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Sample records for mutator protein mu2

  1. Recognition of double strand breaks by a mutator protein (MU2 in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghuvar Dronamraju

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Telomere capture, a rare event that stabilizes chromosome breaks, is associated with certain genetic abnormalities in humans. Studies pertaining to the generation, maintenance, and biological effects of telomere formation are limited in metazoans. A mutation, mu2(a, in Drosophila melanogaster decreases the rate of repair of double strand DNA breaks in oocytes, thus leading to chromosomes that have lost a natural telomere and gained a new telomere. Amino acid sequence, domain architecture, and protein interactions suggest that MU2 is an ortholog of human MDC1. The MU2 protein is a component of meiotic recombination foci and localizes to repair foci in S2 cells after irradiation in a manner similar to that of phosphorylated histone variant H2Av. Domain searches indicated that the protein contains an N-terminal FHA domain and a C-terminal tandem BRCT domain. Peptide pull-down studies showed that the BRCT domain interacts with phosphorylated H2Av, while the FHA domain interacts with the complex of MRE11, RAD50, and NBS. A frameshift mutation that eliminates the MU2 BRCT domain decreases the number and size of meiotic phospho-H2Av foci. MU2 is also required for the intra-S checkpoint in eye-antennal imaginal discs. MU2 participates at an early stage in the recognition of DNA damage at a step that is prerequisite for both DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control. We propose a model suggesting that neotelomeres may arise when radiation-induced chromosome breaks fail to be repaired, fail to arrest progression through meiosis, and are deposited in the zygote, where cell cycle control is absent and rapid rounds of replication and telomere formation ensue.

  2. Mu2e Magnetic Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buehler, Marc [Fermilab; Tartaglia, Michael [Fermilab; Tompkins, John [Fermilab; Orozco, Charles [Illinois U., Urbana (main)

    2014-07-01

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab is designed to explore charged lepton flavor violation by searching for muon-to-electron conversion. The magnetic field generated by a system of solenoids is crucial for Mu2e and requires accurate characterization to detect any flaws and to produce a detailed field map. Stringent physics goals are driving magnetic field specifications for the Mu2e solenoids. A field mapper is being designed, which will produce detailed magnetic field maps. The uniform field region of the spectrometer volume requires the highest level of precision (1 Gauss per 1 Tesla). During commissioning, multiple magnetic field maps will be generated to verify proper alignment of all magnet coils, and to create the final magnetic field map. In order to design and build a precise field mapping system consisting of Hall and NRM probes, tolerances and precision for such a system need to be evaluated. In this paper we present a design for the Mu2e field mapping hardware, and discuss results from OPERA-3D simulations to specify parameters for Hall and NMR probes. We also present a fitting procedure for the analytical treatment of our expected magnetic measurements.

  3. The Mu2e Experiment at Fermilab

    CERN Document Server

    Morescalchi, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The Mu2e Experiment at Fermilab will search for the coherent, neutrinoless conversion of muons into electrons in the field of an aluminium nucleus with an unprecedented sensitivity. Such a charged lepton flavor-violating reaction probes new physics at a scale inaccessible with direct searches at either present or planned high energy colliders. Moreover, the Mu2e experiment both complements and extends the current search for the {\\mu} $\\to$ e{\\gamma} decay at MEG and searches for new physics at the LHC. We will present the physics motivation for Mu2e, the experimental setup and the current status of the experiment.

  4. Mu2e Technical Design Report

    CERN Document Server

    Bartoszek, L; Miller, J P; Mott, J; Palladino, A; Quirk, J; Roberts, B L; Crnkovic, J; Polychronakos, V; Tishchenko, V; Yamin, P; Cheng, C -h; Echenard, B; Flood, K; Hitlin, D G; Kim, J H; Miyashita, T S; Porter, F C; Röhrken, M; Trevor, J; Zhu, R -Y; Heckmaier, E; Kang, T I; Lim, G; Molzon, W; You, Z; Artikov, A M; Budagov, J A; Davydov, Yu I; Glagolev, V V; Simonenko, A V; Usubov, Z U; Oh, S H; Wang, C; Ambrosio, G; Andreev, N; Arnold, D; Ball, M; Bernstein, R H; Bianchi, A; Biery, K; Bossert, R; Bowden, M; Brandt, J; Brown, G; Brown, H; Buehler, M; Campbell, M; Cheban, S; Chen, M; Coghill, J; Coleman, R; Crowley, C; Deshpande, A; Deuerling, G; Dey, J; Dhanaraj, N; Dinnon, M; Dixon, S; Drendel, B; Eddy, N; Evans, R; Evbota, D; Fagan, J; Feher, S; Fellenz, B; Friedsam, H; Gallo, G; Gaponenko, A; Gardner, M; Gaugel, S; Genser, K; Ginther, G; Glass, H; Glenzinski, D; Hahn, D; Hansen, S; Hartsell, B; Hays, S; Hocker, J A; Huedem, E; Huffman, D; Ibrahim, A; Johnstone, C; Kashikhin, V; Kashikhin, V V; Kasper, P; Kiper, T; Knapp, D; Knoepfel, K; Kokoska, L; Kozlovsky, M; Krafczyk, G; Kramp, M; Krave, S; Krempetz, K; Kutschke, R K; Kwarciany, R; Lackowski, T; Lamm, M J; Larwill, M; Leavell, F; Leeb, D; Leveling, A; Lincoln, D; Logashenko, V; Lombardo, V; Lopes, M L; Makulski, A; Martinez, A; McArthur, D; McConologue, F; Michelotti, L; Mokhov, N; Morgan, J; Mukherjee, A; Murat, P; Nagaslaev, V; Neuffer, D V; Nicol, T; Niehoff, J; Nogiec, J; Olson, M; Orris, D; Ostojic, R; Page, T; Park, C; Peterson, T; Pilipenko, R; Pla-Dalmau, A; Poloubotko, V; Popovic, M; Prebys, E; Prieto, P; Pronskikh, V; Pushka, D; Rabehl, R; Ray, R E; Rechenmacher, R; Rivera, R; Robotham, W; Rubinov, P; Rusu, V L; Scarpine, V; Schappert, W; Schoo, D; Stefanik, A; Still, D; Tang, Z; Tanovic, N; Tartaglia, M; Tassotto, G; Tinsley, D; Tschirhart, R S; Vogel, G; Wagner, R; Wands, R; Wang, M; Werkema, S; White, H B; Whitmore, J; Wielgos, R; Woods, R; Worel, C; Zifko, R; Ciambrone, P; Colao, F; Cordelli, M; Corradi, G; Dane, E; Giovannella, S; Happacher, F; Luca, A; Miscetti, S; Ponzio, B; Pileggi, G; Saputi, A; Sarra, I; Soleti, R S; Stomaci, V; Martini, M; Fabbricatore, P; Farinon, S; Musenich, R; Alexander, D; Daniel, A; Empl, A; Hungerford, E V; Lau, K; Gollin, G D; Huang, C; Roderick, D; Trundy, B; Brown, D Na; Ding, D; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lee, M J; Cascella, M; Grancagnolo, F; Ignatov, F; Innocente, A; L'Erario, A; Miccoli, A; Maffezzoli, A; Mazzotta, P; Onorato, G; Piacentino, G M; Rella, S; Rossetti, F; Spedicato, M; Tassielli, G; Taurino, A; Zavarise, G; Hooper, R; Brown, D No; Djilkibaev, R; Matushko, V; Ankenbrandt, C; Boi, S; Dychkant, A; Hedin, D; Hodge, Z; Khalatian, V; Majewski, R; Martin, L; Okafor, U; Pohlman, N; Riddel, R S; Shellito, A; de Gouvea, A L; Cervelli, F; Carosi, R; Di Falco, S; Donati, S; Lomtadze, T; Pezzullo, G; Ristori, L; Spinella, F; Jones, M; Corcoran, M D; Orduna, J; Rivera, D; Bennett, R; Caretta, O; Davenne, T; Densham, C; Loveridge, P; Odell, J; Bomgardner, R; Dukes, E C; Ehrlich, R; Frank, M; Goadhouse, S; Ho, E; Ma, H; Oksuzian, Y; Purvis, J; Wu, Y; Hertzog, D W; Kammel, P; Lynch, K R; Popp, J L

    2015-01-01

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab will search for charged lepton flavor violation via the coherent conversion process mu- N --> e- N with a sensitivity approximately four orders of magnitude better than the current world's best limits for this process. The experiment's sensitivity offers discovery potential over a wide array of new physics models and probes mass scales well beyond the reach of the LHC. We describe herein the preliminary design of the proposed Mu2e experiment. This document was created in partial fulfillment of the requirements necessary to obtain DOE CD-2 approval.

  5. Mu2e Technical Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartoszek, L.; et al.

    2014-10-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and the Mu2e Collaboration, composed of about 155 scientists and engineers from 28 universities and laboratories around the world, have collaborated to create this technical design for a new facility to study charged lepton flavor violation using the existing Department of Energy investment in the Fermilab accelerator complex. Mu2e proposes to measure the ratio of the rate of the neutrinoless, coherent conversion of muons into electrons in the field of a nucleus, relative to the rate of ordinary muon capture on the nucleus. The conversion process is an example of charged lepton flavor violation (CLFV), a process that has never been observed experimentally. The significant motivation behind the search for muon-to-electron conversion is discussed in Chapter 3.

  6. The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab

    CERN Document Server

    Donghia, R

    2016-01-01

    The Mu2e experiment searches for the neutrino-less muon to electron conversion in the field of a nucleus, which is a charged lepton flavor violating process. The goal of the experiment is to reach a single event sensitivity of 2.8 x 10^{-17}, setting an upper limit on the muon conversion rate at 6.7 x 10^{-17}. This corresponds to a four order of magnitude improvement with respect to the existing limits.

  7. Predicting Resistance Mutations Using Protein Design Algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, K.; Georgiev, I; Donald, B; Anderson, A

    2010-01-01

    Drug resistance resulting from mutations to the target is an unfortunate common phenomenon that limits the lifetime of many of the most successful drugs. In contrast to the investigation of mutations after clinical exposure, it would be powerful to be able to incorporate strategies early in the development process to predict and overcome the effects of possible resistance mutations. Here we present a unique prospective application of an ensemble-based protein design algorithm, K*, to predict potential resistance mutations in dihydrofolate reductase from Staphylococcus aureus using positive design to maintain catalytic function and negative design to interfere with binding of a lead inhibitor. Enzyme inhibition assays show that three of the four highly-ranked predicted mutants are active yet display lower affinity (18-, 9-, and 13-fold) for the inhibitor. A crystal structure of the top-ranked mutant enzyme validates the predicted conformations of the mutated residues and the structural basis of the loss of potency. The use of protein design algorithms to predict resistance mutations could be incorporated in a lead design strategy against any target that is susceptible to mutational resistance.

  8. Effect of Mutations on HP Lattice Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Guangjie; Vogel, Thomas; Landau, David; Li, Ying; Wüst, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Using Wang-Landau sampling with approriate trial moves[2], we investigate the effect of different types of mutations on lattice proteins in the HP model. While exact studies have been carried out for short HP proteins[3], the systems we investigate are of much larger size and hence not accessible for exact enumerations. Based on the estimated density of states, we systematically analyse the changes in structure and degeneracy of ground states of particular proteins and measure thermodynamic quantities like the stability of ground states and the specific heat, for example. Both, neutral mutations, which do not change the structure and stability of ground states, as well as critical mutations, which do change the thermodynamic behavior qualitatively, have been observed. Research supported by NSF

  9. Reference Design of the Mu2e Detector Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Feher, S; Brandt,, J; Cheban, S; Coleman, R; Dhanaraj, N; Fang, I; Lamm, M; Lombardo, V; Lopes, M; Miller, J; Ostojic, R ,; Orris, D; Page, T; Peterson, T; Tang, Z; Wands, R

    2014-01-01

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab has been approved by the Department of Energy to proceed developing the preliminary design. Integral to the success of Mu2e is the superconducting solenoid system. One of the three major solenoids is the Detector Solenoid that houses the stopping target and the detectors. The goal of the Detector Solenoid team is to produce detailed design specifications that are sufficient for vendors to produce the final design drawings, tooling and fabrication procedures and proceed to production. In this paper we summarize the Reference Design of the Detector Solenoid.

  10. Radiation Studies for the Mu2e Experiment: a Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronskikh, V. S.

    2013-06-01

    The Mu2e experiment being designed at Fermilab will be searching for a rare event — conversion of muon into electron in the field of a nucleus without emission of neutrinos — observation of which would provide unambiguous evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model, making use of an 8 GeV 8 kW proton beam. As an experiment to be performed at the Intensity Frontier, taking advantage of high-intensity proton beams, the Mu2e experimental setup will be residing in a harsh radiation environment created by secondary particle fluxes. Radiation quantities in different parts of the Mu2e apparatus, such as neutron flux, peak power density, displacements per atom (DPA), absorbed dose, dynamic heat load simulated using the MARS15 code are reviewed in this work. Radiation levels and requirements for Heat and Radiation Shield (HRS), Transport Solenoid (TS), residual dose and decay heat from the Mu2e target, beam dump design, rates in Cosmic Ray Veto (CRV) counters as well as stopping target monitor (STM) are considered. Airflow, surface and ground water activation are estimated. Recent developments in the MARS15 DPA model applied in this work are described, their consequences are discussed.

  11. Stability Issues of the Mu2e Proton Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    Stability issues of the mu2e proton beam are discussed. These include space-charge distortion of bunch shape, microwave instabilities, mode-coupling instabilities, head-tail instabilities, as well as electron-cloud effects. We have studied several beam stability issues of the proton beam heading to the target for the mu2e experiment. We find bunch-shape distortions driven by the space charge force is reasonably small, and longitudinal microwave instability will unlikely to occur. Electron-cloud buildup, with density up to {rho}{sub e} {approx} 2 x 10{sup 12} m{sup -3} in the Accumulator, can probably drive head-tail instabilities. However, these, together with the instabilities driven by the resistive-wall impedance can be avoided by restricting the chromaticity to larger than {approx} 0.2. TMCI will not occur even when the electron-cloud wake is included.

  12. Research and Development for the Mu2e Extinction Monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mott, Casey Benjamin [Northern Illinois U.

    2016-01-01

    Mu2e is a planned experiment to search for flavor-violating conversion from a muon to an electron. The experiment will use a pulsed 8 GeV proton beam to produce muons which will then stop in an aluminum target. Mu2e will search for the $\\mu^- + Al \\rightarrow e^- + Al$ process. For Mu2e, an extinction rate of 10$^{-10}$ is required to reduce the backgrounds to an acceptable level. Extinction is the ratio of the amount of protons striking the production target between beam pulses to the number striking it during the beam pulse. One of the backgrounds, off-target interactions, was simulated using G4beamline and Fermilab's Grid setup to confirm that an extinction rate of 10$^{-10}$ is possible. The extinction level will be measured by the extinction monitor which will include scintillation counters read out by photomultiplier tubes. In order to build a beam time profile, low fake responses (after pulses) are needed in the photomultiplier tubes. This thesis determines the best combination of resistors, voltage, and other components that provide the lowest after pulse rate.

  13. Research and development for the Mu2E extinction monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, Casey B.

    Mu2e is a planned experiment to search for flavor violating conversion from a muon to an electron. The experiment will use a pulsed 8 GeV proton beam to produce muons which will then stop in an aluminum target. Mu2e will search for the mu-- + Al → e-- + Al process. For Mu2e, an extinction rate of 10--10 is required to reduce the backgrounds to an acceptable level. Extinction is the ratio of the amount of protons striking the production target between beam pulses to the number striking it during the beam pulse. One of the backgrounds, off-target interactions, was simulated using G4beamline and Fermilab's Grid setup to confirm that an extinction rate of 10--10 is possible. The extinction level will be measured by the extinction monitor which will include scintillation counters read out by photomultiplier tubes. In order to build a beam time profile, low fake responses (after pulses) are needed in the photomultiplier tubes. This thesis determines the best combination of resistors, voltage, and other components that provide the lowest after pulse rate.

  14. Target Station Design for the Mu2e Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pronskikh, Vitaly [Fermilab; Ambrosio, Giorgio [Fermilab; Campbell, Michael [Fermilab; Coleman, Richard [Fermilab; Ginther, George [Fermilab; Kashikhin, Vadim [Fermilab; Krempetz, Kurt [Fermilab; Lamm, Michael [Fermilab; Lee, Ang [Fermilab; Leveling, Anthony [Fermilab; Mokhov, Nikolai [Fermilab; Nagaslaev, Vladimir [Fermilab; Stefanik, Andrew [Fermilab; Striganov, Sergei [Fermilab; Werkema, Steven [Fermilab; Bartoszek, Larry [Technicare; Densham, Chris [Rutherford; Loveridge, Peter [Rutherford; Lynch, Kevin [BMCC, New York; Popp, James [BMCC, New York

    2014-07-01

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab is devoted to search for the conversion of a negative muon into an electron in the field of a nucleus without emission of neutrinos. One of the main parts of the Mu2e experimental setup is its Target Station in which negative pions are generated in interactions of the 8-GeV primary proton beam with a tungsten target. A large-aperture 5-T superconducting production solenoid (PS) enhances pion collection, and an S-shaped transport solenoid (TS) delivers muons and pions to the Mu2e detector. The heat and radiation shield (HRS) protects the PS and the first TS coils. A beam dump absorbs the spent beam. In order for the PS superconducting magnet to operate reliably the sophisticated HRS was designed and optimized for performance and cost. The beam dump was designed to absorb the spent beam and maintaining its temperature and air activation in the hall at the allowable level. Comprehensive MARS15 simulations have been carried out to optimize all the parts while maximizing muon yield. Results of simulations of critical radiation quantities and their implications on the overall Target Station design and integration will be reported.

  15. The layered compound poly[mu2-4,4'-bipyridyl-di-mu2-chlorido-mercury(II)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yi-Ming; Wu, Ji-Huai

    2007-05-01

    The title compound, [HgCl2(C(10)H(8)N(2))]n, features two-dimensional [HgCl2(4,4'-bipy)]n neutral networks (4,4'-bipy is 4,4'-bipyridine), based on an octahedral Hg atom coordinated by four mu2-Cl atoms and two mu2-4,4'-bipy ligands in trans positions, yielding a HgCl(4)N(2) octahedron. The structure has mmm symmetry about the Hg atoms, with most of the atoms on at least one mirror plane, but the unsubstituted C atoms of the 4,4'-bipy rings are disordered across a mirror plane. Photoluminescent investigations reveal that the title compound displays a strong emission in the green region, which probably originates from a ligand-to-ligand charge-transfer transition.

  16. MutationAligner: a resource of recurrent mutation hotspots in protein domains in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Nicholas Paul; Reznik, Ed; Gao, Jianjiong; Sumer, Selcuk Onur; Schultz, Nikolaus; Sander, Chris; Miller, Martin L

    2016-01-04

    The MutationAligner web resource, available at http://www.mutationaligner.org, enables discovery and exploration of somatic mutation hotspots identified in protein domains in currently (mid-2015) more than 5000 cancer patient samples across 22 different tumor types. Using multiple sequence alignments of protein domains in the human genome, we extend the principle of recurrence analysis by aggregating mutations in homologous positions across sets of paralogous genes. Protein domain analysis enhances the statistical power to detect cancer-relevant mutations and links mutations to the specific biological functions encoded in domains. We illustrate how the MutationAligner database and interactive web tool can be used to explore, visualize and analyze mutation hotspots in protein domains across genes and tumor types. We believe that MutationAligner will be an important resource for the cancer research community by providing detailed clues for the functional importance of particular mutations, as well as for the design of functional genomics experiments and for decision support in precision medicine. MutationAligner is slated to be periodically updated to incorporate additional analyses and new data from cancer genomics projects. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. The calorimeter of the Mu2e experiment at Fermilab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanov, N.; Baranov, V.; Budagov, J.; Cervelli, F.; Colao, F.; Cordelli, M.; Corradi, G.; Dané, E.; Davydov, Y. I.; Di Falco, S.; Diociaiuti, E.; Donati, S.; Donghia, R.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K.; Giovannella, S.; Glagolev, V.; Grancagnolo, F.; Happacher, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Martini, M.; Miscetti, S.; Miyashita, T.; Morescalchi, L.; Murat, P.; Pezzullo, G.; Porter, F.; Raffaelli, F.; Radicioni, T.; Ricci, M.; Saputi, A.; Sarra, I.; Spinella, F.; Tassielli, G.; Tereshchenko, V.; Usubov, Z.; Zhu, R. Y.

    2017-01-01

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab looks for Charged Lepton Flavor Violation (CLFV) improving by 4 orders of magnitude the current experimental sensitivity for the muon to electron conversion in a muonic atom. A positive signal could not be explained in the framework of the current Standard Model of particle interactions and therefore would be a clear indication of new physics. In 3 years of data taking, Mu2e is expected to observe less than one background event mimicking the electron coming from muon conversion. Achieving such a level of background suppression requires a deep knowledge of the experimental apparatus: a straw tube tracker, measuring the electron momentum and time, a cosmic ray veto system rejecting most of cosmic ray background and a pure CsI crystal calorimeter, that will measure time of flight, energy and impact position of the converted electron. The calorimeter has to operate in a harsh radiation environment, in a 10‑4 Torr vacuum and inside a 1 T magnetic field. The results of the first qualification tests of the calorimeter components are reported together with the energy and time performances expected from the simulation and measured in beam tests of a small scale prototype.

  18. Mu2e production solenoid cryostat conceptual design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicol, T.H.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Page, T.M.; Peterson, T.J.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-01

    Mu2e is a muon-to-electron conversion experiment being designed by an international collaboration of more than 65 scientists and engineers from more than 20 research institutions for installation at Fermilab. The experiment is comprised of three large superconducting solenoid magnet systems, production solenoid (PS), transport solenoid (TS) and detector solenoid (DS). A 25 kW, 8 GeV proton beam strikes a target located in the PS creating muons from the decay of secondary particles. These muons are then focused in the PS and the resultant muon beam is transported through the TS towards the DS. The production solenoid presents a unique set of design challenges as the result of high radiation doses, stringent magnetic field requirements, and large structural forces. This paper describes the conceptual design of the PS cryostat and will include discussions of the vacuum vessel, thermal shield, multi-layer insulation, cooling system, cryogenic piping, and suspension system.

  19. Beam Extinction Monitoring in the Mu2e Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prebys, Eric [Fermilab; Bartoszek, Larry [Technicare; Gaponenko, Andrei [Fermilab; Kasper, Peter [Fermilab

    2015-06-01

    The Mu2e Experiment at Fermilab will search for the conversion of a muon to an electron in the field of an atomic nucleus with unprecedented sensitivity. The experiment requires a beam consisting of proton bunches approximately 200ns FW long, separated by 1.7 microseconds, with no out-of-time protons at the 10⁻¹⁰ fractional level. The verification of this level of extinction is very challenging. The proposed technique uses a special purpose spectrometer which will observe particles scattered from the production target of the experiment. The acceptance will be limited such that there will be no saturation effects from the in-time beam. The precise level and profile of the out-of-time beam can then be built up statistically, by integrating over many bunches.

  20. Prediction of disease-related mutations affecting protein localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurila Kirsti

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic cells contain numerous compartments, which have different protein constituents. Proteins are typically directed to compartments by short peptide sequences that act as targeting signals. Translocation to the proper compartment allows a protein to form the necessary interactions with its partners and take part in biological networks such as signalling and metabolic pathways. If a protein is not transported to the correct intracellular compartment either the reaction performed or information carried by the protein does not reach the proper site, causing either inactivation of central reactions or misregulation of signalling cascades, or the mislocalized active protein has harmful effects by acting in the wrong place. Results Numerous methods have been developed to predict protein subcellular localization with quite high accuracy. We applied bioinformatics methods to investigate the effects of known disease-related mutations on protein targeting and localization by analyzing over 22,000 missense mutations in more than 1,500 proteins with two complementary prediction approaches. Several hundred putative localization affecting mutations were identified and investigated statistically. Conclusion Although alterations to localization signals are rare, these effects should be taken into account when analyzing the consequences of disease-related mutations.

  1. Design and status of the Mu2e electromagnetic calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanov, N.; Baranov, V.; Budagov, J.; Carosi, R.; Cervelli, F.; Colao, F.; Cordelli, M.; Corradi, G.; Dané, E.; Davydov, Yu. I.; Di Falco, S.; Donati, S.; Donghia, R.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K.; Giovannella, S.; Glagolev, V.; Grancagnolo, F.; Happacher, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Martini, M.; Miscetti, S.; Miyashita, T.; Morescalchi, L.; Murat, P.; Pasciuto, D.; Pezzullo, G.; Porter, F.; Saputi, A.; Sarra, I.; Soleti, S. R.; Spinella, F.; Tassielli, G.; Tereshchenko, V.; Usubov, Z.; Zhu, R. Y.

    2016-07-01

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab aims at measuring the neutrinoless conversion of a negative muon into an electron and reach a single event sensitivity of 2.5 ×10-17 after three years of data taking. The monoenergetic electron produced in the final state, is detected by a high precision tracker and a crystal calorimeter, all embedded in a large superconducting solenoid (SD) surrounded by a cosmic ray veto system. The calorimeter is complementary to the tracker, allowing an independent trigger and powerful particle identification, while seeding the track reconstruction and contributing to remove background tracks mimicking the signal. In order to match these requirements, the calorimeter should have an energy resolution of O(5)% and a time resolution better than 500 ps at 100 MeV. The baseline solution is a calorimeter composed of two disks of BaF2 crystals read by UV extended, solar blind, Avalanche Photodiode (APDs), which are under development from a JPL, Caltech, RMD consortium. In this paper, the calorimeter design, the R&D studies carried out so far and the status of engineering are described. A backup alternative setup consisting of a pure CsI crystal matrix read by UV extended Hamamatsu MPPC's is also presented.

  2. Design and status of the Mu2e electromagnetic calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Atanov, N; Budagov, J; Carosi, R; Cervelli, F; Colao, F; Cordelli, M; Corradi, G; Dane', E; Davydov, Yu I; Di Falco, S; Donati, S; Donghia, R; Echenard, B; Flood, K; Giovannella, S; Glagolev, V; Grancagnolo, F; Happacher, F; Hitlin, D G; Martini, M; Miscetti, S; Miyashita, T; Morescalchi, L; Murat, P; Pasciuto, D; Pezzullo, G; Porter, F; Saputi, A; Sarra, I; Soleti, S R; Spinella, F; Tassielli, G; Tereshchenko, V; Usubov, Z; Zhu, R Y

    2016-01-01

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab aims at measuring the neutrinoless conversion of a negative muon into an electron and reach a single event sensitivity of 2.5x10^{-17} after three years of data taking. The monoenergetic electron produced in the final state, is detected by a high precision tracker and a crystal calorimeter, all embedded in a large superconducting solenoid (SD) surrounded by a cosmic ray veto system. The calorimeter is complementary to the tracker, allowing an independent trigger and powerful particle identification, while seeding the track reconstruction and contributing to remove background tracks mimicking the signal. In order to match these requirements, the calorimeter should have an energy resolution of O(5)% and a time resolution better than 500 ps at 100 MeV. The baseline solution is a calorimeter composed of two disks of BaF2 crystals read by UV extended, solar blind, Avalanche Photodiode (APDs), which are under development from a JPL, Caltech, RMD consortium. In this paper, the calorim...

  3. Mu2e Transport Solenoid Cold-Mass Alignment Issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, M. [Fermilab; Ambrosio, G. [Fermilab; Badgley, K. [Fermilab; Bradascio, F. [Fermilab; Brandt, J. [Fermilab; Evbota, D. [Fermilab; Hocker, A. [Fermilab; Lamm, M. [Fermilab; Lombardo, V. [Fermilab; Miller, J. [Boston U.; Nicol, T. [Fermilab; Kutschke, R. [Fermilab; Vellidis, C. [Fermilab; Wands, R. [Fermilab; Wenk, E. [Fermilab

    2016-10-01

    The Muon-to-electron conversion experiment (Mu2e) at Fermilab is designed to explore charged lepton flavor violation. It is composed of three large superconducting solenoids: the Production Solenoid (PS), the Transport Solenoid (TS) and the Detector Solenoid (DS). The TS is formed by two magnets: TS upstream (TSu) and downstream (TSd). Each has its own cryostat and power supply. Tolerance sensitivity studies of the position and angular alignment of each coil in this magnet system were performed in the past with the objective to demonstrate that the magnet design meets all the field requirements. The alignment of the cold-masses is critical to maximize the transmission of muons and to avoid possible backgrounds that would reduce the sensitivity of the experiment. Each TS magnet cold-mass can be individually aligned. In this work, we discuss implications of the alignment of the TS cold-masses in terms of the displacement of the magnetic center. Consideration of the practical mechanical limits are also presented.

  4. Semiotic Selection of Mutated or Misfolded Receptor Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giorgi, Franco; Bruni, Luis Emilio; Maggio, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    for receptor monomers to assemble along the membrane and to sustain meaningful relationships with environmental ligands. How could a cell lineage deal with these loss-of-function mutations during evolution and restrain gene redundancy accordingly? In this paper, we will be arguing that the easiest way...... for bacteria clones to accomplish this goal is by getting rid of cells expressing mutated receptor proteins. The mechanism sustaining this cell selection is also occurring in many somatic tissues and its function is currently believed to counteract in vivo protein mutagenesis. Our discussion will be mainly...

  5. Statistical theory of neutral protein evolution by random site mutations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arnab Bhattacherjee; Parbati Biswas

    2009-09-01

    Understanding the features of the protein conformational space represents a key component to characterize protein structural evolution at the molecular level. This problem is approached in a twofold manner; simple lattice models are used to represent protein structures with the ability of a protein sequence to fold into the lowest energy native conformation, quantified as the foldability, which measures the fitness of the sequence. Alternatively, a self-consistent mean-field based theory is developed to evaluate the protein neutrality through random single-point and multiple-point mutations by calculating the pair-wise probability profile of the amino acid residues in a library of sequences, consistent with a particular foldability criterion. The theory predicts the change in sequence plasticity with the foldability criterion and also correlates the effect of hydrophobic residues on the variation of the free energy surface of the protein as a function of the number of cumulative mutations. The results obtained from the theory are compared with the exact enumeration results of 3 × 3 × 3 lattice protein and also with some small real proteins chosen from the protein databank. An excellent match of the results obtained from theory and exact enumeration with those of real proteins validates the range of applicability of the theory. The theory may provide a new perspective in de novo protein design, in-vivo/in-vitro protein evolution and site-directed mutagenesis experiments.

  6. Defective Proteasome Delivery of Polyubiquitinated Proteins by Ubiquilin-2 Proteins Containing ALS Mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Chang

    Full Text Available Ubiquilin proteins facilitate delivery of ubiquitinated proteins to the proteasome for degradation. Interest in the proteins has been heightened by the discovery that gene mutations in UBQLN2 cause dominant inheritance of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. However, the mechanisms by which the mutations cause ALS are not known. Here we report on the underlying defect of ubiquilin-2 proteins containing ALS-linked mutations in affecting proteasome-mediated degradation. We found that overexpression of ubiquilin-2 proteins containing any one of five different ALS mutations slow degradation of Myc, a prototypic proteasome substrate. Examination of coprecipitating proteins indicated that the mutant proteins are generally capable of binding polyubiquitinated proteins, but defective in binding the proteasome. GST-pulldown studies revealed that many of the mutants bind weaker to the S5a subunit of the proteasome, compared with wild type (WT ubiquilin-2 protein. The results suggest the mutant proteins are unable to deliver their captured cargo to the proteasome for degradation, which presumably leads to toxicity. Quantification of cell death is consistent with this idea. Measurement of protein turnover further indicated the mutant proteins have longer half-lives than WT ubiquilin-2. Our studies provide novel insight into the mechanism by which ALS-linked mutations in UBQLN2 interfere with protein degradation.

  7. Effect of Single-Site Mutations on HP Lattice Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Guangjie [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Vogel, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Wuest, Thomas [Swiss Federal Research Institute, Switzerland; Li, Ying Wai [ORNL; Landau, David P [University of Georgia, Athens, GA

    2014-01-01

    We developed a heuristic method for determining the ground-state degeneracy of hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice proteins, based on Wang-Landau and multicanonical sampling. It is applied during comprehensive studies of single-site mutations in specific HP proteins with different sequences. The effects in which we are interested include structural changes in ground-states, changes of ground-state energy, degeneracy, and thermodynamic properties of the system. With respect to mutations, both extremely sensitive and insensitive positions in the HP sequence have been found. That is, ground state energies and degeneracies, as well as other thermodynamic and structural quantities may be either largely unaffected or may change significantly due to mutation.

  8. Systematic Mapping of Protein Mutational Space by Prolonged Drift Reveals the Deleterious Effects of Seemingly Neutral Mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liat Rockah-Shmuel

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Systematic mappings of the effects of protein mutations are becoming increasingly popular. Unexpectedly, these experiments often find that proteins are tolerant to most amino acid substitutions, including substitutions in positions that are highly conserved in nature. To obtain a more realistic distribution of the effects of protein mutations, we applied a laboratory drift comprising 17 rounds of random mutagenesis and selection of M.HaeIII, a DNA methyltransferase. During this drift, multiple mutations gradually accumulated. Deep sequencing of the drifted gene ensembles allowed determination of the relative effects of all possible single nucleotide mutations. Despite being averaged across many different genetic backgrounds, about 67% of all nonsynonymous, missense mutations were evidently deleterious, and an additional 16% were likely to be deleterious. In the early generations, the frequency of most deleterious mutations remained high. However, by the 17th generation, their frequency was consistently reduced, and those remaining were accepted alongside compensatory mutations. The tolerance to mutations measured in this laboratory drift correlated with sequence exchanges seen in M.HaeIII's natural orthologs. The biophysical constraints dictating purging in nature and in this laboratory drift also seemed to overlap. Our experiment therefore provides an improved method for measuring the effects of protein mutations that more closely replicates the natural evolutionary forces, and thereby a more realistic view of the mutational space of proteins.

  9. Systematic Mapping of Protein Mutational Space by Prolonged Drift Reveals the Deleterious Effects of Seemingly Neutral Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockah-Shmuel, Liat; Tóth-Petróczy, Ágnes; Tawfik, Dan S

    2015-08-01

    Systematic mappings of the effects of protein mutations are becoming increasingly popular. Unexpectedly, these experiments often find that proteins are tolerant to most amino acid substitutions, including substitutions in positions that are highly conserved in nature. To obtain a more realistic distribution of the effects of protein mutations, we applied a laboratory drift comprising 17 rounds of random mutagenesis and selection of M.HaeIII, a DNA methyltransferase. During this drift, multiple mutations gradually accumulated. Deep sequencing of the drifted gene ensembles allowed determination of the relative effects of all possible single nucleotide mutations. Despite being averaged across many different genetic backgrounds, about 67% of all nonsynonymous, missense mutations were evidently deleterious, and an additional 16% were likely to be deleterious. In the early generations, the frequency of most deleterious mutations remained high. However, by the 17th generation, their frequency was consistently reduced, and those remaining were accepted alongside compensatory mutations. The tolerance to mutations measured in this laboratory drift correlated with sequence exchanges seen in M.HaeIII's natural orthologs. The biophysical constraints dictating purging in nature and in this laboratory drift also seemed to overlap. Our experiment therefore provides an improved method for measuring the effects of protein mutations that more closely replicates the natural evolutionary forces, and thereby a more realistic view of the mutational space of proteins.

  10. Stabilization of G protein-coupled receptors by point mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska eHeydenreich

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are flexible integral membrane proteins involved in transmembrane signaling. Their involvement in many physiological processes makes them interesting targets for drug development. Determination of the structure of these receptors will help to design more specific drugs, however, their structural characterization has so far been hampered by the low expression and their inherent instability in detergents which made protein engineering indispensable for structural and biophysical characterization.Several approaches to stabilize the receptors in a particular conformation have led to breakthroughs in GPCR structure determination. These include truncations of the flexible regions, stabilization by antibodies and nanobodies, fusion partners, high affinity and covalently bound ligands as well as conformational stabilization by mutagenesis. In this review we focus on stabilization of GPCRs by insertion of point mutations, which lead to increased conformational and thermal stability as well as improved expression levels. We summarize existing mutagenesis strategies with different coverage of GPCR sequence space and depth of information, design and transferability of mutations and the molecular basis for stabilization. We also discuss whether mutations alter the structure and pharmacological properties of GPCRs.

  11. Channelopathies from Mutations in the Cardiac Sodium Channel Protein Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adsit, Graham S.; Vaidyanathan, Ravi; Galler, Carla M.; Kyle, John W.; Makielski, Jonathan C.

    2013-01-01

    The cardiac sodium current underlies excitability in heart, and inherited abnormalities of the proteins regulating and conducting this current cause inherited arrhythmia syndromes. This review focuses on inherited mutations in non-pore forming proteins of sodium channel complexes that cause cardiac arrhythmia, and the deduced mechanisms by which they affect function and dysfunction of the cardiac sodium current. Defining the structure and function of these complexes and how they are regulated will contribute to understanding the possible roles for this complex in normal and abnormal physiology and homeostasis. PMID:23557754

  12. Channelopathies from mutations in the cardiac sodium channel protein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adsit, Graham S; Vaidyanathan, Ravi; Galler, Carla M; Kyle, John W; Makielski, Jonathan C

    2013-08-01

    The cardiac sodium current underlies excitability in heart, and inherited abnormalities of the proteins regulating and conducting this current cause inherited arrhythmia syndromes. This review focuses on inherited mutations in non-pore forming proteins of sodium channel complexes that cause cardiac arrhythmia, and the deduced mechanisms by which they affect function and dysfunction of the cardiac sodium current. Defining the structure and function of these complexes and how they are regulated will contribute to understanding the possible roles for this complex in normal and abnormal physiology and homeostasis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Na(+) Regulation in Cardiac Myocytes". Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. G protein-coupled receptor mutations and human genetic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Miles D; Hendy, Geoffrey N; Percy, Maire E; Bichet, Daniel G; Cole, David E C

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variations in G protein-coupled receptor genes (GPCRs) disrupt GPCR function in a wide variety of human genetic diseases. In vitro strategies and animal models have been used to identify the molecular pathologies underlying naturally occurring GPCR mutations. Inactive, overactive, or constitutively active receptors have been identified that result in pathology. These receptor variants may alter ligand binding, G protein coupling, receptor desensitization and receptor recycling. Receptor systems discussed include rhodopsin, thyrotropin, parathyroid hormone, melanocortin, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRHR), adrenocorticotropic hormone, vasopressin, endothelin-β, purinergic, and the G protein associated with asthma (GPRA or neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1)). The role of activating and inactivating calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) mutations is discussed in detail with respect to familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH) and autosomal dominant hypocalemia (ADH). The CASR mutations have been associated with epilepsy. Diseases caused by the genetic disruption of GPCR functions are discussed in the context of their potential to be selectively targeted by drugs that rescue altered receptors. Examples of drugs developed as a result of targeting GPCRs mutated in disease include: calcimimetics and calcilytics, therapeutics targeting melanocortin receptors in obesity, interventions that alter GNRHR loss from the cell surface in idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and novel drugs that might rescue the P2RY12 receptor congenital bleeding phenotype. De-orphanization projects have identified novel disease-associated receptors, such as NPSR1 and GPR35. The identification of variants in these receptors provides genetic reagents useful in drug screens. Discussion of the variety of GPCRs that are disrupted in monogenic Mendelian disorders provides the basis for examining the significance of common

  14. Impairment of protein trafficking upon overexpression and mutation of optineurin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BumChan Park

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glaucoma is a major blinding disease characterized by progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs and axons. Optineurin is one of the candidate genes identified so far. A mutation of Glu(50 to Lys (E50K has been reported to be associated with a more progressive and severe disease. Optineurin, known to interact with Rab8, myosin VI and transferrin receptor (TfR, was speculated to have a role in protein trafficking. Here we determined whether, and how optineurin overexpression and E50K mutation affect the internalization of transferrin (Tf, widely used as a marker for receptor-mediated endocytosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE and rat RGC5 cells transfected to overexpress wild type optineurin were incubated with Texas Red-Tf to evaluate Tf uptake. Granular structures or dots referred to as foci formed in perinuclear regions after transfection. An impairment of the Tf uptake was in addition observed in transfected cells. Compared to overexpression of the wild type, E50K mutation yielded an increased foci formation and a more pronounced defect in Tf uptake. Co-transfection with TfR, but not Rab8 or myosin VI, construct rescued the optineurin inhibitory effect, suggesting that TfR was the factor involved in the trafficking phenotype. Forced expression of both wild type and E50K optineurin rendered TfR to colocalize with the foci. Surface biotinylation experiments showed that the surface level of TfR was also reduced, leading presumably to an impeded Tf uptake. A non-consequential Leu(157 to Ala (L157A mutation that displayed much reduced foci formation and TfR binding had normal TfR distribution, normal surface TfR level and normal Tf internalization. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present study demonstrates that overexpression of wild type optineurin results in impairment of the Tf uptake in RPE and RGC5 cells. The phenotype is related to the optineurin interaction with TfR. Our results

  15. The Emerging Mutational Landscape of G-proteins and G-protein Coupled Receptors in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    O’Hayre, Morgan; Vázquez-Prado, José; Kufareva, Irina; Stawiski, Eric W.; Handel, Tracy M.; Seshagiri, Somasekar; Gutkind, J. Silvio

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant expression and activity of G proteins and G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are frequently associated with tumorigenesis. Deep sequencing studies show that 4.2% of tumors carry activating mutations in GNAS (encoding Gαs), and that oncogenic activating mutants in genes encoding Gαq family members (GNAQ or GNA11) are present in ~66% and ~6% of melanomas arising in the eye and skin, respectively. Furthermore, nearly 20% of human tumors harbor mutations in GPCRs. Many human cancer-asso...

  16. BSE case associated with prion protein gene mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen A Richt

    Full Text Available Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE of cattle and was first detected in 1986 in the United Kingdom. It is the most likely cause of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD in humans. The origin of BSE remains an enigma. Here we report an H-type BSE case associated with the novel mutation E211K within the prion protein gene (Prnp. Sequence analysis revealed that the animal with H-type BSE was heterozygous at Prnp nucleotides 631 through 633. An identical pathogenic mutation at the homologous codon position (E200K in the human Prnp has been described as the most common cause of genetic CJD. This finding represents the first report of a confirmed case of BSE with a potential pathogenic mutation within the bovine Prnp gene. A recent epidemiological study revealed that the K211 allele was not detected in 6062 cattle from commercial beef processing plants and 42 cattle breeds, indicating an extremely low prevalence of the E211K variant (less than 1 in 2000 in cattle.

  17. The mu1, mu2, delta, kappa opioid receptor binding profiles of methadone stereoisomers and morphine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, K; Christensen, C B; Christrup, Lona Louring

    1995-01-01

    The binding affinities of racemic methadone and its optical isomers R-methadone and S-methadone were evaluated for the opioid receptors mu1, mu2, delta and kappa, in comparison with that of morphine. The analgesic R-methadone had a 10-fold higher affinity for mu1 receptors than S-methadone (IC50 3.......0 nM and 26.4 nM, respectively). At the mu2 receptor, the IC50 value of R-methadone was 6.9 nM and 88 nM for S-methadone, respectively. As expected, R-methadone had twice the affinity for mu1 and mu2 receptors than the racemate. All of the compounds tested had low affinity for the delta and kappa...

  18. Design, R&D and status of the crystal calorimeter for the Mu2e experiment

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    The Mu2e Experiment at Fermilab will search for coherent, neutrinoless conversion of muons into electrons in the field of a nucleus, with a sensitivity improvement of a factor of 10^4 over previous experiments. Such a charged lepton flavor-violating reaction probes new physics at a scale inaccessible with direct searches at either present or planned high energy colliders. The conversion electron is mono-energetic with an energy slightly below the muon rest mass. If no events are observed in three years of running, Mu2e will set a limit on the ratio between the conversion rate and the capture rate, R_{\\mu e}, of < 6 x 10^{-17} (@ 90% CL). In this paper, the physics motivation for Mu2e and the current status of the electromagnetic calorimeter project are briefly presented.

  19. Muon to electron conversion: The COMET and Mu2e experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Litchfield, R P

    2014-01-01

    I describe the new generation of muon-to-electron conversion experiments, COMET and Mu2e, being constructed to make use of new high power pulsed muon beams a J-PARC and Fermilab respectively. A brief overview of the physics explored by the muon to electron conversion is given, followed by a description of the experimental challenges and resulting features common to the new experiments. The differences in approach between Mu2e and COMET are then highlighted, and the current schedules given.

  20. Optimization of the muon stopping target for the MU2E collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodge, Zachary Donovan [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The Mu2e Experiment utilizes state of the art accelerators, superconducting magnets, detectors, electronics, and other equipment to maximize the sensitivity to such a rare process. Many of the components of the Mu2e hardware are critical to the overall physics capability of the experiment. The muon stopping target, where muons are stopped and may interact via this very rare process, is one such component where any improvements beyond the base design can have a significant impact on the experiment. This thesis explores possible modifications to the geometry of the muon stopping target. The goal is to determine if any modifications can improve the sensitivity of observing the muon conversion process.

  1. Ribosomal Protein Mutations Result in Constitutive p53 Protein Degradation through Impairment of the AKT Pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antunes, Ana T.; Goos, Yvonne J.; Pereboom, Tamara C.; Hermkens, Dorien; Wlodarski, Marcin W.; Da Costa, Lydie; MacInnes, Alyson W.

    Mutations in ribosomal protein (RP) genes can result in the loss of erythrocyte progenitor cells and cause severe anemia. This is seen in patients with Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), a pure red cell aplasia and bone marrow failure syndrome that is almost exclusively linked to RP gene

  2. Correlated mutations in protein sequences: Phylogenetic and structural effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapedes, A.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Theoretical Div.]|[Santa Fe Inst., NM (United States); Giraud, B.G. [C.E.N. Saclay, Gif/Yvette (France). Service Physique Theorique; Liu, L.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Theoretical Div.; Stormo, G.D. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology

    1998-12-01

    Covariation analysis of sets of aligned sequences for RNA molecules is relatively successful in elucidating RNA secondary structure, as well as some aspects of tertiary structure. Covariation analysis of sets of aligned sequences for protein molecules is successful in certain instances in elucidating certain structural and functional links, but in general, pairs of sites displaying highly covarying mutations in protein sequences do not necessarily correspond to sites that are spatially close in the protein structure. In this paper the authors identify two reasons why naive use of covariation analysis for protein sequences fails to reliably indicate sequence positions that are spatially proximate. The first reason involves the bias introduced in calculation of covariation measures due to the fact that biological sequences are generally related by a non-trivial phylogenetic tree. The authors present a null-model approach to solve this problem. The second reason involves linked chains of covariation which can result in pairs of sites displaying significant covariation even though they are not spatially proximate. They present a maximum entropy solution to this classic problem of causation versus correlation. The methodologies are validated in simulation.

  3. Prediction of change in protein unfolding rates upon point mutations in two state proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Priyashree; Naganathan, Athi N; Gromiha, M Michael

    2016-09-01

    Studies on protein unfolding rates are limited and challenging due to the complexity of unfolding mechanism and the larger dynamic range of the experimental data. Though attempts have been made to predict unfolding rates using protein sequence-structure information there is no available method for predicting the unfolding rates of proteins upon specific point mutations. In this work, we have systematically analyzed a set of 790 single mutants and developed a robust method for predicting protein unfolding rates upon mutations (Δlnku) in two-state proteins by combining amino acid properties and knowledge-based classification of mutants with multiple linear regression technique. We obtain a mean absolute error (MAE) of 0.79/s and a Pearson correlation coefficient (PCC) of 0.71 between predicted unfolding rates and experimental observations using jack-knife test. We have developed a web server for predicting protein unfolding rates upon mutation and it is freely available at https://www.iitm.ac.in/bioinfo/proteinunfolding/unfoldingrace.html. Prominent features that determine unfolding kinetics as well as plausible reasons for the observed outliers are also discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Mitsubishi MU-2B Series Special Training, Experience, and Operating Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Balance A. Aircraft Loading Procedures B. Limitations 1. Weight Limits 2. C.G. Limits C. Plotter 1..., runway length, surface conditions, wind direction and velocity, brake heat energy, and any other... conditions. (c) No person may operate a Mitsubishi MU-2B series airplane unless a copy of the appropriate...

  5. MARS Tracking Simulations for the Mu2e Slow Extracted Proton Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagaslaev, Vladimir [Fermilab; Rakhno, Igor [Fermilab

    2015-06-01

    Particle tracking taking into account interactions with fields and materials is necessary for proper evaluation of the resonant extraction losses and geometry optimization for the extraction beam line. This paper describes the tracking simulations for the Mu2e Resonant Extraction and discusses the geometry choices made based on these simulations.

  6. Energy and time resolution for a LYSO matrix prototype of the Mu2e experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Atanov, N; Colao, F; Cordelli, M; Corradi, G; Dane`, E; Davydov, Y I; Flood, K; Giovannella, S; Glagolev, V; Happacher, F; Hitlin, D G; Martini, M; Miscetti, S; Miyashita, T; Morescalchi, L; Ott, P; Pezzullo, G; Saputi, A; Sarra, I; Soleti, S R; Tassielli, G; Tereshchenko, V; Thomas, A

    2016-01-01

    We have measured the performances of a LYSO crystal matrix prototype tested with electron and photon beams in the energy range 60$-$450 MeV. This study has been carried out to determine the achievable energy and time resolutions for the calorimeter of the Mu2e experiment.

  7. Protein kinase C gamma mutations in spinocerebellar ataxia 14 increase kinase activity and alter membrane targeting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, D. S.; Knight, M. A.; Harmison, G. G.; Fischbeck, K. H.; Howell, B. W.

    2005-01-01

    The protein kinase C gamma (PKCgamma) gene is mutated in spinocerebellar ataxia type 14 (SCA14). In this study, we investigated the effects of two SCA14 missense mutations, G118D and C150F, on PKCgamma function. We found that these mutations increase the intrinsic activity of PKCgamma. Direct visual

  8. Protein C/S ratio, an accurate and simple tool to identify carriers of a protein C gene mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Libourel, EJ; Meinardi, [No Value; de Kam, PJ; Ruiters, MHJ; van der Meer, J; van der Schaaf, W; Veenstra, R.

    Hereditary protein C deficiency is demonstrated by lowered protein C plasma levels in a patient and at least one first-degree relative. This approach is insufficient in some cases owing to overlapping protein C levels in carriers and non-carriers of a protein C gene mutation. The protein C/S ratio

  9. p53 Mutations and Protein Overexpression in Primary Colorectal Cancer and its Liver Metastasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To compare p53 status in primary and hepatic metastatic colorectal cancer in 34 patients. Methods: p53 gene status (exons 5- 9) was examined by PCR, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and automated sequencing. P53 protein was detected by immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibody DO-7. Results: p53 mutations were found in exons 5 through 9 in 21 of 34 patients (61.8%). Among them, 5 patients had mutation in liver metastasis but not in their primary tumors while in the other patients the same mutations were found in both primary and metastatic colorectal cancers. In no patients was p53 mutation exclusively found in the primary colorectal tumors. Moreover, additional mutation was detected in the metastatic lesions in two cases. Of the 37 mutations within the exons examined, 73% was missense mutation and 16% was nonsense mutation. There were 4 microinsertions. P53 protein was overexpressed in both primary and metastatic colorectal cancers with p53 gene mutations. The presence of p53 mutation significantly correlated with p53 protein accumulation (r=0.96, p< 0.001). However, in 4 patients with p53 nonsense mutation, immunohistochemical staining was negative. In three patients who showed no p53 mutation of the primary tumor, p53 protein was consistently overexpressed. Conclusion: In colorectal cancers, p53 gene mutation usually appears first in the primary tumor and maintains as such but is more prominent when metastasized to the liver. However, p53 gene mutation may occur only after being metastasized.Although p53 gene mutation and p53 protein overexpression correlate with each other, either parameter examined alone may lead to false positive or negative results.

  10. Cancer-associated mutations are preferentially distributed in protein kinase functional sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izarzugaza, Jose M G; Redfern, Oliver C; Orengo, Christine A; Valencia, Alfonso

    2009-12-01

    Protein kinases are a superfamily involved in many crucial cellular processes, including signal transmission and regulation of cell cycle. As a consequence of this role, kinases have been reported to be associated with many types of cancer and are considered as potential therapeutic targets. We analyzed the distribution of pathogenic somatic point mutations (drivers) in the protein kinase superfamily with respect to their location in the protein, such as in structural, evolutionary, and functionally relevant regions. We find these driver mutations are more clearly associated with key protein features than other somatic mutations (passengers) that have not been directly linked to tumor progression. This observation fits well with the expected implication of the alterations in protein kinase function in cancer pathogenicity. To explain the relevance of the detected association of cancer driver mutations at the molecular level in the human kinome, we compare these with genetically inherited mutations (SNPs). We find that the subset of nonsynonymous SNPs that are associated to disease, but sufficiently mild to the point of being widespread in the population, tend to avoid those key protein regions, where they could be more detrimental for protein function. This tendency contrasts with the one detected for cancer associated-driver-mutations, which seems to be more directly implicated in the alteration of protein function. The detailed analysis of protein kinase groups and a number of relevant examples, confirm the relation between cancer associated-driver-mutations and key regions for protein kinase structure and function.

  11. Understanding Amino Acid Mutations in Hepatitis B Virus Proteins for Rational Design of Vaccines and Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ke; Shen, Li; Wang, Jing; Jiang, Zhi; Shen, Bairong

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome encodes four proteins, i.e., DNA polymerase, surface protein, X, and core proteins. HBV undergoes different selective pressures for drug resistance and immune/vaccine escape and mutations are common for the HBV proteins. We here collected all the reported amino acid mutations happened in these four HBV proteins and studied their patterns. The relationship between the mutations and epitopic functions are investigated with bioinformatics tools, based on their sequence information. Some interesting results are observed for the mutation patterns, such as we found the serine and threonine are both for frequently mutated residues and mutant residues, while the tryptophan and methionine have low mutability. The results provide important information for the understanding of the molecular mechanism of virus evolution and therefore will facilitate the future rational design of HBV vaccines or drugs.

  12. Mutation analysis of presenilin-1 gene in Alzheimer’s disease patients and the effects of its mutation on expression of presenilin-1 and amyloid precursor protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓雄

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the presenilin-1(PS-1) gene mutations in Alzheimer’s disease(AD) patients and investigate the influence of the initiation codon mutation on the mRNA expression of PS-1 and amyloid precursor protein

  13. Final Technical Report: Mu2e at the City University of New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, Kevin [City Univ. (CUNY), NY (United States); Popp, James [City Univ. (CUNY), NY (United States)

    2017-06-25

    This DOE grant award for was for the period June 1, 2013 to March 31, 2016. Popp was awarded an internship in the Visiting Faculty Program at FNAL in summer of 2015; consequently the unused portion of summer salary funds allowed us to apply for a no-cost extension with our remaining funds until March 31, 2017. That support furnished us with the means to carry out numerous successful projects for Mu2e for nearly four years. Up to now, the driving force to our work has been dictated primarily by the Mu2e Project cost and schedule needs. Our work has been under the purview of three of the Working Groups to which we belong: Target Station, Electron Tracker, and Stopping Target Monitor. We have carried out a mix of bench-top testing tasks locally, more elaborate work at Fermilab every summer, and extensive software development and simulation studies.

  14. Performance of Wavelength-Shifting Fibers for the Mu2e Cosmic Ray Veto Detector

    CERN Document Server

    DeZoort, G; Kessenich, H; Oksuzian, Y; Rase, T; Shooltz, D

    2015-01-01

    The Mu2e experiment will search for a neutrino-less muon-to-electron conversion process with almost four orders of magnitude of sensitivity improvement relative to the current best limit. One important background is caused by cosmic ray muons, and particles produced by their decay or interactions, mimicking the conversion electron signature. In order to reach the design sensitivity, Mu2e needs to obtain a cosmic ray veto (CRV) efficiency of 99.99\\%. The CRV system consists of four layers of plastic scintillating counters read out by silicon photo-multipliers (SiPM) through wavelength shifting fibers. The CRV counters must produce sufficient photo statistics in order to achieve the required veto efficiency. We study the light properties of several wavelength shifting fiber sizes in order to optimize the total light yield for the CRV system. The measurements are performed using a scanner designed to ensure fiber quality for the CRV.

  15. Influence of the mutation on the stability of pyrin protein and development of familial Mediterranean fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arakelov G G

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Present study was carried out for the molecular modeling of the pyrin protein. Tertiary structure of pyrin protein was developed by de novo modeling and treading methods. Subsequent evaluation of the developed model was also carried out and found it stereochemical correct. Furthermore, influence of the mutation on the stability of the pyrin tertiary structure and development of Familial Mediterranean Fever was also studied in the present study. Total 66 mutations were localized at B30.2 domain of pyrin protein and this domain is responsible for manifestation of Familial Mediterranean Fever. It was also reported that among 66 localized mutations 24 mutations affects the stability of pyrin structure while 25 mutations have neutral effect on the stability and rest 17 mutations have stabilizing effect on the tertiary structure of pyrin.

  16. In silico mutation analysis of non-structural protein-5 (NS5) dengue virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puspitasari, R. D.; Tambunan, U. S. F.

    2017-04-01

    Dengue fever is a world disease. It is endemic in more than 100 countries. Information about the effect of mutations in the virus is important in drug design and development. In this research, we studied the effect of mutation on NS5 dengue virus. NS5 is the large protein containing 67% amino acid similarity in DENV 1-4 and has multifunctional enzymatic activities. Dengue virus is an RNA virus that has very high mutation frequency with an average of 100 times higher than DNA mutations, and the accumulation of mutations will be possible to generate the new serotype. In this study, we report that mutation occurs in NS5 of DENV serotype 3, glutamine mutates into methionine at position 10 and threonine mutates into isoleucine at position 55. These residues are part of the domain named S-Adenosyl-L-Methionine-Dependent Methyltransferase (IPR029063).

  17. Abstract 5324: Pan-cancer identification of mutated pathways and protein complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leiserson, Mark D.; Vandin, Fabio; Wu, Hsin-Ta

    2014-01-01

    that are mutually exclusive across the tumor cohort. There are numerous examples of mutually exclusive mutations between interacting proteins; e.g. BRAF and KRAS in colorectal cancer. Dendrix++ generalizes this idea to find larger groups of mutually exclusive mutations.We applied HotNet2 and Dendrix++ to whole......Large-scale cancer sequencing efforts such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and others have shown that tumors exhibit extensive mutational heterogeneity with relatively few genes mutated at significant frequency and many genes mutated in only a small number of individuals. This long tail...... phenomenon complicates the identification of driver mutations by their observed frequency. The long tail is explained in part by the fact that driver mutations target genes in signaling and regulatory pathways, and these pathways may be perturbed by different mutations in different tumors.We developed two...

  18. Ribosomal Protein Mutations Result in Constitutive p53 Protein Degradation through Impairment of the AKT Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana T Antunes

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in ribosomal protein (RP genes can result in the loss of erythrocyte progenitor cells and cause severe anemia. This is seen in patients with Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA, a pure red cell aplasia and bone marrow failure syndrome that is almost exclusively linked to RP gene haploinsufficiency. While the mechanisms underlying the cytopenia phenotype of patients with these mutations are not completely understood, it is believed that stabilization of the p53 tumor suppressor protein may induce apoptosis in the progenitor cells. In stark contrast, tumor cells from zebrafish with RP gene haploinsufficiency are unable to stabilize p53 even when exposed to acute DNA damage despite transcribing wild type p53 normally. In this work we demonstrate that p53 has a limited role in eliciting the anemia phenotype of zebrafish models of DBA. In fact, we find that RP-deficient embryos exhibit the same normal p53 transcription, absence of p53 protein, and impaired p53 response to DNA damage as RP haploinsufficient tumor cells. Recently we reported that RP mutations suppress activity of the AKT pathway, and we show here that this suppression results in proteasomal degradation of p53. By re-activating the AKT pathway or by inhibiting GSK-3, a downstream modifier that normally represses AKT signaling, we are able to restore the stabilization of p53. Our work indicates that the anemia phenotype of zebrafish models of DBA is dependent on factors other than p53, and may hold clinical significance for both DBA and the increasing number of cancers revealing spontaneous mutations in RP genes.

  19. Cosmic background rejection by means of the calorimeter in the Mu2e experiment at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pezzullo, Gianantonio, E-mail: pezzullo@pi.infn.it [University of Pisa (Italy); INFN sezione di Pisa (Italy); Murat, Pavel [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (United States); Sarra, Ivano; Lucà, Alessandra [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (Italy)

    2014-03-01

    Mu2e experiment [J.R. Abrams, et al., Mu2e conceptual design report (http://arxiv.org/abs/1211.7019)] searches for coherent, neutrino-less conversion of muons into electrons in the field of a nucleus with a sensitivity of fews parts in 10{sup −17} (a factor of 10{sup 3}–10{sup 4} over existing limits). Mu2e apparatus takes advantage of high intensity muon beams which hit muon stopping targets (devoted for the capture) and uses a basic detector system which is composed by a low-mass straw tubes tracker and by a LYSO crystal calorimeter. One of the main source of background which afflicts this measure is the cosmic induced background. To suppress and keep that source under control the calorimeter operates both: muon identification (with a muon rejection factor of about 10{sup 2}–10{sup 3}) and fake-signal-electron (created via muon interactions with the experimental set-up) rejection. In this paper a description of the calorimeter role in cosmic suppression is reported showing results from GEANT4 simulations.

  20. Dissecting protein function: an efficient protocol for identifying separation-of-function mutations that encode structurally stable proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubin, Johnathan W; Rao, Timsi; Mandell, Edward K; Wuttke, Deborah S; Lundblad, Victoria

    2013-03-01

    Mutations that confer the loss of a single biochemical property (separation-of-function mutations) can often uncover a previously unknown role for a protein in a particular biological process. However, most mutations are identified based on loss-of-function phenotypes, which cannot differentiate between separation-of-function alleles vs. mutations that encode unstable/unfolded proteins. An alternative approach is to use overexpression dominant-negative (ODN) phenotypes to identify mutant proteins that disrupt function in an otherwise wild-type strain when overexpressed. This is based on the assumption that such mutant proteins retain an overall structure that is comparable to that of the wild-type protein and are able to compete with the endogenous protein (Herskowitz 1987). To test this, the in vivo phenotypes of mutations in the Est3 telomerase subunit from Saccharomyces cerevisiae were compared with the in vitro secondary structure of these mutant proteins as analyzed by circular-dichroism spectroscopy, which demonstrates that ODN is a more sensitive assessment of protein stability than the commonly used method of monitoring protein levels from extracts. Reverse mutagenesis of EST3, which targeted different categories of amino acids, also showed that mutating highly conserved charged residues to the oppositely charged amino acid had an increased likelihood of generating a severely defective est3(-) mutation, which nevertheless encoded a structurally stable protein. These results suggest that charge-swap mutagenesis directed at a limited subset of highly conserved charged residues, combined with ODN screening to eliminate partially unfolded proteins, may provide a widely applicable and efficient strategy for generating separation-of-function mutations.

  1. Global Characterization of Protein-Altering Mutations in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    considerably less is known about the contribution of somatic point mutations to the pathogenesis of prostate cancer (3, 4, 8), including those specific somatic...Totowa, NJ), 2nd Ed, pp 3–32. 39. O’Roak BJ, et al. (2011) Exome sequencing in sporadic autism spectrum disorders identifies severe de novo mutations. Nat

  2. Mutationmapper: a tool to aid the mapping of protein mutation data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabana Vohra

    Full Text Available There has been a rapid increase in the amount of mutational data due to, amongst other things, an increase in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP data and the use of site-directed mutagenesis as a tool to help dissect out functional properties of proteins. Many manually curated databases have been developed to index point mutations but they are not sustainable with the ever-increasing volume of scientific literature. There have been considerable efforts in the automatic extraction of mutation specific information from raw text involving use of various text-mining approaches. However, one of the key problems is to link these mutations with its associated protein and to present this data in such a way that researchers can immediately contextualize it within a structurally related family of proteins. To aid this process, we have developed an application called MutationMapper. Point mutations are extracted from abstracts and are validated against protein sequences in Uniprot as far as possible. Our methodology differs in a fundamental way from the usual text-mining approach. Rather than start with abstracts, we start with protein sequences, which facilitates greatly the process of validating a potential point mutation identified in an abstract. The results are displayed as mutations mapped on to the protein sequence or a multiple sequence alignment. The latter enables one to readily pick up mutations performed at equivalent positions in related proteins. We demonstrate the use of MutationMapper against several examples including a single sequence and multiple sequence alignments. The application is available as a web-service at http://mutationmapper.bioch.ox.ac.uk.

  3. Mutationmapper: a tool to aid the mapping of protein mutation data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohra, Shabana; Biggin, Philip C

    2013-01-01

    There has been a rapid increase in the amount of mutational data due to, amongst other things, an increase in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data and the use of site-directed mutagenesis as a tool to help dissect out functional properties of proteins. Many manually curated databases have been developed to index point mutations but they are not sustainable with the ever-increasing volume of scientific literature. There have been considerable efforts in the automatic extraction of mutation specific information from raw text involving use of various text-mining approaches. However, one of the key problems is to link these mutations with its associated protein and to present this data in such a way that researchers can immediately contextualize it within a structurally related family of proteins. To aid this process, we have developed an application called MutationMapper. Point mutations are extracted from abstracts and are validated against protein sequences in Uniprot as far as possible. Our methodology differs in a fundamental way from the usual text-mining approach. Rather than start with abstracts, we start with protein sequences, which facilitates greatly the process of validating a potential point mutation identified in an abstract. The results are displayed as mutations mapped on to the protein sequence or a multiple sequence alignment. The latter enables one to readily pick up mutations performed at equivalent positions in related proteins. We demonstrate the use of MutationMapper against several examples including a single sequence and multiple sequence alignments. The application is available as a web-service at http://mutationmapper.bioch.ox.ac.uk.

  4. Is there a biological cost of protein disorder? Analysis of cancer-associated mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajkos, Mátyás; Mészáros, Bálint; Simon, István; Dosztányi, Zsuzsanna

    2012-01-01

    As many diseases can be traced back to altered protein function, studying the effect of genetic variations at the level of proteins can provide a clue to understand how changes at the DNA level lead to various diseases. Cellular processes rely not only on proteins with well-defined structure but can also involve intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) that exist as highly flexible ensembles of conformations. Disordered proteins are mostly involved in signaling and regulatory processes, and their functional repertoire largely complements that of globular proteins. However, it was also suggested that protein disorder entails an increased biological cost. This notion was supported by a set of individual IDPs involved in various diseases, especially in cancer, and the increased amount of disorder observed among disease-associated proteins. In this work, we tested if there is any biological risk associated with protein disorder at the level of single nucleotide mutations. Specifically, we analyzed the distribution of mutations within ordered and disordered segments. Our results demonstrated that while neutral polymorphisms were more likely to occur within disordered segments, cancer-associated mutations had a preference for ordered regions. Additionally, we proposed an alternative explanation for the association of protein disorder and the involvement in cancer with the consideration of functional annotations. Individual examples also suggested that although disordered segments are fundamental functional elements, their presence is not necessarily accompanied with an increased mutation rate in cancer. The presented study can help to understand how the different structural properties of proteins influence the consequences of genetic mutations.

  5. Dataset of eye disease-related proteins analyzed using the unfolding mutation screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCafferty, Caitlyn L.; Sergeev, Yuri V.

    2016-01-01

    A number of genetic diseases are a result of missense mutations in protein structure. These mutations can lead to severe protein destabilization and misfolding. The unfolding mutation screen (UMS) is a computational method that calculates unfolding propensities for every possible missense mutation in a protein structure. The UMS validation demonstrated a good agreement with experimental and phenotypical data. 15 protein structures (a combination of homology models and crystal structures) were analyzed using UMS. The standard and clustered heat maps, and patterned protein structure from the analysis were stored in a UMS library. The library is currently composed of 15 protein structures from 14 inherited eye diseases including retina degenerations, glaucoma, and cataracts, and contains data for 181,110 mutations. The UMS protein library introduces 13 new human models of eye disease related proteins and is the first collection of the consistently calculated unfolding propensities, which could be used as a tool for the express analysis of novel mutations in clinical practice, next generation sequencing, and genotype-to-phenotype relationships in inherited eye disease. PMID:27922631

  6. Optimization of Mutation Pressure in Relation to Properties of Protein-Coding Sequences in Bacterial Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błażej, Paweł; Miasojedow, Błażej; Grabińska, Małgorzata; Mackiewicz, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Most mutations are deleterious and require energetically costly repairs. Therefore, it seems that any minimization of mutation rate is beneficial. On the other hand, mutations generate genetic diversity indispensable for evolution and adaptation of organisms to changing environmental conditions. Thus, it is expected that a spontaneous mutational pressure should be an optimal compromise between these two extremes. In order to study the optimization of the pressure, we compared mutational transition probability matrices from bacterial genomes with artificial matrices fulfilling the same general features as the real ones, e.g., the stationary distribution and the speed of convergence to the stationarity. The artificial matrices were optimized on real protein-coding sequences based on Evolutionary Strategies approach to minimize or maximize the probability of non-synonymous substitutions and costs of amino acid replacements depending on their physicochemical properties. The results show that the empirical matrices have a tendency to minimize the effects of mutations rather than maximize their costs on the amino acid level. They were also similar to the optimized artificial matrices in the nucleotide substitution pattern, especially the high transitions/transversions ratio. We observed no substantial differences between the effects of mutational matrices on protein-coding sequences in genomes under study in respect of differently replicated DNA strands, mutational cost types and properties of the referenced artificial matrices. The findings indicate that the empirical mutational matrices are rather adapted to minimize mutational costs in the studied organisms in comparison to other matrices with similar mathematical constraints.

  7. Optimization of Mutation Pressure in Relation to Properties of Protein-Coding Sequences in Bacterial Genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Błażej

    Full Text Available Most mutations are deleterious and require energetically costly repairs. Therefore, it seems that any minimization of mutation rate is beneficial. On the other hand, mutations generate genetic diversity indispensable for evolution and adaptation of organisms to changing environmental conditions. Thus, it is expected that a spontaneous mutational pressure should be an optimal compromise between these two extremes. In order to study the optimization of the pressure, we compared mutational transition probability matrices from bacterial genomes with artificial matrices fulfilling the same general features as the real ones, e.g., the stationary distribution and the speed of convergence to the stationarity. The artificial matrices were optimized on real protein-coding sequences based on Evolutionary Strategies approach to minimize or maximize the probability of non-synonymous substitutions and costs of amino acid replacements depending on their physicochemical properties. The results show that the empirical matrices have a tendency to minimize the effects of mutations rather than maximize their costs on the amino acid level. They were also similar to the optimized artificial matrices in the nucleotide substitution pattern, especially the high transitions/transversions ratio. We observed no substantial differences between the effects of mutational matrices on protein-coding sequences in genomes under study in respect of differently replicated DNA strands, mutational cost types and properties of the referenced artificial matrices. The findings indicate that the empirical mutational matrices are rather adapted to minimize mutational costs in the studied organisms in comparison to other matrices with similar mathematical constraints.

