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Sample records for mutation m520r alters

  1. The novel C-terminal KCNQ1 mutation M520R alters protein trafficking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, Nicole; Calloe, Kirstine; Nielsen, Nathalie Hélix

    2007-01-01

    The long QT-syndrome is characterized by a prolongation of the QT-interval and tachyarrhythmias causing syncopes and sudden death. We identified the missense mutation M520R in the calmodulin binding domain of the Kv7.1 channel from a German family with long QT-syndrome. Heterologous expression of...

  2. Altered telomeres in tumors with ATRX and DAXX mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaphy, Christopher M; de Wilde, Roeland F; Jiao, Yuchen; Klein, Alison P; Edil, Barish H; Shi, Chanjuan; Bettegowda, Chetan; Rodriguez, Fausto J; Eberhart, Charles G; Hebbar, Sachidanand; Offerhaus, G Johan; McLendon, Roger; Rasheed, B Ahmed; He, Yiping; Yan, Hai; Bigner, Darell D; Oba-Shinjo, Sueli Mieko; Marie, Suely Kazue Nagahashi; Riggins, Gregory J; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Vogelstein, Bert; Hruban, Ralph H; Maitra, Anirban; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Meeker, Alan K

    2011-07-22

    The proteins encoded by ATRX and DAXX participate in chromatin remodeling at telomeres and other genomic sites. Because inactivating mutations of these genes are common in human pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs), we examined the telomere status of these tumors. We found that 61% of PanNETs displayed abnormal telomeres that are characteristic of a telomerase-independent telomere maintenance mechanism termed ALT (alternative lengthening of telomeres). All of the PanNETs exhibiting these abnormal telomeres had ATRX or DAXX mutations or loss of nuclear ATRX or DAXX protein. ATRX mutations also correlate with abnormal telomeres in tumors of the central nervous system. These data suggest that an alternative telomere maintenance function may operate in human tumors with alterations in the ATRX or DAXX genes.

  3. Altered oncomodules underlie chromatin regulatory factors driver mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigola, Joan; Iturbide, Ane; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria; Peiro, Sandra; Gonzalez-Perez, Abel

    2016-05-24

    Chromatin regulatory factors (CRFs), are known to be involved in tumorigenesis in several cancer types. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms through which driver alterations of CRFs cause tumorigenesis remain unknown. Here, we developed a CRFs Oncomodules Discovery approach, which mines several sources of cancer genomics and perturbaomics data. The approach prioritizes sets of genes significantly miss-regulated in primary tumors (oncomodules) bearing mutations of driver CRFs. We applied the approach to eleven TCGA tumor cohorts and uncovered oncomodules potentially associated to mutations of five driver CRFs in three cancer types. Our results revealed, for example, the potential involvement of the mTOR pathway in the development of tumors with loss-of-function mutations of MLL2 in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. The experimental validation that MLL2 loss-of-function increases the sensitivity of cancer cell lines to mTOR inhibition lends further support to the validity of our approach. The potential oncogenic modules detected by our approach may guide experiments proposing ways to indirectly target driver mutations of CRFs.

  4. Disease-associated mutations that alter the RNA structural ensemble.

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    Matthew Halvorsen

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS often identify disease-associated mutations in intergenic and non-coding regions of the genome. Given the high percentage of the human genome that is transcribed, we postulate that for some observed associations the disease phenotype is caused by a structural rearrangement in a regulatory region of the RNA transcript. To identify such mutations, we have performed a genome-wide analysis of all known disease-associated Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs from the Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD that map to the untranslated regions (UTRs of a gene. Rather than using minimum free energy approaches (e.g. mFold, we use a partition function calculation that takes into consideration the ensemble of possible RNA conformations for a given sequence. We identified in the human genome disease-associated SNPs that significantly alter the global conformation of the UTR to which they map. For six disease-states (Hyperferritinemia Cataract Syndrome, beta-Thalassemia, Cartilage-Hair Hypoplasia, Retinoblastoma, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD, and Hypertension, we identified multiple SNPs in UTRs that alter the mRNA structural ensemble of the associated genes. Using a Boltzmann sampling procedure for sub-optimal RNA structures, we are able to characterize and visualize the nature of the conformational changes induced by the disease-associated mutations in the structural ensemble. We observe in several cases (specifically the 5' UTRs of FTL and RB1 SNP-induced conformational changes analogous to those observed in bacterial regulatory Riboswitches when specific ligands bind. We propose that the UTR and SNP combinations we identify constitute a "RiboSNitch," that is a regulatory RNA in which a specific SNP has a structural consequence that results in a disease phenotype. Our SNPfold algorithm can help identify RiboSNitches by leveraging GWAS data and an analysis of the mRNA structural ensemble.

  5. Disease causing mutations of troponin alter regulated actin state distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalovich, Joseph M

    2012-12-01

    Striated muscle contraction is regulated primarily through the action of tropomyosin and troponin that are bound to actin. Activation requires Ca(2+) binding to troponin and/or binding of high affinity myosin complexes to actin. Mutations within components of the regulatory complex may lead to familial cardiomyopathies and myopathies. In several cases examined, either physiological or pathological changes in troponin alter the distribution among states of actin-tropomyosin-troponin that differ in their abilities to stimulate myosin ATPase activity. These observations open possibilities for managing disorders of the troponin complex. Furthermore, analyses of mutant forms of troponin give insights into the regulation of striated muscle contraction.

  6. The circadian clock mutation alters sleep homeostasis in the mouse.

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    Naylor, E; Bergmann, B M; Krauski, K; Zee, P C; Takahashi, J S; Vitaterna, M H; Turek, F W

    2000-11-01

    The onset and duration of sleep are thought to be primarily under the control of a homeostatic mechanism affected by previous periods of wake and sleep and a circadian timing mechanism that partitions wake and sleep into different portions of the day and night. The mouse Clock mutation induces pronounced changes in overall circadian organization. We sought to determine whether this genetic disruption of circadian timing would affect sleep homeostasis. The Clock mutation affected a number of sleep parameters during entrainment to a 12 hr light/dark (LD 12:12) cycle, when animals were free-running in constant darkness (DD), and during recovery from 6 hr of sleep deprivation in LD 12:12. In particular, in LD 12:12, heterozygous and homozygous Clock mutants slept, respectively, approximately 1 and approximately 2 hr less than wild-type mice, and they had 25 and 51% smaller increases in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep during 24 hr recovery, respectively, than wild-type mice. The effects of the mutation on sleep are not readily attributable to differential entrainment to LD 12:12 because the baseline sleep differences between genotypes were also present when animals were free-running in DD. These results indicate that genetic alterations of the circadian clock system and/or its regulatory genes are likely to have widespread effects on a variety of sleep and wake parameters, including the homeostatic regulation of sleep.

  7. Global Characterization of Protein-Altering Mutations in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    considerably less is known about the contribution of somatic point mutations to the pathogenesis of prostate cancer (3, 4, 8), including those specific somatic...Totowa, NJ), 2nd Ed, pp 3–32. 39. O’Roak BJ, et al. (2011) Exome sequencing in sporadic autism spectrum disorders identifies severe de novo mutations. Nat

  8. Low Genetic Quality Alters Key Dimensions of the Mutational Spectrum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel P Sharp

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mutations affect individual health, population persistence, adaptation, diversification, and genome evolution. There is evidence that the mutation rate varies among genotypes, but the causes of this variation are poorly understood. Here, we link differences in genetic quality with variation in spontaneous mutation in a Drosophila mutation accumulation experiment. We find that chromosomes maintained in low-quality genetic backgrounds experience a higher rate of indel mutation and a lower rate of gene conversion in a manner consistent with condition-based differences in the mechanisms used to repair DNA double strand breaks. These aspects of the mutational spectrum were also associated with body mass, suggesting that the effect of genetic quality on DNA repair was mediated by overall condition, and providing a mechanistic explanation for the differences in mutational fitness decline among these genotypes. The rate and spectrum of substitutions was unaffected by genetic quality, but we find variation in the probability of substitutions and indels with respect to several aspects of local sequence context, particularly GC content, with implications for models of molecular evolution and genome scans for signs of selection. Our finding that the chances of mutation depend on genetic context and overall condition has important implications for how sequences evolve, the risk of extinction, and human health.

  9. Low Genetic Quality Alters Key Dimensions of the Mutational Spectrum

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    Sharp, Nathaniel P.; Agrawal, Aneil F.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations affect individual health, population persistence, adaptation, diversification, and genome evolution. There is evidence that the mutation rate varies among genotypes, but the causes of this variation are poorly understood. Here, we link differences in genetic quality with variation in spontaneous mutation in a Drosophila mutation accumulation experiment. We find that chromosomes maintained in low-quality genetic backgrounds experience a higher rate of indel mutation and a lower rate of gene conversion in a manner consistent with condition-based differences in the mechanisms used to repair DNA double strand breaks. These aspects of the mutational spectrum were also associated with body mass, suggesting that the effect of genetic quality on DNA repair was mediated by overall condition, and providing a mechanistic explanation for the differences in mutational fitness decline among these genotypes. The rate and spectrum of substitutions was unaffected by genetic quality, but we find variation in the probability of substitutions and indels with respect to several aspects of local sequence context, particularly GC content, with implications for models of molecular evolution and genome scans for signs of selection. Our finding that the chances of mutation depend on genetic context and overall condition has important implications for how sequences evolve, the risk of extinction, and human health. PMID:27015430

  10. WRN mutations in Werner syndrome patients: genomic rearrangements, unusual intronic mutations and ethnic-specific alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Katrin; Lee, Lin; Leistritz, Dru F; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Saha, Bidisha; Hisama, Fuki M; Eyman, Daniel K; Lessel, Davor; Nürnberg, Peter; Li, Chumei; Garcia-F-Villalta, María J; Kets, Carolien M; Schmidtke, Joerg; Cruz, Vítor Tedim; Van den Akker, Peter C; Boak, Joseph; Peter, Dincy; Compoginis, Goli; Cefle, Kivanc; Ozturk, Sukru; López, Norberto; Wessel, Theda; Poot, Martin; Ippel, P F; Groff-Kellermann, Birgit; Hoehn, Holger; Martin, George M; Kubisch, Christian; Oshima, Junko

    2010-07-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive segmental progeroid syndrome caused by null mutations at the WRN locus, which codes for a member of the RecQ family of DNA helicases. Since 1988, the International Registry of Werner syndrome had enrolled 130 molecularly confirmed WS cases from among 110 worldwide pedigrees. We now report 18 new mutations, including two genomic rearrangements, a deep intronic mutation resulting in a novel exon, a splice consensus mutation leading to utilization of the nearby splice site, and two rare missense mutations. We also review evidence for founder mutations among various ethnic/geographic groups. Founder WRN mutations had been previously reported in Japan and Northern Sardinia. Our Registry now suggests characteristic mutations originated in Morocco, Turkey, The Netherlands and elsewhere.

  11. Transposon-induced nuclear mutations that alter chloroplast gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkan, A.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this project is to use mutant phenotypes as a guide to nuclear genes that determine the timing and localization of chloroplast development The immediate goals are to identify nuclear mutants with defects in chloroplast gene expression from maize lines harboring active Mu transposons; characterize their phenotypes to determine the precise defect in gene expression; clone several of the most interesting mutations by exploiting the transposon tag; and use the clones to further define the roles of these genes in modulating chloroplast gene expression. Three mutants were described earlier that had global defects in chloroplast gene expression. We have found that two of these mutations are allelic. Both alleles have global defects in chloroplast translation initiation, as revealed by the failure to assemble chloroplast mRNAs into polysomes. We have isolated and characterized three new mutants from Mu lines that have novel defects in chloroplast RNA metabolism. We are now ready to begin the task of cloning several of these genes, by using the Mu transposon tag.

  12. Mutations That Alter the Bacterial Cell Envelope Increase Lipid Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmer, Kimberly C; Zhang, Weiping; Langer, Samantha J; Dohnalkova, Alice C; Hu, Dehong; Lemke, Rachelle A; Piotrowski, Jeff S; Orr, Galya; Noguera, Daniel R; Donohue, Timothy J

    2017-05-23

    Lipids from microbes offer a promising source of renewable alternatives to petroleum-derived compounds. In particular, oleaginous microbes are of interest because they accumulate a large fraction of their biomass as lipids. In this study, we analyzed genetic changes that alter lipid accumulation in Rhodobacter sphaeroides By screening an R. sphaeroides Tn5 mutant library for insertions that increased fatty acid content, we identified 10 high-lipid (HL) mutants for further characterization. These HL mutants exhibited increased sensitivity to drugs that target the bacterial cell envelope and changes in shape, and some had the ability to secrete lipids, with two HL mutants accumulating ~60% of their total lipids extracellularly. When one of the highest-lipid-secreting strains was grown in a fed-batch bioreactor, its lipid content was comparable to that of oleaginous microbes, with the majority of the lipids secreted into the medium. Based on the properties of these HL mutants, we conclude that alterations of the cell envelope are a previously unreported approach to increase microbial lipid production. We also propose that this approach may be combined with knowledge about biosynthetic pathways, in this or other microbes, to increase production of lipids and other chemicals.IMPORTANCE This paper reports on experiments to understand how to increase microbial lipid production. Microbial lipids are often cited as one renewable replacement for petroleum-based fuels and chemicals, but strategies to increase the yield of these compounds are needed to achieve this goal. While lipid biosynthesis is often well understood, increasing yields of these compounds to industrially relevant levels is a challenge, especially since genetic, synthetic biology, or engineering approaches are not feasible in many microbes. We show that altering the bacterial cell envelope can be used to increase microbial lipid production. We also find that the utility of some of these alterations can be

  13. Mutations That Alter the Bacterial Cell Envelope Increase Lipid Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemmer, Kimberly C.; Zhang, Weiping; Langer, Samantha J.; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Hu, Dehong; Lemke, Rachelle A.; Piotrowski, Jeff S.; Orr, Galya; Noguera, Daniel R.; Donohue, Timothy J.; Ruby, Edward G.

    2017-05-23

    ABSTRACT

    Lipids from microbes offer a promising source of renewable alternatives to petroleum-derived compounds. In particular, oleaginous microbes are of interest because they accumulate a large fraction of their biomass as lipids. In this study, we analyzed genetic changes that alter lipid accumulation inRhodobacter sphaeroides. By screening anR. sphaeroidesTn5mutant library for insertions that increased fatty acid content, we identified 10 high-lipid (HL) mutants for further characterization. These HL mutants exhibited increased sensitivity to drugs that target the bacterial cell envelope and changes in shape, and some had the ability to secrete lipids, with two HL mutants accumulating ~60% of their total lipids extracellularly. When one of the highest-lipid-secreting strains was grown in a fed-batch bioreactor, its lipid content was comparable to that of oleaginous microbes, with the majority of the lipids secreted into the medium. Based on the properties of these HL mutants, we conclude that alterations of the cell envelope are a previously unreported approach to increase microbial lipid production. We also propose that this approach may be combined with knowledge about biosynthetic pathways, in this or other microbes, to increase production of lipids and other chemicals.

    IMPORTANCEThis paper reports on experiments to understand how to increase microbial lipid production. Microbial lipids are often cited as one renewable replacement for petroleum-based fuels and chemicals, but strategies to increase the yield of these compounds are needed to achieve this goal. While lipid biosynthesis is often well understood, increasing yields of these compounds to industrially relevant levels is a challenge, especially since genetic, synthetic biology, or engineering approaches are not feasible in many microbes. We show that altering the bacterial cell envelope can be used to increase

  14. Acetylcholinesterase alterations reveal the fitness cost of mutations conferring insecticide resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Zhen

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insecticide resistance is now common in insects due to the frequent use of chemicals to control them, which provides a useful tool to study the adaptation of eukaryotic genome to new environments. Although numerous potential mutations may provide high level of resistance, only few alleles are found in insect natural populations. Then, we hypothesized that only alleles linked to the highest fitness in the absence of insecticide are selected. Results To obtain information on the origin of the fitness of resistant alleles, we studied Drosophila melanogaster acetylcholinesterase, the target of organophosphate and carbamate insecticides. We produced in vitro 15 possible proteins resulting from the combination of the four most frequent mutations and we tested their catalytic activity and enzymatic stability. Mutations affected deacetylation of the enzyme, decreasing or increasing its catalytic efficiency and all mutations diminished the stability of the enzyme. Combination of mutations result to an additive alteration. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the alteration of activity and stability of acetylcholinesterase are at the origin of the fitness cost associated with mutations providing resistance. Magnitude of the alterations was related to the allelic frequency in Drosophila populations suggesting that the fitness cost is the main driving force for the maintenance of resistant alleles in insecticide free conditions.

  15. Mutations That Alter the Bacterial Cell Envelope Increase Lipid Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly C. Lemmer

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Lipids from microbes offer a promising source of renewable alternatives to petroleum-derived compounds. In particular, oleaginous microbes are of interest because they accumulate a large fraction of their biomass as lipids. In this study, we analyzed genetic changes that alter lipid accumulation in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. By screening an R. sphaeroides Tn5 mutant library for insertions that increased fatty acid content, we identified 10 high-lipid (HL mutants for further characterization. These HL mutants exhibited increased sensitivity to drugs that target the bacterial cell envelope and changes in shape, and some had the ability to secrete lipids, with two HL mutants accumulating ~60% of their total lipids extracellularly. When one of the highest-lipid-secreting strains was grown in a fed-batch bioreactor, its lipid content was comparable to that of oleaginous microbes, with the majority of the lipids secreted into the medium. Based on the properties of these HL mutants, we conclude that alterations of the cell envelope are a previously unreported approach to increase microbial lipid production. We also propose that this approach may be combined with knowledge about biosynthetic pathways, in this or other microbes, to increase production of lipids and other chemicals.

  16. WRN mutations in Werner syndrome patients: genomic rearrangements, unusual intronic mutations and ethnic-specific alterations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedrich, K.; Lee, L.; Leistritz, D.F.; Nurnberg, G.; Saha, B.; Hisama, F.M.; Eyman, D.K.; Lessel, D.; Nurnberg, P.; Li, C.; Garcia-F-Villalta, M.J.; Kets, C.M.; Schmidtke, J.; Cruz, V.T.; Akker, P.C. van den; Boak, J.; Peter, D.; Compoginis, G.; Cefle, K.; Ozturk, S.; Lopez, N.; Wessel, T. van; Poot, M.; Ippel, P.F.; Groff-Kellermann, B.; Hoehn, H.; Martin, G.M.; Kubisch, C.; Oshima, J.

    2010-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive segmental progeroid syndrome caused by null mutations at the WRN locus, which codes for a member of the RecQ family of DNA helicases. Since 1988, the International Registry of Werner syndrome had enrolled 130 molecularly confirmed WS cases from among 11

  17. WRN mutations in Werner syndrome patients : genomic rearrangements, unusual intronic mutations and ethnic-specific alterations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedrich, Katrin; Lee, Lin; Leistritz, Dru F.; Nuernberg, Gudrun; Saha, Bidisha; Hisama, Fuki M.; Eyman, Daniel K.; Lessel, Davor; Nuernberg, Peter; Li, Chumei; Garcia-F-Villalta, Maria J.; Kets, Carolien M.; Schmidtke, Joerg; Cruz, Vitor Tedim; Van den Akker, Peter C.; Boak, Joseph; Peter, Dincy; Compoginis, Goli; Cefle, Kivanc; Ozturk, Sukru; Lopez, Norberto; Wessel, Theda; Poot, Martin; Ippel, P. F.; Groff-Kellermann, Birgit; Hoehn, Holger; Martin, George M.; Kubisch, Christian; Oshima, Junko

    2010-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive segmental progeroid syndrome caused by null mutations at the WRN locus, which codes for a member of the RecQ family of DNA helicases. Since 1988, the International Registry of Werner syndrome had enrolled 130 molecularly confirmed WS cases from among 11

  18. Mutations in HNF1A result in marked alterations of plasma glycan profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thanabalasingham, Gaya; Huffman, Jennifer E; Kattla, Jayesh J

    2013-01-01

    A recent genome-wide association study identified hepatocyte nuclear factor 1-α (HNF1A) as a key regulator of fucosylation. We hypothesized that loss-of-function HNF1A mutations causal for maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) would display altered fucosylation of N-linked glycans on plasma...

  19. PIK3CA Mutation in Colorectal Cancer: Relationship with Genetic and Epigenetic Alterations

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    Katsuhiko Nosho

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Somatic PIK3CA mutations are often present in colorectal cancer. Mutant PIK3CA activates AKT signaling, which up-regulates fatty acid synthase (FASN. Microsatellite instability (MSI and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP are important molecular classifiers in colorectal cancer. However, the relationship between PIK3CA mutation, MSI and CIMP remains uncertain. Using Pyrosequencing technology, we detected PIK3CA mutations in 91 (15% of 590 population-based colorectal cancers. To determine CIMP status, we quantified DNA methylation in eight CIMP-specific promoters [CACNA1G, CDKN2A (p16, CRABP1, IGF2, MLH1, NEUROG1, RUNX3, and SOCS1] by real-time polymerase chain reaction (MethyLight. PIK3CA mutation was significantly associated with mucinous tumors [P = .0002; odds ratio (OR = 2.44], KRAS mutation (P < .0001; OR = 2.68, CIMP-high (P = .03; OR = 2.08, phospho–ribosomal protein S6 expression (P = .002; OR = 2.19, and FASN expression (P = .02; OR = 1.85 and inversely with p53 expression (P = .01; OR = 0.54 and β-catenin (CTNNB1 alteration (P = .004; OR = 0.43. In addition, PIK3CA G-to-A mutations were associated with MGMT loss (P = .001; OR = 3.24 but not with MGMT promoter methylation. In conclusion, PIK3CA mutation is significantly associated with other key molecular events in colorectal cancer, and MGMT loss likely contributes to the development of PIK3CA G>A mutation. In addition, Pyrosequencing is useful in detecting PIK3CA mutation in archival paraffin tumor tissue. PIK3CA mutational data further emphasize heterogeneity of colorectal cancer at the molecular level.

  20. Alterations in bile acid synthesis in carriers of hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α mutations.

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    Ekholm, E; Nilsson, R; Groop, L; Pramfalk, C

    2013-09-01

    Heterozygous mutations in hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α (HNF1α) cause maturity onset diabetes of the young 3 (MODY3), an autosomal dominant form of diabetes. Deficiency of HNF1α in mice results in diabetes, hypercholesterolaemia and increased bile acid (BA) and cholesterol synthesis. Little is known about alterations in lipid metabolism in patients with MODY3. The aim of this study was to investigate whether patients with MODY3 have altered cholesterol and BA synthesis and intestinal cholesterol absorption. A secondary aim was to investigate the effects of HNF1α mutations on the transcriptional regulation of BA metabolism. Plasma biomarkers of BA and cholesterol synthesis and intestinal cholesterol absorption were measured in patients with MODY3 (n = 19) and in matched healthy control subjects (n = 15). Cotransfection experiments were performed with several promoters involved in BA metabolism along with expression vectors carrying the mutations found in these patients. Plasma analysis showed higher levels of BA synthesis in patients with MODY3. No differences were observed in cholesterol synthesis or intestinal cholesterol absorption. Cotransfection experiments showed that one of the mutations (P379A) increased the induction of the cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase promoter compared with HNF1α, without further differences in other studied promoters. By contrast, the other four mutations (L107I, T260M, P291fsinsC and R131Q) reduced the induction of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) promoter, which was followed by reduced repression of the small heterodimer partner promoter. In addition, these mutations also reduced the induction of the apical sodium-dependent bile salt transporter promoter. BA synthesis is increased in patients with MODY3 compared with control subjects. Mutations in HNF1α affect promoters involved in BA metabolism. © 2013 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  1. A Mouse Neurodegenerative Dynein Heavy Chain Mutation Alters Dynein Motility and Localization in Neurospora crassa

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    Sivagurunathan, Senthilkumar; Schnittker, Robert R.; Nandini, Swaran; Plamann, Michael D.; King, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is responsible for the transport and delivery of cargoes in organisms ranging from humans to fungi. Dysfunction of dynein motor machinery due to mutations in dynein or its activating complex dynactin can result in one of several neurological diseases in mammals. The mouse Legs at odd angles (Loa) mutation in the tail domain of the dynein heavy chain has been shown to lead to progressive neurodegeneration in mice. The mechanism by which the Loa mutation affects dynein function is just beginning to be understood. In this work, we generated the dynein tail mutation observed in Loa mice into the Neurospora crassa genome and utilized cell biological and complementing biochemical approaches to characterize how that tail mutation affected dynein function. We determined that the Loa mutation exhibits several subtle defects upon dynein function in N. crassa that were not seen in mice, including alterations in dynein localization, impaired velocity of vesicle transport, and in the biochemical properties of purified motors. Our work provides new information on the role of the tail domain on dynein function and points out areas of future research that will be of interest to pursue in mammalian systems. PMID:22991199

  2. Disease-associated mutation in SRSF2 misregulates splicing by altering RNA-binding affinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Lieu, Yen K; Ali, Abdullah M; Penson, Alex; Reggio, Kathryn S; Rabadan, Raul; Raza, Azra; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Manley, James L

    2015-08-25

    Serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 2 (SRSF2) is an RNA-binding protein that plays important roles in splicing of mRNA precursors. SRSF2 mutations are frequently found in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and certain leukemias, but how these mutations affect SRSF2 function has only begun to be examined. We used clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein-9 nuclease to introduce the P95H mutation to SRSF2 in K562 leukemia cells, generating an isogenic model so that splicing alterations can be attributed solely to mutant SRSF2. We found that SRSF2 (P95H) misregulates 548 splicing events (RNA gel shift assays showed that a mutant SRSF2 derivative bound more tightly than its wild-type counterpart to RNA sites containing UCCAG but bound less tightly to UGGAG sites. Thus in most cases the pattern of exon inclusion or exclusion correlated with stronger or weaker RNA binding, respectively. We further show that the P95H mutation does not affect other functions of SRSF2, i.e., protein-protein interactions with key splicing factors. Our results thus demonstrate that the P95H mutation positively or negatively alters the binding affinity of SRSF2 for cognate RNA sites in target transcripts, leading to misregulation of exon inclusion. Our findings shed light on the mechanism of the disease-associated SRSF2 mutation in splicing regulation and also reveal a group of misspliced mRNA isoforms for potential therapeutic targeting.

  3. Altered proliferation and differentiation properties of primary mammary epithelial cells from BRCA1 mutation carriers.

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    Burga, Laura N; Tung, Nadine M; Troyan, Susan L; Bostina, Mihnea; Konstantinopoulos, Panagiotis A; Fountzilas, Helena; Spentzos, Dimitrios; Miron, Alexander; Yassin, Yosuf A; Lee, Bernard T; Wulf, Gerburg M

    2009-02-15

    Female BRCA1 mutation carriers have a nearly 80% probability of developing breast cancer during their life-time. We hypothesized that the breast epithelium at risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers harbors mammary epithelial cells (MEC) with altered proliferation and differentiation properties. Using a three-dimensional culture technique to grow MECs ex vivo, we found that the ability to form colonies, an indication of clonality, was restricted to the aldehyde dehydrogenase 1-positive fraction in MECs but not in HCC1937 BRCA1-mutant cancer cells. Primary MECs from BRCA1 mutation carriers (n = 9) had a 28% greater ability for clonal growth compared with normal controls (n = 6; P = 0.006), and their colonies were significantly larger. Colonies in controls and BRCA1 mutation carriers stained positive for BRCA1 by immunohistochemistry, and 79% of the examined single colonies from BRCA1 carriers retained heterozygosity for BRCA1 (ROH). Colonies from BRCA1 mutation carriers frequently showed high epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression (71% EGFR positive versus 44% in controls) and were negative for estrogen receptor (ERalpha; 32% ER negative, 44% mixed, 24% ER positive versus 90% ER positive in controls). Expression of CK14 and p63 were not significantly different. Microarray studies revealed that colonies from BRCA1-mutant PMECs anticipate expression profiles found in BRCA1-related tumors, and that the EGFR pathway is up-regulated. We conclude that BRCA1 haploinsufficiency leads to an increased ability for clonal growth and proliferation in the PMECs of BRCA1 mutation carriers, possibly as a result of EGFR pathway activation. These altered growth and differentiation properties may render BRCA1-mutant PMECs vulnerable to transformation and predispose to the development of ER-negative, EGFR-positive breast cancers.

  4. Dynamin GTPase Regulation is Altered by PH Domain Mutations Found in Centronuclear Myopathy Patients

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    Kenniston, J.; Lemmon, M

    2010-01-01

    The large GTPase dynamin has an important membrane scission function in receptor-mediated endocytosis and other cellular processes. Self-assembly on phosphoinositide-containing membranes stimulates dynamin GTPase activity, which is crucial for its function. Although the pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain is known to mediate phosphoinositide binding by dynamin, it remains unclear how this promotes activation. Here, we describe studies of dynamin PH domain mutations found in centronuclear myopathy (CNM) that increase dynamin's GTPase activity without altering phosphoinositide binding. CNM mutations in the PH domain C-terminal {alpha}-helix appear to cause conformational changes in dynamin that alter control of the GTP hydrolysis cycle. These mutations either 'sensitize' dynamin to lipid stimulation or elevate basal GTPase rates by promoting self-assembly and thus rendering dynamin no longer lipid responsive. We also describe a low-resolution structure of dimeric dynamin from small-angle X-ray scattering that reveals conformational changes induced by CNM mutations, and defines requirements for domain rearrangement upon dynamin self-assembly at membrane surfaces. Our data suggest that changes in the PH domain may couple lipid binding to dynamin GTPase activation at sites of vesicle invagination.

  5. Disseminated glioneuronal tumors occurring in childhood: treatment outcomes and BRAF alterations including V600E mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodgshun, Andrew J; SantaCruz, Nadine; Hwang, Jaeho; Ramkissoon, Shakti H; Malkin, Hayley; Bergthold, Guillaume; Manley, Peter; Chi, Susan; MacGregor, Duncan; Goumnerova, Liliana; Sullivan, Michael; Ligon, Keith; Beroukhim, Rameen; Herrington, Betty; Kieran, Mark W; Hansford, Jordan R; Bandopadhayay, Pratiti

    2016-06-01

    Disseminated glioneuronal tumors of childhood are rare. We present a retrospective IRB-approved review of the clinical course and frequency of BRAF mutations in disseminated glioneuronal tumors at two institutions. Defining features of our cohort include diffuse leptomeningeal-spread, often with a discrete spinal cord nodule and oligodendroglioma-like histologic features. Patients were identified through a pathology database search of all cases with disseminated low-grade neoplasms with an oligodendroglioma-like component. De-identified clinical information was collected by chart review and all imaging was reviewed. We retrieved the results of targeted genomic analyses for alterations in BRAF. Ten patients (aged 2-14 years) were identified from the Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Hospital and the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne pathology databases. Nine patients received chemotherapy. Eight patients are alive, although three have had episodes of progressive disease. We identified genomic alterations affecting the MAPK pathway in six patients. One patient had a germline RAF1 mutation and a clinical diagnosis of cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome. BRAF duplications were identified in four and BRAF V600E mutation was identified in one. These data support the presence of targetable genomic alterations in this disease.

  6. Altered Chromosomal Positioning, Compaction, and Gene Expression with a Lamin A/C Gene Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuisneineh, Fida; Fahrenbach, John P.; Zhang, Yuan; MacLeod, Heather; Dellefave, Lisa; Pytel, Peter; Selig, Sara; Labno, Christine M.; Reddy, Karen; Singh, Harinder; McNally, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Background Lamins A and C, encoded by the LMNA gene, are filamentous proteins that form the core scaffold of the nuclear lamina. Dominant LMNA gene mutations cause multiple human diseases including cardiac and skeletal myopathies. The nuclear lamina is thought to regulate gene expression by its direct interaction with chromatin. LMNA gene mutations may mediate disease by disrupting normal gene expression. Methods/Findings To investigate the hypothesis that mutant lamin A/C changes the lamina's ability to interact with chromatin, we studied gene misexpression resulting from the cardiomyopathic LMNA E161K mutation and correlated this with changes in chromosome positioning. We identified clusters of misexpressed genes and examined the nuclear positioning of two such genomic clusters, each harboring genes relevant to striated muscle disease including LMO7 and MBNL2. Both gene clusters were found to be more centrally positioned in LMNA-mutant nuclei. Additionally, these loci were less compacted. In LMNA mutant heart and fibroblasts, we found that chromosome 13 had a disproportionately high fraction of misexpressed genes. Using three-dimensional fluorescence in situ hybridization we found that the entire territory of chromosome 13 was displaced towards the center of the nucleus in LMNA mutant fibroblasts. Additional cardiomyopathic LMNA gene mutations were also shown to have abnormal positioning of chromosome 13, although in the opposite direction. Conclusions These data support a model in which LMNA mutations perturb the intranuclear positioning and compaction of chromosomal domains and provide a mechanism by which gene expression may be altered. PMID:21179469

  7. Altered chromosomal positioning, compaction, and gene expression with a lamin A/C gene mutation.

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    Stephanie K Mewborn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lamins A and C, encoded by the LMNA gene, are filamentous proteins that form the core scaffold of the nuclear lamina. Dominant LMNA gene mutations cause multiple human diseases including cardiac and skeletal myopathies. The nuclear lamina is thought to regulate gene expression by its direct interaction with chromatin. LMNA gene mutations may mediate disease by disrupting normal gene expression. METHODS/FINDINGS: To investigate the hypothesis that mutant lamin A/C changes the lamina's ability to interact with chromatin, we studied gene misexpression resulting from the cardiomyopathic LMNA E161K mutation and correlated this with changes in chromosome positioning. We identified clusters of misexpressed genes and examined the nuclear positioning of two such genomic clusters, each harboring genes relevant to striated muscle disease including LMO7 and MBNL2. Both gene clusters were found to be more centrally positioned in LMNA-mutant nuclei. Additionally, these loci were less compacted. In LMNA mutant heart and fibroblasts, we found that chromosome 13 had a disproportionately high fraction of misexpressed genes. Using three-dimensional fluorescence in situ hybridization we found that the entire territory of chromosome 13 was displaced towards the center of the nucleus in LMNA mutant fibroblasts. Additional cardiomyopathic LMNA gene mutations were also shown to have abnormal positioning of chromosome 13, although in the opposite direction. CONCLUSIONS: These data support a model in which LMNA mutations perturb the intranuclear positioning and compaction of chromosomal domains and provide a mechanism by which gene expression may be altered.

  8. Laminin gene LAMB4 is somatically mutated and expressionally altered in gastric and colorectal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Mi Ryoung; An, Chang Hyeok; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Laminins are important in tumor invasion and metastasis as well as in maintenance of normal epithelial cell structures. However, mutation status of laminin chain-encoding genes remains unknown in cancers. Aim of this study was to explore whether laminin chain genes are mutated and expressionally altered in gastric (GC) and colorectal cancers (CRC). In a public database, we found that laminin chain genes LAMA1, LAMA3, LAMB1 and LAMB4 had mononucleotide repeats in the coding sequences that might be mutation targets in the cancers with microsatellite instability (MSI). We analyzed the genes in 88 GC and 139 CRC [high MSI (MSI-H) or stable MSI/low MSI (MSS/MSI-L)] by single strand conformation polymorphism analysis and DNA sequencing. In the present study, we found LAMB4 (11.8% of GC and 7.6% of CRC with MSI-H), LAMA3 (2.9% of GC and 2.5 of CRC with MSI-H), LAMA1 (5.9% of GC with MSI-H) and LAMB1 frameshift mutations (1.3% of CRC with MSI-H). These mutations were not found in MSS/MSI-L (0/114). We also analyzed LAMB4 expression in GC and CRC by immunohistochemistry. Loss of LAMB4 expression was identified in 17-32% of the GC and CRC. Of note, the loss expression was more common in the cancers with LAMB4 mutation or those with MSI-H. Our data show that frameshift mutations of LAMA1, LAMA3, LAMB1 and LAMB4, and loss of LAMB4 may be features of GC and CRC with MSI-H.

  9. Comprehensive genomic analysis of malignant pleural mesothelioma identifies recurrent mutations, gene fusions and splicing alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Raphael; Stawiski, Eric W; Goldstein, Leonard D; Durinck, Steffen; De Rienzo, Assunta; Modrusan, Zora; Gnad, Florian; Nguyen, Thong T; Jaiswal, Bijay S; Chirieac, Lucian R; Sciaranghella, Daniele; Dao, Nhien; Gustafson, Corinne E; Munir, Kiara J; Hackney, Jason A; Chaudhuri, Amitabha; Gupta, Ravi; Guillory, Joseph; Toy, Karen; Ha, Connie; Chen, Ying-Jiun; Stinson, Jeremy; Chaudhuri, Subhra; Zhang, Na; Wu, Thomas D; Sugarbaker, David J; de Sauvage, Frederic J; Richards, William G; Seshagiri, Somasekar

    2016-04-01

    We analyzed transcriptomes (n = 211), whole exomes (n = 99) and targeted exomes (n = 103) from 216 malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) tumors. Using RNA-seq data, we identified four distinct molecular subtypes: sarcomatoid, epithelioid, biphasic-epithelioid (biphasic-E) and biphasic-sarcomatoid (biphasic-S). Through exome analysis, we found BAP1, NF2, TP53, SETD2, DDX3X, ULK2, RYR2, CFAP45, SETDB1 and DDX51 to be significantly mutated (q-score ≥ 0.8) in MPMs. We identified recurrent mutations in several genes, including SF3B1 (∼2%; 4/216) and TRAF7 (∼2%; 5/216). SF3B1-mutant samples showed a splicing profile distinct from that of wild-type tumors. TRAF7 alterations occurred primarily in the WD40 domain and were, except in one case, mutually exclusive with NF2 alterations. We found recurrent gene fusions and splice alterations to be frequent mechanisms for inactivation of NF2, BAP1 and SETD2. Through integrated analyses, we identified alterations in Hippo, mTOR, histone methylation, RNA helicase and p53 signaling pathways in MPMs.

  10. UBIAD1 mutation alters a mitochondrial prenyltransferase to cause Schnyder corneal dystrophy.

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    Michael L Nickerson

    Full Text Available Mutations in a novel gene, UBIAD1, were recently found to cause the autosomal dominant eye disease Schnyder corneal dystrophy (SCD. SCD is characterized by an abnormal deposition of cholesterol and phospholipids in the cornea resulting in progressive corneal opacification and visual loss. We characterized lesions in the UBIAD1 gene in new SCD families and examined protein homology, localization, and structure.We characterized five novel mutations in the UBIAD1 gene in ten SCD families, including a first SCD family of Native American ethnicity. Examination of protein homology revealed that SCD altered amino acids which were highly conserved across species. Cell lines were established from patients including keratocytes obtained after corneal transplant surgery and lymphoblastoid cell lines from Epstein-Barr virus immortalized peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These were used to determine the subcellular localization of mutant and wild type protein, and to examine cholesterol metabolite ratios. Immunohistochemistry using antibodies specific for UBIAD1 protein in keratocytes revealed that both wild type and N102S protein were localized sub-cellularly to mitochondria. Analysis of cholesterol metabolites in patient cell line extracts showed no significant alteration in the presence of mutant protein indicating a potentially novel function of the UBIAD1 protein in cholesterol biochemistry. Molecular modeling was used to develop a model of human UBIAD1 protein in a membrane and revealed potentially critical roles for amino acids mutated in SCD. Potential primary and secondary substrate binding sites were identified and docking simulations indicated likely substrates including prenyl and phenolic molecules.Accumulating evidence from the SCD familial mutation spectrum, protein homology across species, and molecular modeling suggest that protein function is likely down-regulated by SCD mutations. Mitochondrial UBIAD1 protein appears to have a highly

  11. Leukemia-Associated Mutations in Nucleophosmin Alter Recognition by CRM1: Molecular Basis of Aberrant Transport.

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    Igor Arregi

    Full Text Available Nucleophosmin (NPM is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein, normally enriched in nucleoli, that performs several activities related to cell growth. NPM mutations are characteristic of a subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML, where mutant NPM seems to play an oncogenic role. AML-associated NPM mutants exhibit altered subcellular traffic, being aberrantly located in the cytoplasm of leukoblasts. Exacerbated export of AML variants of NPM is mediated by the nuclear export receptor CRM1, and due, in part, to a mutationally acquired novel nuclear export signal (NES. To gain insight on the molecular basis of NPM transport in physiological and pathological conditions, we have evaluated the export efficiency of NPM in cells, and present new data indicating that, in normal conditions, wild type NPM is weakly exported by CRM1. On the other hand, we have found that AML-associated NPM mutants efficiently form complexes with CRM1HA (a mutant CRM1 with higher affinity for NESs, and we have quantitatively analyzed CRM1HA interaction with the NES motifs of these mutants, using fluorescence anisotropy and isothermal titration calorimetry. We have observed that the affinity of CRM1HA for these NESs is similar, which may help to explain the transport properties of the mutants. We also describe NPM recognition by the import machinery. Our combined cellular and biophysical studies shed further light on the determinants of NPM traffic, and how it is dramatically altered by AML-related mutations.

  12. Nucleosome alterations caused by mutations at modifiable histone residues in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

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    Liu, Hongde; Wang, Pingyan; Liu, Lingjie; Min, Zhu; Luo, Kun; Wan, Yakun

    2015-10-26

    Nucleosome organization exhibits dynamic properties depending on the cell state and environment. Histone proteins, fundamental components of nucleosomes, are subject to chemical modifications on particular residues. We examined the effect of substituting modifiable residues of four core histones with the non-modifiable residue alanine on nucleosome dynamics. We mapped the genome-wide nucleosomes in 22 histone mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and compared the nucleosome alterations relative to the wild-type strain. Our results indicated that different types of histone mutation resulted in different phenotypes and a distinct reorganization of nucleosomes. Nucleosome occupancy was altered at telomeres, but not at centromeres. The first nucleosomes upstream (-1) and downstream (+1) of the transcription start site (TSS) were more dynamic than other nucleosomes. Mutations in histones affected the nucleosome array downstream of the TSS. Highly expressed genes, such as ribosome genes and genes involved in glycolysis, showed increased nucleosome occupancy in many types of histone mutant. In particular, the H3K56A mutant exhibited a high percentage of dynamic genomic regions, decreased nucleosome occupancy at telomeres, increased occupancy at the +1 and -1 nucleosomes, and a slow growth phenotype under stress conditions. Our findings provide insight into the influence of histone mutations on nucleosome dynamics.

  13. Mutations in the catalytic loop HRD motif alter the activity and function of Drosophila Src64.

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    Taylor C Strong

    Full Text Available The catalytic loop HRD motif is found in most protein kinases and these amino acids are predicted to perform functions in catalysis, transition to, and stabilization of the active conformation of the kinase domain. We have identified mutations in a Drosophila src gene, src64, that alter the three HRD amino acids. We have analyzed the mutants for both biochemical activity and biological function during development. Mutation of the aspartate to asparagine eliminates biological function in cytoskeletal processes and severely reduces fertility, supporting the amino acid's critical role in enzymatic activity. The arginine to cysteine mutation has little to no effect on kinase activity or cytoskeletal reorganization, suggesting that the HRD arginine may not be critical for coordinating phosphotyrosine in the active conformation. The histidine to leucine mutant retains some kinase activity and biological function, suggesting that this amino acid may have a biochemical function in the active kinase that is independent of its side chain hydrogen bonding interactions in the active site. We also describe the phenotypic effects of other mutations in the SH2 and tyrosine kinase domains of src64, and we compare them to the phenotypic effects of the src64 null allele.

  14. Alterations in lipid signaling underlie lipodystrophy secondary to AGPAT2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subauste, Angela R; Das, Arun K; Li, Xiangquan; Elliott, Brandon G; Elliot, Brandon; Evans, Charles; El Azzouny, Mahmoud; Treutelaar, Mary; Oral, Elif; Leff, Todd; Burant, Charles F

    2012-11-01

    Congenital generalized lipodystrophy (CGL), secondary to AGPAT2 mutation is characterized by the absence of adipocytes and development of severe insulin resistance. In the current study, we investigated the adipogenic defect associated with AGPAT2 mutations. Adipogenesis was studied in muscle-derived multipotent cells (MDMCs) isolated from vastus lateralis biopsies obtained from controls and subjects harboring AGPAT2 mutations and in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes after knockdown or overexpression of AGPAT2. We demonstrate an adipogenic defect using MDMCs from control and CGL human subjects with mutated AGPAT2. This defect was rescued in CGL MDMCs with a retrovirus expressing AGPAT2. Both CGL-derived MDMCs and 3T3-L1 cells with knockdown of AGPAT2 demonstrated an increase in cell death after induction of adipogenesis. Lack of AGPAT2 activity reduces Akt activation, and overexpression of constitutively active Akt can partially restore lipogenesis. AGPAT2 modulated the levels of phosphatidic acid, lysophosphatidic acid, phosphatidylinositol species, as well as the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) inhibitor cyclic phosphatidic acid. The PPARγ agonist pioglitazone partially rescued the adipogenic defect in CGL cells. We conclude that AGPAT2 regulates adipogenesis through the modulation of the lipome, altering normal activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and PPARγ pathways in the early stages of adipogenesis.

  15. The Z Mutation Alters the Global Structural Dynamics of α1-Antitrypsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Victoria A.; Meklemburg, Robert; Bottomley, Stephen P.; Wintrode, Patrick L.

    2014-01-01

    α1-Antitrypsin (α1AT) deficiency, the most common serpinopathy, results in both emphysema and liver disease. Over 90% of all clinical cases of α1AT deficiency are caused by the Z variant in which Glu342, located at the top of s5A, is replaced by a Lys which results in polymerization both in vivo and in vitro. The Glu342Lys mutation removes a salt bridge and a hydrogen bond but does not effect the thermodynamic stability of Z α1AT compared to the wild type protein, M α1AT, and so it is unclear why Z α1AT has an increased polymerization propensity. We speculated that the loss of these interactions would make the native state of Z α1AT more dynamic than M α1AT and that this change renders the protein more polymerization prone. We have used hydrogen/deuterium exchange combined with mass spectrometry (HXMS) to determine the structural and dynamic differences between native Z and M α1AT to reveal the molecular basis of Z α1AT polymerization. Our HXMS data shows that the Z mutation significantly perturbs the region around the site of mutation. Strikingly the Z mutation also alters the dynamics of regions distant to the mutation such as the B, D and I helices and specific regions of each β-sheet. These changes in global dynamics may lead to an increase in the likelihood of Z α1AT sampling a polymerogenic structure thereby causing disease. PMID:25181470

  16. The Z mutation alters the global structural dynamics of α1-antitrypsin.

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    Victoria A Hughes

    Full Text Available α1-Antitrypsin (α1AT deficiency, the most common serpinopathy, results in both emphysema and liver disease. Over 90% of all clinical cases of α1AT deficiency are caused by the Z variant in which Glu342, located at the top of s5A, is replaced by a Lys which results in polymerization both in vivo and in vitro. The Glu342Lys mutation removes a salt bridge and a hydrogen bond but does not effect the thermodynamic stability of Z α1AT compared to the wild type protein, M α1AT, and so it is unclear why Z α1AT has an increased polymerization propensity. We speculated that the loss of these interactions would make the native state of Z α1AT more dynamic than M α1AT and that this change renders the protein more polymerization prone. We have used hydrogen/deuterium exchange combined with mass spectrometry (HXMS to determine the structural and dynamic differences between native Z and M α1AT to reveal the molecular basis of Z α1AT polymerization. Our HXMS data shows that the Z mutation significantly perturbs the region around the site of mutation. Strikingly the Z mutation also alters the dynamics of regions distant to the mutation such as the B, D and I helices and specific regions of each β-sheet. These changes in global dynamics may lead to an increase in the likelihood of Z α1AT sampling a polymerogenic structure thereby causing disease.

  17. Frequent alteration of MLL3 frameshift mutations in microsatellite deficient colorectal cancer.

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    Yoshiyuki Watanabe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MLL3 is a histone 3-lysine 4 methyltransferase with tumor-suppressor properties that belongs to a family of chromatin regulator genes potentially altered in neoplasia. Mutations in MLL3 were found in a whole genome analysis of colorectal cancer but have not been confirmed by a separate study. METHODS AND RESULTS: We analyzed mutations of coding region and promoter methylation in MLL3 using 126 cases of colorectal cancer. We found two isoforms of MLL3 and DNA sequencing revealed frameshift and other mutations affecting both isoforms of MLL3 in colorectal cancer cells and 19 of 134 (14% primary colorectal samples analyzed. Moreover, frameshift mutations were more common in cases with microsatellite instability (31% both in CRC cell lines and primary tumors. The largest isoform of MLL3 is transcribed from a CpG island-associated promoter that has highly homology with a pseudo-gene on chromosome 22 (psiTPTE22. Using an assay which measured both loci simultaneously we found prominent age related methylation in normal colon (from 21% in individuals less than 25 years old to 56% in individuals older than 70, R = 0.88, p<0.001 and frequent hypermethylation (83% in both CRC cell lines and primary tumors. We next studied the two loci separately and found that age and cancer related methylation was solely a property of the pseudogene CpG island and that the MLL3 loci was unmethylated. CONCLUSIONS: We found that frameshift mutations of MLL3 in both CRC cells and primary tumor that were more common in cases with microsatellite instability. Moreover, we have shown CpG island-associated promoter of MLL3 gene has no DNA methylation in CRC cells but also primary tumor and normal colon, and this region has a highly homologous of pseudo gene (psiTPTE22 that was age relate DNA methylation.

  18. Myocardial structural alteration and systolic dysfunction in preclinical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation carriers.

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    Kai Hang Yiu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To evaluate the presence of myocardial structural alterations and subtle myocardial dysfunction during familial screening in asymptomatic mutation carriers without hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM phenotype. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Sixteen HCM families with pathogenic mutation were studied and 46 patients with phenotype expression (Mut+/Phen+ and 47 patients without phenotype expression (Mut+/Phen- were observed. Twenty-five control subjects, matched with the Mut+/Phen- group, were recruited for comparison. Echocardiography was performed to evaluate conventional parameters, myocardial structural alteration by calibrated integrated backscatter (cIBS and global and segmental longitudinal strain by speckle tracking analysis. All 3 groups had similar left ventricular dimensions and ejection fraction. Basal anteroseptal cIBS was the highest in Mut+/Phen+ patients (-14.0±4.6 dB, p-19.0 dB basal anteroseptal cIBS or >-18.0% basal anteroseptal longitudinal strain had a sensitivity of 98% and a specificity of 72% in differentiating Mut+/Phen- group from controls. CONCLUSION: The use of cIBS and segmental longitudinal strain can differentiate HCM Mut+/Phen- patients from controls with important clinical implications for the family screening and follow-up of these patients.

  19. Fgf9 (Y162C) Mutation Alters Information Processing and Social Memory in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Lillian; Becker, Lore; Rozman, Jan; Puk, Oliver; Stoeger, Tobias; Yildirim, Ali Önder; Bohla, Alexander; Eickelberg, Oliver; Hans, Wolfgang; Prehn, Cornelia; Adamski, Jerzy; Klopstock, Thomas; Rácz, Ildikó; Zimmer, Andreas; Klingenspor, Martin; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Wurst, Wolfgang; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Graw, Jochen; Hölter, Sabine M

    2017-07-10

    In neuropsychiatric diseases, such as major depression and anxiety, pathogenic vulnerability is partially dictated by a genetic predisposition. The search continues to define this genetic susceptibility and establish new genetic elements as potential therapeutic targets. The fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) could be interesting in this regard. This family of signaling molecules plays important roles in development while also functioning within the adult. This includes effects on aspects of brain function such as neurogenesis and synapse formation. Of this family, Fgf9 is expressed in the adult brain, but its functional role is less well defined. In this study, we examined the role of Fgf9 in different brain functions by analyzing the behavior of Fgf9 (Y162C) mutant mice, an Fgf9 allele without the confounding systemic effects of other Fgf9 genetic models. Here, we show that this mutation caused altered locomotor and exploratory reactivity to novel, mildly stressful environments. In addition, mutants showed heightened acoustic startle reactivity as well as impaired social discrimination memory. Notably, there was a substantial decrease in the level of adult olfactory bulb neurogenesis with no difference in hippocampal neurogenesis. Collectively, our findings indicate a role for the Fgf9 (Y162C) mutation in information processing and perception of aversive situations as well as in social memory. Thus, genetic alterations in Fgf9 could increase vulnerability to developing neuropsychiatric disease, and we propose the Fgf9 (Y162C) mutant mice as a valuable tool to study the predictive etiological aspects.

  20. Pathogenic LRRK2 mutations do not alter gene expression in cell model systems or human brain tissue.

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    Michael J Devine

    Full Text Available Point mutations in LRRK2 cause autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease. Despite extensive efforts to determine the mechanism of cell death in patients with LRRK2 mutations, the aetiology of LRRK2 PD is not well understood. To examine possible alterations in gene expression linked to the presence of LRRK2 mutations, we carried out a case versus control analysis of global gene expression in three systems: fibroblasts isolated from LRRK2 mutation carriers and healthy, non-mutation carrying controls; brain tissue from G2019S mutation carriers and controls; and HEK293 inducible LRRK2 wild type and mutant cell lines. No significant alteration in gene expression was found in these systems following correction for multiple testing. These data suggest that any alterations in basal gene expression in fibroblasts or cell lines containing mutations in LRRK2 are likely to be quantitatively small. This work suggests that LRRK2 is unlikely to play a direct role in modulation of gene expression, although it remains possible that this protein can influence mRNA expression under pathogenic cicumstances.

  1. Mutation in the myelin proteolipid protein gene alters BK and SK channel function in the caudal medulla

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer, Catherine A.; Macklin, Wendy B.; Avishai, Nanthawan; Balan, Kannan; Wilson, Christopher G.; Miller, Martha J.

    2009-01-01

    Proteolipid protein (Plp) gene mutation in rodents causes severe CNS dysmyelination, early death, and lethal hypoxic ventilatory depression (Miller et al. 2004). To determine if Plp mutation alters neuronal function critical for control of breathing, the nucleus tractus solitarii (nTS) of four rodent strains were studied: myelin deficient rats (MD), myelin synthesis deficient (Plpmsd), and Plpnull mice, as well as shiverer (Mbpshi) mice, a myelin basic protein mutant. Current-voltage relation...

  2. Mutations That Alter Use of Hepatitis C Virus Cell Entry Factors Mediate Escape From Neutralizing Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    FAUVELLE, CATHERINE; ZAHID, MUHAMMAD NAUMAN; TUREK, MARINE; HEYDMANN, LAURA; CURY, KARINE; HAYER, JULIETTE; COMBET, CHRISTOPHE; COSSET, FRANÇOIS–LOÏC; PIETSCHMANN, THOMAS; HIET, MARIE–SOPHIE; BARTENSCHLAGER, RALF; HABERSETZER, FRANÇOIS; DOFFOËL, MICHEL; KECK, ZHEN–YONG; FOUNG, STEVEN K. H.; ZEISEL, MIRJAM B.; STOLL–KELLER, FRANÇOISE; BAUMERT, THOMAS F.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS The development of vaccines and other strategies to prevent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is limited by rapid viral evasion. HCV entry is the first step of infection; this process involves several viral and host factors and is targeted by host-neutralizing responses. Although the roles of host factors in HCV entry have been well characterized, their involvement in evasion of immune responses is poorly understood. We used acute infection of liver graft as a model to investigate the molecular mechanisms of viral evasion. METHODS We studied factors that contribute to evasion of host immune responses using patient-derived antibodies, HCV pseudoparticles, and cell culture–derived HCV that express viral envelopes from patients who have undergone liver transplantation. These viruses were used to infect hepatoma cell lines that express different levels of HCV entry factors. RESULTS By using reverse genetic analyses, we identified altered use of host-cell entry factors as a mechanism by which HCV evades host immune responses. Mutations that alter use of the CD81 receptor also allowed the virus to escape neutralizing antibodies. Kinetic studies showed that these mutations affect virus–antibody interactions during postbinding steps of the HCV entry process. Functional studies with a large panel of patient-derived antibodies showed that this mechanism mediates viral escape, leading to persistent infection in general. CONCLUSIONS We identified a mechanism by which HCV evades host immune responses, in which use of cell entry factors evolves with escape from neutralizing antibodies. These findings advance our understanding of the pathogenesis of HCV infection and might be used to develop antiviral strategies and vaccines. PMID:22503792

  3. Familial Alzheimer's disease mutations differentially alter amyloid β-protein oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessel, Megan Murray; Bernstein, Summer; Kemper, Martin; Teplow, David B; Bowers, Michael T

    2012-11-21

    Although most cases of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are sporadic, ∼5% of cases are genetic in origin. These cases, known as familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD), are caused by mutations that alter the rate of production or the primary structure of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ). Changes in the primary structure of Aβ alter the peptide's assembly and toxic activity. Recently, a primary working hypothesis for AD has evolved where causation has been attributed to early, soluble peptide oligomer states. Here we posit that both experimental and pathological differences between FAD-related mutants and wild-type Aβ could be reflected in the early oligomer distributions of these peptides. We use ion mobility-based mass spectrometry to probe the structure and early aggregation states of three mutant forms of Aβ40 and Aβ42: Tottori (D7N), Flemish (A21G), and Arctic (E22G). Our results indicate that the FAD-related amino acid substitutions have no noticeable effect on Aβ monomer cross section, indicating there are no major structural changes in the monomers. However, we observe significant changes to the aggregation states populated by the various Aβ mutants, indicating that structural changes present in the monomers are reflected in the oligomers. Moreover, the early oligomer distributions differ for each mutant, suggesting a possible structural basis for the varied pathogenesis of different forms of FAD.

  4. Rare mutations of CACNB2 found in autism spectrum disease-affected families alter calcium channel function.

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    Alexandra F S Breitenkamp

    Full Text Available Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD are complex neurodevelopmental diseases clinically defined by dysfunction of social interaction. Dysregulation of cellular calcium homeostasis might be involved in ASD pathogenesis, and genes coding for the L-type calcium channel subunits CaV1.2 (CACNA1C and CaVβ2 (CACNB2 were recently identified as risk loci for psychiatric diseases. Here, we present three rare missense mutations of CACNB2 (G167S, S197F, and F240L found in ASD-affected families, two of them described here for the first time (G167S and F240L. All these mutations affect highly conserved regions while being absent in a sample of ethnically matched controls. We suggest the mutations to be of physiological relevance since they modulate whole-cell Ba2+ currents through calcium channels when expressed in a recombinant system (HEK-293 cells. Two mutations displayed significantly decelerated time-dependent inactivation as well as increased sensitivity of voltage-dependent inactivation. In contrast, the third mutation (F240L showed significantly accelerated time-dependent inactivation. By altering the kinetic parameters, the mutations are reminiscent of the CACNA1C mutation causing Timothy Syndrome, a Mendelian disease presenting with ASD. In conclusion, the results of our first-time biophysical characterization of these three rare CACNB2 missense mutations identified in ASD patients support the hypothesis that calcium channel dysfunction may contribute to autism.

  5. High burden of copy number alterations and c-MYC amplification in prostate cancer from BRCA2 germline mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castro, E.; Jugurnauth-Little, S.; Karlsson, Q.; Al-Shahrour, F.; Pineiro-Yanez, E.; Van de Poll, F.; Leongamornlert, D.; Dadaev, T.; Govindasami, K.; Guy, M.; Eeles, R.; Kote-Jarai, Z.; Oosterwijk, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Germline BRCA2 mutations are associated with poorer outcome prostate cancer ( PCa) compared with sporadic tumours but this association remains to be characterised. In this study, we aim to assess if there is a signature set of copy number alterations ( CNA) that could aid to the identifi

  6. CBL is frequently altered in lung cancers: its relationship to mutations in MET and EGFR tyrosine kinases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hung Carol Tan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is a heterogeneous group of disorders with a number of genetic and proteomic alterations. c-CBL is an E3 ubiquitin ligase and adaptor molecule important in normal homeostasis and cancer. We determined the genetic variations of c-CBL, relationship to receptor tyrosine kinases (EGFR and MET, and functionality in NSCLC. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using archival formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE extracted genomic DNA, we show that c-CBL mutations occur in somatic fashion for lung cancers. c-CBL mutations were not mutually exclusive of MET or EGFR mutations; however they were independent of p53 and KRAS mutations. In normal/tumor pairwise analysis, there was significant loss of heterozygosity (LOH for the c-CBL locus (22%, n = 8/37 and none of these samples revealed any mutation in the remaining copy of c-CBL. The c-CBL LOH also positively correlated with EGFR and MET mutations observed in the same samples. Using select c-CBL somatic mutations such as S80N/H94Y, Q249E and W802* (obtained from Caucasian, Taiwanese and African-American samples, respectively transfected in NSCLC cell lines, there was increased cell viability and cell motility. CONCLUSIONS: Taking the overall mutation rate of c-CBL to be a combination as somatic missense mutation and LOH, it is clear that c-CBL is highly mutated in lung cancers and may play an essential role in lung tumorigenesis and metastasis.

  7. Activating Akt1 mutations alter DNA double strand break repair and radiosensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeck, S.; Al-Refae, K.; Riffkin, H.; Wiel, G.; Handrick, R.; Klein, D.; Iliakis, G.; Jendrossek, V.

    2017-01-01

    The survival kinase Akt has clinical relevance to radioresistance. However, its contributions to the DNA damage response, DNA double strand break (DSB) repair and apoptosis remain poorly defined and often contradictory. We used a genetic approach to explore the consequences of genetic alterations of Akt1 for the cellular radiation response. While two activation-associated mutants with prominent nuclear access, the phospho-mimicking Akt1-TDSD and the clinically relevant PH-domain mutation Akt1-E17K, accelerated DSB repair and improved survival of irradiated Tramp-C1 murine prostate cancer cells and Akt1-knockout murine embryonic fibroblasts in vitro, the classical constitutively active membrane-targeted myrAkt1 mutant had the opposite effects. Interestingly, DNA-PKcs directly phosphorylated Akt1 at S473 in an in vitro kinase assay but not vice-versa. Pharmacological inhibition of DNA-PKcs or Akt restored radiosensitivity in tumour cells expressing Akt1-E17K or Akt1-TDSD. In conclusion, Akt1-mediated radioresistance depends on its activation state and nuclear localization and is accessible to pharmacologic inhibition. PMID:28209968

  8. Protein kinase C gamma mutations in spinocerebellar ataxia 14 increase kinase activity and alter membrane targeting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, D. S.; Knight, M. A.; Harmison, G. G.; Fischbeck, K. H.; Howell, B. W.

    2005-01-01

    The protein kinase C gamma (PKCgamma) gene is mutated in spinocerebellar ataxia type 14 (SCA14). In this study, we investigated the effects of two SCA14 missense mutations, G118D and C150F, on PKCgamma function. We found that these mutations increase the intrinsic activity of PKCgamma. Direct visual

  9. Identification of an mtDNA mutation hot spot in UV-induced mouse skin tumors producing altered cellular biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandova, Jana; Eshaghian, Alex; Shi, Mingjian; Li, Meiling; King, Lloyd E; Janda, Jaroslav; Sligh, James E

    2012-02-01

    There is increasing awareness of the role of mtDNA alterations in the development of cancer, as mtDNA point mutations are found at high frequency in a variety of human tumors. To determine the biological effects of mtDNA mutations in UV-induced skin tumors, hairless mice were irradiated to produce tumors, and the tumor mtDNAs were screened for single-nucleotide changes using temperature gradient capillary electrophoresis (TGCE), followed by direct sequencing. A mutation hot spot (9821insA) in the mitochondrially encoded tRNA arginine (mt-Tr) locus (tRNA(Arg)) was discovered in approximately one-third of premalignant and malignant skin tumors. To determine the functional relevance of this particular mutation in vitro, cybrid cell lines containing different mt-Tr (tRNA(Arg)) alleles were generated. The resulting cybrid cell lines contained the same nuclear genotype and differed only in their mtDNAs. The biochemical analysis of the cybrids revealed that the mutant haplotype is associated with diminished levels of complex I protein (CI), resulting in lower levels of baseline oxygen consumption and lower cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. We hypothesize that this specific mtDNA mutation alters cellular biochemistry, supporting the development of keratinocyte neoplasia.

  10. Significance of somatic mutations and content alteration of mitochondrial DNA in esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yu-Fen

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The roles of mitochondria in energy metabolism, the generation of ROS, aging, and the initiation of apoptosis have implicated their importance in tumorigenesis. In this study we aim to establish the mutation spectrum and to understand the role of somatic mtDNA mutations in esophageal cancer. Methods The entire mitochondrial genome was screened for somatic mutations in 20 pairs (18 esophageal squamous cell carcinomas, one adenosquamous carcinoma and one adenocarcinoma of tumor/surrounding normal tissue of esophageal cancers, using temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE, followed by direct DNA sequencing to identify the mutations. Results Fourteen somatic mtDNA mutations were identified in 55% (11/20 of tumors analyzed, including 2 novel missense mutations and a frameshift mutation in ND4L, ATP6 subunit, and ND4 genes respectively. Nine mutations (64% were in the D-loop region. Numerous germline variations were found, at least 10 of them were novel and five were missense mutations, some of them occurred in evolutionarily conserved domains. Using real-time quantitative PCR analysis, the mtDNA content was found to increase in some tumors and decrease in others. Analysis of molecular and other clinicopathological findings does not reveal significant correlation between somatic mtDNA mutations and mtDNA content, or between mtDNA content and metastatic status. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that somatic mtDNA mutations in esophageal cancers are frequent. Some missense and frameshift mutations may play an important role in the tumorigenesis of esophageal carcinoma. More extensive biochemical and molecular studies will be necessary to determine the pathological significance of these somatic mutations.

  11. Mutation of senataxin alters disease-specific transcriptional networks in patients with ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Brent L; Cho, Ellen; Wahnich, Amanda; Gao, Fuying; Becherel, Olivier J; Wang, Xizhe; Fike, Francesca; Chen, Leslie; Criscuolo, Chiara; De Michele, Giuseppe; Filla, Alessandro; Collins, Abigail; Hahn, Angelika F; Gatti, Richard A; Konopka, Genevieve; Perlman, Susan; Lavin, Martin F; Geschwind, Daniel H; Coppola, Giovanni

    2014-09-15

    Senataxin, encoded by the SETX gene, contributes to multiple aspects of gene expression, including transcription and RNA processing. Mutations in SETX cause the recessive disorder ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2 (AOA2) and a dominant juvenile form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS4). To assess the functional role of senataxin in disease, we examined differential gene expression in AOA2 patient fibroblasts, identifying a core set of genes showing altered expression by microarray and RNA-sequencing. To determine whether AOA2 and ALS4 mutations differentially affect gene expression, we overexpressed disease-specific SETX mutations in senataxin-haploinsufficient fibroblasts and observed changes in distinct sets of genes. This implicates mutation-specific alterations of senataxin function in disease pathogenesis and provides a novel example of allelic neurogenetic disorders with differing gene expression profiles. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) demonstrated these senataxin-associated genes to be involved in both mutation-specific and shared functional gene networks. To assess this in vivo, we performed gene expression analysis on peripheral blood from members of 12 different AOA2 families and identified an AOA2-specific transcriptional signature. WGCNA identified two gene modules highly enriched for this transcriptional signature in the peripheral blood of all AOA2 patients studied. These modules were disease-specific and preserved in patient fibroblasts and in the cerebellum of Setx knockout mice demonstrating conservation across species and cell types, including neurons. These results identify novel genes and cellular pathways related to senataxin function in normal and disease states, and implicate alterations in gene expression as underlying the phenotypic differences between AOA2 and ALS4.

  12. Mutations in XPR1 cause primary familial brain calcification associated with altered phosphate export

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Legati (Andrea); D. Giovannini (Donatella); G. Nicolas (Gaël); U. López-Sánchez (Uriel); B. Quintáns (Beatriz); J.R. Oliveira (Joao); R.L. Sears (Renee L); E.M. Ramos (Eliana Marisa); E. Spiteri (Elizabeth); M.J. Sobrido (Maria); A. Carracedo (Angel); C. Castro-Fernández (Cristina); S. Cubizolle (Stéphanie); B.L. Fogel (Brent L); C. Goizet (Cyril); J.C. Jen (Joanna C); S. Kirdlarp (Suppachok); A.E. Lang (Anthony E); Z. Miedzybrodzka (Zosia); W. Mitarnun (Witoon); M. Paucar (Martin); H.L. Paulson (Henry); J. Pariente (Jérémie); A.-C. Richard (Anne-Claire); N.S. Salins (Naomi S); S.A. Simpson (Sheila A); P. Striano (Pasquale); P. Svenningsson (Per); F. Tison (François); V.K. Unni (Vivek K); O. Vanakker (Olivier); M.W. Wessels (Marja); S. Wetchaphanphesat (Suppachok); M. Yang (Michele); F. Boller (Francois); D. Campion (Dominique); D. Hannequin (Didier); M. Sitbon (Marc); H. Geschwind; J.-L. Battini (Jean-Luc); D. Coppola (Domenico)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractPrimary familial brain calcification (PFBC) is a neurological disease characterized by calcium phosphate deposits in the basal ganglia and other brain regions and has thus far been associated with SLC20A2, PDGFB or PDGFRB mutations. We identified in multiple families with PFBC mutations

  13. Cellular hyper-excitability caused by mutations that alter the activation process of voltage-gated sodium channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed-Yassine eAMAROUCH

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav are widely expressed as macro-molecular complexes in both excitable and non-excitable tissues. In excitable tissues, the upstroke of the action potential is the result of the passage of a large and rapid influx of sodium ions through these channels. NaV dysfunction has been associated with an increasingly wide range of neurological, muscular and cardiac disorders. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recently identified sodium channel mutations that are linked to hyper-excitability phenotypes and associated with the alteration of the activation process of voltage gated sodium channels. Indeed, several clinical manifestations that demonstrate an alteration of tissue excitability were recently shown to be strongly associated with the presence of mutations that affect the activation process of the voltage-gated sodium channels. These emerging genotype-phenotype correlations have expanded the clinical spectrum of sodium channelopathies to include disorders which feature a hyper-excitability phenotype that may or may not be associated with a cardiomyopathy. The p.I141V mutation in SCN4A and SCN5A, as well as its homologous p.I136V mutation in SCN9A, are interesting examples of mutations that have been linked to inherited hyperexcitability myotonia, exercise-induced polymorphic ventricular arrhythmias and erythromelalgia, respectively. Regardless of which sodium channel isoform is investigated, the substitution of the isoleucine to valine in the locus 141 induces similar modifications in the biophysical properties of the voltage-gated sodium channels by shifting the voltage-dependence of steady state activation towards more negative potentials.

  14. TGFBR2 mutations alter smooth muscle cell phenotype and predispose to thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamoto, Sakiko; Kwartler, Callie S.; Lafont, Andrea L.; Liang, Yao Yun; Fadulu, Van Tran; Duraisamy, Senthil; Willing, Marcia; Estrera, Anthony; Safi, Hazim; Hannibal, Mark C.; Carey, John; Wiktorowicz, John; Tan, Filemon K.; Feng, Xin-Hua; Pannu, Hariyadarshi; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2010-01-01

    Aims Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling is critical for the differentiation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) into quiescent cells expressing a full repertoire of contractile proteins. Heterozygous mutations in TGF-β receptor type II (TGFBR2) disrupt TGF-β signaling and lead to genetic conditions that predispose to thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAADs). The aim of this study is to determine the molecular mechanism by which TGFBR2 mutations cause TAADs. Methods and results Using aortic SMCs explanted from patients with TGFBR2 mutations, we show decreased expression of SMC contractile proteins compared with controls. Exposure to TGF-β1 fails to increase expression of contractile genes in mutant SMCs, whereas control cells further increase expression of these genes. Analysis of fixed and frozen aortas from patients with TGFBR2 mutations confirms decreased in vivo expression of contractile proteins relative to unaffected aortas. Fibroblasts explanted from patients with TGFBR2 mutations fail to transform into mature myofibroblasts with TGF-β1 stimulation as assessed by expression of contractile proteins. Conclusions These data support the conclusion that heterozygous TGFBR2 mutations lead to decreased expression of SMC contractile protein in both SMCs and myofibroblasts. The failure of TGFBR2-mutant SMCs to fully express SMC contractile proteins predicts defective contractile function in these cells and aligns with a hypothesis that defective SMC contractile function contributes to the pathogenesis of TAAD. PMID:20628007

  15. Alterations of the IKBKG locus and diseases: an update and a report of 13 novel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Francesca; Pescatore, Alessandra; Bal, Elodie; Ghoul, Aida; Paciolla, Mariateresa; Lioi, Maria Brigida; D'Urso, Michele; Rabia, Smail Hadj; Bodemer, Christine; Bonnefont, Jean Paul; Munnich, Arnold; Miano, Maria Giuseppina; Smahi, Asma; Ursini, Matilde Valeria

    2008-05-01

    Mutations in the inhibitor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells, kinase gamma (IKBKG), also called nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kB) essential modulator (NEMO), gene are the most common single cause of incontinentia pigmenti (IP) in females and anhydrotic ectodermal dysplasia with immunodeficiency (EDA-ID) in males. The IKBKG gene, located in the Xq28 chromosomal region, encodes for the regulatory subunit of the inhibitor of kappaB (IkB) kinase (IKK) complex required for the activation of the NF-kB pathway. Therefore, the remarkably heterogeneous and often severe clinical presentation reported in IP is due to the pleiotropic role of this signaling transcription pathway. A recurrent exon 4_10 genomic rearrangement in the IKBKG gene accounts for 60 to 80% of IP-causing mutations. Besides the IKBKG rearrangement found in IP females (which is lethal in males), a total of 69 different small mutations (missense, frameshift, nonsense, and splice-site mutations) have been reported, including 13 novel ones in this work. The updated distribution of all the IP- and EDA-ID-causing mutations along the IKBKG gene highlights a secondary hotspot mutation in exon 10, which contains only 11% of the protein. Furthermore, familial inheritance analysis revealed an unexpectedly high incidence of sporadic cases (>65%). The sum of the observations can aid both in determining the molecular basis of IP and EDA-ID allelic diseases, and in genetic counseling in affected families.

