inhibitor Ly294002 and expression of tumor suppressor protein PTEN inhibited Akt kinase activity, resulting in the attenuation of FoxO1 phosphorylation and preventing the downregulating effect of H(2)O(2) on catalase protein level. Dominant negative Akt attenuated the inhibitory effect of H(2)O(2) on expression of catalase. Constitutively active FoxO1 increased the expression of catalase. However, dominant negative FoxO1 inhibited catalase protein level. Catalase transcription was reduced by H(2)O(2) treatment. Furthermore, expression of dominant negative Akt and constitutively active FoxO1 increased catalase transcription, respectively. These results demonstrate that ROS downregulate the expression of catalase in mesangial cells by PI 3 kinase/Akt signaling via FoxO1 as a target. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. The cDNA sequence of a neutral horseradish peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartonek-Roxå, E; Eriksson, H; Mattiasson, B

    1991-02-16

    A cDNA clone encoding a horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) peroxidase has been isolated and characterized. The cDNA contains 1378 nucleotides excluding the poly(A) tail and the deduced protein contains 327 amino acids which includes a 28 amino acid leader sequence. The predicted amino acid sequence is nine amino acids shorter than the major isoenzyme belonging to the horseradish peroxidase C group (HRP-C) and the sequence shows 53.7% identity with this isoenzyme. The described clone encodes nine cysteines of which eight correspond well with the cysteines found in HRP-C. Five potential N-glycosylation sites with the general sequence Asn-X-Thr/Ser are present in the deduced sequence. Compared to the earlier described HRP-C this is three glycosylation sites less. The shorter sequence and fewer N-glycosylation sites give the native isoenzyme a molecular weight of several thousands less than the horseradish peroxidase C isoenzymes. Comparison with the net charge value of HRP-C indicates that the described cDNA clone encodes a peroxidase which has either the same or a slightly less basic pI value, depending on whether the encoded protein is N-terminally blocked or not. This excludes the possibility that HRP-n could belong to either the HRP-A, -D or -E groups. The low sequence identity (53.7%) with HRP-C indicates that the described clone does not belong to the HRP-C isoenzyme group and comparison of the total amino acid composition with the HRP-B group does not place the described clone within this isoenzyme group. Our conclusion is that the described cDNA clone encodes a neutral horseradish peroxidase which belongs to a new, not earlier described, horseradish peroxidase group.

  15. Cloning and analysis of the ascorbate peroxidase gene promoter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ascorbate peroxidase (APX) is known to catalyze the reduction of H2O2 to water and enhance plants' tolerance in stress environment. An ascorbate peroxidase protein (BnAPX) was previously isolated from Brassica napus in our laboratory and it was located in the chloroplast. In order to clarify the physiological function of ...

  16. Catalase activity is modulated by calcium and calmodulin in detached mature leaves of sweet potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afiyanti, Mufidah; Chen, Hsien-Jung

    2014-01-15

    Catalase (CAT) functions as one of the key enzymes in the scavenging of reactive oxygen species and affects the H2O2 homeostasis in plants. In sweet potato, a major catalase isoform was detected, and total catalase activity showed the highest level in mature leaves (L3) compared to immature (L1) and completely yellow, senescent leaves (L5). The major catalase isoform as well as total enzymatic activity were strongly suppressed by ethylene glycol-bis(2-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA). This inhibition could be specifically and significantly mitigated in mature L3 leaves by exogenous CaCl2, but not MgCl2 or CoCl2. EGTA also inhibited the activity of the catalase isoform in vitro. Furthermore, chlorpromazine (CPZ), a calmodulin (CAM) inhibitor, drastically suppressed the major catalase isoform as well as total enzymatic activity, and this suppression was alleviated by exogenous sweet potato calmodulin (SPCAM) fusion protein in L3 leaves. CPZ also inhibited the activity of the catalase isoform in vitro. Protein blot hybridization showed that both anti-catalase SPCAT1 and anti-calmodulin SPCAM antibodies detect a band at the same position, which corresponds to the activity of the major catalase isoform from unboiled, but not boiled crude protein extract of L3 leaves. An inverse correlation between the major catalase isoform/total enzymatic activity and the H2O2 level was also observed. These data suggest that sweet potato CAT activity is modulated by CaCl2 and SPCAM, and plays an important role in H2O2 homeostasis in mature leaves. Association of SPCAM with the major CAT isoform is required and regulates the in-gel CAT activity band. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide Fibril Binding to Catalase: A Transmission Electron Microscopy and Microplate Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel G. N. Milton

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The diabetes-associated human islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP is a 37-amino-acid peptide that forms fibrils in vitro and in vivo. Human IAPP fibrils are toxic in a similar manner to Alzheimer's amyloid-β (Aβ and prion protein (PrP fibrils. Previous studies have shown that catalase binds to Aβ fibrils and appears to recognize a region containing the Gly-Ala-Ile-Ile sequence that is similar to the Gly-Ala-Ile-Leu sequence found in human IAPP residues 24-27. This study presents a transmission electron microscopy (TEM—based analysis of fibril formation and the binding of human erythrocyte catalase to IAPP fibrils. The results show that human IAPP 1-37, 8-37, and 20-29 peptides form fibrils with diverse and polymorphic structures. All three forms of IAPP bound catalase, and complexes of IAPP 1-37 or 8-37 with catalase were identified by immunoassay. The binding of biotinylated IAPP to catalase was high affinity with a KD of 0.77nM, and could be inhibited by either human or rat IAPP 1-37 and 8-37 forms. Fibrils formed by the PrP 118-135 peptide with a Gly-Ala-Val-Val sequence also bound catalase. These results suggest that catalase recognizes a Gly-Ala-Ile-Leu—like sequence in amyloid fibril-forming peptides. For IAPP 1-37 and 8-37, the catalase binding was primarily directed towards fibrillar rather than ribbon-like structures, suggesting differences in the accessibility of the human IAPP 24-27 Gly-Ala-Ile-Leu region. This suggests that catalase may be able to discriminate between different structural forms of IAPP fibrils. The ability of catalase to bind IAPP, Aβ, and PrP fibrils demonstrates the presence of similar accessible structural motifs that may be targets for antiamyloid therapeutic development.

  18. Hepatic and erythrocytic glutathione peroxidase activity in liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, R; Ortiz, A; Hernández, R; López, V; Gómez, M M; Mena, P

    1996-09-01

    Hepatic and erythrocytic glutathione peroxidase activity, together with malondialdehyde levels, were determined as indicators of peroxidation in 83 patients from whom liver biopsies had been taken for diagnostic purposes. On histological study, the patients were classified into groups as minimal changes (including normal liver), steatosis, alcoholic hepatitis, hepatic cirrhosis, light to moderately active chronic hepatitis, and severe chronic active hepatitis. The glutathione peroxidase activity in erythrocytes showed no significant changes in any liver disease group. In the hepatic study, an increased activity was observed in steatosis with respect to the minimal changes group, this increased activity induced by the toxic agent in the initial stages of the alcoholic hepatic disease declining as the hepatic damage progressed. There was a negative correlation between the levels of hepatic malondialdehyde and hepatic glutathione peroxidase in subjects with minimal changes. This suggested the existence of an oxidative equilibrium in this group. This equilibrium is broken in the liver disease groups as was manifest in a positive correlation between malondialdehyde and glutathione peroxidase activity.

  19. Effect of cimetidine on catalase activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: a suggested mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoud, Masoudeh; Ebrahimi, Farnoosh; Minai-Tehrani, Dariush

    2014-01-01

    Catalase is an important enzyme for the degradation of hydrogen peroxide in cells. Bacteria have potent catalase to deal with H2O2 in their medium culture. Any chemicals that inhibit catalase activity can be harmful for cells. Histamine H2 antagonist drugs such as cimetidine and ranitidine are used for the treatment of gastrointestinal tract disorders. The present results showed that cimetidine could inhibit the catalase activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a competitive inhibition. The determination of IC50 value and Ki (6.5 μM) of cimetidine demonstrated that the enzyme binds to the drug with high affinity. Binding of the drug to the enzyme was pH-dependent and no binding was observed at basic pH (>9) and acidic pH (effect on the catalase activity. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. [Soil catalase activity of main plant communities in Leymus chinensis grassland in northeast China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Guo, Jixun; Zhu, Li

    2002-06-01

    The seasonal dynamics of soil catalase activity of three different plants communities in Leymus chinensis grassland in northeast China were in a parabolas shape. The seasonal variation of Chloris virgata community was greater than those of Leymus chinensis community and Puccinellia tenuiflora community, and "seed effect" might be the main reason. The correlation between the activity of soil catalase in different soil layers and environmental factors were analyzed. The results showed that the activity of soil catalase was decreased gradually with depth of soil layer. The activity of soil catalase was closely correlated with rainfall and air temperature, and it was affected by soil temperature, soil moisture, and their interactions. The correlation between the activity and aboveground vegetation was very significant, and the growing condition of plant communities could be reflected by the activity of soil catalase.

  1. Properties of the catalase molecule obtained from acatalasemic and hypocatalasemic mice Part I. Effects of denaturants on the catalase activity in the mouse liver

    OpenAIRE

    佐藤, 征紀

    1985-01-01

    Homogenates of mouse liver with isotonic sucrose solution were separated by the cell fractionation with repeating centrifugation. The supernatants were used for the inhibition test with the reagents such as 3,5 diiodosalicylic acid lithium salt (LIS), guanidine and azide, heat, acid and alkali. After various treatments, the remaining catalase activities were measured and showed as a relative enzyme activity. Stability of catalase in liver supernatants was compared normal (C3H/C(as)C(as)) and ...

  2. Soluble and immobilized catalase. Effect of pressure and inhibition on kinetics and deactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, P T; Thakur, D S

    1994-12-01

    This article examines the effect of pressure on the steady-state kinetics and long-term deactivation of the enzyme catalase supported on porous alumina. The reaction studied is the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. The results of studies carried out in a continuous stirred-tank reactor under isothermal conditions are presented and compared with results obtained for soluble catalase. For soluble catalase, it is found that in the range of pressures studied, the oxygen flow rate increases with increase in pressure up to a certain value and then decreases. Hydrogen peroxide concentration appears to have a strong influence on pressure effects. With immobilized catalase, the pressure effects are not as prominent. Fluorescent microscopy studies of the immobilized enzyme suggest that this is probably because of pore diffusional limitations.

  3. A Salt-Inducible Mn-Catalase (KatB) Protects Cyanobacterium from Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Dhiman; Banerjee, Manisha; Bihani, Subhash C; Ballal, Anand

    2016-02-01

    Catalases, enzymes that detoxify H2O2, are widely distributed in all phyla, including cyanobacteria. Unlike the heme-containing catalases, the physiological roles of Mn-catalases remain inadequately characterized. In the cyanobacterium Anabaena, pretreatment of cells with NaCl resulted in unusually enhanced tolerance to oxidative stress. On exposure to H2O2, the NaCl-treated Anabaena showed reduced formation of reactive oxygen species, peroxides, and oxidized proteins than the control cells (i.e. not treated with NaCl) exposed to H2O2. This protective effect correlated well with the substantial increase in production of KatB, a Mn-catalase. Addition of NaCl did not safeguard the katB mutant from H2O2, suggesting that KatB was indeed responsible for detoxifying the externally added H2O2. Moreover, Anabaena deficient in KatB was susceptible to oxidative effects of salinity stress. The katB gene was strongly induced in response to osmotic stress or desiccation. Promoter-gfp analysis showed katB to be expressed only in the vegetative cells but not in heterocysts. Biochemically, KatB was an efficient, robust catalase that remained active in the presence of high concentrations of NaCl. Our findings unravel the role of Mn-catalase in acclimatization to salt/oxidative stress and demonstrate that the oxidative stress resistance of an organism can be enhanced by a simple compound such as NaCl. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Candida albicans biofilm on titanium: effect of peroxidase precoating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ahariz

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Mohamed Ahariz1, Philippe Courtois1,21Laboratory of Experimental Hormonology, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, 2UER de Biologie Médicale, Haute Ecole Francisco Ferrer, Brussels, BelgiumAbstract: The present study aimed to document Candida albicans biofilm development on titanium and its modulation by a peroxidase-precoated material which can generate antimicrobials, such as hypoiodite or hypothiocyanite, from hydrogen peroxide, iodide, or thiocyanate. For this purpose, titanium (powder or foil was suspended in Sabouraud liquid medium inoculated with C. albicans ATCC10231. After continuous stirring for 2–21 days at room temperature, the supernatant was monitored by turbidimetry at 600 nm and titanium washed three times in sterile Sabouraud broth. Using the tetrazolium salt MTT-formazan assay, the titanium-adherent fungal biomass was measured as 7.50 ± 0.60 × 106 blastoconidia per gram of titanium powder (n = 30 and 0.50 ± 0.04 × 106 blastoconidia per cm² of titanium foil (n = 12. The presence of yeast on the surface of titanium was confirmed by microscopy both on fresh preparations and after calcofluor white staining. However, in the presence of peroxidase systems (lactoperoxidase with substrates such as hydrogen peroxide donor, iodide, or thiocyanate, Candida growth in both planktonic and attached phases appeared to be inhibited. Moreover, this study demonstrates the possible partition of peroxidase systems between titanium material (peroxidase-precoated and liquid environment (containing peroxidase substrates to limit C. albicans biofilm formation.Keywords: adhesion, material, oral, yeast

  5. Activation of catalase activity by a peroxisome-localized small heat shock protein Hsp17.6CII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guannan; Li, Jing; Hao, Rong; Guo, Yan

    2017-08-20

    Plant catalases are important antioxidant enzymes and are indispensable for plant to cope with adverse environmental stresses. However, little is known how catalase activity is regulated especially at an organelle level. In this study, we identified that small heat shock protein Hsp17.6CII (AT5G12020) interacts with and activates catalases in the peroxisome of Arabidopsis thaliana. Although Hsp17.6CII is classified into the cytosol-located small heat shock protein subfamily, we found that Hsp17.6CII is located in the peroxisome. Moreover, Hsp17.6CII contains a novel non-canonical peroxisome targeting signal 1 (PTS1), QKL, 16 amino acids upstream from the C-terminus. The QKL signal peptide can partially locate GFP to peroxisome, and mutations in the tripeptide lead to the abolishment of this activity. In vitro catalase activity assay and holdase activity assay showed that Hsp17.6CII increases CAT2 activity and prevents it from thermal aggregation. These results indicate that Hsp17.6CII is a peroxisome-localized catalase chaperone. Overexpression of Hsp17.6CII conferred enhanced catalase activity and tolerance to abiotic stresses in Arabidopsis. Interestingly, overexpression of Hsp17.6CII in catalase-deficient mutants, nca1-3 and cat2 cat3, failed to rescue their stress-sensitive phenotypes and catalase activity, suggesting that Hsp17.6CII-mediated stress response is dependent on NCA1 and catalase activity. Overall, we identified a novel peroxisome-located catalase chaperone that is involved in plant abiotic stress resistance by activating catalase activity. Copyright © 2017 Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Genetics Society of China. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. ICAM-1 targeted catalase encapsulated PLGA-b-PEG nanoparticles against vascular oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Ece; Tunc-Sarisozen, Yeliz; Mutlu, Hulya; Shahbazi, Reza; Ucar, Gulberk; Ulubayram, Kezban

    2015-01-01

    Targeted delivery of therapeutics is the favourable idea, whereas it is possible to distribute the therapeutically active drug molecule only to the site of action. For this purpose, in this study, catalase encapsulated poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA-b-PEG) nanoparticles were developed and an endothelial target molecule (anti-ICAM-1) was conjugated to this carrier system in order to decrease the oxidative stress level in the target site. According to the enzymatic activity results, initial catalase activity of nanoparticles was increased from 27.39 U/mg to up to 45.66 U/mg by adding 5 mg/mL bovine serum albumin (BSA). After 4 h, initial catalase activity was preserved up to 46.98% while free catalase retained less than 4% of its activity in proteolytic environment. Furthermore, FITC labelled anti-ICAM-1 targeted catalase encapsulated nanoparticles (anti-ICAM-1/CatNPs) were rapidly taken up by cultured endothelial cells and concomitantly endothelial cells were resistant to H2O2 induced oxidative impairment.

