WorldWideScience

Sample records for mwe biomass power

  1. Process simulation of co-firing torrefied biomass in a 220 MWe coal-fired power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jun; Zhang, Xiaolei; Pawlak-Kruczek, Halina; Yang, Weihong; Kruczek, Pawel; Blasiak, Wlodzimierz

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The performances of torrefaction based co-firing power plant are simulated by using Aspen Plus. • Mass loss properties and released gaseous components have been studied during biomass torrefaction processes. • Mole fractions of CO 2 and CO account for 69–91% and 4–27% in total torrefied gases. • The electrical efficiency reduced when increasing either torrefaction temperature or substitution ratio of biomass. - Abstract: Torrefaction based co-firing in a pulverized coal boiler has been proposed for large percentage of biomass co-firing. A 220 MWe pulverized coal-power plant is simulated using Aspen Plus for full understanding the impacts of an additional torrefaction unit on the efficiency of the whole power plant, the studied process includes biomass drying, biomass torrefaction, mill systems, biomass/coal devolatilization and combustion, heat exchanges and power generation. Palm kernel shells (PKS) were torrefied at same residence time but 4 different temperatures, to prepare 4 torrefied biomasses with different degrees of torrefaction. During biomass torrefaction processes, the mass loss properties and released gaseous components have been studied. In addition, process simulations at varying torrefaction degrees and biomass co-firing ratios have been carried out to understand the properties of CO 2 emission and electricity efficiency in the studied torrefaction based co-firing power plant. According to the experimental results, the mole fractions of CO 2 and CO account for 69–91% and 4–27% in torrefied gases. The predicted results also showed that the electrical efficiency reduced when increasing either torrefaction temperature or substitution ratio of biomass. A deep torrefaction may not be recommended, because the power saved from biomass grinding is less than the heat consumed by the extra torrefaction process, depending on the heat sources

  2. Design of a 2.5MW(e) biomass gasification power generation module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLellan, R.

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this contract was to produce a detailed process and mechanical design of a gasification and gas clean up system for a 2.5MW(e) power generation module based on the generation of electrical power from a wood chip feed stock. The design is to enable the detailed economic evaluation of the process and to verify the technical performance data provided by the pilot plant programme. Detailed process and equipment design also assists in the speed at which the technology can be implemented into a demonstration project. (author)

  3. The THESEUS project -- 50 MWe solar thermal power for Crete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schillig, F.; Geyer, M.; Kistner, R.; Aringhoff, R.; Nava, P.; Brakmann, G.

    1998-07-01

    A consortium of European industry, utilities and research institutions from Greece, Germany, Spain and Italy attempts to implement a 52 MWe solar thermal power plant with parabolic trough technology on the Greek island of Crete sponsored by the EU' s THERMIE program. The increased demand for electricity on the island, a consequence of the growing allurement of the island as a tourist resort, makes it necessary to expand the installed capacity on Crete during the next years. According to the capacity expansion plans of Greek' s utility PPC a 160 MWe heavy fuel-fired power plant complex--two 30 MWe diesel units and two 50 MWe steam turbine units--is foreseen to be built by the year 2002. In this paper a description of the technical, economical and environmental aspects of the THESEUS project is provided. Moreover a market entry strategy for solar thermal power generation is discussed.

  4. Power distribution monitoring and control in 500 MWe PHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, A.

    1996-01-01

    The 500 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) is expected to be commissioned in a few years. It has a relatively large sized core with complex material distribution in comparison to the currently operating 220 MWe PHWRs. The resulting neutronically loosely coupled system demands continuous control of the core power distribution. This paper gives a brief description and analysis of the reactor monitoring and control system proposed for this reactor. (author). 11 refs, 8 figs, 3 tabs

  5. Assessment of the Potential of Biomass Gasification for Electricity Generation in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barun Kumar Das

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bangladesh is an agriculture based country where more than 65 percent of the people live in rural areas and over 70% of total primary energy consumption is covered by biomass, mainly agricultural waste and wood. Only about 6% of the entire population has access to natural gas, primarily in urban areas. Electricity production in Bangladesh largely depends on fossil fuel whose reserve is now under threat and the government is now focusing on the alternating sources to harness electricity to meet the continuous increasing demand. To reduce the dependency on fossil fuels, biomass to electricity could play a vital role in this regard. This paper explores the biomass based power generation potential of Bangladesh through gasification technology—an efficient thermochemical process for distributed power generation. It has been estimated that the total power generation from the agricultural residue is about 1178 MWe. Among them, the generation potential from rice husk, and bagasses is 1010 MWe, and 50 MWe, respectively. On the other hand, wheat straw, jute stalks, maize residues, lentil straw, and coconut shell are also the promising biomass resources for power generation which counted around 118 MWe. The forest residue and municipal solid waste could also contribute to the total power generation 250 MWe and 100 MWe, respectively.

  6. Small scale power production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muoniovaara, M [IVO International Ltd, Vantaa (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    IVO International is a major constructor of biomass power plants in Finland and abroad. As a subsidiary of Imatran Voima Oy, the largest power utility in Finland, it has designed and constructed ten power plants owned by IVO Group or others capable of burning biomasses. Sizes of the plants vary from the world`s largest condensing peat-fired power plant of 155 MWe to a 6 MWe combined heat and power producing unit. This article describes the biomass power plants designed and constructed by IVO Group 3 refs.

  7. Small scale power production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muoniovaara, M. [IVO International Ltd, Vantaa (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    IVO International is a major constructor of biomass power plants in Finland and abroad. As a subsidiary of Imatran Voima Oy, the largest power utility in Finland, it has designed and constructed ten power plants owned by IVO Group or others capable of burning biomasses. Sizes of the plants vary from the world`s largest condensing peat-fired power plant of 155 MWe to a 6 MWe combined heat and power producing unit. This article describes the biomass power plants designed and constructed by IVO Group 3 refs.

  8. Listing of nuclear power plant larger than 100 MWe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, B.

    1976-03-01

    This report contains a list of all nuclear power plants larger than 100 MWe, printed out from the Argus Data Bank at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden. The plants are listed by NSSS supply. (M.S.)

  9. BIOMASS GASIFICATION AND POWER GENERATION USING ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Liscinsky

    2002-10-20

    A multidisciplined team led by the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) and consisting of Pratt & Whitney Power Systems (PWPS), the University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), KraftWork Systems, Inc. (kWS), and the Connecticut Resource Recovery Authority (CRRA) has evaluated a variety of gasified biomass fuels, integrated into advanced gas turbine-based power systems. The team has concluded that a biomass integrated gasification combined-cycle (BIGCC) plant with an overall integrated system efficiency of 45% (HHV) at emission levels of less than half of New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) is technically and economically feasible. The higher process efficiency in itself reduces consumption of premium fuels currently used for power generation including those from foreign sources. In addition, the advanced gasification process can be used to generate fuels and chemicals, such as low-cost hydrogen and syngas for chemical synthesis, as well as baseload power. The conceptual design of the plant consists of an air-blown circulating fluidized-bed Advanced Transport Gasifier and a PWPS FT8 TwinPac{trademark} aeroderivative gas turbine operated in combined cycle to produce {approx}80 MWe. This system uses advanced technology commercial products in combination with components in advanced development or demonstration stages, thereby maximizing the opportunity for early implementation. The biofueled power system was found to have a levelized cost of electricity competitive with other new power system alternatives including larger scale natural gas combined cycles. The key elements are: (1) An Advanced Transport Gasifier (ATG) circulating fluid-bed gasifier having wide fuel flexibility and high gasification efficiency; (2) An FT8 TwinPac{trademark}-based combined cycle of approximately 80 MWe; (3) Sustainable biomass primary fuel source at low cost and potentially widespread availability-refuse-derived fuel (RDF); (4) An overall integrated

  10. Listing of nuclear power plant larger than 100 MWe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, B.

    1975-06-01

    This report contains a list of all nuclear power plants larger than 100 MWe, printed out from the Argus Data Bank at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden. The plants are listed alphabetically. The report contains also a plant ranking list, where the plants are listed by the load factor (12 months) (M.S.)

  11. Listing of nuclear power plant larger than 100 MWe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, B.

    1975-12-01

    This report contains a list of all nuclear power plants larger than 100 MWe, printed out from the Argus Data Bank at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden. The plants are listed by country. The report contains also a plant ranking list, where the plants are listed by the load factor (12 months). (M.S.)

  12. Improved design on Qinshan 300 MWe nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Peihua; Cheng Wanli; Lu Rongliang

    1993-01-01

    The main aim, guiding ideology, general performance and parameters of improved design on Qinshan 300 MWe nuclear power plant are presented. Improved items are also introduced including the characteristic of layout in nuclear island building, decreasing unnecessary devices increasing necessary safety facilities and unifying code and standard. The progress of improved design is presented

  13. Improved design on Qinshan 300 MWe nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peihua, Shi; Wanli, Cheng; Rongliang, Lu [Shanghai Nuclear Engineering Research and Design Inst. (China)

    1993-06-01

    The main aim, guiding ideology, general performance and parameters of improved design on Qinshan 300 MWe nuclear power plant are presented. Improved items are also introduced including the characteristic of layout in nuclear island building, decreasing unnecessary devices increasing necessary safety facilities and unifying code and standard. The progress of improved design is presented.

  14. Evolution of Flux Mapping System (FMS) from 540 MWe to 700 MWe Indian PHWR: design perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonavani, Manojkumar; Kelkar, M.G.; Singhvi, P.K.; Roy, S.; Ingle, V.J.

    2013-01-01

    The Flux Mapping System (FMS) of 700 MWe PHWR computes a detailed flux/power distribution of the reactor core using modal synthesis method and is also generate setback on different parameters by monitoring thermal neutron flux at more than 100 points inside the reactor core. These types of setbacks are introduced first time in Indian PHWRs. The paper brings out the Evolution of Flux Mapping System (FMS) from 540 MWe to 700 MWe and the overall design philosophy. The paper emphasizes on comparisons between 540 MWe and 700 MWe design, considerations for architectural design and setbacks for 700 MWe. (author)

  15. Diesel power plants based on biomass gasification; Biomassan ja turpeen kaasutukseen perustuvien dieselvoimalaitosten toteutettavuustutkimus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurkela, E.; Staahlberg, P.; Solantausta, Y.; Wilen, C.

    1995-12-31

    Different power production systems have been developed for biomass feedstocks. However, only few of these systems can meet the following three requirements: (a) suitability to small scale electricity production (< 5-10 MWe), (b) reliable operation with realistically available biomass feedstocks, and (c) potential for economical competitiveness. The fluidized-bed boilers have been successfully operated with wood waste and peat down to outputs of the order of 5 MWe and the investment costs have been successfully lowered to a reasonable level. However, this concept is most suitable for combined heat and electricity production and smaller plant sizes are not considered feasible. One of the most promising alternative for this commercially proven technology is the diesel power plant based on gasification. This concept has a potential for higher power to heat ratios in cogeneration or higher efficiency in separate electricity production. The objectives of this project were (a) to evaluate the technical and economical feasibility of diesel power plants based on biomass gasification and (b) to study the effects of operating conditions (temperature, bed material and air staging) on the performance of a circulating fluidized-bed gasifier. The experimental part of the project was carried out on a new PDU-scale Circulating Fluidized-Bed Gasification test facility of VTT. Wood residues were used as the feedstocks and the experiments were mainly focused on tar formation and gasifier performance. The results will be compared to earlier VTT data obtained for bubbling-bed reactors. The techno-economic feasibility studies are carried out using existing process modelling tools of VTT and the gasification based diesel plants will be compared to conventional fluidized-bed boilers

  16. Diesel power plants based on biomass gasification; Biomassan ja turpeen kaasutukseen perustuvien dieselvoimalaitosten toteutettavuustutkimus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurkela, E; Staahlberg, P; Solantausta, Y; Wilen, C

    1996-12-31

    Different power production systems have been developed for biomass feedstocks. However, only few of these systems can meet the following three requirements: (a) suitability to small scale electricity production (< 5-10 MWe), (b) reliable operation with realistically available biomass feedstocks, and (c) potential for economical competitiveness. The fluidized-bed boilers have been successfully operated with wood waste and peat down to outputs of the order of 5 MWe and the investment costs have been successfully lowered to a reasonable level. However, this concept is most suitable for combined heat and electricity production and smaller plant sizes are not considered feasible. One of the most promising alternative for this commercially proven technology is the diesel power plant based on gasification. This concept has a potential for higher power to heat ratios in cogeneration or higher efficiency in separate electricity production. The objectives of this project were (a) to evaluate the technical and economical feasibility of diesel power plants based on biomass gasification and (b) to study the effects of operating conditions (temperature, bed material and air staging) on the performance of a circulating fluidized-bed gasifier. The experimental part of the project was carried out on a new PDU-scale Circulating Fluidized-Bed Gasification test facility of VTT. Wood residues were used as the feedstocks and the experiments were mainly focused on tar formation and gasifier performance. The results will be compared to earlier VTT data obtained for bubbling-bed reactors. The techno-economic feasibility studies are carried out using existing process modelling tools of VTT and the gasification based diesel plants will be compared to conventional fluidized-bed boilers

  17. Improvement of Candu-1000 MW(e) power cycle by moderator heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fath, H.E.S.

    1988-01-01

    Four different moderator heat recovery circuits are proposed for CANDU-1000 MW(e) reactors. The proposed circuits utilize all, or part, of the 155 MW(th) moderator heat load (at 70 0 C moderator outlet temperature from calandria) to the first stage of the feed water heating system. An economics study was carried out and indicated that the direct circulation of feed water through the moderator heat exchanger (with full heat recovery) is the most economical scheme. For this scheme the saved steam from the turbine extraction was found to produce additional electric power of 8 MW(e). This additional power represents a 0.7% increase in the plants nominal electric output. The outstanding features and advantages of the selected scheme are also presented. (author)

  18. CAREM project 15 to 150 MWe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-05-01

    The main goal of the Carem Project is the introduction of a Inherent Safe Nuclear Power Reactor in the range of low power (15 to 150 MWe). For this low-power application, light-water and low enriched uranium was selected, since using those concepts permits to take full advantage of the special characteristics of low power reactors. INVAP has been involved in the last years in the design and construction of a Carem Reactor, which could cover a range up to 150 MWe, using a multiple-unit approach. It would furnished the 150 MWe, using six Carem Reactors, of proper power, which would share most of the services. INVAP is a reliable supplier of not only the nuclear reactor but also of the fuel

  19. Concept of voltage monitoring for a nuclear power plant emergency power supply system (PWR 1300 MWe)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, R.B. de

    1988-01-01

    Voltage monitoring concept for a Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Power Supply Systems (PWR 1300 MWe) is described based on the phylosophy adopted for Angra 2 and 3 NPP's. Some suggested setpoints are only guidance values and can be modified during plant commissioning for a better performance of the whole protection system. (author) [pt

  20. Diesel power plants based on biomass gasification; Biomassan ja turpeen kaasutukseen perustuen dieselvoimalaitosten toteutettavuustutkimus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurkela, E.; Staahlberg, P.; Solantausta, Y. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    Different power production systems have been developed for biomass feedstocks. However, only few of these systems can meet the following three requirements: (1) suitability to small scale electricity production (<5-10 MWe), (2) reliable operation with realistically available biomass feedstocks, and (3) potential for economical competitiveness. The fluidized-bed boilers have been successfully operated with wood waste and peat down to outputs of the order of 5 MWe and the investment costs have been successfully lowered to a reasonable level. However, this concept is most suitable for combined heat and electricity production and smaller plant sizes are not considered feasible. One of the most promising alternative for this commercially proven technology is the diesel power plant based on gasification. This concept has a potential for higher power to heat ratios in cogeneration or higher efficiency in separate electricity production. The objectives of this project were (1) to evaluate the technical and economical feasibility of diesel power plants based on biomass gasification and (2) to study the effects of operating conditions (temperature, bed material and air staging) on the performance of a circulating fluidized-bed gasifier. The experimental part of the project was carried out on a new PDU-scale Circulating Fluidized-Bed Gasification test facility of VTT. Wood residues were used as the feedstocks and the experiments were mainly focused on tar formation and gasifier performance. The results will be compared to earlier VTT data obtained for bubbling-bed reactors. The techno-economic feasibility studies are carried out using existing process modelling tools of VTT and the gasification based diesel plants will be compared to conventional fluidized-bed boilers. The studies are scheduled to be completed in March 1996. (author)

  1. Demonstration of a 1 MWe biomass power plant at USMC Base Camp Lejeune

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleland, J.; Purvis, C.R.

    1997-01-01

    A biomass energy conversion project is being sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to demonstrate an environmentally and economically sound electrical power option for government installations, industrial sites, rural cooperatives, small municipalities, and developing countries. Under a cooperative agreement with EPA, Research Triangle Institute is initiating operation of the Camp Lejeune Energy from Wood (CLEW) biomass plant. Wood gasification combined with internal combustion engines was chosen because of (1) recent improvements in gas cleaning, (2) simple, economical operation for units less than 10 MW, and (3) the option of a clean, cheap fuel for the many existing facilities generating expensive electricity from petroleum fuels with reciprocating engines. The plant incorporates a downdraft, moving bed gasifier utilizing hogged waste wood from the Marine Corps Base at Camp Lejeune, NC. A moving bed bulk wood dryer and both spark ignition and diesel engines are included. Unique process design features are briefly described relative to the gasifier, wood drying, tar separation, and process control. A test plan for process optimization and demonstration of reliability, economics, and environmental impact is outlined. (author)

  2. Concept of voltage and frequency monitoring for a nuclear power plant normal power supply system - PWR 1300 MWe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, R.B. de

    1990-01-01

    Voltage and frequency monitoring concept for a Nuclear Power Plant Normal Power Supply System (PWR 1300 MWe) is described based on the phylosophy adopted for Angra 2 and e NPP's. Some suggested setpoints are only guidance values and can be modified during plant commissioning for a better performance of the whole protection system. (author) [pt

  3. Improved 1500 MWe Arabelle begins operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Two of the first 1500 MWe steam turbine-generator sets, described as the largest in the world, are undergoing commissioning at the Chooz B PWR nuclear power station in France. A number of design improvements have been made over the previous generation of 1350 MWe turbines, a process which will continue. (Author)

  4. Evolution of the on-site electric power sources on French 900 MWe PWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bera, Jean [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Fontenay-aux-Roses, Departement d' Analyse de Surete, Service d' Analyse Fonctionnelle, Institut de Protection et Surete Nucleaire, B.P. No. 6, 92260 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    1986-02-15

    Additional means have been provided on the French 900 MWe PWRs to improve safety if both the off-site and on-site Power sources are lost, namely: - a primary pump seal water injection device, one for two units; - a gas turbine generator for each site; - supplying any failing unit with electric power from a house load operating unit; - supplying a unit from a diesel generator of another unit. (author)

  5. 300 MWe Burner Core Design with two Enrichment Zoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Hoon; Kim, Sang Ji; Kim, Yeong Il

    2008-01-01

    KAERI has been developing the KALIMER-600 core design with a breakeven fissile conversion ratio. The core is loaded with a ternary metallic fuel (TRU-U-10Zr), and the breakeven characteristics are achieved without any blanket assembly. As an alternative plan, a KALIMER-600 burner core design has been also performed. In the early stage of the development of a fast reactor, the main purpose is an economical use of a uranium resource but nowadays in addition to the maximum utilization of a uranium resource, the burning of a high level radioactive waste is taken as an additional interest for the harmony of the environment. In way of constructing the commercial size reactor which has the power level ranging from 800 MWe to 1600 MWe, the demonstration reactor which has the power level ranging from 200 MWe to 600 MWe was usually constructed for the midterm stage to commercial size reactor. In this paper, a 300 MWe burner core design was performed with purpose of demonstration reactor for KALIMER-600 burner of 600 MWe. As a means to flatten the power distribution, instead of a single fuel enrichment scheme adapted in design of KALIMER-600 burner, the 2 enrichment zoning approach was adapted

  6. Adding a much needed 300 MWe at South Africa's Arnot coal fired power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rich, G. [Alstom, Rugby (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-15

    As power stations built in the last thirty years approach the end of their design life, and the cost of new capacity continues to increase, along with demands for improved efficiency and lower emissions, an integrated approach to retrofit looks increasingly compelling. The ambitious upgrade project currently underway at the Arnot coal fired plant in South Africa, which will result in an update from 6 x 350 MWe to 6 x 400 MWe and a life extension of 20 years, illustrates the benefits. 2 figs.

  7. Co-firing Bosnian coals with woody biomass: Experimental studies on a laboratory-scale furnace and 110 MWe power unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smajevic Izet

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings of research into cofiring two Bosnian cola types, brown coal and lignite, with woody biomass, in this case spruce sawdust. The aim of the research was to find the optimal blend of coal and sawdust that may be substituted for 100% coal in large coal-fired power stations in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Two groups of experimental tests were performed in this study: laboratory testing of co-firing and trial runs on a large-scale plant based on the laboratory research results. A laboratory experiment was carried out in an electrically heated and entrained pulverized-fuel flow furnace. Coal-sawdust blends of 93:7% by weight and 80:20% by weight were tested. Co-firing trials were conducted over a range of the following process variables: process temperature, excess air ratio and air distribution. Neither of the two coal-sawdust blends used produced any significant ash-related problems provided the blend volume was 7% by weight sawdust and the process temperature did not exceed 1250ºC. It was observed that in addition to the nitrogen content in the co-fired blend, the volatile content and particle size distribution of the mixture also influenced the level of NOx emissions. The brown coal-sawdust blend generated a further reduction of SO2 due to the higher sulphur capture rate than for coal alone. Based on and following the laboratory research findings, a trial run was carried out in a large-scale utility - the Kakanj power station, Unit 5 (110 MWe, using two mixtures; one in which 5%/wt and one in which 7%/wt of brown coal was replaced with sawdust. Compared to a reference firing process with 100% coal, these co-firing trials produced a more intensive redistribution of the alkaline components in the slag in the melting chamber, with a consequential beneficial effect on the deposition of ash on the superheater surfaces of the boiler. The outcome of the tests confirms the feasibility of using 7%wt of sawdust in combination

  8. Economic analysis of biomass power generation schemes under renewable energy initiative with Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS) in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Ji-Hong; Lee, Jeung-Woo; Lee, Uen-Do

    2011-10-01

    An economic analysis of biomass power generation was conducted. Two key technologies--direct combustion with a steam turbine and gasification with a syngas engine--were mainly examined. In view of the present domestic biomass infrastructure of Korea, a small and distributed power generation system ranging from 0.5 to 5 MW(e) was considered. It was found that gasification with a syngas engine becomes more economically feasible as the plant size decreases. Changes in the economic feasibilities with and without RPS or heat sales were also investigated. A sensitivity analysis of each system was conducted for representative parameters. Regarding the cost of electricity generation, electrical efficiency and fuel cost significantly affect both direct combustion and gasification systems. Regarding the internal rate of return (IRR), the heat sales price becomes important for obtaining a higher IRR, followed by power generation capacity and electrical efficiency. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Biomass power in transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, D.K. [Zurn/NEPCO, Redmond, WA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Electricity production from biomass fuel has been hailed in recent years as an environmentally acceptable energy source that delivers on its promise of economically viable renewable energy. A Wall Street Journal article from three years ago proclaimed wood to be {open_quotes}moving ahead of costly solar panels and wind turbines as the leading renewable energy alternative to air-fouling fossils fuels and scary nuclear plants.{close_quotes} Biomass fuel largely means wood; about 90% of biomass generated electricity comes from burning waste wood, the remainder from agricultural wastes. Biomass power now faces an uncertain future. The maturing of the cogeneration and independent power plant market, restructuring of the electric industry, and technological advances with power equipment firing other fuels have placed biomass power in a competitive disadvantage with other power sources.

  10. Evolution of on-power refuelling system for 500 MWe PHWR based on experience from Rajasthan, Madras and Narora Atomic Power Stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warrier, S.R.; Inder Jit; Sanatkumar, A.

    1991-01-01

    The on-power fuel handling system design at Rajasthan and Madras Atomic Power Stations (RAPS and MAPS) is essentially based on the design of the fuel handling system at Douglas Point Station (CANADA) Although, a number of improvements have been carried out in the fuel handling system of RAPS and MAPS at the component and sub-assembly level, some problems of repetitive nature like frequent deterioration in the performance of B-ram ball screw, leak detector solenoid valves etc., still exist. Further, there are certain limitations and drawbacks in the fuelling systems of these stations. For example, FM carriage design would not meet current seismic qualification standards. Also there are chances of fuel transfer room getting contaminated during movement of a failed fuel bundle. In order to obviate these deficiencies, a new concept has been worked out for the fuel handling system of Narora Atomic Power Station (NAPS) and accordingly, major changes have been made adopting a new layout. For example, FM head supporting arrangement has been changed to 'Suspension' type and a 'Linear-indexed' transfer magazine has been introduced in the fuel transfer system. Based on the experience gained from RAPS, MAPS and NAPS, design concept for 500 MWe fuel handling system has been evolved with further improvements especially in the layout. Also, a Calibration and Maintenance Facility for maintenance, testing calibration of FM head, sub-assemblies and components of fuel handling system has been introduced in the 500 MWe design. This paper discusses some of the experience gained from RAPS, MAPS and NAPS and also highlights the features of 500 MWe fuel handling system. (author)

  11. 'Kazmer' a complex noise diagnostic system for 1000 MWe PWR WWER type nuclear power units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Por, G.

    1992-06-01

    Noise diagnostic systems have previously been developed and installed for the WWER-440 type reactors at the Paks Nuclear Power Plant, Hungary. Based on the experiences, the system has been extended and modified for use in 1000 MWe, WWER-1000 type units. KAZMER consists of three subsystem, the KARD reactor noise diagnostic system, ARGUS vibration monitoring system for rotation machinery, and ALMOS acoustic monitoring system. The installation of the KAZMER system at the Kalinin Nuclear Power Station, Russia, and the first operational experiences are outlined. (R.P.) 15 refs.; 9 figs

  12. IRIS-50. A 50 MWe advanced PWR design for smaller, regional grids and specialized applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, Bojan; Carelli, Mario; Conway, Larry; Hundal, Rolv; Barbaso, Enrico; Gamba, Federica; Centofante, Mario

    2009-01-01

    IRIS is an advanced, medium-power (1000 MWt or ∼335 MWe) advanced PWR design of integral configuration, that has gained wide recognition due to its innovative 'safety-by-design' safety approach. In spite of its smaller size compared to large monolithic nuclear power plants, it is economically competitive due to its simplicity and advantages of modular deployment. However, the optimum power level for a class of specific applications (e.g., power generation in small regional isolated grids; water desalination and biodiesel production at remote locations; autonomous power source for special applications, etc.) may be even lower, of the order of tens rather than hundreds of MWe. The simple and robust IRIS 335 MWe design provides a solid basis for establishing a 20-100 MWe design, utilizing the same safety and economics principles, so that it will retain economic attractiveness compared to other alternatives of the same power level. A conceptual 50 MWe design, IRIS-50, was initially developed and then assessed in a 2001 report to the US Congress on small and medium reactors, as a design mature enough to have deployment potential within a decade. In the meantime, while the main efforts have focused on the 335 MWe design completion and licensing, parallel efforts have progressed toward the preliminary design of IRIS-50. This paper summarizes the main IRIS-50 features and presents an update on its design status. (author)

  13. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Engineering Test Facility (ETF) 200 MWe power plant. Design Requirements Document (DRD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigo, H. S.; Bercaw, R. W.; Burkhart, J. A.; Mroz, T. S.; Bents, D. J.; Hatch, A. M.

    1981-01-01

    A description and the design requirements for the 200 MWe (nominal) net output MHD Engineering Test Facility (ETF) Conceptual Design, are presented. Performance requirements for the plant are identified and process conditions are indicated at interface stations between the major systems comprising the plant. Also included are the description, functions, interfaces and requirements for each of these major systems. The lastest information (1980-1981) from the MHD technology program are integrated with elements of a conventional steam electric power generating plant.

  14. Control rod cluster drop time anomaly Guandong nuclear power station (Daya bay) and Electricite de France nuclear power stations (1450 MWe N4 Series)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivera, J.J.; Naury, S.; Tricot, N.; Tran Dai, P.; Gama, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    The anomaly of control rod cluster drop time revealed at Guandong Nuclear Power Station in Daya Bay and in the Chooz B1 pilot unit for the N4 series, led to the replacement of the M1 type control rod cluster guide tubes with 1300 MWe PWR type guide tubes, adapted to the geometry of the Guandong reactors and the 1450 MWe reactors of the N4 series. The comparison of the drop times obtained with the 1300 MWe type control rod cluster guide 1300 MWe type control rod cluster guide tubes gave satisfactory results. These met the safety criterion for N4 series control rod cluster drop times (2.15 under hot shutdown conditions). The drop time tests which will be carried out in middle of and at the end of cycle 1 of Chooz B1 should make it possible to finally validate the solution already successfully implemented at Guandong. However, this anomaly has revealed the limits of representativeness of the experimental test loops with regard to the real reactor configuration. In view of this, it has been deemed necessary to ask Electricite de France to pursue its analysis both on the understanding of the phenomena which led to this anomaly and on the limits of the representativeness of the experimental test loops. (authors)

  15. Power from biomass: the power utility perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serafimova, K.; Angele, H.-C.

    2008-01-01

    This article takes a look at possible strategies that electricity utilities in Switzerland could follow in order to be able to make use of biomass as a source of energy. Increasing interest in damp biomass as a relatively cheap, renewable and climate-friendly source of energy is commented on. Strategic choices that energy utilities have to make when they decide to enter into the biomass market are examined. The potentials involved are examined, including biogenic materials from domestic wastes and from agriculture. Figures on potential waste tonnage are quoted. Questions on subsidies and the free market are examined. The setting up of 'virtual power stations' - networks of installations using photovoltaic, wind and biomass - is discussed, as are various strategies that utilities can follow in this area. Examples of such 'virtual power stations' are listed.

  16. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Engineering Test Facility (ETF) 200 MWe power plant Conceptual Design Engineering Report (CDER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    The reference conceptual design of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Engineering Test Facility (ETF), a prototype 200 MWe coal-fired electric generating plant designed to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of open cycle MHD, is summarized. Main elements of the design, systems, and plant facilities are illustrated. System design descriptions are included for closed cycle cooling water, industrial gas systems, fuel oil, boiler flue gas, coal management, seed management, slag management, plant industrial waste, fire service water, oxidant supply, MHD power ventilating

  17. 1300°F 800 MWe USC CFB Boiler Design Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Archie; Goidich, Steve; Fan, Zhen

    Concern about air emissions and the effect on global warming is one of the key factors for developing and implementing new advanced energy production solutions today. One state-of-the-art solution is circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustion technology combined with a high efficiency once-through steam cycle. Due to this extremely high efficiency, the proven CFB technology offers a good solution for CO2 reduction. Its excellent fuel flexibility further reduces CO2 emissions by co-firing coal with biomass. Development work is under way to offer CFB technology up to 800MWe capacities with ultra-supercritical (USC) steam parameters. In 2009 a 460MWe once-through supercritical (OTSC) CFB boiler designed and constructed by Foster Wheeler will start up. However, scaling up the technology further to 600-800MWe with net efficiency of 45-50% is needed to meet the future requirements of utility operators. To support the move to these larger sizes, an 800MWe CFB boiler conceptual design study was conducted and is reported on herein. The use of USC conditions (˜11 00°F steam) was studied and then the changes, that would enable the unit to generate 1300°F steam, were identified. The study has shown that by using INTREX™ heat exchangers in a unique internal-external solids circulation arrangement, Foster Wheeler's CFB boiler configuration can easily accommodate 1300°F steam and will not require a major increase in heat transfer surface areas.

  18. Economics of power generation from imported biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lako, P.; Van Rooijen, S.N.M.

    1998-02-01

    Attention is paid to the economics of import of biomass to the Netherlands, and subsequent utilisation for power generation, as a means to reduce dependence on (imported) fossil fuels and to reduce CO2 emission. Import of wood to the extent of 40 PJ or more from Baltic and South American states seems to be readily achievable. Import of biomass has various advantages, not only for the European Union (reduced CO2 emissions) but also for the countries of origin (employment creation). However, possible disadvantages or risks should be taken into account. With that in mind, import of biomass from Baltic states seems very interesting, although it should be noted that in some of those countries the alternative of fuel-switching to biomass seems to be more cost-effective than import of biomass from those countries. Given the expected increase in inland biomass consumption in the Baltic countries and the potential substantial future demand for biomass in other Western European countries it is expected that the biomass supply from Baltic countries will not be sufficient to fulfill the demand. An early focus on import from other countries seems advisable. Several power generation options are available with short to medium term potential and long term potential. The margin between costs of biomass-fuelled power and of coal fired power will be smaller, due to substantial improvements in power generating efficiency and reductions of investment costs of options for power generation from biomass, notably Biomass Gasification Combined Cycle. 18 refs

  19. Three-dimensional studies of the 700 MWe steam generator design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, B.; Pietralik, J.

    2006-01-01

    The next stage in the Indian nuclear power programme envisions building 700 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (IPHWR) units. This involves up-rating of all the plant equipment including the reactor, steam generators (SGs), turbo-generator, major pumps, etc. The SG used in the current generation of 540 MWe IPHWRs, is a mushroom type, inverted U-tube, natural-circulation SG. The 700 MWe SG is of the same type and has the same tube bundle design and the same heat transfer area. The tube diameter, tube pitch, and outer diameter of the SG sections are the same as for the 540 MWe SG. The geometry of the feedwater header, the flow restrictor in the downcomer and the flow distribution plate are different in the two designs. The changes were required due to a 26% increase in steam flow rate while maintaining the same circulation ratio. This paper describes the design of the 700 MWe SG and a thermalhydraulic analysis using a one-dimensional, in-house code and a three-dimensional code called THIRST developed by AECL. The codes were validated against the 540 MWe SG data. The analysis was made for the 700 MWe SG for two versions: with and without integral preheater. The results of the THIRST runs were used for a flow-induced vibration analysis. The results of the flow-induced vibration analysis show that the vibrations are not excessive. (author)

  20. Independent System Operators and Biomass Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, Kevin L.

    1999-01-01

    Since the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission issued its landmark open access transmission rule in 1996, the idea of creating and establishing independent system operators (ISOs) has gained momentum. ISOs may help combine individual utility transmission systems into more regional transmission networks, which ultimately will allow biomass companies to transmit power over longer distances while paying a single transmission rate. To the extent that ISOs are combined or operated with power exchanges, however, biomass companies will likely face even more competitive market pressures. Few operators have experience with ISOs and power exchanges, but preliminary results show that short-term electricity market prices are probably too low for most biomass companies to compete against. Without policy measures, biomass companies may have to pursue strategic opportunities with short-term, spot-market sales; direct bilateral sales to customers; alternative power exchanges; and perhaps a ''green'' power market and sales to ancillary service markets. In addition, prices will likely be more volatile in a restructured market so biomass generators should be selling during those times

  1. Monitoring-control of the 900 MWe and 1300 MWe nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, J.

    1982-01-01

    After a short definition of the monitoring-control of the 900 MWe and 1300 MWe nuclear reactors, and a recall of requirements of nuclear energy, this paper presents the following points concerning the whole system of monitoring-control: the organization, the systems (instrumentation, automation), the technologies, the imperfections and the improvements brought to the system [fr

  2. Instrumentation of steam cycle HTR's up to 900 MWe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leithner, D.E.; Winkenbach, B.

    1982-06-01

    Due to basic design features and inherent safety qualities in-core instrumentation is not needed in an HTR. Reactor safety requirements can be met by integral measurements. A modest spatial resolving power of the out-of-core instrumentation is sufficient for all operational purposes in small and medium sized steam cycle HTR's. Thus, the instrumentation concept of the THTR 300 MWe prototype reactor can be adopted without major changes for the HTR 450 MWe reactor project, as is demonstrated here for the neutron flux and temperature measurements. (author)

  3. Gasification of wet biomass waste flows for electric power generation. Vergassing van natte biomassa-afvalstromen voor elektriciteitsproduktie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faaij, A; Blok, K; Worrell, E

    1992-06-01

    Feasibility of gasification of biomass waste streams for electricity production is studied. An inventory of available wet biomass wastes and their features is made. A potential of at least 28 PJ/year is available in the Netherlands. On the basis of a technical survey two systems were selected. The first is a steam-injected gas turbine (STIG) of net 15 MWe, and the second system is a STIG of net 49 MWe. Both make use of the Atmospheric Circulating Fluidized Bed (ACFB) gasification technology, wet scrubber gas cleaning and of flue gas for drying the waste. Efficiencies of 27% and 30% were calculated for 160 kton and 500 kton biomass waste a year respectively. Waste treatment costs are expected to be DFl 31 and DFl 24 per ton respectively, which is significant lower than the alternatives, being compost and anaerobic digestion of biomass waste. Moreover, this technique represents a considerable potential for saving fossil fuels and reducing CO[sub 2] emissions. This indicates that gasification can become a strong competitor for anaerobic digestion, composting and incineration on biomass waste treatment. The main technical problems to be solved are optimization of pre-treatment of the waste, especially drying, the behavior of the ash and heavy metals and adaptation of gas turbines for low calorific gas, possibly combined with steam injection. Fundamental problems to prohibit further development of this option seem not to be present. It is expected that realization of the option discussed here is possible within 4-7 years. 3 figs., 6 tabs., 64 refs.

  4. Electricity production by advanced biomass power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solantausta, Y [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Production Technologies; Bridgwater, T [Aston Univ. Birmingham (United Kingdom); Beckman, D [Zeton Inc., Burlington, Ontario (Canada)

    1996-11-01

    This report gives the results of the Pyrolysis Collaborative Project organized by the International Energy Agency (IEA) under Biomass Agreement. The participating countries or organizations were Canada, European Community (EC), Finland, United States of America, and the United Kingdom. The overall objective of the project was to establish baseline assessments for the performance and economics of power production from biomass. Information concerning the performance of biomass-fuelled power plants based on gasification is rather limited, and even less data is available of on pyrolysis based power applications. In order to gain further insight into the potential for these technologies, this study undertook the following tasks: (1) Prepare process models to evaluate the cost and performance of new advanced biomass power production concepts, (2) Assess the technical and economic uncertainties of different biomass power concepts, (3) Compare the concepts in small scale and in medium scale production (5 - 50 MW{sub e}) to conventional alternatives. Processes considered for this assessment were biomass power production technologies based on gasification and pyrolysis. Direct combustion technologies were employed as a reference for comparison to the processes assessed in this study. Wood was used a feedstock, since the most data was available for wood conversion

  5. Biomass Supply and Trade Opportunities of Preprocessed Biomass for Power Generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batidzirai, B.; Junginger, M.; Klemm, M.; Schipfer, F.; Thrän, D.

    2016-01-01

    International trade of solid biomass is expected to increase significantly given the global distribution of biomass resources and anticipated expansion of bioenergy deployment in key global power markets. Given the unique characteristics of biomass, its long-distance trade requires optimized

  6. Flux mapping algorithm (FMA) for 700 MWe PHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonavani, Manoj; Ingle, V.J.; Singhvi, P.K.; Raj, Manish; Fernando, M.P.S.; Kumar, A.N.

    2012-01-01

    For large reactor like 700 MWe PHWR effective spatial control is essential and is provided by RRS. For spatial control purpose reactor core is divided into 14 power zones. Corresponding to each zone is a light water zonal compartment. The 14 ZCCs are located in two radial planes, each containing 7 ZCCs. For each zone, power measurement is carried out using inconel (3 pitch long) self powered neutron detector (SPND) at appropriate location close to the respective ZCC. Since the zone power as obtained by the healthy zone control detector (ZCD) reading belonging to a particular zone may not correspond to its actual power because the detector per zone, measure only average fluxes but the zone extends over a large core region. Therefore accurate estimation of zone power calibration factors is required to estimate the zone powers and also to provide effective spatial power control to avoid the xenon induced spatial power oscillations in large PHWRs like 700 and 540 MWe Reactors. This accurate calculation of zone power is carried out by FMS which uses λ modes in its algorithm. Flux at any point inside the reactor can be represented in terms of the linear combination of these modes. Coefficients used in the expansion are called combining coefficient. If the readings of the detectors are known, then combining coefficients can be estimated by simple matrix operations. Once these combining coefficients are known, flux at any point inside the reactor can be found. (author)

  7. The biomass energy market in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    In 2001, it was estimated that the Finnish biomass market was in excess of 235 million dollars. The development of renewable energy, with special emphasis on biomass, was supported by the development of an energy strategy by the government of Finland. The installed capacity of biomass in Finland in 2002 was 1400 megawatt electrical (MWe). Extensive use of combined heat and power (CHP) is made in Finland, and district heating (DH) systems using biomass are gaining in popularity. Wood-based biomass technologies, retrofits to fluidized bed combustion, and wood procurement technologies were identified as the best opportunities for Canadian companies interested in operating in Finland. A country with high standards, Finland seems to look favorably on new innovative solutions. Joint ventures with Finnish companies might be an excellent way for Canadian companies to gain a foothold in Finland and expand into the European Union, the Nordic countries, the Baltic, Russia and the Central and Eastern European markets. It was further noted that Finland is one of the leading exporters of biomass technology in the world. The document provided quick facts, examined opportunities, and looked at key players. 19 refs., 4 tabs

  8. Biomass combustion technologies for power generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiltsee, G.A. Jr. [Appel Consultants, Inc., Stevenson Ranch, CA (United States); McGowin, C.R.; Hughes, E.E. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Technology in power production from biomass has been advancing rapidly. Industry has responded to government incentives such as the PURPA legislation in the US and has recognized that there are environmental advantages to using waste biomass as fuel. During the 1980s many new biomass power plants were built. The relatively mature stoker boiler technology was improved by the introduction of water-cooled grates, staged combustion air, larger boiler sizes up to 60 MW, higher steam conditions, and advanced sootblowing systems. Circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) technology achieved full commercial status, and now is the leading process for most utility-scale power applications, with more complete combustion, lower emissions, and better fuel flexibility than stoker technology. Bubbling fluidized-bed (BFB) technology has an important market niche as the best process for difficult fuels such as agricultural wastes, typically in smaller plants. Other biomass power generation technologies are being developed for possible commercial introduction in the 1990s. Key components of Whole Tree Energy{trademark} technology have been tested, conceptual design studies have been completed with favorable results, and plans are being made for the first integrated process demonstration. Fluidized-bed gasification processes have advanced from pilot to demonstration status, and the world`s first integrated wood gasification/combined cycle utility power plant is starting operation in Sweden in early 1993. Several European vendors offer biomass gasification processes commercially. US electric utilities are evaluating the cofiring of biomass with fossil fuels in both existing and new plants. Retrofitting existing coal-fired plants gives better overall cost and performance results than any biomass technologies;but retrofit cofiring is {open_quotes}fuel-switching{close_quotes} that provides no new capacity and is attractive only with economic incentives.

  9. Insights gained from PSAs of French 900MWe and 1300MWe units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brisbois, J.; Lanore, J.-M.; Villemeur, A.; Berger, J.-P.; Guio, J.-M. de

    1991-01-01

    The two probabilistic safety assessments of 900MWe and 1300MWe Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) recently completed in France constitute an important knowledge resource for the assessment of PWR safety. One innovative feature of this research programme, which yielded many valuable lessons, comes from the fact that plant shutdown state and long term post-accident conditions were fully taken into account. (author)

  10. Forbush decreases observed 40 mwe underground in 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benko, G.; Kecskemety, K.; Neuprandt, G.; Somogyi, A.J.

    1982-01-01

    Forbush decreases observed 40 mwe underground at Budapest in the first half of 1978 have been analysed together with the data of several neutron monitor stations in Europe. Assuming a power-exponential type spectrum for the variations spectrum in space as a function of rigidity, the best fitting values of power and upper cut-off rigidity have been calculated from maximum decrement by means of the weighted least squares method

  11. The development situation of biomass gasification power generation in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Zhaoqiu; Yin, Xiuli; Xu, Jie; Ma, Longlong

    2012-01-01

    This work presents the development situation of biomass gasification power generation technology in China and analyzes the difficulty and challenge in the development process. For China, a large agricultural country with abundant biomass resources, the utilization of biomass gasification power generation technology is of special importance, because it can contribute to the electricity structure diversification under the present coal-dominant electricity structure, ameliorate the environmental impact, provide energy to electricity-scarce regions and solve the problems facing agriculture. Up to now, China has developed biomass gasification power generation plants of different types and scales, including simple gas engine-based power generation systems with capacity from several kW to 3 MW and integrated gasification combined cycle systems with capacity of more than 5 MW. In recent years, due to the rising cost of biomass material, transportation, manpower, etc., the final cost of biomass power generation has increased greatly, resulting in a serious challenge in the Chinese electricity market even under present preferential policy for biomass power price. However, biomass gasification power generation technology is generally in accord with the characteristics of biomass resources in China, has relatively good adaptability and viability, and so has good prospect in China in the future. - Highlights: ► Biomass gasification power generation of 2 kW–2 MW has wide utilization in China. ► 5.5 MW biomass IGCC demonstration plant has maximum power efficiency of up to 30%. ► Biomass power generation is facing a serious challenge due to biomass cost increase.

  12. Competitiveness of biomass-fueled electrical power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce A. McCarl; Darius M. Adams; Ralph J. Alig; John T. Chmelik

    2000-01-01

    One way countries like the United States can comply with suggested rollbacks in greenhouse gas emissions is by employing power plants fueled with biomass. We examine the competitiveness of biomass-based fuel for electrical power as opposed to coal using a mathematical programming structure. We consider fueling power plants from milling residues, whole trees, logging...

  13. Use of artificial neural network in estimating channel power distribution of a 220 MWe PHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubey, B.P.; Chandra, A.K.; Govindarajan, G.; Jagannathan, V.; Kataria, S.K.

    1998-01-01

    Knowledge of the distribution of power in all the 306 channels of a Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) as a result of the movement of one or more of the four regulating rods is important from the operation and maintenance point view of the reactor. Conventional computer codes available for this purpose take several minutes to calculate the channel power distribution on PC-AT/486. An Artificial Neural network (ANN), based on the RPROP algorithm has been developed and employed in predicting channel power distribution of a 220 MWe Indian PHWR as a result of a perturbation caused by the movement of one or more of the four regulating rods of the reactor. The ANN based system produces the result of an analysis much faster than that produced by a conventional computer code usually employed for this application. The ANN based system is rugged, accurate and fast, and therefore, has potential to be used in real-time applications. (author)

  14. Conceptual evaluation of hybrid energy system comprising wind-biomass-nuclear plants for load balancing and for production of renewable synthetic transport fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, Johan; Purvins, Arturs; Papaioannou, Ioulia T.; Shropshire, David; Cherry, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Future energy systems will increasingly need to integrate variable renewable energy in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from power production. Addressing this trend the present paper studies how a hybrid energy systems comprising aggregated wind farms, a biomass processing plant, and a nuclear cogeneration plant could support high renewable energy penetration. The hybrid energy system operates so that its electrical output tends to meet demand. This is achieved mainly through altering the heat-to-power ratio of the nuclear reactor and by using excess electricity for hydrogen production through electrolysis. Hybrid energy systems with biomass treatment processes, i.e. drying, torrefaction, pyrolysis and synthetic fuel production were evaluated. It was shown that the studied hybrid energy system comprising a 1 GWe wind farm and a 347 MWe nuclear reactor could closely follow the power demand profile with a standard deviation of 34 MWe. In addition, on average 600 m"3 of bio-gasoline and 750 m"3 bio-diesel are produced daily. The reduction of greenhouse gas emissions of up to 4.4 MtCO_2eq annually compared to power generation and transport using conventional fossil fuel sources. (author)

  15. Indian Farmers’ Perceptions and Willingness to Supply Surplus Biomass to an Envisioned Biomass-Based Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anas Zyadin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The main objectives of this socio-technical study are to investigate the Indian farmers’ biomass production capacities and their perceptions and willingness to supply their surplus biomass to fuel an envisioned biomass-based power plant in three selected Indian states: Maharashtra, Madhya Pradesh and Tamil Nadu. For doing so, 471 farmers (about one-third from each state have been interviewed in the field with info-sheet filled in by the field investigators. The farmers from all of the states appeared very much willing to sell their surplus biomass directly to a power plant. The farmers seem to depreciate the involvement of a middleman in the biomass procurement process. The farmers, however, appeared to highly appreciate a community-based association to regulate the biomass prices, with varying perceptions regarding government intervention. The majority of the farmers perceived the establishment of a biomass-based power plant in their region with positive economic outcomes. The farmers identified several barriers to supply biomass to a power plant where transportation logistics appeared to be the main barrier. The study recommends considering biomass collection, storage and transportation logistics as a fundamental segment of any envisioned investment in a biomass-based power plant. Biomass processing, such as pelletization or briquetting is recommended for efficient transportation of biomass at longer distances to reduce the transportation costs. The study further encourages the establishment of a farmers’ association aimed at collecting and selling biomass in agriculture areas predominant for small land holdings.

  16. Technical notes for the conceptual design for an atmospheric fluidized-bed direct combustion power generating plant. [570 MWe plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-04-01

    The design, arrangement, thermodynamics, and economics of a 592 MW(e) (nominal gross) electric power generating plant equipped with a Babcock and Wilcox Company (B and W) atmospheric fluidized bed (AFB) boiler are described. Information is included on capital and operating costs, process systems, electrical systems, control and instrumentation, and environmental systems. This document represents a portion of an overall report describing the conceptual designs of two atmospheric fluidized bed boilers and balance of plants for the generation of electric power and the analysis and comparison of these conceptual designs to a conventional pulverized coal-fired electric power generation plant equipped with a wet limestone flue gas desulfurization system.

  17. Technical notes for the conceptual design for an atmospheric fluidized-bed direct combustion power generating plant. [570 MWe plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-04-01

    The design, arrangement, thermodynamics, and economics of a 578 MW(e) (nominal gross) electric power generating plant equipped with a Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation (FWEC) atmospheric fluidized bed (AFB) boiler are described. Information is included on capital and operating costs, process systems, electrical systems, control and instrumentation, and environmental systems. This document represents a portion of an overall report describing the conceptual designs of two atmospheric fluidized bed boilers and balance of plants for the generation of electric power and the analysis and comparison of these conceptual designs to a conventional pulverized coal-fired electric power generation plant equipped with a wet limestone flue gas desulfurization system.

  18. Hybrid concentrated solar power (CSP)–biomass plants in a semiarid region: A strategy for CSP deployment in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soria, Rafael; Portugal-Pereira, Joana; Szklo, Alexandre; Milani, Rodrigo; Schaeffer, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The production of electricity using concentrated solar power (CSP) technology is not yet possible in Brazil due to the technology’s high capital costs and the lack of a local industry. However, this study introduces a low-cost approach to CSP in Brazil by describing and simulating the operation of hybrid CSP plants that use sustainably managed biomass in Brazil’s semiarid northeast. Biomass hybridisation of a CSP plant with a solar multiple (SM) of 1.2 and a biomass fill fraction (BFF) of 30% can generate electricity at 110 USD/MWh. The high direct normal irradiation (DNI) and the availability of local low-cost biomass in Brazil’s semiarid northeast suggest the possibility of developing a CSP industry capable of supplying low-cost components under a national program framework, with the co-benefits of local job and income generation. For example, the deployment of 10 CSP plants of 30 MWe each would generate 760 direct and indirect jobs during the 24 months of plant construction and approximately 2100 annual jobs associated with the operation and maintenance (O&M) of the generating units. These 10 new units would generate additional local income on the order of USD 57 million. - Highlights: • CSP plant with supplementary biomass hybridisation is a strategic option for Brazil. • DNI and biomass availability in Brazil's semiarid can foster local CSP industry. • LCOE of CSP would cost 11 cent USD/kWh becoming competitive at solar auctions. • Co-benefits of local job and income generation due to CSP in Brazil are high.

  19. Safety margin improvement by adopting the feature of interleaving in 700 MWe PHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Nrependra; Yadav, S.K.; Khan, T.A.; Dixit, A.; Singhal, Mukesh; Nair, Suma R.

    2015-01-01

    Indian Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (IPHWRs) of 700 MWe are under construction at Kakrapar Atomic Power Project -3,4 and Rajasthan Atomic Power Project-7,8. These units have enhanced safety features with respect to standard IPHWRs. One of the enhanced features is interleaving of feeders/channels. In interleaved feeder configuration, each header located at either end of reactor gets connected to one quarter of core channels, which are uniformly distributed. The core is divided into two loops with feeder connected in interleaved fashioned. In this paper a comparative study has been performed between the two cases: 1) The core splits in two vertical halves and each vertical half is a loop of PHT (TAPS-3 and 4 Type configuration). 2) The core is divided into two loops with feeders/ channels connected in interleaved fashioned (700 MWe Configuration). LOCA studies have been performed for 700 MWe PHWR considering interleaving of feeders configuration using in-house developed computer code ATMIKA and 3-D neutron kinetics code IQS-3D. The issue of interleaving is closely linked to an inherent reactivity characteristic of PHWR reactors (viz., positive void reactivity coefficient) which leads to a power increase following a Large LOCA. In 700 MWe PHWR with intent to improve the safety margin, adopted the feature of interleaving of feeders which causes in reduction in the magnitude of void coefficient and results in reduction of peak power during LBLOCA. The systematic LBLOCA study demonstrates that interleaved configuration of feeder/channels of two loops has higher safety margins (i.e. with respect to peak power, prompt-criticality margin, adiabatic heat deposition on the fuel pins, sheath temperature excursion and clad oxidation) with regard to the effectiveness of shutdown system. (author)

  20. Lessons learned from existing biomass power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiltsee, G.

    2000-02-24

    This report includes summary information on 20 biomass power plants, which represent some of the leaders in the industry. In each category an effort is made to identify plants that illustrate particular points. The project experiences described capture some important lessons learned that lead in the direction of an improved biomass power industry.

  1. Energy Opportunities from Lignocellulosic Biomass for a Biorefinery Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Cotana

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This work presents some energy considerations concerning a biorefinery case study that has been carried out by the CRB/CIRIAF of the University of Perugia. The biorefinery is the case study of the BIT3G project, a national funded research project, and it uses the lignocellulosic biomass that is available in the territory as input materials for biochemical purposes, such as cardoon and carthamus. The whole plant is composed of several sections: the cardoon and carthamus seed milling, the oil refinement facilities, and the production section of some high quality biochemicals, i.e., bio-oils and fatty acids. The main goal of the research is to demonstrate energy autonomy of the latter section of the biorefinery, while only recovering energy from the residues resulting from the collection of the biomass. To this aim, this work presents the quantification of the energy requirements to be supplied to the considered biorefinery section, the mass flow, and the energy and chemical characterization of the biomass. Afterwards, some sustainability strategies have been qualitatively investigated in order to identify the best one to be used in this case study; the combined heat and power (CHP technology. Two scenarios have been defined and presented: the first with 6 MWt thermal input and 1.2 MWe electrical power as an output and the second with 9 MWt thermal input and 1.8 MWe electrical power as an output. The first scenario showed that 11,000 tons of residual biomass could ensure the annual production of about 34,000 MWht, equal to about the 72% of the requirements, and about 9600 MWhe, equal to approximately 60% of the electricity demand. The second scenario showed that 18,000 tons of the residual biomass could ensure the total annual production of about 56,000 MWht, corresponding to more than 100% of the requirements, and about 14,400 MWhe, equal to approximately 90% of the electricity demand. In addition, the CO2 emissions from the energy valorization

  2. Thermoeconomic Modeling and Parametric Study of Hybrid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell â Gas Turbine â Steam Turbine Power Plants Ranging from 1.5 MWe to 10 MWe

    OpenAIRE

    Arsalis, Alexandros

    2007-01-01

    Detailed thermodynamic, kinetic, geometric, and cost models are developed, implemented, and validated for the synthesis/design and operational analysis of hybrid solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) â gas turbine (GT) â steam turbine (ST) systems ranging in size from 1.5 MWe to 10 MWe. The fuel cell model used in this thesis is based on a tubular Siemens-Westinghouse-type SOFC, which is integrated with a gas turbine and a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) integrated in turn with a steam turbi...

  3. Main problems experienced on diesel generators of French 900 MWe operating units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dredemis, Geoffroy; Jude, Francois [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Fontenay-aux-Roses, Institut de Protection et Surete Nucleaire, Departement d' Analyse de Surete, B.P. No. 6, 92260 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    1986-02-15

    Each unit of all the French nuclear power plant is equipped with two diesel emergency generator sets., For the totality of standards PWRs of 900 MWe, they are identical. We present in this communication the most significative failures met with diesel engines on operating units, such as rupture of fuel injection pipes, breaking of the connecting rods, and cylinder lubrication failures. All these incidents, which affected the emergency power sources of concerned units, had generic characteristics. In view of their potential consequences, it was proceeded in each case to an immediate control of the components concerned of all PWR 900 MWe diesel engines. At the same time, studies were started as to what modifications would permit to solve rapidly each one of the problems met with. (authors)

  4. Overview of biomass and waste fuel resources for power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easterly, J.L.; Burnham, M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of issues and opportunities associated with the use of biomass for electric power generation. Important physical characteristics of biomass and waste fuels are summarized, including comparisons with conventional fossil fuels, primarily coal. The paper also provides an overview of the current use of biomass and waste fuels for electric power generation. Biomass and waste fuels are currently used for approximately 9,800 megawatts (MW) of electric generating capacity, including about 6,100 MW of capacity fueled by wood/wood waste and about 2,200 MW of capacity fueled with municipal solid waste. Perspectives on the future availability of biomass fuels (including energy crops) are addressed, as well as projected levels of market penetration for biomass power. By the year 2010, there is a potential for 22,000 MW, to as much as 70,000 MW of biomass-powered electric generating capacity in the U.S. Given the range of benefits offered by biomass, including reduced sulfur emissions, reduced greenhouse gas emissions, job creation, rural revitalization impacts, and new incentives under the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the potential use of biomass for power production could significantly expand in the future

  5. Biomass power: Exploring the diffusion challenges in Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dinica, V.

    2009-01-01

    The use of biomass resources for power generation offers numerous benefits of interest for political decision-makers: fuel security, rural and industrial development, ecological benefits. In Spain, policy instruments have been used since 1980 to stimulate biomass power generation. However, the

  6. Experience on KKNPP VVER 1000 MWe water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesh, S.; Selvaraj, S.; Balasubramanian, M.R.; Selvavinayagam, P.; Pillai, Suresh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project consists of pressurized water reactor (VVER) 2 x 1000 MWe constructed in collaboration with Russian Federation at Kudankulam in Tirunelveli District, Tamilnadu. Unit - 1 attained criticality on July 13 th 2013 and the unit was synchronized to grid on 22 nd October 2013. This paper highlights experience gained on water chemistry regime for primary and secondary circuit. (author)

  7. Capital cost: high and low sulfur coal plants-1200 MWe. [High sulfur coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    This Commercial Electric Power Cost Study for 1200 MWe (Nominal) high and low sulfur coal plants consists of three volumes. The high sulfur coal plant is described in Volumes I and II, while Volume III describes the low sulfur coal plant. The design basis and cost estimate for the 1232 MWe high sulfur coal plant is presented in Volume I, and the drawings, equipment list and site description are contained in Volume II. The reference design includes a lime flue gas desulfurization system. A regenerative sulfur dioxide removal system using magnesium oxide is also presented as an alternate in Section 7 Volume II. The design basis, drawings and summary cost estimate for a 1243 MWe low sulfur coal plant are presented in Volume III. This information was developed by redesigning the high sulfur coal plant for burning low sulfur sub-bituminous coal. These coal plants utilize a mechanical draft (wet) cooling tower system for condenser heat removal. Costs of alternate cooling systems are provided in Report No. 7 in this series of studies of costs of commercial electrical power plants.

  8. Nuclear Power Prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cintra do Prado, L.

    1966-01-01

    The present trend is to construct larger plants: the average power of the plants under construction at present, including prototypes, is 300 MW(e), i.e. three times higher than in the case of plants already in operation. Examples of new large-scale plants ares (a) Wylfa, Anglesey, United Kingdom - scheduled power of 1180 MW(e) (800 MW to be installed by 1967), to be completed in 1968; (b) ''Dungeness B'', United Kingdom - scheduled power of 1200 MW(e); (c) second unit for United States Dresden power plant - scheduled power of 715 MW(e) minimum to almost 800 MW(e). Nuclear plants on the whole serve the same purpose as conventional thermal plants

  9. A 1500-MW(e) HTGR nuclear generating station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stinson, R.C.; Hornbuckle, J.D.; Wilson, W.H.

    1976-01-01

    A conceptual design of a 1500-MW(e) HTGR nuclear generating station is described. The design concept was developed under a three-party arrangement among General Atomic Company as nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) supplier, Bechtel Power Corporation as engineer-constructors of the balance of plant (BOP), and Southern California Edison Company as a potential utility user. A typical site in the lower Mojave Desert in southeastern California was assumed for the purpose of establishing the basic site criteria. Various alternative steam cycles, prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) and component arrangements, fuel-handling concepts, and BOP layouts were developed and investigated in a programme designed to lead to an economic plant design. The paper describes the NSSS and BOP designs, the general plant arrangement and a description of the site and its unique characteristics. The elements of the design are: the use of four steam generators that are twice the capacity of GA's steam generators for its 770-MW(e) and 1100-MW(e) units; the rearrangement of steam and feedwater piping and support within the PCRV; the elimination of the PCRV star foundation to reduce the overall height of the containment building as well as of the PCRV; a revised fuel-handling concept which permits the use of a simplified, grade-level fuel storage pool; a plant arrangement that permits a substantial reduction in the penetration structure around the containment while still minimizing the lengths of cable and piping runs; and the use of two tandem-compound turbine generators. Plant design bases are discussed, and events leading to the changes in concept from the reference 8-loop PCRV 1500-MW(e) HTGR unit are described. (author)

  10. Biomass energy conversion: conventional and advanced technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, B C; Hauserman, W B [Energy and Environmental Research Center, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Increasing interest in biomass energy conversion in recent years has focused attention on enhancing the efficiency of technologies converting biomass fuels into heat and power, their capital and operating costs and their environmental emissions. Conventional combustion systems, such as fixed-bed or grate units and entrainment units, deliver lower efficiencies (<25%) than modem coal-fired combustors (30-35%). The gasification of biomass will improve energy conversion efficiency and yield products useful for heat and power generation and chemical synthesis. Advanced biomass gasification technologies using pressurized fluidized-bed systems, including those incorporating hot-gas clean-up for feeding gas turbines or fuel cells, are being demonstrated. However, many biomass gasification processes are derivatives of coal gasification technologies and do not exploit the unique properties of biomass. This paper examines some existing and upcoming technologies for converting biomass into electric power or heat. Small-scale 1-30 MWe units are emphasized, but brief reference is made to larger and smaller systems, including those that bum coal-biomass mixtures and gasifiers that feed pilot-fuelled diesel engines. Promising advanced systems, such as a biomass integrated gasifier/gas turbine (BIG/GT) with combined-cycle operation and a biomass gasifier coupled to a fuel cell, giving cycle efficiencies approaching 50% are also described. These advanced gasifiers, typically fluid-bed designs, may be pressurized and can use a wide variety of biomass materials to generate electricity, process steam and chemical products such as methanol. Low-cost, disposable catalysts are becoming available for hot-gas clean-up (enhanced gas composition) for turbine and fuel cell systems. The advantages, limitations and relative costs of various biomass gasifier systems are briefly discussed. The paper identifies the best known biomass power projects and includes some information on proposed and

  11. Biomass energy conversion: conventional and advanced technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, B.C.; Hauserman, W.B.