  8. Ribosomal protein mutations induce autophagy through S6 kinase inhibition of the insulin pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijnen, Harry F; van Wijk, Richard; Pereboom, Tamara C; Goos, Yvonne J; Seinen, Cor W; van Oirschot, Brigitte A; van Dooren, Rowie; Gastou, Marc; Giles, Rachel H; van Solinge, Wouter; Kuijpers, Taco W; Gazda, Hanna T; Bierings, Marc B; Da Costa, Lydie; MacInnes, Alyson W

    2014-01-01

    Mutations affecting the ribosome lead to several diseases known as ribosomopathies, with phenotypes that include growth defects, cytopenia, and bone marrow failure. Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), for example, is a pure red cell aplasia linked to the mutation of ribosomal protein (RP) genes. Here we

  9. Ribosomal protein mutations induce autophagy through S6 kinase inhibition of the insulin pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijnen, Harry F; van Wijk, Richard; Pereboom, Tamara C; Goos, Yvonne J; Seinen, Cor W; van Oirschot, Brigitte A; van Dooren, Rowie; Gastou, Marc; Giles, Rachel H; van Solinge, Wouter; Kuijpers, Taco W; Gazda, Hanna T; Bierings, Marc B; Da Costa, Lydie; MacInnes, Alyson W

    2014-01-01

    Mutations affecting the ribosome lead to several diseases known as ribosomopathies, with phenotypes that include growth defects, cytopenia, and bone marrow failure. Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), for example, is a pure red cell aplasia linked to the mutation of ribosomal protein (RP) genes. Here we

  10. An X-ray mapper for the Mu2e experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, S. H. [Duke U.; Wang, C. [Duke U.

    2015-10-17

    We report on the construction and performance of a scanner using a collimated x-ray beam to find the positions of wires, straws, slots and spheres. The technique is based on measuring the transmission rate of the beam, and their positions can be determined ~25 μm accuracy. The spheres or slots attached to the detector can also be optically surveyed externally to transfer the coordinates of wires and straws to other detector systems. The scanner was developed for the Mu2e straw tracker but may have a wide range of applications.

  11. An X-ray mapper for the Mu2e experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, S. H. [Duke U.; Wang, C. [Duke U.

    2015-10-17

    We report on the construction and performance of a scanner using a collimated x-ray beam to find the positions of wires, straws, slots and spheres. The technique is based on measuring the transmission rate of the beam, and their positions can be determined ~25 μm accuracy. The spheres or slots attached to the detector can also be optically surveyed externally to transfer the coordinates of wires and straws to other detector systems. The scanner was developed for the Mu2e straw tracker but may have a wide range of applications.

  12. An X-ray mapper for the Mu2e experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, S.H.; Wang, C.

    2016-01-21

    We report on the construction and performance of a scanner using a collimated x-ray beam to find the positions of wires, straws, slots and spheres. The technique is based on measuring the transmission rate of the beam, and their positions can be determined ~25 μm accuracy. The spheres or slots attached to the detector can also be optically surveyed externally to transfer the coordinates of wires and straws to other detector systems. The scanner was developed for the Mu2e straw tracker but may have a wide range of applications.

  13. Natural history of five children with surfactant protein C mutations and interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avital, Avraham; Hevroni, Avigdor; Godfrey, Simon; Cohen, Shlomo; Maayan, Channa; Nusair, Samir; Nogee, Lawrence M; Springer, Chaim

    2014-11-01

    Interstitial lung diseases in infants and children are uncommon and may be caused by specific inborn errors of surfactant metabolism. Five children with open lung biopsy diagnosed interstitial lung disease were followed (mean of 27.2 years) and evaluated for surfactant protein gene mutations. Four of the children were originally diagnosed as desquamative interstitial pneumonitis and one as chronic interstitial pneumonitis. All had good response to chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine treatment for periods of 7-38 months. Lung function tests, incremental exercise tests, and rentgenological studies were performed in the children. Surfactant protein gene mutations were searched in all the patients and in part of their families. Three of the patients, aged now 32, 29, and 37 years, feel well and have normal lung function, while two of the patients, both females, aged 28 and 37 years, conduct normal activities of daily living, have healthy children but have clinical, physiological and rentgenological evidence of restrictive lung disease. All five patients were found to have surfactant protein C gene (SFTPC) mutations, three of them with the most common mutation (p.I73T) and the other two with new mutations of surfactant protein C gene (p.I38F and p.V39L). We conclude that detection of surfactant protein mutations should be attempted in all children presenting with interstitial lung disease. Furthermore, treatment with hydroxychloroquine should be considered in children with SFTPC mutations. Prospective evaluation of hydroxychloroquine therapy in a greater number of patients is needed.

  14. Do cell junction protein mutations cause an airway phenotype in mice or humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Eugene H; Pezzulo, Alejandro A; Zabner, Joseph

    2011-08-01

    Cell junction proteins connect epithelial cells to each other and to the basement membrane. Genetic mutations of these proteins can cause alterations in some epithelia leading to varied phenotypes such as deafness, renal disease, skin disorders, and cancer. This review examines if genetic mutations in these proteins affect the function of lung airway epithelia. We review cell junction proteins with examples of disease mutation phenotypes in humans and in mouse knockout models. We also review which of these genes are expressed in airway epithelium by microarray expression profiling and immunocytochemistry. Last, we present a comprehensive literature review to find the lung phenotype when cell junction and adhesion genes are mutated or subject to targeted deletion. We found that in murine models, targeted deletion of cell junction and adhesion genes rarely result in a lung phenotype. Moreover, mutations in these genes in humans have no obvious lung phenotype. Our research suggests that simply because a cell junction or adhesion protein is expressed in an organ does not imply that it will exhibit a drastic phenotype when mutated. One explanation is that because a functioning lung is critical to survival, redundancy in the system is expected. Therefore mutations in a single gene might be compensated by a related function of a similar gene product. Further studies in human and animal models will help us understand the overlap in the function of cell junction gene products. Finally, it is possible that the human lung phenotype is subtle and has not yet been described.

  15. Protein conformation and disease : pathological consequences of analogous mutations in homologous proteins.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, F. J.; Pokkuluri, P. R.; Schiffer, M.; Biosciences Division

    2000-12-19

    The antibody light chain variable domain (V{sub L}){sup 1} and myelin protein zero (MPZ) are representatives of the functionally diverse immunoglobulin superfamily. The V{sub L} is a subunit of the antigen-binding component of antibodies, while MPZ is the major membrane-linked constituent of the myelin sheaths that coat peripheral nerves. Despite limited amino acid sequence homology, the conformations of the core structures of the two proteins are largely superimposable. Amino acid variations in V{sub L} account for various conformational disease outcomes, including amyloidosis. However, the specific amino acid changes in V{sub L} that are responsible for disease have been obscured by multiple concurrent primary structure alterations. Recently, certain demyelination disorders have been linked to point mutations and single amino acid polymorphisms in MPZ. We demonstrate here that some pathogenic variations in MPZ correspond to changes suspected of determining amyloidosis in V{sub L}. This unanticipated observation suggests that studies of the biophysical origin of conformational disease in one member of a superfamily of homologous proteins may have implications throughout the superfamily. In some cases, findings may account for overt disease; in other cases, due to the natural repertoire of inherited polymorphisms, variations in a representative protein may predict subclinical impairment of homologous proteins.

  16. Prion protein amyloidosis with divergent phenotype associated with two novel nonsense mutations in PRNP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Jansen (Casper); P. Parchi (Piero); S. Capellari (Sabina); A.J. Vermeij (Ad); P. Corrado (Patrizia); F. Baas (Frank); R. Strammiello (Rosario); W.A. van Gool (Willem); J.C. van Swieten; A.J.M. Rozemuller (Annemieke)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractStop codon mutations in the gene encoding the prion protein (PRNP) are very rare and have thus far only been described in two patients with prion protein cerebral amyloid angiopathy (PrP-CAA). In this report, we describe the clinical, histopathological and pathological prion protein (PrP

  17. Correlation analysis for protein evolutionary family based on amino acid position mutations and application in PDZ domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi-Shi Du

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been widely recognized that the mutations at specific directions are caused by the functional constraints in protein family and the directional mutations at certain positions control the evolutionary direction of the protein family. The mutations at different positions, even distantly separated, are mutually coupled and form an evolutionary network. Finding the controlling mutative positions and the mutative network among residues are firstly important for protein rational design and enzyme engineering. METHODOLOGY: A computational approach, namely amino acid position conservation-mutation correlation analysis (CMCA, is developed to predict mutually mutative positions and find the evolutionary network in protein family. The amino acid position mutative function, which is the foundational equation of CMCA measuring the mutation of a residue at a position, is derived from the MSA (multiple structure alignment database of protein evolutionary family. Then the position conservation correlation matrix and position mutation correlation matrix is constructed from the amino acid position mutative equation. Unlike traditional SCA (statistical coupling analysis approach, which is based on the statistical analysis of position conservations, the CMCA focuses on the correlation analysis of position mutations. CONCLUSIONS: As an example the CMCA approach is used to study the PDZ domain of protein family, and the results well illustrate the distantly allosteric mechanism in PDZ protein family, and find the functional mutative network among residues. We expect that the CMCA approach may find applications in protein engineering study, and suggest new strategy to improve bioactivities and physicochemical properties of enzymes.

  18. The role of mutations in core protein of hepatitis B virus in liver fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbasi Shahsanam

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The core protein of hepatitis B virus encompasses B- and T-cell immunodominant epitopes and subdivided into two domains: the N-terminal and the functional C-terminal consisted phosphorylation sites. Mutations of the core gene may change the conformation of the core protein or cause alteration of important epitopes in the host immune response. In this study twenty nine men (mean age 40 ± 9 years old with chronic hepatitis B were recruited for direct sequencing of the core gene. Serum ALT and HBV DNA level were measured at the time of liver biopsy. The effects of core protein mutations on patients' characteristics and subsequently mutations in B cell, T helper and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL epitopes and also C-terminal domain of core protein on the activity of liver disease was evaluated. Liver fibrosis was significantly increased in patients with core protein mutation (1.0 ± 0.8 vs 1.9 ± 1.4 for mean stage of fibrosis P = 0.05. Mutations in CTL epitopes and in phosphorylation sites of C-terminal domain of core protein also were associated with higher liver fibrosis (P = 0.003 and P = 0.04; Fisher's exact test for both. Patients with mutation in C-terminal domain had higher serum ALT (62 ± 17 vs 36 ± 12 IU/l, p = 0.02. Patients with mutations in B cell and T helper epitopes did not show significant difference in the clinical features. Our data suggests that core protein mutations in CTL epitopes and C-terminal domain accompanied with higher stage of liver fibrosis may be due to alterations in the function of core protein.

  19. Gross deletions/duplications in PROS1 are relatively common in point mutation-negative hereditary protein S deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pintao, M.C.; Garcia, A.A.; Borgel, D.; Alhenc-Gelas, M.; Spek, C.A.; de Visser, M.C.H.; Gandrille, S.; Reitsma, P.H.

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary protein S (PS) deficiency is an autosomal disorder caused by mutations in the PS gene (PROS1). Conventional PCR-based mutation detection identifies PROS1 point mutations in approximately 50% of the cases. To verify if gross copy number variations (CNVs) are often present in point mutation

  20. Two novel mutations in surfactant protein-C, lung function and obstructive lung disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baekvad-Hansen, Marie; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Dominant mutations in the surfactant protein-C(SFTPC) gene have been linked with interstitial lung disease. The frequency of lung disease due to SFTPC mutations in the general population is unknown. The aim of this study was to identify novel SFTPC mutations that are associated with lung function...... pulmonary disease or interstitial lung disease. No Y106X heterozygotes suffered from asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), or interstitial lung disease. We identified two novel mutations in highly conserved areas of the SFTPC gene, and show that heterozygotes for the mutations have normal...... lung function and are unaffected by COPD and interstitial lung disease. A53T heterozygotes had increased asthma risk, but further research is required to conclusively determine whether this mutation is associated with asthma....

  1. No evidence of somatic aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein mutations in sporadic endocrine neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raitila, A; Georgitsi, M; Karhu, A;

    2007-01-01

    Germline mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene were recently observed in patients with pituitary adenoma predisposition (PAP). Though AIP mutation-positive individuals with prolactin-, mixed growth hormone/prolactin-, and ACTH-producing pituitary adenomas as well...... as non-secreting pituitary adenomas have been reported, most mutation-positive patients have had growth hormone-producing adenomas diagnosed at relatively young age. Pituitary adenomas are also component tumors of some familial endocrine neoplasia syndromes such as multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1....... Here, we have analyzed 32 pituitary adenomas and 79 other tumors of the endocrine system for somatic AIP mutations by direct sequencing. No somatic mutations were identified. However, two out of nine patients with prolactin-producing adenoma were shown to harbor a Finnish founder mutation (Q14X...

  2. Mutations in the bacterial ribosomal protein l3 and their association with antibiotic resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitgaard, Rasmus N; Ntokou, Eleni; Nørgaard, Katrine

    2015-01-01

    Different groups of antibiotics bind to the peptidyl transferase center (PTC) in the large subunit of the bacterial ribosome. Resistance to these groups of antibiotics has often been linked with mutations or methylations of the 23S rRNA. In recent years, there has been a rise in the number...... of studies where mutations have been found in the ribosomal protein L3 in bacterial strains resistant to PTC-targeting antibiotics but there is often no evidence that these mutations actually confer antibiotic resistance. In this study, a plasmid exchange system was used to replace plasmid-carried wild...... background. Ten plasmid-carried mutated L3 genes were constructed, and their effect on growth and antibiotic susceptibility was investigated. Additionally, computational modeling of the impact of L3 mutations in E. coli was used to assess changes in 50S structure and antibiotic binding. All mutations...

  3. Performance study of single undoped CsI crystals for the Mu2e experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Donghia, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab aims to measure the charged lepton flavor violating neutrinoless muon to electron conversion. The goal of the experiment is to reach a single event sensitivity of 2.5 x 10^{-17}, to set an upper limit on the muon conversion rate at 6.7 x 10^{-17} in a three years run. For this purpose, the Mu2e detector is designed to identify electrons from muon conversion and reduce the background to a negligible level. It consists of a low mass straw tracker and a pure CsI crystal calorimeter. In this paper, the performance of undoped CsI single crystal is reported. Crystals from many vendors have been characterized by determining their Light Yield (LY) and Longitudinal Response Uniformity (LRU), when read with a UV extended PMT, and their time resolution when coupled to a Silicon Photomultiplier. The crystals show a LY of ~ 100 photoelectrons per MeV when wrapped with Tyvek and coupled to the PMT without optical grease. The LRU is well represented by a linear slope that is on average 0.6%/c...

  4. Chromatin remodeling by the CHD7 protein is impaired by mutations that cause human developmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouazoune, Karim; Kingston, Robert E

    2012-11-20

    Mutations in the CHD7 gene cause human developmental disorders including CHARGE syndrome. Genetic studies in model organisms have further established CHD7 as a central regulator of vertebrate development. Functional analysis of the CHD7 protein has been hampered by its large size. We used a dual-tag system to purify intact recombinant CHD7 protein and found that it is an ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeling factor. Biochemical analyses indicate that CHD7 has characteristics distinct from SWI/SNF- and ISWI-type remodelers. Further investigations show that CHD7 patient mutations have consequences that range from subtle to complete inactivation of remodeling activity, and that mutations leading to protein truncations upstream of amino acid 1899 of CHD7 are likely to cause a hypomorphic phenotype for remodeling. We propose that nucleosome remodeling is a key function for CHD7 during developmental processes and provide a molecular basis for predicting the impact of disease mutations on that function.

  5. Initial mutations direct alternative pathways of protein evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salverda, M.L.M.; Dellus, E.; Gorter, F.A.; Debets, A.J.M.; Oost, van der J.; Hoekstra, R.F.; Tawfik, D.S.; Visser, de J.A.G.M.

    2011-01-01

    Whether evolution is erratic due to random historical details, or is repeatedly directed along similar paths by certain constraints, remains unclear. Epistasis (i.e. non-additive interaction between mutations that affect fitness) is a mechanism that can contribute to both scenarios. Epistasis can co

  6. A cancer-predisposing "hot spot" mutation of the fumarase gene creates a dominant negative protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzato, Annalisa; Olivero, Martina; Perro, Mario; Brière, Jean Jacques; Rustin, Pierre; Di Renzo, Maria Flavia

    2008-02-15

    The Fumarase (Fumarate Hydratase, FH) is a tumor suppressor gene whose germline heterozygous mutations predispose to hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC). The FH gene encodes an enzyme of the Krebs cycle, functioning as a homotetramer and catalyzing the hydration of fumarate to malate. Among the numerous FH mutations reported so far, the R190H missense mutation is the most frequent in HLRCC patients. Here we show the functional analyses of the R190H, in comparison to the better characterized E319Q mutation. We first expressed wild-type and mutated proteins in FH deficient human skin fibroblasts, using lentiviral vectors. The wild-type transgene was able to restore the FH enzymatic activity in cells, while the R190H- and E319Q-FH were not. More interestingly, when the same transgenes were expressed in normal, FH-proficient cells, only the R190H-FH reduced the endogenous FH enzymatic activity. By enforcing the expression of equal amount of wild-type and R190H-FH in the same cell, we showed that the mutated FH protein directly inhibited enzymatic activity by nearly abrogating the FH homotetramer formation. These data demonstrate the dominant negative effect of the R190H missense mutation in the FH gene and suggest that the FH tumor-suppressing activity might be impaired in cells carrying a heterozygous mutation. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Predicting the Effect of Mutations on Protein-Protein Binding Interactions through Structure-Based Interface Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brender, Jeffrey R; Zhang, Yang

    2015-10-01

    The formation of protein-protein complexes is essential for proteins to perform their physiological functions in the cell. Mutations that prevent the proper formation of the correct complexes can have serious consequences for the associated cellular processes. Since experimental determination of protein-protein binding affinity remains difficult when performed on a large scale, computational methods for predicting the consequences of mutations on binding affinity are highly desirable. We show that a scoring function based on interface structure profiles collected from analogous protein-protein interactions in the PDB is a powerful predictor of protein binding affinity changes upon mutation. As a standalone feature, the differences between the interface profile score of the mutant and wild-type proteins has an accuracy equivalent to the best all-atom potentials, despite being two orders of magnitude faster once the profile has been constructed. Due to its unique sensitivity in collecting the evolutionary profiles of analogous binding interactions and the high speed of calculation, the interface profile score has additional advantages as a complementary feature to combine with physics-based potentials for improving the accuracy of composite scoring approaches. By incorporating the sequence-derived and residue-level coarse-grained potentials with the interface structure profile score, a composite model was constructed through the random forest training, which generates a Pearson correlation coefficient >0.8 between the predicted and observed binding free-energy changes upon mutation. This accuracy is comparable to, or outperforms in most cases, the current best methods, but does not require high-resolution full-atomic models of the mutant structures. The binding interface profiling approach should find useful application in human-disease mutation recognition and protein interface design studies.

  8. A General Mechanism for the Propagation of Mutational Effects in Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, Nandakumar; Suresh, Swaathiratna; Gopi, Soundhararajan; Raman, Karthik; Naganathan, Athi N

    2017-01-10

    Mutations in the hydrophobic interior of proteins are generally thought to weaken the interactions only in their immediate neighborhood. This forms the basis of protein engineering-based studies of folding mechanism and function. However, mutational work on diverse proteins has shown that distant residues are thermodynamically coupled, with the network of interactions within the protein acting as signal conduits, thus raising an intriguing paradox. Are mutational effects localized, and if not, is there a general rule for the extent of percolation and the functional form of this propagation? We explore these questions from multiple perspectives in this work. Perturbation analysis of interaction networks within proteins and microsecond long molecular dynamics simulations of several aliphatic mutants of ubiquitin reveal strong evidence of the distinct alteration of distal residue-residue communication networks. We find that mutational effects consistently propagate into the second shell of the altered site (even up to 15-20 Å) in proportion to the perturbation magnitude and dissipate exponentially with a decay distance constant of ∼4-5 Å. We also report evidence for this phenomenon from published experimental nuclear magnetic resonance data that strikingly resemble predictions from network theory and molecular dynamics simulations. Reformulating these observations onto a statistical mechanical model, we reproduce the stability changes of 375 mutations from 19 single-domain proteins. Our work thus reveals a robust energy dissipation-cum-signaling mechanism in the interaction network within proteins, quantifies the partitioning of destabilization energetics around the mutation neighborhood, and presents a simple theoretical framework for modeling the allosteric effects of point mutations.

  9. CCND1 mutations increase protein stability and promote ibrutinib resistance in mantle cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Atish; Sandoval, Natalie; Das, Manasi; Pillai, Raju; Chen, Lu; Chen, Robert W; Amin, Hesham M; Wang, Michael; Marcucci, Guido; Weisenburger, Dennis D; Rosen, Steven T; Pham, Lan V; Ngo, Vu N

    2016-11-08

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is characterized by the t(11;14) translocation, which leads to deregulated expression of the cell cycle regulatory protein cyclin D1 (CCND1). Genomic studies of MCL have also identified recurrent mutations in the coding region of CCND1. However, the functional consequence of these mutations is not known. Here, we showed that, compared to wild type (WT), single E36K, Y44D or C47S CCND1 mutations increased CCND1 protein levels in MCL cell lines. Mechanistically, these mutations stabilized CCND1 protein through attenuation of threonine-286 phosphorylation, which is important for proteolysis through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. In addition, the mutant proteins preferentially localized to the nucleus. Interestingly, forced expression of WT or mutant CCND1 increased resistance of MCL cell lines to ibrutinib, an FDA-approved Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor for MCL treatment. The Y44D mutant sustained the resistance to ibrutinib even at supraphysiologic concentrations (5-10 μM). Furthermore, primary MCL tumors with CCND1 mutations also expressed stable CCND1 protein and were resistant to ibrutinib. These findings uncover a new mechanism that is critical for the regulation of CCND1 protein levels, and is directly relevant to primary ibrutinib resistance in MCL.

  10. Structure Based Thermostability Prediction Models for Protein Single Point Mutations with Machine Learning Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Lei; Yarlagadda, Ramya; Reed, Charles C

    2015-01-01

    Thermostability issue of protein point mutations is a common occurrence in protein engineering. An application which predicts the thermostability of mutants can be helpful for guiding decision making process in protein design via mutagenesis. An in silico point mutation scanning method is frequently used to find "hot spots" in proteins for focused mutagenesis. ProTherm (http://gibk26.bio.kyutech.ac.jp/jouhou/Protherm/protherm.html) is a public database that consists of thousands of protein mutants' experimentally measured thermostability. Two data sets based on two differently measured thermostability properties of protein single point mutations, namely the unfolding free energy change (ddG) and melting temperature change (dTm) were obtained from this database. Folding free energy change calculation from Rosetta, structural information of the point mutations as well as amino acid physical properties were obtained for building thermostability prediction models with informatics modeling tools. Five supervised machine learning methods (support vector machine, random forests, artificial neural network, naïve Bayes classifier, K nearest neighbor) and partial least squares regression are used for building the prediction models. Binary and ternary classifications as well as regression models were built and evaluated. Data set redundancy and balancing, the reverse mutations technique, feature selection, and comparison to other published methods were discussed. Rosetta calculated folding free energy change ranked as the most influential features in all prediction models. Other descriptors also made significant contributions to increasing the accuracy of the prediction models.

  11. Structure Based Thermostability Prediction Models for Protein Single Point Mutations with Machine Learning Tools.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Jia

    Full Text Available Thermostability issue of protein point mutations is a common occurrence in protein engineering. An application which predicts the thermostability of mutants can be helpful for guiding decision making process in protein design via mutagenesis. An in silico point mutation scanning method is frequently used to find "hot spots" in proteins for focused mutagenesis. ProTherm (http://gibk26.bio.kyutech.ac.jp/jouhou/Protherm/protherm.html is a public database that consists of thousands of protein mutants' experimentally measured thermostability. Two data sets based on two differently measured thermostability properties of protein single point mutations, namely the unfolding free energy change (ddG and melting temperature change (dTm were obtained from this database. Folding free energy change calculation from Rosetta, structural information of the point mutations as well as amino acid physical properties were obtained for building thermostability prediction models with informatics modeling tools. Five supervised machine learning methods (support vector machine, random forests, artificial neural network, naïve Bayes classifier, K nearest neighbor and partial least squares regression are used for building the prediction models. Binary and ternary classifications as well as regression models were built and evaluated. Data set redundancy and balancing, the reverse mutations technique, feature selection, and comparison to other published methods were discussed. Rosetta calculated folding free energy change ranked as the most influential features in all prediction models. Other descriptors also made significant contributions to increasing the accuracy of the prediction models.

  12. Hidden thermodynamic information in protein amino acid mutation tables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, J. C.

    2017-03-01

    We combine the standard 1992 20 × 20 substitution matrix based on block alignment, BLOSUM62, with the standard 1982 amino acid hydropathicity scale KD as well as the modern 2007 hydropathicity scale MZ, and compare the results. The 20-parameter KD and MZ hydropathicity scales have different thermodynamic character, corresponding to first- and second-order transitions. The KD and MZ comparisons show that the mutation rates reflect quantitative iteration of qualitative amino acid-phobic and -philic binary 2 × 10 properties that define quaternary 4 × 5 subgroups (but not quinary 5 × 4 subgroups), with the modern MZ bioinformatic scale giving much better results. The quaternary 5-mer MZ 4 × 5 subgroups are called mutons (Mu5). Among all hydropathicity scales, the MZ scale uniquely exhibits a smooth, deep mutational minimum at its center associated with alanine, glycine, the smallest amino acid, and histidine.

  13. A Computational Protein Phenotype Prediction Approach to Analyze the Deleterious Mutations of Human MED12 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaganapalli, Babajan; Mohammed, Kaleemuddin; Khan, Imran Ali; Al-Aama, Jumana Y; Elango, Ramu; Shaik, Noor Ahmad

    2016-09-01

    Genetic mutations in MED12, a subunit of Mediator complex are seen in a broad spectrum of human diseases. However, the underlying basis of how these pathogenic mutations elicit protein phenotype changes in terms of 3D structure, stability and protein binding sites remains unknown. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the structural and functional impacts of MED12 mutations, using computational methods as an alternate to traditional in vivo and in vitro approaches. The MED12 gene mutations details and their corresponding clinical associations were collected from different databases and by text-mining. Initially, diverse computational approaches were applied to categorize the different classes of mutations based on their deleterious impact to MED12. Then, protein structures for wild and mutant types built by integrative modeling were analyzed for structural divergence, solvent accessibility, stability, and functional interaction deformities. Finally, this study was able to identify that genetic mutations mapped to exon-2 region, highly conserved LCEWAV and Catenin domains induce biochemically severe amino acid changes which alters the protein phenotype as well as the stability of MED12-CYCC interactions. To better understand the deleterious nature of FS-IDs and Indels, this study asserts the utility of computational screening based on their propensity towards non-sense mediated decay. Current study findings may help to narrow down the number of MED12 mutations to be screened for mediator complex dysfunction associated genetic diseases. This study supports computational methods as a primary filter to verify the plausible impact of pathogenic mutations based on the perspective of evolution, expression and phenotype of proteins. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2023-2035, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Design, status and test of the Mu2e crystal calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martini, Matteo; et al.

    2016-06-17

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab searches for the charged-lepton flavor violating neutrino-less conversion of a negative muon into an electron in the field of a aluminum nucleus. The dynamic of such a process is well modeled by a two-body decay, resulting in a monoenergetic electron with an energy slightly below the muon rest mass (104.967 MeV). The calorimeter of this experiment plays an important role to provide excellent particle identification capabilities and an online trigger filter while aiding the track reconstruction capabilities. The baseline calorimeter configuration consists of two disks each made with about 700 undoped CsI crystals read out by two large area UV-extended Silicon Photomultipliers. These crystals match the requirements for stability of response, high resolution and radiation hardness. In this paper we present the final calorimeter design.

  15. Measurement of Time Resolution of the Mu2e LYSO Calorimeter Prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atanov, N. [Jouint Inst. of Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russia); et al.

    2015-09-16

    In this paper we present the time resolution measurements of the LutetiumYttrium Oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) calorimeter prototype for the Mu2e experiment. The measurements have been performed using the e- beam of the Beam Test Facility (BTF) in Frascati, Italy in the energy range from 100 to 400 MeV. The calorimeter prototype consisted of twenty five 30x30x130 mm3, LYSO crystals read out by 10x10 mm2 Hamamatsu Avalanche Photodiodes (APDs). The energy dependence of the measured time resolution can be parametrized as σt(E) = a/pE/GeV⊕b, with the stochastic and constant terms a = (51±1) ps and b = (14 ± 1) ps, respectively. This corresponds to the time resolution of (162 ± 3) ps at 100 MeV.

  16. Out-of-Time Beam Extinction in the MU2E Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prebys, E. J. [Fermilab; Werkema, S. [Fermilab

    2015-06-01

    The Mu2e Experiment at Fermilab will search for the conversion of a muon to an electron in the field of an atomic nucleus with unprecedented sensitivity. The experiment requires a beam consisting of proton bunches 250 ns FW long, separated by 1.7 $\\mu$ sec, with no out-of-time protons at the $10^{10}$ fractional level. Satisfying this "extinction" requirement is very challenging. The formation of the bunches is expected to result in an extinction on the order of $10^5$. The remaining extinction will be accomplished by a system of resonant magnets and collimators, configured such that only in-time beam is delivered to the experiment. Our simulations show that the total extinction achievable by the system is on the order of $10^{12}$, with an efficiency for transmitting in-time beam of 99.6%.

  17. Measurement of time resolution of the Mu2e LYSO calorimeter prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Atanov, N; Colao, F; Cordelli, M; Corradi, G; Dané, E; Davydov, Yu I; Flood, K; Giovannella, S; Glagolev, V; Happacher, F; Hitlin, D G; Martini, M; Miscetti, S; Miyashita, T; Morescalchi, L; Pezzullo, G; Saputi, A; Sarra, I; Soleti, S R; Tassielli, G; Tereshchenko, V

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present the time resolution measurements of the Lutetium-Yttrium Oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) calorimeter prototype for the Mu2e experiment. The measurements have been performed using the $e^-$ beam of the Beam Test Facility (BTF) in Frascati, Italy in the energy range from 100 to 400 MeV. The calorimeter prototype consisted of twenty five 30x30x130 mm$^3$, LYSO crystals read out by 10x10 mm$^2$ Hamamatsu Avalanche Photodiodes (APDs). The energy dependence of the measured time resolution can be parametrized as $\\sigma_{t}(E)=a/\\sqrt{E/\\mathrm{GeV}} \\oplus b$, with the stochastic and constant terms $a=(51\\pm1)$ ps and $b=(14\\pm1)$ ps, respectively. This corresponds to the time resolution of ($162\\pm3$) ps at 100 MeV.

  18. Design, status and test of the Mu2e crystal calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Atanov, N; Budagov, J; Carosi, R; Cervelli, F; Colao, F; Cordelli, M; Corradi, G; Danè, E; Davydov, Y I; Di Falco, S; Donati, S; Donghia, R; Echenard, B; Flood, K; Giovannella, S; Glagolev, V; Grancagnolo, F; Happacher, F; Hitlin, D G; Martini, M; Miscetti, S; Miyashita, T; Morescalchi, L; Murat, P; Piacentino, G M; Pezzullo, G; Raffaelli, F; Saputi, A; Sarra, I; Spinella, F; Tassielli, G; Tereshchenko, V; Usubov, Z; Zhu, R Y

    2016-01-01

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab searches for the charged-lepton flavor violating neutrino-less conversion of a negative muon into an electron in the field of a aluminum nucleus. The dynamic of such a process is well modeled by a two-body decay, resulting in a monoenergetic electron with an energy slightly below the muon rest mass (104.967 MeV). The calorimeter of this experiment plays an important role to provide excellent particle identification capabilities and an online trigger filter while aiding the track reconstruction capabilities. The baseline calorimeter configuration consists of two disks each made with about 700 undoped CsI crystals read out by two large area UV-extended Silicon Photomultipliers. These crystals match the requirements for stability of response, high resolution and radiation hardness. In this paper we present the final calorimeter design.

  19. Detection of mutant protein in complex biological samples: Glucocerebrosidase mutations in Gaucher’s disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleijlevens, B.; van Breemen, M.J.; Donker-Koopman, W.E.; de Koster, C.G.; Aerts, J.M.F.G.

    2008-01-01

    We report a sensitive method to detect point mutations in proteins from complex samples. The method is based on surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (SELDI-ToF) MS but can be extended to other MS platforms. The target protein in this study is the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebros

  20. Diseases caused by mutations in Nav1.5 interacting proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, John W; Makielski, Jonathan C

    2014-12-01

    Sodium current in the heart flows principally through the pore protein NaV1.5, which is part of a complex of interacting proteins that serve both to target and localize the complex in the membrane, and to modulate function by such post-translational modifications as phosphorylation and nitrosylation. Multiple mutations in seven different NaV1.5 interacting proteins have been associated with dysfunctional sodium current and inherited cardiac diseases, including long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, atrial fibrillation, and cardiomyopathy, as well as sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Mutations in as yet unidentified interacting proteins may account for cardiac disease for which a genetic basis has not yet been established. Characterizing the mechanisms by which these mutations cause disease may give insight into etiologies and treatments of more common acquired cardiac disease, such as ischemia and heart failure.

  1. Engineered mutations in fibrillin-1 leading to Marfan syndrome act at the protein, cellular and organismal levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeyer, Karina A; Reinhardt, Dieter P

    2015-01-01

    Fibrillins are the major components of microfibrils in the extracellular matrix of elastic and non-elastic tissues. They are multi-domain proteins, containing primarily calcium binding epidermal growth factor-like (cbEGF) domains and 8-cysteine/transforming growth factor-beta binding protein-like (TB) domains. Mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene give rise to Marfan syndrome, a connective tissue disorder with clinical complications in the cardiovascular, skeletal, ocular and other organ systems. Here, we review the consequences of engineered Marfan syndrome mutations in fibrillin-1 at the protein, cellular and organismal levels. Representative point mutations associated with Marfan syndrome in affected individuals have been introduced and analyzed in recombinant fibrillin-1 fragments. Those mutations affect fibrillin-1 on a structural and functional level. Mutations which impair folding of cbEGF domains can affect protein trafficking. Protein folding disrupted by some mutations can lead to defective secretion in mutant fibrillin-1 fragments, whereas fragments with other Marfan mutations are secreted normally. Many Marfan mutations render fibrillin-1 more susceptible to proteolysis. There is also evidence that some mutations affect heparin binding. Few mutations have been further analyzed in mouse models. An extensively studied mouse model of Marfan syndrome expresses mouse fibrillin-1 with a missense mutation (p.C1039G). The mice display similar characteristics to human patients with Marfan syndrome. Overall, the analyses of engineered mutations leading to Marfan syndrome provide important insights into the pathogenic molecular mechanisms exerted by mutated fibrillin-1.

  2. BOR-syndrome-associated Eya1 mutations lead to enhanced proteasomal degradation of Eya1 protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amna Musharraf

    Full Text Available Mutations in the human EYA1 gene have been associated with several human diseases including branchio-oto (BO and branchio-oto-renal (BOR syndrome, as well as congenital cataracts and ocular anterior segment anomalies. BOR patients suffer from severe malformations of the ears, branchial arches and kidneys. The phenotype of Eya1-heterozygous mice resembles the symptoms of human patients suffering from BOR syndrome. The Eya1 gene encodes a multifunctional protein that acts as a protein tyrosine phosphatase and a transcriptional coactivator. It has been shown that Eya1 interacts with Six transcription factors, which are also required for nuclear translocation of the Eya1 protein. We investigated the effects of seven disease-causing Eya1 missense mutations on Eya1 protein function, in particular cellular localization, ability to interact with Six proteins, and protein stability. We show here that the BOR-associated Eya1 missense mutations S454P, L472R, and L550P lead to enhanced proteasomal degradation of the Eya1 protein in mammalian cells. Moreover, Six proteins lead to a significant stabilization of Eya1, which is caused by Six-mediated protection from proteasomal degradation. In case of the mutant L550P, loss of interaction with Six proteins leads to rapid protein degradation. Our observations suggest that protein destabilization constitutes a novel disease causing mechanism for Eya1.

  3. Mutations of 3c and spike protein genes correlate with the occurrence of feline infectious peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bank-Wolf, Barbara Regina; Stallkamp, Iris; Wiese, Svenja; Moritz, Andreas; Tekes, Gergely; Thiel, Heinz-Jürgen

    2014-10-10

    The genes encoding accessory proteins 3a, 3b, 3c, 7a and 7b, the S2 domain of the spike (S) protein gene and the membrane (M) protein gene of feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) and feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) samples were amplified, cloned and sequenced. For this faeces and/or ascites samples from 19 cats suffering from feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) as well as from 20 FECV-infected healthy cats were used. Sequence comparisons revealed that 3c genes of animals with FIP were heavily affected by nucleotide deletions and point mutations compared to animals infected with FECV; these alterations resulted either in early termination or destruction of the translation initiation codon. Two ascites-derived samples of cats with FIP which displayed no alterations of ORF3c harboured mutations in the S2 domain of the S protein gene which resulted in amino acid exchanges or deletions. Moreover, changes in 3c were often accompanied by mutations in S2. In contrast, in samples obtained from faeces of healthy cats, the ORF3c was never affected by such mutations. Similarly ORF3c from faecal samples of the cats with FIP was mostly intact and showed only in a few cases the same mutations found in the respective ascites samples. The genes encoding 3a, 3b, 7a and 7b displayed no mutations linked to the feline coronavirus (FCoV) biotype. The M protein gene was found to be conserved between FECV and FIPV samples. Our findings suggest that mutations of 3c and spike protein genes correlate with the occurrence of FIP.

  4. Chimeric proteins for detection and quantitation of DNA mutations, DNA sequence variations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric proteins having both DNA mutation binding activity and nuclease activity are synthesized by recombinant technology. The proteins are of the general formula A-L-B and B-L-A where A is a peptide having DNA mutation binding activity, L is a linker and B is a peptide having nuclease activity. The chimeric proteins are useful for detection and identification of DNA sequence variations including DNA mutations (including DNA damage and mismatches) by binding to the DNA mutation and cutting the DNA once the DNA mutation is detected.

  5. Correlation of p53 gene mutation and expression of P53 protein in cholangiocarcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Fang Liu; Hao Zhang; Shi-Guang Zhu; Xian-Ting Zhou; Hai-Long Su; Zheng Xu; Shao-Jun Li

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the tumor suppressor gene p53 mutations and study the correlation of p53 gene mutation and the expression of P53 protein in cholangiocarcinoma.METHODS: A total of 36 unselected, frozen samples of cholangiocarcinoma were collected. p53 gene status(exon 5-8) and P53 protein were examined by automated sequencing and immunohistochemical staining, combined with the clinical parameters of patients.RESULTS: p53 gene mutations were found in 22 of 36 (61.1%) patients. Nineteen of 36 (52.8%) patients were positive for P53 protein expression. There were significant differences in extent of differentiation and invasion between the positive and negative expression of P53 protein. However, there were no significant differences in pathologic parameters between the mutations and non-mutations.CONCLUSION: The alterations of the p53 gene evaluated by DNA sequence analysis is relatively accurate. Expression of P53 protein could not act as an independent index to estimate the prognosis of cholangiocarcinoma.

  6. Protein homeostasis disorders of key enzymes of amino acids metabolism: mutation-induced protein kinetic destabilization and new therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pey, Angel L

    2013-12-01

    Many inborn errors of amino acids metabolism are caused by single point mutations affecting the ability of proteins to fold properly (i.e., protein homeostasis), thus leading to enzyme loss-of-function. Mutations may affect protein homeostasis by altering intrinsic physical properties of the polypeptide (folding thermodynamics, and rates of folding/unfolding/misfolding) as well as the interaction of partially folded states with elements of the protein homeostasis network (such as molecular chaperones and proteolytic machineries). Understanding these mutational effects on protein homeostasis is required to develop new therapeutic strategies aimed to target specific features of the mutant polypeptide. Here, I review recent work in three different diseases of protein homeostasis associated to inborn errors of amino acids metabolism: phenylketonuria, inherited homocystinuria and primary hyperoxaluria type I. These three different genetic disorders involve proteins operating in different cell organelles and displaying different structural complexities. Mutations often decrease protein kinetic stability of the native state (i.e., its half-life for irreversible denaturation), which can be studied using simple kinetic models amenable to biophysical and biochemical characterization. Natural ligands and pharmacological chaperones are shown to stabilize mutant enzymes, thus supporting their therapeutic application to overcome protein kinetic destabilization. The role of molecular chaperones in protein folding and misfolding is also discussed as well as their potential pharmacological modulation as promising new therapeutic approaches. Since current available treatments for these diseases are either burdening or only successful in a fraction of patients, alternative treatments must be considered covering studies from protein structure and biophysics to studies in animal models and patients.

  7. Mutations Conferring a Noncytotoxic Phenotype on Chikungunya Virus Replicons Compromise Enzymatic Properties of Nonstructural Protein 2

    OpenAIRE

    Utt, Age; Das, Pratyush Kumar; Varjak, Margus; Lulla, Valeria; Lulla, Aleksei; Merits, Andres

    2014-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) (genus Alphavirus) has a positive-sense RNA genome. CHIKV nonstructural protein 2 (nsP2) proteolytically processes the viral nonstructural polyprotein, possesses nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase), RNA triphosphatase, and RNA helicase activities, and induces cytopathic effects in vertebrate cells. Although alphaviral nsP2 mutations can result in a noncytotoxic phenotype, the effects of such mutations on nsP2 enzymatic activities are not well understood. In this study...

  8. p53 gene mutations, p53 protein accumulation and compartmentalization in colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    p53 accumulation may occur in the nucleus and/or cytoplasm of neoplastic cells. Cytoplasmic accumulation has been reported to be an unfavorable, but not established, prognostic indicator in colorectal cancer. Different types of p53 intracellular compartmentalization could depend either on p53 gene mutations or on the interaction with p53 protein ligands. The purposes of our study were (1) to assess whether the different patterns of p53 accumulation are selectively associated with p53 mutation...

  9. Mutation analysis of tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced protein 3 gene in Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etzel, Barbara-Magdalena; Gerth, Melanie; Chen, Yuan; Wünsche, Elisa; Facklam, Tina; Beck, James F; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando; Petersen, Iver

    2017-03-01

    Survival and proliferation of Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells, the malignant cells of classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL), are dependent on constitutive activation of nuclear factor kB (NF-κB). A20, encoded by TNF alpha-induced protein 3 (TNFAIP3), one of the inhibitors of NF-kB, was found to be inactivated by deletions and/or point mutations in CHL. TNFAIP3 mutations were examined in 37 patients with CHL by using PCR and direct sequencing. In addition, protein expression of A20 was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) status of HL samples was determined by EBV EBER chromogenic in situ hybridization (ISH). We identified 8 mutation positive cases in a collective of 37 investigated cases (22%). Mutations were most frequent in the nodular sclerosis subtype. Our results revealed the tendency that cases harboring A20 mutations were negative for A20 staining. None of A20 mutation-positive CHL cases showed EBV infection. Our study confirms the involvement of the TNFAIP3 tumor suppressor gene in CHL. A20 may represent a suppressor of human lymphoma and provide a critical molecular link between chronic inflammation and cancer. None of A20 mutation-positive CHL cases showed EBV infection. This fact suggests complementing functions of TNFAIP3 inactivation and EBV infection in CHL pathogenesis and may represent an interesting point of further investigations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Abnormal desmin protein in myofibrillar myopathies caused by desmin gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M; Dalakas, M C

    2001-04-01

    Muscle proteins were extracted in various sodium dodecyl sulfate buffers from 6 patients with myofibrillar myopathy (MFM) and previously identified with mutations in the desmin gene (desmin myopathy; DesM), 6 with MFM without mutations, and 14 disease controls to search for alterations in biochemistry and solubility of mutated desmin filaments. In the 1% posthigh-speed pellet fraction, desmin was detected with immunoblots only in DesM and not the other MFM. We conclude that mutant desmin forms insoluble aggregates that are specific for the DesM and can be detected with Western blots.

  11. The R304X mutation of the Aryl hydrocarbon receptor Interacting Protein gene in familial isolated pituitary adenomas: mutational Hot-Spot or founder effect?

    OpenAIRE

    Occhi, G.; Jaffrain-Rea, M. L.; Trivellin, G.; Albiger, N; Ceccato, F.; De Menis, E.; Angelini, M.; Ferasin, S; Beckers, Albert; F. Mantero; Scaroni, C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Mutations in the Aryl hydrocarbon receptor Interacting Protein (AIP) gene have been described in about 15% of kindreds with Familial Isolated Pituitary Adenomas (FIPA) and in a minority of early onset sporadic pituitary adenomas (PA). Among the AIP mutations reported so far, the R304X (AIPR304X) represents, together with the "Finnish mutation" Q14X, the most common one. Methods: Three AIPR304X Italian families, including a newly reported kindred, have been genotyped for 12 genetic...

  12. On the physics of thermal-stability changes upon mutations of a protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Shota; Oshima, Hiraku; Hayashi, Tomohiko; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2015-09-28

    It is of great interest from both scientific and practical viewpoints to theoretically predict the thermal-stability changes upon mutations of a protein. However, such a prediction is an intricate task. Up to now, significantly many approaches for the prediction have been reported in the literature. They always include parameters which are adjusted so that the prediction results can be best fitted to the experimental data for a sufficiently large set of proteins and mutations. The inclusion is necessitated to achieve satisfactorily high prediction performance. A problem is that the resulting values of the parameters are often physically meaningless, and the physicochemical factors governing the thermal-stability changes upon mutations are rather ambiguous. Here, we develop a new measure of the thermal stability. Protein folding is accompanied by a large gain of water entropy (the entropic excluded-volume (EV) effect), loss of protein conformational entropy, and increase in enthalpy. The enthalpy increase originates primarily from the following: The energy increase due to the break of protein-water hydrogen bonds (HBs) upon folding cannot completely be cancelled out by the energy decrease brought by the formation of protein intramolecular HBs. We develop the measure on the basis of only these three factors and apply it to the prediction of the thermal-stability changes upon mutations. As a consequence, an approach toward the prediction is obtained. It is distinguished from the previously reported approaches in the following respects: The parameters adjusted in the manner mentioned above are not employed at all, and the entropic EV effect, which is ascribed to the translational displacement of water molecules coexisting with the protein in the system, is fully taken into account using a molecular model for water. Our approach is compared with one of the most popular approaches, FOLD-X, in terms of the prediction performance not only for single mutations but also for

  13. Hereditary thrombophilia: identification of nonsense and missense mutations in the protein C gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romeo, G.; Hassan, H.J.; Staempfli, S.; Roncuzzi, L.; Cianetti, L.; Leonardi, A.; Vicente, V.; Mannucci, P.M.; Bertina, R.; Peschile, C.; Cortese, R.

    1987-05-01

    The structure of the gene for protein C, an anticoagulant serine protease, was analyzed in 29 unrelated patients with hereditary thrombophilia and protein C deficiency. Gene deletion(s) or gross rearrangement(s) was not demonstrable by Southern blot hybridization to cDNA probes. However, two unrelated patients showed a variant restriction pattern after Pvu II or BamHi digestion, due to mutations in the last exon: analysis of their pedigrees, including three or seven heterozygotes, respectively, with approx.50% reduction of both enzymatic and antigen level, showed the abnormal restriction pattern in all heterozygous individuals, but not in normal relatives. Cloning of protein C gene and sequencing of the last exon allowed the authors to identify a nonsense and a missense mutation, respectively. In the first case, codon 306 (CGA, arginine) is mutated to an inframe stop codon, thus generating a new Pvu II recognition site. In the second case, a missense mutation in the BamHI palindrome (GGATCC ..-->.. GCATCC) leads to substitution of a key amino acid (a tryptophan to cysteine substitution at position 402), invariantly conserved in eukaryotic serine proteases. These point mutations may explain the protein C-deficiency phenotype of heterozygotes in the two pedigrees.

  14. Myelin protein zero gene mutated in Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1B patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Ying; Li, Lanying; Lepercq, J.; Lebo, R.V. (Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)); Brooks, D.G.; Ravetch, J.V. (Sloan-Kettering Institute, New York, NY (United States)); Trofatter, J.A. (Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States))

    1993-11-15

    The autosomal dominant of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), whose gene is type 1B (CMT1B), has slow nerve conduction with demyelinated Schwann cells. In this study the abundant peripheral myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene, MPZ, was mapped 130 kb centromeric to the Fc receptor immunoglobulin gene cluster in band 1q22, and a major MPZ point mutation was found to cosegregate with CMT1B in one large CMT1B family. The MPZ point mutation in 18 of 18 related CMT1B pedigree 1 patients converts a positively charged lysine in codon 96 to a negatively charged glutamate. The same MPZ locus cosegregates with the CMT1B disease gene in a second CMT1B family [total multipoint logarithm of odds (lod) = 11.4 at [theta] = 0.00] with a splice junction mutation. Both mutations occur in MPZ protein regions otherwise conserved identically in human, rat, and cow since these species diverged 100 million years ago. MPZ protein, expressed exclusively in myelinated peripheral nerve Schwann cells, constitutes >50% of myelin protein. These mutations are anticipated to disrupt homophilic MPZ binding and result in CMT1B peripheral nerve demyelination.

  15. There is a world beyond protein mutations: the role of non-coding RNAs in melanomagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swoboda, Rolf K; Herlyn, Meenhard

    2013-05-01

    Until recently, the general perception has been that mutations in protein-coding genes are responsible for tumorigenesis. With the discovery of (V600E)BRAF in about 50% of cutaneous melanomas, there was an increased effort to find additional mutations. However, mutations characterized in melanoma to date cannot account for the development of all melanomas. With the discovery of microRNAs as important players in melanomagenesis, protein mutations are no longer considered the sole drivers of tumors. Recent research findings have expanded the view for tumor initiation and progression to additional non-coding RNAs. The data suggest that tumorigenesis is likely an interplay between mutated proteins and deregulation of non-coding RNAs in the cell with an additional role of the tumor environment. With the exception of microRNAs, our knowledge of the role of non-coding RNAs in melanoma is in its infancy. Using few examples, we will summarize some of the roles of non-coding RNAs in tumorigenesis. Thus, there is a whole world beyond protein-coding sequences and microRNAs, which can cause melanoma.

  16. Quantifying and understanding the fitness effects of protein mutations: Laboratory versus nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Jeffrey I; Bolon, Daniel N A; Tawfik, Dan S

    2016-07-01

    The last decade has seen a growing number of experiments aimed at systematically mapping the effects of mutations in different proteins, and of attempting to correlate their biophysical and biochemical effects with organismal fitness. While insightful, systematic laboratory measurements of fitness effects present challenges and difficulties. Here, we discuss the limitations associated with such measurements, and in particular the challenge of correlating the effects of mutations at the single protein level ("protein fitness") with their effects on organismal fitness. A variety of experimental setups are used, with some measuring the direct effects on protein function and others monitoring the growth rate of a model organism carrying the protein mutants. The manners by which fitness effects are calculated and presented also vary, and the conclusions, including the derived distributions of fitness effects of mutations, vary accordingly. The comparison of the effects of mutations in the laboratory to the natural protein diversity, namely to amino acid changes that have fixed in the course of millions of years of evolution, is also debatable. The results of laboratory experiments may, therefore, be less relevant to understanding long-term inter-species variations yet insightful with regard to short-term polymorphism, for example, in the study of the effects of human SNPs.

  17. A Split-Ubiquitin Based Strategy Selecting for Protein Complex-Interfering Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronemeyer, Thomas; Chollet, Julian; Werner, Stefan; Glomb, Oliver; Bäuerle, Anne; Johnsson, Nils

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the topologies and functions of protein interaction networks requires the selective removal of single interactions. We introduce a selection strategy that enriches among a random library of alleles for mutations that impair the binding to a given partner protein. The selection makes use of a split-ubiquitin based protein interaction assay. This assay provides yeast cells that carry protein complex disturbing mutations with the advantage of being able to survive on uracil-lacking media. Applied to the exemplary interaction between the PB domains of the yeast proteins Bem1 and Cdc24, we performed two independent selections. The selections were either analyzed by Sanger sequencing of isolated clones or by next generation sequencing (NGS) of pools of clones. Both screens enriched for the same mutation in position 833 of Cdc24. Biochemical analysis confirmed that this mutation disturbs the interaction with Bem1 but not the fold of the protein. The larger dataset obtained by NGS achieved a more complete representation of the bipartite interaction interface of Cdc24.

  18. Community-wide Evaluation of Methods for Predicting the Effect of Mutations on Protein-Protein Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Rocco; Fleishman, Sarel J.; Agius, Rudi; Torchala, Mieczyslaw; Bates, Paul A.; Kastritis, Panagiotis L.; Rodrigues, João P. G. L. M.; Trellet, Mikaël; Bonvin, Alexandre M. J. J.; Cui, Meng; Rooman, Marianne; Gillis, Dimitri; Dehouck, Yves; Moal, Iain; Romero-Durana, Miguel; Perez-Cano, Laura; Pallara, Chiara; Jimenez, Brian; Fernandez-Recio, Juan; Flores, Samuel; Pacella, Michael; Kilambi, Krishna Praneeth; Gray, Jeffrey J.; Popov, Petr; Grudinin, Sergei; Esquivel-Rodríguez, Juan; Kihara, Daisuke; Zhao, Nan; Korkin, Dmitry; Zhu, Xiaolei; Demerdash, Omar N. A.; Mitchell, Julie C.; Kanamori, Eiji; Tsuchiya, Yuko; Nakamura, Haruki; Lee, Hasup; Park, Hahnbeom; Seok, Chaok; Sarmiento, Jamica; Liang, Shide; Teraguchi, Shusuke; Standley, Daron M.; Shimoyama, Hiromitsu; Terashi, Genki; Takeda-Shitaka, Mayuko; Iwadate, Mitsuo; Umeyama, Hideaki; Beglov, Dmitri; Hall, David R.; Kozakov, Dima; Vajda, Sandor; Pierce, Brian G.; Hwang, Howook; Vreven, Thom; Weng, Zhiping; Huang, Yangyu; Li, Haotian; Yang, Xiufeng; Ji, Xiaofeng; Liu, Shiyong; Xiao, Yi; Zacharias, Martin; Qin, Sanbo; Zhou, Huan-Xiang; Huang, Sheng-You; Zou, Xiaoqin; Velankar, Sameer; Janin, Joël; Wodak, Shoshana J.; Baker, David

    2014-01-01

    Community-wide blind prediction experiments such as CAPRI and CASP provide an objective measure of the current state of predictive methodology. Here we describe a community-wide assessment of methods to predict the effects of mutations on protein-protein interactions. Twenty-two groups predicted the effects of comprehensive saturation mutagenesis for two designed influenza hemagglutinin binders and the results were compared with experimental yeast display enrichment data obtained using deep sequencing. The most successful methods explicitly considered the effects of mutation on monomer stability in addition to binding affinity, carried out explicit side chain sampling and backbone relaxation, and evaluated packing, electrostatic and solvation effects, and correctly identified around a third of the beneficial mutations. Much room for improvement remains for even the best techniques, and large-scale fitness landscapes should continue to provide an excellent test bed for continued evaluation of methodological improvement. PMID:23843247

  19. Comparison of Nuclear Accumulation of p53 Protein with Mutations in the p53 Gene of Human Breast Cancer Tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王萱仪; 查小明; 武正炎; 范萍

    2001-01-01

    Objective The objective was to compare nuclear accumulation of p53 protein with mutations in the p53 gene on the tissues of human breast cancer. Methods Fifty-four invasive ductal carcinomas of breast were analyzed by the method of polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) silver stain and strep-avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex (SABC) immunohistochemistry. Results A statistically significant association between the presence of p53 gene mutation and nuclear accumulation of p53 protein was found (P<0.01). 22 tumors that demonstrated p53 gene mutations showed nuclear accumulation of p53 protein, while only 9 (28%) showed nuclear accumulation of p53 protein in 32 tumors without p53 gene mutations. Both p53 mutation protein and p53 gene mutations were prevalent in steroid and progesterone receptors negative tumors (P<0.05). A statistically significant association was found between the nuclear accumulation of p53 protein and lymph node invasion (P<0.05), and between p53 gene mutations and lymph node invasion (P<0.05). p53 abnormalities might be associated with an aggressive phenotype in breast cancer. Conclusion The immunohistochemical detection of nuclear p53 protein accumulation is highly associated with p53 gene mutations in breast cancer tissues, and that this method is useful for rapid screening of p53 abnormalities. However, in order to avoid false positive reaction, the p53 gene mutations should be determined in cases slightly positive for p53 nuclear protein.

  20. Animal Models of Congenital Cardiomyopathies Associated With Mutations in Z-Line Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Marie-Louise

    2017-01-01

    The cardiac Z-line at the boundary between sarcomeres is a multiprotein complex connecting the contractile apparatus with the cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix. The Z-line is important for efficient force generation and transmission as well as the maintenance of structural stability and integrity. Furthermore, it is a nodal point for intracellular signaling, in particular mechanosensing and mechanotransduction. Mutations in various genes encoding Z-line proteins have been associated with different cardiomyopathies, including dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, and left ventricular noncompaction, and mutations even within the same gene can cause widely different pathologies. Animal models have contributed to a great advancement in the understanding of the physiological function of Z-line proteins and the pathways leading from mutations in Z-line proteins to cardiomyopathy, although genotype-phenotype prediction remains a great challenge. This review presents an overview of the currently available animal models for Z-line and Z-line associated proteins involved in human cardiomyopathies with special emphasis on knock-in and transgenic mouse models recapitulating the clinical phenotypes of human cardiomyopathy patients carrying mutations in Z-line proteins. Pros and cons of mouse models will be discussed and a future outlook will be given. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 38-52, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Two Mutations in Surfactant Protein C Gene Associated with Neonatal Respiratory Distress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Tarocco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple mutations of surfactant genes causing surfactant dysfunction have been described. Surfactant protein C (SP-C deficiency is associated with variable clinical manifestations ranging from neonatal respiratory distress syndrome to lethal lung disease. We present an extremely low birth weight male infant with an unusual course of respiratory distress syndrome associated with two mutations in the SFTPC gene: C43-7G>A and 12T>A. He required mechanical ventilation for 26 days and was treated with 5 subsequent doses of surfactant with temporary and short-term efficacy. He was discharged at 37 weeks of postconceptional age without any respiratory support. During the first 16 months of life he developed five respiratory infections that did not require hospitalization. Conclusion. This mild course in our patient with two mutations is peculiar because the outcome in patients with a single SFTPC mutation is usually poor.

  2. Interpreting the role of de novo protein-coding mutations in neuropsychiatric disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratten, Jacob; Visscher, Peter M; Mowry, Bryan J; Wray, Naomi R

    2013-03-01

    Pedigree, linkage and association studies are consistent with heritable variation for complex disease due to the segregation of genetic factors in families and in the population. In contrast, de novo mutations make only minor contributions to heritability estimates for complex traits. Nonetheless, some de novo variants are known to be important in disease etiology. The identification of risk-conferring de novo variants will contribute to the discovery of etiologically relevant genes and pathways and may help in genetic counseling. There is considerable interest in the role of such mutations in complex neuropsychiatric disease, largely driven by new genotyping and sequencing technologies. An important role for large de novo copy number variations has been established. Recently, whole-exome sequencing has been used to extend the investigation of de novo variation to point mutations in protein-coding regions. Here, we consider several challenges for the interpretation of such mutations in the context of their role in neuropsychiatric disease.

  3. Screening of mutations affecting protein stability and dynamics of FGFR1—A simulation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. George Priya Doss

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Single amino acid substitutions in Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1 (FGFR1 destabilize protein and have been implicated in several genetic disorders like various forms of cancer, Kallamann syndrome, Pfeiffer syndrome, Jackson Weiss syndrome, etc. In order to gain functional insight into mutation caused by amino acid substitution to protein function and expression, special emphasis was laid on molecular dynamics simulation techniques in combination with in silico tools such as SIFT, PolyPhen 2.0, I-Mutant 3.0 and SNAP. It has been estimated that 68% nsSNPs were predicted to be deleterious by I-Mutant, slightly higher than SIFT (37%, PolyPhen 2.0 (61% and SNAP (58%. From the observed results, P722S mutation was found to be most deleterious by comparing results of all in silico tools. By molecular dynamics approach, we have shown that P722S mutation leads to increase in flexibility, and deviated more from the native structure which was supported by the decrease in the number of hydrogen bonds. In addition, biophysical analysis revealed a clear insight of stability loss due to P722S mutation in FGFR1 protein. Majority of mutations predicted by these in silico tools were in good concordance with the experimental results.

  4. Thermal and Structural Analysis of Beamline Components in the Mu2e Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Luke Daniel [Northern Illinois U.

    2016-01-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory will be conducting the high energy particle physics experiment Muons to Electrons (Mu2e). In this experiment, physicists will attempt to witness and understand an ultra-rare process which is the conversion of a muon into the lighter mass electron, without creating additional neutrinos. The experiment is conducted by first generating a proton beam which will be collided into a target within the production solenoid (PS). This creates a high-intensity muon beam which passes through a transport solenoid (TS) and into the detector solenoid (DS). In the detector solenoid the muons will be stopped in an aluminum target and a series of detectors will measure the electrons produced. These components have been named the DS train since they are coupled and travel on a rail system when being inserted or extracted from the DS. To facilitate the installation and removal of the DS train, a set of external stands and a support stand for the instrumentation feed-through bulkhead (IFB) have been designed. Full analysis of safety factors and performance of these two designs has been completed. The detector solenoid itself will need to be maintained to a temperature of 22°C ± 10°C. This will minimize thermal strain and ensure the accurate position of the components is maintained to the tolerance of 2 mm. To reduce the thermal gradient, a passive heating system has been developed and reported.

  5. Forced Two-Phase Helium Cooling Scheme for the Mu2e Transport Solenoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatkowski, G. [Fermilab; Cheban, S. [Fermilab; Dhanaraj, N. [Fermilab; Evbota, D. [Fermilab; Lopes, M. [Fermilab; Nicol, T. [Fermilab; Sanders, R. [Fermilab; Schmitt, R. [Fermilab; Voirin, E. [Fermilab

    2015-01-01

    The Mu2e Transport Solenoid (TS) is an S-shaped magnet formed by two separate but similar magnets, TS-u and TS-d. Each magnet is quarter-toroid shaped with a centerline radius of approximately 3 m utilizing a helium cooling loop consisting of 25 to 27 horizontal-axis rings connected in series. This cooling loop configuration has been deemed adequate for cooling via forced single phase liquid helium; however it presents major challenges to forced two-phase flow such as “garden hose” pressure drop, concerns of flow separation from tube walls, difficulty of calculation, etc. Even with these disadvantages, forced two-phase flow has certain inherent advantages which make it a more attractive option than forced single phase flow. It is for this reason that the use of forced two-phase flow was studied for the TS magnets. This paper will describe the analysis using helium-specific pressure drop correlations, conservative engineering approach, helium properties calculated and updated at over fifty points, and how the results compared with those in literature. Based on the findings, the use of forced-two phase helium is determined to be feasible for steady-state cooling of the TS solenoids

  6. High-accuracy local positioning network for the alignment of the Mu2e experiment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hejdukova, Jana B. [Czech Technical Univ., Prague (Czech Republic)

    2017-06-01

    This Diploma thesis describes the establishment of a high-precision local positioning network and accelerator alignment for the Mu2e physics experiment. The process of establishing new network consists of few steps: design of the network, pre-analysis, installation works, measurements of the network and making adjustments. Adjustments were performed using two approaches. First is a geodetic approach of taking into account the Earth’s curvature and the metrological approach of a pure 3D Cartesian system on the other side. The comparison of those two approaches is performed and evaluated in the results and compared with expected differences. The effect of the Earth’s curvature was found to be significant for this kind of network and should not be neglected. The measurements were obtained with Absolute Tracker AT401, leveling instrument Leica DNA03 and gyrotheodolite DMT Gyromat 2000. The coordinates of the points of the reference network were determined by the Least Square Meth od and the overall view is attached as Annexes.

  7. Radiation and thermal analysis of production solenoid for Mu2e experimental setup

    CERN Document Server

    Pronskikh, V S; Mokhov, N V

    2011-01-01

    The Muon-to-Electron (Mu2e) experiment at Fermilab, will seek the evidence of direct muon to electron conversion at the sensitivity level where it cannot be explained by the Standard Model. An 8-GeV 25-kW proton beam will be directed onto a tilted gold target inside a large-bore superconducting Production Solenoid (PS) with the peak field on the axis of ~5T. The negative muons resulting from the pion decay will be captured in the PS aperture and directed by an S-shaped Transport Solenoid towards the stopping target inside the Detector Solenoid. In order for the superconducting magnets to operate reliably and with a sufficient safety margin, the peak neutron flux entering the coils must be reduced by 3 orders of magnitude that is achieved by means of a sophisticated absorber placed in the magnet aperture. The proposed absorber, consisting of W- and Cu-based alloy parts, is optimized for the performance and cost. Results of MARS15 simulations of energy deposition and radiation are reported. The results of the P...

  8. Effect of single-site mutations on hydrophobic-polar lattice proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Guangjie; Vogel, Thomas; Wüst, Thomas; Li, Ying Wai; Landau, David P.

    2014-09-01

    We developed a heuristic method for determining the ground-state degeneracy of hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice proteins, based on Wang-Landau and multicanonical sampling. It is applied during comprehensive studies of single-site mutations in specific HP proteins with different sequences. The effects in which we are interested include structural changes in ground states, changes of ground-state energy, degeneracy, and thermodynamic properties of the system. With respect to mutations, both extremely sensitive and insensitive positions in the HP sequence have been found. That is, ground-state energies and degeneracies, as well as other thermodynamic and structural quantities, may be either largely unaffected or may change significantly due to mutation.

  9. Mutational and Bioinformatic Analysis of Haloarchaeal Lipobox-Containing Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Storf

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A conserved lipid-modified cysteine found in a protein motif commonly referred to as a lipobox mediates the membrane anchoring of a subset of proteins transported across the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane via the Sec pathway. Sequenced haloarchaeal genomes encode many putative lipoproteins and recent studies have confirmed the importance of the conserved lipobox cysteine for signal peptide processing of three lipobox-containing proteins in the model archaeon Haloferax volcanii. We have extended these in vivo analyses to additional Hfx. volcanii substrates, supporting our previous in silico predictions and confirming the diversity of predicted Hfx. volcanii lipoproteins. Moreover, using extensive comparative secretome analyses, we identified genes encodining putative lipoproteins across a wide range of archaeal species. While our in silico analyses, supported by in vivo data, indicate that most haloarchaeal lipoproteins are Tat substrates, these analyses also predict that many crenarchaeal species lack lipoproteins altogether and that other archaea, such as nonhalophilic euryarchaeal species, transport lipoproteins via the Sec pathway. To facilitate the identification of genes that encode potential haloarchaeal Tat-lipoproteins, we have developed TatLipo, a bioinformatic tool designed to detect lipoboxes in haloarchaeal Tat signal peptides. Our results provide a strong foundation for future studies aimed at identifying components of the archaeal lipoprotein biogenesis pathway.

  10. Frequency of p53 gene mutation and protein expression in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ara, Nighat; Atique, Muhammad; Ahmed, Sohaib; Ali Bukhari, Syed Gulzar

    2014-10-01

    To determine the frequency of p53 gene mutation and protein expression in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) and to establish correlation between the two. Analytical study. Histopathology Department and Molecular Biology Laboratory, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP), Rawalpindi, from May 2010 to May 2011. Thirty diagnosed cases of OSCC were selected by consecutive sampling. Seventeen were retrieved from the record files of the AFIP, and 13 fresh/frozen sections were selected from patients reporting to the Oral Surgery Department, Armed Forces Institute of Dentistry (AFID). Gene p53 mutation was analyzed in all the cases using PCRSSCP analysis. DNA was extracted from the formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue sections and fresh/frozen sections. DNA thus extracted was amplified by polymerase chain reaction. The amplified products were denatured and finally analyzed by gel electrophoresis. Gene mutation was detected as electrophoretic mobility shift. The immunohistochemical marker p53 was applied to the same 30 cases and overexpression of protein p53 was recorded. Immunohistochemical expression of marker p53 was positive in 67% [95% Confidence Interval (CI) 48.7-80.9] of the cases. Mutations of the p53 gene were detected in 23% (95% CI 11.5-41.2) of the OSCC. No statistically significant correlation was found between p53 gene mutation and protein p53 expression (rs=-0.057, p=0.765). A substantial number of patients have p53 gene mutation (23%) and protein p53 expression (67%) in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC).

  11. Prediction of phenotypes of missense mutations in human proteins from biological assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qiong; Xu, Qifang; Dunbrack, Roland L

    2013-02-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most frequent variation in the human genome. Nonsynonymous SNPs that lead to missense mutations can be neutral or deleterious, and several computational methods have been presented that predict the phenotype of human missense mutations. These methods use sequence-based and structure-based features in various combinations, relying on different statistical distributions of these features for deleterious and neutral mutations. One structure-based feature that has not been studied significantly is the accessible surface area within biologically relevant oligomeric assemblies. These assemblies are different from the crystallographic asymmetric unit for more than half of X-ray crystal structures. We find that mutations in the core of proteins or in the interfaces in biological assemblies are significantly more likely to be disease-associated than those on the surface of the biological assemblies. For structures with more than one protein in the biological assembly (whether the same sequence or different), we find the accessible surface area from biological assemblies provides a statistically significant improvement in prediction over the accessible surface area of monomers from protein crystal structures (P = 6e-5). When adding this information to sequence-based features such as the difference between wildtype and mutant position-specific profile scores, the improvement from biological assemblies is statistically significant but much smaller (P = 0.018). Combining this information with sequence-based features in a support vector machine leads to 82% accuracy on a balanced dataset of 50% disease-associated mutations from SwissVar and 50% neutral mutations from human/primate sequence differences in orthologous proteins.

  12. Mutation in West Nile Virus Structural Protein prM during Human Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustig, Yaniv; Lanciotti, Robert S; Hindiyeh, Musa; Keller, Nathan; Milo, Ron; Mayan, Shlomo; Mendelson, Ella

    2016-09-01

    A mutation leading to substitution of a key amino acid in the prM protein of West Nile virus (WNV) occurred during persistent infection of an immunocompetent patient. WNV RNA persisted in the patient's urine and serum in the presence of low-level neutralizing antibodies. This case demonstrates active replication of WNV during persistent infection.

  13. A new mutation in the prion protein gene: A patient with dementia and white matter changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Harten, B.; Van Gool, W.A.; Van Langen, I.M.; Deekman, J.M.; Meijerink, P.H.S.; Weinstein, H.C.

    2000-01-01

    The authors describe the clinical characteristics, MRI abnormalities, and molecular findings in a patient with a novel variant of a two-octarepeat insertion mutation in the prion protein gene. This patient presented with moderately progressive dementia of presenile onset and gait ataxia. MRI showed

  14. Chromatin remodeling by the CHD7 protein is impaired by mutations that cause human developmental disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Bouazoune, Karim; Kingston, Robert Edward

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the CHD7 gene cause human developmental disorders including CHARGE syndrome. Genetic studies in model organisms have further established CHD7 as a central regulator of vertebrate development. Functional analysis of the CHD7 protein has been hampered by its large size. We used a dual-tag system to purify intact recombinant CHD7 protein and found that it is an ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeling factor. Biochemical analyses indicate that CHD7 has characteristics distinct from SWI/S...

  15. Study of requirements and performances of the electromagnetic calorimeter for the Mu2e experiment at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soleti, S. [Sapienza Univ. of Rome (Italy)

    2015-06-15

    In this thesis we discuss the simulation and tests carried out for the optimization and design of the electromagnetic calorimeter for the Mu2e (Muon to electron conversion) experiment, which is a proposed experiment part of the Muon Campus hosted at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in Batavia, United States.