  7. Adenoviral vector-mediated GM-CSF gene transfer improves anti-mycobacterial immunity in mice - role of regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singpiel, Alena; Kramer, Julia; Maus, Regina; Stolper, Jennifer; Bittersohl, Lara Friederike; Gauldie, Jack; Kolb, Martin; Welte, Tobias; Sparwasser, Tim; Maus, Ulrich A

    2018-03-01

    Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a hematopoietic growth factor involved in differentiation, survival and activation of myeloid and non-myeloid cells with important implications for lung antibacterial immunity. Here we examined the effect of pulmonary adenoviral vector-mediated delivery of GM-CSF (AdGM-CSF) on anti-mycobacterial immunity in M. bovis BCG infected mice. Exposure of M. bovis BCG infected mice to AdGM-CSF either applied on 6h, or 6h and 7days post-infection substantially increased alveolar recruitment of iNOS and IL-12 expressing macrophages, and significantly increased accumulation of IFNγ pos T cells and particularly regulatory T cells (Tregs). This was accompanied by significantly reduced mycobacterial loads in the lungs of mice. Importantly, diphtheria toxin-induced depletion of Tregs did not influence mycobacterial loads, but accentuated immunopathology in AdGM-CSF-exposed mice infected with M. bovis BCG. Together, the data demonstrate that AdGM-CSF therapy improves lung protective immunity against M. bovis BCG infection in mice independent of co-recruited Tregs, which however critically contribute to limit lung immunopathology in BCG-infected mice. These data may be relevant to the development of immunomodulatory strategies to limit immunopathology-based lung injury in tuberculosis in humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Direct measurement of catalase activity in living cells and tissue biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaglione, Christine N; Xu, Qijin; Ramanujan, V Krishnan

    2016-01-29

    Spatiotemporal regulation of enzyme-substrate interactions governs the decision-making steps in biological systems. Enzymes, being functional units of every living cell, contribute to the macromolecular stability of cell survival, proliferation and hence are vital windows to unraveling the biological complexity. Experimental measurements capturing this dynamics of enzyme-substrate interactions in real time add value to this understanding. Furthermore these measurements, upon validation in realistic biological specimens such as clinical biopsies - can further improve our capability in disease diagnostics and treatment monitoring. Towards this direction, we describe here a novel, high-sensitive measurement system for measuring diffusion-limited enzyme-substrate kinetics in real time. Using catalase (enzyme) and hydrogen peroxide (substrate) as the example pair, we demonstrate that this system is capable of direct measurement of catalase activity in vitro and the measured kinetics follows the classical Michaelis-Menten reaction kinetics. We further demonstrate the system performance by measuring catalase activity in living cells and in very small amounts of liver biopsies (down to 1 μg total protein). Catalase-specific enzyme activity is demonstrated by genetic and pharmacological tools. Finally we show the clinically-relevant diagnostic capability of our system by comparing the catalase activities in liver biopsies from young and old mouse (liver and serum) samples. We discuss the potential applicability of this system in clinical diagnostics as well as in intraoperative surgical settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Catalase coupled gold nanoparticles: Comparison between carbodiimide and biotin-streptavidin methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirra, Hariharasudhan D.; Sexton, Travis; Biswal, Dipti; Hersh, Louis B.; Hilt, J. Zach

    2011-01-01

    The use of proteins for therapeutic applications requires the protein to maintain sufficient activity for the period of in vivo treatment. Many proteins exhibit a short half-life in vivo and, thus, require delivery systems for them to be applied as therapeutics. The relative biocompatibility and the ability to form functionalized bioconjugates via simple chemistry make gold nanoparticles excellent candidates as protein delivery systems. Herein, two protocols for coupling proteins to gold nanoparticles were compared. In the first, the strong biomolecular binding between biotin and streptavidin was used to couple catalase to the surface of gold nanoparticles. In the second protocol, the formation of an amide bond between carboxylic acid coated gold nanoparticles and free surface amines of catalase using carbodiimide chemistry was performed. The stability and kinetics of the different steps involved in these protocols were studied using UV-Visible spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy. The addition of mercaptoundecanoic acid in conjugation with (N-(6-(biotinamido)hexyl)-3′-(2′-pyridyldithio)-propionamide increased the stability of biotinylated gold nanoparticles. Although the carbodiimide chemistry based bioconjugation approach exhibited a decrease in catalase activity, the carbodiimide chemistry based bioconjugation approach resulted in more active catalase per gold nanoparticle compared to that of mercaptoundecanoic acid stabilized biotinylated gold nanoparticles. Both coupling protocols resulted in gold nanoparticles loaded with active catalase. Thus, these gold nanoparticle systems and coupling protocols represent promising methods for the application of gold nanoparticles for protein delivery. PMID:21232642

  10. Evaluation of salivary catalase activity in blighted ovum gestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Ahmadizadeh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anembryonic gestation (blighted ovum is the most common identifiable pathology in the first trimester of pregnancy, always leads to miscarriage. Early pregnancy failures from blighted ovum are often due to chromosomal abnormalities and a poor quality of sperm or egg. Oxidative stresses as a factor of disturbance balance between the production of free radicals and antioxidant defenses is involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases, including mouth and throat cancer and cardiovascular disease. Catalase is one of the defensive systems against damages caused by oxidative stress in human. The aim of this study was to compare the activity of salivary catalase in women with blighted ovum and women with history of normal pregnancy. Methods: This case-control study was performed on 34 patient women with blighted ovum and 34 healthy women as a control group. The study was performed in biochemistry laboratory at the University of Guilan from October 2015 to July 2015. The age range was 20-44 years and 18-45 years in patient and control groups, respectively. Unstimulated saliva samples were collected using spitting method. Catalase activity was measured by evaluating the constant rate of hydrogen peroxide decomposition in patient and control groups. Results: The patient group matched with healthy subjects in average age and having no other diseases history. The biochemical enzymatic assays indicate that the average catalase activities of saliva in patient and control groups were 14.47±3.8 and 16.42±3.48, respectively. Therefore, the catalase activity was significantly reduced in patient group as compared to the control group (P=0.03. Conclusion: The obtained results suggested that oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of blighted ovum. Therefore, determination the activity of other antioxidant enzymes, in addition to catalse, may be used as a marker for diagnosis of blighted ovum. More studies with larger studied

  11. A catalytic approach to estimate the redox potential of heme-peroxidases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayala, Marcela; Roman, Rosa; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    The redox potential of heme-peroxidases varies according to a combination of structural components within the active site and its vicinities. For each peroxidase, this redox potential imposes a thermodynamic threshold to the range of oxidizable substrates. However, the instability of enzymatic intermediates during the catalytic cycle precludes the use of direct voltammetry to measure the redox potential of most peroxidases. Here we describe a novel approach to estimate the redox potential of peroxidases, which directly depends on the catalytic performance of the activated enzyme. Selected p-substituted phenols are used as substrates for the estimations. The results obtained with this catalytic approach correlate well with the oxidative capacity predicted by the redox potential of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple

  12. Chromatin remodeling regulates catalase expression during cancer cells adaptation to chronic oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glorieux, Christophe; Sandoval, Juan Marcelo; Fattaccioli, Antoine; Dejeans, Nicolas; Garbe, James C; Dieu, Marc; Verrax, Julien; Renard, Patricia; Huang, Peng; Calderon, Pedro Buc

    2016-10-01

    Regulation of ROS metabolism plays a major role in cellular adaptation to oxidative stress in cancer cells, but the molecular mechanism that regulates catalase, a key antioxidant enzyme responsible for conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen, remains to be elucidated. Therefore, we investigated the transcriptional regulatory mechanism controlling catalase expression in three human mammary cell lines: the normal mammary epithelial 250MK primary cells, the breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells and an experimental model of MCF-7 cells resistant against oxidative stress resulting from chronic exposure to H 2 O 2 (Resox), in which catalase was overexpressed. Here we identify a novel promoter region responsible for the regulation of catalase expression at -1518/-1226 locus and the key molecules that interact with this promoter and affect catalase transcription. We show that the AP-1 family member JunB and retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARα) mediate catalase transcriptional activation and repression, respectively, by controlling chromatin remodeling through a histone deacetylases-dependent mechanism. This regulatory mechanism plays an important role in redox adaptation to chronic exposure to H 2 O 2 in breast cancer cells. Our study suggests that cancer adaptation to oxidative stress may be regulated by transcriptional factors through chromatin remodeling, and reveals a potential new mechanism to target cancer cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Inactivation of catalase by free radicals derived from oxygen via gamma radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malhaire, J.P.; Gardes-Albert, M.; Ferradini, C.; Sabourault, D.; Ribiere, C.

    1991-01-01

    The inactivation of catalase (10 -5 mol/l) by OH· or OH·/O 2 - · free radicals, at pH 7.4, has been investigated using γ radiolysis with doses up to 9000 Gy. Maxima initial G-values of catalase inactivation have been determined. These values are inferior to those of the free radicals OH· and O 2 - · produced by water radiolysis. Nevertheless, the presence of O 2 /O 2 - · enhances the inactivation due to OH· radicals. The general shape of the inactivation curves as a function of the radiation dose is biphasic: an initial rapid phase (from 0 to ∼ 500 Gy) followed by a slow phase (from ∼ 500 to 9000 Gy). The addition of H 2 O 2 at the beginning of irradiation decreases the inactivation yield by OH· radicals. This phenomenon could be due to the formation of compound-I (catalase-H 2 O 2 ) which would be less sensitive towards OH· radicals than catalase. In the presence of 0.1 mol/l ethanol, catalase (5 x 10 -6 mol/l) is not inactived by O 2 - · and RO 2 · (from ethanol) radicals for an irradiation dose of 2000 Gy, implying a complete protecting effect by ethanol [fr

  14. Characteristics of estrogen-induced peroxidase in mouse uterine luminal fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jellinck, P.H.; Newbold, R.R.; McLachlan, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    Peroxidase activity in the uterine luminal fluid of mice treated with diethylstilbestrol was measured by the guaiacol assay and also by the formation of 3H2O from [2-3H]estradiol. In the radiometric assay, the generation of 3H2O and 3H-labeled water-soluble products was dependent on H2O2 (25 to 100 microM), with higher concentrations being inhibitory. Tyrosine or 2,4-dichlorophenol strongly enhanced the reaction catalyzed either by the luminal fluid peroxidase or the enzyme in the CaCl2 extract of the uterus, but decreased the formation of 3H2O from [2-3H]estradiol by lactoperoxidase in the presence of H2O2 (80 microM). NADPH, ascorbate, and cytochrome c inhibited both luminal fluid and uterine tissue peroxidase activity to the same extent, while superoxide dismutase showed a marginal activating effect. Lactoferrin, a major protein component of uterine luminal fluid, was shown not to contribute to its peroxidative activity, and such an effect by prostaglandin synthase was also ruled out. However, it was not possible to exclude eosinophil peroxidase, brought to the uterus after estrogen stimulation, as being the source of peroxidase activity in uterine luminal fluid

  15. Peroxidase synthesis and activity in the interaction of soybean with Phytophthora megasperma f. sp. glycinea (Pmg)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chibbar, R.N.; Esnault, R.; Lee, D.; van Huystee, R.B.; Ward, E.W.B.

    1986-01-01

    Changes, in peroxidase (EC1.11.1.7) have been reported following infection. However, determinations of biosynthesis of quantities of the peroxidase protein molecule have not been made! In this study hypocotyl of soybean seedlings (Glycine max; cv Harosoy, susceptible; cv Harosoy 63, resistant) were inoculated with zoospores of Pmg. Incorporation of 35 S-methionine (supplied with inoculum) in TCA precipitates was measured. Peroxidase synthesis was measured by immuno precipitation using antibodies against a cationic and an anionic peroxidase derived from peanut cells. Specific peroxidase activity increased rapidly from 5 to 9 h following infection in the resistant reaction but not in the susceptible reaction or the water controls. There was increased synthesis of the anionic peroxidase but not of the cationic peroxidase in the resistant reaction. The anionic peroxidase did not increase in the susceptible until 15 h. The ratio of peroxidase synthesis to total protein synthesis decreased in inoculated tissues compared to control. Peroxidase synthesis is, therefore, a relative minor host response to infection

  16. [Experience of rapid drug desensitization therapy in the treatment of mycobacterial disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Yuka; Kurashima, Atsuyuki; Morimoto, Kozo; Okumura, Masao; Watanabe, Masato; Yoshiyama, Takashi; Ogata, Hideo; Gotoh, Hajime; Kudoh, Shoji; Suzuki, Hiroaki

    2014-11-01

    Drugs for tuberculosis and non-tuberculosis mycobacterial diseases are limited. In particular, no new drugs for non-tuberculosis mycobacterial disease have been developed in recent years. Antimycobacterial drugs have many adverse reactions, for which drug desensitization therapy has been used. Rapid drug desensitization (RDD) therapy, including antituberculosis drugs and clarithromycin, has been implemented in many regions in Europe and the United States. We investigated the validity of RDD therapy in Japan. We report our experience with RDD therapy in 13 patients who developed severe drug allergy to antimycobacterial treatment. The desensitization protocol reported by Holland and Cernandas was adapted. The underlying diseases were 7 cases of pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex disease and 6 cases of pulmonary tuberculosis. Isoniazid was readministered in 2 (100%) of 2 patients; rifampicin, in 8 (67.7%) of 12 patients; ethambutol, in 4 (67.7%) of 6 patients; and clarithromycin, in 2 (100%) of 2 patients. In Japan, the desensitization therapy recommended by the Treatment Committee of the Japanese Society for Tuberculosis have been implemented generally. We think RDD therapy is effective and safe as the other desensitization therapy. We will continue to investigate the efficiency of RDD therapy in patients who had discontinued antimycobacterial treatment because of the drug allergic reaction.

  17. Isolation, Fractionation and Characterization of Catalase from Neurospora crassa (InaCC F226)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryani; Ambarsari, L.; Lindawati, E.

    2017-03-01

    Catalase from Indigenous isolate Neurospora crassa InaCC F226 has been isolated, fractionated and characterized. Production of catalase by Neurospora crassa was done by using PDA medium (Potato Dextrosa Agar) and fractionated with ammonium sulphate with 20-80% saturation. Fraction 60% was optimum saturation of ammonium sulphate and had highest specific activity 3339.82 U/mg with purity 6.09 times, total protein 0.920 mg and yield 88.57%. The optimum pH and temperature for catalase activity were at 40°C and pH 7.0, respectively. The metal ions that stimulated catalase activity acted were Ca2+, Mn2+ and Zn2+, and inhibitors were EDTA, Mg2+ and Cu2+. Based on Km and Vmax values were 0.2384 mM and 13.3156 s/mM.

  18. Purification and characterization of lignin peroxidases from Penicillium decumbens P6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J.S.; Yuan, H.L.; Wang, H.X.; Chen, W.X. [China Agricultural University, Beijing (China). College of Biological Science

    2005-06-01

    Peroxidases are essential enzymes in biodegradation of lignin and lignite which have been investigated intensively in the white-rot fungi. This is the first report of purification and characterization of lignin peroxidase from Penicillium sp. P6 as lignite degradation fungus. The results indicated that the lignin peroxidase of Penicillium decumbens P6 had physical and chemical properties and a N-terminal amino acid sequence different from the lignin peroxidases of white-rot fungi. The lignin peroxidase was isolated from a liquid culture of P. decumbens P6. This enzyme had a molecular weight of 46.3 KDa in SDS-PAGE and exhibited greater activity, temperature stability and wider pH range than those previously reported. The isolation procedure involved (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} precipitation, ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and CM-cellulose, gel filtration on Sephadex G-100, and non-denaturing, discontinuous polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The K{sub m} and V{sub max} values of this enzyme using veratryl alcohol as substrate were 0.565 mmol L{sup -1} and 0.088 mmol (mg protein){sup -1} min{sup -1} respectively. The optimum pH of P6 lignin peroxidase was 4.0, and 70.6% of the relative activity was remained at pH 9.0. The optimum temperature of the enzyme was 45{sup o}C.

  19. Structural and functional changes in catalase induced by near-UV radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zigman, S.; Schultz, J.B.; McDaniel, T.

    1996-01-01

    Part one of this study shows that exposure of purified beef liver catalase in buffered solutions to BL lamps that provide a mixture of 99% UVA and 1% UVB (to be labeled UV A ) alters its chemistry and enzymatic activity. Thus, its spectral absorbance lose detail, it aggregated and exhibited a lower isoelectric point and its enzymatic activity was substantially reduced. These photochemically induced changes were increased by irradiation in phosphate buffer or in physiological medium (minimal essential medium) containing riboflavin and tryptophan. Neither α-tocopherol nor deferoxamine were protective against these UV A -induced changes in pure catalase. We further investigated the effect of UV A radiation on the activity of catalase in cultured lens epithelial cells and the protective effects of antioxidants. (Author)

  20. Effects of Various Drugs on Alcohol-induced Oxidative Stress in the Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Trivic

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The major aim of this work was to investigate how alcohol-induced oxidative stress in combined chemotherapy changes the metabolic function of the liver in experimental animals. This research was conducted to establish how bromocriptine, haloperidol and azithromycin, applied to the experimental model, affected the antioxidative status of the liver. The following parameters were determined: reduced glutathione, activities of glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, peroxidase, catalase, xanthine oxidase and lipid peroxidation intensity. Alanine transaminase was measured in serum. Alcohol stress (AO group reduced glutathione and the activity of xanthine oxidase and glutathione peroxidase, but increased catalase and alanine transaminase activity. The best protective effect was achieved with the bromocriptine (AB1 group, while other groups had similar effects on the studied parameters.

  1. Class III peroxidases in cellulose deficient cultured maize cells during cell wall remodelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Rubio, Romina; Acebes, José Luis; Encina, Antonio; Kärkönen, Anna

    2018-02-21

    Maize (Zea mays L.) suspension-cultured cells habituated to a cellulose biosynthesis inhibitor 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB) have a modified cell wall, in which the reduction in the cellulose content is compensated by a network of highly cross-linked feruloylated arabinoxylans and the deposition of lignin-like polymers. For both arabinoxylan cross-linking and lignin polymerization, class III peroxidases (POXs) have been demonstrated to have a prominent role. For the first time, a comparative study of POX activity and isoforms in control and cellulose-impaired cells has been addressed, also taking into account their cellular distribution in different compartments. Proteins from the spent medium (SM), soluble cellular (SC), ionically (ICW) and covalently bound cell wall protein fractions were assayed for total and specific peroxidase activity by using coniferyl and sinapyl alcohol and ferulic acid as substrates. The isoPOX profile was obtained by isoelectric focusing. POX activity was higher in DCB-habituated than in non-habituated cells in all protein fractions at all cell culture stages. For all substrates assayed, SC and ICW fractions showed higher activity at the early-log growth phase than at the late-log phase. However, the highest POX activity in the spent medium was found at the late-log phase. According to the isoPOX profiles, the highest diversity of isoPOXs was detected in the ICW and SM protein fractions. The latter fraction contained isoPOXs with higher activity in DCB-habituated cells. Some of the isoPOXs detected could be involved in cross-linking of arabinoxylans and in the lignin-like polymer formation in DCB-habituated cells. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Layer-by-layer assembled multilayers using catalase-encapsulated gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sungwoo; Park, Jeongju; Cho, Jinhan

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a novel and versatile approach for the preparation of multilayers, based on catalase-encapsulated gold nanoparticles (CAT-Au NP ), allowing electrostatic charge reversal and structural transformation through pH adjustment. CAT-Au NP , which are synthesized directly from CAT stabilizer, can be electrostatically assembled with anionic and cationic PEs as a result of the charge reversal of the catalase stabilizers through pH control. In particular, at pH 5.2, near the pI of catalase, dispersed CAT-Au NP are structurally transformed into colloidal or network CAT-Au NP nanocomposites. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the layer-by-layer assembled multilayers composed of PEs and CAT-Au NP induce an effective electron transfer between CAT and the electrode as well as a high loading of CAT and Au NP , and resultantly exhibit a highly catalytic activity toward H 2 O 2 .