    1995-01-01

    Increasing interest in biomass energy conversion in recent years has focused attention on enhancing the efficiency of technologies converting biomass fuels into heat and power, their capital and operating costs and their environmental emissions. Conventional combustion systems, such as fixed-bed or grate units and entrainment units, deliver lower efficiencies (<25%) than modem coal-fired combustors (30-35%). The gasification of biomass will improve energy conversion efficiency and yield products useful for heat and power generation and chemical synthesis. Advanced biomass gasification technologies using pressurized fluidized-bed systems, including those incorporating hot-gas clean-up for feeding gas turbines or fuel cells, are being demonstrated. However, many biomass gasification processes are derivatives of coal gasification technologies and do not exploit the unique properties of biomass. This paper examines some existing and upcoming technologies for converting biomass into electric power or heat. Small-scale 1-30 MWe units are emphasized, but brief reference is made to larger and smaller systems, including those that bum coal-biomass mixtures and gasifiers that feed pilot-fuelled diesel engines. Promising advanced systems, such as a biomass integrated gasifier/gas turbine (BIG/GT) with combined-cycle operation and a biomass gasifier coupled to a fuel cell, giving cycle efficiencies approaching 50% are also described. These advanced gasifiers, typically fluid-bed designs, may be pressurized and can use a wide variety of biomass materials to generate electricity, process steam and chemical products such as methanol. Low-cost, disposable catalysts are becoming available for hot-gas clean-up (enhanced gas composition) for turbine and fuel cell systems. The advantages, limitations and relative costs of various biomass gasifier systems are briefly discussed. The paper identifies the best known biomass power projects and includes some information on proposed and

  12. Biomass utilization at Northern States Power Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, R.P.

    1994-01-01

    Northern States Power Company (open-quotes NSPclose quotes) generates, transmits and distributes electricity and distributes natural gas to customers in Minnesota, Wisconsin, North Dakota, South Dakota and Michigan. An important and growing component of the fuel needed to generate steam for electrical production is biomass. This paper describes NSP's historical use of biomass, current biomass resources and an overview of how NSP plans to expand its use of biomass in the future

  13. 76 FR 77963 - Oglethorpe Power Corporation; Proposed Biomass Power Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-15

    ... Service Oglethorpe Power Corporation; Proposed Biomass Power Plant AGENCY: Rural Utilities Service, USDA... related to possible financial assistance to Oglethorpe Power Corporation's (Oglethorpe) for the... online at the following Web site: http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/UWP-OglethorpePower.html and at the: Warren...

  14. Biomass power. Exploring the diffusion challenges in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinica, Valentina

    2009-01-01

    The use of biomass resources for power generation offers numerous benefits of interest for political decision-makers: fuel security, rural and industrial development, ecological benefits. In Spain, policy instruments have been used since 1980 to stimulate biomass power generation. However, the diffusion outcome by 2007 was very disappointing: only 525 MW. This paper argues that two factors lie at the core of this: the conceptualization of biomass resources by political decision-makers in the instruments used, and the desire that policy instruments be in line with market liberalization principles. These generated a persistent economic obstacle for biomass power generation, and impeded the development of markets for the supply of biomass resources. The policy learning regarding the heterogeneity of biomass resources, and the investors' expectations on risks, profitability and resource markets was very slow among political decision-makers. The paper contributes to the understanding of diffusion outcomes by proposing to analyse diffusion by means of five indicators: types of resources, technologies, developers, motivations to invest and project sizes. Besides, the paper shows the usefulness of investigating policy instruments in terms of their risk and profitability characteristics. This enables a better understanding of the diffusion patterns and outcomes. (author)

  15. 76 FR 20624 - Oglethorpe Power Corporation: Proposed Biomass Power Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Rural Utilities Service Oglethorpe Power Corporation: Proposed Biomass Power Plant AGENCY: Rural Utilities Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of Availability of a Draft... financial assistance to Oglethorpe Power Corporation (Oglethorpe) for the construction of a 100 megawatt (MW...

  16. Recent operating experience during startup testing at latest 1100 MWe BWR-5 nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, Akira; Tateishi, Mizuo; Kajikawa, Makoto; Hayase, Yuichi.

    1986-01-01

    In June and September 1985, the latest two 1100 Mwe BWR-5 nuclear power plants started commercial operation about ten days earlier than initially expected without any unscheduled shutdown. These latest plants, 2F-3 and K-1, are characterized by an improved core with new 8 x 8 fuel assemblies, highly reliable control systems, advanced control room system and turbine steam full bypass system for full load rejection (2F3). This paper describes the following operating experiences gained during their startup testing. 1) Continuous operation at full load rejection. 2) Stable operation at natural circulating flow condition. 3) 31 and 23 hour short time start up operation. 4) 100-75-100 %, 1-8-1-14 hours daily load following operation. (author)

  17. Water treatment for 500 MWe PHWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasist, Sudheer; Sharma, M.C.; Agarwal, N.K.

    1995-01-01

    Large quantities of treated water is required for power generation. For a typical 500 MWe PHWR inland station with cooling towers, raw water at the rate of 6000 m 3 /hr is required. Impurities in cooling water give rise to the problems of corrosion, scaling, microbiological contamination, fouling, silical deposition etc. These problems lead to increased maintenance cost, reduced heat transfer efficiency, and possible production cut backs or shutdowns. The problems in coastal based power plants are more serious because of the highly corrosive nature of sea water used for cooling. An overview of the cooling water systems and water treatment method is enumerated. (author). 2 refs., 1 fig

  18. Reactor protection systems of 500 MWe PHWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallik, G; Kelkar, M G; Apte, Ravindra [C and I Group, Nuclear Power Corporation, Mumbai (India)

    1997-03-01

    The 500 MWe PHWR has two totally independent, diverse, fast acting shutdown system called Shutdown System 1 (SDS 1) and Shutdown System 2 (SDS 2). The trip generation circuitry of SDS 1 and SDS 2 are known as Reactor Protection System 1 (RPS 1) and Reactor Protection System 2 (RPS 2) respectively. Some of the features specific to 500 MWe reactors are Core Over Power Protection System (COPPS) based upon in core Self Powered Neutron Detector (SPND) signals, use of local two out of three coincidence logic and adoption of overlap testing for RPS 2, use of Fine Impulse Testing (FIT) in RPS 2, testing of the final control elements namely electro-magnetic clutch of individual Shutoff Rods (SRs) of SDS 1 and all the fast acting valves of SDS 2, etc. The two shutdown systems have totally separate sets of sensors and associated signal processing circuitry as well as physical arrangements. A separate computerised test and monitoring unit is used for each of the two shutdown systems. Use of Programmable Digital Comparator (PDC) unit exclusively for reactor protection systems, has been adopted. The capability of PDC unit is enhanced and communication links are provided for its integration in over all system. The paper describes the design features of reactor protection systems. (author). 3 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. The future 700 MWe pressurized heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhardwaj, S.A.

    2006-01-01

    The design of a 700 MWe pressurized heavy water reactor has been developed. The design is based on the twin 540 MWe reactors at Tarapur of which the first unit has been made critical in less than 5 years from construction commencement. In the 700 MWe design boiling of the coolant, to a limited extent, has been allowed near the channel exit. While making the plant layout more compact, emphasis has been on constructability. Saving in capital cost of about 15%, over the present units, is expected. The paper describes salient design features of 700 MWe pressurized heavy water reactor

  20. Evaluation on the Efficiency of Biomass Power Generation Industry in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingqi Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As a developing country with large population, China is facing the problems of energy resource shortage and growing environmental pollution arising from the coal-dominated energy structure. Biomass energy, as a kind of renewable energy with the characteristics of being easy to store and friendly to environment, has become the focus of China’s energy development in the future. Affected by the advanced power generation technology and diversified geography environment, the biomass power generation projects show new features in recent years. Hence, it is necessary to evaluate the efficiency of biomass power generation industry by employing proper method with the consideration of new features. In this paper, the regional difference as a new feature of biomass power generation industry is taken into consideration, and the AR model is employed to modify the zero-weight issue when using data envelopment analysis (DEA method to evaluate the efficiency of biomass power generation industry. 30 biomass power generation enterprises in China are selected as the sample, and the efficiency evaluation is performed. The result can provide some insights into the sustainable development of biomass power generation industry in China.

  1. Biomass Power Generation Industry Efficiency Evaluation in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingyou Yan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we compare the properties of the traditional additive-based data envelopment analysis (hereafter, referred to as DEA models and propose two generalized DEA models, i.e., the big M additive-based DEA (hereafter, referred to as BMA model and the big M additive-based super-efficiency DEA (hereafter, referred to as BMAS model, to evaluate the performance of the biomass power plants in China in 2012. The virtues of the new models are two-fold: one is that they inherited the properties of the traditional additive-based DEA models and derived more new additive-based DEA forms; the other is that they can rank the efficient decision making units (hereafter, referred to as DMUs. Therefore, the new models have great potential to be applied in sustainable energy project evaluation. Then, we applied the two new DEA models to evaluate the performance of the biomass power plants in China and find that the efficiency of biomass power plants in the northern part of China is higher than that in the southern part of China. The only three efficient biomass power plants are all in the northern part of China. Furthermore, based on the results of the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney rank-sum test and the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, there is a great technology gap between the biomass power plants in the northern part of China and those in the southern part of China.

  2. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Engineering Test Facility (ETF) 200 MWe power plant. Conceptual Design Engineering Report (CDER). Volume 2: Engineering. Volume 3: Costs and schedules

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Engineering design details for the principal systems, system operating modes, site facilities, and structures of an engineering test facility (ETF) of a 200 MWE power plant are presented. The ETF resembles a coal-fired steam power plant in many ways. It is analogous to a conventional plant which has had the coal combustor replaced with the MHD power train. Most of the ETF components are conventional. They can, however, be sized or configured differently or perform additional functions from those in a conventional coal power plant. The boiler not only generates steam, but also performs the functions of heating the MHD oxidant, recovering seed, and controlling emissions.

  3. Opportunities for Small Biomass Power Systems. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, D. D.; Pinapati, V. S.

    2000-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to provide information to key stakeholders and the general public about biomass resource potential for power generation. Ten types of biomass were identified and evaluated. The quantities available for power generation were estimated separately for five U.S. regions and Canada. A method entitled ''competitive resource profile'' was used to rank resources based on economics, utilization, and environmental impact. The results of the analysis may be used to set priorities for utilization of biomass in each U.S. region. A review of current biomass conversion technologies was accomplished, linking technologies to resources.

  4. Cleaning of biomass derived product gas for engine applications and for co-firing in PC-boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurkela, E; Staahlberg, P; Laatikainen-Luntama, J [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Production Technologies; and others

    1997-10-01

    The conventional fluidized-bed combustion has become commercially available also to relatively small scale (5 MWe), but this technology has rather low power-to-heat ratio and consequently it`s potential is limited to applications where district or process heat is the main product. Thus, there seems to be a real need to develop more efficient methods for small-scale power production from biomass. Gasification diesel power plant is one alternative for the small-scale power production, which has clearly higher power-to-heat ratio than can be reached in conventional steam cycles. The main technical problem in this process is the gas cleaning from condensable tars. In addition to the diesel-power plants, there are several other interesting applications for atmospheric-pressure clean gas technology. One alternative for cost-effective biomass utilization is co-firing of biomass derived product gas in existing pulverized coal fired boilers (or other types of boilers and furnaces). The aim of the project is to develop dry gas cleaning methods for gasification-diesel power plants and for other atmospheric-pressure applications of biomass and waste gasification. The technical objectives of the project are as follows: To develop and test catalytic gas cleaning methods for engine. To study the removal of problematic ash species of (CFE) gasification with regard to co-combustion of the product gas in PC boilers. To evaluate the technical and economical feasibility of different small-scale power plant concepts based on fixed-bed updraft and circulating fluidized- bed gasification of biomass and waste. (orig.)

  5. Economic feasibility of CHP facilities fueled by biomass from unused agriculture land: Case of Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeifer, Antun; Dominković, Dominik Franjo; Ćosić, Boris; Duić, Neven

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Potential of unused agricultural land for biomass and fruit production is assessed. • Technical and energy potential of biomass from SRC and fruit pruning is calculated. • Economic feasibility of CHP plants utilizing biomass from SRC is presented for Croatia. • Sensitivity analysis and recommendations for shift toward feasibility are provided. - Abstract: In this paper, the energy potential of biomass from growing short rotation coppice on unused agricultural land in the Republic of Croatia is used to investigate the feasibility of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) facilities fueled by such biomass. Large areas of agricultural land that remain unused for food crops, represent significant potential for growing biomass that could be used for energy. This biomass could be used to supply power plants of up to 15 MW_e in accordance with heat demands of the chosen locations. The methodology for regional energy potential assessment was elaborated in previous work and is now used to investigate the conditions in which such energy facilities could be feasible. The overall potential of biomass from short rotation coppice cultivated on unused agricultural land in the scenarios with 30% of the area is up to 10 PJ/year. The added value of fruit trees pruning biomass represents an incentive for the development of fruit production on such agricultural land. Sensitivity analysis was conducted for several parameters: cost of biomass, investment costs in CHP systems and combined change in biomass and technology cost.

  6. Nuclear power: Europe report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2001-01-01

    Last year, 2000, nuclear power plants were available for energy supply, respectively, in 18 countries all over Europe. In eight of the fifteen member countries of the European Union nuclear power plants have been in operation. A total of 218 plants with an aggregate net capacity of 172 259 MWe and an aggregate gross capacity of 181 642 MWe were in operation (31.12.2000; 215 plants, 180 067 MWe (gross), 172 259 MWe (net)). One unit, i.e. Temelin in the Czech Republic went critical for the first time and started test operation after having been connected to the grid. Temelin adds about 981 MWe (gross) and 912 MWe (net) to the electricity production capacity. Three units, Hinkley Point A1 and A2 in United Kingdom, and Chernobyl 3 in the Ukraine have been shut down during the year 2000. This means a loss of 1534 MWe gross capacity and 1420 MWe net capacity. Last year, 12 plants (31.12.2000: 11 plants) were under construction in Romania, Russia, Slovakia, the Czech Republic and the Ukraine, that is only in east european countries. In eight countries of the European Union 146 nuclear power plants have been operated with an aggregate gross capacity of 129 188 MWe and an aggregate net capacity of 123 061 MWe (31.12.2000: 144 plants, 128 613 MWe (gross), 122 627 MWe (net)). Net electricity production in 2000 in the EU amounts to approx. 818.8 TWh, which means a share of 35 per cent of the total production in the whole EU. Shares of nuclear power differ widely among the operator countries. The reach 76 per cent in France, 74 per cent in Lithuania, 57 per cent in Belgium and 47 per cent in the Ukraine. Nuclear power also provides an noticeable share in the electricity supply of countries, which operate no own nuclear power plants, e. g. Italy, Portugal and Austria. (orig.) [de

  7. Evaluation of Hybrid Power Plants using Biomass, Photovoltaics and Steam Electrolysis for Hydrogen and Power Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrakopoulou, F.; Sanz, J.

    2014-12-01

    Steam electrolysis is a promising process of large-scale centralized hydrogen production, while it is also considered an excellent option for the efficient use of renewable solar and geothermal energy resources. This work studies the operation of an intermediate temperature steam electrolyzer (ITSE) and its incorporation into hybrid power plants that include biomass combustion and photovoltaic panels (PV). The plants generate both electricity and hydrogen. The reference -biomass- power plant and four variations of a hybrid biomass-PV incorporating the reference biomass plant and the ITSE are simulated and evaluated using exergetic analysis. The variations of the hybrid power plants are associated with (1) the air recirculation from the electrolyzer to the biomass power plant, (2) the elimination of the sweep gas of the electrolyzer, (3) the replacement of two electric heaters with gas/gas heat exchangers, and (4) the replacement two heat exchangers of the reference electrolyzer unit with one heat exchanger that uses steam from the biomass power plant. In all cases, 60% of the electricity required in the electrolyzer is covered by the biomass plant and 40% by the photovoltaic panels. When comparing the hybrid plants with the reference biomass power plant that has identical operation and structure as that incorporated in the hybrid plants, we observe an efficiency decrease that varies depending on the scenario. The efficiency decrease stems mainly from the low effectiveness of the photovoltaic panels (14.4%). When comparing the hybrid scenarios, we see that the elimination of the sweep gas decreases the power consumption due to the elimination of the compressor used to cover the pressure losses of the filter, the heat exchangers and the electrolyzer. Nevertheless, if the sweep gas is used to preheat the air entering the boiler of the biomass power plant, the efficiency of the plant increases. When replacing the electric heaters with gas-gas heat exchangers, the

  8. A multinode digital control system for 500 MWe PHWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, G N; Suresh Babu, R M; Jangra, L R; Das, Shantanu; Mallik, S B [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Reactor Control Div.

    1994-12-31

    A fault tolerant distributed digital computer system for 500 MWe reactor power regulation is configured around standard microcomputer boards designed indigenously. The system is configured as functionally partitioned distributed control system having 8 nodes linked by high-speed dual redundant high-way. The paper gives the details of the configuration of system and how the features of fault-tolerance and fail-safeness are achieved through design. (author). 1 fig.

  9. Aspects of using biomass as energy source for power generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tîrtea Raluca-Nicoleta

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Biomass represents an important source of renewable energy in Romania with about 64% of the whole available green energy. Being a priority for the energy sector worldwide, in our country the development stage is poor compared to solar and wind energy. Biomass power plants offer great horizontal economy development, local and regional economic growth with benefic effects on life standard. The paper presents an analysis on biomass to power conversion solutions compared to fossil fuels using two main processes: combustion and gasification. Beside the heating value, which can be considerably higher for fossil fuels compared to biomass, a big difference between fossil fuels and biomass can be observed in the sulphur content. While the biomass sulphur content is between 0 and approximately 1%, the sulphur content of coal can reach 4%. Using coal in power plants requires important investments in installations of flue gas desulfurization. If limestone is used to reduce SO2 emissions, then additional carbon dioxide moles will be released during the production of CaO from CaCO3. Therefore, fossil fuels not only release a high amount of carbon dioxide through burning, but also through the caption of sulphur dioxide, while biomass is considered CO2 neutral. Biomass is in most of the cases represented by residues, so it is a free fuel compared to fossil fuels. The same power plant can be used even if biomass or fossil fuels is used as a feedstock with small differences. The biomass plant could need a drying system due to high moisture content of the biomass, while the coal plant will need a desulfurization installation of flue gas and additional money will be spent with fuel purchasing.

  10. Cocombustion of biomass in coal-fired power plants; Meestoken van biomassa in kolengestookte E-centrales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrink, W.G.M. [Stork Thermeq, Hengelo (Netherlands)

    2001-12-01

    The aim of the desk study is to determine to what degree several types of biomass can be cofired with existing coal fired utility boilers in the Netherlands. All results with regard to boiler performances are obtained by making use of a computer model of a typical coal fired boiler which make part of a 600 MWe coal fired power plant. Because the existing coal fired units in the Netherlands do deviate more or less from the used model all outcomes and conclusions of this study are indicative. Slagging and corrosion which become more important when firing biogas in a coal fired boiler are considered superficially. More close investigations are necessary when carry out concrete projects. Furthermore all results are based on 100% boiler load and may not be used or extrapolated to part load conditions. The extent of firing biomass gas may depend on available space in the boiler house and correlated restrictions for necessary constructive adaptations. These aspects were leave out of consideration. For information the necessary size of piping for biomass gas from gasifier to the boiler has been determined for several amounts of biomass. [Dutch] Het doel van de studie is te onderzoeken hoeveel biomassa, in percentage van het thermisch vermogen, volgens verschillende concepten kan worden meegestookt in een kolengestookte elektriciteitscentrale. Dit wordt in deze studie behandeld aan de hand van een aantal aspecten: Rookgashoeveelheden door de ketel. Hierbij kornen de volgende zaken aan de orde: snelheden, drukval, belasting van DeNox, DeSox en E-filters, capaciteit van de ventilatoren; Rookgastemperaturen. Dit betreft temperaturen uitlaat vuurhaard, uitlaat ketel en uitlaat LUVO (luchtverhitter); Verslakking en corrosie van oververhitters; Water/stoomzijdige flows. Dit betreft aspecten als flows, temperaturen, flow door de turbine (slikvermogen) en uitlaatconditie stoomturbine (vochtgehalte). Voor de verwerking van biomassa worden alleen vergassing (in hoofdzaak) en, minder

  11. Final Techno-Economic Analysis of 550 MWe Supercritical PC Power Plant CO2 Capture with Linde-BASF Advanced PCC Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostick, Devin [Linde LLC, Murray Hill, NJ (United States); Stoffregen, Torsten [Linde AG Linde Engineering Division, Dresden (Germany); Rigby, Sean [BASF Corporation, Houston, TX (United States)

    2017-01-09

    This topical report presents the techno-economic evaluation of a 550 MWe supercritical pulverized coal (PC) power plant utilizing Illinois No. 6 coal as fuel, integrated with 1) a previously presented (for a subcritical PC plant) Linde-BASF post-combustion CO2 capture (PCC) plant incorporating BASF’s OASE® blue aqueous amine-based solvent (LB1) [Ref. 6] and 2) a new Linde-BASF PCC plant incorporating the same BASF OASE® blue solvent that features an advanced stripper interstage heater design (SIH) to optimize heat recovery in the PCC process. The process simulation and modeling for this report is performed using Aspen Plus V8.8. Technical information from the PCC plant is determined using BASF’s proprietary thermodynamic and process simulation models. The simulations developed and resulting cost estimates are first validated by reproducing the results of DOE/NETL Case 12 representing a 550 MWe supercritical PC-fired power plant with PCC incorporating a monoethanolamine (MEA) solvent as used in the DOE/NETL Case 12 reference [Ref. 2]. The results of the techno-economic assessment are shown comparing two specific options utilizing the BASF OASE® blue solvent technology (LB1 and SIH) to the DOE/NETL Case 12 reference. The results are shown comparing the energy demand for PCC, the incremental fuel requirement, and the net higher heating value (HHV) efficiency of the PC power plant integrated with the PCC plant. A comparison of the capital costs for each PCC plant configuration corresponding to a net 550 MWe power generation is also presented. Lastly, a cost of electricity (COE) and cost of CO2 captured assessment is shown illustrating the substantial cost reductions achieved with the Linde-BASF PCC plant utilizing the advanced SIH configuration in combination with BASF’s OASE® blue solvent technology as compared to the DOE/NETL Case 12 reference. The key factors contributing to the reduction of COE and the cost of CO2 captured

  12. Status of Biomass Power Generation in California, July 31, 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, G.

    2003-12-01

    This report describes the development of the biomass power industry in California over the past quarter century, and examines its future outlook. The development of a state biomass policy, which has been under discussion in California for the better part of the past decade, has never gotten off the ground, but a number of smaller initiatives have helped to keep the biomass power industry afloat and have promoted the use of some targeted types of residues. In this report we analyze the prospects for policy development and the application of new biomass technologies in California.

  13. Thermodynamic evaluation of a novel solar-biomass hybrid power generation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Zhang; Liu, Qibin; Lei, Jing; Wang, Xiaohe; Sun, Jie; Jin, Hongguang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A solar-biomass hybrid power system with zero carbon dioxide emission is proposed. • The internal mechanisms of the solar-biomass utilization are discussed. • The on-design and off-design properties of the system are numerically investigated. • The configurations of the proposed system are optimized. - Abstract: A solar-biomass hybrid power generation system, which integrates a solar thermal energy collection subsystem, a biomass steam boiler and a steam turbine power generation block, is developed for efficiently utilizing renewable energies. The solar thermal energy is concentrated by parabolic trough collectors and is used to heat the feed-water to the superheated steam of 371 °C, then the generated solar steam is further heated to a higher temperature level of 540 °C via a second-stage heating process in a biomass boiler, the system power generation capacity is about 50 MW. The hybrid process of the solar energy and biomass contributes to ameliorating the system thermodynamic performances and reducing of the exergy loss within the steam generation process. The off-design evaluation results indicate that the annual net solar-to-electric efficiency of the hybrid power system is improved to 18.13%, which is higher than that of the typical parabolic trough solar power system as 15.79%. The levelized cost of energy drops to 0.077 $/(kW h) from 0.192 $/(kW h). The annual biomass consumption rate is reduced by 22.53% in comparison with typical biomass power systems. The research findings provide a promising approach for the efficient utilization of the abundant renewable energies resources and the reduction of carbon dioxide emission.

  14. IRSN-ANCCLI partnership. IRSN-ANCCLI seminar on decennial inspections of 900 MWe reactors - November 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollinger, Francois; Delalonde, Jean-Claude; Hubert, F.; Paulmaz, X.; Tindillere, M.; Lheureux, Y.; Junker, R.; Sene, M.

    2010-11-01

    This seminar addressed the commitment of local information commissions (CLI) in the analysis and follow-up of the third decennial inspections of the French 900 MWe nuclear reactors. A first session addressed topics directly related to these inspections. Contributions proposed under the form of Power Point presentations by experts and representatives of the IRSN, EDF and CLIs addressed the following issues: safety re-examination of EDF 900 MWe reactors at the occasion of the third decennial inspection, activities of the IRSN related to skill management in nuclear power stations, implementation of the third decennial inspection of the unit 1 of the Fessenheim nuclear power station, the issue of follow-up by a local information commission after a decennial inspection. A second session addressed topics not related to decennial inspections and were proposed by Gravelines and Dampierre local information commissions: analysis of significant safety events, issues of skill management in nuclear power stations

  15. Life cycle assessment of a biomass gasification combined-cycle power system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, M.K.; Spath, P.L.

    1997-12-01

    The potential environmental benefits from biomass power are numerous. However, biomass power may also have some negative effects on the environment. Although the environmental benefits and drawbacks of biomass power have been debated for some time, the total significance has not been assessed. This study serves to answer some of the questions most often raised in regard to biomass power: What are the net CO{sub 2} emissions? What is the energy balance of the integrated system? Which substances are emitted at the highest rates? What parts of the system are responsible for these emissions? To provide answers to these questions, a life cycle assessment (LCA) of a hypothetical biomass power plant located in the Midwest United States was performed. LCA is an analytical tool for quantifying the emissions, resource consumption, and energy use, collectively known as environmental stressors, that are associated with converting a raw material to a final product. Performed in conjunction with a technoeconomic feasibility study, the total economic and environmental benefits and drawbacks of a process can be quantified. This study complements a technoeconomic analysis of the same process, reported in Craig and Mann (1996) and updated here. The process studied is based on the concept of power Generation in a biomass integrated gasification combined cycle (BIGCC) plant. Broadly speaking, the overall system consists of biomass production, its transportation to the power plant, electricity generation, and any upstream processes required for system operation. The biomass is assumed to be supplied to the plant as wood chips from a biomass plantation, which would produce energy crops in a manner similar to the way food and fiber crops are produced today. Transportation of the biomass and other materials is by both rail and truck. The IGCC plant is sized at 113 MW, and integrates an indirectly-heated gasifier with an industrial gas turbine and steam cycle. 63 refs., 34 figs., 32 tabs.

  16. Life cycle assessment of a biomass gasification combined-cycle power system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, M.K.; Spath, P.L.

    1997-12-01

    The potential environmental benefits from biomass power are numerous. However, biomass power may also have some negative effects on the environment. Although the environmental benefits and drawbacks of biomass power have been debated for some time, the total significance has not been assessed. This study serves to answer some of the questions most often raised in regard to biomass power: What are the net CO{sub 2} emissions? What is the energy balance of the integrated system? Which substances are emitted at the highest rates? What parts of the system are responsible for these emissions? To provide answers to these questions, a life cycle assessment (LCA) of a hypothetical biomass power plant located in the Midwest United States was performed. LCA is an analytical tool for quantifying the emissions, resource consumption, and energy use, collectively known as environmental stressors, that are associated with converting a raw material to a final product. Performed in conjunction with a t echnoeconomic feasibility study, the total economic and environmental benefits and drawbacks of a process can be quantified. This study complements a technoeconomic analysis of the same process, reported in Craig and Mann (1996) and updated here. The process studied is based on the concept of power Generation in a biomass integrated gasification combined cycle (BIGCC) plant. Broadly speaking, the overall system consists of biomass production, its transportation to the power plant, electricity generation, and any upstream processes required for system operation. The biomass is assumed to be supplied to the plant as wood chips from a biomass plantation, which would produce energy crops in a manner similar to the way food and fiber crops are produced today. Transportation of the biomass and other materials is by both rail and truck. The IGCC plant is sized at 113 MW, and integrates an indirectly-heated gasifier with an industrial gas turbine and steam cycle. 63 refs., 34 figs., 32 tabs.

  17. Paluel: the first of the 1300 MWe class

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    The 1300 MWe class follows that of 900 MWe class. It is the result of studies which have taken into account the evolution of projects made by manufacturers, of research into economies of scale and site optimisation and the attempt to secure a reputation in the export field. In comparison with the 900 MWe class, the 1300 MWe class offers both similarities and differences. Similarities: the general design of the pressure vessel and the fuel elements is the same, as is the design of the loops on the primary cooling circuit. With the aim of reducing costs, the Equipment department carried out a study in 1978 regarding a number of slight modifications in the design called P'4, consisting of at least 14 units, orders for which will be given in the period up to 1983-84 [fr

  18. Improvements on computerized procedure system of advanced power reactor 1400 MWe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, Nokyu; Jung, Yeonsub; Sung, Chanho; Kang, Sungkon

    2017-01-01

    Plant procedures are instructions to help operator in monitoring, decision making, and controlling Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). While plant procedures conventionally have been paper-based, computerized-based procedures are being implemented to reduce the drawbacks of paper-based procedures in many nuclear power plants. The Computerized Procedure System (CPS) designed by Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Central Research Institute (KHNP CRI) is one of the human-system interfaces (HSIs) in digitalized Main Control Room (MCR) of APR1400 (Advanced Power Reactor 1400 MWe). Currently, CPS is being applied to constructing nuclear power plants of Korea and Barakah NPP 1, 2, 3 and 4 units of United Arab Emirates. The CPS has many advantages to perform the procedure in fully digitalized MCR. First, CPS provides the procedure flow with logic diagram to operators. The operator easily can be aware of the procedure flow from a previous instruction to the next instruction and also can find out the relation between parent instruction and child instructions such as AND, OR and SEQUENCE logics. Second, CPS has three logic-based functions such as procedure entry condition monitoring logic, continuously applied step (CAS) re-execution monitoring logic and auto evaluation logic on instructions. E.g. CPS provides the standard post trip actions procedure open popup message when the reactor trips by calculating the entry condition logic that procedure writer had made in the writing process. Third, CPS can directly display the task information related to instructions such as valves, pumps, process parameters, etc. and also the operator can call the system display related to procedure execution. If an operator clicks the system display link, the related system display popups on the right side monitor of CPS display. Lastly, CPS supports the synchronization of procedure among the operators. This synchronization function helps operators to succeed the goal of procedure and improve the situation

  19. EPA RE-Powering America's Lands: Kansas City Municipal Farm Site ₋ Biomass Power Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunsberger, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Mosey, G. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Through the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, the economic and technical feasibility of utilizing biomass at the Kansas City, Missouri, Municipal Farm site, a group of City-owned properties, is explored. The study that none of the technologies we reviewed--biomass heat, power and CHP--are economically viable options for the Municipal Farms site. However, if the site were to be developed around a future central biomass heating or CHP facility, biomass could be a good option for the site.

  20. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Engineering Test Facility (ETF) 200 MWe power plant. Conceptual Design Engineering Report (CDER). Volume 2: Engineering. Volume 3: Costs and schedules. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    Engineering design details for the principal systems, system operating modes, site facilities, and structures of an engineering test facility (ETF) of a 200 MWE power plant are presented. The ETF resembles a coal-fired steam power plant in many ways. It is analogous to a conventional plant which has had the coal combustor replaced with the MHD power train. Most of the ETF components are conventional. They can, however, be sized or configured differently or perform additional functions from those in a conventional coal power plant. The boiler not only generates steam, but also performs the functions of heating the MHD oxidant, recovering seed, and controlling emissions

  1. Energy Efficiency and Air Quality Repairs at Lyonsdale Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brower, Michael R; Morrison, James A; Spomer, Eric; Thimot, Carol A

    2012-07-31

    This project enabled Lyonsdale Biomass, LLC to effect analyses, repairs and upgrades for its biomass cogeneration facility located in Lewis County, New York and close by the Adirondack Park to reduce air emissions by improving combustion technique and through the overall reduction of biomass throughput by increasing the system's thermodynamic efficiency for its steam-electrical generating cycle. Project outcomes result in significant local, New York State, Northeast U.S. and national benefits including improved renewable energy operational surety, enhanced renewable energy efficiency and more freedom from foreign fossil fuel source dependence. Specifically, the reliability of the Lyonsdale Biomass 20MWe woody biomass combined-heat and power (CHP) was and is now directly enhanced. The New York State and Lewis County benefits are equally substantial since the facility sustains 26 full-time equivalency (FTE) jobs at the facility and as many as 125 FTE jobs in the biomass logistics supply chain. Additionally, the project sustains essential local and state payment in lieu of taxes revenues. This project helps meet several USDOE milestones and contributes directly to the following sustainability goals:  Climate: Reduces greenhouse gas emissions associated with bio-power production, conversion and use, in comparison to fossil fuels. Efficiency and Productivity: Enhances efficient use of renewable resources and maximizes conversion efficiency and productivity. Profitability: Lowers production costs. Rural Development: Enhances economic welfare and rural development through job creation and income generation. Standards: Develop standards and corresponding metrics for ensuring sustainable biopower production. Energy Diversification and Security: Reduces dependence on foreign oil and increases energy supply diversity. Net Energy Balance: Ensures positive net energy balance for all alternatives to fossil fuels.

  2. Optimization of biomass fuelled systems for distributed power generation using Particle Swarm Optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, P. Reche; Reyes, N. Ruiz; Gonzalez, M. Gomez; Jurado, F.

    2008-01-01

    With sufficient territory and abundant biomass resources Spain appears to have suitable conditions to develop biomass utilization technologies. As an important decentralized power technology, biomass gasification and power generation has a potential market in making use of biomass wastes. This paper addresses biomass fuelled generation of electricity in the specific aspect of finding the best location and the supply area of the electric generation plant for three alternative technologies (gas motor, gas turbine and fuel cell-microturbine hybrid power cycle), taking into account the variables involved in the problem, such as the local distribution of biomass resources, transportation costs, distance to existing electric lines, etc. For each technology, not only optimal location and supply area of the biomass plant, but also net present value and generated electric power are determined by an own binary variant of Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO). According to the values derived from the optimization algorithm, the most profitable technology can be chosen. Computer simulations show the good performance of the proposed binary PSO algorithm to optimize biomass fuelled systems for distributed power generation. (author)

  3. Development of biomass gasification systems for gas turbine power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, E.D.; Svenningsson, P.

    1991-01-01

    Gas turbines are of interest for biomass applications because, unlike steam turbines, they have relatively high efficiencies and low unit capital costs in the small sizes appropriate for biomass installations. Gasification is a simple and efficient way to make biomass usable in gas turbines. The authors evaluate here the technical requirements for gas turbine power generation with biomass gas and the status of pressurized biomass gasification and hot gas cleanup systems. They also discuss the economics of gasifier-gas turbine cycles and make some comparisons with competing technologies. Their analysis indicates that biomass gasifiers fueling advanced gas turbines are promising for cost-competitive cogeneration and central station power generation. Gasifier-gas turbine systems are not available commercially, but could probably be developed in 3 to 5 years. Extensive past work related to coal gasification and pressurized combustion of solid fuels for gas turbines would be relevant in this effort, as would work on pressurized biomass gasification for methanol synthesis

  4. Strategic analysis of biomass and waste fuels for electric power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiltsee, G.A. Jr.; Easterly, J.; Vence, T.

    1993-12-01

    In this report, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) intends to help utility companies evaluate biomass and wastes for power generation. These fuels may be alternatives or supplements to fossil fuels in three applications: (1) utility boiler coining; (2) dedicated combustion/energy recovery plants; and 3) dedicated gasification/combined cycle plants. The report summarizes data on biomass and waste properties, and evaluates the cost and performance of fuel preparation and power generation technologies. The primary biomass and waste resources evaluated are: (1) wood wastes (from forests, mills, construction/demolition, and orchards) and short rotation woody crops; (2) agricultural wastes (from fields, animals, and processing) and herbaceous energy crops; and (3) consumer or industrial wastes (e.g., municipal solid waste, scrap tires, sewage sludge, auto shredder waste). The major fuel types studied in detail are wood, municipal solid waste, and scrap tires. The key products of the project include the BIOPOWER model of biomass/waste-fired power plant performance and cost. Key conclusions of the evaluation are: (1) significant biomass and waste fuel resources are available; (2) biomass power technology cannot currently compete with natural gas-fired combined cycle technology; (3) coining biomass and waste fuels with coal in utility and industrial boilers is the most efficient, lowest cost, and lowest risk method of energy recovery from residual materials; (4) better biomass and waste fuel production and conversion technology must be developed, with the help of coordinated government energy and environmental policies and incentives; and (5) community partnerships can enhance the chances for success of a project

  5. Understanding Biomass Ignition in Power Plant Mills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwarzer, Lars; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Glarborg, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Converting existing coal fired power plants to biomass is a readily implemented strategy to increase the share of renewable energy. However, changing from one fuel to another is not straightforward: Experience shows that wood pellets ignite more readily than coal in power plant mills or storages...

  6. Fire probability safety analysis in France for 900 MWe nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, R.; Bonneval, F.; Mattei, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology implemented by the Institute for Nuclear Safety and Protection (IPSN) to carry out the Fire Probabilistic Safety Assessment (Fire PSA) for French 900 MWe pressurised water reactors. The initial results obtained are presented. Additional research and development activities are indicated which IPSN carried out or decided to perform in order to reduce the amount of uncertainty associated with the data or to confirm hypotheses that can impact significantly the study results. (orig.) [de

  7. Development of manufacturing process for production of 500 MWe calandria sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hariharan, R.; Ramesh, P.; Lakshminarayana, B.; Bhaskara Rao, C.V.; Pande, P.; Agarwala, G.C.

    1992-01-01

    Calandria tubes made of zircaloy-2 are being used as structural components in pressurised heavy water power reactors. The sheets required for producing calandria tube for 235 MWe reactors are being manufactured at Zircaloy Fabrication Plant (ZFP), NFC utilizing a 2 Hi/4 Hi rolling mill procured for the purpose, by carrying out cold rolling process to achieve the required size after hot rolling suitable extruded slabs. Due to limitation of width of the sheet that can be rolled with the mill as well as the size of the slab that can be extruded with the existing press, difficulties arose in producing acceptable full length sheets of size 6600 mm long x 435 mm wide x 1.6 mm thick for manufacturing 500 MWe calandria tube. This paper deals with the details of the process problem resolved. They are: (a)designing of suitable hot and cold rolling pass schedules, (b)selection and standardization of process parameters such as beta quenching, hot rolling and cold rolling, and (c)details of the overall manufacturing process. Due to implementation of above, sheets required for manufacturing 500 MWe calandria tube sheets were successfully rolled. About 40 nos. of acceptable full length sheets have already been manufactured. (author). 1 fig., 3 tabs

  8. Domestic design and validation of natural circulation steam generator of China 1000 MWe PWR NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H.Y.; Wang, X.Y.; Wu, G.; Qin, J.M.; Xiong, Ch.H.; Wang, W.; Chen, J.L.; Cheng, H.P.; Zuo, Ch.P.

    2005-01-01

    In order to meet the requirements of domestic design of China intending built NPP projects, Research Institute of Nuclear Power Operation (RINPO) has achieved design of 1000 MWe NPP steam generator, called RINSG-1000(means 1000MWe SG designed by RINPO), which is based on SG research ,experiments and service experience accumulated by RINPO in more 40 years. Testing validation of two steam generator key technologies, advanced moisture separate device and sludge collector, has been accomplished during the period of 2000 to 2002. This paper describes the design features of RINSG-1000, and provides some validation test results. (authors)

  9. Closed Loop Short Rotation Woody Biomass Energy Crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brower, Michael [CRC Development, LLC, Oakland, CA (United States)

    2012-09-30

    CRC Development LLC is pursuing commercialization of shrub willow crops to evaluate and confirm estimates of yield, harvesting, transportation and renewable energy conversion costs and to provide a diverse resource in its supply portfolio.The goal of Closed Loop Short Rotation Woody Biomass Energy Crops is supply expansion in Central New York to facilitate the commercialization of willow biomass crops as part of the mix of woody biomass feedstocks for bioenergy and bioproducts. CRC Development LLC established the first commercial willow biomass plantation acreage in North America was established on the Tug Hill in the spring of 2006 and expanded in 2007. This was the first 230- acres toward the goal of 10,000 regional acres. This project replaces some 2007-drought damaged acreage and installs a total of 630-acre new planting acres in order to demonstrate to regional agricultural producers and rural land-owners the economic vitality of closed loop short rotation woody biomass energy crops when deployed commercially in order to motivate new grower entry into the market-place. The willow biomass will directly help stabilize the fuel supply for the Lyonsdale Biomass facility, which produces 19 MWe of power and exports 15,000 pph of process steam to Burrows Paper. This project will also provide feedstock to The Biorefinery in New York for the manufacture of renewable, CO2-neutral liquid transportation fuels, chemicals and polymers. This project helps end dependency on imported fossil fuels, adds to region economic and environmental vitality and contributes to national security through improved energy independence.

  10. Present situation, problems and solutions of China's biomass power generation industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jicheng; Wang, Sijia; Wei, Qiushuang; Yan, Suli

    2014-01-01

    With the reduction of global oil reserves, developing renewable energy has become an important issue for each country. Biomass power is an important kind of clean energy, as it has abundant resource and is environmental friendly. In the past few years, China biomass power industry has developed rapidly accompanied with some problems. This paper analyzes the current situation of China biomass power generation from several aspects such as power structure, resource distribution, investment strength, and policy environment, etc. We focus on the problems existed in practical operation and analyze the outstanding problems. At last, this paper offers several suggestions for future development on the relevant fields, such as cost, strategic planning and policy. - Highlights: • Review and analyze the internal and external environment of biomass power in China. • Summarize and classify policies of China biomass power according to time sequence. • Describe the distribution of biomass resources in China accurately on the map. • Use data to draw a picture for grasping current situation. • Provide valuable suggestions for practitioners to improve their business strategies

  11. Biomass energy in the making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2008-01-01

    Wood, straw, agricultural residues, organic wastes, biomass is everywhere you look. But the efficient use of this source of green electricity - the world's second largest renewable energy source - requires optimization of biomass collection and combustion processes. Biomass is back on the political agenda. In mid-June of this year, the French government gave this renewable energy a boost by selecting twenty-two projects to generate power and heat with biomass. The plants, to be commissioned by 2010, will be located in eleven different regions and will consume energy from organic plant matter. The power generated will be bought at a firm price of 128 euros per megawatt-hour. Most of the fuel will come from forest and paper industry waste, but straw and even grape pomace will be used in some cases. The plants will have a combined generating capacity of 300 MWh, raising France's installed biomass capacity to a total of 700 MWe. A drop of water in the ocean in the overall scheme of France's electricity. It is true that France has long neglected biomass. In 2004, electricity generated from biological resources represented a mere 1.74 TWhe in France, just 0.3% of its power consumption. This will rise to 0.6% once the new plants have come on line. The trend is the same in all of the EU's 27 member states, according to Eurostat, the statistical office of the European Communities: the amount of electricity generated from biomass (including biogas, municipal waste and wood) has practically doubled in six years, rising from 40 to 80 TWhe between 2000 and 2005. This is an improvement, but it still only represents 2.5% of the electricity supplied to Europeans. On a global scale, biomass contributes just 1% of total electric power generation. Yet biomass is an energy resource found all over the world, whether as agricultural waste, wood chips, or dried treatment plant sludge, to name but a few. Biomass power plants have managed to gain a foothold mainly in countries that produce

  12. Living probabilistic safety assessment of French 1300 MWe PWR nuclear power plant unit: methodology, results and teaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubreuil Chambardel, A.; Villemeur, A.; Berger, J.P.; Moroni, J.M.

    1991-02-01

    Launched in 1986 by Electricite de France, the Probabilistic Safety Assessment of a French 1300 MWe Pressurized Water Reactor (called PSA 1300) was completed in 1989. The first objective was to assess the annual core damage frequency by identifying all the accident scenarii likely to contribute significantly to this frequency. The second objective of the study was to provide an automated computerized tool (software) for updating the assessment - in order to take new data and knowledge into account - and for performing numerous sensitivity studies easily. Its scope and characteristics render this study unique. Indeed, it required an effort amounting to 50 engineer-years. The results and the first lessons are presented in this paper. The PSA 1300 teachings will be extensively used for the design and operation of existing or future French nuclear power reactors

  13. Hybrid biomass-wind power plant for reliable energy generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Navarro, A.; Alfonso, D.; Alvarez, C.; Ibanez, F.; Sanchez, C.; Segura, I.

    2010-01-01

    Massive implementation of renewable energy resources is a key element to reduce CO 2 emissions associated to electricity generation. Wind resources can provide an important alternative to conventional electricity generation mainly based on fossil fuels. However, wind generators are greatly affected by the restrictive operating rules of electricity markets because, as wind is naturally variable, wind generators may have serious difficulties on submitting accurate generation schedules on a day ahead basis, and on complying with scheduled obligations in real-time operation. In this paper, an innovative system combining a biomass gasification power plant, a gas storage system and stand-by generators to stabilize a generic 40 MW wind park is proposed and evaluated with real data. The wind park power production model is based on real data about power production of a Spanish wind park and a probabilistic approach to quantify fluctuations and so, power compensation needs. The hybrid wind-biomass system is analysed to obtain main hybrid system design parameters. This hybrid system can mitigate wind prediction errors and so provide a predictable source of electricity. An entire year cycle of hourly power compensations needs has been simulated deducing storage capacity, extra power needs of the biomass power plant and stand-by generation capacity to assure power compensation during critical peak hours with acceptable reliability. (author)

  14. Biomass Supply Planning for Combined Heat and Power Plants using Stochastic Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guericke, Daniela; Blanco, Ignacio; Morales González, Juan Miguel

    method using stochastic optimization to support the biomass supply planning for combined heat and power plants. Our two-phase approach combines mid-term decisions about biomass supply contracts with the short-term decisions regarding the optimal market participation of the producer to ensure......During the last years, the consumption of biomass to produce power and heat has increased due to the new carbon neutral policies. Nowadays, many district heating systems operate their combined heat and power (CHP) plants using different types of biomass instead of fossil fuel, especially to produce......, and heat demand and electricity prices vary drastically during the planning period. Furthermore, the optimal operation of combined heat and power plants has to consider the existing synergies between the power and heating systems while always fulfilling the heat demand of the system. We propose a solution...

  15. Some aspects of optimising the reactor core for a 600 MW(e) high temperature helium turbine power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, U; Presser, W

    1972-04-24

    For the HHT 600 MW(e) power plant a core design with Triagonal blocks containing 24 channels with directly cooled fuel pins was considered. The design was found to require a low HM loading in the fuel zone to achieve favourable economic merits. For low HM densities a strong incentive exists to aim for burn-ups between 80 and 100 GWd/t. At the present an average discharge irradiation of 80 GWd/t was thought feasible and a reference design with a HM density of 0.6 g/cm {sup 3} in both core zones was chosen. The optimisation is not likely to be upset by local hot channel effects as a special investigation into the influence of safety margins found no changes in fuel cycle economics.

  16. Ultra-supercritical (USC) technology. The best practical and economic way to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions from coal fired power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Jianxiong [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Thermal Engineering

    2013-07-01

    China is the largest coal producer and consumer with largest coal power capacity in the world. By the end of 2010, the total installed power capacity in China was 962,190 MWe, in which coal fired power capacity was 706,630 MWe, accounting for over 73.4%. China has been the largest CO{sub 2} emission country as well and its huge coal power capacity is the largest CO{sub 2} emission source. How does China reduce its CO{sub 2} emissions from coal fired power plants is an austere challenge now we are facing. How does China reduce its CO{sub 2} emissions from coal fired power plants? There are three ways to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions from coal fired power plants: (1) carbon capture and storage (CCS); (2) co-firing biomass with coal; (3) much improvement of efficiency. For the first option of CCS, the technology is still under development and there are still several uncertainties today to be widely used for coal fired power plants in the short term. For the second option of biomass co-firing, it can reduce CO{sub 2} emissions in a way, but it is difficult to implement it in China without strong support of incentive policy. Therefore, the third option of improvement of efficiency is the only but also the best and feasible economic option for China to much reduce CO{sub 2} emissions from coal fired power plants. This paper will discuss how China to take a active policy to strongly promote the application of supercritical (SC)/Ultra supercritical (USC) technology. Only in 4 years from 2007 to 2010, ordered capacity of coal fired SC/USC units was 482 units with installed capacity of 230,060 MWe, in which, 1,000 MWe USC with 600 C steam parameters was almost 100 units with 100,000 MWe in which 33 units have been in operation. Today, China has been a country with the largest SC/USC units and capacity. The fast application of SC/USC units for coal fired power plants has resulted in energy saving and reduction of emissions. The average coal consumption in China reduced from 366

  17. Biomass power as a strategic business investment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turnbull, J.H.

    1996-01-01

    During 1994 and 1995 the Electric Power Research Institute collaborated with the US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory in support of seven feasibility studies of integrated biomass systems. The goal of the studies was to assess the economic viability and environmental implications of each system. The products were comprehensive business plans for implementation of the proposed systems. One general conclusion from these studies is that the feasibility of any biomass power system is determined by the costs and unique characteristics intrinsic to the specific system. Because of the limited need for new electric capacity in most of the US, and the relatively low capital investment required for implementation, cofiring currently holds more appeal than any of the more advanced conversion options. Cofiring savings accrue from offsets of coal, along with SO x allowances and any available NO x or carbon credits. The closed loop tax credit authorized by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 serves to make energy crops more nearly cost-competitive with coal and natural gas. Biomass gasification combined-cycle units give promise of economic viability after the turn of the century, and as energy crops become more cost-competitive with waste feedstocks, agricultural constituencies will become more integrally involved in the establishment of biomass energy systems. At present, corollary benefits are critical if a system is to be economically feasible. A valid no-regrets policy for global climate-change mitigation that includes near-term investments in biomass technologies should result in large payoffs over the next several decades

  18. A 600 MWe advanced PWR for the 1990's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemon, J.E.; Malloy, J.D.; Allen, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    The Babcock and Wilcox Company (B and W) and United Engineers and Constructors (UE and C) have prepared a conceptual design of an advanced 600 MWe Presurized Water Nuclear Power Plant. This design utilizes the large body of design and operating experience on PWRs in the U.S. and abroad and incorporates improvements emphasizing simplicity, safety, licensability, ease of construction, operability, reliability and maintainability. Cost and schedule estimates based on U.S. utility experience indicate that this plant design should be competitive with alternate options

  19. CFD analysis of the pulverized coal combustion processes in a 160 MWe tangentially-fired-boiler of a thermal power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Cristiano V. da; Beskow, Arthur B. [Universidade Regional Integrada do Alto Uruguai e das Misses (LABSIM/GEAPI/URI), Erechim, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia e Ciencia da Computacao. Grupo de Engenharia Aplicada a Processos Industriais], Emails: cristiano@uricer.edu.br, Arthur@uricer.edu.br; Indrusiak, Maria Luiza S. [Universidade do Vale do Rio dos Sinos (UNISINOS), Sao Leopoldo, RS (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Mecanica], E-mail: sperbindrusiak@via-rs.net

    2010-10-15

    The strategic role of energy and the current concern with greenhouse effects, energetic and exegetic efficiency of fossil fuel combustion greatly enhance the importance of the studies of complex physical and chemical processes occurring inside boilers of thermal power plants. The state of the art in computational fluid dynamics and the availability of commercial codes encourage numeric studies of the combustion processes. In the present work the commercial software CFX Ansys Europe Ltd. was used to study the combustion of coal in a 160 MWe commercial thermal power plant with the objective of simulating the operational conditions and identifying factors of inefficiency. The behavior of the flow of air and pulverized coal through the burners was analyzed, and the three-dimensional flue gas flow through the combustion chamber and heat exchangers was reproduced in the numeric simulation. (author)

  20. INTEGRATED PYROLYSIS COMBINED CYCLE BIOMASS POWER SYSTEM CONCEPT DEFINITION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandvig, Eric; Walling, Gary; Brown, Robert C.; Pletka, Ryan; Radlein, Desmond; Johnson, Warren

    2003-01-01

    Advanced power systems based on integrated gasification/combined cycles (IGCC) are often presented as a solution to the present shortcomings of biomass as fuel. Although IGCC has been technically demonstrated at full scale, it has not been adopted for commercial power generation. Part of the reason for this situation is the continuing low price for coal. However, another significant barrier to IGCC is the high level of integration of this technology: the gas output from the gasifier must be perfectly matched to the energy demand of the gas turbine cycle. We are developing an alternative to IGCC for biomass power: the integrated (fast) pyrolysis/ combined cycle (IPCC). In this system solid biomass is converted into liquid rather than gaseous fuel. This liquid fuel, called bio-oil, is a mixture of oxygenated organic compounds and water that serves as fuel for a gas turbine topping cycle. Waste heat from the gas turbine provides thermal energy to the steam turbine bottoming cycle. Advantages of the biomass-fueled IPCC system include: combined cycle efficiency exceeding 37 percent efficiency for a system as small as 7.6 MW e ; absence of high pressure thermal reactors; decoupling of fuel processing and power generation; and opportunities for recovering value-added products from the bio-oil. This report provides a technical overview of the system including pyrolyzer design, fuel clean-up strategies, pyrolysate condenser design, opportunities for recovering pyrolysis byproducts, gas turbine cycle design, and Rankine steam cycle. The report also reviews the potential biomass fuel supply in Iowa, provide and economic analysis, and present a summery of benefits from the proposed system

  1. INTEGRATED PYROLYSIS COMBINED CYCLE BIOMASS POWER SYSTEM CONCEPT DEFINITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric Sandvig; Gary Walling; Robert C. Brown; Ryan Pletka; Desmond Radlein; Warren Johnson

    2003-03-01

    Advanced power systems based on integrated gasification/combined cycles (IGCC) are often presented as a solution to the present shortcomings of biomass as fuel. Although IGCC has been technically demonstrated at full scale, it has not been adopted for commercial power generation. Part of the reason for this situation is the continuing low price for coal. However, another significant barrier to IGCC is the high level of integration of this technology: the gas output from the gasifier must be perfectly matched to the energy demand of the gas turbine cycle. We are developing an alternative to IGCC for biomass power: the integrated (fast) pyrolysis/ combined cycle (IPCC). In this system solid biomass is converted into liquid rather than gaseous fuel. This liquid fuel, called bio-oil, is a mixture of oxygenated organic compounds and water that serves as fuel for a gas turbine topping cycle. Waste heat from the gas turbine provides thermal energy to the steam turbine bottoming cycle. Advantages of the biomass-fueled IPCC system include: combined cycle efficiency exceeding 37 percent efficiency for a system as small as 7.6 MW{sub e}; absence of high pressure thermal reactors; decoupling of fuel processing and power generation; and opportunities for recovering value-added products from the bio-oil. This report provides a technical overview of the system including pyrolyzer design, fuel clean-up strategies, pyrolysate condenser design, opportunities for recovering pyrolysis byproducts, gas turbine cycle design, and Rankine steam cycle. The report also reviews the potential biomass fuel supply in Iowa, provide and economic analysis, and present a summery of benefits from the proposed system.

  2. Evolution of MMI for 500 MWe PHWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surendar, Ch.; Sharma, M.P.; Jayanthi, S.

    1994-01-01

    The Indian nuclear power programme for building Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors began with the construction of two units at Kota, Rajasthan. Although the concept of a centralized control room has been used since the beginning, the man-machine interface design has evolved with technological developments. The man-machine interaction in the earliest plants imposed a considerable burden on the operators and led to a need for more sophisticated instrumentation. Several microprocessor and computer based systems were identified and developed and many were retrofitted into existing plants providing immediate advantages. This paper traces the evolution of many of these systems and also describes the basis and the architecture for the man-machine interaction scheme in the 500 MWe nuclear power plants currently being designed. (author). 7 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  3. Torrefaction of biomass for power production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saleh, Suriyati Binti

    In order to increase the share of biomass for sustainable energy production, it will be an advantage to utilize fuels as straw, wood and waste on large suspension fired boilers. On a European scale, currently large straw resources are available that are not fully utilized for energy production...... rates, relatively low superheater temperatures have to be applied, which in turn lower the power efficiency. The idea for this Ph.D. project is to develop a biomass pretreatment method that could provide the heating value of the fuel for the boiler, but in a way such that the fuel is easily pulverized.......D. thesis focus on the following subjects: 1) the development of experimental procedures for a novel laboratory scale reactor (simultaneous torrefaction and grinding) and a study on the torrefaction of straw and wood; 2) study the influence of biomass chemical properties such as ash content, ash composition...

  4. The status of safeguarding 600 MW(e) CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Baeckmann, A.; Rundquist, D.E.; Pushkarjov, V.; Smith, R.M.; Zarecki, C.W.

    1982-09-01

    There has been extensive work in the development of CANDU safeguards since the last International Conference on Nuclear Power, and this has resulted in the development of improved equipment for the safeguards system now being installed in the 600 MW(e) CANDU generating stations. The overall system is designed to improve on the existing IAEA safeguards and to provide adequate coverage for each plausible nuclear material diversion route. There is sufficient sensitivity and redundancy to enable the timely detection of the possible diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material

  5. Use of gadolinium as neutron poison in 540 MWe PHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nag, P.K.; Fernando, M.P.S.; Kumar, A.N.

    2006-01-01

    In Pressurised heavy water reactors (PHWRs), neutron poison in the moderator is used to compensate the excess reactivity present in the core on different occasions such as xenon decay during synchronization just after poison out period or start ups from xenon free conditions. It is also used in secondary shutdown system (SDS-2), where required amount of neutron poison is injected directly into the moderator within 2.5 seconds. Further, it is also used for over poisoning the moderator to achieve the guaranteed shutdown state when the regular shutdown systems are taken for maintenance. Generally, two types of moderator poisons are used in power reactors to balance the reactivity of the core and they are boron and gadolinium. Gadolinium is used in the form of gadolinium nitrate (Gd(NO 3 ) 3 .6H 2 O). The paper gives the details of estimation of reactivity coefficients of gadolinium for 540 MWe PHWR for different operating conditions. These neutron poisons are converted into non-absorbing elements and therefore their effective worth will decrease as reactor operation proceeds. The rate of burning of neutron absorbing isotopes depends on its magnitude of absorption cross-section and thermal flux seen by them. The present study discusses the burning characteristics of gadolinium during power operation in 540 MWe PHWR. It is established by detailed analysis that the rate of positive reactivity realized due to burning of neutron absorbing Gd isotopes almost match with the build up rate of xenon. The burning half lives of boron and gadolinium is worked out for different power levels. (author)

  6. Drivers of biomass co-firing in U.S. coal-fired power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael E. Goerndt; Francisco X. Aguilar; Kenneth Skog

    2013-01-01

    Substantial knowledge has been generated in the U.S. about the resource base for forest and other residue-derived biomass for bioenergy including co-firing in power plants. However, a lack of understanding regarding power plant-level operations and manager perceptions of drivers of biomass co-firing remains. This study gathered information from U.S. power plant...

  7. Hybridization of concentrated solar power with biomass gasification in Brazil’s semiarid region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milani, Rodrigo; Szklo, Alexandre; Hoffmann, Bettina Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Assessment of three hybridization concepts between CSP and biomass gasification. • Modelling of a benchmark power plant for each of the hybridization concepts. • The method relies on using Aspentech Hysys and SAM for thermodynamic analysis. • Technical and economic performance of the three benchmark power plants as result. - Abstract: This study aims to propose and analyze different options for hybridizing Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) with biomass, through gasification for power generation. A hybrid CSP-biomass power plant through gasification is an innovative concept which allows the integration of combined cycle for power generation, sun-biomass hybridization and syngas storage. Therefore, this study addressed the proposition of the hybridization concept and the simulation of benchmark power plants for a suitable Brazilian site (high direct normal irradiation and low-cost biomass availability). Three power plant concepts are proposed and simulated in Aspentech Hysys and System Advisor Model (SAM): (i) Series design; (ii) Parallel design, and (iii) Steam Extraction design. For the same gasifier, the Series design holds the highest levelized cost, while the Parallel design presents the highest installed capacity, but the lowest capacity factor. Finally, the Steam Extraction design is placed between the other two proposed plants regarding the capacity factor and the annual energy generation.

  8. Strategic analysis of biomass and waste fuels for electric power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGowin, C.R.; Wiltsee, G.A.

    1993-01-01

    Although the environmental and other benefits of using biomass and waste fuel energy to displace fossil fuels are well known, the economic realities are such that these fuels can not compete effectively in the current market without tax credits, subsidies, and other artificial measures. In 1992, EPRI initiated a strategic analysis of biomass and waste fuels and power technologies, both to develop consistent performance and cost data for the leading fuels and technologies and to identify the conditions that favor and create market pull for biomass and waste fuel energy. Using the interim results of the EPRI project, this paper compares the relative performance and cost of power generation from coal, natural gas, and biomass and waste fuels. The range of fuels includes wood, agricultural wastes, municipal solid waste, refuse-derived fuel, scrap tires, and tire-derived fuel, scrap tires, and tire-derived fuel. The power technologies include pulverized coal and natural gas/combined cycle power plants, cofiring with coal in coal-fired utility boilers, and wood gasification/combined cycle power plants. The analysis suggests that, in the near term, the highest-efficiency, lowest-cost, lowest-risk technology is cofiring with coal in industrial and utility boilers. However, this relative to fossil fuel, or the fuel user receives a tipping fee, subsidy, or emissions credit. In order to increase future use of biomass and waste fuels, a joint initiative, involving government, industry, and fuel suppliers, transporters, and users, is needed to develop low-cost and efficient energy crop production and power technology

  9. Estimated radiological effects of the normal discharge of radioactivity from nuclear power plants in the Netherlands with a total capacity of 3500 MWe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lugt, G. van der; Wijker, H.; Kema, N.V.

    1977-01-01

    In the Netherlands discussions are going on about the installation of three nuclear power plants, leading with the two existing plants to a total capacity of 3500 MWe. To have an impression of the radiological impact of this program, calculations were carried out concerning the population doses due to the discharge of radioactivity from the plants during normal operation. The discharge via the ventilation stack gives doses due to noble gases, halogens and particulate material. The population dose due to the halogens in the grass-milk-man chain is estimated using the real distribution of grass-land around the reactor sites. It could be concluded that the population dose due to the contamination of crops and fruit is negligeable. A conservative estimation is made for the dose due to the discharge of tritium. The population dose due to the discharge in the cooling water is calculated using the following pathways: drinking water; consumption of fish; consumption of meat from animals fed with fish products. The individual doses caused by the normal discharge of a 1000 MWe plant appeared to be very low, mostly below 1 mrem/year. The population dose is in the order of some tens manrems. The total dose of the 5 nuclear power plants to the dutch population is not more than 70 manrem. Using a linear dose-effect relationship the health effects to the population are estimated and compared with the normal frequency

  10. LED power efficiency of biomass, fatty acid, and carotenoid production in Nannochloropsis microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ruijuan; Thomas-Hall, Skye R; Chua, Elvis T; Eltanahy, Eladl; Netzel, Michael E; Netzel, Gabriele; Lu, Yinghua; Schenk, Peer M

    2018-03-01

    The microalga Nannochloropsis produces high-value omega-3-rich fatty acids and carotenoids. In this study the effects of light intensity and wavelength on biomass, fatty acid, and carotenoid production with respect to light output efficiency were investigated. Similar biomass and fatty acid yields were obtained at high light intensity (150 μmol m -2  s -1 ) LEDs on day 7 and low light intensity (50 μmol m -2  s -1 ) LEDs on day 11 during cultivation, but the power efficiencies of biomass and fatty acid (specifically eicosapentaenoic acid) production were higher for low light intensity. Interestingly, low light intensity enhanced both, carotenoid power efficiency of carotenoid biosynthesis and yield. White LEDs were neither advantageous for biomass and fatty acid yields, nor the power efficiency of biomass, fatty acid, and carotenoid production. Noticeably, red LED resulted in the highest biomass and fatty acid power efficiency, suggesting that LEDs can be fine-tuned to grow Nannochloropsis algae more energy-efficiently. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Nuclear power: 2004 world report - evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2005-01-01

    Last year, 2004, 441 nuclear power plants were available for power supply in 31 countries of the world. Nuclear generating capacity attained its highest level so far at an aggregate gross power of 385,854 MWe and an aggregate net power of 366,682 MWe, respectively. Nine different reactor lines are operated in commercial nuclear power plants. Light water reactors (PWR and BWR) again are in the lead with 362 plants. At year's end, 22 nuclear power plants with an aggregate gross power of 18,553 MWe and an aggregate net power, respectively, of 17,591 MWe were under construction in nine countries. Of these, twelve are light water reactors, nine are CANDU-type reactors, and one is a fast breeder reactor. So far, 104 commercial reactors with powers in excess of 5 MWe have been decommissioned in eighteen countries, most of them low-power prototype plants. 228 nuclear power plants of those in operation, i.e. slightly more than half, were commissioned in the 1980es. Nuclear power plant availabilities in terms of capacity and time again reached record levels. Capacity availability was 84.30%, availability in terms of time, 85.60%. The four nuclear power plants in Finland continue to be world champions in this respect with a cumulated average capacity availability of 90.30%. (orig.)

  12. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Engineering Test Facility (ETF) 200 MWe power plant. Conceptual Design Engineering Report (CDER). Volume 4: Supplementary engineering data

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    The reference conceptual design of the Magnetohydrodynamic Engineering Test Facility (ETF), a prototype 200 MWe coal-fired electric generating plant designed to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of open cycle MHD is summarized. Main elements of the design are identified and explained, and the rationale behind them is reviewed. Major systems and plant facilities are listed and discussed. Construction cost and schedule estimates, and identification of engineering issues that should be reexamined are also given. The latest (1980-1981) information from the MHD technology program are integrated with the elements of a conventional steam power electric generating plant. Supplementary Engineering Data (Issues, Background, Performance Assurance Plan, Design Details, System Design Descriptions and Related Drawings) is presented.

  13. A review of start-up operations on the first units of the 1300 MWe generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meclot, B.; Lemagny Boc Lonlaygue, C.; Lavogiez, M.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes and offers comments on the different phases of start-up on power stations of the P4 series. Then, one reviews incidents which occurred in the course of these start-up phases and, having highlighted the lessons to be learnt from the commissioning of these power stations, goes on to make a comparative study of 1300 and 900 MWe availability in the initial year of operation [fr

  14. Back to nature: Power from biomass; Zurueck zur Natur: Energie aus Biomasse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beerbaum, S. [Hohenheim Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Agrarpolitik und landwirtschaftliche Marktlehre; Kappelmann, K.H. [Fachhochschule Nuertingen (Germany); Haerdtlein, M. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Energiewirtschaft und Rationelle Energieanwendung; Kaltschmitt, M. [Technische Univ. Muenchen-Weihenstephan (Germany); Ising, M. [Fraunhofer Inst. fuer Umwelt-, Sicherheits-, und Energietechnik, Oberhausen (Germany); Meier, D.; Faix, O. [Institut fuer Holzchemie und chemische Technologie des Holzes, Hamburg (Germany); Gerdes, C. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Makromolekulare und Technische Chemie

    2000-05-01

    Excepting nuclear power, there are just two strategies to reduce global warming, i.e. either by saving energy or by using renewables, supported by public funding and guaranteed rates. The options of solar, wind, and hydroelectric power are limited in our climate and their potential is nearly completely exploited in some regions already. Biomass is an interesting option. Its introduction should be speeded up as it takes about 50 - 60 years for a new technology to be fully accepted. [German] Soll der Treibhauseffekt eingedaemmt werden, ohne in grossem Umfang auf Kernenergie zurueckzugreifen, bleiben nur zwei Moeglichkeiten: Energiesparen und verstaerkter Einsatz regenerativer Energiequellen. Finanzielle Foerderung aus oeffentlichen Mitteln und Garantiepreise bei der Stromerzeugung sollen den Weg gangbar machen. Sonne, Wind und Wasser eignen sich leider hierzulande nur begrenzt, teilweise ist ihr Potenzial schon weitgehend ausgeschoepft. Eine wichtige Ergaenzung des Angebots duerfte deshalb die Biomasse sein. Letztlich ist sie eine Speicherform von Sonnenenergie: Durch Photosynthese erzeugen Pflanzen aus Kohlendioxid und Wasser ihre eigenen Energietraeger, die Kohlenhydrate. Weil beim Verbrennen nur das aufgenommene Kohlendioxid wieder frei wird, zeigt die energetische Nutzung von Biomasse eine weitgehend ausgeglichene Klimabilanz. Doch Eile ist geboten. Die Nutzung von Kohle und Erdoel benoetigte 50 bis 60 Jahre, um sich zu etablieren; Experten halten das fuer einen typischen Zeitraum (den auch die Kernenergie noch nicht durchschritten hat). Sich erneuernde Energiequellen stehen noch am Anfang dieser Einfuehrungsphase. (orig.)

  15. Marine biomass power plant using methane fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsui, T.; Saito, H.; Amano, T.; Sugawara, H.; Seki, T.; Abe, T. [Technology Research Inst., Tokyo Gas Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    This study presented an effective way to produce biogas from the large quantities of seaweed waste in Japan. A large-scale marine biomass pilot plant was built to produce biogas from marine biomass. Methane fermentation was the process used to produce biogas from Laminaria sp. The maximum treating capacity of the pilot plant is 1 ton of seaweed per day. The pilot plant includes a pretreatment facility, fermentation, biogas storage and power generation. The maximum methane yield from the biomass plant is 22 cubic ton-seaweed. The purified biogas has generated 10 kW of electricity and 23 kW of heat. The biogas was also mixed with natural gas for use in a gas engine generator. The engine operation remained stable despite changes in quantity and composition of the collected biogas caused by changes with the source of biomass and sea conditions. The thermal efficiency of the gas engine running on mixed biogas and natural gas was more than 10 per cent higher than an engine running on biogas fuel alone. 4 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  16. The determination of mercury content in the biomass untended for industrial power plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiktor Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomass is one of the oldest and most widely used renewable energy sources. The biomass is the whole organic matter of vegetable or animal origin which is biodegradable. Biomass includes leftovers from agricultural production, forestry residues, and industrial and municipal waste. The use of biomass in the power industry has become a standard and takes place in Poland and other European countries. This paper discusses the correlation of mercury content in different biomass types used in the power industry and in products of biomass combustion. Different biomass types, which are currently burned in a commercial power plant in Poland, were discussed. A photographic documentation of different biomass types, such as straw briquettes, wood briquettes, pellets from energy crops (sunflower husk and wood husk, wood pellets, wood chips, and agro-biomass (seeds was carried out. The presented paper discusses the results obtained for 15 biomass samples. Five selected biomass samples were burned in controlled conditions in the laboratory at the University of Silesia. The ash resulting from the combustion of five biomass samples was tested for mercury content. A total of twenty biomass samples and its combustion products were tested. Based on the obtained results, it was found that any supply of biomass, regardless of its type, is characterized by variable mercury content in dry matter. In the case of e.g. wood chips, the spread of results reaches 235.1 μm/kg (in dry matter. Meanwhile, the highest mercury content, 472.4 μm/kg (in dry matter was recorded in the biomass of straw, wood pellets, and pellets from energy crops (sunflower husk. In the case of combustion products of five selected biomass types, a three or four fold increase in the mercury content has been observed.

  17. GTHTR 300 economic calculation with Mini G4ECONS as a basis for generation cost of GTHTR 10 MWe calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochamad Nasrullah; Nurlaila

    2014-01-01

    The government plan to build Experimental Power Reactor (EPR) requires measurable economic assessment. The purpose of the study was to recalculate Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor of 300 MWe (GTHTR 300) and compare the results with reference data. Then calculate generation cost of GTHTR 3, 5 and 10 MWe using the scale factor calculation. The methodology used is covered the generation cost calculation using the Mini G4Econs spread sheet models published by IAEA. Result of the verification calculation showed that a relatively similar, which means that the calculation model could be used to calculate for same other cases. Afterward, using scale factor, smaller scale reactor could be calculated. The calculation result show that electricity generation cost of SMR-HTR type with load factor 90% and discount rate 10% for power capacity 3, 5 and 10 MWe are 29.5, 22.68 and 16.17 cents$/kWh respectively. However, because the EPR is planning to be built as a non-commercial power reactors, then 5 % and 3 % of discount rate could be chosen, each of those discount rate will result electricity generation cost of 10.37 cents$/kWh and 8.56 cents$/kWh respectively. These result could be considered by the government for developing SMR type of HTR. (author)

  18. Magnetohydrodynamics MHD Engineering Test Facility ETF 200 MWe power plant. Conceptual Design Engineering Report CDER. Volume 3: Costs and schedules

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    The estimated plant capital cost for a coal fired 200 MWE electric generating plant with open cycle magnetohydrodynamics is divided into principal accounts based on Federal Energy Regulatory Commision account structure. Each principal account is defined and its estimated cost subdivided into identifiable and major equipment systems. The cost data sources for compiling the estimates, cost parameters, allotments, assumptions, and contingencies, are discussed. Uncertainties associated with developing the costs are quantified to show the confidence level acquired. Guidelines established in preparing the estimated costs are included. Based on an overall milestone schedule related to conventional power plant scheduling experience and starting procurement of MHD components during the preliminary design phase there is a 6 1/2-year construction period. The duration of the project from start to commercial operation is 79 months. The engineering phase of the project is 4 1/2 years; the construction duration following the start of the man power block is 37 months.

  19. Model Research of Gas Emissions From Lignite and Biomass Co-Combustion in a Large Scale CFB Boiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzywański Jarosław

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on the idea of a combustion modelling of a large-scale circulating fluidised bed boiler (CFB during coal and biomass co-combustion. Numerical computation results for three solid biomass fuels co-combustion with lignite are presented in the paper. The results of the calculation showed that in previously established kinetics equations for coal combustion, some reactions had to be modified as the combustion conditions changed with the fuel blend composition. Obtained CO2, CO, SO2 and NOx emissions are located in borders of ± 20% in the relationship to the experimental data. Experimental data was obtained for forest biomass, sunflower husk, willow and lignite cocombustion tests carried out on the atmospheric 261 MWe COMPACT CFB boiler operated in PGE Turow Power Station in Poland. The energy fraction of biomass in fuel blend was: 7%wt, 10%wt and 15%wt. The measured emissions of CO, SO2 and NOx (i.e. NO + NO2 were also shown in the paper. For all types of biomass added to the fuel blends the emission of the gaseous pollutants was lower than that for coal combustion.

  20. Solar thermal power stations for activities implemented jointly. The Theseus 50 MWe solar thermal power plant for the island of Crete, Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brakmann, Georg [Fichtner, Stuttgart (Germany); Aringhoff, Rainer [Pilkington Solar International (United Kingdom); Cobi, Arend [PreussenElektra (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    THESEUS, the proposed commercial 50 MWe (net) Thermal Solar European Power Station for the Island of Crete is a solar hybrid plant with parabolic trough collectors and an advanced high efficiency Rankine reheat steam cycle. At the end of 1996 the DG XVII (Energy) of the European Commission has accepted the THERMIE application of the THESEUS consortium for the design phase. THESEUS reduces the required oil imports by 28 000 t/a, thereby saving the Greek economy every year 4 million ECU in foreign currency. During its 25 years technical lifetime 2.2 million tons of CO{sub 2} emissions will be avoided. Supply, construction, erection and operation of THESEUS creates 2 000 qualified employments (man-years). Because of the high manpower intensity of solar plants and their larger capital income from interest payments in contrast to the high fuel import intensity of fossil plants, THESEUS will generate larger tax revenues for Greece and for the supplier`s countries. The investment cost of THESEUS is some 135 million ECU. Even without any subsidies this would result in electricity generation cost of some 0.085 ECY/kWh, which is lower than the current average cost from the existing power plants of Crete. (author)

  1. District heating and combined heat and power generation from biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veski, Rein

    1999-01-01

    An Altener programme seminar District Heating and Combined Heat and Power Generation from Biomass. Minitraining seminar and study tours and also Business forum, Exhibition and Short company presentations were held in Tallinn on March 21-23, 1999. The Seminar was organised by the VTT Energy, the Estonian Bioenergy Association and the Estonian Heat and Power Association in co-operation with the AFB-net. The Agricultural and Forestry Biomass Network (AFB-net) is part of the ALTENER programme. The Network aims at promoting and stimulating the implementation and commercial utilisation of energy from biomass and waste, through the initiation of business opportunities. This includes national and international co-operation and the exchange of the personnel. The Seminar was attended by consulting companies, scientists, municipal authorities and representatives of co-ordinating bodies engaged in renewable energy management as well as DH and CHP plant managers, equipment manufacturers and local energy planners from Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Sweden, Denmark, Belgium, Slovenia and Slovak Republic. At the Seminar minitraining issues were dealt with: the current situation and future trends in biomass DH in the Baltic Sea countries, and biomass DH and CHP in Eastern and Central Europe, planning and construction of biomass-based DH plants, biomass fuel procurement and handling technology, combustion technology, DH networks, financing of biomass projects and evaluating of projects, and case projects in Eastern and Central European countries. The following were presented: boilers with a capacity of 100 kW or more, stoker burners, wood and straw handling equipment, wood fuel harvesters, choppers, pelletisers, district heating pipelines and networks. (author)

  2. Proposal for Dual Pressurized Light Water Reactor Unit Producing 2000 MWe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Kyoung Min; Noh, Sang Woo; Suh, Kune Yull

    2009-01-01

    The Dual Unit Optimizer 2000 MWe (DUO2000) is put forward as a new design concept for large power nuclear plants to cope with economic and safety challenges facing the 21 st century green and sustainable energy industry. DUO2000 is home to two nuclear steam supply systems (NSSSs) of the Optimized Power Reactor 1000 MWe (OPR1000)-like pressurized water reactor (PWR) in single containment so as to double the capacity of the plant. The idea behind DUO may as well be extended to combining any number of NSSSs of PWRs or pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs), or even boiling water reactors (BWRs). Once proven in water reactors, the technology may even be expanded to gas cooled, liquid metal cooled, and molten salt cooled reactors. With its in-vessel retention external reactor vessel cooling (IVR-ERVC) as severe accident management strategy, DUO can not only put the single most querulous PWR safety issue to an end, but also pave the way to very promising large power capacity while dispensing with the huge redesigning cost for Generation III+ nuclear systems. Five prototypes are presented for the DUO2000, and their respective advantages and drawbacks are considered. The strengths include, but are not necessarily limited to, reducing the cost of construction by decreasing the number of containment buildings from two to one, minimizing the cost of NSSS and control systems by sharing between the dual units, and lessening the maintenance cost by uniting the NSSS, just to name the few. The latent threats are discussed as well

  3. Design of a multivariable controller for a CANDU 600 MWe nuclear power plant using the INA method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, N.; Boisvert, J.; Mensah, S.

    1984-04-01

    The development of large and complex nuclear and process plants requires high-performance control systems, designed with rigorous multivariable techniques. This work is part of an analytical study demonstrating the real potential of multivariable methods. It covers every step in the design of a multi-variable controller for a Gentilly-2 type CANDU 600 MWe nuclear power plant using the Inverse Nyquist Array (INA) method. First the linear design model and its preliminary modifications are described. The design tools are reviewed and the operations required to achieve open-loop diagonal dominance are thoroughly described. Analysis of the closed-loop system is then performed and a feedback matrix is selected to meet the design specifications. The performance of the controller on the linear model is verified by simulation. Finally, the controller is implemented on the reference non-linear model to assess its overall performance. The results show that the INA method can be used successfully to design controllers for large and complex systems

  4. Nuclear power world report 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2014-01-01

    At the end of 2013, 435 nuclear power plants were available for energy supply in 31 countries of the world. This means that the number decreased by 2 units compared to the previous year's number on 31 December 2012. The aggregate gross power of the plants amounted to approx. 398,861 MWe, the aggregate net power, to 378,070 MWe (gross: 392,793 MWe, net: 372,572 MWe, new data base as of 2013: nameplate capacities). Four units were commissioned in 2014; three units in China and one in India. Eight units were shut down permanently in 2013; 2 units in Japan, and four units in the USA. Two units in Canada were declared permanently shut-down after a long-term shutdown. 70 nuclear generating units - 2 more than at the end of 2012 - were under construction in late 2013 in 15 countries with an aggregate gross power of approx. 73,814 MWe and net power of approx. 69,279 MWe. Six new projects have been started in 2013 in four countries (Belarus, China, the Republic of Korea, and the United Arab Emirates). Worldwide, some 125 new nuclear power plants are in the concrete project design, planning, and licensing phases; in some of these cases license applications have been submitted or contracts have already been signed. Some 100 further projects are planned. Net electricity generation in nuclear power plants worldwide in 2013 achieved a level of approx. 2,364.15 billion (109) kWh (2012: approx. 2,350.80 billion kWh). Since the first generation of electricity in a nuclear power plant in the EBR-I fast breeder (USA) on December 20, 1951, cumulated net production has reached approx. 70,310 billion kWh, and operating experience has grown to some 15,400 reactor years. (orig.)

  5. Nuclear power world report 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2014-07-15

    At the end of 2013, 435 nuclear power plants were available for energy supply in 31 countries of the world. This means that the number decreased by 2 units compared to the previous year's number on 31 December 2012. The aggregate gross power of the plants amounted to approx. 398,861 MWe, the aggregate net power, to 378,070 MWe (gross: 392,793 MWe, net: 372,572 MWe, new data base as of 2013: nameplate capacities). Four units were commissioned in 2014; three units in China and one in India. Eight units were shut down permanently in 2013; 2 units in Japan, and four units in the USA. Two units in Canada were declared permanently shut-down after a long-term shutdown. 70 nuclear generating units - 2 more than at the end of 2012 - were under construction in late 2013 in 15 countries with an aggregate gross power of approx. 73,814 MWe and net power of approx. 69,279 MWe. Six new projects have been started in 2013 in four countries (Belarus, China, the Republic of Korea, and the United Arab Emirates). Worldwide, some 125 new nuclear power plants are in the concrete project design, planning, and licensing phases; in some of these cases license applications have been submitted or contracts have already been signed. Some 100 further projects are planned. Net electricity generation in nuclear power plants worldwide in 2013 achieved a level of approx. 2,364.15 billion (109) kWh (2012: approx. 2,350.80 billion kWh). Since the first generation of electricity in a nuclear power plant in the EBR-I fast breeder (USA) on December 20, 1951, cumulated net production has reached approx. 70,310 billion kWh, and operating experience has grown to some 15,400 reactor years. (orig.)

  6. Foster Wheeler's Solutions for Large Scale CFB Boiler Technology: Features and Operational Performance of Łagisza 460 MWe CFB Boiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Arto

    During recent years, once-through supercritical (OTSC) CFB technology has been developed, enabling the CFB technology to proceed to medium-scale (500 MWe) utility projects such as Łagisza Power Plant in Poland owned by Poludniowy Koncern Energetyczny SA. (PKE), with net efficiency nearly 44%. Łagisza power plant is currently under commissioning and has reached full load operation in March 2009. The initial operation shows very good performance and confirms, that the CFB process has no problems with the scaling up to this size. Also the once-through steam cycle utilizing Siemens' vertical tube Benson technology has performed as predicted in the CFB process. Foster Wheeler has developed the CFB design further up to 800 MWe with net efficiency of ≥45%.

  7. Nuclear power: 2006 world report - evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2007-01-01

    Last year, 2006, 437 nuclear power plants were available for power supply in 31 countries, 7 plants less than in 2005. One unit was commissioned for the first time, 8 nuclear power plants were decommissioned for good in 2006. At a cumulated gross power of 389,488 MWe and a cumulated net power of 370,441 MWe, respectively, worldwide nuclear generating capacity has reached a high level so far. Nine different reactor lines are operated in commercial plants: PWR, PWR-VVER, BWR, CANDU, D 2 O PWR, GCR, AGR, LWGR, and LMFBR. Light water reactors (PWR and BWR) continue to top the list with 358 plants. By the end of the year, 10 countries operated 29 nuclear power plants with an aggregate gross power of 25,367 MWe and an aggregate net power of 23,953 MWe, respectively. Of these, 21 are light water reactors, 5 are CANDU-type reactors, 2 are fast breeder and 1 a LWGR. 123 commercial reactors with an aggregate power in excess of 5 MWe have so far been decommissioned in 19 countries. Most of them are prototype plants of low power. About 70% of the nuclear power plants in operation, namely 304 plants, were commissioned in the eighties and nineties. The energy availability and operating availability factors of the nuclear power plants again reached peak levels: 82% for energy availability, and 83% for operating availability. The 4 nuclear power plants in Finland continue to be in the lead worldwide with a cumulated average operating capacity factor of 94%. (orig.)

  8. Nuclear power. 2008 world report - evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2010-01-01

    In 2008, 438 nuclear power plants were available for power supply in 31 countries, 1 plant less than in 2007. No unit was commissioned for the first time, 1 nuclear power plant was decommissioned for good in 2008. At a cumulated gross power of 392,597 MWe and a cumulated net power of 372,170 MWe, respectively, worldwide nuclear generating capacity has reached a high level. Nine different reactor lines are operated in commercial plants: PWR, PWR-VVER, BWR, CANDU, D2O PWR, GCR, AGR, LWGR, and LMFBR. Light water reactors (PWR and BWR) continue to top the list with 358 plants. By the end of 2008, in 14 countries 43 nuclear power plants with an aggregate gross power of 39,211 MWe and an aggregate net power of 36,953 MWe were under construction. Of these, 37 are light water reactors, 3 are CANDU-type reactors, 2 are fast breeder and 1 D2O-PWR. 124 commercial reactors with an aggregate power in excess of 5 MWe have so far been decommissioned in 19 countries. Most of them are prototype plants of low power. About 70% of the nuclear power plants in operation, namely 304 plants, were commissioned in the eighties and nineties. The energy availability and operating availability factors of the nuclear power plants reached good levels: 80.80% for operating availability and 80,00% for energy availability. The four nuclear power plants in Finland continuecontinue to be in the lead worldwide with a cumulated average operating capacity factor of 91,60%. (orig.)

  9. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC). Power system development. Preliminary design report, final

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-04

    The preliminary design of the 10 MWe OTEC power module and the 200 kWe test articles is given in detail. System operation and performance; power system cost estimates; 10 MWe heat exchangers; 200 kWe heat exchanger articles; biofouling control;ammonia leak detection, and leak repair; rotating machinery; support subsystem; instrumentation and control; electrical subsystem; installation approach; net energy and resource analysis; and operability, maintainability, and safety are discussed. The conceptual design of the 40 MWe electrical power system includes four or five 10 MWe modules as designed for the 10 MWe pilot plant. (WHK)

  10. Strategic analysis of biomass and waste fuels for electric power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGowin, C.R.; Wiltsee, G.A.

    1996-01-01

    Although the environmental and other benefits of using biomass and waste fuel energy to displace fossil fuels are well known, the economic realities are such that these fuels cannot compete effectively in the current market without tax credits, subsidies and other artificial measures. In 1992, EPRI initiated a strategic analysis of biomass and waste fuels and power technologies, both to develop consistent performance and cost data for the leading fuels and technologies and to identify the conditions which favor and create market pull for biomass and waste fuel energy. Using the final results of the EPRI project, this paper compares the relative performance and cost of power generation from coal, natural gas, and biomass and waste fuels. The range of fuels includes wood, agricultural wastes, municipal solid waste, refuse-derived fuel, scrap tires and tire-derived fuel. The power technologies include pulverized coal and natural gas/combined cycle power plants, cofiring with coal in coal-fired utility boilers, direct combustion in dedicated mass burn, stoker and fluidized bed boilers, and wood gasification/combined cycle-power plants. The analysis suggests that, in the near term, the highest-efficiency, lowest-cost, lowest-risk technology is cofiring with coal in industrial and utility boilers. However, this approach is economically feasible only when the fuel is delivered at a deep discount relative to fossil fuel, or the fuel user receives a tipping fee, subsidy, or emissions credit. (author)

  11. Potential Occupational Exposures and Health Risks Associated with Biomass-Based Power Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohr, Annette C.; Campleman, Sharan L.; Long, Christopher M.; Peterson, Michael K.; Weatherstone, Susan; Quick, Will; Lewis, Ari

    2015-01-01

    Biomass is increasingly being used for power generation; however, assessment of potential occupational health and safety (OH&S) concerns related to usage of biomass fuels in combustion-based generation remains limited. We reviewed the available literature on known and potential OH&S issues associated with biomass-based fuel usage for electricity generation at the utility scale. We considered three potential exposure scenarios—pre-combustion exposure to material associated with the fuel, exposure to combustion products, and post-combustion exposure to ash and residues. Testing of dust, fungal and bacterial levels at two power stations was also undertaken. Results indicated that dust concentrations within biomass plants can be extremely variable, with peak levels in some areas exceeding occupational exposure limits for wood dust and general inhalable dust. Fungal spore types, identified as common environmental species, were higher than in outdoor air. Our review suggests that pre-combustion risks, including bioaerosols and biogenic organics, should be considered further. Combustion and post-combustion risks appear similar to current fossil-based combustion. In light of limited available information, additional studies at power plants utilizing a variety of technologies and biomass fuels are recommended. PMID:26206568

  12. Potential Occupational Exposures and Health Risks Associated with Biomass-Based Power Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette C. Rohr

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Biomass is increasingly being used for power generation; however, assessment of potential occupational health and safety (OH&S concerns related to usage of biomass fuels in combustion-based generation remains limited. We reviewed the available literature on known and potential OH&S issues associated with biomass-based fuel usage for electricity generation at the utility scale. We considered three potential exposure scenarios—pre-combustion exposure to material associated with the fuel, exposure to combustion products, and post-combustion exposure to ash and residues. Testing of dust, fungal and bacterial levels at two power stations was also undertaken. Results indicated that dust concentrations within biomass plants can be extremely variable, with peak levels in some areas exceeding occupational exposure limits for wood dust and general inhalable dust. Fungal spore types, identified as common environmental species, were higher than in outdoor air. Our review suggests that pre-combustion risks, including bioaerosols and biogenic organics, should be considered further. Combustion and post-combustion risks appear similar to current fossil-based combustion. In light of limited available information, additional studies at power plants utilizing a variety of technologies and biomass fuels are recommended.

  13. Permitting a biomass-fired power plant in California -- A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reisman, J.I.; Needham, G.A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the process of preparing an air permit application for a proposed biomass-fired power plant. The plant is designed to produce a net electric power output of 16 megawatts (MW) for sale to Pacific Gas and Electric Company. The biomass fuel will consist of urban wood waste, construction wood waste, and waste from agricultural products, such as tree prunings and fruit pits. The site is located in an industrial park in Soledad, California

  14. Biomass gasification hot gas cleanup for power generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiant, B.C.; Bachovchin, D.M. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States); Carty, R.H.; Onischak, M. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Horazak, D.A. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Reading, PA (United States); Ruel, R.H. [The Pacific International Center for High Technology Research, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1993-12-31

    In support of the US Department of Energy`s Biomass Power Program, a Westinghouse Electric led team consisting of the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), Gilbert/Commonwealth (G/C), and the Pacific International Center for High Technology Research (PICHTR), is conducting a 30 month research and development program. The program will provide validation of hot gas cleanup technology with a pressurized fluidized bed, air-blown, biomass gasifier for operation of a gas turbine. This paper discusses the gasification and hot gas cleanup processes, scope of work and approach, and the program`s status.

  15. RHTF 2, a 1200 MWe high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brisbois, Jacques

    1978-01-01

    After having adapted to French conditions the 1160 MWe G.A.C. reactor, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique and French Industry have decided to design an High Temperature Reactor 1200 MWe based on the G.A.C. technology and taking into account the point of view of Electricite de France and the experience of C.E.A. and industry on the gas cooled reactor technology. The main objective of this work is to produce a reactor design having a low technical risk, good operability, with an emphasis on the safety aspects easing the licensing problems

  16. Development and construction of nuclear power and nuclear heating stations in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, G.; Kirmse, B.

    1983-01-01

    The state-of-the-art of nuclear power technology in the USSR is reviewed by presenting characteristic data on design and construction. The review takes into consideration the following types of facilities: Nuclear power stations with 1000 MWe pressurized water reactors, with 1000 MWe pressure tube boiling water reactors, and with 600 MWe fast breeder reactors; nuclear heating power stations with 1000 MWe reactors and nuclear heating stations with 500 MWth boiling water reactors

  17. 2002 Nuclear Power World Report - Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2003-01-01

    Last year, in 2002, 441 nuclear power plants were available for power supply in 31 countries in the world. With an aggregate gross power of 377,359 MWe, and an aggregate net power of 359,429 MWe, respectively, the nuclear generating capacity reached its highest level so far. Nine different reactor lines are used in commercial facilities. Light water reactors (PWR and BWR) contribute 355 plants, which makes them the most common reactor line. In twelve countries, 32 nuclear power plants with an aggregate gross power of 26,842 MWe and an aggregate net power of 25,546 MWe, respectively, are under construction. Of these, 25 units are light water reactors while eight are CANDU-type plants. In eighteen countries, 94 commercial reactors with more than 5 MWe power have been decommissioned so far. Most of these plants are prototypes with low powers. 228 of the nuclear power plants currently in operation, i.e. slightly more than half of them, were commissioned in the eighties. The oldest commercial nuclear power plant, Calder Hall unit 1, supplied power into the public grid in its 47th year of operation in 2002. The availability in terms of time and capacity of nuclear power plants rose from 74.23% in 1991 to 83.40% in 2001. A continued rise to approx. 85% is expected for 2002. In the same way, the non-availability in terms of time (unscheduled) dropped from 6.90% to 3.48%. The four nuclear power plants in Finland are the world's leaders with a cumulated average capacity availability of 90.00%. (orig.) [de

  18. Model, parameter and code of environmental dispersion of gaseous effluent under normal operation from nuclear power plant with 600 MWe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Erbang; Gao Zhanrong

    1998-06-01

    The model of environmental dispersion of gaseous effluence under normal operation from a nuclear power plant with 600 MWe is established to give a mathematical expression of annual mean atmospheric dispersion factor under mixing release condition based on quality assessment of radiological environment for 30 years of Chinese nuclear industry. In calculation, the impact from calm and other following factors have been taken into account: mixing layer, dry and wet deposition, radioactive decay and buildings. The doses caused from the following exposure pathways are also given by this model: external exposure from immersion cloud and ground deposition, internal exposure due to inhalation and ingestion. The code is named as ROULEA. It contains four modules, i.e. INPUT, ANRTRI, CHIQV and DOSE for calculating 4-dimension joint frequency, annual mean atmospheric dispersion factor and doses

  19. Study on evaluating the reactivity worth of the control rods of the PWR 900 MWe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phan Quoc Vuong; Tran Vinh Thanh; Tran Viet Phu

    2015-01-01

    Control rods of a nuclear reactor are divided into two groups: shut down and power control. Reactivity worth of the control rods depends nonlinearly on the rods' compositions and positions where the rods are inserted into the core. Therefore, calculation of control rod worth is of high important. In this study, we calculated the reactivity worth of the power control rod bank of the Mitsubishi PWR 900 MWe. The results are integral and differential worth calibration of the control rods. (author)

  20. Towards commercial fast breeder reactors the first 1200 MWe unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banal, M.; Carle, R.

    The public probably thinks of these fast breeder reactors in terms of their rising unit capacity: RAPSODIE 20 MW (thermal), raised to 40 MW, PHENIX 25 MWe, and now 1200 MWe. However, the purposes of the project and the framework of construction have been fundamentally different in each case. Design parameters and the development program of the LMFBR are presented. (auth)

  1. A dual pressurized water reactor producing 2000 MWe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, K. M.; Suh, K. Y.

    2010-01-01

    The Dual Unit Optimizer 2000 MWe (DUO2000) is proposed as a new design concept for large nuclear power plant. DUO is being designed to meet economic and safety challenges facing the 21. century green and sustainable energy industry. DUO2000 has two nuclear steam supply systems (NSSSs) of the Unit Nuclear Optimizer (UNO) pressurized water reactor (PWR) in a single containment so as to double the capacity of the plant. UNO is anchored to the Optimized Power Reactor 1000 MWe (OPR1000). The concept of DUO can be extended to any number of PWRs or pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs), or even boiling water reactor (BWRs). Once proven in water reactors, the technology may even be expanded to gas cooled, liquid metal cooled, and molten salt cooled reactors. In particular, since it is required that the Small and Medium sized Reactors (SMRs) be built as units, the concept of DUO2000 will apply to SMRs as well. With its in-vessel retention external reactor vessel cooling (IVR-ERVC) as severe accident management strategy, DUO can not only put the single most querulous PWR safety issue to end, but also pave ways to most promising large power capacity dispensing with huge redesigning cost for Generation III+ nuclear systems. Also, the strengths of DUO2000 include reducing the cost of construction by decreasing the number of containment buildings from two to one, minimizing the cost of NSSS and control systems by sharing between the dual units, and lessening the maintenance cost by uniting the NSSS. Two prototypes are presented for the DUO2000, and their respective advantages and drawbacks are considered. The strengths include, but are not necessarily limited to, reducing the cost of construction by decreasing the number of containment buildings from two to one, minimizing the cost of NSSS and control systems by sharing between the dual units, and lessening the maintenance cost by uniting the NSSS, just to name the few. The Coolant Unit Branching Apparatus (CUBA) is proposed

  2. Integrated biomass pyrolysis with organic Rankine cycle for power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, T. B.; Syahputra, A. W.

    2018-02-01

    The growing interest on Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) application to produce electricity by utilizing biomass energy sources are increasingly due to its successfully used to generate power from waste heat available in industrial processes. Biomass pyrolysis is one of the thermochemical technologies for converting biomass into energy and chemical products consisting of liquid bio-oil, solid biochar, and pyrolytic gas. In the application, biomass pyrolysis can be divided into three main categories; slow, fast and flash pyrolysis mainly aiming at maximizing the products of bio-oil or biochar. The temperature of synthesis gas generated during processes can be used for Organic Rankine Cycle to generate power. The heat from synthesis gas during pyrolysis processes was transfer by thermal oil heater to evaporate ORC working fluid in the evaporator unit. In this study, the potential of the palm oil empty fruit bunch, palm oil shell, and tree bark have been used as fuel from biomass to generate electricity by integrated with ORC. The Syltherm-XLT thermal oil was used as the heat carrier from combustion burner, while R245fa was used as the working fluid for ORC system. Through Aspen Plus, this study analyses the influences on performance of main thermodynamic parameters, showing the possibilities of reaching an optimum performance for different working conditions that are characteristics of different design parameters.

  3. Biomass-powered Solid Oxide Fuel Cells : Experimental and Modeling Studies for System Integrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, M.

    2013-01-01

    Biomass is a sustainable energy source which, through thermo-chemical processes of biomass gasification, is able to be converted from a solid biomass fuel into a gas mixture, known as syngas or biosyngas. A solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is a power generation device that directly converts the chemical

  4. Thermoeconomic Modeling and Parametric Study of a Photovoltaic-Assisted 1 MWe Combined Cooling, Heating, and Power System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandros Arsalis

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study a small-scale, completely autonomous combined cooling, heating, and power (CCHP system is coupled to a photovoltaic (PV subsystem, to investigate the possibility of reducing fuel consumption. The CCHP system generates electrical energy with the use of a simple gas turbine cycle, with a rated nominal power output of 1 MWe. The nominal power output of the PV subsystem is examined in a parametric study, ranging from 0 to 600 kWe, to investigate which configuration results in a minimum lifecycle cost (LCC for a system lifetime of 20 years of service. The load profile considered is applied for a complex of households in Nicosia, Cyprus. The solar data for the PV subsystem are taken on an hourly basis for a whole year. The results suggest that apart from economic benefits, the proposed system also results in high efficiency and reduced CO2 emissions. The parametric study shows that the optimum PV capacity is 300 kWe. The minimum lifecycle cost for the PV-assisted CCHP system is found to be 3.509 million €, as compared to 3.577 million € for a system without a PV subsystem. The total cost for the PV subsystem is 547,445 €, while the total cost for operating the system (fuel is 731,814 € (compared to 952,201 € for a CCHP system without PVs. Overall the proposed system generates a total energy output of 210,520 kWh (during its whole lifetime, which translates to a unit cost of 17 €/kWh.

  5. Seismic analysis of two 1050 mm diameter heavy water upgrading towers for 235 MWe Kaiga Atomic Power Plant Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soni, R.S.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Mahajan, S.C.; Kakodkar, A.; Narwaria, Suresh; Vardarajan, T.G.; Sadhukhan, H.K.

    1992-01-01

    This report deals with the analysis carried out for the evaluation of earthquake induced stresses and deflections in two 1050 mm diameter heavy water upgrading towers for Kaiga Atomic Power Plant Site. The analysis of upgrading tower has been carried out for two mutually perpendicular horizontal excitations and one vertical excitation applied simultaneously. The upgrading towers have been analysed using beam model taking into account soil-structure interaction. Response spectrum analysis has been carried out using site spectra for 235 MWe Kaiga reactor site. The seismic analysis has been performed for both the towers with supporting structure along with concrete pedestals and raft foundation. The towers have been checked for its stability due to compressive stresses to avoid buckling so that the nearby safety related structures are not geopardised in the event of safe shutdown earthquake (SSE) loading. (author). 14 refs., 12 figs., 18 tabs

  6. Treatment and processing of the effluents and wastes (other than fuel) produced by a 900 MWe nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud

    1983-01-01

    Effluents produced by a 900 MWe power plant, are of three sorts: gaseous, liquid and solid. According to their nature, effluents are either released or stored for decaying before being released to the atmosphere. The non-contaminated reactor coolant effluents are purified (filtration, gas stripping) and treated by evaporation for reuse. Depending upon their radioactive level, liquid waste is either treated by evaporation or discharged after filtration. Solid waste issuing from previous treatments (concentrates, resins, filters) is processed in concrete drums using an encapsulation process. The concrete drum provides biological self-protection consistent with the national and international regulations pertaining to the transport of radioactive substance. Finally, the various low-level radioactive solid waste collected throughout the plant, is compacted into metal drums. Annual estimates of the quantity of effluents (gaseous, liquid) released in the environment and the number of drums (concrete, metal) produced by the plant figure in the conclusion

  7. Role of Fugen-HWR in Japan and design of a 600 MWe demonstration reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawai, S.

    1982-01-01

    Fugen, a 165 MWe prototype of a heavy water moderated boiling light water cooled reactor; has been in commercial operation since March 20, 1979. In parallel with the Fugen project, the design work of the 600 MWe demonstration plant has been carried out since 1973. Important system and components, such as pressure tube assemblies, control rod drive mechanism, etc., are essentially the same as those of Fugen. Some modifications, however, are made especially from the stand point of experiences In the Fugen-HWR, plutonium and uranium would be effectively used; and plutonium could make the coolant void reactivity more negative which would give good results in increasing the reactor stability and safety. On the other hand, nuclear power plants are mainly consisted of LWRs in Japan. Considering the above situations, the Fugen-HWR, coupled with LWRs, is now considered in Japan to contribute to our energy security by using plutonium and depleted uranium extracted from spent fuels of LWRs: thereby reducing the demands On August 4, 1981, the ad hoc committee on the 600 MWe demonstration Fugen-HWR submitted the final report to the Japan AEC, after having had discussions and evaluations. In the report, the ad hoc committee recommended to build the 600 MWE demonstration plant with appropriate supports of the Government. The Japan AEC will be expected to make her decision on the program in the near future. As for the reactor safety R and C, development has been stressed on coolant leak detectors and ECCS performances or Since 1965, many development works have been done for mixed oxide fuel assemblies, both for establishment of the fabrication technology and for clarification of irradiation performances. 196 mixed oxide fuel assemblies have been manufactured for Fugen. 168 of them were loaded and 92 were withdrawn. No fuel has been failured yet. (author)

  8. A roadmap for production of sustainable, consistent and reliable electric power from agricultural biomass- An Indian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Jaswinder

    2016-01-01

    The utilization of agricultural biomass for production of electric power can help to reduce the environmental emissions while achieving energy security and sustainable development. This paper presents a methodology for estimating the power production potential of agricultural biomass in a country. Further, the methodology has been applied to develop a roadmap for producing reliable power in India. The present study reveals that about 650 Mt/year of agricultural biomass is generated in India, while about one-third of this has been found to be surplus for energy applications. The cereal crops have major contribution (64.60%) in production of surplus biomass followed by sugarcane (24.60%) and cotton (10.68%). The energy potential of these resources is of the order of 3.72 EJ, which represents a significant proportion of the primary energy consumption in the country. These biomass resources can produce electric power of 23–35 GW depending upon the efficiency of thermal conversion. The delivery of biomass to the plants and selection of appropriate technology have been found as the major issues that need to be resolved carefully. In the end, the study summarizes various technological options for biomass collection and utilization that can be used for producing clean and consistent power supply. - Highlights: •The production of bioelectricity in India is imperative and inevitable. •About one-third of the agricultural biomass is available for power generation. •The power potential of these resources is of the order of 23–31 GW. •The delivery of biomass to plants and technology selection are the key issues. •India should exploit these resources for producing clean and reliable power.

  9. Nuclear power perspective in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xinrong; Xu Changhua

    2003-01-01

    China started developing nuclear technology for power generation in the 1970s. A substantial step toward building nuclear power plants was taken as the beginning of 1980 s. The successful constructions and operations of Qinshan - 1 NPP, which was an indigenous PWR design with the capacity of 300 MWe, and Daya Bay NPP, which was an imported twin-unit PWR plant from France with the capacity of 900 MWe each, give impetus to further Chinese nuclear power development. Now there are 8 units with the total capacity of 6100 MWe in operation and 3 units with the total capacity of 2600 MWe under construction. For the sake of meeting the increasing demand for electricity for the sustainable economic development, changing the energy mix and mitigating the environment pollution impact caused by fossil fuel power plant, a near and middle term electrical power development program will be established soon. It is preliminarily predicted that the total power installation capacity will be 750-800GWe by the year 2020. The nuclear share will account for at least 4.0-4.5 percent of the total. This situation leaves the Chinese nuclear power industry with a good opportunity but also a great challenge. A practical nuclear power program and a consistent policy and strategy for future nuclear power development will be carefully prepared and implemented so as to maintain the nuclear power industry to be healthfully developed. (author)

  10. The costs of nuclear power in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    A study on the costs of nuclear power generation in the Netherlands is presented. Light water cooled reactors are chosen as nuclear power plants and no difference is made in calculating the costs between a PWR type reactor and a BWR type reactor. The power plants have an output of 1000 MWe. From each part of the whole fuel cycle the costs are determined, taking into account interest, investments, time of construction, labor costs, insurances etc. Also are determined from each part of the fuel cycle the energy costs; the costs per kWh. Finally a comparison is made in costs between a 1000 MWe power plant and a 600 MWe power plant

  11. Tactical supply chain planning for a forest biomass power plant under supply uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabani, Nazanin; Sowlati, Taraneh; Ouhimmou, Mustapha; Rönnqvist, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    Uncertainty in biomass supply is a critical issue that needs to be considered in the production planning of bioenergy plants. Incorporating uncertainty in supply chain planning models provides improved and stable solutions. In this paper, we first reformulate a previously developed non-linear programming model for optimization of a forest biomass power plant supply chain into a linear programming model. The developed model is a multi-period tactical-level production planning problem and considers the supply and storage of forest biomass as well as the production of electricity. It has a one-year planning horizon with monthly time steps. Next, in order to incorporate uncertainty in monthly available biomass into the planning, we develop a two-stage stochastic programming model. Finally, to balance the risk and profit, we propose a bi-objective model. The results show that uncertainty in availability of biomass has an additional cost of $0.4 million for the power plant. Using the proposed stochastic optimization model could reduce this cost by half. - Highlights: • Developed a two-stage stochastic optimization model to consider supply uncertainty. • Maximized the profit of a forest biomass power plant value chain. • Minimized two risk measures, variability index and downside risk, to manage risks. • Stochastic optimization model provided feasible solution for all scenarios. • Results showed a trade-off between profit and risk management

  12. Technical feasibility study of 60 MWe fast reactor concept: RAPID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kambe, Mitsuru; Ueda, Nobuyuki; Uotani, Masaki

    1993-01-01

    A study has been performed on the passive safety features and technical feasibility of an inherently safe 60 MWe fast reactor concept RAPID to meet various power requirements in Japan. The system dynamic analyses on the UTOP and ULOF transients revealed that the enhanced reactivity feedback derived from an annular core configuration and the integrated fuel assembly provides a high margin of self-protection. Structural integrity of the integrated fuel assembly has also been confirmed. The following innovative key technologies have been demonstrated; Lithium Injection Modules (LIM) for ultimate shutdown, Lithium Expansion Modulus (LEM) for inherent reactivity feedback and Void Leading Channel (VLC) for the sodium void worth reduction. (author)

  13. Fluid selection for the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) in biomass power and heat plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drescher, Ulli; Brueggemann, Dieter

    2007-01-01

    In small solid biomass power and heat plants, the ORC is used for cogeneration. This application shows constraints different from other ORC. These constraints are described and an adapted power plant design is presented. The new design influences the selection criteria of working fluids. A software has been developed to find thermodynamic suitable fluids for ORC in biomass power and heat plants. Highest efficiencies are found within the family of alkylbenzenes

  14. An Investigation of Sustainable Power Generation from Oil Palm Biomass: A Case Study in Sarawak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Aghamohammadi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sarawak is the largest state in Malaysia, with 22% of the nation's oil palm plantation area, making it the second largest contributor to palm biomass production. Despite the enormous amount of palm biomass in the state, the use of biomass as fuel for power generation remains low. This study is designed to investigate the sustainability of power generation from palm biomass specifically in Sarawak by conducting a survey among the palm oil mill developers. To conduct this investigation, several key sustainability factors were identified: the security of the biomass supply, the efficiency of conversion technology, the existing network system, challenges and future prospects for power generation from palm biomass. These factors were assessed through a set of questionnaires. The returned questionnaires were then analysed using statistical tools. The results of this study demonstrate that Sarawak has biomass in abundance, and that it is ready to be exploited for large scale power generation. The key challenge to achieving the renewable energy target is the inadequate grid infrastructure that inhibits palm oil developers from benefiting from the Feed-in-Tariff payment scheme. One way forward, a strategic partnership between government and industrial players, offers a promising outcome, depending on an economic feasibility study. The decentralization of electricity generation to support rural electrification is another feasible alternative for renewable energy development in the state.

  15. 2010 nuclear power world report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2011-01-01

    At the end of 2010, 443 nuclear power plants were available for energy supply in 30 countries of the world. This are 6 plants more than at the end of 2009. The aggregate gross power of the plants amounted to approx. 396,118 MWe, the aggregate net power, to 375,947 MWe. This capacity numbers are a little bit more than one year before (gross: 391,551 MWe, net: 371,331 MWe). Six unites were commissioned in 2010; 2 units in China and India each and one unit in the Republic of Korea and Russia each. One unit, the Fast Breeder Pilot Reactor Monju in Japan, was connected to the grid after a long-term shutdown. One nuclear power plant, the Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor Phenix in France, was shut down permanently in 2010. 62 nuclear generating units, i.e. 9 plants more than at the end of 2009, were under construction in late 2010 in 15 countries with an aggregate gross power of approx. 63,998 MWe. Worldwide, some 90 new nuclear power plants are in the concrete project design, planning, and licensing phases; in some of these cases license applications have been submitted or contracts have already been signed. Some 120 further projects are planned. Net electricity generation in nuclear power plants worldwide in 2010 achieved another reasonable ranking level of approx. 2,627.5 billion kWh (2009: approx. 2,558 billion kWh). Since the first generation of electricity in a nuclear power plant in the EBR-I fast breeder (USA) on December 20, 1951, cumulated net production has reached approx. 63,100 billion kWh, and operating experience has grown to some 14,400 reactor years. (orig.)

  16. Energy values and estimation of power generation potentials of some non-woody biomass species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, M; Patel, S K [National Institute of Technology, Rourkela (India)

    2008-07-01

    In view of high energy potentials in non-woody biomass species and an increasing interest in their utilization for power generation, an attempt has been made in this study to assess the proximate analysis and energy content of different components of Ocimum canum and Tridax procumbens biomass species (both non-woody), and their impact on power generation and land requirement for energy plantations. The net energy content in Ocimum canum was found to be slightly higher than that in Tridax procumbens. In spite of having higher ash contents, the barks from both the plant species exhibited higher calorific values. The results have shown that approximately 650 and 1,270 hectares of land are required to generate 20,000 kWh/day electricity from Ocimum canum and Tridax procumbens biomass species. Coal samples, obtained from six different local mines, were also examined for their qualities, and the results were compared with those of studied biomass materials. This comparison reveals much higher power output with negligible emission of suspended particulate matters (SPM) from biomass materials.

  17. Failures of the thermal barriers of 900 MWe reactor coolant pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyrouty, P.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the anomalies encountered in the thermal barriers of the reactor coolant pumps in French 900 MWe PWR power stations. In addition to this specific problem, it demonstrates how the fortuitous discovery of a fault during a sampling test enables faults of a generic nature to be revealed in components which were not subject to periodic inspection, the failure of which could seriously affect safety. This example demonstrates the risk represented by deterioration in areas which are not examined periodically and for which there are no preceding signs which would make early detection of deterioration possible. (author)

  18. Failures of the thermal barriers of 900 MWe reactor coolant pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyrouty, P.

    1996-12-01

    This report describes the anomalies encountered in the thermal barriers of the reactor coolant pumps in French 900 MWe PWR power stations. In addition to this specific problem, it demonstrates how the fortuitous discovery of a fault during a sampling test enabled faults of a generic nature to be revealed in components which were not subject to periodic inspection, the failure of which could seriously affect safety. This example demonstrates the risk which can be associated with the deterioration in areas which are not examined periodically and for which there are no preceding signs which would make early detection of deterioration possible.

  19. Failures of the thermal barriers of 900 MWe reactor coolant pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyrouty, P.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the anomalies encountered in the thermal barriers of the reactor coolant pumps in French 900 MWe PWR power stations. In addition to this specific problem, it demonstrates how the fortuitous discovery of a fault during a sampling test enabled faults of a generic nature to be revealed in components which were not subject to periodic inspection, the failure of which could seriously affect safety. This example demonstrates the risk which can be associated with the deterioration in areas which are not examined periodically and for which there are no preceding signs which would make early detection of deterioration possible

  20. 2004 world nuclear power report - evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2004-01-01

    Last year, 2003, 439 nuclear power plants were available for electricity generation in 31 countries of the world. With an aggregate gross capacity of 380,489 MWe and an aggregate net capacity of 361,476MWe, nuclear generating capacity reached its highest level so far. Nine different reactor lines are operated in the commercial nuclear power plants. Light water reactors (PWR and BWR) continue to be in the lead with 355 plants. Twenty-nine nuclear power plants with an aggregate gross capacity of 24,222 MWe and an aggregate net capacity of 23,066 MWe were under construction in eleven countries. Of these, twenty are light water reactors, and seven are CANDU-type reactors. Ninety-nine commercial reactors with a capacity in excess of 5 MWe have so far been decommissioned in eighteen countries, most of them prototype plants of low power. 228 plants, i. e. slightly more than half of the number of plants currently in operation, were commissioned in the 1980s. The oldest commercial nuclear power plant in the world, Calder Hall unit 1, was disconnected from the power grid for good in its 48th year of operation in 2003. For the first time in ten years, the availability in terms of time and capacity of nuclear power plants has decreased from 83,80% in 2002 to 80.50%, and from 84.60% to 81.50%, respectively, in 2003. The main causes are prolonged outages of high-capacity plants in Japan as a consequence of administrative restrictions. The four nuclear power plants in Finland continue to be at the top of the list worldwide with a cumulated average availability of capacity of 90.30%. (orig.)

  1. Grate-firing of biomass for heat and power production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen; Rosendahl, Lasse; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2008-01-01

    bed on the grate, and the advanced secondary air supply (a real breakthrough in this technology) are highlighted for grate-firing systems. Amongst all the issues or problems associated with grate-fired boilers burning biomass, primary pollutant formation and control, deposition formation and corrosion......As a renewable and environmentally friendly energy source, biomass (i.e., any organic non-fossil fuel) and its utilization are gaining an increasingly important role worldwide Grate-firing is one of the main competing technologies in biomass combustion for heat and power production, because it can...... combustion mechanism, the recent breakthrough in the technology, the most pressing issues, the current research and development activities, and the critical future problems to be resolved. The grate assembly (the most characteristic element in grate-fired boilers), the key combustion mechanism in the fuel...

  2. Studies on flow induced vibration of reactivity devices of 700 MWe Indian PHWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, K.M., E-mail: kmprabha@yahoo.com [Reactor Safety Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Goyal, P.; Dutta, Anu; Bhasin, V.; Vaze, K.K.; Ghosh, A.K. [Reactor Safety Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Pillai, Ajith V.; Mathew, Jimmy [Nuclear Power Corporation of India Ltd., Mumbai 400 094 (India)

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FIV studies on internals of heavy water filled calandria of 700 MWe Indian PHWR is presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This includes CFD and structural dynamic analysis to predict the dynamic behavior of component lying inside calandria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results of these calculations as well as conclusions from this investigation are presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is established that FIV is not a concern in the present design of calandria internals. - Abstract: Component failures due to excessive flow-induced vibration are still affecting the performance and reliability of nuclear power stations. Tube failures due to fretting-wear in nuclear steam generators, and vibration related damage of reactor internals are of particular concern. In the Indian nuclear industry, flow induced vibrations are assessed early in the design process and the results are incorporated in the design procedures. In this paper the details of flow induced vibration studies on internals like liquid zone control unit and poison injection units of heavy water filled calandria of 700 MWe Indian pressurized heavy water reactor is given. This includes computational fluid dynamics studies from which the velocities are extracted for the components lying inside the calandria. With these velocities as input, further studies are performed to predict the dynamic behavior of these components. Results of these calculations as well as conclusions derived from this investigation are presented. Based on the studies it has been established that flow induced vibration is not a concern in the present design of 700 MWe calandria internals.

  3. Nuclear power. Europe report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2002-01-01

    Last year, 2001, nuclear power plants were available for energy supply, respectively, in 18 countries all over Europe. In 8 of the 15 member countries of the European Union nuclear power plants have been in operation. In 7 of the 13 EU Candidate Countries nuclear energy was used for power production. A total of 216 plants with an aggregate net capacity of 171 802 MWe and an aggregate gross capacity of 181 212 MWe were in operation. One unit, i.e. Volgodonsk-1 in Russia went critical for the first time and started test operation after having been connected to the grid. Volgodonsk-1 adds about 1 000 MWe (gross) nd 953 MWe (net) to the electricity production capacity. The operator of the Muehlheim-Kaerlich NPP field an application to decommission and dismantle the plant; this plant was only 13 months in operation and has been shut down since 1988 for legal reasons. Last year, 10 plants were under construction in Romania (1), Russia (4), Slovakia (2), the Czech Republic (1) and the Ukraine (2), that is only in East European Countries. In eight countries of the European Union 143 nuclear power plants have been operated with an aggregate gross capacity of 128 758 MWe and an aggregate net capacity of 122 601 MWe. Net electricity production in 2001 in the EU amounts to approx. 880.3 TWh gross, which means a share of 33,1 per cent of the total production in the whole EU. Shares of nuclear power differ widely among the operator countries. The reach 75.6% in France, 74.2% in Lithuania, 58.2% in Belgium, 53.2% in the Slovak Republic, and 47.4% in the Ukraine. Nuclear power also provides a noticeable share in the electricity supply of countries, which operate no own nuclear power plants, e.g. Italy, Portugal, and Austria. On May 24th, 2002 the Finnish Parliament voted for the decision in principle to build a fifth nuclear power plant in the country. This launches the next stage in the nuclear power plant project. The electric output of the plant unit will be 1000-1600 MW

  4. An update technology for integrated biomass gasification combined cycle power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, P.; Dey, S.

    2014-01-01

    A discussion is presented on the technical analysis of a 6.4 M W_e integrated biomass gasification combined cycle (IBGCC) plant. It features three numbers of downdraft biomass gasifier systems with suitable gas clean-up trains, three numbers of internal combustion (IC) producer gas engines for producing 5.85 MW electrical power in open cycle and 550 kW power in a bottoming cycle using waste heat. Comparing with IC gas engine single cycle systems, this technology route increases overall system efficiency of the power plant, which in turn improves plant economics. Estimated generation cost of electricity indicates that mega-watt scale IBGCC power plants can contribute to good economies of scale in India. This paper also highlight's the possibility of activated carbon generation from the char, a byproduct of gasification process, and use of engine's jacket water heat to generate chilled water through VAM for gas conditioning. (author)

  5. Power production from biomass III. Gasification and pyrolysis R and D and D for industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sipilae, K.; Korhonen, M. [eds.] [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). New Energy Technologies

    1999-07-01

    The Seminar on Power Production from Biomass III. Gasification and Pyrolysis R and D and D for Industry, was held on 14-15 September 1998 in Espoo. The seminar was organised by VTT Energy in co-operation with the University of Groningen, EU-Thermie Programme and Technology Development Centre, Finland (Tekes). Overviews of current activities on power production from biomass and wastes in Europe and in the United States were given, and all European and U. S. demonstration projects on biomass gasification were presented. In Europe, the target is to produce additional 90 Mtoe/a of bioenergy for the market by 2010. This is a huge challenge for the bioenergy sector, including biomass production and harvesting, conversion technology, energy companies, and end users. In USA, U.S. Department of Energy is promoting the Biomass Power Programme to encourage and assist industry in the development and validation of renewable, biomass-based electricity generation systems, the objective being to double the present use of 7 000 MW biomass power by the year 2010. The new Finnish PROGAS Programme initiated by VTT was also introduced. Several gasification projects are today on the demonstration stage prior to entering the commercial level. Pyrolysis technologies are not yet on the demonstration stage on the energy market. Bio-oils can easily be transported, stored and utilised in existing boiler and diesel plants. The proceedings include the presentations given by the keynote speakers and other invited speakers, as well as some extended poster presentations. (orig.)

  6. Utilization of agricultural waste in power production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clausen, J.C. [ELSAMPROJEKT A/S, Fredericia (Denmark); Rasmussen, I. [MIDTKRAFT Power Co., Aarhus (Denmark)

    1993-12-31

    It is a goal of the Danish energy policy for the last decade to reduce energy consumption and to introduce fuels for power production with less CO{sub 2} emission than coal. This measure has caused a considerable effort by the Danish utilities to develop technologies that reduce CO{sub 2} emissions without causing heavy cost increases of power. Agricultural waste in the form of surplus straw is available in an amount equivalent to 20% of the annual coal imports to Denmark. Straw firing is difficult due to its significant contents of alkaline components. Consequently, its utilization presupposes the development of new technologies. The biomass development program is concentrated on two ways which are (1) co-firing of existing coal fired power station with a modest amount of straw and (2) development of CFB technology that allows a high share of biomass as well as coal only. These options were tested in a coal fired 70 MW spreader stoker unit and a 125 MW PF unit. Approx. 4000 t of straw were burned. Additional tests will be launched this autumn, burning 35,000 t of straw at rates up to 20% straw. The CFB option is pursued from the platform of a 80 MWth unit, operational early `92. This plant burns a mix of 50% straw and 50% coal and consumes annually 70.000 t of straw. Future development is aiming towards CFBs of 250 MW(e), burning in excess of 50% biomass.

  7. GIS-based biomass resource utilization for rice straw cofiring in the Taiwanese power market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Ming-Che; Huang, An-Lei; Wen, Tzai-Hung

    2013-01-01

    Rice straw, a rich agricultural byproduct in Taiwan, can be used as biomass feedstock for cofiring systems. In this study, we analyzed the penetration of rice straw cofiring systems in the Taiwanese power market. In the power generation system, rice straw is cofired with fossil fuel in existing electricity plants. The benefits of cofiring systems include increasing the use of renewable energy, decreasing the fuel cost, and lowering greenhouse gas emissions. We established a linear complementarity model to simulate the power market equilibrium with cofiring systems in Taiwan. GIS-based analysis was then used to analyze the geospatial relationships between paddy rice farms and power plants to assess potential biomass for straw-power generation. Additionally, a sensitivity analysis of the biomass feedstock supply system was conducted for various cofiring scenarios. The spatial maps and equilibrium results of rice straw cofiring in Taiwanese power market are presented in the paper. - Highlights: ► The penetration of straw cofiring systems in the power market is analyzed. ► GIS-based analysis assesses potential straw-power generation. ► The spatial maps and equilibrium results of rice straw cofiring are presented

  8. Mathematical modelling of straw combustion in a 38 MWe power plant furnace and effect of operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao Bin Yang; Robert Newman; Vida Sharifi; Jim Swithenbank; John Ariss [Sheffield University, Sheffield (United Kingdom). Sheffield University Waste Incineration Centre (SUWIC), Department of Chemical and Process Engineering

    2007-01-15

    As one of the most easily accessible renewable energy resources, straw can be burned to provide electricity and heat to local communities. In this paper, mathematical modelling methods have been employed to simulate the operation of a 38 MWe straw-burning power plant to obtain detailed information on the flow and combustion characteristics in the furnace and to predict the effect on plant performance of variation in operating conditions. The predicted data are compared to measurements in terms of burning time, furnace temperature, flue gas emissions (including NOx), carbon content in the ash and overall combustion efficiency. It is concluded that straw burning on the grate is locally sub-stoichiometric and most of the NO is formed in the downstream combustion chamber and radiation shaft; auxiliary gas burners are responsible for the uneven distribution of temperature and gas flow at the furnace exit; and fuel moisture content is limited to below 25% to prevent excessive CO emission without compromising the plant performance. The current work greatly helps to understand the operating characteristics of large-scale straw-burning plants. 33 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Biomass power for rural development. Quarterly report, July 3--December 4, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, J.T.

    1998-03-01

    This paper describes progress in several projects related to biomass power. These include switchgrass conversion development; switchgrass gasification development; production activities including soil studies, carbon studies, switchgrass production economics, watershed impacts, and prairie lands bio-products; information and education; and geographical information system. Attachments describe switchgrass co-firing test; switchgrass production in Iowa; cooperative agreements with ISU; Rathbun Lake watershed project; newspaper articles and information publications; Secretary of Agriculture Glickman`s visit; integration of technical aspects of switchgrass production in Iowa; and evaluation of an integrated biomass gasification/fuel cell power plant.

  10. Planning the nuclear contribution to the Brazilian power program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbalho, A. Rodrigues; Alves, R. Nazare; Pinto, C. Syllus M.; Souza Santos, T.D. de; Abrao, A.

    1977-01-01

    The thermo-electric power in Brazil accounts for less than 20% of the total generating capacity. Brazil's power is essentially generated hydraulically, which grants the growing development. The electric energy consumption keeps growing, with the annual average rate of 13%/year in the last five years. The present installed capacity is 20 000 MWe and the projections are: 35 000MWe, in 1980; 50 000 MWe in 1985; 75 000 MWe, in 1990 and 150 000 MWe, in 2 000. Most of the hydraulic resources are located in remote areas of the country, very far from the consumption centers. Under the agreement between the Federal Republic of Germany and Brazil (signed in June 1975), besides the nuclear power station, American made, under construction in Agra dos Reis, with a power capacity of 626 MWe, two more units, each one with 1 300 MWe capacity are to be erected at the same site, and planned to be in operation in 1982 and 1983. Several joint German-Brazilian companies will be established for reactor and fuel manufacture, in the country. The Brazilian state holding nuclear company, Empresas Nucleares Brasileiras S/A., NUCLEBRAS, will participate in the formation of all joint companies with at least 51% of capital investments. The Brazilian Government will spend 10 billion dollars (U.S.), during the agreement's duration, to make its industry stronger, to develop its technology and to reduce its dependence on energy imports. Brazil's target: full independence in nuclear technology (including reactor manufacture and complete fuel cycle) in about 15 years [es

  11. New nuclear power plants in Europe 1984. Pt 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The atw report on new nuclear power plants in Europe contains both a survey of the Federal Republic of Germany, which was pubslished in the April 1984 issue, and an overview of the nuclear power plant situation in 26 European countries including the Soviet Union and six other CMEA countries. Also this year's review includes specific status reports, complete with technical information, about all nuclear generating units under construction, in the project and concrete planning phases. The fifteen nuclear power plants newly commissioned in Europe since last year's atw report was published are covered in a similar way. Moreover, introductory summaries describe the plants in operation in each country and their 1983 electricity generation. A general introduction provides an outlook on developments in Western and Eastern Europe. The total number of nuclear power plants now in operation and under construction in Europe is 300 units with an aggregate gross 219, 320 MWe. Of these, 185 units are located in Western Europe, 115 in Eastern Europe. The units currently in operation of this total are 180 with 103,978 MWe in sixteen European countries; of these, 126 units with 74,869 MWe are run in eleven West European countries, 54 units with an aggregate 29,109 MWe in five East European countries. Of the 120 nuclear generating units at present under construction with an aggregate 115,342 MWe in fifteen European countries, 59 units with 63,442 MWe are located in eight West European, 61 units with 51,900 MWe in seven East European countries. (orig./UA) [de

  12. Study tour to biomass gasifiers in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoef, H.A.M.

    2000-12-01

    A study trip to a biomass gasification plant in Germany took place from 13-15 November 2000. The goal of the trip was to obtain information on German developments, experience, and possibilities in the field of biomass gasification. The participants were representatives of Dutch parties in the energy sector: waste sector, manufacturers, producers, policy makers and consultants. The most important feature was the visit to plants that were in operation. Due in particular to the new EEG (Emeuerbare-Energien-Gesetz/Renewable Energy) legislation, German policy makers have created an initial market for sustainable energy with a degree of success. The key feature is that EEG makes projects 'bankable' by guaranteeing a return delivery compensation. An EEG-type scheme designed to accelerate the development of sustainable energy could be an interesting instrument also for the Netherlands. The plan was to visit four plants and have a number of presentations in a period of three days. Preference was for relatively new plants with differing concepts. The following plants were visited and/or presented: 200-kWe CHP wood gasification plant, based on AHT technology, located at Domsland in Eckenfoerde; a 10,000 tonnes/year wood gasification plant, based on 'cupola furnace' technology of blast furnaces, located at Holzhausen near Leipzig; a 1-MWe wood gasification plant, based on Carbo-V technology, located at Freiberg; and finally a 23-MWe CBP wood gasification plant, also based on Juch technology, located at Siebenlehn. In clearly appears that Germany is ahead of the Netherlands in the realisation of gasification plants. Still, there are certain problems with the reliability of operation. The plants selected were relatively new (with the possible exception of Espenhain) and they are having too many teething problems. Sound insight has been obtained into the various concepts of decentralised energy generation from biomass and how this can be fitted into the existing infrastructure

  13. Prospects and constraints for nuclear power in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polliart, A.J.

    1977-01-01

    Despite the interest in nuclear power and the IAEA's active assistance programme, only five developing countries (Argentina, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, India, Pakistan) have nuclear plants in operation. The combined net output of these plants is about 2,000 MWe. Twelve other developing countries have nuclear power reactors under construction, ordered or planned for operation by 1985. The net output of those under construction amounts to 17,200 MWe while the ordered or planned reactors will generate an additional 10,300 MWe. (orig./RW) [de

  14. IEA Energy Technology Essentials: Biomass for Power Generation and CHP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-01-15

    The IEA Energy Technology Essentials series offers concise four-page updates on the different technologies for producing, transporting and using energy. Biomass for Power Generation and CHP is the topic covered in this edition.

  15. Investigations on the inadvertent power increase in a PHWR as ASSET experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, S H [Operating Plants Safety Div., Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, Mumbai (India)

    1997-12-31

    Investigations were carried out using the ASSET methodology to find out the root cause of an incident involving inadvertent increase in reactor power in the Unit 1 of Narora Atomic Power Station (NAPS) in India. NAPS is a twin Unit, 220 MWe PHWR based power station. On December 4, 1992, when NPAS Unit 1 was operating at 130 MWe, the reactor power increased steadily on its own and touched 147 MWe, over a period of 14 minutes. The set (demand) power of the triplicated reactor regulating system had increased on its own and in turn has made the reactor to operated at higher power. The power was brought down to 120 MWe by manual intervention. Since adequate system related data during the incident was not available, laboratory studies were carried out using computer simulations for the various process disturbances which could affect the reactor regulating system, for establishing the causes of the event. 4 figs.

  16. Investigations on the inadvertent power increase in a PHWR as ASSET experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, S.H.

    1996-01-01

    Investigations were carried out using the ASSET methodology to find out the root cause of an incident involving inadvertent increase in reactor power in the Unit 1 of Narora Atomic Power Station (NAPS) in India. NAPS is a twin Unit, 220 MWe PHWR based power station. On December 4, 1992, when NPAS Unit 1 was operating at 130 MWe, the reactor power increased steadily on its own and touched 147 MWe, over a period of 14 minutes. The set (demand) power of the triplicated reactor regulating system had increased on its own and in turn has made the reactor to operated at higher power. The power was brought down to 120 MWe by manual intervention. Since adequate system related data during the incident was not available, laboratory studies were carried out using computer simulations for the various process disturbances which could affect the reactor regulating system, for establishing the causes of the event. 4 figs

  17. BIOMASS UTILIZATION AS A RENEVABLE ENERGY SOURCE IN POLISH POWER INDUSTRY – CURRENT STATUS AND PERSPECTIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Gołuchowska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The depletion of the conventional energy sources, as well as the degradation and pollution of the environment by the exploitation of fossil fuels caused the development of renewable energy sources (RES, including biomass. In Poland, biomass is the most popular renewable energy source, which is closely related to the obligations associated with the membership in the EU. Biomass is the oldest renewable energy source, and its potential, diversity and polymorphism place it over other sources. Besides, the improvement in its parameters, including an increase in its calorific value, resulted in increasing use of biomass as energy source. In the electric power industry biomass is applied in the process of co-combustion with coal. This process may contribute, inter alia, to the reduction in the emissions of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur oxides. The article presents the characteristics of the biomass burned in power boilers of one of the largest Polish power plants, located in Opole Province (Southern Poland. Besides, the impact of biomass on the installation of co-combustion, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of the co-combustion process not only in technological, but also environmental, economic and social aspects were described.

  18. MHD generator performance analysis for the Advanced Power Train study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pian, C. C. P.; Hals, F. A.

    1984-01-01

    Comparative analyses of different MHD power train designs for early commercial MHD power plants were performed for plant sizes of 200, 500, and 1000 MWe. The work was conducted as part of the first phase of a planned three-phase program to formulate an MHD Advanced Power Train development program. This paper presents the results of the MHD generator design and part-load analyses. All of the MHD generator designs were based on burning of coal with oxygen-enriched air preheated to 1200 F. Sensitivities of the MHD generator design performance to variations in power plant size, coal type, oxygen enrichment level, combustor heat loss, channel length, and Mach number were investigated. Basd on these sensitivity analyses, together with the overall plant performance and cost-of-electricity analyses, as well as reliability and maintenance considerations, a recommended MHD generator design was selected for each of the three power plants. The generators for the 200 MWe and 500 MWe power plant sizes are supersonic designs. A subsonic generator design was selected for the 1000 MWe plant. Off-design analyses of part-load operation of the supersonic channel selected for the 200 MWe power plant were also conductd. The results showed that a relatively high overall net plant efficiency can be maintained during part-laod operation with a supersonic generator design.

  19. Analysis and co-ordination of the activities concerning gasification of biomass. Summary country report, Denmark and Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoholm, P.; Olsen, A.

    1996-11-01

    The analysis summarises the coordination of activities concerning the gasification of biomass in Denmark and Norway. The total quantity of available biomass for energy production in Denmark corresponds to ca. 115 PJ of which ca. 40% is utilized - and this constitutes ca. 6% of the country's total energy consumption. The resulting energy from biomass is currently mostly used for heating purposes utilizing small wood/straw household or farm stoves in addition to ca. 100 district heating systems. There is a tendency to use biomass fuels for electric power production as in the case of all major waste incineration plants and about 10 fully or partly wood/straw-fired cogeneration plants which are found within the range of 2 -20 MWe. A table shows details of all Danish biomass gasification plants and information is given on the types of biomass, under the titles of residue products and energy crops, most relevant to energy production in Denmark. Data is presented on the consumption of renewable energy in Denmark, recalculated in fuel equivalents, and Danish national energy policy and related legislation are described. Information on Norway's use of biomass as fuel is given under the headings of primary consumption, biomass sources and use, legislation, and brief evaluations of commercial gasification plants, pilot and demonstration plants, and laboratory plants and studies. It has recently been decided to speed up the development of small-scale gasification plants for combined heat and electricity production using biomass as fuel in Denmark. Total Norwegian energy consumption is 25% higher than Denmark's, and biomass fuels cover only 3.6% of this. (ARW) 32 refs

  20. Nuclear power: Europe report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2000-01-01

    Last year, 1999, nuclear power plants were available for energy supply, respectively, in 18 countries all over Europe. In eight of the fifteen member countries of the European Union nuclear power plants have been in operation. A total of 218 plants with an aggregate net capacity of 181,120 MWe and an aggregate gross capacity of 171,802 MWe were in operation. Two units, i.e. Civaux 2 in France and Mochovce-2 in Slovakia went critical for the first time and started commercial operation after having been connected to the grid. Three further units in France, Chooz 1 and 2 and Civaux 1, started commercial operation in 1999 after the completion of technical measures in the primary circuit. Last year, 13 plants were under construction in Romania, Russia, Slovakia and the Czech Republic, that is only in East European countries. In eight countries of the European Union 146 nuclear power plants have been operated with an aggregate gross capacity of 129.772 MWe and an aggregate net capacity of 123.668 MWe. Net electricity production in 1999 in the EU amounts to approx. 840.2 TWh, which means a share of 35 per cent of the total production. Shares of nuclear power differ widely among the operator countries. They reach 75 per cent in France, 73 per cent in Lithuania, 58 per cent in Belgium and 47 per cent in Bulgaria, Sweden and Slovakia. Nuclear power also provides a noticeable share in the electricity supply of countries, which operate no own nuclear power plants, e.g. Italy, Portugal and Austria. (orig.) [de

  1. Monetization of External Costs Using Lifecycle Analysis—A Comparative Case Study of Coal-Fired and Biomass Power Plants in Northeast China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingling Wang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the structures of external costs are built in line with coal-fired and biomass power plant life cycle activities in Northeast China. The external cost of coal-fired and biomass power plants was compared, using the lifecycle approach. In addition, the external costs of a biomass power plant are calculated for each stage for comparison with those of a coal-fired power plant. The results highlight that the external costs of a coal-fired plant are 0.072 US $/kWh, which are much higher than that of a biomass power plant, 0.00012 US$/kWh. The external cost of coal-fired power generation is as much as 90% of the current price of electricity generated by coal, while the external cost of a biomass power plant is 1/1000 of the current price of electricity generated by biomass. In addition, for a biomass power plant, the external cost associated with SO2, NOX, and PM2.5 are particularly lower than those of a coal-fired power plant. The prospect of establishing precise estimations for external cost mechanisms and sustainable energy policies is discussed to show a possible direction for future energy schemes in China. The paper has significant value for supporting the biomass power industry and taxing or regulating coal-fired power industry to optimize the energy structure in China.

  2. 1999 Nuclear power world report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesselmann, C.

    2000-01-01

    Last year, 1999, nuclear power plants were available for energy supply and under construction, respectively, in 33 countries. A total of 436 nuclear power plants with an aggregate net power of 350.228 MWe and an aggregate gross power of 366.988 MWe were in operation in 31 countries. Four units with an aggregate of 2.900 MWe, i.e. Civaux 2 in France, Kaiga 2 and Rajasthan 3 in India, and Wolsung-4 in the Republic of Korea, went critical for the first time or started commercial operation after having been synchronized with the power grid. After 26 years of operation, the BN 350 sodium cooled fast breeder was permanently decommissioned in Kazakhstan. The plant not only generated electricity (its capacity was 135 MWe) but also supplied process heat to a seawater desalination plant. In 1999, however, it did not contribute to the supply of electricity. In Sweden, unit 1 of the Barsebaeck nuclear power station (600 Mwe net) was decommissioned because of political decisions. This step entails financial compensation payments and substitute electricity generating capacity made available to the power plant operators. Net electricity generation in 1999 amounts to approx. 2.395 Twh, which marks a 100 TWh increase over the preceding year. Since the first generation of electricity from nuclear power in 1951, the cumulated world generation amounts to nearly 37.200 TWh of electricity, and experience in the operation of nuclear power plants has increased to 9414 years. Last year, 38 plants were under construction. This slight increase is due to the start of construction of a total of seven projects: Two each in Japan, the Republic of Korea and Taiwan, and one in China. Shares of nuclear power differ widely among the operator countries. They reach 75 per cent in France, 73 per cent in Lithuania, and 58 per cent in Belgium. With a share of approx. 20 per cent and more than 720 TWh, the US is the largest producer worldwide of electricity from nuclear power. As far as the aggregate

  3. Nuclear power plants in the world, as of December 31, 1983. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    A List of Nuclear Power Plants all over the world is made every year by JAIF, based on an annual survey on reactors in operation, under construction, on oder, and planned throughout the world. The English version of the List is published now for the second time. The present survey was to find the present status of the world's nuclear power plants as of the end December 1983 as well as changes or new developments during 1983 in the countries listed. The results of the survey are 302 reactors in operation for 198,508.6 MWe, 210 reactors under construction for 205,852 MWe, 13 reactors on order for 10,038 MWe and 134 planned reactors for 134,902 MWe, a total of 659 reactors and a total gross nuclear power generating capacity of 549,300.6 MWe. (author)

  4. French 900 MWe PWR PSA preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanore, J.M.; Brisbois, J.

    1988-10-01

    A PSA is performed by the Safety Assessment Department of CEA for a 900 MWe standardized plant. The paper presents the objectives, the scope of the study and the relative preliminary results. Some general insights are drawn, especially the benefit related to the implementation of emergency procedures

  5. Probabilistic safety assessment of French 900 and 1,300 MWe nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brisbois, J.; Lanore, J.M.

    1991-08-01

    Although reactor design is mainly governed by deterministic principles in France, the probabilistic approach has been considered an important aid to safety analysis since the early seventies. Various partial probabilistic studies have been performed by Electricite de France, by IPSN and by Framatome, for various types of reactor. In particular, these studies have made it possible to assess the reliability and availability of nuclear power plants safety systems as well as the probability of accident scenarios and have helped to define technical specifications (especially, allowed operating times in the event of a partial unavailability of safety systems). Simultaneously, evaluation methods and corresponding software have been widely developed. Besides. EDF has implemented the Systeme de Recueil de Donnees de Fiabilite - SRDF (Reliability Data Collection System) which allows follow-up of equipment behaviour on all the operating units, and has led to a particularly representative data base. In 1982 the decision was taken at IPSN to carry out a complete PSA for a standard reactor of the 900 MWe type, and in 1986 EDF launched an equivalent study on a 1,300 MWe reactor, taking Unit 3 Paluel as reference. These PSAs were terminated in the course of the first quarter of 1990

  6. Probabilistic safety assessment of French 900 and 1,300 MWe nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brisbois, J.; Lanore, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    Although reactor design is mainly governed by deterministic principles in France, the probabilistic approach has been considered an important aid to safety analysis since the early seventies. Various partial probabilistic studies have been performed by Electricite de France, by IPSN and by Framatome, for various types of reactor. In particular, these studies have made it possible to assess the reliability and availability of nuclear power plants safety systems as well as the probability of accident scenarios and have helped to define technical specifications (especially, allowed operating times in the event of a partial unavailability of safety systems). Simultaneously, evaluation methods and corresponding software have been widely developed. Besides. EDF has implemented the Systeme de Recueil de Donnees de Fiabilite - SRDF (Reliability Data Collection System) which allows follow-up of equipment behaviour on all the operating units, and has led to a particularly representative data base. In 1982 the decision was taken at IPSN to carry out a complete PSA for a standard reactor of the 900 MWe type, and in 1986 EDF launched an equivalent study on a 1,300 MWe reactor, taking Unit 3 Paluel as reference. These PSAs were terminated in the course of the first quarter of 1990. (author)

  7. Economic viability of present-day biomass energy installations; Wirtschaftlichkeit von heutigen Biomasse-Energieanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markus Sommerhalder, M; Schelske, O [Ernst Basler und Partner AG, Zuerich (Switzerland); Nussbaumer, T [Verenum, Zuerich (Switzerland); Engeli, H [Engeli Engineering, Neerach (Switzerland); Membrez, Y; Ndoh, M; Tacchini, C [EREP SA, Aclens (Switzerland)

    2007-03-15

    This illustrated, comprehensive report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) takes a look at the economic viability of biomass energy installations. The installations examined included wood-fired installations, biogas installations and those using bio-diesel and bio-ethanol. The system boundaries involved are defined and various factors that influence cost calculations are examined. The resulting heat and electricity prices for various energy sources and systems are presented and discussed. Examples of small and large-scale installations are presented. For wood-energy, combined heat and power system producing electricity at powers of 1 to 5 MWe are looked at and the various factors influencing their viability are discussed. Biogas installations of various sizes are discussed and the differing investment costs involved are commented on. Here, large industrial installations using communal green wastes are also examined and the influence of communal waste-collection charges on the price for the electricity generated is discussed, as is the influence of the market for the residual compost produced. The production and use of biogas in public wastewater treatment plants is also looked at, including the use of co-substrates. As far as biogenic liquid fuels such as bio-diesel and bio-ethanol are concerned, the report takes a brief look at the situation concerning installations in Switzerland and reviews the production costs involved. Various conclusions are drawn for the various energy sources reviewed as well as for the prices for heat and electrical energy obtained.

  8. Design of megawatt power level heat pipe reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcclure, Patrick Ray [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Poston, David Irvin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dasari, Venkateswara Rao [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reid, Robert Stowers [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-12

    An important niche for nuclear energy is the need for power at remote locations removed from a reliable electrical grid. Nuclear energy has potential applications at strategic defense locations, theaters of battle, remote communities, and emergency locations. With proper safeguards, a 1 to 10-MWe (megawatt electric) mobile reactor system could provide robust, self-contained, and long-term power in any environment. Heat pipe-cooled fast-spectrum nuclear reactors have been identified as a candidate for these applications. Heat pipe reactors, using alkali metal heat pipes, are perfectly suited for mobile applications because their nature is inherently simpler, smaller, and more reliable than “traditional” reactors. The goal of this project was to develop a scalable conceptual design for a compact reactor and to identify scaling issues for compact heat pipe cooled reactors in general. Toward this goal two detailed concepts were developed, the first concept with more conventional materials and a power of about 2 MWe and a the second concept with less conventional materials and a power level of about 5 MWe. A series of more qualitative advanced designs were developed (with less detail) that show power levels can be pushed to approximately 30 MWe.

  9. Exergy analysis of biomass organic Rankine cycle for power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, T. B.; Sunoto

    2018-02-01

    The study examines proposed small biomass-fed Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) power plant through exergy analysis. The system consists of combustion burner unit to utilize biomass as fuel, and organic Rankine cycle unit to produce power from the expander. The heat from combustion burner was transfered by thermal oil heater to evaporate ORC working fluid in the evaporator part. The effects of adding recuperator into exergy destruction were investigated. Furthermore, the results of the variations of system configurations with different operating parameters, such as the evaporating pressures, ambient temperatures, and expander pressures were analyzed. It was found that the largest exergy destruction occurs during processes are at combustion part, followed by evaporator, condenser, expander, and pump. The ORC system equipped with a recuperator unit exhibited good operational characteristics under wide range conditions compared to the one without recuperator.

  10. The impact of the CO_2 separation system integration with a 900 MW_e power unit on its thermodynamic and economic indices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Łukowicz, Henryk; Mroncz, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the thermal cycle of a supercritical 900 MW_e condensing power plant which meets the “capture ready” requirements. The CO_2 separation method selected for the analysis is chemical absorption using MEA (monoethanolamine) or ammonia as sorbent. The indispensable scope of the turbine system upgrade necessitated by the incorporation of the carbon dioxide separation installation is proposed. The change in indices of the power unit operation after integration with the capture installation is presented for different variants of the retrofit. If MEA is used for carbon dioxide separation, the smallest drop in electric power can be observed in the case of hard coal for added stages at the intermediate pressure part outlet. In the case of lignite, the most favourable upgrade solution in terms of the smallest drop in electric power is elimination of one low pressure part and a backpressure turbine is added at the same time. If ammonia is used as sorbent, the best upgrade solution in terms of the smallest drop in electric power is the variant with more stages added at the IP part outlet, regardless of the type of fuel. An economic analysis is conducted for the proposed variants. - Highlights: • Impact of steam extraction on the turbine operation. • Adding more stages at the intermediate pressure part outlet. • Installing a backpressure turbine. • Eliminating one of the operating low pressure parts. • Economic assessment of proposed variants.

  11. Nuclear power plants: 2004 atw compact statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2005-01-01

    In late 2004, nuclear power plants were available for power supply or were under construction in 32 countries worldwide. A total of 441 nuclear power plants, i.e. two plants more than in late 2003, were in operation with an aggregate gross power of approx. 386 GWe and an aggregate net power, respectively, of 362 GWe, in 31 countries. The available capacity of nuclear power plants increased by approx. 5 GWe as a result of the additions by the six units newly commissioned: Hamaoka 5 (Japan), Ulchin 6 (Korea), Kalinin 3 (Russia), Khmelnitski 2 (Ukraine), Qinshan II-2 (People's Republic of China), and Rowno 4 (Ukraine). In addition, unit 3 of the Bruce A nuclear power plant in Canada with a power of 825 MWe was restarted after an outage of many years. Contrary to earlier plans, a recommissioning program was initiated for the Bruce A-1 and A-2 units, which are also down at present. Five plants were decommissioned for good in 2004; Chapelcross 1 to 4 with 50 MWe each in the United Kingdom, and Ignalina 1 with 1 300 MWe in Lithuania. 22 nuclear generating units with an aggregate gross power of 19 GWe in nine countries were under construction in late 2004. In India, construction work was started on a new project, the 500 MWe PFBR prototype fast breeder reactor. In France, the EDF utility announced its intention to build an EPR on the Flamanville site beginning in 2007. (orig.)

  12. Biomass CCS study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavezzali, S.

    2009-11-15

    The use of biomass in power generation is one of the important ways in reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Specifically, the cofiring of biomass with coal could be regarded as a common feature to any new build power plant if a sustainable supply of biomass fuel is readily accessible. IEA GHG has undertaken a techno-economic evaluation of the use of biomass in biomass fired and co-fired power generation, using post-combustion capture technology. This report is the result of the study undertaken by Foster Wheeler Italiana.

  13. Optimal Sizing of a Hybrid Grid-Connected Photovoltaic–Wind–Biomass Power System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnau González

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid renewable energy systems (HRES are a trendy alternative to enhance the renewable energy deployment worldwide. They effectively take advantage of scalability and flexibility of these energy sources, since combining two or more allows counteracting the weaknesses of a stochastic renewable energy source with the strengths of another or with the predictability of a non-renewable energy source. This work presents an optimization methodology for minimum life cycle cost of a HRES based on solar photovoltaic, wind and biomass power. Biomass power seeks to take advantage of locally available forest wood biomass in the form of wood chips to provide energy in periods when the PV and wind power generated are not enough to match the existing demand. The results show that a HRES combining the selected three sources of renewable energy could be installed in a rural township of about 1300 dwellings with an up-front investment of US $7.4 million, with a total life cycle cost of slightly more than US $30 million. Such a system would have benefits in terms of energy autonomy and environment quality improvement, as well as in term of job opportunity creation.

  14. Numerical simulation of a hybrid CSP/Biomass 5 MWel power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, João; Oliveira, Armando

    2017-06-01

    The fundamental benefit of using renewable energy systems is undeniable since they rely on a source that will not run out. Nevertheless, they strongly depend on meteorological conditions (solar, wind, etc.), leading to uncertainty of instantaneous energy supply and consequently to grid connection issues. An interesting concept is renewable hybridisation. This consists in the strategic combination of different renewable sources in the power generation portfolio by taking advantage of each technology. Hybridisation of concentrating solar power with biomass denotes a powerful way of assuring system stability and reliability. The main advantage is dispatchability through the whole extent of the operating range. Regarding concentrating solar power heat transfer fluid, direct steam generation is one of the most interesting concepts. Nevertheless, it presents itself technical challenges that are mostly related to the two-phase fluid flow in horizontal pipes, as well as the design of an energy storage system. Also, the use of reheat within the turbine is usually indirectly addressed, hindering system efficiency. These challenges can be addressed through hybridisation with biomass. In this paper, a hybrid renewable electricity generation system is presented. The system relies on a combination of solar and biomass sources to drive a 5 MWel steam turbine. System performance is analysed through numerical simulation using Ebsilon professional software. The use of direct reheat in the turbine is addressed. Results show that hybridisation results in an enhancement of system dispatchability and generation stability. Furthermore, hybridisation enhanced the annual solar field and power block efficiencies, and thus the system annual efficiency (from 7.6% to 20%). The use of direct reheat eliminates steam wetness in the last turbine stage and also improves system efficiency.

  15. Intelligent Control Framework for the Feeding System in the Biomass Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Jin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an intelligent control framework for biomass drying process with flue gases based on FLC (fuzzy logic controller and CAN (Controller Area Network bus. In the operation of a biomass drying process, in order to get the biomass with the set-point low moisture content dried by waste high temperature flue gases, it is necessary to intelligent control for the biomass flow rate. Use of an experiment with varied materials at different initial moisture contents enables acquisition of the biomass flow rates as initial setting values. Set the error between actual straw moisture content and set-point, and rate of change of error as two inputs. the biomass flow rate can be acquired by the fuzzy logic computing as the output. Since the length of dryer is more than twenty meters, the integration by the CAN bus can ensure real-time reliable data acquisition and processing. The control framework for biomass drying process can be applied to a variety of biomass, such as, cotton stalk, corn stalk, rice straw, wheat straw, sugar cane. It has strong potential for practical applications because of its advantages on intelligent providing the set-point low moisture content of biomass feedstock for power generation equipment.

  16. Biomass Power Generation through Direct Integration of Updraft Gasifier and Stirling Engine Combustion System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jai-Houng Leu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomass is the largest renewable energy source in the world. Its importance grows gradually in the future energy market. Since most biomass sources are low in energy density and are widespread in space, small-scale biomass conversion system is therefore more competitive than a large stand-alone conversion plant. The current study proposes a small-scale solid biomass power system to explore the viability of direct coupling of an updraft fixed bed gasifier with a Stirling engine. The modified updraft fixed bed gasifier employs an embedded combustor inside the gasifier to fully combust the synthetic gas generated by the gasifier. The flue gas produced by the synthetic gas combustion inside the combustion tube is piped directly to the heater head of the Stirling engine. The engine will then extract and convert the heat contained in the flue gas into electricity automatically. Output depends on heat input. And, the heat input is proportional to the flow rate and temperature of the flue gas. The preliminary study of the proposed direct coupling of an updraft gasifier with a 25 kW Stirling engine demonstrates that full power output could be produced by the current system. It could be found from the current investigation that no auxiliary fuel is required to operate the current system smoothly. The proposed technology and units could be considered as a viable solid biomass power system.

  17. Sewage sludge conditioning with the application of ash from biomass-fired power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcik, Marta; Stachowicz, Feliks; Masłoń, Adam

    2018-02-01

    During biomass combustion, there are formed combustion products. Available data indicates that only 29.1 % of biomass ashes were recycled in Poland in 2013. Chemical composition and sorptive properties of ashes enable their application in the sewage sludge treatment. This paper analyses the impact of ashes from biomass-combustion power plant on sewage sludge dewatering and higienisation. The results obtained in laboratory tests proved the possitive impact of biomass ashes on sewage sludge hydration reduction after dewatering and the increase of filtrate volume. After sludge conditioning with the use of biomass combustion by-products, the final moisture content decreased by approximatelly 10÷25 % in comparison with raw sewage sludge depending on the method of dewatering. The application of biomass combustion products in sewage sludge management could provide an alternative method of their utilization according to law and environmental requirements.

  18. Biomass gasification for electric power generation. Biomassa vergassing voor elektriciteitsopwekking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croezen, H J

    1992-10-01

    Attention is paid to power generation by means of the use of synthesis gas, produced by biomass gasification, in internal combustion engines and gas turbines. Descriptions are given of the biomass gasification process and several types of gasifiers: cocurrent or downcraft gasifiers, countercurrent gasifiers, crosscurrent gasifiers and fluidized bed gasifiers. The first aim of this report is to assess which gasifier is the most appropriate gasifier to be used in combination with an internal combustion engine or a gas turbine. The second aim is to determine the quality of the biomass fuel, which must be gasified in a particular gasifier. In chapter two the notion biomass is discussed, and in chapter three attention is paid to the gasification process. An overview of the characteristics of available gasifiers is presented in chapter four (performance, quality of the synthesis gas and the biomass fuel, investment costs, and state of the art). In chapter five and six the internal combustion engine and the gas turbine are dealt with, as well as the experiences with and the consequences of the use of synthesis gas. Also the economic feasibility of the application of combined gasifier/engine systems and gasifier/gas turbine systems is discussed. 39 figs., 20 tabs., 43 refs.

  19. 2012 nuclear power world report; Kernenergie Weltreport 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2013-06-15

    At the end of 2012, 437 nuclear power plants were available for energy supply in 31 countries of the world. This means that the number was unchanged compared to the previous year's number on 31 December 2011. The aggregate gross power of the plants amounted to approx. 392,793 MWe, the aggregate net power, to 372,572 MWe. This indicates a slight increase of gross and net capacity (gross: 389,367 MWe, net: 369,371 MWe) Two units were commissioned in 2012; 1 unit in China and the Republic of Korea each. Two reactors in Canada resumed commercial operation after a long-term shutdown. The units have been layed-up since the mid 1990ies. Four units were shut down permanently in 2012; 2 units in the United Kingdom, and one unit in Canada and Spain each. The shut-downs in the United Kingdom and Canada have been planned on a long-term base. 68 nuclear generating units - 5 more than at the end of 2011 - were under construction in late 2012 in 14 countries with an aggregate gross power of approx. 70,933 MWe and net power of approx. 66,244 MWe. 9 new projects have been started in 2012 in 3 countries (China, United Arab Emirates, USA). Worldwide, some 110 new nuclear power plants are in the concrete project design, planning, and licensing phases; in some of these cases license applications have been submitted or contracts have already been signed. Some 100 further projects are planned. Net electricity generation in nuclear power plants worldwide in 2012 achieved a level of approx. 2,346.16 billion kWh (2011: approx. 2,497.1 billion kWh). The main cause for the lower production have been the permanent shut-downs of almost all nuclear power plants in Japan since the natural disaster on 11 March 2011. Since the first generation of electricity in a nuclear power plant in the EBR-I fast breeder (USA) on December 20, 1951, cumulated net production has reached approx. 67,946 billion kWh, and operating experience has grown to some 15,050 reactor years. (orig.)

  20. Nuclear power 2005: European report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, nuclear power plants were operated and/or built in eighteen European countries. Thirteen of these countries are members of EU-25. Five of the ten countries joining the European Union on May 1, 2004 operate nuclear power stations. A total of 204 power reactors with a gross power of 181,030 MWe and a net power of 171,8479 MWe were in operation at the end of the year. In 2005, no nuclear power plant was commissioned. Two nuclear power plants were decommissioned in Europe in the course of 2005. In Germany the Obrigheim NPP and in Sweden the Barsebaeck 2 NPP have been permanently shut down due to political decisions. As a result of ongoing technical optimization in some plants, involving increases in reactor power or generator power as well as commissioning of plants of higher capacity, nuclear generating capacity increased by approx. 1.6 GW. In late 2005, five nuclear generating units were under construction in Finland (1), Romania (1), and Russia (3). 148 nuclear power plants were operated in thirteen states of the European Union (EU-25). They had an aggregate gross power of 137,023 MWe and a net power of 130,415 MWe, generating approx. 970 billion gross kWh of electricity in 2005, thus again contributing some 31% to the public electricity supply in the EU-25. In largest share of nuclear power in electricity generation is found in France (80%), followed by 72% in Lithuania, 55% in the Slovak Republic, 55% in Belgium, and 51% in Ukraine. In several countries not operating nuclear power plants of their own, such as Italy, Portugal, and Austria, nuclear power makes considerable contributions to public electricity supply as a result of electricity imports. (All statistical data in the country report apply to 2004 unless indicated otherwise. This is the year for which sound preliminary data are currently available for the states listed.) (orig.)

  1. Development of low cost systems for co-utilisation of biomass in large power plant. Mid term review report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingston, W.R.

    2003-07-01

    Interest in the cofiring of biomass materials with coal in large coal-fired power stations in the UK has increased significantly in recent years in response to the potential additional income from Renewables Obligation Certificates (ROCs). It is anticipated that most coal-fired power stations in the UK will have the capability to cofire biomass materials by the end of 2003. This mid-term review report examines the various stages in the route to fully commercial operation of biomass cofiring at coal-fired power stations, the availability of suitable biomass materials in the UK and the technical options for cofiring. The factors affecting the economics of biomass cofiring in large coal-fired boilers are discussed including the delivered price of biofuels, the future value of ROCs, the development costs of cofiring projects, the 25% ceiling on cofiring imposed by the Renewables Obligation Order 2002 and the use of preblending. An overview of the current status of cofiring in the UK is presented, which includes a summary of the results of trials already carried out by operators of coal-fired power stations and a discussion of the future prospects for biomass cofiring in the UK.

  2. Efficient Biomass Fuel Cell Powered by Sugar with Photo- and Thermal-Catalysis by Solar Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Gong, Yutao; Wu, Weibing; Yang, Weisheng; Liu, Congmin; Deng, Yulin; Chao, Zi-Sheng

    2018-06-19

    The utilization of biomass sugars has received great interesting recently. Herein, we present a highly efficient hybrid solar biomass fuel cell that utilizes thermal- and photocatalysis of solar irradiation and converts biomass sugars into electricity with high power output. The fuel cell uses polyoxometalates (POMs) as photocatalyst to decompose sugars and capture their electrons. The reduced POMs have strong visible and near-infrared light adsorption, which can significantly increase the temperature of the reaction system and largely promotes the thermal oxidation of sugars by the POM. In addition, the reduced POM functions as charge carrier that can release electrons at the anode in the fuel cell to generate electricity. The electron-transfer rates from glucose to POM under thermal and light-irradiation conditions were investigated in detail. The power outputs of this solar biomass fuel cell are investigated by using different types of sugars as fuels, with the highest power density reaching 45 mW cm -2 . © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Input of biomass in power plants for power generation. Calculation of the financial gap. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Tilburg, X.; De Vries, H.J.; Pfeiffer, A.E.; Cleijne, J.W.

    2005-09-01

    The Ministry of Economic Affairs has requested ECN and KEMA to answer two questions. (1) Are the costs and benefits of projects in which wood-pellets are co-fired in a coal fired power plant representative for those of bio-oil fueled co-firing projects in a gas fired plant?; and (2) Are new projects representative for existing projects? To answer these questions, ECN and KEMA have calculated the financial gaps in six different situations: co-firing bio-oil in a gas fired power plant; co-firing bio-oil in a coal fired power plant; gasification of solid biomass; co-firing wood pellets in a coal fired power plant; co-firing agricultural residues in a coal fired power plant; and co-firing waste wood (A- and B-grade) in a coal fired power plant. The ranges and reference cases show that co-firing bio-oil on average has a smaller financial gap than the solid biomass reference case. On average it can also be concluded that when using waste wood or agro-residues, the financial gaps are smaller. Based on these findings it is concluded that: (1) The reference case of co-firing wood pellets in a coal fired power plant are not representative for bio-fuel options. A new category for bio-oil options seems appropriate; and (2) The financial gap of new projects as calculated in November 2004, is often higher then the ranges for existing projects indicate [nl

  4. Source terms associated with two severe accident sequences in a 900 MWe PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fermandjian, J.; Evrard, J.M.; Berthion, Y.; Lhiaubet, G.; Lucas, M.

    1983-12-01

    Hypothetical accidents taken into account in PWR risk assessment result in fission product release from the fuel, transfer through the primary circuit, transfer into the reactor containment building (RCB) and finally release to the environment. The objective of this paper is to define the characteristics of the source term (noble gases, particles and volatile iodine forms) released from the reactor containment building during two dominant core-melt accident sequences: S 2 CD and TLB according to the ''Reactor Safety Study'' terminology. The reactor chosen for this study is a French 900 MWe PWR unit. The reactor building is a prestressed concrete containment with an internal liner. The first core-melt accident sequence is a 2-break loss-of-coolant accident on the cold leg, with failure of both system and the containment spray system. The second one is a transient initiated by a loss of offsite and onsite power supply and auxiliary feedwater system. These two sequences have been chosen because they are representative of risk dominant scenarios. Source terms associated with hypothetical core-melt accidents S 2 CD and TLB in a French PWR -900 MWe- have been performed using French computer codes (in particular, JERICHO Code for containment response analysis and AEROSOLS/31 for aerosol behavior in the containment)

  5. Modification to 200 MW(e) CANDU for improved dynamic behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamany, B.F.; Murthy, L.G.K.; Ray, R.N.

    1976-01-01

    Rajasthan Atomic Power Station is inherently suitable for base load operation. Its control philosophy is based on turbine following the reactor. However, due to load fluctuations and inherent limitation of the control system, there had been considerable number of outages of the station. This limitation is further enhanced by improper choice of the operating pressure range of the boilers. Besides, existing fuel design does not permit thermal cycling and hence there is no use in attempting to make the reactor follow the turbine. Design modifications have been suggested for incorporation in the further 200 MW(e) systems. The method adopted is complete decoupling of the reactor from the load. Dynamic behaviour of the station with the suggested modifications and its comparison with the existing situation has been brought out. (author)

  6. Some failures of diesel generators during commissioning tests of 1300 MWe PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colas, A.F.; Morzelle, C.

    1985-10-01

    During commissioning tests of the French 1300 MWe units, which are equipped with different diesel generator from the 900 MWe units, some devices and components failures were experienced. These components include: Alarm sensors on fuel, lubricating, cooling circuits; Injection pumps and speed governors; Fuel delivery; Vibrations of fuel and lubrication lines. This paper shows how and when the above elements can affect the reliability of Diesel-generator units and how commissioning tests should show the defects

  7. Combined heat and power production through biomass gasification with 'Heatpipe-Reformer'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliev, I.; Kamburova, V.; Terziev, A.

    2013-01-01

    The current report aims is to analyze the system for combined heat and power production through biomass gasification with “heatpipe-reformer” system. Special attention is paid on the process of synthetic gas production in the Reformer, its cleaning and further burning in the co-generation unit. A financial analysis is made regarding the investments and profits generated by the combined heat and power production. (authors)

  8. Economic feasibility of biomass gasification for power generation in three selected communities of northwestern Ontario, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhyay, Thakur Prasad; Shahi, Chander; Leitch, Mathew; Pulkki, Reino

    2012-01-01

    Biomass gasification is expected to be an attractive option among other competitive applications of biomass conversion for bio-energy. This study analyzes economic feasibility of biomass gasification power generating plants in three selected communities (Ignace, Nipigon and Kenora) of northwestern Ontario. The major variables considered in the model are harvesting and handling costs, logistic costs for biomass feedstock delivery and storage, capital costs of power plant by scales, operation and maintenance costs, labor costs, capital financing costs and other regulatory costs. GIS analysis was undertaken to estimate the distance class matrix to apportion the biomass feedstock supply side from different forest management units. Total cost per MW h power production at a 50 MW scale ranges from CAD 61.89 to CAD 63.79. Total cost per unit of electricity production decreases significantly as plant capacity increases due to economy of scale in the production system. Further, the locations of plants explained the cost variability. - Highlights: ► We model feasibility of gasification power plants in three rural communities. ► The variables considered in the model are logistics, operational and capital costs. ► Mean distance from each community to different forest units are estimated with GIS. ► Total cost per MWh at a 50 MW scale ranges from CAD 61.89 to CAD 63.79. ► Total cost decreases with increase in plant capacity.

  9. Gas-cooled reactor power systems for space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    Efficiency and mass characteristics for four gas-cooled reactor power system configurations in the 2- to 20-MWe power range are modeled. The configurations use direct and indirect Brayton cycles with and without regeneration in the power conversion loop. The prismatic ceramic core of the reactor consists of several thousand pencil-shaped tubes made from a homogeneous mixture of moderator and fuel. The heat rejection system is found to be the major contributor to system mass, particularly at high power levels. A direct, regenerated Brayton cycle with helium working fluid permits high efficiency and low specific mass for a 10-MWe system

  10. Exergy analysis of a coal/biomass co-hydrogasification based chemical looping power generation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Linbo; Yue, Guangxi; He, Boshu

    2015-01-01

    Power generation from co-utilization of coal and biomass is very attractive since this technology can not only save the coal resource but make sufficient utilization of biomass. In addition, with this concept, net carbon discharge per unit electric power generation can also be sharply reduced. In this work, a coal/biomass co-hydrogasification based chemical looping power generation system is presented and analyzed with the assistance of Aspen Plus. The effects of different operating conditions including the biomass mass fraction, R_b, the hydrogen recycle ratio, R_h_r, the hydrogasification pressure, P_h_g, the iron to fuel mole ratio, R_i_f, the reducer temperature, T_r_e, the oxidizer temperature, T_o_x, and the fuel utilization factor, U_f of the SOFC (solid oxide fuel cell) on the system operation results including the energy efficiency, η_e, the total energy efficiency, η_t_e, the exergy efficiency, η_e_x, the total exergy efficiency, η_t_e_x and the carbon capture rate, η_c_c, are analyzed. The energy and exergy balances of the whole system are also calculated and the corresponding Sankey diagram and Grassmann diagram are drawn. Under the benchmark condition, exergy efficiencies of different units in the system are calculated. η_t_e, η_t_e_x and η_c_c of the system are also found to be 43.6%, 41.2% and 99.1%, respectively. - Highlights: • A coal/biomass co-hydrogasification based chemical looping power generation system is setup. • Sankey and Grassmann diagrams are presented based on the energy and exergy balance calculations. • Sensitivity analysis is done to understand the system operation characteristics. • Total energy and exergy efficiencies of this system can be 43.6% and 41.2%, respectively. • About 99.1% of the carbon contained in coal and biomass can be captured in this system.

  11. Systems analysis of a 100-MWe modular liquid metal cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, E.E.; Rhow, S.K.; Switick, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    The response of a 100-MWe modular liquid metal cooled reactor to unprotected loss of flow and/or loss of primary heat removal accidents is analyzed using the systems analysis code SASSYS. The reactor response is tracked for the first 1000 s following a postulated upset in the primary heat removal system. The calculations do not take credit for the functioning of any decay heat removal other than through the secondary system. In addition to the power rating, other features of the reactor are an average sodium temperature rise of 148 K, a sodium void worth (counting the core and upper axial blanket) of 1.89 $, and 3.6 $ of Doppler feedback due to a uniform e-fold fuel temperature increase

  12. Understanding Biomass Ignition in Power Plant Mills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwarzer, Lars; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Glarborg, Peter

    2017-01-01

    . This is not very well explained by apply-ing conventional thermal ignition theory. An experimental study at lab scale, using pinewood as an example fuel, was conducted to examine self-heating and self-ignition. Supplemental experiments were performed with bituminous coal. Instead of characterizing ignition......Converting existing coal fired power plants to biomass is a readily implemented strategy to increase the share of renewable energy. However, changing from one fuel to another is not straightforward: Experience shows that wood pellets ignite more readily than coal in power plant mills or storages...... temperature in terms of sample volume, mass-scaling seems more physically correct for the self-ignition of solids. Findings also suggest that the transition between self-heating and self-ignition is controlled both by the availability of reactive material and temperature. Comparison of experiments at 20...

  13. Some failures of diesel-generators during commissioning tests of 1300 MWe PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colas, A.F.; Morzelle, C.

    1986-01-01

    During commissioning tests of the French 1300 MWe units, which are equipped with different diesel generator from the 900 MWe units, some devices and components failures were experienced. These components include: - Alarm sensors on fuel, lubricating, cooling circuits. - Injection pumps and speed governors. - Fuel delivery. - Vibrations of fuel and lubrication lines. This paper will try to show how and when the above elements can affect the reliability of Diesel-generator units and how commissioning tests should show the defects. (authors)

  14. Some failures of diesel-generators during commissioning tests of 1300 MWe PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colas, A. F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Institut de Protection et Surete Nucleaire, Departement d' Analyse de Surete, CEA/IPSN, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Fontenay-aux-Roses, B.P. No. 6, 92260 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Morzelle, C. [Service Etudes et Projets Thermiques et Nucleaires, EdF Lyon (France)

    1986-02-15

    During commissioning tests of the French 1300 MWe units, which are equipped with different diesel generator from the 900 MWe units, some devices and components failures were experienced. These components include: - Alarm sensors on fuel, lubricating, cooling circuits. - Injection pumps and speed governors. - Fuel delivery. - Vibrations of fuel and lubrication lines. This paper will try to show how and when the above elements can affect the reliability of Diesel-generator units and how commissioning tests should show the defects. (authors)

  15. Obligations and characteristics applicable to the French unit of the 1400 MWe series. Adaptation to the 900 and 1300 MWe series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, M.

    1985-10-01

    This report presents the directives concerning the obligations and the main characteristics of the nuclear PWR units of 1400 MWe, notified Electricite de France on the 06th of October 1983 by the Industry and Research Department. They reflect the concept of defence in depth [fr

  16. Biomass thermochemical conversion - overview of results; Biomassan jalostus - tutkimusalueen katsaus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sipilae, K. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Production Technologies

    1995-12-31

    In this Bioenergy research program the thermochemical conversion activities are mainly concentrated in three fields (1) flash pyrolysis and the use of wood oil in boilers and engines (2) biomass gasification for gas engine power plants and finally (3) conversion of black liquor and extractives in a pulp mill to various liquid fuels. Parallel to activities in Finland also significant work has been done in EU-Joule and Apas projects and in the IEA Bioenergy Agreement. In the area of flash pyrolysis technology, three new laboratory and PDU-units have been installed to VTT in order to produce various qualities of bio oils from wood and straw. The quality of pyrolysis oils have been characterized by physical and chemical methods supported by EU and IEA networks. Several companies are carrying out pyrolysis activities as well: Neste Oy is testing the wood oil in a 200 kW boiler, Waertsilae Diesel Oy is testing Canadian wood oil in a 1.5 MWe diesel power plant engine and Vapo Oy is carrying out investigations to produce pyrolysis oils in Finland. The biomass gasification coupled to a gas engine is an interesting alternative for small scale power production parallel to existing fluid bed boiler technology. VTT has installed a circulating fluid bed gasifier with advanced gas cleaning system to test various technologies in order to feed the gas to an engine. In order to produce liquid fuels at a pulp mill, the laboratory work has continued using crude soap as a raw material for high pressure liquid phase treatment and atmospheric pyrolysis process. The quality of the oil is like light fuel oil or diesel fuel, possibilities to use it as a lubricant will be investigated

  17. Biomass thermochemical conversion - overview of results; Biomassan jalostus - tutkimusalueen katsaus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sipilae, K [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Production Technologies

    1996-12-31

    In this Bioenergy research program the thermochemical conversion activities are mainly concentrated in three fields (1) flash pyrolysis and the use of wood oil in boilers and engines (2) biomass gasification for gas engine power plants and finally (3) conversion of black liquor and extractives in a pulp mill to various liquid fuels. Parallel to activities in Finland also significant work has been done in EU-Joule and Apas projects and in the IEA Bioenergy Agreement. In the area of flash pyrolysis technology, three new laboratory and PDU-units have been installed to VTT in order to produce various qualities of bio oils from wood and straw. The quality of pyrolysis oils have been characterized by physical and chemical methods supported by EU and IEA networks. Several companies are carrying out pyrolysis activities as well: Neste Oy is testing the wood oil in a 200 kW boiler, Waertsilae Diesel Oy is testing Canadian wood oil in a 1.5 MWe diesel power plant engine and Vapo Oy is carrying out investigations to produce pyrolysis oils in Finland. The biomass gasification coupled to a gas engine is an interesting alternative for small scale power production parallel to existing fluid bed boiler technology. VTT has installed a circulating fluid bed gasifier with advanced gas cleaning system to test various technologies in order to feed the gas to an engine. In order to produce liquid fuels at a pulp mill, the laboratory work has continued using crude soap as a raw material for high pressure liquid phase treatment and atmospheric pyrolysis process. The quality of the oil is like light fuel oil or diesel fuel, possibilities to use it as a lubricant will be investigated

  18. Present status and future development of Qinshan nuclear power project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang Yu

    1987-01-01

    Qinshan 300 MWe Nuclear power Project is the first domestically designed and constructed nuclear power plant in China. Here is a brief description of its progress in design work, equipment manufacture and site construction since the first structural concrete in March 1985. In Qinshan area four units of 600 MWe each are planned to be built with collaboration of proper foreign partners. (author)

  19. Interpretation of out of line control rod experiments for 1300 MWE PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leroy, J.L.; Garcia-Fernandez, L.

    1988-01-01

    The present note summarizes the studies we performed recently in order to search a 2D reconstruction procedure for the 1300 MWE PWR power shape, starting from data coming out from thermocouples placed on several fuel assemblies. In classical PWR design, only a few assemblies are equipped with measurement devices, so that it is necessary to interpolate among measure points in order to obtain a complete coverage of the core. A mathematical approach based on the splitting of the power into a reference steady state nominal shape and some ''influence'' and harmonic functions was chosen. The reference steady state power shape, which corresponds to the full power operating mode, is obtained via direct mobile chamber measurements. The perturbations due to the control rod movements are accounted for by specific ''influence'' functions: moreover, harmonics are used to reconstruct the minor effects due to xenon tilts, rod out of line positions and all actual mechanical and thermohydraulic inhomogeneities. The weighting coefficients of the functions are evaluated by a least square method, starting from the distribution of the deviations among the measurements and the reference values.

  20. Advanced circulating fluidised bed technology (CFB) for large-scale solid biomass fuel firing power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaentti, Timo; Zabetta, Edgardo Coda; Nuortimo, Kalle [Foster Wheeler Energia Oy, Varkaus (Finland)

    2013-04-01

    Worldwide the nations are taking initiatives to counteract global warming by reducing their greenhouse gas emissions. Efforts to increase boiler efficiency and the use of biomass and other solid renewable fuels are well in line with these objectives. Circulating fluidised bed boilers (CFB) are ideal for efficient power generation, capable to fire a broad variety of solid biomass fuels from small CHP plants to large utility power plants. Relevant boiler references in commercial operation are made for Finland and Poland.

  1. Biomass power industry: Assessment of key players and approaches for DOE and industry interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report reviews the status of the US biomass power industry. The topics of the report include current fuels and the problems associated with procuring, transporting, preparing and burning them, competition from natural gas projects because of the current depressed natural gas prices, need for incentives for biomass fueled projects, economics, market potential and expansion of US firms overseas

  2. The power control system of the Siemens-KWU nuclear power station of the PWR [pressurized water reactors] type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, Horacio

    1989-01-01

    Starting with the first nuclear power plant constructed by Siemens AG of the pressurized light water reactor line (PWR), the Obrigheim Nuclear Power Plant (340 MWe net), until the recently constructed plants of 1300 MWe (named 'Konvoi'), the design of the power control system of the plant was continuously improved and optimized using the experience gained in the operation of the earlier generations of plants. The reactor power control system of the Siemens - KWU nuclear power plants is described. The features of this design and of the Siemens designed heavy water power plants (PHWR) Atucha I and Atucha II are mentioned. Curves showing the behaviour of the controlled variables during load changes obtained from plant tests are also shown. (Author) [es

  3. Energy production from biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bestebroer, S.I.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the task group 'Energy Production from Biomass', initiated by the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs, was to identify bottlenecks in the development of biomass for energy production. The bottlenecks were identified by means of a process analysis of clean biomass fuels to the production of electricity and/or heat. The subjects in the process analysis are the potential availability of biomass, logistics, processing techniques, energy use, environmental effects, economic impact, and stimulation measures. Three categories of biomass are distinguished: organic residual matter, imported biomass, and energy crops, cultivated in the Netherlands. With regard to the processing techniques attention is paid to co-firing of clean biomass in existing electric power plants (co-firing in a coal-fired power plant or co-firing of fuel gas from biomass in a coal-fired or natural gas-fired power plant), and the combustion or gasification of clean biomass in special stand-alone installations. 5 figs., 13 tabs., 28 refs

  4. Heat transfer and fluid flow research relevant to India's nuclear power program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, S.K.; Venkatraj, V.

    1988-01-01

    The Indian Nuclear Power Programme envisages three important stages viz., installation of thermal reactors, fast reactors and utilization of Thorium. By the year 2000 AD, it is proposed to have an installed total capacity of nuclear power of about 10,000 MWe. Starting from the present installed capacity of 1330 MWe, the additional contribution will be mainly made by thermal power reactors of the Pressurized Heavy Water type (PHWR). Apart from the reactors presently under construction about 12 numbers of 235 MWe units are planned to be constructed, which will be based on the standardized design of the reactors at Narora Atomic Power Project (NAPP). In addition, 10 units of 500 MWe capacity each, the design for which is currently under progress, will also be installed. The design, construction and operating agency is the Nuclear Power Board (NPB), while the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) is responsible for the research and development work required. In addition to the programme on thermal power reactors, a thermal research reactor (DHRUVA) of 100 MWth capacity has been designed, constructed and has been commissioned. Some of the important heat transfer and fluid flow research problems relevant to the Indian nuclear power and research reactors are discussed in this paper

  5. Technical Manual for the SAM Biomass Power Generation Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorgenson, J.; Gilman, P.; Dobos, A.

    2011-09-01

    This technical manual provides context for the implementation of the biomass electric power generation performance model in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) System Advisor Model (SAM). Additionally, the report details the engineering and scientific principles behind the underlying calculations in the model. The framework established in this manual is designed to give users a complete understanding of behind-the-scenes calculations and the results generated.

  6. Techno-Environmental Assessment Of Co-Gasification Of Low-Grade Turkish Lignite With Biomass In A Trigeneration Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirabedin Ehsan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Trigeneration or Combined Cooling, Heat and Power (CCHP which is based upon combined heat and power (CHP systems coupled to an absorption chiller can be recognized as one of the best technologies recovering biomass effectively to heat, cooling and power. Co-gasification of the lignite and biomass can provide the possibility for safe and effective disposal of different waste types as well as for sustainable and environmentally-friendly production of energy. In this article, a trigeneration system based on an IC engine and gasifier reactor has been simulated and realized using Thermoflex simulation software. Performance results suggest that utilization of sustainably-grown biomass in a Tri-Generation Power Plant (TGPP can be a possibility for providing cooling, heat and power demands with local renewable sources and reducing the environmental impacts of the energy conversion systems.

  7. Centralised electricity production from winter cereals biomass grown under central-northern Spain conditions: Global warming and energy yield assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sastre, C.M.; Maletta, E.; González-Arechavala, Y.; Ciria, P.; Santos, A.M.; Val, A. del; Pérez, P.; Carrasco, J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We assess the sustainability of electricity production from winter cereals biomass. • Productivity ranks are generated from different genotypes cultivated in real farms. • GHG and energy balances show better performance compared to natural gas electricity. • Cereals yields below 8 odt/ha do not accomplish objective 60% of GHG savings. • Marginal yields and sustainability criteria are discussed suggesting optimization. - Abstract: The goal of this paper is to assess the sustainability of electricity production from winter cereals grown in one of the most important Spanish agricultural areas, Castilla y León Region, situated in central-northern Spain. This study analyses greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions and energy balances of electricity production in a 25 MWe power plant that was powered using straw biomass from three annual winter cereals (rye, triticale and oat) grown as dedicated energy crops. The results of these analyses were compared with those of electricity produced from natural gas in Spanish power plants. Assessments were performed using a wide range of scenarios, mainly based on the biomass yield variability obtained in demonstration plots of twelve different winter cereal genotypes. Demonstration plots were established in two different locations (provinces of Soria and León) of the Castilla y León Region during two crop seasons (2009/2010 and 2010/2011) using common management practices and input rates for rain-fed agriculture in these regions. Our results suggest that production of electricity from winter cereals biomass combustion yielded considerable reductions in terms of GHG emissions when compared to electricity from natural gas. Nevertheless, the results show that low biomass yields that are relatively frequent for Spanish farmers on low productivity lands may produce no significant reductions in GHG in comparison with electricity from natural gas. Consequently, the agronomic management of winter cereals should be re

  8. The potential impact of externalities considerations on the market for biomass power technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swezey, B.G.; Porter, K.L.; Feher, J.S.

    1995-01-01

    Of all the renewable energy sources used for power generation, biomass energy has experienced the greatest growth over the last decade. Spurred by requirements established in the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA), as well as various tax incentives, biomass-based power generation now provides more than 50 billion kWh of electric energy from 10,000 MW of installed capacity. The overwhelming majority of this capacity, primarily wood-based, has been developed by the nonutility sector. However, the biomass industry is currently facing more difficult market conditions due to a reduction in federal incentives and changes in the generation market, such as lower utility avoided costs, slower demand growth, and greater competition among both generators and fuel sources. States are increasingly contemplating the inclusion of market externalities costs and benefits associated with different generation options in electricity resource planning and procurement decisions. Market externalities, as they relate to generation resources and technologies, represent impacts that are not wholly reflected in the market price of electricity derived from these sources. These impacts, which can be either positive or negative, can encompass environmental, economic and other social factors, but state considerations have focused predominantly on environmental externalities costs, especially air emissions. The explicit quantification of externalities could measurably affect the competitive standing of various energy resources and technologies in future generation resource acquisitions. This paper summarizes work undertaken to assess the status the externalities considerations in state and utility electricity resource planning processes and to determine how externalities considerations might help or hinder future development of biomass power plants. (author)

  9. Nuclear power: European report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2005-01-01

    In 2004, nuclear power plants were operated and/or built in eighteen European countries. Thirteen of these countries are members of EU-25. Five of the ten countries joining the European Union on May 1, 2004 operate nuclear power stations. A total of 206 power reactors with a gross power of 181,941 MWe and a net power of 172,699 MWe were in operation at the end of the year. In 2004, one nuclear power plant was commissioned in Russia (Kalinin 3), two (Kmelnitzki 2 and Rowno 4) in Ukraine. Five nuclear power plants were decommissioned in Europe in the course of 2004. As announced in 2000, the Chapelcross 1 to Chapelcross 4 plants in Britain were shut down for economic reasons. In Lithuania, the Ignalina 1 unit was disconnected from the power grid, as had been demanded by the EU Commission within the framework of the negotiations about the country's accession to the EU. As a result of ongoing technical optimization in some plants, involving increases in reactor power or generator power as well as commissioning of plants of higher capacity, nuclear generating capacity increased by approx. 1.5 GW. In late 2004, four nuclear generating units were under construction in Finland (1), Romania (1), and Russia (2). 150 nuclear power plants were operated in thirteen states of the European Union (EU-25), which is sixteen more than the year before as a consequence of the accession of new countries. They had an aggregate gross power of 137,943 MWe and a net power of 131,267 MWe, generating approx. 983 billion gross kWh of electricity in 2003, thus again contributing some 32% to the public electricity supply in the EU-25. In largest share of nuclear power in electricity generation is found in Lithuania (80%), followed by 78% in France, 57% in the Slovak Republic, 56% in Belgium, and 46% in Ukraine. In several countries not operating nuclear power plants of their own, such as Italy, Portugal, and Austria, nuclear power makes considerable contributions to public electricity supply as

  10. Alkali deposits found in biomass boilers: The behavior of inorganic material in biomass-fired power boilers -- Field and laboratory experiences. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, L.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility; Miles, T.R.; Miles, T.R. Jr. [Miles (Thomas R.), Portland, OR (United States); Jenkins, B.M. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States); Dayton, D.C.; Milne, T.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Bryers, R.W. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Oden, L.L. [Bureau of Mines, Albany, OR (United States). Albany Research Center

    1996-03-01

    This report documents the major findings of the Alkali Deposits Investigation, a collaborative effort to understand the causes of unmanageable ash deposits in biomass-fired electric power boilers. Volume 1 of this report provide an overview of the project, with selected highlights. This volume provides more detail and discussion of the data and implications. This document includes six sections. The first, the introduction, provides the motivation, context, and focus for the investigation. The remaining sections discuss fuel properties, bench-scale combustion tests, a framework for considering ash deposition processes, pilot-scale tests of biomass fuels, and field tests in commercially operating biomass power generation stations. Detailed chemical analyses of eleven biomass fuels representing a broad cross-section of commercially available fuels reveal their properties that relate to ash deposition tendencies. The fuels fall into three broad categories: (1) straws and grasses (herbaceous materials); (2) pits, shells, hulls and other agricultural byproducts of a generally ligneous nature; and (3) woods and waste fuels of commercial interest. This report presents a systematic and reasonably detailed analysis of fuel property, operating condition, and boiler design issues that dictate ash deposit formation and property development. The span of investigations from bench-top experiments to commercial operation and observations including both practical illustrations and theoretical background provide a self-consistent and reasonably robust basis to understand the qualitative nature of ash deposit formation in biomass boilers. While there remain many quantitative details to be pursued, this project encapsulates essentially all of the conceptual aspects of the issue. It provides a basis for understanding and potentially resolving the technical and environmental issues associated with ash deposition during biomass combustion. 81 refs., 124 figs., 76 tabs.

  11. Thermo-mechanical design and structural analysis of the first wall for ARIES-III, A 1000 MWeD-3He power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sviatoslavsky, I.; Blanchard, J.P.; Mogahed, E.A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on ARIES III, a conceptual design study of a 1000 MWe D- 3 He tokamak fusion power reactor in which most of the energy comes from charged particle transport, bremsstrahlung and synchrotron radiation, and only a small fraction (∼ 4%) comes form neutrons. This form of energy is deposited as surface heating on the chamber first wall (FW) and divertor elements, while the neutron energy is deposited as bulk nuclear heating within the shield. Since this reactor does not use tritium, there is no breeding blanket. Instead a shield is provided to protect the magnets from neutrons. The Fw is very unique in a D- 3 He reactor, it must be capable of absorbing the high surface heat in a mode suitable for efficient power cycle conversion, it must be able to reflect synchrotron radiation, and it must be able to withstand high current plasma disruptions. The FW is made of a low activation ferritic steel (MHT-9) and is cooled with an organic coolant (HB-40) at a pressure of 2 MPa. The FW has a coating of 0.01 cm tungsten on the MHT-9, followed by 0.15 cm of Be on the plasma side. This is needed for synchrotron radiation reflection and as a melt layer to guard against the thermal effects of a plasma disruption

  12. Assessment of the way of biomass transportation to the coal power plant with regard to the limitation of emissions of CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamkiewicz, A.; Zenczak, W.

    2014-01-01

    One from the activities taken in Poland in aim of limitation of CO 2 , emission is coal and biomass combustion together in one boiler. Biomass is delivered to power station Dolna Odra in Szczecin by trucks, which are also a source of CO 2 , emission. The paper presents results of comparative analysis of CO 2 , emission from trucks during transportation of biomass to power station with actual reduction of emission through power station as result of substitution of part of coal by biomass.

  13. New advanced small and medium nuclear power reactors: possible nuclear power plants for Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dussol, R.J.

    2003-01-01

    In recent years interest has increased in small and medium sized nuclear power reactors for generating electricity and process heat. This interest has been driven by a desire to reduce capital costs, construction times and interest during construction, service remote sites and ease integration into small grids. The IAEA has recommended that the term 'small' be applied to reactors with a net electrical output less than 300 MWe and the term 'medium' to 300-700 MWe. A large amount of experience has been gained over 50 years in the design, construction and operation of small and medium nuclear power reactors. Historically, 100% of commercial reactors were in these categories in 1951-1960, reducing to 21% in 1991-2000. The technologies involved include pressurised water reactors, boiling water reactors, high temperature gas-cooled reactors, liquid metal reactors and molten salt reactors. Details will be provided of two of the most promising new designs, the South African Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) of about 110 MWe, and the IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure) reactor of about 335 MWe. Their construction costs are estimated to be about US$l,000/kWe with a generating cost for the PBMR of about US1.6c/kWh. These costs are lower than estimated for the latest designs of large reactors such as the European Pressurised Reactor (EPR) designed for 1,600 MWe for use in Europe in the next decade. It is concluded that a small or medium nuclear power reactor system built in modules to follow an increasing demand could be attractive for generating low cost electricity in many Australian states and reduce problems arising from air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions from burning fossil fuels

  14. Prospects of power ramping and cycling supervision in Finnish power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antila, M; Kaikkonen, H T [Imatran Voima Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Mannola, E [Teollisuuden Voima Oy Industries Kraft Ab, Helsinki (Finland)

    1983-06-01

    Since 1977 2x440 MWe PWR and 2x660 MWe BWR nuclear power has been taken in operation in Finland, which until the middle of 1982 has given favourable fuel operating experiences from 10 reactor years. This paper describes the core supervision systems of the plants especially from the viewpoint of ramp surveillance and the potentials and needs to improve the supervision capability to meet the future needs in case more load follow operation is required. As a special feature for Imatran Voima is the demand of general basic understanding of the behaviour of Loviisa reactors' fuel in different operating conditions. A possibility to investigate the fuel seem to be power cycling tests in Loviisa reactors. (author)

  15. Prospects of power ramping and cycling supervision in Finnish power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antila, M.; Kaikkonen, H.T.; Mannola, E.

    1983-01-01

    Since 1977 2x440 MWe PWR and 2x660 MWe BWR nuclear power has been taken in operation in Finland, which until the middle of 1982 has given favourable fuel operating experiences from 10 reactor years. This paper describes the core supervision systems of the plants especially from the viewpoint of ramp surveillance and the potentials and needs to improve the supervision capability to meet the future needs in case more load follow operation is required. As a special feature for Imatran Voima is the demand of general basic understanding of the behaviour of Loviisa reactors' fuel in different operating conditions. A possibility to investigate the fuel seem to be power cycling tests in Loviisa reactors. (author)

  16. ORC power plant for electricity production from forest and agriculture biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borsukiewicz-Gozdur, A.; Wiśniewski, S.; Mocarski, S.; Bańkowski, M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Results for three variants of CHP plant fuelled by sawmill biomass are presented. • Octamethyltrisiloxane, MDM, methanol and H 2 O working fluids was conducted in CHP. • CHP with internal regeneration and “dry” working fluid has the highest electric power. • Power output, drying heat and drying temperature depend on CHP variant and ORC fluid. - Abstract: The paper presents the calculation results for three variants of CHP plant fuelled by sawmill biomass. The plant shall produce electricity and heat for a drying chamber. An analysis of the system efficiency for four different working fluids was conducted: octamethyltrisiloxane, methylcyclohexane, methanol and water. The highest electric power was obtained for the system with internal regeneration and methylcyclohexane applied as the “dry” working fluid, the highest temperature to supply the drying chamber was obtained for the system with external regeneration and octamethyltrisiloxane applied as the working fluid. The results of the analysis indicate that, by proper choice of the working fluid and of the regeneration variant (internal or external), it is possible to “adjust” the work of the system to the needs and expectations of the plant investor (user)

  17. Repowering options for steam power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, H.; Gopalarathinam, R.

    1992-01-01

    Repowering an existing steam power plant with a gas turbine offers an attractive alternative to a new plant or life extension, especially for unit sizes smaller than 300 MWe. Gas turbine repowering improves thermal efficiency and substantially increases the plant output. Based on recent repowering studies and projects, this paper examines gas turbine repowering options for 100 MWe, 200 MWe and 300 MWe units originally designed for coal firing and currently firing either coal or natural gas. Also discussed is the option for a phased future conversion of the repowered unit to fire coal-derived gas, should there be a fluctuation in the price or availability of natural gas. A modular coal gasification plant designed to shorten the conversion time is presented. Repowering options, performance, costs, and availability impacts are discussed for selected cases

  18. Investigation of thermodynamic performances for two solar-biomass hybrid combined cycle power generation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Qibin; Bai, Zhang; Wang, Xiaohe; Lei, Jing; Jin, Hongguang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Two solar-biomass hybrid combined cycle power generation systems are proposed. • The characters of the two proposed systems are compared. • The on-design and off-design properties of the system are numerically investigated. • The favorable performances of thermochemical hybrid routine are validated. - Abstract: Two solar-biomass hybrid combined cycle power generation systems are proposed in this work. The first system employs the thermochemical hybrid routine, in which the biomass gasification is driven by the concentrated solar energy, and the gasified syngas as a solar fuel is utilized in a combined cycle for generating power. The second system adopts the thermal integration concept, and the solar energy is directly used to heat the compressed air in the topping Brayton cycle. The thermodynamic performances of the developed systems are investigated under the on-design and off-design conditions. The advantages of the hybrid utilization technical mode are demonstrated. The solar energy can be converted and stored into the chemical fuel by the solar-biomass gasification, with the net solar-to-fuel efficiency of 61.23% and the net solar share of 19.01% under the specific gasification temperature of 1150 K. Meanwhile, the proposed system with the solar thermochemical routine shows more favorable behaviors, the annual system overall energy efficiency and the solar-to-electric efficiency reach to 29.36% and 18.49%, while the with thermal integration concept of 28.03% and 15.13%, respectively. The comparison work introduces a promising approach for the efficient utilization of the abundant solar and biomass resources in the western China, and realizes the mitigation of CO_2 emission.

  19. The long term plan for the integration of nuclear power plants into the Turkish Electrical Power System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutukcuoglu, A.

    1974-03-01

    The report covers in detail the study of the expansion of the Turkish Electric Power System for the period 1980-1987. Load forecast is done by sectors and regions and inter-regions power balances gave the basis for the high voltage network configurations. Expansion alternatives are defined giving priority to hydroelectric projects, to local resources and nuclear power plants concurrently with conventional plants (lignite and oil). Several reactor strategies are analysed with LWR, HWR, FBR and HTGR power plants. Present worth value method is used for comparison of alternatives and sensitivity analysis is done for those ranked in the first places. Load flow, transient stability and frequency deviation studies of the power system are studied carefully by means of A.C. calculator and digital computer codes in order to see the influence of the introduction of large-sized power plants (600-750MW(e)) and their location in the power system. A 600MW(e) nuclear plant in 1983 and a second one of 750MW(e) in 1987 should, it is found, be commissioned into the system. The economic optimization was done with two computer programmes developed by KFA (Juelich): IACO for fuelling nuclear plant and RESTRAPO for power system with high hydroelectric component. The report is bound in three volumes: Volume I: Summary and Conclusions; Volume II: System Planning; Volume III: Electrical Survey

  20. The biomass valorization / the electric power in processes: innovation and challenges; valorisation de la biomasse / l'electricite dans les procedes: innovation et defis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahy, M [Agence de l' Environnement et de la Maitrise de l' Energie, ADEME, 75 - Paris (France); Leclercq, M [Ministere de l' Industrie, des Postes et Telecommunications et du Commerce Exterieur, 75 - Paris (France). Direction Generale de L' Energie et des Matieres Premieres; Gosse, G [Institut National de Recherches Agronomiques (INRA), 75 - Paris (France); Lacour, P A [AFOCEL, 34 - St Clement de Riviere (France); Ballerini, D; Duplan, J L; Monot, F [Institut Francais du Petrole (IFP), 69 - Lyon (France); Seiler, J M [CEA Grenoble, 38 (France); Ancelme, A [Syndicat National des Producteurs d' Alcools Agricoles (SNPAA), 92 - Neuilly (France); Vermeersch, G [Sofiproteol, 75 - Paris (France); Hervouet, V [Total, La Defense, 92 - Courbevoie (France); Rouveirolles, P [Renault, 92 6 Boulogne Billancourt (France); Bellot, M [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France); Pascual, C [ELYO Cylergie, 69 - Ecully (France); Girard, M [PRONOVIAL, 51 - Reims (France); Bernard, D [ARKEMA, 69 - Lyon (France); Dussaud, J; Vrevin, L [Ahlstrom Research and Services, Edinburgh, Midlothian (United Kingdom); Mentink, L [Roquette Freres (Italy)

    2005-07-01

    In a context of an insufficient offer on processes/technology, this day is devoted to the processes adapted to the biomass conversion in energy, fuels and other products. It provides presentations on the biomass economy and regulations, the different channels, the thermochemical processes to produce synthetic fuels and hydrogen, the ethanol production, refiners, automotive industry, an electric power, producer point of view, the byproducts. (A.L.B.)

  1. Biomass power production in Amazonia: Environmentally sound, economically productive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waddle, D.B. [National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, Washington, DC (United States); Hollomon, J.B. [Winrock International Institute for Agricultural Development, Arlington, VA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    With the support of the US Agency for International Development, the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) is assisting their utility counterparts in Bolivia to improve electric service in the country`s rural population. In remote areas, the cost of extending transmission lines to small communities is prohibitive, and diesel generators represent an expensive alternative, especially for baseload power. This has led to serious consideration of electric generating systems using locally available renewable resources, including biomass, hydro, wind, and solar energy. A project has recently been initiated in Riberalta, in the Amazonian region of Bolivia, to convert waste Brazil nut shells and sawmill residues to electricity. Working in tandem with diesel generators, the biomass-fired plant will produce base-load power in an integrated system that will be able to provide reliable and affordable electricity to the city. The project will allow the local rural electric cooperative to lower the price of electricity by nearly forty percent, enable the local Brazil nut industry to increase its level of mechanization, and reduce the environmental impacts of dumping waste shells around the city and in an adjacent river. The project is representative of others that will be funded in the future by NRECA/AID.

  2. Higher efficiency, lower bonuses. Financial incentives for power from biomass according to EEG 2012; Mehr Effizienz, weniger Boni. Die Foerderung von Strom aus Biomasse nach dem EEG 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Dominik [Ecologic Institute, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    The German parliament passed a total of eight new laws for the intended energy turnaround. Apart from changes in atomic law, the focus was on a complete amendment of the Renewables Act (EEG). The contribution outlines the new regulations for power generation from biomass from 2012. It indicates the changes from former regulations and describes the structural changes required for sustainable power supply from biomass, among others.

  3. Realizing vision of Dr. Homi Bhabha - first stage of nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhardwaj, S.A.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Dr. Homi Bhabha had a vision to harness nuclear energy for peaceful uses of mankind. Considering typical nuclear resources in the country, Dr Bhabha conceptualized the three stage nuclear power programme and gave a road map for its implementation. The robustness of the vision is such that the programme has not undergone a change in last five decades. The first stage of the three-stage programme, based on natural uranium fuelled Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) has been precursor to the nuclear power programme in India. This paper describes the developments in the last five decades. The establishment of research laboratories and reactors, training school for the manpower needs, industrial infrastructure and establishment of regulatory framework are briefly described. Setting up of first nuclear power reactor in the country as turnkey project and experience on operation of these reactors in India are discussed. The learning phase consisting of setting up of first PHWR in technical collaboration with Canada and design of 220 MWe PHWRs for MAPS is described. The safety features consistent with development of nuclear power globally were incorporated in Narora design and this became a standardized 220 MWe reactor of which many PHWRs of 220 MWe were set up. The experiences with operation of these small size reactors leading to internationally best operational experience in the year 2002 are discussed. The efforts of plant life extension, in-core maintenance jobs and other renovation and modernization jobs are discussed. The increase in unit size of 540 MWe, of which two reactors have been already set up, is explained in detail. The economies of scale demanded increase in the unit size and design of 700 MWe PHWR has been established and the salient features of this design are also discussed in detail. Eight reactors of 700 MWe each would complete the first stage of about 10,000 MWe PHWR programme and plans for setting up of these reactors are discussed

  4. Design, development and deployment of special sealing plug for 540 MWe PHWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, G.; Roy, S.; Patel, R.J.

    2012-01-01

    The coolant channel in Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors is a pressure boundary component and is very important for reactor performance and reactor safety. Monitoring the condition of the pressure tube of each coolant channel on a periodic basis is very important. In-Service Inspection (ISI) of the coolant channels in water filled condition is done regularly for 220 MWe PHWR. For the same purpose BARC Channel Inspection System is developed for 540 MWe PHWR also. Special Sealing Plug has been developed to facilitate the channel inspection (in water filled condition) with all necessary safety features at par with normal sealing plug. Special Sealing Plug provides a 50 mm through hole for passage of drive tube of Inspection Head maintaining integrity of PHT. Lot of challenges were faced for developing the Special Sealing Plug and its associated tools. It was a first of its kind design. First ISI of TAPS-4 was conducted successfully using this plug along with associated tools in November 2011. This development has provided immense help to NPCIL in life management of 540 MWe PHWR coolant channels. (author)

  5. Purchase of power by State Electricity Boards from biomass gasifier systems: formulating a long term national policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, B.C.

    1992-01-01

    Current policy for purchase of power from renewable sources of energy by State Electricity Boards in India is examined and certain changes in that policy are suggested. State Electricity Boards are reluctant to buy power from renewables as such a purchase is seen by the Boards as being of against their economic interests. But if socio-environmental and climatological costs of power of thermal plants are taken into consideration, it becomes imperative that a long term policy for power purchase from renewables by electricity boards will have to be followed. Such a policy is outlined. After giving formulae for unit cost of generation from thermal power plants, diesel generation (DG) sets and biomass gasification, it is recommended that basis for the purchase price for power generated through biomass gas should be the cost of generation through DG sets or cost of generation through biomass gasification whichever is lower. A clause for automatic price escalation should also be a part of such policy. Some measures to compensate electricity boards for purchase of power from renewables are suggested. They include levying of a special surcharge by boards on their electricity sales and funding by the Central Government. (M.G.B.)

  6. Nuclear power plants 1995 - a world survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    The atw Statistics Report compiled by atw lists 428 nuclear power plants with 363 397 gross MWe in operation in 30 countries in late 1995. Another 62 units with 55 180 gross MWe were under construction in 18 countries. This adds up to a total of 490 units with an aggregate 418 577 MWe. In the course of 1995 four units in four countries started commercial operation. In the survey of electricity generation in 1995 for which no information was made available from China and Kasachstan, a total of 417 nuclear power plants were covered. In the year under review they generated an aggregate 2 282 614 GWH, which is 3.4% more than in the previous year. The highest nuclear generation again was recorded in the USA with 705 771 GWh, followed by France with 377 021 GWh. The Grohnde power station in Germany attained the maximum annual production figure of 11 359 GWh. The survey includes nine tables indicating the generating performance of each nuclear power plant, the development of electricity generation in nuclear plants, and status of nuclear power plants at the end of 1995 arranged by countries, types of reactors, and reactor manufacturers. (orig.) [de

  7. Nuclear power: Europa report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2004-01-01

    Last year, 2003, nuclear power plants were available for energy supply, respectively, in 18 countries all over Europe. In 8 of the 15 member countries of the European Union (EU-15) nuclear power plants have been operation. In 7 of the 13 EU Candidate Countries (incl. Turkey) nuclear energy was used for power production. A total of 208 plants with an aggregate net capacity of 171 031 MWe and an aggregate gross capacity of 180 263 MWe were in operation at the end of 2003. No unit reached first criticality in 2003 or was connected to the grid. The unit Calder Hall 1 to Calder Hall 4 have been permanently shut down in Great Britain due to economical reasons and an earlier decision. In Germany the NPP Stade was closed. The utility E.ON has decided to shut down the plant due to the efforts of the liberalisation of the electricity markets. Last year, 8 plants were under construction in Romania (1), Russia (3), Slovakia (2 - suspended), and the Ukraine (2), that is only in East European Countries. The Finnish parliament approved plans for the construction of the country's fifth nuclear power reactor by a majority of 107 votes to 92. The consortium led by Framatome ANP was awarded the contract to build the new nuclear power plant (EPR, 1 600 MW) in Olkiluoto. In eight countries of the European Union 136 nuclear power plants have been operated with an aggregate gross capacity of 127 708 MWe and an aggregate net capacity of 121 709 MWe. Net electricity production in 2003 in the EU amounts to approx. 905 TWh gross, which means a share of about 33 per cent of the total production in the whole EU. Shares of nuclear power differ widely among the operator countries. They reach 80% in Lithuania, 78% in France, 57% in the Slovak Republic, 57% in Belgium, and 46% in the Ukraine. Nuclear power also provides a noticeable share in the electricity supply of countries, which operate no own nuclear power plants, e.g. Italy, Portugal, and Austria. (orig.)

  8. Preliminary studies leading to a conceptual design of a 1000 MWe fast neutron reactor; Etudes preliminaires conduisant a un concept de reacteur a neutrons rapides de 1000 MWe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vendryes, G.; Zaleski, C.P. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    This report presents the results of studies which seemed important to undertake in connexion with the development of fast neutron reactors. - It points out the advantage of high internal breeding ratios ({approx}1, 1) which are necessary in order to get a small change in time both in power distribution and reactivity (less: than 0.005 {delta}k/k in 18 months). - It shows how to achieve this goal, when simultaneously power distribution flattening is obtained. These results in a higher mean specific power (which is an economic gain) and therefore in a smaller doubling time (about 10 years). - It attempts to find criteria concerning the specific power that should be used in future reactor designs -It presents a conceptional design of a 1000 MWe fast neutron reactor, for the realisation of which no technological impossibility appears. - It shows that the dynamic behaviour seems satisfactory despite a positive total isothermal sodium coefficient. - It tries to predict the development of fast reactors within the future total nuclear program. It does not appear that fissile materials supply problems should in France slow down the development of fast neutron reactors, which will be essentially tied up to its economical ability to produce cheap electric power. (authors) [French] Ce rapport presente les etudes qu'il nous a paru important d'aborder dans le cadre du developpement des reacteurs a neutrons rapides. - Il met en evidence l'interet des taux de regeneration internes eleves ({approx}1, 1) pour obtenir une bonne evolution dans le temps de la distribution de puissance et de la reactivite (moins de 0,005 {delta}k/k pour 18 mois). - Il montre la possibilite d'y parvenir tout en applatissant la distribution des fissions, ce qui se traduit par une puissance specifique moyenne plus elevee (gain economique), et donc un temps de doublement plus faible de l'ordte de 10 ans - Il tente de definir un optimum de la puissance specifique valable pour les

  9. Preliminary studies leading to a conceptual design of a 1000 MWe fast neutron reactor; Etudes preliminaires conduisant a un concept de reacteur a neutrons rapides de 1000 MWe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vendryes, G; Zaleski, C P [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    This report presents the results of studies which seemed important to undertake in connexion with the development of fast neutron reactors. - It points out the advantage of high internal breeding ratios ({approx}1, 1) which are necessary in order to get a small change in time both in power distribution and reactivity (less: than 0.005 {delta}k/k in 18 months). - It shows how to achieve this goal, when simultaneously power distribution flattening is obtained. These results in a higher mean specific power (which is an economic gain) and therefore in a smaller doubling time (about 10 years). - It attempts to find criteria concerning the specific power that should be used in future reactor designs -It presents a conceptional design of a 1000 MWe fast neutron reactor, for the realisation of which no technological impossibility appears. - It shows that the dynamic behaviour seems satisfactory despite a positive total isothermal sodium coefficient. - It tries to predict the development of fast reactors within the future total nuclear program. It does not appear that fissile materials supply problems should in France slow down the development of fast neutron reactors, which will be essentially tied up to its economical ability to produce cheap electric power. (authors) [French] Ce rapport presente les etudes qu'il nous a paru important d'aborder dans le cadre du developpement des reacteurs a neutrons rapides. - Il met en evidence l'interet des taux de regeneration internes eleves ({approx}1, 1) pour obtenir une bonne evolution dans le temps de la distribution de puissance et de la reactivite (moins de 0,005 {delta}k/k pour 18 mois). - Il montre la possibilite d'y parvenir tout en applatissant la distribution des fissions, ce qui se traduit par une puissance specifique moyenne plus elevee (gain economique), et donc un temps de doublement plus faible de l'ordte de 10 ans - Il tente de definir un optimum de la puissance specifique valable pour les projets de reacteurs futurs

  10. Biomass Co-Firing in Suspension-Fired Power Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kær, Søren Knudsen; Hvid, Søren Lovmand; Baxter, Larry

    , in the future it is expected to become relevant to cofire in more advanced plants as the trend in the power plant structure is towards older plants having fewer operating hours or being decommissioned. A major product of this project is an experimentally validated computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based...... modelling tool adapted to accommodate biomass cofiring combustion features. The CFD tool will be able to predict deposit accumulation, particle conversion, fly ash composition, temperatures, velocities, and composition of furnace gases, etc. The computer model will primarily be used in the development...

  11. Design of 50 MWe HTR-PBMR reactor core and nuclear power plant fuel using SRAC2006 programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bima Caraka Putra; Yosaphat Sumardi; Yohannes Sardjono

    2014-01-01

    This research aims to assess the design of core and fuel of nuclear power plant type High Temperature Reactor-Pebble Bed Modular Reactor 50 MWe from the Beginning of Life (BOL) to Ending of life (EOL) with eight years operating life. The parameters that need to be analyzed in this research are the temperature distribution inside the core, quantity enrichment of U 235 , fuel composition, criticality, and temperature reactivity coefficient of the core. The research was conducted with a data set of core design parameters such as nuclides density, core and fuel dimensions, and the axial temperature distribution inside the core. Using SRAC2006 program package, the effective multiplication factor (k eff ) values obtained from the input data that has been prepared. The results show the value of the criticality of core is proportional to the addition of U 235 enrichment. The optimum enrichment obtained at 10.125% without the use of burnable poison with an excess reactivity of 3.1 2% at BOL. The addition Gd 2O3 obtained an optimum value of 12 ppm burnable poison with an excess reactivity 0.38 %. The use of Er 2O3 with an optimum value 290 ppm has an excess reactivity 1.24 % at BOL. The core temperature reactivity coefficient with and without the use of burnable poison has a negative values that indicates the nature of its inherent safety. (author)

  12. Thermodynamic optimization of biomass gasification for decentralized power generation and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buragohain, Buljit; Mahanta, Pinakeswar; Moholkar, Vijayanand S.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, biomass gasification has emerged as a viable option for decentralized power generation, especially in developing countries. Another potential use of producer gas from biomass gasification is in terms of feedstock for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis - a process for manufacture of synthetic gasoline and diesel. This paper reports optimization of biomass gasification process for these two applications. Using the non-stoichometric equilibrium model (SOLGASMIX), we have assessed the outcome of gasification process for different combinations of operating conditions. Four key parameters have been used for optimization, viz. biomass type (saw dust, rice husk, bamboo dust), air or equivalence ratio (AR = 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1), temperature of gasification (T = 400, 500, 600, 700, 800, 900 and 1000 o C), and gasification medium (air, air-steam 10% mole/mole mixture, air-steam 30%mole/mole mixture). Performance of the gasification process has been assessed with four measures, viz. molar content of H 2 and CO in the producer gas, H 2 /CO molar ratio, LHV of producer gas and overall efficiency of gasifier. The optimum sets of operating conditions for gasifier for FT synthesis are: AR = 0.2-0.4, Temp = 800-1000 o C, and gasification medium as air. The optimum sets of operating conditions for decentralized power generation are: AR = 0.3-0.4, Temp = 700-800 o C with gasification medium being air. The thermodynamic model and methodology presented in this work also presents a general framework, which could be extended for optimization of biomass gasification for any other application.

  13. IAEA’s Perspectives on Global Nuclear Power – Opportunities and Challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.K.

    2014-01-01

    Status of global nuclear power: 437 reactors in operation (374.5 GWe); 2 reactors in long-term shutdown; 149 reactors in permanent shutdown; 70 reactors under construction. [As of Sep. 2014] Latest connections to the grid: - Ningde-2, 1000 MW(e), PWR, China; - Atucha-2, 692 MW(e), PHWR, Argentina; - Fuqing-1, 1000 MW(e), PWR, China). [Website: http://www.iaea.org/pris/]. IAEA projections of nuclear power: • Sep. 2014: 374.5 GWe; • 2030 - low 400.6 GWe: 7.0% increase; - high 699.2 GWe: 86.7% increase; • 2050 - low 412.9 GWe: 10.3% increase; - high 1091.7 GWe: 191.5% increase

  14. 400-MWe consolidated nuclear steam system (CNSS). 1255 MWt CNSS design/cost update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    Since 1976 Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) has been extensively involved in the development of a medium-sized (1255 MWt/400 MWe) reactor. Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and through a contract with Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL), B and W investigated the feasibility of the concept for utility power generation and cogenerated process heat. The potential benefits of the design, called the Consolidated Nuclear Steam System (CNSS), were also identified. This study provides an update of the CNSS design and cost reflecting current regulatory requirements and operating reactor experience. The study was funded by DOE through ORNL and was performed by B and W and UE and C

  15. Comparative Evaluation of Biomass Power Generation Systems in China Using Hybrid Life Cycle Inventory Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huacai; Yin, Xiuli; Wu, Chuangzhi

    2014-01-01

    There has been a rapid growth in using agricultural residues as an energy source to generate electricity in China. Biomass power generation (BPG) systems may vary significantly in technology, scale, and feedstock and consequently in their performances. A comparative evaluation of five typical BPG systems has been conducted in this study through a hybrid life cycle inventory (LCI) approach. Results show that requirements of fossil energy savings, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reductions, as well as emission reductions of SO2 and NOx, can be best met by the BPG systems. The cofiring systems were found to behave better than the biomass-only fired system and the biomass gasification systems in terms of energy savings and GHG emission reductions. Comparing with results of conventional process-base LCI, an important aspect to note is the significant contribution of infrastructure, equipment, and maintenance of the plant, which require the input of various types of materials, fuels, services, and the consequent GHG emissions. The results demonstrate characteristics and differences of BPG systems and help identify critical opportunities for biomass power development in China. PMID:25383383

  16. Comparative Evaluation of Biomass Power Generation Systems in China Using Hybrid Life Cycle Inventory Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huacai Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been a rapid growth in using agricultural residues as an energy source to generate electricity in China. Biomass power generation (BPG systems may vary significantly in technology, scale, and feedstock and consequently in their performances. A comparative evaluation of five typical BPG systems has been conducted in this study through a hybrid life cycle inventory (LCI approach. Results show that requirements of fossil energy savings, and greenhouse gas (GHG emission reductions, as well as emission reductions of SO2 and NOx, can be best met by the BPG systems. The cofiring systems were found to behave better than the biomass-only fired system and the biomass gasification systems in terms of energy savings and GHG emission reductions. Comparing with results of conventional process-base LCI, an important aspect to note is the significant contribution of infrastructure, equipment, and maintenance of the plant, which require the input of various types of materials, fuels, services, and the consequent GHG emissions. The results demonstrate characteristics and differences of BPG systems and help identify critical opportunities for biomass power development in China.

  17. Input of biomass in power plants or the power generation. Calculation of the financial gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Vries, H.J.; Van Tilburg, X.; Pfeiffer, A.E.; Cleijne, H.

    2005-09-01

    The project on the title subject concerns two questions: (1) Are projects in which wood-pellets are co-fired in a coalfired power plant representative for bio-oil fueled co-firing projects in a gas-fired plant?; and (2) are new projects representative for existing projects? To answer those questions the financial gaps have been calculated for five different situations: Co-firing bio-oil in a gas-fired power plant; Co-firing bio-oil in a coal-fired power plant; Co-firing wood pellets in a coal-fired power plant; Co-firing agro-residues in a coal-fired power plant; and Co-firing waste-wood (A- and B-grade) in a coal-fired power plant. The ranges and reference cases in this report show that co-firing bio-oil on average has a smaller financial gap than the solid biomass reference case. On average it can also be concluded that by using waste wood or agro-residues, the financial gaps can decrease [nl

  18. Combined heat and power system with advanced gasification technology for biomass wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochida, S.; Abe, T.; Yasuda, T. [Nippon Furnace Kogyo Kaisha Ltd, Yokohama (Japan); Gupta, A.K. [Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Mechnical Engineering

    2013-07-01

    The results obtained from an advanced gasification system utilizing high temperature steam are presented here. The results showed successful demonstration of clean syngas production having high calorific value fuel ({proportional_to}10 MJ/m{sup 3}N) using woody biomass wastes in a downdraft type gasifier. The gasification capacity of the plant on dry basis was 60 kg/h. The syngas produced can be utilized in an absorption type chiller for air conditioning. This advanced gasification technology allows one to transform wastes to clean energy at local production sites without any environmental impact and expensive waste transportation costs. The experience gained from the demonstration plant allows one to implement to other industrial applications for use as a decentralized unit and obtain clean syngas for local use. The demonstration conducted here shows that the system is favorable for onsite use of compatible combined heat and power (CHP) system including light oil supported diesel engine power generator. The biomass waste fuel from a lumber mill factory was used in this study. The factory handles a wide forests area of about 50 ha and produces about 2,500 m{sup 3}/year of wood chips from thin out trees and waste lumbers. This translates to a maximum 110 kg/h of wood chips that can be fed to a gasifier. The syngas produced was used for the combined heat and power system. Local use of biomass for fuel reforming reduces the cost of collection and transportation costs so that a sustainable business is demonstrated with profit from the generated electricity and thermal energy. The cost structure incorporates both the depreciation cost and operation cost of the system. Thermal energy from hot water can be used for drying lumbers and wood chips in a cascade manner. The drying process can be adopted for enhancing its productivity with increased variability on the quality of lumber. The results show that the combined heat and power system (CHP) offers good profitable

  19. A financial evaluation of biomass-gasifier-based power generation in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, A.K.; Iyer, P.V.R.; Kandpal, T.C.

    1997-01-01

    A preliminary financial evaluation of biomass-gasifier-based power generation in India was undertaken. Simple cost functions were developed and used for this purpose. The unit cost of electricity has been estimated for a variety of scenarios taking into account some of the uncertainties associated with this emerging technology in India. (author)

  20. The biomass valorization / the electric power in processes: innovation and challenges; valorisation de la biomasse / l'electricite dans les procedes: innovation et defis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahy, M. [Agence de l' Environnement et de la Maitrise de l' Energie, ADEME, 75 - Paris (France); Leclercq, M. [Ministere de l' Industrie, des Postes et Telecommunications et du Commerce Exterieur, 75 - Paris (France). Direction Generale de L' Energie et des Matieres Premieres; Gosse, G. [Institut National de Recherches Agronomiques (INRA), 75 - Paris (France); Lacour, P.A. [AFOCEL, 34 - St Clement de Riviere (France); Ballerini, D.; Duplan, J.L.; Monot, F. [Institut Francais du Petrole (IFP), 69 - Lyon (France); Seiler, J.M. [CEA Grenoble, 38 (France); Ancelme, A. [Syndicat National des Producteurs d' Alcools Agricoles (SNPAA), 92 - Neuilly (France); Vermeersch, G. [Sofiproteol, 75 - Paris (France); Hervouet, V. [Total, La Defense, 92 - Courbevoie (France); Rouveirolles, P. [Renault, 92 6 Boulogne Billancourt (France); Bellot, M. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France); Pascual, C. [ELYO Cylergie, 69 - Ecully (France); Girard, M. [PRONOVIAL, 51 - Reims (France); Bernard, D. [ARKEMA, 69 - Lyon (France); Dussaud, J.; Vrevin, L. [Ahlstrom Research and Services, Edinburgh, Midlothian (United Kingdom); Mentink, L. [Roquette Freres (Italy)

    2005-07-01

    In a context of an insufficient offer on processes/technology, this day is devoted to the processes adapted to the biomass conversion in energy, fuels and other products. It provides presentations on the biomass economy and regulations, the different channels, the thermochemical processes to produce synthetic fuels and hydrogen, the ethanol production, refiners, automotive industry, an electric power, producer point of view, the byproducts. (A.L.B.)

  1. Sustainable model for financial viability of decentralized biomass gasifier based power projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palit, D.; Malhotra, R.; Kumar, Atul

    2011-01-01

    This paper made a modest attempt for designing a sustainable model for financial viability of biomass gasifier power projects for enhancing electricity access in India and other developing countries. For long term sustainability of distributed generation projects in remote rural areas, viability

  2. Scenarios for power production with biomass in the Finnish forest industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nousiainen, I.K.; Malinen, H.O.; Villa, A.O.

    1997-01-01

    This study presents three scenarios for power production with biomass in Finnish pulp and paper mills. The basic scenario assumes that the production capacity in the forest industry increases as in the past. The green energy scenario assumes that there is a strong demand from the market for sustainable green energy production. The maximum scenario assumes that the production capacity of chemical pulp increases significantly and the use of wood raw material extends to the maximum level. According to the basic scenario the use of biofuels in the pulp and paper mills will increase from starting level, 3.24 Mtoe in 1992, to 5.07 Mtoe by the year 2010. The utilization potential of biofuels will increase to 5.45 Mtoe in green energy and to 6.43 Mtoe in the maximum biofuels scenario. The power production with biomass will increase from the starting level, 572 MW in 1992, to 930 MW in the basic, to 1 100 MW in the green energy and to 1 670 MW in the maximum biofuels scenario by the year 2010. (author)

  3. Distributed renewable power from biomass and other waste fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Chris

    2012-03-01

    The world population is continually growing and putting a burden on our fossil fuels. These fossil fuels such as coal, oil and natural gas are used for a variety of critical needs such as power production and transportation. While significant environmental improvements have been made, the uses of these fuels are still causing significant ecological impacts. Coal power production efficiency has not improved over the past thirty years and with relatively cheap petroleum cost, transportation mileage has not improved significantly either. With the demand for these fossil fuels increasing, ultimately price will also have to increase. This presentation will evaluate alternative power production methods using localized distributed generation from biomass, municipal solid waste and other waste sources of organic materials. The presentation will review various gasification processes that produce a synthetic gas that can be utilized as a fuel source in combustion turbines for clean and efficient combined heat and power. This fuel source can produce base load renewable power. In addition tail gases from the production of bio-diesel and methanol fuels can be used to produce renewable power. Being localized can reduce the need for long and costly transmission lines making the production of fuels and power from waste a viable alternative energy source for the future.

  4. Comparative of fuel cycle cost for light water nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocic, A.; Dimitrijevic, Z.

    1978-01-01

    Starting from ost general fuel cycle scheme for light water reactors this article deals with conceptual differences of BWR, PWR and WWER as well as with the influence of certain phases of fuel cycle on economic parameters of an equivalent 1000 MWe reactor using a computer program CENA /1/ and typical parameters of each reactor type. An analysis of two particular power plants 628 MWe and 440 MWe WWER by means of the same program is given in the second part of this paper taking into account the differences of in-core fuel management. This second approach is especially interesting for the economy of the power plant itself in the period of planning. (author)

  5. The use of oxygen-enriched air for biomass gasification: initial scoping study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    The article reports an initial scoping study which is aimed at assessing the potential impact of using non-cryogenic oxygen, or oxygen-enriched air, for biomass gasification with respect to cost, design and operation of stationary biomass-fuelled generators in the range 5 to 15 MW(e). The study is expected to lead to identification of options worthy of more detailed study. The format of the scoping study is as follows: (i) using data on performance and cost from the manufacturers, minimum cost-saving potential is assessed; (ii) the performance and component costs of various gasifier types and engine types are reviewed to identify possible savings in monetary cost; (iii) an assessment of the likely impact of low-cost fuels is made and (iv) areas for detailed investigation are highlighted.

  6. A Co-Powered Biomass and Concentrated Solar Power Rankine Cycle Concept for Small Size Combined Heat and Power Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen Tortora

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The present work investigates the matching of an advanced small scale Combined Heat and Power (CHP Rankine cycle plant with end-user thermal and electric load. The power plant consists of a concentrated solar power field co-powered by a biomass furnace to produce steam in a Rankine cycle, with a CHP configuration. A hotel was selected as the end user due to its high thermal to electric consumption ratio. The power plant design and its operation were modelled and investigated by adopting transient simulations with an hourly distribution. The study of the load matching of the proposed renewable power technology and the final user has been carried out by comparing two different load tracking scenarios, i.e., the thermal and the electric demands. As a result, the power output follows fairly well the given load curves, supplying, on a selected winter day, about 50 GJ/d of thermal energy and the 6 GJ/d of electric energy, with reduced energy dumps when matching the load.

  7. Unit size limitations in smaller power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnach, J.S.

    1975-01-01

    The developing nations have generally found it an economic necessity to accept the minimum commercial size limit of 600 MWe. Smaller reactor sizes tendered as 'one off' specials carry high specific cost penalties which considerably weaken the competitiveness of nuclear versus conventional thermal plants. The revised IAEA market survey for nuclear power in developing countries (1974 edition) which takes account of the recent heavy escalation in oil prices, indicates a reasonable market for smaller size reactors in the range 150 MWe to 400 MWe, but until this market is approached seriously by manufacturers, the commercial availability and economic viability of smaller size reactors remains uncertain. (orig.) [de

  8. Biomass power generation in competitive markets - The impact of instruments and regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackermann, Thomas; Soeder, Lennart

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents and briefly evaluates the most important existing market instruments and market schemes which support the development of renewable energy generation as well as the impact of market regulations on the development of biomass power generation. The evaluation of the existing instruments focuses on the incentives provided by the various instruments to reduce production costs. The instruments and schemes are: Feed-in Tariffs, Net Metering, Bidding Process, Fixed Quotas, Green Certificate Trading, Green Power Exchange, Green Pricing. Feed-in tariffs and net metering are important instruments to get the different technologies 'off the ground', however, they can only be considered an interim solution as they do not necessarily lead to cost reduction. A bidding process is one way to achieve these cost reductions, but high transaction costs will support the development of large renewable energy projects, which is not always the desired effect. Fixed quotas combined with green certificate trading or a power exchange in combination with Green Pricing seem to lead to similar costs reduction, however, so far there is only limited experience with such instruments. The analysis of the impact of market regulations focuses on international electricity markets with a power exchange. Such markets exist, for example, in Scandinavia, England and Wales, Australia, New Zealand and California. The analysis showed that new distributed generation, for example based on biomass, faces significant market barriers. Furthermore, distributed generation is not treated equally within the market regulations compared to large-scale power generation

  9. Dynamic response of domes in CANDU 600 MWe containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, T.S.; Meng, V.; Alizadeh, A.

    1981-01-01

    CANDU reactors of the 600 MWe type are typically housed in a cylindrical prestressed concrete containment structure; rising from a flat slab and ending in a domed roof. The principal components of this structure are: (a) a circular base slab, (b) a vertical cylinder and (c) a spherical dome cap. A unique feature of a CANDU 600 MWe containment structure is the existence of an inner spherical concrete dome, located below the outer spherical dome, which serves as the bottom of a reservoir for the storage of 560,000 imperial gallons of douzing water. The thickness of the prestressed cylinder wall is approximately doubled between the two domes to create a ring beam. Inside the containment there exists an internal concrete structure which is independent of the containment structure except for support on the base slab. The containment boundary is a fully prestressed concrete structure. This paper deals with the seismic behaviour of the CANDU 600 MWe containment structure and the effect of its unique features; such as the lower dome and the douzing water on this behaviour. The objective of the study is to evaluate the interaction (coupling) effects between the different components of the structure. The approach taken is to study each component of the structure individually, then an assembly of the different components, and finally the total containment structure. This presentation is limited to the vertical response of the structure under a vertical earthquake only. Axisymmetric finite elements were used in all models. The vertical responses at selected points of the structure were obtained by the response spectrum method as well as the time-history method. It was observed that the response spectrum method over-estimates the vertical response of the domes and under-estimates the vertical responses of the ring girder and the containment cylinder compared to the time-history method. (orig./RW)

  10. Occupational exposure at a contemplated Belarussian power plant fired with contaminated biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Kasper Grann; Fogh, C.L.; Roed, Jørn

    1999-01-01

    To meet the current demand in Belarus for remediation of the vast forest areas that were contaminated by the Chernobyl accident and at the same time establish a much needed energy production, applying contaminated forest biomass as fuel in special power plants is being considered. This paper......-called 'big bags' filled with fly ash waste. Inhalation doses were estimated to be low. External doses received while working at the power plant do not appear to be highly significant compared with the doses from environmental contamination in the area where the power plant is expected to be constructed....

  11. Ocean thermal energy conversion power system development-I. Phase I. Preliminary design report. Volume 1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-18

    The results of a conceptual and preliminary design study of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) closed loop ammonia power system modules performed by Lockheed Missiles and Space Company, Inc. (LMSC) are presented. This design study is the second of 3 tasks in Phase I of the Power System Development-I Project. The Task 2 objectives were to develop: 1) conceptual designs for a 40 to 50-MW(e) closed cycle ammonia commercial plant size power module whose heat exchangers are immersed in seawater and whose ancillary equipments are in a shirt sleeve environment; preliminary designs for a modular application power system sized at 10-MW(e) whose design, construction and material selection is analogous to the 50 MW(e) module, except that titanium tubes are to be used in the heat exchangers; and 3) preliminary designs for heat exchanger test articles (evaporator and condenser) representative of the 50-MW(e) heat exchangers using aluminum alloy, suitable for seawater service, for testing on OTEC-1. The reference ocean platform was specified by DOE as a surface vessel with the heat exchanger immersed in seawater to a design depth of 0 to 20 ft measured from the top of the heat exchanger. For the 50-MW(e) module, the OTEC 400-MW(e) Plant Ship, defined in the Platform Configuration and Integration study, was used as the reference platform. System design, performance, and cost are presented. (WHK)

  12. Status and development of nuclear power program in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, C.T.

    1991-01-01

    The low availability in Korea of indigenous energy resources in the forms of water power and coal, and the oil squeeze in the seventies, have caused nuclear power to be expanded into the country's main primary energy source. Nine nuclear generating units with a cumulated power of 7616 MWe have been commissioned since 1978 and now contribute 36.2% to the power generating capacity of the country. In 1990, the nine nuclear plants converted 52.9 TWh of nuclear power into electricity, thus covering some 50% of the Korean electricity supply, as already in 1989. In the past three years, the electricity requirement rose by an annual 13.7%. In the light of a forecast continued rise by 5% to 8% annually up until 2006, the nuclear generating capacity then installed would have to be 23 229 MWe, which would be some 40% of the total generating capacity required. Under the long term energy plan of the Korean Energy Ministry, nine new nuclear generating units with an aggregate 8100 MWe will be built by 2001, and another nine units by the year 2006. (orig.) [de

  13. Characterization of biomass producer gas as fuel for stationary gas engines in combined heat and power production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrenfeldt, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this project has been the characterization of biomass producer gas as a fuel for stationary gas engines in heat and power production. More than 3200 hours of gas engine operation, with producer gas as fuel, has been conducted at the biomass gasification combined heat and power (CHP...... different measuring methods. Likewise, no particles were detected in the gas. Considerable amounts of NH3 were measured in the produced gas.An analysis of engine operation at varying load has been carried out. Standard emissions, load and efficiency have been measured at varying operating conditions ranging...... from 50% to 90% load. Biomass producer gas is an excellent lean burn engine fuel: Operation of a natural aspirated engine has been achieved for 1.2...

  14. Environmental and socioeconomic aspects in the strategic analysis of a biomass power plant integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varela, M.; Lechon, Y.; Saez, R.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the work was to assess the potential weaknesses and threats of the integration of a biomass power plant proposed in a depressed area of Spain as well as to analyse the inherent strengths and opportunities that such a project could have in economic, technical or environmental terms. For this purpose an analysis of site, biomass resources, problems associated to fuel mix combustion, electricity production and connection were assessed. The socioeconomic (employment, GDP effects or tax revenue impact) and environmental (human health, soil erosion, fertiliser application) outcomes associated with the proposed biomass scheme have been evaluated. Finally, a list of actions to take into account for successful implementation of this proposed project has been defined. (author)

  15. Evaluation of biogas and syngas as energy vectors for heat and power generation using lignocellulosic biomass as raw material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Camilo Solarte-Toro

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The use of nonrenewable energy sources to provide the worldwide energy needs has caused different problems such as global warming, water pollution, and smog production. In this sense, lignocellulosic biomass has been postulated as a renewable energy source able to produce energy carriers that can cover this energy demand. Biogas and syngas are two energy vectors that have been suggested to generate heat and power through their use in cogeneration systems. Therefore, the aim of this review is to develop a comparison between these energy vectors considering their main features based on literature reports. In addition, a techno-economic and energy assessment of the heat and power generation using these vectors as energy sources is performed. If lignocellulosic biomass is used as raw material, biogas is more commonly used for cogeneration purposes than syngas. However, syngas from biomass gasification has a great potential to be employed as a chemical platform in the production of value-added products. Moreover, the investment costs to generate heat and power from lignocellulosic materials using the anaerobic digestion technology are higher than those using the gasification technology. As a conclusion, it was evidenced that upgraded biogas has a higher potential to produce heat and power than syngas. Nevertheless, the implementation of both energy vectors into the energy market is important to cover the increasing worldwide energy demand.How to cite: Solarte-Toro JC, Chacón-Pérez Y, Cardona-Alzate CA. Evaluation of biogas and syngas as energy vectors for heat and power generation using lignocellulosic biomass as raw material. Electron J Biotechnol 2018:33. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejbt.2018.03.005 Keywords: Anaerobic digestion, Biogas power generation, Biomass gasification, Biomethane, Energy sources, Energy vectors, Heat generation, Lignocellulosic energy production, Power generation, Renewable energy, Syngas production

  16. Cofiring versus biomass-fired power plants: GHG (Greenhouse Gases) emissions savings comparison by means of LCA (Life Cycle Assessment) methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebastian, F.; Royo, J.; Gomez, M.

    2011-01-01

    One way of producing nearly CO 2 free electricity is by using biomass as a combustible. In many cases, removal of CO 2 in biomass grown is almost the same as the emissions for the bioelectricity production at the power plant. For this reason, bioelectricity is generally considered CO 2 neutral. For large-scale biomass electricity generation two alternatives can be considered: biomass-only fired power plants, or cofiring in an existing coal power plant. Among other factors, two important aspects should be analyzed in order to choose between the two options. Firstly, which is the most appealing alternative if their Greenhouse Gases (GHG) Emissions savings are taken into account. Secondly, which biomass resource is the best, if the highest impact reduction is sought. In order to quantify all the GHG emissions related to each system, a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) methodology has been performed and all the processes involved in each alternative have been assessed in a cradle-to-grave manner. Sensitivity analyses of the most dominant parameters affecting GHG emissions, and comparisons between the obtained results, have also been carried out.

  17. The french 900 MWe PWR PSA results and specificities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanore, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    A probabilistic Safety Assessment has been performed by the Safety Analysis Department of CEA for a 900 MWe standardized plant. The paper presents the objectives, the scope of the study and the level 1 results. Some general insights are drawn, especially the benefit related to the implementation of emergency procedures and the importance of risk during shutdown situations

  18. Optimal Level of Woody Biomass Co-Firing with Coal Power Plant Considering Advanced Feedstock Logistics System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangpil Ko

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Co-firing from woody biomass feedstock is one of the alternatives toward increased use of renewable feedstock in existing coal power plants. However, the economic level of co-firing at a particular power plant depends on several site-specific factors. Torrefaction has been identified recently as a promising biomass pretreatment option to lead to reduction of the feedstock delivered cost, and thus facilitate an increase in the co-firing ratio. In this study, a mixed integer linear program (MILP is developed to integrate supply chain of co-firing and torrefaction process and find the optimal level of biomass co-firing in terms of minimized transportation and logistics costs, with or without tax credits. A case study of 26 existing coal power plants in three Great Lakes States of the US is used to test the model. The results reveal that torrefaction process can lead to higher levels of co-firing, but without the tax credit, the effect is limited to the low capacity of power plants. The sensitivity analysis shows that co-firing ratio has higher sensitivity to variation in capital and operation costs of torrefaction than to the variation in the transportation and feedstock purchase costs.

  19. Biomass Gasification for Power Generation Internal Combustion Engines. Process Efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesme-Jaén, René; Garcia-Faure, Luis; Oliva-Ruiz, Luis; Pajarín-Rodríguez, Juan; Revilla-Suarez, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Biomass is a renewable energy sources worldwide greater prospects for its potential and its lower environmental impact compared to fossil fuels. By different processes and energy conversion technologies is possible to obtain solid, liquid and gaseous fuels from any biomass.In this paper the evaluation of thermal and overall efficiency of the gasification of Integral Forestry Company Santiago de Cuba is presented, designed to electricity generation from waste forest industry. The gasifier is a downdraft reactor, COMBO-80 model of Indian manufacturing and motor (diesel) model Leyland modified to work with producer gas. The evaluation was conducted at different loads (electric power generated) of the motor from experimental measurements of flow and composition of gas supplied to the engine. The results show that the motor operates with a thermal efficiency in the range of 20-32% with an overall efficiency between 12-25 %. (author)

  20. Central receiver solar thermal power system, phase 1. Progress report for period ending December 31, 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1976-04-01

    The program objective is the preliminary design of a 10 MWe pilot solar power plant supported by major subsystem experiments. Progress is reported on the following task elements: 10 MWe pilot plant; collector subsystem design and analysis; receiver subsystem requirements; receiver subsystem design; thermal storage subsystem; electrical power generation subsystem; and pilot plant architectural engineering and support. (WDM)

  1. Preliminary studies leading to a conceptual design of a 1000 MWe fast neutron reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vendryes, G.; Zaleski, C.P.

    1964-01-01

    This report presents the results of studies which seemed important to undertake in connexion with the development of fast neutron reactors. - It points out the advantage of high internal breeding ratios (∼1, 1) which are necessary in order to get a small change in time both in power distribution and reactivity (less: than 0.005 Δk/k in 18 months). - It shows how to achieve this goal, when simultaneously power distribution flattening is obtained. These results in a higher mean specific power (which is an economic gain) and therefore in a smaller doubling time (about 10 years). - It attempts to find criteria concerning the specific power that should be used in future reactor designs -It presents a conceptional design of a 1000 MWe fast neutron reactor, for the realisation of which no technological impossibility appears. - It shows that the dynamic behaviour seems satisfactory despite a positive total isothermal sodium coefficient. - It tries to predict the development of fast reactors within the future total nuclear program. It does not appear that fissile materials supply problems should in France slow down the development of fast neutron reactors, which will be essentially tied up to its economical ability to produce cheap electric power. (authors) [fr

  2. Overview of seismic resistant design of Indian Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, G.K.; Hawaldar, R.V.K.P.; Vinod Kumar

    2007-01-01

    Safe operation of a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) is of utmost importance. NPPs consist of various Structure, System and Equipment (SS and E) that are designed to resist the forces generated due to a natural phenomenon like earthquake. An earthquake causes severe oscillatory ground motion of short duration. Seismic resistant design of SS and E calls for evaluation of effect of severe ground shaking for assuring the structural integrity and operability during and after the occurrence of earthquake event. Overall exercise is a multi-disciplinary approach. First of standardized 220 MWe design reactor is Narora Atomic Power Station. Seismic design was carried out as per state of art then, for the first time. The twelve 220 MWe reactors and two 540 MWe reactors designed since 1975 have been seismically qualified for the earthquake loads expected in the region. Seismic design of 700 MWe reactor is under advanced stage of finalization. Seismic re-evaluation of six numbers of old plants has been completed as per latest state of art. Over the years, expertise have been developed at Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, prominent educational institutes, research laboratories and engineering consultants in the country in the area of seismic design, analysis and shake table testing. (author)

  3. Biomass from agriculture in small-scale combined heat and power plants - A comparative life cycle assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimming, M.; Sundberg, C.; Nordberg, A.; Baky, A.; Bernesson, S.; Noren, O.; Hansson, P.-A.

    2011-01-01

    Biomass produced on farm land is a renewable fuel that can prove suitable for small-scale combined heat and power (CHP) plants in rural areas. However, it can still be questioned if biomass-based energy generation is a good environmental choice with regards to the impact on greenhouse gas emissions, and if there are negative consequences of using of agricultural land for other purposes than food production. In this study, a simplified life cycle assessment (LCA) was conducted over four scenarios for supply of the entire demand of power and heat of a rural village. Three of the scenarios are based on utilization of biomass in 100 kW (e) combined heat and power (CHP) systems and the fourth is based on fossil fuel in a large-scale plant. The biomass systems analyzed were based on 1) biogas production with ley as substrate and the biogas combusted in a microturbine, 2) gasification of willow chips and the product gas combusted in an IC-engine and 3) combustion of willow chips for a Stirling engine. The two first scenarios also require a straw boiler. The results show that the biomass-based scenarios reduce greenhouse gas emissions considerably compared to the scenario based on fossil fuel, but have higher acidifying emissions. Scenario 1 has by far the best performance with respect to global warming potential and the advantage of utilizing a byproduct and thus not occupying extra land. Scenario 2 and 3 require less primary energy and less fossil energy input than 1, but set-aside land for willow production must be available. The low electric efficiency of scenario 3 makes it an unsuitable option.

  4. Improving 900 MW(e) PWR control rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouat, M.; Marcille, R.

    1983-01-01

    Analyses of the behaviour of operators during operating tests on PWR units and the lessons learned from the TMI-2 accident have demonstrated the need to improve the interface between operators and the facilities they control. To that end, and to complement its establishment of safety panels, Electricite de France (EDF) embarked upon a study on the ''Modification of Control Desks and Boards'' in control rooms. This study, involving twenty-eight 900 MW(e) units, almost all of which are currently in service, began with an ergonomic analysis of control rooms by an external consultant, the ADERSA GERBIOS Association. This analysis was based on interviews with simulator instructors and operators, a study of the operation of the unit, and a general review of previous studies. The analysis began in October 1980 and resulted, in April 1981, in a critical report and a proposal to create a full-scale mock-up of a 900 MW(e) control room. Improvements to this were subsequently proposed, enabling options to be made between, among other things, active overall control panels and function-by-function control panels. Finally, a number of general principles, which largely encompass the operators' suggestions, were defined. The alterations to be made will make it necessary to revamp the control panels completely. The work and tests involved should match the duration of refuelling shut-downs. Audio-visual training programmes are planned (portable model). (author)

  5. Management of radioactive waste nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dlouhy, Z.; Marek, J.

    1976-01-01

    The authors give a survey of the sources, types and amounts of radioactive waste in LWR nuclear power stations (1,300 MWe). The amount of solid waste produced by a Novovorenezh-type PWR reactor (2 x 400 resp. 1 x 1,000 MWe) is given in a table. Treatment, solidification and final storage of radioactive waste are shortly discussed with special reference to the problems of final storage in the CSR. (HR) [de

  6. Thermodynamic simulation of a multi-step externally fired gas turbine powered by biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durante, A.; Pena-Vergara, G.; Curto-Risso, P.L.; Medina, A.; Calvo Hernández, A.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A realistic model for an EFGT fueled with solid biomass is presented. • Detailed submodels for the HTHE and the chemical reactions are incorporated. • An arbitrary number of compression and expansion stages is considered. • Model validation leads to good agreement with experimental results. • A layout with two-stage compression leads to good efficiencies and power output. - Abstract: A thermodynamic model for a realistic Brayton cycle, working as an externally fired gas turbine fueled with biomass is presented. The use of an external combustion chamber, allows to burn dirty fuels to preheat pure air, which is the working fluid for the turbine. It also avoids direct contact of ashes with the turbine blades, resulting in a higher life cycle for the turbine. The model incorporates a high temperature heat exchanger and an arbitrary number of turbines and compressors, with the corresponding number of intercoolers and reheaters. It considers irreversibilities such as non-isentropic compressions and expansions, and pressure losses in heat input and release. The composition and temperature of the combustion gases, as well as the variable flow rate of air and combustion gases, are calculated for specific biomasses. The numerical model for a single stage configuration has been validated by comparing its predictions with the data sheets of two commercial turbines. Results are in good agreement. Curves on the dependence of thermal efficiency and power output with the overall pressure ratio will be shown for several plant configurations with variable number of compression/expansion stages. Also the influence of different types of biomasses and their moisture will be analyzed on parameters such as fuel consumption and exhaust gases temperature. For a single step plant layout fueled with eucalyptus wood an efficiency of 23% is predicted, whereas for a configuration with two compressors and one turbine efficiency increases up to 25%. But it is remarkable

  7. Fatigue cycles evaluation of 500 MWe PHWR coolant channel sealdisc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chawla, D.S.; Vaze, K.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Gupta, K.S.; Bhambra, H.S.

    1998-07-01

    At each end of coolant channel there is one sealing plug assembly. The sealdisc is a part of sealing plug assembly. The sealdisc is used to avoid leakage of heavy water. The importance of sealdisc can be understood by the fact that there are 784 sealdiscs in one 500 MWe PHWR unit. During the life time of reactor the sealdisc will be subjected to cyclic loads due to reactor startup, shutdown, power setback and also due to refuelling operations. Excessive reversal of stresses may lead to fatigue failure. The sealdisc failure may cause loss of coolant accidents. Since sealdisc is safety class 1 component, it has to be qualified according to ASME Section III Division 1 NB. For cyclic loads, the fatigue analysis is essential to assess the allowable number of cycles and also to check the total usage factor due to different cyclic loads. To evaluate the allowable fatigue cycles, the analysis is carried out using finite element method. The present report deals with the fatigue cycles evaluation of 500 MWe PHWR sealdisc. The finite element model having eight noded axisymmetric elements is used for the analysis. The various loads considered in the analysis are mechanical loads arising due to refuelling operations and number of temperature-pressure transients. During refuelling, the sealdisc is removed and reinstalled back by use of fuelling machine ram which applies load at centre as well as at rocker point of sealdisc. The stress analysis is carried out for each stage of loading during refuelling and fatigue cycles are evaluated. For temperature transient, decoupled thermal analysis is carried out. At various instants of time, the stresses are computed using temperatures calculated in thermal analysis. The pressure variation is also considered along with temperature variation. The fatigue cycles are evaluated for each transient using maximum alternating stress intensities. The usage factors are calculated for various temperature/pressure transients and refuelling loads

  8. Comparison of metaheuristic techniques to determine optimal placement of biomass power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reche-Lopez, P.; Ruiz-Reyes, N.; Garcia Galan, S.; Jurado, F.

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the application and comparison of several metaheuristic techniques to optimize the placement and supply area of biomass-fueled power plants. Both, trajectory and population-based methods are applied for our goal. In particular, two well-known trajectory method, such as Simulated Annealing (SA) and Tabu Search (TS), and two commonly used population-based methods, such as Genetic Algorithms (GA) and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) are hereby considered. In addition, a new binary PSO algorithm has been proposed, which incorporates an inertia weight factor, like the classical continuous approach. The fitness function for the metaheuristics is the profitability index, defined as the ratio between the net present value and the initial investment. In this work, forest residues are considered as biomass source, and the problem constraints are: the generation system must be located inside the supply area, and its maximum electric power is 5 MW. The comparative results obtained by all considered metaheuristics are discussed. Random walk has also been assessed for the problem we deal with.

  9. Comparison of metaheuristic techniques to determine optimal placement of biomass power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reche-Lopez, P.; Ruiz-Reyes, N.; Garcia Galan, S. [Telecommunication Engineering Department, University of Jaen Polytechnic School, C/ Alfonso X el Sabio 28, 23700 Linares, Jaen (Spain); Jurado, F. [Electrical Engineering Department, University of Jaen Polytechnic School, C/ Alfonso X el Sabio 28, 23700 Linares, Jaen (Spain)

    2009-08-15

    This paper deals with the application and comparison of several metaheuristic techniques to optimize the placement and supply area of biomass-fueled power plants. Both, trajectory and population-based methods are applied for our goal. In particular, two well-known trajectory method, such as Simulated Annealing (SA) and Tabu Search (TS), and two commonly used population-based methods, such as Genetic Algorithms (GA) and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) are hereby considered. In addition, a new binary PSO algorithm has been proposed, which incorporates an inertia weight factor, like the classical continuous approach. The fitness function for the metaheuristics is the profitability index, defined as the ratio between the net present value and the initial investment. In this work, forest residues are considered as biomass source, and the problem constraints are: the generation system must be located inside the supply area, and its maximum electric power is 5 MW. The comparative results obtained by all considered metaheuristics are discussed. Random walk has also been assessed for the problem we deal with. (author)

  10. Decentralised power generation using solid biomass - Know-how on combined heat and power generation for investors; Dezentrale Stromerzeugung mit Feststoffbiomasse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, M.; Gaegauf, Ch.; Sattler, M.

    2007-01-15

    This comprehensive report made by the Centre of Appropriate Technology and Social Ecology in Langenbruck, Switzerland presents a summary of know-how for investors on combined heat and power generation using solid biomass in installations with an electrical rating of up to one megawatt. Topics covered include a review of the reasons for using biomass to generate electricity - with the results of an analysis of potential in Switzerland and the European Union - and of economic assessment methods for the choice of technology and manufacturers. A SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) analysis of technologies is presented and existing biomass-fired installations in Switzerland are listed. A comparison with centrally-refined combustibles is presented and examples of cost and profitability calculations are given. Finally technological background information is presented, including information on 'forgotten' technologies.

  11. Processing Cost Analysis for Biomass Feedstocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badger, P.C.

    2002-11-20

    The receiving, handling, storing, and processing of woody biomass feedstocks is an overlooked component of biopower systems. The purpose of this study was twofold: (1) to identify and characterize all the receiving, handling, storing, and processing steps required to make woody biomass feedstocks suitable for use in direct combustion and gasification applications, including small modular biopower (SMB) systems, and (2) to estimate the capital and operating costs at each step. Since biopower applications can be varied, a number of conversion systems and feedstocks required evaluation. In addition to limiting this study to woody biomass feedstocks, the boundaries of this study were from the power plant gate to the feedstock entry point into the conversion device. Although some power plants are sited at a source of wood waste fuel, it was assumed for this study that all wood waste would be brought to the power plant site. This study was also confined to the following three feedstocks (1) forest residues, (2) industrial mill residues, and (3) urban wood residues. Additionally, the study was confined to grate, suspension, and fluidized bed direct combustion systems; gasification systems; and SMB conversion systems. Since scale can play an important role in types of equipment, operational requirements, and capital and operational costs, this study examined these factors for the following direct combustion and gasification system size ranges: 50, 20, 5, and 1 MWe. The scope of the study also included: Specific operational issues associated with specific feedstocks (e.g., bark and problems with bridging); Opportunities for reducing handling, storage, and processing costs; How environmental restrictions can affect handling and processing costs (e.g., noise, commingling of treated wood or non-wood materials, emissions, and runoff); and Feedstock quality issues and/or requirements (e.g., moisture, particle size, presence of non-wood materials). The study found that over the

  12. China: the long wait. [Developments in the nuclear power programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-03-01

    The repercussions of Tiananmen Square coupled with worse than expected balance of payments problems have been made it even more difficult than usual to discern the likely future direction of China's nuclear power programme. Currently there are three power reactors under construction, an indigenously designed 300MWe PWR at Qinsham and the two 900MWe Framatome units at Daya Bay, Guang-dong. Prior to the events of June the most likely way forward, beyond these units under construction, appeared to be development of 600MWe units for Chinese conditions in a joint venture with Western companies. There are strong pressures to ''go indigenous'', and attempt to develop a home grown 600MWe design or, perhaps more likely, go for repeats of the 300 MWe plant - assuming it can be operated successfully, a point on which some factions of the Chinese nuclear industry have their doubts. Nuclear district heating still has strong advocates, as an environmentally sound way of meeting the country's huge projected increases in primary energy consumption over the coming years. Construction of a 5MWt district heating reactor at Tsinghua University, Beijing, started in 1986, entered operation at the end of 1989 following a test phase and is now supplying 3MWt to heating of university buildings. (author).

  13. The control of emissions from nuclear power reactors in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorman, D.J.; Neil, B.C.J.; Chatterjee, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear power reactors in Canada are of the CANDU pressurised heavy water design. These are located in the provinces of Ontario, Quebec, and New Brunswick. Most of the nuclear generating capacity is in the province of Ontario which has 16 commissioned reactors with a total capacity of 11,500 MWe. There are four reactors under construction with an additional capacity of 3400 MWe. Nuclear power currently accounts for approximately 50% of the electrical power generation of Ontario. Regulation of the reactors is a Federal Government responsibility administered by the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) which licenses the reactors and sets occupational and public dose limits

  14. Probabilistic analysis of 900 MWe PWR. Shutdown technical specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattei, J.M.; Bars, G.

    1987-11-01

    During annual shutdown, preventive maintenance and modifications which are made on PWRs cause scheduled unavailabilities of equipment or systems which might harm the safety of the installation, in spite of the low level of decay heat during this period. The pumps in the auxiliary feedwater system, component cooling water system, service water system, the water injection arrays (LPIS, HPIS, CVCS), and the containment spray system may have scheduled unavailability, as well as the power supply of the electricity boards. The EDF utility is aware of the risks related to these situations for which accident procedures have been set up and hence has proposed limiting downtime for this equipment during the shutdown period, through technical specifications. The project defines the equipment required to ensure the functions important for safety during the various shutdown phases (criticality, water inventory, evacuation of decay heat, containment). In order to be able to judge the acceptability of these specifications, the IPSN, the technical support of the Service Central de Surete des Installations Nucleaires, has used probabilistic methodology to analyse the impact on the core melt probability of these specifications, for a French 900 MWe PWR

  15. Co-combustion of wood biomass in coal power plants, a contribution to energy turnaround and climate protection?; Die Mitverbrennung holzartiger Biomasse in Kohlekraftwerken. Ein Beitrag zur Energiewende und zum Klimaschutz?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, Claudia; Herr, Michael; Edel, Matthias; Seidl, Hannes

    2011-08-15

    Co-combustion of wood biomass in coal power plants is feasible at short notice and can is a low-cost option for climate protection. While other EU states have already provided funding mechanism, Germany has not followed this lead so far. Domestic wood resources are limited and unevenly distributed among the German regions, so that wood materials will have to be imported. During the past few years, the basic requirements for imports of wood were provided with the initiation of a global pellets market. Sustainability criteria for wood consumption were defined, and international certification systems were developed. The sustainability criteria should be extended to cover also wood-like materials and other biomass for power generation. The German EEG (Renewables Act) is a first step in this direction. Further, investments must be made in logistics capacities. The available logistics of coal power plants can be used with some minor modifications. In all, successful and sustainable international biomass markets may soon be available.

  16. Combined Heat and Power Systems for the Provision of Sustainable Energy from Biomass in Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortwein Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Against the background of greenhouse gases causing climate change, combined heat and power (CHP systems fueled by biomass can efficiently supply energy with high flexibility. Such CHP systems will usually consist of one or more thermo-chemical conversion steps and at least one (the more or less separated electric power generation unit. Depending on the main products of the previous conversion steps (e.g. combustible gases or liquids, but also flue gases with sensible heat, different technologies are available for the final power conversion step. This includes steam cycles with steam turbines or engines and different working fluids (water, organic fluids, but also combustion based systems like gas turbines or gas engines. Further promising technologies include fuel cells with high electric efficiency. When integrating such CHP systems in buildings, there are different strategies, especially concerning electric power generation. While some concepts are focusing on base load production, others are regulated either by thermal or by electric power demand. The paper will give a systematic overview on the combination of thermo-chemical conversion of biomass and combined heat and power production technologies. The mentioned building integration strategies will be discussed, leading to conclusions for further research and development in that field.

  17. Assessment of the way of biomass transportation to the coal power plant with regard to the limitation of emissions of CO{sub 2}; Beurteilung der Befoerderungsweise der Biomasse in das Kohlenkraftwerk im Blick auf die Beschraenkung der Emission von CO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamkiewicz, A. [Maritime Univ. of Szczecin (Poland). Faculty of Mechanical Engineering; Zenczak, W. [West Pomeranian Univ. of Technology, Szczecin (Poland). Fakultaet fuer Meerestechnik und Transport

    2014-07-01

    One from the activities taken in Poland in aim of limitation of CO{sub 2}, emission is coal and biomass combustion together in one boiler. Biomass is delivered to power station Dolna Odra in Szczecin by trucks, which are also a source of CO{sub 2}, emission. The paper presents results of comparative analysis of CO{sub 2}, emission from trucks during transportation of biomass to power station with actual reduction of emission through power station as result of substitution of part of coal by biomass.

  18. Supplementary shutdown system of 220 MWe standard PHWR in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muktibodh, U.C.

    1997-01-01

    The design objective of the shutdown system is to make the reactor subcritical and hold it in that state for an extended period of time. This objective must be realised under all anticipated operational occurrences and postulated abnormal conditions even during most reactive state of the core. PHWR design criteria for shutdown stipulates requirement of two independent diverse and fast acting shutdown systems, either of which acting alone should meet the above objectives. This requirement would normally call for a large number of reactivity mechanism penetrations into the calandria. From the point of view of space availability at the reactivity mechanism area on top of calandria, for the relatively small core of 220 MWe PHWRs, and ease of maintenance realisation of the total worth by either of the shutdown systems acting alone was difficult. To overcome this engineering constraint and at the same time to satisfy the design criteria, a unique approach to meet the reactivity demands for shutdown was adopted. The reactivity requirements of the shutdown consists of fast and slow reactivity changes. For the shutdown system of 220 MWe PHWRs, the approach of realizing fast reactivity changes with dual redundant, diverse, fast acting shutdown systems aided by a slow acting shutdown system to counter delayed reactivity changes was conceived. The supplementary slow acting shutdown system is called upon to act after actuation of either of the two redundant fast acting systems and is referred to as Liquid Poison Injection System (LPIS). The system adds bulk amount of neutron poison (boric acid), equivalent to 45 mk, directly into the moderator through two nozzles in calandria using pneumatic pressure. This paper describes the design of LPIS as envisaged for the standardised 220 MWe PHWRs. (author)

  19. Power production from biomass II with special emphasis on gasification and pyrolysis R and DD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sipilae, K; Korhonen, M [eds.; VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Production Technologies

    1997-12-31

    The Seminar on Power Production from Biomass II with special emphasis on gasification and pyrolysis R and DD, was organized by VTT Energy on 27 - 28 March 1995 in Espoo, Finland. All seminar speakers were invited in order to give a high-level overview of the achievements of biomass combustion, gasification and flash pyrolysis technologies. The sessions included presentations by all key industrial entrepreneurs in the field. The poster session was open to all groups interested. Globally bioenergy covers about 3 % of the primary energy consumption. Locally it has a significant role in many countries like in Finland, where bioenergy covers almost 15 % and peat 5 % of primary energy consumption. Today`s cost-effective heat and power production is based on industrial wood residues and spent cooking liquors in relatively large industrial units or municipal heating and power stations. Agricultural residues like straw and especially energy crops are becoming more interesting in co-utilization with other biomasses or fossil fuels. The seminar successfully displayed the status of present technologies as well as development targets for new gasification and flash pyrolysis technologies in the coming years. The many industrial participants showed that there are growing business possibilities in many countries all over the world. The proceedings include the most oral presentations given at the Seminar and also abstracts of poster presentations. (orig.)

  20. Power production from biomass II with special emphasis on gasification and pyrolysis R and DD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sipilae, K.; Korhonen, M. [eds.] [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Production Technologies

    1996-12-31

    The Seminar on Power Production from Biomass II with special emphasis on gasification and pyrolysis R and DD, was organized by VTT Energy on 27 - 28 March 1995 in Espoo, Finland. All seminar speakers were invited in order to give a high-level overview of the achievements of biomass combustion, gasification and flash pyrolysis technologies. The sessions included presentations by all key industrial entrepreneurs in the field. The poster session was open to all groups interested. Globally bioenergy covers about 3 % of the primary energy consumption. Locally it has a significant role in many countries like in Finland, where bioenergy covers almost 15 % and peat 5 % of primary energy consumption. Today`s cost-effective heat and power production is based on industrial wood residues and spent cooking liquors in relatively large industrial units or municipal heating and power stations. Agricultural residues like straw and especially energy crops are becoming more interesting in co-utilization with other biomasses or fossil fuels. The seminar successfully displayed the status of present technologies as well as development targets for new gasification and flash pyrolysis technologies in the coming years. The many industrial participants showed that there are growing business possibilities in many countries all over the world. The proceedings include the most oral presentations given at the Seminar and also abstracts of poster presentations. (orig.)

  1. Commerical electric power cost studies. Capital cost addendum multi-unit coal and nuclear stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    This report is the culmination of a study performed to develop designs and associated capital cost estimates for multi-unit nuclear and coal commercial electric power stations, and to determine the distribution of these costs among the individual units. This report addresses six different types of 2400 MWe (nominal) multi-unit stations as follows: Two Unit PWR Station-1139 MWe Each, Two Unit BWR Station-1190 MWe Each, Two Unit High Sulfur Coal-Fired Station-1232 MWe Each, Two Unit Low Sulfur Coal-Fired Station-1243 MWe Each, Three Unit High Sulfur Coal-Fired Station-794 MWe Each, Three Unit Low Sulfur Coal-Fired Station-801 MWe Each. Recent capital cost studies performed for ERDA/NRC of single unit nuclear and coal stations are used as the basis for developing the designs and costs of the multi-unit stations. This report includes the major study groundrules, a summary of single and multi-unit stations total base cost estimates, details of cost estimates at the three digit account level and plot plan drawings for each multi-unit station identified

  2. Evaluation of anticipatory signal to steam generator pressure control program for 700 MWe Indian pressurized heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahari, S.; Hajela, S.; Rammohan, H. P.; Malhotra, P. K.; Ghadge, S. G.

    2012-01-01

    700 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (IPHWR) is horizontal channel type reactor with partial boiling at channel outlet. Due to boiling, it has a large volume of vapor present in the primary loops. It has two primary loops connected with the help of pressurizer surge line. The pressurizer has a large capacity and is partly filled by liquid and partly by vapor. Large vapor volume improves compressibility of the system. During turbine trip or load rejection, pressure builds up in Steam Generator (SG). This leads to pressurization of Primary Heat Transport System (PHTS). To control pressurization of SG and PHTS, around 70% of the steam generated in SG is dumped into the condenser by opening Condenser Steam Dump Valves (CSDVs) and rest of the steam is released to the atmosphere by opening Atmospheric Steam Discharge Valves (ASDVs) immediately after sensing the event. This is accomplished by adding anticipatory signal to the output of SG pressure controller. Anticipatory signal is proportional to the thermal power of reactor and the proportionality constant is set so that SG pressure controller's output jacks up to ASDV opening range when operating at 100% FP. To simulate this behavior for 700 MWe IPHWR, Primary and secondary heat transport system is modeled. SG pressure control and other process control program have also been modeled to capture overall plant dynamics. Analysis has been carried out with 3-D neutron kinetics coupled thermal hydraulic computer code ATMIKA.T to evaluate the effect of the anticipatory signal on PHT pressure and over all plant dynamics during turbine trip in 700 MWe IPHWR. This paper brings out the results of the analysis with and without considering anticipatory signal in SG pressure control program during turbine trip. (authors)

  3. Combined hydraulic and biomass power - an answer to economic and ecological adaptation pressure on the energy supply system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pistauer, M.

    1991-01-01

    On the large scale, there will be an economic pressure in the European Communities on coal and oil from the CO 2 taxes. The economic and ecological advantages of a combination of hydraulic and biomass power in Austria are emphasized. In particular a biomass remote heating pilot project is announced. (Quittner)

  4. Biomass, a 750 billion euros bet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remoue, A.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the check of its previous attempts to develop power generation from biomass fuels, the French government has announced the financing of 32 new projects of biomass fueled power plants representing 266 MW of additional power. Today's production represents 700 MW and the goal is to raise this production to 1230 MW by 2012 and 3530 MW by 2020. The development of biomass projects requires more important shareholders equity than wind power or solar energy projects and a good organization of the supply chain. (J.S.)

  5. Small-Scale Combined Heat and Power Plants Using Biofuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salomon-Popa, Marianne [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Energy Technology

    2002-11-01

    In this time period where energy supply and climate change are of special concern, biomass-based fuels have attracted much interest due to their plentiful supply and favorable environmental characteristics (if properly managed). The effective capture and continued sustainability of this renewable resource requires a new generation of biomass power plants with high fuel energy conversion. At the same time, deregulation of the electricity market offers new opportunities for small-scale power plants in a decentralized scheme. These two important factors have opened up possibilities for small-scale combined heat and power (CHP) plants based on biofuels. The objective of this pre-study is to assess the possibilities and technical limitations for increased efficiency and energy utilization of biofuels in small size plants (approximately 10 MWe or lower). Various energy conversion technologies are considered and proven concepts for large-scale fossil fuel plants are an especially important area. An analysis has been made to identify the problems, technical limitations and different possibilities as recognized in the literature. Beyond published results, a qualitative survey was conducted to gain first-hand, current knowledge from experts in the field. At best, the survey results together with the results of personal interviews and a workshop on the role of small-scale plants in distributed generation will serve a guideline for future project directions and ideas. Conventional and novel technologies are included in the survey such as Stirling engines, combustion engines, gas turbines, steam turbines, steam motors, fuel cells and other novel technologies/cycles for biofuels. State-of-the-art heat and power plants will be identified to clarify of the advantages and disadvantages as well as possible obstacles for their implementation.

  6. ASTEC-CATHARE2 benchmarks on French PWR 1300MWe reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tregoures, Nicolas; Philippot, Marc; Foucher, Laurent; Guillard, Gaetan; Fleurot, Joelle

    2009-01-01

    The French Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN) is performing a level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA-2) on the French 1300 MWe reactors. This PSA-2 is heavily relying on the ASTEC integral computer code, jointly developed by IRSN and GRS (Germany). In order to assess the reliability and the quality of physical results of the ASTEC V1.3 code as well as the PWR 1300 MWe reference input deck, an important series of benchmarks with the French best-estimate thermal-hydraulic code CATHARE 2 V2.5 has been performed on 14 different severe accident scenarios. The present paper details 2 out of the 14 studied scenarios: a 12 inches cold leg Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) and a 2 tubes Steam Generator Tube Rupture (SGTR). The thermal-hydraulic behavior of the primary and secondary circuits is thoroughly investigated and the ASTEC results of the core degradation phase are presented. Overall, the thermal-hydraulic behavior given by the ASTEC V1.3 is in very good agreement with the CATHARE 2 V2.5 results. (author)

  7. Biomass combustion power generation technologies: Background report 4.1 for the EU Joule 2+ project: Energy from biomass: An assessment of two promising systems for energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van den Broek, R.; Faaij, A.; Van Wijk, A.

    1995-05-01

    New developments in biomass combustion technology in progress tend to go towards efficiencies which come close to the present fossil fuel fired systems. The objective of this study is to give a representation of the state of the art and future prospects of biomass combustion technologies and to compare those on a location-independent basis. This will be done both by a general boiler technology description on the basis of qualitative criteria and by a comparison of most recently built and planned power plants on more quantitative grounds. The methodology which has been used in gathering, selecting, presenting and comparing the information is discussed in chapter 2. In chapter 3, a general introduction is given on some basic principles of biomass combustion technology. This includes the combustion process, the Rankine steam cycle and NO x formation. Different boiler technologies which are in use for biomass combustion power generation are discussed in chapter 4. The main groups of boilers which are discussed are the pile burners, stoker fired boilers, suspension fired boilers and fluidized bed boilers. The description focuses on aspects such as construction, operation, fuel requirements, efficiencies and emissions. Chapter 5 deals with individual existing or planned biomass combustion plants, resulting from an international inventory. All the different technologies which have been discussed in chapter 4 are discussed in chapter 5 in the context of complete power plants. The information which is presented for each plant comprises a technical description, efficiencies, emissions and investment costs. At the end of chapter 5 an overview of comparable data from the literature is given, as well as an overview of the results of the inventory. 32 figs., 28 tabs., 4 appendices., 51 refs

  8. Hollow Fiber Membrane Contactors for CO2 Capture: Modeling and Up-Scaling to CO2 Capture for an 800 MWe Coal Power Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimball Erin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A techno-economic analysis was completed to compare the use of Hollow Fiber Membrane Modules (HFMM with the more conventional structured packing columns as the absorber in amine-based CO2 capture systems for power plants. In order to simulate the operation of industrial scale HFMM systems, a two-dimensional model was developed and validated based on results of a laboratory scale HFMM. After successful experiments and validation of the model, a pilot scale HFMM was constructed and simulated with the same model. The results of the simulations, from both sizes of HFMM, were used to assess the feasibility of further up-scaling to a HFMM system to capture the CO2 from an 800 MWe power plant. The system requirements – membrane fiber length, total contact surface area, and module volume – were determined from simulations and used for an economic comparison with structured packing columns. Results showed that a significant cost reduction of at least 50% is required to make HFMM competitive with structured packing columns. Several factors for the design of industrial scale HFMM require further investigation, such as the optimal aspect ratio (module length/diameter, membrane lifetime, and casing material and shape, in addition to the need to reduce the overall cost. However, HFMM were also shown to have the advantages of having a higher contact surface area per unit volume and modular scale-up, key factors for applications requiring limited footprints or flexibility in configuration.

  9. Torrefied biomass for use in power station sector; Torrefizierte Biomasse zum Einsatz im Kraftwerkssektor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witt, Janet; Schaubach, Kay [Deutsches Biomasseforschungszentrum (DBFZ) gemeinnuetzige GmbH, Leipzig (Germany). Bereich Bioenergiesysteme; Kiel, Jaap; Carbo, Michiel [Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), Petten (Netherlands); Wojcik, Magdalena [OFI Austrian Research Institute for Chemistry and Technology, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-10-01

    In the torrefaction process biomass is heated up in the absence of oxygen to a temperature of at least 250 C. By combining torrefaction with pelletisation or briquetting, biomass materials can be converted into a high-energy-density bioenergy carrier with improved behaviour in (long-distance) transport, handling and storage. Torrefaction also creates superior properties for biomass in many major end-use applications. The process has the potential to provide a significant contribution to an enlarged raw material portfolio for sustainable biomass fuel production inside Europe by including both agricultural and forestry biomass (residues). The article will briefly introduce the concept and objectives of the project and the different torrefaction technologies involved and then focus on the results obtained within the first project phase of the EU-project SECTOR. This comprises production of torrefied biomass batches, subsequent densification (pelletisation and briquetting), characterisation and Round Robin testing of characterisation methods, initial logistics and end-use performance testing, material safety data sheet preparation and sustainability assessment along the value chain. (orig.)

  10. Role of Fugen HWR in Japan and design of a 600 MWe demonstration reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawai, Sadamu.

    1982-03-01

    Fugen, a 165 MWe prototype of a heavy water-moderated, boiling light water-cooled reactor, has been in commercial operation since March 20, 1979. In parallel with the Fugen project, the design work for a 600 MWe demonstration plant has been carried out since 1973. The important systems and components, such as pressure tube assemblies and control rod drive mechanism, are essentially the same as those of Fugen. However, some modification is made owing to the experience obtained in Fugen and LWrs. In the HWR Fugen, plutonium and uranium are effectively used, and plutonium makes the coolant void reactivity more negative, which results in the increase of the stability and safety of the reactor. On August 4, 1981, the ad hoc committee submitted the final report to the Japanese Atomic Energy Commission, in which the construction of a 600 MWe demonstration plant was recommended. As for the research and development on reactor safety, coolant leak detectors, the performance of ECCS, and safety design codes are enumerated. Since 1965, mixed oxide fuel has been developed, and 168 fuel assemblies were loaded in Fugen, but failure did not occur. (Kako, I.)

  11. Successful experience with limestone and other sorbents for combustion of biomass in fluid bed power boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coe, D.R. [LG& E Power Systems, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    This paper presents the theoretical and practical advantages of utilizing limestone and other sorbents during the combustion of various biomass fuels for the reduction of corrosion and erosion of boiler fireside tubing and refractory. Successful experiences using a small amount of limestone, dolomite, kaolin, or custom blends of aluminum and magnesium compounds in fluid bed boilers fired with biomass fuels will be discussed. Electric power boiler firing experience includes bubbling bed boilers as well as circulating fluid bed boilers in commercial service on biomass fuels. Forest sources of biomass fuels fired include wood chips, brush chips, sawmill waste wood, bark, and hog fuel. Agricultural sources of biomass fuels fired include grape vine prunings, bean straw, almond tree chips, walnut tree chips, and a variety of other agricultural waste fuels. Additionally, some urban sources of wood fuels have been commercially burned with the addition of limestone. Data presented includes qualitative and quantitative analyses of fuel, sorbent, and ash.

  12. Renew, reduce or become more efficient? The climate contribution of biomass co-combustion in a coal-fired power plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, Jan H.; Benders, Rene M. J.; Moll, Henri C.; Pierie, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Within this paper, biomass supply chains, with different shares of biomass co-combustion in coal fired power plants, are analysed on energy efficiency, energy consumption, renewable energy production, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and compared with the performance of a 100% coal supply chain

  13. Evolution of the design of fuel handling control system in 220 MWe Indian PHWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhruvanarayana, L.; Gupta, H.; Bharathkumar, M.

    1996-01-01

    Following two CANDU type reactors at Rajasthan (RAPS-1 and 2), three nuclear power stations, each of two units of 220 MWe has been in operation at Rajasthan (RAPS-1 and 2). Madras (MAPS-1 and 2). Narora (NAPS-1 and 2) and Kakrapar (KAPS-1 and 2). Two more stations, also of 220 MWe capacity, are under construction at Rajasthan (RAPP-3 and 4) and Kaiga (Kaiga-1 and 2). These are natural uranium fuelled pressurized heavy water cooled and heavy water moderated reactors (PHWRs). The two units at Rajasthan viz RAPS-1 and 2, were built with the technical collaboration with Canada, and the rest of the units have been designed and built indigenously, incorporating a number of modifications, particularly in the on-power refuelling system. The evolution of the design of the Fuel Handling Control systems of these reactors, taking into consideration operational needs, safety aspects and maintainability are highlighted in this paper. A combination of hydraulic and electronic control has been provided to enable the operations. In RAPS-1 and 2, hardwired electronic controls were provided, while in MAPS-1 and 2, the hardwired system was improved. From NAPS onwards, a computerized control system with hardwired interlock logic has been provided. New devices like coarse-fine potentiometers, special oil filled potentiometer assembly, rectilinear potentiometers etc., were specified from NAPS onwards. Positioning logic is computerized providing flexibility and expendability. Digital panel meters and indicating lamps have been provided for manual mode operations, while CRT (cathode-ray tube) monitors help in computer mode operations. Hydraulic controls which comprise D 2 0 hydraulics, H 2 0 hydraulics and oil hydraulics have been improved from NAPS onwards. Hydraulic panels have been relocated in accessible areas to reduce radiation doses and for better maintainability. All electric drives including X and Y drives were modified as hydraulic drives for better control. New types of valves

  14. Evolution of the design of fuel handling control system in 220 MWe Indian PHWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhruvanarayana, L; Gupta, H; Bharathkumar, M [Nuclear Power Corporation of India Ltd., Mumbai (India)

    1997-12-31

    Following two CANDU type reactors at Rajasthan (RAPS-1 and 2), three nuclear power stations, each of two units of 220 MWe has been in operation at Rajasthan (RAPS-1 and 2). Madras (MAPS-1 and 2). Narora (NAPS-1 and 2) and Kakrapar (KAPS-1 and 2). Two more stations, also of 220 MWe capacity, are under construction at Rajasthan (RAPP-3 and 4) and Kaiga (Kaiga-1 and 2). These are natural uranium fuelled pressurized heavy water cooled and heavy water moderated reactors (PHWRs). The two units at Rajasthan viz RAPS-1 and 2, were built with the technical collaboration with Canada, and the rest of the units have been designed and built indigenously, incorporating a number of modifications, particularly in the on-power refuelling system. The evolution of the design of the Fuel Handling Control systems of these reactors, taking into consideration operational needs, safety aspects and maintainability are highlighted in this paper. A combination of hydraulic and electronic control has been provided to enable the operations. In RAPS-1 and 2, hardwired electronic controls were provided, while in MAPS-1 and 2, the hardwired system was improved. From NAPS onwards, a computerized control system with hardwired interlock logic has been provided. New devices like coarse-fine potentiometers, special oil filled potentiometer assembly, rectilinear potentiometers etc., were specified from NAPS onwards. Positioning logic is computerized providing flexibility and expendability. Digital panel meters and indicating lamps have been provided for manual mode operations, while CRT (cathode-ray tube) monitors help in computer mode operations. Hydraulic controls which comprise D{sub 2}0 hydraulics, H{sub 2}0 hydraulics and oil hydraulics have been improved from NAPS onwards. Hydraulic panels have been relocated in accessible areas to reduce radiation doses and for better maintainability. All electric drives including X and Y drives were modified as hydraulic drives for better control. New types of

  15. Conceptual core designs for a 1200 MWe sodium cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, H. K.; Lee, K. B.; Yoo, J. W.; Kim, Y. I.

    2008-01-01

    The conceptual core design for a 1200 MWe sodium cooled fast reactor is being developed under the framework of the Gen-IV SFR development program. To this end, three core concepts have been tested during the development of a core concept: a core with an enrichment split fuel, a core with a single-enrichment fuel with a region-wise varying clad thickness, and a core with a single-enrichment fuel with non-fuel rods. In order to optimize a conceptual core configuration which satisfies the design targets, a sensitivity study of the core design parameters has been performed. Two core concepts, the core with an enrichment-split fuel and the core with a single-enrichment fuel with a region-wise varying clad thickness, have been proposed as the candidates of the conceptual core for a 1200 MWe sodium cooled fast reactor. The detailed core neutronic, fuel behavior, thermal, and safety analyses will be performed for the proposed candidate core concepts to finalize the core design concept. (authors)

  16. Calculation of economic and financing of NPP and conventional power plant using spreadsheet innovation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moch Djoko Birmano; Imam Bastori

    2008-01-01

    The study for calculating the economic and financing of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) and conventional power plant using spreadsheet Innovation has been done. As case study, the NPP of PWR type of class 1050 MWe is represented by OPR-1000 (Optimized Power Reactor, 1000 MWe) and the conventional plant of class 600 MWe, is coal power plant (Coal PP). The purpose of the study is to assess the economic and financial feasibility level of OPR-1000 and Coal PP. The study result concludes that economically, OPR-1000 is more feasible compared to Coal PP because its generation cost is cheaper. Whereas financially, OPR-1000 is more beneficial compared to Coal PP because the higher benefit at the end of economic lifetime (NPV) and the higher ratio of benefit and cost (B/C Ratio). For NPP and Coal PP, the higher Discount Rate (%) is not beneficial. NPP is more sensitive to the change of discount rate compared to coal PP, whereas Coal PP is more sensitive to the change of power purchasing price than NPP. (author)

  17. Waste-based biomass to power plants with high portions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aho, M.; Taipale, R. (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)); Hupa, M.; Yrjas, P. (Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland)); Jokiniemi, J.; Sippula, O. (Univ. of Kuopio (Finland))

    2009-07-01

    Recycling of chemicals back to processes as effectively as possible is sustainable development. Landfilling and agricultural use of sewage sludge (SWS) produces methane which is a strong greenhouse gas. Our earlier project 'Corraway' funded by Tekes ClimBus programme and Finnish industry indicated that iron and aluminium sulphates can destroy effectively alkali chlorides at furnace conditions preventing Cl deposition to heat transfer surfaces. Cl in the deposits is the main reason to superheater corrosion with biomass- containing feedstocks. These sulphates have been used as process chemicals in wastewater treatment, and therefore they are present in SWS. SWS-originated combustion products will pass the whole furnace when SWS is mixed to the main fuel. The furnace includes oxidising and reducing zones. Therefore it is not clear if the SWS-originated sulphur remains in an effective form in the point view of alkali chlorides destruction. The project work included thorough fuel analysis, pilot-scale combustion tests with blends of risky biomass and SWS and research of sampling techniques to detect alkali compounds. The combustion experiments proved the power of SWS originated sulphur to destroy alkali chlorides in the furnace and suggest strongly to continue this research. The order of power of the two SWS tested was different than expected indicating need to produce more thorough results. SWS may contain much minerals which lowers its value as a fuel. It can be possible to increase sulphur content and to decrease ash content in the sludge during SWS processing and dry and pelletise the sludge to strengthen further its value as a protective and as a fuel. (orig.)

  18. Thermodynamic analyses of a biomass-coal co-gasification power generation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Linbo; Yue, Guangxi; He, Boshu

    2016-04-01

    A novel chemical looping power generation system is presented based on the biomass-coal co-gasification with steam. The effects of different key operation parameters including biomass mass fraction (Rb), steam to carbon mole ratio (Rsc), gasification temperature (Tg) and iron to fuel mole ratio (Rif) on the system performances like energy efficiency (ηe), total energy efficiency (ηte), exergy efficiency (ηex), total exergy efficiency (ηtex) and carbon capture rate (ηcc) are analyzed. A benchmark condition is set, under which ηte, ηtex and ηcc are found to be 39.9%, 37.6% and 96.0%, respectively. Furthermore, detailed energy Sankey diagram and exergy Grassmann diagram are drawn for the entire system operating under the benchmark condition. The energy and exergy efficiencies of the units composing the system are also predicted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Study of essential safety features of a three-loop 1,000 MWe light water reactor (PWR) and a corresponding heavy water reactor (HWR) on the basis of the IAEA nuclear safety standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-02-01

    Based on the IAEA Standards, essential safety aspects of a three-loop pressurized water reactor (1,000 MWe) and a corresponding heavy water reactor were studied by the TUeV Baden e.V. in cooperation with the Gabinete de Proteccao e Seguranca Nuclear, a department of the Ministry which is responsible for Nuclear power plants in Portugal. As the fundamental principles of this study the design data for the light water reactor and the heavy water reactor provided in the safety analysis reports (KWU-SSAR for the 1,000 MWe PWR, KWU-PSAR Nuclear Power Plant ATUCHA II) are used. The assessment of the two different reactor types based on the IAEA Nuclear Safety Standards shows that the reactor plants designed according to the data given in the safety analysis reports of the plant manufacturer meet the design requirements laid down in the pertinent IAEA Standards. (orig.) [de

  20. Biomass IGCC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salo, K; Keraenen, H [Enviropower Inc., Espoo (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    Enviropower Inc. is developing a modern power plant concept based on pressurised fluidized-bed gasification and gas turbine combined cycle (IGCC). The process is capable of maximising the electricity production with a variety of solid fuels - different biomass and coal types - mixed or separately. The development work is conducted on many levels. These and demonstration efforts are highlighted in this article. The feasibility of a pressurised gasification based processes compared to competing technologies in different applications is discussed. The potential of power production from biomass is also reviewed. (orig.) 4 refs.

  1. Biomass IGCC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salo, K.; Keraenen, H. [Enviropower Inc., Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Enviropower Inc. is developing a modern power plant concept based on pressurised fluidized-bed gasification and gas turbine combined cycle (IGCC). The process is capable of maximising the electricity production with a variety of solid fuels - different biomass and coal types - mixed or separately. The development work is conducted on many levels. These and demonstration efforts are highlighted in this article. The feasibility of a pressurised gasification based processes compared to competing technologies in different applications is discussed. The potential of power production from biomass is also reviewed. (orig.) 4 refs.

  2. Danish Experiences with Deposit Probe Measurements in Grate and Pulverized Fuel Biomass Power Boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Stine Broholm; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2012-01-01

    Several measuring campaigns with focus on deposition behavior have been conducted at full-scale power plants firing biomass in Denmark. These campaigns have been reviewed in this work. The focus is the obtained experiences on deposit formation, shedding and chemistry. When comparing results from...

  3. Biomass power for rural development. Technical progress report, Phase 2, July 1--September 30, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuhauser, E.

    1999-01-01

    The project undertaken by the Salix Consortium is a multi-phased, multi-partner endeavor. Phase 1 focused on initial development and testing of the technology and forging the necessary agreements to demonstrate commercial willow production. The Phase 1 objectives have been successfully completed: preparing final design plans for two utility pulverized coal boiler for 20 MW of biopower capacity; developing fuel supply plans for the project with a goal of establishing 365 ha (900 ac) of willow; obtaining power production commitments from the power companies for Phase 2; obtaining construction and environmental permits; and developing an experimental strategy for crop production and power generation improvements needed to assure commercial success. The R and D effort also addresses environmental issues pertaining to introduction of the willow energy system. Beyond those Phase 1 requirements, the Consortium has already successfully demonstrated cofiring at Greenidge Station and has initiated development of the required nursery capacity for acreage scale-up. In Phase 2 every aspect of willow production and power generation from willow biomass will be demonstrated. The ultimate objective of Phase 2 is to transition the work performed under the Biomass Power for Rural Development project into a thriving, self-supported energy crop enterprise.

  4. Transportation Energy Futures Series. Projected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature Market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Mai, T. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Newes, E. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Aden, A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Warner, E. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Uriarte, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Inman, D. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Simpkins, T. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Argo, A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-03-01

    The viability of biomass as transportation fuel depends upon the allocation of limited resources for fuel, power, and products. By focusing on mature markets, this report identifies how biomass is projected to be most economically used in the long term and the implications for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and petroleum use. In order to better understand competition for biomass between these markets and the potential for biofuel as a market-scale alternative to petroleum-based fuels, this report presents results of a micro-economic analysis conducted using the Biomass Allocation and Supply Equilibrium (BASE) modeling tool. The findings indicate that biofuels can outcompete biopower for feedstocks in mature markets if research and development targets are met. The BASE tool was developed for this project to analyze the impact of multiple biomass demand areas on mature energy markets. The model includes domestic supply curves for lignocellulosic biomass resources, corn for ethanol and butanol production, soybeans for biodiesel, and algae for diesel. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  5. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Projected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature Market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, M.; Mai, T.; Newes, E.; Aden, A.; Warner, E.; Uriarte, C.; Inman, D.; Simpkins, T.; Argo, A.

    2013-03-01

    The viability of biomass as transportation fuel depends upon the allocation of limited resources for fuel, power, and products. By focusing on mature markets, this report identifies how biomass is projected to be most economically used in the long term and the implications for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and petroleum use. In order to better understand competition for biomass between these markets and the potential for biofuel as a market-scale alternative to petroleum-based fuels, this report presents results of a micro-economic analysis conducted using the Biomass Allocation and Supply Equilibrium (BASE) modeling tool. The findings indicate that biofuels can outcompete biopower for feedstocks in mature markets if research and development targets are met. The BASE tool was developed for this project to analyze the impact of multiple biomass demand areas on mature energy markets. The model includes domestic supply curves for lignocellulosic biomass resources, corn for ethanol and butanol production, soybeans for biodiesel, and algae for diesel. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  6. Energy from biomass. Teaching material; Energie aus Biomasse. Ein Lehrmaterial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-04-01

    The textbook discusses the available options for power and heat generation from biomass as well as the limits of biomass-based power supply. The main obstacle apart from the high cost is a lack of knowledge, which the book intends to remedy. It addresses students of agriculture, forestry, environmental engineering, heating systems engineering and apprentice chimney sweepers, but it will also be useful to all other interested readers. [German] Biomasse kann aufgrund seiner vielfaeltigen Erscheinungs- und Umwandlungsformen sowohl als Brennstoff zur Waerme- und Stromgewinnung oder als Treibstoff eingesetzt werden. Die energetische Nutzung von Biomasse birgt zudem nicht zu verachtende Vorteile. Zum einen wegen des Beitrags zum Klimaschutz aufgrund der CO{sub 2}-Neutralitaet oder einfach, weil Biomasse immer wieder nachwaechst und von fossilen Ressourcen unabhaengig macht. All den bisher erschlossenen Moeglichkeiten der energetischen Nutzung von Biomasse moechte dieses Lehrbuch Rechnung tragen. Es zeigt aber auch die Grenzen auf, die mit der Energieversorgung durch Bioenergie einhergehen. Hohe Kosten und ein erhebliches Informationsdefizit behinderten bisher eine verstaerkte Nutzung dieses Energietraeges. Letzterem soll dieses Lehrbuch entgegenwirken. Das vorliegende Lehrbuch wurde fuer die Aus- und Weiterbildung erstellt. Es richtet sich vor allem an angehende Land- und Forstwirte, Umwelttechniker, Heizungsbauer und Schornsteinfeger, ist aber auch fuer all diejenigen interessant, die das Thema ''Energie aus Biomasse'' verstehen und ueberblicken moechten. (orig.)

  7. 'Crud' detection and evaluation during the Embalse nuclear power plant's thermal cycle for powers of 100%

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, A.; Rosales, A.H.; Mura, V.R.; Sentupery, C.; Rascon, H.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the 'crud' measurements performed during the Embalse nuclear power plant's thermal cycle for a power of 100% (645 MWe) under different purification conditions. The aim of this work is to optimize the four steam generators' tube plate cleaning in function of the sweeping produced by their purification. (Author)

  8. Reduction of CO2 emission by INCAM model in Malaysia biomass power plants during the year 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Nor Aishah Saidina; Talebian-Kiakalaieh, Amin

    2018-03-01

    As the world's second largest palm oil producer and exporter, Malaysia could capitalize on its oil palm biomass waste for power generation. The emission factors from this renewable energy source are far lower than that of fossil fuels. This study applies an integrated carbon accounting and mitigation (INCAM) model to calculate the amount of CO 2 emissions from two biomass thermal power plants. The CO 2 emissions released from biomass plants utilizing empty fruit bunch (EFB) and palm oil mill effluent (POME), as alternative fuels for powering steam and gas turbines, were determined using the INCAM model. Each section emitting CO 2 in the power plant, known as the carbon accounting center (CAC), was measured for its carbon profile (CP) and carbon index (CI). The carbon performance indicator (CPI) included electricity, fuel and water consumption, solid waste and waste-water generation. The carbon emission index (CEI) and carbon emission profile (CEP), based on the total monthly carbon production, were determined across the CPI. Various innovative strategies resulted in a 20%-90% reduction of CO 2 emissions. The implementation of reduction strategies significantly reduced the CO 2 emission levels. Based on the model, utilization of EFB and POME in the facilities could significantly reduce the CO 2 emissions and increase the potential for waste to energy initiatives. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Nuclear power and heating plants in the electric power system. Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalincik, L.

    1975-01-01

    Procedures used and results obtained in the following works are described: Incorporation of the nuclear power plants in the power system in the long term perspective; physical limitations on the WWER 440 reactor power changes during fuel campaigns; evaluation of the consumption and start-up characteristics of WWER type nuclear power plants (2x440 MWe); evaluation of refuelling campaigns distribution of nuclear power plant units with regard to comprehensive control properties of nuclear power plants; the possibilities are investigated of the utilization of the WWER type reactor for heat supply in Czechoslovakia. (author)

  10. Fiscalini Farms Biomass Energy Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Stringfellow; Mary Kay Camarillo; Jeremy Hanlon; Michael Jue; Chelsea Spier

    2011-09-30

    In this final report describes and documents research that was conducted by the Ecological Engineering Research Program (EERP) at the University of the Pacific (Stockton, CA) under subcontract to Fiscalini Farms LP for work under the Assistance Agreement DE-EE0001895 'Measurement and Evaluation of a Dairy Anaerobic Digestion/Power Generation System' from the United States Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory. Fiscalini Farms is operating a 710 kW biomass-energy power plant that uses bio-methane, generated from plant biomass, cheese whey, and cattle manure via mesophilic anaerobic digestion, to produce electricity using an internal combustion engine. The primary objectives of the project were to document baseline conditions for the anaerobic digester and the combined heat and power (CHP) system used for the dairy-based biomass-energy production. The baseline condition of the plant was evaluated in the context of regulatory and economic constraints. In this final report, the operation of the plant between start-up in 2009 and operation in 2010 are documented and an interpretation of the technical data is provided. An economic analysis of the biomass energy system was previously completed (Appendix A) and the results from that study are discussed briefly in this report. Results from the start-up and first year of operation indicate that mesophilic anaerobic digestion of agricultural biomass, combined with an internal combustion engine, is a reliable source of alternative electrical production. A major advantage of biomass energy facilities located on dairy farms appears to be their inherent stability and ability to produce a consistent, 24 hour supply of electricity. However, technical analysis indicated that the Fiscalini Farms system was operating below capacity and that economic sustainability would be improved by increasing loading of feedstocks to the digester. Additional operational modifications, such as increased utilization of

  11. Modular simulation of the dynamics of a 925 MWe PWR electronuclear type reactor and design of a multivariable control algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansouri, S.

    1985-06-01

    This work has been consecrated to the modular simulation of a PWR 925 MWe power plant's dynamic and to the design of a multivariable algorithm control: a mathematical model of a plant type was developed. The programs were written on a structured manner in order to maximize flexibility. A multivariable control algorithm based on pole placement with output feedback was elaborated together with its correspondent program. The simulation results for different normal transients were shown and the capabilities of the new method of multivariable control are illustrated through many examples

  12. Market Survey for Nuclear Power in Developing Countries. 1974 Ed. (Preliminary Report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    In August 1973, the Agency concluded a market survey of nuclear power in fourteen selected developing countries throughout the world. The results of this survey have been reported in individual country reports and in a general report. A summary report on the survey was presented at the seventeenth regular session of the Agency's General Conference. These results indicated that in the fourteen countries surveyed, about 60,000 MWe of nuclear plant capacity might be put into operation during the 1980 to 1989 period. About 94 % of this capacity was represented by units of 600 MWe or larger since under the economic conditions which prevailed in early 1973 nuclear units in the 200 - 400 MWe size range were generally found to be uneconomical compared to oil-fired plants. Following completion of the Market Survey, a very preliminary evaluation of the total potential nuclear market in all developing countries of the world was carried out by Agency staff using the Market Survey results as a basis. This extended study which was completed in late 1973 indicated that the total capacity of nuclear plants which might be installed in the developing world during the 1980 to 1989 period could amount to approximately 160,000 MWe. Of this amount the capacity of small and medium power reactors (200 - 400 MWe) was less than 10,000 MW

  13. A renewable energy scenario for Aalborg Municipality based on low-temperature geothermal heat, wind power and biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Poul Alberg; Mathiesen, Brian Vad; Möller, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    Aalborg Municipality, Denmark, wishes to investigate the possibilities of becoming independent of fossil fuels. This article describes a scenario for supplying Aalborg Municipality’s energy needs through a combination of low-temperature geothermal heat, wind power and biomass. Of particular focus...... in the scenario is how low-temperature geothermal heat may be utilised in district heating (DH) systems. The analyses show that it is possible to cover Aalborg Municipality’s energy needs through the use of locally available sources in combination with significant electricity savings, heat savings, reductions...... in industrial fuel use and savings and fuel-substitutions in the transport sector. With biomass resources being finite, the two marginal energy resources in Aalborg are geothermal heat and wind power. If geothermal heat is utilised more, wind power may be limited and vice versa. The system still relies...

  14. IMPROVING SPECIFIC POWER CONSUMPTION FOR MECHANICAL MIXING OF THE FEEDSTOCK IN A BIOGAS FERMENTER BY MECHANICAL DISINTEGRATION OF LIGNOCELLULOSE BIOMASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Kratky

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Lignocellulosic biomass particles in biogas fermenter batch either sediment towards vessel bottom or rise towards batch surface, where they float and form a compact thick scum. These processes have primarily the negative influence on batch homogeneity, on evenness of batch temperature field, on removal of produced biogas bubbles out of liquid batch and also on mass transfer among microorganisms. These facts result in non-effective usage of biomass energy-potential that entails in low biogas yields. Therefore, good mixing of bioreactor batch is very important in order to stabilize anaerobic digestion process. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the impact of wheat straw disintegration and its hydration on hydrodynamic behaviour and on specific power consumption for mechanical mixing of wheat straw-water suspension. Based on experimental results, it was concluded that both hydration and mechanical disintegration of lignocellulosic biomass significantly improve homogeneity and pump-ability of biomass-water batches. Wheat straw hydration itself decreases specific power consumption for batch mixing by 60 % towards untreated straw. Moreover, mechanical disintegration itself decreases specific power consumption by 50 % at least towards untreated hydrated straw.

  15. High temperature corrosion of superheater materials for power production through biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gotthjaelp, K.; Broendsted, P. [Forskningscenter Risoe (Denmark); Jansen, P. [FORCE Institute (Denmark); Montgomery, M.; Nielsen, K.; Maahn, E. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Corrosion and Surface Techn. Inst. of Manufacturing Engineering (Denmark)

    1996-08-01

    The aim of the present study has been to establish a fundamental knowledge of the corrosion mechanisms acting on materials for use in biomass fired power plants. The knowledge is created based on laboratory exposures of selected materials in well-defined corrosive gas environments. The experiments using this facility includes corrosion studies of two types of high temperature resistant steels, Sanvik 8LR30 (18Cr 10Ni Ti) and Sanicro 28 (27Cr 31Ni 4Mo), investigated at 600 deg. C in time intervals up to 300 hours. The influence of HCl (200 ppm) and of SO{sub 2} (300 ppm) on the corrosion progress has been investigated. In addition the corrosion behaviour of the same materials was investigated after having been exposed under a cover of ash in air in a furnace at temperatures of 525 deg. C, 600 deg. C, and 700 deg. C. The ashes utilised are from a straw fired power plant and a synthetic ash composed of potassium chloride (KCl) and potassium sulphate (K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}). Different analysis techniques to characterise the composition of the ash coatings have been investigated in order to judge the reliability and accuracy of the SEM-EDX method. The results are considered as an important step towards a better understanding of the high temperature corrosion under the conditions found in biomass fired power plants. One of the problems to solve in a suggested subsequent project is to combine the effect of the aggressive gases (SO{sub 2} and HCl) and the active ash coatings on high temperature corrosion of materials. (EG) 20 refs.

  16. Security of nuclear power in operation. Results from the first PWR 900 MWe stages of Electricity of France (EDF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capel, R; Chaubaron, J F [Electricite de France, 93 - Saint-Denis. Service de la Production Thermique

    1980-06-01

    The security and reliability objectives of the PWR 900 MWe stages are acquiring particular importance in the present energetic and nuclear context. This article presents the general framework wherein the superintendence and maintenance of plant equipment are situated. E.D.F. applies to all of its activities, the assurance of quality principles. The General Rules of Operating constitute the basic document. The Operating Technical Specifications specify the conditions for the correct operating and safety of the installations. The Organization of Quality handbook sets the rules to be obeyed in the management of all operations. Examples from Fessenhein and Bugey illustrate the subject and elucidate the practical dimension of security. Lastly, the lessons of experience are recalled.

  17. Design of Biomass Combined Heat and Power (CHP Systems based on Economic Risk using Minimax Regret Criterion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Wen Choong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available It is a great challenge to identify optimum technologies for CHP systems that utilise biomass and convert it into heat and power. In this respect, industry decision makers are lacking in confidence to invest in biomass CHP due to economic risk from varying energy demand. This research work presents a linear programming systematic framework to design biomass CHP system based on potential loss of profit due to varying energy demand. Minimax Regret Criterion (MRC approach was used to assess maximum regret between selections of the given biomass CHP design based on energy demand. Based on this, the model determined an optimal biomass CHP design with minimum regret in economic opportunity. As Feed-in Tariff (FiT rates affects the revenue of the CHP plant, sensitivity analysis was then performed on FiT rates on the selection of biomass CHP design. Besides, design analysis on the trend of the optimum design selected by model was conducted. To demonstrate the proposed framework in this research, a case study was solved using the proposed approach. The case study focused on designing a biomass CHP system for a palm oil mill (POM due to large energy potential of oil palm biomass in Malaysia.

  18. Wood chip production technology and costs for fuel in Namibia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leinonen, A.

    2007-12-15

    This work has been done in the project where the main target is to evaluate the technology and economy to use bush biomass for power production in Namibia. The project has been financed by the Ministry for Foreign Affairs of Finland and the Ministry of Agriculture, Water and Forestry of the Republic of Namibia. The target of this study is to calculate the production costs of bush chips at the power plant using the current production technology and to look possibilities to develop production technology in order to mechanize production technology and to decrease the production costs. The wood production costs are used in feasibility studies, in which the technology and economy of utilization of wood chips for power generation in 5, 10 and 20 MW electric power plants and for power generation in Van Eck coal fired power plant in Windhoek are evaluated. Field tests were made at Cheetah Conservation Farm (CCF) in Otjiwarongo region. CCF is producing wood chips for briquette factory in Otjiwarongo. In the field tests it has been gathered information about this CCF semi-mechanized wood chip production technology. Also new machines for bush biomass chip production have been tested. A new mechanized production chain has been designed on the basis of this information. The production costs for the CCF semi-mechanized and the new production chain have been calculated. The target in the moisture content to produce wood chips for energy is 20 w-%. In the semi-mechanized wood chip production chain the work is done partly manually, and the supply chain is organized into crews of 4.8 men. The production chain consists of manual felling and compiling, drying, chipping with mobile chipper and manual feeding and road transport by a tractor with two trailers. The CCF production chain works well. The chipping and road transport productivity in the semimechanized production chain is low. New production machines, such as chainsaw, brush cutter, lawn mover type cutter, rotator saw in skid

  19. Development and delivery of a workshop methodology: planning for biomass power plant projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, A.J.; Delbridge, P.; Trevorrow, E.; Pile, C.

    2001-07-01

    This report gives details of the approach used to develop a workshop methodology to help planners and stakeholders address key issues that may arise when submitting a planning application for a biomass power plant in the light of the UK government's energy and climate change targets. The results of interviews with stakeholders (central government, regulatory authorities, developers, planners, non-governmental organisations, local community, resident groups) are summarised, and the NIMBY (not in my back yard) syndrome, the lack of trust in the developer, and lack of awareness of the use of biomass are discussed. Details are given of the design and testing of the workshop methodology and the resulting workshop methodology and workbook guide aimed at understanding the stakeholder issues and concerns through stakeholder discussions.

  20. Power/heat production from biomass in Finland - Two modern Finnish examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aeijaelae, M.

    1997-01-01

    According to this conference paper, Finland is a leading country in the utilization of biomass fuels for power and heat production. One reason is that peat and wood are the only indigenous fuels available in Finland. Other reasons are the strong forest industry and the widely adopted combined heat and power (CHP) production. CHP production is typical of process industry and municipal district heating. The most common boiler type in modern CHP plants is the fluidized bed type. District heating is the cheapest heating in municipalities with a few thousand inhabitants. Electric heating dominates in sparsely populated regions. CHP becomes attractive for populations of more than ten thousand. Two examples are described: (1) Rauhalahti Power Plant produces 140 MW of district heat, 65 MW of industrial steam and 87 MW of electricity. (2) Kuusamo Power Plant produces 6.1 MW electric energy and 17.6 MW district heat; its unique feature is the utilization of the bed mixing dryer for drying of the fuel prior to combustion, this dryer being the first of its kind in the world. 1 figure

  1. Large-scale biodiesel production using flue gas from coal-fired power plants with Nannochloropsis microalgal biomass in open raceway ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Baohua; Sun, Faqiang; Yang, Miao; Lu, Lin; Yang, Guanpin; Pan, Kehou

    2014-12-01

    The potential use of microalgal biomass as a biofuel source has raised broad interest. Highly effective and economically feasible biomass generating techniques are essential to realize such potential. Flue gas from coal-fired power plants may serve as an inexpensive carbon source for microalgal culture, and it may also facilitate improvement of the environment once the gas is fixed in biomass. In this study, three strains of the genus Nannochloropsis (4-38, KA2 and 75B1) survived this type of culture and bloomed using flue gas from coal-fired power plants in 8000-L open raceway ponds. Lower temperatures and solar irradiation reduced the biomass yield and lipid productivities of these strains. Strain 4-38 performed better than the other two as it contained higher amounts of triacylglycerols and fatty acids, which are used for biodiesel production. Further optimization of the application of flue gas to microalgal culture should be undertaken. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Life cycle assessment of fossil and biomass power generation chains. An analysis carried out for ALSTOM Power Services

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Ch.

    2008-12-15

    This final report issued by the Technology Assessment Department of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) reports on the results of an analysis carried out on behalf of the Alstom Power Services company. Fossil and biomass chains as well as co-combustion power plants are assessed. The general objective of this analysis is an evaluation of specific as well as overall environmental burdens resulting from these different options for electricity production. The results obtained for fuel chains including hard coal, lignite, wood, natural gas and synthetic natural gas are discussed. An overall comparison is made and the conclusions drawn from the results of the analysis are presented.

  3. Biomass CHP Catalog of Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report reviews the technical and economic characterization of biomass resources, biomass preparation, energy conversion technologies, power production systems, and complete integrated CHP systems.

  4. Development of an innovative polygeneration process in hybrid solar-biomass system for combined power, cooling and desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, U.; Kumar, R.; Pant, P.C.; Chaudhary, R.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Heat utilization from solar and biomass resources are considered for hybridization. • Modeling of polygeneration process in hybrid solar-biomass power plant is considered. • Thermodynamic evaluation are performed to identify the effect of various parameters. • Primary Energy Saving of polygeneration process is determined. - Abstract: In the polygeneration process simultaneous production of power, vapor absorption refrigeration (VAR) cooling and multi-effect humidification and dehumidification (MEHD) desalination system from different heat sources in hybrid solar-biomass (HSB) system with higher energy efficiency take place. It is one of the solutions to fulfill energy requirements from renewable sources and also helps in the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions. The VAR cooling system operates using the extracted heat taken from turbine and condenser heat of the VAR cooling system is used in desalination system for production of drinking water as per demand requirement. Though the production of electricity decreases due to extraction of heat from turbine for VAR cooling and desalination, the complete system meets the energy requirements & increases the primary energy savings (PES). The thermodynamic evaluation and optimization of HSB system in polygeneration process for combined power, cooling and desalination is investigated to identify the effects of various operating parameters. Primary energy savings (PES) of polygeneration process in HSB system is achieved to 50.5%. The energy output is increased to 78.12% from this system as compared to simple power plant.

  5. Ergonomic design of mosaic control panel and standardised control tile configurations for 500 MWe PHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ughade, A.V.; Das, R.N.; Ramakrishnan, S.

    1994-01-01

    A review of control rooms of operating nuclear power plants identified many design problems having potential for degrading the performance of operators. Many indications and controls on existing control panels are placed outside the recommended visual and reach envelopes for acceptable operator usage. As a result, the application of human factor principles was found to be needed. This paper describes the design approach for working out the dimensions of main control room panels and console using human engineering principles and recommends the ergonomic dimensions of the main control room panels and console. Further it gives the basis and works out the control tile configurations for 500 MWe PHWR project. It also suggests the use of a full scale mock up for design evaluation and verification. (author). 7 refs., 4 figs

  6. Alkali deposits found in biomass power plants: A preliminary investigation of their extent and nature. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, T.R.; Miles, T.R. Jr. [Miles (Thomas R.), Portland, OR (United States); Baxter, L.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility; Bryers, R.W. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Jenkins, B.M. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States); Oden, L.L. [Bureau of Mines, Albany, OR (United States). Albany Research Center

    1995-04-15

    Alkali in the ash of annual crop biomass fuels creates serious fouling and slagging in conventional boilers. Even with the use of sorbents and other additives, power plants can only fire limited amounts of these fuels in combination with wood. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), US Department of Energy, and the biomass power industry carried out eight full-scale firing tests and several laboratory experiments to study the nature and occurrence of deposits with the goal of increasing the quantities of these biofuels that can be used. This report describes the results of the laboratory and power plant tests that included: tracking and analyzing fuels and deposits by various methods; recording operating conditions; and extensive laboratory testing. The paper describes the occurrence of deposits, fuel and deposit analyses, boiler design and operation, fouling and slagging indicators, and recommendations. 37 refs., 41 figs., 17 tabs.

  7. Development of process route for production of tubing for various core sub-assemblies and heat exchangers for 500 MWe Indian PFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Phani Babu, C.; Dubey, A.K.; Surender, A.; Deshpande, K.V.K.; Maity, P.K.

    2009-01-01

    India's three stage Nuclear Power Program has entered its second stage on commercial scale with the commencement of construction of 500 MWe Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) at Kalpakkam. Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC), Hyderabad is playing a crucial role in the manufacture of all the critical sub-assemblies and control elements for this reactor. The challenging task of process development and production of the various critical tubing for these sub assemblies for PFBR has been taken up by Stainless Steel Tubes Plant (SSTP), NFC with indigenous development of the equipment and technology

  8. High Temperature Corrosion of Superheater Materials for Power Production through Biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Maahn, Ernst emanuel; Nielsen, Karsten agersted

    The aim of the present study has been to establish a fundamental knowledge of the corrosion mechanisms acting on materials for use in biomass fired power plants. The knowledge is created based on laboratory exposures on selected materials in well-defined corrosive gas environments. An experimental...... facility has been established wherein the planned exposures are completed. Specimens were exposed in combined synthetic flue gas at temperatures up to 900C. The specimens could be cooled to 300C below the gas temperature. Gas flow and gas mixture can be varied according to the conditions found in a power......) on the corrosion progress has been investigated.In addition the corrosion behaviour of the same materials was investigated after having been exposed under a cover of ash in air in a furnace at temperatures of 525C, 600C and 700C. The ashes utilised are from a straw-fired power plant and a synthetic ash composed...

  9. Power generation based on biomass by combined fermentation and gasification--a new concept derived from experiments and modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methling, Torsten; Armbrust, Nina; Haitz, Thilo; Speidel, Michael; Poboss, Norman; Braun-Unkhoff, Marina; Dieter, Heiko; Kempter-Regel, Brigitte; Kraaij, Gerard; Schliessmann, Ursula; Sterr, Yasemin; Wörner, Antje; Hirth, Thomas; Riedel, Uwe; Scheffknecht, Günter

    2014-10-01

    A new concept is proposed for combined fermentation (two-stage high-load fermenter) and gasification (two-stage fluidised bed gasifier with CO2 separation) of sewage sludge and wood, and the subsequent utilisation of the biogenic gases in a hybrid power plant, consisting of a solid oxide fuel cell and a gas turbine. The development and optimisation of the important processes of the new concept (fermentation, gasification, utilisation) are reported in detail. For the gas production, process parameters were experimentally and numerically investigated to achieve high conversion rates of biomass. For the product gas utilisation, important combustion properties (laminar flame speed, ignition delay time) were analysed numerically to evaluate machinery operation (reliability, emissions). Furthermore, the coupling of the processes was numerically analysed and optimised by means of integration of heat and mass flows. The high, simulated electrical efficiency of 42% including the conversion of raw biomass is promising for future power generation by biomass. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Experimental study of the tritium inventory in the BR3 and extrapolation to a P.W.R. of 900 MWe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlier, A.; Gubel, P.; Vandenberg, C.; Haas, D.

    1982-01-01

    The aim of this report is to evaluate the tritium production and diffusion in uranium and plutonium fuel in the primary circuit of a PWR and to improve the knowledge about the production difference between the two kinds of isotopes. The first part of the work is relative to the experimental PWR BR3, cycle 4A, during which a constant control of the tritium activity has been performed in the primary circuit. These experimental evaluation was compared with the the theoretical estimation of the tritium production during the cycle 4A. From these observations and calculations, a tritium release fraction was deduced and estimated to be 0.81% of the total tritium produced in the fuel. The second part of the work is devoted to post-irradiation examinations on a few uranium and plutonium rods irradiated in the BR3 reactor. The tritium content was measured in the cladding, in the fuel and in the gas plenum for various samples of fuel rods. These results show the relationship between the release rate from the fuel matrix, the linear power and the burnup. The last part of the work is the estimate of the tritium production in a PWR of 900 MWe in operating conditions. The tritium production was calculated for an uranium fuelled core and for a core containing 30% of all plutonium fuel assemblies in a generic power plant of 900 MWe. From this study, it results that the loading with 30% plutonium assemblies at equilibrium increases the tritium balance in the moderator water of less than 5%

  11. Dynamic Analysis of Coolant Channel and Its Internals of Indian 540 MWe PHWR Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rama Rao

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The horizontal coolant channel is one of the important parts of primary heat transport system in PHWR type of reactors. There are in all 392 channels in the core of Indian 540 MWe reactor. Each channel houses 13 natural uranium fuel bundles and shielding and sealing plugs one each on either side of the channel. The heavy water coolant flows through the coolant channel and carries the nuclear heat to outside the core for steam generation and power production in the turbo-generator. India has commissioned one 540 MWe PHWR reactor in September 2005 and another similar unit will be going into operation very shortly. For a complete dynamic study of the channel and its internals under the influence of high coolant flow, experimental and modeling studies have been carried out. A good correlation has been achieved between the results of experimental and analytical models. The operating life of a typical coolant channel typically ranges from 10 to 15 full-power years. Towards the end of its operating life, its health monitoring becomes an important activity. Vibration diagnosis plays an important role as a tool for life management of coolant. Through the study of dynamic characteristics of the coolant channel under simulated loading condition, an attempt has been made to develop a diagnostics to monitor the health of the coolant channel over its operating life. A study has been also carried out to characterize the fuel vibration under different flow condition.

  12. Safety options for the 1300 MWe program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cayol, A.; Dupuis, M.C.; Fourest, B.; Oury, J.M.

    1980-04-01

    Standardization of the nuclear plants built in France implies an examination of the main technical safety options to be taken for a given type of reactor. By this procedure the subjects for which detailed studies will be needed to confirm the decisions made for the project can be defined in advance. In this context the technical safety option analysis for the 1300 MWe plants was conducted from the end of 1975 to the middle of 1978 according to usual regulation examination practice. The main conclusions are presented on the following subjects: safety methods; technical options concerning the containment vessel, primary fluid activity, fuel elements, steam generators; general organization of the lay-out [fr

  13. Institutional support to the nuclear power based on transportable installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, V.P.; Cherepnin, Y.S.

    2010-01-01

    Existing nuclear power uses large-power nuclear plants (more than 1,000 MWe) and enriched uranium fuel ( 2 35 U ). Each plant is treated as an exclusive costly project. As a result, large NPPs are operated predominantly in highly developed big countries. In many countries, construction of large power units is not reasonable because of the economic conditions and national specifics. This calls for the use of small- and medium-power nuclear plants (SMPNP), especially transportable nuclear installations (TNI). TNI feature small power (up to 100 MWe); serial production, and transportability. Small- and medium-power nuclear plants could serve to produce electricity and heat; perform water desalination; provide temporary and emergency energy supply. The authors discuss some findings of the studies carried out on the various aspects of the TNI life, as well as the legal and institutional support to their development, construction and operation. The studies have been performed in the framework of the INPRO Action Plan

  14. Fuel procurement for first generation fusion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gore, B.F.; Hendrickson, P.L.

    1976-09-01

    The provision of deuterium, tritium, lithium and beryllium fuel materials for fusion power plants is examined in this document. Possible fusion reactions are discussed for use in first generation power plants. Requirements for fuel materials are considered. A range of expected annual consumption is given for each of the materials for a 1000 megawatts electric (MWe) fusion power plant. Inventory requirements are also given. Requirements for an assumed fusion power plant electrical generating capacity of 10 6 MWe (roughly twice present U.S. generating capacity) are also given. The supply industries are then examined for deuterium, lithium, and beryllium. Methods are discussed for producing the only tritium expected to be purchased by a commercial fusion industry--an initial inventory for the first plant. Present production levels and methods are described for deuterium, lithium and beryllium. The environmental impact associated with production of these materials is then discussed. The toxicity of beryllium is described, and methods are indicated to keep worker exposure to beryllium as low as achievable

  15. District heating by the Bohunice nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metke, E.; Skvarka, P.

    1984-01-01

    Technical and economical aspects of district heating by the electricity generating nuclear plants in Czechoslovakia are discussed. As a first stage of the project, 240 MW thermal power will be supplied using bleeding lines steam from the B-2 nuclear power plant at Jaslovske Bohunice to heat up water at a central station to 130 grad C. The maximal thermal power that can be produced for district heating by WWER type reactors with regular condensation turbines is estimated to be: 465 MW for a WWER-440 reactor with two 220 MWe turbines and 950 MW for a WWER-1000 reactor with a Skoda made 1000 MWe turbine using a three-stage scheme to heat up water from 60 grad C to 150 grad C. The use of satelite heating turbines connected to the steam collector is expected to improve the efficiency. District heating needs will de taken into account for siting of the new power plants

  16. Comparative of fuel cycle cost for light water nuclear power plants; Uporedna analiza cene gorivnog ciklusa lakovodne nuklearne elektrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocic, A; Dimitrijevic, Z [Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences, Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1978-07-01

    Starting from ost general fuel cycle scheme for light water reactors this article deals with conceptual differences of BWR, PWR and WWER as well as with the influence of certain phases of fuel cycle on economic parameters of an equivalent 1000 MWe reactor using a computer program CENA /1/ and typical parameters of each reactor type. An analysis of two particular power plants 628 MWe and 440 MWe WWER by means of the same program is given in the second part of this paper taking into account the differences of in-core fuel management. This second approach is especially interesting for the economy of the power plant itself in the period of planning. (author)

  17. Process Control Logic Modification to Mitigate Transient Following Tripping of a Primary Circulating Pump for a 540 MWe PHWR Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contractor, Ankur D; Gaikwad, Avinash J.; Kumar, Rajesh; Chakraborty, G.; Vhora, S.F.

    2006-01-01

    The 540 MWe Indian Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) incorporates many new features as compared to the earlier 220 MWe PHWRs. To evaluate the new design features like Primary Heat Transport (PHT) system configuration with two loops, four Primary Circulating Pumps (PCPs) and four passes through core, addition of a Pressurizer (surge Tank) in the PHT system along with Feed/Bleed system and their safety related implications, simulation model have been developed. A reactor step-back is proposed following one PCP trip. The corresponding PCP in the healthy loop is tripped to avoid asymmetrical flow and pressure distribution in the two identical loops. In spite of such elaborate provisions, the margins from high/low PHT pressure are small following tripping of one PCP. Mathematical models for all the major components and sub-systems of the proposed 540 MWe PHWR were developed based on the conservation equations of mass, momentum, energy and equation of state. All the associated control systems are also modeled. The PHT system includes the reactor core with nuclear fuel, PCP, PHT system pressure controller with feed/bleed system and Pressurizer (Surge Tank). The secondary system includes mainly the Steam Generators (SGs), the SG level and pressure controllers, apart from the various steam cycle components. All these models are integrated together to form the Plant Transient Analysis Computer Code Dyna540. The scenario following one PCP trips leads to different states (high/low pressure in Reactor Outlet Header (ROH)) depending upon the banks in which the PCP trips. The pressurizer is connected to two ROHs on one side of the reactor. The system pressure is controlled based on average of four ROHs pressure. In the case of asymmetrical pump operation, this logic leads to a situation where individual ROH pressure goes very near the low/high PHT system pressure trip set point, even though the controlled average pressure is very close to the set pressure. The PHT high

  18. The biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viterbo, J.

    2011-01-01

    Biomass comes mainly from forests and agriculture and is considered as a clean alternative energy that can be valorized as heat, power, bio-fuels and chemical products but its mass production is challenging in terms of adequate technology but also in terms of rethinking the use of lands. Forests can be managed to produce biomass but bio-fuels can also be generated from sea-weeds. Biomass appears very promising but on one hand we have to secure its supplying and assure its economical profitability and on another hand we have to assure a reasonable use of lands and a limited impact on the environment. The contribution of biomass to sustainable development depends on the balance between these 2 ends. (A.C.)

  19. Termisk forgasning af biomasse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Ulrik Birk

    2005-01-01

    The title of this Ph.D. thesis is: Thermal Gasification of Biomass. Compilation of activities in the ”Biomass Gasification Group” at Technical University of Denmark (DTU). This thesis gives a presentation of selected activities in the Biomass Gasification Group at DTU. The activities are related...... to thermal gasification of biomass. Focus is on gasification for decentralised cogeneration of heat and power, and on related research on fundamental processes. In order to insure continuity of the presentation the other activities in the group, have also been described. The group was started in the late...... of these activities has been fruitful. The two- stage gasifier was developed for gasification aiming at decentralised cogeneration of heat and power. The development ranged from lap-top scale equipment to a fully automatic plant with more than 2000 hours of operation. Compared to most other gasification processes...

  20. Evaluation of design and operation of fuel handling systems for 25 MW biomass fueled CFB power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precht, D.

    1991-01-01

    Two circulating fluidized bed, biomass fueled, 25MW power plants were placed into operation by Thermo Electron Energy Systems in California during late 1989. This paper discusses the initial fuel and system considerations, system design, actual operating fuel characterisitics, system operation during the first year and modifications. Biomass fuels handled by the system include urban/manufacturing wood wastes and agricultural wastes in the form of orchard prunings, vineyard prunings, pits, shells, rice hulls and straws. Equipment utilized in the fuel handling system are described and costs are evaluated. Lessons learned from the design and operational experience are offered for consideration on future biomass fueled installations where definition of fuel quality and type is subject to change

  1. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a Reference Boiling Water Reactor Power Station. Main report. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

    1980-06-01

    Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWe.

  2. Biomass co-firing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen

    2013-01-01

    Co-firing biomass with fossil fuels in existing power plants is an attractive option for significantly increasing renewable energy resource utilization and reducing CO2 emissions. This chapter mainly discusses three direct co-firing technologies: pulverized-fuel (PF) boilers, fluidized-bed combus......Co-firing biomass with fossil fuels in existing power plants is an attractive option for significantly increasing renewable energy resource utilization and reducing CO2 emissions. This chapter mainly discusses three direct co-firing technologies: pulverized-fuel (PF) boilers, fluidized......-bed combustion (FBC) systems, and grate-firing systems, which are employed in about 50%, 40% and 10% of all the co-firing plants, respectively. Their basic principles, process technologies, advantages, and limitations are presented, followed by a brief comparison of these technologies when applied to biomass co...

  3. Biomass direct-fired power generation system in China: An integrated energy, GHG emissions, and economic evaluation for Salix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Changbo; Zhang, Lixiao; Chang, Yuan; Pang, Mingyue

    2015-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of the options of biomass power generation in China, this study presented an integrated energy, environmental, and economic evaluation for Salix in China, and a typical Salix direct-fired power generation system (SDPGS) in Inner Mongolia was selected for case study. A tiered hybrid life cycle assessment (LCA) model was developed to calculate the “planting-to-wire” (PTW) energy consumption, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and economic cost and profit of the SDPGS, including feedstock cultivation, power plant construction and operation, and on-grid price with/without government subsidies. The results show that the PTW energy consumption and GHG emissions of Salix are 0.8 MJ/kWh and 114 g CO 2 -eq/kWh, respectively, indicating an energy payback time (EPBT) of 3.2 years. The SDPGS is not economically feasible without government subsidies. The PTW costs are dominated by feedstock cultivation. The energy saving and GHG mitigation benefits are still robust, even when the power plant runs at only 60% design capacity. For future development of biomass power in China, scientific planning is necessary to guarantee a sufficient feedstock supply. In addition, technology progress, mature industrial chains, and reasonable price setting policy are required to enable potential energy and environmental advantages of biomass power moving forward. -- Highlights: •A hybrid LCA model was used to evaluate overall performance of the SDPGS. •On-site processes dominate the “planting-to-wire” footprints. •The energy saving and GHG mitigation benefits of the SDPGS are robust. •The economic profit of the SDPGS is feeble without government subsidies. •Generating efficiency promotion has a comprehensive positive effect on the system

  4. Combined Heat and Power Systems for the Provision of Sustainable Energy from Biomass in Buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Ortwein Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Against the background of greenhouse gases causing climate change, combined heat and power (CHP) systems fueled by biomass can efficiently supply energy with high flexibility. Such CHP systems will usually consist of one or more thermo-chemical conversion steps and at least one (the more or less separated) electric power generation unit. Depending on the main products of the previous conversion steps (e.g. combustible gases or liquids, but also flue gases with sensible heat), different techno...

  5. Reliability investigation for the ECC subsystem of a 1300 MWe-PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalovic, M.

    1983-01-01

    In this study, a fault-tree analysis is used for reliability investigation of Emergency Core Cooling Sub-system of a 1300 MWe pressurised water reactor. Basic assumptions of the study are large break in the reactor coolant system and independence of the pseudo-components. Relatively high non-availability of the sub-system was calculated. Critical component and minimum cut set are determined. (author)

  6. Optimal design and operating strategies for a biomass-fueled combined heat and power system with energy storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Yingying; Jenkins, Bryan M.; Kornbluth, Kurt

    2018-01-01

    An economic linear programming model with a sliding time window was developed to assess designing and scheduling a biomass-fueled combined heat and power system consisting of biomass gasifier, internal combustion engine, heat recovery set, heat-only boiler, producer gas storage and thermal energy......, utility tariff structure and technical and finical performance of the system components. Engine partial load performance was taken into consideration. Sensitivity analyses demonstrate how the optimal BCHP configuration changes with varying demands and utility tariff rates....

  7. Advanced Biomass Gasification Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1997-08-01

    DOE has a major initiative under way to demonstrate two high-efficiency gasification systems for converting biomass into electricity. As this fact sheet explains, the Biomass Power Program is cost-sharing two scale-up projects with industry in Hawaii and Vermont that, if successful, will provide substantial market pull for U.S. biomass technologies, and provide a significant market edge over competing foreign technologies.

  8. Size and series effects on the economics of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouyer, J.L.; Marcetteau, P.; Nisan, S.

    2001-01-01

    This paper updates data and models concerning size and series effects on the economics of nuclear power plants. Size effect is the observation that, for a given technology, capital cost of a plant increases less rapidly than its capacity. The overall scaling exponent is derived from specific exponents for different plant items. It varies for industrial LWR and PHWR between 0.4 to 0.7. Series effect comprises two types of effects: a) fabrication in series of equipment, thus reducing unit cost with increased number of units; b) Increased efficiency through the feedback of experience obtained from the on-site realisation of a number of identical plants. Size and series effects are combined in the realisation of a full programme of a same standard model of nuclear power plants, for a given country or for several countries, in the same period of time (typically 10 years). Calculations have been performed to compare size and series effects for a 15000 MWe programme to be installed within 10 years, and reactor sizes varying from 600 MWe to 1500 MWe. The different options regarding the size of PWR standard model have also been compared on the basis of the least leveled electricity cost. The results of the calculations show that a standardised series of 1500 MWe appears presently the best solution in densely industrialized countries. In the long term, reactors of 1000 MWe, or less, (if new concepts sharply decrease unit cost per kW installed), may be preferred because of the associated large series effect. (authors)

  9. Feasibility study for biomass power plants in Thailand. Volume 1. Main report. Export trade information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This study, conducted by Black and Veatch, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. The report presents a technical and commercial analysis for the development of three nearly identical electricity generating facilities (biomass steam power plants) in the towns of Chachoengsao, Suphan Buri, and Pichit in Thailand. The Main Report is divided into the following sections: (1.0) Executive Study; (2.0) Project Objectives; (3.0) Review of Combustion Technology for Biomass Fueled Steam Generator Units; (4.0) Conceptual Design; (5.0) Plant Descriptions; (6.0) Plant Operations Staffing; (7.0) Project Schedule; (8.0) Project Cost Estimate; (9.0) Financial Analysis; Appendix - Financial Analysis

  10. Externalities of biomass based electricity production compared to power generation from coal in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faaij, A.; Meuleman, B.

    1997-12-01

    Externalities of electricity production from biomass and coal are investigated and compared for the Dutch context. Effects on economic activity and employment are investigated by means of Input/Output and multiplier tables. Valuations of damage from emissions to air are based on generic data from other studies. In addition, external costs are estimated for nitrogen leaching and for the use of agrochemicals for energy crop production. The average private costs for biomass and coal based power generation are projected to be 68 and 38 mECU/kWh respectively in the year 2005. It is assumed that biomass production takes place on fallow land. Coal mining is excluded from the analysis. If the quantified external damages and benefits are included the cost range for bio-electricity is 53-70 mECU/kWh and 45-72 mECU/kWh for coal. Indirect economic effects (increment of Gross Domestic Product) and the difference in CO2 emissions are the most important distinguishing factors between coal and biomass in economic terms. Damage costs of other emissions to air (NOx, SO2, dust and CO) are of the same order of magnitude for both coal and biomass (coal mining excluded). In this analysis environmental impacts of energy farming are compared mainly to fallow land focused on the use of fertilizers and agrochemicals. The related damage costs appear to be low but should be considered as a preliminary estimate only. The quantitative outcomes should not be considered as the external costs of the two fuel cycles studied. Many impacts have not been valued and large uncertainties persist e.g. with respect to the costs of climate change and numerous dose response relations. More detailed analysis is required with respect to macro-economic impacts. The results serve as a first indication, but the outcomes plead for the support of bio-electricity production and/or taxation of coal based power generation. 88 refs

  11. Northeast Regional Biomass Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Connell, R.A.

    1991-11-01

    The management structure and program objectives for the Northeast Regional Biomass Program (NRBP) remain unchanged from previous years. Additional funding was provided by the Bonneville Power Administration Regional Biomass Program to continue the publication of articles in the Biologue. The Western Area Power Administration and the Council of Great Lakes Governors funded the project Characterization of Emissions from Burning Woodwaste''. A grant for the ninth year was received from DOE. The Northeast Regional Biomass Steering Committee selected the following four projects for funding for the next fiscal year. (1) Wood Waste Utilization Conference, (2) Performance Evaluation of Wood Systems in Commercial Facilities, (3) Wood Energy Market Utilization Training, (4) Update of the Facility Directory.

  12. Northeast Regional Biomass Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connell, R.A.

    1991-11-01

    The management structure and program objectives for the Northeast Regional Biomass Program (NRBP) remain unchanged from previous years. Additional funding was provided by the Bonneville Power Administration Regional Biomass Program to continue the publication of articles in the Biologue. The Western Area Power Administration and the Council of Great Lakes Governors funded the project ''Characterization of Emissions from Burning Woodwaste''. A grant for the ninth year was received from DOE. The Northeast Regional Biomass Steering Committee selected the following four projects for funding for the next fiscal year. (1) Wood Waste Utilization Conference, (2) Performance Evaluation of Wood Systems in Commercial Facilities, (3) Wood Energy Market Utilization Training, (4) Update of the Facility Directory

  13. Nuclear power plants in Europe 1996. Report on operation, construction and planning in 18 European countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    Eighteen European countries operate and build, respectively, nuclear power plants in 1996. The 'Nuclear Power Plants in Europe 1996' atw report singles out the main events and lines of development. As per August 1996, 216 (1995: 215) nuclear generating units (which means power reactors for the purposes of this report) with an aggregate 177,916 (177,010) MWe installed gross capacity are in operation and 24 (26) units with 23,086 (24,786) MWe are under construction in seven countries. This adds up to a total of 240 (241) nuclear generating units with an aggregate 201,002 (201,796) MWe. In the nuclear power plants in Europe, some 1067 (1048) TWh of nuclear power was converted into electric power in 1995; 802 (792) TWh of this aggregate was converted in 142 (137) units in the European Union (EU). In the EU the share of nuclear power in the public supply of electricity was 36%. Lithuania, with 86 (77)% has the highest share of nuclear power in Europe, followed by France with 76 (75)% and Belgium with 56%. The lowest percentage, only 4 (5)%, is recorded in the Netherlands. As a consequence of electricity imports, nuclear power holds considerable shares in the public electricity supply also of countries in which no nuclear power are operated, such as Italy or Austria. (orig.) [de

  14. Nuclear power plants in Europe 1995. Report about operation, construction, and planning in 18 European countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Report about Operation, Construction, and Planning in 18 European Countries Eighteen European countries operate and build, respectively, nuclear power plants in 1995. The ''Nuclear Power Plants in Europe 1995'' atw report singles out the main events and lines of development. As per August 1995, 214 (1994: 215) nuclear generating units (which means power reactors for the purposes of this report) with an aggregate 177,010 (176,322) MWe installed gross capacity are in operation in seventeen countries, and 26 (30) units with 24,786 (28,086) MWe are under construction in seven countries. This adds up to a total of 240 (245) nuclear generating units with an aggregate 201,796 (204,408) MWe. In the nuclear power plants in Europe, some 1048 TWh of nuclear power was converted into electric power in 1994; 792 TWh of this aggregate was converted in 137 units in the European Union (EU). In the EU the share of nuclear power in the public supply of electricity was 36%. Lithuania, with 77%, has the highest share of nuclear power in Europe, followed by France with 75% and Belgium with 56%. The lowest percentage, only 5%, is recorded in the Netherlands. As a consequence of electricity imports, nuclear power holds considerable shares in the public electricity supply also of countries in which no nuclear power plants are operated, such as Italy or Austria. (orig.) [de

  15. Biomass energy technologies for rural infrastructure and village power - opportunities and challenges in the context of global climate change concerns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishore, V.V.N.; Bhandari, P.M.; Gupta, P.

    2004-01-01

    The potential and role of biomass resources in developing countries for addressing global climate change concerns are highlighted using India as a case study. Promotion of technologies, which use biomass more efficiently, is seen as a key strategy to integrate the concerns of both developing countries and developed countries. The role of various biomass technologies for improving rural infrastructure and village power is discussed in detail. A vision of establishing and running a chain of rural energy service companies, operating with a basket of devices and technologies, under the general provisions of CDM, is examined for commercialization and mainstreaming of biomass technologies which have achieved reasonable levels of maturity. (author)

  16. The Use of Fire Radiative Power to Estimate the Biomass Consumption Coefficient for Temperate Grasslands in the Atlantic Forest Biome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibiana Salvador Cabral da Costa

    Full Text Available Abstract Every year, many active fire spots are identified in the satellite images of the southern Brazilian grasslands in the Atlantic Forest biome and Pampa biome. Fire Radiative Power (FRP is a technique that uses remotely sensed data to quantify burned biomass. FRP measures the radiant energy released per time unit by burning vegetation. This study aims to use satellite and field data to estimate the biomass consumption rate and the biomass consumption coefficient for the southern Brazilian grasslands. Three fire points were identified in satellite FRP products. These data were combined with field data, collected through literature review, to calculate the biomass consumption coefficient. The type of vegetation is an important variable in the estimation of the biomass consumption coefficient. The biomass consumption rate was estimated to be 2.237 kg s-1 for the southern Brazilian grasslands in Atlantic Forest biome, and the biomass consumption coefficient was estimated to be 0.242 kg MJ-1.

  17. Integrated firewood production, ensures fuel security for self sustaining Biomass Power Plants reduces agricultural cost and provides livestock production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Andre

    2010-01-01

    Growing concerns on the impact of climate change, constraints on fossil fuel electricity generation and the likelihood of oil depletion is driving unprecedented growth and investment in renewable energy across the world. The consistency of biomass power plants makes them capable of replacing coal and nuclear for base-load. However experience had shown otherwise, climate change reduces yields, uncontrolled approvals for biomass boilers increased demands and at times motivated by greedy farmers have raised price of otherwise a problematic agricultural waste to high secondary income stream forcing disruption to fuel supply to power plants and even their shutting down. The solution is to established secured fuel sources, fortunately in Asia there are several species of trees that are fast growing and have sufficient yields to make their harvesting economically viable for power production. (author)

  18. The cost of integration of parabolic trough CSP plants in isolated Mediterranean power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poullikkas, Andreas; Hadjipaschalis, Ioannis; Kourtis, George

    2010-01-01

    In this work, a technical and economic analysis concerning the integration of parabolic trough concentrated solar power (CSP) technologies, with or without thermal storage capability, in an existing typical small isolated Mediterranean power generation system, in the absence of a feed-in tariff scheme, is carried out. In addition to the business as usual (BAU) scenario, five more scenarios are examined in the analysis in order to assess the electricity unit cost with the penetration of parabolic trough CSP plants of 50 MWe or 100 MWe, with or without thermal storage capability. Based on the input data and assumptions made, the simulations indicated that the scenario with the utilization of a single parabolic trough CSP plant (either 50 MWe or 100 MWe and with or without thermal storage capability) in combination with BAU will effect an insignificant change in the electricity unit cost of the generation system compared to the BAU scenario. In addition, a sensitivity analysis on natural gas price, showed that increasing fuel prices and the existence of thermal storage capability in the CSP plant make this scenario marginally more economically attractive compared to the BAU scenario. (author)

  19. International and Domestic Market Opportunities for Biomass Power: Volumes I and II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1998-09-01

    This report examines the domestic and international markets for biopower. Domestic and foreign markets present fundamentally different challenges to private power developers. Volume I focuses on the domestic market for biopower. The domestic challenge lies in finding economically viable opportunities for biopower. Vol. I outlines the current state of the U.S. biomass industry, discusses policies affecting biomass development, describes some demonstration projects currently underway, and discusses the future direction of the industry. Volume II focuses on the international market for biopower. Recent literature states that the electricity investment and policy climate in foreign markets are the key elements in successful private project development. Vol. II discusses the financing issues, policy climate, and business incentives and barriers to biopower development. As India and China are the largest future markets for biopower, they are the focus of this volume. Three other top markets- -Brazil, Indonesia, and the Philippines--are also discussed. Potential financial resources wrap up the discussion.

  20. Pilot scale testing of biomass feedstocks for use in gasification/gas turbine based power generation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Najewicz, D.J.; Furman, A.H. [General Electric Corporate Research and Development Center, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1993-12-31

    A biomass gasification pilot program was performed at the GE Corporate Research and Development Center using two types of biomass feedstock. The object of the testing was to determine the properties of biomass product gas and its` suitability as a fuel for gas turbine based power generation cycles. The test program was sponsored by the State of Vermont, the US Environmental Protection Agency, the US Department of Energy and Winrock International/US Agency for International Development. Gasification of bagasse and wood chip feedstock was performed at a feed rate of approximately one ton per hour, using the Ge pressurized fixed bed gasifier and a single stage of cyclone particulate removal, operating at a temperature of 1,000 F. Both biomass feedstocks were found to gasify easily, and gasification capacity was limited by volumetric capacity of the fuel feed equipment. The biomass product gas was analyzed for chemical composition, particulate loading, fuel bound nitrogen levels, sulfur and alkali metal content. The results of the testing indicated the combustion characteristics of the biomass product gas are compatible with gas turbine combustor requirements. However, the particulate removal performance of the pilot facility single stage cyclone was found to be inadequate to meet turbine particulate contamination specifications. In addition, alkali metals found in biomass based fuels, which are known to cause corrosion of high temperature gas turbine components, were found to exceed allowable levels in the fuel gas. These alkali metal compounds are found in the particulate matter (at 1000 F) carried over from the gasifier, thus improved particulate removal technology, designed specifically for biomass particulate characteristics could meet the turbine requirements for both particulate and alkali loading. The paper will present the results of the biomass gasification testing and discuss the development needs in the area of gas clean-up and turbine combustion.

  1. Biomass low-temperature gasification in a rotary reactor prior to cofiring of syngas in power boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostrowski, Piotr; Maj, Izabella; Kalisz, Sylwester; Polok, Michał

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • An innovative method of gasification with use of flue gas was investigated. • Gasification temperature ranging from 350 °C was considered. • Discussed gasification unit is connected to a power boiler. • Syngas with combustible components is recirculated to the boiler. • Wide range of biomass and waste fuels can be used as a feedstock. - Abstract: The paper presents results of the investigation of an innovative biomass and alternative fuel low-temperature gasification method before co-firing in industrial or power plant boilers. Before running industrial-size installation, laboratory tests were carried out to determine usability of alternative fuels to low-temperature gasification process. Tests were conducted in a laboratory reactor designed and constructed specifically for this purpose. The experimental stand enables recording of the weight loss of a sample and syngas composition. The process occurs for a fuel sample of a constant weight and known granulation and with a flue gas of known composition used as a gasifying agent. The aim of the laboratory research was to determine the usability of selected biomass fuel for indirect co-firing in power boilers and to build a knowledge base for industrial-size process by defining the process kinetics (time for fuel to remain in the reactor), recommended fuel granulation and process temperature. Presented industrial-size gasification unit has been successfully built in Marcel power plant in Radlin town, Poland. It consist an innovative rotary gasification reactor. Gasification process takes place with use of flue gas from coal and coke-oven fired boiler as a gasifying agent with recirculation of resulting gas (syngas) with combustible components: CO, H 2 , CH 4 . C n H m to the boiler’s combustion chamber. The construction of the reactor allows the use of a wide range of fuels (biomass, industrial waste and municipal waste). This paper presents the results of the reactor tests using coniferous

  2. Proposal and analysis of a polygeneration system for power and methanol based on natural gas and biomass as co-feed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H.Q.; Hong, H.; Jin, H.G.; Cai, R.X. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Inst. of Engineering Thermophysics

    2008-07-01

    Biomass is getting increasing attention as a potential source of renewable energy as a result of global issues such as sustainable energy and reduction of greenhouse gases. Biomass is an abundant feedstock containing mainly carbon, oxygen, hydrogen, and volatile matter. The purpose of this paper was to propose a new biomass-natural gas based polygeneration system, with partial recycling unreacted syngas and without the shift process for methanol production and power generation. The paper identified the features of the proposed system and that determine the exergy ratio of chemical production and thermodynamic performance of the system. The paper provided an introduction to individual systems such as the natural gas to methanol system and biomass to methanol system. The paper also presented the suggested polygeneration system based on biomass and natural gas as co-feed. Processes that were described included syngas preparation; distillation process; and power generation. System evaluation criteria and performance were identified. It was concluded that bio-energy made the best utilization and overcame the disadvantages of the polygeneration system, partly taking the place of natural gas which is non-renewable. Bio-energy could reduce carbon dioxide emission for it is carbon neutrality. 18 refs., 3 tabs., 9 figs.

  3. Near-term and next-generation nuclear power plant concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiga, Shigenori; Handa, Norihiko; Heki, Hideaki

    2002-01-01

    Near-term and next-generation nuclear reactors will be required to have high economic competitiveness in the deregulated electricity market, flexibility with respect to electricity demand and investment, and good public acceptability. For near-term reactors in the 2010s, Toshiba is developing an improved advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR) based on the present ABWR with newly rationalized systems and components; a construction period of 36 months, one year shorter than the current period; and a power lineup ranging from 800 MWe to 1,600 MWe. For future reactors in the 2020s and beyond, Toshiba is developing the ABWR-II for large-scale, centralized power sources; a supercritical water-cooled power reactor with high thermal efficiency for medium-scale power sources; a modular reactor with siting flexibility for small-scale power sources; and a small, fast neutron reactor with inherent safety for independent power sources. From the viewpoint of efficient uranium resource utilization, a low-moderation BWR core with a high conversion factor is also being developed. (author)

  4. Biomass energy utilisation in Malaysia - prospects and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Hoi Why

    1999-01-01

    An assessment of the contribution of biomass fuels in the rubber, palm oil, cocoa, brick and charcoal industries is given with biomass accounting for about 16% of the total power demand; equivalent to about 2.48 MTOE. The use of biomass in Malaysia is by the direct combustion of wood for heat and power and by gasification with power production via a diesel engine. Challenges facing Malaysia include a rapid increase in demand for power, the need for development funding, environmental issues, and increases in the price of rubber wood, the main fuel source. (uk)

  5. Results for Singapore [Market Survey for Nuclear Power in Developing Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    A re-analysis of market for nuclear power in Singapore during 1981-1990 was carried out based on the so called ''high'' load forecast of the Market Survey, under the revised economic and technical ground rules, and using the full dynamic programming (DP) optimization option of WASP. In order to reduce computer time requirements the horizon was set at the end of 1995, rather than 2000. During the whole study period, 1977-1995, the DP was allowed free choice of 250 MWe oil-fired plants and of blocks of four 50 MWe gas turbines. During 1981-1995 250 MWe nuclear plants were also allowed to be chosen. During 1985-1995 400 Me nuclear plants were added to the list of candidates, and for 1990-1995 600 MWe nuclear plants were included also. The 250 MWe plant size was chosen because it was in the Public Utility Board expansion plan as the proposed size of units for Senoko Station stage 2 expansion. Gas turbines were considered as expansion candidates in blocks of four, rather than individually, to reduce the number of expansion configuration to be simulated in order to reduce computer time requirements. The 400 and 600 MWe unit sizes were the largest standard size acceptable under the frequency stability criterion in the first year they were permitted as a choice

  6. Energy from biomass and wastes 15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klass, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    This proceedings is contains 63 papers on the utilization of biomass as an energy source and as a source for materials. The specific topics discussed include: environmental issues, biomass production, biomass pretreatment and processing, chemicals and other products from biomass, fuel ethanol, thermal liquefaction, thermal gasification, combustion and power generation, and national programs. Individual papers are indexed separately

  7. Design of reactor components (non replaceable) of 500 MWe PHWR for enhanced life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwivedi, K.P.; Seth, V.K.

    1994-01-01

    A nuclear power station is characterised by large initial cost and low operating cost. So a plant which is capable of operating for a longer period of time will be economically more attractive. In the past approach had been to design a nuclear power plant for 30 to 40 years of life time. However, with the improvement in technology and incorporation of redundant and diverse safety features it is now possible to design a nuclear power plant for longer life. Now internationally it is being realised that without sacrificing safety features, plant life should be extended till the cost of maintenance or refurbishment is larger than the cost of the replacement capacity. In order to meet the objective of long life, for the components which cannot be easily replaced the life time of about 100 years is being considered as the design objective. For other items replacement, layout space, shielding, access route and lifting capacity and component design are receiving additional emphasis so as to provide a long total station life time. With the above background, design improvements to enhance the life of reactor components for 500 MWe PHWR namely calandria, end shields and calandria vault liners which cannot be replaced and on which any repair is extremely difficult, have been made. This paper deals with design life of these components and the modifications incorporated in the design. (author). 3 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  8. Evaluation of feed and bleed cooling mode in case of total loss of feedwater on 900 MWe PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champ, M.; Cornille, Y.

    1989-07-01

    The physical studies carried out with the CATHARE code to assess the feed and bleed procedure developed in order to cope with the total loss of feed water on a 900 MWe PWR are presented. These studies allowed the definition of the maximum delays of intervention which would prevent the core from uncovering. Different cases of equipment availability are considered. The data generated will be used in the 900 MWe Probabilistic Safety Assessment which is under way at the Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire

  9. Transport and supply logistics of biomass fuels: Vol. 1. Supply chain options for biomass fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, J; Browne, M; Palmer, H; Hunter, A; Boyd, J

    1996-10-01

    The study which forms part of a wider project funded by the Department of Trade and Industry, looks at the feasibility of generating electricity from biomass-fuelled power stations. Emphasis is placed on supply availabilty and transport consideration for biomass fuels such as wood wastes from forestry, short rotation coppice products, straw, miscanthus (an energy crop) and farm animal slurries. The study details the elements of the supply chain for each fuel from harvesting to delivery at the power station. The delivered cost of each fuel, the environmental impact of the biomass fuel supply and other relevant non-technical issues are addressed. (UK)

  10. Development of biomass power plant technologies in Malaysia: niche development and the formation of innovative capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ulrich Elmer

    The objective of this thesis is to contribute to advance further the emerging research agenda on the transfer and diffusion of low-carbon technologies in developing countries by adopting a study of the development of biomass power plant technologies in Malaysia. The main research question addresses...... successive periods of fieldwork in Malaysia. The thesis conceptualises the diffusion of biomass technologies in Malaysia as a niche development process and finds that the development of a palm oil biomass waste-to-energy niche in Malaysia has only made limited progress despite a period of twenty years...... of niche formation. The thesis identifies the reluctance to implement an efficient energy policy as the main limiting factor for niche development in this case. Although a number of donor programs have advocated the introduction of a stronger enabling framework for niche development, they have generally...

  11. Numerical simulation of the gasification based biomass cofiring on a 600 MW pulverized coal boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, R.; Dong, C.Q.; Yang, Y.P.; Zhang, J.J. [Key Laboratory of Condition Monitoring and Control for Power Plant Equipment, Ministry of Education, Beijing (China); North China Electric Power Univ., Beijing (China). Key Laboratory of Security and Clean Energy Technology

    2008-07-01

    Biomass cofiring is the practice of supplementing a base fuel with biomass fuels such as wood waste, short rotation woody crops, short rotation herbaceous crops, alfalfa stems, various types of manure, landfill gas and wastewater treatment gas. The practice began in the 1980s and is becoming commonplace in Europe and the United States. The benefits include reduced carbon dioxide emissions and other airborne emissions such as nitrous oxides (NOx), sulphur dioxide and trace metals; potential for reduced fuel cost; and supporting economic development among wood products and agricultural industries in a given service area. However, technical challenges remain when biomass is directly cofired with coal. These include limited percentage of biomass for cofiring; fuel preparation, storage, and delivery; ash deposition and corrosion associated with the high alkali metal and chlorine content in biomass; fly ash utilization; and impacts on the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system. This study involved a numerical simulation of cofiring coal and biomass gas in a 600 MWe tangential PC boiler using Fluent software. Combustion behaviour and pollutant formation in the conventional combustion and cofiring cases were compared. The study revealed that reduced NOx emissions can be achieved when producer gas is injected from the lowest layer burner. The nitrogen monoxide (NO) removal rate was between 56.64 and 70.37 per cent. In addition, slagging can be reduced because of the lower temperature. It was concluded that the convection heat transfer area should be increased or the proportion of biomass gas should be decreased to achieve higher boiler efficiency. 8 refs., 4 tabs., 8 figs.

  12. Upgrading of fire safety in Indian nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, N.K.

    1998-01-01

    Indian nuclear power programme started with the installation of 2 nos. of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) at Tarapur (TAPS I and II) of 210 MWe each commissioned in the year 1996. The Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) programme in the country started with the installation of 2x220 MWe stations at Rawatbhatta near Kota (RAPS I and II) in the State of Rajasthan in the sixties. At the present moment, the country has 10 stations in operation. Construction is going on for 4 more units of 220 MWe where as work on two more 500 MWe units is going to start soon. Fire safety systems for the earlier units were engineered as per the state-of-art knowledge available then. The need for review of fire protection systems in the Indian nuclear power plants has also been felt since long almost after Brown's Ferry fire in 1975 itself. Task forces consisting of fire experts, systems design engineers, O and M personnel as well as the Fire Protection engineers at the plant were constituted for each plant to review the existing fire safety provisions in details and highlight the upgradation needed for meeting the latest requirements as per the national as well as international practices. The recommendations made by three such task forces for the three plants are proposed to be reviewed in this paper. The paper also highlights the recommendations to be implemented immediately as well as on long-term basis over a period of time

  13. Simulated performance of biomass gasification based combined power and refrigeration plant for community scale application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chattopadhyay, S., E-mail: suman.mech09@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, NIT, Agarpara, Kolkata – 700109, West Bengal (India); Mondal, P., E-mail: mondal.pradip87@gmail.com; Ghosh, S., E-mail: sudipghosh.becollege@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, IIEST, Shibpur, Howrah – 711103, West Bengal (India)

    2016-07-12

    Thermal performance analysis and sizing of a biomass gasification based combined power and refrigeration plant (CPR) is reported in this study. The plant is capable of producing 100 kWe of electrical output while simultaneously producing a refrigeration effect, varying from 28-68 ton of refrigeration (TR). The topping gas turbine cycle is an indirectly heated all-air cycle. A combustor heat exchanger duplex (CHX) unit burns producer gas and transfer heat to air. This arrangement avoids complex gas cleaning requirements for the biomass-derived producer gas. The exhaust air of the topping GT is utilized to run a bottoming ammonia absorption refrigeration (AAR) cycle via a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG), steam produced in the HRSG supplying heat to the generator of the refrigeration cycle. Effects of major operating parameters like topping cycle pressure ratio (r{sub p}) and turbine inlet temperature (TIT) on the energetic performance of the plant are studied. Energetic performance of the plant is evaluated via energy efficiency, required biomass consumption and fuel energy savings ratio (FESR). The FESR calculation method is significant for indicating the savings in fuel of a combined power and process heat plant instead of separate plants for power and process heat. The study reveals that, topping cycle attains maximum power efficiency of 30%in pressure ratio range of 8-10. Up to a certain value of pressure ratio the required air flow rate through the GT unit decreases with increase in pressure ratio and then increases with further increase in pressure ratio. The capacity of refrigeration of the AAR unit initially decreases up to a certain value of topping GT cycle pressure ratio and then increases with further increase in pressure ratio. The FESR is found to be maximized at a pressure ratio of 9 (when TIT=1100°C), the maximum value being 53%. The FESR is higher for higher TIT. The heat exchanger sizing is also influenced by the topping cycle pressure ratio

  14. Biomass in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapron, Thibaut

    2014-01-01

    This document provides, first, an overview of biomass industry in Germany: energy consumption and renewable energy production, the French and German electricity mix, the 2003-2013 evolution of renewable electricity production and the 2020 forecasts, the biomass power plants, plantations, biofuels production and consumption in Germany. Then, the legal framework of biofuels development in Germany is addressed (financial incentives, tariffs, direct electricity selling). Next, a focus is made on biogas production both in France and in Germany (facilities, resources). Finally, the French-German cooperation in the biomass industry and the research actors are presented

  15. Electricity from biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, B.

    1998-11-01

    Electricity from biomass assesses the potential of biomass electricity for displacing other more polluting power sources and providing a relatively clean and ecologically friendly source of energy; discusses its environmental and economic effects, while analysing political and institutional initiatives and constraints; evaluates key factors, such as energy efficiency, economics, decentralisation and political repurcussions; considers the processes and technologies employed to produce electricity from biomass; and discusses the full range of incentives offered to producers and potential producers and the far-reaching implications it could have for industry, society and the environment. (author)

  16. Novel Role of Rural Official Organization in the Biomass-Based Power Supply Chain in China: A Combined Game Theory and Agent-Based Simulation Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiyan Luo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Developing biomass-based power generation is helpful for China to reduce the dependence on fossil fuels and to release the targets of carbon emission peak. The decentralized farming method leads to Chinese farmers’ weak willingness to collect and sell crop residues to biomass-based power plants. The purpose of this paper is to solve the issue by proposing a novel biomass feedstock supply model with China’s rural official organization—villagers’ committee, which has great influence on villagers’ decision making. Introducing it into the biomass-based power supply chain is beneficial to motivating farmers’ supplying enthusiasm. A combined game theory and agent-based simulation approach is applied to study the effectiveness of this new supply model. Multiple simulation scenarios are built to study impacts of different simulation parameters, and results show that farmers tend to supply more biomass material for electricity production in the proposed villagers’ committee model, compared with the two conventional supply models, direct-deal and broker models. The supply model incorporating the rural official organization can ensure the feedstock sufficiency for plants. A proper model design depends on the feed-in tariff subsidy for biomass-based electricity, feedstock shipping distance, performance appraisal system of the villagers’ committee, as well as farmers’ utility weights on net income and public service improvement.

  17. Staging Rankine Cycles Using Ammonia for OTEC Power Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bharathan, D.

    2011-03-01

    Recent focus on renewable power production has renewed interest in looking into ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) systems. Early studies in OTEC applicability indicate that the island of Hawaii offers a potential market for a nominal 40-MWe system. a 40-MWe system represents a large leap in the current state of OTEC technology. Lockheed Martin Inc. is currently pursuing a more realistic goal of developing a 10-MWe system under U.S. Navy funding (Lockheed 2009). It is essential that the potential risks associated with the first-of-its-kind plant should be minimized for the project's success. Every means for reducing costs must also be pursued without increasing risks. With this in mind, the potential for increasing return on the investment is assessed both in terms of effective use of the seawater resource and of reducing equipment costs.

  18. Osiris and SOMBRERO inertial confinement fusion power plant designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, W.R.; Bieri, R.L.; Monsler, M.J.

    1992-03-01

    Conceptual designs and assessments have been completed for two inertial fusion energy (IFE) electric power plants. The detailed designs and results of the assessment studies are presented in this report. Osiris is a heavy-ion-beam (HIB) driven power plant and SOMBRERO is a Krypton-Fluoride (KrF) laser-driven power plant. Both plants are sized for a net electric power of 1000 MWe

  19. Innovations in PHWR design, integration of nuclear power stations into power systems and role of small size nuclear power plants in a developing country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, S.K.; Kakodkar, A.; Balakrishnan, M.R.; Ray, R.N.; Murthy, L.G.K.; Chamany, B.F.; Kati, S.L.

    1977-01-01

    PHWR concept of thermal reactors has been considered with a view to exploiting the limited resources of natural uranium and keeping in mind the projected nuclear power programme covering fast breeder reactors. Experience in engineering of current PHWR units in India, gradual build up of necessary infrastructure and operational experience with one unit, have helped in building up design and technological capability in the country. The R and D facilities have been so planned that additional data required for the design of bigger reactor units (i.e.500/600 MWe) could be generated with minimal augmentation. Satisfactory operation of a nuclear power station demands certain prerequisites from the connected power system. The grid should have load patterns suitable for base load operation of these stations, should be stiff so far as voltage and frequency fluctuations are concerned and should have high reliability. A typical power grid in this country is characterised by heavy loads during peak hours and very light loads during night. Regional grids are of small size and the few interconnections existing between the regional grids consist of weak tie lines. Amongst all types of the power stations, it is the nuclear system which undergoes maximum strain and economic penalty while operating when connected to such a power system. Consistent with the above, phase installation of small-size power reactor units of about 200 MWe capacity may facilitate setting up of larger unit sizes at a later date. The effect of any possible reduction in the capital cost of a larger unit power station will enable the power station to partially meet the demand of the more productive types of loads. This paper deals with some of the major design changes that are being incorporated in the PHWR type power reactors currently being set up and the research and development back-up required for the purpose. Since the unit sizes of the power reactors presently contemplated are small compared to nuclear

  20. Romania biomass energy. Country study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnham, M; Easterly, J L; Mark, P E; Keller, A [DynCorp, Alexandria, VA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The present report was prepared under contract to UNIDO to conduct a case study of biomass energy use and potential in Romania. The purpose of the case study is to provide a specific example of biomass energy issues and potential in the context of the economic transition under way in eastern Europe. The transition of Romania to a market economy is proceeding at a somewhat slower pace than in other countries of eastern Europe. Unfortunately, the former regime forced the use of biomass energy with inadequate technology and infrastructure, particularly in rural areas. The resulting poor performance thus severely damaged the reputation of biomass energy in Romania as a viable, reliable resource. Today, efforts to rejuvenate biomass energy and tap into its multiple benefits are proving challenging. Several sound biomass energy development strategies were identified through the case study, on the basis of estimates of availability and current use of biomass resources; suggestions for enhancing potential biomass energy resources; an overview of appropriate conversion technologies and markets for biomass in Romania; and estimates of the economic and environmental impacts of the utilization of biomass energy. Finally, optimal strategies for near-, medium- and long-term biomass energy development, as well as observations and recommendations concerning policy, legislative and institutional issues affecting the development of biomass energy in Romania are presented. The most promising near-term biomass energy options include the use of biomass in district heating systems; cofiring of biomass in existing coal-fired power plants or combined heat and power plants; and using co-generation systems in thriving industries to optimize the efficient use of biomass resources. Mid-term and long-term opportunities include improving the efficiency of wood stoves used for cooking and heating in rural areas; repairing the reputation of biogasification to take advantage of livestock wastes

  1. Romania biomass energy. Country study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnham, M.; Easterly, J.L.; Mark, P.E.; Keller, A.

    1995-01-01

    The present report was prepared under contract to UNIDO to conduct a case study of biomass energy use and potential in Romania. The purpose of the case study is to provide a specific example of biomass energy issues and potential in the context of the economic transition under way in eastern Europe. The transition of Romania to a market economy is proceeding at a somewhat slower pace than in other countries of eastern Europe. Unfortunately, the former regime forced the use of biomass energy with inadequate technology and infrastructure, particularly in rural areas. The resulting poor performance thus severely damaged the reputation of biomass energy in Romania as a viable, reliable resource. Today, efforts to rejuvenate biomass energy and tap into its multiple benefits are proving challenging. Several sound biomass energy development strategies were identified through the case study, on the basis of estimates of availability and current use of biomass resources; suggestions for enhancing potential biomass energy resources; an overview of appropriate conversion technologies and markets for biomass in Romania; and estimates of the economic and environmental impacts of the utilization of biomass energy. Finally, optimal strategies for near-, medium- and long-term biomass energy development, as well as observations and recommendations concerning policy, legislative and institutional issues affecting the development of biomass energy in Romania are presented. The most promising near-term biomass energy options include the use of biomass in district heating systems; cofiring of biomass in existing coal-fired power plants or combined heat and power plants; and using co-generation systems in thriving industries to optimize the efficient use of biomass resources. Mid-term and long-term opportunities include improving the efficiency of wood stoves used for cooking and heating in rural areas; repairing the reputation of biogasification to take advantage of livestock wastes

  2. 1997: Nuclear power plants in Europe. Report on operation, construction and planning in 18 European countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    Eighteen European countries operate and build, respectively, nuclear power plants in 1997. The '1997: Nuclear Power Plants in Europe' atw report singles out the main events and lines of development. As per August 1997, 216 (1996: 216) nuclear generating units (which means power reactors for the purposes of this report) with an aggregate 180, 184 (177, 916) MWe installed gross capacity are in operation and 22 (24) units with 20,054 (23,086) MWe are under construction in seven countries. This adds up to a total of 238 (240) nuclear generating units with an aggregate 200,238 (201,002) MWe. In the nuclear power plants in Europe, some 1138 (1067) TWh of nuclear power was converted into electric power in 1996: 806 (802) TWh of this aggregate was converted in 142 (142) units in the European Union (EU). In the EU the share of nuclear power in the public supply of electricity was 35,4 (36,0)%. Lithuania, with 83,4 (85,6)% has the highest share of nuclear power in Europe, followed by France with 77,4 (76,0)% and Belgium with 57,2 (55,5)%. The lowest percentage, only 4,8 (3,8)%, is recorded in the Netherlands. As a consequence of electricity imports, nuclear power holds considerable shares in the public electricity supply also of countries in which no nuclear power is operated, such as Italy or Austria. (orig.) [de

  3. National renewable energy policy and local opposition in the UK: the failed development of a biomass electricity plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upreti, B.R.; Horst, Dan van der

    2004-01-01

    Biomass energy developments in the UK are supported by central government but face considerable opposition from the public. The purpose of this study is to explore the causes and consequences of public opposition to biomass energy development in North Wiltshire where Ambient Energy Ltd. proposed the development of a 5 MWe wood gasification plant near the town of Cricklade. The case study was conducted through in-depth interviews, content analysis, person to person questionnaire survey, focus group discussion and participatory appraisal methods. Though biomass energy plants in general have fewer environmental impacts than plants which use fossil fuel, there could still be local impacts which give rise to concerns and local opposition to the development. The opposition could be partially explained by the fact that the general public is relatively unfamiliar with biomass energy. Public acceptance or rejection was mainly based on the public trust or mistrust. The case study demonstrates two distinctly rigid characteristics among the key stakeholders of biomass energy development. These are the 'not-in-my-back-yard' attitude from the public and the 'there-is-no-alternative' attitude of the developers. These rigid stances were widely contributing to the failure of the project to gain planning permission. The environmental justification of biomass energy at the national level is not always sufficient to convince the local residents. Winning public support to promote biomass energy requires an alternative approach of planning and action through interactive communication, public participation and collective learning among all the stakeholders

  4. Biomass power for rural development. Quarterly report, September 23, 1996--December 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, J.T.

    1997-02-01

    Goals for the biomass power for rural development include: expanded feedstock research and demonstration activities to provide soil-specific production costs and yield data, as well as better methods for harvest and transport; four thousand acres of feedstock available for fueling a commercial venture; comparison of the feasibility of gasification and cocombustion; designs for on-site switchgrass handling and feeding system; a detailed assessment of utilizing switchgrass for gasification and cocombustion to generate electricity using turbines and fuel cells.

  5. Biomass energy: Sustainable solution for greenhouse gas emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadrul Islam, A. K. M.; Ahiduzzaman, M.

    2012-06-01

    sustainable carbon sink will be developed. Clean energy production from biomass (such as ethanol, biodiesel, producer gas, bio-methane) could be viable option to reduce fossil fuel consumption. Electricity generation from biomass is increasing throughout the world. Co-firing of biomass with coal and biomass combustion in power plant and CHP would be a viable option for clean energy development. Biomass can produce less emission in the range of 14% to 90% compared to emission from fossil for electricity generation. Therefore, biomass could play a vital role for generation of clean energy by reducing fossil energy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The main barriers to expansion of power generation from biomass are cost, low conversion efficiency and availability of feedstock. Internationalization of external cost in power generation and effective policies to improve energy security and carbon dioxide reduction is important to boost up the bio-power. In the long run, bio-power will depend on technological development and on competition for feedstock with food production and arable land use.

  6. Techno-economic Assessment of Biomass Pellets for Power Generation in India

    OpenAIRE

    Purohit, P.; Chaturvedi, V.

    2016-01-01

    Biomass pellet production has increased considerably in recent years, mainly due to the demand created by policies and bioenergy-use targets in the European Union (EU). Global biomass pellet production was 24.1 million tonne (Mt) in 2014. In this study, a preliminary attempt has been made to assess the techno-economic feasibility of biomass pellets for electricity generation in India produced from biomass surplus available from agriculture and forestry/wasteland. Biomass surplus availability ...

  7. Electrifying biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusnierczyk, D.

    2005-01-01

    British Columbia's (BC) energy plan was outlined in this PowerPoint presentation. BC Hydro is the third largest electric utility in Canada with a generating capacity of 11,000 MW, 90 per cent of which is hydro generation. Various independent power project (IPP) biomass technologies were outlined, including details of biogas, wood residue and municipal solid waste facilities. An outline of BC Hydro's overall supply mix was presented, along with details of the IPP supply mix. It was suggested that the cancellation of the Duke Point power project has driven growth in the renewable energy sector. A chart of potential energy contribution by resource type was presented, as well as unit energy cost ranges. Resources included small and large hydro; demand side management; resource smart natural gas; natural gas; coal; wind; geothermal; biomass; wave; and tidal. The acquisition process was reviewed. Details of calls for tenders were presented, and issues concerning bidder responsibility and self-selection were examined. It was observed that wood residue presents a firm source of electricity that is generally local, and has support from the public. In addition, permits for wood residue energy conversion are readily available. However, size limitations, fuel risks, and issues concerning site control may prove to be significant challenges. It was concluded that the success of biomass energy development will depend on adequate access and competitive pricing. tabs., figs

  8. Technical, economic and environmental potential of co-firing of biomass in coal and natural gas fired power plants in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Ree, R.; Korbee, R.; Eenkhoorn, S.; De Lange, T.; Groenendaal, B.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper the technical, economic, and environmental potential of co-firing of biomass in existing Dutch coal and natural gas fired power plants, and industrial combined-cycles (CC), is addressed. Main criteria that are considered are: the availability and contractibility of biomass for energy purposes; the (technical) operation of the conventional fossil fuel based processes may not be disturbed; the gaseous and liquid plant emissions have to comply to those applicable for power plants/CCs, the commercial applicability of the solid residues may not be negatively influenced; applicable additional biomass conversion technologies must be commercially available; the necessary additional investment costs must be acceptable from an economic point of view, and the co-firing option must result in a substantial CO 2 -emission reduction. The main result of the study described in the paper is the presentation of a clear and founded indication of the total co-firing potential of biomass in existing power plants and industrial CCs in the Netherlands. This potential is determined by considering both technical, economic, and environmental criteria. In spite of the fact that the co-firing potential for the specific Dutch situation is presented, the results of the criteria considered are more generally applicable, and therefore are also very interesting for potential co-firing initiatives outside of the Netherlands

  9. Safe and green nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushwaha, H.S.

    2010-01-01

    Energy development plays an important role in the national economic growth. Presently the per capita consumption of energy in our country is about 750 kWh including captive power generation which is low in comparison to that in the developed countries like USA where it is about 12,000 kWh. As of now the total installed capacity of electricity generation is about 152,148 MW(e) which is drawn from Thermal (65%), Hydel (24%), Nuclear (3%) power plants and Renewables (8%). It is expected that by the end of year 2020, the required installed capacity would be more than 3,00,000 MW(e), if we assume per capita consumption of about 800-1000 kWh for Indian population of well over one billion. To meet the projected power requirement in India, suitable options need to be identified and explored for generation of electricity. For choosing better alternatives various factors such as availability of resources, potential to generate commercial power, economic viability, etc. need to be considered. Besides these factors, an important factor which must be taken into consideration is protection of environment around the operating power stations. This paper attempts to demonstrate that the nuclear power generation is an environmentally benign option for meeting the future requirement of electricity in India. It also discusses the need for creating the public awareness about the safe operations of the nuclear power plants and ionising radiation. (author)

  10. Pellets for Power: sustainable biomass import from Ukraine : public final report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elbersen, H.W.; Poppens, R.P.; Lesschen, J.P.; Sluis, van der T.; Galytska, M.; Kulyk, M.; Jamblinne, de P.; Kraisvitnii, P.; Rii, O.; Hoekstra, T.

    2013-01-01

    This project responds to the mismatch between on the one hand a growing demand for biomass on the Dutch and EU energy markets with a limited biomass potential and on the other hand large amounts of biomass and biomass potential currently underutilised in Ukraine. Ukraine itself is seen as a very

  11. Green power production by co-gasification of biomass in coal-fired oxygen-blown entrained-flow based IGCC processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Ree, R; Korbee, R; De Smidt, R P; Jansen, D [ECN Fuels Conversion and Environment, Petten (Netherlands); Baumann, H R; Ullrich, N [Krupp Uhde, Dortmund (Germany); Haupt, G; Zimmerman, [Siemens, Erlangen (Germany)

    1998-11-01

    The use of coal for large scale power production meets a growing environmental concern. In spite of the fact that clean coal conversion technologies integrated with high-efficiency power production facilities, such as IGCC, are developed, the aim for sustainable development strives for a power production system based on renewable energy sources. One of the most promising renewable energy sources that can be used in the Netherlands is biomass, i.e. organic waste materials and/or energy crops. To accelerate the introduction of this material, in a technical and economically acceptable way, co-gasification with fossil fuels, in particular coal, in large scale IGCC processes is considered. In this paper the technical feasibility, economic profitability, and environmental acceptability of co-gasification of biomass in coal-fired oxygen-blown entrained-flow based IGM is discussed. Both a base-case coal-fired oxygen-blown entrained-flow based IGCC process - showing strong resemblance to the Puertollano IGCC plant in Spain - and three co-gasification concepts, viz.: (1) a concept with separate dry coal and biomass feeding systems, (2) a concept with a combined dry coal/biomass-derived pyrolysis char feeding system, and (3) a concept with parallel biomass pre-treatment/gasification and combined fuel gas clean-up/power production, were defined for further consideration. The base-case system and the co-gasification concepts as well are modelled in the flowsheet simulation package ASPEN{sup +}. Steady-state integral system calculations resulted in an overall net electrical plant efficiency for the base-case system of 50. 1 %LHV (48.3 %HHV). Replacing about 10 % of the total thermal plant input (coal) by biomass (willow) resulted in a decrease of the overall net electrical plant efficiency of 1.4 to 2.1 %-points LHV, avoided specific CO2 emissions of 40-49 g/kWh{sub e}, and total avoided CO2 emissions of about 129 to 159 kt/a, all depending on the co-gasification concept

  12. Overview of biomass conversion technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noor, S.; Latif, A.; Jan, M.

    2011-01-01

    A large part of the biomass is used for non-commercial purposes and mostly for cooking and heating, but the use is not sustainable, because it destroys soil-nutrients, causes indoor and outdoor pollution, adds to greenhouse gases, and results in health problems. Commercial use of biomass includes household fuelwood in industrialized countries and bio-char (charcoal) and firewood in urban and industrial areas in developing countries. The most efficient way of biomass utilization is through gasification, in which the gas produced by biomass gasification can either be used to generate power in an ordinary steam-cycle or be converted into motor fuel. In the latter case, there are two alternatives, namely, the synthesis of methanol and methanol-based motor fuels, or Fischer-Tropsch hydrocarbon synthesis. This paper deals with the technological overview of the state-of-the-art key biomass-conversion technologies that can play an important role in the future. The conversion routes for production of Heat, power and transportation fuel have been summarized in this paper, viz. combustion, gasification, pyrolysis, digestion, fermentation and extraction. (author)

  13. Autothermal upgrading of biomass and wastes for clean and efficient production of power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafal Kobylecki; Zbigniew Bis; Wojciech Nowak [Czestochowa University of Technology (Poland)

    2005-07-01

    In this paper it is demonstrated that the main barrier of large scale heat and electricity production from biomass may be significantly reduced or eliminated by fuel upgrading and thermal treatment in a specially-designed pilot plant autothermal reactor. The process does not require significant amount of additional energy, since the whole process is run autothermal. The process final products are hot flue gases and a solid residue called a 'biocarbon' of LHV of roughly 28 MJ/kg. The properties of the biocarbon were similar, regardless of the input raw fuel type (biomass, waste, sewage sludge, energy crops, etc.). The use of the biocarbon for direct co-combustion with coal does not require installation of any additional feeding or fuel treatment systems at the power plants. Apart from its possible direct combustion, the biocarbon can be also efficiently used as a promising solid energy carrier for other processes (e.g. fuel cells). 6 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Assessment of biomass cogeneration in the Great Lakes region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnham, M.; Easterly, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Many biomass cogeneration facilities have successfully entered into power sales agreements with utilities across the country, often after overcoming various difficulties or barriers. Under a project sponsored by the Great Lakes Regional Biomass Energy Program of the U.S. Department of Energy, DynCorp sm-bullet Meridian has conducted a survey of biomass facilities in the seven Great Lakes states, selecting 10 facilities for case studies with at least one facility in each of the seven states. The purpose of the case studies was to address obstacles that biomass processors face in adding power production to their process heat systems, and to provide examples of successful strategies for entering into power sales agreements with utilities. The case studies showed that the primary incentives for investing in cogeneration and power sales are to reduce operating costs through improved biomass waste management and lower energy expenditures. Common barriers to cogeneration and power sales were high utility stand-by charges for unplanned outages and low utility avoided cost payments due to excess utility generation capacity

  15. Global movement in reviewing nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Yoshiyasu

    2007-01-01

    The price of crude oil, natural gas and coal has increased since 2004 with the rapid increase of primary energy demand in China, India and other developing countries. Moreover due to the political uncertainty in the Middle East, and the state control of energy resources in countries like Russia, the issue of energy security has become a critical issue. Nuclear power has been reconsidered in recent years in the US and European countries, because nuclear power is one of the cheapest sources of low carbon energy and also has relatively stable costs, and is thereby useful to energy security and to prevent climate change. Electricity demand is growing very rapidly in China and additional reactors are planned to give a fivefold increase in nuclear capacity to 40,000 MWe by 2020. India has a largely indigenous nuclear power program and expects to have 20,000 MWe nuclear capacity by 2020. Russia is moving steadily forward with plans for a much expanded role of nuclear energy, and the restructuring of nuclear industries has begun to strengthen competitiveness in international nuclear markets. (author)

  16. Power-up of Fugen reactor and development of demonstration plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawai, Sadamu; Akebi, Michio; Yazaki, Akira.

    1979-06-01

    The Fugen Nuclear Power Station is the 165 MWe prototype plant characterized by heavy water-moderated, boiling light water-cooled, pressure tube type, and was developed by the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, Japan. The plant went into commercial operation on March 20, 1979, in Tsuruga, Fukui Prefecture. Some delay in the overall schedule occurred due to the shortage of cement caused by the oil crisis, more stringent regulations as the result of stress corrosion cracking experienced in BWRs, and design modifications. All functional tests, the final check-up of the whole plant, and remaining modifying works had been completed by March 10, 1978. The minimum criticality was achieved with 22 mixed oxide fuel assemblies on March 20, 1978. Thereafter, the tests on reactor physics, plant dynamics, the performances of components and systems, and radiation and water chemistry have been carried out. 5 MWe was sent to grid system for the first time on July 29, 1978. The commercial operation of the plant was licenced by the Government on March 30, 1979. The conceptual design of the 600 MWe demonstration plant was finished in early 1979, and the detailed design is to be carried out in 1979 and 1980. The main design principle was incorporated in the conceptual design, but some modifications are to be made to reduce the power cost and to facilitate the easy maintenance. (Kako, I.)

  17. Performance analysis of an integrated biomass gasification and PEMFC (proton exchange membrane fuel cell) system: Hydrogen and power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chutichai, Bhawasut; Authayanun, Suthida; Assabumrungrat, Suttichai; Arpornwichanop, Amornchai

    2013-01-01

    The PEMFC (proton exchange membrane fuel cell) is expected to play a significant role in next-generation energy systems. Because most hydrogen that is used as a fuel for PEMFCs is derived from the reforming of natural gas, the use of renewable energy sources such as biomass to produce this hydrogen offers a promising alternative. This study is focused on the performance analysis of an integrated biomass gasification and PEMFC system. The combined heat and power generation output of this integrated system is designed for residential applications, taking into account thermal and electrical demands. A flowsheet model of the integrated PEMFC system is developed and employed to analyze its performance with respect to various key operating parameters. A purification process consisting of a water–gas shift reactor and a preferential oxidation reactor is also necessary in order to reduce the concentration of CO in the synthesis gas to below 10 ppm for subsequent use in the PEMFC. The effect of load level on the performance of the PEMFC system is investigated. Based on an electrical load of 5 kW, it is found that the electrical efficiency of the PEMFC integrated system is 22%, and, when waste heat recovery is considered, the total efficiency of the PEMFC system is 51%. - Highlights: • Performance of a biomass gasification and PEMFC integrated system is analyzed. • A flowsheet model of the PEMFC integrated system is developed. • Effect of biomass sources and key parameters on hydrogen and power generation is presented. • The PEMFC integrated system is designed for small-scale power demand. • Effect of load changes on the performance of PEMFC is investigated

  18. Solar central receiver hybrid power system, Phase I. Volume 3. Appendices. Final technical report, October 1978-August 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-09-01

    A design study for a central receiver/fossil fuel hybrid power system using molten salts for heat transfer and heat storage is presented. This volume contains the appendices: (A) parametric salt piping data; (B) sample heat exchanger calculations; (C) salt chemistry and salt/materials compatibility evaluation; (D) heliostat field coordinates; (E) data lists; (F) STEAEC program input data; (G) hybrid receiver design drawings; (H) hybrid receiver absorber tube thermal math model; (I) piping stress analysis; (J) 100-MWe 18-hour storage solar central receiver hybrid power system capital cost worksheets; and (K) 500-MWe 18-hour solar central receiver hybrid power system cost breakdown. (WHK)

  19. Biomass pyrolysis for chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Wild, P.

    2011-07-15

    The problems associated with the use of fossil fuels demand a transition to renewable sources (sun, wind, water, geothermal, biomass) for materials and energy where biomass provides the only renewable source for chemicals. In a biorefinery, biomass is converted via different technologies into heat, power and various products. Here, pyrolysis (thermal degradation without added oxygen) of lignocellulosic biomass can play an important role, because it leads to an array of useful chemicals. Examples are furfural and acetic acid from hemicellulose, levoglucosan from cellulose and phenols and biochar from lignin. Since the three major biomass polymers hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin possess dissimilar thermal stabilities and reactivities, type and amount of degradation products are tunable by proper selection of the pyrolysis conditions. To determine if step-wise pyrolysis would be suitable for the production of chemicals, staged degasification of lignocellulosic biomass was studied. Due to limited yields, a hot pressurized water pre-treatment (aquathermolysis) followed by pyrolysis was subsequently developed as an improved version of a staged approach to produce furfural and levoglucosan from the carbohydrate fraction of the biomass. Lignin is the only renewable source for aromatic chemicals. Lignocellulosic biorefineries for bio-ethanol produce lignin as major by-product. The pyrolysis of side-streams into valuable chemicals is of prime importance for a profitable biorefinery. To determine the added-value of lignin side-streams other than their use as fuel for power, application research including techno-economic analysis is required. In this thesis, the pyrolytic valorisation of lignin into phenols and biochar was investigated and proven possible.

  20. Further development of a mixed-dryer for wood biomass; Sekoituskuivurin jatkokehitys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinonen, O. [Imatran Voima Oy, Vantaa (Finland). Research and Development; Parvio, E. [IVO International Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    1995-12-31

    Imatran Voima Oy and IVO International Ltd are developing a new, advanced drying method for high moisture content fuels such as peat, biomass, and brown coal. The drying technology is based on using the heat of the fluidized bed directly for drying. The drying takes place at steam atmosphere, which makes it possible to recover the latent heat of evaporation back to process at high temperature level. This improves the thermal efficiency of the plant considerably. The technology is called bed mixing dryer. The pilot plant of the bed mixing dryer was built to IVO`s Kuusamo peat and wood fired power plant that was commissioned in the beginning of 1994. The Kuusamo district heating power plant has a fuel input of 27 MW that gives a power output of 6 MWe and district heat output of 17.5/21.2 MWth. As fuels are used peat, saw dust and wood wastes. The boiler is a bubbling fluidized bed boiler and the steam cycle is a conventional back pressure steam process. The unique feature in the plant is the new dryer that increases the overall thermal efficiency of the plant 10 to 15 units of percentage. In this project the operation and behaviour of the bed mixing dryer has been examined. Various components of the dryer were developed by the cold model tests carried out at IVO`s laboratory in Helsinki. Testing with the Kuusamo bed mixing dryer consisted of about 390 hours of drying tests with peat, bark and saw dust. The dryer operated well, and the drying was effective. The measured final moisture content varied from 7 to 19 % depending on the fuel particle size and the temperature level of the dryer

  1. Further development of a mixed-dryer for wood biomass; Sekoituskuivurin jatkokehitys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinonen, O. [Imatran Voima Oy, Vantaa (Finland). Research and Development; Parvio, E [IVO International Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Imatran Voima Oy and IVO International Ltd are developing a new, advanced drying method for high moisture content fuels such as peat, biomass, and brown coal. The drying technology is based on using the heat of the fluidized bed directly for drying. The drying takes place at steam atmosphere, which makes it possible to recover the latent heat of evaporation back to process at high temperature level. This improves the thermal efficiency of the plant considerably. The technology is called bed mixing dryer. The pilot plant of the bed mixing dryer was built to IVO`s Kuusamo peat and wood fired power plant that was commissioned in the beginning of 1994. The Kuusamo district heating power plant has a fuel input of 27 MW that gives a power output of 6 MWe and district heat output of 17.5/21.2 MWth. As fuels are used peat, saw dust and wood wastes. The boiler is a bubbling fluidized bed boiler and the steam cycle is a conventional back pressure steam process. The unique feature in the plant is the new dryer that increases the overall thermal efficiency of the plant 10 to 15 units of percentage. In this project the operation and behaviour of the bed mixing dryer has been examined. Various components of the dryer were developed by the cold model tests carried out at IVO`s laboratory in Helsinki. Testing with the Kuusamo bed mixing dryer consisted of about 390 hours of drying tests with peat, bark and saw dust. The dryer operated well, and the drying was effective. The measured final moisture content varied from 7 to 19 % depending on the fuel particle size and the temperature level of the dryer

  2. Progress of China's nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Jianping

    1997-01-01

    From a long-term point of view, nuclear power is the only solution for the shortage of energy resource. Nuclear power development strategy has been specified in China according to national condition: The electricity development of nuclear power optimizes the national energy structure and ensure the power supply, particularly in east China. China's first self-designed and self-constructed nuclear power plant--Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant (300MWe PWR) is now well under commercial operation. China is willing to cooperate with IAEA, other countries and regions in the field of nuclear energy for peaceful use on basis of mutual benefit. (author)

  3. A probabilistic safety assessment of the standard French 900MWe pressurized water reactor. Main report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-04-15

    of these studies was twofold: - firstly to check the safety level of the French units in the international context. - secondly, and considerably more importantly, to develop an additional resource for help in decision-making, allowing assessment of the relative impact of modifications to installations or procedures and to detect, once again in relative terms, any weak points. The importance of this second objective is of course greatly increased by the fact that the French nuclear facilities are standardized. When probabilistic safety studies are mentioned, emphasis is frequently placed on the first objective. Although it may be reassuring to find that the French power plants are well placed internationally, the absolute values indicated by the different probabilistic assessments are too dependent on the domain covered, the techniques implemented and the data used for it to be possible to make comparisons of safety levels on the basis of global results alone. On the other hand, the use of probabilistic safety assessments can provide interesting insights towards relative comparison approaches offering the greatest improvements in safety. In this respect, it is encouraging to find that the design of the 1300 MWe series represents an overall improvement over that of the 900 MWe series. The two studies which have been carried out must not be seen as an end, but as a way forward. Furthermore, it is possible to improve and add to them. This opens up two lines of action for the French safety organizations in the field of probabilistic safety assessments. Therefore, the latter plan to use the probabilistic safety assessments to help in the following fields: - grading safety problems and identifying any weak points; for instance, in carrying out the two assessments, two outage accident sequences were revealed whose relative importance had been underestimated. The international community has been kept well informed about them, - making periodic safety reassessments (earned out

  4. A probabilistic safety assessment of the standard French 900MWe pressurized water reactor. Main report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    these studies was twofold: - firstly to check the safety level of the French units in the international context. - secondly, and considerably more importantly, to develop an additional resource for help in decision-making, allowing assessment of the relative impact of modifications to installations or procedures and to detect, once again in relative terms, any weak points. The importance of this second objective is of course greatly increased by the fact that the French nuclear facilities are standardized. When probabilistic safety studies are mentioned, emphasis is frequently placed on the first objective. Although it may be reassuring to find that the French power plants are well placed internationally, the absolute values indicated by the different probabilistic assessments are too dependent on the domain covered, the techniques implemented and the data used for it to be possible to make comparisons of safety levels on the basis of global results alone. On the other hand, the use of probabilistic safety assessments can provide interesting insights towards relative comparison approaches offering the greatest improvements in safety. In this respect, it is encouraging to find that the design of the 1300 MWe series represents an overall improvement over that of the 900 MWe series. The two studies which have been carried out must not be seen as an end, but as a way forward. Furthermore, it is possible to improve and add to them. This opens up two lines of action for the French safety organizations in the field of probabilistic safety assessments. Therefore, the latter plan to use the probabilistic safety assessments to help in the following fields: - grading safety problems and identifying any weak points; for instance, in carrying out the two assessments, two outage accident sequences were revealed whose relative importance had been underestimated. The international community has been kept well informed about them, - making periodic safety reassessments (earned out every

  5. Assessment of Biomass Resources in Afghanistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milbrandt, A.; Overend, R.

    2011-01-01

    Afghanistan is facing many challenges on its path of reconstruction and development. Among all its pressing needs, the country would benefit from the development and implementation of an energy strategy. In addition to conventional energy sources, the Afghan government is considering alternative options such as energy derived from renewable resources (wind, solar, biomass, geothermal). Biomass energy is derived from a variety of sources -- plant-based material and residues -- and can be used in various conversion processes to yield power, heat, steam, and fuel. This study provides policymakers and industry developers with information on the biomass resource potential in Afghanistan for power/heat generation and transportation fuels production. To achieve this goal, the study estimates the current biomass resources and evaluates the potential resources that could be used for energy purposes.

  6. Microbiological Contamination at Workplaces in a Combined Heat and Power (CHP Station Processing Plant Biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Szulc

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the microbial contamination at a plant biomass processing thermal power station (CHP. We found 2.42 × 103 CFU/m3 of bacteria and 1.37 × 104 CFU/m3 of fungi in the air; 2.30 × 107 CFU/g of bacteria and 4.46 × 105 CFU/g of fungi in the biomass; and 1.61 × 102 CFU/cm2 bacteria and 2.39 × 101 CFU/cm2 fungi in filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs. Using culture methods, we found 8 genera of mesophilic bacteria and 7 of fungi in the air; 10 genera each of bacteria and fungi in the biomass; and 2 and 5, respectively, on the FFRs. Metagenomic analysis (Illumina MiSeq revealed the presence of 46 bacterial and 5 fungal genera on the FFRs, including potential pathogens Candida tropicalis, Escherichia coli, Prevotella sp., Aspergillus sp., Penicillium sp.. The ability of microorganisms to create a biofilm on the FFRs was confirmed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM. We also identified secondary metabolites in the biomass and FFRs, including fumigaclavines, quinocitrinines, sterigmatocistin, and 3-nitropropionic acid, which may be toxic to humans. Due to the presence of potential pathogens and mycotoxins, the level of microbiological contamination at workplaces in CHPs should be monitored.

  7. Thailand: Infrastructure Development and Challenges to Launch Nuclear Power Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keinmeesuke, Sirichai

    2011-01-01

    In June 2007, the cabinet passed a resolution for Thailand's Power Development Plan (PDP 2007). It was mentioned in the plan that Thailand will have 2 x 1,000 MWe nuclear power plants in 2020 and another 2 x 1,000 MWe in 2021. The PDP 2007 was revised in March 2009 and it was agreed to change the nuclear power generation to only 1 x 1,000 MWe in 2020 and 2021 respectively due to the large excess capacity at present. Many activities related to development of infrastructures in order to support electricity generation using nuclear power are being executed. Milestones for nuclear power program implementation has been developed using the IAEA document 'Milestones in the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power' with some amendment/additions to suit the country situation. According to the schedule, a lot of activities related to infrastructure establishment, feasibility study, utility preparation and public education and participation are being performed. Within the year 2011, various issues such as legal and regulatory systems and international commitment, industrial and commercial infrastructure, technology transfer and human resource development, safety and environmental protection, public information and public acceptance, preparation of the nuclear power utility establishment, etc. must be solved out and undertaken to assure the cabinet to make final decision to go nuclear. There are many challenges for Thailand embarking of the nuclear power programme. It is essential to plan for the establishment of a regulatory body at the national level to support and regulate the nuclear power plant industry. Currently, the application for a license and the monitoring of a power plant are administered by the authorities of various agencies under different ministries; hence the process is very time-consuming and overlaps with one another. The approach that the regulatory body and the authorities to issue licenses relevant to the nuclear power plant operation

  8. Capital cost: pressurized water reactor plant. Commercial electric power cost studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-06-01

    The investment cost study for the 1139 MW(e) pressurized water reactor (PWR) central station power plant consists of two volumes. This volume contains the drawings, equipment list and site description.

  9. Capital cost: pressurized water reactor plant. Commercial electric power cost studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-06-01

    The investment cost study for the 1139 MW(e) pressurized water reactor (PWR) central station power plant consists of two volumes. This volume contains the drawings, equipment list and site description

  10. Combustion and NOx emission characteristics of a retrofitted down-fired 660 MWe utility boiler at different loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Z.Q.; Liu, G.K.; Zhu, Q.Y.; Chen, Z.C.; Ren, F. [Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China)

    2011-07-15

    Industrial experiments were performed for a retrofitted 660 MWe full-scale down-fired boiler. Measurements of ignition of the primary air/fuel mixture flow, the gas temperature distribution of the furnace and the gas components in the furnace were conducted at loads of 660, 550 and 330 MWe. With decreasing load, the gas temperature decreases and the ignition position of the primary coal/air flow becomes farther along the axis of the fuel-rich pipe in the burner region under the arches. The furnace temperature also decreases with decreasing load, as does the difference between the temperatures in the burning region and the lower position of the burnout region. With decreasing load, the exhaust gas temperature decreases from 129.8{sup o}C to 114.3{sup o}C, while NOx emissions decrease from 2448 to 1610 mg/m{sup 3}. All three loads result in low carbon content in fly ash and great boiler thermal efficiency higher than 92%. Compared with the case of 660 MWe before retrofit, the exhaust gas temperature decreased from 136 to 129.8{sup o}C, the carbon content in the fly ash decreased from 9.55% to 2.43% and the boiler efficiency increased from 84.54% to 93.66%.

  11. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Volume 1. Main report. Technical report, September 1977-October 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

    1980-06-01

    Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWE

  12. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Volume 1. Main report. Technical report, September 1977-October 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

    1980-06-01

    Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWE.

  13. Impacts on human health from the coal and nuclear fuel cycles and other technologies associated with electric power generation and transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, E.P.

    1980-01-01

    Major public health impacts of electric power generation and transmission associated with the nuclear fuel cycle and with coal use are evaluated. Only existing technology is evaluated. The only health effects of concern are those leading to definable human disease and injury. Health effects are scaled to a nominal 1000 Megawatt (electric) plant fueled by either option. Comparison of the total health effects to the general public gives: nuclear, 0.03 to 0.05 major health effects per 1000 MWe per year; coal, 0.7 to 3.7 per 1000 MWe per year. Thus for the general public the health risks from the coal cycle are about 50 times greater than for the nuclear cycle. Health effects to workers in the industry are currently quite high. For the nuclear cycle, 4.6 to 5.1 major health impacts per 1000 MWe per year; for coal, 6.5 to 10.9. The two-fold greater risk for the coal cycle is primarily due to high injury rates in coal miners. There is no evidence that electrical transmission contributes any health effects to the general public, except for episodes where broken power lines come in contact with people. For power line workers, the risk is estimated at 0.1 serious injury per 1000 MWe per year

  14. Small and medium power reactors: the past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, T.G.G.

    1987-01-01

    The history of small and medium power reactors (SMPRs) is reviewed. Although the power range goes up to plants with an electricity output of 600MWe, the focus is on plants of 250-300 MWe. The role of the International Atomic Energy Agency in promoting their use for electrical energy production for developing countries is examined. It can be shown that there is a considerable potential market for SMPRs which will increase later this century and into the next. There are, however, a number of problems to be overcome. These are not in the technical aspects but problems of costs and financing. Thus efforts should be made to reduce capital costs, shorten construction time and find potential customers who are acceptable borrowers to the international banking world. Various types of reactor are examined. (U.K.)

  15. Potential for Coal Power Plants to Co-Fire with Woody Biomass in the U. S. North, 2010-2030: A Technical Document Supporting the Northern Forest Futures Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael E. Goerndt; Francisco X. Aguilar; Kenneth E. Skog

    2015-01-01

    Future use of woody biomass to produce electric power in the U.S. North can have an important influence on timber production, carbon storage in forests, and net carbon emissions from producing electric power. The Northern Forest Futures Project (NFFP) has provided regional- and state-level projections of standing forest biomass, land-use change, and timber harvest,...

  16. Geographical distributions of biomass and potential sites of rubber wood fired power plants in Southern Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krukanont, P.; Prasertsan, S.

    2004-01-01

    Biomass residues from rubber trees in rubber producing countries have immense potential for power production. This paper presents the case of the south peninsular of Thailand, where the rubber industry is intense. Mathematical models were developed to determine the maximum affordable fuel cost and optimum capacity of the power plant for a given location of known area-based fuel availability density. GIS data of rubber growing was used to locate the appropriate sites and sizes of the power plants. Along 700 km of the highway network in the region, it was found that 8 power plants are financially feasible. The total capacity is 186.5 MW e . The fuel procurement area is in the range of less than 35 km. (Author)

  17. Effects of the distribution density of a biomass combined heat and power plant network on heat utilisation efficiency in village-town systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yifei; Kang, Jian

    2017-11-01

    The building of biomass combined heat and power (CHP) plants is an effective means of developing biomass energy because they can satisfy demands for winter heating and electricity consumption. The purpose of this study was to analyse the effect of the distribution density of a biomass CHP plant network on heat utilisation efficiency in a village-town system. The distribution density is determined based on the heat transmission threshold, and the heat utilisation efficiency is determined based on the heat demand distribution, heat output efficiency, and heat transmission loss. The objective of this study was to ascertain the optimal value for the heat transmission threshold using a multi-scheme comparison based on an analysis of these factors. To this end, a model of a biomass CHP plant network was built using geographic information system tools to simulate and generate three planning schemes with different heat transmission thresholds (6, 8, and 10 km) according to the heat demand distribution. The heat utilisation efficiencies of these planning schemes were then compared by calculating the gross power, heat output efficiency, and heat transmission loss of the biomass CHP plant for each scenario. This multi-scheme comparison yielded the following results: when the heat transmission threshold was low, the distribution density of the biomass CHP plant network was high and the biomass CHP plants tended to be relatively small. In contrast, when the heat transmission threshold was high, the distribution density of the network was low and the biomass CHP plants tended to be relatively large. When the heat transmission threshold was 8 km, the distribution density of the biomass CHP plant network was optimised for efficient heat utilisation. To promote the development of renewable energy sources, a planning scheme for a biomass CHP plant network that maximises heat utilisation efficiency can be obtained using the optimal heat transmission threshold and the nonlinearity

  18. Investigation of human performance events at French power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghertman, F.; Griffon-Fouco, M.

    1985-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the collection of data on human errors that occur at operating power plants. Three collection methods are used, each relating to a difference level of analysis. (1) Simplified statistical analysis of the causes of human errors: Events which have occurred at operating power plants and which are attributable to human errors are selected. The errors thus identified are analysed briefly and are described by a simplified classification, statistical analysis then being applied to find the principal factors underlying these errors. By way of example, an analysis is given of data on emergency shut-downs involving a human error component that occurred at 900 MW(e) PWR plants during 1982, 1983, 1984. (2) In-depth statistical analysis of the causes of certain human errors: The errors selected are analysed and described by means of a detailed classification. By way of example, the collection and evaluation of data on human errors occurring during periodic tests at a 900 MW(e) power plant over a period of six months are described. (3) In-depth analysis of certain events due to human errors: The events selected are analysed by means of a method which reconstitutes the multicausal aspect of the event and of each human error. By way of example, a description is given of an emergency core cooling required at a 900 MW(e) PWR plant. In conclusion, it is explained how these three methods of collection play complementary roles

  19. Biomass as a fuel: Advantages, limitations and possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McBurney, B.

    1997-01-01

    This presentation briefly outlines major issues related to the use of biomass fuels. Advantages and disadvantages of biomass fuels are identified, as well as major factors that may facilitate greater use of biomass fuels. Highlights of the US DOE Biomass Power Program, program activities, and demonstration projects are presented. Some statistical and economic data are provided, including biomass fueled electric capacity, biomass energy consumption by sector, and fuel cost savings and greenhouse gas emissions reductions for four biomass co-fired units

  20. Operating experience with nuclear power stations in Member States in 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    This report is twenty-ninth in the IAEA series of annual reports on operating experience with nuclear power stations in Member States. The report is a direct output from the Agency's Power Reactor Information System (PRIS), whose database contains all operating experience data published in Agency's operating experience annual reports published since 1971 and basic information on power reactors, including design data. According to the information available to the Agency at the end of 1997, there were 437 nuclear power reactors having a total capacity of 351795 MW(e). During 1997 three new reactors having total capacity of 3555 MW(e) were connected to the grid in France and the Republic of Korea. There were 36 nuclear power plants under construction in the world. Load, operation and availability factors are used as the basic performance factors. In addition to annual performance data and outage information, the report contains a historical summary of performance and outages during the lifetime of individual plants and five figures illustrating worldwide performance and statistical data

  1. Renew, reduce or become more efficient? The climate contribution of biomass co-combustion in a coal-fired power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miedema, Jan H.; Benders, René M.J.; Moll, Henri C.; Pierie, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Coal mining is more energy and CO_2 efficient than biomass production. • Co-combustion of 60% biomass with coal doubles mass transport compared to 100% coal. • Low co-combustion levels reduce GHG emissions, but the margins are small. • Total supply chain efficiency is the highest for the coal reference at 41.2%. - Abstract: Within this paper, biomass supply chains, with different shares of biomass co-combustion in coal fired power plants, are analysed on energy efficiency, energy consumption, renewable energy production, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and compared with the performance of a 100% coal supply chain scenario, for a Dutch situation. The 60% biomass co-combustion supply chain scenarios show possibilities to reduce emissions up to 48%. The low co-combustion levels are effective to reduce GHG emissions, but the margins are small. Currently co-combustion of pellets is the norm. Co-combustion of combined torrefaction and pelleting (TOP) shows the best results, but is also the most speculative. The indicators from the renewable energy directive cannot be aligned. When biomass is regarded as scarce, co-combustion of small shares or no co-combustion is the best option from an energy perspective. When biomass is regarded as abundant, co-combustion of large shares is the best option from a GHG reduction perspective.

  2. Review of the conceptual design of a Doublet fusion experimental power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.C.

    1976-01-01

    The results of a two-year, conceptual design study of a fusion experimental power reactor (EPR) are presented. For this study, the primary objectives of the EPR are to obtain plasma ignition conditions and produce net electrical power. The design features a Doublet plasma configuration with a major radius of 4.5 m. The average plasma beta is 10 percent which yields a thermonuclear power level of 410 MW during a 105-sec burn period. With a duty factor of 0.84, the gross electrical output is 124 MW(e) while the net output is 37 MW(e). The design features a 25-cm-thick, helium-cooled, modular, stainless-steel blanket with a 1-cm-thick, silicon carbide first wall. Sufficient shielding is provided to permit contact maintenance outside the shield envelope within 24 hr after shutdown. An overall plant concept has been developed including a superheated steam cycle power conversion system. Preliminary cost estimates and construction schedules have also been developed. 3 refs

  3. Biomass in Switzerland. Energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guggisberg, B.

    2006-01-01

    In the long term, biomass could be used for energy production in a three times more intensive way, compared to current figures. A major contribution would be delivered to Switzerland's energy supply. Numerous biomass conversion technologies do exist, for the production of heat, power or vehicle fuel. However, the implementation of such a large-scale utilisation of biomass requires a couple of strategic decisions in order to improve the framework conditions for biomass development and precisely target the supporting measures applicable to both research and pilot plants. In short, a clear and efficient strategy is necessary in what regards biomass, that will be used for the definition of a future catalogue of measures. (author)

  4. Reducing life cycle greenhouse gas emissions of corn ethanol by integrating biomass to produce heat and power at ethanol plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaliyan, Nalladurai; Morey, R. Vance; Tiffany, Douglas G.

    2011-01-01

    A life-cycle assessment (LCA) of corn ethanol was conducted to determine the reduction in the life-cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for corn ethanol compared to gasoline by integrating biomass fuels to replace fossil fuels (natural gas and grid electricity) in a U.S. Midwest dry-grind corn ethanol plant producing 0.19 hm 3 y -1 of denatured ethanol. The biomass fuels studied are corn stover and ethanol co-products [dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS), and syrup (solubles portion of DDGS)]. The biomass conversion technologies/systems considered are process heat (PH) only systems, combined heat and power (CHP) systems, and biomass integrated gasification combined cycle (BIGCC) systems. The life-cycle GHG emission reduction for corn ethanol compared to gasoline is 38.9% for PH with natural gas, 57.7% for PH with corn stover, 79.1% for CHP with corn stover, 78.2% for IGCC with natural gas, 119.0% for BIGCC with corn stover, and 111.4% for BIGCC with syrup and stover. These GHG emission estimates do not include indirect land use change effects. GHG emission reductions for CHP, IGCC, and BIGCC include power sent to the grid which replaces electricity from coal. BIGCC results in greater reductions in GHG emissions than IGCC with natural gas because biomass is substituted for fossil fuels. In addition, underground sequestration of CO 2 gas from the ethanol plant's fermentation tank could further reduce the life-cycle GHG emission for corn ethanol by 32% compared to gasoline.

  5. Biomass gasification in electric power production; Gaseificacao de biomassa na producao de eletricidade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paula, Claudio P. de; Ennes, Sergio A.W. [Companhia Energetica de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Corsetti, Marilena

    1992-12-31

    The main objective of this work is to evaluate the technical and economical viability of thermoelectric power generation based on biomass. The technology of gasification of sugar cane bagasse in fluidized bed and its influences in the generation or co-generation process in gas turbines is analysed. The potential of such kind of generation as well as the costs are indicated. Such potential are compared to those of the conventional technologies of co-generation using fuel oil and natural gas in the industry 10 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Market dynamics of biomass fuel in California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaney, W.F.; Zane, G.A.

    1991-01-01

    The California market for biomass fuel purchased by independent power producers has grown substantially since 1980. The PURPA legislation that based power purchase rates upon the 'avoided cost' of public utilities resulted in construction of nearly 900 Megawatts of capacity coming online by 1991. Until 1987, most powerplants were co-sited at sawmills and burned sawmill residue. By 1990 the installed capacity of stand-alone powerplants exceeded the capacity co-sited at wood products industry facilities. The 1991 demand for biomass fuel is estimated as 6,400,000 BDT. The 1991 market value of most biomass fuel delivered to powerplants is from $34 to $47 per BDT. Biomass fuel is now obtained from forest chips, agriculture residue and urban wood waste. The proportion of biomass fuel from the wood products industry is expected to decline and non-traditional fuels are expected to increase in availability

  7. Biomass programme: Overview of the 2006 Swiss research programme; Programm Biomasse. Ueberblicksbericht zum Forschungsprogramm 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binggeli, D.; Guggisberg, B.

    2007-07-01

    This report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) reviews work done within the framework of the Swiss biomass research programme in 2006. The programme concentrates on the efficient conversion of biomass into heat, electrical power and motor fuels. Projects concerned with the optimisation of processes are reported on, including low-particle-emission systems, control systems for bivalent heating installations, use of demanding biomass fuels, combined pellets and solar heating systems and the elimination of ammonia emissions. In the material flow area, measurement campaigns, organic pollutants in compost, the effects of fermented wastes in agriculture and methane losses in biogas conditioning are reported on. New conversion technologies are reviewed, including hydro-thermal gasification, plant-oil fuelled combined heat and power units, flameless burners and catalytic direct liquefaction. In the area of basics, studies and concepts, eco-balances and life-cycle analyses are reported on; the production of synthetic natural gas and the influence of combustion particles are discussed and decentralised power generation from solid biomass is reported on. National and international co-operation is reviewed. The report is concluded with a review of eight pilot and demonstration projects, a review of work to be done in 2007 and a list of research and demonstration projects.

  8. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Volume 2. Appendices. Technical report, September 1977-October 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

    1980-06-01

    Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWE. This volume contains the appendices

  9. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Volume 2. Appendices. Technical report, September 1977-October 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

    1980-06-01

    Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWE. This volume contains the appendices.

  10. Development Strategies for Deployment of Biomass Resources in the Production of Biomass Power: November 6, 2001--February 28, 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminsky, J.

    2004-01-01

    The study analyzes strategies for deployment of biomass resources for biopower generation. It compares biomass supply databases and the projected biopower market penetration for several alternative incentive scenarios. It analyzes the availability of biomass to meet the projected market demands and recommends future research.

  11. Putney Basketville Site Biomass CHP Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunsberger, Randolph [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Mosey, Gail [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-10-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response Center for Program Analysis developed the RE-Powering America's Land initiative to reuse contaminated sites for renewable energy generation when aligned with the community's vision for the site. The Putney, Vermont, Basketville site, formerly the location of a basket-making facility and a paper mill andwoolen mill, was selected for a feasibility study under the program. Biomass was chosen as the renewable energy resource based on abundant woody-biomass resources available in the area. Biomass combined heat and power (CHP) was selected as the technology due to nearby loads, including Putney Paper and Landmark College.

  12. Three biomass power plants in New England first five years of challenges and solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeBlanc, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    Generating electricity from biomass fuels, through stand-alone power plants, represents a renewal of a half-century old plus, renewable technology. New England has generated its electricity sequentially, and still in parallel, from hydro, coal, oil, and nuclear sources during this period, and most recently during the 1980's, from a mixture of various alternate technologies including wood waste fuels and domestic waste fuels. Three plants located in New Hampshire and Maine, of identical power-island design, were constructed in eighteen months, and began operation in the period December, 1987 through March, 1988. These plants almost from the start have experienced an outstanding record of operation, dependability, and reliability. This paper will describe how each plant has fit into its respective location and environment, the personnel, technical and administrative support required, the biomass wood waste production and supply infra-structure which has developed around these facilities; and the technical problems and challenges which arose and were resolved in the process of handling a cantankerous, bulk fuel and turning it into a reliable supply of electricity. These plants are designed around a zero discharge concept. The author will discuss the design features built in, and operating practices which have evolved, to effectively use waste water internally, minimize air emissions, and recycle 100% of its solid waste as an effective fertilizer and soil conditioner

  13. A review on torrefaction of biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tapasvi, Dhruv; Tran, Khanh-Quang

    2010-07-01

    Full text: Torrefaction is a mild-pyrolysis (200-300 deg.C.) process which can be employed as pre-treatment to improve fuel properties of plant biomass materials. The treatment results in not only improved energy density, but also enhanced grindability and better storage characteristics for biomass fuels. Because of these advantages and the high level of viability, the technique has attracted increasing interests during the last decades. Several studies on torrefaction of biomass for heat and power applications have been documented. Substantial amounts of data on the technique are available in the literature, which need to be reviewed and analyzed for further actions in the area. This is the primary objective of the present study. This review is consisted of three parts, of which the first focuses on the mechanism of biomass torrefaction for heat and power applications, and the process as a whole. It is then followed by a critical review on experimental methods in laboratory, and effects of operating parameters on fuel properties of torrefied biomass. Finally, opportunities and challenges for the process are discussed. (Author)

  14. Operator training simulator for BWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Tadasu

    1988-01-01

    For the operation management of nuclear power stations with high reliability and safety, the role played by operators is very important. The effort of improving the man-machine interface in the central control rooms of nuclear power stations is energetically advanced, but the importance of the role of operators does not change. For the training of the operators of nuclear power stations, simulators have been used from the early stage. As the simulator facilities for operator training, there are the full scope simulator simulating faithfully the central control room of an actual plant and the small simulator mainly aiming at learning the plant functions. For BWR nuclear power stations, two full scope simulators are installed in the BWR Operator Training Center, and the training has been carried out since 1974. The plant function learning simulators have been installed in respective electric power companies as the education and training facilities in the companies. The role of simulators in operator training, the BTC No.1 simulator of a BWR-4 of 780 MWe and the BTC No.2 simulator of a BWR-5 of 1,100 MWe, plant function learning simulators, and the design of the BTC No.2 simulator and plant function learning simulators are reported. (K.I.)

  15. 78 FR 26747 - Oglethorpe Power Corporation: Proposed Biomass Power Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-08

    ... Decision. SUMMARY: The Rural Utilities Service (RUS) has issued a Record of Decision (ROD) for the.... Accordingly, comments submitted in the EIS process also informed RUS's decision making in the Section 106... Oglethorpe for RUS financing to construct the 100 megawatt (MW) biomass plant and related facilities...

  16. Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1. Annual operating report, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Net electric power generated in 1975 was 1,074,401 MW(e) with the generator on line 4,680.7 hrs. Information is presented concerning operations, maintenance, radioactive effluents and waste shipments, health physics, shutdowns, and personnel exposures

  17. The lateral distribution of muons in showers at 40 mwe underground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergamasco, L.; Castagnoli, C.; Dardo, M.; D'Ettorre Piazzoli, B.; Mannocchi, G.; Picchi, P.; Visentin, R.; Sitte, K.; Freiburg Univ.

    1975-01-01

    The multiplicity distribution of muon showers at 40 mwe underground was studied with a 4 m 2 spark chamber telescope. The observed frequencies deviate systematically from those calculated with the 'standard' lateral distributions of Vernov or of Greisen. Agreement can be attained if an enhancement of the muon component at small shower sizes is assumed, in accordance with the assumptions of a two-component theory of cosmic ray origin. It is improved by introducing an age dependence of the lateral structure function. (orig.) [de

  18. Integration of biomass into urban energy systems for heat and power. Part I: An MILP based spatial optimization methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantaleo, Antonio M.; Giarola, Sara; Bauen, Ausilio; Shah, Nilay

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • MILP tool for optimal sizing and location of heating and CHP plants to serve residential energy demand. • Trade-offs between local vs centralized heat generation, district heating vs natural gas distribution systems. • Assessment of multi-biomass supply chains and biomass to biofuel processing technologies. • Assessment of the key factors influencing the use of biomass and district heating in residential areas. - Abstract: The paper presents a mixed integer linear programming (MILP) approach to optimize multi-biomass and natural gas supply chain strategic design for heat and power generation in urban areas. The focus is on spatial and temporal allocation of biomass supply, storage, processing, transport and energy conversion (heat and CHP) to match the heat demand of residential end users. The main aim lies on the representation of the relationships between the biomass processing and biofuel energy conversion steps, and on the trade-offs between centralized district heating plants and local heat generation systems. After a description of state of the art and research trends in urban energy systems and bioenergy modelling, an application of the methodology to a generic case study is proposed. With the assumed techno-economic parameters, biomass based thermal energy generation results competitive with natural gas, while district heating network results the main option for urban areas with high thermal energy demand density. Potential further applications of this model are also described, together with main barriers for development of bioenergy routes for urban areas

  19. Current status of SMPRs and manpower development for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, M.P.

    1994-01-01

    The development of SMPRs could make it possible for countries with small electrical grids to use nuclear power. SMPRs are still in the developing stages and none of them have the capability of good plant performance. Most of the SMPRs are in the 300 MWe range and a grid capacity of at least 2000 MWe would be required before such a power plant can be connected to the grid. There is a possibility that SMPRs could generate electricity cheaper coal plants requiring desulphurization. An unexpected increase in coal price and adverse environmental effects could make it necessary to use nuclear power in the future. Qualified manpower is required to plan, build and properly operate a nuclear power plant; and the availability of qualified manpower is a pre-condition for deciding to use nuclear power. There is a possibility that Sri Lanka would be able to use nuclear power in the next 15-20 years and a total dependence upon foreign expertise is neither possible nor desirable. Therefore pre-project activities should be considering such things as teaching nuclear science and engineering in the universities and retraining existing professionals, say from the coal power industry. Adequate emphasis must be given to manpower development and to the need to scheduling this development

  20. Energy analysis of nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindhout, A.H.

    1975-01-01

    A study based on a 1000MWe light water reactor power station was carried out to determine the total energy input and output of the power station. The calculations took into account the mining and processing of the ore, enrichment of the uranium, treatment of used nuclear fuel, investment in land, buildings, machinery, and transport. 144 tons of natural uranium produce 6100 million kWh (electric) and 340 million kWh (thermal) per annum. (J.S.)

  1. Programmed system for nuclear power plant protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jover, Pierre.

    1980-06-01

    The progress in the field of microprocessors and large scale integration circuits, have incited to introduce this new technologies into nuclear power plant protection system. The hardware and software design principles are briefly listed; then, a quad-redundant protection system for 1300 MWe PWR, developed in France is described [fr

  2. The floating nuclear power plant with high safety (''Cruise-M'')

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gromov, B.F.; Stepanov, V.N.; Toshinsky, G.I.; Tchekunov, V.V.; Stepanov, V.S.; Vakhrushin, M.P.; Kiryukhin, V.I.; Maltsev, V.P.; Kozlov, B.M.; Landgraf, K.A.

    1997-01-01

    The results of conceptual development for a floating nuclear power plant (FNPP) of 50 MW(e) with a nuclear steam producing unit (NSPU) based on a fast reactor with lead-bismut coolant were presented. A lead-bismuth coolant has a number of important safety advantages and it was developed in Russia for nuclear-powered submarines. This FNPP could be used as a power source for seawater desalination and electricity supply. (author)

  3. Biomass co-firing opportunities and experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyng, R. [Ontario Power Generation Inc., Niagara Falls, ON (Canada). Nanticoke Generating Station

    2006-07-01

    Biomass co-firing and opportunities in the electricity sector were described in this presentation. Biomass co-firing in a conventional coal plant was first illustrated. Opportunities that were presented included the Dutch experience and Ontario Power Generation's (OPG) plant and production mix. The biomass co-firing program at OPG's Nantucket generating station was presented in three phases. The fuel characteristics of co-firing were identified. Several images and charts of the program were provided. Results and current status of tests were presented along with conclusions of the biomass co-firing program. It was concluded that biomass firing is feasible and following the Dutch example. Biomass firing could considerably expand renewable electricity generation in Ontario. In addition, sufficient biomass exists in Ontario and the United States to support large scale biomass co-firing. Several considerations were offered such as electricity market price for biomass co-firing and intensity targets and credit for early adoption and banking. tabs., figs.

  4. Modeling and simulations of a 30 MWe solar electric generating system using parabolic trough collectors in Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usta, Yasemin [Anyl Asansor Ltd (Turkey)], email: syusta@gmail.com; Baker, Derek [Middle East Technical University (Turkey)], email: dbaker@metu.edu.tr; Kaftanoglu, Bilgin [Atilim University (Turkey)], email: bilgink@atilim.edu.tr

    2011-07-01

    With the energy crisis and the increasing concerns about climate change, the interest in concentrating solar power (CSP) systems is growing in Turkey. The aim of this paper is to develop a model of a CSP system using a field of parabolic trough collectors and to assess the predicted performance of the system. A model was developed for a 30MWe solar generating system in Antalya, Turkey, using TRNSYS software, the solar thermal electric components library and information on an existing system in Kramer Junction, California, United States. Annual simulations were then performed for both systems in Antalya and California using weather data. It was found that the predictions were in good agreement with published data. In addition results showed that Antalya's system would generate 30% less than Kramer Junction's system on an annual basis. This paper provides useful information on modeling and simulation of CSP systems.

  5. Biomass gasification in Europe - status and perspectives; Vergasung von Biomasse in Europa - Stand und Perspektiven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinkelbach, L; Kaltschmitt, M [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Energiewirtschaft und Rationelle Energieanwendung (IER)

    1997-12-31

    Gasification of biomass is a promising option, especially in the fields of waste management and power generation, but there are considerable economic and technical problems that must be solved first. A critical analysis of biomass gasification in Europe today shows that this technology is not marketable today and cannot contribute to environmentally acceptable power supply on a short-term basis. (orig) [Deutsch] Von allen Moeglichkeiten einer energetischen Nutzung von Biomasse stellt die Technik der Vergasung insbesondere in den Bereichen Abfallentsorgung und Stromerzeugung eine vielversprechende Option dar. Einer weiteren Verbreitung dieser Technik stehen allerdings erhebliche wirtschaftliche und technische Probleme entgegen. Die kritische Analyse der derzeitigen Gegebenheiten der Biomassevergasung in Europa fuehrt zu dem Schluss, dass diese Technik noch nicht unmittelbar vor der Mrkteinfuehrung steht und somit kurzfristig keinen merklichen Beitrag zu einer umwelt- und klimavertraeglicheren Energieversorgung in Europa leisten kann. (orig)

  6. Biomass gasification in Europe - status and perspectives; Vergasung von Biomasse in Europa - Stand und Perspektiven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinkelbach, L.; Kaltschmitt, M. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Energiewirtschaft und Rationelle Energieanwendung (IER)

    1996-12-31

    Gasification of biomass is a promising option, especially in the fields of waste management and power generation, but there are considerable economic and technical problems that must be solved first. A critical analysis of biomass gasification in Europe today shows that this technology is not marketable today and cannot contribute to environmentally acceptable power supply on a short-term basis. (orig) [Deutsch] Von allen Moeglichkeiten einer energetischen Nutzung von Biomasse stellt die Technik der Vergasung insbesondere in den Bereichen Abfallentsorgung und Stromerzeugung eine vielversprechende Option dar. Einer weiteren Verbreitung dieser Technik stehen allerdings erhebliche wirtschaftliche und technische Probleme entgegen. Die kritische Analyse der derzeitigen Gegebenheiten der Biomassevergasung in Europa fuehrt zu dem Schluss, dass diese Technik noch nicht unmittelbar vor der Mrkteinfuehrung steht und somit kurzfristig keinen merklichen Beitrag zu einer umwelt- und klimavertraeglicheren Energieversorgung in Europa leisten kann. (orig)

  7. BN-600 power unit 15-year operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saraev, O.M.; Oshkanov, N.N.; Vylomov, V.V.

    1996-01-01

    Comprehensive experience has been gained with the operating fast reactor BN-600 with a power out of 600 MWe. This paper includes important performance results and gives also an overview of the experience gained from BN-600 NPP commercial operation during 15 years. (author). 2 figs, 1 tab

  8. Ocean Thermal Energy Conservation (OTEC) power system development (PDS) II. Preliminary design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-08-10

    This report documents the results and conclusions of the PDS II, Phase I, preliminary design of a 10 MWe OTEC power system, using enhanced plate type heat exchangers, and of representative 0.2 MWe test articles. It further provides the documentation (specifications, drawings, trade studies, etc.) resulting from the design activities. The data and discussions of the technical concepts are organized to respond to the PDS II, Phase II proposal evaluation criteria. This volume, which specifically addresses the three evaluation categories (heat exchangers, rotating machinery, and power system configuration and performance) is an integral part of the Phase II plans (proposal) which describe the technical approach to delivering test articles to OTEC-1. In addition, there is a section which addresses power system cost and net energy analysis and another which discusses the results of stainless steel feasibility studies. Supporting documentation is contained in two appendix volumes.

  9. Raft River binary-cycle geothermal pilot power plant final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bliem, C.J.; Walrath, L.F.

    1983-04-01

    The design and performance of a 5-MW(e) binary-cycle pilot power plant that used a moderate-temperature hydrothermal resource, with isobutane as a working fluid, are examined. Operating problems experienced and solutions found are discussed and recommendations are made for improvements to future power plant designs. The plant and individual systems are analyzed for design specification versus actual performance figures.

  10. Parametric cost analysis of a HYLIFE-II power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieri, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The SAFIRE (Systems Analysis for ICF Reactor Economics) code was adapted to model a power plant using a HYLIFE-2 reactor chamber. The code was then used to examine the dependence of the plant capital costs and the busbar cost of electricity (COE) on a variety of design parameters (type of driver, chamber repetition rate, and net electric power). The results show the most attractive operating space for each set of driver/target assumptions and quantify the benefits of improvements in key design parameters. The base-case plant was a 1000-MW(e) plant containing a reactor vessel driven by an induction linac heavy-ion accelerator, run at 8 Hz with a driver energy of 6.73 MJ and a target yield of 350 MJ. The total direct cost for this plant was $2.6 billion. (All costs in this paper are given in equivalent 1988 dollars.) The COE was 8.5 cents/(kWh). The COE and total capital costs for a 1000-MW(e) base plant are nearly independent of the chosen combination of repetition rate and driver energy for a driver operating between 4 and 10 Hz. For comparison, the COE for a coal or future fission plant would be 4.5--5.5 cents/(kWh). The COE for a 1000-MW(e) plant could be reduced to 7.5 cents/(kWh) by using advanced targets and could be cut to 6.5 cents/(kWh) with conventional targets, if the driver cost could be cut in half. There is a large economy of scale with heavy-ion-driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) plants. A 2000-MW(e) plant with a heavy-ion driver and a HYLIFE-2 chamber would have a COE of only 5.8 cents/(kWh)

  11. Biomass Support for the China Renewable Energy Law: Final Report, December 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2006-10-01

    Final subcontractor report giving an overview of the biomass power generation technologies used in China. Report covers resources, technologies, foreign technologies and resources for comparison purposes, biomass potential in China, and finally government policies in China that support/hinder development of the using biomass in China for power generation.

  12. Cofiring biomass with coal: Opportunities for Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, A A; Shamsuddin, A H

    2013-01-01

    Malaysia generated 108,175 GWh of electricity in 2010 where 39.51 % was sourced from coal. Coal power generation is also planned to overtake natural gas as the main fuel for electricity generation within the next two decades. Malaysia also has a vast biomass resource that is currently under-utilised for electricity generation. This paper studies the option of cofiring biomass in existing Malaysian coal power plants to increase the nation's renewable energy mix as well as to reduce its power sector carbon dioxide emission. Benefits of cofiring to the nation were discussed and agricultural residues from palm oil and paddy was identified as a potential source of biomass for cofiring. It was also found that there is a willingness for cofiring by stakeholders but barriers existed in the form of technical issues and lack of clear direction and mechanism.

  13. Cofiring biomass with coal: Opportunities for Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, A. A.; Shamsuddin, A. H.

    2013-06-01

    Malaysia generated 108,175 GWh of electricity in 2010 where 39.51 % was sourced from coal. Coal power generation is also planned to overtake natural gas as the main fuel for electricity generation within the next two decades. Malaysia also has a vast biomass resource that is currently under-utilised for electricity generation. This paper studies the option of cofiring biomass in existing Malaysian coal power plants to increase the nation's renewable energy mix as well as to reduce its power sector carbon dioxide emission. Benefits of cofiring to the nation were discussed and agricultural residues from palm oil and paddy was identified as a potential source of biomass for cofiring. It was also found that there is a willingness for cofiring by stakeholders but barriers existed in the form of technical issues and lack of clear direction and mechanism.

  14. Conceptual design of advanced central receiver power systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Volume 2, Book 2. Appendices. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-03-01

    The appendices include: (A) design data sheets and P and I drawing for 100-MWe commercial plant design, for all-sodium storage concept; (B) design data sheets and P and I drawing for 100-MWe commercial plant design, for air-rock bed storage concept; (C) electric power generating water-steam system P and I drawing and equipment list, 100-MWe commercial plant design; (D) design data sheets and P and I drawing for 281-MWe commercial plant design; (E) steam generator system conceptual design; (F) heat losses from solar receiver surface; (G) heat transfer and pressure drop for rock bed thermal storage; (H) a comparison of alternative ways of recovering the hydraulic head from the advanced solar receiver tower; (I) central receiver tower study; (J) a comparison of mechanical and electromagnetic sodium pumps; (K) pipe routing study of sodium downcomer; and (L) sodium-cooled advanced central receiver system simulation model. (WHK)

  15. The feasibility of co-firing biomass for electricity in Missouri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Zuoming; Altman, Ira; Johnson, Thomas G.

    2014-01-01

    Bioenergy is one of the most significant energy resources with potential to serve as a partial replacement for fossil. As an agricultural state, Missouri has great potential to use biomass for energy production. In 2008, Missouri adopted a renewable portfolio standard (RPS) yet about 80% of its power supply still comes from coal. This paper describes a feasibility study of co-firing biomass in existing coal-powered plants in Missouri. Specifically, this study developed a linear programming model and simulated six scenarios to assess the economic feasibility and greenhouse gas impacts of co-firing biomass in existing qualified coal power plants in Missouri. The results of this study indicate that although co-firing can reduce the emissions of GHG and environmental pollutants, it is still not an economically feasible option for power generation without additional economic or policy incentives or regulations which could take environmental costs into account. Based on these results, strategies and policies to promote the utilization of biomass and to increase its competitiveness with fossil fuels are identified and discussed. - Highlights: • This paper reports on a study of the economic feasibility and environmental effects of co-firing biomass for electricity. • The feasibility of co-firing biomass varies by location depending on local availability of biomass and size of facility. • We apply a linear optimization model that generates economic and environmental indicators for each of several locations. • This paper will appeal to power generators, academic researchers and consultants interested in the feasibility of biopower

  16. Developing business in emerging biomass energy markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadyszewski, J.

    2005-01-01

    Global market trends for forest products were reviewed in this PowerPoint presentation. The status of biomass energy products in relation to climate change and renewable energy portfolio standards was also examined. It was noted that China has increased investment in processing capacity and has increased imports of raw logs. India has doubled its imports of raw logs. Details of major tropical log producers and consumers were presented. Details of the biomass industry in the United States were presented, as well as data on fuel use at biomass energy plants and biomass energy capacity. An overview of biomass energy in the Russian far east and Siberia was presented, as well as details of activities and opportunities in Brazil and Indonesia. An economic analysis for small dry kilns was presented. Issues concerning boiler capacity in Russian companies for 2001-2005 were discussed. A case study of a biomass project from Congo was presented. It was noted that projects that replace fossil fuels can obtain revenues from the sale of carbon benefits, and that biomass energy offers the most attractive current option for the removal of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from the atmosphere. Details of a district heating project in Siberia were presented, and it was noted that in remote regions, costs for heat and power from biomass can be lower than costs from diesel and coal. It was concluded that there will be significant growth for biomass energy systems in the developing world, and that climate change will be an increasingly important element in advancing biomass energy. tabs., figs

  17. Small-medium sized nuclear coal and gas power plant: A probabilistic analysis of their financial performances and influence of CO2 cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Locatelli, Giorgio; Mancini, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    Nations or regions with limited electrical grid and restricted financial resources are a suitable market for small medium power plants with a size of 300-400 MWe. The literature presents several comparisons about the economics of large power plants (of about 1000 MWe); however there are not probabilistic analysis regarding the economics of small medium power plants. This paper fills this gap comparing, with a Monte Carlo evaluation, the economical and financial performances of a nuclear reactor, a coal fired power plant and a combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT) of 335 MWe. The paper aims also to investigate the effect of the carbon tax and electrical energy price on the economics of these plants. The analysis show as, without any carbon tax, the coal plant has the lowest levelised unit electricity cost (LUEC) and the highest net present value (NPV). Introducing the carbon tax the rank changes: depending on its amount the first and the nuclear after becomes the plant with lower LUEC and highest NPV. Therefore, the uncertainty in the carbon tax cost increases the risk of investing in a coal plant above the level of the new small medium reactor.

  18. Energy situation in Latin America and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jinchuk, D.; Deluchi, F.

    2006-01-01

    Greenhouse Gas emission levels. As an example, C02 emission levels in South America were dominated by a 38% increase in Brazil in the period of 1990-2003. Regarding Nuclear Power generation, at present, only Mexico (1.30