  16. Mutations in multidomain protein MEGF8 identify a Carpenter syndrome subtype associated with defective lateralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twigg, Stephen R F; Lloyd, Deborah; Jenkins, Dagan; Elçioglu, Nursel E; Cooper, Christopher D O; Al-Sannaa, Nouriya; Annagür, Ali; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Hüning, Irina; Knight, Samantha J L; Goodship, Judith A; Keavney, Bernard D; Beales, Philip L; Gileadi, Opher; McGowan, Simon J; Wilkie, Andrew O M

    2012-11-02

    Carpenter syndrome is an autosomal-recessive multiple-congenital-malformation disorder characterized by multisuture craniosynostosis and polysyndactyly of the hands and feet; many other clinical features occur, and the most frequent include obesity, umbilical hernia, cryptorchidism, and congenital heart disease. Mutations of RAB23, encoding a small GTPase that regulates vesicular transport, are present in the majority of cases. Here, we describe a disorder caused by mutations in multiple epidermal-growth-factor-like-domains 8 (MEGF8), which exhibits substantial clinical overlap with Carpenter syndrome but is frequently associated with abnormal left-right patterning. We describe five affected individuals with similar dysmorphic facies, and three of them had either complete situs inversus, dextrocardia, or transposition of the great arteries; similar cardiac abnormalities were previously identified in a mouse mutant for the orthologous Megf8. The mutant alleles comprise one nonsense, three missense, and two splice-site mutations; we demonstrate in zebrafish that, in contrast to the wild-type protein, the proteins containing all three missense alterations provide only weak rescue of an early gastrulation phenotype induced by Megf8 knockdown. We conclude that mutations in MEGF8 cause a Carpenter syndrome subtype frequently associated with defective left-right patterning, probably through perturbation of signaling by hedgehog and nodal family members. We did not observe any subject with biallelic loss-of function mutations, suggesting that some residual MEGF8 function might be necessary for survival and might influence the phenotypes observed.

  17. In silico investigation of molecular effects caused by missense mutations in creatine transporter protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhe; Schwatz, Charles; Alexov, Emil

    2011-03-01

    Creatine transporter (CT) protein, which is encoded by SLC6A8 gene, is essential for taking up the creatine in the cell, which in turn plays a key role in the spatial and temporal maintenance of energy in skeletal and cardiac muscle cells. It was shown that some missense mutations in CT cause mental retardation, while others are harmless non-synonymous single nucleoside polymorphism (nsSNP). Currently fifteen missense mutations in CT are known, among which twelve are disease-causing. Sequence analysis reveals that there is no clear trend distinguishing disease-causing from harmless missense mutations. Because of that, we built 3D model of the CT using highly homologous template and use the model to investigate the effects of mutations of CT stability and hydrogen bond network. It is demonstrated that disease-causing mutations affect the folding free energy and ionization states of titratable group in much greater extend as compared with harmless mutations. Supported by grants from NLM, NIH, grant numbers 1R03LM009748 and 1R03LM009748-S1.

  18. Irradiation study of UV Silicon Photomultipliers for the Mu2e calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccaro, S.; Cemmi, A.; Cordelli, M.; Diociaiuti, E.; Donghia, R.; Ferrari, A.; Giovannella, S.; Loreti, S.; Miscetti, S.; Müller, S.; Pillon, M.; Sarra, I.

    2017-02-01

    The Mu2e calorimeter is composed of 1400 un-doped CsI crystals, coupled to large area UV extended Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs), arranged in two annular disks. This calorimeter has to provide precise information on energy, timing and position resolutions. It should also be fast enough to handle the high rate background and it must operate and survive in the high radiation environment. Simulation studies estimated that, in the highest irradiated regions, each photo-sensor will absorb a dose of 20 krad and will be exposed to a neutron fluency of 5.5×1011n1 MeV/cm2 in three years of running, with a safety factor of 3 included. At the end of 2015, we have concluded an irradiation campaign at the Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG, Frascati, Italy) measuring the response of two different 16 array models from Hamamatsu, which differ for the protection windows and a SiPM from FBK. In 2016, we have carried out two additional irradiation campaigns with neutrons and photons at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR, Dresden, Germany) and at the Calliope gamma irradiation facility at ENEA-Casaccia, respectively. A negligible increment of the leakage current and no gain change have been observed with the dose irradiation. On the other hand, at the end of the neutron irradiation, the gain does not show large changes whilst the leakage current increases by around a factor of 2000. In these conditions, the too high leakage current makes problematic to bias the SiPMs, thus requiring to cool them down to a running temperature of ~0oC.

  19. CHARACTERIZATION OF ENU-INDUCED MUTATIONS IN RED BLOOD CELL STRUCTURAL PROTEINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina Kildey

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Murine models with modified gene function as a result of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU mutagenesis have been used to study phenotypes resulting from genetic change. This study investigated genetic factors associated with red blood cell (RBC physiology and structural integrity that may impact on blood component storage and transfusion outcome. Forward and reverse genetic approaches were employed with pedigrees of ENU-treated mice using a homozygous recessive breeding strategy. In a “forward genetic” approach, pedigree selection was based upon identification of an altered phenotype followed by exome sequencing to identify a causative mutation. In a second strategy, a “reverse genetic” approach based on selection of pedigrees with mutations in genes of interest was utilised and, following breeding to homozygosity, phenotype assessed. Thirty-three pedigrees were screened by the forward genetic approach. One pedigree demonstrated reticulocytosis, microcytic anaemia and thrombocytosis. Exome sequencing revealed a novel single nucleotide variation (SNV in Ank1 encoding the RBC structural protein ankyrin-1 and the pedigree was designated Ank1EX34. The reticulocytosis and microcytic anaemia observed in the Ank1EX34 pedigree were similar to clinical features of hereditary spherocytosis in humans. For the reverse genetic approach three pedigrees with different point mutations in Spnb1 encoding RBC protein spectrin-1β, and one pedigree with a mutation in Epb4.1, encoding band 4.1 were selected for study. When bred to homozygosity two of the spectrin-1β pedigrees (a, b demonstrated increased RBC count, haemoglobin (Hb and haematocrit (HCT. The third Spnb1 mutation (spectrin-1β c and mutation in Epb4.1 (band 4.1 did not significantly affect the haematological phenotype, despite these two mutations having a PolyPhen score predicting the mutation may be damaging. Exome sequencing allows rapid identification of causative mutations and development of

  20. Mutation of genes controlling mRNA metabolism and protein synthesis predisposes to neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartor, Francesca; Anderson, Jihan; McCaig, Colin; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Müller, Berndt

    2015-12-01

    Brain development is a tightly controlled process that depends upon differentiation and function of neurons to allow for the formation of functional neural networks. Mutation of genes encoding structural proteins is well recognized as causal for neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs). Recent studies have shown that aberrant gene expression can also lead to disorders of neural development. Here we summarize recent evidence implicating in the aetiology of NDDs mutation of factors acting at the level of mRNA splicing, mRNA nuclear export, translation and mRNA degradation. This highlights the importance of these fundamental processes for human health and affords new strategies and targets for therapeutic intervention.

  1. Mutations in the Novel Mitochondrial Protein REEP1 Cause Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia Type 31

    OpenAIRE

    Züchner, Stephan; Wang, Gaofeng; Tran-Viet, Khanh-Nhat; Nance, Martha A.; Gaskell, Perry C.; Vance, Jeffery M.; Ashley-Koch, Allison E; Margaret A Pericak-Vance

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) comprises a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous diseases that affect the upper motor neurons and their axonal projections. For the novel SPG31 locus on chromosome 2p12, we identified six different mutations in the receptor expression–enhancing protein 1 gene (REEP1). REEP1 mutations occurred in 6.5% of the patients with HSP in our sample, making it the third-most common HSP gene. We show that REEP1 is widely expressed and localizes to mitochon...

  2. Mutations in the Novel Mitochondrial Protein REEP1 Cause Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia Type 31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Züchner, Stephan; Wang, Gaofeng; Tran-Viet, Khanh-Nhat; Nance, Martha A.; Gaskell, Perry C.; Vance, Jeffery M.; Ashley-Koch, Allison E.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) comprises a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous diseases that affect the upper motor neurons and their axonal projections. For the novel SPG31 locus on chromosome 2p12, we identified six different mutations in the receptor expression–enhancing protein 1 gene (REEP1). REEP1 mutations occurred in 6.5% of the patients with HSP in our sample, making it the third-most common HSP gene. We show that REEP1 is widely expressed and localizes to mitochondria, which underlines the importance of mitochondrial function in neurodegenerative disease. PMID:16826527

  3. A single mutation in the envelope protein modulates flavivirus antigenicity, stability, and pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Goo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The structural flexibility or 'breathing' of the envelope (E protein of flaviviruses allows virions to sample an ensemble of conformations at equilibrium. The molecular basis and functional consequences of virus conformational dynamics are poorly understood. Here, we identified a single mutation at residue 198 (T198F of the West Nile virus (WNV E protein domain I-II hinge that regulates virus breathing. The T198F mutation resulted in a ~70-fold increase in sensitivity to neutralization by a monoclonal antibody targeting a cryptic epitope in the fusion loop. Increased exposure of this otherwise poorly accessible fusion loop epitope was accompanied by reduced virus stability in solution at physiological temperatures. Introduction of a mutation at the analogous residue of dengue virus (DENV, but not Zika virus (ZIKV, E protein also increased accessibility of the cryptic fusion loop epitope and decreased virus stability in solution, suggesting that this residue modulates the structural ensembles sampled by distinct flaviviruses at equilibrium in a context dependent manner. Although the T198F mutation did not substantially impair WNV growth kinetics in vitro, studies in mice revealed attenuation of WNV T198F infection. Overall, our study provides insight into the molecular basis and the in vitro and in vivo consequences of flavivirus breathing.

  4. Mutations in the West Nile prM protein affect VLP and virion secretion in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Amanda E; Huang, Claire Y-H; Blair, Carol D; Roehrig, John T

    2012-11-10

    Mutation of the West Nile virus-like particle (WN VLP) prM protein (T20D, K31A, K31V, or K31T) results in undetectable VLP secretion from transformed COS-1 cells. K31 mutants formed intracellular prM-E heterodimers; however these proteins remained in the ER and ER-Golgi intermediary compartments of transfected cells. The T20D mutation affected glycosylation, heterodimer formation, and WN VLP secretion. When infectious viruses bearing the same mutations were used to infect COS-1 cells, K31 mutant viruses exhibited delayed growth and reduced infectivity compared to WT virus. Epitope maps of WN VLP and WNV prM were also different. These results suggest that while mutations in the prM protein can reduce or eliminate secretion of WN VLPs, they have less effect on virus. This difference may be due to the quantity of prM in WN VLPs compared to WNV or to differences in maturation, structure, and symmetry of these particles.

  5. A single mutation in the envelope protein modulates flavivirus antigenicity, stability, and pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Leslie; VanBlargan, Laura A.; Dowd, Kimberly A.; Diamond, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    The structural flexibility or ‘breathing’ of the envelope (E) protein of flaviviruses allows virions to sample an ensemble of conformations at equilibrium. The molecular basis and functional consequences of virus conformational dynamics are poorly understood. Here, we identified a single mutation at residue 198 (T198F) of the West Nile virus (WNV) E protein domain I-II hinge that regulates virus breathing. The T198F mutation resulted in a ~70-fold increase in sensitivity to neutralization by a monoclonal antibody targeting a cryptic epitope in the fusion loop. Increased exposure of this otherwise poorly accessible fusion loop epitope was accompanied by reduced virus stability in solution at physiological temperatures. Introduction of a mutation at the analogous residue of dengue virus (DENV), but not Zika virus (ZIKV), E protein also increased accessibility of the cryptic fusion loop epitope and decreased virus stability in solution, suggesting that this residue modulates the structural ensembles sampled by distinct flaviviruses at equilibrium in a context dependent manner. Although the T198F mutation did not substantially impair WNV growth kinetics in vitro, studies in mice revealed attenuation of WNV T198F infection. Overall, our study provides insight into the molecular basis and the in vitro and in vivo consequences of flavivirus breathing. PMID:28207910

  6. Alternative mechanisms of telomere lengthening: Permissive mutations, DNA repair proteins and tumorigenic progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gocha, April Renee Sandy; Harris, Julia [Department of Molecular Virology, Immunology and Medical Genetics, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Groden, Joanna, E-mail: joanna.groden@osumc.edu [Department of Molecular Virology, Immunology and Medical Genetics, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Neoplastic cells maintain telomeres by telomerase or ALT. ► Genetic mutations in p53, ATRX, DAXX or H3F3A may activate ALT. ► Many DNA repair proteins are involved in ALT. ► Tumor progression is favored by telomerase expression. - Abstract: Telomeres protect chromosome termini to maintain genomic stability and regulate cellular lifespan. Maintenance of telomere length is required for neoplastic cells after the acquisition of mutations that deregulate cell cycle control and increase cellular proliferation, and can occur through expression of the enzyme telomerase or in a telomerase-independent manner termed alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT). The precise mechanisms that govern the activation of ALT or telomerase in tumor cells are unknown, although cellular origin may favor one or the other mechanisms. ALT pathways are incompletely understood to date; however, recent publications have increasingly broadened our understanding of how ALT is activated, how it proceeds, and how it influences tumor growth. Specific mutational events influence ALT activation, as mutations in genes that suppress recombination and/or alterations in the regulation of telomerase expression are associated with ALT. Once engaged, ALT uses DNA repair proteins to maintain telomeres in the absence of telomerase; experiments that manipulate the expression of specific proteins in cells using ALT are illuminating some of its mechanisms. Furthermore, ALT may influence tumor growth, as experimental and clinical data suggest that telomerase expression may favor tumor progression. This review summarizes recent findings in mammalian cells and models, as well as clinical data, that identify the genetic mutations permissive to ALT, the DNA repair proteins involved in ALT mechanisms and the importance of telomere maintenance mechanisms for tumor progression. A comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms that permit tumor cell immortalization will be important for identifying

  7. Mutation bias favors protein folding stability in the evolution of small populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Raul; Fritsche, Miriam; Porto, Markus; Bastolla, Ugo

    2010-05-01

    Mutation bias in prokaryotes varies from extreme adenine and thymine (AT) in obligatory endosymbiotic or parasitic bacteria to extreme guanine and cytosine (GC), for instance in actinobacteria. GC mutation bias deeply influences the folding stability of proteins, making proteins on the average less hydrophobic and therefore less stable with respect to unfolding but also less susceptible to misfolding and aggregation. We study a model where proteins evolve subject to selection for folding stability under given mutation bias, population size, and neutrality. We find a non-neutral regime where, for any given population size, there is an optimal mutation bias that maximizes fitness. Interestingly, this optimal GC usage is small for small populations, large for intermediate populations and around 50% for large populations. This result is robust with respect to the definition of the fitness function and to the protein structures studied. Our model suggests that small populations evolving with small GC usage eventually accumulate a significant selective advantage over populations evolving without this bias. This provides a possible explanation to the observation that most species adopting obligatory intracellular lifestyles with a consequent reduction of effective population size shifted their mutation spectrum towards AT. The model also predicts that large GC usage is optimal for intermediate population size. To test these predictions we estimated the effective population sizes of bacterial species using the optimal codon usage coefficients computed by dos Reis et al. and the synonymous to non-synonymous substitution ratio computed by Daubin and Moran. We found that the population sizes estimated in these ways are significantly smaller for species with small and large GC usage compared to species with no bias, which supports our prediction.

  8. Mutation bias favors protein folding stability in the evolution of small populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Mendez

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Mutation bias in prokaryotes varies from extreme adenine and thymine (AT in obligatory endosymbiotic or parasitic bacteria to extreme guanine and cytosine (GC, for instance in actinobacteria. GC mutation bias deeply influences the folding stability of proteins, making proteins on the average less hydrophobic and therefore less stable with respect to unfolding but also less susceptible to misfolding and aggregation. We study a model where proteins evolve subject to selection for folding stability under given mutation bias, population size, and neutrality. We find a non-neutral regime where, for any given population size, there is an optimal mutation bias that maximizes fitness. Interestingly, this optimal GC usage is small for small populations, large for intermediate populations and around 50% for large populations. This result is robust with respect to the definition of the fitness function and to the protein structures studied. Our model suggests that small populations evolving with small GC usage eventually accumulate a significant selective advantage over populations evolving without this bias. This provides a possible explanation to the observation that most species adopting obligatory intracellular lifestyles with a consequent reduction of effective population size shifted their mutation spectrum towards AT. The model also predicts that large GC usage is optimal for intermediate population size. To test these predictions we estimated the effective population sizes of bacterial species using the optimal codon usage coefficients computed by dos Reis et al. and the synonymous to non-synonymous substitution ratio computed by Daubin and Moran. We found that the population sizes estimated in these ways are significantly smaller for species with small and large GC usage compared to species with no bias, which supports our prediction.

  9. Study on phylogenetic relationships, variability, and correlated mutations in M2 proteins of influenza virus A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ly Le

    Full Text Available M2 channel, an influenza virus transmembrane protein, serves as an important target for antiviral drug design. There are still discordances concerning the role of some residues involved in proton transfer as well as the mechanism of inhibition by commercial drugs. The viral M2 proteins show high conservativity; about 3/4 of the positions are occupied by one residue in over 95%. Nine M2 proteins from the H3N2 strain and possibly two proteins from H2N2 strains make a phylogenic cluster closely related to 2RLF. The variability range is limited to 4 residues/position with one exception. The 2RLF protein stands out by the presence of 2 serines at the positions 19 and 50, which are in most other M2 proteins occupied by cysteines. The study of correlated mutations shows that there are several positions with significant mutational correlation that have not been described so far as functionally important. That there are 5 more residues potentially involved in the M2 mechanism of action. The original software used in this work (Consensus Constructor, SSSSg, Corm, Talana is freely accessible as stand-alone offline applications upon request to the authors. The other software used in this work is freely available online for noncommercial purposes at public services on bioinformatics such as ExPASy or NCBI. The study on mutational variability, evolutionary relationship, and correlated mutation presented in this paper is a potential way to explain more completely the role of significant factors in proton channel action and to clarify the inhibition mechanism by specific drugs.

  10. A novel gene encoding an integral membrane protein is mutated in nephropathic cystinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Town, M; Jean, G; Cherqui, S; Attard, M; Forestier, L; Whitmore, S A; Callen, D F; Gribouval, O; Broyer, M; Bates, G P; van't Hoff, W; Antignac, C

    1998-04-01

    Nephropathic cystinosis, an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from defective lysosomal transport of cystine, is the most common inherited cause of renal Fanconi syndrome. The cystinosis gene has been mapped to chromosome 17p13. We found that the locus D17S829 was homozygously deleted in 23 out of 70 patients, and identified a novel gene, CTNS, which mapped to the deletion interval. CTNS encodes an integral membrane protein, cystinosin, with features of a lysosomal membrane protein. Eleven different mutations, all predicted to cause loss of function of the protein, were found to segregate with the disorder.

  11. Changes in protein expression due to deleterious mutations in the FA/BRCA pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salles, Daniela; Cabral, Rosa Estela Caseira; Pizzatti, Luciana; Bisch, Paulo M; Paixão, Julio Cesar; de Almeida, Carlos Eduardo Bonacossa; Seuánez, Héctor N; Cabral-Neto, Januario Bispo

    2007-12-28

    Inherited deleterious mutations in one of the Fanconi anemia genes lead to a disease, characterized by bone marrow failure, myeloid leukemia, and hypersensitivity to DNA damage. We identified proteins likely associated to the molecular signaling pathways involved in DNA repair of interstrand cross-link lesions and in mechanisms of genomic stability mediated by FA/BRCA pathways. We compared protein maps resolved by bidimensional electrophoresis and analyzed differentially expressed proteins, by mass spectrometry, between FA complementation group C (FANCC)-deficient cells, and their ectopically corrected counterpart in physiological conditions or after treatment with MMC. We found six differentially expressed proteins; among them, the checkpoint mediator protein MDC1 whose expression was disrupted in FANCC-/- cells. The potential role of differentially expressed proteins in FA phenotype is discussed.

  12. Ancestral mutations as a tool for solubilizing proteins: The case of a hydrophobic phosphate-binding protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Gonzalez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stable and soluble proteins are ideal candidates for functional and structural studies. Unfortunately, some proteins or enzymes can be difficult to isolate, being sometimes poorly expressed in heterologous systems, insoluble and/or unstable. Numerous methods have been developed to address these issues, from the screening of various expression systems to the modification of the target protein itself. Here we use a hydrophobic, aggregation-prone, phosphate-binding protein (HPBP as a case study. We describe a simple and fast method that selectively uses ancestral mutations to generate a soluble, stable and functional variant of the target protein, here named sHPBP. This variant is highly expressed in Escherichia coli, is easily purified and its structure was solved at much higher resolution than its wild-type progenitor (1.3 versus 1.9 Å, respectively.

  13. Accuracy modulating mutations of the ribosomal protein S4-S5 interface do not necessarily destabilize the rps4-rps5 protein-protein interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallabhaneni, Haritha; Farabaugh, Philip J

    2009-06-01

    During the process of translation, an aminoacyl tRNA is selected in the A site of the decoding center of the small subunit based on the correct codon-anticodon base pairing. Though selection is usually accurate, mutations in the ribosomal RNA and proteins and the presence of some antibiotics like streptomycin alter translational accuracy. Recent crystallographic structures of the ribosome suggest that cognate tRNAs induce a "closed conformation" of the small subunit that stabilizes the codon-anticodon interactions at the A site. During formation of the closed conformation, the protein interface between rpS4 and rpS5 is broken while new contacts form with rpS12. Mutations in rpS12 confer streptomycin resistance or dependence and show a hyperaccurate phenotype. Mutations reversing streptomycin dependence affect rpS4 and rpS5. The canonical rpS4 and rpS5 streptomycin independent mutations increase translational errors and were called ribosomal ambiguity mutations (ram). The mutations in these proteins are proposed to affect formation of the closed complex by breaking the rpS4-rpS5 interface, which reduces the cost of domain closure and thus increases translational errors. We used a yeast two-hybrid system to study the interactions between the small subunit ribosomal proteins rpS4 and rpS5 and to test the effect of ram mutations on the stability of the interface. We found no correlation between ram phenotype and disruption of the interface.

  14. Functional characterization of fidgetin, an AAA-family protein mutated in fidget mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan; Mahaffey, Connie L; Bérubé, Nathalie; Nystuen, Arne; Frankel, Wayne N

    2005-03-10

    The mouse fidget mutation is an autosomal recessive mutation that renders reduced or absent semicircular canals, microphthalmia, and various skeletal abnormalities to affected mice. We previously identified the defective gene which encodes fidgetin, a new member of the ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities (AAA proteins). Here, we report on the subcellular localization of fidgetin as well as that of two closely related proteins, fidgetin-like 1 and fidgetin-like 2. Epitope-tagging and immunostaining revealed that both fidgetin and fidgetin-like 2 were predominantly localized to the nucleus, whereas fidgetin-like 1 was both nuclear and cytoplasmic. Furthermore, deletion studies identified a putative bipartite nuclear localization signal in the middle portion of the fidgetin protein. Since AAA proteins are known to form functional hetero- or homo-hexamers, we used reciprocal immunoprecipitation to examine the potential interaction among these proteins. We found that fidgetin interacted with itself and this specific interaction was abolished when either the N- or C-terminus of the protein was truncated. Taken together, our results suggest that fidgetin is a nuclear AAA-family protein with the potential to form homo-oligomers, thus representing the first step towards the elucidation of fidgetin's cellular function and the disease mechanism in fidget mutant mice.

  15. Effects of mutated replicase and movement protein genes on attenuation of tobacco mosaic virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨恭; 邱并生; 魏军亚; 刘广超

    2001-01-01

    Our previous reports showed that one opal mutation (UGA) and one ochre mutation (UAA) respectively located in the replicase and movement protein (MP) genes of the attenuated tomato mosaic virus K(ToMV-K) contribute to the viral attenuation. To explore a wider application of this attenuation pattern to other plant viruses, we have constructed three mutants which respectively contain one opal mutation of the replicase gene and/or one ochre mutation of the MP using PCR-mediated site-directed mutagenesis from a virulent tobacco mosaic virus isolated from China (TMV-Cv). Plant infection performed by in vitro transcripts revealed that the MP truncated mutant TMV-Cvmp and the replicase-MP truncated mutant TMV-Cvrase-mp were infectious on both local lesion (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi NC) and systemic (N. tabacum cv. K326) host plants, while the replicase truncated mutant TMV-Cvrase was non-infectious. The K326 plant infected by TMV- Cvrease-mp displayed only a little mild mosaic. By electronic microscopy (EM), plant re-inoculation, RNA Dot-blot, RT-PCR and sequencing we demonstrated that the progeny viruses of TMV-Cvmp and TMV-Cvrease-mp shared similar morphological character with TMV-Cv, owned the abilities to infect, replicate and propagate in the assayed plants, and maintained the mutated sites during infection. These data showed that both the opal and the ochre mutations are able to cooperatively induce the attenuated phenotypes of TMV-Cvrase-mp on plants, indicating that the mutation pattern of ToMV-K could be used to attenuate other virulent plant viruses.

  16. Mutations outside the YMDD motif in the P protein can also cause DHBV resistant to Lamivudine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Yang He; Yu-Tong Zhu; Rui-Yi Yang; Li-Ling Feng; Xing-Bo Guo; Feng-Xue Zhang; Hong-Shan Chen

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To observe the Lamivudine resistance character of a DHBV strain in vitro and in vivo, and to analyze if the Lamivudine resistance character is caused by gene mutation or by abnormity of the Lamivudine metabolism.METHODS: Congenitally DHBV-negative Guangdong brown ducks and duck embryo liver cells were respectively taken as animal and cell model. The Lamivudine-susceptive DHBV and Lamivudine-resistant DHBV (LRDHBV) were infected and Lamivudine was administrated according to the divided groups. The changes of DHBV quantity in the animal and cell model were tested. Three Lamivudineresistant and two Lamivudine-susceptive DHBV complete genomes were successfully amplified, sequenced and then submitted to GenBank. All the DHBV complete sequences in the GenBank at present were taken to align with the three LRDHBV to analyze the mutational points related to the Lamivudine-resistant mutation.RESULTS: Both the animal and cell model showed that the large and the small dosage Lamivudine have no significant inhibitory effect on the LRDHBV. Five sequences of DHBV complete genomes were successfully cloned. The GenBank accession numbers of the three sequences of LRDHBV are AY521226, AY521227, and AY433937. The two strains of Lamivudine-susceptive DHBV are AY392760and AY536371. The correlated mutational points are KorR86Q and AorE591T in the P protein.CONCLUSION: The Lamivudine resistance character of this DHBV strain is caused by genome mutation; the related mutational points are KorR86Q and AorE591T and have no relations with the YMDD motif mutation.

  17. The CFTR frameshift mutation 3905insT and its effect at transcript and protein level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Javier; von Känel, Thomas; Schneider, Mircea; Steiner, Bernhard; Schaller, André; Gallati, Sabina

    2010-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the most common genetic diseases in the Caucasian population and is characterized by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, and elevation of sodium and chloride concentrations in the sweat and infertility in men. The disease is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, which encodes a protein that functions as chloride channel at the apical membrane of different epithelia. Owing to the high genotypic and phenotypic disease heterogeneity, effects and consequences of the majority of the CFTR mutations have not yet been studied. Recently, the frameshift mutation 3905insT was identified as the second most frequent mutation in the Swiss population and found to be associated with a severe phenotype. The frameshift mutation produces a premature termination codon (PTC) in exon 20, and transcripts bearing this PTC are potential targets for degradation through nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) and/or for exon skipping through nonsense-associated alternative splicing (NAS). Using RT-PCR analysis in lymphocytes and different tissue types from patients carrying the mutation, we showed that the PTC introduced by the mutation does neither elicit a degradation of the mRNA through NMD nor an alternative splicing through NAS. Moreover, immunocytochemical analysis in nasal epithelial cells revealed a significantly reduced amount of CFTR at the apical membrane providing a possible molecular explanation for the more severe phenotype observed in F508del/3905insT compound heterozygotes compared with F508del homozygotes. However, further experiments are needed to elucidate the fate of the 3905insT CFTR in the cell after its biosynthesis.

  18. A novel coding method for gene mutation correction during protein translation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Tian, Fengchun; Wang, Shiyuan; Liu, Xiao

    2012-03-07

    In gene expression, gene mutations often lead to negative effect of protein translation in prokaryotic organisms. With consideration of the influences produced by gene mutation, a novel method based on error-correction coding theory is proposed for modeling and detection of translation initiation in this paper. In the proposed method, combined with a one-dimensional codebook from block coding, a decoding method based on the minimum hamming distance is designed for analysis of translation efficiency. The results show that the proposed method can recognize the biologically significant regions such as Shine-Dalgarno region within the mRNA leader sequences effectively. Also, a global analysis of single base and multiple bases mutations of the Shine-Dalgarno sequences are established. Compared with other published experimental methods for mutation analysis, the translation initiation can not be disturbed by multiple bases mutations using the proposed method, which shows the effectiveness of this method in improving the translation efficiency and its biological relevance for genetic regulatory system.

  19. Mutations in STX1B, encoding a presynaptic protein, cause fever-associated epilepsy syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Julian; Siekierska, Aleksandra; Langlois, Mélanie; May, Patrick; Huneau, Clément; Becker, Felicitas; Muhle, Hiltrud; Suls, Arvid; Lemke, Johannes R; de Kovel, Carolien G F; Thiele, Holger; Konrad, Kathryn; Kawalia, Amit; Toliat, Mohammad R; Sander, Thomas; Rüschendorf, Franz; Caliebe, Almuth; Nagel, Inga; Kohl, Bernard; Kecskés, Angela; Jacmin, Maxime; Hardies, Katia; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Riesch, Erik; Dorn, Thomas; Brilstra, Eva H; Baulac, Stephanie; Møller, Rikke S; Hjalgrim, Helle; Koeleman, Bobby P C; Jurkat-Rott, Karin; Lehman-Horn, Frank; Roach, Jared C; Glusman, Gustavo; Hood, Leroy; Galas, David J; Martin, Benoit; de Witte, Peter A M; Biskup, Saskia; De Jonghe, Peter; Helbig, Ingo; Balling, Rudi; Nürnberg, Peter; Crawford, Alexander D; Esguerra, Camila V; Weber, Yvonne G; Lerche, Holger

    2014-12-01

    Febrile seizures affect 2-4% of all children and have a strong genetic component. Recurrent mutations in three main genes (SCN1A, SCN1B and GABRG2) have been identified that cause febrile seizures with or without epilepsy. Here we report the identification of mutations in STX1B, encoding syntaxin-1B, that are associated with both febrile seizures and epilepsy. Whole-exome sequencing in independent large pedigrees identified cosegregating STX1B mutations predicted to cause an early truncation or an in-frame insertion or deletion. Three additional nonsense or missense mutations and a de novo microdeletion encompassing STX1B were then identified in 449 familial or sporadic cases. Video and local field potential analyses of zebrafish larvae with antisense knockdown of stx1b showed seizure-like behavior and epileptiform discharges that were highly sensitive to increased temperature. Wild-type human syntaxin-1B but not a mutated protein rescued the effects of stx1b knockdown in zebrafish. Our results thus implicate STX1B and the presynaptic release machinery in fever-associated epilepsy syndromes.

  20. Surfactant protein A2 mutations associated with pulmonary fibrosis lead to protein instability and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitra, Meenakshi; Wang, Yongyu; Gerard, Robert D; Mendelson, Carole R; Garcia, Christine Kim

    2010-07-16

    Rare heterozygous mutations in the gene encoding surfactant protein A2 (SP-A2, SFTPA2) are associated with adult-onset pulmonary fibrosis and adenocarcinoma of the lung. We have previously shown that two recombinant SP-A2 mutant proteins (G231V and F198S) remain within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of A549 cells and are not secreted into the culture medium. The pathogenic mechanism of the mutant proteins is unknown. Here we analyze all common and rare variants of the surfactant protein A2, SP-A2, in both A549 cells and in primary type II alveolar epithelial cells. We show that, in contrast with all other SP-A2 variants, the mutant proteins are not secreted into the medium with wild-type SP-A isoforms, form fewer intracellular dimer and trimer oligomers, are partially insoluble in 0.5% Nonidet P-40 lysates of transfected A549 cells, and demonstrate greater protein instability in chymotrypsin proteolytic digestions. Both the G231V and F198S mutant SP-A2 proteins are destroyed via the ER-association degradation pathway. Expression of the mutant proteins increases the transcription of a BiP-reporter construct, expression of BiP protein, and production of an ER stress-induced XBP-1 spliced product. Human bronchoalveolar wash samples from individuals who are heterozygous for the G231V mutation have similar levels of total SP-A as normal family members, which suggests that the mechanism of disease does not involve an overt lack of secreted SP-A but instead involves an increase in ER stress of resident type II alveolar epithelial cells.

  1. Novel C16orf57 mutations in patients with Poikiloderma with Neutropenia: bioinformatic analysis of the protein and predicted effects of all reported mutations

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    Colombo Elisa A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poikiloderma with Neutropenia (PN is a rare autosomal recessive genodermatosis caused by C16orf57 mutations. To date 17 mutations have been identified in 31 PN patients. Results We characterize six PN patients expanding the clinical phenotype of the syndrome and the mutational repertoire of the gene. We detect the two novel C16orf57 mutations, c.232C>T and c.265+2T>G, as well as the already reported c.179delC, c.531delA and c.693+1G>T mutations. cDNA analysis evidences the presence of aberrant transcripts, and bioinformatic prediction of C16orf57 protein structure gauges the mutations effects on the folded protein chain. Computational analysis of the C16orf57 protein shows two conserved H-X-S/T-X tetrapeptide motifs marking the active site of a two-fold pseudosymmetric structure recalling the 2H phosphoesterase superfamily. Based on this model C16orf57 is likely a 2H-active site enzyme functioning in RNA processing, as a presumptive RNA ligase. According to bioinformatic prediction, all known C16orf57 mutations, including the novel mutations herein described, impair the protein structure by either removing one or both tetrapeptide motifs or by destroying the symmetry of the native folding. Finally, we analyse the geographical distribution of the recurrent mutations that depicts clusters featuring a founder effect. Conclusions In cohorts of patients clinically affected by genodermatoses with overlapping symptoms, the molecular screening of C16orf57 gene seems the proper way to address the correct diagnosis of PN, enabling the syndrome-specific oncosurveillance. The bioinformatic prediction of the C16orf57 protein structure denotes a very basic enzymatic function consistent with a housekeeping function. Detection of aberrant transcripts, also in cells from PN patients carrying early truncated mutations, suggests they might be translatable. Tissue-specific sensitivity to the lack of functionally correct protein accounts for the

  2. Low penetrance and effect on protein secretion of LGI1 mutations causing autosomal dominant lateral temporal epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bonaventura, Carlo; Operto, Francesca F; Busolin, Giorgia; Egeo, Gabriella; D'Aniello, Alfredo; Vitello, Libero; Smaniotto, Gessica; Furlan, Sandra; Diani, Erica; Michelucci, Roberto; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Coppola, Giangennaro; Nobile, Carlo

    2011-07-01

    To describe the clinical and genetic findings of four families with autosomal dominant lateral temporal epilepsy. A personal and family history was obtained from each affected and unaffected subject along with a physical and neurologic examination. Routine electroencephalography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies were performed in almost all patients. DNAs from family members were screened for LGI1 mutations. The effects of mutations on Lgi1 protein secretion were determined in transfected culture cells. The four families included a total of 11 patients (two deceased), six of whom had lateral temporal epilepsy with auditory aura. Age at onset was in the second decade of life; seizures were well controlled by antiepileptic treatment and MRI studies were normal. We found two pathogenic LGI1 mutations with uncommonly low penetrance: the R136W mutation, previously detected in a sporadic case with telephone-induced partial seizures, gave rise to the epileptic phenotype in three of nine mutation carriers in one family; the novel C179R mutation caused epilepsy in an isolated patient from a family where the mutation segregated. Another novel pathogenic mutation, I122T, and a nonsynonymous variant, I359V, were found in the two other families. Protein secretion tests showed that the R136W and I122T mutations inhibited secretion of the mutant proteins, whereas I359V had no effect on protein secretion; C179R was not tested, because of its predictable effect on protein folding. These findings suggest that some LGI1 mutations may have a weak penetrance in families with complex inheritance pattern, or isolated patients, and that the protein secretion test, together with other predictive criteria, may help recognize pathogenic LGI1 mutations. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2011 International League Against Epilepsy.

  3. Selective translational repression of truncated proteins from frameshift mutation-derived mRNAs in tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwon Tae You

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Frameshift and nonsense mutations are common in tumors with microsatellite instability, and mRNAs from these mutated genes have premature termination codons (PTCs. Abnormal mRNAs containing PTCs are normally degraded by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD system. However, PTCs located within 50-55 nucleotides of the last exon-exon junction are not recognized by NMD (NMD-irrelevant, and some PTC-containing mRNAs can escape from the NMD system (NMD-escape. We investigated protein expression from NMD-irrelevant and NMD-escape PTC-containing mRNAs by Western blotting and transfection assays. We demonstrated that transfection of NMD-irrelevant PTC-containing genomic DNA of MARCKS generates truncated protein. In contrast, NMD-escape PTC-containing versions of hMSH3 and TGFBR2 generate normal levels of mRNA, but do not generate detectable levels of protein. Transfection of NMD-escape mutant TGFBR2 genomic DNA failed to generate expression of truncated proteins, whereas transfection of wild-type TGFBR2 genomic DNA or mutant PTC-containing TGFBR2 cDNA generated expression of wild-type protein and truncated protein, respectively. Our findings suggest a novel mechanism of gene expression regulation for PTC-containing mRNAs in which the deleterious transcripts are regulated either by NMD or translational repression.

  4. Back-translation for discovering distant protein homologies in the presence of frameshift mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noé Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frameshift mutations in protein-coding DNA sequences produce a drastic change in the resulting protein sequence, which prevents classic protein alignment methods from revealing the proteins' common origin. Moreover, when a large number of substitutions are additionally involved in the divergence, the homology detection becomes difficult even at the DNA level. Results We developed a novel method to infer distant homology relations of two proteins, that accounts for frameshift and point mutations that may have affected the coding sequences. We design a dynamic programming alignment algorithm over memory-efficient graph representations of the complete set of putative DNA sequences of each protein, with the goal of determining the two putative DNA sequences which have the best scoring alignment under a powerful scoring system designed to reflect the most probable evolutionary process. Our implementation is freely available at http://bioinfo.lifl.fr/path/. Conclusions Our approach allows to uncover evolutionary information that is not captured by traditional alignment methods, which is confirmed by biologically significant examples.

  5. [Hereditary cardiomyopathies: a review. Mutation of structural proteins a common cause of hereditary cardiomyopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöberg, Gunnar; Kostareva, Anna; Sejersen, Thomas

    Cardiomyopathy is a disorder of the cardiac muscle and can be either primary or secondary. The primary disorders have been classified by WHO into 4 groups based on structure and function; hypertrophic, dilated and restricted cardiomyopathies and arrythmogenic right ventricle dysplasia. During the last decade the familial nature of many of these cardiomyopathies has been elucidated and different genes have been found to be mutated and causative of disease. Certain patterns can be distinguished in the mutated genes, e.g. in general the genes causing hypertrophic cardiomyopathies code for proteins involved in the contractile apparatus, the sarcomere, and the genes causing dilated cardiomyopathy code for proteins that anchor the sarcomere to the cell membrane and extracellular matrix. This article reviews these recent genetic findings and discusses their potential clinical applicability.

  6. Mutation analysis of barley malt protein Z4 and protein Z7 on beer foam stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iimure, Takashi; Kimura, Tatsuji; Araki, Shigeki; Kihara, Makoto; Sato, Masahide; Yamada, Shinji; Shigyou, Tatsuro; Sato, Kazuhiro

    2012-02-15

    Beer foam stability is an important characteristic. It has been suggested that isoforms of protein Z, that is, protein Z4 and protein Z7, contribute to beer foam stability. We investigated the relationship between beer foam stability and protein Z4 and protein Z7 using their deficient mutants. As a protein Z4-deficient mutant, cv. Pirkka was used. Protein Z7 deficiency was screened in 1564 barley accessions in the world collection of Okayama University, Japan. The barley samples from normal, protein Z4-deficient, protein Z7-deficient, and double-deficient were genotyped in F(2) populations and then pooled based on the DNA marker genotypes of protein Z4 and protein Z7. For a brewing trial, F(5) pooled subpopulations were used. After malting and brewing, the foam stability was determined, and the results showed that the levels of foam stability in the four samples were comparable. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to investigate the proteome in these beer samples. The results showed that low molecular weight proteins, including lipid transfer protein (LTP2), in the deficient mutants were higher than those in the normal sample. Our results suggest that the contribution of protein Z4 and protein Z7 to beer foam stability was not greater than that of other beer proteins.

  7. A cardiac myosin binding protein C mutation in the Maine Coon cat with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meurs, Kathryn M; Sanchez, Ximena; David, Ryan M; Bowles, Neil E; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Reiser, Peter J; Kittleson, Judith A; Munro, Marcia J; Dryburgh, Keith; Macdonald, Kristin A; Kittleson, Mark D

    2005-12-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is one of the most common causes of sudden cardiac death in young adults and is a familial disease in at least 60% of cases. Causative mutations have been identified in several sarcomeric genes, including the myosin binding protein C (MYBPC3) gene. Although numerous causative mutations have been identified, the pathogenetic process is still poorly understood. A large animal model of familial HCM in the cat has been identified and may be used for additional study. As the first spontaneous large animal model of this familial disease, feline familial HCM provides a valuable model for investigators to evaluate pathophysiologic processes and therapeutic (pharmacologic or genetic) manipulations. The MYBPC3 gene was chosen as a candidate gene in this model after identifying a reduction in the protein in myocardium from affected cats in comparison to control cats (P<0.001). DNA sequencing was performed and sequence alterations were evaluated for evidence that they changed the amino acid produced, that the amino acid was conserved and that the protein structure was altered. We identified a single base pair change (G to C) in the feline MYBPC3 gene in affected cats that computationally alters the protein conformation of this gene and results in sarcomeric disorganization. We have identified a causative mutation in the feline MYBPC3 gene that results in the development of familial HCM. This is the first report of a spontaneous mutation causing HCM in a non-human species. It should provide a valuable model for evaluating pathophysiologic processes and therapeutic manipulations.

  8. Significance of the pathogenic mutation T372R in the Yin Yang 1 protein interaction with DNA--thermodynamic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieborak, Anna; Górecki, Andrzej

    2016-03-01

    This work focuses on the pathogenic missense mutation in YY1 protein correlated with insulinomas. Based on in vitro studies, we demonstrate that the mutation does not affect the secondary structure of either zinc fingers or the N-terminal fragment (NTF) of the protein. Apart from a slight increase in the protein's compactness, no changes in the tertiary structure were observed. The introduced mutation significantly alters DNA-binding properties, both the affinity and enthalpy-entropy contribution of the process, which are highly dependent on the recognized sequence. Obtained results indicate concerted rather than a modular mode of sequence recognition by YY1 with the significant impact of a disordered NTF.

  9. Rapid detection of translation-terminating mutations at the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene by direct protein truncation test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Der Luut, R.; Khan, P.M.; Van Leeuwen, C.; Tops, C.; Roest, P.; Den Dunnen, J. (Leiden Univ. (Netherlands))

    1994-03-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is usually associated with protein truncating mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene. The APC mutations are known to play a major role in colorectal carcinogensis. For the identification of protein truncating mutations of the APC gene, the authors developed a rapid, sensitive, and direct screening procedure. The technique is based on the in vitro transcription and translation of the genomic PCR products and is called the protein truncation test. Samples of DNA from individual FAP patients, members of a FAP family, colorectal tumors, and colorectal tumor-derived cell lines were used to show the effectiveness of this method. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  10. A novel mutation (G114V) in the prion protein gene in a family with inherited prion disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, M-M; Peoc'h, K; Haïk, S; Bouchet, C; Vernengo, L; Mañana, G; Salamano, R; Carrasco, L; Lenne, M; Beaudry, P; Launay, J-M; Laplanche, J-L

    2005-04-26

    Inherited prion diseases are characterized by mutations in the PRNP gene encoding the prion protein (PrP). We report a novel missense mutation in the PRNP gene (resulting in a G114V mutation in PrP) in members of a Uruguayan family with clinical and histopathologic features of prion disease. Affected individuals were characterized by an early age at onset, initial neuropsychiatric symptoms, late dementia with prominent pyramidal and extrapyramidal symptoms, and long disease duration.

  11. Microfluidic screening and whole-genome sequencing identifies mutations associated with improved protein secretion by yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Mingtao; Bai, Yunpeng; Sjostrom, Staffan L.

    2015-01-01

    interest in improving its protein secretion capacity. Due to the complexity of the secretory machinery in eukaryotic cells, it is difficult to apply rational engineering for construction of improved strains. Here we used high-throughput microfluidics for the screening of yeast libraries, generated by UV...... to construct efficient cell factories for protein secretion. The combined use of microfluidics screening and whole-genome sequencing to map the mutations associated with the improved phenotype can easily be adapted for other products and cell types to identify novel engineering targets, and this approach could...

  12. Proteolipid protein 1 gene mutation in nine patients with Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jing-min; WU Ye; WANG Hui-fang; DENG Yan-hua; YANG Yan-ling; QIN Jiong; LI Xin-yi; WU Xi-ru; JIANG Yu-wu

    2008-01-01

    Background Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease(PMD)is a rare X-linked recessive disorder with svmptoms including nystagmus,impaired motor development,ataxia,and progressive spasticity.The proteolipid protein 1(PLPl)gene is the only pathogenic gene of PMD.Duplication of the PLP1 gene is the most frequent gene defect.accounting for 500%-70%of PMD cases.whereas point mutations in the coding sequence or the splice sites account for 10%-25%of PMD cases.This study aimed to identify PLP1 mutations in nine unrelated Chinese patients(P1-9)with PMD,and 14 subjects from the family of patient 2 were also described.Methods Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples.Gene dosage was determined using the multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA).All 7 exons and exon-intron boundanes of the PLP1 gene were amplified and analyzed using direct DNA sequencing.Reaults Of these nine patients,there were four transitional.four classical,and one connatal PMD according to their clinical and radiological presentations.PLP1 duplications were identified in patients 1-7 with PMD.Their mothers were PLP1 duplications carriers as well.Both duplication carders and normal genotypes of PLP1 were identified in the family members of patient 2.A c.51 7C>T(p.P173S)hemizygous missense mutation in exon 4 was found in patient 8 with PMD,and his mother was shown to be a heterozygote of this mutation.Conclusions We identified seven genomic duplications and one missense mutation(p.P173S)of the PLP1 gene in eight Chinese patients with PMD.This is the report about PLP1 mutations in PMD patients from the mainland of China.

  13. Functional analysis of the novel TBX5 c.1333delC mutation resulting in an extended TBX5 protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekman-Joelsson Britt-Marie

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autosomal dominant Holt-Oram syndrome (HOS is caused by mutations in the TBX5 gene and is characterized by congenital heart and preaxial radial ray upper limb defects. Most of the TBX5 mutations found in patients with HOS cause premature truncation of the primary TBX5 transcript. TBX5 missense mutations alter the three-dimensional structure of the protein and result in failed nuclear localization or reduced binding to target DNA. In this study we present our functional analyses of the novel and unusual c.1333delC mutation found in a patient with classical HOS. Methods The functional impact of this novel mutation was assessed by investigating the intracellular localization of the resulting TBX5 protein and its ability to activate the expression of its downstream target ANF. Results The deletion of the cytosine is the first TBX5 frameshift mutation predicted to result in an elongated TBX5 protein with 74 miscoding amino acids and 62 supernumerary C-terminal amino acids. The c.1333delC mutation affects neither the nuclear localization, nor its colocalization with SALL4, but severely affects the activation of the ANF promoter. Conclusion The mutation c.1333delC does not locate within functional domains, but impairs the activation of the downstream target. This suggests that misfolding of the protein prevents its biological function.

  14. Mutations in Three Genes Encoding Proteins Involved in Hair Shaft Formation Cause Uncombable Hair Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ü Basmanav, F Buket; Cau, Laura; Tafazzoli, Aylar

    2016-01-01

    Uncombable hair syndrome (UHS), also known as "spun glass hair syndrome," "pili trianguli et canaliculi," or "cheveux incoiffables" is a rare anomaly of the hair shaft that occurs in children and improves with age. UHS is characterized by dry, frizzy, spangly, and often fair hair that is resistant...... in the majority of UHS case subjects. The two enzymes PADI3 and TGM3, responsible for posttranslational protein modifications, and their target structural protein TCHH are all involved in hair shaft formation. Elucidation of the molecular outcomes of the disease-causing mutations by cell culture experiments...... and tridimensional protein models demonstrated clear differences in the structural organization and activity of mutant and wild-type proteins. Scanning electron microscopy observations revealed morphological alterations in hair coat of Padi3 knockout mice. All together, these findings elucidate the molecular genetic...

  15. Mutation of exposed hydrophobic amino acids to arginine to increase protein stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Czaplicki Jerzy

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One strategy to increase the stability of proteins is to reduce the area of water-accessible hydrophobic surface. Results In order to test it, we replaced 14 solvent-exposed hydrophobic residues of acetylcholinesterase by arginine. The stabilities of the resulting proteins were tested using denaturation by high temperature, organic solvents, urea and by proteolytic digestion. Conclusion Altough the mutational effects were rather small, this strategy proved to be successful since half of the mutants showed an increased stability. This stability may originate from the suppression of unfavorable interactions of nonpolar residues with water or from addition of new hydrogen bonds with the solvent. Other mechanisms may also contribute to the increased stability observed with some mutants. For example, introduction of a charge at the surface of the protein may provide a new coulombic interaction on the protein surface.

  16. Sequence context of indel mutations and their effect on protein evolution in a bacterial endosymbiont.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Laura E; Wernegreen, Jennifer J

    2013-01-01

    Indel mutations play key roles in genome and protein evolution, yet we lack a comprehensive understanding of how indels impact evolutionary processes. Genome-wide analyses enabled by next-generation sequencing can clarify the context and effect of indels, thereby integrating a more detailed consideration of indels with our knowledge of nucleotide substitutions. To this end, we sequenced Blochmannia chromaiodes, an obligate bacterial endosymbiont of carpenter ants, and compared it with the close relative, B. pennsylvanicus. The genetic distance between these species is small enough for accurate whole genome alignment but large enough to provide a meaningful spectrum of indel mutations. We found that indels are subjected to purifying selection in coding regions and even intergenic regions, which show a reduced rate of indel base pairs per kilobase compared with nonfunctional pseudogenes. Indels occur almost exclusively in repeat regions composed of homopolymers and multimeric simple sequence repeats, demonstrating the importance of sequence context for indel mutations. Despite purifying selection, some indels occur in protein-coding genes. Most are multiples of three, indicating selective pressure to maintain the reading frame. The deleterious effect of frameshift-inducing indels is minimized by either compensation from a nearby indel to restore reading frame or the indel's location near the 3'-end of the gene. We observed amino acid divergence exceeding nucleotide divergence in regions affected by frameshift-inducing indels, suggesting that these indels may either drive adaptive protein evolution or initiate gene degradation. Our results shed light on how indel mutations impact processes of molecular evolution underlying endosymbiont genome evolution.

  17. Cloning, mapping and mutation analysis of human gene GJB5 encoding gap junction protein b-5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA; Jiahui; (夏家辉); ZHENG; Duo; (郑多),; TANG; Dongsheng; (唐冬生); DAI; Heping; (戴和平); PAN; Qian; (潘乾); LONG; Zhigao; (龙志高); LIAO; Xiaodong; (廖晓东)

    2001-01-01

    By homologous EST searching and nested PCR a new human gene GJB5 encoding gap junction protein b-5 was identified. GJB5 was genetically mapped to human chromosome 1p33-p35 by FISH. RT-PCR revealed that it was expressed in skin, placenta and fetal skin. DNA sequencing of GJB5 was carried out in 142 patients with sensorineural hearing impairment and probands of 36 families with genetic diseases, including erythrokeratodermia (5 families), Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (13), ptosis (4), and retinitis pigmentosa and deafness (14). Two missense mutations (686A→G, H229R; 25C→T, L9F) were detected in two sensorineural hearing impairment families. A heterologous deletion of 18 bp within intron was found in 3 families with heredity hearing impairment, and in one of the 3 families, a missense mutation (R265P) was identified also. But the deletion and missense mutation seemed not segregating with hearing impairment in the family. No abnormal mRNA or mRNA expression was detected in deletion carriers by RT-PCR analysis in skin tissue. Mutation analysis in 199 unaffected individuals revealed that two of them were carriers with the same 18 bp deletion.

  18. Cloning, mapping and mutation analysis of human gene GJB5 encoding gap junction protein b-5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    By homologous EST searching and nested PCR a new human gene GJB5encoding gap junction protein b-5 was identified. GJB5 was genetically mapped to human chromosome 1p33-p35 by FISH. RT-PCR revealed that it was expressed in skin, placenta and fetal skin. DNA sequencing of GJB5 was carried out in 142 patients with sensorineural hearing impairment and probands of 36 families with genetic diseases, including erythrokeratodermia (5 families), Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (13), ptosis (4), and retinitis pigmentosa and deafness (14). Two missense mutations (686A→G, H229R; 25C→T, L9F) were detected in two sensorineural hearing impairment families. A heterologous deletion of 18 bp within intron was found in 3 families with heredity hearing impairment, and in one of the 3 families, a missense mutation (R265P) was identified also. But the deletion and missense mutation seemed not segregating with hearing impairment in the family. No abnormal mRNA or mRNA expression was detected in deletion carriers by RT-PCR analysis in skin tissue. Mutation analysis in 199 unaffected individuals revealed that two of them were carriers with the same 18 bp deletion.

  19. Prion protein insertional mutations increase aggregation propensity but not fiber stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    True Heather L

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the PRNP gene account for ~15% of all prion disease cases. Little is understood about the mechanism of how some of these mutations in PRNP cause the protein to aggregate into amyloid fibers or cause disease. We have taken advantage of a chimeric protein system to study the oligopeptide repeat domain (ORD expansions of the prion protein, PrP, and their effect on protein aggregation and amyloid fiber formation. We replaced the ORD of the yeast prion protein Sup35p with that from wild type and expanded ORDs of PrP and compared their biochemical properties in vitro. We previously determined that these chimeric proteins maintain the [PSI+] yeast prion phenotype in vivo. Interestingly, we noted that the repeat expanded chimeric prions seemed to be able to maintain a stronger strain of [PSI+] and convert from [psi-] to [PSI+] with a much higher frequency. In this study we have attempted to understand the biochemical properties of these chimeric proteins and to establish a system to study the properties of the ORD of PrP both in vivo and in vitro. Results Investigation of the chimeric proteins in vitro reveals that repeat-expansions increase aggregation propensity and that the kinetics of fiber formation depends on the number of repeats. The fiber formation reactions are promiscuous in that the chimeric protein containing 14 repeats can readily cross-seed fiber formation of proteins that have the wild type number of repeats. Morphologically, the amyloid fibers formed by repeat-expanded proteins associate with each other to form large clumps that were not as prevalent in fibers formed by proteins containing the wild type number of repeats. Despite the increased aggregation propensity and lateral association of the repeat expanded proteins, there was no corresponding increase in the stability of the fibers formed. Therefore, we predict that the differences in fibers formed with different repeat lengths may not be due to

  20. Symptomatic type 1 protein C deficiency caused by a de novo Ser270Leu mutation in the catalytic domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, B; Koefoed, P; Thorsen, S

    2001-01-01

    the intracellular content of mutant and wild-type protein was similar. Northern blot analysis of total mRNA from transfected cells showed no reduction of the mutant protein C mRNA compared with wild-type protein C mRNA. Collectively, these results indicate that the Ser270Leu mutation in the affected family caused...

  1. Non-local effects of point mutations on the stability of a protein module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chwastyk, Mateusz; Vera, Andrés M.; Galera-Prat, Albert; Gunnoo, Melissabye; Thompson, Damien; Carrión-Vázquez, Mariano; Cieplak, Marek

    2017-09-01

    We combine experimental and theoretical methods to assess the effect of a set of point mutations on c7A, a highly mechanostable type I cohesin module from scaffoldin CipA from Clostridium thermocellum. We propose a novel robust and computationally expedient theoretical method to determine the effects of point mutations on protein structure and stability. We use all-atom simulations to predict structural shifts with respect to the native protein and then analyze the mutants using a coarse-grained model. We examine transitions in contacts between residues and find that changes in the contact map usually involve a non-local component that can extend up to 50 Å. We have identified mutations that may lead to a substantial increase in mechanical and thermodynamic stabilities by making systematic substitutions into alanine and phenylalanine in c7A. Experimental measurements of the mechanical stability and circular dichroism data agree qualitatively with the predictions provided the thermal stability is calculated using only the contacts within the secondary structures.

  2. Improving Polymerase Activity with Unnatural Substrates by Sampling Mutations in Homologous Protein Architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Matthew R; Otto, Carine; Fenton, Kathryn E; Chaput, John C

    2016-05-20

    The ability to synthesize and propagate genetic information encoded in the framework of xeno-nucleic acid (XNA) polymers would inform a wide range of topics from the origins of life to synthetic biology. While directed evolution has produced examples of engineered polymerases that can accept XNA substrates, these enzymes function with reduced activity relative to their natural counterparts. Here, we describe a biochemical strategy that enables the discovery of engineered polymerases with improved activity for a given unnatural polymerase function. Our approach involves identifying specificity determining residues (SDRs) that control polymerase activity, screening mutations at SDR positions in a model polymerase scaffold, and assaying key gain-of-function mutations in orthologous protein architectures. By transferring beneficial mutations between homologous protein structures, we show that new polymerases can be identified that function with superior activity relative to their starting donor scaffold. This concept, which we call scaffold sampling, was used to generate engineered DNA polymerases that can faithfully synthesize RNA and TNA (threose nucleic acid), respectively, on a DNA template with high primer-extension efficiency and low template sequence bias. We suggest that the ability to combine phenotypes from different donor and recipient scaffolds provides a new paradigm in polymerase engineering where natural structural diversity can be used to refine the catalytic activity of synthetic enzymes.

  3. Mutation in the myelin proteolipid protein gene alters BK and SK channel function in the caudal medulla

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer, Catherine A.; Macklin, Wendy B.; Avishai, Nanthawan; Balan, Kannan; Wilson, Christopher G.; Miller, Martha J.

    2009-01-01

    Proteolipid protein (Plp) gene mutation in rodents causes severe CNS dysmyelination, early death, and lethal hypoxic ventilatory depression (Miller et al. 2004). To determine if Plp mutation alters neuronal function critical for control of breathing, the nucleus tractus solitarii (nTS) of four rodent strains were studied: myelin deficient rats (MD), myelin synthesis deficient (Plpmsd), and Plpnull mice, as well as shiverer (Mbpshi) mice, a myelin basic protein mutant. Current-voltage relation...

  4. Mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency due to HADHB gene mutation in a Chinese family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaona Fu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report an 8-year-old girl with lower limb weakness since birth in whom mitochondrial trifunctional protein (MTP deficiency, an autosomal recessive fatty acid oxidation disorder caused by HADHA or HADHB mutations, had not been definitively diagnosed before she was referred to our hospital. Repeated blood acylcarnitine analysis revealed slightly increased long-chain 3-OH-acylcarnitine levels; electromyography (EMG suggested peripheral nerve injury; muscle biopsy confirmed a neurogenic lesion in muscle fibers, as shown by EMG. Analysis of the HADHB, which encodes long-chain 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase, one of the enzymes constituting mitochondrial trifunctional protein, identified homozygous missense mutation c.739C > T (p.R247C. Mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency is an extremely rare disorder and has not been reported in Chinese people to date. It is likely that neonatal onset, as seen in our patient, has not been reported for the neuromyopathic phenotype of mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency.

  5. Proteomic analysis of cytosolic proteins associated with petite mutations in Candida glabrata

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    C.V. Loureiro y Penha

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of superficial or deep-seated infections due to Candida glabrata has increased markedly, probably because of the low intrinsic susceptibility of this microorganism to azole antifungals and its relatively high propensity to acquire azole resistance. To determine changes in the C. glabrata proteome associated with petite mutations, cytosolic extracts from an azole-resistant petite mutant of C. glabrata induced by exposure to ethidium bromide, and from its azole-susceptible parent isolate were compared by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Proteins of interest were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting or sequence tagging using a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Tryptic peptides from a total of 160 Coomassie-positive spots were analyzed for each strain. Sixty-five different proteins were identified in the cytosolic extracts of the parent strain and 58 in the petite mutant. Among the proteins identified, 10 were higher in the mutant strain, whereas 23 were lower compared to the parent strain. The results revealed a significant decrease in the enzymes associated with the metabolic rate of mutant cells such as aconitase, transaldolase, and pyruvate kinase, and changes in the levels of specific heat shock proteins. Moreover, transketolase, aconitase and catalase activity measurements decreased significantly in the ethidium bromide-induced petite mutant. These data may be useful for designing experiments to obtain a better understanding of the nuclear response to impairment of mitochondrial function associated with this mutation in C. glabrata.

  6. Mutation of the N-Terminal Region of Chikungunya Virus Capsid Protein: Implications for Vaccine Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang; Zaid, Ali; Goh, Lucas Y. H.; Hobson-Peters, Jody; Hall, Roy A.; Merits, Andres

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mosquito-transmitted chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthritogenic alphavirus of the Togaviridae family responsible for frequent outbreaks of arthritic disease in humans. Capsid protein, a structural protein encoded by the CHIKV RNA genome, is able to translocate to the host cell nucleolus. In encephalitic alphaviruses, nuclear translocation induces host cell transcriptional shutoff; however, the role of capsid protein nucleolar localization in arthritogenic alphaviruses remains unclear. Using recombinant enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged expression constructs and CHIKV infectious clones, we describe a nucleolar localization sequence (NoLS) in the N-terminal region of capsid protein, previously uncharacterized in CHIKV. Mutation of the NoLS by site-directed mutagenesis reduced efficiency of nuclear import of CHIKV capsid protein. In the virus, mutation of the capsid protein NoLS (CHIKV-NoLS) attenuated replication in mammalian and mosquito cells, producing a small-plaque phenotype. Attenuation of CHIKV-NoLS is likely due to disruption of the viral replication cycle downstream of viral RNA synthesis. In mice, CHIKV-NoLS infection caused no disease signs compared to wild-type CHIKV (CHIKV-WT)-infected mice; lack of disease signs correlated with significantly reduced viremia and decreased expression of proinflammatory factors. Mice immunized with CHIKV-NoLS, challenged with CHIKV-WT at 30 days postimmunization, develop no disease signs and no detectable viremia. Serum from CHIKV-NoLS-immunized mice is able to efficiently neutralize CHIKV infection in vitro. Additionally, CHIKV-NoLS-immunized mice challenged with the related alphavirus Ross River virus showed reduced early and peak viremia postchallenge, indicating a cross-protective effect. The high degree of CHIKV-NoLS attenuation may improve CHIKV antiviral and rational vaccine design. PMID:28223458

  7. Mutation of the N-Terminal Region of Chikungunya Virus Capsid Protein: Implications for Vaccine Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Taylor

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mosquito-transmitted chikungunya virus (CHIKV is an arthritogenic alphavirus of the Togaviridae family responsible for frequent outbreaks of arthritic disease in humans. Capsid protein, a structural protein encoded by the CHIKV RNA genome, is able to translocate to the host cell nucleolus. In encephalitic alphaviruses, nuclear translocation induces host cell transcriptional shutoff; however, the role of capsid protein nucleolar localization in arthritogenic alphaviruses remains unclear. Using recombinant enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP-tagged expression constructs and CHIKV infectious clones, we describe a nucleolar localization sequence (NoLS in the N-terminal region of capsid protein, previously uncharacterized in CHIKV. Mutation of the NoLS by site-directed mutagenesis reduced efficiency of nuclear import of CHIKV capsid protein. In the virus, mutation of the capsid protein NoLS (CHIKV-NoLS attenuated replication in mammalian and mosquito cells, producing a small-plaque phenotype. Attenuation of CHIKV-NoLS is likely due to disruption of the viral replication cycle downstream of viral RNA synthesis. In mice, CHIKV-NoLS infection caused no disease signs compared to wild-type CHIKV (CHIKV-WT-infected mice; lack of disease signs correlated with significantly reduced viremia and decreased expression of proinflammatory factors. Mice immunized with CHIKV-NoLS, challenged with CHIKV-WT at 30 days postimmunization, develop no disease signs and no detectable viremia. Serum from CHIKV-NoLS-immunized mice is able to efficiently neutralize CHIKV infection in vitro. Additionally, CHIKV-NoLS-immunized mice challenged with the related alphavirus Ross River virus showed reduced early and peak viremia postchallenge, indicating a cross-protective effect. The high degree of CHIKV-NoLS attenuation may improve CHIKV antiviral and rational vaccine design.

  8. Biophysical characterization and mutational analysis of the antibiotic resistance protein NimA from Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiros, Hanna-Kirsti S; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav; McSweeney, Seán M

    2010-04-01

    Metronidazole (MTZ) is an antibiotic commonly used to treat anaerobic bacterial infections in humans and animals. Antibiotic resistance toward this class of 5-nitroimidazole (5-Ni) drug derivatives has been related to the Nim genes thought to encode a reductase. Here we report the biophysical characteristics of the NimA protein from Deinococcus radiodurans (DrNimA) binding to MTZ and three other 5-Ni drugs. The interaction energies of the protein and antibiotic are studied by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and with free energy and linear interaction energy (LIE) calculations, where the latter method revealed that the antibiotic binding is mainly of hydrophobic character. ITC measurements further found that one DrNimA dimer has two antibiotic binding sites which were not affected by mutation of the reactive His71. The observed association constants (K(a)) were in the range of 5.1-4910(4)M(-1) and the enthalpy release upon binding to DrNimA for the four drugs studied was relatively low (approximately -1 kJ/mol) but still measurable. The drug binding is mainly entropy driven and along with the hydrophobic drug binding site found by crystallography, this possibly explains the low observed enthalpy values. The effect of the His71 mutation and the presence of MTZ were studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Native DrNimA is a yellow colored protein where the interaction from His71 to the cofactor is thought to be responsible for the coloring. Mutations of His71 to Ala, Ser, Leu or Asp all gave transparent, colorless protein solutions, and the two mutant crystal structures of DrNimA-H71A and DrNimA-H71S presented revealed no cofactor binding.

  9. Mutations in Three Genes Encoding Proteins Involved in Hair Shaft Formation Cause Uncombable Hair Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ü Basmanav, F Buket; Cau, Laura; Tafazzoli, Aylar; Méchin, Marie-Claire; Wolf, Sabrina; Romano, Maria Teresa; Valentin, Frederic; Wiegmann, Henning; Huchenq, Anne; Kandil, Rima; Garcia Bartels, Natalie; Kilic, Arzu; George, Susannah; Ralser, Damian J; Bergner, Stefan; Ferguson, David J P; Oprisoreanu, Ana-Maria; Wehner, Maria; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Swan, Daniel; Houniet, Darren; Büchner, Aline; Weibel, Lisa; Wagner, Nicola; Grimalt, Ramon; Bygum, Anette; Serre, Guy; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Sprecher, Eli; Schoch, Susanne; Oji, Vinzenz; Hamm, Henning; Farrant, Paul; Simon, Michel; Betz, Regina C

    2016-12-01

    Uncombable hair syndrome (UHS), also known as "spun glass hair syndrome," "pili trianguli et canaliculi," or "cheveux incoiffables" is a rare anomaly of the hair shaft that occurs in children and improves with age. UHS is characterized by dry, frizzy, spangly, and often fair hair that is resistant to being combed flat. Until now, both simplex and familial UHS-affected case subjects with autosomal-dominant as well as -recessive inheritance have been reported. However, none of these case subjects were linked to a molecular genetic cause. Here, we report the identification of UHS-causative mutations located in the three genes PADI3 (peptidylarginine deiminase 3), TGM3 (transglutaminase 3), and TCHH (trichohyalin) in a total of 11 children. All of these individuals carry homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in one of these three genes, indicating an autosomal-recessive inheritance pattern in the majority of UHS case subjects. The two enzymes PADI3 and TGM3, responsible for posttranslational protein modifications, and their target structural protein TCHH are all involved in hair shaft formation. Elucidation of the molecular outcomes of the disease-causing mutations by cell culture experiments and tridimensional protein models demonstrated clear differences in the structural organization and activity of mutant and wild-type proteins. Scanning electron microscopy observations revealed morphological alterations in hair coat of Padi3 knockout mice. All together, these findings elucidate the molecular genetic causes of UHS and shed light on its pathophysiology and hair physiology in general. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Mutations of the CEP290 gene encoding a centrosomal protein cause Meckel-Gruber syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Valeska; den Hollander, Anneke I; Brüchle, Nadina Ortiz; Zonneveld, Marijke N; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Becker, Christian; Du Bois, Gabriele; Kendziorra, Heide; Roosing, Susanne; Senderek, Jan; Nürnberg, Peter; Cremers, Frans P M; Zerres, Klaus; Bergmann, Carsten

    2008-01-01

    Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MKS) is an autosomal recessive, lethal multisystemic disorder characterized by meningooccipital encephalocele, cystic kidney dysplasia, hepatobiliary ductal plate malformation, and postaxial polydactyly. Recently, genes for MKS1 and MKS3 were identified, putting MKS on the list of ciliary disorders (ciliopathies). By positional cloning in a distantly related multiplex family, we mapped a novel locus for MKS to a 3-Mb interval on 12q21. Sequencing of the CEP290 gene located in the minimal critical region showed a homozygous 1-bp deletion supposed to lead to loss of function of the encoded centrosomal protein CEP290/nephrocystin-6. CEP290 is thought to be involved in chromosome segregation and localizes to cilia, centrosomes, and the nucleus. Subsequent analysis of another consanguineous multiplex family revealed homozygous haplotypes and the same frameshift mutation. Our findings add to the increasing body of evidence that ciliopathies can cause a broad spectrum of disease phenotypes, and pleiotropic effects of CEP290 mutations range from single organ involvement with isolated Leber congenital amaurosis to Joubert syndrome and lethal early embryonic multisystemic malformations in Meckel-Gruber syndrome. We compiled clinical and genetic data of all patients with CEP290 mutations described so far. No clear-cut genotype-phenotype correlations were apparent as almost all mutations are nonsense, frameshift, or splice-site changes and scattered throughout the gene irrespective of the patients' phenotypes. Conclusively, other factors than the type and location of CEP290 mutations may underlie phenotypic variability. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Congenital syndactyly in cattle: four novel mutations in the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 gene (LRP4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Höltershinken Martin

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Isolated syndactyly in cattle, also known as mulefoot, is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait with variable penetrance in different cattle breeds. Recently, two independent mutations in the bovine LRP4 gene have been reported as the primary cause of syndactyly in the Holstein and Angus cattle breeds. Results We confirmed the previously described LRP4 exon 33 two nucleotide substitution in most of the affected Holstein calves and revealed additional evidence for allelic heterogeneity by the identification of four new LRP4 non-synonymous point mutations co-segregating in Holstein, German Simmental and Simmental-Charolais families. Conclusion We confirmed a significant role of LRP4 mutations in the pathogenesis of congenital syndactyly in cattle. The newly detected missense mutations in the LRP4 gene represent independent mutations affecting different conserved protein domains. However, the four newly described LRP4 mutations do still not explain all analyzed cases of syndactyly.