  16. Alterations in Epidermal Eicosanoid Metabolism Contribute to Inflammation and Impaired Late Differentiation in FLG-Mutated Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blunder, Stefan; Rühl, Ralph; Moosbrugger-Martinz, Verena; Krimmel, Christine; Geisler, Anita; Zhu, Huiting; Crumrine, Debra; Elias, Peter M; Gruber, Robert; Schmuth, Matthias; Dubrac, Sandrine

    2017-03-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the FLG gene cause ichthyosis vulgaris (IV) and represent the major predisposing genetic risk factor for atopic dermatitis (AD). Although both conditions are characterized by epidermal barrier impairment, AD also exhibits signs of inflammation. This work was aimed at delineating the role of FLG loss-of-function mutations on eicosanoid metabolism in IV and AD. Using human epidermal equivalents (HEEs) generated with keratinocytes isolated from nonlesional skin of patients with FLG wild-type AD (WT/WT), FLG-mutated AD (FLG/WT), IV (FLG/FLG), or FLG WT control skin, we assessed the potential autocrine role of epidermal-derived eicosanoids in FLG-associated versus FLG-WT AD pathogenesis. Ultrastructural analyses demonstrated abnormal stratum corneum lipid architecture in AD and IV HEEs, independent of FLG genotype. Both AD (FLG/WT) and IV (FLG/FLG) HEEs showed impaired late epidermal differentiation. Only AD (FLG/WT) HEEs exhibited significantly increased levels of inflammatory cytokines. Analyses of lipid mediators revealed increased arachidonic acid and 12-lipoxygenase metabolites. Whereas treatment of control HEEs with arachidonic acid increased expression of inflammatory cytokines, 12-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid attenuated expression of late differentiation markers. Thus, FLG mutations lead to alterations in epidermal eicosanoid metabolism that could serve as an autocrine trigger of inflammation and impaired late epidermal differentiation in AD.

  17. An altered GABA-A receptor function in spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 and familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 associated with the CACNA1A gene mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Kono

    2014-12-01

    General significance: An altered GABA-A receptor function has previously been reported in models of inherited murine cerebellar ataxia caused by a mutation in the CACNA1A gene. This study showed novel clinical characteristics of alteration in the GABA-A receptor in vivo, which may provide clinical evidence indicating a pathological mechanism common to neurological disorders associated with CACNA1A gene mutation.

  18. A pan-cancer analysis of transcriptome changes associated with somatic mutations in U2AF1 reveals commonly altered splicing events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela N Brooks

    Full Text Available Although recurrent somatic mutations in the splicing factor U2AF1 (also known as U2AF35 have been identified in multiple cancer types, the effects of these mutations on the cancer transcriptome have yet to be fully elucidated. Here, we identified splicing alterations associated with U2AF1 mutations across distinct cancers using DNA and RNA sequencing data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA. Using RNA-Seq data from 182 lung adenocarcinomas and 167 acute myeloid leukemias (AML, in which U2AF1 is somatically mutated in 3-4% of cases, we identified 131 and 369 splicing alterations, respectively, that were significantly associated with U2AF1 mutation. Of these, 30 splicing alterations were statistically significant in both lung adenocarcinoma and AML, including three genes in the Cancer Gene Census, CTNNB1, CHCHD7, and PICALM. Cell line experiments expressing U2AF1 S34F in HeLa cells and in 293T cells provide further support that these altered splicing events are caused by U2AF1 mutation. Consistent with the function of U2AF1 in 3' splice site recognition, we found that S34F/Y mutations cause preferences for CAG over UAG 3' splice site sequences. This report demonstrates consistent effects of U2AF1 mutation on splicing in distinct cancer cell types.

  19. The APP670/671 mutation alters calcium signaling and response to hyperosmotic stress in rat primary hippocampal neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kloskowska, Ewa; Bruton, Joseph D; Winblad, Bengt;

    2008-01-01

    on the effect of the APP670/671 mutation on spontaneous calcium oscillations in embryonic hippocampal neurons derived from the tg6590 transgenic rat. Intracellular free calcium levels were imaged by confocal microscopy using the fluorescent dye fluo-3AM. Hyperosmotic shrinkage, which can occur in a variety......Altered calcium homeostasis is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and much effort has been put into understanding the association between the autosomal dominant gene mutations causative of this devastating disease and perturbed calcium signaling. We have focused our attention...... of pathophysiological conditions, has been shown to induce multiple cellular responses, including activation of volume-regulatory ion transport, cytoskeletal reorganization, and cell death. When exposed to hyperosmotic stress (addition of 50mM sucrose) the frequency of calcium oscillations was suppressed to an equal...

  20. Hepatitis E virus mutations associated with ribavirin treatment failure result in altered viral fitness and ribavirin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debing, Yannick; Ramière, Christophe; Dallmeier, Kai; Piorkowski, Géraldine; Trabaud, Mary-Anne; Lebossé, Fanny; Scholtès, Caroline; Roche, Magali; Legras-Lachuer, Catherine; de Lamballerie, Xavier; André, Patrice; Neyts, Johan

    2016-09-01

    Ribavirin monotherapy is the preferred treatment for chronic hepatitis E, although occasional treatment failure occurs. We present a patient with chronic hepatitis E experiencing ribavirin treatment failure with a completely resistant phenotype. We aimed to identify viral mutations associated with treatment failure and explore the underlying mechanisms. Viral genomes were deep-sequenced at different time points and the role of identified mutations was assessed in vitro using mutant replicons, antiviral assays, cell culture of patient-derived virus and deep-sequencing. Ribavirin resistance was associated with Y1320H, K1383N and G1634R mutations in the viral polymerase, but also an insertion in the hypervariable region comprising a duplication and a polymerase-derived fragment. Analysis of these genome alterations in vitro revealed replication-increasing roles for Y1320H and G1634R mutations and the hypervariable region insertion. In contrast, the K1383N mutation in the polymerase F1-motif suppressed viral replication and increased the in vitro sensitivity to ribavirin, contrary to the clinical phenotype. Analysis of the replication of mutant full-length virus and in vitro culturing of patient-derived virus confirmed that sensitivity to ribavirin was retained. Finally, deep-sequencing of hepatitis E virus genomes revealed that ribavirin is mutagenic to viral replication in vitro and in vivo. Mutations Y1320H, G1634R and the hypervariable region insertion compensated for K1383N-associated replication defects. The specific role of the K1383N mutation remains enigmatic, but it appears to be of importance for the ribavirin resistant phenotype in this patient. Ribavirin is the most common treatment for chronic hepatitis E and is mostly effective, although some cases of ribavirin treatment failure have been described. Here, we report on a particular case of ribavirin resistance and investigate the underlying causes of treatment failure. Mutations in the viral polymerase

  1. IDH1 mutations alter citric acid cycle metabolism and increase dependence on oxidative mitochondrial metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassian, Alexandra R; Parker, Seth J; Davidson, Shawn M; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Green, Courtney R; Zhang, Xiamei; Slocum, Kelly L; Pu, Minying; Lin, Fallon; Vickers, Chad; Joud-Caldwell, Carol; Chung, Franklin; Yin, Hong; Handly, Erika D; Straub, Christopher; Growney, Joseph D; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Murphy, Anne N; Pagliarini, Raymond; Metallo, Christian M

    2014-06-15

    Oncogenic mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) occur in several types of cancer, but the metabolic consequences of these genetic changes are not fully understood. In this study, we performed (13)C metabolic flux analysis on a panel of isogenic cell lines containing heterozygous IDH1/2 mutations. We observed that under hypoxic conditions, IDH1-mutant cells exhibited increased oxidative tricarboxylic acid metabolism along with decreased reductive glutamine metabolism, but not IDH2-mutant cells. However, selective inhibition of mutant IDH1 enzyme function could not reverse the defect in reductive carboxylation activity. Furthermore, this metabolic reprogramming increased the sensitivity of IDH1-mutant cells to hypoxia or electron transport chain inhibition in vitro. Lastly, IDH1-mutant cells also grew poorly as subcutaneous xenografts within a hypoxic in vivo microenvironment. Together, our results suggest therapeutic opportunities to exploit the metabolic vulnerabilities specific to IDH1 mutation. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. A mutation in TRPV4 results in altered chondrocyte calcium signaling in severe metatropic dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd, Lauren; Kirwin, Susan M; Boggs, Mary; Mackenzie, William G; Bober, Michael B; Funanage, Vicky L; Duncan, Randall L

    2015-10-01

    Transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 4 (TRPV4) is a polymodal modulated non-selective cation channel required for normal development and maintenance of bone and cartilage. Heterozygous mutations of this channel cause a variety of channelopathies, including metatropic dysplasia (MD). We analyzed the effect of a novel TRPV4 mutation c.2398G>A, p.Gly800Asp on intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+) ]i ) regulation in chondrocytes and compared this response to chondrocytes with a frequently observed mutation, c.2396C>T, p.Pro799Leu. We observed temperature-dependent [Ca(2+) ]i oscillations in both intact and MD chondrocytes however, MD mutations exhibited increased peak magnitudes of [Ca(2+) ]i during oscillations. We also found increased baseline [Ca(2+) ]i in MD primary cells, as well as increased [Ca(2+) ]i response to either hypotonic swelling or the TRVP4-specific agonist, GSK1016790A. Oscillations and stimulation responses were blocked with the TRPV4-specific antagonist, GSK205. Analysis of [Ca(2+) ]i response kinetics showed that MD chondrocytes had increased frequency of temperature-sensitive oscillations, and the magnitude and duration of [Ca(2+) ]i responses to given stimuli. Duration of the response of the p.Gly800Asp mutation to stimulation was greater than for the p.Pro799Leu mutation. These experiments show that this region of the channel is essential for proper [Ca(2+) ]i regulation. These studies of primary cells from patients show how both mutant and WT TRPV4 channels regulate cartilage and bone development. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Histone H3K36 mutations promote sarcomagenesis through altered histone methylation landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chao; Jain, Siddhant U.; Hoelper, Dominik; Bechet, Denise; Molden, Rosalynn C.; Ran, Leili; Murphy, Devan; Venneti, Sriram; Hameed, Meera; Pawel, Bruce R.; Wunder, Jay S.; Dickson, Brendan C.; Lundgren, Stefan M.; Jani, Krupa S.; De Jay, Nicolas; Papillon-Cavanagh, Simon; Andrulis, Irene L.; Sawyer, Sarah L.; Grynspan, David; Turcotte, Robert E.; Nadaf, Javad; Fahiminiyah, Somayyeh; Muir, Tom W.; Majewski, Jacek; Thompson, Craig B.; Chi, Ping; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Allis, C. David; Jabado, Nada; Lewis, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    Several types of pediatric cancers reportedly contain high frequency missense mutations in histone H3, yet the underlying oncogenic mechanism remains poorly characterized. Here, we report that the H3 lysine 36 to methionine (H3K36M) mutation impairs the differentiation of mesenchymal progenitor cells and generates undifferentiated sarcoma in vivo. H3K36M mutant nucleosomes inhibit the enzymatic activities of several H3K36 methyltransferases. Depleting H3K36 methyltransferases, or expressing an H3K36I mutant that similarly inhibits H3K36 methylation, is sufficient to phenocopy the H3K36M mutation. Following the loss of H3K36 methylation, a genome-wide gain in H3K27 methylation leads to a redistribution of Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 and de-repression of its target genes known to block mesenchymal differentiation. Our findings are mirrored in human undifferentiated sarcomas where novel K36M/I mutations in H3.1 are identified. PMID:27174990

  4. A novel splicing mutation alters DSPP transcription and leads to dentinogenesis imperfecta type II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    Full Text Available Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI type II is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by a serious disorders in teeth. Mutations of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP gene were revealed to be the causation of DGI type II (DGI-II. In this study, we identified a novel mutation (NG_011595.1:g.8662T>C, c.135+2T>C lying in the splice donor site of intron 3 of DSPP gene in a Chinese Han DGI-II pedigree. It was found in all affected subjects but not in unaffected ones or other unrelated healthy controls. The function of the mutant DSPP gene, which was predicted online and subsequently confirmed by in vitro splicing analysis, was the loss of splicing of intron 3, leading to the extended length of DSPP mRNA. For the first time, the functional non-splicing of intron was revealed in a novel DSPP mutation and was considered as the causation of DGI-II. It was also indicated that splicing was of key importance to the function of DSPP and this splice donor site might be a sensitive mutation hot spot. Our findings combined with other reports would facilitate the genetic diagnosis of DGI-II, shed light on its gene therapy and help to finally conquer human diseases.

  5. A novel splicing mutation alters DSPP transcription and leads to dentinogenesis imperfecta type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Wang, Jiucun; Ma, Yanyun; Du, Wenqi; Zhao, Siyang; Zhang, Zuowei; Zhang, Xiaojiao; Liu, Yue; Xiao, Huasheng; Wang, Hongyan; Jin, Li; Liu, Jie

    2011-01-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) type II is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by a serious disorders in teeth. Mutations of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene were revealed to be the causation of DGI type II (DGI-II). In this study, we identified a novel mutation (NG_011595.1:g.8662T>C, c.135+2T>C) lying in the splice donor site of intron 3 of DSPP gene in a Chinese Han DGI-II pedigree. It was found in all affected subjects but not in unaffected ones or other unrelated healthy controls. The function of the mutant DSPP gene, which was predicted online and subsequently confirmed by in vitro splicing analysis, was the loss of splicing of intron 3, leading to the extended length of DSPP mRNA. For the first time, the functional non-splicing of intron was revealed in a novel DSPP mutation and was considered as the causation of DGI-II. It was also indicated that splicing was of key importance to the function of DSPP and this splice donor site might be a sensitive mutation hot spot. Our findings combined with other reports would facilitate the genetic diagnosis of DGI-II, shed light on its gene therapy and help to finally conquer human diseases.

  6. Isolated NIBPL missense mutations that cause Cornelia de Lange syndrome alter MAU2 interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunholz, Diana; Hullings, Melanie; Gil-Rodríguez, María Concepcion; Fincher, Christopher T; Mallozzi, Mark B; Loy, Elizabeth; Albrecht, Melanie; Kaur, Maninder; Limon, Janusz; Rampuria, Abhinav; Clark, Dinah; Kline, Antonie; Dalski, Andreas; Eckhold, Juliane; Tzschach, Andreas; Hennekam, Raoul; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Wierzba, Jolanta; Krantz, Ian D; Deardorff, Matthew A; Kaiser, Frank J

    2012-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS; or Brachmann-de Lange syndrome) is a dominantly inherited congenital malformation disorder with features that include characteristic facies, cognitive delays, growth retardation and limb anomalies. Mutations in nearly 60% of CdLS patients have been identified in NIPBL, which encodes a regulator of the sister chromatid cohesion complex. NIPBL, also known as delangin, is a homolog of yeast and amphibian Scc2 and C. elegans PQN-85. Although the exact mechanism of NIPBL function in sister chromatid cohesion is unclear, in vivo yeast and C. elegans experiments and in vitro vertebrate cell experiments have demonstrated that NIPBL/Scc2 functionally interacts with the MAU2/Scc4 protein to initiate loading of cohesin onto chromatin. To test the significance of this model in the clinical setting of CdLS, we fine-mapped the NIBPL–MAU2 interaction domain and tested the functional significance of missense mutations and variants in NIPBL and MAU2 identified in these minimal domains in a cohort of patients with CdLS. We demonstrate that specific novel mutations at the N-terminus of the MAU2-interacting domain of NIBPL result in markedly reduced MAU2 binding, although we appreciate no consistent clinical difference in the small group of patients with these mutations. These data suggest that factors in addition to MAU2 are essential in determining the clinical features and severity of CdLS. PMID:21934712

  7. Convergence of mutation and epigenetic alterations identifies common genes in cancer that predict for poor prognosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy A Chan

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The identification and characterization of tumor suppressor genes has enhanced our understanding of the biology of cancer and enabled the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic modalities. Whereas in past decades, a handful of tumor suppressors have been slowly identified using techniques such as linkage analysis, large-scale sequencing of the cancer genome has enabled the rapid identification of a large number of genes that are mutated in cancer. However, determining which of these many genes play key roles in cancer development has proven challenging. Specifically, recent sequencing of human breast and colon cancers has revealed a large number of somatic gene mutations, but virtually all are heterozygous, occur at low frequency, and are tumor-type specific. We hypothesize that key tumor suppressor genes in cancer may be subject to mutation or hypermethylation. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Here, we show that combined genetic and epigenetic analysis of these genes reveals many with a higher putative tumor suppressor status than would otherwise be appreciated. At least 36 of the 189 genes newly recognized to be mutated are targets of promoter CpG island hypermethylation, often in both colon and breast cancer cell lines. Analyses of primary tumors show that 18 of these genes are hypermethylated strictly in primary cancers and often with an incidence that is much higher than for the mutations and which is not restricted to a single tumor-type. In the identical breast cancer cell lines in which the mutations were identified, hypermethylation is usually, but not always, mutually exclusive from genetic changes for a given tumor, and there is a high incidence of concomitant loss of expression. Sixteen out of 18 (89% of these genes map to loci deleted in human cancers. Lastly, and most importantly, the reduced expression of a subset of these genes strongly correlates with poor clinical outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Using an unbiased genome

  8. L1198F Mutation Resensitizes Crizotinib to ALK by Altering the Conformation of Inhibitor and ATP Binding Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Sun, Rong; Wu, Yuehong; Song, Mingzhu; Li, Jia; Yang, Qianye; Chen, Xiaoyi; Bao, Jinku; Zhao, Qi

    2017-02-24

    The efficacy of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatment with small molecule inhibitors is greatly challenged by acquired resistance. A recent study reported the newest generation inhibitor resistant mutation L1198F led to the resensitization to crizotinib, which is the first Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drug for the treatment of ALK-positive NSCLC. It is of great importance to understand how this extremely rare event occurred for the purpose of overcoming the acquired resistance of such inhibitors. In this study, we exploited molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to dissect the molecular mechanisms. Our MD results revealed that L1198F mutation of ALK resulted in the conformational change at the inhibitor site and altered the binding affinity of ALK to crizotinib and lorlatinib. L1198F mutation also affected the autoactivation of ALK as supported by the identification of His1124 and Tyr1278 as critical amino acids involved in ATP binding and phosphorylation. Our findings are valuable for designing more specific and potent inhibitors for the treatment of ALK-positive NSCLC and other types of cancer.

  9. L1198F Mutation Resensitizes Crizotinib to ALK by Altering the Conformation of Inhibitor and ATP Binding Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Li

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK positive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC treatment with small molecule inhibitors is greatly challenged by acquired resistance. A recent study reported the newest generation inhibitor resistant mutation L1198F led to the resensitization to crizotinib, which is the first Food and Drug Administration (FDA approved drug for the treatment of ALK-positive NSCLC. It is of great importance to understand how this extremely rare event occurred for the purpose of overcoming the acquired resistance of such inhibitors. In this study, we exploited molecular dynamics (MD simulation to dissect the molecular mechanisms. Our MD results revealed that L1198F mutation of ALK resulted in the conformational change at the inhibitor site and altered the binding affinity of ALK to crizotinib and lorlatinib. L1198F mutation also affected the autoactivation of ALK as supported by the identification of His1124 and Tyr1278 as critical amino acids involved in ATP binding and phosphorylation. Our findings are valuable for designing more specific and potent inhibitors for the treatment of ALK-positive NSCLC and other types of cancer.

  10. Biophysical analysis of a lethal laminin alpha-1 mutation reveals altered self-interaction

    KAUST Repository

    Patel, Trushar R.

    2015-07-26

    Laminins are key basement membrane molecules that influence several biological activities and are linked to a number of diseases. They are secreted as heterotrimeric proteins consisting of one α, one β, and one γ chain, followed by their assembly into a polymer-like sheet at the basement membrane. Using sedimentation velocity, dynamic light scattering, and surface plasmon resonance experiments, we studied self-association of three laminin (LM) N-terminal fragments α-1 (hLM α-1 N), α-5 (hLM α-5 N) and β-3 (hLM β-3 N) originating from the short arms of the human laminin αβγ heterotrimer. Corresponding studies of the hLM α-1 N C49S mutant, equivalent to the larval lethal C56S mutant in zebrafish, have shown that this mutation causes enhanced self-association behavior, an observation that provides a plausible explanation for the inability of laminin bearing this mutation to fulfill functional roles in vivo, and hence for the deleterious pathological consequences of the mutation on lens function.

  11. Biophysical analysis of a lethal laminin alpha-1 mutation reveals altered self-interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Trushar R; Nikodemus, Denise; Besong, Tabot M D; Reuten, Raphael; Meier, Markus; Harding, Stephen E; Winzor, Donald J; Koch, Manuel; Stetefeld, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Laminins are key basement membrane molecules that influence several biological activities and are linked to a number of diseases. They are secreted as heterotrimeric proteins consisting of one α, one β, and one γ chain, followed by their assembly into a polymer-like sheet at the basement membrane. Using sedimentation velocity, dynamic light scattering, and surface plasmon resonance experiments, we studied self-association of three laminin (LM) N-terminal fragments α-1 (hLM α-1N), α-5 (hLM α-5N) and β-3 (hLM β-3N) originating from the short arms of the human laminin αβγ heterotrimer. Corresponding studies of the hLM α-1N C49S mutant, equivalent to the larval lethal C56S mutant in zebrafish, have shown that this mutation causes enhanced self-association behavior, an observation that provides a plausible explanation for the inability of laminin bearing this mutation to fulfill functional roles in vivo, and hence for the deleterious pathological consequences of the mutation on lens function.

  12. Altered-function p53 missense mutations identified in breast cancers can have subtle effects on transactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jennifer J.; Inga, Alberto; Conway, Kathleen; Edmiston, Sharon; Carey, Lisa A.; Wu, Lin; Resnick, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations of the sequence-specific master regulator p53 that alter transactivation function from promoter response elements (REs) could result in changes in the strength of gene activation or spectra of genes regulated. Such mutations in this tumor suppressor might lead to dramatic phenotypic changes and diversification of cell responses to stress. We have determined “functional fingerprints” of sporadic breast cancer-related p53 mutants many of which are also associated with familial cancer proneness such as the Li-Fraumeni Syndrome and germline BRCA1/2 mutant-associated cancers. The ability of p53, wild type and mutants, to transactivate from 11 human target REs has been assessed at variable expression levels using a cellular, isogenomic yeast model system that allows for the rapid analysis of p53 function using a qualitative and a quantitative reporter. Among 50 missense mutants, 29 were classified as loss-of-function. The remaining 21 retained transactivation towards at least one RE. At high levels of galactose induced p53 expression, 12/21 mutants that retain transactivation appeared similar to WT. When the level of galactose was reduced, transactivation defects could be revealed suggesting that some breast cancer related mutants can have subtle changes in transcription. These findings have been compared with clinical data from an ongoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy treatment trial for locally advanced breast tumors. The functional and nonfunctional missense mutations may distinguish tumors in terms of demographics, appearance and relapse, implying that heterogeneity in the functionality of specific p53 mutations could impact clinical behavior and outcome. PMID:20407015

  13. Altered global histone-trimethylation code and H3F3A-ATRX mutation in pediatric GBM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Pankaj; Jha, Prerana; Purkait, Suvendu; Sharma, Vikas; Suri, Vaishali; Sharma, Mehar C; Faruq, Mohammed; Suri, Ashish; Sarkar, Chitra

    2015-02-01

    Mutations in H3.3-ATRX-DAXX chromatin remodeling pathway have been reported in pediatric GBMs. H3.3 (H3F3A) mutations may affect transcriptional regulation by altered global histone-methylation. Therefore, we analyzed yet partly understood global histone code (H3K-4/9/27/36) trimethylation pattern in H3F3A-ATRX mutants and wild-type. H3F3A, HIST1H3B, IDH1, ATRX, DAXX and Tp53 mutations were identified by sequencing/immunohistochemistry in 27 pediatric GBMs. Global histone-methylation H3K-4/9/27/36me3 and Polycomb-protein EZH2 expression were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. H3F3A-ATRX mutation was observed in 66.7 % (18/27) of pediatric GBMs. K27M and G34R-H3F3A mutations were found in 37 % (10/27) and 14.8 % (4/27) patients respectively. G34V-H3F3A, HIST1H3B and IDH1 mutations were absent. Notably, commonest global histone-methylation mark lost was H3K27me3 (17/25, 68 %) followed by H3K4me3 (45.5 %, 10/22) and H3K9me3 (18.2 %, 4/22). Global H3K36me3 showed no loss. Most significant observation was loss of one or more histone-trimethylation mark in 80 % (20/25) pediatric GBMs. Notably, simultaneous loss of H3K27me3 and H3K4me3 were present in 7/22 (31.8 %) of pediatric GBMs. Low expression of EZH2 was found in 12/24 (50 %) of cases. However no significant correlation of loss of histone-marks or EZH2 expression with H3F3A-ATRX mutants (loss of at least one histone-marks in 87.5 % (14/16) cases) versus wild-types (loss of at least one histone-marks in 75 % (6/8) cases) was seen. The present study highlights for the first time combinatorial loss of one or more histone-trimethylation marks associated with majority of pediatric GBMs and the finding suggests significant role of histone-code in the molecular biology that underlies pediatric GBMs. Hence therapies for patients with particular combinations of histone modifications present opportunity to design innovative patient-tailored treatment protocols.

  14. Mutations of Francisella novicida that alter the mechanism of its phagocytosis by murine macrophages.

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    Xin-He Lai

    Full Text Available Infection with the bacterial pathogen Francisella tularensis tularensis (F. tularensis causes tularemia, a serious and debilitating disease. Francisella tularensis novicida strain U112 (abbreviated F. novicida, which is closely related to F. tularensis, is pathogenic for mice but not for man, making it an ideal model system for tularemia. Intracellular pathogens like Francisella inhibit the innate immune response, thereby avoiding immune recognition and death of the infected cell. Because activation of inflammatory pathways may lead to cell death, we reasoned that we could identify bacterial genes involved in inhibiting inflammation by isolating mutants that killed infected cells faster than the wild-type parent. We screened a comprehensive transposon library of F. novicida for mutant strains that increased the rate of cell death following infection in J774 macrophage-like cells, as compared to wild-type F. novicida. Mutations in 28 genes were identified as being hypercytotoxic to both J774 and primary macrophages of which 12 were less virulent in a mouse infection model. Surprisingly, we found that F. novicida with mutations in four genes (lpcC, manB, manC and kdtA were taken up by and killed macrophages at a much higher rate than the parent strain, even upon treatment with cytochalasin D (cytD, a classic inhibitor of macrophage phagocytosis. At least 10-fold more mutant bacteria were internalized by macrophages as compared to the parent strain if the bacteria were first fixed with formaldehyde, suggesting a surface structure is required for the high phagocytosis rate. However, bacteria were required to be viable for macrophage toxicity. The four mutant strains do not make a complete LPS but instead have an exposed lipid A. Interestingly, other mutations that result in an exposed LPS core were not taken up at increased frequency nor did they kill host cells more than the parent. These results suggest an alternative, more efficient macrophage

  15. The importance of making ends meet: mutations in genes and altered expression of proteins of the MRN complex and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzikiewicz-Krawczyk, Agnieszka

    2008-01-01

    The MRN protein complex, consisting of MRE1, RAD50 and NBS1, plays a crucial role in sensing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), and it is involved in cell cycle control. This makes the MRN complex an important guard of genome stability. Hypomorphic mutations in NBS1 result in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS), which is characterized by, among other things, an increased predisposition to malignancies, especially leukemia/lymphoma. Relatives of NBS patients carrying heterozygous mutations are also more prone to cancer development. This review summarizes several studies searching for associations between heterozygous mutations in NBS1, MRE11, and RAD50 and cancer and examining the levels of expression of proteins coded by these genes in tumor tissues. The results indicate that both decreased and increased expression of NBS1 may contribute to tumorigenesis, whereas overexpressed RAD50 has an anti-tumoric effect. MRE11 and RAD50 are also affected in tumors with microsatellite instability. However, the outcomes of association studies, which concerned primarily lymphomas/leukemias and breast cancer, were inconclusive. Heterozygous NBS1 mutations and molecular variants 657del5, I171V, R215W and E185Q were most commonly analyzed. Among these, an association with cancer was found most frequently for 657del5 (in leukemia/lymphoma and breast cancer) and I171V (in leukemia, breast, head and neck and colorectal cancers); however, other studies gave contradictory results. For other NBS1 as well as MRE11 and RAD50 variants, too little data were available to assess their role in cancer risk. Overall, the results suggest that heterozygous MRN complex mutations and molecular variants may contribute only to a limited fraction of tumors. This may be caused by several factors: various frequencies of the variants in specific populations, different criteria used for selection of control groups, possible effects of environmental factors, and potential interactions with variants of other

  16. Albinism-causing mutations in recombinant human tyrosinase alter intrinsic enzymatic activity.

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    Monika B Dolinska

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tyrosinase (TYR catalyzes the rate-limiting, first step in melanin production and its gene (TYR is mutated in many cases of oculocutaneous albinism (OCA1, an autosomal recessive cause of childhood blindness. Patients with reduced TYR activity are classified as OCA1B; some OCA1B mutations are temperature-sensitive. Therapeutic research for OCA1 has been hampered, in part, by the absence of purified, active, recombinant wild-type and mutant human enzymes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The intra-melanosomal domain of human tyrosinase (residues 19-469 and two OCA1B related temperature-sensitive mutants, R422Q and R422W were expressed in insect cells and produced in T. ni larvae. The short trans-membrane fragment was deleted to avoid potential protein insolubility, while preserving all other functional features of the enzymes. Purified tyrosinase was obtained with a yield of >1 mg per 10 g of larval biomass. The protein was a monomeric glycoenzyme with maximum enzyme activity at 37°C and neutral pH. The two purified mutants when compared to the wild-type protein were less active and temperature sensitive. These differences are associated with conformational perturbations in secondary structure. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The intramelanosomal domains of recombinant wild-type and mutant human tyrosinases are soluble monomeric glycoproteins with activities which mirror their in vivo function. This advance allows for the structure - function analyses of different mutant TYR proteins and correlation with their corresponding human phenotypes; it also provides an important tool to discover drugs that may improve tyrosinase activity and treat OCA1.

  17. Mutations that alter the transport function of the LamB protein in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Wandersman, C; Schwartz, M

    1982-01-01

    Some Escherichia coli K-12 lamB mutants, those producing reduced amounts of LamB protein (one-tenth the wild type amount), grow normally on dextrins but transport maltose when present at a concentration of 1 microM at about one-tenth the normal rate. lamB Dex- mutants were found as derivatives of these strains. These Dex- mutants are considerably impaired in the transport of maltose at low concentrations (below 10 microM), and they have a structurally altered LamB protein which is impaired in...

  18. Monocytes of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis linked to gene mutations display altered TDP-43 subcellular distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marco, G; Lomartire, A; Calvo, A; Risso, A; De Luca, E; Mostert, M; Mandrioli, J; Caponnetto, C; Borghero, G; Manera, U; Canosa, A; Moglia, C; Restagno, G; Fini, N; Tarella, C; Giordana, M T; Rinaudo, M T; Chiò, A

    2017-02-01

    Cytoplasmic accumulation of the nuclear protein transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) is an early determinant of motor neuron degeneration in most amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases. We previously disclosed this accumulation in circulating lymphomonocytes (CLM) of ALS patients with mutant TARDBP, the TDP-43-coding gene, as well as of a healthy individual carrying the parental TARDBP mutation. Here, we investigate TDP-43 subcellular localization in CLM and in the constituent cells, lymphocytes and monocytes, of patients with various ALS-linked mutant genes. TDP-43 subcellular localization was analysed with western immunoblotting and immunocytofluorescence in CLM of healthy controls (n = 10), patients with mutant TARDBP (n = 4, 1 homozygous), valosin-containing protein (VCP; n = 2), fused in sarcoma/translocated in liposarcoma (FUS; n = 2), Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1; n = 6), chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9ORF72; n = 4), without mutations (n = 5) and neurologically unaffected subjects with mutant TARDBP (n = 2). TDP-43 cytoplasmic accumulation was found (P TDP-43 subcellular localization described for motor neurons of corresponding groups. Accumulation also characterized CLM of the healthy individuals with mutant TARDBP and of some patients with mutant SOD1 or C9ORF72. In 5 patients, belonging to categories described to carry TDP-43 mislocalization in motor neurons (3 C9ORF72, 1 TARDBP and 1 without mutations), TDP-43 cytoplasmic accumulation was not detected in CLM or in lymphocytes but was in monocytes. In ALS forms characterized by TDP-43 mislocalization in motor neurons, monocytes display this alteration, even when not manifest in CLM. Monocytes may be used to support diagnosis, as well as to identify subjects at risk, of ALS and to develop/monitor targeted treatments. © 2016 British Neuropathological Society.

  19. Proteome-wide search for functional motifs altered in tumors: Prediction of nuclear export signals inactivated by cancer-related mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Gorka; Fullaondo, Asier; Rodríguez, Jose A

    2016-05-12

    Large-scale sequencing projects are uncovering a growing number of missense mutations in human tumors. Understanding the phenotypic consequences of these alterations represents a formidable challenge. In silico prediction of functionally relevant amino acid motifs disrupted by cancer mutations could provide insight into the potential impact of a mutation, and guide functional tests. We have previously described Wregex, a tool for the identification of potential functional motifs, such as nuclear export signals (NESs), in proteins. Here, we present an improved version that allows motif prediction to be combined with data from large repositories, such as the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC), and to be applied to a whole proteome scale. As an example, we have searched the human proteome for candidate NES motifs that could be altered by cancer-related mutations included in the COSMIC database. A subset of the candidate NESs identified was experimentally tested using an in vivo nuclear export assay. A significant proportion of the selected motifs exhibited nuclear export activity, which was abrogated by the COSMIC mutations. In addition, our search identified a cancer mutation that inactivates the NES of the human deubiquitinase USP21, and leads to the aberrant accumulation of this protein in the nucleus.

  20. Induced mutations in tomato SlExp1 alter cell wall metabolism and delay fruit softening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minoia, Silvia; Boualem, Adnane; Marcel, Fabien; Troadec, Christelle; Quemener, Bernard; Cellini, Francesco; Petrozza, Angelo; Vigouroux, Jacqueline; Lahaye, Marc; Carriero, Filomena; Bendahmane, Abdelhafid

    2016-01-01

    Fruit ripening and softening are key traits for many fleshy fruit. Since cell walls play a key role in the softening process, expansins have been investigated to control fruit over ripening and deterioration. In tomato, expression of Expansin 1 gene, SlExp1, during fruit ripening was associated with fruit softening. To engineer tomato plants with long shelf life, we screened for mutant plants impaired in SlExp1 function. Characterization of two induced mutations, Slexp1-6_W211S, and Slexp1-7_Q213Stop, showed that SlExp1 loss of function leads to enhanced fruit firmness and delayed fruit ripening. Analysis of cell wall polysaccharide composition of Slexp1-7_Q213Stop mutant pointed out significant differences for uronic acid, neutral sugar and total sugar contents. Hemicelluloses chemistry analysis by endo-β-1,4-d-glucanase hydrolysis and MALDI-TOF spectrometry revealed that xyloglucan structures were affected in the fruit pericarp of Slexp1-7_Q213Stop mutant. Altogether, these results demonstrated that SlExp1 loss of function mutants yield firmer and late ripening fruits through modification of hemicellulose structure. These SlExp1 mutants represent good tools for breeding long shelf life tomato lines with contrasted fruit texture as well as for the understanding of the cell wall polysaccharide assembly dynamics in fleshy fruits.

  1. PLZF mutation alters mouse hematopoietic stem cell function and cell cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent-Fabert, Christelle; Platet, Nadine; Vandevelde, Amelle; Poplineau, Mathilde; Koubi, Myriam; Finetti, Pascal; Tiberi, Guillaume; Imbert, Anne-Marie; Bertucci, François; Duprez, Estelle

    2016-04-14

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) give rise to all blood populations due to their long-term self-renewal and multipotent differentiation capacities. Because they have to persist throughout an organism's life span, HSCs tightly regulate the balance between proliferation and quiescence. Here, we investigated the role of the transcription factor promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (plzf) in HSC fate using the Zbtb16(lu/lu)mouse model, which harbors a natural spontaneous mutation that inactivates plzf. Regenerative stress revealed that Zbtb16(lu/lu)HSCs had a lineage-skewing potential from lymphopoiesis toward myelopoiesis, an increase in the long-term-HSC pool, and a decreased repopulation potential. Furthermore, oldplzf-mutant HSCs present an amplified aging phenotype, suggesting that plzf controls age-related pathway. We found that Zbtb16(lu/lu)HSCs harbor a transcriptional signature associated with a loss of stemness and cell cycle deregulation. Lastly, cell cycle analyses revealed an important role for plzf in the regulation of the G1-S transition of HSCs. Our study reveals a new role for plzf in regulating HSC function that is linked to cell cycle regulation, and positions plzf as a key player in controlling HSC homeostasis.

  2. Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy: Do Folate Pathway Gene Alterations Influence the Expression of Mitochondrial DNA Mutation?

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    A Aleyasin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON is an inherited form of bilateral optic atrophy leading to the loss of central vision.  The primary cause of vision loss is mutation in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA, however, unknown secon­dary genetic and/or epigenetic risk factors are suggested to influence its neuropathology.  In this study folate gene polymor­phisms were examined as a possible LHON secondary genetic risk factor in Iranian patients."nMethods: Common polymorphisms in the MTHFR (C677T and A1298C and MTRR (A66G genes were tested in 21 LHON patients and 150 normal controls."nResults:  Strong associations were observed between the LHON syndrome and C677T (P= 0.00 and A66G (P= 0.00 polymor­phisms.  However, no significant association was found between A1298C (P =0.69 and the LHON syndrome."nConclusion: This is the first study that shows MTHFR C677T and MTRR A66G polymorphisms play a role in the etiology of the LHON syndrome.  This finding may help in the better understanding of mechanisms involved in neural degeneration and vision loss by LHON and hence the better treatment of patients.

  3. Assessment of epigenetic alterations in early colorectal lesions containing BRAF mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nojima, Masanori; Harada, Taku; Maruyama, Reo; Ashida, Masami; Aoki, Hironori; Matsushita, Hiro-o; Yoshikawa, Kenjiro; Harada, Eiji; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Wakita, Shigenori; Niinuma, Takeshi; Kai, Masahiro; Eizuka, Makoto; Sugai, Tamotsu; Suzuki, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    To clarify the molecular and clinicopathological characteristics of colorectal serrated lesions, we assessed the DNA methylation of cancer-associated genes in a cohort of BRAF-mutant precancerous lesions from 94 individuals. We then compared those results with the lesions' clinicopathological features, especially colorectal subsites. The lesions included hyperplastic polyps (n = 16), traditional serrated adenomas (TSAs) (n = 15), TSAs with sessile serrated adenomas (SSAs) (n = 6), SSAs (n = 49) and SSAs with dysplasia (n = 16). The prevalence of lesions exhibiting the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) was lower in the sigmoid colon and rectum than in other bowel subsites, including the cecum, ascending, transverse and descending colon. In addition, several cancer-associated genes showed higher methylation levels within lesions in the proximal to sigmoid colon than in the sigmoid colon and rectum. These results indicate that the methylation status of lesions with BRAF mutation is strongly associated with their location, histological findings and neoplastic pathways. By contrast, no difference in aberrant DNA methylation was observed in normal-appearing background colonic mucosa along the bowel subsites, which may indicate the absence of an epigenetic field defect. PMID:27145369

  4. The fatty liver dystrophy (fld) mutation: Developmentally related alterations in hepatic triglyceride metabolism and protein expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reue, K.; Rehnmark, S.; Cohen, R.D.; Leete, T.H.; Doolittle, M.H. [West Los Angeles VA Medical Center, CA (United States). Lipid Research Lab.]|[Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Medicine; Giometti, C.S.; Mishler, K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Slavin, B.G. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Fatty liver dystrophy (fld) is an autosomal recessive mutation in mice characterized by hypertriglyceridemia and development of a fatty liver in the early neonatal period. Also associated with the fld phenotype is a tissue-specific deficiency in the expression of lipoprotein lipase and hepatic lipase, as well as elevations in hepatic apolipoprotein A-IV and apolipoprotein C-II mRNA levels. Although these lipid abnormalities resolve at the age of weaning, adult mutant mice exhibit a peripheral neuropathy associated with abnormal myelin formation. The fatty liver in fld/fld neonates is characterized by the accumulation of large triglyceride droplets within the parenchymal cells, and these droplets persist within isolated hepatocytes maintained in culture for several days. To identify the metabolic defect that leads to lipid accumulation, the authors investigated several aspects of cellular triglyceride metabolism. The mutant mice exhibited normal activity of acid triacylglycerol lipase, an enzyme thought to be responsible for hydrolysis of dietary triglycerides in the liver. Metabolic labeling studies performed with oleic acid revealed that free fatty acids accumulate in the liver of 3 day old fld/fld mice, but not in adults. This accumulation in liver was mirrored by elevated free fatty acid levels in plasma of fld/fld neonates, with levels highest in very young mice and returning to normal by the age of one month. Quantitation of fatty acid oxidation in cells isolated from fld/fld neonates revealed that oxidation rate is reduced 60% in hepatocytes and 40% in fibroblasts; hepatocytes from adult fld/fld mice exhibited an oxidation rate similar to those from wild-type mice.

  5. Single-cell genetic expression of mutant GABAA receptors causing Human genetic epilepsy alters dendritic spine and GABAergic bouton formation in a mutation-specific manner

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    Pamela eLachance-Touchette

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in genes encoding for GABAA receptor subunits is a well-established cause of genetic generalized epilepsy. GABA neurotransmission is implicated in several developmental processes including neurite outgrowth and synapse formation. Alteration in excitatory/inhibitory synaptic activities plays a critical role in epilepsy, thus here we investigated whether mutations in α1 subunit of GABAA receptor may affect dendritic spine and GABAergic bouton formation. In particular, we examined the effects of three mutations of the GABRA1 gene (D219N, A322D and K353delins18X that were found in a cohort of families with genetic generalized epilepsy. We used a novel single-cell genetic approach, by preparing cortical organotypic cultures from GABRA1flox/flox mice and simultaneously inactivating endogenous GABRA1 and transfecting mutant α1 subunits in single glutamatergic pyramidal cells and basket GABAergic interneurons by biolistic transfection. We found that GABRA1-/- GABAergic cells showed reduced innervation field, which was rescued by co-expressing α1-A322D and α1-WT but not α1-D219N. We further found that the expression of the most severe GABRA1 missense mutation (α1-A322D induced a striking increase of spine density in pyramidal cells along with an increase in the number of mushroom-like spines. In addition, α1-A322D expression in GABAergic cells slightly increased perisomatic bouton density, whereas other mutations did not alter bouton formation. All together, these results suggest that the effects of different GABAAR mutations on GABAergic bouton and dendritic spine formation are specific to the mutation and cannot be always explained by a simple loss-of-function gene model. The use of single cell genetic manipulation in organotypic cultures may provide a better understanding of the specific and distinct neural circuit alterations caused by different GABAA receptor subunit mutations and will help define the pathophysiology of genetic

  6. Structure-Function Correlation Analysis of Connexin50 Missense Mutations Causing Congenital Cataract: Electrostatic Potential Alteration Could Determine Intracellular Trafficking Fate of Mutants

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    Devroop Sarkar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Connexin50 (Cx50 mutations are reported to cause congenital cataract probably through the disruption of intercellular transport in the lens. Cx50 mutants that undergo mistrafficking have generally been associated with failure to form functional gap junction channels; however, sometimes even properly trafficked mutants were found to undergo similar consequences. We hereby wanted to elucidate any structural bases of the varied functional consequences of Cx50 missense mutations through in silico approach. Computational studies have been done based on a Cx50 homology model to assess conservation, solvent accessibility, and 3-dimensional localization of mutated residues as well as mutation-induced changes in surface electrostatic potential, H-bonding, and steric clash. This was supplemented with meta-analysis of published literature on the functional properties of connexin missense mutations. Analyses revealed that the mutation-induced critical alterations of surface electrostatic potential in Cx50 mutants could determine their fate in intracellular trafficking. A similar pattern was observed in case of mutations involving corresponding conserved residues in other connexins also. Based on these results the trafficking fates of 10 uncharacterized Cx50 mutations have been predicted. Further experimental analyses are needed to validate the observed correlation.

  7. STN1 OB Fold Mutation Alters DNA Binding and Affects Selective Aspects of CST Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Anukana; Stewart, Jason; Chaiken, Mary; Price, Carolyn M.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian CST (CTC1-STN1-TEN1) participates in multiple aspects of telomere replication and genome-wide recovery from replication stress. CST resembles Replication Protein A (RPA) in that it binds ssDNA and STN1 and TEN1 are structurally similar to RPA2 and RPA3. Conservation between CTC1 and RPA1 is less apparent. Currently the mechanism underlying CST action is largely unknown. Here we address CST mechanism by using a DNA-binding mutant, (STN1 OB-fold mutant, STN1-OBM) to examine the relationship between DNA binding and CST function. In vivo, STN1-OBM affects resolution of endogenous replication stress and telomere duplex replication but telomeric C-strand fill-in and new origin firing after exogenous replication stress are unaffected. These selective effects indicate mechanistic differences in CST action during resolution of different replication problems. In vitro binding studies show that STN1 directly engages both short and long ssDNA oligonucleotides, however STN1-OBM preferentially destabilizes binding to short substrates. The finding that STN1-OBM affects binding to only certain substrates starts to explain the in vivo separation of function observed in STN1-OBM expressing cells. CST is expected to engage DNA substrates of varied length and structure as it acts to resolve different replication problems. Since STN1-OBM will alter CST binding to only some of these substrates, the mutant should affect resolution of only a subset of replication problems, as was observed in the STN1-OBM cells. The in vitro studies also provide insight into CST binding mechanism. Like RPA, CST likely contacts DNA via multiple OB folds. However, the importance of STN1 for binding short substrates indicates differences in the architecture of CST and RPA DNA-protein complexes. Based on our results, we propose a dynamic DNA binding model that provides a general mechanism for CST action at diverse forms of replication stress. PMID:27690379

  8. Site-directed mutations of thermostable direct hemolysin from Grimontia hollisae alter its arrhenius effect and biophysical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Kuo; Huang, Sheng-Cih; Wu, Yi-Fang; Chen, Yu-Ching; Lin, Yen-Ling; Nayak, Manoswini; Lin, Yan Ren; Chen, Wen-Hung; Chiu, Yi-Rong; Li, Thomas Tien-Hsiung; Yeh, Bo-Sou; Wu, Tung-Kung

    2011-03-31

    Recombinant thermostable direct hemolysin from Grimontia hollisae (Gh-rTDH) exhibits paradoxical Arrhenius effect, where the hemolytic activity is inactivated by heating at 60 °C but is reactivated by additional heating above 80 °C. This study investigated individual or collective mutational effect of Tyr53, Thr59, and Ser63 positions of Gh-rTDH on hemolytic activity, Arrhenius effect, and biophysical properties. In contrast to the Gh-rTDH wild-type (Gh-rTDH(WT)) protein, a 2-fold decrease of hemolytic activity and alteration of Arrhenius effect could be detected from the Gh-rTDH(Y53H/T59I) and Gh-rTDH(T59I/S63T) double-mutants and the Gh-rTDH(Y53H/T59I/S63T) triple-mutant. Differential scanning calorimetry results showed that the Arrhenius effect-loss and -retaining mutants consistently exhibited higher and lower endothermic transition temperatures, respectively, than that of the Gh-rTDH(WT). Circular dichroism measurements of Gh-rTDH(WT) and Gh-rTDH(mut) showed a conspicuous change from a β-sheet to α-helix structure around the endothermic transition temperature. Consistent with the observation is the conformational change of the proteins from native globular form into fibrillar form, as determined by Congo red experiments and transmission electron microscopy.

  9. Ascorbate, added after irradiation, reduces the mutant yield and alters the spectrum of CD59- mutations in A(L) cells irradiated with high LET carbon ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Akiko; Vannais, Diane; Lenarczyk, Marek; Waldren, Charles A.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    It has been reported that X-ray induced HPRT- mutation in cultured human cells is prevented by ascorbate added after irradiation. Mutation extinction is attributed to neutralization by ascorbate, of radiation-induced long-lived radicals (LLR) with half-lives of several hours. We here show that post-irradiation treatment with ascorbate (5 mM added 30 min after radiation) reduces, but does not eliminate, the induction of CD59- mutants in human-hamster hybrid A(L) cells exposed to high-LET carbon ions (LET of 100 KeV/microm). RibCys, [2(R,S)-D-ribo-1',2',3',4'-Tetrahydroxybutyl]-thiazolidene-4(R)-ca riboxylic acid] (4 mM) gave a similar but lesser effect. The lethality of the carbon ions was not altered by these chemicals. Preliminary data are presented that ascorbate also alters the spectrum of CD59- mutations induced by the carbon beam, mainly by reducing the incidence of small mutations and mutants displaying transmissible genomic instability (TGI), while large mutations are unaffected. Our results suggest that LLR are important in initiating TGI.

  10. Altered Pre-mRNA Splicing Caused by a Novel Intronic Mutation c.1443+5G>A in the Dihydropyrimidinase (DPYS Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Nakajima

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dihydropyrimidinase (DHP deficiency is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the DPYS gene. Patients present with highly elevated levels of dihydrouracil and dihydrothymine in their urine, blood and cerebrospinal fluid. The analysis of the effect of mutations in DPYS on pre-mRNA splicing is hampered by the fact that DHP is primarily expressed in liver and kidney cells. The minigene approach can detect mRNA splicing aberrations using cells that do not express the endogenous mRNA. We have used a minigene-based approach to analyze the effects of a presumptive pre-mRNA splicing mutation in two newly identified Chinese pediatric patients with DHP deficiency. Mutation analysis of DPYS showed that both patients were compound heterozygous for a novel intronic mutation c.1443+5G>A in intron 8 and a previously described missense mutation c.1001A>G (p.Q334R in exon 6. Wild-type and the mutated minigene constructs, containing exons 7, 8 and 9 of DPYS, yielded different splicing products after expression in HEK293 cells. The c.1443+5G>A mutation resulted in altered pre-mRNA splicing of the DPYS minigene construct with full skipping of exon 8. Analysis of the DHP crystal structure showed that the deletion of exon 8 severely affects folding, stability and homooligomerization of the enzyme as well as disruption of the catalytic site. Thus, the analysis suggests that the c.1443+5G>A mutation results in aberrant splicing of the pre-mRNA encoding DHP, underlying the DHP deficiency in two unrelated Chinese patients.

  11. A GNAS mutation found in pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms induces drastic alterations of gene expression profiles with upregulation of mucin genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotake Komatsu

    Full Text Available GNAS, a gene encoding G protein stimulating α subunit, is frequently mutated in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs, which are indolent and slow-growing pancreatic tumors that secrete abundant mucin. The GNAS mutation is not observed in conventional ductal adenocarcinomas of the pancreas. To determine the functional significance of the GNAS mutation in pancreatic ductal lineage cells, we examined in vitro phenotypes of cells of pancreatic ductal lineage, HPDE, PK-8, PCI-35, and MIA PaCa-2, with exogenous expression of either wild-type or mutated (R201H GNAS. We found that exogenous GNAS upregulated intracellular cyclic adenine monophosphate (cAMP, particularly in mutated GNAS transfectants, and upregulated expression of MUC2 and MUC5AC in HPDE and PK-8 cells. By contrast, exogenous GNAS inhibited expression of mucin genes in PCI-35 and MIA PaCa-2 cells, despite upregulation of cAMP. We examined global gene expression profiles of some of the cells transfected with exogenous mutated GNAS (PK-8, PCI-35, and MIA PaCa-2, and found that PK-8 cells exhibited drastic alterations of the gene expression profile, which contrasted with modest alterations in PCI-35 and MIA PaCa-2 cells. To identify a cause of these different effects of exogenous mutated GNAS on phenotypes of the cells, we examined effects of interactions of the signaling pathways of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K on expression of mucin genes. The MAPK and PI3K pathways significantly influenced the expression of mucin genes. Exogenous GNAS did not promote cell growth but suppressed it in some of the cells. In conclusion, mutated GNAS found in IPMNs may extensively alter gene expression profiles, including expression of mucin genes, through the interaction with MAPK and PI3K pathways in pancreatic ductal cells; these changes may determine the characteristic phenotype of IPMN. PK-8 cells expressing

  12. BRAF, PIK3CA, and HER2 Oncogenic Alterations According to KRAS Mutation Status in Advanced Colorectal Cancers with Distant Metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Kyung Nam

    Full Text Available Anti-EGFR antibody-based treatment is an important therapeutic strategy for advanced colorectal cancer (CRC; despite this, several mutations--including KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutations, and HER2 amplification--are associated with the mechanisms underlying the development of resistance to anti-EGFR therapy. The aim of our study was to investigate the frequencies and clinical implications of these genetic alterations in advanced CRC.KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutations were determined by Cobas real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR in 191 advanced CRC patients with distant metastasis. Microsatellite instability (MSI status was determined by a fragmentation assay and HER2 amplification was assessed by silver in situ hybridization. In addition, KRAS mutations were investigated by the Sanger sequencing method in 97 of 191 CRC cases.Mutations in KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA were found in 104 (54.5%, 6 (3.1%, and 25 (13.1% cases of advanced CRC, respectively. MSI-high status and HER2 amplification were observed in 3 (1.6% and 16 (8.4% cases, respectively. PIK3CA mutations were more frequently found in KRAS mutant type (18.3% than KRAS wild type (6.9% (P = 0.020. In contrast, HER2 amplifications and BRAF mutations were associated with KRAS wild type with borderline significance (P = 0.052 and 0.094, respectively. In combined analyses with KRAS, BRAF and HER2 status, BRAF mutations or HER2 amplifications were associated with the worst prognosis in the wild type KRAS group (P = 0.004. When comparing the efficacy of detection methods, the results of real time PCR analysis revealed 56 of 97 (57.7% CRC cases with KRAS mutations, whereas Sanger sequencing revealed 49 cases (50.5%.KRAS mutations were found in 54.5% of advanced CRC patients. Our results support that subgrouping using PIK3CA and BRAF mutation or HER2 amplification status, in addition to KRAS mutation status, is helpful for managing advanced CRC patients.

  13. The I4895T mutation in the type 1 ryanodine receptor induces fiber-type specific alterations in skeletal muscle that mimic premature aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boncompagni, Simona; Loy, Ryan E; Dirksen, Robert T; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara

    2010-12-01

    The I4898T (IT) mutation in type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1), the Ca(2+) release channel of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) is linked to a form of central core disease (CCD) in humans and results in a nonleaky channel and excitation-contraction uncoupling. We characterized age-dependent and fiber-type-dependent alterations in muscle ultrastructure, as well as the magnitude and spatiotemporal properties of evoked Ca(2+) release in heterozygous Ryr1(I4895T/WT) (IT/+) knock-in mice on a mixed genetic background. The results indicate a classical but mild CCD phenotype that includes muscle weakness and the presence of mitochondrial-deficient areas in type I fibers. Electrically evoked Ca(2+) release is significantly reduced in single flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) fibers from young and old IT/+ mice. Structural changes are strongly fiber-type specific, affecting type I and IIB/IIX fibers in very distinct ways, and sparing type IIA fibers. Ultrastructural alterations in our IT/+ mice are also present in wild type, but at a lower frequency and older ages, suggesting that the disease mutation on the mixed background promotes an acceleration of normal age-dependent changes. The observed functional and structural alterations and their similarity to age-associated changes are entirely consistent with the known properties of the mutated channel, which result in reduced calcium release as is also observed in normal aging muscle. In strong contrast to these observations, a subset of patients with the analogous human heterozygous mutation and IT/+ mice on an inbred 129S2/SvPasCrl background exhibit a more severe disease phenotype, which is not directly consistent with the mutated channel properties.

  14. Long-term foscarnet therapy remodels thymidine analogue mutations and alters resistance to zidovudine and lamivudine in HIV-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Sofie; Dam, Elisabeth; Roge, Birgit

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the evolution of multi-drug-resistant HIV-1 in treatment-experienced patients receiving foscarnet (PFA) as part of salvage therapy and to investigate the virological consequences of emerging mutations. METHODS: Genotypic and phenotypic resistance tests were performed on plasma...... viruses from seven patients at baseline and during treatment with PFA. The phenotypic effects of mutations suspected to be associated with PFA resistance were evaluated by site-directed mutagenesis of wild-type or thymidine analogue mutations (TAM)-carrying pNL4-3. Reversion of single mutations...... was performed in a patient-derived recombinant clone. RESULTS: Baseline multi-drug-resistant isolates exhibited hypersusceptibility to PFA. In two patients who received > 12 months of PFA treatment, a novel mutation pattern including K70G, V75T, K219R and L228R emerged. These viruses had 3-6-fold resistance...

  15. X-ray-induced mutations in Escherichia coli K-12 strains with altered DNA polymerase I activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Yuki; Kawata, Masakado; Komura, Jun-ichiro; Ono, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2003-07-25

    Spectra of ionizing radiation mutagenesis were determined by sequencing X-ray-induced endogenous tonB gene mutations in Escherichia coli polA strains. We used two polA alleles, the polA1 mutation, defective for Klenow domain, and the polA107 mutation, defective for flap domain. We demonstrated that irradiation of 75 and 50 Gy X-rays could induce 3.8- and 2.6-fold more of tonB mutation in polA1 and polA107 strains, respectively, than spontaneous level. The radiation induced spectrum of 51 tonB mutations in polA1 and 51 in polA107 indicated that minus frameshift, A:T{yields}T:A transversion and G:C{yields}T:A transversion were the types of mutations increased. Previously, we have reported essentially the same X-ray-induced tonB mutation spectra in the wild-type strain. These results indicate that (1) X-rays can induce minus frameshift, A:T{yields}T:A transversion and G:C{yields}T:A transversion in E. coli and (2) presence or absence of polymerase I (PolI) of E. coli does not have any effects on the process of X-ray mutagenesis.

  16. Genetic alterations in uncommon low-grade neuroepithelial tumors: BRAF, FGFR1, and MYB mutations occur at high frequency and align with morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaddoumi, Ibrahim; Orisme, Wilda; Wen, Ji; Santiago, Teresa; Gupta, Kirti; Dalton, James D; Tang, Bo; Haupfear, Kelly; Punchihewa, Chandanamali; Easton, John; Mulder, Heather; Boggs, Kristy; Shao, Ying; Rusch, Michael; Becksfort, Jared; Gupta, Pankaj; Wang, Shuoguo; Lee, Ryan P; Brat, Daniel; Peter Collins, V; Dahiya, Sonika; George, David; Konomos, William; Kurian, Kathreena M; McFadden, Kathryn; Serafini, Luciano Neder; Nickols, Hilary; Perry, Arie; Shurtleff, Sheila; Gajjar, Amar; Boop, Fredrick A; Klimo, Paul D; Mardis, Elaine R; Wilson, Richard K; Baker, Suzanne J; Zhang, Jinghui; Wu, Gang; Downing, James R; Tatevossian, Ruth G; Ellison, David W

    2016-06-01

    Low-grade neuroepithelial tumors (LGNTs) are diverse CNS tumors presenting in children and young adults, often with a history of epilepsy. While the genetic profiles of common LGNTs, such as the pilocytic astrocytoma and 'adult-type' diffuse gliomas, are largely established, those of uncommon LGNTs remain to be defined. In this study, we have used massively parallel sequencing and various targeted molecular genetic approaches to study alterations in 91 LGNTs, mostly from children but including young adult patients. These tumors comprise dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors (DNETs; n = 22), diffuse oligodendroglial tumors (d-OTs; n = 20), diffuse astrocytomas (DAs; n = 17), angiocentric gliomas (n = 15), and gangliogliomas (n = 17). Most LGNTs (84 %) analyzed by whole-genome sequencing (WGS) were characterized by a single driver genetic alteration. Alterations of FGFR1 occurred frequently in LGNTs composed of oligodendrocyte-like cells, being present in 82 % of DNETs and 40 % of d-OTs. In contrast, a MYB-QKI fusion characterized almost all angiocentric gliomas (87 %), and MYB fusion genes were the most common genetic alteration in DAs (41 %). A BRAF:p.V600E mutation was present in 35 % of gangliogliomas and 18 % of DAs. Pathogenic alterations in FGFR1/2/3, BRAF, or MYB/MYBL1 occurred in 78 % of the series. Adult-type d-OTs with an IDH1/2 mutation occurred in four adolescents, the youngest aged 15 years at biopsy. Despite a detailed analysis, novel genetic alterations were limited to two fusion genes, EWSR1-PATZ1 and SLMAP-NTRK2, both in gangliogliomas. Alterations in BRAF, FGFR1, or MYB account for most pathogenic alterations in LGNTs, including pilocytic astrocytomas, and alignment of these genetic alterations and cytologic features across LGNTs has diagnostic implications. Additionally, therapeutic options based upon targeting the effects of these alterations are already in clinical trials.

  17. Altered heme catabolism by heme oxygenase-1 caused by mutations in human NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Amit V., E-mail: amit@pandeylab.org [Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism, Department of Clinical Research, University of Bern, Tiefenaustrasse 120c, CH-3004 Bern (Switzerland); Flueck, Christa E.; Mullis, Primus E. [Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism, Department of Clinical Research, University of Bern, Tiefenaustrasse 120c, CH-3004 Bern (Switzerland)

    2010-09-24

    Research highlights: {yields} Mutations in POR identified from patients lead to reduced HO-1 activities. {yields} POR mutation Y181D affecting FMN binding results in total loss of HO-1 activity. {yields} POR mutations A287P, C569Y and V608F, lost 50-70% activity. {yields} Mutations in FAD binding domain, R457H, Y459H and V492E lost all HO-1 activity. {yields} POR polymorphisms P228L, R316W, G413S, A503V and G504R have normal activity. -- Abstract: Human heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) carries out heme catabolism supported by electrons supplied from the NADPH through NADPH P450 reductase (POR, CPR). Previously we have shown that mutations in human POR cause a rare form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia. In this study, we have evaluated the effects of mutations in POR on HO-1 activity. We used purified preparations of wild type and mutant human POR and in vitro reconstitution with purified HO-1 to measure heme degradation in a coupled assay using biliverdin reductase. Here we show that mutations in POR found in patients may reduce HO-1 activity, potentially influencing heme catabolism in individuals carrying mutant POR alleles. POR mutants Y181D, A457H, Y459H, V492E and R616X had total loss of HO-1 activity, while POR mutations A287P, C569Y and V608F lost 50-70% activity. The POR variants P228L, R316W and G413S, A503V and G504R identified as polymorphs had close to WT activity. Loss of HO-1 activity may result in increased oxidative neurotoxicity, anemia, growth retardation and iron deposition. Further examination of patients affected with POR deficiency will be required to assess the metabolic effects of reduced HO-1 activity in affected individuals.

  18. Mutations in the human naked cuticle homolog NKD1 found in colorectal cancer alter Wnt/Dvl/beta-catenin signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhui Guo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutation of Wnt signal antagonists Apc or Axin activates beta-catenin signaling in many cancers including the majority of human colorectal adenocarcinomas. The phenotype of apc or axin mutation in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is strikingly similar to that caused by mutation in the segment-polarity gene, naked cuticle (nkd. Nkd inhibits Wnt signaling by binding to the Dishevelled (Dsh/Dvl family of scaffold proteins that link Wnt receptor activation to beta-catenin accumulation and TCF-dependent transcription, but human NKD genes have yet to be directly implicated in cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identify for the first time mutations in NKD1--one of two human nkd homologs--in a subset of DNA mismatch repair-deficient colorectal tumors that are not known to harbor mutations in other Wnt-pathway genes. The mutant Nkd1 proteins are defective at inhibiting Wnt signaling; in addition, the mutant Nkd1 proteins stabilize beta-catenin and promote cell proliferation, in part due to a reduced ability of each mutant Nkd1 protein to bind and destabilize Dvl proteins. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data raise the hypothesis that specific NKD1 mutations promote Wnt-dependent tumorigenesis in a subset of DNA mismatch-repair-deficient colorectal adenocarcinomas and possibly other Wnt-signal driven human cancers.

  19. Two rare human mitofusin 2 mutations alter mitochondrial dynamics and induce retinal and cardiac pathology in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William H Eschenbacher

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial fusion is essential to organelle homeostasis and organ health. Inexplicably, loss of function mutations of mitofusin 2 (Mfn2 specifically affect neurological tissue, causing Charcot Marie Tooth syndrome (CMT and atypical optic atrophy. As CMT-linked Mfn2 mutations are predominantly within the GTPase domain, we postulated that Mfn2 mutations in other functional domains might affect non-neurological tissues. Here, we defined in vitro and in vivo consequences of rare human mutations in the poorly characterized Mfn2 HR1 domain. Human exome sequencing data identified 4 rare non-synonymous Mfn2 HR1 domain mutations, two bioinformatically predicted as damaging. Recombinant expression of these (Mfn2 M393I and R400Q in Mfn2-null murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs revealed incomplete rescue of characteristic mitochondrial fragmentation, compared to wild-type human Mfn2 (hMfn2; Mfn2 400Q uniquely induced mitochondrial fragmentation in normal MEFs. To compare Mfn2 mutation effects in neurological and non-neurological tissues in vivo, hMfn2 and the two mutants were expressed in Drosophila eyes or heart tubes made deficient in endogenous fly mitofusin (dMfn through organ-specific RNAi expression. The two mutants induced similar Drosophila eye phenotypes: small eyes and an inability to rescue the eye pathology induced by suppression of dMfn. In contrast, Mfn2 400Q induced more severe cardiomyocyte mitochondrial fragmentation and cardiac phenotypes than Mfn2 393I, including heart tube dilation, depressed fractional shortening, and progressively impaired negative geotaxis. These data reveal a central functional role for Mfn2 HR1 domains, describe organ-specific effects of two Mfn2 HR1 mutations, and strongly support prospective studies of Mfn2 400Q in heritable human heart disease of unknown genetic etiology.

  20. MFAP5 loss-of-function mutations underscore the involvement of matrix alteration in the pathogenesis of familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, Mathieu; Gross, Marie-Sylvie; Aubart, Mélodie; Hanna, Nadine; Kessler, Ketty; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Tosolini, Laurent; Ho-Tin-Noe, Benoit; Regalado, Ellen; Varret, Mathilde; Abifadel, Marianne; Milleron, Olivier; Odent, Sylvie; Dupuis-Girod, Sophie; Faivre, Laurence; Edouard, Thomas; Dulac, Yves; Busa, Tiffany; Gouya, Laurent; Milewicz, Dianna M; Jondeau, Guillaume; Boileau, Catherine

    2014-12-04

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection (TAAD) is an autosomal-dominant disorder with major life-threatening complications. The disease displays great genetic heterogeneity with some forms allelic to Marfan and Loeys-Dietz syndrome, and an important number of cases still remain unexplained at the molecular level. Through whole-exome sequencing of affected members in a large TAAD-affected family, we identified the c.472C>T (p.Arg158(∗)) nonsense mutation in MFAP5 encoding the extracellular matrix component MAGP-2. This protein interacts with elastin fibers and the microfibrillar network. Mutation screening of 403 additional probands identified an additional missense mutation of MFAP5 (c.62G>T [p.Trp21Leu]) segregating with the disease in a second family. Functional analyses performed on both affected individual's cells and in vitro models showed that these two mutations caused pure or partial haploinsufficiency. Thus, alteration of MAGP-2, a component of microfibrils and elastic fibers, appears as an initiating mechanism of inherited TAAD.

  1. The I4895T Mutation in the Type 1 Ryanodine Receptor Induces Fiber-Type Specific Alterations in Skeletal Muscle that Mimic Premature Aging

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The I4898T (IT) mutation in type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1), the Ca2+ release channel of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) is linked to a form of central core disease (CCD) in humans and results in a non leaky channel and excitation-contraction uncoupling. We characterized age- and fiber type-dependent alterations in muscle ultrastructure, as well as the magnitude and spatiotemporal properties of evoked Ca2+ release in heterozygous Ryr1I4895T/WT (IT/+) knock-in mice on a mixed genetic backgrou...

  2. Mutations in NEK8 link multiple organ dysplasia with altered Hippo signalling and increased c-MYC expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frank, Valeska; Habbig, Sandra; Bartram, Malte P.; Eisenberger, Tobias; Veenstra-Knol, Hermine E.; Decker, Christian; Boorsma, Reinder A. C.; Goebel, Heike; Nuernberg, Gudrun; Griessmann, Anabel; Franke, Mareike; Borgal, Lori; Kohli, Priyanka; Voelker, Linus A.; Doetsch, Joerg; Nuernberg, Peter; Benzing, Thomas; Bolz, Hanno J.; Johnson, Colin; Gerkes, Erica H.; Schermer, Bernhard; Bergmann, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Mutations affecting the integrity and function of cilia have been identified in various genes over the last decade accounting for a group of diseases called ciliopathies. Ciliopathies display a broad spectrum of phenotypes ranging from mild manifestations to lethal combinations of multiple severe

  3. Modeling human Coenzyme A synthase mutation in yeast reveals altered mitochondrial function, lipid content and iron metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Ceccatelli Berti

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in nuclear genes associated with defective coenzyme A biosynthesis have been identified as responsible for some forms of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA, namely PKAN and CoPAN. PKAN are defined by mutations in PANK2, encoding the pantothenate kinase 2 enzyme, that account for about 50% of cases of NBIA, whereas mutations in CoA synthase COASY have been recently reported as the second inborn error of CoA synthesis leading to CoPAN. As reported previously, yeast cells expressing the pathogenic mutation exhibited a temperature-sensitive growth defect in the absence of pantothenate and a reduced CoA content. Additional characterization revealed decreased oxygen consumption, reduced activities of mitochondrial respiratory complexes, higher iron content, increased sensitivity to oxidative stress and reduced amount of lipid droplets, thus partially recapitulating the phenotypes found in patients and establishing yeast as a potential model to clarify the pathogenesis underlying PKAN and CoPAN diseases.

  4. Truncating PREX2 mutations activate its GEF activity and alter gene expression regulation in NRAS-mutant melanoma

    KAUST Repository

    Lissanu Deribe, Yonathan

    2016-03-01

    PREX2 (phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate-dependent Rac-exchange factor 2) is a PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) binding protein that is significantly mutated in cutaneous melanoma and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Here, genetic and biochemical analyses were conducted to elucidate the nature and mechanistic basis of PREX2 mutation in melanoma development. By generating an inducible transgenic mouse model we showed an oncogenic role for a truncating PREX2 mutation (PREX2E824*) in vivo in the context of mutant NRAS. Using integrative cross-species gene expression analysis, we identified deregulated cell cycle and cytoskeleton organization as significantly perturbed biological pathways in PREX2 mutant tumors. Mechanistically, truncation of PREX2 activated its Rac1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity, abolished binding to PTEN and activated the PI3K (phosphatidyl inositol 3 kinase)/Akt signaling pathway. We further showed that PREX2 truncating mutations or PTEN deletion induces down-regulation of the tumor suppressor and cell cycle regulator CDKN1C (also known as p57KIP2). This down-regulation occurs, at least partially, through DNA hypomethylation of a differentially methylated region in chromosome 11 that is a known regulatory region for expression of the CDKN1C gene. Together, these findings identify PREX2 as a mediator of NRAS-mutant melanoma development that acts through the PI3K/PTEN/Akt pathway to regulate gene expression of a cell cycle regulator.

  5. Mutations of the S4-S5 linker alter activation properties of HERG potassium channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanguinetti, M C; Xu, Q P

    1999-02-01

    1. The structural basis for the activation gate of voltage-dependent K+ channels is not known, but indirect evidence has implicated the S4-S5 linker, the cytoplasmic region between the fourth and fifth transmembrane domains of the channel subunit. We have studied the effects of mutations in the S4-S5 linker of HERG (human ether-á-go-go-related gene), a human delayed rectifier K+ channel, in Xenopus oocytes. 2. Mutation of acidic residues (D540, E544) in the S4-S5 linker of HERG channels to neutral (Ala) or basic (Lys) residues accelerated the rate of channel deactivation. Most mutations greatly accelerated the rate of activation. However, E544K HERG channels activated more slowly than wild-type HERG channels. 3. Mutation of residues in the S4-S5 linker had little or no effect on fast inactivation, consistent with independence of HERG channel activation and inactivation 4. In response to large hyperpolarizations, D540K HERG channels can reopen into a state that is distinct from the normal depolarization-induced open state. It is proposed that substitution of a negatively charged Asp with the positively charged Lys disrupts a subunit interaction that normally stabilizes the channel in a closed state at negative transmembrane potentials. 5. The results indicate that the S4-S5 linker is a crucial component of the activation gate of HERG channels.

  6. Mutational profiles in triple-negative breast cancer defined by ultradeep multigene sequencing show high rates of PI3K pathway alterations and clinically relevant entity subgroup specific differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegsmann, Mark; Endris, Volker; Wolf, Thomas; Pfarr, Nicole; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Loibl, Sibylle; Denkert, Carsten; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Budczies, Jan; Sinn, Peter; Weichert, Wilko

    2014-10-30

    Mutational profiling of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) by whole exome sequencing (WES) yielded a landscape of genomic alterations in this tumor entity. However, the clinical significance of these findings remains enigmatic. Further, integration of WES in routine diagnostics using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) material is currently not feasible. Therefore, we designed and validated a breast cancer specific gene panel for semiconductor-based sequencing comprising 137 amplicons covering mutational hotspots in 44 genes and applied this panel on a cohort of 104 well-characterized FFPE TNBC with complete clinical follow-up. TP53 mutations were present in more than 80% of cases. PI3K pathway alterations (29.8%) comprising mainly PIK3CA mutations (22.1%) but also mutations and/or amplifications/deletions in other PI3K-associated genes (7.7%) were far more frequently observed, when compared to WES data. Alterations in MAPK signaling genes (8.7%) and cell-cycle regulators (14.4%) were also frequent. Mutational profiles were linked to TNBC subgroups defined by morphology and immunohistochemistry. Alterations in cell-cycle pathway regulators were linked with better overall (p=0.053) but not disease free survival. Taken together, we could demonstrate that breast cancer targeted hotspot sequencing is feasible in a routine setting and yields reliable and clinically meaningful results. Mutational spectra were linked to clinical and immunohistochemically defined parameters.