  3. Catalase as a sulfide-sulfur oxido-reductase: An ancient (and modern?) regulator of reactive sulfur species (RSS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Kenneth R; Gao, Yan; DeLeon, Eric R; Arif, Maaz; Arif, Faihaan; Arora, Nitin; Straub, Karl D

    2017-08-01

    Catalase is well-known as an antioxidant dismutating H 2 O 2 to O 2 and H 2 O. However, catalases evolved when metabolism was largely sulfur-based, long before O 2 and reactive oxygen species (ROS) became abundant, suggesting catalase metabolizes reactive sulfide species (RSS). Here we examine catalase metabolism of H 2 S n , the sulfur analog of H 2 O 2 , hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) and other sulfur-bearing molecules using H 2 S-specific amperometric electrodes and fluorophores to measure polysulfides (H 2 S n ; SSP4) and ROS (dichlorofluorescein, DCF). Catalase eliminated H 2 S n , but did not anaerobically generate H 2 S, the expected product of dismutation. Instead, catalase concentration- and oxygen-dependently metabolized H 2 S and in so doing acted as a sulfide oxidase with a P 50 of 20mmHg. H 2 O 2 had little effect on catalase-mediated H 2 S metabolism but in the presence of the catalase inhibitor, sodium azide (Az), H 2 O 2 rapidly and efficiently expedited H 2 S metabolism in both normoxia and hypoxia suggesting H 2 O 2 is an effective electron acceptor in this reaction. Unexpectedly, catalase concentration-dependently generated H 2 S from dithiothreitol (DTT) in both normoxia and hypoxia, concomitantly oxidizing H 2 S in the presence of O 2 . H 2 S production from DTT was inhibited by carbon monoxide and augmented by NADPH suggesting that catalase heme-iron is the catalytic site and that NADPH provides reducing equivalents. Catalase also generated H 2 S from garlic oil, diallyltrisulfide, thioredoxin and sulfur dioxide, but not from sulfite, metabisulfite, carbonyl sulfide, cysteine, cystine, glutathione or oxidized glutathione. Oxidase activity was also present in catalase from Aspergillus niger. These results show that catalase can act as either a sulfide oxidase or sulfur reductase and they suggest that these activities likely played a prominent role in sulfur metabolism during evolution and may continue do so in modern cells as well. This also appears

  4. Elevated catalase expression in a fungal pathogen is a double-edged sword of iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Arnab; Herrero-de-Dios, Carmen; Belmonte, Rodrigo; Budge, Susan; Lopez Garcia, Angela; Kolmogorova, Aljona; Lee, Keunsook K; Martin, Brennan D; Ribeiro, Antonio; Bebes, Attila; Yuecel, Raif; Gow, Neil A R; Munro, Carol A; MacCallum, Donna M; Quinn, Janet; Brown, Alistair J P

    2017-05-01

    Most fungal pathogens of humans display robust protective oxidative stress responses that contribute to their pathogenicity. The induction of enzymes that detoxify reactive oxygen species (ROS) is an essential component of these responses. We showed previously that ectopic expression of the heme-containing catalase enzyme in Candida albicans enhances resistance to oxidative stress, combinatorial oxidative plus cationic stress, and phagocytic killing. Clearly ectopic catalase expression confers fitness advantages in the presence of stress, and therefore in this study we tested whether it enhances fitness in the absence of stress. We addressed this using a set of congenic barcoded C. albicans strains that include doxycycline-conditional tetON-CAT1 expressors. We show that high basal catalase levels, rather than CAT1 induction following stress imposition, reduce ROS accumulation and cell death, thereby promoting resistance to acute peroxide or combinatorial stress. This conclusion is reinforced by our analyses of phenotypically diverse clinical isolates and the impact of stochastic variation in catalase expression upon stress resistance in genetically homogeneous C. albicans populations. Accordingly, cat1Δ cells are more sensitive to neutrophil killing. However, we find that catalase inactivation does not attenuate C. albicans virulence in mouse or invertebrate models of systemic candidiasis. Furthermore, our direct comparisons of fitness in vitro using isogenic barcoded CAT1, cat1Δ and tetON-CAT1 strains show that, while ectopic catalase expression confers a fitness advantage during peroxide stress, it confers a fitness defect in the absence of stress. This fitness defect is suppressed by iron supplementation. Also high basal catalase levels induce key iron assimilatory functions (CFL5, FET3, FRP1, FTR1). We conclude that while high basal catalase levels enhance peroxide stress resistance, they place pressure on iron homeostasis through an elevated cellular demand

  5. Apple and quince peroxidase activity in response to essential oils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enzymatic browning arises by peroxidase in fruits. However, essential oils are recognized as natural antioxidant agents. So in this study, the effect of thyme, coriander and rosemary essential oils were evaluated on the reduction of peroxidase activity in apples (Malus domestica Mill. cv Golden delicious), (M. domestica Mill.

  6. Peroxidase-like activity of magnetoferritin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Melníková, V.; Pospíšková, K.; Mitróová, Z.; Kopčanský, P.; Šafařík, Ivo

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 181, 3-4 (2014), s. 295-301 ISSN 0026-3672 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13021 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : magnetoferritin * magnetic nanoparticles * peroxidase-like activity * hydrogen peroxide * oxidative stress Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.741, year: 2014

  7. Electrochemical monitoring of native catalase activity in skin using skin covered oxygen electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocchi, Sarah; Björklund, Sebastian; Svensson, Birgitta; Engblom, Johan; Ruzgas, Tautgirdas

    2017-07-15

    A skin covered oxygen electrode, SCOE, was constructed with the aim to study the enzyme catalase, which is part of the biological antioxidative system present in skin. The electrode was exposed to different concentrations of H 2 O 2 and the amperometric current response was recorded. The observed current is due to H 2 O 2 penetration through the outermost skin barrier (referred to as the stratum corneum, SC) and subsequent catalytic generation of O 2 by catalase present in the underlying viable epidermis and dermis. By tape-stripping the outermost skin layers we demonstrate that SC is a considerable diffusion barrier for H 2 O 2 penetration. Our experiments also indicate that skin contains a substantial amount of catalase, which is sufficient to detoxify H 2 O 2 that reaches the viable epidermis after exposure of skin to high concentrations of peroxide (0.5-1mM H 2 O 2 ). Further, we demonstrate that the catalase activity is reduced at acidic pH, as compared with the activity at pH 7.4. Finally, experiments with often used penetration enhancer thymol shows that this compound interferes with the catalase reaction. Health aspect of this is briefly discussed. Summarizing, the results of this work show that the SCOE can be utilized to study a broad spectrum of issues involving the function of skin catalase in particular, and the native biological antioxidative system in skin in general. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Binding of Cimetidine to Balb/C Mouse Liver Catalase; Kinetics and Conformational Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangirvand, Mahboubeh; Minai-Tehrani, Dariush; Yazdi, Fatemeh; Minai-Tehrani, Arash; Razmi, Nematollah

    2016-01-01

    Catalase is responsible for converting hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) into water and oxygen in cells. This enzyme has high affinity for hydrogen peroxide and can protect the cells from oxidative stress damage. Catalase is a tetramer protein and each monomer contains a heme group. Cimetidine is a histamine H2 receptor blocker which inhibits acid release from stomach and is used for gasterointestinal diseases. In this research, effect of cimetidine on the activity of liver catalase was studied and the kinetic parameters of this enzyme and its conformational changes were investigated. Cell free extract of mouse liver was used for the catalase assay. The activity of the catalase was detected in the absence and presence of cimetidine by monitoring hydrogen peroxide reduction absorbance at 240 nm. The purified enzyme was used for conformational studies by Fluorescence spectrophotometry. The data showed that cimetidine could inhibit the enzyme in a non-competitive manner. Ki and IC50 values of the drug were determined to be about 0.75 and 0.85 uM, respectively. The Arrhenius plot showed that activation energy was 6.68 and 4.77 kJ/mol in the presence and absence of the drug, respectively. Fluorescence spectrophotometry revealed that the binding of cimetidine to the purified enzyme induced hyperchromicity and red shift which determined the conformational change on the enzyme. Cimetidine could non-competitively inhibit the liver catalase with high affinity. Binding of cimetidine to the enzyme induced conformational alteration in the enzyme.

  9. Involvement of brain catalase activity in the acquisition of ethanol-induced conditioned place preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font, Laura; Miquel, Marta; Aragon, Carlos M G

    2008-03-18

    It has been suggested that some of the behavioral effects produced by ethanol are mediated by its first metabolite, acetaldehyde. The present research addressed the hypothesis that catalase-dependent metabolism of ethanol to acetaldehyde in the brain is an important step in the production of ethanol-related affective properties. Firstly, we investigated the contribution of brain catalase in the acquisition of ethanol-induced conditioned place preference (CPP). Secondly, the specificity of the catalase inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (AT) was evaluated with morphine- and cocaine-induced CPP. Finally, to investigate the role of catalase in the process of relapse to ethanol seeking caused by re-exposure to ethanol, after an initial conditioning and extinction, mice were primed with saline and ethanol or AT and ethanol and tested for reinstatement of CPP. Conditioned place preference was blocked in animals treated with AT and ethanol. Morphine and cocaine CPP were unaffected by AT treatment. However, the reinstatement of place preference was not modified by catalase inhibition. Taken together, the results of the present study indicate that the brain catalase-H(2)O(2) system contributes to the acquisition of affective-dependent learning induced by ethanol, and support the involvement of centrally-formed acetaldehyde in the formation of positive affective memories produced by ethanol.

  10. Immobilization and kinetics of catalase on calcium carbonate nanoparticles attached epoxy support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preety; Hooda, Vinita

    2014-01-01

    A novel hybrid epoxy/nano CaCO3 composite matrix for catalase immobilization was prepared by polymerizing epoxy resin in the presence of CaCO3 nanoparticles. The hybrid support was characterized using scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Catalase was successfully immobilized onto epoxy/nano CaCO3 support with a conjugation yield of 0.67 ± 0.01 mg/cm(2) and 92.63 ± 0.80 % retention of activity. Optimum pH and optimum temperature of free and immobilized catalases were found to be 7.0 and 35 °C. The value of Km for H2O2 was higher for immobilized enzyme (31.42 mM) than native enzyme (27.73 mM). A decrease in Vmax value from 1,500 to 421.10 μmol (min mg protein)(-1) was observed after immobilization. Thermal and storage stabilities of catalase improved immensely after immobilization. Immobilized enzyme retained three times than the activity of free enzyme when kept at 75 °C for 1 h and the half-life of enzyme increased five times when stored in phosphate buffer (0.01 M, pH 7.0) at 5 °C. The enzyme could be reused 30 times without any significant loss of its initial activity. Desorption of catalase from the hybrid support was minimum at pH 7.0.

  11. Synergistic Roles of Helicobacter pylori Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase and GroEL in Repairing Oxidant-damaged Catalase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahawar, Manish; Tran, ViLinh; Sharp, Joshua S.; Maier, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) produced via the enzyme myeloperoxidase is a major antibacterial oxidant produced by neutrophils, and Met residues are considered primary amino acid targets of HOCl damage via conversion to Met sulfoxide. Met sulfoxide can be repaired back to Met by methionine sulfoxide reductase (Msr). Catalase is an important antioxidant enzyme; we show it constitutes 4–5% of the total Helicobacter pylori protein levels. msr and katA strains were about 14- and 4-fold, respectively, more susceptible than the parent to killing by the neutrophil cell line HL-60 cells. Catalase activity of an msr strain was much more reduced by HOCl exposure than for the parental strain. Treatment of pure catalase with HOCl caused oxidation of specific MS-identified Met residues, as well as structural changes and activity loss depending on the oxidant dose. Treatment of catalase with HOCl at a level to limit structural perturbation (at a catalase/HOCl molar ratio of 1:60) resulted in oxidation of six identified Met residues. Msr repaired these residues in an in vitro reconstituted system, but no enzyme activity could be recovered. However, addition of GroEL to the Msr repair mixture significantly enhanced catalase activity recovery. Neutrophils produce large amounts of HOCl at inflammation sites, and bacterial catalase may be a prime target of the host inflammatory response; at high concentrations of HOCl (1:100), we observed loss of catalase secondary structure, oligomerization, and carbonylation. The same HOCl-sensitive Met residue oxidation targets in catalase were detected using chloramine-T as a milder oxidant. PMID:21460217

  12. A novel fluorescence immunoassay for the sensitive detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in milk based on catalase-mediated fluorescence quenching of CdTe quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui; Huang, Xiaolin; Li, Juan; Shan, Shan; Lai, Weihua; Xiong, Yonghua

    2016-12-01

    Immunoassay is a powerful tool for rapid detection of food borne pathogens in food safety monitoring. However, conventional immunoassay always suffers from low sensitivity when it employs enzyme-catalyzing chromogenic substrates to generate colored molecules as signal outputs. In the present study, we report a novel fluorescence immunoassay for the sensitive detection of E. coli O157:H7 through combination of the ultrahigh bioactivity of catalase to hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) and H 2 O 2 -sensitive mercaptopropionic acid modified CdTe QDs (MPA-QDs) as a signal transduction. Various parameters, including the concentrations of anti-E. coli O157:H7 polyclonal antibody and biotinylated monoclonal antibody, the amounts of H 2 O 2 and streptavidin labeled catalase (CAT), the hydrolysis temperature and time of CAT to H 2 O 2 , as well as the incubation time between H 2 O 2 and MPA-QDs, were systematically investigated and optimized. With optimal conditions, the catalase-mediated fluorescence quenching immunoassay exhibits an excellent sensitivity for E. coli O157:H7 with a detection limit of 5 × 10 2  CFU/mL, which was approximately 140 times lower than that of horseradish peroxidase-based colorimetric immunoassay. The reliability of the proposed method was further evaluated using E. coli O157:H7 spiked milk samples. The average recoveries of E. coli O157:H7 concentrations from 1.18 × 10 3  CFU/mL to 1.18 × 10 6  CFU/mL were in the range of 65.88%-105.6%. In brief, the proposed immunoassay offers a great potential for rapid and sensitive detection of other pathogens in food quality control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Cu–hemin metal-organic frameworks with peroxidase-like activity as peroxidase mimics for colorimetric sensing of glucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Fenfen; He, Juan; Zeng, Mulang; Hao, Juan; Guo, Qiaohui; Song, Yonghai; Wang, Li, E-mail: lwanggroup@aliyun.com [Jiangxi Normal University, Key Laboratory of Functional Small Organic Molecule, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China)

    2016-05-15

    In this work, a facile strategy to synthesize Cu–hemin metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with peroxidase-like activity was reported. The prepared Cu–hemin MOFs were characterized by various techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV–visible absorbance spectra, and so on. The results showed that the prepared Cu–hemin MOFs looked like a ball-flower with an average diameter of 10 μm and provided a large specific surface area. The Cu–hemin MOFs possessing peroxidase-like activity could be used to catalyze the peroxidase substrate of 3,3,5,5-tetramethylbenzidine in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, which was employed to detect H{sub 2}O{sub 2} quantitatively with the linear range from 1.0 μM to 1.0 mM and the detection limit was 0.42 μM. Furthermore, with the additional help of glucose oxidase, a sensitive and selective method to detect glucose was developed by using the Cu–hemin MOFs as catalyst and the linear range was from 10.0 μM to 3.0 mM and the detection limit was 6.9 μM. This work informs researchers of the advantages of MOFs for preparing biomimetic catalysts and extends the functionality of MOFs for biosensor application.Graphical Abstract.

  14. Cardiac-Specific Overexpression of Catalase Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Myocardial Contractile Dysfunction: Role of Autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turdi, Subat; Han, Xuefeng; Huff, Anna F.; Roe, Nathan D.; Hu, Nan; Gao, Feng; Ren, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria is a major initiator of sepsis, leading to cardiovascular collapse. Accumulating evidence has indicated a role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cardiovascular complication in sepsis. This study was designed to examine the effect of cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase in LPS-induced cardiac contractile dysfunction and the underlying mechanism(s) with a focus on autophagy. Catalase transgenic and wild-type FVB mice were challenged with LPS (6 mg/kg) and cardiac function was evaluated. Levels of oxidative stress, autophagy, apoptosis and protein damage were examined using fluorescence microscopy, Western blot, TUNEL assay, caspase-3 activity and carbonyl formation. Kaplan-Meier curve was constructed for survival following LPS treatment. Our results revealed a lower mortality in catalase mice compared with FVB mice following LPS challenge. LPS injection led to depressed cardiac contractile capacity as evidenced by echocardiography and cardiomyocyte contractile function, the effect of which was ablated by catalase overexpression. LPS treatment induced elevated TNF-α level, autophagy, apoptosis (TUNEL, caspase-3 activation, cleaved caspase-3), production of ROS and O2−, and protein carbonyl formation, the effects of which were significantly attenuated by catalase overexpression. Electron microscopy revealed focal myocardial damage characterized by mitochondrial injury following LPS treatment, which was less severe in catalase mice. Interestingly, LPS-induced cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction was prevented by antioxidant NAC and the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. Taken together, our data revealed that catalase protects against LPS-induced cardiac dysfunction and mortality, which may be associated with inhibition of oxidative stress and autophagy. PMID:22902401

  15. Novel nonsense mutation in the katA gene of a catalase-negative Staphylococcus aureus strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagos, Jaime; Alarcón, Pedro; Benadof, Dona; Ulloa, Soledad; Fasce, Rodrigo; Tognarelli, Javier; Aguayo, Carolina; Araya, Pamela; Parra, Bárbara; Olivares, Berta; Hormazábal, Juan Carlos; Fernández, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    We report the first description of a rare catalase-negative strain of Staphylococcus aureus in Chile. This new variant was isolated from blood and synovial tissue samples of a pediatric patient. Sequencing analysis revealed that this catalase-negative strain is related to ST10 strain, which has earlier been described in relation to S. aureus carriers. Interestingly, sequence analysis of the catalase gene katA revealed presence of a novel nonsense mutation that causes premature translational truncation of the C-terminus of the enzyme leading to a loss of 222 amino acids. Our study suggests that loss of catalase activity in this rare catalase-negative Chilean strain is due to this novel nonsense mutation in the katA gene, which truncates the enzyme to just 283 amino acids. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Layer-by-layer assembled multilayers using catalase-encapsulated gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sungwoo; Park, Jeongju [School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Kookmin University, Jeongneung-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jinhan, E-mail: jinhan71@korea.ac.kr [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Korea University, Anam-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-17

    We introduce a novel and versatile approach for the preparation of multilayers, based on catalase-encapsulated gold nanoparticles (CAT-Au{sub NP}), allowing electrostatic charge reversal and structural transformation through pH adjustment. CAT-Au{sub NP}, which are synthesized directly from CAT stabilizer, can be electrostatically assembled with anionic and cationic PEs as a result of the charge reversal of the catalase stabilizers through pH control. In particular, at pH 5.2, near the pI of catalase, dispersed CAT-Au{sub NP} are structurally transformed into colloidal or network CAT-Au{sub NP} nanocomposites. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the layer-by-layer assembled multilayers composed of PEs and CAT-Au{sub NP} induce an effective electron transfer between CAT and the electrode as well as a high loading of CAT and Au{sub NP}, and resultantly exhibit a highly catalytic activity toward H{sub 2}O{sub 2}.

