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Sample records for mv photon beams

  1. Comparison of Head Scatter Factor for 6MV and 10MV flattened (FB) and Unflattened (FFF) Photon Beam using indigenously Designed Columnar Mini Phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashokkumar, Sigamani; Nambi Raj, N Arunai; Sinha, Sujit Nath; Yadav, Girigesh; Thiyagarajan, Rajesh; Raman, Kothanda; Mishra, Manindra Bhushan

    2014-07-01

    To measure and compare the head scatter factor for flattened (FB) and unflattened (FFF) of 6MV and 10MV photon beam using indigenously designed mini phantom. A columnar mini phantom was designed as recommended by AAPM Task Group 74 with low and high atomic number materials at 10 cm (mini phantom) and at approximately twice the depth of maximum dose water equivalent thickness (brass build-up cap). Scatter in the accelerator (Sc) values of 6MV-FFF photon beams are lesser than that of the 6MV-FB photon beams (0.66-2.8%; Clinac iX, 2300CD) and (0.47-1.74%; True beam) for field sizes ranging from 10 × 10 cm(2) to 40 × 40 cm(2). Sc values of 10MV-FFF photon beams are lesser (0.61-2.19%; True beam) than that of the 10MV-FB photons beams for field sizes ranging from 10 × 10 cm(2) to 40 × 40 cm(2). The SSD had no influence on head scatter for both flattened and unflattened beams and irrespective of head design of the different linear accelerators. The presence of field shaping device influences the Sc values. The collimator exchange effect reveals that the opening of the upper jaw increases Sc irrespective of FB or FFF photon beams and different linear accelerators, and it is less significant in FFF beams. Sc values of 6MV-FB square field were in good agreement with that of AAPM, TG-74 published data for Varian (Clinac iX, 2300CD) accelerator. Our results confirm that the removal of flattening filter decreases in the head scatter factor compared to flattened beam. This could reduce the out-of-field dose in advanced treatment delivery techniques.

  2. The comparison of Co-60 and 4MV photons matching dosimetry during half-beam technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cakir, Aydin; Bilge, Hatice; Dadasbilge, Alpar; Kuecuecuek, Halil; Okutan, Murat; Merdan Fayda, Emre

    2005-01-01

    In this phantom study, we tried to compare matching dosimetry differences between half-blocking of Co-60 and asymmetric collimation of the 4MV photons during craniospinal irradiation. The dose distributions are compared and discussed. Firstly, some gaps with different sizes are left between cranial and spinal field borders. Secondly, the fields are overlapped in the same sizes. We irradiate the films located in water-equivalent solid phantoms with Co-60 and 4MV photon beams. This study indicates that the field placement errors in +/- 1mm are acceptable for both Co-60 and 4MV photon energies during craniospinal irradiation with half-beam block technique. Within these limits the dose variations are specified in +/- 5%. However, the setup errors that are more than 1mm are unacceptable for both asymmetric collimation of 4MV photon and half-blocking of Co-60

  3. Beam Characterization of 10-MV Photon Beam from Medical Linear Accelerator without Flattening Filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimozato, Tomohiro; Aoyama, Yuichi; Matsunaga, Takuma; Tabushi, Katsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    This work investigated the dosimetric properties of a 10-MV photon beam emitted from a medical linear accelerator (linac) with no flattening filter (FF). The aim of this study is to analyze the radiation fluence and energy emitted from the flattening filter free (FFF) linac using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. The FFF linac was created by removing the FF from a linac in clinical use. Measurements of the depth dose (DD) and the off-axis profile were performed using a three-dimensional water phantom with an ionization chamber. A MC simulation for a 10-MV photon beam from this FFF linac was performed using the BEAMnrc code. The off-axis profiles for the FFF linac exhibited a chevron-like distribution, and the dose outside the irradiation field was found to be lower for the FFF linac than for a linac with an FF (FF linac). The DD curves for the FFF linac included many contaminant electrons in the build-up region. Therefore, for clinical use, a metal filter is additionally required to reduce the effects of the electron contamination. The mean energy of the FFF linac was found to be lower than that of the FF linac owing to the absence of beam hardening caused by the FF.

  4. Radiobiological Characterization of Two Photon-Beam Energies 6 and 15 MV used in Radiotherapy From Linear Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eltayeb, A.E.H.

    2009-02-01

    The main objective of this study is to perform radiobiological characterization of two different photon beam energies, 6 MV and 15 MV, from linear accelerator used in radiotherapy, with special regard to late effects of radiation. Two end-points, namely cell survival and micronucleus induction were used for the characterization. Chinese hamster V 79 lung fibroblast cell line to prepare cell culture and to perform the innervate experiments. chromosomes number was counted and found to be 22 chromosomes per cell, this result is in complete agreement with expected 11 pairs of chromosomes representing the genome of this species. Cells were kept in confluent growth for two days and then exposed to two photon beam energies, 6 and 15 MV respectively. Different dose rates were used for the two beam energies, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, 7.0 Gy. Cells were counted immediately after irradiation and re seeded, the seeded number of cells was calculated to the dose rate used. Another set of unirradiated cells treated the same as the experimental set was used as a control group. The plating efficiency (PE) was calculated for the control group, then cells were incubated at 37 o C for 6 days to construct the survival curve, five samples were counted per dose and the mean was calculated. The two survival curves are similar for photon beam energies (6 and 15 MV) and the surviving fraction was decreased with dose rate. The two curves showed similar values of α and β parameters, this result is expected for the same radiation type (X-ray). For the micronuclei assay three samples for each dose were seeded and incubated at 37 o C for 24 hours then Cytochalasin-B was added to block cells in cytokinesis phase of the mitosis. The micronuclei number was counted and plotted with dose. A significant positive correlation was found between dose and micronuclei frequency (P=0.00), moreover, the micronuclei frequency is relatively higher with 15 MV compared with 6 MV energy. This indicates the

  5. Sources of electron contamination for the Clinac-35 25-MV photon beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petti, P.L.; Goodman, M.S.; Sisterson, J.M.; Biggs, P.J.; Gabriel, T.A.; Mohan, R.

    1983-01-01

    A detailed Monte Carlo approach has been employed to investigate the sources of electron contamination for the 25-MV photon beam generated by Varian's Clinac-35. Three sources of contamination were examined: (a) the flattening filter and beam monitor chamber, (b) the fixed primary collimators downstream from the monitor chamber and the adjustable photon jaws, and (c) the air volume separating the treatment head from the observation point. Five source-to-surface distances (SSDs) were considered for a single field size, 28 cm in diameter at 80 cm SSD. It was found that for small SSDs (80-100 cm), the dominant sources of electron contamination were the flattening filter and the beam monitor chamber which accounted for 70% of the unwanted electrons. Thirteen percent of the remaining electrons originated in the downstream primary collimators and the photon jaws, and 17% were produced in air. At larger SSDs, the fraction of unwanted electrons originating in air increased. At 400 cm SSD, 61% of the contaminating electrons present in the beam were produced in air, 34% originated in the flattening filter and beam monitor chamber, and 5% were due to interactions in the fixed collimators downstream from the monitor chamber and the adjustable photon jaws. These calculated results are substantiated by recent experiments

  6. Relative dosimetry of photon beam of 6 MV with a liquid ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benitez Villegas, E. M.; Casado Villalon, F. J.; Martin-Cueto, J. A.; Caudepon Moreno, F.; Garcia Pareja, S.; Galan Montenegro, P.

    2011-01-01

    The increasing use of reduced size fields in the special techniques of treatment generates regions with high dose gradients. It therefore requires the use of detectors that present high spatial resolution. The aim of this study is to compare the dosimetric measurements obtained with a liquid ionization chamber PTW MicroLion recently acquired with other commonly used detectors for a photon beam of 6 MV linear electron accelerator Varian 600DBX.

  7. Validation of calculated tissue maximum ratio obtained from measured percentage depth dose (PPD) data for high energy photon beam ( 6 MV and 15 MV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osei, J.E.

    2014-07-01

    During external beam radiotherapy treatments, high doses are delivered to the cancerous cell. Accuracy and precision of dose delivery are primary requirements for effective and efficiency in treatment. This leads to the consideration of treatment parameters such as percentage depth dose (PDD), tissue air ratio (TAR) and tissue phantom ratio (TPR), which show the dose distribution in the patient. Nevertheless, tissue air ratio (TAR) for treatment time calculation, calls for the need to measure in-air-dose rate. For lower energies, measurement is not a problem but for higher energies, in-air measurement is not attainable due to the large build-up material required for the measurement. Tissue maximum ratio (TMR) is the quantity required to replace tissue air ratio (TAR) for high energy photon beam. It is known that tissue maximum ratio (TMR) is an important dosimetric function in radiotherapy treatment. As the calculation methods used to determine tissue maximum ratio (TMR) from percentage depth dose (PDD) were derived by considering the differences between TMR and PDD such as geometry and field size, where phantom scatter or peak scatter factors are used to correct dosimetric variation due to field size difference. The purpose of this study is to examine the accuracy of calculated tissue maximum ratio (TMR) data with measured TMR values for 6 MV and 15 MV photon beam at Sweden Ghana Medical Centre. With the help of the Blue motorize water phantom and the Omni pro-Accept software, Pdd values from which TMRs are calculated were measured at 100 cm source-to-surface distance (SSD) for various square field sizes from 5x5 cm to 40x40 cm and depth of 1.5 cm to 25 cm for 6 MV and 15 MV x-ray beam. With the same field sizes, depths and energies, the TMR values were measured. The validity of the calculated data was determined by making a comparison with values measured experimentally at some selected field sizes and depths. The results show that; the reference depth of maximum

  8. A comparison of two photon planning algorithms for 8 MV and 25 MV X-ray beams in lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, M.W.K.; Young, E.C.M.; Yu, P.K.N.

    1995-01-01

    The results of a comparison of two photon planning algorithms, the Clarkson Scatter Integration algorithm and the Equivalent Tissue-air Ratio algorithm are reported, using a simple lung phantom for 8 MV and 25 MV X-ray beams of field sizes 5 cm x 5 cm and 10 cm x 10 cm. Central axis depth-dose distributions were measured with a thimble chamber or a Markus parallel-plate chamber. Dose profile distributions were measured with TLD rods and films. Measured dose distributions were then compared to predicted dose distributions. Both algorithms overestimate the dose at mid-lung as they do not account for the effect of electronic disequilibrium. The Clarkson algorithm consistently shows less accurate results in comparison with the ETAR algorithm. There is additional error in the case of the Clarkson algorithm because of the assumption of a unit density medium in calculating scatter, which gives an overestimate in the effective scatter-air ratios in lung. For a 5 cm x 5 cm field, the error of dose prediction for 25 MV x-ray beam at mid-lung is 15.8 % and 12.8 % for Clarkson and ETAR algorithm respectively. At 8 MV the error is 9.3 % and 5.1 % respectively. In addition, both algorithms underestimate the penumbral width at mid-lung as they do not account for the penumbral flaring effect in low density medium. 25 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs

  9. Calculation of Nuclear Particles Production at High-Energy Photon Beams from a Linac Operating at 6, 10 and 15 MV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesini, Renato; Bettega, Daniela; Calzolari, Paola; Pignoli, Emanuele

    2017-05-01

    Production of photonuclear particles in a tissue-equivalent medium has been calculated for linacs at 6, 10 and 15 MV from Varian TrueBeam. Based on the knowledge of bremsstrahlung fluence spectra and linac photon beam parameters, numerical integration was performed on the cross sections for photoparticle production of the constituent elements of tissue (2H,12C,13C,16O,17O,18O,14N,15N). At 15 MV, at the depth of photon maximum dose, the total absorbed dose due to neutrons, protons, alphas and residual nuclei from photon reactions in tissue (5.5E-05 Gy per Gy of photons) is comparable to that due to neutrons from accelerator head. Results reasonably agree with data reported in the literature using Monte Carlo models simulating linac head components. This work suggests a simple method to estimate the dose contributed by the photon-induced nuclear particles for high-energy photon beams produced by linacs in use, as it might be relevant for late stochastic effects. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Relative measurements of fast neutron contamination in 18-MV photon beams from two linear accelerators and a betatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gur, D.; Bukovitz, A.G.; Rosen, J.C.; Holmes, B.G.

    1979-01-01

    Fast neutron contamination in photon beams in the 20 MV range have been reported in recent years. In order to determine if the variations were due mainly to differences in measurement procedures, or inherent in the design of the accelerators, three different 18-MV (BJR) photon beams were compared using identical analytical techniques. The units studied were a Philips SL/75-20 and a Siemens Mevatron-20 linear accelerators and a Schimadzu betatron. Gamma spectroscopy of an activated aluminum foil was the method used. By comparing the relative amounts of neutron contamination, errors associated with absolute measurements such as detector efficiency and differences in activation foils were eliminated. Fast neutron contaminations per rad of x rays in a ratio of 6.7:3.7:1 were found for the Philips, Schimadzu and Siemens accelerators, respectively

  11. Dosimetric characteristics of a 6 MV photon beam from a linear accelerator with asymmetric collimator jaws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palta, J.R.; Ayyangar, K.M.; Suntharalingam, N.

    1988-01-01

    Dosimetric measurements have been made of a 6 MV photon beam from a linear accelerator equipped with asymmetric jaws. The field size factors for asymmetrically set fields are compared to those for symmetrically set fields. The change of beam quality has been measured as a function of off-axis position of the asymmetric fields to assess its effect on depth dose. Additional measurements include beam penumbra and shape of isodose curves for open and wedge fields as the field opening is moved asymmetrically from the central ray

  12. Absorbed dose beam quality factors for cylindrical ion chambers: Experimental determination at 6 and 15 MV photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caporali, C; Guerra, A S; Laitano, R F; Pimpinella, M [ENEA-Casaccia, Inst. Nazionale di Meterologia delle Radiazioni Ionizzanti, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente

    1996-08-01

    Ion chambers calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water need an additional factor conventionally designed by k{sub Q} in order to determine the absorbed dose. The quantity k{sub Q} depends on beam quality and chamber characteristics. Rogers and Andreo provided calculations of the k{sub Q} factors for most commercially available ionization chambers for clinical dosimetry. Experimental determinations of the k{sub Q} factors for a number of cylindrical ion chambers have been made and are compared with the calculated values so far published. Measurements were made at 6 MV and 15 MV clinical photon beams at a point in water phantom where the ion chambers and a Fricke dosimeter were alternatively irradiated. The uncertainty on the experimental k{sub Q} factors resulted about {+-} 0.6%. The theoretical and experimental k{sub Q} values are in fairly good agreement. (author). 12 refs, 3 tabs.

  13. Neutron contamination of Varian Clinac iX 10 MV photon beam using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yani, S; Haryanto, F; Arif, I; Tursinah, R; Rhani, M F; Soh, R C X

    2016-01-01

    High energy medical accelerators are commonly used in radiotherapy to increase the effectiveness of treatments. As we know neutrons can be emitted from a medical accelerator if there is an incident of X-ray that hits any of its materials. This issue becomes a point of view of many researchers. The neutron contamination has caused many problems such as image resolution and radiation protection for patients and radio oncologists. This study concerns the simulation of neutron contamination emitted from Varian Clinac iX 10 MV using Monte Carlo code system. As neutron production process is very complex, Monte Carlo simulation with MCNPX code system was carried out to study this contamination. The design of this medical accelerator was modelled based on the actual materials and geometry. The maximum energy of photons and neutron in the scoring plane was 10.5 and 2.239 MeV, respectively. The number and energy of the particles produced depend on the depth and distance from beam axis. From these results, it is pointed out that the neutron produced by linac 10 MV photon beam in a typical treatment is not negligible. (paper)

  14. The effect of energy spectrum change on DNA damage in and out of field in 10-MV clinical photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzati, A O; Xiao, Y; Sohrabpour, M; Studenski, M T

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the DNA damage induced in a clinical megavoltage photon beam at various depths in and out of the field. MCNPX was used to simulate 10 × 10 and 20 × 20 cm(2) 10-MV photon beams from a clinical linear accelerator. Photon and electron spectra were collected in a water phantom at depths of 2.5, 12.5 and 22.5 cm on the central axis and at off-axis points out to 10 cm. These spectra were used as an input to a validated microdosimetric Monte Carlo code, MCDS, to calculate the RBE of induced DSB in DNA at points in and out of the primary radiation field at three depths. There was an observable difference in the energy spectra for photons and electrons for points in the primary radiation field and those points out of field. In the out-of-field region, the mean energy for the photon and electron spectra decreased by a factor of about six and three from the in-field mean energy, respectively. Despite the differences in spectra and mean energy, the change in RBE was photon and electron spectra, these changes do not correlate with a change in RBE in a clinical MV photon beam as the electron spectra are dominated by electrons with energies >20 keV.

  15. Small-Field Dosimetry in A 6 MV Photon Beam Using Alanine and Liquid Ionisation Chamber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmermann, S.; Riis, H. L.; Hjelm-Hansen, M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Dosimetry of small field sizes in MV photon beams is an increasingly important subject, and a generally accepted guideline for clinical measurements is still lacking. The present comparative study was carried out to further investigate the use of alanine and the PTW microLion...... of each field and depth. This dose maximum was measured for each field using a Scanditronix Wellhöfer photon field diode. The same measurements were carried out using a liquid ionchamber, PTW microLion, irradiated by 500 MU. The output of the accelerator was controlled by a PTW semiflex ion chamber...

  16. SU-F-T-461: Dosimetric Evaluation of Indigenous Farmer Type Chamber FAR65- GB for Reference Dosimetry of FFF MV Photon Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patwe, P; Mhatre, V; Dandekar, P [Sir HN RF Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra (India)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Indigenous Farmer type chamber FAR 65 GB is a reference class 0.6 cc ion chamber. It can be used for dosimetric evaluation of photon and high energy electron beams. We studied dosimetric characteristics of the chamber for 6MV and 10MV Flattening filter free FFF photon beams available on trueBEAM STx Linac. Methods: The study was carried out on trueBEAM STx Linac having 6 and 10 MV FFF photon beam with maximum dose rate 1400 and 2400 MU per min respectively. The dosimetric device to be evaluated is Rosalina Instruments FAR 65-GB Ion Chamber with active volume 0.65 cc, total active length 23.1cm, inner diameter of cylinder 6.2mm, wall thickness 0.4mm, inner electrode diameter 1mm. Inner and outer electrodes are made from Aluminium 2.7 gm per cc and graphite 1.82 gm per cc respectively. The ion chamber was placed along central axis of beam at 10cm depth and irradiated for 10cm × 10cm field size at SAD of 100 cm in plastic phantom. We studied Precision, Dose Linearity, Dose Rate dependence, directional dependence, Recombination effect. Recombination effect was determined using standard two-voltage method. Results: 1. Measurements were reproducible std deviation of 0.0105 and type A uncertainty 0.003265 under same set of reference conditions 2. Chamber exhibit dose linearity over a wider dose range. 3. Chamber shows dose rate independence for all available dose rate range. 4. Response of chamber with the angle of incidence of radiation is constant. 5. Recombination correction factors were 1.01848 and 1.02537 for dose rate 1400 and 2400 MU per min resp. Conclusion: Our study reveals that the chamber is prone to saturation effect at dose rate of 2400 MU per min. FAR 65-GB can be used for reference dosimetry of FFF MV photon beam with proper calculation of recombination effect.

  17. Evaluation of a 50-MV photon therapy beam from a racetrack microtron using MCNP4B Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudowska, I.; Svensson, R.

    2001-01-01

    High energy photon therapy beam from the 50 MV racetrack microtron has been evaluated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP4B. The spatial and energy distribution of photons, radial and depth dose distributions in the phantom are calculated for the stationary and scanned photon beams from different targets. The calculated dose distributions are compared to the experimental data using a silicon diode detector. Measured and calculated depth-dose distributions are in fairly good agreement, within 2-3% for the positions in the range 2-30 cm in the phantom, whereas the larger discrepancies up to 10% are observed in the dose build-up region. For the stationary beams the differences in the calculated and measured radial dose distributions are about 2-10%. (orig.)

  18. Monte Carlo simulation of Varian Linac for 6 MV photon beam with BEAMnrc code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Maged; El Bardouni, T.; Chakir, E.; Boukhal, H.; Saeed, M.; Ahmed, Abdul-Aziz

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the initial electron beam parameters on the absorbed dose distribution calculated with EGSnrc Monte Carlo code, for 6 MV photon beam. A proposed methodology for benchmarking the BEAMnrc model of Varian Linac has been used. Also, a new photon cross section data based on ENDF/B-VII release 8 evaluation has been employed. The parameters tested include mean energy, radial intensity distribution and angular spread of the initial electron beam. Mean energy and angular spread were tested for a square irradiation field 10 × 10 cm2, whereas beam width of the electron beam was studied for 10 × 10 cm2 at different depths and 30 × 30 cm2 at depth of 10 cm. The results obtained are compared with measurement data to select the optimal electron beam parameters. The differences between MC calculation and measurements data are analyzed using gamma index criteria which fixed within 1% -1 mm accuracy. The obtained results indicated that the depth-dose and dose-profile curves were considerably influenced by the mean energy of the electron beam. The depth-dose curves were unaffected by the beam width of the electron beam, for both irradiation fields. On the contrary, lateral dose-profile curves were affected by the beam width of initial electron beam. Both dose-profile and depth-dose curves were unaffected to the angular spread of the electron beam. A deep depth of 10 × 10 cm2 is very accurate to tune the beam width. Mean energy and beam width must be tuned precisely, to get the MC does distribution with acceptable accuracy.

  19. Intermediate Megavoltage Photon Beams for Improved Lung Cancer Treatments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhang

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to evaluate the effects of intermediate megavoltage (3-MV photon beams on SBRT lung cancer treatments. To start with, a 3-MV virtual beam was commissioned on a commercial treatment planning system based on Monte Carlo simulations. Three optimized plans (6-MV, 3-MV and dual energy of 3- and 6-MV were generated for 31 lung cancer patients with identical beam configuration and optimization constraints for each patient. Dosimetric metrics were evaluated and compared among the three plans. Overall, planned dose conformity was comparable among three plans for all 31 patients. For 21 thin patients with average short effective path length (< 10 cm, the 3-MV plans showed better target coverage and homogeneity with dose spillage index R50% = 4.68±0.83 and homogeneity index = 1.26±0.06, as compared to 4.95±1.01 and 1.31±0.08 in the 6-MV plans (p < 0.001. Correspondingly, the average/maximum reductions of lung volumes receiving 20 Gy (V20Gy, 5 Gy (V5Gy, and mean lung dose (MLD were 7%/20%, 9%/30% and 5%/10%, respectively in the 3-MV plans (p < 0.05. The doses to 5% volumes of the cord, esophagus, trachea and heart were reduced by 9.0%, 10.6%, 11.4% and 7.4%, respectively (p < 0.05. For 10 thick patients, dual energy plans can bring dosimetric benefits with comparable target coverage, integral dose and reduced dose to the critical structures, as compared to the 6-MV plans. In conclusion, our study indicated that 3-MV photon beams have potential dosimetric benefits in treating lung tumors in terms of improved tumor coverage and reduced doses to the adjacent critical structures, in comparison to 6-MV photon beams. Intermediate megavoltage photon beams (< 6-MV may be considered and added into current treatment approaches to reduce the adjacent normal tissue doses while maintaining sufficient tumor dose coverage in lung cancer radiotherapy.

  20. A Measurement and Analysis of Buildup Region Dose for Open Field Photon Beams (Cobalt-60 through 24 MV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCullough, Edwin C.

    2015-01-01

    The central axis depth dose in the build-up region (surface to d_m_a_x) of single open field photon beams (cobalt-60 through 24 MV) has been measured utilizing parallel plate and extrapolation chamber methodology. These data were used to derive, for a prescription dose of 100 cGy, values of surface dose, the maximum value of dose along the central axis (D_m_a_x) and the depth (nearest the surface) at which 90% of the prescription dose occurs (d_9_0). For both single and parallel opposed pair (POP) open field configurations, data are presented at field sizes of 5 × 5, 15 × 15 and 25 × 25 cm"2 for prescription depths of 10, 15 and 20 cm (midplane for POP). For the treatment machines, field sizes, and prescription depths studied, it is possible to conclude that: for single open field irradiation, surface dose values (as a percentage of the prescription dose) can be either low (<10%) or comparable to the prescription dose itself; for POP open fields, surface dose values are relatively independent of photon energy and midplane depth, and range between 30% and 70% of prescription dose, being principally dependent on field size; the depth of the initial 90 cGy point for a prescription dose of 100 cGy, d_9_0, was larger for POP fields. For either single or POP open field treatments, d_9_0 was always less than 22 mm, while for 6 MV or less, values of d_9_0 were less than 4 mm; D_m_a_x values can be very large (e.g., above 300 cGy) for certain treatment situations and are reduced significantly for POP treatments; for open field POP treatments, the percent reduction in D_m_a_x with each increment in beam energy above 10 MV is reduced over that seen at 10 MV or less and, possibly, this further reduction may be clinically insignificant; for open field POP treatments, changes in surface dose, d_9_0 and D_m_a_x with beam energy above 10 MV do not suggest, with regard to these specific build-up curve parameters, any obvious advantage for treatment with beam energies greater

  1. Experimental determination of kQ factors for cylindrical ionization chambers in 10 cm × 10 cm and 3 cm × 3 cm photon beams from 4 MV to 25 MV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, A; Kapsch, R P

    2014-08-07

    For the ionometric determination of absorbed dose to water, Dw, in megavoltage photon beams from a linear accelerator, beam-quality-dependent correction factors, kQ, are used for the ionization chambers. By using a water calorimeter, these factors can be determined experimentally and with substantially lower standard uncertainties compared to calculated values of the kQ, which are published in various dosimetry protocols. In this investigation, kQ for different types of cylindrical ionization chambers (NE 2561, NE 2571, FC 65 G) were determined experimentally in 10 cm × 10 cm photon beams from 4 MV to 25 MV (corresponding beam quality index TPR20,10 from 0.64 to 0.80). The measurements were carried out at the linear accelerator facility of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt. It is shown that the kQ factors for a single ionization chamber in 10 cm × 10 cm photon beams can be measured with a relative standard uncertainty of 0.31%. In addition to these measurements in 10 cm × 10 cm fields, kQ factors for the NE 2561 chamber were also determined in smaller 3 cm × 3 cm photon beams between 6 MV and 25 MV. In this case, relative standard uncertainties between 0.35 % and 0.38 % are achieved for the kQ factors. It is found for this ionization chamber, that the ratio of the kQ factors in 3 cm × 3 cm and in 10 cm × 10 cm beams increases with increasing TPR20,10 to reach a value of 1.0095 at TPR20,10 = 0.8 with a relative standard uncertainty of 0.4 %.

  2. Photon beam commissioning of an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Mashud, Md Abdullah; Tariquzzaman, M.; Jahangir Alam, M.; Zakaria, GA

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study is to present the results of commissioning of Elekta Synergy linear accelerator (linac). The acceptance test and commissioning were performed for three photon beams energies 4 MV, 6 MV and 15 MV and for the multileaf collimator (MLC). The percent depth doses (PDDs), in-plane and cross-plane beam profiles, head scatter factors (Sc), relative photon output factors (Scp), universal wedge transmission factor and MLC transmission factors were measured. The size of gantry, collimator, and couch isocenter were also measured.

  3. Characteristics of photon beams from Philips SL25 linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palta, J.R.; Ayyangar, K.; Daftari, I.; Suntharalingam, N.

    1990-01-01

    The Philips SL25 accelerator is a multimodality machine offering asymmetric collimator jaws and a new type of beam bending and transport system. It produces photon beams, nominally at 6 and 25 MV, and a scattered electron beam with nine selectable energies between 4 and 22 MeV. Dosimetric characteristics for the 6- and 25-MV photon beams are presented with respect to field flatness, surface and depth dose characteristics, isodose distribution, field size factors for both open and wedged fields, and narrow beam transmission data in different materials

  4. Lepton contamination and photon scatter produced by open field 18 MV X-ray beams in the build-up region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butson, M.J.; Cheung Tsang; Yu, P.K.N.

    2002-01-01

    18 MV X-ray beams used in radiotherapy have skin sparing properties as they produce a dose build-up effect whereby a smaller dose is delivered to the skin compared to dose at depth. Experimental results have shown that variations in the build-up dose significantly contribute to lepton contamination produced outside of the patient or the phantom in question. Monte Carlo simulations of 18 MV X-ray beams show that the surface dose contribution from in-phantom scatter alone is approximately 6% of the maximum dose. The contribution to dose from lepton contamination is found by comparison of Monte Carlo phantom photon scatter dose only and experimental data. Results show that the percentage contributions to dose from lepton contamination are approximately, 65%, 90% of dose at 0.05 mm (basal cell layer), 52%, 79% at 1 mm depth (dermal layer) and 15%, 26% at 10 mm depth (subcutaneous tissue) for 10 cmx10 cm 2 and 40 cmx40 cm 2 fields, respectively

  5. Lepton contamination and photon scatter produced by open field 18 MV X-ray beams in the build-up region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butson, M.J. E-mail: mbutson@guessmail.com; Cheung Tsang; Yu, P.K.N

    2002-04-01

    18 MV X-ray beams used in radiotherapy have skin sparing properties as they produce a dose build-up effect whereby a smaller dose is delivered to the skin compared to dose at depth. Experimental results have shown that variations in the build-up dose significantly contribute to lepton contamination produced outside of the patient or the phantom in question. Monte Carlo simulations of 18 MV X-ray beams show that the surface dose contribution from in-phantom scatter alone is approximately 6% of the maximum dose. The contribution to dose from lepton contamination is found by comparison of Monte Carlo phantom photon scatter dose only and experimental data. Results show that the percentage contributions to dose from lepton contamination are approximately, 65%, 90% of dose at 0.05 mm (basal cell layer), 52%, 79% at 1 mm depth (dermal layer) and 15%, 26% at 10 mm depth (subcutaneous tissue) for 10 cmx10 cm{sup 2} and 40 cmx40 cm{sup 2} fields, respectively.

  6. Relative dosimetry of photon beam of 6 MV with a liquid ionization chamber; Dosimetria relativa de un haz de fotones de 6 MV con una camara de ionizacion liquida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benitez Villegas, E. M.; Casado Villalon, F. J.; Martin-Cueto, J. A.; Caudepon Moreno, F.; Garcia Pareja, S.; Galan Montenegro, P.

    2011-07-01

    The increasing use of reduced size fields in the special techniques of treatment generates regions with high dose gradients. It therefore requires the use of detectors that present high spatial resolution. The aim of this study is to compare the dosimetric measurements obtained with a liquid ionization chamber PTW MicroLion recently acquired with other commonly used detectors for a photon beam of 6 MV linear electron accelerator Varian 600DBX.

  7. Monte Carlo simulation of a varian 21EX Clinac 6 MV photon beam characteristics using GATE6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Jung Su [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Nonproliferation System Research Division, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang Lae [Center for Radiological Environment and Health Science, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Cheol Ha [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Science, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Monte Carlo simulations are widely used as the most accurate technique for dose calculation in radiation therapy. In this paper, the GATE6(Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission ver.6) code was employed to calculate the dosimetric performance of the photon beams from a linear accelerator(LINAC). The treatment head of a Varian 21EX Clinac was modeled including the major geometric structures within the beam path such as a target, a primary collimator, a flattening filter, a ion chamber, and jaws. The 6 MV photon spectra were characterized in a standard 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} field at 100 cm source-to-surface distance(SSD) and subsequent dose estimations were made in a water phantom. The measurements of percentage depth dose and dose profiles were performed with 3D water phantom and the simulated data was compared to measured reference data. The simulated results agreed very well with the measured data. It has been found that the GATE6 code is an effective tool for dose optimization in radiotherapy applications.

  8. Volume dose ratios relevant for alanine dosimetry in small, 6 MV photon beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronholm, Rickard O.; Andersen, Claus Erik; Behrens, Claus F.

    2012-01-01

    therapy). To this end, we here present the results of a Monte Carlo simulation study with DOSRZnrc that investigated the influence of field and detector size for small 6 MV photon beams. The study focusses on doses averaged over the volume of the detector rather than point doses.The ratio of volume...... averaged doses to water (D¯W) and alanine (D¯det) was found to be approximately 1.025 for most situations studied, and a constant ratio is likely to be representative for many applications in radiation therapy. However, D¯W/D¯det was found to be as low as 0.9908 ± 0.0037 in situations where one might...... expect significant deviations from charged particle equilibrium (i.e. at shallow depths and when the field size was smaller than the range of the secondary electrons). These effects therefore need consideration when finite-size alanine dosimeters are used under such conditions....

  9. Surface dose measurements in and out of field. Implications for breast radiotherapy with megavoltage photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lonski, Peta; Kron, Tomas [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); RMIT Univ., Melbourne (Australia); Ramachandran, Prabhakar; Franich, Rick [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia)

    2017-07-01

    This study examines the difference in surface dose between flat and flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams in the context of breast radiotherapy. The surface dose was measured for 6 MV, 6 MV FFF, 10 MV, 10 MV FFF and 18 MV photon beams using a thin window ionisation chamber for various field sizes. Profiles were acquired to ascertain the change in surface dose off-axis. Out-of-field measurements were included in a clinically representative half beam block tangential breast field. In the field centres of FFF beams the surface dose was found to be increased for small fields and decreased for large fields compared to flat beams. For FFF beams, surface dose was found to decrease off-axis and resulted in lower surface dose out-of-field compared to flat beams.

  10. Dosimetric aspects of the therapeutic photon beams from a dual-energy linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ghazi, M.S.A.L.; Arjune, B.; Fiedler, J.A.; Sharma, P.D.

    1988-01-01

    Parameters of the photon beams (6 and 20 MV) from a dual-energy linear accelerator (Mevatron-KD, Siemens Medical Laboratories, CA) are presented. The depth dose characteristics of the photon beams are d/sub max/ of 1.8 and 3.8 cm and percentage depth dose of 68% and 80% at 10-cm depth and 100-cm source--surface distance for a field size of 10 x 10 cm 2 for 6 and 20 MV, respectively. The 6 and 20 MV beams were found to correspond to nominal accelerating potentials of 4.7 and 17 MV, respectively. The stability of output is within +- 1% and flatness and symmetry are within +- 3%. These figures compare favorably with the manufacturer's specifications

  11. Dosimetric characterization of the 18-MV photon beam from the Siemens Mevatron 77 linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palta, J.R.; Meyer, J.A.; Hogstrom, K.R.

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive set of dosimetric measurements has been made on the Mevatron 77.80.67 18-MV photon beam. Percentage depth dose, dose in the buildup region, field size dependence of output, transmission through lead, tray attenuation, and isodose curves for the open and wedged fields were measured using an ionization chamber in water and polystyrene phantoms. These dosimetric measurements sufficiently characterized the beam to permit clinical use. The depth dose at 10-cm depth for a 10 x 10 cm 2 field at 100-cm source-to-skin distance (SSD) is 80.9%, which meets design specifications. Central axis depth-dose data were fitted to within 0.5% by a set of polynomial equations utilizing a two-dimensional linear regression analysis. Tissue--maximum ratios calculated from depth-dose data agree with measured data to within 2%. Output differences as large as 2.5% were measured for rectangular fields depending on which collimator jaws defined the long dimension of the field. The field size dependence of output was fit to within +- 0.1% by a linear regression. The half-value thickness of the beam was measured to be 13 mm of lead

  12. Commissioning measurements for photon beam data on three TrueBeam linear accelerators, and comparison with Trilogy and Clinac 2100 linear accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This study presents the beam data measurement results from the commissioning of three TrueBeam linear accelerators. An additional evaluation of the measured beam data within the TrueBeam linear accelerators contrasted with two other linear accelerators from the same manufacturer (i.e., Clinac and Trilogy) was performed to identify and evaluate any differences in the beam characteristics between the machines and to evaluate the possibility of beam matching for standard photon energies. We performed a comparison of commissioned photon beam data for two standard photon energies (6 MV and 15 MV) and one flattening filter‐free (“FFF”) photon energy (10 FFF) between three different TrueBeam linear accelerators. An analysis of the beam data was then performed to evaluate the reproducibility of the results and the possibility of “beam matching” between the TrueBeam linear accelerators. Additionally, the data from the TrueBeam linear accelerator was compared with comparable data obtained from one Clinac and one Trilogy linear accelerator models produced by the same manufacturer to evaluate the possibility of “beam matching” between the TrueBeam linear accelerators and the previous models. The energies evaluated between the linear accelerator models are the 6 MV for low energy and the 15 MV for high energy. PDD and output factor data showed less than 1% variation and profile data showed variations within 1% or 2 mm between the three TrueBeam linear accelerators. PDD and profile data between the TrueBeam, the Clinac, and Trilogy linear accelerators were almost identical (less than 1% variation). Small variations were observed in the shape of the profile for 15 MV at shallow depths (linear accelerators; the TrueBeam data resulted in a slightly greater penumbra width. The diagonal scans demonstrated significant differences in the profile shapes at a distance greater than 20 cm from the central axis, and this was more notable for the 15 MV energy. Output factor

  13. A 4 MV flattening filter-free beam: commissioning and application to conformal therapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, S W; Rosser, K E; Bedford, J L

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that radiotherapy treatments undertaken on a flattening filter-free (FFF) linear accelerator have a number of advantages over treatments undertaken on a conventional linear accelerator. In addition, 4 MV photon beams may give improved isodose coverage for some treatment volumes at air/tissue interfaces, compared to when utilizing the clinical standard of 6 MV photons. In order to investigate these benefits, FFF beams were established on an Elekta Beam Modulator linear accelerator for 4 MV photons. Commissioning beam data were obtained for open and wedged fields. The measured data were then imported into a treatment planning system and a beam model was commissioned. The beam model was optimized to improve dose calculations at shallow, clinically relevant depths. Following verification, the beam model was utilized in a treatment planning study, including volumetric modulated arc therapy, for a selection of lung, breast/chest wall and larynx patients. Increased dose rates of around 800 MU min -1 were recorded for open fields (relative to 320 MU min -1 for filtered open fields) and reduced head scatter was inferred from output factor measurements. Good agreement between planned and delivered dose was observed in verification of treatment plans. The planning study indicated that with a FFF beam, equivalent (and in some cases improved) isodose profiles could be achieved for small lung and larynx treatment volumes relative to 4 MV filtered treatments. Furthermore, FFF treatments with wedges could be replicated using open fields together with an 'effective wedge' technique and isocentre shift. Clinical feasibility of a FFF beam was therefore demonstrated, with beam modelling, treatment planning and verification being successfully accomplished.

  14. Comparison of photon beam qualities for treatment of deep seated tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ssengabi, J.

    1977-06-01

    Physical parameters that influence the quality of photon beams have been examined. The interaction of photon beams of different qualities from cobolt-60 gamma rays to 42 MV X-rays, with a patient-target region system has been investigated with a view to compare the photon beam qualities under specified irradiation conditions. The concept of integral dose and its use in photon beam intercomparison has been investigated. The results of the study have shown the inadequacy of a single beam parameter, such as the central axis depth dose data, in the intercomparison of photon beam qualities for the treatment of deep seated tumours. (author)

  15. Surface dose measurements and comparison of unflattened and flattened photon beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashokkumar Sigamani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the central axis dose in the build-up region and the surface dose of a 6 MV and 10 MV flattened photon beam (FB and flattening filter free (FFF therapeutic photon beam for different square field sizes (FSs for a Varian Truebeam linear accelerator using parallel-plate ionization chamber and Gafchromic film. Knowledge of dosimetric characteristics in the build-up region and surface dose of the FFF is essential for clinical care. The dose measurements were also obtained empirically using two different commonly used dosimeters: a p-type photon semiconductor dosimeter and a cylindrical ionization chamber. Surface dose increased linearly with FS for both FB and FFF photon beams. The surface dose values of FFF were higher than the FB FSs. The measured surface dose clearly increases with increasing FS. The FFF beams have a modestly higher surface dose in the build-up region than the FB. The dependence of source to skin distance (SSD is less significant in FFF beams when compared to the flattened beams at extended SSDs.

  16. Dosimetric properties of a Solid Water High Equivalency (SW557) phantom for megavoltage photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Fujio

    2017-07-01

    The dosimetric properties of the recently developed SW557 phantom have been investigated by comparison with those of the existing SW457 phantom in megavoltage photon beams. The electron fluence ratio φ pl w , and chamber ionization ratio k pl , of water to SW457 and water to SW557 for 4-15MV photons were calculated as a function of depth using Monte Carlo simulations, and compared with measured values. Values of φ pl w for SW457 were in the range of 1.004-1.014 for 4MV, and 1.014-1.018 for 15MV photons. The φ pl w for SW557 ranged from 1.005 to 1.008 for 4MV and from 1.010 to 1.015 for 15MV photons and the variation of φ pl w with depth for each beam energy was within ±0.5%. Values of k pl were obtained with a PTW 30013 Farmer-type ionization chamber. The k pl for SW457 ranged from 0.997 to 1.011 for 4-15MV photons. Values of k pl for SW557 were almost unity for 4 and 6MV photons, while in the case of 10 and 15MV photons they were less than 1.006, excepting the build-up region. The measured and calculated k pl values of water to SW557 were in the range of 0.997-1.002 and 1.000-1.006, respectively, for 4-15MV photons, at a depth of 10cm with a source-to-axis distance of 100cm. The measured and calculated k pl values were in agreement within their uncertainty ranges. As a water-equivalent phantom, SW557 can be used with a dosimetric difference within±0.6%, for 4-15MV photons, and is more water-equivalent than SW457 in megavoltage photon beams. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. On beam quality and flatness of radiotherapy megavoltage photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, Murshed; Rhoades, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Ratio of percentage depth dose (PDD) at two depths, PDD at a depth of 10 cm (PDD 10 ), and beam flatness are monitored regularly for radiotherapy beams for quality assurance. The purpose of this study is to understand the effects of changes in one of these parameters on the other. Is it possible to monitor only the beam flatness and not PDD? The investigation has two components. Naturally occurring i.e., unintended changes in PDD ratio and in-plane flatness for 6 and 10 MV photon beams for one particular Siemens Artiste Linac are monitored for a period of about 4 years. Secondly, deliberate changes in the beam parameters are induced by changing the bending magnet current (BMI). Relationships between various beam parameters for unintended changes as well as deliberate changes are characterized. Long term unintentional changes of PDD ratio are found to have no systematic trend. The flatness in the in plane direction for 6 and 10 MV beams show slow increase of 0.43 and 0.75 % respectively in about 4 years while the changes in the PDD ratio show no such trend. Over 10 % changes in BMI are required to induce changes in the beam quality indices at 2 % level. PDD ratio for the 10 MV beam is found to be less sensitive, while the depth of maximum dose, d max , is more sensitive to the changes in BMI compared to the 6 MV beam. Tolerances are more stringent for PDD 10 than PDD ratio for the 10 MV beam. PDD ratio, PDD 10 , and flatness must be monitored independently. Furthermore, off axis ratio alone cannot be used to monitor flatness. The effect of beam quality change in the absolute dose is clinically insignificant.

  18. Validating dose rate calibration of radiotherapy photon beams through IAEA/WHO postal audit dosimetry service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jangda, A.Q.; Hussein, S.

    2012-01-01

    In external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), the quality assurance (QA) of the radiation beam is crucial to the accurate delivery of the prescribed dose to the patient. One of the dosimetric parameters that require monitoring is the beam output, specified as the dose rate on the central axis under reference conditions. The aim of this project was to validate dose rate calibration of megavoltage photon beams using the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)/World Health Organisation (WHO) postal audit dosimetry service. Three photon beams were audited: a 6 MV beam from the low-energy linac and 6 and 18 MV beams from a dual high-energy linac. The agreement between our stated doses and the IAEA results was within 1% for the two 6 MV beams and within 2% for the 18 MV beam. The IAEA/WHO postal audit dosimetry service provides an independent verification of dose rate calibration protocol by an international facility. (author)

  19. Validating dose rate calibration of radiotherapy photon beams through IAEA/WHO postal audit dosimetry service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangda, Abdul Qadir; Hussein, Sherali

    2012-05-01

    In external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), the quality assurance (QA) of the radiation beam is crucial to the accurate delivery of the prescribed dose to the patient. One of the dosimetric parameters that require monitoring is the beam output, specified as the dose rate on the central axis under reference conditions. The aim of this project was to validate dose rate calibration of megavoltage photon beams using the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)/World Health Organisation (WHO) postal audit dosimetry service. Three photon beams were audited: a 6 MV beam from the low-energy linac and 6 and 18 MV beams from a dual high-energy linac. The agreement between our stated doses and the IAEA results was within 1% for the two 6 MV beams and within 2% for the 18 MV beam. The IAEA/WHO postal audit dosimetry service provides an independent verification of dose rate calibration protocol by an international facility.

  20. MCMEG: Simulations of both PDD and TPR for 6 MV LINAC photon beam using different MC codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, T.C.F.; Mendes, B.M.; Lacerda, M.A.S.; Silva, L.A.C.; Paixão, L.

    2017-01-01

    The Monte Carlo Modelling Expert Group (MCMEG) is an expert network specializing in Monte Carlo radiation transport and the modelling and simulation applied to the radiation protection and dosimetry research field. For the first inter-comparison task the group launched an exercise to model and simulate a 6 MV LINAC photon beam using the Monte Carlo codes available within their laboratories and validate their simulated results by comparing them with experimental measurements carried out in the National Cancer Institute (INCA) in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The experimental measurements were performed using an ionization chamber with calibration traceable to a Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL). The detector was immersed in a water phantom at different depths and was irradiated with a radiation field size of 10×10 cm 2 . This exposure setup was used to determine the dosimetric parameters Percentage Depth Dose (PDD) and Tissue Phantom Ratio (TPR). The validation process compares the MC calculated results to the experimental measured PDD20,10 and TPR20,10. Simulations were performed reproducing the experimental TPR20,10 quality index which provides a satisfactory description of both the PDD curve and the transverse profiles at the two depths measured. This paper reports in detail the modelling process using MCNPx, MCNP6, EGSnrc and Penelope Monte Carlo codes, the source and tally descriptions, the validation processes and the results. - Highlights: • MCMEG is an expert network specializing in Monte Carlo radiation transport. • MCNPx, MCNP6, EGSnrc and Penelope Monte Carlo codes are used. • Exercise to model and simulate a 6 MV LINAC photon beam using the Monte Carlo codes. • The PDD 20,10 and TPR 20,10 dosimetric parameters were compared with real data. • The paper reports in the modelling process using different Monte Carlo codes.

  1. Characteristics of mobile MOSFET dosimetry system for megavoltage photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, A Sathish; Sharma, S D; Ravindran, B Paul

    2014-07-01

    The characteristics of a mobile metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (mobile MOSFET) detector for standard bias were investigated for megavoltage photon beams. This study was performed with a brass alloy build-up cap for three energies namely Co-60, 6 and 15 MV photon beams. The MOSFETs were calibrated and the performance characteristics were analyzed with respect to dose rate dependence, energy dependence, field size dependence, linearity, build-up factor, and angular dependence for all the three energies. A linear dose-response curve was noted for Co-60, 6 MV, and 15 MV photons. The calibration factors were found to be 1.03, 1, and 0.79 cGy/mV for Co-60, 6 MV, and 15 MV photon energies, respectively. The calibration graph has been obtained to the dose up to 600 cGy, and the dose-response curve was found to be linear. The MOSFETs were found to be energy independent both for measurements performed at depth as well as on the surface with build-up. However, field size dependence was also analyzed for variable field sizes and found to be field size independent. Angular dependence was analyzed by keeping the MOSFET dosimeter in parallel and perpendicular orientation to the angle of incidence of the radiation with and without build-up on the surface of the phantom. The maximum variation for the three energies was found to be within ± 2% for the gantry angles 90° and 270°, the deviations without the build-up for the same gantry angles were found to be 6%, 25%, and 60%, respectively. The MOSFET response was found to be independent of dose rate for all three energies. The dosimetric characteristics of the MOSFET detector make it a suitable in vivo dosimeter for megavoltage photon beams.

  2. The response of a radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter in megavoltage photon and electron beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Fujio; Ohno, Takeshi

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the response of a radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter (RGD) in megavoltage photon and electron beams. The RGD response was compared with ion chamber measurements for 4-18 MV photons and 6-20 MeV electrons in plastic water phantoms. The response was also calculated via Monte Carlo (MC) simulations with EGSnrc/egs_chamber and Cavity user-codes, respectively. In addition, the response of the RGD cavity was analyzed as a function of field sizes and depths according to Burlin's general cavity theory. The perturbation correction factor, PQ, in the RGD cavity was also estimated from MC simulations for photon and electron beams. The calculated and measured RGD energy response at reference conditions with a 10 × 10 cm(2) field and 10 cm depth in photons was lower by up to 2.5% with increasing energy. The variation in RGD response in the field size range of 5 × 5 cm(2) to 20 × 20 cm(2) was 3.9% and 0.7%, at 10 cm depth for 4 and 18 MV, respectively. The depth dependence of the RGD response was constant within 1% for energies above 6 MV but it increased by 2.6% and 1.6% for a large (20 × 20 cm(2)) field at 4 and 6 MV, respectively. The dose contributions from photon interactions (1 - d) in the RGD cavity, according to Burlin's cavity theory, decreased with increasing energy and decreasing field size. The variation in (1 - d) between field sizes became larger with increasing depth for the lower energies of 4 and 6 MV. PQ for the RGD cavity was almost constant between 0.96 and 0.97 at 10 MV energies and above. Meanwhile, PQ depends strongly on field size and depth for 4 and 6 MV photons. In electron beams, the RGD response at a reference depth, dref, varied by less than 1% over the electron energy range but was on average 4% lower than the response for 6 MV photons. The RGD response for photon beams depends on both (1 - d) and perturbation effects in the RGD cavity. Therefore, it is difficult to predict the energy dependence of RGD response by

  3. SU-E-T-409: Evaluation of Tissue Composition Effect On Dose Distribution in Radiotherapy with 6 MV Photon Beam of a Medical Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghorbani, M; Tabatabaei, Z; Noghreiyan, A Vejdani [Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Meigooni, A Soleimani [Comprehensive Cancer Center of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate soft tissue composition effect on dose distribution for various soft tissues and various depths in radiotherapy with 6 MV photon beam of a medical linac. Methods: A phantom and Siemens Primus linear accelerator were simulated using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. In a homogeneous cubic phantom, six types of soft tissue and three types of tissue-equivalent materials were defined separately. The soft tissues were muscle (skeletal), adipose tissue, blood (whole), breast tissue, soft tissue (9-component) and soft tissue (4-component). The tissue-equivalent materials included: water, A-150 tissue-equivalent plastic and perspex. Photon dose relative to dose in 9-component soft tissue at various depths on the beam’s central axis was determined for the 6 MV photon beam. The relative dose was also calculated and compared for various MCNPX tallies including,F8, F6 and,F4. Results: The results of the relative photon dose in various materials relative to dose in 9-component soft tissue and using different tallies are reported in the form of tabulated data. Minor differences between dose distributions in various soft tissues and tissue-equivalent materials were observed. The results from F6 and F4 were practically the same but different with,F8 tally. Conclusion: Based on the calculations performed, the differences in dose distributions in various soft tissues and tissue-equivalent materials are minor but they could be corrected in radiotherapy calculations to upgrade the accuracy of the dosimetric calculations.

  4. Small field depth dose profile of 6 MV photon beam in a simple air-water heterogeneity combination: A comparison between anisotropic analytical algorithm dose estimation with thermoluminescent dosimeter dose measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Abhijit; Ram, Chhape; Mourya, Ankur; Singh, Navin

    2017-01-01

    To establish trends of estimation error of dose calculation by anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) with respect to dose measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) in air-water heterogeneity for small field size photon. TLDs were irradiated along the central axis of the photon beam in four different solid water phantom geometries using three small field size single beams. The depth dose profiles were estimated using AAA calculation model for each field sizes. The estimated and measured depth dose profiles were compared. The over estimation (OE) within air cavity were dependent on field size (f) and distance (x) from solid water-air interface and formulated as OE = - (0.63 f + 9.40) x2+ (-2.73 f + 58.11) x + (0.06 f2 - 1.42 f + 15.67). In postcavity adjacent point and distal points from the interface have dependence on field size (f) and equations are OE = 0.42 f2 - 8.17 f + 71.63, OE = 0.84 f2 - 1.56 f + 17.57, respectively. The trend of estimation error of AAA dose calculation algorithm with respect to measured value have been formulated throughout the radiation path length along the central axis of 6 MV photon beam in air-water heterogeneity combination for small field size photon beam generated from a 6 MV linear accelerator.

  5. Application of spherical diodes for megavoltage photon beams dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbés, Benigno; Azcona, Juan D; Burguete, Javier; Martí-Climent, Josep M

    2014-01-01

    External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) usually uses heterogeneous dose distributions in a given volume. Designing detectors for quality control of these treatments is still a developing subject. The size of the detectors should be small to enhance spatial resolution and ensure low perturbation of the beam. A high uniformity in angular response is also a very important feature in a detector, because it has to measure radiation coming from all the directions of the space. It is also convenient that detectors are inexpensive and robust, especially to perform in vivo measurements. The purpose of this work is to introduce a new detector for measuring megavoltage photon beams and to assess its performance to measure relative dose in EBRT. The detector studied in this work was designed as a spherical photodiode (1.8 mm in diameter). The change in response of the spherical diodes is measured regarding the angle of incidence, cumulated irradiation, and instantaneous dose rate (or dose per pulse). Additionally, total scatter factors for large and small fields (between 1 × 1 cm(2) and 20 × 20 cm(2)) are evaluated and compared with the results obtained from some commercially available ionization chambers and planar diodes. Additionally, the over-response to low energy scattered photons in large fields is investigated using a shielding layer. The spherical diode studied in this work produces a high signal (150 nC/Gy for photons of nominal energy of 15 MV and 160 for 6 MV, after 12 kGy) and its angular dependence is lower than that of planar diodes: less than 5% between maximum and minimum in all directions, and 2% around one of the axis. It also has a moderated variation with accumulated dose (about 1.5%/kGy for 15 MV photons and 0.7%/kGy for 6 MV, after 12 kGy) and a low variation with dose per pulse (± 0.4%), and its behavior is similar to commercial diodes in total scatter factor measurements. The measurements of relative dose using the spherical diode described in this

  6. Application of spherical diodes for megavoltage photon beams dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbés, Benigno; Azcona, Juan D.; Burguete, Javier; Martí-Climent, Josep M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) usually uses heterogeneous dose distributions in a given volume. Designing detectors for quality control of these treatments is still a developing subject. The size of the detectors should be small to enhance spatial resolution and ensure low perturbation of the beam. A high uniformity in angular response is also a very important feature in a detector, because it has to measure radiation coming from all the directions of the space. It is also convenient that detectors are inexpensive and robust, especially to performin vivo measurements. The purpose of this work is to introduce a new detector for measuring megavoltage photon beams and to assess its performance to measure relative dose in EBRT. Methods: The detector studied in this work was designed as a spherical photodiode (1.8 mm in diameter). The change in response of the spherical diodes is measured regarding the angle of incidence, cumulated irradiation, and instantaneous dose rate (or dose per pulse). Additionally, total scatter factors for large and small fields (between 1 × 1 cm 2 and 20 × 20 cm 2 ) are evaluated and compared with the results obtained from some commercially available ionization chambers and planar diodes. Additionally, the over-response to low energy scattered photons in large fields is investigated using a shielding layer. Results: The spherical diode studied in this work produces a high signal (150 nC/Gy for photons of nominal energy of 15 MV and 160 for 6 MV, after 12 kGy) and its angular dependence is lower than that of planar diodes: less than 5% between maximum and minimum in all directions, and 2% around one of the axis. It also has a moderated variation with accumulated dose (about 1.5%/kGy for 15 MV photons and 0.7%/kGy for 6 MV, after 12 kGy) and a low variation with dose per pulse (±0.4%), and its behavior is similar to commercial diodes in total scatter factor measurements. Conclusions: The measurements of relative dose using

  7. Experimental determination of beam quality conversion factors kQ in clinical photon beams using ferrous sulphate (Fricke) dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palm, A.; Mattsson, Olof

    2002-01-01

    The implementation of protocols based on absorbed dose to water standards requires beam quality conversion factors, k Q . Calculated values of k Q are available for ionization chambers used for reference dosimetry. Ideally, k Q should be experimentally determined at the same beam qualities as that of the user. In this work we measure k Q factors in clinical photon beams and compare them with calculated and measured values. Beam quality conversion factors are determined for clinical photon beams of nominal energies 4 MV, 6 MV, 15 MV, and 25 MV, for commonly used cylindrical ionization chambers. Twelve chambers of eight different types are used. For three of them, no experimental data have previously been available. The experimental procedure is based on measurements with ionization chambers and Fricke dosimetry in the reference beam ( 60 Co γ radiation) and in clinical linear accelerator beams. The k Q values determined in this work generally agree within 0.5% with previously reported experimental values both when %dd(10) x and TPR 20,10 are used for beam quality specification. The agreement with calculated data is generally within 0.5%, except for the 15 MV beam. For this beam the measured values are usually between 0.5% and 1% lower than the data taken from the TG-51 protocol or the TRS-398 code of practice. For three NE2571 chambers and three NE2581 chambers, the maximum observed deviation of individual k Q values is 0.2% and 0.4%, respectively

  8. A feasibility study of Dynamic Phantom scanner for quality assurance of photon beam profiles at various gantry angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunkai; Hsi, Wen C; Chu, James C H; Bernard, Damian B; Abrams, Ross A

    2005-01-01

    The effect of gantry rotation on beam profiles of photon and electron beams is an important issue in quality assurance for radiotherapy. To address variations in the profiles of photon and electron beams at different gantry angles, a Dynamic Phantom scanner composed of a 20 x 12 x 6 cm3 scanning Lucite block was designed as a cross-beam-profile scanner. To our knowledge, differences between scanned profiles acquired at different gantry angles with a small size Lucite block and those acquired a full-size (60 x 60 x 50 cm3) water phantom have not been previously investigated. We therefore performed a feasibility study for a first prototype Dynamic Phantom scanner without a gantry attachment mount. Radiation beams from a Varian LINAC 21EX and 2100C were used. Photon beams (6 MV and 18 MV) were shaped by either collimator jaws or a Varian 120 Multileaf (MLC) collimator, and electron beams (6 MeV, 12 MeV, and 20 MeV) were shaped by a treatment cone. To investigate the effect on profiles by using a Lucite block, a quantitative comparison of scanned profiles with the Dynamic Phantom and a full-size water phantom was first performed at a 0 degrees gantry angle for both photon and electron beams. For photon beam profiles defined by jaws at 1.0 cm and 5.0 cm depths of Lucite (i.e., at 1.1 cm and 5.7 cm depth of water), a good agreement (less than 1% variation) inside the field edge was observed between profiles scanned with the Dynamic Phantom and with a water phantom. The use of Lucite in the Dynamic Phantom resulted in reduced penumbra width (about 0.5 mm out of 5 mm to 8mm) and reduced (1% to 2%) scatter dose beyond the field edges for both 6 MV and 18 MV beams, compared with the water phantom scanner. For profiles of the MLC-shaped 6 MV photon beam, a similar agreement was observed. For profiles of electron beams scanned at 2.9 cm depth of Lucite (i.e., at 3.3 cm depth of water), larger disagreements in profiles (3% to 4%) and penumbra width (3 mm to 4 mm out of 12 mm

  9. Modeling silicon diode energy response factors for use in therapeutic photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Karin; Ahnesjö, Anders

    2009-10-21

    Silicon diodes have good spatial resolution, which makes them advantageous over ionization chambers for dosimetry in fields with high dose gradients. However, silicon diodes overrespond to low-energy photons, that are more abundant in scatter which increase with large fields and larger depths. We present a cavity-theory-based model for a general response function for silicon detectors at arbitrary positions within photon fields. The model uses photon and electron spectra calculated from fluence pencil kernels. The incident photons are treated according to their energy through a bipartition of the primary beam photon spectrum into low- and high-energy components. Primary electrons from the high-energy component are treated according to Spencer-Attix cavity theory. Low-energy primary photons together with all scattered photons are treated according to large cavity theory supplemented with an energy-dependent factor K(E) to compensate for energy variations in the electron equilibrium. The depth variation of the response for an unshielded silicon detector has been calculated for 5 x 5 cm(2), 10 x 10 cm(2) and 20 x 20 cm(2) fields in 6 and 15 MV beams and compared with measurements showing that our model calculates response factors with deviations less than 0.6%. An alternative method is also proposed, where we show that one can use a correlation with the scatter factor to determine the detector response of silicon diodes with an error of less than 3% in 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams.

  10. Modeling silicon diode energy response factors for use in therapeutic photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eklund, Karin; Ahnesjoe, Anders

    2009-01-01

    Silicon diodes have good spatial resolution, which makes them advantageous over ionization chambers for dosimetry in fields with high dose gradients. However, silicon diodes overrespond to low-energy photons, that are more abundant in scatter which increase with large fields and larger depths. We present a cavity-theory-based model for a general response function for silicon detectors at arbitrary positions within photon fields. The model uses photon and electron spectra calculated from fluence pencil kernels. The incident photons are treated according to their energy through a bipartition of the primary beam photon spectrum into low- and high-energy components. Primary electrons from the high-energy component are treated according to Spencer-Attix cavity theory. Low-energy primary photons together with all scattered photons are treated according to large cavity theory supplemented with an energy-dependent factor K(E) to compensate for energy variations in the electron equilibrium. The depth variation of the response for an unshielded silicon detector has been calculated for 5 x 5 cm 2 , 10 x 10 cm 2 and 20 x 20 cm 2 fields in 6 and 15 MV beams and compared with measurements showing that our model calculates response factors with deviations less than 0.6%. An alternative method is also proposed, where we show that one can use a correlation with the scatter factor to determine the detector response of silicon diodes with an error of less than 3% in 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams.

  11. Fast and slow neutrons in an 18-MV photon beam from a Philips SL/75-20 linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gur, D.; Rosen, J.C.; Bukovitz, A.G.; Gill, A.W.

    1978-01-01

    Fast- and slow-neutron contamination in an 18-MV photon beam from a Philips SL/75-20 linear accelerator has been measured. Aluminum and indium foils were activated to determine fast- and slow-neutron fluence, which were largely independent of field sizes. Measured fast-neutron fluences were typically 13.9 x 10 4 and 4.4 x 10 4 neutrons/cm 2 /rad of x ray inside and 5 cm outside the field, respectively. Slow-neutron fluences, 1.3 x 10 4 neutrons/cm 2 /rad of x ray, remained relatively constant inside and outside the field. The reported results are about three times higher than neutron fluences recently reported with a betatron operated at the same energy

  12. Experimental determination of beam quality factors, kQ, for two types of Farmer chamber in a 10 MV photon and a 175 MeV proton beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medin, Joakim; Ross, Carl K; Klassen, Norman V; Palmans, Hugo; Grusell, Erik; Grindborg, Jan-Erik

    2006-03-21

    Absorbed doses determined with a sealed water calorimeter operated at 4 degrees C are compared with the results obtained using ionization chambers and the IAEA TRS-398 code of practice in a 10 MV photon beam (TPR(20,10) = 0.734) and a 175 MeV proton beam (at a depth corresponding to the residual range, R(res) = 14.7 cm). Three NE 2571 and two FC65-G ionization chambers were calibrated in terms of absorbed-dose-to-water in (60)Co at the Swedish secondary standard dosimetry laboratory, directly traceable to the BIPM. In the photon beam quality, calorimetry was found to agree with ionometry within 0.3%, confirming the k(Q) values tabulated in TRS-398. In contrast, a 1.8% deviation was found in the proton beam at 6 g cm(-2) depth, suggesting that the TRS-398 tabulated k(Q) values for these two ionization chamber types are too high. Assuming no perturbation effect in the proton beam for the ionization chambers, a value for (w(air)/e)(Q) of 33.6 J C(-1) +/- 1.7% (k = 1) can be derived from these measurements. An analytical evaluation of the effect from non-elastic nuclear interactions in the ionization chamber wall indicates a perturbation effect of 0.6%. Including this estimated result in the proton beam would increase the determined (w(air)/e)(Q) value by the same amount.

  13. The Study of Tissue Dose Perturbation by Air Cavity with 6MV Photon Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Byung Chul; Yoo, Myung Jin; Moon, Chang Woo; Jeung, Tae Sig; Yum, Ha Yong

    1995-01-01

    Purpose : To determine the perturbation effect in the tissue downstream from surface layers of lesions located in the air/tumor-tissue interface of larynx using 6MV photon beam. Materials and Methods : Thermoluminescent dosimeters(TLDs). Were embedded at 3 measurement locations in slab no.7 of a humanoid phantom and exposed to forward and backward direction using various field sizes(4 X 4cm 2 - 15 X 15 cm 2 ). Results : At the air/tissue interface, forward dose perturbation factor(FDPF) is about 1.085 with 4 X 4 cm 2 , 1.05 with 7 X 7 cm 2 , 1.048 with 10 X 10 cm 2 , and 1.041 with 15 X 15 cm 2 . Backscatter dose perturbation factor(BDPF) is about 0.99 with 4 X 4 cm 2 , 0.981 with 7 X 7 cm 2 , 0.956 with 10 X 10 cm 2 and 0.97 with 15 X 15 cm 2 . Conclusion : FDPF is greater as field size is smaller. And FDPF is smaller as the distance is further from the air/tissue interface

  14. Comparison of Flattening Filter (FF) and Flattening-Filter-Free (FFF) 6 MV photon beam characteristics for small field dosimetry using EGSnrc Monte Carlo code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangeetha, S.; Sureka, C. S.

    2017-06-01

    The present study is focused to compare the characteristics of Varian Clinac 600 C/D flattened and unflattened 6 MV photon beams for small field dosimetry using EGSnrc Monte Carlo Simulation since the small field dosimetry is considered to be the most crucial and provoking task in the field of radiation dosimetry. A 6 MV photon beam of a Varian Clinac 600 C/D medical linear accelerator operates with Flattening Filter (FF) and Flattening-Filter-Free (FFF) mode for small field dosimetry were performed using EGSnrc Monte Carlo user codes (BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc) in order to calculate the beam characteristics using Educated-trial and error method. These includes: Percentage depth dose, lateral beam profile, dose rate delivery, photon energy spectra, photon beam uniformity, out-of-field dose, surface dose, penumbral dose and output factor for small field dosimetry (0.5×0.5 cm2 to 4×4 cm2) and are compared with magna-field sizes (5×5 cm2 to 40×40 cm2) at various depths. The results obtained showed that the optimized beam energy and Full-width-half maximum value for small field dosimetry and magna-field dosimetry was found to be 5.7 MeV and 0.13 cm for both FF and FFF beams. The depth of dose maxima for small field size deviates minimally for both FF and FFF beams similar to magna-fields. The depths greater than dmax depicts a steeper dose fall off in the exponential region for FFF beams comparing FF beams where its deviations gets increased with the increase in field size. The shape of the lateral beam profiles of FF and FFF beams varies remains similar for the small field sizes less than 4×4 cm2 whereas it varies in the case of magna-fields. Dose rate delivery for FFF beams shows an eminent increase with a two-fold factor for both small field dosimetry and magna-field sizes. The surface dose measurements of FFF beams for small field size were found to be higher whereas it gets lower for magna-fields than FF beam. The amount of out-of-field dose reduction gets

  15. Influence of the Integral Quality Monitor transmission detector on high energy photon beams. A multi-centre study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casar, Bozidar [Institute of Oncology, Ljubljana (Slovenia). Dept. of Radiation Physics; Pasler, Marlies [Lake Constance Radiation Oncology Center, Singen and Friedrichshafen (Germany); Wegener, Sonja [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; and others

    2017-10-01

    The influence of the Integral Quality Monitor (IQM) transmission detector on photon beam properties was evaluated in a preclinical phase, using data from nine participating centres: (i) the change of beam quality (beam hardening), (ii) the influence on surface dose, and (iii) the attenuation of the IQM detector. For 6 different nominal photon energies (4 standard, 2 FFF) and square field sizes from 1 x 1 cm{sup 2} to 20 x 20 cm{sup 2}, the effect of IQM on beam quality was assessed from the PDD{sub 20,10} values obtained from the percentage dose depth (PDD) curves, measured with and without IQM in the beam path. The change in surface dose with/without IQM was assessed for all available energies and field sizes from 4 x 4 cm{sup 2} to 20 x 20 cm{sup 2}. The transmission factor was calculated by means of measured absorbed dose at 10 cm depth for all available energies and field sizes. (i) A small (0.11-0.53%) yet statistically significant beam hardening effect was observed, depending on photon beam energy. (ii) The increase in surface dose correlated with field size (p < 0.01) for all photon energies except for 18 MV. The change in surface dose was smaller than 3.3% in all cases except for the 20 x 20 cm{sup 2} field and 10 MV FFF beam, where it reached 8.1%. (iii) For standard beams, transmission of the IQM showed a weak dependence on the field size, and a pronounced dependence on the beam energy (0.9412 for 6 MV to 0.9578 for 18 MV and 0.9440 for 6 MV FFF; 0.9533 for 10 MV FFF). The effects of the IQM detector on photon beam properties were found to be small yet statistically significant. The magnitudes of changes which were found justify treating IQM either as tray factors within the treatment planning system (TPS) for a particular energy or alternatively as modified outputs for specific beam energy of linear accelerators, which eases the introduction of the IQM into clinical practice.