  7. Ecdysone and insulin signaling play essential roles in readjusting the altered body size caused by the dGPAT4 mutation in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yan; Wang, Hao; Chen, Hanqing; Lindström-Battle, Anya; Jiao, Renjie

    2015-09-20

    Body size is one of the features that distinguish one species from another in the biological world. Animals have developed mechanisms to control their body size during normal development. However, how animals cope with genetic alterations and/or environmental stresses to develop into normal-sized adults remain poorly understood. The ability of the animals to develop into a normal-sized adult after the challenges of genetic alterations and/or environmental stresses reveals a robustness of body size control. Here we show that the mutation of dGPAT4, a de novo synthase of lysophosphatidic acid, is a genetic alteration that triggers such a robust response of the animals to body size challenges in Drosophila. Loss of dGPAT4 leads to a severe delay of development, slow growth and resultant small-sized animals during the larval stages, but results in normal-sized adult flies. The robust body size adjustment of the dGPAT4 mutant is likely achieved by corresponding changes in ecdysone and insulin signaling, which is also manifested by compromised food intake. Thus, we propose that a strategy has been evolved by the animals to reach final body size when challenged by genetic alterations, which requires the coordinated ecdysone and insulin signaling.

  8. Alteration in cell cycle-related proteins in lymphoblasts from carriers of the c.709-1G>A PGRN mutation associated with FTLD-TDP dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alquezar, Carolina; Esteras, Noemí; Bartolomé, Fernando; Merino, José J; Alzualde, Ainhoa; López de Munain, Adolfo; Martín-Requero, Ángeles

    2012-02-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration with neuronal inclusions containing TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43) is associated in most cases with null-mutations in the progranulin gene (PGRN). While the mechanisms by which PGRN haploinsufficiency leads to neurodegeneration remained speculative, increasing evidence support the hypothesis that cell cycle reentry of postmitotic neurons precedes many instances of neuronal death. Based in the mitogenic and neurotrophic activities of PGRN, we hypothesized that PGRN deficit may induce cell cycle disturbances and alterations in neuronal vulnerability. Because cell cycle dysfunction is not restricted to neurons, we studied the influence of PGRN haploinsufficiency, on cell cycle control in peripheral cells from patients suffering from frontotemporal dementia, bearing the PGRN mutation c.709-1G>A. Here we show that progranulin deficit increased cell cycle activity in immortalized lymphocytes. This effect was associated with increased levels of cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (CDK6) and phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (pRb), resulting in a G(1)/S regulatory failure. A loss of function of TDP-43 repressing CDK6 expression may result from altered subcellular TDP-43 distribution. The distinct functional features of lymphoblastoid cells from c.709-1 G>A carriers offer an invaluable, noninvasive tool to investigate the etiopathogenesis of frontotemporal lobar degeneration.

  9. LRP4 mutations alter Wnt/beta-catenin signaling and cause limb and kidney malformations in Cenani-Lenz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun; Pawlik, Barbara; Elcioglu, Nursel; Aglan, Mona; Kayserili, Hülya; Yigit, Gökhan; Percin, Ferda; Goodman, Frances; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Cenani, Asim; Urquhart, Jill; Chung, Boi-Dinh; Ismail, Samira; Amr, Khalda; Aslanger, Ayca D; Becker, Christian; Netzer, Christian; Scambler, Pete; Eyaid, Wafaa; Hamamy, Hanan; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Hennekam, Raoul; Nürnberg, Peter; Herz, Joachim; Temtamy, Samia A; Wollnik, Bernd

    2010-05-14

    Cenani-Lenz syndrome (CLS) is an autosomal-recessive congenital disorder affecting distal limb development. It is characterized mainly by syndactyly and/or oligodactyly and is now shown to be commonly associated with kidney anomalies. We used a homozygosity-mapping approach to map the CLS1 locus to chromosome 11p11.2-q13.1. By sequencing candidate genes, we identified recessive LRP4 mutations in 12 families with CLS. LRP4 belongs to the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related proteins (LRPs), which are essential for various developmental processes. LRP4 is known to antagonize LRP6-mediated activation of canonical Wnt signaling, a function that is lost by the identified mutations. Our findings increase the spectrum of congenital anomalies associated with abnormal lipoprotein receptor-dependent signaling.

  10. Conformational alterations resulting from mutations in cytoplasmic domains of the alpha subunit of the Na,K-ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blostein, R; Daly, S E; MacAulay, Nanna;

    1998-01-01

    , and decreased sensitivity to inhibition by vanadate. The striking changes observed with alpha 1M32E233K suggests interactions between the N-terminus, the beta-strand in the M2-M3 loop and the catalytic phosphorylation site. The behavior of these mutants contrasts with that of least one mutant involving......This paper summarizes experiments concerned with the functional consequences of mutations in cytoplasmic regions of the alpha 1 subunit of the Na,K-ATPase, in particular the amino terminus, the first cytoplasmic loop between transmembrane segments M2 and M3, and the major cytoplasmic loop between M......4 and M5. In the first mutation (alpha 1M32), 32 residues were removed from the N-terminus. The second mutation (E233K) was in the putative beta strand of M2-M3 loop and the third, comprised the replacement of the amino terminal half of loop M4-M5 of the Na,K-ATPase with the homologous segment...

  11. Mutations altering the gammaretrovirus endoproteolytic motif affect glycosylation of the envelope glycoprotein and early events of the virus life cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argaw, Takele; Wilson, Carolyn A., E-mail: carolyn.wilson@fda.hhs.gov

    2015-01-15

    Previously, we found that mutation of glutamine to proline in the endoproteolytic cleavage signal of the PERV-C envelope (RQKK to RPKK) resulted in non-infectious vectors. Here, we show that RPKK results in a non-infectious vector when placed in not only a PERV envelope, but also the envelope of a related gammaretrovirus, FeLV-B. The amino acid substitutions do not prevent envelope precursor cleavage, viral core and genome assembly, or receptor binding. Rather, the mutations result in the formation of hyperglycosylated glycoprotein and a reduction in the reverse transcribed minus strand synthesis and undetectable 2-LTR circular DNA in cells exposed to vectors with these mutated envelopes. Our findings suggest novel functions associated with the cleavage signal sequence that may affect trafficking through the glycosylation machinery of the cell. Further, the glycosylation status of the envelope appears to impact post-binding events of the viral life cycle, either membrane fusion, internalization, or reverse transcription. - Highlights: • Env cleavage signal impacts infectivity of gammaretroviruses. • Non-infectious mutants have hyper-glycosylated envelope that bind target cells. • Non-infectious mutants have defects in the formation of the double-stranded DNA. • Env cleavage motif has functions beyond cleavage of the env precursor.

  12. A Foxp2 Mutation Implicated in Human Speech Deficits Alters Sequencing of Ultrasonic Vocalizations in Adult Male Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabout, Jonathan; Sarkar, Abhra; Patel, Sheel R.; Radden, Taylor; Dunson, David B.; Fisher, Simon E.; Jarvis, Erich D.

    2016-01-01

    Development of proficient spoken language skills is disrupted by mutations of the FOXP2 transcription factor. A heterozygous missense mutation in the KE family causes speech apraxia, involving difficulty producing words with complex learned sequences of syllables. Manipulations in songbirds have helped to elucidate the role of this gene in vocal learning, but findings in non-human mammals have been limited or inconclusive. Here, we performed a systematic study of ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) of adult male mice carrying the KE family mutation. Using novel statistical tools, we found that Foxp2 heterozygous mice did not have detectable changes in USV syllable acoustic structure, but produced shorter sequences and did not shift to more complex syntax in social contexts where wildtype animals did. Heterozygous mice also displayed a shift in the position of their rudimentary laryngeal motor cortex (LMC) layer-5 neurons. Our findings indicate that although mouse USVs are mostly innate, the underlying contributions of FoxP2 to sequencing of vocalizations are conserved with humans.

  13. Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter, PfCRT, enlarge the parasite's food vacuole and alter drug sensitivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulcini, Serena; Staines, Henry M; Lee, Andrew H; Shafik, Sarah H; Bouyer, Guillaume; Moore, Catherine M; Daley, Daniel A; Hoke, Matthew J; Altenhofen, Lindsey M; Painter, Heather J; Mu, Jianbing; Ferguson, David J P; Llinás, Manuel; Martin, Rowena E; Fidock, David A; Cooper, Roland A; Krishna, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter, PfCRT, are the major determinant of chloroquine resistance in this lethal human malaria parasite. Here, we describe P. falciparum lines subjected to selection by amantadine or blasticidin that carry PfCRT mutations (C101F or L272F), causing the development of enlarged food vacuoles. These parasites also have increased sensitivity to chloroquine and some other quinoline antimalarials, but exhibit no or minimal change in sensitivity to artemisinins, when compared with parental strains. A transgenic parasite line expressing the L272F variant of PfCRT confirmed this increased chloroquine sensitivity and enlarged food vacuole phenotype. Furthermore, the introduction of the C101F or L272F mutation into a chloroquine-resistant variant of PfCRT reduced the ability of this protein to transport chloroquine by approximately 93 and 82%, respectively, when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. These data provide, at least in part, a mechanistic explanation for the increased sensitivity of the mutant parasite lines to chloroquine. Taken together, these findings provide new insights into PfCRT function and PfCRT-mediated drug resistance, as well as the food vacuole, which is an important target of many antimalarial drugs.

  14. TMEM43 mutation p.S358L alters intercalated disc protein expression and reduces conduction velocity in arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinayakumar Siragam

    Full Text Available Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC is a myocardial disease characterized by fibro-fatty replacement of myocardium in the right ventricular free wall and frequently results in life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. A heterozygous missense mutation in the transmembrane protein 43 (TMEM43 gene, p.S358L, has been genetically identified to cause autosomal dominant ARVC type 5 in a founder population from the island of Newfoundland, Canada. Little is known about the function of the TMEM43 protein or how it leads to the pathogenesis of ARVC. We sought to determine the distribution of TMEM43 and the effect of the p.S358L mutation on the expression and distribution of various intercalated (IC disc proteins as well as functional effects on IC disc gap junction dye transfer and conduction velocity in cell culture. Through Western blot analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, immunofluorescence (IF, and electrophysiological analysis, our results showed that the stable expression of p.S358L mutation in the HL-1 cardiac cell line resulted in decreased Zonula Occludens (ZO-1 expression and the loss of ZO-1 localization to cell-cell junctions. Junctional Plakoglobin (JUP and α-catenin proteins were redistributed to the cytoplasm with decreased localization to cell-cell junctions. Connexin-43 (Cx43 phosphorylation was altered, and there was reduced gap junction dye transfer and conduction velocity in mutant TMEM43-transfected cells. These observations suggest that expression of the p.S358L mutant of TMEM43 found in ARVC type 5 may affect localization of proteins involved in conduction, alter gap junction function and reduce conduction velocity in cardiac tissue.

  15. Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy related cardiac troponin C L29Q mutation alters length-dependent activation and functional effects of phosphomimetic troponin I*.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Y Li

    Full Text Available The Ca(2+ binding properties of the FHC-associated cardiac troponin C (cTnC mutation L29Q were examined in isolated cTnC, troponin complexes, reconstituted thin filament preparations, and skinned cardiomyocytes. While higher Ca(2+ binding affinity was apparent for the L29Q mutant in isolated cTnC, this phenomenon was not observed in the cTn complex. At the level of the thin filament in the presence of phosphomimetic TnI, L29Q cTnC further reduced the Ca(2+ affinity by 27% in the steady-state measurement and increased the Ca(2+ dissociation rate by 20% in the kinetic studies. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that L29Q destabilizes the conformation of cNTnC in the presence of phosphomimetic cTnI and potentially modulates the Ca(2+ sensitivity due to the changes of the opening/closing equilibrium of cNTnC. In the skinned cardiomyocyte preparation, L29Q cTnC increased Ca(2+ sensitivity in a highly sarcomere length (SL-dependent manner. The well-established reduction of Ca(2+ sensitivity by phosphomimetic cTnI was diminished by 68% in the presence of the mutation and it also depressed the SL-dependent increase in myofilament Ca(2+ sensitivity. This might result from its modified interaction with cTnI which altered the feedback effects of cross-bridges on the L29Q cTnC-cTnI-Tm complex. This study demonstrates that the L29Q mutation alters the contractility and the functional effects of the phosphomimetic cTnI in both thin filament and single skinned cardiomyocytes and importantly that this effect is highly sarcomere length dependent.

  16. Conformational alterations resulting from mutations in cytoplasmic domains of the alpha subunit of the Na,K-ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blostein, R; Daly, S E; MacAulay, Nanna

    1998-01-01

    substitution of a residue in the putative cation binding pocket, namely S775A in the fifth transmembrane segment (Arguello, J.M., & Lingrel, J. B. J. Biol. Chem. 270: 22764-22771, 1995). Although its K+/ATP antagonism resembles that of the foregoing cytoplasmic mutants, its vanadate sensitivity is unaltered...... in the presence or absence of Na+ and at low versus high pH indicate a marked alteration in cation affinity and/or selectivity. This results suggests coupling of an alteration in the large M4-M5 cytoplasmic domain to cation binding in, presumably, the juxtapositioned transmembrane domain....

  17. The episodic ataxia type 1 mutation I262T alters voltage-dependent gating and disrupts protein biosynthesis of human Kv1.1 potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Szu-Han; Fu, Ssu-Ju; Huang, Jing-Jia; Tang, Chih-Yung

    2016-01-18

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are essential for setting neuronal membrane excitability. Mutations in human Kv1.1 channels are linked to episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1). The EA1-associated mutation I262T was identified from a patient with atypical phenotypes. Although a previous report has characterized its suppression effect, several key questions regarding the impact of the I262T mutation on Kv1.1 as well as other members of the Kv1 subfamily remain unanswered. Herein we show that the dominant-negative effect of I262T on Kv1.1 current expression is not reversed by co-expression with Kvβ1.1 or Kvβ2 subunits. Biochemical examinations indicate that I262T displays enhanced protein degradation and impedes membrane trafficking of Kv1.1 wild-type subunits. I262T appears to be the first EA1 mutation directly associated with impaired protein stability. Further functional analyses demonstrate that I262T changes the voltage-dependent activation and Kvβ1.1-mediated inactivation, uncouples inactivation from activation gating, and decelerates the kinetics of cumulative inactivation of Kv1.1 channels. I262T also exerts similar dominant effects on the gating of Kv1.2 and Kv1.4 channels. Together our data suggest that I262T confers altered channel gating and reduced functional expression of Kv1 channels, which may account for some of the phenotypes of the EA1 patient.

  18. Two mutations in the locus control region hypersensitivity site-2 (5' HS-2) of haplotype 19 beta s chromosomes alter binding of trans-acting factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, J C; Scott, D F; Lanclos, K D

    1996-01-01

    There are five major haplotypes associated with sickle cell anemia (SS). Individuals homozygous for haplotypes 3 (Senegal) and 31 (Saudi Arabian) have high fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels (15 to 30% of total hemoglobin) whereas individuals homozygous for haplotypes 17 (Cameroon), 19 (Benin), and 20 (Bantu) have low HbF levels (1 to 10%). We previously identified several point mutations in the LCR 5'HS-2 that were specific for haplotype 19 beta s chromosomes (compared to the GenBank HUMHBB reference sequence, T-->G at position 8580, A-->G at position 8598, and A-->T at position 9114). We postulated that one or more of these mutations may alter the binding of specific trans-acting factors and ultimately affect the expression of HbF in these sickle cell patients. We performed gel mobility shift assays using 32P-end-labeled double-stranded 19mers corresponding to each of the LCR 5'HS-2 normal (GenBank) and mutant sequences. Nuclear extracts prepared from HeLa and HEL cells were used in our experiments and neither the normal nor mutant sequence at position 8580 bound trans-acting factors in either nuclear extract. The 8598 mutant increased binding of Sp1; using purified protein and both nuclear extracts. HEL extracts were used to quantify the increase in Sp1 binding to the 8598 mutation and we found an increase in binding of 66 and 47%, respectively, in two shifted bands. The 9114 mutation sharply decreased binding of an unknown trans-acting factor by 74%. This factor was present in both HeLa and HEL nuclear extracts.

  19. Rab3 interacting molecule 3 mutations associated with autism alter regulation of voltage-dependent Ca²⁺ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Yoshinori; Hirano, Mitsuru; Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Ueda, Yoshifumi; Yamaguchi, Kazuma; Nakahara, Keiko; Mori, Masayuki X; Mori, Yasuo

    2015-09-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental psychiatric disorder characterized by impaired reciprocal social interaction, disrupted communication, and restricted and stereotyped patterns of interests. Autism is known to have a strong genetic component. Although mutations in several genes account for only a small proportion of individuals with autism, they provide insight into potential biological mechanisms that underlie autism, such as dysfunction in Ca(2+) signaling, synaptic dysfunction, and abnormal brain connectivity. In autism patients, two mutations have been reported in the Rab3 interacting molecule 3 (RIM3) gene. We have previously demonstrated that RIM3 physically and functionally interacts with voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs) expressed in neurons via the β subunits, and increases neurotransmitter release. Here, by introducing corresponding autism-associated mutations that replace glutamic acid residue 176 with alanine (E176A) and methionine residue 259 with valine (M259V) into the C2B domain of mouse RIM3, we demonstrate that both mutations partly cancel the suppressive RIM3 effect on voltage-dependent inactivation of Ba(2+) currents through P/Q-type CaV2.1 recombinantly expressed in HEK293 cells. In recombinant N-type CaV2.2 VDCCs, the attenuation of the suppressive RIM3 effect on voltage-dependent inactivation is conserved for M259V but not E176A. Slowing of activation speed of P/Q-type CaV2.1 currents by RIM3 is abolished in E176A, while the physical interaction between RIM3 and β subunits is significantly attenuated in M259V. Moreover, increases by RIM3 in depolarization-induced Ca(2+) influx and acetylcholine release are significantly attenuated by E176A in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. Thus, our data raise the interesting possibility that autism phenotypes are elicited by synaptic dysfunction via altered regulation of presynaptic VDCC function and neurotransmitter release.

  20. The combined effect of two mutations that alter serially homologous color pattern elements on the fore and hindwings of a butterfly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedder Lindsey

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability for serially homologous structures to acquire a separate identity has been primarily investigated for structures dependent on Hox gene input but is still incompletely understood in other systems. The fore and hindwings of butterflies are serially homologous structures as are the serially homologous eyespots that can decorate each of these wings. Eyespots can vary in number between fore and hindwings of the same individual and mutations of large effect can control the total number of eyespots that each of the wings displays. Here we investigate the genetics of a new spontaneous color pattern mutation, Missing, that alters eyespot number in the nymphalid butterfly, Bicyclus anynana. We further test the interaction of Missing with a previously described mutation, Spotty, describe the developmental stage affected by Missing, and test whether Missing is a mutant variant of the gene Distal-less via a linkage association study. Results Missing removes or greatly reduces the size of two of the hindwing eyespots from the row of seven eyespots, with no detectable effect on the rest of the wing pattern. Offspring carrying a single Missing allele display intermediate sized eyespots at these positions. Spotty has the opposite effect of Missing, i.e., it introduces two extra eyespots in homologous wing positions to those affected by Missing, but on the forewing. When Missing is combined with Spotty the size of the two forewing eyespots decreases but the size of the hindwing spots stays the same, suggesting that these two mutations have a combined effect on the forewing such that Missing reduces eyespot size when in the presence of a Spotty mutant allele, but that Spotty has no effect on the hindwing. Missing prevents the complete differentiation of two of the eyespot foci on the hindwing. We found no evidence for any linkage between the Distal-less and Missing genes. Conclusion The spontaneous mutation Missing controls the

  1. Mutation I136V alters electrophysiological properties of the NaV1.7 channel in a family with onset of erythromelalgia in the second decade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dib-Hajj Sulayman D

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary erythromelalgia is an autosomal dominant pain disorder characterized by burning pain and skin redness in the extremities, with onset of symptoms during the first decade in the families whose mutations have been physiologically studied to date. Several mutations of voltage-gated Na+ channel NaV1.7 have been linked with primary erythromelalgia. Recently, a new substitution NaV1.7/I136V has been reported in a Taiwanese family, in which pain appeared at later ages (9–22 years, with onset at 17 years of age or later in 5 of 7 family members, with relatively slow progression (8–10 years to involvement of the hands. The proband reported onset of symptoms first in his feet at the age of 11, which then progressed to his hands at the age of 19. The new mutation is located in transmembrane segment 1 (S1 of domain I (DI in contrast to all NaV1.7 mutations reported to date, which have been localized in the voltage sensor S4, the linker joining segments S4 and S5 or pore-lining segments S5 and S6 in DI, II and III. Results In this study, we characterized the gating and kinetic properties of I136V mutant channels in HEK293 cells using whole-cell patch clamp. I136V shifts the voltage-dependence of activation by -5.7 mV, a smaller shift in activation than the other erythromelalgia mutations that have been characterized. I136V also decreases the deactivation rate, and generates larger ramp currents. Conclusion The I136V substitution in NaV1.7 alters channel gating and kinetic properties. Each of these changes may contribute to increased excitability of nociceptive dorsal root ganglion neurons, which underlies pain in erythromelalgia. The smaller shift in voltage-dependence of activation of NaV1.7, compared to the other reported cases of inherited erythromelalgia, may contribute to the later age of onset and slower progression of the symptoms reported in association with this mutation.

  2. Structural and functional alterations associated with deutan N94K and R330Q mutations of green cone opsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Sundaramoorthy; Fernández-Sampedro, Miguel A; Ramon, Eva; Garriga, Pere

    2017-07-01

    Deuteranopia is an X-linked congenital dichromatic condition in which single point mutations in green cone opsin lead to defective non-functional cone photoreceptor cells. Green cone opsin belongs to the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily and consists of a seven transmembrane helical apoprotein covalently bound to 11-cis-retinal, by means of a protonated Schiff base linkage, in its inactive dark state. Several point mutations in green cone opsin have been reported to cause deuteranopia, but the structural details underlying the molecular mechanisms behind the malfunction of mutated opsins have not been clearly established. Here, deutan N94K and R330Q mutants were studied by introducing these substitutions into the native green cone opsin gene by site-directed mutagenesis. The mutant proteins were purified and analyzed using UV-vis spectroscopy and transducin activation assay. We find that the N94K mutant binds the retinal chromophore by means of an unprotonated Schiff base linkage in contrast to previous studies that reported no chromophore regeneration. The other mutant studied, R330Q, showed impaired functionality as measured by its reduced transducin activation ability when compared to wild-type green cone opsin. A double Cys mutant that could form a stabilizing disulfide bond was used in an attempt to address the instability of the green opsin mutants. Our results suggest the presence of key intramolecular networks which may be disrupted in deuteranopia, and these findings could help in finding therapeutic solutions for treating color blindness. Furthermore, our results can also have implications for the study of other visual pigments and other rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Presenilin-1 mutations alter K+ currents in the human neuroblastoma cell line, SH-SY5Y

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plant, Leigh D; Boyle, John P; Thomas, Natasha M

    2002-01-01

    Mutations in presenilin 1 (PS1) are the major cause of autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease. We have measured the voltage-gated K+ current in the human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y using whole-cell patch-clamp. When cells were stably transfected to over-express PS1, no change in K+ current...... membrane distribution when the deltaE9 over-expressing cells were compared to control cells. Intracellular retention of Kv3.1 is consistent with the notion that PS1 can modulate the activity and trafficking of ion channels in central neurones and implicates a compromise in electrical signalling...

  4. Alteration of substrate specificity by a naturally-occurring aldolase B mutation (Ala337-->Val) in fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rellos, P; Ali, M; Vidailhet, M; Sygusch, J; Cox, T M

    1999-05-15

    A molecular analysis of human aldolase B genes in two newborn infants and a 4-year-old child with hereditary fructose intolerance, the offspring of a consanguineous union, has identified the novel mutation Ala337-->Val in homozygous form. This mutation was also detected independently in two other affected individuals who were compound heterozygotes for the prevalent aldolase B allele, Ala149-->Pro, indicating that the mutation causes aldolase B deficiency. To test for the effect of the mutation, catalytically active wild-type human aldolase B and the Val337 variant enzyme were expressed in Escherichia coli. The specific activities of the wild-type recombinant enzyme were 4.8 units/mg and 4.5 units/mg towards fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) and fructose 1-phosphate (F-1-P) as substrates with Michaelis constants of 4 microM and 2.4 mM respectively. The specific activities of purified tetrameric Val337 aldolase B, which affects an invariant residue in the C-terminal region, were 4.2 units/mg and 2.6 units/mg towards FBP and F-1-P as substrates respectively; the corresponding Michaelis constants were 22 microM and 24 mM. The FBP-to-F-1-P substrate activity ratios were 0.98 and 1.63 for wild-type and Val337 variant enzymes respectively. The Val337 mutant aldolase had an increased susceptibility to proteolytic cleavage in E. coli and rapidly lost activity on storage. Comparative CD determinations showed that the Val337 protein had a distinct thermal denaturation profile with markedly decreased enthalpy, indicating that the mutant protein is partly unfolded. The undegraded mutant had preferentially decreased affinity and activity towards its specific F-1-P substrate and maintained appreciable activity towards FBP. In contrast, fluorescence studies of the mutant showed an increased binding affinity for products of the aldolase reaction, indicating a role for the C-terminus in mediating product release. These findings in a rare but widespread naturally occurring mutant

  5. Mutations within the S4-S5 linker alter voltage sensor constraints in hERG K+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Slyke, Aaron C; Rezazadeh, Saman; Snopkowski, Mischa; Shi, Patrick; Allard, Charlene R; Claydon, Tom W

    2010-11-03

    Human ether-a-go-go related gene (hERG) channel gating is associated with slow activation, yet the mechanistic basis for this is unclear. Here, we examine the effects of mutation of a unique glycine residue (G546) in the S4-S5 linker on voltage sensor movement and its coupling to pore gating. Substitution of G546 with residues possessing different physicochemical properties shifted activation gating by ∼-50 mV (with the exception of G546C). With the activation shift taken into account, the time constant of activation was also accelerated, suggesting a stabilization of the closed state by ∼1.6-4.3 kcal/mol (the energy equivalent of one to two hydrogen bonds). Predictions of the α-helical content of the S4-S5 linker suggest that the presence of G546 in wild-type hERG provides flexibility to the helix. Deactivation gating was affected differentially by the G546 substitutions. G546V induced a pronounced slow component of closing that was voltage-independent. Fluorescence measurements of voltage sensor movement in G546V revealed a slow component of voltage sensor return that was uncoupled from charge movement, suggesting a direct effect of the mutation on voltage sensor movement. These data suggest that G546 plays a critical role in channel gating and that hERG channel closing involves at least two independently modifiable reconfigurations of the voltage sensor.

  6. Transposon-induced nuclear mutations that alter chloroplast gene expression. Annual report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkan, A.

    1992-12-31

    The goal of this project is to use mutant phenotypes as a guide to nuclear genes that determine the timing and localization of chloroplast development The immediate goals are to identify nuclear mutants with defects in chloroplast gene expression from maize lines harboring active Mu transposons; characterize their phenotypes to determine the precise defect in gene expression; clone several of the most interesting mutations by exploiting the transposon tag; and use the clones to further define the roles of these genes in modulating chloroplast gene expression. Three mutants were described earlier that had global defects in chloroplast gene expression. We have found that two of these mutations are allelic. Both alleles have global defects in chloroplast translation initiation, as revealed by the failure to assemble chloroplast mRNAs into polysomes. We have isolated and characterized three new mutants from Mu lines that have novel defects in chloroplast RNA metabolism. We are now ready to begin the task of cloning several of these genes, by using the Mu transposon tag.

  7. Familial hemiplegic migraine type-1 mutated cav2.1 calcium channels alter inhibitory and excitatory synaptic transmission in the lateral superior olive of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inchauspe, Carlota González; Pilati, Nadia; Di Guilmi, Mariano N; Urbano, Francisco J; Ferrari, Michel D; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Forsythe, Ian D; Uchitel, Osvaldo D

    2015-01-01

    CaV2.1 Ca(2+) channels play a key role in triggering neurotransmitter release and mediating synaptic transmission. Familial hemiplegic migraine type-1 (FHM-1) is caused by missense mutations in the CACNA1A gene that encodes the α1A pore-forming subunit of CaV2.1 Ca(2+) channels. We used knock-in (KI) transgenic mice harbouring the pathogenic FHM-1 mutation R192Q to study inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission in the principle neurons of the lateral superior olive (LSO) in the auditory brainstem. We tested if the R192Q FHM-1 mutation differentially affects excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission, disturbing the normal balance between excitation and inhibition in this nucleus. Whole cell patch-clamp was used to measure neurotransmitter elicited excitatory (EPSCs) and inhibitory (IPSCs) postsynaptic currents in wild-type (WT) and R192Q KI mice. Our results showed that the FHM-1 mutation in CaV2.1 channels has multiple effects. Evoked EPSC amplitudes were smaller whereas evoked and miniature IPSC amplitudes were larger in R192Q KI compared to WT mice. In addition, in R192Q KI mice, the release probability was enhanced compared to WT, at both inhibitory (0.53 ± 0.02 vs. 0.44 ± 0.01, P = 2.10(-5), Student's t-test) and excitatory synapses (0.60 ± 0.03 vs. 0.45 ± 0.02, P = 4 10(-6), Student's t-test). Vesicle pool size was diminished in R192Q KI mice compared to WT mice (68 ± 6 vs 91 ± 7, P = 0.008, inhibitory; 104 ± 13 vs 335 ± 30, P = 10(-6), excitatory, Student's t-test). R192Q KI mice present enhanced short-term plasticity. Repetitive stimulation of the afferent axons caused short-term depression (STD) of E/IPSCs that recovered significantly faster in R192Q KI mice compared to WT. This supports the hypothesis of a gain-of-function of the CaV2.1 channels in R192Q KI mice, which alters the balance of excitatory/inhibitory inputs and could also have implications in the altered cortical excitability responsible for FHM

  8. EXOSC8 mutations alter mRNA metabolism and cause hypomyelination with spinal muscular atrophy and cerebellar hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boczonadi, Veronika; Müller, Juliane S; Pyle, Angela; Munkley, Jennifer; Dor, Talya; Quartararo, Jade; Ferrero, Ileana; Karcagi, Veronika; Giunta, Michele; Polvikoski, Tuomo; Birchall, Daniel; Princzinger, Agota; Cinnamon, Yuval; Lützkendorf, Susanne; Piko, Henriett; Reza, Mojgan; Florez, Laura; Santibanez-Koref, Mauro; Griffin, Helen; Schuelke, Markus; Elpeleg, Orly; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Lochmüller, Hanns; Elliott, David J; Chinnery, Patrick F; Edvardson, Shimon; Horvath, Rita

    2014-07-03

    The exosome is a multi-protein complex, required for the degradation of AU-rich element (ARE) containing messenger RNAs (mRNAs). EXOSC8 is an essential protein of the exosome core, as its depletion causes a severe growth defect in yeast. Here we show that homozygous missense mutations in EXOSC8 cause progressive and lethal neurological disease in 22 infants from three independent pedigrees. Affected individuals have cerebellar and corpus callosum hypoplasia, abnormal myelination of the central nervous system or spinal motor neuron disease. Experimental downregulation of EXOSC8 in human oligodendroglia cells and in zebrafish induce a specific increase in ARE mRNAs encoding myelin proteins, showing that the imbalanced supply of myelin proteins causes the disruption of myelin, and explaining the clinical presentation. These findings show the central role of the exosomal pathway in neurodegenerative disease.

  9. Mutations in a plastid-localized elongation factor G alter early stages of plastid development in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hangarter Roger P

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proper development of plastids in embryo and seedling tissues is critical for plant development. During germination, plastids develop to perform many critical functions that are necessary to establish the seedling for further growth. A growing body of work has demonstrated that components of the plastid transcription and translation machinery must be present and functional to establish the organelle upon germination. Results We have identified Arabidopsis thaliana mutants in a gene that encodes a plastid-targeted elongation factor G (SCO1 that is essential for plastid development during embryogenesis since two T-DNA insertion mutations in the coding sequence (sco1-2 and sco1-3 result in an embryo-lethal phenotype. In addition, a point mutation allele (sco1-1 and an allele with a T-DNA insertion in the promoter (sco1-4 of SCO1 display conditional seedling-lethal phenotypes. Seedlings of these alleles exhibit cotyledon and hypocotyl albinism due to improper chloroplast development, and normally die shortly after germination. However, when germinated on media supplemented with sucrose, the mutant plants can produce photosynthetically-active green leaves from the apical meristem. Conclusion The developmental stage-specific phenotype of the conditional-lethal sco1 alleles reveals differences in chloroplast formation during seedling germination compared to chloroplast differentiation in cells derived from the shoot apical meristem. Our identification of embryo-lethal mutant alleles in the Arabidopsis elongation factor G indicates that SCO1 is essential for plant growth, consistent with its predicted role in chloroplast protein translation.

  10. Pathologic and phenotypic alterations in a mouse expressing a connexin47 missense mutation that causes Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease in humans.

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    Oliver Tress

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Gap junction channels are intercellular conduits that allow diffusional exchange of ions, second messengers, and metabolites. Human oligodendrocytes express the gap junction protein connexin47 (Cx47, which is encoded by the GJC2 gene. The autosomal recessive mutation hCx47M283T causes Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease 1 (PMLD1, a progressive leukodystrophy characterized by hypomyelination, retarded motor development, nystagmus, and spasticity. We introduced the human missense mutation into the orthologous position of the mouse Gjc2 gene and inserted the mCx47M282T coding sequence into the mouse genome via homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells. Three-week-old homozygous Cx47M282T mice displayed impaired rotarod performance but unchanged open-field behavior. 10-15-day-old homozygous Cx47M282T and Cx47 null mice revealed a more than 80% reduction in the number of cells participating in glial networks after biocytin injections into oligodendrocytes in sections of corpus callosum. Homozygous expression of mCx47M282T resulted in reduced MBP expression and astrogliosis in the cerebellum of ten-day-old mice which could also be detected in Cx47 null mice of the same age. Three-month-old homozygous Cx47M282T mice exhibited neither altered open-field behavior nor impaired rotarod performance anymore. Adult mCx47M282T expressing mice did not show substantial myelin alterations, but homozygous Cx47M282T mice, additionally deprived of connexin32, which is also expressed in oligodendrocytes, died within six weeks after birth and displayed severe myelin defects accompanied by astrogliosis and activated microglia. These results strongly suggest that PMLD1 is caused by the loss of Cx47 channel function that results in impaired panglial coupling in white matter tissue.

  11. The pch2Delta mutation in baker's yeast alters meiotic crossover levels and confers a defect in crossover interference.

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    Sarah Zanders

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Pch2 is a widely conserved protein that is required in baker's yeast for the organization of meiotic chromosome axes into specific domains. We provide four lines of evidence suggesting that it regulates the formation and distribution of crossover events required to promote chromosome segregation at Meiosis I. First, pch2Delta mutants display wild-type crossover levels on a small (III chromosome, but increased levels on larger (VII, VIII, XV chromosomes. Second, pch2Delta mutants show defects in crossover interference. Third, crossovers observed in pch2Delta require both Msh4-Msh5 and Mms4-Mus81 functions. Lastly, the pch2Delta mutation decreases spore viability and disrupts crossover interference in spo11 hypomorph strains that have reduced levels of meiosis-induced double-strand breaks. Based on these and previous observations, we propose a model in which Pch2 functions at an early step in crossover control to ensure that every homolog pair receives an obligate crossover.

  12. Mutations in ionotropic AMPA receptor 3 alter channel properties and are associated with moderate cognitive impairment in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ye; Arai, Amy C; Rumbaugh, Gavin; Srivastava, Anand K; Turner, Gillian; Hayashi, Takashi; Suzuki, Erika; Jiang, Yuwu; Zhang, Lilei; Rodriguez, Jayson; Boyle, Jackie; Tarpey, Patrick; Raymond, F Lucy; Nevelsteen, Joke; Froyen, Guy; Stratton, Mike; Futreal, Andy; Gecz, Jozef; Stevenson, Roger; Schwartz, Charles E; Valle, David; Huganir, Richard L; Wang, Tao

    2007-11-13

    Ionotropic alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors (iGluRs) mediate the majority of excitatory synaptic transmission in the CNS and are essential for the induction and maintenance of long-term potentiation and long-term depression, two cellular models of learning and memory. We identified a genomic deletion (0.4 Mb) involving the entire GRIA3 (encoding iGluR3) by using an X-array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and four missense variants (G833R, M706T, R631S, and R450Q) in functional domains of iGluR3 by sequencing 400 males with X-linked mental retardation (XLMR). Three variants were found in males with moderate MR and were absent in 500 control males. Expression studies in HEK293 cells showed that G833R resulted in a 78% reduction of iGluR3 due to protein misfolding. Whole-cell recording studies of iGluR3 homomers in HEK293 cells revealed that neither iGluR3-M706T (S2 domain) nor iGluR3-R631S (near channel core) had substantial channel function, whereas R450Q (S1 domain) was associated with accelerated receptor desensitization. When forming heteromeric receptors with iGluR2 in HEK293 cells, all four iGluR3 variants had altered desensitization kinetics. Our study provides the genetic and functional evidence that mutant iGluR3 with altered kinetic properties is associated with moderate cognitive impairment in humans.

  13. Cardiomyopathy-related mutation (A30V) in mouse cardiac troponin T divergently alters the magnitude of stretch activation in α- and β-myosin heavy chain fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickelson, Alexis V; Gollapudi, Sampath K; Chandra, Murali

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated the functional consequences of the human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) mutation A28V in cardiac troponin T (TnT). The A28V mutation is located within the NH2 terminus of TnT, a region known to be important for full activation of cardiac thin filaments. The functional consequences of the A28V mutation in TnT remain unknown. Given how α- and β-myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms differently alter the functional effect of the NH2 terminus of TnT, we hypothesized that the A28V-induced effects would be differently modulated by α- and β-MHC isoforms. Recombinant wild-type mouse TnT (TnTWT) and the mouse equivalent of the human A28V mutation (TnTA30V) were reconstituted into detergent-skinned cardiac muscle fibers extracted from normal (α-MHC) and transgenic (β-MHC) mice. Dynamic and steady-state contractile parameters were measured in reconstituted muscle fibers. Step-like length perturbation experiments demonstrated that TnTA30V decreased the magnitude of the muscle length-mediated recruitment of new force-bearing cross bridges (ER) by 30% in α-MHC fibers. In sharp contrast, TnTA30V increased ER by 55% in β-MHC fibers. Inferences drawn from other dynamic contractile parameters suggest that directional changes in ER in TnTA30V + α-MHC and TnTA30V + β-MHC fibers result from a divergent impact on cross bridge-regulatory unit (troponin-tropomyosin complex) cooperativity. TnTA30V-mediated effects on Ca(2+)-activated maximal tension and instantaneous muscle fiber stiffness (ED) were also divergently affected by α- and β-MHC. Our study demonstrates that TnTA30V + α-MHC and TnTA30V + β-MHC fibers show contrasting contractile phenotypes; however, only the observations from β-MHC fibers are consistent with the clinical data for A28V in humans.

  14. The free energy barrier for arginine gating charge translation is altered by mutations in the voltage sensor domain.

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    Christine S Schwaiger

    Full Text Available The gating of voltage-gated ion channels is controlled by the arginine-rich S4 helix of the voltage-sensor domain moving in response to an external potential. Recent studies have suggested that S4 moves in three to four steps to open the conducting pore, thus visiting several intermediate conformations during gating. However, the exact conformational changes are not known in detail. For instance, it has been suggested that there is a local rotation in the helix corresponding to short segments of a 3(10-helix moving along S4 during opening and closing. Here, we have explored the energetics of the transition between the fully open state (based on the X-ray structure and the first intermediate state towards channel closing (C1, modeled from experimental constraints. We show that conformations within 3 Å of the X-ray structure are obtained in simulations starting from the C1 model, and directly observe the previously suggested sliding 3(10-helix region in S4. Through systematic free energy calculations, we show that the C1 state is a stable intermediate conformation and determine free energy profiles for moving between the states without constraints. Mutations indicate several residues in a narrow hydrophobic band in the voltage sensor contribute to the barrier between the open and C1 states, with F233 in the S2 helix having the largest influence. Substitution for smaller amino acids reduces the transition cost, while introduction of a larger ring increases it, largely confirming experimental activation shift results. There is a systematic correlation between the local aromatic ring rotation, the arginine barrier crossing, and the corresponding relative free energy. In particular, it appears to be more advantageous for the F233 side chain to rotate towards the extracellular side when arginines cross the hydrophobic region.

  15. Mutational analysis of a monoterpene synthase reaction: altered catalysis through directed mutagenesis of (-)-pinene synthase from Abies grandis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, David C; Croteau, Rodney

    2005-07-15

    Two monoterpene synthases, (-)-pinene synthase and (-)-camphene synthase, from grand fir (Abies grandis) produce different product mixtures despite having highly homologous amino acid sequences and, presumably, very similar three-dimensional structures. The major product of (-)-camphene synthase, (-)-camphene, and the major products of (-)-pinene synthase, (-)-alpha-pinene, and (-)-beta-pinene, arise through distinct mechanistic variations of the electrophilic reaction cascade that is common to terpenoid synthases. Structural modeling followed by directed mutagenesis in (-)-pinene synthase was used to replace selected amino acid residues with the corresponding residues from (-)-camphene synthase in an effort to identify the amino acids responsible for the catalytic differences. This approach produced an enzyme in which more than half of the product was channeled through an alternative pathway. It was also shown that several (-)-pinene synthase to (-)-camphene synthase amino acid substitutions were necessary before catalysis was significantly altered. The data support a model in which the collective action of many key amino acids, located both in and distant from the active site pocket, regulate the course of the electrophilic reaction cascade.

  16. Mutations altering the interplay between GkDnaC helicase and DNA reveal an insight into helicase unwinding.

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    Yu-Hua Lo

    Full Text Available Replicative helicases are essential molecular machines that utilize energy derived from NTP hydrolysis to move along nucleic acids and to unwind double-stranded DNA (dsDNA. Our earlier crystal structure of the hexameric helicase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkDnaC in complex with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA suggested several key residues responsible for DNA binding that likely play a role in DNA translocation during the unwinding process. Here, we demonstrated that the unwinding activities of mutants with substitutions at these key residues in GkDnaC are 2-4-fold higher than that of wild-type protein. We also observed the faster unwinding velocities in these mutants using single-molecule experiments. A partial loss in the interaction of helicase with ssDNA leads to an enhancement in helicase efficiency, while their ATPase activities remain unchanged. In strong contrast, adding accessory proteins (DnaG or DnaI to GkDnaC helicase alters the ATPase, unwinding efficiency and the unwinding velocity of the helicase. It suggests that the unwinding velocity of helicase could be modulated by two different pathways, the efficiency of ATP hydrolysis or protein-DNA interaction.

  17. The von Hippel-Lindau Chuvash mutation in mice alters cardiac substrate and high-energy phosphate metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slingo, Mary; Cole, Mark; Carr, Carolyn; Curtis, Mary K; Dodd, Michael; Giles, Lucia; Heather, Lisa C; Tyler, Damian; Clarke, Kieran; Robbins, Peter A

    2016-09-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) appears to function as a global master regulator of cellular and systemic responses to hypoxia. HIF pathway manipulation is of therapeutic interest; however, global systemic upregulation of HIF may have as yet unknown effects on multiple processes. We used a mouse model of Chuvash polycythemia (CP), a rare genetic disorder that modestly increases expression of HIF target genes in normoxia, to understand what these effects might be within the heart. An integrated in and ex vivo approach was employed. Compared with wild-type controls, CP mice had evidence (using in vivo magnetic resonance imaging) of pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular hypertrophy, and increased left ventricular ejection fraction. Glycolytic flux (measured using [(3)H]glucose) in the isolated contracting perfused CP heart was 1.8-fold higher. Net lactate efflux was 1.5-fold higher. Furthermore, in vivo (13)C-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of hyperpolarized [(13)C1]pyruvate revealed a twofold increase in real-time flux through lactate dehydrogenase in the CP hearts and a 1.6-fold increase through pyruvate dehydrogenase. (31)P-MRS of perfused CP hearts under increased workload (isoproterenol infusion) demonstrated increased depletion of phosphocreatine relative to ATP. Intriguingly, no changes in cardiac gene expression were detected. In summary, a modest systemic dysregulation of the HIF pathway resulted in clear alterations in cardiac metabolism and energetics. However, in contrast to studies generating high HIF levels within the heart, the CP mice showed neither the predicted changes in gene expression nor any degree of LV impairment. We conclude that the effects of manipulating HIF on the heart are dose dependent.

  18. Ca++-sensitizing mutations in troponin, P(i), and 2-deoxyATP alter the depressive effect of acidosis on regulated thin-filament velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longyear, Thomas J; Turner, Matthew A; Davis, Jonathan P; Lopez, Joseph; Biesiadecki, Brandon; Debold, Edward P

    2014-05-01

    Repeated, intense contractile activity compromises the ability of skeletal muscle to generate force and velocity, resulting in fatigue. The decrease in velocity is thought to be due, in part, to the intracellular build-up of acidosis inhibiting the function of the contractile proteins myosin and troponin; however, the underlying molecular basis of this process remains poorly understood. We sought to gain novel insight into the decrease in velocity by determining whether the depressive effect of acidosis could be altered by 1) introducing Ca(++)-sensitizing mutations into troponin (Tn) or 2) by agents that directly affect myosin function, including inorganic phosphate (Pi) and 2-deoxy-ATP (dATP) in an in vitro motility assay. Acidosis reduced regulated thin-filament velocity (VRTF) at both maximal and submaximal Ca(++) levels in a pH-dependent manner. A truncated construct of the inhibitory subunit of Tn (TnI) and a Ca(++)-sensitizing mutation in the Ca(++)-binding subunit of Tn (TnC) increased VRTF at submaximal Ca(++) under acidic conditions but had no effect on VRTF at maximal Ca(++) levels. In contrast, both Pi and replacement of ATP with dATP reversed much of the acidosis-induced depression of VRTF at saturating Ca(++). Interestingly, despite producing similar magnitude increases in VRTF, the combined effects of Pi and dATP were additive, suggesting different underlying mechanisms of action. These findings suggest that acidosis depresses velocity by slowing the detachment rate from actin but also by possibly slowing the attachment rate.

  19. Ca++-sensitizing mutations in troponin, Pi, and 2-deoxyATP alter the depressive effect of acidosis on regulated thin-filament velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longyear, Thomas J.; Turner, Matthew A.; Davis, Jonathan P.; Lopez, Joseph; Biesiadecki, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    Repeated, intense contractile activity compromises the ability of skeletal muscle to generate force and velocity, resulting in fatigue. The decrease in velocity is thought to be due, in part, to the intracellular build-up of acidosis inhibiting the function of the contractile proteins myosin and troponin; however, the underlying molecular basis of this process remains poorly understood. We sought to gain novel insight into the decrease in velocity by determining whether the depressive effect of acidosis could be altered by 1) introducing Ca++-sensitizing mutations into troponin (Tn) or 2) by agents that directly affect myosin function, including inorganic phosphate (Pi) and 2-deoxy-ATP (dATP) in an in vitro motility assay. Acidosis reduced regulated thin-filament velocity (VRTF) at both maximal and submaximal Ca++ levels in a pH-dependent manner. A truncated construct of the inhibitory subunit of Tn (TnI) and a Ca++-sensitizing mutation in the Ca++-binding subunit of Tn (TnC) increased VRTF at submaximal Ca++ under acidic conditions but had no effect on VRTF at maximal Ca++ levels. In contrast, both Pi and replacement of ATP with dATP reversed much of the acidosis-induced depression of VRTF at saturating Ca++. Interestingly, despite producing similar magnitude increases in VRTF, the combined effects of Pi and dATP were additive, suggesting different underlying mechanisms of action. These findings suggest that acidosis depresses velocity by slowing the detachment rate from actin but also by possibly slowing the attachment rate. PMID:24651988

  20. Sexual orientation in Drosophila is altered by the satori mutation in the sex-determination gene fruitless that encodes a zinc finger protein with a BTB domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, H; Fujitani, K; Usui, K; Shimizu-Nishikawa, K; Tanaka, S; Yamamoto, D

    1996-09-03

    We have isolated a new Drosophila mutant, satori (sat), the males of which do not court or copulate with female flies. The sat mutation comaps with fruitless (fru) at 91B and does not rescue the bisexual phenotype of fru, indicating that sat is allelic to fru (fru(sat)). The fru(sat) adult males lack a male-specific muscle, the muscle of Lawrence, as do adult males with other fru alleles. Molecular cloning and analyses of the genomic and complementary DNAs indicated that transcription of the fru locus yields several different transcripts. The sequence of fru cDNA clones revealed a long open reading frame that potentially encodes a putative transcription regulator with a BTB domain and two zinc finger motifs. In the 5' noncoding region, three putative transformer binding sites were identified in the female transcript but not in male transcripts. The fru gene is expressed in a population of brain cells, including those in the antennal lobe, that have been suggested to be involved in determination of male sexual orientation. We suggest that fru functions downstream of tra in the sex-determination cascade in some neural cells and that inappropriate sexual development of these cells in the fru mutants results in altered sexual orientation of the fly.

  1. Mitochondrial protein alterations in a familial peripheral neuropathy caused by the V144D amino acid mutation in the sphingolipid protein, SPTLC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimpson, Scott E; Coorssen, Jens R; Myers, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    Axonal degeneration is the final common path in many neurological disorders. Subsets of neuropathies involving the sensory neuron are known as hereditary sensory neuropathies (HSNs). Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN-I) is the most common subtype of HSN with autosomal dominant inheritance. It is characterized by the progressive degeneration of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) with clinical symptom onset between the second or third decade of life. Heterozygous mutations in the serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) long chain subunit 1 (SPTLC1) gene were identified as the pathogenic cause of HSN-I. Ultrastructural analysis of mitochondria from HSN-I patient cells has displayed unique morphological abnormalities that are clustered to the perinucleus where they are wrapped by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). This investigation defines a small subset of proteins with major alterations in abundance in mitochondria harvested from HSN-I mutant SPTLC1 cells. Using mitochondrial protein isolates from control and patient lymphoblasts, and a combination of 2D gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting and mass spectrometry, we have shown the increased abundance of ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase core protein 1, an electron transport chain protein, as well as the immunoglobulin, Ig kappa chain C. The regulation of these proteins may provide a new route to understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying HSN-I.

  2. Biological and Clinical Relevance of Associated Genomic Alterations in MYD88 L265P and non-L265P-Mutated Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma: Analysis of 361 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Sydney; Viailly, Pierre-Julien; Bohers, Elodie; Bertrand, Philippe; Ruminy, Philippe; Marchand, Vinciane; Maingonnat, Catherine; Mareschal, Sylvain; Picquenot, Jean-Michel; Penther, Dominique; Jais, Jean-Philippe; Tesson, Bruno; Peyrouze, Pauline; Figeac, Martin; Desmots, Fabienne; Fest, Thierry; Haioun, Corinne; Lamy, Thierry; Copie-Bergman, Christiane; Fabiani, Bettina; Delarue, Richard; Peyrade, Frédéric; André, Marc; Ketterer, Nicolas; Leroy, Karen; Salles, Gilles; Molina, Thierry J; Tilly, Hervé; Jardin, Fabrice

    2017-05-01

    Purpose:MYD88 mutations, notably the recurrent gain-of-function L265P variant, are a distinguishing feature of activated B-cell like (ABC) diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), leading to constitutive NFκB pathway activation. The aim of this study was to examine the distinct genomic profiles of MYD88-mutant DLBCL, notably according to the presence of the L265P or other non-L265P MYD88 variants.Experimental Design: A cohort of 361 DLBCL cases (94 MYD88 mutant and 267 MYD88 wild-type) was submitted to next-generation sequencing (NGS) focusing on 34 genes to analyze associated mutations and copy number variations, as well as gene expression profiling, and clinical and prognostic analyses.Results: Importantly, we highlighted different genomic profiles for MYD88 L265P and MYD88 non-L265P-mutant DLBCL, shedding light on their divergent backgrounds. Clustering analysis also segregated subgroups according to associated genetic alterations among patients with the same MYD88 mutation. We showed that associated CD79B and MYD88 L265P mutations act synergistically to increase NFκB pathway activation, although the majority of MYD88 L265P-mutant cases harbors downstream NFκB alterations, which can predict BTK inhibitor resistance. Finally, although the MYD88 L265P variant was not an independent prognostic factor in ABC DLBCL, associated CD79B mutations significantly improved the survival of MYD88 L265P-mutant ABC DLBCL in our cohort.Conclusions: This study highlights the relative heterogeneity of MYD88-mutant DLBCL, adding to the field's knowledge of the theranostic importance of MYD88 mutations, but also of associated alterations, emphasizing the usefulness of genomic profiling to best stratify patients for targeted therapy. Clin Cancer Res; 23(9); 2232-44. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. p53 and H-ras mutations and microsatellite instability in renal pelvic carcinomas of NON / Shi mice treated with N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)-nitrosamine: different genetic alteration from urinary bladder carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gen, H; Yamamoto, S; Morimura, K; Min, W; Mitsuhashi, M; Murai, T; Mori, S; Hosono, M; Oohara, T; Makino, S; Wanibuchi, H; Fukushima, S

    2001-12-01

    We previously reported p53 mutations to be frequent (greater than 70%), whereas both H-ras mutations and microsatellite instability (MSI) were infrequent (about 10%), in urinary bladder carcinomas (UBCs) and their metastatic foci in the N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN)-induced mouse urothelial carcinogenesis model. In the present study, an analysis of p53 and H-ras mutations as well as MSI was performed on 12 renal pelvic carcinomas (RPCs) and 8 metastatic or invading foci produced by the same experimental procedure. Histologically, 10 of the RPCs were transitional cell carcinomas and the remaining 2 were squamous cell carcinomas. p53 mutations were infrequent and only found in one primary RPC (8%), its metastatic foci and an invading lesion in another animal (in a total 2 of 12; 17%). H-ras mutations were slightly more frequent (found in 3 of 12 animals; 25%), 4 of 5 involving codon 44, GTG to GCG, not a hot-spot reported for human cancers. In two cases, H-ras mutations were confined to lung metastasis and not detectable in their primary RPCs. MSI analysis was available for 6 pairs of primary RPCs and their metastatic foci, and 4 animals (67%) had MSI at one or more microsatellite loci. Overall, the distribution of genetic alterations differed from that in UBCs produced by the same experimental protocol. The results thus suggest that different genetic pathways may participate in carcinogenesis of the upper and lower urinary tract due to BBN.

  4. Morquio A syndrome-associated mutations: a review of alterations in the GALNS gene and a new locus-specific database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrone, Amelia; Caciotti, Anna; Atwood, Robert; Davidson, Kathryn; Du, Chaoyi; Francis-Lyon, Patricia; Harmatz, Paul; Mealiffe, Matthew; Mooney, Sean; Oron, Tal Ronnen; Ryles, April; Zawadzki, Karl A; Miller, Nicole

    2014-11-01

    Morquio A syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis IVA) is an autosomal recessive disorder that results from deficient activity of the enzyme N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS) due to alterations in the GALNS gene, which causes major skeletal and connective tissue abnormalities and effects on multiple organ systems. The GALNS alterations associated with Morquio A are numerous and heterogeneous, and new alterations are continuously identified. To aid detection and interpretation of GALNS alterations, from previously published research, we provide a comprehensive and up-to-date listing of 277 unique GALNS alterations associated with Morquio A identified from 1,091 published GALNS alleles. In agreement with previous findings, most reported GALNS alterations are missense changes and even the most frequent alterations are relatively uncommon. We found that 48% of patients are assessed as homozygous for a GALNS alteration, 39% are assessed as heterozygous for two identified GALNS alterations, and in 13% of patients only one GALNS alteration is detected. We report here the creation of a locus-specific database for the GALNS gene (http://galns.mutdb.org/) that catalogs all reported alterations in GALNS to date. We highlight the challenges both in alteration detection and genotype-phenotype interpretation caused in part by the heterogeneity of GALNS alterations and provide recommendations for molecular testing of GALNS.

  5. A defective ABC transporter of the MRP family, responsible for the bean lpa1 mutation, affects the regulation of the phytic acid pathway, reduces seed myo-inositol and alters ABA sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzeri, Dario; Cassani, Elena; Doria, Enrico; Tagliabue, Giovanni; Forti, Luca; Campion, Bruno; Bollini, Roberto; Brearley, Charles A; Pilu, Roberto; Nielsen, Erik; Sparvoli, Francesca

    2011-07-01

    • We previously identified the lpa1 (low phytic acid) 280-10 line that carries a mutation conferring a 90% reduction in phytic acid (InsP(6) ) content. In contrast to other lpa mutants, lpa1(280-10) does not display negative pleiotropic effects. In the present paper, we have identified the mutated gene and analysed its impact on the phytic acid pathway. • Here, we mapped the lpa1(280-10) mutation by bulk analysis on a segregating F(2) population, an then, by comparison with the soybean genome, we identified and sequenced a candidate gene. The InsP(6) pathway was analysed by gene expression and quantification of metabolites. • The mutated Pvmrp1(280-10) cosegregates with the lpa1(280-10) mutation, and the expression level of several genes of the InsP(6) pathway are reduced in the lpa1(280-10) mutant as well as the inositol and raffinosaccharide content. PvMrp2, a very similar paralogue of PvMrp1 was also mapped and sequenced. • The lpa1 mutation in beans is likely the result of a defective Mrp1 gene (orthologous to the lpa genes AtMRP5 and ZmMRP4), while its Mrp2 paralog is not able to complement the mutant phenotype in the seed. This mutation appears to down-regulate the InsP(6) pathway at the transcriptional level, as well as altering inositol-related metabolism and affecting ABA sensitivity.

  6. Function of IHF in lambda DNA packaging. II. Effects of mutations altering the IHF binding site and the intrinsic bend in cosB on lambda development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, W; Cai, Z H; Feiss, M

    1993-03-20

    cosB is the binding site on lambda DNA for terminase, the phage DNA packaging protein. cosB contains three binding sites for gpNu1, the small subunit of terminase, and a site for integration host factor (IHF). IHF plays an accessory role in lambda DNA packaging, and IHF stimulates the burst size of lambda several-fold, presumably by assisting the interaction of terminase with cosB. The present work includes a study of the effect on lambda development of a mutation, called I1A-, which consists of three adjacent base-pair changes in the IHF binding site. The I1A- mutation was found to abolish IHF stimulation of the lambda burst size, indicating that IHF is unable to bind to the mutant I1A site. A second mutation, called I1B- and also consisting of three adjacent base-pair changes, is a mutation that reduces an intrinsic bend found in cosB. lambda I1B- was more dependent on IHF than lambda+, raising the possibility that the intrinsic bend in cosB plays a role in cos function for lambda+ under the IHF- conditions. In vitro DNA packaging experiments established that the I1 mutations affect DNA packaging per se. A series of Nu1 mutations that create terminases able to suppress a variety of cosB defects were found to suppress the defects of the I1A- and I1B- mutations under IHF- conditions.

  7. The G1613A mutation in the HBV genome affects HBeAg expression and viral replication through altered core promoter activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man-Shan Li

    Full Text Available Infection of hepatitis B virus (HBV causes acute and chronic hepatitis and is closely associated with the development of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Previously, we demonstrated that the G1613A mutation in the HBV negative regulatory element (NRE is a hotspot mutation in HCC patients. In this study, we further investigated the functional consequences of this mutation in the context of the full length HBV genome and its replication. We showed that the G1613A mutation significantly suppresses the secretion of e antigen (HBeAg and enhances the synthesis of viral DNA, which is in consistence to our clinical result that the G1613A mutation associates with high viral load in chronic HBV carriers. To further investigate the molecular mechanism of the mutation, we performed the electrophoretic mobility shift assay with the recombinant RFX1 protein, a trans-activator that was shown to interact with the NRE of HBV. Intriguingly, RFX1 binds to the G1613A mutant with higher affinity than the wild-type sequence, indicating that the mutation possesses the trans-activating effect to the core promoter via NRE. The trans-activating effect was further validated by the enhancement of the core promoter activity after overexpression of RFX1 in liver cell line. In summary, our results suggest the functional consequences of the hotspot G1613A mutation found in HBV. We also provide a possible molecular mechanism of this hotspot mutation to the increased viral load of HBV carriers, which increases the risk to HCC.

  8. Infertility in Female Mice with a Gain-of-Function Mutation in the Luteinizing Hormone Receptor Is Due to Irregular Estrous Cyclicity, Anovulation, Hormonal Alterations, and Polycystic Ovaries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hai, Lan; McGee, Stacey R; Rabideau, Amanda C; Paquet, Marilène; Narayan, Prema

    2015-01-01

    The luteinizing hormone receptor, LHCGR, is essential for fertility in males and females, and genetic mutations in the receptor have been identified that result in developmental and reproductive defects...

  9. CACNA1H missense mutations associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis alter Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel activity and reticular thalamic neuron firing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzhepetskyy, Yuriy; Lazniewska, Joanna; Blesneac, Iulia; Pamphlett, Roger; Weiss, Norbert

    2016-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. In a recent study by Steinberg and colleagues, 2 recessive missense mutations were identified in the Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel gene (CACNA1H), in a family with an affected proband (early onset, long duration ALS) and 2 unaffected parents. We have introduced and functionally characterized these mutations using transiently expressed human Cav3.2 channels in tsA-201 cells. Both of these mutations produced mild but significant changes on T-type channel activity that are consistent with a loss of channel function. Computer modeling in thalamic reticular neurons suggested that these mutations result in decreased neuronal excitability of thalamic structures. Taken together, these findings implicate CACNA1H as a susceptibility gene in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  10. The cytochrome b p.278Y>C mutation causative of a multisystem disorder enhances superoxide production and alters supramolecular interactions of respiratory chain complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghelli, Anna; Tropeano, Concetta V; Calvaruso, Maria Antonietta

    2013-01-01

    Cytochrome b is the only mtDNA-encoded subunit of the mitochondrial complex III (CIII), the functional bottleneck of the respiratory chain. Previously, the human cytochrome b missense mutation m.15579A>G, which substitutes the Tyr 278 with Cys (p.278Y>C), was identified in a patient with severe...... exercise intolerance and multisystem manifestations. In this study, we characterized the biochemical properties of cybrids carrying this mutation and report that the homoplasmic p.278Y>C mutation caused a dramatic reduction in the CIII activity and in CIII-driven mitochondrial ATP synthesis. However......, the CI, CI + CIII and CII + CIII activities and the rate of ATP synthesis driven by the CI or CII substrate were only partially reduced or unaffected. Consistent with these findings, mutated cybrids maintained the mitochondrial membrane potential in the presence of oligomycin, indicating...

  11. Altered HLA Class I Profile Associated with Type A/D Nucleophosmin Mutation Points to Possible Anti-Nucleophosmin Immune Response in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateřina Kuželová

    Full Text Available Nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1 mutations are frequently found in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML and the newly generated sequences were suggested to induce immune response contributing to the relatively favorable outcome of patients in this AML subset. We hypothesized that if an efficient immune response against mutated nucleophosmin can be induced in vivo, the individuals expressing HLA alleles suitable for presenting NPM-derived peptides should be less prone to developing AML associated with NPM1 mutation. We thus compared HLA class I frequencies in a cohort of patients with mutated NPM1 (63 patients, NPMc+, a cohort of patients with wild-type NPM1 (94 patients, NPMwt and in normal individuals (large datasets available from Allele Frequency Net Database. Several HLA allelic groups were found to be depleted in NPMc+ patients, but not in NPMwt compared to the normal distribution. The decrease was statistically significant for HLA B(*07, B(*18, and B(*40. Furthermore, statistically significant advantage in the overall survival was found for patients with mutated NPM1 expressing at least one of the depleted allelic groups. The majority of the depleted alleles were predicted to bind potent NPM-derived immunopeptides and, importantly, these peptides were often located in the unmutated part of the protein. Our analysis suggests that individuals expressing specific HLA allelic groups are disposed to develop an efficient anti-AML immune response thanks to aberrant cytoplasmic localization of the mutated NPM protein.

  12. Pancreatic endocrine tumours: mutational and immunohistochemical survey of protein kinases reveals alterations in targetable kinases in cancer cell lines and rare primaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbo, V.; Beghelli, S.; Bersani, S.; Antonello, D.; Talamini, G.; Brunelli, M.; Capelli, P.; Falconi, M.; Scarpa, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Kinases represent potential therapeutic targets in pancreatic endocrine tumours (PETs). Patients and methods: Thirty-five kinase genes were sequenced in 36 primary PETs and three PET cell lines: (i) 4 receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK), epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), tyrosine-protein kinase KIT (KIT), platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRalpha); (ii) 6 belonging to the Akt/mTOR pathway; and (iii) 25 frequently mutated in cancers. The immunohistochemical expression of the four RTKs and the copy number of EGFR and HER2 were assessed in 140 PETs. Results: Somatic mutations were found in KIT in one and ATM in two primary neoplasms. Among 140 PETs, EGFR was immunopositive in 18 (13%), HER2 in 3 (2%), KIT in 16 (11%), and PDGFRalpha in 135 (96%). HER2 amplification was found in 2/130 (1.5%) PETs. KIT membrane immunostaining was significantly associated with tumour aggressiveness and shorter patient survival. PET cell lines QGP1, CM and BON harboured mutations in FGFR3, FLT1/VEGFR1 and PIK3CA, respectively. Conclusions: Only rare PET cases, harbouring either HER2 amplification or KIT mutation, might benefit from targeted drugs. KIT membrane expression deserves further attention as a prognostic marker. ATM mutation is involved in a proportion of PET. The finding of specific mutations in PET cell lines renders these models useful for preclinical studies involving pathway-specific therapies. PMID:21447618

  13. Altered mRNA Splicing, Chondrocyte Gene Expression and Abnormal Skeletal Development due to SF3B4 Mutations in Rodriguez Acrofacial Dysostosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevarez, Lisette; Pogue, Robert; Krakow, Deborah; Cohn, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    The acrofacial dysostoses (AFD) are a genetically heterogeneous group of inherited disorders with craniofacial and limb abnormalities. Rodriguez syndrome is a severe, usually perinatal lethal AFD, characterized by severe retrognathia, oligodactyly and lower limb abnormalities. Rodriguez syndrome has been proposed to be a severe form of Nager syndrome, a non-lethal AFD that results from mutations in SF3B4, a component of the U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (U2 snRNP). Furthermore, a case with a phenotype intermediate between Rodriguez and Nager syndromes has been shown to have an SF3B4 mutation. We identified heterozygosity for SF3B4 mutations in Rodriguez syndrome, confirming that the phenotype is a dominant disorder that is allelic with Nager syndrome. The mutations led to reduced SF3B4 synthesis and defects in mRNA splicing, primarily exon skipping. The mutations also led to reduced expression in growth plate chondrocytes of target genes, including the DLX5, DLX6, SOX9, and SOX6 transcription factor genes, which are known to be important for skeletal development. These data provide mechanistic insight toward understanding how SF3B4 mutations lead to the skeletal abnormalities observed in the acrofacial dysostoses. PMID:27622494

  14. Altered mRNA Splicing, Chondrocyte Gene Expression and Abnormal Skeletal Development due to SF3B4 Mutations in Rodriguez Acrofacial Dysostosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Marques

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The acrofacial dysostoses (AFD are a genetically heterogeneous group of inherited disorders with craniofacial and limb abnormalities. Rodriguez syndrome is a severe, usually perinatal lethal AFD, characterized by severe retrognathia, oligodactyly and lower limb abnormalities. Rodriguez syndrome has been proposed to be a severe form of Nager syndrome, a non-lethal AFD that results from mutations in SF3B4, a component of the U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (U2 snRNP. Furthermore, a case with a phenotype intermediate between Rodriguez and Nager syndromes has been shown to have an SF3B4 mutation. We identified heterozygosity for SF3B4 mutations in Rodriguez syndrome, confirming that the phenotype is a dominant disorder that is allelic with Nager syndrome. The mutations led to reduced SF3B4 synthesis and defects in mRNA splicing, primarily exon skipping. The mutations also led to reduced expression in growth plate chondrocytes of target genes, including the DLX5, DLX6, SOX9, and SOX6 transcription factor genes, which are known to be important for skeletal development. These data provide mechanistic insight toward understanding how SF3B4 mutations lead to the skeletal abnormalities observed in the acrofacial dysostoses.

  15. Null Mutations of Group A Streptococcus Orphan Kinase RocA: Selection in Mouse Infection and Comparison with CovS Mutations in Alteration of In Vitro and In Vivo Protease SpeB Expression and Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wenchao; Minor, Dylan; Liu, Mengyao; Li, Jinquan; Ishaq, Suzanne L; Yeoman, Carl; Lei, Benfang

    2017-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) acquires mutations of the virulence regulator CovRS in human and mouse infections, and these mutations result in the upregulation of virulence genes and the downregulation of the protease SpeB. To identify in vivo mutants with novel phenotypes, GAS isolates from infected mice were screened by enzymatic assays for SpeB and the platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase Sse, and a new type of variant that had enhanced Sse expression and normal levels of SpeB production was identified (the variants had a phenotype referred to as enhanced Sse activity [Sse(A+)] and normal SpeB activity [SpeB(A+)]). Sse(A+) SpeB(A+) variants had transcript levels of CovRS-controlled virulence genes comparable to those of a covS mutant but had no covRS mutations. Genome resequencing of an Sse(A+) SpeB(A+) isolate identified a C605A nonsense mutation in orphan kinase gene rocA, and 6 other Sse(A+) SpeB(A+) isolates also had nonsense mutations or small indels in rocA RocA and CovS mutants had similar levels of enhancement of the expression of CovRS-controlled virulence genes at the exponential growth phase; however, mutations of RocA but not mutations of CovS did not result in the downregulation of speB transcription at stationary growth phase or in subcutaneous infection of mice. GAS with RocA and CovS mutations caused greater enhancement of the expression of hasA than spyCEP in mouse skin infection than wild-type GAS did. RocA mutants ranked between wild-type GAS and CovS mutants in skin invasion, inhibition of neutrophil recruitment, and virulence in subcutaneous infection of mice. Thus, GAS RocA mutants can be selected in subcutaneous infections in mice and exhibit gene expression patterns and virulences distinct from those of CovS mutants. The findings provide novel information for understanding GAS fitness mutations in vivo, virulence gene regulation, in vivo gene expression, and virulence. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. Mutational spectrum drives the rise of mutator bacteria.

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    Alejandro Couce

    Full Text Available Understanding how mutator strains emerge in bacterial populations is relevant both to evolutionary theory and to reduce the threat they pose in clinical settings. The rise of mutator alleles is understood as a result of their hitchhiking with linked beneficial mutations, although the factors that govern this process remain unclear. A prominent but underappreciated fact is that each mutator allele increases only a specific spectrum of mutational changes. This spectrum has been speculated to alter the distribution of fitness effects of beneficial mutations, potentially affecting hitchhiking. To study this possibility, we analyzed the fitness distribution of beneficial mutations generated from different mutator and wild-type Escherichia coli strains. Using antibiotic resistance as a model system, we show that mutational spectra can alter these distributions substantially, ultimately determining the competitive ability of each strain across environments. Computer simulation showed that the effect of mutational spectrum on hitchhiking dynamics follows a non-linear function, implying that even slight spectrum-dependent fitness differences are sufficient to alter mutator success frequency by several orders of magnitude. These results indicate an unanticipated central role for the mutational spectrum in the evolution of bacterial mutation rates. At a practical level, this study indicates that knowledge of the molecular details of resistance determinants is crucial for minimizing mutator evolution during antibiotic therapy.

  17. H3(K27M/I) mutations promote context-dependent transformation in acute myeloid leukemia with RUNX1 alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnertz, Bernhard; Zhang, Yu Wei; Boivin, Isabel; Mayotte, Nadine; Tomellini, Elisa; Chagraoui, Jalila; Lavallée, Vincent-Philippe; Hébert, Josée; Sauvageau, Guy

    2017-08-30

    Neomorphic missense mutations affecting crucial lysine residues in histone H3 genes significantly contribute to a variety of solid cancers. Despite the high prevalence of H3(K27M) mutations in pediatric glioblastoma and their well-established impact on global histone H3 lysine 27 di and trimethylation (H3K27me2/3), the relevance of these mutations has not been studied in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Here, we report the first identification of H3(K27M) and H3(K27I) mutations in AML patients. We find that these lesions are major determinants of reduced H3K27me2/3 in these patients and that they associate with common aberrations in the RUNX1 gene. We demonstrate that H3(K27I/M) mutations are strong disease accelerators in a RUNX1-RUNX1T1 AML mouse model, suggesting that H3K27me2/3 has an important and selective leukemia-suppressive activity in this genetic context. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Hematology.

  18. Modifications on the hydrogen bond network by mutations of Escherichia coli copper efflux oxidase affect the process of proton transfer to dioxygen leading to alterations of enzymatic activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajikawa, Takao; Kataoka, Kunishige [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Sakurai, Takeshi, E-mail: tsakurai@se.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan)

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proton transfer pathway to dioxygen in CueO was identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Glu506 is the key amino acid to transport proton. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ala mutation at Glu506 formed a compensatory proton transfer pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ile mutation at Glu506 shut down the hydrogen bond network. -- Abstract: CueO has a branched hydrogen bond network leading from the exterior of the protein molecule to the trinuclear copper center. This network transports protons in the four-electron reduction of dioxygen. We replaced the acidic Glu506 and Asp507 residues with the charged and uncharged amino acid residues. Peculiar changes in the enzyme activity of the mutants relative to the native enzyme indicate that an acidic amino acid residue at position 506 is essential for effective proton transport. The Ala mutation resulted in the formation of a compensatory hydrogen bond network with one or two extra water molecules. On the other hand, the Ile mutation resulted in the complete shutdown of the hydrogen bond network leading to loss of enzymatic activities of CueO. In contrast, the hydrogen bond network without the proton transport function was constructed by the Gln mutation. These results exerted on the hydrogen bond network in CueO are discussed in comparison with proton transfers in cytochrome oxidase.

