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Sample records for mutations lethal interactions

  1. Biophysical analysis of a lethal laminin alpha-1 mutation reveals altered self-interaction

    KAUST Repository

    Patel, Trushar R.

    2015-07-26

    Laminins are key basement membrane molecules that influence several biological activities and are linked to a number of diseases. They are secreted as heterotrimeric proteins consisting of one α, one β, and one γ chain, followed by their assembly into a polymer-like sheet at the basement membrane. Using sedimentation velocity, dynamic light scattering, and surface plasmon resonance experiments, we studied self-association of three laminin (LM) N-terminal fragments α-1 (hLM α-1 N), α-5 (hLM α-5 N) and β-3 (hLM β-3 N) originating from the short arms of the human laminin αβγ heterotrimer. Corresponding studies of the hLM α-1 N C49S mutant, equivalent to the larval lethal C56S mutant in zebrafish, have shown that this mutation causes enhanced self-association behavior, an observation that provides a plausible explanation for the inability of laminin bearing this mutation to fulfill functional roles in vivo, and hence for the deleterious pathological consequences of the mutation on lens function.

  2. Biophysical analysis of a lethal laminin alpha-1 mutation reveals altered self-interaction

    KAUST Repository

    Patel, Trushar R.; Nikodemus, Denise; Besong, Tabot M.D.; Reuten, Raphael; Meier, Markus; Harding, Stephen E.; Winzor, Donald J.; Koch, Manuel; Stetefeld, Jö rg

    2015-01-01

    Laminins are key basement membrane molecules that influence several biological activities and are linked to a number of diseases. They are secreted as heterotrimeric proteins consisting of one α, one β, and one γ chain, followed by their assembly into a polymer-like sheet at the basement membrane. Using sedimentation velocity, dynamic light scattering, and surface plasmon resonance experiments, we studied self-association of three laminin (LM) N-terminal fragments α-1 (hLM α-1 N), α-5 (hLM α-5 N) and β-3 (hLM β-3 N) originating from the short arms of the human laminin αβγ heterotrimer. Corresponding studies of the hLM α-1 N C49S mutant, equivalent to the larval lethal C56S mutant in zebrafish, have shown that this mutation causes enhanced self-association behavior, an observation that provides a plausible explanation for the inability of laminin bearing this mutation to fulfill functional roles in vivo, and hence for the deleterious pathological consequences of the mutation on lens function.

  3. Analysis of time of death of prenatally lethal Steeloid mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinchik, E.M.; Cummings, C.C.; Bangham, J.W.; Hunsicker, P.R.; Phipps, E.L.; Stelzner, K.F.

    1987-01-01

    Deletion mutations have been extremely useful in initiating the functional and molecular dissections of regions of the mouse genome. For the d-se and c regions, for example, it was observed that radiation mutations carrying lethal factors separable, by complementation analysis, from the primary d, se, or c mutation itself, could often be associated at both the genetic and molecular levels with multilocus chromosomal deletions. Since many of the Oak Ridge Sld mutations arose in radiation mutagenesis experiments, a substantial number may carry chromosomal deletions that involve the Sl locus in chromosome 10. Because of the great value of deletion mutations for the genetic and molecular analysis of chromosomal regions and complex genetic loci, they have initiated a series of experiments designed to test whether radiation-induced Sld mutations carry other lethal factors, in addition to the lethality caused by severe alleles of the Sl locus itself, as one prescreen for identifying Sld's that are caused by deletions

  4. Lethal mutagenesis: targeting the mutator phenotype in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Edward J; Loeb, Lawrence A

    2010-10-01

    The evolution of cancer and RNA viruses share many similarities. Both exploit high levels of genotypic diversity to enable extensive phenotypic plasticity and thereby facilitate rapid adaptation. In order to accumulate large numbers of mutations, we have proposed that cancers express a mutator phenotype. Similar to cancer cells, many viral populations, by replicating their genomes with low fidelity, carry a substantial mutational load. As high levels of mutation are potentially deleterious, the viral mutation frequency is thresholded at a level below which viral populations equilibrate in a traditional mutation-selection balance, and above which the population is no longer viable, i.e., the population undergoes an error catastrophe. Because their mutation frequencies are fine-tuned just below this error threshold, viral populations are susceptible to further increases in mutational load and, recently this phenomenon has been exploited therapeutically by a concept that has been termed lethal mutagenesis. Here we review the application of lethal mutagenesis to the treatment of HIV and discuss how lethal mutagenesis may represent a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of solid cancers. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Dominant-lethal mutations and heritable translocations in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generoso, W.M.

    1983-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations are a major component of radiation or chemically induced genetic damage in mammalian germ cells. The types of aberration produced are dependent upon the mutagen used and the germ-cell stage treated. For example, in male meiotic and postmeiotic germ cells certain alkylating chemicals induce both dominant-lethal mutations and heritable translocations while others induce primarily dominant-lethal mutations. Production of these two endpoints appears to be determined by the stability of alkylation products with the chromosomes. If the reaction products are intact in the male chromosomes at the time of sperm entry, they may be repaired in fertilized eggs. If repair is not effected and the alkylation products persist to the time of pronuclear chromosome replication, they lead to chromatid-type aberrations and eventually to dominant-lethality. The production of heritable translocations, on the other hand, requires a transformation of unstable alkylation products into suitable intermediate lesions. The process by which these lesions are converted into chromosome exchange within the male genome takes place after sperm enters the egg but prior to the time of pronuclear chromosome replication (i.e., chromosome-type). Thus, dominant-lethal mutations result from both chromatid- and chromosome-type aberrations while heritable translocations result primarily from the latter type. DNA target sites associated with the production of these two endpoints are discussed

  6. Dominant-lethal mutations and heritable translocations in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Generoso, W.M.

    1983-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations are a major component of radiation or chemically induced genetic damage in mammalian germ cells. The types of aberration produced are dependent upon the mutagen used and the germ-cell stage treated. For example, in male meiotic and postmeiotic germ cells certain alkylating chemicals induce both dominant-lethal mutations and heritable translocations while others induce primarily dominant-lethal mutations. Production of these two endpoints appears to be determined by the stability of alkylation products with the chromosomes. If the reaction products are intact in the male chromosomes at the time of sperm entry, they may be repaired in fertilized eggs. If repair is not effected and the alkylation products persist to the time of pronuclear chromosome replication, they lead to chromatid-type aberrations and eventually to dominant-lethality. The production of heritable translocations, on the other hand, requires a transformation of unstable alkylation products into suitable intermediate lesions. The process by which these lesions are converted into chromosome exchange within the male genome takes place after sperm enters the egg but prior to the time of pronuclear chromosome replication (i.e., chromosome-type). Thus, dominant-lethal mutations result from both chromatid- and chromosome-type aberrations while heritable translocations result primarily from the latter type. DNA target sites associated with the production of these two endpoints are discussed.

  7. Lethal mutation of internal irradiation brown planthopper (Nilaparvita lugens Stal)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahid, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    The moulting IVth of BPH nympha were irradiated internally with radiophosphorous 32-P 1 uCi/ml, 10 uCi/ml, 50 uCi/ml, 100 uCi/ml, and 500 uCi/ml concentrations respectivelly. An observation was carried out to determines heredity of hopper sterilities from the mating groups of R male x N female, R male x R female, and N male x R female. The 32-P concentration below of 50 uCi/ml seemed to be the substerile dose, however, the dominant lethal mutation has been visually shown by R male x R female F1 mating group. The hereditary lines of F1, F2, F3, and F4 of the hopper sterilities wich were indicated by the nympha hatch ability have some significant correlations (r1= -0.77, r2= -0.92, r3= -0.93 and r4= -0.85). Thus, the resesif lethal mutations visually showed by F3 and F4 from all of the 100 uCi/ml and 50 uCi/ml treated groups. (author). 10 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  8. Revertant mutation releases confined lethal mutation, opening Pandora's box: a novel genetic pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Ogawa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available When two mutations, one dominant pathogenic and the other "confining" nonsense, coexist in the same allele, theoretically, reversion of the latter may elicit a disease, like the opening of Pandora's box. However, cases of this hypothetical pathogenic mechanism have never been reported. We describe a lethal form of keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID syndrome caused by the reversion of the GJB2 nonsense mutation p.Tyr136X that would otherwise have confined the effect of another dominant lethal mutation, p.Gly45Glu, in the same allele. The patient's mother had the identical misssense mutation which was confined by the nonsense mutation. The biological relationship between the parents and the child was confirmed by genotyping of 15 short tandem repeat loci. Haplotype analysis using 40 SNPs spanning the >39 kbp region surrounding the GJB2 gene and an extended SNP microarray analysis spanning 83,483 SNPs throughout chromosome 13 in the family showed that an allelic recombination event involving the maternal allele carrying the mutations generated the pathogenic allele unique to the patient, although the possibility of coincidental accumulation of spontaneous point mutations cannot be completely excluded. Previous reports and our mutation screening support that p.Gly45Glu is in complete linkage disequilibrium with p.Tyr136X in the Japanese population. Estimated from statisitics in the literature, there may be approximately 11,000 p.Gly45Glu carriers in the Japanese population who have this second-site confining mutation, which acts as natural genetic protection from the lethal disease. The reversion-triggered onset of the disesase shown in this study is a previously unreported genetic pathogenesis based on Mendelian inheritance.

  9. Synthetic Lethal Therapeutic Approaches for ARID1A-Mutated Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-16-1-0496 TITLE: Synthetic lethal therapeutic approaches for ARID1A-mutated ovarian cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Rugang...AND SUBTITLE Synthetic lethal therapeutic approaches for ARID1A-mutated ovarian cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0496 5c...Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the leading cause of death among gynecological

  10. Variability in mutational fitness effects prevents full lethal transitions in large quasispecies populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardanyés, Josep; Simó, Carles; Martínez, Regina; Solé, Ricard V.; Elena, Santiago F.

    2014-04-01

    The distribution of mutational fitness effects (DMFE) is crucial to the evolutionary fate of quasispecies. In this article we analyze the effect of the DMFE on the dynamics of a large quasispecies by means of a phenotypic version of the classic Eigen's model that incorporates beneficial, neutral, deleterious, and lethal mutations. By parameterizing the model with available experimental data on the DMFE of Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and Tobacco etch virus (TEV), we found that increasing mutation does not totally push the entire viral quasispecies towards deleterious or lethal regions of the phenotypic sequence space. The probability of finding regions in the parameter space of the general model that results in a quasispecies only composed by lethal phenotypes is extremely small at equilibrium and in transient times. The implications of our findings can be extended to other scenarios, such as lethal mutagenesis or genomically unstable cancer, where increased mutagenesis has been suggested as a potential therapy.

  11. Consortium for Osteogenesis Imperfecta Mutations in the Helical Domain of Type I Collagen: Regions Rich in Lethal Mutations Align With Collagen Binding Sites for Integrins and Proteoglycans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Joan C.; Forlino, Antonella; Cabral, Wayne A.; Barnes, Aileen M.; San Antonio, James D.; Milgrom, Sarah; Hyland, James C.; Körkkö, Jarmo; Prockop, Darwin J.; De Paepe, Anne; Coucke, Paul; Symoens, Sofie; Glorieux, Francis H.; Roughley, Peter J.; Lund, Alan M.; Kuurila-Svahn, Kaija; Hartikka, Heini; Cohn, Daniel H.; Krakow, Deborah; Mottes, Monica; Schwarze, Ulrike; Chen, Diana; Yang, Kathleen; Kuslich, Christine; Troendle, James; Dalgleish, Raymond; Byers, Peter H.

    2014-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a generalized disorder of connective tissue characterized by fragile bones and easy susceptibility to fracture. Most cases of OI are caused by mutations in type I collagen. We have identified and assembled structural mutations in type I collagen genes (COL1A1 and COL1A2, encoding the proα1(I) and proα2(I) chains, respectively) that result in OI. Quantitative defects causing type I OI were not included. Of these 832 independent mutations, 682 result in substitution for glycine residues in the triple helical domain of the encoded protein and 150 alter splice sites. Distinct genotype–phenotype relationships emerge for each chain. One-third of the mutations that result in glycine substitutions in α1(I) are lethal, especially when the substituting residues are charged or have a branched side chain. Substitutions in the first 200 residues are nonlethal and have variable outcome thereafter, unrelated to folding or helix stability domains. Two exclusively lethal regions (helix positions 691–823 and 910–964) align with major ligand binding regions (MLBRs), suggesting crucial interactions of collagen monomers or fibrils with integrins, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), fibronectin, and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP). Mutations in COL1A2 are predominantly nonlethal (80%). Lethal substitutions are located in eight regularly spaced clusters along the chain, supporting a regional model. The lethal regions align with proteoglycan binding sites along the fibril, suggesting a role in fibril–matrix interactions. Recurrences at the same site in α2(I) are generally concordant for outcome, unlike α1(I). Splice site mutations comprise 20% of helical mutations identified in OI patients, and may lead to exon skipping, intron inclusion, or the activation of cryptic splice sites. Splice site mutations in COL1A1 are rarely lethal; they often lead to frameshifts and the mild type I phenotype. In α2(I), lethal exon skipping events are

  12. Interactive lethal and mutagenic effects of ultraviolet light and bleomycin in yeast: synergism or antagonism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillo, O L; Severgnini, A A; Nunes, E M

    1997-11-01

    The mutagenic interactions of ultraviolet light and bleomycin in haploid populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were analyzed. Survival and mutation frequency as a function of different bleomycin concentrations after one conditioning dose of UV radiation were determined. Furthermore, corresponding interaction functions and sensitization factors were calculated. A synergistic interaction between UV light and bleomycin was shown for both lethal and mutagenic events when the cells were in nutrient broth during the treatments. Conversely, the interaction between UV light and bleomycin was antagonistic when the cells were in deionized water during the treatment. The magnitude of lethal and mutagenic interactions depends on dose, and thus presumably on the number of lesions. The observed interactions between UV light and bleomycin suggest that the mechanism that is most likely involved is the induction of repair systems with different error probabilities during the delay of cell division.

  13. Frequencies of aneuploidy and dominant lethal mutations in young female mice induced by low dose γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Suyan; Zhang Chaoyang; Dai Lianlian; Gao Changwen

    1991-01-01

    Relationship between aneuploidy, dominant lethal mutations and doses in young feral mice induced by low dose γ-rays was examined. The results suggest that the frequencies of aneuploidy of embryos increased at 0.15 Gy, but increases at over 0.50 Gy after irradiation in groups. The frequencies of aneuploidy and dominant lethal mutations increased with increasing doses and fitted linear relationship. This dose-response relationship of trisomic was not significant. The frequency of dominant lethal mutations induced by 60 Co γ irradiation is 5.59%. The effect of dominant lethal mutation is higher than that of the aneuploidy

  14. Modification of radiation-induced sex-linked recessive lethal mutation frequency by tocopherol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckman, C.; Roy, R.M.; Sproule, A.

    1982-01-01

    The present study evaluates the effect of supplementing culture medium with α-tocopherol acetate on the yield of sex-linked recessive lethal mutants induced by X-irradiation in mature sperm of Drosophila. Although tocopherol treatment of males had no impact on the yield of mutations, a drastic reduction in mutation frequency was observed when irradiated males were mated to females raised and subsequently maintained on tocopherol-enriched diet. (orig./MG)

  15. Dominant lethal mutations research in mice fed with irradiated black beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Z.P.

    1982-01-01

    To evaluate the potential mutagenic effects of irradiated black beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) with conservation purpose, in germ cells of mice, dominant lethal assay were employed. Three groups of albino swiss male mice (S W-55) were fed with a normal ration, or unirradiated or irradiated (0,2; 0,5; 1; 5; 10; 15 e 20 KGy) test diets for eight weeks. After the feeding period the males were mated with groups of untreated females mice for four consecutive weeks. Numbers of pregnancy rates females were observed. The females were autopsied at mid-term pregnancy for evaluation of dominant lethal mutations. (author)

  16. Dominant lethal mutations in male mice fed γ-irradiated diet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauhan, P.S.; Aravindakshan, M.; Aiyer, A.S.; Sundaram, K.

    1975-01-01

    Three groups of Swiss male mice were fed a stock ration of an unirradiated or irradiated (2.5 Mrad) test diet for 8 wk. After the feeding period, the males were mated with groups of untreated female mice for 4 consecutive weeks. The females were autopsied at mid-term pregnancy for evaluation of dominant lethal mutations. Numbers of dead implantations, including deciduomas and dead embryos, showed no significant differences among the different groups, thus producing no evidence of any induced post-implantation lethality in mice fed on irradiated diet. Similarly, there was no indication of preimplantation lethality, since implantation rates remained comparable among different groups. Consumption of irradiated diet did not affect the fertility of mice. Total pre- and post-implantation loss, as indicated by the numbers of live implantations remained comparable among all the groups of mice. (author)

  17. Induction of dominant lethal mutations by gamma irradiation of Gallus domesticus spermatozoa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgartner, J; Grom, A; Csuka, J; Kindlova, L [Poultry Research Institute, Ivanka pri Dunaji (Czechoslovakia)

    1977-01-01

    Mixed semen of Gallus domesticus cocks was gamma irradiated in vitro with exposures of 500, 1000, 2000, and 3000 R at the exposure rate of 5.86 Rs/sup -1/. After the irradiation the semen was applied to experimental and control layer hens, the embryonic mortality in F/sub 1/ was observed, the total number of incubated eggs was 3344. Irradiation with 500 R had a favourable influence on embryonic vitality, the exposures 1000, 2000, and 3000 R resulted in increased embryonic mortality, for 2100 R a 50% mortality of offspring was found. Induced dominant lethality was manifest during embryonic and oviduct development. The frequency of induced dominant lethality for exposures used was 19.2, 9.9, 48.3, and 69.1%, the values of mutation rate were 0.087, 0.104, 0.659, and 1.174. The mutation rate had a linear course, the value of the lethal hit per gamete for 1 R was 1.04x10/sup -4/.

  18. Induction of dominant lethal mutations by gamma irradiation of Gallus domesticus spermatozoa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgartner, J.; Grom, A.; Csuka, J.; Kindlova, L.

    1977-01-01

    Mixed semen of Gallus domesticus cocks was gamma irradiated in vitro with exposures of 500, 1000, 2000 and 3000 R at the exposure rate of 5.86 Rs -1 . After the irradiation the semen was applied to experimental and control layer hens, the embryonic mortality in F 1 was observed, the total number of incubated eggs was 3344. Irradiation with 500 R had a favourable influence on embryonic vitality, the exposures 1000, 2000 and 3000 R resulted in increased embryonic mortality, for 2100 R a 50% mortality of offspring was found. Induced dominant lethality was manifest during embryonic and oviduct development. The frequency of induced dominant lethality for exposures used was 19.2, 9.9, 48.3, and 69.1%, the values of mutation rate were 0.087, 0.104, 0.659, and 1.174. The mutation rate had linear course, the value of the lethal hit per gamete for 1 R was 1.04x10 -4 . (author)

  19. Molecular analysis of two mouse dilute locus deletion mutations: Spontaneous dilute lethal20J and radiation-induced dilute prenatal lethal Aa2 alleles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strobel, M.C.; Seperack, P.K.; Copeland, N.G.; Jenkins, N.A.

    1990-01-01

    The dilute (d) coat color locus of mouse chromosome 9 has been identified by more than 200 spontaneous and mutagen-induced recessive mutations. With the advent of molecular probes for this locus, the molecular lesion associated with different dilute alleles can be recognized and precisely defined. In this study, two dilute mutations, dilute-lethal20J (dl20J) and dilute prenatal lethal Aa2, have been examined. Using a dilute locus genomic probe in Southern blot analysis, we detected unique restriction fragments in dl20J and Aa2 DNA. Subsequent analysis of these fragments showed that they represented deletion breakpoint fusion fragments. DNA sequence analysis of each mutation-associated deletion breakpoint fusion fragment suggests that both genomic deletions were generated by nonhomologous recombination events. The spontaneous dl20J mutation is caused by an interstitial deletion that removes a single coding exon of the dilute gene. The correlation between this discrete deletion and the expression of all dilute-associated phenotypes in dl20J homozygotes defines the dl20J mutation as a functional null allele of the dilute gene. The radiation-induced Aa2 allele is a multilocus deletion that, by complementation analysis, affects both the dilute locus and the proximal prenatal lethal-3 (pl-3) functional unit. Molecular analysis of the Aa2 deletion breakpoint fusion fragment has provided access to a previously undefined gene proximal to d. Initial characterization of this new gene suggests that it may represent the genetically defined pl-3 functional unit

  20. A novel Noonan syndrome RAF1 mutation: lethal course in a preterm infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Ratola

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Noonan syndrome is a relatively common and heterogeneous genetic disorder, associated with congenital heart defect in about 50% of the cases. If the defect is not severe, life expectancy is normal. We report a case of Noonan syndrome in a preterm infant with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and lethal outcome associated to acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by Adenovirus pneumonia. A novel mutation in the RAF1 gene was identified: c.782C>G (p.Pro261Arg in heterozygosity, not described previously in the literature. Consequently, the common clinical course in this mutation and its respective contribution to the early fatal outcome is unknown. No conclusion can be established regarding genotype/phenotype correlation.

  1. A survey of new temperature-sensitive, embryonic-lethal mutations in C. elegans: 24 alleles of thirteen genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean M O'Rourke

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available To study essential maternal gene requirements in the early C. elegans embryo, we have screened for temperature-sensitive, embryonic lethal mutations in an effort to bypass essential zygotic requirements for such genes during larval and adult germline development. With conditional alleles, multiple essential requirements can be examined by shifting at different times from the permissive temperature of 15°C to the restrictive temperature of 26°C. Here we describe 24 conditional mutations that affect 13 different loci and report the identity of the gene mutations responsible for the conditional lethality in 22 of the mutants. All but four are mis-sense mutations, with two mutations affecting splice sites, another creating an in-frame deletion, and one creating a premature stop codon. Almost all of the mis-sense mutations affect residues conserved in orthologs, and thus may be useful for engineering conditional mutations in other organisms. We find that 62% of the mutants display additional phenotypes when shifted to the restrictive temperature as L1 larvae, in addition to causing embryonic lethality after L4 upshifts. Remarkably, we also found that 13 out of the 24 mutations appear to be fast-acting, making them particularly useful for careful dissection of multiple essential requirements. Our findings highlight the value of C. elegans for identifying useful temperature-sensitive mutations in essential genes, and provide new insights into the requirements for some of the affected loci.

  2. Mutations in GLDN, Encoding Gliomedin, a Critical Component of the Nodes of Ranvier, Are Responsible for Lethal Arthrogryposis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maluenda, Jérôme; Manso, Constance; Quevarec, Loic; Vivanti, Alexandre; Marguet, Florent; Gonzales, Marie; Guimiot, Fabien; Petit, Florence; Toutain, Annick; Whalen, Sandra; Grigorescu, Romulus; Coeslier, Anne Dieux; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Laquerrière, Annie; Devaux, Jérôme; Melki, Judith

    2016-10-06

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) is a developmental condition characterized by multiple joint contractures resulting from reduced or absent fetal movements. Through linkage analysis, homozygosity mapping, and exome sequencing in four unrelated families affected by lethal AMC, we identified biallelic mutations in GLDN in the affected individuals. GLDN encodes gliomedin, a secreted cell adhesion molecule involved in the formation of the nodes of Ranvier. Transmission electron microscopy of the sciatic nerve from one of the affected individuals showed a marked lengthening defect of the nodes. The GLDN mutations found in the affected individuals abolish the cell surface localization of gliomedin and its interaction with its axonal partner, neurofascin-186 (NF186), in a cell-based assay. The axoglial contact between gliomedin and NF186 is essential for the initial clustering of Na + channels at developing nodes. These results indicate a major role of gliomedin in node formation and the development of the peripheral nervous system in humans. These data indicate that mutations of GLDN or CNTNAP1 (MIM: 616286), encoding essential components of the nodes of Ranvier and paranodes, respectively, lead to inherited nodopathies, a distinct disease entity among peripheral neuropathies. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Novel Lethal Form of Congenital Hypopituitarism Associated With the First Recessive LHX4 Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, L. C.; Humayun, K. N.; Turton, J. P. G.; McCabe, M. J.; Rhodes, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: LHX4 encodes a member of the LIM-homeodomain family of transcription factors that is required for normal development of the pituitary gland. To date, only incompletely penetrant heterozygous mutations in LHX4 have been described in patients with variable combined pituitary hormone deficiencies. Objective/Hypothesis: To report a unique family with a novel recessive variant in LHX4 associated with a lethal form of congenital hypopituitarism that was identified through screening a total of 97 patients. Method: We screened 97 unrelated patients with combined pituitary hormone deficiency, including 65% with an ectopic posterior pituitary, for variants in the LHX4 gene using Sanger sequencing. Control databases (1000 Genomes, dbSNP, Exome Variant Server, ExAC Browser) were consulted upon identification of variants. Results: We identified the first novel homozygous missense variant (c.377C>T, p.T126M) in two deceased male patients of Pakistani origin with severe panhypopituitarism associated with anterior pituitary aplasia and posterior pituitary ectopia. Both were born small for gestational age with a small phallus, undescended testes, and mid-facial hypoplasia. The parents' first-born child was a female with mid-facial hypoplasia (DNA was unavailable). Despite rapid commencement of hydrocortisone and T4 in the brothers, all three children died within the first week of life. The LHX4(p.T126M) variant is located within the LIM2 domain, in a highly conserved location. The absence of homozygosity for the variant in over 65 000 controls suggests that it is likely to be responsible for the phenotype. Conclusion: We report, for the first time to our knowledge, a novel homozygous mutation in LHX4 associated with a lethal phenotype, implying that recessive mutations in LHX4 may be incompatible with life. PMID:25871839

  4. Clinical intrafamilial variability in lethal familial neonatal seizure disorder caused by TBC1D24 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Reymundo; Herman, Kristin; Rothfuss, Melanie; Rieger, Hillary; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar; Aprile, Davide; Fruscione, Floriana; Zara, Federico; Fassio, Anna

    2016-12-01

    TBC1D24-related disorders include a wide phenotypic ranging from mild to lethal seizure disorders, non-syndromic deafness, and composite syndromes such as DOORS (deafness, onychodystrophy, osteodystrophy, mental retardation, and seizures). The TBC1D24 gene has a role in cerebral cortex development and in presynaptic neurotransmission. Here, we present a familial case of a lethal early-onset epileptic encephalopathy, associated with two novel compound heterozygous missense variants on the TBC1D24 gene, which were detected by exome sequencing. The detailed clinical data of the three siblings is summarized in order to support the variability of the phenotype, severity, and progression of this disorder among these family members. Functional studies demonstrated that the identified novel missense mutations result in a loss of expression of the protein, suggesting a correlation between residual expression, and the disease severity. This indicates that protein expression analysis is important for interpreting genetic results when novel variants are found, as well as for complementing clinical assessment by predicting the functional impact. Further analysis is necessary to delineate the clinical presentation of individuals with TBC1D24 pathogenic variants, as well as to develop markers for diagnosis, prognosis, and potential targeted treatments. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Lethal/severe osteogenesis imperfecta in a large family: a novel homozygous LEPRE1 mutation and bone histological findings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Fleur S.; Nikkels, Peter G. J.; den Hollander, Nicolette S.; Nesbitt, Isabel M.; van Rijn, Rick R.; Cobben, Jan M.; Pals, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    We report a large consanguineous Turkish family in which multiple individuals are affected with autosomal recessive lethal or severe osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) due to a novel homozygous LEPRE1 mutation. In one affected individual histological studies of bone tissue were performed, which may

  6. Dominant lethal mutations in Drosophila melanogaster natural populations flown on board ISS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larina, Olga; Bekker, Anna

    The resistance to mutagenic impacts represents an important issue of manned space missions. However the reasons of its individual variability as well as the factors which could induce mutations in space flight are not fully understood. Drosophila studies accomplished by several research teams at real space flights, revealed pronounced increase of mutations in somatic and reproductive cells, nonetheless, quite an opposite spaceflight effects also occurred, i.e., mei-41 laboratory strain showed postflight mutation rates lower than that in ground control. In order to monitor the influence of space flight on the mutational process, 4 series of space experiment with D. melanogaster wild type populations were performed at International Space Station (ISS). The appliance “Drosophila-2” used for breeding of drosophila in spaceflight conditions, enabled to conduct synchronous studies with two samples of fly populations. First instar drosophila larvae were placed into the experimental appliance 12 hours before the start of transport spacecraft. The duration of experiments was 7.9 through 19.7 days. In 19.7-day experiment, two generations of the flies were raised during the space flight, and then delivered to the earth. The frequency of dominant lethal mutations (DLM) was evaluated as the percentage of embryonic death in the progeny of experimental drosophila samples. DLM tests in VV-09 and Chas-09 natural populations, performed after the exposure to 10.9-day flight, showed the increase of DLM rate in Chas-09 (0.077 in flight series vs. 0.43 in earth-based control) while post-flight DLM value in VV-09 did not diverge from on-earth sample (0.025 and 0.027 correspondingly). The same results for VV-09 were obtained after the 14.7-day and 7.9-day flights with the only exception: 7.9-day flight experiment employed DLM measurements in two VV-09 spaceflight samples, differing by the age of the flies, and the above DLM rates were detected in “younger” VV-09 sample only. DLM

  7. Evaluation of freshly irradiated wheat for dominant lethal mutations in Wistar rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawan, S.C.; Aravindakshan, M.; Kumar, N.S.; Subba Rao, V.; Aiyar, A.S.; Sundaram, K.

    1977-01-01

    Three independent, serially performed experiments involving acute and chronic feeding of freshly irradiated wheat (75 krad, gamma-irradiation) were carried out in Wistar rats. In the first experiment groups of 10 males were given wheat for 1 week; irradiated wheat was consumed by the animals within 24 h of irradiation. In the other two experiments feeding of males was continued for 6 (10 males per group) and 12 (13 males per group) weeks, respectively, and the irradiated wheat was fed within 7 days of irradiation. At the end of each treatment period each male was paired with 3 females for 7 days and sequentially at weekly intervals for 5 or 8 weeks. Females were killed and examined for live and dead implantations and corpora lutea. There were no differences between groups with regard to fertility nor was there any inter-group difference as regards pre- and post-implantation losses whether the rats were fed irradiated or non-irradiated wheat. This suggested that even feeding of freshly irradiated wheat does not induce any dominant lethal mutations in rats

  8. Postirradiation expression of lethal mutations in an immortalized human keratinocyte cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Reilly, S.; Mothersill, C.; Seymour, C.B.

    1994-01-01

    The quantification of the extent of delayed cell death and the rate and pattern of its occurrence in relation to the cell division cycle is important in radiotherapy and also in radiation transformation studies related to protection and dose limits. Here the numbers of lethal mutations occurring over 45 population doublings (clonal expansion to about 10 13 cells per cell originally surviving irradiation) was measured in an HPV 16 immortalized human keratinocyte cell lines used for transformation studies. The results showed that when postirradiation (dose range 1-6 Gy) growth curves were constructed, the difference in slopes could be accounted for entirely by correcting for the non-clonogenic fraction in the cell count, excluding a longer cell generation time as an explanation. When the cell loss was examined over the entire growth period of 6 weeks (about 45 doublings of the cell population), it was found to be dose dependent for the first two passages, but then to become more independent of dose. The results allow a time/cell generation dependent factor to be derived for the cell line and used in survival curve equations where effects of radiation are being measured at times distant from the original exposure. (author)

  9. Dominant lethal mutations in insects with holokinetic chromosomes: irradiation of pink bollworm sperm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, G.J.; LaChance, L.E.

    1976-01-01

    Adult males of the pink bollworm, Pectinophora gosypiella (Saunders), were irradiated with 19 and 30 krad of gamma radiation and mated with virgin, untreated females. Males treated with 19 or 30 krad of gamma radiation, at 2 to 24-h or 48 to 72-h postemergence, respectively, did not show reduced mating frequency compared with the untreated male controls. However, transfer of eupyrene sperm was reduced by treating 2 to 24-h postemergent males with 30 krad. Irradiation with 19 or 30 krad did not cause complete male sterility; 12.7 and 16.8 percent, respectively, of the fertilized eggs hatched. Eggs fertilized with irradiated sperm were examined cytologically and showed a retardation of embryonic development up to the blastoderm stage. From the blastoderm stage onward, development was parallel to those eggs which were fertilized by unirradiated sperm. Of the embryos in the groups treated with 30 and 19 krad, 51.3 to 66.6 percent, respectively, developed into fully differentiated, normal-appearing, prehatch embryos. The radiation-induced dominant lethal mutations were, generally, expressed very late in embryonic development

  10. Evaluation of freshly irradiated wheat for dominant lethal mutations in Wistar rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawan, S C; Aravindakshan, M; Kumar, N S; Subba Rao, V; Aiyar, A S; Sundaram, K [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Bio-medical Group

    1977-01-01

    Three independent, serially performed experiments involving acute and chronic feeding of freshly irradiated wheat (75 krad, gamma-irradiation) were carried out in Wistar rats. In the first experiment groups of 10 males were given wheat for 1 week; irradiated wheat was consumed by the animals within 24 h of irradiation. In the other two experiments feeding of males was continued for 6 (10 males per group) and 12 (13 males per group) weeks, respectively, and the irradiated wheat was fed within 7 days of irradiation. At the end of each treatment period each male was paired with 3 females for 7 days and sequentially at weekly intervals for 5 or 8 weeks. Females were killed and examined for live and dead implantations and corpora lutea. There were no differences between groups with regard to fertility nor was there any inter-group difference as regards pre- and post-implantation losses whether the rats were fed irradiated or non-irradiated wheat. This suggested that even feeding of freshly irradiated wheat does not induce any dominant lethal mutations in rats.

  11. Comparative studies of dose-response curves for recessive lethal mutations induced by ethylnitrosourea in spermatogonia and in spermatozoa of Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, I.; Ayaki, T.; Ohshima, K.

    1984-01-01

    Induction of recessive lethal mutation by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) was studied for the second chromosome of spermatogonia and spermatozoa in Drosophila melanogaster. ENU (0.03, 0.3, and 1.0 mM) was given to flies by dissolving it in feeding sucrose solution. When plotted against absorbed doses of ENU, the observed frequencies to recessive lethals showed a linear relationship for induction in spermatozoa but a sigmoidal relationship for induction in spermatogonia. These results suggest that in spermatogonia ENU-induced mutational damage is more repairable in a lower dose range of ENU. Mosaic lethal mutations were induced by ENU but not in spermatogonia.

  12. X-ray induced dominant lethal mutations in mature and immature oocytes of guinea-pigs and golden hamsters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, B.D.; Lyon, M.F.

    1975-01-01

    The induction of dominant lethal mutations by doses of 100-400 rad X-rays in oocytes of the guinea-pig and golden hamster was studied using criteria of embryonic mortality. For both species higher yields were obtained from mature than from immature oocytes. Data on fertility indicated that in the golden hamster immature oocytes were more sensitive to killing by X-rays than mature oocytes but that the converse was true in the guinea-pig. The dose-response relationship for mutation to dominant lethals in pre-ovulatory oocytes of guinea-pigs and golden hamsters was linear, both when based on pre- and post-implantation loss only. The rate per unit dose was higher for the golden hamster, and the old golden hamsters were possibly slightly more sensitive than young ones

  13. Mutations in GLDN, Encoding Gliomedin, a Critical Component of the Nodes of Ranvier, Are Responsible for Lethal Arthrogryposis

    OpenAIRE

    Maluenda, J?r?me; Manso, Constance; Quevarec, Loic; Vivanti, Alexandre; Marguet, Florent; Gonzales, Marie; Guimiot, Fabien; Petit, Florence; Toutain, Annick; Whalen, Sandra; Grigorescu, Romulus; Coeslier, Anne?Dieux; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Laquerri?re, Annie

    2016-01-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) is a developmental condition characterized by multiple joint contractures resulting from reduced or absent fetal movements. Through linkage analysis, homozygosity mapping, and exome sequencing in four unrelated families affected by lethal AMC, we identified biallelic mutations in GLDN in the affected individuals. GLDN encodes gliomedin, a secreted cell adhesion molecule involved in the formation of the nodes of Ranvier. Transmission electron microscopy...

  14. Induction of lethal mutations in the x-chromosome of unirradiated Drosophila oocytes after fertilization by irradiated spermatozoa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaposhnikov, M.V.; Zainullin, V.G.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: In primary study on Drosophila it was found that irradiated male X-chromosomes induce recessive lethals in unirradiated female homologues (Abeleva et al., 1961, Radiobiologya. 1:123-126). The same effects were obtained in Drosophila in some recent investigations. The mechanisms of these effects is unknown. However it may be responsible for low-dose radiation effects as it induce mutations in unirradiated DNA. We assume that this effect may be a result of activation of error prone repair in response to preliminary DNA lesions in irradiated chromosome. In this research we analyse the frequencies of the recessive lethal mutations in the X-chromosome of Drosophila females mated with irradiated Basc males. We used acute irradiation with a dose rate of 10 Gy. For testing our hypothesis we use the mus209 and mei-41 mutant females. Mus209 is a PCNA gene homologue and mei-41 is a homologue of ATM gene. These genes are involved in post-replication DNA repair which may be error prone repair in Drosophila. It was obtained the tendency to decreasing the mutation rate at the mei-41[D5] background and decreasing mutation rate in mus209[B1] background in comparison with wild type strains CS (p<0.05). The obtained results demonstrate the possible role of mus209[B1] and mei-41[D5] genes in the inducing of mutations in the unirradiated X-chromosome in the presence of irradiated homologue

  15. Theories of Lethal Mutagenesis: From Error Catastrophe to Lethal Defection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejero, Héctor; Montero, Francisco; Nuño, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses get extinct in a process called lethal mutagenesis when subjected to an increase in their mutation rate, for instance, by the action of mutagenic drugs. Several approaches have been proposed to understand this phenomenon. The extinction of RNA viruses by increased mutational pressure was inspired by the concept of the error threshold. The now classic quasispecies model predicts the existence of a limit to the mutation rate beyond which the genetic information of the wild type could not be efficiently transmitted to the next generation. This limit was called the error threshold, and for mutation rates larger than this threshold, the quasispecies was said to enter into error catastrophe. This transition has been assumed to foster the extinction of the whole population. Alternative explanations of lethal mutagenesis have been proposed recently. In the first place, a distinction is made between the error threshold and the extinction threshold, the mutation rate beyond which a population gets extinct. Extinction is explained from the effect the mutation rate has, throughout the mutational load, on the reproductive ability of the whole population. Secondly, lethal defection takes also into account the effect of interactions within mutant spectra, which have been shown to be determinant for the understanding the extinction of RNA virus due to an augmented mutational pressure. Nonetheless, some relevant issues concerning lethal mutagenesis are not completely understood yet, as so survival of the flattest, i.e. the development of resistance to lethal mutagenesis by evolving towards mutationally more robust regions of sequence space, or sublethal mutagenesis, i.e., the increase of the mutation rate below the extinction threshold which may boost the adaptability of RNA virus, increasing their ability to develop resistance to drugs (including mutagens). A better design of antiviral therapies will still require an improvement of our knowledge about lethal

  16. Induction of dominant lethal mutations by alkylating agnets in germ-cells of the silkworm, Bombyx mori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murota, Tetsuo; Murakami, Akio.

    1977-01-01

    The comparison of the intensity of activity was made by measuring radiation equivalent chemical (REC) dose in the experiment of the induction of dominant lethal mutation, using the germ cells of pupae five days before the moths will be hatched. The alkylating agents employed in the experiment are methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), diethyl sulfate (DSC) and mitomycine-C (MC). X-ray irradiation was employed in order to indicate the capability of inducing mutation of the alkylating agents with the radiation equivalent chemical dose (REC dose). The dose-hatchability curves for the alkylating agents showed sigmoidal fashion as observed in X-ray, regardless of germ cells. The REC value at LD (50) was estimated by comparing the relative mutagenic capability of these chemicals. In sperm, EMS and DES with concentration of 1.0 x 10 -7 M/g showed the same lethality as about 2.3 kR and 0.6 kR of X-ray. However, no significant reduction of embryonic lethality after the treatment of pupae with MC (up to 2.1 x 10 -7 M/g) and MMS (up to 1.0 x 10 -6 M/g) was observed. As the results, the order of mutagenic effectiveness was as follows: EMS>DES>MMS approximately equal to MC. When oocytes in the mid-pupae were treated with MMS, EMS and MC with concentration of 1.0 x 10 -7 M/g, MMS and EMS showed the same effects as 12.8 kR and 0.6 kR. Surprisingly, MC showed the same lethality as 232.3 kR. This extremely high sensitivity of oocytes to MC may be ascribed to the inhibiting effect of the drug on the meiotic division. (Iwakiri, K.)

  17. Effect of dose-rate on the frequency of X-linked lethal mutation in the nematode Panagrellus redivivus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ager, D.

    1984-01-01

    A total X-ray dose of 50 Gy was applied to the nematode Panagrellus redivivus using dose-rates ranging from 0.23 Gy/min to 10.49 Gy/min, and the frequency of lethal X-chromosomes was determined. This frequency ranged from approximately 1.6% at the lower dose-rate to 4.3% at the highest dose-rate, indicating a dose-rate dependency of mutation frequency in the spermatogonia and oogonia of this organism. (orig.)

  18. Development and application of genetic sexing systems for the Mediterranean fruit fly based on a temperature sensitive lethal mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franz, G.; Willhoeft, U.; Kerremans, P.; Hendrichs, J.; Rendon, P.

    1997-01-01

    The present status in genetic sexing for the Mediterranean fruit fly is discussed. This includes the selection of the appropriate sexing gene (which determines the feasibility and practical applicability of the sexing system) as well as the selection of the appropriate Y-autosome translocation (which determines the stability of the sexing system). A temperature sensitive lethal mutation is used to eliminate females during the egg stage. This mutation in combination with new Y-autosome translocations allowed the construction of a genetic sexing strain, named VIENNA-42, that is stable enough for large scale mass rearing. Also described are the analysis of this strain under field cage and field conditions and, in preparation for large scale tests in Guatemala, the outcrossing of VIENNA-42 with genetic material from the target area. (author)

  19. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome with lethal cardiac valvular dystrophy in males carrying a novel splice mutation in FLNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritelli, Marco; Morlino, Silvia; Giacopuzzi, Edoardo; Carini, Giulia; Cinquina, Valeria; Chiarelli, Nicola; Majore, Silvia; Colombi, Marina; Castori, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Filamin A is an X-linked, ubiquitous actin-binding protein whose mutations are associated to multiple disorders with limited genotype-phenotype correlations. While gain-of-function mutations cause various bone dysplasias, loss-of-function variants are the most common cause of periventricular nodular heterotopias with variable soft connective tissue involvement, as well as X-linked cardiac valvular dystrophy (XCVD). The term "Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) with periventricular heterotopias" has been used in females with neurological, cardiovascular, integument and joint manifestations, but this nosology is still a matter of debate. We report the clinical and molecular update of an Italian family with an X-linked recessive soft connective tissue disorder and which was described, in 1975, as the first example of EDS type V of the Berlin nosology. The cutaneous phenotype of the index patient was close to classical EDS and all males died for a lethal cardiac valvular dystrophy. Whole exome sequencing identified the novel c.1829-1G>C splice variation in FLNA in two affected cousins. The nucleotide change was predicted to abolish the canonical splice acceptor site of exon 13 and to activate a cryptic acceptor site 15 bp downstream, leading to in frame deletion of five amino acid residues (p.Phe611_Gly615del). The predicted in frame deletion clusters with all the mutations previously identified in XCVD and falls within the N-terminus rod 1 domain of filamin A. Our findings expand the male-specific phenotype of FLNA mutations that now includes classical-like EDS with lethal cardiac valvular dystrophy, and offer further insights for the genotype-phenotype correlations within this spectrum. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Manifestation of x-radiation induced sex-linked recessive lethal mutation impairing the development of imaginal disks and gonads in Drosophila Melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abeleva, Eh.A.; Ivanov, A.I.

    1982-01-01

    A study was made of Drosophila melanogaster mutations impairing the development of imaginal disks. The state of gonads in these mutants was not studied. Using X-radiation a lethal mutation in X chromosome was obtained that induced degeneration of imaginal disks at the 3d stage of larva development. The gonads of the mutants at this stage of development vary in size. The transplantation tests showed that the mutation manifests itself in both the imaginal disks and the gonads

  1. Imaging findings in a distinct lethal inherited arteriopathy syndrome associated with a novel mutation in the FBLN4 gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajeshkannan, Ramiah; Kulkarni, Chinmay; Moorthy, Srikanth [Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences, AIMS, Department of Radiology, Ernakulam (India); Kappanayil, Mahesh [Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences, AIMS, Department of pediatric cardiology, Ernakulam (India); Nampoothiri, Sheela [Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences, AIMS, Department of Pediatric Genetics, Ernakulam (India); Malfait, Fransiska; Paepe, Anne de [Ghent University Hospital, Center for Medical Genetics, Ghent (Belgium)

    2014-08-15

    We present the imaging findings of a newly identified lethal arteriopathy associated with a novel mutation in the gene encoding fibulin-4, occurring in a distinct community from southern India. A total of 31 children from a distinct population subgroup who presented with characteristic arterial dilatation and tortuosity were studied. All children except one belonged to unrelated families from an ethno-religious group (Muslim) from the northern coastal belt of southern India. CT angiography was performed in 30 children and contrast MRA in one. Impressive dilatation and elongation of ascending aorta, arch, descending aorta and main pulmonary arteries with characteristic narrowing of aortic isthmus were seen in all patients. Stenosis of arch branches, abdominal visceral branches and pulmonary artery branches was observed in 21 (68 %), 23 (62.5 %) and 20 (65 %) patients respectively. Genetic studies revealed an identical mutation in exon 7 of the FBLN4 gene. On follow-up, 27 of them had died before the age of 3 years and only two children were alive after the age of 4 years. FBLN4-associated vasculopathy is a highly lethal disease characterized by severe aneurysmal dilatation of thoracic aorta, its branches and pulmonary arteries with stenoses at typical locations. (orig.)

  2. Dominant lethal mutations and histological changes produced in mouse oocytes by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyglenov, A.; Baev, I.; Rupova, I.; Kusheva, R.

    1976-01-01

    Mouse female were exposed to a total dose of 500 or 1000 rad 137 Cs gamma rays delivered at 0.01 rad/min. Effects were scored at 1, 5, 7, and 10 weeks after cessation of treatment. Histologically, ovaria in the 500 rad group showed a decrease up to 11% in follicle numbers as compared to controls; with the prolongation of the time after exposure, a further fall in follicle numbers is observed. In the 1000 rad group, depopulation of ovaria was complete. With the 500 rad dose, total dominant lethality was found to be increased for any of the time intervals between radiation exposure and conception; postimplantation dominant lethality was comparatively low, with similar scores between the weeks investigated. (author)

  3. The Color Mutation Model for soft interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwa, R.C.

    1998-01-01

    A comprehensive model for soft interaction is presented. It overcomes all the shortcomings of the existing models - in particular, the failure of Fritiof and Venus models in predicting the correct multiplicity fluctuations as observed in the intermittency data. The Color Mutation Model incorporates all the main features of hadronic interaction: eikonal formalism, parton model, evolution in color space according to QCD, branching of color neutral clusters, contraction due to confinement forces, dynamical self-similarity, resonance production, and power-law behavior of factorial moments. (author)

  4. PYCR2 Mutations cause a lethal syndrome of microcephaly and failure to thrive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Maha S; Bhat, Gifty; Sultan, Tipu; Issa, Mahmoud; Jung, Hea-Jin; Dikoglu, Esra; Selim, Laila; G Mahmoud, Imam; Abdel-Hamid, Mohamed S; Abdel-Salam, Ghada; Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2016-07-01

    A study was undertaken to characterize the clinical features of the newly described hypomyelinating leukodystrophy type 10 with microcephaly. This is an autosomal recessive disorder mapped to chromosome 1q42.12 due to mutations in the PYCR2 gene, encoding an enzyme involved in proline synthesis in mitochondria. From several international clinics, 11 consanguineous families were identified with PYCR2 mutations by whole exome or targeted sequencing, with detailed clinical and radiological phenotyping. Selective mutations from patients were tested for effect on protein function. The characteristic clinical presentation of patients with PYCR2 mutations included failure to thrive, microcephaly, craniofacial dysmorphism, progressive psychomotor disability, hyperkinetic movements, and axial hypotonia with variable appendicular spasticity. Patients did not survive beyond the first decade of life. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed global brain atrophy and white matter T2 hyperintensities. Routine serum metabolic profiles were unremarkable. Both nonsense and missense mutations were identified, which impaired protein multimerization. PYCR2-related syndrome represents a clinically recognizable condition in which PYCR2 mutations lead to protein dysfunction, not detectable on routine biochemical assessments. Mutations predict a poor outcome, probably as a result of impaired mitochondrial function. Ann Neurol 2016;80:59-70. © 2016 American Neurological Association.

  5. Tuning of the Lethal Response to Multiple Stressors with a Single-Site Mutation during Clinical Infection by Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishan Kumar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The agr system of Staphylococcus aureus promotes invasion of host tissues, and as expected, agents that block agr quorum sensing have anti-infective properties. Paradoxically, agr-defective mutants are frequently recovered from patients, especially those persistently infected with S. aureus. We found that an agr deficiency increased survival of cultured bacteria during severe stress, such as treatment with gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, heat, or low pH. With daptomycin, deletion of agr decreased survival. Therefore, agr activity can be either detrimental or protective, depending on the type of lethal stress. Deletion of agr had no effect on the ability of the antimicrobials to block bacterial growth, indicating that agr effects are limited to lethal action. Thus, the effect of an agr deletion is on bacterial tolerance, not resistance. For gentamicin and daptomycin, activity can be altered by agr-regulated secreted factors. For ciprofloxacin, a detrimental function was downregulation of glutathione peroxidase (bsaA, an enzyme responsible for defense against oxidative stress. Deficiencies in agr and bsaA were epistatic for survival, consistent with agr having a destructive role mediated by reactive oxygen species. Enhanced susceptibility to lethal stress by wild-type agr, particularly antimicrobial stress, helps explain why inactivating mutations in S. aureus agr commonly occur in hospitalized patients during infection. Moreover, the agr quorum-sensing system of S. aureus provides a clinically relevant example in which a single-step change in the response to severe stress alters the evolutionary path of a pathogen during infection.

  6. Comparison of UV action spectra for lethality and mutation in Salmonella typhimurium using a broad band source and monochromatic radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calkins, John; Selby, Christopher; Enoch, H.G.

    1987-01-01

    The UV-B region (280-320 nm) is thought to be primarily responsible for the mutagenic, lethal, and carcinogenic effects of solar radiation. We have conducted UV-B action spectroscopy for mutagenesis and survival of Ames' Salmonella typhimurium strain TA98 (uvrB, pKM101) using both monochromatic radiation from a dye laser and broader bandwidth radiation emitted from FS-20 sunlamps. A series of optical filters having different transmission cut-offs together with the sunlamp source provided bandwidths having successively less short wavelength components from which a ''broad band'' action spectrum was deduced. The two sets of action spectra differed both qualitatively and quantitatively: in comparison to the monochromatic action spectra, the ''broad band'' spectra showed up to a 200-fold reduced efficiency for both mutation induction and lethality by UV-B wavelengths. These results suggest a large protective effect of the background UV-A and/or visible radiations which were present during the broad spectrum irradiations and which are also present in solar radiation. Additional experiments show that to the extent tested this protective effect is not due to photo-reactivation or irradiance (dose rate) effects. (author)

  7. Evidence of heritable lethal mutations in progeny of X-irradiated CHO cells by micronucleus count in clon-cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagemann, G.; Kreczik, A.; Treichel, M.

    1996-01-01

    Low doses of ionizing radiation reduce the growth rates of clones following irradiation of the progenitor cells. Such reductions of clone growth have been proven by means of measurements of clone size distributions. The medians of such distributions can be used to quantify the radiation damage. Prolongations of generation times and cell death as result of heritable lethal mutations have been discussed as causes for the reduction of clone growth. The cell number of a clone of hypotetraploid CHO-cells was compared to the frequency of micronucleated binucleated cells in the same clone using the cytokinesis-block-micronucleus method. The dose dependent reduction of clone sizes is measured by the difference of the medians (after log transformation) of the clone size distributions. At cytochalasin-B concentrations of 1 μg/ml and after an incubation time of 16 h a yield of binucleated cells of about 50% was obtained. Median clone size differences as a measure of clonal radiation damage increased linearly with incubation times of 76, 100, 124, and 240 h following irradiation with 3, 5, 7, and 12 Gy. The frequency of binucleated clone cells with micronuclei strongly increased with decreasing clone size by a factor up to 20 following irradiation with 3, 5, and 7 Gy. The frequency of micronucleated binucleated clone cells was found to be independent of incubation time after irradiation. Radiation induced clone size reductions result from cell losses caused by intraclonal expression of micronuclei which have its origin in heritable lethal mutations. Measurements of clone size distributions can be done automatically. They can serve as predictive test for determination of median cell loss rates of surviving cell clones. (orig./MG) [de

  8. Phenotypic spectrum of STRA6 mutations: from Matthew-Wood syndrome to non-lethal anophthalmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassaing, Nicolas; Golzio, Christelle; Odent, Sylvie; Lequeux, Léopoldine; Vigouroux, Adeline; Martinovic-Bouriel, Jelena; Tiziano, Francesco Danilo; Masini, Lucia; Piro, Francesca; Maragliano, Giovanna; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Attié-Bitach, Tania; Manouvrier-Hanu, Sylvie; Etchevers, Heather C; Calvas, Patrick

    2009-05-01

    Matthew-Wood, Spear, PDAC or MCOPS9 syndrome are alternative names used to refer to combinations of microphthalmia/anophthalmia, malformative cardiac defects, pulmonary dysgenesis, and diaphragmatic hernia. Recently, mutations in STRA6, encoding a membrane receptor for vitamin A-bearing plasma retinol binding protein, have been identified in such patients. We performed STRA6 molecular analysis in three fetuses and one child diagnosed with Matthew-Wood syndrome and in three siblings where two adult living brothers are affected with combinations of clinical anophthalmia, tetralogy of Fallot, and mental retardation. Among these patients, six novel mutations were identified, bringing the current total of known STRA6 mutations to seventeen. We extensively reviewed clinical data pertaining to all twenty-one reported patients with STRA6 mutations (the seven of this report and fourteen described elsewhere) and discuss additional features that may be part of the syndrome. The clinical spectrum associated with STRA6 deficiency is even more variable than initially described. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. A novel ICK mutation causes ciliary disruption and lethal endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oud, Machteld M; Bonnard, Carine; Mans, Dorus A; Altunoglu, Umut; Tohari, Sumanty; Ng, Alvin Yu Jin; Eskin, Ascia; Lee, Hane; Rupar, C Anthony; de Wagenaar, Nathalie P; Wu, Ka Man; Lahiry, Piya; Pazour, Gregory J; Nelson, Stanley F; Hegele, Robert A; Roepman, Ronald; Kayserili, Hülya; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Siu, Victoria M; Reversade, Bruno; Arts, Heleen H

    2016-01-01

    Endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia (ECO) syndrome [MIM:612651] caused by a recessive mutation (p.R272Q) in Intestinal cell kinase (ICK) shows significant clinical overlap with ciliary disorders. Similarities are strongest between ECO syndrome, the Majewski and Mohr-Majewski short-rib thoracic dysplasia (SRTD) with polydactyly syndromes, and hydrolethalus syndrome. In this study, we present a novel homozygous ICK mutation in a fetus with ECO syndrome and compare the effect of this mutation with the previously reported ICK variant on ciliogenesis and cilium morphology. Through homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing, we identified a second variant (c.358G > T; p.G120C) in ICK in a Turkish fetus presenting with ECO syndrome. In vitro studies of wild-type and mutant mRFP-ICK (p.G120C and p.R272Q) revealed that, in contrast to the wild-type protein that localizes along the ciliary axoneme and/or is present in the ciliary base, mutant proteins rather enrich in the ciliary tip. In addition, immunocytochemistry revealed a decreased number of cilia in ICK p.R272Q-affected cells. Through identification of a novel ICK mutation, we confirm that disruption of ICK causes ECO syndrome, which clinically overlaps with the spectrum of ciliopathies. Expression of ICK-mutated proteins result in an abnormal ciliary localization compared to wild-type protein. Primary fibroblasts derived from an individual with ECO syndrome display ciliogenesis defects. In aggregate, our findings are consistent with recent reports that show that ICK regulates ciliary biology in vitro and in mice, confirming that ECO syndrome is a severe ciliopathy.

  10. Relationship between chromosomal aberration of germ cells and dominant lethal mutation in male mice after low dosage of X-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingdong, Wang; Baochen, Yang; Yuke, Jin [Bethune (N.) Medical Univ., Changchun, JL (China). Dept. of Gentics

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between chromosomal aberration adn dominant mutation in spermatocytes of late pachytene phase in male mice after a single X-irridiation was reported. It was found that the frequency of aberrant cells was correlative to the rate of fetal death, the latter was being about 2.5 times as high as the former. The frequency of dominant lethal mutation induced by X-irradiation is 2.1995x10{sup -3} gamete {center dot} 10 mGy.

  11. Clinical spectrum of females with HCCS mutation: from no clinical signs to a neonatal lethal form of the microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS) syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rahden, V.A.; Rau, I.; Fuchs, S.; Kosyna, F.K.; de Almeida, H.L.; Fryssira, H.; Isidor, B.; Jauch, A.; Joubert, M.; Lachmeijer, A.M.A.; Zweier, C.; Moog, U.; Kutsche, K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Segmental Xp22.2 monosomy or a heterozygous HCCS mutation is associated with the microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS) or MIDAS (microphthalmia, dermal aplasia, and sclerocornea) syndrome, an X-linked disorder with male lethality. HCCS encodes the holocytochrome c-type synthase

  12. Mitotic catastrophe is the mechanism of lethality for mutations that confer mutagen sensitivity in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denison, S H; May, G S

    1994-01-16

    We have examined the consequences of treatment with DNA-damaging agents of uvs mutants and the bimD6 mutant of Aspergillus nidulans. We first established that wild-type Aspergillus undergoes a cell cycle delay following treatment with the DNA-damaging agents methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) or ultraviolet light (UV). We have also determined that strains carrying the bimD6, uvsB110, uvsH77, uvsF201 and the uvsC114 mutations, all of which cause an increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents, undergo a cell-cycle delay following DNA damage. These mutations therefore do not represent nonfunctional checkpoints in Aspergillus. However, all of the mutant strains accumulated nuclear defects after a period of delay following mutagen treatment. The nuclear defects in the uvsB110 and bimD6 strains following MMS treatment were shown to be dependent on passage through mitosis after DNA damage, as the defects were prevented with benomyl. Checkpoint controls responding to DNA damage thus only temporarily halt cell-cycle progression in response to DNA damage. The conditional bimD6 mutation also results in a defective mitosis at restrictive temperatures. This mitotic defect is similar to that seen with MMS treatment at temperatures permissive for the mitotic defect. Thus the bimD gene product may perform dual roles, one in DNA repair and the other during the mitotic cell cycle in the absence of damage.

  13. Genetic interaction motif finding by expectation maximization – a novel statistical model for inferring gene modules from synthetic lethality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Ping

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synthetic lethality experiments identify pairs of genes with complementary function. More direct functional associations (for example greater probability of membership in a single protein complex may be inferred between genes that share synthetic lethal interaction partners than genes that are directly synthetic lethal. Probabilistic algorithms that identify gene modules based on motif discovery are highly appropriate for the analysis of synthetic lethal genetic interaction data and have great potential in integrative analysis of heterogeneous datasets. Results We have developed Genetic Interaction Motif Finding (GIMF, an algorithm for unsupervised motif discovery from synthetic lethal interaction data. Interaction motifs are characterized by position weight matrices and optimized through expectation maximization. Given a seed gene, GIMF performs a nonlinear transform on the input genetic interaction data and automatically assigns genes to the motif or non-motif category. We demonstrate the capacity to extract known and novel pathways for Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast. Annotations suggested for several uncharacterized genes are supported by recent experimental evidence. GIMF is efficient in computation, requires no training and automatically down-weights promiscuous genes with high degrees. Conclusion GIMF effectively identifies pathways from synthetic lethality data with several unique features. It is mostly suitable for building gene modules around seed genes. Optimal choice of one single model parameter allows construction of gene networks with different levels of confidence. The impact of hub genes the generic probabilistic framework of GIMF may be used to group other types of biological entities such as proteins based on stochastic motifs. Analysis of the strongest motifs discovered by the algorithm indicates that synthetic lethal interactions are depleted between genes within a motif, suggesting that synthetic

  14. A novel mutation in LEPRE1 that eliminates only the KDEL ER- retrieval sequence causes non-lethal osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Takagi

    Full Text Available Prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1 (P3H1, encoded by the LEPRE1 gene, forms a molecular complex with cartilage-associated protein (CRTAP and cyclophilin B (encoded by PPIB in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. This complex is responsible for one step in collagen post-translational modification, the prolyl 3-hydroxylation of specific proline residues, specifically α1(I Pro986. P3H1 provides the enzymatic activity of the complex and has a Lys-Asp-Glu-Leu (KDEL ER-retrieval sequence at the carboxyl terminus. Loss of function mutations in LEPRE1 lead to the Pro986 residue remaining unmodified and lead to slow folding and excessive helical post-translational modification of type I collagen, which is seen in both dominant and recessive osteogenesis imperfecta (OI. Here, we present the case of siblings with non-lethal OI due to novel compound heterozygous mutations in LEPRE1 (c.484delG and c.2155dupC. The results of RNA analysis and real-time PCR suggest that mRNA with c.2155dupC escapes from nonsense-mediated RNA decay. Without the KDEL ER- retrieval sequence, the product of the c.2155dupC variant cannot be retained in the ER. This is the first report of a mutation in LEPRE1 that eliminates only the KDEL ER-retrieval sequence, whereas other functional domains remain intact. Our study shows, for the first time, that the KDEL ER- retrieval sequence is essential for P3H1 functionality and that a defect in KDEL is sufficient for disease onset.

  15. A strong loss-of-function mutation in RAN1 results in constitutive activation of the ethylene response pathway as well as a rosette-lethal phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woeste, K. E.; Kieber, J. J.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    A recessive mutation was identified that constitutively activated the ethylene response pathway in Arabidopsis and resulted in a rosette-lethal phenotype. Positional cloning of the gene corresponding to this mutation revealed that it was allelic to responsive to antagonist1 (ran1), a mutation that causes seedlings to respond in a positive manner to what is normally a competitive inhibitor of ethylene binding. In contrast to the previously identified ran1-1 and ran1-2 alleles that are morphologically indistinguishable from wild-type plants, this ran1-3 allele results in a rosette-lethal phenotype. The predicted protein encoded by the RAN1 gene is similar to the Wilson and Menkes disease proteins and yeast Ccc2 protein, which are integral membrane cation-transporting P-type ATPases involved in copper trafficking. Genetic epistasis analysis indicated that RAN1 acts upstream of mutations in the ethylene receptor gene family. However, the rosette-lethal phenotype of ran1-3 was not suppressed by ethylene-insensitive mutants, suggesting that this mutation also affects a non-ethylene-dependent pathway regulating cell expansion. The phenotype of ran1-3 mutants is similar to loss-of-function ethylene receptor mutants, suggesting that RAN1 may be required to form functional ethylene receptors. Furthermore, these results suggest that copper is required not only for ethylene binding but also for the signaling function of the ethylene receptors.

  16. Immunotherapy with mutated onchocystatin fails to enhance the efficacy of a sub-lethal oxytetracycline regimen against Onchocerca ochengi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bah, Germanus S; Tanya, Vincent N; Makepeace, Benjamin L

    2015-08-15

    Human onchocerciasis (river blindness), caused by the filarial nematode Onchocerca volvulus, has been successfully controlled by a single drug, ivermectin, for over 25 years. Ivermectin prevents the disease symptoms of severe itching and visual impairment by killing the microfilarial stage, but does not eliminate the adult parasites, necessitating repeated annual treatments. Mass drug administration with ivermectin does not always break transmission in forest zones and is contraindicated in individuals heavily co-infected with Loa loa, while reports of reduced drug efficacy in Ghana and Cameroon may signal the development of resistance. An alternative treatment for onchocerciasis involves targeting the essential Wolbachia symbiont with tetracycline or its derivatives, which are adulticidal. However, implementation of antibiotic therapy has not occurred on a wide scale due to the prolonged treatment regimen required (several weeks). In the bovine Onchocerca ochengi system, it has been shown previously that prolonged oxytetracycline therapy increases eosinophil counts in intradermal nodules, which kill the adult worms by degranulating on their surface. Here, in an "immunochemotherapeutic" approach, we sought to enhance the efficacy of a short, sub-lethal antibiotic regimen against O. ochengi by prior immunotherapy targeting onchocystatin, an immunomodulatory protein located in the adult female worm cuticle. A key asparagine residue in onchocystatin was mutated to ablate immunomodulatory activity, which has been demonstrated previously to markedly improve the protective efficacy of this vaccine candidate when used as an immunoprophylactic. The immunochemotherapeutic regimen was compared with sub-lethal oxytetracycline therapy alone; onchocystatin immunotherapy alone; a gold-standard prolonged, intermittent oxytetracycline regimen; and no treatment (negative control) in naturally infected Cameroonian cattle. Readouts were collected over one year and comprised adult

  17. A missense mutation in the human liver/bone/kidney alkaline phosphatase gene causing a lethal form of hypophosphatasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, M.J.; Cole, D.E.C.; Ray, K.; Whyte, M.P.; Lafferty, M.A.; Mulivor, R.A.; Harris, H.

    1988-01-01

    Hypophosphatasia is an inherited disorder characterized by defective bone mineralization and a deficiency of serum and tissue liver/bone/kidney alkaline phosphatase (L/B/K ALP) activity. Clinical severity is variable, ranging from death in utero (due to severe rickets) to pathologic fractures first presenting in adult life. Affected siblings, however, are phenotypically similar. Severe forms of the disease are inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion; heterozygotes often show reduced serum ALP activity. The specific gene defects in hypophosphatasia are unknown but are thought to occur either at the L/B/K ALP locus or within another gene that regulates L/B/K ALP expression. The authors used the polymerase chain reaction to examine L/B/K ALP cDNA from a patient with a perinatal (lethal) form of the disease. They observed a guanine-to-adenine transition in nucleotide 711 of the cDNA that converts alanine-162 of the mature enzyme to threonine. The affected individual, whose parents are second cousins, is homozygous for the mutant allele. Introduction of this mutation into an otherwise normal cDNA by site-directed mutagenesis abolished the expression of active enzyme, demonstrating that a defect in the L/B/K ALP gene results in hypophosphatasia and that the enzyme is, therefore, essential for normal skeletal mineralization

  18. Rechecking the Centrality-Lethality Rule in the Scope of Protein Subcellular Localization Interaction Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqing Peng

    Full Text Available Essential proteins are indispensable for living organisms to maintain life activities and play important roles in the studies of pathology, synthetic biology, and drug design. Therefore, besides experiment methods, many computational methods are proposed to identify essential proteins. Based on the centrality-lethality rule, various centrality methods are employed to predict essential proteins in a Protein-protein Interaction Network (PIN. However, neglecting the temporal and spatial features of protein-protein interactions, the centrality scores calculated by centrality methods are not effective enough for measuring the essentiality of proteins in a PIN. Moreover, many methods, which overfit with the features of essential proteins for one species, may perform poor for other species. In this paper, we demonstrate that the centrality-lethality rule also exists in Protein Subcellular Localization Interaction Networks (PSLINs. To do this, a method based on Localization Specificity for Essential protein Detection (LSED, was proposed, which can be combined with any centrality method for calculating the improved centrality scores by taking into consideration PSLINs in which proteins play their roles. In this study, LSED was combined with eight centrality methods separately to calculate Localization-specific Centrality Scores (LCSs for proteins based on the PSLINs of four species (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Homo sapiens, Mus musculus and Drosophila melanogaster. Compared to the proteins with high centrality scores measured from the global PINs, more proteins with high LCSs measured from PSLINs are essential. It indicates that proteins with high LCSs measured from PSLINs are more likely to be essential and the performance of centrality methods can be improved by LSED. Furthermore, LSED provides a wide applicable prediction model to identify essential proteins for different species.

  19. A ΔdinB mutation that sensitizes Escherichia coli to the lethal effects of UV- and X-radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Mei-Chong W.; Franco, Magdalena; Vargas, Doris M. [Department of Biological Sciences, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA 95192 (United States); Hudman, Deborah A. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, A.T. Still University, Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine, Kirksville, MO 63501 (United States); White, Steven J. [Department of Biological Sciences, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA 95192 (United States); Fowler, Robert G., E-mail: rfowler@sjsu.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA 95192 (United States); Sargentini, Neil J. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, A.T. Still University, Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine, Kirksville, MO 63501 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    B strains to UV radiation, but did not sensitize a ΔrecA strain. A comparison of the DNA sequences of the ΔdinB883 allele with the sequences of the Δ(dinB-yafN)882(::kan) and ΔdinB749 alleles, which do not sensitize cells to UV radiation, revealed ΔdinB883 is likely a “gain-of-function” mutation. The ΔdinB883 allele encodes the first 54 amino acids of wild-type DinB followed by 29 predicted residues resulting from the continuation of the dinB reading frame into an adjacent insertion fragment. The resulting polypeptide is proposed to interfere directly or indirectly with UmuDC function(s) involved in protecting cells against the lethal effects of radiation.

  20. Insect radiosensitivity: dose curves and dose-fractionation studies of dominant lethal mutations in the mature sperm of 4 insect species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaChance, L.E.; Graham, C.K.

    1984-01-01

    Males of 4 species of insects: Musca domestica L. (housefly) (Diptera), Oncopeltus fasciatus (Dallas) (milkweed bug) (Hemiptera), Anagasta kuhniella (Zeller) (mealmoth) (Lepidoptera) and Heliothis virescens (Fab.) (tobacco budworm) (Lepidoptera) were irradiated as adults. Dose-response curves for the induction of dominant lethal mutations in the mature sperm were constructed. The curves were analyzed mathematically and compared with theoretical computer simulated curves requiring 1, 2, 4, 8 and 16 'hits' for the induction of a dominant lethal mutation. The 4 species belonging to 3 different orders of insects showed a wide range in radiation sensitivity and vastly different dose-response curves. When the data were analyzed by several mathematical models the authors found that a logistic response curve gave reasonably good fit with vastly different parameters for the 4 species. Dose-fractionation experiments showed no reduction in the frequency of lethal mutations induced in any species when an acute dose was fractionated into 2 equal exposures separated by an 8-h period. (Auth.)

  1. An inhibitor of potentially lethal damage (PLD) repair reduces the frequency of γ-ray mutations in cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoiyama, A.; Kada, T.; Kuroda, Y.