  12. EDM1: a novel point mutation in cartilage oligomeric matrix protein gene in a Chinese family with multiple epiphyseal dysplasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Feng-xia; LI Yan-xiang; ZHANG Xu-de; REN Cui-ai; HUANG Shang-zhi; YU Meng-xue

    2013-01-01

    Background Multiple epiphysis dysplasia (MED) is a common skeletal dysplasia with a significant locus heterogeneity.In the majority of clinically defined.cases,mutations have been identified in the gene encoding cartilage algometric matrix protein (COMP).Methods Five patients were included in the study.Linkage analysis and mutation analysis of the COMP gene were conducted in the patients and their family members.Results We have identified a novel mutation in axon 14 of COMPgene in the family.Conclusions This mutation produced a severe MED phenotype with marked short stature,early onset osteoarthritis,and remarkable radiographic changes.Our results extended the range of disease-causing mutations in COMP gene and contributed more information about relationship between mutations and phenotype.

  13. Impact of LCA-Associated E14L LRAT Mutation on Protein Stability and Retinoid Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelstowska, Sylwia; Widjaja-Adhi, Made Airanthi K; Silvaroli, Josie A; Golczak, Marcin

    2017-08-29

    Vitamin A (all-trans-retinol) is metabolized to the visual chromophore (11-cis-retinal) in the eyes and to all-trans-retinoic acid, a hormone like compound, in most tissues. A key enzyme in retinoid metabolism is lecithin:retinol acyltransferase (LRAT), which catalyzes the esterification of vitamin A. The importance of LRAT is indicated by pathogenic missense and nonsense mutations, which cause devastating blinding diseases. Retinoid-based chromophore replacement therapy has been proposed as treatment for these types of blindness based on studies in LRAT null mice. Here, we analyzed the structural and biochemical basis for retinal pathology caused by mutations in the human LRAT gene. Most LRAT missense mutations associated with retinal degeneration are localized within the catalytic domain, whereas E14L substitution is localized in an N-terminal α-helix, which has been implicated in interaction with the phospholipid bilayer. To elucidate the biochemical consequences of this mutation, we determined LRAT(E14L)'s enzymatic properties, protein stability, and impact on ocular retinoid metabolism. Bicistronic expression of LRAT(E14L) and enhanced green fluorescence protein revealed instability and accelerated proteosomal degradation of this mutant isoform. Surprisingly, instability of LRAT(E14L) did not abrogate the production of the visual chromophore in a cell-based assay. Instead, expression of LRAT(E14L) led to a rapid increase in cellular levels of retinoic acid upon retinoid supplementation. Thus, our study unveils the potential role of retinoic acid in the pathology of a degenerative retinal disease with important implications for the use of retinoid-based therapeutics in affected patients.

  14. Mutations in APOPT1, encoding a mitochondrial protein, cause cavitating leukoencephalopathy with cytochrome c oxidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchionda, Laura; Haack, Tobias B; Hardy, Steven; Abbink, Truus E M; Fernandez-Vizarra, Erika; Lamantea, Eleonora; Marchet, Silvia; Morandi, Lucia; Moggio, Maurizio; Carrozzo, Rosalba; Torraco, Alessandra; Diodato, Daria; Strom, Tim M; Meitinger, Thomas; Tekturk, Pinar; Yapici, Zuhal; Al-Murshedi, Fathiya; Stevens, René; Rodenburg, Richard J; Lamperti, Costanza; Ardissone, Anna; Moroni, Isabella; Uziel, Graziella; Prokisch, Holger; Taylor, Robert W; Bertini, Enrico; van der Knaap, Marjo S; Ghezzi, Daniele; Zeviani, Massimo

    2014-09-04

    Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficiency is a frequent biochemical abnormality in mitochondrial disorders, but a large fraction of cases remains genetically undetermined. Whole-exome sequencing led to the identification of APOPT1 mutations in two Italian sisters and in a third Turkish individual presenting severe COX deficiency. All three subjects presented a distinctive brain MRI pattern characterized by cavitating leukodystrophy, predominantly in the posterior region of the cerebral hemispheres. We then found APOPT1 mutations in three additional unrelated children, selected on the basis of these particular MRI features. All identified mutations predicted the synthesis of severely damaged protein variants. The clinical features of the six subjects varied widely from acute neurometabolic decompensation in late infancy to subtle neurological signs, which appeared in adolescence; all presented a chronic, long-surviving clinical course. We showed that APOPT1 is targeted to and localized within mitochondria by an N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence that is eventually cleaved off from the mature protein. We then showed that APOPT1 is virtually absent in fibroblasts cultured in standard conditions, but its levels increase by inhibiting the proteasome or after oxidative challenge. Mutant fibroblasts showed reduced amount of COX holocomplex and higher levels of reactive oxygen species, which both shifted toward control values by expressing a recombinant, wild-type APOPT1 cDNA. The shRNA-mediated knockdown of APOPT1 in myoblasts and fibroblasts caused dramatic decrease in cell viability. APOPT1 mutations are responsible for infantile or childhood-onset mitochondrial disease, hallmarked by the combination of profound COX deficiency with a distinctive neuroimaging presentation.

  15. Mutations in complement regulatory proteins predispose to preeclampsia: a genetic analysis of the PROMISSE cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane E Salmon

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pregnancy in women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE or antiphospholipid antibodies (APL Ab--autoimmune conditions characterized by complement-mediated injury--is associated with increased risk of preeclampsia and miscarriage. Our previous studies in mice indicate that complement activation targeted to the placenta drives angiogenic imbalance and placental insufficiency. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We use PROMISSE, a prospective study of 250 pregnant patients with SLE and/or APL Ab, to test the hypothesis in humans that impaired capacity to limit complement activation predisposes to preeclampsia. We sequenced genes encoding three complement regulatory proteins--membrane cofactor protein (MCP, complement factor I (CFI, and complement factor H (CFH--in 40 patients who had preeclampsia and found heterozygous mutations in seven (18%. Five of these patients had risk variants in MCP or CFI that were previously identified in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, a disease characterized by endothelial damage. One had a novel mutation in MCP that impairs regulation of C4b. These findings constitute, to our knowledge, the first genetic defects associated with preeclampsia in SLE and/or APL Ab. We confirmed the association of hypomorphic variants of MCP and CFI in a cohort of non-autoimmune preeclampsia patients in which five of 59 were heterozygous for mutations. CONCLUSION: The presence of risk variants in complement regulatory proteins in patients with SLE and/or APL Ab who develop preeclampsia, as well as in preeclampsia patients lacking autoimmune disease, links complement activation to disease pathogenesis and suggests new targets for treatment of this important public health problem. STUDY REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00198068.

  16. Studies of the Impact of Magnetic Field Uncertainties on Physics Parameters of the Mu2e Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradascio, Federica [Pisa U.

    2016-01-01

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab will search for a signature of charged lepton flavor violation, an effect prohibitively too small to be observed within the Standard Model of particle physics. Therefore, its observation is a signal of new physics. The signature that Mu2e will search for is the ratio of the rate of neutrinoless coherent conversion of muons into electrons in the field of a nucleus, relative to the muon capture rate by the nucleus. The conversion process is an example of charged lepton flavor violation. This experiment aims at a sensitivity of four orders of magnitude higher than previous related experiments. The desired sensitivity implies highly demanding requirements of accuracy in the design and conduct of the experiment. It is therefore important to investigate the tolerance of the experiment to instrumental uncertainties and provide specifications that the design and construction must meet. This is the core of the work reported in this thesis. The design of the experiment is based on three superconducting solenoid magnets. The most important uncertainties in the magnetic field of the solenoids can arise from misalignments of the Transport Solenoid, which transfers the beam from the muon production area to the detector area and eliminates beam-originating backgrounds. In this thesis, the field uncertainties induced by possible misalignments and their impact on the physics parameters of the experiment are examined. The physics parameters include the muon and pion stopping rates and the scattering of beam electrons off the capture target, which determine the signal, intrinsic background and late-arriving background yields, respectively. Additionally, a possible test of the Transport Solenoid alignment with low momentum electrons is examined, as an alternative option to measure its field with conventional probes, which is technically difficult due to mechanical interference. Misalignments of the Transport Solenoid were simulated using standard

  17. Coevolutionary modeling of protein sequences: Predicting structure, function, and mutational landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigt, Martin

    Over the last years, biological research has been revolutionized by experimental high-throughput techniques, in particular by next-generation sequencing technology. Unprecedented amounts of data are accumulating, and there is a growing request for computational methods unveiling the information hidden in raw data, thereby increasing our understanding of complex biological systems. Statistical-physics models based on the maximum-entropy principle have, in the last few years, played an important role in this context. To give a specific example, proteins and many non-coding RNA show a remarkable degree of structural and functional conservation in the course of evolution, despite a large variability in amino acid sequences. We have developed a statistical-mechanics inspired inference approach - called Direct-Coupling Analysis - to link this sequence variability (easy to observe in sequence alignments, which are available in public sequence databases) to bio-molecular structure and function. In my presentation I will show, how this methodology can be used (i) to infer contacts between residues and thus to guide tertiary and quaternary protein structure prediction and RNA structure prediction, (ii) to discriminate interacting from non-interacting protein families, and thus to infer conserved protein-protein interaction networks, and (iii) to reconstruct mutational landscapes and thus to predict the phenotypic effect of mutations. References [1] M. Figliuzzi, H. Jacquier, A. Schug, O. Tenaillon and M. Weigt ''Coevolutionary landscape inference and the context-dependence of mutations in beta-lactamase TEM-1'', Mol. Biol. Evol. (2015), doi: 10.1093/molbev/msv211 [2] E. De Leonardis, B. Lutz, S. Ratz, S. Cocco, R. Monasson, A. Schug, M. Weigt ''Direct-Coupling Analysis of nucleotide coevolution facilitates RNA secondary and tertiary structure prediction'', Nucleic Acids Research (2015), doi: 10.1093/nar/gkv932 [3] F. Morcos, A. Pagnani, B. Lunt, A. Bertolino, D. Marks, C

  18. Mutations in the unfolded protein response regulator ATF6 cause the cone dysfunction disorder achromatopsia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Susanne; Zobor, Ditta; Chiang, Wei-Chieh; Weisschuh, Nicole; Staller, Jennifer; Menendez, Irene Gonzalez; Chang, Stanley; Beck, Susanne C; Garrido, Marina Garcia; Sothilingam, Vithiyanjali; Seeliger, Mathias W; Stanzial, Franco; Benedicenti, Francesco; Inzana, Francesca; Héon, Elise; Vincent, Ajoy; Beis, Jill; Strom, Tim M; Rudolph, Günther; Roosing, Susanne; den Hollander, Anneke I; Cremers, Frans P M; Lopez, Irma; Ren, Huanan; Moore, Anthony T; Webster, Andrew R; Michaelides, Michel; Koenekoop, Robert K; Zrenner, Eberhart; Kaufman, Randal J; Tsang, Stephen H; Wissinger, Bernd; Lin, Jonathan H

    2015-01-01

    Achromatopsia (ACHM) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by color blindness, photophobia, nystagmus and severely reduced visual acuity. Using homozygosity mapping and whole-exome and candidate gene sequencing, we identified ten families carrying six homozygous and two compound-heterozygous mutations in the ATF6 gene (encoding activating transcription factor 6A), a key regulator of the unfolded protein response (UPR) and cellular endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis. Patients had evidence of foveal hypoplasia and disruption of the cone photoreceptor layer. The ACHM-associated ATF6 mutations attenuate ATF6 transcriptional activity in response to ER stress. Atf6−/− mice have normal retinal morphology and function at a young age but develop rod and cone dysfunction with increasing age. This new ACHM-related gene suggests a crucial and unexpected role for ATF6A in human foveal development and cone function and adds to the list of genes that, despite ubiquitous expression, when mutated can result in an isolated retinal photoreceptor phenotype. PMID:26029869

  19. Heterozygous mutations in HSD17B4 cause juvenile peroxisomal D-bifunctional protein deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor, David J.; Marsh, Ashley P.L.; Storey, Elsdon; Tankard, Rick; Gillies, Greta; Delatycki, Martin B.; Pope, Kate; Bromhead, Catherine; Leventer, Richard J.; Bahlo, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the genetic cause of slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia, sensorineural deafness, and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism in 5 patients from 3 different families. Methods: The patients comprised 2 sib pairs and 1 sporadic patient. Clinical assessment included history, physical examination, and brain MRI. Linkage analysis was performed separately on the 2 sets of sib pairs using single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays, followed by analysis of the intersection of the regions. Exome sequencing was performed on 1 affected patient with variant filtering and prioritization undertaken using these intersected regions. Results: Using a combination of sequencing technologies, we identified compound heterozygous mutations in HSD17B4 in all 5 affected patients. In all 3 families, peroxisomal D-bifunctional protein (DBP) deficiency was caused by compound heterozygosity for 1 nonsense/deletion mutation and 1 missense mutation. Conclusions: We describe 5 patients with juvenile DBP deficiency from 3 different families, bringing the total number of reported patients to 14, from 8 families. This report broadens and consolidates the phenotype associated with juvenile DBP deficiency.

  20. A comprehensive computational study on pathogenic mis-sense mutations spanning the RING2 and REP domains of Parkin protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Ria; Bagchi, Angshuman

    2017-04-30

    Various mutations in PARK2 gene, which encodes the protein parkin, are significantly associated with the onset of autosomal recessive juvenile Parkinson (ARJP) in neuronal cells. Parkin is a multi domain protein, the N-terminal part contains the Ubl and the C-terminal part consists of four zinc coordinating domains, viz., RING0, RING1, in between ring (IBR) and RING2. Disease mutations are spread over all the domains of Parkin, although mutations in some regions may affect the functionality of Parkin more adversely. The mutations in the RING2 domain are seen to abolish the neuroprotective E3 ligase activity of Parkin. In this current work, we carried out detailed in silico analysis to study the extent of pathogenicity of mutations spanning the Parkin RING2 domain and the adjoining REP region by SIFT, Mutation Accessor, PolyPhen2, SNPs and GO, GV/GD and I-mutant. To study the structural and functional implications of these mutations on RING2-REP domain of Parkin, we studied the solvent accessibility (SASA/RSA), hydrophobicity, intra-molecular hydrogen bonding profile and domain analysis by various computational tools. Finally, we analysed the interaction energy profiles of the mutants and compared them to the wild type protein using Discovery studio 2.5. By comparing the various analyses it could be safely concluded that except P437L and A379V mutations, all other mutations were potentially deleterious affecting various structural aspects of RING2 domain architecture. This study is based purely on computational approach which has the potential to identify disease mutations and the information could further be used in treatment of diseases and prognosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A homozygous mutation in a novel zinc-finger protein, ERIS, is responsible for Wolfram syndrome 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amr, Sami; Heisey, Cindy; Zhang, Min; Xia, Xia-Juan; Shows, Kathryn H; Ajlouni, Kamel; Pandya, Arti; Satin, Leslie S; El-Shanti, Hatem; Shiang, Rita

    2007-10-01

    A single missense mutation was identified in a novel, highly conserved zinc-finger gene, ZCD2, in three consanguineous families of Jordanian descent with Wolfram syndrome (WFS). It had been shown that these families did not have mutations in the WFS1 gene (WFS1) but were mapped to the WFS2 locus at 4q22-25. A G-->C transversion at nucleotide 109 predicts an amino acid change from glutamic acid to glutamine (E37Q). Although the amino acid is conserved and the mutation is nonsynonymous, the pathogenesis for the disorder is because the mutation also causes aberrant splicing. The mutation was found to disrupt messenger RNA splicing by eliminating exon 2, and it results in the introduction of a premature stop codon. Mutations in WFS1 have also been found to cause low-frequency nonsyndromic hearing loss, progressive hearing loss, and isolated optic atrophy associated with hearing loss. Screening of 377 probands with hearing loss did not identify mutations in the WFS2 gene. The WFS1-encoded protein, Wolframin, is known to localize to the endoplasmic reticulum and plays a role in calcium homeostasis. The ZCD2-encoded protein, ERIS (endoplasmic reticulum intermembrane small protein), is also shown to localize to the endoplasmic reticulum but does not interact directly with Wolframin. Lymphoblastoid cells from affected individuals show a significantly greater rise in intracellular calcium when stimulated with thapsigargin, compared with controls, although no difference was observed in resting concentrations of intracellular calcium.

  2. L576P KIT mutation in anal melanomas correlates with KIT protein expression and is sensitive to specific kinase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonescu, Cristina R; Busam, Klaus J; Francone, Todd D; Wong, Grace C; Guo, Tianhua; Agaram, Narasimhan P; Besmer, Peter; Jungbluth, Achim; Gimbel, Mark; Chen, Chin-Tung; Veach, Darren; Clarkson, Bayard D; Paty, Philip B; Weiser, Martin R

    2007-07-15

    Activating mutations in either BRAF or NRAS are seen in a significant number of malignant melanomas, but their incidence appears to be dependent to ultraviolet light exposure. Thus, BRAF mutations have the highest incidence in non-chronic sun damaged (CSD), and are uncommon in acral, mucosal and CSD melanomas. More recently, activating KIT mutations have been described in rare cases of metastatic melanoma, without further reference to their clinical phenotypes. This finding is intriguing since KIT expression is downregulated in most melanomas progressing to more aggressive lesions. In this study, we investigated a group of anal melanomas for the presence of BRAF, NRAS, KIT and PDGFRA mutations. A heterozygous KIT exon 11 L576P substitution was identified in 3 of 20 cases tested. The 3 KIT mutation-carrying tumors were strongly immunopositive for KIT protein. No KIT mutations were identified in tumors with less than 4+ KIT immunostaining. NRAS mutation was identified in one tumor. No BRAF or PDGFRA mutations were identified in either KIT positive or negative anal melanomas. In vitro drug testing of stable transformant Ba/F3 KIT(L576P) mutant cells showed sensitivity for dasatinib (previously known as BMS-354825), a dual SRC/ABL kinase inhibitor, and imatinib. However, compared to an imatinib-sensitive KIT mutant, dasatinib was potent at lower doses than imatinib in the KIT(L576P) mutant. These results suggest that a subset of anal melanomas show activating KIT mutations, which are susceptible for therapy with specific kinase inhibitors.

  3. Six missense mutations associated with type I and type II protein C deficiency and implications obtained from molecular modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y Z; Sakata, T; Matsusue, T; Umeyama, H; Kato, H; Miyata, T

    1994-10-01

    The molecular basis of protein C deficiency was studied in three type I and three type II heterozygotes. Three probands showed thrombotic complications. All the exons and intron/exon junctions of the protein C gene were studied using a strategy combining by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification, single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, and DNA sequencing of the PCR-amplified fragments. Six missense mutations were identified, including three novel ones. One was located in exon II, in which the initiating translation codon (ATG) encoding for Met at position -42 was replaced by ACG encoding for Thr. The other five were located in exon IX, and included TAC(Tyr399)-->CAC(His), CCG(Pro327)-->CTG(Leu), GAC(Asp359)-->AAC(Asn) in two cases, and GGG(Gly350)-->AGG(Arg). Four of the six missense mutations occurred in CG dinucleotide. Sequence analysis of the other exons excluded additional mutations. By restriction enzyme analysis, co-segregation of the mutation with protein C deficiency was observed in four families. The other two mutations at amino acid positions -42 and 350 were also considered to be associated with protein C deficiency due to the absence of these mutations in 50 normal individuals. A structural model of the protease domain of mutant activated protein C was constructed by the chimeric modelling method, and the resultant model suggested conformational changes due to each missense mutation identified in protein C deficiency. The present data also provide some evidence regarding the genetic heterogeneity of protein C deficiency.

  4. Human surfactant protein A2 gene mutations impair dimmer/trimer assembly leading to deficiency in protein sialylation and secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Song

    Full Text Available Surfactant protein A2 (SP-A2 plays an essential role in surfactant metabolism and lung host defense. SP-A2 mutations in the carbohydrate recognition domain have been related to familial pulmonary fibrosis and can lead to a recombinant protein secretion deficiency in vitro. In this study, we explored the molecular mechanism of protein secretion deficiency and the subsequent biological effects in CHO-K1 cells expressing both wild-type and several different mutant forms of SP-A2. We demonstrate that the SP-A2 G231V and F198S mutants impair the formation of dimmer/trimer SP-A2 which contributes to the protein secretion defect. A deficiency in sialylation, but not N-linked glycosylation, is critical to the observed dimmer/trimer impairment-induced secretion defect. Furthermore, both mutant forms accumulate in the ER and form NP-40-insoluble aggregates. In addition, the soluble mutant SP-A2 could be partially degraded through the proteasome pathway but not the lysosome or autophagy pathway. Intriguingly, 4-phenylbutyrate acid (4-PBA, a chemical chaperone, alleviates aggregate formation and partially rescued the protein secretion of SP-A2 mutants. In conclusion, SP-A2 G231V and F198S mutants impair the dimmer/trimer assembly, which contributes to the protein sialylation and secretion deficiency. The intracellular protein mutants could be partially degraded through the proteasome pathway and also formed aggregates. The treatment of the cells with 4-PBA resulted in reduced aggregation and rescued the secretion of mutant SP-A2.

  5. Cochlear implantation effect on deaf children with gap junction protein beta 2 gene mutation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KONG Ying; LIU Sha; WANG Su-ju; Li Shu-jing; LIANG Shuang

    2013-01-01

    Background The popularization and promotion of gene diagnosis technology makes it possible to detect deafness genes for children with congenital hearing impairment,and the proportion of gap junction protein beta 2 (GJB2) gene mutations in cochlear implant patients is 26.5% We did follow-up evaluation on auditory rehabilitation effect for all 31 deaf children with GJB2 gene mutation after cochlear implantation to provide a reference for such patients.Methods Application of “the genetic deafness gene chip detection kit” and “gene complete sequence analysis” were applied to conduct detection on common genetic deafness gene mutation hotspots of the hearing impaired children with cochlear implantation.To conduct auditory rehabilitation effect evaluation on all 31 cases of patients with GJB2 genetic deafness after 3,6 and 12 months of the operation respectively.The single factor repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to analysis whether there were significant difference among the results of initial consonant of a Chinese syllable recognition at 3 different stages after the operation,the results of vowel of a Chinese syllable recognition at 3 different stages after the operation,and the results of two-syllable recognition at 3 different stages after the operation.Results The 235delC is the high-incidence mutational site in 31 cases of patients with GJB2 genetic deafness,and the total detection rate is up to 90.3% (28/31).There were significant differences in the initial consonant and the vowel of a Chinese syllable recognition rate,and the two-syllable recognition rates at 3,6,and 12 months after the operation (P<0.01).Conclusion Cochlear implantation is a safe and effective measure for auditory reconstruction,enabling patients with GJB2 hereditary severe sensorineural deafness to achieve auditory speech recognition effectively.

  6. Fukutin-related protein localizes to the Golgi apparatus and mutations lead to mislocalization in muscle in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keramaris-Vrantsis, Elizabeth; Lu, Pei J; Doran, Timothy; Zillmer, Allen; Ashar, Jignya; Esapa, Christopher T; Benson, Matthew A; Blake, Derek J; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Lu, Qi L

    2007-10-01

    Mutations in the fukutin-related protein gene (FKRP) are associated with a spectrum of diseases from mild limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I to severe congenital muscular dystrophy type 1C, muscle-eye-brain disease (MEB), and Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS). The effect of mutations on the transportation of the mutant proteins may constitute the underlying mechanisms for the pathogenesis of these diseases. Here we examined the subcellular localization of mouse and human normal and mutant FKRP proteins in cells and in muscle in vivo. Both normal human and mouse FKRPs localize in part of the Golgi apparatus in muscle fibers. Mutations in the FKRP gene invariably altered the localization of the protein, leading to endoplasmic reticulum retention within cells and diminished Golgi localization in muscle fibers. Our results therefore suggest that an individual missense point mutation can confer at least two independent effects on the protein, causing (1) reduction or loss of the presumed glycosyltransferase activity directly and (2) mislocalization that could further alter the function of the protein. The complexity of the effect of individual missense point mutations may partly explain the wide variation of the FKRP-related myopathies.

  7. Single point mutation in tick-borne encephalitis virus prM protein induces a reduction of virus particle secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshii, Kentarou; Konno, Akihiro; Goto, Akiko; Nio, Junko; Obara, Mayumi; Ueki, Tomotaka; Hayasaka, Daisuke; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Kariwa, Hiroaki; Takashima, Ikuo

    2004-10-01

    Flaviviruses are assembled to bud into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and are secreted through the vesicle transport pathway. Virus envelope proteins play important roles in this process. In this study, the effect of mutations in the envelope proteins of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus on secretion of virus-like particles (VLPs), using a recombinant plasmid expression system was analysed. It was found that a single point mutation at position 63 in prM induces a reduction in secretion of VLPs. The mutation in prM did not affect the folding of the envelope proteins, and chaperone-like activity of prM was maintained. As observed by immunofluorescence microscopy, viral envelope proteins with the mutation in prM were scarce in the Golgi complex, and accumulated in the ER. Electron microscopic analysis of cells expressing the mutated prM revealed that many tubular structures were present in the lumen. The insertion of the prM mutation at aa 63 into the viral genome reduced the production of infectious virus particles. This data suggest that prM plays a crucial role in the virus budding process.

  8. Characterization of two second-site mutations preventing wild type protein aggregation caused by a dominant negative PMA1 mutant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Eraso

    Full Text Available The correct biogenesis and localization of Pma1 at the plasma membrane is essential for yeast growth. A subset of PMA1 mutations behave as dominant negative because they produce aberrantly folded proteins that form protein aggregates, which in turn provoke the aggregation of the wild type protein. One approach to understand this dominant negative effect is to identify second-site mutations able to suppress the dominant lethal phenotype caused by those mutant alleles. We isolated and characterized two intragenic second-site suppressors of the PMA1-D378T dominant negative mutation. We present here the analysis of these new mutations that are located along the amino-terminal half of the protein and include a missense mutation, L151F, and an in-frame 12bp deletion that eliminates four residues from Cys409 to Ala412. The results show that the suppressor mutations disrupt the interaction between the mutant and wild type enzymes, and this enables the wild type Pma1 to reach the plasma membrane.

  9. LanFP10-A, first functional fluorescent protein whose chromophore contains the elusive mutation G67A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán-Salgado, Abigail; Sánchez-Barreto, Celidee; Gaytán, Paul

    2016-11-01

    Since Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) was first successfully expressed in heterologous systems in 1994, many genes encoding other natural autofluorescent proteins (AFPs) have been cloned and subsequently modified by protein engineering to improve their physicochemical properties. Throughout this twenty-two-year period, glycine 67 (Gly67) has been regarded as the only amino acid in the entire protein family that is essential for the formation of the different reported chromophores. In this work, we demonstrate that a synthetic gene encoding LanFP10-A, a natural protein encoded in the genome of the lancelet Branchiostoma floridae containing the G67A mutation, produces a heterologous, functional yellow fluorescent protein when expressed in E. coli. In contrast to LanFP10-A, LanFP6-A, a second GFP-like protein found in the lancelet genome that also contains the natural G67A mutation, was non-fluorescent.

  10. Restoration of proper trafficking to the cell surface for membrane proteins harboring cysteine mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Lopez-Rodriguez

    Full Text Available A common phenotype for many genetic diseases is that the cell is unable to deliver full-length membrane proteins to the cell surface. For some forms of autism, hereditary spherocytosis and color blindness, the culprits are single point mutations to cysteine. We have studied two inheritable cysteine mutants of cyclic nucleotide-gated channels that produce achromatopsia, a common form of severe color blindness. By taking advantage of the reactivity of cysteine's sulfhydryl group, we modified these mutants with chemical reagents that attach moieties with similar chemistries to the wild-type amino acids' side chains. We show that these modifications restored proper delivery to the cell membrane. Once there, the channels exhibited normal functional properties. This strategy might provide a unique opportunity to assess the chemical nature of membrane protein traffic problems.

  11. wKinMut: An integrated tool for the analysis and interpretation of mutations in human protein kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Izarzugaza, Jose Maria; Vazquez, Miguel; del Pozo, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein kinases are involved in relevant physiological functions and a broad number of mutations in this superfamily have been reported in the literature to affect protein function and stability. Unfortunately, the exploration of the consequences on the phenotypes of each individual...

  12. A mutation in protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit A affects auxin transport in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbers, C.; DeLong, A.; Deruere, J.; Bernasconi, P.; Soll, D.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin controls processes such as cell elongation, root hair development and root branching. Tropisms, growth curvatures triggered by gravity, light and touch, are also auxin-mediated responses. Auxin is synthesized in the shoot apex and transported through the stem, but the molecular mechanism of auxin transport is not well understood. Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and other inhibitors of auxin transport block tropic curvature responses and inhibit root and shoot elongation. We have isolated a novel Arabidopsis thaliana mutant designated roots curl in NPA (rcn1). Mutant seedlings exhibit altered responses to NPA in root curling and hypocotyl elongation. Auxin efflux in mutant seedlings displays increased sensitivity to NPA. The rcn1 mutation was transferred-DNA (T-DNA) tagged and sequences flanking the T-DNA insert were cloned. Analysis of the RCN1 cDNA reveals that the T-DNA insertion disrupts a gene for the regulatory A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-A). The RCN1 gene rescues the rcn1 mutant phenotype and also complements the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PP2A-A mutation, tpd3-1. These data implicate protein phosphatase 2A in the regulation of auxin transport in Arabidopsis.

  13. Mutations of the microsomal triglyceride-transfer-protein gene in abetalipoproteinemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narcisi, T.M.E.; Shoulders, C.C.; Chester, S.A. [Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    Elevated plasma levels of apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoproteins constitute a major risk factor for the development of coronary heart disease. In the rare recessively inherited disorder abetalipoproteinemia (ABL) the production of apoB-containing lipoproteins is abolished, despite no abnormality of the apoB gene. In the current study we have characterized the gene encoding a microsomal triglyceride-transfer protein (MTP), localized to chromosome 4q22-24, and have identified a mutation of the MTP gene in both alleles of all individuals in a cohort of eight patients with classical ABL. Each mutant allele is predicted to encode a truncated form of MTP with a variable number of aberrant amino acids at its C-terminal end. Expression of genetically engineered forms of MTP in Cos-1 cells indicates that the C-terminal portion of MTP is necessary for triglyceride-transfer activity. Deletion of 20 amino acids from the carboxyl terminus of the 894-amino-acid protein and a missense mutation of cysteine 878 to serine both abolished activity. These results establish that defects of the MTP gene are the predominant, if not sole, cause of hereditary ABL and that an intact carboxyl terminus is necessary for activity. 49 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Protein Kinase A Effects of an Expressed PRKAR1A Mutation Associated with Aggressive Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meoli, Elise; Bossis, Ioannis; Cazabat, Laure; Mavrakis, Manos; Horvath, Anelia; Stergiopoulos, Sotiris; Shiferaw, Miriam L.; Fumey, Glawdys; Perlemoine, Karine; Muchow, Michael; Robinson-White, Audrey; Weinberg, Frank; Nesterova, Maria; Patronas, Yianna; Groussin, Lionel; Bertherat, Jérôme; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2011-01-01

    Most PRKAR1A tumorigenic mutations lead to nonsense mRNA that is decayed; tumor formation has been associated with an increase in type II protein kinase A (PKA) subunits. The IVS6+1G>T PRKAR1A mutation leads to a protein lacking exon 6 sequences [R1αΔ184-236 (R1αΔ6)]. We compared in vitro R1αΔ6 with wild-type (wt) R1α. We assessed PKA activity and subunit expression, phosphorylation of target molecules, and properties of wt-R1α and mutant (mt) R1α; we observed by confocal microscopy R1α tagged with green fluorescent protein and its interactions with Cerulean-tagged catalytic subunit (Cα). Introduction of the R1αΔ6 led to aberrant cellular morphology and higher PKA activity but no increase in type II PKA subunits. There was diffuse, cytoplasmic localization of R1α protein in wt-R1α– and R1αΔ6-transfected cells but the former also exhibited discrete aggregates of R1α that bound Cα; these were absent in R1αΔ6-transfected cells and did not bind Cα at baseline or in response to cyclic AMP. Other changes induced by R1αΔ6 included decreased nuclear Cα. We conclude that R1αΔ6 leads to increased PKA activity through the mt-R1α decreased binding to Cα and does not involve changes in other PKA subunits, suggesting that a switch to type II PKA activity is not necessary for increased kinase activity or tumorigenesis. PMID:18451138

  15. A novel mutation of ribosomal protein S10 gene in a Japanese patient with diamond-Blackfan anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazaki, Makoto; Kamei, Michi; Ito, Yasuhiko; Konno, Yuki; Wang, Runan; Toki, Tsutomu; Ito, Etsuro

    2012-05-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is an inherited bone marrow disease. The condition is characterized by anemia that usually presents during infancy or early childhood and congenital malformation. Several reports show that DBA is associated with mutations in the ribosomal protein (RP) genes, RPS19, RPS24, RPS17, RPL35A, RPL5, RPL11, and RPS7. Recently, 5 and 12 patients with mutations in RPS10 and RPS26, respectively, were identified in a cohort of 117 DBA probands. Therefore, we screened the DBA patients who were negative for mutations in these DBA genes for mutations in RPS10 and RPS26. The present case report describes the identification of the first Japanese DBA patient with a novel mutation in RPS10.

  16. Vacuolar Protein Sorting Genes in Parkinson's Disease: A Re-appraisal of Mutations Detection Rate and Neurobiology of Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambardella, Stefano; Biagioni, Francesca; Ferese, Rosangela; Busceti, Carla L; Frati, Alessandro; Novelli, Giuseppe; Ruggieri, Stefano; Fornai, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian retromers play a critical role in protein trans-membrane sorting from endosome to the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Recently, retromer alterations have been related to the onset of Parkinson's Disease (PD) since the variant p.Asp620Asn in VPS35 (Vacuolar Protein Sorting 35) was identified as a cause of late onset PD. This variant causes a primary defect in endosomal trafficking and retromers formation. Other mutations in VPS genes have been reported in both sporadic and familial PD. These mutations are less defined. Understanding the specific prevalence of all VPS gene mutations is key to understand the relevance of retromers impairment in the onset of PD. A number of PD-related mutations despite affecting different biochemical systems (autophagy, mitophagy, proteasome, endosomes, protein folding), all converge in producing an impairment in cell clearance. This may explain how genetic predispositions to PD may derive from slightly deleterious VPS mutations when combined with environmental agents overwhelming the clearance of the cell. This manuscript reviews genetic data produced in the last 5 years to re-define the actual prevalence of VPS gene mutations in the onset of PD. The prevalence of p.Asp620Asn mutation in VPS35 is 0.286 of familial PD. This increases up to 0.548 when considering mutations affecting all VPS genes. This configures mutations in VPS genes as the second most frequent autosomal dominant PD genotype. This high prevalence, joined with increased awareness of the role played by retromers in the neurobiology of PD, suggests environmentally-induced VPS alterations as crucial in the genesis of PD.

  17. Vacuolar Protein Sorting Genes in Parkinson's Disease: A Re-appraisal of Mutations Detection Rate and Neurobiology of Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambardella, Stefano; Biagioni, Francesca; Ferese, Rosangela; Busceti, Carla L.; Frati, Alessandro; Novelli, Giuseppe; Ruggieri, Stefano; Fornai, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian retromers play a critical role in protein trans-membrane sorting from endosome to the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Recently, retromer alterations have been related to the onset of Parkinson's Disease (PD) since the variant p.Asp620Asn in VPS35 (Vacuolar Protein Sorting 35) was identified as a cause of late onset PD. This variant causes a primary defect in endosomal trafficking and retromers formation. Other mutations in VPS genes have been reported in both sporadic and familial PD. These mutations are less defined. Understanding the specific prevalence of all VPS gene mutations is key to understand the relevance of retromers impairment in the onset of PD. A number of PD-related mutations despite affecting different biochemical systems (autophagy, mitophagy, proteasome, endosomes, protein folding), all converge in producing an impairment in cell clearance. This may explain how genetic predispositions to PD may derive from slightly deleterious VPS mutations when combined with environmental agents overwhelming the clearance of the cell. This manuscript reviews genetic data produced in the last 5 years to re-define the actual prevalence of VPS gene mutations in the onset of PD. The prevalence of p.Asp620Asn mutation in VPS35 is 0.286 of familial PD. This increases up to 0.548 when considering mutations affecting all VPS genes. This configures mutations in VPS genes as the second most frequent autosomal dominant PD genotype. This high prevalence, joined with increased awareness of the role played by retromers in the neurobiology of PD, suggests environmentally-induced VPS alterations as crucial in the genesis of PD. PMID:27932943

  18. Mutational breeding and genetic engineering in the development of high grain protein content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenefrida, Ida; Utomo, Herry S; Linscombe, Steve D

    2013-12-04

    Cereals are the most important crops in the world for both human consumption and animal feed. Improving their nutritional values, such as high protein content, will have significant implications, from establishing healthy lifestyles to helping remediate malnutrition problems worldwide. Besides providing a source of carbohydrate, grain is also a natural source of dietary fiber, vitamins, minerals, specific oils, and other disease-fighting phytocompounds. Even though cereal grains contain relatively little protein compared to legume seeds, they provide protein for the nutrition of humans and livestock that is about 3 times that of legumes. Most cereal seeds lack a few essential amino acids; therefore, they have imbalanced amino acid profiles. Lysine (Lys), threonine (Thr), methionine (Met), and tryptophan (Trp) are among the most critical and are a limiting factor in many grain crops for human nutrition. Tremendous research has been put into the efforts to improve these essential amino acids. Development of high protein content can be outlined in four different approaches through manipulating seed protein bodies, modulating certain biosynthetic pathways to overproduce essential and limiting amino acids, increasing nitrogen relocation to the grain through the introduction of transgenes, and exploiting new genetic variance. Various technologies have been employed to improve protein content including conventional and mutational breeding, genetic engineering, marker-assisted selection, and genomic analysis. Each approach involves a combination of these technologies. Advancements in nutrigenomics and nutrigenetics continue to improve public knowledge at a rapid pace on the importance of specific aspects of food nutrition for optimum fitness and health. An understanding of the molecular basis for human health and genetic predisposition to certain diseases through human genomes enables individuals to personalize their nutritional requirements. It is critically important

  19. The D1 and D2 proteins of dinoflagellates: unusually accumulated mutations which influence on PSII photoreaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Satoko; Kobiyama, Atsushi; Ogata, Takehiko; Murakami, Akio

    2008-01-01

    Plastid encoded genes of the dinoflagellates are rapidly evolving and most divergent. The importance of unusually accumulated mutations on structure of PSII core protein and photosynthetic function was examined in the dinoflagellates, Symbiodinium sp. and Alexandrium tamarense. Full-length cDNA sequences of psbA (D1 protein) and psbD (D2 protein) were obtained and compared with the other oxygen-evolving photoautotrophs. Twenty-three amino acid positions (7%) for the D1 protein and 34 positions (10%) for the D2 were mutated in the dinoflagellates, although amino acid residues at these positions were conserved in cyanobacteria, the other algae, and plant. Many mutations were likely to distribute in the N-terminus and the D-E interhelical loop of the D1 protein and helix B of D2 protein, while the remaining regions were well conserved. The different structural properties in these mutated regions were supported by hydropathy profiles. The chlorophyll fluorescence kinetics of the dinoflagellates was compared with Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 in relation to the altered protein structure.

  20. Mutational analysis of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) immediate early protein (IE62) subdomains and their importance in viral replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, Mohamed I., E-mail: mkhalil2@stanford.edu [Departments of Pediatrics and Microbiology & Immunology, Stan ford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Department of Molecular Biology, National Research Centre, El-Buhouth St., Cairo (Egypt); Che, Xibing; Sung, Phillip; Sommer, Marvin H. [Departments of Pediatrics and Microbiology & Immunology, Stan ford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Hay, John [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine and Biomedical Science, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY (United States); Arvin, Ann M. [Departments of Pediatrics and Microbiology & Immunology, Stan ford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2016-05-15

    VZV IE62 is an essential, immediate-early, tegument protein and consists of five domains. We generated recombinant viruses carrying mutations in the first three IE62 domains and tested their influence on VZV replication kinetics. The mutations in domain I did not affect replication kinetics while domain II mutations, disrupting the DNA binding and dimerization domain (DBD), were lethal for VZV replication. Mutations in domain III of the nuclear localization signal (NLS) and the two phosphorylation sites S686A/S722A resulted in slower growth in early and late infection respectively and were associated with IE62 accumulation in the cytoplasm and nucleus respectively. This study mapped the functional domains of IE62 in context of viral infection, indicating that DNA binding and dimerization domain is essential for VZV replication. In addition, the correct localization of IE62, whether nuclear or cytoplasmic, at different points in the viral life cycle, is important for normal progression of VZV replication. - Highlights: • Mutation of IE62 domain I did not affect VZV replication in melanoma cells. • IE62 domain II and III are important for VZV replication in melanoma cells. • Mutations of IE62 domain II (DBD) were lethal for virus replication. • Mutations of IE62 NLS and phosphorylation sites inhibited VZV replication. • NLS and S686A/S722A mutations altered localization of IE62 during early and late infection.

  1. Gene p53 mutations, protein p53, and anti-p53 antibodies as biomarkers of cancer process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Waldemar; Nowakowska-Swirta, Ewa

    2002-01-01

    The finding that gene mutations and changes in their expression form the basis of cancer processes, has prompted molecular epidemiologists to use biomarkers for detecting damaged genes or proteins synthesized under their control in easily available cellular material or systemic liquids. Mutations in the suppressor gen p53 are thought to be essential for cancer development. This gen is one of the most important regulators of transcription, cellular cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis detected till now. Inactivation of gene p53 leads to uncontrolled cell divisions, and further to transformation of normal cells into the carcinous ones. Observations that mutations in gene p53 appear under conditions of occupational and environmental exposures to chemical and physical carcinogens, such as vinyl chloride, radon, or aflatoxin B1, have proved to be of enormous importance for the occupational and environmental health. Changes in expression of gene p53, and also its mutations, cause variations of cellular protein p53 concentration. Higher cellular protein p53 levels are associated with increased protein transfer to the extracellular liquid and to blood. It has been observed that increased blood serum protein p53 concentrations may have a prognostic value in early diagnosis of lung cancer. The results of a number of studies confirm that accumulation of a mutated form of protein p53, and presumably also large quantities of wild forms of that protein in the cells, may be a factor that triggers the production of anti-p53 antibodies. Statistical analysis showed that anti-p53 antibodies can be regarded as a specific biomarker of cancer process. The prevalence of anti-p53 antibodies correlated with the degree of cancer malignancy. The increased incidence of anti-p53 antibodies was also associated with higher frequency of mutations in gene p53. There are some reports confirming that anti-p53 antibodies emerging in blood serum in the subclinical phase of cancer development may be

  2. Error-prone and error-restrictive mutations affecting ribosomal protein S12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Deepali; Gregory, Steven T; O'Connor, Michael

    2011-07-01

    Ribosomal protein S12 plays a pivotal role in decoding functions on the ribosome. X-ray crystallographic analyses of ribosomal complexes have revealed that S12 is involved in the inspection of codon-anticodon pairings in the ribosomal A site, as well as in the succeeding domain rearrangements of the 30S subunit that are essential for accommodation of aminoacyl-tRNA. A role for S12 in tRNA selection is also well supported by classical genetic analyses; mutations affecting S12 are readily isolated in bacteria and organelles, since specific alterations in S12 confer resistance to the error-inducing antibiotic streptomycin, and the ribosomes from many such streptomycin-resistant S12 mutants display decreased levels of miscoding. However, substitutions that confer resistance to streptomycin likely represent a very distinct class of all possible S12 mutants. Until recently, the technical difficulties in generating random, unselectable mutations in essential genes in complex operons have generally precluded the analysis of other classes of S12 alterations. Using a recombineering approach, we have targeted the Escherichia coli rpsL gene, encoding S12, for random mutagenesis and screened the resulting mutants for effects on decoding fidelity. We have recovered over 40 different substitutions located throughout the S12 protein that alter the accuracy of translation without substantially affecting the sensitivity to streptomycin. Moreover, this collection includes mutants that promote miscoding, as well as those that restrict decoding errors. These results affirm the importance of S12 in decoding processes and indicate that alterations in this essential protein can have diverse effects on the accuracy of decoding.

  3. Mutation analysis of mitogen activated protein kinase 1 gene in Indian cases of 46,XY disorder of sex development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanjit Kumar Das

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Determination of sex is the result of cascade of molecular events that cause undifferentiated bipotential gonad to develop as a testis or an ovary. A series of genes such as SRY, steroidogenic factor-1 (SF1, AR, SRD5 α, Desert hedgehog (DHH etc., have been reported to have a significant role in development of sex in the fetus and secondary sexual characteristics at the time of puberty. Recently, mitogen activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1 (MAP3K1 gene was found to be associated with 46, XY disorders of sex development (DSD. Aim: The present study is focused to identify mutations in MAP3K1 gene in the cohort of 10 Indian patients with 46,XY DSD including one family with two affected sisters. These patients were already screened for SRY, SF1 and DHH gene, but no mutation was observed in any of these genes. Materials and Methods: The entire coding regions of MAP3K1 were amplified and sequenced using the gene specific primers. Results and Discussions: Sequence analysis of MAP3K1 gene has revealed four variants including one missense, two silent and one deletion mutation. The missense mutation p.D806N was observed in four patients with hypospadias. Two patients showed the presence of silent mutation p.Q1028Q present in exon 14. Another silent mutation p.T428T was observed in a patient with gonadal dysgenesis. We have also observed one deletion mutation p. 942insT present in two patients. The pathogenicity of the missense mutation p.D806N was carried out using in-silico approach. Sequence homology analysis has revealed that the aspartate at 806 was found to be well-conserved across species, indicated the importance of this residue. The score for polyphen analysis of this mutation was found to be 0.999 indicating to be pathogenic mutation. Since, p.D806N mutation was found to be important residue; it might contribute to sexual development. We have reported the presence of mutations/polymorphism in MAP3K1 gene. All the mutations were

  4. L233P mutation of the Tax protein strongly correlated with leukemogenicity of bovine leukemia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Emi; Matsumura, Keiko; Soma, Norihiko; Hirasawa, Shintaro; Wakimoto, Mayuko; Arakaki, Yoshihiro; Yoshida, Takashi; Osawa, Yoshiaki; Okazaki, Katsunori

    2013-12-27

    The bovine leukemia virus (BLV) Tax protein is believed to play a crucial role in leukemogenesis by the virus. BLV usually causes asymptomatic infections in cattle, but only one-third develop persistent lymphocytosis that rarely progress after a long incubation period to lymphoid tumors, namely enzootic bovine leucosis (EBL). In the present study, we demonstrated that the BLV tax genes could be divided into two alleles and developed multiplex PCR detecting an L233P mutation of the Tax protein. Then, in order to define the relationship between the Tax protein and leukemogenicity, we examined 360 tumor samples randomly collected from dairy or breeding cattle in Japan, of which Tax proteins were categorized, for age at the time of diagnosis of EBL. The ages of 288 animals (80.0%) associated with L233-Tax and those of 70 animals (19.4%) with P233-Tax individually followed log-normal distributions. Only the two earliest cases (0.6%) with L233-Tax disobeyed the log-normal distribution. These findings suggest that the animals affected by EBL were infected with the virus at a particular point in life, probably less than a few months after birth. Median age of those with P233-Tax was 22 months older than that with L233-Tax and geometric means exhibited a significant difference (PTax protein infect older cattle. Here, we conclude that BLV could be divided into two categories on the basis of amino acid at position 233 of the Tax protein, which strongly correlated with leukemogenicity.

  5. The de novo autism spectrum disorder RELN R2290C mutation reduces Reelin secretion and increases protein disulfide isomerase expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammert, Dawn B; Middleton, Frank A; Pan, Jen; Olson, Eric C; Howell, Brian W

    2017-07-01

    Despite the recent identification of over 40 missense heterozygous Reelin gene (RELN) mutations in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), none of these has been functionally characterized. Reelin is an integral signaling ligand for proper brain development and post-natal synapse function - properties likely disrupted in ASD patients. We find that the R2290C mutation, which arose de novo in an affected ASD proband, and other analogous mutations in arginine-amino acid-arginine domains reduce protein secretion. Closer analysis of RELN R2290C heterozygous neurospheres reveals up-regulation of Protein Disulfide Isomerase A1, best known as an endoplasmic reticulum-chaperone protein, which has been linked to neuronal pathology. This effect is recapitulated in a heterozygous RELN mouse mutant that is characterized by defective Reelin secretion. These findings suggest that both a deficiency in Reelin signaling and pathologic impairment of Reelin secretion may contribute to ASD risk. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  6. A novel germline mutation in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene in an Italian family with gigantism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbani, C; Russo, D; Raggi, F; Lombardi, M; Sardella, C; Scattina, I; Lupi, I; Manetti, L; Tomisti, L; Marcocci, C; Martino, E; Bogazzi, F

    2014-10-01

    Acromegaly usually occurs as a sporadic disease, but it may be a part of familial pituitary tumor syndromes in rare cases. Germline mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene have been associated with a predisposition to familial isolated pituitary adenoma. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the AIP gene in a patient with gigantism and in her relatives. Direct sequencing of AIP gene was performed in fourteen members of the family, spanning among three generations. The index case was an 18-year-old woman with gigantism due to an invasive GH-secreting pituitary adenoma and a concomitant tall-cell variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma. A novel germline mutation in the AIP gene (c.685C>T, p.Q229X) was identified in the proband and in two members of her family, who did not present clinical features of acromegaly or other pituitary disorders. Eleven subjects had no mutation in the AIP gene. Two members of the family with clinical features of acromegaly refused either the genetic or the biochemical evaluation. The Q229X mutation was predicted to generate a truncated AIP protein, lacking the last two tetratricopeptide repeat domains and the final C-terminal α-7 helix. We identified a new AIP germline mutation predicted to produce a truncated AIP protein, lacking its biological properties due to the disruption of the C-terminus binding sites for both the chaperones and the client proteins of AIP.

  7. Inhibition of Bcl-2 or IAP proteins does not provoke mutations in surviving cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shekhar, Tanmay M. [Department of Biochemistry, La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science, La Trobe University, Bundoora 3083 (Australia); Green, Maja M. [Department of Biochemistry, La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science, La Trobe University, Bundoora 3083 (Australia); Department of Anatomy & Neuroscience, The University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia); Rayner, David M.; Miles, Mark A.; Cutts, Suzanne M. [Department of Biochemistry, La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science, La Trobe University, Bundoora 3083 (Australia); Hawkins, Christine J., E-mail: c.hawkins@latrobe.edu.au [Department of Biochemistry, La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science, La Trobe University, Bundoora 3083 (Australia)

    2015-07-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Mutagenicities of anti-cancer drugs were tested using HPRT, γH2AX and comet assays. • TRAIL, doxorubicin and etoposide were more mutagenic than BH3- or Smac-mimetics. • Physiologically achievable levels of the BH3-mimetic ABT-737 were not mutagenic. • High concentrations of ABT-737 provoked mutations via an off-target mechanism. • Even very high concentrations of IAP antagonists were not mutagenic. - Abstract: Chemotherapy and radiotherapy can cause permanent damage to the genomes of surviving cells, provoking severe side effects such as second malignancies in some cancer survivors. Drugs that mimic the activity of death ligands, or antagonise pro-survival proteins of the Bcl-2 or IAP families have yielded encouraging results in animal experiments and early phase clinical trials. Because these agents directly engage apoptosis pathways, rather than damaging DNA to indirectly provoke tumour cell death, we reasoned that they may offer another important advantage over conventional therapies: minimisation or elimination of side effects such as second cancers that result from mutation of surviving normal cells. Disappointingly, however, we previously found that concentrations of death receptor agonists like TRAIL that would be present in vivo in clinical settings provoked DNA damage in surviving cells. In this study, we used cell line model systems to investigate the mutagenic capacity of drugs from two other classes of direct apoptosis-inducing agents: the BH3-mimetic ABT-737 and the IAP antagonists LCL161 and AT-406. Encouragingly, our data suggest that IAP antagonists possess negligible genotoxic activity. Doses of ABT-737 that were required to damage DNA stimulated Bax/Bak-independent signalling and exceeded concentrations detected in the plasma of animals treated with this drug. These findings provide hope that cancer patients treated by BH3-mimetics or IAP antagonists may avoid mutation-related illnesses that afflict

  8. Study of thermosiphon cooling scheme for the production solenoid of the Mu2e experiment at Fermilab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanaraj, N.; Kashikhin, V.; Peterson, T.; Pronskikh, V.; Nicol, T.

    2014-01-01

    A thermosiphon cooling scheme is envisioned for the Production Solenoid of the Mu2e experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The thermosiphon cooling is achieved by indirect cooling with helium at 4.7 K. The siphon tubes are welded to the solenoid outer structure. The anticipated heat loads in the solenoid is presented as well as the cooling scheme design. A thermal model using ANSYS to simulate the temperature gradient is presented. The thermal analysis also makes provisions for including the heat load generated in the coils and structures by the secondary radiation simulated using the MARS 15 code. The impact of the heat loads from supports on the solenoid cooling is studied. The thermosiphon cooling scheme is also validated using pertinent correlations to study flow reversals and the cooling regime.

  9. Ribosomal protein mutations induce autophagy through S6 kinase inhibition of the insulin pathway.

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    Harry F Heijnen

    Full Text Available Mutations affecting the ribosome lead to several diseases known as ribosomopathies, with phenotypes that include growth defects, cytopenia, and bone marrow failure. Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA, for example, is a pure red cell aplasia linked to the mutation of ribosomal protein (RP genes. Here we show the knock-down of the DBA-linked RPS19 gene induces the cellular self-digestion process of autophagy, a pathway critical for proper hematopoiesis. We also observe an increase of autophagy in cells derived from DBA patients, in CD34+ erythrocyte progenitor cells with RPS19 knock down, in the red blood cells of zebrafish embryos with RP-deficiency, and in cells from patients with Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS. The loss of RPs in all these models results in a marked increase in S6 kinase phosphorylation that we find is triggered by an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS. We show that this increase in S6 kinase phosphorylation inhibits the insulin pathway and AKT phosphorylation activity through a mechanism reminiscent of insulin resistance. While stimulating RP-deficient cells with insulin reduces autophagy, antioxidant treatment reduces S6 kinase phosphorylation, autophagy, and stabilization of the p53 tumor suppressor. Our data suggest that RP loss promotes the aberrant activation of both S6 kinase and p53 by increasing intracellular ROS levels. The deregulation of these signaling pathways is likely playing a major role in the pathophysiology of ribosomopathies.

  10. Ribosomal protein mutations induce autophagy through S6 kinase inhibition of the insulin pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry F Heijnen

    Full Text Available Mutations affecting the ribosome lead to several diseases known as ribosomopathies, with phenotypes that include growth defects, cytopenia, and bone marrow failure. Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA, for example, is a pure red cell aplasia linked to the mutation of ribosomal protein (RP genes. Here we show the knock-down of the DBA-linked RPS19 gene induces the cellular self-digestion process of autophagy, a pathway critical for proper hematopoiesis. We also observe an increase of autophagy in cells derived from DBA patients, in CD34+ erythrocyte progenitor cells with RPS19 knock down, in the red blood cells of zebrafish embryos with RP-deficiency, and in cells from patients with Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS. The loss of RPs in all these models results in a marked increase in S6 kinase phosphorylation that we find is triggered by an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS. We show that this increase in S6 kinase phosphorylation inhibits the insulin pathway and AKT phosphorylation activity through a mechanism reminiscent of insulin resistance. While stimulating RP-deficient cells with insulin reduces autophagy, antioxidant treatment reduces S6 kinase phosphorylation, autophagy, and stabilization of the p53 tumor suppressor. Our data suggest that RP loss promotes the aberrant activation of both S6 kinase and p53 by increasing intracellular ROS levels. The deregulation of these signaling pathways is likely playing a major role in the pathophysiology of ribosomopathies.

  11. Truncating plakophilin-2 mutations in arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy are associated with protein haploinsufficiency in both myocardium and epidermis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torsten B; Nissen, Peter H; Palmfeldt, Johan;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (AC) is a hereditary cardiac condition associated with ventricular arrhythmias, heart failure, and sudden death. The disease is most often caused by mutations in the desmosomal gene for plakophilin-2 (PKP2), which is expressed in both myocardial...... individuals. It was evident that PKP2 mutations introducing a premature termination codon in the reading frame were associated with PKP2 transcript and protein levels reduced to ≈50%, whereas a missense variant did not seem to affect the amount of PKP2 protein. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study showed...

  12. Single point mutation in tick-borne encephalitis virus prM protein induces a reduction of virus particle secretion

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshii, Kentarou; Konno, Akihiro; Goto, Akiko; Nio, Junko; Obara, Mayumi; Ueki, Tomotaka; Hayasaka, Daisuke; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Kariwa, Hiroaki; Takashima, Ikuo

    2004-01-01

    Flaviviruses are assembled to bud into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and are secreted through the vesicle transport pathway. Virus envelope proteins play important roles in this process. In this study, the effect of mutations in the envelope proteins of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus on secretion of virus-like particles (VLPs), using a recombinant plasmid expression system was analysed. It was found that a single point mutation at position 63 in prM induces a reduction in s...

  13. Familial acromegaly due to aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene mutation in a Turkish cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niyazoglu, Mutlu; Sayitoglu, Muge; Firtina, Sinem; Hatipoglu, Esra; Gazioglu, Nurperi; Kadioglu, Pinar

    2014-06-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) is associated with 15-20% of familial isolated pituitary adenomas and 50-80% of cases with AIP mutation exhibit a somatotropinoma. Herein we report clinical characteristics of a large family where AIP R304X variants have been identified. AIP mutation analysis was performed on a large (n = 52) Turkish family across six generations. Sella MRIs of 30 family members were obtained. Basal pituitary hormone levels were evaluated in 13 family members harboring an AIP mutation. Thirteen of 52 family members (25%) were found to have a heterozygous nonsense germline R304X mutation in the AIP gene. Seven of the 13 mutation carriers (53.8%) had current or previous history of pituitary adenoma. Of these 7 mutation carriers, all but one had somatotropinoma/somatolactotropinoma (85.7% of the pituitary adenomas). Of the 6 acromegaly patients with AIP mutation (F/M: 3/3) the mean age at diagnosis of acromegaly was 32 ± 10.3 years while the mean age of symptom onset was 24.8 ± 9.9 years. Three of the six (50%) acromegaly cases with AIP mutation within the family presented with a macroadenoma and none presented with gigantism. Biochemical disease control was achieved in 66.6% (4/6) of the mutation carriers with acromegaly after a mean follow-up period of 18.6 ± 17.6 years. Common phenotypic characteristics of familial pituitary adenoma or somatotropinoma due to AIP mutation vary between families or even between individuals within a family.

  14. Structural and protein interaction effects of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathic mutations in alpha-tropomyosin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey N. Chang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The potential alterations to structure and associations with thin filament proteins caused by the dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM associated tropomyosin (Tm mutants E40K and E54K, and the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM associated Tm mutants E62Q and L185R, were investigated. In order to ascertain what the cause of the known functional effects may be, structural and protein-protein interaction studies were conducted utilizing actomyosin ATPase activity measurements and spectroscopy. In actomyosin ATPase measurements, both HCM mutants and the DCM mutant E54K caused increases in Ca2+-induced maximal activities, while E40K caused a decrease. Investigation of Tm’s ability to inhibit actomyosin ATPase in the absence of troponin showed that HCM-associated mutant Tms did not inhibit as well as wildtype, whereas the DCM associated mutant E40K inhibited better. E54K did not inhibit the actomyosin ATPase activity at any concentration of Tm tested. Thermal denaturation studies by circular dichroism and molecular modeling of the mutations in Tm showed that in general, the DCM mutants caused destabilization within the Tm, while the HCM mutants resulted in increased stability. These findings demonstrate that the structural alterations in Tm observed here may affect the regulatory function of Tm on actin, thereby directly altering the ATPase rates of myosin.

  15. Structural stability of human protein tyrosine phosphatase ρ catalytic domain: effect of point mutations.

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    Alessandra Pasquo

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatase ρ (PTPρ belongs to the classical receptor type IIB family of protein tyrosine phosphatase, the most frequently mutated tyrosine phosphatase in human cancer. There are evidences to suggest that PTPρ may act as a tumor suppressor gene and dysregulation of Tyr phosphorylation can be observed in diverse diseases, such as diabetes, immune deficiencies and cancer. PTPρ variants in the catalytic domain have been identified in cancer tissues. These natural variants are nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms, variations of a single nucleotide occurring in the coding region and leading to amino acid substitutions. In this study we investigated the effect of amino acid substitution on the structural stability and on the activity of the membrane-proximal catalytic domain of PTPρ. We expressed and purified as soluble recombinant proteins some of the mutants of the membrane-proximal catalytic domain of PTPρ identified in colorectal cancer and in the single nucleotide polymorphisms database. The mutants show a decreased thermal and thermodynamic stability and decreased activation energy relative to phosphatase activity, when compared to wild- type. All the variants show three-state equilibrium unfolding transitions similar to that of the wild- type, with the accumulation of a folding intermediate populated at ~4.0 M urea.

  16. A missense mutation in CHS1, a TIR-NB protein, induces chilling sensitivity in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuancong; Zhang, Yao; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Yang, Shuhua

    2013-08-01

    Low temperature is an environmental factor that affects plant growth and development and plant-pathogen interactions. How temperature regulates plant defense responses is not well understood. In this study, we characterized chilling-sensitive mutant 1 (chs1), and functionally analyzed the role of the CHS1 gene in plant responses to chilling stress. The chs1 mutant displayed a chilling-sensitive phenotype, and also displayed defense-associated phenotypes, including extensive cell death, the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide and salicylic acid, and an increased expression of PR genes: these phenotypes indicated that the mutation in chs1 activates the defense responses under chilling stress. A map-based cloning analysis revealed that CHS1 encodes a TIR-NB-type protein. The chilling sensitivity of chs1 was fully rescued by pad4 and eds1, but not by ndr1. The overexpression of the TIR and NB domains can suppress the chs1-conferred phenotypes. Interestingly, the stability of the CHS1 protein was positively regulated by low temperatures independently of the 26S proteasome pathway. This study revealed the role of a TIR-NB-type gene in plant growth and cell death under chilling stress, and suggests that temperature modulates the stability of the TIR-NB protein in Arabidopsis.

  17. Ethylmalonic encephalopathy is caused by mutations in ETHE1, a gene encoding a mitochondrial matrix protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiranti, Valeria; D'Adamo, Pio; Briem, Egill; Ferrari, Gianfrancesco; Mineri, Rossana; Lamantea, Eleonora; Mandel, Hanna; Balestri, Paolo; Garcia-Silva, Maria-Teresa; Vollmer, Brigitte; Rinaldo, Piero; Hahn, Si Houn; Leonard, James; Rahman, Shamima; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Garavaglia, Barbara; Gasparini, Paolo; Zeviani, Massimo

    2004-02-01

    Ethylmalonic encephalopathy (EE) is a devastating infantile metabolic disorder affecting the brain, gastrointestinal tract, and peripheral vessels. High levels of ethylmalonic acid are detected in the body fluids, and cytochrome c oxidase activity is decreased in skeletal muscle. By use of a combination of homozygosity mapping, integration of physical and functional genomic data sets, and mutational screening, we identified GenBank D83198 as the gene responsible for EE. We also demonstrated that the D83198 protein product is targeted to mitochondria and internalized into the matrix after energy-dependent cleavage of a short leader peptide. The gene had previously been known as "HSCO" (for hepatoma subtracted clone one). However, given its role in EE, the name of the gene has been changed to "ETHE1." The severe consequences of its malfunctioning indicate an important role of the ETHE1 gene product in mitochondrial homeostasis and energy metabolism.

  18. The PINK1 p.I368N mutation affects protein stability and ubiquitin kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Maya; Fiesel, Fabienne C; Hudec, Roman; Caulfield, Thomas R; Ogaki, Kotaro; Górka-Skoczylas, Paulina; Koziorowski, Dariusz; Friedman, Andrzej; Chen, Li; Dawson, Valina L; Dawson, Ted M; Bu, Guojun; Ross, Owen A; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Springer, Wolfdieter

    2017-04-24

    Mutations in PINK1 and PARKIN are the most common causes of recessive early-onset Parkinson's disease (EOPD). Together, the mitochondrial ubiquitin (Ub) kinase PINK1 and the cytosolic E3 Ub ligase PARKIN direct a complex regulated, sequential mitochondrial quality control. Thereby, damaged mitochondria are identified and targeted to degradation in order to prevent their accumulation and eventually cell death. Homozygous or compound heterozygous loss of either gene function disrupts this protective pathway, though at different steps and by distinct mechanisms. While structure and function of PARKIN variants have been well studied, PINK1 mutations remain poorly characterized, in particular under endogenous conditions. A better understanding of the exact molecular pathogenic mechanisms underlying the pathogenicity is crucial for rational drug design in the future. Here, we characterized the pathogenicity of the PINK1 p.I368N mutation on the clinical and genetic as well as on the structural and functional level in patients' fibroblasts and in cell-based, biochemical assays. Under endogenous conditions, PINK1 p.I368N is expressed, imported, and N-terminally processed in healthy mitochondria similar to PINK1 wild type (WT). Upon mitochondrial damage, however, full-length PINK1 p.I368N is not sufficiently stabilized on the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) resulting in loss of mitochondrial quality control. We found that binding of PINK1 p.I368N to the co-chaperone complex HSP90/CDC37 is reduced and stress-induced interaction with TOM40 of the mitochondrial protein import machinery is abolished. Analysis of a structural PINK1 p.I368N model additionally suggested impairments of Ub kinase activity as the ATP-binding pocket was found deformed and the substrate Ub was slightly misaligned within the active site of the kinase. Functional assays confirmed the lack of Ub kinase activity. Here we demonstrated that mutant PINK1 p.I368N can not be stabilized on the OMM upon

  19. Adaptive mutations in the JC virus protein capsid are associated with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamil R Sunyaev

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available PML is a progressive and mostly fatal demyelinating disease caused by JC virus infection and destruction of infected oligodendrocytes in multiple brain foci of susceptible individuals. While JC virus is highly prevalent in the human population, PML is a rare disease that exclusively afflicts only a small percentage of immunocompromised individuals including those affected by HIV (AIDS or immunosuppressive drugs. Viral- and/or host-specific factors, and not simply immune status, must be at play to account for the very large discrepancy between viral prevalence and low disease incidence. Here, we show that several amino acids on the surface of the JC virus capsid protein VP1 display accelerated evolution in viral sequences isolated from PML patients but not in sequences isolated from healthy subjects. We provide strong evidence that at least some of these mutations are involved in binding of sialic acid, a known receptor for the JC virus. Using statistical methods of molecular evolution, we performed a comprehensive analysis of JC virus VP1 sequences isolated from 55 PML patients and 253 sequences isolated from the urine of healthy individuals and found that a subset of amino acids found exclusively among PML VP1 sequences is acquired via adaptive evolution. By modeling of the 3-D structure of the JC virus capsid, we showed that these residues are located within the sialic acid binding site, a JC virus receptor for cell infection. Finally, we go on to demonstrate the involvement of some of these sites in receptor binding by demonstrating a profound reduction in hemagglutination properties of viral-like particles made of the VP1 protein carrying these mutations. Collectively, these results suggest that a more virulent PML causing phenotype of JC virus is acquired via adaptive evolution that changes viral specificity for its cellular receptor(s.

  20. Location of glycine mutations within a bacterial collagen protein affects degree of disruption of triple-helix folding and conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Haiming; Rashid, Shayan; Yu, Zhuoxin; Yoshizumi, Ayumi; Hwang, Eileen; Brodsky, Barbara

    2011-01-21

    The hereditary bone disorder osteogenesis imperfecta is often caused by missense mutations in type I collagen that change one Gly residue to a larger residue and that break the typical (Gly-Xaa-Yaa)(n) sequence pattern. Site-directed mutagenesis in a recombinant bacterial collagen system was used to explore the effects of the Gly mutation position and of the identity of the residue replacing Gly in a homogeneous collagen molecular population. Homotrimeric bacterial collagen proteins with a Gly-to-Arg or Gly-to-Ser replacement formed stable triple-helix molecules with a reproducible 2 °C decrease in stability. All Gly replacements led to a significant delay in triple-helix folding, but a more dramatic delay was observed when the mutation was located near the N terminus of the triple-helix domain. This highly disruptive mutation, close to the globular N-terminal trimerization domain where folding is initiated, is likely to interfere with triple-helix nucleation. A positional effect of mutations was also suggested by trypsin sensitivity for a Gly-to-Arg replacement close to the triple-helix N terminus but not for the same replacement near the center of the molecule. The significant impact of the location of a mutation on triple-helix folding and conformation could relate to the severe consequences of mutations located near the C terminus of type I and type III collagens, where trimerization occurs and triple-helix folding is initiated.

  1. Mutational analysis of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) immediate early protein (IE62) subdomains and their importance in viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Mohamed I; Che, Xibing; Sung, Phillip; Sommer, Marvin H; Hay, John; Arvin, Ann M

    2016-05-01

    VZV IE62 is an essential, immediate-early, tegument protein and consists of five domains. We generated recombinant viruses carrying mutations in the first three IE62 domains and tested their influence on VZV replication kinetics. The mutations in domain I did not affect replication kinetics while domain II mutations, disrupting the DNA binding and dimerization domain (DBD), were lethal for VZV replication. Mutations in domain III of the nuclear localization signal (NLS) and the two phosphorylation sites S686A/S722A resulted in slower growth in early and late infection respectively and were associated with IE62 accumulation in the cytoplasm and nucleus respectively. This study mapped the functional domains of IE62 in context of viral infection, indicating that DNA binding and dimerization domain is essential for VZV replication. In addition, the correct localization of IE62, whether nuclear or cytoplasmic, at different points in the viral life cycle, is important for normal progression of VZV replication.

  2. Mutation-Structure-Function Relationship Based Integrated Strategy Reveals the Potential Impact of Deleterious Missense Mutations in Autophagy Related Proteins on Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC: A Comprehensive Informatics Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faryal Mehwish Awan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy, an evolutionary conserved multifaceted lysosome-mediated bulk degradation system, plays a vital role in liver pathologies including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Post-translational modifications (PTMs and genetic variations in autophagy components have emerged as significant determinants of autophagy related proteins. Identification of a comprehensive spectrum of genetic variations and PTMs of autophagy related proteins and their impact at molecular level will greatly expand our understanding of autophagy based regulation. In this study, we attempted to identify high risk missense mutations that are highly damaging to the structure as well as function of autophagy related proteins including LC3A, LC3B, BECN1 and SCD1. Number of putative structural and functional residues, including several sites that undergo PTMs were also identified. In total, 16 high-risk SNPs in LC3A, 18 in LC3B, 40 in BECN1 and 43 in SCD1 were prioritized. Out of these, 2 in LC3A (K49A, K51A, 1 in LC3B (S92C, 6 in BECN1 (S113R, R292C, R292H, Y338C, S346Y, Y352H and 6 in SCD1 (Y41C, Y55D, R131W, R135Q, R135W, Y151C coincide with potential PTM sites. Our integrated analysis found LC3B Y113C, BECN1 I403T, SCD1 R126S and SCD1 Y218C as highly deleterious HCC-associated mutations. This study is the first extensive in silico mutational analysis of the LC3A, LC3B, BECN1 and SCD1 proteins. We hope that the observed results will be a valuable resource for in-depth mechanistic insight into future investigations of pathological missense SNPs using an integrated computational platform.

  3. Guided macro-mutation in a graded energy based genetic algorithm for protein structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Mahmood A; Iqbal, Sumaiya; Khatib, Firas; Hoque, Md Tamjidul; Sattar, Abdul

    2016-04-01

    Protein structure prediction is considered as one of the most challenging and computationally intractable combinatorial problem. Thus, the efficient modeling of convoluted search space, the clever use of energy functions, and more importantly, the use of effective sampling algorithms become crucial to address this problem. For protein structure modeling, an off-lattice model provides limited scopes to exercise and evaluate the algorithmic developments due to its astronomically large set of data-points. In contrast, an on-lattice model widens the scopes and permits studying the relatively larger proteins because of its finite set of data-points. In this work, we took the full advantage of an on-lattice model by using a face-centered-cube lattice that has the highest packing density with the maximum degree of freedom. We proposed a graded energy-strategically mixes the Miyazawa-Jernigan (MJ) energy with the hydrophobic-polar (HP) energy-based genetic algorithm (GA) for conformational search. In our application, we introduced a 2 × 2 HP energy guided macro-mutation operator within the GA to explore the best possible local changes exhaustively. Conversely, the 20 × 20 MJ energy model-the ultimate objective function of our GA that needs to be minimized-considers the impacts amongst the 20 different amino acids and allow searching the globally acceptable conformations. On a set of benchmark proteins, our proposed approach outperformed state-of-the-art approaches in terms of the free energy levels and the root-mean-square deviations.

  4. Coronavirus receptor switch explained from the stereochemistry of protein-carbohydrate interactions and a single mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkers, Mark J G; Zeng, Qinghong; Feitsma, Louris J; Hulswit, Ruben J G; Li, Zeshi; Westerbeke, Aniek; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Boons, Geert-Jan; Langereis, Martijn A; Huizinga, Eric G; de Groot, Raoul J

    2016-05-31

    Hemagglutinin-esterases (HEs) are bimodular envelope proteins of orthomyxoviruses, toroviruses, and coronaviruses with a carbohydrate-binding "lectin" domain appended to a receptor-destroying sialate-O-acetylesterase ("esterase"). In concert, these domains facilitate dynamic virion attachment to cell-surface sialoglycans. Most HEs (type I) target 9-O-acetylated sialic acids (9-O-Ac-Sias), but one group of coronaviruses switched to using 4-O-Ac-Sias instead (type II). This specificity shift required quasisynchronous adaptations in the Sia-binding sites of both lectin and esterase domains. Previously, a partially disordered crystal structure of a type II HE revealed how the shift in lectin ligand specificity was achieved. How the switch in esterase substrate specificity was realized remained unresolved, however. Here, we present a complete structure of a type II HE with a receptor analog in the catalytic site and identify the mutations underlying the 9-O- to 4-O-Ac-Sia substrate switch. We show that (i) common principles pertaining to the stereochemistry of protein-carbohydrate interactions were at the core of the transition in lectin ligand and esterase substrate specificity; (ii) in consequence, the switch in O-Ac-Sia specificity could be readily accomplished via convergent intramolecular coevolution with only modest architectural changes in lectin and esterase domains; and (iii) a single, inconspicuous Ala-to-Ser substitution in the catalytic site was key to the emergence of the type II HEs. Our findings provide fundamental insights into how proteins "see" sugars and how this affects protein and virus evolution.

  5. Mutational analysis of the herpes simplex virus virion host shutoff protein: evidence that vhs functions in the absence of other viral proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, F E; Smibert, C A; Smiley, J R

    1995-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) virions contain one or more factors that trigger rapid shutoff of host protein synthesis and accelerated decay of cellular and viral mRNAs in infected cells. HSV isolates bearing mutations at the virion host shutoff (vhs) locus (gene UL41) are defective for both processes, indicating that the vhs protein is required; however, it is not clear whether the role of vhs in shutoff is direct or indirect and if other virion components are also necessary. We therefore used a transient-cotransfection assay to determine if the vhs protein displays activity in the absence of other viral gene products. We found that a vhs expression vector strongly suppressed expression of a cotransfected lacZ reporter gene and that this effect was eliminated by the vhs1 point mutation that abolishes virion-induced host shutoff during HSV infection. Further evidence for the biological relevance of the transfection assay came from the demonstration that five vhs in-frame linker insertion mutations yielded concordant results when assayed in cotransfected cells and following transfer into the viral genome: three mutations eliminated activity in both assays, while two had no effect. On the basis of these results, we conclude that the vhs protein can trigger host shutoff in the absence of other HSV proteins. The cotransfection assay was used to rapidly assess the activities of a panel of linker insertion mutants spanning the vhs polypeptide. All mutations that mapped to regions conserved among the vhs homologs of alphaherpesvirus inactivated function; in contrast, four of five mutations that mapped to regions that are absent from several vhs homologs had no effect. These results further support the biological relevance of the transfection assay and begin to delineate functional domains of the vhs polypeptide.

  6. The Bioinformatics Report of Mutation Outcome on NADPH Flavin Oxidoreductase Protein Sequence in Clinical Isolates of H. pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Nasrin; Poursina, Farkhondeh; Moghim, Sharareh; Ghaempanah, Abdol Majid; Safaei, Hajieh Ghasemian

    2016-05-01

    frxA gene has been implicated in the metronidazole nitro reduction by H. pylori. Alternatively, frxA is expected to contribute to the protection of urease and to the in vivo survival of H. pylori. The aim of present study is to report the mutation effects on the frxA protein sequence in clinical isolates of H. pylori in our community. Metronidazole resistance was proven in 27 of 48 isolates. glmM and frxA genes were used for molecular confirmation of H. pylori isolates. The primer set for detection of whole sequence of frxA gene for the effect of mutation on protein sequence was used. DNA and protein sequence evaluation and analysis were done by blast, Clustal Omega, and T COFFEE programs. Then, FrxA protein sequences from six metronidazole-resistant clinical isolates were analyzed by web-based bioinformatics tools. The result of six metronidazole-resistant clinical isolates in comparison with strain 26695 showed ten missense mutations. The result with the STRING program revealed that no change was seen after alterations in these sequences. According to consensus data involving four methods, residue substitutions at 40, 13, and 141 increase the stability of protein sequence after mutation, while other alterations decrease. Residue substitutions at 40, 43, 141, 138, 169, and 179 are deleterious, while, V7I, Q10R, V34I, and V96I alterations are neutral. As FrxA contribute to survival of bacterium and in regard to the effect of mutations on protein function, it might affect the survival and bacterium phenotype and it need to be studied more. Also, none of the stability prediction tool is perfect; iStable is the best predictor method among all methods.

  7. High throughput computing to improve efficiency of predicting protein stability change upon mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chao-Chin; Lai, Lien-Fu; Gromiha, M Michael; Huang, Liang-Tsung

    2014-01-01

    Predicting protein stability change upon mutation is important for protein design. Although several methods have been proposed to improve prediction accuracy it will be difficult to employ those methods when the required input information is incomplete. In this work, we integrated a fuzzy query model based on the knowledge-based approach to overcome this problem, and then we proposed a high throughput computing method based on parallel technologies in emerging cluster or grid systems to discriminate stability change. To improve the load balance of heterogeneous computing power in cluster and grid nodes, a variety of self-scheduling schemes have been implemented. Further, we have tested the method by performing different analyses and the results showed that the present method can process hundreds of predication queries in more reasonable response time and perform a super linear speedup to a maximum of 86.2 times. We have also established a website tool to implement the proposed method and it is available at http://bioinformatics.myweb.hinet.net/para.htm.

  8. Mutation in ribosomal protein S5 leads to spectinomycin resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena eIlina

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Spectinomycin remains a useful reserve option for therapy of gonorrhea. The emergence of multidrug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains with decreased susceptibility to cefixime and to ceftriaxone makes it the only medicine still effective for treatment of gonorrhea infection in analogous cases. However, adoption of spectinomycin as a routinely used drug of choice was soon followed by reports of spectinomycin resistance. The main molecular mechanism of spectinomycin resistance in N. gonorrhoeae was C1192T substitution in 16S rRNA genes. Here we reported a Thr-24→Pro mutation in ribosomal protein S5 found in spectinomycin resistant clinical N. gonorrhoeae strain, which carried no changes in 16S rRNA. In a series of experiments, the transfer of rpsE gene allele encoding the mutant ribosomal protein S5 to the recipient N. gonorrhoeae strains was analyzed. The relatively high rate of transformation (ca. 10-5 CFUs indicates the possibility of spread of spectinonycin resistance within gonococcal population due to the horizontal gene transfer.

  9. Presentation of amyloidosis in carriers of the codon 692 mutation in the amyloid precursor protein gene (APP692)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Forey; H.L.J. Tanghe (Hervé); M.F. Niermeijer (Martinus); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); J.C. van Swieten (John); F. van Harskamp (Frans); I. de Koning (Inge); M. Cruts (Marc); C. de Jonghe (Chris); S. Kumar-Singh (Samir); A. Tibben (Arend); C. van Broeckhoven (Christine); A. Hofman (Albert)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractSeveral mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene may lead to either Alzheimer's disease or cerebral haemorrhage due to congophilic amyloid angiopathy (CAA). A single family is known in which both types of pathology are expressed because of a missense mutati

  10. Mutations in POGLUT1, Encoding Protein O-Glucosyltransferase 1, Cause Autosomal-Dominant Dowling-Degos Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basmanav, F Buket; Oprisoreanu, Ana-Maria; Pasternack, Sandra M;

    2014-01-01

    . Recently, mutations in POFUT1, which encodes protein O-fucosyltransferase 1, were also reported to be responsible for DDD. Interestingly, both POGLUT1 and POFUT1 are essential regulators of Notch activity. Our results furthermore emphasize the important role of the Notch pathway in pigmentation...

  11. TP53 Promoter Methylation in Primary Glioblastoma: Relationship with TP53 mRNA and Protein Expression and Mutation Status

    OpenAIRE

    JESIONEK-KUPNICKA, DOROTA; Szybka, Malgorzata; Malachowska, Beata; Fendler, Wojciech; Potemski, Piotr; Piaskowski, Sylwester; Jaskolski, Dariusz; Papierz, Wielislaw; Skowronski, Wieslaw; Och, Waldemar; Kordek, Radzislaw; ZAWLIK, IZABELA

    2014-01-01

    Reduced expression of TP53 by promoter methylation has been reported in several neoplasms. It remains unclear whether TP53 promoter methylation is associated with reduced transcriptional and protein expression in glioblastoma (GB). The aim of our work was to study the impact of TP53 methylation and mutations on TP53 mRNA level and protein expression in 42 molecularly characterized primary GB tumors. We also evaluate the impact of all molecular alterations on the overall patient survival. The ...

  12. Nonsense mediated decay resistant mutations are a source of expressed mutant proteins in colon cancer cell lines with microsatellite instability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S Williams

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Frameshift mutations in microsatellite instability high (MSI-High colorectal cancers are a potential source of targetable neo-antigens. Many nonsense transcripts are subject to rapid degradation due to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD, but nonsense transcripts with a cMS in the last exon or near the last exon-exon junction have intrinsic resistance to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD. NMD-resistant transcripts are therefore a likely source of expressed mutant proteins in MSI-High tumours. METHODS: Using antibodies to the conserved N-termini of predicted mutant proteins, we analysed MSI-High colorectal cancer cell lines for examples of naturally expressed mutant proteins arising from frameshift mutations in coding microsatellites (cMS by immunoprecipitation and Western Blot experiments. Detected mutant protein bands from NMD-resistant transcripts were further validated by gene-specific short-interfering RNA (siRNA knockdown. A genome-wide search was performed to identify cMS-containing genes likely to generate NMD-resistant transcripts that could encode for antigenic expressed mutant proteins in MSI-High colon cancers. These genes were screened for cMS mutations in the MSI-High colon cancer cell lines. RESULTS: Mutant protein bands of expected molecular weight were detected in mutated MSI-High cell lines for NMD-resistant transcripts (CREBBP, EP300, TTK, but not NMD-sensitive transcripts (BAX, CASP5, MSH3. Expression of the mutant CREBBP and EP300 proteins was confirmed by siRNA knockdown. Five cMS-bearing genes identified from the genome-wide search and without existing mutation data (SFRS12IP1, MED8, ASXL1, FBXL3 and RGS12 were found to be mutated in at least 5 of 11 (45% of the MSI-High cell lines tested. CONCLUSION: NMD-resistant transcripts can give rise to expressed mutant proteins in MSI-High colon cancer cells. If commonly expressed in primary MSI-High colon cancers, MSI-derived mutant proteins could be useful as cancer specific

  13. Mutational Analysis and Allosteric Effects in the HIV-1 Capsid Protein Carboxyl-Terminal Dimerization Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD, residues 146−231) of the HIV-1 capsid (CA) protein plays an important role in the CA−CA dimerization and viral assembly of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Disrupting the native conformation of the CA is essential for blocking viral capsid formation and viral replication. Thus, it is important to identify the exact nature of the structural changes and driving forces of the CTD dimerization that take place in mutant forms. Here, we compare the structural stability, conformational dynamics, and association force of the CTD dimers for both wild-type and mutated sequences using all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD). The simulations show that Q155N and E159D at the major homology region (MHR) and W184A and M185A at the helix 2 region are energetically less favorable than the wild-type, imposing profound negative effects on intermolecular CA−CA dimerization. Detailed structural analysis shows that three mutants (Q155N, E159D, and W184A) display much more flexible local structures and weaker CA−CA association than the wild-type, primarily due to the loss of interactions (hydrogen bonds, side chain hydrophobic contacts, and π-stacking) with their neighboring residues. Most interestingly, the MHR that is far from the interacting dimeric interface is more sensitive to the mutations than the helix 2 region that is located at the CA−CA dimeric interface, indicating that structural changes in the distinct motif of the CA could similarly allosterically prevent the CA capsid formation. In addition, the structural and free energy comparison of the five residues shorter CA (151−231) dimer with the CA (146−231) dimer further indicates that hydrophobic interactions, side chain packing, and hydrogen bonds are the major, dominant driving forces in stabilizing the CA interface. PMID:19199580

  14. P53 Gene Mutation and Expression of MDM2, P53, P16 Protein and their Relationship in Human Glioma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Wen; WU Renliang; CAO Huiling; GAO Jifa; WANG Xu; REN Qiwei

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the effect of P53 protein accumulation and p53 gene mutation in the pathogenesis of glioma and to study the role of MDM2, P53 and P16 protein in glioma formation and progression and their relationship with each other, LSAB immunohistochemical staining method and non-isotopic PCR-SSCP techniques were used to detect the expression of MDM2, P53 and P16 pro tein and p53 gene mutation in 48 cases of gliomas. The results showed that the positive expression rate of MDM2, P53 and the negative rate of P16 was 22.9 %, 41.7 % and 60.4 %, respectively.The latter two in high grade (grade Ⅲ , Ⅳ) gliomas had a significantly higher rate than in the low grade (grade Ⅱ ) gliomas. Moreover, the co-expression of MDM2 and P53 protein was confirmed in only 1 of 48 cases. No significant difference was found in the rate of the expression of MDM2 between high grade and low grade gliomas (P>0.1) . PCR SSCP results showed that mutation of 5-8 exons of p53 gene was detected in 17 out of 48 cases (35.42 %) . Mutation was detected in 16of 20 cases of positive p53 expression, and another one was detected in 28 cases of negative expression cases. The correlation between p53 mutation and p53 immunopositivity was observed in 89.6% of the cases. P53 gene mutation and the level of MDM2, P53 and P16 protein were not related to age, gender of the patients, tumor location and size. It is concluded that the mutation of p53 and deletion of p16 might play important roles in the tumorigenesis of gliomas and it was significantly associated with the grade of tumor differentiation. P53 protein accumulation can indirectly reflect p53 mutation. MDM2 amplification and overexpression might be an early event in the growth of human gliomas.

  15. Mutational definition of binding requirements of an hnRNP-like protein in Arabidopsis using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leder, Verena [Molecular Cell Physiology, Faculty of Biology, Bielefeld University (Germany); Biomolecular Photonics, Faculty of Physics, Bielefeld University (Germany); Lummer, Martina [Molecular Cell Physiology, Faculty of Biology, Bielefeld University (Germany); Tegeler, Kathrin [Molecular Cell Physiology, Faculty of Biology, Bielefeld University (Germany); Biomolecular Photonics, Faculty of Physics, Bielefeld University (Germany); Humpert, Fabian [Biomolecular Photonics, Faculty of Physics, Bielefeld University (Germany); Lewinski, Martin [Molecular Cell Physiology, Faculty of Biology, Bielefeld University (Germany); Schüttpelz, Mark [Biomolecular Photonics, Faculty of Physics, Bielefeld University (Germany); Staiger, Dorothee, E-mail: dorothee.staiger@uni-bielefeld.de [Molecular Cell Physiology, Faculty of Biology, Bielefeld University (Germany)

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • We use FCS to investigate binding site requirements for the hnRNP-like protein AtGRP7. • We identify three nucleotides critical for AtGRP7 binding to its own intron. • Mutation of the conserved R{sup 49} abolishes binding altogether. • The paralogue AtGRP8 binds to an overlapping motif with different sequence requirement. • The glycine-rich stretch of a plant hnRNP-like protein contributes to binding. - Abstract: Arabidopsis thaliana glycine-rich RNA binding protein 7 (AtGRP7) is part of a negative feedback loop through which it regulates alternative splicing and steady-state abundance of its pre-mRNA. Here we use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to investigate the requirements for AtGRP7 binding to its intron using fluorescently-labelled synthetic oligonucleotides. By systematically introducing point mutations we identify three nucleotides that lead to an increased K{sub d} value when mutated and thus are critical for AtGRP7 binding. Simultaneous mutation of all three residues abrogates binding. The paralogue AtGRP8 binds to an overlapping motif but with a different sequence preference, in line with overlapping but not identical functions of this protein pair. Truncation of the glycine-rich domain reduces the binding affinity of AtGRP7, showing for the first time that the glycine-rich stretch of a plant hnRNP-like protein contributes to binding. Mutation of the conserved R{sup 49} that is crucial for AtGRP7 function in pathogen defence and splicing abolishes binding.

  16. Study of Mutation in Tyrosine Protein Kinase of Insulin Receptor Gene in Patients with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min LI; Hong-yu QIU; Yong-yu SUN; Hong-fa LI; Yong-li CHU

    2003-01-01

    Objective To explore the molecular mechanism of insulin resistance in the patients with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS)Methods Polymerase chain reaction, silver staining-single strand conformation polymorphism(PCR-SSCP) and DNA direct sequencing were used to detect the mutation of insulin receptor(INSR) gene in exon 17~21 with the abdominal wall adipose tissue from 31 patients with PCOS (PCOS Group) and 30 patients with pure hysteromyoma in reproductive lift (Control Group).Results Twenty-two variant SSCP patterns in exon 17 of INSR gene were detected. Direct sequence analysis of exon 17 showed that homozygous nonsense mutation was two alleles single nucleotide polymorphism(SNP) at the codon 1058 (CAC→CAT). Exons 18~21 were not detected with any significantly mutation. The INSR gene His1058C→T substitution collecting rate and insulin resistance were significantly higher in the PCOS group than in the control group (P=0.0293, P<0.05, P<0.01).Conclusion It is suggested that the SNP in codon 1058 of the INSR gene might be related with the insulin resistance in PCOS patients, which has hereditary tendency. And the missense mutation,nonsense mutation and frameshift mutation at exons 18~21 in tyrosine protein kinase region of INSR gene for PCOS patients were not frequently observed.

  17. Conformational changes induced by the A21G Flemish mutation in the amyloid precursor protein lead to increased Aβ production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tzu-Chun; Hu, Yi; Kienlen-Campard, Pascal; El Haylani, Laetitia; Decock, Marie; Van Hees, Joanne; Fu, Ziao; Octave, Jean-Noel; Constantinescu, Stefan N; Smith, Steven O

    2014-03-04

    Proteolysis of the β C-terminal fragment (β-CTF) of the amyloid precursor protein generates the Aβ peptides associated with Alzheimer's disease. Familial mutations in the β-CTF, such as the A21G Flemish mutation, can increase Aβ secretion. We establish how the Flemish mutation alters the structure of C55, the first 55 residues of the β-CTF, using FTIR and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. We show that the A21G mutation reduces β sheet structure of C55 from Leu17 to Ala21, an inhibitory region near the site of the mutation, and increases α-helical structure from Gly25 to Gly29, in a region near the membrane surface and thought to interact with cholesterol. Cholesterol also increases Aβ peptide secretion, and we show that the incorporation of cholesterol into model membranes enhances the structural changes induced by the Flemish mutant, suggesting a common link between familial mutations and the cellular environment.

  18. Hyccin, the molecule mutated in the leukodystrophy hypomyelination and congenital cataract (HCC, is a neuronal protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Gazzerro

    Full Text Available "Hypomyelination and Congenital Cataract", HCC (MIM #610532, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by congenital cataract and diffuse cerebral and peripheral hypomyelination. HCC is caused by deficiency of Hyccin, a protein whose biological role has not been clarified yet. Since the identification of the cell types expressing a protein of unknown function can contribute to define the physiological context in which the molecule is explicating its function, we analyzed the pattern of Hyccin expression in the central and peripheral nervous system (CNS and PNS. Using heterozygous mice expressing the b-galactosidase (LacZ gene under control of the Hyccin gene regulatory elements, we show that the gene is primarily expressed in neuronal cells. Indeed, Hyccin-LacZ signal was identified in CA1 hippocampal pyramidal neurons, olfactory bulb, and cortical pyramidal neurons, while it did not colocalize with oligodendroglial or astrocytic markers. In the PNS, Hyccin was detectable only in axons isolated from newborn mice. In the brain, Hyccin transcript levels were higher in early postnatal development (postnatal days 2 and 10 and then declined in adult mice. In a model of active myelinogenesis, organotypic cultures of rat Schwann cells (SC/Dorsal Root Ganglion (DRG sensory neurons, Hyccin was detected along the neurites, while it was absent from SC. Intriguingly, the abundance of the molecule was upregulated at postnatal days 10 and 15, in the initial steps of myelinogenesis and then declined at 30 days when the process is complete. As Hyccin is primarily expressed in neurons and its mutation leads to hypomyelination in human patients, we suggest that the protein is involved in neuron-to-glia signalling to initiate or maintain myelination.

  19. Mutational analysis of the myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 1B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roa, B.B.; Warner, L.E.; Lupski, J.R. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The MPZ gene that maps to chromosome 1q22q23 encodes myelin protein zero, which is the most abundant peripheral nerve myelin protein that functions as a homophilic adhesion molecule in myelin compaction. Association of the MPZ gene with the dysmyelinating peripheral neuropathies Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B (CMT1B) and the more severe Dejerine-Sottas syndrome (DSS) was previously demonstrated by MPZ mutations identified in CMT1B and in rare DSS patients. In this study, the coding region of the MPZ gene was screened for mutations in a cohort of 74 unrelated patients with either CMT type 1 or DSS who do not carry the most common CMT1-associated molecular lesion of a 1.5 Mb DNA duplication on 17p11.2-p12. Heteroduplex analysis detected base mismatches in ten patients that were distributed over three exons of MPZ. Direct sequencing of PCR-amplified genomic DNA identified a de novo MPZ mutation associated with CMT1B that predicts an Ile(135)Thr substitution. This finding further confirms the role of MPZ in the CMT1B disease process. In addition, two polymorphisms were identified within the Gly(200) and Ser(228) codons that do not alter the respective amino acid residues. A fourth base mismatch in MPZ exon 3 detected by heteroduplex analysis is currently being characterized by direct sequence determination. Previously, four unrelated patients in this same cohort were found to have unique point mutations in the coding region of the PMP22 gene. The collective findings on CMT1 point mutations could suggest that regulatory region mutations, and possibly mutations in CMT gene(s) apart from the MPZ, PMP22 and Cx32 genes identified thus far, may prove to be significant for a number of CMT1 cases that do not involve DNA duplication.

  20. Correlation between the Insertion/Deletion Mutations of Prion Protein Gene and BSE Susceptibility and Milk Performance in Dairy Cows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the 23 bp and 12 bp insertion/deletion (indel) mutations within the bovine prion protein (PRNP) gene in Chinese dairy cows, and to detect the associations of two indel mutations with BSE susceptibility and milk performance. Methods Based on bovine PRNP gene sequence, two pairs of primers for testing the 23 bp and 12 bp indel mutations were designed. The PCR ampliifcation and agarose electrophoresis were carried out to distinguish the different genotypes within the mutations. Moreover, based on previous data from other cattle breeds and present genotypic and allelic frequencies of two indels mutations in this study, the corrections between the two indel mutations and BSE susceptibility were tested, as well as the relationships between the mutations and milk performance traits were analyzed in this study based on the statistical analyses. Results In the analyzed Chinese Holstein population, the frequencies of two“del”alleles in 23 bp and 12 bp indel muations were more frequent. The frequency of haplotype of 23del-12del was higher than those of 23del-12ins and 23ins-12del. From the estimated r2 and D’ values, two indel polymorphisms were linked strongly in the Holstein population (D’=57.5%, r2=0.257). Compared with the BSE-affected cattle populations from the reported data, the signiifcant differences of genotypic and allelic frequencies were found among present Holstein and some BSE-affected populations (P0.05). Conclusions These observations revealed that the inlfuence of two indel mutations within the bovine PRNP gene on BSE depended on the breed and they did not affect the milk production traits, which layed the foundation for future selection of resistant animals, and for improving health conditions for dairy breeding against BSE in China.

  1. Protein Structure-Function Relationship at Work: Learning from Myopathy Mutations of the Slow Skeletal Muscle Isoform of Troponin T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Anupom; Jin, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    Troponin T (TnT) is the sarcomeric thin filament anchoring subunit of the troponin complex in striated muscles. A nonsense mutation in exon 11 of the slow skeletal muscle isoform of TnT (ssTnT) gene (TNNT1) was found in the Amish populations in Pennsylvania and Ohio. This single nucleotide substitution causes a truncation of the ssTnT protein at Glu180 and the loss of the C-terminal tropomyosin (Tm)-binding site 2. As a consequence, it abolishes the myofilament integration of ssTnT and the loss of function causes an autosomal recessive nemaline myopathy (NM). More TNNT1 mutations have recently been reported in non-Amish ethnic groups with similar recessive NM phenotypes. A nonsense mutation in exon 9 truncates ssTnT at Ser108, deleting Tm-binding site 2 and a part of the middle region Tm-binding site 1. Two splicing site mutations result in truncation of ssTnT at Leu203 or deletion of the exon 14-encoded C-terminal end segment. Another splicing mutation causes an internal deletion of the 39 amino acids encoded by exon 8, partially damaging Tm-binding site 1. The three splicing mutations of TNNT1 all preserve the high affinity Tm-binding site 2 but still present recessive NM phenotypes. The molecular mechanisms for these mutations to cause myopathy provide interesting models to study and understand the structure-function relationship of TnT. This focused review summarizes the current knowledge of TnT isoform regulation, structure-function relationship of TnT and how various ssTnT mutations cause recessive NM, in order to promote in depth studies for further understanding the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of TNNT1 myopathies toward the development of effective treatments. PMID:27790152

  2. Hamamatsu PMT R7056 Study for the Extinction Monitoring System of the Mu2e Experiment at Fermilab

    CERN Document Server

    Boi, S; Hedin, D; Johnson, E; Prebys, E; Rubinov, P

    2015-01-01

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab proposes to search for the coherent neutrino-less conversion of muons to electrons in the presence of a nucleus. The experimental signature for an aluminum target is an isolated 105 MeV electron exiting the stopping target no earlier than ~700 ns after the pulse of proton beam hits the production target. Any protons that hit the production target in between the pulses can lead to fake conversion electrons during the measurement period. We define the beam extinction as the ratio of the number of protons striking the production target between pulses to the number striking the target during the pulses. It has been established that an extinction of approximately 10-10 is required to reduce the backgrounds to an acceptable level. It would be desirable to measure the extinction of the beam coming out of the accelerator in a minute or less. Studies for the fast extinction monitor based on Hamamatsu PMT R7056 is the subject of this presentation.

  3. Radiation hardness test of un-doped CsI crystals and Silicon Photomultipliers for the Mu2e calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Baccaro, Stefania; Cordelli, Marco; Diociaiuti, Eleonora; Donghia, Raffaella; Giovannella, Simona; Loreti, Stefano; Miscetti, Stefano; Pillon, Mario; Sarra, Ivano

    2016-01-01

    The Mu2e calorimeter is composed by 1400 un-doped CsI crystals coupled to large area UV extended Silicon Photomultipliers arranged in two annular disks. This calorimeter has to provide precise information on energy, timing and position. It should also be fast enough to handle the high rate background and it must operate and survive in a high radiation environment. Simulation studies estimated that, in the hottest regions, each crystal will absorb a dose of 300 Gy and will be exposed to a neutron fluency of 6 x 10^{11} n/cm^2 in 3 years of running. Test of un-doped CsI crystals irradiated up to 900 Gy and to a neutron fluency up to 9 x 10^{11} n/cm^2 have been performed at CALLIOPE and FNG ENEA facilities in Italy. We present our study on the variation of light yield (LY) and longitudinal response uniformity (LRU) of these crystals after irradiation. The ionization dose does not modify LRU while a 20% reduction in LY is observed at 900 Gy. Similarly, the neutron flux causes an acceptable LY deterioration (<...

  4. Tracking Simulation of Third-Integer Resonant Extraction for Fermilab's Mu2e Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chong Shik [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Amundson, James [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Michelotti, Leo [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-02-13

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab requires acceleration and transport of intense proton beams in order to deliver stable, uniform particle spills to the production target. To meet the experimental requirement, particles will be extracted slowly from the Delivery Ring to the external beamline. Using Synergia2, we have performed multi-particle tracking simulations of third-integer resonant extraction in the Delivery Ring, including space charge effects, physical beamline elements, and apertures. A piecewise linear ramp profile of tune quadrupoles was used to maintain a constant averaged spill rate throughout extraction. To study and minimize beam losses, we implemented and introduced a number of features, beamline element apertures, and septum plane alignments. Additionally, the RF Knockout (RFKO) technique, which excites particles transversely, is employed for spill regulation. Combined with a feedback system, it assists in fine-tuning spill uniformity. Simulation studies were carried out to optimize the RFKO feedback scheme, which will be helpful in designing the final spill regulation system.

  5. Tracking Simulation of Third-Integer Resonant Extraction for Fermilab's Mu2e Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chong Shik [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Amundson, James [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Michelotti, Leo [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-02-13

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab requires acceleration and transport of intense proton beams in order to deliver stable, uniform particle spills to the production target. To meet the experimental requirement, particles will be extracted slowly from the Delivery Ring to the external beamline. Using Synergia2, we have performed multi-particle tracking simulations of third-integer resonant extraction in the Delivery Ring, including space charge effects, physical beamline elements, and apertures. A piecewise linear ramp profile of tune quadrupoles was used to maintain a constant averaged spill rate throughout extraction. To study and minimize beam losses, we implemented and introduced a number of features, beamline element apertures, and septum plane alignments. Additionally, the RF Knockout (RFKO) technique, which excites particles transversely, is employed for spill regulation. Combined with a feedback system, it assists in fine-tuning spill uniformity. Simulation studies were carried out to optimize the RFKO feedback scheme, which will be helpful in designing the final spill regulation system.

  6. Protein conformational perturbations in hereditary amyloidosis: Differential impact of single point mutations in ApoAI amyloidogenic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Giudice, Rita; Arciello, Angela; Itri, Francesco; Merlino, Antonello; Monti, Maria; Buonanno, Martina; Penco, Amanda; Canetti, Diana; Petruk, Ganna; Monti, Simona Maria; Relini, Annalisa; Pucci, Piero; Piccoli, Renata; Monti, Daria Maria

    2016-02-01

    Amyloidoses are devastating diseases characterized by accumulation of misfolded proteins which aggregate in fibrils. Specific gene mutations in Apolipoprotein A I (ApoAI) are associated with systemic amyloidoses. Little is known on the effect of mutations on ApoAI structure and amyloid properties. Here we performed a physico-chemical characterization of L75P- and L174S-amyloidogenic ApoAI (AApoAI) variants to shed light on the effects of two single point mutations on protein stability, proteolytic susceptibility and aggregation propensity. Both variants are destabilized in their N-terminal region and generate fibrils with different morphological features. L75P-AApoAI is significantly altered in its conformation and compactness, whereas a more flexible and pronounced aggregation-competent state is associated to L174S-AApoAI. These observations point out how single point mutations in ApoAI gene evocate differences in the physico-chemical and conformational behavior of the corresponding protein variants, with the common feature of diverting ApoAI from its natural role towards a pathogenic pathway.

  7. Single mutations introduced in the essential ribosomal proteins L3 and S10 cause a sporulation defect in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akanuma, Genki; Suzuki, Shota; Yano, Koichi; Nanamiya, Hideaki; Natori, Yousuke; Namba, Eri; Watanabe, Kazuya; Tagami, Kazumi; Takeda, Takuya; Iizuka, Yuka; Kobayashi, Ako; Ishizuka, Morio; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Kawamura, Fujio

    2013-01-01

    We introduced single mutations into the rplC and rpsJ genes, which encode the essential ribosomal proteins L3 (RplC) and S10 (RpsJ), respectively, and are located in the S10 gene cluster of the gram-positive, endospore-forming bacterium Bacillus subtilis, and examined whether these mutations affected their growth rate, sporulation, competence development and 70S ribosome formation. Mutant cells harboring the G52D mutation in the L3 ribosomal protein, which is located at the peptidyl transferase center of 50S, accumulated 30S subunit at 45°C, probably due to a defect in 50S formation, and exhibited a reduction in the sporulation frequency at high temperature. On the other hand, mutant cells harboring the H56R mutation in the S10 protein, which is located near the aminoacyl-tRNA site of 30S, showed severe growth defect and deficiency in spore formation, and also exhibited significant delay in competence development.

  8. Assessment of a novel recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus with triple mutations in its matrix protein as a vaccine for pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xinkui; Qi, Bing; Ma, Yufang; Zhou, Xinchu; Zhang, Shikuan; Sun, Tao

    2015-11-17

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) causes a serious vesicular disease responsible for economic losses in the livestock industry. Currently, there are no suitable vaccines to prevent VSV infection. Although the structural matrix (M) protein of VSV has been shown to be a virulence factor in rodent models, its role in the pathogenicity of VSV infection in livestock species is unknown. We hypothesized that VSV with mutations in the M protein represents a novel live attenuated vaccine candidate. To test this, we introduced mutations into VSV M protein using reverse genetics and assessed their attenuation both in vitro and in pigs, an important natural host of VSV. A recombinant VSV with a triple amino acid mutation in M protein (VSVMT) demonstrated a significantly reduced ability to inhibit the type I interferon (IFN) signaling pathway and to shutoff host gene expression compared to WT-VSV and a mutant virus with a single amino acid deletion (VSVΔM51). Inoculation of pigs with VSVMT induced no apparent vesicular lesions but stimulated virus-neutralizing antibodies and animals were protected against virulent VSV challenge infection. These data demonstrate that the M protein is an important virulence factor for VSV in swine and VSVMT represents a novel vaccine candidate for VSV infections in pigs.

  9. Protein structure analysis of mutations causing inheritable diseases. An e-Science approach with life scientist friendly interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hekkelman Maarten L

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many newly detected point mutations are located in protein-coding regions of the human genome. Knowledge of their effects on the protein's 3D structure provides insight into the protein's mechanism, can aid the design of further experiments, and eventually can lead to the development of new medicines and diagnostic tools. Results In this article we describe HOPE, a fully automatic program that analyzes the structural and functional effects of point mutations. HOPE collects information from a wide range of information sources including calculations on the 3D coordinates of the protein by using WHAT IF Web services, sequence annotations from the UniProt database, and predictions by DAS services. Homology models are built with YASARA. Data is stored in a database and used in a decision scheme to identify the effects of a mutation on the protein's 3D structure and function. HOPE builds a report with text, figures, and animations that is easy to use and understandable for (biomedical researchers. Conclusions We tested HOPE by comparing its output to the results of manually performed projects. In all straightforward cases HOPE performed similar to a trained bioinformatician. The use of 3D structures helps optimize the results in terms of reliability and details. HOPE's results are easy to understand and are presented in a way that is attractive for researchers without an extensive bioinformatics background.

  10. Mutations in the DI-DII Linker of Human Parainfluenza Virus Type 3 Fusion Protein Result in Diminished Fusion Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyan Xie

    Full Text Available Human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3 can cause severe respiratory tract diseases in infants and young children, but no licensed vaccines or antiviral agents are currently available for treatment. Fusing the viral and target cell membranes is a prerequisite for its entry into host cells and is directly mediated by the fusion (F protein. Although several domains of F are known to have important effects on regulating the membrane fusion activity, the roles of the DI-DII linker (residues 369-374 of the HPIV3 F protein in the fusogenicity still remains ill-defined. To facilitate our understanding of the role of this domain might play in F-induced cell-cell fusion, nine single mutations were engineered into this domain by site-directed mutagenesis. A vaccinia virus-T7 RNA polymerase transient expression system was employed to express the wild-type or mutated F proteins. These mutants were analyzed for membrane fusion activity, cell surface expression, and interaction between F and HN protein. Each of the mutated F proteins in this domain has a cell surface expression level similar to that of wild-type F. All of them resulted in a significant reduction in fusogenic activity in all steps of membrane fusion. Furthermore, all these fusion-deficient mutants reduced the amount of the HN-F complexes at the cell surface. Together, the results of our work suggest that this region has an important effect on the fusogenic activity of F.

  11. pRb2/p130 protein expression and RBL2 mutation analysis in Burkitt lymphoma from Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wabinga Henry

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The members of the retinoblastoma protein family, pRb, p107 and pRb2 (p130, are central players in controlling the cell cycle. Whereas disturbed function of pRb is commonly seen in human cancers, it is still an open question whether pRb2 is involved in tumorigenic processes. However, altered subcellular localization of pRb2 and mutations in the pRb2-encoding gene RBL2 have been described for some tumours, including Burkitt lymphomas (BL. Methods We retrieved 51 biopsy specimens of endemic BL cases from Uganda. The expression of pRb2 was determined by immunohistochemistry. Exons 19–22 of the RBL2 gene, the region known to contain a nuclear localization signal, were screened for mutations by PCR amplification and direct DNA sequencing. Results Nearly all of our cases (84.0% were positive for pRb2 protein expression although this protein is a marker for growth arrest and Burkitt lymphoma is characterized by a high proliferation rate. Of the positive cases, 73.8% were scored as expressing the protein at a high level. Subcellular pRb2 localization was predominantly nuclear and no cases with expression restricted to the cytoplasm were observed. We did not detect any RBL2 mutations in the part of the gene that encodes the C-terminal end of the protein. Conclusion The majority of endemic BL cases from Uganda express pRb2, but somatic RBL2 mutations affecting the protein's nuclear localization signal appear to be rare.

  12. Targeted Mutation of Nuclear Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2 Impairs Secondary Immune Response in a Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel S. Olsen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We recently identified a nuclear variant of the BMP2 growth factor, called nBMP2. In an effort to understand the function of this variant protein, we generated a mouse line in which BMP2 is expressed and functions normally, but nBMP2 is excluded from the nucleus. This novel mutation allows the study of nBMP2 without compromising BMP2 function. To determine whether nBMP2 plays a role in immune function, we performed a series of experiments in which we compared mouse survival, organ weights, immune cells numbers, and bacterial load in wild type and nBmp2NLStm mice following primary and secondary challenges with Staphylococcus aureus. Following primary challenge with S. aureus, wild type and nBmp2NLStm mice showed no differences in survival or bacterial load and generated similar numbers and types of leukocytes, although mutant spleens were smaller than wild type. Secondary bacterial challenge with S. aureus, however, produced differences in survival, with increased mortality seen in nBmp2NLStm mice. This increased mortality corresponded to higher levels of bacteremia in nBmp2NLStm mice and to a reduced enlargement of mutant spleens in response to the secondary infection. Together, these results suggest that the recently described nuclear variant of BMP2 is necessary for efficient secondary immune responses.

  13. Mutation in ribosomal protein S5 leads to spectinomycin resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilina, Elena N; Malakhova, Maya V; Bodoev, Ivan N; Oparina, Nina Y; Filimonova, Alla V; Govorun, Vadim M

    2013-01-01

    Spectinomycin remains a useful reserve option for therapy of gonorrhea. The emergence of multidrug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains with decreased susceptibility to cefixime and to ceftriaxone makes it the only medicine still effective for treatment of gonorrhea infection in analogous cases. However, adoption of spectinomycin as a routinely used drug of choice was soon followed by reports of spectinomycin resistance. The main molecular mechanism of spectinomycin resistance in N. gonorrhoeae was C1192T substitution in 16S rRNA genes. Here we reported a Thr-24→Pro mutation in ribosomal protein S5 (RPS5) found in spectinomycin resistant clinical N. gonorrhoeae strain, which carried no changes in 16S rRNA. In a series of experiments, the transfer of rpsE gene allele encoding the mutant RPS5 to the recipient N. gonorrhoeae strains was analyzed. The relatively high rate of transformation [ca. 10(-5) colony-forming units (CFUs)] indicates the possibility of spread of spectinonycin resistance within gonococcal population due to the horizontal gene transfer (HGT).

  14. Familial Alzheimer's disease mutations differentially alter amyloid β-protein oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessel, Megan Murray; Bernstein, Summer; Kemper, Martin; Teplow, David B; Bowers, Michael T

    2012-11-21

    Although most cases of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are sporadic, ∼5% of cases are genetic in origin. These cases, known as familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD), are caused by mutations that alter the rate of production or the primary structure of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ). Changes in the primary structure of Aβ alter the peptide's assembly and toxic activity. Recently, a primary working hypothesis for AD has evolved where causation has been attributed to early, soluble peptide oligomer states. Here we posit that both experimental and pathological differences between FAD-related mutants and wild-type Aβ could be reflected in the early oligomer distributions of these peptides. We use ion mobility-based mass spectrometry to probe the structure and early aggregation states of three mutant forms of Aβ40 and Aβ42: Tottori (D7N), Flemish (A21G), and Arctic (E22G). Our results indicate that the FAD-related amino acid substitutions have no noticeable effect on Aβ monomer cross section, indicating there are no major structural changes in the monomers. However, we observe significant changes to the aggregation states populated by the various Aβ mutants, indicating that structural changes present in the monomers are reflected in the oligomers. Moreover, the early oligomer distributions differ for each mutant, suggesting a possible structural basis for the varied pathogenesis of different forms of FAD.

  15. Instability of buried hydration sites increases protein subdomains fluctuations in the human prion protein by the pathogenic mutation T188R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomobe, Katsufumi; Yamamoto, Eiji; Akimoto, Takuma; Yasui, Masato; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2016-05-01

    The conformational change from the cellular prion protein (PrPc) to scrapie prion protein (PrPsc) is a key process in prion diseases. The prion protein has buried water molecules which significantly contribute to the stability of the protein; however, there has been no report investigating the influence on the buried hydration sites by a pathogenic mutation not adjacent to the buried hydration sites. Here, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of wild type (WT) PrPc and pathogenic point mutant T188R to investigate conformational changes and the buried hydration sites. In WT-PrPc, four buried hydration sites are identified by residence time and rotational relaxation analysis. However, there are no stable buried hydration sites in one of T188R simulations, which indicates that T188R sometimes makes the buried hydration sites fragile. We also find that fluctuations of subdomains S1-H1-S2 and H1-H2 increase in T188R when the buried hydration sites become unstable. Since the side chain of arginine which is replaced from threonine in T188R is larger than of threonine, the side chain cannot be embedded in the protein, which is one of the causes of the instability of subdomains. These results show correlations between the buried hydration sites and the mutation which is far from them, and provide a possible explanation for the instability by mutation.

  16. Instability of buried hydration sites increases protein subdomains fluctuations in the human prion protein by the pathogenic mutation T188R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsufumi Tomobe

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The conformational change from the cellular prion protein (PrPc to scrapie prion protein (PrPsc is a key process in prion diseases. The prion protein has buried water molecules which significantly contribute to the stability of the protein; however, there has been no report investigating the influence on the buried hydration sites by a pathogenic mutation not adjacent to the buried hydration sites. Here, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of wild type (WT PrPc and pathogenic point mutant T188R to investigate conformational changes and the buried hydration sites. In WT-PrPc, four buried hydration sites are identified by residence time and rotational relaxation analysis. However, there are no stable buried hydration sites in one of T188R simulations, which indicates that T188R sometimes makes the buried hydration sites fragile. We also find that fluctuations of subdomains S1-H1-S2 and H1-H2 increase in T188R when the buried hydration sites become unstable. Since the side chain of arginine which is replaced from threonine in T188R is larger than of threonine, the side chain cannot be embedded in the protein, which is one of the causes of the instability of subdomains. These results show correlations between the buried hydration sites and the mutation which is far from them, and provide a possible explanation for the instability by mutation.

  17. Analysis of protein-coding mutations in hiPSCs and their possible role during somatic cell reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Sergio; Gore, Athurva; Li, Zhe; Panopoulos, Athanasia D; Montserrat, Nuria; Fung, Ho-Lim; Giorgetti, Alessandra; Bilic, Josipa; Batchelder, Erika M; Zaehres, Holm; Schöler, Hans R; Zhang, Kun; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that human-induced pluripotent stem cells contain genomic structural variations and point mutations in coding regions. However, these studies have focused on fibroblast-derived human induced pluripotent stem cells, and it is currently unknown whether the use of alternative somatic cell sources with varying reprogramming efficiencies would result in different levels of genetic alterations. Here we characterize the genomic integrity of eight human induced pluripotent stem cell lines derived from five different non-fibroblast somatic cell types. We show that protein-coding mutations are a general feature of the human induced pluripotent stem cell state and are independent of somatic cell source. Furthermore, we analyse a total of 17 point mutations found in human induced pluripotent stem cells and demonstrate that they do not generally facilitate the acquisition of pluripotency and thus are not likely to provide a selective advantage for reprogramming.

  18. Analysing the Effect of Mutation on Protein Function and Discovering Potential Inhibitors of CDK4: Molecular Modelling and Dynamics Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagasundaram N

    Full Text Available The cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4-cyclin D1 complex plays a crucial role in the transition from the G1 phase to S phase of the cell cycle. Among the CDKs, CDK4 is one of the genes most frequently affected by somatic genetic variations that are associated with various forms of cancer. Thus, because the abnormal function of the CDK4-cyclin D1 protein complex might play a vital role in causing cancer, CDK4 can be considered a genetically validated therapeutic target. In this study, we used a systematic, integrated computational approach to identify deleterious nsSNPs and predict their effects on protein-protein (CDK4-cyclin D1 and protein-ligand (CDK4-flavopiridol interactions. This analysis resulted in the identification of possible inhibitors of mutant CDK4 proteins that bind the conformations induced by deleterious nsSNPs. Using computational prediction methods, we identified five nsSNPs as highly deleterious: R24C, Y180H, A205T, R210P, and R246C. From molecular docking and molecular dynamic studies, we observed that these deleterious nsSNPs affected CDK4-cyclin D1 and CDK4-flavopiridol interactions. Furthermore, in a virtual screening approach, the drug 5_7_DIHYDROXY_ 2_ (3_4_5_TRI HYDROXYPHENYL _4H_CHROMEN_ 4_ONE displayed good binding affinity for proteins with the mutations R24C or R246C, the drug diosmin displayed good binding affinity for the protein with the mutation Y180H, and the drug rutin displayed good binding affinity for proteins with the mutations A205T and R210P. Overall, this computational investigation of the CDK4 gene highlights the link between genetic variation and biological phenomena in human cancer and aids in the discovery of molecularly targeted therapies for personalized treatment.

  19. Characterization of novel StAR (steroidogenic acute regulatory protein mutations causing non-classic lipoid adrenal hyperplasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christa E Flück

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR is crucial for transport of cholesterol to mitochondria where biosynthesis of steroids is initiated. Loss of StAR function causes lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia (LCAH. OBJECTIVE: StAR gene mutations causing partial loss of function manifest atypical and may be mistaken as familial glucocorticoid deficiency. Only a few mutations have been reported. DESIGN: To report clinical, biochemical, genetic, protein structure and functional data on two novel StAR mutations, and to compare them with published literature. SETTING: Collaboration between the University Children's Hospital Bern, Switzerland, and the CIBERER, Hospital Vall d'Hebron, Autonomous University, Barcelona, Spain. PATIENTS: Two subjects of a non-consanguineous Caucasian family were studied. The 46,XX phenotypic normal female was diagnosed with adrenal insufficiency at the age of 10 months, had normal pubertal development and still has no signs of hypergonodatropic hypogonadism at 32 years of age. Her 46,XY brother was born with normal male external genitalia and was diagnosed with adrenal insufficiency at 14 months. Puberty was normal and no signs of hypergonadotropic hypogonadism are present at 29 years of age. RESULTS: StAR gene analysis revealed two novel compound heterozygote mutations T44HfsX3 and G221S. T44HfsX3 is a loss-of-function StAR mutation. G221S retains partial activity (∼30% and is therefore responsible for a milder, non-classic phenotype. G221S is located in the cholesterol binding pocket and seems to alter binding/release of cholesterol. CONCLUSIONS: StAR mutations located in the cholesterol binding pocket (V187M, R188C, R192C, G221D/S seem to cause non-classic lipoid CAH. Accuracy of genotype-phenotype prediction by in vitro testing may vary with the assays employed.

  20. A novel mutation of gap junction protein β 1 gene in X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sheng Dong; Li, Zheng Xi; Guan, Yang Tai; Zhou, Xia Jun; Jiang, Jian Ming; Hao, Yong

    2011-06-01

    In this study we report a novel mutation in the gap junction protein beta 1 (GJB1) gene of a Chinese X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX1) family, which has specific electrophysiological characteristics. Twenty members in the family were studied by clinical neurological examination and GJB1 gene mutation analysis, and 3 patients were studied electrophysiologically. The proband and his mother also underwent sural nerve biopsy. All patients have the CMT phenotype, except for 2 asymptomatic carriers. Electrophysiological examinations showed non-uniform slowing of motor conduction velocities and partial motor conduction blocks and temporal dispersion. Sural nerve biopsy confirmed a predominantly demyelinating neuropathy, and an Asn2Lys mutation in the amino-terminal domain was found in 9 members of this family, but not in 25 normal controls in the family. This family represents a novel mutation in the GJB1 form of CMTX1. The mutation in the amino-terminus has an impact on the electrophysiological characteristics of the disease. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Case report: a novel KERA mutation associated with cornea plana and its predicted effect on protein function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, Laura; Bertelsen, Birgitte; Harris, Pernille;

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cornea plana (CNA) is a hereditary congenital abnormality of the cornea characterized by reduced corneal curvature, extreme hypermetropia, corneal clouding and hazy corneal limbus. The recessive form, CNA2, is associated with homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations of the kerato......Background: Cornea plana (CNA) is a hereditary congenital abnormality of the cornea characterized by reduced corneal curvature, extreme hypermetropia, corneal clouding and hazy corneal limbus. The recessive form, CNA2, is associated with homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations...... of the keratocan gene (KERA) on chromosome 12q22. To date, only nine different disease-associated KERA mutations, including four missense mutations, have been described. Case presentation: In this report, we present clinical data from a Turkish family with autosomal recessive cornea plana. In some of the affected...... individuals, hypotrichosis was found. KERA was screened for mutations using Sanger sequencing. We detected a novel KERA variant, p.(Ile225Thr), that segregates with the disease in the homozygous form. The three-dimensional structure of keratocan protein was modelled, and we showed that this missense variation...

  2. A new F131V mutation in Chlamydomonas phytoene desaturase locates a cluster of norflurazon resistance mutations near the FAD-binding site in 3D protein models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio V Suarez

    Full Text Available The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii provides a tractable genetic model to study herbicide mode of action using forward genetics. The herbicide norflurazon inhibits phytoene desaturase, which is required for carotenoid synthesis. Locating amino acid substitutions in mutant phytoene desaturases conferring norflurazon resistance provides a genetic approach to map the herbicide binding site. We isolated a UV-induced mutant able to grow in very high concentrations of norflurazon (150 µM. The phytoene desaturase gene in the mutant strain contained the first resistance mutation to be localised to the dinucleotide-binding Rossmann-likedomain. A highly conserved phenylalanine amino acid at position 131 of the 564 amino acid precursor protein was changed to a valine in the mutant protein. F131, and two other amino acids whose substitution confers norflurazon resistance in homologous phytoene desaturase proteins, map to distant regions in the primary sequence of the C. reinhardtii protein (V472, L505 but in tertiary models these residues cluster together to a region close to the predicted FAD binding site. The mutant gene allowed direct 5 µM norflurazon based selection of transformants, which were tolerant to other bleaching herbicides including fluridone, flurtamone, and diflufenican but were more sensitive to beflubutamid than wild type cells. Norflurazon resistance and beflubutamid sensitivity allow either positive or negative selection against transformants expressing the mutant phytoene desaturase gene.

  3. Co-mutation of p53, K-ras genes and accumulation of p53 protein and its correlation to clinicopathological features in rectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Zhong Pan; De-Sen Wan; Gong Chen; Li-Ren Li; Zhen-Hai Lu; Bi-Jun Huang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To determine the accuracy of p53 gene mutations predicted by overexpression of p53 protein immunohistochemically,and to investigate the co-mutation of p53 and K-rasgenes in rectal cancer and its effect on promoting malignant biologic behaviors of tumors.METHODS: Ninety-seven specimens of rectal cancer were surgically resected in our hospital from August 1996 to October 1997. The hot mutation areas of p53 gene (in exons 5-8) and K-ras gene (in codon 5/12 and 13) were detected with polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP), and overexpression of p53 protein was detected with immunohistochemistry (IHC) in the 97 specimens of rectal cancer. Correlation between gene mutations and tumor clinicopathologic factors was studied, and survival analysis was penfomed as well.RESULTS: There were 36 cases of p53 gene mutations in 61 p53 protein positive cases, and 21 cases of p53 gene non-mutation in 36 p53 protein negative cases respectively.The coincidence rate of p53 gene mutation by IHC method with PCR-SSCP method was 58.8% (57/97). The mutation rate of p53 gene was 52.6% (51/97), while K-ras gene mutation was observed in codons 12 and 13 in 61 cases with a mutation rate of 62.9% (61/97). Single gene mutation of p53 or K-raswas found in 32 cases. Both p53 and K-ras gene mutation were found in 48 cases. Statistical analysis showed that p53 and K-rasgene mutations were not related to the clinicopathologic factors, including tumor size, gross tumor type, histological classification, differentiation, invasion to intestinal veins, lymphatics and nerves, invasive depth to wall, lymph node metastasis, and Dukes' stages (P>0.05).The survival in patients with no gene mutation, single gene mutation and both gene mutations were similar (P>0.05).CONCLUSION: IHC has a certain false positive and false negative rate in detecting p53 gene mutations. Malignant biological behaviours of rectal cancer are not enhanced by p53 and K-rasgene mutations. Co-mutation

  4. Mutational Studies on Resurrected Ancestral Proteins Reveal Conservation of Site-Specific Amino Acid Preferences throughout Evolutionary History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risso, Valeria A.; Manssour-Triedo, Fadia; Delgado-Delgado, Asunción; Arco, Rocio; Barroso-delJesus, Alicia; Ingles-Prieto, Alvaro; Godoy-Ruiz, Raquel; Gavira, Jose A.; Gaucher, Eric A.; Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    Local protein interactions (“molecular context” effects) dictate amino acid replacements and can be described in terms of site-specific, energetic preferences for any different amino acid. It has been recently debated whether these preferences remain approximately constant during evolution or whether, due to coevolution of sites, they change strongly. Such research highlights an unresolved and fundamental issue with far-reaching implications for phylogenetic analysis and molecular evolution modeling. Here, we take advantage of the recent availability of phenotypically supported laboratory resurrections of Precambrian thioredoxins and β-lactamases to experimentally address the change of site-specific amino acid preferences over long geological timescales. Extensive mutational analyses support the notion that evolutionary adjustment to a new amino acid may occur, but to a large extent this is insufficient to erase the primitive preference for amino acid replacements. Generally, site-specific amino acid preferences appear to remain conserved throughout evolutionary history despite local sequence divergence. We show such preference conservation to be readily understandable in molecular terms and we provide crystallographic evidence for an intriguing structural-switch mechanism: Energetic preference for an ancestral amino acid in a modern protein can be linked to reorganization upon mutation to the ancestral local structure around the mutated site. Finally, we point out that site-specific preference conservation naturally leads to one plausible evolutionary explanation for the existence of intragenic global suppressor mutations. PMID:25392342

  5. High frequency of mutations in codon 98 of the peripheral myelin protein Po gene in 20 French CMT1 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rougher, H.; LeGuern, E. Gouider, R. [and others

    1996-03-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, characterized by distal muscle weakness and amyotrophy, decreased or absent tendon reflexes, and high arched feet, is the most common inherited peripheral neuropathy, with a prevalence of 1 in 2,500. Two types of CMT have been distinguished on the basis of nerve conduction velocities. CMT type 1 is the most frequent, with markedly slowed velocities ({<=}40 m/s) associated with hypertrophic onion bulb changes on nerve biopsy. Autosomal dominant CMT1 is genetically heterogeneous: CMT1A is caused by a 1.5-Mb duplication in 17p11.2 and, more rarely, by a point mutation in tha PMP22 (peripheral myelin protein, 22 kD) gene located in the duplicated region; CMT1B results from mutations in the Po (peripheral myelin protein zero) gene in 1q22-23. Forty-five percent (7/16) of the published mutations associated with CMT1 occur in exon 3 of Po. In order to determine the cause of CMT1 in 20 unrelated patients without 17p11.2 duplications, mutations were sought in exon 3 of Po with three techniques: nonradioactive SSCP, automated sequencing, and PCR enzymatic restriction. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Effects of mutated replicase and movement protein genes on attenuation of tobacco mosaic virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Gong; (

    2001-01-01

    mosaic virus isolates deduced from full-length infectious cDNA clones, Chinese Journal of Biotechnology (in Chinese), 2000, 6: 437-442.[11]Yang, G., Liu, X. G., Qiu, B. S., Recombinant constructions and infectivity analysis of tobacco mosaic virus and attenuated tomato mosaic virus N14 genomes, Chinese Science Bulletin, 2000, 45(15): 1399-1403.[12]Kang, L. Y., Yang, X. C., Tien, P., Double-stranded viral RNA content in tobacco leaves infected with virulent and avirulent isolates of tobacco mosaic virus, Virology, 1982, 118: 324-328.[13]Fenczik, C. A., Padgett, H. S., Holt, C. A. et al., Mutational analysis of the movement protein of Odontoglossum ringspot virus to identify a host-range determinant, Mol. Plant-Microbe Interact., 1995, 8: 666-673.[14]Fernandez, I., Candresse, T., Gall, O. L. et al., The 5′ noncoding region of grapevine chrome mosaic nepovirus RNA-2 triggers a necrotic response on three Nicotiana spp., Mol. Plant-Microbe Interact., 1999, 12: 337-344.[15]Po, T., Pei, M. Y., Research Methods of Plant Viruses, Beijing: Science Press, 1987.[16]Sambrook, J., Fritsch, E. E., Maniatis, T., Molecular Cloning, A Laboratory Manual, 2nd ed., New York: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, 1989.

  7. No evidence of somatic aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein mutations in sporadic endocrine neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raitila, A; Georgitsi, M; Karhu, A

    2007-01-01

    (MEN1) and Carney complex (CNC). Genes underlying MEN1 and CNC are rarely mutated in sporadic pituitary adenomas, but more often in other lesions contributing to these two syndromes. Thus far, the occurrence of somatic AIP mutations has not been studied in endocrine tumors other than pituitary adenomas...

  8. Mutations in OTOGL, encoding the inner ear protein otogelin-like, cause moderate sensorineural hearing loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yariz, K.O.; Duman, D.; Seco, C.Z.; Dallman, J.; Huang, M.; Peters, T.A.; Sirmaci, A.; Lu, N.; Schraders, M.; Skromne, I.; Oostrik, J.; Diaz-Horta, O.; Young, J.I.; Tokgoz-Yilmaz, S.; Konukseven, O.; Shahin, H.; Hetterschijt, L.; Kanaan, M.; Oonk, A.M.M.; Edwards, Y.J.; Li, H.; Atalay, S.; Blanton, S.; Desmidt, A.A.; Liu, X.Z.; Pennings, R.J.E.; Lu, Z.; Chen, Z.Y.; Kremer, J.M.J.; Tekin, M.

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary hearing loss is characterized by a high degree of genetic heterogeneity. Here we present OTOGL mutations, a homozygous one base pair deletion (c.1430 delT) causing a frameshift (p.Val477Glufs( *)25) in a large consanguineous family and two compound heterozygous mutations, c.547C>T (p.Arg1

  9. Mutations in STX1B, encoding a presynaptic protein, cause fever-associated epilepsy syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubert, J.; Siekierska, A.; Langlois, M.

    2014-01-01

    Febrile seizures affect 2-4% of all children(1) and have a strong genetic component(2). Recurrent mutations in three main genes (SCN1A, SCN1B and GABRG2)(3-5) have been identified that cause febrile seizures with or without epilepsy. Here we report the identification of mutations in STX1B, encodi...

  10. PLAA Mutations Cause a Lethal Infantile Epileptic Encephalopathy by Disrupting Ubiquitin-Mediated Endolysosomal Degradation of Synaptic Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Emma A; Nahorski, Michael S; Murray, Lyndsay M; Shaheen, Ranad; Perkins, Emma; Dissanayake, Kosala N; Kristaryanto, Yosua; Jones, Ross A; Vogt, Julie; Rivagorda, Manon; Handley, Mark T; Mali, Girish R; Quidwai, Tooba; Soares, Dinesh C; Keighren, Margaret A; McKie, Lisa; Mort, Richard L; Gammoh, Noor; Garcia-Munoz, Amaya; Davey, Tracey; Vermeren, Matthieu; Walsh, Diana; Budd, Peter; Aligianis, Irene A; Faqeih, Eissa; Quigley, Alan J; Jackson, Ian J; Kulathu, Yogesh; Jackson, Mandy; Ribchester, Richard R; von Kriegsheim, Alex; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Woods, C Geoffrey; Maher, Eamonn R; Mill, Pleasantine

    2017-05-04

    During neurotransmission, synaptic vesicles undergo multiple rounds of exo-endocytosis, involving recycling and/or degradation of synaptic proteins. While ubiquitin signaling at synapses is essential for neural function, it has been assumed that synaptic proteostasis requires the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). We demonstrate here that turnover of synaptic membrane proteins via the endolysosomal pathway is essential for synaptic function. In both human and mouse, hypomorphic mutations in the ubiquitin adaptor protein PLAA cause an infantile-lethal neurodysfunction syndrome with seizures. Resulting from perturbed endolysosomal degradation, Plaa mutant neurons accumulate K63-polyubiquitylated proteins and synaptic membrane proteins, disrupting synaptic vesicle recycling and neurotransmission. Through characterization of this neurological intracellular trafficking disorder, we establish the importance of ubiquitin-mediated endolysosomal trafficking at the synapse. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Mutations in the PQBP1 gene prevent its interaction with the spliceosomal protein U5-15 kD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Obita, Takayuki; Serita, Tomohito; Kojima, Rieko; Nabeshima, Yuko; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2014-04-30

    A loss-of-function of polyglutamine tract-binding protein 1 (PQBP1) induced by frameshift mutations is believed to cause X-linked mental retardation. However, the mechanism by which structural changes in PQBP1 lead to mental retardation is unknown. Here we present the crystal structure of a C-terminal fragment of PQBP1 in complex with the spliceosomal protein U5-15 kD. The U5-15 kD hydrophobic groove recognizes a YxxPxxVL motif in PQBP1, and mutations within this motif cause a loss-of-function phenotype of PQBP1 in vitro. The YxxPxxVL motif is absent in all PQBP1 frameshift mutants seen in cases of mental retardation. These results suggest a mechanism by which the loss of the YxxPxxVL motif could lead to the functional defects seen in this type of mental retardation.

  12. Folding RaCe: a robust method for predicting changes in protein folding rates upon point mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Priyashree; Naganathan, Athi N; Gromiha, M Michael

    2015-07-01

    Protein engineering methods are commonly employed to decipher the folding mechanism of proteins and enzymes. However, such experiments are exceedingly time and resource intensive. It would therefore be advantageous to develop a simple computational tool to predict changes in folding rates upon mutations. Such a method should be able to rapidly provide the sequence position and chemical nature to modulate through mutation, to effect a particular change in rate. This can be of importance in protein folding, function or mechanistic studies. We have developed a robust knowledge-based methodology to predict the changes in folding rates upon mutations formulated from amino and acid properties using multiple linear regression approach. We benchmarked this method against an experimental database of 790 point mutations from 26 two-state proteins. Mutants were first classified according to secondary structure, accessible surface area and position along the primary sequence. Three prime amino acid features eliciting the best relationship with folding rates change were then shortlisted for each class along with an optimized window length. We obtained a self-consistent mean absolute error of 0.36 s(-1) and a mean Pearson correlation coefficient (PCC) of 0.81. Jack-knife test resulted in a MAE of 0.42 s(-1) and a PCC of 0.73. Moreover, our method highlights the importance of outlier(s) detection and studying their implications in the folding mechanism. A web server 'Folding RaCe' has been developed and is available at http://www.iitm.ac.in/bioinfo/proteinfolding/foldingrace.html. gromiha@iitm.ac.in Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Functional characterization of the protein C A267T mutation: evidence for impaired secretion due to defective intracellular transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjeldhorn Lena

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activated protein C (PC is a serine protease that regulates blood coagulation by inactivating coagulation factors Va and VIIIa. PC deficiency is an autosomally inherited disorder associated with a high risk of recurrent venous thrombosis. The aim of the study was to explore the mechanisms responsible for severe PC deficiency in a patient with the protein C A267T mutation by in-vitro expression studies. Results Huh7 and CHO-K1 cells were transiently transfected with expression vectors containing wild-type (WT PC and mutated PC (A267T PC cDNAs. PC mRNA levels were assessed by qRT-PCR and the PC protein levels were measured by ELISA. The mRNA levels of WT PC and A267T PC were similar, while the intracellular protein level of A267T PC was moderately decreased compared to WT PC. The secretion of A267T PC into the medium was severely impaired. No differences in molecular weights were observed between WT and A267T PC before and after treatment with endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase. Proteasomal and lysosomal degradations were examined using lactacystin and bafilomycin, respectively, and revealed that A267T PC was slightly more susceptible for proteasomal degradation than WT PC. Intracellular co-localization analysis indicated that A267T PC was mainly located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, whereas WT PC was observed in both ER and Golgi. Conclusions In contrast to what has been reported for other PC mutants, intracellular degradation of A267T PC was not the main/dominant mechanism underlying the reduced intracellular and secretion levels of PC. Our results indicate that the A267T mutation most likely caused misfolding of PC, which might lead to increased retention of the mutated PC in ER.

  14. [Portal-splenic-mesenteric venous thrombosis in a patients with protein S deficiency due to novel PROS1 gene mutation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Eui Tae; Kang, Won Sik; Park, Jin Woo; Lee, Ji Hyun; Han, Hyun Jeong; Shin, Sang Yong; Kim, Hee Jin; Choi, Ja Sung

    2014-08-01

    Protein S (PS), a vitamin K-dependent glycoprotein, performs an important role in the anticoagulation cascade as a cofactor of protein C. Because of the presence of a pseudogene and two different forms of PS in the plasma, protein S deficiency (PSD) is one of the most difficult thrombophilias to study and a rare blood disorder associated with an increased risk of thrombosis. We describe a unusual case of previously healthy 37-year-old man diagnosed with portal-splenic-mesenteric vein thrombosis secondary to PSD. The patient was admitted to the hospital due to continuous nonspecific abdominal pain and nausea. Abdominal computed tomography revealed acute venous thrombosis from inferior mesenteric vein to left portal vein via splenic vein, and laboratory test revealed decreased PS antigen level and PS functional activity. Conventional polymerase chain reaction and direct DNA sequencing analysis of the PROS1 gene demonstrated duplication of the 166th base in exon 2 resulting in frame-shift mutation (p.Arg56Lysfs*10) which is the first description of the new PROS1 gene mutation to our knowledge. Results from other studies suggest that the inherited PSD due to a PROS1 gene mutation may cause venous thrombosis in a healthy young man without any known predisposing factor.

  15. Abstract 5324: Pan-cancer identification of mutated pathways and protein complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leiserson, Mark D.; Vandin, Fabio; Wu, Hsin-Ta

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale cancer sequencing efforts such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and others have shown that tumors exhibit extensive mutational heterogeneity with relatively few genes mutated at significant frequency and many genes mutated in only a small number of individuals. This long tail phenome...... Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research; 2014 Apr 5-9; San Diego, CA. Philadelphia (PA): AACR; Cancer Res 2014;74(19 Suppl):Abstract nr 5324. doi:10.1158/1538-7445.AM2014-5324...

  16. Hypomorphic mutations in PGAP2, encoding a GPI-anchor-remodeling protein, cause autosomal-recessive intellectual disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars; Tawamie, Hasan; Murakami, Yoshiko

    2013-01-01

    PGAP2 encodes a protein involved in remodeling the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor in the Golgi apparatus. After synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), GPI anchors are transferred to the proteins and are remodeled while transported through the Golgi to the cell membrane. Germline...... rescue when we used strong promoters before the mutant cDNAs, suggesting a hypomorphic effect of the mutations. We report on alterations in the Golgi-located part of the GPI-anchor-biosynthesis pathway and extend the phenotypic spectrum of the GPI-anchor deficiencies to isolated intellectual disability...

  17. Exploring the interplay between experimental methods and the performance of predictors of binding affinity change upon mutations in protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Cunliang; Vangone, Anna; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J

    2016-08-01

    Reliable prediction of binding affinity changes (ΔΔG) upon mutations in protein complexes relies not only on the performance of computational methods but also on the availability and quality of experimental data. Binding affinity changes can be measured by various experimental methods with different accuracies and limitations. To understand the impact of these on the prediction of binding affinity change, we present the Database of binding Affinity Change Upon Mutation (DACUM), a database of 1872 binding affinity changes upon single-point mutations, a subset of the SKEMPI database (Moal,I.H. and Fernández-Recio,J. Bioinformatics, 2012;28:2600-2607) extended with information on the experimental methods used for ΔΔG measurements. The ΔΔG data were classified into different data sets based on the experimental method used and the position of the mutation (interface and non-interface). We tested the prediction performance of the original HADDOCK score, a newly trained version of it and mutation Cutoff Scanning Matrix (Pires,D.E.V., Ascher,D.B. and Blundell,T.L. Bioinformatics 2014;30:335-342), one of the best reported ΔΔG predictors so far, on these various data sets. Our results demonstrate a strong impact of the experimental methods on the performance of binding affinity change predictors for protein complexes. This underscores the importance of properly considering and carefully choosing experimental methods in the development of novel binding affinity change predictors. The DACUM database is available online at https://github.com/haddocking/DACUM.

  18. Mutation of praR in Rhizobium leguminosarum enhances root biofilms, improving nodulation competitiveness by increased expression of attachment proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederix, Marijke; Edwards, Anne; Swiderska, Anna; Stanger, Andrew; Karunakaran, Ramakrishnan; Williams, Alan; Abbruscato, Pamela; Sanchez-Contreras, Maria; Poole, Philip S; Downie, J Allan

    2014-08-01

    In Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae, quorum-sensing is regulated by CinR, which induces the cinIS operon. CinI synthesizes an AHL, whereas CinS inactivates PraR, a repressor. Mutation of praR enhanced biofilms in vitro. We developed a light (lux)-dependent assay of rhizobial attachment to roots and demonstrated that mutation of praR increased biofilms on pea roots. The praR mutant out-competed wild-type for infection of pea nodules in mixed inoculations. Analysis of gene expression by microarrays and promoter fusions revealed that PraR represses its own transcription and mutation of praR increased expression of several genes including those encoding secreted proteins (the adhesins RapA2, RapB and RapC, two cadherins and the glycanase PlyB), the polysaccharide regulator RosR, and another protein similar to PraR. PraR bound to the promoters of several of these genes indicating direct repression. Mutations in rapA2, rapB, rapC, plyB, the cadherins or rosR did not affect the enhanced root attachment or nodule competitiveness of the praR mutant. However combinations of mutations in rapA, rapB and rapC abolished the enhanced attachment and nodule competitiveness. We conclude that relief of PraR-mediated repression determines a lifestyle switch allowing the expression of genes that are important for biofilm formation on roots and the subsequent initiation of infection of legume roots.