  19. Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 mutations W1684R and V1696I alter G protein-mediated regulation of Ca(V)2.1 voltage-gated calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza-López, Edgar; Sandoval, Alejandro; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Gandini, María A; Van den Maagdenberg, Arn; De Waard, Michel; Felix, Ricardo

    2012-08-01

    Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM-1) is a monogenic form of migraine with aura that is characterized by recurrent attacks of a typical migraine headache with transient hemiparesis during the aura phase. In a subset of patients, additional symptoms such as epilepsy and cerebellar ataxia are part of the clinical phenotype. FHM-1 is caused by missense mutations in the CACNA1A gene that encodes the pore-forming subunit of Ca(V)2.1 voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. Although the functional effects of an increasing number of FHM-1 mutations have been characterized, knowledge on the influence of most of these mutations on G protein regulation of channel function is lacking. Here, we explored the effects of G protein-dependent modulation on mutations W1684R and V1696I which cause FHM-1 with and without cerebellar ataxia, respectively. Both mutations were introduced into the human Ca(V)2.1α(1) subunit and their functional consequences investigated after heterologous expression in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK-293) cells using patch-clamp recordings. When co-expressed along with the human μ-opioid receptor, application of the agonist [d-Ala2, N-MePhe4, Gly-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO) inhibited currents through both wild-type (WT) and mutant Ca(V)2.1 channels, which is consistent with the known modulation of these channels by G protein-coupled receptors. Prepulse facilitation, which is a way to characterize the relief of direct voltage-dependent G protein regulation, was reduced by both FHM-1 mutations. Moreover, the kinetic analysis of the onset and decay of facilitation showed that the W1684R and V1696I mutations affect the apparent dissociation and reassociation rates of the Gβγ dimer from the channel complex, suggesting that the G protein-Ca(2+) channel affinity may be altered by the mutations. These biophysical studies may shed new light on the pathophysiology underlying FHM-1.

  20. Ethylmalonic encephalopathy ETHE1 R163W/R163Q mutations alter protein stability and redox properties of the iron centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Bárbara J; Lucas, Tânia G; Rodrigues, João V; Frederiksen, Jane H; Teixeira, Miguel S; Tiranti, Valeria; Bross, Peter; Gomes, Cláudio M

    2014-01-01

    ETHE1 is an iron-containing protein from the metallo β-lactamase family involved in the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway. Mutations in ETHE1 causing loss of function result in sulfide toxicity and in the rare fatal disease Ethylmalonic Encephalopathy (EE). Frequently mutations resulting in depletion of ETHE1 in patient cells are due to severe structural and folding defects. However, some ETHE1 mutations yield nearly normal protein levels and in these cases disease mechanism was suspected to lie in compromised catalytic activity. To address this issue and to elicit how ETHE1 dysfunction results in EE, we have investigated two such pathological mutations, ETHE1-p.Arg163Gln and p.Arg163Trp. In addition, we report a number of benchmark properties of wild type human ETHE1, including for the first time the redox properties of the mononuclear iron centre. We show that loss of function in these variants results from a combination of decreased protein stability and activity. Although structural assessment revealed that the protein fold is not perturbed by mutations, both variants have decreased thermal stabilities and higher proteolytic susceptibilities. ETHE1 wild type and variants bind 1 ± 0.2 mol iron/protein and no zinc; however, the variants exhibited only ≈ 10% of wild-type catalytically activity. Analysis of the redox properties of ETHE1 mononuclear iron centre revealed that the variants have lowered reduction potentials with respect to that of the wild type. This illustrates how point mutation-induced loss of function may arise via very discrete subtle conformational effects on the protein fold and active site chemistry, without extensive disruption of the protein structure or protein-cofactor association.

  1. Mutations in the control of virulence sensor gene from Streptococcus pyogenes after infection in mice lead to clonal bacterial variants with altered gene regulatory activity and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayfield, Jeffrey A; Liang, Zhong; Agrahari, Garima; Lee, Shaun W; Donahue, Deborah L; Ploplis, Victoria A; Castellino, Francis J

    2014-01-01

    The cluster of virulence sensor (CovS)/responder (CovR) two-component operon (CovRS) regulates ∼15% of the genes of the Group A Streptococcal pyogenes (GAS) genome. Bacterial clones containing inactivating mutations in the covS gene have been isolated from patients with virulent invasive diseases. We report herein an assessment of the nature and types of covS mutations that can occur in both virulent and nonvirulent GAS strains, and assess whether a nonvirulent GAS can attain enhanced virulence through this mechanism. A group of mice were infected with a globally-disseminated clonal M1T1 GAS (isolate 5448), containing wild-type (WT) CovRS (5448/CovR+S+), or less virulent engineered GAS strains, AP53/CovR+S+ and Manfredo M5/CovR+S+. SpeB negative GAS clones from wound sites and/or from bacteria disseminated to the spleen were isolated and the covS gene was subjected to DNA sequence analysis. Numerous examples of inactivating mutations were found in CovS in all regions of the gene. The mutations found included frame-shift insertions and deletions, and in-frame small and large deletions in the gene. Many of the mutations found resulted in early translation termination of CovS. Thus, the covS gene is a genomic mutagenic target that gives GAS enhanced virulence. In cases wherein CovS- was discovered, these clonal variants exhibited high lethality, further suggesting that randomly mutated covS genes occur during the course of infection, and lead to the development of a more invasive infection.

  2. Mutations in the control of virulence sensor gene from Streptococcus pyogenes after infection in mice lead to clonal bacterial variants with altered gene regulatory activity and virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Mayfield

    Full Text Available The cluster of virulence sensor (CovS/responder (CovR two-component operon (CovRS regulates ∼15% of the genes of the Group A Streptococcal pyogenes (GAS genome. Bacterial clones containing inactivating mutations in the covS gene have been isolated from patients with virulent invasive diseases. We report herein an assessment of the nature and types of covS mutations that can occur in both virulent and nonvirulent GAS strains, and assess whether a nonvirulent GAS can attain enhanced virulence through this mechanism. A group of mice were infected with a globally-disseminated clonal M1T1 GAS (isolate 5448, containing wild-type (WT CovRS (5448/CovR+S+, or less virulent engineered GAS strains, AP53/CovR+S+ and Manfredo M5/CovR+S+. SpeB negative GAS clones from wound sites and/or from bacteria disseminated to the spleen were isolated and the covS gene was subjected to DNA sequence analysis. Numerous examples of inactivating mutations were found in CovS in all regions of the gene. The mutations found included frame-shift insertions and deletions, and in-frame small and large deletions in the gene. Many of the mutations found resulted in early translation termination of CovS. Thus, the covS gene is a genomic mutagenic target that gives GAS enhanced virulence. In cases wherein CovS- was discovered, these clonal variants exhibited high lethality, further suggesting that randomly mutated covS genes occur during the course of infection, and lead to the development of a more invasive infection.

  3. Ethylmalonic encephalopathy ETHE1 R163W/R163Q mutations alter protein stability and redox properties of the iron centre.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara J Henriques

    Full Text Available ETHE1 is an iron-containing protein from the metallo β-lactamase family involved in the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway. Mutations in ETHE1 causing loss of function result in sulfide toxicity and in the rare fatal disease Ethylmalonic Encephalopathy (EE. Frequently mutations resulting in depletion of ETHE1 in patient cells are due to severe structural and folding defects. However, some ETHE1 mutations yield nearly normal protein levels and in these cases disease mechanism was suspected to lie in compromised catalytic activity. To address this issue and to elicit how ETHE1 dysfunction results in EE, we have investigated two such pathological mutations, ETHE1-p.Arg163Gln and p.Arg163Trp. In addition, we report a number of benchmark properties of wild type human ETHE1, including for the first time the redox properties of the mononuclear iron centre. We show that loss of function in these variants results from a combination of decreased protein stability and activity. Although structural assessment revealed that the protein fold is not perturbed by mutations, both variants have decreased thermal stabilities and higher proteolytic susceptibilities. ETHE1 wild type and variants bind 1 ± 0.2 mol iron/protein and no zinc; however, the variants exhibited only ≈ 10% of wild-type catalytically activity. Analysis of the redox properties of ETHE1 mononuclear iron centre revealed that the variants have lowered reduction potentials with respect to that of the wild type. This illustrates how point mutation-induced loss of function may arise via very discrete subtle conformational effects on the protein fold and active site chemistry, without extensive disruption of the protein structure or protein-cofactor association.

  4. Construction and characterization of mutations at codon 751 of the Escherichia coli gyrB gene that confer resistance to the antimicrobial peptide microcin B17 and alter the activity of DNA gyrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Castillo, F J; del Castillo, I; Moreno, F

    2001-03-01

    Microcin B17 is a peptide antibiotic that inhibits DNA replication in Escherichia coli by targeting DNA gyrase. Previously, two independently isolated microcin B17-resistant mutants were shown to harbor the same gyrB point mutation that results in the replacement of tryptophan 751 by arginine in the GyrB polypeptide. We used site-directed mutagenesis to construct mutants in which tryptophan 751 was deleted or replaced by other amino acids. These mutants exhibit altered DNA gyrase activity and different levels of resistance to microcin B17.

  5. Mutation of aspartic acid-351, lysine-352, and lysine-515 alters the Ca2+ transport activity of the Ca2+-ATPase expressed in COS-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, K; MacLennan, D H

    1988-01-01

    Full-length cDNAs encoding neonatal and adult isoforms of the Ca2+-ATPase of rabbit fast-twitch skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum were expressed transiently in COS-1 cells. The microsomal fraction isolated from transfected COS-1 cells contained immunoreactive Ca2+-ATPase and catalyzed Ca2+ transport at rates at least 15-fold above controls. No differences were observed in either the rates or Ca2+ dependency of Ca2+ transport catalyzed by the two isoforms. Aspartic acid-351, the site of formation of the catalytic acyl phosphate in the enzyme, was mutated to asparagine, glutamic acid, serine, threonine, histidine, or alanine. In every case, Ca2+ transport activity and Ca2+-dependent phosphorylation were eliminated. Ca2+ transport was also eliminated by mutation of lysine-352 to arginine, glutamine, or glutamic acid or by mutation of Asp351-Lys352 to Lys351-Asp352. Mutation of lysine-515, the site of fluorescein isothiocyanate modification in the enzyme, resulted in diminished Ca2+ transport activity as follows: arginine, 60%; glutamine, 25%; glutamic acid, 5%. These results demonstrate the absolute requirement of acylphosphate formation for the Ca2+ transport function and define a residue important for ATP binding. They also demonstrate the feasibility of a thorough analysis of active sites in the Ca2+-ATPase by expression and site-specific mutagenesis. Images PMID:2966962

  6. Infertility in Female Mice with a Gain-of-Function Mutation in the Luteinizing Hormone Receptor Is Due to Irregular Estrous Cyclicity, Anovulation, Hormonal Alterations, and Polycystic Ovaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, Lan; McGee, Stacey R; Rabideau, Amanda C; Paquet, Marilène; Narayan, Prema

    2015-07-01

    The luteinizing hormone receptor, LHCGR, is essential for fertility in males and females, and genetic mutations in the receptor have been identified that result in developmental and reproductive defects. We have previously generated and characterized a mouse model (KiLHR(D582G)) for familial male-limited precocious puberty caused by an activating mutation in the receptor. We demonstrated that the phenotype of the KiLHR(D582G) male mice is an accurate phenocopy of male patients with activating LHCGR mutations. In this study, we observed that unlike women with activating LHCGR mutations who are normal, female KiLHR(D582G) mice are infertile. Mice exhibit irregular estrous cyclicity, anovulation, and precocious puberty. A temporal study from 2-24 wk of age indicated elevated levels of progesterone, androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol and upregulation of several steroidogenic enzyme genes. Ovaries of KiLHR(D582G) mice exhibited significant pathology with the development of large hemorrhagic cysts as early as 3 wk of age, extensive stromal cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy with luteinization, numerous atretic follicles, and granulosa cell tumors. Ovulation could not be rescued by the addition of exogenous gonadotropins. The body weights of the KiLHR(D582G) mice were higher than wild-type counterparts, but there was no increase in the body fat composition or metabolic abnormalities such as impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. These studies demonstrate that activating LHCGR mutations do not produce the same phenotype in female mice as in humans and clearly illustrate species differences in the expression and regulation of LHCGR in the ovary, but not in the testis. © 2015 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  7. Kv3.3 channels harbouring a mutation of spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 alter excitability and induce cell death in cultured cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irie, Tomohiko; Matsuzaki, Yasunori; Sekino, Yuko; Hirai, Hirokazu

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum plays crucial roles in controlling sensorimotor functions. The neural output from the cerebellar cortex is transmitted solely by Purkinje cells (PCs), whose impairment causes cerebellar ataxia. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 (SCA13) is an autosomal dominant disease, and SCA13 patients exhibit cerebellar atrophy and cerebellar symptoms. Recent studies have shown that missense mutations in the voltage-gated K(+) channel Kv3.3 are responsible for SCA13. In the rodent brain, Kv3.3 mRNAs are expressed most strongly in PCs, suggesting that the mutations severely affect PCs in SCA13 patients. Nevertheless, how these mutations affect the function of Kv3.3 in PCs and, consequently, the morphology and neuronal excitability of PCs remains unclear. To address these questions, we used lentiviral vectors to express mutant mouse Kv3.3 (mKv3.3) channels harbouring an R424H missense mutation, which corresponds to the R423H mutation in the Kv3.3 channels of SCA13 patients, in mouse cerebellar cultures. The R424H mutant-expressing PCs showed decreased outward current density, broadened action potentials and elevated basal [Ca(2+)]i compared with PCs expressing wild-type mKv3.3 subunits or those expressing green fluorescent protein alone. Moreover, expression of R424H mutant subunits induced impaired dendrite development and cell death selectively in PCs, both of which were rescued by blocking P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels in the culture conditions. We therefore concluded that expression of R424H mutant subunits in PCs markedly affects the function of endogenous Kv3 channels, neuronal excitability and, eventually, basal [Ca(2+)]i, leading to cell death. These results suggest that PCs in SCA13 patients also exhibit similar defects in PC excitability and induced cell death, which may explain the pathology of SCA13.

  8. Mutated Ptpn11 alters leukemic stem cell frequency and reduces the sensitivity of acute myeloid leukemia cells to Mcl1 inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L; Chen, W; Mysliwski, M; Serio, J; Ropa, J; Abulwerdi, F A; Chan, R J; Patel, J P; Tallman, M S; Paietta, E; Melnick, A; Levine, R L; Abdel-Wahab, O; Nikolovska-Coleska, Z; Muntean, A G

    2015-06-01

    PTPN11 encodes the Shp2 non-receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatase implicated in several signaling pathways. Activating mutations in Shp2 are commonly associated with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia but are not as well defined in other neoplasms. Here we report that Shp2 mutations occur in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) at a rate of 6.6% (6/91) in the ECOG E1900 data set. We examined the role of mutated Shp2 in leukemias harboring MLL translocations, which co-occur in human AML. The hyperactive Shp2E76K mutant, commonly observed in leukemia patients, significantly accelerated MLL-AF9-mediated leukemogenesis in vivo. Shp2E76K increased leukemic stem cell frequency and affords MLL-AF9 leukemic cells IL3 cytokine hypersensitivity. As Shp2 is reported to regulate anti-apoptotic genes, we investigated Bcl2, Bcl-xL and Mcl1 expression in MLL-AF9 leukemic cells with and without Shp2E76K. Although the Bcl2 family of genes was upregulated in Shp2E76K cells, Mcl1 showed the highest upregulation in MLL-AF9 cells in response to Shp2E76K. Indeed, expression of Mcl1 in MLL-AF9 cells phenocopies expression of Shp2E76K, suggesting Shp2 mutations cooperate through activation of anti-apoptotic genes. Finally, we show Shp2E76K mutations reduce sensitivity of AML cells to small-molecule-mediated Mcl1 inhibition, suggesting reduced efficacy of drugs targeting MCL1 in patients with hyperactive Shp2.

  9. Dominant-Negative Effects of Adult-Onset Huntingtin Mutations Alter the Division of Human Embryonic Stem Cells-Derived Neural Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Carla; Aubert, Sophie; Bourgois-Rocha, Fany; Barnat, Monia; Rego, Ana Cristina; Déglon, Nicole; Perrier, Anselme L; Humbert, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of the huntingtin protein (HTT) gene underlie both adult-onset and juvenile forms of Huntington's disease (HD). HTT modulates mitotic spindle orientation and cell fate in mouse cortical progenitors from the ventricular zone. Using human embryonic stem cells (hESC) characterized as carrying mutations associated with adult-onset disease during pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, we investigated the influence of human HTT and of an adult-onset HD mutation on mitotic spindle orientation in human neural stem cells (NSCs) derived from hESCs. The RNAi-mediated silencing of both HTT alleles in neural stem cells derived from hESCs disrupted spindle orientation and led to the mislocalization of dynein, the p150Glued subunit of dynactin and the large nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA) protein. We also investigated the effect of the adult-onset HD mutation on the role of HTT during spindle orientation in NSCs derived from HD-hESCs. By combining SNP-targeting allele-specific silencing and gain-of-function approaches, we showed that a 46-glutamine expansion in human HTT was sufficient for a dominant-negative effect on spindle orientation and changes in the distribution within the spindle pole and the cell cortex of dynein, p150Glued and NuMA in neural cells. Thus, neural derivatives of disease-specific human pluripotent stem cells constitute a relevant biological resource for exploring the impact of adult-onset HD mutations of the HTT gene on the division of neural progenitors, with potential applications in HD drug discovery targeting HTT-dynein-p150Glued complex interactions.

  10. Burkitt’s lymphoma-associated c-Myc mutations converge on a dramatically altered target gene response and implicate Nol5a/Nop56 in oncogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowling, Victoria H.; Turner, Scott A.; Cole, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Burkitt’s Lymphomas (BLs) acquire consistent point mutations in a conserved domain of Myc, Myc Box I. We report that the enhanced transforming activity of BL-associated Myc mutants can be uncoupled from loss of phosphorylation and increased protein stability. Furthermore, two different BL-associated Myc mutations induced similar gene expression profiles independently of T58 phosphorylation, and these profiles are dramatically different from MycWT. Nol5a/Nop56, which is required for rRNA methylation, was identified as a gene hyperactivated by the BL-associated Myc mutants. We show that Nol5a is necessary for Myc-induced cell transformation, enhances MycWT-induced cell transformation, and increases the size of MycWT induced tumors. Thus, Nol5a expands the link between Myc-induced regulation of nucleolar target genes which are rate-limiting for cell transformation and tumor growth. PMID:24013231

  11. A mutation in the tuft mouse disrupts TET1 activity and alters the expression of genes that are crucial for neural tube closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith S. K. Fong

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Genetic variations affecting neural tube closure along the head result in malformations of the face and brain. Neural tube defects (NTDs are among the most common birth defects in humans. We previously reported a mouse mutant called tuft that arose spontaneously in our wild-type 3H1 colony. Adult tuft mice present midline craniofacial malformations with or without an anterior cephalocele. In addition, affected embryos presented neural tube closure defects resulting in insufficient closure of the anterior neuropore or exencephaly. Here, through whole-genome sequencing, we identified a nonsense mutation in the Tet1 gene, which encodes a methylcytosine dioxygenase (TET1, co-segregating with the tuft phenotype. This mutation resulted in premature termination that disrupts the catalytic domain that is involved in the demethylation of cytosine. We detected a significant loss of TET enzyme activity in the heads of tuft embryos that were homozygous for the mutation and had NTDs. RNA-Seq transcriptome analysis indicated that multiple gene pathways associated with neural tube closure were dysregulated in tuft embryo heads. Among them, the expressions of Cecr2, Epha7 and Grhl2 were significantly reduced in some embryos presenting neural tube closure defects, whereas one or more components of the non-canonical WNT signaling pathway mediating planar cell polarity and convergent extension were affected in others. We further show that the recombinant mutant TET1 protein was capable of entering the nucleus and affected the expression of endogenous Grhl2 in IMCD-3 (inner medullary collecting duct cells. These results indicate that TET1 is an epigenetic determinant for regulating genes that are crucial to closure of the anterior neural tube and its mutation has implications to craniofacial development, as presented by the tuft mouse.

  12. Altered promoter recycling rates contribute to dominant-negative activity of human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma mutations associated with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Leff, Todd

    2007-04-01

    The transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma) plays an important role in regulating lipid and glucose metabolism and improves insulin sensitivity in diabetic patients when activated by thiazolidinedione drugs. Several loss-of-function mutations in PPARgamma have been identified that cause lipodystrophy and diabetes in humans. Because affected individuals are heterozygotes and have one normal PPARgamma allele, it is of interest to know whether these mutations act in a dominant-negative fashion to inhibit the activity of the wild-type (WT) receptor. Here we compare the molecular phenotypes of two previously identified PPARgamma mutations: P467L, reported to be dominant negative; and F388L, reported to be devoid of dominant-negative activity. We developed a competitive chromatin immunoprecipitation assay to measure the relative ability of mutant PPARgamma to compete with WT receptor for binding to a PPAR regulatory element (PPRE)-containing promoter. By determining the ratio of mutant and WT receptors bound to a PPRE over time, we estimated the relative promoter turnover rate of each receptor. This assay demonstrated that PPARgamma bearing the P467L had a reduced promoter turnover rate compared with the F388L receptor, and over time out-competed the WT receptor for promoter binding sites. We propose that the P467L receptor is dominant negative because in a cell containing both WT and mutant receptors, the majority of the PPAR-regulated promoters will be occupied by the transcriptionally defective mutant receptor. In contrast, the F388L mutation lacks dominant-negative activity because its more rapid promoter turnover rate prevented it from out-competing the WT receptor for promoter binding sites.

  13. Mutations that alter a repeated ACCA element located at the 5' end of the Potato virus X genome affect RNA accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mi-Ri; Kwon, Sun-Jung; Choi, Hong-Soo; Hemenway, Cynthia L; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2008-08-15

    The repeated ACCA or AC-rich sequence and structural (SL1) elements in the 5' non-translated region (NTR) of the Potato virus X (PVX) RNA play vital roles in the PVX life cycle by controlling translation, RNA replication, movement, and assembly. It has already been shown that the repeated ACCA or AC-rich sequence affect both gRNA and sgRNA accumulation, while not affecting minus-strand RNA accumulation, and are also required for host protein binding. The functional significance of the repeated ACCA sequence elements in the 5' NTR region was investigated by analyzing the effects of deletion and site-directed mutations on PVX replication in Nicotiana benthamiana plants and NT1 protoplasts. Substitution (ACCA into AAAA or UUUU) mutations introduced in the first (nt 10-13) element in the 5' NTR of the PVX RNA significantly affected viral replication, while mutations introduced in the second (nt 17-20) and third (nt 20-23) elements did not. The fourth (nt 29-32) ACCA element weakly affected virus replication, whereas mutations in the fifth (nt 38-41) significantly reduced virus replication due to the structure disruption of SL1 by AAAA and/or UUUU substitutions. Further characterization of the first ACCA element indicated that duplication of ACCA at nt 10-13 (nt 10-17, ACCAACCA) caused severe symptom development as compared to that of wild type, while deletion of the single element (nt 10-13), DeltaACCA) or tripling of this element caused reduced symptom development. Single- and double-nucleotide substitutions introduced into the first ACCA element revealed the importance of CC located at nt positions 11 and 12. Altogether, these results indicate that the first ACCA element is important for PVX replication.

  14. A mutation in the tuft mouse disrupts TET1 activity and alters the expression of genes that are crucial for neural tube closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Keith S K; Hufnagel, Robert B; Khadka, Vedbar S; Corley, Michael J; Maunakea, Alika K; Fogelgren, Ben; Ahmed, Zubair M; Lozanoff, Scott

    2016-05-01

    Genetic variations affecting neural tube closure along the head result in malformations of the face and brain. Neural tube defects (NTDs) are among the most common birth defects in humans. We previously reported a mouse mutant called tuft that arose spontaneously in our wild-type 3H1 colony. Adult tuft mice present midline craniofacial malformations with or without an anterior cephalocele. In addition, affected embryos presented neural tube closure defects resulting in insufficient closure of the anterior neuropore or exencephaly. Here, through whole-genome sequencing, we identified a nonsense mutation in the Tet1 gene, which encodes a methylcytosine dioxygenase (TET1), co-segregating with the tuft phenotype. This mutation resulted in premature termination that disrupts the catalytic domain that is involved in the demethylation of cytosine. We detected a significant loss of TET enzyme activity in the heads of tuft embryos that were homozygous for the mutation and had NTDs. RNA-Seq transcriptome analysis indicated that multiple gene pathways associated with neural tube closure were dysregulated in tuft embryo heads. Among them, the expressions of Cecr2, Epha7 and Grhl2 were significantly reduced in some embryos presenting neural tube closure defects, whereas one or more components of the non-canonical WNT signaling pathway mediating planar cell polarity and convergent extension were affected in others. We further show that the recombinant mutant TET1 protein was capable of entering the nucleus and affected the expression of endogenous Grhl2 in IMCD-3 (inner medullary collecting duct) cells. These results indicate that TET1 is an epigenetic determinant for regulating genes that are crucial to closure of the anterior neural tube and its mutation has implications to craniofacial development, as presented by the tuft mouse.

  15. Mutations altering a structurally conserved loop-helix-loop region of a viral packaging motor change DNA translocation velocity and processivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsay, James M; Sippy, Jean; DelToro, Damian; Andrews, Benjamin T; Draper, Bonnie; Rao, Venigalla; Catalano, Carlos E; Feiss, Michael; Smith, Douglas E

    2010-07-30

    Many double-stranded DNA viruses employ ATP-driven motors to translocate their genomes into small, preformed viral capsids against large forces resisting confinement. Here, we show via direct single-molecule measurements that a mutation T194M downstream of the Walker B motif in the phage lambda gpA packaging motor causes an 8-fold reduction in translocation velocity without substantially changing processivity or force dependence, whereas the mutation G212S in the putative C (coupling) motif causes a 3-fold reduction in velocity and a 6-fold reduction in processivity. Meanwhile a T194M pseudorevertant (T194V) showed a near restoration of the wild-type dynamics. Structural comparisons and modeling show that these mutations are in a loop-helix-loop region that positions the key residues of the catalytic motifs, Walker B and C, in the ATPase center and is structurally homologous with analogous regions in chromosome transporters and SF2 RNA helicases. Together with recently published studies of SpoIIIE chromosome transporter and Ded1 RNA helicase mutants, these findings suggest the presence of a structurally conserved region that may be a part of the mechanism that determines motor velocity and processivity in several different types of nucleic acid translocases.

  16. Alterations of the portal protein, gpB, of bacteriophage lambda suppress mutations in cosQ, the site required for termination of DNA packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Douglas J; Didion, Lisa; Feiss, Michael

    2002-05-01

    The cosQ site of bacteriophage lambda is required for DNA packaging termination. Previous studies have shown that cosQ mutations can be suppressed in three ways: by a local suppressor within cosQ, an increase in the length of the lambda chromosome, and missense mutations affecting the prohead's portal protein, gpB. In the present work, revertants of a set of lethal cosQ mutants were screened for suppressors. Seven new cosQ suppressors affected gene B, which encodes the portal protein of the prohead. All seven were allele-nonspecific suppressors of cosQ mutations. Experiments with several phages having two cosQ suppressors showed that the suppression effects were additive. Furthermore, these double suppressors had minimal effects on the growth of cosQ(+) phages. These trans-acting suppressors affecting the portal protein are proposed to allow the mutant cosQ site to be more efficiently recognized, due to the slowing of the rate of translocation.

  17. Mutations in human C2CD3 cause skeletal dysplasia and provide new insights into phenotypic and cellular consequences of altered C2CD3 function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Claudio R.; McInerney-Leo, Aideen M.; Vogel, Ida; Rondón Galeano, Maria C.; Leo, Paul J.; Harris, Jessica E.; Anderson, Lisa K.; Keith, Patricia A.; Brown, Matthew A.; Ramsing, Mette; Duncan, Emma L.; Zankl, Andreas; Wicking, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Ciliopathies are a group of genetic disorders caused by defective assembly or dysfunction of the primary cilium, a microtubule-based cellular organelle that plays a key role in developmental signalling. Ciliopathies are clinically grouped in a large number of overlapping disorders, including the orofaciodigital syndromes (OFDS), the short rib polydactyly syndromes and Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy. Recently, mutations in the gene encoding the centriolar protein C2CD3 have been described in two families with a new sub-type of OFDS (OFD14), with microcephaly and cerebral malformations. Here we describe a third family with novel compound heterozygous C2CD3 mutations in two fetuses with a different clinical presentation, dominated by skeletal dysplasia with no microcephaly. Analysis of fibroblast cultures derived from one of these fetuses revealed a reduced ability to form cilia, consistent with previous studies in C2cd3-mutant mouse and chicken cells. More detailed analyses support a role for C2CD3 in basal body maturation; but in contrast to previous mouse studies the normal recruitment of the distal appendage protein CEP164 suggests that this protein is not sufficient for efficient basal body maturation and subsequent axonemal extension in a C2CD3-defective background. PMID:27094867

  18. Loss-of-function mutations in MICU1 cause a brain and muscle disorder linked to primary alterations in mitochondrial calcium signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Clare V; Szabadkai, György; Sharpe, Jenny A; Parry, David A; Torelli, Silvia; Childs, Anne-Marie; Kriek, Marjolein; Phadke, Rahul; Johnson, Colin A; Roberts, Nicola Y; Bonthron, David T; Pysden, Karen A; Whyte, Tamieka; Munteanu, Iulia; Foley, A Reghan; Wheway, Gabrielle; Szymanska, Katarzyna; Natarajan, Subaashini; Abdelhamed, Zakia A; Morgan, Joanne E; Roper, Helen; Santen, Gijs W E; Niks, Erik H; van der Pol, W Ludo; Lindhout, Dick; Raffaello, Anna; De Stefani, Diego; den Dunnen, Johan T; Sun, Yu; Ginjaar, Ieke; Sewry, Caroline A; Hurles, Matthew; Rizzuto, Rosario; Duchen, Michael R; Muntoni, Francesco; Sheridan, Eamonn

    2014-02-01

    Mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake has key roles in cell life and death. Physiological Ca(2+) signaling regulates aerobic metabolism, whereas pathological Ca(2+) overload triggers cell death. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake is mediated by the Ca(2+) uniporter complex in the inner mitochondrial membrane, which comprises MCU, a Ca(2+)-selective ion channel, and its regulator, MICU1. Here we report mutations of MICU1 in individuals with a disease phenotype characterized by proximal myopathy, learning difficulties and a progressive extrapyramidal movement disorder. In fibroblasts from subjects with MICU1 mutations, agonist-induced mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake at low cytosolic Ca(2+) concentrations was increased, and cytosolic Ca(2+) signals were reduced. Although resting mitochondrial membrane potential was unchanged in MICU1-deficient cells, the mitochondrial network was severely fragmented. Whereas the pathophysiology of muscular dystrophy and the core myopathies involves abnormal mitochondrial Ca(2+) handling, the phenotype associated with MICU1 deficiency is caused by a primary defect in mitochondrial Ca(2+) signaling, demonstrating the crucial role of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake in humans.

  19. A novel familial mutation in the PCSK1 gene that alters the oxyanion hole residue of proprotein convertase 1/3 and impairs its enzymatic activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Wilschanski

    Full Text Available Four siblings presented with congenital diarrhea and various endocrinopathies. Exome sequencing and homozygosity mapping identified five regions, comprising 337 protein-coding genes that were shared by three affected siblings. Exome sequencing identified a novel homozygous N309K mutation in the proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 1 (PCSK1 gene, encoding the neuroendocrine convertase 1 precursor (PC1/3 which was recently reported as a cause of Congenital Diarrhea Disorder (CDD. The PCSK1 mutation affected the oxyanion hole transition state-stabilizing amino acid within the active site, which is critical for appropriate proprotein maturation and enzyme activity. Unexpectedly, the N309K mutant protein exhibited normal, though slowed, prodomain removal and was secreted from both HEK293 and Neuro2A cells. However, the secreted enzyme showed no catalytic activity, and was not processed into the 66 kDa form. We conclude that the N309K enzyme is able to cleave its own propeptide but is catalytically inert against in trans substrates, and that this variant accounts for the enteric and systemic endocrinopathies seen in this large consanguineous kindred.

  20. Identification of potential mutations and genomic alterations in the epithelial and spindle cell components of biphasic synovial sarcomas using a human exome SNP chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yan; Wang, Ning; Pang, Li-Juan; Zou, Hong; Hu, Jian-Ming; Zhao, Jin; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Chun-Xia; Zhang, Wen-Jie; Yuan, Xiang-Lin; Li, Feng

    2015-10-27

    Synovial sarcoma (SS) is one of the most aggressive soft-tissue sarcomas and is noted for late local recurrence and metastasis. It is of uncertain histological origin and exhibits a biphasic histopathological form involving both the mesenchyme and epithelium. Thus, its diagnosis and therapy remain a huge challenge for clinicians and pathologists. This study aimed to determine whether differential morphological-associated genomic changes could aid in ascertaining the histogenesis of SS and to determine whether these sarcomas showed some specific mutated genes between epithelial and spindle cells that would promote tumor invasion and metastasis. We conducted a comprehensive genomic analysis of mesenchymal and epithelial components in 12 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded biphasic SS samples using the Illumina human exon microarray. Exome capture sequencing was performed to validate the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-chip data, and de novo data were generated using a whole-exome chip with the Illumina exon microarray. Fisher's exact test based on PLINK analysis of the SNP-chip data. Here, the SNP-chip data showed that 336 SNPs had association P-values of less than 0.05 by chi-square test. We identified 23 significantly mutated genes between epithelial and spindle cell regions of SSs. Fifteen gene mutations were specific for the spindle cell component (65.2 %) and eight for the epithelial cell component (34.8 %). Most of these genes have not been previously reported in SS, and neuroguidin (NGDN), RAS protein activator like 3 (RASAL3), KLHL34 and MUM1L1 have not previously been linked to cancer; only one gene (EP300) has been reported in SS. Genomic analyses suggested that the differential SNPs in genes used for functional enrichment are mainly related to the inflammatory response pathway, adhesion, ECM-receptor interactions, TGF-β signaling, JAK-STAT signaling, phenylalanine metabolism, the intrinsic pathway and formation of fibrin. This study investigated novel

  1. Altered RyR2 regulation by the calmodulin F90L mutation associated with idiopathic ventricular fibrillation and early sudden cardiac death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomikos, Michail; Thanassoulas, Angelos; Beck, Konrad; Vassilakopoulou, Vyronia; Hu, Handan; Calver, Brian L; Theodoridou, Maria; Kashir, Junaid; Blayney, Lynda; Livaniou, Evangelia; Rizkallah, Pierre; Nounesis, George; Lai, F Anthony

    2014-08-25

    Calmodulin (CaM) association with the cardiac muscle ryanodine receptor (RyR2) regulates excitation-contraction coupling. Defective CaM-RyR2 interaction is associated with heart failure. A novel CaM mutation (CaM(F90L)) was recently identified in a family with idiopathic ventricular fibrillation (IVF) and early onset sudden cardiac death. We report the first biochemical characterization of CaM(F90L). F90L confers a deleterious effect on protein stability. Ca(2+)-binding studies reveal reduced Ca(2+)-binding affinity and a loss of co-operativity. Moreover, CaM(F90L) displays reduced RyR2 interaction and defective modulation of [(3)H]ryanodine binding. Hence, dysregulation of RyR2-mediated Ca(2+) release via aberrant CaM(F90L)-RyR2 interaction is a potential mechanism that underlies familial IVF.

  2. In vitro resistance selections for Plasmodium falciparum dihydroorotate dehydrogenase inhibitors give mutants with multiple point mutations in the drug-binding site and altered growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Leila S; Gamo, Francisco Javier; Lafuente-Monasterio, Maria José; Singh, Onkar M P; Rowland, Paul; Wiegand, Roger C; Wirth, Dyann F

    2014-06-27

    Malaria is a preventable and treatable disease; yet half of the world's population lives at risk of infection, and an estimated 660,000 people die of malaria-related causes every year. Rising drug resistance threatens to make malaria untreatable, necessitating both the discovery of new antimalarial agents and the development of strategies to identify and suppress the emergence and spread of drug resistance. We focused on in-development dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) inhibitors. Characterizing resistance pathways for antimalarial agents not yet in clinical use will increase our understanding of the potential for resistance. We identified resistance mechanisms of Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) DHODH inhibitors via in vitro resistance selections. We found 11 point mutations in the PfDHODH target. Target gene amplification and unknown mechanisms also contributed to resistance, albeit to a lesser extent. These mutant parasites were often hypersensitive to other PfDHODH inhibitors, which immediately suggested a novel combination therapy approach to preventing resistance. Indeed, a combination of wild-type and mutant-type selective inhibitors led to resistance far less often than either drug alone. The effects of point mutations in PfDHODH were corroborated with purified recombinant wild-type and mutant-type PfDHODH proteins, which showed the same trends in drug response as the cognate cell lines. Comparative growth assays demonstrated that two mutant parasites grew less robustly than their wild-type parent, and the purified protein of those mutants showed a decrease in catalytic efficiency, thereby suggesting a reason for the diminished growth rate. Co-crystallography of PfDHODH with three inhibitors suggested that hydrophobic interactions are important for drug binding and selectivity.

  3. Chromosome 19q13 disruption alters expressions of CYP2A7, MIA and MIA-RAB4B lncRNA and contributes to FAP-like phenotype in APC mutation-negative familial colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thean, Lai Fun; Wong, Yu Hui; Lo, Michelle; Loi, Carol; Chew, Min Hoe; Tang, Choong Leong; Cheah, Peh Yean

    2017-01-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is an autosomal-dominantly inherited form of colorectal cancer (CRC) caused by mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene. Our ability to exhaustively screen for APC mutations identify microsatellite-stable and APC-mutation negative familial CRC patients, enabling us to search for novel genes. We performed genome-wide scan on two affected siblings of one family and 88 ethnicity- and gender-matched healthy controls to identify deletions shared by the siblings. Combined loss of heterozygosity, copy number and allelic-specific copy number analysis uncovered 5 shared deletions. Long-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) confirmed chromosome 19q13 deletion, which was subsequently found in one other family. The 32 kb deleted region harbors the CYP2A7 gene and was enriched with enhancer, repressor and insulator sites. The wildtype allele was lost in the polyps of the proband. Further, real-time RT-PCR assays showed that expressions of MIA and MIA-RAB4B located 35 kb upstream of the deletion, were up-regulated in the polyps compared to the matched mucosa of the proband. MIA-RAB4B, the read-through long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), RAB4B, PIM2 and TAOK1 share common binding site of a microRNA, miR-24, in their 3'UTRs. PIM2 and TAOK1, two target oncogenes of miR-24, were co-ordinately up-regulated with MIA-RAB4B in the polyps, suggesting that MIA-RAB4B could function as competitive endogenous RNA to titrate miR-24 away from its other targets. The data suggest that the 19.13 deletion disrupted chromatin boundary, leading to altered expression of several genes and lncRNA, could contribute to colorectal cancer via novel genetic and epigenetic mechanisms.

  4. Combined exposure to X-irradiation followed by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea treatment alters the frequency and spectrum of Ikaros point mutations in murine T-cell lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakinuma, Shizuko, E-mail: skakinum@nirs.go.jp [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Research Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Nishimura, Mayumi; Amasaki, Yoshiko; Takada, Mayumi; Yamauchi, Kazumi; Sudo, Satomi; Shang, Yi [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Research Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Doi, Kazutaka; Yoshinaga, Shinji [Regulatory Sciences Research Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Shimada, Yoshiya [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Research Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2012-09-01

    Ionizing radiation is a well-known carcinogen, but its potency may be influenced by other environmental carcinogens, which is of practical importance in the assessment of risk. Data are scarce, however, on the combined effect of radiation with other environmental carcinogens and the underlying mechanisms involved. We studied the mode and mechanism of the carcinogenic effect of radiation in combination with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) using doses approximately equal to the corresponding thresholds. B6C3F1 mice exposed to fractionated X-irradiation (Kaplan's method) followed by ENU developed T-cell lymphomas in a dose-dependent manner. Radiation doses above an apparent threshold acted synergistically with ENU to promote lymphoma development, whereas radiation doses below that threshold antagonized lymphoma development. Ikaros, which regulates the commitment and differentiation of lymphoid lineage cells, is a critical tumor suppressor gene frequently altered in both human and mouse lymphomas and shows distinct mutation spectra between X-ray- and ENU-induced lymphomas. In the synergistically induced lymphomas, we observed a low frequency of LOH and an inordinate increase of Ikaros base substitutions characteristic of ENU-indcued point mutations, G:C to A:T at non-CpG, A:T to G:C, G:C to T:A and A:T to T:A. This suggests that radiation doses above an apparent threshold activate the ENU mutagenic pathway. This is the first report on the carcinogenic mechanism elicited by combined exposure to carcinogens below and above threshold doses based on the mutation spectrum of the causative gene. These findings constitute a basis for assessing human cancer risk following exposure to multiple carcinogens.

  5. Mutation of the aspartic acid residues of the GDD sequence motif of poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase results in enzymes with altered metal ion requirements for activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, S A; Morrow, C D

    1995-01-01

    The poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, 3Dpol, is known to share a region of sequence homology with all RNA polymerases centered at the GDD amino acid motif. The two aspartic acids have been postulated to be involved in the catalytic activity and metal ion coordination of the enzyme. To test this hypothesis, we have utilized oligonucleotide site-directed mutagenesis to generate defined mutations in the aspartic acids of the GDD motif of the 3Dpol gene. The codon for the first aspartate (3D-D-328 [D refers to the single amino acid change, and the number refers to its position in the polymerase]) was changed to that for glutamic acid, histidine, asparagine, or glutamine; the codons for both aspartic acids were simultaneously changed to those for glutamic acids; and the codon for the second aspartic acid (3D-D-329) was changed to that for glutamic acid or asparagine. The mutant enzymes were expressed in Escherichia coli, and the in vitro poly(U) polymerase activity was characterized. All of the mutant 3Dpol enzymes were enzymatically inactive in vitro when tested over a range of Mg2+ concentrations. However, when Mn2+ was substituted for Mg2+ in the in vitro assays, the mutant that substituted the second aspartic acid for asparagine (3D-N-329) was active. To further substantiate this finding, a series of different transition metal ions were substituted for Mg2+ in the poly(U) polymerase assay. The wild-type enzyme was active with all metals except Ca2+, while the 3D-N-329 mutant was active only when FeC6H7O5 was used in the reaction. To determine the effects of the mutations on poliovirus replication, the mutant 3Dpol genes were subcloned into an infectious cDNA of poliovirus. The cDNAs containing the mutant 3Dpol genes did not produce infectious virus when transfected into tissue culture cells under standard conditions. Because of the activity of the 3D-N-329 mutant in the presence of Fe2+ and Mn2+, transfections were also performed in the presence of the

  6. TDP-43 mutations causing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis are associated with altered expression of RNA-binding protein hnRNP K and affect the Nrf2 antioxidant pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moujalled, Diane; Grubman, Alexandra; Acevedo, Karla; Yang, Shu; Ke, Yazi D; Moujalled, Donia M; Duncan, Clare; Caragounis, Aphrodite; Perera, Nirma D; Turner, Bradley J; Prudencio, Mercedes; Petrucelli, Leonard; Blair, Ian; Ittner, Lars M; Crouch, Peter J; Liddell, Jeffrey R; White, Anthony R

    2017-05-01

    TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43) is a major disease-associated protein involved in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions (FTLD-U). Our previous studies found a direct association between TDP-43 and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K). In this study, utilizing ALS patient fibroblasts harboring a TDP-43M337V mutation and NSC-34 motor neuronal cell line expressing TDP-43Q331K mutation, we show that hnRNP K expression is impaired in urea soluble extracts from mutant TDP-43 cell models. This was confirmed in vivo using TDP-43Q331K and inducible TDP-43A315T murine ALS models. We further investigated the potential pathological effects of mutant TDP-43-mediated changes to hnRNP K metabolism by RNA binding immunoprecipitation analysis. hnRNP K protein was bound to antioxidant NFE2L2 transcripts encoding Nrf2 antioxidant transcription factor, with greater enrichment in TDP-43M337V patient fibroblasts compared to healthy controls. Subsequent gene expression profiling revealed an increase in downstream antioxidant transcript expression of Nrf2 signaling in the spinal cord of TDP-43Q331K mice compared to control counterparts, yet the corresponding protein expression was not up-regulated in transgenic mice. Despite the elevated expression of antioxidant transcripts, we observed impaired levels of glutathione (downstream Nrf2 antioxidant) in TDP-43M337V patient fibroblasts and astrocyte cultures from TDP-43Q331K mice, indicative of elevated oxidative stress and failure of some upregulated antioxidant genes to be translated into protein. Our findings indicate that further exploration of the interplay between hnRNP K (or other hnRNPs) and Nrf2-mediated antioxidant signaling is warranted and may be an important driver for motor neuron degeneration in ALS. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. A thermosensitive mutation alters the effects of lacosamide on slow inactivation in neuronal voltage-gated sodium channels, NaV1.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelsayed, Mena; Sokolov, Stanislav; Ruben, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy is a disorder characterized by seizures and convulsions. The basis of epilepsy is an increase in neuronal excitability that, in some cases, may be caused by functional defects in neuronal voltage gated sodium channels (NaVs). The C121W mutation of the β1 subunit, in particular, gives rise to the thermosensitive generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) phenotype. Lacosamide is used to treat epileptic seizures and is distinct from other anti-seizure drugs by targeting NaV slow-inactivation. We studied the effects of a physiologically relevant concentration of lacosamide on the biophysical properties of NaV1.2 channels associated with either WT-β1 or the mutant C121W-β1 subunit. Biophysical parameters were measured at both normal (22°C) and elevated (34°C) temperatures to elicit the differential temperature-sensitivity of C121W. Lacosamide was more effective in NaV1.2 associated with the WT-β1 than with C121W-β1 at either temperature. There is also a more potent effect by lacosamide on slow inactivation at elevated temperatures. Our data suggest a modulatory role is imparted by the β1 subunit in the interaction between the drug and the channel. PMID:24065921

  8. Structural Basis of Human Triosephosphate Isomerase Deficiency: Mutation E104D is Related to Alterations of a Conserved Water Network at the Dimer Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez-Almazan, Claudia; Arreola, Rodrigo; Rodriguez-Larrea, David; Aguirre-Lopez, Beatriz; Gomez-Puyou, Marietta Tuena de; Perez-Montfort, Ruy; Costas, Miguel; Gomez-Puyou, Armando; Torres-Larios, Alfredo (Granada); (U. NAM)

    2010-01-07

    Human triosephosphate isomerase deficiency is a rare autosomal disease that causes premature death of homozygous individuals. The most frequent mutation that leads to this illness is in position 104, which involves a conservative change of a Glu for Asp. Despite the extensive work that has been carried out on the E104D mutant enzyme in hemolysates and whole cells, the molecular basis of this disease is poorly understood. Here, we show that the purified, recombinant mutant enzyme E104D, while exhibiting normal catalytic activity, shows impairments in the formation of active dimers and low thermostability and monomerizes under conditions in which the wild type retains its dimeric form. The crystal structure of the E104D mutant at 1.85 {angstrom} resolution showed that its global structure was similar to that of the wild type; however, residue 104 is part of a conserved cluster of 10 residues, five from each subunit. An analysis of the available high resolution structures of TIM dimers revealed that this cluster forms a cavity that possesses an elaborate conserved network of buried water molecules that bridge the two subunits. In the E104D mutant, a disruption of contacts of the amino acid side chains in the conserved cluster leads to a perturbation of the water network in which the water-protein and water-water interactions that join the two monomers are significantly weakened and diminished. Thus, the disruption of this solvent system would stand as the underlying cause of the deficiency.

  9. Targeted mutation of Δ12 and Δ15 desaturase genes in hemp produce major alterations in seed fatty acid composition including a high oleic hemp oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielecka, Monika; Kaminski, Filip; Adams, Ian; Poulson, Helen; Sloan, Raymond; Li, Yi; Larson, Tony R; Winzer, Thilo; Graham, Ian A

    2014-06-01

    We used expressed sequence tag library and whole genome sequence mining to identify a suite of putative desaturase genes representing the four main activities required for production of polyunsaturated fatty acids in hemp seed oil. Phylogenetic-based classification and developing seed transcriptome analysis informed selection for further analysis of one of seven Δ12 desaturases and one of three Δ15 desaturases that we designate CSFAD2A and CSFAD3A, respectively. Heterologous expression of corresponding cDNAs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed CSFAD2A to have Δx+3 activity, while CSFAD3A activity was exclusively at the Δ15 position. TILLING of an ethyl methane sulphonate mutagenized population identified multiple alleles including non-sense mutations in both genes and fatty acid composition of seed oil confirmed these to be the major Δ12 and Δ15 desaturases in developing hemp seed. Following four backcrosses and sibling crosses to achieve homozygosity, csfad2a-1 was grown in the field and found to produce a 70 molar per cent high oleic acid (18:1(Δ9) ) oil at yields similar to wild type. Cold-pressed high oleic oil produced fewer volatiles and had a sevenfold increase in shelf life compared to wild type. Two low abundance octadecadienoic acids, 18:2(Δ6,9) and 18:2(Δ9,15), were identified in the high oleic oil, and their presence suggests remaining endogenous desaturase activities utilize the increased levels of oleic acid as substrate. Consistent with this, CSFAD3A produces 18:2(Δ9,15) from endogenous 18:1(Δ9) when expressed in S. cerevisiae. This work lays the foundation for the development of additional novel oil varieties in this multipurpose low input crop.

  10. Mutations in the EDR1 Gene Alter the Response of Arabidopsis thaliana to Phytophthora infestans and the Bacterial PAMPs flg22 and elf18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Katrin; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Naumann, Kai; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Weigel, Detlef; Scheel, Dierk; Rosahl, Sabine; Westphal, Lore

    2015-02-01

    Mechanistically, nonhost resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana against the oomycete Phytophthora infestans is not well understood. Besides PEN2 and PEN3, which contribute to penetration resistance, no further components have been identified so far. In an ethylmethane sulphonate-mutant screen, we mutagenized pen2-1 and screened for mutants with an altered response to infection by P. infestans. One of the mutants obtained, enhanced response to Phytophthora infestans6 (erp6), was analyzed. Whole-genome sequencing of erp6 revealed a single nucleotide polymorphism in the coding region of the kinase domain of At1g08720, which encodes the putative MAPKKK ENHANCED DISEASE RESISTANCE1 (EDR1). We demonstrate that three independent lines with knock-out alleles of edr1 mount an enhanced response to P. infestans inoculation, mediated by increased salicylic acid signaling and callose deposition. Moreover, we show that the single amino acid substitution in erp6 causes the loss of in vitro autophosphorylation activity of EDR1. Furthermore, growth inhibition experiments suggest a so-far-unknown involvement of EDR1 in the response to the pathogen-associated molecular patterns flg22 and elf18. We conclude that EDR1 contributes to the defense response of A. thaliana against P. infestans. Our data position EDR1 as a negative regulator in postinvasive nonhost resistance.

  11. The transparent testa4 mutation prevents flavonoid synthesis and alters auxin transport and the response of Arabidopsis roots to gravity and light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buer, Charles S; Muday, Gloria K

    2004-05-01

    We examined whether flavonoids act as endogenous auxin transport regulators during gravity vector and light intensity changes in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. Flavonoid deficient transparent testa4 [tt4(2YY6)] seedlings had elevated root basipetal auxin transport compared with the wild type, consistent with the absence of a negative auxin transport regulator. The tt4(2YY6) roots had delayed gravitropism that was chemically complemented with a flavonoid intermediate. Flavonoid accumulation was found in wild-type columella cells, the site of gravity perception, and in epidermal and cortical cells, the site of differential growth, but flavonoid accumulation was absent in tt4(2YY6) roots. Flavonoid accumulation was higher in gravity-stimulated root tips as compared with vertical controls, with maximum differences coinciding with the timing of gravitropic bending, and was located in epidermal cells. Exogenous indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) also elevated flavonoid accumulation, suggesting that flavonoid changes in response to gravity might be partly as a result of changing IAA distribution. Acropetal IAA transport was also elevated in roots of tt4(2YY6). Flavonoid synthesis was repressed in the dark, as were differences in root acropetal transport in tt4(2YY6). These results are consistent with light- and gravity-induced flavonoid stimulation that alters auxin transport in roots and dependent physiological processes, including gravitropic bending and root development.

  12. Missense Mutation of Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF Alters Neurocognitive Performance in Patients with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: A Longitudinal Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vairavan Narayanan

    Full Text Available The predictability of neurocognitive outcomes in patients with traumatic brain injury is not straightforward. The extent and nature of recovery in patients with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI are usually heterogeneous and not substantially explained by the commonly known demographic and injury-related prognostic factors despite having sustained similar injuries or injury severity. Hence, this study evaluated the effects and association of the Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF missense mutations in relation to neurocognitive performance among patients with mTBI. 48 patients with mTBI were prospectively recruited and MRI scans of the brain were performed within an average 10.1 (SD 4.2 hours post trauma with assessment of their neuropsychological performance post full Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS recovery. Neurocognitive assessments were repeated again at 6 months follow-up. The paired t-test, Cohen's d effect size and repeated measure ANOVA were performed to delineate statistically significant differences between the groups [wildtype G allele (Val homozygotes vs. minor A allele (Met carriers] and their neuropsychological performance across the time point (T1 = baseline/ admission vs. T2 = 6th month follow-up. Minor A allele carriers in this study generally performed more poorly on neuropsychological testing in comparison wildtype G allele group at both time points. Significant mean differences were observed among the wildtype group in the domains of memory (M = -11.44, SD = 10.0, p = .01, d = 1.22, executive function (M = -11.56, SD = 11.7, p = .02, d = 1.05 and overall performance (M = -6.89 SD = 5.3, p = .00, d = 1.39, while the minor A allele carriers showed significant mean differences in the domains of attention (M = -11.0, SD = 13.1, p = .00, d = .86 and overall cognitive performance (M = -5.25, SD = 8.1, p = .01, d = .66.The minor A allele carriers in comparison to the wildtype G allele group, showed considerably lower scores at

  13. Mutations affecting lysine-35 of gpNu1, the small subunit of bacteriophage lambda terminase, alter the strength and specificity of holoterminase interactions with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Y; Feiss, M

    1997-05-12

    The small subunit of lambda terminase, gpNu1, contains a low-affinity ATPase activity that is stimulated by nonspecific dsDNA. The location of the gpNu1 ATPase center is suggested by a sequence match between gpNu1 (29-VLRGGGKG-36) and the phosphate-binding loop, or P-loop (GXXXXGKT/S), of known ATPase. The proposed P-loop of gpNu1 is just downstream of a putative helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif, located between residues 5 and 24. Published work has shown that changing lysine-35 of the proposed P-loop of gpNu1 alters the response of the ATPase activity to DNA, as follows. The changes gpNu1 k35A and gpNu1 K35D increase the level of DNA required for maximal stimulation of the gpNu1 ATPase by factors of 2- and 10-fold, respectively. The maximally stimulated ATPase activities of the mutant enzymes are indistinguishable from that of the wild-type enzyme. In the present work, the effects of changing lysine-35 on the cos-cleavage and DNA-packaging activities of terminase were examined. In vitro, the gpNu1 K35A enzyme cleaved cos as efficiently as the wild-type enzyme, but required a 2-fold increased level of substrate DNA for saturation, suggesting a slight reduction in DNA affinity. In a crude DNA-packaging system using cleaved lambda DNA as substrate, the gpNu1 K35A enzyme had a 10-fold defect. In vivo, lambda Nu1 K35A showed a 2-fold reduction in cos cleavage, but no packaged DNA was detected. The primary defect of the gpNu1 K35A enzyme was concluded to be in a post-cos-cleavage step of DNA packaging. In in vitro cos-cleavage experiments, the gpNu1 K35D enzyme had a 10-fold increased requirement for saturation by substrate DNA. Furthermore, the cos-cleavage activity of gpNu1 K35D enzyme was strongly inhibited by the presence of nonspecific DNA, indicating that the gpNu1 K35D enzyme is unable to discriminate effectively between cos and nonspecific DNA. No cos cleavage was observed in vivo for lambda Nu1 K35D, a result consistent with the discrimination defect found in

  14. Septin mutations in human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias T Spiliotis

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Septins are GTP-binding proteins that are evolutionarily and structurally related to the RAS oncogenes. Septin expression levels are altered in many cancers and new advances point to how abnormal septin expression may contribute to the progression of cancer. In contrast to the RAS GTPases, which are frequently mutated and actively promote tumorigenesis, little is known about the occurrence and role of septin mutations in human cancers. Here, we review septin missense mutations that are currently in the Catalog of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC database. The majority of septin mutations occur in tumors of the large intestine, skin, endometrium and stomach. Over 25% of the annotated mutations in SEPT2, SEPT4 and SEPT9 belong to large intestine tumors. From all septins, SEPT9 and SEPT14 exhibit the highest mutation frequencies in skin, stomach and large intestine cancers. While septin mutations occur with frequencies lower than 3%, recurring mutations in several invariant and highly conserved amino acids are found across different septin paralogs and tumor types. Interestingly, a significant number of these mutations occur in the GTP-binding pocket and septin dimerization interfaces. Future studies may determine how these somatic mutations affect septin structure and function, whether they contribute to the progression of specific cancers and if they could serve as tumor-specific biomarkers.

  15. Infertility in Female Mice with a Gain-of-Function Mutation in the Luteinizing Hormone Receptor Is Due to Irregular Estrous Cyclicity, Anovulation, Hormonal Alterations, and Polycystic Ovaries1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lan Hai; Stacey R. McGee; Amanda C. Rabideau; Marilène Paquet; Prema Narayan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The luteinizing hormone receptor, LHCGR, is essential for fertility in males and females, and genetic mutations in the receptor have been identified that result in developmental and reproductive defects...

  16. Mutational Analysis of Cell Types in TSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    associated with epilepsy and autism . The generation of two new model systems permits more in-depth analysis of the developmental pathogenesis of TSC and...disability, and autism . TSC1/TSC2 gene mutations lead to developmental alterations in brain structure known as tubers in over 80% of TSC patients. Loss of...that is associated with epilepsy, cognitive disability, and autism . TSC1/TSC2 gene mutations lead to developmental alterations in brain structure

  17. Altered CYP19A1 and CYP3A4 Activities Due to Mutations A115V, T142A, Q153R and P284L in the Human P450 Oxidoreductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer S. Udhane

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available All cytochromes P450s in the endoplasmic reticulum rely on P450 oxidoreductase (POR for their catalytic activities. Mutations in POR cause metabolic disorders of steroid hormone biosynthesis and affect certain drug metabolizing P450 activities. We studied mutations A115V, T142A, Q153R identified in the flavin mononucleotide (FMN binding domain of POR that interacts with partner proteins and P284L located in the hinge region that is required for flexibility and domain movements in POR. Human wild-type (WT and mutant POR as well as CYP3A4 and CYP19A1 proteins in recombinant form were expressed in bacteria, and purified proteins were reconstituted in liposomes for enzyme kinetic assays. Quality of POR protein was checked by cytochrome c reduction assay as well as flavin content measurements. We found that proteins carrying mutations A115V, T142A located close to the FMN binding site had reduced flavin content compared to WT POR and lost almost all activity to metabolize androstenedione via CYP19A1 and showed reduced CYP3A4 activity. The variant P284L identified from apparently normal subjects also had severe loss of both CYP19A1 and CYP3A4 activities, indicating this to be a potentially disease causing mutation. The mutation Q153R initially identified in a patient with disordered steroidogenesis showed remarkably increased activities of both CYP19A1 and CYP3A4 without any significant change in flavin content, indicating improved protein–protein interactions between POR Q153R and some P450 proteins. These results indicate that effects of mutations on activities of individual cytochromes P450 can be variable and a detailed analysis of each variant with different partner proteins is necessary to accurately determine the genotype-phenotype correlations of POR variants.

  18. Mutation induction by ion beams in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Atsushi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    The effect of ion beams such as C, He, and Ne ions was investigated on the mutation induction in plants with the expectation that ion beams of high linear energy transfer (LET) can frequently produce large DNA alternation such as inversion, translocation and large deletion rather than point mutation. Mutation frequency was investigated using Arabidopsis visible phenotype loci and was 8 to 33 fold higher for 220 MeV carbon ions than for electrons. Mutation spectrum was investigated on the flower color of chrysanthemum cv to find that flower mutants induced by ion beams show complex and stripe types rather than single color. Polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed to investigate DNA alteration of mutations. In conclusion, the characteristics of ion beams for the mutation induction are 1) high frequency, 2) broad mutation spectrum, and 3) novel mutants. (S. Ohno)

  19. Infertility in Female Mice with a Gain-of-Function Mutation in the Luteinizing Hormone Receptor Is Due to Irregular Estrous Cyclicity, Anovulation, Hormonal Alterations, and Polycystic Ovaries1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, Lan; McGee, Stacey R.; Rabideau, Amanda C.; Paquet, Marilène; Narayan, Prema

    2015-01-01

    The luteinizing hormone receptor, LHCGR, is essential for fertility in males and females, and genetic mutations in the receptor have been identified that result in developmental and reproductive defects. We have previously generated and characterized a mouse model (KiLHRD582G) for familial male-limited precocious puberty caused by an activating mutation in the receptor. We demonstrated that the phenotype of the KiLHRD582G male mice is an accurate phenocopy of male patients with activating LHCGR mutations. In this study, we observed that unlike women with activating LHCGR mutations who are normal, female KiLHRD582G mice are infertile. Mice exhibit irregular estrous cyclicity, anovulation, and precocious puberty. A temporal study from 2–24 wk of age indicated elevated levels of progesterone, androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol and upregulation of several steroidogenic enzyme genes. Ovaries of KiLHRD582G mice exhibited significant pathology with the development of large hemorrhagic cysts as early as 3 wk of age, extensive stromal cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy with luteinization, numerous atretic follicles, and granulosa cell tumors. Ovulation could not be rescued by the addition of exogenous gonadotropins. The body weights of the KiLHRD582G mice were higher than wild-type counterparts, but there was no increase in the body fat composition or metabolic abnormalities such as impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. These studies demonstrate that activating LHCGR mutations do not produce the same phenotype in female mice as in humans and clearly illustrate species differences in the expression and regulation of LHCGR in the ovary, but not in the testis. PMID:26040673

  20. Mutation in Cyclophilin B That Causes Hyperelastosis Cutis in American Quarter Horse Does Not Affect Peptidylprolyl cis-trans Isomerase Activity but Shows Altered Cyclophilin B-Protein Interactions and Affects Collagen Folding*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Vranka, Janice A.; Boudko, Sergei P.; Pokidysheva, Elena; Mizuno, Kazunori; Zientek, Keith; Keene, Douglas R.; Rashmir-Raven, Ann M.; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Winand, Nena J.; Bächinger, Hans Peter

    2012-01-01

    The rate-limiting step of folding of the collagen triple helix is catalyzed by cyclophilin B (CypB). The G6R mutation in cyclophilin B found in the American Quarter Horse leads to autosomal recessive hyperelastosis cutis, also known as hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia. The mutant protein shows small structural changes in the region of the mutation at the side opposite the catalytic domain of CypB. The peptidylprolyl cis-trans isomerase activity of the mutant CypB is normal when analyzed in vitro. However, the biosynthesis of type I collagen in affected horse fibroblasts shows a delay in folding and secretion and a decrease in hydroxylysine and glucosyl-galactosyl hydroxylysine. This leads to changes in the structure of collagen fibrils in tendon, similar to those observed in P3H1 null mice. In contrast to cyclophilin B null mice, where little 3-hydroxylation was found in type I collagen, 3-hydroxylation of type I collagen in affected horses is normal. The mutation disrupts the interaction of cyclophilin B with the P-domain of calreticulin, with lysyl hydroxylase 1, and probably other proteins, such as the formation of the P3H1·CypB·cartilage-associated protein complex, resulting in less effective catalysis of the rate-limiting step in collagen folding in the rough endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:22556420

  1. Mutation in cyclophilin B that causes hyperelastosis cutis in American Quarter Horse does not affect peptidylprolyl cis-trans isomerase activity but shows altered cyclophilin B-protein interactions and affects collagen folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Vranka, Janice A; Boudko, Sergei P; Pokidysheva, Elena; Mizuno, Kazunori; Zientek, Keith; Keene, Douglas R; Rashmir-Raven, Ann M; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Winand, Nena J; Bächinger, Hans Peter

    2012-06-22

    The rate-limiting step of folding of the collagen triple helix is catalyzed by cyclophilin B (CypB). The G6R mutation in cyclophilin B found in the American Quarter Horse leads to autosomal recessive hyperelastosis cutis, also known as hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia. The mutant protein shows small structural changes in the region of the mutation at the side opposite the catalytic domain of CypB. The peptidylprolyl cis-trans isomerase activity of the mutant CypB is normal when analyzed in vitro. However, the biosynthesis of type I collagen in affected horse fibroblasts shows a delay in folding and secretion and a decrease in hydroxylysine and glucosyl-galactosyl hydroxylysine. This leads to changes in the structure of collagen fibrils in tendon, similar to those observed in P3H1 null mice. In contrast to cyclophilin B null mice, where little 3-hydroxylation was found in type I collagen, 3-hydroxylation of type I collagen in affected horses is normal. The mutation disrupts the interaction of cyclophilin B with the P-domain of calreticulin, with lysyl hydroxylase 1, and probably other proteins, such as the formation of the P3H1·CypB·cartilage-associated protein complex, resulting in less effective catalysis of the rate-limiting step in collagen folding in the rough endoplasmic reticulum.

  2. Genetic Alterations in Glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bralten, Linda B. C.; French, Pim J., E-mail: p.french@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Neurology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Dr Molewaterplein 50, 3000 CA, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-03-07

    Gliomas are the most common type of primary brain tumor and have a dismal prognosis. Understanding the genetic alterations that drive glioma formation and progression may help improve patient prognosis by identification of novel treatment targets. Recently, two major studies have performed in-depth mutation analysis of glioblastomas (the most common and aggressive subtype of glioma). This systematic approach revealed three major pathways that are affected in glioblastomas: The receptor tyrosine kinase signaling pathway, the TP53 pathway and the pRB pathway. Apart from frequent mutations in the IDH1/2 gene, much less is known about the causal genetic changes of grade II and III (anaplastic) gliomas. Exceptions include TP53 mutations and fusion genes involving the BRAF gene in astrocytic and pilocytic glioma subtypes, respectively. In this review, we provide an update on all common events involved in the initiation and/or progression across the different subtypes of glioma and provide future directions for research into the genetic changes.

  3. Identification of recurrent SMO and BRAF mutations in ameloblastomas

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Here we report the discovery of oncogenic mutations in the Hedgehog and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways in over 80% of ameloblastomas, locally destructive odontogenic tumors of the jaw, by genomic analysis of archival material. Mutations in SMO (encoding Smoothened, SMO) are common in ameloblastomas of the maxilla, whereas BRAF mutations are predominant in tumors of the mandible. We show that a frequently occurring SMO alteration encoding p.Leu412Phe is an activating mutation...

  4. 肺癌患者呼出气冷凝液中基因微卫星改变和p53基因变异的检测及其意义%Significance of detection of chromosome microsatellite alterations and p53 gene mutation in exhaled breath condensate of lung cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯哲敏; 陈建荣; 蔡映云

    2009-01-01

    呼出气冷凝液(exhaled breath condensate,EBC)检测是一种新的肺部病变诊断技术.通过检测EBC中相关基因.从而寻找早期诊断肺癌的新方法是目前肺癌研究的热点.采用聚合酶链式反应,对肺癌患者EBC中3号染色体短臂上基因的微卫星异常以及p53基因变异进行检测,结果发现肺癌患者EBC中基因微卫星改变和p53基因变异较正常对照者阳性率明显为高.目前对于EBC基因检测尚属探索阶段,但随着检测技术的不断完善,检测EBC中肺癌的基因标志物是一个较为有希望提高肺癌早期诊断率的方法.%Detection of the exhaled breath condensate(EBC) is a new diagnosis for lung disease.Detecting gene mutation in EBC of lung cancer patients as a potential method of diagnosing lung cancer in early period has become a hot spot in lung cancer research. Some researches, which detect gene mutation in EBC by using polymerase chain reaction, demonstrate that positive rates of p53 gene mutation and chromosome microsatellite alterations in chromosomal region 3p of lung cancer patients are higher than those of healthy peoples. Detecting gene mutation in EBC is still in research stage. However, as the continual development of detecting technique,it is expected to raise the early diagnosis of lung carcinoma.

  5. Mutations affecting gyrase in Haemophilus influenzae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setlow, J.K.; Cabrera-Juarez, E.; Albritton, W.L.; Spikes, D.; Mutschler, A.

    1985-11-01

    Mutants separately resistant to novobiocin, coumermycin, nalidixic acid, and oxolinic acid contained gyrase activity as measured in vitro that was resistant to the antibiotics, indicating that the mutations represented structural alterations of the enzyme. One Novr mutant contained an altered B subunit of the enzyme, as judged by the ability of a plasmid, pNov1, containing the mutation to complement a temperature-sensitive gyrase B mutation in Escherichia coli and to cause novobiocin resistance in that strain. Three other Novr mutations did not confer antibiotic resistance to the gyrase but appeared to increase the amount of active enzyme in the cell. One of these, novB1, could only act in cis, whereas a new mutation, novC, could act in trans. An RNA polymerase mutation partially substituted for the novB1 mutation, suggesting that novB1 may be a mutation in a promoter region for the B subunit gene. Growth responses of strains containing various combinations of mutations on plasmids or on the chromosome indicated that low-level resistance to novobiocin or coumermycin may have resulted from multiple copies of wild-type genes coding for the gyrase B subunit, whereas high-level resistance required a structural change in the gyrase B gene and was also dependent on alteration in a regulatory region. When there was mismatch at the novB locus, with the novB1 mutation either on a plasmid or the chromosome, and the corresponding wild-type gene present in trans, chromosome to plasmid recombination during transformation was much higher than when the genes matched, probably because plasmid to chromosome recombination, eliminating the plasmid, was inhibited by the mismatch.

  6. Novel frameshift mutation in the p16/INK4A tumor suppressor gene in canine breast cancer alters expression from the p16/INK4A/p14ARF locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutful Kabir, Farruk M; Agarwal, Payal; Deinnocentes, Patricia; Zaman, Jishan; Bird, Allison Church; Bird, R Curtis

    2013-01-01

    The INK4 family of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CKI) encode important cell cycle regulators that tightly control cell cycle during G1 to S phase. These related genes are considered tumor suppressors as loss of function contributes to the malignant phenotype. Expression of CKIs p16, p14ARF, or p15 were defective in six different canine mammary tumor (CMT) cell lines compared to normal thoracic canine fibroblasts. This suggests CKI defects are frequently responsible for neoplastic transformation in canine mammary carcinomas. p16 and p14ARF are two alternatively spliced products derived from the canine p16/INK4A/p14ARF gene locus. Despite omissions in the published p16 transcript and canine genome and the presence of GC-rich repeats, we determined the complete coding sequence of canine p16 revealing a deletion and frameshift mutation in p16 exon 1α in CMT28 cells. In addition, we determined canine p14ARF mRNA and protein sequences. Mapping of these mutations uncovered important aspects of p16 and p14ARF expression and defects in CMT28 cells shifting the p16 reading frame into p14ARF making a fusion protein that was predicted to be truncated, unstable and devoid of structural and functional integrity. This data describes an important neoplastic mechanism in the p16/INK4A/p14ARF locus in a spontaneous canine model of breast cancer. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Profile of TP53 gene mutations in sinonasal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmila, Reetta; Bornholdt, Jette; Suitiala, Tuula

    2010-01-01

    %) frameshift or nonsense mutations, and 36 (23%) intronic or silent mutations. In coding region, the most common base change detected was C-->T transition (43/125; 34% of base changes in the coding region). G-->T transversions occurred at a frequency of 10% (12/125), which is less than reported in mutation...... not been reported before as frequently mutated in head and neck cancer or human cancer in general. About half of all tumours with TP53 mutations carried more than one mutation. Interestingly, 86% (19/22) of the silent mutations detected had occurred in tumours with multiple mutations.......Genetic alterations underlying the development of the cancer of the nose and paranasal sinuses (sinonasal cancer, SNC), a rare cancer that can be included in the group of head and neck cancers, are still largely unknown. We recently reported that TP53 mutations are a common feature of SNC...

  8. THE ANALYSIS OF NF2 GENE MUTATION IN SPORADIC SCHWANNOMAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卞留贯; 孙青芳; 沈建康; 赵卫国; 罗其中

    2002-01-01

    Objective To analyze the mutation of NF2 gene (exon 2,4,6 and 13) in schwannomas. Methods The NF2 gene mutation in 36 schwannomas were observed by PCR-SSCP and DNA sequence. The proliferative index of schwannoma was detected by immunohistochemistry. Results We found 13 mutations in 36 schwannomas, including 6 deletion or insertion resulting in a frameshift, 2 nonsense mutations, 2 missense mutations, and 3 alterations affecting acceptor or donor of splicing sites in E4,E6,E13. The proliferative index of schwannomas with mutation were significantly higher than those without mutation (P< 0.05). Conclusion NF2 gene mutation is the frequent event in the tumorigenesis of schwannomas, and there is some correlation between the mutation and clinical behavior(tumor proliferation).

  9. CF Mutation Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing; Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Mutation Analysis; CFTR Mutation Analysis Formal name: Cystic Fibrosis Gene Mutation ... an elevated immunoreactive trypsinogen (IRT) or positive sweat chloride test , to confirm the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis. ...

  10. Clinical resistance to vicriviroc through adaptive V3 loop mutations in HIV-1 subtype D gp120 that alter interactions with the N-terminus and ECL2 of CCR5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogert, Robert A; Hou, Yan; Ba, Lei; Wojcik, Lisa; Qiu, Ping; Murgolo, Nicholas; Duca, Jose; Dunkle, Lisa M; Ralston, Robert; Howe, John A

    2010-04-25

    The HIV-1 CCR5 co-receptor is a member of the chemokine receptor family of G-protein coupled receptors; for which a number of small molecule antagonists, such as vicriviroc (VCV), have been developed to inhibit HIV-1 R5-tropic replication. In this study, we analyzed an HIV-1 subtype D envelope gene from a clinical trial subject who developed complete resistance to VCV. The HIV-1 resistant envelope has six predominant amino acid changes in the V3 loop, together with one change in the C4 domain of gp120, which are fully responsible for the resistance phenotype. V3 loop mutations Q315E and R321G are essential for resistance to VCV, whereas E328K and G429R in C4 contribute significantly to the infectivity of the resistant variant. Collectively, these amino acid changes influenced the interaction of gp120 with both the N-terminus and ECL2 region of CCR5.