    1992-01-01

    Cordycepin (3'-deoxyadenosine, 3 - dA) is an RNA antimetabolite and a radiosensitizer in cultured mammalian cells. In the present paper, the effects of 3'-dA on γ-ray-induced lethality and 6-thioguanine (6TG)-resistant mutations in cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells were examined. 3'-dA had the effect of sensitizing the lethality induced by γ-rays. The potentially lethal damage (PLD) repair produced by post-incubation cells in Hanks' solution after γ-irradiation was almost completely suppressed by 5x10 -5 M 3'-dA. When cells were irradiated with 10 Gy γ-rays and incubated with 3'-dA for 5 h, the frequency of 6TG-resistant mutations induced by γ-rays decreased to 1/6 of that of the irradiated cells incubated without 3'-dA. The decrease in the frequency of γ-ray-induced mutations was dependent on the length of incubation time with 3'-dA. It is suggested that the inhibition of PLD repair by 3'-dA may be that of error-prone repair. (author). 26 refs.; 5 figs

  2. Mutation of a vitelline membrane protein, BmEP80, is responsible for the silkworm "Ming" lethal egg mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Anli; Gao, Peng; Zhao, Qiaoling; Tang, Shunming; Shen, Xingjia; Zhang, Guozheng; Qiu, Zhiyong; Xia, Dingguo; Huang, Yongping; Xu, Yunmin; He, Ningjia

    2013-02-25

    The egg stage is an important stage in the silkworm (Bombyx mori) life cycle. Normal silkworm eggs are usually short, elliptical, and laterally flattened, with a sometimes hollowed surface on the lateral side. However, the eggs laid by homozygous recessive "Ming" lethal egg mutants (l-e(m)) lose water and become concaved around 1h, ultimately exhibiting a triangular shape on the egg surfaces. We performed positional cloning, and narrowed down the region containing the gene responsible for the l-e(m) mutant to 360 kb on chromosome 10 using 2287 F(2) individuals. Using expression analysis and RNA interference, the best l-e(m) candidate gene was shown to be BmEP80. The results of the inverse polymerase chain reaction showed that an ~1.9 kb region from the 3' untranslated region of BmVMP23 to the forepart of BmEP80 was replaced by a >100 kb DNA fragment in the l-e(m) mutant. Several eggs laid by the normal moths injected with BmEP80 small interfering RNAs were evidently depressed and exhibited a triangular shape on the surface. The phenotype exhibited was consistent with the eggs laid by the l-e(m) mutant. Moreover, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that the BmEP80 protein was expressed in the ovary from the 9th day of the pupa stage to eclosion in the wild-type silkworm, but was absent in the l-e(m) mutant. These results indicate that BmEP80 is responsible for the l-e(m) mutation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. On the mutagenicity of methadone hydrochloride. Induced dominant lethal mutation and spermatocyte chromosomal aberrations in treated males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badr, F M; Rabouh, S A; Badr, R S

    1979-11-01

    The mutagenicity of methadone hydrochloride was tested in male mice using the dominant lethal mutation technique and the spermatocyte test of treated mice. Male mice of C3H inbred strain received one of the following doses, 1, 2, 4 or 6 mg/kg body weight once a day for 3 consecutive days. Another group of mice served as control and received saline instead. Treated males were then mated to virgin females at 3-day intervals for a period of 45 days. Pregnant females were dissected at mid-term and the corpora lutea and intrauterine contents were recorded. The spermatocytes of treated males were examined 45-50 d after treatments with methadone and abnormal pairing configurations were scored. The methadone treatment was found to increase the rate of preimplantation deaths consistently in all post-meiotic stages with all doses used. In addition, the higher doses, 4 and 6 mg, affected spermatogonia stages. Quantitatively, the dose-response relationship cannot be demonstrated though the spectrum of effect increased with higher doses as more spermatogenesis stages became more sensitive to the treatment. In many cases the frequency of live implants showed a positive correlation with preimplantation deaths in contrast with the frequency of early deaths which showed only sporadic variation. The mutation indices based on total embryonic death indicate that methadone hydrochloride affected several stages of germ-cell maturation namely, spermatozoa (M.I. 14-35), late spermatids (M.I. 15-48), early spermatids (M.I. 14-50), late spermatocytes (M.I. 15-43) and spermatogonial stages (M.I. 12-63). Chromosome analysis at diakinesis-metaphase 1 revealed significant increase in the frequency of sex chromosome and autosome univalents with different doses of methadone. The smallest dose applied was quite effective and the data represent direct dose-response relationship. Of the multivalent configuration, the most frequent type was chain quadrivalents. The frequencies of total translocations

  4. The distribution of and complementation relationships between spontaneous X-linked recessive lethal mutations recovered from crossing long-term laboratory stocks of Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schalet, A.P.

    1986-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster males from a wild-type laboratory stock, were mated with virgin females of the M-6 stock, and 149 spontaneous independent non-mosaically transmitted, as well as 8 incidentally detected, mosaically transmitted, X-linked recessive lethal mutations were recovered from 95 704 F 2 cultures. 152 mutations were mapped over the entire length of the X-chromosome by complementation and/or crossover tests. Although there were far too few spontaneous mutations to make a meaningful comparison of relative mutability on a locus-by-locus basis, those loci displaying a relatively higher X-ray mutability, when taken as a group, tend to display a relatively higher spontaneous mutability, and those loci displaying a relatively lower X-ray mutability, when taken as a group, tend to display a relatively lower spontaneous mutability. (Auth.)

  5. A missense mutation in PFAS (phosphoribosylformylglycinamidine synthase) is likely causal for embryonic lethality associated with the MH1 haplotype in Montbéliarde dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michot, Pauline; Fritz, Sébastien; Barbat, Anne; Boussaha, Mekki; Deloche, Marie-Christine; Grohs, Cécile; Hoze, Chris; Le Berre, Laurène; Le Bourhis, Daniel; Desnoes, Olivier; Salvetti, Pascal; Schibler, Laurent; Boichard, Didier; Capitan, Aurélien

    2017-10-01

    A candidate mutation in the sex hormone binding globulin gene was proposed in 2013 to be responsible for the MH1 recessive embryonic lethal locus segregating in the Montbéliarde breed. In this follow-up study, we excluded this candidate variant because healthy homozygous carriers were observed in large-scale genotyping data generated in the framework of the genomic selection program. We fine mapped the MH1 locus in a 702-kb interval and analyzed genome sequence data from the 1,000 bull genomes project and 54 Montbéliarde bulls (including 14 carriers and 40 noncarriers). We report the identification of a strong candidate mutation in the gene encoding phosphoribosylformylglycinamidine synthase (PFAS), a protein involved in de novo purine synthesis. This mutation, located in a class I glutamine amidotransferase-like domain, results in the substitution of an arginine residue that is entirely conserved among eukaryotes by a cysteine (p.R1205C). No homozygote for the cysteine-encoding allele was observed in a large population of more than 25,000 individuals despite a 6.7% allelic frequency and 122 expected homozygotes under neutrality assumption. Genotyping of 18 embryos collected from heterozygous parents as well as analysis on nonreturn rates suggested that most homozygous carriers died between 7 and 35 d postinsemination. The identification of this strong candidate mutation will enable the accurate testing of the reproducers and the efficient selection against this lethal recessive embryonic defect in the Montbéliarde breed. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Ultraviolet-x-ray interaction: mutation and transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, A.; Elkind, M.M.; Suzuki, F.; Dainko, J.L.; Buess, E.

    1981-01-01

    The overall long-range objectives of the proposed research are to: (1) determine whether ionizing and nonionizing radiations interact in the induction of mutation and neoplastic transformation; (2) identify the nature of the interaction; (3) establish the possible relationship between the repair processes and the expression of interactive damage related to mutation and neoplastic transformation. Principal methods were used to assess survival, mutation, and neoplastic transformation of mammalian cells in culture. Cells were exposed to the following radiations: 50-kV x-rays; light from a germicidal lamp, uv-C (254 nm); light from unfiltered sun lamps, uv-B (290 to 345 nm); and light from sun lamps filtered by polystyrene dish covers

  7. Interaction of radiation, Dihydroxyanthraquinone, and Adriamycin on the induction of acute lethality in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimler, B.F.; Cox, G.G.; Reddy, E.K.

    1984-01-01

    The acute lethality induced by combinations of radiation, Dihydroxyanthraquinone (DHAQ), and Adriamycin (ADR) was investigated in mice. Whole-body irradiation produced acute lethality, with an LD-50/30 of approximately 6.5 Gy. ADR and DHAQ produced LD-50/30's of 14 and 4 mg/kg, respectively. When 10 mg/kg doses were fractionated into 5 x 2 mg/kg daily doses, both drugs were equally or more efficient at producing mortality, 90% by day 30. When 4 Gy radiation was combined with 5 mg/kg ADR or 5 mg/kg DHAQ, a response no greater than that produced by drug alone was obtained. However, when 5 mg/kg ADR was administered concomitantly with 5 mg/kg DHAQ, there was a less-than-additive induction of lethality, resulting in only 21% mortality by day 20. ADR and DHAQ (at doses of 5 mg/kg) were combined but with a 1 day interval between drugs, the protective effect was lost and animals died earlier than after either agent alone. At present, no definite explanation is available for this unusual protective effect of ADR against acute lethality induced by DHAQ

  8. Studies on chromosomal aberrations and dominant lethal mutations induced by x irradiation in germ cells of male mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xianli; Wang Mingdong; Wang Bin; Sun Shuqing

    1992-01-01

    After male mice irradiated by 2 Gy X rays mated to normal virginal females superovulated with PMSG and HCG, pronuclei chromosome spreading of first-cleavage embryos were prepared and chromosomal aberrations of paternal pronuclei were observed. The results showed that the frequency of chromosomal aberrations was highest irradiated at spermatic stage among different stages of spermatogenesis. The sequence of radiosensitivity in spermatogenesis was as follows: spermatids > mature sperm > spermatocyte > spermatogonia and stem spermatogonia. The frequencies of paternal chromosomal aberrations resulted from irradiation at spermatids and mature sperms were significantly higher than that in control. The reciprocal translocations of stem spermatogonia induced by 2 Gy X rays in those male mice were also examined in the preparations of diakinesis-metaphase I. The frequency of reciprocal translocations were 0.0429 per cell and significantly higher than that in control. The proportion of unbalanced gametes, resulting in lethal embryos after fertilization, was 0.02145 to be predicted. At the same time, the dominant lethality induced by X rays in stem spermatogonia was measured, being 0.0371. The frequency of dead fetuses in irradiation group was about twice as in control. The regression analysis was found that the reciprocal translocations was markedly related to the dominant lethality

  9. Tissue-specific mosaicism for a lethal osteogenesis imperfecta COL1A1 mutation causes mild OI/EDS overlap syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symoens, Sofie; Steyaert, Wouter; Demuynck, Lynn; De Paepe, Anne; Diderich, Karin E M; Malfait, Fransiska; Coucke, Paul J

    2017-04-01

    Type I collagen is the predominant protein of connective tissues such as skin and bone. Mutations in the type I collagen genes (COL1A1 and COL1A2) mainly cause osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). We describe a patient with clinical signs of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), including fragile skin, easy bruising, recurrent luxations, and fractures resembling mild OI. Biochemical collagen analysis of the patients' dermal fibroblasts showed faint overmodification of the type I collagen bands, a finding specific for structural defects in type I collagen. Bidirectional Sanger sequencing detected an in-frame deletion in exon 44 of COL1A1 (c.3150_3158del), resulting in the deletion of three amino acids (p.Ala1053_Gly1055del) in the collagen triple helix. This COL1A1 mutation was hitherto identified in four probands with lethal OI, and never in EDS patients. As the peaks on the electropherogram corresponding to the mutant allele were decreased in intensity, we performed next generation sequencing of COL1A1 to study mosaicism in skin and blood. While approximately 9% of the reads originating from fibroblast gDNA harbored the COL1A1 deletion, the deletion was not detected in gDNA from blood. Most likely, the mild clinical symptoms observed in our patient can be explained by the mosaic state of the mutation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Synergism between caffeine and γ-radiation in the induction of dominant lethal mutations in oocytes and spermatozoa of Musca domestica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Targa, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    Caffeine was studied with regard to its synergism with γ-radiation in the induction of dominant lethal mutations in S14 oocytes and mature spermatozoa of M. domestica. In S14 oocytes an increase in the frequency of such a type of mutation was observed only when the exposure to γ-radiation followed a pretreatment with a diet containing 0.2% of caffeine. Negative results were obtained with (a) post-treatment with the same kind of diet, (b) pretreatment with diets containing 0.1 and 0.02% of caffeine and (c) exposure to the radiation 6 h after interruption of the feeding treatment with the diet containing 0.2% of caffeine. Such influence of the conditions under which the treatment is performed and the synergistic effects is probably related to the food intake pattern and the rapid metabolism of the caffeine. When the 0.2% caffeine pretreatment was combined with an exposure of the oocytes to variable doses of γ-radiation, the increments in the mutations observed seemed to be negatively correlated to the radiation doses used. Also, under such conditions, the dose/survival relationship fits well an exponential curve expressed by in y=-0.866chi. With mature spermatozoa, synergism by caffeine was found only when the females, after having been mated with the irradiated males, were fed for 24 h on a diet supplemented with 0.2% of caffeine. (orig.)

  11. A novel and lethal de novo LQT-3 mutation in a newborn with distinct molecular pharmacology and therapeutic response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R Bankston

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available SCN5A encodes the alpha-subunit (Na(v1.5 of the principle Na(+ channel in the human heart. Genetic lesions in SCN5A can cause congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS variant 3 (LQT-3 in adults by disrupting inactivation of the Na(v1.5 channel. Pharmacological targeting of mutation-altered Na(+ channels has proven promising in developing a gene-specific therapeutic strategy to manage specifically this LQTS variant. SCN5A mutations that cause similar channel dysfunction may also contribute to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS and other arrhythmias in newborns, but the prevalence, impact, and therapeutic management of SCN5A mutations may be distinct in infants compared with adults.Here, in a multidisciplinary approach, we report a de novo SCN5A mutation (F1473C discovered in a newborn presenting with extreme QT prolongation and differential responses to the Na(+ channel blockers flecainide and mexiletine. Our goal was to determine the Na(+ channel phenotype caused by this severe mutation and to determine whether distinct effects of different Na(+ channel blockers on mutant channel activity provide a mechanistic understanding of the distinct therapeutic responsiveness of the mutation carrier. Sequence analysis of the proband revealed the novel missense SCN5A mutation (F1473C and a common variant in KCNH2 (K897T. Patch clamp analysis of HEK 293 cells transiently transfected with wild-type or mutant Na(+ channels revealed significant changes in channel biophysics, all contributing to the proband's phenotype as predicted by in silico modeling. Furthermore, subtle differences in drug action were detected in correcting mutant channel activity that, together with both the known genetic background and age of the patient, contribute to the distinct therapeutic responses observed clinically.The results of our study provide further evidence of the grave vulnerability of newborns to Na(+ channel defects and suggest that both genetic background and age are

  12. Genomewide Screen for Synthetic Lethal Interactions with Mutant KRAS in Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    development of lung cancer; one of the important contributing ones is genetic mutations. For example, KRAS mutations account for 22% lung cancer cases...Public Release; Distribution Unlimited The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author (s) and should not be...5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0287 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR (S) Yin-Yuan Mo Betty Diamond 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER E-Mail

  13. Mutation induction by and mutational interaction between monochromatic wavelength radiations in the near-ultraviolet and visible ranges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyrrell, R.M.

    1980-01-01

    The induction of mutations (reversion to tryptophan independence) by various UV (254, 313, 334 and 365 nm) and visible (405 and 434 nm) wavelengths was measured in exponential phase populations of Escherichia coli B/r thy trp and B/r thy trp uvr A by assay of irradiated populations on semi-enriched media. No mutations were induced in the repair proficient strain at wavelengths longer than 313 nm. Mutations were induced to the excisionless strain at wavelengths as long as 405 nm but less than expected from the known amount of DNA damage induced. Irradiation at the long wavelenths (434, 405, 365 and 334 nm) suppressed the appearance of 254- or 313 nm-induced mutations in the repair competent strain but not in the excision deficient strain. The relative dose-requirement for mutation suppression was related to the relative efficiency of these wavelengths in inducing growth delay. These results suggest that the growth delay induced by near-UV and visible wavelenghts allows more time for the 'error-free' excision repair process to act on the potentially mutagenic lesions induced by 254- and 313-nm radiations, thereby reducing the mutation frequency observed in the repair-proficient strain. The level of near-UV mutation induced in the excision deficient strain is lower than expected from the DNA damage known to be induced. It is possible that near-UV radiation induces a class of lethal lesions that are not susceptible to error-prone repair. (author)

  14. The scid mutation does not affect slowly repairing potentially lethal damage that is sensitive to 0.23 M NaCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Hiroshi; Ikebuchi, Makoto; Fushiki, Masato; Komatsu, Kenshi.

    1996-01-01

    The repair of slowly repairing potentially lethal damage (PLD) in radiosensitive cells from the severe combined immunodeficient (scid) mouse was compared with that in Balb/c 3T3 cells with ''wild-type'' radiosensitivity and that in RD13B2 cells derived from scid cells whose sensitivity is normal because of the presence of fragments of human chromosome 8. Treatment with 0.23 M NaCl was used for fixation of slowly repairing PLD. The scid cells repaired PLD sensitive to 0.23 M NaCl to a great extent whin 3-4 h, similarly to Balb/c 3T3 and RD13B2 cells. This indicates that the scid mutation hardly affects the repair of PLD sensitive to 0.23 M NaCl. On the other hand, as reported previously, the rapidly repairing PLD that is sensitive to 0.5 M NaCl was repaired only slowly (3-4 h) in scid cells, in contrast to the rapid repair (within 1 h) seen with Balb/c 3T3 and RD13B2. This suggests that scid mutation is responsible for this repair at reduced rate. To confirm the independence of repair of 0.23 M NaCl-sensitive PLD from that of 0.5 M NaCl-sensitive PLD, both treatments with 0.23 M NaCl and 0.5 M NaCl were combined in each line. It is found that the repair of either PLD was not affected by the other treatment. The scid mutation impaired only the repair of 0.5 M NaCl-sensitive PLD. (author)

  15. Mutations in PPIB (cyclophilin B) delay type I procollagen chain association and result in perinatal lethal to moderate osteogenesis imperfecta phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyott, Shawna M; Schwarze, Ulrike; Christiansen, Helena E; Pepin, Melanie G; Leistritz, Dru F; Dineen, Richard; Harris, Catharine; Burton, Barbara K; Angle, Brad; Kim, Katherine; Sussman, Michael D; Weis, Maryann; Eyre, David R; Russell, David W; McCarthy, Kevin J; Steiner, Robert D; Byers, Peter H

    2011-04-15

    Recessive mutations in the cartilage-associated protein (CRTAP), leucine proline-enriched proteoglycan 1 (LEPRE1) and peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerase B (PPIB) genes result in phenotypes that range from lethal in the perinatal period to severe deforming osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). These genes encode CRTAP (encoded by CRTAP), prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1 (P3H1; encoded by LEPRE1) and cyclophilin B (CYPB; encoded by PPIB), which reside in the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) and can form a complex involved in prolyl 3-hydroxylation in type I procollagen. CYPB, a prolyl cis-trans isomerase, has been thought to drive the prolyl-containing peptide bonds to the trans configuration needed for triple helix formation. Here, we describe mutations in PPIB identified in cells from three individuals with OI. Cultured dermal fibroblasts from the most severely affected infant make some overmodified type I procollagen molecules. Proα1(I) chains are slow to assemble into trimers, and abnormal procollagen molecules concentrate in the RER, and bind to protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and prolyl 4-hydroxylase 1 (P4H1). These findings suggest that although CYPB plays a role in helix formation another effect is on folding of the C-terminal propeptide and trimer formation. The extent of procollagen accumulation and PDI/P4H1 binding differs among cells with mutations in PPIB, CRTAP and LEPRE1 with the greatest amount in PPIB-deficient cells and the least in LEPRE1-deficient cells. These findings suggest that prolyl cis-trans isomerase may be required to effectively fold the proline-rich regions of the C-terminal propeptide to allow proα chain association and suggest an order of action for CRTAP, P3H1 and CYPB in procollagen biosynthesis and pathogenesis of OI.

  16. Mutations blocking side chain assembly, polymerization, or transport of a Wzy-dependent Streptococcus pneumoniae capsule are lethal in the absence of suppressor mutations and can affect polymer transfer to the cell wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xayarath, Bobbi; Yother, Janet

    2007-05-01

    Extracellular polysaccharides of many bacteria are synthesized by the Wzy polymerase-dependent mechanism, where long-chain polymers are assembled from undecaprenyl-phosphate-linked repeat units on the outer face of the cytoplasmic membrane. In gram-positive bacteria, Wzy-dependent capsules remain largely cell associated via membrane and peptidoglycan linkages. Like many Wzy-dependent capsules, the Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 2 capsule is branched. In this study, we found that deletions of cps2K, cps2J, or cps2H, which encode a UDP-glucose dehydrogenase necessary for side chain synthesis, the putative Wzx transporter (flippase), and the putative Wzy polymerase, respectively, were obtained only in the presence of suppressor mutations. Most of the suppressor mutations were in cps2E, which encodes the initiating glycosyltransferase for capsule synthesis. The cps2K mutants containing the suppressor mutations produced low levels of high-molecular-weight polymer that was detected only in membrane fractions. cps2K-repaired mutants exhibited only modest increases in capsule production due to the effect of the secondary mutation, but capsule was detectable in both membrane and cell wall fractions. Lethality of the cps2K, cps2J, and cps2H mutations was likely due to sequestration of undecaprenyl-phosphate in the capsule pathway and either preclusion of its turnover for utilization in essential pathways or destabilization of the membrane due to an accumulation of lipid-linked intermediates. The results demonstrate that proper polymer assembly requires not only a functional transporter and polymerase but also complete repeat units. A central role for the initiating glycosyltransferase in controlling capsule synthesis is also suggested.

  17. Context-dependent interactive effects of non-lethal predation on larvae impact adult longevity and body composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasegaran, Karthikeyan; Kandregula, Samyuktha Rao; Quader, Suhel; Juliano, Steven A

    2018-01-01

    Predation impacts development, behavior and morphology of prey species thereby shaping their abundances, distribution and community structure. Non-lethal threat of predation, specifically, can have a strong influence on prey lifehistory characteristics. While investigations often focus on the impact of predation threat on prey in isolation, tests of its interactive effects with food availability and resource competition on prey survival and fitness can improve understanding of costs, benefits and trade-offs of anti-predator strategies. This study, involving Aedes aegypti mosquitoes as a model organism, investigates both simple and interactive effects of predation threat during the larval stage on survival, size at and time to maturity, stored teneral reserves of glycogen, protein and lipid in adults, and adult longevity. Our results show that development times of mosquito larvae were increased (by 14.84% in males and by 97.63% in females), and size of eclosing adults decreased (by 62.30% in males and by 58.33% in females) when exposed to lowered nutrition and elevated intraspecific competition, but that predation had no detectable effect on these simple traits. Teneral reserves of glycogen, protein and lipid and adult longevity were positively correlated with adult body size. Non-lethal predation threat had significant interactive effects with nutrition and larval competition on teneral reserves in males and adult longevity in males and females. The sexes responded differently to conditions encountered as larvae, with the larval environment affecting development and adult characteristics more acutely for females than for males. The outcome of this study shows how threat of predation on juveniles can have long-lasting effects on adults that are likely to impact mosquito population dynamics and that may impact disease transmission.

  18. Targeting Synthetic Lethal Interactions between Myc and the eIF4F Complex Impedes Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Ju Lin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The energetically demanding process of translation is linked to multiple signaling events through mTOR-mediated regulation of eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF4F complex assembly. Disrupting mTOR constraints on eIF4F activity can be oncogenic and alter chemotherapy response, making eIF4F an attractive antineoplastic target. Here, we combine a newly developed inducible RNAi platform and pharmacological targeting of eIF4F activity to define a critical role for endogenous eIF4F in Myc-dependent tumor initiation. We find elevated Myc levels are associated with deregulated eIF4F activity in the prelymphomatous stage of the Eμ-Myc lymphoma model. Inhibition of eIF4F is synthetic lethal with elevated Myc in premalignant pre-B/B cells resulting in reduced numbers of cycling pre-B/B cells and delayed tumor onset. At the organismal level, eIF4F suppression affected a subset of normal regenerating cells, but this was well tolerated and rapidly and completely reversible. Therefore, eIF4F is a key Myc client that represents a tumor-specific vulnerability.

  19. NAXE Mutations Disrupt the Cellular NAD(P)HX Repair System and Cause a Lethal Neurometabolic Disorder of Early Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Laura S; Danhauser, Katharina; Herebian, Diran; Petkovic Ramadža, Danijela; Piekutowska-Abramczuk, Dorota; Seibt, Annette; Müller-Felber, Wolfgang; Haack, Tobias B; Płoski, Rafał; Lohmeier, Klaus; Schneider, Dominik; Klee, Dirk; Rokicki, Dariusz; Mayatepek, Ertan; Strom, Tim M; Meitinger, Thomas; Klopstock, Thomas; Pronicka, Ewa; Mayr, Johannes A; Baric, Ivo; Distelmaier, Felix; Prokisch, Holger

    2016-10-06

    To safeguard the cell from the accumulation of potentially harmful metabolic intermediates, specific repair mechanisms have evolved. APOA1BP, now renamed NAXE, encodes an epimerase essential in the cellular metabolite repair for NADHX and NADPHX. The enzyme catalyzes the epimerization of NAD(P)HX, thereby avoiding the accumulation of toxic metabolites. The clinical importance of the NAD(P)HX repair system has been unknown. Exome sequencing revealed pathogenic biallelic mutations in NAXE in children from four families with (sub-) acute-onset ataxia, cerebellar edema, spinal myelopathy, and skin lesions. Lactate was elevated in cerebrospinal fluid of all affected individuals. Disease onset was during the second year of life and clinical signs as well as episodes of deterioration were triggered by febrile infections. Disease course was rapidly progressive, leading to coma, global brain atrophy, and finally to death in all affected individuals. NAXE levels were undetectable in fibroblasts from affected individuals of two families. In these fibroblasts we measured highly elevated concentrations of the toxic metabolite cyclic-NADHX, confirming a deficiency of the mitochondrial NAD(P)HX repair system. Finally, NAD or nicotinic acid (vitamin B3) supplementation might have therapeutic implications for this fatal disorder. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Mottled Neuherberg (Mo sup(N)), a new male-lethal coat colour mutation of the house mouse (Mus musculus)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, J.H.

    1975-01-01

    A new semidominant X-chromosomal mutation, Mottled Neuherberg (Mo sup(N)), which causes coat colour variegation is described. Mo sup(N) arose in the second postirradiation generation after 2 x 200 R of X-rays (24 hours apart) to oocytes of X/O mice. Heterozygous Mo sup(N) females have irregular patches of fully and lightly coloured fur over the whole coat with curly vibrissae. Their viability is reduced, about 3% of the heterozygotes dying prenatally and 6 to 28% dying postnatally before weaning. Survivors are fertile without externally visible abnormalities. Hemizygous Mo sup(N) males die in utero after implantation. The recombination frequency between Mo sup(N) and tabby (Ta) was 3.65 +- 3.16% (with 95% -confidence limits). Therefore, it is suggested that Mo sup(N) is a new allele of the mottled (Mo) locus of the house mouse. Mo sup(N)-bearing ova seem to have a lower chance of becoming fertilized by wild-type spermatozoa than by Ta-bearing spermatozoa. (orig.) [de

  1. A dominant-negative mutation of mouse Lmx1b causes glaucoma and is semi-lethal via LDB1-mediated dimerization [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally H Cross

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the LIM-homeodomain transcription factor LMX1B cause nail-patella syndrome, an autosomal dominant pleiotrophic human disorder in which nail, patella and elbow dysplasia is associated with other skeletal abnormalities and variably nephropathy and glaucoma. It is thought to be a haploinsufficient disorder. Studies in the mouse have shown that during development Lmx1b controls limb dorsal-ventral patterning and is also required for kidney and eye development, midbrain-hindbrain boundary establishment and the specification of specific neuronal subtypes. Mice completely deficient for Lmx1b die at birth. In contrast to the situation in humans, heterozygous null mice do not have a mutant phenotype. Here we report a novel mouse mutant Icst, an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced missense substitution, V265D, in the homeodomain of LMX1B that abolishes DNA binding and thereby the ability to transactivate other genes. Although the homozygous phenotypic consequences of Icst and the null allele of Lmx1b are the same, heterozygous Icst elicits a phenotype whilst the null allele does not. Heterozygous Icst causes glaucomatous eye defects and is semi-lethal, probably due to kidney failure. We show that the null phenotype is rescued more effectively by an Lmx1b transgene than is Icst. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments show that both wild-type and Icst LMX1B are found in complexes with LIM domain binding protein 1 (LDB1, resulting in lower levels of functional LMX1B in Icst heterozygotes than null heterozygotes. We conclude that Icst is a dominant-negative allele of Lmx1b. These findings indicate a reassessment of whether nail-patella syndrome is always haploinsufficient. Furthermore, Icst is a rare example of a model of human glaucoma caused by mutation of the same gene in humans and mice.

  2. Compound heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in KIF20A are associated with a novel lethal congenital cardiomyopathy in two siblings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacoba J Louw

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital or neonatal cardiomyopathies are commonly associated with a poor prognosis and have multiple etiologies. In two siblings, a male and female, we identified an undescribed type of lethal congenital restrictive cardiomyopathy affecting the right ventricle. We hypothesized a novel autosomal recessive condition. To identify the cause, we performed genetic, in vitro and in vivo studies. Genome-wide SNP typing and parametric linkage analysis was done in a recessive model to identify candidate regions. Exome sequencing analysis was done in unaffected and affected siblings. In the linkage regions, we selected candidate genes that harbor two rare variants with predicted functional effects in the patients and for which the unaffected sibling is either heterozygous or homozygous reference. We identified two compound heterozygous variants in KIF20A; a maternal missense variant (c.544C>T: p.R182W and a paternal frameshift mutation (c.1905delT: p.S635Tfs*15. Functional studies confirmed that the R182W mutation creates an ATPase defective form of KIF20A which is not able to support efficient transport of Aurora B as part of the chromosomal passenger complex. Due to this, Aurora B remains trapped on chromatin in dividing cells and fails to translocate to the spindle midzone during cytokinesis. Translational blocking of KIF20A in a zebrafish model resulted in a cardiomyopathy phenotype. We identified a novel autosomal recessive congenital restrictive cardiomyopathy, caused by a near complete loss-of-function of KIF20A. This finding further illustrates the relationship of cytokinesis and congenital cardiomyopathy.

  3. An analysis of lethal and sublethal interactions among type I and type II pyrethroid pesticide mixtures using standard Hyalella azteca water column toxicity tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Krista Callinan; Deanovic, Linda; Werner, Inge; Stillway, Marie; Fong, Stephanie; Teh, Swee

    2016-10-01

    A novel 2-tiered analytical approach was used to characterize and quantify interactions between type I and type II pyrethroids in Hyalella azteca using standardized water column toxicity tests. Bifenthrin, permethrin, cyfluthrin, and lambda-cyhalothrin were tested in all possible binary combinations across 6 experiments. All mixtures were analyzed for 4-d lethality, and 2 of the 6 mixtures (permethrin-bifenthrin and permethrin-cyfluthrin) were tested for subchronic 10-d lethality and sublethal effects on swimming motility and growth. Mixtures were initially analyzed for interactions using regression analyses, and subsequently compared with the additive models of concentration addition and independent action to further characterize mixture responses. Negative interactions (antagonistic) were significant in 2 of the 6 mixtures tested, including cyfluthrin-bifenthrin and cyfluthrin-permethrin, but only on the acute 4-d lethality endpoint. In both cases mixture responses fell between the additive models of concentration addition and independent action. All other mixtures were additive across 4-d lethality, and bifenthrin-permethrin and cyfluthrin-permethrin were also additive in terms of subchronic 10-d lethality and sublethal responses. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2542-2549. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  4. Analysis of recessive sex-linked lethal mutations in genetically different strains of Drosophila melanogaster ms and w irradiated in the five-kilometer zone of the Chernobyl meltdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslanyan, M.M.; Kim, A.I.; Magomedova, M.A.; Fatkulbayanova, N.L.

    1994-01-01

    The frequency of induced and spontaneous recessive sex-linked lethal mutations (RSLLM) in Drosophila melanogaster strains w and ms was estimated after their chronic irradiation in the five-kilometer zone of the Chernobyl' meltdown. The mutagenic effect of relatively low radiation doses was analyzed. In an experiment conducted in 1990, a significant increase in the RSLLM frequency was recorded, while, in 1991, no significant difference between the experiment and control was found

  5. Caffeine and D sub 2 O medium interact in affecting the expression of radiation-induced potentially lethal damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utsumi, H. (Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Radiation Biology Center); Elkind, M.M. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Radiological Health Sciences)

    1991-10-01

    Earlier work has been extended to compare the killing of long-phase V79 Chinese hamster cells by ionizing radiation when they are treated immediately after irradiation with medium containing either caffeine or 90% D{sub 2}O. The object was to determine if the enhanced killing due to post-treatment with caffeine, or D{sub 2}O, resulted from action on the same sector of potentially lethal damage as appeared to be the case for hypertonic shock and D{sub 2}O medium. The treatments by themselves were not toxic to unirradiated cells. We found that the enhanced expression of potentially lethal damage by post-treatment with caffeine or D{sub 2}O medium is similar. For example, the kinetic of the repair of the potentially lethal damage expressible by either post-treatment was similar, and an additive enhancement of potentially lethal damage occurred when the two treatments were administered sequentially. These findings suggest that caffeine and D{sub 2}O medium affect the same sector of potentially lethal damage. When the two treatments were combined, however, they competed with each other. Thus, although caffeine and D{sub 2}O medium act on the same sector of potentially lethal damage they do so differently, suggesting that more than one pathway of the expression of radiation damage can result in the same phenotypic effect. (author).

  6. Caffeine and D2O medium interact in affecting the expression of radiation-induced potentially lethal damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsumi, H.; Elkind, M.M.

    1991-01-01

    Earlier work has been extended to compare the killing of long-phase V79 Chinese hamster cells by ionizing radiation when they are treated immediately after irradiation with medium containing either caffeine or 90% D 2 O. The object was to determine if the enhanced killing due to post-treatment with caffeine, or D 2 O, resulted from action on the same sector of potentially lethal damage as appeared to be the case for hypertonic shock and D 2 O medium. The treatments by themselves were not toxic to unirradiated cells. We found that the enhanced expression of potentially lethal damage by post-treatment with caffeine or D 2 O medium is similar. For example, the kinetic of the repair of the potentially lethal damage expressible by either post-treatment was similar, and an additive enhancement of potentially lethal damage occurred when the two treatments were administered sequentially. These findings suggest that caffeine and D 2 O medium affect the same sector of potentially lethal damage. When the two treatments were combined, however, they competed with each other. Thus, although caffeine and D 2 O medium act on the same sector of potentially lethal damage they do so differently, suggesting that more than one pathway of the expression of radiation damage can result in the same phenotypic effect. (author)

  7. Lethal Epistaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byard, Roger W

    2016-09-01

    Epistaxis or nosebleed refers to bleeding from the nostrils, nasal cavity, or nasopharynx. Occasional cases may present with torrential lethal hemorrhage. Three cases are reported to demonstrate particular features: Case 1: A 51-year-old woman with lethal epistaxis with no obvious bleeding source; Case 2: A 77-year-old man with treated nasopharyngeal carcinoma who died from epistaxis arising from a markedly neovascularized tumor bed; Case 3: A 2-year-old boy with hemophilia B who died from epistaxis with airway obstruction in addition to gastrointestinal bleeding. Epistaxis may be associated with trauma, tumors, vascular malformations, bleeding diatheses, infections, pregnancy, endometriosis, and a variety of different drugs. Careful dissection of the nasal cavity is required to locate the site of hemorrhage and to identify any predisposing conditions. This may be guided by postmortem computerized tomographic angiography (PCTA). Despite careful dissection, however, a source of bleeding may never be identified. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  8. Lethal action of ultraviolet and visible (blue violet) radiations at defined wavelengths on human lymphoblastoid cells; action spectra and interaction sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyrrell, R.M.; Werfelli, P.; Moraes, E.C. (Institut Suisse de Recherches Experimentales sur le Cancer, Lausanne)

    1984-02-01

    The repair proficient human lymphoblastoid line (TK6) has been employed to construct an action spectrum for the lethal action of ultraviolet (UV) radiation in the range 254 to 434 nm and to examine possible interactions between longer (334, 365 and 405 nm) and shorter wavelength (254 and 313 nm) radiations. The action spectrum follows a DNA absorption spectrum fairly closely out to 360 nm. As in previously determined lethal action spectra for procaryotic and eucaryotic cell populations, there is a broad shoulder in the 334 to 405 nm region which could reflect the existence of either (a) a non-DNA chromophore or (b) a unique photochemical reaction in the DNA over this region. Pre-treatment with radiation at 334 or 365 nm causes either a slight sensitivity to (low fluences) or protection from (higher fluences) subsequent exposure to radiation at a shorter wavelength (254 or 313 nm). Pre-irradiation at a visible wavelength (405 nm) at all fluence levels employed sensitizes the populations to treatment with 254 or 313 nm radiations. These interactions will influence the lethal outcome of cellular exposure to broad-band radiation sources.

  9. Lethal action of ultraviolet and visible (blue violet) radiations at defined wavelengths on human lymphoblastoid cells; action spectra and interaction sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyrrell, R.M.; Werfelli, P.; Moraes, E.C.

    1984-01-01

    The repair proficient human lymphoblastoid line (TK6) has been employed to construct an action spectrum for the lethal action of ultraviolet (UV) radiation in the range 254 to 434 nm and to examine possible interactions between longer (334, 365 and 405 nm) and shorter wavelength (254 and 313 nm) radiations. The action spectrum follows a DNA absorption spectrum fairly closely out to 360 nm. As in previously determined lethal action spectra for procaryotic and eucaryotic cell populations, there is a broad shoulder in the 334 to 405 nm region which could reflect the existence of either (a) a non-DNA chromophore or (b) a unique photochemical reaction in the DNA over this region. Pre-treatment with radiation at 334 or 365 nm causes either a slight sensitivity to (low fluences) or protection from (higher fluences) subsequent exposure to radiation at a shorter wavelength (254 or 313 nm). Pre-irradiation at a visible wavelength (405 nm) at all fluence levels employed sensitizes the populations to treatment with 254 or 313 nm radiations. These interactions will influence the lethal outcome of cellular exposure to broad-band radiation sources. (author)

  10. Effects and interactions of myostatin and callipyge mutations: I. Growth and carcass traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objectives were to document effects of the Texel myostatin mutation (MSTN) on growth and carcass traits and also test whether or not interactions with the callipyge mutation (CLPG) could be detected. Twelve rams heterozygous at both loci on the two different chromosomes were mated to 215 terminal-si...

  11. Mutations in SLC33A1 cause a lethal autosomal-recessive disorder with congenital cataracts, hearing loss, and low serum copper and ceruloplasmin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huppke, Peter; Brendel, Cornelia; Kalscheuer, Vera

    2012-01-01

    or compound heterozygous mutations for all affected subjects in SLC33A1 encoding a highly conserved acetylCoA transporter (AT-1) required for acetylation of multiple gangliosides and glycoproteins. The mutations were found to cause reduced or absent AT-1 expression and abnormal intracellular localization...

  12. A founder mutation in LEPRE1 carried by 1.5% of West Africans and 0.4% of African Americans causes lethal recessive osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Wayne A; Barnes, Aileen M; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Cushing, Kelly; Chitayat, David; Porter, Forbes D; Panny, Susan R; Gulamali-Majid, Fizza; Tishkoff, Sarah A; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Gueye, Serigne M; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Brody, Lawrence C; Rotimi, Charles N; Marini, Joan C

    2012-05-01

    Deficiency of prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1, encoded by LEPRE1, causes recessive osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). We previously identified a LEPRE1 mutation exclusively in African Americans and contemporary West Africans. We hypothesized that this allele originated in West Africa and was introduced to the Americas with the Atlantic slave trade. We aimed to determine the frequency of carriers for this mutation among African Americans and West Africans, and the mutation origin and age. Genomic DNA was screened for the mutation using PCR and restriction digestion, and a custom TaqMan genomic single-nucleotide polymorphism assay. The mutation age was estimated using microsatellites and short tandem repeats spanning 4.2 Mb surrounding LEPRE1 in probands and carriers. Approximately 0.4% (95% confidence interval: 0.22-0.68%) of Mid-Atlantic African Americans carry this mutation, estimating recessive OI in 1/260,000 births in this population. In Nigeria and Ghana, 1.48% (95% confidence interval: 0.95-2.30%) of unrelated individuals are heterozygous carriers, predicting that 1/18,260 births will be affected with recessive OI, equal to the incidence of de novo dominant OI. The mutation was not detected in Africans from surrounding countries. All carriers shared a haplotype of 63-770 Kb, consistent with a single founder for this mutation. Using linkage disequilibrium analysis, the mutation was estimated to have originated between 650 and 900 years before present (1100-1350 CE). We identified a West African founder mutation for recessive OI in LEPRE1. Nearly 1.5% of Ghanians and Nigerians are carriers. The estimated age of this allele is consistent with introduction to North America via the Atlantic slave trade (1501-1867 CE).

  13. The lethal interaction of x ray and penicillin induced lesions following x-irradiation of Escherichia coli B/r in the presence of hypoxic cell sensitizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillies, N.E.; Obioha, F.I.

    1982-01-01

    When Escherichia coli B/r were x-irradiated under anoxia in the presence of different electron-affinic sensitizers and then incubated in broth containing penicillin (at a concentration that did not kill unirradiated cells) additional killing of the bacteria occurred provided the sensitizers were of relatively high lipophilicity. The overall effect was to increase the efficiency of these sensitizers. It is concluded that sensitizer-dependent latent radiation lesions(s) are produced in membrane components of the cell envelope that interact with damage caused by penicillin in the peptidoglycan layer and this causes the additional lethality

  14. Genetic effects of decay of tritium incorporated into cells of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. 5. Lethal and mutagenic effects and the nature of mutations induced by /sup 3/H decay in the 6-th position of thymine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, E.L.; Korolev, V.G. (AN SSSR, Leningrad. Inst. Yadernoj Fiziki)

    1982-03-01

    Lethal and mutagenous effects as well as nature of mutations induced with /sup 3/H decay in the sixth position of thymine (6-/sup 3/H-T) have been studied. Inactivation probability of haploid yeasts constituted ..cap alpha..=(6.1+-1.0)x10/sup -3/ decay/sup -1/ or ..cap alpha..=(7.6+-1.3)x10/sup -5/ rad/sup -1/, and probability of mutation appearance in genes ade 1, ade -K is (2.8+-1.7)x10/sup -8/ decay/sup -1/ or K=(3.5+-2.1)x10/sup -10/ rad/sup -1/. Lethal and mutageneous effects of 6-/sup 3/H-T don't differ considerably from those for /sup 3/H decay in the fifth position of thymine (5-/sup 3/H-T). From the point of view of frequency of transversions and mutations of read-out frame shift type induced in ade 2 gene, 6-/sup 3/H-T doesn't differ from 5-/sup 3/H-T. However, in comparison with the latter 6-/sup 3/H-T causes appearance of a larger amount of AT ..-->.. GTs transitions. A scheme, according to which 5 methyl barbituric acid (5MBK) is a finite product of /sup 3/H decay in the sixth position of thymine, is suggested. The results obtained point to that fact that 5MBK represents weak mutageneous damage of thymine causing the exchange of AT pair.

  15. Two microcephaly-associated novel missense mutations in CASK specifically disrupt the CASK-neurexin interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaConte, Leslie E W; Chavan, Vrushali; Elias, Abdallah F; Hudson, Cynthia; Schwanke, Corbin; Styren, Katie; Shoof, Jonathan; Kok, Fernando; Srivastava, Sarika; Mukherjee, Konark

    2018-03-01

    Deletion and truncation mutations in the X-linked gene CASK are associated with severe intellectual disability (ID), microcephaly and pontine and cerebellar hypoplasia in girls (MICPCH). The molecular origin of CASK-linked MICPCH is presumed to be due to disruption of the CASK-Tbr-1 interaction. This hypothesis, however, has not been directly tested. Missense variants in CASK are typically asymptomatic in girls. We report three severely affected girls with heterozygous CASK missense mutations (M519T (2), G659D (1)) who exhibit ID, microcephaly, and hindbrain hypoplasia. The mutation M519T results in the replacement of an evolutionarily invariant methionine located in the PDZ signaling domain known to be critical for the CASK-neurexin interaction. CASK M519T is incapable of binding to neurexin, suggesting a critically important role for the CASK-neurexin interaction. The mutation G659D is in the SH3 (Src homology 3) domain of CASK, replacing a semi-conserved glycine with aspartate. We demonstrate that the CASK G659D mutation affects the CASK protein in two independent ways: (1) it increases the protein's propensity to aggregate; and (2) it disrupts the interface between CASK's PDZ (PSD95, Dlg, ZO-1) and SH3 domains, inhibiting the CASK-neurexin interaction despite residing outside of the domain deemed critical for neurexin interaction. Since heterozygosity of other aggregation-inducing mutations (e.g., CASK W919R ) does not produce MICPCH, we suggest that the G659D mutation produces microcephaly by disrupting the CASK-neurexin interaction. Our results suggest that disruption of the CASK-neurexin interaction, not the CASK-Tbr-1 interaction, produces microcephaly and cerebellar hypoplasia. These findings underscore the importance of functional validation for variant classification.

  16. Lethal digenic mutations in the K+ channels Kir4.1 (KCNJ10) and SLACK (KCNT1) associated with severe-disabling seizures and neurodevelopmental delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Sonia; Balobaid, Ameera; Grottesi, Alessandro; Dabbagh, Omar; Cenciarini, Marta; Rawashdeh, Rifaat; Al-Sagheir, Afaf; Bove, Cecilia; Macchioni, Lara; Pessia, Mauro; Al-Owain, Mohammed; D'Adamo, Maria Cristina

    2017-10-01

    A 2-yr-old boy presented profound developmental delay, failure to thrive, ataxia, hypotonia, and tonic-clonic seizures that caused the death of the patient. Targeted and whole exome sequencing revealed two heterozygous missense variants: a novel mutation in the KCNJ10 gene that encodes for the inward-rectifying K + channel Kir4.1 and another previously characterized mutation in KCNT1 that encodes for the Na + -activated K + channel known as Slo2.2 or SLACK. The objectives of this study were to perform the clinical and genetic characterization of the proband and his family and to examine the functional consequence of the Kir4.1 mutation. The mutant and wild-type KCNJ10 constructs were generated and heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, and whole cell K + currents were measured using the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. The KCNJ10 mutation c.652C>T resulted in a p.L218F substitution at a highly conserved residue site. Wild-type KCNJ10 expression yielded robust Kir current, whereas currents from oocytes expressing the mutation were reduced, remarkably. Western Blot analysis revealed reduced protein expression by the mutation. Kir5.1 subunits display selective heteromultimerization with Kir4.1 constituting channels with unique kinetics. The effect of the mutation on Kir4.1/5.1 channel activity was twofold: a reduction in current amplitudes and an increase in the pH-dependent inhibition. We thus report a novel loss-of-function mutation in Kir4.1 found in a patient with a coexisting mutation in SLACK channels that results in a fatal disease. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We present and characterize a novel mutation in KCNJ10 Unlike previously reported EAST/SeSAME patients, our patient was heterozygous, and contrary to previous studies, mimicking the heterozygous state by coexpression resulted in loss of channel function. We report in the same patient co-occurrence of a KCNT1 mutation resulting in a more severe phenotype. This study provides new insights into the

  17. Parasites and deleterious mutations: interactions influencing the evolutionary maintenance of sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, A W; Jokela, J; Michalakis, Y

    2010-05-01

    The restrictive assumptions associated with purely genetic and purely ecological mechanisms suggest that neither of the two forces, in isolation, can offer a general explanation for the evolutionary maintenance of sex. Consequently, attention has turned to pluralistic models (i.e. models that apply both ecological and genetic mechanisms). Existing research has shown that combining mutation accumulation and parasitism allows restrictive assumptions about genetic and parasite parameter values to be relaxed while still predicting the maintenance of sex. However, several empirical studies have shown that deleterious mutations and parasitism can reduce fitness to a greater extent than would be expected if the two acted independently. We show how interactions between these genetic and ecological forces can completely reverse predictions about the evolution of reproductive modes. Moreover, we demonstrate that synergistic interactions between infection and deleterious mutations can render sex evolutionarily stable even when there is antagonistic epistasis among deleterious mutations, thereby widening the conditions for the evolutionary maintenance of sex.

  18. A Color Mutation Hadronic Soft Interaction Model -- Eikonal Formalism and Branching Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Zhen

    1998-01-01

    ECOMB is established as a hadronic multiparticle production generator by soft interaction. It incorporates the eikonal formalism, parton model, color mutation, branching, resonance production and decay. A partonic cluster, being color-neutral initially, splits into smaller color-neutral clusters successively due to the color mutation of the quarks. The process stops at hadronic resonance, $q\\bar q$ pair, formation. The model contains self-similar dynamics and exhibits scaling behavior in the ...

  19. Lethal/sublethal responses of Daphnia magna to acute norfloxacin contamination and changes in phytoplankton-zooplankton interactions induced by this antibiotic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ying; Yan, Shi-Wei; Li, Ruo-Zhu; Hu, Yi-Wen; Chang, Xue-Xiu

    2017-01-01

    Although the well-known antibiotic norfloxacin (NOR) is recognized as an important environmental pollutant, little is known about its impacts on ecological processes, particularly on species interactions. In this paper, we quantified Daphnia magna (Crustacea, Cladocera) responses in mortality rate at lethal NOR concentrations (0, 25, 50, 100, 200, 300 and 400 mg L-1), and in heartbeat rate, swimming behavior and feeding rate (on the green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa) at sublethal NOR concentrations (0, 25, 50 and 100 mg L-1) to determine the effects of this antibiotic in plankton systems. In 96-h-long lethal experiment, mortality rates of D. magna increased significantly with increasing NOR concentration and exposure time. In sublethal experiments, heartbeat rate decreased, while time ratio of vertical to horizontal swimming (TVH) and the duration of quiescence increased in D. magna individuals exposed to increasing NOR concentrations after 4 and 12 h of exposure. These collectively led to decreases in both average swimming ability and feeding rate, consistent with the positive relationship between average swimming ability and feeding rate. Overall, results indicate that, by affecting zooplankton heartbeat rate and behavior, NOR decreased feeding efficiency of D. magna even at low doses, therefore, it might seriously compromise ecosystem health and function.

  20. Hair Dye–DNA Interaction: Plausible Cause of Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Maiti

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hair dye is one of the most popular cosmetic products which are used more widely and frequently to improve an individual’s appearance. Although the genotoxic effects of dye ingredients are widely reported, hair dye in its usable form is not reported extensively. In this contribution, we report the possible mode of interaction of hair dye with DNA which leads to genotoxicity. The effect of dye DNA interaction was studied on the most popular and globally used hair dye with Calf Thymus DNA and plasmid DNA. This interaction of dye DNA was studied by spectroscopic analyses and gel electrophoresis. The result had shown positive interaction of dye with DNA. Gel electrophoresis study confirms the binding of dye with DNA which results in linearization and fragmentation of the plasmid DNA. Dye–DNA interaction causes fragmentation and oxidation of DNA in absence of any catalyst, implies high toxicity of commercial hair dyes. Thus, it can be deduced from the present studies that hair dye in its usable form may lead to its penetration through skin affecting genomic DNA possesses genotoxic property and can be treated as one of the most common mutagen.

  1. Impact of kinase activating and inactivating patient mutations on binary PKA interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röck, Ruth; Mayrhofer, Johanna E; Bachmann, Verena; Stefan, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    The second messenger molecule cAMP links extracellular signals to intracellular responses. The main cellular cAMP effector is the compartmentalized protein kinase A (PKA). Upon receptor initiated cAMP-mobilization, PKA regulatory subunits (R) bind cAMP thereby triggering dissociation and activation of bound PKA catalytic subunits (PKAc). Mutations in PKAc or RIa subunits manipulate PKA dynamics and activities which contribute to specific disease patterns. Mutations activating cAMP/PKA signaling contribute to carcinogenesis or hormone excess, while inactivating mutations cause hormone deficiency or resistance. Here we extended the application spectrum of a Protein-fragment Complementation Assay based on the Renilla Luciferase to determine binary protein:protein interactions (PPIs) of the PKA network. We compared time- and dose-dependent influences of cAMP-elevation on mutually exclusive PPIs of PKAc with the phosphotransferase inhibiting RIIb and RIa subunits and the protein kinase inhibitor peptide (PKI). We analyzed PKA dynamics following integration of patient mutations into PKAc and RIa. We observed that oncogenic modifications of PKAc(L206R) and RIa(Δ184-236) as well as rare disease mutations in RIa(R368X) affect complex formation of PKA and its responsiveness to cAMP elevation. With the cell-based PKA PPI reporter platform we precisely quantified the mechanistic details how inhibitory PKA interactions and defined patient mutations contribute to PKA functions.

  2. Interaction of co-insult treatments wth cadmium chloride and gamma irradiation on lethality and blood indices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    The main objectives of this study were (1) to gain insight into sensitivities of vital organs systems after treatments with cadmium chloride (CdCl 2 ), gamma ( 60 Co) radiation, and combined CdCl 2 -gamma radiation; (2) to determine physiological and cellular/molecular changes after these same treatments; and (3) to develop a summary of biochemical/hematological indicators for each insult individually, as well as for the co-insult treatment. Three lethality studies, Acute CdCl 2 , Chronic CdCl 2 , and Acute Radiation, wwere used to determine sublethal doses for the fourth study (Co-insult), which utilized various combinations of CdCl 2 and gamma radiation and from which the hematological and biochemical data were derived. Radiation groups exhibited statistically significant decreases in the total number of leukocytes, lymphocytes, and polyneutrophils. Significant increases were seen in serum iron, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alkaline phosphatase, and triglycerides. Cadmium groups had increased total numbers of leukocytes, polyneutrophils, and serum glutamic oxaloacetate transminase (SGOT). Decreases were seen in lymphocytes, hemoglobin, hematocrit, total red blood cell counts, and total protein. When co-insult treatments were used, significant decreases were seen in the total number of leukocytes, polyneutrophils, lymphocytes, hemoglobin, total red blood cells, and serum iron

  3. HAEdb: a novel interactive, locus-specific mutation database for the C1 inhibitor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmár, Lajos; Hegedüs, Tamás; Farkas, Henriette; Nagy, Melinda; Tordai, Attila

    2005-01-01

    Hereditary angioneurotic edema (HAE) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by episodic local subcutaneous and submucosal edema and is caused by the deficiency of the activated C1 esterase inhibitor protein (C1-INH or C1INH; approved gene symbol SERPING1). Published C1-INH mutations are represented in large universal databases (e.g., OMIM, HGMD), but these databases update their data rather infrequently, they are not interactive, and they do not allow searches according to different criteria. The HAEdb, a C1-INH gene mutation database (http://hae.biomembrane.hu) was created to contribute to the following expectations: 1) help the comprehensive collection of information on genetic alterations of the C1-INH gene; 2) create a database in which data can be searched and compared according to several flexible criteria; and 3) provide additional help in new mutation identification. The website uses MySQL, an open-source, multithreaded, relational database management system. The user-friendly graphical interface was written in the PHP web programming language. The website consists of two main parts, the freely browsable search function, and the password-protected data deposition function. Mutations of the C1-INH gene are divided in two parts: gross mutations involving DNA fragments >1 kb, and micro mutations encompassing all non-gross mutations. Several attributes (e.g., affected exon, molecular consequence, family history) are collected for each mutation in a standardized form. This database may facilitate future comprehensive analyses of C1-INH mutations and also provide regular help for molecular diagnostic testing of HAE patients in different centers.

  4. Determination of fitness components of flies bearing the recessive lethal l(2)M167DTS mutation with dominant heat sensitivity in artificial Drosophila melanogaster populations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kulikov, A. M.; Kuznetsov, A.; Marec, František; Mitrofanov, V. G.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 6 (2005), s. 620-629 ISSN 1022-7954 Grant - others:Russian Foundation for Basic Research(RU) 02-04-50021; Program of the Presidium of the Russian Academy of Sciences "Dynamics of Gene Pools in Plants, Animals, and Humans"(RU) 10002-251/P-24/154-150/2004-04-111 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : mutation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.240, year: 2005

  5. A kinase-dead knock-in mutation in mTOR leads to early embryonic lethality and is dispensable for the immune system in heterozygous mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavender Druie

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mammalian target of rapamycin protein (mTOR is an evolutionarily conserved kinase that regulates protein synthesis, cell cycle progression and proliferation in response to various environmental cues. As a critical downstream mediator of PI3K signaling, mTOR is important for lymphocyte development and function of mature T and B-cells. Most studies of mTOR in immune responses have relied on the use of pharmacological inhibitors, such as rapamycin. Rapamycin-FKBP12 complex exerts its immunosuppressive and anti-proliferative effect by binding outside the kinase domain of mTOR, and subsequently inhibiting downstream mTOR signaling. Results To determine the requirement for mTOR kinase activity in the immune system function, we generated knock-in mice carrying a mutation (D2338 in the catalytic domain of mTOR. While homozygous mTOR kd/kd embryos died before embryonic day 6.5, heterozygous mTOR+/kd mice appeared entirely normal and are fertile. mTOR +/kd mice exhibited normal T and B cell development and unaltered proliferative responses of splenocytes to IL-2 and TCR/CD28. In addition, heterozygousity for the mTOR kinase-dead allele did not sensitize T cells to rapamycin in a CD3-mediated proliferation assay. Unexpectedly, mTOR kinase activity towards its substrate 4E-BP1 was not decreased in hearts and livers from heterozygous animals. Conclusion Altogether, our findings indicate that mTOR kinase activity is indispensable for the early development of mouse embryos. Moreover, a single wild type mTOR allele is sufficient to maintain normal postnatal growth and lymphocyte development and proliferation.

  6. MVP-Associated Filamin A Mutations Affect FlnA-PTPN12 (PTP-PEST) Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Damien; Labbé, Pauline; Bureau, Léa; Le Tourneau, Thierry; Norris, Russell A; Markwald, Roger R; Levine, Robert; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Mérot, Jean

    2015-09-08

    Although the genetic basis of mitral valve prolapse (MVP) has now been clearly established, the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the pathological processes associated to a specific mutation often remain to be determined. The FLNA gene (encoding Filamin A; FlnA) was the first gene associated to non-syndromic X-linked myxomatous valvular dystrophy, but the impacts of the mutations on its function remain un-elucidated. Here, using the first repeats (1-8) of FlnA as a bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen, we identified the tyrosine phosphatase PTPN12 (PTP-PEST) as a specific binding partner of this region of FlnA protein. In addition, using yeast two-hybrid trap assay pull down and co-immunoprecipitation experiments, we showed that the MVP-associated FlnA mutations (G288R, P637Q, H743P) abolished FlnA/PTPN12 interactions. PTPN12 is a key regulator of signaling pathways involved in cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) crosstalk, cellular responses to mechanical stress that involve integrins, focal adhesion transduction pathways, and actin cytoskeleton dynamics. Interestingly, we showed that the FlnA mutations impair the activation status of two PTPN12 substrates, the focal adhesion associated kinase Src, and the RhoA specific activating protein p190RhoGAP. Together, these data point to PTPN12/FlnA interaction and its weakening by FlnA mutations as a mechanism potentially involved in the physiopathology of FlnA-associated MVP.

  7. MVP-Associated Filamin A Mutations Affect FlnA-PTPN12 (PTP-PEST Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Duval

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Although the genetic basis of mitral valve prolapse (MVP has now been clearly established, the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the pathological processes associated to a specific mutation often remain to be determined. The FLNA gene (encoding Filamin A; FlnA was the first gene associated to non-syndromic X-linked myxomatous valvular dystrophy, but the impacts of the mutations on its function remain un-elucidated. Here, using the first repeats (1–8 of FlnA as a bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen, we identified the tyrosine phosphatase PTPN12 (PTP-PEST as a specific binding partner of this region of FlnA protein. In addition, using yeast two-hybrid trap assay pull down and co-immunoprecipitation experiments, we showed that the MVP-associated FlnA mutations (G288R, P637Q, H743P abolished FlnA/PTPN12 interactions. PTPN12 is a key regulator of signaling pathways involved in cell-extracellular matrix (ECM crosstalk, cellular responses to mechanical stress that involve integrins, focal adhesion transduction pathways, and actin cytoskeleton dynamics. Interestingly, we showed that the FlnA mutations impair the activation status of two PTPN12 substrates, the focal adhesion associated kinase Src, and the RhoA specific activating protein p190RhoGAP. Together, these data point to PTPN12/FlnA interaction and its weakening by FlnA mutations as a mechanism potentially involved in the physiopathology of FlnA-associated MVP.

  8. DNMT1 mutations found in HSANIE patients affect interaction with UHRF1 and neuronal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smets, Martha; Link, Stephanie; Wolf, Patricia; Schneider, Katrin; Solis, Veronica; Ryan, Joel; Meilinger, Daniela; Qin, Weihua; Leonhardt, Heinrich

    2017-04-15

    DNMT1 is recruited to substrate sites by PCNA and UHRF1 to maintain DNA methylation after replication. The cell cycle dependent recruitment of DNMT1 is mediated by the PCNA-binding domain (PBD) and the targeting sequence (TS) within the N-terminal regulatory domain. The TS domain was found to be mutated in patients suffering from hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies with dementia and hearing loss (HSANIE) and autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia deafness and narcolepsy (ADCA-DN) and is associated with global hypomethylation and site specific hypermethylation. With functional complementation assays in mouse embryonic stem cells, we showed that DNMT1 mutations P496Y and Y500C identified in HSANIE patients not only impair DNMT1 heterochromatin association, but also UHRF1 interaction resulting in hypomethylation. Similar DNA methylation defects were observed when DNMT1 interacting domains in UHRF1, the UBL and the SRA domain, were deleted. With cell-based assays, we could show that HSANIE associated mutations perturb DNMT1 heterochromatin association and catalytic complex formation at methylation sites and decrease protein stability in late S and G2 phase. To investigate the neuronal phenotype of HSANIE mutations, we performed DNMT1 rescue assays and could show that cells expressing mutated DNMT1 were prone to apoptosis and failed to differentiate into neuronal lineage. Our results provide insights into the molecular basis of DNMT1 dysfunction in HSANIE patients and emphasize the importance of the TS domain in the regulation of DNA methylation in pluripotent and differentiating cells. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  9. A new lethal sclerosing bone dysplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kingston, H.M.; Freeman, J.S.; Hall, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    A neonate is described with a lethal sclerosing bone dysplasia associated with prenatal fractures and craniofacial abnormalities including microcephaly, exophthalmos, hypoplastic nose and mid-face, small jaw and nodular hyperplasia of the gums. Parental consanguinity suggests that an autosomal recessive mutation is the likely aetiology. (orig.)

  10. Back to the future: revisiting HIV-1 lethal mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapp, Michael J.; Patterson, Steven E.; Mansky, Louis M.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of eliminating HIV-1 infectivity by elevating the viral mutation rate was first proposed over a decade ago, even though the general concept had been conceived earlier for RNA viruses. Lethal mutagenesis was originally viewed as a novel chemotherapeutic approach for treating HIV-1 infection in which use of a viral mutagen would over multiple rounds of replication lead to the lethal accumulation of mutations, rendering the virus population non infectious – known as the slow mutation accumulation model. There have been limitations in obtaining good efficacy data with drug leads, leaving some doubt into clinical translation. More recent studies of the APOBEC3 proteins as well as new progress in the use of nucleoside analogs for inducing lethal mutagenesis have helped to refocus attention on rapid induction of HIV-1 lethal mutagenesis in a single or limited number of replication cycles leading to a rapid mutation accumulation model. PMID:23195922

  11. Redox biotransformation and delivery of anthracycline anticancer antibiotics: How interpretable structure-activity relationships of lethality using electrophilicity and the London formula for dispersion interaction work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Siu-Kwong

    2017-03-30

    Quantum chemical methods and molecular mechanics approaches face a lot of challenges in drug metabolism study because of their either insufficient accuracy or huge computational cost, or lack of clear molecular level pictures for building computational models. Low-cost QSAR methods can often be carried out even though molecular level pictures are not well defined; however, they show difficulty in identifying the mechanisms of drug metabolism and delineating the effects of chemical structures on drug toxicity because a certain amount of molecular descriptors are difficult to be interpreted. In order to make a breakthrough, it was proposed that mechanistically interpretable molecular descriptors were used to correlate with biological activity to establish structure-activity plots. The mechanistically interpretable molecular descriptors used in this study include electrophilicity and the mathematical function in the London formula for dispersion interaction, and they were calculated using quantum chemical methods. The biological activity is the lethality of anthracycline anticancer antibiotics denoted as log LD50, which were obtained by intraperitoneal injection into mice. The results reveal that the plots for electrophilicity, which can be interpreted as redox reactivity of anthracyclines, can describe oxidative degradation for detoxification and reductive bioactivation for toxicity induction. The plots for the dispersion interaction function, which represent the attraction between anthracyclines and biomolecules, can describe efflux from and influx into target cells of toxicity. The plots can also identify three structural scaffolds of anthracyclines that have different metabolic pathways, resulting in their different toxicity behavior. This structure-dependent toxicity behavior revealed in the plots can provide perspectives on design of anthracycline anticancer antibiotics. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. BAG3 directly interacts with mutated alphaB-crystallin to suppress its aggregation and toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinori Hishiya

    Full Text Available A homozygous disruption or genetic mutation of the bag3 gene causes progressive myofibrillar myopathy in mouse and human skeletal and cardiac muscle disorder while mutations in the small heat shock protein αB-crystallin gene (CRYAB are reported to be responsible for myofibrillar myopathy. Here, we demonstrate that BAG3 directly binds to wild-type αB-crystallin and the αB-crystallin mutant R120G, via the intermediate domain of BAG3. Peptides that inhibit this interaction in an in vitro binding assay indicate that two conserved Ile-Pro-Val regions of BAG3 are involved in the interaction with αB-crystallin, which is similar to results showing BAG3 binding to HspB8 and HspB6. BAG3 overexpression increased αB-crystallin R120G solubility and inhibited its intracellular aggregation in HEK293 cells. BAG3 suppressed cell death induced by αB-crystallin R120G overexpression in differentiating C2C12 mouse myoblast cells. Our findings indicate a novel function for BAG3 in inhibiting protein aggregation caused by the genetic mutation of CRYAB responsible for human myofibrillar myopathy.

  13. BAG3 Directly Interacts with Mutated alphaB-Crystallin to Suppress Its Aggregation and Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hishiya, Akinori; Salman, Mortada Najem; Carra, Serena; Kampinga, Harm H.; Takayama, Shinichi

    2011-01-01

    A homozygous disruption or genetic mutation of the bag3 gene causes progressive myofibrillar myopathy in mouse and human skeletal and cardiac muscle disorder while mutations in the small heat shock protein αB-crystallin gene (CRYAB) are reported to be responsible for myofibrillar myopathy. Here, we demonstrate that BAG3 directly binds to wild-type αB-crystallin and the αB-crystallin mutant R120G, via the intermediate domain of BAG3. Peptides that inhibit this interaction in an in vitro binding assay indicate that two conserved Ile-Pro-Val regions of BAG3 are involved in the interaction with αB-crystallin, which is similar to results showing BAG3 binding to HspB8 and HspB6. BAG3 overexpression increased αB-crystallin R120G solubility and inhibited its intracellular aggregation in HEK293 cells. BAG3 suppressed cell death induced by αB-crystallin R120G overexpression in differentiating C2C12 mouse myoblast cells. Our findings indicate a novel function for BAG3 in inhibiting protein aggregation caused by the genetic mutation of CRYAB responsible for human myofibrillar myopathy. PMID:21423662

  14. Evolution of a G protein-coupled receptor response by mutations in regulatory network interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Roberto, Raphaël B; Chang, Belinda; Trusina, Ala

    2016-01-01

    All cellular functions depend on the concerted action of multiple proteins organized in complex networks. To understand how selection acts on protein networks, we used the yeast mating receptor Ste2, a pheromone-activated G protein-coupled receptor, as a model system. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae......, Ste2 is a hub in a network of interactions controlling both signal transduction and signal suppression. Through laboratory evolution, we obtained 21 mutant receptors sensitive to the pheromone of a related yeast species and investigated the molecular mechanisms behind this newfound sensitivity. While...... demonstrate that a new receptor-ligand pair can evolve through network-altering mutations independently of receptor-ligand binding, and suggest a potential role for such mutations in disease....

  15. Mutations in actin used for structural studies partially disrupt β-thymosin/WH2 domains interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deville, Célia; Girard-Blanc, Christine; Assrir, Nadine; Nhiri, Naïma; Jacquet, Eric; Bontems, François; Renault, Louis; Petres, Stéphane; van Heijenoort, Carine

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the structural basis of actin cytoskeleton remodeling requires stabilization of actin monomers, oligomers, and filaments in complex with partner proteins, using various biochemical strategies. Here, we report a dramatic destabilization of the dynamic interaction with a model β-thymosin/WH2 domain induced by mutations in actin. This result underlines that mutant actins should be used with prudence to characterize interactions with intrinsically disordered partners as destabilization of dynamic interactions, although identifiable by NMR, may be invisible to other structural techniques. It also highlights how both β-thymosin/WH2 domains and actin tune local structure and dynamics in regulatory processes involving intrinsically disordered domains. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  16. Electrostatic study of Alanine mutational effects on transcription: application to GATA-3:DNA interaction complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Assaad, Atlal; Dawy, Zaher; Nemer, Georges

    2015-01-01

    Protein-DNA interaction is of fundamental importance in molecular biology, playing roles in functions as diverse as DNA transcription, DNA structure formation, and DNA repair. Protein-DNA association is also important in medicine; understanding Protein-DNA binding kinetics can assist in identifying disease root causes which can contribute to drug development. In this perspective, this work focuses on the transcription process by the GATA Transcription Factor (TF). GATA TF binds to DNA promoter region represented by `G,A,T,A' nucleotides sequence, and initiates transcription of target genes. When proper regulation fails due to some mutations on the GATA TF protein sequence or on the DNA promoter sequence (weak promoter), deregulation of the target genes might lead to various disorders. In this study, we aim to understand the electrostatic mechanism behind GATA TF and DNA promoter interactions, in order to predict Protein-DNA binding in the presence of mutations, while elaborating on non-covalent binding kinetics. To generate a family of mutants for the GATA:DNA complex, we replaced every charged amino acid, one at a time, with a neutral amino acid like Alanine (Ala). We then applied Poisson-Boltzmann electrostatic calculations feeding into free energy calculations, for each mutation. These calculations delineate the contribution to binding from each Ala-replaced amino acid in the GATA:DNA interaction. After analyzing the obtained data in view of a two-step model, we are able to identify potential key amino acids in binding. Finally, we applied the model to GATA-3:DNA (crystal structure with PDB-ID: 3DFV) binding complex and validated it against experimental results from the literature.

  17. The population genetics of X-autosome synthetic lethals and steriles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachance, Joseph; Johnson, Norman A; True, John R

    2011-11-01

    Epistatic interactions are widespread, and many of these interactions involve combinations of alleles at different loci that are deleterious when present in the same individual. The average genetic environment of sex-linked genes differs from that of autosomal genes, suggesting that the population genetics of interacting X-linked and autosomal alleles may be complex. Using both analytical theory and computer simulations, we analyzed the evolutionary trajectories and mutation-selection balance conditions for X-autosome synthetic lethals and steriles. Allele frequencies follow a set of fundamental trajectories, and incompatible alleles are able to segregate at much higher frequencies than single-locus expectations. Equilibria exist, and they can involve fixation of either autosomal or X-linked alleles. The exact equilibrium depends on whether synthetic alleles are dominant or recessive and whether fitness effects are seen in males, females, or both sexes. When single-locus fitness effects and synthetic incompatibilities are both present, population dynamics depend on the dominance of alleles and historical contingency (i.e., whether X-linked or autosomal mutations occur first). Recessive synthetic lethality can result in high-frequency X-linked alleles, and dominant synthetic lethality can result in high-frequency autosomal alleles. Many X-autosome incompatibilities in natural populations may be cryptic, appearing to be single-locus effects because one locus is fixed. We also discuss the implications of these findings with respect to standing genetic variation and the origins of Haldane's rule.

  18. Human synthetic lethal inference as potential anti-cancer target gene detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solé Ricard V

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two genes are called synthetic lethal (SL if mutation of either alone is not lethal, but mutation of both leads to death or a significant decrease in organism's fitness. The detection of SL gene pairs constitutes a promising alternative for anti-cancer therapy. As cancer cells exhibit a large number of mutations, the identification of these mutated genes' SL partners may provide specific anti-cancer drug candidates, with minor perturbations to the healthy cells. Since existent SL data is mainly restricted to yeast screenings, the road towards human SL candidates is limited to inference methods. Results In the present work, we use phylogenetic analysis and database manipulation (BioGRID for interactions, Ensembl and NCBI for homology, Gene Ontology for GO attributes in order to reconstruct the phylogenetically-inferred SL gene network for human. In addition, available data on cancer mutated genes (COSMIC and Cancer Gene Census databases as well as on existent approved drugs (DrugBank database supports our selection of cancer-therapy candidates. Conclusions Our work provides a complementary alternative to the current methods for drug discovering and gene target identification in anti-cancer research. Novel SL screening analysis and the use of highly curated databases would contribute to improve the results of this methodology.