  17. An updated view on horseradish peroxidases: recombinant production and biotechnological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainer, Florian W; Glieder, Anton

    2015-02-01

    Horseradish peroxidase has been the subject of scientific research for centuries. It has been used exhaustively as reporter enzyme in diagnostics and histochemistry and still plays a major role in these applications. Numerous studies have been conducted on the role of horseradish peroxidase in the plant and its catalytic mechanism. However, little progress has been made in its recombinant production. Until now, commercial preparations of horseradish peroxidase are still isolated from plant roots. These preparations are commonly mixtures of various isoenzymes of which only a small fraction has been described so far. The composition of isoenzymes in these mixed isolates is subjected to uncontrollable environmental conditions. Nowadays, horseradish peroxidase regains interest due to its broad applicability in the fields of medicine, life sciences, and biotechnology in cancer therapy, biosensor systems, bioremediation, and biocatalysis. These medically and commercially relevant applications, the recent discovery of new natural isoenzymes with different biochemical properties, as well as the challenges in recombinant production render this enzyme particularly interesting for future biotechnological solutions. Therefore, we reviewed previous studies as well as current developments with biotechnological emphasis on new applications and the major remaining biotechnological challenge-the efficient recombinant production of horseradish peroxidase enzymes.

  18. DESTRUCTIVE LESIONS OF BONES AS A RESULT OF MYCOBACTERIAL PROCESS IN CHILDREN WITH INITIAL IMMUNODEFICIENCIES (CLINICAL, DIAGNOSTICAL AND TACTIC PECULIARITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Yu. Mushkin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Initial immunodeficiencies are genetically conditioned defects of immune system; they are the basis for generalized infections including those induced by mycobacteria of tuberculosis complex. The lesions of skeleton in those patients are of different types depending on the kind of immunodeficiency. The article presents the results of clinical observation, conservative and surgical treatment of 12 children with mycobacterial lesions of skeleton on the ground different initial immunodeficiencies — severe combined immune deficiency, chronic granulematosis and insufficiency of interferon and interleukin 12.Key words: children, initial immunodeficiency, mycobacterial infection, bone lesions, surgical treatment.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2011; 10 (3: 60–64

  19. Screening of postharvest agricultural wastes as alternative sources of peroxidases: characterization and kinetics of a novel peroxidase from lentil ( Lens culinaris L.) stubble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo-Cuadrado, Nazaret; Pérez-Galende, Patricia; Manzano, Teresa; De Maria, Cándido Garcia; Shnyrov, Valery L; Roig, Manuel G

    2012-05-16

    Aqueous crude extracts of a series of plant wastes (agricultural, wild plants, residues from sports activities (grass), ornamental residues (gardens)) from 17 different plant species representative of the typical biodiversity of the Iberian peninsula were investigated as new sources of peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.7). Of these, lentil (Lens culinaris L.) stubble crude extract was seen to provide one of the highest specific peroxidase activities, catalyzing the oxidation of guaiacol in the presence of hydrogen peroxide to tetraguaiacol, and was used for further studies. For the optimum extraction conditions found, the peroxidase activity in this crude extract (110 U mL(-1)) did not vary for at least 15 months when stored at 4 °C (k(inact) = 0.146 year(-1), t(1/2 inact) = 4.75 year), whereas, for comparative purposes, the peroxidase activity (60 U mL(-1)) of horseradish (Armoracia rusticana L.) root crude extract, obtained and stored under the same conditions, showed much faster inactivation kinetics (k(inact) = 2.2 × 10(-3) day(-1), t(1/2 inact) = 315 days). Using guaiacol as an H donor and a universal buffer (see above), all crude extract samples exhibited the highest peroxidase activity in the pH range between 4 and 7. Once semipurified by passing the crude extract through hydrophobic chromatography on phenyl-Sepharose CL-4B, the novel peroxidase (LSP) was characterized as having a purity number (RZ) of 2.5 and three SDS-PAGE electrophoretic bands corresponding to molecular masses of 52, 35, and 18 kDa. The steady-state kinetic study carried out on the H(2)O(2)-mediated oxidation of guaiacol by the catalytic action of this partially purified peroxidase pointed to apparent Michaelian kinetic behavior (K(m)(appH(2)O(2)) = 1.87 mM; V(max)(appH(2)O(2)) = 6.4 mM min(-1); K(m)(app guaicol) = 32 mM; V(max)(app guaicol) = 9.1 mM min(-1)), compatible with the two-substrate ping-pong mechanism generally accepted for peroxidases. Finally, after the effectiveness of the crude

  20. Ameliorating activity of ginger (Zingiber officinale) extract against lead induced renal toxicity in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Y Amarnath; Chalamaiah, M; Ramesh, B; Balaji, G; Indira, P

    2014-05-01

    Lead poisoning has been known to be associated with structural and functional abnormalities of multiple organ systems of human body. The aim of this investigation was to study the renal protective effects of ginger (Zingiber officinale) extract in lead induced toxicity rats. In this study renal glutathione (GSH) level, glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione-s-transferase (GST), and catalase enzymes were measured in lead nitrate (300 mg/kg BW), and lead nitrate plus ginger extract (150 mg/kg BW) treated rat groups for 1 week and 3 weeks respectively. The glutathione level and GSH dependent antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-s-transferase, and catalase significantly (P < 0.05) increased in ginger extract treated rat groups. In addition, histological studies showed lesser renal changes in lead plus ginger extract treated rat groups than that of lead alone treated rat groups. These results indicate that ginger extract alleviated lead toxic effects by enhancing the levels of glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-s-transferase and catalase.

  1. Structure of catalase determined by MicroED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nannenga, Brent L; Shi, Dan; Hattne, Johan; Reyes, Francis E; Gonen, Tamir

    2014-01-01

    MicroED is a recently developed method that uses electron diffraction for structure determination from very small three-dimensional crystals of biological material. Previously we used a series of still diffraction patterns to determine the structure of lysozyme at 2.9 Å resolution with MicroED (Shi et al., 2013). Here we present the structure of bovine liver catalase determined from a single crystal at 3.2 Å resolution by MicroED. The data were collected by continuous rotation of the sample under constant exposure and were processed and refined using standard programs for X-ray crystallography. The ability of MicroED to determine the structure of bovine liver catalase, a protein that has long resisted atomic analysis by traditional electron crystallography, demonstrates the potential of this method for structure determination. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03600.001 PMID:25303172

  2. Secondary metabolites from Tetracera potatoria stem bark with anti-mycobacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomogne-Fodjo, M C Y; Ndinteh, D T; Olivier, D K; Kempgens, P; van Vuuren, S; Krause, R W M

    2017-01-04

    Tetracera potatoria Afzel. Exg. Don (Dilleniaceae) is a medicinal plant used traditionally in Africa for the treatment of tuberculosis related ailments and respiratory infections. The antibacterial activity of the medium polar extracts of T. potatoria leaves and stem bark was recently reported against Mycobacterium smegmatis (MIC 25µg/mL) and M. aurum (65µg/mL), two fast-growing Mycobacterium strains used as model micro-organisms for the more pathogenic strain Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Fomogne-Fodjo et al., 2014). The aim of this study was consequently to isolate the compounds possibly contributing to this activity, and which may therefore be promising precursors to be used for the development of novel anti-TB drugs. T. potatoria medium polar extract [MeOH/DCM (1:1, v/v)] was fractionated sequentially with petroleum ether to which EtOAC and MeOH were gradually added to increase the polarity. The examination of T. potatoria extract and its fractions was guided by bioassays for anti-mycobacterial activity against M. smegmatis (ATCC 23246) and M. aurum (NCTC 10437) using the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) method. All the isolated compounds were structurally elucidated using spectroscopic techniques and evaluated for their anti-mycobacterial activity. Two novel secondary metabolites (1, 2) named tetraceranoate and N-hydroxy imidate-tetracerane, together with five known compounds [β-stigmasterol (3), stigmast-5-en-3β-yl acetate (4), betulinic acid (5), betulin (6) and lupeol (7)] were isolated and identified. Tetraceranoate exhibited the best activity against M. smegmatis with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 7.8µg/mL, while β-stigmasterol, betulinic acid and betulin showed appreciable anti-mycobacterial activity against both strains (MIC 15µg/mL). Seven compounds were isolated from the medium polar extract [MeOH/DCM (1:1, v/v)] of T. potatoria stem bark. Only tetraceranoate one of the isolated compounds showed antibacterial activity against

  3. Andrographolide reorganise hyperglycaemia and distorted antioxidant profile in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Ramavat Ravindhar; Munipally, Praveen Kumar; Nagaraju, Turlapati

    2017-10-26

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a constant and illimitable metabolic disorder that can happen even at a young age due to the virtual absence of naturally acting insulin, which uptakes and accumulates glucose; thereby reduce the use of glucose. In the present study, we evaluated the neuroprotective efficacy of andrographolide on streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic Sprague dawley rats. Diabetes was induced by intraperitonial injection of STZ (45 mg/kg B.W) in Sprague dawley rats. Andrographolide (2.5 mg/kg B.W) was administered orally to diabetic rats and Glibenclamide (25mg/kg B.W) as control for 30 days to assess its effects on blood glucose, insulin, insulin resistance and antioxidant profiles such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, reduced glutathione and lipid peroxidation in various regions of brain namely hypothalamus, cerebellum, hippocampus and brain cerebral cortex. Oral supplementation of andrographolide extensively diminished the blood glucose levels than diabetic control. There was noteworthy reduction in the CAT, SOD and GPx activities in the hippocampus, hypothalamus and cerebral cortex cerebellum of the DM rat brain. However, andrographolide supplementation drastically reverses the CAT, GPx and SOD back to normal levels. In conclusion, the results revealed that andrographolide shown beneficial potentiality against neuropathy in STZ induced diabetic rats. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Catalase Induced by All-Trans Retinoic Acid Is Involved in Antiproliferation of 36B10 Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Woo Yoon; Yu, Jae Ran

    2010-01-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) has antiproliferative effects against brain tumor cells. Recently, ATRA has been reported to induce catalase. We investigated whether catalase induction by ATRA is associated with its antiproliferative effects. 36B10 cells were exposed to 0-50μM ATRA for 24 or 48 hours and mRNA, protein, and activity of catalase were measured. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured using 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate. A clonogenic assay was used to confirm the cytotoxic effect. The mRNA, protein, and activity of catalase were found to increase in a concentration- and incubation- time-dependent manner. The increase in catalase activity induced by ATRA was decreased by the addition of 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (ATZ). ROS was also increased with ATRA and decreased by the addition of ATZ. The decrease in cell survival induced by ATRA was partly rescued by ATZ. Catalase induction by ATRA is involved in ROS overproduction and thus inhibits the proliferation of 36B10 cells.

  5. Feedback regulation of an Agrobacterium catalase gene katA involved in Agrobacterium-plant interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X Q; Li, L P; Pan, S Q

    2001-11-01

    Catalases are known to detoxify H2O2, a major component of oxidative stress imposed on a cell. An Agrobacterium tumefaciens catalase encoded by a chromosomal gene katA has been implicated as an important virulence factor as it is involved in detoxification of H2O2 released during Agrobacterium-plant interaction. In this paper, we report a feedback regulation pathway that controls the expression of katA in A. tumefaciens cells. We observed that katA could be induced by plant tissue sections and by acidic pH on a minimal medium, which resembles the plant environment that the bacteria encounter during the course of infection. This represents a new regulatory factor for catalase induction in bacteria. More importantly, a feedback regulation was observed when the katA-gfp expression was studied in different genetic backgrounds. We found that introduction of a wild-type katA gene encoding a functional catalase into A. tumefaciens cells could repress the katA-gfp expression over 60-fold. The katA gene could be induced by H2O2 and the encoded catalase could detoxify H2O2. In addition, the katA-gfp expression of one bacterial cell could be repressed by other surrounding catalase-proficient bacterial cells. Furthermore, mutation at katA caused a 10-fold increase of the intracellular H2O2 concentration in the bacteria grown on an acidic pH medium. These results suggest that the endogenous H2O2 generated during A. tumefaciens cell growth could serve as the intracellular and intercellular inducer for the katA gene expression and that the acidic pH could pose an oxidative stress on the bacteria. Surprisingly, one mutated KatA protein, exhibiting no significant catalase activity as a result of the alteration of two important residues at the putative active site, could partially repress the katA-gfp expression. The feedback regulation of the katA gene by both catalase activity and KatA protein could presumably maintain an appropriated level of catalase activity and H2O2 inside A

  6. Catalase and Superoxide Dismutase of Root-Colonizing Saprophytic Fluorescent Pseudomonads †

    OpenAIRE

    Katsuwon, Jirasak; Anderson, Anne J.

    1990-01-01

    Root-colonizing, saprophytic fluorescent pseudomonads of the Pseudomonas putida-P. fluorescens group express similar levels of catalase and superoxide dismutase activities during growth on a sucrose- and amino acid-rich medium. Increased specific activities of catalase but not superoxide dismutase were observed during growth of these bacteria on components washed from root surfaces. The specific activities of both enzymes were also regulated during contact of these bacteria with intact bean r...

  7. Husbandry stress exacerbates mycobacterial infections in adult zebrafish, Danio rerio (Hamilton)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, J.M.; Watral, Virginia G.; Schreck, C.B.; Kent, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacteria are significant pathogens of laboratory zebrafish, Danio rerio (Hamilton). Stress is often implicated in clinical disease and morbidity associated with mycobacterial infections but has yet to be examined with zebrafish. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of husbandry stressors on zebrafish infected with mycobacteria. Adult zebrafish were exposed to Mycobacterium marinum or Mycobacterium chelonae, two species that have been associated with disease in zebrafish. Infected fish and controls were then subjected to chronic crowding and handling stressors and examined over an 8-week period. Whole-body cortisol was significantly elevated in stressed fish compared to non-stressed fish. Fish infected with M. marinum ATCC 927 and subjected to husbandry stressors had 14% cumulative mortality while no mortality occurred among infected fish not subjected to husbandry stressors. Stressed fish, infected with M. chelonae H1E2 from zebrafish, were 15-fold more likely to be infected than non-stressed fish at week 8 post-injection. Sub-acute, diffuse infections were more common among stressed fish infected with M. marinum or M. chelonae than non-stressed fish. This is the first study to demonstrate an effect of stress and elevated cortisol on the morbidity, prevalence, clinical disease and histological presentation associated with mycobacterial infections in zebrafish. Minimizing husbandry stress may be effective at reducing the severity of outbreaks of clinical mycobacteriosis in zebrafish facilities. ?? 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. DYNAMICS OF LEAF PEROXIDASE ACTIVITY DURING ONTOGENY OF HEMP PLANTS, IN RELATION TO SEXUAL PHENOTYPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Truta

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available During vegetation of female and male hemp plants (Cannabis sativa L., five quantitative determinations of peroxidase activities were made (40 days, 55 days, 70 days, 85 days, 105 days. Peroxidase activity presented some differences in hemp plants, between females and males, during their vegetation cycle. In female plants, before anthesis were registered peaks of peroxidase activities. The blossoming of male plants was coincident with the increase of catalitic action of peroxidase. Generally, the male plants displayed greater levels of peroxidasic activity.

  9. Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-Vis) and Fluorescence Spectroscopic Investigation of the Interactions of Ionic Liquids and Catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xing; Fan, Yunchang; Yang, Peng; Kong, Jichuan; Li, Dandan; Miao, Juan; Hua, Shaofeng; Hu, Chaobing

    2016-11-01

    The inhibitory effects of nine ionic liquids (ILs) on the catalase activity were investigated using fluorescence, absorption ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. The interactions of ILs and catalase on the molecular level were studied. The experimental results indicated that ILs could inhibit the catalase activity and their inhibitory abilities depended on their chemical structures. Fluorescence experiments showed that hydrogen bonding played an important role in the interaction process. The inhibitory abilities of ILs on catalase activity could be simply described by their hydrophobicity and hydrogen bonding abilities. Unexpected less inhibitory effects of trifluoromethanesulfonate (TfO - ) might be ascribed to its larger size, which makes it difficult to go through the substrate channel of catalase to the active site. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. Surgical excision versus antibiotic treatment for nontuberculous mycobacterial cervicofacial lymphadenitis in children: a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindeboom, Jerome A.; Kuijper, Ed J.; van Coppenraet, Elisabeth S. Bruijnesteijn; Lindeboom, Robert; Prins, Jan M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The optimal treatment of nontuberculosis mycobacterial cervical lymphadenitis in children has not been established. Until recently, surgical excision was the standard treatment, but the number of reports of successful antibiotic treatment is increasing, which questions whether surgery is

  11. Subchronic exposure to high-dose ACE-inhibitor moexipril induces catalase activity in rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeghate, E; Hasan, M Y; Ponery, A S; Nurulain, S M; Petroianu, G A

    2005-12-01

    The long-term clinical effects of ACE-inhibitors have similarities with those of both fibrates and glitazones, activators of peroxisome proliferator activator receptor (PPAR) alpha and gamma, respectively. The antioxidant enzyme catalase, a heme protein that degrades hydrogen peroxide, is found at high concentrations in peroxisomes. Catalase activity is one of the recognized surrogate markers indicative of PPAR activation in the rat liver. The purpose of the study was to establish the effect of moexipril on catalase activity and to compare it with the effect of both saline controls and that of the known PPAR agonist clofibrate (positive control). Three groups of seven rats were used. All substances were applied i.p. daily for 5 days, followed by a 2-day break. The cycle was repeated eight times. After the final cycle (day 56) the animals were sacrificed and liver tissue collected. The number of catalase positive cells in both moexipril group (95% CI 57-61) and clofibrate group (95% CI 72-80) is higher than in controls (95% CI 3-16) (p catalase positive cells in the clofibrate group is higher than in the moexipril group (p inhibitor moexipril induces catalase activity in the rat liver to an extent comparable to fibrates. We suggest that some of the long-term advantages of ACE inhibitor use - beyond mere BP lowering - might be due to a PPAR mediated effect.

  12. Effects of noise exposure on catalase activity of growing lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Kashif Nawaz

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress due to noise was estimated at cell level using model of growing lymphocytes. Lymphocytes were isolated and cultured using conventional methodology. Cell culture of each group was exposed to sound of frequency 1 KHz during incubation. Three groups were defined on the basis of exposure of sound with specific range of intensity and duration of exposure. Group A and Group B were exposed to sound with intensity 110 dBA for four hours per day and for eight hours per day respectively. Control group was exposed to sound less than 85 dBA. Viable cell count was performed using trypan blue. Catalase activity of each group was estimated using ELISA kit.Viable cell count of Group A and Group B was almost same but significantly less than that of control group. Catalase activity of lymphocytes in Group B was significantly low as compared to Group A and controls (p=0.003,p< 0.05. There was no significant difference between catalase activity of Group A and control group.Exposure of sound with frequency 1 KHz and intensity 110 dBA for 4 hours and eight hours per day may induce oxidative stress in growing lymphocytes causing the difference in viable cell count. However the catalase activity depends on duration of exposure. In case of noise exposure of 8 hours per day, it declines significantly as compared to noise exposure of 4 hours per day.