  11. Transcomplementation, but not Physical Association of the CC-NB-ARC and LRR Domains of Tomato R Protein Mi-1.2 is Altered by Mutations in the ARC2 Subdomain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gerben van Ooijen; Gabriele Mayr; Mario Albrecht; Ben J. C. Cornelissena; Frank L.W. Takken

    2008-01-01

    Race-specific disease resistance in plants is mediated by Resistance (R) proteins that recognize pathogen attack and initiate defence responses. Most R proteins contain a central NB-ARC domain and a C-terminal leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain. We analyzed the intramolecular interaction of the LRR domain of tomato R protein Mi-1.2 with its Nterminus. We expressed the CC-NB-ARC and LRR parts in trans and analyzed functional transcomplementation and physical interactions. We show that these domains functionally transcomplement when expressed in trans. Known autoactivating LRR domain swaps were found to induce a hypersensitive response (HR) upon co-expression. Likewise, autoactivating mutants in the NB subdomain transcomplemented to induce HR. Point mutations in the ARC2 subdomain that induce strong autoactivation in the full-length Mi-1.2 protein, however, fail to induce HR in the transcomplementation assay. These data indicate distinct functions for the NB-ARC subdomains in induction of HR signalling. Furthermore, dissociation of the LRR is not required to release its negative regulation, as in all combinations of CC-NB-ARC and LRR domains tested, a physical interaction was observed.

  12. Somatic mutations of calreticulin in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klampfl, Thorsten; Gisslinger, Heinz; Harutyunyan, Ashot S; Nivarthi, Harini; Rumi, Elisa; Milosevic, Jelena D; Them, Nicole C C; Berg, Tiina; Gisslinger, Bettina; Pietra, Daniela; Chen, Doris; Vladimer, Gregory I; Bagienski, Klaudia; Milanesi, Chiara; Casetti, Ilaria Carola; Sant'Antonio, Emanuela; Ferretti, Virginia; Elena, Chiara; Schischlik, Fiorella; Cleary, Ciara; Six, Melanie; Schalling, Martin; Schönegger, Andreas; Bock, Christoph; Malcovati, Luca; Pascutto, Cristiana; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Cazzola, Mario; Kralovics, Robert

    2013-12-19

    Approximately 50 to 60% of patients with essential thrombocythemia or primary myelofibrosis carry a mutation in the Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2), and an additional 5 to 10% have activating mutations in the thrombopoietin receptor gene (MPL). So far, no specific molecular marker has been identified in the remaining 30 to 45% of patients. We performed whole-exome sequencing to identify somatically acquired mutations in six patients who had primary myelofibrosis without mutations in JAK2 or MPL. Resequencing of CALR, encoding calreticulin, was then performed in cohorts of patients with myeloid neoplasms. Somatic insertions or deletions in exon 9 of CALR were detected in all patients who underwent whole-exome sequencing. Resequencing in 1107 samples from patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms showed that CALR mutations were absent in polycythemia vera. In essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis, CALR mutations and JAK2 and MPL mutations were mutually exclusive. Among patients with essential thrombocythemia or primary myelofibrosis with nonmutated JAK2 or MPL, CALR mutations were detected in 67% of those with essential thrombocythemia and 88% of those with primary myelofibrosis. A total of 36 types of insertions or deletions were identified that all cause a frameshift to the same alternative reading frame and generate a novel C-terminal peptide in the mutant calreticulin. Overexpression of the most frequent CALR deletion caused cytokine-independent growth in vitro owing to the activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) by means of an unknown mechanism. Patients with mutated CALR had a lower risk of thrombosis and longer overall survival than patients with mutated JAK2. Most patients with essential thrombocythemia or primary myelofibrosis that was not associated with a JAK2 or MPL alteration carried a somatic mutation in CALR. The clinical course in these patients was more indolent than that in patients with the JAK2 V617F

  13. Postnatal Loss of P/Q-type Channels Confined to Rhombic Lip Derived Neurons Alters Synaptic Transmission at the Parallel Fiber to Purkinje Cell Synapse and Replicates Genomic Cacna1a Mutation Phenotype of Ataxia and Seizures in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maejima, Takashi; Wollenweber, Patric; Teusner, Lena U. C.; Noebels, Jeffrey L.; Herlitze, Stefan; Mark, Melanie D.

    2013-01-01

    Ataxia, episodic dyskinesia and thalamocortical seizures are associated with an inherited loss of P/Q-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channel function. P/Q-type channels are widely expressed throughout the neuraxis, obscuring identification of the critical networks underlying these complex neurological disorders. We recently showed that the conditional postnatal loss of P/Q-type channels in cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) in mice (purky) leads to these aberrant phenotypes, suggesting that intrinsic alteration in PC output is a sufficient pathogenic factor for disease initiation. The question arises whether P/Q-type channel deletion confined to a single upstream cerebellar synapse might induce the pathophysiological abnormality of genomically inherited P/Q-type channel disorders. PCs integrate two excitatory inputs, climbing fibers from inferior olive and parallel fibers (PFs) from granule cells (GCs) that receive mossy fiber (MF) input derived from precerebellar nuclei. In this paper, we introduce a new mouse model with a selective knock-out of P/Q-type channels in rhombic lip derived neurons including PF- and MF-pathways (quirky). We found that in quirky mice, PF-PC synaptic transmission is reduced during low-frequency stimulation. Using focal light stimulation of GCs that express optogenetic light-sensitive channels, channelrhodopsin-2, we found that modulation of PC firing via GC input is reduced in quirky mice. Phenotypic analysis revealed that quirky mice display ataxia, dyskinesia and absence epilepsy. These results suggest that developmental alteration of patterned input confined to only one of the main afferent cerebellar excitatory synaptic pathways has a significant role in generating the neurological phenotype associated with the global genomic loss of P/Q-type channel function. PMID:23516282

  14. Mutational screening of the RB1 gene in Italian patients with retinoblastoma reveals 11 novel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampieri, Katia; Hadjistilianou, Theodora; Mari, Francesca; Speciale, Caterina; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Cetta, Francesco; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Giachino, Daniela; Pasini, Barbara; Acquaviva, Antonio; Caporossi, Aldo; Frezzotti, Renato; Renieri, Alessandra; Bruttini, Mirella

    2006-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB, OMIM#180200) is the most common intraocular tumour in infancy and early childhood. Constituent mutations in the RB1 gene predispose individuals to RB development. We performed a mutational screening of the RB1 gene in Italian patients affected by RB referred to the Medical Genetics of the University of Siena. In 35 unrelated patients, we identified germline RB1 mutations in 6 out of 9 familial cases (66%) and in 7 out of 26 with no family history of RB (27%). Using the single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) technique, 11 novel mutations were detected, including 3 nonsense, 5 frameshift and 4 splice-site mutations. Only two of these mutations (1 splice site and 1 missense) were previously reported. The mutation spectrum reflects the published literature, encompassing predominately nonsense or frameshift and splicing mutations. RB1 germline mutation was detected in 37% of our cases. Gross rearrangements outside the investigated region, altered DNA methylation, or mutations in non-coding regions, may be the cause of disease in the remainder of the patients. Some cases, e.g. a case of incomplete penetrance, or variable expressivity ranging from retinoma to multiple tumours, are discussed in detail. In addition, a case of pre-conception genetic counselling resolved by rescue of banked cordonal blood of the affected deceased child is described.

  15. Molecular methods for the detection of mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, C; Marcelino, L A; Conde, A R; Saraiva, C; Giphart-Gassler, M; De Nooij-van Dalen, A G; Van Buuren-van Seggelen, V; Van der Keur, M; May, C A; Cole, J; Lehmann, A R; Steinsgrimsdottir, H; Beare, D; Capulas, E; Armour, J A

    2000-01-01

    We report the results of a collaborative study aimed at developing reliable, direct assays for mutation in human cells. The project used common lymphoblastoid cell lines, both with and without mutagen treatment, as a shared resource to validate the development of new molecular methods for the detection of low-level mutations in the presence of a large excess of normal alleles. As the "gold standard, " hprt mutation frequencies were also measured on the same samples. The methods under development included i) the restriction site mutation (RSM) assay, in which mutations lead to the destruction of a restriction site; ii) minisatellite length-change mutation, in which mutations lead to alleles containing new numbers of tandem repeat units; iii) loss of heterozygosity for HLA epitopes, in which antibodies can be used to direct selection for mutant cells; iv) multiple fluorescence-based long linker arm nucleotides assay (mf-LLA) technology, for the detection of substitutional mutations; v) detection of alterations in the TP53 locus using a (CA) array as the target for the screening; and vi) PCR analysis of lymphocytes for the presence of the BCL2 t(14:18) translocation. The relative merits of these molecular methods are discussed, and a comparison made with more "traditional" methods.

  16. Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations in gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitkus, Matthew S; Diplas, Bill H; Yan, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, extraordinary progress has been made in elucidating the underlying genetic causes of gliomas. In 2008, our understanding of glioma genetics was revolutionized when mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) were identified in the vast majority of progressive gliomas and secondary glioblastomas (GBMs). IDH enzymes normally catalyze the decarboxylation of isocitrate to generate α-ketoglutarate (αKG), but recurrent mutations at Arg(132) of IDH1 and Arg(172) of IDH2 confer a neomorphic enzyme activity that catalyzes reduction of αKG into the putative oncometabolite D-2-hydroxyglutate (D2HG). D2HG inhibits αKG-dependent dioxygenases and is thought to create a cellular state permissive to malignant transformation by altering cellular epigenetics and blocking normal differentiation processes. Herein, we discuss the relevant literature on mechanistic studies of IDH1/2 mutations in gliomas, and we review the potential impact of IDH1/2 mutations on molecular classification and glioma therapy.

  17. Mutational Analysis of Cell Types in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Comorbid neuropsychological disorders such as autism , mental retardation (MR), pervasive developmental disorder, attention deficit disorder (ADD...from mutations in the TSC1 or TSC2 genes that is associated with epilepsy, cognitive disability, and autism . TSC1/TSC2 gene mutations lead to...or TSC2 genes that is associated with epilepsy, cognitive disability, and autism . TSC1/TSC2 gene mutations lead to developmental alterations in brain

  18. IDH Mutations: Genotype-Phenotype Correlation and Prognostic Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Wei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available IDH1/2 mutation is the most frequent genomic alteration found in gliomas, affecting 40% of these tumors and is one of the earliest alterations occurring in gliomagenesis. We investigated a series of 1305 gliomas and showed that IDH mutation is almost constant in 1p19q codeleted tumors. We found that the distribution of IDH1R132H, IDH1nonR132H, and IDH2 mutations differed between astrocytic, mixed, and oligodendroglial tumors, with an overrepresentation of IDH2 mutations in oligodendroglial phenotype and an overrepresentation of IDH1nonR132H in astrocytic tumors. We stratified grade II and grade III gliomas according to the codeletion of 1p19q and IDH mutation to define three distinct prognostic subgroups: 1p19q and IDH mutated, IDH mutated—which contains mostly TP53 mutated tumors, and none of these alterations. We confirmed that IDH mutation with a hazard ratio = 0.358 is an independent prognostic factor of good outcome. These data refine current knowledge on IDH mutation prognostic impact and genotype-phenotype associations.

  19. Landscape of Genomic Alterations in Cervical Carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojesina, Akinyemi I.; Lichtenstein, Lee; Freeman, Samuel S.; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Imaz-Rosshandler, Ivan; Pugh, Trevor J.; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Ambrogio, Lauren; Cibulskis, Kristian; Bertelsen, Bjørn; Romero-Cordoba, Sandra; Treviño, Victor; Vazquez-Santillan, Karla; Guadarrama, Alberto Salido; Wright, Alexi A.; Rosenberg, Mara W.; Duke, Fujiko; Kaplan, Bethany; Wang, Rui; Nickerson, Elizabeth; Walline, Heather M.; Lawrence, Michael S.; Stewart, Chip; Carter, Scott L.; McKenna, Aaron; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Iram P.; Espinosa-Castilla, Magali; Woie, Kathrine; Bjorge, Line; Wik, Elisabeth; Halle, Mari K.; Hoivik, Erling A.; Krakstad, Camilla; Gabiño, Nayeli Belem; Gómez-Macías, Gabriela Sofia; Valdez-Chapa, Lezmes D.; Garza-Rodríguez, María Lourdes; Maytorena, German; Vazquez, Jorge; Rodea, Carlos; Cravioto, Adrian; Cortes, Maria L.; Greulich, Heidi; Crum, Christopher P.; Neuberg, Donna S.; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Escareno, Claudia Rangel; Akslen, Lars A.; Carey, Thomas E.; Vintermyr, Olav K.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo A.; Melendez-Zajgla, Jorge; Getz, Gad; Salvesen, Helga B.; Meyerson, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer is responsible for 10–15% of cancer-related deaths in women worldwide1,2. The etiological role of infection with high-risk human papilloma viruses (HPV) in cervical carcinomas is well established3. Previous studies have implicated somatic mutations in PIK3CA, PTEN, TP53, STK11 and KRAS4–7 as well as several copy number alterations in the pathogenesis of cervical carcinomas8,9. Here, we report whole exome sequencing analysis of 115 cervical carcinoma-normal paired samples, transcriptome sequencing of 79 cases and whole genome sequencing of 14 tumor-normal pairs. Novel somatic mutations in 79 primary squamous cell carcinomas include recurrent E322K substitutions in the MAPK1 gene (8%), inactivating mutations in the HLA-B gene (9%), and mutations in EP300 (16%), FBXW7 (15%), NFE2L2 (4%) TP53 (5%) and ERBB2 (6%). We also observed somatic ELF3 (13%) and CBFB (8%) mutations in 24 adenocarcinomas. Squamous cell carcinomas had higher frequencies of somatic mutations in the Tp*C dinucleotide context than adenocarcinomas. Gene expression levels at HPV integration sites were significantly higher in tumors with HPV integration compared with expression of the same genes in tumors without viral integration at the same site. These data demonstrate several recurrent genomic alterations in cervical carcinomas that suggest novel strategies to combat this disease. PMID:24390348

  20. Early mutation bursts in colorectal tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Matthew P.; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina; Siegmund, Kimberly; Marjoram, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Tumor growth is an evolutionary process involving accumulation of mutations, copy number alterations, and cancer stem cell (CSC) division and differentiation. As direct observation of this process is impossible, inference regarding when mutations occur and how stem cells divide is difficult. However, this ancestral information is encoded within the tumor itself, in the form of intratumoral heterogeneity of the tumor cell genomes. Here we present a framework that allows simulation of these processes and estimation of mutation rates at the various stages of tumor development and CSC division patterns for single-gland sequencing data from colorectal tumors. We parameterize the mutation rate and the CSC division pattern, and successfully retrieve their posterior distributions based on DNA sequence level data. Our approach exploits Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC), a method that is becoming widely-used for problems of ancestral inference. PMID:28257429

  1. 5'UTR mutations of ENG cause hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damjanovich, Kristy; Langa, Carmen; Blanco, Francisco J; McDonald, Jamie; Botella, Luisa M; Bernabeu, Carmelo; Wooderchak-Donahue, Whitney; Stevenson, David A; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar

    2011-12-22

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a vascular disorder characterized by epistaxis, arteriovenous malformations, and telangiectases. The majority of the patients have a mutation in the coding region of the activin A receptor type II-like 1 (ACVRL1) or Endoglin (ENG) gene. However, in approximately 15% of cases, sequencing analysis and deletion/duplication testing fail to identify mutations in the coding regions of these genes. Knowing its vital role in transcription and translation control, we were prompted to investigate the 5'untranslated region (UTR) of ENG. We sequenced the 5'UTR of ENG for 154 HHT patients without mutations in ENG or ACVRL1 coding regions. We found a mutation (c.-127C > T), which is predicted to affect translation initiation and alter the reading frame of endoglin. This mutation was found in a family with linkage to the ENG, as well as in three other patients, one of which had an affected sibling with the same mutation. In vitro expression studies showed that a construct with the c.-127C > T mutation alters the translation and decreases the level of the endoglin protein. In addition, a c.-9G > A mutation was found in three patients, one of whom was homozygous for this mutation. Expression studies showed decreased protein levels suggesting that the c.-9G > A is a hypomorphic mutation. Our results emphasize the need for the inclusion of the 5'UTR region of ENG in clinical testing for HHT.

  2. Transgenic Animal Mutation Assays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Chen; Ph.D.D.A.B.T.

    2005-01-01

    @@ The novel transgenic mouse and rat mutation assays have provided a tool for analyzing in vivo mutation in any tissue, thus permitting the direct comparison of cancer incidence with mutant frequency.

  3. Novel KRAS gene mutations in sporadic colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid M Naser

    Full Text Available In this article, we report 7 novel KRAS gene mutations discovered while retrospectively studying the prevalence and pattern of KRAS mutations in cancerous tissue obtained from 56 Saudi sporadic colorectal cancer patients from the Eastern Province.Genomic DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cancerous and noncancerous colorectal tissues. Successful and specific PCR products were then bi-directionally sequenced to detect exon 4 mutations while Mutector II Detection Kits were used for identifying mutations in codons 12, 13 and 61. The functional impact of the novel mutations was assessed using bioinformatics tools and molecular modeling.KRAS gene mutations were detected in the cancer tissue of 24 cases (42.85%. Of these, 11 had exon 4 mutations (19.64%. They harbored 8 different mutations all of which except two altered the KRAS protein amino acid sequence and all except one were novel as revealed by COSMIC database. The detected novel mutations were found to be somatic. One mutation is predicted to be benign. The remaining mutations are predicted to cause substantial changes in the protein structure. Of these, the Q150X nonsense mutation is the second truncating mutation to be reported in colorectal cancer in the literature.Our discovery of novel exon 4 KRAS mutations that are, so far, unique to Saudi colorectal cancer patients may be attributed to environmental factors and/or racial/ethnic variations due to genetic differences. Alternatively, it may be related to paucity of clinical studies on mutations other than those in codons 12, 13, 61 and 146. Further KRAS testing on a large number of patients of various ethnicities, particularly beyond the most common hotspot alleles in exons 2 and 3 is needed to assess the prevalence and explore the exact prognostic and predictive significance of the discovered novel mutations as well as their possible role in colorectal carcinogenesis.

  4. Genetic and epigenetic alterations in pancreatic carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpu, Yannick; Hanoun, Naïma; Lulka, Hubert; Sicard, Flavie; Selves, Janick; Buscail, Louis; Torrisani, Jérôme; Cordelier, Pierre

    2011-03-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide. Despite significant progresses in the last decades, the origin of this cancer remains unclear and no efficient therapy exists. PDAC does not arise de novo: three remarkable different types of pancreatic lesions can evolve towards pancreatic cancer. These precursor lesions include: Pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) that are microscopic lesions of the pancreas, Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms (IPMN) and Mucinous Cystic Neoplasms (MCN) that are both macroscopic lesions. However, the cellular origin of these lesions is still a matter of debate. Classically, neoplasm initiation or progression is driven by several genetic and epigenetic alterations. The aim of this review is to assemble the current information on genetic mutations and epigenetic disorders that affect genes during pancreatic carcinogenesis. We will further discuss the interest of the genetic and epigenetic alterations for the diagnosis and prognosis of PDAC. Large genetic alterations (chromosomal deletion/amplification) and single point mutations are well described for carcinogenesis inducers. Mutations classically occur within key regions of the genome. Consequences are various and include activation of mitogenic pathways or silencing of apoptotic processes. Alterations of K-RAS, P16 and DPC4 genes are frequently observed in PDAC samples and have been described to arise gradually during carcinogenesis. DNA methylation is an epigenetic process involved in imprinting and X chromosome inactivation. Alteration of DNA methylation patterns leads to deregulation of gene expression, in the absence of mutation. Both genetic and epigenetic events influence genes and non-coding RNA expression, with dramatic effects on proliferation, survival and invasion. Besides improvement in our fundamental understanding of PDAC development, highlighting the molecular alterations that occur in pancreatic carcinogenesis could

  5. CDH1 germline mutations and hereditary lobular breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corso, Giovanni; Intra, Mattia; Trentin, Chiara; Veronesi, Paolo; Galimberti, Viviana

    2016-04-01

    Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer is an autosomal dominant inherited disease associated of CDH1 germline mutations (that encodes for the E-cadherin protein), and lobular breast cancer is the second most frequent type of neoplasia. Recently, novel E-cadherin constitutional alterations have been identified in pedigree clustering only for lobular breast carcinoma without evidence of diffuse gastric tumors and in absence of BRCA1/2 mutations. This first evidence opens novel questions about the inherited correlation between diffuse gastric and lobular breast cancers. In this brief review we revise the literature data about the CDH1 mutation frequency affecting exclusively lobular breast cancer, providing clinical recommendation for asymptomatic mutation carriers.

  6. Implications of mitochondrial DNA mutations and mitochondrial dysfunction in tumorigenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianxin Lu; Lokendra Kumar Sharma; Yidong Bai

    2009-01-01

    Alterations in oxidative phosphorylation resulting from mitochondrial dysfunction have long been hypothesized to be involved in tumorigenesis. Mitochondria have recently been shown to play an important role in regulating both programmed cell death and cell proliferation. Furthermore, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations have been found in various cancer cells. However, the role of these mtDNA mutations in tumorigenesis remains largely unknown. This review focuses on basic mitochondrial genetics, mtDNA mutations and consequential mitochondrial dysfunction associated with cancer. The potential molecular mechanisms, mediating the pathogenesis from mtDNA mutations and mitochondrial dysfunction to tumorigenesis are also discussed.

  7. Maize Mutator transposon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yijun WANG; Mingliang XU; Dexiang DENG; Yunlong BIAN

    2008-01-01

    Transposable elements are widely distributed in eukaryotes. Due to its high copy numbers, high forward mutation rate and preferential insertion into low-copy DNA sequences, among others, the Mutator system has been widely used as a mutagen in genomic research. The discovery, classification, transposition specificity and epige-netic regulation of Mutator transposons were described. The application of Mutator tagging in plant genomic research was also presented. The role of Mu-like elements in genome evolution was briefly depicted. Moreover, the direction of Mutator transposon research in the future was discussed.

  8. Genomic alterations in pancreatic cancer and their relevance to therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Erina; Takai; Shinichi; Yachida

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal cancer type, for which there are few viable therapeutic options. But, with the advance of sequencing technologies for global genomic analysis, the landscape of genomic alterations in pancreatic cancer is becoming increasingly well understood. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of genomic alterations in 12 core signaling pathways or cellular processes in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, which is the most common type of malignancy in the pancreas, including four commonly mutated genes and many other genes that are mutated at low frequencies. We also describe the potential implications of these genomic alterations for development of novel therapeutic approaches in the context of personalized medicine.

  9. Interplay of genetic and epigenetic alterations in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun-Min; Kim-Ha, Jeongsil; Choi, Won-Young; Lee, Jungwoo; Kim, Dawon; Lee, Jinyoung; Choi, Eunji; Kim, Young-Joon

    2016-07-01

    Genetic and epigenetic alterations play prominent roles in hepatocarcinogenesis and their appearance varies depending on etiological factors, race and tumor progression. Intriguingly, distinct patterns of these genetic and epigenetic mutations are coupled not only to affect each other, but to trigger different types of tumorigenesis. The patterns and frequencies of somatic variations vary depending on the nature of the surrounding chromatin. On the other hand, epigenetic alterations often induce genomic instability prone to mutation. Therefore, genetic mutations and epigenetic alterations in hepatocellular carcinoma appear to be inseparable factors that accelerate tumorigenesis synergistically. We have summarized recent findings on genetic and epigenetic modifications, their influences on each other's alterations and putative roles in liver tumorigenesis.

  10. The Role of U2AF1 Mutations in the Pathogenesis of Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    effect has been previously reported in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patient samples with U2AF1 mutations . To prioritize altered junctions for...hematopoiesis and pre-mRNA splicing observed in patients with U2AF1 mutations . This study also identifies changes in gene isoform expression unique to U2AF1...making it one of the most commonly mutated genes in MDS. Overall, mutations in spliceosome genes occur in up to 57% of patients with MDS, further

  11. RELN Mutations in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammert, Dawn B; Howell, Brian W

    2016-01-01

    RELN encodes a large, secreted glycoprotein integral to proper neuronal positioning during development and regulation of synaptic function postnatally. Rare, homozygous, null mutations lead to lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia (LCH), accompanied by developmental delay and epilepsy. Until recently, little was known about the frequency or consequences of heterozygous mutations. Several lines of evidence from multiple studies now implicate heterozygous mutations in RELN in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). RELN maps to the AUTS1 locus on 7q22, and at this time over 40 distinct mutations have been identified that would alter the protein sequence, four of which are de novo. The RELN mutations that are most clearly consequential are those that are predicted to inactivate the signaling function of the encoded protein and those that fall in a highly conserved RXR motif found at the core of the 16 Reelin subrepeats. Despite the growing evidence of RELN dysfunction in ASD, it appears that these mutations in isolation are insufficient and that secondary genetic or environmental factors are likely required for a diagnosis.

  12. RELN mutations in autism spectrum disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn B. Lammert

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available RELN encodes a large, secreted glycoprotein integral to proper neuronal positioning during development and regulation of synaptic function postnatally. Rare, homozygous, null mutations lead to lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia, accompanied by developmental delay and epilepsy. Until recently, little was known about the frequency or consequences of heterozygous mutations. Several lines of evidence from multiple studies now implicate heterozygous mutations in RELN in autism spectrum disorders (ASD. RELN maps to the AUTS1 locus on 7q22, and at this time over 40 distinct mutations have been identified that would alter the protein sequence, four of which are de novo. The RELN mutations that are most clearly consequential are those that are predicted to inactivate the signaling function of the encoded protein, and those that fall in a highly conserved RXR motif found at the core of the 16 Reelin subrepeats. Despite the growing evidence of RELN dysfunction in ASD, it appears that these mutations in isolation are insufficient and that secondary genetic or environmental factors are likely required for a diagnosis.

  13. Applications of homemade kit in mutation detection of genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Chunxia; XU Guowang; SHI Xianzhe; MA Jianmei; ZHANG Yan; L(U) Shen; YANG Qing

    2004-01-01

    Several methods of mutation detection, such as single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), tandem SSCP/heteroduplex analysis and SNaPshot analysis were developed using homemade kit on ABI 310 genetic analyzer, and were successfully applied to mutation detection of 31 colorectal tumor samples. The sieving capability of homemade kit and commercial kit were compared, results demonstrate that homemade kit has higher resolution and shorter analysis time. In clinical tumor samples, 26% K-ras (exon 1) and 24% p53 (exons 7-8) were found to have mutations, and all mutations were single point variations. A majority of mutations occurred in one gene, only 1 tumor contained alterations in the two genes, which indicates that development of colorectal cancer lies on alternate pathways, and may correlate with different gene mutations.

  14. Global Characterization of Protein-Altering Mutations in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Abnormalities Strongly Correlate with Changes at the Expression Level and Suggest Functional Interactions between AR, PTEN and TMPRSS2/ ERG Chaux et...prostate cancer. J Urol 170: 1817–1821. 34. Chaux A, Albadine R, Toubaji A, Hicks J, Meeker A, et al. (2011) Immunohistochemistry for ERG expression

  15. Nonsense mutations and altered splice-site selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietz, H.C. [Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1997-03-01

    The invited editorial by Maquat, regarding defects in RNA splicing and the consequence of shortened translational reading frames, provided a balanced and comprehensive review of the topic. We believe, however, that our work describing the nonsense codon-mediated skipping of fibrillin-1 exon 51 was interpreted in a manner that is not fully supported by our data. 6 refs.

  16. Mutations and binding sites of human transcription factors

    KAUST Repository

    Kamanu, Frederick Kinyua

    2012-06-01

    Mutations in any genome may lead to phenotype characteristics that determine ability of an individual to cope with adaptation to environmental challenges. In studies of human biology, among the most interesting ones are phenotype characteristics that determine responses to drug treatments, response to infections, or predisposition to specific inherited diseases. Most of the research in this field has been focused on the studies of mutation effects on the final gene products, peptides, and their alterations. Considerably less attention was given to the mutations that may affect regulatory mechanism(s) of gene expression, although these may also affect the phenotype characteristics. In this study we make a pilot analysis of mutations observed in the regulatory regions of 24,667 human RefSeq genes. Our study reveals that out of eight studied mutation types, insertions are the only one that in a statistically significant manner alters predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs). We also find that 25 families of TFBSs have been altered by mutations in a statistically significant manner in the promoter regions we considered. Moreover, we find that the related transcription factors are, for example, prominent in processes related to intracellular signaling; cell fate; morphogenesis of organs and epithelium; development of urogenital system, epithelium, and tube; neuron fate commitment. Our study highlights the significance of studying mutations within the genes regulatory regions and opens way for further detailed investigations on this topic, particularly on the downstream affected pathways. 2012 Kamanu, Medvedeva, Schaefer, Jankovic, Archer and Bajic.

  17. Three kinds of mutation

    CERN Document Server

    Buan, Aslak Bakke; Thomas, Hugh

    2010-01-01

    For a finite dimensional hereditary algebra, we consider: exceptional sequences in the category of finite dimensional modules, silting objects in the bounded derived category, and m-cluster tilting objects in the m-cluster category. There are mutation operations on both the set of m-cluster tilting objects and the set of exceptional sequences. It is also possible to define a mutation operation for silting objects. We compare these three different notions of mutation.

  18. Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations in Korean melanoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Mi Ryung; Park, Kyu-Hyun; Chung, Kee Yang; Shin, Sang Joon; Rha, Sun Young; Tsao, Hensin

    2017-01-01

    Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) is the reverse transcriptase component of the telomeric complex, which synthesizes terminal DNA to protect chromosomal ends and to maintain genomic integrity. In melanoma, mutation in TERT promoter region is a common event and theses promoter variants have been shown to be associated with increased gene expression, decreased telomere length and poorer outcome. In this study, we determined the frequency of TERT promoter mutation in 88 Korean primary melanoma patients and aimed to see the association of TERT promoter mutation status to other major molecular features, such as BRAF, NRAS, KIT mutations and correlate with clinicopathological features. In our study, acral melanoma (n=46, 52.3%) was the most common type. Overall, TERT promoter mutation was observed in 15 cases (17%) with ten c. -124C>T altertions and five c. -146C>T alterations. None of our samples showed CC>TT mutation which is considered pathognomonic of UV induction. Among the 46 acral melanoma patients, 5 patients (10.9%) harbored TERT promoter mutation. Tumors with TERT promoter mutation showed significantly greater Breslow thickness compared to WT tumors (P=0.039). A combined analysis for the presence of TERT promoter and BRAF mutations showed that patients with both TERT promoter and BRAF mutation showed decreased survival compared with those with only TERT promoter mutation, only BRAF mutation, or without mutations in either TERT promoter or BRAF (P=0.035). Our data provides additional evidence that UV-induced TERT promoter mutation frequencies vary depending on melanoma subtype, but preserves its prognostic value.

  19. Frequent ATRX mutations and loss of expression in adult diffuse astrocytic tumors carrying IDH1/IDH2 and TP53 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Yang; Gerges, Noha; Korshunov, Andrey; Sabha, Nesrin; Khuong-Quang, Dong-Anh; Fontebasso, Adam M; Fleming, Adam; Hadjadj, Djihad; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Majewski, Jacek; Dong, Zhifeng; Siegel, Peter; Albrecht, Steffen; Croul, Sidney; Jones, David T W; Kool, Marcel; Tonjes, Martje; Reifenberger, Guido; Faury, Damien; Zadeh, Gelareh; Pfister, Stefan; Jabado, Nada

    2012-11-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors in children and adults. We recently identified frequent alterations in chromatin remodelling pathways including recurrent mutations in H3F3A and mutations in ATRX (α-thalassemia/mental-retardation-syndrome-X-linked) in pediatric and young adult glioblastoma (GBM, WHO grade IV astrocytoma). H3F3A mutations were specific to pediatric high-grade gliomas and identified in only 3.4 % of adult GBM. Using sequencing and/or immunohistochemical analyses, we investigated ATRX alterations (mutation/loss of expression) and their association with TP53 and IDH1 or IDH2 mutations in 140 adult WHO grade II, III and IV gliomas, 17 pediatric WHO grade II and III astrocytomas and 34 pilocytic astrocytomas. In adults, ATRX aberrations were detected in 33 % of grade II and 46 % of grade III gliomas, as well as in 80 % of secondary and 7 % of primary GBMs. They were absent in the 17 grade II and III astrocytomas in children, and the 34 pilocytic astrocytomas. ATRX alterations closely overlapped with mutations in IDH1/2 (p ATRX mutation/loss of expression and alternative lengthening of telomeres was identified in our cohort. In summary, our data show that ATRX alterations are frequent in adult diffuse gliomas and are specific to astrocytic tumors carrying IDH1/2 and TP53 mutations. Combined alteration of these genes may contribute to drive the neoplastic growth in a major subset of diffuse astrocytomas in adults.

  20. Immunohistochemical correlates of TP53 somatic mutations in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murnyák, Balázs; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2016-10-04

    Despite controversy on the correlation between p53 accumulation and TP53 mutational status, immunohistochemical (IHC) detection of overexpressed protein has long been used as a surrogate method for mutation analysis. The aim of our study was to characterise the IHC expression features of TP53 somatic mutations and define their occurrence in human cancers. A large-scale database analysis was conducted in the IARC TP53 Database (R17); 7878 mutations with IHC features were retrieved representing 60 distinct tumour sites. The majority of the alterations were immunopositive (p TP53 mutations were divided into three IHC groups according to mutation frequency and IHC positivity. Each group had female dominance. Among the IHC groups, significant correlations were observed with age at diagnosis in breast, bladder, liver, haematopoietic system and head & neck cancers. An increased likelihood of false negative IHC associated with rare nonsense mutations was observed in certain tumour sites. Our study demonstrates that p53 immunopositivity largely correlates with TP53 mutational status but expression is absent in certain mutation types.Besides, describing the complex IHC expression of TP53 somatic mutations, our results reveal some caveats for the diagnostic practice.

  1. HUMAN MITOCHONDRIAL tRNA MUTATIONS IN MATERNALLY INHERITED DEAFNESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Jing; GONG Sha-sha; TANG Xiao-wen; ZHU Yi; GUAN Min-xin

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in mitochondrial tRNA genes have been shown to be associated with maternally inherited syn-dromic and non-syndromic deafness. Among those, mutations such as tRNALeu(UUR) 3243A>G associated with syndromic deafness are often present in heteroplasmy, and the non-syndromic deafness-associated tRNA mu-tations including tRNASer(UCN) 7445A>G are often in homoplasmy or in high levels of heteroplasmy. These tRNA mutations are the primary factors underlying the development of hearing loss. However, other tRNA mutations such as tRNAThr 15927G>A and tRNASer(UCN) 7444G>A are insufficient to produce a deafness phe-notype, but always act in synergy with the primary mitochondrial DNA mutations, and can modulate their phenotypic manifestation. These tRNA mutations may alter the structure and function of the corresponding mitochondrial tRNAs and cause failures in tRNAs metabolism. Thereby, the impairment of mitochondrial protein synthesis and subsequent defects in respiration caused by these tRNA mutations, results in mitochon-drial dysfunctions and eventually leads to the development of hearing loss. Here, we summarized the deaf-ness-associated mitochondrial tRNA mutations and discussed the pathophysiology of these mitochondrial tRNA mutations, and we hope these data will provide a foundation for the early diagnosis, management, and treatment of maternally inherited deafness.

  2. Immunohistochemistry predicts nucleophosmin (NPM) mutations in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falini, Brunangelo; Martelli, Maria Paola; Bolli, Niccolò; Bonasso, Rossella; Ghia, Emanuela; Pallotta, Maria Teresa; Diverio, Daniela; Nicoletti, Ildo; Pacini, Roberta; Tabarrini, Alessia; Galletti, Barbara Verducci; Mannucci, Roberta; Roti, Giovanni; Rosati, Roberto; Specchia, Giorgina; Liso, Arcangelo; Tiacci, Enrico; Alcalay, Myriam; Luzi, Lucilla; Volorio, Sara; Bernard, Loris; Guarini, Anna; Amadori, Sergio; Mandelli, Franco; Pane, Fabrizio; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Saglio, Giuseppe; Pelicci, Pier-Giuseppe; Martelli, Massimo F; Mecucci, Cristina

    2006-09-15

    Nucleophosmin (NPM) exon-12 mutations occur in 50% to 60% of adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with normal karyotype and are predictors of favorable prognosis. We evaluated bone marrow or peripheral blood samples from 450 adult patients with AML of the GIMEMA (Gruppo Italiano Malattie Ematologiche Maligne dell'Adulto)/AML12 EORTC (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer) trial to (1) search for new exon-12 NPM mutations; (2) determine whether NPM immunostaining on paraffin-embedded biopsies predicts NPM mutations; and (3) investigate altered nucleocytoplasmic NPM traffic in primary AML cells. Fourteen NPM mutations, including 8 new variants, were identified. All 200 AML cases expressing cytoplasmic NPM (NPMc(+) AML) carried NPM mutations. None of the 250 cases with nucleus-restricted NPM (NPMc(-) AML) was mutated. At the C-terminus, NPM leukemic mutants carried mutations of only tryptophan 290 or of both tryptophans 288 and 290 and a new nuclear export signal (NES) motif, which appear to underlie their nuclear export. The specific Crm1/exportin-1 inhibitor leptomycin-B relocated NPM mutants from cytoplasm to nucleus of primary NPMc(+) AML cells, demonstrating that nuclear export is NES dependent. NPM mutants bound and recruited wild-type NPM into leukemic cell cytoplasm. Because alterations at C-terminus of leukemic NPM mutants are similar, immunohistochemistry detects all exon-12 NPM mutations and is a valuable, inexpensive tool in the diagnostic-prognostic work-up of patients with AML with normal karyotype.

  3. Germline Stem Cell Competition, Mutation Hot Spots, Genetic Disorders, and Older Fathers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnheim, Norman; Calabrese, Peter

    2016-08-31

    Some de novo human mutations arise at frequencies far exceeding the genome average mutation rate. Examples include the common mutations at one or a few sites in the genes that cause achondroplasia, Apert syndrome, multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B, and Noonan syndrome. These mutations are recurrent, provide a gain of function, are paternally derived, and are more likely to be transmitted as the father ages. Recent experiments have tested whether the high mutation frequencies are due to an elevated mutation rate per cell division, as expected, or to an advantage of the mutant spermatogonial stem cells over wild-type stem cells. The evidence, which includes the surprising discovery of testis mutation clusters, rules out the former model but not the latter. We propose how the mutations might alter spermatogonial stem cell function and discuss how germline selection contributes to the paternal age effect, the human mutational load, and adaptive evolution.

  4. Histotype-specific copy-number alterations in ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Ruby YunJu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epithelial ovarian cancer is characterized by multiple genomic alterations; most are passenger alterations which do not confer tumor growth. Like many cancers, it is a heterogeneous disease and can be broadly categorized into 4 main histotypes of clear cell, endometrioid, mucinous, and serous. To date, histotype-specific copy number alterations have been difficult to elucidate. The difficulty lies in having sufficient sample size in each histotype for statistical analyses. Methods To dissect the heterogeneity of ovarian cancer and identify histotype-specific alterations, we used an in silico hypothesis-driven approach on multiple datasets of epithelial ovarian cancer. Results In concordance with previous studies on global copy number alterations landscape, the study showed similar alterations. However, when the landscape was de-convoluted into histotypes, distinct alterations were observed. We report here significant histotype-specific copy number alterations in ovarian cancer and showed that there is genomic diversity amongst the histotypes. 76 cancer genes were found to be significantly altered with several as potential copy number drivers, including ERBB2 in mucinous, and TPM3 in endometrioid histotypes. ERBB2 was found to have preferential alterations, where it was amplified in mucinous (28.6% but deleted in serous tumors (15.1%. Validation of ERBB2 expression showed significant correlation with microarray data (p=0.007. There also appeared to be reciprocal relationship between KRAS mutation and copy number alterations. In mucinous tumors where KRAS mutation is common, the gene was not significantly altered. However, KRAS was significantly amplified in serous tumors where mutations are rare in high grade tumors. Conclusions The study demonstrates that the copy number landscape is specific to the histotypes and identification of these alterations can pave the way for targeted drug therapy specific to the histotypes.

  5. Novel insight into mutational landscape of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria A Gaykalova

    Full Text Available Development of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is characterized by accumulation of mutations in several oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. We have formerly described the mutation pattern of HNSCC and described NOTCH signaling pathway alterations. Given the complexity of the HNSCC, here we extend the previous study to understand the overall HNSCC mutation context and to discover additional genetic alterations. We performed high depth targeted exon sequencing of 51 highly actionable cancer-related genes with a high frequency of mutation across many cancer types, including head and neck. DNA from primary tumor tissues and matched normal tissues was analyzed for 37 HNSCC patients. We identified 26 non-synonymous or stop-gained mutations targeting 11 of 51 selected genes. These genes were mutated in 17 out of 37 (46% studied HNSCC patients. Smokers harbored 3.2-fold more mutations than non-smokers. Importantly, TP53 was mutated in 30%, NOTCH1 in 8% and FGFR3 in 5% of HNSCC. HPV negative patients harbored 4-fold more TP53 mutations than HPV positive patients. These data confirm prior reports of the HNSCC mutational profile. Additionally, we detected mutations in two new genes, CEBPA and FES, which have not been previously reported in HNSCC. These data extend the spectrum of HNSCC mutations and define novel mutation targets in HNSCC carcinogenesis, especially for smokers and HNSCC without HPV infection.

  6. Gestational mutations in radiation carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza, R.; Luebeck, G.; Moolgavkar, S.

    Mutations in critical genes during gestation could increase substantially the risk of cancer. We examine the consequences of such mutations using the Luebeck-Moolgavkar model for colorectal cancer and the Lea-Coulson modification of the Luria-Delbruck model for the accumulation of mutations during gestation. When gestational mutation rates are high, such mutations make a significant contribution to cancer risk even for adult tumors. Furthermore, gestational mutations ocurring at distinct times during emryonic developmemt lead to substantially different numbers of mutated cells at birth, with early mutations leading to a large number (jackpots) of mutated cells at birth and mutation occurring late leading to only a few mutated cells. Thus gestational mutations could confer considerable heterogeneity of the risk of cancer. If the fetus is exposed to an environmental mutagen, such as ionizing radiation, the gestational mutation rate would be expected to increase. We examine the consequences of such exposures during gestation on the subsequent development of cancer.

  7. [Colorectal cancer (CCR): genetic and molecular alterations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez-Vázquez, Clara Ibet; Rosales-Reynoso, Mónica Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present a genetic and molecular overview of colorectal carcinogenesis (sporadic and hereditary origin) as a multistage process, where there are a number of molecular mechanisms associated with the development of colorectal cancer and genomic instability that allows the accumulation of mutations in proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, chromosomal instability, and methylation and microsatellite instability, and the involvement of altered expression of microRNAs' prognosis factors.

  8. Mutation and premating isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, R C; Thompson, J N

    2002-11-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  9. Experiences from treatment-predictive KRAS testing; high mutation frequency in rectal cancers from females and concurrent mutations in the same tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Mats; Ekstrand, Anna; Edekling, Thomas;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: KRAS mutations represent key alterations in colorectal cancer development and lead to constitutive EGFR signaling. Since EGFR inhibition represents a therapeutic strategy in advanced colorectal cancer, KRAS mutation analysis has quickly been introduced as a treatment-predictive test. ...... therapies, whereas the observation of concurrent KRAS mutations imply that repeated KRAS targeting may occur during tumor progression in a subset of colorectal cancers.......BACKGROUND: KRAS mutations represent key alterations in colorectal cancer development and lead to constitutive EGFR signaling. Since EGFR inhibition represents a therapeutic strategy in advanced colorectal cancer, KRAS mutation analysis has quickly been introduced as a treatment-predictive test...... carried Gly12Cys/Gly12Asp in an adenomatous component and additionally acquired Gly12Val in the invasive component. CONCLUSION: The demonstration of a particularly high KRAS mutation frequency among female rectal cancer patients suggests that this subset is the least likely to respond to anti-EGFR...

  10. Founder mutations characterise the mutation panorama in 200 Swedish index cases referred for Long QT syndrome genetic testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stattin Eva-Lena

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long QT syndrome (LQTS is an inherited arrhythmic disorder characterised by prolongation of the QT interval on ECG, presence of syncope and sudden death. The symptoms in LQTS patients are highly variable, and genotype influences the clinical course. This study aims to report the spectrum of LQTS mutations in a Swedish cohort. Methods Between March 2006 and October 2009, two hundred, unrelated index cases were referred to the Department of Clinical Genetics, Umeå University Hospital, Sweden, for LQTS genetic testing. We scanned five of the LQTS-susceptibility genes (KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2 for mutations by DHPLC and/or sequencing. We applied MLPA to detect large deletions or duplications in the KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2 genes. Furthermore, the gene RYR2 was screened in 36 selected LQTS genotype-negative patients to detect cases with the clinically overlapping disease catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT. Results In total, a disease-causing mutation was identified in 103 of the 200 (52% index cases. Of these, altered exon copy numbers in the KCNH2 gene accounted for 2% of the mutations, whereas a RYR2 mutation accounted for 3% of the mutations. The genotype-positive cases stemmed from 64 distinct mutations, of which 28% were novel to this cohort. The majority of the distinct mutations were found in a single case (80%, whereas 20% of the mutations were observed more than once. Two founder mutations, KCNQ1 p.Y111C and KCNQ1 p.R518*, accounted for 25% of the genotype-positive index cases. Genetic cascade screening of 481 relatives to the 103 index cases with an identified mutation revealed 41% mutation carriers who were at risk of cardiac events such as syncope or sudden unexpected death. Conclusion In this cohort of Swedish index cases with suspected LQTS, a disease-causing mutation was identified in 52% of the referred patients. Copy number variations explained 2% of the

  11. Mitochondrial DNA m.3242G > A mutation, an under diagnosed cause of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and renal tubular dysfunction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wortmann, S.B.; Champion, M.P.; Heuvel, L.P. van den; Barth, H.; Trutnau, B.; Craig, K.; Lammens, M.M.; Schreuder, M.F.; Taylor, R.W.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Wevers, R.A.; Rodenburg, R.J.T.; Morava, E.

    2012-01-01

    We present two new patients with the recently described mitochondrial m.3242G > A mutation. Although the mutation is situated next to the well known m.3243A > G mutation, the most common alteration associated with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episode

  12. A novel mitochondrial mutation m.8989G>C associated with neuropathy, ataxia, retinitis pigmentosa - the NARP syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duno, Morten; Wibrand, Flemming; Baggesen, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    mitochondrial point mutation, m.8989G>C, in a patient presenting with neuropathy, ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa constituting the classical NARP phenotype. This mutation alters the amino acid right next to canonical NARP mutation. We suggest that classic NARP syndrome relates to a defined dysfunction of p...

  13. Absolute quantification of somatic DNA alterations in human cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, Scott L.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Helman, Elena; McKenna, Aaron; Shen, Hui; Zack, Travis; Laird, Peter W.; Onofrio, Robert C.; Winckler, Wendy; Weir, Barbara A; Beroukhim, Rameen; Pellman, David; Levine, Douglas A.; Lander, Eric S.; Meyerson, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    We developed a computational method (ABSOLUTE) that infers tumor purity and malignant cell ploidy directly from analysis of somatic DNA alterations. ABSOLUTE can detect subclonal heterogeneity, somatic homozygosity, and calculate statistical sensitivity to detect specific aberrations. We used ABSOLUTE to analyze ovarian cancer data and identified pervasive subclonal somatic point mutations. In contrast, mutations occurring in key tumor suppressor genes, TP53 and NF1 were predominantly clonal ...

  14. Absolute quantification of somatic DNA alterations in human cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, Scott L.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Helman, Elena; McKenna, Aaron; Shen, Hui; Zack, Travis; Laird, Peter W.; Onofrio, Robert C.; Winckler, Wendy; Weir, Barbara A; Beroukhim, Rameen; Pellman, David; Levine, Douglas A.; Lander, Eric S.; Meyerson, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    We developed a computational method (ABSOLUTE) that infers tumor purity and malignant cell ploidy directly from analysis of somatic DNA alterations. ABSOLUTE can detect subclonal heterogeneity, somatic homozygosity, and calculate statistical sensitivity to detect specific aberrations. We used ABSOLUTE to analyze ovarian cancer data and identified pervasive subclonal somatic point mutations. In contrast, mutations occurring in key tumor suppressor genes, TP53 and NF1 were predominantly clonal ...

  15. Genetic alterations in pancreatic carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmid Roland M

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer of the exocrine pancreas represents the fifth leading cause of cancer death in the Western population with an average survival after diagnosis of 3 to 6 months and a five-year survival rate under 5%. Our understanding of the molecular carcinogenesis has improved in the last few years due to the development of novel molecular biological techniques. Pancreatic cancer is a multi-stage process resulting from the accumulation of genetic changes in the somatic DNA of normal cells. In this article we describe major genetic alterations of pancreatic cancer, mutations in the proto-oncogene K-RAS and the tumor suppressors INK4A, TP53 and DPC4/SMAD4. The accumulation of these genetic changes leads to a profound disturbance in cell cycle regulation and continuous growth. The knowledge of the underlying molecular mechanisms will offer new therapeutic and diagnostic options and hopefully improve the outcome of this aggressive disease.

  16. Acute myeloid leukemia with DNMT3A mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunlong; Zhu, Baosheng

    2014-09-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a type of blood cancer, is characterized by an increase in the number of abnormal white blood cells in the bone marrow, frequently causing hematopoietic insufficiency. It is a heterogeneous disease featuring cytogenetic aberrations, recurrent somatic mutations and alterations in gene expression. DNA (cytosine-5-)-methyltransferase 3 alpha (DNMT3A) is closely associated with epigenetic modifications in mammalian development and disease. More recent studies have identified recurrent somatic mutations in DNMT3A in AML, most of which are heterozygous. The DNMT3A R882 codon is a mutational hotspot. The frequency of DNMT3A mutations varies among different countries, but mutations have been found to be associated with cytogenetics, age, white blood cell (WBC) count, prognosis and response of patients to chemotherapy. The normal function of DNMT3A can be disrupted by these mutations, which subsequently results in an abnormality of epigenetic modification. These data suggest that mutations in the DNMT3A gene represent a novel class of mutations in AML with distinct biological and clinical features. Further studies are needed to elucidate the exact molecular mechanism and function of DNMT3A mutations in leukemogenesis.

  17. Gene mutations of acute myeloid leukemia in the genome era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naoe, Tomoki; Kiyoi, Hitoshi

    2013-02-01

    Ten years ago, gene mutations found in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) were conceptually grouped into class I mutation, which causes constitutive activation of intracellular signals that contribute to the growth and survival, and class II mutation, which blocks differentiation and/or enhance self-renewal by altered transcription factors. A cooperative model between two classes of mutations has been suggested by murine experiments and partly supported by epidemiological findings. In the last 5 years, comprehensive genomic analysis proceeded to find new gene mutations, which are found in the epigenome-associated enzymes and the molecules never noticed so far. These new mutations apparently increase the complexity and heterogeneity of AML. Although a long list of gene mutations might have been compiled, the entire picture of molecular pathogenesis in AML remains to be elucidated because gene rearrangement, gene copy number, DNA methylation and expression profiles are not fully studied in conjunction with gene mutations. Comprehensive genome research will deepen the understanding of AML to promote the development of new classification and treatment. This review focuses on gene mutations that were recently discovered by genome sequencing.

  18. The functional importance of disease-associated mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klein Teri E

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For many years, scientists believed that point mutations in genes are the genetic switches for somatic and inherited diseases such as cystic fibrosis, phenylketonuria and cancer. Some of these mutations likely alter a protein's function in a manner that is deleterious, and they should occur in functionally important regions of the protein products of genes. Here we show that disease-associated mutations occur in regions of genes that are conserved, and can identify likely disease-causing mutations. Results To show this, we have determined conservation patterns for 6185 non-synonymous and heritable disease-associated mutations in 231 genes. We define a parameter, the conservation ratio, as the ratio of average negative entropy of analyzable positions with reported mutations to that of every analyzable position in the gene sequence. We found that 84.0% of the 231 genes have conservation ratios less than one. 139 genes had eleven or more analyzable mutations and 88.0% of those had conservation ratios less than one. Conclusions These results indicate that phylogenetic information is a powerful tool for the study of disease-associated mutations. Our alignments and analysis has been made available as part of the database at http://cancer.stanford.edu/mut-paper/. Within this dataset, each position is annotated with the analysis, so the most likely disease-causing mutations can be identified.

  19. Mutation rates among RNA viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Drake, John W.; Holland, John J.

    1999-01-01

    The rate of spontaneous mutation is a key parameter in modeling the genetic structure and evolution of populations. The impact of the accumulated load of mutations and the consequences of increasing the mutation rate are important in assessing the genetic health of populations. Mutation frequencies are among the more directly measurable population parameters, although the information needed to convert them into mutation rates is often lacking. A previous analysis of mutation rates in RNA viru...

  20. Identification of recurrent SMO and BRAF mutations in ameloblastomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Robert T; McClary, Andrew C; Myers, Benjamin R; Biscocho, Jewison; Neahring, Lila; Kwei, Kevin A; Qu, Kunbin; Gong, Xue; Ng, Tony; Jones, Carol D; Varma, Sushama; Odegaard, Justin I; Sugiyama, Toshihiro; Koyota, Souichi; Rubin, Brian P; Troxell, Megan L; Pelham, Robert J; Zehnder, James L; Beachy, Philip A; Pollack, Jonathan R; West, Robert B

    2014-07-01

    Here we report the discovery of oncogenic mutations in the Hedgehog and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways in over 80% of ameloblastomas, locally destructive odontogenic tumors of the jaw, by genomic analysis of archival material. Mutations in SMO (encoding Smoothened, SMO) are common in ameloblastomas of the maxilla, whereas BRAF mutations are predominant in tumors of the mandible. We show that a frequently occurring SMO alteration encoding p.Leu412Phe is an activating mutation and that its effect on Hedgehog-pathway activity can be inhibited by arsenic trioxide (ATO), an anti-leukemia drug approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that is currently in clinical trials for its Hedgehog-inhibitory activity. In a similar manner, ameloblastoma cells harboring an activating BRAF mutation encoding p.Val600Glu are sensitive to the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib. Our findings establish a new paradigm for the diagnostic classification and treatment of ameloblastomas.

  1. Factors affecting the spontaneous mutational spectra in somatic mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О.А. Ковальова

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available  In our survey of references we are discussed the influence of factors biological origin on the spontaneous mutation specters in mammalian. Seasonal and age components influence on the frequence of cytogenetic anomalies. The immune and endocrinous systems are take part in control of the alteration of the spontaneous mutation specters. Genetical difference of sensibility in animal and human at the alteration of factors enviroment as and  genetical differences of repair systems activity are may influence on individual variation of spontaneous destabilization characters of chromosomal apparatus.

  2. Identification of anaplastic lymphoma kinase break points and oncogenic mutation profiles in acral/mucosal melanomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Hai-Tao; Zhou, Qi-Ming; Wang, Fang; Shao, Qiong; Guan, Yuan-Xiang; Wen, Xi-Zhi; Chen, Li-Zhen; Feng, Qi-Sheng; Li, Wei; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Zhang, Xiao-Shi

    2013-09-01

    Acral and mucosal melanomas, the two most common subtypes of melanoma in China, exhibit different genetic alterations and biologic behavior compared with other subtypes of melanomas. The purpose of this study was to identify the genetic alterations in patients with acral or mucosal melanomas in southern China. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) were used to assess the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) break points. Furthermore, a mass spectrometry-based genotyping platform was used to analyze 30 acral melanomas and 28 mucosal melanomas to profile 238 known somatic mutations in 19 oncogenes. ALK break points were identified in four acral cases (6.9%). Eight (13.8%) cases harbored BRAF mutations, six (10.3%) had NRAS mutations, four (6.9%) had KIT mutations, two (3.5%) had EGFR mutations, two (3.5%) had KRAS mutations, two (3.5%) had MET mutations, one (1.7%) had an HRAS mutation, and one (1.7%) had a PIK3CA mutation. Two cases exhibited co-occurring mutations, and one case with a BRAF mutation had a translocation in ALK. This study represents a comprehensive and concurrent analysis of the major recurrent oncogenic mutations involved in melanoma cases from southern China. These data have implications for both clinical trial designs and therapeutic strategies.

  3. Small FVIII gene rearrangements in 18 hemophilia A patients: five novel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicocchi, Maria Patrizia; Pasino, Mirella; Lanza, Tiziana; Bottini, Federico; Molinari, Angelo Claudio; Caprino, Daniela; Rosano, Camillo; Acquila, Maura

    2005-02-01

    Hemophilia A (HA) is a disorder caused by mutations of the FVIII gene, which is located on the tip of the long arm of the X chromosome. In a cohort of 18 unrelated Italian patients affected with HA of varying severity, we performed mutational screening of the gene by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) and direct sequencing of abnormal peaks. We identified five novel mutations and 9 previously reported DNA alterations. Two of the 9 previously reported alterations were each common to 3 unrelated patients. Six different mutations were characterized as missense alterations, while 8 were non-missense mutations. Among the new gene alterations, one created a stop codon, one consisted of an out-of frame deletion, and one was a splice-site mutation. The last two were missense alterations. In an attempt to better understand the causative effect of the mutations and the clinical variability of the patients, we investigated the consequences of each missense mutation and visualized the effect of the amino acid change on structural FVIII models.

  4. Progression inference for somatic mutations in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif E. Peterson

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Computational methods were employed to determine progression inference of genomic alterations in commonly occurring cancers. Using cross-sectional TCGA data, we computed evolutionary trajectories involving selectivity relationships among pairs of gene-specific genomic alterations such as somatic mutations, deletions, amplifications, downregulation, and upregulation among the top 20 driver genes associated with each cancer. Results indicate that the majority of hierarchies involved TP53, PIK3CA, ERBB2, APC, KRAS, EGFR, IDH1, VHL, etc. Research into the order and accumulation of genomic alterations among cancer driver genes will ever-increase as the costs of nextgen sequencing subside, and personalized/precision medicine incorporates whole-genome scans into the diagnosis and treatment of cancer.

  5. [Altered states of consciousness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gora, E P

    2005-01-01

    The review of modern ideas concerning the altered states of consciousness is presented in this article. Various methods of entry into the altered states of consciousness are looked over. It is shown that the altered states of consciousness are insufficiently known, but important aspects of human being existence. The role of investigation of the altered states of consciousness for the creation of integrative scientific conception base is discussed.

  6. TP53 and Beta-catenin mutations in liver tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Hainaut

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available

    HBV and HCV play key roles in the etiopathogenesis of Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC . Studies mostly based on cases from Western countries suggest distinct genetic pathways of carcinogenesis involving either TP53 or CTTNB1 mutations. Inappropriate reactivation of Wnt pathway due to mutations in CTNNB1 (Beta-Catenin gene itself is also frequently reported. Mutant Beta-catenin escapes to ubiquitination and down regulation by GSK3-B, it accumulates and trans-activates variety of oncogenes involved in neoplasmic transformation mimicking Wnt pathway activation. Taking into consideration viral infection, chromosome instability and TP53 /Beta-catenin alterations, Laurent-Puig et al. described two distinct HCC profiles in a serie of 137 HCC cases , the first one associates HBV infection with frequent chromosomal alteration and distributes with TP53 mutations, the second would be observed in HBV negative large sized tumors and distributes with Beta-catenin mutations. We have investigated the status of HBV and HCV infections and of genetic alterations in TP53 and CTTNB1 in 26 patients with HCC from Thailand. In tumours, HBV DNA was found in 19 cases (73% and HCV RNA in 4 cases (15.4% cases, 3 of whom were co-infected. Among the 19 HBV positive cases, sequencing of S gene showed genotype C in 82% and genotype B in 18%. Furthermore, 5/19 cases were negative for HBsAg and were categorized as occult HBV infections. TP53 mutations were detected in 9 cases (34,6% including 7 mutations at codon 249 (AGG to AGT, arginine to serine, considered as ";fingerprint"; of mutagenesis by aflatoxin metabolites. All cases with 249ser mutation had overt HBV infection.

    CTNNB1 mutations were found in 6/26 cases (23%, 4 of whom also had TP53 mutation. There was no significant association between CTTNB1

  7. The role of the ND5 gene in LHON: characterization of a new, heteroplasmic LHON mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorov, Vladimir; Biousse, Valerie; Newman, Nancy J; Brown, Michael D

    2005-11-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) causes central vision loss from bilateral optic neuropathy. Although 13 mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are strongly associated with LHON, only three account for roughly 90% of cases and thus are found in multiple independent LHON families. The remaining LHON mutations are rare. Here, we describe the clinical and genetic characterization of a new LHON mtDNA mutation. The 12848T mutation alters a highly conserved amino acid in the ND5 complex I gene, is not found in controls, and is heteroplasmic. Despite ND5 being the largest of the mtDNA complex I genes, ND5 mutations are quite rare in LHON.

  8. Mutations in GABRB3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rikke S; Wuttke, Thomas V; Helbig, Ingo

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the role of mutations in GABRB3 encoding the β3 subunit of the GABAA receptor in individual patients with epilepsy with regard to causality, the spectrum of genetic variants, their pathophysiology, and associated phenotypes. METHODS: We performed massive parallel sequencing...... of GABRB3 in 416 patients with a range of epileptic encephalopathies and childhood-onset epilepsies and recruited additional patients with epilepsy with GABRB3 mutations from other research and diagnostic programs. RESULTS: We identified 22 patients with heterozygous mutations in GABRB3, including 3...... probands from multiplex families. The phenotypic spectrum of the mutation carriers ranged from simple febrile seizures, genetic epilepsies with febrile seizures plus, and epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures to West syndrome and other types of severe, early-onset epileptic encephalopathies...

  9. AIP mutations and gigantism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostomyan, Liliya; Potorac, Iulia; Beckers, Pablo; Daly, Adrian F; Beckers, Albert

    2017-06-01

    AIP mutations are rare in sporadic acromegaly but they are seen at a higher frequency among certain specific populations of pituitary adenoma patients (pituitary gigantism cases, familial isolated pituitary adenoma (FIPA) kindreds, and patients with macroadenomas who are diagnosed ≤30 years). AIP mutations are most prevalent in patients with pituitary gigantism (29% of this group were found to have mutations in AIP gene). These data support targeted genetic screening for AIP mutations/deletions in these groups of pituitary adenoma patients. Earlier diagnosis of AIP-related acromegaly-gigantism cases enables timely clinical evaluation and treatment, thereby improving outcomes in terms of excessive linear growth and acromegaly comorbidities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Mapping Mutations on Phylogenies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    This chapter provides a short review of recent methodologies developed for mapping mutations on phylogenies. Mapping of mutations, or character changes in general, using the maximum parsimony principle has been one of the most powerful tools in phylogenetics, and it has been used in a variety...... of different applications, for example, in the detection of correlated evolution and to identify selection acting on DNA sequences. However, many uses of parsimony mappings have been criticized because they focus on only one of many possible mappings and/or because they do not incorporate statistical...... uncertainty in the mapping. Recently developed probabilistic methods can incorporate statistical uncertainty in the character mappings. In these methods, focus is on a probability distribution of mutational mappings instead of a single estimate of the mutational mapping....

  11. PRRT2 gene mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Alice R.; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Stamelou, Maria; Dale, Russell C.; Kurian, Manju A.; Schneider, Susanne A.; Wali, G.M.; Counihan, Tim; Schapira, Anthony H.; Spacey, Sian D.; Valente, Enza-Maria; Silveira-Moriyama, Laura; Teive, Hélio A.G.; Raskin, Salmo; Sander, Josemir W.; Lees, Andrew; Warner, Tom; Kullmann, Dimitri M.; Wood, Nicholas W.; Hanna, Michael

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The proline-rich transmembrane protein (PRRT2) gene was recently identified using exome sequencing as the cause of autosomal dominant paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) with or without infantile convulsions (IC) (PKD/IC syndrome). Episodic neurologic disorders, such as epilepsy, migraine, and paroxysmal movement disorders, often coexist and are thought to have a shared channel-related etiology. To investigate further the frequency, spectrum, and phenotype of PRRT2 mutations, we analyzed this gene in 3 large series of episodic neurologic disorders with PKD/IC, episodic ataxia (EA), and hemiplegic migraine (HM). Methods: The PRRT2 gene was sequenced in 58 family probands/sporadic individuals with PKD/IC, 182 with EA, 128 with HM, and 475 UK and 96 Asian controls. Results: PRRT2 genetic mutations were identified in 28 out of 58 individuals with PKD/IC (48%), 1/182 individuals with EA, and 1/128 individuals with HM. A number of loss-of-function and coding missense mutations were identified; the most common mutation found was the p.R217Pfs*8 insertion. Males were more frequently affected than females (ratio 52:32). There was a high proportion of PRRT2 mutations found in families and sporadic cases with PKD associated with migraine or HM (10 out of 28). One family had EA with HM and another large family had typical HM alone. Conclusions: This work expands the phenotype of mutations in the PRRT2 gene to include the frequent occurrence of migraine and HM with PKD/IC, and the association of mutations with EA and HM and with familial HM alone. We have also extended the PRRT2 mutation type and frequency in PKD and other episodic neurologic disorders. PMID:23077024

  12. GATA2 mutations in patients with acute myeloid leukemia-paired samples analyses show that the mutation is unstable during disease evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Hsin-An; Lin, Yun-Chu; Kuo, Yuan-Yeh; Chou, Wen-Chien; Lin, Chien-Chin; Liu, Chieh-Yu; Chen, Chien-Yuan; Lin, Liang-In; Tseng, Mei-Hsuan; Huang, Chi-Fei; Chiang, Ying-Chieh; Liu, Ming-Chih; Liu, Chia-Wen; Tang, Jih-Luh; Yao, Ming; Huang, Shang-Yi; Ko, Bor-Sheng; Hsu, Szu-Chun; Wu, Shang-Ju; Tsay, Woei; Chen, Yao-Chang; Tien, Hwei-Fang

    2015-02-01

    Recently, mutations of the GATA binding protein 2 (GATA2) gene were identified in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients with CEBPA double mutations (CEBPA (double-mut)), but the interaction of this mutation with other genetic alterations and its dynamic changes during disease progression remain to be determined. In this study, 14 different missense GATA2 mutations, which were all clustered in the highly conserved N-terminal zinc finger 1 domain, were identified in 27.4, 6.7, and 1 % of patients with CEBPA (double-mut), CEBPA (single-mut), and CEBPA wild type, respectively. All but one patient with GATA2 mutation had concurrent CEBPA mutation. GATA2 mutations were closely associated with younger age, FAB M1 subtype, intermediate-risk cytogenetics, expression of HLA-DR, CD7, CD15, or CD34 on leukemic cells, and CEBPA mutation, but negatively associated with FAB M4 subtype, favorable-risk cytogenetics, and NPM1 mutation. Patients with GATA2 mutation had significantly better overall survival and relapse-free survival than those without GATA2 mutation. Sequential analysis showed that the original GATA2 mutations might be lost during disease progression in GATA2-mutated patients, while novel GATA2 mutations might be acquired at relapse in GATA2-wild patients. In conclusion, AML patients with GATA2 mutations had distinct clinic-biological features and a favorable prognosis. GATA2 mutations might be lost or acquired at disease progression, implying that it was a second hit in the leukemogenesis of AML, especially those with CEBPA mutation.

  13. JAK2-V617F mutation in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms: Association with FLT3-ITD mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čolović Milica

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. An acquired somatic mutation V617F in Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2 is the cause of uncontrolled proliferation in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms. It is known that uncontrolled myeloid cell proliferation is also provoked by alteration in other genes, e.g. mutations in receptor tyrosine kinase FLT3 gene. FLT3 represents the most frequently mutated gene in acute myeloid leukaemia. Interestingly, mutated FLT3- ITD (internal tandem duplication protein is a member of the same signalling pathway as JAK2 protein, the STAT5 signalling pathway. STAT5 activation is recognized as important for selfrenewal of haematopoetic stem cells. Objective. The aim of this study was the detection of JAK2- V617F mutation in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms. Additionally, we investigated the presence of FLT3-ITD mutation in JAK2-V617F-positive patients in order to shed the light on the hypothesis of a similar role of these two molecular markers in haematological malignancies. Methods. Using allele-specific PCR, 61 patients with known or suspected diagnosis of myeloproliferative neoplasms were tested for the presence of JAK2-V617F mutation. Samples that were positive for JAK2 mutation were subsequently tested for the presence of FLT3-ITD mutation by PCR. Results. Eighteen of 61 analysed patients were positive for JAK2-V617F mutation. Among them, 8/18 samples were diagnosed as polycythaemia vera, and 10/18 as essential thrombocythaemia. None of JAK2-V617F-positive patient was positive for FLT3-ITD mutation. Conclusion. This study suggests that one activating mutation is sufficient for aberrant cell proliferation leading to malignant transformation of haematopoetic stem cell.

  14. Subquivers of mutation-acyclic quivers are mutation-acyclic

    CERN Document Server

    Warkentin, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Quiver mutation plays a crucial role in the definition of cluster algebras by Fomin and Zelevinsky. It induces an equivalence relation on the set of all quivers without loops and two-cycles. A quiver is called mutation-acyclic if it is mutation-equivalent to an acyclic quiver. The aim of this note is to show that full subquivers of mutation-acyclic quivers are mutation-acyclic.

  15. Epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in nonsmall cell lung carcinoma patients in Kuwait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabeah Al-Temaimi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Given the evidence of EGFR gene alterations occurring in NSCLC patients in Kuwait, there is a need to incorporate EGFR gene mutational screen for NSCLC patients to implement its consequent use in patient treatment.

  16. From minisatellites and genes: When do germinal mutations occur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohrenweiser, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Utilization of molecular techniques has provided insight into the molecular techniques has provided insight into the molecular techniques has provided insight into the molecular character and origins of spontaneous and induced germinal mutations. Review of the variants and disease loci suggests differences among loci in the frequency of nucleotide substitutions and more complex events. Mechanistic features associated with the alterations in DNA structure are observed in each variant class. The spectrum of mutations identified reflects the gene structure and the selective pressure generating disease phenotypes, and the techniques employed to screen for variation. Locus specificity in spectra has the potential to compromise estimates of increases in germinal gene mutation rates. Recent studies have identified mosaicism, rather than de novo mutation, as the explanation for the non-traditional pattern of inheritance of disease in some families. Mosaicism is a concern for studies of induced mutation rates as it reflects embryonic exposure of the parent of the proband. This is in contrast to the {open_quotes}normal expectation{close_quotes} that induced mutations result from parental exposure to genotoxins in the environment. Observations suggest that the germ cell stage sensitivity may reflect interaction of the mutagen and the loci screened. The mosaicism and germ cell stage issues, in conjunction with incomplete ascertainment of mutational events, increase the complexity of efforts to estimate induced germinal mutation rates and associated health consequences in populations exposed to genotoxic agents.

  17. Association of TERT Promoter Mutation, But Not BRAF Mutation, With Increased Mortality in PTC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Jonathan R; Henderson, Ying C; Williams, Michelle D; Roberts, Dianna B; Hei, Hu; Lai, Stephen Y; Clayman, Gary L

    2015-12-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) carrying the BRAF mutation has been reported to be associated with high recurrence and potentially increased mortality. PTC carrying the TERT promoter mutation has been associated with older age, recurrence, and aggressive disease. The objective of this study was to determine the association of BRAF and TERT promoter gene alterations with recurrence and survival in a high-risk population. Genomic DNA was analyzed for the BRAF mutation from 256 persistent/recurrent PTC (p/rPTC; 202 new, 54 previously reported) and for the TERT promoter mutation and polymorphism (242 p/rPTC). Two-tailed Fisher exact tests or the Pearson χ(2) test were performed for the associations between mutations and other variables. Overall and disease-free survivals were compared by log rank tests on Kaplan-Meier plots and by Cox regression analysis. TERT promoter constructs were tested in PTC cell lines to determine their activities in these cells. BRAF V600E mutation was identified in 235 of 256 (91.8%), TERT promoter mutation at -124 was detected in 77 of 242 (31.8%), and TERT promoter polymorphism at -245 was found in 113 of 242 (46.7%) p/rPTC patients. A significant difference in survival was found in p/rPTC patients with the TERT promoter mutation, which also displayed increased activity in vitro as compared to the nonmutated promoter sequence. No association was noted between the BRAF mutation or TERT promoter polymorphism and recurrence or survival. A drawback of our study could be the limited number of patients with nonmutated BRAF (21 of 256 [8.2%]). Mutation in the TERT promoter, but not in BRAF, was associated with decreased survival in 19 (24.7%) p/rPTC patients who died of disease and in 38 (49.4%) p/rPTC patients who died at last contact. The presence or absence of the BRAF mutation and TERT promoter polymorphism, however, was not significantly correlated with survival.

  18. Mutational Analysis of Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erstad, Derek J. [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Cusack, James C. Jr., E-mail: jcusack@mgh.harvard.edu [Division of Surgical Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2014-10-17

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive cutaneous neuroendocrine malignancy that is associated with a poor prognosis. The pathogenesis of MCC is not well understood, and despite a recent plethora of mutational analyses, we have yet to find a set of signature mutations implicated in the majority of cases. Mutations, including TP53, Retinoblastoma and PIK3CA, have been documented in subsets of patients. Other mechanisms are also likely at play, including infection with the Merkel cell polyomavirus in a subset of patients, dysregulated immune surveillance, epigenetic alterations, aberrant protein expression, posttranslational modifications and microRNAs. In this review, we summarize what is known about MCC genetic mutations and chromosomal abnormalities, and their clinical significance. We also examine aberrant protein function and microRNA expression, and discuss the therapeutic and prognostic implications of these findings. Multiple clinical trials designed to selectively target overexpressed oncogenes in MCC are currently underway, though most are still in early phases. As we accumulate more molecular data on MCC, we will be better able to understand its pathogenic mechanisms, develop libraries of targeted therapies, and define molecular prognostic signatures to enhance our clinicopathologic knowledge.