  19. Investigating the Impact of Asp181 Point Mutations on Interactions between PTP1B and Phosphotyrosine Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengyuan; Wang, Lushan; Sun, Xun; Zhao, Xian

    2014-05-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a key negative regulator of insulin and leptin signaling, which suggests that it is an attractive therapeutic target in type II diabetes and obesity. The aim of this research is to explore residues which interact with phosphotyrosine substrate can be affected by D181 point mutations and lead to increased substrate binding. To achieve this goal, molecular dynamics simulations were performed on wild type (WT) and two mutated PTP1B/substrate complexes. The cross-correlation and principal component analyses show that point mutations can affect the motions of some residues in the active site of PTP1B. Moreover, the hydrogen bond and energy decomposition analyses indicate that apart from residue 181, point mutations have influence on the interactions of substrate with several residues in the active site of PTP1B.

  20. Analyses of Dynein Heavy Chain Mutations Reveal Complex Interactions Between Dynein Motor Domains and Cellular Dynein Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivagurunathan, Senthilkumar; Schnittker, Robert R.; Razafsky, David S.; Nandini, Swaran; Plamann, Michael D.; King, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein transports cargoes for a variety of crucial cellular functions. However, since dynein is essential in most eukaryotic organisms, the in-depth study of the cellular function of dynein via genetic analysis of dynein mutations has not been practical. Here, we identify and characterize 34 different dynein heavy chain mutations using a genetic screen of the ascomycete fungus Neurospora crassa, in which dynein is nonessential. Interestingly, our studies show that these mutations segregate into five different classes based on the in vivo localization of the mutated dynein motors. Furthermore, we have determined that the different classes of dynein mutations alter vesicle trafficking, microtubule organization, and nuclear distribution in distinct ways and require dynactin to different extents. In addition, biochemical analyses of dynein from one mutant strain show a strong correlation between its in vitro biochemical properties and the aberrant intracellular function of that altered dynein. When the mutations were mapped to the published dynein crystal structure, we found that the three-dimensional structural locations of the heavy chain mutations were linked to particular classes of altered dynein functions observed in cells. Together, our data indicate that the five classes of dynein mutations represent the entrapment of dynein at five separate points in the dynein mechanochemical and transport cycles. We have developed N. crassa as a model system where we can dissect the complexities of dynein structure, function, and interaction with other proteins with genetic, biochemical, and cell biological studies. PMID:22649085

  1. Genetic interaction analysis of point mutations enables interrogation of gene function at a residue-level resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braberg, Hannes; Moehle, Erica A.; Shales, Michael; Guthrie, Christine; Krogan, Nevan J.

    2014-01-01

    We have achieved a residue-level resolution of genetic interaction mapping – a technique that measures how the function of one gene is affected by the alteration of a second gene – by analyzing point mutations. Here, we describe how to interpret point mutant genetic interactions, and outline key applications for the approach, including interrogation of protein interaction interfaces and active sites, and examination of post-translational modifications. Genetic interaction analysis has proven effective for characterizing cellular processes; however, to date, systematic high-throughput genetic interaction screens have relied on gene deletions or knockdowns, which limits the resolution of gene function analysis and poses problems for multifunctional genes. Our point mutant approach addresses these issues, and further provides a tool for in vivo structure-function analysis that complements traditional biophysical methods. We also discuss the potential for genetic interaction mapping of point mutations in human cells and its application to personalized medicine. PMID:24842270

  2. The Arg233Lys AQP0 mutation disturbs aquaporin0-calmodulin interaction causing polymorphic congenital cataract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Hu

    Full Text Available Calmodulin (CaM directly interacts with the aquaporin 0 (AQP0 C-terminus in a calcium dependent manner to regulate the water permeability of AQP0. We previously identified a missense mutation (p.R233K in the putative CaM binding domain of AQP0 C-terminus in a congenital cataract family. This study was aimed at exploring the potential pathogenesis of this mutation causative of cataract and mainly identifying how it influenced the binding of AQP0 to CaM. Wild type and R233K mutant AQP0 with EGFP-tag were transfected separately into Hela cells to determine the expression and subcellular localizations. The co-immunoprecipitation (CoIP assay was used to detect the interaction between AQP0 and CaM. AQP0 C-terminus peptides were synthesized with and without R233K, and the binding abilities of these peptides to CaM were assessed using a fluorescence binding assay. Localizations of wild type and R233K mutant AQP0 were determined from EGFP fluorescence, and the chimeric proteins were both localized abundantly in the plasma membrane. Protein expression levels of the culture cells showed no significant difference between them. The results from CoIP assay implied that R233K mutant presented more weakly in association with CaM than wild type AQP0. The AQP0 C-terminal mutant peptide was found to have 2.5-fold lower binding affinity to CaM than wild type peptide. These results suggested that R233K mutation did not affect the expression, location and trafficking of the protein but did influence the interaction between AQP0 and CaM. The binding affinity of AQP0 C-terminus to CaM was significantly reduced. Due to lack of the modulation of the Ca2+-calmodulin complex, the water permeability of AQP0 was subsequently augmented, which might lead to the development of this cataract.

  3. Environmental modulation of somatic mutations: nature of interactions. Final report, 1 June 1974--31 May 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mericle, L.W.

    1977-05-01

    Research on this project has had as a major goal a combined ecologic-genetic investigation of somatic mutations in order to evaluate the impacts of certain changing environmental parameters. The ultimate aim, to better understand how such environmental-mutation interactions operate and to assure the information obtained be extrapolatable to conditions and events in nature. Higher plants delineate reproductive tissues late in development from meristematic, somatic tissues. Moreover, the prevailing method of reproduction may be without sexual fusion of gametes and/or wholly asexual (vegetative). Therefore, somatic mutations can have as far-reaching genetic significance for a plant population as when germ cells, themselves, are directly affected. Our data show diurnal temperature differences (DTD) of greater than or equal to 22.2 C-degrees to be very effective mutagenic agents in the Tradescantia somatic mutation system. Further, these ranges of DTD were found to occur often in important seed production areas. A DTD of 22.2 in magnitude can increase mutations 10-fold. And, durations short as 1-day can induce significant increases in mutation rate. Whether interaction of 22.2 DTD with low-level radiation (800 mR/day) is synergistic or attenuative is still debatable. We believe, however, that spontaneous, and 22.2 DTD induced, mutations occur mainly via the genetic mechanism of somatic crossing-over; mutations from acute ionizing radiation (e.g., 30-60 R γ) via chromosome breakage, producing micronuclei. Requirements for maximizing the Discriminatory Response Capability (DRC) in the Tradescantia somatic mutation system are set forth

  4. Effect of mutations in the A site of 16 S rRNA on aminoglycoside antibiotic-ribosome interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Recht, M I; Douthwaite, S; Dahlquist, K D

    1999-01-01

    antibiotics, which also interact with this region of rRNA. Mutations of certain nucleotides in rRNA reduce aminoglycoside binding affinity, as previously demonstrated using a model RNA oligonucleotide system. Here, predictions from the oligonucleotide system were tested in the ribosome by mutation...... for the aminoglycoside paromomycin, whereas no discernible reduction in affinity was observed with 1406 mutant ribosomes. These data are consistent with prior NMR structural determination of aminoglycoside interaction with the decoding region, and further our understanding of how aminoglycoside resistance can...

  5. Thermodynamics of antibody-antigen interaction revealed by mutation analysis of antibody variable regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiba, Hiroki; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2015-07-01

    Antibodies (immunoglobulins) bind specific molecules (i.e. antigens) with high affinity and specificity. In order to understand their mechanisms of recognition, interaction analysis based on thermodynamic and kinetic parameters, as well as structure determination is crucial. In this review, we focus on mutational analysis which gives information about the role of each amino acid residue in antibody-antigen interaction. Taking anti-hen egg lysozyme antibodies and several anti-small molecule antibodies, the energetic contribution of hot-spot and non-hot-spot residues is discussed in terms of thermodynamics. Here, thermodynamics of the contribution from aromatic, charged and hydrogen bond-forming amino acids are discussed, and their different characteristics have been elucidated. The information gives fundamental understanding of the antibody-antigen interaction. Furthermore, the consequences of antibody engineering are analysed from thermodynamic viewpoints: humanization to reduce immunogenicity and rational design to improve affinity. Amino acid residues outside hot-spots in the interface play important roles in these cases, and thus thermodynamic and kinetic parameters give much information about the antigen recognition. Thermodynamic analysis of mutant antibodies thus should lead to advanced strategies to design and select antibodies with high affinity. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  6. Effective lethal mutagenesis of influenza virus by three nucleoside analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauly, Matthew D; Lauring, Adam S

    2015-04-01

    Lethal mutagenesis is a broad-spectrum antiviral strategy that exploits the high mutation rate and low mutational tolerance of many RNA viruses. This approach uses mutagenic drugs to increase viral mutation rates and burden viral populations with mutations that reduce the number of infectious progeny. We investigated the effectiveness of lethal mutagenesis as a strategy against influenza virus using three nucleoside analogs, ribavirin, 5-azacytidine, and 5-fluorouracil. All three drugs were active against a panel of seasonal H3N2 and laboratory-adapted H1N1 strains. We found that each drug increased the frequency of mutations in influenza virus populations and decreased the virus' specific infectivity, indicating a mutagenic mode of action. We were able to drive viral populations to extinction by passaging influenza virus in the presence of each drug, indicating that complete lethal mutagenesis of influenza virus populations can be achieved when a sufficient mutational burden is applied. Population-wide resistance to these mutagenic agents did not arise after serial passage of influenza virus populations in sublethal concentrations of drug. Sequencing of these drug-passaged viral populations revealed genome-wide accumulation of mutations at low frequency. The replicative capacity of drug-passaged populations was reduced at higher multiplicities of infection, suggesting the presence of defective interfering particles and a possible barrier to the evolution of resistance. Together, our data suggest that lethal mutagenesis may be a particularly effective therapeutic approach with a high genetic barrier to resistance for influenza virus. Influenza virus is an RNA virus that causes significant morbidity and mortality during annual epidemics. Novel therapies for RNA viruses are needed due to the ease with which these viruses evolve resistance to existing therapeutics. Lethal mutagenesis is a broad-spectrum strategy that exploits the high mutation rate and the low

  7. Structural analysis of eight novel and 112 previously reported missense mutations in the interactive FXI mutation database reveals new insight on FXI deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Rebecca E; Shiltagh, Nuha; Gomez, Keith; Mellars, Gillian; Cooper, Carolyn; Perry, David J; Tuddenham, Edward G; Perkins, Stephen J

    2009-08-01

    Factor XI (FXI) functions in blood coagulation. FXI is composed of four apple (Ap) domains and a serine protease (SP) domain. Deficiency of FXI leads to an injury-related bleeding disorder, which is remarkable for the lack of correlation between bleeding symptoms and FXI coagulant activity (FXI:C). The number of mutations previously reported in our interactive web database (http://www.FactorXI.org) is now significantly increased to 183 through our new patient studies and from literature surveys. Eight novel missense mutations give a total of 120 throughout the FXI gene (F11). The most abundant defects in FXI are revealed to be those from low-protein plasma levels (Type I: CRM-) that originate from protein misfolding, rather than from functional defects (Type II: CRM+). A total of 70 Ap missense mutations were analysed using a consensus Ap domain structure generated from the FXI dimer crystal structure. This showed that all parts of the Ap domain were affected. The 47 SP missense mutations were also distributed throughout the SP domain structure. The periphery of the Ap beta-sheet structure is sensitive to structural perturbation caused by residue changes throughout the Ap domain, yet this beta-sheet is crucial for FXI dimer formation. Residues located at the Ap4:Ap4 interface in the dimer are much less directly involved. We conclude that the abundance of Type I defects in FXI results from the sensitivity of the Ap domain folding to residue changes within this, and discuss how structural knowledge of the mutations improves our understanding of FXI deficiencies.

  8. ZMYND10 is mutated in primary ciliary dyskinesia and interacts with LRRC6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zariwala, Maimoona A; Gee, Heon Yung; Kurkowiak, Małgorzata

    2013-01-01

    Defects of motile cilia cause primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), characterized by recurrent respiratory infections and male infertility. Using whole-exome resequencing and high-throughput mutation analysis, we identified recessive biallelic mutations in ZMYND10 in 14 families and mutations in the ...

  9. A developmental systems perspective on epistasis: computational exploration of mutational interactions in model developmental regulatory networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayson Gutiérrez

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The way in which the information contained in genotypes is translated into complex phenotypic traits (i.e. embryonic expression patterns depends on its decoding by a multilayered hierarchy of biomolecular systems (regulatory networks. Each layer of this hierarchy displays its own regulatory schemes (i.e. operational rules such as +/- feedback and associated control parameters, resulting in characteristic variational constraints. This process can be conceptualized as a mapping issue, and in the context of highly-dimensional genotype-phenotype mappings (GPMs epistatic events have been shown to be ubiquitous, manifested in non-linear correspondences between changes in the genotype and their phenotypic effects. In this study I concentrate on epistatic phenomena pervading levels of biological organization above the genetic material, more specifically the realm of molecular networks. At this level, systems approaches to studying GPMs are specially suitable to shed light on the mechanistic basis of epistatic phenomena. To this aim, I constructed and analyzed ensembles of highly-modular (fully interconnected networks with distinctive topologies, each displaying dynamic behaviors that were categorized as either arbitrary or functional according to early patterning processes in the Drosophila embryo. Spatio-temporal expression trajectories in virtual syncytial embryos were simulated via reaction-diffusion models. My in silico mutational experiments show that: 1 the average fitness decay tendency to successively accumulated mutations in ensembles of functional networks indicates the prevalence of positive epistasis, whereas in ensembles of arbitrary networks negative epistasis is the dominant tendency; and 2 the evaluation of epistatic coefficients of diverse interaction orders indicates that, both positive and negative epistasis are more prevalent in functional networks than in arbitrary ones. Overall, I conclude that the phenotypic and fitness effects of

  10. Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) interacts with p400 ATPase for an efficient DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rebecca J; Savoian, Matthew S; Weber, Lauren E; Park, Jeong Hyeon

    2016-11-04

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and TRRAP proteins belong to the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinase family and are involved in DNA damage repair and chromatin remodeling. ATM is a checkpoint kinase that is recruited to sites of DNA double-strand breaks where it phosphorylates a diverse range of proteins that are part of the chromatin and DNA repair machinery. As an integral subunit of the TRRAP-TIP60 complexes, p400 ATPase is a chromatin remodeler that is also targeted to DNA double-strand break sites. While it is understood that DNA binding transcriptional activators recruit p400 ATPase into a regulatory region of the promoter, how p400 recognises and moves to DNA double-strand break sites is far less clear. Here we investigate a possibility whether ATM serves as a shuttle to deliver p400 to break sites. Our data indicate that p400 co-immunoprecipitates with ATM independently of DNA damage state and that the N-terminal domain of p400 is vital for this interaction. Heterologous expression studies using Sf9 cells revealed that the ATM-p400 complex can be reconstituted without other mammalian bridging proteins. Overexpression of ATM-interacting p400 regions in U2OS cells induced dominant negative effects including the inhibition of both DNA damage repair and cell proliferation. Consistent with the dominant negative effect, the stable expression of an N-terminal p400 fragment showed a decrease in the association of p400 with ATM, but did not alter the association of p400 with TRRAP. Taken together, our findings suggest that a protein-protein interaction between ATM and p400 ATPase occurs independently of DNA damage and contributes to efficient DNA damage response and repair.

  11. No evidence of somatic aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein mutations in sporadic endocrine neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raitila, A; Georgitsi, M; Karhu, A

    2007-01-01

    . Here, we have analyzed 32 pituitary adenomas and 79 other tumors of the endocrine system for somatic AIP mutations by direct sequencing. No somatic mutations were identified. However, two out of nine patients with prolactin-producing adenoma were shown to harbor a Finnish founder mutation (Q14X...... as non-secreting pituitary adenomas have been reported, most mutation-positive patients have had growth hormone-producing adenomas diagnosed at relatively young age. Pituitary adenomas are also component tumors of some familial endocrine neoplasia syndromes such as multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1...... (MEN1) and Carney complex (CNC). Genes underlying MEN1 and CNC are rarely mutated in sporadic pituitary adenomas, but more often in other lesions contributing to these two syndromes. Thus far, the occurrence of somatic AIP mutations has not been studied in endocrine tumors other than pituitary adenomas...

  12. d-Amino acid mutation of PMI as potent dual peptide inhibitors of p53-MDM2/MDMX interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Liu, Chao; Chen, Si; Hu, Honggang; Su, Jiacan; Zou, Yan

    2017-10-15

    According to the previously reported potent dual l-peptide PMI of p53-MDM2/MDMX interactions, a series of d-amino acid mutational PMI analogues, PMI-1-4, with enhanced proteolytic resistence and in vitro tumor cell inhibitory activities were reported, of which Liposome-PMI-1 showed a stronger inhibitory activity against the U87 cell lines than Nutlin-3. This d-amino acid mutation strategy may give a hand for enhancing the potential of peptide drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Mutation breeding for downy mildew resistance in pearl millet. Nucleo-cytoplasmic interactions in disease-resistant lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murty, B.R.; Thakur, S.R.; Prakash, N.; Mehta, S.L.; Bhakta, S.T.

    1983-01-01

    Under the need to rescue hybrid pearl millet cultivation in India from devastating damage by downy mildew, a mutation induction project was started in 1971 to make the commonly used male sterile parent Tift 23A resistant to the disease. Simultaneously sources of resistance from West Africa were used in crossbreeding by which climatic adaptation and male sterility had to be transferred. A number of mildew-resistant hybrids were developed, both from induced mutation and introduction. The resistant male sterile lines were further examined as to their common features and differences from susceptible lines. A strong evidence for nuclear-cytoplasmic interaction was obtained by biochemical and ultrastructural investigations. (author)

  14. Lethals induced by γ-radiation in drosophila somatic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, A.I.

    1989-01-01

    Exposure of 3-hour drosophila male embryos to γ-radiation during the topographic segregation of the germ anlage nuclei caused recessive sex-linked lethals in somatic cells only. The selectivity of the screening was determined by the ratio of mutation frequencies induced in embryos and adult males. Analysis of lethal mutations shows that a minimal rate of the divergence between germinal and somatic patterns of the cell development is observed in the embryogenesis, the 3d instar larva and prepupa, and maximal in the 1st and 2nd larva and pupa

  15. A screen for F1 hybrid male rescue reveals no major-effect hybrid lethality loci in the Drosophila melanogaster autosomal genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuykendall, Tawny N; Satyaki, P; Ji, Shuqing; Clay, Derek M; Edelman, Nathaniel B; Kimchy, Alexandra; Li, Ling-Hei; Nuzzo, Erin A; Parekh, Neil; Park, Suna; Barbash, Daniel A

    2014-10-27

    Hybrid sons between Drosophila melanogaster females and D. simulans males die as 3rd instar larvae. Two genes, D. melanogaster Hybrid male rescue (Hmr) on the X chromosome, and D. simulans Lethal hybrid rescue (Lhr) on chromosome II, interact to cause this lethality. Loss-of-function mutations in either gene suppress lethality, but several pieces of evidence suggest that additional factors are required for hybrid lethality. Here we screen the D. melanogaster autosomal genome by using the Bloomington Stock Center Deficiency kit to search for additional regions that can rescue hybrid male lethality. Our screen is designed to identify putative hybrid incompatibility (HI) genes similar to Hmr and Lhr which, when removed, are dominant suppressors of lethality. After screening 89% of the autosomal genome, we found no regions that rescue males to the adult stage. We did, however, identify several regions that rescue up to 13% of males to the pharate adult stage. This weak rescue suggests the presence of multiple minor-effect HI loci, but we were unable to map these loci to high resolution, presumably because weak rescue can be masked by genetic background effects. We attempted to test one candidate, the dosage compensation gene male specific lethal-3 (msl-3), by using RNA interference with short hairpin microRNA constructs targeted specifically against D. simulans msl-3 but failed to achieve knockdown, in part due to off-target effects. We conclude that the D. melanogaster autosomal genome likely does not contain additional major-effect HI loci. We also show that Hmr is insufficient to fully account for the lethality associated with the D. melanogaster X chromosome, suggesting that additional X-linked genes contribute to hybrid lethality. Copyright © 2014 Cuykendall et al.

  16. Interaction-based evolution: how natural selection and nonrandom mutation work together

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The modern evolutionary synthesis leaves unresolved some of the most fundamental, long-standing questions in evolutionary biology: What is the role of sex in evolution? How does complex adaptation evolve? How can selection operate effectively on genetic interactions? More recently, the molecular biology and genomics revolutions have raised a host of critical new questions, through empirical findings that the modern synthesis fails to explain: for example, the discovery of de novo genes; the immense constructive role of transposable elements in evolution; genetic variance and biochemical activity that go far beyond what traditional natural selection can maintain; perplexing cases of molecular parallelism; and more. Presentation of the hypothesis Here I address these questions from a unified perspective, by means of a new mechanistic view of evolution that offers a novel connection between selection on the phenotype and genetic evolutionary change (while relying, like the traditional theory, on natural selection as the only source of feedback on the fit between an organism and its environment). I hypothesize that the mutation that is of relevance for the evolution of complex adaptation—while not Lamarckian, or “directed” to increase fitness—is not random, but is instead the outcome of a complex and continually evolving biological process that combines information from multiple loci into one. This allows selection on a fleeting combination of interacting alleles at different loci to have a hereditary effect according to the combination’s fitness. Testing and implications of the hypothesis This proposed mechanism addresses the problem of how beneficial genetic interactions can evolve under selection, and also offers an intuitive explanation for the role of sex in evolution, which focuses on sex as the generator of genetic combinations. Importantly, it also implies that genetic variation that has appeared neutral through the lens of traditional

  17. Radiation-induced mouse chimeras: a cellular analysis of the major lymphoid compartments, factors affecting lethal graft versus host disease and host-tumor interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almaraz, R.

    1981-01-01

    The major lymphoid compartments of allogeneic bone marrow chimeras were evaluated for the extent of cell chimerism and distribution of Thy 1 and la bearing cells. These chimeras contained lymphoid cell primarily of donor origin. The bone marrow compartment was a mixture of host and donor origin cells. The distribution of Thy 1 and la bearing cells was similar as in normal mice. The effect of adult thymectomy alone or followed by whole-body irradiation and bone marrow reconstitution on the distribution of the Thy 1 positive cells was also investigated. Thymectomy with or without WBI and bone marrow reconstitution significantly lowered the number of Thy 1 bearing cells in the blood and spleen. The number of la bearing cells did not appear to be affected by thymectomy. The role of circulating lymphoid cells in the incidence of lethal graft versus host disease (GVHD) in radiation induced fully allogeneic mouse chimeras was studied. Mice reconstituted with allogeneic bone marrow from bled donors had a statistically lower incidence of GVHD than those reconstituted with bone marrow from unbled donors. Addition of mature peripheral lymphocytes from blood to the reconstituting bone marrow cells from bled donors reduplicated the high incidence of lethal GVHD. It was demonstrated that the bone marrow of mice not exsanguinated prior to harvesting of bone marrow contained significant numbers of peripheral contaminating cells in the harvested bone marrow. The role of suppressor cell elimination in resisting tumor growth was investigated using radiation induced mouse chimeras. Local effects of irradiation alone at the site of tumor inoculation could account for this lack of growth

  18. BAG3 Directly Interacts with Mutated alphaB-Crystallin to Suppress Its Aggregation and Toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hishiya, Akinori; Salman, Mortada Najem; Carra, Serena; Kampinga, Harm H.; Takayama, Shinichi

    2011-01-01

    A homozygous disruption or genetic mutation of the bag3 gene causes progressive myofibrillar myopathy in mouse and human skeletal and cardiac muscle disorder while mutations in the small heat shock protein aB-crystallin gene ( CRYAB) are reported to be responsible for myofibrillar myopathy. Here, we

  19. A novel germline mutation in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene in an Italian family with gigantism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbani, C; Russo, D; Raggi, F; Lombardi, M; Sardella, C; Scattina, I; Lupi, I; Manetti, L; Tomisti, L; Marcocci, C; Martino, E; Bogazzi, F

    2014-10-01

    Acromegaly usually occurs as a sporadic disease, but it may be a part of familial pituitary tumor syndromes in rare cases. Germline mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene have been associated with a predisposition to familial isolated pituitary adenoma. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the AIP gene in a patient with gigantism and in her relatives. Direct sequencing of AIP gene was performed in fourteen members of the family, spanning among three generations. The index case was an 18-year-old woman with gigantism due to an invasive GH-secreting pituitary adenoma and a concomitant tall-cell variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma. A novel germline mutation in the AIP gene (c.685C>T, p.Q229X) was identified in the proband and in two members of her family, who did not present clinical features of acromegaly or other pituitary disorders. Eleven subjects had no mutation in the AIP gene. Two members of the family with clinical features of acromegaly refused either the genetic or the biochemical evaluation. The Q229X mutation was predicted to generate a truncated AIP protein, lacking the last two tetratricopeptide repeat domains and the final C-terminal α-7 helix. We identified a new AIP germline mutation predicted to produce a truncated AIP protein, lacking its biological properties due to the disruption of the C-terminus binding sites for both the chaperones and the client proteins of AIP.

  20. Structure-Activity Relationship in TLR4 Mutations: Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Residue Interaction Network Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Muhammad Ayaz; Choi, Sangdun

    2017-03-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a vital innate immune receptor present on cell surfaces, initiates a signaling cascade during danger and bacterial intrusion. TLR4 needs to form a stable hexamer complex, which is necessary to dimerize the cytoplasmic domain. However, D299G and T399I polymorphism may abrogate the stability of the complex, leading to compromised TLR4 signaling. Crystallography provides valuable insights into the structural aspects of the TLR4 ectodomain; however, the dynamic behavior of polymorphic TLR4 is still unclear. Here, we employed molecular dynamics simulations (MDS), as well as principal component and residue network analyses, to decipher the structural aspects and signaling propagation associated with mutations in TLR4. The mutated complexes were less cohesive, displayed local and global variation in the secondary structure, and anomalous decay in rotational correlation function. Principal component analysis indicated that the mutated complexes also exhibited distinct low-frequency motions, which may be correlated to the differential behaviors of these TLR4 variants. Moreover, residue interaction networks (RIN) revealed that the mutated TLR4/myeloid differentiation factor (MD) 2 complex may perpetuate abnormal signaling pathways. Cumulatively, the MDS and RIN analyses elucidated the mutant-specific conformational alterations, which may help in deciphering the mechanism of loss-of-function mutations.

  1. Are Trp53 rescue of Brca1 embryonic lethality and Trp53/Brca1 breast cancer association related?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAllister, Kimberly A; Wiseman, Roger W

    2002-01-01

    Brca1 is involved in multiple biological pathways including DNA damage repair, transcriptional regulation, and cell-cycle progression. A complex pattern of interactions of Brca1 with Trp53 has also emerged. Xu and coworkers found that haploid loss of Trp53 significantly reduces the embryonic lethality observed in mice with a homozygous in-frame deletion of Brca1 exon 11. They report that widespread apoptosis correlates with the embryonic lethality resulting from this homozygous Δ11 Brca1 mutation. A mechanism responsible for Brca1-associated carcinogenesis is proposed. These experiments extend our knowledge of a complex Brca1/Trp53 relationship. However, the precise mechanisms through which Brca1 interacts with Trp53 to suppress mammary tumor formation have yet to be elucidated

  2. Empirical complexities in the genetic foundations of lethal mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, James J; Joyce, Paul; Gladstone, Eric; Molineux, Ian J

    2013-10-01

    From population genetics theory, elevating the mutation rate of a large population should progressively reduce average fitness. If the fitness decline is large enough, the population will go extinct in a process known as lethal mutagenesis. Lethal mutagenesis has been endorsed in the virology literature as a promising approach to viral treatment, and several in vitro studies have forced viral extinction with high doses of mutagenic drugs. Yet only one empirical study has tested the genetic models underlying lethal mutagenesis, and the theory failed on even a qualitative level. Here we provide a new level of analysis of lethal mutagenesis by developing and evaluating models specifically tailored to empirical systems that may be used to test the theory. We first quantify a bias in the estimation of a critical parameter and consider whether that bias underlies the previously observed lack of concordance between theory and experiment. We then consider a seemingly ideal protocol that avoids this bias-mutagenesis of virions-but find that it is hampered by other problems. Finally, results that reveal difficulties in the mere interpretation of mutations assayed from double-strand genomes are derived. Our analyses expose unanticipated complexities in testing the theory. Nevertheless, the previous failure of the theory to predict experimental outcomes appears to reside in evolutionary mechanisms neglected by the theory (e.g., beneficial mutations) rather than from a mismatch between the empirical setup and model assumptions. This interpretation raises the specter that naive attempts at lethal mutagenesis may augment adaptation rather than retard it.

  3. Annotating Mutational Effects on Proteins and Protein Interactions: Designing Novel and Revisiting Existing Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Minghui; Goncearenco, Alexander; Panchenko, Anna R

    2017-01-01

    In this review we describe a protocol to annotate the effects of missense mutations on proteins, their functions, stability, and binding. For this purpose we present a collection of the most comprehensive databases which store different types of sequencing data on missense mutations, we discuss their relationships, possible intersections, and unique features. Next, we suggest an annotation workflow using the state-of-the art methods and highlight their usability, advantages, and limitations for different cases. Finally, we address a particularly difficult problem of deciphering the molecular mechanisms of mutations on proteins and protein complexes to understand the origins and mechanisms of diseases.

  4. Detection of First-Line Drug Resistance Mutations and Drug-Protein Interaction Dynamics from Tuberculosis Patients in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachappa, Somanna Ajjamada; Neelambike, Sumana M; Amruthavalli, Chokkanna; Ramachandra, Nallur B

    2018-05-01

    Diagnosis of drug-resistant tuberculosis predominantly relies on culture-based drug susceptibility testing, which take weeks to produce a result and a more time-efficient alternative method is multiplex allele-specific PCR (MAS-PCR). Also, understanding the role of mutations in causing resistance helps better drug designing. To evaluate the ability of MAS-PCR in the detection of drug resistance and to understand the mechanism of interaction of drugs with mutant proteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Detection of drug-resistant mutations using MAS-PCR and validation through DNA sequencing. MAS-PCR targeted five loci on three genes, katG 315 and inhA -15 for the drug isoniazid (INH), and rpoB 516, 526, and 531 for rifampicin (RIF). Furthermore, the sequence data were analyzed to study the effect on interaction of the anti-TB drug molecule with the target protein using in silico docking. We identified drug-resistant mutations in 8 out of 114 isolates with 2 of them as multidrug-resistant TB using MAS-PCR. DNA sequencing confirmed only six of these, recording a sensitivity of 85.7% and specificity of 99.3% for MAS-PCR. Molecular docking showed estimated free energy of binding (ΔG) being higher for RIF binding with RpoB S531L mutant. Codon 315 in KatG does not directly interact with INH but blocks the drug access to active site. We propose DNA sequencing-based drug resistance detection for TB, which is more accurate than MAS-PCR. Understanding the action of resistant mutations in disrupting the normal drug-protein interaction aids in designing effective drug alternatives.

  5. Tyr120Asp mutation alters domain flexibility and dynamics of MeCP2 DNA binding domain leading to impaired DNA interaction: Atomistic characterization of a Rett syndrome causing mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Annessa, Ilda; Gandaglia, Anna; Brivio, Elena; Stefanelli, Gilda; Frasca, Angelisa; Landsberger, Nicoletta; Di Marino, Daniele

    2018-05-01

    Mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene represent the main origin of Rett syndrome, causing a profound intellectual disability in females. MeCP2 is an epigenetic transcriptional regulator containing two main functional domains: a methyl-CpG binding domain (MBD) and a transcription repression domain (TRD). Over 600 pathogenic mutations were reported to affect the whole protein; almost half of missense mutations affect the MBD. Understanding the impact of these mutations on the MBD structure and interaction with DNA will foster the comprehension of their pathogenicity and possibly genotype/phenotype correlation studies. Herein, we use molecular dynamics simulations to obtain a detailed view of the dynamics of WT and mutated MBD in the presence and absence of DNA. The pathogenic mutation Y120D is used as paradigm for our studies. Further, since the Y120 residue was previously found to be a phosphorylation site, we characterize the dynamic profile of the MBD also in the presence of Y120 phosphorylation (pY120). We found that addition of a phosphate group to Y120 or mutation in aspartic acid affect domain mobility that samples an alternative conformational space with respect to the WT, leading to impaired ability to interact with DNA. Experimental assays showing a significant reduction in the binding affinity between the mutated MBD and the DNA confirmed our predictions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Synergistic interaction of gamma rays and some metallic salts in the induction of chlorophyll mutations in rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, T.P.; Vaidyanath, K.

    1978-01-01

    In this study the mutagenic activity of 9 metallic salts was tested in comparison and conjunction with gamma rays on rice seed. In M 2 , barium and cadmium produced chlorophyll mutation and mutant frequencies on a par with those of 20 kR gamma rays. Similarly, copper and mercury induced moderately high mutation and mutant frequencies. Salts of strontium, iron and lead showed rather weak mutagenic effects. On the other hand, two metals - manganese anc calcium - failed to provoke chlorophyll mutations in rice seed. Sequential treatments of gamma rays + 5 metals, namely Sr, Cd, Hg, Pb and Cu, produced synergistic yields of chlorophyll mutants in the M 2 generation. Two genetically active metals, Ba and Fe, showed less than additive effects when post-treated after gamma irradiation. Manganese, which failed to induce chlorophyll mutations in independent treatment, potentiated the mutagenic activity of gamma radiation in sequential treatment. On the other hand, sequential treatment with calcium seemed to confer a substantial protection against gamma-ray-induced genetic lesions. The probable mechanisms of synergistic interaction, mutagenic potentiation and protection, observed in sequential treatments, are discussed. (Auth.)

  7. The Tip of the Four N-Terminal α-Helices of Clostridium sordellii Lethal Toxin Contains the Interaction Site with Membrane Phosphatidylserine Facilitating Small GTPases Glucosylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Varela Chavez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium sordellii lethal toxin (TcsL is a powerful virulence factor responsible for severe toxic shock in man and animals. TcsL belongs to the large clostridial glucosylating toxin (LCGT family which inactivates small GTPases by glucosylation with uridine-diphosphate (UDP-glucose as a cofactor. Notably, TcsL modifies Rac and Ras GTPases, leading to drastic alteration of the actin cytoskeleton and cell viability. TcsL enters cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis and delivers the N-terminal glucosylating domain (TcsL-cat into the cytosol. TcsL-cat was found to preferentially bind to phosphatidylserine (PS-containing membranes and to increase the glucosylation of Rac anchored to the lipid membrane. We have previously reported that the N-terminal four helical bundle structure (1–93 domain recognizes a broad range of lipids, but that TcsL-cat specifically binds to PS and phosphatidic acid. Here, we show using mutagenesis that the PS binding site is localized on the tip of the four-helix bundle which is rich in positively-charged amino acids. Residues Y14, V15, F17, and R18 on loop 1, between helices 1 and 2, in coordination with R68 from loop 3, between helices 3 and 4, form a pocket which accommodates L-serine. The functional PS-binding site is required for TcsL-cat binding to the plasma membrane and subsequent cytotoxicity. TcsL-cat binding to PS facilitates a high enzymatic activity towards membrane-anchored Ras by about three orders of magnitude as compared to Ras in solution. The PS-binding site is conserved in LCGTs, which likely retain a common mechanism of binding to the membrane for their full activity towards membrane-bound GTPases.

  8. Gene interactions in the DNA damage-response pathway identified by genome-wide RNA-interference analysis of synthetic lethality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haaften, Gijs; Vastenhouw, Nadine L; Nollen, Ellen A A; Plasterk, Ronald H A; Tijsterman, Marcel

    2004-01-01

    Here, we describe a systematic search for synthetic gene interactions in a multicellular organism, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We established a high-throughput method to determine synthetic gene interactions by genome-wide RNA interference and identified genes that are required to protect

  9. Outbreeding lethality between toxic Group I and nontoxic Group III Alexandrium tamarense spp. isolates: Predominance of heterotypic encystment and implications for mating interactions and biogeography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosnahan, Michael L.; Kulis, David M.; Solow, Andrew R.; Erdner, Deana L.; Percy, Linda; Lewis, Jane; Anderson, Donald M.

    2010-02-01

    collected over an 18-year period indicated a leaky pre-mating barrier between ribosomal species (including Groups I and III). Whether the observed selectivity inhibits hybridization in nature is dependent on its mechanism. If the point of selectivity is the induction of gametogenesis, dissimilar ribotypes could interbreed freely, promoting displacement in cases where hybridization is lethal. If instead, selectivity occurs during the adhesion of gamete pairs, it could enable stable co-existence of A. tamarense species. In either case, hybrid inviability may impose a significant obstacle to range expansion. The nested PCR assay developed here is a valuable tool for investigation of interspecies hybridization and its consequences for the global biogeography of these important organisms.

  10. Mutation dynamics and fitness effects followed in single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Lydia; Ollion, Jean; Robert, Jerome; Song, Xiaohu; Matic, Ivan; Elez, Marina

    2018-03-16

    Mutations have been investigated for more than a century but remain difficult to observe directly in single cells, which limits the characterization of their dynamics and fitness effects. By combining microfluidics, time-lapse imaging, and a fluorescent tag of the mismatch repair system in Escherichia coli , we visualized the emergence of mutations in single cells, revealing Poissonian dynamics. Concomitantly, we tracked the growth and life span of single cells, accumulating ~20,000 mutations genome-wide over hundreds of generations. This analysis revealed that 1% of mutations were lethal; nonlethal mutations displayed a heavy-tailed distribution of fitness effects and were dominated by quasi-neutral mutations with an average cost of 0.3%. Our approach has enabled the investigation of single-cell individuality in mutation rate, mutation fitness costs, and mutation interactions. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  11. Histopathological effects of lethal and sub-lethal concentrations of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The histopathological effects of lethal and sub-lethal concentrations of glyphosate on African catfish Clarias gariepinus were investigated. C. gariepinus juveniles were assessed in a static renewal bioassay for 96 hours (acute toxicity) and 28 days (chronic toxicity) using varying concentrations (0.0 mg/l 20.0 mg/l, 30.0 mg/l, ...

  12. Interaction of T- and B-lymphocytes in the immune respouse of lethally irradiated dogs thymus and part of bone marrow being shielded

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, R.V.; Khaitov, R.M.; Sbitneva, M.F.; Fedorovskij, L.L.; Nazhmitdinov, A.M.; Ataullakhanov, R.I.; Gvozdeva, N.I.

    1978-01-01

    It has been first shown in experiments with sublethally irradiated dogs that it is possible to simulate and study the role of the co-operative interaction of T- and B-lymphocytes in the immune response. A model has been developed for determining dynamically the number of antibody-forming cells in the spleen of dogs in the course of the chronic experiment. The proposed model may be used for assessing the role of the substances that affect the interaction of T- and B-cells in the irradiated dog organism

  13. A mutation in human VAP-B--MSP domain, present in ALS patients, affects the interaction with other cellular proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitne-Neto, M; Ramos, C R R; Pimenta, D C; Luz, J S; Nishimura, A L; Gonzales, F A; Oliveira, C C; Zatz, M

    2007-09-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is the most common adult-onset Motor Neuron Disease (MND), characterized by motor neurons death in the cortex, brainstem and spinal cord. Ten loci linked to Familial ALS have been mapped. ALS8 is caused by a substitution of a proline by a serine in the Vesicle-Associated Membrane Protein-Associated protein-B/C (VAP-B/C). VAP-B belongs to a highly conserved family of proteins implicated in Endoplasmic Reticulum-Golgi and intra-Golgi transport and microtubules stabilization. Previous studies demonstrated that the P56S mutation disrupts the subcellular localization of VAP-B and that this position would be essential for Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) induced by VAP-B. In the present work we expressed and purified recombinant wild-type and P56S mutant VAP-B-MSP domain for the analysis of its interactions with other cellular proteins. Our findings suggest that the P56S mutation may lead to a less stable interaction of this endoplasmic reticulum protein with at least two other proteins: tubulin and GAPDH. These two proteins have been previously related to other forms of neurodegenerative diseases and are potential key points to understand ALS8 pathogenesis and other forms of MND. Understanding the role of these protein interactions may help the treatment of this devastating disease in the future.

  14. Suicide Lethality: A Concept Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBastiani, Summer; De Santis, Joseph P

    2018-02-01

    Suicide is a significant health problem internationally. Those who complete suicide may have different behaviors and risk factors than those who attempt a non-fatal suicide. The purpose of this article is to analyze the concept of suicide lethality and propose a clear definition of the concept through the identification of antecedents, attributes, and consequences. A literature search for articles published in the English language between 1970 and 2016 was conducted using MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, Pubmed, Psychlit, Ovid, PsycINFO, and Proquest. The bibliographies of all included studies were also reviewed to identify additional relevant citations. A concept analysis was conducted on the literature findings using six stages of Walker and Avant's method. The concept analysis differentiated between suicide, lethality, suicidal behavior, and suicide lethality. Presence of a suicide plan or a written suicide note was not found to be associated with the majority of completed suicides included in the definition of suicide lethality. There are a few scales that measure the lethality of a suicide attempt, but none that attempt to measure the concept of suicide lethality as described in this analysis. Clarifying the concept of suicide lethality encourages awareness of the possibility of different suicidal behaviors associated with different suicide outcomes and will inform the development of future nursing interventions. A clearer definition of the concept of suicide lethality will guide clinical practice, research, and policy development aimed at suicide prevention.

  15. Y682 mutation of amyloid precursor protein promotes endo-lysosomal dysfunction by disrupting APP-SorLA interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Rosario La Rosa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The intracellular transport and localization of amyloid precursor protein (APP are critical determinants of APP processing and β-amyloid peptide production, thus crucially important for the pathophysiology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Notably, the C-terminal Y682ENPTY687 domain of APP binds to specific adaptors controlling APP trafficking and sorting in neurons. Mutation on the Y682 residue to glycine (Y682G leads to altered APP sorting in hippocampal neurons that favors its accumulation in intracellular compartments and the release of soluble APPα. Such alterations induce premature aging and learning and cognitive deficits in APP Y682G mutant mice (APPYG/YG. Here, we report that Y682G mutation affects formation of the APP complex with sortilin-related receptor (SorLA, resulting in endo-lysosomal dysfunctions and neuronal degeneration. Moreover, disruption of the APP/SorLA complex changes the trafficking pathway of SorLA, with its consequent increase in secretion outside neurons. Mutations in the SorLA gene are a prognostic factor in AD, and increases in SorLA levels in cerebrospinal fluid are predictive of AD in humans. These results might open new possibilities in comprehending the role played by SorLA in its interaction with APP and in the progression of neuronal degeneration. In addition, they further underline the crucial role played by Y682 residue in controlling APP trafficking in neurons.

  16. Genetic interaction between the ero1-1 and leu2 mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López-Mirabal, H Reynaldo; Winther, Jakob R; Kielland-Brandt, Morten C

    2007-01-01

    of the ero1-1 mutation were carried out in a leu2 mutant. The ero1-1 leu2 strain does not grow in standard synthetic complete medium at 30 degrees C, a defect that can be remedied by increasing the L-leucine concentration in the medium or by transforming the ero1-1 leu2 strain with the LEU2 wild-type allele...

  17. Interactions of a didomain fragment of the Drosophila Sex-lethal protein with single-stranded uridine-rich oligoribonucleotides derived from the transformer and Sex-lethal messenger RNA precursors: NMR with residue-selective [5-2H]uridine substitutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Insil; Muto, Yutaka; Watanabe, Satoru; Kitamura, Aya; Futamura, Yasuhiro; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Hosono, Kazumi; Kawai, Gota; Takaku, Hiroshi; Dohmae, Naoshi; Takio, Koji; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Shimura, Yoshiro

    2000-01-01

    Proteins that contain two or more copies of the RNA-binding domain [ribonucleoprotein (RNP) domain or RNA recognition motif (RRM)] are considered to be involved in the recognition of single-stranded RNA, but the mechanisms of this recognition are poorly understood at the molecular level. For an NMR analysis of a single-stranded RNA complexed with a multi-RBD protein, residue-selective stable-isotope labeling techniques are necessary, rather than common assignment methods based on the secondary structure of RNA. In the present study, we analyzed the interaction of a Drosophila Sex-lethal (Sxl) protein fragment, consisting of two RBDs (RBD1-RBD2), with two distinct target RNAs derived from the tra and Sxl mRNA precursors with guanosine and adenosine, respectively, in a position near the 5'-terminus of a uridine stretch. First, we prepared a [5- 2 H]uridine phosphoramidite, and synthesized a series of 2 H-labeled RNAs, in which all of the uridine residues except one were replaced by [5- 2 H]uridine in the target sequence, GU 8 C. By observing the H5-H6 TOCSY cross peaks of the series of 2 H-labeled RNAs complexed with the Sxl RBD1-RBD2, all of the base H5-H6 proton resonances of the target RNA were unambiguously assigned. Then, the H5-H6 cross peaks of other target RNAs, GU 2 GU 8 , AU 8 , and UAU 8 , were assigned by comparison with those of GU 8 C. We found that the uridine residue prior to the G or A residue is essential for proper interaction with the protein, and that the interaction is tighter for A than for G. Moreover, the H1' resonance assignments were achieved from the H5-H6 assignments. The results revealed that all of the protein-bound nucleotide residues, except for only two, are in the unusual C2'-endo ribose conformation in the complex

  18. Interactions of a didomain fragment of the Drosophila Sex-lethal protein with single-stranded uridine-rich oligoribonucleotides derived from the transformer and Sex-lethal messenger RNA precursors: NMR with residue-selective [5-2H]uridine substitutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Insil; Muto, Yutaka; Watanabe, Satoru; Kitamura, Aya; Futamura, Yasuhiro; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki [University of Tokyo, Department of Biophysics and Biochemistry, Graduate School of Science (Japan); Hosono, Kazumi; Kawai, Gota; Takaku, Hiroshi [Chiba Institute of Technology, Department of Industrial Chemistry (Japan); Dohmae, Naoshi; Takio, Koji [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN) (Japan); Sakamoto, Hiroshi [Kobe University, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science (Japan); Shimura, Yoshiro [Biomolecular Engineering Research Institute (Japan)

    2000-06-15

    Proteins that contain two or more copies of the RNA-binding domain [ribonucleoprotein (RNP) domain or RNA recognition motif (RRM)] are considered to be involved in the recognition of single-stranded RNA, but the mechanisms of this recognition are poorly understood at the molecular level. For an NMR analysis of a single-stranded RNA complexed with a multi-RBD protein, residue-selective stable-isotope labeling techniques are necessary, rather than common assignment methods based on the secondary structure of RNA. In the present study, we analyzed the interaction of a Drosophila Sex-lethal (Sxl) protein fragment, consisting of two RBDs (RBD1-RBD2), with two distinct target RNAs derived from the tra and Sxl mRNA precursors with guanosine and adenosine, respectively, in a position near the 5'-terminus of a uridine stretch. First, we prepared a [5-{sup 2}H]uridine phosphoramidite, and synthesized a series of {sup 2}H-labeled RNAs, in which all of the uridine residues except one were replaced by [5-{sup 2}H]uridine in the target sequence, GU{sub 8}C. By observing the H5-H6 TOCSY cross peaks of the series of {sup 2}H-labeled RNAs complexed with the Sxl RBD1-RBD2, all of the base H5-H6 proton resonances of the target RNA were unambiguously assigned. Then, the H5-H6 cross peaks of other target RNAs, GU{sub 2}GU{sub 8}, AU{sub 8}, and UAU{sub 8}, were assigned by comparison with those of GU{sub 8}C. We found that the uridine residue prior to the G or A residue is essential for proper interaction with the protein, and that the interaction is tighter for A than for G. Moreover, the H1' resonance assignments were achieved from the H5-H6 assignments. The results revealed that all of the protein-bound nucleotide residues, except for only two, are in the unusual C2'-endo ribose conformation in the complex.

  19. TBC1D24, an ARF6-interacting protein, is mutated in familial infantile myoclonic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falace, Antonio; Filipello, Fabia; La Padula, Veronica; Vanni, Nicola; Madia, Francesca; De Pietri Tonelli, Davide; de Falco, Fabrizio A; Striano, Pasquale; Dagna Bricarelli, Franca; Minetti, Carlo; Benfenati, Fabio; Fassio, Anna; Zara, Federico

    2010-09-10

    Idiopathic epilepsies (IEs) are a group of disorders characterized by recurrent seizures in the absence of detectable brain lesions or metabolic abnormalities. IEs include common disorders with a complex mode of inheritance and rare Mendelian traits suggesting the occurrence of several alleles with variable penetrance. We previously described a large family with a recessive form of idiopathic epilepsy, named familial infantile myoclonic epilepsy (FIME), and mapped the disease locus on chromosome 16p13.3 by linkage analysis. In the present study, we found that two compound heterozygous missense mutations (D147H and A509V) in TBC1D24, a gene of unknown function, are responsible for FIME. In situ hybridization analysis revealed that Tbc1d24 is mainly expressed at the level of the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus. By coimmunoprecipitation assay we found that TBC1D24 binds ARF6, a Ras-related family of small GTPases regulating exo-endocytosis dynamics. The main recognized function of ARF6 in the nervous system is the regulation of dendritic branching, spine formation, and axonal extension. TBC1D24 overexpression resulted in a significant increase in neurite length and arborization and the FIME mutations significantly reverted this phenotype. In this study we identified a gene mutation involved in autosomal-recessive idiopathic epilepsy, unveiled the involvement of ARF6-dependent molecular pathway in brain hyperexcitability and seizures, and confirmed the emerging role of subtle cytoarchitectural alterations in the etiology of this group of common epileptic disorders. 2010 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Mutations in the DNA-binding domain of NR2E3 affect in vivo dimerization and interaction with CRX.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Roduit

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: NR2E3 (PNR is an orphan nuclear receptor essential for proper photoreceptor determination and differentiation. In humans, mutations in NR2E3 have been associated with the recessively inherited enhanced short wavelength sensitive (S- cone syndrome (ESCS and, more recently, with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP. NR2E3 acts as a suppressor of the cone generation program in late mitotic retinal progenitor cells. In adult rod photoreceptors, NR2E3 represses cone-specific gene expression and acts in concert with the transcription factors CRX and NRL to activate rod-specific genes. NR2E3 and CRX have been shown to physically interact in vitro through their respective DNA-binding domains (DBD. The DBD also contributes to homo- and heterodimerization of nuclear receptors. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed NR2E3 homodimerization and NR2E3/CRX complex formation in an in vivo situation by Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET(2. NR2E3 wild-type protein formed homodimers in transiently transfected HEK293T cells. NR2E3 homodimerization was impaired in presence of disease-causing mutations in the DBD, except for the p.R76Q and p.R104W mutant proteins. Strikingly, the adRP-linked p.G56R mutant protein interacted with CRX with a similar efficiency to that of NR2E3 wild-type and p.R311Q proteins. In contrast, all other NR2E3 DBD-mutant proteins did not interact with CRX. The p.G56R mutant protein was also more effective in abolishing the potentiation of rhodospin gene transactivation by the NR2E3 wild-type protein. In addition, the p.G56R mutant enhanced the transrepression of the M- and S-opsin promoter, while all other NR2E3 DBD-mutants did not. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest different disease mechanisms in adRP- and ESCS-patients carrying NR2E3 mutations. Titration of CRX by the p.G56R mutant protein acting as a repressor in trans may account for the severe clinical phenotype in adRP patients.

  1. Probing the role of backbone hydrogen bonds in protein-peptide interactions by amide-to-ester mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eildal, Jonas N N; Hultqvist, Greta; Balle, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    -protein interactions, those of the PDZ domain family involve formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds: C-termini or internal linear motifs of proteins bind as β-strands to form an extended antiparallel β-sheet with the PDZ domain. Whereas extensive work has focused on the importance of the amino acid side chains...... of the protein ligand, the role of the backbone hydrogen bonds in the binding reaction is not known. Using amide-to-ester substitutions to perturb the backbone hydrogen-bonding pattern, we have systematically probed putative backbone hydrogen bonds between four different PDZ domains and peptides corresponding...... to natural protein ligands. Amide-to-ester mutations of the three C-terminal amides of the peptide ligand severely affected the affinity with the PDZ domain, demonstrating that hydrogen bonds contribute significantly to ligand binding (apparent changes in binding energy, ΔΔG = 1.3 to >3.8 kcal mol(-1...

  2. A single mutation in the 15S rRNA gene confers nonsense suppressor activity and interacts with mRF1 the release factor in yeast mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Gargouri

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We have determined the nucleotide sequence of the mim3-1 mitochondrial ribosomal suppressor, acting on ochre mitochondrial mutations and one frameshift mutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The 15s rRNA suppressor gene contains a G633 to C transversion. Yeast mitochondrial G633 corresponds to G517 of the E.coli 15S rRNA, which is occupied by an invariant G in all known small rRNA sequences. Interestingly, this mutation has occurred at the same position as the known MSU1 mitochondrial suppressor which changes G633 to A. The suppressor mutation lies in a highly conserved region of the rRNA, known in E.coli as the 530-loop, interacting with the S4, S5 and S12 ribosomal proteins. We also show an interesting interaction between the mitochondrial mim3-1 and the nuclear nam3-1 suppressors, both of which have the same action spectrum on mitochondrial mutations: nam3-1 abolishes the suppressor effect when present with mim3-1 in the same haploid cell. We discuss these results in the light of the nature of Nam3, identified by [1] as the yeast mitochondrial translation release factor. A hypothetical mechanism of suppression by "ribosome shifting" is also discussed in view of the nature of mutations suppressed and not suppressed.

  3. Pedigree analyses of yeast cells recovering from DNA damage allow assignment of lethal events to individual post-treatment generations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, F.; Karwan, A.; Wintersberger, U.

    1990-01-01

    Haploid cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were treated with different DNA damaging agents at various doses. A study of the progeny of individual such cells allowed the assignment of lethal events to distinct post treatment generations. By microscopically inspecting those cells which were not able to form visible colonies the authors could discriminate between cells dying from immediately effective lethal hits and those generating microcolonies probably as a consequence of lethal mutation(s). The experimentally obtained numbers of lethal events were mathematically transformed into mean probabilities of lethal fixations at taking place in cells of certain post treatment generations. Such analyses give detailed insight into the kinetics of lethality as a consequence of different kinds of DNA damage. For example, X-irradiated cells lost viability mainly by lethal hits, only at a higher dose also lethal mutations fixed in the cells that were in direct contact with the mutagen, but not in later generations, occurred. Ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS)-treated cells were hit by 00-fixations in a dose dependent manner. The distribution of all sorts of lethal fixations taken together, which occurred in the EMS-damaged cell families, was not random. For comparison analyses of cells treated with methyl methanesulfonate, N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine and nitrous acid are also reported

  4. Mechanical interactions in bacterial colonies and the surfing probability of beneficial mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Fred D.

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial conglomerates such as biofilms and microcolonies are ubiquitous in nature and play an important role in industry and medicine. In contrast to well-mixed cultures routinely used in microbial research, bacteria in a microcolony interact mechanically with one another and with the substrate to which they are attached. Here, we use a computer model of a microbial colony of rod-shaped cells to investigate how physical interactions between cells determine their motion in the colony and how this affects biological evolution. We show that the probability that a faster-growing mutant ‘surfs’ at the colony's frontier and creates a macroscopic sector depends on physical properties of cells (shape, elasticity and friction). Although all these factors contribute to the surfing probability in seemingly different ways, their effects can be summarized by two summary statistics that characterize the front roughness and cell alignment. Our predictions are confirmed by experiments in which we measure the surfing probability for colonies of different front roughness. Our results show that physical interactions between bacterial cells play an important role in biological evolution of new traits, and suggest that these interactions may be relevant to processes such as de novo evolution of antibiotic resistance. PMID:28592660

  5. Mechanical interactions in bacterial colonies and the surfing probability of beneficial mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Fred D; Gralka, Matti; Hallatschek, Oskar; Waclaw, Bartlomiej

    2017-06-01

    Bacterial conglomerates such as biofilms and microcolonies are ubiquitous in nature and play an important role in industry and medicine. In contrast to well-mixed cultures routinely used in microbial research, bacteria in a microcolony interact mechanically with one another and with the substrate to which they are attached. Here, we use a computer model of a microbial colony of rod-shaped cells to investigate how physical interactions between cells determine their motion in the colony and how this affects biological evolution. We show that the probability that a faster-growing mutant 'surfs' at the colony's frontier and creates a macroscopic sector depends on physical properties of cells (shape, elasticity and friction). Although all these factors contribute to the surfing probability in seemingly different ways, their effects can be summarized by two summary statistics that characterize the front roughness and cell alignment. Our predictions are confirmed by experiments in which we measure the surfing probability for colonies of different front roughness. Our results show that physical interactions between bacterial cells play an important role in biological evolution of new traits, and suggest that these interactions may be relevant to processes such as de novo evolution of antibiotic resistance. © 2017 The Author(s).

  6. Higher risk of death among MEN1 patients with mutations in the JunD interacting domain: a Groupe d'etude des Tumeurs Endocrines (GTE) cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevenon, Julien; Bourredjem, Abderrahmane; Faivre, Laurence; Cardot-Bauters, Catherine; Calender, Alain; Murat, Arnaud; Giraud, Sophie; Niccoli, Patricia; Odou, Marie-Françoise; Borson-Chazot, Françoise; Barlier, Anne; Lombard-Bohas, Catherine; Clauser, Eric; Tabarin, Antoine; Parfait, Béatrice; Chabre, Olivier; Castermans, Emilie; Beckers, Albert; Ruszniewski, Philippe; Le Bras, Morgane; Delemer, Brigitte; Bouchard, Philippe; Guilhem, Isabelle; Rohmer, Vincent; Goichot, Bernard; Caron, Philippe; Baudin, Eric; Chanson, Philippe; Groussin, Lionel; Du Boullay, Hélène; Weryha, Georges; Lecomte, Pierre; Penfornis, Alfred; Bihan, Hélène; Archambeaud, Françoise; Kerlan, Véronique; Duron, Françoise; Kuhn, Jean-Marc; Vergès, Bruno; Rodier, Michel; Renard, Michel; Sadoul, Jean-Louis; Binquet, Christine; Goudet, Pierre

    2013-05-15

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome type 1 (MEN1), which is secondary to mutation of the MEN1 gene, is a rare autosomal-dominant disease that predisposes mutation carriers to endocrine tumors. Although genotype-phenotype studies have so far failed to identify any statistical correlations, some families harbor recurrent tumor patterns. The function of MENIN is unclear, but has been described through the discovery of its interacting partners. Mutations in the interacting domains of MENIN functional partners have been shown to directly alter its regulation abilities. We report on a cohort of MEN1 patients from the Groupe d'étude des Tumeurs Endocrines. Patients with a molecular diagnosis and a clinical follow-up, totaling 262 families and 806 patients, were included. Associations between mutation type, location or interacting factors of the MENIN protein and death as well as the occurrence of MEN1-related tumors were tested using a frailty Cox model to adjust for potential heterogeneity across families. Accounting for the heterogeneity across families, the overall risk of death was significantly higher when mutations affected the JunD interacting domain (adjusted HR = 1.88: 95%-CI = 1.15-3.07). Patients had a higher risk of death from cancers of the MEN1 spectrum (HR = 2.34; 95%-CI = 1.23-4.43). This genotype-phenotype correlation study confirmed the lack of direct genotype-phenotype correlations. However, patients with mutations affecting the JunD interacting domain had a higher risk of death secondary to a MEN1 tumor and should thus be considered for surgical indications, genetic counseling and follow-up.

  7. Mutations Phe785Leu and Thr618Met in Na+, K+-ATPase, Associated with Familial Rapid-Onset Dystonia Parkinsonism, Interfere with Na+ Interaction by Distinct Mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schack, Vivien Rodacker; Toustrup-Jensen, Mads Schak; Vilsen, Bente

    The Na+, K+-ATPase plays key roles in brain function. Recently, missense mutations in the Na+, K+-ATPase were found associated with familial rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism (FRDP). Here, we have characterized the functional consequences of FRDP mutations Phe785Leu and Thr618Met. Both mutations...... lead to functionally altered, but active, Na+, K+-pumps that display reduced apparent affinity for cytoplasmic Na+, but the underlying mechanism differs between the mutants. In Phe785Leu, the interaction of the E1 form with Na+ is defective, and the E1-E2 equilibrium is not displaced. In Thr618Met......, the Na+ affinity is reduced because of displacement of the conformational equilibrium in favor of the K+-occluded E2(K2) form. In both mutants, K+ interaction at the external activating sites of the E2P phosphoenzyme is normal. The change of cellular Na+ homeostasis is likely a major factor contributing...

  8. Mutations Phe785Leu and Thr618Met in Na+, K+-ATPase, Associated with Familial Rapid-Onset Dystonia Parkinsonism, Interfere with Na+ Interaction by Distinct Mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schack, Vivien Rodacker; Toustrup-Jensen, Mads Schak; Vilsen, Bente

    The Na+, K+-ATPase plays key roles in brain function. Recently, missense mutations in the Na+, K+-ATPase were found associated with familial rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism (FRDP). We have characterized the functional consequences of FRDP mutations Phe785Leu and Thr618Met. Both mutations lead...... to functionally altered, but active, Na+, K+-pumps that display reduced apparent affinity for cytoplasmic Na+, but the underlying mechanism differs between the mutants. In Phe785Leu, the interaction of the E1 form with Na+ is defective, and the E1-E2 equilibrium is not displaced. In Thr618Met, the Na+ affinity...... is reduced because of displacement of the conformational equilibrium in favor of the K+-occluded E2(K2) form. In both mutants, K+ interaction at the external activating sites of the E2P phosphoenzyme is normal. The change of cellular Na+ homeostasis is likely a major factor contributing to the development...

  9. Effect of lethality on the extinction and on the error threshold of quasispecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejero, Hector; Marín, Arturo; Montero, Francisco

    2010-02-21

    In this paper the effect of lethality on error threshold and extinction has been studied in a population of error-prone self-replicating molecules. For given lethality and a simple fitness landscape, three dynamic regimes can be obtained: quasispecies, error catastrophe, and extinction. Using a simple model in which molecules are classified as master, lethal and non-lethal mutants, it is possible to obtain the mutation rates of the transitions between the three regimes analytically. The numerical resolution of the extended model, in which molecules are classified depending on their Hamming distance to the master sequence, confirms the results obtained in the simple model and shows how an error catastrophe regime changes when lethality is taken in account. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mutations that promote furin-independent growth of Semliki Forest virus affect p62-E1 interactions and membrane fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xinyong; Kielian, Margaret

    2004-01-01

    The enveloped alphavirus Semliki Forest virus (SFV) infects cells via a low pH-triggered membrane fusion reaction mediated by the E1 protein. E1's fusion activity is regulated by its heterodimeric interaction with a companion membrane protein E2. Mature E2 protein is generated by furin processing of the precursor p62. Processing destabilizes the heterodimer, allowing dissociation at acidic pH, E1 conformational changes, and membrane fusion. We used a furin-deficient cell line, FD11, to select for SFV mutants that show increased growth in the absence of p62 processing. We isolated and characterized 7 such pci mutants (p62 cleavage independent), which retained the parental furin cleavage site but showed significant increases in their ability to carry out membrane fusion in the p62 form. Sequence analysis of the pci mutants identified mutations primarily on the E2 protein, and suggested sites important in the interaction of p62 with E1 and the regulation of fusion

  11. Binding of superantigen toxins into the CD28 homodimer interface is essential for induction of cytokine genes that mediate lethal shock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gila Arad

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial superantigens, a diverse family of toxins, induce an inflammatory cytokine storm that can lead to lethal shock. CD28 is a homodimer expressed on T cells that functions as the principal costimulatory ligand in the immune response through an interaction with its B7 coligands, yet we show here that to elicit inflammatory cytokine gene expression and toxicity, superantigens must bind directly into the dimer interface of CD28. Preventing access of the superantigen to CD28 suffices to block its lethality. Mice were protected from lethal superantigen challenge by short peptide mimetics of the CD28 dimer interface and by peptides selected to compete with the superantigen for its binding site in CD28. Superantigens use a conserved β-strand/hinge/α-helix domain of hitherto unknown function to engage CD28. Mutation of this superantigen domain abolished inflammatory cytokine gene induction and lethality. Structural analysis showed that when a superantigen binds to the T cell receptor on the T cell and major histocompatibility class II molecule on the antigen-presenting cell, CD28 can be accommodated readily as third superantigen receptor in the quaternary complex, with the CD28 dimer interface oriented towards the β-strand/hinge/α-helix domain in the superantigen. Our findings identify the CD28 homodimer interface as a critical receptor target for superantigens. The novel role of CD28 as receptor for a class of microbial pathogens, the superantigen toxins, broadens the scope of pathogen recognition mechanisms.

  12. KRAS mutations and CDKN2A promoter methylation show an interactive adverse effect on survival and predict recurrence of rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohonen-Corish, Maija R J; Tseung, Jason; Chan, Charles; Currey, Nicola; Dent, Owen F; Clarke, Stephen; Bokey, Les; Chapuis, Pierre H

    2014-06-15

    Colonic and rectal cancers differ in their clinicopathologic features and treatment strategies. Molecular markers such as gene methylation, microsatellite instability and KRAS mutations, are becoming increasingly important in guiding treatment decisions in colorectal cancer. However, their association with clinicopathologic variables and utility in the management of rectal cancer is still poorly understood. We analyzed CDKN2A gene methylation, CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), microsatellite instability and KRAS/BRAF mutations in a cohort of 381 rectal cancers with extensive clinical follow-up data. BRAF mutations (2%), CIMP-high (4%) and microsatellite instability-high (2%) were rare, whereas KRAS mutations (39%), CDKN2A methylation (20%) and CIMP-low (25%) were more common. Only CDKN2A methylation and KRAS mutations showed an association with poor overall survival but these did not remain significant when analyzed with other clinicopathologic factors. In contrast, this prognostic effect was strengthened by the joint presence of CDKN2A methylation and KRAS mutations, which independently predicted recurrence of cancer and was associated with poor overall and cancer-specific survival. This study has identified a subgroup of more aggressive rectal cancers that may arise through the KRAS-p16 pathway. It has been previously shown that an interaction of p16 deficiency and oncogenic KRAS promotes carcinogenesis in the mouse and is characterized by loss of oncogene-induced senescence. These findings may provide avenues for the discovery of new treatments in rectal cancer. © 2013 UICC.

  13. Non-Lethal Weapons Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets Frequently Asked Questions Non-Lethal Weapons FAQs Active Denial System FAQs Human Electro -Muscular Incapacitation FAQs Related Links Business Opportunities Contact JNLWD Congressional Engagement , Wednesday, Sept 20, 2017. The Active Denial System, blunt-impact munitions, dazzling lasers, LRAD 100X

  14. The cytochrome b p.278Y>C mutation causative of a multisystem disorder enhances superoxide production and alters supramolecular interactions of respiratory chain complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghelli, Anna; Tropeano, Concetta V; Calvaruso, Maria Antonietta

    2013-01-01

    , the examination of respiratory supercomplexes revealed that the amounts of CIII dimer and III2IV1 were reduced, whereas those of I1III2IVn slightly increased. We therefore suggest that the deleterious effects of p.278Y>C mutation on cytochrome b are palliated when CIII is assembled into the supercomplexes I1III2......IVn, in contrast to when it is found alone. These findings underline the importance of supramolecular interactions between complexes for maintaining a basal respiratory chain activity and shed light to the molecular basis of disease manifestations associated with this mutation.......Cytochrome b is the only mtDNA-encoded subunit of the mitochondrial complex III (CIII), the functional bottleneck of the respiratory chain. Previously, the human cytochrome b missense mutation m.15579A>G, which substitutes the Tyr 278 with Cys (p.278Y>C), was identified in a patient with severe...

  15. Mutations to Less-Preferred Synonymous Codons in a Highly Expressed Gene of Escherichia coli: Fitness and Epistatic Interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Hauber

    Full Text Available Codon-tRNA coevolution to maximize protein production has been, until recently, the dominant hypothesis to explain codon-usage bias in highly expressed bacterial genes. Two predictions of this hypothesis are 1 selection is weak; and 2 similar silent replacements at different codons should have similar fitness consequence. We used an allele-replacement strategy to change five specific 3rd-codon-position (silent sites in the highly expressed Escherichia coli ribosomal protein gene rplQ from the wild type to a less-preferred alternative. We introduced the five mutations within a 10-codon region. Four of the silent sites were chosen to test the second prediction, with a CTG to CTA mutation being introduced at two closely linked leucine codons and an AAA to AAG mutation being introduced at two closely linked lysine codons. We also introduced a fifth silent mutation, a GTG to GTA mutation at a valine codon in the same genic region. We measured the fitness effect of the individual mutations by competing each single-mutant strain against the parental wild-type strain, using a disrupted form of the araA gene as a selectively neutral phenotypic marker to distinguish between strains in direct competition experiments. Three of the silent mutations had a fitness effect of |s| > 0.02, which is contradictory to the prediction that selection will be weak. The two leucine mutations had significantly different fitness effects, as did the two lysine mutations, contradictory to the prediction that similar mutations at different codons should have similar fitness effects. We also constructed a strain carrying all five silent mutations in combination. Its fitness effect was greater than that predicted from the individual fitness values, suggesting that negative synergistic epistasis acts on the combination allele.

  16. Prediction of sensitivity to gefitinib/erlotinib for EGFR mutations in NSCLC based on structural interaction fingerprints and multilinear principal component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Bin; Lee, Victor H F; Yan, Hong

    2018-03-07

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with activating EGFR mutations, especially exon 19 deletions and the L858R point mutation, is particularly responsive to gefitinib and erlotinib. However, the sensitivity varies for less common and rare EGFR mutations. There are various explanations for the low sensitivity of EGFR exon 20 insertions and the exon 20 T790 M point mutation to gefitinib/erlotinib. However, few studies discuss, from a structural perspective, why less common mutations, like G719X and L861Q, have moderate sensitivity to gefitinib/erlotinib. To decode the drug sensitivity/selectivity of EGFR mutants, it is important to analyze the interaction between EGFR mutants and EGFR inhibitors. In this paper, the 30 most common EGFR mutants were selected and the technique of protein-ligand interaction fingerprint (IFP) was applied to analyze and compare the binding modes of EGFR mutant-gefitinib/erlotinib complexes. Molecular dynamics simulations were employed to obtain the dynamic trajectory and a matrix of IFPs for each EGFR mutant-inhibitor complex. Multilinear Principal Component Analysis (MPCA) was applied for dimensionality reduction and feature selection. The selected features were further analyzed for use as a drug sensitivity predictor. The results showed that the accuracy of prediction of drug sensitivity was very high for both gefitinib and erlotinib. Targeted Projection Pursuit (TPP) was used to show that the data points can be easily separated based on their sensitivities to gefetinib/erlotinib. We can conclude that the IFP features of EGFR mutant-TKI complexes and the MPCA-based tensor object feature extraction are useful to predict the drug sensitivity of EGFR mutants. The findings provide new insights for studying and predicting drug resistance/sensitivity of EGFR mutations in NSCLC and can be beneficial to the design of future targeted therapies and innovative drug discovery.

  17. Activating and deactivating mutations in the receptor interaction site of GDF5 cause symphalangism or brachydactyly type A2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seemann, Petra; Schwappacher, Raphaela; Kjær, Klaus Wilbrandt

    2005-01-01

    Here we describe 2 mutations in growth and differentiation factor 5 (GDF5) that alter receptor-binding affinities. They cause brachydactyly type A2 (L441P) and symphalangism (R438L), conditions previously associated with mutations in the GDF5 receptor bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 1b...

  18. Lethal mechanisms in gastric volvulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omond, Kimberley J; Byard, Roger W

    2017-01-01

    A 55-year-old wheelchair-bound woman with severe cerebral palsy was found at autopsy to have marked distention of the stomach due to a volvulus. The stomach was viable, and filled with air and fluid and had pushed the left dome of the diaphragm upwards causing marked compression of the left lung with a mediastinal shift to the right (including the heart). There was no evidence of gastric perforation, ischaemic necrosis or peritonitis. Removal of the organ block revealed marked kyphoscoliosis. Histology confirmed the viability of the stomach and biochemistry showed no dehydration. Death in cases of acute gastric volvulus usually occurs because of compromise of the gastric blood supply resulting in ischaemic necrosis with distention from swallowed air and fluid resulting in perforation with lethal peritonitis. Hypovolaemic shock may also occur. However, the current case demonstrates an alternative lethal mechanism, that of respiratory compromise due to marked thoracic organ compression.