  13. Cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced myocardial contractile dysfunction: role of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turdi, Subat; Han, Xuefeng; Huff, Anna F; Roe, Nathan D; Hu, Nan; Gao, Feng; Ren, Jun

    2012-09-15

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from gram-negative bacteria is a major initiator of sepsis, leading to cardiovascular collapse. Accumulating evidence has indicated a role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cardiovascular complications in sepsis. This study was designed to examine the effect of cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase in LPS-induced cardiac contractile dysfunction and the underlying mechanism(s) with a focus on autophagy. Catalase transgenic and wild-type FVB mice were challenged with LPS (6 mg/kg) and cardiac function was evaluated. Levels of oxidative stress, autophagy, apoptosis, and protein damage were examined using fluorescence microscopy, Western blot, TUNEL assay, caspase-3 activity, and carbonyl formation. A Kaplan-Meier curve was constructed for survival after LPS treatment. Our results revealed a lower mortality in catalase mice compared with FVB mice after LPS challenge. LPS injection led to depressed cardiac contractile capacity as evidenced by echocardiography and cardiomyocyte contractile function, the effect of which was ablated by catalase overexpression. LPS treatment induced elevated TNF-α level, autophagy, apoptosis (TUNEL, caspase-3 activation, cleaved caspase-3), production of ROS and O(2)(-), and protein carbonyl formation, the effects of which were significantly attenuated by catalase overexpression. Electron microscopy revealed focal myocardial damage characterized by mitochondrial injury after LPS treatment, which was less severe in catalase mice. Interestingly, LPS-induced cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction was prevented by the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine and the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. Taken together, our data revealed that catalase protects against LPS-induced cardiac dysfunction and mortality, which may be associated with inhibition of oxidative stress and autophagy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Elevated catalase expression in a fungal pathogen is a double-edged sword of iron.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnab Pradhan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Most fungal pathogens of humans display robust protective oxidative stress responses that contribute to their pathogenicity. The induction of enzymes that detoxify reactive oxygen species (ROS is an essential component of these responses. We showed previously that ectopic expression of the heme-containing catalase enzyme in Candida albicans enhances resistance to oxidative stress, combinatorial oxidative plus cationic stress, and phagocytic killing. Clearly ectopic catalase expression confers fitness advantages in the presence of stress, and therefore in this study we tested whether it enhances fitness in the absence of stress. We addressed this using a set of congenic barcoded C. albicans strains that include doxycycline-conditional tetON-CAT1 expressors. We show that high basal catalase levels, rather than CAT1 induction following stress imposition, reduce ROS accumulation and cell death, thereby promoting resistance to acute peroxide or combinatorial stress. This conclusion is reinforced by our analyses of phenotypically diverse clinical isolates and the impact of stochastic variation in catalase expression upon stress resistance in genetically homogeneous C. albicans populations. Accordingly, cat1Δ cells are more sensitive to neutrophil killing. However, we find that catalase inactivation does not attenuate C. albicans virulence in mouse or invertebrate models of systemic candidiasis. Furthermore, our direct comparisons of fitness in vitro using isogenic barcoded CAT1, cat1Δ and tetON-CAT1 strains show that, while ectopic catalase expression confers a fitness advantage during peroxide stress, it confers a fitness defect in the absence of stress. This fitness defect is suppressed by iron supplementation. Also high basal catalase levels induce key iron assimilatory functions (CFL5, FET3, FRP1, FTR1. We conclude that while high basal catalase levels enhance peroxide stress resistance, they place pressure on iron homeostasis through an

  15. Action of ionizing radiation on catalase synthesis in the rat liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komov, V.P.; Strelkova, M.A.

    1975-01-01

    3-amino-1,2,4-triazole was used to study the effect of total-body X-ray irradiation on the rates of catalase synthesis and breakdown in rat liver. It was found that in the interval between hour 22 and hour 144 of radiation sickness, the average rate of catalase synthesis in the liver was 2.6 times lower in rats that received a dose of 800 rads than in control rats

  16. Activation of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha Improves Aged and UV-Irradiated Skin by Catalase Induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Mi Hee; Lee, Se-Rah; Kim, Min-Kyoung; Shin, Chang-Yup; Lee, Dong Hun; Chung, Jin Ho

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) is a nuclear hormone receptor involved in the transcriptional regulation of lipid metabolism, fatty acid oxidation, and glucose homeostasis. Its activation stimulates antioxidant enzymes such as catalase, whose expression is decreased in aged human skin. Here we investigated the expression of PPARα in aged and ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated skin, and whether PPARα activation can modulate expressions of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and procollagen through catalase regulation. We found that PPARα mRNA level was significantly decreased in intrinsically aged and photoaged human skin as well as in UV-irradiated skin. A PPARα activator, Wy14643, inhibited UV-induced increase of MMP-1 and decrease of procollagen expression and caused marked increase in catalase expression. Furthermore, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was suppressed by Wy14643 in UV-irradiated and aged dermal fibroblasts, suggesting that the PPARα activation-induced upregulation of catalase leads to scavenging of ROS produced due to UV irradiation or aging. PPARα knockdown decreased catalase expression and abolished the beneficial effects of Wy14643. Topical application of Wy14643 on hairless mice restored catalase activity and prevented MMP-13 and inflammatory responses in skin. Our findings indicate that PPARα activation triggers catalase expression and ROS scavenging, thereby protecting skin from UV-induced damage and intrinsic aging.

  17. [Kinetic characteristics of extracellular catalase from Penicillium piceum F-648 and variants of fungi, adapted to hydrogen peroxide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremin, A N; Metelitsa, D I; Moroz, I V; Pavlovskaia, Zh I; Mikhaĭlova, R V

    2002-01-01

    A comparative kinetic study of extracellular catalases produced by Penicillium piceum F-648 and their variants adapted to H2O2 was performed in culture liquid filtrates. The specific activity of catalase, the maximum rate of catalase-induced H2O2 degradation (Vmax),Vmax/KM ratio, and the catalase inactivation rate constant in the enzymatic reaction (kin, s-1) were estimated in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) at 30 degrees C. The effective constant representing the rate of catalase thermal inactivation (kin*, s-1) was determined at 45 degrees C. In all samples, the specific activity and KM for catalase were maximum at a protein concentration in culture liquid filtrates of 2.5-3.5 x 10(-4) mg/ml. The effective constants describing the rate of H2O2 degradation (k, s-1) were similar to that observed in the initial culture. These values reflected a twofold decrease in catalase activity in culture liquid filtrates. We hypothesized that culture liquid filtrates contain two isoforms of extracellular catalase characterized by different activities and affinities for H2O2. Catalases from variants 5 and 3 with high and low affinities for H2O2, respectively, had a greater operational stability than the enzyme from the initial culture. The method of adaptive selection for H2O2 can be used to obtain fungal variants producing extracellular catalases with improved properties.

  18. Immobilized glucose oxidase--catalase and their deactivation in a differential-bed loop reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prenosil, J E

    1979-01-01

    Glucose oxidase containing catalase was immobilized with a copolymer of phenylenediamine and glutaraldehyde on pumice and titania carrier to study the enzymatic oxidation of glucose in a differential-bed loop reactor. The reaction rate was found to be first order with respect to the concentration of limiting oxygen substrate, suggesting a strong external mass-transfer resistance for all the flow rates used. The partial pressure of oxygen was varied from 21.3 up to 202.6 kPa. The use of a differential-bed loop reactor for the determination of the active enzyme concentration in the catalyst with negligible internal pore diffusion resistance is shown. Catalyst deactivation was studied, especially with respect to the presence of catalase. It is believed that the hydrogen peroxide formed in the oxidation reaction deactivates catalase first; if an excess of catalase is present, the deactivation of glucose oxidase remains small. The mathematical model subsequently developed adequately describes the experimental results.

  19. COMPARISON OF METHODS FOR ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE AND PEROXIDASE DETECTION IN MILK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    felipe Nael Seixas

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the performance of strips for colorimetric detection of alkaline phosphatase and peroxidase in milk, comparing them with a kit of reagents for alkaline phosphatase and the official methodology for peroxidase. The samples were analyzed at the Laboratory Inspection of Products of Animal Origin, State University of Londrina. For the comparison tests for the detection of alkaline phosphatase four treatments were made by adding different percentages of raw milk (1%, 2%, 5% and 10% in the pasteurized milk, plus two control treatments. Thirty-eight samples triplicate for each treatment were analyzed. To compare the performance of tests for peroxidase 80 pasteurized milk samples were evaluated simultaneously by official methodology and by colorimetric strips. The performance of the alkaline phosphatase were different for the treatments with 1% and 2% of raw milk which had all the strips change color as the reagent kit showed the presence of phosphatase in just 2.63% and 5.26% the cases, respectively for each treatment. The colorimetric strips for alkaline phosphatase are more sensitive for the identification of small quantities compared to the reagent kit. The performance of tests for peroxidase showed no difference. The strips for the detection of peroxidase or alkaline phosphatase were effective and can replace traditional methods.

  20. Polypeptides having catalase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ye; Duan, Junxin; Zhang, Yu; Tang, Lan

    2017-05-02

    Provided are isolated polypeptides having catalase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. Also provided are nucleic acid constructs, vectors and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  1. Up-regulation of P-glycoprotein expression by catalase via JNK activation in HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Xu, Jianfeng; Min, Taishan; Huang, Weida

    2006-01-01

    Overexpression of the MDR1 gene is one of the reasons for multidrug resistance (MDR). Some studies suggested that antioxidants could down-regulate MDR1 expression as a possible cancer treatment. In this report, we try to determine the effects of antioxidants (catalase or N-acetylcysteine [NAC]) on the regulation of intrinsic MDR1 overexpression in HepG2 cells. Adding catalase or N-acetylcysteine to the HepG2 culture led to a significant increase of MDR1 mRNA and P-glycoprotein drug transporter activity. After catalase or NAC treatment, a reduced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was observed. The JNK inhibitor SP600125 abolished the positive effects of catalase on drug transporter activity in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the up-regulation of P-glycoprotein functions by catalase was only observed in HepG2 cells but not in other cell lines tested (MCF-7, A549, A431). These data suggested that catalase can up-regulate P-glycoprotein expression in HepG2 cells via reducing intracellular ROS, and JNK may mediate this process.

  2. Catalase activity of a crude enzyme preparation from iron-chlorotic barley (Hordeum vulgaris) seedlings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotaka, S; Krueger, A P; Andriese, P C

    1964-12-19

    An attempt is made to investigate the effect of Fe-EDTA on catalase activity of the enzyme preparation from iron-chlorotic barley. It has been observed that the addition of iron in the form of iron-potassium-ethylene-tetraacetate to cell-free extracts prepared from barley seedlings which had developed chlorosis produced a marked increase in the catalase activity of the extracts. Results are presented which indicate that the pattern of increase in catalase activity is related to the extent of chlorosis. 7 references, 3 figures.

  3. Heterologous Expression of Peroxidases : Chapter 12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christien Lokman; S. de Weert

    2010-01-01

    This monograph describes many applications of peroxidase-based biocatalysis in the biotechnology industry. The need for such a book emerges from the considerable amount of new data regarding the phylogeny, reaction mechanisms, thermodynamic characterization and structural features of fungal and

  4. Isolation and characterization of a catalase gene "HuCAT3" from pitaya (Hylocereus undatus) and its expression under abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Qiong; Gao, Guo-Li; Fan, Qing-jie; Qiao, Guang; Wen, Xiao-Peng; Liu, Tao; Peng, Zhi-Jun; Cai, Yong-Qiang

    2015-05-25

    Abiotic stresses usually cause H2O2 accumulation, with harmful effects, in plants. Catalase may play a key protective role in plant cells by detoxifying this excess H2O2. Pitaya (Hylocereus undatus) shows broad ecological adaptation due to its high tolerance to abiotic stresses, e.g. drought, heat and poor soil. However, involvement of the pitaya catalase gene (HuCAT) in tolerance to abiotic stresses is unknown. In the present study, a full-length HuCAT3 cDNA (1870 bp) was isolated from pitaya based on our previous microarray data and RACE method. The cDNA sequence and deduced amino acid sequence shared 73-77% and 75-80% identity with other plant catalases, respectively. HuCAT3 contains conserved catalase family domain and catalytic sites. Pairwise comparison and phylogenetic analysis indicated that HuCAT3 is most similar to Eriobotrya japonica CAT, followed by Dimocarpus longan CAT and Nicotiana tabacum CAT1. Expression profile analysis demonstrated that HuCAT3 is mainly expressed in green cotyledons and mature stems, and was regulated by H2O2, drought, cold and salt stress, whereas, its expression patterns and maximum expression levels varied with stress types. HuCAT activity increased as exposure to the tested stresses, and the fluctuation of HuCAT activity was consistent with HuCAT3 mRNA abundance (except for 0.5 days upon drought stress). HuCAT3 mRNA elevations and HuCAT activities changes under cold stress were also in conformity with the cold tolerances among the four genotypes. The obtained results confirmed a major role of HuCAT3 in abiotic stress response of pitaya. This may prove useful in understanding pitaya's high tolerance to abiotic stresses at molecular level. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Oxidation of eugenol by purified human term placental peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, R; Kulkarni, K A; Kulkarni, A P

    2000-01-01

    The oxidation of eugenol by purified human term placental peroxidase (HTPP) was examined. Spectral analyses indicated that, similar to horseradish peroxidase, HTPP is capable of catalyzing the oxidation of eugenol. The accumulated stable product in the reaction medium due to eugenol oxidation by HTPP was tentatively identified as quinone methide of eugenol (EQM). The EQM formation exhibited a pH optimum of 8.0 and was dependent on incubation time, amount of HTPP and the concentration of both eugenol and hydrogen peroxide. The specific activity of approx 2.8 micromoles of EQM/min/mg protein was observed with different preparations of HTPP. The EQM formation was significantly suppressed by glutathione and ascorbic acid. The classical peroxidase inhibitors viz. potassium cyanide and sodium azide blocked the reaction in a concentration manner. Collectively, the results suggest that eugenol may undergo peroxidative metabolism in human placenta. Copyright 2000 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  6. Optimization of extracellular catalase production from Aspergillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aghomotsegin

    extracellular catalase produced by the strain in the optimized medium was about four times higher than ... celial and unicellular fungi in synthetic media (Kurakov et .... covering the appropriate range and the broad calibration kit ... This optimization allowed us to define new cultural con- ..... Ann. New York Academy Sci.

  7. The mycobacterial DNA-binding protein 1 (MDP1 from Mycobacterium bovis BCG influences various growth characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurischat Sven

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pathogenic mycobacteria such as M. tuberculosis, M. bovis or M. leprae are characterised by their extremely slow growth rate which plays an important role in mycobacterial virulence and eradication of the bacteria. Various limiting factors influence the generation time of mycobacteria, and the mycobacterial DNA-binding protein 1 (MDP1 has also been implicated in growth regulation. Our strategy to investigate the role of MDP1 in mycobacterial growth consisted in the generation and characterisation of a M. bovis BCG derivative expressing a MDP1-antisense gene. Results The expression rate of the MDP1 protein in the recombinant M. bovis BCG containing the MDP1-antisense plasmid was reduced by about 50% compared to the reference strain M. bovis BCG containing the empty vector. In comparison to this reference strain, the recombinant M. bovis BCG grew faster in broth culture and reached higher cell masses in stationary phase. Likewise its intracellular growth in mouse and human macrophages was ameliorated. Bacterial clumping in broth culture was reduced by the antisense plasmid. The antisense plasmid increased the susceptibility of the bacteria towards Ampicillin. 2-D protein gels of bacteria maintained under oxygen-poor conditions demonstrated a reduction in the number and the intensity of many protein spots in the antisense strain compared to the reference strain. Conclusion The MDP1 protein has a major impact on various growth characteristics of M. bovis BCG. It plays an important role in virulence-related traits such as aggregate formation and intracellular multiplication. Its impact on the protein expression in a low-oxygen atmosphere indicates a role in the adaptation to the hypoxic conditions present in the granuloma.

  8. Catalytic Properties and Immobilization Studies of Catalase from Malva sylvestris L.

    OpenAIRE

    Arabaci, G.; Usluoglu, A.

    2013-01-01

    Catalase was partially purified from Malva sylvestris L. and immobilized onto chitosan. Then, its catalytic properties were investigated. (NH4)2SO4 precipitation and dialysis were performed in the extracted enzyme. Further purification was performed with sephadex G-200 column. Kinetic studies of the purified enzyme activity were measured and characterized. The inhibitory effects of KCN, NaN3, CuSO4, and EDTA on M. sylvestris L. catalase activity were observed except NaCl. Furthermore, M. sylv...

  9. High production, purification, biochemical characterization and gene analysis of a novel catalase from the thermophilic bacterium Ureibacillus thermosphaericus FZSF03.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xianbo; Lin, Xinjian; Tian, Yandan; Chen, Jichen; You, Minsheng

    2017-10-01

    A catalase-producing thermophilic bacterium, Ureibacillus thermosphaericus FZSF03, was isolated from high-temperature compost. Catalase production in this strain increased 31 times and reached 57,630U/mL after optimization in a shake flask, which might represent the highest catalase activity level among reported wild strains. This catalase was further purified and identified. The purified enzyme showed a specific activity of 219,360U/mg, higher than many other catalases. The molecular weight of this enzyme is 52kDa according to sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and the enzyme was identified as a monofunctional haeme catalase of Ureibacillus thermosphaericus by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)/MS. The optimal reaction temperature for this catalase was found to be 60°C. Stability was observed at 60°C and at a pH of 10.0, indicating the superiority of this enzyme at a high temperature and under alkaline conditions. Therefore, this catalase is a prospective candidate for industrial production and applications. The gene encoding this catalase is 1503bp. As the amino acid sequence shows low similarity with other catalases, we suggest that this is a novel monofunctional haeme catalase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Freezability of water buffalo spermatozoa is improved with the addition of catalase in cryodiluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, L; Hassan Andrabi, S M; Ahmed, H; Hussain Shah, A A

    Catalase enzyme is usually distributed in mammalian seminal plasma, where it decomposes hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen and enhances sperm survivability. To evaluate the effect of catalase (0, 100, 200 or 300 IU/ml) added in tris-citric acid (TCA) based extender on motion characteristics, viability and DNA integrity of bubaline spermatozoa at post dilution (PD) and post thawing (PT) stages of cryopreservation. Collection of semen was done in four Nili-Ravi bulls with an artificial vagina (42 degree C). Qualified semen samples from each bull were further subdivided into four aliquots for dilution with the experimental TCA extender containing either 0.0 (T1), 100 IU (T2), 200 IU (T3) or 300 IU (T4) catalase (activity12660 U/mg). At PT, mean computer progressive motility, average path velocity, straight line velocity, curvilinear velocity, visual motility and DNA integrity were higher (P catalase fortified treatment groups as compared with control. Regarding plasma membrane integrity and supra-vital plasma membrane integrity, at PT the mean values were higher (P catalase at a concentration of 300IU/ml in TCA cryodiluent improved the freezability of water buffalo spermatozoa.

  11. Low dose X –ray effects on catalase activity in animal tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Focea, R; Nadejde, C; Creanga, D; Luchian, T

    2012-01-01

    This study was intended to investigate the effect of low-dose X ray-irradiation upon the activity of catalase (CAT) in freshly excised chicken tissues (liver, kidney, brain, muscle). The tissue samples were irradiated with 0.5Gy and 2Gy respectively, in a 6 MV photon beam produced by a clinical linear accelerator (VARIAN CLINAC 2100SC). The dose rate was of 260.88cGy/min. at 100 cm source to sample distance. The catalase level was assayed spectrophotometrically, based on reaction kinetics, using a catalase UV assay kit (SIGMA). Catalase increased activity in various tissue samples exposed to the studied X ray doses (for example with 24 % in the liver cells, p<0.05) suggested the stimulation of the antioxidant enzyme biosynthesis within several hours after exposure at doses of 0.5 Gy and 2 Gy; the putative enzyme inactivation could also occur (due to the injuries on the hydrogen bonds that ensure the specificity of CAT active site) but the resulted balance of the two concurrent processes indicates the cell ability of decomposing the hydrogen peroxide-with benefits for the cell physiology restoration for the chosen low dose radiation.

  12. Comparison of the phytoremediation potentials of Medicago falcata L. And Medicago sativa L. in aged oil-sludge-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchenko, Leonid; Muratova, Anna; Turkovskaya, Olga

    2017-01-01

    Thirteen-year monitoring of the vegetation growing in the industrial and adjacent areas of an oil refinery showed the prevalence of yellow medick (Medicago falcata L.) over other plant species, including alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.). A comparative field study of the two Medicago species established that yellow medick and alfalfa exhibited similar resistance to soil petroleum hydrocarbons and that the pollutant concentration in their rhizosphere was 30% lower than that in the surrounding bulk soil. In laboratory pot experiments, yellow medick reduced the contaminant content by 18% owing to the degradation of the major heavy oil fractions, such as paraffins, naphthenes, and alcohol and benzene tars; and it was more successful than alfalfa. Both species were equally effective in stimulating the total number of soil microorganisms, but the number of hydrocarbon-oxidizing microorganisms, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degraders, was larger in the root zone of alfalfa. In turn, yellow medick provided a favorable balance of available nitrogen. Both Medicago species equally stimulated the dehydrogenase and peroxidase activities of the soil, and yellow medick increased the activity of soil polyphenol oxidase but reduced the activity of catalase. The root tissue activity of catalase, ascorbate oxidase, and tyrosinase was grater in alfalfa than in yellow medick. The peroxidase activity of plant roots was similar in both species, but nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed some differences in the peroxidase profiles of the root extracts of alfalfa and yellow medick. Overall, this study suggests that the phytoremediation potentials of yellow medick and alfalfa are similar, with some differences.

  13. Effects of cysteine on growth, protease production, and catalase activity of Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    OpenAIRE

    Himelbloom, B H; Hassan, H M

    1986-01-01

    Cysteine inhibits growth of and protease production by Pseudomonas fluorescens NC3. Catalase activity in P. fluorescens NC3 was increased by cysteine. The addition of exogenous hydrogen peroxide did not increase catalase activity, thus suggesting a role for the endogenous generation of hydrogen peroxide via the autoxidation of cysteine.

  14. Tailoring nutritional and process variables for hyperproduction of catalase from a novel isolated bacterium Geobacillus sp. BSS-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauldhar, Baljinder Singh; Sooch, Balwinder Singh

    2016-01-14

    Catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) is one of the important industrial enzyme employed in diagnostic and analytical methods in the form of biomarkers and biosensors in addition to their enormous applications in textile, paper, food and pharmaceutical sectors. The present study demonstrates the utility of a newly isolated and adapted strain of genus Geobacillus possessing unique combination of several industrially important extremophilic properties for the hyper production of catalase. The bacterium can grow over a wide range of pH (3-12) and temperature (10-90 °C) with extraordinary capability to produce catalase. A novel extremophilic strain belonging to genus Geobacillus was exploited for the production of catalase by tailoring its nutritional requirements and process variables. One variable at a time traditional approach followed by computational designing was applied to customize the fermentation process. A simple fermentation media containing only three components namely sucrose (0.55 %, w/v), yeast extract (1.0 %, w/v) and BaCl2 (0.08 %, w/v) was designed for the hyperproduction of catalase. A controlled and optimum air supply caused a tremendous increase in the enzyme production on moving the bioprocess from the flask to bioreactor level. The present paper reports high quantum of catalase production (105,000 IU/mg of cells) in a short fermentation time of 12 h. To the best of our knowledge, there is no report in the literature that matches the performance of the developed protocol for the catalase production. This is the first serious study covering intracellular catalase production from thermophilic genus Geobacillus. An increase in intracellular catalase production by 214.72 % was achieved in the optimized medium when transferred from the shake flask to the fermenter level. The extraordinary high production of catalase from Geobacillus sp. BSS-7 makes the isolated strain a prospective candidate for bulk catalase production on an industrial scale.

  15. The effects of exogenous catalase on broad-spectrum near-UV (300-400nm) treated Escherichia coli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sammartano, L.J.; Tuveson, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Catalase incorporated into plating medium protects against inactivation and mutagenesis by broad-spectrum near-ultraviolet wavelength (300-400nm) (NUV) radiation in strains of Escherichia coli. Plating medium containing catalase does not provide protection against inactivation by wavelengths in the FUV region. Catalase added to the cell suspension during or added immediately after NUV exposure also protects against inactivation. The protection provided by catalase suggests a possible role for hydrogen peroxide in the processes of inactivation and mutagenesis by broad-spectrum NUV. (author)

  16. The activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase in isogenous bacteria strains with different radioresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'eva, E.I.; Goncharenko, E.N.; Yudz, T.I.; Samojlenko, I.I.

    1984-01-01

    The catalase and superoxide dismutase activity in isogenous bacterial strains with various radiosensitivity is investigated. In micrococcus radiodurans mutants with defects in the DNA repair systems the superoxide dismutase activity is lower than in the wild type cells. In investigated Escherichia coli strains differing in radiosensitivity, no alteration in catalase and superoxide dismutase activity is found. The conclusion is drawn that viability of bacteria subjected to the effect of ionizing radiations is determined by the efficiency of DNA repair systems whose functional reliability is sometimes connected with the catalase and suferoxide dismutase activity

  17. The effects of xylitol and sorbitol on lysozyme- and peroxidase-related enzymatic and candidacidal activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bum-Soo; Chang, Ji-Youn; Kim, Yoon-Young; Kho, Hong-Seop

    2015-07-01

    To investigate whether xylitol and sorbitol affect enzymatic and candidacidal activities of lysozyme, the peroxidase system, and the glucose oxidase-mediated peroxidase system. Xylitol and sorbitol were added to hen egg-white lysozyme, bovine lactoperoxidase, glucose oxidase-mediated peroxidase, and whole saliva in solution and on hydroxyapatite surfaces. The enzymatic activities of lysozyme, peroxidase, and glucose oxidase-mediated peroxidase were determined by the turbidimetric method, the NbsSCN assay, and production of oxidized o-dianisidine, respectively. Candidacidal activities were determined by comparing colony forming units using Candida albicans ATCC strains 10231, 11006, and 18804. While xylitol and sorbitol did not affect the enzymatic activity of hen egg-white lysozyme both in solution and on hydroxyapatite surfaces, they did inhibit the enzymatic activity of salivary lysozyme significantly in solution, but not on the surfaces. Xylitol and sorbitol enhanced the enzymatic activities of both bovine lactoperoxidase and salivary peroxidase significantly in a dose-dependent manner in solution, but not on the surfaces. Sorbitol, but not xylitol, inhibited the enzymatic activity of glucose oxidase-mediated peroxidase significantly. Both xylitol and sorbitol did not affect candidacidal activities of hen egg-white lysozyme, the bovine lactoperoxidase system, or the glucose oxidase-mediated bovine lactoperoxidase system. Xylitol and sorbitol inhibited salivary lysozyme activity, but enhanced both bovine lactoperoxidase and salivary peroxidase activities significantly in solution. Xylitol and sorbitol did not augment lysozyme- and peroxidase-related candidacidal activities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Involvement of c-Met- and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase dependent pathways in arsenite-induced downregulation of catalase in hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soohee; Lee, Seung Heon; Kang, Sukmo; Lee, Lyon; Park, Jung-Duck; Ryu, Doug-Young

    2011-01-01

    Catalase protects cells from reactive oxygen species-induced damage by catalyzing the breakdown of hydrogen peroxide to oxygen and water. Arsenite decreases catalase activity; it activates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and its key downstream effector Akt in a variety of cells. The PI3K pathway is known to inhibit catalase expression. c-Met, an upstream regulator of PI3K and Akt, is also involved in the regulation of catalase expression. To examine the involvement of c-Met and PI3K pathways in the arsenite-induced downregulation of catalase, catalase mRNA and protein expression were analyzed in the human hepatoma cell line HepG2 treated with arsenite and either an inhibitor of c-Met (PHA665752 (PHA)) or of PI3K (LY294002 (LY)). Arsenite treatment markedly activated Akt and decreased the levels of both catalase mRNA and protein. Both PHA and LY attenuated arsenite-induced activation of Akt. PHA and LY treatment also prevented the inhibitory effect of arsenite on catalase protein expression but did not affect the level of catalase mRNA. These findings suggest that arsenite-induced inhibition of catalase expression is regulated at the mRNA and post-transcriptional levels in HepG2 cells, and that the post-transcriptional regulation is mediated via c-Met- and PI3K-dependent mechanisms.

  19. The grapevine VviPrx31 peroxidase as a candidate gene involved in anthocyanin degradation in ripening berries under high temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movahed, Nooshin; Pastore, Chiara; Cellini, Antonio; Allegro, Gianluca; Valentini, Gabriele; Zenoni, Sara; Cavallini, Erika; D'Incà, Erica; Tornielli, Giovanni Battista; Filippetti, Ilaria

    2016-05-01

    Anthocyanin levels decline in some red grape berry varieties ripened under high-temperature conditions, but the underlying mechanism is not yet clear. Here we studied the effects of two different temperature regimes, representing actual Sangiovese (Vitis vinifera L.) viticulture regions, on the accumulation of mRNAs and enzymes controlling berry skin anthocyanins. Potted uniform plants of Sangiovese were kept from veraison to harvest, in two plastic greenhouses with different temperature conditions. The low temperature (LT) conditions featured average and maximum daily air temperatures of 20 and 29 °C, respectively, whereas the corresponding high temperature (HT) conditions were 22 and 36 °C, respectively. The anthocyanin concentration at harvest was much lower in HT berries than LT berries although their profile was similar under both conditions. Under HT conditions, the biosynthesis of anthocyanins was suppressed at both the transcriptional and enzymatic levels, but peroxidase activity was higher. This suggests that the low anthocyanin content of HT berries reflects the combined impact of reduced biosynthesis and increased degradation, particularly the direct role of peroxidases in anthocyanin catabolism. Overexpression of VviPrx31 decreased anthocyanin contents in Petunia hybrida petals under heat stress condition. These data suggest that high temperature can stimulate peroxidase activity thus anthocyanin degradation in ripening grape berries.

  20. Atividade do sistema antioxidante e desenvolvimento de aerênquima em raízes de milho 'Saracura' Antioxidant system activity and aerenchyma formation in 'Saracura' maize roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabricio José Pereira

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar a influência de sucessivos ciclos de seleção do milho 'Saracura' na atividade das enzimas do sistema antioxidante, e a relação dessas enzimas com a capacidade dessa variedade em desenvolver aerênquima. Sementes de 18 ciclos de seleção intercalados do milho 'Saracura' e da cultivar BR 107, sensível à hipoxia, foram semeadas em vasos e em casa de vegetação. As plantas foram submetidas ao alagamento intermitente de dois em dois dias. As amostras de raízes foram coletadas após 60 dias e analisaram-se as atividades das enzimas peroxidase do guaiacol, peroxidase do ascorbato e catalase, além da capacidade das plantas de cada ciclo desenvolverem aerênquima. Ao longo dos ciclos, as plantas apresentaram modificações na atividade das enzimas, com aumento na de peroxidase do ascorbato e diminuição na de catalase e de peroxidase do guaiacol. Observou-se, ainda, maior capacidade de desenvolver aerênquima nos últimos ciclos de seleção. A redução na atividade das enzimas do sistema antioxidante parece estar relacionada a um desbalanço na decomposição de H2O2.This work aimed to assess the influence of successive selection cycles in 'Saracura' maize on the enzyme activity of the antioxidant system and the relationship of these enzymes with the aerenchyma development capacity of this variety. Seeds of 18 intercalated selection cycles of the 'Saracura' maize and of the cultivar BR 107, sensitive to hipoxia, were sown in pots in the greenhouse. Plants were submitted to intermittent soil flooding each two days. After 60 days, the roots were sampled and analysis were done for the guaiacol peroxidase, ascorbate peroxidase, and catalase activities and for the capacity of the plants of each cycle to develop aerenchyma. The plants showed modifications in enzyme activity along the cycles, increasing the ascorbate peroxidase activity and decreasing the catalase and guaiacol peroxidase ones. A greater

  1. Eosinophil peroxidase signals via epidermal growth factor-2 to induce cell proliferation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Marie-Therese

    2011-11-01

    Eosinophils exert many of their inflammatory effects in allergic disorders through the degranulation and release of intracellular mediators, including a set of cationic granule proteins that include eosinophil peroxidase. Studies suggest that eosinophils are involved in remodeling. In previous studies, we showed that eosinophil granule proteins activate mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling. In this study, we investigated the receptor mediating eosinophil peroxidase-induced signaling and downstream effects. Human cholinergic neuroblastoma IMR32 and murine melanoma B16.F10 cultures, real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunoprecipitations, and Western blotting were used in the study. We showed that eosinophil peroxidase caused a sustained increase in both the expression of epidermal growth factor-2 (HER2) and its phosphorylation at tyrosine 1248, with the consequent activation of extracellular-regulated kinase 1\\/2. This, in turn, promoted a focal adhesion kinase-dependent egress of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(kip) from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Eosinophil peroxidase induced a HER2-dependent up-regulation of cell proliferation, indicated by an up-regulation of the nuclear proliferation marker Ki67. This study identifies HER2 as a novel mediator of eosinophil peroxidase signaling. The results show that eosinophil peroxidase, at noncytotoxic levels, can drive cell-cycle progression and proliferation, and contribute to tissue remodeling and cell turnover in airway disease. Because eosinophils are a feature of many cancers, these findings also suggest a role for eosinophils in tumorigenesis.

  2. Expression of a bacterial catalase in a strictly anaerobic methanogen significantly increases tolerance to hydrogen peroxide but not oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Matthew E.; Schaff, Cody W.; Horne, Alexandra J.; Lessner, Faith H.

    2014-01-01

    Haem-dependent catalase is an antioxidant enzyme that degrades H2O2, producing H2O and O2, and is common in aerobes. Catalase is present in some strictly anaerobic methane-producing archaea (methanogens), but the importance of catalase to the antioxidant system of methanogens is poorly understood. We report here that a survey of the sequenced genomes of methanogens revealed that the majority of species lack genes encoding catalase. Moreover, Methanosarcina acetivorans is a methanogen capable of synthesizing haem and encodes haem-dependent catalase in its genome; yet, Methanosarcina acetivorans cells lack detectable catalase activity. However, inducible expression of the haem-dependent catalase from Escherichia coli (EcKatG) in the chromosome of Methanosarcina acetivorans resulted in a 100-fold increase in the endogenous catalase activity compared with uninduced cells. The increased catalase activity conferred a 10-fold increase in the resistance of EcKatG-induced cells to H2O2 compared with uninduced cells. The EcKatG-induced cells were also able to grow when exposed to levels of H2O2 that inhibited or killed uninduced cells. However, despite the significant increase in catalase activity, growth studies revealed that EcKatG-induced cells did not exhibit increased tolerance to O2 compared with uninduced cells. These results support the lack of catalase in the majority of methanogens, since methanogens are more likely to encounter O2 rather than high concentrations of H2O2 in the natural environment. Catalase appears to be a minor component of the antioxidant system in methanogens, even those that are aerotolerant, including Methanosarcina acetivorans. Importantly, the experimental approach used here demonstrated the feasibility of engineering beneficial traits, such as H2O2 tolerance, in methanogens. PMID:24222618

  3. Increased catalase activity by all-trans retinoic acid and its effect on radiosensitivity in rat glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Hua; Jeon, Ha Yeun; Park, Woo Yoon; Kim, Won Dong; Ahn, Hee Yul; Yu, Jae Ran

    2005-01-01

    It has been reported that all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) can inhibit glioma growing in vitro. However, clinical trials with ATRA alone in gliomas revealed modest results. ATRA has been shown to increase radiosensitivity in other tumor types, so combining radiation and ATRA would be one of alternatives to increase therapeutic efficacy in malignant gliomas. Thus, we intended to know the role of catalase, which is induced by ATRA, for radiosensitivity. If radiation-reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) is removed by catalase, the effect of radiation will be reduced. A rat glioma cell line (36B10) was used for this study. The change of catalase activity and radiosensitivity by ATRA, with or without 3-amino-1, 2, 4-triazole (ATZ), a chemical inhibitor of catalase were measured. Catalase activity was measured by the decomposition of H 2 O 2 spectrophotometrically. Radiosensitivity was measured with clonogenic assay. Also ROS was measured using a 2, 7-dichlorofluores-cein diacetate spectrophotometrically. When 36B10 cells were exposed to 10, 25 and 50 μ M of ATRA for 48 h, the expression of catalase activity were increased with increasing concentration and incubation time of ATRA. Catalase activity was decreased with increasing the concentration of AT (1, 10 mM) dose-dependently. ROS was increased with ATRA and it was augmented with the combination of ATRA and radiation. ATZ decreased ROS production and increased cell survival in combination of ATRA and radiation despite the reduction of catalase. The increase of ROS is one of the reasons for the increased radiosensitivity in combination with ATRA. The catalase that is induced by ATRA doesn't decrease ROS production and radiosensitivity

  4. Thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies in euthyroid subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prummel, Mark F.; Wiersinga, Wilmar M.