  19. Hypothesis: Obesity Is Associated with a Lower Mutation Threshold in Colon Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordonaro, Michael; Lazarova, Darina

    2015-01-01

    Neoplastic progression requires accumulation of several mutations (mutation threshold). We hypothesize that obesity raises the risk of microsatellite stable (MSS) colon cancer (CC) at least in part by decreasing the mutation threshold. Thus, we posit that obese patients require fewer mutations, particularly driver mutations, compared to their normal BMI counterparts. Further, we suggest that the reduced number of required mutations in obese patients could be due to several factors, including the high levels of cytokines that accompany obesity. Cytokine-activated ERK, AKT, and JAK/STAT signaling could synergize with CC-initiating mutations to promote intestinal neoplastic development. Therefore, driver mutations that induce these specific pathways may not be "required" for neoplastic development in obesity; alteration in cell signaling consequent to obesity can substitute for some driver mutations in neoplastic progression. This hypothesis is supported by preliminary analyses of data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Thus, we observed that, compared to normal weight patients, cancer genomes of obese MSS CC patients exhibit fewer somatic mutations, and correspondingly lower numbers of mutations in driver genes (P = 0.026).The most striking observation was the lower number of KRAS mutations detected in patients with high body-mass index (BMI). These intriguing observations require further validation with increased number of patients, taking into account all possible confounding factors. If the hypothesis is confirmed, future studies should also address several possible explanations for the observed lower mutation threshold in obese MSS CC patients.

  20. Glycine Substitutions in Collagen Heterotrimers Alter Triple Helical Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Katherine A; Acevedo-Jake, Amanda M; Walker, Douglas R; Hartgerink, Jeffrey D

    2017-02-13

    Osteogenesis imperfecta typically results from missense mutations in the collagen genome where the required glycine residues are replaced with another amino acid. Many models have attempted to replicate the structure of mutated collagen on the triple helix level. However, composition and register control of the triple helix is complicated and requires extreme precision, especially when these destabilizing mutations are present. Here we present mutations to a composition- and register-controlled AAB helix where one of the requisite glycines in the A chain of the triple helix is changed to serine or alanine. We see a loss of compositional control when the A chain is mutated, resulting in an A'BB composition that minimizes the number of mutations included in the triple helix. However, when both A and B chains are mutated and no nonmutated peptide chains are available, the designed A'A'B' composition is reestablished. Our work shows the ability of the mutations to influence and alter the composition and register of the collagen triple helix.

  1. Analysis of BRAF V600E mutation in 1,320 nervous system tumors reveals high mutation frequencies in pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma, ganglioglioma and extra-cerebellar pilocytic astrocytoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schindler, G.; Capper, D.; Meyer, J.; Janzarik, W.; Omran, H.; Herold-Mende, C.; Schmieder, K.; Wesseling, P.; Mawrin, C.; Hasselblatt, M.; Louis, D.N.; Korshunov, A.; Pfister, S.; Hartmann, C.; Paulus, W.; Reifenberger, G.; Deimling, A. Von

    2011-01-01

    Missense mutations of the V600E type constitute the vast majority of tumor-associated somatic alterations in the v-RAF murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 (BRAF) gene. Initially described in melanoma, colon and papillary thyroid carcinoma, these alterations have also been observed in primary ne

  2. Biological insights into BRAF(V600) mutations in melanoma patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Improta, Giuseppina; Pelosi, Giuseppe; Tamborini, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Some experimental evidence indicates that uncommon BRAF mutations consisting in the substitution of 2 adjacent nucleotides within codon 600 are in a cis configuration and associate with BRAF gene amplification. These findings suggest that BRAF(V600) mutations are unlikely to occur as homozygous a...... alterations in clinical melanoma samples, with gene amplification perhaps contributing to mask the heterozygous state....

  3. JAK2 and MPL gene mutations in V617F-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siemiatkowska, A.M.; Bieniaszewska, M.; Hellmann, A.; Limon, J.

    2010-01-01

    We report three novel mutations in JAK2 exons 12, 19 and 25 in V617F-negative patients with polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia and idiopathic myelofibrosis. Scanning of JAK2 exons 12-25 and MPL exon 10 revealed the presence of JAK2 alterations in six and MPL W515L/K mutations in five of 34

  4. JAK2 and MPL gene mutations in V617F-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siemiatkowska, A.M.; Bieniaszewska, M.; Hellmann, A.; Limon, J.

    2010-01-01

    We report three novel mutations in JAK2 exons 12, 19 and 25 in V617F-negative patients with polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia and idiopathic myelofibrosis. Scanning of JAK2 exons 12-25 and MPL exon 10 revealed the presence of JAK2 alterations in six and MPL W515L/K mutations in five of 34

  5. An Evolutionary Approach for Identifying Driver Mutations in Colorectal Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmine Foo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The traditional view of cancer as a genetic disease that can successfully be treated with drugs targeting mutant onco-proteins has motivated whole-genome sequencing efforts in many human cancer types. However, only a subset of mutations found within the genomic landscape of cancer is likely to provide a fitness advantage to the cell. Distinguishing such "driver" mutations from innocuous "passenger" events is critical for prioritizing the validation of candidate mutations in disease-relevant models. We design a novel statistical index, called the Hitchhiking Index, which reflects the probability that any observed candidate gene is a passenger alteration, given the frequency of alterations in a cross-sectional cancer sample set, and apply it to a mutational data set in colorectal cancer. Our methodology is based upon a population dynamics model of mutation accumulation and selection in colorectal tissue prior to cancer initiation as well as during tumorigenesis. This methodology can be used to aid in the prioritization of candidate mutations for functional validation and contributes to the process of drug discovery.

  6. P53 MUTATIONS IN HUMAN LUNG-TUMORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MILLER, CW; ASLO, A; KOK, K; YOKOTA, J; BUYS, CHCM; TERADA, M; KOEFFLER, HP; Simon, K.

    1992-01-01

    Mutation of one p53 allele and loss of the normal p53 allele [loss of heterozygosity (LOH)] occur in many tumors including lung cancers. These alterations apparently contribute to development of cancer by interfering with the tumor suppressor activity of p53. We directly sequenced amplified DNA in t

  7. Mutations in DJ-1 are rare in familial Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankratz, Nathan; Pauciulo, Michael W.; Elsaesser, Veronika E.; Marek, Diane K.; Halter, Cheryl A.; Wojcieszek, Joanne; Rudolph, Alice; Shults, Clifford W.; Foroud, Tatiana; Nichols Ph.D., William C.

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in DJ-1 (PARK7) are one cause of early-onset autosomal-recessive parkinsonism. We screened for DJ-1 mutations in 93 affected individuals from the 64 multiplex Parkinson disease (PD) families in our sample that had the highest family-specific multipoint LOD scores at the DJ-1 locus. In addition to sequencing all coding exons for alterations, we used multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) to examine the genomic copy number of DJ-1 exons. A known polymorphism (R98Q) was found in five PD subjects, once as a homozygote and in the other four cases as heterozygotes. No additional missense mutations and no exon deletions or duplications were detected. Our results, in combination with those of previous studies, suggest that alterations in DJ-1 are not a common cause of familial PD. PMID:16997464

  8. Esophageal melanomas harbor frequent NRAS mutations unlike melanomas of other mucosal sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Shigeki; Nakanishi, Yukihiro; Ogawa, Reiko; Kouda, Satoko; Kanai, Yae

    2009-05-01

    Mucosal melanomas have genetic alterations distinct from those in cutaneous melanomas. For example, NRAS- and BRAF-activating mutations occur frequently in cutaneous melanomas, but not in mucosal melanomas. We examined 16 esophageal melanomas for genetic alterations in NRAS, BRAF, and KIT to determine whether they exhibit genetic features common to melanomas arising from other mucosal sites. A sequencing analysis identified NRAS mutations in six cases; notably, four of these mutations were located in exon 1, an uncommon mutation site in cutaneous and other mucosal melanomas. BRAF and KIT mutations were found in one case each. Immunohistochemistry showed KIT expression in four cases, including the tumor with a KIT mutation and two other intramucosal tumors. The low frequency of BRAF mutations and the presence of a KIT mutation-positive case are findings similar to those of mucosal melanomas of other sites, but the prevalence of NRAS mutations was even higher than that of cutaneous melanomas. The present study implies that esophageal melanomas have genetic alterations unique from those observed in other mucosal melanomas.

  9. Mutational and haplotype analyses of families with familial partial lipodystrophy (Dunnigan variety) reveal recurrent missense mutations in the globular C-terminal domain of lamin A/C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speckman, R A; Garg, A; Du, F; Bennett, L; Veile, R; Arioglu, E; Taylor, S I; Lovett, M; Bowcock, A M

    2000-04-01

    Familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD), Dunnigan variety, is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by marked loss of subcutaneous adipose tissue from the extremities and trunk but by excess fat deposition in the head and neck. The disease is frequently associated with profound insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and diabetes. We have localized a gene for FPLD to chromosome 1q21-q23, and it has recently been proposed that nuclear lamin A/C is altered in FPLD, on the basis of a novel missense mutation (R482Q) in five Canadian probands. This gene had previously been shown to be altered in autosomal dominant Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD-AD) and in dilated cardiomyopathy and conduction-system disease. We examined 15 families with FPLD for mutations in lamin A/C. Five families harbored the R482Q alteration that segregated with the disease phenotype. Seven families harbored an R482W alteration, and one family harbored a G465D alteration. All these mutations lie within exon 8 of the lamin A/C gene-an exon that has also been shown to harbor different missense mutations that are responsible for EDMD-AD. Mutations could not be detected in lamin A/C in one FPLD family in which there was linkage to chromosome 1q21-q23. One family with atypical FPLD harbored an R582H alteration in exon 11 of lamin A. This exon does not comprise part of the lamin C coding region. All mutations in FPLD affect the globular C-terminal domain of the lamin A/C protein. In contrast, mutations responsible for dilated cardiomyopathy and conduction-system disease are observed in the rod domain of the protein. The FPLD mutations R482Q and R482W occurred on different haplotypes, indicating that they are likely to have arisen more than once.

  10. Promoter Methylation Precedes Chromosomal Alterations in Colorectal Cancer Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Derks

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colorectal cancers are characterized by genetic and epigenetic alterations. This study aimed to explore the timing of promoter methylation and relationship with mutations and chromosomal alterations in colorectal carcinogenesis. Methods: In a series of 47 nonprogressed adenomas, 41 progressed adenomas (malignant polyps, 38 colorectal carcinomas and 18 paired normal tissues, we evaluated promoter methylation status of hMLH1, O6MGMT, APC, p14ARF, p16INK4A, RASSF1A, GATA-4, GATA-5, and CHFR using methylation-specific PCR. Mutation status of TP53, APC and KRAS were studied by p53 immunohistochemistry and sequencing of the APC and KRAS mutation cluster regions. Chromosomal alterations were evaluated by comparative genomic hybridization. Results: Our data demonstrate that nonprogressed adenomas, progressed adenomas and carcinomas show similar frequencies of promoter methylation for the majority of the genes. Normal tissues showed significantly lower frequencies of promoter methylation of APC, p16INK4A, GATA-4, and GATA-5 (P-values: 0.02, 0.02, 1.1×10−5 and 0.008 respectively. P53 immunopositivity and chromosomal abnormalities occur predominantly in carcinomas (P values: 1.1×10−5 and 4.1×10−10. Conclusions: Since promoter methylation was already present in nonprogressed adenomas without chromosomal alterations, we conclude that promoter methylation can be regarded as an early event preceding TP53 mutation and chromosomal abnormalities in colorectal cancer development.

  11. Altered status of glutathione and its metabolites in cystinotic cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levtchenko, E.N.; Graaf-Hess, A.C. de; Wilmer, M.J.G.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Monnens, L.A.H.; Blom, H.J.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cystinosis is an autosomal recessive disorder, caused by mutations of the lysosomal cystine carrier cystinosin, encoded by the CTNS gene (17p13). The concomitant intralysosomal cystine accumulation leads to multi-organ damage, with kidneys being the first affected. Altered mitochondrial

  12. Understanding and Targeting Epigenetic Alterations in Acquired Bone Marrow Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    chromatin modifying enzymes (Dalgliesh et al., 2010), DNAmethyltransferases ( Ley et al., 2010), and other genes implicated in epigenetic regulation... Boyle , M., Woolcock, B.W., Kuchenbauer, F., et al. (2010). Somatic mutations altering EZH2 (Tyr641) in follicular and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas of

  13. Silting mutation in triangulated categories

    CERN Document Server

    Aihara, Takuma

    2010-01-01

    In representation theory of algebras the notion of `mutation' often plays important roles, and two cases are well known, i.e. `cluster tilting mutation' and `exceptional mutation'. In this paper we focus on `tilting mutation', which has a disadvantage that it is often impossible, i.e. some of summands of a tilting object can not be replaced to get a new tilting object. The aim of this paper is to take away this disadvantage by introducing `silting mutation' for silting objects as a generalization of `tilting mutation'. We shall develope a basic theory of silting mutation. In particular, we introduce a partial order on the set of silting objects and establish the relationship with `silting mutation' by generalizing the theory of Riedmann-Schofield and Happel-Unger. We show that iterated silting mutation act transitively on the set of silting objects for local, hereditary or canonical algebras. Finally we give a bijection between silting subcategories and certain t-structures.

  14. MUTATIONS IN CALMODULIN GENES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to an isolated polynucleotide encoding at least a part of calmodulin and an isolated polypeptide comprising at least a part of a calmodulin protein, wherein the polynucleotide and the polypeptide comprise at least one mutation associated with a cardiac disorder. The ...... the binding of calmodulin to ryanodine receptor 2 and use of such compound in a treatment of an individual having a cardiac disorder. The invention further provides a kit that can be used to detect specific mutations in calmodulin encoding genes....

  15. MUTATIONS IN CALMODULIN GENES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to an isolated polynucleotide encoding at least a part of calmodulin and an isolated polypeptide comprising at least a part of a calmodulin protein, wherein the polynucleotide and the polypeptide comprise at least one mutation associated with a cardiac disorder...... the binding of calmodulin to ryanodine receptor 2 and use of such compound in a treatment of an individual having a cardiac disorder. The invention further provides a kit that can be used to detect specific mutations in calmodulin encoding genes....

  16. Are There Mutator Polymerases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Garcia-Diaz

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA polymerases are involved in different cellular events, including genome replication and DNA repair. In the last few years, a large number of novel DNA polymerases have been discovered, and the biochemical analysis of their properties has revealed a long list of intriguing features. Some of these polymerases have a very low fidelity and have been suggested to play mutator roles in different processes, like translesion synthesis or somatic hypermutation. The current view of these processes is reviewed, and the current understanding of DNA polymerases and their role as mutator enzymes is discussed.

  17. The molecular anatomy of spontaneous germline mutations in human testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jian; Calabrese, Peter; Tiemann-Boege, Irene; Shinde, Deepali Narendra; Yoon, Song-Ro; Gelfand, David; Bauer, Keith; Arnheim, Norman

    2007-09-01

    offspring, thereby unfavorably altering the mutational load in humans. Studying the anatomical distribution of germline mutations can provide new insights into genetic disease and evolutionary change.

  18. The molecular anatomy of spontaneous germline mutations in human testes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Qin

    2007-09-01

    deleterious to an offspring, thereby unfavorably altering the mutational load in humans. Studying the anatomical distribution of germline mutations can provide new insights into genetic disease and evolutionary change.

  19. Prognostic and Predictive Roles of KRAS Mutation in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda K. Arrington

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The RAS gene family is among the most studied and best characterized of the known cancer-related genes. Of the three human ras isoforms, KRAS is the most frequently altered gene, with mutations occurring in 17%–25% of all cancers. In particular, approximately 30%–40% of colon cancers harbor a KRAS mutation. KRAS mutations in colon cancers have been associated with poorer survival and increased tumor aggressiveness. Additionally, KRAS mutations in colorectal cancer lead to resistance to select treatment strategies. In this review we examine the history of KRAS, its prognostic value in patients with colorectal cancer, and evidence supporting its predictive value in determining appropriate therapies for patients with colorectal cancer.

  20. Keratin 9 gene mutations in epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (EPPK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, A; Hennies, H C; Langbein, L; Digweed, M; Mischke, D; Drechsler, M; Schröck, E; Royer-Pokora, B; Franke, W W; Sperling, K

    1994-02-01

    We have isolated the gene for human type I keratin 9 (KRT9) and localised it to chromosome 17q21. Patients with epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (EPPK), an autosomal dominant skin disease, were investigated. Three KRT9 mutations, N160K, R162Q, and R162W, were identified. All the mutations are in the highly conserved coil 1A of the rod domain, thought to be important for heterodimerisation. R162W was detected in five unrelated families and affects the corresponding residue in the keratin 14 and keratin 10 genes that is also altered in cases of epidermolysis bullosa simplex and generalised epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, respectively. These findings provide further evidence that mutations in keratin genes may cause epidermolysis and hyperkeratosis and that hyperkeratosis of palms and soles may be caused by different mutations in the KRT9 gene.

  1. Breast cancer in BRCA mutation carriers: medical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Andrea; Geuna, Elena; Zucchini, Giorgia; Aversa, Caterina; Martinello, Rossella; Montemurro, Filippo

    2016-10-01

    About 10% of breast cancers are associated with the inheritance of autosomal dominant breast cancer susceptibility alleles BRCA1 and BRCA2. Until recently, the medical management of BRCA mutation-associated breast cancer has not differed from that of the sporadic breast cancer counterpart. However, there is mounting evidence that this molecular alteration confers sensitivity or resistance to systemic therapies that can be exploited in terms of medical management. For example, studies support the use of platinum salts chemotherapy in BRCA mutated cancers. Moreover, a number of targeted therapies are showing activity in BRCA mutation carriers. Above all, BRCA defective tumor cells are particularly sensitive to Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. This review will summarize the state of the art of the medical treatment of breast cancer in BRCA mutation carriers, with a particular focus on chemotherapies and targeted therapies.

  2. Molecular profiling, including TERT promoter mutations, of acral lentiginous melanomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Vinicius de Lima; Vicente, Anna L; Carloni, Adriana; Berardinelli, Gustavo; Soares, Paula; Scapulatempo, Cristovam; Martinho, Olga; Reis, Rui M

    2016-04-01

    Acral lentiginous melanoma (ALM) is the less common subtype with singular characterization. TERT (human telomerase reverse transcriptase) promoter mutations have being described as recurrent in melanomas and infrequent in ALM, but their real incidence and clinical relevance is unclear. The objectives of this study were to describe the prevalence of TERT promoter mutations in ALM, and correlate with the molecular profile of other drive genes and clinical features. Sixty-one samples from 48 patients with ALM were analyzed. After DNA isolation, the mutation profiles of the hotspot region of BRAF, NRAS, KIT, PDGFRA, and TERT genes were determined by PCR amplification followed by direct Sanger sequencing. KIT, PDGFRA, and VEGFR2 gene amplification was performed by quantitative PCR. Clinical information such as survival, clinical stage, and Breslow tumor classification were obtained from medical records. TERT promoter mutations were found in 9.3% of the cases, BRAF in 10.3%, NRAS in 7.5%, KIT in 20.7%, and PDGFRA in 14.8% of ALM. None of the cases showed KIT, PDGFRA, or VEGFR2 gene amplification. We found an association between KIT mutations and advanced Clark level (IV and V, P=0.043) and TERT promoter mutations with low mitotic index. No other significant associations were observed between mutation profile and patients' clinical features nor survival rates. Oncogenic TERT promoter mutations are present in a fraction of ALMs. No relevant associations were found between TERT mutation status and clinical/molecular features nor survival. Mutations of KIT and PDGFRA are the most common genetic alterations, and they can be therapeutic targets for these patients.

  3. Mutation directional selection sheds light on prion pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Liang [Shandong Provincial Research Center for Bioinformatic Engineering and Technique, Shandong University of Technology, Zibo 255049 (China); Ji, Hong-Fang, E-mail: jhf@sdut.edu.cn [Shandong Provincial Research Center for Bioinformatic Engineering and Technique, Shandong University of Technology, Zibo 255049 (China)

    2011-07-01

    Highlights: {yields} Most pathogenic mutations possess strong directional selection, i.e., enhancing hydrophobicity or decreasing negative and increasing positive charge. {yields} Mutation-induced changes may strengthen the interactions between PrP and facilitating factors. {yields} The findings also have significant implications for exploring potential regions involved in the conformational transition from PrP{sup C} to PrP{sup Sc}. -- Abstract: As mutations in the PRNP gene account for human hereditary prion diseases (PrDs), it is crucial to elucidating how these mutations affect the central pathogenic conformational transition of normal cellular prion protein (PrP{sup C}) to abnormal scrapie isoform (PrP{sup Sc}). Many studies proposed that these pathogenic mutations may make PrP more susceptible to conformational change through altering its structure stability. By evaluating the most recent observations regarding pathogenic mutations, it was found that the pathogenic mutations do not exert a uniform effect on the thermodynamic stability of the human PrP's structure. Through analyzing the reported PrDs-related mutations, we found that 25 out of 27 mutations possess strong directional selection, i.e., enhancing hydrophobicity or decreasing negative and increasing positive charge. Based on the triggering role reported by previous studies of facilitating factors in PrP{sup C} conversion, e.g., lipid and polyanion, we proposed that the mutation-induced changes may strengthen the interaction between PrP and facilitating factors, which will accelerate PrP conversion and cause PrDs.

  4. Mitochondrial mutations in subjects with psychiatric disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Sequeira

    Full Text Available A considerable body of evidence supports the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in psychiatric disorders and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations are known to alter brain energy metabolism, neurotransmission, and cause neurodegenerative disorders. Genetic studies focusing on common nuclear genome variants associated with these disorders have produced genome wide significant results but those studies have not directly studied mtDNA variants. The purpose of this study is to investigate, using next generation sequencing, the involvement of mtDNA variation in bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, major depressive disorder, and methamphetamine use. MtDNA extracted from multiple brain regions and blood were sequenced (121 mtDNA samples with an average of 8,800x coverage and compared to an electronic database containing 26,850 mtDNA genomes. We confirmed novel and rare variants, and confirmed next generation sequencing error hotspots by traditional sequencing and genotyping methods. We observed a significant increase of non-synonymous mutations found in individuals with schizophrenia. Novel and rare non-synonymous mutations were found in psychiatric cases in mtDNA genes: ND6, ATP6, CYTB, and ND2. We also observed mtDNA heteroplasmy in brain at a locus previously associated with schizophrenia (T16519C. Large differences in heteroplasmy levels across brain regions within subjects suggest that somatic mutations accumulate differentially in brain regions. Finally, multiplasmy, a heteroplasmic measure of repeat length, was observed in brain from selective cases at a higher frequency than controls. These results offer support for increased rates of mtDNA substitutions in schizophrenia shown in our prior results. The variable levels of heteroplasmic/multiplasmic somatic mutations that occur in brain may be indicators of genetic instability in mtDNA.

  5. Targeted next generation sequencing of mucosal melanomas identifies frequent NF1 and RAS mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgarea, Ioana; Ugurel, Selma; Sucker, Antje; Livingstone, Elisabeth; Zimmer, Lisa; Ziemer, Mirjana; Utikal, Jochen; Mohr, Peter; Pfeiffer, Christiane; Pföhler, Claudia; Hillen, Uwe; Horn, Susanne; Schadendorf, Dirk; Griewank, Klaus G; Roesch, Alexander

    2017-06-20

    Mucosal melanoma represents ~1% of all melanomas, frequently having a poor prognosis due to diagnosis at a late stage of disease. Mucosal melanoma differs from cutaneous melanoma not only in terms of poorer clinical outcome but also on the molecular level having e.g. less BRAF and more frequent KIT mutations than cutaneous melanomas. For the majority of mucosal melanomas oncogenic driver mutations remain unknown. In our study, 75 tumor tissues from patients diagnosed with mucosal melanoma were analyzed, applying a targeted next generation sequencing panel covering 29 known recurrently mutated genes in melanoma. NF1 and RAS mutations were identified as the most frequently mutated genes occurring in 18.3% and 16.9% of samples, respectively. Mutations in BRAF were identified in 8.4% and KIT in 7.0% of tumor samples. Our study identifies NF1 as the most frequently occurring driver mutation in mucosal melanoma. RAS alterations, consisting of NRAS and KRAS mutations, were the second most frequent mutation type. BRAF and KIT mutations were rare with frequencies below 10% each. Our data indicate that in mucosal melanomas RAS/NF1 alterations are frequent, implying a significant pathogenetic role for MAPK and potentially PI3K pathway activation in these tumors.

  6. HER2 missense mutations have distinct effects on oncogenic signaling and migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabransky, Daniel J.; Yankaskas, Christopher L.; Cochran, Rory L.; Wong, Hong Yuen; Croessmann, Sarah; Chu, David; Kavuri, Shyam M.; Red Brewer, Monica; Rosen, D. Marc; Dalton, W. Brian; Cimino-Mathews, Ashley; Cravero, Karen; Button, Berry; Kyker-Snowman, Kelly; Cidado, Justin; Erlanger, Bracha; Parsons, Heather A.; Manto, Kristen M.; Bose, Ron; Lauring, Josh; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Park, Ben Ho

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) missense mutations have been reported in human cancers. These mutations occur primarily in the absence of HER2 gene amplification such that most HER2-mutant tumors are classified as “negative” by FISH or immunohistochemistry assays. It remains unclear whether nonamplified HER2 missense mutations are oncogenic and whether they are targets for HER2-directed therapies that are currently approved for the treatment of HER2 gene-amplified breast cancers. Here we functionally characterize HER2 kinase and extracellular domain mutations through gene editing of the endogenous loci in HER2 nonamplified human breast epithelial cells. In in vitro and in vivo assays, the majority of HER2 missense mutations do not impart detectable oncogenic changes. However, the HER2 V777L mutation increased biochemical pathway activation and, in the context of a PIK3CA mutation, enhanced migratory features in vitro. However, the V777L mutation did not alter in vivo tumorigenicity or sensitivity to HER2-directed therapies in proliferation assays. Our results suggest the oncogenicity and potential targeting of HER2 missense mutations should be considered in the context of cooperating genetic alterations and provide previously unidentified insights into functional analysis of HER2 mutations and strategies to target them. PMID:26508629

  7. Identification and characterization of NF1 splicing mutations in Korean patients with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Mi-Ae; Kim, Young-Eun; Kim, Sun Kyung; Lee, Myoung-Keun; Kim, Jong-Won; Ki, Chang-Seok

    2016-08-01

    Neurofibromatosis type I (NF1) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder caused by NF1 mutations. Although mutations affecting mRNA splicing are the most common molecular defects in NF1, few studies have analyzed genomic DNA (gDNA)-mRNA correlations in Korean NF1 patients. In this study, we investigated 28 unrelated NF1 patients who showed splicing alterations in reverse transcription-PCR of NF1 mRNA and identified 24 different NF1 splicing mutations, 9 of which were novel. These mutations can be categorized into five groups: exon skipping resulting from mutations at authentic 5' and 3' splice sites (type I, 46%), cryptic exon inclusion caused by deep intronic mutations (type II, 8%), creation of new splice sites causing loss of exonic sequences (type III, 8%), activation of cryptic splice sites due to disruption of authentic splice sites (type IV, 25%) and exonic sequence alterations causing exon skipping (type V, 13%). In total, 42% of all splicing mutations did not involve the conserved AG/GT dinucleotides of the splice sites, making it difficult to identify the correct mutation sites at the gDNA level. These results add to the mutational spectrum of NF1 and further elucidate the gDNA-mRNA correlations of NF1 mutations.

  8. HER2 missense mutations have distinct effects on oncogenic signaling and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabransky, Daniel J; Yankaskas, Christopher L; Cochran, Rory L; Wong, Hong Yuen; Croessmann, Sarah; Chu, David; Kavuri, Shyam M; Red Brewer, Monica; Rosen, D Marc; Dalton, W Brian; Cimino-Mathews, Ashley; Cravero, Karen; Button, Berry; Kyker-Snowman, Kelly; Cidado, Justin; Erlanger, Bracha; Parsons, Heather A; Manto, Kristen M; Bose, Ron; Lauring, Josh; Arteaga, Carlos L; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Park, Ben Ho

    2015-11-10

    Recurrent human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) missense mutations have been reported in human cancers. These mutations occur primarily in the absence of HER2 gene amplification such that most HER2-mutant tumors are classified as "negative" by FISH or immunohistochemistry assays. It remains unclear whether nonamplified HER2 missense mutations are oncogenic and whether they are targets for HER2-directed therapies that are currently approved for the treatment of HER2 gene-amplified breast cancers. Here we functionally characterize HER2 kinase and extracellular domain mutations through gene editing of the endogenous loci in HER2 nonamplified human breast epithelial cells. In in vitro and in vivo assays, the majority of HER2 missense mutations do not impart detectable oncogenic changes. However, the HER2 V777L mutation increased biochemical pathway activation and, in the context of a PIK3CA mutation, enhanced migratory features in vitro. However, the V777L mutation did not alter in vivo tumorigenicity or sensitivity to HER2-directed therapies in proliferation assays. Our results suggest the oncogenicity and potential targeting of HER2 missense mutations should be considered in the context of cooperating genetic alterations and provide previously unidentified insights into functional analysis of HER2 mutations and strategies to target them.

  9. Msx1 Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Kong, H.; Mues, G.; D’Souza, R.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the transcription factors PAX9 and MSX1 cause selective tooth agenesis in humans. In tooth bud mesenchyme of mice, both proteins are required for the expression of Bmp4, which is the key signaling factor for progression to the next step of tooth development. We have previously shown that Pax9 can transactivate a 2.4-kb Bmp4 promoter construct, and that most tooth-agenesis-causing PAX9 mutations impair DNA binding and Bmp4 promoter activation. We also found that Msx1 by itself represses transcription from this proximal Bmp4 promoter, and that, in combination with Pax9, it acts as a potentiator of Pax9-induced Bmp4 transactivation. This synergism of Msx1 with Pax9 is significant, because it is currently the only documented mechanism for Msx1-mediated activation of Bmp4. In this study, we investigated whether the 5 known tooth-agenesis-causing MSX1 missense mutations disrupt this Pax9-potentiation effect, or if they lead to deficiencies in protein stability, protein-protein interactions, nuclear translocation, and DNA-binding. We found that none of the studied molecular mechanisms yielded a satisfactory explanation for the pathogenic effects of the Msx1 mutations, calling for an entirely different approach to the investigation of this step of odontogenesis on the molecular level. PMID:21297014

  10. Multigene mutational profiling of cholangiocarcinomas identifies actionable molecular subgroups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafficini, Andrea; Wood, Laura D.; Corbo, Vincenzo; Melisi, Davide; Malleo, Giuseppe; Vicentini, Caterina; Malpeli, Giorgio; Antonello, Davide; Sperandio, Nicola; Capelli, Paola; Tomezzoli, Anna; Iacono, Calogero; Lawlor, Rita T.; Bassi, Claudio; Hruban, Ralph H.; Guglielmi, Alfredo; Tortora, Giampaolo; de Braud, Filippo; Scarpa, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    One-hundred-fifty-three biliary cancers, including 70 intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas (ICC), 57 extrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas (ECC) and 26 gallbladder carcinomas (GBC) were assessed for mutations in 56 genes using multigene next-generation sequencing. Expression of EGFR and mTOR pathway genes was investigated by immunohistochemistry. At least one mutated gene was observed in 118/153 (77%) cancers. The genes most frequently involved were KRAS (28%), TP53 (18%), ARID1A (12%), IDH1/2 (9%), PBRM1 (9%), BAP1 (7%), and PIK3CA (7%). IDH1/2 (p=0.0005) and BAP1 (p=0.0097) mutations were characteristic of ICC, while KRAS (p=0.0019) and TP53 (p=0.0019) were more frequent in ECC and GBC. Multivariate analysis identified tumour stage and TP53 mutations as independent predictors of survival. Alterations in chromatin remodeling genes (ARID1A, BAP1, PBRM1, SMARCB1) were seen in 31% of cases. Potentially actionable mutations were seen in 104/153 (68%) cancers: i) KRAS/NRAS/BRAF mutations were found in 34% of cancers; ii) mTOR pathway activation was documented by immunohistochemistry in 51% of cases and by mutations in mTOR pathway genes in 19% of cancers; iii) TGF-ß/Smad signaling was altered in 10.5% cancers; iv) mutations in tyrosine kinase receptors were found in 9% cases. Our study identified molecular subgroups of cholangiocarcinomas that can be explored for specific drug targeting in clinical trials. PMID:24867389

  11. Genetic alterations in primary glioblastomas in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Takao; Favereaux, Alexandre; Huang, Hervé; Shimizu, Tsuneo; Yonekawa, Yasuhiro; Nakazato, Yoichi; Ohagki, Hiroko

    2006-01-01

    Current knowledge of genetic alterations in glioblastomas is based largely on genetic analyses of tumors from mainly caucasian patients in the United States and Europe. In the present study, screening for several key genetic alterations was performed on 77 primary (de novo) glioblastomas in Japanese patients. SSCP followed by DNA sequencing revealed TP53 mutations in 16 of 73 (22%) glioblastomas and PTEN mutations in 13 of 63 (21%) cases analyzed. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) showed EGFR amplification in 25 of 77 (32%) cases and p16 homozygous deletion in 32 of 77 (42%) cases. Quantitative microsatellite analysis revealed LOH 10q in 41 of 59 (69%) glioblastomas. The frequencies of these genetic alterations were similar to those reported for primary glioblastomas at the population level in Switzerland. As previously observed for glioblastomas in Europe, there was a positive association between EGFR amplification and p16 deletion (p=0.009), whereas there was an inverse association between TP53 mutations and p16 deletion (p=0.049) in glioblastomas in Japan. Multivariate analyses showed that radiotherapy was significantly predictive for longer survival of glioblastoma patients (p=0.002). SSCP followed by DNA sequencing of the kinase domain (exons 18-21) of the EGFR gene revealed mutations in 2 ou of 69 (3%) glioblastomas in Japan and in 4 of 81 (5%) glioblastomas in Switzerland. The allele frequencies of polymorphisms at codon 787 CAG/CAA (Gln/Gln) in glioblastomas in Japan were G/G (82.4%), G/A (10.8%), A/A (6.8%), corresponding to G 0.878 versus A 0.122, significantly different from those in glioblastomas in Switzerland: G/G (27.2%), G/A (28.4%), A/A (44.4%), corresponding to G 0.414 versus A 0.586 (p < 0.0001). These results suggest that primary glioblastomas in Japan show genetic alterations similar to those in Switzerland, suggesting a similar molecular basis in caucasians and Asians, despite different genetic backgrounds, including different status of a

  12. Landscape of Genomic Alterations in Cervical Carcinomas

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer is responsible for 10–15% of cancer-related deaths in women worldwide1,2. The etiological role of infection with high-risk human papilloma viruses (HPV) in cervical carcinomas is well established3. Previous studies have implicated somatic mutations in PIK3CA, PTEN, TP53, STK11 and KRAS4–7 as well as several copy number alterations in the pathogenesis of cervical carcinomas8,9. Here, we report whole exome sequencing analysis of 115 cervical carcinoma-normal paired samples, tran...

  13. Efficient purging of deleterious mutations in plants with haploid selfing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szovenyi, Peter [Univ. of Zurich (Switzerland); Shaw, Jon [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Yang, Xiaohan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Devos, Nicolas [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-05-30

    In diploid organisms, selfing reduces the efficiency of selection in removing deleterious mutations from a population. This need not be the case for all organisms. Some plants, for example, undergo an extreme form of selfing known as intragametophytic selfing, which immediately exposes all recessive deleterious mutations in a parental genome to selective purging. Here we ask how effectively deleterious mutations are removed from such plants. Specifically, we study the extent to which deleterious mutations accumulate in a predominantly selfing and a predominantly outcrossing pair of moss species, using genome-wide transcriptome data. We find that the selfing species purge significantly more non-synonymous mutations, as well as a greater proportion of radical amino acid changes which alter physicochemical properties of amino acids. Moreover, their purging of deleterious mutation is especially strong in conserved regions of protein-coding genes. Our observations show that selfing need not impede but can even accelerate the removal of deleterious mutations, and do so on a genome-wide scale.

  14. Mass genetics study of rhodopsin point mutations in retinitis pigmentosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiao-li; YIN Zheng-qin; ZHANG Xue; FU Wei-ling

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the incidence and pattern of rhodopsin (RHO) mutations in Chinese patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Methods: Conformation sensitive gel electrophoresis (CSGE) and direct DNA sequencing were applied to detect point mutations that occurred in the five coding exous and splice sites of RHO gene in 98 index patients with RP. Results: Four patients of one ADRP family were found to have a missense mutation at codon 347, Pro347Leu. One late-onset RP patient and her daughter, without clinical expression at present, were discovered to have a novel frameshift mutation at codon 327, Pro327 ( 1-bp del). Neither of the two mutations was found in 100 normal controls. Ala299Ser was found in one RP patient. Two control subjects also had Ala299Ser, suggesting its nonpathogenicity and just single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Conclusion: Two RP patients had rhodopsin mutations, thus the expected frequency of RHO mutations in RP is about 2.0% (95% confidence interval: 0.3% - 4.4% ). A highly conserved C-terminal sequence QVS (A)PA was altered due to Pro347Leu and thereby misdirecting rhodopsin to incorrect subcellular location. Loss of all phosphorylation sites at the C-terminus and a highly conserved sequence QVS(A)PA may occur because of Pro327( 1-bp del). To elucidate the predominant biochemical defects in such mutant, transgenic mice and transfected culture cells carrying Pro327( 1-bp del) would be of great value.

  15. Intronic splicing mutations in PTCH1 cause Gorlin syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bholah, Zaynab; Smith, Miriam J; Byers, Helen J; Miles, Emma K; Evans, D Gareth; Newman, William G

    2014-09-01

    Gorlin syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by multiple early-onset basal cell carcinoma, odontogenic keratocysts and skeletal abnormalities. It is caused by heterozygous mutations in the tumour suppressor PTCH1. Routine clinical genetic testing, by Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) to confirm a clinical diagnosis of Gorlin syndrome, identifies a mutation in 60-90 % of cases. We undertook RNA analysis on lymphocytes from ten individuals diagnosed with Gorlin syndrome, but without known PTCH1 mutations by exonic sequencing or MLPA. Two altered PTCH1 transcripts were identified. Genomic DNA sequence analysis identified an intron 7 mutation c.1068-10T>A, which created a strong cryptic splice acceptor site, leading to an intronic insertion of eight bases; this is predicted to create a frameshift p.(His358Alafs*12). Secondly, a deep intronic mutation c.2561-2057A>G caused an inframe insertion of 78 intronic bases in the cDNA transcript, leading to a premature stop codon p.(Gly854fs*3). The mutations are predicted to cause loss of function of PTCH1, consistent with its tumour suppressor function. The findings indicate the importance of RNA analysis to detect intronic mutations in PTCH1 not identified by routine screening techniques.

  16. Bioenergetic consequences of PINK1 mutations in Parkinson disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Yurevich Abramov

    Full Text Available Mutations of the gene for PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1 are a cause of familial Parkinson's disease (PD. PINK1 protein has been localised to mitochondria and PINK1 gene knockout models exhibit abnormal mitochondrial function. The purpose of this study was to determine whether cells derived from PD patients with a range of PINK1 mutations demonstrate similar defects of mitochondrial function, whether the nature and severity of the abnormalities vary between mutations and correlate with clinical features.We investigated mitochondrial bioenergetics in live fibroblasts from PINK1 mutation patients using single cell techniques. We found that fibroblasts from PINK1 mutation patients had significant defects of bioenergetics including reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, altered redox state, a respiratory deficiency that was determined by substrate availability, and enhanced sensitivity to calcium stimulation and associated mitochondrial permeability pore opening. There was an increase in the basal rate of free radical production in the mutant cells. The pattern and severity of abnormality varied between different mutations, and the less severe defects in these cells were associated with later age of onset of PD.The results provide insight into the molecular pathology of PINK1 mutations in PD and also confirm the critical role of substrate availability in determining the biochemical phenotype--thereby offering the potential for novel therapeutic strategies to circumvent these abnormalities.

  17. Expanded versions of the 16S and 23S ribosomal RNA mutation databases (16SMDBexp and 23SMDBexp)

    OpenAIRE

    Triman, K L; Peister, A; Goel, R A

    1998-01-01

    Expanded versions of the Ribosomal RNA Mutation Databases provide lists of mutated positions in 16S and 16S-like ribosomal RNA (16SMDBexp) and 23S and 23S-like ribosomal RNA (23SMDBexp) and the identity of each alteration. Alterations from organisms other than Escherichia coli are reported at positions according to the E.coli numbering system. Information provided for each mutation includes: (i) a brief description of the phenotype(s) associated with each mutation, (ii) whether a mutant pheno...

  18. The genetic alteration of retinoblastoma gene in esophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jae Il; Shim, Yung Mok; Kim, Chang Min [Korea Cancer Center Hospital of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-01

    Retinoblastoma(RB) gene is the prototype of tumor suppressor gene and it`s alteration have been frequently observed in a large number of human tumors. To investigate the role of RB in esophageal cancer, we studied 36 esophageal cancer tissues with Southern blot analysis to detect gross LOH and PCR-SSCP method to find minute LOH and mutation, if any. In the cases with abnormalities, the nucleotide sequence analysis was performed. Allelic loss of chromosome 13q14 occurred in 20 out of 32 informative cases (62.5%) by Southern analysis. Furthermore, PCR-LOH added three positive cases. Mobility shift by PCR-SSCP was observed in one case at exon 22, which showed 1 bp deletion in codon 771 of RB gene resulting in frame shift mutation. Besides, nine PCR-band alteration in tumor tissue compared with normal tissue were observed in exon 14 and 22, but mutation was not found on sequencing analysis suggesting the epigenetic alteration in tumor tissue. Analysis of the clinical data did not show any difference depending upon RB alteration. However, the total incidence of RB gene may play an important role in the development of esophageal cancer. The main genetic alteration of RB gene was deletion detected by Southern blot and one bp deletion leading to frame shift was also observed. 8 figs, 5 tabs. (Author).

  19. Mutations in galactosemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichardt, J.K.V. [Univ. of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This Letter raises four issues concerning two papers on galactosemia published in the March 1995 of the Journal. First, table 2 in the paper by Elsas et al. incorrectly attributes seven galactose-l-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) mutations (S135L, L195P, K285N, N314D, R333W, R333G, and K334R). The table also fails to mention that others have reported the same two findings attributed to {open_quotes}Leslie et al.; Elsas et al. and in press{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}Leslie et al.; Elsas et al.{close_quotes} The first finding on the prevalence of the Q188R galactosemia mutation in the G/G Caucasian population has also been described by Ng et al., and the second finding on the correlation of the N314D GALT mutation with the Duarte variant was reported by Lin et al. Second, Elsas et al. suggest that the E203K and N314D mutations may {open_quotes}produce intra-allelic complementation when in cis{close_quotes}. This speculation is supported by the activity data of individual III-2 but is inconsistent with the activities of three other individuals I-1, II-1, and III-1 of the same pedigree. The GALT activity measured in these three individuals suggests a dominant negative effect of E203K in E203K-N314D chromosomes, since they all have less than normal activity. Thus, the preponderance of the data in this paper is at odds with the authors speculation. It is worth recalling that Lin et al. also identified four N314D GALT mutations on 95 galactosemic chromosomes examined. A similar situation also appears to be the case in proband III-1 (with genotype E203K-N314D/IVSC) in the Elsas et al. paper. 9 refs.

  20. Cornelia de Lange individuals with new and recurrent SMC1A mutations enhance delineation of mutation repertoire and phenotypic spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervasini, Cristina; Russo, Silvia; Cereda, Anna; Parenti, Ilaria; Masciadri, Maura; Azzollini, Jacopo; Melis, Daniela; Aravena, Teresa; Doray, Bérénice; Ferrarini, Alessandra; Garavelli, Livia; Selicorni, Angelo; Larizza, Lidia

    2013-11-01

    We report on the clinical and molecular characterization of eight patients, one male and seven females, with clinical diagnosis of Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS), who were found to carry distinct mutations of the SMC1A gene. Five of the eight mutations are novel, with two involving amino acid residues previously described as altered in a different way. The other three have been reported each in a single case. Comparison of pairs of individuals with the same mutation indicates only partial overlap of their clinical phenotypes. The following novel missense mutations, all affecting highly conserved amino acid residues, were found: p.R398G in the N-terminal coiled-coil domain, p.V651M in the C-terminal coiled-coil/hinge junction, p.R693G in the C-terminal coiled-coil, and p.N1166T and p.L1189F in the C-terminal ABC cassette. The latter is localized in the H-loop, and represents the first mutation involving a functional motif of SMC1A protein. The effect of the mutations on SMC1A protein function has been predicted using four bioinformatic tools. All mutations except p.V651M were scored as pathogenic by three or four of the tools. p.V651M was found in the only male individual of our cohort, who presented with the most severe phenotype. This raises the issue of gender effect when addressing mutation-phenotype correlation for genes such as SMC1A, which incompletely escapes X-inactivation. Our clinical and molecular findings expand the total number of characterized SMC1A-mutated patients (from 44 to 52) and the restricted repertoire of SMC1A mutations (from 29 to 34), contributing to the molecular and clinical signature of SMC1A-based CdLS. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Evolutionary Stability Against Multiple Mutations

    CERN Document Server

    Ghatak, Anirban; Shaiju, A J

    2012-01-01

    It is known (see e.g. Weibull (1995)) that ESS is not robust against multiple mutations. In this article, we introduce robustness against multiple mutations and study some equivalent formulations and consequences.

  2. BRAF mutations in conjunctival melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ann-Cathrine; Dahl, Christina; Dahmcke, Christina M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate incidence, clinicopathological features and prognosis of BRAF-mutated conjunctival melanoma in Denmark. Furthermore, to determine BRAF mutations in paired premalignant lesions and evaluate immunohistochemical BRAF V600E oncoprotein detection. Methods: Data from 139 patients...

  3. Parkinson disease: α-synuclein mutational screening and new clinical insight into the p.E46K mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, Márcia M G; Rodrigues, Fabíola C; Leite, Marco Antônio A; Campos Júnior, Mário; Rosso, Ana Lucia; Nicaretta, Denise H; Pereira, João S; Silva, Delson José; Della Coletta, Marcus V; Vasconcellos, Luiz Felipe R; Abreu, Gabriella M; Dos Santos, Jussara M; Santos-Rebouças, Cíntia B

    2015-06-01

    Amongst Parkinson's disease-causing genetic factors, missense mutations and genomic multiplications in the gene encoding α-synuclein are well established causes of the disease, although genetic data in populations with a high degree of admixture, such as the Brazilian one, are still scarce. In this study, we conducted a molecular screening of α-synuclein point mutations and copy number variation in the largest cohort of Brazilian patients with Parkinson's disease (n = 549) and also in twelve Portuguese and one Bolivian immigrants. Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood leukocytes or saliva, and the mutational screening was performed by quantitative and qualitative real-time PCR. The only alteration identified was the p.E46K mutation in a 60-year-old man, born in Bolivia, with a familial history of autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease. This is the second family ever reported, in which this rare pathogenic mutation is segregating. The same mutation was firstly described ten years ago in a Spanish family with a neurodegenerative syndrome combining parkinsonism, dementia and visual hallucinations. The clinical condition of our proband reveals a less aggressive phenotype than previously described and reinforces that marked phenotypic heterogeneity is common among patients with Parkinson's disease, even among those carriers sharing the same mutation. Our findings add new insight into the preexisting information about α-synuclein p.E46K, improving our understanding about the endophenotypes associated to this mutation and corroborate that missense alterations and multiplications in α-synuclein are uncommon among Brazilian patients with Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Metabolic alterations in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massari, Francesco; Ciccarese, Chiara; Santoni, Matteo; Brunelli, Matteo; Piva, Francesco; Modena, Alessandra; Bimbatti, Davide; Fantinel, Emanuela; Santini, Daniele; Cheng, Liang; Cascinu, Stefano; Montironi, Rodolfo; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2015-11-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a metabolic disease, being characterized by the dysregulation of metabolic pathways involved in oxygen sensing (VHL/HIF pathway alterations and the subsequent up-regulation of HIF-responsive genes such as VEGF, PDGF, EGF, and glucose transporters GLUT1 and GLUT4, which justify the RCC reliance on aerobic glycolysis), energy sensing (fumarate hydratase-deficient, succinate dehydrogenase-deficient RCC, mutations of HGF/MET pathway resulting in the metabolic Warburg shift marked by RCC increased dependence on aerobic glycolysis and the pentose phosphate shunt, augmented lipogenesis, and reduced AMPK and Krebs cycle activity) and/or nutrient sensing cascade (deregulation of AMPK-TSC1/2-mTOR and PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathways). We analyzed the key metabolic abnormalities underlying RCC carcinogenesis, highlighting those altered pathways that may represent potential targets for the development of more effective therapeutic strategies.

  5. Molecular Alterations in Sporadic Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Inês Alvelos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT is a frequent endocrine disorder characterized by an excessive autonomous production and release of parathyroid hormone (PTH by the parathyroid glands. This endocrinopathy may result from the development of a benign lesion (adenoma or hyperplasia or from a carcinoma. Most of the PHPT cases occur sporadically; however, approximately 10% of the patients present a familial form of the disease. The molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of sporadic PHPT are incompletely understood, even though somatic alterations in MEN1 gene and CCND1 protein overexpression are frequently observed. The MEN1 gene is mutated in about 30% of the parathyroid tumours and the protooncogene CCND1 is implicated in parathyroid neoplasia by rearrangements, leading to an overexpression of CCND1 protein in parathyroid cells. The aim of this work is to briefly update the molecular alterations underlying sporadic primary hyperparathyroidism.

  6. Genetic mutations associated with status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, M; Shorvon, S

    2015-08-01

    This paper reports the results of a preliminary search of the literature aimed at identifying the genetic mutations reported to be strongly associated with status epilepticus. Genetic mutations were selected for inclusion if status epilepticus was specifically mentioned as a consequence of the mutation in standard genetic databases or in a case report or review article. Mutations in 122 genes were identified. The genetic mutations identified were found in only rare conditions (sometimes vanishingly rare) and mostly in infants and young children with multiple other handicaps. Most of the genetic mutations can be subdivided into those associated with cortical dysplasias, inborn errors of metabolism, mitochondrial disease, or epileptic encephalopathies and childhood syndromes. There are no identified 'pure status epilepticus genes'. The range of genes underpinning status epilepticus differs in many ways from the range of genes underpinning epilepsy, which suggests that the processes underpinning status epilepticus differ from those underpinning epilepsy. It has been frequently postulated that status epilepticus is the result of a failure of 'seizure termination mechanisms', but the wide variety of genes affecting very diverse biochemical pathways identified in this survey makes any unitary cause unlikely. The genetic influences in status epilepticus are likely to involve a wide range of mechanisms, some related to development, some to cerebral energy production, some to diverse altered biochemical pathways, some to transmitter and membrane function, and some to defects in networks or systems. The fact that many of the identified genes are involved with cerebral development suggests that status epilepticus might often be a system or network phenomenon. To date, there are very few genes identified which are associated with adult-onset status epilepticus (except in those with preexisting neurological damage), and this is disappointing as the cause of many adult

  7. The Frequency and clinical significance of IDH1 mutations in Chinese acute myeloid leukemia patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixun Guan

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Mutations in the gene encoding isocitrate dehydrogenease 1 (IDH1 occur in various hematopoietic tumors including acute myeloid leukemia (AML, myeloproliferative neoplasms and myelodysplastic syndromes. IDH1 mutations are significant in both diagnosis and prognosis of these conditions. In the present study we determined the prevalence and clinical significance of IDH1 mutations in 349 samples from newly diagnosed AML patients. RESULTS: Of the 349 AML patient specimens analyzed, 35 (10.03% were found to have IDH1 mutations including 4 IDH1 R132 mutations and 31 non-R132 mutations. IDH1 non-R132 mutations were largely concentrated within AML-M1 (35.72%, pA, p.R100Q; (2 c.311G>T, p.G104V; (3 c.322T>C, p.F108L; (4 c.356G>A, p.R119Q; and (5 c.388A>G, p.I130V. In addition, we identified three IDH1 mutations that were previously described in AML. The frequency of IDH1 mutations in AML patients with normal karyotype was 9.9%. IDH1 non-R132 mutations were concurrent with mutations in FLT3-ITD (p<0.01, CEBPA (p<0.01, and NRAS (p<0.01, as well as the overexpression of MN1 (p<0.01 and WT1(p<0.01. The overall survival (OS in the patients with IDH1 non-R132 mutations compared to patients without IDH1 mutations don't reach statistically significance (median 521 days vs median: not reached; n.s.. CONCLUSION: IDH1 non-R132 mutations occurred frequently in newly diagnosed adult Chinese AML patients, and these mutations were associated with genetic alterations. The OS was not influenced by IDH1 non-R132 mutations in the present study.

  8. Transcriptomic Characterization of SF3B1 Mutation Reveals Its Pleiotropic Effects in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lili; Brooks, Angela N; Fan, Jean; Wan, Youzhong; Gambe, Rutendo; Li, Shuqiang; Hergert, Sarah; Yin, Shanye; Freeman, Samuel S; Levin, Joshua Z; Fan, Lin; Seiler, Michael; Buonamici, Silvia; Smith, Peter G; Chau, Kevin F; Cibulskis, Carrie L; Zhang, Wandi; Rassenti, Laura Z; Ghia, Emanuela M; Kipps, Thomas J; Fernandes, Stacey; Bloch, Donald B; Kotliar, Dylan; Landau, Dan A; Shukla, Sachet A; Aster, Jon C; Reed, Robin; DeLuca, David S; Brown, Jennifer R; Neuberg, Donna; Getz, Gad; Livak, Kenneth J; Meyerson, Matthew M; Kharchenko, Peter V; Wu, Catherine J

    2016-11-14

    Mutations in SF3B1, which encodes a spliceosome component, are associated with poor outcome in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), but how these contribute to CLL progression remains poorly understood. We undertook a transcriptomic characterization of primary human CLL cells to identify transcripts and pathways affected by SF3B1 mutation. Splicing alterations, identified in the analysis of bulk cells, were confirmed in single SF3B1-mutated CLL cells and also found in cell lines ectopically expressing mutant SF3B1. SF3B1 mutation was found to dysregulate multiple cellular functions including DNA damage response, telomere maintenance, and Notch signaling (mediated through KLF8 upregulation, increased TERC and TERT expression, or altered splicing of DVL2 transcript, respectively). SF3B1 mutation leads to diverse changes in CLL-related pathways.

  9. Simultaneous mutation detection of three homoeologous genes in wheat by High Resolution Melting analysis and Mutation Surveyor®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Kate

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes is a powerful tool for reverse genetics, combining traditional chemical mutagenesis with high-throughput PCR-based mutation detection to discover induced mutations that alter protein function. The most popular mutation detection method for TILLING is a mismatch cleavage assay using the endonuclease CelI. For this method, locus-specific PCR is essential. Most wheat genes are present as three similar sequences with high homology in exons and low homology in introns. Locus-specific primers can usually be designed in introns. However, it is sometimes difficult to design locus-specific PCR primers in a conserved region with high homology among the three homoeologous genes, or in a gene lacking introns, or if information on introns is not available. Here we describe a mutation detection method which combines High Resolution Melting (HRM analysis of mixed PCR amplicons containing three homoeologous gene fragments and sequence analysis using Mutation Surveyor® software, aimed at simultaneous detection of mutations in three homoeologous genes. Results We demonstrate that High Resolution Melting (HRM analysis can be used in mutation scans in mixed PCR amplicons containing three homoeologous gene fragments. Combining HRM scanning with sequence analysis using Mutation Surveyor® is sensitive enough to detect a single nucleotide mutation in the heterozygous state in a mixed PCR amplicon containing three homoeoloci. The method was tested and validated in an EMS (ethylmethane sulfonate-treated wheat TILLING population, screening mutations in the carboxyl terminal domain of the Starch Synthase II (SSII gene. Selected identified mutations of interest can be further analysed by cloning to confirm the mutation and determine the genomic origin of the mutation. Conclusion Polyploidy is common in plants. Conserved regions of a gene often represent functional domains and have high sequence

  10. 过表达拟南芥点突变乙酰羟酸合成酶基因改变植物对缬氨酸的抗性及增强缬氨酸合成%Overexpression of the PointMutated Acetohydroxyacid Synthase Alters Resis-tance to Valine and Enhances Production of Valine inArabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵菲佚; 焦成瑾; 王太术; 田春芳; 谢尚强; 刘亚萍

    2015-01-01

    拟南芥乙酰羟酸合成酶(acetohydroxyacid synthase, AHAS)在支链氨基酸合成中具有重要的作用。为考察AHAS不同亚基关键位点突变对植物缬氨酸抗性与缬氨酸合成的影响,对AHAS大小亚基上特定位点进行体外突变,构建AHAS点突变过表达转基因植物,研究AHAS不同亚基点突变转基因植物对缬氨酸抗性及其合成的影响。研究结果表明: AHAS小亚基G88D突变解除了终端产物对该酶的反馈抑制作用,使转基因植物缬氨酸含量提高。大亚基E305D突变增强小亚基G88D突变效应,而大亚基E482D突变对G88D突变具有相反的作用。AHAS全酶E305DG88D双突变转基因植物较E482DG88D具有更强的缬氨酸抗性表型和更高的缬氨酸含量。这些结果提示AHAS大小亚基间存在着相互作用,大小亚基不同位点突变对AHAS全酶活性具有不同的影响。%Acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) plays a pivotal role in the synthesis of brahched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) inArabidopsis. To investigate effects of various speciifc mutated sites harboring in the large and small subunits of AHAS on resistance to valine and production of valine inArabidopsis, transgenic plants overexpressing the point mutated AHAS were generated by site-directed mutagenesis, and the phenotype of re-sistance to valine and production of valine of the transgenic plants were evaluatedin planta. The results showed that the G88D mutation in the small unit of AHAS abolished the feedback-resistant of valine to AHAS and this mutation resulted in increase of valine in the transgenic plants. The E305D mutation in the large unit of AHAS strengthens the effect of the G88D mutation. Interestingly, the E482D mutation in the large unit of AHAS acts antagonistically on the G88D mutation in resistance to valine and production of valine in transgenic plants. Compared with the combined double E482DG88D AHAS mutant transgenic plants, the E305DG88D AHAS transgenic plants exhibited the

  11. Epigenetic Alterations in Parathyroid Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Verdelli

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Parathyroid cancers (PCas are rare malignancies representing approximately 0.005% of all cancers. PCas are a rare cause of primary hyperparathyroidism, which is the third most common endocrine disease, mainly related to parathyroid benign tumors. About 90% of PCas are hormonally active hypersecreting parathormone (PTH; consequently patients present with complications of severe hypercalcemia. Pre-operative diagnosis is often difficult due to clinical features shared with benign parathyroid lesions. Surgery provides the current best chance of cure, though persistent or recurrent disease occurs in about 50% of patients with PCas. Somatic inactivating mutations of CDC73/HRPT2 gene, encoding parafibromin, are the most frequent genetic anomalies occurring in PCas. Recently, the aberrant DNA methylation signature and microRNA expression profile have been identified in PCas, providing evidence that parathyroid malignancies are distinct entities from parathyroid benign lesions, showing an epigenetic signature resembling some embryonic aspects. The present paper reviews data about epigenetic alterations in PCas, up to now limited to DNA methylation, chromatin regulators and microRNA profile.

  12. Epigenetic Alterations in Parathyroid Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdelli, Chiara; Corbetta, Sabrina

    2017-01-01

    Parathyroid cancers (PCas) are rare malignancies representing approximately 0.005% of all cancers. PCas are a rare cause of primary hyperparathyroidism, which is the third most common endocrine disease, mainly related to parathyroid benign tumors. About 90% of PCas are hormonally active hypersecreting parathormone (PTH); consequently patients present with complications of severe hypercalcemia. Pre-operative diagnosis is often difficult due to clinical features shared with benign parathyroid lesions. Surgery provides the current best chance of cure, though persistent or recurrent disease occurs in about 50% of patients with PCas. Somatic inactivating mutations of CDC73/HRPT2 gene, encoding parafibromin, are the most frequent genetic anomalies occurring in PCas. Recently, the aberrant DNA methylation signature and microRNA expression profile have been identified in PCas, providing evidence that parathyroid malignancies are distinct entities from parathyroid benign lesions, showing an epigenetic signature resembling some embryonic aspects. The present paper reviews data about epigenetic alterations in PCas, up to now limited to DNA methylation, chromatin regulators and microRNA profile. PMID:28157158

  13. ATRX driver mutation in a composite malignant pheochromocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comino-Méndez, Iñaki; Tejera, Águeda M; Currás-Freixes, María; Remacha, Laura; Gonzalvo, Pablo; Tonda, Raúl; Letón, Rocío; Blasco, María A; Robledo, Mercedes; Cascón, Alberto

    2016-06-01

    Pheochromocytomas (PCCs) and paragangliomas (PGLs) are tumors arising from the adrenal medulla and sympathetic/parasympathetic paraganglia, respectively. Approximately 40% of PCCs/PGLs are due to germline mutations in one of 16 susceptibility genes, and a further 30% are due to somatic alterations in 5 main genes. Recently, somatic ATRX mutations have been found in succinate dehydrogenase (SDH)-associated hereditary PCCs/PGLs. In the present study we applied whole-exome sequencing to the germline and tumor DNA of a patient with metastatic composite PCC and no alterations in known PCC/PGL susceptibility genes. A somatic loss-of-function mutation affecting ATRX was identified in tumor DNA. Transcriptional profiling analysis classified the tumor within cluster 2 of PCCs/PGLs (without SDH gene mutations) and identified downregulation of genes involved in neuronal development and homeostasis (NLGN4, CD99 and CSF2RA) as well as upregulation of Drosha, an important gene involved in miRNA and rRNA processing. CpG island methylator phenotype typical of SDH gene-mutated tumors was ruled out, and SNP array data revealed a unique profile of gains and losses. Finally, we demonstrated the presence of alternative lengthening of telomeres in the tumor, probably associated with the failure of ATRX functions. In conclusion, somatic variants affecting ATRX may play a driver role in sporadic PCC/PGL.

  14. Kin Selection - Mutation Balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyken, J. David Van; Linksvayer, Timothy Arnold; Wade, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Social conflict, in the form of intraspecific selfish "cheating" has been observed in a number of natural systems. However, a formal, evolutionary genetic theory of social cheating that provides an explanatory, predictive framework for these observations is lacking. Here we derive the kin...... selection-mutation balance, which provides an evolutionary null hypothesis for the statics and dynamics of cheating. When social interactions have linear fitness effects and Hamilton´s rule is satisfied, selection is never strong enough to eliminate recurrent cheater mutants from a population, but cheater...... lineages are transient and do not invade. Instead, cheating lineages are eliminated by kin selection but are constantly reintroduced by mutation, maintaining a stable equilibrium frequency of cheaters. The presence of cheaters at equilibrium creates a "cheater load" that selects for mechanisms of cheater...

  15. Ichthyosis vulgaris: the filaggrin mutation disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyssen, J P; Godoy-Gijon, E; Elias, P M

    2013-06-01

    Ichthyosis vulgaris is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG) and is characterized clinically by xerosis, scaling, keratosis pilaris, palmar and plantar hyperlinearity, and a strong association with atopic disorders. According to the published studies presented in this review article, FLG mutations are observed in approximately 7·7% of Europeans and 3·0% of Asians, but appear to be infrequent in darker-skinned populations. This clinical review article provides an overview of ichthyosis vulgaris epidemiology, related disorders and pathomechanisms. Not only does ichthyosis vulgaris possess a wide clinical spectrum, recent studies suggest that carriers of FLG mutations may have a generally altered risk of developing common diseases, even beyond atopic disorders. Mechanistic studies have shown increased penetration of allergens and chemicals in filaggrin-deficient skin, and epidemiological studies have found higher levels of hand eczema, irritant contact dermatitis, nickel sensitization and serum vitamin D levels. When relevant, individuals should be informed about an increased risk of developing dermatitis when repeatedly or continuously exposed to nickel or irritants. Moreover, with our current knowledge, individuals with ichthyosis vulgaris should be protected against neonatal exposure to cats to prevent atopic dermatitis and should abstain from smoking to prevent asthma. Finally, they should be advised against excessive exposure to factors that decrease skin barrier functions and increase the risk of atopic dermatitis.

  16. ACTN1 mutations cause congenital macrothrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunishima, Shinji; Okuno, Yusuke; Yoshida, Kenichi; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Sanada, Masashi; Muramatsu, Hideki; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Miyazaki, Koji; Sakai, Michio; Ohtake, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Iguchi, Akihiro; Niimi, Gen; Otsu, Makoto; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Miyano, Satoru; Saito, Hidehiko; Kojima, Seiji; Ogawa, Seishi

    2013-03-01

    Congenital macrothrombocytopenia (CMTP) is a heterogeneous group of rare platelet disorders characterized by a congenital reduction of platelet counts and abnormally large platelets, for which CMTP-causing mutations are only found in approximately half the cases. We herein performed whole-exome sequencing and targeted Sanger sequencing to identify mutations that cause CMTP, in which a dominant mode of transmission had been suspected but for which no known responsible mutations have been documented. In 13 Japanese CMTP-affected pedigrees, we identified six (46%) affected by ACTN1 variants cosegregating with CMTP. In the entire cohort, ACNT1 variants accounted for 5.5% of the dominant forms of CMTP cases and represented the fourth most common cause in Japanese individuals. Individuals with ACTN1 variants presented with moderate macrothrombocytopenia with anisocytosis but were either asymptomatic or had only a modest bleeding tendency. ACTN1 encodes α-actinin-1, a member of the actin-crosslinking protein superfamily that participates in the organization of the cytoskeleton. In vitro transfection experiments in Chinese hamster ovary cells demonstrated that altered α-actinin-1 disrupted the normal actin-based cytoskeletal structure. Moreover, transduction of mouse fetal liver-derived megakaryocytes with disease-associated ACTN1 variants caused a disorganized actin-based cytoskeleton in megakaryocytes, resulting in the production of abnormally large proplatelet tips, which were reduced in number. Our findings provide an insight into the pathogenesis of CMTP.

  17. Cis-regulatory mutations in human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Douglas J

    2009-07-01

    Cis-acting regulatory sequences are required for the proper temporal and spatial control of gene expression. Variation in gene expression is highly heritable and a significant determinant of human disease susceptibility. The diversity of human genetic diseases attributed, in whole or in part, to mutations in non-coding regulatory sequences is on the rise. Improvements in genome-wide methods of associating genetic variation with human disease and predicting DNA with cis-regulatory potential are two of the major reasons for these recent advances. This review will highlight select examples from the literature that have successfully integrated genetic and genomic approaches to uncover the molecular basis by which cis-regulatory mutations alter gene expression and contribute to human disease. The fine mapping of disease-causing variants has led to the discovery of novel cis-acting regulatory elements that, in some instances, are located as far away as 1.5 Mb from the target gene. In other cases, the prior knowledge of the regulatory landscape surrounding the gene of interest aided in the selection of enhancers for mutation screening. The success of these studies should provide a framework for following up on the large number of genome-wide association studies that have identified common variants in non-coding regions of the genome that associate with increased risk of human diseases including, diabetes, autism, Crohn's, colorectal cancer, and asthma, to name a few.

  18. Novel GAA mutations in patients with Pompe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turaça, Lauro Thiago; de Faria, Douglas Oliveira Soares; Kyosen, Sandra Obikawa; Teixeira, Valber Dias; Motta, Fabiana Louise; Pessoa, Juliana Gilbert; Rodrigues E Silva, Marina; de Almeida, Sandro Soares; D'Almeida, Vânia; Munoz Rojas, Maria Verônica; Martins, Ana Maria; Pesquero, João Bosco

    2015-04-25

    Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive disorder linked to GAA gene that leads to a multi-system intralysosomal accumulation of glycogen. Mutation identification in the GAA gene can be very important for early diagnosis, correlation between genotype-phenotype and therapeutic intervention. For this purpose, peripheral blood from 57 individuals susceptible to Pompe disease was collected and all exons of GAA gene were amplified; the sequences and the mutations were analyzed in silico to predict possible impact on the structure and function of the human protein. In this study, 46 individuals presented 33 alterations in the GAA gene sequence, among which five (c.547-67C>G, c.547-39T>G, p.R437H, p.L641V and p.L705P) have not been previously described in the literature. The alterations in the coding region included 15 missense mutations, three nonsense mutations and one deletion. One insertion and other 13 single base changes were found in the non-coding region. The mutation p.G611D was found in homozygosis in a one-year-old child, who presented low levels of GAA activity, hypotonia and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Two patients presented the new mutation p.L705P in association with c.-32-13T>G. They had low levels of GAA activity and developed late onset Pompe disease. In our study, we observed alterations in the GAA gene originating from Asians, African-Americans and Caucasians, highlighting the high heterogeneity of the Brazilian population. Considering that Pompe disease studies are not very common in Brazil, this study will help to better understand the potential pathogenic role of each change in the GAA gene. Furthermore, a precise and early molecular analysis improves genetic counseling besides allowing for a more efficient treatment in potential candidates.

  19. Mutation of Auslander generators

    CERN Document Server

    Lada, Magdalini

    2009-01-01

    Let $\\Lambda$ be an artin algebra with representation dimension equal to three and $M$ an Auslander generator of $\\Lambda$. We show how, under certain assumptions, we can mutate $M$ to get a new Auslander generator whose endomorphism ring is derived equivalent to the endomorphism ring of $M$. We apply our results to selfinjective algebras with radical cube zero of infinite representation type, where we construct an infinite set of Auslander generators.

  20. Sex and deleterious mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordo, Isabel; Campos, Paulo R A

    2008-05-01

    The evolutionary advantage of sexual reproduction has been considered as one of the most pressing questions in evolutionary biology. While a pluralistic view of the evolution of sex and recombination has been suggested by some, here we take a simpler view and try to quantify the conditions under which sex can evolve given a set of minimal assumptions. Since real populations are finite and also subject to recurrent deleterious mutations, this minimal model should apply generally to all populations. We show that the maximum advantage of recombination occurs for an intermediate value of the deleterious effect of mutations. Furthermore we show that the conditions under which the biggest advantage of sex is achieved are those that produce the fastest fitness decline in the corresponding asexual population and are therefore the conditions for which Muller's ratchet has the strongest effect. We also show that the selective advantage of a modifier of the recombination rate depends on its strength. The quantification of the range of selective effects that favors recombination then leads us to suggest that, if in stressful environments the effect of deleterious mutations is enhanced, a connection between sex and stress could be expected, as it is found in several species.

  1. A novel mitochondrial mutation m.8989G>C associated with neuropathy, ataxia, retinitis pigmentosa - the NARP syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duno, Morten; Wibrand, Flemming; Baggesen, Kirsten; Rosenberg, Thomas; Kjaer, Niels; Frederiksen, Anja L

    2013-02-25

    The archetypal NARP syndrome is almost exclusively associated with the m.8993T>C/G mutation in the sixth subunit of the mitochondrial ATP synthase, whereas other mutations in the MT-ATP6 gene primarily associate with Leigh syndrome or Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). We report a novel mitochondrial point mutation, m.8989G>C, in a patient presenting with neuropathy, ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa constituting the classical NARP phenotype. This mutation alters the amino acid right next to canonical NARP mutation. We suggest that classic NARP syndrome relates to a defined dysfunction of p.MT-ATP6.

  2. Sex speeds adaptation by altering the dynamics of molecular evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Michael J; Rice, Daniel P; Desai, Michael M

    2016-03-10

    Sex and recombination are pervasive throughout nature despite their substantial costs. Understanding the evolutionary forces that maintain these phenomena is a central challenge in biology. One longstanding hypothesis argues that sex is beneficial because recombination speeds adaptation. Theory has proposed several distinct population genetic mechanisms that could underlie this advantage. For example, sex can promote the fixation of beneficial mutations either by alleviating interference competition (the Fisher-Muller effect) or by separating them from deleterious load (the ruby in the rubbish effect). Previous experiments confirm that sex can increase the rate of adaptation, but these studies did not observe the evolutionary dynamics that drive this effect at the genomic level. Here we present the first, to our knowledge, comparison between the sequence-level dynamics of adaptation in experimental sexual and asexual Saccharomyces cerevisiae populations, which allows us to identify the specific mechanisms by which sex speeds adaptation. We find that sex alters the molecular signatures of evolution by changing the spectrum of mutations that fix, and confirm theoretical predictions that it does so by alleviating clonal interference. We also show that substantially deleterious mutations hitchhike to fixation in adapting asexual populations. In contrast, recombination prevents such mutations from fixing. Our results demonstrate that sex both speeds adaptation and alters its molecular signature by allowing natural selection to more efficiently sort beneficial from deleterious mutations.

  3. Gender Specific Mutation Incidence and Survival Associations in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma (CCRCC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Ricketts

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is diagnosed in >200,000 individuals worldwide each year, accounting for ~2% of all cancers, but the spread of this disease amongst genders is distinctly uneven. In the U.S. the male:female incidence ratio is approximately 2:1. A potential hypothesis is mutation spectra may differ between tumors dependent upon the gender of the patient, such as mutations of X chromosome encoded genes being more prevalent in male-derived tumors. Combined analysis of three recent large-scale clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC mutation sequencing projects identified a significantly increased mutation frequency of PBRM1 and the X chromosome encoded KDM5C in tumors from male patients and BAP1 in tumors from female patients. Mutation of BAP1 had previously been significantly associated with poorer overall survival; however, when stratified by gender, mutation of BAP1 only significantly affected overall survival in female patients. Mutation of chromatin remodeling genes alters gene regulation, but the overall effect of these alterations may also be modified by the presence of other gender specific factors. Thus, the combination of gender and mutation of a specific gene, such as BAP1, may have implications not only for prognosis but also for understanding the role of chromatin remodeling gene mutations in kidney cancer progression.