  19. Chemical and radiation induced late dominant lethal effects in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favor, J.; Crenshaw, J.W. Jr.; Soares, E.R.

    1978-01-01

    Although theoretically expected, experimental data to date have not shown dominant lethal expression to occur throughout the developmental period. Specifically, late post-implantation effects have not been demonstrated. The authors routinely use an experimental technique in which parental females mated to mutagenically treated males are allowed to give birth and wean their litter, and their uterine horns are then inspected for uterine scars indicative of live and dead embryos. In a number of experiments in which males were mutagenically treated with either chemicals or X-irradiation, a discrepancy was observed between the number of live embryos as determined by the scar technique and the number of live observed at birth, suggesting the possibility of embryonic losses at a late stage in development. Initial analyses showed that mutagenic treatment increased the percentage of these late losses. These differences were statistically significant in 2 of 3 analyses. Factors affecting statistical significance and an understanding of dominant lethal mutations are discussed. (Auth.)

  20. Dominant lethals following administration of tritium (THO) to rat males

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagova, A.; Baev, I.; Bajrakova, A.

    1976-01-01

    Adult rat males were given a single intraperitoneal tritium (THO) injection at 0,01 or 0,001 mCi/g body weight (1/100 or 1/1000 of LDsub(50/30), respectively). Twelve days after treatment each male was mated to 3-5 intact females, and the latter were replaced by fresh ones every 12 following days over a 120-day period. Mated females were killed to score conceptions, corpora lutea, and live and dead embryos. Estimations were made of F 1 prenatal death rate (according to Bateman, 1958) and the frequency of induction of dominant lethal mutations (according to Roehrborn, 1970). The results observed indicated paternal exposure to tritium (THO) to produce dominant lethals both in pre- and post-meiotic germ cells in the rat. The extent of the genetic damage studied was found to depend on the amount of activity administered as well as on the time interval between treatment and conception. (author)

  1. GTP Binding and Oncogenic Mutations May Attenuate Hypervariable Region (HVR)-Catalytic Domain Interactions in Small GTPase K-Ras4B, Exposing the Effector Binding Site*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shaoyong; Banerjee, Avik; Jang, Hyunbum; Zhang, Jian; Gaponenko, Vadim; Nussinov, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    K-Ras4B, a frequently mutated oncogene in cancer, plays an essential role in cell growth, differentiation, and survival. Its C-terminal membrane-associated hypervariable region (HVR) is required for full biological activity. In the active GTP-bound state, the HVR interacts with acidic plasma membrane (PM) headgroups, whereas the farnesyl anchors in the membrane; in the inactive GDP-bound state, the HVR may interact with both the PM and the catalytic domain at the effector binding region, obstructing signaling and nucleotide exchange. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations and NMR, we aim to figure out the effects of nucleotides (GTP and GDP) and frequent (G12C, G12D, G12V, G13D, and Q61H) and infrequent (E37K and R164Q) oncogenic mutations on full-length K-Ras4B. The mutations are away from or directly at the HVR switch I/effector binding site. Our results suggest that full-length wild-type GDP-bound K-Ras4B (K-Ras4BWT-GDP) is in an intrinsically autoinhibited state via tight HVR-catalytic domain interactions. The looser association in K-Ras4BWT-GTP may release the HVR. Some of the oncogenic mutations weaken the HVR-catalytic domain association in the K-Ras4B-GDP/-GTP bound states, which may facilitate the HVR disassociation in a nucleotide-independent manner, thereby up-regulating oncogenic Ras signaling. Thus, our results suggest that mutations can exert their effects in more than one way, abolishing GTP hydrolysis and facilitating effector binding. PMID:26453300

  2. GTP Binding and Oncogenic Mutations May Attenuate Hypervariable Region (HVR)-Catalytic Domain Interactions in Small GTPase K-Ras4B, Exposing the Effector Binding Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shaoyong; Banerjee, Avik; Jang, Hyunbum; Zhang, Jian; Gaponenko, Vadim; Nussinov, Ruth

    2015-11-27

    K-Ras4B, a frequently mutated oncogene in cancer, plays an essential role in cell growth, differentiation, and survival. Its C-terminal membrane-associated hypervariable region (HVR) is required for full biological activity. In the active GTP-bound state, the HVR interacts with acidic plasma membrane (PM) headgroups, whereas the farnesyl anchors in the membrane; in the inactive GDP-bound state, the HVR may interact with both the PM and the catalytic domain at the effector binding region, obstructing signaling and nucleotide exchange. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations and NMR, we aim to figure out the effects of nucleotides (GTP and GDP) and frequent (G12C, G12D, G12V, G13D, and Q61H) and infrequent (E37K and R164Q) oncogenic mutations on full-length K-Ras4B. The mutations are away from or directly at the HVR switch I/effector binding site. Our results suggest that full-length wild-type GDP-bound K-Ras4B (K-Ras4B(WT)-GDP) is in an intrinsically autoinhibited state via tight HVR-catalytic domain interactions. The looser association in K-Ras4B(WT)-GTP may release the HVR. Some of the oncogenic mutations weaken the HVR-catalytic domain association in the K-Ras4B-GDP/-GTP bound states, which may facilitate the HVR disassociation in a nucleotide-independent manner, thereby up-regulating oncogenic Ras signaling. Thus, our results suggest that mutations can exert their effects in more than one way, abolishing GTP hydrolysis and facilitating effector binding. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Mutation in Torenia fournieri Lind. UFO homolog confers loss of TfLFY interaction and results in a petal to sepal transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Katsutomo; Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Aida, Ryutaro; Shikata, Masahito; Abe, Tomoko; Ohtsubo, Norihiro

    2012-09-01

    We identified a Torenia fournieri Lind. mutant (no. 252) that exhibited a sepaloid phenotype in which the second whorls were changed to sepal-like organs. This mutant had no stamens, and the floral organs consisted of sepals and carpels. Although the expression of a torenia class B MADS-box gene, GLOBOSA (TfGLO), was abolished in the 252 mutant, no mutation of TfGLO was found. Among torenia homologs such as APETALA1 (AP1), LEAFY (LFY), and UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO), which regulate expression of class B genes in Arabidopsis, only accumulation of the TfUFO transcript was diminished in the 252 mutant. Furthermore, a missense mutation was found in the coding region of the mutant TfUFO. Intact TfUFO complemented the mutant phenotype whereas mutated TfUFO did not; in addition, the transgenic phenotype of TfUFO-knockdown torenias coincided with the mutant phenotype. Yeast two-hybrid analysis revealed that the mutated TfUFO lost its ability to interact with TfLFY protein. In situ hybridization analysis indicated that the transcripts of TfUFO and TfLFY were partially accumulated in the same region. These results clearly demonstrate that the defect in TfUFO caused the sepaloid phenotype in the 252 mutant due to the loss of interaction with TfLFY. © 2012 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. The Effects of Anthrax Lethal Toxin on Host Barrier Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Frucht

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The pathological actions of anthrax toxin require the activities of its edema factor (EF and lethal factor (LF enzyme components, which gain intracellular access via its receptor-binding component, protective antigen (PA. LF is a metalloproteinase with specificity for selected mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases (MKKs, but its activity is not directly lethal to many types of primary and transformed cells in vitro. Nevertheless, in vivo treatment of several animal species with the combination of LF and PA (termed lethal toxin or LT leads to morbidity and mortality, suggesting that LT-dependent toxicity is mediated by cellular interactions between host cells. Decades of research have revealed that a central hallmark of this toxicity is the disruption of key cellular barriers required to maintain homeostasis. This review will focus on the current understanding of the effects of LT on barrier function, highlighting recent progress in establishing the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects.

  5. The effect of male mating competitiveness, developmental rate, and viability of larvae and pupae in D. melanogaster heterozygous for the temperature-sensitive lethal mutation 1(2)M167(DTS) on the dynamics of the mutation elimination from the population

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kulikov, A. M.; Marec, František; Mitrofanov, V. G.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 5 (2005), s. 495-500 ISSN 1022-7954 Grant - others:Russian Foundation for Basic Research(RU) 02-04-50021; Program of the Presidium of the Russian Academy of Sciences "Dynamics of Gene Pools in Plants, Animals, and Humans"(RU) 10002-251/P-24/154-150/2004-04-111 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : mutation elimination Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.240, year: 2005

  6. Tumor clone dynamics in lethal prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreira, Suzanne; Romanel, Alessandro; Goodall, Jane; Grist, Emily; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Miranda, Susana; Prandi, Davide; Lorente, David; Frenel, Jean-Sebastien; Pezaro, Carmel; Omlin, Aurelius; Rodrigues, Daniel Nava; Flohr, Penelope; Tunariu, Nina; S de Bono, Johann; Demichelis, Francesca; Attard, Gerhardt

    2014-09-17

    It is unclear whether a single clone metastasizes and remains dominant over the course of lethal prostate cancer. We describe the clonal architectural heterogeneity at different stages of disease progression by sequencing serial plasma and tumor samples from 16 ERG-positive patients. By characterizing the clonality of commonly occurring deletions at 21q22, 8p21, and 10q23, we identified multiple independent clones in metastatic disease that are differentially represented in tissue and circulation. To exemplify the clinical utility of our studies, we then showed a temporal association between clinical progression and emergence of androgen receptor (AR) mutations activated by glucocorticoids in about 20% of patients progressing on abiraterone and prednisolone or dexamethasone. Resistant clones showed a complex dynamic with temporal and spatial heterogeneity, suggesting distinct mechanisms of resistance at different sites that emerged and regressed depending on treatment selection pressure. This introduces a management paradigm requiring sequential monitoring of advanced prostate cancer patients with plasma and tumor biopsies to ensure early discontinuation of agents when they become potential disease drivers. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. Artemether resistance in vitro is linked to mutations in PfATP6 that also interact with mutations in PfMDR1 in travellers returning with Plasmodium falciparum infections.

    KAUST Repository

    Pillai, Dylan R; Lau, Rachel; Khairnar, Krishna; Lepore, Rosalba; Via, Allegra; Staines, Henry M; Krishna, Sanjeev

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Monitoring resistance phenotypes for Plasmodium falciparum, using in vitro growth assays, and relating findings to parasite genotype has proved particularly challenging for the study of resistance to artemisinins. METHODS: Plasmodium falciparum isolates cultured from 28 returning travellers diagnosed with malaria were assessed for sensitivity to artemisinin, artemether, dihydroartemisinin and artesunate and findings related to mutations in pfatp6 and pfmdr1. RESULTS: Resistance to artemether in vitro was significantly associated with a pfatp6 haplotype encoding two amino acid substitutions (pfatp6 A623E and S769N; (mean IC50 (95% CI) values of 8.2 (5.7 - 10.7) for A623/S769 versus 623E/769 N 13.5 (9.8 - 17.3) nM with a mean increase of 65%; p = 0.012). Increased copy number of pfmdr1 was not itself associated with increased IC50 values for artemether, but when interactions between the pfatp6 haplotype and increased copy number of pfmdr1 were examined together, a highly significant association was noted with IC50 values for artemether (mean IC50 (95% CI) values of 8.7 (5.9 - 11.6) versus 16.3 (10.7 - 21.8) nM with a mean increase of 87%; p = 0.0068). Previously described SNPs in pfmdr1 are also associated with differences in sensitivity to some artemisinins. CONCLUSIONS: These findings were further explored in molecular modelling experiments that suggest mutations in pfatp6 are unlikely to affect differential binding of artemisinins at their proposed site, whereas there may be differences in such binding associated with mutations in pfmdr1. Implications for a hypothesis that artemisinin resistance may be exacerbated by interactions between PfATP6 and PfMDR1 and for epidemiological studies to monitor emerging resistance are discussed.

  8. Artemether resistance in vitro is linked to mutations in PfATP6 that also interact with mutations in PfMDR1 in travellers returning with Plasmodium falciparum infections.

    KAUST Repository

    Pillai, Dylan R

    2012-04-27

    BACKGROUND: Monitoring resistance phenotypes for Plasmodium falciparum, using in vitro growth assays, and relating findings to parasite genotype has proved particularly challenging for the study of resistance to artemisinins. METHODS: Plasmodium falciparum isolates cultured from 28 returning travellers diagnosed with malaria were assessed for sensitivity to artemisinin, artemether, dihydroartemisinin and artesunate and findings related to mutations in pfatp6 and pfmdr1. RESULTS: Resistance to artemether in vitro was significantly associated with a pfatp6 haplotype encoding two amino acid substitutions (pfatp6 A623E and S769N; (mean IC50 (95% CI) values of 8.2 (5.7 - 10.7) for A623/S769 versus 623E/769 N 13.5 (9.8 - 17.3) nM with a mean increase of 65%; p = 0.012). Increased copy number of pfmdr1 was not itself associated with increased IC50 values for artemether, but when interactions between the pfatp6 haplotype and increased copy number of pfmdr1 were examined together, a highly significant association was noted with IC50 values for artemether (mean IC50 (95% CI) values of 8.7 (5.9 - 11.6) versus 16.3 (10.7 - 21.8) nM with a mean increase of 87%; p = 0.0068). Previously described SNPs in pfmdr1 are also associated with differences in sensitivity to some artemisinins. CONCLUSIONS: These findings were further explored in molecular modelling experiments that suggest mutations in pfatp6 are unlikely to affect differential binding of artemisinins at their proposed site, whereas there may be differences in such binding associated with mutations in pfmdr1. Implications for a hypothesis that artemisinin resistance may be exacerbated by interactions between PfATP6 and PfMDR1 and for epidemiological studies to monitor emerging resistance are discussed.

  9. Electroshock weapons can be lethal!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, Marjorie

    2008-03-01

    Electroshock weapons (EWs)-stun guns, tasers, riot shields-are electroconductive devices designed to safely incapacitate healthy men neuromuscularly, so they are called nonlethal or less-lethal. EW firms seeking large nonmilitary markets targeted law enforcement and corrections personnel, who began using EWs in prisons/jails and on public patrol in 1980 in the USA. This shifted the EW-shocked population from healthy soldiers to a heterogeneous mix of both sexes, ages 6-92, in a wide variety of health conditions! An EW operates by disrupting normal physiological processes, producing transient effects in healthy people. But if a person's health is sufficiently compromised, the margin of safety can be lost, resulting in death or permanent health problems. 325 people have died after EW shock since 1980. Did the EW cause these deaths? Evidence indicates that EWs do play a causal role in most such deaths. EWs can be lethal for people in diabetic shock^1 (hypoglycemia), which may be why Robert Dziekanski-a Polish immigrant to Canada-died so quickly after he was tasered at Vancouver Airport: not having eaten for over 10 hours, he likely was severely hypoglycemic. The EW death rate in North America is 30 times higher than need be, because EW users have not been properly trained to use EWs on a heterogeneous population safely! ^1J. Clinical Engineering 30(3):111(2005).

  10. ALS Associated Mutations in Matrin 3 Alter Protein-Protein Interactions and Impede mRNA Nuclear Export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehringer, Ashley; Garcia-Mansfield, Krystine; Singh, Gurkaran; Bakkar, Nadine; Pirrotte, Patrick; Bowser, Robert

    2017-11-06

    Mutations in Matrin 3 have recently been linked to ALS, though the mechanism that induces disease in these patients is unknown. To define the protein interactome of wild-type and ALS-linked MATR3 mutations, we performed immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometry using NSC-34 cells expressing human wild-type or mutant Matrin 3. Gene ontology analysis identified a novel role for Matrin 3 in mRNA transport centered on proteins in the TRanscription and EXport (TREX) complex, known to function in mRNA biogenesis and nuclear export. ALS-linked mutations in Matrin 3 led to its re-distribution within the nucleus, decreased co-localization with endogenous Matrin 3 and increased co-localization with specific TREX components. Expression of disease-causing Matrin 3 mutations led to nuclear mRNA export defects of both global mRNA and more specifically the mRNA of TDP-43 and FUS. Our findings identify a potential pathogenic mechanism attributable to MATR3 mutations and further link cellular transport defects to ALS.

  11. The LRRK2 G2385R variant is a partial loss-of-function mutation that affects synaptic vesicle trafficking through altered protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrion, Maria Dolores Perez; Marsicano, Silvia; Daniele, Federica; Marte, Antonella; Pischedda, Francesca; Di Cairano, Eliana; Piovesana, Ester; von Zweydorf, Felix; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Gloeckner, Christian Johannes; Onofri, Franco; Perego, Carla; Piccoli, Giovanni

    2017-07-14

    Mutations in the Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene (LRRK2) are associated with familial Parkinson's disease (PD). LRRK2 protein contains several functional domains, including protein-protein interaction domains at its N- and C-termini. In this study, we analyzed the functional features attributed to LRRK2 by its N- and C-terminal domains. We combined TIRF microscopy and synaptopHluorin assay to visualize synaptic vesicle trafficking. We found that N- and C-terminal domains have opposite impact on synaptic vesicle dynamics. Biochemical analysis demonstrated that different proteins are bound at the two extremities, namely β3-Cav2.1 at N-terminus part and β-Actin and Synapsin I at C-terminus domain. A sequence variant (G2385R) harboured within the C-terminal WD40 domain increases the risk for PD. Complementary biochemical and imaging approaches revealed that the G2385R variant alters strength and quality of LRRK2 interactions and increases fusion of synaptic vesicles. Our data suggest that the G2385R variant behaves like a loss-of-function mutation that mimics activity-driven events. Impaired scaffolding capabilities of mutant LRRK2 resulting in perturbed vesicular trafficking may arise as a common pathophysiological denominator through which different LRRK2 pathological mutations cause disease.

  12. Structural insight with mutational impact on tyrosinase and PKC-β interaction from Homo sapiens: Molecular modeling and docking studies for melanogenesis, albinism and increased risk for melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Arundhati; Ray, Sujay

    2016-10-30

    Human tyrosinase, is an important protein for biosynthetic pathway of melanin. It was studied to be phosphorylated and activated by protein kinase-C, β-subunit (PKC-β) through earlier experimentations with in vivo evidences. Documentation documents that mutation in two essentially vital serine residues in C-terminal end of tyrosinase leads to albinism. Due to the deficiency of protective shield like enzyme; melanin, albinos are at an increased peril for melanoma and other skin cancers. So, computational and residue-level insight including a mutational exploration with evolutionary importance into this mechanism lies obligatory for future pathological and therapeutic developments. Therefore, functional tertiary models of the relevant proteins were analyzed after satisfying their stereo-chemical features. Evolutionarily paramount residues for the activation of tyrosinase were perceived via multiple sequence alignment phenomena. Mutant-type tyrosinase protein (S98A and S102A) was thereby modeled, maintaining the wild-type proteins' functionality. Furthermore, this present comparative study discloses the variation in the stable residual participation (for mutant-type and wild-type tyrosinase-PKCβ complex). Mainly, an increased number of polar negatively charged residues from the wild-type tyrosinase participated with PKC-β, predominantly. Fascinatingly supported by evaluation of statistical significances, mutation even led to a destabilizing impact in tyrosinase accompanied by conformational switches with a helix-to-coil transition in the mutated protein. Even the allosteric sites in the protein got poorly hampered upon mutation leading to weaker tendency for binding partners to interact. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Familial Isolated Pituitary Adenomas (FIPA) and the Pituitary Adenoma Predisposition due to Mutations in the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Interacting Protein (AIP) Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, Lauri A.; Daly, Adrian F.

    2013-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas are one of the most frequent intracranial tumors and occur with a prevalence of approximately 1:1000 in the developed world. Pituitary adenomas have a serious disease burden, and their management involves neurosurgery, biological therapies, and radiotherapy. Early diagnosis of pituitary tumors while they are smaller may help increase cure rates. Few genetic predictors of pituitary adenoma development exist. Recent years have seen two separate, complimentary advances in inherited pituitary tumor research. The clinical condition of familial isolated pituitary adenomas (FIPA) has been described, which encompasses the familial occurrence of isolated pituitary adenomas outside of the setting of syndromic conditions like multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and Carney complex. FIPA families comprise approximately 2% of pituitary adenomas and represent a clinical entity with homogeneous or heterogeneous pituitary adenoma types occurring within the same kindred. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene has been identified as causing a pituitary adenoma predisposition of variable penetrance that accounts for 20% of FIPA families. Germline AIP mutations have been shown to associate with the occurrence of large pituitary adenomas that occur at a young age, predominantly in children/adolescents and young adults. AIP mutations are usually associated with somatotropinomas, but prolactinomas, nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas, Cushing disease, and other infrequent clinical adenoma types can also occur. Gigantism is a particular feature of AIP mutations and occurs in more than one third of affected somatotropinoma patients. Study of pituitary adenoma patients with AIP mutations has demonstrated that these cases raise clinical challenges to successful treatment. Extensive research on the biology of AIP and new advances in mouse Aip knockout models demonstrate multiple pathways by which AIP may contribute to tumorigenesis. This review assesses

  14. Loss of ATM kinase activity leads to embryonic lethality in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daniel, J.A.; Pellegrini, M.; Filsuf, D.

    2012-01-01

    whether the functions of ATM are mediated solely by its kinase activity, we generated two mouse models containing single, catalytically inactivating point mutations in Atm. In this paper, we show that, in contrast to Atm-null mice, both D2899A and Q2740P mutations cause early embryonic lethality in mice......, without displaying dominant-negative interfering activity. Using conditional deletion, we find that the D2899A mutation in adult mice behaves largely similar to Atm-null cells but shows greater deficiency in homologous recombination (HR) as measured by hypersensitivity to poly (adenosine diphosphate...

  15. The Mutational Robustness of Influenza A Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Visher

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A virus' mutational robustness is described in terms of the strength and distribution of the mutational fitness effects, or MFE. The distribution of MFE is central to many questions in evolutionary theory and is a key parameter in models of molecular evolution. Here we define the mutational fitness effects in influenza A virus by generating 128 viruses, each with a single nucleotide mutation. In contrast to mutational scanning approaches, this strategy allowed us to unambiguously assign fitness values to individual mutations. The presence of each desired mutation and the absence of additional mutations were verified by next generation sequencing of each stock. A mutation was considered lethal only after we failed to rescue virus in three independent transfections. We measured the fitness of each viable mutant relative to the wild type by quantitative RT-PCR following direct competition on A549 cells. We found that 31.6% of the mutations in the genome-wide dataset were lethal and that the lethal fraction did not differ appreciably between the HA- and NA-encoding segments and the rest of the genome. Of the viable mutants, the fitness mean and standard deviation were 0.80 and 0.22 in the genome-wide dataset and best modeled as a beta distribution. The fitness impact of mutation was marginally lower in the segments coding for HA and NA (0.88 ± 0.16 than in the other 6 segments (0.78 ± 0.24, and their respective beta distributions had slightly different shape parameters. The results for influenza A virus are remarkably similar to our own analysis of CirSeq-derived fitness values from poliovirus and previously published data from other small, single stranded DNA and RNA viruses. These data suggest that genome size, and not nucleic acid type or mode of replication, is the main determinant of viral mutational fitness effects.

  16. "Sickle Cell Anemia: Tracking down a Mutation": An Interactive Learning Laboratory That Communicates Basic Principles of Genetics and Cellular Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, Kevin; Williams, Mary; Horn, Spencer; Radford, David; Wyss, J. Michael

    2016-01-01

    "Sickle cell anemia: tracking down a mutation" is a full-day, inquiry-based, biology experience for high school students enrolled in genetics or advanced biology courses. In the experience, students use restriction endonuclease digestion, cellulose acetate gel electrophoresis, and microscopy to discover which of three putative patients…

  17. Evolutionary invasion and escape in the presence of deleterious mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Loverdo

    Full Text Available Replicators such as parasites invading a new host species, species invading a new ecological niche, or cancer cells invading a new tissue often must mutate to adapt to a new environment. It is often argued that a higher mutation rate will favor evolutionary invasion and escape from extinction. However, most mutations are deleterious, and even lethal. We study the probability that the lineage will survive and invade successfully as a function of the mutation rate when both the initial strain and an adaptive mutant strain are threatened by lethal mutations. We show that mutations are beneficial, i.e. a non-zero mutation rate increases survival compared to the limit of no mutations, if in the no-mutation limit the survival probability of the initial strain is smaller than the average survival probability of the strains which are one mutation away. The mutation rate that maximizes survival depends on the characteristics of both the initial strain and the adaptive mutant, but if one strain is closer to the threshold governing survival then its properties will have greater influence. These conclusions are robust for more realistic or mechanistic depictions of the fitness landscapes such as a more detailed viral life history, or non-lethal deleterious mutations.

  18. Effect of lethal and sub-lethal concentrations of tobacco (Nicotiana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lethal and sub-lethal bioassays on Clarias gariepinus were conducted to evaluate the toxicity of tobacco (Nicotiana tobaccum) leaf dust on weight gain and haematological indices of Clarias gariepinus (mean weight 10.5±0.70g) in glass aquaria with aeration system. The concentrations used during the lethal exposure are: ...

  19. The effect of day-neutral mutations in barley and wheat on the interaction between photoperiod and vernalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Adrian S; Faure, Sébastien; Zhang, Yang; Laurie, David A

    2013-09-01

    Vernalization-2 (Vrn-2) is the major flowering repressor in temperate cereals. It is only expressed under long days in wild-type plants. We used two day-neutral (photoperiod insensitive) mutations that allow rapid flowering in short or long days to investigate the day length control of Vrn-2. The barley (Hordeum vulgare) early maturity8 (eam8) mutation affects the barley ELF3 gene. eam8 mutants disrupt the circadian clock resulting in elevated expression of Ppd-H1 and the floral activator HvFT1 under short or long days. When eam8 was crossed into a genetic background with a vernalization requirement Vrn-2 was expressed under all photoperiods and the early flowering phenotype was partially repressed in unvernalized (UV) plants, likely due to competition between the constitutively active photoperiod pathway and the repressing effect of Vrn-2. We also investigated the wheat (Triticum aestivum) Ppd-D1a mutation. This differs from eam8 in causing elevated levels of Ppd-1 and TaFT1 expression without affecting the circadian clock. We used genotypes that differed in "short-day vernalization". Short days were effective in promoting flowering in individuals wild type at Ppd-D1, but not in individuals that carry the Ppd-D1a mutation. The latter showed Vrn-2 expression in short days. In summary, eam8 and Ppd-D1a mimic long days in terms of photoperiod response, causing Vrn-2 to become aberrantly expressed (in short days). As Ppd-D1a does not affect the circadian clock, this also shows that clock regulation of Vrn-2 operates indirectly through one or more downstream genes, one of which may be Ppd-1.

  20. Annotating novel genes by integrating synthetic lethals and genomic information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faty Mahamadou

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large scale screening for synthetic lethality serves as a common tool in yeast genetics to systematically search for genes that play a role in specific biological processes. Often the amounts of data resulting from a single large scale screen far exceed the capacities of experimental characterization of every identified target. Thus, there is need for computational tools that select promising candidate genes in order to reduce the number of follow-up experiments to a manageable size. Results We analyze synthetic lethality data for arp1 and jnm1, two spindle migration genes, in order to identify novel members in this process. To this end, we use an unsupervised statistical method that integrates additional information from biological data sources, such as gene expression, phenotypic profiling, RNA degradation and sequence similarity. Different from existing methods that require large amounts of synthetic lethal data, our method merely relies on synthetic lethality information from two single screens. Using a Multivariate Gaussian Mixture Model, we determine the best subset of features that assign the target genes to two groups. The approach identifies a small group of genes as candidates involved in spindle migration. Experimental testing confirms the majority of our candidates and we present she1 (YBL031W as a novel gene involved in spindle migration. We applied the statistical methodology also to TOR2 signaling as another example. Conclusion We demonstrate the general use of Multivariate Gaussian Mixture Modeling for selecting candidate genes for experimental characterization from synthetic lethality data sets. For the given example, integration of different data sources contributes to the identification of genetic interaction partners of arp1 and jnm1 that play a role in the same biological process.

  1. Lethal and mutagenic effects of ion beams and γ-rays in Aspergillus oryzae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyoshima, Yoshiyuki; Takahashi, Akemi; Tanaka, Hisaki; Watanabe, Jun; Mogi, Yoshinobu; Yamazaki, Tatsuo; Hamada, Ryoko; Iwashita, Kazuhiro; Satoh, Katsuya; Narumi, Issay

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We investigated the effects of different LET radiation in A. oryzae. ► Both γ-rays and ion beams induced base substitutions, frameshifts, deletions. ► Both γ-rays and ion beams induced genome-wide large-scale mutations in A. oryzae. ► Some differences in the types and frequencies of mutations were found. ► Our results provide new basic insights into the mutation breeding of A. oryzae. - Abstract: Aspergillus oryzae is a fungus that is used widely in traditional Japanese fermentation industries. In this study, the lethal and mutagenic effects of different linear energy transfer (LET) radiation in freeze-dried conidia of A. oryzae were investigated. The lethal effect, which was evaluated by a 90% lethal dose, was dependent on the LET value of the ionizing radiation. The most lethal ionizing radiation among that tested was 12 C 5+ ion beams with an LET of 121 keV/μm. The 12 C 5+ ion beams had a 3.6-times higher lethal effect than low-LET (0.2 keV/μm) γ-rays. The mutagenic effect was evaluated by the frequency of selenate resistant mutants. 12 C 6+ ion beams with an LET of 86 keV/μm were the most effective in inducing selenate resistance. The mutant frequency following exposure to 12 C 6+ ion beams increased with an increase in dose and reached 3.47 × 10 −3 at 700 Gy. In the dose range from 0 to 700 Gy, 12 C 5+ ion beams were the second most effective in inducing selenate resistance, the mutant frequency of which reached a maximum peak (1.67 × 10 −3 ) at 400 Gy. To elucidate the characteristics of mutation induced by ionizing radiation, mutations in the sulphate permease gene (sB) and ATP sulfurylase gene (sC) loci, the loss of function of which results in a selenate resistant phenotype, were compared between 12 C 5+ ion beams and γ-rays. We detected all types of transversions and transitions. For frameshifts, the frequency of a +1 frameshift was the highest in all cases. Although the incidence of deletions >2 bp was generally low

  2. The Role of Tumor Protein 53 Mutations in Common Human Cancers and Targeting the Murine Double Minute 2–P53 Interaction for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayebeh Hamzehloie

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The gene TP53 (also known as protein 53 or tumor protein 53, encoding transcription factor P53, is mutated or deleted in half of human cancers, demonstrating the crucial role of P53 in tumor suppression. There are reports of nearly 250 independent germ line TP53 mutations in over 100 publications. The P53 protein has the structure of a transcription factor and, is made up of several domains. The main function of P53 is to organize cell defense against cancerous transformation. P53 is a potent transcription factor that is activated in response to diverse stresses, leading to the induction of cell cycle arrest, apoptosis or senescence. The P53 tumor suppressor is negatively regulated in cells by the murine double minute 2 (MDM2 protein. Murine double minute 2 favors its nuclear export, and stimulates its degradation. Inhibitors of the P53-MDM2 interaction might be attractive new anticancer agents that could be used to activate wild-type P53 in tumors. Down regulation of MDM2 using an small interfering RNA (siRNA approach has recently provided evidence for a new role of MDM2 in the P53 response, by modulating the inhibition of the cyclin dependent kinase 2 (cdk2 by P21/WAF1 (also known as cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1 or CDK-interacting protein 1.

  3. Factors influencing circadian rhythms in acetaminophen lethality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, R C; Bozigian, H P; Davies, M H; Merrick, B A; Park, K S; McMillan, D A

    1984-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to examine the effects of changes in lighting schedules and food consumption on circadian rhythms in acetaminophen lethality and hepatic glutathione levels in male mice. Under a normal lighting schedule (light: 06.00-18.00 h), male mice exhibited a circadian rhythm in acetaminophen lethality (peak: 18.00 h; nadir: 06.00, 10.00 h) and an inverse rhythm in hepatic glutathione concentrations (peak: 06.00, 10.00 h; nadir: 18.00 h). Under a reversed lighting schedule (light: 18.00-06.00 h) the glutathione rhythm was reversed and the rhythm in acetaminophen lethality was altered showing greater sensitivity to the drug. Under continuous light, there was a shift in the acetaminophen lethality and the hepatic glutathione rhythms. Under continuous dark, both rhythms were abolished. Under a normal lighting regimen, hepatic glutathione levels were closely correlated with food consumption; i.e., both were increased during the dark phase and decreased during the light phase. Fasting the mice for 12 h abolished the rhythms in acetaminophen lethality and hepatic glutathione levels; moreover, the lethality was increased and the hepatic glutathione levels were decreased. These experiments show that both lighting schedules and feeding can alter the circadian rhythms in acetaminophen lethality and hepatic glutathione levels in male mice.

  4. Precise estimates of mutation rate and spectrum in yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuan O.; Siegal, Mark L.; Hall, David W.; Petrov, Dmitri A.

    2014-01-01

    Mutation is the ultimate source of genetic variation. The most direct and unbiased method of studying spontaneous mutations is via mutation accumulation (MA) lines. Until recently, MA experiments were limited by the cost of sequencing and thus provided us with small numbers of mutational events and therefore imprecise estimates of rates and patterns of mutation. We used whole-genome sequencing to identify nearly 1,000 spontaneous mutation events accumulated over ∼311,000 generations in 145 diploid MA lines of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. MA experiments are usually assumed to have negligible levels of selection, but even mild selection will remove strongly deleterious events. We take advantage of such patterns of selection and show that mutation classes such as indels and aneuploidies (especially monosomies) are proportionately much more likely to contribute mutations of large effect. We also provide conservative estimates of indel, aneuploidy, environment-dependent dominant lethal, and recessive lethal mutation rates. To our knowledge, for the first time in yeast MA data, we identified a sufficiently large number of single-nucleotide mutations to measure context-dependent mutation rates and were able to (i) confirm strong AT bias of mutation in yeast driven by high rate of mutations from C/G to T/A and (ii) detect a higher rate of mutation at C/G nucleotides in two specific contexts consistent with cytosine methylation in S. cerevisiae. PMID:24847077

  5. Site-directed mutational analysis of structural interactions of low molecule compounds binding to the N-terminal 8 kDa domain of DNA polymerase β

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Shizuka; Kamisuki, Shinji; Takata, Kei-ichi; Kasai, Nobuyuki; Kimura, Seisuke; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki; Ohta, Keisuke; Sugawara, Fumio; Sakaguchi, Kengo

    2006-01-01

    We previously reported the mode of inhibition of DNA polymerase β (pol. β) by long chain fatty acids and a bile acid, involving binding analyses to the N-terminal 8-kDa DNA binding domain. Here we describe a site-directed mutational analysis in which the key amino acids (L11, K35, H51, K60, L77, and T79), which are direct interaction sites in the domain, were substituted with K, A, A, A, K, and A, respectively. And their pol. β interactions with a C24-long chain fatty acid, nervonic acid (NA), and a bile acid, lithocholic acid (LCA), were investigated by gel mobility shift assay and NMR spectroscopy. In the case of K35A, there was complete loss of DNA binding activity while K60A hardly has any activity. In contrast the other mutations had no appreciable effects. Thus, K35 and K60 are key amino acid sites for binding to template DNA. The DNA binding activities of L11K, H51A, and T79A as well as the wild type were inhibited by NA to the same extent. T79A demonstrated a disturbed interaction with LCA. 1 H- 15 N HSQC NMR analysis indicated that despite their many similarities, the wild-type and the mutant proteins displayed some significant chemical shift differences. Not only were the substituted amino acid residues three-dimensionally shifted, but some amino acids which are positioned far distant from the key amino acids showed a shift. These results suggest that the interaction surface was significantly distorted with the result that LCA could not bind to the domain. These findings confirm our previous biochemical and 3D structural proposals concerning inhibition by NA and LCA

  6. Human cooperation by lethal group competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egas, Martijn; Kats, Ralph; van der Sar, Xander; Reuben, Ernesto; Sabelis, Maurice W

    2013-01-01

    Why humans are prone to cooperate puzzles biologists, psychologists and economists alike. Between-group conflict has been hypothesized to drive within-group cooperation. However, such conflicts did not have lasting effects in laboratory experiments, because they were about luxury goods, not needed for survival ("looting"). Here, we find within-group cooperation to last when between-group conflict is implemented as "all-out war" (eliminating the weakest groups). Human subjects invested in helping group members to avoid having the lowest collective pay-off, whereas they failed to cooperate in control treatments with random group elimination or with no subdivision in groups. When the game was repeated, experience was found to promote helping. Thus, not within-group interactions alone, not random group elimination, but pay-off-dependent group elimination was found to drive within-group cooperation in our experiment. We suggest that some forms of human cooperation are maintained by multi-level selection: reciprocity within groups and lethal competition among groups acting together.

  7. "Sickle cell anemia: tracking down a mutation": an interactive learning laboratory that communicates basic principles of genetics and cellular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, Kevin; Williams, Mary; Horn, Spencer; Radford, David; Wyss, J Michael

    2016-03-01

    "Sickle cell anemia: tracking down a mutation" is a full-day, inquiry-based, biology experience for high school students enrolled in genetics or advanced biology courses. In the experience, students use restriction endonuclease digestion, cellulose acetate gel electrophoresis, and microscopy to discover which of three putative patients have the sickle cell genotype/phenotype using DNA and blood samples from wild-type and transgenic mice that carry a sickle cell mutation. The inquiry-based, problem-solving approach facilitates the students' understanding of the basic concepts of genetics and cellular and molecular biology and provides experience with contemporary tools of biotechnology. It also leads to students' appreciation of the causes and consequences of this genetic disease, which is relatively common in individuals of African descent, and increases their understanding of the first principles of genetics. This protocol provides optimal learning when led by well-trained facilitators (including the classroom teacher) and carried out in small groups (6:1 student-to-teacher ratio). This high-quality experience can be offered to a large number of students at a relatively low cost, and it is especially effective in collaboration with a local science museum and/or university. Over the past 15 yr, >12,000 students have completed this inquiry-based learning experience and demonstrated a consistent, substantial increase in their understanding of the disease and genetics in general. Copyright © 2016 The American Physiological Society.

  8. Suppression and synthetic-lethal genetic relationships of gpsB mutations indicate that GpsB mediates protein phosphorylation and penicillin-binding protein interactions in Streptococcus pneumoniae D39

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rued, B.E.; Zheng, J.J.; Mura, Andrea; Tsui, H.C.T.; Boersma, M.J.; Mazny, J.L.; Corona, F.; Perez, A.J.; Fadda, D.; Doubravová, Linda; Buriánková, Karolína; Branny, Pavel; Massida, O.; Winkler, M.E.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 103, č. 6 (2017), s. 931-957 ISSN 0950-382X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP302/12/0256; GA ČR GAP207/12/1568 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : BACILLUS-SUBTILIS DIVISOME * D- AMINO ACIDS * CELL-DIVISION Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 3.898, year: 2016

  9. Transporting Patients with Lethal Contagious Infections

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Swartz, Colleen

    2002-01-01

    .... The AIT is a unique military medical team capable of worldwide air evacuation and management of a limited number of patients who are potentially exposed to known and unknown lethal communicable...

  10. Experimental Determination and Prediction of the Fitness Effects of Random Point Mutations in the Biosynthetic Enzyme HisA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, Erik; Tang, Po-Cheng; Guy, Lionel; Näsvall, Joakim; Andersson, Dan I

    2018-01-01

    Abstract The distribution of fitness effects of mutations is a factor of fundamental importance in evolutionary biology. We determined the distribution of fitness effects of 510 mutants that each carried between 1 and 10 mutations (synonymous and nonsynonymous) in the hisA gene, encoding an essential enzyme in the l-histidine biosynthesis pathway of Salmonella enterica. For the full set of mutants, the distribution was bimodal with many apparently neutral mutations and many lethal mutations. For a subset of 81 single, nonsynonymous mutants most mutations appeared neutral at high expression levels, whereas at low expression levels only a few mutations were neutral. Furthermore, we examined how the magnitude of the observed fitness effects was correlated to several measures of biophysical properties and phylogenetic conservation.We conclude that for HisA: (i) The effect of mutations can be masked by high expression levels, such that mutations that are deleterious to the function of the protein can still be neutral with regard to organism fitness if the protein is expressed at a sufficiently high level; (ii) the shape of the fitness distribution is dependent on the extent to which the protein is rate-limiting for growth; (iii) negative epistatic interactions, on an average, amplified the combined effect of nonsynonymous mutations; and (iv) no single sequence-based predictor could confidently predict the fitness effects of mutations in HisA, but a combination of multiple predictors could predict the effect with a SD of 0.04 resulting in 80% of the mutations predicted within 12% of their observed selection coefficients. PMID:29294020

  11. Experiences in therapy for lethal midline granuloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosaka, Kaoru; Ishikawa, Takeru

    1982-01-01

    Four cases of the lethal midline granuloma or malignant granuloma of the nose were treated by irradiation and chemotherapy, which are generally prescribed for malignant lymphomas. Clinical, histological and laboratory examination indicated that they were the lethal midline granuloma and clearly differentiated from Wegener's granulomatosis or malignant lymphoma. All of the cases exhibited primary remission. The four cases were observed up to 38, 22, 14, and 10 months since the beginning of the therapy, showing no local or general recurrence. (author)

  12. Comparative study of different sexis mutability: recessive sex-linked and dominant lethals in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatti, K.V.; Dzhaparidze, L.A.; Mamon, L.A.

    1980-01-01

    The frequency of recessive sex-linked lethal mutations (RSLLM) and those realizing in embryogenesis of dominant lethals, which form in oo- and spermatogenesis of Drosophila and fly productivity under the effect of X-rays and N-nitroso-N methylourea (NMU), is studied. In the case of effect of both mutagens RSLLM form in spermatocytes with higher frequency as compared with oocytes. Dominant lethal mutations (DLM) during irradiation are also often registered in spermatocytes. NMU induces DLM in mitotic male cells with a very high frequency but is not effective during the effect on oocytes. When both mutagens affect males and X-rays affect females, the decrease of productivity is mainly conditioned by DLM. As NMU does not induce DLM in females realizing in embryogenesis but reduces productivity, a later lethal realization connected with their different nature is supposed. Differences in mole and female mutability found in the course of X-ray and NMU effect are discussed in connection with peculiarities of their mitotic cells and the nature of effect of mutagens applied [ru

  13. Radiation-induced mutagenicity and lethality in Salmonella typhimurium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isildar, M.; Bakale, G.

    1983-01-01

    The mutagenic and lethal effects of ionizing radiation on histidine-deficient auxotrophs of Salmonella typhimurium were studied to improve the understanding of radiation damage to DNA. The auxotrophs were divided into two groups - one which is sensitive to base-pair substitutions and another sensitive to frameshifts. These groups were composed of parent-daughter pairs in which the chemical mutagenicity enhancing plasmid, pKM101, is absent in the parent strain and present in the daughter. Co-60 #betta#-radiation and 250 kV x-rays were used to irradiate the bacteria. Irradiation of the frameshift - sensitive strains which carry the pKm101 plasmid doubled the absolute number of induced revertants whereas irradiation of the base-pair substitution sensitive strain which also carries the pKm101 plasmid produced nearly no change in the number of induced revertants. A nearly negligible effect on the mutation rate was observed for all parent strains

  14. The rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism mutation D923N of the Na+, K+-ATPase alpha3 isoform disrupts Na+ interaction at the third Na+ site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einholm, Anja Pernille; Toustrup-Jensen, Mads S; Holm, Rikke; Andersen, Jens Peter; Vilsen, Bente

    2010-08-20

    Rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism (RDP), a rare neurological disorder, is caused by mutation of the neuron-specific alpha3-isoform of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase. Here, we present the functional consequences of RDP mutation D923N. Relative to the wild type, the mutant exhibits a remarkable approximately 200-fold reduction of Na(+) affinity for activation of phosphorylation from ATP, reflecting a defective interaction of the E(1) form with intracellular Na(+). This is the largest effect on Na(+) affinity reported so far for any Na(+), K(+)-ATPase mutant. D923N also affects the interaction with extracellular Na(+) normally driving the E(1)P to E(2)P conformational transition backward. However, no impairment of K(+) binding was observed for D923N, leading to the conclusion that Asp(923) is specifically associated with the third Na(+) site that is selective toward Na(+). The crystal structure of the Na(+), K(+)-ATPase in E(2) form shows that Asp(923) is located in the cytoplasmic half of transmembrane helix M8 inside a putative transport channel, which is lined by residues from the transmembrane helices M5, M7, M8, and M10 and capped by the C terminus, recently found involved in recognition of the third Na(+) ion. Structural modeling of the E(1) form of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase based on the Ca(2+)-ATPase crystal structure is consistent with the hypothesis that Asp(923) contributes to a site binding the third Na(+) ion. These results in conjunction with our previous findings with other RDP mutants suggest that a selective defect in the handling of Na(+) may be a general feature of the RDP disorder.

  15. A common mutation in the 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene affects genomic DNA methylation through an interaction with folate status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friso, Simonetta; Choi, Sang-Woon; Girelli, Domenico; Mason, Joel B.; Dolnikowski, Gregory G.; Bagley, Pamela J.; Olivieri, Oliviero; Jacques, Paul F.; Rosenberg, Irwin H.; Corrocher, Roberto; Selhub, Jacob

    2002-01-01

    DNA methylation, an essential epigenetic feature of DNA that modulates gene expression and genomic integrity, is catalyzed by methyltransferases that use the universal methyl donor S-adenosyl-l-methionine. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) catalyzes the synthesis of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-methylTHF), the methyl donor for synthesis of methionine from homocysteine and precursor of S-adenosyl-l-methionine. In the present study we sought to determine the effect of folate status on genomic DNA methylation with an emphasis on the interaction with the common C677T mutation in the MTHFR gene. A liquid chromatography/MS method for the analysis of nucleotide bases was used to assess genomic DNA methylation in peripheral blood mononuclear cell DNA from 105 subjects homozygous for this mutation (T/T) and 187 homozygous for the wild-type (C/C) MTHFR genotype. The results show that genomic DNA methylation directly correlates with folate status and inversely with plasma homocysteine (tHcy) levels (P < 0.01). T/T genotypes had a diminished level of DNA methylation compared with those with the C/C wild-type (32.23 vs.62.24 ng 5-methylcytosine/μg DNA, P < 0.0001). When analyzed according to folate status, however, only the T/T subjects with low levels of folate accounted for the diminished DNA methylation (P < 0.0001). Moreover, in T/T subjects DNA methylation status correlated with the methylated proportion of red blood cell folate and was inversely related to the formylated proportion of red blood cell folates (P < 0.03) that is known to be solely represented in those individuals. These results indicate that the MTHFR C677T polymorphism influences DNA methylation status through an interaction with folate status. PMID:11929966

  16. Mutations Abrogating VP35 Interaction with Double-Stranded RNA Render Ebola Virus Avirulent in Guinea Pigs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prins, Kathleen C.; Delpeut, Sebastien; Leung, Daisy W.; Reynard, Olivier; Volchkova, Valentina A.; Reid, St. Patrick; Ramanan, Parameshwaran; Cárdenas, Washington B.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K.; Volchkov, Viktor E.; Basler, Christopher F. (CNRS-INSERM); (Mount Sinai Hospital); (LB-Ecuador); (Iowa State)

    2010-10-11

    Ebola virus (EBOV) protein VP35 is a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) binding inhibitor of host interferon (IFN)-{alpha}/{beta} responses that also functions as a viral polymerase cofactor. Recent structural studies identified key features, including a central basic patch, required for VP35 dsRNA binding activity. To address the functional significance of these VP35 structural features for EBOV replication and pathogenesis, two point mutations, K319A/R322A, that abrogate VP35 dsRNA binding activity and severely impair its suppression of IFN-{alpha}/{beta} production were identified. Solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography reveal minimal structural perturbations in the K319A/R322A VP35 double mutant and suggest that loss of basic charge leads to altered function. Recombinant EBOVs encoding the mutant VP35 exhibit, relative to wild-type VP35 viruses, minimal growth attenuation in IFN-defective Vero cells but severe impairment in IFN-competent cells. In guinea pigs, the VP35 mutant virus revealed a complete loss of virulence. Strikingly, the VP35 mutant virus effectively immunized animals against subsequent wild-type EBOV challenge. These in vivo studies, using recombinant EBOV viruses, combined with the accompanying biochemical and structural analyses directly correlate VP35 dsRNA binding and IFN inhibition functions with viral pathogenesis. Moreover, these studies provide a framework for the development of antivirals targeting this critical EBOV virulence factor.

  17. Sigma virus and mutation in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paquin, S.L.A.

    1977-01-01

    - The objectives of these experiments have been (1) to verify and evidence more fully the action of sigma in causing recessive lethal mutation on the X chromosome of Drosophila, both in the male and the female germ line; (2) to extend the study of sigma-induced recessive lethal mutation to the Drosophila autosomes; (3) to explore the possibility that this mutagenesis is site-directed; (4) to study the effects of sigma virus in conjunction with radiation in increasing non-disjunction and dominant lethality. The virus increases the rate of radiation-induced nondisjunction by altering meiotic chromosomal behavior. Percentage of non-disjunction with 500 rads of x-rays in the virus-free flies was 0.176, while in sigma-containing lines it was 0.333. With high doses of either x or neutron radiation, the presence of the virus enhances the frequency of dominant lethality. The difference is especially significant with the fast neutrons. The results indicate that sigma, and presumably other viruses, are indeed environmental mutagens and are, therefore, factors in the rate of background or spontaneous mutation

  18. Lethality Index 2008-2014: Less shootings, same lethality, more opacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Silva Forné

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This article evaluates the use of lethal force by Mexican federal security forces during shootings with presumed members of organized crime from 2008-2014. The authors use official data and press reports on deaths and wounded in shootings to construct indicators such as the number of dead civilians over the number of dead officials from the federal security forces and the number of dead civilians over the number of wounded civilians. In a context where certain factors that contribute to an excessive use of force become more common, the results of the study show a growing use of lethal force. This raises questions over the possible excessive use of lethal force as a normal or systematic practice. The study also shows a growing context of opacity in the information available to evaluate the use of lethal force and the general lack of a legal framework to regulate the use of lethal force in Mexico.

  19. A family of oculofaciocardiodental syndrome (OFCD) with a novel BCOR mutation and genomic rearrangements involving NHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Yukiko; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Miyamoto, Toshinobu; Nishiyama, Kiyomi; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Doi, Hiroshi; Miyake, Noriko; Ryoo, Na-Kyung; Kim, Jeong Hun; Yu, Young Suk; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2012-03-01

    Oculofaciocardiodental syndrome (OFCD) is an X-linked dominant disorder associated with male lethality, presenting with congenital cataract, dysmorphic face, dental abnormalities and septal heart defects. Mutations in BCOR (encoding BCL-6-interacting corepressor) cause OFCD. Here, we report on a Korean family with common features of OFCD including bilateral 2nd-3rd toe syndactyly and septal heart defects in three affected females (mother and two daughters). Through the mutation screening and copy number analysis using genomic microarray, we identified a novel heterozygous mutation, c.888delG, in the BCOR gene and two interstitial microduplications at Xp22.2-22.13 and Xp21.3 in all the three affected females. The BCOR mutation may lead to a premature stop codon (p.N297IfsX80). The duplication at Xp22.2-22.13 involved the NHS gene causative for Nance-Horan syndrome, which is an X-linked disorder showing similar clinical features with OFCD in affected males, and in carrier females with milder presentation. Considering the presence of bilateral 2nd-3rd toe syndactyly and septal heart defects, which is unique to OFCD, the mutation in BCOR is likely to be the major determinant for the phenotypes in this family.

  20. Lethal and mutagenic effects of ion beams and γ-rays in Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoshima, Yoshiyuki; Takahashi, Akemi; Tanaka, Hisaki; Watanabe, Jun; Mogi, Yoshinobu; Yamazaki, Tatsuo; Hamada, Ryoko; Iwashita, Kazuhiro; Satoh, Katsuya; Narumi, Issay

    2012-12-01

    Aspergillus oryzae is a fungus that is used widely in traditional Japanese fermentation industries. In this study, the lethal and mutagenic effects of different linear energy transfer (LET) radiation in freeze-dried conidia of A. oryzae were investigated. The lethal effect, which was evaluated by a 90% lethal dose, was dependent on the LET value of the ionizing radiation. The most lethal ionizing radiation among that tested was (12)C(5+) ion beams with an LET of 121keV/μm. The (12)C(5+) ion beams had a 3.6-times higher lethal effect than low-LET (0.2keV/μm) γ-rays. The mutagenic effect was evaluated by the frequency of selenate resistant mutants. (12)C(6+) ion beams with an LET of 86keV/μm were the most effective in inducing selenate resistance. The mutant frequency following exposure to (12)C(6+) ion beams increased with an increase in dose and reached 3.47×10(-3) at 700Gy. In the dose range from 0 to 700Gy, (12)C(5+) ion beams were the second most effective in inducing selenate resistance, the mutant frequency of which reached a maximum peak (1.67×10(-3)) at 400Gy. To elucidate the characteristics of mutation induced by ionizing radiation, mutations in the sulphate permease gene (sB) and ATP sulfurylase gene (sC) loci, the loss of function of which results in a selenate resistant phenotype, were compared between (12)C(5+) ion beams and γ-rays. We detected all types of transversions and transitions. For frameshifts, the frequency of a +1 frameshift was the highest in all cases. Although the incidence of deletions >2bp was generally low, deletions >20bp were characteristic for (12)C(5+) ion beams. γ-rays had a tendency to generate mutants carrying a multitude of mutations in the same locus. Both forms of radiation also induced genome-wide large-scale mutations including chromosome rearrangements and large deletions. These results provide new basic insights into the mutation breeding of A. oryzae using ionizing radiation. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published

  1. Inactivation and mutation induction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae exposed to simulated sunlight: evaluation of action spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk-Meuser, K; Pawlowsky, K; Kiefer, J

    1992-07-15

    The effectiveness of polychromatic light irradiation was investigated for haploid yeast cells. Inactivation and mutation induction were measured in both a RAD-wildtype strain and an excision-repair defective strain. The behaviour of vegetative "wet" cells was compared to that of dehydrated cells. The aim of the study was to assess the interaction of UVC with other wavelengths in cells of different states of humidity. The irradiation procedure was therefore carried out using a solar simulator either with full spectrum or with a UVC-blocking filter (modified sunlight) added. The results were analysed on the basis of separately determined action spectra. The summation of the efficiency of individual wavelengths was compared to the values obtained from polychromatic irradiation. It is shown that the effects caused by the whole-spectrum irradiation in wet cells can be predicted sufficiently from the calculation, while dried wildtype cells exhibit higher mutation rates. Thus it can be assumed that drying-specific damage leads to lethal and mutagenic lesions which are processed in different ways, causing a synergistic behaviour in mutation induction. Irradiation of vegetative cells with modified sunlight (UVC-) results in less inactivation and lower mutation rates than were calculated. From these results it can be concluded that this antagonistic behaviour is caused by the interaction of near-UV photoproducts.

  2. Mutational analysis of affinity and selectivity of kringle-tetranectin interaction. Grafting novel kringle affinity ontp the trtranectin lectin scaffold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graversen, Jonas Heilskov; Jacobsen, C; Sigurskjold, B W

    2000-01-01

    -type lectin-like domain of tetranectin, involving Lys-148, Glu-150, and Asp-165, which mediates calcium-sensitive binding to plasminogen kringle 4. Here, we investigate the effect of conservative substitutions of these and a neighboring amino acid residue. Substitution of Thr-149 in tetranectin...... with a tyrosine residue considerably increases the affinity for plasminogen kringle 4, and, in addition, confers affinity for plasminogen kringle 2. As shown by isothermal titration calorimetry analysis, this new interaction is stronger than the binding of wild-type tetranectin to plasminogen kringle 4...

  3. Characterization of two second-site mutations preventing wild type protein aggregation caused by a dominant negative PMA1 mutant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Eraso

    Full Text Available The correct biogenesis and localization of Pma1 at the plasma membrane is essential for yeast growth. A subset of PMA1 mutations behave as dominant negative because they produce aberrantly folded proteins that form protein aggregates, which in turn provoke the aggregation of the wild type protein. One approach to understand this dominant negative effect is to identify second-site mutations able to suppress the dominant lethal phenotype caused by those mutant alleles. We isolated and characterized two intragenic second-site suppressors of the PMA1-D378T dominant negative mutation. We present here the analysis of these new mutations that are located along the amino-terminal half of the protein and include a missense mutation, L151F, and an in-frame 12bp deletion that eliminates four residues from Cys409 to Ala412. The results show that the suppressor mutations disrupt the interaction between the mutant and wild type enzymes, and this enables the wild type Pma1 to reach the plasma membrane.

  4. Characterization of Ofloxacin Interaction with Mutated (A91V) Quinolone Resistance Determining Region of DNA Gyrase in Mycobacterium Leprae through Computational Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisha, J; Shanthi, V

    2018-06-01

    Mycobacterium leprae, the causal agent of leprosy is non-cultivable in vitro. Thus, the assessment of antibiotic activity against Mycobacterium leprae depends primarily upon the time-consuming mouse footpad system. The GyrA protein of Mycobacterium leprae is the target of the antimycobacterial drug, Ofloxacin. In recent times, the GyrA mutation (A91V) has been found to be resistant to Ofloxacin. This phenomenon has necessitated the development of new, long-acting antimycobacterial compounds. The underlying mechanism of drug resistance is not completely known. Currently, experimentally crystallized GyrA-DNA-OFLX models are not available for highlighting the binding and mechanism of Ofloxacin resistance. Hence, we employed computational approaches to characterize the Ofloxacin interaction with both the native and mutant forms of GyrA complexed with DNA. Binding energy measurements obtained from molecular docking studies highlights hydrogen bond-mediated efficient binding of Ofloxacin to Asp47 in the native GyrA-DNA complex in comparison with that of the mutant GyrA-DNA complex. Further, molecular dynamics studies highlighted the stable binding of Ofloxacin with native GyrA-DNA complex than with the mutant GyrA-DNA complex. This mechanism provided a plausible reason for the reported, reduced effect of Ofloxacin to control leprosy in individuals with the A91V mutation. Our report is the first of its kind wherein the basis for the Ofloxacin drug resistance mechanism has been explored with the help of ternary Mycobacterium leprae complex, GyrA-DNA-OFLX. These structural insights will provide useful information for designing new drugs to target the Ofloxacin-resistant DNA gyrase.

  5. Contribution of the C-terminal region within the catalytic core domain of HIV-1 integrase to yeast lethality, chromatin binding and viral replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belhumeur Pierre

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 integrase (IN is a key viral enzymatic molecule required for the integration of the viral cDNA into the genome. Additionally, HIV-1 IN has been shown to play important roles in several other steps during the viral life cycle, including reverse transcription, nuclear import and chromatin targeting. Interestingly, previous studies have demonstrated that the expression of HIV-1 IN induces the lethal phenotype in some strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, we performed mutagenic analyses of the C-terminal region of the catalytic core domain of HIV-1 IN in order to delineate the critical amino acid(s and/or motif(s required for the induction of the lethal phenotype in the yeast strain HP16, and to further elucidate the molecular mechanism which causes this phenotype. Results Our study identified three HIV-1 IN mutants, V165A, A179P and KR186,7AA, located in the C-terminal region of the catalytic core domain of IN that do not induce the lethal phenotype in yeast. Chromatin binding assays in yeast and mammalian cells demonstrated that these IN mutants were impaired for the ability to bind chromatin. Additionally, we determined that while these IN mutants failed to interact with LEDGF/p75, they retained the ability to bind Integrase interactor 1. Furthermore, we observed that VSV-G-pseudotyped HIV-1 containing these IN mutants was unable to replicate in the C8166 T cell line and this defect was partially rescued by complementation with the catalytically inactive D64E IN mutant. Conclusion Overall, this study demonstrates that three mutations located in the C-terminal region of the catalytic core domain of HIV-1 IN inhibit the IN-induced lethal phenotype in yeast by inhibiting the binding of IN to the host chromatin. These results demonstrate that the C-terminal region of the catalytic core domain of HIV-1 IN is important for binding to host chromatin and is crucial for both viral replication and the promotion of

  6. Loss of ATM kinase activity leads to embryonic lethality in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Jeremy A; Pellegrini, Manuela; Lee, Baeck-Seung; Guo, Zhi; Filsuf, Darius; Belkina, Natalya V; You, Zhongsheng; Paull, Tanya T; Sleckman, Barry P; Feigenbaum, Lionel; Nussenzweig, André

    2012-08-06

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) mutated (ATM) is a key deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage signaling kinase that regulates DNA repair, cell cycle checkpoints, and apoptosis. The majority of patients with A-T, a cancer-prone neurodegenerative disease, present with null mutations in Atm. To determine whether the functions of ATM are mediated solely by its kinase activity, we generated two mouse models containing single, catalytically inactivating point mutations in Atm. In this paper, we show that, in contrast to Atm-null mice, both D2899A and Q2740P mutations cause early embryonic lethality in mice, without displaying dominant-negative interfering activity. Using conditional deletion, we find that the D2899A mutation in adult mice behaves largely similar to Atm-null cells but shows greater deficiency in homologous recombination (HR) as measured by hypersensitivity to poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase inhibition and increased genomic instability. These results may explain why missense mutations with no detectable kinase activity are rarely found in patients with classical A-T. We propose that ATM kinase-inactive missense mutations, unless otherwise compensated for, interfere with HR during embryogenesis.

  7. Inactivation of CDK2 is synthetically lethal to MYCN over-expressing cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar, Jan J.; Ebus, Marli E.; Geerts, Dirk; Koster, Jan; Lamers, Fieke; Valentijn, Linda J.; Westerhout, Ellen M.; Versteeg, Rogier; Caron, Huib N.

    2009-01-01

    Two genes have a synthetically lethal relationship when the silencing or inhibiting of 1 gene is only lethal in the context of a mutation or activation of the second gene. This situation offers an attractive therapeutic strategy, as inhibition of such a gene will only trigger cell death in tumor cells with an activated second oncogene but spare normal cells without activation of the second oncogene. Here we present evidence that CDK2 is synthetically lethal to neuroblastoma cells with MYCN amplification and over-expression. Neuroblastomas are childhood tumors with an often lethal outcome. Twenty percent of the tumors have MYCN amplification, and these tumors are ultimately refractory to any therapy. Targeted silencing of CDK2 by 3 RNA interference techniques induced apoptosis in MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma cell lines, but not in MYCN single copy cells. Silencing of MYCN abrogated this apoptotic response in MYCN-amplified cells. Inversely, silencing of CDK2 in MYCN single copy cells did not trigger apoptosis, unless a MYCN transgene was activated. The MYCN induced apoptosis after CDK2 silencing was accompanied by nuclear stabilization of P53, and mRNA profiling showed up-regulation of P53 target genes. Silencing of P53 rescued the cells from MYCN-driven apoptosis. The synthetic lethality of CDK2 silencing in MYCN activated neuroblastoma cells can also be triggered by inhibition of CDK2 with a small molecule drug. Treatment of neuroblastoma cells with roscovitine, a CDK inhibitor, at clinically achievable concentrations induced MYCN-dependent apoptosis. The synthetically lethal relationship between CDK2 and MYCN indicates CDK2 inhibitors as potential MYCN-selective cancer therapeutics. PMID:19525400

  8. The phosphomimetic mutation of syndecan-4 binds and inhibits Tiam1 modulating Rac1 activity in PDZ interaction-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniko Keller-Pinter

    Full Text Available The small GTPases of the Rho family comprising RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 function as molecular switches controlling several essential biochemical pathways in eukaryotic cells. Their activity is cycling between an active GTP-bound and an inactive GDP-bound conformation. The exchange of GDP to GTP is catalyzed by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs. Here we report a novel regulatory mechanism of Rac1 activity, which is controlled by a phosphomimetic (Ser179Glu mutant of syndecan-4 (SDC4. SDC4 is a ubiquitously expressed transmembrane, heparan sulfate proteoglycan. In this study we show that the Ser179Glu mutant binds strongly Tiam1, a Rac1-GEF reducing Rac1-GTP by 3-fold in MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cells. Mutational analysis unravels the PDZ interaction between SDC4 and Tiam1 is indispensable for the suppression of the Rac1 activity. Neither of the SDC4 interactions is effective alone to block the Rac1 activity, on the contrary, lack of either of interactions can increase the activity of Rac1, therefore the Rac1 activity is the resultant of the inhibitory and stimulatory effects. In addition, SDC4 can bind and tether RhoGDI1 (GDP-dissociation inhibitor 1 to the membrane. Expression of the phosphomimetic SDC4 results in the accumulation of the Rac1-RhoGDI1 complex. Co-immunoprecipitation assays (co-IP-s reveal that SDC4 can form complexes with RhoGDI1. Together, the regulation of the basal activity of Rac1 is fine tuned and SDC4 is implicated in multiple ways.

  9. The phosphomimetic mutation of syndecan-4 binds and inhibits Tiam1 modulating Rac1 activity in PDZ interaction-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller-Pinter, Aniko; Ughy, Bettina; Domoki, Monika; Pettko-Szandtner, Aladar; Letoha, Tamas; Tovari, Jozsef; Timar, Jozsef; Szilak, Laszlo

    2017-01-01

    The small GTPases of the Rho family comprising RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 function as molecular switches controlling several essential biochemical pathways in eukaryotic cells. Their activity is cycling between an active GTP-bound and an inactive GDP-bound conformation. The exchange of GDP to GTP is catalyzed by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Here we report a novel regulatory mechanism of Rac1 activity, which is controlled by a phosphomimetic (Ser179Glu) mutant of syndecan-4 (SDC4). SDC4 is a ubiquitously expressed transmembrane, heparan sulfate proteoglycan. In this study we show that the Ser179Glu mutant binds strongly Tiam1, a Rac1-GEF reducing Rac1-GTP by 3-fold in MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cells. Mutational analysis unravels the PDZ interaction between SDC4 and Tiam1 is indispensable for the suppression of the Rac1 activity. Neither of the SDC4 interactions is effective alone to block the Rac1 activity, on the contrary, lack of either of interactions can increase the activity of Rac1, therefore the Rac1 activity is the resultant of the inhibitory and stimulatory effects. In addition, SDC4 can bind and tether RhoGDI1 (GDP-dissociation inhibitor 1) to the membrane. Expression of the phosphomimetic SDC4 results in the accumulation of the Rac1-RhoGDI1 complex. Co-immunoprecipitation assays (co-IP-s) reveal that SDC4 can form complexes with RhoGDI1. Together, the regulation of the basal activity of Rac1 is fine tuned and SDC4 is implicated in multiple ways.

  10. Effects of a chromosome-3 mutator gene on radiation-induced mutability in Drosophila melanogaster females

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sankaranarayanan, K. (Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Genetics and Chemical Mutagenesis; Cohen (J.A.) Inst. voor Radiopathologie en Stralenbescherming, Leiden (Netherlands))

    1982-01-01

    A series of X-irradiation experiments was carried out using Drosophila melanogaster females homozygous for a third chromosome mutator gene and females which had a similar genetic background except that the mutator-bearing third chromosomes were substituted by normal wild-type chromosomes. In the present work, the sensitivity of the pre-meiotic germ cells of mutator and normal females to the X-ray induction (2000 R) of sex-linked recessive lethals was studied. In addition, experiments were conducted to examine the sensitivity of the immature (stage 7; prophase I of meiosis) oocytes of both kinds of females to the induction of dominant lethals, X-linked recessive lethals and X-chromosome losses. The results show that in pre-meiotic germ cells, the frequencies of radiation-induced recessive lethals are similar in both kinds of females. However, the proportion of these mutations that occur in clusters of size 3 and higher, is higher in mutator than in normal females. In stage-7 oocytes, the frequencies of radiation-induced dominant lethals and sex-linked recessive lethals were similar in both kinds of females. The X-loss frequencies however, were consistently higher in mutator females although statistical significance was obtained only at higher exposures (3000 and 3750 R) and not at lower ones (750-2250 R). Possible reasons for the discrepancy between the present results and those of Gold and Green with respect to pre-meiotic germ cells are discussed.

  11. Effects of lethal and non-lethal malaria on the mononuclear phagocyte system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Tosta

    1983-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects ofone non-lethal species ofmalarialparasite, Plasmodium yoelii, and one lethal species, P. berghei, on the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS of BALB/c mice were studied. P. yoelii caused a greater and more sustained expansion and activation of the MPS, and the two major populations of spleen phagocytic cells-red pulp and marginal zone macrophages - exhibited a greater increase in numbers in this infection. During the course of P. berghei mataria, the spleen was progressively occupied by haematopoietic tissue and, at the terminal stage of infection, an extensive depletion of lymphocytes and macrophages was apparent. The possibility was suggested that the outcome of mataria may be inftuenced by the particular way the parasite interacts with the MPS.Estudou-se o efeito da infecção causada por espécie letal (Plasmodium berghei e não- letal (P. yoelii de plasmódio sobre o sistema de fagócitos mononucleares de camundongo BALB/c. O P. yoelii causou maior e mais prolongada expansão e ativação do sistema de macrófagos. As duas mais importantes populações de fagócitos esplênicos - macrófagos de polpa vermelha e da zona marginal - exibiam maior aumento do número de células nesta infecção. Durante a evolução da malária por P. berghei, o baço foi progressivamente ocupado por tecido hematopoiético e, na fase terminal da infecção, observou-se significativa depleção dos linfócitos e macrófagos esplênicos. Os dados apresentados indicam que a evolução da malária depende do tipo de interação entre o plasmódio e o sistema de fagócitos mononucleares.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Amish lethal microcephaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1 in 500 newborns in the Old Order Amish population of Pennsylvania. It has not been found outside this population. Related Information What information about a genetic condition can statistics provide? Why are some genetic ... gene cause Amish lethal microcephaly . The SLC25A19 gene provides instructions for ...

  13. The evolution of lethal intergroup violence

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Raymond C.

    2005-01-01

    Recent findings and analyses in evolutionary biology, archaeology, and ethnology provide a favorable conjuncture for examining the evolution of lethal intergroup violence among hominids during the 2.9-million-year Paleolithic time span. Here, I seek to identify and investigate the main turning points in this evolutionary trajectory and to delineate the periodization that follows from this inquiry.

  14. The evolution of lethal intergroup violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Raymond C

    2005-10-25

    Recent findings and analyses in evolutionary biology, archaeology, and ethnology provide a favorable conjuncture for examining the evolution of lethal intergroup violence among hominids during the 2.9-million-year Paleolithic time span. Here, I seek to identify and investigate the main turning points in this evolutionary trajectory and to delineate the periodization that follows from this inquiry.

  15. Genetics of flowering time in bread wheat Triticum aestivum: complementary interaction between vernalization-insensitive and photoperiod-insensitive mutations imparts very early flowering habit to spring wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sushil; Sharma, Vishakha; Chaudhary, Swati; Tyagi, Anshika; Mishra, Poonam; Priyadarshini, Anupama; Singh, Anupam

    2012-01-01

    Time to flowering in the winter growth habit bread wheat is dependent on vernalization (exposure to cold conditions) and exposure to long days (photoperiod). Dominant Vrn-1 (Vrn-A1, Vrn-B1 and Vrn-D1) alleles are associated with vernalization independent spring growth habit. The semidominant Ppd-D1a mutation confers photoperiod-insensitivity or rapid flowering in wheat under short day and long day conditions. The objective of this study was to reveal the nature of interaction between Vrn-1 and Ppd-D1a mutations (active alleles of the respective genes vrn-1 and Ppd-D1b). Twelve Indian spring wheat cultivars and the spring wheat landrace Chinese Spring were characterized for their flowering times by seeding them every month for five years under natural field conditions in New Delhi. Near isogenic Vrn-1 Ppd-D1 and Vrn-1 Ppd-D1a lines constructed in two genetic backgrounds were also phenotyped for flowering time by seeding in two different seasons. The wheat lines of Vrn-A1a Vrn-B1 Vrn-D1 Ppd-D1a, Vrn-A1a Vrn-B1 Ppd-D1a and Vrn-A1a Vrn-D1 Ppd-D1a (or Vrn-1 Ppd-D1a) genotypes flowered several weeks earlier than that of Vrn-A1a Vrn-B1 Vrn-D1 Ppd-D1b, Vrn-A1b Ppd-D1b and Vrn-D1 Ppd-D1b (or Vrn-1 Ppd-D1b) genotypes. The flowering time phenotypes of the isogenic vernalization-insensitive lines confirmed that Ppd-D1a hastened flowering by several weeks. It was concluded that complementary interaction between Vrn-1 and Ppd-D1a active alleles imparted super/very-early flowering habit to spring wheats. The early and late flowering wheat varieties showed differences in flowering time between short day and long day conditions. The flowering time in Vrn-1 Ppd-D1a genotypes was hastened by higher temperatures under long day conditions. The ambient air temperature and photoperiod parameters for flowering in spring wheat were estimated at 25°C and 12 h, respectively.