  16. SU-E-T-554: Comparison of Electron Disequilibrium Factor in External Photon Beams for Different Models of Linear Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LIU, B; Zhu, T

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The dose in the buildup region of a photon beam is usually determined by the transport of the primary secondary electrons and the contaminating electrons from accelerator head. This can be quantified by the electron disequilibrium factor, E, defined as the ratio between total dose and equilibrium dose (proportional to total kerma), E = 1 in regions beyond buildup region. Ecan be different among accelerators of different models and/or manufactures of the same machine. This study compares E in photon beams from different machine models/ Methods: Photon beam data such as fractional depth dose curve (FDD) and phantom scatter factors as a function of field size and phantom depth were measured for different Linac machines. E was extrapolated from these fractional depth dose data while taking into account inverse-square law. The ranges of secondary electron were chosen as 3 and 6 cm for 6 and 15 MV photon beams, respectively. The field sizes range from 2x2 to 40x40 cm 2 . Results: The comparison indicates the standard deviations of electron contamination among different machines are about 2.4 - 3.3% at 5 mm depth for 6 MV and 1.2 - 3.9% at 1 cm depth for 15 MV for the same field size. The corresponding maximum deviations are 3.0 - 4.6% and 2 - 4% for 6 and 15 MV, respectively. Both standard and maximum deviations are independent of field sizes in the buildup region for 6 MV photons, and slightly decreasing with increasing field size at depths up to 1 cm for 15 MV photons. Conclusion: The deviations of electron disequilibrium factor for all studied Linacs are less than 3% beyond the depth of 0.5 cm for the photon beams for the full range of field sizes (2-40 cm) so long as they are from the same manufacturer

  17. Assessment of radiotherapy photon beams: A practical and low cost methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, C.Q.M.; Nicolucci, P.

    2017-01-01

    Dosimetric properties of radiation beams used in radiotherapy are directly related to the energy spectrum produced by the treatment unit. Therefore, the development of methodologies to evaluate in a simple and accurate way the spectra of clinical beams can help establishing the quality control of the treatment. The purpose of this study is to present a practical and low cost methodology for determining primary spectra of radiotherapy photon beams from transmission measurements in attenuators of aluminum and using the method of the inverse Laplace transform. Monte Carlo simulation with PENELOPE code was used in order to evaluate and validate the reconstructed spectra by the calculation of dosimetric parameters that characterize the beam. Percentage depth dose values simulated with a 6 MV reconstructed spectrum shows maximum difference of 4.4% when compared to values measured at the corresponding clinical beam. For a 10 MV beam that difference was around 4.2%. Results obtained in this study confirm the adequacy of the proposed methodology for assessing primary photon beams produced by clinical accelerators. - Highlights: • Primary spectra of radiotherapy photon beams are determined from transmission measurements. • Monte Carlo calculations are used to evaluate the method of the inverse Laplace transform. • The proposed methodology is practical and of low cost for clinical purposes. • Results are in fair agreement with literature and clinical data.

  18. Commissioning of a medical accelerator photon beam Monte Carlo simulation using wide-field profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena, J; Franco, L; Gomez, F; Iglesias, A; Lobato, R; Mosquera, J; Pazos, A; Pardo, J; Pombar, M; RodrIguez, A; Sendon, J

    2004-01-01

    A method for commissioning an EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulation of medical linac photon beams through wide-field lateral profiles at moderate depth in a water phantom is presented. Although depth-dose profiles are commonly used for nominal energy determination, our study shows that they are quite insensitive to energy changes below 0.3 MeV (0.6 MeV) for a 6 MV (15 MV) photon beam. Also, the depth-dose profile dependence on beam radius adds an additional uncertainty in their use for tuning nominal energy. Simulated 40 cm x 40 cm lateral profiles at 5 cm depth in a water phantom show greater sensitivity to both nominal energy and radius. Beam parameters could be determined by comparing only these curves with measured data

  19. Commissioning of a medical accelerator photon beam Monte Carlo simulation using wide-field profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena, J [Departamento de Fisica de PartIculas, Facultade de Fisica, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Franco, L [Departamento de Fisica de PartIculas, Facultade de Fisica, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Gomez, F [Departamento de Fisica de PartIculas, Facultade de Fisica, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Iglesias, A [Departamento de Fisica de PartIculas, Facultade de Fisica, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Lobato, R [Hospital ClInico Universitario de Santiago, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Mosquera, J [Hospital ClInico Universitario de Santiago, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Pazos, A [Departamento de Fisica de PartIculas, Facultade de Fisica, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Pardo, J [Departamento de Fisica de PartIculas, Facultade de Fisica, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Pombar, M [Hospital ClInico Universitario de Santiago, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); RodrIguez, A [Departamento de Fisica de PartIculas, Facultade de Fisica, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Sendon, J [Hospital ClInico Universitario de Santiago, Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2004-11-07

    A method for commissioning an EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulation of medical linac photon beams through wide-field lateral profiles at moderate depth in a water phantom is presented. Although depth-dose profiles are commonly used for nominal energy determination, our study shows that they are quite insensitive to energy changes below 0.3 MeV (0.6 MeV) for a 6 MV (15 MV) photon beam. Also, the depth-dose profile dependence on beam radius adds an additional uncertainty in their use for tuning nominal energy. Simulated 40 cm x 40 cm lateral profiles at 5 cm depth in a water phantom show greater sensitivity to both nominal energy and radius. Beam parameters could be determined by comparing only these curves with measured data.

  20. Influence of the Integral Quality Monitor transmission detector on high energy photon beams: A multi-centre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casar, Bozidar; Pasler, Marlies; Wegener, Sonja; Hoffman, David; Talamonti, Cinzia; Qian, Jianguo; Mendez, Ignasi; Brojan, Denis; Perrin, Bruce; Kusters, Martijn; Canters, Richard; Pallotta, Stefania; Peterlin, Primoz

    2017-09-01

    The influence of the Integral Quality Monitor (IQM) transmission detector on photon beam properties was evaluated in a preclinical phase, using data from nine participating centres: (i) the change of beam quality (beam hardening), (ii) the influence on surface dose, and (iii) the attenuation of the IQM detector. For 6 different nominal photon energies (4 standard, 2 FFF) and square field sizes from 1×1cm 2 to 20×20cm 2 , the effect of IQM on beam quality was assessed from the PDD 20,10 values obtained from the percentage dose depth (PDD) curves, measured with and without IQM in the beam path. The change in surface dose with/without IQM was assessed for all available energies and field sizes from 4×4cm 2 to 20×20cm 2 . The transmission factor was calculated by means of measured absorbed dose at 10cm depth for all available energies and field sizes. (i) A small (0.11-0.53%) yet statistically significant beam hardening effect was observed, depending on photon beam energy. (ii) The increase in surface dose correlated with field size (pphoton energies except for 18MV. The change in surface dose was smaller than 3.3% in all cases except for the 20×20cm 2 field and 10MV FFF beam, where it reached 8.1%. (iii) For standard beams, transmission of the IQM showed a weak dependence on the field size, and a pronounced dependence on the beam energy (0.9412 for 6MV to 0.9578 for 18MV and 0.9440 for 6MV FFF; 0.9533 for 10MV FFF). The effects of the IQM detector on photon beam properties were found to be small yet statistically significant. The magnitudes of changes which were found justify treating IQM either as tray factors within the treatment planning system (TPS) for a particular energy or alternatively as modified outputs for specific beam energy of linear accelerators, which eases the introduction of the IQM into clinical practice. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  1. Evaluation of the usefulness of a MOSFET detector in an anthropomorphic phantom for 6-MV photon beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Ryosuke; Hirano, Eriko; Kitou, Satoshi; Goka, Tomonori; Matsubara, Kana; Kameoka, Satoru; Matsuura, Taeko; Ariji, Takaki; Nishio, Teiji; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Ogino, Takashi

    2010-07-01

    In order to evaluate the usefulness of a metal oxide-silicon field-effect transistor (MOSFET) detector as a in vivo dosimeter, we performed in vivo dosimetry using the MOSFET detector with an anthropomorphic phantom. We used the RANDO phantom as an anthropomorphic phantom, and dose measurements were carried out in the abdominal, thoracic, and head and neck regions for simple square field sizes of 10 x 10, 5 x 5, and 3 x 3 cm(2) with a 6-MV photon beam. The dose measured by the MOSFET detector was verified by the dose calculations of the superposition (SP) algorithm in the XiO radiotherapy treatment-planning system. In most cases, the measured doses agreed with the results of the SP algorithm within +/-3%. Our results demonstrated the utility of the MOSFET detector for in vivo dosimetry even in the presence of clinical tissue inhomogeneities.

  2. Evaluation of two water-equivalent phantom materials for output calibration of photon and electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Lizhong; Prasad, Satish C.; Bassano, Daniel A.

    2003-01-01

    Two commercially available water-equivalent solid phantom materials were evaluated for output calibration in both photon (6-15 MV) and electron (6-20 MeV) beams. The solid water 457 and virtual water materials have the same chemical composition but differ in manufacturing process and density. A Farmer-type ionization chamber was used for measuring the output of the photon beams at 5- and 10-cm depth and electron beams at maximum buildup depth in the solid phantoms and in natural water. The water-equivalency correction factor for the solid materials is defined as the ratio of the chamber reading in natural water to that in the solid at the same linear depth. For photon beams, the correction factor was found to be independent of depth and was 0.987 and 0.993 for 6- and 15-MV beams, respectively, for solid water. For virtual water, the corresponding correction factors were 0.993 and 0.998 for 6- and 15-MV beams, respectively. For electron beams, the correction factors ranged from 1.013 to 1.007 for energies of 6 to 20 MeV for both solid materials. This indicated that the water-equivalency of these materials is within ± 1.3%, making them suitable substitutes for natural water in both photon and electron beam output measurements over a wide energy range. These correction factors are slightly larger than the manufacturers' advertised values (± 1.0% for solid water and ± 0.5% for virtual water). We suggest that these corrections are large enough in most cases and should be applied in the calculation of beam outputs

  3. Calorimetric determination of kQ factors for NE 2561 and NE 2571 ionization chambers in 5 cm x 5 cm and 10 cm x 10 cm radiotherapy beams of 8 MV and 16 MV photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Achim; Kapsch, Ralf-Peter

    2007-10-21

    The relative uncertainty of the ionometric determination of the absorbed dose to water, D(w), in the reference dosimetry of high-energy photon beams is in the order of 1.5% and is dominated by the uncertainty of the calculated chamber- and energy-dependent correction factors k(Q). In the present investigation, k(Q) values were determined experimentally in 5 cm x 5 cm and 10 cm x 10 cm radiotherapy beams of 8 MV and 16 MV bremsstrahlung by means of a water calorimeter operated at 4 degrees C. Ionization chambers of the types NE 2561 and NE 2571 were calibrated directly in the water phantom of the calorimeter. The measurements were carried out at the linear accelerator of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt. It is shown that the k(Q) factor of a single ionization chamber can be measured with a standard uncertainty of less than 0.3%. No significant variations of k(Q) were found for the different lateral sizes of the radiation fields used in this investigation.

  4. Radiobiological characterization of different energy-photon beams used in radiotherapy from linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elata, A.; Hassan, A. M. E.; Ali, E.; Calzolari, P.; Bettega, D.

    2009-02-01

    The main objective of this study was to perform a radiobiological characterization of different energy photon beams (6 MV and 15 MV) from linear accelerator used in radiotherapy, and comparison of different treatment modalities, with special regard to late effects of radiation. Using two end points, cell survival and micronucleus induction, in the biological system (Chines hamster V79 cell line). Chromosomes number was counted and found to be 22 chromosomes per cell. Cells were kept in confluent growth for two days and then exposed to two photon beams and immediately after irradiation were counted and re seeded in different numbered for each dose. For evaluation of surviving fraction samples were incubated at 37o C for 6 days, five samples were counted for each dose. At the same time three samples were seeded for the micronuclei frequency and incubated at 37o C after 24 hours cytochalasin-B was added to block cells in cytokinesis. The survival curve showed similar curves for the two beams and decreased with dose. The micronuclei frequency was positively correlated with dose and the energy of the photon. This indicates the presence of low dose of photoneutrons produced by using high energy photon beams. (Author)

  5. Dosimetric properties characterization of silicon diodes used in photon beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bizetto, Cesar Augusto

    2013-01-01

    In the current work it was studied the performance of epitaxial (EPI) and float zone (FZ) silicon diodes as on-line dosimeters for megavoltage (EPI diode) and orthovoltage (EPI and FZ diode) photon beam radiotherapy. In order to be used as dosimeters the diodes were enclosed in black polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) probes. The devices were then connected, on photovoltaic mode, to an electrometer Keithley® 6517B to allow measurements of the photocurrent. The irradiations were performed with 6 and 18 MV photon beams (Siemens Primus® linear accelerator), 6 and 15 MV (Novalis TX®) and 10, 25, 30 and 50 kV of a Pantak / Seifert X ray radiation device. During the measurements with the Siemens Primus the diodes were held between PMMA plates placed at 10.0 cm depth. When using Novalis TX® the devices were held between solid water plates placed at 50 cm depth. In both cases the diodes were centered in a radiation field of 10 x 10 cm 2 , with the source-to-surface distance (SSD) kept at 100 cm. In measurements with orthovoltage photon beams the diodes were placed 50.0 cm from the tube in a radiation field of 8 cm diameter. The dose-rate dependency was studied for 6 and 15 MV (varying the dose-rate from 100 to 600 monitor units per minute) and for the 50 kV beam by varying the current tube from 2 to 20 mA. All devices showed linear response with dose rate and, within uncertainties the charge collected is independent of dose rate. The current signals induced showed good instantaneous repeatability of the diodes, characterized by coefficients of variation of current (CV) smaller than 1.14% (megavoltage beams) and 0.15% for orthovoltage beams and coefficients of variation of charge (CV) smaller than 1.84% (megavoltage beams) and 1.67% (orthovoltage beams). The dose response curves were quite linear with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.9999 for all diodes. (author)

  6. Effect of photon-beam energy on VMAT and IMRT treatment plan quality and dosimetric accuracy for advanced prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasler, Marlies; Wirtz, Holger; Lutterbach, Johannes [Lake Constance Radiation Oncology Center Singen-Friedrichshafen, Singen (Germany); Georg, Dietmar [Medical Univ. Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    2011-12-15

    The goal of the research was to evaluate treatment plan quality and dosimetric accuracy of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans using 6, 10, and 15 MV photon beams for prostate cancer including lymph nodes. In this retrospective study, VMAT and IMRT plans were generated with the Pinnacle {sup copyright} treatment planning system (TPS) (V9.0) for 10 prostate cancer cases. Each plan consisted of two target volumes: PTV{sub B} included the prostate bed, PTV{sub PC+LN} contained PTV{sub B} and lymph nodes. For plan evaluation statistics, the homogeneity index, conformity index, mean doses, and near-max doses to organs at risk (OAR) were analyzed. Treatment time and number of monitor units were assessed to compare delivery efficiency. Dosimetric plan verification was performed with a 2D ionization chamber array placed in a full scatter phantom. Results: No differences were found for target and OAR parameters in low and high energy photon beam plans for both VMAT and IMRT. A slightly higher low dose volume was detected for 6 MV VMAT plans (normal tissue: D{sub mean} = 16.47 Gy) compared to 10 and 15 MV VMAT plans (D{sub mean} = 15.90 Gy and 15.74 Gy, respectively), similar to the findings in IMRT. In VMAT, > 96% of detector points passed the 3%/ 3 mm {gamma} criterion; marginally better accuracy was found in IMRT (> 97%). Conclusion: For static and rotational IMRT, 15 MV photons did not show advantages over 6 and 10 MV high energy photon beams in large volume pelvic plans. For the investigated TPS and linac combination, 10 MV photon beams can be used as the general purpose energy for intensity modulation.

  7. Monte Carlo simulation of MOSFET detectors for high-energy photon beams using the PENELOPE code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panettieri, Vanessa; Amor Duch, Maria; Jornet, Núria; Ginjaume, Mercè; Carrasco, Pablo; Badal, Andreu; Ortega, Xavier; Ribas, Montserrat

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work was the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of the response of commercially available dosimeters based on metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) for radiotherapeutic photon beams using the PENELOPE code. The studied Thomson&Nielsen TN-502-RD MOSFETs have a very small sensitive area of 0.04 mm2 and a thickness of 0.5 µm which is placed on a flat kapton base and covered by a rounded layer of black epoxy resin. The influence of different metallic and Plastic water™ build-up caps, together with the orientation of the detector have been investigated for the specific application of MOSFET detectors for entrance in vivo dosimetry. Additionally, the energy dependence of MOSFET detectors for different high-energy photon beams (with energy >1.25 MeV) has been calculated. Calculations were carried out for simulated 6 MV and 18 MV x-ray beams generated by a Varian Clinac 1800 linear accelerator, a Co-60 photon beam from a Theratron 780 unit, and monoenergetic photon beams ranging from 2 MeV to 10 MeV. The results of the validation of the simulated photon beams show that the average difference between MC results and reference data is negligible, within 0.3%. MC simulated results of the effect of the build-up caps on the MOSFET response are in good agreement with experimental measurements, within the uncertainties. In particular, for the 18 MV photon beam the response of the detectors under a tungsten cap is 48% higher than for a 2 cm Plastic water™ cap and approximately 26% higher when a brass cap is used. This effect is demonstrated to be caused by positron production in the build-up caps of higher atomic number. This work also shows that the MOSFET detectors produce a higher signal when their rounded side is facing the beam (up to 6%) and that there is a significant variation (up to 50%) in the response of the MOSFET for photon energies in the studied energy range. All the results have shown that the PENELOPE code system can

  8. Monte Carlo simulation of MOSFET detectors for high-energy photon beams using the PENELOPE code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panettieri, Vanessa; Duch, Maria Amor; Jornet, Núria; Ginjaume, Mercè; Carrasco, Pablo; Badal, Andreu; Ortega, Xavier; Ribas, Montserrat

    2007-01-07

    The aim of this work was the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of the response of commercially available dosimeters based on metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) for radiotherapeutic photon beams using the PENELOPE code. The studied Thomson&Nielsen TN-502-RD MOSFETs have a very small sensitive area of 0.04 mm(2) and a thickness of 0.5 microm which is placed on a flat kapton base and covered by a rounded layer of black epoxy resin. The influence of different metallic and Plastic water build-up caps, together with the orientation of the detector have been investigated for the specific application of MOSFET detectors for entrance in vivo dosimetry. Additionally, the energy dependence of MOSFET detectors for different high-energy photon beams (with energy >1.25 MeV) has been calculated. Calculations were carried out for simulated 6 MV and 18 MV x-ray beams generated by a Varian Clinac 1800 linear accelerator, a Co-60 photon beam from a Theratron 780 unit, and monoenergetic photon beams ranging from 2 MeV to 10 MeV. The results of the validation of the simulated photon beams show that the average difference between MC results and reference data is negligible, within 0.3%. MC simulated results of the effect of the build-up caps on the MOSFET response are in good agreement with experimental measurements, within the uncertainties. In particular, for the 18 MV photon beam the response of the detectors under a tungsten cap is 48% higher than for a 2 cm Plastic water cap and approximately 26% higher when a brass cap is used. This effect is demonstrated to be caused by positron production in the build-up caps of higher atomic number. This work also shows that the MOSFET detectors produce a higher signal when their rounded side is facing the beam (up to 6%) and that there is a significant variation (up to 50%) in the response of the MOSFET for photon energies in the studied energy range. All the results have shown that the PENELOPE code system can successfully

  9. SU-E-T-781: Using An Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) for Correlating Linac Photon Beam Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaddanapudi, S; Cai, B; Sun, B; Noel, C; Goddu, S; Mutic, S [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have proven to be useful for measuring several parameters of interest in linear accelerator (linac) quality assurance (QA). The purpose of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of using EPIDs for determining linac photon beam energies. Methods: Two non-clinical Varian TrueBeam linacs (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) with 6MV and 10MV photon beams were used to perform the measurements. The linacs were equipped with an amorphous silicon based EPIDs (aSi1000) that were used for the measurements. We compared the use of flatness versus percent depth dose (PDD) for predicting changes in linac photon beam energy. PDD was measured in 1D water tank (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne FL) and the profiles were measured using 2D ion-chamber array (IC-Profiler, Sun Nuclear) and the EPID. Energy changes were accomplished by varying the bending magnet current (BMC). The evaluated energies conformed with the AAPM TG142 tolerance of ±1% change in PDD. Results: BMC changes correlating with a ±1% change in PDD corresponded with a change in flatness of ∼1% to 2% from baseline values on the EPID. IC Profiler flatness values had the same correlation. We observed a similar trend for the 10MV beam energy changes. Our measurements indicated a strong correlation between changes in linac photon beam energy and changes in flatness. For all machines and energies, beam energy changes produced change in the uniformity (AAPM TG-142), varying from ∼1% to 2.5%. Conclusions: EPID image analysis of beam profiles can be used to determine linac photon beam energy changes. Flatness-based metrics or uniformity as defined by AAPM TG-142 were found to be more sensitive to linac photon beam energy changes than PDD. Research funding provided by Varian Medical Systems. Dr. Sasa Mutic receives compensation for providing patient safety training services from Varian Medical Systems, the sponsor of this study.

  10. Dosimetric effects of matching 6MV photon and electron fields in the treatment of head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemikler, Goenuel

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimetry across the junction between an enface 9MeV electron field and 6MV parallel opposing photon fields for two photon configurations: (1) laterally opposed divergent beam set-up and (2) laterally opposed half-beam (non-divergent) set-up using asymmetric collimator jaws. In this study, film dosimetry technique was performed to measure dose profiles at depths of 1, 2, and 3cm in the junction of the matching photon and electron fields. In order to investigate the changes in the dose distributions due to set-up uncertainties, dose profiles were measured at these depths using no gap, 2 and 4mm overlaps and gaps between the photon and electron fields. A 2mm gap resulted in approximately +15% and +20% hot spots in the photon field at 1 and 3cm depths, respectively, for divergent photon beams. However, at 2cm depth, an approximately +30% hot spot and -10% cold spot occurred in the junction region. Four millimeter overlap and gap resulted in an unacceptable dose inhomogeneity in the junction. As a result of this study, the magnitudes of hot and cold spots might be clinically acceptable for 2mm gap between photon and electron fields

  11. SU-E-T-611: Photon and Neutron Peripheral Dose Ratio for Low (6 MV) and High (15 MV) Energy for Treatment Selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irazola, L; Sanchez-Doblado, F [Departamento de Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica, Universidad de Seville (Spain); Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Seville (Spain); Terron, J; Ortiz-Seidel, M [Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Seville (Spain); Departamento de Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica, Universidad de Seville (Spain); Sanchez-Nieto, B [Instituto de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Differences between radiotherapy techniques and energies, can offer improvements in tumor coverage and organs at risk preservation. However, a more complete decision should include peripheral doses delivered to the patient. The purpose of this work is the balance of photon and neutron peripheral doses for a prostate case solved with 6 different treatment modalities. Methods: Inverse and Forward IMRT and 3D-CRT in 6 and 15 MV for a Siemens Primus linac, using the same CT data set and contours. The methodology described in [1], was used with the TNRD thermal neutron detector [2] for neutron peripheral dose estimation at 7 relevant organs (colon, esophagus, stomach, liver, lung, thyroid and skin). Photon doses were estimated for these organs by terms of the algorithm proposed in [3]. Plans were optimized with the same restrictions and limited to 30 segments in the Inverse case. Results: A similar photon peripheral dose was found comparing 6 and 15 MV cases with slightly higher values of (1.9 ± 1.6) % in mean, for the 6 MV cases. Neutron presence when using 15 MV, represents an increase in peripheral dose of (18 ± 17) % in average. Due to the higher number of MU used in Inverse IMRT, an increasing of (22 ± 3) % in neutron dose is found related to Forward and 3D-CRT plans. This corresponds to photon doses within 44 and 255 mSv along the organs, for a dose prescription of 68 Gy at the isocenter. Conclusion: Neutron and photon peripheral doses for a prostate treatment planified in 6 different techniques have been analyzed. 6 MV plans are slightly more demanding in terms of photon peripheral doses. Inverse technique in 15 MV has Result to be the most demanding one in terms of total peripheral doses, including neutrons and photons.

  12. Technical Note: On the impact of the incident electron beam energy on the primary dose component of flattening filter free photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuess, Peter; Georg, Dietmar; Palmans, Hugo; Lechner, Wolfgang

    2016-08-01

    For commercially available linear accelerators (Linacs), the electron energies of flattening filter free (FFF) and flattened (FF) beams are either identical or the electron energy of the FFF beam is increased to match the percentage depth dose curve (PDD) of the FF beam (in reference geometry). This study focuses on the primary dose components of FFF beams for both kinds of settings, studied on the same Linac. The measurements were conducted on a VersaHD Linac (Elekta, Crawley, UK) for both FF and FFF beams with nominal energies of 6 and 10 MV. In the clinical setting of the VersaHD, the energy of FFFM (Matched) beams is set to match the PDDs of the FF beams. In contrast the incident electron beam of the FFFU beam was set to the same energy as for the FF beam. Half value layers (HVLs) and a dual parameter beam quality specifier (DPBQS) were determined. For the 6 MV FFFM beam, HVL and DPBQS values were very similar compared to those of the 6 MV FF beam, while for the 10 MV FFFM and FF beams, only %dd(10)x and HVL values were comparable (differences below 1.5%). This shows that matching the PDD at one depth does not guarantee other beam quality dependent parameters to be matched. For FFFU beams, all investigated beam quality specifiers were significantly different compared to those for FF beams of the same nominal accelerator potential. The DPBQS of the 6 MV FF and FFFM beams was equal within the measurement uncertainty and was comparable to published data of a machine with similar TPR20,10 and %dd(10)x. In contrast to that, the DPBQS's two parameters of the 10 MV FFFM beam were substantially higher compared to those for the 10 MV FF beam. PDD-matched FF and FFF beams of both nominal accelerator potentials were observed to have similar HVL values, indicating similarity of their primary dose components. Using the DPBQS revealed that the mean attenuation coefficient was found to be the same within the uncertainty of 0.8% for 6 MV FF and 6 MV FFFM beams, while for 10 MV

  13. Dosimetric evaluation of fattening filter free photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lechner, W.

    2014-01-01

    Very recently, conventional treatment machines able to deliver flattening filter free photon have been introduced into clinical practice. An Elekta Pricise linear accelerator LINAC which was able to deliver 6MV and 10 MV flattened (FF) and flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams was used throughout this work. The investigated modalities were 9-Field intensity modulated radiotherapy (Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)) and 360° - single arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT)) with flattened and unflattened photon beams. For treatment plan evaluation the concept of Pareto optimal fronts was employed. Additionally, the efficiency of these modalities was assessed. The evaluation of the treatment plan quality showed no significant difference between FF- and FFF-beams. With respect to treatment plan efficiency, a significant decrease of delivery time of IMRT treatment plans without flattening filter compared to those with filter was found. On average, the delivery time decreased by 18% and 4% for prostate and head-and-neck cases, respectively. In contrast to that, the delivery time of VMAT treatment plans without flatting filter was significantly increased by 22% and 16% for prostate and head- and-neck cases, respectively. The applicability of 14 different detectors to small field dosimetry in FF- as well as in FFF-beams was investigated by measuring output factors of 6MV and 10 MV FF- and FFF- beams. An additional MLC was attached to the treatment machine in order to generate field sizes between 0.6x0.6 cm 2 and 10x10 cm 2 . Alanine pellets were used as reference detectors for the calculation of correction factors for small field dosimetry. Compared to alanine, the solid sate detectors and the liquid filled ionization chamber generally overestimated the output factors of small fields, whereas the air filled ionzation chambers underestimated the output factors. For the shielded diodes the correction factors ranged between 8

  14. SU-F-P-39: End-To-End Validation of a 6 MV High Dose Rate Photon Beam, Configured for Eclipse AAA Algorithm Using Golden Beam Data, for SBRT Treatments Using RapidArc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreyra, M; Salinas Aranda, F; Dodat, D; Sansogne, R; Arbiser, S [Vidt Centro Medico, Ciudad Autonoma De Buenos Aires, Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aire (Argentina)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To use end-to-end testing to validate a 6 MV high dose rate photon beam, configured for Eclipse AAA algorithm using Golden Beam Data (GBD), for SBRT treatments using RapidArc. Methods: Beam data was configured for Varian Eclipse AAA algorithm using the GBD provided by the vendor. Transverse and diagonals dose profiles, PDDs and output factors down to a field size of 2×2 cm2 were measured on a Varian Trilogy Linac and compared with GBD library using 2% 2mm 1D gamma analysis. The MLC transmission factor and dosimetric leaf gap were determined to characterize the MLC in Eclipse. Mechanical and dosimetric tests were performed combining different gantry rotation speeds, dose rates and leaf speeds to evaluate the delivery system performance according to VMAT accuracy requirements. An end-to-end test was implemented planning several SBRT RapidArc treatments on a CIRS 002LFC IMRT Thorax Phantom. The CT scanner calibration curve was acquired and loaded in Eclipse. PTW 31013 ionization chamber was used with Keithley 35617EBS electrometer for absolute point dose measurements in water and lung equivalent inserts. TPS calculated planar dose distributions were compared to those measured using EPID and MapCheck, as an independent verification method. Results were evaluated with gamma criteria of 2% dose difference and 2mm DTA for 95% of points. Results: GBD set vs. measured data passed 2% 2mm 1D gamma analysis even for small fields. Machine performance tests show results are independent of machine delivery configuration, as expected. Absolute point dosimetry comparison resulted within 4% for the worst case scenario in lung. Over 97% of the points evaluated in dose distributions passed gamma index analysis. Conclusion: Eclipse AAA algorithm configuration of the 6 MV high dose rate photon beam using GBD proved efficient. End-to-end test dose calculation results indicate it can be used clinically for SBRT using RapidArc.

  15. Dosimetric properties of dysprosium doped lithium borate glass irradiated by 6 MV photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ab Rasid, A.; Wagiran, H.; Hashim, S.; Ibrahim, Z.; Ali, H.

    2015-01-01

    Undoped and dysprosium doped lithium borate glass system with empirical formula (70–x) B 2 O 3 –30 Li 2 O–(x) Dy 2 O 3 (x=0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, 1.0 mol%) were prepared using the melt-quenching technique. The dosimetric measurements were performed by irradiating the samples to 6 MV photon beam using linear accelerator (LINAC) over a dose range of 0.5–5.0 Gy. The glass series of dysprosium doped lithium borate glass produced the best thermoluminescence (TL) glow curve with the highest intensity peak from sample with 1.0 mol% Dy 2 O 3 concentration. Minimum detectable dose was detected at 2.24 mGy, good linearity of regression coefficient, high reproducibility and high sensitivity compared to the undoped glass are from 1.0 mol% dysprosium doped lithium borate glass. The results indicated that the series of dysprosium doped lithium glasses have a great potential to be considered as a thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD). - Highlights: • TL response of undoped and dysprosium doped lithium borate glass subjected to 6 MV photons irradiation at low dose range. • TL linear response of dysprosium doped lithium borate glass. • The sensitivity of dysprosium doped lithium borate glass is approximately 93 times higher than undoped glass

  16. SU-F-T-491: Photon Beam Matching Analysis at Multiple Sites Up to Twelve Years Post Installation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Able, C [Florida Cancer Specialists - New Port Richey, New Port Richey, FL (United States); Zakikhani, R [Florida Cancer Specialists - Largo, Largo, FL (United States); Yan, K [Florida Cancer Specialists- Tampa, Tampa, FL (United States); Sha, D [Florida Cancer Specialist - New Port Richey, New Port Richey, FL (United States); Chopra, A [Florida Cancer Specialist - Brooksville, Spring Hill, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To determine if the photon beams associated with several models of accelerators are matched with ‘Golden Beam’ data (VGBD) to assess treatment planning modeling and delivery. Methods: Six accelerators’ photon beams were evaluated to determine if they matched the manufacturer’s (Varian Medical Systems, Inc.) VGBD. Additional direct comparisons of the 6X and 18X beams using the manufacturer’s specification of Basic and Fine beam matching were also performed. The Cseries accelerator models were 21 EX (3), IX (2), and a IX Trilogy, ranging from three to twelve years post installation. Computerized beam scanning was performed (IBA Blue Phantom 2) with 2 CC13 ion chambers in water at 100 cm SSD. Dmax (10 cm2 field size), percentage depth dose (6 cm2, 10 cm2, 20 cm2, and 30 cm2 field sizes) and beam uniformity (10 cm2, 30 cm2 and 40 cm2 field sizes) were evaluated. Results: When comparing the beams with VGBD using the ‘Basic’ matching criteria, all beams were within the specifications ( 1.5mm at dmax, 1% PDD, and 2% Profiles). When considering the “Fine” matching criteria ( 1.5mm at dmax, 0.5% PDD, and 2% Profiles), only three of six 6MV beams and two of six high energy (five 18MV & one 15MV) beams passed. Direct comparisons between accelerators using the Clinac IX (installed 2012) as the reference beam datasets resulted in all 6 MV and 18MV beams meeting both the “Basic” and “Fine” criterion with the exception of two accelerators. Conclusion: Linear accelerators installed up to nine years apart are capable of meeting the manufacturers beam matching criteria for “Basic” matching. Without any adjustments most beams, when evaluated, may meet the “Fine” match criteria. The use of a single dataset (VGBD or designated accelerator reference data) for treatment planning commissioning is acceptable and can provide quality treatment delivery.

  17. Comparative study of 6 MV and 15 MV treatment plans for large chest wall irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasana Sarathy, N.; Kothanda Raman, S.; Sen, Dibyendu; Pal, Bipasha

    2007-01-01

    Conventionally, opposed tangential fields are used for the treatment of chest wall irradiation. If the chest wall is treated in the linac, 4 or 6 MV photons will be the energy of choice. It is a welI-established rule that for chest wall separations up to 22 cm, one can use mid-energies, with acceptable volume of hot spots. For larger patient sizes (22 cm and above), mid-energy beams produce hot spots over large volumes. The purpose of this work is to compare plans made with 6 and 15 MV photons, for patients with large chest wall separations. The obvious disadvantage in using high-energy photons for chest wall irradiation is inadequate dose to the skin. But this can be compensated by using a bolus of suitable thickness

  18. Photons and photoneutrons spectra of a Linac of 15 MV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benites R, J. L.; Carrillo C, A.; Vega C, H. R.; Velazquez F, J. B.

    2011-10-01

    Using the Monte Carlo code MCNP-5, the photons and photoneutrons spectra generated in the head stock of the lineal accelerator (Linac) Varian of 15 MV of the Cancerology State of Nayarit were determined. For the calculations a heterogeneous head stock was modeled, more compatible with the work conditions. In the center of the head stock a tungsten target was located on a copper support, followed by the flattened filter. The photons and photoneutrons spectra were obtained accelerating electrons and making them collide against the target to produce photons by Bremsstrahlung, these photons were transported inside the head stock and the photons and photoneutrons spectra were calculated in a punctual detector located under the flattened filter and in the isocenter. The spectra were evaluated in punctual detectors that were located in the plane from the isocenter to the long of the X and Y axes each 20 cm, in an equidistant way, up to 2 m, so much in the longitudinal and transversal axes. In the calculations were used histories 5E(6) with the purpose of obtaining smaller uncertainties to 1%. It was found that the photons spectrum in the punctual detector inside the head stock presents a pick of 1.25 MeV in the energy interval of 0.5 and 1.5 MeV, later suffers a filtration and diminishes in asymptote form. This spectrum modifies when the beam reaches the isocenter, diminishing the low energy photons. Inside the head stock the photoneutrons spectrum shows a structure with two picks, one before 1 MeV and other after 1 MeV; this is for effect of the collimators geometry and the distance. Finally an increment of the total neutrons flow to 60 cm of distance of the isocenter on the Y axis was observed, due to the design geometry of the modeling heterogeneous head stock. (Author)

  19. Technical Note: On the impact of the incident electron beam energy on the primary dose component of flattening filter free photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuess, Peter; Georg, Dietmar; Lechner, Wolfgang; Palmans, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    0.8% for 6 MV FF and 6 MV FFF M beams, while for 10 MV beams, they differed by 6.4%. This shows that the DPBQS can provide a differentiation of photon beam characteristics that would remain hidden by the use of a single beam quality specifier, such as %dd(10) x or HVL.

  20. Feasibility of using a dose-area product ratio as beam quality specifier for photon beams with small field sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimpinella, Maria; Caporali, Claudio; Guerra, Antonio Stefano; Silvi, Luca; De Coste, Vanessa; Petrucci, Assunta; Delaunay, Frank; Dufreneix, Stéphane; Gouriou, Jean; Ostrowsky, Aimé; Rapp, Benjamin; Bordy, Jean-Marc; Daures, Josiane; Le Roy, Maïwenn; Sommier, Line; Vermesse, Didier

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of using the ratio of dose-area product at 20 cm and 10 cm water depths (DAPR 20,10 ) as a beam quality specifier for radiotherapy photon beams with field diameter below 2 cm. Dose-area product was determined as the integral of absorbed dose to water (D w ) over a surface larger than the beam size. 6 MV and 10 MV photon beams with field diameters from 0.75 cm to 2 cm were considered. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed to calculate energy-dependent dosimetric parameters and to study the DAPR 20,10 properties. Aspects relevant to DAPR 20,10 measurement were explored using large-area plane-parallel ionization chambers with different diameters. DAPR 20,10 was nearly independent of field size in line with the small differences among the corresponding mean beam energies. Both MC and experimental results showed a dependence of DAPR 20,10 on the measurement setup and the surface over which D w is integrated. For a given setup, DAPR 20,10 values obtained using ionization chambers with different air-cavity diameters agreed with one another within 0.4%, after the application of MC correction factors accounting for effects due to the chamber size. DAPR 20,10 differences among the small field sizes were within 1% and sensitivity to the beam energy resulted similar to that of established beam quality specifiers based on the point measurement of D w . For a specific measurement setup and integration area, DAPR 20,10 proved suitable to specify the beam quality of small photon beams for the selection of energy-dependent dosimetric parameters. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The characterization of unflattened photon beams from a 6 MV linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cashmore, Jason

    2008-01-01

    Commissioning data have been measured for an Elekta Precise linear accelerator running at 6 MV without a flattening filter with the aim of studying the effects of flattening filter removal on machine operation and beam characterization. Modern radiotherapy practice now routinely relies on the use of fluence modifying techniques such as IMRT, i.e. the active production of non-flat beams. For these techniques the flattening filter should not be necessary. It is also possible that the increased intensity around the central axis associated with unflattened beams may be useful for conventional treatment planning by acting as a field-in-field or integrated boost technique. For this reason open and wedged field data are presented. Whilst problems exist in running the machine filter free clinically, this paper shows that in many ways the beam is actually more stable, exhibiting almost half the variation in field symmetry for changes in steering and bending currents. Dosimetric benefits are reported here which include a reduction in head scatter by approx. 70%, decreased penumbra (0.5 mm), lower dose outside of the field edge (11%) and a doubling in dose rate (2.3 times for open and 1.9 times for wedged fields). Measurements also show that reduced scatter also reduces leakage radiation by approx. 60%, significantly lowering whole body doses. The greatest benefit of filter-free use is perceived to be for IMRT where increased dose rate combined with reduced head scatter and leakage radiation should lead to improved dose calculation, giving simpler, faster and more accurate dose delivery with reduced dose to normal tissues

  2. Modelling of electron contamination in clinical photon beams for Monte Carlo dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J; Li, J S; Qin, L; Xiong, W; Ma, C-M

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to model electron contamination in clinical photon beams and to commission the source model using measured data for Monte Carlo treatment planning. In this work, a planar source is used to represent the contaminant electrons at a plane above the upper jaws. The source size depends on the dimensions of the field size at the isocentre. The energy spectra of the contaminant electrons are predetermined using Monte Carlo simulations for photon beams from different clinical accelerators. A 'random creep' method is employed to derive the weight of the electron contamination source by matching Monte Carlo calculated monoenergetic photon and electron percent depth-dose (PDD) curves with measured PDD curves. We have integrated this electron contamination source into a previously developed multiple source model and validated the model for photon beams from Siemens PRIMUS accelerators. The EGS4 based Monte Carlo user code BEAM and MCSIM were used for linac head simulation and dose calculation. The Monte Carlo calculated dose distributions were compared with measured data. Our results showed good agreement (less than 2% or 2 mm) for 6, 10 and 18 MV photon beams

  3. Peripheral photon and neutron doses from prostate cancer external beam irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezak, Eva; Takam, Rundgham; Marcu, Loredana G

    2015-12-01

    Peripheral photon and neutron doses from external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) are associated with increased risk of carcinogenesis in the out-of-field organs; thus, dose estimations of secondary radiation are imperative. Peripheral photon and neutron doses from EBRT of prostate carcinoma were measured in Rando phantom. (6)LiF:Mg,Cu,P and (7)LiF:Mg,Cu,P glass-rod thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs) were inserted in slices of a Rando phantom followed by exposure to 80 Gy with 18-MV photon four-field 3D-CRT technique. The TLDs were calibrated using 6- and 18-MV X-ray beam. Neutron dose equivalents measured with CR-39 etch-track detectors were used to derive readout-to-neutron dose conversion factor for (6)LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs. Average neutron dose equivalents per 1 Gy of isocentre dose were 3.8±0.9 mSv Gy(-1) for thyroid and 7.0±5.4 mSv Gy(-1) for colon. For photons, the average dose equivalents per 1 Gy of isocentre dose were 0.2±0.1 mSv Gy(-1) for thyroid and 8.1±9.7 mSv Gy(-1) for colon. Paired (6)LiF:Mg,Cu,P and (7)LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs can be used to measure photon and neutron doses simultaneously. Organs in close proximity to target received larger doses from photons than those from neutrons whereas distally located organs received higher neutron versus photon dose. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Surface dose investigation of the flattening filter-free photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuenan; Khan, Mohammad K; Ting, Joseph Y; Easterling, Stephen B

    2012-06-01

    Flattening filter-free (FFF) x-rays can provide more efficient use of photons and a significant increase of dose rate compared with conventional flattened x-rays, features that are especially beneficial for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). The available data on the entrance doses of the FFF photon beams remain limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate the entrance dose of FFF photons in the buildup region and to compare it with that of conventional flattened photons. A Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator has been in full clinical operation with 6-MV and 10-MV FFF and flattened x-ray photons. Entrance dose at the surface was measured using a parallel plate ionization chamber in a solid water phantom with buildup depth = 0~15 mm for 6X and 0~25 mm for 10X. Different field size (FS) patterns were created in the Eclipse Treatment Planning System by multileaf collimator (MLC) rather than jaws (FS = 2 × 2, 3 × 3, 4 × 4, 6 × 6, and 10 × 10 cm(2) by MLC and jaw size = 2.2 × 2.2, 3.2 × 3.2, 4.2 × 4.2, 6 × 6, and 10 × 10 cm(2)). The smallest FS was about four times larger than the ion chamber dimension. All buildup dose measurements were normalized to FS = 10 × 10 cm(2) at the depth of dose maximum (dmax). Good repeatability was demonstrated and surface dose increased linearly with FS for both flattened and FFF photons. The entrance dose of the FFF photons was modestly larger than that of the corresponding flattened photons for both 6X and 10X for different FS ranging from 2 × 2 cm(2) to 10 × 10 cm(2). The FFF photons have a higher entrance dose than that of the corresponding flattened photons for FS smaller than 10 × 10 cm(2). However, the difference is not substantial and may be clinically insignificant. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Using of beam spoilers in linear accelerators with photons of 10 MV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sansogne, R.; Palacios, V.; Arbiser, S.

    1998-01-01

    This work come along of the necessity to utilize an unique High-Energy Electron Linear Accelerator (10 MV) for radiant treatments which require higher doses in the surface levels of tissue. It is analyzed the interposition of acrylic degraders (spoilers) in the beam, especially for opposed and parallel fields in the cases of head and neck. It was analyzed the possible combinations of the following parameters: 1) Field sizes defined at isocenter (100 cm) 6 x 6 cm 2 , 8 x 8 cm 2 and 10 x 10 cm 2 ; 2) Surface-spoiler distance (DSS) of 4, 7 and 10 cm; 3) Spoilers with different thickness 1.1 and 1.5 cm. It was observed a displacement of the maximum dose toward the surface, and an increase in the percentile doses in the build-up zone when the spoiler is nearing and/or increasing its thickness. It is verified that the use of spoilers, support the symmetry and plane of the beam inside of the clinically acceptable margins. When the results obtained are analyzed then it is proposed as a calculation method to incorporate an attenuation factor. (Author)

  6. Shielding provision in an old 6MV bunker for a new 18MV linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howlett, S.J.; Ebert, M.A.; Kenny, W.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: In October 2003 the Newcastle Mater Hospital commenced clinical use of a new Varian 21EX which replaced it's 14 year old Varian Clinac l800. The 1800 had only been enabled for 6MV X-ray beam for most of its clinical use but was enabled for 18MV for a period in 2000. This was to make up for the loss of an 18MV beam from another Clinac 1800 which was being replaced in a bunker designed for that higher energy. The new 21EX would provide both 6MV and 18MV beams for routine clinical use. The original bunker had been designed for the lower energy and hence additional shielding was required to meet radiation dose limits recommended in ICRP 60 and adopted in ARPANSA RPS6. A general radiation survey was conducted around the bunker area when the 18MV beam was available on the older linear accelerator. This rather unique situation provided data which would normally be impossible to obtain. Photon activation in the neutron door was a source of increased dose levels in the control area. Commercial design was contracted for the additional barrier calculations and supply. Additional shielding was required on one primary barrier and the neutron door. Post installation surveys were conducted and the R and V system was used for usage figures. Using dose constraints for public and occupational exposure, various survey points were measured around the bunker. This data was assessed in terms of calculated requirements, actual requirements and the ALARA principle for radiation shielding design. Review of staff dose histories was also performed. The final survey calculations showed the additional shielding more than adequate for the usage of 18MV and 6MV photon beams. The availability of the R and V data gives supporting evidence for design of barriers to be adjusted on usage values as has been reported in an earlier work at this centre. The issue of occupancy arises in this work as dose histories indicate. Typically barrier design is always conservative and survey results on

  7. Skin damage probabilities using fixation materials in high-energy photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carl, J.; Vestergaard, A.

    2000-01-01

    Patient fixation, such as thermoplastic masks, carbon-fibre support plates and polystyrene bead vacuum cradles, is used to reproduce patient positioning in radiotherapy. Consequently low-density materials may be introduced in high-energy photon beams. The aim of the this study was to measure the increase in skin dose when low-density materials are present and calculate the radiobiological consequences in terms of probabilities of early and late skin damage. An experimental thin-windowed plane-parallel ion chamber was used. Skin doses were measured using various overlaying low-density fixation materials. A fixed geometry of a 10 x 10 cm field, a SSD = 100 cm and photon energies of 4, 6 and 10 MV on Varian Clinac 2100C accelerators were used for all measurements. Radiobiological consequences of introducing these materials into the high-energy photon beams were evaluated in terms of early and late damage of the skin based on the measured surface doses and the LQ-model. The experimental ion chamber save results consistent with other studies. A relationship between skin dose and material thickness in mg/cm 2 was established and used to calculate skin doses in scenarios assuming radiotherapy treatment with opposed fields. Conventional radiotherapy may apply mid-point doses up to 60-66 Gy in daily 2-Gy fractions opposed fields. Using thermoplastic fixation and high-energy photons as low as 4 MV do increase the dose to the skin considerably. However, using thermoplastic materials with thickness less than 100 mg/cm 2 skin doses are comparable with those produced by variation in source to skin distance, field size or blocking trays within clinical treatment set-ups. The use of polystyrene cradles and carbon-fibre materials with thickness less than 100 mg/cm 2 should be avoided at 4 MV at doses above 54-60 Gy. (author)

  8. SU-F-T-478: Effect of Deconvolution in Analysis of Mega Voltage Photon Beam Profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muthukumaran, M [Apollo Speciality Hospitals, Chennai, Tamil Nadu (India); Manigandan, D [Fortis Cancer Institute, Mohali, Punjab (India); Murali, V; Chitra, S; Ganapathy, K [Apollo Speciality Hospital, Chennai, Tamil Nadu (India); Vikraman, S [JAYPEE HOSPITAL- RADIATION ONCOLOGY, Noida, UTTAR PRADESH (India)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To study and compare the penumbra of 6 MV and 15 MV photon beam profiles after deconvoluting different volume ionization chambers. Methods: 0.125cc Semi-Flex chamber, Markus Chamber and PTW Farmer chamber were used to measure the in-plane and cross-plane profiles at 5 cm depth for 6 MV and 15 MV photons. The profiles were measured for various field sizes starting from 2×2 cm till 30×30 cm. PTW TBA scan software was used for the measurements and the “deconvolution” functionality in the software was used to remove the volume averaging effect due to finite volume of the chamber along lateral and longitudinal directions for all the ionization chambers. The predicted true profile was compared and the change in penumbra before and after deconvolution was studied. Results: After deconvoluting the penumbra decreased by 1 mm for field sizes ranging from 2 × 2 cm till 20 x20 cm. This is observed for along both lateral and longitudinal directions. However for field sizes from 20 × 20 till 30 ×30 cm the difference in penumbra was around 1.2 till 1.8 mm. This was observed for both 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams. The penumbra was always lesser in the deconvoluted profiles for all the ionization chambers involved in the study. The variation in difference in penumbral values were in the order of 0.1 till 0.3 mm between the deconvoluted profile along lateral and longitudinal directions for all the chambers under study. Deconvolution of the profiles along longitudinal direction for Farmer chamber was not good and is not comparable with other deconvoluted profiles. Conclusion: The results of the deconvoluted profiles for 0.125cc and Markus chamber was comparable and the deconvolution functionality can be used to overcome the volume averaging effect.

  9. Electron and photon spread contributions to the radiological penumbra for small monoenergetic x-ray beam (<=2 MeV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Keller, Brian M.

    2009-05-01

    Our team has previously published that submegavoltage photons could significantly improve the radiological penumbra for small size radiation fields. The present work uses Monte Carlo simulation to evaluate the contributions of secondary electrons and photon scatter to the penumbra region for various field sizes (5, 10, 20, and 40 mm in diameters) and for various monoenergetic photon beams (200, 400, 600, 800, 1000, and 2000 keV, and a standard 6 MV beam), minimizing geometrical and transmission penumbra. For field sizes less than 2 cm in diameter, photon scatter is negligible such that the secondary electrons are the main contributor to the radiological penumbra. Reducing the photon beam energy to the submegavoltage range reduces the range of secondary electrons and eventually improves the beam boundary sharpness. Provided that the geometrical penumbra and patient immobilization system are optimized, submegavoltage photon beams with effective photon energies in the 300 to 600 keV range, present significant advantages for multiple beam stereotactic irradiations of tumors less than 2 cm in diameter.

  10. Small photon beam measurements using radiochromic film and Monte Carlo simulations in a water phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Garduno, Olivia A.; Larraga-Gutierrez, Jose M.; Rodriguez-Villafuerte, Mercedes; Martinez-Davalos, Arnulfo; Celis, Miguel A.

    2010-01-01

    This work reports the use of both GafChromic EBT film immersed in a water phantom and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for small photon beam stereotactic radiosurgery dosimetry. Circularly collimated photon beams with diameters in the 4-20 mm range of a dedicated 6 MV linear accelerator (Novalis (registered) , BrainLAB, Germany) were used to perform off-axis ratios, tissue maximum ratios and total scatter factors measurements, and MC simulations. GafChromic EBT film data show an excellent agreement with MC results (<2.7%) for all measured quantities.

  11. Dosimetric properties of germanium doped calcium borate glass subjected to 6 MV and 10 MV X-ray irradiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tengku Kamarul Bahri, T. N. H.; Wagiran, H.; Hussin, R.; Saeed, M. A.; Hossain, I.; Ali, H.

    2014-10-01

    Germanium doped calcium borate glasses are investigated in term of thermoluminescence properties to seek their possibility to use as glass radiation dosimeter. The samples were exposed to 6 MV, and 10 MV photon beams in a dose range of 0.5-4.0 Gy. There is a single and broad thermoluminescence glow curve that exhibits its maximum intensity at about 300 °C. Linear dose response behavior has been found in this dose range for the both photon energies. Effective atomic number, TL sensitivity, and reproducibility have also been studied. It is found that the sensitivity of germanium doped sample at 6 MV is only 1.28% and it is superior to the sensitivity at 10 MV. The reproducibility of germanium doped sample is good with a percentage of relative error less than 10%. The results indicate that this glass has a potential to be used as a radiation dosimetry, especially for application in radiotherapy.

  12. Photon beam position monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzay, Tuncer M.; Shu, Deming

    1995-01-01

    A photon beam position monitor for use in the front end of a beamline of a high heat flux and high energy photon source such as a synchrotron radiation storage ring detects and measures the position and, when a pair of such monitors are used in tandem, the slope of a photon beam emanating from an insertion device such as a wiggler or an undulator inserted in the straight sections of the ring. The photon beam position monitor includes a plurality of spaced blades for precisely locating the photon beam, with each blade comprised of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond with an outer metal coating of a photon sensitive metal such as tungsten, molybdenum, etc., which combination emits electrons when a high energy photon beam is incident upon the blade. Two such monitors are contemplated for use in the front end of the beamline, with the two monitors having vertically and horizontally offset detector blades to avoid blade "shadowing". Provision is made for aligning the detector blades with the photon beam and limiting detector blade temperature during operation.

  13. Characteristic of EBT-XD and EBT3 radiochromic film dosimetry for photon and proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khachonkham, Suphalak; Dreindl, Ralf; Heilemann, Gerd; Lechner, Wolfgang; Fuchs, Hermann; Palmans, Hugo; Georg, Dietmar; Kuess, Peter

    2018-03-01

    Recently, a new type of radiochromic film, the EBT-XD film, has been introduced for high dose radiotherapy. The EBT-XD film contains the same structure as the EBT3 film but has a slightly different composition and a thinner active layer. This study benchmarks the EBT-XD against EBT3 film for 6 MV and 10 MV photon beams, as well as for 97.4 MeV and 148.2 MeV proton beams and 15-100 kV x-rays. Dosimetric and film reading characteristics, such as post irradiation darkening, film orientation effect, lateral response artifact (LRA), film sensitivity, energy and beam quality dependency were investigated. Furthermore, quenching effects in the Bragg peak were investigated for a single proton beam energy for both film types, in addition measurements were performed in a spread-out Bragg peak. EBT-XD films showed the same characteristic on film darkening as EBT3. The effects between portrait and landscape orientation were reduced by 3.1% (in pixel value) for EBT-XD compared to EBT3 at a dose of 2000 cGy. The LRA is reduced for EBT-XD films for all investigated dose ranges. The sensitivity of EBT-XD films is superior to EBT3 for doses higher than 500 cGy. In addition, EBT-XD showed a similar dosimetric response for photon and proton irradiation with low energy and beam quality dependency. A quenching effect of 10% was found for both film types. The slight decrease in the thickness of the active layer and different composition configuration of EBT-XD resulted in a reduced film orientation effect and LRA, as well as a sensitivity increase in high-dose regions for both photon and proton beams. Overall, the EBT-XD film improved regarding film reading characteristics and showed advantages in the high-dose region for photon and proton beams.

  14. Characteristic of EBT-XD and EBT3 radiochromic film dosimetry for photon and proton beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khachonkham, Suphalak; Dreindl, Ralf; Heilemann, Gerd; Lechner, Wolfgang; Fuchs, Hermann; Palmans, Hugo; Georg, Dietmar; Kuess, Peter

    2018-03-15

    Recently, a new type of radiochromic film, the EBT-XD film, has been introduced for high dose radiotherapy. The EBT-XD film contains the same structure as the EBT3 film but has a slightly different composition and a thinner active layer. This study benchmarks the EBT-XD against EBT3 film for 6 MV and 10 MV photon beams, as well as for 97.4 MeV and 148.2 MeV proton beams and 15-100 kV x-rays. Dosimetric and film reading characteristics, such as post irradiation darkening, film orientation effect, lateral response artifact (LRA), film sensitivity, energy and beam quality dependency were investigated. Furthermore, quenching effects in the Bragg peak were investigated for a single proton beam energy for both film types, in addition measurements were performed in a spread-out Bragg peak. EBT-XD films showed the same characteristic on film darkening as EBT3. The effects between portrait and landscape orientation were reduced by 3.1% (in pixel value) for EBT-XD compared to EBT3 at a dose of 2000 cGy. The LRA is reduced for EBT-XD films for all investigated dose ranges. The sensitivity of EBT-XD films is superior to EBT3 for doses higher than 500 cGy. In addition, EBT-XD showed a similar dosimetric response for photon and proton irradiation with low energy and beam quality dependency. A quenching effect of 10% was found for both film types. The slight decrease in the thickness of the active layer and different composition configuration of EBT-XD resulted in a reduced film orientation effect and LRA, as well as a sensitivity increase in high-dose regions for both photon and proton beams. Overall, the EBT-XD film improved regarding film reading characteristics and showed advantages in the high-dose region for photon and proton beams.

  15. Matching extended-SSD electron beams to multileaf collimated photon beams in the treatment of head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steel, Jared; Stewart, Allan; Satory, Philip [Auckland Regional Blood and Cancer Service, Auckland City Hospital, 2 Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 1023 (New Zealand)

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: Matching the penumbra of a 6 MeV electron beam to the penumbra of a 6 MV photon beam is a dose optimization challenge, especially when the electron beam is applied from an extended source-to-surface distance (SSD), as in the case of some head and neck treatments. Traditionally low melting point alloy blocks have been used to define the photon beam shielding over the spinal cord region. However, these are inherently time consuming to construct and employ in the clinical situation. Multileaf collimators (MLCs) provide a fast and reproducible shielding option but generate geometrically nonconformal approximations to the desired beam edge definition. The effects of substituting Cerrobend for the MLC shielding mode in the context of beam matching with extended-SSD electron beams are the subject of this investigation. Methods: Relative dose beam data from a Varian EX 2100 linear accelerator were acquired in a water tank under the 6 MeV electron beam at both standard and extended-SSD and under the 6 MV photon beam defined by Cerrobend and a number of MLC stepping regimes. The effect of increasing the electron beam SSD on the beam penumbra was assessed. MLC stepping was also assessed in terms of the effects on both the mean photon beam penumbra and the intraleaf dose-profile nonuniformity relative to the MLC midleaf. Computational techniques were used to combine the beam data so as to simulate composite relative dosimetry in the water tank, allowing fine control of beam abutment gap variation. Idealized volumetric dosimetry was generated based on the percentage depth-dose data for the beam modes and the abutment geometries involved. Comparison was made between each composite dosimetry dataset and the relevant ideal dosimetry dataset by way of subtraction. Results: Weighted dose-difference volume histograms (DDVHs) were produced, and these, in turn, summed to provide an overall dosimetry score for each abutment and shielding type/angle combination. Increasing the

  16. Matching extended-SSD electron beams to multileaf collimated photon beams in the treatment of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steel, Jared; Stewart, Allan; Satory, Philip

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Matching the penumbra of a 6 MeV electron beam to the penumbra of a 6 MV photon beam is a dose optimization challenge, especially when the electron beam is applied from an extended source-to-surface distance (SSD), as in the case of some head and neck treatments. Traditionally low melting point alloy blocks have been used to define the photon beam shielding over the spinal cord region. However, these are inherently time consuming to construct and employ in the clinical situation. Multileaf collimators (MLCs) provide a fast and reproducible shielding option but generate geometrically nonconformal approximations to the desired beam edge definition. The effects of substituting Cerrobend for the MLC shielding mode in the context of beam matching with extended-SSD electron beams are the subject of this investigation. Methods: Relative dose beam data from a Varian EX 2100 linear accelerator were acquired in a water tank under the 6 MeV electron beam at both standard and extended-SSD and under the 6 MV photon beam defined by Cerrobend and a number of MLC stepping regimes. The effect of increasing the electron beam SSD on the beam penumbra was assessed. MLC stepping was also assessed in terms of the effects on both the mean photon beam penumbra and the intraleaf dose-profile nonuniformity relative to the MLC midleaf. Computational techniques were used to combine the beam data so as to simulate composite relative dosimetry in the water tank, allowing fine control of beam abutment gap variation. Idealized volumetric dosimetry was generated based on the percentage depth-dose data for the beam modes and the abutment geometries involved. Comparison was made between each composite dosimetry dataset and the relevant ideal dosimetry dataset by way of subtraction. Results: Weighted dose-difference volume histograms (DDVHs) were produced, and these, in turn, summed to provide an overall dosimetry score for each abutment and shielding type/angle combination. Increasing the

  17. Matching extended-SSD electron beams to multileaf collimated photon beams in the treatment of head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Jared; Stewart, Allan; Satory, Philip

    2009-09-01

    Matching the penumbra of a 6 MeV electron beam to the penumbra of a 6 MV photon beam is a dose optimization challenge, especially when the electron beam is applied from an extended source-to-surface distance (SSD), as in the case of some head and neck treatments. Traditionally low melting point alloy blocks have been used to define the photon beam shielding over the spinal cord region. However, these are inherently time consuming to construct and employ in the clinical situation. Multileaf collimators (MLCs) provide a fast and reproducible shielding option but generate geometrically nonconformal approximations to the desired beam edge definition. The effects of substituting Cerrobend for the MLC shielding mode in the context of beam matching with extended-SSD electron beams are the subject of this investigation. Relative dose beam data from a Varian EX 2100 linear accelerator were acquired in a water tank under the 6 MeV electron beam at both standard and extended-SSD and under the 6 MV photon beam defined by Cerrobend and a number of MLC stepping regimes. The effect of increasing the electron beam SSD on the beam penumbra was assessed. MLC stepping was also assessed in terms of the effects on both the mean photon beam penumbra and the intraleaf dose-profile nonuniformity relative to the MLC midleaf. Computational techniques were used to combine the beam data so as to simulate composite relative dosimetry in the water tank, allowing fine control of beam abutment gap variation. Idealized volumetric dosimetry was generated based on the percentage depth-dose data for the beam modes and the abutment geometries involved. Comparison was made between each composite dosimetry dataset and the relevant ideal dosimetry dataset by way of subtraction. Weighted dose-difference volume histograms (DDVHs) were produced, and these, in turn, summed to provide an overall dosimetry score for each abutment and shielding type/angle combination. Increasing the electron beam SSD increased

  18. Photonuclear processes in the treatment room and patient during radiation therapy with 50 MV photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudowska, Irena [Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics

    1997-10-01

    The objectives of this project were to determine the level of photoneutron radiation around the MM50 Racetrack Microtron at Karolinska Hospital, operating in different modes and to evaluate the photonuclear absorbed dose to the treated volume during therapy with a 50 MV photon beam. The photoneutron radiation has been studied both using a {sup 235}U fission chamber and by computer simulation. The estimated neutron equivalent dose due to accelerator produced neutrons delivered to the tissues inside and outside the treatment volume do not exceed the recommended values. However, there is a potential risk that the sensitive tissues (lens of the eye and gonads), outside the treatment volume, can receive a dose of about 300-500 mSv per photon treatment course of 60 Gy with a slight increase for secondary malignancies. 47 refs, 15 figs, 6 tabs.

  19. Photonuclear processes in the treatment room and patient during radiation therapy with 50 MV photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudowska, Irena

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of this project were to determine the level of photoneutron radiation around the MM50 Racetrack Microtron at Karolinska Hospital, operating in different modes and to evaluate the photonuclear absorbed dose to the treated volume during therapy with a 50 MV photon beam. The photoneutron radiation has been studied both using a 235 U fission chamber and by computer simulation. The estimated neutron equivalent dose due to accelerator produced neutrons delivered to the tissues inside and outside the treatment volume do not exceed the recommended values. However, there is a potential risk that the sensitive tissues (lens of the eye and gonads), outside the treatment volume, can receive a dose of about 300-500 mSv per photon treatment course of 60 Gy with a slight increase for secondary malignancies. 47 refs, 15 figs, 6 tabs

  20. Fast IMRT with narrow high energy scanned photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreassen, Bjoern; Straaring t, Sara Janek; Holmberg, Rickard; Naefstadius, Peder; Brahme, Anders [Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, P.O. Box 260, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Hospital Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, P.O. Box 260, SE-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden and Department of Hospital Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: Since the first publications on intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the early 1980s almost all efforts have been focused on fairly time consuming dynamic or segmental multileaf collimation. With narrow fast scanned photon beams, the flexibility and accuracy in beam shaping increases, not least in combination with fast penumbra trimming multileaf collimators. Previously, experiments have been performed with full range targets, generating a broad bremsstrahlung beam, in combination with multileaf collimators or material compensators. In the present publication, the first measurements with fast narrow high energy (50 MV) scanned photon beams are presented indicating an interesting performance increase even though some of the hardware used were suboptimal. Methods: Inverse therapy planning was used to calculate optimal scanning patterns to generate dose distributions with interesting properties for fast IMRT. To fully utilize the dose distributional advantages with scanned beams, it is necessary to use narrow high energy beams from a thin bremsstrahlung target and a powerful purging magnet capable of deflecting the transmitted electron beam away from the generated photons onto a dedicated electron collector. During the present measurements the scanning system, purging magnet, and electron collimator in the treatment head of the MM50 racetrack accelerator was used with 3-6 mm thick bremsstrahlung targets of beryllium. The dose distributions were measured with diodes in water and with EDR2 film in PMMA. Monte Carlo simulations with geant4 were used to study the influence of the electrons transmitted through the target on the photon pencil beam kernel. Results: The full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the scanned photon beam was 34 mm measured at isocenter, below 9.5 cm of water, 1 m from the 3 mm Be bremsstrahlung target. To generate a homogeneous dose distribution in a 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} field, the authors used a spot matrix of 100 equal intensity

  1. SU-E-T-238: Deriving Electron Contamination Spectra From Pure and Clinical Photon Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smit, C; Plessis, F du

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To extract the electron contamination energy spectra for an Elekta Precise Linac, based on pure photon and measured clinical beam percentage depth dose data. And to include this as an additional source in isource 4 in DOSXYZnrc. Methods: A pure photon beam was simulated for the Linac using isource 4 in the DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo (MC) code. Percentage depth dose (PDD) data were extracted afterwards for a range of field sizes (FS). These simulated dose data were compared to actual measured dose PDD data, with the data normalized at 10 cm depth. The resulting PDD data resembled the electron contamination depth dose. Since the dose fall-off is a strictly decreasing function, a method was adopted to derive the contamination electron spectrum. Afterwards this spectrum was used in a DOSXYZnrc MC simulation run to verify that the original electron depth dose could be replicated. Results: Various square aperture FS’s for 6, 8 and 15 megavolt (MV) photon beams were modeled, simulated and compared to their respective actual measured PDD data. As FS increased, simulated pure photon depth-dose profiles shifted deeper, thus requiring electron contamination to increase the surface dose. The percentage of electron weight increased with increase in FS. For a FS of 15×15 cm 2 , the percentage electron weight is 0.1%, 0.2% and 0.4% for 6, 8 and 15 MV beams respectively. Conclusion: From the PDD results obtained, an additional electron contamination source was added to the photon source model so that simulation and measured PDD data could match within 2 % / 2 mm gamma-index criteria. The improved source model could assure more accurate simulations of surface doses. This research project was funded by the South African Medical Research Council (MRC) with funds from National Treasury under its Economic Competitiveness and Support package

  2. SU-E-T-238: Deriving Electron Contamination Spectra From Pure and Clinical Photon Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smit, C; Plessis, F du [University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, Free State (South Africa)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To extract the electron contamination energy spectra for an Elekta Precise Linac, based on pure photon and measured clinical beam percentage depth dose data. And to include this as an additional source in isource 4 in DOSXYZnrc. Methods: A pure photon beam was simulated for the Linac using isource 4 in the DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo (MC) code. Percentage depth dose (PDD) data were extracted afterwards for a range of field sizes (FS). These simulated dose data were compared to actual measured dose PDD data, with the data normalized at 10 cm depth. The resulting PDD data resembled the electron contamination depth dose. Since the dose fall-off is a strictly decreasing function, a method was adopted to derive the contamination electron spectrum. Afterwards this spectrum was used in a DOSXYZnrc MC simulation run to verify that the original electron depth dose could be replicated. Results: Various square aperture FS’s for 6, 8 and 15 megavolt (MV) photon beams were modeled, simulated and compared to their respective actual measured PDD data. As FS increased, simulated pure photon depth-dose profiles shifted deeper, thus requiring electron contamination to increase the surface dose. The percentage of electron weight increased with increase in FS. For a FS of 15×15 cm{sup 2}, the percentage electron weight is 0.1%, 0.2% and 0.4% for 6, 8 and 15 MV beams respectively. Conclusion: From the PDD results obtained, an additional electron contamination source was added to the photon source model so that simulation and measured PDD data could match within 2 % / 2 mm gamma-index criteria. The improved source model could assure more accurate simulations of surface doses. This research project was funded by the South African Medical Research Council (MRC) with funds from National Treasury under its Economic Competitiveness and Support package.