  4. Mutated human androgen receptor gene detected in a prostatic cancer patient is also activated by estradiol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elo, J.P.; Kvist, L.; Leinonen, K.; Isomaa, V. [Univ. of Oulu (Finland)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    Androgens are necessary for the development of prostatic cancer. The mechanisms by which the originally androgen-dependent prostatic cancer cells are relieved of the requirement to use androgen for their growth are largely unknown. The human prostatic cancer cell line LNCaP has been shown to contain a point mutation in the human androgen receptor gene (hAR), suggesting that changes in the hAR may contribute to the abnormal hormone response of prostatic cells. To search for point mutations in the hAR, we used single strand conformation polymorphism analysis and a polymerase chain reaction direct sequencing method to screen 23 prostatic cancer specimens from untreated patients, 6 prostatic cancer specimens from treated patients, and 11 benign prostatic hyperplasia specimens. One mutation was identified in DNA isolated from prostatic cancer tissue, and the mutation was also detected in the leukocyte DNA of the patient and his offspring. The mutation changed codon 726 in exon E from arginine to leucine and was a germ line mutation. The mutation we found in exon E of the hAR gene does not alter the ligand binding specificity of the AR, but the mutated receptor was activated by estradiol to a significantly greater extent than the wild-type receptor. The AR gene mutation described in this study might be one explanation for the altered biological activity of prostatic cancer. 36 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Reversible optic neuropathy with OPA1 exon 5b mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornille, K.; Milea, D.; Amati-Bonneau, P.

    2008-01-01

    A new c.740G>A (R247H) mutation in OPA1 alternate spliced exon 5b was found in a patient presenting with bilateral optic neuropathy followed by partial, spontaneous visual recovery. R247H fibroblasts from the patient and his unaffected father presented unusual highly tubular mitochondrial network......, significant increased susceptibility to apoptosis, oxidative phosphorylation uncoupling, and altered OPA1 protein profile, supporting the pathogenicity of this mutation. These results suggest that the clinical spectrum of the OPA1-associated optic neuropathies may be larger than previously described...

  6. Visual impairment in FOXG1-mutated individuals and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggio, E M; Pancrazi, L; Gennaro, M; Lo Rizzo, C; Mari, F; Meloni, I; Ariani, F; Panighini, A; Novelli, E; Biagioni, M; Strettoi, E; Hayek, J; Rufa, A; Pizzorusso, T; Renieri, A; Costa, M

    2016-06-02

    The Forkead Box G1 (FOXG1 in humans, Foxg1 in mice) gene encodes for a DNA-binding transcription factor, essential for the development of the telencephalon in mammalian forebrain. Mutations in FOXG1 have been reported to be involved in the onset of Rett Syndrome, for which sequence alterations of MECP2 and CDKL5 are known. While visual alterations are not classical hallmarks of Rett syndrome, an increasing body of evidence shows visual impairment in patients and in MeCP2 and CDKL5 animal models. Herein we focused on the functional role of FOXG1 in the visual system of animal models (Foxg1(+/Cre) mice) and of a cohort of subjects carrying FOXG1 mutations or deletions. Visual physiology of Foxg1(+/Cre) mice was assessed by visually evoked potentials, which revealed a significant reduction in response amplitude and visual acuity with respect to wild-type littermates. Morphological investigation showed abnormalities in the organization of excitatory/inhibitory circuits in the visual cortex. No alterations were observed in retinal structure. By examining a cohort of FOXG1-mutated individuals with a panel of neuro-ophthalmological assessments, we found that all of them exhibited visual alterations compatible with high-level visual dysfunctions. In conclusion our data show that Foxg1 haploinsufficiency results in an impairment of mouse and human visual cortical function.

  7. MYD88 L265P mutation in Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulain, Stéphanie; Roumier, Christophe; Decambron, Audrey; Renneville, Aline; Herbaux, Charles; Bertrand, Elisabeth; Tricot, Sabine; Daudignon, Agnès; Galiègue-Zouitina, Sylvie; Soenen, Valerie; Theisen, Olivier; Grardel, Nathalie; Nibourel, Olivier; Roche-Lestienne, Catherine; Quesnel, Bruno; Duthilleul, Patrick; Preudhomme, Claude; Leleu, Xavier

    2013-05-30

    Mutation of the MYD88 gene has recently been identified in activated B-cell-like diffuse cell lymphoma and enhanced Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling pathways. A whole exome-sequencing study of Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia (WM) suggested a high frequency of MYD88 L265P mutation in WM. The genetic background is not fully deciphered in WM, although the role of NF-κB and JAK-STAT has been demonstrated. We analyzed MYD88 mutation in exon 5 and characterized the clinical significance of this genetic alteration in 67 WM patients. Clinical features; immunophenotypic markers; and conventional cytogenetic, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and single nucleotide polymorphism array data were analyzed. MYD88 L265P mutation was acquired in 79% of patients. Overall, we have identified alteration of the MYD88 locus in 91% of WM patients, including 12% with gain on chromosome 3 at the 3p22 locus that included the MYD88 gene. Patients with absence of MYD88 mutation were WM characterized with a female predominance, a splenomegaly, gain of chromosome 3, and CD27 expression. Importantly, inhibition of MYD88 signaling induced cytotoxicity and inhibited cell growth of cell lines issued from patients with WM. In conclusion, these results confirm a high frequency of MYD88 L265P mutation in WM. The discovery of MYD88 L265P mutation may contribute to a better understanding of the physiopathogeny of WM.

  8. Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA mutations in Chinese patients: 16 novel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Weimin; Wang, Yun; Meng, Yan; Su, Liang; Shi, Huiping; Huang, Shangzhi

    2010-08-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA; Morquio A syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS) and transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. This is the first systematic mutation screen in Chinese MPS IVA patients. Mutation detections in 24 unrelated Chinese MPS IVA patients were performed by PCR and direct sequencing of exons or the mRNA of GALNS. A total of 42 mutant alleles were identified, belonging to 27 different mutations. Out of the 27 mutations, 16 were novel, including 2 splicing mutations (c.567-1G>T and c.634-1G>A), 2 nonsense mutations (p.W325X and p.Q422X) and 12 missense mutations (p.T88I, p.H142R, p.P163H, p.G168L, p.H236D, p.N289S, p.T312A, p.G316V, p.A324E, p.L366P, p.Q422K and p.F452L). p.G340D was found to be a common mutation in the Chinese MPS IVA patients, accounting for 16.7% of the total number of mutant alleles. The results show that the mutations in Chinese MPS IVA patients are also family specific but have a different mutation spectrum as compared to those of other populations.

  9. Calreticulin Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Lavi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available With the discovery of the JAK2V617F mutation in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph− myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs in 2005, major advances have been made in the diagnosis of MPNs, in understanding of their pathogenesis involving the JAK/STAT pathway, and finally in the development of novel therapies targeting this pathway. Nevertheless, it remains unknown which mutations exist in approximately one-third of patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL essential thrombocythemia (ET and primary myelofibrosis (PMF. At the end of 2013, two studies identified recurrent mutations in the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR using whole-exome sequencing. These mutations were revealed in the majority of ET and PMF patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL but not in polycythemia vera patients. Somatic 52-bp deletions (type 1 mutations and recurrent 5-bp insertions (type 2 mutations in exon 9 of the CALR gene (the last exon encoding the C-terminal amino acids of the protein calreticulin were detected and found always to generate frameshift mutations. All detected mutant calreticulin proteins shared a novel amino acid sequence at the C-terminal. Mutations in CALR are acquired early in the clonal history of the disease, and they cause activation of JAK/STAT signaling. The CALR mutations are the second most frequent mutations in Ph− MPN patients after the JAK2V617F mutation, and their detection has significantly improved the diagnostic approach for ET and PMF. The characteristics of the CALR mutations as well as their diagnostic, clinical, and pathogenesis implications are discussed in this review.

  10. Frequent heterogeneous missense mutations of GGAP2 in prostate cancer: implications for tumor biology, clonality and mutation analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Cai

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common visceral malignancy in Western men and a major cause of cancer deaths. Increased activation of the AKT and NFkB pathways have been identified as critical steps in prostate cancer initiation and progression. GGAP2 (GTP-binding and GTPase activating protein 2 is a multidomain protein that contains an N-terminal Ras homology domain (GTPase, followed by a PH domain, a C-terminal GAP domain and an ankyrin repeat domain. GGAP2 can directly activate signaling via both the AKT and NFkB pathways and acts as a node of crosstalk between these pathways. Increased GGAP2 expression is present in three quarters of prostate cancers. Mutations of GGAP2 have been reported in cell lines from other malignancies. We therefore analyzed 84 prostate cancer tissues and 43 benign prostate tissues for somatic mutations in GGAP2 by direct sequencing of individual clones derived from the GAP and GTPase domains of normal and tumor tissue. Overall, half of cancers contained mutant GAP domain clones and in 20% of cancers, 30% or more of clones were mutant in the GAP domain. Surprisingly, the mutations were heterogeneous and nonclonal, with multiple different mutations being present in many tumors. Similar findings were observed in the analysis of the GTPase domain. Mutant GGAP2 proteins had significantly higher transcriptional activity using AP-1 responsive reporter constructs when compared to wild-type protein. Furthermore, the presence of these mutations was associated with aggressive clinical behavior. The presence of high frequency nonclonal mutations of a single gene is novel and represents a new mode of genetic alteration that can promote tumor progression. Analysis of mutations in cancer has been used to predict outcome and guide therapeutic target identification but such analysis has focused on clonal mutations. Our studies indicate that in some cases high frequency nonclonal mutations may need to be assessed as well.

  11. Frequent heterogeneous missense mutations of GGAP2 in prostate cancer: implications for tumor biology, clonality and mutation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yi; Wang, Jianghua; Ren, Chengxi; Ittmann, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common visceral malignancy in Western men and a major cause of cancer deaths. Increased activation of the AKT and NFkB pathways have been identified as critical steps in prostate cancer initiation and progression. GGAP2 (GTP-binding and GTPase activating protein 2) is a multidomain protein that contains an N-terminal Ras homology domain (GTPase), followed by a PH domain, a C-terminal GAP domain and an ankyrin repeat domain. GGAP2 can directly activate signaling via both the AKT and NFkB pathways and acts as a node of crosstalk between these pathways. Increased GGAP2 expression is present in three quarters of prostate cancers. Mutations of GGAP2 have been reported in cell lines from other malignancies. We therefore analyzed 84 prostate cancer tissues and 43 benign prostate tissues for somatic mutations in GGAP2 by direct sequencing of individual clones derived from the GAP and GTPase domains of normal and tumor tissue. Overall, half of cancers contained mutant GAP domain clones and in 20% of cancers, 30% or more of clones were mutant in the GAP domain. Surprisingly, the mutations were heterogeneous and nonclonal, with multiple different mutations being present in many tumors. Similar findings were observed in the analysis of the GTPase domain. Mutant GGAP2 proteins had significantly higher transcriptional activity using AP-1 responsive reporter constructs when compared to wild-type protein. Furthermore, the presence of these mutations was associated with aggressive clinical behavior. The presence of high frequency nonclonal mutations of a single gene is novel and represents a new mode of genetic alteration that can promote tumor progression. Analysis of mutations in cancer has been used to predict outcome and guide therapeutic target identification but such analysis has focused on clonal mutations. Our studies indicate that in some cases high frequency nonclonal mutations may need to be assessed as well.

  12. ELOVL5 Mutations Cause Spinocerebellar Ataxia 38

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Gregorio, Eleonora; Borroni, Barbara; Giorgio, Elisa; Lacerenza, Daniela; Ferrero, Marta; Lo Buono, Nicola; Ragusa, Neftj; Mancini, Cecilia; Gaussen, Marion; Calcia, Alessandro; Mitro, Nico; Hoxha, Eriola; Mura, Isabella; Coviello, Domenico A.; Moon, Young-Ah; Tesson, Christelle; Vaula, Giovanna; Couarch, Philippe; Orsi, Laura; Duregon, Eleonora; Papotti, Mauro Giulio; Deleuze, Jean-François; Imbert, Jean; Costanzi, Chiara; Padovani, Alessandro; Giunti, Paola; Maillet-Vioud, Marcel; Durr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis; Tempia, Filippo; Funaro, Ada; Boccone, Loredana; Caruso, Donatella; Stevanin, Giovanni; Brusco, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a heterogeneous group of autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorders involving the cerebellum and 23 different genes. We mapped SCA38 to a 56 Mb region on chromosome 6p in a SCA-affected Italian family by whole-genome linkage analysis. Targeted resequencing identified a single missense mutation (c.689G>T [p.Gly230Val]) in ELOVL5. Mutation screening of 456 independent SCA-affected individuals identified the same mutation in two further unrelated Italian families. Haplotyping showed that at least two of the three families shared a common ancestor. One further missense variant (c.214C>G [p.Leu72Val]) was found in a French family. Both missense changes affect conserved amino acids, are predicted to be damaging by multiple bioinformatics tools, and were not identified in ethnically matched controls or within variant databases. ELOVL5 encodes an elongase involved in the synthesis of polyunsaturated fatty acids of the ω3 and ω6 series. Arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, two final products of the enzyme, were reduced in the serum of affected individuals. Immunohistochemistry on control mice and human brain demonstrated high levels in Purkinje cells. In transfection experiments, subcellular localization of altered ELOVL5 showed a perinuclear distribution with a signal increase in the Golgi compartment, whereas the wild-type showed a widespread signal in the endoplasmic reticulum. SCA38 and SCA34 are examples of SCAs due to mutations in elongase-encoding genes, emphasizing the importance of fatty-acid metabolism in neurological diseases. PMID:25065913

  13. ELOVL5 mutations cause spinocerebellar ataxia 38.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Gregorio, Eleonora; Borroni, Barbara; Giorgio, Elisa; Lacerenza, Daniela; Ferrero, Marta; Lo Buono, Nicola; Ragusa, Neftj; Mancini, Cecilia; Gaussen, Marion; Calcia, Alessandro; Mitro, Nico; Hoxha, Eriola; Mura, Isabella; Coviello, Domenico A; Moon, Young-Ah; Tesson, Christelle; Vaula, Giovanna; Couarch, Philippe; Orsi, Laura; Duregon, Eleonora; Papotti, Mauro Giulio; Deleuze, Jean-François; Imbert, Jean; Costanzi, Chiara; Padovani, Alessandro; Giunti, Paola; Maillet-Vioud, Marcel; Durr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis; Tempia, Filippo; Funaro, Ada; Boccone, Loredana; Caruso, Donatella; Stevanin, Giovanni; Brusco, Alfredo

    2014-08-07

    Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a heterogeneous group of autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorders involving the cerebellum and 23 different genes. We mapped SCA38 to a 56 Mb region on chromosome 6p in a SCA-affected Italian family by whole-genome linkage analysis. Targeted resequencing identified a single missense mutation (c.689G>T [p.Gly230Val]) in ELOVL5. Mutation screening of 456 independent SCA-affected individuals identified the same mutation in two further unrelated Italian families. Haplotyping showed that at least two of the three families shared a common ancestor. One further missense variant (c.214C>G [p.Leu72Val]) was found in a French family. Both missense changes affect conserved amino acids, are predicted to be damaging by multiple bioinformatics tools, and were not identified in ethnically matched controls or within variant databases. ELOVL5 encodes an elongase involved in the synthesis of polyunsaturated fatty acids of the ω3 and ω6 series. Arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, two final products of the enzyme, were reduced in the serum of affected individuals. Immunohistochemistry on control mice and human brain demonstrated high levels in Purkinje cells. In transfection experiments, subcellular localization of altered ELOVL5 showed a perinuclear distribution with a signal increase in the Golgi compartment, whereas the wild-type showed a widespread signal in the endoplasmic reticulum. SCA38 and SCA34 are examples of SCAs due to mutations in elongase-encoding genes, emphasizing the importance of fatty-acid metabolism in neurological diseases.

  14. Somatic frameshift mutations in the Bloom syndrome BLM gene are frequent in sporadic gastric carcinomas with microsatellite mutator phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matei Irina

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic instability has been reported at microsatellite tracts in few coding sequences. We have shown that the Bloom syndrome BLM gene may be a target of microsatelliteinstability (MSI in a short poly-adenine repeat located in its coding region. To further characterize the involvement of BLM in tumorigenesis, we have investigated mutations in nine genes containing coding microsatellites in microsatellite mutator phenotype (MMP positive and negative gastric carcinomas (GCs. Methods We analyzed 50 gastric carcinomas (GCs for mutations in the BLM poly(A tract aswell as in the coding microsatellites of the TGFβ1-RII, IGFIIR, hMSH3, hMSH6, BAX, WRN, RECQL and CBL genes. Results BLM mutations were found in 27% of MMP+ GCs (4/15 cases but not in any of the MMP negative GCs (0/35 cases. The frequency of mutations in the other eight coding regions microsatellite was the following: TGFβ1-RII (60 %, BAX (27%, hMSH6 (20%,hMSH3 (13%, CBL (13%, IGFIIR (7%, RECQL (0% and WRN (0%. Mutations in BLM appear to be more frequently associated with frameshifts in BAX and in hMSH6and/or hMSH3. Tumors with BLM alterations present a higher frequency of unstable mono- and trinucleotide repeats located in coding regions as compared with mutator phenotype tumors without BLM frameshifts. Conclusions BLM frameshifts are frequent alterations in GCs specifically associated with MMP+tumors. We suggest that BLM loss of function by MSI may increase the genetic instability of a pre-existent unstable genotype in gastric tumors.

  15. Exome sequencing identifies recurrent somatic RAC1 mutations in melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauthammer, Michael; Kong, Yong; Ha, Byung Hak; Evans, Perry; Bacchiocchi, Antonella; McCusker, James P.; Cheng, Elaine; Davis, Matthew J.; Goh, Gerald; Choi, Murim; Ariyan, Stephan; Narayan, Deepak; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Capatana, Ana; Holman, Edna C.; Bosenberg, Marcus; Sznol, Mario; Kluger, Harriet M.; Brash, Douglas E.; Stern, David F.; Materin, Miguel A.; Lo, Roger S.; Mane, Shrikant; Ma, Shuangge; Kidd, Kenneth K.; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Lifton, Richard P.; Schlessinger, Joseph; Boggon, Titus J.; Halaban, Ruth (Yale-MED); (UCLA); (Queens)

    2012-10-11

    We characterized the mutational landscape of melanoma, the form of skin cancer with the highest mortality rate, by sequencing the exomes of 147 melanomas. Sun-exposed melanomas had markedly more ultraviolet (UV)-like C>T somatic mutations compared to sun-shielded acral, mucosal and uveal melanomas. Among the newly identified cancer genes was PPP6C, encoding a serine/threonine phosphatase, which harbored mutations that clustered in the active site in 12% of sun-exposed melanomas, exclusively in tumors with mutations in BRAF or NRAS. Notably, we identified a recurrent UV-signature, an activating mutation in RAC1 in 9.2% of sun-exposed melanomas. This activating mutation, the third most frequent in our cohort of sun-exposed melanoma after those of BRAF and NRAS, changes Pro29 to serine (RAC1{sup P29S}) in the highly conserved switch I domain. Crystal structures, and biochemical and functional studies of RAC1{sup P29S} showed that the alteration releases the conformational restraint conferred by the conserved proline, causes an increased binding of the protein to downstream effectors, and promotes melanocyte proliferation and migration. These findings raise the possibility that pharmacological inhibition of downstream effectors of RAC1 signaling could be of therapeutic benefit.

  16. Protection by dietary compounds against mutation in a transgenic rodent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, J G

    2001-11-01

    One of the most relevant biomarkers of genotoxicity and, potentially, carcinogenesis is the occurrence of mutations. Data indicate that carcinogens are highly specific with regard to their target tissue in inducing both tumors and mutations. This specificity may reflect the dependence on tissue-specific metabolic activation, the organ-specific environment or both. Ideally, therefore, mutation should be determined in a real animal rather than in a cell culture system. The lacI transgenic rodent model provides such a system. We have used this model to investigate tissue, species and sex specificity of mutation induced by selected dietary carcinogens and to examine how some compounds may alter the induction of mutation. We have studied mutation using several chemicals, including the dietary heterocyclic amine 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), the environmentally important aromatic hydrocarbon benzo[a]pyrene and the food contaminant aflatoxin B1. We have shown that the mutagenic potency of these chemicals can be modulated by other dietary compounds, including green tea and conjugated linoleic acid, and the dioxin 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo[b,e][1,4]dioxin (TCDD). These results demonstrate that the lacI transgenic rodent is a useful model for the study of chemoprevention in vivo.

  17. Nucleophosmin mutations in childhood acute myelogenous leukemia with normal karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Dell'Oro, Maria Grazia; Mecucci, Cristina; Giarin, Emanuela; Masetti, Riccardo; Rossi, Vincenzo; Locatelli, Franco; Martelli, Massimo F; Basso, Giuseppe; Pession, Andrea; Biondi, Andrea; Falini, Brunangelo

    2005-08-15

    Nucleophosmin (NPM) is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein involved in leukemia-associated chromosomal translocations, and it regulates the alternate reading frame (ARF)-p53 tumor-suppressor pathway. Recently, it has been demonstrated that mutations of the NPM1 gene alter the protein at its C-terminal, causing its cytoplasmic localization. Cytoplasmic NPM was detected in 35% of adult patients with primary non-French-American-British (FAB) classification M3 acute myeloid leukemia (AML), associated mainly with normal karyotype. We evaluated the prevalence of the NPM1 gene mutation in non-M3 childhood AML patients enrolled in the ongoing Associazione Italiana di Ematologia e Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP-AML02) protocol in Italy. NPM1 mutations were found in 7 (6.5%) of 107 successfully analyzed patients. NPM1-mutated patients carried a normal karyotype (7/26, 27.1%) and were older in age. Thus, the NPM1 mutation is a frequent abnormality in AML patients without known genetic marker; the mutation may represent a new target to monitor minimal residual disease in AML and a potential candidate for alternative and targeted treatments.

  18. Heterozygous carriers of a Parkin or PINK1 mutation share a common functional endophenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Nuenen, BF; Siebner, Hartwig; Weiss, MM

    2008-01-01

    inherited Parkinson disease alters the cortical control of sequential finger movements. METHODS: Nonmanifesting individuals carrying a single heterozygous Parkin (n = 13) or PINK1 (n = 9) mutation and 23 healthy controls without these mutations were studied with functional MRI (fMRI). During f......MRI, participants performed simple sequences of three thumb-to-finger opposition movements with their right dominant hand. Since heterozygous Parkin and PINK1 mutations cause a latent dopaminergic nigrostriatal dysfunction, we predicted a compensatory recruitment of those rostral premotor areas that are normally...... rostral dorsal premotor cortex in mutation carriers but not in controls. Task-related activation of these premotor areas was similar in carriers of a Parkin or PINK1 mutation. CONCLUSION: Mutations in different genes linked to recessively inherited Parkinson disease are associated with an additional...

  19. A Novel AXIN2 Missense Mutation Is Associated with Non-Syndromic Oligodontia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haochen Liu

    Full Text Available Oligodontia is defined as the congenital absence of six or more permanent teeth, excluding the third molars. Oligodontia may contribute to masticatory dysfunction, speech alteration, aesthetic problems and malocclusion. Numerous gene mutations have been association with oligodontia. In the present study, we identified a de novo AXIN2 missense mutation (c.314T>G in a Chinese individual with non-syndromic oligodontia. This mutation results in the substitution of Val at residue 105 for Gly (p.Val105Gly; residue 105 is located in the highly conserved regulator of G protein signaling (RGS domain of the AXIN2 protein. This is the first report indicating that a mutation in the RGS domain of AXIN2 is responsible for non-syndromic oligodontia. Our study supports the relationship between AXIN2 mutation and non-syndromic oligodontia and extends the mutation spectrum of the AXIN2 gene.

  20. Mutation update on the CHD7 gene involved in CHARGE syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janssen, Nicole; Bergman, Jorieke E H; Swertz, Morris A

    2012-01-01

    , for example, the central nervous system, eye, ear, nose, and mediastinal organs, are variably involved. In this article, we review all the currently described CHD7 variants, including 183 new pathogenic mutations found by our laboratories. In total, we compiled 528 different pathogenic CHD7 alterations from......CHD7 is a member of the chromodomain helicase DNA-binding (CHD) protein family that plays a role in transcription regulation by chromatin remodeling. Loss-of-function mutations in CHD7 are known to cause CHARGE syndrome, an autosomal-dominant malformation syndrome in which several organ systems...... 508 previously published patients with CHARGE syndrome and 294 unpublished patients analyzed by our laboratories. The mutations are equally distributed along the coding region of CHD7 and most are nonsense or frameshift mutations. Most mutations are unique, but we identified 94 recurrent mutations...

  1. Music and Alterity Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep Martí

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The concept of alterity constitutes an important issue in anthropological research and, therefore, in the study of musical practices, as well. Without it, we could hardly understand other kinds of music situated in different spaces and time from the observer. In order to effectively approach these musical practices, we have to develop strategies to help us reduce as much as possible that which distorts the vision of the other. However, beyond the strictly epistemological and methodological issues, the study of music cannot ignore the ethical question related to the manner in which Western thought has understood and treated the other: through a hierarchical and stereotypical type of thinking based on the condition of otherness. Throughout the article, different alterity procedures are presented and discussed, such as synecdochization, exoticization, undervaluation, overvaluation, misunderstanding and exclusion. Taking these different alterity strategies into account may help us to better understand how the musical other is constructed, used and ultimately instrumentalized.

  2. Attention Alters Perceived Attractiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Störmer, Viola S; Alvarez, George A

    2016-04-01

    Can attention alter the impression of a face? Previous studies showed that attention modulates the appearance of lower-level visual features. For instance, attention can make a simple stimulus appear to have higher contrast than it actually does. We tested whether attention can also alter the perception of a higher-order property-namely, facial attractiveness. We asked participants to judge the relative attractiveness of two faces after summoning their attention to one of the faces using a briefly presented visual cue. Across trials, participants judged the attended face to be more attractive than the same face when it was unattended. This effect was not due to decision or response biases, but rather was due to changes in perceptual processing of the faces. These results show that attention alters perceived facial attractiveness, and broadly demonstrate that attention can influence higher-level perception and may affect people's initial impressions of one another.

  3. Genetic alterations and markers of melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Mazurenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Melanoma remains the most deadly form of malignant skin disease with high risk of metastases. Metastatic melanoma is prognostic highly unfavorable and resistant to traditional chemotherapy and biologic treatment. There is a great progress in understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying melanoma initiation and progression. The external (ultraviolet irradiation and internal (genetic factors are involved in melanoma genesis. 5–14 % of melanoma cases occur in familial context due to genetic predisposition risk factors. Among them rare germinal mutations in the cell cycle genes regulators CDKN2A and CDK4 and in the master gene of melanocyte homeostasis MITF, as well as single nucleotide polymorphisms of several low-penetrated genes, namely MC1R, have been identified. The main cell signaling pathways and oncogene driver mutations are involved in melanoma pathogenesis. RAS / RAF / MEK / ERK cascade is hyperactivated in 75 % of cutaneous melanoma cases. Activation of PI3K / AKT / mTOR signaling pathway is important for melanoma progression. Recent studies revealed that melanomas are genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous tumors. Spectrum of chromosomal alterations and activating mutations corresponding to tumor molecular portraits varies in melanomas of different location. Most of cutaneous melanomas contain BRAF (50 % or NRAS (20 % mutations, and NRAS mutations occur on chronically sun-exposed skin. Activating KIT mutations have been reported in approximately 20–30 % of certain subtypes of melanoma, including acral and mucosal, and melanoma that develop on photodamaged skin. Cutaneous metastatic melanoma derive from preexisting nevi in 25 % of cases, molecular mechanisms of nevi malignization are discussed. Deepsequencing approaches of melanoma samples of different melanoma types highlighted new melanoma driver genes, that are damaged due to tumorigenic effects of ultraviolet: PPP6C, RAC1, SNX31, TACC1 and STK19. The

  4. The Mutational Landscape of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia Reveals an Interacting Network of Co-Occurrences and Recurrent Mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariam Ibáñez

    Full Text Available Preliminary Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL whole exome sequencing (WES studies have identified a huge number of somatic mutations affecting more than a hundred different genes mainly in a non-recurrent manner, suggesting that APL is a heterogeneous disease with secondary relevant changes not yet defined. To extend our knowledge of subtle genetic alterations involved in APL that might cooperate with PML/RARA in the leukemogenic process, we performed a comprehensive analysis of somatic mutations in APL combining WES with sequencing of a custom panel of targeted genes by next-generation sequencing. To select a reduced subset of high confidence candidate driver genes, further in silico analysis were carried out. After prioritization and network analysis we found recurrent deleterious mutations in 8 individual genes (STAG2, U2AF1, SMC1A, USP9X, IKZF1, LYN, MYCBP2 and PTPN11 with a strong potential of being involved in APL pathogenesis. Our network analysis of multiple mutations provides a reliable approach to prioritize genes for additional analysis, improving our knowledge of the leukemogenesis interactome. Additionally, we have defined a functional module in the interactome of APL. The hypothesis is that the number, or the specific combinations, of mutations harbored in each patient might not be as important as the disturbance caused in biological key functions, triggered by several not necessarily recurrent mutations.

  5. The Mutational Landscape of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia Reveals an Interacting Network of Co-Occurrences and Recurrent Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, Mariam; Carbonell-Caballero, José; García-Alonso, Luz; Such, Esperanza; Jiménez-Almazán, Jorge; Vidal, Enrique; Barragán, Eva; López-Pavía, María; LLop, Marta; Martín, Iván; Gómez-Seguí, Inés; Montesinos, Pau; Sanz, Miguel A; Dopazo, Joaquín; Cervera, José

    2016-01-01

    Preliminary Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL) whole exome sequencing (WES) studies have identified a huge number of somatic mutations affecting more than a hundred different genes mainly in a non-recurrent manner, suggesting that APL is a heterogeneous disease with secondary relevant changes not yet defined. To extend our knowledge of subtle genetic alterations involved in APL that might cooperate with PML/RARA in the leukemogenic process, we performed a comprehensive analysis of somatic mutations in APL combining WES with sequencing of a custom panel of targeted genes by next-generation sequencing. To select a reduced subset of high confidence candidate driver genes, further in silico analysis were carried out. After prioritization and network analysis we found recurrent deleterious mutations in 8 individual genes (STAG2, U2AF1, SMC1A, USP9X, IKZF1, LYN, MYCBP2 and PTPN11) with a strong potential of being involved in APL pathogenesis. Our network analysis of multiple mutations provides a reliable approach to prioritize genes for additional analysis, improving our knowledge of the leukemogenesis interactome. Additionally, we have defined a functional module in the interactome of APL. The hypothesis is that the number, or the specific combinations, of mutations harbored in each patient might not be as important as the disturbance caused in biological key functions, triggered by several not necessarily recurrent mutations.

  6. Profiling of somatic mutations in acute myeloid leukemia with FLT3-ITD at diagnosis and relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Manoj; Nagata, Yasunobu; Kanojia, Deepika; Mayakonda, Anand; Yoshida, Kenichi; Haridas Keloth, Sreya; Zang, Zhi Jiang; Okuno, Yusuke; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Miyano, Satoru; Ding, Ling-Wen; Alpermann, Tamara; Sun, Qiao-Yang; Lin, De-Chen; Chien, Wenwen; Madan, Vikas; Liu, Li-Zhen; Tan, Kar-Tong; Sampath, Abhishek; Venkatesan, Subhashree; Inokuchi, Koiti; Wakita, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Chng, Wee Joo; Kham, Shirley-Kow Yin; Yeoh, Allen Eng-Juh; Sanada, Masashi; Schiller, Joanna; Kreuzer, Karl-Anton; Kornblau, Steven M; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Haferlach, Torsten; Lill, Michael; Kuo, Ming-Chung; Shih, Lee-Yung; Blau, Igor-Wolfgang; Blau, Olga; Yang, Henry; Ogawa, Seishi; Koeffler, H Phillip

    2015-11-26

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with an FLT3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) mutation is an aggressive hematologic malignancy with a grave prognosis. To identify the mutational spectrum associated with relapse, whole-exome sequencing was performed on 13 matched diagnosis, relapse, and remission trios followed by targeted sequencing of 299 genes in 67 FLT3-ITD patients. The FLT3-ITD genome has an average of 13 mutations per sample, similar to other AML subtypes, which is a low mutation rate compared with that in solid tumors. Recurrent mutations occur in genes related to DNA methylation, chromatin, histone methylation, myeloid transcription factors, signaling, adhesion, cohesin complex, and the spliceosome. Their pattern of mutual exclusivity and cooperation among mutated genes suggests that these genes have a strong biological relationship. In addition, we identified mutations in previously unappreciated genes such as MLL3, NSD1, FAT1, FAT4, and IDH3B. Mutations in 9 genes were observed in the relapse-specific phase. DNMT3A mutations are the most stable mutations, and this DNMT3A-transformed clone can be present even in morphologic complete remissions. Of note, all AML matched trio samples shared at least 1 genomic alteration at diagnosis and relapse, suggesting common ancestral clones. Two types of clonal evolution occur at relapse: either the founder clone recurs or a subclone of the founder clone escapes from induction chemotherapy and expands at relapse by acquiring new mutations. Relapse-specific mutations displayed an increase in transversions. Functional assays demonstrated that both MLL3 and FAT1 exert tumor-suppressor activity in the FLT3-ITD subtype. An inhibitor of XPO1 synergized with standard AML induction chemotherapy to inhibit FLT3-ITD growth. This study clearly shows that FLT3-ITD AML requires additional driver genetic alterations in addition to FLT3-ITD alone.

  7. Mutational analysis of yeast profilin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarer, B K; Petzold, A S; Brown, S S

    1993-12-01

    We have mutated two regions within the yeast profilin gene in an effort to functionally dissect the roles of actin and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) binding in profilin function. A series of truncations was carried out at the C terminus of profilin, a region that has been implicated in actin binding. Removal of the last three amino acids nearly eliminated the ability of profilin to bind polyproline in vitro but had no dramatic in vivo effects. Thus, the extreme C terminus is implicated in polyproline binding, but the physiological relevance of this interaction is called into question. More extensive truncation, of up to eight amino acids, had in vivo effects of increasing severity and resulted in changes in conformation and expression level of the mutant profilins. However, the ability of these mutants to bind actin in vitro was not eliminated, suggesting that this region cannot be solely responsible for actin binding. We also mutagenized a region of profilin that we hypothesized might be involved in PIP2 binding. Alteration of basic amino acids in this region produced mutant profilins that functioned well in vivo. Many of these mutants, however, were unable to suppress the loss of adenylate cyclase-associated protein (Cap/Srv2p [A. Vojtek, B. Haarer, J. Field, J. Gerst, T. D. Pollard, S. S. Brown, and M. Wigler, Cell 66:497-505, 1991]), indicating that a defect could be demonstrated in vivo. In vitro assays demonstrated that the inability to suppress loss of Cap/Srv2p correlated with a defect in the interaction with actin, independently of whether PIP2 binding was reduced. Since our earlier studies of Acanthamoeba profilins suggested the importance of PIP2 binding for suppression, we conclude that both activities are implicated and that an interplay between PIP2 binding and actin binding may be important for profilin function.

  8. Filaggrin mutations and the skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipankar De

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Filaggrin is very important in the terminal differentiation of the skin and the formation of cornified envelope in the stratum corneum. Several mutations in the filaggrin gene have been identified in the last decade, mostly from the European countries. Loss of function mutations in the filaggrin gene results in reduced production of filaggrin, depending on the type and site of mutation. Such mutations in the filaggrin gene have been shown to be the most significant genetic risk factor for development of atopic dermatitis and undoubtedly has a role in the pathogenesis of ichthyosis vulgaris. Though there is theoretical possibility of association with hand eczema and allergic contact dermatitis; in clinical studies, the strength of these associations was not significantly strong. In this review, we have discussed the structure and function of filaggrin, basic genetics, type of mutations in filaggrin gene, and association of such mutations with different dermatoses.

  9. Muller's ratchet with compensatory mutations

    CERN Document Server

    Pfaffelhuber, Peter; Wakolbinger, Anton

    2011-01-01

    We consider an infinite dimensional system of stochastic differential equations which describes the evolution of type frequencies in a large population. Random reproduction is modeled by a Wright-Fisher noise whose inverse diffusion coefficient $N$ corresponds to the total population size. The type of an individual is the number $k$ of deleterious mutations it carries. We assume that fitness of individuals carrying $k$ mutations is decreased by $\\alpha k$ for some $\\alpha >0$. Along the individual lines of descent, (new) mutations accumulate at rate $\\lambda$ per generation, and each of these mutations has a small probability $\\gamma$ per generation to disappear. While the case $\\gamma =0 $ is known as (the Fleming-Viot version of) {\\em Muller's ratchet}, the case $\\gamma > 0$ is referred to as that of {\\em compensatory mutations} in the biological literature. In the former case ($\\gamma=0$), an ever increasing number of mutations is accumulated over time, while in the latter ($\\gamma > 0$) this is prevented ...

  10. Filaggrin mutations and the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Dipankar; Handa, Sanjeev

    2012-01-01

    Filaggrin is very important in the terminal differentiation of the skin and the formation of cornified envelope in the stratum corneum. Several mutations in the filaggrin gene have been identified in the last decade, mostly from the European countries. Loss of function mutations in the filaggrin gene results in reduced production of filaggrin, depending on the type and site of mutation. Such mutations in the filaggrin gene have been shown to be the most significant genetic risk factor for development of atopic dermatitis and undoubtedly has a role in the pathogenesis of ichthyosis vulgaris. Though there is theoretical possibility of association with hand eczema and allergic contact dermatitis; in clinical studies, the strength of these associations was not significantly strong. In this review, we have discussed the structure and function of filaggrin, basic genetics, type of mutations in filaggrin gene, and association of such mutations with different dermatoses.

  11. Further insights into the allan-herndon-dudley syndrome: Clinical and functional characterization of a novel MCT8 mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Armour, C.M. (Christine M.); S. Kersseboom (Simone); Yoon, G. (Grace); T.J. Visser (Theo)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Mutations in the thyroid hormone (TH) transporter MCT8 have been identified as the cause for Allan-Herndon-Dudley Syndrome (AHDS), characterized by severe psychomotor retardation and altered TH serum levels. Here we report a novel MCT8 mutation identified in 4 generations of

  12. Prognostic value of IDH1 mutations identified with PCR-RFLP assay in acute myeloid leukemia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada M. Elsayed

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: IDH1 mutations are recurring genetic alterations in AML and they may have unfavorable impact on clinical outcome in adult AML. The PCR-RFLP method allows for a fast, inexpensive, and sensitive method for the detection of IDH1 mutations in AML.

  13. Modeling the Etiology of p53-mutated Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Ricardo E; Shen, Hong; Duan, Lei; Kim, Reuben H; Kim, Terresa; Park, No-Hee; Maki, Carl G

    2016-05-06

    p53 gene mutations are among the most common alterations in cancer. In most cases, missense mutations in one TP53 allele are followed by loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH), so tumors express only mutant p53. TP53 mutations and LOH have been linked, in many cases, with poor therapy response and worse outcome. Despite this, remarkably little is known about how TP53 point mutations are acquired, how LOH occurs, or the cells involved. Nutlin-3a occupies the p53-binding site in MDM2 and blocks p53-MDM2 interaction, resulting in the stabilization and activation of p53 and subsequent growth arrest or apoptosis. We leveraged the powerful growth inhibitory activity of Nutlin-3a to select p53-mutated cells and examined how TP53 mutations arise and how the remaining wild-type allele is lost or inactivated. Mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient colorectal cancer cells formed heterozygote (p53 wild-type/mutant) colonies when cultured in low doses of Nutlin-3a, whereas MMR-corrected counterparts did not. Placing these heterozygotes in higher Nutlin-3a doses selected clones in which the remaining wild-type TP53 was silenced. Our data suggest silencing occurred through a novel mechanism that does not involve DNA methylation, histone methylation, or histone deacetylation. These data indicate MMR deficiency in colorectal cancer can give rise to initiating TP53 mutations and that TP53 silencing occurs via a copy-neutral mechanism. Moreover, the data highlight the use of MDM2 antagonists as tools to study mechanisms of TP53 mutation acquisition and wild-type allele loss or silencing in cells with defined genetic backgrounds.

  14. Altered gut microbiota in Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strati, Francesco; Cavalieri, Duccio; Albanese, Davide; De Felice, Claudio; Donati, Claudio; Hayek, Joussef; Jousson, Olivier; Leoncini, Silvia; Pindo, Massimo; Renzi, Daniela; Rizzetto, Lisa; Stefanini, Irene; Calabrò, Antonio; De Filippo, Carlotta

    2016-07-30

    The human gut microbiota directly affects human health, and its alteration can lead to gastrointestinal abnormalities and inflammation. Rett syndrome (RTT), a progressive neurological disorder mainly caused by mutations in MeCP2 gene, is commonly associated with gastrointestinal dysfunctions and constipation, suggesting a link between RTT's gastrointestinal abnormalities and the gut microbiota. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bacterial and fungal gut microbiota in a cohort of RTT subjects integrating clinical, metabolomics and metagenomics data to understand if changes in the gut microbiota of RTT subjects could be associated with gastrointestinal abnormalities and inflammatory status. Our findings revealed the occurrence of an intestinal sub-inflammatory status in RTT subjects as measured by the elevated values of faecal calprotectin and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. We showed that, overall, RTT subjects harbour bacterial and fungal microbiota altered in terms of relative abundances from those of healthy controls, with a reduced microbial richness and dominated by microbial taxa belonging to Bifidobacterium, several Clostridia (among which Anaerostipes, Clostridium XIVa, Clostridium XIVb) as well as Erysipelotrichaceae, Actinomyces, Lactobacillus, Enterococcus, Eggerthella, Escherichia/Shigella and the fungal genus Candida. We further observed that alterations of the gut microbiota do not depend on the constipation status of RTT subjects and that this dysbiotic microbiota produced altered short chain fatty acids profiles. We demonstrated for the first time that RTT is associated with a dysbiosis of both the bacterial and fungal component of the gut microbiota, suggesting that impairments of MeCP2 functioning favour the establishment of a microbial community adapted to the costive gastrointestinal niche of RTT subjects. The altered production of short chain fatty acids associated with this microbiota might reinforce the constipation status of RTT

  15. Mutations induced in plant breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barriga B, P. (Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia. Inst. de Produccion y Sanidad Vegetal)

    1984-10-01

    The most significant aspects of the use of ionizing radiations in plant breeding are reviewed. Aspects such as basic principles of mutation, expression and selection in obtention of mutants, methods for using induced mutations and sucess achieved with this methodology in plant breeding are reviewed. Results obtained in a program of induced mutation on wheat for high content of protein and lysine at the Universidad Austral de Chile are presented.

  16. cDNA sequencing improves the detection of P53 missense mutations in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesionek-Kupnicka Dorota

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently published data showed discrepancies beteween P53 cDNA and DNA sequencing in glioblastomas. We hypothesised that similar discrepancies may be observed in other human cancers. Methods To this end, we analyzed 23 colorectal cancers for P53 mutations and gene expression using both DNA and cDNA sequencing, real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. Results We found P53 gene mutations in 16 cases (15 missense and 1 nonsense. Two of the 15 cases with missense mutations showed alterations based only on cDNA, and not DNA sequencing. Moreover, in 6 of the 15 cases with a cDNA mutation those mutations were difficult to detect in the DNA sequencing, so the results of DNA analysis alone could be misinterpreted if the cDNA sequencing results had not also been available. In all those 15 cases, we observed a higher ratio of the mutated to the wild type template by cDNA analysis, but not by the DNA analysis. Interestingly, a similar overexpression of P53 mRNA was present in samples with and without P53 mutations. Conclusion In terms of colorectal cancer, those discrepancies might be explained under three conditions: 1, overexpression of mutated P53 mRNA in cancer cells as compared with normal cells; 2, a higher content of cells without P53 mutation (normal cells and cells showing K-RAS and/or APC but not P53 mutation in samples presenting P53 mutation; 3, heterozygous or hemizygous mutations of P53 gene. Additionally, for heterozygous mutations unknown mechanism(s causing selective overproduction of mutated allele should also be considered. Our data offer new clues for studying discrepancy in P53 cDNA and DNA sequencing analysis.

  17. CDKN1C mutations: two sides of the same coin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggermann, Thomas; Binder, Gerhard; Brioude, Frédéric; Maher, Eamonn R; Lapunzina, Pablo; Cubellis, Maria Vittoria; Bergadá, Ignacio; Prawitt, Dirk; Begemann, Matthias

    2014-11-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)-inhibitor 1C (CDKN1C) negatively regulates cellular proliferation and it has been shown that loss-of-function mutations in the imprinted CDKN1C gene (11p15.5) are associated with the overgrowth disorder Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS). With recent reports of gain-of-function mutations of the PCNA domain of CDKN1C in growth-retarded patients with IMAGe syndrome or Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS), its key role for growth has been confirmed. Thereby, the last gap in the spectrum of molecular alterations in 11p15.5 in growth-retardation and overgrowth syndromes could be closed. Recent functional studies explain the strict association of CDKN1C mutations with clinically opposite phenotypes and thereby contribute to our understanding of the function and regulation of the gene in particular and epigenetic regulation in general.

  18. Mutations in PYCR1 cause cutis laxa with progeroid features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reversade, Bruno; Escande-Beillard, Nathalie; Dimopoulou, Aikaterini; Fischer, Björn; Chng, Serene C; Li, Yun; Shboul, Mohammad; Tham, Puay-Yoke; Kayserili, Hülya; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Shahwan, Monzer; Brancati, Francesco; Lee, Hane; O'Connor, Brian D; Schmidt-von Kegler, Mareen; Merriman, Barry; Nelson, Stanley F; Masri, Amira; Alkazaleh, Fawaz; Guerra, Deanna; Ferrari, Paola; Nanda, Arti; Rajab, Anna; Markie, David; Gray, Mary; Nelson, John; Grix, Arthur; Sommer, Annemarie; Savarirayan, Ravi; Janecke, Andreas R; Steichen, Elisabeth; Sillence, David; Hausser, Ingrid; Budde, Birgit; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Seemann, Petra; Kunkel, Désirée; Zambruno, Giovanna; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Schuelke, Markus; Robertson, Stephen; Hamamy, Hanan; Wollnik, Bernd; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Mundlos, Stefan; Kornak, Uwe

    2009-09-01

    Autosomal recessive cutis laxa (ARCL) describes a group of syndromal disorders that are often associated with a progeroid appearance, lax and wrinkled skin, osteopenia and mental retardation. Homozygosity mapping in several kindreds with ARCL identified a candidate region on chromosome 17q25. By high-throughput sequencing of the entire candidate region, we detected disease-causing mutations in the gene PYCR1. We found that the gene product, an enzyme involved in proline metabolism, localizes to mitochondria. Altered mitochondrial morphology, membrane potential and increased apoptosis rate upon oxidative stress were evident in fibroblasts from affected individuals. Knockdown of the orthologous genes in Xenopus and zebrafish led to epidermal hypoplasia and blistering that was accompanied by a massive increase of apoptosis. Our findings link mutations in PYCR1 to altered mitochondrial function and progeroid changes in connective tissues.

  19. Genome profiling of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia: frequent alterations of RAS and RUNX1 genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olschwang Sylviane

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML is a hematological disease close to, but separate from both myeloproliferative disorders (MPD and myelodysplastic syndromes and may show either myeloproliferative (MP-CMML or myelodysplastic (MD-CMML features. Not much is known about the molecular biology of this disease. Methods We studied a series of 30 CMML samples (13 MP- and 11 MD-CMMLs, and 6 acutely transformed cases from 29 patients by using Agilent high density array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH and sequencing of 12 candidate genes. Results Two-thirds of samples did not show any obvious alteration of aCGH profiles. In one-third we observed chromosome abnormalities (e.g. trisomy 8, del20q and gain or loss of genes (e.g. NF1, RB1 and CDK6. RAS mutations were detected in 4 cases (including an uncommon codon 146 mutation in KRAS and PTPN11 mutations in 3 cases. We detected 11 RUNX1 alterations (9 mutations and 2 rearrangements. The rearrangements were a new, cryptic inversion of chromosomal region 21q21-22 leading to break and fusion of RUNX1 to USP16. RAS and RUNX1 alterations were not mutually exclusive. RAS pathway mutations occurred in MP-CMMLs (~46% but not in MD-CMMLs. RUNX1 alterations (mutations and cryptic rearrangement occurred in both MP and MD classes (~38%. Conclusion We detected RAS pathway mutations and RUNX1 alterations. The latter included a new cryptic USP16-RUNX1 fusion. In some samples, two alterations coexisted already at this early chronic stage.

  20. Suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 gene mutation status as a prognostic biomarker in classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennerz, Jochen K; Hoffmann, Karl; Bubolz, Anna-Maria; Lessel, Davor; Welke, Claudia; Rüther, Nele; Viardot, Andreas; Möller, Peter

    2015-10-06

    Suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) mutations are among the most frequent somatic mutations in classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL), yet their prognostic relevance in cHL is unexplored. Here, we performed laser-capture microdissection of Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells from tumor samples in a cohort of 105 cHL patients. Full-length SOCS1 gene sequencing showed mutations in 61% of all cases (n = 64/105). Affected DNA-motifs and mutation pattern suggest that many of these SOCS1 mutations are the result of aberrant somatic hypermutation and we confirmed expression of mutant alleles at the RNA level. Contingency analysis showed no significant differences of patient-characteristics with HRS-cells containing mutant vs. wild-type SOCS1. By predicted mutational consequence, mutations can be separated into those with non-truncating point mutations ('minor' n = 49/64 = 77%) and those with length alteration ('major'; n = 15/64 = 23%). Subgroups did not differ in clinicopathological characteristics; however, patients with HRS-cells that contained SOCS1 major mutations suffered from early relapse and significantly shorter overall survival (P = 0.03). The SOCS1 major status retained prognostic significance in uni-(P = 0.016) and multivariate analyses (P = 0.005). Together, our data indicate that the SOCS1 mutation type qualifies as a single-gene prognostic biomarker in cHL.

  1. Tyrosine kinase domain mutations of EGFR gene in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatte, Chittibabu; Al Amri, Ali M; Cyrus, Cyril; Chathoth, Shahanas; Acharya, Sadananda; Hashim, Tariq Mohammad; Al Ali, Zhara; Alshreadah, Saleh Tawfeeq; Alsayyah, Ahmed; Al-Ali, Amein K

    2017-01-01

    Background Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a commonly altered gene that is identified in various cancers, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Therefore, EGFR is a promising molecular marker targeted by monoclonal antibodies and small molecule inhibitors targeting the tyrosine kinase (TK) domain. Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the spectrum of mutations in exons 18, 19, 20, and 21 of the EGFR gene in HNSCC patients. Materials and methods This retrospective study included 47 confirmed HNSCC cases. Mutations in the TK domain, exons 18, 19, 20, and 21 of the EGFR gene, were detected by Scorpion® chemistry and ARMS® technologies on Rotor-Gene Q real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results The tumors exhibited EGFR-TK domain mutations in 57% of cases. Four cases of T790M mutations were reported for the first time among HNSCC patients. Out of the total mutations, L861Q (exon 21), exon 20 insertions and deletions of exon 19 accounted for the majority of mutations (21%, 19%, and 17%, respectively). EGFR mutation status was correlated with the higher grade (P=0.026) and advanced stage (P=0.034) of HNSCC tumors. Conclusion Higher frequency of EGFR-TK domain mutations together with the presence of the T790M mutation suggests that identification of these mutations might streamline the therapy and provide a better prognosis in HNSCC cases. PMID:28352186

  2. Mutations in the NHEJ component XRCC4 cause primordial dwarfism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jennie E; van der Burg, Mirjam; IJspeert, Hanna; Carroll, Paula; Wu, Qian; Ochi, Takashi; Leitch, Andrea; Miller, Edward S; Kysela, Boris; Jawad, Alireza; Bottani, Armand; Brancati, Francesco; Cappa, Marco; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Deshpande, Charu; Faqeih, Eissa A; Graham, Gail E; Ranza, Emmanuelle; Blundell, Tom L; Jackson, Andrew P; Stewart, Grant S; Bicknell, Louise S

    2015-03-05

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is a key cellular process ensuring genome integrity. Mutations in several components of the NHEJ pathway have been identified, often associated with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), consistent with the requirement for NHEJ during V(D)J recombination to ensure diversity of the adaptive immune system. In contrast, we have recently found that biallelic mutations in LIG4 are a common cause of microcephalic primordial dwarfism (MPD), a phenotype characterized by prenatal-onset extreme global growth failure. Here we provide definitive molecular genetic evidence supported by biochemical, cellular, and immunological data for mutations in XRCC4, encoding the obligate binding partner of LIG4, causing MPD. We report the identification of biallelic mutations in XRCC4 in five families. Biochemical and cellular studies demonstrate that these alterations substantially decrease XRCC4 protein levels leading to reduced cellular ligase IV activity. Consequently, NHEJ-dependent repair of ionizing-radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks is compromised in XRCC4 cells. Similarly, immunoglobulin junctional diversification is impaired in cells. However, immunoglobulin levels are normal, and individuals lack overt signs of immunodeficiency. Additionally, in contrast to individuals with LIG4 mutations, pancytopenia leading to bone marrow failure has not been observed. Hence, alterations that alter different NHEJ proteins give rise to a phenotypic spectrum, from SCID to extreme growth failure, with deficiencies in certain key components of this repair pathway predominantly exhibiting growth deficits, reflecting differential developmental requirements for NHEJ proteins to support growth and immune maturation. Copyright © 2015 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Insight on Mutation-Induced Resistance from Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Native and Mutated CSF-1R and KIT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva Figueiredo Celestino Gomes, Priscila; Chauvot De Beauchêne, Isaure; Panel, Nicolas; Lopez, Sophie; De Sepulveda, Paulo; Geraldo Pascutti, Pedro; Solary, Eric; Tchertanov, Luba

    2016-01-01

    The receptors tyrosine kinases (RTKs) for the colony stimulating factor-1, CSF-1R, and for the stem cell factor, SCFR or KIT, are important mediators of signal transduction. The abnormal function of these receptors, promoted by gain-of-function mutations, leads to their constitutive activation, associated with cancer or other proliferative diseases. A secondary effect of the mutations is the alteration of receptors’ sensitivity to tyrosine kinase inhibitors, compromising effectiveness of these molecules in clinical treatment. In particular, the mutation V560G in KIT increases its sensitivity to Imatinib, while the D816V in KIT, and D802V in CSF-1R, triggers resistance to the drug. We analyzed the Imatinib binding affinity to the native and mutated KIT (mutations V560G, S628N and D816V) and CSF-1R (mutation D802V) by using molecular dynamics simulations and energy calculations of Imatinib•target complexes. Further, we evaluated the sensitivity of the studied KIT receptors to Imatinib by measuring the inhibition of KIT phosphorylation. Our study showed that (i) the binding free energy of Imatinib to the targets is highly correlated with their experimentally measured sensitivity; (ii) the electrostatic interactions are a decisive factor affecting the binding energy; (iii) the most deleterious impact to the Imatinib sensitivity is promoted by D802V (CSF-1R) and D816V (KIT) mutations; (iv) the role of the juxtamembrane region, JMR, in the imatinib binding is accessory. These findings contribute to a better description of the mutation-induced effects alternating the targets sensitivity to Imatinib. PMID:27467080

  4. Whole genome analysis of linezolid resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae reveals resistance and compensatory mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Légaré Danielle

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several mutations were present in the genome of Streptococcus pneumoniae linezolid-resistant strains but the role of several of these mutations had not been experimentally tested. To analyze the role of these mutations, we reconstituted resistance by serial whole genome transformation of a novel resistant isolate into two strains with sensitive background. We sequenced the parent mutant and two independent transformants exhibiting similar minimum inhibitory concentration to linezolid. Results Comparative genomic analyses revealed that transformants acquired G2576T transversions in every gene copy of 23S rRNA and that the number of altered copies correlated with the level of linezolid resistance and cross-resistance to florfenicol and chloramphenicol. One of the transformants also acquired a mutation present in the parent mutant leading to the overexpression of an ABC transporter (spr1021. The acquisition of these mutations conferred a fitness cost however, which was further enhanced by the acquisition of a mutation in a RNA methyltransferase implicated in resistance. Interestingly, the fitness of the transformants could be restored in part by the acquisition of altered copies of the L3 and L16 ribosomal proteins and by mutations leading to the overexpression of the spr1887 ABC transporter that were present in the original linezolid-resistant mutant. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the usefulness of whole genome approaches at detecting major determinants of resistance as well as compensatory mutations that alleviate the fitness cost associated with resistance.

  5. Concurrent mutation in exons 1 and 2 of the K-ras oncogene in colorectal cancer

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    Fiorella Guadagni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The K-ras gene is frequently mutated in colorectal cancer and has been associated with tumor initiation and progression; approximately 90% of the activating mutations are found in codons 12 and 13 of exon 1 and just under 5% in codon 61 located in exon 2. These mutations determine single aminoacidic substitutions in the GTPase pocket leading to a block of the GTP hydrolytic activity of the K-ras p21 protein, and therefore to its constitutive activation. Point mutations in sites of the K-ras gene, other than codons 12, 13 and 61, and other types of genetic alterations, may occur in a minority of cases, such as in the less frequent cases of double mutations in the K-ras gene. However, all mutations in this gene, even those which occur in non-canonical sites or double mutations, are relevant oncogenic alterations in colorectal cancer and may underlie K-ras pathway hyperactivation. In the present study, we report the case of a patient with colorectal cancer presenting a concurrent point mutation in exons 1 and 2 of the K-ras gene, a GGT to TGT substitution (Glycine to Cysteine at codon 12, and a GAC to AAC substitution (Aspartic Acid to Asparagine at codon 57. In addition, we found in the same patient’s sample a silent polymorphism at codon 11 (Ala11Ala of exon 1. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011; Vol. 49, No. 4, pp. 729–733

  6. Concurrent mutation in exons 1 and 2 of the K-ras oncogene in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmirotta, Raffaele; Savonarola, Annalisa; Ludovici, Giorgia; De Marchis, Maria Laura; Covello, Renato; Ettorre, Giuseppe Maria; Ialongo, Cristiano; Guadagni, Fiorella

    2011-01-01

    The K-ras gene is frequently mutated in colorectal cancer and has been associated with tumor initiation and progression; approximately 90% of the activating mutations are found in codons 12 and 13 of exon 1 and just under 5% in codon 61 located in exon 2. These mutations determine single aminoacidic substitutions in the GTPase pocket leading to a block of the GTP hydrolytic activity of the K-ras p21 protein, and therefore to its constitutive activation. Point mutations in sites of the K-ras gene, other than codons 12, 13 and 61, and other types of genetic alterations, may occur in a minority of cases, such as in the less frequent cases of double mutations in the K-ras gene. However, all mutations in this gene, even those which occur in non-canonical sites or double mutations, are relevant oncogenic alterations in colorectal cancer and may underlie K-ras pathway hyperactivation. In the present study, we report the case of a patient with colorectal cancer presenting a concurrent point mutation in exons 1 and 2 of the K-ras gene, a GGT to TGT substitution (Glycine to Cysteine) at codon 12, and a GAC to AAC substitution (Aspartic Acid to Asparagine) at codon 57. In addition, we found in the same patient's sample a silent polymorphism at codon 11 (Ala11Ala) of exon 1.

  7. Novel BRAF Alteration in a Sporadic Pilocytic Astrocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonika Dahiya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pilocytic astrocytoma (PA is the most frequently encountered glial tumor (glioma or astrocytoma in children. Recent studies have identified alterations in the BRAF serine/threonine kinase gene as the likely causative mutation in these childhood brain tumors. The majority of these genetic changes involve chromosome 7q34 tandem duplication, resulting in aberrant BRAF fusion transcripts. In this paper, we describe a novel KIAA1549:BRAF fusion transcript in a sporadic PA tumor associated with increased ERK activation and review the spectrum of BRAF genetic alterations in this common pediatric low-grade central nervous system neoplasm.

  8. Rescue of mutated cardiac ion channels in inherited arrhythmia syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balijepalli, Sadguna Y; Anderson, Corey L; Lin, Eric C; January, Craig T

    2010-08-01

    Inherited arrhythmia syndromes comprise an increasingly complex group of diseases involving mutations in multiple genes encoding ion channels, ion channel accessory subunits and channel interacting proteins, and various regulatory elements. These mutations serve to disrupt normal electrophysiology in the heart, leading to increased arrhythmogenic risk and death. These diseases have added impact as they often affect young people, sometimes without warning. Although originally thought to alter ion channel function, it is now increasingly recognized that mutations may alter ion channel protein and messenger RNA processing, to reduce the number of channels reaching the surface membrane. For many of these mutations, it is also known that several interventions may restore protein processing of mutant channels to increase their surface membrane expression toward normal. In this article, we reviewed inherited arrhythmia syndromes, focusing on long QT syndrome type 2, and discuss the complex biology of ion channel trafficking and pharmacological rescue of disease-causing mutant channels. Pharmacological rescue of misprocessed mutant channel proteins, or their transcripts providing appropriate small molecule drugs can be developed, has the potential for novel clinical therapies in some patients with inherited arrhythmia syndromes.

  9. Sequence analysis of mutations and translocations across breast cancer subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerji, Shantanu; Cibulskis, Kristian; Rangel-Escareno, Claudia; Brown, Kristin K.; Carter, Scott L.; Frederick, Abbie M.; Lawrence, Michael S.; Sivachenko, Andrey Y.; Sougnez, Carrie; Zou, Lihua; Cortes, Maria L.; Fernandez-Lopez, Juan C.; Peng, Shouyong; Ardlie, Kristin G.; Auclair, Daniel; Bautista-Piña, Veronica; Duke, Fujiko; Francis, Joshua; Jung, Joonil; Maffuz-Aziz, Antonio; Onofrio, Robert C.; Parkin, Melissa; Pho, Nam H.; Quintanar-Jurado, Valeria; Ramos, Alex H.; Rebollar-Vega, Rosa; Rodriguez-Cuevas, Sergio; Romero-Cordoba, Sandra L.; Schumacher, Steven E.; Stransky, Nicolas; Thompson, Kristin M.; Uribe-Figueroa, Laura; Baselga, Jose; Beroukhim, Rameen; Polyak, Kornelia; Sgroi, Dennis C.; Richardson, Andrea L.; Jimenez-Sanchez, Gerardo; Lander, Eric S.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Garraway, Levi A.; Golub, Todd R.; Melendez-Zajgla, Jorge; Toker, Alex; Getz, Gad; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Meyerson, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Breast carcinoma is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in women worldwide with an estimated 1.38 million new cases and 458,000 deaths in 2008 alone1. This malignancy represents a heterogeneous group of tumours with characteristic molecular features, prognosis, and responses to available therapy2–4. Recurrent somatic alterations in breast cancer have been described including mutations and copy number alterations, notably ERBB2 amplifications, the first successful therapy target defined by a genomic aberration5. Prior DNA sequencing studies of breast cancer genomes have revealed additional candidate mutations and gene rearrangements 6–10. Here we report the whole-exome sequences of DNA from 103 human breast cancers of diverse subtypes from patients in Mexico and Vietnam compared to matched-normal DNA, together with whole-genome sequences of 22 breast cancer/normal pairs. Beyond confirming recurrent somatic mutations in PIK3CA11, TP536, AKT112, GATA313, and MAP3K110, we discovered recurrent mutations in the CBFB transcription factor gene and deletions of its partner RUNX1. Furthermore, we have identified a recurrent MAGI3-AKT3 fusion enriched in triple-negative breast cancer lacking estrogen and progesterone receptors and ERBB2 expression. The Magi3-Akt3 fusion leads to constitutive activation of Akt kinase, which is abolished by treatment with an ATP-competitive Akt small-molecule inhibitor. PMID:22722202

  10. E2F1 somatic mutation within miRNA target site impairs gene regulation in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-Ramos, Camila M; Barros, Bruna P; Koyama, Fernanda C; Carpinetti, Paola A; Pezuk, Julia; Doimo, Nayara T S; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Perez, Rodrigo O; Parmigiani, Raphael B

    2017-01-01

    Genetic studies have largely concentrated on the impact of somatic mutations found in coding regions, and have neglected mutations outside of these. However, 3' untranslated regions (3' UTR) mutations can also disrupt or create miRNA target sites, and trigger oncogene activation or tumor suppressor inactivation. We used next-generation sequencing to widely screen for genetic alterations within predicted miRNA target sites of oncogenes associated with colorectal cancer, and evaluated the functional impact of a new somatic mutation. Target sequencing of 47 genes was performed for 29 primary colorectal tumor samples. For 71 independent samples, Sanger methodology was used to screen for E2F1 mutations in miRNA predicted target sites, and the functional impact of these mutations was evaluated by luciferase reporter assays. We identified germline and somatic alterations in E2F1. Of the 100 samples evaluated, 3 had germline alterations at the MIR205-5p target site, while one had a somatic mutation at MIR136-5p target site. E2F1 gene expression was similar between normal and tumor tissues bearing the germline alteration; however, expression was increased 4-fold in tumor tissue that harbored a somatic mutation compared to that in normal tissue. Luciferase reporter assays revealed both germline and somatic alterations increased E2F1 activity relative to wild-type E2F1. We demonstrated that somatic mutation within E2F1:MIR136-5p target site impairs miRNA-mediated regulation and leads to increased gene activity. We conclude that somatic mutations that disrupt miRNA target sites have the potential to impact gene regulation, highlighting an important mechanism of oncogene activation.

  11. Ressourcenorientierte Diagnostik im Alter

    OpenAIRE

    Forstmeier, Simon; Maercker, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Trotz der im Alter zunehmenden körperlichen, kognitiven und sozialen Verlusten bleibt das subjektive Wohlbefinden relativ stabil. Dies weist auf die vielen Ressourcen älterer Menschen hin. Dieser Artikel stellt für die klinische Ressourcendiagnostik relevante Verfahren vor und erläutert die zugrunde liegenden Konzepte. Berücksichtigt werden Aktivitäten und Erlebnisse als Ressourcen, emotionale Ressourcen (positiver Affekt, Lebenszufriedenheit, Selbstwerterleben, Lebensqualität), motivationale...

  12. MPL mutations in myeloproliferative disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beer, Philip A.; Campbell, Peter J.; Scott, Linda M.

    2008-01-01

    Activating mutations of MPL exon 10 have been described in a minority of patients with idiopathic myelofibrosis (IMF) or essential thrombocythemia (ET), but their prevalence and clinical significance are unclear. Here we demonstrate that MPL mutations outside exon 10 are uncommon in platelet cDNA...

  13. Genetic alterations in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagai M.A.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The genetic alterations observed in head and neck cancer are mainly due to oncogene activation (gain of function mutations and tumor suppressor gene inactivation (loss of function mutations, leading to deregulation of cell proliferation and death. These genetic alterations include gene amplification and overexpression of oncogenes such as myc, erbB-2, EGFR and cyclinD1 and mutations, deletions and hypermethylation leading to p16 and TP53 tumor suppressor gene inactivation. In addition, loss of heterozygosity in several chromosomal regions is frequently observed, suggesting that other tumor suppressor genes not yet identified could be involved in the tumorigenic process of head and neck cancers. The exact temporal sequence of the genetic alterations during head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC development and progression has not yet been defined and their diagnostic or prognostic significance is controversial. Advances in the understanding of the molecular basis of head and neck cancer should help in the identification of new markers that could be used for the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of the disease.

  14. TERT promoter mutation status as an independent prognostic factor in cutaneous melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griewank, Klaus G; Murali, Rajmohan; Puig-Butille, Joan Anton; Schilling, Bastian; Livingstone, Elisabeth; Potrony, Miriam; Carrera, Cristina; Schimming, Tobias; Möller, Inga; Schwamborn, Marion; Sucker, Antje; Hillen, Uwe; Badenas, Celia; Malvehy, Josep; Zimmer, Lisa; Scherag, André; Puig, Susana; Schadendorf, Dirk

    2014-09-01

    Recently, TERT promoter mutations were identified at high frequencies in cutaneous melanoma tumor samples and cell lines. The mutations were found to have a UV-signature and to lead to increased TERT gene expression. We analyzed a large cohort of melanoma patients for the presence and distribution of TERT promoter mutations and their association with clinico-pathological characteristics. 410 melanoma tumor samples were analyzed by Sanger sequencing for the presence of TERT promoter mutations. An analysis of associations between mutation status and various clinical and pathologic variables was performed. TERT promoter mutations were identified in 154 (43%) of 362 successfully sequenced melanomas. Mutation frequencies varied between melanoma subtype, being most frequent in melanomas arising in nonacral skin (48%) and melanomas with occult primary (50%), and less frequent in mucosal (23%), and acral (19%) melanomas. Mutations carried a UV signature (C>T or CC>TT). The presence of TERT promoter mutations was associated with factors such as BRAF or NRAS mutation (P promoter mutation was independently associated with poorer overall survival in patients with nonacral cutaneous melanomas (median survival 80 months vs 291 months for wild-type; hazard ratio corrected for other covariates 2.47; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.29 to 4.74; P = .006). UV-induced TERT promoter mutations are one of the most frequent genetic alterations in melanoma, with frequencies varying depending on melanoma subtype. In nonacral cutaneous melanomas, presence of TERT promoter mutations is independently associated with poor prognosis. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Identification of High-Impact cis-Regulatory Mutations Using Transcription Factor Specific Random Forest Models.

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    Dmitry Svetlichnyy

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer genomes contain vast amounts of somatic mutations, many of which are passenger mutations not involved in oncogenesis. Whereas driver mutations in protein-coding genes can be distinguished from passenger mutations based on their recurrence, non-coding mutations are usually not recurrent at the same position. Therefore, it is still unclear how to identify cis-regulatory driver mutations, particularly when chromatin data from the same patient is not available, thus relying only on sequence and expression information. Here we use machine-learning methods to predict functional regulatory regions using sequence information alone, and compare the predicted activity of the mutated region with the reference sequence. This way we define the Predicted Regulatory Impact of a Mutation in an Enhancer (PRIME. We find that the recently identified driver mutation in the TAL1 enhancer has a high PRIME score, representing a "gain-of-target" for MYB, whereas the highly recurrent TERT promoter mutation has a surprisingly low PRIME score. We trained Random Forest models for 45 cancer-related transcription factors, and used these to score variations in the HeLa genome and somatic mutations across more than five hundred cancer genomes. Each model predicts only a small fraction of non-coding mutations with a potential impact on the function of the encompassing regulatory region. Nevertheless, as these few candidate driver mutations are often linked to gains in chromatin activity and gene expression, they may contribute to the oncogenic program by altering the expression levels of specific oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes.

  16. Functional Characterization of ABCB4 Mutations Found in Low Phospholipid-Associated Cholelithiasis (LPAC)

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Tae Hee; Park, Hyo Jin; Choi, Ji Ha

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistance 3 (MDR3) is expressed on the canalicular membrane of the hepatocytes and plays an important role in protecting the liver from bile acids. Altered ABCB4 gene expression can lead to a rare hepatic disease, low phospholipid-associated cholelithiasis (LPAC). In this study, we characterized 3 ABCB4 mutations in LPAC patients using various in vitro assay systems. We first measured the ability of each mutant to transport paclitaxel and then the mechanisms by which these mutation...

  17. Direct Transcriptional Consequences of Somatic Mutation in Breast Cancer

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    Adam Shlien

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Disordered transcriptomes of cancer encompass direct effects of somatic mutation on transcription, coordinated secondary pathway alterations, and increased transcriptional noise. To catalog the rules governing how somatic mutation exerts direct transcriptional effects, we developed an exhaustive pipeline for analyzing RNA sequencing data, which we integrated with whole genomes from 23 breast cancers. Using X-inactivation analyses, we found that cancer cells are more transcriptionally active than intermixed stromal cells. This is especially true in estrogen receptor (ER-negative tumors. Overall, 59% of substitutions were expressed. Nonsense mutations showed lower expression levels than expected, with patterns characteristic of nonsense-mediated decay. 14% of 4,234 rearrangements caused transcriptional abnormalities, including exon skips, exon reusage, fusions, and premature polyadenylation. We found productive, stable transcription from sense-to-antisense gene fusions and gene-to-intergenic rearrangements, suggesting that these mutation classes drive more transcriptional disruption than previously suspected. Systematic integration of transcriptome with genome data reveals the rules by which transcriptional machinery interprets somatic mutation.

  18. Gene mutation-based and specific therapies in precision medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiangdong

    2016-04-01

    Precision medicine has been initiated and gains more and more attention from preclinical and clinical scientists. A number of key elements or critical parts in precision medicine have been described and emphasized to establish a systems understanding of precision medicine. The principle of precision medicine is to treat patients on the basis of genetic alterations after gene mutations are identified, although questions and challenges still remain before clinical application. Therapeutic strategies of precision medicine should be considered according to gene mutation, after biological and functional mechanisms of mutated gene expression or epigenetics, or the correspondent protein, are clearly validated. It is time to explore and develop a strategy to target and correct mutated genes by direct elimination, restoration, correction or repair of mutated sequences/genes. Nevertheless, there are still numerous challenges to integrating widespread genomic testing into individual cancer therapies and into decision making for one or another treatment. There are wide-ranging and complex issues to be solved before precision medicine becomes clinical reality. Thus, the precision medicine can be considered as an extension and part of clinical and translational medicine, a new alternative of clinical therapies and strategies, and have an important impact on disease cures and patient prognoses.

  19. Absence of pathogenic mitochondrial DNA mutations in mouse brain tumors

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    Seyfried Thomas N

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Somatic mutations in the mitochondrial genome occur in numerous tumor types including brain tumors. These mutations are generally found in the hypervariable regions I and II of the displacement loop and unlikely alter mitochondrial function. Two hypervariable regions of mononucleotide repeats occur in the mouse mitochondrial genome, i.e., the origin of replication of the light strand (OL and the Arg tRNA. Methods In this study we examined the entire mitochondrial genome in a series of chemically induced brain tumors in the C57BL/6J strain and spontaneous brain tumors in the VM mouse strain. The tumor mtDNA was compared to that of mtDNA in brain mitochondrial populations from the corresponding syngeneic mouse host strain. Results Direct sequencing revealed a few homoplasmic base pair insertions, deletions, and substitutions in the tumor cells mainly in regions of mononucleotide repeats. A heteroplasmic mutation in the 16srRNA gene was detected in a spontaneous metastatic VM brain tumor. Conclusion None of the mutations were considered pathogenic, indicating that mtDNA somatic mutations do not likely contribute to the initiation or progression of these diverse mouse brain tumors.

  20. Low clinical penetrance in causal mutation carriers for cardiac channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Jáimez, Juan; Álvarez, Miguel; Algarra, María; Macías Ruíz, Rosa; Peñas, Rocío; Valverde, Francisca; Tortajada, Gustavo; Lorente, Jose Antonio; Melgares, Rafael; Tercedor, Luis

    2013-04-01

    Cardiac channelopathies are genetic alterations that can cause sudden death. Long QT syndrome and Brugada syndrome are 2 such conditions. Both are diagnosed according to previously published criteria. Our objective was to determine the sensitivity of these criteria in a consecutive series of patients carrying the mutations that cause them. We enrolled 15 families and 31 causal mutation carriers with a high pathogenic probability of having long QT syndrome and Brugada syndrome. We conducted clinical and electrocardiographic studies to analyze the extent to which these patients fulfilled the diagnostic criteria. Statistical analysis was with SPSS 17.0. Some 48.3% of the subjects met the criteria indicating a high probability of long QT syndrome or Brugada syndrome. Among those with the mutation for long QT syndrome, only 10 out of 21 had a Schwartz index score ≥ 4. Both the median Schwartz score and the cQT interval were lower in relatives than in probands. Of those with the mutation for Brugada syndrome, 60% failed to meet current diagnostic criteria, which were more frequently fulfilled in relatives. Pharmacological tests with epinephrine and flecainide helped establish the diagnosis in 2 mutation carriers with negative phenotype. Current diagnostic criteria for long QT syndrome and Brugada syndrome had low sensitivity in our sample of genetic carriers. Genetic tests supported by pharmacological tests can increase diagnostic sensitivity, especially in asymptomatic relatives. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Epigenetic Alterations in Colorectal Cancer: Emerging Biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Grady, William M; Goel, Ajay

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. One of the fundamental processes driving the initiation and progression of CRC is the accumulation of a variety of genetic and epigenetic changes in colonic epithelial cells. Over the past decade, major advances have been made in our understanding of cancer epigenetics, particularly regarding aberrant DNA methylation, microRNA (miRNA) and noncoding RNA deregulation, and alterations in histone modification states. Assessment of the colon cancer "epigenome" has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and altered miRNA expression. The average CRC methylome has hundreds to thousands of abnormally methylated genes and dozens of altered miRNAs. As with gene mutations in the cancer genome, a subset of these epigenetic alterations, called driver events, are presumed to have a functional role in CRC. In addition, the advances in our understanding of epigenetic alterations in CRC have led to these alterations being developed as clinical biomarkers for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic applications. Progress in this field suggests that these epigenetic alterations will be commonly used in the near future to direct the prevention and treatment of CRC.

  2. Molecular variants and mutations in medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schroeder K

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Kristin Schroeder, Sri GururanganPediatric Clinical Services, Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center at Duke, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USAAbstract: Medulloblastoma is the commonest malignant brain tumor in children. Treatment with surgery, irradiation, and chemotherapy has improved outcomes in recent years, but patients are frequently left with devastating neurocognitive and other sequelae following such therapy. While the prognosis has traditionally been based on conventional histopathology and clinical staging (based on age, extent of resection, and presence or absence of metastasis, it has become apparent in recent years that the inherent biology of the tumor plays a significant part in predicting survival and sometimes supersedes clinical or pathologic risk factors. The advent of deep sequencing gene technology has provided invaluable clues to the molecular makeup of this tumor and allowed neuro-oncologists to understand that medulloblastoma is an amalgamation of several distinct disease entities with unique clinical associations and behavior. This review is a concise summary of the pathology, genetic syndromes, recent advances in molecular subgrouping, and the associated gene mutations and copy number variations in medulloblastoma. The association of molecular alterations with patient prognosis is also discussed, but it should be remembered that further validation is required in prospective clinical trials utilizing uniform treatment approaches.Keywords: medulloblastoma, children, adults, molecular subgroups, mutations

  3. Disease causing mutations of calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzon, Nancy M; Beam, Kurt G

    2008-01-01

    Calcium ions play an important role in the electrical excitability of nerve and muscle, as well as serving as a critical second messenger for diverse cellular functions. As a result, mutations of genes encoding calcium channels may have subtle affects on channel function yet strongly perturb cellular behavior. This review discusses the effects of calcium channel mutations on channel function, the pathological consequences for cellular physiology, and possible links between altered channel function and disease. Many cellular functions are directly or indirectly regulated by the free cytosolic calcium concentration. Thus, calcium levels must be very tightly regulated in time and space. Intracellular calcium ions are essential second messengers and play a role in many functions including, action potential generation, neurotransmitter and hormone release, muscle contraction, neurite outgrowth, synaptogenesis, calcium-dependent gene expression, synaptic plasticity and cell death. Calcium ions that control cell activity can be supplied to the cell cytosol from two major sources: the extracellular space or intracellular stores. Voltage-gated and ligand-gated channels are the primary way in which Ca(2+) ions enter from the extracellular space. The sarcoplasm reticulum (SR) in muscle and the endoplasmic reticulum in non-muscle cells are the main intracellular Ca(2+) stores: the ryanodine receptor (RyR) and inositol-triphosphate receptor channels are the major contributors of calcium release from internal stores.

  4. Clonal architectures and driver mutations in metastatic melanomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ding

    Full Text Available To reveal the clonal architecture of melanoma and associated driver mutations, whole genome sequencing (WGS and targeted extension sequencing were used to characterize 124 melanoma cases. Significantly mutated gene analysis using 13 WGS cases and 15 additional paired extension cases identified known melanoma genes such as BRAF, NRAS, and CDKN2A, as well as a novel gene EPHA3, previously implicated in other cancer types. Extension studies using tumors from another 96 patients discovered a large number of truncation mutations in tumor suppressors (TP53 and RB1, protein phosphatases (e.g., PTEN, PTPRB, PTPRD, and PTPRT, as well as chromatin remodeling genes (e.g., ASXL3, MLL2, and ARID2. Deep sequencing of mutations revealed subclones in the majority of metastatic tumors from 13 WGS cases. Validated mutations from 12 out of 13 WGS patients exhibited a predominant UV signature characterized by a high frequency of C->T transitions occurring at the 3' base of dipyrimidine sequences while one patient (MEL9 with a hypermutator phenotype lacked this signature. Strikingly, a subclonal mutation signature analysis revealed that the founding clone in MEL9 exhibited UV signature but the secondary clone did not, suggesting different mutational mechanisms for two clonal populations from the same tumor. Further analysis of four metastases from different geographic locations in 2 melanoma cases revealed phylogenetic relationships and highlighted the genetic alterations responsible for differential drug resistance among metastatic tumors. Our study suggests that clonal evaluation is crucial for understanding tumor etiology and drug resistance in melanoma.

  5. A novel silent deletion, an insertion mutation and a nonsense mutation in the TCOF1 gene found in two Chinese cases of Treacher Collins syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Yin, Xiao-Juan; Han, Tao; Peng, Wei; Wu, Hong-Lin; Liu, Xin; Feng, Zhi-Chun

    2014-12-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is the most common and well-known craniofacial disorder caused by mutations in the genes involved in pre-rRNA transcription, which include the TCOF1 gene. This study explored the role of TCOF1 mutations in Chinese patients with TCS. Mutational analysis of the TCOF1 gene was performed in three patients using polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing. Among these three patients, two additional TCOF1 variations, a novel 18 bp deletion and a novel 1 bp insertion mutation, were found in patient 1, together with a novel nonsense mutation (p.Ser476X) and a previously reported 4 bp deletion (c.1872_1875delTGAG) in other patients. Pedigree analysis allowed for prediction of the character of the mutation, which was either pathological or not. The 18 bp deletion of six amino acids, Ser-Asp-Ser-Glu-Glu-Glu (798*803), which was located in the CKII phosphorylation site of treacle, seemed relatively benign for TCS. By contrast, another novel mutation of c.1072_1073insC (p.Gln358ProfsX23) was a frameshift mutation and expected to result in a premature stop codon. This study provides insights into the functional domain of treacle and illustrates the importance of clinical and family TCS screening for the interpretation of novel sequence alterations.

  6. Mutational meltdown in laboratory yeast populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeyl, C.; Mizesko, M.; Visser, de J.A.G.M.

    2001-01-01

    In small or repeatedly bottlenecked populations, mutations are expected to accumulate by genetic drift, causing fitness declines. In mutational meltdown models, such fitness declines further reduce population size, thus accelerating additional mutation accumulation and leading to extinction. Because

  7. [Molecular alterations in melanoma and targeted therapies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourah, Samia; Lebbé, Céleste

    2014-12-01

    Melanoma is a skin cancer whose incidence is increasing steadily. The recent discovery of frequent and recurrent genetic alterations in cutaneous melanoma allowed a molecular classification of tumors into distinct subgroups, and paved the way for targeted therapy. Several signaling pathways are involved in the progression of this disease with oncogenic mutations affecting signaling pathways: MAPK, PI3K, cAMP and cyclin D1/CDK4. In each of these pathways, several potential therapeutic targets have been identified and specific inhibitors have already been developed and have shown clinical efficacy. The use of these inhibitors is often conditioned by tumors genotyping. In France, melanomas genotyping is supported by the platforms of the National Cancer Institute (INCA), which implemented a national program ensuring access to innovation for personalized medicine. The identification of new targets in melanoma supplies a very active dynamic development of innovative molecules contributing to changing the therapeutic landscape of this pathology.

  8. Sequence Alterations of I(Ks Potassium Channel Genes in Kazakhstani Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ainur Akilzhanova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common sustained arrhythmia, and it results in significant morbidity and mortality. However, the pathogenesis of AF remains unclear to date. Recently, more pieces of evidence indicated that AF is a multifactorial disease resulting from the interaction between environmental factors and genetics. Recent studies suggest that genetic mutation of the slow delayed rectifier potassium channel (I(Ks may underlie AF.Objective. To investigate sequence alterations of I(Ks potassium channel genes KCNQ1, KCNE1 and KCNE2 in Kazakhstani patients with atrial fibrillation.Methods. Genomic DNA of 69 cases with atrial fibrillation and 27 relatives were analyzed for mutations in all protein-coding exons and their flanking splice site regions of the genes KCNQ1 (NM_000218.2 and NM_181798.1, KCNE1 (NM_000219.2, and KCNE2 (NM_172201.1 using bidirectional sequencing on the ABI 3730xL DNA Analyzer (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA, USA.Results. In total, a disease-causing mutation was identified in 39 of the 69 (56.5% index cases. Of these, altered sequence variants in the KCNQ1 gene accounted for 14.5% of the mutations, whereas a KCNE1 mutation accounted for 43.5% of the mutations and KCNE2 mutation accounted for 1.4% of the mutations. The majority of the distinct mutations were found in a single case (80%, whereas 20% of the mutations were observed more than once. We found two sequence variants in KCNQ1 exon 13 (S546S G1638A and exon 16 (Y662Y, C1986T in ten patients (14.5%. In KCNE1 gene in exon 3 mutation, S59G A280G was observed in 30 of 69 patients (43.5% and KCNE2 exon 2 T10K C29A in 1 patient (1.4%. Genetic cascade screening of 27 relatives to the 69 index cases with an identified mutation revealed 26.9% mutation carriers  who were at risk of cardiac events such as syncope or sudden unexpected death.Conclusion. In this cohort of Kazakhstani index cases with AF, a disease-causing mutation was identified in

  9. Breast ductal carcinoma in situ carry mutational driver events representative of invasive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Jia-Min B; Savas, Peter; Fellowes, Andrew P; Mir Arnau, Gisela; Kader, Tanjina; Vedururu, Ravikiran; Hewitt, Chelsee; Takano, Elena A; Byrne, David J; Choong, David Yh; Millar, Ewan Ka; Lee, C Soon; O'Toole, Sandra A; Lakhani, Sunil R; Cummings, Margaret C; Mann, G Bruce; Campbell, Ian G; Dobrovic, Alexander; Loi, Sherene; Gorringe, Kylie L; Fox, Stephen B

    2017-03-24

    The spectrum of genomic alterations in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is relatively unexplored, but is likely to provide useful insights into its biology, its progression to invasive carcinoma and the risk of recurrence. DCIS (n=20) with a range of phenotypes was assessed by massively parallel sequencing for mutations and copy number alterations and variants validated by Sanger sequencing. PIK3CA mutations were identified in 11/20 (55%), TP53 mutations in 6/20 (30%), and GATA3 mutations in 9/20 (45%). Screening an additional 91 cases for GATA3 mutations identified a final frequency of 27% (30/111), with a high proportion of missense variants (8/30). TP53 mutations were exclusive to high grade DCIS and more frequent in PR-negative tumors compared with PR-positive tumors (P=0.037). TP53 mutant tumors also had a significantly higher fraction of the genome altered by copy number than wild-type tumors (P=0.005), including a significant positive association with amplification or gain of ERBB2 (P<0.05). The association between TP53 mutation and ERBB2 amplification was confirmed in a wider DCIS cohort using p53 immunohistochemistry as a surrogate marker for TP53 mutations (P=0.03). RUNX1 mutations and MAP2K4 copy number loss were novel findings in DCIS. Frequent copy number alterations included gains on 1q, 8q, 17q, and 20q and losses on 8p, 11q, 16q, and 17p. Patterns of genomic alterations observed in DCIS were similar to those previously reported for invasive breast cancers, with all DCIS having at least one bona fide breast cancer driver event. However, an increase in GATA3 mutations and fewer copy number changes were noted in DCIS compared with invasive carcinomas. The role of such alterations as prognostic and predictive biomarkers in DCIS is an avenue for further investigation.Modern Pathology advance online publication, 24 March 2017; doi:10.1038/modpathol.2017.21.

  10. Clinical and mutational investigations of tyrosinemia type II in Northern Tunisia: identification and structural characterization of two novel TAT mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charfeddine, C; Monastiri, K; Mokni, M; Laadjimi, A; Kaabachi, N; Perin, O; Nilges, M; Kassar, S; Keirallah, M; Guediche, M N; Kamoun, M R; Tebib, N; Ben Dridi, M F; Boubaker, S; Ben Osman, A; Abdelhak, S

    2006-06-01

    Tyrosinemia type II or Richner-Hanhart Syndrome (RHS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by keratitis, palmoplantar keratosis, mental retardation, and elevated blood tyrosine levels. The disease is due to a deficiency of hepatic cytosolic tyrosine aminotransferase (TATc), an enzyme involved in the tyrosine catabolic pathway. Because of the high rate of consanguinity this disorder seems to be relatively common among the Arab and Mediterranean populations. RHS is characterized by inter and intrafamilial phenotypic variability. A large spectrum of mutations within TATc gene has been shown to be responsible for RHS. In the present study, we report the clinical features and the molecular investigation of RHS in three unrelated consanguineous Tunisian families including 7 patients with confirmed biochemical diagnosis of tyrosinemia type II. Mutation analyses were performed and two novel missense mutations were identified (C151Y) and (L273P) within exon 5 and exon 8, respectively. The 3D-structural characterization of these mutations provides evidence of defective folding of the mutant proteins, and likely alteration of the enzymatic activity. Phenotype variability was observed even among individuals sharing the same pathogenic mutation.

  11. Prevalence of mutations in APC, CTNNB1, and BRAF in Tunisian patients with sporadic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougatef, Karim; Ouerhani, Slah; Moussa, Amel; Kourda, Nadia; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Lahely, Yannick Blondeau; Najjar, Tawfik; Ben Jilani, Sarra; Benammar-Elgaaied, Amel; Soubrier, Florent; Marrakchi, Raja

    2008-11-01

    Sporadic colorectal tumorigenesis is caused by alterations in the Wnt (APC, CTNNB1) and Ras pathways. Our objective was to analyze the occurrence of these genetic alterations in relation to tumor and patient characteristics. The prevalence of somatic alteration in the hot-spot regions of the APC, BRAF, and CTNNB1 genes was investigated in 48 unselected and unrelated Tunisian patients with sporadic colorectal cancer, and the association between the molecular features at these genes in relation to tumor and patient characteristics (age at diagnosis, sex, tumor localization, stage, and differentiation) was analyzed. Loss of heterozygosity was observed at the APC locus in 52% of the analyzed tumors. 6 novel mutations were detected by polymerase chain reaction sequencing in the mutation cluster region of the APC gene. No mutations were observed in the CTNNB1 gene in any tumor, but 8% of tumors harbored mutation in the BRAF gene. Clinicopathological analyses showed an association between APC point mutations and the earliest occurrence of sporadic colorectal cancer. The findings confirm the heterogeneity of APC gene alteration and also reveal a particular profile of this pathology among Tunisian patients that confirms the epidemiological data for this country.

  12. Recessive mutations in the INS gene result in neonatal diabetes through reduced insulin biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garin, Intza; Edghill, Emma L; Akerman, Ildem; Rubio-Cabezas, Oscar; Rica, Itxaso; Locke, Jonathan M; Maestro, Miguel Angel; Alshaikh, Adnan; Bundak, Ruveyde; del Castillo, Gabriel; Deeb, Asma; Deiss, Dorothee; Fernandez, Juan M; Godbole, Koumudi; Hussain, Khalid; O'Connell, Michele; Klupa, Thomasz; Kolouskova, Stanislava; Mohsin, Fauzia; Perlman, Kusiel; Sumnik, Zdenek; Rial, Jose M; Ugarte, Estibaliz; Vasanthi, Thiruvengadam; Johnstone, Karen; Flanagan, Sarah E; Martínez, Rosa; Castaño, Carlos; Patch, Ann-Marie; Fernández-Rebollo, Eduardo; Raile, Klemens; Morgan, Noel; Harries, Lorna W; Castaño, Luis; Ellard, Sian; Ferrer, Jorge; Perez de Nanclares, Guiomar; Hattersley, Andrew T

    2010-02-16

    Heterozygous coding mutations in the INS gene that encodes preproinsulin were recently shown to be an important cause of permanent neonatal diabetes. These dominantly acting mutations prevent normal folding of proinsulin, which leads to beta-cell death through endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis. We now report 10 different recessive INS mutations in 15 probands with neonatal diabetes. Functional studies showed that recessive mutations resulted in diabetes because of decreased insulin biosynthesis through distinct mechanisms, including gene deletion, lack of the translation initiation signal, and altered mRNA stability because of the disruption of a polyadenylation signal. A subset of recessive mutations caused abnormal INS transcription, including the deletion of the C1 and E1 cis regulatory elements, or three different single base-pair substitutions in a CC dinucleotide sequence located between E1 and A1 elements. In keeping with an earlier and more severe beta-cell defect, patients with recessive INS mutations had a lower birth weight (-3.2 SD score vs. -2.0 SD score) and were diagnosed earlier (median 1 week vs. 10 weeks) compared to those with dominant INS mutations. Mutations in the insulin gene can therefore result in neonatal diabetes as a result of two contrasting pathogenic mechanisms. Moreover, the recessively inherited mutations provide a genetic demonstration of the essential role of multiple sequence elements that regulate the biosynthesis of insulin in man.

  13. Serum ferritin concentration is affected by ferroportin Q248H mutation in Africans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasvosve, Ishmael; Tshwenyego, Uyapo; Phuthego, Thato; Koto, Garesego; Zachariah, Matshediso; Nyepetsi, Naledi G; Motswaledi, Modisa S

    2015-04-15

    Ferroportin Q248H mutation is common in populations with African ancestry. Studies have reported that the mutation does not alter the ferroportin-hepcidin axis, but there is evidence suggesting that the mutation may lead to hyperferritinemia. We report on the relationship of ferroportin Q248H mutation on serum ferritin (SF) in health adults. A total of 174 apparently healthy adults from Botswana were studied. SF was measured using an enzyme immunoassay and ferroportin Q248H mutation was identified by polymerase chain reaction and restriction enzyme digestion. Independent sample Mann-Whitney U test was used to correlate the presence of the mutation with SF. Ferroportin Q248H mutation was identified in 30 individuals (17.2%) (one homozygote, 29 heterozygotes) and was absent in 144 individuals (82.8%), with Q248H allele frequency of 8.9%. In males, SF was significantly higher in ferroportin Q248H heterozygotes compared to wild types, p=0.029, but the relationship between ferroportin Q248H mutation and iron stores was blunted in females. Our study of healthy adults provides further evidence that ferroportin Q248H mutation affects SF concentration in Africans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Structural modeling of a novel CAPN5 mutation that causes uveitis and neovascular retinal detachment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander G Bassuk

    Full Text Available CAPN5 mutations have been linked to autosomal dominant neovascular inflammatory vitreoretinopathy (ADNIV, a blinding autoimmune eye disease. Here, we link a new CAPN5 mutation to ADNIV and model the three-dimensional structure of the resulting mutant protein. In our study, a kindred with inflammatory vitreoretinopathy was evaluated by clinical eye examinations, DNA sequencing, and protein structural modeling to investigate the disease-causing mutation. Two daughters of an affected mother demonstrated symptoms of stage III ADNIV, with posterior uveitis, cystoid macular edema, intraocular fibrosis, retinal neovascularization, retinal degeneration, and cataract. The women also harbored a novel guanine to thymine (c.750G>T, p.Lys250Asn missense mutation in exon 6 of CAPN5, a gene that encodes a calcium-activated cysteine protease, calpain-5. Modeling based on the structures of all known calpains revealed the mutation falls within a calcium-sensitive flexible gating loop that controls access to the catalytic groove. Three-dimensional modeling placed the new mutation in a region adjacent to two previously identified disease-causing mutations, all three of which likely disrupt hydrogen bonding within the gating loop, yielding a CAPN5 with altered enzymatic activity. This is the third case of a CAPN5 mutation leading to inherited uveitis and neovascular vitreoretinopathy, suggesting patients with ADNIV features should be tested for CAPN5 mutations. Structural modeling of novel variants can be used to support mechanistic consequences of the disease-causing variants.

  15. Identification of a common mutation in mucopolysaccharidosis IVA: correlation among genotype, phenotype, and keratan sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomatsu, Shunji; Dieter, Tatiana; Schwartz, Ida V; Sarmient, Piedad; Giugliani, Roberto; Barrera, Luis A; Guelbert, Norberto; Kremer, Raquel; Repetto, Gabriela M; Gutierrez, Monica A; Nishioka, Tatsuo; Serrato, Olga Peña; Montaño, Adriana Maria; Yamaguchi, Seiji; Noguchi, Akihiko

    2004-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS). Mutation screening of the GALNS was performed by genomic PCR and direct sequence analyses in 20 MPS IVA patients from Latin America. In this study, 12 different gene mutations including nine unreported ones were identified in 16 severe and four attenuated patients and accounted for 90.0% of the unrelated mutant alleles. The gene alterations were missense mutations except one insertion. Six recurrent mutations, p.A75G, p.G116S, p.G139S, p.N164T, p.R380S, and p.R386C, accounted for 5.0, 10.0, 5.0, 7.5, 5.0, and 32.5% of the unrelated mutant alleles, respectively. The p.R386C mutation was identified in all Latin American populations studied. Eleven mutations correlated with a severe form, while one mutation, p.R380S, was associated with an attenuated form. MPS IVA patients had an elevation of urine and plasma keratan sulfate (KS) concentrations compared with those of the age-matched control. KS concentrations in severe patients were higher than those in attenuated patients. These data provide evidence for extensive allelic heterogeneity and presence of a common mutation in Latin American patients. Accumulation of mutations with clinical description and KS concentration will lead us to predict clinical severity of the patient more precisely.

  16. Molecular spectrum of KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA gene mutation: determination of frequency, distribution pattern in Indian colorectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisht, Swati; Ahmad, Firoz; Sawaimoon, Satyakam; Bhatia, Simi; Das, Bibhu Ranjan

    2014-09-01

    Molecular evaluation of KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutation has become an important part in colorectal carcinoma evaluation, and their alterations may determine the therapeutic response to anti-EGFR therapy. The current study demonstrates the evaluation of KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutation using direct sequencing in 204 samples. The frequency of KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutations was 23.5, 9.8, and 5.9 %, respectively. Five different substitution mutations at KRAS codon 12 (G12S, G12D, G12A, G12V, and G12C) and one substitution type at codon 13 (G13D) were observed. KRAS mutations were significantly higher in patients who were >50 years, and were associated with moderate/poorly differentiated tumors and adenocarcinomas. All mutations in BRAF gene were of V600E type, which were frequent in patients who were ≤ 50 years. Unlike KRAS mutations, BRAF mutations were more frequent in well-differentiated tumors and right-sided tumors. PIK3CA-E545K was the most recurrent mutation while other mutations detected were T544I, Q546R, H1047R, G1049S, and D1056N. No significant association of PIK3CA mutation with age, tumor differentiation, location, and other parameters was noted. No concomitant mutation of KRAS and BRAF mutations was observed, while, interestingly, five cases showed concurrent mutation of KRAS and PIK3CA mutations. In conclusion, to our knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate the PIK3CA mutation in Indian CRC patients. The frequency of KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA was similar to worldwide reports. Furthermore, identification of molecular markers has unique strengths, and can provide insights into the pathogenic process and help optimize personalized prevention and therapy.

  17. Gastric cancer and related epigenetic alterations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Trupti N; Roy, Soumyadipta; Ravi, Revathi

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer, a malignant and highly proliferative condition, has significantly affected a large population around the globe and is known to be caused by various factors including genetic, epigenetic, and environmental influences. Though the global trend of these cancers is declining, an increase in its frequency is still a threat because of changing lifestyles and dietary habits. However, genetic and epigenetic alterations related to gastric cancers also have an equivalent contribution towards carcinogenic development. DNA methylation is one of the major forms of epigenetic modification which plays a significant role in gastric carcinogenesis. Methylation leads to inactivation of some of the most important genes like DNA repair genes, cell cycle regulators, apoptotic genes, transcriptional regulators, and signalling pathway regulators; which subsequently cause uncontrolled proliferation of cells. Mutations in these genes can be used as suitable prognostic markers for early diagnosis of the disease, since late diagnosis of gastric cancers has a huge negative impact on overall patient survival. In this review, we focus on the important epigenetic mutations that contribute to the development of gastric cancer and the molecular pathogenesis underlying each of them. Methylation, acetylation, and histone modifications play an integral role in the onset of genomic instability, one of the many contributory factors to gastric cancer. This article also covers the constraints of incomplete knowledge of epigenetic factors influencing gastric cancer, thus throwing light on our understanding of the disease. PMID:28144288

  18. A mutation specific polymerase chain reaction for detecting hepatitis B virus genome mutations at nt551

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Ling Ma; De-Xing Fang; Hua-Biao Chen; Fa-Qing Li; Hui-Ying Jin; Su-Qin Li; Wei-Guo Tan

    2003-01-01

    AIM: The hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) is considered to be one of the best markers for the diagnosis of acute and chronic HBV infection. But in some patients, this antigen cannot be detected by routine serological assays despite the presence of virus. One of the most important explanations for the lack of detectable HBsAg is that mutations which occur within the "a" determinant of HBV S gene can alter expression of HBsAg and lead to changes of antigenicity and immunogenicity of HBsAg accordingly. As a result, these mutants cannot be detected by diagnosis assays. Thus, it is essential to find out specific and sensitive methods to test the new mutants and further investigate their distribution. This study is to establish a method to investigate the distribution of the HBsAg mutant at nt551.METHODS: A mutation specific polymerase chain reaction (msPCR) was established for amplifying HBV DNA with a mutation at nt551. Four sets of primer pairs, P551A-PPS,P551G-PPS, P551C-PPS and P551T-PPS, with the same sequences except for one base at 3' terminus were designed and synthesized according to the known HBV genome sequences and the popular HBV subtypes, adr and adw, in China. At the basis of regular PCR method, we explored the specific conditions for amplifying HBV DNAs with a mutation at nt551 by regulating annealing temperature and the concentration of these primers. 126 serum samples from patients of hepatitis B were collected, among which 16 were positive for HBV S DNA in the nested PCR amplification. These 16 HBV S DNAs were detected by using the msPCR method.RESULTS: When the annealing temperature was raised to 71 °C, nt551A and nt551G were amplified specifically by P551A-PPS and P551G-PPS; At 72 °C and 5 pmole of the primers (each) in reaction of 25 μl volume, nt551C and nt551T were amplified specifically by P551C-PPS and P551TPPS. 16 of HBV S gene fragments were characterized by using this method. 14 of them were positive for nt551A, one was positive for nt

  19. Stratum corneum lipids, skin barrier function and filaggrin mutations in patients with atopic eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgh, Julie Kaae; Hellgren, Lars; Jungersted, JM

    2010-01-01

    Background: Prior to the discovery of filaggrin (FLG) mutations, evidence for an impaired skin barrier in atopic dermatitis (AD) has been documented, and changes in ceramide profile, altered skin pH and increased trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL) in patients with AD have been reported. Until now......, no studies have analysed stratum corneum (SC) lipids combined with skin barrier parameters in subjects of known FLG genotype. Methods: A cohort of 49 German individuals genotyped for the most common FLG mutations (R501X, 2282del4) had SC samples taken for lipid analysis by high-performance thin layer...... differences were observed for ceramide 2, 3, 5 and 6. FLGmut individuals had significantly higher skin pH values than individuals not carrying FLG mutations. Patients with AD with FLG mutations had significantly higher erythema compared to patients with AD without FLG mutations. Conclusion: Our results...

  20. Not only emerging technologies are at risk: The case of mutation breeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagemann, Kit S.; Scholderer, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    plants. Unlike crop cultivars developed by newer techniques such as genetic engineering, mutation-bred cultivars are not subject to special types of horizontal regulation in any UN country. Based on representative survey data (N = 1000), public attitudes towards mutation breeding were compared....... One technology where such a latent crisis potential has often been suspected is mutation breeding. Mutation breeding is a standard technique in the development of new crop cultivars, known since the 1930s, typically involving the use of ionizing radiation to induce alterations in the genomes of crop...... with attitudes towards several other agricultural and food biotechnologies in terms of evaluative extremity, strength, and structure. Among the technologies included in the survey, mutation breeding was by far the most negatively evaluated one (substantially more so than genetic engineering). At the same time...

  1. Research progress of IDH1 and IDH2 mutations in gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-shan ZHANG

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The gene mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2 mainly occur in astrocytoma, anaplastic astrocytoma, oligodendroglioma, anaplastic oligodendroglioma, oligoastrocytoma, anaplastic oligoastrocytoma and secondary glioblastoma. The IDH1/2 gene mutation can alter proteinase function, consume α-ketoglutarate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-reduced (NADPH and thus produce carcinogenic metabolite, 2-hydroxyglutarate. The intracellular accumulation of 2-hydroxyglutarate will induce a series of downstream effects which may result in the development of gliomas mentioned above. Both IDH1/2 mutations and other concomitant hereditary variations are biomarkers for differential diagnosis and IDH1/2 mutations are also independent factors for the prognosis of gliomas. The molecular targeting therapy for IDH1/2 mutations has become the research focus of glioma treatment. This review summarizes the recent progress of this field. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.11.017

  2. Minisequencing mitochondrial DNA pathogenic mutations

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    Carracedo Ángel

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are a number of well-known mutations responsible of common mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA diseases. In order to overcome technical problems related to the analysis of complete mtDNA genomes, a variety of different techniques have been proposed that allow the screening of coding region pathogenic mutations. Methods We here propose a minisequencing assay for the analysis of mtDNA mutations. In a single reaction, we interrogate a total of 25 pathogenic mutations distributed all around the whole mtDNA genome in a sample of patients suspected for mtDNA disease. Results We have detected 11 causal homoplasmic mutations in patients suspected for Leber disease, which were further confirmed by standard automatic sequencing. Mutations m.11778G>A and m.14484T>C occur at higher frequency than expected by change in the Galician (northwest Spain patients carrying haplogroup J lineages (Fisher's Exact test, P-value Conclusion We here developed a minisequencing genotyping method for the screening of the most common pathogenic mtDNA mutations which is simple, fast, and low-cost. The technique is robust and reproducible and can easily be implemented in standard clinical laboratories.

  3. Analyses of Dynein Heavy Chain Mutations Reveal Complex Interactions Between Dynein Motor Domains and Cellular Dynein Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivagurunathan, Senthilkumar; Schnittker, Robert R.; Razafsky, David S.; Nandini, Swaran; Plamann, Michael D.; King, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein transports cargoes for a variety of crucial cellular functions. However, since dynein is essential in most eukaryotic organisms, the in-depth study of the cellular function of dynein via genetic analysis of dynein mutations has not been practical. Here, we identify and characterize 34 different dynein heavy chain mutations using a genetic screen of the ascomycete fungus Neurospora crassa, in which dynein is nonessential. Interestingly, our studies show that these mutations segregate into five different classes based on the in vivo localization of the mutated dynein motors. Furthermore, we have determined that the different classes of dynein mutations alter vesicle trafficking, microtubule organization, and nuclear distribution in distinct ways and require dynactin to different extents. In addition, biochemical analyses of dynein from one mutant strain show a strong correlation between its in vitro biochemical properties and the aberrant intracellular function of that altered dynein. When the mutations were mapped to the published dynein crystal structure, we found that the three-dimensional structural locations of the heavy chain mutations were linked to particular classes of altered dynein functions observed in cells. Together, our data indicate that the five classes of dynein mutations represent the entrapment of dynein at five separate points in the dynein mechanochemical and transport cycles. We have developed N. crassa as a model system where we can dissect the complexities of dynein structure, function, and interaction with other proteins with genetic, biochemical, and cell biological studies. PMID:22649085

  4. Sequence-Specific Fidelity Alterations Associated with West Nile Virus Attenuation in Mosquitoes.

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    Greta A Van Slyke

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available High rates of error-prone replication result in the rapid accumulation of genetic diversity of RNA viruses. Recent studies suggest that mutation rates are selected for optimal viral fitness and that modest variations in replicase fidelity may be associated with viral attenuation. Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses are unique in their requirement for host cycling and may necessitate substantial genetic and phenotypic plasticity. In order to more thoroughly investigate the correlates, mechanisms and consequences of arbovirus fidelity, we selected fidelity variants of West Nile virus (WNV; Flaviviridae, Flavivirus utilizing selection in the presence of a mutagen. We identified two mutations in the WNV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase associated with increased fidelity, V793I and G806R, and a single mutation in the WNV methyltransferase, T248I, associated with decreased fidelity. Both deep-sequencing and in vitro biochemical assays confirmed strain-specific differences in both fidelity and mutational bias. WNV fidelity variants demonstrated host-specific alterations to replicative fitness in vitro, with modest attenuation in mosquito but not vertebrate cell culture. Experimental infections of colonized and field populations of Cx. quinquefaciatus demonstrated that WNV fidelity alterations are associated with a significantly impaired capacity to establish viable infections in mosquitoes. Taken together, these studies (i demonstrate the importance of allosteric interactions in regulating mutation rates, (ii establish that mutational spectra can be both sequence and strain-dependent, and (iii display the profound phenotypic consequences associated with altered replication complex function of flaviviruses.

  5. Abnormal desmin protein in myofibrillar myopathies caused by desmin gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M; Dalakas, M C

    2001-04-01

    Muscle proteins were extracted in various sodium dodecyl sulfate buffers from 6 patients with myofibrillar myopathy (MFM) and previously identified with mutations in the desmin gene (desmin myopathy; DesM), 6 with MFM without mutations, and 14 disease controls to search for alterations in biochemistry and solubility of mutated desmin filaments. In the 1% posthigh-speed pellet fraction, desmin was detected with immunoblots only in DesM and not the other MFM. We conclude that mutant desmin forms insoluble aggregates that are specific for the DesM and can be detected with Western blots.

  6. Advances in Human Mitochondrial Diseases Molecular Genetic Analysis of Pathogenic mtDNA Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, E; King, M P

    1997-01-01

    The mitochondrial diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders that have been defined by specific morphological alterations in muscle and by deficits of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The morphological hallmarks of these diseases include ragged-red fibers (an extensive proliferation of mitochondria in muscle fibers) and abnormal paracrystalline inclusions and membrane structures in mitochondria. The identification of pathogenic mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has resulted in a genetic classification of mitochondrial diseases. Investigations are being conducted to understand the molecular basis for the biochemical and morphological alterations of mitochondria associated with mtDNA mutations. © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997;7:16-24).

  7. HNPCC: Six new pathogenic mutations

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    Epplen Joerg T

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC is an autosomal dominant disease with a high risk for colorectal and endometrial cancer caused by germline mutations in DNA mismatch-repair genes (MMR. HNPCC accounts for approximately 2 to 5% of all colorectal cancers. Here we present 6 novel mutations in the DNA mismatch-repair genes MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6. Methods Patients with clinical diagnosis of HNPCC were counselled. Tumor specimen were analysed for microsatellite instability and immunohistochemistry for MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 protein was performed. If one of these proteins was not detectable in the tumor mutation analysis of the corresponding gene was carried out. Results We identified 6 frameshift mutations (2 in MLH1, 3 in MSH2, 1 in MSH6 resulting in a premature stop: two mutations in MLH1 (c.2198_2199insAACA [p.N733fsX745], c.2076_2077delTG [p.G693fsX702], three mutations in MSH2 (c.810_811delGT [p.C271fsX282], c.763_766delAGTGinsTT [p.F255fsX282], c.873_876delGACT [p.L292fsX298] and one mutation in MSH6 (c.1421_1422dupTG [p.C475fsX480]. All six tumors tested for microsatellite instability showed high levels of microsatellite instability (MSI-H. Conclusions HNPCC in families with MSH6 germline mutations may show an age of onset that is comparable to this of patients with MLH1 and MSH2 mutations.

  8. Radiation mutation breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hi Sup; Kim, Jae Sung; Kim, Jin Kyu; Shin, In Chul; Lim, Young Taek

    1998-04-01

    In order to develop an advanced technical knowledge for the selection of better mutants, some of the crops were irradiated and the mutation rate, the survival rate and the method for selction of a mutant were studied. Furthermore, this study aimed to obtain basic data applicable to the development of genetic resources by evaluation and analysis the specific character for selection of the superior mutant and its plant breeding. 1. selection of the mutant with a superior resistance against environment in the principal crops 1) New varieties of mutant rices such as Wonpyeongbyeo, Wongwangbyeo, Winmibyeo, and heogseon chalbeyeo (sticky forma) were registered in the national variety list and made an application to crop variety protection right. They are under review now. 2) We also keep on studying on the number of a grain of 8 lines of excellent mutant rice for the purpose of improvement of breeding . 3) We selected 3 lines which have a resistance to pod and stem blight in large soybean, 31 lines with small grain size and higher yield, 112 lines of soybean of cooking, 7 lines of low lipoxygenase content, and 12 lines with decreased phytic acid content by 20 % compared to the previous level. 2. Selection of advanced Mugunwha (Rose of Sharon) mutant 1) Bagseul, a new variety of mutant, was developed and 30 plantlets of it are being proliferated. 2) Fifty-three lines of a mutant having a various morphologies were selected.

  9. Pathways to Tumorigenesis—Modeling Mutation Acquisition in Stem Cells and Their Progeny1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazi, Rina; Gentry, Sara N; Jackson, Trachette L

    2008-01-01

    Most adult tissues consist of stem cells, progenitors, and mature cells, and this hierarchical architecture may play an important role in the multistep process of carcinogenesis. Here, we develop and discuss the important predictions of a simple mathematical model of cancer initiation and early progression within a hierarchically structured tissue. This work presents a model that incorporates both the sequential acquisition of phenotype altering mutations and tissue hierarchy. The model simulates the progressive effect of accumulating mutations that lead to an increase in fitness or the induction of genetic instability. A novel aspect of the model is that symmetric self-renewal, asymmetric division, and differentiation are all incorporated, and this enables the quantitative study of the effect of mutations that deregulate the normal, homeostatic stem cell division pattern. The model is also capable of predicting changes in both tissue composition and in the progression of cells along their lineage at any given time and for various sequences of mutations. Simulations predict that the specific order in which mutations are acquired is crucial for determining the pace of cancer development. Interestingly, we find that the importance of genetic stability differs significantly depending on the physiological expression of mutations related to symmetric self-renewal and differentiation of stem and progenitor cells. In particular, mutations that lead to the alteration of the stem cell division pattern or the acquisition of some degree of immortality in committed progenitors lead to an early onset of cancer and diminish the impact of genetic instability. PMID:18953426

  10. Pathways to Tumorigenesis—Modeling Mutation Acquisition in Stem Cells and Their Progeny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Ashkenazi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Most adult tissues consist of stem cells, progenitors, and mature cells, and this hierarchical architecture may play an important role in the multistep process of carcinogenesis. Here, we develop and discuss the important predictions of a simple mathematical model of cancer initiation and early progression within a hierarchically structured tissue. This work presents a model that incorporates both the sequential acquisition of phenotype altering mutations and tissue hierarchy. The model simulates the progressive effect of accumulating mutations that lead to an increase in fitness or the induction of genetic instability. A novel aspect of the model is that symmetric self-renewal, asymmetric division, and differentiation are all incorporated, and this enables the quantitative study of the effect of mutations that deregulate the normal, homeostatic stem cell division pattern. The model is also capable of predicting changes in both tissue composition and in the progression of cells along their lineage at any given time and for various sequences of mutations. Simulations predict that the specific order in which mutations are acquired is crucial for determining the pace of cancer development. Interestingly, we find that the importance of genetic stability differs significantly depending on the physiological expression of mutations related to symmetric self-renewal and differentiation of stem and progenitor cells. In particular, mutations that lead to the alteration of the stem cell division pattern or the acquisition of some degree of immortality in committed progenitors lead to an early onset of cancer and diminish the impact of genetic instability.

  11. EGFR Expression and KRAS and BRAF Mutational Status in Intestinal-Type Sinonasal Adenocarcinoma

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    Valérie Costes

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of molecular alterations, including EGFR overexpression and mutations in KRAS and BRAF, contribute to colorectal carcinogenesis. Since intestinal-type adenocarcinoma (ITAC of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinus has morphologic and phenotypic features that are usually indistinguishable from colorectal cancer (CRC, it is likely that both tumor types share equivalent genetic alterations. Data from a series of 43 patients treated surgically for ITAC in Montpellier, France between November 1998 and December 2012 were collected. Tumors were characterized for mutations in KRAS and BRAF as well as EGFR overexpression. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were constructed using overall survival as the primary end points. Patient survival was analyzed using the hazards ratio. Twenty seven tumors (63% showed EGFR positivity and 30% exhibited a high expression level (+2/+3. KRAS mutations were detected in 43% of cases. BRAF mutations were identified in 3.6% of specimens. Patients with age superior to 60 years, metastatic status, and KRAS mutations had significant overall survival values (p = 0.026, p = 0.001 and p = 0.03, respectively. Our results indicate that KRAS mutations and EGFR expression are frequent in ITAC and that KRAS mutations predict good patient prognosis in ITAC. Finally, EGFR directed molecular treatments could be investigated in a subset of patients affected by ITAC.

  12. TP53 GENE MUTATIONS – FROM GUARDIAN OF THE GENOME TO ONCOGENE

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    Petar Babović

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available TP53 tumor suppressor gene mutations are the most frequent genetic alterations in human cancer affecting a specific gene. The occurrence of TP53 mutations is considerably influenced by cancer-initiating events, such as DNA damage, the aftermath of which is the promotion of cancer development through the loss of anti-proliferative activities, including apoptosis and cellular senescence. Over 27.000 TP53 gene mutations have been discovered and found in more than 50% of human cancers. The most frequent alterations are the point mutations with a single base substitution in gene segment encoding for DNA-binding domaine of p53 molecule, leading to the production of mutant protein that differs from the wild-type protein by one amino acid (missense mutations usually causing the change in tertiary structure of gene product, thus preventing p53 to bind to DNA and activate transcription of target genes. The result of the mutations may also be the proteins with new, abnormal functions, and the ability to modulate expression of genes responsible for neoangiogenesis, resistance to chemotherapeutics and prevention of tumor initiation and promotion. In such circumstances, not only the mutant TP53 loses its tumor suppressive function, but acquires oncogenic potential and becomes an active participant in the neoplastic transformation of the cell.Vast heterogeneity of mutations and methodological approaches in p53 status assessment represent the main difficulties in rapid and effective integration of basic p53 research into clinical practice.

  13. A mutation in the mitochondrial fission gene Dnm1l leads to cardiomyopathy.

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    Houman Ashrafian

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in a number of genes have been linked to inherited dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM. However, such mutations account for only a small proportion of the clinical cases emphasising the need for alternative discovery approaches to uncovering novel pathogenic mutations in hitherto unidentified pathways. Accordingly, as part of a large-scale N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis screen, we identified a mouse mutant, Python, which develops DCM. We demonstrate that the Python phenotype is attributable to a dominant fully penetrant mutation in the dynamin-1-like (Dnm1l gene, which has been shown to be critical for mitochondrial fission. The C452F mutation is in a highly conserved region of the M domain of Dnm1l that alters protein interactions in a yeast two-hybrid system, suggesting that the mutation might alter intramolecular interactions within the Dnm1l monomer. Heterozygous Python fibroblasts exhibit abnormal mitochondria and peroxisomes. Homozygosity for the mutation results in the death of embryos midway though gestation. Heterozygous Python hearts show reduced levels of mitochondria enzyme complexes and suffer from cardiac ATP depletion. The resulting energy deficiency may contribute to cardiomyopathy. This is the first demonstration that a defect in a gene involved in mitochondrial remodelling can result in cardiomyopathy, showing that the function of this gene is needed for the maintenance of normal cellular function in a relatively tissue-specific manner. This disease model attests to the importance of mitochondrial remodelling in the heart; similar defects might underlie human heart muscle disease.

  14. Cancer-associated mutations are preferentially distributed in protein kinase functional sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izarzugaza, Jose M G; Redfern, Oliver C; Orengo, Christine A; Valencia, Alfonso

    2009-12-01

    Protein kinases are a superfamily involved in many crucial cellular processes, including signal transmission and regulation of cell cycle. As a consequence of this role, kinases have been reported to be associated with many types of cancer and are considered as potential therapeutic targets. We analyzed the distribution of pathogenic somatic point mutations (drivers) in the protein kinase superfamily with respect to their location in the protein, such as in structural, evolutionary, and functionally relevant regions. We find these driver mutations are more clearly associated with key protein features than other somatic mutations (passengers) that have not been directly linked to tumor progression. This observation fits well with the expected implication of the alterations in protein kinase function in cancer pathogenicity. To explain the relevance of the detected association of cancer driver mutations at the molecular level in the human kinome, we compare these with genetically inherited mutations (SNPs). We find that the subset of nonsynonymous SNPs that are associated to disease, but sufficiently mild to the point of being widespread in the population, tend to avoid those key protein regions, where they could be more detrimental for protein function. This tendency contrasts with the one detected for cancer associated-driver-mutations, which seems to be more directly implicated in the alteration of protein function. The detailed analysis of protein kinase groups and a number of relevant examples, confirm the relation between cancer associated-driver-mutations and key regions for protein kinase structure and function.

  15. Mutations induced by ultraviolet light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeifer, Gerd P. [Department of Biology, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States)]. E-mail: gpfeifer@coh.org; You, Young-Hyun [Department of Biology, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States); Besaratinia, Ahmad [Department of Biology, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States)

    2005-04-01

    The different ultraviolet (UV) wavelength components, UVA (320-400 nm), UVB (280-320 nm), and UVC (200-280 nm), have distinct mutagenic properties. A hallmark of UVC and UVB mutagenesis is the high frequency of transition mutations at dipyrimidine sequences containing cytosine. In human skin cancers, about 35% of all mutations in the p53 gene are transitions at dipyrimidines within the sequence 5'-TCG and 5'-CCG, and these are localized at several mutational hotspots. Since 5'-CG sequences are methylated along the p53 coding sequence in human cells, these mutations may be derived from sunlight-induced pyrimidine dimers forming at sequences that contain 5-methylcytosine. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) form preferentially at dipyrimidines containing 5-methylcytosine when cells are irradiated with UVB or sunlight. In order to define the contribution of 5-methylcytosine to sunlight-induced mutations, the lacI and cII transgenes in mouse fibroblasts were used as mutational targets. After 254 nm UVC irradiation, only 6-9% of the base substitutions were at dipyrimidines containing 5-methylcytosine. However, 24-32% of the solar light-induced mutations were at dipyrimidines that contain 5-methylcytosine and most of these mutations were transitions. Thus, CPDs forming preferentially at dipyrimidines with 5-methylcytosine are responsible for a considerable fraction of the mutations induced by sunlight in mammalian cells. Using mouse cell lines harboring photoproduct-specific photolyases and mutational reporter genes, we showed that CPDs (rather than 6-4 photoproducts or other lesions) are responsible for the great majority of UVB-induced mutations. An important component of UVB mutagenesis is the deamination of cytosine and 5-methylcytosine within CPDs. The mutational specificity of long-wave UVA (340-400 nm) is distinct from that of the shorter wavelength UV and is characterized mainly by G to T transversions presumably arising through mechanisms

  16. Alterations in tumour suppressor gene p53 in human gliomas from Indian patients

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pornima Phatak; S Kalai Selvi; T Divya; A S Hegde; Sridevi Hegde; Kumaravel Somasundaram

    2002-12-01

    Alterations in the tumour suppressor p53 gene are among the most common defects seen in a variety of human cancers. In order to study the significance of the p53 gene in the genesis and development of human glioma from Indian patients, we checked 44 untreated primary gliomas for mutations in exons 5–9 of the p53 gene by PCR-SSCP and DNA sequencing. Sequencing analysis revealed six missense mutations. The incidence of p53 mutations was 13.6% (6 of 44). All the six mutations were found to be located in the central core domain of p53, which carries the sequence-specific DNA-binding domain. These results suggest a rather low incidence but a definite involvement of p53 mutations in the gliomas of Indian patients.

  17. G protein-coupled receptor mutations and human genetic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Miles D; Hendy, Geoffrey N; Percy, Maire E; Bichet, Daniel G; Cole, David E C

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variations in G protein-coupled receptor genes (GPCRs) disrupt GPCR function in a wide variety of human genetic diseases. In vitro strategies and animal models have been used to identify the molecular pathologies underlying naturally occurring GPCR mutations. Inactive, overactive, or constitutively active receptors have been identified that result in pathology. These receptor variants may alter ligand binding, G protein coupling, receptor desensitization and receptor recycling. Receptor systems discussed include rhodopsin, thyrotropin, parathyroid hormone, melanocortin, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRHR), adrenocorticotropic hormone, vasopressin, endothelin-β, purinergic, and the G protein associated with asthma (GPRA or neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1)). The role of activating and inactivating calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) mutations is discussed in detail with respect to familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH) and autosomal dominant hypocalemia (ADH). The CASR mutations have been associated with epilepsy. Diseases caused by the genetic disruption of GPCR functions are discussed in the context of their potential to be selectively targeted by drugs that rescue altered receptors. Examples of drugs developed as a result of targeting GPCRs mutated in disease include: calcimimetics and calcilytics, therapeutics targeting melanocortin receptors in obesity, interventions that alter GNRHR loss from the cell surface in idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and novel drugs that might rescue the P2RY12 receptor congenital bleeding phenotype. De-orphanization projects have identified novel disease-associated receptors, such as NPSR1 and GPR35. The identification of variants in these receptors provides genetic reagents useful in drug screens. Discussion of the variety of GPCRs that are disrupted in monogenic Mendelian disorders provides the basis for examining the significance of common

  18. Mutational profiling reveals PIK3CA mutations in gallbladder carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bardeesy Nabeel

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genetics of advanced biliary tract cancers (BTC, which encompass intra- and extra-hepatic cholangiocarcinomas as well as gallbladder carcinomas, are heterogeneous and remain to be fully defined. Methods To better characterize mutations in established known oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes we tested a mass spectrometric based platform to interrogate common cancer associated mutations across a panel of 77 formalin fixed paraffin embedded archived BTC cases. Results Mutations among three genes, KRAS, NRAS and PIK3CA were confirmed in this cohort. Activating mutations in PIK3CA were identified exclusively in GBC (4/32, 12.5%. KRAS mutations were identified in 3 (13% intra-hepatic cholangiocarcinomas and 1 (33% perihillar cholangiocarcinoma but were not identified in gallbladder carcinomas and extra-hepatic cholangiocarcinoma. Conclusions The presence of activating mutations in PIK3CA specifically in GBC has clinical implications in both the diagnosis of this cancer type, as well as the potential utility of targeted therapies such as PI3 kinase inhibitors.

  19. A thermosensitive mutation alters the effects of lacosamide on slow inactivation in neuronal voltage-gated sodium channels, NaV 1.2.Mena Abdelsayed1, Stanislav Sokolov1, Peter C. Ruben*1 - These authors contributed equally to this work* - Corresponding author

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mena eAbdelsayed

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a disorder characterized by seizures and convulsions. The basis of epilepsy is an increase in neuronal excitability that, in some cases, may be caused by functional defects in neuronal voltage gated sodium channels (NaVs. The C121W mutation of the β1 subunit, in particular, gives rise to the thermosensitive generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+ phenotype. Lacosamide is used to treat epileptic seizures and is distinct from other anti-seizure drugs by targeting NaV slow-inactivation. We studied the effects of 100 µM lacosamide on the biophysical properties of NaV1.2 channels associated with either WT-β1 or the mutant C121W-β1 subunit. Biophysical parameters were measured at both normal (22 °C and elevated (34 °C temperatures to elicit the differential temperature-sensitivity of C121W. Lacosamide was less effective in NaV1.2 associated with the C121W-β1 at either temperature than in NaV1.2 + WT-β1. There is also a more potent effect by lacosamide on slow inactivation at elevated temperatures. Our data suggest a modulatory role is imparted by the β1 subunit in the interaction between the drug and the channel.

  20. The influence of TP53 mutations on the prognosis of patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer may depend on the intratumor heterogeneity of the mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shin Yup; Jeon, Hyo-Sung; Hwangbo, Yup; Jeong, Ji Yun; Park, Ji Young; Lee, Eun Jin; Jin, Guang; Shin, Kyung Min; Yoo, Seung Soo; Lee, Jaehee; Lee, Eung Bae; Cha, Seung Ick; Kim, Chang Ho; Park, Jae Yong

    2015-02-01

    A large number of studies have evaluated the impact of TP53 mutations on the prognosis of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC); however, the results of these studies are still controversial. Recently, considerable intratumor heterogeneity for genetic alterations has been demonstrated in various human cancers, including lung cancer. In the present study, we evaluated TP53 mutations in NSCLCs by direct sequencing and observed remarkable variation in the values of relative intensity (RI, the height of the peak of mutated allele/the height of the peak of non-mutated allele) of the mutations. We also examined whether the RI values were associated with intratumor heterogeneity of TP53 mutations. In addition, we evaluated the relationship between TP53 mutations and survival outcome. The patients with a TP53 mutation did not have significantly worse survival compared to those without the mutation. However, when tumors with a TP53 mutation were categorized into two groups, those with a low and those with a high RI, the latter group had significantly worse survival compared to those with wild-type TP53 (adjusted hazard ratio = 2.58, 95% confidence interval = 1.21-5.48, P = 0.01), whereas the former group did not. These results suggest that intratumor genetic heterogeneity may be an important factor in determining the role of TP53 mutations on the prognosis of NSCLC patients.

  1. Characterization of mutations causing rifampicin and isoniazid resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Syria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madania, Ammar; Habous, Maya; Zarzour, Hana; Ghoury, Ifad; Hebbo, Barea

    2012-01-01

    In order to characterize mutations causing rifampicin and isoniazid resistance of M. tuberculosis in Syria, 69 rifampicin resistant (Rif(r)) and 72 isoniazid resistant (Inh(r)) isolates were screened for point mutations in hot spots of the rpoB, katG and inhA genes by DNA sequencing and real time PCR. Of 69 Rif(r) isolates, 62 (90%) had mutations in the rifampin resistance determining region (RRDR) of the rpoB gene, with codons 531 (61%), 526 (13%), and 516 (8.7%) being the most commonly mutated. We found two new mutations (Asp516Thr and Ser531Gly) described for the first time in the rpoB-RRDR in association with rifampicin resistance. Only one mutation (Ile572Phe) was found outside the rpoB-RRDR. Of 72 Inh(r) strains, 30 (41.6%) had a mutation in katGcodon315 (with Ser315Thr being the predominant alteration), and 23 (32%) harbored the inhA(-15C-->T) mutation. While the general pattern of rpoB-RRDR and katG mutations reflected those found worldwide, the prevalence of the inhA(-15C-->T mutation was above the value found in most other countries, emphasizing the great importance of testing the inhA(-15C-->T) mutation for prediction of isoniazid resistance in Syria. Sensitivity of a rapid test using real time PCR and 3'-Minor groove binder (MGB) probes in detecting Rif(r) and Inh(r) isolates was 90% and 69.4%, respectively. This demonstrates that a small set of MGB-probes can be used in real time PCR in order to detect most mutations causing resistance to rifampicin and isoniazid.

  2. High prevalence of BRAF gene mutation in papillary thyroid carcinomas and thyroid tumor cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiulong; Quiros, Roderick M; Gattuso, Paolo; Ain, Kenneth B; Prinz, Richard A

    2003-08-01

    The RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK-MAP kinase pathway mediates the cellular response to extracellular signals that regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Mutation of the RAS proto-oncogene occurs in various thyroid neoplasms such as papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTCs), follicular thyroid adenomas and carcinomas. A second genetic alteration frequently involved in PTC is RET/PTC rearrangements. Recent studies have shown that BRAF, which is a downstream signaling molecule of RET and RAS, is frequently mutated in melanomas. This study tests whether BRAF is also mutated in thyroid tumors and cell lines. We analyzed BRAF gene mutation at codon 599 in thyroid tumors using mutant-allele-specific PCR and in 10 thyroid tumor cell lines by DNA sequencing of the PCR-amplified exon 15. We found that BRAF was mutated in 8 of 10 thyroid tumor cell lines, including 2 of 2 papillary carcinoma cell lines, 4 of 5 anaplastic carcinoma cell lines, 1 of 2 follicular carcinoma cell lines, and 1 follicular adenoma cell line. BRAF mutation at codon 599 was detected in 21 of 56 PTC (38%) but not in 18 follicular adenomas and 6 goiters. BRAF mutation occurred in PTC at a significantly higher frequency in male patients than in female patients. To test whether BRAF mutation may cooperate with RET/PTC rearrangements in the oncogenesis of PTC, we tested whether BRAF-mutated PTCs were also positive for RET/PTC rearrangements. Immunohistochemical staining was conducted to evaluate RET/PTC rearrangements by using two different anti-RET antibodies. Surprisingly, we found that a large number of BRAF-mutated PTCs (8 of 21) also expressed RET, indicating that the RET proto-oncogene is rearranged in these BRAF-mutated PTCs. These observations suggest that mutated BRAF gene may cooperate with RET/PTC to induce the oncogenesis of PTC.

  3. Indian hedgehog mutations causing brachydactyly type A1 impair Hedgehog signal transduction at multiple levels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang Ma; Jiang Yu; Yue Xiao; Danny Chan; Bo Gao; Jianxin Hu; Yongxing He

    2011-01-01

    Brachydactyly type A1 (BDA1),the first recorded Mendelian autosomal dominant disorder in humans,is characterized by a shortening or absence of the middle phalanges.Heterozygous missense mutations in the Indian Hedgehog (IHH) gene have been identified as a cause of BDA1; however,the biochemical consequences of these mutations are unclear.In this paper,we analyzed three BDA1 mutations (E95K,D100E,and E131K)in the N-terminal fragment of Indian Hedgehog (IhhN).Structural analysis showed that the E95K mutation changes a negatively charged area to a positively charged area in a calcium-binding groove,and that the D100E mutation changes the local tertiary structure.Furthermore,we showed that the E95K and D100E mutations led to a temperature-sensitive and calcium-dependent instability of lhhN,which might contribute to an enhanced intracellular degradation of the mutant proteins via the lysosome.Notably,all three mutations affected Hh binding to the receptor Patched1 (PTC1),reducing its capacity to induce cellular differentiation.We propose that these are common features of the mutations that cause BDA1,affecting the Hh tertiary structure,intracellular fate,binding to the receptor/partners,and binding to extracellular components.The combination of these features alters signaling capacity and range,but the impact is likely to be variable and mutation-dependent.The potential variation in the signaling range is characterized by an enhanced interaction with heparan sulfate for IHH with the E95K mutation,but not the E131K mutation.Taken together,our results suggest that these IHH mutations affect Hh signaling at multiple levels,causing abnormal bone development and abnormal digit formation.

  4. Founding BRCA1 mutations in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer in southern Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannsson, O; Ostermeyer, E A; Håkansson, S; Friedman, L S; Johansson, U; Sellberg, G; Brøndum-Nielsen, K; Sele, V; Olsson, H; King, M C; Borg, A

    1996-03-01

    Nine different germ-line mutations in the BRCA1 breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene were identified in 15 of 47 kindreds from southern Sweden, by use of SSCP and heteroduplex analysis of all exons and flanking intron region and by a protein-truncation test for exon 11, followed by direct sequencing. All but one of the mutations are predicted to give rise to premature translation termination and include seven frameshift insertions or deletions, a nonsense mutation, and a splice acceptor site mutation. The remaining mutation is a missense mutation (Cys61Gly) in the zinc-binding motif. Four novel Swedish founding mutations were identified: the nucleotide 2595 deletion A was found in five families, the C 1806 T nonsense mutation in three families, the 3166 insertion TGAGA in three families, and the nucleotide 1201 deletion 11 in two families. Analysis of the intragenic polymorphism D17S855 supports common origins of the mutations. Eleven of the 15 kindreds manifesting BRCA1 mutations were breast-ovarian cancer families, several of them with a predominant ovarian cancer phenotype. The set of 32 families in which no BRCA1 alterations were detected included 1 breast-ovarian cancer kindred manifesting clear linkage to the BRCA1 region and loss of the wild-type chromosome in associated tumors. Other tumor types found in BRCA1 mutation/haplotype carriers included prostatic, pancreas, skin, and lung cancer, a malignant melanoma, an oligodendroglioma, and a carcinosarcoma. In all, 12 of 16 kindreds manifesting BRCA1 mutation or linkage contained ovarian cancer, as compared with only 6 of the remaining 31 families (P<.001). The present study confirms the involvement of BRCA1 in disease predisposition for a subset of hereditary breast cancer families often characterized by ovarian cancers.

  5. Founding BRCA1 mutations in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer in southern Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johannsson, O.; Hakansson, S.; Johannson, U. [Univ. Hospital, Lund (Sweden)] [and others

    1996-03-01

    Nine different germ-line mutations in the BRCA1 breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene were identified in 15 of 47 kindreds from southern Sweden, by use of SSCP and heteroduplex analysis of all exons and flanking intron region and by a protein-truncation test for exon 11, followed by direct sequencing. All but one of the mutations are predicted to give rise to premature translation termination and include seven frameshift insertions or deletions, a nonsense mutation, and a splice acceptor site mutation. The remaining mutation is a missense mutation (Cys61Gly) in the zinc-binding motif. Four novel Swedish founding mutations were identified: the nucleotide 2595 deletion A was found in five families, the C 1806 T nonsense mutation in three families, the 3166 insertion TGAGA in three families, and the nucleotide 1201 deletion 11 in two families. Analysis of the intragenic polymorphism D17S855 supports common origins of the mutations. Eleven of the 15 kindreds manifesting BRCA1 mutations were breast-ovarian cancer families, several of them with a predominant ovarian cancer phenotype. The set of 32 families in which no BRCA1 alterations were detected included 1 breast-ovarian cancer kindred manifesting clear linkage to the BRCA1 region and loss of the wild-type chromosome in associated tumors. Other tumor types found in BRCA1 mutation/haplotype carriers included prostatic, pancreas, skin, and lung cancer, a malignant melanoma, an oligodendroglioma, and a carcinosarcoma. In all, 12 of 16 kindreds manifesting BRCA1 mutation or linkage contained ovarian cancer, as compared with only 6 of the remaining 31 families (P < .001). The present study confirms the involvement of BRCA1 in disease predisposition for a subset of hereditary breast cancer families often characterized by ovarian cancers. 28 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Ciprofloxacin selects for RNA polymerase mutations with pleiotropic antibiotic resistance effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, Franziska; Bergman, Jessica M; Brandis, Gerrit; Marcusson, Linda L; Zorzet, Anna; Huseby, Douglas L; Hughes, Diarmaid

    2017-01-01

    Resistance to the fluoroquinolone drug ciprofloxacin is commonly linked to mutations that alter the drug target or increase drug efflux via the major AcrAB-TolC transporter. Very little is known about other mutations that might also reduce susceptibility to ciprofloxacin. We discovered that an Escherichia coli strain experimentally evolved for resistance to ciprofloxacin had acquired a mutation in rpoB, the gene coding for the β-subunit of RNA polymerase. The aim of this work was to determine whether this mutation, and other mutations in rpoB, contribute to ciprofloxacin resistance and, if so, by which mechanism. Independent lineages of E. coli were evolved in the presence of ciprofloxacin and clones from endpoint cultures were screened for mutations in rpoB. Ciprofloxacin-selected rpoB mutations were identified and characterized in terms of effects on susceptibility and mode of action. Mutations in rpoB were selected at a high frequency in 3 out of 10 evolved lineages, in each case arising after the occurrence of mutations affecting topoisomerases and drug efflux. All ciprofloxacin-selected rpoB mutations had a high fitness cost in the absence of drug, but conferred a competitive advantage in the presence of ciprofloxacin. RNA sequencing and quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that expression of mdtK, encoding a multidrug efflux transporter, was significantly increased by the ciprofloxacin-selected rpoB mutations. The susceptibility phenotype was shown to depend on the presence of an active mdtK and a mutant rpoB allele. These data identify mutations in RNA polymerase as novel contributors to the evolution of resistance to ciprofloxacin and show that the phenotype is mediated by increased MdtK-dependent drug efflux. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Ovarian cancer patients at high risk of BRCA mutation: the constitutional genetic characterization does not change prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatier, Renaud; Lavit, Elise; Moretta, Jessica; Lambaudie, Eric; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Eisinger, François; Cherau, Elisabeth; Provansal, Magali; Livon, Doriane; Rabayrol, Laetitia; Popovici, Cornel; Charaffe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Sobol, Hagay; Viens, Patrice

    2016-10-01

    Ovarian neoplasms secondary to germline BRCA mutations had been described to have a more favourable survival. There is only few data concerning the prognosis of non mutated patients presenting clinical features evocative of BRCA alterations. We retrospectively collected data from patients treated in our institution for an invasive ovarian carcinoma between 1995 and 2011. Patients considered at high risk of BRCA mutation were tested for BRCA1/2 germline mutations. We described clinical, pathological and therapeutic features and compared prognosis of BRCA mutation carriers and non-mutated patients. Out of 617 ovarian cancer patients, we identified 104 patients who were considered at high risk of mutation. The 33 mutated patients were more likely to present a personal (33 vs. 10 %, p = 0.003) or a family (42 vs. 24 %, p = 0.06) history of breast/ovarian cancers. BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and wild type patients displayed similar prognosis: median progression-free survival (PFS) of 20.9 versus 37.7 months (p = 0.21); median overall survival (OS) of 151.2 versus 122.5 months (p = 0.52). Personal history of breast cancer increased both PFS [HR = 0.45 (95CI 0.25-0.81)] and OS [HR = 0.35 (95CI 0.16-0.75)]. In multivariate analysis, this parameter was an independent prognostic feature, whereas the identification of a BRCA1/2 mutation was not. In our cohort, all patients at high risk of BRCA mutation share a similar prognosis, whatever is their germline mutation status. Prognosis seems to be more influenced by clinical history than by germline mutations identification. If it is confirmed in larger and independent series, this result suggests that the hypothesis of other BRCA pathway alterations (BRCAness phenotype) deserves to be deeply explored.

  8. Markov models for accumulating mutations

    CERN Document Server

    Beerenwinkel, Niko

    2007-01-01

    We introduce and analyze a waiting time model for the accumulation of genetic changes. The continuous time conjunctive Bayesian network is defined by a partially ordered set of mutations and by the rate of fixation of each mutation. The partial order encodes constraints on the order in which mutations can fixate in the population, shedding light on the mutational pathways underlying the evolutionary process. We study a censored version of the model and derive equations for an EM algorithm to perform maximum likelihood estimation of the model parameters. We also show how to select the maximum likelihood poset. The model is applied to genetic data from different cancers and from drug resistant HIV samples, indicating implications for diagnosis and treatment.

  9. Dynamical Mutation of Dark Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Abramo, L R; Liberato, L; Rosenfeld, R

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the intriguing possibility that dark energy may change its equation of state in situations where large dark energy fluctuations are present. We show indications of this dynamical mutation in some generic models of dark energy.

  10. Analysis of low-density lipoprotein receptor gene mutations in a Chinese patient with clinically homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹守春; 王绿娅; 秦彦文; 蔺洁; 吴邦俊; 刘舒; 潘晓冬; 杜兰平; 陈保生

    2003-01-01

    Objective To screen the point mutation of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) gene in Chinese familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) patients, characterize the relationship between the genotype and the phenotype and discuss the molecular pathological mechanism of FH. Methods A patient with clinical phenotype of homozygous FH and her parents were investigated for mutations in the promoter and all eighteen exons of the LDL-R gene. Screening was carried out using Touch-down PCR and direct DNA sequencing; multiple alignment analysis by DNASIS 2.5 was used to find base alteration, and the LDL-R gene mutation database was searched to identify the alteration. In addition, the apolipoprotein B gene (apo B) was screened for known mutations (R3500Q) that cause familial defective apo B100 (FDB) by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP).Results Two new heterozygous mutations in exons 4 and 9 of the LDL-R gene were identified in the proband (C122Y and T383I) as well as her parents. Both of the mutations have not been published in the LDL-R gene mutation database. No mutation of apo B100 (R3500Q) was observed. Conclusion Two new mutations (C112Y and T383I) were found in the LDL-R gene, which may result in FH and may be particularly pathogenetic genotypes in Chinese people.

  11. Coexistence of TERT promoter and BRAF mutations in cutaneous melanoma is associated with more clinicopathological features of aggressiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macerola, Elisabetta; Loggini, Barbara; Giannini, Riccardo; Garavello, Giulia; Giordano, Mirella; Proietti, Agnese; Niccoli, Cristina; Basolo, Fulvio; Fontanini, Gabriella

    2015-08-01

    The recently described telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations are recurrent in cutaneous melanoma. Several authors have described an association between these molecular alterations, some histological parameters, and patient survival. BRAF mutations are very frequent in melanoma, but their actual role in the evolution of the disease is still unclear. Here, we investigated the relationship of TERT promoter mutations and BRAF mutations with the most relevant clinicopathological parameters, individually and coexisting, in order to evaluate their role as independent prognostic markers and to determine the effect of their coexistence. A TERT promoter alteration was found in 20 of 53 cases (38 %), significantly associated with histological type, increasing tumor thickness and mitotic rate, more advanced pathologic tumor (pT) stage, and absence of regression. A BRAF mutation was found in 21 of 53 cases (40 %), significantly associated with tumor thickness and presence of metastases in the sentinel lymph node. Coexistence of a TERT promoter and BRAF mutation was detected in 11 of 53 cases (21 %). This was associated with increasing thickness, high mitotic rate, lymph node metastasis, presence of ulceration, and absence of regression. Coexistence of a mutation in the TERT promoter and in the BRAF gene correlated with more prognostically relevant factors than either mutation alone. Our data lead us to hypothesize that TERT promoter and BRAF mutations cooperate in cutaneous melanoma. Further studies in larger cohorts of patients are needed to investigate how this synergistic effect is involved in the evolution of the disease.

  12. Novel and recurrent mutations in lamin A/C in patients with Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, C A; Lanning, R W; McKinney, K Q; Salvino, A R; Cherniske, E; Crowe, C A; Darras, B T; Gominak, S; Greenberg, C R; Grosmann, C; Heydemann, P; Mendell, J R; Pober, B R; Sasaki, T; Shapiro, F; Simpson, D A; Suchowersky, O; Spence, J E

    2001-09-01

    Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) is characterized by slowly progressive muscle wasting and weakness; early contractures of the elbows, Achilles tendons, and spine; and cardiomyopathy associated with cardiac conduction defects. Clinically indistinguishable X-linked and autosomal forms of EDMD have been described. Mutations in the STA gene, encoding the nuclear envelope protein emerin, are responsible for X-linked EDMD, while mutations in the LMNA gene encoding lamins A and C by alternative splicing have been found in patients with autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and sporadic forms of EDMD. We report mutations in LMNA found in four familial and seven sporadic cases of EDMD, including seven novel mutations. Nine missense mutations and two small in-frame deletions were detected distributed throughout the gene. Most mutations (7/11) were detected within the LMNA exons encoding the central rod domain common to both lamins A/C. All of these missense mutations alter residues in the lamin A/C proteins conserved throughout evolution, implying an essential structural and/or functional role of these residues. One severely affected patient possesed two mutations, one specific to lamin A that may modify the phenotype of this patient. Mutations in LMNA were frequently identified among patients with sporadic and familial forms of EDMD. Further studies are needed to identify the factors modifying disease phenotype among patients harboring mutations within lamin A/C and to determine the effect of various mutations on lamin A/C structure and function.

  13. PPARγ mutations, lipodystrophy and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astapova, Olga; Leff, Todd

    2014-11-01

    The focus of this review is the lipodystrophy syndrome caused by mutation in the PPARγ nuclear receptor - partial familial lipodystrophy FPLD3. To provide a broader context for how these mutations act to generate the clinical features of partial lipodystrophy we will review the basic biology of PPARγ and also survey the set PPARγ genetic variants that do not cause lipodystrophy, but are nonetheless associated with clinically related syndromes, specifically type 2 diabetes.

  14. Gene mutations in hepatocellular adenomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raft, Marie B; Jørgensen, Ernö N; Vainer, Ben

    2015-01-01

    is associated with bi-allelic mutations in the TCF1 gene and morphologically has marked steatosis. β-catenin activating HCA has increased activity of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and is associated with possible malignant transformation. Inflammatory HCA is characterized by an oncogene-induced inflammation due....... This review offers an overview of the reported gene mutations associated with hepatocellular adenomas together with a discussion of the diagnostic and prognostic value....

  15. Alterations o