  16. The organisational structure of protein networks: revisiting the centrality-lethality hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Karthik; Damaraju, Nandita; Joshi, Govind Krishna

    2014-03-01

    Protein networks, describing physical interactions as well as functional associations between proteins, have been unravelled for many organisms in the recent past. Databases such as the STRING provide excellent resources for the analysis of such networks. In this contribution, we revisit the organisation of protein networks, particularly the centrality-lethality hypothesis, which hypothesises that nodes with higher centrality in a network are more likely to produce lethal phenotypes on removal, compared to nodes with lower centrality. We consider the protein networks of a diverse set of 20 organisms, with essentiality information available in the Database of Essential Genes and assess the relationship between centrality measures and lethality. For each of these organisms, we obtained networks of high-confidence interactions from the STRING database, and computed network parameters such as degree, betweenness centrality, closeness centrality and pairwise disconnectivity indices. We observe that the networks considered here are predominantly disassortative. Further, we observe that essential nodes in a network have a significantly higher average degree and betweenness centrality, compared to the network average. Most previous studies have evaluated the centrality-lethality hypothesis for Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli; we here observe that the centrality-lethality hypothesis hold goods for a large number of organisms, with certain limitations. Betweenness centrality may also be a useful measure to identify essential nodes, but measures like closeness centrality and pairwise disconnectivity are not significantly higher for essential nodes.

  17. Deletion of Indian hedgehog gene causes dominant semi-lethal Creeper trait in chicken

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Sihua; Zhu, Feng; Wang, Yanyun; Yi, Guoqiang; Li, Junying; Lian, Ling; Zheng, Jiangxia; Xu, Guiyun; Jiao, Rengang; Gong, Yu; Hou, Zhuocheng; Yang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    The Creeper trait, a classical monogenic phenotype of chicken, is controlled by a dominant semi-lethal gene. This trait has been widely cited in the genetics and molecular biology textbooks for illustrating autosomal dominant semi-lethal inheritance over decades. However, the genetic basis of the Creeper trait remains unknown. Here we have utilized ultra-deep sequencing and extensive analysis for targeting causative mutation controlling the Creeper trait. Our results indicated that the deletion of Indian hedgehog (IHH) gene was only found in the whole-genome sequencing data of lethal embryos and Creeper chickens. Large scale segregation analysis demonstrated that the deletion of IHH was fully linked with early embryonic death and the Creeper trait. Expression analysis showed a much lower expression of IHH in Creeper than wild-type chickens. We therefore suggest the deletion of IHH to be the causative mutation for the Creeper trait in chicken. Our findings unravel the genetic basis of the longstanding Creeper phenotype mystery in chicken as the same gene also underlies bone dysplasia in human and mouse, and thus highlight the significance of IHH in animal development and human haploinsufficiency disorders. PMID:27439785

  18. Dominant lethal effect of gamma radiation of 60Co in Biomphalaria glabrata (SAY, 1818)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallarico, Lenita de Freitas

    2003-01-01

    Germ cell mutations are used in ecotoxicological studies as biomarkers of population effects and indicators of ecological changes. Biomphalaria glabrata, a freshwater mollusk, is a good experimental model for biomonitoring studies due to its biological characteristics and the ecological importance of this invertebrate group. The dominant lethal test was established in B. glabrata for the detection of germ cell mutations. Results with chemical mutagens showed that this system is efficient, specific and sensitive in the evaluation of germ cell mutations induced by reference mutagens. In this work, the dominant lethal effects of gamma radiation of 60 Co were studied. A preliminary experiment was done to establish the dose range and to estimate the chronology of spermatogenesis in B. glabrata. This estimate is possible because of the uniformity in response to ionizing radiation between germ cells at homologous stages of spermatogenesis in widely different species. In general, pre-meiotic germ cells are less sensitive to the induction of lethal dominant mutations than post-meiotic cells. This effect can be attributed to: young gametogenic cells - mitotically active - have greater repair ability from sub-lethal DNA damage and there is a selective elimination of the damaged cells. In our system: induction of lethal dominant mutations causes an increase in the frequency of malformations and, cytotoxic effect is displayed as a reduction in the crossing rates. Total duration of spermatogenesis was estimated in approximately 36 days, with the following distribution of stages: 1 to 13 days - spermatogonia, 14 to 20 days - spermatocytes, 21 to 36 days - spermatids and spermatozoa. Based on this chronology, irradiated wild-type snails with 2,5; 10 and 20Gy and crossed with non-irradiated albino snails after 7, 17, 23, 30 and 36 days. The frequencies of malformations in the heterozygous wild-type offspring of the nonirradiated albino snails were used as indicator of germ cell

  19. Lethal and mutagenic effects of radiation and chemicals on cultured fish cells derived the erythrophoroma of goldfish (Carassius auratus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitani, H. (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Zoology)

    1983-01-01

    GEM 199 cells derived from an eryhtrophoroma of goldfish (Carassius auratus), which had a high plating efficiency, were used to investigate the lethal and mutational effects of radiations (UV and ..gamma..-rays) and chemicals (4NQO and MNNG). The cells were more resistant to rays than mammalian cells and CAF-MM1 cells derived from the normal fin tissue of goldfish. They were also more resistant to UV-irradiation than CAF-MM1 cells. Photoreactivation after UV-irradiation was present in GEM 199 cells for both survival and mutation. The initial shoulder of the survival curve of UV-irradiated cells was reduced greatly by caffeine, suggesting a high activity of the post-replication repair. The spontaneous mutation frequency to ouabain resistance was 1-5x10/sup -6/ clones per viable cell. MNNG was effective in inducing ouabain-resistant mutation, while 4NQO and ..gamma..-rays did not induce mutation.

  20. Repair-resistant mutation in Neurospora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadler, D.; Macleod, H.; Loo, M.

    1987-01-01

    Chronic UV treatment produces severalfold fewer mutations in Neurospora conidia than does the same total dose of acute UV. Experiments were designed to determine the conditions required for chronic UV mutagenesis. Measurement of the coincidence frequency for two independent mutations revealed the existence of a subset of cells which are mutable by chronic UV. Analysis of forward mutation at the mtr locus showed that the genetic alterations produced by chronic UV were virtually all point mutants, even though the assay system could detect alterations or deletions extending into neighboring genes. A significant fraction of the mutants produced by acute UV were multigenic deletions. The size of the dose-rate effect (acute UV mutation frequency divided by chronic UV mutation frequency) was compared for several different mutation assay systems. Forward mutations (recessive lethals and mtr) gave values ranging from four to nine. For events which were restricted to specific molecular sites (specific reversions and nonsense suppressor mutations), there was a wider range of dose-rate ratios. This suggests that chronic UV mutation may be restricted to certain molecular sequences or configurations

  1. Visualization portal for genetic variation (VizGVar): a tool for interactive visualization of SNPs and somatic mutations in exons, genes and protein domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano-Román, Antonio; Alfaro-Arias, Verónica; Cruz-Castillo, Carlos; Orozco-Solano, Allan

    2018-03-15

    VizGVar was designed to meet the growing need of the research community for improved genomic and proteomic data viewers that benefit from better information visualization. We implemented a new information architecture and applied user centered design principles to provide a new improved way of visualizing genetic information and protein data related to human disease. VizGVar connects the entire database of Ensembl protein motifs, domains, genes and exons with annotated SNPs and somatic variations from PharmGKB and COSMIC. VizGVar precisely represents genetic variations and their respective location by colored curves to designate different types of variations. The structured hierarchy of biological data is reflected in aggregated patterns through different levels, integrating several layers of information at once. VizGVar provides a new interactive, web-based JavaScript visualization of somatic mutations and protein variation, enabling fast and easy discovery of clinically relevant variation patterns. VizGVar is accessible at http://vizport.io/vizgvar; http://vizport.io/vizgvar/doc/. asolano@broadinstitute.org or allan.orozcosolano@ucr.ac.cr.

  2. Kin Selection - Mutation Balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyken, J. David Van; Linksvayer, Timothy Arnold; Wade, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    selection-mutation balance, which provides an evolutionary null hypothesis for the statics and dynamics of cheating. When social interactions have linear fitness effects and Hamilton´s rule is satisfied, selection is never strong enough to eliminate recurrent cheater mutants from a population, but cheater...

  3. Radiation-induced dominant skeletal mutations in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, P.B.

    1979-01-01

    Skeletons were chosen for the attempt to determine the overall damage by radiation to one body system largely bacause they can be prepared readily for detailed study. Dominant mutations were of special interest because they are the type of mutations that would account for almost all damage induced in the early generations. The male offsprings derived from spermatogonial irradiation were used in the mutation-rate experiment, and the mutation frequency of 1.4% per gamete was found. The general dominant skeletal mutations are 1) the fusions of bones or other changes in individual bones, 2) the gross changes in bone shapes, usually caused by incomplete or too extensive bone growth, or 3) the shifts in the relative positions of bones. The recessive lethality in the period between implantation and birth can be recognized by the expected high death rate of implants in approximately 1/4 of the crosses that are between heterozygotes for a given mutation. The recessive lethal mutations may account for an important fraction of human genetic disorders owing to their dominant deleterious effects which represent only a small fraction, but because of their easy detection, they have been studied more than other dominants. At least 45, or 27%, of 164 dominant visibles in mice, ignoring those concerned with enzyme polymorphisms and immunological traits, appear to be recessive lethals. (Yamashita, S.)

  4. Structural investigation of a C-terminal EphA2 receptor mutant: Does mutation affect the structure and interaction properties of the Sam domain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercurio, Flavia A; Costantini, Susan; Di Natale, Concetta; Pirone, Luciano; Guariniello, Stefano; Scognamiglio, Pasqualina L; Marasco, Daniela; Pedone, Emilia M; Leone, Marilisa

    2017-09-01

    Ephrin A2 receptor (EphA2) plays a key role in cancer, it is up-regulated in several types of tumors and the process of ligand-induced receptor endocytosis, followed by degradation, is considered as a potential path to diminish tumor malignancy. Protein modulators of this mechanism are recruited at the cytosolic Sterile alpha motif (Sam) domain of EphA2 (EphA2-Sam) through heterotypic Sam-Sam associations. These interactions engage the C-terminal helix of EphA2 and close loop regions (the so called End Helix side). In addition, several studies report on destabilizing mutations in EphA2 related to cataract formation and located in/or close to the Sam domain. Herein, we analyzed from a structural point of view, one of these mutants characterized by the insertion of a novel 39 residue long polypeptide at the C-terminus of EphA2-Sam. A 3D structural model was built by computational methods and revealed partial disorder in the acquired C-terminal tail and a few residues participating in an α-helix and two short β-strands. We investigated by CD and NMR studies the conformational properties in solution of two peptides encompassing the whole C-terminal tail and its predicted helical region, respectively. NMR binding experiments demonstrated that these peptides do not interact relevantly with either EphA2-Sam or its interactor Ship2-Sam. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations further indicated that the EphA2 mutant could be represented only through a conformational ensemble and that the C-terminal tail should not largely wrap the EphA2-Sam End-Helix interface and affect binding to other Sam domains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Estimation of mutation rates induced by large doses of gamma, proton and neutron irradiation of the X-chromosome of the nematode Panagrellus redivivus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denich, K.T.R.; Samoiloff, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    The radiation-resistant free-living nematode Panagrellus redivivus was used to study mutation rates in oocytes, following gamma, proton and neutron irradiation in the dose range 45-225 grays. γ-Radiation produced approximately 0.001 lethal X-chromosomes per gray over the range tested. Proton or neutron irradiation produced approximately 0.003 lethal X-chromosomes per gray at lower doses, with the mutation rate dropping to 0.001 lethal X-chromosome per gray at the higher doses. These results suggest a dose-dependent mutation-repair system. Cell lethality was also examined. γ-Radiation produced the greatest amount of cell lethality at all doses, while neutron irradiation had no cell lethal effect at any of the doses examined. (orig.)

  6. Lethal neonatal short-limbed dwarfism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ok Hwa; Yim, Chung Ik; Bahk, Yong Whee

    1986-01-01

    We have detailed our experiences on 6 cases of neonatal lethal short-limbed dwarfism and reviewed the articles. They include, achondrogenesis, thanatophoric dysplasia, asphyxiating thoracic dysplasia, osteogenesis imperfect a congenita, and hypophosphatasia lethals. Five babies were born alive but died soon after birth and one was a stillbirth. The main cause of failure to thrive was respiratory insufficiency. Each case was having quite characteristic radiologic findings, even if the general appearances were similar to the achondroplasts clinically. Precise diagnosis is very important for genetic counselling of the parents and alarm to them the possibility of bone dysplasias to the next offsprings. For this purpose, the radiologists play major role for the correct diagnosis. We stress that when the baby is born with short-limbed dwarfism, whole body radiogram should be taken including lateral view and postmortem radiogram is also very precious.

  7. Lethal neonatal short-limbed dwarfism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ok Hwa; Yim, Chung Ik; Bahk, Yong Whee [Catholic Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-02-15

    We have detailed our experiences on 6 cases of neonatal lethal short-limbed dwarfism and reviewed the articles. They include, achondrogenesis, thanatophoric dysplasia, asphyxiating thoracic dysplasia, osteogenesis imperfect a congenita, and hypophosphatasia lethals. Five babies were born alive but died soon after birth and one was a stillbirth. The main cause of failure to thrive was respiratory insufficiency. Each case was having quite characteristic radiologic findings, even if the general appearances were similar to the achondroplasts clinically. Precise diagnosis is very important for genetic counselling of the parents and alarm to them the possibility of bone dysplasias to the next offsprings. For this purpose, the radiologists play major role for the correct diagnosis. We stress that when the baby is born with short-limbed dwarfism, whole body radiogram should be taken including lateral view and postmortem radiogram is also very precious.

  8. Mining of lethal recessive genetic variation in Danish cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Das, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    in fertility. The primary objective of this PhD projekt was to identify recessive lethal gentic variants in the main Danish dairy cattle breed. Holstein-Friesian utilzing next generation sequencing (NGS) data. This study shows a potential for the use of the NGS-based reverse genetic approach in identifying...... lethal or semi-lethal recessive gentic variation...

  9. Lethal midline granuloma syndrome: a diagnostic dilemma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Bruno Niemeyer de Freitas; Bahia, Paulo Roberto Valle; Oliveira, Ana Luiza Vianna Sobral de Magalhaes; Marchon Junior, Joao Luiz

    2012-01-01

    The rare lethal midline granuloma syndrome is difficult to diagnose because of the wide array of related diseases and lack of knowledge by the majority of physicians. In the present report, the authors describe the case of a patient with this disease, caused by squamous cell carcinoma, drawing attention to differential diagnoses and to clinical and radiological findings that may be useful to define the diagnosis. (author)

  10. Lethal Interpersonal Violence in the Middle Pleistocene

    OpenAIRE

    Sala, Nohemi; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Pantoja-P?rez, Ana; Pablos, Adri?n; Mart?nez, Ignacio; Quam, Rolf M.; G?mez-Olivencia, Asier; Berm?dez de Castro, Jos? Mar?a; Carbonell, Eudald

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of interpersonal violence has been documented previously in Pleistocene members of the genus Homo, but only very rarely has this been posited as the possible manner of death. Here we report the earliest evidence of lethal interpersonal violence in the hominin fossil record. Cranium 17 recovered from the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene site shows two clear perimortem depression fractures on the frontal bone, interpreted as being produced by two episodes of localized blunt force ...

  11. Lethal midline granuloma syndrome: a diagnostic dilemma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Bruno Niemeyer de Freitas; Bahia, Paulo Roberto Valle [Radiology, Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho - Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (HUCFF-UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Oliveira, Ana Luiza Vianna Sobral de Magalhaes [Resident of Medical Practice, Hospital Federal da Lagoa, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Marchon Junior, Joao Luiz [Unit of Computed Tomography, Hospital Federal da Lagoa, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-11-15

    The rare lethal midline granuloma syndrome is difficult to diagnose because of the wide array of related diseases and lack of knowledge by the majority of physicians. In the present report, the authors describe the case of a patient with this disease, caused by squamous cell carcinoma, drawing attention to differential diagnoses and to clinical and radiological findings that may be useful to define the diagnosis. (author)

  12. Lethal Nipah virus infection induces rapid overexpression of CXCL10.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyrille Mathieu

    Full Text Available Nipah virus (NiV is a recently emerged zoonotic Paramyxovirus that causes regular outbreaks in East Asia with mortality rate exceeding 75%. Major cellular targets of NiV infection are endothelial cells and neurons. To better understand virus-host interaction, we analyzed the transcriptome profile of NiV infection in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells. We further assessed some of the obtained results by in vitro and in vivo methods in a hamster model and in brain samples from NiV-infected patients. We found that NiV infection strongly induces genes involved in interferon response in endothelial cells. Among the top ten upregulated genes, we identified the chemokine CXCL10 (interferon-induced protein 10, IP-10, an important chemoattractant involved in the generation of inflammatory immune response and neurotoxicity. In NiV-infected hamsters, which develop pathology similar to what is seen in humans, expression of CXCL10 mRNA was induced in different organs with kinetics that followed NiV replication. Finally, we showed intense staining for CXCL10 in the brain of patients who succumbed to lethal NiV infection during the outbreak in Malaysia, confirming induction of this chemokine in fatal human infections. This study sheds new light on NiV pathogenesis, indicating the role of CXCL10 during the course of infection and suggests that this chemokine may serve as a potential new marker for lethal NiV encephalitis.

  13. A/α-specific effect of the mms3 mutation on ultraviolet mutagenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.; Prakash, L.; Prakash, S.

    1981-01-01

    A new gene involved in error-prone repair of ultraviolet (uv) damage has been identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by the mms3-1 mutation. Uv-induced reversion is reduced in diploids that are homozygous for mms3-1, only if they are also heterozygous (MATa/MATα) at the mating type locus. The mms3-1 mutation has no effect on uv-induced reversion either in haploids or MATa/MATα or MATα/MATα diploids. The mutation confers sensitivity to uv and methyl methane sulfonate in both haploids and diploids. Even though mutation induction by uv is restored to wild-type levels in MATa/MATa mms3-1/mms3-1 or MATα/MATα mms3-1/mms3-1 diploids, such strains still retain sensitivity to the lethal effects of uv. Survival after uv irradiation in mms3-1 rad double mutant combinations indicates that mms3-1 is epistatic to rad6-1 whereas non-epistatic interactions are observed with rad3 and rad52 mutants. When present in the homozygous state in MATa/MATα his1-1/his1-315 heteroallelic diploids, mms3-1 was found to lower uv-induced mitotic recombination

  14. Lethal interpersonal violence in the Middle Pleistocene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nohemi Sala

    Full Text Available Evidence of interpersonal violence has been documented previously in Pleistocene members of the genus Homo, but only very rarely has this been posited as the possible manner of death. Here we report the earliest evidence of lethal interpersonal violence in the hominin fossil record. Cranium 17 recovered from the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene site shows two clear perimortem depression fractures on the frontal bone, interpreted as being produced by two episodes of localized blunt force trauma. The type of injuries, their location, the strong similarity of the fractures in shape and size, and the different orientations and implied trajectories of the two fractures suggest they were produced with the same object in face-to-face interpersonal conflict. Given that either of the two traumatic events was likely lethal, the presence of multiple blows implies an intention to kill. This finding shows that the lethal interpersonal violence is an ancient human behavior and has important implications for the accumulation of bodies at the site, supporting an anthropic origin.

  15. Lethal interpersonal violence in the Middle Pleistocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Nohemi; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Pantoja-Pérez, Ana; Pablos, Adrián; Martínez, Ignacio; Quam, Rolf M; Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Bermúdez de Castro, José María; Carbonell, Eudald

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of interpersonal violence has been documented previously in Pleistocene members of the genus Homo, but only very rarely has this been posited as the possible manner of death. Here we report the earliest evidence of lethal interpersonal violence in the hominin fossil record. Cranium 17 recovered from the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene site shows two clear perimortem depression fractures on the frontal bone, interpreted as being produced by two episodes of localized blunt force trauma. The type of injuries, their location, the strong similarity of the fractures in shape and size, and the different orientations and implied trajectories of the two fractures suggest they were produced with the same object in face-to-face interpersonal conflict. Given that either of the two traumatic events was likely lethal, the presence of multiple blows implies an intention to kill. This finding shows that the lethal interpersonal violence is an ancient human behavior and has important implications for the accumulation of bodies at the site, supporting an anthropic origin.

  16. A pharmacological screen for compounds that rescue the developmental lethality of a Drosophila ATM mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimkus, Stacey A; Wassarman, David A

    2018-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by mutation of the A-T mutated (ATM) gene. ATM encodes a protein kinase that is activated by DNA damage and phosphorylates many proteins, including those involved in DNA repair, cell cycle control, and apoptosis. Characteristic biological and molecular functions of ATM observed in mammals are conserved in Drosophila melanogaster. As an example, conditional loss-of-function ATM alleles in flies cause progressive neurodegeneration through activation of the innate immune response. However, unlike in mammals, null alleles of ATM in flies cause lethality during development. With the goals of understanding biological and molecular roles of ATM in a whole animal and identifying candidate therapeutics for A-T, we performed a screen of 2400 compounds, including FDA-approved drugs, natural products, and bioactive compounds, for modifiers of the developmental lethality caused by a temperature-sensitive ATM allele (ATM8) that has reduced kinase activity at non-permissive temperatures. Ten compounds reproducibly suppressed the developmental lethality of ATM8 flies, including Ronnel, which is an organophosphate. Ronnel and other suppressor compounds are known to cause mitochondrial dysfunction or to inhibit the enzyme acetylcholinesterase, which controls the levels of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, suggesting that detrimental consequences of reduced ATM kinase activity can be rescued by inhibiting the function of mitochondria or increasing acetylcholine levels. We carried out further studies of Ronnel because, unlike the other compounds that suppressed the developmental lethality of homozygous ATM8 flies, Ronnel was toxic to the development of heterozygous ATM8 flies. Ronnel did not affect the innate immune response of ATM8 flies, and it further increased the already high levels of DNA damage in brains of ATM8 flies, but its effects were not harmful to the lifespan of rescued ATM8 flies. These results provide

  17. Lethal and mutagenic effects of ion beams and γ-rays in Aspergillus oryzae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyoshima, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: toyoshima@yamasa.com [Soy Sauce Laboratory, Yamasa Corporation, 2-10-1 Araoicho, Choshi, Chiba 288-0056 (Japan); Takahashi, Akemi; Tanaka, Hisaki; Watanabe, Jun; Mogi, Yoshinobu; Yamazaki, Tatsuo [Soy Sauce Laboratory, Yamasa Corporation, 2-10-1 Araoicho, Choshi, Chiba 288-0056 (Japan); Hamada, Ryoko; Iwashita, Kazuhiro [Fundamental Research Division, National Research Institute of Brewing, 3-7-1 Kagamiyama, Higashihiroshima, Hiroshima 739-0046 (Japan); Satoh, Katsuya; Narumi, Issay [Ion Beam Mutagenesis Research Group, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: ► We investigated the effects of different LET radiation in A. oryzae. ► Both γ-rays and ion beams induced base substitutions, frameshifts, deletions. ► Both γ-rays and ion beams induced genome-wide large-scale mutations in A. oryzae. ► Some differences in the types and frequencies of mutations were found. ► Our results provide new basic insights into the mutation breeding of A. oryzae. - Abstract: Aspergillus oryzae is a fungus that is used widely in traditional Japanese fermentation industries. In this study, the lethal and mutagenic effects of different linear energy transfer (LET) radiation in freeze-dried conidia of A. oryzae were investigated. The lethal effect, which was evaluated by a 90% lethal dose, was dependent on the LET value of the ionizing radiation. The most lethal ionizing radiation among that tested was {sup 12}C{sup 5+} ion beams with an LET of 121 keV/μm. The {sup 12}C{sup 5+} ion beams had a 3.6-times higher lethal effect than low-LET (0.2 keV/μm) γ-rays. The mutagenic effect was evaluated by the frequency of selenate resistant mutants. {sup 12}C{sup 6+} ion beams with an LET of 86 keV/μm were the most effective in inducing selenate resistance. The mutant frequency following exposure to {sup 12}C{sup 6+} ion beams increased with an increase in dose and reached 3.47 × 10{sup −3} at 700 Gy. In the dose range from 0 to 700 Gy, {sup 12}C{sup 5+} ion beams were the second most effective in inducing selenate resistance, the mutant frequency of which reached a maximum peak (1.67 × 10{sup −3}) at 400 Gy. To elucidate the characteristics of mutation induced by ionizing radiation, mutations in the sulphate permease gene (sB) and ATP sulfurylase gene (sC) loci, the loss of function of which results in a selenate resistant phenotype, were compared between {sup 12}C{sup 5+} ion beams and γ-rays. We detected all types of transversions and transitions. For frameshifts, the frequency of a +1 frameshift was the highest in all

  18. Restorer-of-Fertility Mutations Recovered in Transposon-Active Lines of S Male-Sterile Maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Gabay-Laughnan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria execute key pathways of central metabolism and serve as cellular sensing and signaling entities, functions that depend upon interactions between mitochondrial and nuclear genetic systems. This is exemplified in cytoplasmic male sterility type S (CMS-S of Zea mays, where novel mitochondrial open reading frames are associated with a pollen collapse phenotype, but nuclear restorer-of-fertility (restorer mutations rescue pollen function. To better understand these genetic interactions, we screened Activator-Dissociation (Ac-Ds, Enhancer/Suppressor-mutator (En/Spm, and Mutator (Mu transposon-active CMS-S stocks to recover new restorer mutants. The frequency of restorer mutations increased in transposon-active stocks compared to transposon-inactive stocks, but most mutants recovered from Ac-Ds and En/Spm stocks were unstable, reverting upon backcrossing to CMS-S inbred lines. However, 10 independent restorer mutations recovered from CMS-S Mu transposon stocks were stable upon backcrossing. Many restorer mutations condition seed-lethal phenotypes that provide a convenient test for allelism. Eight such mutants recovered in this study included one pair of allelic mutations that were also allelic to the previously described rfl2-1 mutant. Targeted analysis of mitochondrial proteins by immunoblot identified two features that consistently distinguished restored CMS-S pollen from comparably staged, normal-cytoplasm, nonmutant pollen: increased abundance of nuclear-encoded alternative oxidase relative to mitochondria-encoded cytochrome oxidase and decreased abundance of mitochondria-encoded ATP synthase subunit 1 compared to nuclear-encoded ATP synthase subunit 2. CMS-S restorer mutants thus revealed a metabolic plasticity in maize pollen, and further study of these mutants will provide new insights into mitochondrial functions that are critical to pollen and seed development.

  19. Coat Protein Mutations That Alter the Flux of Morphogenetic Intermediates through the ϕX174 Early Assembly Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Brody J; Li, Shuaizhi; Roznowski, Aaron P; Perez, Alexis R; Villarreal, Rodrigo H; Johnson, Curtis J; Hardy, Margaret; Tuckerman, Edward C; Burch, April D; Fane, Bentley A

    2017-12-15

    Two scaffolding proteins orchestrate ϕX174 morphogenesis. The internal scaffolding protein B mediates the formation of pentameric assembly intermediates, whereas the external scaffolding protein D organizes 12 of these intermediates into procapsids. Aromatic amino acid side chains mediate most coat-internal scaffolding protein interactions. One residue in the internal scaffolding protein and three in the coat protein constitute the core of the B protein binding cleft. The three coat gene codons were randomized separately to ascertain the chemical requirements of the encoded amino acids and the morphogenetic consequences of mutation. The resulting mutants exhibited a wide range of recessive phenotypes, which could generally be explained within a structural context. Mutants with phenylalanine, tyrosine, and methionine substitutions were phenotypically indistinguishable from the wild type. However, tryptophan substitutions were detrimental at two sites. Charged residues were poorly tolerated, conferring extreme temperature-sensitive and lethal phenotypes. Eighteen lethal and conditional lethal mutants were genetically and biochemically characterized. The primary defect associated with the missense substitutions ranged from inefficient internal scaffolding protein B binding to faulty procapsid elongation reactions mediated by external scaffolding protein D. Elevating B protein concentrations above wild-type levels via exogenous, cloned-gene expression compensated for inefficient B protein binding, as did suppressing mutations within gene B. Similarly, elevating D protein concentrations above wild-type levels or compensatory mutations within gene D suppressed faulty elongation. Some of the parental mutations were pleiotropic, affecting multiple morphogenetic reactions. This progressively reduced the flux of intermediates through the pathway. Accordingly, multiple mechanisms, which may be unrelated, could restore viability. IMPORTANCE Genetic analyses have been

  20. De novo MECP2 frameshift mutation in a boy with moderate mental retardation, obesity and gynaecomastia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleefstra, T.; Yntema, H.G.; Oudakker, A.R.; Romein, T.; Sistermans, E.A.; Nillessen, W.; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van; Vries, L.B.A. de; Hamel, B.C.J.

    2002-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in the MECP2 gene, with apparent lethality in male embryos. However, recent studies indicate that mutations in the MECP2 gene can cause congenital encephalopathy, an Angelman-like phenotype and even nonspecific mental

  1. Identification of Factors Interacting with hMSH2 and hMLH1 in the Fetal Liver and Investigations of how Mitochondrial Dysfunction Creates a Mutator Phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Anne Karin

    mutations. Mutations in MMR genes cause hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer. In an effort to identify unidentified genes involved in MMR and tissue-specific MMRassociated factors, we employed the yeast two-hybrid system, using the human hMSH2 as bait and a human fetal liver cDNA library as prey. We...... between mitochondrial activity and genomic instability. Mitochondrial dysfunction and genetic instability are characteristic features of cancer cells. Furthermore, mitochondrial dysfunction is a key feature of aging due to accumulation of mutations in mtDNA. Our studies in a yeast model system suggest......Increased spontaneous mutation frequency is associated with increased cancer risk. However, the relative contribution of spontaneous endogenous mutagenesis to carcinogenesis is not known today. Defects in the postreplication DNA mismatch repair (MMR) pathway are recognized to increase spontaneous...

  2. The molecular landscape of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia reveals recurrent structural alterations and age-specific mutational interactions | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    We present the molecular landscape of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and characterize nearly 1,000 participants in Children’s Oncology Group (COG) AML trials. The COG–National Cancer Institute (NCI) TARGET AML initiative assessed cases by whole-genome, targeted DNA, mRNA and microRNA sequencing and CpG methylation profiling. Validated DNA variants corresponded to diverse, infrequent mutations, with fewer than 40 genes mutated in >2% of cases.

  3. Lethal and mutagenic effects of fast neutrons of different energy on Streptomyces griseus spores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podgorskaya, M.E.; Tulina, G.G.; Serdechnaya, A.I.; Matselyukh, B.P.

    1986-01-01

    A study was made of lethal and mutagenic effects of fast neutrons of different energy on spores of prototrophic and auxotrophic strains of Streptomyces griseus. Relative biological effectiveness of fast neutrons is higher than that of γ-rays and depends on beam energy. Neutrons of 22-50 MeV induce Streptomyces griseus mutations more frequently (by one order of magnitude) than neutrons of 1.4-1.6 MeV do. The obtained mutants can be used in studying Streptomyces griseus genetics

  4. Spectrum of PEX6 mutations in Zellweger syndrome spectrum patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ebberink, Merel S.; Kofster, Janet; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Waterham, Hans R.

    2010-01-01

    The autosomal recessive Zellweger syndrome spectrum (ZSS) disorders comprise a main subgroup of the peroxisome biogenesis disorders. The ZSS disorders can be caused by mutations in any of 12 different currently identified PEX genes resulting in severe, often lethal, multi-systemic disorders. Defects

  5. Intercellular distribution of mutations induced in oopcytes of Drosophila melanogaster by chemical and physical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traut, H.

    1979-01-01

    When females of Drosophila melanogaster are treated with chemical or physical mutagens, not only in one but also in both of the two homologous X chromosomes of a given oocyte, a recessive sex-linked lethal mutation may be induced. A method is described that discriminates between such single and double mutations. A theory is developed to show how a comparison betweeen the expected and the observer frequency of double mutations yields an indication of the intercellular distribution (random or nonrandom) of recessive lethal mutations induced by mutagenic agents in oocytes and, consequently, of the distribution (homogenous or nonhomogeneous) of those agents. Three agents were tested: FUdR (12.5, 50.0 and 81.0 μg/ml), mitomycin C (130.0 μg/ml) and x rays (2000 R, 150 kV). After FUdR feeding, no increase in the mutation frequency usually observed in D. melanogaster without mutagenic treatment was obtained (u = 0.13%, namely three single mutations among 2332 chromosomes tested). After mitomycin C feeding 104 single and three double mutations were obtained. All of the 50 mutations observed after x irradiation were single mutations. The results obtained in the mitomycin C and radiation experiments favor the assumption of a random intercellular distribution of recessive lethal mutations induced by these two agents in oocytes of D. melanogaster. Reasons are discussed why for other types of mutagenic agents nonrandom distributions may be observed with our technique

  6. Ras1 interacts with multiple new signaling and cytoskeletal loci in Drosophila eggshell patterning and morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnorr, J D; Holdcraft, R; Chevalier, B; Berg, C A

    2001-10-01

    Little is known about the genes that interact with Ras signaling pathways to regulate morphogenesis. The synthesis of dorsal eggshell structures in Drosophila melanogaster requires multiple rounds of Ras signaling followed by dramatic epithelial sheet movements. We took advantage of this process to identify genes that link patterning and morphogenesis; we screened lethal mutations on the second chromosome for those that could enhance a weak Ras1 eggshell phenotype. Of 1618 lethal P-element mutations tested, 13 showed significant enhancement, resulting in forked and fused dorsal appendages. Our genetic and molecular analyses together with information from the Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project reveal that 11 of these lines carry mutations in previously characterized genes. Three mutations disrupt the known Ras1 cell signaling components Star, Egfr, and Blistered, while one mutation disrupts Sec61beta, implicated in ligand secretion. Seven lines represent cell signaling and cytoskeletal components that are new to the Ras1 pathway; these are Chickadee (Profilin), Tec29, Dreadlocks, POSH, Peanut, Smt3, and MESK2, a suppressor of dominant-negative Ksr. A twelfth insertion disrupts two genes, Nrk, a "neurospecific" receptor tyrosine kinase, and Tpp, which encodes a neuropeptidase. These results suggest that Ras1 signaling during oogenesis involves novel components that may be intimately associated with additional signaling processes and with the reorganization of the cytoskeleton. To determine whether these Ras1 Enhancers function upstream or downstream of the Egf receptor, four mutations were tested for their ability to suppress an activated Egfr construct (lambdatop) expressed in oogenesis exclusively in the follicle cells. Mutations in Star and l(2)43Bb had no significant effect upon the lambdatop eggshell defect whereas smt3 and dock alleles significantly suppressed the lambdatop phenotype.

  7. Mapping the epitopes of a neutralizing antibody fragment directed against the lethal factor of Bacillus anthracis and cross-reacting with the homologous edema factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Thullier

    Full Text Available The lethal toxin (LT of Bacillus anthracis, composed of the protective antigen (PA and the lethal factor (LF, plays an essential role in anthrax pathogenesis. PA also interacts with the edema factor (EF, 20% identity with LF to form the edema toxin (ET, which has a lesser role in anthrax pathogenesis. The first recombinant antibody fragment directed against LF was scFv 2LF; it neutralizes LT by blocking the interaction between PA and LF. Here, we report that scFv 2LF cross-reacts with EF and cross-neutralizes ET, and we present an in silico method taking advantage of this cross-reactivity to map the epitope of scFv 2LF on both LF and EF. This method identified five epitope candidates on LF, constituted of a total of 32 residues, which were tested experimentally by mutating the residues to alanine. This combined approach precisely identified the epitope of scFv 2LF on LF as five residues (H229, R230, Q234, L235 and Y236, of which three were missed by the consensus epitope candidate identified by pre-existing in silico methods. The homolog of this epitope on EF (H253, R254, E258, L259 and Y260 was experimentally confirmed to constitute the epitope of scFv 2LF on EF. Other inhibitors, including synthetic molecules, could be used to target these epitopes for therapeutic purposes. The in silico method presented here may be of more general interest.

  8. Synthetic lethality between gene defects affecting a single non-essential molecular pathway with reversible steps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Zinovyev

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Systematic analysis of synthetic lethality (SL constitutes a critical tool for systems biology to decipher molecular pathways. The most accepted mechanistic explanation of SL is that the two genes function in parallel, mutually compensatory pathways, known as between-pathway SL. However, recent genome-wide analyses in yeast identified a significant number of within-pathway negative genetic interactions. The molecular mechanisms leading to within-pathway SL are not fully understood. Here, we propose a novel mechanism leading to within-pathway SL involving two genes functioning in a single non-essential pathway. This type of SL termed within-reversible-pathway SL involves reversible pathway steps, catalyzed by different enzymes in the forward and backward directions, and kinetic trapping of a potentially toxic intermediate. Experimental data with recombinational DNA repair genes validate the concept. Mathematical modeling recapitulates the possibility of kinetic trapping and revealed the potential contributions of synthetic, dosage-lethal interactions in such a genetic system as well as the possibility of within-pathway positive masking interactions. Analysis of yeast gene interaction and pathway data suggests broad applicability of this novel concept. These observations extend the canonical interpretation of synthetic-lethal or synthetic-sick interactions with direct implications to reconstruct molecular pathways and improve therapeutic approaches to diseases such as cancer.

  9. Lethal congenital contracture syndrome (LCCS) and other lethal arthrogryposes in Finland--an epidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakkasjärvi, Niklas; Ritvanen, Annukka; Herva, Riitta; Peltonen, Leena; Kestilä, Marjo; Ignatius, Jaakko

    2006-09-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by multiple contractures with an estimated frequency of 1 in 3,000 births. With improving diagnostic methods, increasing numbers of fetuses with arthrogryposis are found. The pathogenetic mechanisms are relatively well known but the epidemiology and genetics of the prenatally lethal forms of arthrogryposis are less well known. In this study we collected all cases of a multiple contractures diagnosed in Finland during 1987-2002 including live born infants, stillbirths, and terminated pregnancies. Ninety-two cases of 214 suffered intrauterine demise (68 selective pregnancy terminations and 24 stillbirths) and 58 died in infancy. In 141 out of these cases the diagnosis could be included within lethal arthrogryposes, with a prevalence of 1 in 6,985 (1.43/10,000) births. Of these, 59 had spinal cord pathology at autopsy and thus were of neurogenic origin. Thirty-nine cases had lethal congenital contracture syndrome (LCCS) clinically characterized by total immobility of the fetus at all ultrasound examinations (12 weeks or later), multiple joint contractures in both upper and lower limbs, hydrops, and fetal death before the 32nd week of pregnancy. LCCS is noted as a unique Finnish disorder with a prevalence of 1 in 25,250 (0.40/10,000) births and is a major cause of lethal arthrogryposis in Finland.

  10. Suicide Intent and Accurate Expectations of Lethality: Predictors of Medical Lethality of Suicide Attempts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gregory K.; Henriques, Gregg R.; Sosdjan, Daniella; Beck, Aaron T.

    2004-01-01

    The degree of intent to commit suicide and the severity of self-injury were examined in individuals (N = 180) who had recently attempted suicide. Although a minimal association was found between the degree of suicide intent and the degree of lethality of the attempt, the accuracy of expectations about the likelihood of dying was found to moderate…

  11. Potentially lethal damage and its repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsumi, Hiroshi

    1989-01-01

    Two forms termed fast-and slow-potentially lethal lethal damage (PLD) are introduced and discussed. The effect on the survival of x-irradiated Chinese hamster cells (V79) of two different post-treatments is examined in plateau- and in log-phases of growth. The postirradiation treatments used : a) incubation in hypertonic solution, and b) incubation in conditioned medium obtained from plateau-phase. Similar reduction in survival was caused by postirradiation treatment with hypertonic phosphate buffered saline, and similar increased in survival was effected by treatment in conditioned medium in plateau- and in log-phases cells. However, repair of PLD sensitive to hypertonic treatment was faster (half time, 5-10 min)(f-PLD repair) and independent from the repair of PLD (half time, 1-2 hour)(s-PLD repair) observed in conditioned medium. The results indicate the induction of two forms of PLD by radiation. Induction of both PLD was found to decrease with increasing LET of the radiation used. Identification of the molecular processes underlying repair and fixation of PLD is a task of particular interest, since it may allow replacement of a phenomenological definition with a molecular definition. Evidence is reviewed indicating the DNA double strand breaks (directly or indirectly induced) may be the DNA lesions underlying PLD. (author)

  12. Radiation-induced mutagenicity and lethality in tryptophan-requiring auxotrophs of escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Rong; Qian Hongwei; Yao Fenying; Gu Shuzhu; Xu Jiaxin; Bi Hekan; Liu Yuying

    1989-01-01

    Mutation and killing caused by X-ray radiation and 60 Co γ-ray radiation were studied in three different tryptophan-requiring auxotrophs (WP2, Wp2A, Cm 891) of Escherichia coli. These testers are sensitive to base pair substitution mutagens. Cm891 carries a R-factor and is more sensitive than WP2 and WP2A to radiation-induced mutation and lethality. The results of the study show that (1) ionizing radiation was mutagenic to E. coli, (2) the order of mutagenic sensitivity among three strains to ionizing radiation was Cm891 > WP2A > WP2, (3) the dose rate of γ-ray influences mutagenicity and lethalty of E. coli strain, (4) the toxicity and mutagenicity of γ-ray were similar to X-ray when Cm891 was tested, however, γ-ray was more toxic and mutagenic than X-ray to WP2A ang WP2

  13. Lethal domestic violence in eastern North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, M G; Spence, P R; Spence, R L

    2000-01-01

    Strategies for preventing domestic violence can be tailored to a particular geographic or socioeconomic area if the patterns of domestic violence in the area are known. National statistics, although widely available, may not be applicable to a specific region. We reviewed homicide deaths in Eastern North Carolina between 1978 and 1999 to identify patterns in this rural area. Approximately 20% of the homicide deaths in eastern North Carolina are caused by intimate partners. Women accounted for 53% of the victims in 1976, similar to national figures but not rising to 72% as seen nationally in 1998. Latinos are an increasing presence in the area, but had only one recorded episode of lethal violence against an intimate partner. Gunshots accounted for most of the deaths (59% in men, 72% in women). Knowledge of such patterns can assist in selecting prevention strategies for this particular area. Over the last 25 years increasing attention has been devoted to domestic violence (DV), initially defined as abuse committed against a spouse, former spouse, fiancée, boy- or girlfriend, or cohabitant. As time has passed, the definition has been broadened to include other family members--elders, children, and siblings. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) now uses the term "intimate partner violence" for intentional emotional or physical abuse inflicted by a spouse, ex-spouse, a present or former boy- or girlfriend, or date. For the purposes of this paper, we consider DV interchangeable with intimate partner violence. There has been a national concern that abusive events are under-reported. The National Crime Victimization Survey, an anonymous household survey, indicated nearly 1 million incidents of non-lethal intimate partner violence per year between 1992 and 1996. The number decreased from 1.1 million in 1993 to 840,000 in 1996. Attempts to validate such data for a given geographic area often require subjects to violate anonymity--this may account for lower

  14. Protease Addiction and Synthetic Lethality in Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freije, José M. P.; Fraile, Julia M.; López-Otín, Carlos, E-mail: jmpf@uniovi.es [Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Facultad de Medicina, Instituto Universitario de Oncología, Universidad de Oviedo, Oviedo (Spain)

    2011-09-05

    The “oncogene addiction” concept refers to the dependence of cancer cells on the function of the oncogenes responsible for their transformed phenotype, while the term “non-oncogene addiction” has been introduced to define the exacerbated necessity of the normal function of non-mutated genes. In this Perspective, we focus on the importance of proteolytic enzymes to maintain the viability of cancer cells and hypothesize that most, if not all, tumors present “addiction” to a number of proteolytic activities, which in turn may represent valuable targets of anti-cancer therapies, even without being mutated or over-expressed by the malignant cells.

  15. Protease Addiction and Synthetic Lethality in Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freije, José M. P.; Fraile, Julia M.; López-Otín, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    The “oncogene addiction” concept refers to the dependence of cancer cells on the function of the oncogenes responsible for their transformed phenotype, while the term “non-oncogene addiction” has been introduced to define the exacerbated necessity of the normal function of non-mutated genes. In this Perspective, we focus on the importance of proteolytic enzymes to maintain the viability of cancer cells and hypothesize that most, if not all, tumors present “addiction” to a number of proteolytic activities, which in turn may represent valuable targets of anti-cancer therapies, even without being mutated or over-expressed by the malignant cells.

  16. Exome sequencing for gene discovery in lethal fetal disorders--harnessing the value of extreme phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filges, Isabel; Friedman, Jan M

    2015-10-01

    Massively parallel sequencing has revolutionized our understanding of Mendelian disorders, and many novel genes have been discovered to cause disease phenotypes when mutant. At the same time, next-generation sequencing approaches have enabled non-invasive prenatal testing of free fetal DNA in maternal blood. However, little attention has been paid to using whole exome and genome sequencing strategies for gene identification in fetal disorders that are lethal in utero, because they can appear to be sporadic and Mendelian inheritance may be missed. We present challenges and advantages of applying next-generation sequencing approaches to gene discovery in fetal malformation phenotypes and review recent successful discovery approaches. We discuss the implication and significance of recessive inheritance and cross-species phenotyping in fetal lethal conditions. Whole exome sequencing can be used in individual families with undiagnosed lethal congenital anomaly syndromes to discover causal mutations, provided that prior to data analysis, the fetal phenotype can be correlated to a particular developmental pathway in embryogenesis. Cross-species phenotyping allows providing further evidence for causality of discovered variants in genes involved in those extremely rare phenotypes and will increase our knowledge about normal and abnormal human developmental processes. Ultimately, families will benefit from the option of early prenatal diagnosis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Disruption of the Sec24d gene results in early embryonic lethality in the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea C Baines

    Full Text Available Transport of newly synthesized proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER to the Golgi is mediated by the coat protein complex COPII. The inner coat of COPII is assembled from heterodimers of SEC23 and SEC24. Though mice with mutations in one of the four Sec24 paralogs, Sec24b, exhibit a neural tube closure defect, deficiency in humans or mice has not yet been described for any of the other Sec24 paralogs. We now report characterization of mice with targeted disruption of Sec24d. Early embryonic lethality is observed in mice completely deficient in SEC24D, while a hypomorphic Sec24d allele permits survival to mid-embryogenesis. Mice haploinsufficient for Sec24d exhibit no phenotypic abnormality. A BAC transgene containing Sec24d rescues the embryonic lethality observed in Sec24d-null mice. These results demonstrate an absolute requirement for SEC24D expression in early mammalian development that is not compensated by the other three Sec24 paralogs. The early embryonic lethality resulting from loss of SEC24D in mice contrasts with the previously reported mild skeletal phenotype of SEC24D deficiency in zebrafish and restricted neural tube phenotype of SEC24B deficiency in mice. Taken together, these observations suggest that the multiple Sec24 paralogs have developed distinct functions over the course of vertebrate evolution.

  18. DPY-17 and MUA-3 Interact for Connective Tissue-Like Tissue Integrity in Caenorhabditis elegans: A Model for Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotopoulos, Pauline; Kim, Jeongho; Hyun, Moonjung; Qamari, Waiss; Lee, Inhwan; You, Young-Jai

    2015-04-27

    mua-3 is a Caenorhabditis elegans homolog of the mammalian fibrillin1, a monogenic cause of Marfan syndrome. We identified a new mutation of mua-3 that carries an in-frame deletion of 131 amino acids in the extracellular domain, which allows the mutants to survive in a temperature-dependent manner; at the permissive temperature, the mutants grow normally without obvious phenotypes, but at the nonpermissive temperature, more than 90% die during the L4 molt due to internal organ detachment. Using the temperature-sensitive lethality, we performed unbiased genetic screens to isolate suppressors to find genetic interactors of MUA-3. From two independent screens, we isolated mutations in dpy-17 as a suppressor. RNAi of dpy-17 in mua-3 rescued the lethality, confirming dpy-17 is a suppressor. dpy-17 encodes a collagen known to genetically interact with dpy-31, a BMP-1/Tolloid-like metalloprotease required for TGFβ activation in mammals. Human fibrillin1 mutants fail to sequester TGFβ2 leading to excess TGFβ signaling, which in turn contributes to Marfan syndrome or Marfan-related syndrome. Consistent with that, RNAi of dbl-1, a TGFβ homolog, modestly rescued the lethality of mua-3 mutants, suggesting a potentially conserved interaction between MUA-3 and a TGFβ pathway in C. elegans. Our work provides genetic evidence of the interaction between TGFβ and a fibrillin homolog, and thus provides a simple yet powerful genetic model to study TGFβ function in development of Marfan pathology. Copyright © 2015 Fotopoulos et al.

  19. Genetic interactions between neurofibromin and endothelin receptor B in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mugdha Deo

    Full Text Available When mutations in two different genes produce the same mutant phenotype, it suggests that the encoded proteins either interact with each other, or act in parallel to fulfill a similar purpose. Haploinsufficiency of Neurofibromin and over-expression of Endothelin 3 both cause increased numbers of melanocytes to populate the dermis during mouse development, and thus we are interested in how these two signaling pathways might intersect. Neurofibromin is mutated in the human genetic disease, neurofibromatosis type 1, which is characterized by the development of Schwann cell based tumors and skin hyper-pigmentation. Neurofibromin is a GTPase activating protein, while the Endothelin 3 ligand activates Endothelin receptor B, a G protein coupled receptor. In order to study the genetic interactions between endothelin and neurofibromin, we defined the deletion breakpoints of the classical Ednrb piebald lethal allele (Ednrb(s-l and crossed these mice to mice with a loss-of-function mutation in neurofibromin, Dark skin 9 (Dsk9. We found that Neurofibromin haploinsufficiency requires Endothelin receptor B to darken the tail dermis. In contrast, Neurofibromin haploinsufficiency increases the area of the coat that is pigmented in Endothelin receptor B null mice. We also found an oncogenic mutation in the G protein alpha subunit, GNAQ, which couples to Endothelin receptor B, in a uveal melanoma from a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1. Thus, this data suggests that there is a complex relationship between Neurofibromin and Endothelin receptor B.

  20. Incompatibility between X chromosome factor and pericentric heterochromatic region causes lethality in hybrids between Drosophila melanogaster and its sibling species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattani, M Victoria; Presgraves, Daven C

    2012-06-01

    The Dobzhansky-Muller model posits that postzygotic reproductive isolation results from the evolution of incompatible epistatic interactions between species: alleles that function in the genetic background of one species can cause sterility or lethality in the genetic background of another species. Progress in identifying and characterizing factors involved in postzygotic isolation in Drosophila has remained slow, mainly because Drosophila melanogaster, with all of its genetic tools, forms dead or sterile hybrids when crossed to its sister species, D. simulans, D. sechellia, and D. mauritiana. To circumvent this problem, we used chromosome deletions and duplications from D. melanogaster to map two hybrid incompatibility loci in F(1) hybrids with its sister species. We mapped a recessive factor to the pericentromeric heterochromatin of the X chromosome in D. simulans and D. mauritiana, which we call heterochromatin hybrid lethal (hhl), which causes lethality in F(1) hybrid females with D. melanogaster. As F(1) hybrid males hemizygous for a D. mauritiana (or D. simulans) X chromosome are viable, the lethality of deficiency hybrid females implies that a dominant incompatible partner locus exists on the D. melanogaster X. Using small segments of the D. melanogaster X chromosome duplicated onto the Y chromosome, we mapped a dominant factor that causes hybrid lethality to a small 24-gene region of the D. melanogaster X. We provide evidence suggesting that it interacts with hhl(mau). The location of hhl is consistent with the emerging theme that hybrid incompatibilities in Drosophila involve heterochromatic regions and factors that interact with the heterochromatin.

  1. Mutations in FLNB cause boomerang dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicknell, L S; Morgan, T; Bonafé, L; Wessels, M W; Bialer, M G; Willems, P J; Cohn, D H; Krakow, D; Robertson, S P

    2005-07-01

    Boomerang dysplasia (BD) is a perinatal lethal osteochondrodysplasia, characterised by absence or underossification of the limb bones and vertebrae. The BD phenotype is similar to a group of disorders including atelosteogenesis I, atelosteogenesis III, and dominantly inherited Larsen syndrome that we have recently shown to be associated with mutations in FLNB, the gene encoding the actin binding cytoskeletal protein, filamin B. We report the identification of mutations in FLNB in two unrelated individuals with boomerang dysplasia. The resultant substitutions, L171R and S235P, lie within the calponin homology 2 region of the actin binding domain of filamin B and occur at sites that are evolutionarily well conserved. These findings expand the phenotypic spectrum resulting from mutations in FLNB and underline the central role this protein plays during skeletogenesis in humans.

  2. Soluble factor(s) from bone marrow cells can rescue lethally irradiated mice by protecting endogenous hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yi; Zhan, Yuxia; Burke, Kathleen A; Anderson, W French

    2005-04-01

    Ionizing radiation-induced myeloablation can be rescued via bone marrow transplantation (BMT) or administration of cytokines if given within 2 hours after radiation exposure. There is no evidence for the existence of soluble factors that can rescue an animal after a lethal dose of radiation when administered several hours postradiation. We established a system that could test the possibility for the existence of soluble factors that could be used more than 2 hours postirradiation to rescue animals. Animals with an implanted TheraCyte immunoisolation device (TID) received lethal-dose radiation and then normal bone marrow Lin- cells were loaded into the device (thereby preventing direct interaction between donor and recipient cells). Animal survival was evaluated and stem cell activity was tested with secondary bone marrow transplantation and flow cytometry analysis. Donor cell gene expression of five antiapoptotic cytokines was examined. Bone marrow Lin- cells rescued lethally irradiated animals via soluble factor(s). Bone marrow cells from the rescued animals can rescue and repopulate secondary lethally irradiated animals. Within the first 6 hours post-lethal-dose radiation, there is no significant change of gene expression of the known radioprotective factors TPO, SCF, IL-3, Flt-3 ligand, and SDF-1. Hematopoietic stem cells can be protected in lethally irradiated animals by soluble factors produced by bone marrow Lin- cells.

  3. Computed tomography of lethal medline granuloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ho Suk; Kim, Tae Ho; Suh, Kyung Jin; Kim, Tae Hun; Kim, Yong Joo; Kang, Duk Sik

    1991-01-01

    In order to clarify the CT findings of lethal midline granuloma (LMG) diagnosed clinically or histopathologically, the authors retrospectively analyzed 12 patients who were seen at Kyungpook National University Hospital from February 1985 to August 1989. CT showed nasal mucosal thickening and / or soft tissue mass (9 case), spreading of the lesions along the facial subcutaneous fat plane (8 cases), invasion into the paranasal sinuses (5 cases), bone destruction (5 cases), nasopharyngeal mass lesion (2 cases), and extension of the lesion into the infratemporal fossa (1 case). In spite of the fact that CT does not make definitive diagnosis of LMG, it permits evaluation of the extent of the lesion, detection of the combined lesion, differential diagnosis, and close monitoring of its evolution under treatment

  4. Gluconeogenesis in lethally X-irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulikova, E.; Ahlers, I.; Praslicka, M.

    1983-01-01

    The in vivo incorporation of U- 14 C-alanine into blood glucose and liver glycogen was measured in rats irradiated with a single whole body lethal dose of X-rays. Changes in gluconeogenic enzyme activities were studied in the liver. Increased incorporation of 14 C-alanine into blood glucose and liver glycogen were found after irradiation. Liver phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and glycogenic activity underwent almost parallel changes and were significantly elevated from the 6th to the 48th hour, with resultant accumulation of glycogen. Glucose-6-phosphatase activity was depressed and there was a negative correlation between it and liver glycogen concentration. Maximum fructose-1,6-diphosphatase activity was found at 48 hours. The results show that glycogen accumulation in the liver and the raised blood glucose level in X-irradiated rats are based on raised gluconeogenesis. (author)

  5. Gluconeogenesis in lethally X-irradiated rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulikova, E.; Ahlers, I.; Praslicka, M. (Univerzita P.J. Safarika, Kosice (Czechoslovakia). Katedra Vseobecnej Biologie)

    1983-02-01

    The in vivo incorporation of U-/sup 14/C-alanine into blood glucose and liver glycogen was measured in rats irradiated with a single whole body lethal dose of X-rays. Changes in gluconeogenic enzyme activities were studied in the liver. Increased incorporation of /sup 14/C-alanine into blood glucose and liver glycogen were found after irradiation. Liver phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and glycogenic activity underwent almost parallel changes and were significantly elevated from the 6th to the 48th hour, with resultant accumulation of glycogen. Glucose-6-phosphatase activity was depressed and there was a negative correlation between it and liver glycogen concentration. Maximum fructose-1,6-diphosphatase activity was found at 48 hours. The results show that glycogen accumulation in the liver and the raised blood glucose level in X-irradiated rats are based on raised gluconeogenesis.

  6. Ants defend aphids against lethal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Charlotte; Agrawal, Anurag A.; Hajek, Ann E.

    2010-01-01

    Social insects defend their own colonies and some species also protect their mutualist partners. In mutualisms with aphids, ants typically feed on honeydew produced by aphids and, in turn guard and shelter aphid colonies from insect natural enemies. Here we report that Formica podzolica ants tending milkweed aphids, Aphis asclepiadis, protect aphid colonies from lethal fungal infections caused by an obligate aphid pathogen, Pandora neoaphidis. In field experiments, bodies of fungal-killed aphids were quickly removed from ant-tended aphid colonies. Ant workers were also able to detect infective conidia on the cuticle of living aphids and responded by either removing or grooming these aphids. Our results extend the long-standing view of ants as mutualists and protectors of aphids by demonstrating focused sanitizing and quarantining behaviour that may lead to reduced disease transmission in aphid colonies. PMID:19923138

  7. Lethal photosensitization of biofilm-grown bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael

    1997-12-01

    Antibacterial agents are increasingly being used for the prophylaxis and treatment of oral diseases. As these agents can be rendered ineffective by resistance development in the target organisms there is a need to develop alternative antimicrobial approaches. Light-activated antimicrobial agents release singlet oxygen and free radicals which can kill adjacent bacteria and a wide range of cariogenic and periodontopathogenic bacteria has been shown to be susceptible to such agents. In the oral cavity these organisms are present as biofilms (dental plaques) which are less susceptible to traditional antimicrobial agents than bacterial suspensions. The results of these studies have shown that biofilm-grown oral bacteria are also susceptible to lethal photosensitization although the light energy doses required are grater than those needed to kill the organisms when they are grown as aqueous suspensions.

  8. Tityus serrulatus venom--A lethal cocktail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucca, Manuela Berto; Cerni, Felipe Augusto; Pinheiro Junior, Ernesto Lopes; Bordon, Karla de Castro Figueiredo; Amorim, Fernanda Gobbi; Cordeiro, Francielle Almeida; Longhim, Heloisa Tavoni; Cremonez, Caroline Marroni; Oliveira, Guilherme Honda; Arantes, Eliane Candiani

    2015-12-15

    Tityus serrulatus (Ts) is the main scorpion species of medical importance in Brazil. Ts venom is composed of several compounds such as mucus, inorganic salts, lipids, amines, nucleotides, enzymes, kallikrein inhibitor, natriuretic peptide, proteins with high molecular mass, peptides, free amino acids and neurotoxins. Neurotoxins are considered the most responsible for the envenoming syndrome due to their pharmacological action on ion channels such as voltage-gated sodium (Nav) and potassium (Kv) channels. The major goal of this review is to present important advances in Ts envenoming research, correlating both the crude Ts venom and isolated toxins with alterations observed in all human systems. The most remarkable event lies in the Ts induced massive releasing of neurotransmitters influencing, directly or indirectly, the entire body. Ts venom proved to extremely affect nervous and muscular systems, to modulate the immune system, to induce cardiac disorders, to cause pulmonary edema, to decrease urinary flow and to alter endocrine, exocrine, reproductive, integumentary, skeletal and digestive functions. Therefore, Ts venom possesses toxins affecting all anatomic systems, making it a lethal cocktail. However, its low lethality may be due to the low venom mass injected, to the different venom compositions, the body characteristics and health conditions of the victim and the local of Ts sting. Furthermore, we also described the different treatments employed during envenoming cases. In particular, throughout the review, an effort will be made to provide information from an extensive documented studies concerning Ts venom in vitro, in animals and in humans (a total of 151 references). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical experience in the screening and management of a large kindred with familial isolated pituitary adenoma due to an aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Fred; Hunter, Steven; Bradley, Lisa; Chahal, Harvinder S; Storr, Helen L; Akker, Scott A; Kumar, Ajith V; Orme, Stephen M; Evanson, Jane; Abid, Noina; Morrison, Patrick J; Korbonits, Márta; Atkinson, A Brew

    2014-04-01

    Germline AIP mutations usually cause young-onset acromegaly with low penetrance in a subset of familial isolated pituitary adenoma families. We describe our experience with a large family with R304* AIP mutation and discuss some of the diagnostic dilemmas and management issues. The aim of the study was to identify and screen mutation carriers in the family. Forty-three family members participated in the study. The study was performed in university hospitals. We conducted genetic and endocrine screening of family members. We identified 18 carriers of the R304* mutation, three family members with an AIP-variant A299V, and two family members who harbored both changes. One of the two index cases presented with gigantism and pituitary apoplexy, the other presented with young-onset acromegaly, and both had surgery and radiotherapy. After genetic and clinical screening of the family, two R304* carriers were diagnosed with acromegaly. They underwent transsphenoidal surgery after a short period of somatostatin analog treatment. One of these two patients is in remission; the other achieved successful pregnancy despite suboptimal control of acromegaly. One of the A299V carrier family members was previously diagnosed with a microprolactinoma; we consider this case to be a phenocopy. Height of the unaffected R304* carrier family members is not different compared to noncarrier relatives. Families with AIP mutations present particular problems such as the occurrence of large invasive tumors, poor response to medical treatment, difficulties with fertility and management of pregnancy, and the finding of AIP sequence variants of unknown significance. Because disease mostly develops at a younger age and penetrance is low, the timing and duration of the follow-up of carriers without overt disease requires further study. The psychological and financial impact of prolonged clinical screening must be considered. Excellent relationships between the family, endocrinologists, and

  10. A novel CISD2 mutation associated with a classical Wolfram syndrome phenotype alters Ca2+ homeostasis and ER-mitochondria interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouzier, Cécile; Moore, David; Delorme, Cécile; Lacas-Gervais, Sandra; Ait-El-Mkadem, Samira; Fragaki, Konstantina; Burté, Florence; Serre, Valérie; Bannwarth, Sylvie; Chaussenot, Annabelle; Catala, Martin; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Paquis-Flucklinger, Véronique

    2017-05-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by early-onset optic atrophy and diabetes mellitus, which can be associated with more extensive central nervous system and endocrine complications. The majority of patients harbour pathogenic WFS1 mutations, but recessive mutations in a second gene, CISD2, have been described in a small number of families with Wolfram syndrome type 2 (WFS2). The defining diagnostic criteria for WFS2 also consist of optic atrophy and diabetes mellitus, but unlike WFS1, this phenotypic subgroup has been associated with peptic ulcer disease and an increased bleeding tendency. Here, we report on a novel homozygous CISD2 mutation (c.215A > G; p.Asn72Ser) in a Moroccan patient with an overlapping phenotype suggesting that Wolfram syndrome type 1 and type 2 form a continuous clinical spectrum with genetic heterogeneity. The present study provides strong evidence that this particular CISD2 mutation disturbs cellular Ca2+ homeostasis with enhanced Ca2+ flux from the ER to mitochondria and cytosolic Ca2+ abnormalities in patient-derived fibroblasts. This Ca2+ dysregulation was associated with increased ER-mitochondria contact, a swollen ER lumen and a hyperfused mitochondrial network in the absence of overt ER stress. Although there was no marked alteration in mitochondrial bioenergetics under basal conditions, culture of patient-derived fibroblasts in glucose-free galactose medium revealed a respiratory chain defect in complexes I and II, and a trend towards decreased ATP levels. Our results provide important novel insight into the potential disease mechanisms underlying the neurodegenerative consequences of CISD2 mutations and the subsequent development of multisystemic disease. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  11. Mutations in the evolutionarily highly conserved KEOPS complex genes cause nephrotic syndrome with microcephaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Daniela A.; Rao, Jia; Mollet, Geraldine; Schapiro, David; Daugeron, Marie-Claire; Tan, Weizhen; Gribouval, Olivier; Boyer, Olivia; Revy, Patrick; Jobst-Schwan, Tilman; Schmidt, Johanna Magdalena; Lawson, Jennifer A.; Schanze, Denny; Ashraf, Shazia; Boddaert, Nathalie; Collinet, Bruno; Martin, Gaëlle; Liger, Dominique; Lovric, Svjetlana; Furlano, Monica; Guerrera, I. Chiara; Sanchez-Ferras, Oraly; Menten, Björn; Vergult, Sarah; De Rocker, Nina; Airik, Merlin; Hermle, Tobias; Shril, Shirlee; Widmeier, Eugen; Gee, Heon Yung; Choi, Won-Il; Sadowski, Carolin E.; Pabst, Werner L.; Warejko, Jillian; Daga, Ankana; LeBerre, Tamara Basta; Matejas, Verena; Behnam, Babak; Beeson, Brendan; Begtrup, Amber; Bruce, Malcolm; Ch'ng, Gaik-Siew; Lin, Shuan-Pei; Chang, Jui-Hsing; Chen, Chao-Huei; Cho, Megan T.; Gipson, Patrick E.; Hsu, Chyong-Hsin; Kari, Jameela A.; Ke, Yu-Yuan; Kiraly-Borri, Cathy; Lai, Wai-ming; Lemyre, Emmanuelle; Littlejohn, Rebecca Okasha; Masri, Amira; Moghtaderi, Mastaneh; Nakamura, Kazuyuki; Praet, Marleen; Prasad, Chitra; Prytula, Agnieszka; Roeder, Elizabeth; Rump, Patrick; Schnur, Rhonda E.; Shiihara, Takashi; Sinha, Manish; Soliman, Neveen A; Soulami, Kenza; Sweetser, David A.; Tsai, Wen-Hui; Tsai, Jeng-Daw; Vester, Udo; Viskochil, David H.; Vatanavicharn, Nithiwat; Waxler, Jessica L.; Wolf, Matthias T.F.; Wong, Sik-Nin; Poduri, Annapurna; Truglio, Gessica; Mane, Shrikant; Lifton, Richard P.; Bouchard, Maxime; Kannu, Peter; Chitayat, David; Magen, Daniella; Calleweart, Bert; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Zenker, Martin; Antignac, Corinne; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2018-01-01

    Galloway-Mowat syndrome (GAMOS) is a severe autosomal-recessive disease characterized by the combination of early-onset steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) and microcephaly with brain anomalies. To date, mutations of WDR73 are the only known monogenic cause of GAMOS and in most affected individuals the molecular diagnosis remains elusive. We here identify recessive mutations of OSGEP, TP53RK, TPRKB, or LAGE3, encoding the 4 subunits of the KEOPS complex in 33 individuals of 30 families with GAMOS. CRISPR/Cas9 knockout in zebrafish and mice recapitulates the human phenotype of microcephaly and results in early lethality. Knockdown of OSGEP, TP53RK, or TPRKB inhibits cell proliferation, which human mutations fail to rescue, and knockdown of either gene activates DNA damage response signaling and induces apoptosis. OSGEP and TP53RK molecularly interact and co-localize with the actin-regulating ARP2/3 complex. Furthermore, knockdown of OSGEP and TP53RK induces defects of the actin cytoskeleton and reduces migration rate of human podocytes, an established intermediate phenotype of SRNS. We thus identify 4 novel monogenic causes of GAMOS, describe the first link between KEOPS function and human disease, and delineate potential pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:28805828

  12. Lethal genes surviving by mosaicism: a possible explanation for sporadic birth defects involving the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happle, R

    1987-04-01

    A genetic concept is advanced to explain the origin of several sporadic syndromes characterized by a mosaic distribution of skin defects. It is postulated that these disorders are due to the action of a lethal gene surviving by mosaicism. The presence of the mutation in the zygote will lead to death of the embryo at an early stage of development. Cells bearing the mutation can survive only in a mosaic state, in close proximity with normal cells. The mosaic may arise either from a gametic half chromatid mutation or from an early somatic mutation. This concept of origin is proposed to apply to the Schimmelpenning-Feuerstein-Mims syndrome, the McCune-Albright syndrome, the Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, the Sturge-Weber syndrome, and neurocutaneous melanosis. Moreover, this etiologic hypothesis may apply to two other birth defects that have recently been delineated, the Proteus syndrome (partial gigantism of hands or feet, hemihypertrophy, macrocephaly, linear papillomatous epidermal nevus, subcutaneous hemangiomas and lipomas, accelerated growth, and visceral anomalies), and the Delleman-Oorthuys syndrome (orbital cyst, porencephaly, periorbital appendages, and focal aplasia of the skin.

  13. Mutations at the flavin binding site of ETF:QO yield a MADD-like severe phenotype in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Ema; Henriques, Bárbara J; Rodrigues, João V; Prudêncio, Pedro; Rocha, Hugo; Vilarinho, Laura; Martinho, Rui G; Gomes, Cláudio M

    2012-08-01

    Following a screening on EMS-induced Drosophila mutants defective for formation and morphogenesis of epithelial cells, we have identified three lethal mutants defective for the production of embryonic cuticle. The mutants are allelic to the CG12140 gene, the fly homologue of electron transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF:QO). In humans, inherited defects in this inner membrane protein account for multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD), a metabolic disease of β-oxidation, with a broad range of clinical phenotypes, varying from embryonic lethal to mild forms. The three mutant alleles carried distinct missense mutations in ETF:QO (G65E, A68V and S104F) and maternal mutant embryos for ETF:QO showed lethal morphogenetic defects and a significant induction of apoptosis following germ-band elongation. This phenotype is accompanied by an embryonic accumulation of short- and medium-chain acylcarnitines (C4, C8 and C12) as well as long-chain acylcarnitines (C14 and C16:1), whose elevation is also found in severe MADD forms in humans under intense metabolic decompensation. In agreement the ETF:QO activity in the mutant embryos is markedly decreased in relation to wild type activity. Amino acid sequence analysis and structural mapping into a molecular model of ETF:QO show that all mutations map at FAD interacting residues, two of which at the nucleotide-binding Rossmann fold. This structural domain is composed by a β-strand connected by a short loop to an α-helix, and its perturbation results in impaired cofactor association via structural destabilisation and consequently enzymatic inactivation. This work thus pinpoints the molecular origins of a severe MADD-like phenotype in the fruit fly and establishes the proof of concept concerning the suitability of this organism as a potential model organism for MADD. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Measurement of oxygen enhancement ratio for sub-lethal region using saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nairy, Rajesha K.; Anjaria, K.B.; Bhat, Nagesh N.; Chaurasia, Rajesh K.; Balakrishnan, Sreedevi; Yerol, Narayana

    2013-01-01

    Oxygen is one of the best known modifiers of radiation sensitivity and the biological effects is greater in the presence of oxygen, and significant modifying effect will be observed only for low LET radiations. The reduced oxygen availability is sensed which trigger homeostatic responses, which impact on virtually all areas of biology and medicine. Failure to achieve complete response following radiotherapy of large tumors is attributed to the presence of radio-resistant hypoxic cells, therefore clarifying the mechanism of the oxygen effect is important. In the present study, a mutant type diploid yeast strain, Saccharomyces cerevisiae D7 was used to study Oxygen Enhancement Ratio (OER) using 60 Co gamma radiation. Cells were washed thrice by centrifugation (2000 g for 5 min) and re-suspended to a cell concentration of 1x108 cells mL-1 in a sterile polypropylene vial for irradiation (sub-lethal dose range, 0-100 Gy). Hypoxic conditions were achieved by incubating the cells in airtight vials at 30℃ for 30 min prior to irradiation. The gene conversion and back mutation analysis were carried out according to the standard protocol. Gene conversion is the radio-sensitive biological endpoint, that can be studied in Saccharomyces cerevisiae D7 yeast cells at trp locus in tryptophan (Trp- medium) deficient medium. The dose response relation at euoxic and hypoxic condition in sub-lethal doses are found to be linear and is represented by Y (Euoxic) = (6.54±0.102) D with R2=0.999 and for hypoxic condition Y(Hypoxic) = (3.346±0.033) D with R2=0.996. The OER can be calculated by dividing the euoxic slope with hypoxic slope, and is 1.95. Back mutation, which is a result of reversion of Isoleucine auxotrophs to prototrophs gives very good information at sub-lethal doses. The dose response relation between back mutated cells and radiation doses at Euoxic and hypoxic condition can be represented as Y(Euoxic) = (2.85±0.126) D with R2= 0.976 and for hypoxic condition Y

  15. Chronic exposure of corals to fine sediments: lethal and sub-lethal impacts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florita Flores

    Full Text Available Understanding the sedimentation and turbidity thresholds for corals is critical in assessing the potential impacts of dredging projects in tropical marine systems. In this study, we exposed two species of coral sampled from offshore locations to six levels of total suspended solids (TSS for 16 weeks in the laboratory, including a 4 week recovery period. Dose-response relationships were developed to quantify the lethal and sub-lethal thresholds of sedimentation and turbidity for the corals. The sediment treatments affected the horizontal foliaceous species (Montipora aequituberculata more than the upright branching species (Acropora millepora. The lowest sediment treatments that caused full colony mortality were 30 mg l(-1 TSS (25 mg cm(-2 day(-1 for M. aequituberculata and 100 mg l(-1 TSS (83 mg cm(-2 day(-1 for A. millepora after 12 weeks. Coral mortality generally took longer than 4 weeks and was closely related to sediment accumulation on the surface of the corals. While measurements of damage to photosystem II in the symbionts and reductions in lipid content and growth indicated sub-lethal responses in surviving corals, the most reliable predictor of coral mortality in this experiment was long-term sediment accumulation on coral tissue.