  3. The use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy photon beams for improving the dose uniformity of electron beams shaped with MLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosalaei, Homeira; Karnas, Scott; Shah, Sheel; Van Doodewaard, Sharon; Foster, Tim; Chen, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Electrons are ideal for treating shallow tumors and sparing adjacent normal tissue. Conventionally, electron beams are collimated by cut-outs that are time-consuming to make and difficult to adapt to tumor shape throughout the course of treatment. We propose that electron cut-outs can be replaced using photon multileaf collimator (MLC). Two major problems of this approach are that the scattering of electrons causes penumbra widening because of a large air gap, and available commercial treatment planning systems (TPSs) do not support MLC-collimated electron beams. In this study, these difficulties were overcome by (1) modeling electron beams collimated by photon MLC for a commercial TPS, and (2) developing a technique to reduce electron beam penumbra by adding low-energy intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) photons (4 MV). We used blocks to simulate MLC shielding in the TPS. Inverse planning was used to optimize boost photon beams. This technique was applied to a parotid and a central nervous system (CNS) clinical case. Combined photon and electron plans were compared with conventional plans and verified using ion chamber, film, and a 2D diode array. Our studies showed that the beam penumbra for mixed beams with 90 cm source to surface distance (SSD) is comparable with electron applicators and cut-outs at 100 cm SSD. Our mixed-beam technique yielded more uniform dose to the planning target volume and lower doses to various organs at risk for both parotid and CNS clinical cases. The plans were verified with measurements, with more than 95% points passing the gamma criteria of 5% in dose difference and 5 mm for distance to agreement. In conclusion, the study has demonstrated the feasibility and potential advantage of using photon MLC to collimate electron beams with boost photon IMRT fields. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Equivalent (uniform) square field sizes of flattening filter free photon beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Wolfgang; Kuess, Peter; Georg, Dietmar; Palmans, Hugo

    2017-10-01

    Various types of treatment units, such as CyberKnife, TomoTherapy and C-arm linear accelerators (LINACs) are operated using flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams. Their reference dosimetry, however, is currently based on codes of practice that provide data which were primarily developed and tested for high-energy photon beams with flattening filter (WFF). The aim of this work was to introduce equivalent uniform square field sizes of FFF beams to serve as a basis of a unified reference dosimetry procedure applicable to all aforementioned FFF machines. For this purpose, in-house determined experimental data together with published data of the ratio of doses at depths of 20 cm and 10 cm in water (D 20,10) were used to characterize the depth dose distribution of 6 and 10 MV WFF and FFF beams. These data were analyzed for field sizes ranging from 2  ×  2 cm2 to 40  ×  40 cm2. A scatter function that takes the lateral profiles of the individual beams into account was fitted to the experimental data. The lateral profiles of the WFF beams were assumed to be uniform, while those of the FFF beams were approximated using fourth or sixth order polynomials. The scatter functions of the FFF beams were recalculated using a uniform lateral profile (the same as the physical profile of the WFF beams), and are henceforth denoted as virtual uniform FFF beams (VUFFF). The field sizes of the VUFFF beams having the same scatter contribution as the corresponding FFF beams at a given field size were defined as the equivalent uniform square field (EQUSF) size. Data from four different LINACs with 18 different beams in total, as well as a CyberKnife beam, were analyzed. The average values of EQUSFs over all investigated LINACs of the conventional 10  ×  10 cm2 reference fields of 6 MV and 10 MV FFF beams for C-arm LINACs and machine-specific reference fields for CyberKnife and TomoTherapy were 9.5 cm, 9 cm, 5.0 cm and 6.5 cm respectively. The

  5. MCMEG: Simulations of both PDD and TPR for 6 MV LINAC photon beam using different MC codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, T. C. F.; Mendes, B. M.; Lacerda, M. A. S.; Silva, L. A. C.; Paixão, L.; Bastos, F. M.; Ramirez, J. V.; Junior, J. P. R.

    2017-11-01

    The Monte Carlo Modelling Expert Group (MCMEG) is an expert network specializing in Monte Carlo radiation transport and the modelling and simulation applied to the radiation protection and dosimetry research field. For the first inter-comparison task the group launched an exercise to model and simulate a 6 MV LINAC photon beam using the Monte Carlo codes available within their laboratories and validate their simulated results by comparing them with experimental measurements carried out in the National Cancer Institute (INCA) in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The experimental measurements were performed using an ionization chamber with calibration traceable to a Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL). The detector was immersed in a water phantom at different depths and was irradiated with a radiation field size of 10×10 cm2. This exposure setup was used to determine the dosimetric parameters Percentage Depth Dose (PDD) and Tissue Phantom Ratio (TPR). The validation process compares the MC calculated results to the experimental measured PDD20,10 and TPR20,10. Simulations were performed reproducing the experimental TPR20,10 quality index which provides a satisfactory description of both the PDD curve and the transverse profiles at the two depths measured. This paper reports in detail the modelling process using MCNPx, MCNP6, EGSnrc and Penelope Monte Carlo codes, the source and tally descriptions, the validation processes and the results.

  6. A method for photon beam Monte Carlo multileaf collimator particle transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebers, Jeffrey V.; Keall, Paul J.; Kim, Jong Oh; Mohan, Radhe

    2002-09-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) algorithms are recognized as the most accurate methodology for patient dose assessment. For intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivered with dynamic multileaf collimators (DMLCs), accurate dose calculation, even with MC, is challenging. Accurate IMRT MC dose calculations require inclusion of the moving MLC in the MC simulation. Due to its complex geometry, full transport through the MLC can be time consuming. The aim of this work was to develop an MLC model for photon beam MC IMRT dose computations. The basis of the MC MLC model is that the complex MLC geometry can be separated into simple geometric regions, each of which readily lends itself to simplified radiation transport. For photons, only attenuation and first Compton scatter interactions are considered. The amount of attenuation material an individual particle encounters while traversing the entire MLC is determined by adding the individual amounts from each of the simplified geometric regions. Compton scatter is sampled based upon the total thickness traversed. Pair production and electron interactions (scattering and bremsstrahlung) within the MLC are ignored. The MLC model was tested for 6 MV and 18 MV photon beams by comparing it with measurements and MC simulations that incorporate the full physics and geometry for fields blocked by the MLC and with measurements for fields with the maximum possible tongue-and-groove and tongue-or-groove effects, for static test cases and for sliding windows of various widths. The MLC model predicts the field size dependence of the MLC leakage radiation within 0.1% of the open-field dose. The entrance dose and beam hardening behind a closed MLC are predicted within +/-1% or 1 mm. Dose undulations due to differences in inter- and intra-leaf leakage are also correctly predicted. The MC MLC model predicts leaf-edge tongue-and-groove dose effect within +/-1% or 1 mm for 95% of the points compared at 6 MV and 88% of the points compared at 18 MV

  7. A method for photon beam Monte Carlo multileaf collimator particle transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siebers, Jeffrey V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Virginia Hospitals, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)]. E-mail: jsiebers@vcu.edu; Keall, Paul J.; Kim, Jong Oh; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Virginia Hospitals, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)

    2002-09-07

    Monte Carlo (MC) algorithms are recognized as the most accurate methodology for patient dose assessment. For intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivered with dynamic multileaf collimators (DMLCs), accurate dose calculation, even with MC, is challenging. Accurate IMRT MC dose calculations require inclusion of the moving MLC in the MC simulation. Due to its complex geometry, full transport through the MLC can be time consuming. The aim of this work was to develop an MLC model for photon beam MC IMRT dose computations. The basis of the MC MLC model is that the complex MLC geometry can be separated into simple geometric regions, each of which readily lends itself to simplified radiation transport. For photons, only attenuation and first Compton scatter interactions are considered. The amount of attenuation material an individual particle encounters while traversing the entire MLC is determined by adding the individual amounts from each of the simplified geometric regions. Compton scatter is sampled based upon the total thickness traversed. Pair production and electron interactions (scattering and bremsstrahlung) within the MLC are ignored. The MLC model was tested for 6 MV and 18 MV photon beams by comparing it with measurements and MC simulations that incorporate the full physics and geometry for fields blocked by the MLC and with measurements for fields with the maximum possible tongue-and-groove and tongue-or-groove effects, for static test cases and for sliding windows of various widths. The MLC model predicts the field size dependence of the MLC leakage radiation within 0.1% of the open-field dose. The entrance dose and beam hardening behind a closed MLC are predicted within {+-}1% or 1 mm. Dose undulations due to differences in inter- and intra-leaf leakage are also correctly predicted. The MC MLC model predicts leaf-edge tongue-and-groove dose effect within {+-}1% or 1 mm for 95% of the points compared at 6 MV and 88% of the points compared at 18 MV

  8. Photons and photoneutrons spectra of a Linac of 15 MV; Espectros de fotones y fotoneutrones de un LINAC de 15 MV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benites R, J. L.; Carrillo C, A. [Centro Estatal de Cancerologia de Nayarit, Av. Enfermeria, Fracc. Fray Junipero Serra, 63000 Tepic, Nayarit (Mexico); Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Velazquez F, J. B., E-mail: jlbenitesr@prodigy.net.mx [Universidad Autonoma de Nayarit, Posgrado CBAP, Carretera Tepic Compostela Km. 9, Xalisco, Nayarit (Mexico)

    2011-10-15

    Using the Monte Carlo code MCNP-5, the photons and photoneutrons spectra generated in the head stock of the lineal accelerator (Linac) Varian of 15 MV of the Cancerology State of Nayarit were determined. For the calculations a heterogeneous head stock was modeled, more compatible with the work conditions. In the center of the head stock a tungsten target was located on a copper support, followed by the flattened filter. The photons and photoneutrons spectra were obtained accelerating electrons and making them collide against the target to produce photons by Bremsstrahlung, these photons were transported inside the head stock and the photons and photoneutrons spectra were calculated in a punctual detector located under the flattened filter and in the isocenter. The spectra were evaluated in punctual detectors that were located in the plane from the isocenter to the long of the X and Y axes each 20 cm, in an equidistant way, up to 2 m, so much in the longitudinal and transversal axes. In the calculations were used histories 5E(6) with the purpose of obtaining smaller uncertainties to 1%. It was found that the photons spectrum in the punctual detector inside the head stock presents a pick of 1.25 MeV in the energy interval of 0.5 and 1.5 MeV, later suffers a filtration and diminishes in asymptote form. This spectrum modifies when the beam reaches the isocenter, diminishing the low energy photons. Inside the head stock the photoneutrons spectrum shows a structure with two picks, one before 1 MeV and other after 1 MeV; this is for effect of the collimators geometry and the distance. Finally an increment of the total neutrons flow to 60 cm of distance of the isocenter on the Y axis was observed, due to the design geometry of the modeling heterogeneous head stock. (Author)

  9. Gold nanoparticle induced vasculature damage in radiotherapy: Comparing protons, megavoltage photons, and kilovoltage photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yuting, E-mail: yutingl188@gmail.com; Paganetti, Harald; Schuemann, Jan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); McMahon, Stephen J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 and Center for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen’s University Belfast, 97 Lisburn Road, Belfast BT97AE, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to investigate the radiosensitizing effect of gold nanoparticle (GNP) induced vasculature damage for proton, megavoltage (MV) photon, and kilovoltage (kV) photon irradiation. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were carried out using tool for particle simulation (TOPAS) to obtain the spatial dose distribution in close proximity up to 20 μm from the GNPs. The spatial dose distribution from GNPs was used as an input to calculate the dose deposited to the blood vessels. GNP induced vasculature damage was evaluated for three particle sources (a clinical spread out Bragg peak proton beam, a 6 MV photon beam, and two kV photon beams). For each particle source, various depths in tissue, GNP sizes (2, 10, and 20 nm diameter), and vessel diameters (8, 14, and 20 μm) were investigated. Two GNP distributions in lumen were considered, either homogeneously distributed in the vessel or attached to the inner wall of the vessel. Doses of 30 Gy and 2 Gy were considered, representing typical in vivo enhancement studies and conventional clinical fractionation, respectively. Results: These simulations showed that for 20 Au-mg/g GNP blood concentration homogeneously distributed in the vessel, the additional dose at the inner vascular wall encircling the lumen was 43% of the prescribed dose at the depth of treatment for the 250 kVp photon source, 1% for the 6 MV photon source, and 0.1% for the proton beam. For kV photons, GNPs caused 15% more dose in the vascular wall for 150 kVp source than for 250 kVp. For 6 MV photons, GNPs caused 0.2% more dose in the vascular wall at 20 cm depth in water as compared to at depth of maximum dose (Dmax). For proton therapy, GNPs caused the same dose in the vascular wall for all depths across the spread out Bragg peak with 12.7 cm range and 7 cm modulation. For the same weight of GNPs in the vessel, 2 nm diameter GNPs caused three times more damage to the vessel than 20 nm diameter GNPs. When the GNPs were attached

  10. Dosimetric comparison between proton and photon beams in the moving gap region in cranio-spinal irradiation (CSI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Chee-Wai; Das, Indra J.; Zhao, Li; Wolanski, Mark; Johnstone, Peter A.S.; Buchsbaum, Jeffrey C. [IU Health Proton Therapy Center, Bloomington (United States); Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Indiana Univ. School of Medicine, Indianapolis (United States)], e-mail: ccheng1@iuhealth.org; Srivastava, Shiv P. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Indiana Univ. School of Medicine, Indianapolis (United States); Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Reid Hospital, Richmond (United States); Simmons, Joseph [IU Health Proton Therapy Center, Bloomington (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: To investigate the moving gap region dosimetry in proton beam cranio-spinal irradiation (CSI) to provide optimal dose uniformity across the treatment volume. Material and methods: Proton beams of ranges 11.6 cm and 16 cm are used for the spine and the brain fields, respectively. Beam profiles for a 30 cm snout are first matched at the 50% level (hot match) on the computer. Feathering is simulated by shifting the dose profiles by a known distance two successive times to simulate a 2 x feathering scheme. The process is repeated for 2 mm and 4 mm gaps. Similar procedures are used to determine the dose profiles in the moving gap for a series of gap widths, 0-10 mm, and feathering step sizes, 4-10 mm, for a Varian iX 6MV beam. The proton and photon dose profiles in the moving gap region are compared. Results: The dose profiles in the moving gap exhibit valleys and peaks in both proton and photon beam CSI. The dose in the moving gap for protons is around 100% or higher for 0 mm gap, for both 5 and 10 mm feathering step sizes. When the field gap is comparable or larger than the penumbra, dose minima as low as 66% is obtained. The dosimetric characteristics for 6 MV photon beams can be made similar to those of the protons by appropriately combining gap width and feathering step size. Conclusion: The dose in the moving gap region is determined by the lateral penumbras, the width of the gap and the feathering step size. The dose decreases with increasing gap width or decreasing feathering step size. The dosimetric characteristics are similar for photon and proton beams. However, proton CSI has virtually no exit dose and is beneficial for pediatric patients, whereas with photon beams the whole lung and abdomen receive non-negligible exit dose.

  11. Determining clinical photon beam spectra from measured depth dose with the Cimmino algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloch, P.; Altschuler, M.D.; Bjaerngard, B.E.; Kassaee, A.; McDonough, J.

    2000-01-01

    A method to determine the spectrum of a clinical photon beam from measured depth-dose data is described. At shallow depths, where the range of Compton-generated electrons increases rapidly with photon energy, the depth dose provides the information to discriminate the spectral contributions. To minimize the influence of contaminating electrons, small (6x6cm2 ) fields were used. The measured depth dose is represented as a linear combination of basis functions, namely the depth doses of monoenergetic photon beams derived by Monte Carlo simulations. The weights of the basis functions were obtained with the Cimmino feasibility algorithm, which examines in each iteration the discrepancy between predicted and measured depth dose. For 6 and 15 MV photon beams of a clinical accelerator, the depth dose obtained from the derived spectral weights was within about 1% of the measured depth dose at all depths. Because the problem is ill conditioned, solutions for the spectrum can fluctuate with energy. Physically realistic smooth spectra for these photon beams appeared when a small margin (about ±1%) was attributed to the measured depth dose. The maximum energy of both derived spectra agreed with the measured energy of the electrons striking the target to within 1 MeV. The use of a feasibility method on minimally relaxed constraints provides realistic spectra quickly and interactively. (author)

  12. Generation of virtual monochromatic CBCT from dual kV/MV beam projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Hao; Liu, Bo; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a novel on-board imaging technique which allows generation of virtual monochromatic (VM) cone-beam CT (CBCT) with a selected energy from combined kilovoltage (kV)/megavoltage (MV) beam projections. Methods: With the current orthogonal kV/MV imaging hardware equipped in modern linear accelerators, both MV projections (from gantry angle of 0°–100°) and kV projections (90°–200°) were acquired as gantry rotated a total of 110°. A selected range of overlap projections between 90° to 100° were then decomposed into two material projections using experimentally determined parameters from orthogonally stacked aluminum and acrylic step-wedges. Given attenuation coefficients of aluminum and acrylic at a predetermined energy, one set of VM projections could be synthesized from two corresponding sets of decomposed projections. Two linear functions were generated using projection information at overlap angles to convert kV and MV projections at nonoverlap angles to approximate VM projections for CBCT reconstruction. The contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were calculated for different inserts in VM CBCTs of a CatPhan phantom with various selected energies and compared with those in kV and MV CBCTs. The effect of overlap projection number on CNR was evaluated. Additionally, the effect of beam orientation was studied by scanning the CatPhan sandwiched with two 5 cm solid-water phantoms on both lateral sides and an electronic density phantom with two metal bolt inserts. Results: Proper selection of VM energy [30 and 40 keV for low-density polyethylene (LDPE), polymethylpentene, 2 MeV for Delrin] provided comparable or even better CNR results as compared with kV or MV CBCT. An increased number of overlap kV and MV projection demonstrated only marginal improvements of CNR for different inserts (with the exception of LDPE) and therefore one projection overlap was found to be sufficient for the CatPhan study. It was also evident that the optimal CBCT image

  13. Output calibration in solid water for high energy photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reft, C.S.

    1989-01-01

    The AAPM Protocol recommends the use of water, polystyrene or acrylic media for measuring the output of high energy photon beams. It provides the appropriate restricted mass stopping powers and mass energy absorption coefficients for converting the dose to these media to dose to water. A water-equivalent solid has been developed for dosimetric applications. [C. Constantinou, F. Attix, and B. Paliwal, Med. Phys. 9, 436 (1982)]. Calculated values for the restricted mass stopping powers and mass energy absorption coefficients have been published for this material. [A. Ho and B. Paliwal, Med. Phys. 13, 403 (1986)]. The accuracy of these calculations was investigated by making output measurements, following the Protocol, with a Farmer type chamber in four materials for Co-60, 4, 6, 10, 18, and 24 MV photon beams. The results show that the scaled dose to water for the different media agree to better than 1%, and the analysis supports the methodology of the Protocol for obtaining the dose to water from the different media

  14. Beam profile monitors for a tagged photon beam facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arends, J.; Breuer, M.; Dahmen, H.D.; Detemple, P.; Schneider, W.; Urban, D.; Zucht, B.

    1991-01-01

    A beam profile monitor for electron and photon beams is described, which operates at the low intensities encountered in a tagged bremsstrahlung beam environment, typically 10 10 electrons/s and 10 7 photons/s. The method is based on a wire scanner and utilizes the presence of a tagging spectrometer. The accuracy of the measurements can be tuned in a wide range to meet the requirements set by the actual beam parameters. Examples of measured electron and photon beam profiles at the tagged photon beam of the PHOENICS experiment at the electron stretcher ring ELSA in Bonn are given. (orig.)

  15. Simulation study of the photon quality correction factors of ionization chambers for FiR 1 epithermal neutron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koivunoro, H.; Uusi-Simola, J.; Savolainen, S.; Kotiluoto, P.; Auterinen, I.; Kosunen, A.

    2006-01-01

    At FiR 1 BNCT facility in Finland, neutron-insensitive Mg(Ar) ionization chambers are used for photon dose measurements in an epithermal neutron beam. Previously, photon sensitivity factors for the chamber for the measurements in a water phantom in FiR 1 beam have been determined experimentally from measurements in 60 Co gamma and in a 6 MV clinical accelerator photon beams. However, the response of the ionization chamber in a water phantom depends on energy spectrum and angle of the photons and the secondary electrons created inside the phantom and may differ depending on type of the irradiation source (accelerator vs. an epithermal neutron beam). Also, the experimental sensitivity factor does not take into account the possible perturbations in the photon production in phantom caused by the ionization chamber materials. Therefore, it is necessary to determine the photon quality correction factors (k Qγ ) for the Mg(Ar) chamber at the FiR 1 beam through computer simulations. In this study, the k Qγ factors have been determined for Mg(Ar) chamber from Monte Carlo calculations of absorbed photon dose at two depths in a water phantom using MCNP code. The k qγ factors obtained with this method are compared to the sensitivity factors determined with measurements in an accelerator photon beam and to the k Qγ factors published previously. (author)

  16. Design and simulation of a short, variable-energy 4 to 10 MV S-band linear accelerator waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, Devin; Fallone, B Gino; Steciw, Stephen

    2017-06-01

    To modify a previously designed, short, 10 MV linac waveguide, so that it can produce any energy from 4 to 10 MV. The modified waveguide is designed to be a drop-in replacement for the 6 MV waveguide used in the author's current linear accelerator-magnetic resonance imager (Linac-MR). Using our group's previously designed short 10 MV linac as a starting point, the port was moved to the fourth cavity, the shift to the first coupling cavity was removed and a tuning cylinder added to the first coupling cavity. Each cavity was retuned using finite element method (FEM) simulations to resonate at the desired frequency. FEM simulations were used to determine the RF field distributions for various tuning cylinder depths, and electron trajectories were computed using a particle-in-cell model to determine the required RF power level and tuning cylinder depth to produce electron energy distributions for 4, 6, 8, and 10 MV photon beams. Monte Carlo simulations were then used to compare the depth dose profiles with those produced by published electron beam characteristics for Varian linacs. For each desired photon energy, the electron beam energy was within 0.5% of the target mean energy, the depth of maximum dose was within 1.5 mm of that produced by the Varian linac, and the ratio of dose at 10 cm depth to 20 cm depth was within 1%. A new 27.5 cm linear accelerator waveguide design capable of producing any photon energy between 4 and 10 MV has been simulated, however coupling port design and the implications of increased electron beam current at 10 MV remain to be investigated. For the specific cases of 4, 6, and 10 MV, this linac produces depth dose profiles similar to those produced by published spectra for Varian linacs. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  17. Dosimetric properties of germanium doped calcium borate glass subjected to 6 MV and 10 MV X-ray irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tengku Kamarul Bahri, T.N.H., E-mail: tnhidayah2@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Johor Bahru (Malaysia); Wagiran, H.; Hussin, R.; Saeed, M.A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Johor Bahru (Malaysia); Hossain, I. [Department of Physics, College of Science and Arts, King Abdul Aziz University, 21911 Rabigh (Saudi Arabia); Ali, H. [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Hospital Sultan Ismail, 81100 Johor Bahru (Malaysia)

    2014-10-01

    Highlights: •The TL properties of 29.9CaO–70B{sub 2}O{sub 3}: 0.1GeO{sub 2} glass has been investigated. •We exposed glass samples to 6 MV and 10 MV in a dose range of 0.5–4.0 Gy. •This glass has a potential material to be used for application in radiotherapy. -- Abstract: Germanium doped calcium borate glasses are investigated in term of thermoluminescence properties to seek their possibility to use as glass radiation dosimeter. The samples were exposed to 6 MV, and 10 MV photon beams in a dose range of 0.5–4.0 Gy. There is a single and broad thermoluminescence glow curve that exhibits its maximum intensity at about 300 °C. Linear dose response behavior has been found in this dose range for the both photon energies. Effective atomic number, TL sensitivity, and reproducibility have also been studied. It is found that the sensitivity of germanium doped sample at 6 MV is only 1.28% and it is superior to the sensitivity at 10 MV. The reproducibility of germanium doped sample is good with a percentage of relative error less than 10%. The results indicate that this glass has a potential to be used as a radiation dosimetry, especially for application in radiotherapy.

  18. Dosimetric properties of germanium doped calcium borate glass subjected to 6 MV and 10 MV X-ray irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tengku Kamarul Bahri, T.N.H.; Wagiran, H.; Hussin, R.; Saeed, M.A.; Hossain, I.; Ali, H.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •The TL properties of 29.9CaO–70B 2 O 3 : 0.1GeO 2 glass has been investigated. •We exposed glass samples to 6 MV and 10 MV in a dose range of 0.5–4.0 Gy. •This glass has a potential material to be used for application in radiotherapy. -- Abstract: Germanium doped calcium borate glasses are investigated in term of thermoluminescence properties to seek their possibility to use as glass radiation dosimeter. The samples were exposed to 6 MV, and 10 MV photon beams in a dose range of 0.5–4.0 Gy. There is a single and broad thermoluminescence glow curve that exhibits its maximum intensity at about 300 °C. Linear dose response behavior has been found in this dose range for the both photon energies. Effective atomic number, TL sensitivity, and reproducibility have also been studied. It is found that the sensitivity of germanium doped sample at 6 MV is only 1.28% and it is superior to the sensitivity at 10 MV. The reproducibility of germanium doped sample is good with a percentage of relative error less than 10%. The results indicate that this glass has a potential to be used as a radiation dosimetry, especially for application in radiotherapy

  19. A beam profile monitor for a tagged photon beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arends, J.; Breuer, M.; Dahmen, H.D.; Detemple, P.; Noeldeke, G.; Schneider, W.; Zucht, B.

    1990-10-01

    A beam profile monitor for electron and photon beams is described, which operates at the low intensities encountered in a tagged bremsstrahlung beam environment, typically 10 10 electrons/s and 10 7 photons/s. The method is based on a wire scanner and utilizes the presence of a tagging spectrometer. The accuracy of the measurements can be tuned in a wide range (at the expense of measuring time) to meet the requirements set by the actual beam size. Examples of measured electron and photon beam profiles at the tagged photon beam of the PHOENICS experiment at the electron stretcher ring ELSA are given. (orig.)

  20. A beam profile monitor for a tagged photon beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arends, J.; Breuer, M.; Dahmen, H.D.; Detemple, P.; Noeldeke, G.; Schneider, W.; Zucht, B.

    1990-10-01

    A beam profile monitor for electron and photon beams is described, which operates at the low intensities encountered in a tagged bremsstrahlung beam environment, typically 10{sup 10} electrons/s and 10{sup 7} photons/s. The method is based on a wire scanner and utilizes the presence of a tagging spectrometer. The accuracy of the measurements can be tuned in a wide range (at the expense of measuring time) to meet the requirements set by the actual beam size. Examples of measured electron and photon beam profiles at the tagged photon beam of the PHOENICS experiment at the electron stretcher ring ELSA are given. (orig.).

  1. Improved dose localization with dual energy photon irradiation in treatment of lateralized intracranial malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooley, G.; Gillin, M.T.; Murray, K.J.; Wilson, J.F.; Janjan, N.A.

    1991-01-01

    Dual energy photon irradiation (6 MV and 20 MV) was compared to conventional treatment planning with 6 MV photons in a lateralized intracranial malignancy. Dose volume analysis was performed of both the tumor plus a 2 cm margin (target volume, TV) and normal tissues (NT). Parallel opposed treatment using weightings of 1:1, 1.5:1, and 2:1 were compared for 6 MV photons alone or in combination with 20 MV photons. Uniform treatment of the TV was accomplished within the 60 Gy isodose. Significant differences were observed, however, in NT volumes receiving greater than or equal to 60 Gy and 45-59 Gy. Dual photon energy reduced treatment of NT volumes to greater than or equal to 60 Gy by 13% (177 cm3 vs 204 cm3 in 2:1 weighting) to 70% (147 cm3 vs 498 cm3 in 1:1 weighting) for comparable plans. Dose optimization was also performed for both 6 MV alone or in combination with 20 MV photons. Usual approaches to achieve dose lateralization with conventional isocentric techniques were applied including parallel opposed 6 MV photons ipsilaterally weighted 3.4:1 (POP), and a 110 degrees arc rotational field used to limit treatment to the eye (ARC). Dual energy photon optimized plans included a three beam parallel opposed plan (TOP) and a mixed photon ipsilateral (IPSI) approach. The technique using parallel opposed 20 MV photons and ipsilateral 6 MV photons (TOP) used beam weightings of 1.1 (contralateral 20 MVX): 1.6 (ipsilateral 6 MVX): 1 (ipsilateral 20 MVX) to achieve dose optimization. The ipsilateral approach with 6 MVX and 20 MVX (IPSI) used beam weightings of 1:1.4, respectively. All optimized plans demonstrated a 41% (120 cm3; POP) to 53% (95 cm3; TOP) improvement over parallel opposed 6 MV photons weighted 2:1 (204 cm3) in NT volume receiving greater than or equal to 60 Gy

  2. Study of air cavities influence in head and neck radiotherapy with 10 MV photon beam; Estudo da influencia de cavidades de ar em radioterapia de cabeca e pescoco com feixe de fotons de 10 MV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, C.N. de

    1989-03-01

    This is a study about dose distribution in the larynx region under irradiation with a 10 MV photon beam. This localization presents air cavities, that can compromise the dose at air-tissue interfaces by electronic equilibrium loss and backscattering lack. For this study, a parallel ionization chamber was used in the air cavities simulated with a perspex phantom. The influence of the air cavities in the proximal, distal and lateral interfaces was analysed. The results showed a expressive loss of dose at the air-tissue interface. For typical irradiation field and anatomic cavity, under dose values of 4% in the proximal interface, 11% in the distal interface and 7% in the lateral interface were found. Irradiation field larger than 6 X 6 cm{sup 2} were optimal in reducing the total effect of under dosing at the interface. (author). 39 refs, 23 figs, 12 tabs.

  3. Liquid scintillator for 2D dosimetry for high-energy photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poenisch, Falk; Archambault, Louis; Briere, Tina Marie; Sahoo, Narayan; Mohan, Radhe; Beddar, Sam; Gillin, Michael T.

    2009-01-01

    Complex radiation therapy techniques require dosimetric verification of treatment planning and delivery. The authors investigated a liquid scintillator (LS) system for application for real-time high-energy photon beam dosimetry. The system was comprised of a transparent acrylic tank filled with liquid scintillating material, an opaque outer tank, and a CCD camera. A series of images was acquired when the tank with liquid scintillator was irradiated with a 6 MV photon beam, and the light data measured with the CCD camera were filtered to correct for scattering of the optical light inside the liquid scintillator. Depth-dose and lateral profiles as well as two-dimensional (2D) dose distributions were found to agree with results from the treatment planning system. Further, the corrected light output was found to be linear with dose, dose rate independent, and is robust for single or multiple acquisitions. The short time needed for image acquisition and processing could make this system ideal for fast verification of the beam characteristics of the treatment machine. This new detector system shows a potential usefulness of the LS for 2D QA.

  4. Liquid scintillator for 2D dosimetry for high-energy photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poenisch, Falk; Archambault, Louis; Briere, Tina Marie; Sahoo, Narayan; Mohan, Radhe; Beddar, Sam; Gillin, Michael T. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard., Unit 94, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2009-05-15

    Complex radiation therapy techniques require dosimetric verification of treatment planning and delivery. The authors investigated a liquid scintillator (LS) system for application for real-time high-energy photon beam dosimetry. The system was comprised of a transparent acrylic tank filled with liquid scintillating material, an opaque outer tank, and a CCD camera. A series of images was acquired when the tank with liquid scintillator was irradiated with a 6 MV photon beam, and the light data measured with the CCD camera were filtered to correct for scattering of the optical light inside the liquid scintillator. Depth-dose and lateral profiles as well as two-dimensional (2D) dose distributions were found to agree with results from the treatment planning system. Further, the corrected light output was found to be linear with dose, dose rate independent, and is robust for single or multiple acquisitions. The short time needed for image acquisition and processing could make this system ideal for fast verification of the beam characteristics of the treatment machine. This new detector system shows a potential usefulness of the LS for 2D QA.

  5. SU-E-T-336: Dosimetric Properties of a New Solid Water High Equivalency Phantom for High-Energy Photon Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, F; Ohno, T; Onitsuka, R; Shimohigashi, Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate dosimetric properties in high-energy photon beams for a Solid Water High Equivalency (SWHE, SW557) phantom (Gammex) which was newly developed as water mimicking material. Methods: The mass density of SWHE and SWHE/water electron density ratio are 1.032 g/cm 3 and 1.005 according to the manufacturer information, respectively. SWHE is more water equivalent material in physical characteristics and uniformity than conventional SW457. This study calculated the relative ionization ratio of water and SWHE as a function of depth from the cavity dose in PTW30013 and Exradin A19 Farmer-type ionization chambers using Monte Caro simulations. The simulation was performed with a 10 x 10 cm 2 field at SAD of 100 cm for 4, 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV photons. The ionization ratio was also measured with the PTW30013 chamber for 6 and 15 MV photons. In addition, the overall perturbation factor of both chambers was calculated for both phantoms. Results: The relative ionization ratio curves for water and SWHE was in good agreement for all photon energies. The ionization ratio of water/SWHE for both chambers was 0.999–1.002, 0.999–1.002, 1.001–1.004, 1.004–1.007, and 1.006–1.010 at depths of over the buildup region for 4, 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV photons, respectively. The ionization ratio of water/SWHE increased up to 1% with increasing the photon energy. The measured ionization ratio of water/SWHE for 6 and 15 MV photons agreed well with calculated values. The overall perturbation factor for both chambers was 0.983–0.988 and 0.978–0.983 for water and SWHE, respectively, in a range from 4 MV to 18 MV. Conclusion: The depth scaling factor of water/SWHE was equal to unity for all photon energies. The ionization ratio of water/SWHE at a reference depth was equal to unity for 4 and 6 MV and larger up to 0.7% than unity for 18 MV

  6. Characterization of the Photon Energy Spectrum of a 6 MV Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez Bojorquez, M.; Larraga, J. M.; Garcia, A.; Celis, M. A.; Martinez-Davalos, A.; Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.

    2006-01-01

    In this work we study the influence of the purity of the materials used in experimental transmission measurements to obtain data to reconstruct the photon energy spectrum of a 6 MV Linac. We also evaluate the contribution to PDDs due to electron contamination in the reconstructed spectrum

  7. Constituent Components of Out-of-Field Scatter Dose for 18-MV Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy: A Comparison With 6-MV and Implications for Carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruben, Jeremy D.; Smith, Ryan; Lancaster, Craig M.; Haynes, Matthew; Jones, Phillip; Panettieri, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize and compare the components of out-of-field dose for 18-MV intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and their 6-MV counterparts and consider implications for second cancer induction. Methods and Materials: Comparable plans for each technique/energy were delivered to a water phantom with a sloping wall; under full scatter conditions; with field edge abutting but outside the bath to prevent internal/phantom scatter; and with shielding below the linear accelerator head to attenuate head leakage. Neutron measurements were obtained from published studies. Results: Eighteen-megavolt IMRT produces 1.7 times more out-of-field scatter than 18-MV 3D-CRT. In absolute terms, however, differences are just approximately 0.1% of central axis dose. Eighteen-megavolt IMRT reduces internal/patient scatter by 13%, but collimator scatter (C) is 2.6 times greater than 18-MV 3D-CRT. Head leakage (L) is minimal. Increased out-of-field photon scatter from 18-MV IMRT carries out-of-field second cancer risks of approximately 0.2% over and above the 0.4% from 18-MV 3D-CRT. Greater photoneutron dose from 18-MV IMRT may result in further maximal, absolute increased risk to peripheral tissue of approximately 1.2% over 18-MV 3D-CRT. Out-of-field photon scatter remains comparable for the same modality irrespective of beam energy. Machine scatter (C+L) from 18 versus 6 MV is 1.2 times higher for IMRT and 1.8 times for 3D-CRT. It is 4 times higher for 6-MV IMRT versus 3D-CRT. Reduction in internal scatter with 18 MV versus 6 MV is 27% for 3D-CRT and 29% for IMRT. Compared with 6-MV 3D-CRT, 18-MV IMRT increases out-of-field second cancer risk by 0.2% from photons and adds 0.28-2.2% from neutrons. Conclusions: Out-of-field photon dose seems to be independent of beam energy for both techniques. Eighteen-megavolt IMRT increases out-of-field scatter 1.7-fold over 3D-CRT because of greater collimator scatter despite

  8. Consistency check of photon beam physical data after recommissioning process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadman, B; Chawapun, N; Ua-apisitwong, S; Asakit, T; Chumpu, N; Rueansri, J

    2016-01-01

    In radiotherapy, medical linear accelerator (Linac) is the key system used for radiation treatments delivery. Although, recommissioning was recommended after major modification of the machine by AAPM TG53, but it might not be practical in radiotherapy center with heavy workloads. The main purpose of this study was to compare photon beam physical data between initial commissioning and recommissioning of 6 MV Elekta Precise linac. The parameters for comparing were the percentage depth dose (PDD) and beam profiles. The clinical commissioning test cases followed IAEA-TECDOC-1583 were planned on REF 91230 IMRT Dose Verification Phantom by Philips’ Pinnacle treatment planning system. The Delta 4PT was used for dose distribution verification with 90% passing criteria of the gamma index (3%/3mm). Our results revealed that the PDDs and beam profiles agreed within a tolerance limit recommended by TRS430. Most of the point doses and dose distribution verification passed the acceptance criteria. This study showed the consistency of photon beam physical data after recommissioning process. There was a good agreement between initial commissioning and recommissioning within a tolerance limit, demonstrated that the full recommissioning process might not be required. However, in the complex treatment planning geometry, the initial data should be applied with great caution. (paper)

  9. SU-E-T-454: Impact of Air Gap On PDDs of 6 MV Photon Beam for Various Field Sizes in Inhomogeneous Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyewale, S [Cancer Centers of Southwest Oklahoma, Lawton, OK (United States); Pokharel [21st Century Oncology, Estero, FL (United States); Singh, H [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Islam, M [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Rana, S [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate how the shape of air gap and its size will impact the percent depth doses (PDDs) of a 6MV photon beam for various field sizes. Methods: Two in-house phantoms were manufactured containing rectangular (phantom A) and circular (phantom B) air gaps. Both phantoms A and B were composed of same top layer (solid-water; 30×30cm{sup 2},5cm thickness) and bottom layer (solid-water; 30×30cm {sup 2},8cm thickness), but middle layer was varied to observe air gap effects and scatter contribution to the measurement point. In phantom A, a rectangular shaped air gap (30×30cm{sup 2},7cm thickness) was created by placing Styrofoam blocks between top and bottom layers of the phantom. In phantom B, middle layer was replaced by “inhomogenous block”, composed of acrylic plate (30×30cm{sup 2}, 4cm thickness) followed by PVC(30×30cm{sup 2},3cm thickness). Additionally, circular air gap was created by drilling a hole (diameter=2.8cm, length=7cm) at the center of “inhomogenous block”. In both phantoms, measurement readings were obtained at 13cm depth (i.e., 1cm after air gap) and depth of maximum dose(6MV energy; 100 MUs; field sizes ranged from 3×3cm{sup 2} to 10×10cm{sup 2}). The PDDs at 13cm depth were compared in both phantoms. Results: The measurements in both phantoms A and B showed an almost linear increase in PDDs with increasing field size, especially for smaller field sizes (from 3×3 to 7×7cm{sup 2}). For each field size, the PDD in phantom A was smaller compared to the one in phantom B. The difference in PDDs between two phantoms decreased with an increase in field size as the PDD difference decreased from 9.0% to 6.4%. Conclusion: The shape and size of air gap affect the PDD measurements in secondary build-up region as 6 MV primary beam traverses through the center of air gap. The scatter contribution due to increase in field size was more noticeable for field sizes ≤7×7cm{sup 2}.

  10. An MCNP-based model of a medical linear accelerator x-ray photon beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajaj, F A; Ghassal, N M

    2003-09-01

    The major components in the x-ray photon beam path of the treatment head of the VARIAN Clinac 2300 EX medical linear accelerator were modeled and simulated using the Monte Carlo N-Particle radiation transport computer code (MCNP). Simulated components include x-ray target, primary conical collimator, x-ray beam flattening filter and secondary collimators. X-ray photon energy spectra and angular distributions were calculated using the model. The x-ray beam emerging from the secondary collimators were scored by considering the total x-ray spectra from the target as the source of x-rays at the target position. The depth dose distribution and dose profiles at different depths and field sizes have been calculated at a nominal operating potential of 6 MV and found to be within acceptable limits. It is concluded that accurate specification of the component dimensions, composition and nominal accelerating potential gives a good assessment of the x-ray energy spectra.

  11. High quality beams of MV/cm THz pulses generated from DSTMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pernille Klarskov; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2015-01-01

    A beam characterization of a THz beam generated from the organic crystal DSTMS is presented. The simple, collinear phase-matching geometry for this crystal results in an M2 factor below 1.5, resulting in a focused field strength of more than 4 MV/cm....

  12. Water-equivalent one-dimensional scintillating fiber-optic dosimeter for measuring therapeutic photon beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Jinsoo; Won Jang, Kyoung; Jae Yoo, Wook; Han, Ki-Tek; Park, Jang-Yeon; Lee, Bongsoo

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we fabricated a one-dimensional scintillating fiber-optic dosimeter, which consists of 9 scintillating fiber-optic dosimeters, septa, and PMMA blocks for measuring surface and percentage depth doses of a therapeutic photon beam. Each dosimeter embedded in the 1-D scintillating fiber-optic dosimeter is composed of square type organic scintillators and plastic optical fibers. Also black PVC films are used as septa to minimize cross-talk between the scintillating fiber-optic dosimeters. To construct a dosimeter system, a 1-D scintillating fiber-optic dosimeter and a CMOS image sensor were combined with 20 m-length plastic optical fibers. Using the dosimeter system, we measured surface and percentage depth doses of 6 and 15 MV photon beams and compared the results with those of EBT films and an ionization chamber. - Highlights: ► Fabrication of a one-dimensional scintillating fiber-optic dosimeter. ► The one-dimensional scintillating fiber-optic dosimeter has 9 scintillating fiber-optic dosimeters. ► Measurements of surface and percentage depth doses of a therapeutic photon beam. ► The results were compared with those of EBT films and an ionization chamber.

  13. Investigation of percentage depth dose and dose rate dependence of PAGAT polymer gel dosimeter for photon beams using MRI technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azadbakht, B.; Hadad, K.; Zahmatkesh, M. H.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, the investigation of the normoxic Pagan polymer-gel dosimeter percentage depth dose and it's dose rate dependence has been made. Using MRI, the formulation to give the maximum change in the transverse relaxation rate R2 was determined to be 4.5% N,N'-methylene-bis-acrylamide(bis), 4.5% acrylamide, 5% gelatine, 5 m M tetrakis (hydroxymethyl) phosphonium chloride, 0.01 m M hydroquinone and 86% HPLC(Water). Irradiation of vials was performed using photon beams of Co-60 therapy unit and an Elec ta linear accelerator. Gel dosimeters were imaged in a Siemens Symphony 1.5 Tesla clinical MRI scanner using a head coil. Post-manufacture irradiation and post imaging times were both selected to be 1 day. For determining the percentage depth dose of the Pagan gel it was found that at the depth of 21 cm, the percentage depth dose for 1.25 MeV γ-ray photons of 60 Co and for 4,6 and 18 MV x-ray photons of Elec ta linear accelerator, are 48%, 52%, 57.3% and 59.73%, respectively. Thus, in the case of the higher energy photon beams, a higher dose can he delivered. to deep-seated tumors. The dose rate dependence of percentage depth dose was studied for 6 MV x-ray photons with the use of dose rates of 80, 160, 240, 320, 400 and 480 c Gy/min. No trend in polymer-gel dosimeter 1/T 2 dependence was found on the mean dose rate and energy for the photon beams.

  14. Measuring linac photon beam energy through EPID image analysis of physically wedged fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawoud, S. M., E-mail: samir.dawoud@leedsth.nhs.uk; Weston, S. J.; Bond, I.; Ward, G. C.; Rixham, P. A.; Mason, J.; Huckle, A. [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, St. James Institute of Oncology, St. James University Hospital, Leeds LS9 7TF (United Kingdom); Sykes, J. R. [Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, The University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia and Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, St. James Institute of Oncology, St. James University Hospital, Leeds LS9 7TF (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have proven to be useful tools for measuring several parameters of interest in linac quality assurance (QA). However, a method for measuring linac photon beam energy using EPIDs has not previously been reported. In this report, such a method is devised and tested, based on fitting a second order polynomial to the profiles of physically wedged beams, where the metric of interest is the second order coefficientα. The relationship between α and the beam quality index [percentage depth dose at 10 cm depth (PDD{sub 10})] is examined to produce a suitable calibration curve between these two parameters. Methods: Measurements were taken in a water-tank for beams with a range of energies representative of the local QA tolerances about the nominal value 6 MV. In each case, the beam quality was found in terms of PDD{sub 10} for 100 × 100 mm{sup 2} square fields. EPID images of 200 × 200 mm{sup 2} wedged fields were then taken for each beam and the wedge profile was fitted in MATLAB 2010b (The MathWorks, Inc., Natick, MA). α was then plotted against PDD{sub 10} and fitted with a linear relation to produce the calibration curve. The uncertainty in α was evaluated by taking five repeat EPID images of the wedged field for a beam of 6 MV nominal energy. The consistency of measuring α was found by taking repeat measurements on a single linac over a three month period. The method was also tested at 10 MV by repeating the water-tank crosscalibration for a range of energies centered approximately about a 10 MV nominal value. Finally, the calibration curve from the test linac and that from a separate clinical machine were compared to test consistency of the method across machines in a matched fleet. Results: The relationship betweenα and PDD{sub 10} was found to be strongly linear (R{sup 2} = 0.979) while the uncertainty in α was found to be negligible compared to that associated with measuring PDD{sub 10} in the water-tank (

  15. Transport of dc and bunched beams through a 25 MV folded tandem accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milner, W.T.; Alton, G.D.; Hensley, D.C.; Jones, C.M.; King, R.F.; Larson, J.D.; Moak, C.D.; Sayer, R.O.

    1975-01-01

    Studies of beam transport through the planned ORNL 25 MV folded tandem accelerator demonstrate efficient utilization of phase-space acceptance and the feasibility of injecting bunched beams from the tandem accelerator into the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC). Use of a 180 0 bending magnet in the terminal provides outstanding charge state selection and permits better control of the high-energy beam transport than has previously been possible in conventional tandem accelerators. Time spreads introduced in bunched beams by the 180 0 magnet are kept within a 6 0 RF acceptance window at ORIC provided the beam has a crossover in the center of the 180 0 magnet. Ion masses from 12 to 240 amu, preinjection energies from 150 to 500 keV and terminal voltages from 7.5 to 25 MV were studied for dc beams and beams bunched by various modulation techniques. (U.S.)

  16. Dosimetric properties of dysprosium doped lithium borate glass irradiated by 6 MV photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ab Rasid, A.; Wagiran, H.; Hashim, S.; Ibrahim, Z.; Ali, H.

    2015-07-01

    Undoped and dysprosium doped lithium borate glass system with empirical formula (70-x) B2O3-30 Li2O-(x) Dy2O3 (x=0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, 1.0 mol%) were prepared using the melt-quenching technique. The dosimetric measurements were performed by irradiating the samples to 6 MV photon beam using linear accelerator (LINAC) over a dose range of 0.5-5.0 Gy. The glass series of dysprosium doped lithium borate glass produced the best thermoluminescence (TL) glow curve with the highest intensity peak from sample with 1.0 mol% Dy2O3 concentration. Minimum detectable dose was detected at 2.24 mGy, good linearity of regression coefficient, high reproducibility and high sensitivity compared to the undoped glass are from 1.0 mol% dysprosium doped lithium borate glass. The results indicated that the series of dysprosium doped lithium glasses have a great potential to be considered as a thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD).

  17. SU-G-TeP2-05: Development of a Thimble Calorimeter for Absorbed Dose to Water Characterized in MV Photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen-Mayer, H; Bateman, F; Tosh, R; Bergstrom, P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a thimble sized polystyrene calorimeter for use from kV to MV photons, as a primary reference standard for applications from diagnostic CT imaging to therapy beam dose determination. Methods: A polystyrene calorimeter about 1.5 cm diameter embedded with small thermistors was characterized in a 6 MV photon beam from a clinical accelerator at 5 nominal dose rates from 0.8 to 4 Gy/min. Irradiations were delivered with beam on/off cycles first at 60 s and then at 20 s. Two sets of phantom conditions were evaluated: 1) in a 30 cm diameter polyethylene cylinder, and 2) in 10 cm depth of a 30 cm water phantom. The temperature waveforms were recorded and analyzed for temperature rise, arriving at a dose to polystyrene. This value is compared with the result of measurements under identical conditions using an ionization chamber calibrated for absorbed dose to water. Monte Carlo simulations were performed on the measurement systems to estimate such a ratio. Results: The ratio of the dose determined by the calorimeter to the dose reported by the ionization chamber was aggregated from all 5 dose rates. The 60 s results show a much elevated response in both phantoms compared to their respective expected results based on simulation. This deviation was reduced when the on/off cycles were shortened to 20 s. This behavior was possibly due to the heat conduction effects in the small calorimeter body. Finite element modeling is being conducted to simulate this effect. Conclusion: A small solid plastic calorimeter offers the convenience of a portable absorbed dose standard based on direct measurement of energy deposition, but comes at the expense of heat transfer complications which need to be characterized. This work offers preliminary evidence of the behavior and quantitative assessment of the issues to be resolved in future investigations.

  18. SU-G-TeP2-05: Development of a Thimble Calorimeter for Absorbed Dose to Water Characterized in MV Photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen-Mayer, H; Bateman, F; Tosh, R; Bergstrom, P [NIST, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a thimble sized polystyrene calorimeter for use from kV to MV photons, as a primary reference standard for applications from diagnostic CT imaging to therapy beam dose determination. Methods: A polystyrene calorimeter about 1.5 cm diameter embedded with small thermistors was characterized in a 6 MV photon beam from a clinical accelerator at 5 nominal dose rates from 0.8 to 4 Gy/min. Irradiations were delivered with beam on/off cycles first at 60 s and then at 20 s. Two sets of phantom conditions were evaluated: 1) in a 30 cm diameter polyethylene cylinder, and 2) in 10 cm depth of a 30 cm water phantom. The temperature waveforms were recorded and analyzed for temperature rise, arriving at a dose to polystyrene. This value is compared with the result of measurements under identical conditions using an ionization chamber calibrated for absorbed dose to water. Monte Carlo simulations were performed on the measurement systems to estimate such a ratio. Results: The ratio of the dose determined by the calorimeter to the dose reported by the ionization chamber was aggregated from all 5 dose rates. The 60 s results show a much elevated response in both phantoms compared to their respective expected results based on simulation. This deviation was reduced when the on/off cycles were shortened to 20 s. This behavior was possibly due to the heat conduction effects in the small calorimeter body. Finite element modeling is being conducted to simulate this effect. Conclusion: A small solid plastic calorimeter offers the convenience of a portable absorbed dose standard based on direct measurement of energy deposition, but comes at the expense of heat transfer complications which need to be characterized. This work offers preliminary evidence of the behavior and quantitative assessment of the issues to be resolved in future investigations.

  19. Measurements of the Influence of Thermoplastic Mask in High Energy Photon Beams: Gel Dosimeter or Ionizing Chamber?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, M. V.; Petchevist, C. D.; de Almeida, A.

    2009-12-01

    The influence of the immobilization mask material on the absorbed dose distribution in patients exposed to radiotherapy treatment with photon beams has been investigated for photons from a 60Co source and a 6 MV Linac. Absorbed dose values have been inferred at different depths and in the build-up region. Dose measurements were obtained using Fricke Xylenol Gel dosimeter and the cylindrical PTW Freiburg TM 31016-0.016 cc ionizing micro chamber; their discrepancies are discussed. The affinities of FXG and PTW ICMicro for measurements with high energy photons and the difference in the effective atomic numbers due to their compositions are most likely the most important factors that contribute to the measured dose in the build-up region. The measured values show that the use of the mask material contributes to increase the absorbed doses near the surface of the tissue. The result also shows that the build-up effect for 60Co is significantly smaller than that for 6 MV photons; however, the variations noted in the final doses of the radiotherapic treatments with photons of high energy do not represent alterations in the total doses received by the patients submitted to the radiotherapy.

  20. Data analysis of photon beam position at PLS-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, J.; Shin, S., E-mail: tlssh@postech.ac.kr; Huang, Jung-Yun; Kim, D.; Kim, C.; Kim, Ilyou; Lee, T.-Y.; Park, C.-D.; Kim, K. R. [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang, Kyungbuk 790-834 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Moohyun [Department of Physics, POSTECH, Pohang, Kyungbuk 790-834 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-27

    In the third generation light source, photon beam position stability is critical issue on user experiment. Generally photon beam position monitors have been developed for the detection of the real photon beam position and the position is controlled by feedback system in order to keep the reference photon beam position. In the PLS-II, photon beam position stability for front end of particular beam line, in which photon beam position monitor is installed, has been obtained less than rms 1μm for user service period. Nevertheless, detail analysis for photon beam position data in order to demonstrate the performance of photon beam position monitor is necessary, since it can be suffers from various unknown noises. (for instance, a back ground contamination due to upstream or downstream dipole radiation, undulator gap dependence, etc.) In this paper, we will describe the start to end study for photon beam position stability and the Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) analysis to demonstrate the reliability on photon beam position data.

  1. Characterization of Ge-doped optical fibres for MV radiotherapy dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noor, Noramaliza M.; Hussein, M.; Kadni, T.; Bradley, D.A.; Nisbet, A.

    2014-01-01

    Ge-doped optical fibres offer promising thermoluminescence (TL) properties together with small physical size and modest cost. Their use as dosimeters for postal radiotherapy dose audits of megavoltage photon beams has been investigated. Key dosimetric characteristics including reproducibility, linearity, dose rate, temperature and angular dependence have been established. A methodology of measuring absorbed dose under reference conditions was developed. The Ge-doped optical fibres offer linearity between TL yield and dose, with a reproducibility of better than 5%, following repeated measurements (n=5) for doses from 5 cGy to 1000 cGy. The fibres also offer dose rate, angular and temperature independence, while an energy-dependent response of 7% was found over the energy range 6 MV to 15 MV (TPR 20,10 of 0.660, 0.723 and 0.774 for 6, 10 and 15 MV respectively). The audit methodology has been developed with an expanded uncertainty of 4.22% at 95% confidence interval for the photon beams studied. - Highlights: • We investigate dosimetric characteristics of commercial Ge-doped optical fibres. • We develop audit methodology for measuring absorbed dose under reference conditions. • Ge-doped optical fibres offer promising thermoluminescence (TL) properties. • Audit methodology has been developed with an expanded uncertainty of 4.22%

  2. Qualification of a Monte Carlo model of photon beams of a Lilac Elekta Precise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linares R, H. M.; Laguardia, R. A.; Lara M, E.

    2014-08-01

    For the simulation of the accelerator head the parameters determination that characterize the electrons primary beam that affect in the target is a step that involves a fundamental role in the precision of the Monte Carlo calculations. Applying the proposed methodology by Pena et al. [2007], in this work was carried out the qualification of the photon beams (6 MV and 15 MV) of an accelerator Elekta Precise, using the Monte Carlo code EGSnrc. The influence exerted by the characteristics of the electrons primary beam on the distribution of absorbed dose for the two energy of this equipment was studied. Using different mid energy combinations and FWHM of the electrons primary beam was calculated the dose deposited in a segmented water mannequin with its surface to 100 cm of the source. Starting from the deposited dose in the mannequin the dose curves in depth and dose profiles to different depths were built. These curves were compared with measured values in a similar experimental arrangement to the carried out simulation, applying acceptability criteria based on confidence intervals [Venselaar et al. 2001]. The dose profiles for small fields were like it was expected, to be strongly influenced by the radial distribution (FWHM). The energy/FWHM combinations that better reproduce the experimental curves of each photon beam were determined. One time determined the best combination (5.75 MeV/2 mm and 11.25 MeV/2 mm, respectively) was used for the generation of the phase spaces and the field factors calculation. A good correspondence was obtained between the simulations and the measurements for a wide range of field sizes, as well as for different types of detectors, being all the results inside of the tolerance margins. (author)

  3. Correction factors for photon beam quality for cylindrical ionization chambers: Monte Carlo calculations by using the PENELOPE code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreras Caballero, A. A.; Hernandez Garcia, J.J.; Alfonso Laguardia, R.

    2009-01-01

    Were directly determined correction factors depending on the type camera beam quality, k, Q, and kQ, Qo, instead of the product (w, air p) Q, for three type cylindrical ionization chambers Pinpoint and divergent monoenergetic beams of photons in a wide range of energies (4-20 MV). The method of calculation used dispenses with the approaches taken in the classic procedure considered independent of braking power ratios and the factors disturbance of the camera. A detailed description of the geometry and materials chambers were supplied by the manufacturer and used as data input for the system 2006 of PENELOPE Monte Carlo calculation using a User code that includes correlated sampling, and forced interactions division of particles. We used a photon beam Co-60 as beam reference for calculating the correction factors for beam quality. No data exist for the cameras PTW 31014, 31015 and 31016 in the TRS-398 at they do not compare the results with data calculated or determined experimentally by other authors. (author)

  4. Investigation of beam transmission in A 9SDH-2 3.0 MV NEC pelletron tandem accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deoli, Naresh T.; Kummari, Venkata C.; Pacheco, Jose L.; Duggan, Jerome L.; Glass, Gary A.; McDaniel, Floyd D.; Reinert, Tilo; Rout, Bibhudutta; Weathers, Duncan L. [Ion Beam Modification And Analysis Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States)

    2013-04-19

    Electrostatic tandem accelerators are widely used to accelerate ions for experiments in materials science such as high energy ion implantation, materials modification, and analyses. Many applications require high beam current as well as high beam brightness at the target; thus, maximizing the beam transmission through such electrostatic accelerators becomes important. The Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory (IBMAL) at University of North Texas is equipped with four accelerators, one of which is a 9SDH-2 3.0 MV National Electrostatic Corporation (NEC) Pelletron Registered-Sign tandem accelerator. The tandem accelerator is equipped with three ion sources: one radio frequency-He ion source (Alphatross) and two ion sources of Cs-sputter type, the SNICS II (Source of Negative Ions by Cesium Sputtering) and a Cs-sputter source for trace-element accelerator based mass spectrometry. This work presents a detailed study of the beam transmission of hydrogen, silicon, and silver ions through the accelerator using the SNICS ion source with injection energies ranging from 20 keV to 70 keV. The beam transmission is quantified for three different terminal voltages: 1.5 MV, 2.0 MV and 2.5 MV. For a given terminal voltage, it has been found that beam transmission is strongly dependent on the ion source injector potential. Details of experiments and data analysis are presented.

  5. Effect of Photon Beam Energy, Gold Nanoparticle Size and Concentration on the Dose Enhancement in Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahideh Gharehaghaji

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gold nanoparticles have been used as radiation dose enhancing materials in recent investigations. In the current study, dose enhancement effect of gold nanoparticles on tumor cells was evaluated using Monte Carlo (MC simulation. Methods: We used MCNPX code for MC modeling in the current study. A water phantom and a tumor region with a size of 1×1×1 cm3 loaded with gold nanoparticles were simulated. The macroscopic dose enhancement factor was calculated for gold nanoparticles with sizes of 30, 50, and 100 nm. Also, we simulated different photon beams including mono-energetic beams (50-120 keV, a Cobalt-60 beam, 6 & 18 MV photon beams of a conventional linear accelerator. Results: We found a dose enhancement factor (DEF of from 1.4 to 3.7 for monoenergetic kilovoltage beams, while the DEFs for megavoltage beams were negligible and less than 3% for all GNP sizes and concentrations. The optimum energy for higher DEF was found to be the 90 keV monoenergetic beam. The effect of GNP size was not considerable, but the GNP concentration had a substantial impact on achieved DEF in GNP-based radiation therapy. Conclusion: The results were in close agreement with some previous studies considering the effect of photon energy and GNP concentration on observed DEF. Application of GNP-based radiation therapy using kilovoltage beams is recommended.

  6. Transient Beam Dynamics in the LBL 2 MV Injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henestroza, E; Grote, D

    1999-01-01

    A driver-scale injector for the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator project has been built at LBL. This machine has exceeded the design goals of high voltage (> 2 MV), high current (> 0.8 A of K + ) and low normalized emittance (< 1 π mm-mr). The injector consists of a 750 keV gun pre-injector followed by an electrostatic quadrupole accelerator (ESQ) which provides strong (alternating gradient) focusing for the space-charge dominated beam, and simultaneously accelerates the ions to 2 MeV. A matching section is being built to match the beam to the electrostatic accelerator ELISE. The gun preinjector, designed to hold up to 1 MV with minimal breakdown risks, consists of a hot aluminosilicate source with a large curved emitting surface surrounded by a thick ''extraction electrode''. During beam turn-on the voltage at the source is biased from a negative potential, enough to reverse the electric field on the emitting surface and avoid emission, to a positive potential to start extracting the beam; it stays constant for about 1 (micro)s, and is reversed to turn-off the emission. Since the Marx voltage applied on the accelerating quadrupoles and the main pre-injector gap is a long, constant pulse (several (micro)s), the transient behavior is dominated by the extraction pulser voltage time profile. The transient longitudinal dynamics of the beam in the injector was simulated by running the Particle in Cell codes GYMNOS and WARP3d in a time dependent mode. The generalization and its implementation in WAIW3d of a method proposed by Lampel and Tiefenback to eliminate transient oscillations in a one-dimensional planar diode will be presented

  7. Accurate model of photon beams as a tool for commissioning and quality assurance of treatment planning calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linares Rosales, Haydee M.; Lara Mas, Elier; Alfonso Laguardia, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Simulation of a linear accelerator (linac) head requires determining the parameters that characterize the primary electron beam striking on the target which is a step that plays a vital role in the accuracy of Monte Carlo calculations. In this work, the commissioning of photon beams (6 MV and 15 MV) of an Elekta Precise accelerator, using the Monte Carlo code EGSnrc, was performed. The influence of the primary electron beam characteristics on the absorbed dose distribution for two photon qualities was studied. Using different combinations of mean energy and radial FWHM of the primary electron beam, deposited doses were calculated in a water phantom, for different field sizes. Based on the deposited dose in the phantom, depth dose curves and lateral dose profiles were constructed and compared with experimental values measured in an arrangement similar to the simulation. Taking into account the main differences between calculations and measurements, an acceptability criteria based on confidence limits was implemented. As expected, the lateral dose profiles for small field sizes were strongly influenced by the radial distribution (FWHM). The combinations of energy/FWHM that best reproduced the experimental results were used to generate the phase spaces, in order to obtain a model with the motorized wedge included and to calculate output factors. A good agreement was obtained between simulations and measurements for a wide range of fi eld sizes, being all the results found within the range of tolerance. (author)

  8. Dosimetric properties characterization of silicon diodes used in photon beam radiotherapy; Caracterizacao das propriedades dosimetricas de diodos de silicio empregados em radioterapia com fotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizetto, Cesar Augusto

    2013-07-01

    In the current work it was studied the performance of epitaxial (EPI) and float zone (FZ) silicon diodes as on-line dosimeters for megavoltage (EPI diode) and orthovoltage (EPI and FZ diode) photon beam radiotherapy. In order to be used as dosimeters the diodes were enclosed in black polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) probes. The devices were then connected, on photovoltaic mode, to an electrometer KeithleyÒ 6517B to allow measurements of the photocurrent. The irradiations were performed with 6 and 18 MV photon beams (Siemens PrimusÒ linear accelerator), 6 and 15 MV (Novalis TXÒ) and 10, 25, 30 and 50 kV of a Pantak / Seifert X ray radiation device. During the measurements with the Siemens PrimusÒ the diodes were held between PMMA plates placed at 10.0 cm depth. When using Novalis TXÒ the devices were held between solid water plates placed at 50 cm depth. In both cases the diodes were centered in a radiation field of 10 x 10 cm{sup 2}, with the source-to-surface distance (SSD) kept at 100 cm. In measurements with orthovoltage photon beams the diodes were placed 50.0 cm from the tube in a radiation field of 8 cm diameter. The dose-rate dependency was studied for 6 and 15 MV (varying the dose-rate from 100 to 600 monitor units per minute) and for the 50 kV beam by varying the current tube from 2 to 20 mA. All devices showed linear response with dose rate and, within uncertainties the charge collected is independent of dose rate. The current signals induced showed good instantaneous repeatability of the diodes, characterized by coefficients of variation of current (CV) smaller than 1.14% (megavoltage beams) and 0.15% for orthovoltage beams and coefficients of variation of charge (CV) smaller than 1.84% (megavoltage beams) and 1.67% (orthovoltage beams). The dose response curves were quite linear with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.9999 for all diodes. (author)

  9. Absorbed-dose beam quality conversion factors for cylindrical chambers in high energy photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seuntjens, J P; Ross, C K; Shortt, K R; Rogers, D W

    2000-12-01

    Recent working groups of the AAPM [Almond et al., Med. Phys. 26, 1847 (1999)] and the IAEA (Andreo et al., Draft V.7 of "An International Code of Practice for Dosimetry based on Standards of Absorbed Dose to Water," IAEA, 2000) have described guidelines to base reference dosimetry of high energy photon beams on absorbed dose to water standards. In these protocols use is made of the absorbed-dose beam quality conversion factor, kQ which scales an absorbed-dose calibration factor at the reference quality 60Co to a quality Q, and which is calculated based on state-of-the-art ion chamber theory and data. In this paper we present the measurement and analysis of beam quality conversion factors kQ for cylindrical chambers in high-energy photon beams. At least three chambers of six different types were calibrated against the Canadian primary standard for absorbed dose based on a sealed water calorimeter at 60Co [TPR10(20)=0.572, %dd(10)x=58.4], 10 MV [TPR10(20)=0.682, %dd(10)x=69.6), 20 MV (TPR10(20)=0.758, %dd(10)x= 80.5] and 30 MV [TPR10(20) = 0.794, %dd(10)x= 88.4]. The uncertainty on the calorimetric determination of kQ for a single chamber is typically 0.36% and the overall 1sigma uncertainty on a set of chambers of the same type is typically 0.45%. The maximum deviation between a measured kQ and the TG-51 protocol value is 0.8%. The overall rms deviation between measurement and the TG-51 values, based on 20 chambers at the three energies, is 0.41%. When the effect of a 1 mm PMMA waterproofing sleeve is taken into account in the calculations, the maximum deviation is 1.1% and the overall rms deviation between measurement and calculation 0.48%. When the beam is specified using TPR10(20), and measurements are compared with kQ values calculated using the version of TG-21 with corrected formalism and data, differences are up to 1.6% when no sleeve corrections are taken into account. For the NE2571 and the NE2611A chamber types, for which the most literature data are

  10. Photon Collider Physics with Real Photon Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronberg, J; Asztalos, S

    2005-01-01

    Photon-photon interactions have been an important probe into fundamental particle physics. Until recently, the only way to produce photon-photon collisions was parasitically in the collision of charged particles. Recent advances in short-pulse laser technology have made it possible to consider producing high intensity, tightly focused beams of real photons through Compton scattering. A linear e + e - collider could thus be transformed into a photon-photon collider with the addition of high power lasers. In this paper they show that it is possible to make a competitive photon-photon collider experiment using the currently mothballed Stanford Linear Collider. This would produce photon-photon collisions in the GeV energy range which would allow the discovery and study of exotic heavy mesons with spin states of zero and two

  11. SU-E-I-72: First Experimental Study of On-Board CBCT Imaging Using 2.5MV Beam On a Radiotherapy Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Q [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Institute of Image Processing and Pattern Recognition, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Li, R; Yang, Y; Xing, L [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Varian TrueBeam version 2.0 comes with a new inline 2.5MV beam modality for image guided patient setup. In this work we develop an iterative volumetric image reconstruction technique specific to the beam and investigate the possibility of obtaining metal artifact free CBCT images using the new imaging modality. Methods: An iterative reconstruction algorithm with a sparse representation constraint based on dictionary learning is developed, in which both sparse projection and low dose rate (10 MU/min) are considered. Two CBCT experiments were conducted using the newly available 2.5MV beam on a Varian TrueBeam linac. First, a Rando anthropomorphic head phantom with and without a copper bar inserted in the center was scanned using both 2.5MV and kV (100kVp) beams. In a second experiment, an MRI phantom with many coils was scanned using 2.5MV, 6MV, and kV (100kVp) beams. Imaging dose and the resultant image quality is studied. Results: Qualitative assessment suggests that there were no visually detectable metal artifacts in MV CBCT images, compared with significant metal artifacts in kV CBCT images, especially in the MRI phantom. For a region near the metal object in the head phantom, the 2.5MV CBCT gave a more accurate quantification of the electron density compared with kV CBCT, with a ∼50% reduction in mean HU error. As expected, the contrast between bone and soft-tissue in 2.5MV CBCT decreased compared with kV CBCT. Conclusion: On-board CBCT imaging with the new 2.5MV beam can effectively reduce metal artifacts, although with a reduced softtissue contrast. Combination of kV and MV scanning may lead to metal artifact free CBCT images with uncompromised soft-tissue contrast.