  19. Paget disease of bone-associated UBA domain mutations of SQSTM1 exert distinct effects on protein structure and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, Alice; Long, Jed E.; Shaw, Barry; Ralston, Stuart H.; Visconti, Micaela Rios; Gianfrancesco, Fernando; Esposito, Teresa; Gennari, Luigi; Merlotti, Daniela; Rendina, Domenico; Rea, Sarah L.; Sultana, Melanie; Searle, Mark S.; Layfield, Robert

    2014-01-01

    SQSTM1 mutations are common in patients with Paget disease of bone (PDB), with most affecting the C-terminal ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain of the SQSTM1 protein. We performed structural and functional analyses of two UBA domain mutations, an I424S mutation relatively common in UK PDB patients, and an A427D mutation associated with a severe phenotype in Southern Italian patients. Both impaired SQSTM1's ubiquitin-binding function in pull-down assays and resulted in activation of basal NF-κB signalling, compared to wild-type, in reporter assays. We found evidence for a relationship between the ability of different UBA domain mutants to activate NF-κB signalling in vitro and number of affected sites in vivo in 1152 PDB patients from the UK and Italy, with A427D-SQSTM1 producing the greatest level of activation (relative to wild-type) of all PDB mutants tested to date. NMR and isothermal titration calorimetry studies were able to demonstrate that I424S is associated with global structural changes in the UBA domain, resulting in 10-fold weaker UBA dimer stability than wild-type and reduced ubiquitin-binding affinity of the UBA monomer. Our observations provide insights into the role of SQSTM1-mediated NF-κB signalling in PDB aetiology, and demonstrate that different mutations in close proximity within loop 2/helix 3 of the SQSTM1 UBA domain exert distinct effects on protein structure and stability, including indirect effects at the UBA/ubiquitin-binding interface. PMID:24642144

  20. Ataluren (PTC124) induces cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein expression and activity in children with nonsense mutation cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Boeck, Kris De; Casimir, Georges J; Vermeulen, François; Leal, Teresinha; Mogenet, Agnès; Roussel, Delphine; Fritsch, Janine; Hanssens, Laurence; Hirawat, Samit; Miller, Nilsen L; Constantine, Scott; Reha, Allen; Ajayi, Temitayo; Elfring, Gary L; Miller, Langdon L

    2010-11-15

    Nonsense (premature stop codon) mutations in mRNA for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) cause cystic fibrosis (CF) in approximately 10% of patients. Ataluren (PTC124) is an oral drug that permits ribosomes to readthrough premature stop codons in mRNA to produce functional protein. To evaluate ataluren activity, safety, and pharmacokinetics in children with nonsense mutation CF. Patients were assessed in two 28-day cycles, comprising 14 days on and 14 days off ataluren. Patients took ataluren three times per day (morning, midday, and evening) with randomization to the order of receiving a lower dose (4, 4, and 8 mg/kg) and a higher dose (10, 10, and 20 mg/kg) in the two cycles. The study enrolled 30 patients (16 male and 14 female, ages 6 through 18 yr) with a nonsense mutation in at least one allele of the CFTR gene, a classical CF phenotype, and abnormal baseline nasal epithelial chloride transport. Ataluren induced a nasal chloride transport response (at least a -5-mV improvement) or hyperpolarization (value more electrically negative than -5 mV) in 50% and 47% of patients, respectively, with more hyperpolarizations at the higher dose. Improvements were seen in seven of nine nonsense mutation genotypes represented. Ataluren significantly increased the proportion of nasal epithelial cells expressing apical full-length CFTR protein. Adverse events and laboratory abnormalities were infrequent and usually mild. Ataluren pharmacokinetics were similar to those in adults. In children with nonsense mutation CF, ataluren can induce functional CFTR production and is well tolerated.

  1. A novel missense mutation of the ubiquitin protein ligase E3A gene in a patient with Angelman syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Jin-li; QU Yu-jin; ZOU Li-ping; YANG Xin-ying; LIU Li-jun; SONG Fang

    2011-01-01

    Background Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurogenetic disorder caused by an expression defect of the maternally inherited copy of ubiquitin protein ligase E3A (UBE3A) gene from chromosome 15. Although the most common genetic defects include maternal deletions of chromosome 15q11-13, paternal uniparental disomy and imprinting defect,mutations in the UBE3A gene have been identified in approximately 10% of AS patients.Methods A Chinese girl of 28 months presented clinical manifestation of AS. Genetic diagnosis and molecular genetic defects were studied by methylation-specific PCR (MS-PCR) and linkage analysis by short tandem repeat (STR). We further performed sequence analysis of all the coding exons and flanking sequences of the UBE3A gene. The novel mutation screening was also performed in 100 unrelated healthy individuals to exclude the possibility of identifying a polymorphism variation.Results The MS-PCR analysis of the patient showed biparental inheritance of chromosome 15 with a normal methylation pattern in the 15q11-q13 region. And STR analysis revealed that the patient also inherited biparental alleles for six microsatellites. A novel mutation, cDNA1199 C>A (p. P400H), in exon 9 of the maternal UBE3A gene, was identified in the patient. Meanwhile, the mutation was observed in the patient's mother who had a normal phenotype.Conclusions It is necessary to perform the UBE3A gene mutation analysis in non-deletion/non-UPD/non-ID patients with AS. The clinical picture of the patient is concordant with that observed in previously reported AS patients with UBE3A mutation.

  2. A nonsense mutation in cGMP-dependent type II protein kinase (PRKG2) causes dwarfism in American Angus cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koltes, James E; Mishra, Bishnu P; Kumar, Dinesh; Kataria, Ranjit S; Totir, Liviu R; Fernando, Rohan L; Cobbold, Rowland; Steffen, David; Coppieters, Wouter; Georges, Michel; Reecy, James M

    2009-11-17

    Historically, dwarfism was the major genetic defect in U.S. beef cattle. Aggressive culling and sire testing were used to minimize its prevalence; however, neither of these practices can eliminate a recessive genetic defect. We assembled a 4-generation pedigree to identify the mutation underlying dwarfism in American Angus cattle. An adaptation of the Elston-Steward algorithm was used to overcome small pedigree size and missing genotypes. The dwarfism locus was fine-mapped to BTA6 between markers AFR227 and BM4311. Four candidate genes were sequenced, revealing a nonsense mutation in exon 15 of cGMP-dependant type II protein kinase (PRKG2). This C/T transition introduced a stop codon (R678X) that truncated 85 C-terminal amino acids, including a large portion of the kinase domain. Of the 75 mutations discovered in this region, only this mutation was 100% concordant with the recessive pattern of inheritance in affected and carrier individuals (log of odds score = 6.63). Previous research has shown that PRKG2 regulates SRY (sex-determining region Y) box 9 (SOX9)-mediated transcription of collagen 2 (COL2). We evaluated the ability of wild-type (WT) or R678X PRKG2 to regulate COL2 expression in cell culture. Real-time PCR results confirmed that COL2 is overexpressed in cells that overexpressed R678X PRKG2 as compared with WT PRKG2. Furthermore, COL2 and COL10 mRNA expression was increased in dwarf cattle compared with unaffected cattle. These experiments indicate that the R678X mutation is functional, resulting in a loss of PRKG2 regulation of COL2 and COL10 mRNA expression. Therefore, we present PRKG2 R678X as a causative mutation for dwarfism cattle.

  3. Critical amino acid residues in proteins: a BioMart integration of Reactome protein annotations with PRIDE mass spectrometry data and COSMIC somatic mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Cote, R. G.; Croft, D.; D'Eustachio, P.; D'Eustachio, P; Hermjakob, H.; Ndegwa, N.; Ovelleiro, D.; Vizcaino, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    The reversible phosphorylation of serine, threonine and tyrosine hydroxyl groups is an especially prominent form of post-translational modification (PTM) of proteins. It plays critical roles in the regulation of diverse processes, and mutations that directly or indirectly affect these phosphorylation events have been associated with many cancers and other pathologies. Here, we describe the development of a new BioMart tool that gathers data from three different biological resources to provide...

  4. Structural and dynamic changes associated with beneficial engineered single-amino-acid deletion mutations in enhanced green fluorescent protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arpino, James A. J. [Cardiff University, Park Place, Cardiff CF10 3AT Wales (United Kingdom); Rizkallah, Pierre J., E-mail: rizkallahp@cardiff.ac.uk [Cardiff University, Heath Park, Cardiff CF14 4XN Wales (United Kingdom); Jones, D. Dafydd, E-mail: rizkallahp@cardiff.ac.uk [Cardiff University, Park Place, Cardiff CF10 3AT Wales (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-01

    The beneficial engineered single-amino-acid deletion variants EGFP{sup D190Δ} and EGFP{sup A227Δ} have been studied. Single-amino-acid deletions are a common part of the natural evolutionary landscape but are rarely sampled during protein engineering owing to limited and prejudiced molecular understanding of mutations that shorten the protein backbone. Single-amino-acid deletion variants of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) have been identified by directed evolution with the beneficial effect of imparting increased cellular fluorescence. Biophysical characterization revealed that increased functional protein production and not changes to the fluorescence parameters was the mechanism that was likely to be responsible. The structure EGFP{sup D190Δ} containing a deletion within a loop revealed propagated changes only after the deleted residue. The structure of EGFP{sup A227Δ} revealed that a ‘flipping’ mechanism was used to adjust for residue deletion at the end of a β-strand, with amino acids C-terminal to the deletion site repositioning to take the place of the deleted amino acid. In both variants new networks of short-range and long-range interactions are generated while maintaining the integrity of the hydrophobic core. Both deletion variants also displayed significant local and long-range changes in dynamics, as evident by changes in B factors compared with EGFP. Rather than being detrimental, deletion mutations can introduce beneficial structural effects through altering core protein properties, folding and dynamics, as well as function.

  5. FET Proteins TAF15 and EWS Are Selective Markers that Distinguish FTLD with FUS Pathology from Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis with "FUS" Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Manuela; Bentmann, Eva; Dormann, Dorothee; Jawaid, Ali; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Ansorge, Olaf; Roeber, Sigrun; Kretzschmar, Hans A.; Munoz, David G.; Kusaka, Hirofumi; Yokota, Osamu; Ang, Lee-Cyn; Bilbao, Juan; Rademakers, Rosa; Haass, Christian; Mackenzie, Ian R. A.

    2011-01-01

    Accumulation of the DNA/RNA binding protein fused in sarcoma as cytoplasmic inclusions in neurons and glial cells is the pathological hallmark of all patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with mutations in "FUS" as well as in several subtypes of frontotemporal lobar degeneration, which are not associated with "FUS" mutations. The mechanisms…

  6. FET Proteins TAF15 and EWS Are Selective Markers that Distinguish FTLD with FUS Pathology from Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis with "FUS" Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Manuela; Bentmann, Eva; Dormann, Dorothee; Jawaid, Ali; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Ansorge, Olaf; Roeber, Sigrun; Kretzschmar, Hans A.; Munoz, David G.; Kusaka, Hirofumi; Yokota, Osamu; Ang, Lee-Cyn; Bilbao, Juan; Rademakers, Rosa; Haass, Christian; Mackenzie, Ian R. A.

    2011-01-01

    Accumulation of the DNA/RNA binding protein fused in sarcoma as cytoplasmic inclusions in neurons and glial cells is the pathological hallmark of all patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with mutations in "FUS" as well as in several subtypes of frontotemporal lobar degeneration, which are not associated with "FUS" mutations. The mechanisms…

  7. High prevalence of mutations in the microtubule-associated protein tau in a population study of frontotemporal dementia in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Rizzu (Patrizia); M. Hillebrand; R. Ravid (Rivka); B.A. Oostra (Ben); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); M. Goedert; J.C. van Swieten (John); M. Joosse (Marijke); M. Hasegawa (Masato); M. Stevens (Martijn); A. Tibben (Arend); M.F. Niermeijer (Martinus); P. Heutink (Peter)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractMutations in microtubule-associated protein tau recently have been identified in familial cases of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). We report the frequency of tau mutations in a large population-based study of FTD carried out in the Netherlands from January 1994 to June 1

  8. Protein expression studies of desmoplakin mutations in cardiomyopathy patients reveal different molecular disease mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, T B; Hansen, Jakob; Nissen, P H;

    2013-01-01

    identified and included haploinsufficiency, dominant-negative effects, or a combination hereof. Furthermore, the results suggest that the keratinocytes cultured from patients are a valuable and easily accessible resource to elucidate the effects of desmosomal gene mutations in humans....

  9. Probing the role of backbone hydrogen bonds in protein-peptide interactions by amide-to-ester mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eildal, Jonas N N; Hultqvist, Greta; Balle, Thomas;

    2013-01-01

    -protein interactions, those of the PDZ domain family involve formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds: C-termini or internal linear motifs of proteins bind as β-strands to form an extended antiparallel β-sheet with the PDZ domain. Whereas extensive work has focused on the importance of the amino acid side chains...... of the protein ligand, the role of the backbone hydrogen bonds in the binding reaction is not known. Using amide-to-ester substitutions to perturb the backbone hydrogen-bonding pattern, we have systematically probed putative backbone hydrogen bonds between four different PDZ domains and peptides corresponding...... to natural protein ligands. Amide-to-ester mutations of the three C-terminal amides of the peptide ligand severely affected the affinity with the PDZ domain, demonstrating that hydrogen bonds contribute significantly to ligand binding (apparent changes in binding energy, ΔΔG = 1.3 to >3.8 kcal mol(-1...

  10. Abetalipoproteinemia: A novel mutation of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP gene in a young Tunisian patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hager Barakizou

    2016-07-01

    We report the case of a Tunisian male child born from consanguineous marriage. He presented at the age of 4 months with failure to thrive, greasy stool and vomiting. His clinical phenotype and serum lipid profile suggested the diagnosis of ABL. The MTP gene analysis revealed a novel homozygous mutation [c.2313-2314delinsAA (p.771Tyr>x]. The parents were heterozygous for the same mutation.

  11. Mutations in multidomain protein MEGF8 identify a Carpenter syndrome subtype associated with defective lateralization.

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Carpenter syndrome is an autosomal-recessive multiple-congenital-malformation disorder characterized by multisuture craniosynostosis and polysyndactyly of the hands and feet; many other clinical features occur, and the most frequent include obesity, umbilical hernia, cryptorchidism, and congenital heart disease. Mutations of RAB23, encoding a small GTPase that regulates vesicular transport, are present in the majority of cases. Here, we describe a disorder caused by mutations in multiple epid...

  12. Protein structure guided discovery of functional mutations across 19 cancer types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Beifang; Scott, Adam D.; Sengupta, Sohini; Bailey, Matthew H.; Batra, Prag; Ning, Jie; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A.; Liang, Wen-Wei; Zhang, Qunyuan; McLellan, Michael D.; Sun, Sam Q.; Tripathi, Piyush; Lou, Carolyn; Ye, Kai; Mashl, R. Jay; Wallis, John; Wendl, Michael C.; Chen, Feng; Ding, Li

    2017-01-01

    Local concentrations of mutations are well-known in human cancers. However, their 3-dimensional (3D) spatial relationships have yet to be systematically explored. We developed a computational tool, HotSpot3D, to identify such spatial hotspots (clusters) and to interpret the potential function of variants within them. We applied HotSpot3D to >4,400 TCGA tumors across 19 cancer types, discovering >6,000 intra- and inter-molecular clusters, some of which showed tumor/tissue specificity. In addition, we identified 369 rare mutations from genes including TP53, PTEN, VHL, EGFR, and FBXW7 and 99 medium recurrence mutations from genes such as RUNX1, MTOR, CA3, PI3, and PTPN11, all residing within clusters having potential functional implications. As a proof of concept, we validated our predictions in EGFR using high throughput phosphorylation data and cell-line based experimental evaluation. Finally, drug-mutation cluster/network analysis predicted over 800 promising candidates of druggable mutations, raising new possibilities for designing personalized treatments for patients carrying specific mutations. PMID:27294619

  13. South African mutations of the CCR5 coreceptor for HIV modify interaction with chemokines and HIV Envelope protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folefoc, Asongna T; Fromme, Bernhard J; Katz, Arieh A; Flanagan, Colleen A

    2010-08-01

    The CCR5 chemokine receptor is the major coreceptor for HIV-1 and the receptor for CC-chemokines, MIP-1alpha, MIP-1beta, and regulated upon activation normal T-cell-expressed and secreted. Individuals, who are homozygous for the nonfunctional CCR5Delta32 allele, are largely resistant to HIV-1 infection. Four unique mutations that affect the amino acid sequence of CCR5 have been identified in South Africa. We have assessed the effect of these mutations on CCR5 interactions with chemokines and HIV Envelope protein. The LeuPhe mutation did not affect CCR5 expression, chemokine binding, intracellular signaling, or interaction with Envelope. The ArgGln mutant was similar to wild-type CCR5, but ligand-independent intracellular signaling suggests that it is partially constitutively active. The AspVal mutation decreased chemokine-binding affinity, chemokine-stimulated intracellular signaling, and receptor expression. It also decreased HIV Envelope-mediated cell fusion. The ArgStop mutant showed no measurable chemokine binding or signaling and no measurable expression of CCR5 at the cell surface or within the cell. Consistent with lack of cell surface expression, it did not support envelope-mediated cell fusion. These results show that South African CCR5 variants have a range of phenotypes in vitro that may reflect altered chemokine responses and susceptibility to HIV infection in individuals who carry these alleles.

  14. Three novel and the common Arg677Ter RP1 protein truncating mutations causing autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa in a Spanish population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antiñolo Guillermo

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retinitis pigmentosa (RP, a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of retinal degeneration disorders affecting the photoreceptor cells, is one of the leading causes of genetic blindness. Mutations in the photoreceptor-specific gene RP1 account for 3–10% of cases of autosomal dominant RP (adRP. Most of these mutations are clustered in a 500 bp region of exon 4 of RP1. Methods Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE analysis and direct genomic sequencing were used to evaluate the 5' coding region of exon 4 of the RP1 gene for mutations in 150 unrelated index adRP patients. Ophthalmic and electrophysiological examination of RP patients and relatives according to pre-existing protocols were carried out. Results Three novel disease-causing mutations in RP1 were detected: Q686X, K705fsX712 and K722fsX737, predicting truncated proteins. One novel missense mutation, Thr752Met, was detected in one family but the mutation does not co-segregate in the family, thereby excluding this amino acid variation in the protein as a cause of the disease. We found the Arg677Ter mutation, previously reported in other populations, in two independent families, confirming that this mutation is also present in a Spanish population. Conclusion Most of the mutations reported in the RP1 gene associated with adRP are expected to encode mutant truncated proteins that are approximately one third or half of the size of wild type protein. Patients with mutations in RP1 showed mild RP with variability in phenotype severity. We also observed several cases of non-penetrant mutations.

  15. Structural study of the effects of mutations in proteins to identify the molecular basis of the loss of local structural fluidity leading to the onset of autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ananya; Ghosh, Semanti; Bagchi, Angshuman

    2017-02-26

    Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs) are crucial in most of the biological processes and PPI dysfunctions are known to be associated with the onsets of various diseases. One of such diseases is the auto-immune disease. Auto-immune diseases are one among the less studied group of diseases with very high mortality rates. Thus, we tried to correlate the appearances of mutations with their probable biochemical basis of the molecular mechanisms leading to the onset of the disease phenotypes. We compared the effects of the Single Amino Acid Variants (SAVs) in the wild type and mutated proteins to identify any structural deformities that might lead to altered PPIs leading ultimately to disease onset. For this we used Relative Solvent Accessibility (RSA) as a spatial parameter to compare the structural perturbation in mutated and wild type proteins. We observed that the mutations were capable to increase intra-chain PPIs whereas inter-chain PPIs would remain mostly unaltered. This might lead to more intra-molecular friction causing a deleterious alteration of protein's normal function. A Lyapunov exponent analysis, using the altered RSA values due to polymorphic and disease causing mutations, revealed polymorphic mutations have a positive mean value for the Lyapunov exponent while disease causing mutations have a negative mean value. Thus, local spatial stochasticity has been lost due to disease causing mutations, indicating a loss of structural fluidity. The amino acid conversion plot also showed a clear tendency of altered surface patch residue conversion propensity than polymorphic conversions. So far, this is the first report that compares the effects of different kinds of mutations (disease and non-disease causing polymorphic mutations) in the onset of autoimmune diseases.

  16. Nephrocystin-5, a ciliary IQ domain protein, is mutated in Senior-Loken syndrome and interacts with RPGR and calmodulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Edgar A; Loeys, Bart; Khanna, Hemant; Hellemans, Jan; Sudbrak, Ralf; Fan, Shuling; Muerb, Ulla; O'Toole, John F; Helou, Juliana; Attanasio, Massimo; Utsch, Boris; Sayer, John A; Lillo, Concepcion; Jimeno, David; Coucke, Paul; De Paepe, Anne; Reinhardt, Richard; Klages, Sven; Tsuda, Motoyuki; Kawakami, Isao; Kusakabe, Takehiro; Omran, Heymut; Imm, Anita; Tippens, Melissa; Raymond, Pamela A; Hill, Jo; Beales, Phil; He, Shirley; Kispert, Andreas; Margolis, Benjamin; Williams, David S; Swaroop, Anand; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2005-03-01

    Nephronophthisis (NPHP) is the most frequent genetic cause of chronic renal failure in children. Identification of four genes mutated in NPHP subtypes 1-4 (refs. 4-9) has linked the pathogenesis of NPHP to ciliary functions. Ten percent of affected individuals have retinitis pigmentosa, constituting the renal-retinal Senior-Loken syndrome (SLSN). Here we identify, by positional cloning, mutations in an evolutionarily conserved gene, IQCB1 (also called NPHP5), as the most frequent cause of SLSN. IQCB1 encodes an IQ-domain protein, nephrocystin-5. All individuals with IQCB1 mutations have retinitis pigmentosa. Hence, we examined the interaction of nephrocystin-5 with RPGR (retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator), which is expressed in photoreceptor cilia and associated with 10-20% of retinitis pigmentosa. We show that nephrocystin-5, RPGR and calmodulin can be coimmunoprecipitated from retinal extracts, and that these proteins localize to connecting cilia of photoreceptors and to primary cilia of renal epithelial cells. Our studies emphasize the central role of ciliary dysfunction in the pathogenesis of SLSN.

  17. Effects of Activating Mutations on EGFR Cellular Protein Turnover and Amino Acid Recycling Determined Using SILAC Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Greig

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid mutations of proteins that are targeted in cancer therapy often lead to drug resistance. Often, the mutation directly affects a drug’s binding site, effectively blocking binding of the drug, but these mutations can have other effects such as changing the protein turnover half-life. Utilizing SILAC MS, we measured the cellular turnover rates of an important non-small cell lung cancer target, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. Wild-type (WT EGFR, EGFR with a single activating mutant (Del 746–750 or L858R, and the drug-resistant double mutant (L858R/T790M EGFR were analyzed. In non-small cell lung cancer cell lines, EGFR turnover rates ranged from 28 hours in A431 cells (WT to 7.5 hours in the PC-9 cells (Del 746–750 mutant. The measurement of EGFR turnover rate in PC-9 cells dosed with irreversible inhibitors has additional complexity due to inhibitor effects on cell viability and results were reported as a range. Finally, essential amino acid recycling (K and R was measured in different cell lines. The recycling was different in each cell line, but the overall inclusion of the effect of amino acid recycling on calculating EGFR turnover rates resulted in a 10–20% reduction in rates.

  18. The Role of Histone Protein Modifications and Mutations in Histone Modifiers in Pediatric B-Cell Progenitor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janczar, Szymon; Janczar, Karolina; Pastorczak, Agata; Harb, Hani; Paige, Adam J. W.; Zalewska-Szewczyk, Beata; Danilewicz, Marian; Mlynarski, Wojciech

    2017-01-01

    While cancer has been long recognized as a disease of the genome, the importance of epigenetic mechanisms in neoplasia was acknowledged more recently. The most active epigenetic marks are DNA methylation and histone protein modifications and they are involved in basic biological phenomena in every cell. Their role in tumorigenesis is stressed by recent unbiased large-scale studies providing evidence that several epigenetic modifiers are recurrently mutated or frequently dysregulated in multiple cancers. The interest in epigenetic marks is especially due to the fact that they are potentially reversible and thus druggable. In B-cell progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) there is a relative paucity of reports on the role of histone protein modifications (acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation) as compared to acute myeloid leukemia, T-cell ALL, or other hematologic cancers, and in this setting chromatin modifications are relatively less well studied and reviewed than DNA methylation. In this paper, we discuss the biomarker associations and evidence for a driver role of dysregulated global and loci-specific histone marks, as well as mutations in epigenetic modifiers in BCP-ALL. Examples of chromatin modifiers recurrently mutated/disrupted in BCP-ALL and associated with disease outcomes include MLL1, CREBBP, NSD2, and SETD2. Altered histone marks and histone modifiers and readers may play a particular role in disease chemoresistance and relapse. We also suggest that epigenetic regulation of B-cell differentiation may have parallel roles in leukemogenesis. PMID:28054944

  19. The mouse rumpshaker mutation of the proteolipid protein in human X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, H.; Hoffman, E.P.; Matise, T.C. [and others

    1994-09-01

    X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia is a rare neurodegenerative disorder characterized by slowly progressive weakness and spasticity of the lower extremities. We have recently genetically analyzed the original X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia family reported by Johnston and McKusick in 1962. We employed a fluorescent multiplex CA repeat strategy using a 22 locus, 10 cM framework map of the human X chromosome and localized the gene within a 36 cM region of Xq2l.3-q24 which includes the PLP locus. Saugier-Veber et al. recently reported a point mutation (His139Tyr) in exon 3B of the PLP gene in an X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia family (SPG2). This family shows no optic atrophy, in contrast to the family we have studied. This data showed that SPG2 and Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease were allelic disorders. We investigated the PLP gene as a candidate gene for the original X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia family using SSCP and direct sequencing methods. We found a point mutation (T to C) in exon 4 of affected males which alters the amino-acid (Ile to Thr) at residue 186. This change was absent in the unaffected males of the family and in 40 unrelated control females (80 X chromosomes). Surprisingly, this mutation is identical to the mutation previously identified in the rumpshaker mouse model. The complete homology between both the mouse and human PLP sequence, and the mouse rumpshaker mutation and human spastic paraplegia mutation in our family, permit direct parallels to be drawn with regards to pathophysiology. Our data indicates that the well-documented and striking clinical differences between Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease and X-linked recessive spastic paraplegia is due to the specific effect of different mutations of the human PLP gene on oligodendrocyte differentiation and development and on later myelin production and maintenance.

  20. Mutations in the gene encoding the PML nuclear body protein Sp110 are associated with immunodeficiency and hepatic veno-occlusive disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Roscioli, Tony; Simon T Cliffe; Bloch, Donald B.; Bell, Christopher G.; Mullan, Glenda; Taylor, Peter J; Sarris, Maria; Wang, Joanne; Donald, Jennifer A.; Kirk, Edwin P; Ziegler, John B.; Salzer, Ulrich; McDonald, George B.; Wong, Melanie; Lindeman, Robert

    2006-01-01

    We describe mutations in the PML nuclear body protein Sp110 in the syndrome veno-occlusive disease with immunodeficiency, an autosomal recessive disorder of severe hypogammaglobulinemia, combined T and B cell immunodeficiency, absent lymph node germinal centers, absent tissue plasma cells and hepatic veno-occlusive disease. This is the first report of the involvement of a nuclear body protein in a human primary immunodeficiency and of high-penetrance genetic mutations in hepatic veno-occlusiv...

  1. Mutation of the cytosolic ribosomal protein-encoding RPS10B gene affects shoot meristematic function in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stirnberg Petra

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant cytosolic ribosomal proteins are encoded by small gene families. Mutants affecting these genes are often viable, but show growth and developmental defects, suggesting incomplete functional redundancy within the families. Dormancy to growth transitions, such as the activation of axillary buds in the shoot, are characterised by co-ordinated upregulation of ribosomal protein genes. Results A recessive mutation in RPS10B, one of three Arabidopsis genes encoding the eukaryote-specific cytoplasmic ribosomal protein S10e, was found to suppress the excessive shoot branching mutant max2-1. rps10b-1 mildly affects the formation and separation of shoot lateral organs, including the shoot axillary meristems. Axillary meristem defects are enhanced when rps10b-1 is combined with mutations in REVOLUTA, AUXIN-RESISTANT1, PINOID or another suppressor of max2-1, FAR-RED ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL3. In some of these double mutants, the maintenance of the primary shoot meristem is also affected. In contrast, mutation of ALTERED MERISTEM PROGRAMME1 suppresses the rps10b-1axillary shoot defect. Defects in both axillary shoot formation and organ separation were enhanced by combining rps10b-1 with cuc3, a mutation affecting one of three Arabidopsis NAC transcription factor genes with partially redundant roles in these processes. To assess the effect of rps10b-1 on bud activation independently from bud formation, axillary bud outgrowth on excised cauline nodes was analysed. The outgrowth rate of untreated buds was reduced only slightly by rps10b-1 in both wild-type and max2-1 backgrounds. However, rps10b-1 strongly suppressed the auxin resistant outgrowth of max2-1 buds. A developmental phenotype of rps10b-1, reduced stamen number, was complemented by the cDNA of another family member, RPS10C, under the RPS10B promoter. Conclusions RPS10B promotes shoot branching mainly by promoting axillary shoot development. It contributes to organ boundary

  2. A mutation in NFkB interacting protein 1 results in cardiomyopathy and abnormal skin development in wa3 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herron, Bruce J; Rao, Cherie; Liu, Shanming; Laprade, Lisa; Richardson, James A; Olivieri, Emily; Semsarian, Chris; Millar, Sarah E; Stubbs, Lisa; Beier, David R

    2005-03-01

    We have identified waved 3 (wa3), a novel recessive mutation that causes abnormalities of the heart and skin. The cardiac defect results in a severe and rapidly progressive dilated cardiomyopathy. We identified the gene mutated in these mice, which we call NFkB interacting protein1 (Nkip1), using positional cloning. Nkip1 is expressed in skin, heart and vascular endothelium and shares homology with a small family of proteins that play a role in the regulation of transcription factors. A C-terminal fragment of this protein was previously identified as the RelA associated inhibitor (RAI). We show that the full-length protein is larger than previously described, and we confirm that it interacts with NFkB in vivo. Expression analysis of genes known to be regulated by NFkB revealed that Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (Icam1) expression is consistently elevated in mutant mice. This result suggests that wa3 mutant mice represent a potentially important model for the analysis of the role of inflammatory processes in heart disease.

  3. Lethal mutations in the major homology region and their suppressors act by modulating the dimerization of the rous sarcoma virus capsid protein C-terminal domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalessio, Paula M; Craven, Rebecca C; Lokhandwala, Parvez M; Ropson, Ira J

    2013-02-01

    An infective retrovirus requires a mature capsid shell around the viral replication complex. This shell is formed by about 1500 capsid protein monomers, organized into hexamer and pentamer rings that are linked to each other by the dimerization of the C-terminal domain (CTD). The major homology region (MHR), the most highly conserved protein sequence across retroviral genomes, is part of the CTD. Several mutations in the MHR appear to block infectivity by preventing capsid formation. Suppressor mutations have been identified that are distant in sequence and structure from the MHR and restore capsid formation. The effects of two lethal and two suppressor mutations on the stability and function of the CTD were examined. No correlation with infectivity was found for the stability of the lethal mutations (D155Y-CTD, F167Y-CTD) and suppressor mutations (R185W-CTD, I190V-CTD). The stabilities of three double mutant proteins (D155Y/R185W-CTD, F167Y/R185W-CTD, and F167Y/I190V-CTD) were additive. However, the dimerization affinity of the mutant proteins correlated strongly with biological function. The CTD proteins with lethal mutations did not dimerize, while those with suppressor mutations had greater dimerization affinity than WT-CTD. The suppressor mutations were able to partially correct the dimerization defect caused by the lethal MHR mutations in double mutant proteins. Despite their dramatic effects on dimerization, none of these residues participate directly in the proposed dimerization interface in a mature capsid. These findings suggest that the conserved sequence of the MHR has critical roles in the conformation(s) of the CTD that are required for dimerization and correct capsid maturation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A novel Lys141Thr mutation in small heat shock protein 22 (HSPB8) gene in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhro, Khriezhanuo; Park, Jin-Mo; Kim, Ye Jin; Yoon, Bo Ram; Yoo, Jeong Hyun; Koo, Heasoo; Choi, Byung-Ok; Chung, Ki Wha

    2013-08-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous peripheral neuropathies. HSPB8 gene encodes heat shock protein 22 (HSP22) which belongs to the superfamily of small stress induced proteins. Mutations in HSPB8 are implicated to CMT2L and distal hereditary motor neuropathy 2A (dHMN2A). All three reported HSPB8 mutations are interestingly located in the Lys141 residue. In the present study, we examined a Korean axonal CMT patient who presented distal limb atrophy, sensory loss, areflexia, and axonal loss of large myelinated fibers. Whole exome sequencing identified a novel missense mutation c.422A>C (p.Lys141Thr) in HSPB8 as the underlying cause of the CMT2 patient. The mutation was regarded as a de novo case because both unaffected parents have no such mutation. The patient with HSPB8 mutation is the first case in Koreans. Clinical heterogeneities have been revealed in patients with Lys141 mutation; the present patient revealed similar phenotype of CMT2L. In addition, the lower limb MRI revealed a similarity between our HSPB8 and HSPB1 patients. It seems that the Lys141 site in the alpha-crystallin domain of HSPB8 is regarded as a mutational hot spot for peripheral neuropathy development, and mutations even in the same codon can exhibit different CMT phenotypes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Nonsense Mutations in SMPX, Encoding a Protein Responsive to Physical Force, Result in X-Chromosomal Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Antje K.; Gandia, Marta; Frommolt, Peter; Maak, Anika; Wicklein, Eva M.; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Wagner, Florian; Viñuela, Antonio; Aguirre, Luis A.; Moreno, Felipe; Maier, Hannes; Rau, Isabella; Gießelmann, Sebastian; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Gal, Andreas; Nürnberg, Peter; Hübner, Christian A.; del Castillo, Ignacio; Kurth, Ingo

    2011-01-01

    The fact that hereditary hearing loss is the most common sensory disorder in humans is reflected by, among other things, an extraordinary allelic and nonallelic genetic heterogeneity. X-chromosomal hearing impairment represents only a minor fraction of all cases. In a study of a Spanish family the locus for one of the X-chromosomal forms was assigned to Xp22 (DFNX4). We mapped the disease locus in the same chromosomal region in a large German pedigree with X-chromosomal nonsyndromic hearing impairment by using genome-wide linkage analysis. Males presented with postlingual hearing loss and onset at ages 3–7, whereas onset in female carriers was in the second to third decades. Targeted DNA capture with high-throughput sequencing detected a nonsense mutation in the small muscle protein, X-linked (SMPX) of affected individuals. We identified another nonsense mutation in SMPX in patients from the Spanish family who were previously analyzed to map DFNX4. SMPX encodes an 88 amino acid, cytoskeleton-associated protein that is responsive to mechanical stress. The presence of Smpx in hair cells and supporting cells of the murine cochlea indicates its role in the inner ear. The nonsense mutations detected in the two families suggest a loss-of-function mechanism underlying this form of hearing impairment. Results obtained after heterologous overexpression of SMPX proteins were compatible with this assumption. Because responsivity to physical force is a characteristic feature of the protein, we propose that long-term maintenance of mechanically stressed inner-ear cells critically depends on SMPX function. PMID:21549336

  6. Structural and functional analyses of disease-causing missense mutations in Bloom syndrome protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Rong-Bing; Rigolet, Pascal; Ren, Hua; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Xing-Dong; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Wang, Peng-Ye; Amor-Gueret, Mounira; Xi, Xu Guang

    2007-01-01

    Bloom syndrome (BS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by genomic instability and the early development of many types of cancer. Missense mutations have been identified in the BLM gene (encoding a RecQ helicase) in affected individuals, but the molecular mechanism and the structural basis of the effects of these mutations remain to be elucidated. We analysed five disease-causing missense mutations that are localized in the BLM helicase core region: Q672R, I841T, C878R, G891E and C901Y. The disease-causing mutants had low ATPase and helicase activities but their ATP binding abilities were normal, except for Q672, whose ATP binding activity was lower than that of the intact BLM helicase. Mutants C878R, mapping near motif IV, and G891E and C901Y, mapping in motif IV, displayed severe DNA-binding defects. We used molecular modelling to analyse these mutations. Our work provides insights into the molecular basis of BLM pathology, and reveals structural elements implicated in coupling DNA binding to ATP hydrolysis and DNA unwinding. Our findings will help to explain the mechanism underlying BLM catalysis and interpreting new BLM causing mutations identified in the future.

  7. Mutations in the latent TGF-beta binding protein 3 (LTBP3) gene cause brachyolmia with amelogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckert, Mathilde; Stoetzel, Corinne; Morkmued, Supawich; Laugel-Haushalter, Virginie; Geoffroy, Véronique; Muller, Jean; Clauss, François; Prasad, Megana K; Obry, Frédéric; Raymond, Jean Louis; Switala, Marzena; Alembik, Yves; Soskin, Sylvie; Mathieu, Eric; Hemmerlé, Joseph; Weickert, Jean-Luc; Dabovic, Branka Brukner; Rifkin, Daniel B; Dheedene, Annelies; Boudin, Eveline; Caluseriu, Oana; Cholette, Marie-Claude; Mcleod, Ross; Antequera, Reynaldo; Gellé, Marie-Paule; Coeuriot, Jean-Louis; Jacquelin, Louis-Frédéric; Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Manière, Marie-Cécile; Van Hul, Wim; Bertola, Debora; Dollé, Pascal; Verloes, Alain; Mortier, Geert; Dollfus, Hélène; Bloch-Zupan, Agnès

    2015-06-01

    Inherited dental malformations constitute a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders. Here, we report on four families, three of them consanguineous, with an identical phenotype, characterized by significant short stature with brachyolmia and hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) with almost absent enamel. This phenotype was first described in 1996 by Verloes et al. as an autosomal recessive form of brachyolmia associated with AI. Whole-exome sequencing resulted in the identification of recessive hypomorphic mutations including deletion, nonsense and splice mutations, in the LTBP3 gene, which is involved in the TGF-beta signaling pathway. We further investigated gene expression during mouse development and tooth formation. Differentiated ameloblasts synthesizing enamel matrix proteins and odontoblasts expressed the gene. Study of an available knockout mouse model showed that the mutant mice displayed very thin to absent enamel in both incisors and molars, hereby recapitulating the AI phenotype in the human disorder.

  8. Uniparental disomy of chromosome 2 resulting in lethal trifunctional protein deficiency due to homozygous alpha-subunit mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiekerkoetter, Ute; Eeds, Angela; Yue, Zou; Haines, Jonathan; Strauss, Arnold W; Summar, Marshall

    2002-12-01

    The mitochondrial trifunctional protein (TFP) is an enzyme complex of the fatty acid beta-oxidation cycle composed of an alpha- and a beta-subunit. The two encoding genes are located in the same region on chromosome 2 (2p23). TFP deficiency due to either alpha- or beta-subunit mutations is characterized by mutational and phenotypic heterogeneity with severe, early-onset, cardiac forms and milder, later-onset, myopathic phenotypes. In two unrelated patients with lethal TFP deficiency, we delineated apparently homozygous alpha-subunit mutations that were present in heterozygous form in both mothers, but not in either biological father. We performed a microsatellite repeat analysis of both patients and their parents using seven chromosome 2-specific polymorphic DNA markers and four nonchromosome 2 markers. In both patients, two chromosome 2-specific markers demonstrated maternal isodisomy of chromosome 2. The other five chromosome 2-specific markers were noninformative in each patient. Inheritance of alleles from chromosomes 4, 5, and 7 was consistent with paternity. These results explain the apparently anomalous pattern of transmission. Six of our 12 known TFP-deficient patients with alpha-subunit mutations have disease due to homozygous changes and two of them via the mechanism of uniparental disomy (UPD) (16.7%). For very rare autosomal recessive diseases, UPD may represent a common mechanism. This study emphasizes the need to confirm mutations in parents whenever possible. TFP deficiency is another disorder that has become manifest due to isodisomy of chromosome 2. This information will impact genetic counseling for these families, reducing greatly the 25% risk normally used for recessive disorders.

  9. A Novel Missense Mutation (L296Q) in Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein Gene Related to Coronary Heart Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke-QinZHENG; Si-ZhongZHANG; LiZHANG; De-JiaHUANG; Lin-ChuanLIAO; Yi-PingHOU

    2004-01-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) is a key participant in the, reverse transport of cholesterol from the peripheral tissues to the liver. To understand the role that CETP gene plays in the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease (CHD), the promoter region, all 16 exons and adjacent intronic regions of CETP gene were screened for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 203 CHD patients and 209 controls by a combination of PCR, denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC),molecular cloning, and DNA sequencing. A novel missense mutation in the CETP geve was identified. This mutation (L296Q) was a T-to-A conversion at codon 296 of exon 10 which replaced the codon for leucine (CTG) with the codon for glutamine (CAG). Association study revealed that L296Q mutation was associated with CHD with a significantly higher mutant allele frequency in the CHD patients than that in the controls (0.160 vs. 0.091,x2=9.014, P=0.003), and that the odds ratio for the development of CHD was 1.83 for the 296Q allele carriers relative to 296LL homozygotes. Statistical analyses demonstrated thai the mutant 296Q allele carrier patients displayed significantly higher total cholesterol (TC) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) concentrations than non-carrier patients. The results of the present study suggest that the L296Q mutation is related to CHD, and the identification of new mutations in the CETP gene will afford the opportunity to investigate the relationship between CETP gene and CHD.

  10. A cis-regulatory mutation in troponin-I of Drosophila reveals the importance of proper stoichiometry of structural proteins during muscle assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdaus, Hena; Mohan, Jayaram; Naz, Sarwat; Arathi, Prabhashankar; Ramesh, Saraf R; Nongthomba, Upendra

    2015-05-01

    Rapid and high wing-beat frequencies achieved during insect flight are powered by the indirect flight muscles, the largest group of muscles present in the thorax. Any anomaly during the assembly and/or structural impairment of the indirect flight muscles gives rise to a flightless phenotype. Multiple mutagenesis screens in Drosophila melanogaster for defective flight behavior have led to the isolation and characterization of mutations that have been instrumental in the identification of many proteins and residues that are important for muscle assembly, function, and disease. In this article, we present a molecular-genetic characterization of a flightless mutation, flightless-H (fliH), originally designated as heldup-a (hdp-a). We show that fliH is a cis-regulatory mutation of the wings up A (wupA) gene, which codes for the troponin-I protein, one of the troponin complex proteins, involved in regulation of muscle contraction. The mutation leads to reduced levels of troponin-I transcript and protein. In addition to this, there is also coordinated reduction in transcript and protein levels of other structural protein isoforms that are part of the troponin complex. The altered transcript and protein stoichiometry ultimately culminates in unregulated acto-myosin interactions and a hypercontraction muscle phenotype. Our results shed new insights into the importance of maintaining the stoichiometry of structural proteins during muscle assembly for proper function with implications for the identification of mutations and disease phenotypes in other species, including humans.

  11. Mutation in the novel nuclear-encoded mitochondrial protein CHCHD10 in a family with autosomal dominant mitochondrial myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajroud-Driss, Senda; Fecto, Faisal; Ajroud, Kaouther; Lalani, Irfan; Calvo, Sarah E; Mootha, Vamsi K; Deng, Han-Xiang; Siddique, Nailah; Tahmoush, Albert J; Heiman-Patterson, Terry D; Siddique, Teepu

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial myopathies belong to a larger group of systemic diseases caused by morphological or biochemical abnormalities of mitochondria. Mitochondrial disorders can be caused by mutations in either the mitochondrial or nuclear genome. Only 5% of all mitochondrial disorders are autosomal dominant. We analyzed DNA from members of the previously reported Puerto Rican kindred with an autosomal dominant mitochondrial myopathy (Heimann-Patterson et al. 1997). Linkage analysis suggested a putative locus on the pericentric region of the long arm of chromosome 22 (22q11). Using the tools of integrative genomics, we established chromosome 22 open reading frame 16 (C22orf16) (later designated as CHCHD10) as the only high-scoring mitochondrial candidate gene in our minimal candidate region. Sequence analysis revealed a double-missense mutation (R15S and G58R) in cis in CHCHD10 which encodes a coiled coil-helix-coiled coil-helix protein of unknown function. These two mutations completely co-segregated with the disease phenotype and were absent in 1,481 Caucasian and 80 Hispanic (including 32 Puerto Rican) controls. Expression profiling showed that CHCHD10 is enriched in skeletal muscle. Mitochondrial localization of the CHCHD10 protein was confirmed using immunofluorescence in cells expressing either wild-type or mutant CHCHD10. We found that the expression of the G58R, but not the R15S, mutation induced mitochondrial fragmentation. Our findings identify a novel gene causing mitochondrial myopathy, thereby expanding the spectrum of mitochondrial myopathies caused by nuclear genes. Our findings also suggest a role for CHCHD10 in the morphologic remodeling of the mitochondria.

  12. GCK-MODY diabetes as a protein misfolding disease: the mutation R275C promotes protein misfolding, self-association and cellular degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negahdar, Maria; Aukrust, Ingvild; Molnes, Janne; Solheim, Marie H; Johansson, Bente B; Sagen, Jørn V; Dahl-Jørgensen, Knut; Kulkarni, Rohit N; Søvik, Oddmund; Flatmark, Torgeir; Njølstad, Pål R; Bjørkhaug, Lise

    2014-01-25

    GCK-MODY, dominantly inherited mild hyperglycemia, is associated with more than 600 mutations in the glucokinase gene. Different molecular mechanisms have been shown to explain GCK-MODY. Here, we report a Pakistani family harboring the glucokinase mutation c.823C>T (p.R275C). The recombinant and in cellulo expressed mutant pancreatic enzyme revealed slightly increased enzyme activity (kcat) and normal affinity for α-D-glucose, and resistance to limited proteolysis by trypsin comparable with wild-type. When stably expressed in HEK293 cells and MIN6 β-cells (at different levels), the mutant protein appeared misfolded and unstable with a propensity to form dimers and aggregates. Its degradation rate was increased, involving the lysosomal and proteasomal quality control systems. On mutation, a hydrogen bond between the R275 side-chain and the carbonyl oxygen of D267 is broken, destabilizing the F260-L271 loop structure and the protein. This promotes the formation of dimers/aggregates and suggests that an increased cellular degradation is the molecular mechanism by which R275C causes GCK-MODY.

  13. Volume-based solvation models out-perform area-based models in combined studies of wild-type and mutated protein-protein interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warwicker Jim

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Empirical binding models have previously been investigated for the energetics of protein complexation (ΔG models and for the influence of mutations on complexation (i.e. differences between wild-type and mutant complexes, ΔΔG models. We construct binding models to directly compare these processes, which have generally been studied separately. Results Although reasonable fit models were found for both ΔG and ΔΔG cases, they differ substantially. In a dataset curated for the absence of mainchain rearrangement upon binding, non-polar area burial is a major determinant of ΔG models. However this ΔG model does not fit well to the data for binding differences upon mutation. Burial of non-polar area is weighted down in fitting of ΔΔG models. These calculations were made with no repacking of sidechains upon complexation, and only minimal packing upon mutation. We investigated the consequences of more extensive packing changes with a modified mean-field packing scheme. Rather than emphasising solvent exposure with relatively extended sidechains, rotamers are selected that exhibit maximal packing with protein. This provides solvent accessible areas for proteins that are much closer to those of experimental structures than the more extended sidechain regime. The new packing scheme increases changes in non-polar burial for mutants compared to wild-type proteins, but does not substantially improve agreement between ΔG and ΔΔG binding models. Conclusion We conclude that solvent accessible area, based on modelled mutant structures, is a poor correlate for ΔΔG upon mutation. A simple volume-based, rather than solvent accessibility-based, model is constructed for ΔG and ΔΔG systems. This shows a more consistent behaviour. We discuss the efficacy of volume, as opposed to area, approaches to describe the energetic consequences of mutations at interfaces. This knowledge can be used to develop simple computational screens for

  14. Smoking correlates with increased cytoskeletal protein-related coding region mutations in the lung and head and neck datasets of the cancer genome atlas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavorski, John M; Blanck, George

    2016-12-01

    Cancer from smoking tobacco is considered dependent on mutagens, but significant molecular aspects of smoking-specific, cancer development remain unknown. We defined sets of coding regions for oncoproteins, tumor suppressor proteins, and cytoskeletal-related proteins that were compared between nonsmokers and smokers, for mutation occurrences, in the lung adenocarcinoma (LUAD), head and neck squamous carcinoma (HNSC), bladder carcinoma (BLCA), and pancreatic adenocarcinoma ( PAAD) datasets from the cancer genome atlas (TCGA). We uncovered significant differences in overall mutation rates, and in mutation rates in cytoskeletal protein-related coding regions (CPCRs, including extracellular matrix protein coding regions), between nonsmokers and smokers in LUAD and HNSC (P < 0.001), raising the question of whether the CPCR mutation differences lead to different clinical courses for nonsmoker and smoker cancers. Another important question inspired by these results is, whether high smoker cancer mutation rates would facilitate genotoxicity or neoantigen-based therapies. No significant, mutation-based differences were found in the BLCA or PAAD datasets, between nonsmokers and smokers. However, a significant difference was uncovered for the average number of overall cancer mutations, in LUAD, for persons who stopped smoking more than 15 years ago, compared with more recent smokers (P < 0.032).

  15. Mutations of C-reactive protein (CRP) -286 SNP, APC and p53 in colorectal cancer: implication for a CRP-Wnt crosstalk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hai-Xiang; Zhou, Hai-Hong; Wang, Ming-Yu; Cheng, Jin; Zhang, Shi-Chao; Hui, Feng; Chen, Xue-Zhong; Liu, Shan-Hui; Liu, Qin-Jiang; Zhu, Zi-Jiang; Hu, Qing-Rong; Wu, Yi; Ji, Shang-Rong

    2014-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an established marker of inflammation with pattern-recognition receptor-like activities. Despite the close association of the serum level of CRP with the risk and prognosis of several types of cancer, it remains elusive whether CRP contributes directly to tumorigenesis or just represents a bystander marker. We have recently identified recurrent mutations at the SNP position -286 (rs3091244) in the promoter of CRP gene in several tumor types, instead suggesting that locally produced CRP is a potential driver of tumorigenesis. However, it is unknown whether the -286 site is the sole SNP position of CRP gene targeted for mutation and whether there is any association between CRP SNP mutations and other frequently mutated genes in tumors. Herein, we have examined the genotypes of three common CRP non-coding SNPs (rs7553007, rs1205, rs3093077) in tumor/normal sample pairs of 5 cancer types (n = 141). No recurrent somatic mutations are found at these SNP positions, indicating that the -286 SNP mutations are preferentially selected during the development of cancer. Further analysis reveals that the -286 SNP mutations of CRP tend to co-occur with mutated APC particularly in rectal cancer (p = 0.04; n = 67). By contrast, mutations of CRP and p53 or K-ras appear to be unrelated. There results thus underscore the functional importance of the -286 mutation of CRP in tumorigenesis and imply an interaction between CRP and Wnt signaling pathway.

  16. Mutations in the human adenosine deaminase gene that affect protein structure and RNA splicing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akeson, A.L.; Wiginton, D.A.; States, C.J.; Perme, C.M.; Dusing, M.R.; Hutton, J.J.

    1987-08-01

    Adenosine deaminase deficiency is one cause of the genetic disease severe combined immunodeficiency. To identify mutations responsible for ADA deficiency, the authors synthesized cDNAs to ADA mRNAs from two cell lines, GM2756 and GM2825A, derived from ADA-deficient immunodeficient patients. Sequence analysis of GM2756 cDNA clones revealed a different point mutation in each allele that causes amino acid changes of alanine to valine and arginine to histidine. One allele of GM2825A also has a point mutation that causes an alanine to valine substitution. The other allele of GM2825A was found to produce an mRNA in which exon 4 had been spliced out but had no other detrimental mutations. S1 nuclease mapping of GM2825A mRNA showed equal abundance of the full-length ADA mRNA and the ADA mRNA that was missing exon 4. Several of the ADA cDNA clones extended 5' of the major initiation start site, indicating multiple start sites for ADA transcription. The point mutations in GM2756 and GM2825A and the absence of exon 4 in GM2825A appear to be directly responsible for the ADA deficiency. Comparison of a number of normal and mutant ADA cDNA sequences showed a number of changes in the third base of codons. These change do not affect the amino acid sequence. Analyses of ADA cDNAs from different cell lines detected aberrant RNA species that either included intron 7 or excluded exon 7. Their presence is a result of aberrant splicing of pre-mRNAs and is not related to mutations that cause ADA deficiency.

  17. LDL receptor-GFP fusion proteins: new tools for the characterization of disease-causing mutations in the LDL receptor gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Henrik Uffe; Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik; Corydon, Thomas Juhl;

    2001-01-01

    The function of a series of LDL receptor GFP fusion proteins with different, flexible, unstructured spacer regions was analysed. An optimised version of the fusion protein was used to analyse the effect of a LDL receptor mutation (W556S) found in FH patients and characterized as transport defective....... In cultured liver cells this mutation was found to inhibit the transport of LDL receptor GFP fusion protein to the cell surface, thus leading to impaired internalisation of fluorescent labelled LDL. Co-locallisation studies confirmed the retention of the mutant protein in the endoplasmic reticulum....

  18. Resistance to cyclosporin A derives from mutations in hepatitis C virus nonstructural proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Masaaki; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Takagi, Asako; Tobita, Yoshimi; Inoue, Kazuaki; Kohara, Michinori

    2014-05-23

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) is an immunosuppressive drug that targets cyclophilins, cellular cofactors that regulate the immune system. Replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is suppressed by CsA, but the molecular basis of this suppression is still not fully understood. To investigate this suppression, we cultured HCV replicon cells (Con1, HCV genotype 1b, FLR-N cell) in the presence of CsA and obtained nine CsA-resistant FLR-N cell lines. We determined full-length HCV sequences for all nine clones, and chose two (clones #6 and #7) of the nine clones that have high replication activity in the presence of CsA for further analysis. Both clones showed two consensus mutations, one in NS3 (T1280V) and the other in NS5A (D2292E). Characterization of various mutants indicated that the D2292E mutation conferred resistance to high concentrations of CsA (up to 2 μM). In addition, the missense mutation T1280V contributed to the recovery of colony formation activity. The effects of these mutations are also evident in two established HCV replicon cell lines-HCV-RMT ([1], genotype 1a) and JFH1 (genotype 2a). Moreover, three other missense mutations in NS5A-D2303H, S2362G, and E2414K-enhanced the resistance to CsA conferred by D2292E; these double or all quadruple mutants could resist approximately 8- to 25-fold higher concentrations of CsA than could wild-type Con1. These four mutations, either as single or combinations, also made Con1 strain resistant to two other cyclophilin inhibitors, N-methyl-4-isoleucine-cyclosporin (NIM811) or Debio-025. Interestingly, the changes in IC50 values that resulted from each of these mutations were the lowest in the Debio-025-treated cells, indicating its highest resistant activity against the adaptive mutation. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The importance of making ends meet: mutations in genes and altered expression of proteins of the MRN complex and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzikiewicz-Krawczyk, Agnieszka

    2008-01-01

    The MRN protein complex, consisting of MRE1, RAD50 and NBS1, plays a crucial role in sensing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), and it is involved in cell cycle control. This makes the MRN complex an important guard of genome stability. Hypomorphic mutations in NBS1 result in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS), which is characterized by, among other things, an increased predisposition to malignancies, especially leukemia/lymphoma. Relatives of NBS patients carrying heterozygous mutations are also more prone to cancer development. This review summarizes several studies searching for associations between heterozygous mutations in NBS1, MRE11, and RAD50 and cancer and examining the levels of expression of proteins coded by these genes in tumor tissues. The results indicate that both decreased and increased expression of NBS1 may contribute to tumorigenesis, whereas overexpressed RAD50 has an anti-tumoric effect. MRE11 and RAD50 are also affected in tumors with microsatellite instability. However, the outcomes of association studies, which concerned primarily lymphomas/leukemias and breast cancer, were inconclusive. Heterozygous NBS1 mutations and molecular variants 657del5, I171V, R215W and E185Q were most commonly analyzed. Among these, an association with cancer was found most frequently for 657del5 (in leukemia/lymphoma and breast cancer) and I171V (in leukemia, breast, head and neck and colorectal cancers); however, other studies gave contradictory results. For other NBS1 as well as MRE11 and RAD50 variants, too little data were available to assess their role in cancer risk. Overall, the results suggest that heterozygous MRN complex mutations and molecular variants may contribute only to a limited fraction of tumors. This may be caused by several factors: various frequencies of the variants in specific populations, different criteria used for selection of control groups, possible effects of environmental factors, and potential interactions with variants of other

  20. Active site mutations in yeast protein disulfide isomerase cause dithiothreitol sensitivity and a reduced rate of protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, B; Tachibana, C; Winther, Jakob R.

    1997-01-01

    Aspects of protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) function have been studied in yeast in vivo. PDI contains two thioredoxin-like domains, a and a', each of which contains an active-site CXXC motif. The relative importance of the two domains was analyzed by rendering each one inactive by mutation to SGAS....... Such mutations had no significant effect on growth. The domains however, were not equivalent since the rate of folding of carboxypeptidase Y (CPY) in vivo was reduced by inactivation of the a domain but not the a' domain. To investigate the relevance of PDI redox potential, the G and H positions of each CGHC...... active site were randomly mutagenized. The resulting mutant PDIs were ranked by their growth phenotype on medium containing increasing concentrations of DTT. The rate of CPY folding in the mutants showed the same ranking as the DTT sensitivity, suggesting that the oxidative power of PDI is an important...

  1. The Mu2e crystal calorimeter and improvements in the $\\mu^-\\mbox{N} \\to e^-\\mbox{N}$ search sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pezzullo, Gianantonio [Univ. of Pisa (Italy)

    2016-01-01

    The Mu2e experiment will search for Charged Lepton Flavor Violation (CLFV) looking at the conversion of a muon into an electron in the field of an aluminum nucleus. About $7\\cdot 10^{17}$ muons, provided by a dedicated muon beam line in construction at the Fermi National Accelarator Laboratory (Fermilab), will be stopped in 3 years in the Aluminum target. The corresponding single event sensitivity will be $2.5\\cdot 10^{-17}$. The Standard Model of particle physics, even extendend to include the finite neutrino masses, predicts the ratio Rμe between muon conversions and muon nuclear captures to be $\\sim 10^{- 52}$. Several extensions of the Standard Model predict Rμe to be in the range of $10^{-14} - 10^{-18}$. % The current best experimental limit, set by the SINDRUM II experiment is $7 \\cdot 10^{-13}$ @ $90\\%$ CL. The Mu2e experiment plans to improve this experimental limit by four order of magnitude to test many of the possible extensions of the Standard Model. To reach this ambitious goal, the Mu2e experiment is expected to use an intense pulsed muon beam, and rely on a detector system composed of a straw tube tracker and a calorimeter made of pure CsI crystals. The calorimeter plays a central role in the Mu2e measurement, providing particle identification capabilities that are necessary for rejecting two of the most dangerous background sources that can mimic the μ⁻N → e⁻N conversion electron: cosmic muons and $\\bar{p}$ induced background. The calorimeter information allows also to improve the tracking performance. Thanks to a calorimeter-seeded track finder algorithm, it is possible to increase the track reconstruction efficiency, and make it more robust with respect to the occupancy level. Expected performances of the calorimeter have been studied in a beam test at the Beam Test Facility in Frascati (Rome, Italy). A reduced scale calorimeter prototype has been exposed to an electron beam, with energy varying from 80 to 140

  2. Role of the Tomato Non-Ripening Mutation in Regulating Fruit Quality Elucidated Using iTRAQ Protein Profile Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xin-Yu; Wang, Rui-Heng; Zhao, Xiao-Dan; Luo, Yun-Bo; Fu, Da-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Natural mutants of the Non-ripening (Nor) gene repress the normal ripening of tomato fruit. The molecular mechanism of fruit ripening regulation by the Nor gene is unclear. To elucidate how the Nor gene can affect ripening and fruit quality at the protein level, we used the fruits of Nor mutants and wild-type Ailsa Craig (AC) to perform iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation) analysis. The Nor mutation altered tomato fruit ripening and affected quality in various respects, including ethylene biosynthesis by down-regulating the abundance of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase (ACO), pigment biosynthesis by repressing phytoene synthase 1 (PSY1), ζ-carotene isomerase (Z-ISO), chalcone synthase 1 (CHS1) and other proteins, enhancing fruit firmness by increasing the abundance of cellulose synthase protein, while reducing those of polygalacturonase 2 (PG2) and pectate lyase (PL), altering biosynthesis of nutrients such as carbohydrates, amino acids, and anthocyanins. Conversely, Nor mutation also enhanced the fruit’s resistance to some pathogens by up-regulating the expression of several genes associated with stress and defense. Therefore, the Nor gene is involved in the regulation of fruit ripening and quality. It is useful in the future as a means to improve fruit quality in tomato. PMID:27732677

  3. Differential regulation of hepatitis B virus core protein expression and genome replication by a small upstream open reading frame and naturally occurring mutations in the precore region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Li; Qin, Yanli; Jia, Haodi; Ye, Lei; Wang, Yongxiang; Zhang, Jiming; Wands, Jack R; Tong, Shuping; Li, Jisu

    2017-05-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) transcribes two subsets of 3.5-kb RNAs: precore RNA for hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) expression, and pregenomic RNA for core and P protein translation as well as genome replication. HBeAg expression could be prevented by mutations in the precore region, while an upstream open reading frame (uORF) has been proposed as a negative regulator of core protein translation. We employed replication competent HBV DNA constructs and transient transfection experiments in Huh7 cells to verify the uORF effect and to explore the alternative function of precore RNA. Optimized Kozak sequence for the uORF or extra ATG codons as present in some HBV genotypes reduced core protein expression. G1896A nonsense mutation promoted more efficient core protein expression than mutated precore ATG, while a +1 frameshift mutation was ineffective. In conclusion, various HBeAg-negative precore mutations and mutations affecting uORF differentially regulate core protein expression and genome replication. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. CHD8 interacts with CHD7, a protein which is mutated in CHARGE syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batsukh, Tserendulam; Pieper, Lasse; Koszucka, Anna M.; von Velsen, Nina; Hoyer-Fender, Sigrid; Elbracht, Miriam; Bergman, Jorieke E. H.; Hoefsloot, Lies H.; Pauli, Silke

    2010-01-01

    CHARGE syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder caused in about two-third of cases by mutations in the CHD7 gene. For other genetic diseases e.g. hereditary spastic paraplegia, it was shown that interacting partners are involved in the underlying cause of the disease. These data encouraged us to s

  5. The novel C-terminal KCNQ1 mutation M520R alters protein trafficking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, Nicole; Calloe, Kirstine; Nielsen, Nathalie Hélix

    2007-01-01

    The long QT-syndrome is characterized by a prolongation of the QT-interval and tachyarrhythmias causing syncopes and sudden death. We identified the missense mutation M520R in the calmodulin binding domain of the Kv7.1 channel from a German family with long QT-syndrome. Heterologous expression of...

  6. [Point mutations of genes encoding proteins involvedin RNA splicing in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barańska, Marta; Czerwińska-Rybak, Joanna; Gil, Lidia; Komarnicki, Mieczysław

    2015-01-01

    The myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) constitute heterogeneous group of clonal disorders, characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, peripheral cytopenia and increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia development. Molecular mechanisms behind MDS have not been fully explained, however recent studies based on new technologies confirmed that epigenetic abnormalities and somatic mutation in the spliceasome machinery are crucial in pathogenesis of these diseases. Abnormal mRNA splicing (excision of intronic sequences from mRNA) has been found in over half of all MDS patients and resulted in accumulation of cytogenetical and molecular changes. The biological impact of splicing factor genes mutations has been evaluated only in a limited extend and current studies concentrate on analysis of MDS transcriptome. Molecular characteristic of classical and alternative splicing is presented in the paper, according to current knowledge. We review the most prominent findings from recent years concerning mutation in the spliceasome machinery with respect to MDS phenotype and disease prognosis. Perspectives in applying of novel diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities for myelodysplasia, based on spliceosome mutations identification are also presented.

  7. Mutations in the polyglutamine binding protein 1 gene cause X-linked mental retardation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalscheuer, Vera M; Freude, Kristine; Musante, Luciana

    2003-01-01

    We found mutations in the gene PQBP1 in 5 of 29 families with nonsyndromic (MRX) and syndromic (MRXS) forms of X-linked mental retardation (XLMR). Clinical features in affected males include mental retardation, microcephaly, short stature, spastic paraplegia and midline defects. PQBP1 has previou...

  8. Germline inactivating mutations of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein gene in a large cohort of sporadic acromegaly: mutations are found in a subset of young patients with macroadenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazabat, Laure; Libè, Rossella; Perlemoine, Karine; René-Corail, Fernande; Burnichon, Nelly; Gimenez-Roqueplo, Anne-Paule; Dupasquier-Fediaevsky, Laurence; Bertagna, Xavier; Clauser, Eric; Chanson, Philippe; Bertherat, Jérôme; Raffin-Sanson, Marie-Laure

    2007-07-01

    Germline mutations of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein gene (AIP) have recently been described in three families with GH or prolactin-secreting tumors, as well as in a few patients with apparently sporadic somatotropinomas. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of AIP mutations in a large cohort of patients with apparently sporadic GH-secreting tumors. One hundred and fifty-four patients were included in a prospective cohort designed to study the genetic predisposition to GH-secreting tumors together with 270 controls. In all these subjects, the entire coding sequence of the AIP gene was screened for germline mutations. AIP mutations were detected in 5 out of 154 patients (3%): nonsense mutations in exon 4 (p.Lys201X; n = 2) and in exon 6 (p.Arg304X), one deletion in exon 3 (c.404delA; pHis135LeufsX21), and one mutation affecting the splice acceptor site of exon 4 (c.469-2 A > G). The five patients with an AIP mutation were significantly younger (mean age +/- S.D.: 25 +/- 10 vs 43 +/- 14 years, P = 0.005) and three of them presented with gigantism. One missense mutation (p.Arg304Gln) was found in a single patient that was absent in all controls. Germline mutations of the AIP gene were found in a small proportion of patients with sporadic pituitary somatotropinomas. This study shows that age and gigantism are simple clinical features which can help to select patients for mutation screening. It also supports the role of AIP in pituitary tumorigenesis.

  9. Connecting Sarcomere Protein Mutations to Pathogenesis in Cardiomyopathies: The Development of ‘Disease in a Dish’ Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Zaunbrecher

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent technological and protocol developments have greatly increased the ability to utilize stem cells transformed into cardiomyocytes as models to study human heart muscle development and how this is affected by disease associated mutations in a variety of sarcomere proteins. In this perspective we provide an overview of these emerging technologies and how they are being used to create better models of ‘disease in a dish’ for both research and screening assays. We also consider the value of these assays as models to explore the seminal processes in initiation of the disease development and the possibility of early interventions.

  10. HotSpot Wizard 2.0: automated design of site-specific mutations and smart libraries in protein engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendl, Jaroslav; Stourac, Jan; Sebestova, Eva; Vavra, Ondrej; Musil, Milos; Brezovsky, Jan; Damborsky, Jiri

    2016-07-01

    HotSpot Wizard 2.0 is a web server for automated identification of hot spots and design of smart libraries for engineering proteins' stability, catalytic activity, substrate specificity and enantioselectivity. The server integrates sequence, structural and evolutionary information obtained from 3 databases and 20 computational tools. Users are guided through the processes of selecting hot spots using four different protein engineering strategies and optimizing the resulting library's size by narrowing down a set of substitutions at individual randomized positions. The only required input is a query protein structure. The results of the calculations are mapped onto the protein's structure and visualized with a JSmol applet. HotSpot Wizard lists annotated residues suitable for mutagenesis and can automatically design appropriate codons for each implemented strategy. Overall, HotSpot Wizard provides comprehensive annotations of protein structures and assists protein engineers with the rational design of site-specific mutations and focused libraries. It is freely available at http://loschmidt.chemi.muni.cz/hotspotwizard.

  11. Mutational analysis of the coding regions of the genes encoding protein kinase B-alpha and -beta, phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1, phosphatase targeting to glycogen, protein phosphatase inhibitor-1, and glycogenin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L; Fjordvang, H; Rasmussen, S K

    1999-01-01

    be caused by genetic variability in the genes encoding proteins shown by biochemical evidence to be involved in insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis in skeletal muscle. In 70 insulin-resistant Danish NIDDM patients, mutational analysis by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction-single strand...... conformation polymorphism-heteroduplex analysis was performed on genomic DNA or skeletal muscle-derived cDNAs encoding glycogenin, protein phosphatase inhibitor-1, phophatase targeting to glycogen, protein kinase B-alpha and -beta, and the phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1. Although a number...

  12. Synthesis and Characterization of Mixed Chalcogen Triangular Complexes with New Mo-3(mu(3)-S)(mu(2)-Se-2)(3)(4+) and M-3(mu(3)-S)mu(2)-Se)(3)(4+) (M = Mo, W) Cluster Cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gushchin, Artem; Ooi, Bee Lean; Harris, Pernille

    2009-01-01

    with II and contains the new Mo-3(mu(3)-S)Se-6(4+) cluster core. By treatment of a 4 M Hpts solution of I with PPh3 followed by cation-exchange chromatography, the new mixed chalcogenido-molybdenum aqua ion, [Mo-3(mu S--(3))(mu(2)-Se)(3)(H2O)(9)](4+), was isolated and characterized using UV-vis...... all-selenide analogue (Bu4N)(3){[Mo-3(mu(3)-Se)(mu(2)-Se-2)(3)Br--(6)]Br} (II) was prepared from Mo3Se7Br4 in a similar way. Both compounds were characterized by IR, Raman, and Se-77 NMR spectroscopy. The structure of 11 was determined by X-ray single-crystal analysis. Compound I is isostructural...... spectroscopy and, after derivatization into [Mo-3(mu S--(3))(mu(2)-Se)(3)(acac)(3)(py(3))](+), electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. From HCl solutions of the aqua ion, a supramolecular adduct with cucurbit[6]uril (CB[6]), {[Mo-3(mu(3)-S)(mu(2)-Se)(3)(H2O)(6)Cl-3](2)CB[6]}Cl-2 center dot 11H(2)O (III...

  13. A Novel SMAD4 Mutation Causing Severe Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome with Protein Losing Enteropathy, Immunodeficiency, and Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Johansson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS is a rare genetic disorder characterized by juvenile polyps of the gastrointestinal tract. We present a new pathogenic mutation of the SMAD4 gene and illustrate the need for a multidisciplinary health care approach to facilitate the correct diagnosis. The patient, a 47-year-old Caucasian woman, was diagnosed with anaemia at the age of 12. During the following 30 years, she developed numerous gastrointestinal polyps. The patient underwent several operations, and suffered chronic abdominal pain, malnutrition, and multiple infections. Screening of the SMAD4 gene revealed a novel, disease-causing mutation. In 2012, the patient suffered hypoalbuminemia and a large polyp in the small bowel was found. Gamma globulin was given but the patient responded with fever and influenza-like symptoms and refused more treatment. The patient underwent surgery in 2014 and made an uneventful recovery. At follow-up two months later albumin was 38 g/L and IgG was 6.9 g/L. Accurate diagnosis is essential for medical care. For patients with complex symptomatology, often with rare diseases, this is best provided by multidisciplinary teams including representatives from clinical genetics. Patients with a SMAD4 mutation should be followed up both for JPS and haemorrhagic hereditary telangiectasia and may develop protein loosing enteropathy and immunodeficiency.

  14. A Novel SMAD4 Mutation Causing Severe Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome with Protein Losing Enteropathy, Immunodeficiency, and Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Joel; Sahin, Christofer; Pestoff, Rebecka; Ignatova, Simone; Forsberg, Pia; Edsjö, Anders; Ekstedt, Mattias; Stenmark Askmalm, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by juvenile polyps of the gastrointestinal tract. We present a new pathogenic mutation of the SMAD4 gene and illustrate the need for a multidisciplinary health care approach to facilitate the correct diagnosis. The patient, a 47-year-old Caucasian woman, was diagnosed with anaemia at the age of 12. During the following 30 years, she developed numerous gastrointestinal polyps. The patient underwent several operations, and suffered chronic abdominal pain, malnutrition, and multiple infections. Screening of the SMAD4 gene revealed a novel, disease-causing mutation. In 2012, the patient suffered hypoalbuminemia and a large polyp in the small bowel was found. Gamma globulin was given but the patient responded with fever and influenza-like symptoms and refused more treatment. The patient underwent surgery in 2014 and made an uneventful recovery. At follow-up two months later albumin was 38 g/L and IgG was 6.9 g/L. Accurate diagnosis is essential for medical care. For patients with complex symptomatology, often with rare diseases, this is best provided by multidisciplinary teams including representatives from clinical genetics. Patients with a SMAD4 mutation should be followed up both for JPS and haemorrhagic hereditary telangiectasia and may develop protein loosing enteropathy and immunodeficiency. PMID:25705527

  15. Identification of a mutation in the tyrosinase related protein 1 (TRP1) gene associated with brown oculocutaneous albinism (OCA3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wildenberg, S.C.; Oetting, W.S.; Fryer, J.P. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The genes responsible for the two most common types of human oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) have been identified. Mutations of the tyrosinase gene (chromosome 11q14-21) produce OCA1, and mutations of the P gene (chromosome 15q11.2-13) produce OCA2. Another type of OCA known as brown OCA or OCA3 is found commonly in the African and African-American population. OCA3 is characterized by light brown skin and hair with the ocular features of albinism and represents the third most frequent type of OCA. We previously identified dizygotic African-American twin boys who were discordant for OCA3. Melanocytes from the affected twin produced brown melanin and contained no detectable TRP1 protein. We have now characterized the TRP1 gene from the affected twin. The human TRP1 gene, homologous to the murine brown locus, contains 8 exons and maps to chromosome 9p23. Using PCR amplification of each exon coupled with SSCP analysis and direct DNA sequencing, we found the affected twin to homozygous for a single bp deletion in exon 6. The deletion removes a G in codon 368 leading to a premature stop at codon 384. We also identified a Tsp509 polymorphism in the 3{prime} UTR. We conclude that mutations of the TRP1 gene are responsible for brown OCA or OCA3, making this the third major OCA gene identified in humans.

  16. Mapping Flexibility and the Assembly Switch of Cell Division Protein FtsZ by Computational and Mutational Approaches*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Galiano, Antonio J.; Buey, Rubén M.; Cabezas, Marta; Andreu, José M.

    2010-01-01

    The molecular switch for nucleotide-regulated assembly and disassembly of the main prokaryotic cell division protein FtsZ is unknown despite the numerous crystal structures that are available. We have characterized the functional motions in FtsZ with a computational consensus of essential dynamics, structural comparisons, sequence conservation, and networks of co-evolving residues. Employing this information, we have constructed 17 mutants, which alter the FtsZ functional cycle at different stages, to modify FtsZ flexibility. The mutant phenotypes ranged from benign to total inactivation and included increased GTPase, reduced assembly, and stabilized assembly. Six mutations clustering at the long cleft between the C-terminal β-sheet and core helix H7 deviated FtsZ assembly into curved filaments with inhibited GTPase, which still polymerize cooperatively. These mutations may perturb the predicted closure of the C-terminal domain onto H7 required for switching between curved and straight association modes and for GTPase activation. By mapping the FtsZ assembly switch, this work also gives insight into FtsZ druggability because the curved mutations delineate the putative binding site of the promising antibacterial FtsZ inhibitor PC190723. PMID:20472561

  17. Y682 mutation of amyloid precursor protein promotes endo-lysosomal dysfunction by disrupting APP-SorLA interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Rosario La Rosa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The intracellular transport and localization of amyloid precursor protein (APP are critical determinants of APP processing and β-amyloid peptide production, thus crucially important for the pathophysiology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Notably, the C-terminal Y682ENPTY687 domain of APP binds to specific adaptors controlling APP trafficking and sorting in neurons. Mutation on the Y682 residue to glycine (Y682G leads to altered APP sorting in hippocampal neurons that favors its accumulation in intracellular compartments and the release of soluble APPα. Such alterations induce premature aging and learning and cognitive deficits in APP Y682G mutant mice (APPYG/YG. Here, we report that Y682G mutation affects formation of the APP complex with sortilin-related receptor (SorLA, resulting in endo-lysosomal dysfunctions and neuronal degeneration. Moreover, disruption of the APP/SorLA complex changes the trafficking pathway of SorLA, with its consequent increase in secretion outside neurons. Mutations in the SorLA gene are a prognostic factor in AD, and increases in SorLA levels in cerebrospinal fluid are predictive of AD in humans. These results might open new possibilities in comprehending the role played by SorLA in its interaction with APP and in the progression of neuronal degeneration. In addition, they further underline the crucial role played by Y682 residue in controlling APP trafficking in neurons.

  18. Effect of mutations in a simian virus 40 PolyA signal enhancer on green fluorescent protein reporter gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H G; Wang, X F; Jing, X Y; Li, Z; Zhang, Y; Lv, Z J

    2011-08-26

    Our previous studies have shown that tandem Alu repeats inhibit green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene expression when inserted downstream of the GFP gene in the pEGFP-C1 vector. We found that the 22R sequence (5'-GTGAAAAAAATGCTTTATTTGT-3') from the antisense PolyA (240 bp polyadenylation signal) of simian virus 40, eliminated repression of GFP gene expression when inserted between the GFP gene and the Alu repeats. The 22R sequence contains an imperfect palindrome; based on RNA structure software prediction, it forms an unstable stem-loop structure, including a loop, a first stem, a bulge, and a second stem. Analysis of mutations of the loop length of the 22R sequence showed that the three-nucleotide loop (wild-type, 22R) induced much stronger GFP expression than did other loop lengths. Two mutations, 4TMI (A7→T, A17→T) and 5AMI (A6→T, T18→A), which caused the base type changes in the bulge and in the second stem in the 22R sequence, induced stronger GFP gene expression than 22R itself. Mutation of the bulge base (A17→T), leading to complete complementation of the stem, caused weaker GFP gene expression. Sequences without a palindrome (7pieA, 5'-GTGAAAAAAATG CAAAAAAAGT-3', 7pieT, 5'-GTGTTTTTTTTGCTTTTTTTGT-3') did not activate GFP gene expression. We conclude that an imperfect palindrome affects and can increase GFP gene expression.

  19. Evolution of a G protein-coupled receptor response by mutations in regulatory network interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Roberto, Raphaël B; Chang, Belinda; Trusina, Ala

    2016-01-01

    All cellular functions depend on the concerted action of multiple proteins organized in complex networks. To understand how selection acts on protein networks, we used the yeast mating receptor Ste2, a pheromone-activated G protein-coupled receptor, as a model system. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae,...

  20. Evolution of a G protein-coupled receptor response by mutations in regulatory network interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Roberto, Raphaël B; Chang, Belinda; Trusina, Ala;

    2016-01-01

    All cellular functions depend on the concerted action of multiple proteins organized in complex networks. To understand how selection acts on protein networks, we used the yeast mating receptor Ste2, a pheromone-activated G protein-coupled receptor, as a model system. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae...

  1. Mutagenesis Objective Search and Selection Tool (MOSST: an algorithm to predict structure-function related mutations in proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asenjo Juan A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functionally relevant artificial or natural mutations are difficult to assess or predict if no structure-function information is available for a protein. This is especially important to correctly identify functionally significant non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs or to design a site-directed mutagenesis strategy for a target protein. A new and powerful methodology is proposed to guide these two decision strategies, based only on conservation rules of physicochemical properties of amino acids extracted from a multiple alignment of a protein family where the target protein belongs, with no need of explicit structure-function relationships. Results A statistical analysis is performed over each amino acid position in the multiple protein alignment, based on different amino acid physical or chemical characteristics, including hydrophobicity, side-chain volume, charge and protein conformational parameters. The variances of each of these properties at each position are combined to obtain a global statistical indicator of the conservation degree of each property. Different types of physicochemical conservation are defined to characterize relevant and irrelevant positions. The differences between statistical variances are taken together as the basis of hypothesis tests at each position to search for functionally significant mutable sites and to identify specific mutagenesis targets. The outcome is used to statistically predict physicochemical consensus sequences based on different properties and to calculate the amino acid propensities at each position in a given protein. Hence, amino acid positions are identified that are putatively responsible for function, specificity, stability or binding interactions in a family of proteins. Once these key functional positions are identified, position-specific statistical distributions are applied to divide the 20 common protein amino acids in each position of the protein

  2. Epidermal differentiation complex yields a secret: mutations in the cornification protein filaggrin underlie ichthyosis vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segre, Julia A

    2006-06-01

    Ichthyosis vulgaris (IV), characterized by mild scaling on limbs and lower abdomen, has an incidence of 1 in 250. Smith, McLean, and colleagues demonstrate that common mutations in filaggrin underlie IV. Filaggrin aggregates keratin intermediate filaments and is cross-linked into the cornified envelope to form the epidermal barrier. These findings reinforce the importance of the epidermal barrier in pathogenesis of skin diseases.

  3. Ethylmalonic Encephalopathy Is Caused by Mutations in ETHE1, a Gene Encoding a Mitochondrial Matrix Protein

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Ethylmalonic encephalopathy (EE) is a devastating infantile metabolic disorder affecting the brain, gastrointestinal tract, and peripheral vessels. High levels of ethylmalonic acid are detected in the body fluids, and cytochrome c oxidase activity is decreased in skeletal muscle. By use of a combination of homozygosity mapping, integration of physical and functional genomic data sets, and mutational screening, we identified GenBank D83198 as the gene responsible for EE. We also demonstrated t...

  4. Ancestral origins of the prion protein gene D178N mutation in the Basque Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Ana B; Barreau, Christian; Coupry, Isabelle; Yagüe, Jordi; Sánchez-Valle, Raquel; Galdós-Alcelay, Luis; Ibáñez, Agustín; Digón, Antón; Fernández-Manchola, Ignacio; Goizet, Cyril; Castro, Azucena; Cuevas, Nerea; Alvarez-Alvarez, Maite; de Pancorbo, Marian M; Arveiler, Benoît; Zarranz, Juan J

    2005-06-01

    Fatal familial insomnia (FFI) and familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (fCJD) are familial prion diseases with autosomal dominant inheritance of the D178N mutation. FFI has been reported in at least 27 pedigrees around the world. Twelve apparently unrelated FFI and fCJD pedigrees with the characteristic D178N mutation have been reported in the Prion Diseases Registry of the Basque Country since 1993. The high incidence of familial prion diseases in this region may reflect a unique ancestral origin of the chromosome carrying this mutation. In order to investigate this putative founder effect, we developed "happy typing", a new approach to the happy mapping method, which consists of the physical isolation of large haploid genomic DNA fragments and their analysis by the Polymerase Chain Reaction in order to perform haplotypic analysis instead of pedigree analysis. Six novel microsatellite markers, located in a 150-kb genomic segment flanking the PRNP gene were characterized for typing haploid DNA fragments of 285 kb in size. A common haplotype was found in patients from the Basque region, strongly suggesting a founder effect. We propose that "happy typing" constitutes an efficient method for determining disease-associated haplotypes, since the analysis of a single affected individual per pedigree should provide sufficient evidence.

  5. Rationally designed aberrant kinase-targeted endogenous protein nanomedicine against oncogene mutated/amplified refractory chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retnakumari, Archana P; Hanumanthu, Prasanna Lakshmi; Malarvizhi, Giridharan L; Prabhu, Raghuveer; Sidharthan, Neeraj; Thampi, Madhavan V; Menon, Deepthy; Mony, Ullas; Menon, Krishnakumar; Keechilat, Pavithran; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2012-11-05

    Deregulated protein kinases play a very critical role in tumorigenesis, metastasis, and drug resistance of cancer. Although molecularly targeted small molecule kinase inhibitors (SMI) are effective against many types of cancer, point mutations in the kinase domain impart drug resistance, a major challenge in the clinic. A classic example is chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) caused by BCR-ABL fusion protein, wherein a BCR-ABL kinase inhibitor, imatinib (IM), was highly successful in the early chronic phase of the disease, but failed in the advanced stages due to amplification of oncogene or point mutations in the drug-binding site of kinase domain. Here, by identifying critical molecular pathways responsible for the drug-resistance in refractory CML patient samples and a model cell line, we have rationally designed an endogenous protein nanomedicine targeted to both cell surface receptors and aberrantly activated secondary kinase in the oncogenic network. Molecular diagnosis revealed that, in addition to point mutations and amplification of oncogenic BCR-ABL kinase, relapsed/refractory patients exhibited significant activation of STAT5 signaling with correlative overexpression of transferrin receptors (TfR) on the cell membrane. Accordingly, we have developed a human serum albumin (HSA) based nanomedicine, loaded with STAT5 inhibitor (sorafenib), and surface conjugated the same with holo-transferrin (Tf) ligands for TfR specific delivery. This dual-targeted "transferrin conjugated albumin bound sorafenib" nanomedicine (Tf-nAlb-Soraf), prepared using aqueous nanoprecipitation method, displayed uniform spherical morphology with average size of ∼150 nm and drug encapsulation efficiency of ∼74%. TfR specific uptake and enhanced antileukemic activity of the nanomedicine was found maximum in the most drug resistant patient sample having the highest level of STAT5 and TfR expression, thereby confirming the accuracy of our rational design and potential of dual

  6. Recessive Inactivating Mutations in TBCK, Encoding a Rab GTPase-Activating Protein, Cause Severe Infantile Syndromic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Jessica X.; Caputo, Viviana; Phelps, Ian G.; Stella, Lorenzo; Worgan, Lisa; Dempsey, Jennifer C.; Nguyen, Alina; Leuzzi, Vincenzo; Webster, Richard; Pizzuti, Antonio; Marvin, Colby T.; Ishak, Gisele E.; Ardern-Holmes, Simone; Richmond, Zara; Bamshad, Michael J.; Ortiz-Gonzalez, Xilma R.; Tartaglia, Marco; Chopra, Maya; Doherty, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Infantile encephalopathies are a group of clinically and biologically heterogeneous disorders for which the genetic basis remains largely unknown. Here, we report a syndromic neonatal encephalopathy characterized by profound developmental disability, severe hypotonia, seizures, diminished respiratory drive requiring mechanical ventilation, brain atrophy, dysgenesis of the corpus callosum, cerebellar vermis hypoplasia, and facial dysmorphism. Biallelic inactivating mutations in TBCK (TBC1-domain-containing kinase) were independently identified by whole-exome sequencing as the cause of this condition in four unrelated families. Matching these families was facilitated by the sharing of phenotypic profiles and WES data in a recently released web-based tool (Geno2MP) that links phenotypic information to rare variants in families with Mendelian traits. TBCK is a putative GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for small GTPases of the Rab family and has been shown to control cell growth and proliferation, actin-cytoskeleton dynamics, and mTOR signaling. Two of the three mutations (c.376C>T [p.Arg126∗] and c.1363A>T [p.Lys455∗]) are predicted to truncate the protein, and loss of the major TBCK isoform was confirmed in primary fibroblasts from one affected individual. The third mutation, c.1532G>A (p.Arg511His), alters a conserved residue within the TBC1 domain. Structural analysis implicated Arg511 as a required residue for Rab-GAP function, and in silico homology modeling predicted impaired GAP function in the corresponding mutant. These results suggest that loss of Rab-GAP activity is the underlying mechanism of disease. In contrast to other disorders caused by dysregulated mTOR signaling associated with focal or global brain overgrowth, impaired TBCK function results in progressive loss of brain volume. PMID:27040692

  7. A Cohort Study of p53 Mutations and Protein Accumulation in Benign Breast Tissue and Subsequent Breast Cancer Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Geoffrey C; Kandel, Rita A; Glass, Andrew G; Jones, Joan G; Olson, Neal; Duggan, Catherine; Ginsberg, Mindy; Negassa, Abdissa; Rohan, Thomas E

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene and accumulation of its protein in breast tissue are thought to play a role in breast carcinogenesis. However, few studies have prospectively investigated the association of p53 immunopositivity and/or p53 alterations in women with benign breast disease in relation to the subsequent risk of invasive breast cancer. We carried out a case-control study nested within a large cohort of women biopsied for benign breast disease in order to address this question. After exclusions, 491 breast cancer cases and 471 controls were available for analysis. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Neither p53 immunopositivity nor genetic alterations in p53 (either missense mutations or polymorphisms) was associated with altered risk of subsequent breast cancer. However, the combination of both p53 immunopositivity and any p53 nucleotide change was associated with an approximate 5-fold nonsignificant increase in risk (adjusted OR 4.79, 95% CI 0.28-82.31) but the confidence intervals were extremely wide. Our findings raise the possibility that the combination of p53 protein accumulation and the presence of genetic alterations may identify a group at increased risk of breast cancer.

  8. A Cohort Study of p53 Mutations and Protein Accumulation in Benign Breast Tissue and Subsequent Breast Cancer Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey C. Kabat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene and accumulation of its protein in breast tissue are thought to play a role in breast carcinogenesis. However, few studies have prospectively investigated the association of p53 immunopositivity and/or p53 alterations in women with benign breast disease in relation to the subsequent risk of invasive breast cancer. We carried out a case-control study nested within a large cohort of women biopsied for benign breast disease in order to address this question. After exclusions, 491 breast cancer cases and 471 controls were available for analysis. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI. Neither p53 immunopositivity nor genetic alterations in p53 (either missense mutations or polymorphisms was associated with altered risk of subsequent breast cancer. However, the combination of both p53 immunopositivity and any p53 nucleotide change was associated with an approximate 5-fold nonsignificant increase in risk (adjusted OR 4.79, 95% CI 0.28–82.31 but the confidence intervals were extremely wide. Our findings raise the possibility that the combination of p53 protein accumulation and the presence of genetic alterations may identify a group at increased risk of breast cancer.

  9. Postnatal ocular expression of tyrosinase and related proteins: disruption by the pink-eyed unstable (p(un)) mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, E; Lamoreux, M L; Orlow, S J

    1993-09-01

    Ocular pigmentation in the mouse occurs primarily postnatally as a result of the melanization of neural crest-derived melanocytes. Using immunologic and biochemical techniques, we demonstrate that in normal mice the expression of tyrosinase and the related proteins TRP-1 and TRP-2, rises during the first week of life, remains elevated for a week, and then steadily declines to low levels by adulthood. Sucrose gradient density centrifugation demonstrates that tyrosinase, TRP-1 and TRP-2 are present in high molecular weight forms in the eyes of wild-type mice. The normal time course is disrupted in mice carrying the pink-eyed unstable (p(un)) mutation at the P-locus, a model for tyrosinase-positive albinism in man. Tyrosinase and TRP-2 are present at wild-type levels in the eyes of p(un)/p(un) mice at birth, but, rather than rising, their levels rapidly decline over the first week of life. TRP-1 is almost undetectable, even at birth. High molecular weight complexes could not be detected in eyes of p(un)/p(un) mice. Our results suggest that postnatal ocular melanogenesis in the mouse presents an attractive model for the study of the orderly expression and action of the proteins involved in eumelanin synthesis, and that the p(un) mutation disrupts this temporally controlled process.

  10. Pathogenic mutations causing glucose transport defects in GLUT1 transporter: The role of intermolecular forces in protein structure-function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Mobeen; Kinne, Rolf K H

    2015-01-01

    Two families of glucose transporter - the Na(+)-dependent glucose cotransporter-1 (SGLT family) and the facilitated diffusion glucose transporter family (GLUT family) - play a crucial role in the translocation of glucose across the epithelial cell membrane. How genetic mutations cause life-threatening diseases like GLUT1-deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS) is not well understood. In this review, we have combined previous functional data with our in silico analyses of the bacterial homologue of GLUT members, XylE (an outward-facing, partly occluded conformation) and previously proposed GLUT1 homology model (an inward-facing conformation). A variety of native and mutant side chain interactions were modeled to highlight the potential roles of mutations in destabilizing protein-protein interaction hence triggering structural and functional defects. This study sets the stage for future studies of the structural properties that mediate GLUT1 dysfunction and further suggests that both SGLT and GLUT families share conserved domains that stabilize the transporter structure/function via a similar mechanism.

  11. Ethylmalonic encephalopathy ETHE1 R163W/R163Q mutations alter protein stability and redox properties of the iron centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Bárbara J; Lucas, Tânia G; Rodrigues, João V; Frederiksen, Jane H; Teixeira, Miguel S; Tiranti, Valeria; Bross, Peter; Gomes, Cláudio M

    2014-01-01

    ETHE1 is an iron-containing protein from the metallo β-lactamase family involved in the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway. Mutations in ETHE1 causing loss of function result in sulfide toxicity and in the rare fatal disease Ethylmalonic Encephalopathy (EE). Frequently mutations resulting in depletion of ETHE1 in patient cells are due to severe structural and folding defects. However, some ETHE1 mutations yield nearly normal protein levels and in these cases disease mechanism was suspected to lie in compromised catalytic activity. To address this issue and to elicit how ETHE1 dysfunction results in EE, we have investigated two such pathological mutations, ETHE1-p.Arg163Gln and p.Arg163Trp. In addition, we report a number of benchmark properties of wild type human ETHE1, including for the first time the redox properties of the mononuclear iron centre. We show that loss of function in these variants results from a combination of decreased protein stability and activity. Although structural assessment revealed that the protein fold is not perturbed by mutations, both variants have decreased thermal stabilities and higher proteolytic susceptibilities. ETHE1 wild type and variants bind 1 ± 0.2 mol iron/protein and no zinc; however, the variants exhibited only ≈ 10% of wild-type catalytically activity. Analysis of the redox properties of ETHE1 mononuclear iron centre revealed that the variants have lowered reduction potentials with respect to that of the wild type. This illustrates how point mutation-induced loss of function may arise via very discrete subtle conformational effects on the protein fold and active site chemistry, without extensive disruption of the protein structure or protein-cofactor association.

  12. DNA damage-processing in E. coli: on-going protein synthesis is required for fixation of UV-induced lethality and mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Amanda; Raymer, Jenny; Bockrath, R

    2002-10-01

    UV irradiation of E. coli produces photoproducts in the DNA genome. In consequence, some bacteria lose viability (colony-forming ability) or remain viable as mutant cells. However, the end-points of viability inactivation (lethality) or mutation are determined by cellular processes that act on the UV-damaged DNA. We have investigated the in vivo time course for processes that deal with cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) which can be specifically removed by photoreactivation (PR). At different times during post-UV incubation, samples were challenged with PR and assayed for viability or mutation. We used excision-defective E. coli B/r cells and worked under yellow light to avoid background PR. During post-UV incubation (0-100min) in fully supplemented defined medium, inactivation and mutation were initially significantly reversed by PR but the extent of this reversal decreased during continued incubation defining "fixation" of lethality or mutation, respectively. In contrast, if protein synthesis was restricted during the post-UV incubation, no fixation developed. When chloramphenicol was added to inhibit protein synthesis after 30min of supplemented post-UV incubation, at a time sufficient for expression of UV-induced protein(s), fixation of lethality or mutation was still annulled (no change in the effectiveness of PR developed). Lethality fixation did progress when protein synthesis was restricted and the cells were incubated in the presence of puromycin or were either clpP or clpX defective. We discuss these and related results to suggest (1) on-going protein synthesis is required in the fixation process for lethality and mutation to sustain an effective level of a hypothetical protein sensitive to ClpXP proteolysis and (2) this protein plays a critical role in the process leading to exchange between Pol III activity and alternative polymerase activities required as each cell deals with damage in template DNA.

  13. Ethylmalonic encephalopathy ETHE1 R163W/R163Q mutations alter protein stability and redox properties of the iron centre.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara J Henriques

    Full Text Available ETHE1 is an iron-containing protein from the metallo β-lactamase family involved in the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway. Mutations in ETHE1 causing loss of function result in sulfide toxicity and in the rare fatal disease Ethylmalonic Encephalopathy (EE. Frequently mutations resulting in depletion of ETHE1 in patient cells are due to severe structural and folding defects. However, some ETHE1 mutations yield nearly normal protein levels and in these cases disease mechanism was suspected to lie in compromised catalytic activity. To address this issue and to elicit how ETHE1 dysfunction results in EE, we have investigated two such pathological mutations, ETHE1-p.Arg163Gln and p.Arg163Trp. In addition, we report a number of benchmark properties of wild type human ETHE1, including for the first time the redox properties of the mononuclear iron centre. We show that loss of function in these variants results from a combination of decreased protein stability and activity. Although structural assessment revealed that the protein fold is not perturbed by mutations, both variants have decreased thermal stabilities and higher proteolytic susceptibilities. ETHE1 wild type and variants bind 1 ± 0.2 mol iron/protein and no zinc; however, the variants exhibited only ≈ 10% of wild-type catalytically activity. Analysis of the redox properties of ETHE1 mononuclear iron centre revealed that the variants have lowered reduction potentials with respect to that of the wild type. This illustrates how point mutation-induced loss of function may arise via very discrete subtle conformational effects on the protein fold and active site chemistry, without extensive disruption of the protein structure or protein-cofactor association.

  14. NS1 Protein Mutation I64T Affects Interferon Responses and Virulence of Circulating H3N2 Human Influenza A Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeDiego, Marta L; Nogales, Aitor; Lambert-Emo, Kris; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis; Topham, David J

    2016-11-01

    Influenza NS1 protein is the main viral protein counteracting host innate immune responses, allowing the virus to efficiently replicate in interferon (IFN)-competent systems. In this study, we analyzed NS1 protein variability within influenza A (IAV) H3N2 viruses infecting humans during the 2012-2013 season. We also evaluated the impact of the mutations on the ability of NS1 proteins to inhibit host innate immune responses and general gene expression. Surprisingly, a previously unidentified mutation in the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-binding domain (I64T) decreased NS1-mediated general inhibition of host protein synthesis by decreasing its interaction with cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 30 (CPSF30), leading to increased innate immune responses after viral infection. Notably, a recombinant A/Puerto Rico/8/34 H1N1 virus encoding the H3N2 NS1-T64 protein was highly attenuated in mice, most likely because of its ability to induce higher antiviral IFN responses at early times after infection and because this virus is highly sensitive to the IFN-induced antiviral state. Interestingly, using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) collected at the acute visit (2 to 3 days after infection), we show that the subject infected with the NS1-T64 attenuated virus has diminished responses to interferon and to interferon induction, suggesting why this subject could be infected with this highly IFN-sensitive virus. These data demonstrate the importance of influenza virus surveillance in identifying new mutations in the NS1 protein, affecting its ability to inhibit innate immune responses and, as a consequence, the pathogenicity of the virus. Influenza A and B viruses are one of the most common causes of respiratory infections in humans, causing 1 billion infections and between 300,000 and 500,000 deaths annually. Influenza virus surveillance to identify new mutations in the NS1 protein affecting innate immune responses and, as a consequence, the pathogenicity of

  15. Two novel variants of human medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD). K364R, a folding mutation, and R256T, a catalytic-site mutation resulting in a well-folded but totally inactive protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Reilly, Linda P; Andresen, Brage S; Engel, Paul C

    2005-01-01

    Two novel rare mutations, MCAD approximately 842G-->C (R256T) and MCAD approximately 1166A-->G (K364R), have been investigated to assess how far the biochemical properties of the mutant proteins correlate with the clinical phenotype of medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency. When t...

  16. Rapid Proteasomal Degradation of Mutant Proteins Is the Primary Mechanism Leading to Tumorigenesis in Patients With Missense AIP Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ramírez, Laura C.; Martucci, Federico; Morgan, Rhodri M. L.; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Tilley, Daniel; Ramos-Guajardo, Nancy; Iacovazzo, Donato; D'Acquisto, Fulvio; Prodromou, Chrisostomos

    2016-01-01

    Context: The pathogenic effect of mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene (AIPmuts) in pituitary adenomas is incompletely understood. We have identified the primary mechanism of loss of function for missense AIPmuts. Objective: This study sought to analyze the mechanism/speed of protein turnover of wild-type and missense AIP variants, correlating protein half-life with clinical parameters. Design and Setting: Half-life and protein–protein interaction experiments and cross-sectional analysis of AIPmut positive patients' data were performed in a clinical academic research institution. Patients: Data were obtained from our cohort of pituitary adenoma patients and literature-reported cases. Interventions: Protein turnover of endogenous AIP in two cell lines and fifteen AIP variants overexpressed in HEK293 cells was analyzed via cycloheximide chase and proteasome inhibition. Glutathione-S-transferase pull-down and quantitative mass spectrometry identified proteins involved in AIP degradation; results were confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation and gene knockdown. Relevant clinical data was collected. Main Outcome Measures: Half-life of wild-type and mutant AIP proteins and its correlation with clinical parameters. Results: Endogenous AIP half-life was similar in HEK293 and lymphoblastoid cells (43.5 and 32.7 h). AIP variants were divided into stable proteins (median, 77.7 h; interquartile range [IQR], 60.7–92.9 h), and those with short (median, 27 h; IQR, 21.6–28.7 h) or very short (median, 7.7 h; IQR, 5.6–10.5 h) half-life; proteasomal inhibition rescued the rapid degradation of mutant proteins. The experimental half-life significantly correlated with age at diagnosis of acromegaly/gigantism (r = 0.411; P = .002). The FBXO3-containing SKP1–CUL1–F-box protein complex was identified as the E3 ubiquitin-ligase recognizing AIP. Conclusions: AIP is a stable protein, driven to ubiquitination by the SKP1–CUL1–F-box protein complex

  17. Mitochondrial protein alterations in a familial peripheral neuropathy caused by the V144D amino acid mutation in the sphingolipid protein, SPTLC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimpson, Scott E; Coorssen, Jens R; Myers, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    Axonal degeneration is the final common path in many neurological disorders. Subsets of neuropathies involving the sensory neuron are known as hereditary sensory neuropathies (HSNs). Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN-I) is the most common subtype of HSN with autosomal dominant inheritance. It is characterized by the progressive degeneration of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) with clinical symptom onset between the second or third decade of life. Heterozygous mutations in the serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) long chain subunit 1 (SPTLC1) gene were identified as the pathogenic cause of HSN-I. Ultrastructural analysis of mitochondria from HSN-I patient cells has displayed unique morphological abnormalities that are clustered to the perinucleus where they are wrapped by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). This investigation defines a small subset of proteins with major alterations in abundance in mitochondria harvested from HSN-I mutant SPTLC1 cells. Using mitochondrial protein isolates from control and patient lymphoblasts, and a combination of 2D gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting and mass spectrometry, we have shown the increased abundance of ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase core protein 1, an electron transport chain protein, as well as the immunoglobulin, Ig kappa chain C. The regulation of these proteins may provide a new route to understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying HSN-I.

  18. Actin organization, bristle morphology, and viability are affected by actin capping protein mutations in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    Regulation of actin filament length and orientation is important in many actin-based cellular processes. This regulation is postulated to occur through the action of actin-binding proteins. Many actin-binding proteins that modify actin in vitro have been identified, but in many cases, it is not known if this activity is physiologically relevant. Capping protein (CP) is an actin-binding protein that has been demonstrated to control filament length in vitro by binding to the barbed ends and pre...

  19. Mutations in the exon 7 of Trp53 gene and the level of p53 protein in double transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorszewska, Jolanta; Oczkowska, Anna; Suwalska, Monika; Rozycka, Agata; Florczak-Wyspianska, Jolanta; Dezor, Mateusz; Lianeri, Margarita; Jagodzinski, Paweł P; Kowalczyk, Michal J; Prendecki, Michal; Kozubski, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) leads to generation of β-amyloid (Aβ) in the brain. Alzheimer's disease model PS/APP mice show a markedly accelerated accumulation of Aβ, which may lead to apoptosis induction e.g. in cells expressing wild-type p53. The TP53 gene is found to be the most frequently mutated gene in human tumour cells. There is accumulating evidence pointing out to the contribution of oxidative stress and chronic inflammation in both AD and cancer. The purpose of this study was to analyze exon 7 mutations of the murine Trp53 gene and Aβ/A4 and p53 protein levels in PS/APP and control mice. The studies were performed on female double transgenic PS/APP mice and young adults (8-12 weeks old) and age-matched control mice. The Trp53 mutation analysis was carried out with the use of PCR and DNA sequencing. The Aβ/A4 and p53 levels were analyzed by Western blotting. The frequency of mutations was almost quadrupled in PS/APP mice (44%), compared to controls (14%). PS/APP mice with the A929T and A857G mutations had a similar p53 level. In cerebral gray matter of PS/APP mice the level of p53 positive correlated with the level of Aβ protein (RS = +0.700, p p53 down-regulation, while in aging ones, G859A substitution was most likely associated with over-expression of p53. In silico protein analysis revealed a possibly substantial impact of all four mutations on p53 activity. Three mutations were in close proximity to zinc-coordinating cysteine residues. It seems that in PS/APP mice missense Trp53 exon 7 mutations may be associated with the degenerative process by changes of p53 protein function.

  20. Palbociclib can overcome mutations in cyclin dependent kinase 6 that break hydrogen bonds between the drug and the protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez Maganhi, Stella; Jensen, Patrizia; Caracelli, Ignez; Zukerman Schpector, Julio; Fröhling, Stefan; Friedman, Ran

    2017-04-01

    Inhibition of cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) 4 and 6 prevent cells from entering the synthesis phase of the cell cycle. CDK4 and 6 are therefore important drug targets in various cancers. The selective CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib is approved for the treatment of breast cancer and has shown activity in a cellular model of mixed lineage leukaemia (MLL)-rearranged acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). We studied the interactions of palbociclib and CDK6 using molecular dynamics simulations. Analysis of the simulations suggested several interactions that stabilized the drug in its binding site and that were not observed in the crystal structure of the protein-drug complex. These included a hydrogen bond to His 100 that was hitherto not reported and several hydrophobic contacts. Evolutionary-based bioinformatic analysis was used to suggest two mutants, D163G and H100L that would potentially yield drug resistance, as they lead to loss of important protein-drug interactions without hindering the viability of the protein. One of the mutants involved a change in the glycine of the well-conserved DFG motif of the kinase. Interestingly, CDK6-dependent human AML cells stably expressing either mutant retained sensitivity to palbociclib, indicating that the protein-drug interactions are not affected by these. Furthermore, the cells were proliferative in the absence of palbociclib, indicating that the Asp to Gly mutation in the DFG motif did not interfere with the catalytic activity of the protein. © 2017 The Authors Protein Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Protein Society.

  1. Conduction block and tonic pupils in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease caused by a myelin protein zero p.Ile112Thr mutation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Sinéad M

    2011-03-01

    We report a patient with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) due to the p.Ile112Thr mutation in myelin protein zero (MPZ) who presented with a patchy neuropathy with conduction block and tonic pupils. Conduction block is unusual in inherited neuropathies, while pupil abnormalities are recognised to occur in CMT especially due to MPZ mutations. This case highlights that patchy demyelinating neuropathy with conduction block may occur in p.Ile112Thr MPZ mutations. Involvement of the pupils, as in this case, may be a pointer towards a genetic rather than inflammatory cause of neuropathy.

  2. Mutation of cytotoxin-associated gene A affects expressions of antioxidant proteins of Hellcobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Gang Huang; Guang-Cai Duan; Qing-Tang Fan; Wei-Dong Zhang; Chun-Hua Song; Xue-Yong Huang; Rong-Guang Zhang

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To determine if disruption of the cagA gene of Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori) has an effect on the expression of other proteins at proteome level.METHODS: Construction of a cagA knock out mutant Hp27_. cagA ( cagA-) via homologous recombinat ion wi th the wi ld- type st rain Hp27 ( cagA+) as a recipient was performed. The method of sonicat ion-urea-CHAPS-DTT was employed to extract bacterial proteins from both strains. Soluble proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). Images of 2-DE gels were digitalized and analyzed. Only spots that had a statistical significance in differential expression were selected and analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionizationtime of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Biological information was used to search protein database and identify the biological function of proteins. RESULTS: The proteome expressions between wild-type strain and isogenic mutant with the cagA gene knocked-out were compared. Five protein spots with high abundance in bacteria proteins of wild-type strains, down-regulated or absently expressed in bacteria proteins of mutants, were identified and analyzed. From a quantitative point of view, the identified proteins are related to the cagA gene and important antioxidant proteins of H pylori, including alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (Ahp), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and modulator of drug activity (Mda66), respectively, suggesting that cagA is important to maintain the normal activity of antioxidative stress and ensure H pylori persistent colonization in the host. CONCLUSION: cagA gene i s relevant to the expressions of antioxidant proteins of H pylori, which may be a novel mechanism involved in H pylori cagA pathogenesis.

  3. Critical regions of the Vibrio fischeri luxR protein defined by mutational analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    Expression of Vibrio fischeri luminescence genes requires an inducer, termed autoinducer, and a positive regulatory element, the luxR gene product. A plasmid containing a tac promoter-controlled luxR was mutagenized in vitro with hydroxylamine, and luxR mutant plasmids were identified by their inability to complement a luxR deletion mutation in trans. Sixteen luxR mutant plasmids were obtained, ten of which encoded full-length but inactive luxR gene products as demonstrated by a Western immun...

  4. Reduced cholesterol and triglycerides in mice with a mutation in Mia2, a liver protein that localizes to ER exit sites[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, Jeffrey L.; Bonnet, David J.; Curtiss, Linda K.; Gekakis, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    Through forward genetic screening in the mouse, a recessive mutation (couch potato, cpto) has been discovered that dramatically reduces plasma cholesterol levels across all lipoprotein classes. The cpto mutation altered a highly conserved residue in the Src homology domain 3 (SH3) domain of the Mia2 protein. Full-length hepatic Mia2 structurally and functionally resembled the related Mia3 protein. Mia2 localized to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) exit sites, suggesting a role in guiding proteins from the ER to the Golgi. Similarly to the Mia3 protein, Mia2’s cytosolic C terminus interacted directly with COPII proteins Sec23 and Sec24, whereas its lumenal SH3 domain may facilitate interactions with secretory cargo. Fractionation of plasma revealed that Mia2cpto/cpto mice had lower circulating VLDL, LDL, HDL, and triglycerides. Mia2 is thus a novel, hepatic, ER-to-Golgi trafficking protein that regulates cholesterol metabolism. PMID:21807889

  5. Reduced cholesterol and triglycerides in mice with a mutation in Mia2, a liver protein that localizes to ER exit sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, Jeffrey L; Bonnet, David J; Curtiss, Linda K; Gekakis, Nicholas

    2011-10-01

    Through forward genetic screening in the mouse, a recessive mutation (couch potato, cpto) has been discovered that dramatically reduces plasma cholesterol levels across all lipoprotein classes. The cpto mutation altered a highly conserved residue in the Src homology domain 3 (SH3) domain of the Mia2 protein. Full-length hepatic Mia2 structurally and functionally resembled the related Mia3 protein. Mia2 localized to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) exit sites, suggesting a role in guiding proteins from the ER to the Golgi. Similarly to the Mia3 protein, Mia2's cytosolic C terminus interacted directly with COPII proteins Sec23 and Sec24, whereas its lumenal SH3 domain may facilitate interactions with secretory cargo. Fractionation of plasma revealed that Mia2(cpto/cpto) mice had lower circulating VLDL, LDL, HDL, and triglycerides. Mia2 is thus a novel, hepatic, ER-to-Golgi trafficking protein that regulates cholesterol metabolism.

  6. Conserved and variable correlated mutations in the plant MADS protein network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, van A.D.J.; Ham, van R.C.H.J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Plant MADS domain proteins are involved in a variety of developmental processes for which their ability to form various interactions is a key requisite. However, not much is known about the structure of these proteins or their complexes, whereas such knowledge would be valuable for a bet

  7. A point mutation in Euglene gracilis chloroplast tRNA{sup Glu} uncouples protein and chlorophyll biosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stange-Thomann, N.; Thomann, H.U.; Lloyd, A.J.; Soell, D. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Lyman, H. [Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    1994-08-16

    The universal precursor of tetrapyrrole pigments (e.g., chlorophylls and hemes) is 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), which in Euglena gracilis chloroplasts is derived via the two-step C{sub 5} pathway from glutamate charged to tRNA{sup Glu}. The first enzyme in this pathway, Glu-tRNA reductase (GluTR) catalyzes the reduction of glutamyl-tRNA{sup Glu} (Glu-tRNA) to glutamate 1-semialdehyde (GSA) with the release of the uncharged tRNA{sup Glu}. The second enzyme, GSA-2, 1-aminomutase, converts GSA to ALA. tRNA{sup Glu} is a specific cofactor for the NADPH-dependent reduction by GluTR, an enzyme that recognizes the tRNA in a sequence-specific manner. This RNA is the normal tRNA{sup Glu}, a dual-function molecule participating both in protein and in ALA and, hence, chlorophyll biosynthesis. A chlorophyll-deficient mutant of E. gracilis (Y{sub 9}ZNaIL) does not synthesize ALA from glutamate, although it contains GluTR and GSA-2,1-aminomutase activity. The tRNA{sup Glu} isolated from the mutant can still be acrylated with glutamate in vitro and in vitro. Furthermore, it supports chloroplast protein synthesis; however, it is a poor substrate for GluTR. Sequence analysis of the tRNA and of its gene revealed a C56 {yields} U mutation in the resulting gene product. C56 is therefore an important identity element for GluTR. Thus, a point mutation in the T loop of tRNA uncouples protein from chlorophyll biosynthesis.

  8. The Pathogenic A116V Mutation Enhances Ion-Selective Channel Formation by Prion Protein in Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabareesan, Ambadi Thody; Singh, Jogender; Roy, Samrat; Udgaonkar, Jayant B; Mathew, M K

    2016-04-26

    Prion diseases are a group of fatal neurodegenerative disorders that afflict mammals. Misfolded and aggregated forms of the prion protein (PrP(Sc)) have been associated with many prion diseases. A transmembrane form of PrP favored by the pathogenic mutation A116V is associated with Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome, but no accumulation of PrP(Sc) is detected. However, the role of the transmembrane form of PrP in pathological processes leading to neuronal death remains unclear. This study reports that the full-length mouse PrP (moPrP) significantly increases the permeability of living cells to K(+), and forms K(+)- and Ca(2+)-selective channels in lipid membranes. Importantly, the pathogenic mutation A116V greatly increases the channel-forming capability of moPrP. The channels thus formed are impermeable to sodium and chloride ions, and are blocked by blockers of voltage-gated ion channels. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange studies coupled with mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) show that upon interaction with lipid, the central hydrophobic region (109-132) of the protein is protected against exchange, making it a good candidate for inserting into the membrane and lining the channel. HDX-MS also shows a dramatic increase in the protein-lipid stoichiometry for A116V moPrP, providing a rationale for its increased channel-forming capability. The results suggest that ion channel formation may be a possible mechanism of PrP-mediated neurodegeneration by the transmembrane forms of PrP.

  9. Germline Mutation in EXPH5 Implicates the Rab27B Effector Protein Slac2-b in Inherited Skin Fragility

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, John A.; Stone, Kristina L.; Begum, Rumena; Simpson, Michael A.; Dopping-Hepenstal, Patricia J.; Liu, Lu; McMillan, James R.; South, Andrew P.; Pourreyron, Celine; McLean, W.H. Irwin; Martinez, Anna E.; Mellerio, Jemima E.; Parsons, Maddy

    2012-01-01

    The Rab GTPase Rab27B and one of its effector proteins, Slac2-b (also known as EXPH5, exophilin-5), have putative roles in intracellular vesicle trafficking but their relevance to human disease is not known. By using whole-exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous frameshift mutation in EXPH5 in three siblings with inherited skin fragility born to consanguineous Iraqi parents. All three individuals harbor the mutation c.5786delC (p.Pro1929Leufs∗8) in EXPH5, which truncates the 1,989 amino acid Slac2-b protein by 52 residues. The clinical features comprised generalized scale-crusts and occasional blisters, mostly induced by trauma, as well as mild diffuse pigmentary mottling on the trunk and proximal limbs. There was no increased bleeding tendency, no neurologic abnormalities, and no increased incidence of infection. Analysis of an affected person's skin showed loss of Slac2-b immunostaining (C-terminal antibody), disruption of keratinocyte adhesion within the lower epidermis, and an increased number of perinuclear vesicles. A role for Slac2-b in keratinocyte biology was supported by findings of cytoskeletal disruption (mainly keratin intermediate filaments) and decreased keratinocyte adhesion in both keratinocytes from an affected subject and after shRNA knockdown of Slac2-b in normal keratinocytes. Slac2-b was also shown to colocalize with Rab27B and β4 integrin to early adhesion initiation sites in spreading normal keratinocytes. Collectively, our findings identify an unexpected role for Slac2-b in inherited skin fragility and expand the clinical spectrum of human disorders of GTPase effector proteins. PMID:23176819

  10. Mutation in spike protein cleavage site and pathogenesis of feline coronavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licitra, Beth N; Millet, Jean K; Regan, Andrew D; Hamilton, Brian S; Rinaldi, Vera D; Duhamel, Gerald E; Whittaker, Gary R

    2013-07-01

    Feline coronaviruses (FCoV) exist as 2 biotypes: feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) and feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV). FECV causes subclinical infections; FIPV causes feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), a systemic and fatal disease. It is thought that mutations in FECV enable infection of macrophages, causing FIP. However, the molecular basis for this biotype switch is unknown. We examined a furin cleavage site in the region between receptor-binding (S1) and fusion (S2) domains of the spike of serotype 1 FCoV. FECV sequences were compared with FIPV sequences. All FECVs had a conserved furin cleavage motif. For FIPV, there was a correlation with the disease and >1 substitution in the S1/S2 motif. Fluorogenic peptide assays confirmed that the substitutions modulate furin cleavage. We document a functionally relevant S1/S2 mutation that arises when FIP develops in a cat. These insights into FIP pathogenesis may be useful in development of diagnostic, prevention, and treatment measures against coronaviruses.

  11. Insight into the intermolecular recognition mechanism between Keap1 and IKKβ combining homology modelling, protein-protein docking, molecular dynamics simulations and virtual alanine mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-Yu Jiang

    Full Text Available Degradation of certain proteins through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is a common strategy taken by the key modulators responsible for stress responses. Kelch-like ECH-associated protein-1(Keap1, a substrate adaptor component of the Cullin3 (Cul3-based ubiquitin E3 ligase complex, mediates the ubiquitination of two key modulators, NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 and IκB kinase β (IKKβ, which are involved in the redox control of gene transcription. However, compared to the Keap1-Nrf2 protein-protein interaction (PPI, the intermolecular recognition mechanism of Keap1 and IKKβ has been poorly investigated. In order to explore the binding pattern between Keap1 and IKKβ, the PPI model of Keap1 and IKKβ was investigated. The structure of human IKKβ was constructed by means of the homology modeling method and using reported crystal structure of Xenopus laevis IKKβ as the template. A protein-protein docking method was applied to develop the Keap1-IKKβ complex model. After the refinement and visual analysis of docked proteins, the chosen pose was further optimized through molecular dynamics simulations. The resulting structure was utilized to conduct the virtual alanine mutation for the exploration of hot-spots significant for the intermolecular interaction. Overall, our results provided structural insights into the PPI model of Keap1-IKKβ and suggest that the substrate specificity of Keap1 depend on the interaction with the key tyrosines, namely Tyr525, Tyr574 and Tyr334. The study presented in the current project may be useful to design molecules that selectively modulate Keap1. The selective recognition mechanism of Keap1 with IKKβ or Nrf2 will be helpful to further know the crosstalk between NF-κB and Nrf2 signaling.

  12. Insight into the intermolecular recognition mechanism between Keap1 and IKKβ combining homology modelling, protein-protein docking, molecular dynamics simulations and virtual alanine mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zheng-Yu; Chu, Hong-Xi; Xi, Mei-Yang; Yang, Ting-Ting; Jia, Jian-Min; Huang, Jing-Jie; Guo, Xiao-Ke; Zhang, Xiao-Jin; You, Qi-Dong; Sun, Hao-Peng

    2013-01-01

    Degradation of certain proteins through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is a common strategy taken by the key modulators responsible for stress responses. Kelch-like ECH-associated protein-1(Keap1), a substrate adaptor component of the Cullin3 (Cul3)-based ubiquitin E3 ligase complex, mediates the ubiquitination of two key modulators, NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and IκB kinase β (IKKβ), which are involved in the redox control of gene transcription. However, compared to the Keap1-Nrf2 protein-protein interaction (PPI), the intermolecular recognition mechanism of Keap1 and IKKβ has been poorly investigated. In order to explore the binding pattern between Keap1 and IKKβ, the PPI model of Keap1 and IKKβ was investigated. The structure of human IKKβ was constructed by means of the homology modeling method and using reported crystal structure of Xenopus laevis IKKβ as the template. A protein-protein docking method was applied to develop the Keap1-IKKβ complex model. After the refinement and visual analysis of docked proteins, the chosen pose was further optimized through molecular dynamics simulations. The resulting structure was utilized to conduct the virtual alanine mutation for the exploration of hot-spots significant for the intermolecular interaction. Overall, our results provided structural insights into the PPI model of Keap1-IKKβ and suggest that the substrate specificity of Keap1 depend on the interaction with the key tyrosines, namely Tyr525, Tyr574 and Tyr334. The study presented in the current project may be useful to design molecules that selectively modulate Keap1. The selective recognition mechanism of Keap1 with IKKβ or Nrf2 will be helpful to further know the crosstalk between NF-κB and Nrf2 signaling.

  13. Two single mutations in the fusion protein of Newcastle disease virus confer hemagglutinin-neuraminidase independent fusion promotion and attenuate the pathogenicity in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yanhong; Liu, Tao; Jia, Yane; Liu, Bin; Yu, Qingzhong; Cui, Xiaole; Guo, Fengfeng; Chang, Huiyun; Zhu, Qiyun

    2017-09-01

    The fusion (F) protein of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) affects viral infection and pathogenicity through mediating membrane fusion. Previously, we found NDV with increased fusogenic activity in which contained T458D or G459D mutation in the F protein. Here, we investigated the effects of these two mutations on viral infection, fusogenicity and pathogenicity. Syncytium formation assays indicated that T458D or G459D increased the F protein cleavage activity and enhanced cell fusion with or without the presence of HN protein. The T458D- or G459D-mutated NDV resulted in a decrease in virus replication or release from cells. The animal study showed that the pathogenicity of the mutated NDVs was attenuated in chickens. These results indicate that these two single mutations in F altered or diminished the requirement of HN for promoting membrane fusion. The increased fusogenic activity may disrupt the cellular machinery and consequently decrease the virus replication and pathogenicity in chickens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Copy number variation and missense mutations of the agouti signaling protein (ASIP) gene in goat breeds with different coat colors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontanesi, L; Beretti, F; Riggio, V; Gómez González, E; Dall'Olio, S; Davoli, R; Russo, V; Portolano, B

    2009-01-01

    In goats, classical genetic studies reported a large number of alleles at the Agouti locus with effects on coat color and pattern distribution. From these early studies, the dominant A(Wt) (white/tan) allele was suggested to cause the white color of the Saanen breed. Here, we sequenced the coding region of the goat ASIP gene in 6 goat breeds (Girgentana, Maltese, Derivata di Siria, Murciano-Granadina, Camosciata delle Alpi, and Saanen), with different coat colors and patterns. Five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified, 3 of which caused missense mutations in conserved positions of the cysteine-rich carboxy-terminal domain of the protein (p.Ala96Gly, p.Cys126Gly, and p.Val128Gly). Allele and genotype frequencies suggested that these mutations are not associated or not completely associated with coat color in the investigated goat breeds. Moreover, genotyping and sequencing results, deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, as well as allele copy number evaluation from semiquantitative fluorescent multiplex PCR, indicated the presence of copy number variation (CNV) in all investigated breeds. To confirm the presence of CNV and evaluate its extension, we applied a bovine-goat cross-species array comparative genome hybridization (aCGH) experiment using a custom tiling array based on bovine chromosome 13. aCGH results obtained for 8 goat DNA samples confirmed the presence of CNV affecting a region of less that 100 kb including the ASIP and AHCY genes. In Girgentana and Saanen breeds, this CNV might cause the A(Wt) allele, as already suggested for a similar structural mutation in sheep affecting the ASIP and AHCY genes, providing evidence for a recurrent interspecies CNV. However, other mechanisms may also be involved in determining coat color in these 2 breeds.

  15. A Novel Missense Mutation (L296Q) in Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein Gene Related to Coronary Heart Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke-Qin ZHENG; Si-Zhong ZHANG; Li ZHANG; De-Jia HUANG; Lin-Chuan LIAO; Yi-Ping HOU

    2004-01-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) is a key participant in the reverse transport ofcholesterol from the peripheral tissues to the liver. To understand the role that CETP gene plays in thepathogenesis of coronary heart disease (CHD), the promoter region, all 16 exons and adjacent intronicregions of CETP gene were screened for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 203 CHD patients and209 controls by a combination of PCR, denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC),molecular cloning, and DNA sequencing. A novel missense mutation in the CETP gene was identified. Thismutation (L296Q) was a T-to-A conversion at codon 296 of exon 10 which replaced the codon for leucine(CTG) with the codon for glutamine (CAG). Association study revealed that L296Q mutation was associatedwith CHD with a significantly higher mutant allele frequency in the CHD patients than that in the controls (0.160 vs. 0.091,x2= 9.014, P = 0.003), and that the odds ratio for the development of CHD was 1.83 for the296Q allele carriers relative to 296LL homozygotes. Statistical analyses demonstrated that the mutant 296Q allelecarrier patients displayed significantly higher total cholesterol (TC) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol(LDL-C) concentrations than non-carrier patients. The results of the present study suggest that the L296Qmutation is related to CHD, and the identification of new mutations in the CETP gene will afford the oppor-tunity to investigate the relationship between CETP gene and CHD.

  16. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase T-786C Mutation, Prothrombin Gene Mutation (G-20210-A and Protein S Deficiency Could Lead to Myocardial Infarction in a Very Young Male Adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milka Klincheva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Myocardial infarction is a rare medical event in young people. The main reasons include congenital coronary abnormalities, coronary artery spasm, and coronary thrombosis due to hypercoagulable states (hereditary and acquired. AIM: We present a case of a young male adult with myocardial infarction caused by a combination of gene mutations and anticoagulation protein deficiency. CASE PRESENTATION: A 19 years old young man was admitted to our hospital complaining of chest pain during the last two weeks. The patient did not have any known cardiovascular risk factors, except a positive family anamnesis. Subacute inferior nonST segment myocardial infarction was diagnosed according to the patient’s history, electrocardiographic and laboratory findings. Coronary angiography revealed suboclusive thrombus in the proximal, medial and distal part of the right coronary artery (TIMI 2. Percutaneous coronary intervention was performed. Anticoagulant and antiagregant therapy (heparin, acetilsalicilic acid and clopidogrel according to protocol was started. The hospital stay was uneventful. Homozygous endothelial nitric oxid synthase (eNOS T-786-C mutation, heterozygote prothrombin gene mutation (G-20210-A, and protein S deficiency were verified from the thrombophilia testing. Other trombophilic tests were normal. Three months after discharge from hospital another coronary angiography was performed. It revealed normal coronary arteries. Four years after the attack, the patient is free of symptoms and another cardiovascular event. CONCLUSION: Combination of genetic mutations and anticoagulation protein deficiency could be a reasonable cause for myocardial infarction in a very young male adult without any other cardiovascular risk factors.

  17. A STUDY OF THE ENERGY DEPENDENCE OF RADIATION DAMAGE IN SUPERCONDUCTING COILS FOR A NEXT GENERATION MU2E AT PIP - II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pronskikh, V. [Fermilab; Glenzinski, D. [Fermilab; Knoepfel, K. [Fermilab; Mokhov, N. [Fermilab; Tschirhart, Tschirhart [Fermilab

    2016-04-01

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab is being designed to study the coherent neutrino-less conversion of a negative muon into an electron in the field of a nucleus. This process has an extremely low probability in the Standard Model, and its observation would provide unambiguous evidence for beyond the standard model physics. The Mu2e design aims to reach a single-event-sensitivity of about 2.5 x $10^{-17}$ and will probe effective new physics mass scales in the $10^{3}-10^{4}$ TeV range, well beyond the reach of the LHC. This work will examine the maximum beam power that can be tolerated for beam energies in the 0.5-8 GeV range. This has implications for how the sensitivity might be further improved with a second generation experiment using an upgraded proton beam from the PIP-II project, which will be capable of providing MW beams to Fermilab experiments later in the next decade.

  18. Mutations in the c-Kit Gene Disrupt Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling during Tumor Development in Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Salivary Glands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osamu Tetsu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway is considered to be a positive regulator of tumor initiation, progression, and maintenance. This study reports an opposite finding: we have found strong evidence that the MAPK pathway is inhibited in a subset of adenoid cystic carcinomas (ACCs of the salivary glands. ACC tumors consistently overexpress the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK c-Kit, which has been considered a therapeutic target. We performed mutational analysis of the c-Kit gene (KIT in 17 cases of ACC and found that 2 cases of ACC had distinct missense mutations in KIT at both the genomic DNA and messenger RNA levels. These mutations caused G664R and R796G amino acid substitutions in the kinase domains. Surprisingly, the mutations were functionally inactive in cultured cells. We observed a significant reduction of MAPK (ERK1/2 activity in tumor cells, as assessed by immunohistochemistry. We performed further mutational analysis of the downstream effectors in the c-Kit pathway in the genes HRAS, KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, and PTEN. This analysis revealed that two ACC tumors without KIT mutations had missense mutations in either KRAS or BRAF, causing S17N K-Ras and V590I B-Raf mutants, respectively. Our functional analysis showed that proteins with these mutations were also inactive in cultured cells. This is the first time that MAPK activity from the RTK signaling has been shown to be inhibited by gene mutations during tumor development. Because ACC seems to proliferate despite inactivation of the c-Kit signaling pathway, we suggest that selective inhibition of c-Kit is probably not a suitable treatment strategy for ACC.

  19. Functional characterisation and Mutational analysis of a bacterial dynamin-like protein, DynA

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Membrane remodeling is a dynamic process that occurs in bacterial cells to facilitate substrate transport and to provide protection to bacteria during environmental stress. In eukaryotic cells, membrane remodeling is carried out by dynamin-like proteins (DLPs). These proteins are involved in diverse membrane-associated functions such as cargo transport via vesicles, cytokinesis, division of cell organelles and resistance to pathogens. DLPs are also conserved in bacterial species; howeve...

  20. Hepatitis B virus core protein with hot-spot mutations inhibit MxA gene transcription but has no effect on inhibition of virus replication by interferon α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhijian, Yu; Zhen, Huang; Fan, Zhang; Jin, Yang; Qiwen, Deng; Zhongming, Zeng

    2010-10-20

    It has been reported that hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein (HBc) can inhibit the transcription of human interferon-induced MxA gene. In this study, we investigated whether HBc protein mutations at hot spots (L60V, S87G and I97L) could still inhibit MxA transcription and the potential significance of this inhibition in virus replication in vitro. Our data indicated that the IFN-induced MxA mRNA expression level and MxA promoter activity was significantly down-regulated by mutant protein of HBc(I97L), compared to WT and the other two mutated HBc proteins(L60V or S87G). However, in Huh7 cells stably expressing WT or the mutated HBc proteins (L60V, S87G or I97L), IFN-α could inhibit the extra- and intracellular HBV DNA level and HBsAg secretion to a similar level compared to that in cells transfected with control plasmids. In conclusion, HBc protein with I97L mutation may play an special role in suppressing the transcription of MxA gene. Moreover, the inhibitory effect on MxA gene transcription by the WT or mutated HBc proteins (L60V, S87G and I97L) has no impact on inhibition of HBV replication by IFN-α in Huh7 cells. The clinical significance of the inhibitory effect of MxA gene transcription by HBc protein requires further study.

  1. Deletion of ribosomal protein genes is a common vulnerability in human cancer, especially in concert with TP53 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajore, Ram; Raiser, David; McConkey, Marie; Jöud, Magnus; Boidol, Bernd; Mar, Brenton; Saksena, Gordon; Weinstock, David M; Armstrong, Scott; Ellis, Steven R; Ebert, Benjamin L; Nilsson, Björn

    2017-04-01

    Heterozygous inactivating mutations in ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) are associated with hematopoietic and developmental abnormalities, activation of p53, and altered risk of cancer in humans and model organisms. Here we performed a large-scale analysis of cancer genome data to examine the frequency and selective pressure of RPG lesions across human cancers. We found that hemizygous RPG deletions are common, occurring in about 43% of 10,744 cancer specimens and cell lines. Consistent with p53-dependent negative selection, such lesions are underrepresented in TP53-intact tumors (P ≪ 10(-10)), and shRNA-mediated knockdown of RPGs activated p53 in TP53-wild-type cells. In contrast, we did not see negative selection of RPG deletions in TP53-mutant tumors. RPGs are conserved with respect to homozygous deletions, and shRNA screening data from 174 cell lines demonstrate that further suppression of hemizygously deleted RPGs inhibits cell growth. Our results establish RPG haploinsufficiency as a strikingly common vulnerability of human cancers that associates with TP53 mutations and could be targetable therapeutically. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  2. EPIDEMIOLOGY OF ACTIVATED PROTEIN C RESISTANCE AND FACTOR V LEIDEN MUTATION IN THE MEDITERRANEAN REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrez Mehrez M. Jadaon

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Venous thromboembolic disorders (VTE are serious disorders with high morbidity and mortality rates. Many genetic and acquired risk factors were identified to cause VTE The most common genetic risk factor is Factor V Leiden mutation (FVL. FVL was found in high percentage of populations of Caucasian origin but was almost absent in non-Caucasians. It was also reported in populations living in North Africa and the Middle East.  This review article briefly explains FVL and how it causes VTE, the distribution of FVL worldwide, and then it elaborates on the epidemiology of FVL in the Mediterranean Region and how this brought speculations that FVL might have originated in the Eastern Mediterranean area.

  3. Epidemiology of Activated Protein C Resistance and Factor V Leiden Mutation in the Mediterranean Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadaon, Mehrez M.

    2011-01-01

    Venous thromboembolic disorders (VTE) are serious disorders with high morbidity and mortality rates. Many genetic and acquired risk factors were identified to cause VTE. The most common genetic risk factor is Factor V Leiden mutation (FVL). FVL was found in high percentage of populations of Caucasian origin but was almost absent in non-Caucasians. It was also reported in populations living in North Africa and the Middle East. This review article briefly explains FVL and how it causes VTE, the distribution of FVL worldwide, and then it elaborates on the epidemiology of FVL in the Mediterranean Region and how this brought speculations that FVL might have originated in the Eastern Mediterranean area. PMID:22224194

  4. Inherited protein S deficiency due to a novel nonsense mutation in the PROS1 gene in the patient with recurrent vascular access thrombosis: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Jin Cho

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Vascular access thrombosis is one of the major causes of morbidity in patients maintained on chronic hemodialysis. Thrombophilia has been recognized as a risk factor of vascular access thrombosis. The authors report a case of inherited protein S deficiency associated with vascular access thrombotic events. DNA sequence analysis of the PROS1 gene identified a novel heterozygous nonsense mutation in exon 10 by transition of AAG (lysine to TAG (stop codon at codon 473 (c.1417A>T, p.K473X. Results from the study suggest that the inherited protein S deficiency due to a PROS1 gene mutation may cause vascular access thrombosis in hemodialysis patients.

  5. Mutations of C-reactive protein (CRP -286 SNP, APC and p53 in colorectal cancer: implication for a CRP-Wnt crosstalk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Xiang Su

    Full Text Available C-reactive protein (CRP is an established marker of inflammation with pattern-recognition receptor-like activities. Despite the close association of the serum level of CRP with the risk and prognosis of several types of cancer, it remains elusive whether CRP contributes directly to tumorigenesis or just represents a bystander marker. We have recently identified recurrent mutations at the SNP position -286 (rs3091244 in the promoter of CRP gene in several tumor types, instead suggesting that locally produced CRP is a potential driver of tumorigenesis. However, it is unknown whether the -286 site is the sole SNP position of CRP gene targeted for mutation and whether there is any association between CRP SNP mutations and other frequently mutated genes in tumors. Herein, we have examined the genotypes of three common CRP non-coding SNPs (rs7553007, rs1205, rs3093077 in tumor/normal sample pairs of 5 cancer types (n = 141. No recurrent somatic mutations are found at these SNP positions, indicating that the -286 SNP mutations are preferentially selected during the development of cancer. Further analysis reveals that the -286 SNP mutations of CRP tend to co-occur with mutated APC particularly in rectal cancer (p = 0.04; n = 67. By contrast, mutations of CRP and p53 or K-ras appear to be unrelated. There results thus underscore the functional importance of the -286 mutation of CRP in tumorigenesis and imply an interaction between CRP and Wnt signaling pathway.

  6. Targeting the bHLH transcriptional networks by mutated E proteins in experimental glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyeler, Sarah; Joly, Sandrine; Fries, Michel; Obermair, Franz-Josef; Burn, Felice; Mehmood, Rashid; Tabatabai, Ghazaleh; Raineteau, Olivier

    2014-10-01

    Glioblastomas (GB) are aggressive primary brain tumors. Helix-loop-helix (HLH, ID proteins) and basic HLH (bHLH, e.g., Olig2) proteins are transcription factors that regulate stem cell proliferation and differentiation throughout development and into adulthood. Their convergence on many oncogenic signaling pathways combined with the observation that their overexpression in GB correlates with poor clinical outcome identifies these transcription factors as promising therapeutic targets. Important dimerization partners of HLH/bHLH proteins are E proteins that are necessary for nuclear translocation and DNA binding. Here, we overexpressed a wild type or a dominant negative form of E47 (dnE47) that lacks its nuclear localization signal thus preventing nuclear translocation of bHLH proteins in long-term glioma cell lines and in glioma-initiating cell lines and analyzed the effects in vitro and in vivo. While overexpression of E47 was sufficient to induce apoptosis in absence of bHLH proteins, dnE47 was necessary to prevent nuclear translocation of Olig2 and to achieve similar proapoptotic responses. Transcriptional analyses revealed downregulation of the antiapoptotic gene BCL2L1 and the proproliferative gene CDC25A as underlying mechanisms. Overexpression of dnE47 in glioma-initiating cell lines with high HLH and bHLH protein levels reduced sphere formation capacities and expression levels of Nestin, BCL2L1, and CDC25A. Finally, the in vivo induction of dnE47 expression in established xenografts prolonged survival. In conclusion, our data introduce a novel approach to jointly neutralize HLH and bHLH transcriptional networks activities, and identify these transcription factors as potential targets in glioma.

  7. Functional mutation of SMAC/DIABLO, encoding a mitochondrial proapoptotic protein, causes human progressive hearing loss DFNA64.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jing; Zhu, Yuhua; He, Sudan; Lu, Yanping; Chen, Jing; Han, Bing; Petrillo, Marco; Wrzeszczynski, Kazimierz O; Yang, Shiming; Dai, Pu; Zhai, Suoqiang; Han, Dongyi; Zhang, Michael Q; Li, Wei; Liu, Xuezhong; Li, Huawei; Chen, Zheng-Yi; Yuan, Huijun

    2011-07-15

    SMAC/DIABLO is a mitochondrial proapoptotic protein that is released from mitochondria during apoptosis and counters the inhibitory activities of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins, IAPs. By linkage analysis and candidate screening, we identified a heterozygous SMAC/DIABLO mutation, c.377C>T (p.Ser126Leu, refers to p.Ser71Leu in the mature protein) in a six-generation Chinese kindred characterized by dominant progressive nonsyndromic hearing loss, designated as DFNA64. SMAC/DIABLO is highly expressed in human embryonic ears and is enriched in the developing mouse inner-ear hair cells, suggesting it has a role in the development and homeostasis of hair cells. We used a functional study to demonstrate that the SMAC/DIABLO(S71L) mutant, while retaining the proapoptotic function, triggers significant degradation of both wild-type and mutant SMAC/DIABLO and renders host mitochondria susceptible to calcium-induced loss of the membrane potential. Our work identifies DFNA64 as the human genetic disorder associated with SMAC/DIABLO malfunction and suggests that mutant SMAC/DIABLO(S71L) might cause mitochondrial dysfunction.

  8. Unraveling the molecular effects of mutation L270P on Wiskkot-Aldrich syndrome protein: insights from molecular dynamics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniappan, Chandrasekaran; Rao, Sethumadhavan; Ramalingam, Rajasekaran

    2016-09-01

    Missense mutation L270P disrupts the auto-inhibited state of "Wiskkot-Aldrich syndrome protein" (WASP), thereby constitutively activating the mutant structure, a key event for pathogenesis of X-linked neutropenia (XLN). In this study, we comprehensively deciphered the molecular feature of activated mutant structure by all atom molecular dynamics (MD) approach. MD analysis revealed that mutant structure exposed a wide variation in the spatial environment of atoms, resulting in enhanced residue flexibility. The increased flexibility of residues favored to decrease the number of intra-molecular hydrogen bonding interactions in mutant structure. The reduction of hydrogen bonds in the mutant structure resulted to disrupt the local folding of secondary structural elements that eventually affect the proper folding of mutants. The unfolded state of mutant structure established more number of inter-molecular hydrogen bonding interaction at interface level due to the conformational variability, thus mediated high binding affinity with its interacting partner, Cdc42.

  9. Mutations in Biosynthetic Enzymes for the Protein Linker Region of Chondroitin/Dermatan/Heparan Sulfate Cause Skeletal and Skin Dysplasias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuji Mizumoto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycosaminoglycans, including chondroitin, dermatan, and heparan sulfate, have various roles in a wide range of biological events such as cell signaling, cell proliferation, tissue morphogenesis, and interactions with various growth factors. Their polysaccharides covalently attach to the serine residues on specific core proteins through the common linker region tetrasaccharide, -xylose-galactose-galactose-glucuronic acid, which is produced through the stepwise addition of respective monosaccharides by four distinct glycosyltransferases. Mutations in the human genes encoding the glycosyltransferases responsible for the biosynthesis of the linker region tetrasaccharide cause a number of genetic disorders, called glycosaminoglycan linkeropathies, including Desbuquois dysplasia type 2, spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and Larsen syndrome. This review focused on recent studies on genetic diseases caused by defects in the biosynthesis of the common linker region tetrasaccharide.

  10. Spinocerebellar ataxia-13 Kv3.3 potassium channels: arginine-to-histidine mutations affect both functional and protein expression on the cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian; Zhu, Jing; Thornhill, William B

    2013-09-01

    The voltage-gated potassium channel Kv3.3 is the causative gene of SCA13 (spinocerebellar ataxia type 13), an autosomal dominant neurological disorder. The four dominant mutations identified to date cause Kv3.3 channels to be non-functional or have altered gating properties in Xenopus oocytes. In the present paper, we report that SCA13 mutations affect functional as well as protein expression of Kv3.3 channels in a mammalian cell line. The reduced protein level of SCA13 mutants is caused by a shorter protein half-life, and blocking the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway increases the total protein of SCA13 mutants more than wild-type. SCA13 mutated amino acids are highly conserved, and the side chains of these residues play a critical role in the stable expression of Kv3.3 proteins. In addition, we show that mutant Kv3.3 protein levels could be partially rescued by treatment with the chemical chaperone TMAO (trimethylamine N-oxide) and to a lesser extent with co-expression of Kv3.1b. Thus our results suggest that amino acid side chains of SCA13 positions affect the protein half-life and/or function of Kv3.3, and the adverse effect on protein expression cannot be fully rescued.

  11. Iron-Sulfur Cluster Biogenesis Chaperones: Evidence for Emergence of Mutational Robustness of a Highly Specific Protein-Protein Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delewski, Wojciech; Paterkiewicz, Bogumiła; Manicki, Mateusz; Schilke, Brenda; Tomiczek, Bartłomiej; Ciesielski, Szymon J; Nierzwicki, Lukasz; Czub, Jacek; Dutkiewicz, Rafal; Craig, Elizabeth A; Marszalek, Jaroslaw

    2016-03-01

    Biogenesis of iron-sulfur clusters (FeS) is a highly conserved process involving Hsp70 and J-protein chaperones. However, Hsp70 specialization differs among species. In most eukaryotes, including Schizosaccharomyces pombe, FeS biogenesis involves interaction between the J-protein Jac1 and the multifunctional Hsp70 Ssc1. But, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and closely related species, Jac1 interacts with the specialized Hsp70 Ssq1, which emerged through duplication of SSC1. As little is known about how gene duplicates affect the robustness of their protein interaction partners, we analyzed the functional and evolutionary consequences of Ssq1 specialization on the ubiquitous J-protein cochaperone Jac1, by comparing S. cerevisiae and S. pombe. Although deletion of JAC1 is lethal in both species, alanine substitutions within the conserved His-Pro-Asp (HPD) motif, which is critical for Jac1:Hsp70 interaction, have species-specific effects. They are lethal in S. pombe, but not in S. cerevisiae. These in vivo differences correlated with in vitro biochemical measurements. Charged residues present in the J-domain of S. cerevisiae Jac1, but absent in S. pombe Jac1, are important for tolerance of S. cerevisiae Jac1 to HPD alterations. Moreover, Jac1 orthologs from species that encode Ssq1 have a higher sequence divergence. The simplest interpretation of our results is that Ssq1's coevolution with Jac1 resulted in expansion of their binding interface, thus increasing the efficiency of their interaction. Such an expansion could in turn compensate for negative effects of HPD substitutions. Thus, our results support the idea that the robustness of Jac1 emerged as consequence of its highly efficient and specific interaction with Ssq1. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Biological impacts of "hot-spot" mutations of hepatitis B virus X proteins are genotype B and C differentiated

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Lin; Xiao Xu; Qing-Ling Huang; Yu-Qing Liu; Da-Li Zheng; Wan-Nan Chen; Jian-Yin Lin

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the biological impacts of "hot-spot"mutations on genotype B and C HBV X proteins (HBx).METHODS: Five types of"hot-spot" mutations of genotype B or C HBV X genes, which sequentially lead to the amino acid substitutions of HBx as I127T, F132Y, K130M+V131I,I127T+K130M+V131I, or K130M+V131I+F132Y, respectively,were generated by means of site-directed mutagenesis.To evaluate the anti-proliferative effects, HBx or related mutants' expression vectors were transfected separately to the Chang cells by lipofectamine, and the cells were cultured in hygromycin selective medium for 14 d, drug-resistant colonies were fixed with cold methanol, stained with Giemsa dyes and scored (increase of the colonies indicated the reduction of the anti-proliferation activity,and vice versa). Different types of HBx expression vectors were co-transfected separately with the reporter plasmid pCMVβ to Chang cells, which were lysed 48 h post-transfection and the intra-cellular β-galactosidase activities were monitored (increase of the β-galactosidase activities indicated the reduction of the transactivation activity, and vice versa). All data obtained were calculated by paired-samples t-test.RESULTS: As compared to standard genotype B HBx,mutants of I127T and I127T+K130M+V131I showed higher transactivation and anti-proliferative activities, while the mutants of F132Y, K130M+V131I, and K130M+V131I+F132Y showed lower activities. As compared to standard genotype C HBx, I127T mutant showed higher transactivation activity, while the other four types of mutants showed no differences. With regard to anti-proliferative activity,compared to standard genotype C HBx, F132Y and K130M+V131I mutants showed lower activities, and K130M+V131I +F132Y mutant, on the other hand, showed higher activity,while the mutants of I127T and I127T+K130M+V131I showed no differences.CONCLUSION: "Hot-spot" mutations affect the antiproliferation and transactivation activities of genotype B and/or C HBx, and

  13. Experimental Estimation of the Effects of All Amino-Acid Mutations to HIV's Envelope Protein on Viral Replication in Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddox, Hugh K; Dingens, Adam S; Bloom, Jesse D

    2016-12-01

    HIV is notorious for its capacity to evade immunity and anti-viral drugs through rapid sequence evolution. Knowledge of the functional effects of mutations to HIV is critical for understanding this evolution. HIV's most rapidly evolving protein is its envelope (Env). Here we use deep mutational scanning to experimentally estimate the effects of all amino-acid mutations to Env on viral replication in cell culture. Most mutations are under purifying selection in our experiments, although a few sites experience strong selection for mutations that enhance HIV's replication in cell culture. We compare our experimental measurements of each site's preference for each amino acid to the actual frequencies of these amino acids in naturally occurring HIV sequences. Our measured amino-acid preferences correlate with amino-acid frequencies in natural sequences for most sites. However, our measured preferences are less concordant with natural amino-acid frequencies at surface-exposed sites that are subject to pressures absent from our experiments such as antibody selection. Our data enable us to quantify the inherent mutational tolerance of each site in Env. We show that the epitopes of broadly neutralizing antibodies have a significantly reduced inherent capacity to tolerate mutations, rigorously validating a pervasive idea in the field. Overall, our results help disentangle the role of inherent functional constraints and external selection pressures in shaping Env's evolution.

  14. Interactions of y+LAT1 and 4F2hc in the y+l amino acid transporter complex: consequences of lysinuric protein intolerance-causing mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toivonen, Minna; Tringham, Maaria; Kurko, Johanna; Terho, Perttu; Simell, Olli; Heiskanen, Kaisa M; Mykkänen, Juha

    2013-12-01

    Lysinuric protein intolerance (LPI) is an inherited aminoaciduria caused by recessive mutations in the SLC7A7 gene encoding y+L amino acid transporter 1 (y+LAT1), which combines with 4F2hc to generate an active transporter responsible for the system y+L amino acid transport. We have previously shown that the y+LAT1 proteins with point mutations are expressed in the plasma membrane, while those with frameshift mutations are retained in the cytoplasm. This finding has prompted us to study whether the difference in localization is due to the inability of the structurally altered mutant y+LAT1 proteins to heteromerize with 4F2hc. For this purpose, we utilized FACS technique to reveal fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in cells expressing wild type or LPI-mutant CFP-tagged y+LAT1 and YFP-tagged 4F2hc. The heteromerization of y+LAT1 and 4F2hc within the cell is not disrupted by any of the tested LPI mutations. In addition, the expression rate of the LPI mutant y+LAT1 proteins was significantly lower and cellular mortality was markedly increased than that of the wild type y+LAT1 in transfected samples. Our results indicate that the FACS-FRET method provides an alternative approach for screening of potential protein associations.

  15. Mutations that alter the transport function of the LamB protein in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Wandersman, C; Schwartz, M

    1982-01-01

    Some Escherichia coli K-12 lamB mutants, those producing reduced amounts of LamB protein (one-tenth the wild type amount), grow normally on dextrins but transport maltose when present at a concentration of 1 microM at about one-tenth the normal rate. lamB Dex- mutants were found as derivatives of these strains. These Dex- mutants are considerably impaired in the transport of maltose at low concentrations (below 10 microM), and they have a structurally altered LamB protein which is impaired in...

  16. Association of mutations in the zona pellucida binding protein 1 (ZPBP1) gene with abnormal sperm head morphology in infertile men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsenko, Alexander N.; O'Neil, Derek S.; Roy, Angshumoy; Arias-Mendoza, Paola A.; Chen, Ruihong; Murthy, Lata J.; Lamb, Dolores J.; Matzuk, Martin M.

    2012-01-01

    Nearly 7% of men are afflicted by male infertility worldwide, and genetic factors are suspected to play a significant role in the majority of these patients. Although sperm morphology is an important parameter measured in the semen analysis, only a few genetic causes of teratozoospermia are currently known. The objective of this study was to define the association between alterations in the genes encoding the Golgi-associated PDZ- and coiled-coil motif containing protein (GOPC), the protein interacting with C kinase 1 (PICK1) and the acrosomal protein zona pellucida binding protein 1 (ZPBP1/sp38) with abnormal sperm head morphology in infertile men. Previous reports demonstrated that mice lacking Gopc, Pick1 and Zpbp1 are infertile due to abnormal head morphology. Herein, using our validated RNA-based method, we studied spermatozoal cDNA encoding the human GOPC, PICK1 and ZPBP1 genes in 381 teratozoospermic and 240 controls patients via direct sequencing. Among these genes, we identified missense and splicing mutations in the sperm cDNA encoding ZPBP1 in 3.9% (15/381) of men with abnormal sperm head morphology. These mutations were not observed in 240 matched controls and the dbSNP database (χ2 = 9.3, P = 0.002). In contrast, statistically significant and functionally relevant mutations were not discovered in the GOPC and PICK1 genes. In our study ZPBP1 mutations are associated with abnormal sperm head morphology, defined according to strict criteria, resembling the mouse Zpbp1 null phenotype. We hypothesize that missense mutations exert a dominant-negative effect due to altered ZPBP1 protein folding and protein:protein interactions in the acrosome. PMID:21911476

  17. Catalytic effects of mutations of distant protein residues in human DNA polymerase β: theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klvaňa, Martin; Murphy, Drew L; Jeřábek, Petr; Goodman, Myron F; Warshel, Arieh; Sweasy, Joann B; Florián, Jan

    2012-11-06

    We carried out free-energy calculations and transient kinetic experiments for the insertion of the right (dC) and wrong (dA) nucleotides by wild-type (WT) and six mutant variants of human DNA polymerase β (Pol β). Since the mutated residues in the point mutants, I174S, I260Q, M282L, H285D, E288K, and K289M, were not located in the Pol β catalytic site, we assumed that the WT and its point mutants share the same dianionic phosphorane transition-state structure of the triphosphate moiety of deoxyribonucleotide 5'-triphosphate (dNTP) substrate. On the basis of this assumption, we have formulated a thermodynamic cycle for calculating relative dNTP insertion efficiencies, Ω = (k(pol)/K(D))(mut)/(k(pol)/K(D))(WT) using free-energy perturbation (FEP) and linear interaction energy (LIE) methods. Kinetic studies on five of the mutants have been published previously using different experimental conditions, e.g., primer-template sequences. We have performed a presteady kinetic analysis for the six mutants for comparison with wild-type Pol β using the same conditions, including the same primer/template DNA sequence proximal to the dNTP insertion site used for X-ray crystallographic studies. This consistent set of kinetic and structural data allowed us to eliminate the DNA sequence from the list of factors that can adversely affect calculated Ω values. The calculations using the FEP free energies scaled by 0.5 yielded 0.9 and 1.1 standard deviations from the experimental log Ω values for the insertion of the right and wrong dNTP, respectively. We examined a hybrid FEP/LIE method in which the FEP van der Waals term for the interaction of the mutated amino acid residue with its surrounding environment was replaced by the corresponding van der Waals term calculated using the LIE method, resulting in improved 0.4 and 1.0 standard deviations from the experimental log Ω values. These scaled FEP and FEP/LIE methods were also used to predict log Ω for R283A and R283L Pol

  18. Mutations in the H, F, or M Proteins Can Facilitate Resistance of Measles Virus to Neutralizing Human Anti-MV Sera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Kweder

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although there is currently no evidence of emerging strains of measles virus (MV that can resist neutralization by the anti-MV antibodies present in vaccinees, certain mutations in circulating wt MV strains appear to reduce the efficacy of these antibodies. Moreover, it has been hypothesized that resistance to neutralization by such antibodies could allow MV to persist. In this study, we use a novel in vitro system to determine the molecular basis of MV’s resistance to neutralization. We find that both wild-type and laboratory strain MV variants that escape neutralization by anti-MV polyclonal sera possess multiple mutations in their H, F, and M proteins. Cytometric analysis of cells expressing viral escape mutants possessing minimal mutations and their plasmid-expressed H, F, and M proteins indicates that immune resistance is due to particular mutations that can occur in any of these three proteins that affect at distance, rather than directly, the native conformation of the MV-H globular head and hence its epitopes. A high percentage of the escape mutants contain mutations found in cases of Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis (SSPE and our results could potentially shed light on the pathogenesis of this rare fatal disease.

  19. Mutations in LCA5, encoding the ciliary protein lebercilin, cause Leber congenital amaurosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollander, A.I. den; Koenekoop, R.K.; Mohamed, M.D.; Arts, H.H.; Boldt, K.; Towns, K.V.; Sedmak, T.; Beer, M. de; Nagel-Wolfrum, K.; McKibbin, M.; Dharmaraj, S.; Lopez, I.; Ivings, L.; Williams, G.A.; Springell, K.; Woods, C.G.; Jafri, H.; Rashid, Y.; Strom, T.M.; Zwaag, B. van der; Gosens, I.; Kersten, F.F.J.; Wijk, E. van; Veltman, J.A.; Zonneveld, M.N.; Beersum, S.E.C. van; Maumenee, I.H.; Wolfrum, U.; Cheetham, M.E.; Ueffing, M.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Inglehearn, C.F.; Roepman, R.

    2007-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) causes blindness or severe visual impairment at or within a few months of birth. Here we show, using homozygosity mapping, that the LCA5 gene on chromosome 6q14, which encodes the previously unknown ciliary protein lebercilin, is associated with this disease. We dete

  20. Moving in the Right Direction: Evolution of Protein Structural Vibrations with Functional State and Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessen, Katherine; Xu, Mengyang; Snell, Edward; Markelz, Andrea

    Long-range intramolecular vibrations may enable efficient access to functionally important conformations. We examine how these motions change with inhibitor binding and mutation using terahertz anisotropic absorption and molecular modeling. The measured anisotropic absorption dramatically changes with 3NAG inhibitor binding for wild type (WT) free chicken egg white lysozyme (CEWL). We examine the evolution of internal motions with binding using normal mode analysis to calculate an ensemble averaged vibrational density of states (VDOS) and isotropic and anisotropic absorptions for both WT and a two residue (R14 and H15) deletion mutant which has a 1.4 higher activity rate. While the VDOS and isotropic response are largely unchanged with inhibitor binding, the anisotropic response changes dramatically with binding. However, for the mutant the calculated unbound anisotropic absorption more closely resembles its bound spectrum, and it has increased calculated mean squared fluctuations in regions overlapping those in its bound state. These results indicate that the mutant's enhanced activity may be due to a shift in the direction of vibrations toward those of the bound state, increasing the sampling rate of the bound conformation.

  1. Structural Characterization of Missense Mutations Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry: A Case Study of the Parkinson's-Related Protein, DJ-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Nissan, Gili; Chotiner, Almog; Tarnavsky, Mark; Sharon, Michal

    2016-06-01

    Missense mutations that lead to the expression of mutant proteins carrying single amino acid substitutions are the cause of numerous diseases. Unlike gene lesions, insertions, deletions, nonsense mutations, or modified RNA splicing, which affect the length of a polypeptide, or determine whether a polypeptide is translated at all, missense mutations exert more subtle effects on protein structure, which are often difficult to evaluate. Here, we took advantage of the spectral resolution afforded by the EMR Orbitrap platform, to generate a mass spectrometry-based approach relying on simultaneous measurements of the wild-type protein and the missense variants. This approach not only considerably shortens the analysis time due to the concurrent acquisition but, more importantly, enables direct comparisons between the wild-type protein and the variants, allowing identification of even subtle structural changes. We demonstrate our approach using the Parkinson's-associated protein, DJ-1. Together with the wild-type protein, we examined two missense mutants, DJ-1A104T and DJ-1D149A, which lead to early-onset familial Parkinson's disease. Gas-phase, thermal, and chemical stability assays indicate clear alterations in the conformational stability of the two mutants: the structural stability of DJ-1D149A is reduced, whereas that of DJ-1A104T is enhanced. Overall, we anticipate that the methodology presented here will be applicable to numerous other missense mutants, promoting the structural investigations of multiple variants of the same protein.

  2. Apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC) expression profiles in familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) patients with different MEFV mutation patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalbantoglu, S; Tanyolac, B; Berdeli, A

    2013-01-01

    The inflammasome complex and the inflammatory pathway have been implicated in the pathogenesis of the most common autoinflammatory disorder, familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). Pyrin, the protein product of the FMF gene MEFV, interacts with the inflammasome complex adaptor protein ASC/PYCARD (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein with a CARD). Pyrin and ASC can both function as either inducers or suppressors of the cellular inflammatory response. We aimed to characterize ASC-induced gene expression profiles in FMF patients with different MEFV mutation patterns. A total of 165 Caucasian patients with clinical and molecular FMF diagnoses were enrolled in the study. ASC gene expression was quantified by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). ASC mRNA expression was increased in the MEFV mutation-positive group compared to the mutation-negative group (p = 0.001). The fold changes of ASC expression in the M694V homozygous (p = 0.02), M694V heterozygous (p = 0.012), compound heterozygous (p = 0.002), and R202Q/P369S/R408Q (p = 0.00) groups relative to the MEFV mutation-negative group were +2.4, +2.7, +3, and +3.4, respectively. qRT-PCR did not reveal a significant difference in ASC mRNA expression levels among the MEFV mutation-positive groups (p > 0.05). ASC mRNA expression was up-regulated in patients carrying MEFV mutations independent of mutation type. There was no significant relationship between specific MEFV genotypes and the level of ASC expression in the patient group analysed. Thus, the findings of this work may suggest a crucial relationship between mutant MEFV/pyrin and remarkable ASC up-regulation in FMF inflammation.

  3. Mucopolysaccharidosis type I in 21 Czech and Slovak patients: Mutation analysis suggests a functional importance of C-terminus of the IDUA protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazna, Alzbeta; Beesley, Clare; Berna, Linda; Stolnaja, Larisa; Myskova, Helena; Bouckova, Michaela; Vlaskova, Hana; Poupetova, Helena; Zeman, Jiri; Magner, Martin; Hlavata, Anna; Winchester, Bryan; Hrebicek, Martin; Dvorakova, Lenka

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder that is caused by a deficiency of the enzyme α-l-iduronidase (IDUA). Of the 21 Czech and Slovak patients who have been diagnosed with MPS I in the last 30 years, 16 have a severe clinical presentation (Hurler syndrome), 2 less severe manifestations (Scheie syndrome), and 3 an intermediate severity (Hurler/Scheie phenotype). Mutation analysis was performed in 20 MPS I patients and 39 mutant alleles were identified. There was a high prevalence of the null mutations p.W402X (12 alleles) and p.Q70X (7 alleles) in this cohort. Four of the 13 different mutations were novel: p.V620F (3 alleles), p.W626X (1 allele), c.1727 + 2T > G (1 allele) and c.1918_1927del (2 alleles). The pathogenicity of the novel mutations was verified by transient expression studies in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Seven haplotypes were observed in the patient alleles using 13 intragenic polymorphisms. One of the two haplotypes associated with the mutation p.Q70X was not found in any of the controls. Haplotype analysis showed, that mutations p.Q70X, p.V620F, and p.D315Y probably have more than one ancestor. Missense mutations localized predominantly in the hydrophobic core of the enzyme are associated with the severe phenotype, whereas missense mutations localized to the surface of the enzyme are usually associated with the attenuated phenotypes. Mutations in the 130 C-terminal amino acids lead to clinical manifestations, which indicates a functional importance of the C-terminus of the IDUA protein. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:19396826

  4. Mutation Analysis of Gap Junction Protein Beta 1 and Genotype-Phenotype Correlation in X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease in Chinese Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Sun; Zhao-Hui Chen; Li Ling; Yi-Fan Li; Li-Zhi Liu; Fei Yang; Xu-Sheng Huang

    2016-01-01

    Background:Among patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT),the X-linked variant (CMTX) caused by gap junction protein beta 1 (GJB1) gene mutation is the second most frequent type,accounting for approximately 90% of all CMTX.More than 400 mutations have been identified in the GJB1 gene that encodes connexin 32 (CX32).CX32 is thought to form gap junctions that promote the diffusion pathway between cells.GJB1 mutations interfere with the formation of the functional channel and impair the maintenance of peripheral myelin,and novel mutations are continually discovered.Methods:We included 79 unrelated patients clinically diagnosed with CMT at the Department of Neurology of the Chinese People's Liberation Army General Hospital from December 20,2012,to December 31,2015.Clinical examination,nerve conduction studies,and molecular and bioinformatics analyses were performed to identify patients with CMTX 1.Results:Nine GJB1 mutations (c.283G>A,c.77C>T,c.643C>T,c.515C>T,c.191G>A,c.610C>T,c.490C>T,c.491G>A,and c.44G>A) were discovered in nine patients.Median motor nerve conduction velocities of all nine patients were < 38 m/s,resembling CMT Type 1.Three novel mutations,c.643C>T,c.191G>A,and c.610C>T,were revealed and bioinformatics analyses indicated high pathogenicity.Conclusions:The three novel missense mutations within the GJB1 gene broaden the mutational diversity of CMT 1 X.Molecular analysis of family members and bioinformatics analyses of the afflicted patients confirmed the pathogenicity of these mutations.

  5. Ratio of mutated versus wild-type coat protein sequences in Pepino mosaic virus determines the nature and severity of yellowing symptoms on tomato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasiów-Jaroszewska, Beata; Paeleman, Anneleen; Ortega-Parra, Nelia; Borodynko, Natasza; Minicka, Julia; Czerwoniec, Anna; Thomma, Bart P H J; Hanssen, Inge M

    2013-12-01

    Recently, Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) infections causing severe yellowing symptoms in tomato plants have been reported in glasshouse tomato crops. When studying this phenomenon in commercial glasshouses, two different types of yellowing symptoms, occurring in adjacent plants, were distinguished: interveinal leaf yellowing and yellow mosaics. After several weeks, the interveinal leaf yellowing symptoms gradually disappeared and the plant heads became green again, with yellow mosaic patterns on the leaves as an intermediate stage. The sequencing of multiple isolates causing interveinal leaf yellowing identified two point mutations, occurring in positions 155 and 166 of the coat protein (CP), as unique to the yellowing pathotype. Site-directed mutagenesis of infectious clones confirmed that both CP mutations are determinants of the interveinal leaf yellowing symptoms. Sequencing of CP clones from plants or plant parts with the yellow mosaic symptoms resulted in a mixture of wild-type and mutated sequences, whereas sequencing of CP clones from the green heads of recovered plants resulted in only wild-type sequences. Yellow mosaic symptoms could be reproduced by inoculation of an artificial 1:1 mixture of RNA transcripts from the wild-type and mutated infectious clones. These results show that the ratio of mutated versus wild-type sequences can determine the nature and severity of symptom development. The gradual recovery of the plants, which coincides with the disappearance of the yellowing mutations, suggests that selection pressure acts to the advantage of the wild-type virus. Experiments with wild-type and mutated infectious clones showed that reverse mutation events from mutant to wild-type occur and that the wild-type virus does not have a replicative advantage over the mutant. These results suggest that reverse mutation events occur, with subsequent selection pressure acting in favour of the wild-type virus in the growing plant parts, possibly related to a lower

  6. Probing Tertiary Structure of Proteins Using Single Trp Mutations with Circular Dichroism at Low Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Trp is the most spectroscopically informative aromatic amino acid of proteins. However, the near-UV circular dichroism (CD) spectrum of Trp is complicated because the intensity and sign of 1La and 1Lb bands vary independently. To resolve vibronic structure and gain site-specific information from complex spectra, deconvolution was combined with cooling and site-directed tryptophan substitution. Low temperature near-UV CD was used to probe the local tertiary structure of a loop and α-helix in tear lipocalin. Upon cooling, the enhancement of the intensities of the near-UV CD was not uniform, but depends on the position of Trp in the protein structure. The most enhanced 1Lb band was observed for Trp at position 124 in the α-helix segment matching the known increased conformational mobility during ligand binding. Some aspects of the CD spectra of W28 and W130 were successfully linked to specific rotamers of Trp previously obtained from fluorescence lifetime measurements. The discussion was based on a framework that the magnitude of the energy differences in local conformations governs the changes in the CD intensities at low temperature. The Trp CD spectral classification of Strickland was modified to facilitate the recognition of pseudo peaks. Near-UV CD spectra harbor abundant information about the conformation of proteins that site directed Trp CD can report. PMID:24404774

  7. Deficiency of the DNA repair protein nibrin increases the basal but not the radiation induced mutation frequency in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wessendorf, Petra [Institute of Medical and Human Genetics, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13353 Berlin (Germany); Vijg, Jan [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Michael F. Price Center, 1301 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Nussenzweig, André [Laboratory of Genome Integrity, National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Health, 37 Convent Drive, Room 1106, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Digweed, Martin, E-mail: martin.digweed@charite.de [Institute of Medical and Human Genetics, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13353 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • lacZ mutant frequencies measured in vivo in mouse models of radiosensitive Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome. • Spontaneous mutation frequencies are increased in lymphatic tissue due to Nbn mutation. • Single base transitions, not deletions, dominate the mutation spectrum. • Radiation induced mutation frequencies are not increased due to Nbn mutation. - Abstract: Nibrin (NBN) is a member of a DNA repair complex together with MRE11 and RAD50. The complex is associated particularly with the repair of DNA double strand breaks and with the regulation of cell cycle check points. Hypomorphic mutation of components of the complex leads to human disorders characterised by radiosensitivity and increased tumour occurrence, particularly of the lymphatic system. We have examined here the relationship between DNA damage, mutation frequency and mutation spectrum in vitro and in vivo in mouse models carrying NBN mutations and a lacZ reporter plasmid. We find that NBN mutation leads to increased spontaneous DNA damage in fibroblasts in vitro and high basal mutation rates in lymphatic tissue of mice in vivo. The characteristic mutation spectrum is dominated by single base transitions rather than the deletions and complex rearrangements expected after abortive repair of DNA double strand breaks. We conclude that in the absence of wild type nibrin, the repair of spontaneous errors, presumably arising during DNA replication, makes a major contribution to the basal mutation rate. This applies also to cells heterozygous for an NBN null mutation. Mutation frequencies after irradiation in vivo were not increased in mice with nibrin mutations as might have been expected considering the radiosensitivity of NBS patient cells in vitro. Evidently apoptosis is efficient, even in the absence of wild type nibrin.

  8. The fatty liver dystrophy (fld) mutation: Developmentally related alterations in hepatic triglyceride metabolism and protein expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reue, K.; Rehnmark, S.; Cohen, R.D.; Leete, T.H.; Doolittle, M.H. [West Los Angeles VA Medical Center, CA (United States). Lipid Research Lab.]|[Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Medicine; Giometti, C.S.; Mishler, K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Slavin, B.G. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Fatty liver dystrophy (fld) is an autosomal recessive mutation in mice characterized by hypertriglyceridemia and development of a fatty liver in the early neonatal period. Also associated with the fld phenotype is a tissue-specific deficiency in the expression of lipoprotein lipase and hepatic lipase, as well as elevations in hepatic apolipoprotein A-IV and apolipoprotein C-II mRNA levels. Although these lipid abnormalities resolve at the age of weaning, adult mutant mice exhibit a peripheral neuropathy associated with abnormal myelin formation. The fatty liver in fld/fld neonates is characterized by the accumulation of large triglyceride droplets within the parenchymal cells, and these droplets persist within isolated hepatocytes maintained in culture for several days. To identify the metabolic defect that leads to lipid accumulation, the authors investigated several aspects of cellular triglyceride metabolism. The mutant mice exhibited normal activity of acid triacylglycerol lipase, an enzyme thought to be responsible for hydrolysis of dietary triglycerides in the liver. Metabolic labeling studies performed with oleic acid revealed that free fatty acids accumulate in the liver of 3 day old fld/fld mice, but not in adults. This accumulation in liver was mirrored by elevated free fatty acid levels in plasma of fld/fld neonates, with levels highest in very young mice and returning to normal by the age of one month. Quantitation of fatty acid oxidation in cells isolated from fld/fld neonates revealed that oxidation rate is reduced 60% in hepatocytes and 40% in fibroblasts; hepatocytes from adult fld/fld mice exhibited an oxidation rate similar to those from wild-type mice.

  9. Mutation distribution in the NSP4 protein in rotaviruses isolated from Mexican children with moderate to severe gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ochoa, Guadalupe; Menchaca, Griselda E; Hernández, Carlos E; Rodríguez, Cristina; Tamez, Reyes S; Contreras, Juan F

    2013-03-11

    The NSP4 protein is a multifunctional protein that plays a role in the morphogenesis and pathogenesis of the rotavirus. Although NSP4 is considered an enterotoxin, the relationship between gastroenteritis severity and amino acid variations in NSP4 of the human rotavirus remains unclear. In this study, we analyzed the sequence diversity of NSP4 and the severity of gastroenteritis of children with moderate to severe gastroenteritis. The rotavirus-infected children were hospitalized before the rotavirus vaccine program in Mexico. All children had diarrhea within 1-4 days, 44 (88%) were vomiting and 35 (70%) had fevers. The severity analysis showed that 13 (26%) cases had mild gastroenteritis, 23 (46%) moderate gastroenteritis and 14 (28%) severe. NSP4 phylogenetic analysis showed three clusters within the genotype E1. Sequence analysis revealed similar mutations inside each cluster, and an uncommon variation in residue 144 was found in five of the Mexican NSP4 sequences. Most of the amino acid variations were located in the VP4 and VP6 binding site domains, with no relationship to different grades of gastroenteritis. This finding indicates that severe gastroenteritis caused by the rotavirus appears to be related to diverse viral or cellular factors instead of NSP4 activity as a unique pathogenic factor.

  10. Mutation Distribution in the NSP4 Protein in Rotaviruses Isolated from Mexican Children with Moderate to Severe Gastroenteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan F. Contreras

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The NSP4 protein is a multifunctional protein that plays a role in the morphogenesis and pathogenesis of the rotavirus. Although NSP4 is considered an enterotoxin, the relationship between gastroenteritis severity and amino acid variations in NSP4 of the human rotavirus remains unclear. In this study, we analyzed the sequence diversity of NSP4 and the severity of gastroenteritis of children with moderate to severe gastroenteritis. The rotavirus-infected children were hospitalized before the rotavirus vaccine program in Mexico. All children had diarrhea within 1-4 days, 44 (88% were vomiting and 35 (70% had fevers. The severity analysis showed that 13 (26% cases had mild gastroenteritis, 23 (46% moderate gastroenteritis and 14 (28% severe. NSP4 phylogenetic analysis showed three clusters within the genotype E1. Sequence analysis revealed similar mutations inside each cluster, and an uncommon variation in residue 144 was found in five of the Mexican NSP4 sequences. Most of the amino acid variations were located in the VP4 and VP6 binding site domains, with no relationship to different grades of gastroenteritis. This finding indicates that severe gastroenteritis caused by the rotavirus appears to be related to diverse viral or cellular factors instead of NSP4 activity as a unique pathogenic factor.

  11. Ribosomal protein L3 mutations are associated with cfr-mediated linezolid resistance in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus cohnii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hongtao; Tian, Rui; Li, Yanming; Chen, Dongke; Liu, Yalin; Hu, Yunjian; Xiao, Fei

    2015-06-01

    From June, 2012 to November, 2013 five linezolid-resistant Staphylococcus cohnii isolates were identified in our hospital in Beijing, China. The investigation of the resistance mechanisms confirmed that the cfr-carrying plasmids were the main cause of linezolid resistance in those clinical isolates. Moreover, all the five isolates had ribosomal protein L3 mutations, which had different coordinate effect on cfr-mediated linezolid resistance directly through the substitution of serine 158 by phenylalanine or tyrosine in L3 protein. In this study, two types of plasmids (p432, p438) (Accession No. KM114207) were found, which share high sequence identity with previously reported cfr-carrying pRM01 and pMHZ plasmids originated from northern and southern China, showing wide regional dissemination in China. The stability of linezolid resistance was studied by passaging single colonies serially on antibiotic-free blood medium, which showed that the susceptible derivatives emerged until the passages 39-42 with the elimination of cfr-carrying plasmid. Thus the high stability of this plasmid may pose a risk for the transmission among patients or even cause an outbreak in clinical settings.

  12. Three-Dimensional Visualizations in Teaching Genomics and Bioinformatics: Mutations in HIV Envelope Proteins and Their Consequences for Vaccine Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathy Takayama

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This project addresses the need to provide a visual context to teach the practical applications of genome sequencing and bioinformatics. Present-day research relies on indirect visualization techniques (e.g., fluorescence-labeling of DNA in sequencing reactions and sophisticated computer analysis. Such methods are impractical and prohibitively expensive for laboratory classes. More importantly, there is a need for curriculum resources that visually demonstrate the application of genome sequence information rather than the DNA sequencing methodology itself. This project is a computer-based lesson plan that engages students in collaborative, problem-based learning. The specific example focuses on approaches to Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1 vaccine design based on HIV-1 genome sequences using a case study. Students performed comparative alignments of variant HIV-1 sequences available from a public database. Students then examined the consequences of HIV-1 mutations by applying the alignments to three-dimensional images of the HIV-1 envelope protein structure, thus visualizing the implications for applications such as vaccine design. The lesson enhances problem solving through the application of one type of information (genomic or protein sequence into concrete visual conceptualizations. Assessment of student comprehension and problem-solving ability revealed marked improvement after the computer tutorial. Furthermore, contextual presentation of these concepts within a case study resulted in student responses that demonstrated higher levels of cognitive ability than was expected by the instructor.

  13. Rational design of mutations that change the aggregation rate of a protein while maintaining its native structure and stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilloni, Carlo; Sala, Benedetta Maria; Sormanni, Pietro; Porcari, Riccardo; Corazza, Alessandra; De Rosa, Matteo; Zanini, Stefano; Barbiroli, Alberto; Esposito, Gennaro; Bolognesi, Martino; Bellotti, Vittorio; Vendruscolo, Michele; Ricagno, Stefano

    2016-05-01

    A wide range of human diseases is associated with mutations that, destabilizing proteins native state, promote their aggregation. However, the mechanisms leading from folded to aggregated states are still incompletely understood. To investigate these mechanisms, we used a combination of NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations to compare the native state dynamics of Beta-2 microglobulin (β2m), whose aggregation is associated with dialysis-related amyloidosis, and its aggregation-resistant mutant W60G. Our results indicate that W60G low aggregation propensity can be explained, beyond its higher stability, by an increased average protection of the aggregation-prone residues at its surface. To validate these findings, we designed β2m variants that alter the aggregation-prone exposed surface of wild-type and W60G β2m modifying their aggregation propensity. These results allowed us to pinpoint the role of dynamics in β2m aggregation and to provide a new strategy to tune protein aggregation by modulating the exposure of aggregation-prone residues.

  14. Recombinant Envelope-Proteins with Mutations in the Conserved Fusion Loop Allow Specific Serological Diagnosis of Dengue-Infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Rockstroh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is a mosquito-borne flavivirus and a major international public health concern in many tropical and sub-tropical areas worldwide. DENV is divided into four major serotypes, and infection with one serotype leads to immunity against the same, but not the other serotypes. The specific diagnosis of DENV-infections via antibody-detection is problematic due to the high degree of cross-reactivity displayed by antibodies against related flaviviruses, such as West Nile virus (WNV, Yellow Fever virus (YFV or Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV. Especially in areas where several flaviviruses co-circulate or in the context of vaccination e.g. against YFV or TBEV, this severely complicates diagnosis and surveillance. Most flavivirus cross-reactive antibodies are produced against the highly conserved fusion loop (FL domain in the viral envelope (E protein. We generated insect-cell derived recombinant E-proteins of the four DENV-serotypes which contain point mutations in the FL domain. By using specific mixtures of these mutant antigens, cross-reactivity against heterologous flaviviruses was strongly reduced, enabling sensitive and specific diagnosis of the DENV-infected serum samples in IgG and IgM-measurements. These results have indications for the development of serological DENV-tests with improved specificity.

  15. Genotype-phenotype correlation between the cardiac myosin binding protein C mutation A31P and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a cohort of Maine Coon cats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granström, S; Godiksen, M T N; Christiansen, M;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: A missense mutation (A31P) in the cardiac myosin binding protein C gene has been associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) in Maine Coon cats. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of A31P on development of HCM, myocardial diastolic dysfunction detected by color ...

  16. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from a patient with frontotemporal dementia caused by a R406W mutation in microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mikkel A.; Hjermind, Lena E.; Hasholt, Lis F.

    2016-01-01

    Skin fibroblasts were obtained from a 59-year-old woman diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia. The disease is caused by a R406W mutation in microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT). Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were established by electroporation with episomal plasmids containing hOCT4...

  17. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from a patient with frontotemporal dementia caused by a P301L mutation in microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mikkel A.; Hjermind, Lena Elisabeth; Hasholt, Lis Frydenreich

    2016-01-01

    Skin fibroblasts were obtained froma 57-year-old woman diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia. The diseaseis caused by a P301L mutation in microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT). Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were established by electroporation with episomal plasmids containing hOCT4, h...

  18. Coat protein mutations in an attenuated Cucumber mosaic virus encoding mutant 2b protein that lacks RNA silencing suppressor activity induces chlorosis with photosynthesis gene repression and chloroplast abnormalities in infected tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Tomofumi; Yamazaki, Ryota; Wada, Tomoya; Ohki, Satoshi T

    2014-05-01

    In tobacco plants, the Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) pepo strain induces mosaic symptoms, including pale green chlorosis and malformed tissues. Here, we characterized the involvement of 2b protein and coat protein (CP) in the development of mosaic symptoms. A 2b mutant (R46C) that lacks viral suppressor of RNA silencing (VSR) activity showed an asymptomatic phenotype with low levels of virus accumulation. Tomato spotted wilt virus NSs protein did not complement the virulence of the R46C, although it did restore high-level virus accumulation. However, R46C mutants expressing mutated CP in which the amino acid P129 was mutated to A, E, C, Q, or S induced chlorosis that was associated with reduced expression of chloroplast and photosynthesis related genes (CPRGs) and abnormal chloroplasts with fewer thylakoid membranes. These results suggest that the CP of the CMV pepo strain acquires virulence by amino acid mutations, which causes CPRG repression and chloroplast abnormalities.

  19. Expression of cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein and its association with p53 mutation in colon cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Dong Zhou; Jie-Ping Yu; Hong-Xia Chen; Hong-Gang Yu; He-Sheng Luo

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of cellular FLICE (Fas associated death domain-like IL-1beta-converting enzyme)-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP) and its association with p53mutation in colon cancer.METHODS: Immunohistochemical staining of c-FLIP and mutant p53 by using specific antibodies was performed by the standard streptavidin-peroxidase technique for 45 colon cancer tissue samples with matched normal tissues. Semi-quantitative reverse transcriptional (RT)-PCR was used to measure c-FLIP mRNA levels. t-test statistical method was used in data analyses.RESULTS: c-FLIP mRNA was expressed in all colon cancer tissues and its level (0.63±0.12) was significantly higher than that in normal tissues (0.38±0.10, P<0.01). Immunohistochemically, c-FLIP protein was also expressed in all colon cancers (45/45) and 71.1% (32/45) showed an intense immunostaining, in contrast, 93.3% (42/45) of normal colonic mucosa showed positive staining and none of them immunostained intensely. The quantity of c-FLIP protein was significantly higher in cancer tissues than in normal mucosa (7.04±1.20 vs 5.21±0.86, P<0.01).Positive staining of mutant p53 protein was found in 60%(27/45) colon cancers. c-FLIP mRNA level was decreased in p53 positive group compared with p53 negative cancer tissues (0.59±0.13 vs 0.69±0.14, P<0.01), but c-FLIP protein had a significantly higher level in p53 positive cancer tissues than in negative ones (7.57±1.30 vs 6.25±1.27,P<0.01).CONCLUSION: c-FLIP is specially overexpressed in colon cancers and it might contribute to carcinogenesis of normal colonic mucosa. p53 may exert transcriptional upregulation effects on c-FLIP gene and more potent effects on promoting the degradation of c-FLIP protein.

  20. Insect Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin Cry2Ab Is Conferred by Mutations in an ABC Transporter Subfamily A Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wee Tek Tay

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of conventional chemical insecticides and bacterial toxins to control lepidopteran pests of global agriculture has imposed significant selection pressure leading to the rapid evolution of insecticide resistance. Transgenic crops (e.g., cotton expressing the Bt Cry toxins are now used world wide to control these pests, including the highly polyphagous and invasive cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera. Since 2004, the Cry2Ab toxin has become widely used for controlling H. armigera, often used in combination with Cry1Ac to delay resistance evolution. Isolation of H. armigera and H. punctigera individuals heterozygous for Cry2Ab resistance in 2002 and 2004, respectively, allowed aspects of Cry2Ab resistance (level, fitness costs, genetic dominance, complementation tests to be characterised in both species. However, the gene identity and genetic changes conferring this resistance were unknown, as was the detailed Cry2Ab mode of action. No cross-resistance to Cry1Ac was observed in mutant lines. Biphasic linkage analysis of a Cry2Ab-resistant H. armigera family followed by exon-primed intron-crossing (EPIC marker mapping and candidate gene sequencing identified three independent resistance-associated INDEL mutations in an ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC transporter gene we named HaABCA2. A deletion mutation was also identified in the H. punctigera homolog from the resistant line. All mutations truncate the ABCA2 protein. Isolation of further Cry2Ab resistance alleles in the same gene from field H. armigera populations indicates unequal resistance allele frequencies and the potential for Bt resistance evolution. Identification of the gene involved in resistance as an ABC transporter of the A subfamily adds to the body of evidence on the crucial role this gene family plays in the mode of action of the Bt Cry toxins. The structural differences between the ABCA2, and that of the C subfamily required for Cry1Ac toxicity, indicate differences in the

  1. Insect Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin Cry2Ab Is Conferred by Mutations in an ABC Transporter Subfamily A Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Wee Tek; Mahon, Rod J.; Heckel, David G.; Walsh, Thomas K.; Downes, Sharon; James, William J.; Lee, Sui-Fai; Reineke, Annette; Williams, Adam K.; Gordon, Karl H. J.

    2015-01-01

    The use of conventional chemical insecticides and bacterial toxins to control lepidopteran pests of global agriculture has imposed significant selection pressure leading to the rapid evolution of insecticide resistance. Transgenic crops (e.g., cotton) expressing the Bt Cry toxins are now used world wide to control these pests, including the highly polyphagous and invasive cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera. Since 2004, the Cry2Ab toxin has become widely used for controlling H. armigera, often used in combination with Cry1Ac to delay resistance evolution. Isolation of H. armigera and H. punctigera individuals heterozygous for Cry2Ab resistance in 2002 and 2004, respectively, allowed aspects of Cry2Ab resistance (level, fitness costs, genetic dominance, complementation tests) to be characterised in both species. However, the gene identity and genetic changes conferring this resistance were unknown, as was the detailed Cry2Ab mode of action. No cross-resistance to Cry1Ac was observed in mutant lines. Biphasic linkage analysis of a Cry2Ab-resistant H. armigera family followed by exon-primed intron-crossing (EPIC) marker mapping and candidate gene sequencing identified three independent resistance-associated INDEL mutations in an ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporter gene we named HaABCA2. A deletion mutation was also identified in the H. punctigera homolog from the resistant line. All mutations truncate the ABCA2 protein. Isolation of further Cry2Ab resistance alleles in the same gene from field H. armigera populations indicates unequal resistance allele frequencies and the potential for Bt resistance evolution. Identification of the gene involved in resistance as an ABC transporter of the A subfamily adds to the body of evidence on the crucial role this gene family plays in the mode of action of the Bt Cry toxins. The structural differences between the ABCA2, and that of the C subfamily required for Cry1Ac toxicity, indicate differences in the detailed mode

  2. Stomatin-like protein 2 overexpression in papillary thyroid carcinoma is significantly associated with high-risk clinicopathological parameters and BRAFV600E mutation.

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    Bartolome, Aleksandar; Boskovic, Srdjan; Paunovic, Ivan; Bozic, Vesna; Cvejic, Dubravka

    2016-04-01

    Stomatin-like protein 2 (SLP-2), a member of the stomatin protein family, has emerged as a potential molecular hallmark of tumor progression in several human malignancies. The aim of this study was to analyze SLP-2 expression pattern in benign and malignant thyroid tumors (n = 210) and to examine its relationship with clinicopathological parameters and BRAFV600E mutation in thyroid cancer. SLP-2 immunohistochemical expression was not detected in benign adenomas and was absent/weak in follicular and anaplastic carcinomas. High expression levels of SLP-2, found only in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), particularly in the classical variant, were significantly associated with adverse clinicopathological parameters: lymph node metastasis (p = 0.002), extrathyroid invasion (p < 0.001), pT status (p < 0.001), and advanced tumor stage (p = 0.001). Additional genotyping of PTC cases for the BRAFV600E mutation revealed for the first time a close relation between SLP-2 overexpression and the presence of BRAF mutation (p = 0.02) with high positive rates of lymph node metastasis (70%) and extrathyroid invasion (80%) in these cases. The significant association of SLP-2 overexpression with unfavorable clinicopathological characteristics and BRAFV600E mutation indicates that SLP-2 may have a role in aggressiveness of BRAF-mutated PTC and that SLP-2 evaluation could be clinically useful in identification of high-risk PTC patients.

  3. Pancreatic endocrine tumours: mutational and immunohistochemical survey of protein kinases reveals alterations in targetable kinases in cancer cell lines and rare primaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbo, V.; Beghelli, S.; Bersani, S.; Antonello, D.; Talamini, G.; Brunelli, M.; Capelli, P.; Falconi, M.; Scarpa, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Kinases represent potential therapeutic targets in pancreatic endocrine tumours (PETs). Patients and methods: Thirty-five kinase genes were sequenced in 36 primary PETs and three PET cell lines: (i) 4 receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK), epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), tyrosine-protein kinase KIT (KIT), platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRalpha); (ii) 6 belonging to the Akt/mTOR pathway; and (iii) 25 frequently mutated in cancers. The immunohistochemical expression of the four RTKs and the copy number of EGFR and HER2 were assessed in 140 PETs. Results: Somatic mutations were found in KIT in one and ATM in two primary neoplasms. Among 140 PETs, EGFR was immunopositive in 18 (13%), HER2 in 3 (2%), KIT in 16 (11%), and PDGFRalpha in 135 (96%). HER2 amplification was found in 2/130 (1.5%) PETs. KIT membrane immunostaining was significantly associated with tumour aggressiveness and shorter patient survival. PET cell lines QGP1, CM and BON harboured mutations in FGFR3, FLT1/VEGFR1 and PIK3CA, respectively. Conclusions: Only rare PET cases, harbouring either HER2 amplification or KIT mutation, might benefit from targeted drugs. KIT membrane expression deserves further attention as a prognostic marker. ATM mutation is involved in a proportion of PET. The finding of specific mutations in PET cell lines renders these models useful for preclinical studies involving pathway-specific therapies. PMID:21447618

  4. Effects of naturally occurring missense mutations and G525V in the hydratase domain of human d-bifunctional protein on hydratase activity

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    Shirou Tsuchida

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available d-bifunctional protein (d-BP deficiency is thought to lead to severe lipid metabolism disorders. To investigate the effect of naturally occurring missense mutations in the hydratase domain in d-BP, we constructed several d-BP hydratase variants and measured their activities. Missense mutations at sites whose conservation rates among 30 eukaryotes were < 70% did not affect hydratase activity. We predicted that missense mutations of highly conserved amino acids would markedly reduce activity. However, R562H and R562L, naturally occurring missense mutations of highly conserved amino acids, did not reduce activity. This result suggests that a missense mutation in a highly conserved amino acid does not always lead to severe lipid metabolism disorders. We also investigated the effect of G525V, which had been found in a mildly symptomatic patient with d-BP deficiency who was heterozygous for G525 and G658X. G525V markedly reduced hydratase activity. We had predicted that heterozygous G525V and G658X would lead to severely disordered lipid metabolism. However, the symptoms were inconsistent with this prediction. Characterizing mutations in the d-BP gene and the symptoms of d-BP deficiency may require pleiotropy, not only in vitro, studies.

  5. Ligand- and mutation-induced conformational selection in the CCR5 chemokine G protein-coupled receptor.

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    Abrol, Ravinder; Trzaskowski, Bartosz; Goddard, William A; Nesterov, Alexandre; Olave, Ivan; Irons, Christopher

    2014-09-09

    We predicted the structural basis for pleiotropic signaling of the C-C chemokine type 5 (CCR5) G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) by predicting the binding of several ligands to the lower-energy conformations of the CCR5 receptor and 11 mutants. For each case, we predicted the ∼ 20 most stable conformations for the receptor along with the binding sites for four anti-HIV ligands. We found that none of the ligands bind to the lowest-energy apo-receptor conformation. The three ligands with a similar pharmacophore (Maraviroc, PF-232798, and Aplaviroc) bind to a specific higher-energy receptor conformation whereas TAK-779 (with a different pharmacophore) binds to a different high-energy conformation. This result is in agreement with the very different binding-site profiles for these ligands obtained by us and others. The predicted Maraviroc binding site agrees with the recent structure of CCR5 receptor cocrystallized with Maraviroc. We performed 11 site-directed mutagenesis experiments to validate the predicted binding sites. Here, we independently predicted the lowest 10 mutant protein conformations for each of the 11 mutants and then docked the ligands to these lowest conformations. We found the predicted binding energies to be in excellent agreement with our mutagenesis experiments. These results show that, for GPCRs, each ligand can stabilize a different protein conformation, complicating the use of cocrystallized structures for ligand screening. Moreover, these results show that a single-point mutation in a GPCR can dramatically alter the available low-energy conformations, which in turn alters the binding site, potentially altering downstream signaling events. These studies validate the conformational selection paradigm for the pleiotropic function and structural plasticity of GPCRs.

  6. Mutational analysis of an archaeal minichromosome maintenance protein exterior hairpin reveals critical residues for helicase activity and DNA binding

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    Brewster Aaron S

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mini-chromosome maintenance protein (MCM complex is an essential replicative helicase for DNA replication in Archaea and Eukaryotes. While the eukaryotic complex consists of six homologous proteins (MCM2-7, the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus has only one MCM protein (ssoMCM, six subunits of which form a homohexamer. We have recently reported a 4.35Å crystal structure of the near full-length ssoMCM. The structure reveals a total of four β-hairpins per subunit, three of which are located within the main channel or side channels of the ssoMCM hexamer model generated based on the symmetry of the N-terminal Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus (mtMCM structure. The fourth β-hairpin, however, is located on the exterior of the hexamer, near the exit of the putative side channels and next to the ATP binding pocket. Results In order to better understand this hairpin's role in DNA binding and helicase activity, we performed a detailed mutational and biochemical analysis of nine residues on this exterior β-hairpin (EXT-hp. We examined the activities of the mutants related to their helicase function, including hexamerization, ATPase, DNA binding and helicase activities. The assays showed that some of the residues on this EXT-hp play a role for DNA binding as well as for helicase activity. Conclusions These results implicate several current theories regarding helicase activity by this critical hexameric enzyme. As the data suggest that EXT-hp is involved in DNA binding, the results reported here imply that the EXT-hp located near the exterior exit of the side channels may play a role in contacting DNA substrate in a manner that affects DNA unwinding.

  7. Influence of mutations in hepatitis B virus surface protein on viral antigenicity and phenotype in occult HBV strains from blood donors.

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    Huang, Cheng-Hao; Yuan, Quan; Chen, Pei-Jer; Zhang, Ya-Li; Chen, Chang-Rong; Zheng, Qing-Bing; Yeh, Shiou-Hwei; Yu, Hai; Xue, Yu; Chen, Yi-Xin; Liu, Ping-Guo; Ge, Sheng-Xiang; Zhang, Jun; Xia, Ning-Shao

    2012-10-01

    This study aimed at investigating mutations in the hepatitis B surface protein (HBsAg) in occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (OBI) and their influence on viral antigenicity and phenotype. The characteristics of 61 carriers with OBI (OBI group), 153 HBsAg(+) carriers with serum HBsAg ≤ 100 IU/ml (HBsAg-L group) and 54 carriers with serum HBsAg >100 IU/ml (HBsAg-H group) from 38,499 blood donors were investigated. Mutations in the major hydrophilic region (MHR) of the viral sequences were determined. Thirteen representative MHR mutations observed in OBI sequences were antigenically characterized with a panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and commercial HBsAg immunoassays and functionally characterized in HuH7 cells and hydrodynamically injected mice. Of 61 OBI sequences, 34 (55.7%) harbored MHR mutations, which was significantly higher than the frequency in either the HBsAg-L (34.0%, p=0.003) or the HBsAg-H group (17.1%, pMHR mutations identified in the OBI group were assessed by reacting recombinant HBV mutants with 30 different MAbs targeting various epitopes. Four out of the 13 mutations (C124R, C124Y, K141E, and D144A) strongly decreased the analytical sensitivity of seven commercial HBsAg immunoassays, and 10 (G119R, C124Y, I126S, Q129R, S136P, C139R, T140I, K141E, D144A, and G145R) significantly impaired virion and/or S protein secretion in both HuH7 cells and mice. MHR mutations alter antigenicity and impair virion secretion, both of which may contribute to HBsAg detection failure in individuals with OBI. Copyright © 2012 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Genome-wide polysomal analysis of a yeast strain with mutated ribosomal protein S9

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    Arava Yoav

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The yeast ribosomal protein S9 (S9 is located at the entrance tunnel of the mRNA into the ribosome. It is known to play a role in accurate decoding and its bacterial homolog (S4 has recently been shown to be involved in opening RNA duplexes. Here we examined the effects of changing the C terminus of S9, which is rich in acidic amino acids and extends out of the ribosome surface. Results We performed a genome-wide analysis to reveal effects at the transcription and translation levels of all yeast genes. While negligible relative changes were observed in steady-state mRNA levels, a significant number of mRNAs appeared to have altered ribosomal density. Notably, 40% of the genes having reliable signals changed their ribosomal association by more than one ribosome. Yet, no general correlations with physical or functional features of the mRNA were observed. Ribosome Density Mapping (RDM along four of the mRNAs with increased association revealed an increase in ribosomal density towards the end of the coding region for at least two of them. Read-through analysis did not reveal any increase in read-through of a premature stop codon by the mutant strain. Conclusion The ribosomal protein rpS9 appears to be involved in the translation of many mRNAs, since altering its C terminus led to a significant change in ribosomal association of many mRNAs. We did not find strong correlations between these changes and several physical features of the mRNA, yet future studies with advanced tools may allow such correlations to be determined. Importantly, our results indicate an accumulation of ribosomes towards the end of the coding regions of some mRNAs. This suggests an involvement of S9 in ribosomal dissociation during translation termination.

  9. Envelope Protein Mutations L107F and E138K Are Important for Neurovirulence Attenuation for Japanese Encephalitis Virus SA14-14-2 Strain

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    Jian Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The attenuated Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV strain SA14-14-2 has been successfully utilized to prevent JEV infection; however, the attenuation determinants have not been fully elucidated. The envelope (E protein of the attenuated JEV SA14-14-2 strain differs from that of the virulent parental SA14 strain at eight amino acid positions (E107, E138, E176, E177, E264, E279, E315, and E439. Here, we investigated the SA14-14-2-attenuation determinants by mutating E107, E138, E176, E177, and E279 in SA14-14-2 to their status in the parental virulent strain and tested the replication capacity, neurovirulence, neuroinvasiveness, and mortality associated with the mutated viruses in mice, as compared with those of JEV SA14-14-2 and SA14. Our findings indicated that revertant mutations at the E138 or E107 position significantly increased SA14-14-2 virulence, whereas other revertant mutations exhibited significant increases in neurovirulence only when combined with E138, E107, and other mutations. Revertant mutations at all eight positions in the E protein resulted in the highest degree of SA14-14-2 virulence, although this was still lower than that observed in SA14. These results demonstrated the critical role of the viral E protein in controlling JEV virulence and identified the amino acids at the E107 and E138 positions as the key determinants of SA14-14-2 neurovirulence.

  10. Vacuolar Protein Sorting genes in Parkinson’s Disease: a re-appraisal of mutations detection rate and neurobiology of disease

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    Stefano Gambardella

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian retromers play a critical role in protein trans-membrane sorting from endosome to the trans-Golgi network (TGN. Recently, retromers have been linked to Parkinson's Disease (PD since the identification of the variant p.Asp620Asn in VPS35 (Vacuolar Protein Sorting 35 as a cause of late onset PD. This variant causes a primary defect in endosomal trafficking and retromers formation, which represent critical steps in the molecular mechanisms of disease. Other slightly penetrant and mildly deleterious mutations in VPS genes have been reported in both sporadic and familial PD. Therefore, understanding the actual prevalence of the whole range of VPS gene mutations is key to understand the relevance of retromers impairment in PD. This scenario indicates a plethora of mutations occurring in different pathways (autophagy, mitophagy, proteasome, endosomes, protein misfolding all converging to cell clearing systems. This may explain how genetic predispositions to PD may derive from slightly deleterious mutations when combining with heterogeneous environmental factors. This manuscript is a re-appraisal of genetic data produced in the last five years redefining the prevalence of VPS mutations in PD. The prevalence of p.Asp620Asn in VPS35 is 0.286 of familial PD. This data increases up to 0.548 considering mutations affecting all VPS genes, thus representing the second most frequent autosomal dominant PD genotype. This high prevalence, joined with increased awareness of the key role of retromers alterations in PD, strongly candidate environmentally-induced VPS alterations as key molecular mechanisms in the genesis of PD. rations as key molecular mechanisms in the genesis of PD.

  11. Mutation Analysis of Gap Junction Protein Beta 1 and Genotype-Phenotype Correlation in X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease in Chinese Patients.

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    Sun, Bo; Chen, Zhao-Hui; Ling, Li; Li, Yi-Fan; Liu, Li-Zhi; Yang, Fei; Huang, Xu-Sheng

    2016-05-05

    Among patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), the X-linked variant (CMTX) caused by gap junction protein beta 1 (GJB1) gene mutation is the second most frequent type, accounting for approximately 90% of all CMTX. More than 400 mutations have been identified in the GJB1 gene that encodes connexin 32 (CX32). CX32 is thought to form gap junctions that promote the diffusion pathway between cells. GJB1 mutations interfere with the formation of the functional channel and impair the maintenance of peripheral myelin, and novel mutations are continually discovered. We included 79 unrelated patients clinically diagnosed with CMT at the Department of Neurology of the Chinese People's Liberation Army General Hospital from December 20, 2012, to December 31, 2015. Clinical examination, nerve conduction studies, and molecular and bioinformatics analyses were performed to identify patients with CMTX1. Nine GJB1 mutations (c.283G>A, c.77C>T, c.643C>T, c.515C>T, c.191G>A, c.610C>T, c.490C>T, c.491G>A, and c.44G>A) were discovered in nine patients. Median motor nerve conduction velocities of all nine patients were T, c.191G>A, and c.610C>T, were revealed and bioinformatics analyses indicated high pathogenicity. The three novel missense mutations within the GJB1 gene broaden the mutational diversity of CMT1X. Molecular analysis of family members and bioinformatics analyses of the afflicted patients confirmed the pathogenicity of these mutations.

  12. Protein Structure-Function Relationship at Work:Learning from Myopathy Mutations of the Slow Skeletal Muscle Isoform of Troponin T

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    Anupom Mondal

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Troponin T (TnT is the sarcomeric thin filament anchoring subunit of the troponin complex in striated muscles. A nonsense mutation in exon 11 of the slow skeletal muscle isoform of TnT (ssTnT gene (TNNT1 was found in the Amish populations in Pennsylvania and Ohio. This single nucleotide substitution causes a truncation of the ssTnT protein at Glu180 and the loss of the C-terminal tropomyosin (Tm-binding site 2. As a consequence, it abolishes the myofilament integration of ssTnT and the loss of function causes an autosomal recessive nemaline myopathy (NM. More TNNT1 mutations have recently been reported in non-Amish ethnic groups with similar recessive NM phenotypes. A nonsense mutation in exon 9 truncates ssTnT at Ser108, deleting Tm-binding site 2 and a part of the middle region Tm-binding site 1. Two splicing site mutations result in truncation of ssTnT at Leu203 or deletion of the exon 14-encoded C-terminal end segment. Another splicing mutation causes an internal deletion of the 39 amino acids encoded by exon 8, partially damaging Tm-binding site 1. The three splicing mutations of TNNT1 all preserve the high affinity Tm-binding site 2 but still present recessive NM phenotypes. The molecular mechanisms for these mutations to cause myopathy provide interesting models to study and understand the structure-function relationship of TnT. This focused review summarizes the current knowledge of TnT isoform regulation, structure-function relationship of TnT and how various ssTnT mutations cause recessive NM, in order to promote in depth studies for further understanding the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of TNNT1 myopathies toward the development of effective treatments.□

  13. Mutation in mitochondrial ribosomal protein S7 (MRPS7) causes congenital sensorineural deafness, progressive hepatic and renal failure and lactic acidemia.

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    Menezes, Minal J; Guo, Yiran; Zhang, Jianguo; Riley, Lisa G; Cooper, Sandra T; Thorburn, David R; Li, Jiankang; Dong, Daoyuan; Li, Zhijun; Glessner, Joseph; Davis, Ryan L; Sue, Carolyn M; Alexander, Stephen I; Arbuckle, Susan; Kirwan, Paul; Keating, Brendan J; Xu, Xun; Hakonarson, Hakon; Christodoulou, John

    2015-04-15

    Functional defects of the mitochondrial translation machinery, as a result of mutations in nuclear-encoded genes, have been associated with combined oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) deficiencies. We report siblings with congenital sensorineural deafness and lactic acidemia in association with combined respiratory chain (RC) deficiencies of complexes I, III and IV observed in fibroblasts and liver. One of the siblings had a more severe phenotype showing progressive hepatic and renal failure. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a homozygous mutation in the gene encoding mitochondrial ribosomal protein S7 (MRPS7), a c.550A>G transition that encodes a substitution of valine for a highly conserved methionine (p.Met184Val) in both affected siblings. MRPS7 is a 12S ribosomal RNA-binding subunit of the small mitochondrial ribosomal subunit, and is required for the assembly of the small ribosomal subunit. Pulse labeling of mitochondrial protein synthesis products revealed impaired mitochondrial protein synthesis in patient fibroblasts. Exogenous expression of wild-type MRPS7 in patient fibroblasts rescued complexes I and IV activities, demonstrating the deleterious effect of the mutation on RC function. Moreover, reduced 12S rRNA transcript levels observed in the patient's fibroblasts were also restored to normal levels by exogenous expression of wild-type MRPS7. Our data demonstrate the pathogenicity of the identified MRPS7 mutation as a novel cause of mitochondrial RC dysfunction, congenital sensorineural deafness and progressive hepatic and renal failure.

  14. Identification of a novel mutation of the gene for gap junction protein α3 (GJA3) in a Chinese family with congenital cataract.

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    Hu, Ying; Gao, Lin; Feng, Yali; Yang, Tao; Huang, Shangzhi; Shao, Zhengbo; Yuan, Huiping

    2014-07-01

    Cataract, defined as any opacity of the crystallin lens, can be divided into early onset (congenital or infantile) and age-related. It is the leading cause of visual disability in children, and mutations in many genes have currently been linked with this disorder. In the present study, we identified a genetic defect in a Chinese family with congenital cataract. Genomic DNA was extracted from the venous blood of the family and 100 normal controls. To screen for the disease-causing mutation, we sequenced eight candidate genes, and to predict the functional consequences of the mutation, a structural model of the protein was developed using the Protein Data Bank and PyMOL 1.1r1. We found a novel variant (c.163 A > G transition) in the gene for gap junction protein α3, or the connexin46 gene. This mutation resulted in the substitution of a highly conserved asparagine at codon 55 by aspartic acid (p.N55D). There were no nucleotide polymorphisms in the other candidate genes sequenced.

  15. Structural and dynamic characterization of the C313Y mutation in Myostatin dimeric protein, responsible for the double muscle phenotype in Piedmontese cattle

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    Silvia eBongiorno

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of the molecular effects of the C313Y mutation, responsible for the double muscle phenotype in Piedmontese cattle, can help understanding the actual mechanism of phenotype determination and paves the route for a better modulation of the positive effects of this economic important phenotype in the beef industry, while minimizing the negative side effects, now inevitably intersected.The structure and dynamic behaviour of the active dimeric form of Myostatin in cattle was analyzed by means of three state-of-the-art Molecular Dynamics simulations, 200-ns long, of wild-type and C313Y mutants. Our results highlight a role for the conserved Arg333 in establishing a network of short and long range interactions between the two monomers in the wild-type protein that is destroyed upon the C313Y mutation even in a single monomer. Furthermore, the native protein shows an asymmetry in residue fluctuation that is absent in the double monomer mutant. Time window analysis on further 200-ns of simulation demonstrates that this is a characteristic behaviour of the protein, likely depended from the long range communications between monomers. The same behaviour, in fact, has already been observed in other mutated dimers. Finally, the mutation does not produce alterations in the secondary structure elements that compose the characteristic TGF-β cystine-knot motif.

  16. A novel missense mutation in CACNA1A evaluated by in silico protein modeling is associated with non-episodic spinocerebellar ataxia with slow progression.

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    Bürk, Katrin; Kaiser, Frank J; Tennstedt, Stephanie; Schöls, Ludger; Kreuz, Friedmar R; Wieland, Thomas; Strom, Tim M; Büttner, Thomas; Hollstein, Ronja; Braunholz, Diana; Plaschke, Jens; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Zühlke, Christine

    2014-04-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6), episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) and familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM1) are allelic disorders of the gene CACNA1A encoding the P/Q subunit of a voltage gated calcium channel. While SCA6 is related to repeat expansions affecting the C-terminal part of the protein, EA2 and FHM phenotypes are usually associated with nonsense and missense mutations leading to impaired channel properties. In three unrelated families with dominant cerebellar ataxia, symptoms cosegregated with CACNA1A missense mutations of evolutionary highly conserved amino acids (exchanges p.E668K, p.R583Q and p.D302N). To evaluate pathogenic effects, in silico, protein modeling analyses were performed which indicate structural alterations of the novel mutation p.E668K within the homologous domain 2 affecting CACNA1A protein function. The phenotype is characterised by a very slowly progressive ataxia, while ataxic episodes or migraine are uncommon. These findings enlarge the phenotypic spectrum of CACNA1A mutations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Autism-associated R451C mutation in neuroligin3 leads to activation of the unfolded protein response in a PC12 Tet-On inducible system.

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    Ulbrich, Lisa; Favaloro, Flores Lietta; Trobiani, Laura; Marchetti, Valentina; Patel, Vruti; Pascucci, Tiziana; Comoletti, Davide; Marciniak, Stefan J; De Jaco, Antonella

    2016-02-15

    Several forms of monogenic heritable autism spectrum disorders are associated with mutations in the neuroligin genes. The autism-linked substitution R451C in neuroligin3 induces local misfolding of its extracellular domain, causing partial retention in the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) of expressing cells. We have generated a PC12 Tet-On cell model system with inducible expression of wild-type or R451C neuroligin3 to investigate whether there is activation of the UPR (unfolded protein response) as a result of misfolded protein retention. As a positive control for protein misfolding, we also expressed the mutant G221R neuroligin3, which is known to be completely retained within the ER. Our data show that overexpression of either R451C or G221R mutant proteins leads to the activation of all three signalling branches of the UPR downstream of the stress sensors ATF6 (activating transcription factor 6), IRE1 (inositol-requiring enzyme 1) and PERK [PKR (dsRNA-dependent protein kinase)-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase]. Each branch displayed different activation profiles that partially correlated with the degree of misfolding caused by each mutation. We also show that up-regulation of BiP (immunoglobulin heavy-chain-binding protein) and CHOP [C/EBP (CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein)-homologous protein] was induced by both mutant proteins but not by wild-type neuroligin3, both in proliferative cells and cells differentiated to a neuron-like phenotype. Collectively, our data show that mutant R451C neuroligin3 activates the UPR in a novel cell model system, suggesting that this cellular response may have a role in monogenic forms of autism characterized by misfolding mutations.

  18. Phylogenetic analysis and predicted functional effect of protein mutations of E6 and E7 HPV16 strains isolated in Indonesia

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    Dwi Wulandari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: E6 and E7 are oncoproteins of HPV16. Natural amino acid variation in HPV16 E6 can alter its carcinogenic potential. The aim of this study was to analyze phylogenetically E6 and E7 genes and proteins of HPV16 from Indonesia and predict the effects of single amino acid substitution on protein function. This analysis could be used to reduce time, effort, and research cost as initial screening in selection of protein or isolates to be tested in vitro or in vivo.Methods: In this study, E6 and E7 gene sequences were obtained from 12 samples of  Indonesian isolates, which  were compared with HPV16R (prototype and 6 standard isolates in the category of European (E, Asian (As, Asian-American (AA, African-1 (Af-1, African-2 (Af-2, and North American (NA branch from Genbank. Bioedit v.7.0.0 was used to analyze the composition and substitution of single amino acids. Phylogenetic analysis of E6 and E7 genes and proteins was performed using Clustal X (1.81 and NJPLOT softwares. Effects of single amino acid substitutions on protein function of E6 and E7 were analysed by SNAP.Results: Java variants and isolate ui66* belonged to European branch, while the others belonged to Asian and African branches. Twelve changes of amino acids were found in E6 and one in E7 proteins. SNAP analysis showed two non neutral mutations, i.e. R10I and C63G in E6 proteins. R10I mutations were found in Af-2 genotype (AF472509 and Indonesian isolates (Af2*, while C63G mutation was found only in Af2*.Conclusion: E6 proteins of HPV16 variants were more variable than E7. SNAP analysis showed that only E6 protein of African-2 branch had functional differences compared to HPV16R.

  19. Tolerance to acetic acid is improved by mutations of the TATA-binding protein gene.

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    An, Jieun; Kwon, Hyeji; Kim, Eunjung; Lee, Young Mi; Ko, Hyeok Jin; Park, Hongjae; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Sooah; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Kim, Wankee; Choi, Wonja

    2015-03-01

    Screening a library of overexpressing mutant alleles of the TATA-binding gene SPT15 yielded two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains (MRRC 3252 and 3253) with enhanced tolerance to acetic acid. They were also tolerant to propionic acid and hydrogen peroxide. Transcriptome profile analysis identified 58 upregulated genes and 106 downregulated genes in MRRC 3252. Stress- and protein synthesis-related transcription factors were predominantly enriched in the upregulated and downregulated genes respectively. Eight deletion mutants for some of the highly downregulated genes were acetic acid-tolerant. The level of intracellular reactive oxygen species was considerably lessened in MRRC 3252 and 3253 upon exposure to acetic acid. Metabolome profile analysis revealed that intracellular concentrations of 5 and 102 metabolites were increased and decreased, respectively, in MRRC 3252, featuring a large increase of urea and a significant decrease of amino acids. The dur1/2Δmutant, in which the urea degradation gene DUR1/2 is deleted, displayed enhanced tolerance to acetic acid. Enhanced tolerance to acetic acid was also observed on the medium containing a low concentration of amino acids. Taken together, t