  16. Chronic Exposure of Corals to Fine Sediments: Lethal and Sub-Lethal Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Florita; Hoogenboom, Mia O.; Smith, Luke D.; Cooper, Timothy F.; Abrego, David; Negri, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the sedimentation and turbidity thresholds for corals is critical in assessing the potential impacts of dredging projects in tropical marine systems. In this study, we exposed two species of coral sampled from offshore locations to six levels of total suspended solids (TSS) for 16 weeks in the laboratory, including a 4 week recovery period. Dose-response relationships were developed to quantify the lethal and sub-lethal thresholds of sedimentation and turbidity for the corals. The sediment treatments affected the horizontal foliaceous species (Montipora aequituberculata) more than the upright branching species (Acropora millepora). The lowest sediment treatments that caused full colony mortality were 30 mg l−1 TSS (25 mg cm−2 day−1) for M. aequituberculata and 100 mg l−1 TSS (83 mg cm−2 day−1) for A. millepora after 12 weeks. Coral mortality generally took longer than 4 weeks and was closely related to sediment accumulation on the surface of the corals. While measurements of damage to photosystem II in the symbionts and reductions in lipid content and growth indicated sub-lethal responses in surviving corals, the most reliable predictor of coral mortality in this experiment was long-term sediment accumulation on coral tissue. PMID:22662225

  17. Mitochondrial uncoupler exerts a synthetic lethal effect against β-catenin mutant tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikata, Yuki; Kiga, Masaki; Futamura, Yushi; Aono, Harumi; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Kawada, Manabu; Osada, Hiroyuki; Imoto, Masaya

    2017-04-01

    The wingless/int-1 (Wnt) signal transduction pathway plays a central role in cell proliferation, survival, differentiation and apoptosis. When β-catenin: a component of the Wnt pathway, is mutated into an active form, cell growth signaling is hyperactive and drives oncogenesis. As β-catenin is mutated in a wide variety of tumors, including up to 10% of all sporadic colon carcinomas and 20% of hepatocellular carcinomas, it has been considered a promising target for therapeutic interventions. Therefore, we screened an in-house natural product library for compounds that exhibited synthetic lethality towards β-catenin mutations and isolated nonactin, an antibiotic mitochondrial uncoupler, as a hit compound. Nonactin, as well as other mitochondrial uncouplers, induced apoptosis selectively in β-catenin mutated tumor cells. Significant tumor regression was observed in the β-catenin mutant HCT 116 xenograft model, but not in the β-catenin wild type A375 xenograft model, in response to daily administration of nonactin in vivo. Furthermore, we found that expression of an active mutant form of β-catenin induced a decrease in the glycolysis rate. Taken together, our results demonstrate that tumor cells with mutated β-catenin depend on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation for survival. Therefore, they undergo apoptosis in response to mitochondrial dysfunction following the addition of mitochondrial uncouplers, such as nonactin. These results suggest that targeting mitochondria is a potential chemotherapeutic strategy for tumor cells that harbor β-catenin mutations. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  18. Alisertib added to rituximab and vincristine is synthetic lethal and potentially curative in mice with aggressive DLBCL co-overexpressing MYC and BCL2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daruka Mahadevan

    Full Text Available Pearson correlation coefficient for expression analysis of the Lymphoma/Leukemia Molecular Profiling Project (LLMPP demonstrated Aurora A and B are highly correlated with MYC in DLBCL and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL, while both Auroras correlate with BCL2 only in DLBCL. Auroras are up-regulated by MYC dysregulation with associated aneuploidy and resistance to microtubule targeted agents such as vincristine. Myc and Bcl2 are differentially expressed in U-2932, TMD-8, OCI-Ly10 and Granta-519, but only U-2932 cells over-express mutated p53. Alisertib [MLN8237 or M], a highly selective small molecule inhibitor of Aurora A kinase, was synergistic with vincristine [VCR] and rituximab [R] for inhibition of cell proliferation, abrogation of cell cycle checkpoints and enhanced apoptosis versus single agent or doublet therapy. A DLBCL (U-2932 mouse model showed tumor growth inhibition (TGI of ∼ 10-20% (p = 0.001 for M, VCR and M-VCR respectively, while R alone showed ∼ 50% TGI (p = 0.001. M-R and VCR-R led to tumor regression [TR], but relapsed 10 days after discontinuing therapy. In contrast, M-VCR-R demonstrated TR with no relapse >40 days after stopping therapy with a Kaplan-Meier survival of 100%. Genes that are modulated by M-VCR-R (CENP-C, Auroras play a role in centromere-kinetochore function in an attempt to maintain mitosis in the presence of synthetic lethality. Together, our data suggest that the interaction between alisertib plus VCR plus rituximab is synergistic and synthetic lethal in Myc and Bcl-2 co-expressing DLBCL. Alisertib plus vincristine plus rituximab [M-VCR-R] may represent a new strategy for DLBCL therapy.

  19. Alisertib added to rituximab and vincristine is synthetic lethal and potentially curative in mice with aggressive DLBCL co-overexpressing MYC and BCL2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, Daruka; Morales, Carla; Cooke, Laurence S; Manziello, Ann; Mount, David W; Persky, Daniel O; Fisher, Richard I; Miller, Thomas P; Qi, Wenqing

    2014-01-01

    Pearson correlation coefficient for expression analysis of the Lymphoma/Leukemia Molecular Profiling Project (LLMPP) demonstrated Aurora A and B are highly correlated with MYC in DLBCL and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), while both Auroras correlate with BCL2 only in DLBCL. Auroras are up-regulated by MYC dysregulation with associated aneuploidy and resistance to microtubule targeted agents such as vincristine. Myc and Bcl2 are differentially expressed in U-2932, TMD-8, OCI-Ly10 and Granta-519, but only U-2932 cells over-express mutated p53. Alisertib [MLN8237 or M], a highly selective small molecule inhibitor of Aurora A kinase, was synergistic with vincristine [VCR] and rituximab [R] for inhibition of cell proliferation, abrogation of cell cycle checkpoints and enhanced apoptosis versus single agent or doublet therapy. A DLBCL (U-2932) mouse model showed tumor growth inhibition (TGI) of ∼ 10-20% (p = 0.001) for M, VCR and M-VCR respectively, while R alone showed ∼ 50% TGI (p = 0.001). M-R and VCR-R led to tumor regression [TR], but relapsed 10 days after discontinuing therapy. In contrast, M-VCR-R demonstrated TR with no relapse >40 days after stopping therapy with a Kaplan-Meier survival of 100%. Genes that are modulated by M-VCR-R (CENP-C, Auroras) play a role in centromere-kinetochore function in an attempt to maintain mitosis in the presence of synthetic lethality. Together, our data suggest that the interaction between alisertib plus VCR plus rituximab is synergistic and synthetic lethal in Myc and Bcl-2 co-expressing DLBCL. Alisertib plus vincristine plus rituximab [M-VCR-R] may represent a new strategy for DLBCL therapy.

  20. Mutation in cyclophilin B that causes hyperelastosis cutis in American Quarter Horse does not affect peptidylprolyl cis-trans isomerase activity but shows altered cyclophilin B-protein interactions and affects collagen folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Vranka, Janice A; Boudko, Sergei P; Pokidysheva, Elena; Mizuno, Kazunori; Zientek, Keith; Keene, Douglas R; Rashmir-Raven, Ann M; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Winand, Nena J; Bächinger, Hans Peter

    2012-06-22

    The rate-limiting step of folding of the collagen triple helix is catalyzed by cyclophilin B (CypB). The G6R mutation in cyclophilin B found in the American Quarter Horse leads to autosomal recessive hyperelastosis cutis, also known as hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia. The mutant protein shows small structural changes in the region of the mutation at the side opposite the catalytic domain of CypB. The peptidylprolyl cis-trans isomerase activity of the mutant CypB is normal when analyzed in vitro. However, the biosynthesis of type I collagen in affected horse fibroblasts shows a delay in folding and secretion and a decrease in hydroxylysine and glucosyl-galactosyl hydroxylysine. This leads to changes in the structure of collagen fibrils in tendon, similar to those observed in P3H1 null mice. In contrast to cyclophilin B null mice, where little 3-hydroxylation was found in type I collagen, 3-hydroxylation of type I collagen in affected horses is normal. The mutation disrupts the interaction of cyclophilin B with the P-domain of calreticulin, with lysyl hydroxylase 1, and probably other proteins, such as the formation of the P3H1·CypB·cartilage-associated protein complex, resulting in less effective catalysis of the rate-limiting step in collagen folding in the rough endoplasmic reticulum.

  1. Mutation in Cyclophilin B That Causes Hyperelastosis Cutis in American Quarter Horse Does Not Affect Peptidylprolyl cis-trans Isomerase Activity but Shows Altered Cyclophilin B-Protein Interactions and Affects Collagen Folding*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Vranka, Janice A.; Boudko, Sergei P.; Pokidysheva, Elena; Mizuno, Kazunori; Zientek, Keith; Keene, Douglas R.; Rashmir-Raven, Ann M.; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Winand, Nena J.; Bächinger, Hans Peter

    2012-01-01

    The rate-limiting step of folding of the collagen triple helix is catalyzed by cyclophilin B (CypB). The G6R mutation in cyclophilin B found in the American Quarter Horse leads to autosomal recessive hyperelastosis cutis, also known as hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia. The mutant protein shows small structural changes in the region of the mutation at the side opposite the catalytic domain of CypB. The peptidylprolyl cis-trans isomerase activity of the mutant CypB is normal when analyzed in vitro. However, the biosynthesis of type I collagen in affected horse fibroblasts shows a delay in folding and secretion and a decrease in hydroxylysine and glucosyl-galactosyl hydroxylysine. This leads to changes in the structure of collagen fibrils in tendon, similar to those observed in P3H1 null mice. In contrast to cyclophilin B null mice, where little 3-hydroxylation was found in type I collagen, 3-hydroxylation of type I collagen in affected horses is normal. The mutation disrupts the interaction of cyclophilin B with the P-domain of calreticulin, with lysyl hydroxylase 1, and probably other proteins, such as the formation of the P3H1·CypB·cartilage-associated protein complex, resulting in less effective catalysis of the rate-limiting step in collagen folding in the rough endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:22556420

  2. Neutron-induced mutation experiments. Comprehensive report, March 1, 1977-August 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrahamson, S.

    1981-02-01

    Neutron-induced X-linked lethal mutations were induced in Drosophila melanogaster oogonia at energies of .43, .66, 2, and 6 MeV. The 37 irradiations were carried out at the RARAF facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory. RBE's (relative to x-ray data similarly collected) were calculated to be .43 MeV to 4.8; .66 MeV to 4.0; 2 MeV to 3.2; and 6 MeV to 2.9. The dose/frequency response curves for all energies best fit a linear rather than a linear-quadratic model following regression analyses. Control data for specific locus mutations (420,000 tests) were gathered. This data, combined with other data (both X-linked lethal and specific locus) has been used to estimate the number of loci on the X-chromosome of Drosophila which can mutate to recessive lethals

  3. Patterning and gastrulation defects caused by the tw18 lethal are due to loss of Ppp2r1a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisette Lange

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The mouse t haplotype, a variant 20 cM genomic region on Chromosome 17, harbors 16 embryonic control genes identified by recessive lethal mutations isolated from wild mouse populations. Due to technical constraints so far only one of these, the tw5 lethal, has been cloned and molecularly characterized. Here we report the molecular isolation of the tw18 lethal. Embryos carrying the tw18 lethal die from major gastrulation defects commencing with primitive streak formation at E6.5. We have used transcriptome and marker gene analyses to describe the molecular etiology of the tw18 phenotype. We show that both WNT and Nodal signal transduction are impaired in the mutant epiblast, causing embryonic patterning defects and failure of primitive streak and mesoderm formation. By using a candidate gene approach, gene knockout by homologous recombination and genetic rescue, we have identified the gene causing the tw18 phenotype as Ppp2r1a, encoding the PP2A scaffolding subunit PR65alpha. Our work highlights the importance of phosphatase 2A in embryonic patterning, primitive streak formation, gastrulation, and mesoderm formation downstream of WNT and Nodal signaling.

  4. Lethal and sub-lethal effects of five pesticides used in rice farming on the earthworm Eisenia fetida

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rico, Andreu; Sabater, Consuelo; Castillo, María Ángeles

    2016-01-01

    The toxicity of five pesticides typically used in rice farming (trichlorfon, dimethoate, carbendazim, tebuconazole and prochloraz) was evaluated on different lethal and sub-lethal endpoints of the earthworm Eisenia fetida. The evaluated endpoints included: avoidance behaviour after an exposure

  5. Mutational robustness of gene regulatory networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aalt D J van Dijk

    Full Text Available Mutational robustness of gene regulatory networks refers to their ability to generate constant biological output upon mutations that change network structure. Such networks contain regulatory interactions (transcription factor-target gene interactions but often also protein-protein interactions between transcription factors. Using computational modeling, we study factors that influence robustness and we infer several network properties governing it. These include the type of mutation, i.e. whether a regulatory interaction or a protein-protein interaction is mutated, and in the case of mutation of a regulatory interaction, the sign of the interaction (activating vs. repressive. In addition, we analyze the effect of combinations of mutations and we compare networks containing monomeric with those containing dimeric transcription factors. Our results are consistent with available data on biological networks, for example based on evolutionary conservation of network features. As a novel and remarkable property, we predict that networks are more robust against mutations in monomer than in dimer transcription factors, a prediction for which analysis of conservation of DNA binding residues in monomeric vs. dimeric transcription factors provides indirect evidence.

  6. Predictable Phenotypes of Antibiotic Resistance Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopp, M; Andersson, D I

    2018-05-15

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria represent a major threat to our ability to treat bacterial infections. Two factors that determine the evolutionary success of antibiotic resistance mutations are their impact on resistance level and the fitness cost. Recent studies suggest that resistance mutations commonly show epistatic interactions, which would complicate predictions of their stability in bacterial populations. We analyzed 13 different chromosomal resistance mutations and 10 host strains of Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli to address two main questions. (i) Are there epistatic interactions between different chromosomal resistance mutations? (ii) How does the strain background and genetic distance influence the effect of chromosomal resistance mutations on resistance and fitness? Our results show that the effects of combined resistance mutations on resistance and fitness are largely predictable and that epistasis remains rare even when up to four mutations were combined. Furthermore, a majority of the mutations, especially target alteration mutations, demonstrate strain-independent phenotypes across different species. This study extends our understanding of epistasis among resistance mutations and shows that interactions between different resistance mutations are often predictable from the characteristics of the individual mutations. IMPORTANCE The spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria imposes an urgent threat to public health. The ability to forecast the evolutionary success of resistant mutants would help to combat dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Previous studies have shown that the phenotypic effects (fitness and resistance level) of resistance mutations can vary substantially depending on the genetic context in which they occur. We conducted a broad screen using many different resistance mutations and host strains to identify potential epistatic interactions between various types of resistance mutations and to determine the effect of strain

  7. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions ...

  8. Nicotinamide starvation and inhibition of poly(ADP-Ribose) synthesis enhance the induced mutation in Chinese hamster V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Gensaku; Kaneko, Ichiro; Mitsui, Hideki.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of nicotinamide (NA) deficiency and added NA and 3-aminobenzamide (3AB) on the cytotoxicity and the induction of mutations in Chinese hamster V79-14 cells were investigated. In NA deficiency the addition of NA (up to 4 mM) and 3AB (up to 7.5 mM) was not cytotoxic. The presence of NA prior to exposure to mitomycin C (MMC) or γ-rays produced a dose-dependent increase in the relative cloning ability of DNA-damaged cells. The lethality of N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) was significantly potentiated by pre-treatment with 5 mM 3AB, but no potentiation by 3AB was observed for MMC, ultraviolet (UV)-B light, or γ-rays. Among cells pre-cultured in NA-free medium there were increased frequencies of mutations at both the hypoxanthineguanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) and the adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) loci following DNA damage. The enhancing effect by NA deficiency was time-dependent. Incubation with NA prior to DNA damage produced a significant reduction in the frequency of mutations. The addition of 3AB to the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD + )-depleted cell cultures before or after the DNA damage also strongly increased the frequency of induced mutations, with increasing concentrations of 3AB up to 5 mM, but the frequency was reduced at higher concentrations. The interaction between NA deficiency and the addition of 3AB appears to act synergistically on mutation induction. A correlation was observed between the potential of inhibiting poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase and the enhancement of mutation frequency. (author)

  9. Lethal endomyocarditis caused by chronic "Krokodil" intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Antonella; Trotta, Silvia; Colucci, Anna Pia; Aventaggiato, Lucia; Marzullo, Andrea; Solarino, Biagio

    2018-03-19

    "Krokodil" is a home-made opioid drug obtained by synthesizing desomorphine from codeine and combining it with other low-cost additives. Initially introduced in the former Soviet countries, it was then imported to Western Europe as a heroin substitute. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an Italian case of lethal krokodil abuse, that occurred in a 39-year-old man, who died suddenly after transportation to the Emergency Department (ED) for hyperthermia associated with sweating, dyspnoea and tachycardia. Post-mortem examination revealed extensive necrotic ulcerative lesions on the forearms, and autopsy showed a hypertrophic heart with ample endocardial vegetation on the aortic valve and patency of the foramen ovale. Histopathological examination of the heart showed ulcero-vegetative lesions of the aortic valve with an abscess on the annulus and extension to the periaortic adipose tissue, as well as diffuse myocardial interstitial inflammatory neutrophilic infiltrates. Toxicological analysis demonstrated a desomorphine metabolite in urine. On the basis of all these findings the cause of death was ruled to be congestive heart failure caused by endocarditis and myocarditis, correlated with chronic abuse of krokodil.

  10. Mutational analysis of the β-trefoil fold protein barley α-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor probes hot spots for the interaction with barley α-amylase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønsager, Birgit Christine; Nielsen, P. K.; Abou Hachem, Maher

    2005-01-01

    The barley alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor (BASI) inhibits alpha-amylase 2 (AMY2) with subnanomolar affinity. The contribution of selected side chains of BASI to this high affinity is discerned in this study, and binding to other targets is investigated. Seven BASI residues along the AMY2-BASI...... interface and four residues in the putative protease-binding loop on the opposite side of the inhibitor were mutated. A total of 15 variants were compared with the wild type by monitoring the alpha-amylase and protease inhibitory activities using Blue Starch and azoalbumin, respectively, and the kinetics...

  11. Mutation breeding in guava (Psidium guajava)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahishi, D.M.; Reddy, B.G.S.; Shivashankar, G.

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Guava is an important tropical fruit crop, rich in Vitamin C. The pulp of the fruit is very soft and is ideal for canning. However, the presence of a large number of hard seeds is a major disadvantage. Mutation studies have been initiated with a view to induce seed sterility. Large quantities of guava seeds were subjected to treatments with gamma radiation ranging from 10 krad to 25 krad. The lethal dose for 50% reduction in the growth parameters was around 35 krad. Among the irradiated progenies distinct variations with reference to growth habits, leaf size and branching pattern have been observed. (author)

  12. Doctor of Philosophy Thesis in Military Informatics : Lethal Autonomy of Weapons is Designed and/or Recessive

    OpenAIRE

    Nyagudi, Nyagudi Musandu

    2016-01-01

    p { margin-bottom: 0.1in; line-height: 120%; } My original contribution to knowledge is : Any weapon that exhibits intended and/or untended lethal autonomy in targeting and interdiction – does so by way of design and/or recessive flaw(s) in its systems of control – any such weapon is capable of war-fighting and other battle-space interaction in a manner that its Human Commander does not anticipate. A lethal autonomous weapons is therefore independently capable of ex...

  13. Radiation-induced mutagenicity and lethality in Ames tester strains of Salmonella

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isildar, M.; Bakale, G.

    1984-01-01

    Mutation and killing induced by X radiation and 60 Co γ radiation were studied in six different histidine-requiring auxotrophs of Salmonella typhimurium. Strain TA100, which is sensitive to base-pair substitutions, and strains TA2637 and TA98, which are sensitive to frameshifts, carry the pKM101 plasmid and exhibit significantly higher radiation-induced mutations compared to their plasmidless parent strains TA1535, TA1537, and TA1538, respectively. Among the plasmid-containing strains, TA98 and TA2637 are much more sensitive to the mutagenic action of radiation than is TA100 based on a comparison with their respective spontaneous mutation rates; however, no uniformity was observed in the responses of the strains to the lethal action of ionizing radiation. The following conclusions are consistent with these observations: (1) the standard Ames Salmonella assay correctly identifies ionizing radiation as a mutagenic agent; (2) frameshift-sensitive parent strains are more sensitive to the mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation than is the only strain studied that is sensitive to base-pair substitutions; and (3) enhancement of mutagenesis and survival is related to plasmid-mediated repair of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation and does not involve damage induced by Cerenkov-generated uv radiation which is negligible for our irradiation conditions

  14. Structural specificity in the lethal and mutagenic activity of furocoumarins in yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averbeck, D.; Chandra, P.; Biswas, R.K.; Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung m.b.H., Frankfurt am Main

    1975-01-01

    Using monofunctional (Angelicin) and bifunctional furocoumarins (Psoralen and 8 Methoxypsoralen) plus 365 nm light it is shown that both kinds of damage, the induced monoadducts and/or crosslinks in DNA, provoke lethal and mutagenic effects in haploid and diploid cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Bifunctional furocoumarins are about 20 times more effective in cell killing than Angelicin. Diploid cells are always more resistant than haploid cells. Dark repair (agar holding) increases survival. This effect can be at least in part correlated to the release of bound material from DNA in dark repair conditions. Bifunctional psoralens (10 μg/ml) are at least 10-fold more effective in inducing nuclear gene back mutations (his - to HIS + ) than Angelicin (10 μg/ml) plus 365 nm light or 254 nm ultraviolet light. In contrast cytoplasmic 'petite' (rho-) mutations are about as frequently induced by Angelicin plus 365 nm light as by 254 nm UV light. Bifunctional furocoumarins are less effective. The frequency of cytoplasmic 'petite' mutations per survivors decreases during dark repair conditions more efficiently after Angelicin than after Psoralen plus 365 nm light treatment. (orig.) [de

  15. A new type of lethal short-limbed dwarfism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nairn, E.R.; Chapman, S.

    1989-01-01

    Details are presented of a most unusual osteo-chondrodysplasia which presents with lethal neonatal short-limbed dwarfism, defective ossification and nodular calcification with cartilage. The features resemble one case previously described in the literature. (orig.)

  16. New type of lethal short-limbed dwarfism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nairn, E.R.; Chapman, S.

    1989-05-01

    Details are presented of a most unusual osteo-chondrodysplasia which presents with lethal neonatal short-limbed dwarfism, defective ossification and nodular calcification with cartilage. The features resemble one case previously described in the literature.

  17. ATM loss leads to synthetic lethality in BRCA1 BRCT mutant mice associated with exacerbated defects in homology-directed repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Chin; Kass, Elizabeth M; Yen, Wei-Feng; Ludwig, Thomas; Moynahan, Mary Ellen; Chaudhuri, Jayanta; Jasin, Maria

    2017-07-18

    BRCA1 is essential for homology-directed repair (HDR) of DNA double-strand breaks in part through antagonism of the nonhomologous end-joining factor 53BP1. The ATM kinase is involved in various aspects of DNA damage signaling and repair, but how ATM participates in HDR and genetically interacts with BRCA1 in this process is unclear. To investigate this question, we used the Brca1 S1598F mouse model carrying a mutation in the BRCA1 C-terminal domain of BRCA1. Whereas ATM loss leads to a mild HDR defect in adult somatic cells, we find that ATM inhibition leads to severely reduced HDR in Brca1 S1598F cells. Consistent with a critical role for ATM in HDR in this background, loss of ATM leads to synthetic lethality of Brca1 S1598F mice. Whereas both ATM and BRCA1 promote end resection, which can be regulated by 53BP1, 53bp1 deletion does not rescue the HDR defects of Atm mutant cells, in contrast to Brca1 mutant cells. These results demonstrate that ATM has a role in HDR independent of the BRCA1-53BP1 antagonism and that its HDR function can become critical in certain contexts.

  18. Perinatal-lethal Gaucher disease presenting as hydrops fetalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BenHamida, Emira; Ayadi, Imene; Ouertani, Ines; Chammem, Maroua; Bezzine, Ahlem; BenTmime, Riadh; Attia, Leila; Mrad, Ridha; Marrakchi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Perinatal-lethal Gaucher disease is very rare and is considered a variant of type 2 Gaucher disease that occurs in the neonatal period. The most distinct features of perinatal-lethal Gaucher disease are non-immune hydrops fetalis. Less common signs of the disease are hepatosplenomegaly, ichthyosis and arthrogryposis. We report a case of Gaucher's disease (type 2) diagnosed in a newborn who presented with Hydrops Fetalis.

  19. Conflict Without Casualties: Non-Lethal Weapons in Irregular Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    the body,” and the Geneva Protocol of 1925, bans the use of chemical and biological weapons .11 On 8 April 1975, President Ford issued Executive...E Funding – PE 63851M) (accessed 15 December 2006). The American Journal of Bioethics . “Medical Ethics and Non-Lethal Weapons .” Bioethics.net...CASUALTIES: NON-LETHAL WEAPONS IN IRREGULAR WARFARE by Richard L. Scott September 2007 Thesis Advisor: Robert McNab Second Reader

  20. Non-Lethal Weapons: Opportunities for R&D

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    during the Vietnam War. US; emulsifying agents are used in food processing, drilling fluids, cosmetics , pharmaceuticals, heavy- duty cleaners, textile...conducted in a professional manner, with no threat to public safety or the environment. 11 References [1] Fenton , G., (2001). NLW Technology Taxonomy...W.A., Mason, R.L., Collins, K.R., (2000). Non-Lethal Applicants of Slippery Substances. NDIA Non-Lethal Defense IV. [24] Fenton , G., (2000). Overview

  1. Lethal synergy involving bicyclomycin: an approach for reviving old antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Muhammad; Li, Liping; Zhao, Xilin; Kerns, Robert J; Berger, James M; Drlica, Karl

    2014-12-01

    One way to address the growing problem of antimicrobial resistance is to revive old compounds that may have intrinsic lethal activity that is obscured by protective factors. Bicyclomycin is an old inhibitor of the Rho transcription terminator that by itself shows little rapid lethal activity. However, bicyclomycin participates in bacteriostatic synergy, which raises the possibility that conditions for lethal synergy may exist, perhaps through a suppression of protective factors. Bicyclomycin was combined with bacteriostatic inhibitors of gene expression, and bactericidal activity was measured with several cultured Gram-negative pathogens. When used alone, bicyclomycin failed to rapidly kill growing cultures of Escherichia coli; however, the additional presence of bacteriostatic concentrations of tetracycline, chloramphenicol or rifampicin led to rapid killing. Four other pathogen species, Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium and Shigella dysenteriae, also exhibited enhanced killing when bicyclomycin was combined with tetracycline or rifampicin. This lethal synergy was achieved at low concentrations (slightly above the MIC) for all agents tested in combinations. Follow-up work with E. coli indicated that lethal synergy arose from a blockage of transcription elongation. Moreover, lethal synergy was reduced when bicyclomycin was added 60 min before tetracycline, suggesting that bicyclomycin induces a protective factor. The action of bicyclomycin illustrates the potential present in a largely abandoned antibacterial agent; it exhibits lethal synergy when coadministered with known, bacteriostatic inhibitors of gene expression. The identification of protective factors, which are currently uncharacterized, may reveal new ways to promote the lethal action of some old antibiotics. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved

  2. Sonographic features of lethal multiple pterygium syndrome at 14 weeks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min; Chan, Gavin Shueng Wai; Lee, Chin Peng; Tang, Mary Hoi Yin

    2005-06-01

    Lethal multiple pterygium syndrome is a rare inherited disorder. Previous reports suggest that the diagnosis may be based on prenatal sonographic demonstration of severe limb flexion, absence of fetal motion, and a large cystic hygroma in the second and third trimesters. We present the sonographic features and postmortem features of a fetus with lethal multiple pterygium syndrome at 13 weeks of gestation, which shows that the condition can possibly be diagnosed in the first trimester of pregnancy.

  3. Detection of new paternal dystrophin gene mutations in isolated cases of dystrophinopathy in females

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pegoraro, E.; Wessel, H.B.; Schwartz, L.; Hoffman, E.P. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Schimke, R.N. (Kansas Univ. Medical Center, Kansas City (United States)); Arahata, Kiichi; Hayashi, Yukiko (National Institute of Neurosciences, Tokyo (Japan)); Stern, H. (Children' s National Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)); Marks, H. (A.I. duPont Institute, Wilmington (United States)); Glasberg, M.R. (Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI (United States)) (and others)

    1994-06-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is one of the most common lethal monogenic disorders and is caused by dystrophin deficiency. The disease is transmitted as an X-linked recessive trait; however, recent biochemical and clinical studies have shown that many girls and women with a primary myopathy have an underlying dystrophinopathy, despite a negative family history for Duchenne dystrophy. These isolated female dystrophinopathy patients carried ambiguous diagnoses with presumed autosomal recessive inheritance (limb-girdle muscular dystrophy) prior to biochemical detection of dystrophin abnormalities in their muscle biopsy. It has been assumed that these female dystrophinopathy patients are heterozygous carries who show preferential inactivation of the X chromosome harboring the normal dystrophin gene, although this has been shown for only a few X:autosome translocations and for two cases of discordant monozygotic twin female carriers. Here the authors study X-inactivation patterns of 13 female dystrophinopathy patients - 10 isolated cases and 3 cases with a positive family history for Duchenne dystrophy in males. They show that all cases have skewed X-inactivation patterns in peripheral blood DNA. Of the nine isolated cases informative in the assay, eight showed inheritance of the dystrophin gene mutation from the paternal germ line. Only a single case showed maternal inheritance. The 10-fold higher incidence of paternal transmission of dystrophin gene mutations in these cases is at 30-fold variance with Bayesian predictions and gene mutation rates. Thus, the results suggest some mechanistic interaction between new dystrophin gene mutations, paternal inheritance, and skewed X inactivation. The results provide both empirical risk data and a molecular diagnostic test method, which permit genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis of this new category of patients. 58 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Linkage analysis for the gametic lethal gene of a rice variety 'Koshihikari' and the semi-dwarfing gene induced in 'Koshihikari'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, M.; Tanisaka, T.; Okumoto, Y.; Yamagata, H.

    1990-01-01

    Full text: 'Koshihikari', a Japanese tall variety, is now most widely cultivated in Japan because of its good quality and taste, but is extremely poor in lodging resistance. In order to create a semi-dwarf 'Koshihikari', large scale mutation breeding was carried out at Hokuriku Agricultural Experiment Station, resulting in the production of an excellent semi-dwarf mutant strain 'Hokuriku 100'. It has extensively been used as cross parent. Genetic analyses revealed that the semi-dwarfness of 'Hokuriku 100' is controlled by two mutant genes, a recessive semi-dwarfness gene sd(t) and a non-gametic lethal gene lt m mutated from the genetic lethal gene of 'Koshihikari' lt, which would cause abortion of both male and female gametes when it occurs together with sd(t). Further analyses led to conclude that It is located on chromosome 9, sd(t) on chromosome 10. (author)

  5. Herpesvirus telomerase RNA (vTR with a mutated template sequence abrogates herpesvirus-induced lymphomagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt B Kaufer

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT and telomerase RNA (TR represent the enzymatically active components of telomerase. In the complex, TR provides the template for the addition of telomeric repeats to telomeres, a protective structure at the end of linear chromosomes. Human TR with a mutation in the template region has been previously shown to inhibit proliferation of cancer cells in vitro. In this report, we examined the effects of a mutation in the template of a virus encoded TR (vTR on herpesvirus-induced tumorigenesis in vivo. For this purpose, we used the oncogenic avian herpesvirus Marek's disease virus (MDV as a natural virus-host model for lymphomagenesis. We generated recombinant MDV in which the vTR template sequence was mutated from AATCCCAATC to ATATATATAT (vAU5 by two-step Red-mediated mutagenesis. Recombinant viruses harboring the template mutation replicated with kinetics comparable to parental and revertant viruses in vitro. However, mutation of the vTR template sequence completely abrogated virus-induced tumor formation in vivo, although the virus was able to undergo low-level lytic replication. To confirm that the absence of tumors was dependent on the presence of mutant vTR in the telomerase complex, a second mutation was introduced in vAU5 that targeted the P6.1 stem loop, a conserved region essential for vTR-TERT interaction. Absence of vTR-AU5 from the telomerase complex restored virus-induced lymphoma formation. To test if the attenuated vAU5 could be used as an effective vaccine against MDV, we performed vaccination-challenge studies and determined that vaccination with vAU5 completely protected chickens from lethal challenge with highly virulent MDV. Taken together, our results demonstrate 1 that mutation of the vTR template sequence can completely abrogate virus-induced tumorigenesis, likely by the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, and 2 that this strategy could be used to generate novel vaccine candidates

  6. Efficiency of interaction between various radiation and chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Song, H. S.; Kim, J. S.; Chun, K. J.; Lee, Y. K.; Lee, B. H.; Shin, H. S.; Lee, K. H.; Petin, Vladislav G.

    2002-01-01

    KAERI and INP (Poland) have been carried out parallel study and joint experiments on the major topics according to MOU about their cooperative project. Major experimental techniques were TSH assay, comet assay, and synergism assay. The research consisted of the following workscopes. 1) Application of TSH bioindicator for studying the biological efficiency of radiation, 2) Relative biological efficiency of californium-252 neutrons in the induction of gene and lethal mutations in TSH cells normal and enriched with boron compound, 3) Effect of pesticide on radiation-induced mutations in TSH cells, 4) Interaction of radiation with pesticide on DNA damage in human peripheral blood lymphocytes, 5) Radiomodifying effect of boron and gadolinium compounds in human peripheral blood lymphocytes, 6) Mathematical description of synergistic interactions, 7) General regularities of synergistic interactions, and 8) Determinant of synergistic interaction between radiation, heat and chemicals in cell killing. Both institutes have established wide variety of research techniques applicable to various radiation research through the cooperation. The results of research can make the role of fundamental basis for the better relationship between Korea and Poland

  7. 35S induced dominant lethals in male germ cells of mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satyanarayana Reddy, K.; Reddy, P.D.; Reddi, O.S.

    1977-01-01

    (CBA female x C 3 H/He male) F 1 males born to 35 S (20 μCi) treated animals during major organogenesis period were tested for dominant lethal mutations at maturity. The pre-implantation loss showed an increase from 6.88% in the control to 10.92% in 35 S treated animals. Similarly the post-implantation loss has increased from 3.96% (control) to 7.40%. As a result of the increased pre- and post-losses the total loss showed a significant increase (17.51%) in F 1 males born to 35 S treated animals when compared to controls (10.57%). Thus the results clearly show that 35 S is mutagenic in male germ cells of mouse. (author)

  8. Addition of molecular methods to mutation studies with Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.R.

    1989-01-01

    For 80 years, Drosophila melanogaster has been used as a major tool in analyzing Mendelian genetics. By using chromosome inversions that suppress crossing over, geneticists have developed a large number of stocks for mutation analysis. These stocks permit numerous tests for specific locus mutations, lethals at multiple loci on any chromosome, chromosome exchanges, insertions, and deletions. The entire genome can be manipulated for a degree of genetic control not found in other germ-line systems. Recombinant DNA techniques now permit analysis of mutations to the nucleotide level. By combining classical genetic analysis with recombinant DNA techniques, it is possible to analyze mutations that range from chromosome aberrations and multilocus deficiencies to single nucleotide transitions

  9. Deficiency of CRTAP in non-lethal recessive osteogenesis imperfecta reduces collagen deposition into matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valli, M; Barnes, A M; Gallanti, A; Cabral, W A; Viglio, S; Weis, M A; Makareeva, E; Eyre, D; Leikin, S; Antoniazzi, F; Marini, J C; Mottes, M

    2012-11-01

    Deficiency of any component of the ER-resident collagen prolyl 3-hydroxylation complex causes recessive osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). The complex modifies the α1(I)Pro986 residue and contains cartilage-associated protein (CRTAP), prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1 (P3H1) and cyclophilin B (CyPB). Fibroblasts normally secrete about 10% of CRTAP. Most CRTAP mutations cause a null allele and lethal type VII OI. We identified a 7-year-old Egyptian boy with non-lethal type VII OI and investigated the effects of his null CRTAP mutation on collagen biochemistry, the prolyl 3-hydroxylation complex, and collagen in extracellular matrix. The proband is homozygous for an insertion/deletion in CRTAP (c.118_133del16insTACCC). His dermal fibroblasts synthesize fully overmodified type I collagen, and 3-hydroxylate only 5% of α1(I)Pro986. CRTAP transcripts are 10% of control. CRTAP protein is absent from proband cells, with residual P3H1 and normal CyPB levels. Dermal collagen fibril diameters are significantly increased. By immunofluorescence of long-term cultures, we identified a severe deficiency (10-15% of control) of collagen deposited in extracellular matrix, with disorganization of the minimal fibrillar network. Quantitative pulse-chase experiments corroborate deficiency of matrix deposition, rather than increased matrix turnover. We conclude that defects of extracellular matrix, as well as intracellular defects in collagen modification, contribute to the pathology of type VII OI. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Cytoplasmic superoxide dismutase and catalase activity and resistance to radiation lethality in murine tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davy, C.A.; Tesfay, Z.; Jones, J.; Rosenberg, R.C.; McCarthy, C.; Rosenberg, S.O.

    1986-01-01

    Reduced species of molecular oxygen are produced by the interaction of ionizing radiation with aqueous solutions containing molecular oxygen. The enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) are thought to function in vivo as scavengers of metabolically produced peroxide and superoxide respectively. SOD has been shown to protect against the lethal effects of ionizing radiation in vitro and in vivo. The authors have investigated the relationship between the cytosolic SOD catalase content and the sensitivity to radiation lethality of a number of murine cell lines (402AX, EL-4, MB-2T3, MB-4, MEL, P-815, SAI, SP-2, and SV-3T3). K/sub i/(CN - ) for murine Cu-Zn-SOD was determined to be 6.8 x 10 -6 M. No cytosolic Mn-SOD activity was found in any of the cell lines studied. No correlation was found between the cytosolic Cu-Zn-SOD or cytosolic catalase activity and the resistance to radiation lethality or the murine cell lines studied

  11. Eigen's Error Threshold and Mutational Meltdown in a Quasispecies Model

    OpenAIRE

    Bagnoli, F.; Bezzi, M.

    1998-01-01

    We introduce a toy model for interacting populations connected by mutations and limited by a shared resource. We study the presence of Eigen's error threshold and mutational meltdown. The phase diagram of the system shows that the extinction of the whole population due to mutational meltdown can occur well before an eventual error threshold transition.

  12. Hemochromatosis C282Y gene mutation as a potential susceptibility ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    G.M. Mokhtar

    2017-08-12

    Aug 12, 2017 ... Background: Hereditary hemochromatosis is the most frequent cause of primary iron overload that is associated with HFE gene's mutation especially the C282Y mutation. The interaction between hemoglo- bin chain synthesis' disorders and the C282Y mutation may worsen the clinical picture of beta-.

  13. Disruption of lolCDE, Encoding an ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter, Is Lethal for Escherichia coli and Prevents Release of Lipoproteins from the Inner Membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Narita, Shin-ichiro; Tanaka, Kimie; Matsuyama, Shin-ichi; Tokuda, Hajime

    2002-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter LolCDE was previously identified, by using reconstituted proteoliposomes, as an apparatus catalyzing the release of outer membrane-specific lipoproteins from the inner membrane of Escherichia coli. Mutations resulting in defective LolD were previously shown to be lethal for E. coli. The amino acid sequences of LolC and LolE are similar to each other, but the necessity of both proteins for lipoprotein release has not been proved. Moreover, previous reconstituti...

  14. Modulation of the virus-receptor interaction by mutations in the V5 loop of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV following in vivo escape from neutralising antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samman Ayman

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the acute phase of infection with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV, the virus targets activated CD4+ T cells by utilising CD134 (OX40 as a primary attachment receptor and CXCR4 as a co-receptor. The nature of the virus-receptor interaction varies between isolates; strains such as GL8 and CPGammer recognise a "complex" determinant on CD134 formed by cysteine-rich domains (CRDs 1 and 2 of the molecule while strains such as PPR and B2542 require a more "simple" determinant comprising CRD1 only for infection. These differences in receptor recognition manifest as variations in sensitivity to receptor antagonists. In this study, we ask whether the nature of the virus-receptor interaction evolves in vivo. Results Following infection with a homogeneous viral population derived from a pathogenic molecular clone, a quasispecies emerged comprising variants with distinct sensitivities to neutralising antibody and displaying evidence of conversion from a "complex" to a "simple" interaction with CD134. Escape from neutralising antibody was mediated primarily by length and sequence polymorphisms in the V5 region of Env, and these alterations in V5 modulated the virus-receptor interaction as indicated by altered sensitivities to antagonism by both anti-CD134 antibody and soluble CD134. Conclusions The FIV-receptor interaction evolves under the selective pressure of the host humoral immune response, and the V5 loop contributes to the virus-receptor interaction. Our data are consistent with a model whereby viruses with distinct biological properties are present in early versus late infection and with a shift from a "complex" to a "simple" interaction with CD134 with time post-infection.

  15. Modulation of the virus-receptor interaction by mutations in the V5 loop of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) following in vivo escape from neutralising antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Brian J; Kraase, Martin; Logan, Nicola; McMonagle, Elizabeth L; Samman, Ayman; Hosie, Margaret J

    2010-04-26

    In the acute phase of infection with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), the virus targets activated CD4+ T cells by utilising CD134 (OX40) as a primary attachment receptor and CXCR4 as a co-receptor. The nature of the virus-receptor interaction varies between isolates; strains such as GL8 and CPGammer recognise a "complex" determinant on CD134 formed by cysteine-rich domains (CRDs) 1 and 2 of the molecule while strains such as PPR and B2542 require a more "simple" determinant comprising CRD1 only for infection. These differences in receptor recognition manifest as variations in sensitivity to receptor antagonists. In this study, we ask whether the nature of the virus-receptor interaction evolves in vivo. Following infection with a homogeneous viral population derived from a pathogenic molecular clone, a quasispecies emerged comprising variants with distinct sensitivities to neutralising antibody and displaying evidence of conversion from a "complex" to a "simple" interaction with CD134. Escape from neutralising antibody was mediated primarily by length and sequence polymorphisms in the V5 region of Env, and these alterations in V5 modulated the virus-receptor interaction as indicated by altered sensitivities to antagonism by both anti-CD134 antibody and soluble CD134. The FIV-receptor interaction evolves under the selective pressure of the host humoral immune response, and the V5 loop contributes to the virus-receptor interaction. Our data are consistent with a model whereby viruses with distinct biological properties are present in early versus late infection and with a shift from a "complex" to a "simple" interaction with CD134 with time post-infection.

  16. New insights into genotype–phenotype correlation for GLI3 mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Démurger, Florence; Ichkou, Amale; Mougou-Zerelli, Soumaya; Le Merrer, Martine; Goudefroye, Géraldine; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Quélin, Chloé; Manouvrier, Sylvie; Baujat, Geneviève; Fradin, Mélanie; Pasquier, Laurent; Megarbané, André; Faivre, Laurence; Baumann, Clarisse; Nampoothiri, Sheela

    2014-01-01

    The phenotypic spectrum of GLI3 mutations includes autosomal dominant Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS) and Pallister–Hall syndrome (PHS). PHS was first described as a lethal condition associating hypothalamic hamartoma, postaxial or central polydactyly, anal atresia and bifid epiglottis. Typical GCPS combines polysyndactyly of hands and feet and craniofacial features. Genotype–phenotype correlations have been found both for the location and the nature of GLI3 mutations, highlightin...

  17. Hyperthermia-induced alteration of yeast susceptibility to mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchel, R.E.J.; Morrison, D.P.

    1985-01-01

    Diploid yeast (s. cerevisiae) were examined for alterations in susceptibility to induced mutation following hyperthermia treatment. In cells grown at 23 0 C, a non-lethal heat exposure (38 0 C, 30 min) markedly suppressed mutation induced by a subsequent non-killing dose of MNNG of MNU. Mutation by ENU, 8-MOP + UVA, or γ-rays was not affected. An intermediate level of mutation suppression was observed for mutation by 254nm UV or MMS. Mutation by MNNG was not suppressed by the same heat treatment delivered after the mutagen exposure. In a split dose experiment (two MNNG treatments separated by a heat exposure) no suppression of mutation was observed. Treatment with cycloheximide mimicked the effect of heat treatment. These data suggest that mutation induction by MNNG or MNU is protein synthesis dependent, i.e. an error-prone repair system is induced by exposure to MNNG or MNU but not by ENU, 8-MOP+UVA or γ-irradiation. We propose that hyperthermia treatment, by inducing stress protein synthesis at the expense of normal protein synthesis, precludes induction of this error-prone system. Therefore, in heat treated cells, DNA lesions produced by MNNG or MNU exposure must be resolved by an essentially constitutive system which is less error-prone than the inducible one

  18. The shapes of the radiation dose-mutation response curves in drosophila: Mechanisms and implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrahamson, S.; DeJongh, C.; Meyer, H.U.

    1981-01-01

    This chapter proposes that radiation induced mutations, namely sex-linked recessive lethals in Drosophila and forward mutations at specific loci in Drosophila, mammals and lower eucaryotes, are the result of two sub-lesions or hits, induced by either single ionization tracks or by the interaction of two independent tracks for low LET radiations, when the dose is delivered in an acute fashion. Utilizes the well recognized linear quadratic expression Y=C+αD+βD 2 , where C is the spontaneous frequency of events scored and α and β represent the coefficients of the dose. Concludes that for low LET radiations, X or gamma rays, the linear-quadratic model can be used to predict the genetic response of germ cells and somatic cells to a variety of radiation regimes. Points out that the point of inflection in the curve, α/β value, can be determined specifically by target dimensions which vary with respect to DNA content. Considers the difference in RBE values observed for different species to be a reflection of their different target sizes

  19. Lethal action of soluble metallic salts on fishes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, K E

    1927-01-01

    A study of pollution of Welsh rivers by lead-mine effluents revealed the fact that fishes were killed by the action of soluble salts of lead, which proved lethal at concentrations so low as pb i : 3,000,000. A physiological investigation of the action of lead-salts revealed the following facts: the action does not correspond to the normal toxic type. The graph of survival-times in different concentrations closely follows the equation: K = i/t log i/conc. The speed of the reaction is dependent upon the total quantity of metallic ion present, as well as upon the actual concentrations. The speed of the reaction varies in inverse relation to the size and weight of fishes employed. The most marked symptom is the formation of a film over gills and skin, by interaction of the metallic ion with a mucus-constituent. Death by suffocation is the final result. Where insufficient lead ion is present, the film is shed off, and complete recovery takes place. The speed of the reaction varies in direct relation to the temperature. Chemical analysis of residues shows that no trace of metallic ion penetrates into the body itself. The action is thus held to be purely external in process, chemical in type, and mechanical in effect; i.e., it is not a toxic action in the ordinary sense of the term. The action of soluble salts of zinc, iron, copper, cadmium, and mercury is shown to follow the same law as that of lead. Attention is directed to the economic importance of the facts, in connection with the pollution of rivers.

  20. The influence of calf thymus DNA and deoxyribonucleosides on the induction of different mutation types in Drosophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondrej, M.

    1975-01-01

    The influence of an exogenous DNA on the induction of mutations by X rays was compared with the influence of an equimolar mixture of four deoxyribonucleosides. Pre-treatment and post-treatment with the calf thymus DNA did not influence mutation frequency in the specific loci dp, b, cn and bw as well as Minute mutations induced in the Drosophila sperm by X radiation. Pre-treatment with the equimolar mixture of four deoxyribonucleosides increased the frequency of the Minutes but did not affect mutation frequency in the loci dp, b, cn, bw. The equimolar mixture of nucleosides alone induced a low frequency of Minute mutations in the Drosophila sperm. DNA alone induced a low frequency of recessive lethals. These lethals arose as mosaics of small sectors of the gonads of the F 1 females and were revealed as late as in the F 3 generation. (author)

  1. Mutations at the CXCR4 interaction sites for AMD3100 influence anti-CXCR4 antibody binding and HIV-1 entry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatse, Sigrid; Princen, Katrien; Vermeire, Kurt

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 with its target is greatly influenced by specific aspartate residues in the receptor protein, including Asp(171) and Asp(262). We have now found that aspartate-to-asparagine substitutions at these positions differentially affect the binding of four...

  2. Structural mutations of C-domains in members of the Ig superfamily. Consequences for the interactions between the T cell antigen receptor and the zeta 2 homodimer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geisler, C; Rubin, B; Caspar-Bauguil, S

    1992-01-01

    Several molecules belonging to the Ig superfamily are expressed together with noncovalently associated subunits. This applies for membrane-bound IgM and IgD, some of the FcR, and the Ti dimers of the TCR. The interactions between members of the Ig superfamily and their associated subunits are sti...

  3. An essential role of intestinal cell kinase in lung development is linked to the perinatal lethality of human ECO syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yixin; Park, So Hyun; Wu, Di; Xu, Wenhao; Guillot, Stacey J.; Jin, Li; Li, Xudong; Wang, Yalin; Lin, Chyuan-Sheng; Fu, Zheng

    2017-01-01

    Human endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia (ECO) syndrome, caused by the loss-of-function mutation R272Q in the ICK (intestinal cell kinase) gene, is a neonatal-lethal developmental disorder. To elucidate the molecular basis of ECO syndrome, we constructed an Ick R272Q knock-in mouse model that recapitulates ECO pathological phenotypes. Newborns bearing Ick R272Q homozygous mutations die at birth due to respiratory distress. Ick mutant lungs exhibit not only impaired branching morphogenesis associated with reduced mesenchymal proliferation, but also significant airspace deficiency in primitive alveoli concomitant with abnormal interstitial mesenchymal differentiation. ICK dysfunction induces elongated primary cilia and perturbs ciliary Hedgehog signaling and autophagy during lung sacculation. Our study identifies an essential role for ICK in lung development and advances the mechanistic understanding of ECO syndrome. PMID:28380258

  4. A multivariate model of stakeholder preference for lethal cat management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, Dara M; Jacobson, Susan K

    2014-01-01

    Identifying stakeholder beliefs and attitudes is critical for resolving management conflicts. Debate over outdoor cat management is often described as a conflict between two groups, environmental advocates and animal welfare advocates, but little is known about the variables predicting differences among these critical stakeholder groups. We administered a mail survey to randomly selected stakeholders representing both of these groups (n=1,596) in Florida, where contention over the management of outdoor cats has been widespread. We used a structural equation model to evaluate stakeholder intention to support non-lethal management. The cognitive hierarchy model predicted that values influenced beliefs, which predicted general and specific attitudes, which in turn, influenced behavioral intentions. We posited that specific attitudes would mediate the effect of general attitudes, beliefs, and values on management support. Model fit statistics suggested that the final model fit the data well (CFI=0.94, RMSEA=0.062). The final model explained 74% of the variance in management support, and positive attitudes toward lethal management (humaneness) had the largest direct effect on management support. Specific attitudes toward lethal management and general attitudes toward outdoor cats mediated the relationship between positive (pstakeholder intention to support non-lethal cat management. Our findings suggest that stakeholders can simultaneously perceive both positive and negative beliefs about outdoor cats, which influence attitudes toward and support for non-lethal management.

  5. Narrowing the wingless-2 mutation to a 227 Kb candidate region on chicken chromosome 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingless-2 (wg-2) is autosomal recessive mutation in chicken which results in an embryonic lethal condition with affected individuals exhibiting a multisystem syndrome characterized by absent wings, truncated legs, and craniofacial, kidney, and feather malformations. After many years of breeding the...

  6. A Mosaic Activating Mutation in AKT1 Associated with the Proteus Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindhurst, Marjorie J.; Sapp, Julie C.; Teer, Jamie K.; Johnston, Jennifer J.; Finn, Erin M.; Peters, Kathryn; Turner, Joyce; Cannons, Jennifer L.; Bick, David; Blakemore, Laurel; Blumhorst, Catherine; Brockmann, Knut; Calder, Peter; Cherman, Natasha; Deardorff, Matthew A.; Everman, David B.; Golas, Gretchen; Greenstein, Robert M.; Kato, B. Maya; Keppler-Noreuil, Kim M.; Kuznetsov, Sergei A.; Miyamoto, Richard T.; Newman, Kurt; Ng, David; O'Brien, Kevin; Rothenberg, Steven; Schwartzentruber, Douglas J.; Singhal, Virender; Tirabosco, Roberto; Upton, Joseph; Wientroub, Shlomo; Zackai, Elaine H.; Hoag, Kimberly; Whitewood-Neal, Tracey; Robey, Pamela G.; Schwartzberg, Pamela L.; Darling, Thomas N.; Tosi, Laura L.; Mullikin, James C.; Biesecker, Leslie G.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND The Proteus syndrome is characterized by the overgrowth of skin, connective tissue, brain, and other tissues. It has been hypothesized that the syndrome is caused by somatic mosaicism for a mutation that is lethal in the nonmosaic state. METHODS We performed exome sequencing of DNA from

  7. Improvement of Thermal Stability via Outer-Loop Ion Pair Interaction of Mutated T1 Lipase from Geobacillus zalihae Strain T1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahiran Basri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutant D311E and K344R were constructed using site-directed mutagenesis to introduce an additional ion pair at the inter-loop and the intra-loop, respectively, to determine the effect of ion pairs on the stability of T1 lipase isolated from Geobacillus zalihae. A series of purification steps was applied, and the pure lipases of T1, D311E and K344R were obtained. The wild-type and mutant lipases were analyzed using circular dichroism. The Tm for T1 lipase, D311E lipase and K344R lipase were approximately 68.52 °C, 70.59 °C and 68.54 °C, respectively. Mutation at D311 increases the stability of T1 lipase and exhibited higher Tm as compared to the wild-type and K344R. Based on the above, D311E lipase was chosen for further study. D311E lipase was successfully crystallized using the sitting drop vapor diffusion method. The crystal was diffracted at 2.1 Å using an in-house X-ray beam and belonged to the monoclinic space group C2 with the unit cell parameters a = 117.32 Å, b = 81.16 Å and c = 100.14 Å. Structural analysis showed the existence of an additional ion pair around E311 in the structure of D311E. The additional ion pair in D311E may regulate the stability of this mutant lipase at high temperatures as predicted in silico and spectroscopically.

  8. The effects of radiation dose-rate and quality on the induction of dominant lethals in mouse spermatids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Searle, A.G.; Beechey, G.V.

    1981-01-01

    Hybrid male mice were given 3 Gy (300 rad) doses of X- or γ-irradiation at dose-rates of either 0.6 or 0.002 Gy/min for each radiation. Germ-cells treated as spermatids were tested for dominant lethality. Effects on spermatogonia were evaluated by studying testis-weight, sperm-count and sperm abnormalities. The rate of induction of dominant lethal mutations was 2.1 times as high after acute X-irradiation as after protracted γ-irradiation. Most of this difference resulted from the change in radiation quality, since the relative effectiveness of X- versus γ-irradiation was 1.9 at low and 1.6 at high dose rates. For each radiation, however, fewer dominant lethals were induced at low dose-rates than at high (low/high ratios of 0.8 and 0.9 respectively) although differences did not reach a significant level. There were no statistically significant effects of dose rate on testis-weight of sperm-count in the X-ray series, but there were significantly less severe effects on both with protraction of the γ-irradiation. Evidence for effects of radiation quality on these characters was conflicting. Frequencies of abnormal spermatozoa were markedly increased 7 weeks after irradiation but there were no consistent effects of radiation intensity or quality. (orig.)

  9. Developmental and transcriptional consequences of mutations in Drosophila TAF(II)60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, N; Wassarman, D A

    2001-10-01

    In vitro, the TAF(II)60 component of the TFIID complex contributes to RNA polymerase II transcription initiation by serving as a coactivator that interacts with specific activator proteins and possibly as a promoter selectivity factor that interacts with the downstream promoter element. In vivo roles for TAF(II)60 in metazoan transcription are not as clear. Here we have investigated the developmental and transcriptional requirements for TAF(II)60 by analyzing four independent Drosophila melanogaster TAF(II)60 mutants. Loss-of-function mutations in Drosophila TAF(II)60 result in lethality, indicating that TAF(II)60 provides a nonredundant function in vivo. Molecular analysis of TAF(II)60 alleles revealed that essential TAF(II)60 functions are provided by two evolutionarily conserved regions located in the N-terminal half of the protein. TAF(II)60 is required at all stages of Drosophila development, in both germ cells and somatic cells. Expression of TAF(II)60 from a transgene rescued the lethality of TAF(II)60 mutants and exposed requirements for TAF(II)60 during imaginal development, spermatogenesis, and oogenesis. Phenotypes of rescued TAF(II)60 mutant flies implicate TAF(II)60 in transcriptional mechanisms that regulate cell growth and cell fate specification and suggest that TAF(II)60 is a limiting component of the machinery that regulates the transcription of dosage-sensitive genes. Finally, TAF(II)60 plays roles in developmental regulation of gene expression that are distinct from those of other TAF(II) proteins.

  10. Novel synthetic lethality screening method identifies TIP60-dependent radiation sensitivity in the absence of BAF180.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Suzanna R; McGregor, Grant A; Murray, Johanne M; Downs, Jessica A; Savic, Velibor

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, research into synthetic lethality and how it can be exploited in cancer treatments has emerged as major focus in cancer research. However, the lack of a simple to use, sensitive and standardised assay to test for synthetic interactions has been slowing the efforts. Here we present a novel approach to synthetic lethality screening based on co-culturing two syngeneic cell lines containing individual fluorescent tags. By associating shRNAs for a target gene or control to individual fluorescence labels, we can easily follow individual cell fates upon siRNA treatment and high content imaging. We have demonstrated that the system can recapitulate the functional defects of the target gene depletion and is capable of discovering novel synthetic interactors and phenotypes. In a trial screen, we show that TIP60 exhibits synthetic lethality interaction with BAF180, and that in the absence of TIP60, there is an increase micronuclei dependent on the level of BAF180 loss, significantly above levels seen with BAF180 present. Moreover, the severity of the interactions correlates with proxy measurements of BAF180 knockdown efficacy, which may expand its usefulness to addressing synthetic interactions through titratable hypomorphic gene expression. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Early events of lethal action by tobramycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raulston, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The immediate activities of the aminoglycoside antibiotic, tobramycin, were investigated in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. The influence of carbon growth substate and the antibiotic exposure environment in the magnitude of activity were examined. Lethality by 8 μg/ml tobramycin occurred rapidly (1 to 3 minutes). The release of specific cellular components into the supernatant was associated with lethality. This material was initially detected as an increase in UV-absorbance. Magnesium in the reaction mixture provided protection against lethality and leakage, but did not reverse lethal damage after a 3 minute tobramycin treatment. Also, uptake of 3 H-tobramycin was reduced in the presence of magnesium. Cells grown with glucose as a carbon source were more susceptible than organic acid grown cells as was the rapidity and amount of cell damage. Analyses of the leakage material revealed a 2-fold increase of protein in the supernatant after a 1-3 minute treatment which paralleled lethality. A prominent 29 kDa protein was observed by SDS-PAGE in the released material, which has been identified as the periplasmic enzyme, β-lactamase. The immediate activities of tobramycin did not involve (i) release of overall cell protein, (ii) massive loss of total pool amino acids, (iii) cell lysis, (iv) inhibition of proline uptake, (v) release of lipopolysaccharide, or (vi) leakage of ATP. Electron microscopy showed no apparent damage after a 3 minute exposure. 40% inhibition of protein synthesis had occurred by 3 minutes of exposure, while release of UV-absorbing material and lethality were detectable after only 1 minute. Resistant cystic fibrosis isolates of P. aeruginosa did not leak under the same experimental conditions, but one of two susceptible strains examined did show increased UV-absorbance following treatment

  12. Impact of acute alcohol consumption on lethality of suicide methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, C Hyung Keun; Yoo, Seong Ho; Lee, Jaewon; Cho, Sung Joon; Shin, Min-Sup; Kim, Eun Young; Kim, Se Hyun; Ham, Keunsoo; Ahn, Yong Min

    2017-05-01

    The influence of acute alcohol consumption on the factors related to suicide remains understudied. Thus, the present study investigated the relationship between blood alcohol content (BAC) and the lethality of suicide methods. Autopsy data on 315 South Korean suicide completers with a positive BAC were collected from a nationwide pool between May 2015 and November 2015, and the methods were dichotomised as suicide methods of low lethality (SMLL; drug/chemical overdose and sharp objects, n=67) and suicide methods of high lethality (SMHL; everything else, n=243). BAC at the time of autopsy and various suicide-related factors of these two groups were compared with logistic regression analyses. Compared to suicide completers with a BAC in the lowest range of 0.011-0.049%, suicide completers with a BAC in the range of 0.150-0.199% were more likely to use SMHL (odds ratio [OR]: 3.644, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.221-10.874). Additionally, the adoption of SMHL was significantly associated with the absence of a psychiatric illness (OR: 0.433, 95% CI: 0.222-0.843) and a younger age; the OR for high BAC among subjects in their 40s was 0.266 (95% CI: 0.083-0.856); in their 50s, 0.183 (95% CI: 0.055-0.615); and in their 60s, 0.057 (95% CI: 0.015-0.216). The relationship between BAC and suicide method lethality was represented by a bell-shaped pattern in which suicide methods of high lethality were more likely to be used by suicide completers with mid-range BAC levels. The increased impulsivity and impairments in particular executive functions, including planning and organization, associated with acute alcohol use may influence the selection of a particular suicide method based on its lethality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Favipiravir can evoke lethal mutagenesis and extinction of foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Avila, Ana Isabel; Moreno, Elena; Perales, Celia; Domingo, Esteban

    2017-04-02

    Antiviral agents are increasingly considered an option for veterinary medicine. An understanding of their mechanism of activity is important to plan their administration either as monotherapy or in combination with other agents. Previous studies have shown that the broad spectrum antiviral agent favipiravir (T-705) and its derivatives T-1105 and T-1106 are efficient inhibitors of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) replication in cell culture and in vivo. However, no mechanism for their activity against FMDV has been proposed. In the present study we show that favipiravir (T-705) can act as a lethal mutagen for FMDV in cell culture. Evidence includes virus extinction associated with increase in mutation frequency in the mutant spectrum of 860 residues of the 3D (polymerase)-coding region, and a decrease of specific infectivity while the consensus nucleotide sequence of the region analyzed remained invariant. The mutational spectrum evoked by favipiravir differs from that observed with other viruses in that no predominant transition type is observed, indicating that a movement towards A,U- or G,C-rich regions of sequence space is not a prerequisite for virus extinction. We discuss prospects for the use of favipiravir to assist in the control of FMDV, and its possible broader use in veterinary medicine as an extension of its current status as antiviral agent for human influenza virus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Deficiency in plasma protein synthesis caused by x-ray-induced lethal albino alleles in mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garland, R.C.; Satrustegui, J.; Gluecksohn-Waelsch, S.; Cori, C.F.

    1976-01-01

    Plasma protein synthesis was studied in mice bearing x-ray induced lethal mutations at the albino locus. Newborn albino mutants showed a decrease in each of the three principal plasma proteins, albumin, α-fetoprotein, and transferrin, when compared with colored littermate controls. Incorporation of [ 14 C] leucine into plasma proteins of the newborn albinos 30 min after injection was only 1 / 5 that of the controls, but incorporation into total liver protein was only slightly diminished. Incorporation of [ 14 C] leucine into an albumin fraction obtained by immunoprecipitation from livers incubated in vitro in an amino acid mixture was also strongly diminished. Thus, the liver of 18-day-old albino fetuses incorporated into this fraction 1 / 3 and that of newborn albinos 1 / 8 as much as the controls, but in both cases the incorporation into total liver protein was only 25 percent less than in the respective controls. These results indicate that the rather severe structural abnormalities observed in the mutants in the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus are not associated with a general deficiency of hepatic protein synthesis. Instead the data from this and previous work show that the progressive deficiency from fetal life to birth involves certain specific proteins represented by several perinatally developing enzymes and by plasma proteins. It is suggested that the mutational effects observed in these mice are due to deletions involving regulatory rather than structural genes at or near the albino locus

  15. Mutagenesis-mediated virus extinction: virus-dependent effect of viral load on sensitivity to lethal defection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Moreno

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lethal mutagenesis is a transition towards virus extinction mediated by enhanced mutation rates during viral genome replication, and it is currently under investigation as a potential new antiviral strategy. Viral load and virus fitness are known to influence virus extinction. Here we examine the effect or the multiplicity of infection (MOI on progeny production of several RNA viruses under enhanced mutagenesis. RESULTS: The effect of the mutagenic base analogue 5-fluorouracil (FU on the replication of the arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV can result either in inhibition of progeny production and virus extinction in infections carried out at low multiplicity of infection (MOI, or in a moderate titer decrease without extinction at high MOI. The effect of the MOI is similar for LCMV and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, but minimal or absent for the picornaviruses foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV and encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV. The increase in mutation frequency and Shannon entropy (mutant spectrum complexity as a result of virus passage in the presence of FU was more accentuated at low MOI for LCMV and VSV, and at high MOI for FMDV and EMCV. We present an extension of the lethal defection model that agrees with the experimental results. CONCLUSIONS: (i Low infecting load favoured the extinction of negative strand viruses, LCMV or VSV, with an increase of mutant spectrum complexity. (ii This behaviour is not observed in RNA positive strand viruses, FMDV or EMCV. (iii The accumulation of defector genomes may underlie the MOI-dependent behaviour. (iv LCMV coinfections are allowed but superinfection is strongly restricted in BHK-21 cells. (v The dissimilar effects of the MOI on the efficiency of mutagenic-based extinction of different RNA viruses can have implications for the design of antiviral protocols based on lethal mutagenesis, presently under development.

  16. MT-CYB mutations in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Christian M; Aidt, Frederik H; Havndrup, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a characteristic of heart failure. Mutations in mitochondrial DNA, particularly in MT-CYB coding for cytochrome B in complex III (CIII), have been associated with isolated hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We hypothesized that MT-CYB mutations might play an important...... and m.15482T>C; p.S246P were identified. Modeling showed that the p.C93Y mutation leads to disruption of the tertiary structure of Cytb by helix displacement, interfering with protein-heme interaction. The p.S246P mutation induces a diproline structure, which alters local secondary structure and induces...... of HCM patients. We propose that further patients with HCM should be examined for mutations in MT-CYB in order to clarify the role of these variants....

  17. Perforated appendicitis presenting as a thigh abscess: A lethal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Typical cases of acute appendicitis have excellent treatment outcomes, if managed appropriately.1 We discuss an unusual case of perforated retrocaecal appendicitis that presented as a right thigh abscess without prominent abdominal symptoms, which highlights the lethal nature of advanced appendicitis even when ...

  18. The "Lethal Chamber": Further Evidence of the Euthanasia Option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elks, Martin A.

    1993-01-01

    Historical discussions of the euthanasia or "lethal chamber" option in relation to people with mental retardation are presented. The paper concludes that eugenic beliefs in the primacy of heredity over environment and the positive role of natural selection may have condoned the poor conditions characteristic of large, segregated institutions and…

  19. Papaya Lethal Yellowing Virus (PLYV) Infects Vasconcellea cauliflora

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaral, P.P.R.; Resende, de R.O.; Souza, M.T.

    2006-01-01

    Papaya lethal yellowing virus (PLYV) é um dos três vírus descritos infectando mamoeiros (Carica papaya L.) no Brasil. Vasconcellea cauliflora (Jacq.) A. DC., antes denominada de Carica cauliflora (Jacq.), é uma reconhecida fonte de resistência natural ao Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV), causador da

  20. Fighting Lethal Yellowing Disease for Coconut Farmers (CIFSRF ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Copra is the dried kernel of the coconut, which is used to extract coconut oil. Coconut is the main income source for the coastal region's poor farmers. Over the past 10 years, Côte d'Ivoire lethal yellowing disease has destroyed more than 350 hectares of coconut and caused losses of 12,000 tons of copra per year.

  1. Why the United States Must Adopt Lethal Autonomous Weapon Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    intelligence , Lethal Autonomous Weapon Systems, energy production, energy storage, three-dimensional printing , bandwidth improvements, computer...views on the morality of artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics technology. Eastern culture sees artificial intelligence as an economic savior...capable of improving their society. In contrast, Western culture regards artificial intelligence with paranoia, anxiety, and skepticism. As Eastern

  2. Mutation formation and inactivation of mammalian cells by heavy ions. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obaturov, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    Using parameter values of equations for cell inactivation cross-sections, theoretical curves were calculated for cell radiosensitivity (α 1 ) in dependence on LET. There is good agreement between calculated and experimental values of α 1 . The yield of lethal mutations of 1st and 2nd types and their sum in dependence on LET was also calculated. It was shown that for low LET ions cell radiosensitivity is caused by the 2nd type of mutation, independent of LET, proportional to DNA mass and inversely proportional to repair rate. For high LET ions when lethal mutation number per one track is more than one, α 1 is caused by the 1st type of mutation, proportional to cell nuclear cross-section and inversely proportional to LET. For intermediate LET ions α 1 is a complicated function of LET. It is follows from the equations that more than 17% of double strand breaks (DSB) take part in lethal mutation formation. Others are either repaired or formed in the process of experimentally determined DSB yield. (author)

  3. PPIB mutations cause severe osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Fleur S; Nesbitt, Isabel M; Zwikstra, Eline H; Nikkels, Peter G J; Piersma, Sander R; Fratantoni, Silvina A; Jimenez, Connie R; Huizer, Margriet; Morsman, Alice C; Cobben, Jan M; van Roij, Mirjam H H; Elting, Mariet W; Verbeke, Jonathan I M L; Wijnaendts, Liliane C D; Shaw, Nick J; Högler, Wolfgang; McKeown, Carole; Sistermans, Erik A; Dalton, Ann; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Pals, Gerard

    2009-10-01

    Deficiency of cartilage-associated protein (CRTAP) or prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1(P3H1) has been reported in autosomal-recessive lethal or severe osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). CRTAP, P3H1, and cyclophilin B (CyPB) form an intracellular collagen-modifying complex that 3-hydroxylates proline at position 986 (P986) in the alpha1 chains of collagen type I. This 3-prolyl hydroxylation is decreased in patients with CRTAP and P3H1 deficiency. It was suspected that mutations in the PPIB gene encoding CyPB would also cause OI with decreased collagen 3-prolyl hydroxylation. To our knowledge we present the first two families with recessive OI caused by PPIB gene mutations. The clinical phenotype is compatible with OI Sillence type II-B/III as seen with COL1A1/2, CRTAP, and LEPRE1 mutations. The percentage of 3-hydroxylated P986 residues in patients with PPIB mutations is decreased in comparison to normal, but it is higher than in patients with CRTAP and LEPRE1 mutations. This result and the fact that CyPB is demonstrable independent of CRTAP and P3H1, along with reported decreased 3-prolyl hydroxylation due to deficiency of CRTAP lacking the catalytic hydroxylation domain and the known function of CyPB as a cis-trans isomerase, suggest that recessive OI is caused by a dysfunctional P3H1/CRTAP/CyPB complex rather than by the lack of 3-prolyl hydroxylation of a single proline residue in the alpha1 chains of collagen type I.