  12. SU-F-T-276: Source Modeling and VMAT Quality Assurance Referring to the TrueBeam Representative Beam Data for Eclipse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Q [Beijing Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To study quality assurance (QA) of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) after the 6MV and 10MV photon beam source modeling, referring to the Varian TrueBeam representative beam data for Eclipse. Methods: The source model needs specific measured beam data, such as PDDs and profiles, diagonal profile, output factors (OFs), and MLC transmission factor (TF) and dosimetric leaf gap (DLG), et al. We downloaded the representative data from myVarian website, which includes TrueBeam 4MV-15MV photon beam data and 6MeV-22MeV electron beam data in w2CAD file format for use with Eclipse and in Excel spreadsheet format for use in data comparison. The beam data in W2CAD format can be imported into the Eclipse system and calibrated for use, as appropriate. We used PTW MP3 water tank to measure the beam data in some typical field sizes, and compared the measured data with the representative data. We found that the PDDs, profiles and OFs are similar. However according to some papers and our measurements, we decided that our MLC TF and DLG are 1.58 and 1.33 (6MV), 1.79 and 1.57 (10MV), respectively. After we had configured the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) with the representative data in Eclipse, we also have done dosimetric verification for 88 VMAT plans. Results: The end-to-end test procedures of VMAT were performed for 6MV and 10MV energy modes. The NE Farmer ion chamber mean measurements showed 1.2% (6MV, 38 cases) and 1.2% (10MV, 50 cases) between measurement and calculation; the Sun Nuclear ArcCheck mean measurements demonstrated gamma pass rates are as followings: 98.9%, 93.2%, 61.0% for 6MV, and 98.9%, 91.9%, 59.5% for 10MV, using 3%/3mm, 2%/2mm, 1%/1mm, 10% threshold criteria, respectively. Conclusion: The representative data is applicable to our TrueBeam for the VMAT plan, though our MLC factors are a little different, and its patientspecific QA is good.

  13. SU-E-T-493: Influence of Filtered and Flatting Filter Free Photon Beam of 10 Megavolts Energy On Rapid Arc Radiotherapy Planning for Cervix Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girigesh, Y; Kumar, L; Raman, K; Mishra, M [Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Institute and Research Centre, New Delhi, Delhi (India)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Aim of this study is to determine the dosimetric influence of Filtered and Flatting Filter Free Photon Beam of 10 MV energy on RA planning for Ca. Cervix. Methods: CT data sets of eleven patients reported with carcinoma cervix were used for RA planning for 10MV -FFB and 10MV-FFFB. RA plans were generated using two full arcs.All RA plans were generated to deliver a dose of 50.4Gy in 28 fractions for PTV and ALARA for OAR’s. All plans were analysed for PTV Coverage, conformity Index, homogeneity index, dose to OAR’s, integral dose to normal tissue and total monitor units were studied. Results: DVH was used to evaluate RA plans for both 10MV-FFB and 10MV-FFFB photon beam. Planning results show a comparable PTV coverage for both energies. Results shows volume of PTV receiving prescription dose were 95.10+ 0.09% and 95.09 +0.11%, and volume of PTV receiving a dose of 107% is 0.45+0.96% and 5.25+8.9%, homogeneity index (HI) were 1.051+0.007 and 1.066+0.008, Conformity Index(CI) were 1.003+0.019 and 1.012+0.013, Mean Integral dose were 2.65+0.34 and 2.60+0.33(*10−5Gy.cm3) for 10MV-FFB and 10MV-FFFB respectively. 10MV-FB shows statistically significant (p<0.05) improvement in mean doses to bladder, rectum, bowel and mean total number of MU’s and also shows remarkable decrease in mean total no. of MU’s by 43.7% in comparison to 10MV-FFFB. There is statistically significant (p<0.05) difference found in CI and HI for 10MV-FB in comparison to 10MV -FFF beam. 10MV-FFFB shows statistically significant (p<0.05) for mean NTID and delivers 1.65 % less NTID in comparison to 10 MV- FB. Conclusion: 10MV-FB is superior to 10MV-FFFB for rapid arc planning in case of Cervix carcinomas, it offers better target coverage and OAR’s sparing, comparable mean Integral dose to normal tissues and 10 MV- FB also produced highly conformal and homogeneous dose distribution in comparison to 10MV-FFFB.

  14. Performance of EPI diodes as dosimeters for photon beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Thais C. dos; Bizetto, Cesar A., E-mail: ccbueno@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Neves-Junior, Wellington F.P.; Haddad, Cecilia M.K. [Hospital Sirio Libanes (HSL), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Goncalves, Josemary A.C.; Bueno, Carmen C. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Sao Paulo (PUC-SP), SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    In this work we present the preliminary results about the performance of an epitaxial (EPI) diode as on-line dosimeter for photon beam radiotherapy. The diode used was processed at University of Hamburg on n-type 75 {mu}m thick epitaxial silicon layer grown on a highly doped n-type 300 {mu}m thick Czochralski (Cz) silicon substrate. The measurements were performed with a diode which not received any type of pre-dose. In order to use this device as a dosimeter, it was enclosed in a black polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) probe. The diode was connected to an electrometer Keithley 6517B in the photovoltaic mode. During all measurements, the diode was held between PMMA plates, placed at 10.0 cm depth and centered in a radiation field of 10 x 10 cm{sup 2}, with the source-to-surface distance (SSD) kept at 100 cm. The short-term repeatability was measured with photon beams of 6 and 18 MV energy by registering five consecutive current signals for the same radiation dose. The current signals induced showed good instantaneous repeatability of the diode, characterized by a smallest coefficient of variation (CV) of 0.21%. Furthermore, the dose-response curves of the diode were quite linear with the highest charge sensitivity achieved of 5.0 {mu}C/Gy. It worth noting that still remains to be investigated the pre-dose influence on epitaxial silicon diode response in radiotherapy photon beam dosimetry, the long term stability and the radiation hardness of these diodes for absorbed doses higher than that investigated in this work. All these studies are under way. (author)

  15. Scattered fractions of dose from 18 and 25 MV X-ray radiotherapy linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shobe, J.; Rodgers, J.E.; Taylor, P.L.; Jackson, J.; Popescu, G.

    1996-01-01

    Over the years, measurements have been made at a few energies to estimate the scattered fraction of dose from the patient in medical radiotherapy operations. This information has been a useful aid in the determination of shielding requirements for these facilities. With these measurements, known characteriztics of photons, and various other known parameters, Monte Carlo codes are being used to calculate the scattered fractions and hence the shielding requirements for the photons of other energies commonly used in radiotherapeutic applications. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) acquired a Sagittaire medical linear accelerator (linac) which was previously located at the Yale-New Haven Hospital. This linac provides an X-ray beam of 25 MV photons and electron beams with energies up to 32 MeV. The housing on the gantry was permanently removed from the accelerator during installation. A Varian Clinac 1800 linear accelerator was used to produce the 18 MV photons at the Frederick Memorial Hospital Regional Cancer Therapy Center in Frederick, MD. This paper represents a study of the photon dose scattered from a patient in typical radiation treatment situations as it relates to the dose delivered at the isocenter in water. The results of these measurements will be compared to Monte Carlo calculations. Photon spectral measurements were not made at this time. Neutron spectral measurements were made on this Sagittaire machine in its previous location and that work was not repeated here, although a brief study of the neutron component of the 18 and 25 MV linacs was performed utilizing thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) to determine the isotropy of the neutron dose. (author)

  16. Characterization of phenolic pellets for ESR dosimetry in photon beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallo, Salvatore; Veronese, Ivan; Iacoviello, Giuseppina; Panzeca, Salvatore; Bartolotta, Antonio; Longo, Anna; Dondi, Daniele; Gueli, Anna Maria; Loi, Gianfranco; Mones, Eleonora; Marrale, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    This work deals with the dosimetric features of a particular phenolic compound (IRGANOX 1076 registered ) for dosimetry of clinical photon beams by using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. After the optimization of the ESR readout parameters (namely modulation amplitude and microwave power) to maximise the signal without excessive spectrum distortions, basic dosimetric properties of laboratory-made phenolic dosimeters in pellet form, such as reproducibility, dose-response, sensitivity, linearity and dose rate dependence were investigated. The dosimeters were tested by measuring the depth dose profile of a 6 MV photon beam. A satisfactory intra-batch reproducibility of the ESR signal of the manufactured dosimeters was obtained. The ESR signal proved to increase linearly with increasing dose in the investigated dose range 1-13 Gy. The presence of an intrinsic background signal limits the minimum detectable dose to a value of approximately 0.6 Gy. Reliable and accurate assessment of the dose was achieved, independently of the dose rate. Such characteristics, together with the fact that IRGANOX 1076 registered is almost tissue-equivalent, and the stability of the ESR signal, make these dosimeters promising materials for ESR dosimetric applications in radiotherapy. (orig.)

  17. Characterization of phenolic pellets for ESR dosimetry in photon beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallo, Salvatore; Veronese, Ivan [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Department of Physics, Milan (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano (Italy); Iacoviello, Giuseppina [Hospital ARNAS-Civico, Medical Physics Department, Palermo (Italy); Panzeca, Salvatore [Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Department of Physics and Chemistry, Palermo (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare-Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Bartolotta, Antonio; Longo, Anna [Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Department of Physics and Chemistry, Palermo (Italy); Dondi, Daniele [Universita degli Studi di Pavia, Department of Chemistry, Pavia (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pavia (Italy); Gueli, Anna Maria [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare-Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Catania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, PH3DRA Laboratories, Catania (Italy); Loi, Gianfranco; Mones, Eleonora [Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Maggiore della Carita, Medical Physics Department, Novara (Italy); Marrale, Maurizio [Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Department of Physics and Chemistry, Palermo (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare-Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Advanced Technologies Network Center (ATeN Center), Palermo (Italy)

    2017-11-15

    This work deals with the dosimetric features of a particular phenolic compound (IRGANOX 1076 {sup registered}) for dosimetry of clinical photon beams by using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. After the optimization of the ESR readout parameters (namely modulation amplitude and microwave power) to maximise the signal without excessive spectrum distortions, basic dosimetric properties of laboratory-made phenolic dosimeters in pellet form, such as reproducibility, dose-response, sensitivity, linearity and dose rate dependence were investigated. The dosimeters were tested by measuring the depth dose profile of a 6 MV photon beam. A satisfactory intra-batch reproducibility of the ESR signal of the manufactured dosimeters was obtained. The ESR signal proved to increase linearly with increasing dose in the investigated dose range 1-13 Gy. The presence of an intrinsic background signal limits the minimum detectable dose to a value of approximately 0.6 Gy. Reliable and accurate assessment of the dose was achieved, independently of the dose rate. Such characteristics, together with the fact that IRGANOX 1076 {sup registered} is almost tissue-equivalent, and the stability of the ESR signal, make these dosimeters promising materials for ESR dosimetric applications in radiotherapy. (orig.)

  18. Optical cone beam tomography of Cherenkov-mediated signals for fast 3D dosimetry of x-ray photon beams in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Adam K; Andreozzi, Jacqueline M; Zhang, Rongxiao; Pogue, Brian W; Gladstone, David J

    2015-07-01

    To test the use of a three-dimensional (3D) optical cone beam computed tomography reconstruction algorithm, for estimation of the imparted 3D dose distribution from megavoltage photon beams in a water tank for quality assurance, by imaging the induced Cherenkov-excited fluorescence (CEF). An intensified charge-coupled device coupled to a standard nontelecentric camera lens was used to tomographically acquire two-dimensional (2D) projection images of CEF from a complex multileaf collimator (MLC) shaped 6 MV linear accelerator x-ray photon beam operating at a dose rate of 600 MU/min. The resulting projections were used to reconstruct the 3D CEF light distribution, a potential surrogate of imparted dose, using a Feldkamp-Davis-Kress cone beam back reconstruction algorithm. Finally, the reconstructed light distributions were compared to the expected dose values from one-dimensional diode scans, 2D film measurements, and the 3D distribution generated from the clinical Varian ECLIPSE treatment planning system using a gamma index analysis. A Monte Carlo derived correction was applied to the Cherenkov reconstructions to account for beam hardening artifacts. 3D light volumes were successfully reconstructed over a 400 × 400 × 350 mm(3) volume at a resolution of 1 mm. The Cherenkov reconstructions showed agreement with all comparative methods and were also able to recover both inter- and intra-MLC leaf leakage. Based upon a 3%/3 mm criterion, the experimental Cherenkov light measurements showed an 83%-99% pass fraction depending on the chosen threshold dose. The results from this study demonstrate the use of optical cone beam computed tomography using CEF for the profiling of the imparted dose distribution from large area megavoltage photon beams in water.

  19. Depth dependence of the single chamber response function of the I'mRT MatriXX array in a 6 MV photon beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alashrah, Saleh

    2013-01-01

    One of the factors which influence the spatial resolution of a 2D detector array is the size of the single detector, another the transport of the secondary electrons from the walls into the measuring volume. In this study, the single ion chamber dose response function of an I'mRT MatriXX array was determined by comparison between slit beam dose profiles measured with the array and with EBT2 radiochromic film in a solid water-equivalent phantom at a shallow depth of 0.5 cm and at a depth of 5 cm beyond the depth dose maximum for a 6 MV photon beam. The dose response functions were obtained using two methods, the best fit method and the deconvolution method. At the shallow depth, a Lorentz function and at 5 cm depth a Gaussian function, both with the same FWHM of 7.4 mm within limits of uncertainty, were identified as the best suited dose response functions of the 4.5 mm diameter single array chamber. These dose response functions were then tested on various dose profiles whose true shape had been determined with EBT2 film and with the IC03 ionization chamber. By convolving these with the Lorentz kernel (at shallow depth) and the Gaussian kernel (at 5 cm depth) the signal profiles measured with the I'mRT MatriXX array were closely approximated. Thus, the convolution of TPS-calculated dose profiles with these dose response functions can minimize the differences between calculation and measurement which occur due to the limited spatial resolution of the I'mRT MatriXX detector. (orig.)

  20. Analysis of the EBT3 Gafchromic film irradiated with 6 MV photons and 6 MeV electrons using reflective mode scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, Nicolas; Francis, Ziad; Abboud, Marie

    2014-09-01

    We explore in our study the effects of electrons and X-rays irradiations on the newest version of the Gafchromic EBT3 film. Experiments are performed using the Varian "TrueBeam 1.6" medical accelerator delivering 6 MV X-ray photons and 6 MeV electron beams as desired. The main interest is to compare the responses of EBT3 films exposed to two separate beams of electrons and photons, for radiation doses ranging up to 500 cGy. The analysis is done on a flatbed EPSON 10000 XL scanner and cross checked on a HP Scanjet 4850 scanner. Both scanners are used in reflection mode taking into account landscape and portrait scanning positions. After thorough verifications, the reflective scanning method can be used on EBT3 as an economic alternative to the transmission method which was also one of the goals of this study. A comparison is also done between single scan configuration including all samples in a single A4 (HP) or A3 (EPSON) format area and multiple scan procedure where each sample is scanned separately on its own. The images analyses are done using the ImageJ software. Results show significant influence of the scanning configuration but no significant differences between electron and photon irradiations for both single and multiple scan configurations. In conclusion, the film provides a reliable relative dose measurement method for electrons and photons irradiations in the medical field applications. Copyright © 2014 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Dosimetric properties characterization of silicon diodes used in photon beam radiotherapy; Caracterizacao das propriedades dosimetricas de diodos de silicio empregados em radioterapia com feixe de fotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizetto, Cesar Augusto

    2013-07-01

    In the current work it was studied the performance of epitaxial (EPI) and float zone (FZ) silicon diodes as on-line dosimeters for megavoltage (EPI diode) and orthovoltage (EPI and FZ diode) photon beam radiotherapy. In order to be used as dosimeters the diodes were enclosed in black polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) probes. The devices were then connected, on photovoltaic mode, to an electrometer Keithley Registered-Sign 6517B to allow measurements of the photocurrent. The irradiations were performed with 6 and 18 MV photon beams (Siemens Primus Registered-Sign linear accelerator), 6 and 15 MV (Novalis TX Registered-Sign ) and 10, 25, 30 and 50 kV of a Pantak / Seifert X ray radiation device. During the measurements with the Siemens Primus the diodes were held between PMMA plates placed at 10.0 cm depth. When using Novalis TX Registered-Sign the devices were held between solid water plates placed at 50 cm depth. In both cases the diodes were centered in a radiation field of 10 x 10 cm{sup 2}, with the source-to-surface distance (SSD) kept at 100 cm. In measurements with orthovoltage photon beams the diodes were placed 50.0 cm from the tube in a radiation field of 8 cm diameter. The dose-rate dependency was studied for 6 and 15 MV (varying the dose-rate from 100 to 600 monitor units per minute) and for the 50 kV beam by varying the current tube from 2 to 20 mA. All devices showed linear response with dose rate and, within uncertainties the charge collected is independent of dose rate. The current signals induced showed good instantaneous repeatability of the diodes, characterized by coefficients of variation of current (CV) smaller than 1.14% (megavoltage beams) and 0.15% for orthovoltage beams and coefficients of variation of charge (CV) smaller than 1.84% (megavoltage beams) and 1.67% (orthovoltage beams). The dose response curves were quite linear with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.9999 for all diodes. (author)

  2. Comparison of build-up region doses in oblique tangential 6 MV photon beams calculated by AAA and CCC algorithms in breast Rando phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masunun, P.; Tangboonduangjit, P.; Dumrongkijudom, N.

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the build-up region doses on breast Rando phantom surface with the bolus covered, the doses in breast Rando phantom and also the doses in a lung that is the heterogeneous region by two algorithms. The AAA in Eclipse TPS and the collapsed cone convolution algorithm in Pinnacle treatment planning system were used to plan in tangential field technique with 6 MV photon beam at 200 cGy total doses in Breast Rando phantom with bolus covered (5 mm and 10 mm). TLDs were calibrated with Cobalt-60 and used to measure the doses in irradiation process. The results in treatment planning show that the doses in build-up region and the doses in breast phantom were closely matched in both algorithms which are less than 2% differences. However, overestimate of doses in a lung (L2) were found in AAA with 13.78% and 6.06% differences at 5 mm and 10 mm bolus thickness, respectively when compared with CCC algorithm. The TLD measurements show the underestimate in buildup region and in breast phantom but the doses in a lung (L2) were overestimated when compared with the doses in the two plannings at both thicknesses of the bolus.

  3. Using of beam spoilers in linear accelerators with photons of 10 MV; Empleo de degradadores del haz en aceleradores lineales con fotones de 10 MV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sansogne, R.; Palacios, V.; Arbiser, S. [Vidt Centro Medico- CETRO. Vidt 1924- (1428) Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    1998-12-31

    This work come along of the necessity to utilize an unique High-Energy Electron Linear Accelerator (10 MV) for radiant treatments which require higher doses in the surface levels of tissue. It is analyzed the interposition of acrylic degraders (spoilers) in the beam, especially for opposed and parallel fields in the cases of head and neck. It was analyzed the possible combinations of the following parameters: 1) Field sizes defined at isocenter (100 cm) 6 x 6 cm{sup 2}, 8 x 8 cm{sup 2} and 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} ; 2) Surface-spoiler distance (DSS) of 4, 7 and 10 cm; 3) Spoilers with different thickness 1.1 and 1.5 cm. It was observed a displacement of the maximum dose toward the surface, and an increase in the percentile doses in the build-up zone when the spoiler is nearing and/or increasing its thickness. It is verified that the use of spoilers, support the symmetry and plane of the beam inside of the clinically acceptable margins. When the results obtained are analyzed then it is proposed as a calculation method to incorporate an attenuation factor. (Author)

  4. Nuclear photon science with inverse compton photon beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Mamoru

    2007-01-01

    Recent developments of the synchrotron radiation facilities and intense lasers are now guiding us to a new research frontier with probes of a high energy GeV photon beam and an intense and short pulse MeV γ-ray beam. New directions of the science developments with photo-nuclear reactions are discussed. The inverse Compton γ-ray has two good advantages for searching for a microscopic quantum world; they are 1) good emittance and 2) high linear and circular polarizations. With these advantages, photon beams in the energy range from MeV to GeV are used for studying hadron structure, nuclear structure, astrophysics, materials science, as well as for applying medical science. (author)

  5. Model-based calculations of off-axis ratio of conic beams for a dedicated 6 MV radiosurgery unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J. N.; Ding, X.; Du, W.; Pino, R. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: Because the small-radius photon beams shaped by cones in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) lack lateral electronic equilibrium and a detector's finite cross section, direct experimental measurement of dosimetric data for these beams can be subject to large uncertainties. As the dose calculation accuracy of a treatment planning system largely depends on how well the dosimetric data are measured during the machine's commissioning, there is a critical need for an independent method to validate measured results. Therefore, the authors studied the model-based calculation as an approach to validate measured off-axis ratios (OARs). Methods: The authors previously used a two-component analytical model to calculate central axis dose and associated dosimetric data (e.g., scatter factors and tissue-maximum ratio) in a water phantom and found excellent agreement between the calculated and the measured central axis doses for small 6 MV SRS conic beams. The model was based on that of Nizin and Mooij [''An approximation of central-axis absorbed dose in narrow photon beams,'' Med. Phys. 24, 1775-1780 (1997)] but was extended to account for apparent attenuation, spectral differences between broad and narrow beams, and the need for stricter scatter dose calculations for clinical beams. In this study, the authors applied Clarkson integration to this model to calculate OARs for conic beams. OARs were calculated for selected cones with radii from 0.2 to 1.0 cm. To allow comparisons, the authors also directly measured OARs using stereotactic diode (SFD), microchamber, and film dosimetry techniques. The calculated results were machine-specific and independent of direct measurement data for these beams. Results: For these conic beams, the calculated OARs were in excellent agreement with the data measured using an SFD. The discrepancies in radii and in 80%-20% penumbra were within 0.01 cm, respectively. Using SFD-measured OARs as the reference data, the

  6. Production of high energy photon beam at TAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akkurt, I.; Tekin, H. O.; Demir, N.; Cakirli, R. B.; Akkus, B.; Kupa, I.

    2010-01-01

    When an electron pass through an electric field, the electron loose its part of energy and photon is generated. This process is known as Bremsstrahlung (means 'radiation breaking' in German) and this photon can be used in a variety of different application. The TAC will be first Turkish Accelerator Center (TAC) where a IR-FEL and Beamstrahlung photon beam facilities will be established in first stage. The electrons will be accelerated up to 40 MeV by two LINAC and these beam will be used to generate Bremsstrahlung photon. In this study, the main parameters for Bremsstrahlung photon beam facility will be established at TAC will be detailed and fields to be used Bremsstrahlung beam will also be presented.

  7. Experimental determination of the beam quality dependence factors, kQ, for ionization chambers used in photon and electron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerra, A.S.; Laitano, R.F.; Pimpinella, M.

    1995-01-01

    Dosimetry in radiotherapy with ionization chambers calibrated in 60 Co gamma beams in terms of absorbed dose to water, D W , can be performed if a factor conventionally denoted as k Q is known. The factor k Q depends on the beam quality and the chamber characteristics. Calculated values of the k Q factors for many types of ionization chamber have been recently published. In this work the experimental determination of the k Q factors for various ionization chambers was performed for 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams and for a 14 MeV electron beam. The k Q factors were determined by a procedure based on relative measurements performed with the ionization chamber and ferrous sulphate solution in 60 Co gamma radiation and accelerator beams, respectively. The experimental k Q values are compared with the calculated values so far published. Theoretical and experimental k Q values are in fairly good agreement. The uncertainty in the experimental k Q factors determined in this work is less than about 1%, that is, appreciably smaller than the uncertainty of about 1.5% reported for the calculated values. (Author)

  8. A feasibility study of the Dynamic Phantom scanner for quality assurance of beam profiles at various gantry angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunkai; Hsi, Wen C.; Chu, James C.H.; Bernard, Damian B.; Abrams, Ross A.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of gantry rotation on beam profiles of photon and electron beams is an important issue in quality assurance for radiotherapy. To address variations in the profiles of photon and electron beams at different gantry angles, a Dynamic Phantom scanner composed of a 20×12×6 cm3 scanning Lucite block was designed as a cross‐beam‐profile scanner. To our knowledge, differences between scanned profiles acquired at different gantry angles with a small size Lucite block and those acquired a full‐size (60×60×50 cm3) water phantom have not been previously investigated. We therefore performed a feasibility study for a first prototype Dynamic Phantom scanner without a gantry attachment mount. Radiation beams from a Varian LINAC 21EX and 2100C were used. Photon beams (6 MV and 18 MV) were shaped by either collimator jaws or a Varian 120 Multileaf (MLC) collimator, and electron beams (6 MeV, 12 MeV, and 20 MeV) were shaped by a treatment cone. To investigate the effect on profiles by using a Lucite block, a quantitative comparison of scanned profiles with the Dynamic Phantom and a full‐size water phantom was first performed at a 0° gantry angle for both photon and electron beams. For photon beam profiles defined by jaws at 1.0 cm and 5.0 cm depths of Lucite (i.e., at 1.1 cm and 5.7 cm depth of water), a good agreement (less than 1% variation) inside the field edge was observed between profiles scanned with the Dynamic Phantom and with a water phantom. The use of Lucite in the Dynamic Phantom resulted in reduced penumbra width (about 0.5 mm out of 5 mm to 8 mm) and reduced (1% to 2%) scatter dose beyond the field edges for both 6 MV and 18 MV beams, compared with the water phantom scanner. For profiles of the MLC‐shaped 6 MV photon beam, a similar agreement was observed. For profiles of electron beams scanned at 2.9 cm depth of Lucite (i.e., at 3.3 cm depth of water), larger disagreements in profiles (3% to 4%) and penumbra width (3 mm to 4 mm out of 12 mm

  9. Study on the photoneutrons produced in 15 MV medical linear accelerators : Comparison of three dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Oh Nam [Gangneung Asan Hospital, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Oh Nam; Lim, Cheong Hwan [Hanseo Univ., Seosan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy(IMRT) have the ability to provide better dose conformity and sparing of critical normal tissues than three-dimensional radiotherapy(3DCRT). Especially, with the benefit of health insurance in 2011, its use now increasingly in many modern radiotherapy departments. Also the use of linear accelerator with high-energy photon beams over 10 MV is increasing. As is well known, these linacs have the capacity to produce photoneutrons due to photonuclear reactions in materials with a large atomic number such as the target, flattening filters, collimators, and multi-leaf collimators(MLC). MLC-based IMRT treatments increase the monitor units and the probability of production of photoneutrons from photon-induced nuclear reactions. The purpose of this study is to quantitatively evaluate the dose of photoneutrons produced from 3DCRT and IMRT technique for Rando phantom in cervical cancer. We performed the treatment plans with 3DCRT and IMRT technique using Rando phantom for treatment of cervical cancer. An Rando phantom placed on the couch in the supine position was irradiated using 15 MV photon beams. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters(OSLD) were attached to 4 different locations (abdomen, chest, head and neck, eyes) and from center of field size and measured 5 times each of locations. Measured neutron dose from IMRT technique increased by 9.0, 8.6, 8.8, and 14 times than 3DCRT technique for abdomen, chest, head and neck, and eyes, respectively. When using IMRT with 15 MV photon beams, the photoneutrons contributed a significant portion on out-of-field. It is difficult to prevent high energy photon beams to produce the photoneutrons due to physical properties, if necessary, It is difficult to prevent high energy photon beams to produce the photoneutrons due to physical properties, if necessary, it is need to provide the additional safe shielding on a linear accelerator and should therefore reduce the out-of-field dose.

  10. Study on the photoneutrons produced in 15 MV medical linear accelerators : Comparison of three dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Oh Nam; Yang, Oh Nam; Lim, Cheong Hwan

    2012-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy(IMRT) have the ability to provide better dose conformity and sparing of critical normal tissues than three-dimensional radiotherapy(3DCRT). Especially, with the benefit of health insurance in 2011, its use now increasingly in many modern radiotherapy departments. Also the use of linear accelerator with high-energy photon beams over 10 MV is increasing. As is well known, these linacs have the capacity to produce photoneutrons due to photonuclear reactions in materials with a large atomic number such as the target, flattening filters, collimators, and multi-leaf collimators(MLC). MLC-based IMRT treatments increase the monitor units and the probability of production of photoneutrons from photon-induced nuclear reactions. The purpose of this study is to quantitatively evaluate the dose of photoneutrons produced from 3DCRT and IMRT technique for Rando phantom in cervical cancer. We performed the treatment plans with 3DCRT and IMRT technique using Rando phantom for treatment of cervical cancer. An Rando phantom placed on the couch in the supine position was irradiated using 15 MV photon beams. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters(OSLD) were attached to 4 different locations (abdomen, chest, head and neck, eyes) and from center of field size and measured 5 times each of locations. Measured neutron dose from IMRT technique increased by 9.0, 8.6, 8.8, and 14 times than 3DCRT technique for abdomen, chest, head and neck, and eyes, respectively. When using IMRT with 15 MV photon beams, the photoneutrons contributed a significant portion on out-of-field. It is difficult to prevent high energy photon beams to produce the photoneutrons due to physical properties, if necessary, It is difficult to prevent high energy photon beams to produce the photoneutrons due to physical properties, if necessary, it is need to provide the additional safe shielding on a linear accelerator and should therefore reduce the out-of-field dose

  11. A Monte Carlo multiple source model applied to radiosurgery narrow photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaves, A.; Lopes, M.C.; Alves, C.C.; Oliveira, C.; Peralta, L.; Rodrigues, P.; Trindade, A.

    2004-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) methods are nowadays often used in the field of radiotherapy. Through successive steps, radiation fields are simulated, producing source Phase Space Data (PSD) that enable a dose calculation with good accuracy. Narrow photon beams used in radiosurgery can also be simulated by MC codes. However, the poor efficiency in simulating these narrow photon beams produces PSD whose quality prevents calculating dose with the required accuracy. To overcome this difficulty, a multiple source model was developed that enhances the quality of the reconstructed PSD, reducing also the time and storage capacities. This multiple source model was based on the full MC simulation, performed with the MC code MCNP4C, of the Siemens Mevatron KD2 (6 MV mode) linear accelerator head and additional collimators. The full simulation allowed the characterization of the particles coming from the accelerator head and from the additional collimators that shape the narrow photon beams used in radiosurgery treatments. Eight relevant photon virtual sources were identified from the full characterization analysis. Spatial and energy distributions were stored in histograms for the virtual sources representing the accelerator head components and the additional collimators. The photon directions were calculated for virtual sources representing the accelerator head components whereas, for the virtual sources representing the additional collimators, they were recorded into histograms. All these histograms were included in the MC code, DPM code and using a sampling procedure that reconstructed the PSDs, dose distributions were calculated in a water phantom divided in 20000 voxels of 1x1x5 mm 3 . The model accurately calculates dose distributions in the water phantom for all the additional collimators; for depth dose curves, associated errors at 2σ were lower than 2.5% until a depth of 202.5 mm for all the additional collimators and for profiles at various depths, deviations between measured

  12. Photon energy-modulated radiotherapy: Monte Carlo simulation and treatment planning study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Min; Kim, Jung-in; Heon Choi, Chang; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kim, Il Han; Ye, Sung-Joon [Interdiciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University, Seoul, 110-744, Korea and Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Interdiciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University, Seoul, 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Interdiciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University, Seoul, 110-744 (Korea, Republic of) and Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Interdiciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University, Seoul, 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, 110-744 (Korea, Republic of) and Department of Intelligent Convergence Systems, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of photon energy-modulated radiotherapy during beam-on time. Methods: A cylindrical device made of aluminum was conceptually proposed as an energy modulator. The frame of the device was connected with 20 tubes through which mercury could be injected or drained to adjust the thickness of mercury along the beam axis. In Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, a flattening filter of 6 or 10 MV linac was replaced with the device. The thickness of mercury inside the device varied from 0 to 40 mm at the field sizes of 5 x 5 cm{sup 2} (FS5), 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} (FS10), and 20 x 20 cm{sup 2} (FS20). At least 5 billion histories were followed for each simulation to create phase space files at 100 cm source to surface distance (SSD). In-water beam data were acquired by additional MC simulations using the above phase space files. A treatment planning system (TPS) was commissioned to generate a virtual machine using the MC-generated beam data. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans for six clinical cases were generated using conventional 6 MV, 6 MV flattening filter free, and energy-modulated photon beams of the virtual machine. Results: As increasing the thickness of mercury, Percentage depth doses (PDD) of modulated 6 and 10 MV after the depth of dose maximum were continuously increased. The amount of PDD increase at the depth of 10 and 20 cm for modulated 6 MV was 4.8% and 5.2% at FS5, 3.9% and 5.0% at FS10 and 3.2%-4.9% at FS20 as increasing the thickness of mercury from 0 to 20 mm. The same for modulated 10 MV was 4.5% and 5.0% at FS5, 3.8% and 4.7% at FS10 and 4.1% and 4.8% at FS20 as increasing the thickness of mercury from 0 to 25 mm. The outputs of modulated 6 MV with 20 mm mercury and of modulated 10 MV with 25 mm mercury were reduced into 30%, and 56% of conventional linac, respectively. The energy-modulated IMRT plans had less integral doses than 6 MV IMRT or 6 MV flattening filter free plans for tumors located in the

  13. Optimization of parameters for fitting linear accelerator photon beams using a modified CBEAM model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayyangar, K.; Daftari, I.; Palta, J.; Suntharalingam, N.

    1989-01-01

    Measured beam profiles and central-axis depth-dose data for 6- and 25-MV photon beams are used to generate a dose matrix which represents the full beam. A corresponding dose matrix is also calculated using the modified CBEAM model. The calculational model uses the usual set of three parameters to define the intensity at beam edges and the parameter that accounts for collimator transmission. An additional set of three parameters is used for the primary profile factor, expressed as a function of distance from the central axis. An optimization program has been adapted to automatically adjust these parameters to minimize the χ 2 between the measured and calculated data. The average values of the parameters for small (6x6 cm 2 ), medium (10x10 cm 2 ), and large (20x20 cm 2 ) field sizes are found to represent the beam adequately for all field sizes. The calculated and the measured doses at any point agree to within 2% for any field size in the range 4x4 to 40x40 cm 2

  14. Optical microscope using an interferometric source of two-color, two-beam entangled photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dress, William B.; Kisner, Roger A.; Richards, Roger K.

    2004-07-13

    Systems and methods are described for an optical microscope using an interferometric source of multi-color, multi-beam entangled photons. A method includes: downconverting a beam of coherent energy to provide a beam of multi-color entangled photons; converging two spatially resolved portions of the beam of multi-color entangled photons into a converged multi-color entangled photon beam; transforming at least a portion of the converged multi-color entangled photon beam by interaction with a sample to generate an entangled photon specimen beam; and combining the entangled photon specimen beam with an entangled photon reference beam within a single beamsplitter. An apparatus includes: a multi-refringent device providing a beam of multi-color entangled photons; a condenser device optically coupled to the multi-refringent device, the condenser device converging two spatially resolved portions of the beam of multi-color entangled photons into a converged multi-color entangled photon beam; a beam probe director and specimen assembly optically coupled to the condenser device; and a beam splitter optically coupled to the beam probe director and specimen assembly, the beam splitter combining an entangled photon specimen beam from the beam probe director and specimen assembly with an entangled photon reference beam.

  15. Comparison of the NPL water calorimeter with other dosimetric techniques for high energy photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosser, K.E.; Williams, A.J.

    1999-01-01

    At present, the primary standard of absorbed dose to water at NPL in high energy photon beams is a graphite calorimeter. However the quantity of interest in radiation dosimetry is absorbed dose to water. Therefore, a new absorbed dose to water standard based on water calorimetry is being developed at NPL. The calorimeter operates at 4 deg. C, with temperature control being provided by a combination of liquid and air cooling. The sealed glass inner vessel of the calorimeter has been designed to minimise the effect of non-water materials on the measurement of absorbed dose. Measurements of absorbed dose to water made in 6, 10 and 19 MV photon beams agreed within the measurement uncertainties with those determined using the primary standard graphite calorimeter. Also the absorbed dose to water measured using the water calorimeter agrees with that based on the air kerma standards for 60 Co γ-radiation within the uncertainties. The development of the water calorimeter will lead to a very robust dosimetry system at NPL, where the absorbed dose to water can be determined using three independent techniques. (author)

  16. Spiraling contaminant electrons increase doses to surfaces outside the photon beam of an MRI-linac with a perpendicular magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, Sara L; van Asselen, Bram; Wolthaus, Jochem W H; Bluemink, J J; Ishakoglu, Kübra; Kok, Jan G M; Lagendijk, Jan J W; Raaymakers, Bas W

    2018-03-29

    The transverse magnetic field of an MRI-linac sweeps contaminant electrons away from the radiation beam. Films oriented perpendicular to the magnetic field and 5cm from the radiation beam edge show a projection of the divergent beam, indicating that contaminant electrons spiral along magnetic field lines and deposit dose on surfaces outside the primary beam perpendicular to the magnetic field. These spiraling contaminant electrons (SCE) could increase skin doses to protruding regions of the patient along the cranio-caudal axis. This study investigated doses from SCE for an MRI-linac comprising a 7MV linac and a 1.5T MRI scanner. Surface doses to films perpendicular to the magnetic field and 5cm from the radiation beam edge showed increased dose within the projection of the primary beam, whereas films parallel to the magnetic field and 5cm from the beam edge showed no region of increased dose. However, the dose from contaminant electrons is absorbed within a few millimeters. For large fields, the SCE dose is within the same order of magnitude as doses from scattered and leakage photons. Doses for both SCE and scattered photons decrease rapidly with decreasing beam size and increasing distance from the beam edge. © 2018 Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine.

  17. SU-E-T-381: Evaluation of Calculated Dose Accuracy for Organs-At-Risk Located at Out-Of-Field in a Commercial Treatment Planning System for High Energy Photon Beams Produced From TrueBeam Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L; Ding, G

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Dose calculation accuracy for the out-of-field dose is important for predicting the dose to the organs-at-risk when they are located outside primary beams. The investigations on evaluating the calculation accuracy of treatment planning systems (TPS) on out-of-field dose in existing publications have focused on low energy (6MV) photon. This study evaluates out-of-field dose calculation accuracy of AAA algorithm for 15MV high energy photon beams. Methods: We used the EGSnrc Monte Carlo (MC) codes to evaluate the AAA algorithm in Varian Eclipse TPS (v.11). The incident beams start with validated Varian phase-space sources for a TrueBeam linac equipped with Millennium 120 MLC. Dose comparisons between using AAA and MC for CT based realistic patient treatment plans using VMAT techniques for prostate and lung were performed and uncertainties of organ dose predicted by AAA at out-of-field location were evaluated. Results: The results show that AAA calculations under-estimate doses at the dose level of 1% (or less) of prescribed dose for CT based patient treatment plans using VMAT techniques. In regions where dose is only 1% of prescribed dose, although AAA under-estimates the out-of-field dose by 30% relative to the local dose, it is only about 0.3% of prescribed dose. For example, the uncertainties of calculated organ dose to liver or kidney that is located out-of-field is <0.3% of prescribed dose. Conclusion: For 15MV high energy photon beams, very good agreements (<1%) in calculating dose distributions were obtained between AAA and MC. The uncertainty of out-of-field dose calculations predicted by the AAA algorithm for realistic patient VMAT plans is <0.3% of prescribed dose in regions where the dose relative to the prescribed dose is <1%, although the uncertainties can be much larger relative to local doses. For organs-at-risk located at out-of-field, the error of dose predicted by Eclipse using AAA is negligible. This work was conducted in part using the

  18. A high energy photon beam derived from neutral strange particle decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reibel, K.; Ruchti, R.

    1982-01-01

    Conventional methods for generating photon beams include: tagged beams in which the photons are derived from electron bremsstrahlung in a radiator target; and broad band beams in which the photons are derived from π/sup 0/ decay - the hadronic component (n, K/sub s//sup 0/) accompanying such a beam is usually suppressed by passage of the beam through a low Z (D/sub 2/) filter. Although one can generate high energy photons by these techniques, the major drawback to these beams is that the photon energy spectrum obtained is peaked at very low E/sub γ/. (Recall that the bremsstrahlung spectrum falls as 1/k). With very high energy proton beams (20 TeV/c), one can image other alternatives for photon beam design. The authors consider one such option here

  19. Photon interactions in a cesium beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nygaard, K.J.; Jones, J.D.; Hebner, R.E. Jr

    1974-01-01

    Photoionization of excited cesium atoms in the 6 2 P3/2 - state has been studied in a triple crossed-beam experiment. A thermal beam of cesium atoms was intersected by one photon beam of wavelength 8521A that served to excite the atoms and another photon beam with wavelengths below 5060A that served to ionize the excited atoms. The resulting ions were detected with a channel electron multiplier. All background effects were discriminated against by chopping the beam of exciting radiation and by analyzing the net count rate with digital synchronous techniques. The relative cross section for photoionization fo Cs(6 2 P3/2) has been measured from threshold (5060A) to 2500A. The results fall off faster than the theoretical calculations of Weisheit and Norcross

  20. Photoelectric effect photon beam position monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Stability of the electron orbit is of critical importance at the NSLS. Many experimenters utilizing the NSLS photon beams can take full advantage of the small transverse dimensions of the source only if the electron orbit variation is kept below 10 to 20% of the transverse electron bunch size. Clearly the first step in a program to stabilize the orbit is to develop position monitors with the required sensitivity, reliability and dynamic range. Of great importance are monitors detecting the photon beams themselves, and also monitors measuring the position of the electron beam. In this section the authors discuss photon beam position monitors utilizing the photoelectric effects, and in the following section the use of capacitively coupled pick-up electrodes to detect electron beam position will be described. In what follows they shall proceed to consider two generic types of monitor geometries (1) Gap monitors, which are designed with the idea that the fringes of the synchrotron radiation will be measured, and the hot or fundamental beam will pass through the monitor unimpeded. (2) Area monitors, which are comprised of two triangular elements nested together similar to the electrodes of a split ion chamber or the diodes described by Siddons and Kraner or Mitsuhashi et al

  1. Photon beam audits for radiation therapy clinics: A pilot mailed dosemeter study in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yegingil, Z.; DeWerd, L. A.; Davis, S. D.; Hammer, C.; Kunugi, K.

    2012-01-01

    A thermoluminescent dosemeter (TLD) mailed dose audit programme was performed at five radiotherapy clinics in Turkey. The intercomparison was organised by the Univ. of Wisconsin Radiation Calibration Laboratory (UWRCL), which was responsible for the technical aspects of the study including reference irradiations, distribution, collection and evaluation. The purpose of these audits was to perform an independent dosimetry check of the radiation beams using TLDs sent by mail. Acrylic holders, each with five TLD chips inside and instructions for their irradiation to specified absorbed dose to water of 2 Gy, were mailed to all participating clinics. TLD irradiations were performed with a 6 MV linear accelerator and 60 Co photon beams. The deviations from the TL readings of UWRCL were calculated. Discrepancies inside the limits of ±5 % between the participant-stated dose, and the TLD-measured dose were considered acceptable. One out of 10 beams checked was outside this limit, with a difference of 5.8 %. (authors)

  2. Transient beam dynamics in the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 2 MV injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henestroza, E.

    1996-01-01

    A driver-scale injector for the heavy ion fusion accelerator project has been built at LBL. This machine has exceeded the design goals of high voltage (above 2 MV), high current (more than 0.8 A of K + ) and low normalized emittance (less than 1 π mm mrad). The injector consists of a 750 keV gun pre-injector followed by an electrostatic quadrupole accelerator which provides strong (alternating gradient) focusing for the space-charge-dominated beam, and simultaneously accelerates the ions to 2 MeV. A matching section is being built to match the beam to the electrostatic accelerator ELISE. The gun pre-injector, designed to hold up to 1 MV with minimal breakdown risks, consists of a hot alumino-silicate source with a large curved emitting surface surrounded by a thick ''extraction electrode''. During beam turn-on the voltage at the source is biased from a negative potential, enough to reverse the electric field on the emitting surface and to avoid emission, to a positive potential to start extracting the beam; it stays constant for about 1 μs, and is reversed to turn off the emission. Since the Marx voltage applied on the accelerating quadrupoles and the main pre-injector gap is a long, constant pulse (several microseconds), the transient behavior is dominated by the extraction pulser voltage time profile. The transient longitudinal dynamics of the beam in the injector was simulated by running the particle-in-cell codes GYMNOS and WARP3D in a time-dependent mode. The generalization and its implementation is WARP3D of a method proposed by Lampel and Tiefenback to eliminate transient oscillations in a one-dimensional planar diode will be presented. (orig.)

  3. Matching beams on photon/electron linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, L.; Vial, P.; Hunt, P.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: There are a number of obvious reasons to match megavoltage X-ray and electron beams for clinical purposes. If two dual-purpose X-ray/electron linear accelerators are of the same design and manufacturer, then this might be possible. The issue is however whether the beams can be matched sufficiently close to be considered the same for patient treatments and planning data for dose calculation purposes. If successfully achieved, there are significant advantages in reduced commissioning time, less work in planning and flexibility in the treatment of patients between the two treatment machines. We have investigated matching a new Varian Clinac 21EX with our 1993 Varian Clinac 2100 C/D. A Varian Clinac 1800 was the first linear accelerator installed at RNSH in 1987. When the Clinac 2100 C/D was installed in 1993, we attempted to match all the X-ray and electron beams with the original Clinac 1800 physical data. The X-ray beam characteristics were satisfactory but the electron beams were not sufficiently compatible for planning or patient treatment purposes. A different designed scattering foil and electron applicator were the cause of the different electron beam physical characteristics between the two models. In replacing the Clinac 1800 with the Clinac 21EX, we have used the original 1993 data of the Clinac 2100 C/D as the gold standard to aim for. Initial measurements during acceptance tests showed that all beams satisfied the manufacturer's specification. The energy was then matched to the existing clinical physics data by adjusting the bending magnet power supply and re-tuning the accelerator. This involved matching % depth dose and the corresponding ratio of 10 and 20 cm % depth dose ratio for 6MV and 18 MV X-ray beams. For 6, 9, 12, 16 and 20 MeV electron beams the normal physical parameters of depth of maximum (R max ), the practical range (R p ), the depth of 50% (R 50 ), the slope (G), the average energy at the surface (E 0 ) and the % photon

  4. Photonic Crystal Polarizing and Non-Polarizing Beam Splitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun-Ying, Guan; Jin-Hui, Shi; Li-Boo, Yuan

    2008-01-01

    A polarizing beam splitter (PBS) and a non-polarizing beam splitter (NPBS) based on a photonic crystal (PC) directional coupler are demonstrated. The photonic crystal directional coupler consists of a hexagonal lattice of dielectric pillars in air and has a complete photonic band gap. The photonic band structure and the band gap map are calculated using the plane wave expansion (PWE) method. The splitting properties of the splitter are investigated numerically using the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method

  5. Correction of experimental photon pencil-beams for the effects of non-uniform and non-parallel measurement conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceberg, Crister P.; Bjaerngard, Bengt E.

    1995-01-01

    An approximate experimental determination of photon pencil-beams can be based on the reciprocity theorem. The scatter part of the pencil-beam is then essentially the derivative with respect to the field radius of measured scatter-to-primary ratios in circular fields. Obtained in this way, however, the pencil-beam implicitly carries the influence from the lateral fluence and beam quality variations of the incident photons, as well as the effects of the divergence of the beam. In this work we show how these effects can be corrected for. The procedure was to calculate scatter-to-primary ratios using an analytical expression for the pencil-beam. By disregarding one by one the effects of the divergence and the fluence and beam quality variations, the influence of these effects were separated and quantified. For instance, for a 6 MV beam of 20x20 cm 2 field size, at 20 cm depth and a source distance of 100 cm, the total effect was 3.9%; 2.0% was due to the non-uniform incident profile, 1.0% due to the non-uniform beam quality, and 0.9% due to the divergence of the beam. At a source distance of 400 cm, all these effects were much lower, adding up to a total of 0.3 %. Using calculated correction factors like these, measured scatter-to-primary ratios were then stripped from the effects of non-uniform and non-parallel measurement conditions, and the scatter part of the pencil-beam was determined using the reciprocity theorem without approximations

  6. Design of electron beam bending magnet system using three sector magnets for electron and photon therapy: a simulation approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahzad, A.A.; Bhoraskar, V.N.; Dhole, S.D.

    2013-01-01

    The 270 degree doubly achromatic beam bending magnet system using three sector magnets has been designed mainly for treating cancer and skin diseases. The main requirements of the design of three magnet system is to focus an electron beam having a spot size less than 3mm x 3mm, energy spread within 3% and divergence angle ≤ 3 mrad at the target. To achieve these parameters the simulation was carried out using Lorentz-3EM software. The beam spot, divergence angle and energy spread were observed with respect to the variation in angles of sector magnets and drift distances. From the simulated results, it has been optimized that all the three sector magnets has an angle of 62 degree and the drift distance 68 mm. It is also observed that at the 1637, 2425, 3278, 4165 and 5690 Amp-turn, the optimized design produces 3851, 5754, 7434, 9356 and 11425 Gauss of magnetic field at median plane require to bend 6, 9, 12, 15 and 18 MeV energy of electron respectively for electron therapy. The output parameters of the optimized design are energy spread 3%, divergence angle ∼ 3 mrad and spot size 2.8 mm. Moreover, for 6 MV and 15 MV photon therapy application, an electron beam of energy 6.5 MeV and 15.5 MeV extracted from magnet system and focussed on the Bremsstrahlung target. For the photon therapy the 1780, and 4456 amp-turn, an optimized design produces 4148 and 9682 Gauss of magnetic field at median plane require to bend 6.5 and 15.5 MeV energy of electron respectively, which further produces Bremsstrahlung in Tungsten target. (author)

  7. Dose attenuation effect of hip prostheses in a 9-MV photon beam. Commercial treatment planning system versus Monte Carlo calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesbahi, A.; Nejad, F.S.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the dosimetric effect of various hip prostheses on pelvis lateral fields treated by a 9-MV photon beam using Monte Carlo (MC) and effective path-length (EPL) methods. The head of the Neptun 10 pc linac was simulated using the MCNP4C MC code. The accuracy of the MC model was evaluated using measured dosimetric features including depth dose values and dose profiles in a water phantom. The Alfard treatment planning system (TPS) was used for EPL calculations. A virtual water phantom with dimensions of 30 x 30 x 30 cm 3 and a cube with dimensions of 4 x 4 x 4 cm 3 made of various metals centered in 12 cm depth was used for MC and EPL calculations. Various materials including titanium, Co-Cr-Mo, and steel alloys were used as hip prostheses. Our results showed significant attenuation in absorbed dose for points after and inside the prostheses. Attenuations of 32%, 54% and 55% were seen for titanium, Co-Cr-Mo, and steel alloys, respectively, at a distance of 5 cm from the prosthesis. Considerable dose increase (up to 18%) was found at the water-prosthesis interface due to back-scattered electrons using the MC method. The results of EPL calculations for the titanium implant were comparable to the MC calculations. This method, however, was not able to predict the interface effect or calculate accurately the absorbed dose in the presence of the Co-Cr-Mo and steel prostheses. The dose perturbation effect of hip prostheses is significant and cannot be predicted accurately by the EPL method for Co-Cr-Mo or steel prostheses. The use of MC-based TPS is recommended for treatments requiring fields passing through hip prostheses. (author)

  8. 200-MeV bremsstrahlung tagged photon beams at Sendai

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, K.; Chiba, M.; Inoue, M.; Kanda, H.; Kimura, R.; Kino, K.; Kobayashi, Y.; Konno, O.; Maeda, K.; Miyase, H.; Miyamoto, A.; Ohtsuki, T.; Saito, A.; Suda, T.; Takahashi, K.; Tamae, T.; Terasaki, Y.; Terasawa, T.; Tsubota, H.; Tsuruta, T.; Utoyama, M.; Yuuki, H.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamazaki, H.

    2006-01-01

    A new beam line for photonuclear reaction experiments using tagged photons has been constructed to take advantage of the completion of the 1.2-GeV STretcher Booster (STB) ring at the Laboratory of Nuclear Science (LNS), Tohoku University. A photon tagging system was installed at the end of the new beam line. It provides bremsstrahlung tagged photon beams in an energy range from 0.2E 0 to 0.8E 0 MeV at the incident electron energy E 0 with an energy resolution of ΔE/E∼10 -2 . The tagged photon intensity I= 6 photons/s is available for typical photonuclear reaction experiments. We introduce the basic parameters of the tagged photons by showing the commissioning data

  9. SU-F-T-338: Flattening Filter Free Photon Beams Can Achieve the Same Plan Quality as Conventional Flattened Beams for Prostate Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolar, M; Szwedowski, R; Greskovich, J; Xia, P [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Some modern linear accelerators are equipped with one low energy flat beam and two flattening filter free (FFF) beams at high and low energies. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the high energy FFF beam can produce the same plan quality as the conventional low energy flat beam, using a volumetric modulated arc (VMAT) technique for prostate patients. Methods: Ten prostate cancer patients were selected with a prescription of 78Gy. For each patient, three plans were created: (a) double arc flat 6MV plan used clinically; (b) double arc 10MV FFF plan; (c) single arc 10MV FFF plan. Each plan was prescribed so that at least 95% of the PTV received the prescription dose. The following dosimetric endpoints were evaluated: volume receiving 78Gy (V78) of the CTV and PTV, PTV conformality index (CI, ratio of prescription isodose volume to the PTV volume), bladder volume receiving 70Gy (V70) and 60Gy (V60), rectum volume receiving 70Gy (V70) and 50Gy (V50), dose to 10cc of the rectum, and volume of both femoral heads receiving 50Gy (V50). Total monitor units for each plan were recorded. Results: No significant difference was found for all dosimetric endpoints between all plans (p>0.05). Compared to the 6MV plans, monitor units were higher with the double arc 10MV FFF plans and lower with the single arc 10MV FFF plans, 29% and 4% respectively. Conclusion: Both single arc and double arc 10MV FFF VMAT can achieve equivalent plan quality as 6MV flat beam double arc treatment plans. With the gantry speed restriction, a high dose rate of 2400MU/min may allow the optimizer to use more MUs than actually needed. Single arc 10MV FFF VMAT plans are a reasonable alternative to double arc 6MV flat beam VMAT plans.

  10. SU-F-T-338: Flattening Filter Free Photon Beams Can Achieve the Same Plan Quality as Conventional Flattened Beams for Prostate Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolar, M; Szwedowski, R; Greskovich, J; Xia, P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Some modern linear accelerators are equipped with one low energy flat beam and two flattening filter free (FFF) beams at high and low energies. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the high energy FFF beam can produce the same plan quality as the conventional low energy flat beam, using a volumetric modulated arc (VMAT) technique for prostate patients. Methods: Ten prostate cancer patients were selected with a prescription of 78Gy. For each patient, three plans were created: (a) double arc flat 6MV plan used clinically; (b) double arc 10MV FFF plan; (c) single arc 10MV FFF plan. Each plan was prescribed so that at least 95% of the PTV received the prescription dose. The following dosimetric endpoints were evaluated: volume receiving 78Gy (V78) of the CTV and PTV, PTV conformality index (CI, ratio of prescription isodose volume to the PTV volume), bladder volume receiving 70Gy (V70) and 60Gy (V60), rectum volume receiving 70Gy (V70) and 50Gy (V50), dose to 10cc of the rectum, and volume of both femoral heads receiving 50Gy (V50). Total monitor units for each plan were recorded. Results: No significant difference was found for all dosimetric endpoints between all plans (p>0.05). Compared to the 6MV plans, monitor units were higher with the double arc 10MV FFF plans and lower with the single arc 10MV FFF plans, 29% and 4% respectively. Conclusion: Both single arc and double arc 10MV FFF VMAT can achieve equivalent plan quality as 6MV flat beam double arc treatment plans. With the gantry speed restriction, a high dose rate of 2400MU/min may allow the optimizer to use more MUs than actually needed. Single arc 10MV FFF VMAT plans are a reasonable alternative to double arc 6MV flat beam VMAT plans.

  11. SU-E-T-432: Field Size Influence On the Electron and Photon Spectra Within Small MV Field Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benmakhlouf, H; Andreo, P [Department of Medical Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm and Department of Physics, Medical Radiation Physics, Stockholm University (Sweden)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the influence of photon field size on the electron and photon fluence spectra in the active volume of small field detectors. Methods: The PENELOPE MC system based usercode PenEasy was used to calculate the material influence on the spectra by scoring the differential fluence in inserts of silicon, carbon, phosphorus and aluminium having 3 mm diameter and height. The spectra were then calculated inside the active volume of eleven detectors (ion chambers and solid-state detectors) whose geometry was simulated with great detail. The inserts/detectors were placed at 10 cm depth in a 30 cm x 30 cm x 30 cm water phantom and irradiated with 2.5 MeV photons and Varian Clinac 6 MV beams of small, medium and large size. Results: For all configurations, photon spectra in the scoring volume were similar to that in a small water volume except for additional characteristic x-ray peaks resulting from the material itself and from the materials surrounding the detectors (i.e. high-Z shielding the silicon). Electron fluence calculated in the inserts were up to 60% larger than in water; the difference increased with material density and decreasing field size. MC-calculated doses were compared to analytically determined collision kerma and restricted cema (cut-off=15keV). For the inserts, with large and medium fields K-col agreed with MC-dose, but K-col overestimated the dose for small fields due to lack of lateral CPE. For the detectors, up to 15% differences between K-col and the MC-dose were found. For all configurations the C-delta and MC-dose agreed within ±2%. Conclusion: The most relevant findings were that shielding affects substantially the photon spectra and material conditions the electron spectra, their field size dependence varying with the geometry configuration. These affect the values of factors entering into relative dosimetry.

  12. High energy high intensity coherent photon beam for the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannenbaum, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    What is proposed for the 20 TeV protons hitting a fixed target is to make a tertiary electron beam similar to that which is the basis of the tagged photon beam at Fermilab. Briefly, a zero degree neutral beam is formed by sweeping out the primary proton beam and any secondary charged particles. Then the photons, from the decay of π 0 in the neutral beam, are converted to e + e - pairs in a lead converter and a high quality electron beam is formed. This beam is brought to the target area where it is converted to a photon beam by Bremsstrahlung in a radiator

  13. Evaluations of absorbed dose ratio factor of Al2O3 dosemeter in radiotherapy photon beams using cavity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, J.; Chen, S.; Chen, L.; Liu, X.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the work was to evaluate the absorbed dose ratio factor f md of an Al 2 O 3 dosemeter to water in photon radiotherapy beams using cavity theory. Burlin theory was used for calculating of this ratio. The effective mass attenuation coefficient β was obtained by comparing Monte Carlo simulations in monoenergetic photon beams. The evaluations of the absorbed dose ratio factor f md were studied for Al 2 O 3 dosemeters of different sizes, which were placed at various depths of the water phantom in different radiation field sizes of Mohan's 6, 10 and 15-MV X-rays. Beyond the build-up region, the variation of f md increases by 0.25 % as the depth increases from 4 to 10 cm. The maximum variation due to different dosemeter sizes is 8.3 %. The difference in the f md due to different radiation field sizes is 1.5 %. The effect of the dosemeter size cannot be neglected. The difference in the f md due to the radiation field sizes of different beams would increase as the dosemeter size increases. (authors)

  14. Comparison of measurements of absorbed dose to water using a water calorimeter and ionization chambers for clinical radiotherapy photon and electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marles, A.E.M.

    1981-01-01

    With the development of the water calorimeter direct measurement of absorbed dose in water becomes possible. This could lead to the establishment of an absorbed dose rather than an exposure related standard for ionization chambers for high energy electrons and photons. In changing to an absorbed dose standard it is necessary to investigate the effect of different parameters, among which are the energy dependence, the air volume, wall thickness and material of the chamber. The effect of these parameters is experimentally studied and presented for several commercially available chambers and one experimental chamber, for photons up to 25 MV and electrons up to 20 MeV, using a water calorimeter as the absorbed dose standard and the most recent formalism to calculate the absorbed dose with ion chambers. For electron beams, the dose measured with the calorimeter was 1% lower than the dose calculated with the chambers, independent of beam energy and chamber. For photon beams, the absorbed dose measured with the calorimeter was 3.8% higher than the absorbed dose calculated from the chamber readings. Such differences were found to be chamber and energy independent. The results for the photons were found to be statistically different from the results with the electron beams. Such difference could not be attributed to a difference in the calorimeter response

  15. Evaluation of IMRT plans for prostate treatment using energies of 6 MV and 15 MV; Avaliacao de planejamentos de IMRT para tratamento de prostata utilizando energias de 6 MV e 15 MV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Lucas Francisco C.; Silva, Murilo C. da; Silveira, Paula J.; Flosi, Adriana A.; Boccaletti, Karina W., E-mail: mcollete@gmail.com [A. C. Camargo Cancer Center, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Servico de Radioterapia

    2013-08-15

    This study aims to evaluate and compare radiotherapy plans with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer treatments optimized for photon energies of 6 MV and 15 MV. We retrospectively evaluated 29 patients with prostate cancer, planned with IMRT technique with prescribed dose of 78 Gy. The initial plan was done for the two photon energies, keeping the same optimization parameters and comparing maximum, minimum and modal PTV doses, conformity and homogeneity indexes, dose gradients, isodoses volumes of 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70 Gy, and the total number of monitor units. It was found that the plans are equivalent regarding higher isodose volumes, conformity and homogeneity indexes, maximum, minimum and modal PTV doses. However, for 6 MV plans there was a considerable increase in both number of monitor units and volume lower isodose volumes, especially the 30 Gy. (author)

  16. Photon beam convolution using polyenergetic energy deposition kernels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoban, P.W.; Murray, D.C.; Round, W.H.

    1994-01-01

    In photon beam convolution calculations where polyenergetic energy deposition kernels (EDKs) are used, the primary photon energy spectrum should be correctly accounted for in Monte Carlo generation of EDKs. This requires the probability of interaction, determined by the linear attenuation coefficient, μ, to be taken into account when primary photon interactions are forced to occur at the EDK origin. The use of primary and scattered EDKs generated with a fixed photon spectrum can give rise to an error in the dose calculation due to neglecting the effects of beam hardening with depth. The proportion of primary photon energy that is transferred to secondary electrons increases with depth of interaction, due to the increase in the ratio μ ab /μ as the beam hardens. Convolution depth-dose curves calculated using polyenergetic EDKs generated for the primary photon spectra which exist at depths of 0, 20 and 40 cm in water, show a fall-off which is too steep when compared with EGS4 Monte Carlo results. A beam hardening correction factor applied to primary and scattered 0 cm EDKs, based on the ratio of kerma to terma at each depth, gives primary, scattered and total dose in good agreement with Monte Carlo results. (Author)

  17. Radiation Therapy of Large Intact Breasts Using a Beam Spoiler or Photons with Mixed Energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lief, Eugene P.; Hunt, Margie A.; Hong, Linda X.; Amols, Howard I.

    2007-01-01

    Radiation treatment of large intact breasts with separations of more than 24 cm is typically performed using x-rays with energies of 10 MV and higher, to eliminate high-dose regions in tissue. The disadvantage of the higher energy beams is the reduced dose to superficial tissue in the buildup region. We evaluated 2 methods of avoiding this underdosage: (1) a beam spoiler: 1.7-cm-thick Lucite plate positioned in the blocking tray 35 cm from the isocenter, with 15-MV x-rays; and (2) combining 6- and 15-MV x-rays through the same portal. For the beam with the spoiler, we measured the dose distribution for normal and oblique incidence using a film and ion chamber in polystyrene, as well as a scanning diode in a water tank. In the mixed-energy approach, we calculated the dose distributions in the buildup region for different proportions of 6- and 15-MV beams. The dose enhancement due to the beam spoiler exhibited significant dependence upon the source-to-skin distance (SSD), field size, and the angle of incidence. In the center of a 20 x 20-cm 2 field at 90-cm SSD, the beam spoiler raises the dose at 5-mm depth from 77% to 87% of the prescription, while maintaining the skin dose below 57%. Comparison of calculated dose with measurements suggested a practical way of treatment planning with the spoiler-usage of 2-mm 'beam' bolus-a special option offered by in-house treatment planning system. A second method of increasing buildup doses is to mix 6- and 15-MV beams. For example, in the case of a parallel-opposed irradiation of a 27-cm-thick phantom, dose to D max for each energy, with respect to midplane, is 114% for pure 6-, 107% for 15-MV beam with the spoiler, and 108% for a 3:1 mixture of 15- and 6-MV beams. Both methods are practical for radiation therapy of large intact breasts

  18. Investigation of the HU-density conversion method and comparison of dose distribution for dose calculation on MV cone beam CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Joo; Lee, Seu Ran; Suh, Tae Suk [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Modern radiation therapy techniques, such as Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), Adaptive radiation therapy (ART) has become a routine clinical practice on linear accelerators for the increase the tumor dose conformity and improvement of normal tissue sparing at the same time. For these highly developed techniques, megavoltage cone beam computed tomography (MVCBCT) system produce volumetric images at just one rotation of the x-ray beam source and detector on the bottom of conventional linear accelerator for real-time application of patient condition into treatment planning. MV CBCT image scan be directly registered to a reference CT data set which is usually kilo-voltage fan-beam computed tomography (kVFBCT) on treatment planning system and the registered image scan be used to adjust patient set-up error. However, to use MV CBCT images in radiotherapy, reliable electron density (ED) distribution are required. Patients scattering, beam hardening and softening effect caused by different energy application between kVCT, MV CBCT can cause cupping artifacts in MV CBCT images and distortion of Houns field Unit (HU) to ED conversion. The goal of this study, for reliable application of MV CBCT images into dose calculation, MV CBCT images was modified to correct distortion of HU to ED using the relationship of HU and ED from kV FBCT and MV CBCT images. The HU-density conversion was performed on MV CBCT image set using Dose difference map was showing in Figure 1. Finally, percentage differences above 3% were reduced depending on applying density calibration method. As a result, total error co uld be reduced to under 3%. The present study demonstrates that dose calculation accuracy using MV CBCT image set can be improved my applying HU-density conversion method. The dose calculation and comparison of dose distribution from MV CBCT image set with/without HU-density conversion method was performed. An advantage of this study compared to other approaches is that HU

  19. Improved field abutment-wedge design for 6-MV x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyerick, C.E.; Steadham, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents an improved abutment wedge for matching large photon fields. The wedge is used with a 6-MV Linac accelerator and generates a 5-cm pseudopenumbra at the 50% relative dose juncture. The features allow treatment of fields up to 40 cm long in any fractional step of increment, simultaneous generation of two wide penumbrae or one wide and one sharp penumbra, and attachment of the device downstream of standard beam-shaping accessories in any 90 degrees angular orientation

  20. Dose determination in radiotherapy for photon beams modified by static intensity modulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellanos Lopez, M.E.

    1998-01-01

    The static intensity modulators, used in radiotherapy, modify the spectral composition of the beam and lead to specific problems of the dose calculation. The aim of this work was to establish a three dimensional calculation, global and accurate, adapted to the primary-diffused separation algorithm and valid for any static modulator type. A theoretical study, experimentally verified, allowed the evaluation of the primary fluence, resulting from metallic sheets placed between photons beams of 6 to 23 MV nominal energy. It has been showed that the diffused, coming from the modulators, could be neglected for weak thickness and for the relative dose variation. In return it leads to significant variations of many % on the absolute dose and must be take into account for the bigger thicknesses. Corrective methods for the primary fluence have been proposed. From the energy spectra of the beam, the metallic modulator influence has been studied on the primary and diffused components of the dose and improvements of the calculation method have been proposed. These improvements are based on the modulator representation as a transmission matrix and on semi-empirical corrective factors. (A.L.B.)