    2005-01-01

    Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) is a key enzyme in the formation of thyroid hormones and a major autoantigen in autoimmune thyroid diseases. Titers of TPO antibodies also correlate with the degree of lymphocytic infiltration in euthyroid subjects, and they are frequently present in euthyroid subjects

  5. Use of an immuno-peroxidase staining method for the detection of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Immunopurified antigens of axenic E. histolytica were used to produce rabbit hyper-immune sera. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) was purified from hyper-immune sera and coupled to peroxidase using a two-step procedure. The IgG-peroxidase conjugate was then evaluated by detection of E. histolytica in 128 stool samples and ...

  6. Optimization of extracellular catalase production from Aspergillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The studies of the effect of each variable and the establishment of a correlation between the response of enzyme activity and variables revealed that the link is a multiple linear regression form. The optimization was carried out through a simplex algorithm. The amount of extracellular catalase produced by the strain in the ...

  7. Identification of a novel calcium binding motif based on the detection of sequence insertions in the animal peroxidase domain of bacterial proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaría-Hernando, Saray; Krell, Tino; Ramos-González, María-Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Proteins of the animal heme peroxidase (ANP) superfamily differ greatly in size since they have either one or two catalytic domains that match profile PS50292. The orf PP_2561 of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 that we have called PepA encodes a two-domain ANP. The alignment of these domains with those of PepA homologues revealed a variable number of insertions with the consensus G-x-D-G-x-x-[GN]-[TN]-x-D-D. This motif has also been detected in the structure of pseudopilin (pdb 3G20), where it was found to be involved in Ca(2+) coordination although a sequence analysis did not reveal the presence of any known calcium binding motifs in this protein. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that a peptide containing this consensus motif bound specifically calcium ions with affinities ranging between 33-79 µM depending on the pH. Microcalorimetric titrations of the purified N-terminal ANP-like domain of PepA revealed Ca(2+) binding with a K(D) of 12 µM and stoichiometry of 1.25 calcium ions per protein monomer. This domain exhibited peroxidase activity after its reconstitution with heme. These data led to the definition of a novel calcium binding motif that we have termed PERCAL and which was abundantly present in animal peroxidase-like domains of bacterial proteins. Bacterial heme peroxidases thus possess two different types of calcium binding motifs, namely PERCAL and the related hemolysin type calcium binding motif, with the latter being located outside the catalytic domains and in their C-terminal end. A phylogenetic tree of ANP-like catalytic domains of bacterial proteins with PERCAL motifs, including single domain peroxidases, was divided into two major clusters, representing domains with and without PERCAL motif containing insertions. We have verified that the recently reported classification of bacterial heme peroxidases in two families (cd09819 and cd09821) is unrelated to these insertions. Sequences matching PERCAL were detected in all kingdoms of life.

  8. Identification of a novel calcium binding motif based on the detection of sequence insertions in the animal peroxidase domain of bacterial proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saray Santamaría-Hernando

    Full Text Available Proteins of the animal heme peroxidase (ANP superfamily differ greatly in size since they have either one or two catalytic domains that match profile PS50292. The orf PP_2561 of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 that we have called PepA encodes a two-domain ANP. The alignment of these domains with those of PepA homologues revealed a variable number of insertions with the consensus G-x-D-G-x-x-[GN]-[TN]-x-D-D. This motif has also been detected in the structure of pseudopilin (pdb 3G20, where it was found to be involved in Ca(2+ coordination although a sequence analysis did not reveal the presence of any known calcium binding motifs in this protein. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that a peptide containing this consensus motif bound specifically calcium ions with affinities ranging between 33-79 µM depending on the pH. Microcalorimetric titrations of the purified N-terminal ANP-like domain of PepA revealed Ca(2+ binding with a K(D of 12 µM and stoichiometry of 1.25 calcium ions per protein monomer. This domain exhibited peroxidase activity after its reconstitution with heme. These data led to the definition of a novel calcium binding motif that we have termed PERCAL and which was abundantly present in animal peroxidase-like domains of bacterial proteins. Bacterial heme peroxidases thus possess two different types of calcium binding motifs, namely PERCAL and the related hemolysin type calcium binding motif, with the latter being located outside the catalytic domains and in their C-terminal end. A phylogenetic tree of ANP-like catalytic domains of bacterial proteins with PERCAL motifs, including single domain peroxidases, was divided into two major clusters, representing domains with and without PERCAL motif containing insertions. We have verified that the recently reported classification of bacterial heme peroxidases in two families (cd09819 and cd09821 is unrelated to these insertions. Sequences matching PERCAL were detected in all kingdoms of

  9. Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: dynamics of the main antioxidant enzymes--superoxide dismutase and catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negreva, Mariya N; Penev, Atanas P; Georgiev, Svetoslav Zh; Aleksandrova, Albena A

    2014-01-01

    Researchers have a particularly strong interest in the mechanisms implicated in the clinical manifestation of atrial fibrillation. To examine dynamically the activity of the antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase and catalase in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (duration enzyme activity was determined by a spectrophotometric method. The average duration of atrial fibrillation episodes until the time of hospitalization was 8.14 hours (from 2 to 24 hours). During patient hospitalization the activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase was considerably higher compared to that of the controls (8.46 +/- 0.26 vs 5.81 +/- 0.14 U/mg Hb; 7.36 +/- 0.25 vs 4.76 +/- 0.12 E240/min/mg Hb; P catalase remained increased (5.11 +/- 0.08 vs 4.76 +/- 0.12 E240/min/mg Hb, p catalase even in the early hours of clinical manifestation of the disorder, which then slowly decreased with the restoration of sinus rhythm. Therefore, we can conclude that changes in oxidative status are closely related to the disease and are probably a part of the intimate mechanisms related to its initiation and clinical course.

  10. A Laboratory Experiment of the Purification of Catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquets, Montserrat; Franco, Rafael

    1986-01-01

    Describes a simple method for purifying catalase for the study of proteins. Procedures are systematically and diagramatically presented. Also identifies polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, kinetic studies, and apparent molecular weight determination as possible techniques to be used in studying proteins. (ML)

  11. Ultrasensitive fluorescence immunoassay for detection of ochratoxin A using catalase-mediated fluorescence quenching of CdTe QDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaolin; Zhan, Shengnan; Xu, Hengyi; Meng, Xianwei; Xiong, Yonghua; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2016-04-01

    Herein, for the first time we report an improved competitive fluorescent enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the ultrasensitive detection of ochratoxin A (OTA) by using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced fluorescence quenching of mercaptopropionic acid-modified CdTe quantum dots (QDs). In this immunoassay, catalase (CAT) was labeled with OTA as a competitive antigen to connect the fluorescence signals of the QDs with the concentration of the target. Through the combinatorial use of H2O2-induced fluorescence quenching of CdTe QDs as a fluorescence signal output and the ultrahigh catalytic activity of CAT to H2O2, our proposed method could be used to perform a dynamic linear detection of OTA ranging from 0.05 pg mL-1 to 10 pg mL-1. The half maximal inhibitory concentration was 0.53 pg mL-1 and the limit of detection was 0.05 pg mL-1. These values were approximately 283- and 300-folds lower than those of horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-based conventional ELISA, respectively. The reported method is accurate, highly reproducible, and specific against other mycotoxins in agricultural products as well. In summary, the developed fluorescence immunoassay based on H2O2-induced fluorescence quenching of CdTe QDs can be used for the rapid and highly sensitive detection of mycotoxins or haptens in food safety monitoring.Herein, for the first time we report an improved competitive fluorescent enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the ultrasensitive detection of ochratoxin A (OTA) by using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced fluorescence quenching of mercaptopropionic acid-modified CdTe quantum dots (QDs). In this immunoassay, catalase (CAT) was labeled with OTA as a competitive antigen to connect the fluorescence signals of the QDs with the concentration of the target. Through the combinatorial use of H2O2-induced fluorescence quenching of CdTe QDs as a fluorescence signal output and the ultrahigh catalytic activity of CAT to H2O2, our proposed method could be used to

  12. Caribbean yellow band disease compromises the activity of catalase and glutathione S-transferase in the reef-building coral Orbicella faveolata exposed to anthracene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montilla, Luis Miguel; Ramos, Ruth; García, Elia; Cróquer, Aldo

    2016-05-03

    Healthy and diseased corals are threatened by different anthropogenic sources, such as pollution, a problem expected to become more severe in the near future. Despite the fact that coastal pollution and coral diseases might represent a serious threat to coral reef health, there is a paucity of controlled experiments showing whether the response of diseased and healthy corals to xenobiotics differs. In this study, we exposed healthy and Caribbean yellow band disease (CYBD)-affected Orbicella faveolata colonies to 3 sublethal concentrations of anthracene to test if enzymatic responses to this hydrocarbon were compromised in CYBD-affected tissues. For this, a 2-factorial fully orthogonal design was used in a controlled laboratory bioassay, using tissue condition (2 levels: apparently healthy and diseased) and pollutant concentration (4 levels: experimental control, 10, 30 and 100 ppb concentration) as fixed factors. A permutation-based ANOVA (PERMANOVA) was used to test the effects of condition and concentration on the specific activity of 3 enzymatic biomarkers: catalase, glutathione S-transferase, and glutathione peroxidase. We found a significant interaction between the concentration of anthracene and the colony condition for catalase (Pseudo-F = 3.84, df = 3, p < 0.05) and glutathione S-transferase (Pseudo-F = 3.29, df = 3, p < 0.05). Moreover, our results indicated that the enzymatic response to anthracene in CYBD-affected tissues was compromised, as the activity of these enzymes decreased 3- to 4-fold compared to healthy tissues. These results suggest that under a potential scenario of increasing hydrocarbon coastal pollution, colonies of O. faveolata affected with CYBD might become more vulnerable to the deleterious effects of chemical pollution.

  13. Musa paradisiaca stem juice as a source of peroxidase and ligninperoxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernwal, S K; Yadav, R S; Yadav, K D

    2000-10-01

    Musa paradisiaca stem juice has been shown to contain peroxidase activity of the order of 0.1 enzyme unit/ml. The Km values of this peroxidase for the substrates guaiacol and hydrogen peroxide are 2.4 and 0.28 mM respectively. The pH and temperature optima are 4.5 and 62.5 degrees C respectively. Like other peroxidases, it follows double displacement type mechanism. At low pH, Musa paradisiaca stem juice exhibits ligninperoxidase type activity. The pH optimum for ligninperoxidase type activity is 2.0 and the temperature optimum is 24 degrees C. The Km values for veratryl alcohol and n-propanol are 66 and 78 microM respectively.

  14. Cytokines in mycobacterial infections: `in vitro` and `ex vivo` studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flad, H.D.; Gercken, J.; Huebner, L.; Schlueter, C.; Ernst, M. [Forschungsinstitut Borstel (Germany). Inst. fuer Experimentelle Biologie und Medizin; Pryjma, J. [Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, Cracow (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    Different species of mycobacteria differ in their capacity to induce the production of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) by human monocytes `in vitro`. Whereas `M. tuberculosis` is a potent inducer of TNF-{alpha}, `M. leprae` is much less potent. TNF-{alpha} production is found to be associated with the availability of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generated by activated monocytes, as superoxide enhancing H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration increases and catalase degrading H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decreases TNF-{alpha} production. Furthermore, `M. kansasii` with high intrinsic catalase induce less TNF-{alpha} than mycobacteria with low intrinsic catalase. `In vitro` infection of monocytes with `M. tuberculosis` leads to an impairment of the antigen-presenting capacity, as determined by a reduction of antigen-induced T cell proliferation and interferon {gamma} (IFN-{gamma}) production. Of crucial importance in this impairment is the `M. tuberculosis`-induced down-modulation of MHC class II antigens. The role of TNF-{alpha} `in vivo` is reflected in patients with various forms of leprosy. In skin lesions of lepromatous leprosy patients TNF-{alpha}, interleukin 1{beta} (IL-1{beta}), and IFN-{gamma} production are found to be rare, whereas these cytokines are well expressed in skin lesions of patients with tuberculoid leprosy. After multidrug chemotherapy an increase of local cytokine production is found. Taken together, these findings suggest that components of mycobacteria may interfere with local cell-mediated immune reactions `in vivo`. The molecular mechanisms involved in these local responses need to be defined. (author). 10 refs, 3 figs, 5 tabs.

  15. Cytokines in mycobacterial infections: 'in vitro' and 'ex vivo' studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flad, H.D.; Gercken, J.; Huebner, L.; Schlueter, C.; Ernst, M.

    1995-01-01

    Different species of mycobacteria differ in their capacity to induce the production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) by human monocytes 'in vitro'. Whereas 'M. tuberculosis' is a potent inducer of TNF-α, 'M. leprae' is much less potent. TNF-α production is found to be associated with the availability of H 2 O 2 generated by activated monocytes, as superoxide enhancing H 2 O 2 concentration increases and catalase degrading H 2 O 2 decreases TNF-α production. Furthermore, 'M. kansasii' with high intrinsic catalase induce less TNF-α than mycobacteria with low intrinsic catalase. 'In vitro' infection of monocytes with 'M. tuberculosis' leads to an impairment of the antigen-presenting capacity, as determined by a reduction of antigen-induced T cell proliferation and interferon γ (IFN-γ) production. Of crucial importance in this impairment is the 'M. tuberculosis'-induced down-modulation of MHC class II antigens. The role of TNF-α 'in vivo' is reflected in patients with various forms of leprosy. In skin lesions of lepromatous leprosy patients TNF-α, interleukin 1β (IL-1β), and IFN-γ production are found to be rare, whereas these cytokines are well expressed in skin lesions of patients with tuberculoid leprosy. After multidrug chemotherapy an increase of local cytokine production is found. Taken together, these findings suggest that components of mycobacteria may interfere with local cell-mediated immune reactions 'in vivo'. The molecular mechanisms involved in these local responses need to be defined. (author). 10 refs, 3 figs, 5 tabs

  16. Frequency of anti thyroid peroxidase antibody in patients of vitiligo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhokhar, A.; Shaikh, Z.I.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to compare the frequency of anti thyroid peroxidase antibody in patients suffering from vitiligo with healthy control group. Type of Study: Case control study. Settings: Dermatology Department, Military Hospital, Rawalpindi, from 20th March 2010 to 20th July 2011. Material and Methods: Fifty clinically diagnosed patients of vitiligo, age = 18 yrs and both genders with no history of thyroid disease, past or current use of drugs for thyroid disorder or thyroid surgery were included as cases (Group A). Fifty healthy individuals with no evidence of vitiligo or thyroid disorder on history and physical examination and with no family history of vitiligo, matched for age and gender with cases, were included as control (Group B). Serum anti thyroid peroxidase (anti TPO) antibodies were measured using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in both cases and control. Results: Eight (16%) patients in Group A were anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody positive and forty two (84%) patients were negative while one (2%) patient was anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody positive in Group B and forty nine (98%) patients were negative (p = 0.001). Conclusion: Anti TPO antibody is significantly more common in patients of vitiligo as compared to general population. (author)

  17. Effect of dose and dose rate of gamma radiation on catalytic activity of catalase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaclav Cuba; Tereza Pavelkova; Viliam Mucka

    2010-01-01

    Catalytic activity of gamma irradiated catalase from bovine liver was studied for hydrogen peroxide decomposition at constant temperature and pressure. The measurement was performed at temperatures 27, 32, 37, 42 and 47 deg C. Solutions containing 1 and 0.01 g dm -3 of catalase in phosphate buffer were used for the study. Repeatability of both sample preparation and kinetics measurement was experimentally verified. Rate constants of the reaction were determined for all temperatures and the activation energy was evaluated from Arrhenius plot. Gamma irradiation was performed using 60 Co radionuclide source Gammacell 220 at two different dose rates 5.5 and 70 Gy h -1 , with doses ranging from 10 to 1000 Gy. The observed reaction of irradiated and non-irradiated catalase with hydrogen peroxide is of the first order. Irradiation significantly decreases catalytic activity of catalase, but the activation energy does not depend markedly on the dose. The effect of irradiation is more significant at higher dose rate. (author)

  18. Radiation-induced inhibition of human lymphocyte blastogenesis: the effect of superoxide dismutase and catalase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knox, S.; Misra, H.P.; Shifrine, M.

    1982-01-01

    Mitogen-induced lymphocyte blastogenesis was measured following X-irradiation (0-4 Gy) in the presence or absence of superoxide dismutase (SOD), under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. There were no significant differences between radiation survival curves under these different conditions, nor did SOD have any radioprotective effect. This demonstrates lack of oxygen dependence of radiation-induced inhibition of lymphocyte blastogenesis. Following X-irradiation at 2 Gy, neither SOD nor catalase, alone or together, added before or after irradiation, were radioprotective. In comparison to controls, both enzymes depressed lymphocyte proliferation when added at levels as low as 25 μg catalase or 100 μg SOD/ml media. When SOD and catalase were added together, the greatest depression of blastogenesis was obtained with increasing levels of SOD relative to increasing levels of catalase, indicating that SOD was largely responsible for this depression. The suppressive effect of administration of SOD (p 2 - and/or H 2 O 2 are not involved in radiation-induced inhibition of lymphocyte blastogenesis. (author)

  19. Identification of novel sRNAs in mycobacterial species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Hsun Tsai

    Full Text Available Bacterial small RNAs (sRNAs are short transcripts that typically do not encode proteins and often act as regulators of gene expression through a variety of mechanisms. Regulatory sRNAs have been identified in many species, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis. Here, we use a computational algorithm to predict sRNA candidates in the mycobacterial species M. smegmatis and M. bovis BCG and confirmed the expression of many sRNAs using Northern blotting. Thus, we have identified 17 and 23 novel sRNAs in M. smegmatis and M. bovis BCG, respectively. We have also applied a high-throughput technique (Deep-RACE to map the 5' and 3' ends of many of these sRNAs and identified potential regulators of sRNAs by analysis of existing ChIP-seq datasets. The sRNAs identified in this work likely contribute to the unique biology of mycobacteria.

  20. Whole genome sequencing reveals mycobacterial microevolution among concurrent isolates from sputum and blood in HIV infected TB patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ssengooba, Willy; de Jong, Bouke C.; Joloba, Moses L.; Cobelens, Frank G.; Meehan, Conor J.

    2016-01-01

    In the context of advanced immunosuppression, M. tuberculosis is known to cause detectable mycobacteremia. However, little is known about the intra-patient mycobacterial microevolution and the direction of seeding between the sputum and blood compartments. From a diagnostic study of HIV-infected TB

  1. Nutritional status and eating disorders: neglected risks factor for nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portillo, Karina; Morera, Josep

    2012-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease (NTMLD) in immunocompetent patients is an increasingly important epidemiologic concern. However, risk factors associated with susceptibility to NTMLD are not completely known. A prevalence of NTMLD appears to be rising, mainly in some populations such as middle-aged or elderly thin women, (a group including those with Lady Windermere syndrome) with neither remarkable history of respiratory disease nor smoking habit. Right middle lobe (RML) and lingula are often involved. Various predisposing factors and genetic defects have been described as possible causes of development of NTMLD, namely: voluntary suppression of cough, RML anatomical factors, menopause and mutations in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Malnutrition is also an important and common risk factor associated with other mycobacterial disease like tuberculosis (TB) and its probable association with NTMLD as have been pointed out for some authors. However, a real description of all nutritional aspects and eating habits of patients prior to NTMLD diagnosis is lacking. We hypothesized that malnutrition and eating disorders like anorexia nervosa could be risk factors that may promoting NTMLD. From a clinical viewpoint, if this hypothesis proves to be correct, eating habits and nutritional aspects should be taken into account in the diagnosis process of suspected NTMLD, since they are easily identifiable and treatable conditions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Differential activation of catalase expression and activity by PPAR agonists: Implications for astrocyte protection in anti-glioma therapy☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, Nicholas K.H.; Hebbar, Sachin; Zhao, Weiling; Moore, Steven A.; Domann, Frederick E.; Robbins, Mike E.

    2013-01-01

    Glioma survival is dismal, in part, due to an imbalance in antioxidant expression and activity. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonists have antineoplastic properties which present new redox-dependent targets for glioma anticancer therapies. Herein, we demonstrate that treatment of primary cultures of normal rat astrocytes with PPAR agonists increased the expression of catalase mRNA protein, and enzymatic activity. In contrast, these same agonists had no effect on catalase expression and activity in malignant rat glioma cells. The increase in steady-state catalase mRNA observed in normal rat astrocytes was due, in part, to de novo mRNA synthesis as opposed to increased catalase mRNA stability. Moreover, pioglitazone-mediated induction of catalase activity in normal rat astrocytes was completely blocked by transfection with a PPARγ-dominant negative plasmid. These data suggest that defects in PPAR-mediated signaling and gene expression may represent a block to normal catalase expression and induction in malignant glioma. The ability of PPAR agonists to differentially increase catalase expression and activity in normal astrocytes but not glioma cells suggests that these compounds might represent novel adjuvant therapeutic agents for the treatment of gliomas. PMID:24024139

  3. Tritium effect in peroxidation of ethanol by liver catalase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damgaard, S.E.

    1977-01-01

    Simultaneous determination of the rate of appearance of 3 H in water from [(1 R)-1- 3 H 1 ]-ethanol and the rate of acetaldehyde formation in the presence of rat or ox liver catalase under conditions of steady-state generation of H 2 O 2 allowed calculation of the 3 H isotope effect. The mean value of 2.52 obtained for rat liver catalase at 37 0 C and pH 6.3 to 7.7 was independent of both ethanol concentration and the rate of H 2 O 2 generation over a wide range. At 25 0 C a slightly lower mean value of 2.40 was obtained with the ox liver catalase. Neither the product, acetaldehyde, nor 4-methylpyrazole influenced the two rates measured in the assay. Relating the value obtained for the 3 H isotope effect to a known value for the 2 H isotope effect strongly supports the view that both values are close to the true isotope effect with the respective substituted compounds on the rate constant in the catalytic step involving scission of the C-H bond. The constancy of the isotope effect under various conditions makes it possible to use it for interpretations in vivo. It was established that β-D-galactose dehydrogenase exhibits B-specificity towards the nicotinamide ring in NAD. (author)

  4. Platelet crossmatch tests using radiolabelled staphylococcal protein A or peroxidase anti-peroxidase in alloimmunised patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yam, P.; Petz, L.D.; Scott, E.P.; Santos, S.

    1984-01-01

    Refractoriness to random-donor platelets as a result of alloimmunization remains a major problem in long-term platelet transfusion therapy despite the use of HLA-matched platelets. A study has been made of two methods for detection of platelet associated IgG as platelet crossmatch tests for the selection of platelet donors. These methods use radiolabelled staphylococcal protein A( 125 I-SPA) and peroxidase anti-peroxidase (PAP), respectively. One hundred and ten crossmatch tests using 125 I-SPA were performed retrospectively in 18 alloimmunized patients. The results indicated that the predictive value of a positive or a negative test was 87%; the sensitivity was 73% and the specificity was 95%. Results with the PAP test were similar. The HLA types were known for 48 donor-recipient pairs. With few exceptions, there was a correlation between the results of the platelet crossmatch tests and the effectiveness of platelet transfusion regardless of the degree of HLA match. These results indicate that platelet crossmatch tests may be valuable even when closely HLA matched donors are not available. A large-scale prospective study is warranted, particularly in highly immunized patients. (author)

  5. Catalase inhibition in the Arcuate nucleus blocks ethanol effects on the locomotor activity of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchis-Segura, Carles; Correa, Mercé; Miquel, Marta; Aragon, Carlos M G

    2005-03-07

    Previous studies have demonstrated that there is a bidirectional modulation of ethanol-induced locomotion produced by drugs that regulate brain catalase activity. In the present study we have assessed the effect in rats of intraperitoneal, intraventricular or intracraneal administration of the catalase inhibitor sodium azide in the locomotor changes observed after ethanol (1 g/kg) administration. Our results show that sodium azide prevents the effects of ethanol in rats locomotion not only when sodium azide was systemically administered but also when it was intraventricularly injected, then confirming that the interaction between catalase and ethanol takes place in Central Nervous System (CNS). Even more interestingly, the same results were observed when sodium azide administration was restricted to the hypothalamic Arcuate nucleus (ARC), a brain region which has one of the highest levels of expression of catalase. Therefore, the results of the present study not only confirm a role for brain catalase in the mediation of ethanol-induced locomotor changes in rodents but also point to the ARC as a major neuroanatomical location for this interaction. These results are in agreement with our reports showing that ethanol-induced locomotor changes are clearly dependent of the ARC integrity and, especially of the POMc-synthesising neurons of this nucleus. According to these data we propose a model in which ethanol oxidation via catalase could produce acetaldehyde into the ARC and to promote a release of beta-endorphins that would activate opioid receptors to produce locomotion and other ethanol-induced neurobehavioural changes.

  6. Isolation, characterization and transcriptome analysis of a novel Antarctic Aspergillus sydowii strain MS-19 as a potential lignocellulosic enzyme source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Bailin; Wang, Nengfei; Liu, Shenghao; Liu, Feng; Yin, Xiaofei; Shen, Jihong

    2017-05-30

    With the growing demand for fossil fuels and the severe energy crisis, lignocellulose is widely regarded as a promising cost-effective renewable resource for ethanol production, and the use of lignocellulose residues as raw material is remarkable. Polar organisms have important value in scientific research and development for their novelty, uniqueness and diversity. In this study, a fungus Aspergillus sydowii MS-19, with the potential for lignocellulose degradation was screened out and isolated from an Antarctic region. The growth profile of Aspergillus sydowii MS-19 was measured, revealing that Aspergillus sydowii MS-19 could utilize lignin as a sole carbon source. Its ability to synthesize low-temperature lignin peroxidase (Lip) and manganese peroxidase (Mnp) enzymes was verified, and the properties of these enzymes were also investigated. High-throughput sequencing was employed to identify and characterize the transcriptome of Aspergillus sydowii MS-19. Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes (CAZyme)-annotated genes in Aspergillus sydowii MS-19 were compared with those in the brown-rot fungus representative species, Postia placenta and Penicillium decumbens. There were 701CAZymes annotated in Aspergillus sydowii MS-19, including 17 cellulases and 19 feruloyl esterases related to lignocellulose-degradation. Remarkably, one sequence annotated as laccase was obtained, which can degrade lignin. Three peroxidase sequences sharing a similar structure with typical lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase were also found and annotated as haem-binding peroxidase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase-peroxidase. In this study, the fungus Aspergillus sydowii MS-19 was isolated and shown to synthesize low-temperature lignin-degrading enzymes: lignin peroxidase (Lip) and manganese peroxidase (Mnp). These findings provide useful information to improve our understanding of low-temperature lignocellulosic enzyme production by polar microorganisms and to facilitate research and

  7. A putative peroxidase cDNA from turnip and analysis of the encoded protein sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Gómez, S; Duarte-Vázquez, M A; García-Almendárez, B E; Mayorga-Martínez, L; Cervantes-Avilés, O; Regalado, C

    2008-12-01

    A putative peroxidase cDNA was isolated from turnip roots (Brassica napus L. var. purple top white globe) by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). Total RNA extracted from mature turnip roots was used as a template for RT-PCR, using a degenerated primer designed to amplify the highly conserved distal motif of plant peroxidases. The resulting partial sequence was used to design the rest of the specific primers for 5' and 3' RACE. Two cDNA fragments were purified, sequenced, and aligned with the partial sequence from RT-PCR, and a complete overlapping sequence was obtained and labeled as BbPA (Genbank Accession No. AY423440, named as podC). The full length cDNA is 1167bp long and contains a 1077bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a 358 deduced amino acid peroxidase polypeptide. The putative peroxidase (BnPA) showed a calculated Mr of 34kDa, and isoelectric point (pI) of 4.5, with no significant identity with other reported turnip peroxidases. Sequence alignment showed that only three peroxidases have a significant identity with BnPA namely AtP29a (84%), and AtPA2 (81%) from Arabidopsis thaliana, and HRPA2 (82%) from horseradish (Armoracia rusticana). Work is in progress to clone this gene into an adequate host to study the specific role and possible biotechnological applications of this alternative peroxidase source.

  8. CDNA cloning, characterization and expression of an endosperm-specific barley peroxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren Kjærsgård; Welinder, K.G.; Hejgaard, J.

    1991-01-01

    A barley peroxidase (BP 1) of pI ca. 8.5 and M(r) 37000 has been purified from mature barley grains. Using antibodies towards peroxidase BP 1, a cDNA clone (pcR7) was isolated from cDNA expression library. The nucleotide sequence of pcR7 gave a derived amino acid sequence identical to the 158 C...

  9. Obtenção de nova fonte de peroxidase de folha de Copaifera langsdorffii Desf. com alta atividade Obtention of a new source of peroxidase from Copaifera langsdorffii leaf, Desf. with high activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermelinda Penha Freire Maciel

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se neste trabalho extrair peroxidase de folha de Copaifera langsdorffii (COP, medir sua atividade, compará-la com a peroxidase de raiz forte (Horseradish peroxidase - HRP e determinar o pH ótimo, a melhor solução extratora e o efeito de aditivos sobre a atividade da COP. Os resultados mostraram que a COP atingiu 81,6% da atividade de HRP e a faixa de pH ótimo foi de 5,5 a 6,0. A melhor solução extratora da enzima foi o tampão fosfato de sódio 50 mM, pH 6,0 e o melhor aditivo foi o PVPP. Concluindo, a COP apresenta atividade mais alta que outras peroxidases de diferentes fontes citadas na literatura.The purpose of this work was to extract peroxidase from Copaifera langsdorffii leaves (COP, measure its activity, compare it to that of Horseradish peroxidase and determine the optimum pH, the best extraction solution and the effect of additives on the COP activity. The results showed that COP has 81.6% of the activity of HRP and an optimum pH range between 5.5-6.0. The best extraction solution was a sodium phosphate buffer 50 mM, pH 6.0 and the best additive was PVPP. In conclusion, COP presents higher activity than peroxidases from different sources reported in the literature.

  10. Cytoplasmic catalase and ghostlike peroxisomes in the liver from a child with atypical chondrodysplasia punctata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Espeel, M.; Heikoop, J. C.; Smeitink, J. A.; Beemer, F. A.; de Craemer, D.; van den Berg, M.; Hashimoto, T.; Wanders, R. J.; Schutgens, R. B.; Poll-The, B. T.

    1993-01-01

    In the liver biopsy from an 8.5-year-old girl with the biochemical characteristics of rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata (RCDP), but with normal limbs, normal catalase-containing peroxisomes were absent. Light microscopy after diaminobenzidine staining for catalase activity (the peroxisomal marker

  11. Halide peroxidase in tissues that interact with bacteria in the host squid Euprymna scolopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, A L; McFall-Ngai, M J

    1999-03-15

    An enzyme with similarities to myeloperoxidase, the antimicrobial halide peroxidase in mammalian neutrophils, occurs abundantly in the light organ tissue of Euprymna scolopes, a squid that maintains a beneficial association with the luminous bacterium Vibrio fischeri. Using three independent assays typically applied to the analysis of halide peroxidase enzymes, we directly compared the activity of the squid enzyme with that of human myeloperoxidase. One of these methods, the diethanolamine assay, confirmed that the squid peroxidase requires halide ions for its activity. The identification of a halide peroxidase in a cooperative bacterial association suggested that this type of enzyme can function not only to control pathogens, but also to modulate the interactions of host animals with their beneficial partners. To determine whether the squid peroxidase functions under both circumstances, we examined its distribution in a variety of host tissues, including those that typically interact with bacteria and those that do not. Tissues interacting with bacteria included those that have specific cooperative associations with bacteria (i.e., the light organ and accessory nidamental gland) and those that have transient nonspecific interactions with bacteria (i.e., the gills, which clear the cephalopod circulatory system of invading microorganisms). These bacteria-associated tissues were compared with the eye, digestive gland, white body, and ink-producing tissues, which do not typically interact directly with bacteria. Peroxidase enzyme assays, immunocytochemical localization, and DNA-RNA hybridizations showed that the halide-dependent peroxidase is consistently expressed in high concentration in tissues that interact bacteria. Elevated levels of the peroxidase were also found in the ink-producing tissues, which are known to have enzymatic pathways associated with antimicrobial activity. Taken together, these data suggest that the host uses a common biochemical response to

  12. Induction of cyclooxygenase-2 in macrophages by catalase: role of NF-kappaB and PI3K signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Byeong-Churl; Kim, Do-Hyun; Park, Jong-Wook; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Kim, Sang-Pyo; Song, Dae-Kyu; Park, Jong-Gu; Bae, Jae-Hoon; Mun, Kyo-Chul; Baek, Won-Ki; Suh, Min-Ho; Hla, Timothy; Suh, Seong-Il

    2004-04-02

    Induction of COX-2 by catalase in smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, and neuronal cells has been previously reported. However, the mechanism by which catalase up-regulates COX-2 remains poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of catalase on induction of COX-2 in macrophages. The addition of catalase into Raw 264.7 macrophages induced COX-2 expression that was correlated with increased COX-2 transcription and mRNA stability. Catalase also induced activation of NF-kappaB, PI3K, ERKs, p38s, or JNKs. Catalase-induced COX-2 expression was abrogated by treatment of MG-132 (a NF-kappaB inhibitor) or LY294002 (a PI3K inhibitor), but not by treatment of PD98059 (an ERK inhibitor), SB203580 (a p38 inhibitor), or SP600125 (a JNK inhibitor). Moreover, inhibition of PI3K by LY294002 caused partial decrease of catalase-induced COX-2 transcription and steady-state COX-2 transcript levels, but not COX-2 mRNA stability. Together, these results suggest that catalase induces the expression of COX-2 in Raw 264.7 macrophages, and the induction is related with activation of NF-kappaB transcription factor and PI3K signaling pathway.

  13. Comparative study on the catalase activity in grassy and forestry plants exposed to low gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arteni, A. A; Mocanasu, R. C.; Arteni, V.; Creanga, I.

    2001-01-01

    Since gamma rays level in atmosphere occasionally increases affecting biosphere,the radiation effect damages seriously certain plant species. This study was focused on a grassy species,Triticum aestivum, in comparison to a forestry species, namely Quercus robur. Young plantlets were exposed to weak gamma rays delivered by a laboratory 60 Co source, for different irradiation times. The enzymatic activity of catalase was evaluated using biochemical methods. Triticum aestivum presented a slight enhancing of catalase, both in caryopsides and leafs. Quercus robur revealed a rapid linear enhancing of catalase in saplings cultivated in laboratory while saplings grown in forestry were characterized by a reduced catalase activity. Concurrent phenomena of enzyme biosynthesis stimulation and enzyme structure damage are presumed to be the cause of such behavior. (authors)

  14. Kinetic mechanism and nucleotide specificity of NADH peroxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoll, V.S.; Blanchard, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    NADH peroxidase is a flavoprotein isolated from Streptococcus faecalis which catalyzes the pyridine nucleotide-dependent reduction of hydrogen peroxide to water. Initial velocity, product, and dead-end inhibition studies have been performed at pH 7.5 and support a ping-pong kinetic mechanism. In the absence of hydrogen peroxide, both transhydrogenation between NADH and thioNAD, and isotope exchange between [ 14 C]NADH and NAD, have been demonstrated, although in both these experiments, the maximal velocity of nucleotide exchange was less than 1.5% the maximal velocity of the peroxidatic reaction. We propose that NADH binds tightly to both oxidized and two-electron reduced enzyme. NADH oxidation proceeds stereospecifically with the transfer of the 4S hydrogen to enzyme, and then, via exchange, to water. No primary tritium kinetic isotope effect was observed, and no statistically significant primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on V/K were determined, although primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on V were observed in the presence and absence of sodium acetate. NADH peroxidase thus shares with other flavoprotein reductases striking kinetic, spectroscopic, and stereochemical similarities. On this basis, we propose a chemical mechanism for the peroxide cleaving reaction catalyzed by NADH peroxidase which involves the obligate formation of a flavinperoxide, and peroxo bond cleavage by nucleophilic attack by enzymatic dithiols

  15. Nucleotide sequences of two genomic DNAs encoding peroxidase of Arabidopsis thaliana.