  4. Necrostatin-1 rescues mice from lethal irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhentai; Epperly, Michael; Watkins, Simon C; Greenberger, Joel S; Kagan, Valerian E; Bayır, Hülya

    2016-04-01

    There is an emerging need in new medical products that can mitigate and/or treat the short- and long-term consequences of radiation exposure after a radiological or nuclear terroristic event. The direct effects of ionizing radiation are realized primarily via apoptotic death pathways in rapidly proliferating cells within the initial 1-2days after the exposure. However later in the course of the radiation disease necrotic cell death may ensue via direct and indirect pathways from increased generation of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Here we evaluated radiomitigative potential of necrostatin-1 after total body irradiation (TBI) and the contribution of necroptosis to cell death induced by radiation. Circulating TNFα levels were increased starting on d1 after TBI and associated with increased plasmalemma permeability in ileum of irradiated mice. Necrostatin-1 given iv. 48h after 9.5Gy TBI attenuated radiation-induced receptor interacting protein kinase 3 (RIPK3) serine phosphorylation in ileum and improved survival vs. vehicle. Utilizing apoptosis resistant cytochrome c(-/-) cells, we showed that radiation can induce necroptosis, which is attenuated by RNAi knock down of RIPK1 and RIPK3 or by treatment with necrostatin-1 or -1s whereas 1-methyl-L-tryptophan, an indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase inhibitor, did not exhibit radiomitigative effect. This suggests that the beneficial effect of necrostatin-1 is likely through inhibition of RIPK1-mediated necroptotic pathway. Overall, our data indicate that necroptosis, a form of programmed necrosis, may play a significant role in cell death contributing to radiation disease and mortality. This study provides a proof of principle that necrostatin-1 and perhaps other RIPK1 inhibitors are promising therapeutic agents for radiomitigation after TBI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Association of a missense mutation in the positional candidate gene glutamate receptor-interacting protein 1 with backfat thickness traits in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Bong Lee

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective Previously, we reported quantitative trait loci (QTLs affecting backfat thickness (BFT traits on pig chromosome 5 (SW1482–SW963 in an F2 intercross population between Landrace and Korean native pigs. The aim of this study was to evaluate glutamate receptor-interacting protein 1 (GRIP1 as a positional candidate gene underlying the QTL affecting BFT traits. Methods Genotype and phenotype analyses were performed using the 1,105 F2 progeny. A mixed-effect linear model was used to access association between these single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers and the BFT traits in the F2 intercross population. Results Highly significant associations of two informative SNPs (c.2442 T>C, c.3316 C>G [R1106G] in GRIP1 with BFT traits were detected. In addition, the two SNPs were used to construct haplotypes that were also highly associated with the BFT traits. Conclusion The SNPs and haplotypes of the GRIP1 gene determined in this study can contribute to understand the genetic structure of BFT traits in pigs.

  6. Scopolamine methylbromide mitigates radiation induced damage and lethality in zebrafish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrivastava, Nitisha; Joshi, Jayadev; Ghosh, Subhajit; Dimri, Manali; Prem Kumar, Indracanti; Sehgal, Neeta

    2014-01-01

    In view of the strategic importance radiation countermeasures hold, the present study was undertaken to screen a collection of small molecule clinical compounds for possible radioprotective action using zebrafish as a model system. Preliminary screening in developing zebrafish embryos (24 hour post fertilization, (hpf)) using damage manifestations and survival as end point identified scopolamine methylbromide (SMB), a muscarinic receptor antagonist, as a potential radiomitigator. It was found to be optimal (60% survival advantage after 6 th post irradiation day) at a dose of 80 μM when added 3 h post 20 Gy exposure. Mechanistic studies suggested that SMB though exhibited no significant antioxidant potential, but was found to limit radiation induced apoptosis (pre G1 population) quantified through flow cytometry (6 and 5% reduction after 8 or 24 h after treatments) and annexin V staining (8% reduction). Further, quantitative analysis, using caspase 3 assay, revealed a 2.46 fold increase in apoptosis in irradiated group and treatment of irradiated zebrafish embryos with SMB led to a significant reduction in global apoptosis (1.7 fold; p<0.05) when compared to irradiated group. In silico studies based on structural and functional similarity with known radioprotectors suggested similarities with atropine, a known anti-inflammatory agent with muscarinic antagonism and radioprotective potential. In view of this SMB was tested, in silico, for possible anti-inflammatory action. Molecular docking studies revealed that SMB interacts (B.E-8.0 Kcal/mole) with cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2). In lieu of this, anti-inflammation activity was assessed through ChIN (chemically induced inflammation) method in 3 dpf (days post fertilization) embryos and SMB was found to significantly inhibit inflammation at all doses studied from 20-200 μM at 3 and 6 hpi (hours post inflammation). Overall the result suggests that scopolamine methylbromide mitigates radiation induced injury and lethality in

  7. Influence of temperature and pressure on the lethality of ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raso, J.; Pagan, R.; Condon, S.; Sala, F.J.

    1998-01-01

    A specially designed resistometer was constructed, and the lethal effect on Yersinia enterocolitica of ultrasonic waves (UW) at different static pressures (manosonication [MS]) and of combined heat-UW under pressure treatments (manothermosonication [MTS]) was investigated. During MS treatments at 30 degrees C and 200 kPa, the increase in the amplitude of UW of 20 kHz from 21 to 150 micrometers exponentially decreased decimal reduction time values (D(MS)) from 4 to 0.37 min. When pressure was increased from 0 to 600 kPa at a constant amplitude (150 micrometers) and temperature (30 degrees C), D(MS) values decreased from 1.52 to 0.20 min. The magnitude of this decrease in D(MS) declined progressively as pressure was increased. The influence of pressure on D(MS) values was greater with increased amplitude of UW. Pressure alone of as much as 600 kPa did not influence the heat resistance of Y. enterocolitica (D60 = 0.094; zeta = 5.65). At temperatures of as much as 58 degrees C, the lethality of UW under pressure was greater than that of heat treatment alone at the same temperature. At higher temperatures, this difference disappeared. Heat and UW under pressure seemed to act independently. The lethality of MTS treatments appeared to result from the added effects of UW under pressure and the lethal effect of heat. The individual contributions of heat and of UW under pressure to the total lethal effect of MTS depended on temperature. The inactivating effect of UW was not due to titanium particles eroded from the sonication horn. The addition to the MS media of cysteamine did not increase the resistance of Y. enterocolitica to MS treatment. MS treatment caused cell disruption

  8. Functional diversity of non-lethal effects, chemical camouflage, and variation in fish avoidance in colonizing beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resetarits, William J; Pintar, Matthew R

    2016-12-01

    Predators play an extremely important role in natural communities. In freshwater systems, fish can dominate sorting both at the colonization and post-colonization stage. Specifically, for many colonizing species, fish can have non-lethal, direct effects that exceed the lethal direct effects of predation. Functionally diverse fish species with a range of predatory capabilities have previously been observed to elicit functionally equivalent responses on oviposition in tree frogs. We tested this hypothesis of functional equivalence of non-lethal effects for four predatory fish species, using naturally colonizing populations of aquatic beetles. Among taxa other than mosquitoes, and with the exception of the chemically camouflaged pirate perch, Aphredoderus sayanus, we provide the first evidence of variation in colonization or oviposition responses to different fish species. Focusing on total abundance, Fundulus chrysotus, a gape-limited, surface-feeding fish, elicited unique responses among colonizing Hydrophilidae, with the exception of the smallest and most abundant taxa, Paracymus, while Dytiscidae responded similarly to all avoided fish. Neither family responded to A. sayanus. Analysis of species richness and multivariate characterization of the beetle assemblages for the four fish species and controls revealed additional variation among the three avoided species and confirmed that chemical camouflage in A. sayanus results in assemblages essentially identical to fishless controls. The origin of this variation in beetle responses to different fish is unknown, but may involve variation in cue sensitivity, different behavioral algorithms, or differential responses to species-specific fish cues. The identity of fish species occupying aquatic habitats is crucial to understanding community structure, as varying strengths of lethal and non-lethal effects, as well as their interaction, create complex landscapes of predator effects and challenge the notion of functional

  9. Study on the abnormalities in sperm and gene mutation induced by retention of 147Pm in testis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shoupeng; Lun Mingyue; Yang Shuqin

    1990-05-01

    The purpose of the present study is to ascertain 147 Pm retention in testis and its radiogenotoxicological effects of gene mutation through varying radioactivities of internal exposure. Especially the accumulation of 147 Pm in testis induces the dominant lethal, dominant skeletal mutation and abnormalities in sperm. Studies indicated that the cumulative absorption dose in testis increases as the internal exposure of 147 Pm increases. The internal exposure of 147 Pm can destroy the genetic materials and raise the rates of dominant lethal and dominant mutation of skeletal abnormalities in the offspring. The relationship between the rate of dominant skeletal mutation (B) and accumulated radioactivities of 147 Pm (D) in testis can be described by a linear equation that is B 20.68 + 35.48 D. The relationship between abnormalities of the sperm and the cumulative dose from 147 Pm in testis can be expressed by the following equation: S = 10.8705 D 0.5224 + 3.1768

  10. Deletion mutations of bacteriophage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryo, Yeikou

    1975-01-01

    Resolution of mutation mechanism with structural changes of DNA was discussed through the studies using bacteriophage lambda. One of deletion mutations inductions of phage lambda is the irradiation of ultraviolet ray. It is not clear if the inductions are caused by errors in reparation of ultraviolet-induced damage or by the activation of int gene. Because the effective site of int gene lies within the regions unnecessary for existing, it is considered that int gene is connected to deletion mutations induction. A certain system using prophage complementarity enables to detect deletion mutations at essential hereditary sites and to solve the relations of deletion mutations with other recombination system, DNA reproduction and repairment system. Duplication and multiplication of hereditary elements were discussed. If lambda deletion mutations of the system, which can control recombination, reproduction and repairment of added DNA, are constructed, mutations mechanism with great changes of DNA structure can be solved by phage lambda. (Ichikawa, K.)

  11. Bypass of lethality with mosaic mice generated by Cre-loxP-mediated recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, U A; Vosshenrich, C A; Rajewsky, K; Müller, W

    1996-10-01

    The analysis of gene function based on the generation of mutant mice by homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells is limited if gene disruption results in embryonic lethality. Mosaic mice, which contain a certain proportion of mutant cells in all organs, allow lethality to be circumvented and the potential of mutant cells to contribute to different cell lineages to be analyzed. To generate mosaic animals, we used the bacteriophage P1-derived Cre-loxP recombination system, which allows gene alteration by Cre-mediated deletion of loxP-flanked gene segments. We generated nestin-cre transgenic mouse lines, which expressed the Cre recombinase under the control of the rat nestin promoter and its second intron enhancer. In crosses to animals carrying a loxP-flanked target gene, partial deletion of the loxP-flanked allele occurred before day 10.5 post coitum and was detectable in all adult organs examined, including germ-line cells. Using this approach, we generated mosaic mice containing cells deficient in the gamma-chain of the interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R gamma); in these animals, the IL-2R gamma-deficient cells were underrepresented in the thymus and spleen. Because mice deficient in DNA polymerase beta die perinatally, we studied the effects of DNA polymerase beta deficiency in mosaic animals. We found that some of the mosaic polymerase beta-deficient animals were viable, but were often reduced in size and weight. The fraction of DNA polymerase beta-deficient cells in mosaic embryos decreased during embryonic development, presumably because wild-type cells had a competitive advantage. The nestin-cre transgenic mice can be used to generate mosaic animals in which target genes are mutated by Cre-mediated recombination of loxP-flanked target genes. By using mosaic animals, embryonic lethality can be bypassed and cell lineages for whose development a given target gene is critical can be identified. In the case of DNA polymerase beta, deficient cells are already

  12. Chloroquine Improves Survival and Hematopoietic Recovery After Lethal Low-Dose-Rate Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim Yiting; Hedayati, Mohammad; Merchant, Akil A.; Zhang Yonggang; Yu, Hsiang-Hsuan M.; Kastan, Michael B.; Matsui, William; DeWeese, Theodore L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that the antimalarial agent chloroquine can abrogate the lethal cellular effects of low-dose-rate (LDR) radiation in vitro, most likely by activating the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein. Here, we demonstrate that chloroquine treatment also protects against lethal doses of LDR radiation in vivo. Methods and Materials: C57BL/6 mice were irradiated with a total of 12.8 Gy delivered at 9.4 cGy/hour. ATM null mice from the same background were used to determine the influence of ATM. Chloroquine was administered by two intraperitoneal injections of 59.4 μg per 17 g of body weight, 24 hours and 4 hours before irradiation. Bone marrow cells isolated from tibia, fibula, and vertebral bones were transplanted into lethally irradiated CD45 congenic recipient mice by retroorbital injection. Chimerism was assessed by flow cytometry. In vitro methylcellulose colony-forming assay of whole bone marrow cells and fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis of lineage depleted cells were used to assess the effect of chloroquine on progenitor cells. Results: Mice pretreated with chloroquine before radiation exhibited a significantly higher survival rate than did mice treated with radiation alone (80% vs. 31%, p = 0.0026). Chloroquine administration before radiation did not affect the survival of ATM null mice (p = 0.86). Chloroquine also had a significant effect on the early engraftment of bone marrow cells from the irradiated donor mice 6 weeks after transplantation (4.2% vs. 0.4%, p = 0.015). Conclusion: Chloroquine administration before radiation had a significant effect on the survival of normal but not ATM null mice, strongly suggesting that the in vivo effect, like the in vitro effect, is also ATM dependent. Chloroquine improved the early engraftment of bone marrow cells from LDR-irradiated mice, presumably by protecting the progenitor cells from radiation injury. Chloroquine thus could serve as a very useful drug for protection

  13. Immunobiotic Lactobacillus administered post-exposure averts the lethal sequelae of respiratory virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percopo, Caroline M; Rice, Tyler A; Brenner, Todd A; Dyer, Kimberly D; Luo, Janice L; Kanakabandi, Kishore; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Porcella, Stephen F; Domachowske, Joseph B; Keicher, Jesse D; Rosenberg, Helene F

    2015-09-01

    We reported previously that priming of the respiratory tract with immunobiotic Lactobacillus prior to virus challenge protects mice against subsequent lethal infection with pneumonia virus of mice (PVM). We present here the results of gene microarray which document differential expression of proinflammatory mediators in response to PVM infection alone and those suppressed in response to Lactobacillus plantarum. We also demonstrate for the first time that intranasal inoculation with live or heat-inactivated L. plantarum or Lactobacillus reuteri promotes full survival from PVM infection when administered within 24h after virus challenge. Survival in response to L. plantarum administered after virus challenge is associated with suppression of proinflammatory cytokines, limited virus recovery, and diminished neutrophil recruitment to lung tissue and airways. Utilizing this post-virus challenge protocol, we found that protective responses elicited by L. plantarum at the respiratory tract were distinct from those at the gastrointestinal mucosa, as mice devoid of the anti-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin (IL)-10, exhibit survival and inflammatory responses that are indistinguishable from those of their wild-type counterparts. Finally, although L. plantarum interacts specifically with pattern recognition receptors TLR2 and NOD2, the respective gene-deleted mice were fully protected against lethal PVM infection by L. plantarum, as are mice devoid of type I interferon receptors. Taken together, L. plantarum is a versatile and flexible agent that is capable of averting the lethal sequelae of severe respiratory infection both prior to and post-virus challenge via complex and potentially redundant mechanisms. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Mutation induction by ion beams in higher plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Atsushi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2003-04-01

    This review mainly describes study results obtained in the Takasaki ion-beam (IB) irradiation facility (TIARA) on the mutation induction in higher plants. Biological effects like lethality and on budding of IBs (carbon, Ne and Ar) are discussed in relation with their linear energy transfer (LET), relative biological effectiveness and the developmental states in shepherd's-purse and tobacco. Induced mutation by IB are characterized by those findings that the mutation rate by C beam is 1.9 x 10{sup -6}, being 17 times higher than the electron beam, in the shepherd's-purse, that C beam induces larger structural changes than electron beam when examined by molecular mechanism of tt and gl gene mutations, and that mutation spectrum of IB is different from that of {gamma}-ray and is wider. Novel mutants are described on shepherd's-purse (pigment mutants, ultraviolet (UV)-resistant and sensitive ones, and flowering ones), disease-resistant rice, barley and tobacco plants, and flowering plants. IB mutation is possibly useful for solving the problems of environment and foods in future. (N.I.)

  15. Influence of mutations in some structural genes of heat-shock proteins on radiation resistance of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verbenko, V.N.; Kuznetsova, L.V.; Bikineeva, E.G.; Kalinin, V.L.

    1992-01-01

    Lethal effects of γ-irradiation were studied in Escherichia coli strains with normal repair genotype and in radiation-resistant Gam r strains, both carrying additional mutations in the structural genes dnaK, grpE, groES or groEL. The null mutation ΔdnaK52::Cm r enhanced radiation sensitivity of wild-type cells and abolished the effect of heat induced rediation-resistance (ETIRR) and elevated radiation resistance of the Gam r strains

  16. The influence of continuous γ-irradiation at decreasing dose-rate on the survival rote and induction of gene mutations in cultured Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feoktistova, T.P.; Elisova, E.V.; Stavrakova, N.M.

    1991-01-01

    Continuous γ-irradiation at decreasing dose-rate was shown to be less effective than acute exposure with regard to the lethal effect and frequency of mutations of resistance to 6-thioguanine in cultured Chinese hamster cells. The cell population subjected to continuons irradiation was d more radioresistant than the intact one. Lethal and genetic effects of continuous irradiation at decreasing dose-rate were mainly determined by the contribution of the radiation dose received during the first 24 h of exposure

  17. How much do we know about spontaneous human mutation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crow, J.F. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States))

    1993-01-01

    The much larger number of cell divisions between zygote and sperm than between zygote and egg, the increased age of fathers of children with new dominant mutations, and the greater evolution rate of pseudogenes on the Y chromosome than of those on autosomes all point to a much higher mutation rate in human males than in females, as first pointed out by Haldane in his classical study of X-linked hemophilia. The age of the father is the main factor determining the human spontaneous mutation rate, and probably the total mutation rate. The total mutation rate in Drosophila males of genes causing minor reduction in viability is at least 0.4 per sperm and may be considerably higher. The great mutation load implied by a rate of [approx] 1 per zygote can be greatly ameliorated by quasi-transition selection. Corresponding data are not available for the human population. The evolution rate of pseudogenes in primates suggests some 10[sup 2] new mutations per zygote. Presumably the overwhelming majority of these are neutral, but even the approximate fraction is not known. Statistical evidence in Drosophilia shows that mutations with minor effects cause about the same heterozygous impairment of fitness as those that are lethal when homozygous. The magnitude of heterozygous effect is such that almost all mutant genes are eliminated as heterozygotes before ever becoming homozygous. Although quantitative data in the human species are lacking, anecdotal information supports the conclusion that partial dominance is the rule here as well. This suggests that if the human mutation rate were increased or decreased, the effects would be spread over a period of 50-100 generations. 31 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. A quick method for testing recessive lethal damage with a diploid strain of Aspergillus nidulans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morpurgo, G.; Puppo, S.; Gualandi, G.; Conti, L.

    1978-01-01

    A simple method capable of detecting recessive lethal damage in a diploid strain of Aspergillus nidulans is described. The method scores the recessive lethals on the 1st, the 3rd and the 5th chromosomes, which represent about 40% of the total map of A. nidulans. Two examples of induced lethals, with ultraviolet irradiation and methyl methanesulfonate are shown. The frequency of lethals may reach 36% of the total population with UV irradiation. (Auth.)

  19. Humanitarian Algorithms : A Codified Key Safety Switch Protocol for Lethal Autonomy

    OpenAIRE

    Nyagudi, Nyagudi Musandu

    2014-01-01

    With the deployment of lethal autonomous weapons, there is the requirement that any such platform complies with the precepts of International Humanitarian Law. Humanitarian Algorithms[9: p. 9] ensure that lethal autonomous weapon systems perform military/security operations, within the confines of International Humanitarian Law. Unlike other existing techniques of regulating lethal autonomy this scheme advocates for an approach that enables Machine Learning. Lethal autonomous weapons must be ...

  20. Penetrance of eye defects in mice heterozygous for mutation of Gli3 is enhanced by heterozygous mutation of Pax6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Price David J

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge of the consequences of heterozygous mutations of developmentally important genes is important for understanding human genetic disorders. The Gli3 gene encodes a zinc finger transcription factor and homozygous loss-of-function mutations of Gli3 are lethal. Humans heterozygous for mutations in this gene suffer Greig cephalopolysyndactyly or Pallister-Hall syndromes, in which limb defects are prominent, and mice heterozygous for similar mutations have extra digits. Here we examined whether eye development, which is abnormal in mice lacking functional Gli3, is defective in Gli3+/- mice. Results We showed that Gli3 is expressed in the developing eye but that Gli3+/- mice have only very subtle eye defects. We then generated mice compound heterozygous for mutations in both Gli3 and Pax6, which encodes another developmentally important transcription factor known to be crucial for eye development. Pax6+/-; Gli3+/- eyes were compared to the eyes of wild-type, Pax6+/- or Gli3+/- siblings. They exhibited a range of abnormalities of the retina, iris, lens and cornea that was more extensive than in single Gli3+/- or Pax6+/- mutants or than would be predicted by addition of their phenotypes. Conclusion These findings indicate that heterozygous mutations of Gli3 can impact on eye development. The importance of a normal Gli3 gene dosage becomes greater in the absence of a normal Pax6 gene dosage, suggesting that the two genes co-operate during eye morphogenesis.

  1. Pacman dysplasia: a lethal skeletal dysplasia with variable radiographic features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, S.F. [Dept. of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of the King' s Daughters, Norfolk (United States); Proud, V.K. [Dept. of Genetics, Children' s Hospital of the King' s Daughters, Norfolk (United States); Werner, A.L. [Dept. of Pathology, Children' s Hospital of the King' s Daughters, Norfolk (United States); Field, F.M.; Wilcox, W.F.; Lachman, R.S.; Rimoin, D.L. [International Skeletal Dysplasia Registry, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles (United States)

    2003-04-01

    Background: Punctate or stippled cartilaginous calcifications are associated with many conditions, including chromosomal, infectious, endocrine, and teratogenic etiologies. Some of these conditions are clinically mild, while others are lethal. Accurate diagnosis can prove instrumental in clinical management and in genetic counseling. Objective: To describe the diagnostic radiographic features seen in Pacman dysplasia, a distinct autosomal recessive, lethal skeletal dysplasia. Materials and methods: We present the fourth reported case of Pacman dysplasia and compare the findings seen in our patient with the three previously described patients. Results: Invariable and variable radiographic findings were seen in all four cases of histologically proven Pacman dysplasia. Conclusion: Pacman dysplasia presents both constant and variable diagnostic radiographic features. (orig.)

  2. Neonatal lethal dwarfism with distinct skeletal malformations - a separate entity?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosendahl, K.; Maurseth, K.; Olsen, Oe.E. [Dept. of Paediatric Radiology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Halvorsen, O.J. [Dept. of Pathology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Gjelland, K. [Dept. of Gynaecology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Engebretsen, L. [Dept. of Genetics, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway)

    2001-09-01

    We describe a case of neonatal lethal dwarfism characterised by short trunk, short, stick-like tubular bones, deficient ossification of the axial skeleton and broad, sclerotic horizontal ribs. Two similar cases have previously been reported as examples of the Neu-Laxova syndrome. However, the radiological findings of the Neu-Laxova syndrome, as reported in 16 out of 40 documented cases, show a heterogeneous pattern of minor features, which differ distinctively from those found in the previous two cases and by us. A literature research did not reveal similar cases, and we therefore suggest that our case, together with the two previous cases, may represent a new distinctive form of neonatal lethal dwarfism. (orig.)

  3. Neonatal lethal dwarfism with distinct skeletal malformations - a separate entity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosendahl, K.; Maurseth, K.; Olsen, Oe.E.; Halvorsen, O.J.; Gjelland, K.; Engebretsen, L.

    2001-01-01

    We describe a case of neonatal lethal dwarfism characterised by short trunk, short, stick-like tubular bones, deficient ossification of the axial skeleton and broad, sclerotic horizontal ribs. Two similar cases have previously been reported as examples of the Neu-Laxova syndrome. However, the radiological findings of the Neu-Laxova syndrome, as reported in 16 out of 40 documented cases, show a heterogeneous pattern of minor features, which differ distinctively from those found in the previous two cases and by us. A literature research did not reveal similar cases, and we therefore suggest that our case, together with the two previous cases, may represent a new distinctive form of neonatal lethal dwarfism. (orig.)

  4. Hematologic syndrome in man modeled from mammalian lethality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, T.D.

    1981-01-01

    Data on acute radiation lethality due to failure of the hematologic system in rats, mice, dogs, swine, monkeys and man are analyzed. Based on the available data, the mortality incidences for 1-100% levels can be computed directly if one has only an estimate of the dose lethal to 50% of the population (LD 50 ) for the mammalian strain and radiation environment of interest. The sole restriction is that the dose profile to the marrow be moderately uniform. If an LD 50 for any exposure situation has been measured, then one can readily scale to any desired situation through implicit-biological and empirical-physical relationships. The LD 50 for man, exposed to an isotropic cloud of photons, and knowledge of the bone-marrow dose profiles readily permit evaluation of the model for other levels of human mortality from different irradiating particles, partial body irradiation and spatially dependent and/or mixed radiation environments. (author)

  5. An improved brine shrimp larvae lethality microwell test method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Mu, Jun; Han, Jinyuan; Gu, Xiaojie

    2012-01-01

    This article described an improved brine shrimp larvae lethality microwell test method. A simply designed connecting vessel with alternative photoperiod was used to culture and collect high yield of active Artemia parthenogenetica nauplii for brine shrimp larvae lethality microwell test. Using this method, pure A. parthenogenetica nauplii suspension was easily cultured and harvested with high density about 100-150 larvae per milliliter and the natural mortality was reduced to near zero by elimination of unnecessary artificial disturbance. And its sensitivity was validated by determination of LC(50)-24 h of different reference toxicants including five antitumor agents, two pesticides, three organic pollutants, and four heavy metals salts, most of which exhibited LC(50)-24 h between 0.07 and 58.43 mg/L except for bleomycin and mitomycin C with LC(50)-24 h over 300 mg/L.

  6. [Detection of the lethal process in plankton noctiluca by means of a forbidden transition of ESR of Mn2+ ion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenev, S E; Kopvillem, U Kh; Pasynkov, A S; Sharipov, R Z

    1981-01-01

    A forbidden ESR line of Mn2+ that is connected with the penetration of Mn into the plancton organism and binding it to a marcomolecule is selected from the experiment. A method for saturating the plancton organism with paramagnetic ions is proposed. It is shown that the constant of the axial electric field in the spin hamiltonian of Mn2+ ion described the dynamics of a selforganizing system. It is tested that the lethal process in the plancton with paramagnetic ion enrichment originated from boson avalanche. Experiments are performed with plancton noctiluca which illustrate the occurrence of avalancheline lethal process in the case of paramagnetic ion enrichment with limiting concentration. The meaning of these results for the problems of oceanology and pollution-ocean inhabitants interaction in the case of paramagnetic ions is discussed.

  7. Non-Lethal Weaponry: A Framework for Future Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-04-01

    community, but was widely popularized by John Naisbitt in his 1982 work, Megatrends . In short, it asserts that much may be learned about a dynamic, but...Notes 1 John Naisbitt, Megatrends : Ten New Directions Transforming Our Lives (New York, NY: Warner Books, Inc., 1982), 3-5. 2 Robert J. Bunker...lethals by opponents of biological and chemical weapons. The use of chemical agents…is seen as a Trojan Horse to circumvent the Chemical Weapons

  8. Genome Replikin Count Predicts Increased Infectivity/Lethality of Viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Samuel Bogoch; Elenore S. Bogoch

    2012-01-01

    The genomes of all groups of viruses whose sequences are listed on Pubmed, specimens since 1918, analyzed by a software from Bioradar UK Ltd., contain Replikins which range in concentration from a Replikin Count (number of Replikins per 100 amino acids) of less than 1 to 30 (see accompanying communications for higher Counts in tuberculosis, malaria, and cancer, associated with higher lethality). Counts of less than 4.0 were found in ‘resting’ virus states; Counts greater than 4....

  9. Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita. A cause of lethal neonatal dwarfism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macpherson, R.I.; Wood, B.P.

    1980-07-01

    Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita is a form of primarily short trunk dwarfism, that is manifest at birth but generally has not been regarded as a cause of lethal neonatal dwarfism. Seven neonates with severe dwarfism are presented. The first survived the newborn period, but the other six were early neonatal deaths. All displayed the clinical and radiologic features of spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita. The striking similarities between spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita and achondrogenesis type 2 are discussed.

  10. Torrance type of lethal neonatal short-limbed platyspondylic dwarfism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaibara, N.; Yokoyama, K.; Nakano, H.

    1983-01-01

    A rare case of lethal neonatal short-limbed platyspondylic dwarfism is described. Roentgenographic features of this case, distinctly different from those of the classical thanatophoric dysplasia, are indistinguishable from the other three types of short-limbed platyspondylic dwarfism. Histologic features of the cartilage in this case are not very different from those of the Torrance type, but the presence of focal disruption of column formation in this case suggests a wider spectrum for this entity. (orig.)

  11. Torrance type of lethal neonatal short-limbed platyspondylic dwarfism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaibara, N.; Yokoyama, K.; Nakano, H.

    1983-06-01

    A rare case of lethal neonatal short-limbed platyspondylic dwarfism is described. Roentgenographic features of this case, distinctly different from those of the classical thanatophoric dysplasia, are indistinguishable from the other three types of short-limbed platyspondylic dwarfism. Histologic features of the cartilage in this case are not very different from those of the Torrance type, but the presence of focal disruption of column formation in this case suggests a wider spectrum for this entity.

  12. First diagnosed lethal case of lyssavirus infection in Primorsky krai

    OpenAIRE

    Leonova, G.; Chentsova, I.; Petukhova, S.; Somova, L.; Belikov, S.; Kondratov, I.; Kryilova, N.; Plekhova, N.; Pavlenko, E.; Romanova, E.; Matsak, V.; Smirnov, G.; Novikov, D.

    2010-01-01

    The paper provides data of comprehensive study of lethal case of lyssavirus infection first diagnosed in Yakovlevsky municipal district in Primorsky Krai. The data of epidemiologic analysis (contact with a rattle mouse), clinical picture and results of virologic, morphological and molecular genetic tests allow attributing this case to lyssavirus infection. This is the first diagnosed case of lyssavirus infection in the Siberia and Far East.

  13. Transplantation of bone marrow cells into lethally irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viktora, L.; Hermanova, E.

    1978-01-01

    Morphological changes were studied of megakaryocytes in the bone marrow and spleen of lethally irradiated mice (0.2 C/kg) after transplantation of living bone marrow cells. It was observed that functional trombopoietic megakaryocytes occur from day 15 after transplantation and that functional active megakaryocytes predominate in bone marrow and spleen from day 20. In addition, other types of cells, primarily granulocytes, were detected in some megakaryocytes. (author)

  14. The role of cell progression in potentiation of radiation lethality by hyperthermia and by chemical means

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djordjevic, B.; Lange, C.S.

    1984-01-01

    Aerobic stationary dense cultures of HeLa cells show very little potentiation of radiation lethality when irradiated cells are incubated with procaine HCl for two hours at 37 0 C, but if cells are diluted in fresh medium after irradiation and incubated for two hours with procaine, a high degree of radiopotentiation is obtained. This effect is not cell density dependent, since the addition of heavily irradiated cells to achieve comparable densities did not diminish lethality in the diluted culture. Procaine radiopotentiation at 37 0 C could be prevented by simultaneous administration with procaine of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Since cycloheximide inhibits cell cycle progression (with block points in G1 and G2) progression is strongly implicated in the phenomenon of radiopotentiation. Cell progression may be also involved in hyperthermic radiopotentiation: adding cycloheximide during heating of irradiated cells at 41 0 C for two hours increased survival. This effect of cycloheximide is even more pronounced in cells also treated with procaine during heating, thus diminishing the interaction of heat and procaine in radiopotentiation. Data pertaining to cell progression in synchronous cultures of HeLa cells under various treatment conditions are presented and discussed

  15. The (noneffects of lethal population control on the diet of Australian dingoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin L Allen

    Full Text Available Top-predators contribute to ecosystem resilience, yet individuals or populations are often subject to lethal control to protect livestock, managed game or humans from predation. Such management actions sometimes attract concern that lethal control might affect top-predator function in ways ultimately detrimental to biodiversity conservation. The primary function of a predator is predation, which is often investigated by assessing their diet. We therefore use data on prey remains found in 4,298 Australian dingo scats systematically collected from three arid sites over a four year period to experimentally assess the effects of repeated broad-scale poison-baiting programs on dingo diet. Indices of dingo dietary diversity and similarity were either identical or near-identical in baited and adjacent unbaited treatment areas in each case, demonstrating no control-induced change to dingo diets. Associated studies on dingoes' movement behaviour and interactions with sympatric mesopredators were similarly unaffected by poison-baiting. These results indicate that mid-sized top-predators with flexible and generalist diets (such as dingoes may be resilient to ongoing and moderate levels of population control without substantial alteration of their diets and other related aspects of their ecological function.

  16. Effect of sulfhydryls on potentiation of radiation-induced cell lethality by substituted anthraquinones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimler, B.F.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of various substituted anthraquinones (SAQ's) and Adriamycin (ADR) were investigated in cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells. These drugs cause a potentiation of radiation-induced cell lethality, albeit by different mechanisms. One possibility is that these components operate through the production of free radicals which then produce DNA strand breaks and crosslinks. If so, then one should be able to change the degree of cell kill by modifying sulfhydryl (SH) levels such that free radical processes are altered. Diamide, buthionine-S, R-sulfoximine, and N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) were used to reduce intracellular SH levels. Cysteamine and dithiotheitol were used to increase SH levels. In general, altered SH levels did not affect SAQ-induced cytotoxicity at low drug concentrations. When drug-tested cells were also irradiated, survival levels were generally those predicted from assuming purely additive interactions. On the other hand, survival after treatment with high concentrations of ADR and one other SAQ were decreased by concomitant treatment with NEM. Since altered SH levels do not produce changes in the potentiation of radiation-induced cell lethality by SAQs, it is concluded that free radicals are not involved in this potentiation. A free radical-mediated process may be involved in the cytotoxicity induced by ADR and other SAQs; however, it is not a simple process

  17. Transgenic Drosophila simulans strains prove the identity of the speciation gene Lethal hybrid rescue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigent, Stéphane R; Matsubayashi, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Masa-Toshi

    2009-10-01

    Speciation genes are responsible for genetic incompatibilities in hybrids of incipient species and therefore participate in reproductive isolation leading to complete speciation. Hybrid males between Drosophila melanogaster females and D. simulans males die at late larval or prepupal stages due to a failure in chromosome condensation during mitosis. However a mutant male of D. simulans, named Lethal hybrid rescue (Lhr), produces viable hybrid males when crossed to females of D. melanogaster. Recently the Lhr gene has been proposed as corresponding to the CG18468 gene in D. melanogaster. However this identification relied on sequence characteristics more than on a precise mapping and the use of the GAL4/UAS system to drive the transgene in D. melanogaster might have increased the complexity of interaction. Thus here we propose an independent identification of the Lhr gene based on a more precise mapping and transgenic experiments in D. simulans. We have mapped the Lhr gene by using Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) and identified within the candidate region the gene homologous to CG18468 as the Lhr gene as it was previously reported. Transgenic experiments in D. simulans with the native promoter of CG18468 prove that it is the Lhr gene of D. simulans by inducing the lethality of the hybrid males.

  18. Suppression of F1 Male-Specific Lethality in Caenorhabditis Hybrids by cbr-him-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragavapuram, Vaishnavi; Hill, Emily Elaine; Baird, Scott Everet

    2015-12-31

    Haldane's Rule and Darwin's Corollary to Haldane's Rule are the observations that heterogametic F1 hybrids are frequently less fit than their homogametic siblings, and that asymmetric results are often obtained from reciprocal hybrid crosses. In Caenorhabditis, Haldane's Rule and Darwin's Corollary have been observed in several hybrid crosses, including crosses of Caenorhabditis briggsae and C. nigoni. Fertile F1 females are obtained from reciprocal crosses. However, F1 males obtained from C. nigoni mothers are sterile and F1 males obtained from C. briggsae die during embryogenesis. We have identified cbr-him-8 as a recessive maternal-effect suppressor of F1 hybrid male-specific lethality in this combination of species. This result implicates epigenetic meiotic silencing in the suppression of F1 male-specific lethality. It is also shown that F1 males bearing a C. briggsae X chromosome are fertile. When crossed to C. briggsae hermaphrodites or F1 females derived from C. briggsae hermaphrodites, viable F2 and backcross (B2) progeny were obtained. Sibling males that possessed a C. nigoni X chromosome were sterile. Therefore, the sterility of F1 males bearing a C. nigoni X chromosome must result from dysgenic interactions between the X chromosome of C. nigoni and the autosomes of C. briggsae. The fertility of F1 males bearing a C. briggsae X chromosome provides an opportunity to identify C. nigoni loci that prevent spermatogenesis, and hence hermaphroditic reproduction, in diplo-X hybrids. Copyright © 2016 Ragavapuram et al.

  19. Mutated genes as research tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Green plants are the ultimate source of all resources required for man's life, his food, his clothes, and almost all his energy requirements. Primitive prehistoric man could live from the abundance of nature surrounding him. Man today, dominating nature in terms of numbers and exploiting its limited resources, cannot exist without employing his intelligence to direct natural evolution. Plant sciences, therefore, are not a matter of curiosity but an essential requirement. From such considerations, the IAEA and FAO jointly organized a symposium to assess the value of mutation research for various kinds of plant science, which directly or indirectly might contribute to sustaining and improving crop production. The benefit through developing better cultivars that plant breeders can derive from using the additional genetic resources resulting from mutation induction has been assessed before at other FAO/IAEA meetings (Rome 1964, Pullman 1969, Ban 1974, Ibadan 1978) and is also monitored in the Mutation Breeding Newsletter, published by IAEA twice a year. Several hundred plant cultivars which carry economically important characters because their genes have been altered by ionizing radiation or other mutagens, are grown by farmers and horticulturists in many parts of the world. But the benefit derived from such mutant varieties is without any doubt surpassed by the contribution which mutation research has made towards the advancement of genetics. For this reason, a major part of the papers and discussions at the symposium dealt with the role induced-mutation research played in providing insight into gene action and gene interaction, the organization of genes in plant chromosomes in view of homology and homoeology, the evolutionary role of gene duplication and polyploidy, the relevance of gene blocks, the possibilities for chromosome engineering, the functioning of cytroplasmic inheritance and the genetic dynamics of populations. In discussing the evolutionary role of

  20. Genetic Allee effects and their interaction with ecological Allee effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Meike J; Stuis, Hanna; Metzler, Dirk

    2018-01-01

    It is now widely accepted that genetic processes such as inbreeding depression and loss of genetic variation can increase the extinction risk of small populations. However, it is generally unclear whether extinction risk from genetic causes gradually increases with decreasing population size or whether there is a sharp transition around a specific threshold population size. In the ecological literature, such threshold phenomena are called 'strong Allee effects' and they can arise for example from mate limitation in small populations. In this study, we aim to (i) develop a meaningful notion of a 'strong genetic Allee effect', (ii) explore whether and under what conditions such an effect can arise from inbreeding depression due to recessive deleterious mutations, and (iii) quantify the interaction of potential genetic Allee effects with the well-known mate-finding Allee effect. We define a strong genetic Allee effect as a genetic process that causes a population's survival probability to be a sigmoid function of its initial size. The inflection point of this function defines the critical population size. To characterize survival-probability curves, we develop and analyse simple stochastic models for the ecology and genetics of small populations. Our results indicate that inbreeding depression can indeed cause a strong genetic Allee effect, but only if individuals carry sufficiently many deleterious mutations (lethal equivalents). Populations suffering from a genetic Allee effect often first grow, then decline as inbreeding depression sets in and then potentially recover as deleterious mutations are purged. Critical population sizes of ecological and genetic Allee effects appear to be often additive, but even superadditive interactions are possible. Many published estimates for the number of lethal equivalents in birds and mammals fall in the parameter range where strong genetic Allee effects are expected. Unfortunately, extinction risk due to genetic Allee effects

  1. A population genetic analysis of the potential for a crude oil spill to induce heritable mutations and impact natural populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronin, M.A. [LGL Alaska Research Associates Inc., Anchorage, AK (United States); Bickham, J.W. [Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences; LGL Ecological Genetics Inc., Bryan, TX (United States)

    1998-07-01

    The primary environmental impact following an oil spill typically is acute toxicity to fish and wildlife. However, multigenerational effects through toxicant-induced heritable mutations might also occur. Some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) components of crude oil are potentially mutagenic, although specific components and doses that induce mutations are poorly known. We applied population genetics concepts to assess the extent of mortality and the persistence of deleterious heritable mutations resulting from exposure to potential mutagens, such as crude oil. If lethal mutations are induced, the population will experience some mortality, but the mutations are quickly removed or reduced to low frequency by natural selection. This occurs within one or a few generations when mutations are dominant or partially recessive. Totally recessive alleles persist in low frequency for many generations, but result in relatively little impact on the population, depending on the number of mutated loci. We also applied population genetics concepts to assess the potential for heritable mutations induced by the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Prince William Sound, Alaska, to affect pink salmon populations. We stress that breeding units (e.g., streams with distinct spawning populations of salmon) must be considered individually to assess heritable genetic effects. For several streams impacted by the oil spill, there is inconsistency between observed egg mortality and that expected if lethal heritable mutations had been induced by exposure to crude oil. Observed mortality was either higher or lower than expected depending on the spawning population, year, and cohort considered. Any potential subtle effect of lethal mutations induced by the Exxon Valdez oil spill is overridden by natural environmental variation among spawning areas. We discuss the need to focus on population-level effects in toxicological assessments because fish and wildlife management focuses on populations, not

  2. Asymptomatic parental mosaicism for osteogenesis imperfect associated with a new splice site mutation in COL1A2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Anja Lisbeth; Dunø, Morten; Johnsen, Iben Birgit Gade

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent lethal perinatal osteogenesis imperfecta may result from asymptomatic parental mosaicism. A previously unreported mutation in COL1A2 leads to recurrent cases of fetal osteogenesis imperfecta Sillence type IIA, which emphasizes the importance of clinical and genetic evaluation of mosaicism...

  3. Computational analysis of histidine mutations on the structural stability of human tyrosinases leading to albinism insurgence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Mubashir; Abbas, Qamar; Raza, Hussain; Moustafa, Ahmed A; Seo, Sung-Yum

    2017-07-25

    Misfolding and structural alteration in proteins lead to serious malfunctions and cause various diseases in humans. Mutations at the active binding site in tyrosinase impair structural stability and cause lethal albinism by abolishing copper binding. To evaluate the histidine mutational effect, all mutated structures were built using homology modelling. The protein sequence was retrieved from the UniProt database, and 3D models of original and mutated human tyrosinase sequences were predicted by changing the residual positions within the target sequence separately. Structural and mutational analyses were performed to interpret the significance of mutated residues (N 180 , R 202 , Q 202 , R 211 , Y 363 , R 367 , Y 367 and D 390 ) at the active binding site of tyrosinases. CSpritz analysis depicted that 23.25% residues actively participate in the instability of tyrosinase. The accuracy of predicted models was confirmed through online servers ProSA-web, ERRAT score and VERIFY 3D values. The theoretical pI and GRAVY generated results also showed the accuracy of the predicted models. The CCA negative correlation results depicted that the replacement of mutated residues at His within the active binding site disturbs the structural stability of tyrosinases. The predicted CCA scores of Tyr 367 (-0.079) and Q/R 202 (0.032) revealed that both mutations have more potential to disturb the structural stability. MD simulation analyses of all predicted models justified that Gln 202 , Arg 202 , Tyr 367 and D 390 replacement made the protein structures more susceptible to destabilization. Mutational results showed that the replacement of His with Q/R 202 and Y/R 363 has a lethal effect and may cause melanin associated diseases such as OCA1. Taken together, our computational analysis depicts that the mutated residues such as Q/R 202 and Y/R 363 actively participate in instability and misfolding of tyrosinases, which may govern OCA1 through disturbing the melanin biosynthetic pathway.

  4. Better plants through mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This is a public relations film describing problems associated with the genetic improvement of crop plants through induced mutations. Mutations are the ultimate source of genetic variation in plants. Mutation induction is now established as a practical tool in plant breeding. The Joint FAO/IAEA Division and the IAEA's laboratory at Seibersdorf have supported research and practical implementation of mutation breeding of both seed propagated and vegetatively propagated plants. Plant biotechnology based on in vitro culture and recombinant DNA technology will make a further significant contribution to plant breeding

  5. Identification of a nonsense mutation in CWC15 associated with decreased reproductive efficiency in Jersey cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tad S Sonstegard

    Full Text Available With the recent advent of genomic tools for cattle, several recessive conditions affecting fertility have been identified and selected against, such as deficiency of uridine monophosphate synthase, complex vertebral malformation, and brachyspina. The current report refines the location of a recessive haplotype affecting fertility in Jersey cattle using crossover haplotypes, discovers the causative mutation using whole genome sequencing, and examines the gene's role in embryo loss. In an attempt to identify unknown recessive lethal alleles in the current dairy population, a search using deep Mendelian sampling of 5,288 Jersey cattle was conducted for high-frequency haplotypes that have a deficit of homozygotes at the population level. This search led to the discovery of a putative recessive lethal in Jersey cattle on Bos taurus autosome 15. The haplotype, denoted JH1, was associated with reduced fertility, and further investigation identified one highly-influential Jersey bull as the putative source ancestor. By combining SNP analysis of whole-genome sequences aligned to the JH1 interval and subsequent SNP validation a nonsense mutation in CWC15 was identified as the likely causative mutation underlying the fertility phenotype. No homozygous recessive individuals were found in 749 genotyped animals, whereas all known carriers and carrier haplotypes possessed one copy of the mutant allele. This newly identified lethal has been responsible for a substantial number of spontaneous abortions in Jersey dairy cattle throughout the past half-century. With the mutation identified, selection against the deleterious allele in breeding schemes will aid in reducing the incidence of this defect in the population. These results also show that carrier status can be imputed with high accuracy. Whole-genome resequencing proved to be a powerful strategy to rapidly identify a previously mapped deleterious mutation in a known carrier of a recessive lethal allele.

  6. Lethal and Sub-lethal Effects of Four Insecticides on the Aphidophagous Coccinellid Adalia bipunctata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depalo, Laura; Lanzoni, Alberto; Masetti, Antonio; Pasqualini, Edison; Burgio, Giovanni

    2017-12-05

    Conventional insecticide assays, which measure the effects of insecticide exposure on short-term mortality, overlook important traits, including persistence of toxicity or sub-lethal effects. Therefore, such approaches are especially inadequate for prediction of the overall impact of insecticides on beneficial arthropods. In this study, the side effects of four modern insecticides (chlorantraniliprole, emamectin benzoate, spinosad, and spirotetramat) on Adalia bipunctata (L.) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) were evaluated under laboratory conditions by exposition on treated potted plants. In addition to investigation of acute toxicity and persistence of harmful activity in both larvae and adults of A. bipunctata, demographic parameters were evaluated, to provide a comprehensive picture of the nontarget effects of these products. Field doses of the four insecticides caused detrimental effects to A. bipunctata; but in different ways. Overall, spinosad showed the best toxicological profile among the products tested. Emamectin benzoate could be considered a low-risk insecticide, but had high persistence. Chlorantraniliprole exhibited lethal effects on early instar larvae and adults, along with a long-lasting activity, instead spirotetramat showed a low impact on larval and adult mortality and can be considered a short-lived insecticide. However, demographic analysis demonstrated that chlorantraniliprole and spirotetramat caused sub-lethal effects. Our findings highlight that sole assessment of mortality can lead to underestimation of the full impact of pesticides on nontarget insects. Demographic analysis was demonstrated to be a sensitive method for detection of the sub-lethal effects of insecticides on A. bipunctata, and this approach should be considered for evaluation of insecticide selectivity. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. New insights into genotype-phenotype correlation for GLI3 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Démurger, Florence; Ichkou, Amale; Mougou-Zerelli, Soumaya; Le Merrer, Martine; Goudefroye, Géraldine; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Quélin, Chloé; Manouvrier, Sylvie; Baujat, Geneviève; Fradin, Mélanie; Pasquier, Laurent; Megarbané, André; Faivre, Laurence; Baumann, Clarisse; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Roume, Joëlle; Isidor, Bertrand; Lacombe, Didier; Delrue, Marie-Ange; Mercier, Sandra; Philip, Nicole; Schaefer, Elise; Holder, Muriel; Krause, Amanda; Laffargue, Fanny; Sinico, Martine; Amram, Daniel; André, Gwenaelle; Liquier, Alain; Rossi, Massimiliano; Amiel, Jeanne; Giuliano, Fabienne; Boute, Odile; Dieux-Coeslier, Anne; Jacquemont, Marie-Line; Afenjar, Alexandra; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Lackmy-Port-Lis, Marylin; Vincent-Delorme, Catherine; Chauvet, Marie-Liesse; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Devisme, Louise; Geneviève, David; Munnich, Arnold; Viot, Géraldine; Raoul, Odile; Romana, Serge; Gonzales, Marie; Encha-Razavi, Ferechte; Odent, Sylvie; Vekemans, Michel; Attie-Bitach, Tania

    2015-01-01

    The phenotypic spectrum of GLI3 mutations includes autosomal dominant Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS) and Pallister-Hall syndrome (PHS). PHS was first described as a lethal condition associating hypothalamic hamartoma, postaxial or central polydactyly, anal atresia and bifid epiglottis. Typical GCPS combines polysyndactyly of hands and feet and craniofacial features. Genotype-phenotype correlations have been found both for the location and the nature of GLI3 mutations, highlighting the bifunctional nature of GLI3 during development. Here we report on the molecular and clinical study of 76 cases from 55 families with either a GLI3 mutation (49 GCPS and 21 PHS), or a large deletion encompassing the GLI3 gene (6 GCPS cases). Most of mutations are novel and consistent with the previously reported genotype-phenotype correlation. Our results also show a correlation between the location of the mutation and abnormal corpus callosum observed in some patients with GCPS. Fetal PHS observations emphasize on the possible lethality of GLI3 mutations and extend the phenotypic spectrum of malformations such as agnathia and reductional limbs defects. GLI3 expression studied by in situ hybridization during human development confirms its early expression in target tissues.

  8. New insights into genotype–phenotype correlation for GLI3 mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Démurger, Florence; Ichkou, Amale; Mougou-Zerelli, Soumaya; Le Merrer, Martine; Goudefroye, Géraldine; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Quélin, Chloé; Manouvrier, Sylvie; Baujat, Geneviève; Fradin, Mélanie; Pasquier, Laurent; Megarbané, André; Faivre, Laurence; Baumann, Clarisse; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Roume, Joëlle; Isidor, Bertrand; Lacombe, Didier; Delrue, Marie-Ange; Mercier, Sandra; Philip, Nicole; Schaefer, Elise; Holder, Muriel; Krause, Amanda; Laffargue, Fanny; Sinico, Martine; Amram, Daniel; André, Gwenaelle; Liquier, Alain; Rossi, Massimiliano; Amiel, Jeanne; Giuliano, Fabienne; Boute, Odile; Dieux-Coeslier, Anne; Jacquemont, Marie-Line; Afenjar, Alexandra; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Lackmy-Port-Lis, Marylin; Vincent- Delorme, Catherine; Chauvet, Marie-Liesse; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Devisme, Louise; Geneviève, David; Munnich, Arnold; Viot, Géraldine; Raoul, Odile; Romana, Serge; Gonzales, Marie; Encha-Razavi, Ferechte; Odent, Sylvie; Vekemans, Michel; Attie-Bitach, Tania

    2015-01-01

    The phenotypic spectrum of GLI3 mutations includes autosomal dominant Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS) and Pallister–Hall syndrome (PHS). PHS was first described as a lethal condition associating hypothalamic hamartoma, postaxial or central polydactyly, anal atresia and bifid epiglottis. Typical GCPS combines polysyndactyly of hands and feet and craniofacial features. Genotype–phenotype correlations have been found both for the location and the nature of GLI3 mutations, highlighting the bifunctional nature of GLI3 during development. Here we report on the molecular and clinical study of 76 cases from 55 families with either a GLI3 mutation (49 GCPS and 21 PHS), or a large deletion encompassing the GLI3 gene (6 GCPS cases). Most of mutations are novel and consistent with the previously reported genotype–phenotype correlation. Our results also show a correlation between the location of the mutation and abnormal corpus callosum observed in some patients with GCPS. Fetal PHS observations emphasize on the possible lethality of GLI3 mutations and extend the phenotypic spectrum of malformations such as agnathia and reductional limbs defects. GLI3 expression studied by in situ hybridization during human development confirms its early expression in target tissues. PMID:24736735

  9. Mutation directional selection sheds light on prion pathogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Liang; Ji, Hong-Fang

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Most pathogenic mutations possess strong directional selection, i.e., enhancing hydrophobicity or decreasing negative and increasing positive charge. → Mutation-induced changes may strengthen the interactions between PrP and facilitating factors. → The findings also have significant implications for exploring potential regions involved in the conformational transition from PrP C to PrP Sc . -- Abstract: As mutations in the PRNP gene account for human hereditary prion diseases (PrDs), it is crucial to elucidating how these mutations affect the central pathogenic conformational transition of normal cellular prion protein (PrP C ) to abnormal scrapie isoform (PrP Sc ). Many studies proposed that these pathogenic mutations may make PrP more susceptible to conformational change through altering its structure stability. By evaluating the most recent observations regarding pathogenic mutations, it was found that the pathogenic mutations do not exert a uniform effect on the thermodynamic stability of the human PrP's structure. Through analyzing the reported PrDs-related mutations, we found that 25 out of 27 mutations possess strong directional selection, i.e., enhancing hydrophobicity or decreasing negative and increasing positive charge. Based on the triggering role reported by previous studies of facilitating factors in PrP C conversion, e.g., lipid and polyanion, we proposed that the mutation-induced changes may strengthen the interaction between PrP and facilitating factors, which will accelerate PrP conversion and cause PrDs.

  10. Loss of desmoplakin tail causes lethal acantholytic epidermolysis bullosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkman, MF; Pasmooij, AMG; Pasmans, SGMA; van den Berg, MP; ter Horst, HJ; Timmer, A; Pas, HH

    2005-01-01

    The cytoplasmic plaque protein desmoplakin (DP), which is located in desmosomes, plays a major role in epithelial and muscle cell adhesion by linking the transmembrane cadherins to the cytoplasmic intermediate filament network. Mutations of DP may cause striate palmoplantar keratoderma,

  11. Lack of a peroxiredoxin suppresses the lethality of cells devoid of electron donors by channelling electrons to oxidized ribonucleotide reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boronat, Susanna; Domènech, Alba; Carmona, Mercè; García-Santamarina, Sarela; Bañó, M Carmen; Ayté, José; Hidalgo, Elena

    2017-06-01

    The thioredoxin and glutaredoxin pathways are responsible of recycling several enzymes which undergo intramolecular disulfide bond formation as part of their catalytic cycles such as the peroxide scavengers peroxiredoxins or the enzyme ribonucleotide reductase (RNR). RNR, the rate-limiting enzyme of deoxyribonucleotide synthesis, is an essential enzyme relying on these electron flow cascades for recycling. RNR is tightly regulated in a cell cycle-dependent manner at different levels, but little is known about the participation of electron donors in such regulation. Here, we show that cytosolic thioredoxins Trx1 and Trx3 are the primary electron donors for RNR in fission yeast. Unexpectedly, trx1 transcript and Trx1 protein levels are up-regulated in a G1-to-S phase-dependent manner, indicating that the supply of electron donors is also cell cycle-regulated. Indeed, genetic depletion of thioredoxins triggers a DNA replication checkpoint ruled by Rad3 and Cds1, with the final goal of up-regulating transcription of S phase genes and constitutive RNR synthesis. Regarding the thioredoxin and glutaredoxin cascades, one combination of gene deletions is synthetic lethal in fission yeast: cells lacking both thioredoxin reductase and cytosolic dithiol glutaredoxin. We have isolated a suppressor of this lethal phenotype: a mutation at the Tpx1-coding gene, leading to a frame shift and a loss-of-function of Tpx1, the main client of electron donors. We propose that in a mutant strain compromised in reducing equivalents, the absence of an abundant and competitive substrate such as the peroxiredoxin Tpx1 has been selected as a lethality suppressor to favor RNR function at the expense of the non-essential peroxide scavenging function, to allow DNA synthesis and cell growth.

  12. Lack of a peroxiredoxin suppresses the lethality of cells devoid of electron donors by channelling electrons to oxidized ribonucleotide reductase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Boronat

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The thioredoxin and glutaredoxin pathways are responsible of recycling several enzymes which undergo intramolecular disulfide bond formation as part of their catalytic cycles such as the peroxide scavengers peroxiredoxins or the enzyme ribonucleotide reductase (RNR. RNR, the rate-limiting enzyme of deoxyribonucleotide synthesis, is an essential enzyme relying on these electron flow cascades for recycling. RNR is tightly regulated in a cell cycle-dependent manner at different levels, but little is known about the participation of electron donors in such regulation. Here, we show that cytosolic thioredoxins Trx1 and Trx3 are the primary electron donors for RNR in fission yeast. Unexpectedly, trx1 transcript and Trx1 protein levels are up-regulated in a G1-to-S phase-dependent manner, indicating that the supply of electron donors is also cell cycle-regulated. Indeed, genetic depletion of thioredoxins triggers a DNA replication checkpoint ruled by Rad3 and Cds1, with the final goal of up-regulating transcription of S phase genes and constitutive RNR synthesis. Regarding the thioredoxin and glutaredoxin cascades, one combination of gene deletions is synthetic lethal in fission yeast: cells lacking both thioredoxin reductase and cytosolic dithiol glutaredoxin. We have isolated a suppressor of this lethal phenotype: a mutation at the Tpx1-coding gene, leading to a frame shift and a loss-of-function of Tpx1, the main client of electron donors. We propose that in a mutant strain compromised in reducing equivalents, the absence of an abundant and competitive substrate such as the peroxiredoxin Tpx1 has been selected as a lethality suppressor to favor RNR function at the expense of the non-essential peroxide scavenging function, to allow DNA synthesis and cell growth.

  13. [Bladder tumor lethality. Results in the autonomous community of Rioja between 1975-1991].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Fernández, A; Gil Fabra, J; Fernández Ruíz, M; Angulo Castellanos, M G; Blanco Martín, E; Otero Mauricio, G

    1998-01-01

    Between 1975-1991, a total of 557 cases of bladder carcinoma were identified in the Autonomous Community of La Rioja (CAR) which were followed up to December 1994. The overall lethality was 21.9%. 492 cases with 22.35% lethality were identified in males. In females, however, there was 65 cases with 18.46% lethality. The comparison of males and females lethality resulted in p = 0.525. Lethality between cases diagnosed within each 5-year period analyzed is: 1975-1981: 177 cases, lethality 23.72%. 1982-1986: 168 cases, lethality 30.95%. 1987-1991: 212 cases, lethality 13.20%. Between the first and the second 5-year periods, p = 0.132; between the first and third 5-year periods p = 0.007 and between the second and third 5-year periods p CAR for a 22.35% lethality. Lethality is higher in males that in females but the difference is not statistically significant. In the last 5-year period assessed, 1987-1991, a reduction of lethality from bladder neoplasms has been documented.

  14. Mutational analysis of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) immediate early protein (IE62) subdomains and their importance in viral replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, Mohamed I., E-mail: mkhalil2@stanford.edu [Departments of Pediatrics and Microbiology & Immunology, Stan ford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Department of Molecular Biology, National Research Centre, El-Buhouth St., Cairo (Egypt); Che, Xibing; Sung, Phillip; Sommer, Marvin H. [Departments of Pediatrics and Microbiology & Immunology, Stan ford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Hay, John [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine and Biomedical Science, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY (United States); Arvin, Ann M. [Departments of Pediatrics and Microbiology & Immunology, Stan ford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2016-05-15

    VZV IE62 is an essential, immediate-early, tegument protein and consists of five domains. We generated recombinant viruses carrying mutations in the first three IE62 domains and tested their influence on VZV replication kinetics. The mutations in domain I did not affect replication kinetics while domain II mutations, disrupting the DNA binding and dimerization domain (DBD), were lethal for VZV replication. Mutations in domain III of the nuclear localization signal (NLS) and the two phosphorylation sites S686A/S722A resulted in slower growth in early and late infection respectively and were associated with IE62 accumulation in the cytoplasm and nucleus respectively. This study mapped the functional domains of IE62 in context of viral infection, indicating that DNA binding and dimerization domain is essential for VZV replication. In addition, the correct localization of IE62, whether nuclear or cytoplasmic, at different points in the viral life cycle, is important for normal progression of VZV replication. - Highlights: • Mutation of IE62 domain I did not affect VZV replication in melanoma cells. • IE62 domain II and III are important for VZV replication in melanoma cells. • Mutations of IE62 domain II (DBD) were lethal for virus replication. • Mutations of IE62 NLS and phosphorylation sites inhibited VZV replication. • NLS and S686A/S722A mutations altered localization of IE62 during early and late infection.

  15. Mutational analysis of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) immediate early protein (IE62) subdomains and their importance in viral replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, Mohamed I.; Che, Xibing; Sung, Phillip; Sommer, Marvin H.; Hay, John; Arvin, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    VZV IE62 is an essential, immediate-early, tegument protein and consists of five domains. We generated recombinant viruses carrying mutations in the first three IE62 domains and tested their influence on VZV replication kinetics. The mutations in domain I did not affect replication kinetics while domain II mutations, disrupting the DNA binding and dimerization domain (DBD), were lethal for VZV replication. Mutations in domain III of the nuclear localization signal (NLS) and the two phosphorylation sites S686A/S722A resulted in slower growth in early and late infection respectively and were associated with IE62 accumulation in the cytoplasm and nucleus respectively. This study mapped the functional domains of IE62 in context of viral infection, indicating that DNA binding and dimerization domain is essential for VZV replication. In addition, the correct localization of IE62, whether nuclear or cytoplasmic, at different points in the viral life cycle, is important for normal progression of VZV replication. - Highlights: • Mutation of IE62 domain I did not affect VZV replication in melanoma cells. • IE62 domain II and III are important for VZV replication in melanoma cells. • Mutations of IE62 domain II (DBD) were lethal for virus replication. • Mutations of IE62 NLS and phosphorylation sites inhibited VZV replication. • NLS and S686A/S722A mutations altered localization of IE62 during early and late infection.

  16. /sup 35/S induced dominant lethals in immature oocytes in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satyanarayana Reddy, K; Reddy, P P; Reddi, O S [Osmania Univ., Hyderabad (India). Dept. of Genetics

    1977-03-01

    CBA female mice were injected intraperitoneally with a dose of 20..mu..Ci of sulphur-35 on 15.5 day post conception. Another group of pregnant mice injected with normal saline was kept as control. The pregnant females were allowed to litter and the mothers were separated from their offsprings 4 weeks after littering. Eight weeks after treatment i.e. at the age of 22 to 24 weeks, the treated mothers were mated with control C/sub 3/H/He males. The vaginal plugs were checked every morning and those which mated were separated. The pregnant females were killed on the 14th day of gestation. The uterine contents were examined for live and dead embryos and the ovaries for corpora lutea. The pre- and post-implantation losses and total loss were calculated in the treated females and compared with those of controls. Embryonic death was significantly higher among treated animals. The results indicated that /sup 35/S can induced dominant lethal mutations in immature oocytes.

  17. Activating mutations in FGFR3 and HRAS reveal a shared genetic origin for congenital disorders and testicular tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goriely, Anne; Hansen, Ruth M S; Taylor, Indira B

    2009-01-01

    Genes mutated in congenital malformation syndromes are frequently implicated in oncogenesis, but the causative germline and somatic mutations occur in separate cells at different times of an organism's life. Here we unify these processes to a single cellular event for mutations arising in male germ...... cells that show a paternal age effect. Screening of 30 spermatocytic seminomas for oncogenic mutations in 17 genes identified 2 mutations in FGFR3 (both 1948A>G, encoding K650E, which causes thanatophoric dysplasia in the germline) and 5 mutations in HRAS. Massively parallel sequencing of sperm DNA...... a common 'selfish' pathway supporting proliferation in the testis, leading to diverse phenotypes in the next generation including fetal lethality, congenital syndromes and cancer predisposition....

  18. Sensitivity of Vibrio cholerae cells to lethal and mutagenic effect of UV-irradiation mediated by plasmids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiganova, I.G.; Evdokimova, N.M.; Aleshkin, G.I.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of UV-irradiation on Vibrio cholerae cells and its changes mediated by the plasmid R245 have been studied. Vibrio cholerae strains 569B and RV31 have been shown to be considerably more sensitive to lethal effect of UV-irradiation as compared with Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium cells. Highly toxigenic strain 569B and practically atoxigenic strain RV31 have the same UV-sensitivity. Lethla effect of UV-irradiation on Vibrio cholerae cells is incresed when the irradiated cells are plated on enriched media. UV-induction of mutations was not registered in plasmidless strains of Vibrio cholerae. Plasmid R245 increase UV-resistance of vibrio cells and makes them UV-mutable

  19. NDST1 missense mutations in autosomal recessive intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Miriam S; Musante, Luciana; Hu, Hao; Diederich, Stefan; Sticht, Heinrich; Ekici, Arif B; Uebe, Steffen; Wienker, Thomas F; Bartsch, Oliver; Zechner, Ulrich; Oppitz, Cornelia; Keleman, Krystyna; Jamra, Rami Abou; Najmabadi, Hossein; Schweiger, Susann; Reis, André; Kahrizi, Kimia

    2014-11-01

    NDST1 was recently proposed as a candidate gene for autosomal recessive intellectual disability in two families. It encodes a bifunctional GlcNAc N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase with important functions in heparan sulfate biosynthesis. In mice, Ndst1 is crucial for embryonic development and homozygous null mutations are perinatally lethal. We now report on two additional unrelated families with homozygous missense NDST1 mutations. All mutations described to date predict the substitution of conserved amino acids in the sulfotransferase domain, and mutation modeling predicts drastic alterations in the local protein conformation. Comparing the four families, we noticed significant overlap in the clinical features, including both demonstrated and apparent intellectual disability, muscular hypotonia, epilepsy, and postnatal growth deficiency. Furthermore, in Drosophila, knockdown of sulfateless, the NDST ortholog, impairs long-term memory, highlighting its function in cognition. Our data confirm NDST1 mutations as a cause of autosomal recessive intellectual disability with a distinctive phenotype, and support an important function of NDST1 in human development. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Interaction between Hb E and Hb Yala (HBB:c.129delT); a novel frameshift beta globin gene mutation, resulting in Hemoglobin E/β0 thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekwattanakit, Supachai; Riolueang, Suchada; Viprakasit, Vip

    2018-03-01

    There are more than 200 known mutations found in patients with β-thalassemia, a possibility to identify an unknown or novel mutation becomes less possible. Here, we report a novel mutation in a patient from Thailand who presented with chronic hemolytic anemia. A comprehensive hematology and DNA analysis was applied in the index patient and her mother. Hematological and hemoglobin analyses were consistent with the clinical diagnosis of Hb E/β 0 -thalassemia. However, we could find only Hb E heterozygous mutation using our common polymerase chain reaction-based mutation detection of the β-globin genes. Furthermore, the molecular analysis demonstrated a novel T-deletion at codon 42 of the second exon of the β-globin gene which we named 'Hb Yala' according to the origin of this index family. This mutation was assumed to generate a truncated β-globin chain terminating at codon 60 with possible unstable variant leading to a 'null' or β 0 -thalassemia. However, the clinical phenotype was surprisingly mild and no other ameliorating genetic factors, including co-inheritance of α-thalassemia and high propensity of Hb F by Xmn I polymorphism, were found. This report has provided evidence that genotype-phenotype correlation in thalassemia syndromes is highly complex and a correct clinical severity classification of thalassemia should be mainly based on clinical evaluation.

  1. Mutation and premating isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, R. C.; Thompson, J. N. Jr

    2002-01-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  2. ATM inhibition induces synthetic lethality and enhances sensitivity of PTEN-deficient breast cancer cells to cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Yan, Huaying; Guo, Wenhao; Tang, Mei; Zhao, Xinyu; Tong, Aiping; Peng, Yong; Li, Qintong; Yuan, Zhu

    2018-05-01

    PTEN deficiency often causes defects in DNA damage repair. Currently, effective therapies for breast cancer are lacking. ATM is an attractive target for cancer treatment. Previous studies suggested a synthetic lethality between PTEN and PARP. However, the synthetically lethal interaction between PTEN and ATM in breast cancer has not been reported. Moreover, the mechanism remains elusive. Here, using KU-60019, an ATM kinase inhibitor, we investigated ATM inhibition as a synthetically lethal strategy to target breast cancer cells with PTEN defects. We found that KU-60019 preferentially sensitizes PTEN-deficient MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells to cisplatin, though it also slightly enhances sensitivity of PTEN wild-type breast cancer cells. The increased cytotoxic sensitivity is associated with apoptosis, as evidenced by flow cytometry and PARP cleavage. Additionally, the increase of DNA damage accumulation due to the decreased capability of DNA repair, as indicated by γ-H2AX and Rad51 foci, also contributed to this selective cytotoxicity. Mechanistically, compared with PTEN wild-type MDA-MB-231 cells, PTEN-deficient MDA-MB-468 cells have lower level of Rad51, higher ATM kinase activity, and display the elevated level of DNA damage. Moreover, these differences could be further enlarged by cisplatin. Our findings suggest that ATM is a promising target for PTEN-defective breast cancer. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Detection of p53 gene mutations in bronchial biopsy samples of patients with lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irshad, S.; Nawaz, T.

    2008-01-01

    Lung cancer is the malignant transformation and expansion of lung tissue. It is the most lethal of all cancers worldwide, responsible for 1.2 million deaths annually. The goal of this study was to detect the p53 gene mutations in lung cancer, in local population of Lahore, Pakistan. These mutations were screened in the bronchial biopsy lung cancer tissue samples. For this purpose microtomed tissue sections were collected. Following DNA extraction from tissue sections, the p53 mutations were detected by amplifying Exon 7 (145 bp) and Exon 8 (152 bp) of the p53 gene. PCR then followed by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis for screening the p53 gene mutations. This results of SSCP were visualized of silver staining. The results showed different banding pattern indicating the presence of mutation. Majority of the mutations were found in Exon 7. Exon 7 of p53 gene may be the mutation hotspot in lung cancer. In lung cancer, the most prevalent mutations of p53 gene are G -> T transversions; other types of insertions and deletions are also expected, however, the exact nature of mutations in presented work could be confirmed by direct sequencing. (author)

  4. 5-Lipoxygenase Deficiency Reduces Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity and Lethality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam S. N. Hohmann

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LO converts arachidonic acid into leukotrienes (LTs and is involved in inflammation. At present, the participation of 5-LO in acetaminophen (APAP-induced hepatotoxicity and liver damage has not been addressed. 5-LO deficient (5-LO-/- mice and background wild type mice were challenged with APAP (0.3–6 g/kg or saline. The lethality, liver damage, neutrophil and macrophage recruitment, LTB4, cytokine production, and oxidative stress were assessed. APAP induced a dose-dependent mortality, and the dose of 3 g/kg was selected for next experiments. APAP induced LTB4 production in the liver, the primary target organ in APAP toxicity. Histopathological analysis revealed that 5-LO-/- mice presented reduced APAP-induced liver necrosis and inflammation compared with WT mice. APAP-induced lethality, increase of plasma levels of aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase, liver cytokine (IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-10, superoxide anion, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances production, myeloperoxidase and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase activity, Nrf2 and gp91phox mRNA expression, and decrease of reduced glutathione and antioxidant capacity measured by 2,2′-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline 6-sulfonate assay were prevented in 5-LO-/- mice compared to WT mice. Therefore, 5-LO deficiency resulted in reduced mortality due to reduced liver inflammatory and oxidative damage, suggesting 5-LO is a promising target to reduce APAP-induced lethality and liver inflammatory/oxidative damage.