  1. SU-E-T-577: Commissioning of a Deterministic Algorithm for External Photon Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, T; Finlay, J; Mesina, C; Liu, H

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: We report commissioning results for a deterministic algorithm for external photon beam treatment planning. A deterministic algorithm solves the radiation transport equations directly using a finite difference method, thus improve the accuracy of dose calculation, particularly under heterogeneous conditions with results similar to that of Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. Methods: Commissioning data for photon energies 6 – 15 MV includes the percentage depth dose (PDD) measured at SSD = 90 cm and output ratio in water (Spc), both normalized to 10 cm depth, for field sizes between 2 and 40 cm and depths between 0 and 40 cm. Off-axis ratio (OAR) for the same set of field sizes was used at 5 depths (dmax, 5, 10, 20, 30 cm). The final model was compared with the commissioning data as well as additional benchmark data. The benchmark data includes dose per MU determined for 17 points for SSD between 80 and 110 cm, depth between 5 and 20 cm, and lateral offset of up to 16.5 cm. Relative comparisons were made in a heterogeneous phantom made of cork and solid water. Results: Compared to the commissioning beam data, the agreement are generally better than 2% with large errors (up to 13%) observed in the buildup regions of the FDD and penumbra regions of the OAR profiles. The overall mean standard deviation is 0.04% when all data are taken into account. Compared to the benchmark data, the agreements are generally better than 2%. Relative comparison in heterogeneous phantom is in general better than 4%. Conclusion: A commercial deterministic algorithm was commissioned for megavoltage photon beams. In a homogeneous medium, the agreement between the algorithm and measurement at the benchmark points is generally better than 2%. The dose accuracy for a deterministic algorithm is better than a convolution algorithm in heterogeneous medium

  2. Evaluation of latent variances in Monte Carlo dose calculations with Varian TrueBeam photon phase-spaces used as a particle source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhakeem, Eyad; Zavgorodni, Sergei

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the latent variance (LV) of Varian TrueBeam photon phase-space files (PSF) for open 10  ×  10 cm2 and small stereotactic fields and estimate the number of phase spaces required to be summed up in order to maintain sub-percent LV in Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations. BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc software was used to transport particles from Varian phase-space files (PSFA) through the secondary collimators. Transported particles were scored into another phase-space located under the jaws (PSFB), or transported further through the cone collimators and scored straight below, forming PSFC. Phase-space files (PSFB) were scored for 6 MV-FFF, 6 MV, 10 MV-FFF, 10 MV and 15 MV beams with 10  ×  10 cm2 field size, and PSFC were scored for 6 MV beam under circular cones of 0.13, 0.25, 0.35, and 1 cm diameter. Both PSFB and PSFC were transported into a water phantom with particle recycling number ranging from 10 to 1000. For 10  ×  10 cm2 fields 0.5  ×  0.5  ×  0.5 cm3 voxels were used to score the dose, whereas the dose was scored in 0.1  ×  0.1  ×  0.5 cm3 voxels for beams collimated with small cones. In addition, for small 0.25 cm diameter cone-collimated 6 MV beam, phantom voxel size varied as 0.02  ×  0.02  ×  0.5 cm3, 0.05  ×  0.05  ×  0.5 cm3 and 0.1  ×  0.1  ×  0.5 cm3. Dose variances were scored in all cases and LV evaluated as per Sempau et al. For the 10  ×  10 cm2 fields calculated LVs were greatest at the phantom surface and decreased with depth until they reached a plateau at 5 cm depth. LVs were found to be 0.54%, 0.96%, 0.35%, 0.69% and 0.57% for the 6 MV-FFF, 6 MV, 10 MV-FFF, 10 MV and 15 MV energies, respectively at the depth of 10 cm. For the 6 MV phase-space collimated with cones of 0.13, 0.25, 0.35, 1.0 cm diameter, the LVs calculated at 1.5 cm depth were 75.6%, 25.4%, 17

  3. Absorbed dose calibration factors for parallel-plate chambers in high energy photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEwen, M.R.; Duane, S.; Thomas, R.A.S.

    2002-01-01

    An investigation was carried out into the performance of parallel-plate chambers in 60 Co and MV photon beams. The aim was to derive calibration factors, investigate chamber-to-chamber variability and provide much-needed information on the use of parallel-plate chambers in high-energy X-ray beams. A set of NE2561/NE2611 reference chambers, calibrated against the primary standard graphite calorimeter is used for the dissemination of absorbed dose to water. The parallel-plate chambers were calibrated by comparison with the NPL reference chambers in a water phantom. Two types of parallel-plate chamber were investigated - the NACP -02 and Roos and measurements were made at 60 C0 and 6 linac photon energies (6-19 MV). Calibration factors were derived together with polarity corrections. The standard uncertainty in the calibration of a chamber in terms of absorbed dose to water is estimated to be ±0.75%. The results of the polarity measurements were somewhat confusing. One would expect the correction to be small and previous measurements in electron beams have indicated that there is little variation between chambers of these types. However, some chambers gave unexpectedly large polarity corrections, up to 0.8%. By contrast the measured polarity correction for a NE2611 chamber was less than 0.13% at all energies. The reason for these large polarity corrections is not clear, but experimental error and linac variations have been ruled out. By combining the calibration data for the different chambers it was possible to obtain experimental k Q factors for the two chamber types. It would appear from the data that the variations between chambers of the same type are random and one can therefore define a generic curve for each chamber type. These are presented in Figure 1, together with equivalent data for two cylindrical chamber types - NE2561/NE2611 and NE2571. As can be seen, there is a clear difference between the curves for the cylindrical chambers and those for the

  4. FEM design and simulation of a short, 10 MV, S-band Linac with Monte Carlo dose simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baillie, Devin; Aubin, J. St.; Steciw, S.; Fallone, B. G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Current commercial 10 MV Linac waveguides are 1.5 m. The authors’ current 6 MV linear accelerator–magnetic resonance imager (Linac–MR) system fits in typical radiotherapy vaults. To allow 10 MV treatments with the Linac–MR and still fit within typical vaults, the authors design a 10 MV Linac with an accelerator waveguide of the same length (27.5 cm) as current 6 MV Linacs. Methods: The first design stage is to design a cavity such that a specific experimental measurement for breakdown is applicable to the cavity. This is accomplished through the use of finite element method (FEM) simulations to match published shunt impedance, Q factor, and ratio of peak to mean-axial electric field strength from an electric breakdown study. A full waveguide is then designed and tuned in FEM simulations based on this cavity design. Electron trajectories are computed through the resulting radio frequency fields, and the waveguide geometry is modified by shifting the first coupling cavity in order to optimize the electron beam properties until the energy spread and mean energy closely match values published for an emulated 10 MV Linac. Finally, Monte Carlo dose simulations are used to compare the resulting photon beam depth dose profile and penumbra with that produced by the emulated 10 MV Linac. Results: The shunt impedance, Q factor, and ratio of peak to mean-axial electric field strength are all matched to within 0.1%. A first coupling cavity shift of 1.45 mm produces an energy spectrum width of 0.347 MeV, very close to the published value for the emulated 10 MV of 0.315 MeV, and a mean energy of 10.53 MeV, nearly identical to the published 10.5 MeV for the emulated 10 MV Linac. The depth dose profile produced by their new Linac is within 1% of that produced by the emulated 10 MV spectrum for all depths greater than 1.5 cm. The penumbra produced is 11% narrower, as measured from 80% to 20% of the central axis dose. Conclusions: The authors have successfully

  5. Injector for CESAR (2 MeV electron storage ring): 2-beam, 2 MV van de Graaff generator.

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1963-01-01

    The van de Graaff generator in its tank. For voltage-holding, the tank was filled with pressurized extra-dry nitrogen. 2 beams emanated from 2 separate electron-guns. The left beam, for injection into the CESAR ring, was pulsed at 50 Hz, with currents of up to 1 A for 400 ns. The right beam was sent to a spectrometer line. Its pulselength was also 400 ns, but the pulse current was 12 microA, at a rate variable from 50 kHz to 1 MHz. This allowed stabilization of the top-terminal voltage to an unprecedented stability of +- 100 V, i.e. 6E-5. Although built for a nominal voltage of 2 MV, the operational voltage was limited to 1.75 MV in order to minimize voltage break-down events.

  6. Effect of silicone gel breast prosthesis on electron and photon dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, L.; St George, F.J.; Mansfield, C.M.; Krishnan, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of a silicone gel breast prosthesis on the absorbed dose distribution of 9-20 MeV electron beams and 1.25-15 MV photon beams was studied. Compared to water measurements, at depths smaller than the practical range of the electron beams, the central axis depth dose values below the prosthesis were lower for all energies by as much as 3.5%. However, at depths near the practical range, the central axis depth dose values for the prosthesis were greater than that of water by as much as 33%. Since this occurs near the end of the electron range, the resultant difference may not be clinically significant. Results of the effect of breast prosthesis on photon depth dose distributions reveal that no clinically significant perturbation is produced by the breast prosthesis using Co-60, 6- and 15-MV radiations

  7. Effect of silicone gel breast prosthesis on electron and photon dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, L.; St George, F.J.; Mansfield, C.M.; Krishnan, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of a silicone gel breast prosthesis on the absorbed dose distribution of 9--20 MeV electron beams and 1.25--15 MV photon beams was studied. Compared to water measurements, at depths smaller than the practical range of the electron beams, the central axis depth dose values below the prothesis were lower for all energies by as much as 3.5%. However, at depths near the practical range, the central axis depth dose values for the prosthesis were greater than that of water by as much as 33%. Since this occurs near the end of the electron range, the resultant difference may not be clinically significant. Results of the effect of breast prosthesis on photon depth dose distributions reveal that no clinically significant perturbation is produced by the breast prosthesis using Co-60, 6- and 15-MV radiations

  8. SU-E-T-163: Thin-Film Organic Photocell (OPV) Properties in MV and KV Beams for Dosimetry Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, S K; Hesser, J; Zhang, H; Gowrisanker, S; Yakushevich, S; Shulhevich, Y; Abkai, C; Wack, L; Zygmanski, P

    2012-06-01

    To characterize dosimetric properties of low-cost thin film organic-based photovoltaic (OPV) cells to kV and MV x-ray beams for their usage as large area dosimeter for QA and patient safety monitoring device. A series of thin film OPV cells of various areas and thicknesses were irradiated with MV beams to evaluate the stability and reproducibility of their response, linearity and sensitivity to absorbed dose. The OPV response to x-rays of various linac energies were also characterized. Furthermore the practical (clinical) sensitivity of the cells was determined using IMRT sweeping gap test generated with various gap sizes. To evaluate their potential usage in the development of low cost kV imaging device, the OPV cells were irradiated with kV beam (60-120 kVp) from a fluoroscopy unit. Photocell response to the absorbed dose was characterized as a function of the organic thin film thickness and size, beam energy and exposure for kV beams as well. In addition, photocell response was determined with and without thin plastic scintillator. Response of the OPV cells to the absorbed dose from kV and MV beams are stable and reproducible. The photocell response was linearly proportional to the size and about slightly decreasing with the thickness of the organic thin film, which agrees with the general performance of the photocells in visible light. The photocell response increases as a linear function of absorbed dose and x-ray energy. The sweeping gap tests performed showed that OPV cells have sufficient practical sensitivity to measured MV x-ray delivery with gap size as small as 1 mm. With proper calibration, the OPV cells could be used for online radiation dose measurement for quality assurance and patient safety purposes. Their response to kV beam show promising potential in development of low cost kV radiation detection devices. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  9. Evaluation of IMRT plans for prostate treatment using energies of 6 MV and 15 MV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, Lucas Francisco C.; Silva, Murilo C. da; Silveira, Paula J.; Flosi, Adriana A.; Boccaletti, Karina W.

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate and compare radiotherapy plans with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer treatments optimized for photon energies of 6 MV and 15 MV. We retrospectively evaluated 29 patients with prostate cancer, planned with IMRT technique with prescribed dose of 78 Gy. The initial plan was done for the two photon energies, keeping the same optimization parameters and comparing maximum, minimum and modal PTV doses, conformity and homogeneity indexes, dose gradients, isodoses volumes of 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70 Gy, and the total number of monitor units. It was found that the plans are equivalent regarding higher isodose volumes, conformity and homogeneity indexes, maximum, minimum and modal PTV doses. However, for 6 MV plans there was a considerable increase in both number of monitor units and volume lower isodose volumes, especially the 30 Gy. (author)

  10. Low dose out-of-field radiotherapy, part 2: Calculating the mean photon energy values for the out-of-field photon energy spectrum from scattered radiation using Monte Carlo methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrobala, A; Adamczyk, S; Kruszyna-Mochalska, M; Skórska, M; Konefał, A; Suchorska, W; Zaleska, K; Kowalik, A; Jackowiak, W; Malicki, J

    2017-08-01

    During radiotherapy, leakage from the machine head and collimator expose patients to out-of-field irradiation doses, which may cause secondary cancers. To quantify the risks of secondary cancers due to out-of-field doses, it is first necessary to measure these doses. Since most dosimeters are energy-dependent, it is essential to first determine the type of photon energy spectrum in the out-of-field area. The aim of this study was to determine the mean photon energy values for the out-of-field photon energy spectrum for a 6 MV photon beam using the GEANT 4-Monte Carlo method. A specially-designed large water phantom was simulated with a static field at gantry 0°. The source-to-surface distance was 92cm for an open field size of 10×10cm2. The photon energy spectra were calculated at five unique positions (at depths of 0.5, 1.6, 4, 6, 8, and 10cm) along the central beam axis and at six different off-axis distances. Monte Carlo simulations showed that mean radiation energy levels drop rapidly beyond the edge of the 6 MV photon beam field: at a distance of 10cm, the mean energy level is close to 0.3MeV versus 1.5MeV at the central beam axis. In some cases, the energy level actually increased even as the distance from the field edge increased: at a depth of 1.6cm and 15cm off-axis, the mean energy level was 0.205MeV versus 0.252MeV at 20cm off-axis. The out-of-field energy spectra and dose distribution data obtained in this study with Monte Carlo methods can be used to calibrate dosimeters to measure out-of-field radiation from 6MV photons. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Testing of the analytical anisotropic algorithm for photon dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esch, Ann van; Tillikainen, Laura; Pyykkonen, Jukka; Tenhunen, Mikko; Helminen, Hannu; Siljamaeki, Sami; Alakuijala, Jyrki; Paiusco, Marta; Iori, Mauro; Huyskens, Dominique P.

    2006-01-01

    The analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) was implemented in the Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems) treatment planning system to replace the single pencil beam (SPB) algorithm for the calculation of dose distributions for photon beams. AAA was developed to improve the dose calculation accuracy, especially in heterogeneous media. The total dose deposition is calculated as the superposition of the dose deposited by two photon sources (primary and secondary) and by an electron contamination source. The photon dose is calculated as a three-dimensional convolution of Monte-Carlo precalculated scatter kernels, scaled according to the electron density matrix. For the configuration of AAA, an optimization algorithm determines the parameters characterizing the multiple source model by optimizing the agreement between the calculated and measured depth dose curves and profiles for the basic beam data. We have combined the acceptance tests obtained in three different departments for 6, 15, and 18 MV photon beams. The accuracy of AAA was tested for different field sizes (symmetric and asymmetric) for open fields, wedged fields, and static and dynamic multileaf collimation fields. Depth dose behavior at different source-to-phantom distances was investigated. Measurements were performed on homogeneous, water equivalent phantoms, on simple phantoms containing cork inhomogeneities, and on the thorax of an anthropomorphic phantom. Comparisons were made among measurements, AAA, and SPB calculations. The optimization procedure for the configuration of the algorithm was successful in reproducing the basic beam data with an overall accuracy of 3%, 1 mm in the build-up region, and 1%, 1 mm elsewhere. Testing of the algorithm in more clinical setups showed comparable results for depth dose curves, profiles, and monitor units of symmetric open and wedged beams below d max . The electron contamination model was found to be suboptimal to model the dose around d max , especially for physical

  12. Definition of parameters for quality assurance of flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogliata, A.; Garcia, R.; Knöös, T.; Nicolini, G.; Clivio, A.; Vanetti, E.; Khamphan, C.; Cozzi, L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Flattening filter free (FFF) beams generated by medical linear accelerators have recently started to be used in radiotherapy clinical practice. Such beams present fundamental differences with respect to the standard filter flattened (FF) beams, making the generally used dosimetric parameters and definitions not always viable. The present study will propose possible definitions and suggestions for some dosimetric parameters for use in quality assurance of FFF beams generated by medical linacs in radiotherapy. Methods: The main characteristics of the photon beams have been analyzed using specific data generated by a Varian TrueBeam linac having both FFF and FF beams of 6 and 10 MV energy, respectively. Results: Definitions for dose profile parameters are suggested starting from the renormalization of the FFF with respect to the corresponding FF beam. From this point the flatness concept has been translated into one of “unflatness” and other definitions have been proposed, maintaining a strict parallelism between FFF and FF parameter concepts. Conclusions: Ideas for quality controls used in establishing a quality assurance program when introducing FFF beams into the clinical environment are given here, keeping them similar to those used for standard FF beams. By following the suggestions in this report, the authors foresee that the introduction of FFF beams into a clinical radiotherapy environment will be as safe and well controlled as standard beam modalities using the existing guidelines.

  13. Studies and comparisons of two photon-tagging systems for the production of monochromatic photon beams for photonuclear experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aniel, Thierry.

    1982-06-01

    The performance of photon beams obtained by two different tagging processes (tagging of ''hard'' annihilation photons with ''soft'' associated photons, tagging of bremstrahlung photons with associated electrons) on the same facility was studied. The two processes are described and experimental results on the characteristics of the resulting beams given. The respective advantages of both methods are compared with one another and with those of a quasi-monochromatic beam obtained by the in-flight annihilation of a positron beam. A development based on the second process is then studied together with its applications to photonuclear physics [fr

  14. Beam properties and stability of a flattening-filter free 7 MV beam--An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzierma, Yvonne; Licht, Norbert; Nuesken, Frank; Ruebe, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Several works have recently focused on flattening-filter-free (FFF) beams of linear accelerators of various companies (in particular, Varian and Elekta), but no overview as yet exists for the flattening-filter free 7XU beam (Siemens Artiste). Methods: Dosimetric properties of the 7XU beam were measured in May and September 2011. We present depth dose curves and beam profiles, output factors, and MLC transmission and assess the stability of the measurements. The 7XU beam was commissioned in the Pinnacle³ treatment planning system (TPS), and modeling results including the spectrum are presented. Results: The percent depth dose curve of the 7XU beam is similar to the flat 6X beam line, with a slightly smaller surface dose. The beam profiles show the characteristic shape of flattening-filter free beams, with deviations between measurements of generally less than 1%. The output factors of the 7XU beam decrease more slowly than for the 6X beam. The MLC transmission is comparable but slightly less for the 7XU beam. The 7XU beam can be adequately modeled by the Pinnacle³ TPS, with successful dosimetric verification. The spectrum of the 7XU beam has lower photon fluence up to approximately 2.5 MeV and higher fluence beyond, with a slightly higher mean energy. Conclusions: The 7XU beam has been commissioned for clinical use after successful modeling, stability checks, and dosimetric verification.

  15. A numerical study of the characteristics of the LEALE photon beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucherini, V.; De Sanctis, E.; Di Giacomo, P.

    1978-01-01

    At the LEALE laboratory a monochromatic photon beam with energy in the range 80/300 MeV is available. Photons are produced by positron annihilation on a liquid hydrogen target. The characteristics of the beam are calculated for various conditions (positron energy, photon collimator, target thickness), taking into account the effects contributing to the beam spreading (energy loss and multiple scattering of protons in the annihilation target, energy distribution and angular divergence of the positron beam). (author)

  16. A neutron survey of a 25 MV x-ray clinical linac treatment room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, Kenneth W.; Holeman, George R.; Nath, Ravinder

    1978-01-01

    Neutron production in high energy x-ray radiotherapy machines results in unnecessary dose to patients and has been of recent interest to private and Federal agencies. An activation technique has been used to measure fast and thermal neutron fluxes in the high energy x-ray beam, and at radial distances of 1 and 2 meters from the beam axis of the 25 MV Sagittaire Linear Accelerator located at the Yale-New Haven Hospital's Cancer Therapy Center. Phosphorous pentoxide activation detectors were used to monitor the thermal flux and the fast neutron flux above 0.7 MeV neutron energy. Unlike other techniques for measuring neutrons, this detector has been shown to be insensitive to high energy photon interference at the photon dose rates present in the beam. Neutron spectra at various distances from the accelerator target were computed for the treatment room geometry using the Morse Monte Carlo Code (R.C. McCall, SLAC, Personal Communication). Normalization of these spectra provided the means by which the activation products measured in the phosphorous were converted to fast neutron fluxes. Dose equivalent conversion factors were applied to each energy of the calculated neutron spectra and integrated, resulting in fast neutron flux to dose equivalent conversion factors at various locations in the treatment room. Fast neutron dose equivalent was found to maximize in the photon beam, (0.005 - .007 neutron Rem/photon Rad) and decrease with distance thereafter. Thermal neutron dose equivalent was found to be essentially constant through- out the treatment room (∼ 3.35x10 -5 neutron Rem/ photon Rad). (author)

  17. SU-E-T-391: Assessment and Elimination of the Angular Dependence of the Response of the NanoDot OSLD System in MV Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, J; Dunn, L; Lye, J; Kenny, J W; Alves, A D C; Cole, A; Asena, A; Kron, T; Williams, I M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Assess the angular dependence of the nanoDot OSLD system in MV X-ray beams at depths and mitigate this dependence for measurements in phantoms. Methods: Measurements for 6 MV photons at 3 cm and 10 cm depth and Monte Carlo simulations were performed. Two special holders were designed which allow a nanoDot dosimeter to be rotated around the center of its sensitive volume (5 mm diameter disk). The first holder positions the dosimeter disk perpendicular to the beam (en-face). It then rotates until the disk is parallel with the beam (edge on). This is referred to as Setup 1. The second holder positions the disk parallel to the beam (edge on) for all angles (Setup 2). Monte Carlo simulations using GEANT4 considered detector and housing in detail based on microCT data. Results: An average drop in response by 1.4±0.7% (measurement) and 2.1±0.3% (Monte Carlo) for the 90° orientation compared to 0° was found for Setup 1. Monte Carlo simulations also showed a strong dependence of the effect on the composition of the sensitive layer. Assuming 100% active material (Al??O??) results in a 7% drop in response for 90° compared to 0°. Assuming the layer to be completely water, results in a flat response (within simulation uncertainty of about 1%). For Setup 2, measurements and Monte Carlo simulations found the angular dependence of the dosimeter to be below 1% and within the measurement uncertainty. Conclusion: The nanoDot dosimeter system exhibits a small angular dependence off approximately 2%. Changing the orientation of the dosimeter so that a coplanar beam arrangement always hits the detector material edge on reduces the angular dependence to within the measurement uncertainty of about 1%. This makes the dosimeter more attractive for phantom based clinical measurements and audits with multiple coplanar beams. The Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service is a joint initiative between the Australian Department of Health and the Australian Radiation Protection and

  18. Flattening filter free beams from TrueBeam and Versa HD units: Evaluation of the parameters for quality assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogliata, Antonella, E-mail: antonella.fogliata@humanitas.it; Reggiori, Giacomo; Stravato, Antonella; Scorsetti, Marta; Cozzi, Luca [Radiotherapy and Radiosurgery Department, Humanitas Research Hospital, Milan-Rozzano I-20098 (Italy); Fleckenstein, Jens; Schneider, Frank; Lohr, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim D-68167 (Germany); Pachoud, Marc; Ghandour, Sarah [Radiation Oncology Department, Hôpital Riviera Chablais, Vevey CH-1800 (Switzerland); Krauss, Harald [Radio-Oncology Department, Kaiser Franz Josef Spital, Vienna A-1100 (Austria)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: Flattening filter free (FFF) beams generated by medical linear accelerators are today clinically used for stereotactical and non-stereotactical radiotherapy treatments. Such beams differ from the standard flattened beams (FF) in the high dose rate and the profile shape peaked on the beam central axis. Definition of new parameters as unflatness and slope for FFF beams has been proposed based on a renormalization factor for FFF profiles. The present study aims to assess the dosimetric differences between FFF beams generated by linear accelerators from different vendors, and to provide renormalization and parameter data of the two kinds of units. Methods: Dosimetric data from two Varian TrueBeam and two Elekta Versa HD linear accelerators, all with 6 and 10 MV nominal accelerating potentials, FF and FFF modes have been collected. Renormalization factors and related fit parameters according to Fogliata et al. [“Definition of parameters for quality assurance of flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams in radiation therapy,” Med. Phys. 39, 6455–6464 (2012)] have been evaluated for FFF beams of both units and energies. Unflatness and slope parameters from profile curves were evaluated. Dosimetric differences in terms of beam penetration and near-the-surface dose were also assessed. Results: FFF profile parameters have been updated; renormalization factors and unflatness from the Varian units are consistent with the published data. Elekta FFF beam qualities, different from the Varian generated beams, tend to express similar behaviour as the FF beam of the corresponding nominal energy. TPR{sub 20,10} for 6 and 10 MV FF and FFF TrueBeam beams are 0.665, 0.629 (6 MV) and 0.738, 0.703 (10 MV). The same figures for Versa HD units are 0.684, 0.678 (6 MV) and 0.734, 0.721 (10 MV). Conclusions: Renormalization factor and unflatness parameters evaluated from Varian and Elekta FFF beams are provided, in particular renormalization factors table and fit parameters.

  19. A performance comparison of flat-panel imager-based MV and kV cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groh, B.A.; Siewerdsen, J.H.; Drake, D.G.; Wong, J.W.; Jaffray, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    The use of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been proposed for guiding the delivery of radiation therapy, and investigators have examined the use of both kilovoltage (kV) and megavoltage (MV) x-ray beams in the development of such CBCT systems. In this paper, the inherent contrast and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) performance for a variety of existing and hypothetical detectors for CBCT are investigated analytically as a function of imaging dose and object size. Theoretical predictions are compared to the results of experimental investigations employing large-area flat-panel imagers (FPIs) at kV and MV energies. Measurements were performed on two different FPI-based CBCT systems: a bench-top prototype incorporating an FPI and kV x-ray source (100 kVp x rays), and a system incorporating an FPI mounted on the gantry of a medical linear accelerator (6 MV x rays). The SNR in volume reconstructions was measured as a function of dose and found to agree reasonably with theoretical predictions. These results confirm the theoretically predicted advantages of employing kV energy x rays in imaging soft-tissue structures found in the human body. While MV CBCT may provide a valuable means of correcting 3D setup errors and may offer an advantage in terms of simplicity of mechanical integration with a linear accelerator (e.g., implementation in place of a portal imager), kV CBCT offers significant performance advantages in terms of image contrast and SNR per unit dose for visualization of soft-tissue structures. The relatively poor SNR performance at MV energies is primarily a result of the low x-ray quantum efficiencies (∼a few percent or less) that are currently achieved with FPIs at high energies. Furthermore, kV CBCT with an FPI offers the potential of combined volumetric and radiographic/fluoroscopic imaging using the same device

  20. EPR dosimetry of radiotherapy photon beams in inhomogeneous media using alanine films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oesteraas, Bjoern Helge [Department of Radiation Biology, Institute for Cancer Research, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Montebello, N-0310 Oslo (Norway); Hole, Eli Olaug [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, PO Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Olsen, Dag Rune [Department of Radiation Biology, Institute for Cancer Research, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Montebello, N-0310 Oslo (Norway); Malinen, Eirik [Department of Radiation Biology, Institute for Cancer Research, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Montebello, N-0310 Oslo (Norway)

    2006-12-21

    In the current work, EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) dosimetry using alanine films (134 {mu}m thick) was utilized for dose measurements in inhomogeneous phantoms irradiated with radiotherapy photon beams. The main phantom material was PMMA, while either Styrofoam or aluminium was introduced as an inhomogeneity. The phantoms were irradiated to a maximum dose of about 30 Gy with 6 or 15 MV photons. The performance of the alanine film dosimeters was investigated and compared to results from ion chamber dosimetry, Monte Carlo simulations and radiotherapy treatment planning calculations. It was found that the alanine film dosimeters had a linear dose response above approximately 5 Gy, while a background signal obscured the response at lower dose levels. For doses between 5 and 60 Gy, the standard deviation of single alanine film dose estimates was about 2%. The alanine film dose estimates yielded results comparable to those from the Monte Carlo simulations and the ion chamber measurements, with absolute differences between estimates in the order of 1-15%. The treatment planning calculations exhibited limited applicability. The current work shows that alanine film dosimetry is a method suitable for estimating radiotherapeutical doses and for dose measurements in inhomogeneous media.

  1. EPR dosimetry of radiotherapy photon beams in inhomogeneous media using alanine films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oesteraas, Bjoern Helge; Hole, Eli Olaug; Olsen, Dag Rune; Malinen, Eirik

    2006-01-01

    In the current work, EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) dosimetry using alanine films (134 μm thick) was utilized for dose measurements in inhomogeneous phantoms irradiated with radiotherapy photon beams. The main phantom material was PMMA, while either Styrofoam or aluminium was introduced as an inhomogeneity. The phantoms were irradiated to a maximum dose of about 30 Gy with 6 or 15 MV photons. The performance of the alanine film dosimeters was investigated and compared to results from ion chamber dosimetry, Monte Carlo simulations and radiotherapy treatment planning calculations. It was found that the alanine film dosimeters had a linear dose response above approximately 5 Gy, while a background signal obscured the response at lower dose levels. For doses between 5 and 60 Gy, the standard deviation of single alanine film dose estimates was about 2%. The alanine film dose estimates yielded results comparable to those from the Monte Carlo simulations and the ion chamber measurements, with absolute differences between estimates in the order of 1-15%. The treatment planning calculations exhibited limited applicability. The current work shows that alanine film dosimetry is a method suitable for estimating radiotherapeutical doses and for dose measurements in inhomogeneous media

  2. True beam commissioning experience at Nordland Hospital Trust, Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daci, Lulzime, E-mail: lulzime.daci@nodlandssykehuset.no [Nordland Hospital Trust, Bodø (Norway); Malkaj, Partizan, E-mail: malkaj-p@hotmail.com [Faculty of Mathematics Engineering and Physics Engineering, Polytechnic University of Tirana (Albania)

    2016-03-25

    To evaluate the measured of all photon beam data of first Varian True Beam version 2.0 slim model, recently commissioned at Nordland Hospital Trust, Bodø. To compare and evaluate the possibility of beam matching with the Clinac2300, for the energies of 6MV and 15 MV. Materials/Methods: Measurements of PDD, OAR, and Output factors were realized with the IBA Blue-phantom with different detectors and evaluated between them for all photon energies: 6MV, 15MV, 6MV FFF and 10MV FFF. The ionization chambers used were Pin Point CC01, CC04, Semiflex CC13 and photon diode by Iba dosimetry. The data were processed using Beizer algorithm with a resolution of 1 mm. The measured depth dose curves, diagonals, OAR, and output factors were imported into Eclipse in order to calculate beam data for the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA version 10.0.28) for both the dataset measured with CC04 and CC13 and compared. The model head of 23EX was selected as the most near model to True Beam as a restriction of our version of Aria. It was seen that better results were achieved with the CC04 measured data as a result of better resolution. For the biggest field after 10 cm depth a larger difference is seen between measured and calculated for both dataset, but it is within the criteria for acceptance. Results: The Beam analysis criteria of 2 mm at 50% dose is achieved for all the fields accept for 40x40 that is within 3%. Depth difference at maximum dose is within 1 mm for all the fields and dose difference at 100 mm and 200 mm is lower than 1% for or all the fields. The PDD between two machines for all the fields differ after Dmax with less than 1%. For profiles in the field zone and outside field the difference is within 1% for all the fields. In the penumbra region the difference is from 2% up to 12% for big fields. As for diagonals they differ as a result of the head construction at the edge of the field and the penumbra region. The output factors differ for big fields

  3. True beam commissioning experience at Nordland Hospital Trust, Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daci, Lulzime; Malkaj, Partizan

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the measured of all photon beam data of first Varian True Beam version 2.0 slim model, recently commissioned at Nordland Hospital Trust, Bodø. To compare and evaluate the possibility of beam matching with the Clinac2300, for the energies of 6MV and 15 MV. Materials/Methods: Measurements of PDD, OAR, and Output factors were realized with the IBA Blue-phantom with different detectors and evaluated between them for all photon energies: 6MV, 15MV, 6MV FFF and 10MV FFF. The ionization chambers used were Pin Point CC01, CC04, Semiflex CC13 and photon diode by Iba dosimetry. The data were processed using Beizer algorithm with a resolution of 1 mm. The measured depth dose curves, diagonals, OAR, and output factors were imported into Eclipse in order to calculate beam data for the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA version 10.0.28) for both the dataset measured with CC04 and CC13 and compared. The model head of 23EX was selected as the most near model to True Beam as a restriction of our version of Aria. It was seen that better results were achieved with the CC04 measured data as a result of better resolution. For the biggest field after 10 cm depth a larger difference is seen between measured and calculated for both dataset, but it is within the criteria for acceptance. Results: The Beam analysis criteria of 2 mm at 50% dose is achieved for all the fields accept for 40x40 that is within 3%. Depth difference at maximum dose is within 1 mm for all the fields and dose difference at 100 mm and 200 mm is lower than 1% for or all the fields. The PDD between two machines for all the fields differ after Dmax with less than 1%. For profiles in the field zone and outside field the difference is within 1% for all the fields. In the penumbra region the difference is from 2% up to 12% for big fields. As for diagonals they differ as a result of the head construction at the edge of the field and the penumbra region. The output factors differ for big fields

  4. Imaging high energy photons with PILATUS II at the tagged photon beam at MAX-lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, V. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia)], E-mail: leev@physics.unimelb.edu.au; Peake, D.J.; Sobott, B. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia); Schroeder, B. [MAX-lab, Lund University, Lund (Sweden); Broennimann, Ch. [DECTRIS Ltd., Baden (Switzerland); Henrich, B. [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Hansen, K. [MAX-lab, Lund University, Lund (Sweden); O' Keefe, G.J. [Centre for PET, Austin Hospital, Heidelberg, Victoria 3084 (Australia); School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia); Taylor, G.N. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia); Boland, M.J. [Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia); Thompson, M.N.; Rassool, R.P. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia)

    2009-05-21

    In photonuclear experiments precise location of the photon beam relative to the experimental sample is critical. Previously used techniques such as using photographic film to identify the position, intensity and centroid of the beam is time-consuming and a faster method is required. PILATUS is a single-photon-counting pixel detector developed at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Switzerland. It is a silicon-based, two-dimensional detector with a large dynamic range and zero readout noise. Designed as an X-ray detector, its optimal quantum efficiency is between 3 and 30 keV. This paper reports measurements carried out at the MAX-lab tagged photon facility in Lund, Sweden. The beam endpoint energy of approximately 200 MeV is far above the designed optimal energy detection range of PILATUS, and provides a critical test of the use of PILATUS under high energy conditions. The detector was placed in the photon beam and images were taken both downstream of other experiments, and in close range of a 19 mm collimator. The successful measurements demonstrate the versatility and robustness of the detector and provide an effective way of quickly and accurately monitoring beam position and profile in real time.

  5. Technique charts for Kodak EC-L film screen system for portal localization in a 6MV X-ray beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandilos, P; Antypas, C; Paraskevopoulou, C; Kouvaris, J; Vlachos, L

    2006-01-01

    Port films are used in radiotherapy for visual evaluation of the radiation fields and subsequent quantitative analysis. Common port films suffer from poor image quality compared to the simulator-diagnostic films and is desirable to determine the appropriate exposure required for the best image contrast. The aim of this work is to generate technique charts for the Kodak EC-L film screen system for use in a 6MV x-ray beam. Three homogeneous water phantoms were used to simulate head-neck, thorax and abdomen dimensions of adult human, correspondingly. The film screen system was calibrated in a 6MV x-ray beam and under various irradiation conditions. The film screen system behavior was studied as a function of phantom thickness, field size and air gap between the phantom and the film screen system. In each case the optimum film exposure which produces the maximum image contrast was determined. The generated technique charts for the EC-L film screen system and for a 6 MV x-ray beam are used in our radiotherapy department for daily quality assurance of the radiotherapy procedure.

  6. Penumbra characteristics of square photon beams delimited by a GEMS multi-leaf collimator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briot, E; Julia, F [Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Gustave-Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France)

    1995-12-01

    A multi-leaf collimator (MLC) has been designed to replace directly the standard collimator of a SATURNE IV Series linac. It consists of 2 x 32 tungsten leaves and one set of upper block jaws. Isodose curves and dose profiles were measured for symmetric fields at the depth of the maximum and the reference depths for 6 MV, 10 MV, 18 MV photon beams. The penumbra (80%-20%) corresponding to the face and the side of the leaves have been compared with the standard collimators. Along with the X direction, the field delimitation is performed primarily with the leaves which are continuously variable in position. Along the Y direction, the field is initially approximated by the closure of opposite leaf pairs; then the Y upper jaws produce the exact size of the required field. As the leaves move linearly the penumbra (80%-20%) corresponding to the leaf ends is minimized and held constant at all positions by curvature of their faces. Penumbra obtained with the superposition of leaves and Y jaws depend on their relative position. The penumbra is minimum when the leaf side and the Y jaw edge coincide and the comparison of the measurement values with the conventional collimator shows that the differences are within 1 mm. When the leaves delineating the field are not entirely covered by the Y block upper jaws, the penumbra increases, and the junction of the opposing leaves, a width increase up to 3.5 mm has been measured.

  7. Monte Carlo evaluation of the potential benefits of flattening filter free beams from the Oncor® clinical linear accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Amin; Razavi-Ratki, Seid Kazem; Jabbari, Keyvan; Najafzadeh, Milad; Nickfarjam, Abolfazl

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the potential privileges of flattening filter-free (FFF) photon beams from Oncor® linac for 6 MV and 18 MV energies. A Monte Carlo (MC) model of Oncor® linac was built using BEAMnrc MCCode and verified by the measured data using 6 MV and 18 MV energies. A comprehensive set of data was also characterized for MC model of Oncor® machine running with and without flattening filter (FF) for 6 MV and 18 MV beams in six field sizes. The investigated characteristics included mean energy, energy spectrum, photon spatial fluence, superficial dose, percent depth dose (PDD), dose output, and out-of-field dose with two indexes of lateral dose profile and isodose curve at three depths. Using FFF enhanced the energy uniformity 3.4±0.11% (6 MV) and 2.05±0.09% (18 MV) times and improved dose output by factor of 2.91 (6 MV) and 4.2 (18 MV) on the central axis, respectively. Using FFF also reduced the PDD dependencies by 9.1% (6 MV) and 5.57% (18 MV). In addition, using FFF had a lower out-of-field dose due to the reduced head scatter and softer spectra. The findings in this study suggested that using FFF, Oncor® machine could achieve better treatment results with lower dose toxicity and a shorter beam-on time.

  8. Diagnostic phosphors for photon beams at the ALS and APS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, Deming; Warwick, T.; Johnson, E.D.

    1991-01-01

    Some tests have been made of phosphors for photon beam diagnosis. Plasma sprayed coatings were checked for damage and decay during a period of several ampere-hours of irradiation from the NSLS Xray ring. Surface temperatures were measured and extrapolated to give an indication of the temperatures expected in more powerful photon beams. Based on our findings we have chosen plasma-sprayed coatings of Europium-doped Yttrium Oxide as the best candidate for use on masks and flags in ''white'' photon beams of the new facilities. 4 refs., 2 figs

  9. Measuring Beam Quality of Hollow Core Photonic Crystal Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shephard, J.D.; Roberts, John; Jones, J.D.C.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the authors measure the quality of the delivered beam from hollow core photonic crystal fibers (HC-PCFs). The$M^2$parameter is determined, and the near- to far-field transition is examined. The influence on these properties due to the presence of a core surround mode is evaluated.......17 for the same output beam. This highlights the need for careful consideration when measuring and describing the beam quality delivered by these novel photonic fibers....

  10. Present status of beam position stabilization at photon factory storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Norio

    1990-01-01

    Stabilization of photon beam position became a major issue in the operation of the storage rings dedicated as synchrotron radiation source. At the Photon Factory storage ring (PF ring), the orbit movement appeared remarkably when the low-emittance operation started. This orbit movement became a serious problem to synchrotron radiation users because the photon beam to drift with a large amplitude. The horizontal and vertical orbit feedback systems were constructed and developed in order to suppress the orbit movement globally. As a result, the horizontal and vertical orbit movements were reduced by a factor of five and ten, respectively. In addition, another type of feedback system using a local bump was constructed. In the test operation, this system could remove the fast photon beam motion as well as the slow photon beam drift for a beamline. (author)

  11. Low-energy photons in high-energy photon fields--Monte Carlo generated spectra and a new descriptive parameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chofor, Ndimofor; Harder, Dietrich; Willborn, Kay; Rühmann, Antje; Poppe, Björn

    2011-09-01

    The varying low-energy contribution to the photon spectra at points within and around radiotherapy photon fields is associated with variations in the responses of non-water equivalent dosimeters and in the water-to-material dose conversion factors for tissues such as the red bone marrow. In addition, the presence of low-energy photons in the photon spectrum enhances the RBE in general and in particular for the induction of second malignancies. The present study discusses the general rules valid for the low-energy spectral component of radiotherapeutic photon beams at points within and in the periphery of the treatment field, taking as an example the Siemens Primus linear accelerator at 6 MV and 15 MV. The photon spectra at these points and their typical variations due to the target system, attenuation, single and multiple Compton scattering, are described by the Monte Carlo method, using the code BEAMnrc/EGSnrc. A survey of the role of low energy photons in the spectra within and around radiotherapy fields is presented. In addition to the spectra, some data compression has proven useful to support the overview of the behaviour of the low-energy component. A characteristic indicator of the presence of low-energy photons is the dose fraction attributable to photons with energies not exceeding 200 keV, termed P(D)(200 keV). Its values are calculated for different depths and lateral positions within a water phantom. For a pencil beam of 6 or 15 MV primary photons in water, the radial distribution of P(D)(200 keV) is bellshaped, with a wide-ranging exponential tail of half value 6 to 7 cm. The P(D)(200 keV) value obtained on the central axis of a photon field shows an approximately proportional increase with field size. Out-of-field P(D)(200 keV) values are up to an order of magnitude higher than on the central axis for the same irradiation depth. The 2D pattern of P(D)(200 keV) for a radiotherapy field visualizes the regions, e.g. at the field margin, where changes of

  12. Build-up and surface dose measurements on phantoms using micro-MOSFET in 6 and 10 MV x-ray beams and comparisons with Monte Carlo calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang, Hong F.; Song, Jun S.; Chin, David W. H.; Cormack, Robert A.; Tishler, Roy B.; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike; Court, Laurence E.; Chin, Lee M.

    2007-01-01

    This work is intended to investigate the application and accuracy of micro-MOSFET for superficial dose measurement under clinically used MV x-ray beams. Dose response of micro-MOSFET in the build-up region and on surface under MV x-ray beams were measured and compared to Monte Carlo calculations. First, percentage-depth-doses were measured with micro-MOSFET under 6 and 10 MV beams of normal incidence onto a flat solid water phantom. Micro-MOSFET data were compared with the measurements from a parallel plate ionization chamber and Monte Carlo dose calculation in the build-up region. Then, percentage-depth-doses were measured for oblique beams at 0 deg. - 80 deg. onto the flat solid water phantom with micro-MOSFET placed at depths of 2 cm, 1 cm, and 2 mm below the surface. Measurements were compared to Monte Carlo calculations under these settings. Finally, measurements were performed with micro-MOSFET embedded in the first 1 mm layer of bolus placed on a flat phantom and a curved phantom of semi-cylindrical shape. Results were compared to superficial dose calculated from Monte Carlo for a 2 mm thin layer that extends from the surface to a depth of 2 mm. Results were (1) Comparison of measurements with MC calculation in the build-up region showed that micro-MOSFET has a water-equivalence thickness (WET) of 0.87 mm for 6 MV beam and 0.99 mm for 10 MV beam from the flat side, and a WET of 0.72 mm for 6 MV beam and 0.76 mm for 10 MV beam from the epoxy side. (2) For normal beam incidences, percentage depth dose agree within 3%-5% among micro-MOSFET measurements, parallel-plate ionization chamber measurements, and MC calculations. (3) For oblique incidence on the flat phantom with micro-MOSFET placed at depths of 2 cm, 1 cm, and 2 mm, measurements were consistent with MC calculations within a typical uncertainty of 3%-5%. (4) For oblique incidence on the flat phantom and a curved-surface phantom, measurements with micro-MOSFET placed at 1.0 mm agrees with the MC

  13. Contribution to the planning and dosimetry of photon beams applied to radiosurgery and stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Walter Menezes

    2003-08-01

    Radiosurgery and stereotactic radiotherapy are irradiation techniques that use small diameter photon beams for treating intracranial lesions such as pituitary adenomas, acoustic tumors and arterio-venous malformations which are inaccessible for surgery. These treatment techniques are characterized by the use of very small radiation beams which deliver a precisely measured dose to the target volume, while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. Treatment can be performed by using multiple 60 Co gamma-ray sources (in the so-called 'Gamma Knife'), charged particles or X-ray beams produced by linear accelerators. The prescribed dose can be given in a single session or in multiple fractions, as in conventional radiotherapy. The success of the treatment depends, among other factors, of the accurate determination of the parameters that characterize the radiation beam produced by the equipment, as well as, of a well designed quality assurance program. In this study, the dosimetric parameters of a set of collimating cones of a Radionics TM treatment system applied to two 6 MV- photon beams (Clinac 600C - Varian TM , and Mevatron MD2 - Siemens TM ) were evaluated by using a water filled PMMA simulator. Measurements were carried out for photon beam diameters ranging from 12.5 to 40.0 mm for the Clinac-600C and from 5.0 to 50.0 mm for the Mevatron MD2. The parameters were evaluated by using a parallel plate ionization chamber (Markus), Kodak X-Omat V dosimetric films, thermoluminescent dosemeters (Harschaw, TLD-100) and photodiodes. The maximum tissue-ratio, the off-axis profile and the output factors were determined and the results were compared to those reported elsewhere. A study of the dosimetric characteristics of some commercially available phototransistors was also carried out. The results showed that these electronic components can be successfully used for measuring the dosimetric parameters of small diameter photon beans used in radiosurgery. Measurements were also

  14. The effect of voxel size on dose distribution in Varian Clinac iX 6 MV photon beam using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yani, Sitti; Dirgayussa, I Gde E.; Haryanto, Freddy; Arif, Idam; Rhani, Moh. Fadhillah

    2015-01-01

    Recently, Monte Carlo (MC) calculation method has reported as the most accurate method of predicting dose distributions in radiotherapy. The MC code system (especially DOSXYZnrc) has been used to investigate the different voxel (volume elements) sizes effect on the accuracy of dose distributions. To investigate this effect on dosimetry parameters, calculations were made with three different voxel sizes. The effects were investigated with dose distribution calculations for seven voxel sizes: 1 × 1 × 0.1 cm 3 , 1 × 1 × 0.5 cm 3 , and 1 × 1 × 0.8 cm 3 . The 1 × 10 9 histories were simulated in order to get statistical uncertainties of 2%. This simulation takes about 9-10 hours to complete. Measurements are made with field sizes 10 × 10 cm2 for the 6 MV photon beams with Gaussian intensity distribution FWHM 0.1 cm and SSD 100.1 cm. MC simulated and measured dose distributions in a water phantom. The output of this simulation i.e. the percent depth dose and dose profile in d max from the three sets of calculations are presented and comparisons are made with the experiment data from TTSH (Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore) in 0-5 cm depth. Dose that scored in voxels is a volume averaged estimate of the dose at the center of a voxel. The results in this study show that the difference between Monte Carlo simulation and experiment data depend on the voxel size both for percent depth dose (PDD) and profile dose. PDD scan on Z axis (depth) of water phantom, the big difference obtain in the voxel size 1 × 1 × 0.8 cm 3 about 17%. In this study, the profile dose focused on high gradient dose area. Profile dose scan on Y axis and the big difference get in the voxel size 1 × 1 × 0.1 cm 3 about 12%. This study demonstrated that the arrange voxel in Monte Carlo simulation becomes important

  15. The effect of voxel size on dose distribution in Varian Clinac iX 6 MV photon beam using Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yani, Sitti; Dirgayussa, I. Gde E.; Rhani, Moh. Fadhillah; Haryanto, Freddy; Arif, Idam

    2015-09-01

    Recently, Monte Carlo (MC) calculation method has reported as the most accurate method of predicting dose distributions in radiotherapy. The MC code system (especially DOSXYZnrc) has been used to investigate the different voxel (volume elements) sizes effect on the accuracy of dose distributions. To investigate this effect on dosimetry parameters, calculations were made with three different voxel sizes. The effects were investigated with dose distribution calculations for seven voxel sizes: 1 × 1 × 0.1 cm3, 1 × 1 × 0.5 cm3, and 1 × 1 × 0.8 cm3. The 1 × 109 histories were simulated in order to get statistical uncertainties of 2%. This simulation takes about 9-10 hours to complete. Measurements are made with field sizes 10 × 10 cm2 for the 6 MV photon beams with Gaussian intensity distribution FWHM 0.1 cm and SSD 100.1 cm. MC simulated and measured dose distributions in a water phantom. The output of this simulation i.e. the percent depth dose and dose profile in dmax from the three sets of calculations are presented and comparisons are made with the experiment data from TTSH (Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore) in 0-5 cm depth. Dose that scored in voxels is a volume averaged estimate of the dose at the center of a voxel. The results in this study show that the difference between Monte Carlo simulation and experiment data depend on the voxel size both for percent depth dose (PDD) and profile dose. PDD scan on Z axis (depth) of water phantom, the big difference obtain in the voxel size 1 × 1 × 0.8 cm3 about 17%. In this study, the profile dose focused on high gradient dose area. Profile dose scan on Y axis and the big difference get in the voxel size 1 × 1 × 0.1 cm3 about 12%. This study demonstrated that the arrange voxel in Monte Carlo simulation becomes important.

  16. A new approach to film dosimetry for high-energy photon beams using organic plastic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeo, I.J.; Wang, C.-K.C.; Burch, S.E.

    1999-01-01

    Successful radiotherapy relies on accurate dose measurement. Traditional dosimeters such as ion chambers, TLDs and diodes have disadvantages such as relatively long measurement time and poor spatial resolution. These drawbacks become more serious problems for dynamic beams (i.e. with the use of dynamic wedges or even the intensity modulation technique). X-ray film, an integrating dosimeter, may not be associated with the above disadvantages and problems. However, there are several major issues regarding use of x-ray film for routine dosimetry, including the over-response of the film to low-energy photons, variations in the dose response curve (nonlinearity), lack of reproducibility due to variation in processing, etc. This paper addresses the first problem. That is, x-ray film over-responds to low-energy photons (energies below 400 keV), and thus generates unacceptably inaccurate dosimetric data compared with ion-chamber data. To overcome the over-response problem of x-ray film in a phantom, a scintillation method has been investigated. In this method, a film is sandwiched by two plastic scintillation screens to enhance the film response to upstream electrons, and therefore minimize the over-response caused by low-energy photons. The sandwiched system was tested with a 4 MV linac beam. The result shows that, depending on the uniformity of the scintillation screens, the depth-dose distribution obtained from the sandwich system can be made to agree well with that obtained from ion chambers. However, the required high degree of uniformity remains a challenge for the scintillation screen manufacturers. (author)

  17. Dosimetric Uncertainties in Verification of Intensity Modulated Photon Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurkovic, S.

    2010-01-01

    The doctoral thesis presents method for the calculation of the compensators' shape to modulate linear accelerators' beams. Characteristic of the method is more strict calculation of the scattered radiation in beams with an inhomogeneous cross-section than it was before. Method could be applied in various clinical situations. It's dosimetric verification was made in phantoms, measuring dose distributions using ionization chambers as well as radiographic film. Therefore, ionization chambers were used for the evaluation of modulator shape and film was used for the evaluation of two-dimensional dose distributions. It is well known that dosimetry of the intensity modulated photon beams is rather complicated regarding inhomogeneity of the dose distribution. The main reason for that is the beam modulator which changes spectral distribution of the beam. Possibility of use different types of detectors for the measurements of dose distributions in modulated photon beams and their accuracy were examined. Small volume ionization chambers, different diodes and amorphus silicon detector and radigraphic film were used. Measured dose distributions were compared between each other as well as with distributions simulated using Monte Carlo particle transport algorithm. In this way the most accurate method for the verification of modulate photon beams is suggested. (author)

  18. Comparison of different dose calculation methods for irregular photon fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakaria, G.A.; Schuette, W.

    2000-01-01

    In this work, 4 calculation methods (Wrede method, Clarskon method of sector integration, beam-zone method of Quast and pencil-beam method of Ahnesjoe) are introduced to calculate point doses in different irregular photon fields. The calculations cover a typical mantle field, an inverted Y-field and different blocked fields for 4 and 10 MV photon energies. The results are compared to those of measurements in a water phantom. The Clarkson and the pencil-beam method have been proved to be the methods of equal standard in relation to accuracy. Both of these methods are being distinguished by minimum deviations and applied in our clinical routine work. The Wrede and beam-zone methods deliver useful results to central beam and yet provide larger deviations in calculating points beyond the central axis. (orig.) [de

  19. Photon-Electron Interaction and Condense Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    1998-01-01

    We discuss beams of charged particles and radiation from multiple perspectives. These include fundamental acceleration and radiation mechanisms, underlying electron-photon interaction, various classical and quantum phase-space concepts and fluctuational interpretations

  20. Three-dimensional photon radiotherapy planning for laryngeal and hypopharyngeal tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esik, O.; Schlegel, W.; Doll, J.; Nemeth, G.; Lorenz, W.J.; Weil Emil Korhaz-Rendeloeintezet, Budapest; Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg

    1990-01-01

    Three-dimensional absorbed dose distributions have been computed for high-energy photon radiation therapy of laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers, using a coaxial pair of opposing lateral beams in fixed positions. Treatment plans obtained under various conditions of irradiation are analyzed and compared for a cobalt-60 gamma unit (GAMMATRON S80, Siemens), photon beams from a 6 MV (CLINAC 1800, VARIAN), an 8 MV (SATURNE, CGR) and a 15 MV (MEVATRON 77, Siemens) linear accelerator. Using open fields a somewhat non-uniform and partly insufficient dose in target volume of interest is obtained with all treatment units if sufficient protection of the spinal cord is provided. The X-ray plans are somewhat superior to the cobalt-60 ones. Depending on the quantum energy and wedge isodose angle, wedging only slightly improves or sometimes moderately decreases the homogeneity of the dose in the target volume. According to these small and/or controversial effects of wedges their application seems unnecessary and/or non-convenient. Simulations show that extreme care is needed in positioning the isocentre: An accuracy of ±3 mm is required in the median sagittal plane. (orig.)

  1. SU-F-T-521: Flattening-Filter-Free Beam Parameters Comparison From Different Linac Machine Types

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, A [King Faisal Specialist Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, Arkansas Cancer Institute, Pine Bluff, AR (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Novel linac machines, TrueBeam (TB) and Elekta Versa have updated head designing and software control system, include flattening-filter-free (FFF) photon and electron beams. Later on FFF beams were also introduced on C-Series machines. In this work FFF beams for same energy 6MV but from different machine versions were studied with reference to beam data parameters. Methods: The 6MV-FFF percent depth doses, profile symmetry and flatness, dose rate tables, and multi-leaf collimator (MLC) transmission factors were measured during commissioning process of both C-series and Truebeam machines. The scanning and dosimetric data for 6MV-FFF beam from Truebeam and C-Series linacs was compared. A correlation of 6MV-FFF beam from Elekta Versa with that of Varian linacs was also found. Results: The scanning files were plotted for both qualitative and quantitative analysis. The dosimetric leaf gap (DLG) for C-Series 6MV-FFF beam is 1.1 mm. Published values for Truebeam dosimetric leaf gap is 1.16 mm. 6MV MLC transmission factor varies between 1.3 % and 1.4 % in two separate measurements and measured DLG values vary between 1.32 mm and 1.33 mm on C-Series machine. MLC transmission factor from C-Series machine varies between 1.5 % and 1.6 %. Some of the measured data values from C-Series FFF beam are compared with Truebeam representative data. 6MV-FFF beam parameter values like dmax, OP factors, beam symmetry and flatness and additional parameters for C-Series and Truebeam liancs will be presented and compared in graphical form and tabular data form if selected. Conclusion: The 6MV flattening filter (FF) beam data from C-Series & Truebeam and 6MV-FFF beam data from Truebeam has already presented. This particular analysis to compare 6MV-FFF beam from C-Series and Truebeam provides opportunity to better elaborate FFF mode on novel machines. It was found that C-Series and Truebeam 6MV-FFF dosimetric and beam data was quite similar.

  2. Verification of the pure alanine in PMMA tube dosimeter applicability for dosimetry of radiotherapy photon beams: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Karmi, Anan M; Ayaz, Ali Asghar H; Al-Enezi, Mamdouh S; Abdel-Rahman, Wamied; Dwaikat, Nidal

    2015-09-01

    Alanine dosimeters in the form of pure alanine powder in PMMA plastic tubes were investigated for dosimetry in a clinical application. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to measure absorbed radiation doses by detection of signals from radicals generated in irradiated alanine. The measurements were performed for low-dose ranges typical for single-fraction doses often used in external photon beam radiotherapy. First, the dosimeters were irradiated in a solid water phantom to establish calibration curves in the dose range from 0.3 to 3 Gy for 6 and 18 MV X-ray beams from a clinical linear accelerator. Next, the dosimeters were placed at various locations in an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom to measure the dose delivery of a conventional four-field box technique treatment plan to the pelvis. Finally, the doses measured with alanine dosimeters were compared against the doses calculated with a commercial treatment planning system (TPS). The results showed that the alanine dosimeters have a highly sensitive dose response with good linearity and no energy dependence in the dose range and photon beams used in this work. Also, a fairly good agreement was found between the in-phantom dose measurements with alanine dosimeters and the TPS dose calculations. The mean value of the ratios of measured to calculated dose values was found to be near unity. The measured points in the in-field region passed dose-difference acceptance criterion of 3% and those in the penumbral region passed distance-to-agreement acceptance criterion of 3 mm. These findings suggest that the pure alanine powder in PMMA tube dosimeter is a suitable option for dosimetry of radiotherapy photon beams.

  3. Development of isodose curves for A 6 mv x-ray beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidaytalla, Lamya Abbas

    1994-08-01

    In this thesis radiation distribution of 6 Mv x-ray beam in a water phantom is developed. The method is based on a simple empirical equation and the assumption that the x-ray source is a point source. This leads to a simple equation for the calculation and plotting of the isodose curves. the charts obtained for two fields, 6*6 and 12*12 cm 2 show good agreement with the previous data used in the isotope and radiation centre, Khartoum hospital. It is suggested that further development should be carried out by writing a computer program for all the fields. (Author)

  4. Skin dose estimation for various beam modifiers and source-to-surface distances for 6MV photons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Girigesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to learn the skin dose estimation for various beam modifiers at various source-to-surface distances (SSDs for a 6 MV photon. Surface and buildup region doses were measured with an acrylic slab phantom and Markus 0.055 cc parallel plate (PP ionization chamber. Measurements were carried out for open fields, motorized wedge fields, acrylic block tray fields ranging from 3 x 3 cm 2 to 30 x 30 cm 2 . Twenty-five percent of the field was blocked with a cerrobend block and a Multileaf collimator (MLC. The effect of the blocks on the skin dose was measured for a 20 x 20 cm 2 field size, at 80 cm, 100 cm and 120 cm SSD. During the use of isocentric treatments, whereby the tumor is positioned at 100 cm from the source, depending on the depth of the tumor and size of the patient, the SSD can vary from 80 cm to 100 cm. To achieve a larger field size, the SSD can also be extended up to 120 cm at times. The skin dose increased as field size increased. The skin dose for the open 10 x10 cm 2 field was 15.5%, 14.8% and 15.5% at 80 cm, 100 cm and 120 cm SSDs, respectively. The skin dose due to a motorized 60 0 wedge for the 10 x 10 cm 2 field was 9.9%, 9.5%, and 9.5% at 80 cm, 100 cm and 120 cm SSDs. The skin dose due to acrylic block tray, of thickness 1.0 cm for a 10 x 10 cm 2 field was 27.0%, 17.2% and 16.1% at 80, 100 and 120 cm SSD respectively. Due to the use of an acrylic block tray, the surface dose was increased for all field sizes at the above three SSDs and the percentage skin dose was more dominant at the lower SSD and larger field size. The skin dose for a 30 x 30 cm 2 field size at 80 cm SSD was 38.3% and it was 70.4% for the open and acrylic block tray fields, respectively. The skin doses for motorized wedge fields were lower than for open fields. The effect of SSDs on the surface dose for motorized 60° wedge fields was not significant for a small field size (difference was less than 1% up to a 15 x 15 cm 2 field size

  5. Monte Carlo correction factors for a Farmer 0.6 cm3 ion chamber dose measurement in the build-up region of the 6 MV clinical beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena, J; Sanchez-Doblado, F; Capote, R; Terron, J A; Gomez, F

    2006-01-01

    Reference dosimetry of photon fields is a well-established subject and currently available protocols (such as the IAEA TRS-398 and AAPM TG-51) provide methods for converting the ionization chamber (IC) reading into dose to water, provided reference conditions of charged particle equilibrium (CPE) are fulfilled. But these protocols cannot deal with the build-up region, where the lack of CPE limits the applicability of the cavity theorems and so the chamber correction factors become depth dependent. By explicitly including the IC geometry in the Monte Carlo simulations, depth-dependent dose correction factors are calculated for a PTW 30001 0.6 cm 3 ion chamber in the build-up region of the 6 MV photon beam. The corrected percentage depth dose (PDD) agrees within 2% with that measured using the NACP 02 plane-parallel ion chamber in the build-up region at depths greater than 0.4 cm, where the Farmer chamber wall reaches the phantom surface

  6. Beam pulsing in the 2.5 MV - VdG accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirsch, Robert; Tromeur, William; Champelovier, Yves; Miguet, Michel

    2003-01-01

    This is a technical report describing the work of beam pulsing of the 2.5 MV Van de Graaff. The objective is to supply the 2.5 MV VdG with gold clusters (Au n ) events by events (ion by ion), with a time synchronization signal with a precision of a coupled of nano seconds. The technical specifications are as follows: deflection plates in the present installation: l - length of plates = 245 mm; d - plates' separation = 16 mm; Lp - plate separation / D2 = 1812 mm (center of horizontal deflection) and 1547 mm center of vertical deflection; Lc - distance between collimator = 2020 mm; D1, D2 φ of collimators = 50 to 100 μm; Acceptance with 50 and 100 μm = ± 2.5 x 10 -2 mrad (= 3/1000 angle). The time of presence inside collimator equals the time necessary for passing from + Vc to - Vc, where Vc is the voltage necessary to deflect the beam from + 2.5 x 10 -2 to - 2.5 x 10 -2 mrad. The contents of the report is the following: I. Geometry of pulsing system. 1. Method; 2. Obtaining short times of beam presence; 3. Amplitude of ion deflection; 4. Au n cluster velocities; II. Control electronics and high voltages; 5. Defining the guiding module of the low voltage section; 6. Further details in Annex II under the definition of high voltage supply; 7. Definition of high voltage supply. For details see Annex III under III PVX - 4130 modulator for high voltage pulsed commutation. III. PVX - 4130 modulator for high voltage pulsed switching; 8. Limitations; 9. Dynamical characteristics; 10. Connection circuitry and operation; 11. Measurements; 12. Power for high voltage supplies; 13. Power requirement for pulsation; IV. Electromagnetic spurious effects; 14. Evidencing; 15. Suppression; Annex I - PVX-4130 modulator; 16. Measurements; 17. PVX-4130 documentation; Annex II - IPNL control and switching module; 18.I. Technical specifications; 19. II. Conception; 20. III. Adjustments; 21. IV. Layout; 22. V. Results; Annex III - High voltage supply; 23. Technical specifications for

  7. Study of the exotic Θ+ with polarized photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Qiang

    2004-01-01

    We carry out an analysis of the pentaquark Θ + photoproduction with polarized photon beams. Kinematical and dynamical aspects are examined for the purpose of determining Θ + 's spin and parity. It shows that the polarized photon beam asymmetry in association with certain dynamical properties of the production mechanism would provide further information on its quantum numbers. Facilities at SPring-8, JLab, ELSA, and ESRF will have access to them

  8. A dark hollow beam from a selectively liquid-filled photonic crystal fibre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei-Yan, Zhang; Shu-Guang, Li; Yan-Yan, Yao; Bo, Fu; Lei, Zhang

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports that, based on the electromagnetic scattering theory of the multipole method, a high-quality hollow beam is produced through a selectively liquid-filled photonic crystal fibre. Instead of a doughnut shape, a typical hollow beam is produced by other methods; the mode-field images of the hollow-beam photonic crystal fibre satisfy sixth-order rotation symmetry, according to the symmetry of the photonic crystal fibre (PCF) structure. A dark spot size of the liquid-filled photonic crystal fibre-generated hollow beam can be tuned by inserting liquid into the cladding region and varying the photonic crystal fibre structure parameters. The liquid-filled PCF makes a convenient and flexible tool for the guiding and trapping of atoms and the creation of all-fibre optical tweezers. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  9. Experimental verification of a commercial Monte Carlo-based dose calculation module for high-energy photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuenzler, Thomas; Fotina, Irina; Stock, Markus; Georg, Dietmar

    2009-01-01

    The dosimetric performance of a Monte Carlo algorithm as implemented in a commercial treatment planning system (iPlan, BrainLAB) was investigated. After commissioning and basic beam data tests in homogenous phantoms, a variety of single regular beams and clinical field arrangements were tested in heterogeneous conditions (conformal therapy, arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy including simultaneous integrated boosts). More specifically, a cork phantom containing a concave-shaped target was designed to challenge the Monte Carlo algorithm in more complex treatment cases. All test irradiations were performed on an Elekta linac providing 6, 10 and 18 MV photon beams. Absolute and relative dose measurements were performed with ion chambers and near tissue equivalent radiochromic films which were placed within a transverse plane of the cork phantom. For simple fields, a 1D gamma (γ) procedure with a 2% dose difference and a 2 mm distance to agreement (DTA) was applied to depth dose curves, as well as to inplane and crossplane profiles. The average gamma value was 0.21 for all energies of simple test cases. For depth dose curves in asymmetric beams similar gamma results as for symmetric beams were obtained. Simple regular fields showed excellent absolute dosimetric agreement to measurement values with a dose difference of 0.1% ± 0.9% (1 standard deviation) at the dose prescription point. A more detailed analysis at tissue interfaces revealed dose discrepancies of 2.9% for an 18 MV energy 10 x 10 cm 2 field at the first density interface from tissue to lung equivalent material. Small fields (2 x 2 cm 2 ) have their largest discrepancy in the re-build-up at the second interface (from lung to tissue equivalent material), with a local dose difference of about 9% and a DTA of 1.1 mm for 18 MV. Conformal field arrangements, arc therapy, as well as IMRT beams and simultaneous integrated boosts were in good agreement with absolute dose measurements in the

  10. Fe+3 diffusion coefficient in Fricke xylenol gel through shielding half of a 6 MV photon beam field size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalcante, Fernanda; Oliveira, Lucas de; Almeida, Adelaide de

    2009-01-01

    Diffusion of ions can be observed in a solution or gel when a difference occurs in their concentrations. For dosimetric gels, the diffusion can interfere on measurements of absorbed dose delivered to the patient in a radiotherapic treatment, when the time interval for measurements pos-irradiation is considered long. In the present work, a pos-irradiation Fricke Xylenol Gel (FXG) spatial dose distribution was obtained for several time intervals and the diffusion coefficient was inferred following a literature theoretical methodology. Using FXG samples, whose [Fe 2+ ] are oxidated to [Fe +3 ] when irradiated, the diffusion coefficient for the last ion was obtained in order that one can have the real spatial dose distribution right after the irradiation and this was done using half shielded 6 MV photons field size. Each sample, for each time interval selected (from 2.8 up to 28.6 hours) was analyzed in function of their optical absorbance. From Fick's law and from an error equation, the diffusion coefficient was inferred, which can be used to correct the absorbance positions promptly after irradiation. The diffusion coefficient found for the FXG dosimeter, has the value of 0.452 mm 2 /h, that is between the interval of 0.3 up to 2.0 mm 2 /h, predicted for gel type dosimeters. (author)

  11. Optimum steering of photon beam lines in SPEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbett, W.J.; Fong, B.; Lee, M.; Ziemann, V.

    1993-04-01

    A common operational requirement for many synchrotron light sources is to maintain steered photon beamlines with minimum corrector strength values. To solve this problem for SPEAR, we employed the Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) matrix-inversion technique to minimize corrector strengths while constraining the photon beamlines to remain on target. The result was a reduction in corrector strengths, yielding increased overhead for the photon-beam position feedback systems

  12. Dosimetric comparative analysis between 10 MV Megavoltage unidirectional beam and boron neutron capture therapy for brain tumors treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandao, Samia F.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper present a comparative dosimetric analysis between boron neutron capture therapy and 10 MV megavoltage employed in brain tumor treatments, limited to a unidirectional beam. A computational phantom of a human head was developed to be used in computational simulations of the two protocols, conducted in MCNP5 code. This phantom represents several head's structures, mainly, the central nervous system and a tumor that represents a Glioblastoma Multiform - one of the most malignant and aggressive brain tumors. Absorbed and biological weighted dose rates and neutron fluency in the computational phantom were evaluated from the MCNP5 code. The biologically weighted dose rate to 10 MV megavoltage beam presented no specificity in deposited dose in tumor. The average total biologically weighted dose rate in tumor was 9.93E-04 RBE.Gy.h"-"1/Mp.s"-"1 while in healthy tissue it was 8.67E-04 RBE.Gy.h"-"1/Mp.s"-1. On the BNCT simulations the boron concentration was particularly relevant since the largest dose deposition happened in borate tissues. The average total biologically weighted dose rate in tumor was 3.66E-02 RBE.Gy.h"-"1/Mp.s"-"1 while in healthy tissue it was 1.39E-03 RBE.Gy.h"-"1/Mp.s"-"1. In comparison to the 10 MV megavoltage beam, BNCT showed clearly a largest dose deposition in the tumor, on average, 37 times larger than in the megavoltage beam, while in healthy tissue that average was only 1,6 time larger in BNCT. (author)

  13. Laboratory Astrophysics Using High Energy Density Photon and Electron Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Bingham, Robert

    2005-01-01

    The development of intense laser and particle beams has opened up new opportunities to study high energy density astrophysical processes in the Laboratory. With even higher laser intensities possible in the near future vacuum polarization processes such as photon - photon scattering with or without large magnetic fields may also be experimentally observed. In this talk I will review the status of laboratory experiments using intense beans to investigate extreme astrophysical phenomena such as supernovae explosions, gamma x-ray bursts, ultra-high energy cosmic accelerators etc. Just as intense photon or electron beams can excite relativistic electron plasma waves or wakefields used in plasma acceleration, intense neutrino beams from type II supernovae can also excite wakefields or plasma waves. Other instabilities driven by intense beams relevant to perhaps x-ray bursts is the Weibel instability. Simulation results of extreme processes will also be presented.

  14. Investigation of the accuracy of MV radiation isocentre calculations in the Elekta cone-beam CT software XVI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynggaard Riis, Hans; Moltke, Lars N; Zimmermann, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate determination of the megavoltage (MV) radiation isocentre of a linear accelerator (linac) is an important task in radiotherapy. The localization of the MV radiation isocentre is crucial for correct calibration of the in-room lasers and the cone-beam CT scanner used for patient positioning...... orientation or the phantom asymmetry in the longitudinal direction do not appear to cause the discrepancy. The main cause of the differences could not be clearly identified. However, it is our opinion that the commercial software delivered by the linac manufacturer should be improved to reach better stability...

  15. Poster — Thur Eve — 37: Respiratory gating with an Elekta flattening filter free photon beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Péloquin, S; Furstoss, C; Munger, P; Wierzbicki, W; Carrier, J-F

    2014-01-01

    In cases where surgery is not possible for lung cancer treatment, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) may be an option. One problem when treating this type of cancer is the motion of the lungs caused by the patient's respiration. It is possible to reduce the impact of this movement with the use of respiratory gating. By combining respiratory gating with a flattening filter free (FFF) photon beam linac, the increased treatment time caused by a reduced beam-on time of respiratory gating methods can be compensated by the inherent increased dose rate of FFF beams. This project's aim is to create hardware and software interfaces allowing free respiration gating on an Elekta Synergy-S linac specially modified to deliver 6 MV FFF photon beams. First, a printed circuit board was created for reading the signal from a Bellows Belt from Philips (a respiration monitor belt) and transmitting an On/Off signal to the accelerator. A software was also developed to visualize patient respiration. Secondly, a FFF model was created with the Pinnacle treatment planning system from Philips. Gamma (Γ) analysis (2%, 2 mm) was used to evaluate model. For fields going from 5.6 × 5.6 to 12 × 12 cm 2 , central axis depth dose model fitting shows an average gamma value of 0.2 and 100% of gamma values remain under the Γ = 1 limit. For smaller fields (0.8 × 0.8 and 1.6 × 1.6 cm 2 ), Pinnacle has more trouble trying to fit the measurements, overestimating dose in penumbra and buildup regions

  16. EGSNRC Monte Carlo study of the effect of photon energy and field margin in phantoms simulating small lung lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osei, E.K.; Darko, J.; Mosseri, A.; Jezioranski, J.

    2003-01-01

    The dose distribution in small lung tumors (coin lesions) is affected by the combined effects of reduced attenuation of photons and extended range of electrons in lung. The increased range of electrons in low-density tissues can lead to loss of field flatness and increased penumbra width, especially at high energies. The EGSNRC Monte Carlo code, together with DOSXYZNRC, a three-dimensional voxel dose calculation module has been used to study the characteristics of the penumbra in the region of the target-lung interfaces for various radiation beam energies, lung densities, target-field edge distances, target size, and depth. The Monte Carlo model was validated by film measurements made in acrylic (simulating a tumor) imbedded in cork (simulating the lung). Beam profiles that are deemed to be acceptable are defined as those in which no point within the planning target volume (target volume plus 1 cm margin) received less than 95% of the dose prescribed to the center of the target. For parallel opposed beams and 2 cm cube target size, 6 MV photons produce superior dose distribution with respect to penumbra at the lateral, anterior, and posterior surfaces and midplane of the simulated target, with a target-field edge distance of 2.5 cm. A lesser target-field edge distance of 2.0 cm is required for 4 MV photons to produce acceptable dose distribution. To achieve equivalent dose distribution with 10 and 18 MV photons, a target-field edge distance of 3.0 and 3.5 cm, respectively, is required. For a simulated target size of 4 cm cube, a target-field edge distance of 2, 2.5, and 3 cm is required for 6, 10, and 18 MV photons, respectively, to yield acceptable PTV coverage. The effect, which is predominant in determining the target dose, depends on the beam energy, target-field edge distance, lung density, and the depth and size of the target

  17. Measurement of changes in linear accelerator photon energy through flatness variation using an ion chamber array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Song; Balter, Peter A.; Rose, Mark; Simon, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the use of flatness versus percent depth dose (PDD) for determining changes in photon beam energy for a megavoltage linear accelerator. Methods: Energy changes were accomplished by adjusting the bending magnet current by up to ±15% in 5% increments away from the value used clinically. Two metrics for flatness, relative flatness in the central 80% of the field (Flat) and average maximum dose along the diagonals normalized by central axis dose (F DN ), were measured using a commercially available planner ionization chamber array. PDD was measured in water at depths of 5 and 10 cm in 3 × 3 cm 2 and 10 × 10 cm 2 fields using a cylindrical chamber. Results: PDD was more sensitive to changes in energy when the beam energy was increased than when it was decreased. For the 18-MV beam in particular, PDD was not sensitive to energy reductions below the nominal energy. The value of Flat was found to be more sensitive to decreases in energy than to increases, with little sensitivity to energy increases above the nominal energy for 18-MV beams. F DN was the only metric that was found to be sensitive to both increases and reductions of energy for both the 6- and 18-MV beams. Conclusions: Flatness based metrics were found to be more sensitive to energy changes than PDD, In particular, F DN was found to be the most sensitive metric to energy changes for photon beams of 6 and 18 MV. The ionization chamber array allows this metric to be conveniently measured as part of routine accelerator quality assurance.

  18. Verification of Radiation Isocenter on Linac Beam 6 MV using Computed Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irsal, Muhammad; Hidayanto, Eko; Sutanto, Heri

    2017-06-01

    Radiation isocenter is more important part of quality assurance for the linear accelerator (Linac) due to radiation isocenter is a main location in irradiation radiotherapy, isocenter can shift when the gantry and collimator rotation. In general, the radiation isocenter verification using a special film. This research was conducted radiation isocenter verification using computed radiography with digital image processing techniques. Image acquisition was done using the modalities of Linac 6 MV with star shot method is star-shaped beam due to rotation of the collimator, gantry and couch. Then do the delineation on each beam to determine the centroid and beam diameter. By the results of verification of radiation isocenter performed on collimator and the couch, it shows that the size diameter for rotational collimator is 0.632 mm and 0.458 mm for the couch. Based on AAPM report 40 about the size of the Linac radiation isocenter diameter used in this study is still in good condition and worth to be operated because the value of the radiation isocenter diameter is below 2 mm.

  19. Verification of Radiation Isocenter on Linac Beam 6 MV using Computed Radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irsal, Muhammad; Hidayanto, Eko; Sutanto, Heri

    2017-01-01

    Radiation isocenter is more important part of quality assurance for the linear accelerator (Linac) due to radiation isocenter is a main location in irradiation radiotherapy, isocenter can shift when the gantry and collimator rotation. In general, the radiation isocenter verification using a special film. This research was conducted radiation isocenter verification using computed radiography with digital image processing techniques. Image acquisition was done using the modalities of Linac 6 MV with star shot method is star-shaped beam due to rotation of the collimator, gantry and couch. Then do the delineation on each beam to determine the centroid and beam diameter. By the results of verification of radiation isocenter performed on collimator and the couch, it shows that the size diameter for rotational collimator is 0.632 mm and 0.458 mm for the couch. Based on AAPM report 40 about the size of the Linac radiation isocenter diameter used in this study is still in good condition and worth to be operated because the value of the radiation isocenter diameter is below 2 mm. (paper)

  20. Beam related response of in vivo diode detectors for external radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baci, Syrja, E-mail: sbarci2013@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Gjirokastra, “Eqrem Çabej” (Albania); Telhaj, Ervis [Department of Medical Physics, Hygeia Hospital Tirana (Albania); Malkaj, Partizan [Department of Physical Engineering, Polytechnic University, Tirana (Albania)

    2016-03-25

    In Vivo Dosimetry (IVD) is a set of methods used in cancer treatment clinics to determine the real dose of radiation absorbed by target volume in a patient’s body. IVD has been widely implemented in radiotherapy treatment centers and is now recommended part of Quality Assurance program by many International health and radiation organizations. Because of cost and lack of specialized personnel, IVD has not been practiced as yet, in Albanian radiotherapy clinics. At Hygeia Hospital Tirana, patients are irradiated with high energy photons generated by Elekta Synergy Accelerators. We have recently started experimenting with the purpose of establishing an IVD practice at this hospital. The first set of experiments was aimed at calibration of diodes that are going to be used for IVD. PMMA, phantoms by PTW were used to calibrate p – type Si, semiconductor diode dosimeters, made by PTW Freiburg for entrance dose. Response of the detectors is affected by energy of the beam, accumulated radiation dose, dose rate, temperature, angle against the beam axis, etc. Here we present the work done for calculating calibration factor and correction factors of source to surface distance, field size, and beam incidence for the entrance dose for both 6 MV photon beam and 18 MV photon beam. Dependence of dosimeter response was found to be more pronounced with source to surface distance as compared to other variables investigated.

  1. Beam related response of in vivo diode detectors for external radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baci, Syrja; Telhaj, Ervis; Malkaj, Partizan

    2016-01-01

    In Vivo Dosimetry (IVD) is a set of methods used in cancer treatment clinics to determine the real dose of radiation absorbed by target volume in a patient’s body. IVD has been widely implemented in radiotherapy treatment centers and is now recommended part of Quality Assurance program by many International health and radiation organizations. Because of cost and lack of specialized personnel, IVD has not been practiced as yet, in Albanian radiotherapy clinics. At Hygeia Hospital Tirana, patients are irradiated with high energy photons generated by Elekta Synergy Accelerators. We have recently started experimenting with the purpose of establishing an IVD practice at this hospital. The first set of experiments was aimed at calibration of diodes that are going to be used for IVD. PMMA, phantoms by PTW were used to calibrate p – type Si, semiconductor diode dosimeters, made by PTW Freiburg for entrance dose. Response of the detectors is affected by energy of the beam, accumulated radiation dose, dose rate, temperature, angle against the beam axis, etc. Here we present the work done for calculating calibration factor and correction factors of source to surface distance, field size, and beam incidence for the entrance dose for both 6 MV photon beam and 18 MV photon beam. Dependence of dosimeter response was found to be more pronounced with source to surface distance as compared to other variables investigated.

  2. Beam property measurement of a 300-kV ion source test stand for a 1-MV electrostatic accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sae-Hoon; Kim, Dae-Il; Kim, Yu-Seok

    2016-09-01

    The KOMAC (Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex) has been developing a 300-kV ion source test stand for a 1-MV electrostatic accelerator for industrial purposes. A RF ion source was operated at 200 MHz with its matching circuit. The beam profile and emittance were measured behind an accelerating column to confirm the beam property from the RF ion source. The beam profile was measured at the end of the accelerating tube and at the beam dump by using a beam profile monitor (BPM) and wire scanner. An Allison-type emittance scanner was installed behind the beam profile monitor (BPM) to measure the beam density in phase space. The measurement results for the beam profile and emittance are presented in this paper.

  3. Imaging and dosimetric considerations for titanium prosthesis implanted within the irradiated region by high photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indogo, V.

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this research was to observe dose distributions in the vicinity of titanium prosthetic implants during radiotherapy procedures. Data were obtained using a locally fabricated tissue equivalent phantom CT images, and in blue water phantom with titanium prosthesis which was irradiated with 60 Co gamma radiation and Elekta Platform photon beams. Images obtained were loaded into Prowess Panther and Oncentra treatment planning systems (TPSs) for dose simulations. Prowess TPS (1.25 MeV) estimated lesser errors whilst Oncentra (6 and 15 MV) dose simulations yielded large variations. Proximal ends of the metal recorded slight increase in doses as a rcsult of backscatter with dose increment below acceptable tolerance of ±3%. Doses measured decreases on the distal side of the prosthesis at a distance less than d max from the plate on each beam energy. Beyond certain depth along the axis, depth doses increased slightly mainly due to increase in electron fluence by portions receiving unperturbed dose. An increase in the plate thickness showed a corresponding decrease on percentage depth dose. A reduction in the above trend was also noticed with an increase in beam energy primarily because scattered photons are more forwardly directed. Prowess TPS (convolution superposition algorithm) was found to be better at reducing dose variation than OMP (collapse cone algorithm) when correction for artifact. Manual calculations on blue phantom data agree with results from Prowess. Oncentra is not capable of simulating dose around titanium prosthesis as its range of densities, 0.00121 to 2.83, excludes titanium density (rED for titanium is 3.74). (au)

  4. A comparison of protocols for external beam radiotherapy beam calibrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeed Al-Ahbabi, Salma; Bradley, D.A.; Beyomi, M.; Alkatib, Z.; Adhaheri, S.; Darmaki, M.; Nisbet, A.

    2012-01-01

    A number of codes of practice (CoP) for electron and photon radiotherapy beam dosimetry are currently in use. Comparison is made of the more widely used of these, specifically those of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA TRS-398), the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM TG-51) and the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM 2003). All are based on calibration of ionization chambers in terms of absorbed dose to water, each seeking to reduce uncertainty in delivered dose, providing an even stronger system of primary standards than previous air-kerma based approaches. They also provide a firm, traceable and straight-forward formalism. Included in making dose assessments for the three CoP are calibration coefficients for a range of beam quality indices. Measurements have been performed using clinical photon and electron beams, the absorbed dose to water being obtained following the recommendations given by each code. Electron beam comparisons have been carried out using measurements for electron beams of nominal energies 6, 9, 12, 16 and 20 MeV. Comparisons were also carried out for photon beams of nominal energies 6 and 18 MV. For photon beams use was made of NE2571 cylindrical graphite walled ionization chambers, cross-calibrated against an NE2611 Secondary Standard; for electron beams, PTW Markus and NACP-02 plane-parallel chambers were used. Irradiations were made using Varian 600C/2100C linacs, supported by water tanks and Virtual Water™ phantoms. The absorbed doses for photon and electron beams obtained following these CoP are all in good agreement, with deviations of less than 2%. A number of studies have been carried out by different groups in different countries to examine the consistency of dosimetry codes of practice or protocols. The aim of these studies is to confirm that the goal of those codes is met, namely uniformity in establishment of dosimetry of all radiation beam types used in cancer therapy in the world

  5. Performance on a CT Scanner. Application for the dose correction in the presence of heterogeneities, experimental study using high energy photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanna, Therese.

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this work is the physical analysis of a second generation C T scanner: the A C T A Scanner 0200 FS (PFIZER) used at the 'Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif' and its application in radiotherapy. The first part of the study specifically concerns the physical performance of the C T Scanner, and, the evaluation of the doses, delivered to patients during tomodensitometric examinations. The second part envisages the possibilities of the application of C T scanning in radiotherapy. A particular study is established for the utilization of the physical characteristics, furnished by the C T Scanner, concerning different organs, in dose calculations, in the presence of heterogeneities. An experimental study using high energy photon beams more particularly 25 MV X ray beams produced by a linear accelerator (type Sagittaire) has been realized with materials, simulating different human tissues. Consequently, the validity of different correction methods proposed in the literature has been tested for the soft tissues and bone as for the lungs. Modifications are suggested to allow the use of these methods for the photons of very high energy [fr

  6. Injector for CESAR (2 MeV electron storage ring): 2-beam, 2 MV van de Graaff generator; tank removed.

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1968-01-01

    The van de Graaff generator in its tank. For voltage-holding, the tank was filled with pressurized extra-dry nitrogen. 2 beams emanated from 2 separate electron-guns. The left beam, for injection into the CESAR ring, was pulsed at 50 Hz, with currents of up to 1 A for 400 ns. The right beam was sent to a spectrometer line. Its pulselength was also 400 ns, but the pulse current was 12 microA, at a rate variable from 50 kHz to 1 MHz. This allowed stabilization of the top-terminal voltage to an unprecedented stability of +- 100 V, i.e. 6E-5. Although built for a nominal voltage of 2 MV, the operational voltage was limited to 1.75 MV in order to minimize voltage break-down events. CESAR was terminated at the end of 1967 and dismantled in 1968. R.Nettleton (left) and H.Burridge (right) are preparing the van de Graaff for shipment to the University of Swansea.

  7. Photon spectrum and absorbed dose in brain tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva S, A. [General Electric Healthcare, Antonio Dovali Jaime 70, Torre A 3er. piso, Col. Santa Fe, 01210 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico); Rivera M, T. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Av. Legaria No. 694, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Using Monte Carlo methods a BOMAB phantom inside a treatment hall with a brain tumor nearby the pituitary gland was treated with photons produced by a Varian 6 MV linac. The photon spectrum and the absorbed dose were calculated in the tumor, pituitary gland and the head. The treatment beam was collimated to illuminate only the tumor volume; however photons were noticed in the gland. Photon fluence reaching the tumor is 78.1 times larger than the fluence in the pituitary gland, on the other hand the absorbed dose in the tumor is 188 times larger than the dose in the gland because photons that reach the pituitary gland are scattered, by the head and the tumor, through Compton effect. (Author)

  8. Photon spectrum and absorbed dose in brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva S, A.; Vega C, H. R.; Rivera M, T.

    2015-10-01

    Using Monte Carlo methods a BOMAB phantom inside a treatment hall with a brain tumor nearby the pituitary gland was treated with photons produced by a Varian 6 MV linac. The photon spectrum and the absorbed dose were calculated in the tumor, pituitary gland and the head. The treatment beam was collimated to illuminate only the tumor volume; however photons were noticed in the gland. Photon fluence reaching the tumor is 78.1 times larger than the fluence in the pituitary gland, on the other hand the absorbed dose in the tumor is 188 times larger than the dose in the gland because photons that reach the pituitary gland are scattered, by the head and the tumor, through Compton effect. (Author)

  9. Test study of boron nitride as a new detector material for dosimetry in high-energy photon beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppinga, D.; Halbur, J.; Lemmer, S.; Delfs, B.; Harder, D.; Looe, H. K.; Poppe, B.

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this test study is to check whether boron nitride (BN) might be applied as a detector material in high-energy photon-beam dosimetry. Boron nitride exists in various crystalline forms. Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) possesses high mobility of the electrons and holes as well as a high volume resistivity, so that ionizing radiation in the clinical range of the dose rate can be expected to produce a measurable electrical current at low background current. Due to the low atomic numbers of its constituents, its density (2.0 g cm-3) similar to silicon and its commercial availability, h-BN appears as possibly suitable for the dosimetry of ionizing radiation. Five h-BN plates were contacted to triaxial cables, and the detector current was measured in a solid-state ionization chamber circuit at an applied voltage of 50 V. Basic dosimetric properties such as formation by pre-irradiation, sensitivity, reproducibility, linearity and temporal resolution were measured with 6 MV photon irradiation. Depth dose curves at quadratic field sizes of 10 cm and 40 cm were measured and compared to ionization chamber measurements. After a pre-irradiation with 6 Gy, the devices show a stable current signal at a given dose rate. The current-voltage characteristic up to 400 V shows an increase in the collection efficiency with the voltage. The time-resolved detector current behavior during beam interrupts is comparable to diamond material, and the background current is negligible. The measured percentage depth dose curves at 10 cm  ×  10 cm field size agreed with the results of ionization chamber measurements within  ±2%. This is a first study of boron nitride as a detector material for high-energy photon radiation. By current measurements on solid ionization chambers made from boron nitride chips we could demonstrate that boron nitride is in principle suitable as a detector material for high-energy photon-beam dosimetry.

  10. Photonic guiding structures in lithium niobate crystals produced by energetic ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng

    2009-10-01

    A range of ion beam techniques have been used to fabricate a variety of photonic guiding structures in the well-known lithium niobate (LiNbO3 or LN) crystals that are of great importance in integrated photonics/optics. This paper reviews the up-to-date research progress of ion-beam-processed LiNbO3 photonic structures and reports on their fabrication, characterization, and applications. Ion beams are being used with this material in a wide range of techniques, as exemplified by the following examples. Ion beam milling/etching can remove the selected surface regions of LiNbO3 crystals via the sputtering effects. Ion implantation and swift ion irradiation can form optical waveguide structures by modifying the surface refractive indices of the LiNbO3 wafers. Crystal ion slicing has been used to obtain bulk-quality LiNbO3 single-crystalline thin films or membranes by exfoliating the implanted layer from the original substrate. Focused ion beams can either generate small structures of micron or submicron dimensions, to realize photonic bandgap crystals in LiNbO3, or directly write surface waveguides or other guiding devices in the crystal. Ion beam-enhanced etching has been extensively applied for micro- or nanostructuring of LiNbO3 surfaces. Methods developed to fabricate a range of photonic guiding structures in LiNbO3 are introduced. Modifications of LiNbO3 through the use of various energetic ion beams, including changes in refractive index and properties related to the photonic guiding structures as well as to the materials (i.e., electro-optic, nonlinear optic, luminescent, and photorefractive features), are overviewed in detail. The application of these LiNbO3 photonic guiding structures in both micro- and nanophotonics are briefly summarized.

  11. Diamond detector in absorbed dose measurements in high-energy linear accelerator photon and electron beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravichandran, Ramamoorthy; Binukumar, John Pichy; Al Amri, Iqbal; Davis, Cheriyathmanjiyil Antony

    2016-03-08

    Diamond detectors (DD) are preferred in small field dosimetry of radiation beams because of small dose profile penumbras, better spatial resolution, and tissue-equivalent properties. We investigated a commercially available 'microdiamond' detector in realizing absorbed dose from first principles. A microdiamond detector, type TM 60019 with tandem electrometer is used to measure absorbed doses in water, nylon, and PMMA phantoms. With sensitive volume 0.004 mm3, radius 1.1mm, thickness 1 x10(-3) mm, the nominal response is 1 nC/Gy. It is assumed that the diamond detector could collect total electric charge (nC) developed during irradiation at 0 V bias. We found that dose rate effect is less than 0.7% for changing dose rate by 500 MU/min. The reproducibility in obtaining readings with diamond detector is found to be ± 0.17% (1 SD) (n = 11). The measured absorbed doses for 6 MV and 15 MV photons arrived at using mass energy absorption coefficients and stop-ping power ratios compared well with Nd, water calibrated ion chamber measured absorbed doses within 3% in water, PMMA, and nylon media. The calibration factor obtained for diamond detector confirmed response variation is due to sensitivity due to difference in manufacturing process. For electron beams, we had to apply ratio of electron densities of water to carbon. Our results qualify diamond dosimeter as a transfer standard, based on long-term stability and reproducibility. Based on micro-dimensions, we recommend these detectors for pretreatment dose verifications in small field irradiations like stereotactic treatments with image guidance.

  12. Integrated single- and two-photon light sheet microscopy using accelerating beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piksarv, Peeter; Marti, Dominik; Le, Tuan

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate the first light sheet microscope using propagation invariant, accelerating Airy beams that operates both in single- and two-photon modes. The use of the Airy beam permits us to develop an ultra compact, high resolution light sheet system without beam scanning. In two-photon mode......, an increase in the field of view over the use of a standard Gaussian beam by a factor of six is demonstrated. This implementation for light sheet microscopy opens up new possibilities across a wide range of biomedical applications, especially for the study of neuronal processes....

  13. Ultra-compact laser beam steering device using holographically formed two dimensional photonic crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Xinyuan; Chen, Xiaonan; Chen, Maggie Yihong; Wang, Alan Xiaolong; Jiang, Wei; Chen, Ray T

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, we report the theoretical study of polymer-based photonic crystals for laser beam steering which is based on the superprism effect as well as the experiment fabrication of the two dimensional photonic crystals for the laser beam steering. Superprism effect, the principle for beam steering, was separately studied in details through EFC (Equifrequency Contour) analysis. Polymer based photonic crystals were fabricated through double exposure holographic interference method using SU8-2007. The experiment results showed a beam steering angle of 10 degree for 30 nm wavelength variation.

  14. The effect of voxel size on dose distribution in Varian Clinac iX 6 MV photon beam using Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yani, Sitti, E-mail: sitti.yani@s.itb.ac.id [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Division, Physics Department, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Akademi Kebidanan Pelita Ibu, Kendari (Indonesia); Dirgayussa, I Gde E.; Haryanto, Freddy; Arif, Idam [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Division, Physics Department, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Rhani, Moh. Fadhillah [Tan Tock Seng Hospital (Singapore)

    2015-09-30

    Recently, Monte Carlo (MC) calculation method has reported as the most accurate method of predicting dose distributions in radiotherapy. The MC code system (especially DOSXYZnrc) has been used to investigate the different voxel (volume elements) sizes effect on the accuracy of dose distributions. To investigate this effect on dosimetry parameters, calculations were made with three different voxel sizes. The effects were investigated with dose distribution calculations for seven voxel sizes: 1 × 1 × 0.1 cm{sup 3}, 1 × 1 × 0.5 cm{sup 3}, and 1 × 1 × 0.8 cm{sup 3}. The 1 × 10{sup 9} histories were simulated in order to get statistical uncertainties of 2%. This simulation takes about 9-10 hours to complete. Measurements are made with field sizes 10 × 10 cm2 for the 6 MV photon beams with Gaussian intensity distribution FWHM 0.1 cm and SSD 100.1 cm. MC simulated and measured dose distributions in a water phantom. The output of this simulation i.e. the percent depth dose and dose profile in d{sub max} from the three sets of calculations are presented and comparisons are made with the experiment data from TTSH (Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore) in 0-5 cm depth. Dose that scored in voxels is a volume averaged estimate of the dose at the center of a voxel. The results in this study show that the difference between Monte Carlo simulation and experiment data depend on the voxel size both for percent depth dose (PDD) and profile dose. PDD scan on Z axis (depth) of water phantom, the big difference obtain in the voxel size 1 × 1 × 0.8 cm{sup 3} about 17%. In this study, the profile dose focused on high gradient dose area. Profile dose scan on Y axis and the big difference get in the voxel size 1 × 1 × 0.1 cm{sup 3} about 12%. This study demonstrated that the arrange voxel in Monte Carlo simulation becomes important.

  15. Dosimetric characterization of VIPARnd gel by optical analysis to high-energy photon beam used in external radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Juliana R.; Lima, Renata S.; Lopes, Roseany de V. Vieira; Ceschin, Artemis Marti

    2015-01-01

    Polymer gel dosimetry has been proposed as a possibility for measurements of dose distribution in radiotherapy. This work aims to evaluate the dosimetric characteristics of a VIPARnd for 6 MV photon beam used in radiotherapy using optical investigations. The absorbance spectrum of irradiated gel dosimeter was optical evaluated with spectrophotometer techniques and with CMOS camera readout for dose range of 0 to 50 Gy. Data shows that the VIPARnd has a maximum absorbance at 300 to 320 nm depending on the absorbed dose. The CMOS camera readouts were obtained in RGB color, the absorbance measurements suggest a major response of dose for blue matrix verified with data. The dose-response curve for blue component showed interval of linearity from 1 Gy to 20 Gy. (author)

  16. Analytical approach for determining beam profiles in water phantom of symmetric and asymmetric fields of wedged, blocked, and open photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahmasebi Birgani, Mohamad Javad; Chegeni, Nahid; Arvandi, Shole; Razmjoo Ghalaee, Sasan; Zabihzadeh, Mansoor; Khezerloo, Davood

    2013-11-04

    Nowadays, in most radiotherapy departments, the commercial treatment planning systems (TPS) used to calculate dose distributions needs to be verified; therefore, quick, easy-to-use, and low-cost dose distribution algorithms are desirable to test and verify the performance of the TPS. In this paper, we put forth an analytical method to calculate the phantom scatter contribution and depth dose on the central axis based on the equivalent square concept. Then, this method was generalized to calculate the profiles at any depth and for several field shapes - regular or irregular fields - under symmetry and asymmetry photon beam conditions. Varian 2100 C/D and Siemens Primus Plus linacs with 6 and 18 MV photon beam were used for irradiations. Percentage depth doses (PDDs) were measured for a large number of square fields for both energies and for 45° wedge, which were employed to obtain the profiles in any depth. To assess the accuracy of the calculated profiles, several profile measurements were carried out for some treatment fields. The calculated and measured profiles were compared by gamma-index calculation. All γ-index calculations were based on a 3% dose criterion and a 3 mm dose-to-agreement (DTA) acceptance criterion. The γ values were less than 1 at most points. However, the maximum γ observed was about 1.10 in the penumbra region in most fields and in the central area for the asymmetric fields. This analytical approach provides a generally quick and fairly accurate algorithm to calculate dose distribution for some treatment fields in conventional radiotherapy.

  17. Dosimetric Analysis of Unflattened (FFFB) and Flattened (FB) Photon Beam Energy for Gastric Cancers Using IMRT and VMAT-a Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhushan, Manindra; Yadav, Girigesh; Tripathi, Deepak; Kumar, Lalit; Kishore, Vimal; Dewan, Abhinav; Kumar, Gourav; Wahi, Inderjit Kaur; Gairola, Munish

    2018-03-08

    To evaluate the feasibility of flattening filter free beam (FFFB) for the treatment of gastric tumors and to review their benefits over 6MV flatten beam (6MV_FFB). Fifteen patients with histologically proven gastric carcinoma were selected. CT scans with slice thickness of 0.3 cm were acquired and planning target volume (PTV) and organ at risk (OAR) were delineated. Plans were made retrospectively for each patient for the prescription dose of 45 Gy/25 fractions to the PTV. Four isocentric plans were compared in the present study on Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA). PTV D98% was 44.41 ± 0.12, 44.38 ± 0.13, 44.59 ± 0.14, and 44.49 ± 0.19 Gy for IMRT 6MV_FFB, IMRT 6MV_FFFB, VMAT 6MV_FFB, and VMAT 6MV_FFFB respectively. 6MV_FFFB beam minimizes the mean heart dose D mean (P = 0.001). VMAT dominates over IMRT when it came to kidney doses V 12Gy (P = 0.02), V 23Gy (P = 0.015), V 28Gy (P = 0.011), and D max (P < 0.01). VMAT has significantly reduced the doses to kidneys. It was analyzed that 6MV_FFFB significantly reduces the dose to normal tissues (P = 0.006 and P = 0.018). VMAT significantly reduces the TMU, which is required to deliver the similar dose by IMRT (P < 0.01). Unflattened beam spares the organs at risk significantly to avoid the chances of secondary malignancies and reduces the intra-fraction motion during treatment due to provision of higher dose rate. Hence, we conclude that 6MV unflattened beam can be used to treat gastric carcinoma.

  18. Introduction of beam flatness filter for 60Co teletherapy beam and its efficacy in clinical radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathiyan, S.; Ravichandran, R.; Ravikumar, M.

    2003-01-01

    In the western countries cobalt-60 machines have become obsolete, whereas in India we have about 250 machines operational for clinical radiotherapy. The basic differences of 6 MV x-ray beam and cobalt-60 beam are: a) build-up d max point, b) flatness of beam at depths, and c) sharpness of the beam edge. We looked at the homogeneity of delivered dose in the target volume in a 3 field SAD technique for 60 Co (80 cm, 100 cm) and 6 MV treatments. More dose variations are seen in 60 Co treated volume. The excess curvature of isodose curves of 60 Co at depths may be one of the reasons for this inhomogeneity in dose to target volume. Therefore, there is need for achieving perfect flatness in the isodose curves at desired depths. A flattening filter was fabricated using dental wax impression material to account for depths of curvature of 50% 60 Co isodose curve. The filter was fabricated for the Theratron 780C machine for necessary flatness. The beam flatness with filter was measured with a) ionization and b) TL dosimetry methods. The flattened beam profile was compared with 6 MV x-ray beam (Clinac-1800, M/s Varian, USA). Our measurements show uniform flatness of cobalt-60 isodose curve at desired depth and useful radiation field width comparable to 6 MV x-ray photon profile at full width at half maximum (FWHM). If this concept is extendable to short field widths, it appears that there is scope for use of such filter in the treatments of oesophagus, larynx, and pituitary tumours to achieve dose homogeneity. Using this flatness filter and penumbra trimmer, we may achieve better quality cobalt-60 beam for radiotherapy. (author)

  19. Dosimetry study comparing NCS report-2 versus IAEA TRS-398 protocol for high energy photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attalaa, E.M.; Khaled, N.E.; Abou Elenein, H.S.; Elsayed, A.A.

    2005-01-01

    In this work a dosimetry study is presented in which the results of absorbed dose determined at reference condition according to the IAEA TRS-398 protocol and the NCS report-2 are compared. The IAEA TRS-398 protocol for absorbed dose calibration is based on ionization chamber having absorbed dose to water calibration factor N d w, while the NCS-2 dosimetry report for absorbed dose calibration is based on an ionization chamber having air- kerma calibration factor N k . This study shows that the absorbed dose which is calculated with The IAEA TRS-398 formalisms is higher than that calculated with NCS report-2 formalisms within range from 0.4 to 0.9% in cobalt-60 beam as sensed by different ionization chambers, and from 0.2 to 1.1% for different higher energy photon beams of 6, 8 and 18 MV. The chambers used are PTW 30001, 30004, and NE-2571; which have calibration factors N k and N d w traceable to the BIPM (Bureau International des Poids et Mesures)

  20. Packaging consideration of two-dimensional polymer-based photonic crystals for laser beam steering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Xinyuan; Chen, Xiaonan; Chen, Maggie Yihong; Wang, Alan Xiaolong; Jiang, Wei; Chen, Ray T.

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we report the theoretical study of polymer-based photonic crystals for laser beam steering which is based on the superprism effect as well as the experiment fabrication of the two dimensional photonic crystals for the laser beam steering. Superprism effect, the principle for beam steering, was separately studied in details through EFC (Equifrequency Contour) analysis. Polymer based photonic crystals were fabricated through double exposure holographic interference method using SU8-2007. The experiment results were also reported.

  1. Theoretical and experimental study of an energy-reinforced braking radiation photon beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertin, Pierre-Yves

    1966-01-01

    This research thesis reports the theoretical study of a photon beam raised towards high energies, its experimental implementation, the definition of a gamma spectrometry method which aimed at checking various hypotheses used in the beam theoretical study. After a presentation of the theory of phenomena of electron braking radiation, of materialisation of photons into positon-negaton pair, and of issues related to multiple Coulomb diffusion, the author reports the study of the different solutions which allow a photon beam to be obtained. A braking radiation of mono-kinetic electron has been used. This braking radiation is reinforced by absorption of low energy protons in a column of lithium hydride. The author describes how the beam is built up, and the experimental approach. He describes how raw data are processed to get rid of the influence of the multiple Coulomb diffusion and of the braking radiation. Experimental results are compared with those obtained by convolution of photon spectra and differential cross section

  2. Tenth value layers for 60Co gamma rays and for 4, 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV x rays in concrete for beams of cone angles between 0 degrees and 14 degrees calculated by Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaradat, Adnan K; Biggs, Peter J

    2007-05-01

    The calculation of shielding barrier thicknesses for radiation therapy facilities according to the NCRP formalism is based on the use of broad beams (that is, the maximum possible field sizes). However, in practice, treatment fields used in radiation therapy are, on average, less than half the maximum size. Indeed, many contemporary treatment techniques call for reduced field sizes to reduce co-morbidity and the risk of second cancers. Therefore, published tenth value layers (TVLs) for shielding materials do not apply to these very small fields. There is, hence, a need to determine the TVLs for various beam modalities as a function of field size. The attenuation of (60)Co gamma rays and photons of 4, 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV bremsstrahlung x ray beams by concrete has been studied using the Monte Carlo technique (MCNP version 4C2) for beams of half-opening angles of 0 degrees , 3 degrees , 6 degrees , 9 degrees , 12 degrees , and 14 degrees . The distance between the x-ray source and the distal surface of the shielding wall was fixed at 600 cm, a distance that is typical for modern radiation therapy rooms. The maximum concrete thickness varied between 76.5 cm and 151.5 cm for (60)Co and 18 MV x rays, respectively. Detectors were placed at 630 cm, 700 cm, and 800 cm from the source. TVLs have been determined down to the third TVL. Energy spectra for 4, 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV x rays for 10 x 10 cm(2) and 40 x 40 cm(2) field sizes were used to generate depth dose curves in water that were compared with experimentally measured values.

  3. Thermoluminescence response of Ge-, Al- and Nd- doped optical fibers by 6 MeV - electron and 6 MeV - photon irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, I.; Moburak, A. A.; Saeed, M.A.; Wagiran, H.; Hida, N.; Yaakob, H.N.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report the prediction of thermoluminescence responses of Neodymium-doped SiO 2 optical fibre with various dose ranges from 0.5 Gy to 4.0 Gy by 6 MeV - electron irradiations without requirement for experimental measurements. A technique has been developed to calculate prediction of 6 MeV - electron response of Neodymium-doped SiO 2 optical fibre by observing the measured TL response of 6 MV - photon and the ratio of known measured photon/electron yield ratio distribution for Ge-doped, Al-doped optical fibre and standard TLD 100 dosimeter. The samples were kept in gelatin capsule an irradiated with 6 MV - photon at the dose range from 0.5 Gy to 4.0 Gy. Siemens model Primus 3368 linear accelerator located at Hospital Sultan Ismail, Johor Bahru has been used to deliver the photon beam to the samples. We found the average response ratio of 6 MV - photon and 6 MeV - electron in Ge-doped, Al-doped optical fibre and standard TLD-100 dosimeter are 0.83(3). Observing the measured value of 6 MV - photon irradiation this average ratio is useful to find the prediction of thermoluminescence responses by 6 MeV - electron irradiation of Neodymium-doped SiO 2 optical fibre by the requirement for experimental measurements with various dose ranges from 0.5 Gy to 4.0 Gy by 6 MV - photon irradiations.

  4. Photon spectrum and absorbed dose in brain tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene; Silva-Sanchez, Angeles; Rivera-Montalvo, Teodoro

    2016-11-01

    Using Monte Carlo methods a BOMAB phantom inside a treatment hall with a brain tumor nearby the pituitary gland was treated with photons produced by a Varian 6MV linac. The photon spectrum and the absorbed dose were calculated in the tumor, pituitary gland and the head. The treatment beam was collimated to illuminate only the tumor volume; however photons were noticed in the gland. Photon fluence reaching the tumor is and 15.7 times larger than the fluence in the pituitary gland, on the other hand the absorbed dose in the tumor is 37.1 times larger than the dose in the gland because photons that reach the pituitary gland are scattered, by the head and the tumor, through Compton effect. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Fabrication of photonic crystals on several kinds of semiconductor materials by using focused-ion beam method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xingsheng; Chen Hongda; Xiong Zhigang; Jin Aizi; Gu Changzhi; Cheng Bingying; Zhang Daozhong

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we introduced the fabrication of photonic crystals on several kinds of semiconductor materials by using focused-ion beam machine, it shows that the method of focused-ion beam can fabricate two-dimensional photonic crystal and photonic crystal device efficiently, and the quality of the fabricated photonic crystal is high. Using the focused-ion beam method, we fabricate photonic crystal wavelength division multiplexer, and its characteristics are analyzed

  6. Evaluation of secondary electron filter for removing contaminant electrons from high-energy 6 MV x-ray beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagai, Kozo

    1988-01-01

    When using high energy X-rays, the dose increases at the skin surface and build-up region of beam contamination of secondary electrons coming out from the inner surface of the lineac head. At our radiotherapy department, many cases of external otitis from severe skin reactions, particularly resulting from whole brain irradiation of primary and metastatic brain tumors with a 6 MV X-ray lineac, have been encountered. An investigation was made of the physical aspects of a 6 MV X-ray beam using three electron filters, lead lucite, lead glass and lucite to remove secondary electrons. Transparent materials for filters should be preferable for locating the light field. The following results were obtained: 1) For removing secondary electrons, a lead lucite filter was found best. 2) The lead lucite filter proved most effective for removing secondary electrons from the area of treatment. It reduced the dose of irradiation to the skin surface and build-up region, and furthermore improved the depth dose relative to that without filters. 3) From a clinical standpoint, skin reactions such as external otitis remarkably decreased using a lead lucite filter. 4) It thus appears necessary to use a high energy X-ray with newly designed filters to reduce beam contamination of secondary electrons. (author)

  7. Qualification of a Monte Carlo model of photon beams of a Lilac Elekta Precise; Habilitacion de un modelo Monte Carlo de haces de fotones de un linac Elekta Precise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linares R, H. M.; Laguardia, R. A. [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas, Av. Salvador Allende Esq. Luaces, Quinta de los Molinos, Plaza de la Revolucion, 10600 La Habana (Cuba); Lara M, E., E-mail: elier@inor.sld.cu [Instituto Nacional de Oncologia y Radioterapia, Av. 29 y E. Vedado, 10400 La Habana (Cuba)

    2014-08-15

    For the simulation of the accelerator head the parameters determination that characterize the electrons primary beam that affect in the target is a step that involves a fundamental role in the precision of the Monte Carlo calculations. Applying the proposed methodology by Pena et al. [2007], in this work was carried out the qualification of the photon beams (6 MV and 15 MV) of an accelerator Elekta Precise, using the Monte Carlo code EGSnrc. The influence exerted by the characteristics of the electrons primary beam on the distribution of absorbed dose for the two energy of this equipment was studied. Using different mid energy combinations and FWHM of the electrons primary beam was calculated the dose deposited in a segmented water mannequin with its surface to 100 cm of the source. Starting from the deposited dose in the mannequin the dose curves in depth and dose profiles to different depths were built. These curves were compared with measured values in a similar experimental arrangement to the carried out simulation, applying acceptability criteria based on confidence intervals [Venselaar et al. 2001]. The dose profiles for small fields were like it was expected, to be strongly influenced by the radial distribution (FWHM). The energy/FWHM combinations that better reproduce the experimental curves of each photon beam were determined. One time determined the best combination (5.75 MeV/2 mm and 11.25 MeV/2 mm, respectively) was used for the generation of the phase spaces and the field factors calculation. A good correspondence was obtained between the simulations and the measurements for a wide range of field sizes, as well as for different types of detectors, being all the results inside of the tolerance margins. (author)

  8. Development of a fibre-optic dosemeter to measure the skin dose and percentage depth dose in the build-up region of therapeutic photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K. A.; Yoo, W. J.; Jang, K. W.; Moon, J.; Han, K. T.; Jeon, D.; Park, J. Y.; Cha, E. J.; Lee, B.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a fibre-optic dosemeter (FOD) using an organic scintillator with a diameter of 0.5 mm for photon-beam therapy dosimetry was fabricated. The fabricated dosemeter has many advantages, including water equivalence, high spatial resolution, remote sensing and real-time measurement. The scintillating light generated from an organic-dosemeter probe embedded in a solid-water stack phantom is guided to a photomultiplier tube and an electrometer via 20 m of plastic optical fibre. Using this FOD, the skin dose and the percentage depth dose in the build-up region according to the depths of a solid-water stack phantom are measured with 6- and 15-MV photon-beam energies with field sizes of 10310 and 20320 cm 2 , respectively. The results are compared with those measured using conventional dosimetry films. It is expected that the proposed FOD can be effectively used in radiotherapy dosimetry for accurate measurement of the skin dose and the depth dose distribution in the build-up region due to its high spatial resolution. (authors)

  9. Development of isodose curves for A 6 mv x-ray beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidaytalla, Lamya Abbas [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Khartoum, Khartoum (Sudan)

    1994-08-01

    In this thesis radiation distribution of 6 Mv x-ray beam in a water phantom is developed. The method is based on a simple empirical equation and the assumption that the x-ray source is a point source. This leads to a simple equation for the calculation and plotting of the isodose curves. the charts obtained for two fields, 6*6 and 12*12 cm{sup 2} show good agreement with the previous data used in the isotope and radiation centre, Khartoum hospital. It is suggested that further development should be carried out by writing a computer program for all the fields. (Author) 14 refs. , 9 tabs. , 34 figs. Also available from the Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Khartoum, Khartoum (SD)

  10. Effect of dental metal in 10 MV X-ray beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mimura, Seiichi; Mikami, Yasutaka; Inamura, Keiji; Tahara, Seiji; Nagaya, Isao; Egusa, Tomomi; Nakagiri, Yoshitada; Sugita, Katsuhiko.

    1991-01-01

    We have often encountered patients with dental metal when employing the 10 MV X-ray beam therapy for head and neck tumors, and felt it important to investigate the effect of dental metal in relation to dose distribution. The absorbed dose rose abruptly in the vicinity of the metal reaching an interface value equal to 150% of the dose within the acrylic phantom. These results showed that an overdose occurred about 5 mm from the metal. We also learned that the overdose can be avoided by using a 5-mm thick tissue equivalent material. Six patients with dental metal were treated after first covering their metal with a 5-mm thick mouthpiece. No radiation stomatitis caused by the metal was observed in any of these cases. (author)

  11. Beam Extraction for 1-MV Electrostatic Accelerator at the 300 kV Test Stand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sae-Hoon; Kim, Yu-Seok [Dongguk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Cho, Yong-Sub [KOMAC, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The Korea Multipurpose Accelerator Complex (KOMAC) has been developing a 300-kV test stand for a 1-MV electrostatic accelerator ion source. The ion source in the high-pressure vessel is required to have a high reliability. The test stand has been proposed and developed to confirm the stable operating conditions of the ion source. The ion source will be tested at the test stand to verify the long-time operating conditions. The test stand comprises a 300-kV high-voltage terminal, a battery for the ion-source power, a 60-Hz inverter, 200-MHz RF power, a 5-kV extraction power supply, a 300-kV accelerating tube, and a vacuum system. A beam extraction experiment for the test stand was performed, and the beam current was measured using a faraday cup in the chamber. A beam extraction results for the RF ion source will be presented. Beam extraction from the RF ion source of the test stand is verified by measuring the beam current with a faraday cup in the chamber. Thus far NI Labview, PLC and faraday cup have been used to measure the beam current. The OPC server is useful for monitoring the PLC values. The average beam current of (a), (b) and (c) shown in figure 2 are 110.241µA, 105.8597µA and 103.5278µA respectively.

  12. Analysis of the penumbra enlargement in lung versus the Quality Index of photon beams: A methodology to check the dose calculation algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsiakalos, Miltiadis F.; Theodorou, Kiki; Kappas, Constantin; Zefkili, Sofia; Rosenwold, Jean-Claude

    2004-01-01

    It is well known that considerable underdosage can occur at the edges of a tumor inside the lung because of the degradation of penumbra due to lack of lateral electronic equilibrium. Although present even at smaller energies, this phenomenon is more pronounced for higher energies. Apart from Monte Carlo calculation, most of the existing Treatment Planning Systems (TPSs) cannot deal at all, or with acceptable accuracy, with this effect. A methodology has been developed for assessing the dose calculation algorithms in the lung region where lateral electronic disequilibrium exists, based on the Quality Index (QI) of the incident beam. A phantom, consisting of layers of polystyrene and lung material, has been irradiated using photon beams of 4, 6, 15, and 20 MV. The cross-plane profiles of each beam for 5x5, 10x10, and 25x10 fields have been measured at the middle of the phantom with the use of films. The penumbra (20%-80%) and fringe (50%-90%) enlargement was measured and the ratio of the widths for the lung to that of polystyrene was defined as the Correction Factor (CF). Monte Carlo calculations in the two phantoms have also been performed for energies of 6, 15, and 20 MV. Five commercial TPS's algorithms were tested for their ability to predict the penumbra and fringe enlargement. A linear relationship has been found between the QI of the beams and the CF of the penumbra and fringe enlargement for all the examined fields. Monte Carlo calculations agree very well (less than 1% difference) with the film measurements. The CF values range between 1.1 for 4 MV (QI 0.620) and 2.28 for 20 MV (QI 0.794). Three of the tested TPS's algorithms could not predict any enlargement at all for all energies and all fields and two of them could predict the penumbra enlargement to some extent. The proposed methodology can help any user or developer to check the accuracy of its algorithm for lung cases, based on a simple phantom geometry and the QI of the incident beam. This check is

  13. Rapid volumetric imaging with Bessel-Beam three-photon microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bingying; Huang, Xiaoshuai; Gou, Dongzhou; Zeng, Jianzhi; Chen, Guoqing; Pang, Meijun; Hu, Yanhui; Zhao, Zhe; Zhang, Yunfeng; Zhou, Zhuan; Wu, Haitao; Cheng, Heping; Zhang, Zhigang; Xu, Chris; Li, Yulong; Chen, Liangyi; Wang, Aimin

    2018-01-01

    Owing to its tissue-penetration ability, multi-photon fluorescence microscopy allows for the high-resolution, non-invasive imaging of deep tissue in vivo; the recently developed three-photon microscopy (3PM) has extended the depth of high-resolution, non-invasive functional imaging of mouse brains to beyond 1.0 mm. However, the low repetition rate of femtosecond lasers that are normally used in 3PM limits the temporal resolution of point-scanning three-photon microscopy. To increase the volumetric imaging speed of 3PM, we propose a combination of an axially elongated needle-like Bessel-beam with three-photon excitation (3PE) to image biological samples with an extended depth of focus. We demonstrate the higher signal-to-background ratio (SBR) of the Bessel-beam 3PM compared to the two-photon version both theoretically and experimentally. Finally, we perform simultaneous calcium imaging of brain regions at different axial locations in live fruit flies and rapid volumetric imaging of neuronal structures in live mouse brains. These results highlight the unique advantage of conducting rapid volumetric imaging with a high SBR in the deep brain in vivo using scanning Bessel-3PM.

  14. Combined photon-electron beams in the treatment of the supraclavicular lymph nodes in breast cancer: A novel technique that achieves adequate coverage while reducing lung dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Ahmed; Mohamad, Issa; Dayyat, Abdulmajeed; Kanaa'n, Haitham; Sarhan, Nasim; Roujob, Ibrahim; Salem, Abdel-Fattah; Afifi, Shatha; Jaradat, Imad; Mubiden, Rasmi; Almousa, Abdelateif

    2015-01-01

    Radiation pneumonitis is a well-documented side effect of radiation therapy for breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to compare combined photon-electron, photon-only, and electron-only plans in the radiation treatment of the supraclavicular lymph nodes. In total, 13 patients requiring chest wall and supraclavicular nodal irradiation were planned retrospectively using combined photon-electron, photon-only, and electron-only supraclavicular beams. A dose of 50Gy over 25 fractions was prescribed. Chest wall irradiation parameters were fixed for all plans. The goal of this planning effort was to cover 95% of the supraclavicular clinical target volume (CTV) with 95% of the prescribed dose and to minimize the volume receiving ≥ 105% of the dose. Comparative end points were supraclavicular CTV coverage (volume covered by the 95% isodose line), hotspot volume, maximum radiation dose, contralateral breast dose, mean total lung dose, total lung volume percentage receiving at least 20 Gy (V(20 Gy)), heart volume percentage receiving at least 25 Gy (V(25 Gy)). Electron and photon energies ranged from 8 to 18 MeV and 4 to 6 MV, respectively. The ratio of photon-to-electron fractions in combined beams ranged from 5:20 to 15:10. Supraclavicular nodal coverage was highest in photon-only (mean = 96.2 ± 3.5%) followed closely by combined photon-electron (mean = 94.2 ± 2.5%) and lowest in electron-only plans (mean = 81.7 ± 14.8%, p dose was higher in the electron-only (mean = 69.7 ± 56.1 cm(3)) as opposed to combined photon-electron (mean = 50.8 ± 40.9 cm(3)) and photon-only beams (mean = 32.2 ± 28.1 cm(3), p = 0.114). Heart V(25 Gy) was not statistically different among the plans (p = 0.999). Total lung V(20 Gy) was lowest in electron-only (mean = 10.9 ± 2.3%) followed by combined photon-electron (mean = 13.8 ± 2.3%) and highest in photon-only plans (mean = 16.2 ± 3%, p electron-only beams, in terms of decreasing lung dose, is set back by the dosimetric hotspots

  15. THE PAIR BEAM PRODUCTION SPECTRUM FROM PHOTON-PHOTON ANNIHILATION IN COSMIC VOIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlickeiser, R.; Ibscher, D. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Lehrstuhl IV: Weltraum- und Astrophysik, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Elyiv, A. [Institut d' Astrophysique et de Geophysique, Universite de Liege, B-4000 Liege (Belgium); Miniati, F., E-mail: rsch@tp4.rub.de, E-mail: ibscher@tp4.rub.de, E-mail: elyiv@astro.ulg.ac.be, E-mail: fm@phys.ethz.ch [Physics Department, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, ETH-Zuerich, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2012-10-20

    Highly beamed relativistic e {sup {+-}}-pair energy distributions result in double photon collisions of the beamed gamma rays from TeV blazars at cosmological distances with the isotropically distributed extragalactic background light (EBL) in the intergalactic medium. The typical energies k {sub 0} {approx_equal} 10{sup -7} in units of m{sub e}c {sup 2} of the EBL are more than 10 orders of magnitude smaller than the observed gamma-ray energies k {sub 1} {>=} 10{sup 7}. Using the limit k {sub 0} << k {sub 1}, we demonstrate that the angular distribution of the generated pairs in the lab frame is highly beamed in the direction of the initial gamma-ray photons. For the astrophysically important case of power-law distributions of the emitted gamma-ray beam up to the maximum energy M interacting with Wien-type N(k {sub 0}){proportional_to}k{sup q} {sub 0}exp (- k {sub 0}/{Theta}) soft photon distributions with total number density N {sub 0}, we calculate analytical approximations for the electron production spectrum. For distant objects with luminosity distances d{sub L} >> r {sub 0} = ({sigma} {sub T} N {sub 0}){sup -1} = 0.49N {sup -1} {sub 0} Mpc (with Thomson cross section {sigma} {sub T}), the implied large values of the optical depth {tau}{sub 0} = d{sub L} /r {sub 0} indicate that the electron production spectra differ at energies inside and outside the interval [({Theta}ln {tau}{sub 0}){sup -1}, {tau}{sub 0}/{Theta}], given the maximum gamma-ray energy M >> {Theta}{sup -1}. In the case M >> {Theta}{sup -1}, the production spectrum is strongly peaked near E {approx_equal} {Theta}{sup -1}, being exponentially reduced at small energies and decreasing with the steep power law {proportional_to}E {sup -1-p} up to the maximum energy E = M - (1/2).

  16. Investigation of the accuracy of MV radiation isocentre calculations in the Elekta cone-beam CT software XVI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmermann, S. J.; Rowshanfarzad, P.; Ebert, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    ) and the radiation field centre (RFC) is calculated. A software package was developed for accurate calculation of the linac isocentre position. This requires precise determination of the position of the ball bearing and the RFC. Results: Data were acquired for 6 MV, 18 MV and flattening filter free (FFF) 6 MV FFF...... radiation isocentre prior to routine use of the cone-beam CT system. The isocentre determination method used in the XVI software is not available to users. The aim of this work is to perform an independent evaluation of the Elekta XVI 4.5 software for isocentre verification with focus on the robustness...... iView GT software. Two images were acquired at each cardinal gantry angle (-180o, -90o , 0o, 90o) at two opposing collimator angles. The images were exported to the conebeam CT software XVI 4.5 where the difference between the ball bearing position in the XYZ-room coordinates (IEC61217...

  17. Tissue classifications in Monte Carlo simulations of patient dose for photon beam tumor treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mu-Han; Chao, Tsi-Chian; Lee, Chung-Chi; Tung-Chieh Chang, Joseph; Tung, Chuan-Jong

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the calculated dose uncertainties induced by the material classification that determined the interaction cross-sections and the water-to-material stopping-power ratios. Calculations were made for a head- and neck-cancer patient treated with five intensity-modulated radiotherapy fields using 6 MV photon beams. The patient's CT images were reconstructed into two voxelized patient phantoms based on different CT-to-material classification schemes. Comparisons of the depth-dose curve of the anterior-to-posterior field and the dose-volume-histogram of the treatment plan were used to evaluate the dose uncertainties from such schemes. The results indicated that any misassignment of tissue materials could lead to a substantial dose difference, which would affect the treatment outcome. To assure an appropriate material assignment, it is desirable to have different conversion tables for various parts of the body. The assignment of stopping-power ratio should be based on the chemical composition and the density of the material.

  18. Determination Of Output Factor For Photon Beam Of The Mitsubishi EXL-14 Linear Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurman R; Sri-Inang S; Dani

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the determination of output factor for 6 MV photon beam of The Mitsubishi EXL-14 linear accelerator teletherapy unit. Determination of percentage depth dose curve has been done using Wallhofer dosemeter at source to surface distance, SSD of 100 cm and field size of 10 cm x 10 cm. Measurement of output has been carried out using a 0.6 cc ionization chamber inside a water phantom at depth of 5 cm with source to surface distance, SSD of 100 cm for square fields ranging in size 4 cm x 4 cm up to 10 cm x 10 cm. Output for rectangular fields which equal to the equivalent square fields were also determined. The results obtained shows that the deviations of the output for 12 cm x 3 cm and 19 cm x 7 cm were higher than ±2% to the output of the equivalent square fields. (author)

  19. Tissue classifications in Monte Carlo simulations of patient dose for photon beam tumor treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Mu-Han; Chao, Tsi-Chian; Lee, Chung-Chi; Tung-Chieh Chang, Joseph; Tung, Chuan-Jong

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the calculated dose uncertainties induced by the material classification that determined the interaction cross-sections and the water-to-material stopping-power ratios. Calculations were made for a head- and neck-cancer patient treated with five intensity-modulated radiotherapy fields using 6 MV photon beams. The patient's CT images were reconstructed into two voxelized patient phantoms based on different CT-to-material classification schemes. Comparisons of the depth-dose curve of the anterior-to-posterior field and the dose-volume-histogram of the treatment plan were used to evaluate the dose uncertainties from such schemes. The results indicated that any misassignment of tissue materials could lead to a substantial dose difference, which would affect the treatment outcome. To assure an appropriate material assignment, it is desirable to have different conversion tables for various parts of the body. The assignment of stopping-power ratio should be based on the chemical composition and the density of the material.

  20. The physics of small megavoltage photon beam dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreo, Pedro

    2018-02-01

    The increased interest during recent years in the use of small megavoltage photon beams in advanced radiotherapy techniques has led to the development of dosimetry recommendations by different national and international organizations. Their requirement of data suitable for the different clinical options available, regarding treatment units and dosimetry equipment, has generated a considerable amount of research by the scientific community during the last decade. The multiple publications in the field have led not only to the availability of new invaluable data, but have also contributed substantially to an improved understanding of the physics of their dosimetry. This work provides an overview of the most important aspects that govern the physics of small megavoltage photon beam dosimetry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Ion Beam Facilities at the National Centre for Accelerator based Research using a 3 MV Pelletron Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, T.; Patel, Shiv P.; Chandra, P.; Bajpai, P. K.

    A 3.0 MV (Pelletron 9 SDH 4, NEC, USA) low energy ion accelerator has been recently installed as the National Centre for Accelerator based Research (NCAR) at the Department of Pure & Applied Physics, Guru Ghasidas Vishwavidyalaya, Bilaspur, India. The facility is aimed to carried out interdisciplinary researches using ion beams with high current TORVIS (for H, He ions) and SNICS (for heavy ions) ion sources. The facility includes two dedicated beam lines, one for ion beam analysis (IBA) and other for ion implantation/ irradiation corresponding to switching magnet at +20 and -10 degree, respectively. Ions with 60 kV energy are injected into the accelerator tank where after stripping positively charged ions are accelerated up to 29 MeV for Au. The installed ion beam analysis techniques include RBS, PIXE, ERDA and channelling.

  2. A photon beam position monitor for SSRL beamline 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerino, J.A.; Rabedeau, T.; Bowen, W.

    1995-10-01

    We present here the concept of a simple one dimensional photon beam position monitor for use with high power synchrotron radiation beams. It has micron resolution, reasonable linearity in an inexpensive design. Most important, is its insensitivity to diffusely scattered low energy radiation from components upstream of the monitor

  3. A new ion beam facility based on a 3 MV Tandetron™ at IFIN-HH, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burducea, I.; Straticiuc, M.; Ghiță, D. G.; Moșu, D. V.; Călinescu, C. I.; Podaru, N. C.; Mous, D. J. W.; Ursu, I.; Zamfir, N. V.

    2015-09-01

    A 3 MV Tandetron™ accelerator system has been installed and commissioned at the "Horia Hulubei" National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN-HH, Măgurele, Romania. The main purpose of this machine is to strengthen applied nuclear physics research ongoing in our institute for more than four decades. The accelerator system was developed by High Voltage Engineering Europa B.V. (HVE) and comprises three high energy beam lines. The first beam line is dedicated to ion beam analysis (IBA) techniques: Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry - RBS, Nuclear Reaction Analysis - NRA, Particle Induced X-ray and γ-ray Emission - PIXE and PIGE and micro-beam experiments - μ-PIXE. The second beam line is dedicated to high energy ion implantation experiments and the third beam line was designed mainly for nuclear cross-sections measurements used in nuclear astrophysics. A unique feature, the first time in operation at an accelerator facility is the Na charge exchange canal (CEC), which is used to obtain high intensity beams of He- of at least 3 μA. The results of the acceptance tests demonstrate the huge potential of this new facility in various fields, from IBA to radiation hardness studies and from medical or environmental applications to astrophysics. The main features of the accelerator are presented in this paper.

  4. Analytical description of photon beam phase spaces in inverse Compton scattering sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Curatolo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We revisit the description of inverse Compton scattering sources and the photon beams generated therein, emphasizing the behavior of their phase space density distributions and how they depend upon those of the two colliding beams of electrons and photons. The main objective is to provide practical formulas for bandwidth, spectral density, brilliance, which are valid in general for any value of the recoil factor, i.e. both in the Thomson regime of negligible electron recoil, and in the deep Compton recoil dominated region, which is of interest for gamma-gamma colliders and Compton sources for the production of multi-GeV photon beams. We adopt a description based on the center of mass reference system of the electron-photon collision, in order to underline the role of the electron recoil and how it controls the relativistic Doppler/boost effect in various regimes. Using the center of mass reference frame greatly simplifies the treatment, allowing us to derive simple formulas expressed in terms of rms momenta of the two colliding beams (emittance, energy spread, etc. and the collimation angle in the laboratory system. Comparisons with Monte Carlo simulations of inverse Compton scattering in various scenarios are presented, showing very good agreement with the analytical formulas: in particular we find that the bandwidth dependence on the electron beam emittance, of paramount importance in Thomson regime, as it limits the amount of focusing imparted to the electron beam, becomes much less sensitive in deep Compton regime, allowing a stronger focusing of the electron beam to enhance luminosity without loss of mono-chromaticity. A similar effect occurs concerning the bandwidth dependence on the frequency spread of the incident photons: in deep recoil regime the bandwidth comes out to be much less dependent on the frequency spread. The set of formulas here derived are very helpful in designing inverse Compton sources in diverse regimes, giving a

  5. Temporal nonlinear beam dynamics in infiltrated photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennet, Francis; Rosberg, Christian Romer; Neshev, Dragomir N.

    Liquid-infiltrated photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) offer a new way of studying light propagation in periodic and discrete systems. A wide range of available fiber structures combined with the ease of infiltration opens up a range of novel experimental opportunities for optical detection and bio...... the evolution of the fiber output beam in the few micro or milliseconds after the beam is turned on. The characterization of the temporal behavior of the thermal nonlinear response provides important information about the nonlocality associated with heat diffusion inside the fiber, thus enabling studies of long...... and technological potential of liquid-infiltrated PCFs it is important to understand the temporal dynamics of nonlinear beam propagation in such structures. In this work we consider thermally induced spatial nonlinear effects in infiltrated photonic crystal fibers. We experimentally study the temporal dynamics...

  6. Photonuclear physics with low intensity photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mecking, B.A.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments in photonuclear physics are discussed that require a low intensity photon beam and large acceptance detectors. This combination is especially suitable for the investigation of photoprocesses on nucleons and light nuclei. A specific experimental setup for the electron stretcher ring ELSA is presented. (orig.)

  7. SU-E-T-608: Perturbation Corrections for Alanine Dosimeters in Different Phantom Materials in High-Energy Photon Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voigts-Rhetz, P von; Czarnecki, D; Anton, M; Zink, K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Alanine dosimeters are often used for in-vivo dosimetry purposes in radiation therapy. In a Monte Carlo study the influence of 20 different surrounding/phantom materials for alanine dosimeters was investigated. The investigations were performed in high-energy photon beams, covering the whole range from 60 Co up to 25 MV-X. The aim of the study is the introduction of a perturbation correction k env for alanine dosimeters accounting for the environmental material. Methods: The influence of different surrounding materials on the response of alanine dosimeters was investigated with Monte Carlo simulations using the EGSnrc code. The photon source was adapted with BEAMnrc to a 60 Co unit and an Elekta (E nom =6, 10, 25 MV-X) linear accelerator. Different tissue-equivalent materials ranging from cortical bone to lung were investigated. In addition to available phantom materials, some material compositions were taken and scaled to different electron densities. The depth of the alanine detectors within the different phantom materials corresponds to 5 cm depth in water, i.e. the depth is scaled according to the electron density (n e /n e,w ) of the corresponding phantom material. The dose was scored within the detector volume once for an alanine/paraffin mixture and once for a liquid water voxel. The relative response, the ratio of the absorbed dose to alanine to the absorbed dose to water, was calculated and compared to the corresponding ratio under reference conditions. Results: For each beam quality the relative response r and the correction factor for the environment kenv was calculated. k env =0.9991+0.0049 *((n e /n e,w )−0.7659) 3 Conclusion: A perturbation correction factor k env accounting for the phantom environment has been introduced. The response of the alanine dosimeter can be considered independent of the surrounding material for relative electron densities (n e /n e,w ) between 1 and 1.4. For denser materials such as bone or much less dense

  8. SU-F-I-70: Investigation of Gafchromic EBT3 Film Energy Dependence Using Proton, Photon, and Electron Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, C; Schnell, E; Ahmad, S; De La Fuente Herman, T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the energy dependence of Gafchromic EBT3 film over a range of clinically used proton, photon and electron energies. Methods: Proton beam energies of 117 and 204 MeV, corresponding respectively to ranges in water of 10 cm and 27 cm from a Mevion S250 double scatter system unit were used. Electron energies of 6 and 20 MeV and photon energies of 6 and 18 MV from a Varian Clinac 21EX Linac were used. Two pieces of film (5×5 cm"2) were irradiated sequentially for doses of 100, 500, and 1000 cGy for all energies and modalities. Films were placed on the central beam axis for a 10×10 cm"2 field size in the middle of spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) for proton and in respective dmax for photon and electron energies. Films were scanned on a flatbed Epson Expression 10000 XL scanner on the central region of the scanning window using 48-bit, 300 dpi, and landscape orientation after 48 hours post-irradiation of film to account for optical density (OD) stabilization. Film analysis of the red channel was performed using ImageJ 1.48v (National Institutes of Health). Results: The energy dependency of EBT3 among all energies and modalities for all doses studied was small within measurement uncertainties (1σ = ± 4.1%). The mean net OD in red channel for films receiving the same dose in the same energy modality had standard deviations within 0.9% for photons, 4.9% for electrons and 1.8% for protons. It was observed that film pieces were activated during proton irradiation, e.g., 7 mR/hr at surface after 30 minutes of irradiation, lasting for 2 hours post irradiation. Conclusion: EBT3 energy dependency was evaluated for clinically used proton, photon, and electron energies. The film self-activation may have contributed to fog and negligible dose.

  9. SU-F-I-70: Investigation of Gafchromic EBT3 Film Energy Dependence Using Proton, Photon, and Electron Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, C; Schnell, E; Ahmad, S; De La Fuente Herman, T [University of Oklahoma Health Science Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the energy dependence of Gafchromic EBT3 film over a range of clinically used proton, photon and electron energies. Methods: Proton beam energies of 117 and 204 MeV, corresponding respectively to ranges in water of 10 cm and 27 cm from a Mevion S250 double scatter system unit were used. Electron energies of 6 and 20 MeV and photon energies of 6 and 18 MV from a Varian Clinac 21EX Linac were used. Two pieces of film (5×5 cm{sup 2}) were irradiated sequentially for doses of 100, 500, and 1000 cGy for all energies and modalities. Films were placed on the central beam axis for a 10×10 cm{sup 2} field size in the middle of spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) for proton and in respective dmax for photon and electron energies. Films were scanned on a flatbed Epson Expression 10000 XL scanner on the central region of the scanning window using 48-bit, 300 dpi, and landscape orientation after 48 hours post-irradiation of film to account for optical density (OD) stabilization. Film analysis of the red channel was performed using ImageJ 1.48v (National Institutes of Health). Results: The energy dependency of EBT3 among all energies and modalities for all doses studied was small within measurement uncertainties (1σ = ± 4.1%). The mean net OD in red channel for films receiving the same dose in the same energy modality had standard deviations within 0.9% for photons, 4.9% for electrons and 1.8% for protons. It was observed that film pieces were activated during proton irradiation, e.g., 7 mR/hr at surface after 30 minutes of irradiation, lasting for 2 hours post irradiation. Conclusion: EBT3 energy dependency was evaluated for clinically used proton, photon, and electron energies. The film self-activation may have contributed to fog and negligible dose.

  10. Monte Carlo-based investigations on the impact of removing the flattening filter on beam quality specifiers for photon beam dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecki, Damian; Poppe, Björn; Zink, Klemens

    2017-06-01

    The impact of removing the flattening filter in clinical electron accelerators on the relationship between dosimetric quantities such as beam quality specifiers and the mean photon and electron energies of the photon radiation field was investigated by Monte Carlo simulations. The purpose of this work was to determine the uncertainties when using the well-known beam quality specifiers or energy-based beam specifiers as predictors of dosimetric photon field properties when removing the flattening filter. Monte Carlo simulations applying eight different linear accelerator head models with and without flattening filter were performed in order to generate realistic radiation sources and calculate field properties such as restricted mass collision stopping power ratios (L¯/ρ)airwater, mean photon and secondary electron energies. To study the impact of removing the flattening filter on the beam quality correction factors k Q , this factor for detailed ionization chamber models was calculated by Monte Carlo simulations. Stopping power ratios (L¯/ρ)airwater and k Q values for different ionization chambers as a function of TPR1020 and %dd(10) x were calculated. Moreover, mean photon energies in air and at the point of measurement in water as well as mean secondary electron energies at the point of measurement were calculated. The results revealed that removing the flattening filter led to a change within 0.3% in the relationship between %dd(10) x and (L¯/ρ)airwater, whereby the relationship between TPR1020 and (L¯/ρ)airwater changed up to 0.8% for high energy photon beams. However, TPR1020 was a good predictor of (L¯/ρ)airwater for both types of linear accelerator with energies filter within 1.1% and 1.6% was observed for TPR1020 and %dd(10) x respectively. The results of this study have shown that removing the flattening filter led to a change in the relationship between the well-known beam quality specifiers and dosimetric quantities at the point of measurement

  11. A Polarized High-Energy Photon Beam for Production of Exotic Mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senderovich, Igor [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This work describes design, prototyping and testing of various components of the Jefferson Lab Hall D photon beamline. These include coherent bremsstrahlung radiators to be used in this facility for generating the photon beam, a fine resolution hodoscope for the facility's tagging spectrometer, and a photon beam position sensor for stabilizing the beam on a collimator. The principal instrumentation project was the hodoscope: its design, implementation and beam testing will be thoroughly described. Studies of the coherent bremsstrahlung radiators involved X-ray characterization of diamond crystals to identify the appropriate line of manufactured radiators and the proper techniques for thinning them to the desired specification of the beamline. The photon beam position sensor project involved completion of a designed detector and its beam test. The results of these shorter studies will also be presented. The second part of this work discusses a Monte Carlo study of a possible photo-production and decay channel in the GlueX experiment that will be housed in the Hall D facility. Specifically, the γ p → Xp → b1 π → ω π+1 π-1 channel was studied including its Amplitude Analysis. This exercise attempted to generate a possible physics signal, complete with internal angular momentum states, and be able to reconstruct the signal in the detector and find the proper set of JPC quantum numbers through an amplitude fit. Derivation of the proper set of amplitudes in the helicity basis is described, followed by a discussion of the implementation, generation of the data sets, reconstruction techniques, the amplitude fit and results of this study.

  12. Metrology and quality of radiation therapy dosimetry of electron, photon and epithermal neutron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosunen, A

    1999-08-01

    In radiation therapy using electron and photon beams the dosimetry chain consists of several sequential phases starting by the realisation of the dose quantity in the Primary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory and ending to the calculation of the dose to a patient. A similar procedure can be described for the dosimetry of epithermal neutron beams in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). To achieve the required accuracy of the dose delivered to a patient the quality of all steps in the dosimetry procedure has to be considered. This work is focused on two items in the dosimetry chains: the determination of the dose in the reference conditions and the evaluation of the accuracy of dose calculation methods. The issues investigated and discussed in detail are: a)the calibration methods of plane parallel ionisation chambers used in electron beam dosimetry, (b) the specification of the critical dosimetric parameter i.e. the ratio of stopping powers for water to air, (S I ?){sup water} {sub air}, in photon beams, (c) the feasibility of the twin ionization chamber technique for dosimetry in epithermal neutron beams applied to BNCT and (d) the determination accuracy of the calculated dose distributions in phantoms in electron, photon, and epithermal neutron beams. The results demonstrate that up to a 3% improvement in the consistency of dose determinations in electron beams is achieved by the calibration of plane parallel ionisation chambers in high energy electron beams instead of calibrations in {sup 60}Co gamma beams. In photon beam dosimetry (S I ?){sup water} {sub air} can be determined with an accuracy of 0.2% using the percentage dose at the 10 cm depth, %dd(10), as a beam specifier. The use of %odd(10) requires the elimination of the electron contamination in the photon beam. By a twin ionisation chamber technique the gamma dose can be determined with uncertainty of 6% (1 standard deviation) and the total neutron dose with an uncertainty of 15 to 20% (1 standard deviation

  13. Metrology and quality of radiation therapy dosimetry of electron, photon and epithermal neutron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosunen, A.

    1999-08-01

    In radiation therapy using electron and photon beams the dosimetry chain consists of several sequential phases starting by the realisation of the dose quantity in the Primary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory and ending to the calculation of the dose to a patient. A similar procedure can be described for the dosimetry of epithermal neutron beams in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). To achieve the required accuracy of the dose delivered to a patient the quality of all steps in the dosimetry procedure has to be considered. This work is focused on two items in the dosimetry chains: the determination of the dose in the reference conditions and the evaluation of the accuracy of dose calculation methods. The issues investigated and discussed in detail are: a)the calibration methods of plane parallel ionisation chambers used in electron beam dosimetry, (b) the specification of the critical dosimetric parameter i.e. the ratio of stopping powers for water to air, (S I ?) water air , in photon beams, (c) the feasibility of the twin ionization chamber technique for dosimetry in epithermal neutron beams applied to BNCT and (d) the determination accuracy of the calculated dose distributions in phantoms in electron, photon, and epithermal neutron beams. The results demonstrate that up to a 3% improvement in the consistency of dose determinations in electron beams is achieved by the calibration of plane parallel ionisation chambers in high energy electron beams instead of calibrations in 60 Co gamma beams. In photon beam dosimetry (S I ?) water air can be determined with an accuracy of 0.2% using the percentage dose at the 10 cm depth, %dd(10), as a beam specifier. The use of %odd(10) requires the elimination of the electron contamination in the photon beam. By a twin ionisation chamber technique the gamma dose can be determined with uncertainty of 6% (1 standard deviation) and the total neutron dose with an uncertainty of 15 to 20% (1 standard deviation). To improve the accuracy

  14. Gafchromic EBT3 film dosimetry in electron beams — energy dependence and improved film read‐out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojala, Jarkko; Kaijaluoto, Sampsa; Jokelainen, Ilkka; Kosunen, Antti

    2016-01-01

    For megavoltage photon radiation, the fundamental dosimetry characteristics of Gafchromic EBT3 film were determined in  60Co gamma ray beam with addition of experimental and Monte Carlo (MC)‐simulated energy dependence of the film for 6 MV photon beam and 6 MeV, 9 MeV, 12 MeV, and 16 MeV electron beams in water phantom. For the film read‐out, two phase correction of scanner sensitivity was applied: a matrix correction for scanning area and dose‐dependent correction by iterative procedure. With these corrections, the uniformity of response can be improved to be within ±50 pixel values (PVs). To improve the read‐out accuracy, a procedure with flipped film orientations was established. With the method, scanner uniformity can be improved further and dust particles, scratches and/or dirt on scanner glass can be detected and eliminated. Responses from red and green channels were averaged for read‐out, which decreased the effect of noise present in values from separate channels. Since the signal level with the blue channel is considerably lower than with other channels, the signal variation due to different perturbation effects increases the noise level so that the blue channel is not recommended to be used for dose determination. However, the blue channel can be used for the detection of emulsion thickness variations for film quality evaluations with unexposed films. With electron beams ranging from 6 MeV to 16 MeV and at reference measurement conditions in water, the energy dependence of the EBT3 film is uniform within 0.5%, with uncertainties close to 1.6% (k=2). Including 6 MV photon beam and the electron beams mentioned, the energy dependence is within 1.1%. No notable differences were found between the experimental and MC‐simulated responses, indicating negligible change in intrinsic energy dependence of the EBT3 film for 6 MV photon beam and 6 MeV–16 MeV electron beams. Based on the dosimetric characteristics of the EBT3 film, the read

  15. Study of dose distribution in high energy photon beam used in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafaravavy, R.; Raoelina Andriambololona; Bridier, A.

    2007-01-01

    The dose distribution in a medium traversed by a photon beam depends on beam energy, field size and medium nature. Percent depth dose (PDD), Dose Profile (DP) and Opening Collimator Factor (OCF) curves will be established to study this distribution. So, the PDD curves are composed by tree parts: the build-up region, the maximal dose and the quasi-equilibrium region. The maximum dose depth and the dose in depth increase with increasing photon beam energy but the dose surface decreases. The PDD increases with increasing field size.

  16. Comparison of Techniques to Reduce Bremsstrahlung Background Radiation from Monoenergetic Photon Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, M; McNabb, D

    2006-01-01

    An important applied technology is a tunable mono-energetic photon source [1]. These sources are made of relativistic electron accelerators coupled to low-energy lasers, which produce high-energy, mono-energetic-rays. One challenge associated with systems such as this is a continuum of bremsstrahlung background created when an electron beam passes through an aperture of some sort and the electron bunch or its halo impinges on the aperture pictured in figure 1. For instance, in the current T-REX [1] design for the interaction point between the laser- and electron-beam, the electron-beam passes through the center of a mirror used to reflect the laser. There is a potential with this design that bremsstrahlung radiation may be produced at the edges of the mirror openings and contaminate the mono-energetic photon beam. Certain applications [2] may be sensitive to this contamination. To reduce the bremsstrahlung contaminate a collimator (thickness ∼24in. (calculated from XCOM database [3]) to attenuate by a factor of 10 -3 the 112MeV photons expected in the T-REX demonstration [1]) is situated between the aperture and target. To maximize the brightness of the photon-beam, the collimator opening must be no less than the size of the photon-beam spot size expected to be about 1mm. This fixes the collimator opening. a priori the aperture size must be greater than the collimator opening and is a function distance between the aperture and collimator. In this paper we focus on two approaches to estimate the aperture size, given a collimator and a target whose sizes and distances from the aperture are given. In the next section we will discuss these approaches

  17. Establishing the impact of temporary tissue expanders on electron and photon beam dose distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asena, A; Kairn, T; Crowe, S B; Trapp, J V

    2015-05-01

    This study investigates the effects of temporary tissue expanders (TTEs) on the dose distributions in breast cancer radiotherapy treatments under a variety of conditions. Using EBT2 radiochromic film, both electron and photon beam dose distribution measurements were made for different phantoms, and beam geometries. This was done to establish a more comprehensive understanding of the implant's perturbation effects under a wider variety of conditions. The magnetic disk present in a tissue expander causes a dose reduction of approximately 20% in a photon tangent treatment and 56% in electron boost fields immediately downstream of the implant. The effects of the silicon elastomer are also much more apparent in an electron beam than a photon beam. Evidently, each component of the TTE attenuates the radiation beam to different degrees. This study has demonstrated that the accuracy of photon and electron treatments of post-mastectomy patients is influenced by the presence of a tissue expander for various beam orientations. The impact of TTEs on dose distributions establishes the importance of an accurately modelled high-density implant in the treatment planning system for post-mastectomy patients. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. An EXAFS spectrometer on beam line 10B at the Photon Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyanagi, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Tadashi; Ito, Masahisa; Kuroda, Haruo.

    1984-03-01

    An EXAFS spectrometer installed on the beam line 10B at the Photon Factory is designed to cover the photon energy between 4 and 30 keV. Utilizing either a channel-cut or two flat silicon crystals as a monochromator, a beam intensity between 10 8 and 10 9 photons/sec is obtained at 9 keV with a resolution of 1 eV. The performance of the spectrometer, such as a signal-to-noise ratio or an energy resolution is demonstrated with examples of K edge absorption spectra of bromine, germanium, gallium arsenide, and zinc selenide. (author)

  19. Accelerator mass spectrometry at the Rossendorf 5 MV tandem accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, M.; Buerger, W.; Curian, H.; Hartmann, B.; Hentschel, E.; Matthes, H.; Probst, W.; Seidel, M.; Turuc, S.; Hebert, D.; Rothe, T.; Stolz, W.

    1992-01-01

    The Rossendorf electrostatic accelerators (5 MV tandem accelerator and single ended 2 MV van de Graaff accelerator) are already used for ion beam analysis. The existing methods (RBS, PIXE, ERDA, NRA, nuclear microprobe and external beam) will be completed by introduction of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). A short description of the Rossendorf AMS system is given and first experimental results are presented. (R.P.) 4 refs.; 6 figs

  20. Polarised Photon Beams for the BGO-OD Experiment at ELSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, T.; Bella, A.; Alef, S.; Bayadilov, D.; Beck, R.; Becker, M.; Bielefeldt, P.; Boese, S.; Braghieri, A.; Brinkmann, K.; Cole, P.; Curciarello, F.; De Leo, V.; Di Salvo, R.; Dutz, H.; Elsner, D.; Fantini, A.; Freyermuth, O.; Friedrich, S.; Frommberger, F.; Ganenko, V.; Gervino, G.; Ghio, F.; Giardina, G.; Goertz, S.; Gridnev, A.; Gutz, E.; Hammann, D.; Hannappel, J.; Hartmann, P.; Hillert, W.; Ignatov, A.; Jahn, R.; Joosten, R.; Jude, T. C.; Klein, F.; Koop, K.; Krusche, B.; Lapik, A.; Levi Sandri, P.; Lopatin, I. V.; Mandaglio, G.; Messi, F.; Messi, R.; Metag, V.; Moricciani, D.; Mushkarenkov, A.; Nanova, M.; Nedorezov, V.; Novinskiy, D.; Pedroni, P.; Reitz, B.; Romaniuk, M.; Rostomyan, T.; Rudnev, N.; Schaerf, C.; Scheluchin, G.; Schmieden, H.; Stugelev, A.; Sumachev, V.; Tarakanov, V.; Vegna, V.; Walther, D.; Watts, D.; Zaunick, H.

    The new BGO-OD experiment at the electron accelerator ELSA, of the University of Bonn, is designed to study the reaction dynamics of nucleon excitations in meson photoproduction. It consists of a central BGO calorimeter with a magnetic spectrometer in forward direction. The physics programme includes the measurement of polarisation observables using linearly and circularly polarised photon beams. Linear polarisation is obtained by coherent bremsstrahlung off a diamond crystal, and circular polarisation is obtained via bremsstrahlung from longitudinally polarised electrons. The degree of linear polarisation is determined from the bremsstrahlung spectrum itself. To determine the polarisation of the circularly polarised photon beam, the polarisation of the electron beam is measured by a Møller polarimeter. As a preliminary consistency check, the (linear) polarisation observable, Σ, was compared to world data for π0 and η photoproduction. To determine the degree of circular polarisation, a Møller polarimeter was setup and first measurements of the electron beam polarisation performed.

  1. Scattering of thermal photons by a 46 GeV positron beam at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bini, C.; De Zorzi, G.; Diambrini-Palazzi, G.; Di Cosimo, G.; Di Domenico, A.; Gauzzi, P.; Zanello, D.

    1991-01-01

    The scattering of thermal photons present in the vacuum pipe of LEP against the high energy positron beam has been detected. The spectrum of the back-scattered photons is presented for a positron beam energy of 46.1 GeV. Measurements have been performed in the interaction region 1 with the LEP-5 experiment calorimeter. (orig.)

  2. A 5 MV Pelletron accelerator providing {sup 1}H{sup +}, {sup 4}He{sup +}, and {sup 12}C{sup +} beams for underground nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinicke, Stefan; Cowan, Thomas E.; Grieger, Marcel; Ludwig, Felix; Rath, Ferdinand; Roeder, Marko; Takacs, Marcell P.; Wagner, Louis [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Dresden (Germany); Technische Universitaet Dresden (Germany); Bemmerer, Daniel; Junghans, Arnd R.; Mueller, Stefan E.; Rimarzig, Bernd; Schwengner, Ronald; Szuecs, Tamas; Wagner, Andreas [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Dresden (Germany); Reinhardt, Tobias P.; Zuber, Kai [Technische Universitaet Dresden (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Accelerator-based experiments at the 0.4 MV LUNA underground accelerator at Gran Sasso have enabled great progress for studies of Big Bang and solar fusion reactions. However, to complete the picture of solar fusion reactions and open up helium and carbon burning reactions to study, higher beam energies are required. A 5 MV Pelletron accelerator will be installed in the Felsenkeller underground laboratory in Dresden. It will allow both, tandem mode operations for {sup 12}C{sup +} beams and the use of a radio frequency ion source on the high voltage terminal for {sup 1}H{sup +} and {sup 4}He{sup +} beams. The beam from the RF ion source is fed in with a remotely controlled electrostatic deflector. In addition, a large, ultra-sensitive high-purity germanium detector for offline measurements will be installed at Felsenkeller. The final timeline of the project will be shown, as well as the science case for in-house research and the capabilities available to external scientific users.

  3. Creating aperiodic photonic structures by synthesized Mathieu-Gauss beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiljević, Jadranka M.; Zannotti, Alessandro; Timotijević, Dejan V.; Denz, Cornelia; Savić, Dragana M. Jović

    2017-08-01

    We demonstrate a kind of aperiodic photonic structure realized using the interference of multiple Mathieu-Gauss beams. Depending on the beam configurations, their mutual distances, angles of rotation, or phase relations we are able to observe different classes of such aperiodic optically induced refractive index structures. Our experimental approach is based on the optical induction in a single parallel writing process.

  4. Evaluation of the thermoluminescent detector answers of CaSO4:Dy, LiF:Mg,Ti and micro LiF:Mg,Ti in photon clinical beams dosimetry using water simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushima, Luciana C.; Veneziani, Glauco R.; Campos, Leticia L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper perform the comparative study of thermoluminescent answer of calcium sulfate dosemeter doped with dysprosium (DaSO 4 :Dy) produced by the IPEN, Sao Paulo, with answer of lithium fluoride dosemeters doped with magnesium and titanium (LiF:Mg, Ti) in the dosimetry of clinical beams of photons (6 and 15 MV) by using water simulator object. Dose-answer curves were obtained for gamma radiation of cobalt-60 in the air and in conditions of electronic equilibrium (plate of PMMA), and clinical photons of CLINAC model 2100C accelerators of the two evaluated hospitals: Hospital das Clinicas of the Faculty of Medicine of Sao Paulo university and Hospital Albert Einstein. It was also evaluated the sensitivity and reproduction of the three dosemeters

  5. Photon beam asymmetry Σ for η and η′ photoproduction from the proton

    OpenAIRE

    P. Collins; B.G. Ritchie; M. Dugger; A.V. Anisovich; M. Döring; E. Klempt; V.A. Nikonov; D. Rönchen; D. Sadasivan; A. Sarantsev; K.P. Adhikari; Z. Akbar; M.J. Amaryan; S. Anefalos Pereira; H. Avakian

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of the linearly-polarized photon beam asymmetry $\\Sigma$ for photoproduction from the proton of $\\eta$ and $\\eta^\\prime$ mesons are reported. A linearly-polarized tagged photon beam produced by coherent bremsstrahlung was incident on a cryogenic hydrogen target within the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Results are presented for the $\\gamma p \\to \\eta p$ reaction for incident photon energies from 1.070 to 1.876 GeV, and from 1.516 to 1.836 GeV for the $\\gamma p \\to \\eta^\\pri...

  6. Resonant production of dark photons in positron beam dump experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Enrico; Carvajal, Cristian D. R.; Ghoshal, Anish; Meloni, Davide; Raggi, Mauro

    2018-05-01

    Positrons beam dump experiments have unique features to search for very narrow resonances coupled superweakly to e+e- pairs. Due to the continued loss of energy from soft photon bremsstrahlung, in the first few radiation lengths of the dump a positron beam can continuously scan for resonant production of new resonances via e+ annihilation off an atomic e- in the target. In the case of a dark photon A' kinetically mixed with the photon, this production mode is of first order in the electromagnetic coupling α , and thus parametrically enhanced with respect to the O (α2)e+e-→γ A' production mode and to the O (α3)A' bremsstrahlung in e- -nucleon scattering so far considered. If the lifetime is sufficiently long to allow the A' to exit the dump, A'→e+e- decays could be easily detected and distinguished from backgrounds. We explore the foreseeable sensitivity of the Frascati PADME experiment in searching with this technique for the 17 MeV dark photon invoked to explain the Be 8 anomaly in nuclear transitions.

  7. Feasibility study of using PET to determine nitrogen concentration after high energy photon irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alghamdi, A.A.; Spyrou, N.M.; Al-Mokhlef, J.; Alhaj, A.

    2007-01-01

    The technique of photon activation analysis (PAA) is widely employed in many fields as an effective non-invasive tool for measuring elemental compositions and concentrations. In recent years there has been a revival and growing interest of PAA in general and for medical applications in particular. The feasibility of using a PET scanner (Ecat Exact 931) to determine nitrogen concentration in a dead rabbit is described. This method is based on the photon activation of 14 N(γ,n) 13 N (T 1/2 = 9.9 min) using an 18 MV photon beam Medical Linear Accelerator (Varian 2300EX). (author)

  8. Dynamic PET/CT measurements of induced positron activity in a prostate cancer patient after 50-MV photon radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janek Strååt, Sara; Jacobsson, Hans; Noz, Marilyn E; Andreassen, Björn; Näslund, Ingemar; Jonsson, Cathrine

    2013-01-23

    The purpose of this work was to reveal the research interest value of positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in visualizing the induced tissue activity post high-energy photon radiation treatment. More specifically, the focus was on the possibility of retrieving data such as tissue composition and physical half-lives from dynamic PET acquisitions, as positron-emitting radionuclides such as 15O, 11C, and 13N are produced in vivo during radiation treatment with high-energy photons (>15 MeV). The type, amount, and distribution of induced positron-emitting radionuclides depend on the irradiated tissue cross section, the photon spectrum, and the possible perfusion-driven washout. A 62-year-old man diagnosed with prostate cancer was referred for palliative radiation treatment of the pelvis minor. A total dose of 8 Gy was given using high-energy photon beams (50 MV) with a racetrack microtron, and 7 min after the end of irradiation, the patient was positioned in a PET/computed tomography (CT) camera, and a list-mode acquisition was performed for 30 min. Two volumes of interests (VOIs) were positioned on the dynamic PET/CT images, one in the urinary bladder and the other in the subcutaneous fat. Analysis of the measured relative count rate was performed in order to compute the tissue compositions and physical half-lives in the two regions. Dynamic analysis from the two VOIs showed that the decay constants of activated oxygen and carbon could be deduced. Calculation of tissue composition from analyzing the VOI containing subcutaneous fat only moderately agreed with that of the tabulated International Commission on Radiation Units & Measurements (ICRU) data of the adipose tissue. However, the same analysis for the bladder showed a good agreement with that of the tabulated ICRU data. PET can be used in visualizing the induced activity post high-energy photon radiation treatment. Despite the very low count rate in this specific application, wherein 7 min after treatment

  9. Simulação computacional de um feixe de fótons de 6 MV em diferentes meios heterogêneos utilizando o código PENELOPE Computer simulation of a 6 MV photon beam in different heterogeneous media utilizing the PENELOPE code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Salata

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Utilizar o código PENELOPE e desenvolver geometrias onde estão presentes heterogeneidades para simular o comportamento do feixe de fótons nessas condições. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Foram feitas simulações do comportamento da radiação ionizante para o caso homogêneo, apenas água, e para os casos heterogêneos, com diferentes materiais. Consideraram-se geometrias cúbicas para os fantomas e geometrias em forma de paralelepípedos para as heterogeneidades com a seguinte composição: tecido simulador de osso e pulmão, seguindo recomendações da International Commission on Radiological Protection, e titânio, alumínio e prata. Definiram-se, como parâmetros de entrada: a energia e o tipo de partícula da fonte, 6 MV de fótons; a distância fonte-superfície de 100 cm; e o campo de radiação de 10x 10 cm². RESULTADOS: Obtiveram-se curvas de percentual de dose em profundidade para todos os casos. Observou-se que em materiais com densidade eletrônica alta, como a prata, a dose absorvida é maior em relação à dose absorvida no fantoma homogêneo, enquanto no tecido simulador de pulmão a dose é menor. CONCLUSÃO: Os resultados obtidos demonstram a importância de se considerar heterogeneidades nos algoritmos dos sistemas de planejamento usados no cálculo da distribuição de dose nos pacientes, evitando-se sub ou superdosagem dos tecidos próximos às heterogeneidades.OBJECTIVE: The PENELOPE code was utilized to simulate irradiation geometries where heterogeneities are present and to simulate a photon beam behavior under these conditions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: For the homogeneous case, the ionizing radiation behavior was simulated only with water, and different materials were introduced to simulate heterogeneous conditions. Cubic geometries were utilized for the homogeneous phantoms, and parallelepiped-shaped geometries for the heterogeneities with the following composition: bone and lung tissue simulators, as recommended

  10. Towards an objective evaluation of tolerances for beam modeling in a treatment planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangel, A; Ploquin, N; Kay, I; Dunscombe, P

    2007-01-01

    The performance of a convolution/superposition based treatment planning system depends on the ability of the dose calculation algorithm to accurately account for physical interactions taking place in the tissue, key components of the linac head and on the accuracy of the photon beam model. Generally the user has little or no control over the performance of the dose calculation algorithm but is responsible for the accuracy of the beam model within the constraints imposed by the system. This study explores the dosimetric impact of limitations in photon beam modeling accuracy on complex 3D clinical treatment plans. A total of 70 photon beam models was created in the Pinnacle(TM) treatment planning system. Two of the models served as references for 6 MV and 15 MV beams, while the rest were created by perturbing the reference models in order to produce specific deviations in specific regions of the calculated dose profiles (central axis and transverse). The beam models were then used to generate 3D plans on seven CT data sets each for four different treatment sites (breast and conformal prostate, lung and brain). The equivalent uniform doses (EUD) of the targets and the principal organs at risk (OARs) of all plans (∼1000) were calculated and compared to the EUDs delivered by the reference beam models. In general, accurate dosimetry of the target is most greatly compromised by poor modeling of the central axis depth dose and the horns, while the EUDs of the OARs exhibited the greatest sensitivity to beam width accuracy. Based on the results of this analysis we suggest a set of tolerances to be met during commissioning of the beam models in a treatment planning system that are consistent in terms of clinical outcomes as predicted by the EUD

  11. RBE of the NCT beam at Petten (The Netherlands) for intestinal crypt regeneration in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueulette, J.; Coster, B.M. de; Wambersie, A.; Stecher-Rasmussen, F.; Huiskamp, R.; Moss, R.; Morrissey, J.

    2000-01-01

    RBE of the BNCT epithermal neutron beam at Petten (The Netherlands) has been determined for intestinal crypt regeneration in mice i.e. an in vivo system. No boron was administered. This experiment is part of an IAEA programme aiming at intercomparing radiobiologically the NCT neutron beams of different facilities world-wide. Six MV photons were used as the reference radiation. For the NCT beam at Petten, irradiation times ranging between 1 and 3 hours were applied. These low dose rate irradiations (∼3 Gy/hour) were found ∼2.4 more effective than acute photon irradiations. This type of experiment - repeated at different BNCT facilities - will improve harmonisation in the radiobiological specification of NCT neutron beams and facilitate exchange of clinical information. (author)

  12. Cardiac single-photon emission-computed tomography using combined cone-beam/fan-beam collimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gullberg, Grant T.; Zeng, Gengsheng L.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this work is to increase system sensitivity in cardiac single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT) studies without increasing patient imaging time. For imaging the heart, convergent collimation offers the potential of increased sensitivity over that of parallel-hole collimation. However, if a cone-beam collimated gamma camera is rotated in a planar orbit, the projection data obtained are not complete. Two cone-beam collimators and one fan-beam collimator are used with a three-detector SPECT system. The combined cone-beam/fan-beam collimation provides a complete set of data for image reconstruction. The imaging geometry is evaluated using data acquired from phantom and patient studies. For the Jaszazck cardiac torso phantom experiment, the combined cone-beam/fan-beam collimation provided 1.7 times greater sensitivity than standard parallel-hole collimation (low-energy high-resolution collimators). Also, phantom and patient comparison studies showed improved image quality. The combined cone-beam/fan-beam imaging geometry with appropriate weighting of the two data sets provides improved system sensitivity while measuring sufficient data for artifact free cardiac images

  13. On the absorbed dose determination method in high energy photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarlat, F.; Scarisoreanu, A.; Oane, M.; Mitru, E.; Avadanei, C.

    2008-01-01

    The absorbed dose determination method in water, based on standards of air kerma or exposure in high energy photon beams generated by electron with energies in the range of 1 MeV to 50 MeV is presented herein. The method is based on IAEA-398, AAPM TG-51, DIN 6800-2, IAEA-381, IAEA-277 and NACP-80 recommendations. The dosimetry equipment is composed of UNIDOS T 10005 electrometer and different ionization chambers calibrated in air kerma method in a Co 60 beam. Starting from the general formalism showed in IAEA-381, the determination of absorbed dose in water, under reference conditions in high energy photon beams, is given. This method was adopted for the secondary standard dosimetry laboratory (SSDL) in NILPRP-Bucharest

  14. A Liquid Scintillator System for Dosimetry of Photon and Proton Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beddar S

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a 3D system based on liquid scintillator (LS) for the dosimetry of photon and proton therapy. We have validated the LS detector system for fast and accurate quality assurance of IMRT and proton therapy fields. Further improvements are required to optimize the quantitative analysis of the light output provided by the system in photon beams. We have also demonstrated its usefulness for protons as it can determine the position and the range of proton beams. This system has also been shown to be capable of fast, sub-millimeter spatial localization of proton spots delivered in a 3D volume and could be used for quality assurance of IMPT. Further developments are on-going to measure beam intensities in 3D.

  15. Beam-bending in spatially variant photonic crystals at telecommunications wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digaum, Jennefir L.; Sharma, Rashi; Batista, Daniel; Pazos, Javier J.; Rumpf, Raymond C.; Kuebler, Stephen M.

    2016-03-01

    This work reports the fabrication of micron-scale spatially variant photonic crystals (SVPCs) and their use for steering light beams through turns with bending radius Rbend on the order of ten times the optical wavelength λ0. Devices based on conventional photonic crystals, metamaterials, plasmonics and transformation optics have all been explored for controlling light beams and steering them through tight turns. These devices offer promise for photonic interconnects, but they are based on exotic materials, including metals, that make them impractically lossy or difficult to fabricate. Waveguides can also be used to steer light using total internal reflection; however, Rbend of a waveguide must be hundreds of times λ0 to guide light efficiently, which limits their use in optical circuits. SVPCs are spatially variant 3D lattices which can be created in transparent, low-refractive-index media and used to control the propagation of light through the self-collimation effect. SVPCs were fabricated by multi-photon lithography using the commercially available photo-polymer IP-DIP. The SVPCs were structurally and optically characterized and found to be capable of bending light having λ0 = 1.55 μm through a 90-degree turn with Rbend = 10 μm. Curved waveguides with Rbend = 15 μm and 35 μm were also fabricated using IP-DIP and optically characterized. The SVPCs were able to steer the light beams through tighter turns than either waveguide and with higher efficiency.

  16. Secondary bremsstrahlung and the energy-conservation aspects of kerma in photon-irradiated media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sudhir; Nahum, Alan E

    2016-02-07

    Kerma, collision kerma and absorbed dose in media irradiated by megavoltage photons are analysed with respect to energy conservation. The user-code DOSRZnrc was employed to compute absorbed dose D, kerma K and a special form of kerma, K ncpt, obtained by setting the charged-particle transport energy cut-off very high, thereby preventing the generation of 'secondary bremsstrahlung' along the charged-particle paths. The user-code FLURZnrc was employed to compute photon fluence, differential in energy, from which collision kerma, K col and K were derived. The ratios K/D, K ncpt/D and K col/D have thereby been determined over a very large volumes of water, aluminium and copper irradiated by broad, parallel beams of 0.1 to 25 MeV monoenergetic photons, and 6, 10 and 15 MV 'clinical' radiotherapy qualities. Concerning depth-dependence, the 'area under the kerma, K, curve' exceeded that under the dose curve, demonstrating that kerma does not conserve energy when computed over a large volume. This is due to the 'double counting' of the energy of the secondary bremsstrahlung photons, this energy being (implicitly) included in the kerma 'liberated' in the irradiated medium, at the same time as this secondary bremsstrahlung is included in the photon fluence which gives rise to kerma elsewhere in the medium. For 25 MeV photons this 'violation' amounts to 8.6%, 14.2% and 25.5% in large volumes of water, aluminium and copper respectively but only 0.6% for a 'clinical' 6 MV beam in water. By contrast, K col/D and K ncpt/D, also computed over very large phantoms of the same three media, for the same beam qualities, are equal to unity within (very low) statistical uncertainties, demonstrating that collision kerma and the special type of kerma, K ncpt, do conserve energy over a large volume. A comparison of photon fluence spectra for the 25 MeV beam at a depth of  ≈51 g cm−2 for both very high and very low charged-particle transport cut-offs reveals the considerable

  17. Dosimetric characteristics of a new unshielded silicon diode and its application in clinical photon and electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griessbach, Irmgard; Lapp, Markus; Bohsung, Joerg; Gademann, Guenther; Harder, Dietrich

    2005-01-01

    Shielded p-silicon diodes, frequently applied in general photon-beam dosimetry, show certain imperfections when applied in the small photon fields occurring in stereotactic or intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), in electron beams and in the buildup region of photon beam dose distributions. Using as a study object the shielded p-silicon diode PTW 60008, well known for its reliable performance in general photon dosimetry, we have identified these imperfections as effects of electron scattering at the metallic parts of the shielding. In order to overcome these difficulties a new, unshielded diode PTW 60012 has been designed and manufactured by PTW Freiburg. By comparison with reference detectors, such as thimble and plane-parallel ionization chambers and a diamond detector, we could show the absence of these imperfections. An excellent performance of the new unshielded diode for the special dosimetric tasks in small photon fields, electron beams and build-up regions of photon beams has been observed. The new diode also has an improved angular response. However, due to its over-response to low-energy scattered photons, its recommended range of use does not include output factor measurements in large photon fields, although this effect can be compensated by a thin auxiliary lead shield

  18. Dose calculation methods in photon beam therapy using energy deposition kernels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahnesjoe, A.

    1991-01-01

    The problem of calculating accurate dose distributions in treatment planning of megavoltage photon radiation therapy has been studied. New dose calculation algorithms using energy deposition kernels have been developed. The kernels describe the transfer of energy by secondary particles from a primary photon interaction site to its surroundings. Monte Carlo simulations of particle transport have been used for derivation of kernels for primary photon energies form 0.1 MeV to 50 MeV. The trade off between accuracy and calculational speed has been addressed by the development of two algorithms; one point oriented with low computional overhead for interactive use and one for fast and accurate calculation of dose distributions in a 3-dimensional lattice. The latter algorithm models secondary particle transport in heterogeneous tissue by scaling energy deposition kernels with the electron density of the tissue. The accuracy of the methods has been tested using full Monte Carlo simulations for different geometries, and found to be superior to conventional algorithms based on scaling of broad beam dose distributions. Methods have also been developed for characterization of clinical photon beams in entities appropriate for kernel based calculation models. By approximating the spectrum as laterally invariant, an effective spectrum and dose distribution for contaminating charge particles are derived form depth dose distributions measured in water, using analytical constraints. The spectrum is used to calculate kernels by superposition of monoenergetic kernels. The lateral energy fluence distribution is determined by deconvolving measured lateral dose distributions by a corresponding pencil beam kernel. Dose distributions for contaminating photons are described using two different methods, one for estimation of the dose outside of the collimated beam, and the other for calibration of output factors derived from kernel based dose calculations. (au)

  19. WE-DE-BRA-05: Monte Carlo Simulation of a Novel Multi-Layer MV Imager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myronakis, M; Rottmann, J; Berbeco, R [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Hu, Y [Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Wang, A; Shedlock, D; Star-Lack, J [Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Morf, D [Varian Medical Systems, Dattwil, Aargau (Switzerland)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop and validate a Monte Carlo (MC) model of a novel multi-layer imager (MLI) for megavolt (MV) energy beams. The MC model will enable performance optimization of the MLI design for clinical applications including patient setup verification, tumor tracking and MVCBCT. Methods: The MLI is composed of four layers of converter, scintillator and light detector, each layer similar to the current clinical AS1200 detector (Varian Medical Systems, Inc). The MLI model was constructed using the Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE v7.1) and includes interactions for x-ray photons, charged particles and optical photons. Computational experiments were performed to assess Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE) and Noise Power Spectrum normalized by photon fluence and average detector signal (qNNPS). Results were compared with experimental measurements. The current work incorporates, in one model, the complete chain of events occurring in the imager; i.e. starting from x-ray interaction to charged particle transport and energy deposition to subsequent generation, interactions and detection of optical photons. Results: There is good agreement between measured and simulated MTF, qNNPS and DQE values. Normalized root mean squared error (NRMSE) between measured and simulated values over all four layers was 2.18%, 2.43% and 6.05% for MTF, qNNPS and DQE respectively. The relative difference between simulated and measured values for qNNPS(0) was 1.68% and 1.57% for DQE(0). Current results were obtained using a 6MV Varian Truebeam™ spectrum. Conclusion: A comprehensive Monte Carlo model of the MLI prototype was developed to allow optimization of detector components. The model was assessed in terms of imaging performance using standard metrics (i.e. MTF, qNNPS, DQE). Good agreement was found between simulated and measured values. The model will be used to assess alternative detector constructions to facilitate advanced

  20. Dosimetric study of RapidArc plans with flattened beam (FB and flattening filter-free (FFF beam for localized prostate cancer based on physical indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birendra Kumar Rout

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To identify the continual diversity between flattening photon beam (FB and Flattening Filter Free (FFF photon beams for localized prostate cancer; and to determine potential benefits and drawbacks of using unflattened beam for this type of treatment.Methods: Eight prostate cases including seminal vesicles selected for this study. The primary planning target volume (PTVP and boost planning target volume (PTVB were contoured. The total prescription dose was 78 Gy (56 Gy to PTVP and an additional 22 Gy to PTVB. For all cases, treatment plans using 6MV with FB and FFF beams with identical dose-volume constraints, arc angles and number of arcs were developed. The dose volume histograms for both techniques were compared for primary target volume and critical structures.Results: A low Sigma index (FFF: 1.65 + 0.361; FB: 1.725 + 0.39 indicating improved dose homogeneity in FFF beam. Conformity index (FFF: 0.994 + 0.01; FB: 0.993 + 0.01 is comparable for both techniques. Minimal difference of Organ at risk mean dose was observed. Normal tissue integral dose in FB plan resulted 1.5% lower than FFF plan. All the plans displayed significant increase (1.18 times for PTVP and 1.11 for PTBB in the average number of necessary MU with FFF beam.Conclusion: Diversity between FB and FFF beam plans were found. FFF beam accelerator has been utilized to develop clinically acceptable Rapid Arc treatment plans for prostate cancer with 6 MV.---------------------------------Cite this article as: Rout BK, Muralidhar KR, Ali M, Shekar MC, Kumar A. Dosimetric study of RapidArc plans with flattened beam (FB and flattening filter-free (FFF beam for localized prostate cancer based on physical indices. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2014; 2(4:02046.  DOI: 10.14319/ijcto.0204.6

  1. Fission product yield measurements using monoenergetic photon beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishichayan; Bhike, M.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.

    2017-09-01

    Measurements of fission products yields (FPYs) are an important source of information on the fission process. During the past couple of years, a TUNL-LANL-LLNL collaboration has provided data on the FPYs from quasi monoenergetic neutron-induced fission on 235U, 238U, and 239Pu and has revealed an unexpected energy dependence of both asymmetric fission fragments at energies below 4 MeV. This peculiar FPY energy dependence was more pronounced in neutron-induced fission of 239Pu. In an effort to understand and compare the effect of the incoming probe on the FPY distribution, we have carried out monoenergetic photon-induced fission experiments on the same 235U, 238U, and 239Pu targets. Monoenergetic photon beams of Eγ = 13.0 MeV were provided by the HIγS facility, the world's most intense γ-ray source. In order to determine the total number of fission events, a dual-fission chamber was used during the irradiation. These irradiated samples were counted at the TUNL's low-background γ-ray counting facility using high efficient HPGe detectors over a period of 10 weeks. Here we report on our first ever photofission product yield measurements obtained with monoenegetic photon beams. These results are compared with neutron-induced FPY data.

  2. Fission product yield measurements using monoenergetic photon beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishichayan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of fission products yields (FPYs are an important source of information on the fission process. During the past couple of years, a TUNL-LANL-LLNL collaboration has provided data on the FPYs from quasi monoenergetic neutron-induced fission on 235U, 238U, and 239Pu and has revealed an unexpected energy dependence of both asymmetric fission fragments at energies below 4 MeV. This peculiar FPY energy dependence was more pronounced in neutron-induced fission of 239Pu. In an effort to understand and compare the effect of the incoming probe on the FPY distribution, we have carried out monoenergetic photon-induced fission experiments on the same 235U, 238U, and 239Pu targets. Monoenergetic photon beams of Eγ = 13.0 MeV were provided by the HIγS facility, the world's most intense γ-ray source. In order to determine the total number of fission events, a dual-fission chamber was used during the irradiation. These irradiated samples were counted at the TUNL's low-background γ-ray counting facility using high efficient HPGe detectors over a period of 10 weeks. Here we report on our first ever photofission product yield measurements obtained with monoenegetic photon beams. These results are compared with neutron-induced FPY data.

  3. Ultracompact multiway beam splitters using multiple coupled photonic crystal waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Tianbao; Zhou Haifeng; Yang Jianyi; Jiang Xiaoqing; Wang Minghua; Gong Zhao

    2008-01-01

    Ultracompact 1 x N (N > 2) beam splitters based on coupling of multiple photonic crystal waveguides (PCWs) are numerically demonstrated. The operation of the devices is on the basis of the self-imaging phenomenon. Variation of the effective index of modified rods induces the transverse redistribution of the N-fold images with the same coupling length, and uniform or free splitting can be achieved. The devices with three and four output channels are discussed in details as examples. Results show that this kind of beam splitters are very short. At the operating wavelength of 1.55 μm, the splitting length of the devices is only 35 μm even if the output channel number reaches 20. It provides a new method and a compact model to export freely the beam to N channels in PCW devices and can find practical applications in future photonic integrated circuits

  4. Ultracompact multiway beam splitters using multiple coupled photonic crystal waveguides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Tianbao; Zhou Haifeng; Yang Jianyi; Jiang Xiaoqing; Wang Minghua [Department of Information Science and Electronic Engineering, Zhejiang University, 310027 Hangzhou (China); Gong Zhao [Zhejiang University City College, 310027 Hangzhou (China)

    2008-05-07

    Ultracompact 1 x N (N > 2) beam splitters based on coupling of multiple photonic crystal waveguides (PCWs) are numerically demonstrated. The operation of the devices is on the basis of the self-imaging phenomenon. Variation of the effective index of modified rods induces the transverse redistribution of the N-fold images with the same coupling length, and uniform or free splitting can be achieved. The devices with three and four output channels are discussed in details as examples. Results show that this kind of beam splitters are very short. At the operating wavelength of 1.55 {mu}m, the splitting length of the devices is only 35 {mu}m even if the output channel number reaches 20. It provides a new method and a compact model to export freely the beam to N channels in PCW devices and can find practical applications in future photonic integrated circuits.

  5. Three-dimensional photon dose distributions with and without lung corrections for tangential breast intact treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, L.M.; Cheng, C.W.; Siddon, R.L.; Rice, R.K.; Mijnheer, B.J.; Harris, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of lung volume and photon energy on the 3-dimensional dose distribution for patients treated by intact breast irradiation is not well established. To investigate this issue, we studied the 3-dimensional dose distributions calculated for an 'average' breast phantom for 60Co, 4 MV, 6 MV, and 8 MV photon beams. For the homogeneous breast, areas of high dose ('hot spots') lie along the periphery of the breast near the posterior plane and near the apex of the breast. The highest dose occurs at the inferior margin of the breast tissue, and this may exceed 125% of the target dose for lower photon energies. The magnitude of these 'hot spots' decreases for higher energy photons. When lung correction is included in the dose calculation, the doses to areas at the left and right margin of the lung volume increase. The magnitude of the increase depends on energy and the patient anatomy. For the 'average' breast phantom (lung density 0.31 g/cm3), the correction factors are between 1.03 to 1.06 depending on the energy used. Higher energy is associated with lower correction factors. Both the ratio-of-TMR and the Batho lung correction methods can predict these corrections within a few percent. The range of depths of the 100% isodose from the skin surface, measured along the perpendicular to the tangent of the skin surface, were also energy dependent. The range was 0.1-0.4 cm for 60Co and 0.5-1.4 cm for 8 MV. We conclude that the use of higher energy photons in the range used here provides lower value of the 'hot spots' compared to lower energy photons, but this needs to be balanced against a possible disadvantage in decreased dose delivered to the skin and superficial portion of the breast

  6. Postal dosimetry audit test for small photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa, María del Mar; Núñez, Luis; Muñiz, José Luis; Lagares, Juan Ignacio; Embid, Miguel; Gómez-Ros, José María

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: Small radiation beams ( 3 ) of TLD-100 inserted at 5 and 10 cm of depth in a cylindrical PMMA phantom designed for this purpose. This experimental system is mailed to the audited centres to be irradiated with beams of 1 and 3 cm of side or diameter. The prescribeddose is 1.5 Gy at 10 cm. The properties of this system were studied experimentally and by Monte Carlo (MC) simulation, before the external test. Results: Deviations between the prescribed and measured absorbed doses are below 5% for 69% (1 × 1 cm 2 beam) and 64% (3 × 3 cm 2 beam) of the audited centres. When deviations are above 5%, their causes have been investigated and led to corrections. Conclusion: The developed postal audit is suitable to verify the absorbed doses in small photon beams with an accuracy of 2.9% (1s).

  7. A closed-loop photon beam control study for the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portmann, G.; Bengtsson, J.

    1993-05-01

    The third generation Advanced Light Source (ALS) will produce extremely bright photon beams using undulators and wigglers. In order to position the photon beams accurate to the micron level, a closed-loop feedback system is being developed. Using photon position monitors and dipole corrector magnets, a closed-loop system can automatically compensate for modeling uncertainties and exogenous disturbances. The following paper will present a dynamics model for the perturbations of the closed orbit of the electron beam in the ALS storage ring including the vacuum chamber magnetic field penetration effects. Using this reference model, two closed-loop feedback algorithms will be compared -- a classical PI controller and a two degree-of-freedom approach. The two degree-of-freedom method provides superior disturbance rejection while maintaining the desired performance goals. Both methods will address the need to gain schedule the controller due to the time varying dynamics introduced by changing field strengths when scanning the insertion devices

  8. Dose corrections for field obliquity for 45-MV x-ray therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinley, P.H.; Clanton, A.; Downes, B.; Nuskind, J.

    1983-01-01

    The degree of dose perturbation produced by a 25.7-cm-diam circular water phantom was determined for a 45-MV x-ray beam by direct measurement. Data obtained in a circular and a cubical water phantom was utilized to test three accepted techniques (isodose shift, TAR method, and effective SSD method) for the correction of isodose levels to account for patient curvature. In general, the effective SSD method yielded the most accurate results for all depth including the buildup region. An isodose shift factor of 0.8 was found for the 45-MV x-ray beam. Key words: curvature corrections, 45-MV x ray, isodose shift, TAR, effective SSD method

  9. Comparative study of a low-Z cone-beam computed tomography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, D A; Hansen, V N; Poludniowski, G; Evans, P M; Thompson, M G; Niven, A; Seco, J

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography images have been acquired using an experimental (low atomic number (Z) insert) megavoltage cone-beam imaging system. These images have been compared with standard megavoltage and kilovoltage imaging systems. The experimental system requires a simple modification to the 4 MeV electron beam from an Elekta Precise linac. Low-energy photons are produced in the standard medium-Z electron window and a low-Z carbon electron absorber located after the window. The carbon electron absorber produces photons as well as ensuring that all remaining electrons from the source are removed. A detector sensitive to diagnostic x-ray energies is also employed. Quantitative assessment of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) contrast shows that the low-Z imaging system is an order of magnitude or more superior to a standard 6 MV imaging system. CBCT data with the same contrast-to-noise ratio as a kilovoltage imaging system (0.15 cGy) can be obtained in doses of 11 and 244 cGy for the experimental and standard 6 MV systems, respectively. Whilst these doses are high for everyday imaging, qualitative images indicate that kilovoltage like images suitable for patient positioning can be acquired in radiation doses of 1-8 cGy with the experimental low-Z system.

  10. The APS x-ray undulator photon beam position monitor and tests at CHESS and NSLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, D.; Rodricks, B.; Barraza, J.; Sanchez, T.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1992-01-01

    The advent of third generation synchrotron radiation sources, like the Advanced Photon Source (APS), will provide significant increases in brilliance over existing synchrotron sources. The APS x-ray undulators will increase the brilliance in the 3-40 KeV range by several orders of magnitude. Thus, the design of the photon beam position monitor is a challenging engineering task. The beam position monitors must withstand the high thermal load, be able to achieve sub-micron spatial resolution while maintaining their stability, and be compatible with both undulators and wigglers. A preliminary APS prototype photon beam position monitor consisting of a CVD-diamond-based, tungsten-coated blade was tested on the APS/CHESS undulator at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Radiation Source (CHESS) and on the NSLS X-13 undulator beamline. Results from these tests, as well as the design of this prototype APS photon beam position monitor, will be discussed in this paper

  11. The APS X-ray undulator photon beam position monitor and tests at CHESS and NSLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, D.; Rodricks, B.; Barraza, J.; Sanchez, T.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1992-01-01

    The advent of thirs generation synchrotron sources, like the Advanced Photon Source (APS), will provide significant increases in brilliance over existing synchrotron sources. The APS X-ray undulators will increase the brilliance in the 3-40 keV range by several orders of magnitude. Thus, the design of the photon beam position monitor is a challenging engineering task. The beam position monitors must withstand the high thermal load, be able to achieve submicron spatial resolution while maintaining their stability, and be compatible with both undulators and wigglers. A preliminary APS prototype photon beam position monitor consisting of a CVD-diamond-based, tungsten-coated blade was tested on the APS/CHESS undulator at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Radiation Source (CHESS) and on the NSLS X-13 undulator beamline. Results from these tests, as well as the design of this prototype APS photon beam position monitor, will be discussed in this paper. (orig.)

  12. Portal imaging improvement with a low energy un flattened beam in high energy medical accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krutman, Y; Faermann, S; Tsechanski, A [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba (Israel)

    1996-12-01

    In this work we present a further improvement of the portal film option, for a Clinac 18 accelerator with a 10 MV therapeutic x-ray beam. This is done by lowering the nominal photon energy to 4 MV, therefore increasing the relative contribution of the low energy portion of the x-ray spectrum. Improvement of the image quality is demonstrated with a portal film scale tray, and with an anthropomorphic phantom, a graphical analysis demonstrates the improvement on image (authors).

  13. Silicon diodes as an alternative to diamond detectors for depth dose curves and profile measurements of photon and electron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherf, Christian; Moog, Jussi; Licher, Joerg; Kara, Eugen; Roedel, Claus; Ramm, Ulla; Peter, Christiane; Zink, Klemens

    2009-01-01

    Background: Depth dose curves and lateral dose profiles should correspond to relative dose to water in any measured point, what can be more or less satisfied with different detectors. Diamond as detector material has similar dosimetric properties like water. Silicon diodes and ionization chambers are also commonly used to acquire dose profiles. Material and Methods: The authors compared dose profiles measured in an MP3 water phantom with a diamond detector 60003, unshielded and shielded silicon diodes 60008 and 60012 and a 0.125-cm 3 thimble chamber 233642 (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) for 6- and 25-MV photons. Electron beams of 6, 12 and 18 MeV were investigated with the diamond detector, the unshielded diode and a Markus chamber 23343. Results: The unshielded diode revealed relative dose differences at the water surface below +10% for 6-MV and +4% for 25-MV photons compared to the diamond data. These values decreased to less than 1% within the first millimeters of water depth. The shielded diode was only required to obtain correct data of the fall-off zones for photon beams larger than 10 x 10 cm 2 because of important contributions of low-energy scattered photons. For electron radiation the largest relative dose difference of -2% was observed with the unshielded silicon diode for 6 MeV within the build-up zone. Spatial resolutions were always best with the small voluminous silicon diodes. Conclusion: Relative dose profiles obtained with the two silicon diodes have the same degree of accuracy as with the diamond detector. (orig.)

  14. Silicon diodes as an alternative to diamond detectors for depth dose curves and profile measurements of photon and electron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherf, Christian; Peter, Christiane; Moog, Jussi; Licher, Jörg; Kara, Eugen; Zink, Klemens; Rödel, Claus; Ramm, Ulla

    2009-08-01

    Depth dose curves and lateral dose profiles should correspond to relative dose to water in any measured point, what can be more or less satisfied with different detectors. Diamond as detector material has similar dosimetric properties like water. Silicon diodes and ionization chambers are also commonly used to acquire dose profiles. The authors compared dose profiles measured in an MP3 water phantom with a diamond detector 60003, unshielded and shielded silicon diodes 60008 and 60012 and a 0.125-cm(3) thimble chamber 233642 (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) for 6- and 25-MV photons. Electron beams of 6, 12 and 18 MeV were investigated with the diamond detector, the unshielded diode and a Markus chamber 23343. The unshielded diode revealed relative dose differences at the water surface below +10% for 6-MV and +4% for 25-MV photons compared to the diamond data. These values decreased to less than 1% within the first millimeters of water depth. The shielded diode was only required to obtain correct data of the fall-off zones for photon beams larger than 10 x 10 cm(2) because of important contributions of low-energy scattered photons. For electron radiation the largest relative dose difference of -2% was observed with the unshielded silicon diode for 6 MeV within the build-up zone. Spatial resolutions were always best with the small voluminous silicon diodes. Relative dose profiles obtained with the two silicon diodes have the same degree of accuracy as with the diamond detector.

  15. Two-photon equivalent weighting of spatial excimer laser beam profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eva, Eric; Bauer, Harry H.; Metzger, K.; Pfeiffer, A.

    2001-04-01

    Damage in optical materials for semiconductor lithography applications caused by exposure to 248 or 193 nm light is usually two-photon driven, hence it is a nonlinear function of incident intensity. Materials should be tested with flat- topped temporal and spatial laser beam profiles to facilitate interpretation of data, but in reality this is hard to achieve. Sandstrom provided a formula that approximates any given temporal pulse shape with a two- photon equivalent rectangular pulse (Second Symposium on 193 nm Lithography, Colorado Springs 1997). Known as the integral-square pulse duration, this definition has been embraced as an industry standard. Originally faced with the problem of comparing results obtained with pseudo-Gaussian spatial profiles to literature data, we found that a general solution for arbitrarily inhomogeneous spatial beam profiles exists which results in a definition much similar to Sandstrom's. In addition, we proved the validity of our approach in experiments with intentionally altered beam profiles.

  16. Summary test results of the particle-beam diagnostics for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) subsystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumpkin, A.; Wang, X.; Sellyey, W.; Patterson, D.; Kahana, E.

    1994-01-01

    During the first half of 1994, a number of the diagnostic systems for measurement of the charged-particle beam parameters throughout the subsystems of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) have been installed and tested. The particle beams eventually will involve 450-MeV to 7-GeV positrons and with different pulse formats. The first test and commissionin results for beam profiles, beam position monitors, loss rate monitors, current monitors, and synchrotron radiation photon monitors hve been obtained using 200- to 350-MeV electron beams injected into the subsystems. Data presented are principally from the transport lines and the positron accumulator ring

  17. Derivation of electron and photon energy spectra from electron beam central axis depth dose curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng Jun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)]. E-mail: jun@reyes.stanford.edu; Jiang, Steve B.; Pawlicki, Todd; Li Jinsheng; Ma, C.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2001-05-01

    A method for deriving the electron and photon energy spectra from electron beam central axis percentage depth dose (PDD) curves has been investigated. The PDD curves of 6, 12 and 20 MeV electron beams obtained from the Monte Carlo full phase space simulations of the Varian linear accelerator treatment head have been used to test the method. We have employed a 'random creep' algorithm to determine the energy spectra of electrons and photons in a clinical electron beam. The fitted electron and photon energy spectra have been compared with the corresponding spectra obtained from the Monte Carlo full phase space simulations. Our fitted energy spectra are in good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulated spectra in terms of peak location, peak width, amplitude and smoothness of the spectrum. In addition, the derived depth dose curves of head-generated photons agree well in both shape and amplitude with those calculated using the full phase space data. The central axis depth dose curves and dose profiles at various depths have been compared using an automated electron beam commissioning procedure. The comparison has demonstrated that our method is capable of deriving the energy spectra for the Varian accelerator electron beams investigated. We have implemented this method in the electron beam commissioning procedure for Monte Carlo electron beam dose calculations. (author)

  18. Entanglement of two-qubit photon beam by magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, A.D.; Castro, R.A. [University of Sao Paulo, Institute of Physics, CP 66318, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Gitman, D.M. [University of Sao Paulo, Institute of Physics, CP 66318, Sao Paulo (Brazil); P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-09-15

    We study the possibility of affecting the entanglement in a two-qubit system consisting of two photons with different fixed frequencies but with two arbitrary linear polarizations, moving in the same direction, with the help of an applied external magnetic field. The interaction between the magnetic field and the photons in our model is achieved through intermediate electrons that interact both with the photons and the magnetic field. The possibility of an exact theoretical analysis of this scheme is based on well-known exact solutions that describe the interaction of an electron subjected to an external magnetic field (or a medium of electrons not interacting with each other) with a quantized field of two photons. We adapt these exact solutions to the case under consideration. Using explicit wave functions for the resulting electromagnetic field, we calculate the entanglement measures (the information and the Schmidt ones) of the photon beam as functions of the applied magnetic field and the parameters of the electron medium. (orig.)

  19. Comparison of k Q factors measured with a water calorimeter in flattening filter free (FFF) and conventional flattening filter (cFF) photon beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Prez, Leon; de Pooter, Jacco; Jansen, Bartel; Perik, Thijs; Wittkämper, Frits

    2018-02-01

    Recently flattening filter free (FFF) beams became available for application in modern radiotherapy. There are several advantages of FFF beams over conventional flattening filtered (cFF) beams, however differences in beam spectra at the point of interest in a phantom potentially affect the ion chamber response. Beams are also non-uniform over the length of a typical reference ion chamber and recombination is usually larger. Despite several studies describing FFF beam characteristics, only a limited number of studies investigated their effect on k Q factors. Some of those studies predicted significant discrepancies in k Q factors (0.4% up to 1.0%) if TPR20,10 based codes of practice (CoPs) were to be used. This study addresses the question to which extent k Q factors, based on a TPR20,10 CoP, can be applied in clinical reference dosimetry. It is the first study that compares k Q factors measured directly with an absorbed dose to water primary standard in FFF-cFF pairs of clinical photon beams. This was done with a transportable water calorimeter described elsewhere. The measurements corrected for recombination and beam radial non-uniformity were performed in FFF-cFF beam pairs at 6 MV and 10 MV of an Elekta Versa HD for a selection of three different Farmer-type ion chambers (eight serial numbers). The ratio of measured k Q factors of the FFF-cFF beam pairs were compared with the TPR20,10 CoPs of the NCS and IAEA and the %dd(10) x CoP of the AAPM. For the TPR20,10 based CoPs differences less than 0.23% were found in k Q factors between the corresponding FFF-cFF beams with standard uncertainties smaller than 0.35%, while for the %dd(10) x these differences were smaller than 0.46% and within the expanded uncertainty of the measurements. Based on the measurements made with the equipment described in this study the authors conclude that the k Q factors provided by the NCS-18 and IAEA TRS-398 codes of practice can be applied for flattening filter free beams without

  20. Prototype photon position monitors for undulator beams at the advanced light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warwick, T.; Shu, D.; Rodricks, B.; Johnson, E.D.

    1992-01-01

    Design criteria are described, and test results are presented, for prototype ALS undulator beam position monitors. The design is based on monitors presently in use at NSLS, with modifications to account for the widely varying and large K values of the undulators to be installed at the ALS. In particular, we have modified the design to simplify the thermal engineering and we have explored techniques to suppress the response of the monitors to soft photons, so that the beam position can be determined by measuring the higher energy photons which are better collimated

  1. AAA and PBC calculation accuracy in the surface build-up region in tangential beam treatments. Phantom and breast case study with the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panettieri, Vanessa; Barsoum, Pierre; Westermark, Mathias; Brualla, Lorenzo; Lax, Ingmar

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: In tangential beam treatments accurate dose calculation of the absorbed dose in the build-up region is of major importance, in particular when the target has superficial extension close to the skin. In most analytical treatment planning systems (TPSs) calculations depend on the experimental measurements introduced by the user in which accuracy might be limited by the type of detector employed to perform them. To quantify the discrepancy between analytically calculated and delivered dose in the build-up region, near the skin of a patient, independent Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using the PENELOPE code were performed. Dose distributions obtained with MC simulations were compared with those given by the Pencil Beam Convolution (PBC) algorithm and the Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA) implemented in the commercial TPS Eclipse. Material and methods: A cylindrical phantom was used to approximate the breast contour of a patient for MC simulations and the TPS. Calculations of the absorbed doses were performed for 6 and 18 MV beams for four different angles of incidence: 15 deg., 30 deg., 45 deg. and 75 deg. and different field sizes: 3 x 3 cm 2 , 10 x 10 cm 2 and 40 x 40 cm 2 . Absorbed doses along the phantom central axis were obtained with both the PBC algorithm and the AAA and compared to those estimated by the MC simulations. Additionally, a breast patient case was calculated with two opposed 6 MV photon beams using all the aforementioned analytical and stochastic algorithms. Results: For the 6 MV photon beam in the phantom case, both the PBC algorithm and the AAA tend to underestimate the absorbed dose in the build-up region in comparison to MC results. These differences are clinically irrelevant and are included in a 1 mm range. This tendency is also confirmed in the breast patient case. For the 18 MV beam the PBC algorithm underestimates the absorbed dose with respect to the AAA. In comparison to MC simulations the PBC algorithm tends

  2. Technical Note: On maximizing Cherenkov emissions from medical linear accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrock, Zachary; Yoon, Suk W; Gunasingha, Rathnayaka; Oldham, Mark; Adamson, Justus

    2018-04-19

    Cherenkov light during MV radiotherapy has recently found imaging and therapeutic applications but is challenged by relatively low fluence. Our purpose is to investigate the feasibility of increasing Cherenkov light production during MV radiotherapy by increasing photon energy and applying specialized beam-hardening filtration. GAMOS 5.0.0, a GEANT4-based framework for Monte Carlo simulations, was used to model standard clinical linear accelerator primary photon beams. The photon source was incident upon a 17.8 cm 3 cubic water phantom with a 94 cm source to surface distance. Dose and Cherenkov production was determined at depths of 3-9 cm. Filtration was simulated 15 cm below the photon beam source. Filter materials included aluminum, iron, and copper with thicknesses of 2-20 cm. Histories used depended on the level of attenuation from the filter, ranging from 100 million to 2 billion. Comparing average dose per history also allowed for evaluation of dose-rate reduction for different filters. Overall, increasing photon beam energy is more effective at improving Cherenkov production per unit dose than is filtration, with a standard 18 MV beam yielding 3.3-4.0× more photons than 6 MV. Introducing an aluminum filter into an unfiltered 2400 cGy/min 10 MV beam increases the Cherenkov production by 1.6-1.7×, while maintaining a clinical dose rate of 300 cGy/min, compared to increases of ~1.5× for iron and copper. Aluminum was also more effective than the standard flattening filter, with the increase over the unfiltered beam being 1.4-1.5× (maintaining 600 cGy/min dose rate) vs 1.3-1.4× for the standard flattening filter. Applying a 10 cm aluminum filter to a standard 18 MV, photon beam increased the Cherenkov production per unit dose to 3.9-4.3× beyond that of 6 MV (vs 3.3-4.0× for 18 MV with no aluminum filter). Through a combination of increasing photon energy and applying specialized beam-hardening filtration, the amount of Cherenkov photons per

  3. Dose behind various immobilization and beam-modifying devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellenberg, David E.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the degradation of skin sparing associated with using beam modifiers such as compensators, immobilization devices, and custom blocks for high energy photon beams. Methods and Materials: The degradation of skin sparing was quantified by measuring dose build-up curves with an extrapolation chamber for 6 and 15 MV photon beams. Uniform thickness compensators made of gypsum and lead, thermoplastic mask material, immobilization cradle foam, and cerrobend custom blocks were placed in geometries that mimic relevant clinical situations. Results: Compensators, whether made of gypsum or lead, placed in the linear accelerator's wedge slot did not significantly effect the depth dose curve's build-up region. Immobilization devices such as cradle foam or thermoplastic placed in contact with the patient degrade the skin sparing expected from high energy photon beams proportional to their thickness and density. Measurements behind custom blocks show that surface and near surface doses for a blocked field are best described by build-up curves for an equivalent size open field. Conclusions: These results allow explanation and possibly prediction of skin reactions on patients in which compensators, foam immobilization cradles, thermoplastic masks, or custom blocks are used. These results also provide a baseline by which substitute materials can be evaluated

  4. Dose response of commercially available optically stimulated luminescent detector, Al2O3:C for megavoltage photons and electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Wook; Chung, Weon Kuu; Shin, Dong Oh; Yoon, Myonggeun; Hwang, Ui-Jung; Rah, Jeong-Eun; Jeong, Hojin; Lee, Sang Yeob; Shin, Dongho; Lee, Se Byeong; Park, Sung Yong

    2012-04-01

    This study examined the dose response of an optically stimulated luminescence dosemeter (OSLD) to megavoltage photon and electron beams. A nanoDot™ dosemeter was used to measure the dose response of the OSLD. Photons of 6-15 MV and electrons of 9-20 MeV were delivered by a Varian 21iX machine (Varian Medical System, Inc. Milpitas, CA, USA). The energy dependency was dose was linear until 200 cGy. The superficial dose measurements revealed photon irradiation to have an angular dependency. The nanoDot™ dosemeter has potential use as an in vivo dosimetric tool that is independent of the energy, has dose linearity and a rapid response compared with normal in vivo dosimetric tools, such as thermoluminescence detectors. However, the OSLD must be treated very carefully due to the high angular dependency of the photon beam.

  5. Dosimetry of clinical neutron and proton beams: An overview of recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vynckier, S.

    2004-01-01

    Neutron therapy beams are obtained by accelerating protons or deuterons on Beryllium. These neutron therapy beams present comparable dosimetric characteristics as those for photon beams obtained with linear accelerators; for instance, the penetration of a p(65) + Be neutron beam is comparable with the penetration of an 8 MV photon beam. In order to be competitive with conventional photon beam therapy, the dosimetric characteristics of the neutron beam should therefore not deviate too much from the photon beam characteristics. This paper presents a brief summary of the neutron beams used in radiotherapy. The dosimetry of the clinical neutron beams is described. Finally, recent and future developments in the field of physics for neutron therapy is mentioned. In the last two decades, a considerable number of centres have established radiotherapy treatment facilities using proton beams with energies between 50 and 250 MeV. Clinical applications require a relatively uniform dose to be delivered to the volume to be treated, and for this purpose the proton beam has to be spread out, both laterally and in depth. The technique is called 'beam modulation' and creates a region of high dose uniformity referred to as the 'spread-out Bragg peak'. Meanwhile, reference dosimetry in these beams had to catch up with photon and electron beams for which a much longer tradition of dosimetry exists. Proton beam dosimetry can be performed using different types of dosemeters, such as calorimeters, Faraday cups, track detectors and ionisation chambers. National standard dosimetry laboratories will, however, not provide a standard for the dosimetry of proton beams. To achieve uniformity on an international level, the use of an ionisation chamber should be considered. This paper reviews and summarises the basic principles and recommendations for the absorbed dose determination in a proton beam, utilising ionisation chambers calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water. These recommendations

  6. The ESTRO-EQUAL quality assurance network for photon and electron radiotherapy beams in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, I.H.; Dutreix, A.; Richter, J.; Bridier, A.; Chavaudra, J.; Svensson, H.

    2001-01-01

    Background: In 1998 an ESTRO Quality Assurance Network for radiotherapy (EQUAL) has been set up for 25 European countries for photon and electron beams in reference and non-reference conditions. Material and Methods: Measurements are done using LiF powder (DTL937-Philitech, France) that is processed with the PCL3 automatic reader (Fimel-PTW). The participating centers irradiate the TLDs with an absorbed dose of 2 Gy according to the clinical routine. Results: Until September 2000 EQUAL has checked 135 photon beams (including the beams rechecked) from 51 radiotherapy centers in Germany out of 86 accepted centers. The results show that 2% of the beam outputs in reference conditions and 3% of the percentage depth doses are outside the tolerance level (deviation > ± 5%). 6% of the beam output variations and of the wedge transmission factors show deviations > ± 5%. The global analysis of results shows deviations > ± 5% in at least one parameter for 18 beams out of the 135 beams checked. Five rechecked beams present one ''real dosimetric'' problem in one or more parameters, corresponding to 4% of the 114 beams for which the deviations cannot be attributed to set-up errors. - The EQUAL network has checked 89 electron beams in Germany. The results show that all beam outputs checked are within the tolerance level. The standard deviation for the beam output in reference conditions is 2.0% and 2.2% for the beam output for the others field sizes. The percentage of deviations > 3% and ≤ 5% for the reference beam output is higher for electron beams than for photon beam checks. Therefore the electron beam calibration and the TPS algorithms should be improved to increase the accuracy of the patient dosimetry for radiotherapy. (orig.) [de

  7. Thermoluminescence properties of Yb-Tb-doped SiO2 optical fiber subject to 6 and 10 MV photon irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahini, M. H.; Wagiran, H.; Hossain, I.; Saeed, M. A.; Ali, H.

    2014-08-01

    This paper reports thermoluminescence characteristics of thermoluminescence dosimetry 100 chips and Yb-Tb-doped optical fibers irradiated with 6 and 10 MV photons. Thermoluminescence response of both dosimeters increases over a wide photon dose range from 0.5 to 4 Gy. Yb-Tb-doped optical fibers demonstrate useful thermoluminescence properties and represent a good candidate for thermoluminescence dosimetry application with ionizing radiation. The results of this fiber have been compared with those of commercially available standard thermoluminescence dosimetry-100 media. Commercially available Yb-Tb-doped optical fibers and said standard media are found to yield a linear relationship between dose- and thermoluminescence signal, although Yb-Tb-doped optical fibers provide only 10 % of the sensitivity of thermoluminescence dosimetry-100. With better thermoluminescence characteristics such as small size (125 μm diameter), high flexibility, easy of handling and low cost, as compared to other thermoluminescence materials, indicate that commercial Yb-Tb-doped optical fiber is a promising thermoluminescence material for variety of applications.

  8. Detailed design of the RF source for the 1 MV neutral beam test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcuzzi, D.; Palma, M. Dalla; Pavei, M.; Heinemann, B.; Kraus, W.; Riedl, R.

    2009-01-01

    In the framework of the EU activities for the development of the Neutral Beam Injector for ITER, the detailed design of the Radio Frequency (RF) driven negative ion source to be installed in the 1 MV ITER Neutral Beam Test Facility (NBTF) has been carried out. Results coming from ongoing R and D on IPP test beds [A. Staebler et al., Development of a RF-Driven Ion Source for the ITER NBI System, this conference] and the design of the new ELISE facility [B. Heinemann et al., Design of the Half-Size ITER Neutral Beam Source Test Facility ELISE, this conference] brought several modifications to the solution based on the previous design. An assessment was carried out regarding the Back-Streaming positive Ions (BSI+) that impinge on the back plates of the ion source and cause high and localized heat loads. This led to the redesign of most heated components to increase cooling, and to different choices for the plasma facing materials to reduce the effects of sputtering. The design of the electric circuit, gas supply and the other auxiliary systems has been optimized. Integration with other components of the beam source has been revised, with regards to the interfaces with the supporting structure, the plasma grid and the flexible connections. In the paper the design will be presented in detail, as well as the results of the analyses performed for the thermo-mechanical verification of the components.

  9. SU-F-J-146: Experimental Validation of 6 MV Photon PDD in Parallel Magnetic Field Calculated by EGSnrc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghila, A; Steciw, S; Fallone, B; Rathee, S [Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Integrated linac-MR systems are uniquely suited for real time tumor tracking during radiation treatment. Understanding the magnetic field dose effects and incorporating them in treatment planning is paramount for linac-MR clinical implementation. We experimentally validated the EGSnrc dose calculations in the presence of a magnetic field parallel to the radiation beam travel. Methods: Two cylindrical bore electromagnets produced a 0.21 T magnetic field parallel to the central axis of a 6 MV photon beam. A parallel plate ion chamber was used to measure the PDD in a polystyrene phantom, placed inside the bore in two setups: phantom top surface coinciding with the magnet bore center (183 cm SSD), and with the magnet bore’s top surface (170 cm SSD). We measured the field of the magnet at several points and included the exact dimensions of the coils to generate a 3D magnetic field map in a finite element model. BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc simulated the PDD experiments in parallel magnetic field (i.e. 3D magnetic field included) and with no magnetic field. Results: With the phantom surface at the top of the electromagnet, the surface dose increased by 10% (compared to no-magnetic field), due to electrons being focused by the smaller fringe fields of the electromagnet. With the phantom surface at the bore center, the surface dose increased by 30% since extra 13 cm of air column was in relatively higher magnetic field (>0.13T) in the magnet bore. EGSnrc Monte Carlo code correctly calculated the radiation dose with and without the magnetic field, and all points passed the 2%, 2 mm Gamma criterion when the ion chamber’s entrance window and air cavity were included in the simulated phantom. Conclusion: A parallel magnetic field increases the surface and buildup dose during irradiation. The EGSnrc package can model these magnetic field dose effects accurately. Dr. Fallone is a co-founder and CEO of MagnetTx Oncology Solutions (under discussions to license Alberta bi

  10. Gamma beams generation with high intensity lasers for two photon Breit-Wheeler pair production

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Humieres, Emmanuel; Ribeyre, Xavier; Jansen, Oliver; Esnault, Leo; Jequier, Sophie; Dubois, Jean-Luc; Hulin, Sebastien; Tikhonchuk, Vladimir; Arefiev, Alex; Toncian, Toma; Sentoku, Yasuhiko

    2017-10-01

    Linear Breit-Wheeler pair creation is the lowest threshold process in photon-photon interaction, controlling the energy release in Gamma Ray Bursts and Active Galactic Nuclei, but it has never been directly observed in the laboratory. Using numerical simulations, we demonstrate the possibility to produce collimated gamma beams with high energy conversion efficiency using high intensity lasers and innovative targets. When two of these beams collide at particular angles, our analytical calculations demonstrate a beaming effect easing the detection of the pairs in the laboratory. This effect has been confirmed in photon collision simulations using a recently developed innovative algorithm. An alternative scheme using Bremsstrahlung radiation produced by next generation high repetition rate laser systems is also being explored and the results of first optimization campaigns in this regime will be presented.

  11. Theory of the effect of third-harmonic generation on three-photon resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization in focused beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, M.G.; Garrett, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    Multiphoton ionization in the region near a three-photon resonance is treated for focused, plane-polarized Gaussian beams with diffraction-limited beam divergence. In this situation, a third-harmonic field is generated within the laser beam. At, and very near, three-photon resonance the driving rate for the upper-state probability amplitude due to one-photon absorption of third-harmonic light becomes nearly equal to the corresponding three-photon rate due to the laser field, but these effects are 180 0 out of phase. As a consequence of this cancellation between two pumping terms, the three-photon resonance line essentially disappears at moderate concentrations and the observed ionization has a line shape that is close to the phase-matching curve for third-harmonic generation. The ionization signal, near but not on the resonance, is due almost entirely to absorption of third-harmonic photons plus other laser photons; three-photon resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization by the laser is much weaker. This is particularly true on the blue side of the three-photon resonance at detunings where phase matching occurs. The problem is treated quite generally with predictions of the full line shape for n-photon ionization and third-harmonic light generation near three-photon resonance, including the rather strong influences of positively dispersive buffer gases. We also show that the cancellation between the one-photon and the three-photon process is partially spoiled in the presence of a counterpropagating beam at the same frequency

  12. Simultaneous optimization of photons and electrons for mixed beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, S; Fix, M K; Joosten, A; Henzen, D; Frei, D; Volken, W; Kueng, R; Aebersold, D M; Stampanoni, M F M; Manser, P

    2017-06-26

    The aim of this work is to develop and investigate an inverse treatment planning process (TPP) for mixed beam radiotherapy (MBRT) capable of performing simultaneous optimization of photon and electron apertures. A simulated annealing based direct aperture optimization (DAO) is implemented to perform simultaneous optimization of photon and electron apertures, both shaped with the photon multileaf collimator (pMLC). Validated beam models are used as input for Monte Carlo dose calculations. Consideration of photon pMLC transmission during DAO and a weight re-optimization of the apertures after deliverable dose calculation are utilized to efficiently reduce the differences between optimized and deliverable dose distributions. The TPP for MBRT is evaluated for an academic situation with a superficial and an enlarged PTV in the depth, a left chest wall case including the internal mammary chain and a squamous cell carcinoma case. Deliverable dose distributions of MBRT plans are compared to those of modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT), photon IMRT and if available to those of clinical VMAT plans. The generated MBRT plans dosimetrically outperform the MERT, photon IMRT and VMAT plans for all investigated situations. For the clinical cases of the left chest wall and the squamous cell carcinoma, the MBRT plans cover the PTV similarly or more homogeneously than the VMAT plans, while OARs are spared considerably better with average reductions of the mean dose to parallel OARs and D 2% to serial OARs by 54% and 26%, respectively. Moreover, the low dose bath expressed as V 10% to normal tissue is substantially reduced by up to 45% compared to the VMAT plans. A TPP for MBRT including simultaneous optimization is successfully implemented and the dosimetric superiority of MBRT plans over MERT, photon IMRT and VMAT plans is demonstrated for academic and clinical situations including superficial targets with and without deep-seated part.

  13. A simple self-breaking 2 MV gas switch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Capua, M.S.; Freytag, E.K.; Dixon, W.R.; Hawley, R.A.

    1987-06-29

    We describe a simple self-breaking 2 MV gas master switch for the LLNL 2 MV general purpose relativistic electron beam (REB) accelerator. The switch cavity has been hollowed out in a 17.8 cm-thick acrylic slab. The switch gap is 3.55 cm. At 2 MV the maximum field at the cathode is 740 kV cm/sup -1/ and the maximum envelope field is 172 kV cm/sup -1/. The maximum measured switching voltage is 1.90 +- 0.1 MV (10 bar abs). The minimum switching voltage is 1.1 MV (4.3 bar abs). The operating characteristics break away from the 89 kV/(cm atm) dc breakdown strength of SF/sub 6/ at 5 bar abs. Careful electrical and mechanical design as well as strict quality control during assembly and operation have resulted in reliable and reproducible operation.

  14. To test photon statistics by atomic beam deflection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yuzhu; Chen Yudan; Huang Weigang; Liu Liang

    1985-02-01

    There exists a simple relation between the photon statistics in resonance fluorescence and the statistics of the momentum transferred to an atom by a plane travelling wave [Cook, R.J., Opt. Commun., 35, 347(1980)]. Using an atomic beam deflection by light pressure, we have observed sub-Poissonian statistics in resonance fluorescence of two-level atoms. (author)

  15. SU-G-TeP2-03: Comparison of Standard Dosimetry Protocol in Japan and AAPM TG-51 Addendum in Order to Establish Optimal Dosimetry for FFF Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsunaga, T; Adachi, Y [Department of Radiology, Seirei Hamamatsu General Hospital, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka (Japan); Hayashi, N [Graduate School of Health Sciences, Fujita Health University, Tayoake, Aichi (Japan); Nozue, M [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seirei Hamamtsu General Hospital, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Japan Standard Dosimetry of Absorbed dose to water in external beam radiotherapy (JSDP12) is widely used to measure radiation dose in radiotherapy. However, JSDP12 does not take flattening-filter-free (FFF) beam into consideration. In addition, JSDP12 applied TPR20,10 for dose quality index for photon beam. The purpose of this study is to compare JSDP12 with AAPM TG-51 addendum in order to establish optimal dosimetry procedure for FFF beam. Method: We evaluated the ion-recombination factor (ks) and the correction factor of radial beam profile (Prp) in FFF beam dosimetry. The ks was introduced by 2 voltages method and verified by Jaffe’s plot. The Prp was given by both film measurement and calculation of treatment planning system, and compared them. Next, we compared the dose quality indexes (kQ) between TPR20,10 method and PDD(10)x method. Finally we considered optimal dosimetry protocol for FFF photon beam using JSDP12 with referring TG-51 addendum protocols. The FFF photon beams of 6 MV (6X-FFF) and 10 MV (10X-FFF) from TrueBeam were investigated in this study. Results: The ks for 6X-FFF and 10X-FFF beams were 1.005 and 1.010, respectively. The Prp of 0.6 cc ionization chamber for 6X-FFF and 10X-FFF beams (Film, TPS) were (1.004, 1.008) and (1.005, 1.008), respectively. The kQ for 6X-FFF and 10X-FFF beams (JSDP12, TG-51 addendum) were (0.9950, 0.9947) and (0.9851, 0.9845), respectively. The most effective factor for uncertainty in FFF photon beam measurement was Prp for JSDP12 formalism. Total dosimetric differences between JSDP12 and TG-51 addendum for 6X-FFF and 10X-FFF were -0.47% and -0.73%, respectively. Conclusion: The total dosimetric difference between JSDP12 and TG-51 addendum was within 1%. The introduction of kQ given by JSDP is feasible for FFF photon beam dosimetry. However, we think Prp should be considered for optimal dosimetry procedure even if JSDP12 is used for FFF photon beam dosimetry.

  16. Performance Results for Building the 1 MV Electrostatic Accelerator at KOMAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae-Il; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Park, Sae-Hoon; Cho, Yong-Sub [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    1 MV electrostatic accelerator of KOrea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex (KOMAC) is being developed to satisfy the needs from the users, especially for the applications with a MeV range ion beam implantation. Table 1 shows specifications of the 1MV electrostatic accelerator. The accelerator consists of ion source, beam transport system and target chamber. The ion source and accelerating column are installed inside the pressure vessel of high voltage power supply. The layout of the system is shown in Fig. 1. A 1 MV electrostatic accelerator is being developed at KOMAC. The high voltage power supply is already developed. The 200 MHz RF ion source is now being tested in the 300 kV test-stand. In the test results, it is necessary to improve increasing RF power absorption into the plasma in order to supply 1 mA beam. For this goal, we need more reliable the matching circuit and should be modified the matching components.

  17. SU-F-BRE-11: Neutron Measurements Around the Varian TrueBeam Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maglieri, R; Seuntjens, J; Kildea, J [McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); Liang, L; DeBlois, F [Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, QC (Canada); Evans, M [Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, QC (Canada); Licea, A [Canadian Nuclear Safety Comission, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Dubeau, J; Witharana, S [Detec, Gatineau, QC (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: With the emergence of flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams, several authors have noted many advantages to their use. One such advantage is the decrease in neutron production by photonuclear reactions in the linac head. In the present work we investigate the reduction in neutrons from a Varian TrueBeam linac using the Nested Neutron Spectrometer (NNS, Detec). The neutron spectrum, total fluence and source strength were measured and compared for 10 MV with and without flattening filter and the effect of moderation by the room and maze was studied for the 15 MV beam. Methods: The NNS, similar to traditional Bonner sphere detectors but operated in current mode, was used to measure the neutron fluence and spectrum. The NNS was validated for use in high dose rate environments using Monte Carlo simulations and calibrated at NIST and NRC Canada. Measurements were performed at several positions within the treatment room and maze with the linac jaws closed to maximize neutron production. Results: The measurements showed a total fluence reduction between 35-40% in the room and maze when the flattening filter was removed. The neutron source strength Qn was calculated from in-room fluence measurements and was found to be 0.042 × 10{sup 2} n/Gy, 0.026 × 10{sup 2} n/Gy and 0.59 × 101{sup 2} n/Gy for the 10 MV, the 10 MV FFF and 15 MV beams, respectively. We measured ambient equivalent doses of 11 mSv/hr, 7 mSv/hr and 218 mSv/hr for the 10 MV, 10 MV FFF and 15 MV by the head. Conclusion: Our measurements revealed a decrease in total fluence, neutron source strength and equivalent dose of approximately 35-40% across the treatment room for the FFF compared to FF modes. This demonstrates, as expected, that the flattening filter is a major component of the neutron production for the TrueBeam. The authors greatly acknowledge support form the Canadian Nuclear Commission and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada through the CREATE program. Co

  18. Experiences of calibration in photon beams for the personal dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindborg, L.; Gullberg, O.

    1994-01-01

    The calibration quantity shall, according to ICRU, be the personal dose equivalent, H p (d), in a phantom having the composition of the ICRU tissue and the same shape and size as the recommended PMMA calibration phantom, 30 x 30 x 15 cm 3 . There exist differences in backscattering between PMMA and tissue that for certain photon energies could be of importance. This could either be treated as a systematic uncertainty or be incorporated in the definition. However, monoenergetic beams seldom appear in reality and the difference in backscatter is not thought to be important. The calibration quantity for photons was chosen as the absorbed dose to ICRU tissue (times a quality factor 1) at 10 mm depth in a tissue-equivalent slab phantom. In Sweden 13 different services run personal dosimetry. Their initial hesitation about the change of quantity disappeared after testing their photon energy responses. It was found that most TLD systems were measuring the new quantity better than the old one and that the film systems needed only minor corrections. Most TLD systems now report 5% larger dose equivalents for the same irradiation in a photon beam from a 137 Cs source. (author)

  19. Metal artifact correction for x-ray computed tomography using kV and selective MV imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Meng; Keil, Andreas; Constantin, Dragos; Star-Lack, Josh; Zhu, Lei; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The overall goal of this work is to improve the computed tomography (CT) image quality for patients with metal implants or fillings by completing the missing kilovoltage (kV) projection data with selectively acquired megavoltage (MV) data that do not suffer from photon starvation. When both of these imaging systems, which are available on current radiotherapy devices, are used, metal streak artifacts are avoided, and the soft-tissue contrast is restored, even for regions in which the kV data cannot contribute any information. Methods: Three image-reconstruction methods, including two filtered back-projection (FBP)-based analytic methods and one iterative method, for combining kV and MV projection data from the two on-board imaging systems of a radiotherapy device are presented in this work. The analytic reconstruction methods modify the MV data based on the information in the projection or image domains and then patch the data onto the kV projections for a FBP reconstruction. In the iterative reconstruction, the authors used dual-energy (DE) penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) methods to simultaneously combine the kV/MV data and perform the reconstruction. Results: The authors compared kV/MV reconstructions to kV-only reconstructions using a dental phantom with fillings and a hip-implant numerical phantom. Simulation results indicated that dual-energy sinogram patch FBP and the modified dual-energy PWLS method can successfully suppress metal streak artifacts and restore information lost due to photon starvation in the kV projections. The root-mean-square errors of soft-tissue patterns obtained using combined kV/MV data are 10–15 Hounsfield units smaller than those of the kV-only images, and the structural similarity index measure also indicates a 5%–10% improvement in the image quality. The added dose from the MV scan is much less than the dose from the kV scan if a high efficiency MV detector is assumed. Conclusions: The authors have shown that it

  20. Metal artifact correction for x-ray computed tomography using kV and selective MV imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Meng, E-mail: mengwu@stanford.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Keil, Andreas [microDimensions GmbH, Munich 81379 (Germany); Constantin, Dragos; Star-Lack, Josh [Varian Medical Systems, Inc., Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Zhu, Lei [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Fahrig, Rebecca [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: The overall goal of this work is to improve the computed tomography (CT) image quality for patients with metal implants or fillings by completing the missing kilovoltage (kV) projection data with selectively acquired megavoltage (MV) data that do not suffer from photon starvation. When both of these imaging systems, which are available on current radiotherapy devices, are used, metal streak artifacts are avoided, and the soft-tissue contrast is restored, even for regions in which the kV data cannot contribute any information. Methods: Three image-reconstruction methods, including two filtered back-projection (FBP)-based analytic methods and one iterative method, for combining kV and MV projection data from the two on-board imaging systems of a radiotherapy device are presented in this work. The analytic reconstruction methods modify the MV data based on the information in the projection or image domains and then patch the data onto the kV projections for a FBP reconstruction. In the iterative reconstruction, the authors used dual-energy (DE) penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) methods to simultaneously combine the kV/MV data and perform the reconstruction. Results: The authors compared kV/MV reconstructions to kV-only reconstructions using a dental phantom with fillings and a hip-implant numerical phantom. Simulation results indicated that dual-energy sinogram patch FBP and the modified dual-energy PWLS method can successfully suppress metal streak artifacts and restore information lost due to photon starvation in the kV projections. The root-mean-square errors of soft-tissue patterns obtained using combined kV/MV data are 10–15 Hounsfield units smaller than those of the kV-only images, and the structural similarity index measure also indicates a 5%–10% improvement in the image quality. The added dose from the MV scan is much less than the dose from the kV scan if a high efficiency MV detector is assumed. Conclusions: The authors have shown that it

  1. Metal artifact correction for x-ray computed tomography using kV and selective MV imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meng; Keil, Andreas; Constantin, Dragos; Star-Lack, Josh; Zhu, Lei; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-12-01

    The overall goal of this work is to improve the computed tomography (CT) image quality for patients with metal implants or fillings by completing the missing kilovoltage (kV) projection data with selectively acquired megavoltage (MV) data that do not suffer from photon starvation. When both of these imaging systems, which are available on current radiotherapy devices, are used, metal streak artifacts are avoided, and the soft-tissue contrast is restored, even for regions in which the kV data cannot contribute any information. Three image-reconstruction methods, including two filtered back-projection (FBP)-based analytic methods and one iterative method, for combining kV and MV projection data from the two on-board imaging systems of a radiotherapy device are presented in this work. The analytic reconstruction methods modify the MV data based on the information in the projection or image domains and then patch the data onto the kV projections for a FBP reconstruction. In the iterative reconstruction, the authors used dual-energy (DE) penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) methods to simultaneously combine the kV/MV data and perform the reconstruction. The authors compared kV/MV reconstructions to kV-only reconstructions using a dental phantom with fillings and a hip-implant numerical phantom. Simulation results indicated that dual-energy sinogram patch FBP and the modified dual-energy PWLS method can successfully suppress metal streak artifacts and restore information lost due to photon starvation in the kV projections. The root-mean-square errors of soft-tissue patterns obtained using combined kV/MV data are 10-15 Hounsfield units smaller than those of the kV-only images, and the structural similarity index measure also indicates a 5%-10% improvement in the image quality. The added dose from the MV scan is much less than the dose from the kV scan if a high efficiency MV detector is assumed. The authors have shown that it is possible to improve the image quality of

  2. Design of a novel multi channel photonic crystal fiber polarization beam splitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunyan; Li, Shuguang; Wang, Xinyu; Wang, Guangyao; Shi, Min; Wu, Junjun

    2017-10-01

    A kind of multi channel dual-core photonic crystal fiber polarization beam splitter is designed. We analyze the effects of the lattice parameters and the thickness of gold layer on the beam splitting by the finite element method. Numerical results show that the thickness of metal layer and the size of the air holes near the fiber cores are closely linked with the nature of the polarization beam splitter. We also obtain that extinction ratio can reach -73.87 dB at 1 . 55 μm wavelength and at 1 . 41 μm, 1 . 65 μm extinction ratio can reach 30.8978 dB and 31.1741 dB, respectively. The comparison of the effect on the characteristic of the photonic crystal fiber with coating no gold is also taken into account.

  3. Dose evaluation of narrow-beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Shinichi

    1999-01-01

    Reliability of the dose from the narrow photon beam becomes more important since the single high-dose rate radiosurgery becoming popular. The dose evaluation for the optimal dose is difficult due to absence of lateral electronic equilibrium. Data necessary for treatment regimen are TMR (tissue maximum ratio), OCR (off center ratio) and S c,p (total scatter factor). The narrow-beam was 10 MV X-ray from Varian Clinac 2100C equipped with cylindrical Fischer collimator CBI system. Detection was performed by Kodak XV-2 film, a PTW natural diamond detector M60003, Scanditronics silicon detector EDD-5 or Fujitec micro-chamber FDC-9.4C. Phantoms were the water equivalent one (PTW, RW3), water one (PTW, MP3 system) and Wellhofer WP600 system. Factors above were actually measured to reveal that in the dose evaluation of narrow photon beam, TMR should be measured by micro-chamber, OCR, by film, and S c,p , by the two. The use of diamond detector was recommended for more precise measurement and evaluation of the dose. The importance of water phantom in the radiosurgery system was also shown. (K.H.)

  4. Determination of output factor for 6 MV small photon beam: comparison between Monte Carlo simulation technique and microDiamond detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krongkietlearts, K; Tangboonduangjit, P; Paisangittisakul, N

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve the life's quality for a cancer patient, the radiation techniques are constantly evolving. Especially, the two modern techniques which are intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) are quite promising. They comprise of many small beam sizes (beamlets) with various intensities to achieve the intended radiation dose to the tumor and minimal dose to the nearby normal tissue. The study investigates whether the microDiamond detector (PTW manufacturer), a synthetic single crystal diamond detector, is suitable for small field output factor measurement. The results were compared with those measured by the stereotactic field detector (SFD) and the Monte Carlo simulation (EGSnrc/BEAMnrc/DOSXYZ). The calibration of Monte Carlo simulation was done using the percentage depth dose and dose profile measured by the photon field detector (PFD) of the 10×10 cm 2 field size with 100 cm SSD. Comparison of the values obtained from the calculations and measurements are consistent, no more than 1% difference. The output factors obtained from the microDiamond detector have been compared with those of SFD and Monte Carlo simulation, the results demonstrate the percentage difference of less than 2%. (paper)

  5. TU-E-BRA-05: Reverse Geometry Imaging with MV Detector for Improved Image Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, A; Abel, E; Sun, M; Fahrig, R; Virshup, G; Star-Lack, J

    2012-06-01

    Thick pixilated scintillators can offer significant improvements in quantum efficiency over phosphor screen megavoltage (MV) detectors. However spatial resolution can be compromised due to the spreading of light across pixels within septa. Of particular interest are the lower energy x-ray photons and associated light photons that produce higher image contrast but are stopped near the scintillator entrance surface. They suffer the most scattering in the scintillator prior to detection in the photodiodes. Reversing the detector geometry, so that the incident x-ray beam passes through the photodiode array into the scintillator, allows the light to scatter less prior to detection. This also reduces the Swank noise since now higher and lower energy x-ray photons tend to produce similar electronic signals. In this work, we present simulations and measurements of detector MTF for the conventional/forward and reverse geometries to demonstrate this phenomenon. A tabletop system consisting of a Varian CX1 1MeV linear accelerator and a modified Varian Paxscan4030 with the readout electronics moved away from the incident the beam was used. A special holder was used to press a 2.5W×5.0L×2.0Hcm 3 pixellated Cesium Iodide (CsI:Tl) scintillator array on to the detector glass. The CsI array had a pitch of 0.784mm with plastic septa between pixels and the photodiode array pitch was 0.192 mm. The MTF in the forward and reverse geometries was measured using a 0.5mm thick Tantalum slanted edge. Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulations were performed for comparison. The measured and simulated MTFs matched to within 3.4(±3.7)% in the forward and 4.4(±1.5)% in reverse geometries. The reverse geometry MTF was higher than the forward geometry MTF at all spatial frequencies and doubled to .25 at 0.3lp/mm. A novel method of improving the image resolution at MV energies was demonstrated. The improvements should be more pronounced with increased scintillator thickness. Funding support provided

  6. Choice of beam energy and dosimetric implications for radiation treatment in a subpopulation of women with large breasts in the United States and Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Indra J.; Shikama, Naoto; Cheng, C.-W.; Solin, Lawrence J.

    2006-01-01

    Radiation complications are often related to the dose inhomogeneity (hot spot) in breast tissue treated with conservative therapy, especially for large patients. The effect of photon energy on radiation dose distribution is analyzed to provide guidelines for the selection of beam energy when tangential fields and limited slices are used to treat women with large breasts. Forty-eight patients with chest wall separation > 22 cm were selected for dosimetric analysis. We compared the maximum dose in the central axis (CAX) plane (2D) using 6-, 10-, and 18-MV photon beams in all patients and 3D data set for 16 patients. Correlation between hot spot dose (HSD), separation, breast cup size, breast volume, and body weight was derived with beam energy. Among the 48 patients in this study, HSD > 10% in the CAX plane was noted in 98%, 46%, and 4% of the population when 2D dosimetry was performed; however, with 3D study, it was in 50%, 19%, and 6% of the patients with 6-MV, 10-MV and 18-MV beams, respectively. The chest wall separation, body weight, and breast volume were correlated with the HSD in both the 2D and 3D plans. Patient's bra size was not correlated with the hot spot. The chest wall separation was found to be the most important parameter to correlate with hot spot in tangential breast treatment. Simple guidelines are provided for dose uniformity in breast with respect to chest wall separation, body weight, bra size, and breast volume with tangential field irradiations

  7. Giant nonlinear interaction between two optical beams via a quantum dot embedded in a photonic wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, H. A.; Grange, T.; Reznychenko, B.; Yeo, I.; de Assis, P.-L.; Tumanov, D.; Fratini, F.; Malik, N. S.; Dupuy, E.; Gregersen, N.; Auffèves, A.; Gérard, J.-M.; Claudon, J.; Poizat, J.-Ph.

    2018-05-01

    Optical nonlinearities usually appear for large intensities, but discrete transitions allow for giant nonlinearities operating at the single-photon level. This has been demonstrated in the last decade for a single optical mode with cold atomic gases, or single two-level systems coupled to light via a tailored photonic environment. Here, we demonstrate a two-mode giant nonlinearity with a single semiconductor quantum dot (QD) embedded in a photonic wire antenna. We exploit two detuned optical transitions associated with the exciton-biexciton QD level scheme. Owing to the broadband waveguide antenna, the two transitions are efficiently interfaced with two free-space laser beams. The reflection of one laser beam is then controlled by the other beam, with a threshold power as low as 10 photons per exciton lifetime (1.6 nW ). Such a two-color nonlinearity opens appealing perspectives for the realization of ultralow-power logical gates and optical quantum gates, and could also be implemented in an integrated photonic circuit based on planar waveguides.

  8. B-factory via conversion of 1-TeV electron beams into 1-TeV photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mtingwa, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the study of CP violation and rare decays of beauty particles which are pressing problems in high-energy physics. It is known that one should analyze beauty decays of at least the order of 10 8 or 19 9 . Thus, numerous proposals for beauty factories are being discussed now, although some of these projects are likely to supply much smaller numbers of beauty events. At the same time, at present several projects, such as CLIC (Cern Linear Collider), expect to build linear e + e - colliders with beam energies up to 1 TeV. The aim of this work is to show that the possibility exists of using the unique features of the discussed teraelectron volt electron linacs to obtain a facility for the production of beauty via photoproduction of nuclei. Unique features of high-energy photoproduction are as follows. The rather large fraction (∼2 x 10 -4 ) of events with beauty at E γ ∼ 1 TeV. Beauty particles are produced with about equally large momenta ∼0.05 E γ and at rather large transverse momenta p t ∼ m b . The following scheme can be envisioned. The 1-TeV electron beam is Compton scattered off a low-energy (∼ 1-eV) laser pulse. The laser photons are thus converted into a highly collimated beam of energy E γ ∼ E e , directed along the electron's original line of motion. Such schemes to produce high-energy photon beams have been discussed. These 1-TeV photons are subsequently scattered onto a nuclear target to produce b bar b pairs

  9. Measurement of electron beam polarization from unstrained GaAs via two-photon photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarter, J.L., E-mail: jlm2ar@virginia.edu [Department of Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22901 (United States); Afanasev, A. [Department of Physics, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Gay, T.J. [Jorgensen Hall, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Hansknecht, J. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12050 Jefferson Avenue, Suite 500, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Kechiantz, A. [Department of Physics, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Poelker, M. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12050 Jefferson Avenue, Suite 500, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2014-02-21

    Two-photon absorption of 1560 nm light was used to generate polarized electron beams from unstrained GaAs photocathodes of varying thickness: 625 μm, 0.32 μm, and 0.18 μm. For each photocathode, the degree of spin polarization of the photoemitted beam was less than 50%, contradicting earlier predictions based on simple quantum mechanical selection rules for spherically-symmetric systems but consistent with the more sophisticated model of Bhat et al. (Phys. Rev. B 71 (2005) 035209). Polarization via two-photon absorption was the highest from the thinnest photocathode sample and comparable to that obtained via one-photon absorption (using 778 nm light), with values 40.3±1.0% and 42.6±1.0%, respectively.

  10. Probing WWγ and WWγγ couplings with high energy photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, S.Y.; Schrempp, F.

    1991-12-01

    We examine the potential of a future 500 GeV linear e + e - collider for probing anomalous WW γ and WW γγ couplings in the so-called γ(γ)model, corresponding to colliding γe and γγ beams from Compton backscattering of laser light. We consider in detail the 'minimal' set (k γ , λ γ ) of CP conserving anomalous couplings and present first results for the CP violating 'partner' couplings (anti K γ , anti l γ ) as well. The reactions under consideration are γe → Wν, γγ → W + W - and, as a reference, also e + e - → W + W - . We discuss the impact of both circular polarization of laser photons and polarized e(anti e) beams. Photon 'beams' due to classical Bremsstrahlung are also studied for comparison. We analyze in detail, how changes of the assumed machine parameters, cuts and systematic errors affect the sensitivity to the anomalous couplings. (orig.)

  11. Low Z target switching to increase tumor endothelial cell dose enhancement during gold nanoparticle-aided radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berbeco, Ross I., E-mail: rberbeco@partners.org; Detappe, Alexandre [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Tsiamas, Panogiotis [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Jude Children’s Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105 (United States); Parsons, David; Yewondwossen, Mammo; Robar, James [Department of Radiation Oncology and Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 1V7 (Canada)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: Previous studies have introduced gold nanoparticles as vascular-disrupting agents during radiation therapy. Crucial to this concept is the low energy photon content of the therapy radiation beam. The authors introduce a new mode of delivery including a linear accelerator target that can toggle between low Z and high Z targets during beam delivery. In this study, the authors examine the potential increase in tumor blood vessel endothelial cell radiation dose enhancement with the low Z target. Methods: The authors use Monte Carlo methods to simulate delivery of three different clinical photon beams: (1) a 6 MV standard (Cu/W) beam, (2) a 6 MV flattening filter free (Cu/W), and (3) a 6 MV (carbon) beam. The photon energy spectra for each scenario are generated for depths in tissue-equivalent material: 2, 10, and 20 cm. The endothelial dose enhancement for each target and depth is calculated using a previously published analytic method. Results: It is found that the carbon target increases the proportion of low energy (<150 keV) photons at 10 cm depth to 28% from 8% for the 6 MV standard (Cu/W) beam. This nearly quadrupling of the low energy photon content incident on a gold nanoparticle results in 7.7 times the endothelial dose enhancement as a 6 MV standard (Cu/W) beam at this depth. Increased surface dose from the low Z target can be mitigated by well-spaced beam arrangements. Conclusions: By using the fast-switching target, one can modulate the photon beam during delivery, producing a customized photon energy spectrum for each specific situation.

  12. Proceeding of the workshop on gamma-ray spectroscopy utilizing heavy-ion, photon and RI beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshima, Masumi; Sugita, Michiaki; Hayakawa, Takehito [eds.

    1998-03-01

    Three time since 1992, we have held the symposia entitled `Joint Spectroscopy Experiments Utilizing JAERI Tandem-Booster Accelerator` at the Tokai Research Establishment. In the symposia, we have mainly discussed the plans of experiments to be done in this joint program. The joint program started in 1994. Several experiments have been made since and some new results have already come up. This symposium `Gamma-ray Spectroscopy utilizing heavy-ion, Photon and RI beams` was held at Tokai Research Establishment of JAERI. Because this symposium is the first occasion after the program started, the first purpose of the symposium is to present and discuss the experimental results so far obtained using the JAERI Tandem-Booster. The second purpose of the symposium is to discuss new possibilities of gamma-ray spectroscopy using new resources such as RI-beam and Photon-beam. The participants from RIKEN, Tohoku University and JAERI Neutron Science Research Center presented the future plans of experiments with RI-beam at each facility. Compared with these nuclear beams, photon beam provides a completely new tool for the {gamma}-ray spectroscopy, which is achieved by inverse Compton scattering between high-energy electron and laser beams. The 23 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  13. The Monte Carlo simulation of the Ladon photon beam facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strangio, C.

    1976-01-01

    The backward compton scattering of laser light against high energy electrons has been simulated with a Monte Carlo method. The main features of the produced photon beam are reported as well as a careful description of the numerical calculation

  14. Dual-energy (MV/kV) CT with probabilistic attenuation mapping for IGRT applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Erik; Pan, Xiaochuan; Pelizzari, Charles

    2015-03-01

    Imaging plays an important role in the delivery of external beam radiation therapy. It is used to confirm the setup of the patient and to ensure accurate targeting and delivery of the therapeutic radiation dose. Most modern linear accelerators come equipped with a flat panel detector opposite the MV source as well as an independent kV imaging system, typically mounted perpendicular to the MV beam. kV imaging provides superior soft tissue contrast and is typically lower dose to the patient than MV imaging, however it can suffer from artifacts caused by metallic objects such as implants and immobilization devices. In addition to being less artifact prone, MV imaging also provides a direct measure of the attenuation for the MV beam which is useful for computing the therapeutic dose distributions. Furthermore either system requires a large angular coverage, which is slow for large linear accelerators. We present a method for reconstructing tomographic images from data acquired at multiple x-ray beam energies using a statistical model of inherent physical properties of the imaged object. This approach can produce image quality superior to traditional techniques in the case of limited measurement data (angular sampling range, sampling density or truncated projections) and/or conditions in which the lower energy image would typically suffer from corrupting artifacts such as the presence of metals in the object. Both simulation and real data results are shown.

  15. Two-photon polymerization of cylinder microstructures by femtosecond Bessel beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Liang [Department of Precision Machinery and Precision Instrumentation, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V., 30419 Hannover (Germany); El-Tamer, Ayman; Hinze, Ulf; Chichkov, Boris N [Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V., 30419 Hannover (Germany); Li, Jiawen, E-mail: jwl@ustc.edu.cn; Hu, Yanlei; Huang, Wenhao; Chu, Jiaru [Department of Precision Machinery and Precision Instrumentation, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2014-07-28

    In this work, we present an approach to modulate femtosecond laser beams into Bessel beams with a spatial light modulator (SLM) for two-photon polymerization applications. Bessel beams with different parameters are generated and annular optical fields are produced at the focal plane of the objective. Uniform cylinder microstructures are fabricated by a single illumination during a few seconds without stage translation. By modulating the holograms encoded on the SLM, the diameters of the fabricated annular structures can be flexibly controlled in a wide range with no need of changing the optical elements and realignment of the optical path.

  16. Laser-driven particle and photon beams and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledingham, K W D; Galster, W

    2010-01-01

    Outstanding progress has been made in high-power laser technology in the last 10 years with laser powers reaching petawatt (PW) values. At present, there are 15 PW lasers built or being built around the world and plans are afoot for new, even higher power, lasers reaching values of exawatt (EW) or even zetawatt (ZW) powers. Petawatt lasers generate electric fields of 10 12 V m -1 with a large fraction of the total pulse energy being converted to relativistic electrons with energies reaching in excess of 1 GeV. In turn these electrons result in the generation of beams of protons, heavy ions, neutrons and high-energy photons. These laser-driven particle beams have encouraged many to think of carrying out experiments normally associated with conventional nuclear accelerators and reactors. To this end a number of introductory articles have been written under a trial name 'Laser Nuclear Physics' (Ledingham and Norreys 1999 Contemp. Phys. 40 367, Ledingham et al 2002 Europhys. News. 33 120, Ledingham et al 2003 Science 300 1107, Takabe et al 2001 J. Plasma Fusion Res. 77 1094). However, even greater strides have been made in the last 3 or 4 years in laser technology and it is timely to reassess the potential of laser-driven particle and photon beams. It must be acknowledged right from the outset that to date laser-driven particle beams have yet to compete favourably with conventional nuclear accelerator-generated beams in any way and so this is not a paper comparing laser and conventional accelerators. However, occasionally throughout the paper as a reality check, it will be mentioned what conventional nuclear accelerators can do.

  17. Laser-driven particle and photon beams and some applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledingham, K W D; Galster, W, E-mail: K.Ledingham@phys.strath.ac.u [SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15

    Outstanding progress has been made in high-power laser technology in the last 10 years with laser powers reaching petawatt (PW) values. At present, there are 15 PW lasers built or being built around the world and plans are afoot for new, even higher power, lasers reaching values of exawatt (EW) or even zetawatt (ZW) powers. Petawatt lasers generate electric fields of 10{sup 12} V m{sup -1} with a large fraction of the total pulse energy being converted to relativistic electrons with energies reaching in excess of 1 GeV. In turn these electrons result in the generation of beams of protons, heavy ions, neutrons and high-energy photons. These laser-driven particle beams have encouraged many to think of carrying out experiments normally associated with conventional nuclear accelerators and reactors. To this end a number of introductory articles have been written under a trial name 'Laser Nuclear Physics' (Ledingham and Norreys 1999 Contemp. Phys. 40 367, Ledingham et al 2002 Europhys. News. 33 120, Ledingham et al 2003 Science 300 1107, Takabe et al 2001 J. Plasma Fusion Res. 77 1094). However, even greater strides have been made in the last 3 or 4 years in laser technology and it is timely to reassess the potential of laser-driven particle and photon beams. It must be acknowledged right from the outset that to date laser-driven particle beams have yet to compete favourably with conventional nuclear accelerator-generated beams in any way and so this is not a paper comparing laser and conventional accelerators. However, occasionally throughout the paper as a reality check, it will be mentioned what conventional nuclear accelerators can do.

  18. Final-photon polarization in the scattering of photons by high-energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, J.; Choi, S.Y.; Ie, S.H.; Song, H.S.; Good, R.H. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    A general method for calculating the polarization of the outgoing photon beam in any reaction is presented. As an example the method is applied to the high-energy photon beam produced in Compton scattering of a laser beam by a high-energy electron beam. The Stokes parameters of the outgoing photon beam, relative to a unit vector normal to the photon momentum and including their dependence on the polarization of incident photon and electron beams, are obtained explicitly. It is expected that this method will be useful, both in photon production reactions and in the subsequent high-energy photon reactions

  19. Medium-Term Stability of the Photon Beam Energy of An Elekta CompactTM Linear Accelerator Based on Daily Measurements of Beam Quality Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Amin Mosleh-Shirazi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In this study, we aimed to assess the medium-term energy stability of a 6MV Elekta CompactTM linear accelerator. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first published article to evaluate this linear accelerator in terms of energy stability. As well as investigating the stability of the linear accelerator energy over a period of several weeks, the results will be useful for estimation of the required tolerance values for the beam quality factor (BQF of the PTW QUICKCHECK weblineTM (QCW daily checking device. Materials and Methods Over a 13 week period of routine clinical service, 52 daily readings of BQF were taken and then analyzed for a 10×10 cm2 field. Results No decreasing or increasing trend in BQF was observed over the study period. The mean BQF value was estimated at 5.4483 with a standard deviation (SD of 0.0459 (0.8%. The mean value was only 0.1% different from the baseline value. Conclusion The results of this medium-term stability study of the Elekta Compact linear accelerator energy showed that 96.2% of the observed BQF values were within ±1.3% of the baseline value. This can be considered to be within the recommended tolerance for linear accelerator photon beam energy. If an approach of applying ±3 SD is taken, the tolerance level for BQF may be suggested to be set at ±2.5%. However, further research is required to establish a relationship between BQF value and the actual changes in beam energy and penetrative quality.

  20. Corpuscular Model of Two-Beam Interference and Double-Slit Experiments with Single Photons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, Fengping; Yuan, Shengjun; De Raedt, Hans; Michielsen, Kristel; Miyashita, Seiji

    We introduce an event-based corpuscular simulation model that reproduces the wave mechanical results of single-photon double-slit and two-beam interference experiments and (of a one-to-one copy of an experimental realization) of a single-photon interference experiment with a Fresnel biprism. The

  1. Scattered hard X-ray and γ-ray generation from a chromatic electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, J. E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Welch, D. R.; Miller, C. L. [Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States)

    2015-11-14

    An array of photon diagnostics has been deployed on a high power relativistic electron beam diode. Electrons are extracted through a 17.8 cm diode from the surface discharge of a carbon fiber velvet cathode with a nominal diode voltage of 3.8 MV. <10% of the 100 ns electron pulse is composed of off energy electrons (1–3 MeV) accelerated during the rise and fall of the pulse that impact the stainless steel beam pipe and generate a Bremsstrahlung spectrum of 0.1–3 MeV photons with a total count of 10{sup 11}. The principal objective of these experiments is to quantify the electron beam dynamics and spatial dynamics of the hard X-ray and γ-ray flux generated in the diode region. A qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results are presented, including time and energy resolved electron beam propagation and scattered photon measurements with X-ray PIN diodes and a photomultiplier tube indicating a dose dependence on the diode voltage >V{sup 4} and detected photon counts of nearly 10{sup 6} at a radial distance of 1 m which corresponds to dose ∼40 μrad at 1 m.

  2. Monte Carlo Investigation of Photon Beam Characteristics and its Variation with Incident Electron Beam Parameters for Indigenous Medical Linear Accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Subhalaxmi; Dixit, P K; Selvam, T Palani; Yavalkar, Sanket S; Deshpande, D D

    2018-01-01

    A Monte Carlo model of a 6 MV medical linear accelerator (linac) unit built indigenously was developed using the BEAMnrc user code of the EGSnrc code system. The model was benchmarked against the measurements. Monte Carlo simulations were carried out for different incident electron beam parameters in the study. Simulation of indigenously developed linac unit has been carried out using the Monte Carlo based BEAMnrc user-code of the EGSnrc code system. Using the model, percentage depth dose (PDD), and lateral dose profiles were studied using the DOSXYZnrc user code. To identify appropriate electron parameters, three different distributions of electron beam intensity were investigated. For each case, the kinetic energy of the incident electron was varied from 6 to 6.5 MeV (0.1 MeV increment). The calculated dose data were compared against the measurements using the PTW, Germany make RFA dosimetric system (water tank MP3-M and 0.125 cm 3 ion chamber). The best fit of incident electron beam parameter was found for the combination of beam energy of 6.2 MeV and circular Gaussian distributed source in X and Y with FWHM of 1.0 mm. PDD and beam profiles (along both X and Y directions) were calculated for the field sizes from 5 cm × 5 cm to 25 cm × 25 cm. The dose difference between the calculated and measured PDD and profile values were under 1%, except for the penumbra region where the maximum deviation was found to be around 2%. A Monte Carlo model of indigenous linac (6 MV) has been developed and benchmarked against the measured data.

  3. Fundamental limits on beam stability at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, G. A.

    1998-01-01

    Orbit correction is now routinely performed at the few-micron level in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring. Three diagnostics are presently in use to measure and control both AC and DC orbit motions: broad-band turn-by-turn rf beam position monitors (BPMs), narrow-band switched heterodyne receivers, and photoemission-style x-ray beam position monitors. Each type of diagnostic has its own set of systematic error effects that place limits on the ultimate pointing stability of x-ray beams supplied to users at the APS. Limiting sources of beam motion at present are magnet power supply noise, girder vibration, and thermal timescale vacuum chamber and girder motion. This paper will investigate the present limitations on orbit correction, and will delve into the upgrades necessary to achieve true sub-micron beam stability

  4. SU-E-T-267: Construction and Evaluation of a Neutron Wall to Shield a 15 MV Linac in a Low-Energy Vault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speiser, M; Hager, F; Foster, R; Solberg, T

    2012-06-01

    To design and quantify the shielding efficacy of an inner Borated Polyethylene (BPE)wall for a 15 MV linac in a low energy vault. A Varian TrueBeam linac with a maximum photon energy of 15 MV was installed in asmaller, preexisting vault. This vault originally housed a low-energy machine and did not havesufficient maze length recommended for neutron attenuation. Effective dose rate calculationswere performed using the Modified Kersey's Method as detailed in NCRP Report No. 151 andfound to be unacceptably high. An initial survey following the machine installation confirmedthese calculations. Rather than restrict the linac beam energy to 10 MV, BPE was investigatedas a neutron moderating addition. An inner wall and door were planned and constructed using4'×8'×1″ thick 5% BPE sheets. The resulting door and wall had 2″ of BPE; conduits and ductwork were also redesigned and shielded. A survey was conducted following construction of thewall. The vault modification reduced the expected effective dose at the vault door from 36.23to 0.010 mSv/week. As specific guidelines for vault modification are lacking, this project quantitativelydemonstrates the potential use of BPE for vault modification. Such modifications may provide alow-cost shielding solution to allow for the use of high energy modes in smaller treatment vaults. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  5. New limits on hidden photons from past electron beam dumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreas, Sarah; Niebuhr, Carsten; Ringwald, Andreas

    2012-09-01

    Hidden sectors with light extra U(1) gauge bosons, so called hidden photons, have recently attracted some attention because they are a common feature of physics beyond the Standard Model like string theory and SUSY and additionally are phenomenologically of great interest regarding recent astrophysical observations. The hidden photon is already constrained by various laboratory experiments and presently searched for in running as well as upcoming experiments. We summarize the current status of limits on hidden photons from past electron beam dump experiments including two new limits from such experiments at KEK and Orsay that have so far not been considered. All our limits take into account the experimental acceptances obtained from Monte Carlo simulations.

  6. New limits on hidden photons from past electron beam dumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreas, Sarah; Niebuhr, Carsten; Ringwald, Andreas

    2012-09-15

    Hidden sectors with light extra U(1) gauge bosons, so called hidden photons, have recently attracted some attention because they are a common feature of physics beyond the Standard Model like string theory and SUSY and additionally are phenomenologically of great interest regarding recent astrophysical observations. The hidden photon is already constrained by various laboratory experiments and presently searched for in running as well as upcoming experiments. We summarize the current status of limits on hidden photons from past electron beam dump experiments including two new limits from such experiments at KEK and Orsay that have so far not been considered. All our limits take into account the experimental acceptances obtained from Monte Carlo simulations.

  7. Impact of thermoplastic mask on dosimetry of different radiotherapeutic beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Lixin; Zhang Li; Qian Jianyang; Huang Xiaoyan; Lu Jie; Huang Shaomin

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To determine the influence of auxiliary thermoplastic mask on dose distribution of photon or electron beams. Methods: Using the PTW Marcus 23343 type fixed-separation parallel-plate ionization chamber in a special phantom(PMMA), the change of photon dose buildup region was measured with rectification of Bruce empirical formula. Using 3-D water phantom, the central axis percentage depth doses (PDD) of electron beams were measured with verification of the parallel-plate ionization chamber at several given depths. Results: When 8 MV X-ray was delivered through the added facial mask, the buildup region doses were increased obviously with a 25% relative increment beneath near the surface. When 8, 12, 15 MeV electron beams and mask were used, all PDD curves moved to the surface. Conclusions: The impact of thermoplastic mask on the dose increase in the X-ray buildup region, and on the PDD decrease in the electron beam target region should be paid much more attention. And the dose distribution, with an added mask, will have to be re-evaluated in 3-D conformal radiotherapy

  8. Cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of Yb atoms with a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Minsoo; Yoon, Tai Hyun

    2013-01-01

    We present a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus for cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of the dipole-forbidden transition (6s 2 1 S 0 ↔ 6s7s 1 S 0 ) of Yb atoms. An ohmic-heating effusive oven is designed to have a reservoir volume of 1.6 cm 3 and a high degree of atomic beam collimation angle of 30 mrad. The new atomic beam apparatus allows us to detect the spontaneously cascaded two-photons from the 6s7s 1 S 0 state via the intercombination 6s6p 3 P 1 state with a high signal-to-noise ratio even at the temperature of 340 °C. This is made possible in our apparatus because of the enhanced atomic beam flux and superior detection solid angle.

  9. Compact high-efficiency vortex beam emitter based on a silicon photonics micro-ring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Shimao; Ding, Yunhong; Guan, Xiaowei

    2018-01-01

    Photonic integrated devices that emit vortex beam carrying orbital angular momentum are becoming key components for multiple applications. Here we propose and demonstrate a high-efficiency vortex beam emitter based on a silicon micro-ring resonator integrated with a metal mirror. Such a compact...

  10. Using of germanium detectors in nuclear experiments with photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapitonov, I.M.; Tutin, I.A.

    1995-01-01

    Full text: The study of atomic nuclei with real photons is very important source of the information about nuclear structure. In such experiments the basic electromagnetic interaction between the photon and the target nuclei is well known. Experiments with photon beams become especially valuable when outcoming particles are also photons. In these cases completely model-independent information on nuclear structure can be extracted. The use of semiconductor Ge-spectrometers with excellent resolution and large sensitive volumes for recording outcoming photons gives us such an additional important advantage as possibility to observe individual closely spaced levels of the final nuclei. In the report an experience of using Ge-detectors in two types of nuclear experiments is described. Both of them - nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) and nuclear photodisintegration - are carried out in beams of bremsstrahlung gamma radiation. The central element of the setup recording gamma quanta in these experiments is germanium detector. NRF is unique method for studying low-lying excited nuclear states. The spins of the states can be determined easily from the measured angular distributions of scattered photons. Model independent parity assignments in NRF can be achieved by measuring polarization observables. There are two experimental possibilities: the use of linearly polarized photons (off-axis bremsstrahlung) in the entrance channel and the measurement of the linear polarization of the scattered photons using Compton polarimeters. For both methods several germanium detectors (3-5) must be used simultaneously. Nowadays Compton polarimeter can also be done from single large Ge-crystal by segmenting the outer electrode. Advantages and drawbacks of the methods and background conditions are discussed and requirements to Ge-crystals are formulated. The importance of using a new generation of electron accelerators with continuous wave (cw) beams for NRF-measurements is stressed. The

  11. Beam Profile Measurement of 300 kV Ion Source Test Stand for 1 MV Electrostatic Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sae-Hoon; Kim, Yu-Seok; Kim, Dae-Il; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Cho, Yong-Sub

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, RF ion source, test stand of the ion source and its test results are presented. Beam profile was measured at the downstream from the accelerating tube and at the beam dump by using BPM and wire scanner. The RF ion source of the test stand is verified by measuring the total beam current with a faraday cup in the chamber. The KOMAC (KOrea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex) has been developing a 300 kV ion source test stand for a 1 MV electrostatic accelerator. An ion source and accelerating tube will be installed in a high pressure vessel. The ion source in a high pressure vessel requires high reliability. To confirm the stable operation of the ion source, a test stand was proposed and developed. The ion source will be tested at the test stand to verify its long-term operation conditions. The test stand consists of a 300 kV high voltage terminal, a battery for the ion source power, a 60 Hz inverter, a 200 MHz RF power, a 5 kV extraction power supply, a 300 kV accelerating tube, and a vacuum system. The beam profile monitor was installed at the downstream from the accelerating tube. Wire scanner and faraday-cup was installed at the end of the chamber

  12. Beam Profile Measurement of 300 kV Ion Source Test Stand for 1 MV Electrostatic Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sae-Hoon; Kim, Yu-Seok [Dongguk University, Gyeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae-Il; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Cho, Yong-Sub [Korea Multipurpose Accelerator Complex, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, RF ion source, test stand of the ion source and its test results are presented. Beam profile was measured at the downstream from the accelerating tube and at the beam dump by using BPM and wire scanner. The RF ion source of the test stand is verified by measuring the total beam current with a faraday cup in the chamber. The KOMAC (KOrea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex) has been developing a 300 kV ion source test stand for a 1 MV electrostatic accelerator. An ion source and accelerating tube will be installed in a high pressure vessel. The ion source in a high pressure vessel requires high reliability. To confirm the stable operation of the ion source, a test stand was proposed and developed. The ion source will be tested at the test stand to verify its long-term operation conditions. The test stand consists of a 300 kV high voltage terminal, a battery for the ion source power, a 60 Hz inverter, a 200 MHz RF power, a 5 kV extraction power supply, a 300 kV accelerating tube, and a vacuum system. The beam profile monitor was installed at the downstream from the accelerating tube. Wire scanner and faraday-cup was installed at the end of the chamber.

  13. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of the effect of the mean energy and FWHM of the initial electron fluence on the Bremsstrahlung photon spectra of linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juste, B.; Miró, R.; Verdú, G.; Macián, R.

    2012-01-01

    A calculation of the correct dose in radiation therapy requires an accurate description of the radiation source because uncertainties in characterization of the linac photon spectrum are propagated through the dose calculations. Unfortunately, detailed knowledge of the initial electron beam parameters is not readily available, and many researchers adjust the initial electron fluence values by trial-and-error methods. The main goal of this work was to develop a methodology to characterize the fluence of initial electrons before they hit the tungsten target of an Elekta Precise medical linear accelerator. To this end, we used a Monte Carlo technique to analyze the influence of the characteristics of the initial electron beam on the distribution of absorbed dose from a 6 MV linac photon beam in a water phantom. The technique is based on calculations with Software for Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis (SUSA) and Monte Carlo simulations with the MCNP5 transport code. The free parameters used in the SUSA calculations were the mean energy and full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) of the initial electron distribution. A total of 93 combinations of these parameters gave initial electron fluence configurations. The electron spectra thus obtained were used in a simulation of the electron transport through the target of the linear accelerator, which produced different photon (Bremsstrahlung) spectra. The simulated photon spectra were compared with the 6-MV photon spectrum provided by the linac manufacturer (Elekta). This comparison revealed how the mean energy and FWHM of the initial electron fluence affect the spectrum of the generated photons. This study has made it possible to fine-tune the examined electron beam parameters to obtain the resulted absorbed doses with acceptable accuracy (error <1%). - Highlights: ► Mean energy and radial spread are important parameters for simulating the incident electron beam in radiation therapy. ► Errors in determining the electron

  14. The results of radiotherapy for T1 glottic cancers. Influence of radiation beam energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Michinori; Joja, Ikuo; Takemoto, Mitsuhiro; Kuroda, Masahiro; Hiraki, Yoshio

    1999-01-01

    We analyzed the influence of various parameters on the results of radiotherapy for T1 glottic cancer by assessing the outcomes of 60 patients with this cancer who received definitive radiotherapy between 1985 and 1994. Seven patients were treated with a cobalt-60 unit, and the other 53 with a linear accelerator (26 patients at 3-MV, 10 at 6-MV, and 17 at 10-MV). Of the 17 patients treated at 10-MV, 4 also received part of their treatment with a cobalt-60 unit. The total radiation dose ranged from 56 Gy to 70 Gy (mean, 61 Gy). The total radiation dose of 51 patients (85%) was 60 Gy. The factors found to influence local control were the strength of the radiation beam energy and whether or not there was gross tumor invasion of the anterior commissure. The local control rate was 71% in the patients treated with a 10-MV linear accelerator, 56% in those treated with a 6-MV linear accelerator and, 97% in those treated with a cobalt-60 unit or a 3-MV linear accelerator (P=0.0173). The local control rate was 43% in the patients with gross anterior commissure invasion and 88% in those without (P=0.0075). We conclude that low energy photon beams are more suitable for the treatment of early glottic cancers, especially if the lesion grossly invades the anterior commissure. (author)

  15. Beam position monitor data acquisition for the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenkszus, F.R.; Kahana, E.; Votaw, A.J.; Decker, G.A.; Chung, Y.; Ciarlette, D.J.; Laird, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the Beam Position Monitor (BPM) data acquisition scheme for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring. The storage ring contains 360 beam position monitors distributed around its 1104-meter circumference. The beam position monitor data acquisition system is capable of making turn-by-turn measurements of all BPMs simultaneously. It is VXI-based with each VXI crate containing the electronics for 9 BPMS. The VXI Local Bus is used to provide sustained data transfer rates of up to 13 mega-transfers per second to a scanner module. The system provides single-bunch tracking, bunch-to-bunch measurements, fast digital-averaged positions, beam position history buffering, and synchronized multi-turn measurements. Data is accessible to the control system VME crates via an MXI bus. Dedicated high-speed ports are provided to supply position data to beam orbit feedback systems

  16. Correlated two-photon interference in a dual-beam Michelson interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiat, P.G.; Vareka, W.A.; Hong, C.K.; Nathel, H.; Chiao, R.Y.

    1990-01-01

    We report on an interference effect arising from a two-photon entangled state produced in a potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystal pumped by an ultraviolet argon-ion laser. Two conjugate beams of signal and idler photons were injected in a parallel configuration into a single Michelson interferometer, and detected separately by two photomultipliers, while the difference in its arm lengths was slowly scanned. The coincidence rate exhibited fringes with a visibility of nearly 50%, and a period given by half the ultraviolet (not the signal or idler) wavelength, while the singles rate exhibited no fringes

  17. Benchmarking of Touschek Beam Lifetime Calculations for the Advanced Photon Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, A.; Yang, B.

    2017-06-25

    Particle loss from Touschek scattering is one of the most significant issues faced by present and future synchrotron light source storage rings. For example, the predicted, Touschek-dominated beam lifetime for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) Upgrade lattice in 48-bunch, 200-mA timing mode is only ~ 2 h. In order to understand the reliability of the predicted lifetime, a series of measurements with various beam parameters was performed on the present APS storage ring. This paper first describes the entire process of beam lifetime measurement, then compares measured lifetime with the calculated one by applying the measured beam parameters. The results show very good agreement.

  18. Hidden photons in beam dump experiments and in connection with dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreas, Sarah

    2012-12-15

    Hidden sectors with light extra U(1) gauge bosons, so-called hidden photons, recently received much interest as natural feature of beyond standard model scenarios like string theory and SUSY and because of their possible connection to dark matter. This paper presents limits on hidden photons from past electron beam dump experiments including two new limits from experiments at KEK and Orsay. Additionally, various hidden sector models containing both a hidden photon and a dark matter candidate are discussed with respect to their viability and potential signatures in direct detection.

  19. Hidden photons in beam dump experiments and in connection with dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreas, Sarah

    2012-12-01

    Hidden sectors with light extra U(1) gauge bosons, so-called hidden photons, recently received much interest as natural feature of beyond standard model scenarios like string theory and SUSY and because of their possible connection to dark matter. This paper presents limits on hidden photons from past electron beam dump experiments including two new limits from experiments at KEK and Orsay. Additionally, various hidden sector models containing both a hidden photon and a dark matter candidate are discussed with respect to their viability and potential signatures in direct detection.

  20. A photon source model based on particle transport in a parameterized accelerator structure for Monte Carlo dose calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizawa, Yoshiki; Dobashi, Suguru; Kadoya, Noriyuki; Ito, Kengo; Chiba, Takahito; Takayama, Yoshiki; Sato, Kiyokazu; Takeda, Ken

    2018-05-17

    An accurate source model of a medical linear accelerator is essential for Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations. This study aims to propose an analytical photon source model based on particle transport in parameterized accelerator structures, focusing on a more realistic determination of linac photon spectra compared to existing approaches. We designed the primary and secondary photon sources based on the photons attenuated and scattered by a parameterized flattening filter. The primary photons were derived by attenuating bremsstrahlung photons based on the path length in the filter. Conversely, the secondary photons were derived from the decrement of the primary photons in the attenuation process. This design facilitates these sources to share the free parameters of the filter shape and be related to each other through the photon interaction in the filter. We introduced two other parameters of the primary photon source to describe the particle fluence in penumbral regions. All the parameters are optimized based on calculated dose curves in water using the pencil-beam-based algorithm. To verify the modeling accuracy, we compared the proposed model with the phase space data (PSD) of the Varian TrueBeam 6 and 15 MV accelerators in terms of the beam characteristics and the dose distributions. The EGS5 Monte Carlo code was used to calculate the dose distributions associated with the optimized model and reference PSD in a homogeneous water phantom and a heterogeneous lung phantom. We calculated the percentage of points passing 1D and 2D gamma analysis with 1%/1 mm criteria for the dose curves and lateral dose distributions, respectively. The optimized model accurately reproduced the spectral curves of the reference PSD both on- and off-axis. The depth dose and lateral dose profiles of the optimized model also showed good agreement with those of the reference PSD. The passing rates of the 1D gamma analysis with 1%/1 mm criteria between the model and PSD were 100% for 4

  1. Experimental measurement of radiological penumbra associated with intermediate energy x-rays (1 MV) and small radiosurgery field sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, Brian M.; Beachey, David J.; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2007-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is used to treat intracranial lesions with a high degree of accuracy. At the present time, x-ray energies at or above Co-60 gamma rays are used. Previous Monte Carlo simulations have demonstrated that intermediate energy x-ray photons or IEPs (defined to be photons in the energy range of 0.2-1.2 MeV), combined with small field sizes, produce a reduced radiological penumbra leading to a sharper dose gradient, improved dose homogeneity and sparing of critical anatomy adjacent to the target volume. This hypothesis is based on the fact that, for small x-ray fields, a dose outside the treatment volume is dictated mainly by the range of electrons set into motion by x-ray photons. The purpose of this work is: (1) to produce intermediate energy x rays using a detuned medical linear accelerator (2) to characterize the energy of this beam (3) to measure the radiological penumbra for IEPs and small fields to compare with that produced by 6 MV x rays or Co-60, and (4) to compare these experimental measurements with Monte Carlo computer simulations. The maximum photon energy of our IEP x-ray spectrum was measured to be 1.2 MeV. Gafchromic EBT films (ISP Technologies, Wayne, NJ) were irradiated and read using a novel digital microscopy imaging system with high spatial resolution. Under identical irradiation conditions the measured radiological penumbra widths (80%-20% distance), for field sizes ranging from 0.3x0.3 to 4.0x4.0 cm 2 , varied from 0.3-0.77 mm (1.2 MV) and from 1.1-2.1 mm (6 MV). Even more dramatic were the differences found when comparing the 90%-10% or the 95%-5% widths, which are in fact more significant in radiotherapy. Monte Carlo simulations agreed well with the experimental findings. The reduction in radiological penumbra could be substantial for specific clinical situations such as in the treatment of an ocular melanoma abutting the macula or for the treatment of functional disorders such as trigeminal neuralgia (a nonlethal

  2. Development of the 2-MV Injector for HIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bieniosek, F.M. E-mail: fmbieniosek@lbl.gov; Kwan, J.W.; Henestroza, E.; Kim, C

    2001-05-21

    The 2-MV Injector consists of a 17-cm-diameter surface ionization source, an extraction diode, and an electrostatic quadrupole (ESQ) accelerator, with maximum current of 0.8 A of potassium beam at 2 MeV. Previous performance of the Injector produced a beam with adequate current and emittance but with a hollow profile at the end of the ESQ section. We have examined the profile of the beam as it leaves the diode. The measured nonuniform beam density distribution qualitatively agrees with EGUN simulation. Implications for emittance growth in the post acceleration and transport phase will be investigated.

  3. Development of the 2-MV Injector for HIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniosek, F. M.; Kwan, J. W.; Henestroza, E.; Kim, C.

    2001-05-01

    The 2-MV Injector consists of a 17-cm-diameter surface ionization source, an extraction diode, and an electrostatic quadrupole (ESQ) accelerator, with maximum current of 0.8 A of potassium beam at 2 MeV. Previous performance of the Injector produced a beam with adequate current and emittance but with a hollow profile at the end of the ESQ section. We have examined the profile of the beam as it leaves the diode. The measured nonuniform beam density distribution qualitatively agrees with EGUN simulation. Implications for emittance growth in the post acceleration and transport phase will be investigated.

  4. Development of the 2-MV Injector for HIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Kwan, J.W.; Henestroza, E.; Kim, C.

    2001-01-01

    The 2-MV Injector consists of a 17-cm-diameter surface ionization source, an extraction diode, and an electrostatic quadrupole (ESQ) accelerator, with maximum current of 0.8 A of potassium beam at 2 MeV. Previous performance of the Injector produced a beam with adequate current and emittance but with a hollow profile at the end of the ESQ section. We have examined the profile of the beam as it leaves the diode. The measured nonuniform beam density distribution qualitatively agrees with EGUN simulation. Implications for emittance growth in the post acceleration and transport phase will be investigated

  5. Development of the 2-MV injector for HIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Kwan, J.W.; Henestroza, E.; Kim, C.

    2000-01-01

    The 2-MV Injector consists of a 17-cm-diameter surface ionization source, an extraction diode, and an electrostatic quadrupole (ESQ) accelerator, with maximum current of 0.8 A of potassium beam at 2 MeV. Previous performance of the Injector produced a beam with adequate current and emittance but with a hollow profile at the end of the ESQ section. We have examined the profile of the beam as it leaves the diode. The measured nonuniform beam density distribution qualitatively agrees with EGUN simulation. Implications for emittance growth in the post acceleration and transport phase will be investigated

  6. Development and characterization of a three-dimensional radiochromic film stack dosimeter for megavoltage photon beam dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaw, Travis J; Micka, John A; DeWerd, Larry A

    2014-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) dosimeters are particularly useful for verifying the commissioning of treatment planning and delivery systems, especially with the ever-increasing implementation of complex and conformal radiotherapy techniques such as volumetric modulated arc therapy. However, currently available 3D dosimeters require extensive experience to prepare and analyze, and are subject to large measurement uncertainties. This work aims to provide a more readily implementable 3D dosimeter with the development and characterization of a radiochromic film stack dosimeter for megavoltage photon