  5. Left ventricular function during lethal and sublethal endotoxemia in swine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldfarb, R.D.; Nightingale, L.M.; Kish, P.; Weber, P.B.; Loegering, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that after a median lethal dose (LD 50 ) of endotoxin, cardiac contractility was depressed in nonsurviving dogs. The canine cardiovascular system is unlike humans in that dogs have a hepatic vein sphincter that is susceptible to adrenergic stimulation capable of raising hepatic and splanchnic venous pressures. The authors retested the hypothesis that lethality after endotoxin administration is associated with cardiac contractile depression in pigs, because of the hepatic circulation in this species is similar to that of humans. They compared cardiac mechanical function of pigs administered a high dose (250 μg/kg) or a low dose (100 μg/kg) endotoxin by use of the slope of the end-systolic pressure-diameter relationship (ESPDR) as well as other measurements of cardiac performance. In all the pigs administered a high dose, ESPDR demonstrated a marked, time-dependent depression whereas we observed no significant ESPDR changes after low endotoxin doses. The other cardiodynamic variables were uninterpretable, due to the significant changes in heart rate, end-diastolic diameter (preload), and aortic diastolic pressure (afterload). Plasma myocardia depressant factor activity accumulated in all endotoxin-administered animals, tending to be greater in the high-dose group. In this group, both subendocardial blood flow and global function were depressed, whereas pigs administered the low dose endotoxin demonstrated slight, but nonsignificant, increases in flow and function. These observations indicate that myocardial contractile depression is associated with a lethal outcome to high doses of endotoxin. Myocardial perfusion was measured using radiolabeled microspheres infused into the left atria

  6. Rifaximin diminishes neutropenia following potentially lethal whole-body radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahraus, Christopher D; Schemera, Bettina; Rynders, Patricia; Ramos, Melissa; Powell, Charles; Faircloth, John; Brawner, William R

    2010-07-01

    Terrorist attacks involving radiological or nuclear weapons are a substantial geopolitical concern, given that large populations could be exposed to potentially lethal doses of radiation. Because of this, evaluating potential countermeasures against radiation-induced mortality is critical. Gut microflora are the most common source of systemic infection following exposure to lethal doses of whole-body radiation, suggesting that prophylactic antibiotic therapy may reduce mortality after radiation exposure. The chemical stability, easy administration and favorable tolerability profile of the non-systemic antibiotic, rifaximin, make it an ideal potential candidate for use as a countermeasure. This study evaluated the use of rifaximin as a countermeasure against low-to-intermediate-dose whole-body radiation in rodents. Female Wistar rats (8 weeks old) were irradiated with 550 cGy to the whole body and were evaluated for 30 d. Animals received methylcellulose, neomycin (179 mg/kg/d) or variably dosed rifaximin (150-2000 mg/kg/d) one hour after irradiation and daily throughout the study period. Clinical assessments (e.g. body weight) were made daily. On postirradiation day 30, blood samples were collected and a complete blood cell count was performed. Animals receiving high doses of rifaximin (i.e. 1000 or 2000 mg/kg/d) had a greater increase in weight from the day of irradiation to postirradiation day 30 compared with animals that received placebo or neomycin. For animals with an increase in average body weight from irradiation day within 80-110% of the group average, methylcellulose rendered an absolute neutrophil count (ANC) of 211, neomycin rendered an ANC of 334, rifaximin 300 mg/kg/d rendered an ANC of 582 and rifaximin 1000 mg/kg/d rendered an ANC of 854 (P = 0.05 for group comparison). Exposure to rifaximin after near-lethal whole-body radiation resulted in diminished levels of neutropenia.

  7. Neutron-induced mutation experiments and total radiation-induced genetic damage in entire genomes of Drosophila melanogaster. Final report, November 1, 1967-August 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrahamson, S.

    1981-02-01

    Neutron-induced mutation experiments with Drosophila oogonia were conducted at the University of Wisconsin, with irradiations being carried out at the RARAF facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory. X-linked recessive lethals and specific locus mutations were studied. Using the α value of the weighted linear regression equation for lethal data, RBE's relative to X-rays were calculated for the energies of neutrons studied. They are: 15 MeV to 2.0; 6 MeV to 2.9; 2 MeV to 3.2; .66 MeV to 4.0; .43 MeV to 4.8. The dose/frequency response curves for lethal data of all neutron energies studied was suggestive of a quadratic component. All data best fit a linear hypothesis, however. Control data for specific locus mutations was used to estimate the number of loci on the X-chromosome which are capable of mutating to lethals. Neutron-induced data for specific locus mutation was inconclusive due to the high error inherent in the frequencies obtained

  8. Ultraviolet-B lethal damage on Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degiorgi, C.F.; Fernandez, R.O.; Pizarro, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa has shown an increased sensitivity compared with that of Escherichia coli and Enterobacter cloacae, when they were exposed to 0.4 kJ/m2 of ultraviolet-B radiation. The rapid decay in cell viability observed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa after the irradiation was influenced by factors such as culture media and the presence of pyocyanine during the irradiation. The radioinduced lethal damage could be prevented by photoreactivating treatment, indicating that pyrimidine dimer formation was the mechanism causing bacterial death. The results indicate that several environmental conditions may act as protective agents against ultraviolet-B-induced damage

  9. Metformin is synthetically lethal with glucose withdrawal in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez, Javier A; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Cufí, Sílvia; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Joven, Jorge; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro

    2012-08-01

    Glucose deprivation is a distinctive feature of the tumor microecosystem caused by the imbalance between poor supply and an extraordinarily high consumption rate. The metabolic reprogramming from mitochondrial respiration to aerobic glycolysis in cancer cells (the "Warburg effect") is linked to oncogenic transformation in a manner that frequently implies the inactivation of metabolic checkpoints such as the energy rheostat AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Because the concept of synthetic lethality in oncology can be applied not only to genetic and epigenetic intrinsic differences between normal and cancer cells but also to extrinsic ones such as altered microenvironment, we recently hypothesized that stress-energy mimickers such as the AMPK agonist metformin should produce metabolic synthetic lethality in a glucose-starved cell culture milieu imitating the adverse tumor growth conditions in vivo. Under standard high-glucose conditions, metformin supplementation mostly caused cell cycle arrest without signs of apoptotic cell death. Under glucose withdrawal stress, metformin supplementation circumvented the ability of oncogenes (e.g., HER2) to protect breast cancer cells from glucose-deprivation apoptosis. Significantly, representative cell models of breast cancer heterogeneity underwent massive apoptosis (by >90% in some cases) when glucose-starved cell cultures were supplemented with metformin. Our current findings may uncover crucial issues regarding the cell-autonomous metformin's anti-cancer actions: (1) The offently claimed clinically irrelevant, non-physiological concentrations needed to observe the metformin's anti-cancer effects in vitro merely underlie the artifactual interference of erroneous glucose-rich experimental conditions that poorly reflect glucose-starved in vivo conditions; (2) the preferential killing of cancer stem cells (CSC) by metformin may simply expose the best-case scenario for its synthetically lethal activity because an increased

  10. Genotoxicity test of irradiated spice mixture by dominant lethal test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barna, J

    1986-03-01

    Dominant lethal test (DLT) was performed in Sprague Dawley male rats prefed with 25% irradiated spice mixture which was composed of 55% non-pungent ground paprika, 14% black pepper, 9% allspice, 9% coriander, 7% marjoram, 4% cumin, 2% nutmeg. Microbial count of the spice mixture was reduced with 15 kGy from a sup(60)Co source. Control groups received spice-free or untreated spice diet or were administered to cyclophosphamide i.p., respectively. DTL parameters altered significantly in the latter group but neither untreated nor irradiated spice mixture proved to be germ cell mutagens. 24 refs.; 8 figs.

  11. Lethal subarachnoid bleeding under immunosuppressive therapy due to mycotic arteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weigel, S.; Kloska, S.; Freund, M.; Kehl, H.G.

    2003-01-01

    A subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) occurred 67 days after cardiac transplantation in 10-year-old girl with consecutive immunocompromising therapy. Neither digital subtraction angiography (DSA) nor computed tomographic angiography showed signs of intracranial vascular malformations. One month before the lethal SAH occurred, she had developed arterial hypertension and attacks of severe headache with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pleocytosis while CT scans showed an infarct of the left thalamus. Pathologic findings established the rare diagnosis of SAH due to aspergillosis-related mycotic arteritis. Imaging characteristics are presented. (orig.)

  12. Lethal and Mutagenic Effects of Tritium Decay Produced by Tritiated Compounds Incorporated into Bacteria and Bacteriophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Person, S. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States)

    1968-06-15

    The work discussed below is predominantly from the author's laboratory. Some effects of tritium decay on bacteria and bacteriophages, using labelled compounds that are incorporated preferentially into DNA, RNA or protein, have been studied. A relatively high killing efficiency, the probability that a single decay produces loss of colony-forming ability in bacteria or loss of plaque-forming ability in bacteriophages, is observed for thymidine- methyl-{sup 3}H decay, but this is thought to be due to S-particle ionization damage. The most definitive experiments involved a comparison of killing efficiencies for decays originating as thymidine-methyl-{sup 3}H in phage DNA and as amino acid-{sup 3}H in phage protein with the calculated {beta}-particle path length through, the DNA in the two cases. Experimental and calculated values are essentially the same. Radiation-dose calculations to many different bacterial sub-volumes were determined for several different distributions of radioactivity. The high killing efficiency for thymidine-methyl- {sup 3}H decay can be explained by {beta}-particle ionizations, providing DNA is the sensitive target molecule and it is organized in a central volume of the cell (see also Ref.[24]). Although both the lethal and mutagenic effect of thymidine-methyl-{sup 3}H and amino acid-{sup 3}H decays can readily be explained on the basis of {beta}-particle ionizations, the observed large mutation frequency produced by uracil-5{sup 3}H decay cannot. The majority of mutations produced by uracil-5{sup 3}H decays are due to a specific chemical rearrangement of the parent molecule, since decays from uracil-6{sup 3}H are 6 to 7-fold less mutagenic. It is clear that the decays leading to mutations for cells labelled with uracil-5{sup 3}H originate as cytosine-5{sup 3}H in bacterial DNA. Recent work shows that the specific chemical rearrangement causes a C --> T(u) genetic coding change. (author)

  13. BRCA1/2 mutation analysis in 41 ovarian cell lines reveals only one functionally deleterious BRCA1 mutation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stordal, Britta

    2013-06-01

    Mutations in BRCA1\\/2 increase the risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer. Germline BRCA1\\/2 mutations occur in 8.6-13.7% of unselected epithelial ovarian cancers, somatic mutations are also frequent. BRCA1\\/2 mutated or dysfunctional cells may be sensitive to PARP inhibition by synthetic lethality. The aim of this study is to comprehensively characterise the BRCA1\\/2 status of a large panel of ovarian cancer cell lines available to the research community to assist in biomarker studies of novel drugs and in particular of PARP inhibitors. The BRCA1\\/2 genes were sequenced in 41 ovarian cell lines, mRNA expression of BRCA1\\/2 and gene methylation status of BRCA1 was also examined. The cytotoxicity of PARP inhibitors olaparib and veliparib was examined in 20 cell lines. The cell line SNU-251 has a deleterious BRCA1 mutation at 5564G > A, and is the only deleterious BRCA1\\/2 mutant in the panel. Two cell lines (UPN-251 and PEO1) had deleterious mutations as well as additional reversion mutations that restored the protein functionality. Heterozygous mutations in BRCA1\\/2 were relatively common, found in 14.6% of cell lines. BRCA1 was methylated in two cell lines (OVCAR8, A1847) and there was a corresponding decrease in gene expression. The BRCA1 methylated cell lines were more sensitive to PARP inhibition than wild-type cells. The SNU-251 deleterious mutant was more sensitive to PARP inhibition, but only in a long-term exposure to correct for its slow growth rate. Cell lines derived from metastatic disease are significantly more resistant to veliparib (2.0 fold p = 0.03) compared to those derived from primary tumours. Resistance to olaparib and veliparib was correlated Pearsons-R 0.5393, p = 0.0311. The incidence of BRCA1\\/2 deleterious mutations 1\\/41 cell lines derived from 33 different patients (3.0%) is much lower than the population incidence. The reversion mutations and high frequency of heterozygous mutations suggest that there is a selective

  14. Induction of mutation and recombination following UV irradiation during meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, S.L.; Parry, J.M. (University Coll. of Swansea (UK). Dept. of Genetics)

    1983-03-01

    Irradiation of yeast cultures with ultraviolet light at discrete stages during meiosis produces cyclic variations in sensitivity, i.e. cells are more sensitive to the lethal effects of UV light prior to entry into the meiotic DNA synthesis, and this corresponds to a peak of induction of point mutation. Cells become more resistant to both induced point mutation and lethality as they enter meiotic DNA synthesis, but become more sensitive again during spore formation. The induced level of intragenic recombination rises during the period of commitment ot recombination to a level indistinguishable from the full meiotic level of spontaneous intragenic recombination. Induced reciprocal recombination remains above the spontaneous level up to the point of commitment to sporulation.

  15. Neutron-induced mutation experiments. Progress report, March 1, 1975--February 29, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrahamson, S.

    1975-11-01

    The relative mutagenic effectiveness of neutrons of different energies were compared with x radiation in mice and Drosophila oogonia employing X-linked recessive lethal and specific locus mutation tests. The energies and doses used were 0.68 MeV, 2 MeV, and 6 MeV (250 and 500 0 R), and 15 MeV (250, 500, and 1000 0 R). The data thus far collected from the recessive lethal test indicate that 0.68 MeV neutrons have the highest RBE among the energies tested, followed by 6 and 2 MeV. The specific locus mutation data also indicate the highest RBE for 0.68 MeV, followed respectively by 2 and 6 MeV. The 15 MeV data is as of now incompletely analyzed, as are some dose points of 2 and 6 MeV

  16. The induction of mutation and recombination following UV irradiation during meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, S.L.; Parry, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Irradiation of yeast cultures with ultraviolet light at discrete stages during meiosis produces cyclic variations in sensitivity, i.e. cells are more sensitive to the lethal effects of UV light prior to entry into the meiotic DNA synthesis, and this corresponds to a peak of induction of point mutation. Cells become more resistant to both induced point mutation and lethality as they enter meiotic DNA synthesis, but become more sensitive again during spore formation. The induced level of intragenic recombination rises during the period of commitment ot recombination to a level indistinguishable from the full meiotic level of spontaneous intragenic recombination. Induced reciprocal recombination remains above the spontaneous level up to the point of commitment to sporulation. (orig.)

  17. The induction of mutation and recombination following UV irradiation during meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, S L; Parry, J M

    1983-03-01

    Irradiation of yeast cultures with ultraviolet light at discrete stages during meiosis produces cyclic variations in sensitivity, i.e. cells are more sensitive to the lethal effects of UV light prior to entry into the meiotic DNA synthesis, and this corresponds to a peak of induction of point mutation. Cells become more resistant to both induced point mutation and lethality as they enter meiotic DNA synthesis, but become more sensitive again during spore formation. The induced level of intragenic recombination rises during the period of commitment to recombination to a level indistinguishable from the full meiotic level of spontaneous intragenic recombination. Induced reciprocal recombination remains above the spontaneous level up to the point of commitment to sporulation.

  18. Mutations of PTPN23 in developmental and epileptic encephalopathy

    KAUST Repository

    Sowada, Nadine

    2017-10-31

    Developmental and epileptic encephalopathies (DEE) are a heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental disorders with poor prognosis. Recent discoveries have greatly expanded the repertoire of genes that are mutated in epileptic encephalopathies and DEE, often in a de novo fashion, but in many patients, the disease remains molecularly uncharacterized. Here, we describe a new form of DEE in patients with likely deleterious biallelic variants in PTPN23. The phenotype is characterized by early onset drug-resistant epilepsy, severe and global developmental delay, microcephaly, and sometimes premature death. PTPN23 encodes a tyrosine phosphatase with strong brain expression, and its knockout in mouse is embryonically lethal. Structural modeling supports a deleterious effect of the identified alleles. Our data suggest that PTPN23 mutations cause a rare severe form of autosomal-recessive DEE in humans, a finding that requires confirmation.

  19. Effect of hsm mutations enhancing spontaneous mutability on induced mutagenesis and mitotic recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorova, I.V.; Koval'tsova, S.V.; Ivanov, E.L.

    1993-01-01

    The authors have studied the effect of five nonallelic hms1-hms5 mutations on the incidence of direct mutations in loci ADE1 and ADE2, induced by UV-radiation, 6-hydroxyl-aminopurine, and nitrosomethylurea. All hms mutants were found to be insensitive to the lethal action of these mutagens. The frequency of UV-induced mutations to adenine dependence was increased in mutants hsm2-1, hsm3-1, hsm5-1, and particularly in hsm1-1, but remained unchanged in hsm4-1 compared to HSM. Mutagenesis induced by 6-hydroxylaminopurine was increased in all mutants studied, particularly in mutant hsm3-1. The authors did not detect any appreciable effect of hsm mutations on mutagenesis induced by nitrosomethylurea. The frequency of spontaneous mitotic conversion to prototrophy was studied in diploids heteroallelic to gene ADE2 and homo- and heterozygous for hsm mutations. Mutation hsm5-1 considerably increased the frequency of conversion for all heteroalleles studied, mutations hsm1-1 and hsm3-1 also considerably increased the conversion frequency, while mutations hsm1-1 and hsm4-1 had little effect on this process. The study of the properties of hsm mutations revealed joint genetic control of spontaneous and induced mutagenesis and recombination in yeast. The possibility that hsm mutations belong to the class of mutations impairing correction of unpaired DNA bases is discussed. 25 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  20. Elucidating the Interdependence of Drug Resistance from Combinations of Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragland, Debra A; Whitfield, Troy W; Lee, Sook-Kyung; Swanstrom, Ronald; Zeldovich, Konstantin B; Kurt-Yilmaz, Nese; Schiffer, Celia A

    2017-11-14

    HIV-1 protease is responsible for the cleavage of 12 nonhomologous sites within the Gag and Gag-Pro-Pol polyproteins in the viral genome. Under the selective pressure of protease inhibition, the virus evolves mutations within (primary) and outside of (secondary) the active site, allowing the protease to process substrates while simultaneously countering inhibition. The primary protease mutations impede inhibitor binding directly, while the secondary mutations are considered accessory mutations that compensate for a loss in fitness. However, the role of secondary mutations in conferring drug resistance remains a largely unresolved topic. We have shown previously that mutations distal to the active site are able to perturb binding of darunavir (DRV) via the protein's internal hydrogen-bonding network. In this study, we show that mutations distal to the active site, regardless of context, can play an interdependent role in drug resistance. Applying eigenvalue decomposition to collections of hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions from a series of molecular dynamics simulations of 15 diverse HIV-1 protease variants, we identify sites in the protease where amino acid substitutions lead to perturbations in nonbonded interactions with DRV and/or the hydrogen-bonding network of the protease itself. While primary mutations are known to drive resistance in HIV-1 protease, these findings delineate the significant contributions of accessory mutations to resistance. Identifying the variable positions in the protease that have the greatest impact on drug resistance may aid in future structure-based design of inhibitors.

  1. Environmental stresses can alleviate the average deleterious effect of mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leibler Stanislas

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fundamental questions in evolutionary genetics, including the possible advantage of sexual reproduction, depend critically on the effects of deleterious mutations on fitness. Limited existing experimental evidence suggests that, on average, such effects tend to be aggravated under environmental stresses, consistent with the perception that stress diminishes the organism's ability to tolerate deleterious mutations. Here, we ask whether there are also stresses with the opposite influence, under which the organism becomes more tolerant to mutations. Results We developed a technique, based on bioluminescence, which allows accurate automated measurements of bacterial growth rates at very low cell densities. Using this system, we measured growth rates of Escherichia coli mutants under a diverse set of environmental stresses. In contrast to the perception that stress always reduces the organism's ability to tolerate mutations, our measurements identified stresses that do the opposite – that is, despite decreasing wild-type growth, they alleviate, on average, the effect of deleterious mutations. Conclusions Our results show a qualitative difference between various environmental stresses ranging from alleviation to aggravation of the average effect of mutations. We further show how the existence of stresses that are biased towards alleviation of the effects of mutations may imply the existence of average epistatic interactions between mutations. The results thus offer a connection between the two main factors controlling the effects of deleterious mutations: environmental conditions and epistatic interactions.

  2. Experimental evaluation of the relationship between lethal or non-lethal virulence and transmission success in malaria parasite infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nithiuthai S

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolutionary theory suggests that the selection pressure on parasites to maximize their transmission determines their optimal host exploitation strategies and thus their virulence. Establishing the adaptive basis to parasite life history traits has important consequences for predicting parasite responses to public health interventions. In this study we examine the extent to which malaria parasites conform to the predicted adaptive trade-off between transmission and virulence, as defined by mortality. The majority of natural infections, however, result in sub-lethal virulent effects (e.g. anaemia and are often composed of many strains. Both sub-lethal effects and pathogen population structure have been theoretically shown to have important consequences for virulence evolution. Thus, we additionally examine the relationship between anaemia and transmission in single and mixed clone infections. Results Whereas there was a trade-off between transmission success and virulence as defined by host mortality, contradictory clone-specific patterns occurred when defining virulence by anaemia. A negative relationship between anaemia and transmission success was found for one of the parasite clones, whereas there was no relationship for the other. Notably the two parasite clones also differed in a transmission phenotype (gametocyte sex ratio that has previously been shown to respond adaptively to a changing blood environment. In addition, as predicted by evolutionary theory, mixed infections resulted in increased anaemia. The increased anaemia was, however, not correlated with any discernable parasite trait (e.g. parasite density or with increased transmission. Conclusions We found some evidence supporting the hypothesis that there is an adaptive basis correlating virulence (as defined by host mortality and transmission success in malaria parasites. This confirms the validity of applying evolutionary virulence theory to biomedical

  3. Parental response to severe or lethal prenatal diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lou, Stina; Jensen, Lotte Groth; Petersen, Olav Bjørn

    2017-01-01

    Objective A severe or lethal prenatal diagnosis places great demands on prospective parents, who face choices of far-reaching consequences, such as continuing or terminating the pregnancy. How best to support these parents is a clinical challenge. This systematic review aimed to identify and synt......Objective A severe or lethal prenatal diagnosis places great demands on prospective parents, who face choices of far-reaching consequences, such as continuing or terminating the pregnancy. How best to support these parents is a clinical challenge. This systematic review aimed to identify...... and synthesize the qualitative evidence regarding prospective parents’ responses to such prenatal diagnoses. Methods Following PRISMA guidelines, four databases were systematically searched and 28 studies met the inclusion criteria. Thematic analysis guided data extraction and synthesis of findings. The CERQual....... Prospective parents who continued the pregnancy wished to be acknowledged as parents, and engaged in planning to obtain a sense of meaning and control. Selective disclosure and concerns about negative responses were issues both for the parents who terminated and those who continued a pregnancy. Conclusion...

  4. Cell lethality after selective irradiation of the DNA replication fork

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofer, K.G.; Warters, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    It has been suggested that nascent DNA located at the DNA replication fork may exhibit enhanced sensitivity to radiation damage. To evaluate this hypothesis, Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) were labeled with 125 I-iododeoxyuridine ( 125 IUdR) either in the presence or absence of aphidicolin. Aphidicolin (5 μg/ml) reduced cellular 125 IUdR incorporation to 3-5% of the control value. The residual 125 I incorporation appeared to be restricted to low molecular weight (sub-replicon sized) fragments of DNA which were more sensitive to micrococcal nuclease attack and less sensitive to high salt DNase I digestion than randomly labeled DNA. These findings suggest that DNA replicated in the presence of aphidicolin remains localized at the replication fork adjacent to the nuclear matrix. Based on these observations an attempt was made to compare the lethal consequences of 125 I decays at the replication fork to that of 125 I decays randomly distributed over the entire genome. Regardless of the distribution of decay events, all treatment groups exhibited identical dose-response curves (D 0 : 101 125 I decays/cell). Since differential irradiation of the replication complex did not result in enhanced cell lethality, it can be concluded that neither the nascent DNA nor the protein components (replicative enzymes, nuclear protein matrix) associated with the DNA replication site constitute key radiosensitive targets within the cellular genome. (orig.)

  5. Evaluation of gamma radiation (60-Co) induced mutation in two Phaseolus vulgaris varieties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    Two varieties of Phaseolus vulgaris (Jutiapan and San Martin) were irradiated at 0, 8, 15, 20 and 30 kR doses in a 60-cobalt gamma source, to identify mutants and 20% lethality. M 2 plants showing morphogical mutations were selected. Differences in sensitivity to irradiation of the two varieties were noted, using data and physiological effects of M 1 . Selection and analysis for protein content were in M 3 as well as hereditary changes. (M.A.C.) [pt

  6. Potentiation of radiation lethality by Topotecan, a Topoisomerase I inhibitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamond, J.P.; Kinsella, T.J.; Boothman, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Topotecan is a water soluble Topoisomerase I (Topo I) inhibitor that has demonstrated antineoplastic activity in phase I/II trials of solid tumors (such as non-small cell lung, small cell lung, ovarian, esophageal and head and neck primaries) and leukemias. We sought to determine (1) if Topotecan potentiated the lethal effects of ionizing radiation, and (2) the characteristics of the synergistic effect. Materials and Methods: Human radioresistant melanoma (U1-Mel) and glioma (D54) cells were grown in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DME) with 10% fetal calf serum (FCS) until confluence-arrest. Cells were x-irradiated (0-700 cGy) and exposed to various Topotecan concentrations (2-100μM), either before (for 4 hours), during, or after (for 4 hours) irradiation. Appropriate controls were also performed. Survival was determined via colony forming assays. Survival curves were normalized to correct for drug cytotoxicities and variations in initial viable cells plated. In another set of experiments, U1-Mel cells were exposed to 10 μM Topotecan either before, during or after 400 cGy, as described above. A modification of the SDS and KCl assay was used to quantify Topo I-DNA complexes via glass fiber filter binding. All experiments were performed at least 7 times in duplicate. Results: Potentiation of radiation lethality was seen in the U1-Mel and D54 cell lines. The synergistic effects were (1) dependent on drug concentration, with lethality enhancement and minimal drug lethality alone in the 2-10 μM range (2) dependent on timing, with synergy present only when the drug was present at the time of, or shortly after irradiation, and (3) irreversible, with inhibition of potential lethal damage repair (PLDR). The dose enhancement ratios (DER) for 4 μM Topotecan in the U1-Mel cells was 1.7 - 2.4, depending on the survival endpoints that were used. The DER for 2 μM Topotecan in D54 cells was 3.0 - 4.0. The U1-Mel cells that were exposed to Topotecan

  7. Characterization of a method for quantitating food consumption for mutation assays in Drosophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, E.D.; Reeder, B.A.; Bruce, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    Quantitation of food consumption is necessary when determining mutation responses to multiple chemical exposures in the sex-linked recessive lethal assay in Drosophila. One method proposed for quantitating food consumption by Drosophila is to measure the incorporation of 14C-leucine into the flies during the feeding period. Three sources of variation in the technique of Thompson and Reeder have been identified and characterized. First, the amount of food consumed by individual flies differed by almost 30% in a 24 hr feeding period. Second, the variability from vial to vial (each containing multiple flies) was around 15%. Finally, the amount of food consumed in identical feeding experiments performed over the course of 1 year varied nearly 2-fold. The use of chemical consumption values in place of exposure levels provided a better means of expressing the combined mutagenic response. In addition, the kinetics of food consumption over a 3 day feeding period for exposures to cyclophosphamide which produce lethality were compared to non-lethal exposures. Extensive characterization of lethality induced by exposures to cyclophosphamide demonstrate that the lethality is most likely due to starvation, not chemical toxicity

  8. What Are Reasons for the Large Gender Differences in the Lethality of Suicidal Acts? An Epidemiological Analysis in Four European Countries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Mergl

    objects and poisoning by substances other than drugs. Median age at time of suicidal behaviour (35-44 years did not differ between males and females. The overall gender difference in lethality of suicidal behaviour was explained by males choosing more lethal suicide methods (odds ratio (OR = 2.03; 95% CI = 1.65 to 2.50; p < 0.000001 and additionally, but to a lesser degree, by a higher lethality of suicidal acts for males even within the same method (OR = 1.64; 95% CI = 1.32 to 2.02; p = 0.000005. Results of a regression analysis revealed neither age nor country differences were significant predictors for gender differences in the lethality of suicidal acts. The proportion of serious suicide attempts among all non-fatal suicidal acts with known intentionality (NFSAi was significantly higher in men (57.1%; 1,207 of 2,115 NFSAi than in women (48.6%; 1,508 of 3,100 NFSAi (χ2 = 35.74; p < 0.000001.Due to restrictive data security regulations to ensure anonymity in Ireland, specific ages could not be provided because of the relatively low absolute numbers of suicide in the Irish intervention and control region. Therefore, analyses of the interaction between gender and age could only be conducted for three of the four countries. Attempted suicides were assessed for patients presenting to emergency departments or treated in hospitals. An unknown rate of attempted suicides remained undetected. This may have caused an overestimation of the lethality of certain methods. Moreover, the detection of attempted suicides and the registration of completed suicides might have differed across the four countries. Some suicides might be hidden and misclassified as undetermined deaths.Men more often used highly lethal methods in suicidal behaviour, but there was also a higher method-specific lethality which together explained the large gender differences in the lethality of suicidal acts. Gender differences in the lethality of suicidal acts were fairly consistent across all four European

  9. Enhanced lethal effect of combined ACNU with x-ray on cultured HeLaS3 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanazawa, Haruyuki; Miyamoto, Tadaaki

    1983-01-01

    The combined effects of ACNU and X-irradiation on cultured HeLaS 3 cells were investigated. Pretreatment with either ACNU or X-ray induced a substantial reduction in shoulder width the D 0 value of the dose-response curve for the other agent, given later was unchanged. ACNU did not inhibit the recovery of sublethal damage (SLD) induced by X-ray when this treatment preceded the spilit-dose experiment. Our results indicate that some cell damage induced by each agent is transmissible to the progeny of the surviving cells and that the interaction of ACNU and X-irradiation was lethal to the cells. (author)

  10. Relative autonomy of manifestation of welt mutation in imaginal discs of Drosophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikulova, V.K.

    1988-01-01

    Autonomy of manifestation of the temperature-sensitive lethal welt mutation was investigated during transplantation of imaginal discs of mutant larvae into normal recipients and in large clones of cells homozygous for welt induced by γ-irradiation in a dose of 1000 rd in y; fj wt/M(2)S7 T(1;2)sc s 2 heterozygotes. Three temperature regimes were used: 17 degree C, at which the welt mutation is not manifested; 29 degree C, at which it is manifested better; and 25 degree C. It was established that the welt mutation operates autonomously, but in restricted regions of imaginal discs. The possibility is discussed of nonautonomous manifestation of the mutation with direct contact of wt/wt cells with heteroxygous wt/+ tissue

  11. Spontaneous mutation rate in Chinese hamster cell clones differing in UV-sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manuilova, E.S.; Bagrova, A.M.; Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ.

    1983-01-01

    The spontaneous rate of appearance of mutations to 6-mercaptopurine (6 MP) resistence in the cells of CHR2 and CHs2 clones dofferent in sensitivity to lethal and matagenous effect of UV-rays, is investigated. Increased UV-sensitivity of CHs2 clone is caused by the violation of postreplicative DNA reparation. It is established that the purity of spontaneously occuring mutations in both clones turns out to be similar, i.e. (1.5-1.8)x10 -5 for the cell pergeneration. It is shown that the effect of postreplicative DNA reparation in the cells of chinese hamster is not connected with the increase of spontaneous mutation ability. The problem on the possible role of reparation in the mechanism of appearance of spontaneous and induced mutations in the cells of Chinese hamster with increased UV-sensitivity is discussed

  12. Two Mutations in Surfactant Protein C Gene Associated with Neonatal Respiratory Distress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Tarocco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple mutations of surfactant genes causing surfactant dysfunction have been described. Surfactant protein C (SP-C deficiency is associated with variable clinical manifestations ranging from neonatal respiratory distress syndrome to lethal lung disease. We present an extremely low birth weight male infant with an unusual course of respiratory distress syndrome associated with two mutations in the SFTPC gene: C43-7G>A and 12T>A. He required mechanical ventilation for 26 days and was treated with 5 subsequent doses of surfactant with temporary and short-term efficacy. He was discharged at 37 weeks of postconceptional age without any respiratory support. During the first 16 months of life he developed five respiratory infections that did not require hospitalization. Conclusion. This mild course in our patient with two mutations is peculiar because the outcome in patients with a single SFTPC mutation is usually poor.

  13. On ballistic parameters of less lethal projectiles influencing the severity of thoracic blunt impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavier, Julien; Langlet, André; Eches, Nicolas; Jacquet, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    The development and safety certification of less lethal projectiles require an understanding of the influence of projectile parameters on projectile-chest interaction and on the resulting terminal effect. Several energy-based criteria have been developed for chest injury assessment. Many studies consider kinetic energy (KE) or energy density as the only projectile parameter influencing terminal effect. In a common KE range (100-160 J), analysis of the firing tests of two 40 mm projectiles of different masses on animal surrogates has been made in order to investigate the severity of the injuries in the thoracic region. Experimental results have shown that KE and calibre are not sufficient to discriminate between the two projectiles as regards their injury potential. Parameters, such as momentum, shape and impedance, influence the projectile-chest interaction and terminal effect. A simplified finite element model of projectile-structure interaction confirms the experimental tendencies. Within the range of ballistic parameters used, it has been demonstrated that maximum thoracic deflection is a useful parameter to predict the skeletal level of injury, and it largely depends on the projectile pre-impact momentum. However, numerical simulations show that these results are merely valid for the experimental conditions used and cannot be generalised. Nevertheless, the transmitted impulse seems to be a more general factor governing the thorax deflection.

  14. Genetic Mutations in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many different types of genetic mutations are found in cancer cells. This infographic outlines certain types of alterations that are present in cancer, such as missense, nonsense, frameshift, and chromosome rearrangements.

  15. AIP mutations and gigantism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostomyan, Liliya; Potorac, Iulia; Beckers, Pablo; Daly, Adrian F; Beckers, Albert

    2017-06-01

    AIP mutations are rare in sporadic acromegaly but they are seen at a higher frequency among certain specific populations of pituitary adenoma patients (pituitary gigantism cases, familial isolated pituitary adenoma (FIPA) kindreds, and patients with macroadenomas who are diagnosed ≤30 years). AIP mutations are most prevalent in patients with pituitary gigantism (29% of this group were found to have mutations in AIP gene). These data support targeted genetic screening for AIP mutations/deletions in these groups of pituitary adenoma patients. Earlier diagnosis of AIP-related acromegaly-gigantism cases enables timely clinical evaluation and treatment, thereby improving outcomes in terms of excessive linear growth and acromegaly comorbidities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Timing of the uv mutagenesis in yeast: a pedigree analysis of induced recessive mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, A.P.; Kilbey, B.J.

    1977-01-01

    The mechanism of uv-induced mutation in eukaryotes was studied in individual yeast cells by a procedure that combined pedigree analysis and tetrad analysis. The technique involved the induction of recessive lethals and semilethals in G1 diploid cells. Induced frequencies were 25 and 61% at survival levels of 90 and 77%, respectively. No evidence of gross chromosome aberrations was detected. Recessive mutations that affect only one strand or that affect both strands of the DNA molecule are induced much at random among a population of cells, and both types can occur within the same cell. However, the data confirm that two-strand mutations are in the majority after a low level of irradiation. The simplest explanation involves a mechanism whereby most mutations are fixed in both strands prior to the first round of post-irradiation DNA replication. The recessive mutational consequences of irradiation are exhausted at the conclusion of the first post-irradiation cell division, although dominant-lethal sectoring continues at a high level through the second post-irradiation division. It is concluded that pyrimidine dimers that persist to the second round of DNA replication are rare or ineffective

  17. The timing of UV mutagenesis in yeast: a pedigree analysis of induced recessive mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, A P; Kilbey, B J

    1977-10-01

    The mechanism of UV-induced mutation in eukaryotes was studied in individual yeast cells by a procedure that combined pedigree analysis and tetrad analysis. The technique involved the induction of recessive lethals and semilethals in G1 diploid cells. Induced frequencies were 25 and 61 percent at survival levels of 90 and 77 percent, respectively. No evidence of gross chromosome aberrations was detected. Recessive mutations that affect only one strand or that affect both strands of the DNA molecule are induced much at random among a population of cells, and both types can occur within the same cell. However, the data confirm that two-strand mutations are in the majority after a low level of irradiation. The simplest explanation involves a mechanism whereby most mutations are fixed in both strands prior to the first round of post-irradiation DNA replication. The recessive mutational consequences of irradiation are exhausted at the conclusion of the first post-irradiation cell division, although dominant-lethal sectoring continues at a high level through the second post-irradiation division. It is concluded that pyrimidine dimers that persist to the second round of DNA replication are rare or ineffective.

  18. Mutation breeding in peas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaranowski, J [Institute of Genetics and Plant Breeding, Academy of Agriculture, Poznan (Poland); Micke, A [Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Isotope and Radiation Applications of Atomic Energy for Food and Agricultural Development, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1985-02-01

    The pea as an ancient crop plant still today has wide uses and is an import source of food protein. It is also an important object for genetic studies and as such has been widely used in mutation induction experiments. However, in comparison with cereals this ancient crop plant (like several other grain legumes) has gained relatively little from advances in breeding. The review focuses on the prospects of genetic improvement of pea by induced mutations, discusses principles and gives methodological information. (author)

  19. Mutation breeding in peas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaranowski, J.; Micke, A.

    1985-01-01

    The pea as an ancient crop plant still today has wide uses and is an import source of food protein. It is also an important object for genetic studies and as such has been widely used in mutation induction experiments. However, in comparison with cereals this ancient crop plant (like several other grain legumes) has gained relatively little from advances in breeding. The review focuses on the prospects of genetic improvement of pea by induced mutations, discusses principles and gives methodological information. (author)

  20. Mapping evaporative water loss in desert passerines reveals an expanding threat of lethal dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, Thomas P; Mutiibwa, Denis; Gerson, Alexander R; Smith, Eric Krabbe; Talbot, William A; O'Neill, Jacqueline J; McKechnie, Andrew E; Wolf, Blair O

    2017-02-28

    Extreme high environmental temperatures produce a variety of consequences for wildlife, including mass die-offs. Heat waves are increasing in frequency, intensity, and extent, and are projected to increase further under climate change. However, the spatial and temporal dynamics of die-off risk are poorly understood. Here, we examine the effects of heat waves on evaporative water loss (EWL) and survival in five desert passerine birds across the southwestern United States using a combination of physiological data, mechanistically informed models, and hourly geospatial temperature data. We ask how rates of EWL vary with temperature across species; how frequently, over what areas, and how rapidly lethal dehydration occurs; how EWL and die-off risk vary with body mass; and how die-off risk is affected by climate warming. We find that smaller-bodied passerines are subject to higher rates of mass-specific EWL than larger-bodied counterparts and thus encounter potentially lethal conditions much more frequently, over shorter daily intervals, and over larger geographic areas. Warming by 4 °C greatly expands the extent, frequency, and intensity of dehydration risk, and introduces new threats for larger passerine birds, particularly those with limited geographic ranges. Our models reveal that increasing air temperatures and heat wave occurrence will potentially have important impacts on the water balance, daily activity, and geographic distribution of arid-zone birds. Impacts may be exacerbated by chronic effects and interactions with other environmental changes. This work underscores the importance of acute risks of high temperatures, particularly for small-bodied species, and suggests conservation of thermal refugia and water sources.

  1. Suppression of F1 Male-Specific Lethality in Caenorhabditis Hybrids by cbr-him-8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishnavi Ragavapuram

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Haldane’s Rule and Darwin’s Corollary to Haldane’s Rule are the observations that heterogametic F1 hybrids are frequently less fit than their homogametic siblings, and that asymmetric results are often obtained from reciprocal hybrid crosses. In Caenorhabditis, Haldane’s Rule and Darwin’s Corollary have been observed in several hybrid crosses, including crosses of Caenorhabditis briggsae and C. nigoni. Fertile F1 females are obtained from reciprocal crosses. However, F1 males obtained from C. nigoni mothers are sterile and F1 males obtained from C. briggsae die during embryogenesis. We have identified cbr-him-8 as a recessive maternal-effect suppressor of F1 hybrid male-specific lethality in this combination of species. This result implicates epigenetic meiotic silencing in the suppression of F1 male-specific lethality. It is also shown that F1 males bearing a C. briggsae X chromosome are fertile. When crossed to C. briggsae hermaphrodites or F1 females derived from C. briggsae hermaphrodites, viable F2 and backcross (B2 progeny were obtained. Sibling males that possessed a C. nigoni X chromosome were sterile. Therefore, the sterility of F1 males bearing a C. nigoni X chromosome must result from dysgenic interactions between the X chromosome of C. nigoni and the autosomes of C. briggsae. The fertility of F1 males bearing a C. briggsae X chromosome provides an opportunity to identify C. nigoni loci that prevent spermatogenesis, and hence hermaphroditic reproduction, in diplo-X hybrids.

  2. Most ultraviolet irradiation induced mutations in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans are chromosomal rearrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, H.I.; Rosenbluth, R.E.; Baillie, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    In this study the utility of 254-nm ultraviolet light (UV) as a magnetic tool in C.elegans is determined. It is demonstrated that irradiation of adult hermaphrodites provides a simple method for the induction of heritable chromosomal rearrangements. A screening protocol was employed that identifies either recessive lethal mutations in the 40 map unit region balanced by the translocation eT1(III;V), or unc-36(III) duplications. Mutations were recovered in 3% of the chromosomes screened after a dose of 120 J/m 2 . This rate resembles that for 1500 R γ-ray-induced mutations selected in a similar manner. The mutations were classified either as lethals [mapping to Linkage Group (LG)III or LGV] or as putative unc-36 duplications. In contrast to the majority of UV-induced mutations analysed in micro-organisms, a large fraction of the C.elegans UV-induced mutations were found to be not simple intragenic lesions, but deficiencies for more than one adjacent gene or more complex events. Preliminary evidence for this conclusion came from the high frequency of mutations that had a dominant effect causing reduced numbers of adult progeny. Subsequently 6 out of 9 analysed LGV mutations were found to be deficiencies. Other specific rearrangements also identified were: one translocation, sT5(II;III), and two unc-36 duplications, sDp8 and sDp9. It was concluded that UV irradiation can easily be used as an additional tool for the analysis of C.elegans chromosomes, and that C.elegans should prove to be a useful organism in which to study the mechanisms whereby UV acts as a mutagen in cells of complex eukaryotes. (author). 46 refs.; 5 figs.; 4 tabs

  3. Impulsivity, aggression and brain structure in high and low lethality suicide attempters with borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloff, Paul; White, Richard; Diwadkar, Vaibhav A

    2014-06-30

    Impulsivity and aggressiveness are trait dispositions associated with the vulnerability to suicidal behavior across diagnoses. They are associated with structural and functional abnormalities in brain networks involved in regulation of mood, impulse and behavior. They are also core characteristics of borderline personality disorder (BPD), a disorder defined, in part, by recurrent suicidal behavior. We assessed the relationships between personality traits, brain structure and lethality of suicide attempts in 51 BPD attempters using multiple regression analyses on structural MRI data. BPD was diagnosed by the Diagnostic Interview for Borderline Patients-revised, impulsivity by the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS), aggression by the Brown-Goodwin Lifetime History of Aggression (LHA), and high lethality by a score of 4 or more on the Lethality Rating Scale (LRS). Sixteen High Lethality attempters were compared to 35 Low Lethality attempters, with no significant differences noted in gender, co-morbidity, childhood abuse, BIS or LHA scores. Degree of medical lethality (LRS) was negatively related to gray matter volumes across multiple fronto-temporal-limbic regions. Effects of impulsivity and aggression on gray matter volumes discriminated High from Low Lethality attempters and differed markedly within lethality groups. Lethality of suicide attempts in BPD may be related to the mediation of these personality traits by specific neural networks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Heterochromatin position effects on circularized sex chromosomes cause filicidal embryonic lethality in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferree, Patrick M; Gomez, Karina; Rominger, Peter; Howard, Dagnie; Kornfeld, Hannah; Barbash, Daniel A

    2014-04-01

    Some circularized X-Y chromosomes in Drosophila melanogaster are mitotically unstable and induce early embryonic lethality, but the genetic basis is unknown. Our experiments suggest that a large region of X-linked satellite DNA causes anaphase bridges and lethality when placed into a new heterochromatic environment within certain circularized X-Y chromosomes. These results reveal that repetitive sequences can be incompatible with one another in cis. The lethal phenotype also bears a remarkable resemblance to a case of interspecific hybrid lethality.

  5. Late radiation effects in animals surviving lethal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrov, L.A.

    1974-01-01

    Animals (rats, mice, dogs) survived lethal irradiation by means of prophylactic-therapeutic treatments or previously irradiated, were studied for late radiation effects: life span, cachexia and fat growing of hypophysical type, tissue or organ hypoplasia manifested by disturbed hemopoiesis, suppressed function of adrenal gland, etc., suppressed immune reactivity of the irradiated organism, atypical biochemical changes in DNA and protein metabolism, epilation, chronic dermatitis, ulcerations, reduced reproductivity or full sterility, damage of kidneys leading to nephrosclerosis, dishormonal states, cataracts, diffuse sclerotic processes, various kinds of malignant and non-malignant tumors. In these cases hemopoiesis compensated for a definite time peripheral blood composition, but during the late period it showed features of incompleteness: shorter life survival of erythrocytes and thrombocytes manifested by a decreased binding of labelled methionine in these blood elements, anemia and relative thrombocytopenia sometimes with an increased number of polychromatic erythrocytes in peripheral blood and a decreased number of reticulocytes at the same time; lymphopenia and relative leucopenia with an increased number of hypersegmented neutrophils. Decreased reproductivity and atypical biochemical changes available in the first generation of the irradiated animals showed the probable role of mutagenic factors in the emergence of some late radiation effects. A significant part of late radiation sequences were due to neuro-endocrine desintegrations which lead to a disturbed supply of the vessels and afterwards to their sclerosis. Some of the described late radiation effects were also observed in biological controls as festures of ageing while in irradiated animals they were manifested in an earlier period. After application of optimal amounts radioprotectors (AET, cysteamine, serotonin) a more marked protective effect is demonstrated in the early reactions (time survival

  6. Development of a chromosome-plasmid balanced lethal system for Lactobacillus acidophilus with thyA gene as selective marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, X; Xu, J G

    2000-01-01

    A chromosome-plasmid balanced lethal gene delivery system for Lactobacillus acidophilus based on the thyA gene was developed. The selected L. acidophilus DOM La strain carries a mutated thyA gene and has an obligate requirement for thymidine. This strain can be used as a host for the constructed shuttle vector pFXL03, lacking antibiotic-resistant markers but having the wild-type thyA gene from L. casei which complements the thyA chromosomal mutation. The vector also contains the replicon region from plasmid pUC19 and that of the Lactococcus plasmid pWV01, which allows the transfer between Escherichia coli, L. casei and L. acidophilus. Eight unique restriction sites (i.e., PstI, HindIII, SphI, SalI, AccI, XbaI, KpnI and SacI) are available for cloning. After 40-time transfers in modified MRS medium, no plasmid loss was observed. The vector pFXL03 is potentially useful as a food-grade vaccine delivery system for L. acidophilus.

  7. Seedling lethality in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia conferred by Ds transposable element insertion into a plant-specific gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majira, Amel; Domin, Monique; Grandjean, Olivier; Gofron, Krystyna; Houba-Hérin, Nicole

    2002-10-01

    A seedling lethal mutant of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia (sdl-1) was isolated by transposon tagging using a maize Dissociation (Ds) element. The insertion mutation was produced by direct co-transformation of protoplasts with two plasmids: one containing Ds and a second with an Ac transposase gene. sdl-1 seedlings exhibit several phenotypes: swollen organs, short hypocotyls in light and dark conditions, and enlarged and multinucleated cells, that altogether suggest cell growth defects. Mutant cells are able to proliferate under in vitro culture conditions. Genomic DNA sequences bordering the transposon were used to recover cDNA from the normal allele. Complementation of the mutant phenotype with the cDNA confirmed that the transposon had caused the mutation. The Ds element was inserted into the first exon of the open reading frame and the homozygous mutant lacked detectable transcript. Phenocopies of the mutant were obtained by an antisense approach. SDL-1 encodes a novel protein found in several plant genomes but apparently missingfrom animal and fungal genomes; the protein is highly conserved and has a potential plastid targeting motif.

  8. Experiments on the role of deleterious mutations as stepping stones in adaptive evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covert, Arthur W.; Lenski, Richard E.; Wilke, Claus O.; Ofria, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Many evolutionary studies assume that deleterious mutations necessarily impede adaptive evolution. However, a later mutation that is conditionally beneficial may interact with a deleterious predecessor before it is eliminated, thereby providing access to adaptations that might otherwise be inaccessible. It is unknown whether such sign-epistatic recoveries are inconsequential events or an important factor in evolution, owing to the difficulty of monitoring the effects and fates of all mutations during experiments with biological organisms. Here, we used digital organisms to compare the extent of adaptive evolution in populations when deleterious mutations were disallowed with control populations in which such mutations were allowed. Significantly higher fitness levels were achieved over the long term in the control populations because some of the deleterious mutations served as stepping stones across otherwise impassable fitness valleys. As a consequence, initially deleterious mutations facilitated the evolution of complex, beneficial functions. We also examined the effects of disallowing neutral mutations, of varying the mutation rate, and of sexual recombination. Populations evolving without neutral mutations were able to leverage deleterious and compensatory mutation pairs to overcome, at least partially, the absence of neutral mutations. Substantially raising or lowering the mutation rate reduced or eliminated the long-term benefit of deleterious mutations, but introducing recombination did not. Our work demonstrates that deleterious mutations can play an important role in adaptive evolution under at least some conditions. PMID:23918358

  9. Gastrointestinal decontamination in healthy and lethally irradiated monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendriks, W.D.H.

    1980-01-01

    In periods of extreme immunosuppression, infections which are often life-threatening, frequently occur. In an attempt to prevent such infections in lethally irradiated rhesus monkeys, the animals were subjected to strict reverse isolation prior to irradiation and administrated orally with nonabsorbable antibiotics in order to eliminate their microflora. The antibiotic combination was selected on the basis of a sensitivity test and was added to the liquid food supply. To rapidly achieve a high bactericidal concentration in the intestine, the same antibiotics were additionally given orally for 5 days. The microflora was reduced rapidly; within a few days sterile cultures were obtained. Particularly after discontinuation of the administration of the additional antibiotics were colonizations found. In contrast to colonizations persisting from the first day of treatment on, the first were rather easy to suppress. (Auth.)

  10. In vitro cell culture lethal dose submitted to gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, Carolina S.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Rogero, Jose Roberto [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: carolina_sm@hotmail.com; Ikeda, Tamiko I.; Cruz, Aurea S. [Instituto Adolfo Lutz, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the in vitro effect of gamma radiation in cell culture of mouse connective tissue exposed to different doses of gamma radiation and under several conditions. The cell viability was analyzed by neutral red uptake methodology. This assay was developed for establish a methodology to be used in the future in the study of resveratrol radioprotection. Resveratrol (3,4',5- trihydroxystilbene), a phenolic phytoalexin that occurs naturally in some spermatophytes, such as grapevines, in response to injury as fungal infections and exposure to ultraviolet light. In the wines this compound is found at high levels and is considered one of the highest antioxidant constituents. The intense antioxidant potential of resveratrol provides many pharmacological activities including cardioprotection, chemoprevention and anti-tumor effects. Our results demonstrated that {sup 60}Co gamma radiation lethal dose (LD50) on NCTC clone 929 cells was about 340Gy. (author)

  11. In vitro cell culture lethal dose submitted to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, Carolina S.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Rogero, Jose Roberto; Ikeda, Tamiko I.; Cruz, Aurea S.

    2009-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the in vitro effect of gamma radiation in cell culture of mouse connective tissue exposed to different doses of gamma radiation and under several conditions. The cell viability was analyzed by neutral red uptake methodology. This assay was developed for establish a methodology to be used in the future in the study of resveratrol radioprotection. Resveratrol (3,4',5- trihydroxystilbene), a phenolic phytoalexin that occurs naturally in some spermatophytes, such as grapevines, in response to injury as fungal infections and exposure to ultraviolet light. In the wines this compound is found at high levels and is considered one of the highest antioxidant constituents. The intense antioxidant potential of resveratrol provides many pharmacological activities including cardioprotection, chemoprevention and anti-tumor effects. Our results demonstrated that 60 Co gamma radiation lethal dose (LD50) on NCTC clone 929 cells was about 340Gy. (author)

  12. Perinatally lethal short rib-polydactyly syndromes. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sillence, D.; Kozlowski, K.; Bar-ziv, J.; Fuhrmann-Rieger, A.; Fuhrmann, W.; Pascu, F.

    1987-01-01

    Thirteen newborns with lethal short rib-polydactyly (SRP) have been reviewed, 11 with SRP type 3 (Verma-Naumoff) and 2 with SRP tye 2 (Majewski). In the former group there were three sets of siblings. The excess of males with SRP type III (Verma-Naumoff) is confirmed in this present study. A high frequency of phenotypic females including sex-reversed constitutional males with SRP type 1 (Saldino-Noonan) is in marked contrast to these findings in SRP type 3. Possible hypotheses include variable expressivity in non-Majewski short rib-polydactyly syndromes with sex-reversed and constitutional female cases tending to show more severe phenotypic expression both in terms of major anomalies and skeletal dysplastic effects. (orig.)

  13. Lethal carbon monoxide toxicity in a concrete shower unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Karen; Byard, Roger W

    2018-05-23

    A 47-year-old previously-well woman was found dead on the floor of a shower cubicle on a property in rural South Australia. The impression of the attending doctor and police was of collapse due to natural disease. Although there was significant stenosing coronary artery atherosclerosis found at autopsy, cherry pink discoloration of tissues prompted measurement of the blood carboxyhemoglobin level which was found to be 55%. The source of the gas was a poorly-maintained hot water heater that was mounted on the inside wall of the shower. Construction of the shower using an impermeable concrete rain water tank had caused gas accumulation when the water heater malfunctioned. Had lethal carbon monoxide exposure not been identified others using the same shower unit would also have been at risk.

  14. Analysis of Lethality and Malformations During Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunath, Azhwar; Perumal, Ekambaram

    2018-01-01

    The versatility offered by zebrafish (Danio rerio) makes it a powerful and an attractive vertebrate model in developmental toxicity and teratogenicity assays. Apart from the newly introduced chemicals as drugs, xenobiotics also induce abnormal developmental abnormalities and congenital malformations in living organisms. Over the recent decades, zebrafish embryo/larva has emerged as a potential tool to test teratogenicity potential of these chemicals. Zebrafish responds to compounds as mammals do as they share similarities in their development, metabolism, physiology, and signaling pathways with that of mammals. The methodology used by the different scientists varies enormously in the zebrafish embryotoxicity test. In this chapter, we present methods to assess lethality and malformations during zebrafish development. We propose two major malformations scoring systems: binomial and relative morphological scoring systems to assess the malformations in zebrafish embryos/larvae. Based on the scoring of the malformations, the test compound can be classified as a teratogen or a nonteratogen and its teratogenic potential is evaluated.

  15. BRINE SHRIMP LETHALITY BIOASSAY OF GLAUCIUM GRANDIFLORUM VAR. GRANDIFLORUM

    OpenAIRE

    A. SARI, Ç. ÜNSAL, İ. SARIOĞLU, A. SARI, Ç. ÜNSAL, İ. SARIOĞLU

    2013-01-01

    Türkiye'nin 3 farklı bölgesinden toplanan Glaucium grandiflorum Boiss. et Huet var. grandiflorum örneklerinin toprak üstü kısımlarından elde edilen alkaloit ekstreleri ve bu ekstrelerden elde edilen majör alkaloitler allokriptopin, protopİn, (+)-izokoridin, (+)-korİdin üzerinde brİne shrimp lethality testi yapılarak sitotoksisiteleri İncelenmiştir. Glaucium grandiflorum var. grandiflorum türünün 3 örneği de önemli oranda sitotoksik aktİvite göstermiştir. Allokriptopin, protopin, (+)-izok...

  16. Mechanisms of Lethal Cerebrovascular Accidents in Turner Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byard, Roger W

    2016-05-01

    A case of intracerebral hemorrhage in Turner syndrome is reported with an analysis of possible causes of cerebrovascular accidents in this condition. A 42-year-old woman with known Turner syndrome died soon after hospital admission having been found unconscious at her home address. At autopsy, she showed typical features of Turner syndrome with short stature, webbing of the neck, underdeveloped breasts, and an increased carrying angle of the arm. Death was due to a large left-sided intracerebral hemorrhage extending from the left basal ganglia into the white matter of the frontal lobe and lateral ventricle. Cases of unexpected death in Turner syndrome may arise from occult cerebrovascular accidents which may be hemorrhagic or nonhemorrhagic. Associated features include hypertension, vascular malformations, accelerated atherogenesis, cystic medial necrosis, and moyamoya syndrome. The possibility of Turner syndrome should be considered in cases where there has been a lethal cerebrovascular event in a younger woman. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  17. Preliminary results on epidemiology of Coconut Lethal Yellowing in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnot François

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies are of major importance in understanding the determinants of plant diseases in order to control the risks of their spreading. A research programme on the epidemiology of coconut lethal yellowing, or Cape Saint Paul Wilt Disease (CSPWD, in Ghana was launched in March 2007. The objective was to characterize the distribution and spread of the disease in space and time at various scales, and their relation with the environment. This article presents the general strategy used to evaluate the incidence of CSPWD along with the environmental, ecological and agronomical variables at regional level. A survey was undertaken on 1,166 plots of Coconut Sector Development Project (CSDP planted with Malayan Yellow Dwarf (MYD × Vanuatu Tall (VTT hybrids in Western Region and Central Region. Preliminary results on the distribution of CSPWD and outside variables at regional scale, along with their relations, are given.

  18. Thyroid and pancreatic hormones in lethally irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlersova, E.; Ahlers, I.; Praslicka, M.

    1985-01-01

    The concentrations of thyroxine, triiodothyronine and reverse triiodothyronine, glucagon and insulin in the serum or plasma were determined by radioimmunoassay in male rats of the Wistar strain 1, 6, 24, 48 and 72 hours after irradiation with 14.35 Gy (1500R) of X-rays. The irradiated and sham-irradiated rats were starved till examination. The concentrations of thyroxine and triiodothyronine dropped 6 hours after irradiation as compared with controls, the concentration of thyroxine also dropped after 72 hours. The level of reverse triiodothyronine in irradiated rats increased in the terminal period. The level of insulin dropped 24 hours after irradiation, at 72 hours it was higher than that in controls. The concentration of glucagon in irradiated rats increased in the terminal phase of radiation disease. The results document the diverse reaction of hormones in lethally irradiated rats and contribute to a deeper recognition of metabolic imbalance in the course of radiation disease. (author)

  19. Lethal midline granuloma histologically. Management with radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barriga T, L.; Misad, O.; Moscol, A.; Pinillos G, L.; Barriga T, O.; Heredia, A.; Pinillos A, L.; Mayer Z, T.

    1995-01-01

    From 1973 through 1990, 24 patients with lethal midline granuloma histologically demonstrated were treated with radiation therapy at the Radiation Oncology Department of the National Institute of Neoplasmic Diseases from Peru. The authors reports the results of their experience, reviewed the literature and present a clinic and pathologic discussion of this rare entity. All the patients received radiotherapy as the main treatment and 12 of them received chemotherapy. The male to female ratio was 5:3 with a mean age of 29.33 years (range 6 to 84 years old). Symptoms of nasal obstruction were presented 45.83%, nasal enlargement in 33.33%, nasal discharge in 29.16% and fever in 29.16%, principally. We believe that radiotherapy is the treatment of choice in this report we can not demonstrate it because of the small number of patients. (authors). 28 refs., 10 tabs

  20. Evaluation of Lethal Giant Larvae as a Schistosomiasis Vaccine Candidate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufan Cao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease of humans, and it is considered to be the second most devastating parasitic disease after malaria. Eggs produced by normally developed female worms are important in the transmission of the parasite, and they responsible for the pathogenesis of schistosomiasis. The tumor suppressor gene lethal giant larvae (lgl has an essential function in establishing apical-basal cell polarity, cell proliferation, differentiation, and tissue organization. In our earlier study, downregulation of the lgl gene induced a significant reduction in the egg hatching rate of Schistosoma japonicum (Sj eggs. In this study, the Sjlgl gene was used as a vaccine candidate against schistosomiasis, and vaccination achieved and maintained a stable reduction of the egg hatching rate, which is consistent with previous studies, in addition to reducing the worm burden and liver egg burden in some trials.

  1. Mutator activity in Schizophyllum commune

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shneyour, Y.; Koltin, Y. (Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). Dept. of Microbiology)

    1983-01-01

    A strain with an elevated level of spontaneous mutations and an especially high rate of reversion at a specific locus (pab/sup -/) was identified. The mutator trait is recessive. UV sensitivity and the absence of a UV-specific endonucleolytic activity were associated with the enhancement of the mutation rate in mutator strains. The endonuclease associated with the regulation of the mutation rate also acted on single-stranded DNA. The molecular weight of this enzyme is about 38,000 daltons.

  2. Induced plasmon mutations affecting the growth habit of peanuts, A. hypogaea L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, A.; Ashri, A.

    1978-01-01

    The effectiveness of the acridines ethidium bromide (EB) and acriflavine in inducing plasmon mutations was compared with the alkylating agents ethyl methanesulphonate (EMS) and diethyl sulphate and to γ-rays. The growth habit (trailing versus bunch) of peanuts (A. hypogaea), controlled by genic-cytoplasmic interactions, was utilized. Breeding tests distinguishing nuclear from plasmon mutations were developed and are described in detail. Plasmon mutations were induced, but there were differences in mutation yields between the cultivars and the mutagens. (Auth.)

  3. Late radiation effects in animals surviving lethal irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimitrov, L A

    1974-01-01

    Animals (rats, mice, dogs) survived lethal irradiation by means of prophylactic-therapeutic treatments or previously irradiated, were studied for late radiation effects: life span, cachexia and fat growing of hypophysical type, tissue or organ hypoplasia manifested by disturbed hemopoiesis, suppressed function of adrenal gland, etc., suppressed immune reactivity of the irradiated organism, atypical biochemical changes in DNA and protein metabolism, epilation, chronic dermatitis, ulcerations, reduced reproductivity or full sterility, damage of kidneys leading to nephrosclerosis, dishormonal states, cataracts, diffuse sclerotic processes, various kinds of malignant and non-malignant tumors. In these cases hemopoiesis compensated for a definite time peripheral blood composition, but during the late period it showed features of incompleteness: shorter life survival of erythrocytes and thrombocytes manifested by a decreased binding of labelled methionine in these blood elements, anemia and relative thrombocytopenia sometimes with an increased number of polychromatic erythrocytes in peripheral blood and a decreased number of reticulocytes at the same time; lymphopenia and relative leucopenia with an increased number of hypersegmented neutrophils. Decreased reproductivity and atypical biochemical changes available in the first generation of the irradiated animals showed the probable role of mutagenic factors in the emergency of some late radiation effects. A significant part of late radiation sequences were due to neuro-endocrine disintegrations. Some of the described late radiation effects were also observed in biological controls as features of ageing. After application of radioprotectors (AET, cysteamine, serotonin) a more marked protective effect is demonstrated in the early reactions (time survival till 30th day, DNA and protein metabolism, immune reactions) of the lethally irradiated animals.

  4. Ribosomal elongation factor 4 promotes cell death associated with lethal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liping; Hong, Yuzhi; Luan, Gan; Mosel, Michael; Malik, Muhammad; Drlica, Karl; Zhao, Xilin

    2014-12-09

    Ribosomal elongation factor 4 (EF4) is highly conserved among bacteria, mitochondria, and chloroplasts. However, the EF4-encoding gene, lepA, is nonessential and its deficiency shows no growth or fitness defect. In purified systems, EF4 back-translocates stalled, posttranslational ribosomes for efficient protein synthesis; consequently, EF4 has a protective role during moderate stress. We were surprised to find that EF4 also has a detrimental role during severe stress: deletion of lepA increased Escherichia coli survival following treatment with several antimicrobials. EF4 contributed to stress-mediated lethality through reactive oxygen species (ROS) because (i) the protective effect of a ΔlepA mutation against lethal antimicrobials was eliminated by anaerobic growth or by agents that block hydroxyl radical accumulation and (ii) the ΔlepA mutation decreased ROS levels stimulated by antimicrobial stress. Epistasis experiments showed that EF4 functions in the same genetic pathway as the MazF toxin, a stress response factor implicated in ROS-mediated cell death. The detrimental action of EF4 required transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA, which tags truncated proteins for degradation and is known to be inhibited by EF4) and the ClpP protease. Inhibition of a protective, tmRNA/ClpP-mediated degradative activity would allow truncated proteins to indirectly perturb the respiratory chain and thereby provide a potential link between EF4 and ROS. The connection among EF4, MazF, tmRNA, and ROS expands a pathway leading from harsh stress to bacterial self-destruction. The destructive aspect of EF4 plus the protective properties described previously make EF4 a bifunctional factor in a stress response that promotes survival or death, depending on the severity of stress. Translation elongation factor 4 (EF4) is one of the most conserved proteins in nature, but it is dispensable. Lack of strong phenotypes for its genetic knockout has made EF4 an enigma. Recent biochemical work has

  5. Evaluating the lethal and pre-lethal effects of a range of fungi against adult Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanford Simon

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insecticide resistance is seriously undermining efforts to eliminate malaria. In response, research on alternatives to the use of chemical insecticides against adult mosquito vectors has been increasing. Fungal entomopathogens formulated as biopesticides have received much attention and have shown considerable potential. This research has necessarily focused on relatively few fungal isolates in order to ‘prove concept’. Further, most attention has been paid to examining fungal virulence (lethality and not the other properties of fungal infection that might also contribute to reducing transmission potential. Here, a range of fungal isolates were screened to examine variation in virulence and how this relates to additional pre-lethal reductions in feeding propensity. Methods The Asian malaria vector, Anopheles stephensi was exposed to 17 different isolates of entomopathogenic fungi belonging to species of Beauveria bassiana, Metarhizium anisopliae, Metarhizium acridum and Isaria farinosus. Each isolate was applied to a test substrate at a standard dose rate of 1×109 spores ml-1 and the mosquitoes exposed for six hours. Subsequently the insects were removed to mesh cages where survival was monitored over the next 14 days. During this incubation period the mosquitoes’ propensity to feed was assayed for each isolate by offering a feeding stimulant at the side of the cage and recording the number probing. Results and conclusions Fungal isolates showed a range of virulence to A. stephensi with some causing >80% mortality within 7 days, while others caused little increase in mortality relative to controls over the study period. Similarly, some isolates had a large impact on feeding propensity, causing >50% pre-lethal reductions in feeding rate, whereas other isolates had very little impact. There was clear correlation between fungal virulence and feeding reduction with virulence explaining nearly 70% of the variation in

  6. Photobiological activity of 4-methylpsoralen and 4-methyl-4', 5'-dihydropsoralen with respect to lethal and mutagenic effects on E. coli, and prophage induction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, H. (Tokai Univ., Isehara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1984-06-01

    The lethal and mutagenic effects on E. coli as well as the induction of prophage lambda were determined after treatment with 4-methylpsoralen, 8-methoxypsoralen, psoralen or 4-methyl-4',5'-dihydropsoralen and UV-A irradiation. All psoralens used caused photokilling and photomutagenesis of strains H/r30R and Hs30R. 4-Methylpsoralen was more efficient for killing and for the induced mutation than 8-methoxypsoralen or psoralen in view of the dose modification factor. This finding can be explained by the methylation effect of psoralen. 4-Methylpsoralen induced more mutation in Hs30R than in H/r30R. Monofunctional 4-methyl-4',5'-dihydropsoralen required much higher fluence than bifunctional psoralens to kill cells and to induce the mutation. When the induced mutation frequency was expressed as a function of survival, mutagenic efficiency ranked in the following order: 8-methoxypsoralen > psoralen > 4-methylpsoralen > 4-methyl-4',5'-dihydropsoralen. 4-Methylpsoralen was 3-4-fold less mutagenic than 8-methoxypsoralen in this plot. Lytic growth of prophage in E. coli AB1157 (lambda) was induced by the treatment. When the bifunctional psoralens were used, the maximum induced fraction was larger than 20%. However, it was only 2% when 4-methyl-4',5'-dihydropsoralen was used.

  7. BRAF mutation in hairy cell leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ahmadzadeh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available BRAF is a serine/threonine kinase with a regulatory role in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathway. A mutation in the RAF gene, especially in BRAF protein, leads to an increased stimulation of this cascade, causing uncontrolled cell division and development of malignancy. Several mutations have been observed in the gene coding for this protein in a variety of human malignancies, including hairy cell leukemia (HCL. BRAF V600E is the most common mutation reported in exon15 of BRAF, which is observed in almost all cases of classic HCL, but it is negative in other B-cell malignancies, including the HCL variant. Therefore it can be used as a marker to differentiate between these B-cell disorders. We also discuss the interaction between miRNAs and signaling pathways, including MAPK, in HCL. When this mutation is present, the use of BRAF protein inhibitors may represent an effective treatment. In this review we have evaluated the role of the mutation of the BRAF gene in the pathogenesis and progression of HCL.

  8. DNA Glycosylases Involved in Base Excision Repair May Be Associated with Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osorio, Ana; Milne, Roger L; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline

    2014-01-01

    Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in the DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) pathway could be associated with cancer risk in carriers of mutations in the high-penetrance susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, given the relation of synthetic lethality that exists between one of th...

  9. DNA Glycosylases Involved in Base Excision Repair May Be Associated with Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Osorio (Ana); R.L. Milne (Roger); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); T. Vaclová (Tereza); G. Pita (Guillermo); R. Alonso (Rosario); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); I. Blanco (Ignacio); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); M. Durán (Mercedes); O. Díez (Orland); T. Ramon Y Cajal; I. Konstantopoulou (I.); C. Martínez-Bouzas (Cristina); R. Andrés Conejero (Raquel); P. Soucy (Penny); L. McGuffog (Lesley); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); A. Lee (Andrew); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); J. Rantala (Johanna); N. Loman (Niklas); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); M.S. Beattie (Mary); S.M. Domchek (Susan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); B.K. Arun (Banu); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); C.S. Walsh (Christine); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); E.M. John (Esther); A.S. Whittemore (Alice); M.B. Daly (Mary); M.C. Southey (Melissa); J.L. Hopper (John); M.-B. Terry (Mary-Beth); S.S. Buys (Saundra); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); L. Steele (Linda); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); L. Jønson (Lars); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); J. Infante (Jon); B. Herráez (Belén); L.T. Moreno (Leticia Thais); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); J. Herzog (Josef); K. Weeman (Kisa); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (D.); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); F. Mariette (F.); S. Volorio (Sara); A. Viel (Alessandra); L. Varesco (Liliana); L. Papi (Laura); L. Ottini (Laura); M.G. Tibiletti (Maria Grazia); P. Radice (Paolo); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); J. Garber; S.D. Ellis (Steve); D. Frost (Debra); R. Platte (Radka); E. Fineberg (Elena); D.G. Evans (Gareth); F. Lalloo (Fiona); L. Izatt (Louise); R. Eeles (Rosalind); J.W. Adlard (Julian); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); T.J. Cole (Trevor); D. Eccles (Diana); J. Cook (Jackie); S.V. Hodgson (Shirley); C. Brewer (Carole); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); F. Douglas (Fiona); M.E. Porteous (Mary); L. Side (Lucy); L.J. Walker (Lisa); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); A. Donaldson (Alan); J. Kennedy (John); C. Foo (Claire); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara);