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Sample records for mutation carriers results

  1. Reproductive Decision-Making in MMR Mutation Carriers After Results Disclosure: Impact of Psychological Status in Childbearing Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffour, Jacqueline; Combes, Audrey; Crapez, Evelyne; Boissière-Michot, Florence; Bibeau, Frédéric; Senesse, Pierre; Ychou, Marc; Courraud, Julie; de Forges, Hélène; Roca, Lise

    2016-06-01

    Reproductive techniques such as prenatal diagnosis (PND) or preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), although debated, are legally forbidden in France in case of Lynch syndrome. The preference of mutation carriers about their reproductive options is not systematically considered in France. We aimed to prospectively assess the reproductive preferences of mismatch repair mutation carriers consulting in our institution (2003-2010, n = 100). We also considered the short- and long-term post-disclosure psychological impact using the Impact of Events Scale-Revised questionnaire to measure the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in those patients. Complete data were obtained for 34 respondents (17 males, 17 females, median age of 33.5 years [22-59]). Seventeen respondents (57 %) preferred spontaneous natural conception versus 28 % and 35 % choosing PND and PGD, respectively. At results disclosure, respondents mainly explained their distress by fear of premature death (43 %) and transmitting mutated genes (42 %). One year later, this last fear remained predominant in 55 % of subjects. None of the main socio-demographical, psychological or medical variables (including fear of transmitting mutations) was significantly associated with the reproductive preferences. Results disclosure had a real and time-decreasing psychological impact on mutation carriers. Reproductive techniques, expected to decrease the hereditary risk, were not significantly preferred to natural conception.

  2. Cancer spectrum in DNA mismatch repair gene mutation carriers: results from a hospital based Lynch syndrome registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Mala; Wei, Chongjuan; Chen, Jinyun; Amos, Christopher I; Lynch, Patrick M; Lu, Karen H; Lucio, Laura A; Boyd-Rogers, Stephanie G; Bannon, Sarah A; Mork, Maureen E; Frazier, Marsha L

    2012-09-01

    The spectrum of cancers seen in a hospital based Lynch syndrome registry of mismatch repair gene mutation carriers was examined to determine the distribution of cancers and examine excess cancer risk. Overall there were 504 cancers recorded in 368 mutation carriers from 176 families. These included 236 (46.8 %) colorectal and 268 (53.2 %) extracolonic cancers. MLH1 mutation carriers had a higher frequency of colorectal cancers whereas MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 mutation carriers had more extracolonic cancers although these differences were not statistically significant. Men had fewer extracolonic cancers than colorectal (45.3 vs. 54.7 %), whereas women had more extracolonic than colorectal cancers (59.0 vs. 41.0 %). The mean age at diagnosis overall for extracolonic cancers was older than for colorectal, 49.1 versus 44.8 years (P ≤ 0.001). As expected, the index cancer was colorectal in 58.1 % of patients and among the extracolonic index cancers, endometrial was the most common (13.8 %). A significant number of non-Lynch syndrome index cancers were recorded including breast (n = 5) prostate (n = 3), thyroid (n = 3), cervix (n = 3), melanoma (n = 3), and 1 case each of thymoma, sinus cavity, and adenocarcinoma of the lung. However, standardized incidence ratios calculated to assess excess cancer risk showed that only those cancers known to be associated with Lynch syndrome were significant in our sample. We found that Lynch syndrome patients can often present with cancers that are not considered part of Lynch syndrome. This has clinical relevance both for diagnosis of Lynch syndrome and surveillance for cancers of different sites during follow-up of these patients.

  3. Pathology of Breast and Ovarian Cancers among BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers: Results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mavaddat, Nasim; Barrowdale, Daniel; Andrulis, Irene L

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previously, small studies have found that BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast tumors differ in their pathology. Analysis of larger datasets of mutation carriers should allow further tumor characterization.METHODS: We used data from 4,325 BRCA1 and 2,568 BRCA2 mutation carriers to analyze the patho...

  4. Pathology of breast and ovarian cancers among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavaddat, Nasim; Barrowdale, Daniel; Andrulis, Irene L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Eccles, Diana; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ramus, Susan J.; Spurdle, Amanda; Robson, Mark; Sherman, Mark; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Couch, Fergus J.; Engel, Christoph; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Southey, Melissa C.; Terry, Mary Beth; Goldgar, David; O’Malley, Frances; John, Esther M.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Hansen, Thomas v O; Nielsen, Finn C.; Osorio, Ana; Stavropoulou, Alexandra; Benítez, Javier; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Barile, Monica; Volorio, Sara; Pasini, Barbara; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Putignano, Anna Laura; Ottini, Laura; Radice, Paolo; Hamann, Ute; Rashid, Muhammad U.; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Kriege, Mieke; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Evans, D. Gareth; Brewer, Carole; Walker, Lisa; Rogers, Mark T.; Side, Lucy E.; Houghton, Catherine; Weaver, JoEllen; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Kast, Karin; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Doroteha; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Schönbuchner, Ines; Gevensleben, Heidrun; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Belotti, Muriel; Barjhoux, Laure; Isaacs, Claudine; Peshkin, Beth N.; Caldes, Trinidad; de al Hoya, Miguel; Cañadas, Carmen; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Heikkilä, Päivi; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Arason, Adalgeir; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Dumont, Martine; Simard, Jacques; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; D’Andrea, Emma; Yan, Max; Fox, Stephen; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Rubinstein, Wendy; Tung, Nadine; Garber, Judy E.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Szabo, Csilla; Offit, Kenneth; Sakr, Rita; Gaudet, Mia M.; Singer, Christian F.; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Rappaport, Christine; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Sokolenko, Anna; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Senter, Leigha; Sweet, Kevin; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben; Caligo, Maria; Aretini, Paolo; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeld, Anna; Henriksson, Karin; Steele, Linda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nussbaum, Bob; Beattie, Mary; Odunsi, Kunle; Sucheston, Lara; Gayther, Simon A; Nathanson, Kate; Gross, Jenny; Walsh, Christine; Karlan, Beth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous small studies found that BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast tumors differ in their pathology. Analysis of larger datasets of mutation carriers should allow further tumor characterization. Methods We used data from 4,325 BRCA1 and 2,568 BRCA2 mutation carriers to analyze the pathology of invasive breast, ovarian and contralateral breast cancers. Results There was strong evidence that the proportion of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast tumors decreased with age at diagnosis among BRCA1 (p-trend=1.2×10−5) but increased with age at diagnosis among BRCA2 carriers (p-trend=6.8×10−6). The proportion of triple negative tumors decreased with age at diagnosis in BRCA1 carriers but increased with age at diagnosis of BRCA2 carriers. In both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers, ER-negative tumors were of higher histological grade than ER-positive tumors (Grade 3 vs. Grade 1, p=1.2×10−13 for BRCA1 and p=0.001 for BRCA2). ER and progesterone receptor (PR) expression were independently associated with mutation carrier status (ER-positive odds ratio (OR) for BRCA2=9.4, 95%CI:7.0-12.6 and PR-positive OR=1.7, 95%CI:1.3-2.3, under joint analysis). Lobular tumors were more likely to be BRCA2-related (OR for BRCA2=3.3, 95%CI:2.4-4.4, p=4.4×10−14), and medullary tumors BRCA1-related (OR for BRCA2=0.25, 95%CI:0.18-0.35, p=2.3×10−15). ER-status of the first breast cancer was predictive of ER-status of asynchronous contralateral breast cancer (p=0.0004 for BRCA1; p=0.002 for BRCA2). There were no significant differences in ovarian cancer morphology between BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers (serous:67%; mucinous:1%; endometriod:12%; clear-cell:2%). Conclusions/Impact Pathology characteristics of BRCA1 and BRCA2 tumors may be useful for improving risk prediction algorithms and informing clinical strategies for screening and prophylaxis. PMID:22144499

  5. Baseline results from the UK SIGNIFY study: a whole-body MRI screening study in TP53 mutation carriers and matched controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saya, Sibel; Killick, Emma; Thomas, Sarah; Taylor, Natalie; Bancroft, Elizabeth K; Rothwell, Jeanette; Benafif, Sarah; Dias, Alexander; Mikropoulos, Christos; Pope, Jenny; Chamberlain, Anthony; Gunapala, Ranga; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy; Walker, Lisa; Tomkins, Susan; Cook, Jackie; Barwell, Julian; Wiles, Vicki; Limb, Lauren; Eccles, Diana; Leach, Martin O; Shanley, Susan; Gilbert, Fiona J; Hanson, Helen; Gallagher, David; Rajashanker, Bala; Whitehouse, Richard W; Koh, Dow-Mu; Sohaib, S Aslam; Evans, D Gareth; Eeles, Rosalind A

    2017-07-01

    In the United Kingdom, current screening guidelines for TP53 germline mutation carriers solely recommends annual breast MRI, despite the wide spectrum of malignancies typically seen in this group. This study sought to investigate the role of one-off non-contrast whole-body MRI (WB MRI) in the screening of asymptomatic TP53 mutation carriers. 44 TP53 mutation carriers and 44 population controls were recruited. Scans were read by radiologists blinded to participant carrier status. The incidence of malignancies diagnosed in TP53 mutation carriers against general population controls was calculated. The incidences of non-malignant relevant disease and irrelevant disease were measured, as well as the number of investigations required to determine relevance of findings. In TP53 mutation carriers, 6 of 44 (13.6, 95% CI 5.2-27.4%) participants were diagnosed with cancer during the study, all of which would be considered life threatening if untreated. Two were found to have two primary cancers. Two participants with cancer had abnormalities on the MRI which were initially thought to be benign (a pericardial cyst and a uterine fibroid) but transpired to be sarcomas. No controls were diagnosed with cancer. Fifteen carriers (34.1, 95% CI 20.5-49.9%) and seven controls (15.9, 95% CI 6.7-30.1%) underwent further investigations following the WB MRI for abnormalities that transpired to be benign (p = 0.049). The cancer detection rate in this group justifies a minimum baseline non-contrast WB MRI in germline TP53 mutation carriers. This should be adopted into national guidelines for management of adult TP53 mutation carriers in addition to the current practice of contrast enhanced breast MRI imaging.

  6. Smoking and physical inactivity increase cancer prevalence in BRCA-1 and BRCA-2 mutation carriers: results from a retrospective observational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, Sabine; Yahiaoui-Doktor, Maryam; Dukatz, Ricarda; Lammert, Jacqueline; Ullrich, Mirjam; Engel, Christoph; Pfeifer, Katharina; Basrai, Maryam; Siniatchkin, Michael; Schmidt, Thorsten; Weisser, Burkhard; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Schmutzler, Rita; Bischoff, Stephan C; Halle, Martin; Kiechle, Marion

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this analysis in a pilot study population was to investigate whether we can verify seemingly harmful lifestyle factors such as nicotine and alcohol indulgence, obesity, and physical inactivity, as well as a low socioeconomic status for increased cancer prevalence in a cohort of BRCA 1 and 2 mutation carriers. The analysis data are derived from 68 participants of the lifestyle intervention study LIBRE-1, a randomized, prospective trial that aimed to test the feasibility of a lifestyle modification in BRCA 1 and 2 mutation carriers. At study entry, factors such as medical history, lifestyle behavior, and socioeconomic status were retrospectively documented by interview and the current BMI was determined by clinical examination. The baseline measurements were compared within the cohort, and presented alongside reference values for the German population. Study participants indicating a higher physical activity during their adolescence showed a significantly lower cancer prevalence (p = 0.019). A significant difference in cancer occurrence was observed in those who smoked prior to the disease, and those who did not smoke (p physical activity level than diseased mutation carriers (p = 0.046). The present data in this small cohort of 68 mutation carriers suggest that smoking and low physical activity during adolescence are risk factors for developing breast cancer in women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. Further data of the ongoing LIBRE 2 study are necessary to confirm these findings in a larger cohort of 600 mutation carriers.

  7. Motor pathway excitability in ATP13A2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zittel, S; Kroeger, J; van der Vegt, J P M

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe excitability of motor pathways in Kufor-Rakeb syndrome (PARK9), an autosomal recessive nigro-striatal-pallidal-pyramidal neurodegeneration caused by a mutation in the ATP13A2 gene, using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). METHODS: Five members of a Chilean family...... with an ATP13A2 mutation (one affected mutation carrier (MC) with a compound heterozygous mutation, 4 asymptomatic MC with a single heterozygous mutation) and 11 healthy subjects without mutations were studied. We measured motor evoked potentials (MEP), the contralateral silent period (cSP), short interval....... RESULTS: CSP duration was increased in the symptomatic ATP13A2 MC. The iSP measurements revealed increased interhemispheric inhibition in both the compound heterozygous and the heterozygous MC. CONCLUSION: A compound heterozygous mutation in the ATP13A2 gene is associated with increased intracortical...

  8. Filaggrin loss-of-function mutation R501X and 2282del4 carrier status is associated with fissured skin on the hands: results from a cross-sectional population study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, J P; Ross-Hansen, K; Johansen, J D

    2012-01-01

    Background: Filaggrin metabolites act as osmolytes and are important for skin hydration. Carriers of filaggrin loss-of-function mutations have a higher prevalence of atopic dermatitis and dry skin. There is also evidence to suggest that filaggrin mutations increase the risk of hand eczema in atopic...... whether filaggrin loss-of-function mutations are associated with skin fissures on the hands and/or fingers in the general population. Design: Participants of a population based study were questioned about skin symptom and genotyped for filaggrin mutation, patch tested for nickel allergy and skin prick...... tested. Results: In an adjusted logistic regression analysis, filaggrin mutation status was significantly associated with fissured skin on the hands and/or fingers in adults (OR=1.93; CI95%=1.05-3.55) and a near significant negative interaction with atopic dermatitis (p=0.055), suggesting the effect...

  9. Evaluation of a candidate breast cancer associated SNP in ERCC4 as a risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/BRCA2 (CIMBA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osorio, A.; Milne, R.L.; Pita, G.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In this study we aimed to evaluate the role of a SNP in intron 1 of the ERCC4 gene (rs744154), previously reported to be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in the general population, as a breast cancer risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. METHODS: We have...... genotyped rs744154 in 9408 BRCA1 and 5632 BRCA2 mutation carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) and assessed its association with breast cancer risk using a retrospective weighted cohort approach. RESULTS: We found no evidence of association with breast cancer risk...... for BRCA1 (per-allele HR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.93-1.04, P = 0.5) or BRCA2 (per-allele HR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.89-1.06, P = 0.5) mutation carriers. CONCLUSION: This SNP is not a significant modifier of breast cancer risk for mutation carriers, though weak associations cannot be ruled out Udgivelsesdato: 2009/12/15...

  10. Cortical volumes and atrophy rates in FTD-3 CHMP2B mutation carriers and related non-carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Simon F; Østergaard, Lasse R; Rodell, Anders B

    2008-01-01

    with a mean interval of 16 months and surface based cortical segmentation we measured cortical thickness and volume, and quantified atrophy rates. Cortical thickness and atrophy rates were averaged within major lobes and focal effects were determined by parametric statistical maps. The volumetric atrophy...... in the frontal and occipital lobes, and in the left temporal lobe. Results indicated that cortical thickness has a higher sensitivity for detecting small changes than whole-brain volumetric measures. Comparing mutation carriers with non-carriers revealed increased atrophy rates in mutation carriers bilaterally...

  11. Cancer risks for MLH1 and MSH2 mutation carriers

    OpenAIRE

    Dowty, James G.; Win, Aung K.; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Macrae, Finlay A.; Clendenning, Mark; Antill, Yoland C.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Casey, Graham; Gallinger, Steve; Le Marchand, Loic; Newcomb, Polly A.; Haile, Robert W.; Young, Graeme P.; James, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    We studied 17,576 members of 166 MLH1 and 224 MSH2 mutation-carrying families from the Colon Cancer Family Registry. Average cumulative risks of colorectal cancer (CRC), endometrial cancer (EC) and other cancers for carriers were estimated using modified segregation analysis conditioned on ascertainment criteria. Heterogeneity in risks was investigated using a polygenic risk modifier. Average CRC cumulative risks to age 70 years (95% confidence intervals) for MLH1 and MSH2 mutation carriers, ...

  12. PMS2 monoallelic mutation carriers: the known unknown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodenberger, McKinsey L; Thomas, Brittany C; Riegert-Johnson, Douglas; Boland, C Richard; Plon, Sharon E; Clendenning, Mark; Win, Aung Ko; Senter, Leigha; Lipkin, Steven M; Stadler, Zsofia K; Macrae, Finlay A; Lynch, Henry T; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; de la Chapelle, Albert; Syngal, Sapna; Lynch, Patrick; Parry, Susan; Jenkins, Mark A; Gallinger, Steven; Holter, Spring; Aronson, Melyssa; Newcomb, Polly A; Burnett, Terrilea; Le Marchand, Loïc; Pichurin, Pavel; Hampel, Heather; Terdiman, Jonathan P; Lu, Karen H; Thibodeau, Stephen; Lindor, Noralane M

    2016-01-01

    Germ-line mutations in MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2 have been shown to cause Lynch syndrome. The penetrance of the cancer and tumor spectrum has been repeatedly studied, and multiple professional societies have proposed clinical management guidelines for affected individuals. Several studies have demonstrated a reduced penetrance for monoallelic carriers of PMS2 mutations compared with the other mismatch repair (MMR) genes, but clinical management guidelines have largely proposed the same screening recommendations for all MMR gene carriers. The authors considered whether enough evidence existed to propose new screening guidelines specific to PMS2 mutation carriers with regard to age at onset and frequency of colonic screening. Published reports of PMS2 germ-line mutations were combined with unpublished cases from the authors' research registries and clinical practices, and a discussion of potential modification of cancer screening guidelines was pursued. A total of 234 monoallelic PMS2 mutation carriers from 170 families were included. Approximately 8% of those with colorectal cancer (CRC) were diagnosed before age 30, and each of these tumors presented on the left side of the colon. As it is currently unknown what causes the early onset of CRC in some families with monoallelic PMS2 germline mutations, the authors recommend against reducing cancer surveillance guidelines in families found having monoallelic PMS2 mutations in spite of the reduced penetrance.Genet Med 18 1, 13-19.

  13. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumor subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulligan, Anna Marie; Couch, Fergus J; Barrowdale, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    BRCA1 carriers, SNP rs2981582 (FGFR2) exhibited the biggest difference based on ER status (per-allele HR for ER-positive=1.35, 95%CI:1.17-1.56 vs HR=0.91, 95%CI:0.85-0.98 for ER-negative, P-heterogeneity=6.5e-6). In contrast, SNP rs2046210 at 6q25.1 near ESR1 was primarily associated with ER...... in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers defined by estrogen (ER) or progesterone receptor (PR) status of the tumor. METHODS: We used genotype data on up to 11,421 BRCA1 and 7,080 BRCA2 carriers, of whom 4,310 had been affected with breast cancer and had information on either ER or PR status of the tumor......, to assess the associations of twelve loci with breast cancer tumor characteristics. Associations were evaluated using a retrospective cohort approach. RESULTS: The results suggested stronger associations with ER-positive breast cancer than ER-negative for eleven loci in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Among...

  14. Parity and the risk of breast and ovarian cancer in and mutation carriers

    OpenAIRE

    Milne , Roger L.; Osorio , Ana; Ramón Y Cajal , Teresa; Baiget , Montserrat; Lasa , Adriana; Diaz-Rubio , Eduardo; Hoya , Miguel; Caldés , Trinidad; Teulé , Alex; Lázaro , Conxi; Blanco , Ignacio; Balmaña , Judith; Sánchez-Ollé , Gessamí; Vega , Ana; Blanco , Ana

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Environmental or lifestyle factors are likely to explain part of the heterogeneity in breast and ovarian cancer risk among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We assessed parity as a risk modifier in 515 and 503 Spanish female carriers of mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, respectively. Hazard ratios (HR) and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using weighted Cox proportional hazards regression, adjusted for year of birth and study centre. The result...

  15. Heteroduplex analysis of the dystrophin gene: Application to point mutation and carrier detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prior, T.W.; Papp, A.C.; Snyder, P.J.; Sedra, M.S.; Western, L.M.; Bartolo, C.; Mendell, J.R. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Moxley, R.T. [Univ. of Rochester Medical Center, NY (United States)

    1994-03-01

    Approximately one-third of Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients have undefined mutations in the dystrophin gene. For carrier and prenatal studies in families without detectable mutations, the indirect restriction fragment length polymorphism linkage approach is used. Using a multiplex amplification and heteroduplex analysis of dystrophin exons, the authors identified nonsense mutations in two DMD patients. Although the nonsense mutations are predicted to severely truncate the dystrophin protein, both patients presented with mild clinical courses of the disease. As a result of identifying the mutation in the affected boys, direct carrier studies by heteroduplex analysis were extended to other relatives. The authors conclude that the technique is not only ideal for mutation detection but is also useful for diagnostic testing. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Brain white matter 1 H MRS in Leber optic neuropathy mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostojic, Jelena; Jancic, Jasna; Kozic, Dusko

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study was conducted in order to test the hypothesis that proton MR spectroscopic (1H MRS) profile of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) mutation carriers group (including both symptomatic and asymptomatic) differs from group of healthy individuals and to determine metabolite...... or ratio that contributes most to differentiation. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We performed single voxel 1H MRS in normal appearing white matter of eighteen LHON mtDNA mutation carriers bearing one of three LHON mtDNA point mutations and in fifty control subjects. RESULTS: ANOVA showed significant difference...

  17. Aromatase expression is increased in BRCA1 mutation carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chand, Ashwini L; KConFab; Simpson, Evan R; Clyne, Colin D

    2009-01-01

    Until recently, the molecular mechanisms explaining increased incidence of ovarian and breast cancers in carriers of BRCA1 gene mutations had not been clearly understood. Of significance is the finding that BRCA1 negatively regulates aromatase expression in vitro. Our objective was to characterise aromatase gene (CYP19A1) and its promoter expression in breast adipose and ovarian tissue in BRCA1 mutation carriers and unaffected controls. We measured aromatase transcripts, total and promoter-specific (PII, PI.3, PI.4) in prophylactic oophorectomy or mastectomy, therapeutic mastectomy, ovarian and breast tissue from unaffected women. We demonstrate that the lack of functional BRCA1 protein correlates to higher aromatase levels in 85% of BRCA1 mutation carriers. This increase is mediated by aberrant transcriptional regulation of aromatase; in breast adipose by increases in promoter II/I.3 and I.4-specific transcripts; and in the ovary with elevation in promoter I.3 and II-specific transcripts. Understanding the link between BRCA1 and aromatase is significant in terms of understanding why carcinogenesis is restricted to estrogen-producing tissues in BRCA1 mutation carriers

  18. Evaluation of current prediction models for Lynch syndrome: updating the PREMM5 model to identify PMS2 mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goverde, A; Spaander, M C W; Nieboer, D; van den Ouweland, A M W; Dinjens, W N M; Dubbink, H J; Tops, C J; Ten Broeke, S W; Bruno, M J; Hofstra, R M W; Steyerberg, E W; Wagner, A

    2018-07-01

    Until recently, no prediction models for Lynch syndrome (LS) had been validated for PMS2 mutation carriers. We aimed to evaluate MMRpredict and PREMM5 in a clinical cohort and for PMS2 mutation carriers specifically. In a retrospective, clinic-based cohort we calculated predictions for LS according to MMRpredict and PREMM5. The area under the operator receiving characteristic curve (AUC) was compared between MMRpredict and PREMM5 for LS patients in general and for different LS genes specifically. Of 734 index patients, 83 (11%) were diagnosed with LS; 23 MLH1, 17 MSH2, 31 MSH6 and 12 PMS2 mutation carriers. Both prediction models performed well for MLH1 and MSH2 (AUC 0.80 and 0.83 for PREMM5 and 0.79 for MMRpredict) and fair for MSH6 mutation carriers (0.69 for PREMM5 and 0.66 for MMRpredict). MMRpredict performed fair for PMS2 mutation carriers (AUC 0.72), while PREMM5 failed to discriminate PMS2 mutation carriers from non-mutation carriers (AUC 0.51). The only statistically significant difference between PMS2 mutation carriers and non-mutation carriers was proximal location of colorectal cancer (77 vs. 28%, p PMS2 mutation carriers (AUC 0.77) and overall (AUC 0.81 vs. 0.72). We validated these results in an external cohort of 376 colorectal cancer patients, including 158 LS patients. MMRpredict and PREMM5 cannot adequately identify PMS2 mutation carriers. Adding location of colorectal cancer to PREMM5 may improve the performance of this model, which should be validated in larger cohorts.

  19. Survival analysis of cancer risk reduction strategies for BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurian, Allison W; Sigal, Bronislava M; Plevritis, Sylvia K

    2010-01-10

    Women with BRCA1/2 mutations inherit high risks of breast and ovarian cancer; options to reduce cancer mortality include prophylactic surgery or breast screening, but their efficacy has never been empirically compared. We used decision analysis to simulate risk-reducing strategies in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and to compare resulting survival probability and causes of death. We developed a Monte Carlo model of breast screening with annual mammography plus magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from ages 25 to 69 years, prophylactic mastectomy (PM) at various ages, and/or prophylactic oophorectomy (PO) at ages 40 or 50 years in 25-year-old BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. With no intervention, survival probability by age 70 is 53% for BRCA1 and 71% for BRCA2 mutation carriers. The most effective single intervention for BRCA1 mutation carriers is PO at age 40, yielding a 15% absolute survival gain; for BRCA2 mutation carriers, the most effective single intervention is PM, yielding a 7% survival gain if performed at age 40 years. The combination of PM and PO at age 40 improves survival more than any single intervention, yielding 24% survival gain for BRCA1 and 11% for BRCA2 mutation carriers. PM at age 25 instead of age 40 offers minimal incremental benefit (1% to 2%); substituting screening for PM yields a similarly minimal decrement in survival (2% to 3%). Although PM at age 25 plus PO at age 40 years maximizes survival probability, substituting mammography plus MRI screening for PM seems to offer comparable survival. These results may guide women with BRCA1/2 mutations in their choices between prophylactic surgery and breast screening.

  20. Targeted Prostate Cancer Screening in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers: Results from the Initial Screening Round of the IMPACT Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bancroft, Elizabeth K.; Page, Elizabeth C.; Castro, Elena; Lilja, Hans; Vickers, Andrew; Sjoberg, Daniel; Assel, Melissa; Foster, Christopher S.; Mitchell, Gillian; Drew, Kate; Mæhle, Lovise; Axcrona, Karol; Evans, D. Gareth; Bulman, Barbara; Eccles, Diana; McBride, Donna; van Asperen, Christi; Vasen, Hans; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Ringelberg, Janneke; Cybulski, Cezary; Wokolorczyk, Dominika; Selkirk, Christina; Hulick, Peter J.; Bojesen, Anders; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Lam, Jimmy; Taylor, Louise; Oldenburg, Rogier; Cremers, Ruben; Verhaegh, Gerald; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Blanco, Ignacio; Salinas, Monica; Cook, Jackie; Rosario, Derek J.; Buys, Saundra; Conner, Tom; Ausems, Margreet G.; Ong, Kai-Ren; Hoffman, Jonathan; Domchek, Susan; Powers, Jacquelyn; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Maia, Sofia; Foulkes, William D.; Taherian, Nassim; Ruijs, Marielle; van Os, Theo

    2014-01-01

    Background: Men with germline breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) or breast cancer 2, early onset (BRCA2) gene mutations have a higher risk of developing prostate cancer (PCa) than noncarriers. IMPACT (Identification of Men with a genetic predisposition to ProstAte Cancer: Targeted screening in

  1. Targeted Prostate Cancer Screening in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers : Results from the Initial Screening Round of the IMPACT Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bancroft, Elizabeth K.; Page, Elizabeth C.; Castro, Elena; Lilja, Hans; Vickers, Andrew; Sjoberg, Daniel; Assel, Melissa; Foster, Christopher S.; Mitchell, Gillian; Drew, Kate; Maehle, Lovise; Axcrona, Karol; Evans, D. Gareth; Bulman, Barbara; Eccles, Diana; McBride, Donna; van Asperen, Christi; Vasen, Hans; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Ringelberg, Janneke; Cybulski, Cezary; Wokolorczyk, Dominika; Selkirk, Christina; Hulick, Peter J.; Bojesen, Anders; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Lam, Jimmy; Taylor, Louise; Oldenburg, Rogier; Cremers, Ruben; Verhaegh, Gerald; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Blanco, Ignacio; Salinas, Monica; Cook, Jackie; Rosario, Derek J.; Buys, Saundra; Conner, Tom; Ausems, Margreet G.; Ong, Kai-ren; Hoffman, Jonathan; Domchek, Susan; Powers, Jacquelyn; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Maia, Sofia; Foulkes, William D.; Taherian, Nassim; Ruijs, Marielle; Helderman-van den Enden, Apollonia T.

    Background: Men with germline breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) or breast cancer 2, early onset (BRCA2) gene mutations have a higher risk of developing prostate cancer (PCa) than noncarriers. IMPACT (Identification of Men with a genetic predisposition to ProstAte Cancer: Targeted screening in

  2. Presymptomatic cerebral blood flow changes in CHMP2B mutation carriers of familial frontotemporal dementia (FTD-3), measured with MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunau, Line Andersen; Mouridsen, Kim; Rodell, Anders

    2012-01-01

    1 images. Perfusion data were then extracted from seven regions-of-interest, normalised to white matter and statistically compared between carriers and non-carriers. RESULTS: For SE, contrasts between carriers and non-carriers showed significant differences in temporal, occipital and parietal lobes...... and in hippocampus. There was no evidence of changes from baseline to follow-up. For GRE, there were no significant differences between carriers and non-carriers. CONCLUSIONS: Significantly decreased CBF was found in presymptomatic CHMP2B mutation carriers in occipital-and parietal lobes. Comparing SE with GRE, data...

  3. Evaluation of a candidate breast cancer associated SNP in ERCC4 as a risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/BRCA2 (CIMBA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osorio, A; Milne, R L; Pita, G

    2009-01-01

    Background:In this study we aimed to evaluate the role of a SNP in intron 1 of the ERCC4 gene (rs744154), previously reported to be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in the general population, as a breast cancer risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.Methods:We have geno...

  4. Association of PHB 1630 C > T and MTHFR 677 C > T polymorphisms with breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers: results from a multicenter study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jakubowska, A.; Rozkrut, D.; Antoniou, A.; Hamann, U.; Scott, R. J.; McGuffog, L.; Healy, S.; Sinilnikova, O. M.; Rennert, G.; Lejbkowicz, F.; Flugelman, A.; Andrulis, I. L.; Glendon, G.; Ozcelik, H.; Thomassen, M.; Paligo, M.; Aretini, P.; Kantala, J.; Aroer, B.; Von Wachenfeldt, A.; Liljegren, A.; Loman, N.; Herbst, K.; Kristoffersson, U.; Rosenquist, R.; Karlsson, P.; Stenmark-Askmalm, M.; Melin, B.; Nathanson, K. L.; Domchek, S. M.; Byrski, T.; Huzarski, T.; Gronwald, J.; Menkiszak, J.; Cybulski, C.; Serrano, P.; Osorio, A.; Cajal, T. R.; Tsitlaidou, M.; Benítez, J.; Gilbert, M.; Rookus, M.; Aalfs, C. M.; Kluijt, I.; Boessenkool-Pape, J. L.; Meijers-Heijboer, H. E. J.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; van Asperen, C. J.; Blok, M. J.; Nelen, M. R.; van den Ouweland, A. M. W.; Seynaeve, C.; van der Luijt, R. B.; Devilee, P.; Easton, D. F.; Peock, S.; Frost, D.; Platte, R.; Ellis, S. D.; Fineberg, E.; Evans, D. G.; Lalloo, F.; Eeles, R.; Jacobs, C.; Adlard, J.; Davidson, R.; Eccles, D.; Cole, T.; Cook, J.; Godwin, A.; Bove, B.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D.; Caux-Moncoutier, V.; Belotti, M.; Tirapo, C.; Mazoyer, S.; Barjhoux, L.; Boutry-Kryza, N.; Pujol, P.; Coupier, I.; Peyrat, J.-P.; Vennin, P.; Muller, D.; Fricker, J.-P.; Venat-Bouvet, L.; Johannsson, O. Th; Isaacs, C.; Schmutzler, R.; Wappenschmidt, B.; Meindl, A.; Arnold, N.; Varon-Mateeva, R.; Niederacher, D.; Sutter, C.; Deissler, H.; Preisler-Adams, S.; Simard, J.; Soucy, P.; Durocher, F.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Beesley, J.; Chen, X.; Rebbeck, T.; Couch, F.; Wang, X.; Lindor, N.; Fredericksen, Z.; Pankratz, V. S.; Peterlongo, P.; Bonanni, B.; Fortuzzi, S.; Peissel, B.; Szabo, C.; Mai, P. L.; Loud, J. T.; Lubinski, J.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Ellis, Steve D.; Fineberg, Elena; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Gregory, Helen; Morrison, Patrick; Jeffers, Lisa; Cole, Trevor; Ong, Kai-Ren; Hoffman, Jonathan; Donaldson, Alan; James, Margaret; Paterson, Joan; Downing, Sarah; Taylor, Amy; Murray, Alexandra; Rogers, Mark T.; McCann, Emma; Kennedy, M. John; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Drummond, Sarah; Brewer, Carole; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Hill, Kathryn; Davidson, Rosemarie; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Gibson, Sarah; Haque, Eshika; Tobias, Ed; Duncan, Alexis; Izatt, Louise; Jacobs, Chris; Langman, Caroline; Whaite, Anna; Dorkins, Huw; Barwell, Julian; Adlard, Julian; Chu, Carol; Miller, Julie; Ellis, Ian; Houghton, Catherine; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Taylor, Jane; Side, Lucy; Male, Alison; Berlin, Cheryl; Eason, Jacqueline; Collier, Rebecca; Douglas, Fiona; Claber, Oonagh; Jobson, Irene; Walker, Lisa; McLeod, Diane; Halliday, Dorothy; Durell, Sarah; Stayner, Barbara; Eeles, Ros; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Kohut, Kelly; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Mitra, Anita; Robertson, Lisa; Cook, Jackie; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Hodgson, Shirley; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eddy, Charlotte; Tripathi, Vishakha; Attard, Virginia; Eccles, Diana; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; McBride, Donna; Smalley, Sarah; Sinilnikova, Olga; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Verny-Pierre, Carole; Giraud, Sophie; Léone, Mélanie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Buecher, Bruno; Houdayer, Claude; Moncoutier, Virginie; Belotti, Muriel; Tirapo, Carole; de Pauw, Antoine; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Byrde, Véronique; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Remenieras, Audrey; Eisinger, François; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Coupier, Isabelle; Pujol, Pascal; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révillion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Rouleau, Etienne; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Barouk-Simonet, Emmanuelle; Bonnet, Françoise; Bubien, Virginie; Sevenet, Nicolas; Longy, Michel; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélène; Rebischung, Christine; Peysselon, Magalie; Coron, Fanny; Faivre, Laurence; Prieur, Fabienne; Lebrun, Marine; Kientz, Caroline; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Delnatte, Capucine; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Lynch, Henry T.; Snyder, Carrie L.; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; Verhoef, S.; Verheus, M.; van't Veer, L. J.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; Rookus, M. A.; Collée, M.; Jager, A.; Hooning, M. J.; Tilanus-Linthorst, M. M. A.; Wijnen, J. T.; Vreeswijk, M. P.; Tollenaar, R. A.; Ligtenberg, M. J.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Ausems, M. G.; van Os, T. A.; Gille, J. J. P.; Waisfisz, Q.; Gomez-Garcia, E. B.; van Roozendaal, C. E.; Blok, Marinus J.; Caanen, B.; van der Hout, A. H.; Mourits, M. J.; Vasen, H. F.; Szabo, C. I.; Zikan, Michal; Pohlreich, Petr; Kleibl, Zdenek; Foretova, Lenka; Eva, Machackova; Miroslava, Lukesova; Claes, Kathleen; de Leeneer, Kim; Poppe, Bruce; de Paepe, Anne; Karlsson, Per; Nordling, Margareta; Bergman, Annika; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Liedgren, Sigrun; Borg, Ake; Loman, Niklas; Olsson, Håkan; Soller, Maria; Jernström, Helena; Harbst, Katja; Henriksson, Karin; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Liljegren, Annelie; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Melin, Beatrice; Grönberg, Henrik; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Emanuelsson, Monica; Ehrencrona, Hans; Rosenquist, Richard; Dahl, Niklas

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The variable penetrance of breast cancer in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers suggests that other genetic or environmental factors modify breast cancer risk. Two genes of special interest are prohibitin (PHB) and methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), both of which are important either

  5. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumour subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulligan, Anna Marie; Couch, Fergus J.; Barrowdale, Daniel; Domchek, Susan M.; Eccles, Diana; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ramus, Susan J.; Robson, Mark; Sherman, Mark; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Lee, Andrew; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Hansen, Thomas vO; Nielsen, Finn C.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Osorio, Ana; Muñoz-Repeto, Iván; Durán, Mercedes; Godino, Javier; Pertesi, Maroulio; Benítez, Javier; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Cattaneo, Elisa; Bonanni, Bernardo; Viel, Alessandra; Pasini, Barbara; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Savarese, Antonella; Bernard, Loris; Radice, Paolo; Hamann, Ute; Verheus, Martijn; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Wijnen, Juul; Gómez García, Encarna B.; Nelen, Marcel R.; Kets, C. Marleen; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine M. A.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; van Os, Theo; Rookus, Matti; Frost, Debra; Jones, J. Louise; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Cook, Jackie; Donaldson, Alan; Dorkins, Huw; Gregory, Helen; Eason, Jacqueline; Houghton, Catherine; Barwell, Julian; Side, Lucy E.; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Peock, Susan; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Rhiem, Kerstin; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ruehl, Ina; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Kast, Karin; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Schoenbuchner, Ines; Fiebig, Britta; Heinritz, Wolfram; Schäfer, Dieter; Gevensleben, Heidrun; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Fassy-Colcombet, Marion; Cornelis, François; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Léoné, Mélanie; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Pujol, Pascal; Coupier, Isabelle; Lebrun, Marine; Kientz, Caroline; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Isaacs, Claudine; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Soucy, Penny; Dumont, Martine; Simard, Jacques; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; D'Andrea, Emma; Fox, Stephen; Yan, Max; Rebbeck, Tim; Olopade, Olufunmilayo; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Lynch, Henry T.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Tomlinson, Gail E.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Szabo, Csilla; Offit, Kenneth; Sakr, Rita; Gaudet, Mia; Bhatia, Jasmine; Kauff, Noah; Singer, Christian F.; tea, Muy-Kheng; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Imyanitov, Evgeny; O'Malley, Frances P.; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Glendon, Gordon; Toland, Amanda E.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Soller, Maria; Henriksson, Karin; Wachenfeldt, von Anna; Arver, Brita; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Karlsson, Per; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Beattie, Mary; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; John, Esther M.; Daly, Mary B.; Buys, Saundra M.; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy; Miron, Alexander F.; Goldgar, David; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Ellis, Steve; Fineberg, Elena; Platte, Radka; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Morrison, Patrick; Jeffers, Lisa; Cole, Trevor; Ong, Kai-Ren; Hoffman, Jonathan; James, Margaret; Paterson, Joan; Downing, Sarah; Taylor, Amy; Rogers, T.; Kennedy, John M.; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Drummond, Sarah; Brewer, Carole; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Hill, Kathryn; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Gibson, Sarah; Haque, Eshika; Tobias, Ed; Duncan, Alexis; Jacobs, Chris; Langman, Caroline; Whaite, Anna; Chu, Carol; Miller, Julie; Ellis, Ian; Taylor, Jane; Male, Alison; Berlin, Cheryl; Collier, Rebecca; Douglas, Fiona; Claber, Oonagh; Jobson, Irene; Walker, Lisa; McLeod, Diane; Halliday, Dorothy; Durell, Sarah; Stayner, Barbara; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Kohut, Kelly; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Mitra, Anita; Robertson, Lisa; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Hodgson, Shirley; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eddy, Charlotte; Tripathi, Vishakha; Attard, Virginia; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; McBride, Donna; Smalley, Sarah; Barjhoux, Laure; Verny-Pierre, Carole; Giraud, Sophie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Buecher, Bruno; Houdayer, Claude; Belotti, Muriel; Tirapo, Carole; de Pauw, Antoine; Roussy, Gustave; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Byrde, Véronique; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bérard, Léon; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Baclesse, François; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Eisinger, François; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révillion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Rouleau, Etienne; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Barouk-Simonet, Emmanuelle; Bonnet, Françoise; Bubien, Virginie; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélène; Rebischung, Christine; Peysselon, Magalie; Coron, Fanny; Faivre, Laurence; Prieur, Fabienne; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Lacassagne, Antoine; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Delnatte, Capucine; Snyder, Carrie L.; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; Verhoef, S.; Verheus, M.; van 't Veer, L. J.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; Collée, M.; van den Ouweland, A. M. W.; Jager, A.; Hooning, M. J.; van Asperen, C. J.; Wijnen, J. T.; Vreeswijk, M. P.; Tollenaar, R. A.; Devilee, P.; Ligtenberg, M. J.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Ausems, M. G.; Aalfs, C. M.; Gille, J. J. P.; Waisfisz, Q.; Gomez-Garcia, E. B.; van Roozendaal, C. E.; Blok, Marinus J.; Caanen, B.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; van der Hout, A. H.; Mourits, M. J.; Vasen, H. F.; Nordling, Margareta; Bergman, Annika; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Liedgren, Sigrun; Borg, Åke; Loman, Niklas; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Jernström, Helena; Harbst, Katja; Lindblom, Annika; Liljegren, Annelie; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Melin, Beatrice; Grönberg, Henrik; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Emanuelsson, Monica; Ehrencrona, Hans; Rosenquist, Richard; Dahl, Niklas

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are differentially associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. It is currently unknown how these alleles are associated with different breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2

  6. Evaluation of the XRCC1 gene as a phenotypic modifier in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. Results from the consortium of investigators of modifiers of BRCA1/BRCA2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osorio, A.; Milne, R. L.; Alonso, R.; Pita, G.; Peterlongo, P.; Teulé, A.; Nathanson, K. L.; Domchek, S. M.; Rebbeck, T.; Lasa, A.; Konstantopoulou, I.; Hogervorst, F. B.; Verhoef, S.; van Dooren, M. F.; Jager, A.; Ausems, M. G. E. M.; Aalfs, C. M.; van Asperen, C. J.; Vreeswijk, M.; Waisfisz, Q.; van Roozendaal, C. E.; Ligtenberg, M. J.; Easton, D. F.; Peock, S.; Cook, M.; Oliver, C. T.; Frost, D.; Curzon, B.; Evans, D. G.; Lalloo, F.; Eeles, R.; Izatt, L.; Davidson, R.; Adlard, J.; Eccles, D.; Ong, K.-r; Douglas, F.; Downing, S.; Brewer, C.; Walker, L.; Nevanlinna, H.; Aittomäki, K.; Couch, F. J.; Fredericksen, Z.; Lindor, N. M.; Godwin, A.; Isaacs, C.; Caligo, M. A.; Loman, N.; Jernström, H.; Barbany-Bustinza, G.; Liljegren, A.; Ehrencrona, H.; Stenmark-Askmalm, M.; Feliubadaló, L.; Manoukian, S.; Peissel, B.; Zaffaroni, D.; Bonanni, B.; Fortuzzi, S.; Johannsson, O. T.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Chen, X.-C.; Beesley, J.; Spurdle, A. B.; Sinilnikova, O. M.; Healey, S.; McGuffog, L.; Antoniou, A. C.; Brunet, J.; Radice, P.; Benítez, J.; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; Verheus, M.; van 't Veer, L. J.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; Rookus, M. A.; Collée, M.; van den Ouweland, A. M. W.; Hooning, M. J.; Tilanus-Linthorst, M. M. A.; Seynaeve, C.; Wijnen, J. T.; Vreeswijk, M. P.; Tollenaar, R. A.; Devilee, P.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Ausems, M. G.; van der Luijt, R. B.; van Os, T. A.; Gille, J. J. P.; Meijers-Heijboer, H. E. J.; Gomez-Garcia, E. B.; Blok, Marinus J.; Caanen, B.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; van der Hout, A. H.; Mourits, M. J.; Vasen, H. F.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Gregory, Helen; Morrison, Patrick; Jeffers, Lisa; Cole, Trevor; McKeown, Carole; Ong, Kai-Ren; Hoffman, Jonathan; Donaldson, Alan; Paterson, Joan; Downing, Sarah; Taylor, Amy; Murray, Alexandra; Rogers, Mark T.; McCann, Emma; Kennedy, M. John; Barton, David; East, South; Porteous, Mary; Drummond, Sarah; Brewer, Carole; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Hill, Kathryn; Davidson, Rosemarie; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Gibson, Sarah; Izatt, Louise; Jacobs, Chris; Langman, Caroline; Whaite, Anna; Dorkins, Huw; Barwell, Julian; Adlard, Julian; Chu, Carol; Miller, Julie; Ellis, Ian; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Taylor, Jane; Side, Lucy; Male, Alison; Berlin, Cheryl; Eason, Jacqueline; Collier, Rebecca; Douglas, Fiona; Claber, Oonagh; Walker, Lisa; McLeod, Diane; Halliday, Dorothy; Durell, Sarah; Stayner, Barbara; Eeles, Ros; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Kohut, Kelly; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Mitra, Anitra; Robertson, Lisa; Cook, Jackie; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Hodgson, Shirley; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eddy, Charlotte; Tripathi, Vishakha; Attard, Virginia; Eccles, Diana; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; McBride, Donna; Smalley, Sarah; Godwin, A. K.; Karlsson, Per; Nordling, Margareta; Bergman, Annika; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Stenmark- Askmalm, Marie; Liedgren, Sigrun; Borg, Ake; Loman, Niklas; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Jernström, Helena; Harbst, Katja; Henriksson, Karin; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; Wachenfeldt, Anna von; Liljegren, Annelie; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Melin, Beatrice; Grönberg, Henrik; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Emanuelsson, Monica; Ehrencrona, Hans; Rosenquist Brandell, Richard; Dahl, Niklas

    2011-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in DNA repair are good candidates to be tested as phenotypic modifiers for carriers of mutations in the high-risk susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2. The base excision repair (BER) pathway could be particularly interesting given the relation

  7. Evaluation of a candidate breast cancer associated SNP in ERCC4 as a risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/BRCA2 (CIMBA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osorio, A.; Milne, R. L.; Pita, G.; Peterlongo, P.; Heikkinen, T.; Simard, J.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Spurdle, A. B.; Beesley, J.; Chen, X.; Healey, S.; Neuhausen, S. L.; Ding, Y. C.; Couch, F. J.; Wang, X.; Lindor, N.; Manoukian, S.; Barile, M.; Viel, A.; Tizzoni, L.; Szabo, C. I.; Foretova, L.; Zikan, M.; Claes, K.; Greene, M. H.; Mai, P.; Rennert, G.; Lejbkowicz, F.; Barnett-Griness, O.; Andrulis, I. L.; Ozcelik, H.; Weerasooriya, N.; Gerdes, A.-M.; Thomassen, M.; Cruger, D. G.; Caligo, M. A.; Friedman, E.; Kaufman, B.; Laitman, Y.; Cohen, S.; Kontorovich, T.; Gershoni-Baruch, R.; Dagan, E.; Jernström, H.; Askmalm, M. S.; Arver, B.; Malmer, B.; Domchek, S. M.; Nathanson, K. L.; Brunet, J.; Ramón Y Cajal, T.; Yannoukakos, D.; Hamann, U.; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; Verhoef, S.; Gómez García, E. B.; Wijnen, J. T.; van den Ouweland, A.; Easton, D. F.; Peock, S.; Cook, M.; Oliver, C. T.; Frost, D.; Luccarini, C.; Evans, D. G.; Lalloo, F.; Eeles, R.; Pichert, G.; Cook, J.; Hodgson, S.; Morrison, P. J.; Douglas, F.; Godwin, A. K.; Sinilnikova, O. M.; Barjhoux, L.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D.; Moncoutier, V.; Giraud, S.; Cassini, C.; Olivier-Faivre, L.; Révillion, F.; Peyrat, J.-P.; Muller, D.; Fricker, J.-P.; Lynch, H. T.; John, E. M.; Buys, S.; Daly, M.; Hopper, J. L.; Terry, M. B.; Miron, A.; Yassin, Y.; Goldgar, D.; Singer, C. F.; Gschwantler-Kaulich, D.; Pfeiler, G.; Spiess, A.-C.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Johannsson, O. T.; Kirchhoff, T.; Offit, K.; Kosarin, K.; Piedmonte, M.; Rodriguez, G. C.; Wakeley, K.; Boggess, J. F.; Basil, J.; Schwartz, P. E.; Blank, S. V.; Toland, A. E.; Montagna, M.; Casella, C.; Imyanitov, E. N.; Allavena, A.; Schmutzler, R. K.; Versmold, B.; Engel, C.; Meindl, A.; Ditsch, N.; Arnold, N.; Niederacher, D.; Deissler, H.; Fiebig, B.; Varon-Mateeva, R.; Schaefer, D.; Froster, U. G.; Caldes, T.; de la Hoya, M.; McGuffog, L.; Antoniou, A. C.; Nevanlinna, H.; Radice, P.; Benítez, J.; Simard, Jacques; Durocher, Francine; Laframboise, Rachel; Plante, Marie; Bridge, Peter; Parboosingh, Jilian; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Lesperance, Bernard; Karlsson, Per; Nordling, Margareta; Bergman, Annika; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Liedgren, Sigrun; Borg, Ake; Loman, Niklas; Olsson, Hakan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Jernstrom, Helena; Harbst, Katja; Henriksson, Karin; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Liljegren, Annelie; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Malmer, Beatrice; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Emanuelsson, Monica; Ehrencrona, Hans; Brandell, Richard Rosenquist; Dahl, Niklas; Hogervorst, Frans; Verhoef, Senno; Pijpe, Anouk; van 't Veer, Laura; van Leeuwen, Flora; Rookus, Matti; Collée, Margriet; van den Ouweland, Ans; Kriege, Mieke; Schutte, Mieke; Hooning, Maartje; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tollenaar, Rob; van Asperen, Christi; Wijnen, Juul; Vreeswijk, Maaike; Devilee, Peter; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn; Ausems, Margreet; van der Luijt, Rob; Aalfs, Cora; van Os, Theo; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Gille, Hans; Gomez-Garcia, Encarna; Blok, Rien; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Gregory, Helen; Morrison, Patrick; Cole, Trevor; McKeown, Carole; Taylor, Amy; Donaldson, Alan; Paterson, Joan; Murray, Alexandra; Rogers, Mark; McCann, Emma; Kennedy, John; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Brewer, Carole; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Davidson, Rosemarie; Murday, Murday; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Izatt, Louise; Pichert, Gabriella; Langman, Caroline; Dorkins, Huw; Barwell, Julian; Chu, Carol; Bishop, Tim; Miller, Julie; Ellis, Ian; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Holt, Felicity; Male, Alison; Robinson, Anne; Gardiner, Carol; Douglas, Fiona; Claber, Oonagh; Walker, Lisa; Durell, Sarah; Eeles, Ros; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancrof, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Mitra, Anita; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Cook, Jackie; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Hodgson, Shirley; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eccles, Diana; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; Tyler, Emma; McBride, Donna; Sinilnikova, Olga; Barjhoux, Laure; Giraud, Sophie; Léone, Mélanie; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Houdayer, Claude; Moncoutier, Virginie; Belotti, Muriel; de Pauw, Antoine; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Byrde, Véronique; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Bourdon, Violaine; Eisinger, François; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Coupier, Isabelle; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révillion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Rouleau, Etienne; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélène; Rebischung, Christine; Cassini, Cécile; Olivier-Faivre, Laurence; Prieur, Fabienne; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Frénay, Marc; Lynch, Henry T.

    2009-01-01

    In this study we aimed to evaluate the role of a SNP in intron 1 of the ERCC4 gene (rs744154), previously reported to be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in the general population, as a breast cancer risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We have genotyped rs744154 in

  8. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumour subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); F.J. Couch (Fergus); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); S.M. Domchek (Susan); D. Eccles (Diana); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); S.J. Ramus (Susan); M. Robson (Mark); M.E. Sherman (Mark); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); A. Lee (Andrew); L. McGuffog (Lesley); S. Healey (Sue); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); F.C. Nielsen (Finn); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); A. Osorio (Ana); I. Muñoz-Repeto (Iván); M. Durán (Mercedes); J. Godino (Javier); M. Pertesi (Maroulio); J. Benítez (Javier); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (D.); E. Cattaneo (Elisa); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); A. Viel (Alessandra); B. Pasini (Barbara); L. Papi (Laura); L. Ottini (Laura); A. Savarese (Antonella); L. Bernard (Loris); P. Radice (Paolo); U. Hamann (Ute); M. Verheus (Martijn); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); M.R. Nelen (Marcel); C.M. Kets; C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); M.M.A. Tilanus-Linthorst (Madeleine); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); T.V. Os (Theo); M.A. Rookus (Matti); D. Frost (Debra); J.L. Jones (J Louise); D.G. Evans (Gareth); F. Lalloo (Fiona); R. Eeles (Rosalind); L. Izatt (Louise); J.W. Adlard (Julian); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); J. Cook (Jackie); A. Donaldson (Alan); H. Dorkins (Huw); H. Gregory (Helen); J. Eason (Jacqueline); C. Houghton (Catherine); J. Barwell (Julian); L. Side (Lucy); E. McCann (Emma); A. Murray (Alexandra); S. Peock (Susan); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); C.W. Engel (Christoph); A. Meindl (Alfons); I. Ruehl (Ina); N. Arnold (Norbert); D. Niederacher (Dieter); C. Sutter (Christian); H. Deissler (Helmut); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); K. Kast (Karin); S. Preisler-Adams (Sabine); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); I. Schoenbuchner (Ines); B. Fiebig (Britta); W. Heinritz (Wolfram); D. Schäfer (Dieter); H. Gevensleben (Heidrun); V. Caux-Moncoutier (Virginie); M. Fassy-Colcombet (Marion); F. Cornelis (Franco̧is); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); M. Léone (Mélanie); N. Boutry-Kryza (N.); A. Hardouin (Agnès); P. Berthet (Pascaline); D.W. Muller (Danièle); J.P. Fricker (Jean Pierre); I. Mortemousque (Isabelle); P. Pujol (Pascal); I. Coupier (Isabelle); M. Lebrun (Marine); C. Kientz (Caroline); M. Longy (Michel); N. Sevenet (Nicolas); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); C. Isaacs (Claudine); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); T. Heikinen (Tuomas); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); I. Blanco (Ignacio); C. Lazaro (Conxi); R.B. Barkardottir (Rosa); P. Soucy (Penny); M. Dumont (Martine); J. Simard (Jacques); M. Montagna (Marco); S. Tognazzo (Silvia); E. D'Andrea (Emma); S.B. Fox (Stephen); M. Yan (Max); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); H. Lynch (Henry); P.A. Ganz (Patricia); G. Tomlinson (Gail); X. Wang (Xing); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); C. Szabo (Csilla); K. Offit (Kenneth); R. Sakr (Rita); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); K.P. Bhatia (Kailash); N. Kauff (Noah); C.F. Singer (Christian); M.-K. Tea; D. Gschwantler-Kaulich (Daphne); A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); P.L. Mai (Phuong); M.H. Greene (Mark); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); F.P. O'Malley (Frances); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); G. Glendon (Gord); A.E. Toland (Amanda); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); M. Thomassen (Mads); T.A. Kruse (Torben); U.B. Jensen; A.-B. Skytte (Anne-Bine); M.A. Caligo (Maria); M. Soller (Maria); K. Henriksson (Karin); A. von Wachenfeldt (Anna); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); M. Stenmark-Askmalm (M.); P. Karlsson (Per); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); M.S. Beattie (Mary); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); K.B. Moysich (Kirsten); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); J. Gross (Jenny); E.M. John (Esther); M.B. Daly (Mary); S.S. Buys (Saundra); M.C. Southey (Melissa); J.L. Hopper (John); M.-B. Terry (Mary-Beth); W. Chung (Wendy); A. Miron (Alexander); D. Goldgar (David); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); D.F. Easton (Douglas); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Previous studies have demonstrated that common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are differentially associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. It is currently unknown how these alleles are associated with different breast cancer subtypes

  9. Cognitive impairment in the preclinical stage of dementia in FTD-3 CHMP2B mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokholm, Jette; Teasdale, Thomas W; Johannsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    -3). Subjects were assessed with neuropsychological tests in 2002, 2005 and 2010. RESULTS: Cross-sectional analyses showed that the mutation carriers scored lower on tests of psychomotor speed, working memory, executive functions and verbal memory than a control group consisting of not-at-risk family...... members and spouses. Longitudinal analyses showed a gradual decline in psychomotor speed, working memory capacity and global executive measures in the group of non-demented mutation carriers that was not found in the control group. In contrast, there were no significant group differences in domain scores...

  10. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumor subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulligan, Anna Marie; Couch, Fergus J; Barrowdale, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    BRCA1 carriers, SNP rs2981582 (FGFR2) exhibited the biggest difference based on ER status (per-allele HR for ER-positive=1.35, 95%CI:1.17-1.56 vs HR=0.91, 95%CI:0.85-0.98 for ER-negative, P-heterogeneity=6.5e-6). In contrast, SNP rs2046210 at 6q25.1 near ESR1 was primarily associated with ER...... subtypes. As more risk modifying variants are identified, incorporating these associations into breast cancer subtype-specific risk models may improve clinical management for mutation carriers....

  11. Leucocytes Mutation load Declines with Age in Carriers of the m.3243A>G Mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langdahl, Jakob Høgild; Larsen, Martin; Frost, Morten

    2018-01-01

    Carriers of the mitochondrial mutation m.3243A>G presents highly variable phenotypes including mitochondrial encephalomyopaty, lactoacidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS). We conducted a follow-up study to evaluate changes in leucocyte heteroplasmy and the clinical phenotypes in m.3243A...

  12. The Effect of Reproductive Factors on Breast Cancer Presentation in Women Who Are BRCA Mutation Carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju-Yeon; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; Kang, Young-Joon; Han, Wonshik; Noh, Woo-Chul; Jung, Yongsik; Moon, Byung-In; Kang, Eunyoung; Park, Sung-Shin; Lee, Min Hyuk; Park, Bo Young; Lee, Jong Won; Noh, Dong-Young

    2017-09-01

    Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes confer increased risks for breast cancers. However, the clinical presentation of breast cancer among women who are carriers of the BRCA1 or BRCA2 ( BRCA1/2 carriers) mutations is heterogenous. We aimed to identify the effects of the reproductive histories of women with the BRCA1/2 mutations on the clinical presentation of breast cancer. We retrospectively analyzed clinical data on women with proven BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations who were recruited to the Korean Hereditary Breast Cancer study, from 2007 to 2014. Among the 736 women who were BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, a total of 483 women had breast cancers. Breast cancer diagnosis occurred at significantly younger ages in women who experienced menarche at ≤14 years of age, compared to those who experienced menarche at >14 years of age (37.38±7.60 and 43.30±10.11, respectively, p women with the BRCA2 mutation. The prevalence of advanced stages (stage II or III vs. stage I) of disease in parous women was higher than in nulliparous women (68.5% vs. 55.2%, p =0.043). This association was more pronounced in women with the BRCA2 mutation (hazard ratio, 2.67; p =0.014). Our results suggest that reproductive factors, such as the age of onset of menarche and the presence of parity, are associated with the clinical presentation patterns of breast cancer in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

  13. Diagnostic markers for the detection of ovarian cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daphne Gschwantler-Kaulich

    Full Text Available Screening for ovarian cancer (OC in women at high risk consists of a combination of carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125 and transvaginal ultrasound, despite their low sensitivity and specificity. This could be improved by the combination of several biomarkers, which has been shown in average risk patients but has not been investigated until now in female BRCA mutation carriers.Using a multiplex, bead-based, immunoassay system, we analyzed the concentrations of leptin, prolactin, osteopontin, insulin-like growth factor II, macrophage inhibitory factor, CA125 and human epididymis antigen 4 in 26 healthy wild type women, 26 healthy BRCA1 mutation carriers, 28 wildtype OC patients and 26 OC patients with BRCA1 mutation.Using the ROC analysis, we found a high overall sensitivity of 94.3% in differentiating healthy controls from OC patients with comparable results in the wildtype subgroup (sensitivity 92.8%, AUC = 0.988; p = 5.2e-14 as well as in BRCA1 mutation carriers (sensitivity 95.2%, AUC = 0.978; p = 1.7e-15 at an overall specificity of 92.3%. The used algorithm also allowed to identify healthy BRCA1 mutation carriers when compared to healthy wildtype women (sensitivity 88.4%, specificity 80.7%, AUC = 0.895; p = 6e-08, while this was less pronounced in patients with OC (sensitivity 66.7%, specificity 67.8%, AUC = 0.724; p = 0.00065.We have developed an algorithm, which can differentiate between healthy women and OC patients and have for the first time shown, that such an algorithm can also be used in BRCA mutation carriers. To clarify a suggested benefit to the existing early detection program, large prospective trials with mainly early stage OC cases are warranted.

  14. Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk and Risk Reduction in Jewish BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelman, Brian S.; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Friedman, Sue; Friebel, Tara M.; Dubitsky, Shera; Schonberger, Niecee Singer; Shoretz, Rochelle; Singer, Christian F.; Blum, Joanne L.; Tung, Nadine; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Lynch, Henry T.; Snyder, Carrie; Garber, Judy E.; Schildkraut, Joellen; Daly, Mary B.; Isaacs, Claudine; Pichert, Gabrielle; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Couch, Fergus J.; van't Veer, Laura; Eeles, Rosalind; Bancroft, Elizabeth; Evans, D. Gareth; Ganz, Patricia A.; Tomlinson, Gail E.; Narod, Steven A.; Matloff, Ellen; Domchek, Susan; Rebbeck, Timothy R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Mutations in BRCA1/2 dramatically increase the risk of both breast and ovarian cancers. Three mutations in these genes (185delAG, 5382insC, and 6174delT) occur at high frequency in Ashkenazi Jews. We evaluated how these common Jewish mutations (CJMs) affect cancer risks and risk reduction. Methods Our cohort comprised 4,649 women with disease-associated BRCA1/2 mutations from 22 centers in the Prevention and Observation of Surgical End Points Consortium. Of these women, 969 were self-identified Jewish women. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate breast and ovarian cancer risks, as well as risk reduction from risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO), by CJM and self-identified Jewish status. Results Ninety-one percent of Jewish BRCA1/2-positive women carried a CJM. Jewish women were significantly more likely to undergo RRSO than non-Jewish women (54% v 41%, respectively; odds ratio, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.44 to 2.42). Relative risks of cancer varied by CJM, with the relative risk of breast cancer being significantly lower in 6174delT mutation carriers than in non-CJM BRCA2 carriers (hazard ratio, 0.35; 95% CI, 0.18 to 0.69). No significant difference was seen in cancer risk reduction after RRSO among subgroups. Conclusion Consistent with previous results, risks for breast and ovarian cancer varied by CJM in BRCA1/2 carriers. In particular, 6174delT carriers had a lower risk of breast cancer. This finding requires additional confirmation in larger prospective and population-based cohort studies before being integrated into clinical care. PMID:22430266

  15. Electrocardiographic features of sarcomere mutation carriers with and without clinically overt hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lakdawala, Neal K; Thune, Jens Jakob; Maron, Barry J

    2011-01-01

    In hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC), electrocardiographic (ECG) changes have been postulated to be an early marker of disease, detectable in sarcomere mutation carriers when left ventricular (LV) wall thickness is still normal. However, the ECG features of mutation carriers have not been fully...

  16. Anatomical patterns of dermatitis in adult filaggrin mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heede, Nina G; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Thuesen, Betina H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Common filaggrin (FLG) null mutations are associated with severe and early onset of atopic dermatitis (AD). To date, few studies have investigated anatomical patterns of dermatitis and none has been conducted in the general population. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated patterns of dermatitis...... by use of questionnaires. Participants were genotyped for common FLG mutations. A history of AD was defined by the United Kingdom Working Party's diagnostic criteria. RESULTS: The frequency of foot dermatitis in the general population was associated with FLG genotype (P = .014). However, when...... stratification of FLG genotype and AD was performed, we found that FLG mutations increased the prevalence (odds ratios) of foot dermatitis (odds ratio 10.41; 95% confidence interval 5.27-20.60) and persistent hand dermatitis (odds ratio 17.57; 95% confidence interval 8.60-35.89) only in participants with AD...

  17. TMEM106B gene polymorphism is associated with age at onset in granulin mutation carriers and plasma granulin protein levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruchaga, Carlos; Graff, Caroline; Chiang, Huei-Hsin; Wang, Jun; Hinrichs, Anthony L.; Spiegel, Noah; Bertelsen, Sarah; Mayo, Kevin; Norton, Joanne B.; Morris, John C.; Goate, Alison

    2011-01-01

    Objective A recent genome-wide association study for frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TAR DNA-binding protein inclusions (FTLD-TDP), identified rs1990622 (TMEM106B) as a risk factor for FTLD-TDP. In this study we tested whether rs1990622 is associated with age at onset (AAO) in granulin (GRN) mutation carriers and with plasma GRN levels in mutation carriers and healthy elderly individuals. Design Rs1990622 was genotyped in GRN mutation carriers and tested for association with AAO using the Kaplan-Meier and a Cox proportional hazards model. Subjects We analyzed 50 affected and unaffected GRN mutation carriers from four previously reported FTLD-TDP families (HDDD1, FD1, HDDD2 and the Karolinska family). GRN plasma levels were also measured in 73 healthy, elderly individuals. Results The risk allele of rs1990622 is associated with a mean decrease of the age at onset of thirteen years (p=9.9×10−7), with lower plasma granulin levels in both healthy older adults (p = 4×10−4) and GRN mutation carriers (p=0.0027). Analysis of the HAPMAP database identified a non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism, rs3173615 (T185S) in perfect linkage disequilibrium with rs1990622. Conclusions The association of rs1990622 with AAO explains, in part, the wide range in the age at onset of disease among GRN mutation carriers. We hypothesize that rs1990622 or another variant in linkage disequilibrium could act in a manner similar to APOE in Alzheimer’s disease, increasing risk for disease in the general population and modifying AAO in mutation carriers. Our results also suggest that genetic variation in TMEM106B may influence risk for FTLD-TDP by modulating secreted levels of GRN. PMID:21220649

  18. Reproductive and hormonal factors, and ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Rookus, Matti; Andrieu, Nadine

    2009-01-01

    carriers seemed to be greater among more recent users. Tubal ligation was associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer for BRCA1 carriers (hazard ratio, 0.42; 95% confidence intervals, 0.22-0.80; P = 0.008). The number of ovarian cancer cases in BRCA2 mutation carriers was too small to draw definitive...

  19. Association of TMEM106B gene polymorphism with age at onset in granulin mutation carriers and plasma granulin protein levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruchaga, Carlos; Graff, Caroline; Chiang, Huei-Hsin; Wang, Jun; Hinrichs, Anthony L; Spiegel, Noah; Bertelsen, Sarah; Mayo, Kevin; Norton, Joanne B; Morris, John C; Goate, Alison

    2011-05-01

    To test whether rs1990622 (TMEM106B) is associated with age at onset (AAO) in granulin (GRN) mutation carriers and with plasma GRN levels in mutation carriers and healthy, elderly individuals. Rs1990622 (TMEM106B) was identified as a risk factor for frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TAR DNA-binding protein inclusions (FTLD-TDP) in a recent genome-wide association. Rs1990622 was genotyped in GRN mutation carriers and tested for association with AAO using the Kaplan-Meier method and a Cox proportional hazards model. Alzheimer's Disease Research Center. Subjects  We analyzed 50 affected and unaffected GRN mutation carriers from 4 previously reported FTLD-TDP families (HDDD1, FD1, HDDD2, and the Karolinska family). The GRN plasma levels were also measured in 73 healthy, elderly individuals. Age at onset and GRN plasma levels. The risk allele of rs1990622 was associated with a mean decrease of the AAO of 13 years (P = 9.9 × 10(-7)) and with lower plasma GRN levels in both healthy older adults (P = 4 × 10(-4)) and GRN mutation carriers (P = .0027). Analysis of the HapMap database identified a nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphism rs3173615 (T185S) in perfect linkage disequilibrium with rs1990622. The association of rs1990622 with AAO explains, in part, the wide range in the AAO of disease among GRN mutation carriers. We hypothesize that rs1990622 or another variant in linkage disequilibrium could act in a manner similar to APOE in Alzheimer disease, increasing risk for disease in the general population and modifying AAO in mutation carriers. Our results also suggest that genetic variation in TMEM106B may influence risk for FTLD-TDP by modulating secreted levels of GRN.

  20. Cancer risk in MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 mutation carriers; different risk profiles may influence clinical management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramsoekh Dewkoemar

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lynch syndrome (LS is associated with a high risk for colorectal cancer (CRC and extracolonic malignancies, such as endometrial carcinoma (EC. The risk is dependent of the affected mismatch repair gene. The aim of the present study was to calculate the cumulative risk of LS related cancers in proven MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 mutation carriers. Methods The studypopulation consisted out of 67 proven LS families. Clinical information including mutation status and tumour diagnosis was collected. Cumulative risks were calculated and compared using Kaplan Meier survival analysis. Results MSH6 mutation carriers, both males and females had the lowest risk for developing CRC at age 70 years, 54% and 30% respectively and the age of onset was delayed by 3-5 years in males. With respect to endometrial carcinoma, female MSH6 mutation carriers had the highest risk at age 70 years (61% compared to MLH1 (25% and MSH2 (49%. Also, the age of EC onset was delayed by 5-10 years in comparison with MLH1 and MSH2. Conclusions Although the cumulative lifetime risk of LS related cancer is similar, MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 mutations seem to cause distinguishable cancer risk profiles. Female MSH6 mutation carriers have a lower CRC risk and a higher risk for developing endometrial carcinoma. As a consequence, surveillance colonoscopy starting at age 30 years instead of 20-25 years is more suitable. Also, prophylactic hysterectomy may be more indicated in female MSH6 mutation carriers compared to MLH1 and MSH2 mutation carriers.

  1. Progranulin Levels in Plasma and Cerebrospinal Fluid in Granulin Mutation Carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lieke H.H. Meeter

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pathogenic mutations in the granulin gene (GRN are causative in 5-10% of patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD, mostly leading to reduced progranulin protein (PGRN levels. Upcoming therapeutic trials focus on enhancing PGRN levels. Methods: Fluctuations in plasma PGRN (n = 41 and its relationship with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, n = 32 and specific single nucleotide polymorphisms were investigated in pre- and symptomatic GRN mutation carriers and controls. Results: Plasma PGRN levels were lower in carriers than in controls and showed a mean coefficient of variation of 5.3% in carriers over 1 week. Although plasma PGRN correlated with CSF PGRN in carriers (r = 0.54, p = 0.02, plasma only explained 29% of the variability in CSF PGRN. rs5848, rs646776 and rs1990622 genotypes only partly explained the variability of PGRN levels between subjects. Conclusions: Plasma PGRN is relatively stable over 1 week and therefore seems suitable for treatment monitoring of PGRN-enhancing agents. Since plasma PGRN only moderately correlated with CSF PGRN, CSF sampling will additionally be needed in therapeutic trials.

  2. Detection of mismatch repair gene germline mutation carrier among Chinese population with colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Hei-Ying; Zhao, Ronghua; Liu, Xiufang; Li, Vicky Ka Ming; Ding, Yijiang; Yang, Bolin; Geng, Jianxiang; Lai, Rensheng; Ding, Shuqing; Ni, Min

    2008-01-01

    1 mutation. Mutations were commonly located in exon 7 and 12 of MSH2 and exon 5 of MSH6. Right colonic lesions and mucinous carcinoma were not common in MSI carriers. Our data may imply that the characteristics of HNPCC in the Chinese population are probably different from those of Western countries. Application of NCI recommended criteria may not be effective enough to identify Chinese HNPCC families. Further studies are necessary to echo or refute our results so as to make the NCI recommendation more universally applicable

  3. Risk of malignant paraganglioma in SDHB-mutation and SDHD-mutation carriers: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulsteijn, L.T.; Dekkers, O.M.; Hes, F.J.; Smit, J.W.A.; Corssmit, E.P.

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis on the risk of developing malignant paraganglioma (PGL) in SDHB-mutation and SDHD-mutation carriers. PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, COCHRANE and Academic Search Premier (2000-August 2011) and references of key

  4. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Rudolph, Anja; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Hamann, Ute; Wilkening, Stefan; Chen, Bowang; Rookus, Matti A.; Schmidt, Marjanka K; van der Baan, Frederieke H.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Walker, Logan C.; Lose, Felicity; Maia, Ana-Teresa; Montagna, Marco; Matricardi, Laura; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Chung, Wendy K.; Miron, Alex; Southey, Melissa C.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Jønson, Lars; Osorio, Ana; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Benitez, Javier; Conway, Edye E.; Blazer, Kathleen R.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Barile, Monica; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Mariette, Frederique; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Papi, Laura; Martayan, Aline; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Vratimos, Athanassios; Fostira, Florentia; Garber, Judy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth R.; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley V.; Ellis, Steve; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K.; Claes, Kathleen; Van Maerken, Tom; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Buecher, Bruno; Delnatte, Capucine; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Damiola, Francesca; Coupier, Isabelle; Barjhoux, Laure; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Golmard, Lisa; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Belotti, Muriel; Piedmonte, Marion; Friedlander, Michael L.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Copeland, Larry J; de la Hoya, Miguel; Segura, Pedro Perez; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; van Os, Theo A.M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P.G.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet G.E.M.; van Doorn, Helena C.; Collée, J. Margriet; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Arason, Adalgeir; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Olswold, Curtis; Couch, Fergus J.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I.; Offit, Kenneth; Corines, Marina; Jacobs, Lauren; Robson, Mark E.; Zhang, Liying; Joseph, Vijai; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng M.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Borg, Åke; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Friedman, Eitan

    2014-01-01

    Background BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and non-genetic modifying factors. In this study we evaluated the putative role of variants in many candidate modifier genes. Methods Genotyping data from 15,252 BRCA1 and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers, for known variants (n=3,248) located within or around 445 candidate genes, were available through the iCOGS custom-designed array. Breast and ovarian cancer association analysis was performed within a retrospective cohort approach. Results The observed p-values of association ranged between 0.005-1.000. None of the variants was significantly associated with breast or ovarian cancer risk in either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, after multiple testing adjustments. Conclusion There is little evidence that any of the evaluated candidate variants act as modifiers of breast and/or ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Impact Genome-wide association studies have been more successful at identifying genetic modifiers of BRCA1/2 penetrance than candidate gene studies. PMID:25336561

  5. A non-synonymous polymorphism in IRS1 modifies risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and ovarian cancer in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yuan C.; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Shani-Shimon–Paluch; Kaufman, Bella; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Byrski, Tomasz; Osorio, Ana; Cajal, Teresa Ramóny; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; Aalfs, Cora M.; de Lange, Judith L.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; van Asperen, Christi J.; García, Encarna B. Gómez; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Jager, Agnes; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Easton, Douglas F.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Tischkowitz, Marc; Godwin, Andrew K.; Pathak, Harsh; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Léoné, Mélanie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Dreyfus, Hélène; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Sokolowska, Johanna; Buys, Saundra; Daly, Mary; Miron, Alex; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy; John, Esther M; Southey, Melissa; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F; Maria, Muy-Kheng Tea; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Johannsson, Oskar Th.; Offit, Kenneth; Sarrel, Kara; Gaudet, Mia M.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Piedmonte, Marion R; Andrews, Lesley; Cohn, David; DeMars, Leslie R.; DiSilvestro, Paul; Rodriguez, Gustavo; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Isaacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Ramus, Susan J; Sucheston, Lara; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Ganz, Patricia A.; Beattie, Mary S.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorotehea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Tomlinson, Gail E.; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Garber, Judy E.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Tung, Nadine; Blum, Joanne L.; Narod, Steven A.; Brummel, Sean; Gillen, Daniel L.; Lindor, Noralane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Couch, Fergus J.; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Lee, Andrew; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Neuhausen, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    Background We previously reported significant associations between genetic variants in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and breast cancer risk in women carrying BRCA1 mutations. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the IRS1 variants modified ovarian cancer risk and were associated with breast cancer risk in a larger cohort of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Methods IRS1 rs1801123, rs1330645, and rs1801278 were genotyped in samples from 36 centers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Data were analyzed by a retrospective cohort approach modeling the associations with breast and ovarian cancer risks simultaneously. Analyses were stratified by BRCA1 and BRCA2 status and mutation class in BRCA1 carriers. Results Rs1801278 (Gly972Arg) was associated with ovarian cancer risk for both BRCA1 [Hazard ratio (HR) = 1.43; 95% CI: 1.06–1.92; p = 0.019] and BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR=2.21; 95% CI: 1.39–3.52, p=0.0008). For BRCA1 mutation carriers, the breast cancer risk was higher in carriers with class 2 mutations than class 1 (mutations (class 2 HR=1.86, 95% CI: 1.28–2.70; class 1 HR=0.86, 95%CI:0.69–1.09; p-for difference=0.0006). Rs13306465 was associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 class 2 mutation carriers (HR = 2.42; p = 0.03). Conclusion The IRS1 Gly972Arg SNP, which affects insulin-like growth factor and insulin signaling, modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and breast cancer risk in BRCA1 class 2 mutation carriers. Impact These findings may prove useful for risk prediction for breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. PMID:22729394

  6. Association of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Kuchenbaeker, Karoline B

    2017-01-01

    and ovarian cancer risks in 15,252 BRCA1 and 8211 BRCA2 mutation carriers ascertained from 54 studies participating in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. RESULTS: We identified a region on 11q22.3 that is significantly associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (most...... studies using estrogen receptor (ER)-negative or triple-negative (i.e., ER-, progesterone receptor-, and HER2-negative) cases could therefore be helpful to confirm the association of this locus with breast cancer risk.......1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, a list of 175 genes was developed based of their involvement in cancer-related pathways. METHODS: Using data from a genome-wide map of SNPs associated with allelic expression, we assessed the association of ~320 SNPs located in the vicinity of these genes with breast...

  7. Prediction of Breast and Prostate Cancer Risks in Male BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers Using Polygenic Risk Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecarpentier, Julie; Silvestri, Valentina; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dennis, Joe; McGuffog, Lesley; Soucy, Penny; Leslie, Goska; Rizzolo, Piera; Navazio, Anna Sara; Valentini, Virginia; Zelli, Veronica; Lee, Andrew; Amin Al Olama, Ali; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Southey, Melissa; John, Esther M; Conner, Thomas A; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Steele, Linda; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L; Hansen, Thomas V O; Osorio, Ana; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Toss, Angela; Medici, Veronica; Cortesi, Laura; Zanna, Ines; Palli, Domenico; Radice, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Azzollini, Jacopo; Viel, Alessandra; Cini, Giulia; Damante, Giuseppe; Tommasi, Stefania; Peterlongo, Paolo; Fostira, Florentia; Hamann, Ute; Evans, D Gareth; Henderson, Alex; Brewer, Carole; Eccles, Diana; Cook, Jackie; Ong, Kai-Ren; Walker, Lisa; Side, Lucy E; Porteous, Mary E; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Frost, Debra; Adlard, Julian; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Ros; Ellis, Steve; Tischkowitz, Marc; Godwin, Andrew K; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Dworniczak, Bernd; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Hahnen, Eric; Hauke, Jan; Rhiem, Kerstin; Kast, Karin; Arnold, Norbert; Ditsch, Nina; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wand, Dorothea; Lasset, Christine; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Belotti, Muriel; Damiola, Francesca; Barjhoux, Laure; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Van Heetvelde, Mattias; Poppe, Bruce; De Leeneer, Kim; Claes, Kathleen B M; de la Hoya, Miguel; Garcia-Barberan, Vanesa; Caldes, Trinidad; Perez Segura, Pedro; Kiiski, Johanna I; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Khan, Sofia; Nevanlinna, Heli; van Asperen, Christi J; Vaszko, Tibor; Kasler, Miklos; Olah, Edith; Balmaña, Judith; Gutiérrez-Enríquez, Sara; Diez, Orland; Teulé, Alex; Izquierdo, Angel; Darder, Esther; Brunet, Joan; Del Valle, Jesús; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Lazaro, Conxi; Arason, Adalgeir; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Johannsson, Oskar Th; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Alducci, Elisa; Tognazzo, Silvia; Montagna, Marco; Teixeira, Manuel R; Pinto, Pedro; Spurdle, Amanda B; Holland, Helene; Lee, Jong Won; Lee, Min Hyuk; Lee, Jihyoun; Kim, Sung-Won; Kang, Eunyoung; Kim, Zisun; Sharma, Priyanka; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Lincoln, Anne; Musinsky, Jacob; Gaddam, Pragna; Tan, Yen Y; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F; Loud, Jennifer T; Greene, Mark H; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Andrulis, Irene L; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Senter, Leigha; Bojesen, Anders; Nielsen, Henriette Roed; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Sunde, Lone; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Krogh, Lotte; Kruse, Torben A; Caligo, Maria A; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Teo, Soo-Hwang; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Huo, Dezheng; Nielsen, Sarah M; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Lorenchick, Christa; Jankowitz, Rachel C; Campbell, Ian; James, Paul; Mitchell, Gillian; Orr, Nick; Park, Sue Kyung; Thomassen, Mads; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Schmutzler, Rita K; Antoniou, Antonis C; Ottini, Laura

    2017-07-10

    Purpose BRCA1/2 mutations increase the risk of breast and prostate cancer in men. Common genetic variants modify cancer risks for female carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations. We investigated-for the first time to our knowledge-associations of common genetic variants with breast and prostate cancer risks for male carriers of BRCA1/ 2 mutations and implications for cancer risk prediction. Materials and Methods We genotyped 1,802 male carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 by using the custom Illumina OncoArray. We investigated the combined effects of established breast and prostate cancer susceptibility variants on cancer risks for male carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations by constructing weighted polygenic risk scores (PRSs) using published effect estimates as weights. Results In male carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations, PRS that was based on 88 female breast cancer susceptibility variants was associated with breast cancer risk (odds ratio per standard deviation of PRS, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.19 to 1.56; P = 8.6 × 10 -6 ). Similarly, PRS that was based on 103 prostate cancer susceptibility variants was associated with prostate cancer risk (odds ratio per SD of PRS, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.35 to 1.81; P = 3.2 × 10 -9 ). Large differences in absolute cancer risks were observed at the extremes of the PRS distribution. For example, prostate cancer risk by age 80 years at the 5th and 95th percentiles of the PRS varies from 7% to 26% for carriers of BRCA1 mutations and from 19% to 61% for carriers of BRCA2 mutations, respectively. Conclusion PRSs may provide informative cancer risk stratification for male carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations that might enable these men and their physicians to make informed decisions on the type and timing of breast and prostate cancer risk management.

  8. Expression of estrogen receptor beta in the breast carcinoma of BRCA1 mutation carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litwiniuk, Maria M; Rożnowski, Krzysztof; Filas, Violetta; Godlewski, Dariusz D; Stawicka, Małgorzata; Kaleta, Remigiusz; Bręborowicz, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancers (BC) in women carrying mutations in BRCA1 gene are more frequently estrogen receptor negative than the nonhereditary BC. Nevertheless, tamoxifen has been found to have a protective effect in preventing contralateral tumors in BRCA1 mutation carriers. The identification of the second human estrogen receptor, ERβ, raised a question of its role in hereditary breast cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of ERα, ERβ, PgR (progesterone receptor) and HER-2 expression in breast cancer patients with mutated BRCA1 gene and in the control group. The study group consisted of 48 women with BRCA1 gene mutations confirmed by multiplex PCR assay. The patients were tested for three most common mutations of BRCA1 affecting the Polish population (5382insC, C61G, 4153delA). Immunostaining for ERα, ERβ and PgR (progesterone receptor) was performed using monoclonal antibodies against ERα, PgR (DakoCytomation), and polyclonal antibody against ERβ (Chemicon). The EnVision detection system was applied. The study population comprised a control group of 120 BC operated successively during the years 1998–99. The results of our investigation showed that BRCA1 mutation carriers were more likely to have ERα-negative breast cancer than those in the control group. Only 14.5% of BRCA1-related cancers were ERα-positive compared with 57.5% in the control group (P < 0.0001). On the contrary, the expression of ERβ protein was observed in 42% of BRCA1-related tumors and in 55% of the control group. An interesting finding was that most hereditary cancers (75% of the whole group) were triple-negative: ERα(-)/PgR(-)/HER-2(-) but almost half of this group (44.4%) showed the expression of ERβ. In the case of BRCA1-associated tumors the expression of ERβ was significantly higher than the expression of ERα. This may explain the effectiveness of tamoxifen in preventing contralateral breast cancer development in BRCA1 mutation carriers

  9. Tubal epithelial lesions in salpingo-oophorectomy specimens of BRCA-mutation carriers and controls.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mingels, M.J.J.M.; Roelofsen, T.; Laak, J.A.W.M. van der; Hullu, J.A. de; Ham, M.A.P.C. van; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Bulten, J.; Bol, M.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A precursor lesion for ovarian carcinoma, tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (TIC), has been identified in BRCA-mutation carriers undergoing prophylactic bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (pBSO). Other lesions were also identified in fallopian tubes, but different terminology, interpretation,

  10. Psychological Distress, Anxiety, and Depression of Cancer-Affected BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers: a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringwald, Johanna; Wochnowski, Christina; Bosse, Kristin; Giel, Katrin Elisabeth; Schäffeler, Norbert; Zipfel, Stephan; Teufel, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the intermediate- and long-term psychological consequences of genetic testing for cancer patients has led to encouraging research, but a clear consensus of the psychosocial impact and clinical routine for cancer-affected BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers is still missing. We performed a systematic review of intermediate- and long-term studies investigating the psychological impact like psychological distress, anxiety, and depression in cancer-affected BRCA mutation carriers compared to unaffected mutation carriers. This review included the screening of 1243 studies. Eight intermediate- and long-term studies focusing on distress, anxiety, and depression symptoms among cancer-affected mutation carriers at least six months after the disclosure of genetic testing results were included. Studies reported a great variety of designs, methods, and patient outcomes. We found evidence indicating that cancer-affected mutation carriers experienced a negative effect in relation to psychological well-being in terms of an increase in symptoms of distress, anxiety, and depression in the first months after test disclosure. In the intermediate- and long-term, no significant clinical relevant symptoms occurred. However, none of the included studies used specific measurements, which can clearly identify psychological burdens of cancer-affected mutation carriers. We concluded that current well-implemented distress screening instruments are not sufficient for precisely identifying the psychological burden of genetic testing. Therefore, future studies should implement coping strategies, specific personality structures, the impact of genetic testing, supportive care needs and disease management behaviour to clearly screen for the possible intermediate- and long-term psychological impact of a positive test disclosure.

  11. Risk of breast cancer after a diagnosis of ovarian cancer in BRCA mutation carriers: Is preventive mastectomy warranted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Jacob; Giannakeas, Vasily; Karlan, Beth; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Rosen, Barry; McLaughlin, John; Risch, Harvey; Sun, Ping; Foulkes, William D; Neuhausen, Susan L; Kotsopoulos, Joanne; Narod, Steven A

    2017-05-01

    Preventive breast surgery and MRI screening are offered to unaffected BRCA mutation carriers. The clinical benefit of these two modalities has not been evaluated among mutation carriers with a history of ovarian cancer. Thus, we sought to determine whether or not BRCA mutation carriers with ovarian cancer would benefit from preventive mastectomy or from MRI screening. First, the annual mortality rate for ovarian cancer patients was estimated for a cohort of 178 BRCA mutation carriers from Ontario, Canada. Next, the actuarial risk of developing breast cancer was estimated using an international registry of 509 BRCA mutation carriers with ovarian cancer. A series of simulations was conducted to evaluate the reduction in the probability of death (from all causes) associated with mastectomy and with MRI-based breast surveillance. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the impacts of mastectomy and MRI screening on breast cancer incidence as well as on all-cause mortality. Twenty (3.9%) of the 509 patients developed breast cancer within ten years following ovarian cancer diagnosis. The actuarial risk of developing breast cancer at ten years post-diagnosis, conditional on survival from ovarian cancer and other causes of mortality was 7.8%. Based on our simulation results, among all BRCA mutation-carrying patients diagnosed with stage III/IV ovarian cancer at age 50, the chance of dying before age 80 was reduced by less than 1% with MRI and by less than 2% with mastectomy. Greater improvements in survival with MRI or mastectomy were observed for women who had already survived 10years after ovarian cancer, and for women with stage I or II ovarian cancer. Among BRCA mutation-carrying ovarian cancer patients without a personal history of breast cancer, neither preventive mastectomy nor MRI screening is warranted, except for those who have survived ovarian cancer without recurrence for ten years and for those with early stage ovarian cancer. Copyright © 2017

  12. Do BRCA1/2 mutation carriers have an earlier onset of natural menopause?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tilborg, Theodora C.; Broekmans, Frank J.; Pijpe, Anouk; Schrijver, Lieske H.; Mooij, Thea M.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Verhoef, Senno; Garcia, Encarna B. Gomez; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A.; Adank, Muriel A.; van Asperen, Christi J.; van Doorn, Helena C.; van Os, Theo A.; Bos, Anna M.; Rookus, Matti A.; Ausems, Margreet G.

    Objective: It has been hypothesized that BRCA1/2 mutation carriers have an earlier age at natural menopause (ANM), although to date findings are inconclusive. This study assessed the influence of BRCA mutation status on ANM, and aimed to explore the reasons of inconsistency in the literature.

  13. CSF neurofilament light concentration is increased in presymptomatic CHMP2B mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, Nina; Roos, Peter; Portelius, Erik

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A rare cause of familial frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a mutation in the CHMP2B gene on chromosome 3 (FTD-3), described in a Danish family. Here we examine whether CSF biomarkers change in the preclinical phase of the disease. METHODS: In this cross-sectional explorative study, we...... analyzed CSF samples from 16 mutation carriers and 14 noncarriers from the Danish FTD-3 family. CSF biomarkers included total tau (t-tau) and neurofilament light chain (NfL) as a marker for neurodegeneration, phosphorylated tau (p-tau) as a marker for tau pathology, β-amyloid (Aβ) 38, 40, and 42 (Aβ38, Aβ......40, and Aβ42) to monitor Aβ metabolism, and YKL-40 as a marker of neuroinflammation. Aβ isoform concentrations were measured using a multiplexed immunoassay; t-tau, p-tau, NfL, and YKL-40 concentrations were measured using sandwich ELISAs. RESULTS: CSF NfL concentration was significantly increased...

  14. Heterozygous carriers of a Parkin or PINK1 mutation share a common functional endophenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Nuenen, BF; Siebner, Hartwig; Weiss, MM

    2008-01-01

    inherited Parkinson disease alters the cortical control of sequential finger movements. METHODS: Nonmanifesting individuals carrying a single heterozygous Parkin (n = 13) or PINK1 (n = 9) mutation and 23 healthy controls without these mutations were studied with functional MRI (fMRI). During f...... rostral dorsal premotor cortex in mutation carriers but not in controls. Task-related activation of these premotor areas was similar in carriers of a Parkin or PINK1 mutation. CONCLUSION: Mutations in different genes linked to recessively inherited Parkinson disease are associated with an additional...... recruitment of rostral supplementary motor area and rostral dorsal premotor cortex during a simple motor sequence task. These premotor areas were recruited independently of the underlying genotype. The observed activation most likely reflects a "generic" compensatory mechanism to maintain motor function...

  15. Correlation of ophthalmic examination with carrier status in females potentially harboring a severe Norrie disease gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Arif O; Aldahmesh, Mohammed A; Meyer, Brian

    2008-04-01

    To correlate ophthalmic findings with carrier status for a severe Norrie disease (ND) gene mutation (C95F). Prospective interventional case series. Six potential carriers and 1 obligate carrier from a family harboring the mutation. An ophthalmologist blind to the pedigree performed a full ophthalmic examination for the 7 asymptomatic family members. A peripheral blood sample was collected from each for ND gene sequencing. Ophthalmic examination findings (with attention to the presence or absence of retinal findings) and results of ND gene sequencing. Three carriers were identified by molecular genetics, and all 3 of them had peripheral retinal abnormality. However, 3 of the 4 genetically identified noncarriers also exhibited peripheral retinal abnormality. Two of these noncarriers with retinal findings were the offspring of a confirmed noncarrier. The genetically identified noncarrier with a normal peripheral retinal examination was the daughter of an obligate carrier. The presence of peripheral retinal changes was not useful for carrier prediction in a family harboring ND. There are likely additional loci responsible for phenotypic expression.

  16. Influence of the MDM2 single nucleotide polymorphism SNP309 on tumour development in BRCA1 mutation carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Peter W

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The MDM2 gene encodes a negative regulator of the p53 tumour suppressor protein. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in the MDM2 promoter (a T to G exchange at nucleotide 309 has been reported to produce accelerated tumour formation in individuals with inherited p53 mutations. We have investigated the effect of the MDM2 SNP309 on clinical outcome in a cohort of patients with germline mutations of BRCA1. Methods Genomic DNA was obtained for 102 healthy controls and 116 patients with established pathogenic mutations of BRCA1 and Pyrosequencing technology™ was used to determine the genotype at the MDM2 SNP309 locus. Results The polymorphism was present in 52.9% of the controls (G/T in 37.3% and G/G in 15.6% and 58.6% of the BRCA1 mutation carriers (47.4% G/T and 11.2% G/G. Incidence of malignancy in female BRCA1 carriers was not significantly higher in SNP309 carriers than in wildtype (T/T individuals (72.7% vs. 75.6%, p = 1.00. Mean age of diagnosis of first breast cancer was 41.2 years in the SNP309 G/G genotype carriers, 38.6 years in those with the SNP309 G/T genotype and 39.0 years in wildtype subjects (p = 0.80. Conclusion We found no evidence that the MDM2 SNP309 accelerates tumour development in carriers of known pathogenic germline mutations of BRCA1.

  17. Alcohol Consumption and the Risk of Colorectal Cancer for Mismatch Repair Gene Mutation Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashti, S Ghazaleh; Buchanan, Daniel D; Jayasekara, Harindra; Ait Ouakrim, Driss; Clendenning, Mark; Rosty, Christophe; Winship, Ingrid M; Macrae, Finlay A; Giles, Graham G; Parry, Susan; Casey, Graham; Haile, Robert W; Gallinger, Steven; Le Marchand, Loïc; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Lindor, Noralane M; Newcomb, Polly A; Potter, John D; Baron, John A; Hopper, John L; Jenkins, Mark A; Win, Aung Ko

    2017-03-01

    Background: People with germline mutation in one of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes have increased colorectal cancer risk. For these high-risk people, study findings of the relationship between alcohol consumption and colorectal cancer risk have been inconclusive. Methods: 1,925 MMR gene mutations carriers recruited into the Colon Cancer Family Registry who had completed a questionnaire on lifestyle factors were included. Weighted Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between alcohol consumption and colorectal cancer. Results: Colorectal cancer was diagnosed in 769 carriers (40%) at a mean (SD) age of 42.6 (10.3) years. Compared with abstention, ethanol consumption from any alcoholic beverage up to 14 g/day and >28 g/day was associated with increased colorectal cancer risk (HR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.09-2.07 and 1.69; 95% CI, 1.07-2.65, respectively; P trend = 0.05), and colon cancer risk (HR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.27-2.49 and 1.94; 95% CI, 1.19-3.18, respectively; P trend = 0.02). However, there was no clear evidence for an association with rectal cancer risk. Also, there was no evidence for associations between consumption of individual alcoholic beverage types (beer, wine, spirits) and colorectal, colon, or rectal cancer risk. Conclusions: Our data suggest that alcohol consumption, particularly more than 28 g/day of ethanol (∼2 standard drinks of alcohol in the United States), is associated with increased colorectal cancer risk for MMR gene mutation carriers. Impact: Although these data suggested that alcohol consumption in MMR carriers was associated with increased colorectal cancer risk, there was no evidence of a dose-response, and not all types of alcohol consumption were associated with increased risk. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(3); 366-75. ©2016 AACR . ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Lipid Oxidation in Carriers of Lecithin: Cholesterol Acyltransferase Gene Mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holleboom, Adriaan G.; Daniil, Georgios; Fu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Renliang; Hovingh, G. Kees; Schimmel, Alinda W.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Witztum, Joseph L.; Hutten, Barbara A.; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Hazen, Stanley L.; Chroni, Angeliki; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert

    2012-01-01

    Objective-Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) has been shown to play a role in the depletion of lipid oxidation products, but this has so far not been studied in humans. In this study, we investigated processes and parameters relevant to lipid oxidation in carriers of functional LCAT

  19. Lipid Oxidation in Carriers of Lecithin : Cholesterol Acyltransferase Gene Mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holleboom, Adriaan G.; Daniil, Georgios; Fu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Renliang; Hovingh, G. Kees; Schimmel, Alinda W.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Witztum, Joseph L.; Hutten, Barbara A.; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Hazen, Stanley L.; Chroni, Angeliki; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) has been shown to play a role in the depletion of lipid oxidation products, but this has so far not been studied in humans. In this study, we investigated processes and parameters relevant to lipid oxidation in carriers of functional LCAT

  20. Genetic Diagnosis before Surgery has an Impact on Surgical Decision in BRCA Mutation Carriers with Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sungmin; Lee, Jeong Eon; Ryu, Jai Min; Kim, Issac; Bae, Soo Youn; Lee, Se Kyung; Yu, Jonghan; Kim, Seok Won; Nam, Seok Jin

    2018-05-01

    The first aim of our study was to evaluate surgical decision-making by BRCA mutation carriers with breast cancer based on the timing of knowledge of their BRCA mutation status. The second aim was to evaluate breast cancer outcome following surgical treatment. This was a retrospective study of 164 patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer, tested for BRCA mutation, and treated with primary surgery between 2004 and 2015 at Samsung Medical Center in Seoul, Korea. We reviewed types of surgery and timing of the BRCA test result. We compared surgical decision- making of BRCA carriers with breast cancer based on the timing of knowledge of their BRCA mutation status. Only 15 (9.1%) patients knew their BRCA test results before their surgery, and 149 (90.9%) knew the results after surgery. In patients with unilateral cancer, there was a significant difference between groups whose BRCA mutation status known before surgery and groups whose BRCA status unknown before surgery regarding the choice of surgery (p = 0.017). No significant difference was observed across surgery types of risk of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (p = 0.765) and contralateral breast cancer (p = 0.69). Genetic diagnosis before surgery has an impact on surgical decision choosing unilateral mastectomy or bilateral mastectomy in BRCA mutation carriers with breast cancer. Knowledge about BRCA mutation status after initial surgery led to additional surgeries for patients with BCS. Thus, providing genetic counseling and genetic testing before surgical choice and developing treatment strategies for patients with a high risk of breast cancer are important.

  1. Prevalence of common MEFV mutations and carrier frequencies in a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Christian Oberkanins, oberkanins@viennalab.com. 1967; Pras et al. ... affected populations with spreading very diverse mutational patterns, especially ..... Arabs, mainly living in Syria, Lebanon, Palestine, Jordan and Iraq, and North .... Mediterranean fever suspected patients and gender correlation: a retrospective study.

  2. Appreciating the broad clinical features of SMAD4 mutation carriers: a multi-center chart review

    OpenAIRE

    Wain, K.E.; Ellingson, M.S.; McDonald, J.; Gammon, A.; Roberts, M.; Pichurin, P.; Winship, I.; Riegert-Johnson, D.; Weitzel, J. N.; Lindor, N.M.

    2014-01-01

    Heterozygous loss-of-function (LOF) SMAD4 mutations are associated with juvenile polyposis syndrome (JP) and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Some carriers exhibit symptoms of both conditions, leading to the name JP-HHT syndrome. Three families have been reported with connective tissue abnormalities. In order to better understand the spectrum and extent of clinical findings in SMAD4 carriers, medical records of 34 patients (20 families) from five clinical practices were reviewed. ...

  3. Do BRCA1/2 mutation carriers have an earlier onset of natural menopause?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tilborg, Theodora C; Broekmans, Frank J; Pijpe, Anouk; Schrijver, Lieske H; Mooij, Thea M; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Verhoef, Senno; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A; Adank, Muriel A; van Asperen, Christi J; van Doorn, Helena C; van Os, Theo A; Bos, Anna M; Rookus, Matti A; Ausems, Margreet G

    2016-08-01

    It has been hypothesized that BRCA1/2 mutation carriers have an earlier age at natural menopause (ANM), although to date findings are inconclusive. This study assessed the influence of BRCA mutation status on ANM, and aimed to explore the reasons of inconsistency in the literature. Cross-sectional assessment from an ongoing nationwide cohort study among members of BRCA1/2 mutated families. Information was obtained by a standardized questionnaire. Kaplan-Meier curves were constructed, and Cox regression was used to assess the association between BRCA1/2 mutation status and ANM. Adjustments were made for birth cohort, family, smoking, use of hormonal contraceptives, and parity. A total of 1,208 BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and 2,211 proven noncarriers were included. Overall, no association was found between BRCA1/2 mutation status and ANM (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 1.06 [95% CI, 0.87-1.30]). We examined if the null finding was due to informative censoring by uptake of risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy. Indeed, within the oldest birth cohort, in which the percentage of surgical menopause events was lowest and comparable between carriers and noncarriers, the HR for earlier natural menopause in carriers was 1.45 (95% CI, 1.09-1.94). The second oldest birth cohort, however, demonstrated a decreased HR (0.67 [95% CI, 0.46-0.98]), and thus no trend over birth cohorts was found. Various types of selection bias hamper the comparison of ANM between BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and noncarriers, genetically tested in the clinic.

  4. Risk-reducing mastectomy and salpingo-oophorectomy in unaffected BRCA mutation carriers: uptake and timing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytte, A-B; Gerdes, Anne-Marie Axø; Andersen, M K

    2010-01-01

    from 306 healthy BRCA carriers with no personal history of ovarian or breast cancer. We found a 10-year uptake of 75% for risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy and 50% for risk-reducing mastectomy by time to event analysis. Age and childbirth influenced this decision. The uptake rate has not changed......Once female carriers of a BRCA mutation are identified they have to make decisions on risk management. The aim of this study is to outline the uptake of risk-reducing surgery in the Danish population of BRCA mutation positive women and to search for factors affecting this decision. We analysed data...

  5. The frequency of Tay-Sachs disease causing mutations in the Brazilian Jewish population justifies a carrier screening program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Rozenberg

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Tay-Sachs disease is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by progressive neurologic degeneration, fatal in early childhood. In the Ashkenazi Jewish population the disease incidence is about 1 in every 3,500 newborns and the carrier frequency is 1 in every 29 individuals. Carrier screening programs for Tay-Sachs disease have reduced disease incidence by 90% in high-risk populations in several countries. The Brazilian Jewish population is estimated at 90,000 individuals. Currently, there is no screening program for Tay-Sachs disease in this population. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the importance of a Tay-Sachs disease carrier screening program in the Brazilian Jewish population by determining the frequency of heterozygotes and the acceptance of the program by the community. SETTING: Laboratory of Molecular Genetics - Institute of Biosciences - Universidade de São Paulo. PARTICIPANTS: 581 senior students from selected Jewish high schools. PROCEDURE: Molecular analysis of Tay-Sachs disease causing mutations by PCR amplification of genomic DNA, followed by restriction enzyme digestion. RESULTS: Among 581 students that attended educational classes, 404 (70% elected to be tested for Tay-Sachs disease mutations. Of these, approximately 65% were of Ashkenazi Jewish origin. Eight carriers were detected corresponding to a carrier frequency of 1 in every 33 individuals in the Ashkenazi Jewish fraction of the sample. CONCLUSION: The frequency of Tay-Sachs disease carriers among the Ashkenazi Jewish population of Brazil is similar to that of other countries where carrier screening programs have led to a significant decrease in disease incidence. Therefore, it is justifiable to implement a Tay-Sachs disease carrier screening program for the Brazilian Jewish population.

  6. Primary fibroblasts from CSP? mutation carriers recapitulate hallmarks of the adult onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis

    OpenAIRE

    Benitez, Bruno A.; Sands, Mark S.

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in the co- chaperone protein, CSP?, cause an autosomal dominant, adult-neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (AD-ANCL). The current understanding of CSP? function exclusively at the synapse fails to explain the autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP) dysfunction in cells from AD-ANCL patients. Here, we demonstrate unexpectedly that primary dermal fibroblasts from pre-symptomatic mutation carriers recapitulate in vitro features found in the brains of AD-ANCL patients including auto-fluorescent sto...

  7. Association of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Kuchenbaeker, Karoline B

    2017-01-01

    1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, a list of 175 genes was developed based of their involvement in cancer-related pathways. METHODS: Using data from a genome-wide map of SNPs associated with allelic expression, we assessed the association of ~320 SNPs located in the vicinity of these genes with breast...... and ovarian cancer risks in 15,252 BRCA1 and 8211 BRCA2 mutation carriers ascertained from 54 studies participating in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. RESULTS: We identified a region on 11q22.3 that is significantly associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (most...... significant SNP rs228595 p = 7 × 10(-6)). This association was absent in BRCA2 carriers (p = 0.57). The 11q22.3 region notably encompasses genes such as ACAT1, NPAT, and ATM. Expression quantitative trait loci associations were observed in both normal breast and tumors across this region, namely for ACAT1...

  8. Outcomes of annual surveillance imaging in an adult and paediatric cohort of succinate dehydrogenase B mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufton, Nicola; Shapiro, Lucy; Srirangalingam, Umasuthan; Richards, Polly; Sahdev, Anju; Kumar, Ajith V; McAndrew, Lorraine; Martin, Lee; Berney, Daniel; Monson, John; Chew, Shern L; Waterhouse, Mona; Druce, Maralyn; Korbonits, Márta; Metcalfe, Karl; Drake, William M; Storr, Helen L; Akker, Scott A

    2017-02-01

    For 'asymptomatic carriers' of the succinate dehydrogenase subunit B (SDHB) gene mutations, there is currently no consensus as to the appropriate modality or frequency of surveillance imaging. We present the results of a surveillance programme of SDHB mutation carriers. Review of clinical outcomes of a surveillance regimen in patients identified to have an SDHB gene mutation, based on annual MRI, in a single UK tertiary referral centre. A total of 92 patients were identified with an SDHB gene mutation. a total of 27 index patients presented with symptoms, and 65 patients were identified as asymptomatic carriers. Annual MRI of the abdomen, with alternate year MRI of the neck, thorax and pelvis. Presence of an SDHB-related tumour included paraganglioma (PGL), phaeochromocytoma (PCC), renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST). A total of 43 PGLs, eight PCCs and one RCC occurred in the 27 index patients (23 solitary, four synchronous, five metachronous). A further 15 SDHB-related tumours (11 PGLs, three RCCs, one GIST) were identified in the asymptomatic carriers on surveillance screening (25% of screened carriers): 10 on the first surveillance imaging and five on subsequent imaging 2-6 years later. A total of 11 patients had malignant disease. SDHB-related tumours are picked up as early as 2 years after initial negative surveillance scan. We believe the high malignancy rate and early identification rate of tumours justifies the use of 1-2 yearly imaging protocols and MRI-based imaging could form the mainstay of surveillance in this patient group thereby minimizing radiation exposure. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. RANK ligand as a potential target for breast cancer prevention in BRCA1-mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Emma; Vaillant, François; Branstetter, Daniel; Pal, Bhupinder; Giner, Göknur; Whitehead, Lachlan; Lok, Sheau W; Mann, Gregory B; Rohrbach, Kathy; Huang, Li-Ya; Soriano, Rosalia; Smyth, Gordon K; Dougall, William C; Visvader, Jane E; Lindeman, Geoffrey J

    2016-08-01

    Individuals who have mutations in the breast-cancer-susceptibility gene BRCA1 (hereafter referred to as BRCA1-mutation carriers) frequently undergo prophylactic mastectomy to minimize their risk of breast cancer. The identification of an effective prevention therapy therefore remains a 'holy grail' for the field. Precancerous BRCA1(mut/+) tissue harbors an aberrant population of luminal progenitor cells, and deregulated progesterone signaling has been implicated in BRCA1-associated oncogenesis. Coupled with the findings that tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 11 (TNFSF11; also known as RANKL) is a key paracrine effector of progesterone signaling and that RANKL and its receptor TNFRSF11A (also known as RANK) contribute to mammary tumorigenesis, we investigated a role for this pathway in the pre-neoplastic phase of BRCA1-mutation carriers. We identified two subsets of luminal progenitors (RANK(+) and RANK(-)) in histologically normal tissue of BRCA1-mutation carriers and showed that RANK(+) cells are highly proliferative, have grossly aberrant DNA repair and bear a molecular signature similar to that of basal-like breast cancer. These data suggest that RANK(+) and not RANK(-) progenitors are a key target population in these women. Inhibition of RANKL signaling by treatment with denosumab in three-dimensional breast organoids derived from pre-neoplastic BRCA1(mut/+) tissue attenuated progesterone-induced proliferation. Notably, proliferation was markedly reduced in breast biopsies from BRCA1-mutation carriers who were treated with denosumab. Furthermore, inhibition of RANKL in a Brca1-deficient mouse model substantially curtailed mammary tumorigenesis. Taken together, these findings identify a targetable pathway in a putative cell-of-origin population in BRCA1-mutation carriers and implicate RANKL blockade as a promising strategy in the prevention of breast cancer.

  10. Male breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silvestri, Valentina; Barrowdale, Daniel; Mulligan, Anna Marie

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BRCA1 and, more commonly, BRCA2 mutations are associated with increased risk of male breast cancer (MBC). However, only a paucity of data exists on the pathology of breast cancers (BCs) in men with BRCA1/2 mutations. Using the largest available dataset, we determined whether MBCs...... arising in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers display specific pathologic features and whether these features differ from those of BRCA1/2 female BCs (FBCs). METHODS: We characterised the pathologic features of 419 BRCA1/2 MBCs and, using logistic regression analysis, contrasted those with data from 9675 BRCA1...

  11. Comparison of risk assessment models of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carrier in patients with breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rybchenko L.A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of efficiency of the algorithm BOADICEA using and Manchester scoring system to predict the carrier of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Ukranian patients with breast cancer was performed. Materials for this study were the results of clinical, imunogistological, pathogistological, genealogical, molecular genetic researches of 146 patients with breast cancer. Calculations of mutations risk were performed using BOADICEA algorithm and Manchester scoring system. In the total group of patients the area under the curve while predicting BRCA1 mutations with algorithm BOADICEA was 0.86, with Manchester scoring system - 0.84, and in calculation of the combined risk of BRCA mutations - 0.83 and 0.84, respectively. However, statistical difference between the areas of algorithms has not been established (p> 0.05, it indicates to the same discriminatory power of the test models. Better sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of results of BOADICEA algorithm was reached in 6% of BRCA1 probability and in 8% threshold of BRCA1/2 mutations. The Manchester scoring system has showed the best operating characteristics with 6 and 13-point probability of BRCA1 and BRCA1/2 mutations respectively. Patients with probability of mutations with such thresholds may be offered molecular study of pathogenic alleles.

  12. Determinants of adherence to recommendations for cancer prevention among Lynch Syndrome mutation carriers : A qualitative exploration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Annemiek; Vrieling, Alina; Murugesu, Laxsini; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Kampman, Ellen; Hoedjes, Meeke

    2017-01-01

    Background: Lynch Syndrome (LS) mutation carriers are at high risk for various cancer types, particularly colorectal cancer. Adherence to lifestyle and body weight recommendations for cancer prevention may lower this risk. To promote adherence to these recommendations, knowledge on determinants of

  13. Determinants of adherence to recommendations for cancer prevention among Lynch Syndrome mutation carriers: a qualitative exploration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A.; Vrieling, A.; Murugesu, L.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Kampman, E.; Hoedjes, M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Lynch Syndrome (LS) mutation carriers are at high risk for various cancer types, particularly colorectal cancer. Adherence to lifestyle and body weight recommendations for cancer prevention may lower this risk. To promote adherence to these recommendations, knowledge on determinants of

  14. An international survey of surveillance schemes for unaffected BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madorsky-Feldman, Dana; Sklair-Levy, Miri; Perri, Tamar

    2016-01-01

    Female BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and/or ovarian cancer, and are offered enhanced surveillance including screening from a young age and risk-reducing surgery (RRS)-mastectomy (RRM) and/or salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO). While there are es...

  15. Genaesthics : Breast Surgery in BRCA1/2 Gene Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.M.T. van Verschuer (Victorien)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractThe present thesis focuses on breast surgery in BRCA1/2 gene mutation carriers. The topics that are studied vary broadly, representing the multiple disciplines that are involved in the diagnostic work-up and treatment of BRCA1/2-associated breast cancer. The first part contains

  16. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk inBRCA1andBRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Peterlongo (Paolo); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); K.B. Moysich (Kirsten); A. Rudolph (Anja); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); J. Simard (Jacques); P. Soucy (Penny); R. Eeles (Rosalind); D.F. Easton (Douglas); U. Hamann (Ute); S. Wilkening (Stefan); B. Chen (Bowang); M.A. Rookus (Matti); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); F.H. Van Der Baan (Frederieke H.); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); L.C. Walker (Logan); F. Lose (Felicity); A.-T. Maia (Ana-Teresa); M. Montagna (Marco); L. Matricardi (Laura); J. Lubinski (Jan); A. Jakubowska (Anna); E.B.G. Garcia; O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); R.L. Nussbaum (Robert L.); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); B.K. Arun (Banu); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); S. Orsulic (Sandra); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); W.K. Chung (Wendy K.); A. Miron (Alexander); M.C. Southey (Melissa); D. Goldgar (David); S.S. Buys (Saundra); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); Y.C. Ding (Yuan Chun); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); A.-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); L. Jønson (Lars); A. Osorio (Ana); C. Martínez-Bouzas (Cristina); J. Benítez (Javier); E.E. Conway (Edye E.); K.R. Blazer (Kathleen R.); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (Daniela); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); M. Barile (Monica); F. Ficarazzi (Filomena); F. Mariette (F.); S. Fortuzzi (S.); A. Viel (Alessandra); G. Giannini (Giuseppe); L. Papi (Laura); A. Martayan (Aline); M.G. Tibiletti (Maria Grazia); P. Radice (Paolo); A. Vratimos (Athanassios); F. Fostira (Florentia); J. Garber (Judy); A. Donaldson (Alan); C. Brewer (Carole); C. Foo (Claire); D.G. Evans (Gareth); D. Frost (Debra); D. Eccles (Diana); A. Brady (A.); J. Cook (Jackie); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); L. Adlard; J. Barwell (Julian); L.J. Walker (Lisa); L. Izatt (Louise); L. Side (Lucy); M.J. Kennedy (John); M.T. Rogers (Mark); M.E. Porteous (Mary); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); R. Platte (Radka); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); S. Hodgson (Shirley); S.D. Ellis (Steve); T. Cole (Trevor); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); T. Van Maerken (Tom); A. Meindl (Alfons); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); C. Sutter (Christian); C. Engel (Christoph); D. Niederacher (Dieter); D. Steinemann (Doris); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); K. Kast (Karin); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); B. Bressac-de Paillerets (Brigitte); B. Buecher (Bruno); C.D. Delnatte (Capucine); C. Houdayer (Claude); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); F. Damiola (Francesca); I. Coupier (Isabelle); L. Barjhoux (Laure); L. Vénat-Bouvet (Laurence); L. Golmard (Lisa); N. Boutry-Kryza (N.); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); O. Caron (Olivier); P. Pujol (Pascal); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); M. Belotti (Muriel); M. Piedmonte (Marion); M.L. Friedlander (Michael L.); G. Rodriguez (Gustavo); L.J. Copeland (Larry J.); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); P. Perez-Segura (Pedro); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); T.A.M. van Os (Theo); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); M.P. Vreeswijk (Maaike); N. Hoogerbrugqe (N.); M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); H.C. van Doorn (Helena); J.M. Collée (Margriet); E. Olah; O. Díez (Orland); I. Blanco (Ignacio); C. Lazaro (Conxi); J. Brunet (Joan); L. Feliubadaló (L.); C. Cybulski (Cezary); J. Gronwald (Jacek); K. Durda (Katarzyna); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); G. Sukiennicki (Grzegorz); A. Arason (Adalgeir); J. Chiquette (Jocelyne); P.J. Teixeira; C. Olswold (Curtis); F.J. Couch (Fergus); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); X. Wang (X.); C. Szabo (Csilla); K. Offit (Kenneth); M. Corines (Marina); L. Jacobs (Lauren); M.E. Robson (Mark E.); L. Zhang (Lingling); V. Joseph (Vijai); A. Berger (Andreas); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport (Christine); D.G. Kaulich (Daphne Gschwantler); G. Pfeiler (Georg); M.-K. Tea; C. Phelan (Catherine); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); G. Rennert (Gad); A.-M. Mulligan (Anna-Marie); G. Glendon (Gord); S. Tchatchou (Sandrine); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A.E. Toland (Amanda); A. Bojesen (Anders); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); M. Thomassen (Mads); U.B. Jensen; Y. Laitman (Yael); J. Rantala (Johanna); A. von Wachenfeldt (Anna); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); M.S. Askmalm (Marie); Å. Borg (Åke); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); L. McGuffog (Lesley); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); S. Healey (Sue); A. Lee (Andrew); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul D.P.); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); E. Friedman (Eitan)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying

  17. Evaluation of current prediction models for Lynch syndrome: updating the PREMM5 model to identify PMS2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Goverde (Anne); M.C.W. Spaander (Manon); D. Nieboer (Daan); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); W.N.M. Dinjens (Winand); H.J. Dubbink (Erik Jan); C. Tops (Cmj); S.W. Ten Broeke (Sanne W.); M.J. Bruno (Marco); R.M.W. Hofstra (Robert); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); A. Wagner (Anja)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractUntil recently, no prediction models for Lynch syndrome (LS) had been validated for PMS2 mutation carriers. We aimed to evaluate MMRpredict and PREMM5 in a clinical cohort and for PMS2 mutation carriers specifically. In a retrospective, clinic-based cohort we calculated predictions for

  18. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying factors. In ...

  19. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peterlongo, P.; Chang-Claude, J.; Moysich, K.B.; Rudolph, A.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Simard, J.; Soucy, P.; Eeles, R.A.; Easton, D.F.; Hamann, U.; Wilkening, S.; Chen, B.; Rookus, M.A.; Schmidt, M.K.; Baan, F.H. van der; Spurdle, A.B.; Walker, L.C.; Lose, F.; Maia, A.T.; Montagna, M.; Matricardi, L.; Lubinski, J.; Jakubowska, A.; Garcia, E.B.; Olopade, O.I.; Nussbaum, R.L.; Nathanson, K.L.; Domchek, S.M.; Rebbeck, T.R.; Arun, B.K.; Karlan, B.Y.; Orsulic, S.; Lester, J.; Chung, W.K.; Miron, A.; Southey, M.C.; Goldgar, D.E.; Buys, S.S.; Janavicius, R.; Dorfling, C.M.; Rensburg, E.J. van; Ding, Y.C.; Neuhausen, S.L.; Hansen, T.V.; Gerdes, A.M.; Ejlertsen, B.; Jonson, L.; Osorio, A.; Martinez-Bouzas, C.; Benitez, J.; Conway, E.E.; Blazer, K.R.; Weitzel, J.N.; Manoukian, S.; Peissel, B.; Zaffaroni, D.; Scuvera, G.; Barile, M.; Ficarazzi, F.; Mariette, F.; Fortuzzi, S.; Viel, A.; Giannini, G.; Papi, L.; Martayan, A.; Tibiletti, M.G.; Radice, P.; Vratimos, A.; Fostira, F.; Garber, J.E.; Donaldson, A.; Brewer, C.; Foo, C.; Evans, D.G.; Frost, D.; Eccles, D.; Brady, A.; Cook, J.; Tischkowitz, M.; Adlard, J.; Barwell, J.; Izatt, L.; Side, L.E.; Kennedy, M.J.; Rogers, M.T.; Porteous, M.E.; Morrison, P.J.; Platte, R.; Davidson, R.; Hodgson, S.V.; Ellis, S.; Cole, T.; Godwin, A.K.; Claes, K.; Maerken, T. Van; Meindl, A.; Gehrig, A.; Sutter, C.; Engel, C.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; et al.,

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying factors. In

  20. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Rudolph, Anja; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Hamann, Ute; Wilkening, Stefan; Chen, Bowang; Rookus, Matti A.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; van der Baan, Frederieke H.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Walker, Logan C.; Lose, Felicity; Maia, Ana-Teresa; Montagna, Marco; Matricardi, Laura; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Chung, Wendy K.; Miron, Alex; Southey, Melissa C.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Jønson, Lars; Osorio, Ana; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Benitez, Javier; Conway, Edye E.; Blazer, Kathleen R.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Barile, Monica; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Mariette, Frederique; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Papi, Laura; Martayan, Aline; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Vratimos, Athanassios; Fostira, Florentia; Garber, Judy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth R.; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley V.; Ellis, Steve; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K.; Claes, Kathleen; van Maerken, Tom; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Buecher, Bruno; Delnatte, Capucine; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Damiola, Francesca; Coupier, Isabelle; Barjhoux, Laure; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Golmard, Lisa; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Belotti, Muriel; Piedmonte, Marion; Friedlander, Michael L.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Copeland, Larry J.; de la Hoya, Miguel; Segura, Pedro Perez; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; van Os, Theo A. M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P. G.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; van Doorn, Helena C.; Collée, J. Margriet; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Arason, Adalgeir; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Olswold, Curtis; Couch, Fergus J.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I.; Offit, Kenneth; Corines, Marina; Jacobs, Lauren; Robson, Mark E.; Zhang, Liying; Joseph, Vijai; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; tea, Muy-Kheng M.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Borg, Åke; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Friedman, Eitan

    2015-01-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying factors. In this study, we

  1. No efficacy of annual gynaecological screening in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers; an observational follow-up study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermsen, B. B. J.; Olivier, R. I.; Verheijen, R. H. M.; van Beurden, M.; de Hullu, J. A.; Massuger, L. F.; Burger, C. W.; Brekelmans, C. T.; Mourits, M. J.; de Bock, G. H.; Gaarenstroom, K. N.; van Boven, H. H.; Mooij, T. M.; Rookus, M. A.

    2007-01-01

    BRCA1/ 2 mutation carriers are offered gynaecological screening with the intention to reduce mortality by detecting ovarian cancer at an early stage. We examined compliance and efficacy of gynaecological screening in BRCA1/ 2 mutation carriers. In this multicentre, observational, follow-up study we

  2. Reliability of self-reported diagnostic radiation history in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pijpe, Anouk; Manders, Peggy; Mulder, Renee L.; Leeuwen, Flora E. van; Rookus, Matti A.

    2010-01-01

    We assessed reliability of self-reported diagnostic radiation history in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers with and without breast cancer. Within the frame-work of the HEBON study, 401 BRCA1/2 mutation carriers completed a baseline (1999-2004) and a follow-up questionnaire (2006-2007). Test-retest reliability of self-reported exposure to chest X-rays, fluoroscopies and mammograms was assessed for the entire study population and by case status. Overall proportion agreement on reporting ever/never exposure was good (> 75%), while the corresponding kappa coefficients were between 0.40 and 0.75, indicating at least moderate reliability beyond chance. Reliability of number of exposures was also good (> 75%). Proportion agreement on reporting age at first mammogram was low (40%) for exact consistency and moderate (60%) for consistency ± 1 year. Reliability of age at first mammogram was higher for cases than for unaffected carriers (P < 0.001) but this difference disappeared when excluding diagnostic mammograms (P = 0.60). In unaffected carriers proportion agreement on age at last mammogram was 50%. In general, the direction of disagreement on all items was equally distributed. More consistent reporting was mainly determined by a younger age at questionnaire completion. In conclusion, inconsistent self-report of diagnostic radiation by BRCA1/2 mutation carriers was mainly non-differential by disease status.

  3. The association between smoking and cancer incidence in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Kwang-Pil; Kim, Shana J; Huzarski, Tomasz; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Lynch, Henry T; Armel, Susan; Park, Sue K; Karlan, Beth; Singer, Christian F; Neuhausen, Susan L; Narod, Steven A; Kotsopoulos, Joanne

    2018-06-01

    Tobacco smoke is an established carcinogen, but the association between tobacco smoking and cancer risk in BRCA mutation carriers is not clear. The aim of this study was to evaluate prospectively the association between tobacco smoking and cancer incidence in a cohort of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. The study population consisted of unaffected BRCA mutation carriers. Information on lifestyle including smoking histories, reproductive factors, and past medical histories was obtained through questionnaires. Incident cancers were updated biennially via follow-up questionnaires. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using time-dependent Cox regression models. There were 700 incident cancers diagnosed over 26,711 person-years of follow-up. The most frequent cancers seen in BRCA mutation carriers were breast (n = 428; 61%) and ovarian (n = 109; 15%) cancer. Compared to nonsmokers, (ever) smoking was associated with a modest increased risk of all cancers combined (HR = 1.17; 95%CI 1.01-1.37). Women in the highest group of total pack-years (4.3-9.8) had an increased risk of developing any cancer (HR = 1.27; 95%CI 1.04-1.56), breast cancer (HR = 1.33, 95%CI 1.02-1.75), and ovarian cancer (HR = 1.68; 95%CI 1.06-2.67) compared to never smokers. The associations between tobacco smoking and cancer did not differ by BRCA mutation type or by age at diagnosis. This prospective study suggests that tobacco smoking is associated with a modest increase in the risks of breast and ovarian cancer among women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. © 2018 UICC.

  4. Assessing associations between the AURKA-HMMR-TPX2-TUBG1 functional module and breast cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Blanco

    Full Text Available While interplay between BRCA1 and AURKA-RHAMM-TPX2-TUBG1 regulates mammary epithelial polarization, common genetic variation in HMMR (gene product RHAMM may be associated with risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers. Following on these observations, we further assessed the link between the AURKA-HMMR-TPX2-TUBG1 functional module and risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Forty-one single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were genotyped in 15,252 BRCA1 and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers and subsequently analyzed using a retrospective likelihood approach. The association of HMMR rs299290 with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers was confirmed: per-allele hazard ratio (HR = 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.04-1.15, p = 1.9 x 10(-4 (false discovery rate (FDR-adjusted p = 0.043. Variation in CSTF1, located next to AURKA, was also found to be associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers: rs2426618 per-allele HR = 1.10, 95% CI 1.03-1.16, p = 0.005 (FDR-adjusted p = 0.045. Assessment of pairwise interactions provided suggestions (FDR-adjusted pinteraction values > 0.05 for deviations from the multiplicative model for rs299290 and CSTF1 rs6064391, and rs299290 and TUBG1 rs11649877 in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following these suggestions, the expression of HMMR and AURKA or TUBG1 in sporadic breast tumors was found to potentially interact, influencing patients' survival. Together, the results of this study support the hypothesis of a causative link between altered function of AURKA-HMMR-TPX2-TUBG1 and breast carcinogenesis in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

  5. Urinary Tract Cancer in Lynch Syndrome; Increased Risk in Carriers of MSH2 Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joost, Patrick; Therkildsen, Christina; Dominguez-Valentin, Mev

    2015-01-01

    and microsatellite instability in 23% of the tumors. Mutations in MSH2 were overrepresented (73%), and MSH2 mutation carriers were at a significantly increased risk of developing urinary tract cancer compared with individuals with mutations in MLH1 or MSH6. CONCLUSION: Cancers of the upper urinary tract...

  6. Carrier screening of RTEL1 mutations in the Ashkenazi Jewish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedick, A M; Shi, L; Jalas, C; Treff, N R; Ekstein, J; Kornreich, R; Edelmann, L; Mehta, L; Savage, S A

    2015-08-01

    Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome (HH) is a clinically severe variant of dyskeratosis congenita (DC), characterized by cerebellar hypoplasia, microcephaly, intrauterine growth retardation, and severe immunodeficiency in addition to features of DC. Germline mutations in the RTEL1 gene have recently been identified as causative of HH. In this study, the carrier frequency for five RTEL1 mutations that occurred in individuals of Ashkenazi Jewish descent was investigated in order to advise on including them in existing clinical mutation panels for this population. Our screening showed that the carrier frequency for c.3791G>A (p.R1264H) was higher than expected, 1% in the Ashkenazi Orthodox and 0.45% in the general Ashkenazi Jewish population. Haplotype analyses suggested the presence of a common founder. We recommend that the c.3791G>A RTEL1 mutation be considered for inclusion in carrier screening panels in the Ashkenazi population. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Risk of metachronous colon cancer following surgery for rectal cancer in mismatch repair gene mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Aung Ko; Parry, Susan; Parry, Bryan; Kalady, Matthew F; Macrae, Finlay A; Ahnen, Dennis J; Young, Graeme P; Lipton, Lara; Winship, Ingrid; Boussioutas, Alex; Young, Joanne P; Buchanan, Daniel D; Arnold, Julie; Le Marchand, Loïc; Newcomb, Polly A; Haile, Robert W; Lindor, Noralane M; Gallinger, Steven; Hopper, John L; Jenkins, Mark A

    2013-06-01

    Despite regular surveillance colonoscopy, the metachronous colorectal cancer risk for mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutation carriers after segmental resection for colon cancer is high and total or subtotal colectomy is the preferred option. However, if the index cancer is in the rectum, management decisions are complicated by considerations of impaired bowel function. We aimed to estimate the risk of metachronous colon cancer for MMR gene mutation carriers who underwent a proctectomy for index rectal cancer. This retrospective cohort study comprised 79 carriers of germline mutation in a MMR gene (18 MLH1, 55 MSH2, 4 MSH6, and 2 PMS2) from the Colon Cancer Family Registry who had had a proctectomy for index rectal cancer. Cumulative risks of metachronous colon cancer were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. During median 9 years (range 1-32 years) of observation since the first diagnosis of rectal cancer, 21 carriers (27 %) were diagnosed with metachronous colon cancer (incidence 24.25, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 15.81-37.19 per 1,000 person-years). Cumulative risk of metachronous colon cancer was 19 % (95 % CI 9-31 %) at 10 years, 47 (95 % CI 31-68 %) at 20 years, and 69 % (95 % CI 45-89 %) at 30 years after surgical resection. The frequency of surveillance colonoscopy was 1 colonoscopy per 1.16 years (95 % CI 1.01-1.31 years). The AJCC stages of the metachronous cancers, where available, were 72 % stage I, 22 % stage II, and 6 % stage III. Given the high metachronous colon cancer risk for MMR gene mutation carriers diagnosed with an index rectal cancer, proctocolectomy may need to be considered.

  8. Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer : Identification of mutation carriers and assessing pathogenicity of mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, RC; Sijmons, RH; Berends, MJW; Ou, J; Hofstra, RNW; Kleibeuker, JH

    2004-01-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), also referred to as Lynch syndrome, is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that is characterized by susceptibility to colorectal cancer and extracolonic malignancies, in particular endometrial cancer. HNPCC is caused by pathogenic mutations

  9. Chromosomal radiosensitivity in breast cancer patients and BRCA1 and 2 mutation carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vral, Anne

    2004-01-01

    Enhanced chromosomal radiosensitivity is observed in significant proportions of cancer patients. In breast cancer patients, this elevated sensitivity is confirmed in several independent studies with the G2 assay as well as with the GO micronucleus (MN) assay for peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). Enhanced chromosomal radiosensitivity is a common feature of sporadic breast cancer patients as well as breast cancer patients with a family history of the disease. Segregation analysis showed Mendelian heritability of chromosomal radiosensitivity. As mutations in the highly penetrant breast cancer predisposing genes, BRCA1 and 2, are only present in about 3-5 % of familial breast cancer patients, they cannot solely account for the high proportion of radiosensitive cases found among all breast cancer patients. A review on chromosomal radiosensitivity in BRCA1 and 2 mutation carriers shows that breast cancer patients with a BRCAl or 2 mutation are on the average more radiosensitive than healthy individuals, but not different from breast cancer patients without a BRCA mutation. The radiation response of healthy BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, on the contrary, is not significantly different from controls. Most studies performed on wild type and BRCA +/- EBV lymphoblastoid cell lines also could not demonstrate any differences in MN response between both groups. These findings suggest that mutations in BRCA 1 and 2 are not playing a major role in chromosomal radiosensitivity as measured by G2 and MN assay. The enhanced sensitivity observed in a substantial proportion of breast cancer patients, irrespective of a BRCA1/2 mutation or not, suggests that this feature may be related to the presence of other mutations in low penetrance breast cancer predisposing genes, which may be involved in the process of DNA damage. (author)

  10. Genaesthics : Breast Surgery in BRCA1/2 Gene Mutation Carriers

    OpenAIRE

    Verschuer, Victorien

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractThe present thesis focuses on breast surgery in BRCA1/2 gene mutation carriers. The topics that are studied vary broadly, representing the multiple disciplines that are involved in the diagnostic work-up and treatment of BRCA1/2-associated breast cancer. The first part contains studies on molecular and prognostic tumor characteristics in breast cancer. The thesis continues with an anatomical study on safety of prophylactic mastectomy, and finishes with studies on aesthetics an...

  11. Variation in mutation spectrum partly explains regional differences in the breast cancer risk of female BRCA mutation carriers in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Janet R; Teixeira, Natalia; van der Kolk, Dorina M; Mourits, Marian J E; Rookus, Matti A; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Collée, Margriet; van Asperen, Christi J; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Ausems, Margreet G E M; van Os, Theo A M; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Gómez-Garcia, Encarna B; Vasen, Hans F; Brohet, Richard M; van der Hout, Annemarie H; Jansen, Liesbeth; Oosterwijk, Jan C; de Bock, Geertruida H

    2014-11-01

    We aimed to quantify previously observed relatively high cancer risks in BRCA2 mutation carriers (BRCA2 carriers) older than 60 in the Northern Netherlands, and to analyze whether these could be explained by mutation spectrum or population background risk. This consecutive cohort study included all known pathogenic BRCA1/2 carriers in the Northern Netherlands (N = 1,050). Carrier and general reference populations were: BRCA1/2 carriers in the rest of the Netherlands (N = 2,013) and the general population in both regions. Regional differences were assessed with HRs and ORs. HRs were adjusted for birth year and mutation spectrum. All BRCA1 carriers and BRCA2 carriers younger than 60 had a significantly lower breast cancer risk in the Northern Netherlands; HRs were 0.66 and 0.64, respectively. Above age 60, the breast cancer risk in BRCA2 carriers in the Northern Netherlands was higher than in the rest of the Netherlands [HR, 3.99; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.11-14.35]. Adjustment for mutational spectrum changed the HRs for BRCA1, BRCA2 <60, and BRCA2 ≥60 years by -3%, +32%, and +11% to 0.75, 0.50, and 2.61, respectively. There was no difference in background breast cancer incidence between the two regions (OR, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.97-1.09). Differences in mutation spectrum only partly explain the regional differences in breast cancer risk in BRCA2 carriers, and for an even smaller part in BRCA1 carriers. The increased risk in BRCA2 carriers older than 60 may warrant extension of intensive breast screening beyond age 60. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. The Landscape of Somatic Genetic Alterations in Breast Cancers From ATM Germline Mutation Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigelt, Britta; Bi, Rui; Kumar, Rahul; Blecua, Pedro; Mandelker, Diana L; Geyer, Felipe C; Pareja, Fresia; James, Paul A; Couch, Fergus J; Eccles, Diana M; Blows, Fiona; Pharoah, Paul; Li, Anqi; Selenica, Pier; Lim, Raymond S; Jayakumaran, Gowtham; Waddell, Nic; Shen, Ronglai; Norton, Larry; Wen, Hannah Y; Powell, Simon N; Riaz, Nadeem; Robson, Mark E; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2018-02-28

    Pathogenic germline variants in ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), a gene that plays a role in DNA damage response and cell cycle checkpoints, confer an increased breast cancer (BC) risk. Here, we investigated the phenotypic characteristics and landscape of somatic genetic alterations in 24 BCs from ATM germline mutation carriers by whole-exome and targeted sequencing. ATM-associated BCs were consistently hormone receptor positive and largely displayed minimal immune infiltrate. Although 79.2% of these tumors exhibited loss of heterozygosity of the ATM wild-type allele, none displayed high activity of mutational signature 3 associated with defective homologous recombination DNA (HRD) repair. No TP53 mutations were found in the ATM-associated BCs. Analysis of an independent data set confirmed that germline ATM variants and TP53 somatic mutations are mutually exclusive. Our findings indicate that ATM-associated BCs often harbor bi-allelic inactivation of ATM, are phenotypically distinct from BRCA1/2-associated BCs, lack HRD-related mutational signatures, and that TP53 and ATM genetic alterations are likely epistatic.

  13. Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor protein regulates the penetrance of frontotemporal lobar degeneration in progranulin mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghidoni, Roberta; Flocco, Rosa; Paterlini, Anna; Glionna, Michela; Caruana, Loredana; Tonoli, Elisa; Binetti, Giuliano; Benussi, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    The discovery that mutations in the gene encoding for progranulin (GRN) cause frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and other neurodegenerative diseases leading to dementia has brought renewed interest in progranulin and its functions in the central nervous system. Full length progranulin is preserved from cleavage by secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), one of the smallest serine protease inhibitor circulating in plasma. Herein, we investigated the relationship between circulating SLPI and progranulin in affected and unaffected subjects belonging to 26 Italian pedigrees carrying GRN null mutations. In GRN null mutation carriers, we demonstrated: i) an increase of circulating SLPI levels in affected subjects; ii) an age-related upregulation of the serine-protease inhibitor in response to lifetime progranulin shortage; and iii) a delay in the age of onset in subjects with the highest SLPI protein levels. The study of SLPI and its relation to progranulin suggests the existence of unexpected molecular players in progranulin-associated neurodegeneration.

  14. Efficacy of proximal colectomy for surgical management of right-sided first colorectal cancer in Lynch Syndrome mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiatt, Molly J; Casey, Murray Joseph; Lynch, Henry T; Snyder, Carrie L; Stacey, Mark; Walters, Ryan W

    2017-11-08

    This study analyzes the occurrence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in Lynch syndrome (LS) mutation carriers, interval until diagnosis of metachronous CRC, and survival after proximal colectomy (PC) compared with total (TC) and subtotal colectomy (STC) for right-sided first CRC in LS mutation carriers. Sixty-four LS mutation carriers with right-sided first CRC treated with PC or TC + STC were confirmed by clinical records. Bivariate analyses were examined for significance and life tables were generated for risk of metachronous CRC and survival estimates following surgery. One of 16 (6.3%) mutation carriers treated with TC + STC developed subsequent CRC compared with 13/48 (27%) treated by PC. There was no significant difference in survival estimates between PC compared with TC + STC through 25 years after surgery. Risk of subsequent CRC and survival estimates following PC and TC + STC should be considered in surgical management of right-sided first CRC in LS mutation carriers. Lynch syndrome mutation carriers are still at 27% risk for metachronous colorectal cancer after proximal colectomy for right-sided first colorectal cancers, but this study found no difference in survival through 25 years follow-up compared with those treated with total and subtotal colectomy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Breast tumor characteristics of BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutation carriers on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veltman, J.; Mann, R.; Blickman, J.G.; Boetes, C.; Kok, T.; Obdeijn, I.M.; Hoogerbrugge, N.

    2008-01-01

    The appearance of malignant lesions in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers (BRCA-MCs) on mammography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was evaluated. Thus, 29 BRCA-MCs with breast cancer were retrospectively evaluated and the results compared with an age, tumor size and tumor type matched control group of 29 sporadic breast cancer cases. Detection rates on both modalities were evaluated. Tumors were analyzed on morphology, density (mammography), enhancement pattern and kinetics (MRI). Overall detection was significantly better with MRI than with mammography (55/58 vs 44/57, P = 0.021). On mammography, lesions in the BRCA-MC group were significantly more described as rounded (12//19 vs 3/13, P = 0.036) and with sharp margins (9/19 vs 1/13, P 0.024). On MRI lesions in the BRCA-MC group were significantly more described as rounded (16/27 vs 7/28, P = 0.010), with sharp margins (20/27 vs 7/28, P < 0.001) and with rim enhancement (7/27 vs 1/28, P = 0.025). No significant difference was found for enhancement kinetics (P = 0.667). Malignant lesions in BRCA-MC frequently have morphological characteristics commonly seen in benign lesions, like a rounded shape or sharp margins. This applies for both mammography and MRI. However the possibility of MRI to evaluate the enhancement pattern and kinetics enables the detection of characteristics suggestive for a malignancy. (orig.)

  16. Age-Dependent Cancer Risk Is not Different in between MSH2 and MLH1 Mutation Carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olschwang, S.; Olschwang, S.; Yu, K.

    2009-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is mostly characterized by early-onset colorectal and endometrial adenocarcinomas. Over 90% of the causal mutations occur in two mismatch repair genes, MSH2 and MLH1. The aim of this study was to evaluate the age-dependent cancer risk in MSH2 or MLH1 mutation carriers from data of DNA diagnostic laboratories. To avoid overestimation, evaluation was based on the age-dependent proportion of mutation carriers in asymptomatic first-degree relatives of identified mutation carriers. Data from 859 such eligible relatives were collected from 8 centers; 387 were found to have inherited the mutation from their relatives. Age-dependent risks were calculated either using a nonparametric approach for four discrete age groups or assuming a modified Weibull distribution for the dependence of risk on age. Cancer risk was estimated starting at 28 (25-32 0.68 confidence interval) and to reach near 0.70 at 70 years. The risks were very similar for MSH2 and MLH1 mutation carriers. Although not statistically significant, the risk in males appeared to precede that for females by ten years. This difference needs to be investigated on a larger dataset. If confirmed, this would indicate that the onset of the colonoscopic surveillance may be different in male and female mutation carriers.

  17. Haplotype structure in Ashkenazi Jewish BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Im, Kate M; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Wang, Xianshu

    2011-01-01

    Three founder mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 contribute to the risk of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer in Ashkenazi Jews (AJ). They are observed at increased frequency in the AJ compared to other BRCA mutations in Caucasian non-Jews (CNJ). Several authors have proposed that elevated allele...... the tools of statistical genomics to examine the likelihood of long-range LD at a deleterious locus in a population that faced a genetic bottleneck. We studied the genotypes of hundreds of women from a large international consortium of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and found that AJ women exhibited long......-range haplotypes compared to CNJ women. More than 50% of the AJ chromosomes with the BRCA1 185delAG mutation share an identical 2.1 Mb haplotype and nearly 16% of AJ chromosomes carrying the BRCA2 6174delT mutation share a 1.4 Mb haplotype. Simulations based on the best inference of Ashkenazi population demography...

  18. Evaluation of Polygenic Risk Scores for Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk Prediction in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Soucy, Penny; Healey, Sue; Dennis, Joe; Lush, Michael; Robson, Mark; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Ramus, Susan J.; Mavaddat, Nasim; Terry, Mary Beth; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hamann, Ute; Southey, Melissa; John, Esther M.; Chung, Wendy K.; Daly, Mary B.; Buys, Saundra S.; Goldgar, David E.; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Ejlertsen, Bent; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Slager, Susan; Hallberg, Emily; Benitez, Javier; Osorio, Ana; Cohen, Nancy; Lawler, William; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pensotti, Valeria; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Barile, Monica; Bonanni, Bernardo; Azzollini, Jacopo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Radice, Paolo; Savarese, Antonella; Papi, Laura; Giannini, Giuseppe; Fostira, Florentia; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Adlard, Julian; Brewer, Carole; Cook, Jackie; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Eeles, Ros; Ellis, Steve; Frost, Debra; Hodgson, Shirley; Izatt, Louise; Lalloo, Fiona; Ong, Kai-ren; Godwin, Andrew K.; Arnold, Norbert; Dworniczak, Bernd; Engel, Christoph; Gehrig, Andrea; Hahnen, Eric; Hauke, Jan; Kast, Karin; Meindl, Alfons; Niederacher, Dieter; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Barjhoux, Laure; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Elan, Camille; Golmard, Lisa; Barouk-Simonet, Emmanuelle; Lesueur, Fabienne; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Sokolowska, Joanna; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Isaacs, Claudine; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Poppe, Bruce; de la Hoya, Miguel; Garcia-Barberan, Vanesa; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; de Lange, J. L.; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Kets, Carolien M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Rookus, Matti A.; van Asperen, Christi J.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van Doorn, Helena C.; van Os, Theo A. M.; Kwong, Ava; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Brunet, Joan; Lazaro, Conxi; Teulé, Alex; Gronwald, Jacek; Jakubowska, Anna; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Lubinski, Jan; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Agata, Simona; Montagna, Marco; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Park, Sue Kyung; Olswold, Curtis; Tischkowitz, Marc; Foretova, Lenka; Gaddam, Pragna; Vijai, Joseph; Pfeiler, Georg; Rappaport-Fuerhauser, Christine; Singer, Christian F.; Tea, Muy-Kheng M.; Greene, Mark H.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Hulick, Peter J.; Hays, John L.; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Martyn, Julie; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Andrulis, Irene L.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Kruse, Torben A.; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Caligo, Maria A.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Berger, Raanan; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Arver, Brita; Borg, Ake; Ehrencrona, Hans; Rantala, Johanna; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Bradbury, Angela R.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Arun, Banu K.; James, Paul; Karlan, Beth Y.; Lester, Jenny; Simard, Jacques; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 94 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with breast cancer (BC) risk and 18 associated with ovarian cancer (OC) risk. Several of these are also associated with risk of BC or OC for women who carry a pathogenic mutation in the high-risk BC and OC genes BRCA1 or BRCA2. The combined effects of these variants on BC or OC risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers have not yet been assessed while their clinical management could benefit from improved personalized risk estimates. Methods: We constructed polygenic risk scores (PRS) using BC and OC susceptibility SNPs identified through population-based GWAS: for BC (overall, estrogen receptor [ER]–positive, and ER-negative) and for OC. Using data from 15 252 female BRCA1 and 8211 BRCA2 carriers, the association of each PRS with BC or OC risk was evaluated using a weighted cohort approach, with time to diagnosis as the outcome and estimation of the hazard ratios (HRs) per standard deviation increase in the PRS. Results: The PRS for ER-negative BC displayed the strongest association with BC risk in BRCA1 carriers (HR = 1.27, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.23 to 1.31, P = 8.2×10−53). In BRCA2 carriers, the strongest association with BC risk was seen for the overall BC PRS (HR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.17 to 1.28, P = 7.2×10−20). The OC PRS was strongly associated with OC risk for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. These translate to differences in absolute risks (more than 10% in each case) between the top and bottom deciles of the PRS distribution; for example, the OC risk was 6% by age 80 years for BRCA2 carriers at the 10th percentile of the OC PRS compared with 19% risk for those at the 90th percentile of PRS. Conclusions: BC and OC PRS are predictive of cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Incorporation of the PRS into risk prediction models has promise to better inform decisions on cancer risk management. PMID

  19. AURKA F31I Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers: A CIMBA study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Fergus J.; Sinilnikova, Olga; Vierkant, Robert A; Pankratz, V. Shane; Fredericksen, Zachary S.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Coupier, Isabelle; Hughes, David; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Baynes, Caroline; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Porteous, Mary E.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Schmutzler, Rita; Versmold, Beatrix; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Sutter, Christian; Horst, Jurgen; Schaefer, Dieter; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Andrulis, Irene L.; Ilyushik, Eduard; Glendon, Gordon; Devilee, Peter; Vreeswijk, Maaike P.G.; Vasen, Hans F.A.; Borg, Ake; Backenhorn, Katja; Struewing, Jeffery P.; Greene, Mark H.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Nathanson, Katherine; Domchek, Susan; Wagner, Theresa; Garber, Judy E.; Szabo, Csilla; Zikan, Michal; Foretova, Lenka; Olson, Janet E.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Lindor, Noralane; Nevanlinna, Heli; Tommiska, Johanna; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Hamann, Ute; Rashid, Muhammad U.; Torres, Diana; Simard, Jacques; Durocher, Francine; Guenard, Frederic; Lynch, Henry T.; Isaacs, Claudine; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Narod, Steven; Daly, Mary B.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Tomlinson, Gail; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniouon, Antonis C.

    2009-01-01

    The AURKA oncogene is associated with abnormal chromosome segregation and aneuploidy and predisposition to cancer. Amplification of AURKA has been detected at higher frequency in tumors from BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers than in sporadic breast tumors, suggesting that overexpression of AURKA and inactivation of BRCA1 and BRCA2 co-operate during tumor development and progression. The F31I polymorphism in AURKA has been associated with breast cancer risk in the homozygous state in prior studies. We evaluated whether the AURKA F31I polymorphism modifies breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). CIMBA was established to provide sufficient statistical power through increased numbers of mutation carriers to identify polymorphisms that act as modifiers of cancer risk and can refine breast cancer risk estimates in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. A total of 4935 BRCA1 and 2241 BRCA2 mutation carriers and 11 individuals carrying both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations were genotyped for F31I. Overall, homozygosity for the 31I allele was not significantly associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers combined (HR = 0.91; 95% CI 0.77-1.06). Similarly, no significant association was seen in BRCA1 (HR = 0.90; 95% CI 0.75-1.08) or BRCA2 carriers (HR = 0.93; 95% CI 0.67-1.29) or when assessing the modifying effects of either bilateral prophylactic oophorectomy or menopausal status of BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. In summary, the F31I polymorphism in AURKA is not associated with a modified risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. PMID:17627006

  20. Clinicopathological Correlates in a PRNP P102L Mutation Carrier with Rapidly Progressing Parkinsonism-dystonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeh, Chizoba C.; Kalakoti, Piyush; Greenberg, Michael K; Notari, Silvio; Cohen, Yvonne; Gambetti, Pierluigi; Oblak, Adrian L.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Mari, Zoltan

    2015-01-01

    Parkinsonism-dystonia is rare in carriers of PRNP P102L mutation. Severity and distribution of prion protein (PrP) deposition may influence the clinical presentation. We present such clinic-pathological correlation in a 56-year-old male with a PRNP P102L mutation associated with a phenotype characterized by rapidly progressing parkinsonism-dystonia. The patient was studied clinically (videotaped exams, brain MRIs); molecular genetically (gene sequence analysis); and neuropathologically (histology, immunohistochemistry) during his 7-month disease course. The patient had parkinsonism, apraxia, aphasia, and dystonia, which progressed rapidly. Molecular genetic analysis revealed PRNP P102L mutation carrier status. Brain MRIs revealed progressive global volume loss and T2/FLAIR hyperintensity in neocortex and basal ganglia. Postmortem examination showed neuronal loss, gliosis, spongiform changes, and PrP deposition in the striatum. PrP immunohistochemistry revealed widespread severe PrP deposition in the thalamus and cerebellar cortex. Based on the neuropathological and molecular-genetic analysis, the rapidly progressing parkinsonism-dystonia correlated with nigrostriatal, thalamic, and cerebellar pathology. PMID:27617269

  1. Prediction of Breast and Prostate Cancer Risks in Male BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers Using Polygenic Risk Scores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lecarpentier, Julie; Silvestri, Valentina; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose BRCA1/2 mutations increase the risk of breast and prostate cancer in men. Common genetic variants modify cancer risks for female carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations. We investigated-for the first time to our knowledge-associations of common genetic variants with breast and prostate cancer risks...

  2. Genetic variation at 9p22.2 and ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, Susan J; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Gayther, Simon A

    2011-01-01

    Background Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancers. Although several common variants have been associated with breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers, none have been associated with ovarian cancer susceptibility....

  3. Genetic variation at 9p22.2 and ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, Susan J; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Gayther, Simon A

    2011-01-01

    Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancers. Although several common variants have been associated with breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers, none have been associated with ovarian cancer susceptibility. A genome-w...

  4. Rare mutations in RINT1 predispose carriers to breast and Lynch Syndrome-spectrum cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Daniel J.; Tao, Kayoko; Le Calvez-Kelm, Florence; Nguyen-Dumont, Tu; Robinot, Nivonirina; Hammet, Fleur; Odefrey, Fabrice; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teo, Zhi L.; Thingholm, Louise B.; Young, Erin L.; Voegele, Catherine; Lonie, Andrew; Pope, Bernard J.; Roane, Terrell C.; Bell, Russell; Hu, Hao; Shankaracharya; Huff, Chad D.; Ellis, Jonathan; Li, Jun; Makunin, Igor V.; John, Esther M.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Terry, Mary B.; Daly, Mary; Buys, Saundra S.; Snyder, Carrie; Lynch, Henry T.; Devilee, Peter; Giles, Graham G.; Hopper, John L.; Feng, Bing J.; Lesueur, Fabienne; Tavtigian, Sean V.; Southey, Melissa C.; Goldgar, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately half of the familial aggregation of breast cancer remains unexplained. A multiple-case breast cancer family exome sequencing study identified three likely pathogenic mutations in RINT1 (NM_021930.4) not present in public sequencing databases: RINT1 c.343C>T (p.Q115X), c.1132_1134del (p.M378del) and c.1207G>T (p.D403Y). Based on this finding, a population-based case-control mutation-screening study was conducted and identified 29 carriers of rare (MAF Lynch syndrome-spectrum cancers (SIR 3.35, 95% CI 1.7-6.0; P=0.005), particularly for relatives diagnosed with cancer under age 60 years (SIR 10.9, 95%CI 4.7-21; P=0.0003). PMID:25050558

  5. White matter hyperintensities are seen only in GRN mutation carriers in the GENFI cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carole H. Sudre

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic frontotemporal dementia is most commonly caused by mutations in the progranulin (GRN, microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT and chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72 genes. Previous small studies have reported the presence of cerebral white matter hyperintensities (WMH in genetic FTD but this has not been systematically studied across the different mutations. In this study WMH were assessed in 180 participants from the Genetic FTD Initiative (GENFI with 3D T1- and T2-weighed magnetic resonance images: 43 symptomatic (7 GRN, 13 MAPT and 23 C9orf72, 61 presymptomatic mutation carriers (25 GRN, 8 MAPT and 28 C9orf72 and 76 mutation negative non-carrier family members. An automatic detection and quantification algorithm was developed for determining load, location and appearance of WMH. Significant differences were seen only in the symptomatic GRN group compared with the other groups with no differences in the MAPT or C9orf72 groups: increased global load of WMH was seen, with WMH located in the frontal and occipital lobes more so than the parietal lobes, and nearer to the ventricles rather than juxtacortical. Although no differences were seen in the presymptomatic group as a whole, in the GRN cohort only there was an association of increased WMH volume with expected years from symptom onset. The appearance of the WMH was also different in the GRN group compared with the other groups, with the lesions in the GRN group being more similar to each other. The presence of WMH in those with progranulin deficiency may be related to the known role of progranulin in neuroinflammation, although other roles are also proposed including an effect on blood-brain barrier permeability and the cerebral vasculature. Future studies will be useful to investigate the longitudinal evolution of WMH and their potential use as a biomarker as well as post-mortem studies investigating the histopathological nature of the lesions.

  6. Results of the gas carrier reliquefaction plant trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Fatyhov

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper results of the gas carrier reliquefaction plant trial are considered. Safe transportation of liquefied gases is explained. The construction of the ship on trial is described. Designed parameters of the reliquefaction plant are presented. Heat gain into cargo tanks is obtained. Volumetric capacity, cooling capacity, volumetric efficiency and power consumption of the compressors are determined. Results of the main engine trial, diesel generator trial, reliquefaction plant trial, and calculations performed after wards are represented in five tables. The results obtained may be used for optimisation calculations of gas carriers’ reliquefaction plants.

  7. Safety of American Heart Association-recommended minimum exercise for desmosomal mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Abhishek C; Te Riele, Anneline S J M; Tichnell, Crystal; Murray, Brittney; Bhonsale, Aditya; Tandri, Harikrishna; Judge, Daniel P; Calkins, Hugh; James, Cynthia A

    2016-01-01

    Endurance exercise is associated with adverse outcomes in patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C). Exercise recommendations for family members remain undetermined. The purposes of this study were to determine if (1) endurance exercise (Bethesda class C) and exercise intensity (metabolic equivalent hours per year [MET-Hr/year]) increase the likelihood of fulfilling 2010 Task Force Criteria and ventricular arrhythmias/implantable cardioverter-defibrillator shock (ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation [VT/VF]), and (2) exercise restriction to the American Heart Association (AHA)-recommended minimum for healthy adults is associated with favorable outcomes of at-risk family members. Twenty-eight family members of 10 probands inheriting a PKP2 mutation were interviewed about exercise from age 10. Exercise threshold to maintain overall health was based on the 2007 AHA guidelines of a minimum 390 to 650 MET-Hr/year. After adjustment for age, sex, and family membership, both participation in endurance athletics (odds ratio [OR] 7.4, P = .03) and higher-intensity exercise (OR = 4.2, P = .004) were associated with diagnosis (n = 13). Endurance athletes were also significantly more likely to develop VT/VF (n = 6, P = .02). Family members who restricted exercise at or below the upper bound of the AHA goal (≤650 MET-Hr/year) were significantly less likely to be diagnosed (OR = 0.07, P = .002) and had no VT/VF. At diagnosis and first VT/VF, family members had accumulated 2.8-fold (P = .002) and 3.5-fold (P = .03), respectively, greater MET-Hr exercise than the AHA-recommended minimum. Those who developed VT/VF had performed particularly high-intensity exercise in adolescence compared to unaffected family members (age 10-14: P = .04; age 14-19: P = .02). The results of this study suggest restricting unaffected desmosomal mutation carriers from endurance and high-intensity athletics but potentially not from AHA

  8. Candidate genetic modifiers for breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterlongo, Paolo; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B; Rudolph, Anja; Schmutzler, Rita K; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Eeles, Rosalind A; Easton, Douglas F; Hamann, Ute; Wilkening, Stefan; Chen, Bowang; Rookus, Matti A; Schmidt, Marjanka K; van der Baan, Frederieke H; Spurdle, Amanda B; Walker, Logan C; Lose, Felicity; Maia, Ana-Teresa; Montagna, Marco; Matricardi, Laura; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Nussbaum, Robert L; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Arun, Banu K; Karlan, Beth Y; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Chung, Wendy K; Miron, Alex; Southey, Melissa C; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Ding, Yuan Chun; Neuhausen, Susan L; Hansen, Thomas V O; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Jønson, Lars; Osorio, Ana; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Benitez, Javier; Conway, Edye E; Blazer, Kathleen R; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Barile, Monica; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Mariette, Frederique; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Papi, Laura; Martayan, Aline; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Radice, Paolo; Vratimos, Athanassios; Fostira, Florentia; Garber, Judy E; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D Gareth R; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E; Kennedy, M John; Rogers, Mark T; Porteous, Mary E; Morrison, Patrick J; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley V; Ellis, Steve; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K; Claes, Kathleen; Van Maerken, Tom; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Buecher, Bruno; Delnatte, Capucine; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Damiola, Francesca; Coupier, Isabelle; Barjhoux, Laure; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Golmard, Lisa; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Belotti, Muriel; Piedmonte, Marion; Friedlander, Michael L; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Copeland, Larry J; de la Hoya, Miguel; Segura, Pedro Perez; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; van Os, Theo A M; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; van der Hout, Annemarie H; Vreeswijk, Maaike P G; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet G E M; van Doorn, Helena C; Collée, J Margriet; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Arason, Adalgeir; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Teixeira, Manuel R; Olswold, Curtis; Couch, Fergus J; Lindor, Noralane M; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I; Offit, Kenneth; Corines, Marina; Jacobs, Lauren; Robson, Mark E; Zhang, Liying; Joseph, Vijai; Berger, Andreas; Singer, Christian F; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng M; Phelan, Catherine M; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Rennert, Gad; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Andrulis, Irene L; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Ehrencrona, Hans; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Borg, Åke; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Healey, Sue; Lee, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D P; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Friedman, Eitan

    2015-01-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are at substantially increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. The incomplete penetrance coupled with the variable age at diagnosis in carriers of the same mutation suggests the existence of genetic and nongenetic modifying factors. In this study, we evaluated the putative role of variants in many candidate modifier genes. Genotyping data from 15,252 BRCA1 and 8,211 BRCA2 mutation carriers, for known variants (n = 3,248) located within or around 445 candidate genes, were available through the iCOGS custom-designed array. Breast and ovarian cancer association analysis was performed within a retrospective cohort approach. The observed P values of association ranged between 0.005 and 1.000. None of the variants was significantly associated with breast or ovarian cancer risk in either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, after multiple testing adjustments. There is little evidence that any of the evaluated candidate variants act as modifiers of breast and/or ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Genome-wide association studies have been more successful at identifying genetic modifiers of BRCA1/2 penetrance than candidate gene studies. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Plasma fibrin clot properties in the G20210A prothrombin mutation carriers following venous thromboembolism: the effect of rivaroxaban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janion-Sadowska, Agnieszka; Natorska, Joanna; Siudut, Jakub; Ząbczyk, Michal; Stanisz, Andrzej; Undas, Anetta

    2017-08-30

    We sought to investigate whether the G20210A prothrombin mutation modifies plasma fibrin clot properties in patients after venous thromboembolism (VTE) and how rivaroxaban treatment affects these alterations. We studied 34 prothrombin mutation heterozygous carriers and sex- and age-matched 34 non-carriers, all at least three months since the first VTE episode, before and during treatment with rivaroxaban. Clot permeability (K s ) and clot lysis time (CLT) with or without elimination of thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) were assessed at baseline, 2-6 hours (h) after and 20-25 h after intake of rivaroxaban (20 mg/day). At baseline, the prothrombin mutation group formed denser clots (K s -12 %, p=0.0006) and had impaired fibrinolysis (CLT +14 %, p=0.004, and CLT-TAFI +13 %, p=0.03) compared with the no mutation group and were similar to those observed in 15 healthy unrelated prothrombin mutation carriers. The G20210A prothrombin mutation was the independent predictor for K s and CLT before rivaroxaban intake. At 2-6 h after rivaroxaban intake, clot properties improved in both G20210A carriers and non-carriers (K s +38 %, and +37 %, CLT -25 % and -25 %, CLT-TAFI -20 % and -24 %, respectively, all pCLT +17 %, CLT-TAFI +13 %, all p<0.001). Rivaroxaban concentration correlated with fibrin clot properties. After 20-25 h since rivaroxaban intake most clot properties returned to baseline. Rivaroxaban-related differences in clot structure were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy images. In conclusion, rivaroxaban treatment, though improves fibrin clot properties, cannot abolish more prothrombotic fibrin clot phenotype observed in prothrombin mutation carriers following VTE.

  10. Involvement and Influence of Healthcare Providers, Family Members, and Other Mutation Carriers in the Cancer Risk Management Decision-Making Process of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puski, Athena; Hovick, Shelly; Senter, Leigha; Toland, Amanda Ewart

    2018-03-29

    Deciding between increased cancer screening or prophylactic surgery and the timing of such procedures can be a difficult and complex process for women with BRCA mutations. There are gaps in our understanding of involvement of others in the decision-making process for women with BRCA mutations. This study evaluated the management decision-making process of women with BRCA mutations, focusing on the involvement of others. Grounded theory was used to analyze and code risk management decision-making information from interviews with 20 BRCA mutation carriers. Unaffected at-risk participants with a BRCA mutation, those under age 40, and those with no children described having a difficult time making risk management decisions. Physicians were an integral part of the decision-making process by providing decisional support and management recommendations. Family members and other mutation carriers filled similar yet distinct roles by providing experiential information as well as decisional and emotional support for carriers. Participants described genetic counselors as short-term providers of risk information and management recommendations. The study findings suggest that unaffected at-risk women, women under 40, and those who do not have children may benefit from additional support and information during the decision-making process. Genetic counselors are well trained to help women through this process and connect them with resources, and may be under-utilized in long-term follow-up for women with a BRCA mutation.

  11. Population carrier rates of pathogenic ARSA gene mutations: is metachromatic leukodystrophy underdiagnosed?

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    Agnieszka Ługowska

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD is a severe neurometabolic disease caused mainly by deficiency of arylsulfatase A encoded by the ARSA gene. Based on epidemiological surveys the incidence of MLD per 100,000 live births varied from 0.6 to 2.5. Our purpose was to estimate the birth prevalence of MLD in Poland by determining population frequency of the common pathogenic ARSA gene mutations and to compare this estimate with epidemiological data. METHODOLOGY: We studied two independently ascertained cohorts from the Polish background population (N∼3000 each and determined carrier rates of common ARSA gene mutations: c.459+1G>A, p.P426L, p.I179S (cohort 1 and c.459+1G>A, p.I179S (cohort 2. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Taking into account ARSA gene mutation distribution among 60 Polish patients, the expected MLD birth prevalence in the general population (assuming no selection against homozygous fetuses was estimated as 4.0/100,000 and 4.1/100,000, respectively for the 1(st and the 2(nd cohort with a pooled estimate of 4.1/100,000 (CI: 1.8-9.4 which was higher than the estimate of 0.38 per 100,000 live births based on diagnosed cases. The p.I179S mutation was relatively more prevalent among controls than patients (OR = 3.6, P = 0.0082, for a comparison of p.I179S frequency relative to c.459+1G>A between controls vs. patients. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The observed discrepancy between the measured incidence of metachromatic leukodystrophy and the predicted carriage rates suggests that MLD is substantially underdiagnosed in the Polish population. The underdiagnosis rate may be particularly high among patients with p.I179S mutation whose disease is characterized mainly by psychotic symptoms.

  12. Appreciating the broad clinical features of SMAD4 mutation carriers: a multi-center chart review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wain, K.E.; Ellingson, M.S.; McDonald, J.; Gammon, A.; Roberts, M.; Pichurin, P.; Winship, I.; Riegert-Johnson, D.; Weitzel, J. N.; Lindor, N.M.

    2014-01-01

    Heterozygous loss-of-function (LOF) SMAD4 mutations are associated with juvenile polyposis syndrome (JP) and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Some carriers exhibit symptoms of both conditions, leading to the name JP-HHT syndrome. Three families have been reported with connective tissue abnormalities. In order to better understand the spectrum and extent of clinical findings in SMAD4 carriers, medical records of 34 patients (20 families) from five clinical practices were reviewed. Twenty-one percent (7/34) had features suggesting a connective tissue defect: enlarged aortic root (n=3), aortic and mitral insufficiency (n=2), aortic dissection (n=1), retinal detachment (n=1), brain aneurysms (n=1), lax skin and joints (n=1). JP-specific findings were almost uniformly present but variable. Ninety-seven percent had colon polyps that were generally pan-colonic and of variable histology and number. Forty-eight percent (15/31) had extensive gastric polyposis. HHT features were documented in 76% including epistaxis (19/31, 61%), mucocutaneous telangiectases (15/31, 48%), liver arteriovenous malformation (AVM) (6/16, 38%), brain AVM (1/26, 4%), pulmonary AVM (9/17, 53%), and intrapulmonary shunting (14/23, 61%). SMAD4 carriers should be managed for JP and HHT, since symptoms of both are likely yet unpredictable. Connective tissue abnormalities are an emerging component of JP-HHT syndrome, and larger studies are needed to understand these manifestations. PMID:24525918

  13. Primary fibroblasts from CSPα mutation carriers recapitulate hallmarks of the adult onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez, Bruno A; Sands, Mark S

    2017-07-24

    Mutations in the co- chaperone protein, CSPα, cause an autosomal dominant, adult-neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (AD-ANCL). The current understanding of CSPα function exclusively at the synapse fails to explain the autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP) dysfunction in cells from AD-ANCL patients. Here, we demonstrate unexpectedly that primary dermal fibroblasts from pre-symptomatic mutation carriers recapitulate in vitro features found in the brains of AD-ANCL patients including auto-fluorescent storage material (AFSM) accumulation, CSPα aggregates, increased levels of lysosomal proteins and lysosome enzyme activities. AFSM accumulation correlates with CSPα aggregation and both are susceptible to pharmacological modulation of ALP function. In addition, we demonstrate that endogenous CSPα is present in the lysosome-enriched fractions and co-localizes with lysosome markers in soma, neurites and synaptic boutons. Overexpression of CSPα wild-type (WT) decreases lysotracker signal, secreted lysosomal enzymes and SNAP23-mediated lysosome exocytosis. CSPα WT, mutant and aggregated CSPα are degraded mainly by the ALP but this disease-causing mutation exhibits a faster rate of degradation. Co-expression of both WT and mutant CSPα cause a block in the fusion of autophagosomes/lysosomes. Our data suggest that aggregation-dependent perturbation of ALP function is a relevant pathogenic mechanism for AD-ANCL and supports the use of AFSM or CSPα aggregation as biomarkers for drug screening purposes.

  14. TP53 mutations in ovarian carcinomas from sporadic cases and carriers of two distinct BRCA1 founder mutations; relation to age at diagnosis and survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kringen, Pedro; Wang, Yun; Dumeaux, Vanessa; Kristensen, Gunnar; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Dorum, Anne

    2005-01-01

    Ovarian carcinomas from 30 BRCA1 germ-line carriers of two distinct high penetrant founder mutations, 20 carrying the 1675delA and 10 the 1135insA, and 100 sporadic cases were characterized for somatic mutations in the TP53 gene. We analyzed differences in relation to BRCA1 germline status, TP53 status, survival and age at diagnosis, as previous studies have not been conclusive. DNA was extracted from paraffin embedded formalin fixed tissues for the familial cases, and from fresh frozen specimen from the sporadic cases. All cases were treated at our hospital according to protocol. Mutation analyses of exon 2 – 11 were performed using TTGE, followed by sequencing. Survival rates for BRCA1-familial cases with TP53 mutations were not significantly lower than for familial cases without TP53 mutations (p = 0.25, RR = 1.64, 95% CI [0.71–3.78]). Median age at diagnosis for sporadic (59 years) and familial (49 years) cases differed significantly (p < 0.001) with or without TP53 mutations. Age at diagnosis between the two types of familial carriers were not significantly different, with median age of 47 for 1675delA and 52.5 for 1135insA carriers (p = 0.245). For cases ≥50 years at diagnosis, a trend toward longer survival for sporadic over familial cases was observed (p = 0.08). The opposite trend was observed for cases <50 years at diagnosis. There do not seem to be a protective advantage for familial BRCA1 carriers without TP53 mutations over familial cases with TP53 mutations. However, there seem to be a trend towards initial advantage in survival for familial cases compared to sporadic cases diagnosed before the age of 50 both with and without TP53 mutations. However, this trend diminishes over time and for cases diagnosed ≥50 years the sporadic cases show a trend towards an advantage in survival over familial cases. Although this data set is small, if confirmed, this may be a link in the evidence that the differences in ovarian cancer survival reported, are

  15. The significance of circumscribed malignant mammographic masses in the surveillance of BRCA 1/2 gene mutation carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaas, R.; Kroger, R.; Besnard, A.P.E.; Koops, W.; Pameijer, F.A.; Prevoo, W.; Loo, C.E.; Muller, S.H.; Hendriks, J.H.C.L.

    2004-01-01

    Breast cancers in gene mutation carriers may escape mammographic detection because of rapid growth and tumor expansion. Therefore, they may mimic benign lesions on the mammogram. Twenty-nine BRCA 1/2 mutation carriers under surveillance developed 31 breast cancers between 1994 and 2001 at a mean age of 44.2 years. Controls were 63 women with 67 breast cancers in the same period at a mean age of 53.8 years, also under surveillance because of a life time risk of at least 15%. In 26% of the carriers vs. 48% of the controls, mammography was the method that first suspected a malignancy. Seven radiologists performed a retrospective review of the original mammograms to establish technical assessment, with special attention for circumscribed lesions and estimated probability of malignancy. In the mutation carriers seven (23%) circumscribed non-calcified mammographic masses were found and three in the controls (4.5%) P=0.01. These masses were proven to be malignant. In both groups around 70% of these fast-growing circumscribed lesions were detected by the patients. The masses were situated in breasts with a good interpretable breast pattern. BRCA 1/2 mutation carriers had a significantly higher percentage of circumscribed non-calcified mammographic masses that proved to be malignant. These mammographic lesions in women at high risk should be described as at least Birads 0 and worked-up with ultrasound and needle biopsy. (orig.)

  16. Pathogenic mutations of the human mitochondrial citrate carrier SLC25A1 lead to impaired citrate export required for lipid, dolichol, ubiquinone and sterol synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majd, Homa; King, Martin S; Smith, Anthony C; Kunji, Edmund R S

    2018-01-01

    Missense mutations of the human mitochondrial citrate carrier, encoded by the SLC25A1 gene, lead to an autosomal recessive neurometabolic disorder characterised by neonatal-onset encephalopathy with severe muscular weakness, intractable seizures, respiratory distress, and lack of psychomotor development, often resulting in early death. Here, we have measured the effect of all twelve known pathogenic mutations on the transport activity. The results show that nine mutations abolish transport of citrate completely, whereas the other three reduce the transport rate by >70%, indicating that impaired citrate transport is the most likely primary cause of the disease. Some mutations may be detrimental to the structure of the carrier, whereas others may impair key functional elements, such as the substrate binding site and the salt bridge network on the matrix side of the carrier. To understand the consequences of impaired citrate transport on metabolism, the substrate specificity was also determined, showing that the human citrate carrier predominantly transports citrate, isocitrate, cis-aconitate, phosphoenolpyruvate and malate. Although D-2- and L-2 hydroxyglutaric aciduria is a metabolic hallmark of the disease, it is unlikely that the citrate carrier plays a significant role in the removal of hydroxyglutarate from the cytosol for oxidation to oxoglutarate in the mitochondrial matrix. In contrast, computer simulations of central metabolism predict that the export of citrate from the mitochondrion cannot be fully compensated by other pathways, restricting the cytosolic production of acetyl-CoA that is required for the synthesis of lipids, sterols, dolichols and ubiquinone, which in turn explains the severe disease phenotypes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Risk of iron overload in carriers of genetic mutations associated with hereditary haemochromatosis: UK Food Standards Agency workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mamta; Ashwell, Margaret; Sanderson, Peter; Cade, Janet; Moreton, Jennifer; Fairweather-Tait, Susan; Roe, Mark; Marx, Joannes J M; Worwood, Mark; Cook, James D

    2006-10-01

    The UK Food Standards Agency convened a group of expert scientists to review current research investigating diet and carriers of genetic mutations associated with hereditary haemochromatosis. The workshop concluded that individuals who are heterozygous for the C282Y mutation of the HFE gene do not appear to respond abnormally to dietary Fe and therefore do not need to change their diet to prevent accumulation of body Fe.

  18. Partial loss of heterozygosity events at the mutated gene in tumors from MLH1/MSH2 large genomic rearrangement carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilencikova Denisa

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depending on the population studied, large genomic rearrangements (LGRs of the mismatch repair (MMR genes constitute various proportions of the germline mutations that predispose to hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC. It has been reported that loss of heterozygosity (LOH at the LGR region occurs through a gene conversion mechanism in tumors from MLH1/MSH2 deletion carriers; however, the converted tracts were delineated only by extragenic microsatellite markers. We sought to determine the frequency of LGRs in Slovak HNPCC patients and to study LOH in tumors from LGR carriers at the LGR region, as well as at other heterozygous markers within the gene to more precisely define conversion tracts. Methods The main MMR genes responsible for HNPCC, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2, were analyzed by MLPA (multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification in a total of 37 unrelated HNPCC-suspected patients whose MLH1/MSH2 genes gave negative results in previous sequencing experiments. An LOH study was performed on six tumors from LGR carriers by combining MLPA to assess LOH at LGR regions and sequencing to examine LOH at 28 SNP markers from the MLH1 and MSH2 genes. Results We found six rearrangements in the MSH2 gene (five deletions and dup5-6, and one aberration in the MLH1 gene (del5-6. The MSH2 deletions were of three types (del1, del1-3, del1-7. We detected LOH at the LGR region in the single MLH1 case, which was determined in a previous study to be LOH-negative in the intragenic D3S1611 marker. Three tumors displayed LOH of at least one SNP marker, including two cases that were LOH-negative at the LGR region. Conclusion LGRs accounted for 25% of germline MMR mutations identified in 28 Slovakian HNPCC families. A high frequency of LGRs among the MSH2 mutations provides a rationale for a MLPA screening of the Slovakian HNPCC families prior scanning by DNA sequencing. LOH at part of the informative loci confined to the MLH1

  19. Appreciating the broad clinical features of SMAD4 mutation carriers: a multicenter chart review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wain, Karen E; Ellingson, Marissa S; McDonald, Jamie; Gammon, Amanda; Roberts, Maegan; Pichurin, Pavel; Winship, Ingrid; Riegert-Johnson, Douglas L; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Lindor, Noralane M

    2014-08-01

    Heterozygous loss-of-function SMAD4 mutations are associated with juvenile polyposis syndrome and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. Some carriers exhibit symptoms of both conditions, leading to juvenile polyposis-hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia syndrome. Three families have been reported with connective tissue abnormalities. To better understand the spectrum and extent of clinical findings in SMAD4 carriers, medical records of 34 patients (20 families) from five clinical practices were reviewed. Twenty-one percent of the patients (7/34) had features suggesting a connective tissue defect: enlarged aortic root (n = 3), aortic and mitral insufficiency (n = 2), aortic dissection (n = 1), retinal detachment (n = 1), brain aneurysms (n = 1), and lax skin and joints (n = 1). Juvenile polyposis-specific findings were almost uniformly present but variable. Ninety-seven percent of the patients had colon polyps that were generally pan-colonic and of variable histology and number. Forty-eight percent of the patients (15/31) had extensive gastric polyposis. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia features, including epistaxis (19/31, 61%), mucocutaneous telangiectases (15/31, 48%), liver arteriovenous malformation (6/16, 38%), brain arteriovenous malformation (1/26, 4%), pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (9/17, 53%), and intrapulmonary shunting (14/23, 61%), were documented in 76% of the patients. SMAD4 carriers should be managed for juvenile polyposis and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia because symptoms of both conditions are likely yet unpredictable. Connective tissue abnormalities are an emerging component of juvenile polyposis-hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia syndrome, and larger studies are needed to understand these manifestations.

  20. Partial loss of heterozygosity events at the mutated gene in tumors from MLH1/MSH2 large genomic rearrangement carriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavodna, Katarina; Krivulcik, Tomas; Bujalkova, Maria Gerykova [Laboratory of Cancer Genetics, Cancer Research Institute of Slovak Academy of Sciences, Vlarska 7, 833 91 Bratislava (Slovakia); Slamka, Tomas; Martinicky, David; Ilencikova, Denisa [National Cancer Institute, Department of Oncologic Genetics, Klenova 1, 833 01 Bratislava (Slovakia); Bartosova, Zdena [Laboratory of Cancer Genetics, Cancer Research Institute of Slovak Academy of Sciences, Vlarska 7, 833 91 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2009-11-20

    Depending on the population studied, large genomic rearrangements (LGRs) of the mismatch repair (MMR) genes constitute various proportions of the germline mutations that predispose to hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). It has been reported that loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the LGR region occurs through a gene conversion mechanism in tumors from MLH1/MSH2 deletion carriers; however, the converted tracts were delineated only by extragenic microsatellite markers. We sought to determine the frequency of LGRs in Slovak HNPCC patients and to study LOH in tumors from LGR carriers at the LGR region, as well as at other heterozygous markers within the gene to more precisely define conversion tracts. The main MMR genes responsible for HNPCC, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2, were analyzed by MLPA (multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification) in a total of 37 unrelated HNPCC-suspected patients whose MLH1/MSH2 genes gave negative results in previous sequencing experiments. An LOH study was performed on six tumors from LGR carriers by combining MLPA to assess LOH at LGR regions and sequencing to examine LOH at 28 SNP markers from the MLH1 and MSH2 genes. We found six rearrangements in the MSH2 gene (five deletions and dup5-6), and one aberration in the MLH1 gene (del5-6). The MSH2 deletions were of three types (del1, del1-3, del1-7). We detected LOH at the LGR region in the single MLH1 case, which was determined in a previous study to be LOH-negative in the intragenic D3S1611 marker. Three tumors displayed LOH of at least one SNP marker, including two cases that were LOH-negative at the LGR region. LGRs accounted for 25% of germline MMR mutations identified in 28 Slovakian HNPCC families. A high frequency of LGRs among the MSH2 mutations provides a rationale for a MLPA screening of the Slovakian HNPCC families prior scanning by DNA sequencing. LOH at part of the informative loci confined to the MLH1 or MSH2 gene (heterozygous LGR region, SNP, or

  1. Partial loss of heterozygosity events at the mutated gene in tumors from MLH1/MSH2 large genomic rearrangement carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavodna, Katarina; Krivulcik, Tomas; Bujalkova, Maria Gerykova; Slamka, Tomas; Martinicky, David; Ilencikova, Denisa; Bartosova, Zdena

    2009-01-01

    Depending on the population studied, large genomic rearrangements (LGRs) of the mismatch repair (MMR) genes constitute various proportions of the germline mutations that predispose to hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). It has been reported that loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the LGR region occurs through a gene conversion mechanism in tumors from MLH1/MSH2 deletion carriers; however, the converted tracts were delineated only by extragenic microsatellite markers. We sought to determine the frequency of LGRs in Slovak HNPCC patients and to study LOH in tumors from LGR carriers at the LGR region, as well as at other heterozygous markers within the gene to more precisely define conversion tracts. The main MMR genes responsible for HNPCC, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2, were analyzed by MLPA (multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification) in a total of 37 unrelated HNPCC-suspected patients whose MLH1/MSH2 genes gave negative results in previous sequencing experiments. An LOH study was performed on six tumors from LGR carriers by combining MLPA to assess LOH at LGR regions and sequencing to examine LOH at 28 SNP markers from the MLH1 and MSH2 genes. We found six rearrangements in the MSH2 gene (five deletions and dup5-6), and one aberration in the MLH1 gene (del5-6). The MSH2 deletions were of three types (del1, del1-3, del1-7). We detected LOH at the LGR region in the single MLH1 case, which was determined in a previous study to be LOH-negative in the intragenic D3S1611 marker. Three tumors displayed LOH of at least one SNP marker, including two cases that were LOH-negative at the LGR region. LGRs accounted for 25% of germline MMR mutations identified in 28 Slovakian HNPCC families. A high frequency of LGRs among the MSH2 mutations provides a rationale for a MLPA screening of the Slovakian HNPCC families prior scanning by DNA sequencing. LOH at part of the informative loci confined to the MLH1 or MSH2 gene (heterozygous LGR region, SNP, or

  2. DaT-SPECT assessment depicts dopamine depletion among asymptomatic G2019S LRRK2 mutation carriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moran Artzi

    Full Text Available Identification of early changes in Dopamine-Transporter (DaT SPECT imaging expected in the prodromal phase of Parkinson's disease (PD, are usually overlooked. Carriers of the G2019S LRRK2 mutation are known to be at high risk for developing PD, compared to non-carriers. In this work we aimed to study early changes in Dopamine uptake in non-manifesting PD carriers (NMC of the G2019S LRRK2 mutation using quantitative DaT-SPECT analysis and to examine the potential for early prediction of PD. Eighty Ashkenazi-Jewish subjects were included in this study: eighteen patients with PD; thirty-one NMC and thirty-one non-manifesting non-carriers (NMNC. All subjects underwent a through clinical assessment including evaluation of motor, olfactory, affective and non-motor symptoms and DaT-SPECT imaging. A population based DaT-SPECT template was created based on the NMNC cohort, and data driven volumes-of-interest (VOIs were defined. Comparisons between groups were performed based on VOIs and voxel-wise analysis. The striatum area of all three cohorts was segmented into four VOIs, corresponding to the right/left dorsal and ventral striatum. Significant differences in clinical measures were found between patients with PD and non-manifesting subjects with no differences between NMC and NMNC. Significantly lower uptake (p<0.001 was detected in the right and left dorsal striatum in the PD group (2.2±0.3, 2.3±0.4 compared to the NMC (4.2±0.6, 4.3±0.5 and NMNC (4.5±0.6, 4.6±0.6, and significantly (p = 0.05 lower uptake in the right dorsal striatum in the NMC group compared to NMNC. Converging results were obtained using voxel-wise analysis. Two NMC participants, who later phenoconverted into PD, demonstrated reduced uptake mainly in the dorsal striatum. No significant correlations were found between the DaT-SPECT uptake in the different VOIs and clinical and behavioral assessments in the non-manifesting groups. This study shows the clinical value of

  3. Male breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silvestri, Valentina; Barrowdale, Daniel; Mulligan, Anna Marie

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BRCA1 and, more commonly, BRCA2 mutations are associated with increased risk of male breast cancer (MBC). However, only a paucity of data exists on the pathology of breast cancers (BCs) in men with BRCA1/2 mutations. Using the largest available dataset, we determined whether MBCs....../2 FBCs and with population-based data from 6351 MBCs in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. RESULTS: Among BRCA2 MBCs, grade significantly decreased with increasing age at diagnosis (P = 0.005). Compared with BRCA2 FBCs, BRCA2 MBCs were of significantly higher stage (P...

  4. Risk-reducing salpingectomy with delayed oophorectomy in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers: Patients' and professionals' perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, M. de; Harmsen, M.G.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Hermens, R.P.M.G.; Hullu, J.A. de

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify influencing factors of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and their professionals for risk-reducing salpingectomy (RRS) with delayed oophorectomy (RRO) as a substitute for risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO) and for study participation on this concept. METHODS: A qualitative

  5. Affected female carriers of MTM1 mutations display a wide spectrum of clinical and pathological involvement: delineating diagnostic clues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biancalana, V.; Scheidecker, S.; Miguet, M.; Laquerriere, A.; Romero, N.B.; Stojkovic, T.; Neto, O. Abath; Mercier, S.; Voermans, N.C.; Tanner, L.; Rogers, C.; Ollagnon-Roman, E.; Roper, H.; Boutte, C.; Ben-Shachar, S.; Lornage, X.; Vasli, N.; Schaefer, E.; Laforet, P.; Pouget, J.; Moerman, A.; Pasquier, L.; Marcorelle, P.; Magot, A.; Kusters, B.; Streichenberger, N.; Tranchant, C.; Dondaine, N.; Schneider, R.; Gasnier, C.; Calmels, N.; Kremer, V.; Nguyen, K. Van; Perrier, J.; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Carlier, P.; Carlier, R.Y.; Thompson, J.; Boland, A.; Deleuze, J.F.; Fardeau, M.; Zanoteli, E.; Eymard, B.; Laporte, J.

    2017-01-01

    X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM), a severe congenital myopathy, is caused by mutations in the MTM1 gene located on the X chromosome. A majority of affected males die in the early postnatal period, whereas female carriers are believed to be usually asymptomatic. Nevertheless, several affected

  6. Lipoprotein profiles in human heterozygote carriers of a functional mutation P297S in scavenger receptor class B1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ljunggren, Stefan A.; Levels, Johannes H. M.; Hovingh, Kees; Holleboom, Adriaan G.; Vergeer, Menno; Argyri, Letta; Gkolfinopoulou, Christina; Chroni, Angeliki; Sierts, Jeroen A.; Kastelein, John J.; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert; Lindahl, Mats; Karlsson, Helen

    2015-01-01

    The scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-B1) is an important HDL receptor involved in cholesterol uptake and efflux, but its physiological role in human lipoprotein metabolism is not fully understood. Heterozygous carriers of the SR-B1(P297S) mutation are characterized by increased HDL cholesterol

  7. Breast cancer screening in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers after risk reducing salpingo-oophorectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fakkert, I.E.; Jansen, L.; Meijer, K.; Kok, Theo; Oosterwijk, J.C.; Mourits, M.J.E.; de Bock, G.H.

    Breast cancer screening is offered to BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers from the age of 25 years because of their increased risk of breast cancer. As ovarian cancer screening is not effective, risk-reducing salpingho-oophorectomy (RRSO) is offered after child bearing age. RRSO before menopause

  8. Exposure to diagnostic radiation and risk of breast cancer among carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations: retrospective cohort study (GENE-RAD-RISK)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijpe, Anouk; Andrieu, Nadine; Easton, Douglas F.; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Cardis, Elisabeth; Noguès, Catherine; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Lasset, Christine; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Paterson, Joan; Manders, Peggy; van Asperen, Christi J.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Thierry-Chef, Isabelle; Hauptmann, Michael; Goldgar, David; Rookus, Matti A.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Fourme, Emmanuelle; Lidereau, Rosette; Stevens, Denise; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Chompret, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Luporsi, Elisabeth; Bonadona, Valérie; Gauducheau, René; de Sienne, Catherine; Lortholary, Alain; Frénay, Marc; Faivre, Laurence; Sobol, Hagay; Huiart, Laetitia; Longy, Michel; Nguyen, Tan Dat; Gladieff, Laurence; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gesta, Paul; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Chevrier, Annie; Rossi, Annick; Perrin, Jean; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Limacher, Jean-Marc; Dugast, Catherine; Courlancy, Polyclinique; Demange, Liliane; Zattara-Cannoni, Hélène; Dreyfus, Hélène; Noruzinia, Mehrdad; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Gregory, Helen; Cole, Trevor; Burgess, Lucy; Rogers, Mark; Hughes, Lisa; Brewer, Carole; Davidson, Rosemarie; Bradshaw, Nicola; Izatt, Louise; Pichert, Gabriella; Langman, Caroline; Chu, Carol; Miller, Julie; Evans, Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Shenton, Andrew; Side, Lucy; Bancroft, Elizabeth; Page, Elizabeth; Castro, Elena; Houlston, Richard; Rahman, Nazneen; Shanley, Susan; Cook, Jackie; Baxter, Lauren; Hodgson, Shirley; Goff, Sheila; Eccles, Diana; Verhoef, Senno; Brohet, Richard; Hogervorst, Frans; van 't Veer, Laura; van Leeuwen, Flora; Rookus, Matti; Collée, Margriet; van den Ouweland, Ans; Kriege, Mieke; Schutte, Mieke; Hooning, Maartje; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tollenaar, Rob; van Asperen, Christi; Wijnen, Juul; Devilee, Peter; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn; Ausems, Margreet; van der Luijt, Rob; Aalfs, Cora; van Os, Theo; Gille, Hans; Gomez-Garcia, Encarna; Blok, Rien; Oosterwijk, Jan; van der Hout, Annemiek; Vasen, Hans; van Leeuwen, Inge

    2012-01-01

    To estimate the risk of breast cancer associated with diagnostic radiation in carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations. Retrospective cohort study (GENE-RAD-RISK). Three nationwide studies (GENEPSO, EMBRACE, HEBON) in France, United Kingdom, and the Netherlands, 1993 female carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations

  9. Targeted prostate cancer screening in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bancroft, Elizabeth K; Page, Elizabeth C; Castro, Elena

    2014-01-01

    AND PARTICIPANTS: We recruited men aged 40-69 yr with germline BRCA1/2 mutations and a control group of men who have tested negative for a pathogenic BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation known to be present in their families. All men underwent prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing at enrollment, and those men with PSA >3 ng......BACKGROUND: Men with germline breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) or breast cancer 2, early onset (BRCA2) gene mutations have a higher risk of developing prostate cancer (PCa) than noncarriers. IMPACT (Identification of Men with a genetic predisposition to ProstAte Cancer: Targeted screening....../ml were offered prostate biopsy. OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: PSA levels, PCa incidence, and tumour characteristics were evaluated. The Fisher exact test was used to compare the number of PCa cases among groups and the differences among disease types. RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: We...

  10. Is thyroidectomy necessary in RET mutations carriers of the familial medullary thyroid carcinoma syndrome?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H S; Torring, H; Godballe, C

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The results and consequences of genetic testing in a family with familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC) are described. METHODS: In the screening of relatives, serum calcitonin is replaced by RET mutation analysis that was performed in families suspected of hereditary medullary th...

  11. Overall survival and clinical characteristics of BRCA mutation carriers with stage I/II pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, Talia; Sella, Tal; O'Reilly, Eileen M; Katz, Matthew H G; Epelbaum, Ron; Kelsen, David P; Borgida, Ayelet; Maynard, Hannah; Kindler, Hedy; Friedmen, Eitan; Javle, Milind; Gallinger, Steven

    2017-03-14

    BRCA1/BRCA2 germ line (GL) mutation carriers with pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) may have distinct outcomes. We recently described an apparent more favourable prognosis of surgically resected BRCA-associated PDAC patients in a single-arm, uncontrolled, retrospective study. However, the prognostic impact of GL BRCA1/2 mutations in surgically resected PDAC has not been compared with a matched control population. A larger multi-centre, case-control retrospective analysis was performed. Cases were patients with surgically resected, BRCA1/2-associated PDAC from 2004 to 2013. Controls included surgically resected PDAC cases treated during the same time period that were either BRCA non-carriers, or had no family history of breast, ovarian or pancreatic cancers. Cases and controls were matched by: age at diagnosis (within ±5-year period) and institution. Demographics, clinical history, overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were abstracted from patient records. Statistical comparisons were assessed using χ 2 - and Fisher's exact test, and median DFS/OS using Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank testing. Twenty-five patients with BRCA1-(n=4) or BRCA2 (N=21)-associated resectable PDAC were identified. Mean age was 55.7 years (range, 34-78 years), 48% (n=12) were females and 76% (n=19) were Jewish. Cases were compared (1 : 2) with 49 resectable PDAC controls, and were balanced for age, ethnicity and other relevant clinical and pathological features. BRCA-associated PDAC patients received neoadjuvant, or adjuvant platinum-based treatment more frequently than controls (7 out of 8 vs 6 out of 14) and (7 out of 21 vs 3 out of 44), respectively. No significant difference in median OS (37.06 vs 38.77 months, P=0.838) and in DFS (14.3 vs 12.0 months, P=0.303) could be demonstrated between cases and controls. A trend to increased DFS was observed among BRCA-positive cases treated with neoadjuvant/adjuvant platinum-containing regimens (n=10) compared with similarly

  12. The frequency of Tay-Sachs disease causing mutations in the Brazilian Jewish population justifies a carrier screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenberg, R; Pereira, L da V

    2001-07-05

    Tay-Sachs disease is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by progressive neurologic degeneration, fatal in early childhood. In the Ashkenazi Jewish population the disease incidence is about 1 in every 3,500 newborns and the carrier frequency is 1 in every 29 individuals. Carrier screening programs for Tay-Sachs disease have reduced disease incidence by 90% in high-risk populations in several countries. The Brazilian Jewish population is estimated at 90,000 individuals. Currently, there is no screening program for Tay-Sachs disease in this population. To evaluate the importance of a Tay-Sachs disease carrier screening program in the Brazilian Jewish population by determining the frequency of heterozygotes and the acceptance of the program by the community. Laboratory of Molecular Genetics--Institute of Biosciences--Universidade de São Paulo. 581 senior students from selected Jewish high schools. Molecular analysis of Tay-Sachs disease causing mutations by PCR amplification of genomic DNA, followed by restriction enzyme digestion. Among 581 students that attended educational classes, 404 (70%) elected to be tested for Tay-Sachs disease mutations. Of these, approximately 65% were of Ashkenazi Jewish origin. Eight carriers were detected corresponding to a carrier frequency of 1 in every 33 individuals in the Ashkenazi Jewish fraction of the sample. The frequency of Tay-Sachs disease carriers among the Ashkenazi Jewish population of Brazil is similar to that of other countries where carrier screening programs have led to a significant decrease in disease incidence. Therefore, it is justifiable to implement a Tay-Sachs disease carrier screening program for the Brazilian Jewish population.

  13. Phenotype comparison of MLH1 and MSH2 mutation carriers in a cohort of 1,914 individuals undergoing clinical genetic testing in the United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Kastrinos (Fay); E.M. Stoffel (Elena); J. Balmana (Judith); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); R. Mercado (Rowena); S. Syngal (Sapna)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground and Aims: Lynch syndrome is caused by germ-line mismatch repair gene mutations. We examined the phenotypic differences between MLH1 and MSH2 gene mutation carriers and whether mutation type (point versus large rearrangement) affected phenotypic expression. Methods: This is a

  14. Carrier multiplication in silicon nanocrystals: ab initio results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Marri

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important goals in the field of renewable energy is the development of original solar cell schemes employing new materials to overcome the performance limitations of traditional solar cell devices. Among such innovative materials, nanostructures have emerged as an important class of materials that can be used to realize efficient photovoltaic devices. When these systems are implemented into solar cells, new effects can be exploited to maximize the harvest of solar radiation and to minimize the loss factors. In this context, carrier multiplication seems one promising way to minimize the effects induced by thermalization loss processes thereby significantly increasing the solar cell power conversion. In this work we analyze and quantify different types of carrier multiplication decay dynamics by analyzing systems of isolated and coupled silicon nanocrystals. The effects on carrier multiplication dynamics by energy and charge transfer processes are also discussed.

  15. Classifications within molecular subtypes enables identification of BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation carriers by RNA tumor profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin J; Kruse, Torben A; Tan, Qihua

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic germline mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 are detected in less than one third of families with a strong history of breast cancer. It is therefore expected that mutations still remain undetected by currently used screening methods. In addition, a growing number of BRCA1/2 sequence variants...... of unclear pathogen significance are found in the families, constituting an increasing clinical challenge. New methods are therefore needed to improve the detection rate and aid the interpretation of the clinically uncertain variants. In this study we analyzed a series of 33 BRCA1, 22 BRCA2, and 128 sporadic...... tumors by RNA profiling to investigate the classification potential of RNA profiles to predict BRCA1/2 mutation status. We found that breast tumors from BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers display characteristic RNA expression patterns, allowing them to be distinguished from sporadic tumors. The majority...

  16. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Vigorito

    Full Text Available Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Genotype data were available for 15,252 (2,462 ovarian cancer cases BRCA1 and 8,211 (631 ovarian cancer cases BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following genotype imputation, ovarian cancer associations were assessed for 4,873 and 5,020 SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA 2 mutation carriers respectively, within a retrospective cohort analytical framework. In BRCA1 mutation carriers one set of eight correlated candidate causal variants for ovarian cancer risk modification was identified (top SNP rs10124837, HR: 0.73, 95%CI: 0.68 to 0.79, p-value 2× 10-16. These variants were located up to 20 kb upstream of BNC2. In BRCA2 mutation carriers one region, up to 45 kb upstream of BNC2, and containing 100 correlated SNPs was identified as candidate causal (top SNP rs62543585, HR: 0.69, 95%CI: 0.59 to 0.80, p-value 1.0 × 10-6. The candidate causal in BRCA1 mutation carriers did not include the strongest associated variant at this locus in the general population. In sum, we identified a set of candidate causal variants in a region that encompasses the BNC2 transcription start site. The ovarian cancer association at 9p22.2 may be mediated by different variants in BRCA1 mutation carriers and in the general population. Thus, potentially different mechanisms may underlie ovarian cancer risk for mutation carriers and the general population.

  17. Progression of subtle motor signs in PINK1 mutation carriers with mild dopaminergic deficit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eggers, C; Schmidt, A; Hagenah, J

    2010-01-01

    While homozygous mutations in the PINK1 gene cause recessively inherited early-onset Parkinson disease (PD), heterozygous mutations have been suggested as a susceptibility factor.......While homozygous mutations in the PINK1 gene cause recessively inherited early-onset Parkinson disease (PD), heterozygous mutations have been suggested as a susceptibility factor....

  18. Haplotype analysis of TP53 polymorphisms, Arg72Pro and Ins16, in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers of French Canadian descent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavallone, Luca; Arcand, Suzanna L; Maugard, Christine; Ghadirian, Parviz; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Provencher, Diane; Tonin, Patricia N

    2008-01-01

    The TP53 polymorphisms Arg72Pro (Ex4+199 G>C) and Ins16 (IVS3+24 ins16) have been proposed to modify risk of breast cancer associated with germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Allele frequencies of these polymorphisms were investigated to determine if they modify risk in BRCA mutation carriers in breast cancer cases drawn from French Canadian cancer families, a population shown to exhibit strong founder effects. The frequencies of the TP53 alleles, genotypes and haplotypes of 157 index breast cancer cases comprised of 42 BRCA1 mutation carriers, 57 BRCA2 mutation carriers, and 58 BRCA mutation-negative cases, where each case was drawn from independently ascertained families were compared. The effect of TP53 variants on the age of diagnosis was also investigated for these groups. The TP53 polymorphisms were also investigated in 112 women of French Canadian descent with no personal history of cancer. The BRCA mutation-positive groups had the highest frequency of homozygous carriers of the 72Pro allele compared with mutation-negative group. The TP53 polymorphisms exhibited linkage disequilibrium (p < 0.001), where the 72Arg and Ins16minus alleles occurred in strong disequilibrium. The highest frequency of carriers of Ins16minus-72Arg haplotype occurred in the BRCA mutation-negative groups. The BRCA1 mutation carriers homozygous for the 72Pro allele had the youngest ages of diagnosis of breast cancer. However none of these observations were statistically significant. In contrast, the BRCA2 mutation carriers homozygous for the 72Pro allele had a significantly older age of diagnosis of breast cancer (p = 0.018). Moreover, in this group, the mean age of diagnosis of breast cancer in carriers of the Ins16minus-72Arg haplotype was significantly younger than that of the individuals who did not this carry this haplotype (p = 0.009). We observed no significant association of breast cancer risk with TP53 genetic variants based on BRCA1/2 mutation carrier status. Although the

  19. Peripheral retinopathy in offspring of carriers of Norrie disease gene mutations. Possible transplacental effect of abnormal Norrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintz-Hittner, H A; Ferrell, R E; Sims, K B; Fernandez, K M; Gemmell, B S; Satriano, D R; Caster, J; Kretzer, F L

    1996-12-01

    The Norrie disease (ND) gene (Xp11.3) (McKusick 310600) consists of one untranslated exon and two exons partially translated as the Norrie disease protein (Norrin). Norrin has sequence homology and computer-predicted tertiary structure of a growth factor containing a cystine knot motif, which affects endothelial cell migration and proliferation. Norrie disease (congenital retinal detachment), X-linked primary retinal dysplasia (congenital retinal fold), and X-linked exudative vitreoretinopathy (congenital macular ectopia) are allelic disorders. Blood was drawn for genetic studies from members of two families to test for ND gene mutations. Sixteen unaffected family members were examined ophthalmologically. If any retinal abnormality were identified, fundus photography and fluorescein angiography was performed. Family A had ND (R109stp), and family B had X-linked exudative vitreoretinopathy (R121L). The retinas of 11 offspring of carrier females were examined: three of seven carrier females, three of three otherwise healthy females, and one of one otherwise healthy male had peripheral inner retinal vascular abnormalities. The retinas of five offspring of affected males were examined: none of three carrier females and none of two otherwise healthy males had this peripheral retinal finding. Peripheral inner retinal vascular abnormalities similar to regressed retinopathy of prematurity were identified in seven offspring of carriers of ND gene mutations in two families. These ophthalmologic findings, especially in four genetically healthy offspring, strongly support the hypothesis that abnormal Norrin may have an adverse transplacental (environmental) effect on normal inner retinal vasculogenesis.

  20. Evaluation of chromosome 6p22 as a breast cancer risk modifier locus in a follow-up study of BRCA2 mutation carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Kristen N.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Greene, Mark H.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Thomassen, Mads; Caligo, Maria; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Jakubowska, Anna; Osorio, Ana; Hamann, Ute; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Southey, Melissa; Buys, Saundra S.; Singer, Christian F.; Hansen, Thomas V.O.; Arason, Adalgeir; Offit, Kenneth; Piedmonte, Marion; Montagna, Marco; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Tihomirova, Laima; Sucheston, Lara; Beattie, Mary; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Healey, Sue; Chen, Xiaoqing; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Couch, Fergus J.

    2012-01-01

    Several common germline variants identified through genome-wide association studies of breast cancer risk in the general population have recently been shown to be associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. When combined, these variants can identify marked differences in the absolute risk of developing breast cancer for mutation carriers, suggesting that additional modifier loci may further enhance individual risk assessment for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Recently, a common variant on 6p22 (rs9393597) was found to be associated with increased breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers [Hazard ratio (HR)=1.55, 95% CI 1.25–1.92, p=6.0×10−5]. This observation was based on data from GWAS studies in which, despite statistical correction for multiple comparisons, the possibility of false discovery remains a concern. Here we report on an analysis of this variant in an additional 6,165 BRCA1 and 3,900 BRCA2 mutation carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). In this replication analysis, rs9393597 was not associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers [HR=1.09, 95% CI 0.96–1.24, p=0.18]. No association with ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers or with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers was observed. This follow-up study suggests that, contrary to our initial report, this variant is not associated with breast cancer risk among individuals with germline BRCA2 mutations. PMID:23011509

  1. MSH2 mutation carriers are at higher risk of cancer than MLH1 mutation carriers : A study of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, HFA; Stormorken, A; Menko, FH; Nagengast, FM; Kleibeuker, JH; Griffioen, G; Taal, BG; Moller, P; Wijnen, JT

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by the clustering of colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, and various other cancers. The disease is caused by mutations in DNA-mismatch-repair (MMR) genes, most frequently in MLH1, MSH2, and

  2. MSH2 mutation carriers are at higher risk of cancer than MLH1 mutation carriers: a study of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, H.F.; Stormorken, A.; Menko, F.H.; Nagengast, F.M.; Kleibeuker, J.H.; Griffioen, G.; Taal, B.G.; Moller, P.; Wijnen, J.T.

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by the clustering of colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, and various other cancers. The disease is caused by mutations in DNA-mismatch-repair (MMR) genes, most frequently in MLH1, MSH2, and

  3. Changes in Cerebral Blood Flow in Presymptomatic Mutation Carriers of Familial Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD-3), Measured with MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunau, Line Andersen; Mouridsen, Kim; Rodell, Anders

    , temporal, parietal, and occipital lobes, hippocampus, basal ganglia and cerebellum. Data were normalized to white matter in order to smooth inter-individual differences. Results: We included 8 carriers and 7 first-degree related family non-carriers. Comparing carriers with non-carriers, the former showed...... with statistically significant differences in the occipital- and parietal lobes. Alterations in CBF possibly affect the whole brain. Data indicate that FTD-3 pathology might involve brain capillaries. This may impact the understanding of the pathogenesis involving endosomal dysfunction and implicates involvement...

  4. Parkinson's disease-related LRRK2 G2019S mutation results from independent mutational events in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesage, Suzanne; Patin, Etienne; Condroyer, Christel; Leutenegger, Anne-Louise; Lohmann, Ebba; Giladi, Nir; Bar-Shira, Anat; Belarbi, Soraya; Hecham, Nassima; Pollak, Pierre; Ouvrard-Hernandez, Anne-Marie; Bardien, Soraya; Carr, Jonathan; Benhassine, Traki; Tomiyama, Hiroyuki; Pirkevi, Caroline; Hamadouche, Tarik; Cazeneuve, Cécile; Basak, A Nazli; Hattori, Nobutaka; Dürr, Alexandra; Tazir, Meriem; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Brice, Alexis

    2010-05-15

    Mutations in the leucine-rich-repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene have been identified in families with autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease (PD) and in sporadic cases; the G2019S mutation is the single most frequent. Intriguingly, the frequency of this mutation in PD patients varies greatly among ethnic groups and geographic origins: it is present at <0.1% in East Asia, approximately 2% in European-descent patients and can reach frequencies of up to 15-40% in PD Ashkenazi Jews and North African Arabs. To ascertain the evolutionary dynamics of the G2019S mutation in different populations, we genotyped 74 markers spanning a 16 Mb genomic region around G2019S, in 191 individuals carrying the mutation from 126 families of different origins. Sixty-seven families were of North-African Arab origin, 18 were of North/Western European descent, 37 were of Jewish origin, mostly from Eastern Europe, one was from Japan, one from Turkey and two were of mixed origins. We found the G2019S mutation on three different haplotypes. Network analyses of the three carrier haplotypes showed that G2019S arose independently at least twice in humans. In addition, the population distribution of the intra-allelic diversity of the most widespread carrier haplotype, together with estimations of the age of G2019S determined by two different methods, suggests that one of the founding G2019S mutational events occurred in the Near East at least 4000 years ago.

  5. Modifiers of the Efficacy of Risk-Reducing Salpingo-Oophorectomy for the Prevention of Breast and Ovarian Cancer in Carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kauff, Noah

    2004-01-01

    .... This plan included 1) conduct of a prospective study examining modifiers of the efficacy of risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy for the prevention of breast and ovarian cancer in carriers of BRCA mutations; and 2...

  6. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigorito, Elena; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Beesley, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2...... mutation carriers. Genotype data were available for 15,252 (2,462 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA1 and 8,211 (631 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following genotype imputation, ovarian cancer associations were assessed for 4,873 and 5,020 SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA 2 mutation carriers respectively...... of BNC2. In BRCA2 mutation carriers one region, up to 45 kb upstream of BNC2, and containing 100 correlated SNPs was identified as candidate causal (top SNP rs62543585, HR: 0.69, 95%CI: 0.59 to 0.80, p-value 1.0 × 10-6). The candidate causal in BRCA1 mutation carriers did not include the strongest...

  7. Actigraphy Detects Greater Intra-Individual Variability During Gait in Non-Manifesting LRRK2 Mutation Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel, Lieneke; Lim, Andrew S; Visanji, Naomi P; Huang, Jana; Ghate, Taneera; Mestre, Tiago A; AlDakheel, Amaal; Connolly, Barbara S; Gasca-Salas, Carmen; Kern, Drew S; Jain, Jennifer; Slow, Elizabeth J; Pondal, Margarita; Faust-Socher, Achinoam; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Tomlinson, George; Lang, Anthony E; Marras, Connie

    2018-01-01

    With recent advances in the search for disease-modifying therapies for Parkinson's disease (PD) the importance of identifying prodromal markers becomes greater. Non-manifesting LRRK2 mutation carriers (NMC) are at risk for developing PD, and provide a population in which to identify possible markers. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that NMC have differences in daily activity, fragmentation of sleep, arm swing asymmetry, and movement variability during walking, detectable by actigraphy, as compared to matched control subjects. Eleven NMC, fourteen PD patients (4 LRRK2-PD, 10 idiopathic PD (iPD)), and twenty-nine controls wore wristbands containing an accelerometer for seven days, and performed a daily walking task. Outcome measures included daily activity, fragmentation of activity, fragmentation of sleep, arm swing asymmetry during walking, and intra-individual variability. Compared to healthy controls, both NMC and LRRK2/iPD showed higher intra-individual variability in activity during walking compared to healthy controls. Individuals with LRRK2-PD/iPD, but not NMC, tend to have lower activity levels, more arm swing asymmetry and less increase of arm swing with transition from slow to faster walking speed compared to healthy controls. Higher intra-individual variability of gait-associated movements might be a useful biomarker of prodromal PD. These results encourage replication in a larger sample and longitudinal analysis is warranted.

  8. Common variants at 12p11, 12q24, 9p21, 9q31.2 and in ZNF365 are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Several common alleles have been shown to be associated with breast and/or ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Recent genome-wide association studies of breast cancer have identified eight additional breast cancer susceptibility loci: rs1011970 (9p21, CDKN2A/B), rs10995190 (ZNF365), rs704010 (ZMIZ1), rs2380205 (10p15), rs614367 (11q13), rs1292011 (12q24), rs10771399 (12p11 near PTHLH) and rs865686 (9q31.2). Methods To evaluate whether these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers, we genotyped these SNPs in 12,599 BRCA1 and 7,132 BRCA2 mutation carriers and analysed the associations with breast cancer risk within a retrospective likelihood framework. Results Only SNP rs10771399 near PTHLH was associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers (per-allele hazard ratio (HR) = 0.87, 95% CI: 0.81 to 0.94, P-trend = 3 × 10-4). The association was restricted to mutations proven or predicted to lead to absence of protein expression (HR = 0.82, 95% CI: 0.74 to 0.90, P-trend = 3.1 × 10-5, P-difference = 0.03). Four SNPs were associated with the risk of breast cancer for BRCA2 mutation carriers: rs10995190, P-trend = 0.015; rs1011970, P-trend = 0.048; rs865686, 2df-P = 0.007; rs1292011 2df-P = 0.03. rs10771399 (PTHLH) was predominantly associated with estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer for BRCA1 mutation carriers (HR = 0.81, 95% CI: 0.74 to 0.90, P-trend = 4 × 10-5) and there was marginal evidence of association with ER-negative breast cancer for BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.62 to 1.00, P-trend = 0.049). Conclusions The present findings, in combination with previously identified modifiers of risk, will ultimately lead to more accurate risk prediction and an improved understanding of the disease etiology in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. PMID:22348646

  9. Identification of three novel OA1 gene mutations identified in three families misdiagnosed with congenital nystagmus and carrier status determination by real-time quantitative PCR assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamel Christian

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background X-linked ocular albinism type 1 (OA1 is caused by mutations in OA1 gene, which encodes a membrane glycoprotein localised to melanosomes. OA1 mainly affects pigment production in the eye, resulting in optic changes associated with albinism including hypopigmentation of the retina, nystagmus, strabismus, foveal hypoplasia, abnormal crossing of the optic fibers and reduced visual acuity. Affected Caucasian males usually appear to have normal skin and hair pigment. Results We identified three previously undescribed mutations consisting of two intragenic deletions (one encompassing exon 6, the other encompassing exons 7–8, and a point mutation (310delG in exon 2. We report the development of a new method for diagnosis of heterozygous deletions in OA1 gene based on measurement of gene copy number using real-time quantitative PCR from genomic DNA. Conclusion The identification of OA1 mutations in families earlier reported as families with hereditary nystagmus indicate that ocular albinism type 1 is probably underdiagnosed. Our method of real-time quantitative PCR of OA1 exons with DMD exon as external standard performed on the LightCycler™ allows quick and accurate carrier-status assessment for at-risk females.

  10. Variation in breast cancer risk associated with factors related to pregnancies according to truncating mutation location, in the French National BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations carrier cohort (GENEPSO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecarpentier, Julie; Noguès, Catherine; Mouret-Fourme, Emmanuelle; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Lasset, Christine; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Caron, Olivier; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Berthet, Pascaline; Faivre, Laurence; Bonadona, Valérie; Buecher, Bruno; Coupier, Isabelle; Gladieff, Laurence; Gesta, Paul; Eisinger, François; Frénay, Marc; Luporsi, Elisabeth; Lortholary, Alain; Colas, Chrystelle; Dugast, Catherine; Longy, Michel; Pujol, Pascal; Tinat, Julie; Lidereau, Rosette; Andrieu, Nadine

    2012-07-03

    Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 confer a high risk of breast cancer (BC), but the magnitude of this risk seems to vary according to the study and various factors. Although controversial, there are data to support the hypothesis of allelic risk heterogeneity. We assessed variation in BC risk according to factors related to pregnancies by location of mutation in the homogeneous risk region of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in 990 women in the French study GENEPSO by using a weighted Cox regression model. Our results confirm the existence of the protective effect of an increasing number of full-term pregnancies (FTPs) toward BC among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers (≥3 versus 0 FTPs: hazard ratio (HR) = 0.51, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.33 to 0.81). Additionally, the HR shows an association between incomplete pregnancies and a higher BC risk, which reached 2.39 (95% CI = 1.28 to 4.45) among women who had at least three incomplete pregnancies when compared with women with zero incomplete pregnancies. This increased risk appeared to be restricted to incomplete pregnancies occurring before the first FTP (HR = 1.77, 95% CI = 1.19 to 2.63). We defined the TMAP score (defined as the Time of Breast Mitotic Activity during Pregnancies) to take into account simultaneously the opposite effect of full-term and interrupted pregnancies. Compared with women with a TMAP score of less than 0.35, an increasing TMAP score was associated with a statistically significant increase in the risk of BC (P trend = 0.02) which reached 1.97 (95% CI = 1.19 to 3.29) for a TMAP score >0.5 (versus TMAP ≤0.35). All these results appeared to be similar in BRCA1 and BRCA2. Nevertheless, our results suggest a variation in BC risk associated with parity according to the location of the mutation in BRCA1. Indeed, parity seems to be associated with a significantly decreased risk of BC only among women with a mutation in the central region of BRCA1 (low-risk region) (≥1 versus 0 FTP: HR = 0.27, 95% CI = 0.13 to

  11. Haplotype structure in Ashkenazi Jewish BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Im, Kate M.; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Wang, Xianshu; Green, Todd; Chow, Clement Y.; Vijai, Joseph; Korn, Joshua; Gaudet, Mia M.; Fredericksen, Zachary; Shane Pankratz, V.; Guiducci, Candace; Crenshaw, Andrew; McGuffog, Lesley; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Morrison, Jonathan; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Piedmonte, Marion; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Rookus, Matti A.; Collée, J. Margriet; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van Asperen, Christi J.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; van Roozendaal, Cees E.; Caldes, Trinidad; Perez-Segura, Pedro; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Blecharz, Paweł; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Montagna, Marco; D'Andrea, Emma; Devilee, Peter; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Singer, Christian F.; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Beattie, Mary S.; Chan, Salina; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Phelan, Catherine; Narod, Steven; John, Esther M.; Hopper, John L.; Buys, Saundra S.; Daly, Mary B.; Southey, Melissa C.; Terry, Mary-Beth; Tung, Nadine; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Durán, Mercedes; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare T.; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Paterson, Joan; Brewer, Carole; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Porteous, Mary; Walker, Lisa; Rogers, Mark T.; Side, Lucy E.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Laitman, Yael; Meindl, Alfons; Deissler, Helmut; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Kast, Karin; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Klein, Robert J.; Daly, Mark J.; Friedman, Eitan; Dean, Michael; Clark, Andrew G.; Altshuler, David M.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Couch, Fergus J.; Offit, Kenneth; Gold, Bert; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Houdayer, Claude; Moncoutier, Virginie; Belotti, Muriel; de Pauw, Antoine; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Byrde, Véronique; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Eisinger, François; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Coupier, Isabelle; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révillion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Rouleau, Etienne; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélène; Rebischung, Christine; Cassini, Cécile; Faivre, Laurence; Prieur, Fabienne; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Lynch, Henry T.; Thorne, Heather; Niedermayr, Eveline; Pierotti, Marco; Manoukian, Siranoush; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Ripamonti, Carla B.; Radice, Paolo; Barile, Monica; Bernard, Loris; Karlsson, Per; Nordling, Margareta; Bergman, Annika; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Liedgren, Sigrun; Borg, Åke; Loman, Niklas; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Jernström, Helena; Harbst, Katja; Henriksson, Karin; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Liljegren, Annelie; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Melin, Beatrice; Grönberg, Henrik; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Emanuelsson, Monica; Ehrencrona, Hans; Brandell, Richard Rosenquist; Dahl, Niklas; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; Verhoef, S.; Verheus, M.; van 't Veer, L. J.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; Rookus, M. A.; Collée, M.; van den Ouweland, A. M. W.; Jager, A.; Hooning, M. J.; Tilanus-Linthorst, M. M. A.; Seynaeve, C.; van Asperen, C. J.; Wijnen, J. T.; Vreeswijk, M. P.; Tollenaar, R. A.; Devilee, P.; Ligtenberg, M. J.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Ausems, M. G.; van der Luijt, R. B.; Aalfs, C. M.; van Os, T. A.; Gille, J. J. P.; Waisfisz, Q.; Gomez-Garcia, E. B.; van Roozendaal, C. E.; Blok, Marinus J.; Caanen, B.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; van der Hout, A. H.; Mourits, M. J.; Vasen, H. F.; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Gregory, Helen; Morrison, Patrick; Jeffers, Lisa; Cole, Trevor; Ong, Kai-Ren; Hoffman, Jonathan; Donaldson, Alan; James, Margaret; Downing, Sarah; Taylor, Amy; Murray, Alexandra; McCann, Emma; Kennedy, M. John; Barton, David; Drummond, Sarah; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Hill, Kathryn; Davidson, Rosemarie; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Gibson, Sarah; Haque, Eshika; Tobias, Ed; Duncan, Alexis; Jacobs, Chris; Langman, Caroline; Whaite, Anna; Dorkins, Huw; Randhawa, Kashmir; Barwell, Julian; Patel, Nafisa; Adlard, Julian; Chu, Carol; Miller, Julie; Ellis, Ian; Houghton, Catherine; Lalloo, Fiona; Taylor, Jane; Side, Lucy; Male, Alison; Berlin, Cheryl; Eason, Jacqueline; Collier, Rebecca; Douglas, Fiona; Claber, Oonagh; Jobson, Irene; McLeod, Diane; Halliday, Dorothy; Durell, Sarah; Stayner, Barbara; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Kohut, Kelly; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Mitra, Anita; Robertson, Lisa; Cook, Jackie; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eddy, Charlotte; Tripathi, Vishakha; Attard, Virginia; Eccles, Diana; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; McBride, Donna; Smalley, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Three founder mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 contribute to the risk of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer in Ashkenazi Jews (AJ). They are observed at increased frequency in the AJ compared to other BRCA mutations in Caucasian non-Jews (CNJ). Several authors have proposed that elevated allele

  12. 75 FR 25207 - Polyethylene Retail Carrier Bags From Malaysia: Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary Results...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-07

    ... polyethylene retail carrier bags from Malaysia for the period August 1, 2008, through July 31, 2009. See... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration A-557-813 Polyethylene Retail Carrier Bags From Malaysia: Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative...

  13. 76 FR 68137 - Polyethylene Retail Carrier Bags From Thailand: Amended Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-03

    ... Bags From Thailand: Amended Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review AGENCY: Import..., the Department of Commerce (the Department) published Polyethylene Retail Carrier Bags From Thailand... 351.224(c) from the Polyethylene Retail Carrier Bag Committee and its individual members, Hilex Poly...

  14. 76 FR 26241 - Polyethylene Retail Carrier Bags From Thailand: Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary Results...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [A-549-821] Polyethylene Retail Carrier Bags From Thailand: Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative...) initiated an administrative review of the antidumping duty order on polyethylene retail carrier bags from...

  15. Targeted prostate cancer screening in men with mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 detects aggressive prostate cancer: preliminary analysis of the results of the IMPACT study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitra, Anita V; Bancroft, Elizabeth K; Barbachano, Yolanda

    2011-01-01

    mutations were offered annual prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing, and those with PSA >3 ng/mL, were offered a prostate biopsy. Controls were men age-matched (± 5 years) who were negative for the familial mutation. RESULTS: In total, 300 men were recruited (205 mutation carriers; 89 BRCA1, 116 BRCA2......Study Type - Diagnostic (validating cohort)
Level of Evidence 1b OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the role of targeted prostate cancer screening in men with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, an international study, IMPACT (Identification of Men with a genetic predisposition to ProstAte Cancer: Targeted screening...... in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and controls), was established. This is the first multicentre screening study targeted at men with a known genetic predisposition to prostate cancer. A preliminary analysis of the data is reported. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Men aged 40-69 years from families with BRCA1 or BRCA2...

  16. Distinct fibrosis pattern in desmosomal and phospholamban mutation carriers in hereditary cardiomyopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sepehrkhouy, Shahrzad; Gho, Johannes M.I.H.; van Es, René; Harakalova, Magdalena; de Jonge, Nicolaas; Dooijes, Dennis; van der Smagt, Jasper J.; Buijsrogge, Marc P.; Hauer, Richard N.W.; Goldschmeding, Roel; de Weger, Roel A.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Vink, Aryan

    2017-01-01

    Background Desmosomal and phospholamban (PLN) mutations are associated with arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy. Ultimately, most cardiomyopathic hearts develop significant cardiac fibrosis. Objective To compare the fibrosis patterns of desmosomal and p. Arg14del PLN–associated cardiomyopathies with the

  17. Carriers with functional null mutations in LAMA3 have localized enamel abnormalities due to haploinsufficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gostynska, Katarzyna B.; Yuen, Wing Yan; Pasmooij, Anna Maria Gerdina; Stellingsma, Cornelius; Pas, Hendri H.; Lemmink, Henny; Jonkman, Marcel F.

    2017-01-01

    The hereditary blistering disease junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) is always accompanied by structural enamel abnormalities of primary and secondary dentition, characterized as amelogenesis imperfecta. Autosomal recessive mutations in LAMA3, LAMB3 and LAMC2 encoding the heterotrimer laminin

  18. Ovarian Cancer Susceptibility Alleles and Risk of Ovarian Cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramus, Susan J.; Antoniou, Antonis C; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; McGuffog, Lesley; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Złowocka, Elżbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Duran, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; van Asperen, Christi J.; van Roozendaal, K.E.P.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Collée, J. Margriet; Kriege, Mieke; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Jacobs, Chris; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Paterson, Joan; Douglas, Fiona; Brewer, Carole; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Walker, Lisa; Porteous, Mary E.; Kennedy, M. John; Pathak, Harsh; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Léoné, Mélanie; Calender, Alain; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Faivre, Laurence; Loustalot, Catherine; Buys, Saundra; Daly, Mary; Miron, Alex; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K.; John, Esther M; Southey, Melissa; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Johannsson, Oskar Th.; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Gaudet, Mia M.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Piedmonte, Marion; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Van Le, Linda; Hoffman, James S; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Isaacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Tornero, Eva; Navarro, Matilde; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Olah, Edith; Vaszko, Tibor; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Beattie, Mary S.; Dorfling, Cecelia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Diez, Orland; Kwong, Ava; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Heidemann, Simone; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorotehea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Fiebig, Britta; Schäfer, Dieter; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Plante, Marie; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Wang, Xianshu; Lindor, Noralane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, V. Shane; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bernard, Loris; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Gayther, Simon A.; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2012-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancer. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified six alleles associated with risk of ovarian cancer for women in the general population. We evaluated four of these loci as potential modifiers of ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs10088218 (at 8q24), rs2665390 (at 3q25), rs717852 (at 2q31), and rs9303542 (at 17q21), were genotyped in 12,599 BRCA1 and 7,132 BRCA2 carriers, including 2,678 ovarian cancer cases. Associations were evaluated within a retrospective cohort approach. All four loci were associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA2 carriers; rs10088218 per-allele hazard ratio (HR) = 0.81 (95% CI: 0.67–0.98) P-trend = 0.033, rs2665390 HR = 1.48 (95% CI: 1.21–1.83) P-trend = 1.8 × 10−4, rs717852 HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 1.10–1.42) P-trend = 6.6 × 10−4, rs9303542 HR = 1.16 (95% CI: 1.02–1.33) P-trend = 0.026. Two loci were associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 carriers; rs10088218 per-allele HR = 0.89 (95% CI: 0.81–0.99) P-trend = 0.029, rs2665390 HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 1.10–1.42) P-trend = 6.1 × 10−4. The HR estimates for the remaining loci were consistent with odds ratio estimates for the general population. The identification of multiple loci modifying ovarian cancer risk may be useful for counseling women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations regarding their risk of ovarian cancer. PMID:22253144

  19. Endocrine metabolic disorders in patients with breast cancer, carriers of BRCA1 gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berstein, L M; Boyarkina, M P; Vasilyev, D A; Poroshina, T E; Kovalenko, I G; Imyanitov, E N; Semiglazov, V F

    2012-03-01

    Two groups of breast cancer patients (53±2 years) in clinical remission receiving no specific therapy were examined: group 1, with BRCA1 gene mutations (N=11) and group 2, without mutations of this kind (N=11). The two groups did not differ by insulinemia and glycemia, insulin resistance index, blood levels of thyrotropic hormone, sex hormone-binding globulin, insulin-like growth factor-1, triglycerides, or lipoproteins. In group 1, blood estradiol level was higher. Intensive glucose-induced generation of reactive oxygen species in these patients was associated with a decrease of cholesterolemia, of the C-peptide/insulin proportion, and a trend to higher urinary excretion of 4-hydroxyestrone, one of the most genotoxic catecholestrogens. BRCA1 gene mutations in breast cancer patients were associated with signs of estrogenization and a pro-genotoxic shift in the estrogen and glucose system, which could modulate the disease course and requires correction.

  20. Recurrent mutation testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in Asian breast cancer patients identify carriers in those with presumed low risk by family history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Peter Choon Eng; Phuah, Sze Yee; Sivanandan, Kavitta; Kang, In Nee; Thirthagiri, Eswary; Liu, Jian Jun; Hassan, Norhashimah; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Thong, Meow Keong; Hui, Miao; Hartman, Mikael; Yip, Cheng Har; Mohd Taib, Nur Aishah; Teo, Soo Hwang

    2014-04-01

    Although the breast cancer predisposition genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 were discovered more than 20 years ago, there remains a gap in the availability of genetic counselling and genetic testing in Asian countries because of cost, access and inaccurate reporting of family history of cancer. In order to improve access to testing, we developed a rapid test for recurrent mutations in our Asian populations. In this study, we designed a genotyping assay with 55 BRCA1 and 44 BRCA2 mutations previously identified in Asian studies, and validated this assay in 267 individuals who had previously been tested by full sequencing. We tested the prevalence of these mutations in additional breast cancer cases. Using this genotyping approach, we analysed recurrent mutations in 533 Malaysian breast cancer cases with Malays, 3 BRCA1 and 2 BRCA2 mutations in Chinese and 1 BRCA1 mutation in Indians account for 60, 24 and 20 % of carrier families, respectively. By contrast, haplotype analyses suggest that a recurrent BRCA2 mutation (c.262_263delCT) found in 5 unrelated Malay families has at least 3 distinct haplotypes. Taken together, our data suggests that panel testing may help to identify carriers, particularly Asian BRCA2 carriers, who do not present with a priori strong family history characteristics.

  1. White matter hyperintensities are seen only in GRN mutation carriers in the GENFI cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sudre, C.H. (Carole H.); M. Bocchetta (Martina); D.M. Cash (David M); D.L. Thomas (David L); Woollacott, I. (Ione); Dick, K.M. (Katrina M.); J.C. van Swieten (John); B. Borroni (Barbara); D. Galimberti (Daniela); M. Masellis (Mario); M.C. Tartaglia (Maria Carmela); J.B. Rowe (James); M.J. Graff (Maud J.L.); F. Tagliavini (Fabrizio); G.B. Frisoni (Giovanni B.); R. Laforce (Robert); E. Finger (Elizabeth); A. De Mendonça (Alexandre); S. Sorbi (Sandro); S. Ourselin (Sebastien); M.J. Cardoso (Manuel Jorge); J.D. Rohrer (Jonathan D)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractGenetic frontotemporal dementia is most commonly caused by mutations in the progranulin (GRN), microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) and chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72) genes. Previous small studies have reported the presence of cerebral white matter hyperintensities

  2. Progranulin Levels in Plasma and Cerebrospinal Fluid in Granulin Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.H.H. Meeter (Lieke H.H.); Patzke, H. (Holger); Loewen, G. (Gordon); E.G.P. Dopper (Elise); Y. Pijnenburg (Yolande); A.S. Thornton (Andrew); J.C. van Swieten (John)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Pathogenic mutations in the granulin gene (GRN) are causative in 5-10% of patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD), mostly leading to reduced progranulin protein (PGRN) levels. Upcoming therapeutic trials focus on enhancing PGRN levels. Methods: Fluctuations in plasma PGRN

  3. Genotype-phenotype associations in filaggrin loss-of-function mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landeck, Lilla; Visser, Maaike; Kezic, Sanja; John, Swen M.

    2013-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG) have been reported to be associated with specific phenotypic characteristics such as hyperlinearity and keratosis pilaris. To study phenotypic features in patients with occupational irritant contact eczema of the hands in relation to FLG

  4. A novel mutation in the albumin gene (c.1A>C) resulting in analbuminemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caridi, Gianluca; Dagnino, Monica; Lugani, Francesca; Shalev, Stavit A; Campagnoli, Monica; Galliano, Monica; Spiegel, Ronen; Minchiotti, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    Analbuminemia (OMIM # 103600) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder manifested by the absence or severe reduction of circulating serum albumin in homozygous or compound heterozygous subjects. The trait is caused by a variety of mutations within the albumin gene. We report here the clinical and molecular characterisation of two new cases of congenital analbuminemia diagnosed in two members of the Druze population living in a Galilean village (Northern Israel) on the basis of their low level of circulating albumin. The albumin gene was screened by single-strand conformation polymorphism and heteroduplex analysis, and the mutated region was submitted to DNA sequencing. Both the analbuminemic subjects resulted homozygous for a previously unreported c.1 A>C transversion, for which we suggest the name Afula from the hospital where the two cases were investigated. This mutation causes the loss of the primary start codon ATG for Met1, which is replaced by a - then untranslated - triplet CTG for Leu. (p.Met1Leu). The use of an alternative downstream ATG codon would probably give rise to a completely aberrant polypeptide chain, leading to a misrouted intracellular transport and a premature degradation. The discovery of this new ALB mutation, probably inherited from a common ancestor, sheds light on the molecular mechanism underlying the analbuminemic trait and may serve in the development of a rapid genetic test for the identification of a-symptomatic heterozygous carriers in the Druze population in the Galilee. © 2012 The Authors. European Journal of Clinical Investigation © 2012 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  5. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer: updated clinical guidelines with an emphasis on germline CDH1 mutation carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Post, Rachel S; Vogelaar, Ingrid P; Carneiro, Fátima; Guilford, Parry; Huntsman, David; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Caldas, Carlos; Schreiber, Karen E Chelcun; Hardwick, Richard H; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Bardram, Linda; Benusiglio, Patrick R; Bisseling, Tanya M; Blair, Vanessa; Bleiker, Eveline; Boussioutas, Alex; Cats, Annemieke; Coit, Daniel; DeGregorio, Lynn; Figueiredo, Joana; Ford, James M; Heijkoop, Esther; Hermens, Rosella; Humar, Bostjan; Kaurah, Pardeep; Keller, Gisella; Lai, Jennifer; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; O'Donovan, Maria; Oliveira, Carla; Ragunath, Krish; Rasenberg, Esther; Richardson, Susan; Roviello, Franco; Schackert, Hans; Seruca, Raquel; Taylor, Amy; ter Huurne, Anouk; Tischkowitz, Marc; Joe, Sheena Tjon A; van Dijck, Benjamin; van Grieken, Nicole C T; van Hillegersberg, Richard; van Sandick, Johanna W; Vehof, Rianne; van Krieken, J Han; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C

    2015-01-01

    Germline CDH1 mutations confer a high lifetime risk of developing diffuse gastric (DGC) and lobular breast cancer (LBC). A multidisciplinary workshop was organised to discuss genetic testing, surgery, surveillance strategies, pathology reporting and the patient's perspective on multiple aspects, including diet post gastrectomy. The updated guidelines include revised CDH1 testing criteria (taking into account first-degree and second-degree relatives): (1) families with two or more patients with gastric cancer at any age, one confirmed DGC; (2) individuals with DGC before the age of 40 and (3) families with diagnoses of both DGC and LBC (one diagnosis before the age of 50). Additionally, CDH1 testing could be considered in patients with bilateral or familial LBC before the age of 50, patients with DGC and cleft lip/palate, and those with precursor lesions for signet ring cell carcinoma. Given the high mortality associated with invasive disease, prophylactic total gastrectomy at a centre of expertise is advised for individuals with pathogenic CDH1 mutations. Breast cancer surveillance with annual breast MRI starting at age 30 for women with a CDH1 mutation is recommended. Standardised endoscopic surveillance in experienced centres is recommended for those opting not to have gastrectomy at the current time, those with CDH1 variants of uncertain significance and those that fulfil hereditary DGC criteria without germline CDH1 mutations. Expert histopathological confirmation of (early) signet ring cell carcinoma is recommended. The impact of gastrectomy and mastectomy should not be underestimated; these can have severe consequences on a psychological, physiological and metabolic level. Nutritional problems should be carefully monitored. PMID:25979631

  6. Evaluating the performance of the breast cancer genetic risk models BOADICEA, IBIS, BRCAPRO and Claus for predicting BRCA1/2 mutation carrier probabilities: a study based on 7352 families from the German Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Christine; Kuchenbäcker, Karoline; Engel, Christoph; Zachariae, Silke; Rhiem, Kerstin; Meindl, Alfons; Rahner, Nils; Dikow, Nicola; Plendl, Hansjörg; Debatin, Irmgard; Grimm, Tiemo; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Flöttmann, Ricarda; Horvath, Judit; Schröck, Evelin; Stock, Friedrich; Schäfer, Dieter; Schwaab, Ira; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Mavaddat, Nasim; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Antoniou, Antonis C; Schmutzler, Rita

    2013-06-01

    Risk prediction models are widely used in clinical genetic counselling. Despite their frequent use, the genetic risk models BOADICEA, BRCAPRO, IBIS and extended Claus model (eCLAUS), used to estimate BRCA1/2 mutation carrier probabilities, have never been comparatively evaluated in a large sample from central Europe. Additionally, a novel version of BOADICEA that incorporates tumour pathology information has not yet been validated. Using data from 7352 German families we estimated BRCA1/2 carrier probabilities under each model and compared their discrimination and calibration. The incremental value of using pathology information in BOADICEA was assessed in a subsample of 4928 pedigrees with available data on breast tumour molecular markers oestrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor 2. BRCAPRO (area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC)=0.80 (95% CI 0.78 to 0.81)) and BOADICEA (AUC=0.79 (0.78-0.80)), had significantly higher diagnostic accuracy than IBIS and eCLAUS (p<0.001). The AUC increased when pathology information was used in BOADICEA: AUC=0.81 (95% CI 0.80 to 0.83, p<0.001). At carrier thresholds of 10% and 15%, the net reclassification index was +3.9% and +5.4%, respectively, when pathology was included in the model. Overall, calibration was best for BOADICEA and worst for eCLAUS. With eCLAUS, twice as many mutation carriers were predicted than observed. Our results support the use of BRCAPRO and BOADICEA for decision making regarding genetic testing for BRCA1/2 mutations. However, model calibration has to be improved for this population. eCLAUS should not be used for estimating mutation carrier probabilities in clinical settings. Whenever possible, breast tumour molecular marker information should be taken into account.

  7. Recombination in liquid filled ionisation chambers with multiple charge carrier species: Theoretical and numerical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar, P.; González-Castaño, D.M.; Gómez, F.; Pardo-Montero, J.

    2014-01-01

    Liquid-filled ionisation chambers (LICs) are used in radiotherapy for dosimetry and quality assurance. Volume recombination can be quite important in LICs for moderate dose rates, causing non-linearities in the dose rate response of these detectors, and needs to be corrected for. This effect is usually described with Greening and Boag models for continuous and pulsed radiation respectively. Such models assume that the charge is carried by two different species, positive and negative ions, each of those species with a given mobility. However, LICs operating in non-ultrapure mode can contain different types of electronegative impurities with different mobilities, thus increasing the number of different charge carriers. If this is the case, Greening and Boag models can be no longer valid and need to be reformulated. In this work we present a theoretical and numerical study of volume recombination in parallel-plate LICs with multiple charge carrier species, extending Boag and Greening models. Results from a recent publication that reported three different mobilities in an isooctane-filled LIC have been used to study the effect of extra carrier species on recombination. We have found that in pulsed beams the inclusion of extra mobilities does not affect volume recombination much, a behaviour that was expected because Boag formula for charge collection efficiency does not depend on the mobilities of the charge carriers if the Debye relationship between mobilities and recombination constant holds. This is not the case in continuous radiation, where the presence of extra charge carrier species significantly affects the amount of volume recombination. - Highlights: • Analytical extension of Greening and Boag theories to multiple charge carriers. • Detailed numerical study of process of volume recombination in LICs. • Recombination in pulsed beams is independent of number and mobilities of carriers. • Multiple charge carriers have a significant effect in continuous

  8. DNA glycosylases involved in base excision repair may be associated with cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Osorio

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs in genes involved in the DNA Base Excision Repair (BER pathway could be associated with cancer risk in carriers of mutations in the high-penetrance susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, given the relation of synthetic lethality that exists between one of the components of the BER pathway, PARP1 (poly ADP ribose polymerase, and both BRCA1 and BRCA2. In the present study, we have performed a comprehensive analysis of 18 genes involved in BER using a tagging SNP approach in a large series of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. 144 SNPs were analyzed in a two stage study involving 23,463 carriers from the CIMBA consortium (the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1 and BRCA2. Eleven SNPs showed evidence of association with breast and/or ovarian cancer at p<0.05 in the combined analysis. Four of the five genes for which strongest evidence of association was observed were DNA glycosylases. The strongest evidence was for rs1466785 in the NEIL2 (endonuclease VIII-like 2 gene (HR: 1.09, 95% CI (1.03-1.16, p = 2.7 × 10(-3 for association with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers, and rs2304277 in the OGG1 (8-guanine DNA glycosylase gene, with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (HR: 1.12 95%CI: 1.03-1.21, p = 4.8 × 10(-3. DNA glycosylases involved in the first steps of the BER pathway may be associated with cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and should be more comprehensively studied.

  9. A novel missense NDP mutation [p.(Cys93Arg)] with a manifesting carrier in an austrian family with Norrie disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parzefall, Thomas; Lucas, Trevor; Ritter, Markus; Ludwig, Martin; Ramsebner, Reinhard; Frohne, Alexandra; Schöfer, Christian; Hengstschläger, Markus; Frei, Klemens

    2014-01-01

    Norrie disease is a rare, X-linked genetic syndrome characterized by combined congenital blindness and progressive hearing impairment. Norrie disease is caused by alterations in the NDP gene encoding the growth factor norrin that plays a key role in vascular development and stabilization of the eye, inner ear and brain. We identified a family with 3 affected deafblind males and a single female carrier presenting with a serous retinal detachment but normal hearing. Genetic analysis revealed a novel c.277T>C missense mutation causing the substitution of a hydrophobic cysteine to a hydrophilic arginine [p.(Cys93Arg)] within the highly conserved cysteine knot domain of the norrin protein. These results should expand the scope for amniocentesis and genetic testing for Norrie disease which is gaining in importance due to novel postnatal therapeutic concepts to alleviate the devastating retinal symptoms of Norrie disease. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Assessing Associations between the AURKA-HMMR-TPX2-TUBG1 Functional Module and Breast Cancer Risk in BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanco, Ignacio; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline; Cuadras, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    While interplay between BRCA1 and AURKA-RHAMM-TPX2-TUBG1 regulates mammary epithelial polarization, common genetic variation in HMMR (gene product RHAMM) may be associated with risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers. Following on these observations, we further assessed the link between ...

  11. Assessing Associations between the AURKA-HMMR-TPX2-TUBG1 Functional Module and Breast Cancer Risk in BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanco, Ignacio; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline; Cuadras, Daniel; Wang, Xianshu; Barrowdale, Daniel; Ruiz de Garibay, Gorka; Librado, Pablo; Sanchez-Gracia, Alejandro; Rozas, Julio; Bonifaci, Nuria; McGuffog, Lesley; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Islam, Abul; Mateo, Francesca; Berenguer, Antoni; Petit, Anna; Catala, Isabel; Brunet, Joan; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Tornero, Eva; Benitez, Javier; Osorio, Ana; Cajal, Teresa Ramon Y.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Arun, Banu K.; Toland, Amanda E.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Claes, Kathleen; Van Maerken, Tom; Diez, Orland; Hansen, Thomas V.; Jonson, Lars; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; de la Hoya, Miguel; Caldes, Trinidad; Dunning, Alison M.; Oliver, Clare; Fineberg, Elena; Cook, Margaret; Peock, Susan; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Jacobs, Chris; Pichert, Gabriella; Lalloo, Fiona; Chu, Carol; Dorkins, Huw; Paterson, Joan; Ong, Kai-Ren; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Teixeira, M.R.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Seynaeve, Caroline; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; Devilee, Peter; Wijnen, Juul T.; Rookus, Matti A.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Blok, Marinus J.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Phillips, Kelly-Anne A.; Piedmonte, Marion; Nerenstone, Stacy R.; Bae-Jump, Victoria L.; O'Malley, David M.; Ratner, Elena S.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Rhiem, Kerstin; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Plendl, Hansjoerg J.; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Steinemann, Doris; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Kast, Karin; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Gehrig, Andrea; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Sunde, Lone; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A.; Foretova, Lenka; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bernard, Loris; Peissel, Bernard; Scuvera, Giulietta; Manoukian, Siranoush; Radice, Paolo; Ottini, Laura; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Maugard, Christine; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Berger, Andreas; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Geschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; John, Esther M.; Miron, Alex; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K.; Daly, Mary B.; Goldgar, David E.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elisabeth J.; Fostira, Florentia; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Godwin, Andrew K.; Olah, Edith; Narod, Steven A.; Rennert, Gad; Paluch, Shani Shimon; Laitman, Yael; Friedman, Eitan; Liljegren, Annelie; Rantala, Johanna; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Loman, Niklas; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Hamann, Ute; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Healey, Sue; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Herzog, Josef; Margileth, David; Gorrini, Chiara; Esteller, Manel; Gomez, Antonio; Sayols, Sergi; Vidal, Enrique; Heyn, Holger; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Leone, Melanie; Barjhoux, Laure; Fassy-Colcombet, Marion; de Pauw, Antoine; Lasset, Christine; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Castera, Laurent; Berthet, Pascaline; Cornelis, Francois; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Damiola, Francesca; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Maxwell, Christopher A.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Kauff, Noah; Corines, Marina J.; Villano, Danylko; Cunningham, Julie; Lee, Adam; Lindor, Noralane; Lazaro, Conxi; Easton, Douglas F.; Offit, Kenneth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Couch, Fergus J.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Angel Pujana, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    While interplay between BRCA1 and AURKA-RHAMM-TPX2-TUBG1 regulates mammary epithelial polarization, common genetic variation in HMMR (gene product RHAMM) may be associated with risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers. Following on these observations, we further assessed the link between the

  12. DNA Glycosylases Involved in Base Excision Repair May Be Associated with Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osorio, Ana; Milne, Roger L; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline

    2014-01-01

    Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in the DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) pathway could be associated with cancer risk in carriers of mutations in the high-penetrance susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, given the relation of synthetic lethality that exists between one of th...

  13. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vigorito, E.; Kuchenbaecker, K.B.; Beesley, J.; Adlard, J.; Agnarsson, B.A.; Andrulis, I.L.; Arun, B.K.; Barjhoux, L.; Belotti, M.; Benitez, J.; Berger, A.; Bojesen, A.; Bonanni, B.; Brewer, C.; Caldes, T.; Caligo, M.A.; Campbell, I.; Chan, S.B.; Claes, K.B.; Cohn, D.E.; Cook, J.; Daly, M.B.; Damiola, F.; Davidson, R.; Pauw, A. de; Delnatte, C.; Diez, O.; Domchek, S.M.; Dumont, M.; Durda, K.; Dworniczak, B.; Easton, D.F.; Eccles, D.; Edwinsdotter Ardnor, C.; Eeles, R.; Ejlertsen, B.; Ellis, S.; Evans, D.G.; Feliubadalo, L.; Fostira, F.; Foulkes, W.D.; Friedman, E.; Frost, D.; Gaddam, P.; Ganz, P.A.; Garber, J.; Garcia-Barberan, V.; Gauthier-Villars, M.; Gehrig, A.; Gerdes, A.M.; Giraud, S.; Godwin, A.K.; Goldgar, D.E.; Hake, C.R.; Hansen, T.V.; Healey, S.; Hodgson, S.; Hogervorst, F.B.; Houdayer, C.; Hulick, P.J.; Imyanitov, E.N.; Isaacs, C.; Izatt, L.; Izquierdo, A.; Jacobs, L; Jakubowska, A.; Janavicius, R.; Jaworska-Bieniek, K.; Jensen, U.B.; John, E.M.; Vijai, J.; Karlan, B.Y.; Kast, K.; Khan, S.; Kwong, A.; Laitman, Y.; Lester, J.; Lesueur, F.; Liljegren, A.; Lubinski, J.; Mai, P.L.; Manoukian, S.; Mazoyer, S.; Meindl, A.; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Montagna, M.; Nathanson, K.L.; Neuhausen, S.L.; Nevanlinna, H.; Niederacher, D.; Olah, E.; Olopade, O.I.; Ong, K.R.; Osorio, A.; Park, S.K.; Paulsson-Karlsson, Y.; Pedersen, I.S.; Peissel, B.; Peterlongo, P.; et al.,

    2016-01-01

    Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2

  14. DNA Glycosylases Involved in Base Excision Repair May Be Associated with Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Osorio (Ana); R.L. Milne (Roger); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); T. Vaclová (Tereza); G. Pita (Guillermo); R. Alonso (Rosario); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); I. Blanco (Ignacio); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); M. Durán (Mercedes); O. Díez (Orland); T. Ramon Y Cajal; I. Konstantopoulou (I.); C. Martínez-Bouzas (Cristina); R. Andrés Conejero (Raquel); P. Soucy (Penny); L. McGuffog (Lesley); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); A. Lee (Andrew); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); J. Rantala (Johanna); N. Loman (Niklas); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); M.S. Beattie (Mary); S.M. Domchek (Susan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); B.K. Arun (Banu); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); C.S. Walsh (Christine); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); E.M. John (Esther); A.S. Whittemore (Alice); M.B. Daly (Mary); M.C. Southey (Melissa); J.L. Hopper (John); M.-B. Terry (Mary-Beth); S.S. Buys (Saundra); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); L. Steele (Linda); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); L. Jønson (Lars); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); J. Infante (Jon); B. Herráez (Belén); L.T. Moreno (Leticia Thais); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); J. Herzog (Josef); K. Weeman (Kisa); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (D.); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); F. Mariette (F.); S. Volorio (Sara); A. Viel (Alessandra); L. Varesco (Liliana); L. Papi (Laura); L. Ottini (Laura); M.G. Tibiletti (Maria Grazia); P. Radice (Paolo); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); J. Garber; S.D. Ellis (Steve); D. Frost (Debra); R. Platte (Radka); E. Fineberg (Elena); D.G. Evans (Gareth); F. Lalloo (Fiona); L. Izatt (Louise); R. Eeles (Rosalind); J.W. Adlard (Julian); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); T.J. Cole (Trevor); D. Eccles (Diana); J. Cook (Jackie); S.V. Hodgson (Shirley); C. Brewer (Carole); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); F. Douglas (Fiona); M.E. Porteous (Mary); L. Side (Lucy); L.J. Walker (Lisa); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); A. Donaldson (Alan); J. Kennedy (John); C. Foo (Claire); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); C.W. Engel (Christoph); A. Meindl (Alfons); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); D. Niederacher (Dieter); C. Sutter (Christian); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); D. Steinemann (Doris); S. Preisler-Adams (Sabine); K. Kast (Karin); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); F. Damiola (Francesca); B. Poppe (Bruce); K. Claes (Kathleen); M. Piedmonte (Marion); K. Tucker (Kathryn); F.J. Backes (Floor); P.M. Rodríguez; W. Brewster (Wendy); K. Wakeley (Katie); T. Rutherford (Thomas); T. Caldes (Trinidad); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); M.A. Rookus (Matti); T.A.M. van Os (Theo); L. van der Kolk (Lizet); J.L. de Lange (J.); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); N. Hoogerbrugge (Nicoline); J.M. Collée (Margriet); C.H.M. van Deurzen (Carolien); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); P. Devilee (Peter); E. Olah (Edith); C. Lazaro (Conxi); A. Teulé (A.); M. Menéndez (Mireia); A. Jakubowska (Anna); C. Cybulski (Cezary); J. Gronwald (Jacek); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Durda (Katarzyna); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); O.T. Johannson (Oskar); C. Maugard; M. Montagna (Marco); S. Tognazzo (Silvia); P.J. Teixeira; S. Healey (Sue); C. Olswold (Curtis); L. Guidugli (Lucia); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); S. Slager (Susan); C. Szabo (Csilla); J. Vijai (Joseph); M. Robson (Mark); N. Kauff (Noah); L. Zhang (Lingling); R. Rau-Murthy (Rohini); A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport (Christine); D. Geschwantler Kaulich (Daphne); G. Pfeiler (Georg); M.-K. Tea; A. Berger (Annemarie); C. Phelan (Catherine); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); F. Lejbkowicz (Flavio); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); G. Glendon (Gord); A.E. Toland (Amanda); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); L. Sunde (Lone); M. Thomassen (Mads); T.A. Kruse (Torben); U.B. Jensen; E. Friedman (Eitan); Y. Laitman (Yael); S.P. Shimon (Shani Paluch); J. Simard (Jacques); D.F. Easton (Douglas); K. Offit (Kenneth); F.J. Couch (Fergus); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); J. Benítez (Javier)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractSingle Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in the DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) pathway could be associated with cancer risk in carriers of mutations in the high-penetrance susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, given the relation of synthetic lethality that exists between

  15. DNA glycosylases involved in base excision repair may be associated with cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osorio, A.; Milne, R.L.; Kuchenbaecker, K.; Vaclova, T.; Pita, G.; Alonso, R.; Peterlongo, P.; Blanco, I.; Hoya, M. de la; Duran, M.; Diez, O.; Ramon, Y.C.T.; Konstantopoulou, I.; Martinez-Bouzas, C.; Conejero, R. Andres; Soucy, P.; McGuffog, L.; Barrowdale, D.; Lee, A.; Swe, B.; Arver, B.; Rantala, J.; Loman, N.; Ehrencrona, H.; Olopade, O.I.; Beattie, M.S.; Domchek, S.M.; Nathanson, K.; Rebbeck, T.R.; Arun, B.K.; Karlan, B.Y.; Walsh, C.; Lester, J.; John, E.M.; Whittemore, A.S.; Daly, M.B.; Southey, M.; Hopper, J.; Terry, M.B.; Buys, S.S.; Janavicius, R.; Dorfling, C.M.; Rensburg, E.J. van; Steele, L.; Neuhausen, S.L.; Ding, Y.C.; Hansen, T.V.; Jonson, L.; Ejlertsen, B.; Gerdes, A.M.; Infante, M.; Herraez, B.; Moreno, L.T.; Weitzel, J.N.; Herzog, J.; Weeman, K.; Manoukian, S.; Peissel, B.; Zaffaroni, D.; Scuvera, G.; Bonanni, B.; Mariette, F.; Volorio, S.; Viel, A.; Varesco, L.; Papi, L.; Ottini, L.; Tibiletti, M.G.; Radice, P.; Yannoukakos, D.; Garber, J.; Ellis, S.; Frost, D.; Platte, R.; Fineberg, E.; Evans, G.; Lalloo, F.; Izatt, L.; Eeles, R.; Adlard, J.; Davidson, R.; Cole, T.; Eccles, D.; Cook, J; Hodgson, S.; Brewer, C.; Tischkowitz, M.; Douglas, F.; Porteous, M.; Side, L.; Walker, L.; Morrison, P.; Donaldson, A.; Kennedy, J.; Foo, C.; Godwin, A.K.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Wappenschmidt, B.; Rhiem, K.; Engel, C.; Hoogerbrugge-van der Linden, N.; et al.,

    2014-01-01

    Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in the DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) pathway could be associated with cancer risk in carriers of mutations in the high-penetrance susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, given the relation of synthetic lethality that exists between one of the

  16. Association of PHB 1630 C>T and MTHFR 677 C>T polymorphisms with breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakubowska, A; Rozkrut, D; Antoniou, A

    2012-01-01

    The variable penetrance of breast cancer in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers suggests that other genetic or environmental factors modify breast cancer risk. Two genes of special interest are prohibitin (PHB) and methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), both of which are important either directly or...

  17. Evaluation of chromosome 6p22 as a breast cancer risk modifier locus in a follow-up study of BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevens, Kristen N; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary

    2012-01-01

    Several common germline variants identified through genome-wide association studies of breast cancer risk in the general population have recently been shown to be associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. When combined, these variants can identify marked differe...

  18. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles and the risk of breast cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: implications for risk prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Beesley, Jonathan; McGuffog, Lesley

    2010-01-01

    The known breast cancer susceptibility polymorphisms in FGFR2, TNRC9/TOX3, MAP3K1, LSP1, and 2q35 confer increased risks of breast cancer for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. We evaluated the associations of 3 additional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs4973768 in SLC4A7/NEK10, rs650495...

  19. Common variants associated with breast cancer in genome-wide association studies are modifiers of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Xianshu; Pankratz, V. Shane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Tarrell, Robert; Karaus, Mary; McGuffog, Lesley; Pharaoh, Paul D. P.; Ponder, Bruce A. J.; Dunning, Alison M.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Houdayer, Claude; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J.; Spurdle, Amanda; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Singer, Christian F.; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Dressler, Catherina; Fink, Anneliese; Szabo, Csilla I.; Zikan, Michal; Foretova, Lenka; Claes, Kathleen; Thomas, Gilles; Hoover, Robert N.; Hunter, David J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Couch, Fergus J.; Gregory, Helen; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Morrison, Patrick; Cole, Trevor; McKeown, Carole; Taylor, Amy; Donaldson, Alan; Paterson, Joan; Murray, Alexandra; Rogers, Mark; McCann, Emma; Kennedy, John; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Brewer, Carole; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Davidson, Rosemarie; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Izatt, Louise; Pichert, Gabriella; Langman, Caroline; Dorkins, Huw; Barwell, Julian; Chu, Carol; Bishop, Tim; Miller, Julie; Ellis, Ian; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Holt, Felicity; Male, Alison; Robinson, Anne; Gardiner, Carol; Douglas, Fiona; Claber, Oonagh; Walker, Lisa; McLeod, Diane; Eeles, Ros; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Mitra, Anita; Cook, Jackie; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Hodgson, Shirley; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eccles, Diana; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; Tyler, Emma; McBride, Donna; Bérard, Léon; Sinilnikova, Olga; Barjhoux, Laure; Giraud, Sophie; Léone, Mélanie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Moncoutier, Virginie; Belotti, Muriel; de Pauw, Antoine; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Byrde, Véronique; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Eisinger, Françoise; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Coupier, Isabelle; Payrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révillion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Rouleau, Etienne; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélèn; Rebischung, Christine; Cassini, Cécile; Olivier-Faivre, Laurence; Prieur, Fabienne; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Lynch, Henry T.; Hogervorst, Frans; Vernhoef, Senno; Pijpe, Anouk; van 't Veer, Laura; van Leeuwen, Flora; Rookus, Matti; Collée, Margriet; van den Ouweland, Ans; Kriege, Mieke; Schutte, Mieke; Hooning, Maartje; Seynaeve, Caroline; van Asperen, Christi; Wijnen, Juul; Vreeswijk, Maaike; Tollenaar, Rob; Devilee, Peter; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ausems, Margreet; van der Luijt, Rob; Aalfs, Cora; van Os, Theo; Gille, Hans; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Gomez-Garcia, Encarna; van Roozendaal, Kees; Blok, Marinus; Oosterwijk, Jan; van der Hout, Annemieke; Mourits, Marian; Vasen, Hans; Szabo, Csilla; Pohlreich, Petr; Kleibl, Zdenek; Machackova, Eva; Lukesova, Miroslava; de Leeneer, Kim; Poppe, Bruce; de Paepe, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that significantly modify breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Since these risk modifiers were originally identified as genetic risk factors for breast cancer in genome-wide association studies (GWASs),

  20. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigorito, Elena; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Beesley, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 ...

  1. A Mouse Model That Reproduces the Developmental Pathways and Site Specificity of the Cancers Associated With the Human BRCA1 Mutation Carrier State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Predisposition to breast and extrauterine Müllerian carcinomas in BRCA1 mutation carriers is due to a combination of cell-autonomous consequences of BRCA1 inactivation on cell cycle homeostasis superimposed on cell-nonautonomous hormonal factors magnified by the effects of BRCA1 mutations on hormonal changes associated with the menstrual cycle. We used the Müllerian inhibiting substance type 2 receptor (Mis2r promoter and a truncated form of the Follicle stimulating hormone receptor (Fshr promoter to introduce conditional knockouts of Brca1 and p53 not only in mouse mammary and Müllerian epithelia, but also in organs that control the estrous cycle. Sixty percent of the double mutant mice developed invasive Müllerian and mammary carcinomas. Mice carrying heterozygous mutations in Brca1 and p53 also developed invasive tumors, albeit at a lesser (30% rate, in which the wild type alleles were no longer present due to loss of heterozygosity. While mice carrying heterozygous mutations in both genes developed mammary tumors, none of the mice carrying only a heterozygous p53 mutation developed such tumors (P < 0.0001, attesting to a role for Brca1 mutations in tumor development. This mouse model is attractive to investigate cell-nonautonomous mechanisms associated with cancer predisposition in BRCA1 mutation carriers and to investigate the merit of chemo-preventive drugs targeting such mechanisms.

  2. The effect of genotypes and parent of origin on cancer risk and age of cancer development in PMS2 mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suerink, Manon; van der Klift, Heleen M; Ten Broeke, Sanne W; Dekkers, Olaf M; Bernstein, Inge; Capellá Munar, Gabriel; Gomez Garcia, Encarna; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Letteboer, Tom G W; Menko, Fred H; Lindblom, Annika; Mensenkamp, Arjen; Moller, Pal; van Os, Theo A; Rahner, Nils; Redeker, Bert J W; Olderode-Berends, M J W; Olderode, Maran; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Vos, Yvonne J; Wagner, Anja; Morreau, Hans; Hes, Frederik J; Vasen, Hans F A; Tops, Carli M; Wijnen, Juul T; Nielsen, Maartje

    2016-04-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS), a heritable disorder with an increased risk of primarily colorectal cancer (CRC) and endometrial cancer (EC), can be caused by mutations in the PMS2 gene. We wished to establish whether genotype and/or parent-of-origin effects (POE) explain (part of) the reported variability in severity of the phenotype. European PMS2 mutation carriers (n = 381) were grouped and compared based on RNA expression and whether the mutation was inherited paternally or maternally. Mutation carriers with loss of RNA expression (group 1) had a significantly lower age at CRC diagnosis (51.1 years vs. 60.0 years, P = 0.035) and a lower age at EC diagnosis (55.8 years vs. 61.0 years, P = 0.2, nonsignificant) compared with group 2 (retention of RNA expression). Furthermore, group 1 showed slightly higher, but nonsignificant, hazard ratios (HRs) for both CRC (HR: 1.31, P = 0.38) and EC (HR: 1.22, P = 0.72). No evidence for a significant parent-of-origin effect was found for either CRC or EC. PMS2 mutation carriers with retention of RNA expression developed CRC 9 years later than those with loss of RNA expression. If confirmed, this finding would justify a delay in surveillance for these cases. Cancer risk was not influenced by a parent-of-origin effect.Genet Med 18 4, 405-409.

  3. 76 FR 70965 - Polyethylene Retail Carrier Bags From Thailand: Correction to the Amended Final Results of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-16

    ... Bags From Thailand: Correction to the Amended Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review... bags from Thailand for the period August 1, 2009, through July 31, 2010. The notice did not include the... bags from Thailand. See Polyethylene Retail Carrier Bags From Thailand: Amended Final Results of...

  4. Incidence and Carrier Frequency of CFTR Gene Mutations in Pregnancies With Echogenic Bowel in Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Michelle E; Allen, Victoria M; Brock, Jo-Ann K

    2018-03-01

    Fetal echogenic bowel (echogenic bowel) is associated with cystic fibrosis (CF), with a reported incidence ranging from 1% to 13%. Prenatal testing for CF in the setting of echogenic bowel can be done by screening parental or fetal samples for pathogenic CFTR variants. If only one pathogenic variant is identified, sequencing of the CFTR gene can be undertaken, to identify a second pathogenic variant not covered in the standard screening panel. Full gene sequencing, however, also introduces the potential to identify variants of uncertain significance (VUSs) that can create counselling challenges and cause parental anxiety. To provide accurate counselling for families in the study population, the incidence of CF associated with echogenic bowel and the carrier frequency of CFTR variants were investigated. All pregnancies for which CF testing was undertaken for the indication of echogenic bowel (from Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island) were identified (January 2007-July 2017). The CFTR screening and sequencing results were reviewed, and fetal outcomes related to CF were assessed. A total of 463 pregnancies with echogenic bowel were tested. Four were confirmed to be affected with CF, giving an incidence of 0.9% in this cohort. The carrier frequency of CF among all parents in the cohort was 5.0% (1 in 20); however, when excluding parents of affected fetuses, the carrier frequency for the population was estimated at 4.1% (1 in 25). CFTR gene sequencing identified an additional VUS in two samples. The incidence of CF in pregnancies with echogenic bowel in Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island is 0.9%, with an estimated population carrier frequency of 4.1%. These results provide the basis for improved counselling to assess the risk of CF in the pregnancy, after parental carrier screening, using Bayesian probability. Counselling regarding VUSs should be undertaken before gene sequencing. Copyright © 2017 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. Published by

  5. Profile of Mutations in the Reverse Transcriptase and Overlapping Surface Genes of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) in Treatment-Naïve Indonesian HBV Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamani, Laura Navika; Yano, Yoshihiko; Utsumi, Takako; Wasityastuti, Widya; Rinonce, Hanggoro Tri; Widasari, Dewiyani Indah; Juniastuti; Lusida, Maria Inge; Soetjipto; Hayashi, Yoshitake

    2017-11-22

    Mutations in the reverse transcriptase (RT) region of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome are an important factor in low therapeutic effectiveness. Nonetheless, the prevalence of these mutations in HBV strains isolated previously in Indonesia has not been systematically examined. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the profile of mutations in the RT region and the associations of these mutations with amino acid changes in the surface protein in the virus of treatment-naïve Indonesian HBV carriers. Overall, 96 sequences of the full-length Indonesian HBV genomes (genotype B, n = 54; genotype C, n = 42) were retrieved from the National Center for Biotechnology Information. Naturally occurring primary and/or compensatory drug resistance mutations were found in 6/54 (11.1%) genotype B strains and in 1/42 (2.4%) genotype C strains. The potential mutations underlying resistance to a nucleos(t)ide analog and/or pretreatment mutations were more frequent in both genotypes but more frequent in genotype C strains than in genotype B strains. The A-B interdomain region in the RT gene was more frequently mutated in genotype C than in genotype B (3.51 ± 2.53 vs. 1.08 ± 1.52, P < 0.001). Knowledge about the mutational profiles of the RT gene and changes in the surface protein may help clinicians to select the most appropriate antiviral drug and vaccination or HBV immunoglobulin regimen for management of HBV infection in Indonesia.

  6. Novel ETHE1 mutation in a carrier couple having prior offspring affected with ethylmalonic encephalopathy: Genetic analysis, clinical management and reproductive outcome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, David J

    2010-03-01

    Ethylmalonic encephalopathy (EE) is an autosomally recessive inherited disorder with a relentlessly progressive decline in neurological function, usually fatal by the age of ten. It is characterised by generalised hypotonia, psychomotor regression, spastic tetraparesis, dystonia, seizures and, eventually, global neurological failure. Approximately 50 reports have been published worldwide describing this devastating disease, most involving patients of Mediterranean or Arab origin. The fundamental defect in EE likely involves the impairment of a mitochondrial sulphur dioxygenase coded by the ETHE1 gene responsible for the catabolism of sulphide, which subsequently accumulates to toxic levels. A diagnosis of EE should initiate careful genetic evaluation and counselling, particularly if the parents intend to have additional offspring. The present report describes the diagnosis of EE in a reproductive endocrinology context, where both members of a non-consanguineous couple were confirmed to be carriers of an identical A↷G mutation. This previously unknown mutation at nucleotide position c.494 resulted in an amino acid substitution, p.Asp165Gly. Although consideration was given to in vitro fertilisation, embryo biopsy and single gene pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, the couple decided to first utilise a less aggressive therapeutic approach with donor sperm insemination. Pregnancy with a low risk of EE was indeed achieved; however, the infant was affected with a different anomaly (hypoplastic left heart). As this case demonstrates, prior to the initiation of fertility therapy, genetic analysis may be used to provide a confirmatory diagnosis when EE is suspected.

  7. 78 FR 28192 - Polyethylene Retail Carrier Bags From Thailand: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ... Bags From Thailand: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2011-2012 AGENCY... on polyethylene retail carrier bags (PRCBs) from Thailand. The review covers 11 respondents. The... merchandise has been sold at less than normal value by the companies subject to this review. DATES: Effective...

  8. The Alzheimer’s Prevention Initiative composite cognitive test score: Sample size estimates for the evaluation of preclinical Alzheimer’s disease treatments in presenilin 1 E280A mutation carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayutyanont, Napatkamon; Langbaum, Jessica B.; Hendrix, Suzanne B.; Chen, Kewei; Fleisher, Adam S.; Friesenhahn, Michel; Ward, Michael; Aguirre, Camilo; Acosta-Baena, Natalia; Madrigal, Lucìa; Muñoz, Claudia; Tirado, Victoria; Moreno, Sonia; Tariot, Pierre N.; Lopera, Francisco; Reiman, Eric M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective There is a need to identify a cognitive composite that is sensitive to tracking preclinical AD decline to be used as a primary endpoint in treatment trials. Method We capitalized on longitudinal data, collected from 1995 to 2010, from cognitively unimpaired presenilin 1 (PSEN1) E280A mutation carriers from the world’s largest known early-onset autosomal dominant AD (ADAD) kindred to identify a composite cognitive test with the greatest statistical power to track preclinical AD decline and estimate the number of carriers age 30 and older needed to detect a treatment effect in the Alzheimer’s Prevention Initiative’s (API) preclinical AD treatment trial. The mean-to-standard-deviation ratios (MSDRs) of change over time were calculated in a search for the optimal combination of one to seven cognitive tests/sub-tests drawn from the neuropsychological test battery in cognitively unimpaired mutation carriers during a two and five year follow-up period, using data from non-carriers during the same time period to correct for aging and practice effects. Combinations that performed well were then evaluated for robustness across follow-up years, occurrence of selected items within top performing combinations and representation of relevant cognitive domains. Results This optimal test combination included CERAD Word List Recall, CERAD Boston Naming Test (high frequency items), MMSE Orientation to Time, CERAD Constructional Praxis and Ravens Progressive Matrices (Set A) with an MSDR of 1.62. This composite is more sensitive than using either the CERAD Word List Recall (MSDR=0.38) or the entire CERAD-Col battery (MSDR=0.76). A sample size of 75 cognitively normal PSEN1-E280A mutation carriers age 30 and older per treatment arm allows for a detectable treatment effect of 29% in a 60-month trial (80% power, p=0.05). Conclusions We have identified a composite cognitive test score representing multiple cognitive domains that has improved power compared to the most

  9. The value of a rapid contrast-enhanced angio-MRI protocol in the detection of head and neck paragangliomas in SDHx mutations carriers: a retrospective study on behalf of the PGL.EVA investigators*

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gravel, Guillaume; Hernigou, Anne; Niccoli, Patricia; Rohmer, Vincent; Moulin, Guy; Borson-Chazot, Francoise; Rousset, Pascal; Pasco-Papon, Anne; Marcus, Claude; Dubrulle, Frederique; Gouya, Herve; Bidault, Francois; Dupas, Benoit; Gabrillargues, Jean; Caumont-Prim, Aurore; Gimenez-Roqueplo, Anne-Paule; Halimi, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    To assess the performance of a simplified MRI protocol consisting of a contrast-enhanced three-dimensional MR angiography (CE-MRA) in association with a post-contrast T1-weighted sequence (T1WIV) for the detection of HNPGLs in SDHx mutation carriers. This retrospective sub-study is based on the multicenter PGL.EVA cohort, which prospectively enrolled SDHx mutation carriers from 2005 to 2009; 157 index cases or relatives were included. CE-MRA and the T1WIV images were read solely with knowledge of the clinical data but blind to the diagnosis. Sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratios for the simplified MRI protocol were compared to the full MRI protocol reading results and to the gold standard status obtained through the consensus of an expert committee. The sensitivity and specificity of the readings of the simplified MRI protocol were, respectively, 88.7 % (95 % CI = 78.1-95.3) and 93.7 % (95 % CI = 86.8-97.7) versus 80.7 % (95 % CI = 68.6-89.6) and 94.7 % (95 % CI = 88.1-98.3) for the readings of the full MRI protocol. The simplified post-contrast MRI with shorter duration (5 to 10 minutes) showed no performance difference compared to the lengthy standard full MRI and can be proposed for the detection of head and neck paragangliomas (HNPGLs) in SDHx mutation carriers. (orig.)

  10. The value of a rapid contrast-enhanced angio-MRI protocol in the detection of head and neck paragangliomas in SDHx mutations carriers: a retrospective study on behalf of the PGL.EVA investigators*

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gravel, Guillaume; Hernigou, Anne [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Service de Radiologie, Paris (France); Niccoli, Patricia [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire la Timone, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Marseille, Service d' Endocrinologie, Diabete et Maladies Metaboliques, Marseille (France); Rohmer, Vincent [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire d' Angers, Service d' Endocrinologie, Diabetologie, Nutrition, Angers (France); LUNAM Universite, INSERM, U1063, Angers (France); Moulin, Guy [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire la Timone, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Marseille, Service de Radiologie, Marseille (France); Borson-Chazot, Francoise [Federation d' Endocrinologie, Hospices civils de Lyon, Groupement Hospitalier Est, Lyon (France); Universite de Lyon, Faculte de Medecine Lyon-Est, Lyon (France); Cancer Research Center of Lyon, INSERM UMR1052, UMR CNRS 5286, Lyon (France); Rousset, Pascal [Hospices civils de Lyon, Groupement Hospitalier Est, Service de Radiologie, Lyon (France); Pasco-Papon, Anne [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire d' Angers, Service de Radiologie, Angers (France); Marcus, Claude [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Reims, Service de Radiologie, Reims (France); Dubrulle, Frederique [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Lille, Service de Radiologie, Lille (France); Gouya, Herve [Hopital Cochin, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Service de Radiologie, Paris (France); Bidault, Francois [Institut Gustave Roussy, Service de Radiologie, Villejuif (France); Dupas, Benoit [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Nantes, Service de Radiologie, Nantes (France); Gabrillargues, Jean [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Clermont-Ferrand, Service de Neuroradiologie, Clermont Ferrand (France); Caumont-Prim, Aurore [Unite d' Epidemiologie et de Recherche Clinique, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Paris (France); Centre d' investigation Epidemiologique 4, INSERM, Paris (France); Gimenez-Roqueplo, Anne-Paule [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Service de Genetique, Paris (France); Paris Cardiovascular Research Center, INSERM, UMR970, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Faculte de Medecine, Paris (France); Halimi, Philippe [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Service de Radiologie, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Faculte de Medecine, Paris (France)

    2016-06-15

    To assess the performance of a simplified MRI protocol consisting of a contrast-enhanced three-dimensional MR angiography (CE-MRA) in association with a post-contrast T1-weighted sequence (T1WIV) for the detection of HNPGLs in SDHx mutation carriers. This retrospective sub-study is based on the multicenter PGL.EVA cohort, which prospectively enrolled SDHx mutation carriers from 2005 to 2009; 157 index cases or relatives were included. CE-MRA and the T1WIV images were read solely with knowledge of the clinical data but blind to the diagnosis. Sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratios for the simplified MRI protocol were compared to the full MRI protocol reading results and to the gold standard status obtained through the consensus of an expert committee. The sensitivity and specificity of the readings of the simplified MRI protocol were, respectively, 88.7 % (95 % CI = 78.1-95.3) and 93.7 % (95 % CI = 86.8-97.7) versus 80.7 % (95 % CI = 68.6-89.6) and 94.7 % (95 % CI = 88.1-98.3) for the readings of the full MRI protocol. The simplified post-contrast MRI with shorter duration (5 to 10 minutes) showed no performance difference compared to the lengthy standard full MRI and can be proposed for the detection of head and neck paragangliomas (HNPGLs) in SDHx mutation carriers. (orig.)

  11. Retinal vascular abnormalities and dragged maculae in a carrier with a new NDP mutation (c.268delC) that caused severe Norrie disease in the proband.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Phoebe; Shankar, Suma P; Duncan, Jacque; Slavotinek, Anne; Stone, Edwin M; Rutar, Tina

    2010-02-01

    Norrie disease (ND) is caused by mutations in the ND pseudoglioma (NDP) gene (MIM 300658) located at chromosome Xp11.4-p11.3. ND is characterized by abnormal retinal vascular development and vitreoretinal disorganization presenting at birth. Systemic manifestations include sensorineural deafness, progressive mental disorder, behavioral and psychological problems, growth failure, and seizures. Other vitreoretinopathies that are associated with NDP gene mutations include X-linked familial exudative vitreoretinopathy, Coats disease, persistent fetal vasculature, and retinopathy of prematurity. Phenotypic variability associated with NDP gene mutations has been well documented in affected male patients. However, there are limited data on signs in female carriers, with mild peripheral retinal abnormalities reported in both carrier and noncarrier females of families with NDP gene mutations. Here, we report a family harboring a single base-pair deletion, c.268delC, in the NDP gene causing a severe ND phenotype in the male proband and peripheral retinal vascular abnormalities with dragged maculae similar to those observed in familial exudative vitreoretinopathy in his carrier mother. Copyright (c) 2010 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Colorectal cancer risk variants at 8q23.3 and 11q23.1 are associated with disease phenotype in APC mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbanoghli, Z; Nieuwenhuis, M H; Houwing-Duistermaat, J J; Jagmohan-Changur, S; Hes, F J; Tops, C M; Wagner, A; Aalfs, C M; Verhoef, S; Gómez García, E B; Sijmons, R H; Menko, F H; Letteboer, T G; Hoogerbrugge, N; van Wezel, T; Vasen, H F A; Wijnen, J T

    2016-10-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is a dominantly inherited syndrome caused by germline mutations in the APC gene and characterized by the development of multiple colorectal adenomas and a high risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC). The severity of polyposis is correlated with the site of the APC mutation. However, there is also phenotypic variability within families with the same underlying APC mutation, suggesting that additional factors influence the severity of polyposis. Genome-wide association studies identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with CRC. We assessed whether these SNPs are associated with polyp multiplicity in proven APC mutation carriers. Sixteen CRC-associated SNPs were analysed in a cohort of 419 APC germline mutation carriers from 182 families. Clinical data were retrieved from the Dutch Polyposis Registry. Allele frequencies of the SNPs were compared for patients with APC genotype as a covariate. We found a trend of association of two of the tested SNPs with the ≥100 adenoma phenotype: the C alleles of rs16892766 at 8q23.3 (OR 1.71, 95 % CI 1.05-2.76, p = 0.03, dominant model) and rs3802842 at 11q23.1 (OR 1.51, 95 % CI 1.03-2.22, p = 0.04, dominant model). We identified two risk variants that are associated with a more severe phenotype in APC mutation carriers. These risk variants may partly explain the phenotypic variability in families with the same APC gene defect. Further studies with a larger sample size are recommended to evaluate and confirm the phenotypic effect of these SNPs in FAP.

  13. Associations of common breast cancer susceptibility alleles with risk of breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    OpenAIRE

    Andrulis, IL; Mulligan, AM; Schmutzler, RK; Barrowdale, D; McGuffog, L; Robson, M; Schmidt, MK; Spurdle, AB; Neuhausen, SL; Kuchenbaecker, KB

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: More than 70 common alleles are known to be involved in breast cancer (BC) susceptibility and several exhibit significant heterogeneity in their associations with different BC subtypes. Although there are differences in the association patterns between BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and the general population for several loci, no study has comprehensively evaluated the associations of all known BC susceptibility alleles with risk of BC subtypes in BRCA1 and BRC...

  14. Genetic Counseling and Cardiac Care in Predictively Tested Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Mutation Carriers: The Patients' Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christiaans, Imke; van Langen, Irene M.; Birnie, Erwin; Bonsel, Gouke J.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Smets, Ellen M. A.

    2009-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common hereditary heart disease associated with sudden cardiac death. predictive genetic counseling and testing are performed using adapted Huntington guidelines, that is, psychosocial care and time for reflection are not obligatory and the test result can be

  15. 75 FR 75454 - Polyethylene Retail Carrier Bags From Thailand: Extension of Time Limit for the Final Results of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-03

    ... Bags From Thailand: Extension of Time Limit for the Final Results of the Antidumping Duty... preliminary results of review of the antidumping duty order on polyethylene retail carrier bags from Thailand. See Polyethylene Retail Carrier Bags From Thailand: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...

  16. A Human Neural Crest Stem Cell-Derived Dopaminergic Neuronal Model Recapitulates Biochemical Abnormalities in GBA1 Mutation Carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Yu Yang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Numerically the most important risk factor for the development of Parkinson's disease (PD is the presence of mutations in the glucocerebrosidase GBA1 gene. In vitro and in vivo studies show that GBA1 mutations reduce glucocerebrosidase (GCase activity and are associated with increased α-synuclein levels, reflecting similar changes seen in idiopathic PD brain. We have developed a neural crest stem cell-derived dopaminergic neuronal model that recapitulates biochemical abnormalities in GBA1 mutation-associated PD. Cells showed reduced GCase protein and activity, impaired macroautophagy, and increased α-synuclein levels. Advantages of this approach include easy access to stem cells, no requirement to reprogram, and retention of the intact host genome. Treatment with a GCase chaperone increased GCase protein levels and activity, rescued the autophagic defects, and decreased α-synuclein levels. These results provide the basis for further investigation of GCase chaperones or similar drugs to slow the progression of PD.

  17. Knowledge about hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer; mutation carriers and physicians at equal levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanska, Katarina; Carlsson, Christina; Bendahl, Pär-Ola

    2009-01-01

    questions about cancer risks and surveillance strategies. RESULTS: Both groups answered questions on colorectal cancer risk, surveillance and genetic testing well, whereas answers about inheritance and risks for HNPCC associated cancer were less accurate. Only half of the family members and one third......BACKGROUND: Identification and adequate management of individuals at risk for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is crucial since surveillance programmes reduce morbidity and mortality. We investigated knowledge about key features of HNPCC in at risk individuals and physicians...

  18. Cole Disease Results from Mutations in ENPP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eytan, Ori; Morice-Picard, Fanny; Sarig, Ofer; Ezzedine, Khaled; Isakov, Ofer; Li, Qiaoli; Ishida-Yamamoto, Akemi; Shomron, Noam; Goldsmith, Tomer; Fuchs-Telem, Dana; Adir, Noam; Uitto, Jouni; Orlow, Seth J; Taieb, Alain; Sprecher, Eli

    2013-10-03

    The coexistence of abnormal keratinization and aberrant pigmentation in a number of cornification disorders has long suggested a mechanistic link between these two processes. Here, we deciphered the genetic basis of Cole disease, a rare autosomal-dominant genodermatosis featuring punctate keratoderma, patchy hypopigmentation, and uncommonly, cutaneous calcifications. Using a combination of exome and direct sequencing, we showed complete cosegregation of the disease phenotype with three heterozygous ENPP1 mutations in three unrelated families. All mutations were found to affect cysteine residues in the somatomedin-B-like 2 (SMB2) domain in the encoded protein, which has been implicated in insulin signaling. ENPP1 encodes ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 1 (ENPP1), which is responsible for the generation of inorganic pyrophosphate, a natural inhibitor of mineralization. Previously, biallelic mutations in ENPP1 were shown to underlie a number of recessive conditions characterized by ectopic calcification, thus providing evidence of profound phenotypic heterogeneity in ENPP1-associated genetic diseases. Copyright © 2013 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Odonto-onycho-dermal dysplasia in a patient homozygous for a WNT10A nonsense mutation and mild manifestations of ectodermal dysplasia in carriers of the mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krøigård, Anne Bruun; Clemmensen, Ole; Gjørup, Hans; Hertz, Jens Michael; Bygum, Anette

    2016-03-10

    Odonto-onycho-dermal dysplasia (OODD) is a rare form of ectodermal dysplasia characterized by severe oligodontia, onychodysplasia, palmoplantar hyperkeratosis, dry skin, hypotrichosis, and hyperhidrosis of the palms and soles. The ectodermal dysplasias resulting from biallelic mutations in the WNT10A gene result in highly variable phenotypes, ranging from isolated tooth agenesis to OODD and Schöpf-Schulz-Passarge syndrome (SSPS). We identified a female patient, with consanguineous parents, who was clinically diagnosed with OODD. Genetic testing showed that she was homozygous for a previously reported pathogenic mutation in the WNT10A gene, c.321C > A, p.Cys107*. The skin and nail abnormalities were for many years interpreted as psoriasis and treated accordingly. A thorough clinical examination revealed hypotrichosis and hyperhidrosis of the soles and dental examination revealed agenesis of permanent teeth except the two maxillary central incisors. Skin biopsies from the hyperkeratotic palms and soles showed the characteristic changes of eccrine syringofibroadenomatosis, which has been described in patients with ectodermal dysplasias. Together with a family history of tooth anomalies, this lead to the clinical suspicion of a hereditary ectodermal dysplasia. This case illustrates the challenges of diagnosing ectodermal dysplasia like OODD and highlights the relevance of interdisciplinary cooperation in the diagnosis of rare conditions.

  20. Excess of extracolonic non-endometrial multiple primary cancers in MSH2 germline mutation carriers over MLH1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin-Hurtubise, Kevin M; Yheulon, Christopher G; Gagliano, Ronald A; Lynch, Henry T

    2013-12-01

    The lynch syndrome (LS) tumor spectrum involves colorectal cancer (CRC), endometrial cancer (EC), and less frequently various extracolonic non-endometrial cancers (non-EC). The organ-specific survival rates of these patients are well defined, however, the collective survival of all-cancers combined (CRC + EC + non-EC) are unclear. Fifty-two MSH2 patients and 68 MLH1 patients were followed for a median of 6.3 years after diagnosis of first cancer, regardless of type. The proportions of CRC only, EC, non-EC, and multiple primary cancers were compared between the two genotypes. Kaplan-Meier curves were developed for survival comparisons. MSH2 patients present less frequently with only CRC (37% MSH2, 62% MLH1, P = 0.0096), manifest more multiple primary cancers (38% MSH2, 18% MLH1, P = 0.013), develop more extracolonic cancers (62% MSH2, 38% MLH1, P = 0.003), non-EC only cancers (46% MSH2, 24% MLH1, P = 0.028) and carry a greater risk for urinary tract cancer (UTC) (13.4% MSH2, 1.5% MLH1, P = 0.024). There was no difference in 10-year survival between the two groups (P = 0.4). The additional propensity for UTC in MSH2 carriers argues in favor of UTC screening in MSH2 individuals. Other types of cancer screening should be tailored to the expression history of the specific LS mutation. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes and CD4 epitope mutations in the pre-core/core region of hepatitis B virus in chronic hepatitis B carriers in Northeast Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhand, Sareh; Tabarraei, Alijan; Nazari, Amineh; Moradi, Abdolvahab

    2017-07-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is vulnerable to many various mutations. Those within epitopes recognized by sensitized T cells may influence the re-emergence of the virus. This study was designed to investigate the mutation in immune epitope regions of HBV pre-core/core among chronic HBV patients of Golestan province, Northeast Iran. In 120 chronic HBV carriers, HBV DNA was extracted from blood plasma samples and PCR was done using specific primers. Direct sequencing and alignment of the pre-core/core region were applied using reference sequence from Gene Bank database (Accession Number AB033559). The study showed 27 inferred amino acid substitutions, 9 of which (33.3%) were in CD4 and 2 (7.4%) in cytotoxic T lymphocytes' (CTL) epitopes and 16 other mutations (59.2%) were observed in other regions. CTL escape mutations were not commonly observed in pre-core/core sequences of chronic HBV carriers in the locale of study. It can be concluded that most of the inferred amino acid substitutions occur in different immune epitopes other than CTL and CD4.

  2. 78 FR 69817 - Polyethylene Retail Carrier Bags From Thailand: Final Court Decision and Amended Final Results of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-21

    ... Bags From Thailand: Final Court Decision and Amended Final Results of Administrative Review of the..., which recalculated the weighted-average duty margin for polyethylene retail carrier bags (PRCBs) from... Packaging at the CIT. \\2\\ See Polyethylene Retail Carrier Bags from Thailand: Final Results and Partial...

  3. Comparison of age at natural menopause in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers with a non-clinic-based sample of women in northern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wayne T; Beattie, Mary; Chen, Lee-May; Oktay, Kutluk; Crawford, Sybil L; Gold, Ellen B; Cedars, Marcelle; Rosen, Mitchell

    2013-05-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) are related to an increased lifetime risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer. Although risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy reduces the risk of both cancers, loss of fertility is a major concern. A recent study suggested an association between BRCA1 mutation and occult primary ovarian insufficiency. The objective of the current study was to determine whether BRCA1/2 mutation carriers have an earlier onset of natural menopause compared with unaffected women. White carriers of the BRCA1/2 gene (n = 382) were identified within the Breast Cancer Risk Program Registry at the University of California at San Francisco and compared with non-clinic-based white women in northern California (n = 765). The 2 groups were compared with regard to median age at the time of natural menopause before and after adjustment for known risk factors, and the role of smoking within each group was examined using the Kaplan-Meier approach for unadjusted analyses and Cox proportional hazards regression analyses for adjusted analyses. The median age at the time of natural menopause in the BRCA1/2 carriers was significantly younger than among the unaffected sample (50 years vs 53 years; P < .001). The unadjusted hazard ratio for natural menopause when comparing BRCA1/2 carriers with unaffected women was 4.06 (95% confidence interval, 3.03-5.45) and was 3.98 (95% confidence interval, 2.87-5.53) after adjusting for smoking, parity, and oral contraceptive use. For BRCA1/2 carriers who were current heavy smokers (smoking ≥ 20 cigarettes/day), the median age at natural menopause was 46 years versus 49 years for nonsmokers (P = .027). The BRCA1/2 mutation was associated with a significantly earlier age at natural menopause, and heavy smoking compounded this risk. Because the relationship between menopause and the end of natural fertility is considered to be fixed, these findings suggest the risk of earlier infertility among BRCA1/2 carriers

  4. An original phylogenetic approach identified mitochondrial haplogroup T1a1 as inversely associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blein, Sophie; Bardel, Claire; Danjean, Vincent; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Dennis, Joe; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Soucy, Penny; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ding, Yuan Chun; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C; Hansen, Thomas Vo; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Conejero, Raquel Andrés; Segota, Ena; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Thelander, Margo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Radice, Paolo; Pensotti, Valeria; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Manoukian, Siranoush; Varesco, Liliana; Capone, Gabriele L; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Donaldson, Alan; Brady, Angela; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D Gareth; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Douglas, Fiona; Cook, Jackie; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E; Kennedy, M John; Tischkowitz, Marc; Rogers, Mark T; Porteous, Mary E; Morrison, Patrick J; Platte, Radka; Eeles, Ros; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K; Isaacs, Claudine; Claes, Kathleen; De Leeneer, Kim; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Schmutzler, Rita K; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Markov, Nadja Bogdanova; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; de Pauw, Antoine; Lefol, Cédrick; Lasset, Christine; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Damiola, Francesca; Dreyfus, Hélène; Barjhoux, Laure; Golmard, Lisa; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bonadona, Valérie; Sornin, Valérie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Carter, Jonathan; Van Le, Linda; Piedmonte, Marion; DiSilvestro, Paul A; de la Hoya, Miguel; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Jager, Agnes; van den Ouweland, Ans Mw; Kets, Carolien M; Aalfs, Cora M; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Hogervorst, Frans Bl; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne Ej; Oosterwijk, Jan C; van Roozendaal, Kees Ep; Rookus, Matti A; Devilee, Peter; van der Luijt, Rob B; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Teulé, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Del Valle, Jesús; Jakubowska, Anna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Maugard, Christine; Amadori, Alberto; Montagna, Marco; Teixeira, Manuel R; Spurdle, Amanda B; Foulkes, William; Olswold, Curtis; Lindor, Noralane M; Pankratz, Vernon S; Szabo, Csilla I; Lincoln, Anne; Jacobs, Lauren; Corines, Marina; Robson, Mark; Vijai, Joseph; Berger, Andreas; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Andrulis, Irene L; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria A; Friedman, Eitan; Zidan, Jamal; Laitman, Yael; Lindblom, Annika; Melin, Beatrice; Arver, Brita; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Nussbaum, Robert L; Ramus, Susan J; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Arun, Banu K; Mitchell, Gillian; Karlan, Beth Y; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Thomas, Gilles; Simard, Jacques; Couch, Fergus J; Offit, Kenneth; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Phelan, Catherine M; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Cox, David G

    2015-04-25

    Individuals carrying pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have a high lifetime risk of breast cancer. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in DNA double-strand break repair, DNA alterations that can be caused by exposure to reactive oxygen species, a main source of which are mitochondria. Mitochondrial genome variations affect electron transport chain efficiency and reactive oxygen species production. Individuals with different mitochondrial haplogroups differ in their metabolism and sensitivity to oxidative stress. Variability in mitochondrial genetic background can alter reactive oxygen species production, leading to cancer risk. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that mitochondrial haplogroups modify breast cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. We genotyped 22,214 (11,421 affected, 10,793 unaffected) mutation carriers belonging to the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 for 129 mitochondrial polymorphisms using the iCOGS array. Haplogroup inference and association detection were performed using a phylogenetic approach. ALTree was applied to explore the reference mitochondrial evolutionary tree and detect subclades enriched in affected or unaffected individuals. We discovered that subclade T1a1 was depleted in affected BRCA2 mutation carriers compared with the rest of clade T (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.55; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.34 to 0.88; P = 0.01). Compared with the most frequent haplogroup in the general population (that is, H and T clades), the T1a1 haplogroup has a HR of 0.62 (95% CI, 0.40 to 0.95; P = 0.03). We also identified three potential susceptibility loci, including G13708A/rs28359178, which has demonstrated an inverse association with familial breast cancer risk. This study illustrates how original approaches such as the phylogeny-based method we used can empower classical molecular epidemiological studies aimed at identifying association or risk modification effects.

  5. Carrier frequency of GJB2 gene mutations c.35delG, c.235delC and c.167delT among the populations of Eurasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhemileva, Lilya U; Barashkov, Nikolay A; Posukh, Olga L; Khusainova, Rita I; Akhmetova, Vita L; Kutuev, Ildus A; Gilyazova, Irina R; Tadinova, Vera N; Fedorova, Sardana A; Khidiyatova, Irina M; Lobov, Simeon L; Khusnutdinova, Elza K

    2010-11-01

    Hearing impairment is one of the most common disorders of sensorineural function and the incidence of profound prelingual deafness is about 1 per 1000 at birth. GJB2 gene mutations make the largest contribution to hereditary hearing impairment. The spectrum and prevalence of some GJB2 mutations are known to be dependent on the ethnic origin of the population. This study presents data on the carrier frequencies of major GJB2 mutations, c.35delG, c.167delT and c.235delC, among 2308 healthy persons from 18 various populations of Eurasia: Russians, Bashkirs, Tatars, Chuvashes, Udmurts, Komi-Permyaks and Mordvins (Volga-Ural region of Russia); Belarusians and Ukrainians (East Europe); Abkhazians, Avars, Cherkessians and Ingushes (Caucasus); Kazakhs, Uighurs and Uzbeks (Central Asia); and Yakuts and Altaians (Siberia). The data on c.35delG and c.235delC mutation prevalence in the studied ethnic groups can be used to investigate the prospective founder effect in the origin and prevalence of these mutations in Eurasia and consequently in populations around the world.

  6. Brain calcification process and phenotypes according to age and sex: Lessons from SLC20A2, PDGFB, and PDGFRB mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Gaël; Charbonnier, Camille; de Lemos, Roberta Rodrigues; Richard, Anne-Claire; Guillin, Olivier; Wallon, David; Legati, Andrea; Geschwind, Daniel; Coppola, Giovanni; Frebourg, Thierry; Campion, Dominique; de Oliveira, João Ricardo Mendes; Hannequin, Didier

    2015-10-01

    Primary Familial Brain Calcification (PFBC) is a dominantly inherited cerebral microvascular calcifying disorder with diverse neuropsychiatric expression. Three causative genes have been identified: SLC20A2, PDGFRB and, recently, PDGFB, whose associated phenotype has not yet been extensively studied. We included in the largest published case series of genetically confirmed PFBC, 19 PDGFB (including three new mutations), 24 SLC20A2 (including 4 new mutations), and 14 PDGFRB mutation carriers, from two countries (France and Brazil). We studied clinical features and applied our visual rating scale on all 49 available CT scans. Among the symptomatic mutation carriers (33/57, 58%), the three most frequently observed categories of clinical features were psychiatric signs (72.7%, 76.5%, and 80% for PDGFB, SLC20A2, and PDGFRB, respectively), movement disorders (45.5%, 76.5%, and 40%), and cognitive impairment (54.6%, 64.7%, and 40%). The median age of clinical onset was 31 years, 25% had an early onset (before 18) and 25% a later onset (after 53). Patients with an early clinical onset exhibited mostly isolated psychiatric or cognitive signs, while patients with a later onset exhibited mostly movement disorders, especially in association with other clinical features. CT scans rating allowed identifying four patterns of calcification. The total calcification score was best predicted by the combined effects of gene (SLC20A2 > PDGFB > PDGFRB mutations), sex (male), and (increasing) age, defining three risk classes, which correlated with the four patterns of calcification. These calcification patterns could reflect the natural history of the calcifying process, with distinct risk classes characterized by different age at onset or rate of progression. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Two Thai families with Norrie disease (ND): association of two novel missense mutations with severe ND phenotype, seizures, and a manifesting carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, K; Limprasert, P; Ratanasukon, M; Tengtrisorn, S; Yingchareonpukdee, J; Vasiknanonte, P; Kitaoka, T; Ghadami, M; Niikawa, N; Kishino, T

    2001-04-15

    We describe two Thai families with Norrie disease (ND) in three generations, including 10 affected males and one manifesting female. All affected males in each family had severely defective eye development with complete loss of vision. In addition, three male patients (one from family 1 and two from family 2) suffered from epilepsy, and one female carrier from one family manifested blindness with phthisis bulbi in her right eye. Mutation analysis of the ND gene (NDP) revealed two different novel missense mutations (L16P and S75P) that co-segregated with ND in each family, suggesting that the newly appearing proline at codon 16 or codon 75 alters the conformation of the ND protein and contributes to the severe phenotype of ND in each family. Other studies suggest that epileptic seizures or growth retardation that is associated with ND is the consequence of loss of contiguous genes, because most such patients had deletions extending beyond the Norrie locus. Our finding that the three affected males in the two families with the missense mutations had epilepsy does not support a contiguous gene effect, but favors the pleiotropism of NDP, at least as far as the epileptic manifestation is concerned. The unilateral blindness in the female carrier may have been due to non-random X-inactivation. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Fragile X Premutation Carrier Epidemiology and Symptomatology in Israel-Results from a Tertiary Child Developmental Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabis, Lidia V; Gruber, Noah; Berkenstadt, Michal; Shefer, Shahar; Attia, Odelia Leon; Mula, Dana; Cohen, Yoram; Elizur, Shai E

    2016-10-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most prevalent known genetically inherited cause for autism and intellectual disability. Premutation state can cause several clinical disorders as well. We aimed to perform a nesting approach to acquire data with regard to first degree relatives of index fragile X cases at the largest child development center in Israel in order to map characteristics of Israeli FXS permutation women carriers. Seventy-nine women were referred due to a related fragile X syndrome patient, mainly an offspring or sibling. General information regarding demographics, ethnicity, and associated medical conditions were collected using interviews and structured questionnaires. Thirteen (17 %) of the women who were referred as "carrier" were proven to be actually full mutation. The mean years of education were 14 (±1.51, range 12-17). Twenty-one women (27 %) originated from Tunisia (mainly from the island of Djerba). Ten women (13 %) reported delivery of their affected offspring beyond 41 gestational weeks. Twenty-two percent of women with premutation reported symptoms consistent with learning difficulties, mainly dyscalculia, and 14 % reported ADHD symptoms. Awareness about clinical disorders of the carriers was existent only in 25 % of the patients. Increased awareness and knowledge dissemination concerning premutation symptomatology and associated medical conditions are warranted. We suggest a national registry to be installed in different countries in order to identify fragile X premutation carriers at increased risk for various medical complications.

  9. BRCA mutation carrier detection. A model-based cost-effectiveness analysis comparing the traditional family history approach and the testing of all patients with breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norum, Jan; Grindedal, Eli Marie; Heramb, Cecilie; Karsrud, Inga; Ariansen, Sarah Louise; Undlien, Dag Erik; Schlichting, Ellen; Mæhle, Lovise

    2018-01-01

    Background Identification of BRCA mutation carriers among patients with breast cancer (BC) involves costs and gains. Testing has been performed according to international guidelines, focusing on family history (FH) of breast and/or ovarian cancer. An alternative is testing all patients with BC employing sequencing of the BRCA genes and Multiplex Ligation Probe Amplification (MLPA). Patients and methods A model-based cost-effectiveness analysis, employing data from Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål (OUH-U) and a decision tree, was done. The societal and the healthcare perspectives were focused and a lifetime perspective employed. The comparators were the traditional FH approach used as standard of care at OUH-U in 2013 and the intervention (testing all patients with BC) performed in 2014 and 2015 at the same hospital. During the latter period, 535 patients with BC were offered BRCA testing with sequencing and MLPA. National 2014 data on mortality rates and costs were implemented, a 3% discount rate used and the costing year was 2015. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated in euros (€) per life-year gained (LYG). Results The net healthcare cost (healthcare perspective) was €40 503/LYG. Including all resource use (societal perspective), the cost was €5669/LYG. The univariate sensitivity analysis documented the unit cost of the BRCA test and the number of LYGs the prominent parameters affecting the result. Diagnostic BRCA testing of all patients with BC was superior to the FH approach and cost-effective within the frequently used thresholds (healthcare perspective) in Norway (€60 000–€80 000/LYG). PMID:29682331

  10. Psychological well-being and family satisfaction levels five years after being confirmed as a carrier of the Machado-Joseph disease mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Carlos; Gomes, Elisabete; Kazachkova, Nadiya; Bettencourt, Conceição; Raposo, Mafalda; Kay, Teresa Taylor; MacLeod, Patrick; Vasconcelos, João; Lima, Manuela

    2012-12-01

    The present study on long-term outcome of presymptomatic testing for Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) aimed to evaluate the psychological well-being and the familial satisfaction of subjects that 5 years prior received an unfavorable result in the predictive testing (PT). The study included 47 testees of Azorean origin (23 from the island of Flores and 24 from S. Miguel) that completed the fourth evaluation session of the MJD protocol, and undertook a neurological examination at the moment of participation in the study. Nearly 50% of testees were symptomatic at the time of the study. Psychological well-being of the 47 participants was evaluated using the Psychological General Well-Being Index (PGWB). The family satisfaction scale by adjectives was applied to obtain information on family dynamics. The average PGWB score of the total participants was of 73.3, a value indicative of psychological well-being. Nearly half of the testees presented scores indicating psychological well-being, whereas scores indicating moderate (28.9%) or severe (23.7%) stress were found in the remaining. The average score in the PGWB scale was lower in symptomatic than in asymptomatic subjects; moreover, the distinct distribution of the well-being categories seen in the two groups shows an impact of the appearance of first symptoms on the psychological state. Motives for undertaking the test, provided 5 years prior, failed to show an impact in well-being. The average score for familial satisfaction was of 134, a value compatible with high familial satisfaction, which represented the most frequent category (59.6%). Results demonstrate that well-being and family satisfaction need to be monitored in confirmed carriers of the MJD mutation. The inclusion of acceptance studies, after PT, as well as the development of acceptance training actions, should be of major importance to anticipate the possibility of psychological damage.

  11. Carrier status for the common R501X and 2282del4 filaggrin mutations is not associated with hearing phenotypes in 5,377 children from the ALSPAC cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Rodriguez

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Filaggrin is a major protein in the epidermis. Several mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG have been associated with a number of conditions. Filaggrin is expressed in the tympanic membrane and could alter its mechanical properties, but the relationship between genetic variation in FLG and hearing has not yet been tested.We examined whether loss-of function mutations R501X and 2282del4 in the FLG gene affected hearing in children. Twenty eight hearing variables representing five different aspects of hearing at age nine years in 5,377 children from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC cohort were tested for association with these mutations. No evidence of association was found between R501X or 2282del4 (or overall FLG mutation carrier status and any of the hearing phenotypes analysed.In conclusion, carrier status for common filaggrin mutations does not affect hearing in children.

  12. Genome-wide association study in BRCA1 mutation carriers identifies novel loci associated with breast and ovarian cancer risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fergus J Couch

    Full Text Available BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer, with a further replication in an additional sample of 2,646 BRCA1 carriers. We identified a novel breast cancer risk modifier locus at 1q32 for BRCA1 carriers (rs2290854, P = 2.7 × 10(-8, HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.09-1.20. In addition, we identified two novel ovarian cancer risk modifier loci: 17q21.31 (rs17631303, P = 1.4 × 10(-8, HR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.17-1.38 and 4q32.3 (rs4691139, P = 3.4 × 10(-8, HR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.17-1.38. The 4q32.3 locus was not associated with ovarian cancer risk in the general population or BRCA2 carriers, suggesting a BRCA1-specific association. The 17q21.31 locus was also associated with ovarian cancer risk in 8,211 BRCA2 carriers (P = 2×10(-4. These loci may lead to an improved understanding of the etiology of breast and ovarian tumors in BRCA1 carriers. Based on the joint distribution of the known BRCA1 breast cancer risk-modifying loci, we estimated that the breast cancer lifetime risks for the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk are 28%-50% compared to 81%-100% for the 5% at highest risk. Similarly, based on the known ovarian cancer risk-modifying loci, the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk have an estimated lifetime risk of developing ovarian cancer of 28% or lower, whereas the 5% at highest risk will have a risk of 63% or higher. Such differences in risk may have important implications for risk prediction and clinical management for BRCA1 carriers.

  13. Genome-Wide Association Study in BRCA1 Mutation Carriers Identifies Novel Loci Associated with Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianshu; McGuffog, Lesley; Lee, Andrew; Olswold, Curtis; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Fredericksen, Zachary; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dennis, Joe; Gaudet, Mia M.; Dicks, Ed; Kosel, Matthew; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Lee, Adam; Bacot, François; Vincent, Daniel; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Jakubowska, Anna; Investigators, kConFab; Radice, Paolo; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Domchek, Susan M.; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F.; Friedman, Eitan; Thomassen, Mads; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Blanco, Ignacio; Greene, Mark H.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Garber, Judy; Phelan, Catherine M.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Montagna, Marco; Olah, Edith; Andrulis, Irene L.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Goldgar, David E.; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Osorio, Ana; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary B.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Hamann, Ute; Ramus, Susan J.; Ewart Toland, Amanda; Caligo, Maria A.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Tung, Nadine; Claes, Kathleen; Beattie, Mary S.; Southey, Melissa C.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Tischkowitz, Marc; Janavicius, Ramunas; John, Esther M.; Kwong, Ava; Diez, Orland; Balmaña, Judith; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Arun, Banu K.; Rennert, Gad; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Campbell, Ian; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Gille, Johannes J. P.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Blok, Marinus J.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Devilee, Peter; Verhoef, Senno; van Os, Theo A. M.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve; Fineberg, Elena; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Adlard, Julian; Eccles, Diana M.; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Side, Lucy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Houghton, Catherine; Rogers, Mark T.; Dorkins, Huw; Eason, Jacqueline; Gregory, Helen; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Calender, Alain; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Delnatte, Capucine; Nogues, Catherine; Lasset, Christine; Houdayer, Claude; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Prieur, Fabienne; Damiola, Francesca; Sobol, Hagay; Coupier, Isabelle; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Castera, Laurent; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Léoné, Mélanie; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Złowocka-Perłowska, Elżbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Viel, Alessandra; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Melloni, Giulia; Ottini, Laura; Papi, Laura; Varesco, Liliana; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Peterlongo, Paolo; Volorio, Sara; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Arnold, Norbert; Engel, Christoph; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Gehrig, Andrea; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Meindl, Alfons; Niederacher, Dieter; Ditsch, Nina; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Engert, Stefanie; Sutter, Christian; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weber, Bernhard H. F.; Arver, Brita; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Blank, Stephanie V.; Cohn, David E.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Small, Laurie; Friedlander, Michael; Bae-Jump, Victoria L.; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Rappaport, Christine; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Lindor, Noralane M.; Kaufman, Bella; Shimon Paluch, Shani; Laitman, Yael; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Moeller, Sanne Traasdahl; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Vijai, Joseph; Sarrel, Kara; Robson, Mark; Kauff, Noah; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C.; Jønson, Lars; Andersen, Mette K.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Steele, Linda; Foretova, Lenka; Teulé, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Mai, Phuong L.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Narod, Steven A.; Herzog, Josef; Sand, Sharon R.; Tognazzo, Silvia; Agata, Simona; Vaszko, Tibor; Weaver, Joellen; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V.; Buys, Saundra S.; Romero, Atocha; de la Hoya, Miguel; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Muranen, Taru A.; Duran, Mercedes; Chung, Wendy K.; Lasa, Adriana; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; Miron, Alexander; Benitez, Javier; Senter, Leigha; Huo, Dezheng; Chan, Salina B.; Sokolenko, Anna P.; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Tihomirova, Laima; Friebel, Tara M.; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Lu, Karen H.; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; James, Paul A.; Hall, Per; Dunning, Alison M.; Tessier, Daniel; Cunningham, Julie; Slager, Susan L.; Wang, Chen; Hart, Steven; Stevens, Kristen; Simard, Jacques; Pastinen, Tomi; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Offit, Kenneth; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2013-01-01

    BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer), with a further replication in an additional sample of 2,646 BRCA1 carriers. We identified a novel breast cancer risk modifier locus at 1q32 for BRCA1 carriers (rs2290854, P = 2.7×10−8, HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.09–1.20). In addition, we identified two novel ovarian cancer risk modifier loci: 17q21.31 (rs17631303, P = 1.4×10−8, HR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.17–1.38) and 4q32.3 (rs4691139, P = 3.4×10−8, HR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.17–1.38). The 4q32.3 locus was not associated with ovarian cancer risk in the general population or BRCA2 carriers, suggesting a BRCA1-specific association. The 17q21.31 locus was also associated with ovarian cancer risk in 8,211 BRCA2 carriers (P = 2×10−4). These loci may lead to an improved understanding of the etiology of breast and ovarian tumors in BRCA1 carriers. Based on the joint distribution of the known BRCA1 breast cancer risk-modifying loci, we estimated that the breast cancer lifetime risks for the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk are 28%–50% compared to 81%–100% for the 5% at highest risk. Similarly, based on the known ovarian cancer risk-modifying loci, the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk have an estimated lifetime risk of developing ovarian cancer of 28% or lower, whereas the 5% at highest risk will have a risk of 63% or higher. Such differences in risk may have important implications for risk prediction and clinical management for BRCA1 carriers. PMID:23544013

  14. A voxel-based morphometry and diffusion tensor imaging analysis of asymptomatic Parkinson's disease-related G2019S LRRK2 mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Avner; Artzi, Moran; Mirelman, Anat; Jacob, Yael; Helmich, Rick C; van Nuenen, Bart F L; Gurevich, Tanya; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Marder, Karen; Bressman, Susan; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Hendler, Talma; Giladi, Nir; Ben Bashat, Dafna

    2014-05-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease have reduced gray matter volume and fractional anisotropy in both cortical and sub-cortical structures, yet changes in the pre-motor phase of the disease are unknown. A comprehensive imaging study using voxel-based morphometry and diffusion tensor imaging tract-based spatial statistics analysis was performed on 64 Ashkenazi Jewish asymptomatic first degree relatives of patients with Parkinson's disease (30 mutation carriers), who carry the G2019S mutation in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene. No between-group differences in gray matter volume could be noted in either whole-brain or volume-of-interest analysis. Diffusion tensor imaging analysis did not identify group differences in white matter areas, and volume-of-interest analysis identified no differences in diffusivity parameters in Parkinson's disease-related structures. G2019S carriers do not manifest changes in gray matter volume or diffusivity parameters in Parkinson's disease-related structures prior to the appearance of motor symptoms. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  15. BRCA mutation carrier detection. A model-based cost-effectiveness analysis comparing the traditional family history approach and the testing of all patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norum, Jan; Grindedal, Eli Marie; Heramb, Cecilie; Karsrud, Inga; Ariansen, Sarah Louise; Undlien, Dag Erik; Schlichting, Ellen; Mæhle, Lovise

    2018-01-01

    Identification of BRCA mutation carriers among patients with breast cancer (BC) involves costs and gains. Testing has been performed according to international guidelines, focusing on family history (FH) of breast and/or ovarian cancer. An alternative is testing all patients with BC employing sequencing of the BRCA genes and Multiplex Ligation Probe Amplification (MLPA). A model-based cost-effectiveness analysis, employing data from Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål (OUH-U) and a decision tree, was done. The societal and the healthcare perspectives were focused and a lifetime perspective employed. The comparators were the traditional FH approach used as standard of care at OUH-U in 2013 and the intervention (testing all patients with BC) performed in 2014 and 2015 at the same hospital. During the latter period, 535 patients with BC were offered BRCA testing with sequencing and MLPA. National 2014 data on mortality rates and costs were implemented, a 3% discount rate used and the costing year was 2015. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated in euros (€) per life-year gained (LYG). The net healthcare cost (healthcare perspective) was €40 503/LYG. Including all resource use (societal perspective), the cost was €5669/LYG. The univariate sensitivity analysis documented the unit cost of the BRCA test and the number of LYGs the prominent parameters affecting the result.Diagnostic BRCA testing of all patients with BC was superior to the FH approach and cost-effective within the frequently used thresholds (healthcare perspective) in Norway (€60 000-€80 000/LYG).

  16. The Alzheimer's prevention initiative composite cognitive test score: sample size estimates for the evaluation of preclinical Alzheimer's disease treatments in presenilin 1 E280A mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayutyanont, Napatkamon; Langbaum, Jessica B S; Hendrix, Suzanne B; Chen, Kewei; Fleisher, Adam S; Friesenhahn, Michel; Ward, Michael; Aguirre, Camilo; Acosta-Baena, Natalia; Madrigal, Lucìa; Muñoz, Claudia; Tirado, Victoria; Moreno, Sonia; Tariot, Pierre N; Lopera, Francisco; Reiman, Eric M

    2014-06-01

    To identify a cognitive composite that is sensitive to tracking preclinical Alzheimer's disease decline to be used as a primary end point in treatment trials. We capitalized on longitudinal data collected from 1995 to 2010 from cognitively unimpaired presenilin 1 (PSEN1) E280A mutation carriers from the world's largest known early-onset autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease kindred to identify a composite cognitive test with the greatest statistical power to track preclinical Alzheimer's disease decline and estimate the number of carriers age 30 years and older needed to detect a treatment effect in the Alzheimer's Prevention Initiative's (API) preclinical Alzheimer's disease treatment trial. The mean-to-standard-deviation ratios (MSDRs) of change over time were calculated in a search for the optimal combination of 1 to 7 cognitive tests/subtests drawn from the neuropsychological test battery in cognitively unimpaired mutation carriers during a 2- and 5-year follow-up period (n = 78 and 57), using data from noncarriers (n = 31 and 56) during the same time period to correct for aging and practice effects. Combinations that performed well were then evaluated for robustness across follow-up years, occurrence of selected items within top-performing combinations, and representation of relevant cognitive domains. The optimal test combination included Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD) Word List Recall, CERAD Boston Naming Test (high frequency items), Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) Orientation to Time, CERAD Constructional Praxis, and Raven's Progressive Matrices (Set A), with an MSDR of 1.62. This composite is more sensitive than using either the CERAD Word List Recall (MSDR = 0.38) or the entire CERAD-Col battery (MSDR = 0.76). A sample size of 75 cognitively normal PSEN1 E280A mutation carriers aged 30 years and older per treatment arm allows for a detectable treatment effect of 29% in a 60-month trial (80% power, P = .05). We

  17. Identification of citrullinaemia carrier and detection of a new silent mutation at 240bp position in ASS1 gene of normal Holstein cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotikalapudi Rosaiah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The autosomal recessive genetic disorders are regularly investigated especially in Indian Holstein and Holstein Crossbred bulls before they entered in semen collection so that a defective gene should not be transmitted to future generations. Bovine citrullinaemia first reported in Australia is a metabolic disorder as one of the enzymes, Argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS involved in urea cycle is impaired in function. The mutation responsible for citrullinemia has been characterized as a single-base substitution at 256bp (C>T in coding exon 3 of argininosuccinate synthetase 1 (ASS1 gene, which converts the CGA (arginine at 86 codon to TGA (stop codon. A Holstein bull during routine molecular screening was found to be carrier for Citrullinaemia that was confirmed by sequencing. This is a fresh case of Citrullinaemia carrier in addition to three cases reported earlier in India. Partial sequencing of coding exon 3 of a normal Holstein revealed a new silent polymorphism at 240bp position that does not change amino acid (Sarine AGC>AGT at 80 codon within exon 3 of ASS1 gene. The sequence of exon 3 of ASS1 gene in a normal Holstein exhibiting a new polymorphism was submitted to NCBI with accession No. KF933365. The presence of citrullinaemia carriers in Indian Holstein, though in very low frequency, emphasizing to continue the investigation of mutant gene in cattle population.

  18. Improvement results of rice (Oryza glaberima) by induced mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cisse, F.

    1994-01-01

    In Mali, rice (Orzya glaberima) is still largely cultivated under conditions of natural semi-controlled submersion. To improve productivity the local varieties have been gradually replaced by new varieties, but the yields of these became lower because of the irregularity of the rain and the comparative weakness of the strain. For this reason a programme to improve the local varieties by means of gamma radiation has been undertaken. This document presents the results obtained to date

  19. Genome-Wide Association Study in BRCA1 Mutation Carriers Identifies Novel Loci Associated with Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J. Couch (Fergus); X. Wang (Xing); L. McGuffog (Lesley); A. Lee (Andrew); C. Olswold (Curtis); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); P. Soucy (Penny); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); J. Dennis (Joe); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); E. Dicks (Ed); M. Kosel (Matthew); S. Healey (Sue); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); F. Bacot (Francois); D. Vincent (Daniel); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); S. Peock (Susan); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); A. Jakubowska (Anna); P. Radice (Paolo); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); S.M. Domchek (Susan); M. Piedmonte (Marion); C.F. Singer (Christian); E. Friedman (Eitan); M. Thomassen (Mads); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); C. Szabo (Csilla); I. Blanco (Ignacio); M.H. Greene (Mark); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); J. Garber; C. Phelan (Catherine); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); M. Montagna (Marco); E. Olah; I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); D. Goldgar (David); T. Caldes (Trinidad); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); A. Osorio (Ana); M.-B. Terry (Mary-Beth); M.B. Daly (Mary); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); U. Hamann (Ute); S.J. Ramus (Susan); A. Ewart-Toland (Amanda); M.A. Caligo (Maria); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); N. Tung (Nadine); K. Claes (Kathleen); M.S. Beattie (Mary); M.C. Southey (Melissa); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); E.M. John (Esther); A. Kwong (Ava); O. Diez (Orland); J. Balmana (Judith); R.B. Barkardottir (Rosa); B.K. Arun (Banu); G. Rennert (Gad); S.-H. Teo (Soo-Hwang); P.A. Ganz (Patricia); I. Campbell (Ian); A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); C.H.M. van Deurzen (Carolien); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); F.E. van Leeuwen (F.); H. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); J.J. Gille (Johan); M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); M.J. Blok (Marinus); M.J. Ligtenberg (Marjolijn); M.A. Rookus (Matti); P. Devilee (Peter); S. Verhoef; T.A.M. van Os (Theo); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); D. Frost (Debra); S. Ellis (Steve); E. Fineberg (Elena); R. Platte (Radka); D.G. Evans (Gareth); L. Izatt (Louise); R. Eeles (Rosalind); J.W. Adlard (Julian); D. Eccles (Diana); J. Cook (Jackie); C. Brewer (C.); F. Douglas (Fiona); S.V. Hodgson (Shirley); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); L. Side (Lucy); A. Donaldson (Alan); C. Houghton (Catherine); M.T. Rogers (Mark); H. Dorkins (Huw); J. Eason (Jacqueline); H. Gregory (Helen); E. McCann (Emma); A. Murray (Alexandra); A. Calender (Alain); A. Hardouin (Agnès); P. Berthet (Pascaline); C.D. Delnatte (Capucine); C. Nogues (Catherine); C. Lasset (Christine); C. Houdayer (Claude); D. Leroux (Dominique); E. Rouleau (Etienne); F. Prieur (Fabienne); F. Damiola (Francesca); H. Sobol (Hagay); I. Coupier (Isabelle); L. Vénat-Bouvet (Laurence); L. Castera (Laurent); M. Gauthier-Villars (Marion); M. Léone (Mélanie); P. Pujol (Pascal); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); Y.-J. Bignon (Yves-Jean); E. Złowocka-Perłowska (Elzbieta); J. Gronwald (Jacek); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Durda (Katarzyna); K. Jaworska (Katarzyna); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); A. Viel (Alessandra); B. Peissel (Bernard); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); G. Melloni (Giulia); L. Ottini (Laura); L. Papi (Laura); L. Varesco (Liliana); M.G. Tibiletti (Maria Grazia); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Volorio (Sara); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); V. Pensotti (Valeria); N. Arnold (Norbert); C. Engel (Christoph); H. Deissler (Helmut); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); K. Kast (Karin); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); A. Meindl (Alfons); D. Niederacher (Dieter); N. Ditsch (Nina); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); S. Preisler-Adams (Sabine); S. Engert (Stefanie); C. Sutter (Christian); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); B.H.F. Weber (Bernhard); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); M. Stenmark-Askmalm (M.); N. Loman (Niklas); R. Rosenquist (R.); Z. Einbeigi (Zakaria); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); S.V. Blank (Stephanie); D.E. Cohn (David); G.C. Rodriguez (Gustavo); L. Small (Laurie); M. Friedlander (Michael); V.L. Bae-Jump (Victoria L.); A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); C. Rappaport (Christine); D. Gschwantler-Kaulich (Daphne); G. Pfeiler (Georg); M.-K. Tea; N.M. Lindor (Noralane); B. Kaufman (Bella); S. Shimon Paluch (Shani); Y. Laitman (Yael); A.-B. Skytte (Anne-Bine); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); S.T. Moeller (Sanne Traasdahl); T.A. Kruse (Torben); U.B. Jensen; J. Vijai (Joseph); K. Sarrel (Kara); M. Robson (Mark); N. Kauff (Noah); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); G. Glendon (Gord); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); F.C. Nielsen (Finn); L. Jønson (Lars); M.K. Andersen (Mette); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); L. Steele (Linda); L. Foretova (Lenka); A. Teulé (A.); C. Lazaro (Conxi); J. Brunet (Joan); M.A. Pujana (Miguel); P.L. Mai (Phuong); J.T. Loud (Jennifer); C.S. Walsh (Christine); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); S. Orsulic (Sandra); S. Narod (Steven); J. Herzog (Josef); S.R. Sand (Sharon); S. Tognazzo (Silvia); S. Agata (Simona); T. Vaszko (Tibor); J. Weaver (JoEllen); A. Stavropoulou (Alexandra); S.S. Buys (Saundra); A. Romero (Alfonso); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); T.A. Muranen (Taru); M. Durán (Mercedes); W.K. Chung (Wendy); A. Lasa (Adriana); C.M. Dorfling (Cecelia); A. Miron (Alexander); J. Benítez (Javier); L. Senter (Leigha); D. Huo (Dezheng); S. Chan (Salina); A. Sokolenko (Anna); J. Chiquette (Jocelyne); L. Tihomirova (Laima); M.O.W. Friebel (Mark ); B.A. Agnarsson (Bjarni); K.H. Lu (Karen); F. Lejbkowicz (Flavio); P.A. James (Paul ); A.S. Hall (Alistair); A.M. Dunning (Alison); Y. Tessier (Yann); J. Cunningham (Jane); S. Slager (Susan); C. Wang (Chen); S. Hart (Stewart); K. Stevens (Kristen); J. Simard (Jacques); T. Pastinen (Tomi); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); K. Offit (Kenneth); D.F. Easton (Douglas); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); H. Thorne (Heather); E. Niedermayr (Eveline); Å. Borg (Åke); H. Olsson; H. Jernström (H.); K. Henriksson (Karin); K. Harbst (Katja); M. Soller (Maria); U. Kristoffersson (Ulf); A. Öfverholm (Anna); M. Nordling (Margareta); P. Karlsson (Per); A. von Wachenfeldt (Anna); A. Liljegren (Annelie); A. Lindblom (Annika); G.B. Bustinza; J. Rantala (Johanna); B. Melin (Beatrice); C.E. Ardnor (Christina Edwinsdotter); M. Emanuelsson (Monica); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); M.H. Pigg (Maritta ); S. Liedgren (Sigrun); M.A. Rookus (M.); S. Verhoef (S.); F.E. van Leeuwen (F.); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); J.L. de Lange (J.); J.M. Collée (Margriet); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); P. Devilee (Peter); T.C.T.E.F. van Cronenburg; C.M. Kets; A.R. Mensenkamp (Arjen); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); C.M. Aalfs (Cora); T.A.M. van Os (Theo); Q. Waisfisz (Quinten); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); E.B. Gomez Garcia (Encarna); J.C. Oosterwijk (Jan); M.J. Mourits (Marjan); G.H. de Bock (Geertruida); S.D. Ellis (Steve); E. Fineberg (Elena); Z. Miedzybrodzka (Zosia); L. Jeffers (Lisa); T.J. Cole (Trevor); K.-R. Ong (Kai-Ren); J. Hoffman (Jonathan); M. James (Margaret); J. Paterson (Joan); A. Taylor (Amy); A. Murray (Anna); M.J. Kennedy (John); D.E. Barton (David); M.E. Porteous (Mary); S. Drummond (Sarah); C. Brewer (Carole); E. Kivuva (Emma); A. Searle (Anne); S. Goodman (Selina); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); V. Murday (Victoria); N. Bradshaw (Nicola); L. Snadden (Lesley); M. Longmuir (Mark); C. Watt (Catherine); S. Gibson (Sarah); E. Haque (Eshika); E. Tobias (Ed); A. Duncan (Alexis); L. Izatt (Louise); C. Jacobs (Chris); C. Langman (Caroline); A.F. Brady (Angela); S.A. Melville (Scott); K. Randhawa (Kashmir); J. Barwell (Julian); G. Serra-Feliu (Gemma); I.O. Ellis (Ian); F. Lalloo (Fiona); J. Taylor (James); A. Male (Alison); C. Berlin (Cheryl); R. Collier (Rebecca); F. Douglas (Fiona); O. Claber (Oonagh); I. Jobson (Irene); L.J. Walker (Lisa); D. McLeod (Diane); D. Halliday (Dorothy); S. Durell (Sarah); B. Stayner (Barbara); S. Shanley (Susan); N. Rahman (Nazneen); R. Houlston (Richard); A. Stormorken (Astrid); E.K. Bancroft (Elizabeth); E. Page (Elizabeth); A. Ardern-Jones (Audrey); K. Kohut (Kelly); J. Wiggins (Jennifer); E. Castro (Elena); S.R. Killick; S. Martin (Sue); D. Rea (Dan); A. Kulkarni (Anjana); O. Quarrell (Oliver); C. Bardsley (Cathryn); S. Goff (Sheila); G. Brice (Glen); L. Winchester (Lizzie); C. Eddy (Charlotte); V. Tripathi (Vishakha); V. Attard (Virginia); A. Lehmann (Anna); A. Lucassen (Anneke); G. Crawford (Gabe); D. McBride (Donna); S. Smalley (Sarah); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); F. Damiola (Francesca); L. Barjhoux (Laure); C. Verny-Pierre (Carole); S. Giraud (Sophie); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); B. Buecher (Bruno); V. Moncoutier (Virginie); M. Belotti (Muriel); C. Tirapo (Carole); A. de Pauw (Antoine); B. Bressac-de Paillerets (Brigitte); O. Caron (Olivier); Y.-J. Bignon (Yves-Jean); N. Uhrhammer (Nancy); V. Bonadona (Valérie); S. Handallou (Sandrine); A. hardouin (Agnès); H. Sobol (Hagay); V. Bourdon (Violaine); T. Noguchi (Tetsuro); A. Remenieras (Audrey); F. Eisinger (François); J.-P. Peyrat; J. Fournier (Joëlle); F. Révillion (Françoise); P. Vennin (Philippe); C. Adenis (Claude); R. Lidereau (Rosette); L. Demange (Liliane); D.W. Muller (Danièle); J.P. Fricker (Jean Pierre); E. Barouk-Simonet (Emmanuelle); F. Bonnet (Françoise); V. Bubien (Virginie); N. Sevenet (Nicolas); M. Longy (Michel); C. Toulas (Christine); R. Guimbaud (Rosine); L. Gladieff (Laurence); V. Feillel (Viviane); H. Dreyfus (Hélène); C. Rebischung (Christine); M. Peysselon (Magalie); F. Coron (Fanny); L. Faivre (Laurence); M. Lebrun (Marine); C. Kientz (Caroline); S.F. Ferrer; M. Frenay (Marc); I. Mortemousque (Isabelle); F. Coulet (Florence); C. Colas (Chrystelle); F. Soubrier; J. Sokolowska (Johanna); M. Bronner (Myriam); H. Lynch (Henry); C.L. Snyder (Carrie); M. Angelakos (Maggie); J. Maskiell (Judi); G.S. Dite (Gillian)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer),

  20. Genome-wide association study in BRCA1 mutation carriers identifies novel loci associated with breast and ovarian cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; McGuffog, Lesley; Lee, Andrew; Olswold, Curtis; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Fredericksen, Zachary; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dennis, Joe; Gaudet, Mia M.; Dicks, Ed; Kosel, Matthew; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Lee, Adam; Bacot, François; Vincent, Daniel; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Jakubowska, Anna; Radice, Paolo; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Domchek, Susan M.; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F.; Friedman, Eitan; Thomassen, Mads; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Blanco, Ignacio; Greene, Mark H.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Garber, Judy; Phelan, Catherine M.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Montagna, Marco; Olah, Edith; Andrulis, Irene L.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Goldgar, David E.; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Osorio, Ana; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary B.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Hamann, Ute; Ramus, Susan J.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Caligo, Maria A.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Tung, Nadine; Claes, Kathleen; Beattie, Mary S.; Southey, Melissa C.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Tischkowitz, Marc; Janavicius, Ramunas; John, Esther M.; Kwong, Ava; Diez, Orland; Balmaña, Judith; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Arun, Banu K.; Rennert, Gad; teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Campbell, Ian; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Gille, Johannes J. P.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Blok, Marinus J.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Devilee, Peter; Verhoef, Senno; van Os, Theo A. M.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve; Fineberg, Elena; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Adlard, Julian; Eccles, Diana M.; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Side, Lucy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Houghton, Catherine; Rogers, Mark T.; Dorkins, Huw; Eason, Jacqueline; Gregory, Helen; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Calender, Alain; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Delnatte, Capucine; Nogues, Catherine; Lasset, Christine; Houdayer, Claude; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Prieur, Fabienne; Damiola, Francesca; Sobol, Hagay; Coupier, Isabelle; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Castera, Laurent; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Léoné, Mélanie; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Złowocka-Perłowska, Elżbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Viel, Alessandra; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Melloni, Giulia; Ottini, Laura; Papi, Laura; Varesco, Liliana; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Peterlongo, Paolo; Volorio, Sara; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Arnold, Norbert; Engel, Christoph; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Gehrig, Andrea; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Meindl, Alfons; Niederacher, Dieter; Ditsch, Nina; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Engert, Stefanie; Sutter, Christian; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weber, Bernhard H. F.; Arver, Brita; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Blank, Stephanie V.; Cohn, David E.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Small, Laurie; Friedlander, Michael; Bae-Jump, Victoria L.; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Rappaport, Christine; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; tea, Muy-Kheng; Lindor, Noralane M.; Kaufman, Bella; Shimon Paluch, Shani; Laitman, Yael; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Moeller, Sanne Traasdahl; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Vijai, Joseph; Sarrel, Kara; Robson, Mark; Kauff, Noah; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C.; Jønson, Lars; Andersen, Mette K.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Steele, Linda; Foretova, Lenka; Teulé, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Mai, Phuong L.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Narod, Steven A.; Herzog, Josef; Sand, Sharon R.; Tognazzo, Silvia; Agata, Simona; Vaszko, Tibor; Weaver, Joellen; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V.; Buys, Saundra S.; Romero, Atocha; de la Hoya, Miguel; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Muranen, Taru A.; Duran, Mercedes; Chung, Wendy K.; Lasa, Adriana; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; Miron, Alexander; Benitez, Javier; Senter, Leigha; Huo, Dezheng; Chan, Salina B.; Sokolenko, Anna P.; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Tihomirova, Laima; Friebel, Tara M.; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Lu, Karen H.; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; James, Paul A.; Hall, Per; Dunning, Alison M.; Tessier, Daniel; Cunningham, Julie; Slager, Susan L.; Wang, Chen; Hart, Steven; Stevens, Kristen; Simard, Jacques; Pastinen, Tomi; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Offit, Kenneth; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2013-01-01

    BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer), with a

  1. Genome-wide association study in BRCA1 mutation carriers identifies novel loci associated with breast and ovarian cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couch, Fergus J; Wang, Xianshu; McGuffog, Lesley

    2013-01-01

    BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer), with a fur...

  2. Common breast cancer-predisposition alleles are associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Spurdle, Amanda B; Sinilnikova, Olga M

    2008-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 confer high risks of breast cancer. However, evidence suggests that these risks are modified by other genetic or environmental factors that cluster in families. A recent genome-wide association study has shown that common alleles at single nucleotide polymorp...

  3. Ovarian cancer susceptibility alleles and risk of ovarian cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, Susan J; Antoniou, Antonis C; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B

    2012-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancer. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified six alleles associated with risk of ovarian cancer for women in the general population. We evaluated four of these loci as potential modifiers ...

  4. Ovarian cancer susceptibility alleles and risk of ovarian cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramus, Susan J.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; McGuffog, Lesley; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Złowocka, Elżbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Duran, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; van Asperen, Christi J.; van Roozendaal, K. E. P.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Collée, J. Margriet; Kriege, Mieke; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Jacobs, Chris; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Paterson, Joan; Douglas, Fiona; Brewer, Carole; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Walker, Lisa; Porteous, Mary E.; Kennedy, M. John; Pathak, Harsh; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Léoné, Mélanie; Calender, Alain; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Faivre, Laurence; Loustalot, Catherine; Buys, Saundra; Daly, Mary; Miron, Alex; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K.; John, Esther M.; Southey, Melissa; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F.; tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas v O.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Johannsson, Oskar Th; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Gaudet, Mia M.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Piedmonte, Marion; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; van Le, Linda; Hoffman, James S.; Ewart Toland, Amanda; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Issacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Iganacio; Tornero, Eva; Navarro, Matilde; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Olah, Edith; Vaszko, Tibor; teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Beattie, Mary S.; Dorfling, Cecelia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Diez, Orland; Kwong, Ava; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Heidemann, Simone; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorotehea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Fiebig, Britta; Schäfer, Dieter; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Plante, Marie; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Wang, Xianshu; Lindor, Noralane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, V. Shane; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bernard, Loris; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Gayther, Simon A.; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Gregory, Helen; Morrison, Patrick; Jeffers, Lisa; Ong, Kai-Ren; Hoffman, Jonathan; Donaldson, Alan; James, Margaret; Downing, Sarah; Taylor, Amy; Murray, Alexandra; Rogers, Mark T.; McCann, Emma; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Drummond, Sarah; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Hill, Kathryn; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Gibson, Sarah; Haque, Eshika; Tobias, Ed; Duncan, Alexis; Izatt, Louise; Langman, Caroline; Whaite, Anna; Dorkins, Huw; Barwell, Julian; Serra-Feliu, Gemma; Ellis, Ian; Houghton, Catherine; Taylor, Jane; Side, Lucy; Male, Alison; Berlin, Cheryl; Eason, Jacqueline; Collier, Rebecca; Claber, Oonagh; Jobson, Irene; McLeod, Diane; Halliday, Dorothy; Durell, Sarah; Stayner, Barbara; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Kohut, Kelly; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Mitra, Anita; Robertson, Lisa; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eddy, Charlotte; Tripathi, Vishakha; Attard, Virginia; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; McBride, Donna; Smalley, Sarah; Sinilnikova, Olga; Barjhoux, Laure; Verny-Pierre, Carole; Giraud, Sophie; Léone, Mélanie; Buecher, Bruno; Houdayer, Claude; Moncoutier, Virginie; Belotti, Muriel; Tirapo, Carole; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Byrede, Véronique; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert; Urhammer, Nancy; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Eisinger, François; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Coupier, Isabelle; Pujol, Pascal; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révilliion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Rouleau, Etienne; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Barouk-Simonet, Emmanuelle; Bonnet, Françoise; Bubien, Virginie; Sevenet, Nicolas; Longy, Michel; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélène; Rebischung, Christine; Peysselon, Megalie; Coron, Fanny; Prieur, Fabienne; Lebrun, Marine; Kientz, Caroline; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Delnatte, Capucine; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Lynch, Henry T.; Snyder, Carrie L.; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; Verhoef, S.; Verheus, M.; van't Veer, L. J.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; Collée, M.; van den Ouweland, A. M. W.; Jager, A.; Hooning, M. J.; Tilanus-Linthorst, M. M. A.; Seynaeve, C.; van Asperen, C. J.; Wijnen, J. T.; Vreeswijk, M. P.; Tollenaar, R. A.; Devilee, P.; Ligtenberg, M. J.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Ausems, M. G.; van der Luijt, R. B.; van Os, T. A.; Gille, J. J. P.; Waisfisz, Q.; Gomez-Garcia, E. B.; van Roozendaal, C. E.; Blok, Marinus J.; Caanen, B.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; van der Hout, A. H.; Mourits, M. J.; Vasen, H. F.; Thorne, Heather; Niedermayr, Eveline; Gill, Mona; Collins, Lucine; Gokgoz, Nalan; Selander, Teresa; Weerasooriya, Nayana; Karlsson, Per; Nordlilng, Margareta; Bergman, Annika; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Liedgren, Sigrun; Borg, Åke; Loman, Niklas; Soller, Maria; Jernström, Helena; Harbst, Katja; Henriksson, Karin; Arver, Brita; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Grönberg, Henrik; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Emanuelsson, Monica; Ehrencrona, Hans; Rosenquist, Richard; Dahl, Niklas

    2012-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancer. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified six alleles associated with risk of ovarian cancer for women in the general population. We evaluated four of these loci as potential modifiers of

  5. Results after laparoscopic partial splenectomy for children with hereditary spherocytosis: Are outcomes influenced by genetic mutation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugi, Jakob; Carcao, Manuel; Drury, Luke J; Langer, Jacob C

    2018-05-01

    Laparoscopic partial splenectomy (LPS) theoretically maintains long-term splenic immune function for children with hereditary spherocytosis (HS). Our goal was to review our results after LPS and to determine if specific genetic mutations influence outcome. All children with HS undergoing LPS between 2005 and 2016 were reviewed. Thirty-one children underwent LPS (16 male) at a median age of 9 (range 2-18) years. All experienced an increase in hemoglobin and decrease in reticulocyte count early after LPS and at last follow-up. Twenty-two were sent for genetic analysis. Mutations in α-spectrin, β-spectrin, and Ankyrin were identified in 6, 5, and 11 patients, respectively. Gene mutation was not correlated with complications, perioperative transfusion, length of hospital stay, or median hemoglobin, platelet, or reticulocyte counts. Three children required completion splenectomy at 10.9, 6.9, and 3.2years post-LPS, each with a different gene mutation. LPS is effective in reversing anemia and reducing reticulocytosis. So far less than 10% have required completion splenectomy, and those children did benefit from delaying the risks of asplenia. In this preliminary analysis, genetic mutation did not influence outcome after LPS. A larger multicenter study is necessary to further investigate potential correlations with specific genetic mutations. Prognosis Study. IV. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Bias Correction Methods Explain Much of the Variation Seen in Breast Cancer Risks of BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Janet R; Hsu, Li; Brohet, Richard M; Mourits, Marian J E; de Vries, Jakob; Malone, Kathleen E; Oosterwijk, Jan C; de Bock, Geertruida H

    2015-08-10

    Recommendations for treating patients who carry a BRCA1/2 gene are mainly based on cumulative lifetime risks (CLTRs) of breast cancer determined from retrospective cohorts. These risks vary widely (27% to 88%), and it is important to understand why. We analyzed the effects of methods of risk estimation and bias correction and of population factors on CLTRs in this retrospective clinical cohort of BRCA1/2 carriers. The following methods to estimate the breast cancer risk of BRCA1/2 carriers were identified from the literature: Kaplan-Meier, frailty, and modified segregation analyses with bias correction consisting of including or excluding index patients combined with including or excluding first-degree relatives (FDRs) or different conditional likelihoods. These were applied to clinical data of BRCA1/2 families derived from our family cancer clinic for whom a simulation was also performed to evaluate the methods. CLTRs and 95% CIs were estimated and compared with the reference CLTRs. CLTRs ranged from 35% to 83% for BRCA1 and 41% to 86% for BRCA2 carriers at age 70 years width of 95% CIs: 10% to 35% and 13% to 46%, respectively). Relative bias varied from -38% to +16%. Bias correction with inclusion of index patients and untested FDRs gave the smallest bias: +2% (SD, 2%) in BRCA1 and +0.9% (SD, 3.6%) in BRCA2. Much of the variation in breast cancer CLTRs in retrospective clinical BRCA1/2 cohorts is due to the bias-correction method, whereas a smaller part is due to population differences. Kaplan-Meier analyses with bias correction that includes index patients and a proportion of untested FDRs provide suitable CLTRs for carriers counseled in the clinic. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  7. Evaluation of Polygenic Risk Scores for Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk Prediction in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Background: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 94 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with breast cancer (BC) risk and 18 associated with ovarian cancer (OC) risk. Several of these are also associated with risk of BC or OC for women who carry a pathogenic ...... risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Incorporation of the PRS into risk prediction models has promise to better inform decisions on cancer risk management....

  8. Odonto-onycho-dermal dysplasia in a patient homozygous for a WNT10A nonsens mutation and mild manifestations of ectodermal dysplasia in carriers of the mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun Krøigård, Anne; Clemmensen, Ole; Gjørup, Hans

    2016-01-01

    was homozygous for a previously reported pathogenic mutation in the WNT10A gene, c.321C > A, p.Cys107*. The skin and nail abnormalities were for many years interpreted as psoriasis and treated accordingly. A thorough clinical examination revealed hypotrichosis and hyperhidrosis of the soles and dental...... history of tooth anomalies, this lead to the clinical suspicion of a hereditary ectodermal dysplasia. CONCLUSION: This case illustrates the challenges of diagnosing ectodermal dysplasia like OODD and highlights the relevance of interdisciplinary cooperation in the diagnosis of rare conditions....

  9. Preferences for breast cancer risk reduction among BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation carriers: a discrete-choice experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liede, Alexander; Mansfield, Carol A; Metcalfe, Kelly A; Price, Melanie A; Snyder, Carrie; Lynch, Henry T; Friedman, Sue; Amelio, Justyna; Posner, Joshua; Narod, Steven A; Lindeman, Geoffrey J; Evans, D Gareth

    2017-09-01

    Unaffected women who carry BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations face difficult choices about reducing their breast cancer risk. Understanding their treatment preferences could help us improve patient counseling and inform drug trials. The objective was to explore preferences for various risk-reducing options among women with germline BRCA1/2 mutations using a discrete-choice experiment survey and to compare expressed preferences with actual behaviors. A discrete-choice experiment survey was designed wherein women choose between hypothetical treatments to reduce breast cancer risk. The hypothetical treatments were characterized by the extent of breast cancer risk reduction, treatment duration, impact on fertility, hormone levels, risk of uterine cancer, and ease and mode of administration. Data were analyzed using a random-parameters logit model. Women were also asked to express their preference between surgical and chemoprevention options and to report on their actual risk-reduction actions. Women aged 25-55 years with germline BRCA1/2 mutations who were unaffected with breast or ovarian cancer were recruited through research registries at five clinics and a patient advocacy group. Between January 2015 and March 2016, 622 women completed the survey. Breast cancer risk reduction was the most important consideration expressed, followed by maintaining fertility. Among the subset of women who wished to have children in future, the ability to maintain fertility was the most important factor, followed by the extent of risk reduction. Many more women said they would take a chemoprevention drug than had actually taken chemoprevention. Women with BRCA1/2 mutations indicated strong preferences for breast cancer risk reduction and maintaining fertility. The expressed desire to have a safe chemoprevention drug available to them was not met by current chemoprevention options.

  10. Ambiguity in a masculine world: Being a BRCA1/2 mutation carrier and a man with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynihan, C; Bancroft, E K; Mitra, A; Ardern-Jones, A; Castro, E; Page, E C; Eeles, R A

    2017-11-01

    Increased risk of prostate cancer (PCa) is observed in men with BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations. Sex and gender are key determinants of health and disease although unequal care exists between the sexes. Stereotypical male attitudes are shown to lead to poor health outcomes. Men with BRCA1/2 mutations and diagnosed with PCa were identified and invited to participate in a qualitative interview study. Data were analysed using a framework approach. "Masculinity theory" was used to report the impact of having both a BRCA1/2 mutation and PCa. Eleven of 15 eligible men were interviewed. The umbrella concept of "Ambiguity in a Masculine World" was evident. Men's responses often matched those of women in a genetic context. Men's BRCA experience was described, as "on the back burner" but "a bonus" enabling familial detection and early diagnosis of PCa. Embodiment of PCa took precedence as men revealed stereotypical "ideal" masculine responses such as stoicism and control while creating new "masculinities" when faced with the vicissitudes of having 2 gendered conditions. Health workers are urged to take a reflexive approach, void of masculine ideals, a belief in which obfuscates men's experience. Research is required regarding men's support needs in the name of equality of care. © 2017 The Authors. Psycho-Oncology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Reproductive Endocrinologists' Utilization of Genetic Counselors for Oncofertility and Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) Treatment of BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetsch, Allison L; Wicklund, Catherine; Clayman, Marla L; Woodruff, Teresa K

    2016-06-01

    Genetic counselors believe fertility preservation and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) discussions to be a part of their role when counseling BRCA1/2 mutation-positive patients. This study is the first to explore reproductive endocrinologists' (REI) practices and attitudes regarding involvement of genetic counselors in the care of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers seeking fertility preservation and PGD. A survey was mailed to 1000 REIs from Reproductive Endocrinology & Infertility (SREI), an American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) affiliate group. A 14.5 % response rate was achieved; data was analyzed using SPSS software. The majority of participating REIs were found to recommend genetic counseling to cancer patients considering fertility preservation (82 %) and consult with a genetic counselor regarding PGD for hereditary cancer syndromes (92 %). Additionally, REIs consult genetic counselors regarding PGD patient counseling (88 %), genetic testing (78 %), and general genetics questions (66 %). Two areas genetic counselors may further aid REIs are: elicitation of family history, which is useful to determine fertility preservation and PGD intervention timing (32 % of REIs utilize a cancer family history to determine intervention timing); and, interpretation of variants of uncertain significance (VOUS) as cancer panel genetic testing becomes more common (36 % of REIs are unfamiliar with VOUS). Given our findings, the Oncofertility Consortium® created an online resource for genetic counselors focused on fertility preservation education and communication strategies.

  12. Reproductive Endocrinologists’ Utilization of Genetic Counselors for Oncofertility and Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) Treatment of BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetsch, Allison L.; Wicklund, Catherine; Clayman, Marla L.; Woodruff, Teresa K.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic counselors believe fertility preservation and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) discussions to be a part of their role when counseling BRCA1/2 mutation-positive patients. This study is the first to explore reproductive endocrinologists’ (REI) practices and attitudes regarding involvement of genetic counselors in the care of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers seeking fertility preservation and PGD. A survey was mailed to 1000 REIs from Reproductive Endocrinology & Infertility (SREI), an American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) affiliate group. A 14.5 % response rate was achieved; data was analyzed using SPSS software. The majority of participating REIs were found to recommend genetic counseling to cancer patients considering fertility preservation (82 %) and consult with a genetic counselor regarding PGD for hereditary cancer syndromes (92 %). Additionally, REIs consult genetic counselors regarding PGD patient counseling (88 %), genetic testing (78 %), and general genetics questions (66 %). Two areas genetic counselors may further aid REIs are: elicitation of family history, which is useful to determine fertility preservation and PGD intervention timing (32 % of REIs utilize a cancer family history to determine intervention timing); and, interpretation of variants of uncertain significance (VOUS) as cancer panel genetic testing becomes more common (36 % of REIs are unfamiliar with VOUS). Given our findings, the Oncofertility Consortium® created an online resource for genetic counselors focused on fertility preservation education and communication strategies. PMID:26567039

  13. A case of hypocholesterolemia and steatosis in a carrier of a PCSK9 loss-of-function mutation and polymorphisms predisposing to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Filippo, Mathilde; Vokaer, Benoit; Seidah, Nabil G

    We report a new case of hypobetalipoproteinemia in a 44-year-old man of Peruvian origin exhibiting a heterozygous PCSK9 missense mutation (c.946 G>T, p. Gly316Cys). In vitro functional studies demonstrated that this mutation leads to a loss of function of PCSK9 on low-density lipoprotein receptor degradation. This patient exhibited liver steatosis; he was neither diabetic, nor obese or alcoholic, but is a carrier of 2 polymorphisms, p.Ile148Met (rs738409) and p.Glu167Lys (rs58542926) on PNPLA3 and TM6SF2 gene, respectively, previously shown to be associated with nonalcoholic steatosis and fibrosis evolution. These data suggested that if a resistance to hepatic steatosis mediated by the PCSK9 deficiency exists, as demonstrated in mice, it is not sufficient to prevent hepatic fatty accumulation in the case of genetic factors predisposing to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Copyright © 2017 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Common variants at the 19p13.1 and ZNF365 loci are associated with ER subtypes of breast cancer and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J. Couch (Fergus); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); S.J. Ramus (Susan); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); P. Soucy (Penny); J. Beesley (Jonathan); X. Chen (Xiaoqing); X. Wang (Xing); T. Kircchoff (Tomas); L. McGuffog (Lesley); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); A. Lee (Andrew); S. Healey (Sue); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); M. Thomassen (Mads); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); U.B. Jensen; A.-B. Skytte (Anne-Bine); T.A. Kruse (Torben); M.A. Caligo (Maria); A. von Wachenfeldt (Anna); G. Barbany-Bustinza (Gisela); N. Loman (Niklas); M. Soller (Maria); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); P. Karlsson (Per); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); S.M. Domchek (Susan); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Jaworska (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); E. Zołwocka (Elzbieta); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); T. Byrski (Tomasz); J. Gronwald (Jacek); C. Cybulski (Cezary); B. Górski (Bohdan); A. Osorio (Ana); M. Durán (Mercedes); M.I. Tejada; J. Benítez (Javier); U. Hamann (Ute); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); T.A.M. van Os (Theo); F.E. van Leeuwen (Flora); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); M.J. Blok (Marinus); C.M. Kets; M.J. Hooning (Maartje); R.A. Oldenburg (Rogier); M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); S. Peock (Susan); D. Frost (Debra); S.D. Ellis (Steve); R. Platte (Radka); E. Fineberg (Elena); D.G. Evans (Gareth); C. Jacobs (Chris); R. Eeles (Rosalind); J.W. Adlard (Julian); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); D. Eccles (Diana); T.J. Cole (Trevor); J. Cook (Jackie); J. Paterson (Joan); C. Brewer (Carole); F. Douglas (Fiona); S.V. Hodgson (Shirley); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); L.J. Walker (Lisa); M.E. Porteous (Mary); M.J. Kennedy (John); L. Side (Lucy); B. Bove (B.); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); M. Fassy-Colcombet (Marion); L. Castera (Laurent); F. Cornelis (Franco̧is); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); M. Léone (Mélanie); N. Boutry-Kryza (N.); B. Bressac-de Paillerets (Brigitte); O. Caron (Olivier); P. Pujol (Pascal); I. Coupier (Isabelle); C.D. Delnatte (Capucine); L. Akloul (Linda); H. Lynch (Henry); C.L. Snyder (Carrie); S.S. Buys (Saundra); M.B. Daly (Mary); M.-B. Terry (Mary-Beth); W. Chung (Wendy); E.M. John (Esther); A. Miron (Alexander); M.C. Southey (Melissa); J.L. Hopper (John); D. Goldgar (David); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport (Christine); M.-K. Tea; A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); F.C. Nielsen (Finn); A. Arason (Adalgeir); J. Vijai (Joseph); S. Shah (Sonia); K. Sarrel (Kara); M. Robson (Mark); M. Piedmonte (Marion); K. Phillips (Kelly); J. Basil (Jack); W.S. Rubinstein (Wendy); J.F. Boggess (John); K. Wakeley (Katie); A. Ewart-Toland (Amanda); M. Montagna (Marco); S. Agata (Simona); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); C. Isaacs (Claudine); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); C. Lazaro (Conxi); I. Blanco (Ignacio); L. Feliubadaló (L.); J. Brunet (Joan); S.A. Gayther (Simon); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); K. Odunsi (Kunle); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); C.S. Walsh (Christine); E. Olah; S.-H. Teo (Soo-Hwang); P.A. Ganz (Patricia); M.S. Beattie (Mary); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); C.M. Dorfling (Cecelia); O. Diez (Orland); A. Kwong (Ava); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); C.W. Engel (Christoph); A. Meindl (Alfons); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); S. Heidemann (Simone); D. Niederacher (Dieter); S. Preisler-Adams (Sabine); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); H. Deissler (Helmut); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); C. Sutter (Christian); K. Kast (Karin); B. Fiebig (Britta); W. Heinritz (Wolfram); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); T.A. Muranen (Taru); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (D.); M. Barile (Monica); L. Bernard (Loris); A. Viel (Alessandra); G. Giannini (Giuseppe); L. Varesco (Liliana); P. Radice (Paolo); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); D.F. Easton (Douglas); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); K. Offit (Kenneth); J. Simard (Jacques)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified variants at 19p13.1 and ZNF365 (10q21.2) as risk factors for breast cancer among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, respectively. We explored associations with ovarian cancer and with breast cancer by tumor histopathology for

  15. Common Variants at the 19p13.1 and ZNF365 Loci Are Associated with ER Subtypes of Breast Cancer and Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couch, Fergus J.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Ramus, Susan J.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Wang, Xianshu; Kirchhoff, Tomas; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Kruse, Torben A.; Caligo, Maria A.; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Loman, Niklas; Soller, Maria; Ehrencrona, Hans; Karlsson, Per; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Domchek, Susan M.; Jakubowska, Ania; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Zlowocka, Elzbieta; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Gronwald, Jacek; Cybulski, Cezary; Górski, Bohdan; Osorio, Ana; Durán, Mercedes; Tejada, María Isabel; Benitez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; van Os, Theo A.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Wijnen, Juul; Blok, Marinus J.; Kets, Marleen; Hooning, Maartje J.; Oldenburg, Rogier A.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Jacobs, Chris; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana M.; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Paterson, Joan; Brewer, Carole; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley V.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Walker, Lisa; Porteous, Mary E.; Kennedy, M. John; Side, Lucy E.; Bove, Betsy; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Fassy-Colcombet, Marion; Castera, Laurent; Cornelis, François; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Léoné, Mélanie; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Coupier, Isabelle; Delnatte, Capucine; Akloul, Linda; Lynch, Henry T.; Snyder, Carrie L.; Buys, Saundra S.; Daly, Mary B.; Terry, Marybeth; Chung, Wendy K.; John, Esther M.; Miron, Alexander; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; Goldgar, David E.; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; tea, Muy-Kheng M.; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Nielsen, Finn C.; Arason, Aðalgeir; Vijai, Joseph; Shah, Sohela; Sarrel, Kara; Robson, Mark E.; Piedmonte, Marion; Phillips, Kelly; Basil, Jack; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Boggess, John; Wakeley, Katie; Ewart-Toland, Amanda; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Brunet, Joan; Gayther, Simon A.; Pharoah, Paul P. D.; Odunsi, Kunle O.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine S.; Olah, Edith; teo, Soo Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Beattie, Mary S.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Dorfling, Cecelia M.; Diez, Orland; Kwong, Ava; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Heidemann, Simone; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Fiebig, Britta; Heinritz, Wolfram; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Muranen, Taru A.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Tischkowitz, Marc D.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Lindor, Noralane M.; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, V. Shane; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Barile, Monica; Bernard, Loris; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Varesco, Liliana; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Offit, Kenneth; Simard, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Background: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified variants at 19p13.1 and ZNF365 (10q21.2) as risk factors for breast cancer among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, respectively. We explored associations with ovarian cancer and with breast cancer by tumor histopathology for these

  16. Partial rescue of in vivo insulin signalling in skeletal muscle by impaired insulin clearance in heterozygous carriers of a mutation in the insulin receptor gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, K.; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen; Birk, Jesper Bratz

    2006-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Recently we reported the coexistence of postprandial hypoglycaemia and moderate insulin resistance in heterozygous carriers of the Arg1174Gln mutation in the insulin receptor gene (INSR). Controlled studies of in vivo insulin signalling in humans with mutant INSR are unavailable,...

  17. Common variants at the 19p13.1 and ZNF365 loci are associated with ER subtypes of breast cancer and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couch, Fergus J; Gaudet, Mia M; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified variants at 19p13.1 and ZNF365 (10q21.2) as risk factors for breast cancer among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, respectively. We explored associations with ovarian cancer and with breast cancer by tumor histopathology for these variants in mut...

  18. Prevalence of adenomas and hyperplastic polyps in mismatch repair mutation carriers among CAPP2 participants: report by the colorectal adenoma/carcinoma prevention programme 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liljegren, Annelie; Barker, Gail; Elliott, Faye

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the prevalence of adenomatous and hyperplastic polyps in a large cohort of individuals with a germline mutation in a mismatch repair (MMR) gene, the major genetic determinant of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). These prevalences have been estimated previously...... in smaller studies, and the results have been found to be variable. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Colorectal Adenoma/Carcinoma Prevention Programme 2 trial is a chemoprevention trial in people classified as having HNPCC. The 695 patients with a proven germline MMR mutation and documented screening history before...

  19. Carrier Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How accurate is carrier screening? No test is perfect. In a small number of cases, test results ... in which an egg is removed from a woman’s ovary, fertilized in a laboratory with the man’s ...

  20. High risk of cerebral-vein thrombosis in carriers of a prothrombin-gene mutation and in users of oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, I; Sacchi, E; Landi, G; Taioli, E; Duca, F; Mannucci, P M

    1998-06-18

    Idiopathic cerebral-vein thrombosis can cause serious neurologic disability. We evaluated risk factors for this disorder, including genetic risk factors (mutations in the genes encoding factor V and prothrombin) and nongenetic risk factors (such as the use of oral contraceptive agents). We compared the prevalence of these risk factors in 40 patients with cerebral-vein thrombosis, 80 patients with deep-vein thrombosis of the lower extremities, and 120 healthy controls. The G1691A mutation in the factor V gene and the G20210A prothrombin-gene mutation, which are established genetic risk factors for venous thrombosis, were studied. We also assessed the use of oral contraceptives and other risk factors for thrombosis. The prevalence of the prothrombin-gene mutation was higher in patients with cerebral-vein thrombosis (20 percent) than in healthy controls (3 percent; odds ratio, 10.2; 95 percent confidence interval, 2.3 to 31.0) and was similar to that in patients with deep-vein thrombosis (18 percent). Similar results were obtained for the mutation in the factor V gene. The use of oral contraceptives was more frequent among women with cerebral-vein thrombosis (96 percent) than among controls (32 percent; odds ratio, 22.1; 95 percent confidence interval, 5.9 to 84.2) and among those with deep-vein thrombosis (61 percent; odds ratio, 4.4; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.1 to 17.8). For women who were taking oral contraceptives and who also had the prothrombin-gene mutation (seven patients with cerebral-vein thrombosis but only one control), the odds ratio for cerebral-vein thrombosis rose to 149.3 (95 percent confidence interval, 31.0 to 711.0). Mutations in the prothrombin gene and the factor V gene are associated with cerebral-vein thrombosis. The use of oral contraceptives is also strongly and independently associated with the disorder. The presence of both the prothrombin-gene mutation and oral-contraceptive use raises the risk of cerebral-vein thrombosis further.

  1. Screening in asymptomatic SDHx mutation carriers: added value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT at initial diagnosis and 1-year follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepoutre-Lussey, C.; Deandreis, D.; Berdelou, A.; Nascimento, C.; Lumbroso, J.; Schlumberger, M.; Baudin, E.; Leboulleux, S. [Gustave Roussy Institut, Universite Paris-Sud, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrine Oncology, Villejuif (France); Caramella, C.; Bidault, F.; Deschamps, F. [Gustave Roussy Institut, Department of Radiology, Villejuif (France); Al Ghuzlan, A. [Gustave Roussy Institut, Department of Medical Biology and Pathology, Villejuif (France); Hartl, D.; Dumont, F. [Gustave Roussy Institut, Department of Surgery, Villejuif (France); Borget, I. [Gustave Roussy Institut, Department of Biostatistic and Epidemiology, Villejuif (France); Paris-Sud University, Villejuif (France); Gimenez-Roqueplo, A.P. [Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Department of Genetics, Paris (France); Paris Descartes University, Faculty of Medicine, Paris (France); Guillaud Bataille, M. [Gustave Roussy Institut, Department of Genetics, Villejuif (France)

    2015-05-01

    Specific recommendations on screening modalities for paraganglioma (PGL) and phaeochromocytoma (PCC) in asymptomatic SDHx mutation carriers (relatives) are still lacking. We evaluated the added value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in comparison with morphological imaging at initial diagnosis and 1 year of follow-up in this population. The study included 30 consecutive relatives with a proven SDHx mutation who were investigated by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT, gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography of the head and neck, thoracic/abdominal/pelvic (TAP) contrast-enhanced CT and/or TAP MRI. {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphy was performed in 20 subjects and somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) in 20 subjects. The gold standard was based on pathology or a composite endpoint as defined by any other positive imaging method and persistent tumour on follow-up. Images were considered as false-positive when the lesions were not detected by another imaging method or not confirmed at 1 year. At initial work-up, an imaging abnormality was found in eight subjects (27 %). The final diagnosis was true-positive in five subjects (two with abdominal PGL, one with PCC and two with neck PGL) and false-positives in the other three subjects (detected with {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in two and TAP MRI in one). At 1 year, an imaging abnormality was found in three subjects of which one was an 8-mm carotid body PGL in a patient with SDHD mutation and two were considered false-positive. The tumour detection rate was 100 % for {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and conventional imaging, 80 % for SRS and 60 % for {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphy. Overall, disease was detected in 4 % of the subjects at the 1-year follow-up. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT demonstrated excellent sensitivity but intermediate specificity justifying combined modality imaging in these patients. Given the slow progression of the disease, if {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and MRI are normal at baseline, the second imaging work-up should be delayed and an examination

  2. Lynch Syndrome Caused by Germline PMS2 Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ten Broeke, Sanne W; Brohet, Richard M; Tops, Carli M

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The clinical consequences of PMS2 germline mutations are poorly understood compared with other Lynch-associated mismatch repair gene (MMR) mutations. The aim of this European cohort study was to define the cancer risk faced by PMS2 mutation carriers. METHODS: Data were collected from 98...... PMS2 families ascertained from family cancer clinics that included a total of 2,548 family members and 377 proven mutation carriers. To adjust for potential ascertainment bias, a modified segregation analysis model was used to calculate colorectal cancer (CRC) and endometrial cancer (EC) risks....... Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated to estimate risks for other Lynch syndrome-associated cancers. RESULTS: The cumulative risk (CR) of CRC for male mutation carriers by age 70 years was 19%. The CR among female carriers was 11% for CRC and 12% for EC. The mean age of CRC development was 52...

  3. Application of Single Strand Conformational Polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) in Identification of Some Beta-Globin Gene Mutations in A Group of Egyptian Beta-Thalassemia Patients and Carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somaya, E.T.; Soliman, M.D

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated whether the single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) method could be employed to identify (rather than simply detect) four of the most common beta-globin gene mutations in the Egyptian population: IVS-I-110, IVS-I-6, the IVS-I-1, and Codon 39. Using DNA from 90 beta-thalassemia patients and carriers, by PCR the appropriate 238-bp region of the human beta-globin gene was amplified, the reaction products (Single-stranded DNA) were analyzed by none denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and the bands visualized by silver staining. Single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) fragments showed reproducible pattern of bands that were characteristic of the mutations present. With the use of control samples containing six of the 10 possible combinations of the four beta-globin gene mutations under study, we were able to predict the mutations present in 23 out of 90 (26.4%) of the patients studied. These predictions were confirmed independently by the amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) method. It is concluded that this non-radioactive PCR-SSCP method can be used to reliably identify mutations in beta-thalassemia patients, provided that suitable controls are available. However, usefulness of this method for determining the genotype of beta-thalassaemic individuals is obviously limited by the great number of controls required. Moreover, the ability to detect mutations by SSCP is in general lower compared to other methods, ARMS, DGGE or DHPLC, which are reported to detect 49.5% to 73% of the mutations present. The SSCP method is nevertheless much easier to employ than other methods and is especially successful for beta-thalassemia carriers. This method would thus be particularly useful for an initial screening of target groups (prenatal diagnosis)

  4. A novel mutation of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene results in the formation of supernumerary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fang; Cai, Wenping; Jiang, Beizhan; Xu, Laijun; Liu, Shangfeng; Zhao, Shouliang

    2018-01-01

    Supernumerary teeth are teeth that are present in addition to normal teeth. Although several hypotheses and some molecular signalling pathways explain the formation of supernumerary teeth, but their exact disease pathogenesis is unknown. To study the molecular mechanisms of supernumerary tooth-related syndrome (Gardner syndrome), a deeper understanding of the aetiology of supernumerary teeth and the associated syndrome is needed, with the goal of inhibiting disease inheritance via prenatal diagnosis. We recruited a Chinese family with Gardner syndrome. Haematoxylin and eosin staining of supernumerary teeth and colonic polyp lesion biopsies revealed that these patients exhibited significant pathological characteristics. APC gene mutations were detected by PCR and direct sequencing. We revealed the pathological pathway involved in human supernumerary tooth development and the mouse tooth germ development expression profile by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). Sequencing analysis revealed that an APC gene mutation in exon 15, namely 4292-4293-Del GA, caused Gardner syndrome in this family. This mutation not only initiated the various manifestations typical of Gardner syndrome but also resulted in odontoma and supernumerary teeth in this case. Furthermore, RNA-seq analysis of human supernumerary teeth suggests that the APC gene is the key gene involved in the development of supernumerary teeth in humans. The mouse tooth germ development expression profile shows that the APC gene plays an important role in tooth germ development. We identified a new mutation in the APC gene that results in supernumerary teeth in association with Gardner syndrome. This information may shed light on the molecular pathogenesis of supernumerary teeth. Gene-based diagnosis and gene therapy for supernumerary teeth may become available in the future, and our study provides a high-resolution reference for treating other syndromes associated with supernumerary teeth. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of

  5. Functional analysis of the novel TBX5 c.1333delC mutation resulting in an extended TBX5 protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekman-Joelsson Britt-Marie

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autosomal dominant Holt-Oram syndrome (HOS is caused by mutations in the TBX5 gene and is characterized by congenital heart and preaxial radial ray upper limb defects. Most of the TBX5 mutations found in patients with HOS cause premature truncation of the primary TBX5 transcript. TBX5 missense mutations alter the three-dimensional structure of the protein and result in failed nuclear localization or reduced binding to target DNA. In this study we present our functional analyses of the novel and unusual c.1333delC mutation found in a patient with classical HOS. Methods The functional impact of this novel mutation was assessed by investigating the intracellular localization of the resulting TBX5 protein and its ability to activate the expression of its downstream target ANF. Results The deletion of the cytosine is the first TBX5 frameshift mutation predicted to result in an elongated TBX5 protein with 74 miscoding amino acids and 62 supernumerary C-terminal amino acids. The c.1333delC mutation affects neither the nuclear localization, nor its colocalization with SALL4, but severely affects the activation of the ANF promoter. Conclusion The mutation c.1333delC does not locate within functional domains, but impairs the activation of the downstream target. This suggests that misfolding of the protein prevents its biological function.

  6. FMCSA safety program effectiveness measurement : compliance review effectiveness model results for carriers with compliance reviews in FY 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    In FY 2007, Federal and State enforcement personnel conducted more than 15,000 CRs on individual motor carriers. It is intended that through education, heightened safety regulation awareness, and the enforcement effects of the CR, carriers will impro...

  7. FMCSA safety program effectiveness measurement : compliance review effectiveness model results for carriers with compliance reviews in FY 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    In FY 2008, Federal and State enforcement personnel conducted 14,906 compliance reviews (CRs) on individual motor carriers. It is intended that through education, heightened safety regulation awareness, and the enforcement effects of the CR, carriers...

  8. Prolonged episodes of hypoglycaemia in HNF4A-MODY mutation carriers with IGT. Evidence of persistent hyperinsulinism into early adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, S; Kyithar, M P; Condron, E M; Vizzard, N; Burke, M; Byrne, M M

    2016-12-01

    HNF4A is an established cause of maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY). Congenital hyperinsulinism can also be associated with mutations in the HNF4A gene. A dual phenotype is observed in HNF4A-MODY with hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia in the neonatal period progressing to diabetes in adulthood. The nature and timing of the transition remain poorly defined. We performed an observational study to establish changes in glycaemia and insulin secretion over a 6-year period. We investigated glycaemic variability and hypoglycaemia in HNF4A-MODY using a continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS). An OGTT with measurement of glucose, insulin and C-peptide was performed in HNF4A participants with diabetes mellitus (DM) (n = 14), HNF4A-IGT (n = 7) and age- and BMI-matched MODY negative family members (n = 10). Serial assessment was performed in the HNF4A-IGT cohort. In a subset of HNF4A-MODY mutation carriers (n = 10), CGMS was applied over a 72-h period. There was no deterioration in glycaemic control in the HNF4A-IGT cohort. The fasting glucose-to-insulin ratio was significantly lower in the HNF4A-IGT cohort when compared to the normal control group (0.13 vs. 0.24, p = 0.03). CGMS profiling demonstrated prolonged periods of hypoglycaemia in the HNF4A-IGT group when compared to the HNF4A-DM group (432 vs. 138 min p = 0.04). In a young adult HNF4A-IGT cohort, we demonstrate preserved glucose, insulin and C-peptide secretory responses to oral glucose. Utilising CGMS, prolonged periods of hypoglycaemia are evident despite a median age of 21 years. We propose a prolonged hyperinsulinaemic phase into adulthood is responsible for the notable hypoglycaemic episodes.

  9. [A compound heterozygosity mutation in the interleukin-7 receptor-alpha gene resulted in severe combined immunodeficiency in a Chinese patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-yong; Zhao, Xiao-dong; Wang, Mo; Yu, Jie; An, Yun-fei; Yang, Xi-qiang

    2009-09-01

    Mutation in the interleukin-7 receptor-alpha (IL-7R alpha) chain causes a rare type of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) with presence of NK cells in the peripheral blood. Here we report the molecular and clinical characterization of a compound heterozygosity mutation in the interleukin-7 receptor-alpha gene that resulted in SCID in a patient firstly from China. A 5 month-old male patient and his parents were enrolled in this study. Since 15 days of age, the patient had had recurrent fever, persistent cough and diarrhea. He was in poor general condition with pyorrhea and ulceration of the BCG scar. His brother died of severe infection at 4 months of age. He was initially diagnosed as SCID according to clinical manifestation and immunological analysis. A panel of SCID candidate genes including IL-2RG, RAG1/RAG2 and IL-7R alpha of patient and his parents were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from genomic DNA. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to amplify the IL-7R alpha transcripts. Sequencing was performed directly on the PCR products forward and reversely. The serum immunoglobulin (Ig) profile was IgG 6867 mg/L (normal range, 3050 - 8870 mg/L); IgM 206 mg/L and IgA 249 mg/L, IgE 2.3 IU/ml (normal range microscope and by culture. The patient had a compound heterozygosity mutation in the IL-7R alpha gene:on one allele, there was a splice-junction mutation in intron 4 (intron 4(+1)G > A), for which his father was a carrier; whereas on the other allele, a nonsense mutation at position 638 in exon 5 with a premature stop codon (638 C > T, R206X) was identified, for which his mother was a carrier. The splice-junction mutation in intron 4 of IL-7R alpha was firstly reported. The IL-7R alpha mRNA expression of the patient was remarkably reduced whereas the parents had relatively normal IL-7R alpha mRNA expression. IL-7R alpha cDNA of the patient was amplified by nested PCR. The PCR products were purified, cloned with a TA

  10. Mutations causative of familial hypercholesterolaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Marianne; Watts, Gerald F; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    causing mutations in 98 098 participants from the general population, the Copenhagen General Population Study. METHODS AND RESULTS: We genotyped for LDLR[W23X;W66G;W556S] and APOB[R3500Q] accounting for 38.7% of pathogenic FH mutations in Copenhagen. Clinical FH assessment excluded mutation information......-cholesterol concentration to discriminate between mutation carriers and non-carriers was 4.4 mmol/L. CONCLUSION: Familial hypercholesterolaemia-causing mutations are estimated to occur in 1:217 in the general population and are best identified by a definite or probable phenotypic diagnosis of FH based on the DLCN criteria....... The prevalence of the four FH mutations was 0.18% (1:565), suggesting a total prevalence of FH mutations of 0.46% (1:217). Using the Dutch Lipid Clinic Network (DLCN) criteria, odds ratios for an FH mutation were 439 (95% CI: 170-1 138) for definite FH, 90 (53-152) for probable FH, and 18 (13-25) for possible FH...

  11. The NOD2 3020insC Mutation in Women with Breast Cancer from the Bydgoszcz Region in Poland. First Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janiszewska Hanna

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The frameshift NOD2 gene mutation 3020insC is predominantly associated with Crohn's disease, but predisposes to many types of common cancers as well. We studied the frequency of this mutant NOD2 allele in 148 breast cancer women from the Bydgoszcz region in Poland. The NOD2 mutation was present in 8.8% of the patients. The mean age at breast cancer diagnosis of the mutation carriers was 43 years. We did not find any mutation in patients diagnosed with breast cancer after the age of 50 years. There was no association of the NOD2 mutation with a strong family history of breast cancer. On the contrary, the mutation frequency (11.4% was two times higher in women from families with a single case of breast cancer and with aggregation of other common types of cancer, especially digestive tract cancers. Low risk of breast cancer in the mutation carriers seems to be confirmed by finding the 3020insC mutation in three healthy parents of probands aged 73, 74 and 83 years, from three separate families.

  12. High-resolution respirometry of fine-needle muscle biopsies in pre-manifest Huntington's disease expansion mutation carriers shows normal mitochondrial respiratory function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Buck

    Full Text Available Alterations in mitochondrial respiration are an important hallmark of Huntington's disease (HD, one of the most common monogenetic causes of neurodegeneration. The ubiquitous expression of the disease causing mutant huntingtin gene raises the prospect that mitochondrial respiratory deficits can be detected in skeletal muscle. While this tissue is readily accessible in humans, transgenic animal models offer the opportunity to cross-validate findings and allow for comparisons across organs, including the brain. The integrated respiratory chain function of the human vastus lateralis muscle was measured by high-resolution respirometry (HRR in freshly taken fine-needle biopsies from seven pre-manifest HD expansion mutation carriers and nine controls. The respiratory parameters were unaffected. For comparison skeletal muscle isolated from HD knock-in mice (HdhQ111 as well as a broader spectrum of tissues including cortex, liver and heart muscle were examined by HRR. Significant changes of mitochondrial respiration in the HdhQ knock-in mouse model were restricted to the liver and the cortex. Mitochondrial mass as quantified by mitochondrial DNA copy number and citrate synthase activity was stable in murine HD-model tissue compared to control. mRNA levels of key enzymes were determined to characterize mitochondrial metabolic pathways in HdhQ mice. We demonstrated the feasibility to perform high-resolution respirometry measurements from small human HD muscle biopsies. Furthermore, we conclude that alterations in respiratory parameters of pre-manifest human muscle biopsies are rather limited and mirrored by a similar absence of marked alterations in HdhQ skeletal muscle. In contrast, the HdhQ111 murine cortex and liver did show respiratory alterations highlighting the tissue specific nature of mutant huntingtin effects on respiration.

  13. Carrier screening in the era of expanding genetic technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, Aishwarya; Litwack, Karen; Collins, Nick; Charrow, Joel

    2016-12-01

    The Center for Jewish Genetics provides genetic education and carrier screening to individuals of Jewish descent. Carrier screening has traditionally been performed by targeted mutation analysis for founder mutations with an enzyme assay for Tay-Sachs carrier detection. The development of next-generation sequencing (NGS) allows for higher detection rates regardless of ethnicity. Here, we explore differences in carrier detection rates between genotyping and NGS in a primarily Jewish population. Peripheral blood samples or saliva samples were obtained from 506 individuals. All samples were analyzed by sequencing, targeted genotyping, triplet-repeat detection, and copy-number analysis; the analyses were carried out at Counsyl. Of 506 individuals screened, 288 were identified as carriers of at least 1 condition and 8 couples were carriers for the same disorder. A total of 434 pathogenic variants were identified. Three hundred twelve variants would have been detected via genotyping alone. Although no additional mutations were detected by NGS in diseases routinely screened for in the Ashkenazi Jewish population, 26.5% of carrier results and 2 carrier couples would have been missed without NGS in the larger panel. In a primarily Jewish population, NGS reveals a larger number of pathogenic variants and provides individuals with valuable information for family planning.Genet Med 18 12, 1214-1217.

  14. Web Platform vs In-Person Genetic Counselor for Return of Carrier Results From Exome Sequencing: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesecker, Barbara B; Lewis, Katie L; Umstead, Kendall L; Johnston, Jennifer J; Turbitt, Erin; Fishler, Kristen P; Patton, John H; Miller, Ilana M; Heidlebaugh, Alexis R; Biesecker, Leslie G

    2018-03-01

    A critical bottleneck in clinical genomics is the mismatch between large volumes of results and the availability of knowledgeable professionals to return them. To test whether a web-based platform is noninferior to a genetic counselor for educating patients about their carrier results from exome sequencing. A randomized noninferiority trial conducted in a longitudinal sequencing cohort at the National Institutes of Health from February 5, 2014, to December 16, 2016, was used to compare the web-based platform with a genetic counselor. Among the 571 eligible participants, 1 to 7 heterozygous variants were identified in genes that cause a phenotype that is recessively inherited. Surveys were administered after cohort enrollment, immediately following trial education, and 1 month and 6 months later to primarily healthy postreproductive participants who expressed interest in learning their carrier results. Both intention-to-treat and per-protocol analyses were applied. A web-based platform that integrated education on carrier results with personal test results was designed to directly parallel disclosure education by a genetic counselor. The sessions took a mean (SD) time of 21 (10.6), and 27 (9.3) minutes, respectively. The primary outcomes and noninferiority margins (δNI) were knowledge (0 to 8, δNI = -1), test-specific distress (0 to 30, δNI = +1), and decisional conflict (15 to 75, δNI = +6). After 462 participants (80.9%) provided consent and were randomized, all but 3 participants (n = 459) completed surveys following education and counseling; 398 (86.1%) completed 1-month surveys and 392 (84.8%) completed 6-month surveys. Participants were predominantly well-educated, non-Hispanic white, married parents; mean (SD) age was 63 (63.1) years and 246 (53.6%) were men. The web platform was noninferior to the genetic counselor on outcomes assessed at 1 and 6 months: knowledge (mean group difference, -0.18; lower limit of 97.5% CI, -0.63;

  15. 76 FR 12700 - Polyethylene Retail Carrier Bags From Thailand: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-08

    .... (Sahachit Watana), Thai Plastic Bags Industries Co., Ltd. (TPBI), and Thantawan Industry Public Co., Ltd... stores, and restaurants, to their customers to package and carry their purchased products. The scope of... Industries Co., Ltd., Final Results Analysis Memorandum'' dated concurrently with this notice for details...

  16. Motor and Sensory Deficits in the teetering Mice Result from Mutation of the ESCRT Component HGS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Watson

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurons are particularly vulnerable to perturbations in endo-lysosomal transport, as several neurological disorders are caused by a primary deficit in this pathway. In this report, we used positional cloning to show that the spontaneously occurring neurological mutation teetering (tn is a single nucleotide substitution in hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (Hgs/Hrs, a component of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT. The tn mice exhibit hypokenesis, muscle weakness, reduced muscle size and early perinatal lethality by 5-weeks of age. Although HGS has been suggested to be essential for the sorting of ubiquitinated membrane proteins to the lysosome, there were no alterations in receptor tyrosine kinase levels in the central nervous system, and only a modest decrease in tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB in the sciatic nerves of the tn mice. Instead, loss of HGS resulted in structural alterations at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ, including swellings and ultra-terminal sprouting at motor axon terminals and an increase in the number of endosomes and multivesicular bodies. These structural changes were accompanied by a reduction in spontaneous and evoked release of acetylcholine, indicating a deficit in neurotransmitter release at the NMJ. These deficits in synaptic transmission were associated with elevated levels of ubiquitinated proteins in the synaptosome fraction. In addition to the deficits in neuronal function, mutation of Hgs resulted in both hypermyelinated and dysmyelinated axons in the tn mice, which supports a growing body of evidence that ESCRTs are required for proper myelination of peripheral nerves. Our results indicate that HGS has multiple roles in the nervous system and demonstrate a previously unanticipated requirement for ESCRTs in the maintenance of synaptic transmission.

  17. The Use of Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy in BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers Undergoing Prophylactic Mastectomy: A Retrospective Consecutive Case-Series Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Câmara

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Sentinel lymph node biopsy in prophylactic mastectomy is controversial. It avoids lymphadenectomy in occult carcinoma but is associated with increased morbidity. Women with BRCA mutations have a higher incidence of occult carcinoma and our objective was to assess the clinical utility of sentinel lymph node biopsy when these women undergo prophylactic mastectomy. Materials and Methods. Seven-year retrospective consecutive case-series study of women, with a BRCA deleterious mutation, admitted to prophylactic mastectomy, at our center. Breast MRI < 6 months before surgery was routine, unless contraindicated. Results. Fifty-seven patients (43% BRCA1; 57% BRCA2 underwent 80 prophylactic mastectomies. 72% of patients had had breast cancer treated before prophylactic mastectomy or synchronously to it. The occult carcinoma incidence was 5%, and half of the cases were invasive. SLNB was performed in 19% of the prophylactic mastectomies; none of these had tumor invasion. Women with invasive carcinoma who had not undergone sentinel lymph node biopsy were followed closely with axillary ultrasound. The median follow-up was 37 months, with no local recurrence; 1 patient died of primary tumor systemic relapse. Conclusions. Our data do not support this procedure for routine (in agreement with previous literature, in this high risk for occult carcinoma population.

  18. [Molecular pathogenesis of Waardenburg syndrome type II resulting from SOX10 gene mutation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Chen, Hongsheng; Feng, Yong; Qian, Minfei; Li, Jiping; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Chun

    2016-08-01

    To explore the molecular mechanism of Waardenburg syndrome type II (WS2) resulting from SOX10 gene mutation E248fs through in vitro experiment. 293T cells were transiently transfected with wild type (WT) SOX10 and mutant type (MT) E248fs plasmids. The regulatory effect of WT/MT SOX10 on the transcriptional activity of MITF gene and influence of E248fs on WT SOX10 function were determined with a luciferase activity assay. The DNA binding capacity of the WT/MT SOX10 with the promoter of the MITF gene was determined with a biotinylated double-stranded oligonucleotide probe containing the SOX10 binding sequence cattgtc to precipitate MITF and E248fs, respectively. The stability of SOX10 and E248fs were also analyzed. As a loss-of-function mutation, the E248fs mutant failed to transactivate the MITF promoter as compared with the WT SOX10 (P<0.01), which also showed a dominant-negative effect on WT SOX10. The WT SOX10 and E248fs mutant were also able to bind specifically to the cattgtc motif in the MITF promoter, whereas E248fs had degraded faster than WT SOX10. Despite the fact that the E248fs has a dominant-negative effect on SOX10, its reduced stability may down-regulate the transcription of MITF and decrease the synthesis of melanin, which may result in haploinsufficiency of SOX10 protein and cause the milder WS2 phenotype.

  19. Some results on the combined use of induced mutations and heterosis breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoilov, M.; Daskaloff, S.

    1976-01-01

    The literature on the combined use of induced mutations and heterosis in cultivated species is reviewed. Data from studies of the general and specific combining ability of induced mutations for gene markers both obtained and used in hybrid seed production, translocation lines for development of seedless fruits, male sterile forms, etc., are supplied. The authors give data from their own experimental material for use of mutant lines in heterosis breeding and hybrid seed production. It is concluded that the combined use of induced mutations and heterosis in both self- and cross-pollinating species is very promising. (author)

  20. Homozygous mutations in the Fhit gene results in resistance to ionizing radiation and inhibition of apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, B.C.; Potoczek, M.B.; Ottey, M.; Croce, C.M.; Huebner, K.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The Fhit gene was identified because it represents the most active constitutive chromosome fragile site and has functions often associated with a tumor suppressor gene. Mutations in the Fhit locus have been identified in many cancer-derived cell lines, primary human tumors including lung, head and neck, colon, breast, and esophagus, and are associated with tobacco-induced lung cancers. In this study, we examined the cellular response of mouse epithelial cells with complete loss of Fhit to therapeutic doses of ionizing radiation and the prognostic importance of Fhit protein in early stage breast cancer patients treated with breast conserving therapy. Materials and Methods: Mouse epithelial cell lines containing either homozygous mutant Fhit -/- or wild-type Fhit +/+ were derived from mice (C57BL/6J X 129/SvJ) with either wild-type or inactivated Fhit gene. Clonogenic cell survival assays were carried out on subconfluent cells in logarithmic growth using a 137 Cs irradiator and survival curves were plotted as the log of the surviving cells versus dose and corrected for cloning efficiency. Apoptosis following ionizing radiation was determined by flow cytometry using the Annexin-V FITC kit and DAPI staining. Paraffin-embedded breast tumor blocks were obtained from 42 women with local breast tumor recurrence and 42 matched breast cancer patients without local cancer relapse treated with breast conserving therapy and stained with a 1:4000 dilution of polyclonal antibody to the Fhit protein and scored based on both intensity and distribution of Fhit staining within the invasive breast cancer component. Results: Treatment of Fhit -/- mouse epithelial cells with single fraction doses of ionizing radiation including 2, 4, 6, and 10 Gy result in 4-6 fold increase in cellular survival compared with isogenic parental cells from Fhit +/+ mice. Fhit -/- epithelial cells displayed 3-5 fold lower levels of apoptosis in response to both low and high doses of ionizing

  1. The clinical phenotype of Lynch syndrome due to germline PMS2 mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senter, Leigha; Clendenning, Mark; Sotamaa, Kaisa; Hampel, Heather; Green, Jane; Potter, John D.; Lindblom, Annika; Lagerstedt, Kristina; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Young, Joanne; Winship, Ingrid; Dowty, James G.; White, Darren M.; Hopper, John L.; Baglietto, Laura; Jenkins, Mark A.; de la Chapelle, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Although the clinical phenotype of Lynch syndrome (also known as Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer) has been well described, little is known about disease in PMS2 mutation carriers. Now that mutation detection methods can discern mutations in PMS2 from mutations in its pseudogenes, more mutation carriers have been identified. Information about the clinical significance of PMS2 mutations is crucial for appropriate counseling. Here, we report the clinical characteristics of a large series of PMS2 mutation carriers. Methods We performed PMS2 mutation analysis using long range PCR and MLPA for 99 probands diagnosed with Lynch syndrome-associated tumors showing isolated loss of PMS2 by immunohistochemistry. Penetrance was calculated using a modified segregation analysis adjusting for ascertainment. Results Germline PMS2 mutations were detected in 62% of probands (n = 55 monoallelic; 6 biallelic). Among families with monoallelic PMS2 mutations, 65.5% met revised Bethesda guidelines. Compared with the general population, in mutation carriers, the incidence of colorectal cancer was 5.2 fold higher and the incidence of endometrial cancer was 7.5 fold higher. In North America, this translates to a cumulative cancer risk to age 70 of 15–20% for colorectal cancer, 15% for endometrial cancer, and 25–32% for any Lynch syndrome-associated cancer. No elevated risk for non-Lynch syndrome-associated cancers was observed. Conclusions PMS2 mutations contribute significantly to Lynch syndrome but the penetrance for monoallelic mutation carriers appears to be lower than that for the other mismatch repair genes. Modified counseling and cancer surveillance guidelines for PMS2 mutation carriers are proposed. PMID:18602922

  2. FMCSA safety program effectiveness measurement : compliance review effectiveness model results for carriers with compliance reviews in fiscal year 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    In FY 2009, Federal and State enforcement personnel conducted more than 15,000 compliance reviews (CRs) on individual motor carriers. It is intended that through education, heightened safety regulation awareness, and the enforcement effects of the CR...

  3. Natural Mutations in Streptococcus agalactiae Resulting in Abrogation of β Antigen Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyeva, Anastasia; Santos Sanches, Ilda; Florindo, Carlos; Dmitriev, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae genome encodes 21 two-component systems (TCS) and a variety of regulatory proteins in order to control gene expression. One of the TCS, BgrRS, comprising the BgrR DNA-binding regulatory protein and BgrS sensor histidine kinase, was discovered within a putative virulence island. BgrRS influences cell metabolism and positively control the expression of bac gene, coding for β antigen at transcriptional level. Inactivation of bgrR abrogated bac gene expression and increased virulence properties of S. agalactiae. In this study, a total of 140 strains were screened for the presence of bac gene, and the TCS bgrR and bgrS genes. A total of 53 strains carried the bac, bgrR and bgrS genes. Most of them (48 strains) expressed β antigen, while five strains did not express β antigen. Three strains, in which bac gene sequence was intact, while bgrR and/or bgrS genes had mutations, and expression of β antigen was absent, were complemented with a constructed plasmid pBgrRS(P) encoding functionally active bgrR and bgrS gene alleles. This procedure restored expression of β antigen indicating the crucial regulatory role of TCS BgrRS. The complemented strain A49V/BgrRS demonstrated attenuated virulence in intraperitoneal mice model of S. agalactiae infection compared to parental strain A49V. In conclusion we showed that disruption of β antigen expression is associated with: i) insertion of ISSa4 upstream the bac gene just after the ribosomal binding site; ii) point mutation G342A resulting a stop codon TGA within the bac gene and a truncated form of β antigen; iii) single deletion (G) in position 439 of the bgrR gene resulting in a frameshift and the loss of DNA-binding domain of the BgrR protein, and iv) single base substitutions in bgrR and bgrS genes causing single amino acid substitutions in BgrR (Arg187Lys) and BgrS (Arg252Gln). The fact that BgrRS negatively controls virulent properties of S. agalactiae gives a novel clue for understanding of S

  4. Risk profile of the RET A883F germline mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Jes Sloth; Habra, Mouhammed Amir; Bassett, John Howard Duncan

    2017-01-01

    the highest to high risk level, although no well-defined risk profile for this mutation exists. Objective: To create a risk profile for the A883F mutation for appropriate classification in the ATA risk levels. Design: Retrospective analysis. Setting: International collaboration. Patients: Included were 13 A...... seems to have a more indolent natural course compared to that of M918T carriers. Our results support the classification of the A883F mutation in the ATA high risk level....

  5. Skin pH, Atopic Dermatitis, and Filaggrin Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandier, Josefine; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Petersen, Lars Jelstrup

    2014-01-01

    mutations may influence skin pH. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to determine the epidermal pH in different groups stratified by filaggrin mutations and atopic dermatitis. Further, we investigated the changes in pH according to severity of mutational status among patients with dermatitis, irrespective of skin condition....... METHODS: pH was measured with a multiprobe system pH probe (PH 905), and the study population was composed of 67 individuals, who had all been genotyped for 3 filaggrin mutations (R501X, 2282del4, R2447X). RESULTS: We found no clear pattern in relation to filaggrin mutation carrier status. Individuals...... with wild-type filaggrin displayed both the most acidic and most alkaline values independent of concomitant skin disease; however, no statistical differences between the groups were found. CONCLUSIONS: The lack of significant diversity in skin pH in relation to filaggrin mutation carrier status suggests...

  6. Distribution of a pseudodeficiency allele among Tay-Sachs carriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomczak, J.; Grebner, E.E. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)); Boogen, C. (Univ. of Essen Medical School (Germany))

    1993-08-01

    Recently Triggs-Raine et al. (1992) identified a new mutation in the gene coding for the [alpha]-subunit of [beta]-hexosaminidase A (hex A), the enzyme whose deficiency causes Tay-Sachs disease. This mutation, a C[sub 739]-to-T transition in exon 7, results in an altered enzyme that is active (albeit at reduced levels) in cells but that has essentially no activity in serum. This so-called pseudodeficient allele was first detected in compound heterozygotes who also carried a Tay-Sachs disease allele and therefore had no detectable hex A in their serum but who were in good health. Carriers of this apparently benign mutation are generally indistinguishable from carriers of a lethal mutation by means of routine enzyme-based screening tests, because the product of the pseudodeficient allele is not detectable in serum and has decreased activity in cells. This suggests that some individuals who have been classified as Tay-Sachs carriers are actually carriers of the pseudodeficient allele and are not at risk to have a child affected with Tay-Sachs disease. The pseudodeficient allele may also be responsible for some inconclusive diagnoses, where leukocyte values fall below the normal range but are still above the carrier range. The fact that there are now two mutant alleles (the psuedodeficient and the adult) that are indistinguishable from the lethal infantile mutations by means of enzyme assay yet that are phenotypically very different and that together may account for as much as 12% of enzyme-defined carriers on the basis of the data here suggests that DNA analysis should be part of a comprehensive screening program. It will be particularly useful to identify the mutations in couples at risk, before they undergo prenatal diagnosis. DNA analysis will also resolve some inconclusive diagnoses.

  7. Dealing with the unexpected: consumer responses to direct-access BRCA mutation testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uta Francke

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Inherited BRCA gene mutations convey a high risk for breast and ovarian cancer, but current guidelines limit BRCA mutation testing to women with early-onset cancer and relatives of mutation-positive cases. Benefits and risks of providing this information directly to consumers are unknown.Methods. To assess and quantify emotional and behavioral reactions of consumers to their 23andMe Personal Genome Service® report of three BRCA mutations that are common in Ashkenazi Jews, we invited all 136 BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation-positive individuals in the 23andMe customer database who had chosen to view their BRCA reports to participate in this IRB-approved study. We also invited 160 mutation-negative customers who were matched for age, sex and ancestry. Semi-structured phone interviews were completed for 32 mutation carriers, 16 women and 16 men, and 31 non-carriers. Questions addressed personal and family history of cancer, decision and timing of viewing the BRCA report, recollection of the result, emotional responses, perception of personal cancer risk, information sharing, and actions taken or planned.Results. Eleven women and 14 men had received the unexpected result that they are carriers of a BRCA1 185delAG or 5382insC, or BRCA2 6174delT mutation. None of them reported extreme anxiety and four experienced moderate anxiety that was transitory. Remarkably, five women and six men described their response as neutral. Most carrier women sought medical advice and four underwent risk-reducing procedures after confirmatory mutation testing. Male carriers realized that their test results implied genetic risk for female relatives, and several of them felt considerably burdened by this fact. Sharing mutation information with family members led to screening of at least 30 relatives and identification of 13 additional carriers. Non-carriers did not report inappropriate actions, such as foregoing cancer screening. All but one of the 32 mutation

  8. Dealing with the unexpected: consumer responses to direct-access BRCA mutation testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francke, Uta; Dijamco, Cheri; Kiefer, Amy K; Eriksson, Nicholas; Moiseff, Bianca; Tung, Joyce Y; Mountain, Joanna L

    2013-01-01

    Background. Inherited BRCA gene mutations convey a high risk for breast and ovarian cancer, but current guidelines limit BRCA mutation testing to women with early-onset cancer and relatives of mutation-positive cases. Benefits and risks of providing this information directly to consumers are unknown. Methods. To assess and quantify emotional and behavioral reactions of consumers to their 23andMe Personal Genome Service(®) report of three BRCA mutations that are common in Ashkenazi Jews, we invited all 136 BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation-positive individuals in the 23andMe customer database who had chosen to view their BRCA reports to participate in this IRB-approved study. We also invited 160 mutation-negative customers who were matched for age, sex and ancestry. Semi-structured phone interviews were completed for 32 mutation carriers, 16 women and 16 men, and 31 non-carriers. Questions addressed personal and family history of cancer, decision and timing of viewing the BRCA report, recollection of the result, emotional responses, perception of personal cancer risk, information sharing, and actions taken or planned. Results. Eleven women and 14 men had received the unexpected result that they are carriers of a BRCA1 185delAG or 5382insC, or BRCA2 6174delT mutation. None of them reported extreme anxiety and four experienced moderate anxiety that was transitory. Remarkably, five women and six men described their response as neutral. Most carrier women sought medical advice and four underwent risk-reducing procedures after confirmatory mutation testing. Male carriers realized that their test results implied genetic risk for female relatives, and several of them felt considerably burdened by this fact. Sharing mutation information with family members led to screening of at least 30 relatives and identification of 13 additional carriers. Non-carriers did not report inappropriate actions, such as foregoing cancer screening. All but one of the 32 mutation-positive participants

  9. PMS2 gene mutation results in DNA mismatch repair system failure in a case of adult granulosa cell tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Chung; Lee, Ya-Ting; Lai, Yen-Chein

    2017-03-27

    Granulosa cell tumors are rare ovarian malignancies. Their characteristics include unpredictable indolent growth with malignant potential and late recurrence. Approximately 95% are of adult type. Recent molecular studies have characterized the FOXL2 402C > G mutation in adult granulosa cell tumor. Our previous case report showed that unique FOXL2 402C > G mutation and defective DNA mismatch repair system are associated with the development of adult granulosa cell tumor. In this study, the DNA sequences of four genes, MSH2, MLH1, MSH6, and PMS2, in the DNA mismatch repair system were determined via direct sequencing to elucidate the exact mechanism for the development of this granulosa cell tumor. The results showed that two missense germline mutations, T485K and N775L, inactivate the PMS2 gene. The results of this case study indicated that although FOXL2 402C > G mutation determines the development of granulosa cell tumor, PMS2 mutation may be the initial driver of carcinogenesis. Immunohistochemistry-based tumor testing for mismatch repair gene expression may be necessary for granulosa cell tumors to determine their malignant potential or if they are part of Lynch syndrome.

  10. Mutation of the CH1 Domain in the Histone Acetyltransferase CREBBP Results in Autism-Relevant Behaviors in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Zheng

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs are a group of neurodevelopmental afflictions characterized by repetitive behaviors, deficits in social interaction, and impaired communication skills. For most ASD patients, the underlying causes are unknown. Genetic mutations have been identified in about 25 percent of ASD cases, including mutations in epigenetic regulators, suggesting that dysregulated chromatin or DNA function is a critical component of ASD. Mutations in the histone acetyltransferase CREB binding protein (CBP, CREBBP cause Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome (RTS, a developmental disorder that includes ASD-like symptoms. Recently, genomic studies involving large numbers of ASD patient families have theoretically modeled CBP and its paralog p300 (EP300 as critical hubs in ASD-associated protein and gene interaction networks, and have identified de novo missense mutations in highly conserved residues of the CBP acetyltransferase and CH1 domains. Here we provide animal model evidence that supports this notion that CBP and its CH1 domain are relevant to autism. We show that mice with a deletion mutation in the CBP CH1 (TAZ1 domain (CBPΔCH1/ΔCH1 have an RTS-like phenotype that includes ASD-relevant repetitive behaviors, hyperactivity, social interaction deficits, motor dysfunction, impaired recognition memory, and abnormal synaptic plasticity. Our results therefore indicate that loss of CBP CH1 domain function contributes to RTS, and possibly ASD, and that this domain plays an essential role in normal motor function, cognition and social behavior. Although the key physiological functions affected by ASD-associated mutation of epigenetic regulators have been enigmatic, our findings are consistent with theoretical models involving CBP and p300 in ASD, and with a causative role for recently described ASD-associated CBP mutations.

  11. A locus on 19p13 modifies risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers and is associated with hormone receptor-negative breast cancer in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary S

    2010-01-01

    diagnosis over age 35. We took forward 96 SNPs for replication in another 5,986 BRCA1 carriers (2,974 individuals with breast cancer and 3,012 unaffected individuals). Five SNPs on 19p13 were associated with breast cancer risk (P(trend) = 2.3 × 10¿¿ to P(trend) = 3.9 × 10¿7), two of which showed independent......Germline BRCA1 mutations predispose to breast cancer. To identify genetic modifiers of this risk, we performed a genome-wide association study in 1,193 individuals with BRCA1 mutations who were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer under age 40 and 1,190 BRCA1 carriers without breast cancer...... associations (rs8170, hazard ratio (HR) = 1.26, 95% CI 1.17-1.35; rs2363956 HR = 0.84, 95% CI 0.80-0.89). Genotyping these SNPs in 6,800 population-based breast cancer cases and 6,613 controls identified a similar association with estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer (rs2363956 per-allele odds ratio (OR...

  12. Biosemiotic Entropy of the Genome: Mutations and Epigenetic Imbalances Resulting in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel S. Shepard

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Biosemiotic entropy involves the deterioration of biological sign systems. The genome is a coded sign system that is connected to phenotypic outputs through the interpretive functions of the tRNA/ribosome machinery. This symbolic sign system (semiosis at the core of all biology has been termed “biosemiosis”. Layers of biosemiosis and cellular information management are analogous in varying degrees to the semiotics of computer programming, spoken, and written human languages. Biosemiotic entropy — an error or deviation from a healthy state — results from errors in copying functional information (mutations and errors in the appropriate context or quantity of gene expression (epigenetic imbalance. The concept of biosemiotic entropy is a deeply imbedded assumption in the study of cancer biology. Cells have a homeostatic, preprogrammed, ideal or healthy state that is rooted in genomics, strictly orchestrated by epigenetic regulation, and maintained by DNA repair mechanisms. Cancer is an eminent illustration of biosemiotic entropy, in which the corrosion of genetic information via substitutions, deletions, insertions, fusions, and aberrant regulation results in malignant phenotypes. However, little attention has been given to explicitly outlining the paradigm of biosemiotic entropy in the context of cancer. Herein we distill semiotic theory (from the familiar and well understood spheres of human language and computer code to draw analogies useful for understanding the operation of biological semiosis at the genetic level. We propose that the myriad checkpoints, error correcting mechanisms, and immunities are all systems whose primary role is to defend against the constant pressure of biosemiotic entropy, which malignancy must shut down in order to achieve advanced stages. In lieu of the narrower tumor suppressor/oncogene model, characterization of oncogenesis into the biosemiotic framework of sign, index, or object entropy may allow for more

  13. Experimental Evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Human Macrophages Results in Low-Frequency Mutations Not Associated with Selective Advantage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Guerrini

    Full Text Available Isolates of the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis recovered from clinical samples exhibit genetic heterogeneity. Such variation may result from the stressful environment encountered by the pathogen inside the macrophage, which is the host cell tubercle bacilli parasitize. To study the evolution of the M. tuberculosis genome during growth inside macrophages, we developed a model of intracellular culture in which bacteria were serially passaged in macrophage-like THP-1 cells for about 80 bacterial generations. Genome sequencing of single bacterial colonies isolated before and after the infection cycles revealed that M. tuberculosis developed mutations at a rate of about 5.7 × 10-9 / bp/ generation, consistent with mutation rates calculated during in vivo infection. Analysis of mutant growth in macrophages and in mice showed that the mutations identified after the cyclic infection conferred no advantage to the mutants relative to wild-type. Furthermore, activity testing of the recombinant protein harboring one of these mutations showed that the presence of the mutation did not affect the enzymatic activity. The serial infection protocol developed in this work to study M. tuberculosis genome microevolution can be applied to exposure to stressors to determine their effect on genome remodeling during intra-macrophage growth.

  14. Hemodynamic and clinical onset in patients with hereditary pulmonary arterial hypertension and BMPR2 mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiede Henning

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2 (BMPR2 gene can lead to idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH. This study prospectively screened for BMPR2 mutations in a large cohort of PAH-patients and compared clinical features between BMPR2 mutation carriers and non-carriers. Methods Patients have been assessed by right heart catheterization and genetic testing. In all patients a detailed family history and pedigree analysis have been obtained. We compared age at diagnosis and hemodynamic parameters between carriers and non-carriers of BMPR2 mutations. In non-carriers with familial aggregation of PAH further genes/gene regions as the BMPR2 promoter region, the ACVRL1, Endoglin, and SMAD8 genes have been analysed. Results Of the 231 index patients 22 revealed a confirmed familial aggregation of the disease (HPAH, 209 patients had sporadic IPAH. In 49 patients (86.3% of patients with familial aggregation and 14.3% of sporadic IPAH mutations of the BMPR2 gene have been identified. Twelve BMPR2 mutations and 3 unclassified sequence variants have not yet been described before. Mutation carriers were significantly younger at diagnosis than non-carriers (38.53 ± 12.38 vs. 45.78 ± 11.32 years, p Conclusion This study identified in a large prospectively assessed cohort of PAH- patients new BMPR2 mutations, which have not been described before and confirmed previous findings that mutation carriers are younger at diagnosis with a more severe hemodynamic compromise. Thus, screening for BMPR2 mutations may be clinically useful.

  15. A null mutation of Hhex results in abnormal cardiac development, defective vasculogenesis and elevated Vegfa levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallaq, Haifa; Pinter, Emese; Enciso, Josephine; McGrath, James; Zeiss, Caroline; Brueckner, Martina; Madri, Joseph; Jacobs, Harris C; Wilson, Christine M; Vasavada, Hemaxi; Jiang, Xiaobing; Bogue, Clifford W

    2004-10-01

    The homeobox gene Hhex has recently been shown to be essential for normal liver, thyroid and forebrain development. Hhex(-/-) mice die by mid-gestation (E14.5) and the cause of their early demise remains unclear. Because Hhex is expressed in the developing blood islands at E7.0 in the endothelium of the developing vasculature and heart at E9.0-9.5, and in the ventral foregut endoderm at E8.5-9.0, it has been postulated to play a critical role in heart and vascular development. We show here, for the first time, that a null mutation of Hhex results in striking abnormalities of cardiac and vascular development which include: (1) defective vasculogenesis, (2) hypoplasia of the right ventricle, (3) overabundant endocardial cushions accompanied by ventricular septal defects, outflow tract abnormalities and atrio-ventricular (AV) valve dysplasia and (4) aberrant development of the compact myocardium. The dramatic enlargement of the endocardial cushions in the absence of Hhex is due to decreased apoptosis and dysregulated epithelial-mesenchymal transformation (EMT). Interestingly, vascular endothelial growth factor A (Vegfa) levels in the hearts of Hhex(-/-) mice were elevated as much as three-fold between E9.5 and E11.5, and treatment of cultured Hhex(-/-) AV explants with truncated soluble Vegfa receptor 1, sFlt-1, an inhibitor of Vegf signaling, completely abolished the excessive epithelial-mesenchymal transformation seen in the absence of Hhex. Therefore, Hhex expression in the ventral foregut endoderm and/or the endothelium is necessary for normal cardiovascular development in vivo, and one function of Hhex is to repress Vegfa levels during development.

  16. Mutations in two regions of FLNB result in atelosteogenesis I and III

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farrington-Rock, Claire; Firestein, Marc H.; Bicknell, Louise S.; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Bacino, Carlos A.; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Le Merrer, Martine; Baumann, Clarisse; Roume, Joelle; Rump, Patrick; Verheij, Joke B. G. M.; Sweeney, Elizabeth; Rimoin, David L.; Lachman, Ralph S.; Robertson, Stephen P.; Cohn, Daniel H.; Krakow, Deborah

    The filamins are a family of cytoplasmic proteins that bind to and organize actin filaments, link membrane proteins to the cytoskeleton, and provide a scaffold for signaling molecules. Mutations in the gene encoding filamin B (FLNB) cause a spectrum of osteochondrodysplasias, including

  17. Common variants of the BRCA1 wild-type allele modify the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers.

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, D. G.; Simard, J.; Sinnett, D.; Hamdi, Y.; Soucy, P.; Ouimet, M.; Barjhoux, L.; Verny-Pierre, C.; McGuffog, L.; Healey, S.; Szabo, C.; Greene, M. H.; Mai, P. L.; Andrulis, I. L.; Thomassen, M.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 gene substantially increase a woman's lifetime risk of breast cancer. However, there is great variation in this increase in risk with several genetic and non-genetic modifiers identified. The BRCA1 protein plays a central role in DNA repair, a mechanism that is particularly instrumental in safeguarding cells against tumorigenesis. We hypothesized that polymorphisms that alter the expression and/or function of BRCA1 carried on the wild-type (non-mutated) copy of the BRCA...

  18. Increased Chromosomal Radiosensitivity in Women Carrying BRCA1/BRCA2 Mutations Assessed With the G2 Assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernestos, Beroukas; Nikolaos, Pandis; Koulis, Giannoukakos; Eleni, Rizou; Konstantinos, Beroukas; Alexandra, Giatromanolaki; Michael, Koukourakis

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Several in vitro studies suggest that BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers present increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Different assays for the assessment of deoxyribonucleic acid double-strand break repair capacity have been used, but results are rather inconsistent. Given the concerns about the possible risks of breast screening with mammography in mutation carrier women and the potentially damaging effects of radiotherapy, the purpose of this study was to further investigate the radiosensitivity of this population. Methods and Materials: The G2 chromosomal radiosensitivity assay was used to assess chromosomal breaks in lymphocyte cultures after exposure to 1 Gy. A group of familiar breast cancer patients carrying a mutation in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene (n = 15) and a group of healthy mutation carriers (n = 5) were investigated and compared with a reference group of healthy women carrying no mutation (n = 21). Results: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers had a significantly higher number of mean chromatid breaks per cell (p = 0.006) and a higher maximum number of breaks (p = 0.0001) as compared with their matched controls. Both healthy carriers and carriers with a cancer history were more radiosensitive than controls (p = 0.002 and p = 0.025, respectively). Age was not associated with increased radiosensitivity (p = 0.868). Conclusions: Our results indicate that BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers show enhanced radiosensitivity, presumably because of the involvement of the BRCA genes in deoxyribonucleic acid repair and cell cycle control mechanisms.

  19. Carriers of loss-of-function mutations in EXT display impaired pancreatic beta-cell reserve due to smaller pancreas volume.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie J Bernelot Moens

    Full Text Available Exotosin (EXT proteins are involved in the chain elongation step of heparan sulfate (HS biosynthesis, which is intricately involved in organ development. Loss of function mutations (LOF in EXT1 and EXT2 result in hereditary exostoses (HME. Interestingly, HS plays a role in pancreas development and beta-cell function, and genetic variations in EXT2 are associated with an increased risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus. We hypothesized that loss of function of EXT1 or EXT2 in subjects with hereditary multiple exostoses (HME affects pancreatic insulin secretion capacity and development. We performed an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT followed by hyperglycemic clamps to investigate first-phase glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS in HME patients and age and gender matched non-affected relatives. Pancreas volume was assessed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. OGTT did not reveal significant differences in glucose disposal, but there was a markedly lower GSIS in HME subjects during hyperglycemic clamp (iAUC HME: 0.72 [0.46-1.16] vs. controls 1.53 [0.69-3.36] nmol·l-1·min-1, p<0.05. Maximal insulin response following arginine challenge was also significantly attenuated (iAUC HME: 7.14 [4.22-10.5] vs. controls 10.2 [7.91-12.70] nmol·l-1·min-1 p<0.05, indicative of an impaired beta-cell reserve. MRI revealed a significantly smaller pancreatic volume in HME subjects (HME: 72.0±15.8 vs. controls 96.5±26.0 cm3 p = 0.04. In conclusion, loss of function of EXT proteins may affect beta-cell mass and insulin secretion capacity in humans, and render subjects at a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes when exposed to environmental risk factors.

  20. The effect of genotypes and parent of origin on cancer risk and age of cancer development in PMS2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suerink, Manon; van der Klift, Heleen M.; ten Broeke, Sanne W.; Dekkers, Olaf M.; Bernstein, Inge; Capella Munar, Gabriel; Gomez Garcia, Encarna; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Letteboer, Tom G. W.; Menko, Fred H.; Lindblom, Annika; Mensenkamp, Arjen; Moller, Pal; van Os, Theo A.; Rahner, Nils; Redeker, Bert J. W.; Olderode, Maran; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Vos, Yvonne J.; Wagner, Anja; Morreau, Hans; Hes, Frederik J.; Vasen, Hans F. A.; Tops, Carli M.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Nielsen, Maartje

    Purpose: Lynch syndrome (LS), a heritable disorder with an increased risk of primarily colorectal cancer (CRC) and endometrial cancer (EC), can be caused by mutations in the PMS2 gene. We wished to establish whether genotype and/or parent-of-origin effects (POE) explain (part of) the reported

  1. The effect of genotypes and parent of origin on cancer risk and age of cancer development in PMS2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suerink, Manon; van der Klift, Heleen M; Ten Broeke, Sanne W; Dekkers, Olaf M; Bernstein, Inge; Capellá Munar, Gabriel; Gomez Garcia, Encarna; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Letteboer, Tom G W; Menko, Fred H; Lindblom, Annika; Mensenkamp, Arjen; Moller, Pal; van Os, Theo A; Rahner, Nils; Redeker, Bert J W; Olderode, Maran; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Vos, Yvonne J; Wagner, Anja; Morreau, Hans; Hes, Frederik J; Vasen, Hans F A; Tops, Carli M; Wijnen, Juul T; Nielsen, Maartje

    PURPOSE: Lynch syndrome (LS), a heritable disorder with an increased risk of primarily colorectal cancer (CRC) and endometrial cancer (EC), can be caused by mutations in the PMS2 gene. We wished to establish whether genotype and/or parent-of-origin effects (POE) explain (part of) the reported

  2. The effect of genotypes and parent of origin on cancer risk and age of cancer development in PMS2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suerink, Manon; van der Klift, Heleen M.; ten Broeke, Sanne W.; Dekkers, Olaf M.; Bernstein, Inge; Capellá Munar, Gabriel; Gomez Garcia, Encarna; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Letteboer, Tom G. W.; Menko, Fred H.; Lindblom, Annika; Mensenkamp, Arjen; Moller, Pal; van Os, Theo A.; Rahner, Nils; Redeker, Bert J. W.; Olderode-Berends, M. J. W.; Olderode, Maran; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Vos, Yvonne J.; Wagner, Anja; Morreau, Hans; Hes, Frederik J.; Vasen, Hans F. A.; Tops, Carli M.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Nielsen, Maartje

    2016-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS), a heritable disorder with an increased risk of primarily colorectal cancer (CRC) and endometrial cancer (EC), can be caused by mutations in the PMS2 gene. We wished to establish whether genotype and/or parent-of-origin effects (POE) explain (part of) the reported variability in

  3. The effect of genotypes and parent of origin on cancer risk and age of cancer development in PMS2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suerink, M.; Klift, H.M. van der; Broeke, S.W. ten; Dekkers, O.M.; Bernstein, I.; Capella Munar, G.; Garcia, E.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Letteboer, T.G.; Menko, F.H.; Lindblom, A.; Mensenkamp, A.; Moller, P.; Os, T.A. van; Rahner, N.; Redeker, B.J.; Olderode-Berends, M.J.; Spruijt, L.; Vos, Y.J.; Wagner, A.; Morreau, H.; Hes, F.J.; Vasen, H.F.A.; Tops, C.M.; Wijnen, J.T.; Nielsen, M.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Lynch syndrome (LS), a heritable disorder with an increased risk of primarily colorectal cancer (CRC) and endometrial cancer (EC), can be caused by mutations in the PMS2 gene. We wished to establish whether genotype and/or parent-of-origin effects (POE) explain (part of) the reported

  4. An original phylogenetic approach identified mitochondrial haplogroup T1a1 as inversely associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blein, Sophie; Bardel, Claire; Danjean, Vincent; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Dennis, Joe; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C.; Hansen, Thomas vO; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Conejero, Raquel Andrés; Segota, Ena; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Thelander, Margo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Radice, Paolo; Pensotti, Valeria; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Manoukian, Siranoush; Varesco, Liliana; Capone, Gabriele L.; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Donaldson, Alan; Brady, Angela; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Douglas, Fiona; Cook, Jackie; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Tischkowitz, Marc; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Eeles, Ros; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K.; Isaacs, Claudine; Claes, Kathleen; de Leeneer, Kim; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Markov, Nadja Bogdanova; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; de Pauw, Antoine; Lefol, Cédrick; Lasset, Christine; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Damiola, Francesca; Dreyfus, Hélène; Barjhoux, Laure; Golmard, Lisa; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bonadona, Valérie; Sornin, Valérie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Carter, Jonathan; van Le, Linda; Piedmonte, Marion; DiSilvestro, Paul A.; de la Hoya, Miguel; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Jager, Agnes; van den Ouweland, Ans Mw; Kets, Carolien M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Hogervorst, Frans Bl; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne Ej; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; van Roozendaal, Kees Ep; Rookus, Matti A.; Devilee, Peter; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Teulé, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; del Valle, Jesús; Jakubowska, Anna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Maugard, Christine; Amadori, Alberto; Montagna, Marco; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Foulkes, William; Olswold, Curtis; Lindor, Noralane M.; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Lincoln, Anne; Jacobs, Lauren; Corines, Marina; Robson, Mark; Vijai, Joseph; Berger, Andreas; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; tea, Muy-Kheng; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Andrulis, Irene L.; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria A.; Friedman, Eitan; Zidan, Jamal; Laitman, Yael; Lindblom, Annika; Melin, Beatrice; Arver, Brita; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Ramus, Susan J.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Mitchell, Gillian; Karlan, Beth Y.; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Thomas, Gilles; Simard, Jacques; Couch, Fergus J.; Offit, Kenneth; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Phelan, Catherine M.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Cox, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals carrying pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have a high lifetime risk of breast cancer. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in DNA double-strand break repair, DNA alterations that can be caused by exposure to reactive oxygen species, a main source of which are mitochondria.

  5. An original phylogenetic approach identified mitochondrial haplogroup T1a1 as inversely associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blein, Sophie; Bardel, Claire; Danjean, Vincent; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Dennis, Joe; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Andres Conejero, Raquel; Segota, Ena; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Thelander, Margo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Radice, Paolo; Pensotti, Valeria; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Manoukian, Siranoush; Varesco, Liliana; Capone, Gabriele L.; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Donaldson, Alan; Brady, Angela; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Douglas, Fiona; Cook, Jackie; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Tischkowitz, Marc; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Eeles, Ros; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K.; Isaacs, Claudine; Claes, Kathleen; De Leeneer, Kim; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Markov, Nadja Bogdanova; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; de Pauw, Antoine; Lefol, Cedrick; Lasset, Christine; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Damiola, Francesca; Dreyfus, Helene; Barjhoux, Laure; Golmard, Lisa; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bonadona, Valerie; Sornin, Valerie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Carter, Jonathan; Van Le, Linda; Piedmonte, Marion; DiSilvestro, Paul A.; de la Hoya, Miguel; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Jager, Agnes; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Kets, Carolien M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; van Roozendaal, Kees E. P.; Rookus, Matti A.; Devilee, Peter; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Teule, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Del Valle, Jesus; Jakubowska, Anna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Maugard, Christine; Amadori, Alberto; Montagna, Marco; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Foulkes, William; Olswold, Curtis; Lindor, Noralane M.; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Lincoln, Anne; Jacobs, Lauren; Corines, Marina; Robson, Mark; Vijai, Joseph; Berger, Andreas; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Andrulis, Irene L.; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria A.; Friedman, Eitan; Zidan, Jamal; Laitman, Yael; Lindblom, Annika; Melin, Beatrice; Arver, Brita; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Ramus, Susan J.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Mitchell, Gillian; Karlan, Beth Y.; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Thomas, Gilles; Simard, Jacques; Couch, Fergus J.; Offit, Kenneth; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Phelan, Catherine M.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Cox, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Individuals carrying pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have a high lifetime risk of breast cancer. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in DNA double-strand break repair, DNA alterations that can be caused by exposure to reactive oxygen species, a main source of which are

  6. An original phylogenetic approach identified mitochondrial haplogroup T1a1 as inversely associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Blein (Sophie); C. Bardel (Claire); V. Danjean (Vincent); L. McGuffog (Lesley); S. Healey (Sue); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); A. Lee (Andrew); J. Dennis (Joe); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); P. Soucy (Penny); M.B. Terry (Mary Beth); W. Chung (Wendy); D. Goldgar (David); S.S. Buys (Saundra); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); L. Tihomirova (Laima); N. Tung (Nadine); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); F. Nielsen (Finn); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); A. Osorio (Ana); J. Benítez (Javier); R.A. Conejero (Raquel Andrés); E. Segota (Ena); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); M. Thelander (Margo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); P. Radice (Paolo); V. Pensotti (Valeria); R. Dolcetti (Riccardo); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (D.); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); L. Varesco (Liliana); G.L. Capone (Gabriele L.); L. Papi (Laura); L. Ottini (Laura); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); I. Konstantopoulou (I.); J. Garber (Judy); U. Hamann (Ute); A. Donaldson (Alan); A. Brady (A.); C. Brewer (Carole); C. Foo (Claire); D.G. Evans (Gareth); D. Frost (Debra); D. Eccles (Diana); F. Douglas (Fiona); J. Cook (Jackie); L. Adlard; J. Barwell (Julian); L.J. Walker (Lisa); L. Izatt (Louise); L. Side (Lucy); M.J. Kennedy (John); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); M.T. Rogers (Mark); M.E. Porteous (Mary); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); R. Platte (Radka); R. Eeles (Ros); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); S. Hodgson (Shirley); T.J. Cole (Trevor); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); C. Isaacs (Claudine); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); K. De Leeneer (Kim); A. Meindl (Alfons); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); C. Sutter (Christian); C. Engel (Christoph); D. Niederacher (Dieter); D. Steinemann (Doris); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); K. Kast (Karin); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); S. Preisler-Adams (Sabine); N.B. Markov (Nadja Bogdanova); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); A. de Pauw (Antoine); C. Lefol (Cédrick); C. Lasset (Christine); D. Leroux (Dominique); E. Rouleau (Etienne); F. Damiola (Francesca); H. Dreyfus (Hélène); L. Barjhoux (Laure); L. Golmard (Lisa); N. Uhrhammer (Nancy); V. Bonadona (Valérie); V. Sornin (Valérie); Y.-J. Bignon (Yves-Jean); J. Carter (Jonathan); L. van Le (Linda); M. Piedmonte (Marion); P. DiSilvestro (Paul); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); T. Caldes (Trinidad); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); A. Jager (Agnes); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); C.M. Kets; C.M. Aalfs (Cora); F.E. van Leeuwen (F.); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); J.C. Oosterwijk (Jan); K.E. van Roozendaal (Kees); M.A. Rookus (M.); P. Devilee (Peter); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); E. Olah; O. Díez (Orland); A. Teulé (A.); C. Lazaro (Conxi); I. Blanco (Ignacio); J. Del Valle (Jesús); A. Jakubowska (Anna); G. Sukiennicki (Grzegorz); J. Gronwald (Jacek); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Durda (Katarzyna); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); B.A. Agnarsson (Bjarni); C. Maugard; A. Amadori (Alberto); M. Montagna (Marco); P.J. Teixeira; A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); W.D. Foulkes (William); C. Olswold (Curtis); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); C. Szabo (Csilla); A. Lincoln (Anne); L. Jacobs (Lauren); M. Corines (Marina); M. Robson (Mark); J. Vijai (Joseph); A. Berger (Andreas); A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport (Christine); D.G. Kaulich (Daphne Gschwantler); G. Pfeiler (Georg); M.-K. Tea; M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); G. Rennert (Gad); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); G. Glendon (Gord); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); S. Tchatchou (Sandrine); A.E. Toland (Amanda); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); M. Thomassen (Mads); T.A. Kruse (Torben); U.B. Jensen; M.A. Caligo (Maria); E. Friedman (Eitan); J. Zidan (Jamal); Y. Laitman (Yael); A. Lindblom (Annika); B. Melin (Beatrice); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); N. Loman (Niklas); R. Rosenquist (R.); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); R. Nussbaum (Robert); S.J. Ramus (Susan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); B.K. Arun (Banu); G. Mitchell (Gillian); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); S. Orsulic (Sandra); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); G. Thomas (Gilles); J. Simard (Jacques); F.J. Couch (Fergus); K. Offit (Kenneth); D.F. Easton (Douglas); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); C. Phelan (Catherine); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); D.G. Cox (David)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Individuals carrying pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have a high lifetime risk of breast cancer. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in DNA double-strand break repair, DNA alterations that can be caused by exposure to reactive oxygen species, a main source of

  7. A nonsynonymous polymorphism in IRS1 modifies risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and ovarian cancer in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Yuan C; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported significant associations between genetic variants in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and breast cancer risk in women carrying BRCA1 mutations. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the IRS1 variants modified ovarian cancer risk and were associated wit...

  8. A Nonsynonymous Polymorphism in IRS1 Modifies Risk of Developing Breast and Ovarian Cancers in BRCA1 and Ovarian Cancer in BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ding, Yuan C.; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Paluch-Shimon, Shani-; Kaufman, Bella; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Byrski, Tomasz; Osorio, Ana; Cajal, Teresa Ramóny; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V.; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; Aalfs, Cora M.; de Lange, Judith L.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Gómez García, Encarna B.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Jager, Agnes; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Easton, Douglas F.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Tischkowitz, Marc; Godwin, Andrew K.; Pathak, Harsh; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Léoné, Mélanie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Dreyfus, Hélène; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Sokolowska, Johanna; Buys, Saundra; Daly, Mary; Miron, Alex; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy; John, Esther M.; Southey, Melissa; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F.; tea, Muy-Kheng Maria; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Johannsson, Oskar T.; Offit, Kenneth; Sarrel, Kara; Gaudet, Mia M.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Piedmonte, Marion R.; Andrews, Lesley; Cohn, David; DeMars, Leslie R.; DiSilvestro, Paul; Rodriguez, Gustavo; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Isaacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Ramus, Susan J.; Sucheston, Lara; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Ganz, Patricia A.; Beattie, Mary S.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Arnold, Norbert; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorotehea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Tomlinson, Gail E.; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Garber, Judy E.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Tung, Nadine; Blum, Joanne L.; Narod, Steven A.; Brummel, Sean; Gillen, Daniel L.; Lindor, Noralane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Couch, Fergus J.; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Lee, Andrew; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Neuhausen, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: We previously reported significant associations between genetic variants in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and breast cancer risk in women carrying BRCA1 mutations. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the IRS1 variants modified ovarian cancer risk and were

  9. Common variants of the BRCA1 wild-type allele modify the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, David G.; Simard, Jacques; Sinnett, Daniel; Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Ouimet, Manon; Barjhoux, Laure; Verny-Pierre, Carole; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Szabo, Csilla; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Caligo, Maria A.; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Kaufman, Bella; Paluch, Shani S.; Borg, Åke; Karlsson, Per; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark; Bustinza, Gisela Barbany; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti A.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Devilee, Peter; Gille, Hans J. J. P.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Paterson, Joan; Eason, Jacqueline; Godwin, Andrew K.; Remon, Marie-Alice; Moncoutier, Virginie; van Os, T. A.; Meijers-Heijboer, H. E. J.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 gene substantially increase a woman's lifetime risk of breast cancer. However, there is great variation in this increase in risk with several genetic and non-genetic modifiers identified. The BRCA1 protein plays a central role in DNA repair, a mechanism that is particularly

  10. Common variants of the BRCA1 wild-type allele modify the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, David G; Simard, Jacques; Sinnett, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 gene substantially increase a woman's lifetime risk of breast cancer. However, there is great variation in this increase in risk with several genetic and non-genetic modifiers identified. The BRCA1 protein plays a central role in DNA repair, a mechanism that is particularly...

  11. A Nonsynonymous Polymorphism in IRS1 Modifies Risk of Developing Breast and Ovarian Cancers in BRCA1 and Ovarian Cancer in BRCA2 Mutation Carriers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ding, Y.C.; McGuffog, L.; Healey, S.; Friedman, E.; Laitman, Y.; Paluch-Shimon, S.; Kaufman, B.; Liljegren, A.; Lindblom, A.; Olsson, H.; Kristoffersson, U.; Stenmark-Askmalm, M.; Melin, B.; Domchek, S.M.; Nathanson, K.L.; Rebbeck, T.R.; Jakubowska, A.; Lubinski, J.; Jaworska, K.; Durda, K.; Gronwald, J.; Huzarski, T.; Cybulski, C.; Byrski, T.; Osorio, A.; Cajal, T.R.; Stavropoulou, A.V.; Benitez, J.; Hamann, U.; Rookus, M.; Aalfs, C.M.; Lange, J.L. de; Meijers-Heijboer, H.E.; Oosterwijk, J.C.; Asperen, C.J. van; Gomez Garcia, E.B.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Jager, A.; Luijt, R.B. van der; Easton, D.F.; Peock, S.; Frost, D.; Ellis, S.D.; Platte, R.; Fineberg, E.; Evans, D.G.; Lalloo, F.; Izatt, L.; Eeles, R.; Adlard, J.; Davidson, R.; Eccles, D.; Cole, T.; Cook, J.; Brewer, C.; Tischkowitz, M.; Godwin, A.K.; Pathak, H.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D.; Sinilnikova, O.M.; Mazoyer, S.; Barjhoux, L.; Leone, M.; Gauthier-Villars, M.; Caux-Moncoutier, V.; Pauw, A. de; Hardouin, A.; Berthet, P.; Dreyfus, H.; Ferrer, S.F.; Collonge-Rame, M.A.; Sokolowska, J.; Buys, S.; Daly, M.; Miron, A.; Terry, M.B.; Chung, W.; John, E.M.; Southey, M.; Goldgar, D.; Singer, C.F.; Tea, M.K.; Gschwantler-Kaulich, D.; Fink-Retter, A.; Hansen, T.V.; Ejlertsen, B.; Johannsson, O.T.; Offit, K.; Sarrel, K.; Gaudet, M.M.; Vijai, J.; Robson, M.; Piedmonte, M.R.; Andrews, L.; Cohn, D.; Demars, L.R.; Disilvestro, P.; Rodriguez, G.; Toland, A.E.; Montagna, M.; Agata, S.; Imyanitov, E.; Isaacs, C.; Janavicius, R.; Lazaro, C.; Blanco, I.; Ramus, S.J.; Sucheston, L.; Karlan, B.Y.; Gross, J.; Ganz, P.A.; Beattie, M.S.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Wappenschmidt, B.; Meindl, A.; Arnold, N.; Niederacher, D.; Preisler-Adams, S.; Gadzicki, D.; Varon-Mateeva, R.; Deissler, H.; Gehrig, A.; Sutter, C.; Kast, K.; Nevanlinna, H.; Aittomaki, K.; Simard, J.; Spurdle, A.B.; Beesley, J.; Chen, X.; Tomlinson, G.E.; Weitzel, J.; Garber, J.E.; Olopade, O.I.; Rubinstein, W.S.; Tung, N.; Blum, J.L.; Narod, S.A.; Brummel, S.; Gillen, D.L.; Lindor, N.; Fredericksen, Z.; Pankratz, V.S.; Couch, F.J.; Radice, P.; Peterlongo, P.; Greene, M.H.; Loud, J.T.; Mai, P.L.; Andrulis, I.L.; Glendon, G.; Ozcelik, H.; Gerdes, A.M.; Thomassen, M.; Jensen, U.B.; Skytte, A.B.; Caligo, M.A.; Lee, A.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Antoniou, A.C.; Neuhausen, S.L.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We previously reported significant associations between genetic variants in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and breast cancer risk in women carrying BRCA1 mutations. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the IRS1 variants modified ovarian cancer risk and were

  12. Common variants of the BRCA1 wild-type allele modify the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, D.G.; Simard, J.; Sinnett, D.; Hamdi, Y.; Soucy, P.; Ouimet, M.; Barjhoux, L.; Verny-Pierre, C.; McGuffog, L.; Healey, S.; Szabo, C.; Greene, M.H.; Mai, P.L.; Andrulis, I.L.; Thomassen, M.; Gerdes, A.M.; Caligo, M.A.; Friedman, E.; Laitman, Y.; Kaufman, B.; Paluch, S.S.; Borg, A.; Karlsson, P.; Askmalm, M.S.; Bustinza, G.B.; Nathanson, K.L.; Domchek, S.M.; Rebbeck, T.R.; Benitez, J.; Hamann, U.; Rookus, M.A.; Ouweland, A.M. van den; Ausems, M.G.; Aalfs, C.M.; Asperen, C.J. van; Devilee, P.; Gille, H.J.; Peock, S.; Frost, D.; Evans, D.G.; Eeles, R.; Izatt, L.; Adlard, J.; Paterson, J.; Eason, J.; Godwin, A.K.; Remon, M.A.; Moncoutier, V.; Gauthier-Villars, M.; Lasset, C.; Giraud, S.; Hardouin, A.; Berthet, P.; Sobol, H.; Eisinger, F.; Bressac de Paillerets, B.; Caron, O.; Delnatte, C.; Goldgar, D.; Miron, A.; Ozcelik, H.; Buys, S.; Southey, M.C.; Terry, M.B.; Singer, C.F.; Dressler, A.C.; Tea, M.K.; Hansen, T.V.; Johannsson, O.; Piedmonte, M.; Rodriguez, G.C.; Basil, J.B.; Blank, S.; Toland, A.E.; Montagna, M.; Isaacs, C.; Blanco, I.; Gayther, S.A.; Moysich, K.B.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Wappenschmidt, B.; Engel, C.; Meindl, A.; Ditsch, N.; Arnold, N.; Niederacher, D.; Sutter, C.; Gadzicki, D.; Fiebig, B.; Caldes, T.; Laframboise, R.; Nevanlinna, H.; Chen, X.; Beesley, J.; Spurdle, A.B.; Neuhausen, S.L.; Ding, Y.C.; Couch, F.J.; Wang, X.; Peterlongo, P.; Manoukian, S.; Bernard, L.; Radice, P.; Easton, D.F.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Antoniou, A.C.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D.; Mazoyer, S.; Sinilnikova, O.M.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; et al.,

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 gene substantially increase a woman's lifetime risk of breast cancer. However, there is great variation in this increase in risk with several genetic and non-genetic modifiers identified. The BRCA1 protein plays a central role in DNA repair, a mechanism that is particularly

  13. A Nonsynonymous Polymorphism in IRS1 Modifies Risk of Developing Breast and Ovarian Cancers in BRCA1 and Ovarian Cancer in BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ding, Yuan C.; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Shani-Paluch-Shimon, [No Value; Kaufman, Bella; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Hakan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Byrski, Tomasz; Osorio, Ana; Ramony Cajal, Teresa; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V.; Benitez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; Aalfs, Cora M.; de Lange, Judith L.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Garcia, Encarna B. Gomez; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Jager, Agnes; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Easton, Douglas F.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian

    Background: We previously reported significant associations between genetic variants in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and breast cancer risk in women carrying BRCA1 mutations. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the IRS1 variants modified ovarian cancer risk and were

  14. A nonsynonymous polymorphism in IRS1 modifies risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and ovarian cancer in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.C. Ding (Yuan); L. McGuffog (Lesley); S. Healey (Sue); E. Friedman (Eitan); Y. Laitman (Yael); S.-P. Shimon (Shani-Paluch); B. Kaufman (Bella); A. Liljegren (Annelie); A. Lindblom (Annika); H. Olsson; U. Kristoffersson (Ulf); M. Stenmark-Askmalm (M.); B. Melin (Beatrice); S.M. Domchek (Susan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Jaworska (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); J. Gronwald (Jacek); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); C. Cybulski (Cezary); T. Byrski (Tomasz); A. Osorio (Ana); T.R. Cajal; A. Stavropoulou (Alexandra); J. Benítez (Javier); U. Hamann (Ute); M.A. Rookus (Matti); C.M. Aalfs (Cora); J.L. de Lange (J.); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); J.C. Oosterwijk (Jan); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); N. Hoogerbrugge (Nicoline); A. Jager (Agnes); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); D.F. Easton (Douglas); S. Peock (Susan); D. Frost (Debra); S.D. Ellis (Steve); R. Platte (Radka); E. Fineberg (Elena); D.G. Evans (Gareth); F. Lalloo (Fiona); L. Izatt (Louise); R. Eeles (Rosalind); J.W. Adlard (Julian); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); D. Eccles (Diana); T.J. Cole (Trevor); J. Cook (Jackie); C. Brewer (Carole); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); S.S. Pathak; D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); L. Barjhoux (Laure); M. Léone (Mélanie); M. Gauthier-Villars (Marion); V. Caux-Moncoutier (Virginie); A. de Pauw (Antoine); A. Hardouin (Agnès); P. Berthet (Pascaline); H. Dreyfus (Hélène); S.F. Ferrer; M.-A. Collonge-Rame; J. Sokolowska (Johanna); S.S. Buys (Saundra); M.B. Daly (Mary); A. Miron (Alexander); M.-B. Terry (Mary-Beth); W. Chung (Wendy); E.M. John (Esther); M.C. Southey (Melissa); D. Goldgar (David); C.F. Singer (Christian); M.-K. Tea; D. Gschwantler-Kaulich (Daphne); A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); O.T. Johannson (Oskar); K. Offit (Kenneth); K. Sarrel (Kara); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); J. Vijai (Joseph); M. Robson (Mark); M. Piedmonte (Marion); L. Andrews (Lesley); D.E. Cohn (David); L.R. DeMars (Leslie); P. DiSilvestro (Paul); G.C. Rodriguez (Gustavo); A.E. Toland (Amanda); M. Montagna (Marco); S. Agata (Simona); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); C. Isaacs (Claudine); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); C. Lazaro (Conxi); I. Blanco (Ignacio); S.J. Ramus (Susan); L. Sucheston (Lara); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); J. Gross (Jenny); P.A. Ganz (Patricia); M.S. Beattie (Mary); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); A. Meindl (Alfons); N. Arnold (Norbert); D. Niederacher (Dieter); S. Preisler-Adams (Sabine); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); H. Deissler (Helmut); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); C. Sutter (Christian); K. Kast (Karin); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); J. Simard (Jacques); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); J. Beesley (Jonathan); X. Chen (Xiaoqing); G. Tomlinson (Gail); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); J. Garber; O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); W.S. Rubinstein (Wendy); N. Tung (Nadine); J.L. Blum (Joanne); S. Narod (Steven); S. Brummel (Sean); D.L. Gillen (Daniel); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); F.J. Couch (Fergus); P. Radice (Paolo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); M.H. Greene (Mark); J.T. Loud (Jennifer); P.L. Mai (Phuong); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); G. Glendon (Gord); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); M. Thomassen (Mads); U.B. Jensen; A.-B. Skytte (Anne-Bine); M.A. Caligo (Maria); A. Lee (Andrew); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: We previously reported significant associations between genetic variants in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and breast cancer risk inwomen carrying BRCA1 mutations. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the IRS1 variants modified ovarian cancer risk and

  15. An original phylogenetic approach identified mitochondrial haplogroup T1a1 as inversely associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blein, S.; Bardel, C.; Danjean, V.; McGuffog, L.; Healey, S.; Barrowdale, D.; Lee, A.; Dennis, J.; Kuchenbaecker, K.B.; Soucy, P.; Terry, M.B.; Chung, W.K.; Goldgar, D.E.; Buys, S.S.; Janavicius, R.; Tihomirova, L.; Tung, N.; Dorfling, C.M.; Rensburg, E.J. van; Neuhausen, S.L.; Ding, Y.C.; Gerdes, A.M.; Ejlertsen, B.; Nielsen, F.C.; Hansen, T.V.; Osorio, A.; Benitez, J.; Conejero, R.A.; Segota, E.; Weitzel, J.N.; Thelander, M.; Peterlongo, P.; Radice, P.; Pensotti, V.; Dolcetti, R.; Bonanni, B.; Peissel, B.; Zaffaroni, D.; Scuvera, G.; Manoukian, S.; Varesco, L.; Capone, G.L.; Papi, L.; Ottini, L.; Yannoukakos, D.; Konstantopoulou, I.; Garber, J.; Hamann, U.; Donaldson, A.; Brady, A.; Brewer, C.; Foo, C.; Evans, D.G.; Frost, D.; Eccles, D.; Douglas, F.; Cook, J.; Adlard, J.; Barwell, J.; Walker, L.; Izatt, L.; Side, L.E.; Kennedy, M.J.; Tischkowitz, M.; Rogers, M.T.; Porteous, M.E.; Morrison, P.J.; Platte, R.; Eeles, R.; Davidson, R.; Hodgson, S.; Cole, T.; Godwin, A.K.; Isaacs, C.; Claes, K.; Leeneer, K. De; Meindl, A.; Gehrig, A.; Wappenschmidt, B.; Sutter, C.; Engel, C.; Niederacher, D.; Steinemann, D.; Plendl, H.; Kast, K.; Rhiem, K.; Ditsch, N.; Arnold, N.; Varon-Mateeva, R.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Preisler-Adams, S.; Markov, N.B.; Wang-Gohrke, S.; Pauw, A. de; Lefol, C.; Lasset, C.; Leroux, D.; Rouleau, E.; Damiola, F.; Dreyfus, H.; Barjhoux, L.; Golmard, L.; Uhrhammer, N.; Bonadona, V.; Sornin, V.; Bignon, Y.J.; Carter, J.; Le, L; Piedmonte, M.; DiSilvestro, P.A.; Hoya, M. de la; Caldes, T.; Nevanlinna, H.; Aittomaki, K.; Jager, A.; Ouweland, A.M. van den; Kets, C.M.; Aalfs, C.M.; Leeuwen, F.E. van; Hogervorst, F.B.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.E.; Oosterwijk, J.C.; Roozendaal, K.E. van; Rookus, M.A.; Devilee, P.; Luijt, R.B. van der; Olah, E.; Diez, O.; Teule, A.; Lazaro, C.; Blanco, I.; Valle, J.; Jakubowska, A.; Sukiennicki, G.; Gronwald, J.; Lubinski, J.; Durda, K.; Jaworska-Bieniek, K.; Agnarsson, B.A.; Maugard, C.; Amadori, A.; Montagna, M.; Teixeira, M.R.; Spurdle, A.B.; Foulkes, W.; Olswold, C.; Lindor, N.M.; Pankratz, V.S.; Szabo, C.I.; Lincoln, A.; Jacobs, L.; Corines, M.; Robson, M.; Vijai, J.; Berger, A.; Fink-Retter, A.; Singer, C.F.; Rappaport, C.; Kaulich, D.G.; Pfeiler, G.; Tea, M.K.; Greene, M.H.; Mai, P.L.; Rennert, G.; Imyanitov, E.N.; Mulligan, A.M.; Glendon, G.; Andrulis, I.L.; Tchatchou, S.; Toland, A.E.; Pedersen, I.S.; Thomassen, M.; Kruse, T.A.; Jensen, U.B.; Caligo, M.A.; Friedman, E.; Zidan, J.; Laitman, Y.; Lindblom, A.; Melin, B.; Arver, B.; Loman, N.; Rosenquist, R.; Olopade, O.I.; Nussbaum, R.L.; Ramus, S.J.; Nathanson, K.L.; Domchek, S.M.; Rebbeck, T.R.; Arun, B.K.; Mitchell, G.; Karlan, B.Y.; Lester, J.; Orsulic, S.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D.; Thomas, G; Simard, J.; Couch, F.J.; Offit, K.; Easton, D.F.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Antoniou, A.C.; Mazoyer, S.; Phelan, C.M.; Sinilnikova, O.M.; Cox, D.G.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Individuals carrying pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have a high lifetime risk of breast cancer. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in DNA double-strand break repair, DNA alterations that can be caused by exposure to reactive oxygen species, a main source of which are

  16. Renal cancer and pneumothorax risk in Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome; an analysis of 115 FLCN mutation carriers from 35 BHD families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houweling, A. C.; Gijezen, L. M.; Jonker, M. A.; van Doorn, M. B. A.; Oldenburg, R. A.; van Spaendonck-Zwarts, K. Y.; Leter, E. M.; van Os, T. A.; van Grieken, N. C. T.; Jaspars, E. H.; de Jong, M. M.; Bongers, E. M. H. F.; Johannesma, P. C.; Postmus, P. E.; van Moorselaar, R. J. A.; van Waesberghe, J-H T. M.; Starink, T. M.; van Steensel, M. A. M.; Gille, J. J. P.; Menko, F. H.

    2011-01-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition caused by germline FLCN mutations, and characterised by fibrofolliculomas, pneumothorax and renal cancer. The renal cancer risk, cancer phenotype and pneumothorax risk of BHD have not yet been fully clarified. The main focus of this

  17. Renal cancer and pneumothorax risk in Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome; an analysis of 115 FLCN mutation carriers from 35 BHD families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houweling, A. C.; Gijezen, L. M.; Jonker, M. A.; van Doorn, M. B. A.; Oldenburg, R. A.; van Spaendonck-Zwarts, K. Y.; Leter, E. M.; van Os, T. A.; van Grieken, N. C. T.; Jaspars, E. H.; de Jong, M. M.; Johannesma, P. C.; Postmus, P. E.; van Moorselaar, R. J. A.; van Waesberghe, J-H T. M.; Starink, T. M.; van Steensel, M. A. M.; Gille, J. J. P.; Menko, F. H.; Bongers, Ernie M. H. F.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Birt-Hogg-Dube (BHD) syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition caused by germline FLCN mutations, and characterised by fibrofolliculomas, pneumothorax and renal cancer. The renal cancer risk, cancer phenotype and pneumothorax risk of BHD have not yet been fully clarified. The main

  18. Associations of common breast cancer susceptibility alleles with risk of breast cancer subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Robson, Mark; Barrowdale, Daniel; McGuffog, Lesley; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Andrulis, Irene L.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Engel, Christoph; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Nevanlinna, Heli; Thomassen, Mads; Southey, Melissa; Radice, Paolo; Ramus, Susan J.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Lee, Andrew; Healey, Sue; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; James, Paul; Karlan, Beth Y.; Lester, Jenny; Cass, Ilana; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary B.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Steele, Linda; v O Hansen, Thomas; Ejlertsen, Bent; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Nielsen, Finn C.; Dennis, Joe; Cunningham, Julie; Hart, Steven; Slager, Susan; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Duran, Mercedes; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Tafur, Isaac; Hander, Mary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Roversi, Gaia; Scuvera, Giulietta; Bonanni, Bernardo; Mariani, Paolo; Volorio, Sara; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Varesco, Liliana; Papi, Laura; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Giannini, Giuseppe; Fostira, Florentia; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Donaldson, Alan; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Douglas, Fiona; Brady, Angela; Cook, Jackie; Tischkowitz, Marc; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Ong, Kai-Ren; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Eeles, Ros; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Ellis, Steve; Godwin, Andrew K.; Rhiem, Kerstin; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Steinemann, Doris; Bogdanova-Markov, Nadja; Kast, Karin; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Gehrig, Andrea; Markiefka, Birgid; Buecher, Bruno; Lefol, Cédrick; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Prieur, Fabienne; Damiola, Francesca; Barjhoux, Laure; Faivre, Laurence; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bonadona, Valérie; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Isaacs, Claudine; van Maerken, Tom; Claes, Kathleen; Piedmonte, Marion; Andrews, Lesley; Hays, John; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Khan, Sofia; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Aalfs, Cora M.; de Lange, J. L.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Wijnen, Juul T.; van Roozendaal, K. E. P.; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Teulé, Alex; Menendez, Mireia; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Arason, Adalgeir; Maugard, Christine; Soucy, Penny; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Olswold, Curtis; Lindor, Noralane; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Hallberg, Emily; Wang, Xianshu; Szabo, Csilla I.; Vijai, Joseph; Jacobs, Lauren; Corines, Marina; Lincoln, Anne; Berger, Andreas; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Gschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; tea, Muy-Kheng; Phelan, Catherine M.; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Glendon, Gord; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Bojesen, Anders; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria A.; Friedman, Eitan; Berger, Raanan; Laitman, Yael; Rantala, Johanna; Arver, Brita; Loman, Niklas; Borg, Ake; Ehrencrona, Hans; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Offit, Kenneth; Couch, Fergus J.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Perkins, Jo; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Gregory, Helen; Morrison, Patrick; Jeffers, Lisa; Cole, Trevor; Hoffman, Jonathan; James, Margaret; Paterson, Joan; Downing, Sarah; Taylor, Amy; Murray, Alexandra; McCann, Emma; Barton, David; Porteous, Mary; Drummond, Sarah; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Hill, Kathryn; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Gibson, Sarah; Haque, Eshika; Tobias, Ed; Duncan, Alexis; Jacobs, Chris; Langman, Caroline; Dorkins, Huw; Serra-Feliu, Gemma; Ellis, Ian; Lalloo, Fiona; Taylor, Jane; Side, Lucy; Male, Alison; Berlin, Cheryl; Eason, Jacqueline; Collier, Rebecca; Claber, Oonagh; Jobson, Irene; McLeod, Diane; Halliday, Dorothy; Durell, Sarah; Stayner, Barbara; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Kohut, Kelly; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Mitra, Anita; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Goff, Sheila; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eddy, Charlotte; Tripathi, Vishakha; Attard, Virginia; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; McBride, Donna; Smalley, Sarah; Weaver, Joellen; Bove, Betsy; Sinilnikova, Olga; Verny-Pierre, Carole; Calender, Alain; Giraud, Sophie; Léone, Mélanie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Houdayer, Claude; Moncoutier, Virginie; Belotti, Muriel; Tirapo, Carole; de Pauw, Antoine; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Caron, Olivier; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Lasset, Christine; Handallo, Sandrine; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Remenieras, Audrey; Eisinger, François; Coupier, Isabelle; Pujol, Pascal; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révillion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Barouk-Simonet, Emmanuelle; Bonnet, Françoise; Bubien, Virginie; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélène; Rebischung, Christine; Peysselon, Magalie; Coron, Fanny; Lebrun, Marine; Kientz, Caroline; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Delnatte, Capucine; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Sokolowska, Johanna; Bronner, Myriam; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Damette, Alexandre; Lynch, Henry T.; Snyder, Carrie L.; Coene, Ilse; Crombez, Brecht; Segura, Pedro Perez; Romero, Atocha; Diaque, Paula; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Muranen, Taru A.; Erkkilä, Irja; Palola, Virpi; Rookus, M. A.; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; Verhoef, S.; Schmidt, M. K.; Wijnands, R.; Collée, J. M.; van den Ouweland, A. M. W.; Hooning, M. J.; Seynaeve, C.; van Deurzen, C. H. M.; Obdeijn, I. M.; van Asperen, C. J.; Wijnen, J. T.; Tollenaar, R. A. E. M.; Devilee, P.; van Cronenburg, T. C. T. E. F.; Kets, C. M.; Mensenkamp, A. R.; Ausems, M. G. E. M.; van der Luijt, R. B.; van Os, T. A. M.; Gille, J. J. P.; Waisfisz, Q.; Gómez-Garcia, E. B.; Blok, M. J.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; van der Hout, A. H.; Mourits, M. J.; de Bock, G. H.; Vasen, H. F.; Siesling, S.; Overbeek, L. I. H.; Papp, Janos; Vaszko, Tibor; Bozsik, Aniko; Pocza, Timea; Franko, Judit; Balogh, Maria; Domokos, Gabriella; Ferenczi, Judit; Balmaña, J.; Capella, Gabriel; Dumont, Martine; Tranchant, Martine

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: More than 70 common alleles are known to be involved in breast cancer (BC) susceptibility, and several exhibit significant heterogeneity in their associations with different BC subtypes. Although there are differences in the association patterns between BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation

  19. Risks of Breast, Ovarian, and Contralateral Breast Cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Hopper, John L; Barnes, Daniel R

    2017-01-01

    for trend). Breast cancer risk was higher if mutations were located outside vs within the regions bounded by positions c.2282-c.4071 in BRCA1 (HR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.11-1.93; P=.007) and c.2831-c.6401 in BRCA2 (HR, 1.93; 95% CI, 1.36-2.74; P

  20. phuR intergenic mutation results in pleiotropic effects on global gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khademi, Seyed Mohammad Hossein; Wassermann, Tina; Ciofu, Oana

    2015-01-01

    We have previously found a positive selection for promoter mutations in Pseudomonas aeruginosa DK2 leading to increased expression of the phu (Pseudomonas heme utilization) system. By mimicking conditions of the CF airways in vitro, we experimentally demonstrated that increased expression of phu......R confers a growth advantage in the presence of hemoglobin, thus suggesting that P. aeruginosa evolves towards iron acquisition from hemoglobin....

  1. KRAS mutation testing in colorectal cancer: comparison of the results obtained using 3 different methods for the analysis of codons G12 and G13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihl, Michel P; Hoeller, Sylvia; Andreozzi, Maria Carla; Foerster, Anja; Rufle, Alexander; Tornillo, Luigi; Terracciano, Luigi

    2012-03-01

    Targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a new therapeutic option for patients with metastatic colorectal or lung carcinoma. However, the therapy efficiency highly depends on the KRAS mutation status in the given tumour. Therefore a reliable and secure KRAS mutation testing is crucial. Here we investigated 100 colorectal carcinoma samples with known KRAS mutation status (62 mutated cases and 38 wild type cases) in a comparative manner with three different KRAS mutation testing techniques (Pyrosequencing, Dideoxysequencing and INFINITI) in order to test their reliability and sensitivity. For the large majority of samples (96/100, 96%), the KRAS mutation status obtained by all three methods was the same. Only two cases with clear discrepancies were observed. One case was reported as wild type by the INFINITI method while the two other methods detected a G13C mutation. In the second case the mutation could be detected by the Pyrosequencing and INFINITI method (15% and 15%), while no signal for mutation could be observed with the Dideoxysequencing method. Additional two unclear results were due to a detection of a G12V with the INFINITI method, which was below cut-off when repeated and which was not detectable by the other two methods and very weak signals in a G12V mutated case with the Dideoxy- and Pyroseqencing method compared to the INFINITI method, respectively. In summary all three methods are reliable and robust methods in detecting KRAS mutations. INFINITI, however seems to be slightly more sensitive compared to Dideoxy- and Pyrosequencing.

  2. Distribution of energy carriers and resulting CO2 emission caused by the use of energy in Norwegian buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enlid, Elin; Tokle, Trude

    1999-03-01

    This report calculates the primary energy used in heating and management of buildings in Norway and distributes it according to user category and energy carrier. It also calculates the emission of carbon dioxide caused by this energy use. The total amount of energy used for heating and management of buildings in Norway in 1997 was 84 TWh. The corresponding emission of carbon dioxide was 10.5 mill tonnes, about 25% of the total domestic emission of carbon dioxide, including transport

  3. Phenotypical features of two patients diagnosed with PHARC syndrome and carriers of a new homozygous mutation in the ABHD12 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasquet, Marina; Lupo, Vincenzo; Chumillas, María José; Vázquez-Costa, Juan Francisco; Espinós, Carmen; Sevilla, Teresa

    2018-04-15

    PHARC (Polyneuropathy, Hearing loss, Ataxia, Retinitis pigmentosa and Cataracts) (MIM# 612674) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease caused by mutations in the ABHD12 gene. We evaluated two Spanish siblings affected with pes cavus, sensorimotor neuropathy, hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa and juvenile cataracts in whom the genetic test of ABHD12 revealed a novel homozygous frameshift mutation, c.211_223del (p.Arg71Tyrfs*26). The earliest clinical manifestation in these patients was a demyelinating neuropathy manifested with a Charcot-Marie-Tooth phenotype over three decades. Progressive hearing loss, cataracts and retinitis pigmentosa appeared after the age of 30. We herein describe the complete clinical picture of these two patients, and focus particularly on neuropathy characteristics. This study supports the fact that although PHARC is rare, its phenotype is very characteristic and we should include its study in patients affected with demyelinating polyneuropathy, hearing loss and retinopathy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Improving accuracy of Tay Sachs carrier screening of the non-Jewish population: analysis of 34 carriers and six late-onset patients with HEXA enzyme and DNA sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Noh Jin; Morgan, Craig; Sharma, Rajesh; Li, Yuanyin; Lobo, Raynah M; Redman, Joy B; Salazar, Denise; Sun, Weimin; Neidich, Julie A; Strom, Charles M

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether combining different testing modalities namely beta-hexosaminidase A (HEXA) enzyme analysis, HEXA DNA common mutation assay, and HEXA gene sequencing could improve the sensitivity for carrier detection in non-Ashkenazi (AJ) individuals. We performed a HEXA gene sequencing assay, a HEXA DNA common mutation assay, and a HEXA enzyme assay on 34 self-reported Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) carriers, six late-onset patients with TSD, and one pseudodeficiency allele carrier. Sensitivity of TSD carrier detection was 91% for gene sequencing compared with 91% for the enzyme assay and 52% for the DNA mutation assay. Gene sequencing combined with enzyme testing had the highest sensitivity (100%) for carrier detection. Gene sequencing detected four novel mutations, three of which are predicted to be disease causing [118.delT, 965A-->T (D322V), and 775A-->G (T259A)]. Gene sequencing is useful in identifying rare mutations in patients with TSD and their families, in evaluating spouses of known carriers for TSD who have indeterminate enzyme analysis and negative for common mutation analysis, and in resolving ambiguous enzyme testing results.

  5. Next-generation DNA sequencing of HEXA: a step in the right direction for carrier screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jodi D; Greger, Valerie; Strovel, Erin T; Blitzer, Miriam G; Umbarger, Mark A; Kennedy, Caleb; Bishop, Brian; Saunders, Patrick; Porreca, Gregory J; Schienda, Jaclyn; Davie, Jocelyn; Hallam, Stephanie; Towne, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) is the prototype for ethnic-based carrier screening, with a carrier rate of ∼1/27 in Ashkenazi Jews and French Canadians. HexA enzyme analysis is the current gold standard for TSD carrier screening (detection rate ∼98%), but has technical limitations. We compared DNA analysis by next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) plus an assay for the 7.6 kb deletion to enzyme analysis for TSD carrier screening using 74 samples collected from participants at a TSD family conference. Fifty-one of 74 participants had positive enzyme results (46 carriers, five late-onset Tay-Sachs [LOTS]), 16 had negative, and seven had inconclusive results. NGS + 7.6 kb del screening of HEXA found a pathogenic mutation, pseudoallele, or variant of unknown significance (VUS) in 100% of the enzyme-positive or obligate carrier/enzyme-inconclusive samples. NGS detected the B1 allele in two enzyme-negative obligate carriers. Our data indicate that NGS can be used as a TSD clinical carrier screening tool. We demonstrate that NGS can be superior in detecting TSD carriers compared to traditional enzyme and genotyping methodologies, which are limited by false-positive and false-negative results and ethnically focused, limited mutation panels, respectively, but is not ready for sole use due to lack of information regarding some VUS. PMID:24498621

  6. Early salpingectomy (TUbectomy) with delayed oophorectomy to improve quality of life as alternative for risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers (TUBA study): a prospective non-randomised multicentre study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmsen, Marline G.; Arts-de Jong, Marieke; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Maas, Angela H. E. M.; Prins, Judith B.; Bulten, Johan; Teerenstra, Steven; Adang, Eddy M. M.; Piek, Jurgen M. J.; Doorn, Helena C van; Beurden, Marc van; Mourits, Marian J. E.; Zweemer, Ronald P.; Gaarenstroom, Katja N.; Slangen, Brigitte F. M.; Vos, M. Caroline; Lonkhuijzen, Luc R. C. W. van; Massuger, Leon F. A. G.; Hermens, Rosella P. M. G.; Hullu, Joanne A. de

    2015-01-01

    Risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO) around the age of 40 is currently recommended to BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. This procedure decreases the elevated ovarian cancer risk by 80–96 % but it initiates premature menopause as well. The latter is associated with short-term and long-term morbidity, potentially affecting quality of life (QoL). Based on recent insights into the Fallopian tube as possible site of origin of serous ovarian carcinomas, an alternative preventive strategy has been put forward: early risk-reducing salpingectomy (RRS) and delayed oophorectomy (RRO). However, efficacy and safety of this alternative strategy have to be investigated. A multicentre non-randomised trial in 11 Dutch centres for hereditary cancer will be conducted. Eligible patients are premenopausal BRCA1/2 mutation carriers after completing childbearing without (a history of) ovarian carcinoma. Participants choose between standard RRSO at age 35–40 (BRCA1) or 40–45 (BRCA2) and the alternative strategy (RRS upon completion of childbearing and RRO at age 40–45 (BRCA1) or 45–50 (BRCA2)). Women who opt for RRS but do not want to postpone RRO beyond the currently recommended age are included as well. Primary outcome measure is menopause-related QoL. Secondary outcome measures are ovarian/breast cancer incidence, surgery-related morbidity, histopathology, cardiovascular risk factors and diseases, and cost-effectiveness. Mixed model data analysis will be performed. The exact role of the Fallopian tube in ovarian carcinogenesis is still unclear. It is not expected that further fundamental research will elucidate this role in the near future. Therefore, this clinical trial is essential to investigate RRS with delayed RRO as alternative risk-reducing strategy in order to improve QoL. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02321228

  7. Loss-of-Function Mutations in APOC3, Triglycerides, and Coronary Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Plasma triglyceride levels are heritable and are correlated with the risk of coronary heart disease. Sequencing of the protein-coding regions of the human genome (the exome) has the potential to identify rare mutations that have a large effect on phenotype. Methods We sequenced the protein-coding regions of 18,666 genes in each of 3734 participants of European or African ancestry in the Exome Sequencing Project. We conducted tests to determine whether rare mutations in coding sequence, individually or in aggregate within a gene, were associated with plasma triglyceride levels. For mutations associated with triglyceride levels, we subsequently evaluated their association with the risk of coronary heart disease in 110,970 persons. Results An aggregate of rare mutations in the gene encoding apolipoprotein C3 (APOC3) was associated with lower plasma triglyceride levels. Among the four mutations that drove this result, three were loss-of-function mutations: a nonsense mutation (R19X) and two splice-site mutations (IVS2+1G→A and IVS3+1G→T). The fourth was a missense mutation (A43T). Approximately 1 in 150 persons in the study was a heterozygous carrier of at least one of these four mutations. Triglyceride levels in the carriers were 39% lower than levels in noncarriers (Ptriglycerides and APOC3. Carriers of these mutations were found to have a reduced risk of coronary heart disease. (Funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and others.) PMID:24941081

  8. Autosomal recessive dilated cardiomyopathy due to DOLK mutations results from abnormal dystroglycan O-mannosylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk J Lefeber

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Genetic causes for autosomal recessive forms of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM are only rarely identified, although they are thought to contribute considerably to sudden cardiac death and heart failure, especially in young children. Here, we describe 11 young patients (5-13 years with a predominant presentation of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM. Metabolic investigations showed deficient protein N-glycosylation, leading to a diagnosis of Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation (CDG. Homozygosity mapping in the consanguineous families showed a locus with two known genes in the N-glycosylation pathway. In all individuals, pathogenic mutations were identified in DOLK, encoding the dolichol kinase responsible for formation of dolichol-phosphate. Enzyme analysis in patients' fibroblasts confirmed a dolichol kinase deficiency in all families. In comparison with the generally multisystem presentation in CDG, the nonsyndromic DCM in several individuals was remarkable. Investigation of other dolichol-phosphate dependent glycosylation pathways in biopsied heart tissue indicated reduced O-mannosylation of alpha-dystroglycan with concomitant functional loss of its laminin-binding capacity, which has been linked to DCM. We thus identified a combined deficiency of protein N-glycosylation and alpha-dystroglycan O-mannosylation in patients with nonsyndromic DCM due to autosomal recessive DOLK mutations.

  9. A novel frameshift GRN mutation results in frontotemporal lobar degeneration with a distinct clinical phenotype in two siblings: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosaka, Takashi; Ishii, Kazuhiro; Miura, Takeshi; Mezaki, Naomi; Kasuga, Kensaku; Ikeuchi, Takeshi; Tamaoka, Akira

    2017-09-15

    Progranulin gene (GRN) mutations are major causes of frontotemporal lobar degeneration. To date, 68 pathogenic GRN mutations have been identified. However, very few of these mutations have been reported in Asians. Moreover, some GRN mutations manifest with familial phenotypic heterogeneity. Here, we present a novel GRN mutation resulting in frontotemporal lobar degeneration with a distinct clinical phenotype, and we review reports of GRN mutations associated with familial phenotypic heterogeneity. We describe the case of a 74-year-old woman with left frontotemporal lobe atrophy who presented with progressive anarthria and non-fluent aphasia. Her brother had been diagnosed with corticobasal syndrome (CBS) with right-hand limb-kinetic apraxia, aphasia, and a similar pattern of brain atrophy. Laboratory blood examinations did not reveal abnormalities that could have caused cognitive dysfunction. In the cerebrospinal fluid, cell counts and protein concentrations were within normal ranges, and concentrations of tau protein and phosphorylated tau protein were also normal. Since similar familial cases due to mutation of GRN and microtubule-associated protein tau gene (MAPT) were reported, we performed genetic analysis. No pathological mutations of MAPT were identified, but we identified a novel GRN frameshift mutation (c.1118_1119delCCinsG: p.Pro373ArgX37) that resulted in progranulin haploinsufficiency. This is the first report of a GRN mutation associated with familial phenotypic heterogeneity in Japan. Literature review of GRN mutations associated with familial phenotypic heterogeneity revealed no tendency of mutation sites. The role of progranulin has been reported in this and other neurodegenerative diseases, and the analysis of GRN mutations may lead to the discovery of a new therapeutic target.

  10. Progranulin plasma levels predict the presence of GRN mutations in asymptomatic subjects and do not correlate with brain atrophy: results from the GENFI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galimberti, Daniela; Fumagalli, Giorgio G; Fenoglio, Chiara; Cioffi, Sara M G; Arighi, Andrea; Serpente, Maria; Borroni, Barbara; Padovani, Alessandro; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Masellis, Mario; Tartaglia, Maria Carmela; van Swieten, John; Meeter, Lieke; Graff, Caroline; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Bocchetta, Martina; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Scarpini, Elio

    2018-02-01

    We investigated whether progranulin plasma levels are predictors of the presence of progranulin gene (GRN) null mutations or of the development of symptoms in asymptomatic at risk members participating in the Genetic Frontotemporal Dementia Initiative, including 19 patients, 64 asymptomatic carriers, and 77 noncarriers. In addition, we evaluated a possible role of TMEM106B rs1990622 as a genetic modifier and correlated progranulin plasma levels and gray-matter atrophy. Plasma progranulin mean ± SD plasma levels in patients and asymptomatic carriers were significantly decreased compared with noncarriers (30.5 ± 13.0 and 27.7 ± 7.5 versus 99.6 ± 24.8 ng/mL, p 61.55 ng/mL, the test had a sensitivity of 98.8% and a specificity of 97.5% in predicting the presence of a mutation, independent of symptoms. No correlations were found between progranulin plasma levels and age, years from average age at onset in each family, or TMEM106B rs1990622 genotype (p > 0.05). Plasma progranulin levels did not correlate with brain atrophy. Plasma progranulin levels predict the presence of GRN null mutations independent of proximity to symptoms and brain atrophy. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Imparting carrier status results detected by universal newborn screening for sickle cell and cystic fibrosis in England: a qualitative study of current practice and policy challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulph Fiona

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Universal newborn screening for early detection of children affected by sickle cell disorders and cystic fibrosis is currently being implemented across England. Parents of infants identified as carriers of these disorders must also be informed of their baby's result. However there is a lack of evidence for most effective practice internationally when doing so. This study describes current or proposed models for imparting this information in practice and explores associated challenges for policy. Methods Thematic analysis of semi-structured interviews with Child Health Coordinators from all English Health Regions. Results Diverse methods for imparting carrier results, both within and between regions, and within and between conditions, were being implemented or planned. Models ranged from result by letter to in-person communication during a home visit. Non-specialists were considered the best placed professionals to give results and a similar approach for both conditions was emphasised. While national guidance has influenced choice of models, other factors contributed such as existing service structures and lack of funding. Challenges included uncertainty about guidance specifying face to face notification; how best to balance allaying parental anxiety by using familiar non-specialist health professionals with concerns about practitioner competence; and extent of information parents should be given. Inadequate consideration of resource and service workload was seen as the main policy obstacle. Clarification of existing guidance; more specific protocols to ensure consistent countrywide practice; integration of the two programmes; and 'normalising' carrier status were suggested as improvements. Conclusion Differing models for communicating carrier results raise concerns about equity and clinical governance. However, this variation provides opportunity for evaluation. Timely and more detailed guidance on protocols with

  12. Spectrum of small mutations in the dystrophin coding region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prior, T.W.; Bartolo, C.; Pearl, D.K. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD and BMD) are caused by defects in the dystrophin gene. About two-thirds of the affected patients have large deletions or duplications, which occur in the 5` and central portion of the gene. The nondeletion/duplication cases are most likely the result of smaller mutations that cannot be identified by current diagnostic screening strategies. We screened {approximately} 80% of the dystrophin coding sequence for small mutations in 158 patients without deletions or duplications and identified 29 mutations. The study indicates that many of the DMD and the majority of the BMD small mutations lie in noncoding regions of the gene. All of the mutations identified were unique to single patients, and most of the mutations resulted in protein truncation. We did not find a clustering of small mutations similar to the deletion distribution but found > 40% of the small mutations 3` of exon 55. The extent of protein truncation caused by the 3` mutations did not determine the phenotype, since even the exon 76 nonsense mutation resulted in the severe DMD phenotype. Our study confirms that the dystrophin gene is subject to a high rate of mutation in CpG sequences. As a consequence of not finding any hotspots or prevalent small mutations, we conclude that it is presently not possible to perform direct carrier and prenatal diagnostics for many families without deletions or duplications. 71 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Mutations in HNF1A Result in Marked Alterations of Plasma Glycan Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanabalasingham, Gaya; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Kattla, Jayesh J.; Novokmet, Mislav; Rudan, Igor; Gloyn, Anna L.; Hayward, Caroline; Adamczyk, Barbara; Reynolds, Rebecca M.; Muzinic, Ana; Hassanali, Neelam; Pucic, Maja; Bennett, Amanda J.; Essafi, Abdelkader; Polasek, Ozren; Mughal, Saima A.; Redzic, Irma; Primorac, Dragan; Zgaga, Lina; Kolcic, Ivana; Hansen, Torben; Gasperikova, Daniela; Tjora, Erling; Strachan, Mark W.J.; Nielsen, Trine; Stanik, Juraj; Klimes, Iwar; Pedersen, Oluf B.; Njølstad, Pål R.; Wild, Sarah H.; Gyllensten, Ulf; Gornik, Olga; Wilson, James F.; Hastie, Nicholas D.; Campbell, Harry; McCarthy, Mark I.; Rudd, Pauline M.; Owen, Katharine R.; Lauc, Gordan; Wright, Alan F.

    2013-01-01

    A recent genome-wide association study identified hepatocyte nuclear factor 1-α (HNF1A) as a key regulator of fucosylation. We hypothesized that loss-of-function HNF1A mutations causal for maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) would display altered fucosylation of N-linked glycans on plasma proteins and that glycan biomarkers could improve the efficiency of a diagnosis of HNF1A-MODY. In a pilot comparison of 33 subjects with HNF1A-MODY and 41 subjects with type 2 diabetes, 15 of 29 glycan measurements differed between the two groups. The DG9-glycan index, which is the ratio of fucosylated to nonfucosylated triantennary glycans, provided optimum discrimination in the pilot study and was examined further among additional subjects with HNF1A-MODY (n = 188), glucokinase (GCK)-MODY (n = 118), hepatocyte nuclear factor 4-α (HNF4A)-MODY (n = 40), type 1 diabetes (n = 98), type 2 diabetes (n = 167), and nondiabetic controls (n = 98). The DG9-glycan index was markedly lower in HNF1A-MODY than in controls or other diabetes subtypes, offered good discrimination between HNF1A-MODY and both type 1 and type 2 diabetes (C statistic ≥0.90), and enabled us to detect three previously undetected HNF1A mutations in patients with diabetes. In conclusion, glycan profiles are altered substantially in HNF1A-MODY, and the DG9-glycan index has potential clinical value as a diagnostic biomarker of HNF1A dysfunction. PMID:23274891

  14. Mutational myriad of tumor suppressor p53 in Filipino breast cancer: results and perspectives in molecular pathology and epidemiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deocaris, Custer C.

    2000-04-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is by far the most widely mutated gene in human cancers. p53 encodes a 53-kDa phosphoprotein, transcription-activator whose targets include genes and gene products that orchestrate genomic stability, cellular response to DNA damage, cell cycle progression apoptosis and aging (senescence). Analysis of the p53 gene profile has previously resulted in identifying several cancer-causative factors in the human setting, as well as, in creating a unique molecular profile of a tumor useful in the design of tailored-therapies for individual cancer patients. Our results in screening for p53 abnormalities in 140 Filipino patients with primary breast lesions confined from 1997-1998 in 5 major hospitals in Manila reveal that p53 plays an important role in the development and progression of breast cancer in at least 48% of all cases. Two methods of p53 analysis are employed, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and polymerase chain reaction-temporal temperature gradient electrophoresis (PCR-TTGE). Inter-comparisons of method exhibit 63.3% concordance in 21 fresh breast carcinoma samples, with ELISA demonstrating 14% false-positives and 10% false-negatives. Only mutations in exon 7 (p=0.063) in the tumor samples how significant correlation with abnormal cellular elevation of p53. PCR-TTGE screening in a large series of 140 patients show that most genetic lesions are localized in exons 5 (41% of the total cases) and 6 (27% of the total cases). No mutations are, however, detected in the transactivation (exons 2-4) and oligomerization (exons 10-11) domains. Invasive carcinomas (stages II and III) are characterized with more frequent and diverse genetic alterations compared with benign tumors, most significantly at exon 5B (p=0.066) and at independently multiple sites (p=0.066). Earlier-onset cases (age of diagnosis < 50 yrs), known to be more clinico-pathologically aggressive, are diagnosed harboring more frequent p53 mutations centered at exon 7 (p=0

  15. Mutational myriad of tumor suppressor p53 in Filipino breast cancer: results and perspectives in molecular pathology and epidemiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deocaris, Custer C

    2000-04-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is by far the most widely mutated gene in human cancers. p53 encodes a 53-kDa phosphoprotein, transcription-activator whose targets include genes and gene products that orchestrate genomic stability, cellular response to DNA damage, cell cycle progression apoptosis and aging (senescence). Analysis of the p53 gene profile has previously resulted in identifying several cancer-causative factors in the human setting, as well as, in creating a unique molecular profile of a tumor useful in the design of tailored-therapies for individual cancer patients. Our results in screening for p53 abnormalities in 140 Filipino patients with primary breast lesions confined from 1997-1998 in 5 major hospitals in Manila reveal that p53 plays an important role in the development and progression of breast cancer in at least 48% of all cases. Two methods of p53 analysis are employed, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and polymerase chain reaction-temporal temperature gradient electrophoresis (PCR-TTGE). Inter-comparisons of method exhibit 63.3% concordance in 21 fresh breast carcinoma samples, with ELISA demonstrating 14% false-positives and 10% false-negatives. Only mutations in exon 7 (p=0.063) in the tumor samples how significant correlation with abnormal cellular elevation of p53. PCR-TTGE screening in a large series of 140 patients show that most genetic lesions are localized in exons 5 (41% of the total cases) and 6 (27% of the total cases). No mutations are, however, detected in the transactivation (exons 2-4) and oligomerization (exons 10-11) domains. Invasive carcinomas (stages II and III) are characterized with more frequent and diverse genetic alterations compared with benign tumors, most significantly at exon 5B (p=0.066) and at independently multiple sites (p=0.066). Earlier-onset cases (age of diagnosis < 50 yrs), known to be more clinico-pathologically aggressive, are diagnosed harboring more frequent p53 mutations centered at exon 7 (p=0

  16. XLMR in MRX families 29, 32, 33 and 38 results from the dup24 mutation in the ARX (Aristaless related homeobox gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacMillan Andrée

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background X-linked mental retardation (XLMR is the leading cause of mental retardation in males. Mutations in the ARX gene in Xp22.1 have been found in numerous families with both nonsyndromic and syndromic XLMR. The most frequent mutation in this gene is a 24 bp duplication in exon 2. Based on this fact, a panel of XLMR families linked to Xp22 was tested for this particular ARX mutation. Methods Genomic DNA from XLMR families linked to Xp22.1 was amplified for exon 2 in ARX using a Cy5 labeled primer pair. The resulting amplicons were sized using the ALFexpress automated sequencer. Results A panel of 11 families with X-linked mental retardation was screened for the ARX 24dup mutation. Four nonsyndromic XLMR families – MRX29, MRX32, MRX33 and MRX38 – were found to have this particular gene mutation. Conclusion We have identified 4 additional XLMR families with the ARX dup24 mutation from a panel of 11 XLMR families linked to Xp22.1. This finding makes the ARX dup24 mutation the most common mutation in nonsyndromic XLMR families linked to Xp22.1. As this mutation can be readily tested for using an automated sequencer, screening should be considered for any male with nonsyndromic MR of unknown etiology.

  17. Sesame improvement by induced mutations: Results of the co-ordinated research project and recommendation for future studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanten, L. van

    2001-01-01

    The FAO/IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project has brought together sesame breeders from 11 countries. They, together with pathologists, agronomists and physiologists, have made considerable effort to advance the genetic improvement in sesame. The results and conclusions from this project cover the mutation techniques used for the genetic improvement of various aspects of sesame. These recommendations do not only deal with the application of mutation induction, but also with the wider plant breeding related objectives and methods to be considered for this semi-domesticated crop. It is clear that more advanced techniques can and should be incorporated in the process which would enhance the genetic improvement. Although five years is a relatively limited time in a plant breeding programme, the participants have been able to produce and make available a considerable pool of agronomically interesting mutant sesame germplasm. The participants in the CRP considered that, together with other specialists, plant breeders can gain fuller benefit from the mutations induced by radiation or chemicals. Work on these mutants must continue in co-operation/consultation with plant physiologists and pathologists, and with biotechnologists who may in the future be able to provide in the future methods for introducing beneficial traits from other crops into sesame. The sesame programme should include scientists from the Member States where sesame grows and scientists from developed countries who may have greater access to physiological and molecular research facilities. (author)

  18. Tay-Sachs disease preconception screening in Australia: self-knowledge of being an Ashkenazi Jew predicts carrier state better than does ancestral origin, although there is an increased risk for c.1421 + 1G > C mutation in individuals with South African heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, Raelia; Burnett, Leslie; Proos, Anné

    2011-12-01

    The Australasian Community Genetics Program provided a preconception screening for Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) to 4,105 Jewish high school students in Sydney and Melbourne over the 12-year period 1995-2007. By correlating the frequencies of mutant HEXA, MIM *606869 (gene map locus 15q23-q24) alleles with subjects' nominated ethnicity (Ashkenazi/Sephardi/Mixed) and grandparental birthplaces, we established that Ashkenazi ethnicity is a better predictor of TSD carrier status than grandparental ancestral origins. Screening self-identified Ashkenazi subjects detected 95% of TSD carriers (carrier frequency 1:25). Having mixed Ashkenazi and non-Ashkenazi heritage reduced the carrier frequency (1:97). South African heritage conveyed a fourfold risk of c.1421 + 1G > C mutation compared with other AJ subjects (odds ratio (OR), 4.19; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.83-9.62, p = 0.001), but this was the only specific case of ancestral origin improving diagnostic sensitivity over that based on determining Ashkenazi ethnicity. Carriers of c.1278insTATC mutations were more likely to have heritage from Western Europe (OR, 1.65 (95% CI, 1.04-2.60), p = 0.032) and South Eastern Europe (OR, 1.77 (95% CI, 1.14-2.73), p = 0.010). However, heritage from specific European countries investigated did not significantly alter the overall odds of TSD carrier status.

  19. Mutations in HNF1A result in marked alterations of plasma glycan profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thanabalasingham, Gaya; Huffman, Jennifer E; Kattla, Jayesh J

    2013-01-01

    A recent genome-wide association study identified hepatocyte nuclear factor 1-α (HNF1A) as a key regulator of fucosylation. We hypothesized that loss-of-function HNF1A mutations causal for maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) would display altered fucosylation of N-linked glycans on plasma...... proteins and that glycan biomarkers could improve the efficiency of a diagnosis of HNF1A-MODY. In a pilot comparison of 33 subjects with HNF1A-MODY and 41 subjects with type 2 diabetes, 15 of 29 glycan measurements differed between the two groups. The DG9-glycan index, which is the ratio of fucosylated...... to nonfucosylated triantennary glycans, provided optimum discrimination in the pilot study and was examined further among additional subjects with HNF1A-MODY (n = 188), glucokinase (GCK)-MODY (n = 118), hepatocyte nuclear factor 4-α (HNF4A)-MODY (n = 40), type 1 diabetes (n = 98), type 2 diabetes (n = 167...

  20. Adaptation of cancer cells from different entities to the MDM2 inhibitor nutlin-3 results in the emergence of p53-mutated multi-drug-resistant cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michaelis, M.; Rothweiler, F.; Barth, S.; Cinatl, J.; van Rikxoort, M.; Loeschmann, N.; Voges, Y.; Breitling, R.; von Deimling, A.; Roedel, F.; Weber, K.; Fehse, B.; Mack, E.; Stiewe, T.; Doerr, H. W.; Speidel, D.; Cinatl, J.; Cinatl jr., J.; Stephanou, A.

    2011-01-01

    Six p53 wild-type cancer cell lines from infrequently p53-mutated entities (neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, and melanoma) were continuously exposed to increasing concentrations of the murine double minute 2 inhibitor nutlin-3, resulting in the emergence of nutlin-3-resistant, p53-mutated sublines

  1. Common filaggrin gene mutations and risk of cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Peter; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Sørensen, Erik

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As carriers of filaggrin gene (FLG) mutations may have a compromised cervical mucosal barrier against human papillomavirus infection, our primary objective was to study their risk of cervical cancer. METHODS: We genotyped 586 cervical cancer patients for the two most common FLG...... mutations, R501X and 2282del4, using blood from the Copenhagen Hospital Biobank, Denmark. Controls (n = 8050) were genotyped in previous population-based studies. Information on cervical cancer, mortality and emigration were obtained from national registers. Odds ratios (OR) were estimated by logistic...... and stratification by cancer stage. RESULTS: The primary results showed that FLG mutations were not associated with the risk of cervical cancer (6.3% of cases and 7.7% of controls were carriers; OR adjusted 0.81, 95% CI 0.57-1.14; OR adjusted+ weighted 0.96, 95% CI 0.58-1.57). Among cases, FLG mutations increased...

  2. Diversity of ARSACS mutations in French-Canadians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiffault, I; Dicaire, M J; Tetreault, M; Huang, K N; Demers-Lamarche, J; Bernard, G; Duquette, A; Larivière, R; Gehring, K; Montpetit, A; McPherson, P S; Richter, A; Montermini, L; Mercier, J; Mitchell, G A; Dupré, N; Prévost, C; Bouchard, J P; Mathieu, J; Brais, B

    2013-01-01

    The growing number of spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (SACS) gene mutations reported worldwide has broadened the clinical phenotype of autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS). The identification of Quebec ARSACS cases without two known SACS mutation led to the development of a multi-modal genomic strategy to uncover mutations in this large gene and explore phenotype variability. Search for SACS mutations by combining various methods on 20 cases with a classical French-Canadian ARSACS phenotype without two mutations and a group of 104 sporadic or recessive spastic ataxia cases of unknown cause. Western blot on lymphoblast protein from cases with different genotypes was probed to establish if they still expressed sacsin. A total of 12 mutations, including 7 novels, were uncovered in Quebec ARSACS cases. The screening of 104 spastic ataxia cases of unknown cause for 98 SACS mutations did not uncover carriers of two mutations. Compounds heterozygotes for one missense SACS mutation were found to minimally express sacsin. The large number of SACS mutations present even in Quebec suggests that the size of the gene alone may explain the great genotypic diversity. This study does not support an expanding ARSACS phenotype in the French-Canadian population. Most mutations lead to loss of function, though phenotypic variability in other populations may reflect partial loss of function with preservation of some sacsin expression. Our results also highlight the challenge of SACS mutation screening and the necessity to develop new generation sequencing methods to ensure low cost complete gene sequencing.

  3. A novel alpha-thalassemia nonsense mutation in HBA2: C.382 A > T globin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Mohammad; Bokharaei Merci, Hanieh; Galehdari, Hamid; Saberi, Ali Hossein; Kaikhaei, Bijan; Mohammadi-Anaei, Marziye; Ahmadzadeh, Ahmad; Shariati, Gholamreza

    2014-07-01

    In this study, a new alpha globin gene mutation on the α2-globin gene is reported. This mutation resulted in a Lys > stop codon substitution at position 127 which was detected in four individuals (three males and one female). DNA sequencing revealed this mutation in unrelated persons in Khuzestan province, Southwestern Iran of Lor ethnicity. This mutation caused no severe hematological abnormalities in the carriers. From the nature of substituted residues in α2-globin, it is widely expected that this mutation leads to unstable and truncated protein and should be detected in couples at risk for α-thalassemia.

  4. Prostate screening uptake in Australian BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKinley Joanne M

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Men who carry mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 are at increased risk for prostate cancer. However the efficacy of prostate screening in this setting is uncertain and limited data exists on the uptake of prostate screening by mutation carriers. This study prospectively evaluated uptake of prostate cancer screening in a multi-institutional cohort of mutation carriers. Subjects were unaffected male BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, aged 40–69 years, enrolled in the Kathleen Cuningham Consortium for Research into Familial Breast Cancer (kConFab and who had completed a mailed, self-report follow-up questionnaire 3 yearly after study entry. Of the 75 male carriers in this study, only 26 (35% had elected to receive their mutation result. Overall, 51 (68% did not recall having received a recommendation to have prostate screening because of their family history, but 41 (55% had undergone a prostate specific antigen (PSA test and 32 (43% a digital rectal examination (DRE in the previous 3 years. Those who were aware of their mutation result were more likely to have received a recommendation for prostate screening (43 vs. 6%, p = 0.0001, and to have had a PSA test (77 vs. 43%, p = 0.005 and a DRE (69 vs. 29%, p = 0.001 in the previous 3 years. The majority of unaffected males enrolled in kConFab with a BRCA1/2 mutation have not sought out their mutation result. However, of those aware of their positive mutation status, most have undergone at least one round of prostate screening in the previous 3 years.

  5. Mutations in Mll2, an H3K4 Methyltransferase, Result in Insulin Resistance and Impaired Glucose Tolerance in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröter, David; Matthews, Helen C.; Bogani, Debora; Moir, Lee; Long, Anna; Church, Christopher; Hugill, Alison; Anstee, Quentin M.; Goldin, Rob; Thursz, Mark; Hollfelder, Florian; Cox, Roger D.

    2013-01-01

    We employed a random mutagenesis approach to identify novel monogenic determinants of type 2 diabetes. Here we show that haplo-insufficiency of the histone methyltransferase myeloid-lineage leukemia (Mll2/Wbp7) gene causes type 2 diabetes in the mouse. We have shown that mice heterozygous for two separate mutations in the SET domain of Mll2 or heterozygous Mll2 knockout mice were hyperglycaemic, hyperinsulinaemic and developed non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Consistent with previous Mll2 knockout studies, mice homozygous for either ENU mutation (or compound heterozygotes) died during embryonic development at 9.5–14.5 days post coitum. Heterozygous deletion of Mll2 induced in the adult mouse results in a normal phenotype suggesting that changes in chromatin methylation during development result in the adult phenotype. Mll2 has been shown to regulate a small subset of genes, a number of which Neurod1, Enpp1, Slc27a2, and Plcxd1 are downregulated in adult mutant mice. Our results demonstrate that histone H3K4 methyltransferase Mll2 is a component of the genetic regulation necessary for glucose homeostasis, resulting in a specific disease pattern linking chromatin modification with causes and progression of type 2 diabetes, providing a basis for its further understanding at the molecular level. PMID:23826075

  6. Mutations in Mll2, an H3K4 methyltransferase, result in insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Goldsworthy

    Full Text Available We employed a random mutagenesis approach to identify novel monogenic determinants of type 2 diabetes. Here we show that haplo-insufficiency of the histone methyltransferase myeloid-lineage leukemia (Mll2/Wbp7 gene causes type 2 diabetes in the mouse. We have shown that mice heterozygous for two separate mutations in the SET domain of Mll2 or heterozygous Mll2 knockout mice were hyperglycaemic, hyperinsulinaemic and developed non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Consistent with previous Mll2 knockout studies, mice homozygous for either ENU mutation (or compound heterozygotes died during embryonic development at 9.5-14.5 days post coitum. Heterozygous deletion of Mll2 induced in the adult mouse results in a normal phenotype suggesting that changes in chromatin methylation during development result in the adult phenotype. Mll2 has been shown to regulate a small subset of genes, a number of which Neurod1, Enpp1, Slc27a2, and Plcxd1 are downregulated in adult mutant mice. Our results demonstrate that histone H3K4 methyltransferase Mll2 is a component of the genetic regulation necessary for glucose homeostasis, resulting in a specific disease pattern linking chromatin modification with causes and progression of type 2 diabetes, providing a basis for its further understanding at the molecular level.

  7. A pseudodeficiency allele common in non-Jewish Tay-Sachs carriers: Implications for carrier screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triggs-Raine, B.L.; Akerman, B.R.; Gravel, R.A. (McGill Univ.-Montreal Children' s Hospital Research Institute, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)); Mules, E.H.; Thomas, G.H.; Dowling, C.E. (Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)); Kaback, M.M.; Lim-Steele, J.S.T. (Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)); Natowicz, M.R. (Eunice Kennedy Shriver Center for Mental Retardation, Waltham, MA (United States)); Grebner, E.E. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)); Navon, R.R. (Tel-Aviv Univ., Kfar-Sava (Israel)); Welch, J.P. (Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, Nova, Scotia (Canada)); Greenberg, C.R. (Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg (Canada))

    1992-10-01

    Deficiency of [beta]-hexosaminidase A (Hex A) activity typically results in Tay-Sachs disease. However, healthy subjects found to be deficient in Hex A activity (i.e., pseudodeficient) by means of in vitro biochemical tests have been described. The authors analyzed the HEXA gene of one pseudodeficient subject and identified both a C[sub 739]-to-T substitution that changes Arg[sub 247][yields]Trp on one allele and a previously identified Tay-Sachs disease mutation of the second allele. Six additional pseudodeficient subjects were found to have the C[sub 739]-to-T but for none of 36 Jewish enzyme-defined carries who did not have one of three known mutations common to this group. The C[sub 739]-to-T allele, together with a [open quotes]true[close quotes] Tay-Sachs disease allele, causes Hex A pseudodeficiency. Given both the large proportion of non-Jewish carriers with this allele and that standard biochemical screening cannot differentiate between heterozygotes for the C[sub 739]-to-T mutations and Tay-Sachs disease carriers, DNA testing for this mutation in at-risk couples is essential. This could prevent unnecessary or incorrect prenatal diagnoses. 40 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Presymptomatic generalized brain atrophy in frontotemporal dementia caused by CHMP2B mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohrer, Jonathan D; Ahsan, R Laila; Isaacs, Adrian M

    2009-01-01

    mutation carriers with a control group of 7 mutation-negative family members. Volumetric MRI brain scans were performed on all subjects at two time points, and rates of volume change were compared between the two groups. RESULTS: We demonstrate that generalized atrophy occurs presymptomatically in CHMP2B...... gene mutation carriers. CONCLUSIONS: This finding suggests that mutations in CHMP2B have widespread effects throughout the brain, leading to a neuro-anatomical signature distinct from other diseases in the frontotemporal lobar degeneration spectrum........ There are no detailed studies of brain imaging in CHMP2B mutation-associated FTD. This study aimed to investigate whether there were early or presymptomatic changes in this group of patients. METHODS: Subjects comprised 16 members of a Danish family with CHMP2B mutation-associated FTD. Nine subjects were presymptomatic...

  9. Adverse events in families with hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathy and mutations in the MYBPC3 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehrke Stephanie

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in MYBPC3 encoding myosin binding protein C belong to the most frequent causes of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM and may also lead to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM. MYBPC3 mutations initially were considered to cause a benign form of HCM. The aim of this study was to examine the clinical outcome of patients and their relatives with 18 different MYBPC3 mutations. Methods 87 patients with HCM and 71 patients with DCM were screened for MYBPC3 mutations by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequencing. Close relatives of mutation carriers were genotyped for the respective mutation. Relatives with mutation were then evaluated by echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging. A detailed family history regarding adverse clinical events was recorded. Results In 16 HCM (18.4% and two DCM (2.8% index patients a mutation was detected. Seven mutations were novel. Mutation carriers exhibited no additional mutations in genes MYH7, TNNT2, TNNI3, ACTC and TPM1. Including relatives of twelve families, a total number of 42 mutation carriers was identified of which eleven (26.2% had at least one adverse event. Considering the twelve families and six single patients with mutations, 45 individuals with cardiomyopathy and nine with borderline phenotype were identified. Among the 45 patients, 23 (51.1% suffered from an adverse event. In eleven patients of seven families an unexplained sudden death was reported at the age between 13 and 67 years. Stroke or a transient ischemic attack occurred in six patients of five families. At least one adverse event occurred in eleven of twelve families. Conclusion MYBPC3 mutations can be associated with cardiac events such as progressive heart failure, stroke and sudden death even at younger age. Therefore, patients with MYBPC3 mutations require thorough clinical risk assessment.

  10. Radionuclide carrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, F.A.; Kretschmar, H.C.; Tofe, A.J.

    1978-01-01

    A physiologically acceptable particulate radionuclide carrier is described. It comprises a modified anionic starch derivative with 0.1% to 1.5% by weight of a reducing agent and 1 to 20% by weight of anionic substituents

  11. A splice site mutation in laminin-α2 results in a severe muscular dystrophy and growth abnormalities in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana A Gupta

    Full Text Available Congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited muscle disorders. In patients, muscle weakness is usually present at or shortly after birth and is progressive in nature. Merosin deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (MDC1A is a form of CMD caused by a defect in the laminin-α2 gene (LAMA2. Laminin-α2 is an extracellular matrix protein that interacts with the dystrophin-dystroglycan (DGC complex in membranes providing stability to muscle fibers. In an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis screen to develop zebrafish models of neuromuscular diseases, we identified a mutant fish that exhibits severe muscular dystrophy early in development. Genetic mapping identified a splice site mutation in the lama2 gene. This splice site is highly conserved in humans and this mutation results in mis-splicing of RNA and a loss of protein function. Homozygous lama2 mutant zebrafish, designated lama2(cl501/cl501, exhibited reduced motor function and progressive degeneration of skeletal muscles and died at 8-15 days post fertilization. The skeletal muscles exhibited damaged myosepta and detachment of myofibers in the affected fish. Laminin-α2 deficiency also resulted in growth defects in the brain and eye of the mutant fish. This laminin-α2 deficient mutant fish represents a novel disease model to develop therapies for modulating splicing defects in congenital muscular dystrophies and to restore the muscle function in human patients with CMD.

  12. Prognostic value of X-chromosome inactivation in symptomatic female carriers of dystrophinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Mateu Jonàs

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Between 8% and 22% of female carriers of DMD mutations exhibit clinical symptoms of variable severity. Development of symptoms in DMD mutation carriers without chromosomal rearrangements has been attributed to skewed X-chromosome inactivation (XCI favouring predominant expression of the DMD mutant allele. However the prognostic use of XCI analysis is controversial. We aimed to evaluate the correlation between X-chromosome inactivation and development of clinical symptoms in a series of symptomatic female carriers of dystrophinopathy. Methods We reviewed the clinical, pathological and genetic features of twenty-four symptomatic carriers covering a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes. DMD gene analysis was performed using MLPA and whole gene sequencing in blood DNA and muscle cDNA. Blood and muscle DNA was used for X-chromosome inactivation (XCI analysis thought the AR methylation assay in symptomatic carriers and their female relatives, asymptomatic carriers as well as non-carrier females. Results Symptomatic carriers exhibited 49.2% more skewed XCI profiles than asymptomatic carriers. The extent of XCI skewing in blood tended to increase in line with the severity of muscle symptoms. Skewed XCI patterns were found in at least one first-degree female relative in 78.6% of symptomatic carrier families. No mutations altering XCI in the XIST gene promoter were found. Conclusions Skewed XCI is in many cases familial inherited. The extent of XCI skewing is related to phenotype severity. However, the assessment of XCI by means of the AR methylation assay has a poor prognostic value, probably because the methylation status of the AR gene in muscle may not reflect in all cases the methylation status of the DMD gene.

  13. TFAP2B mutation and dental anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanasubsinn, Natchaya; Sittiwangkul, Rekwan; Pongprot, Yupada; Kawasaki, Katsushige; Ohazama, Atsushi; Sastraruji, Thanapat; Kaewgahya, Massupa; Kantaputra, Piranit Nik

    2017-08-01

    Mutations inTFAP2B has been reported in patients with isolated patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) and Char syndrome. We performed mutation analysis of TFAP2B in 43 patients with isolated PDA, 7 patients with PDA with other congenital heart defects and 286 patients with isolated tooth agenesis with or without other dental anomalies. The heterozygous c.1006G>A mutation was identified in 20 individuals. Those mutation carriers consisted of 1 patient with term PDA (1/43), 16 patients with isolated tooth agenesis with or without other dental anomalies (16/286; 5.6%), 1 patient with PDA and severe valvular aortic stenosis and tooth agenesis (1/4) and 2 normal controls (2/100; 1%). The mutation is predicted to cause an amino-acid substitution p.Val336Ile in the TFAP2B protein. Tfap2b expression during early mouse tooth development supports the association of TFAP2B mutation and dental anomalies. It is hypothesized that this incidence might have been the result of founder effect. Here we report for the first time that TFAP2B mutation is associated with tooth agenesis, microdontia, supernumerary tooth and root maldevelopment. In addition, we also found that TFAP2B mutations, the common causes of PDA in Caucasian, are not the common cause of PDA in Thai population.

  14. Phase 1 trial evaluating cisplatin, gemcitabine, and veliparib in 2 patient cohorts: Germline BRCA mutation carriers and wild-type BRCA pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Eileen M; Lee, Jonathan W; Lowery, Maeve A; Capanu, Marinela; Stadler, Zsofia K; Moore, Malcolm J; Dhani, Neesha; Kindler, Hedy L; Estrella, Hayley; Maynard, Hannah; Golan, Talia; Segal, Amiel; Salo-Mullen, Erin E; Yu, Kenneth H; Epstein, Andrew S; Segal, Michal; Brenner, Robin; Do, Richard K; Chen, Alice P; Tang, Laura H; Kelsen, David P

    2018-04-01

    A phase 1 trial was used to evaluate a combination of cisplatin, gemcitabine, and escalating doses of veliparib in patients with untreated advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) in 2 cohorts: a germline BRCA1/2-mutated (BRCA+) cohort and a wild-type BRCA (BRCA-) cohort. The aims were to determine the safety, dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs), maximum tolerated dose, and recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D) of veliparib combined with cisplatin and gemcitabine and to assess the antitumor efficacy (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, version 1.1) and overall survival. Gemcitabine and cisplatin were dosed at 600 and 25 mg/m 2 , respectively, over 30 minutes on days 3 and 10 of a 21-day cycle. Four dose levels of veliparib were evaluated: 20 (dose level 0), 40 (dose level 1), and 80 mg (dose level 2) given orally twice daily on days 1 to 12 and 80 mg given twice daily on days 1 to 21 (dose level 2A [DL2A]). Seventeen patients were enrolled: 9 BRCA+ patients, 7 BRCA- patients, and 1 patient with an unknown status. DLTs were reached at DL2A (80 mg twice daily on days 1 to 21). Two of the 5 patients in this cohort (40%) experienced grade 4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. Two grade 5 events occurred on protocol. The objective response rate in the BRCA+ cohort was 7 of 9 (77.8%). The median overall survival for BRCA+ patients was 23.3 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.8-30.2 months). The median overall survival for BRCA- patients was 11 months (95% CI, 1.5-12.1 months). The RP2D of veliparib was 80 mg by mouth twice daily on days 1 to 12 in combination with cisplatin and gemcitabine; the DLT was myelosuppression. Substantial antitumor activity was seen in BRCA+ PDAC. A randomized phase 2 trial is currently evaluating cisplatin and gemcitabine with and without veliparib for BRCA+ PDAC (NCT01585805). Cancer 2018;124:1374-82. © 2018 American Cancer Society. © 2018 American Cancer Society.

  15. A brief review on newborn screening methods for hemoglobinopathies and preliminary results selecting beta thalassemia carriers at birth by quantitative estimation of the HbA fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantikou, Eleni; Arkesteijn, Sandra G; Beckhoven van, Jaqueline M; Kerkhoffs, Jean-Louis; Harteveld, Cornelis L; Giordano, Piero Carlo

    2009-12-01

    We present in a brief summary the basic aspects of the most rational technologies used for new born screening (NBS) of the hemoglobinopathies and we report the preliminary results for the identification of beta-thalassemia carriers at birth by measuring the expression of the HbA fraction. Separation and measurement of the Hb fractions in 1.500 cord blood samples collected among the multi-ethnic Dutch population using different methods. By using a cut of thalassemia can be preselected at birth with a reasonable degree of sensitivity and be confirmed by parent analysis.

  16. results of Breeding Tomato Programme (lycopesicon esculentum mill) for the obtaining of new Tolerant varieties to low inputs hidric through the employment of the Radioinduced mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Maria C.; Caballero, Alberto; Mukandama, Jean Pierre; Mohamed Ali, Mansoor; Suarez, Lorenzo; Fuentes, Jorge L

    1999-01-01

    Induced mutation have been mostly used in the improvement of different crops. This papers shows the main results of Breeding Tomato Programme. It was possible to select some promising lines with a good behavior under hidric stress

  17. A mutation in the gene encoding mitochondrial Mg²+ channel MRS2 results in demyelination in the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kuramoto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The rat demyelination (dmy mutation serves as a unique model system to investigate the maintenance of myelin, because it provokes severe myelin breakdown in the central nervous system (CNS after normal postnatal completion of myelination. Here, we report the molecular characterization of this mutation and discuss the possible pathomechanisms underlying demyelination. By positional cloning, we found that a G-to-A transition, 177 bp downstream of exon 3 of the Mrs2 (MRS2 magnesium homeostasis factor (Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene, generated a novel splice acceptor site which resulted in functional inactivation of the mutant allele. Transgenic rescue with wild-type Mrs2-cDNA validated our findings. Mrs2 encodes an essential component of the major Mg²+ influx system in mitochondria of yeast as well as human cells. We showed that the dmy/dmy rats have major mitochondrial deficits with a markedly elevated lactic acid concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid, a 60% reduction in ATP, and increased numbers of mitochondria in the swollen cytoplasm of oligodendrocytes. MRS2-GFP recombinant BAC transgenic rats showed that MRS2 was dominantly expressed in neurons rather than oligodendrocytes and was ultrastructurally observed in the inner membrane of mitochondria. Our observations led to the conclusion that dmy/dmy rats suffer from a mitochondrial disease and that the maintenance of myelin has a different mechanism from its initial production. They also established that Mg²+ homeostasis in CNS mitochondria is essential for the maintenance of myelin.

  18. Higher quality of molecular testing, an unfulfilled priority: Results from external quality assessment for KRAS mutation testing in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tembuyser, Lien; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; Normanno, Nicola; Delen, Sofie; van Krieken, J Han; Dequeker, Elisabeth M C

    2014-05-01

    Precision medicine is now a key element in clinical oncology. RAS mutational status is a crucial predictor of responsiveness to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor agents in metastatic colorectal cancer. In an effort to guarantee high-quality testing services in molecular pathology, the European Society of Pathology has been organizing an annual KRAS external quality assessment program since 2009. In 2012, 10 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples, of which 8 from invasive metastatic colorectal cancer tissue and 2 artificial samples of cell line material, were sent to more than 100 laboratories from 26 countries with a request for routine KRAS testing. Both genotyping and clinical reports were assessed independently. Twenty-seven percent of the participants genotyped at least 1 of 10 samples incorrectly. In total, less than 5% of the distributed specimens were genotyped incorrectly. Genotyping errors consisted of false negatives, false positives, and incorrectly genotyped mutations. Twenty percent of the laboratories reported a technical error for one or more samples. A review of the written reports showed that several essential elements were missing, most notably a clinical interpretation of the test result, the method sensitivity, and the use of a reference sequence. External quality assessment serves as a valuable educational tool in assessing and improving molecular testing quality and is an important asset for monitoring quality assurance upon incorporation of new biomarkers in diagnostic services. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Brown Midrib (Low Lignin) Sorghum Mutations Result in Restricted Growth of Fusarium and Alternaria spp

    Science.gov (United States)

    To increase usability of sorghum for bioenergy and forages, two different brown midrib (bmr) genes, bmr6 and bmr12, were backcrossed into five elite backgrounds, resulting in reduced lignin near-isogenic genotypes. When compared with wild-type, field-grown grain from bmr6 and bmr12 plants had signif...

  20. Sort of agricultural species introducing in production resulting of mutation breeding programs in cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Talavera, Susana

    1999-01-01

    Radiomutant varieties of important species used in the Cuban agricultural productions are shown. They were obtained by INIFAT specialists as authors or co-author with the aid of radiomutation techniques in plant breeding programs. Several dates concerning the procedure and some of the features rendering varieties more useful are given. The introduction and acceptability by farmers are also commented. The information was collected from members of the scientific staff involving in the results and from the available literature

  1. Effect of BRCA1/2 mutation on short-term and long-term breast cancer survival: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Ha; Park, Sue K; Park, Boyoung; Kim, Sung-Won; Lee, Min Hyuk; Ahn, Sei Hyun; Son, Byung Ho; Yoo, Keun-Young; Kang, Daehee

    2010-07-01

    Reports of BRCA genetic mutations and risk of death or recurrence are inconsistent. This study aimed to compare overall and disease-free breast cancer survival rates between BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and non-carriers for short-term and long-term outcomes separately. We searched the PUBMED and EMBASE databases and retrieved 452 articles using keywords that included breast cancer, BRCA mutation, and survival. Seventeen articles were selected for systematic review and among them 11 were included in our meta-analysis. We used the random-effects model to calculate the summary hazard ratio and corresponding 95% confidence interval. BRCA1 mutation carriers had significantly lower short-term and long-term overall survival rates (OSR) relative to non-carriers (HR = 1.92 [95% CI = 1.45-2.53]; 1.33 [1.12-1.58], respectively), while both short-term and long-term OSR of BRCA2 carriers did not differ from non-carriers (HR = 1.30 [95% CI = 0.95-1.76]; 1.12 [95% CI = 0.86-1.45], respectively). For short-term progression-free survival rate (PFSR), BRCA1 mutation carriers had a significantly lower rate than non-carriers (HR = 1.54 [95% CI = 1.12-2.12]), while BRCA2 mutation carriers had a similar PFSR (HR = 1.23 [95% CI = 0.96-1.58]). For long-term PFSRs, we found no significant results. Our results suggest that BRCA1 mutation decreases short-term and long-term OSRs and short-term PFSR, however, BRCA2 mutation does not affect either short-term or long-term survival rate, which is attributed to the different carcinogenic pathways for BRCA1 and BRCA2.

  2. Frequency of ABL gene mutations in chronic myeloid leukemia patients resistant to imatinib and results of treatment switch to second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcé, Silvia; Zamora, Lurdes; Cabezón, Marta; Xicoy, Blanca; Boqué, Concha; Fernández, Cristalina; Grau, Javier; Navarro, José-Tomás; Fernández de Sevilla, Alberto; Ribera, Josep-Maria; Feliu, Evarist; Millá, Fuensanta

    2013-08-04

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) have improved the management of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, a significant proportion of patients do not achieve the optimal response or are resistant to TKI. ABL kinase domain mutations have been extensively implicated in the pathogenesis of TKI resistance. Treatment with second-generation TKI has produced high rates of hematologic and cytogenetic responses in mutated ABL patients. The aim of this study was to determine the type and frequency of ABL mutations in patients who were resistant to imatinib or had lost the response, and to analyze the effect of second-generation TKI on their outcome. The presence of ABL mutations in 45 CML patients resistant to imatinib was evaluated by direct sequencing and was correlated with the results of the cytogenetic study (performed in 39 cases). The outcome of these patients after therapy with nilotinib or dasatinib was analyzed. ABL mutations were detected in 14 out of 45 resistant patients. Patients with clonal cytogenetic evolution tended to develop mutations more frequently than those without clonal evolution. Nine out of the 15 patients with ABL mutation responded to a treatment switch to nilotinib (n=4), dasatinib (n=2), interferon (n=1) or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (n=2). The frequency of ABL mutations in CML patients resistant to imatinib is high and is more frequent among those with clonal cytogenetic evolution. The change to second-generation TKI can overcome imatinib resistance in most of the mutated patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  3. Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutation in Vibrio anguillarum results in virulence attenuation and immunoprotection in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Xiangyu; Spinard, Edward J; Hillman, Shelby L; Nelson, David R

    2017-11-14

    Vibrio anguillarum is an extracellular bacterial pathogen that is a causative agent of vibriosis in finfish and crustaceans with mortality rates ranging from 30% to 100%. Mutations in central metabolism (glycolysis and the TCA cycle) of intracellular pathogens often result in attenuated virulence due to depletion of required metabolic intermediates; however, it was not known whether mutations in central metabolism would affect virulence in an extracellular pathogen such as V. anguillarum. Seven central metabolism mutants were created and characterized with regard to growth in minimal and complex media, expression of virulence genes, and virulence in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Only the isocitrate dehydrogenase (icd) mutant was attenuated in virulence against rainbow trout challenged by either intraperitoneal injection or immersion. Further, the icd mutant was shown to be immunoprotective against wild type V. anguillarum infection. There was no significant decrease in the expression of the three hemolysin genes detected by qRT-PCR. Additionally, only the icd mutant exhibited a significantly decreased growth yield in complex media. Growth yield was directly related to the abundance of glutamate. A strain with a restored wild type icd gene was created and shown to restore growth to a wild type cell density in complex media and pathogenicity in rainbow trout. The data strongly suggest that a decreased growth yield, resulting from the inability to synthesize α-ketoglutarate, caused the attenuation despite normal levels of expression of virulence genes. Therefore, the ability of an extracellular pathogen to cause disease is dependent upon the availability of host-supplied nutrients for growth. Additionally, a live vaccine strain could be created from an icd deletion strain.

  4. Consensus for EGFR mutation testing in non-small cell lung cancer: results from a European workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirker, Robert; Herth, Felix J F; Kerr, Keith M

    2010-01-01

    Activating somatic mutations of the tyrosine kinase domain of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have recently been characterized in a subset of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients harboring these mutations in their tumors show excellent response to EGFR tyros...

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutations in lasl and rhll quorum sensing systems result in milder chronic lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, H.; Song, Z.J.; Givskov, Michael Christian

    2001-01-01

    To understand the importance of quorum sensing in chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection, the in vivo pathogenic effects of the wild-type P aeruginosa PAO1 and its double mutant, PAO1 lasI rhlI, in which the signal-generating parts of the quorum sensing systems are defective were compared....... The rat model of P. aeruginosa lung infection was used in the present study. The rats were killed on days 3, 7, 14 and 28 after infection with the P. aeruginosa strains. The results showed that during the early stages of infection, the PAO1 double mutant induced a stronger serum antibody response, higher...... number of lung bacteria, and minor serum IgG and IgG1 responses but increased lung interferon gamma production were detected in the group infected with the PAO1 double mutant when compared with the PAO1-infected group. Delayed immune responses were observed in the PAO1-infected group and they might...

  6. Results from Coupled Optical and Electrical Sentaurus TCAD Models of a Gallium Phosphide on Silicon Electron Carrier Selective Contact Solar Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limpert, Steven; Ghosh, Kunal; Wagner, Hannes; Bowden, Stuart; Honsberg, Christiana; Goodnick, Stephen; Bremner, Stephen; Green, Martin

    2014-06-09

    We report results from coupled optical and electrical Sentaurus TCAD models of a gallium phosphide (GaP) on silicon electron carrier selective contact (CSC) solar cell. Detailed analyses of current and voltage performance are presented for devices having substrate thicknesses of 10 μm, 50 μm, 100 μm and 150 μm, and with GaP/Si interfacial quality ranging from very poor to excellent. Ultimate potential performance was investigated using optical absorption profiles consistent with light trapping schemes of random pyramids with attached and detached rear reflector, and planar with an attached rear reflector. Results indicate Auger-limited open-circuit voltages up to 787 mV and efficiencies up to 26.7% may be possible for front-contacted devices.

  7. New sample carrier systems for thermogravimetric analysis under forced flow conditions and their influence on microkinetic results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibel, C; Fieback, T M

    2015-09-01

    For thermogravimetric analysis, it has been shown that, depending on the type of sample container, different kinetic results could be obtained despite regarding the same reaction under constant conditions. This is due to limiting macrokinetic effects which are strongly dependant on the type of sample carrying system. This prompted the need for sample containers which deliver results minimally limited by diffusive mass transport. In this way, two container systems were developed, both characterized by a forced flow stream through a solid, porous bed: one from bottom to top (counter-current flow) and one from top to bottom (co-current flow). Optical test measurements were performed, the results indicating that reaction proceedings are almost fully independent of the geometrical shape of the sample containers. The Boudouard reaction was investigated with a standard crucible and the new developed systems; the reaction rates determined differed significantly, up to a factor of 6.2 at 1373 K.

  8. Novel exonic mutation inducing aberrant splicing in the IL10RA gene and resulting in infantile-onset inflammatory bowel disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagi, Tadahiro; Mizuochi, Tatsuki; Takaki, Yugo; Eda, Keisuke; Mitsuyama, Keiichi; Ishimura, Masataka; Takada, Hidetoshi; Shouval, Dror S; Griffith, Alexandra E; Snapper, Scott B; Yamashita, Yushiro; Yamamoto, Ken

    2016-01-28

    Although deleterious mutations in interleukin-10 and its receptor molecules cause severe infantile-onset inflammatory bowel disease, there are no reports of mutations affecting this signaling pathway in Japanese patients. Here we report a novel exonic mutation in the IL10RA gene that caused unique splicing aberrations in a Japanese patient with infantile-onset of inflammatory bowel disease in association with immune thrombocytopenic purpura and a transient clinical syndrome mimicking juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia. A Japanese boy, who was the first child of non-consanguineous healthy parents, developed bloody diarrhea, perianal fistula, and folliculitis in early infancy and was diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease. He also developed immune thrombocytopenic purpura and transient features mimicking juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia. The patient failed to respond to various treatments, including elemental diet, salazosulfapyridine, metronidazole, corticosteroid, infliximab, and adalimumab. We identified a novel mutation (c.537G > A, p.T179T) in exon 4 of the IL10RA gene causing unique splicing aberrations and resulting in lack of signaling through the interleukin-10 receptor. At 21 months of age, the patient underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and achieved clinical remission. We describe a novel exonic mutation in the IL10RA gene resulting in infantile-onset inflammatory bowel disease. This mutation might also be involved in his early-onset hematologic disorders. Physicians should be familiar with the clinical phenotype of IL-10 signaling defects in order to enable prompt diagnosis at an early age and referral for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  9. Weight History, Smoking, Physical Activity and Breast Cancer Risk among French-Canadian Women Non-Carriers of More Frequent BRCA1/2 Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishnee Bissonauth

    2009-01-01

    Comparing cases to controls, breast cancer risk was higher among subjects who reached their maximum body mass index (BMI at an older age (>50 years (OR=2.83; 95% CI: 2.34–2.91. A positive association was noted between breast cancer risk and weight gain of >34 lbs compared to weight gain of ≤15 lbs, since the age of 20 (OR=1.68; 95% CI: 1.10–2.58. Weight gain of >24 lbs compared to weight gain of ≤9 lbs, since the age of 30 also resulted in the same relationship (OR=1.96; 95% CI: 1.46–3.06. Similarly, since the age of 40, weight gain of >12 lbs compared to weight gain of ≤1 lb was associated with increased breast cancer risk (OR=1.91; 95% CI: 1.53–2.66. Women who smoked >9 pack-years of cigarettes had a 59% higher breast cancer risk (P=.05. Subjects who engaged in >24.8 metabolic-equivalent- (MET- hours per week compared to ≤10.7 MET-hours per week of moderate physical activity had a 52% (P=.01 decreased risk and total physical activity between 16.2 and 33.2 MET-hours per week compared to ≤16.2 MET-hours per week, resulted in a 43% (P=.05 lower risk of breast cancer. In conclusion, weight history did affect breast cancer risk. Moreover, smoking appeared to raise the risk, whereas moderate physical activity had a protective effect.

  10. Effect of BRCA germline mutations on breast cancer prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baretta, Zora; Mocellin, Simone; Goldin, Elena; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Huo, Dezheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The contribution of BRCA germline mutational status to breast cancer patients’ prognosis is unclear. We aimed to systematically review and perform meta-analysis of the available evidence of effects of BRCA germline mutations on multiple survival outcomes of breast cancer patients as a whole and in specific subgroups of interest, including those with triple negative breast cancer, those with Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, and patients with stage I–III disease. Methods: Sixty studies met all inclusion criteria and were considered for this meta-analysis. These studies involved 105,220 breast cancer patients, whose 3588 (3.4%) were BRCA mutations carriers. The associations between BRCA genes mutational status and overall survival (OS), breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) were evaluated using random-effect models. Results: BRCA1 mutation carriers have worse OS than BRCA-negative/sporadic cases (hazard ratio, HR 1.30, 95% CI: 1.11–1.52) and worse BCSS than sporadic/BRCA-negative cases among patients with stage I–III breast cancer (HR 1.45, 95% CI: 1.01–2.07). BRCA2 mutation carriers have worse BCSS than sporadic/BRCA-negative cases (HR 1.29, 95% CI: 1.03–1.62), although they have similar OS. Among triple negative breast cancer, BRCA1/2 mutations carriers had better OS than BRCA-negative counterpart (HR 0.49, 95% CI: 0.26–0.92). Among Ashkenazi Jewish women, BRCA1/2 mutations carriers presented higher risk of death from breast cancer (HR 1.44, 95% CI: 1.05–1.97) and of distant metastases (HR 1.82, 95% CI: 1.05–3.16) than sporadic/BRCA-negative patients. Conclusion: Our results support the evaluation of BRCA mutational status in patients with high risk of harboring BRCA germline mutations to better define the prognosis of breast cancer in these patients. PMID:27749552

  11. PMS2 gene mutation results in DNA mismatch repair system failure in a case of adult granulosa cell tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wen-Chung; Lee, Ya-Ting; Lai, Yen-Chein

    2017-01-01

    Background Granulosa cell tumors are rare ovarian malignancies. Their characteristics include unpredictable indolent growth with malignant potential and late recurrence. Approximately 95% are of adult type. Recent molecular studies have characterized the FOXL2 402C?>?G mutation in adult granulosa cell tumor. Our previous case report showed that unique FOXL2 402C?>?G mutation and defective DNA mismatch repair system are associated with the development of adult granulosa cell tumor. Findings In...

  12. A single amino acid mutation in Spo0A results in sporulation deficiency of Paenibacillus polymyxa SC2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiaoyang; Yu, Xiaoning; Du, Binghai; Liu, Kai; Yao, Liangtong; Zhang, Sicheng; Selin, C; Fernando, W G D; Wang, Chengqiang; Ding, Yanqin

    2016-01-01

    Sporulating bacteria such as Bacillus subtilis and Paenibacillus polymyxa exhibit sporulation deficiencies during their lifetime in a laboratory environment. In this study, spontaneous mutants SC2-M1 and SC2-M2, of P. polymyxa SC2 lost the ability to form endospores. A global genetic and transcriptomic analysis of wild-type SC2 and spontaneous mutants was carried out. Genome resequencing analysis revealed 14 variants in the genome of SC2-M1, including three insertions and deletions (indels), 10 single nucleotide variations (SNVs) and one intrachromosomal translocation (ITX). There were nine variants in the genome of SC2-M2, including two indels and seven SNVs. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that 266 and 272 genes showed significant differences in expression in SC2-M1 and SC2-M2, respectively, compared with the wild-type SC2. Besides sporulation-related genes, genes related to exopolysaccharide biosynthesis (eps), antibiotic (fusaricidin) synthesis, motility (flgB) and other functions were also affected in these mutants. In SC2-M2, reversion of spo0A resulted in the complete recovery of sporulation. This is the first global analysis of mutations related to sporulation deficiency in P. polymyxa. Our results demonstrate that a SNV within spo0A caused the sporulation deficiency of SC2-M2 and provide strong evidence that an arginine residue at position 211 is essential for the function of Spo0A. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  13. Mutation of a Rice Gene Encoding a Phenylalanine Biosynthetic Enzyme Results in Accumulation of Phenylalanine and Tryptophan[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Tetsuya; Matsuda, Fumio; Kasai, Koji; Fukuoka, Shuichi; Kitamura, Keisuke; Tozawa, Yuzuru; Miyagawa, Hisashi; Wakasa, Kyo

    2008-01-01

    Two distinct biosynthetic pathways for Phe in plants have been proposed: conversion of prephenate to Phe via phenylpyruvate or arogenate. The reactions catalyzed by prephenate dehydratase (PDT) and arogenate dehydratase (ADT) contribute to these respective pathways. The Mtr1 mutant of rice (Oryza sativa) manifests accumulation of Phe, Trp, and several phenylpropanoids, suggesting a link between the synthesis of Phe and Trp. Here, we show that the Mtr1 mutant gene (mtr1-D) encodes a form of rice PDT with a point mutation in the putative allosteric regulatory region of the protein. Transformed callus lines expressing mtr1-D exhibited all the characteristics of Mtr1 callus tissue. Biochemical analysis revealed that rice PDT possesses both PDT and ADT activities, with a preference for arogenate as substrate, suggesting that it functions primarily as an ADT. The wild-type enzyme is feedback regulated by Phe, whereas the mutant enzyme showed a reduced feedback sensitivity, resulting in Phe accumulation. In addition, these observations indicate that rice PDT is critical for regulating the size of the Phe pool in plant cells. Feeding external Phe to wild-type callus tissue and seedlings resulted in Trp accumulation, demonstrating a connection between Phe accumulation and Trp pool size. PMID:18487352

  14. Mutation and premating isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, R. C.; Thompson, J. N. Jr

    2002-01-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  15. Genetic Testing for Wolfram Syndrome Mutations in a Sample of 71 Patients with Hereditary Optic Neuropathy and Negative Genetic Test Results for OPA1/OPA3/LHON.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvez-Ruiz, Alberto; Galindo-Ferreiro, Alicia; Schatz, Patrik

    2018-04-01

    In this study, the authors present a sample of 71 patients with hereditary optic neuropathy and negative genetic test results for OPA1/OPA3/LHON. All of these patients later underwent genetic testing to rule out WFS. As a result, 53 patients (74.7%) were negative and 18 patients (25.3%) were positive for some type of mutation or variation in the WFS gene. The authors believe that this study is interesting because it shows that a sizeable percentage (25.3%) of patients with hereditary optic 25 neuropathy and negative genetic test results for OPA1/OPA3/LHON had WFS mutations or variants.

  16. A strong loss-of-function mutation in RAN1 results in constitutive activation of the ethylene response pathway as well as a rosette-lethal phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woeste, K. E.; Kieber, J. J.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    A recessive mutation was identified that constitutively activated the ethylene response pathway in Arabidopsis and resulted in a rosette-lethal phenotype. Positional cloning of the gene corresponding to this mutation revealed that it was allelic to responsive to antagonist1 (ran1), a mutation that causes seedlings to respond in a positive manner to what is normally a competitive inhibitor of ethylene binding. In contrast to the previously identified ran1-1 and ran1-2 alleles that are morphologically indistinguishable from wild-type plants, this ran1-3 allele results in a rosette-lethal phenotype. The predicted protein encoded by the RAN1 gene is similar to the Wilson and Menkes disease proteins and yeast Ccc2 protein, which are integral membrane cation-transporting P-type ATPases involved in copper trafficking. Genetic epistasis analysis indicated that RAN1 acts upstream of mutations in the ethylene receptor gene family. However, the rosette-lethal phenotype of ran1-3 was not suppressed by ethylene-insensitive mutants, suggesting that this mutation also affects a non-ethylene-dependent pathway regulating cell expansion. The phenotype of ran1-3 mutants is similar to loss-of-function ethylene receptor mutants, suggesting that RAN1 may be required to form functional ethylene receptors. Furthermore, these results suggest that copper is required not only for ethylene binding but also for the signaling function of the ethylene receptors.

  17. Mutation in Rice Abscisic Acid2 Results in Cell Death, Enhanced Disease-Resistance, Altered Seed Dormancy and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongxiang Liao

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Lesion mimic mutants display spontaneous cell death, and thus are valuable for understanding the molecular mechanism of cell death and disease resistance. Although a lot of such mutants have been characterized in rice, the relationship between lesion formation and abscisic acid (ABA synthesis pathway is not reported. In the present study, we identified a rice mutant, lesion mimic mutant 9150 (lmm9150, exhibiting spontaneous cell death, pre-harvest sprouting, enhanced growth, and resistance to rice bacterial and blast diseases. Cell death in the mutant was accompanied with excessive accumulation of H2O2. Enhanced disease resistance was associated with cell death and upregulation of defense-related genes. Map-based cloning identified a G-to-A point mutation resulting in a D-to-N substitution at the amino acid position 110 of OsABA2 (LOC_Os03g59610 in lmm9150. Knock-out of OsABA2 through CRISPR/Cas9 led to phenotypes similar to those of lmm9150. Consistent with the function of OsABA2 in ABA biosynthesis, ABA level in the lmm9150 mutant was significantly reduced. Moreover, exogenous application of ABA could rescue all the mutant phenotypes of lmm9150. Taken together, our data linked ABA deficiency to cell death and provided insight into the role of ABA in rice disease resistance.

  18. Mutation in Rice Abscisic Acid2 Results in Cell Death, Enhanced Disease-Resistance, Altered Seed Dormancy and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yongxiang; Bai, Que; Xu, Peizhou; Wu, Tingkai; Guo, Daiming; Peng, Yongbin; Zhang, Hongyu; Deng, Xiaoshu; Chen, Xiaoqiong; Luo, Ming; Ali, Asif; Wang, Wenming; Wu, Xianjun

    2018-01-01

    Lesion mimic mutants display spontaneous cell death, and thus are valuable for understanding the molecular mechanism of cell death and disease resistance. Although a lot of such mutants have been characterized in rice, the relationship between lesion formation and abscisic acid (ABA) synthesis pathway is not reported. In the present study, we identified a rice mutant, lesion mimic mutant 9150 ( lmm9150 ), exhibiting spontaneous cell death, pre-harvest sprouting, enhanced growth, and resistance to rice bacterial and blast diseases. Cell death in the mutant was accompanied with excessive accumulation of H 2 O 2 . Enhanced disease resistance was associated with cell death and upregulation of defense-related genes. Map-based cloning identified a G-to-A point mutation resulting in a D-to-N substitution at the amino acid position 110 of OsABA2 (LOC_Os03g59610) in lmm9150 . Knock-out of OsABA2 through CRISPR/Cas9 led to phenotypes similar to those of lmm9150 . Consistent with the function of OsABA2 in ABA biosynthesis, ABA level in the lmm9150 mutant was significantly reduced. Moreover, exogenous application of ABA could rescue all the mutant phenotypes of lmm9150 . Taken together, our data linked ABA deficiency to cell death and provided insight into the role of ABA in rice disease resistance.

  19. Novel GALNT3 mutations causing hyperostosis-hyperphosphatemia syndrome result in low intact fibroblast growth factor 23 concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Shoji; Guigonis, Vincent; Imel, Erik A; Courouble, Mélanie; Heissat, Sophie; Henley, John D; Sorenson, Andrea H; Petit, Barbara; Lienhardt, Anne; Econs, Michael J

    2007-05-01

    Hyperostosis-hyperphosphatemia syndrome (HHS) is a rare metabolic disorder characterized by hyperphosphatemia and localized hyperostosis. HHS is caused by mutations in GALNT3, which encodes UDP-N-acetyl-alpha-D-galactosamine:polypeptide N- acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 3. Familial tumoral calcinosis (TC), characterized by ectopic calcifications and hyperphosphatemia, is caused by mutations in the GALNT3 or fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) genes. Our objective was to identify mutations in FGF23 or GALNT3 and determine serum FGF23 levels in an HHS patient. Mutation detection in FGF23 and GALNT3 was performed by DNA sequencing, and serum FGF23 concentrations were measured by ELISA. A 5-year-old French boy with HHS and his family members participated. The patient presented with painful cortical lesions in his leg. Radiographs of the affected bone showed diaphyseal hyperostosis. The lesional tissue comprised trabeculae of immature, woven bone surrounded by fibrous tissue. Biochemistry revealed elevated phosphate, tubular maximum rate for phosphate reabsorption per deciliter of glomerular filtrate, and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D levels. The patient was a compound heterozygote for two novel GALNT3 mutations. His parents and brother were heterozygous for one of the mutations and had no biochemical abnormalities. Intact FGF23 level in the patient was low normal, whereas C-terminal FGF23 was elevated, a pattern similar to TC. The presence of GALNT3 mutations and elevated C-terminal, but low intact serum FGF23, levels in HHS resemble those seen in TC, suggesting that HHS and TC are different manifestations of the same disorder. The absence of biochemical abnormalities in the heterozygous individuals suggests that one normal allele is sufficient for secretion of intact FGF23.

  20. MSH6 and PMS2 mutation positive Australian Lynch syndrome families: novel mutations, cancer risk and age of diagnosis of colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talseth-Palmer Bente A

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Approximately 10% of Lynch syndrome families have a mutation in MSH6 and fewer families have a mutation in PMS2. It is assumed that the cancer incidence is the same in families with mutations in MSH6 as in families with mutations in MLH1/MSH2 but that the disease tends to occur later in life, little is known about families with PMS2 mutations. This study reports on our findings on mutation type, cancer risk and age of diagnosis in MSH6 and PMS2 families. Methods A total of 78 participants (from 29 families with a mutation in MSH6 and 7 participants (from 6 families with a mutation in PMS2 were included in the current study. A database of de-identified patient information was analysed to extract all relevant information such as mutation type, cancer incidence, age of diagnosis and cancer type in this Lynch syndrome cohort. Cumulative lifetime risk was calculated utilising Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Results MSH6 and PMS2 mutations represent 10.3% and 1.9%, respectively, of the pathogenic mutations in our Australian Lynch syndrome families. We identified 26 different MSH6 and 4 different PMS2 mutations in the 35 families studied. We report 15 novel MSH6 and 1 novel PMS2 mutations. The estimated cumulative risk of CRC at age 70 years was 61% (similar in males and females and 65% for endometrial cancer in MSH6 mutation carriers. The risk of developing CRC is different between males and females at age 50 years, which is 34% for males and 21% for females. Conclusion Novel MSH6 and PMS2 mutations are being reported and submitted to the current databases for identified Lynch syndrome mutations. Our data provides additional information to add to the genotype-phenotype spectrum for both MSH6 and PMS2 mutations.

  1. Aircraft Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nødskov, Kim; Kværnø, Ole

    as their purchases of aircraft carrier systems, makes it more than likely that the country is preparing such an acquisition. China has territorial disputes in the South China Sea over the Spratly Islands and is also worried about the security of its sea lines of communications, by which China transports the majority......, submarines, aircraft and helicopters, is not likely to be fully operational and war-capable until 2020, given the fact that China is starting from a clean sheet of paper. The United States of America (USA), the United Kingdom (UK), Russia and India are currently building or have made decisions to build new...

  2. Serum AMH levels in healthy women from BRCA1/2 mutated families : are they reduced?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tilborg, Theodora C; Derks-Smeets, Inge A P; Bos, Anna M E; Oosterwijk, Jan C; van Golde, Ron J; de Die-Smulders, Christine E; van der Kolk, Lizet E; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A G; Velthuizen, Maria E; Hoek, Annemieke; Eijkemans, Marinus J C; Laven, Joop S E; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Broekmans, Frank J M

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Do BRCA1/2 mutation carriers have a compromised ovarian reserve compared to proven non-carriers, based on serum anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels? SUMMARY ANSWER: BRCA1/2 mutation carriers do not show a lower serum AMH level in comparison to proven non-carriers, after adjustment

  3. Serum AMH levels in healthy women from BRCA1/2 mutated families : are they reduced?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tilborg, Theodora C.; Derks-Smeets, Inge A. P.; Bos, Anna M. E.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; van Golde, Ron J.; de Die-Smulders, Christine E.; van der Kolk, Lizet E.; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A. G.; Velthuizen, Maria E.; Hoek, Annemieke; Eijkemans, Marinus J. C.; Laven, Joop S. E.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Broekmans, Frank J. M.

    Do BRCA1/2 mutation carriers have a compromised ovarian reserve compared to proven non-carriers, based on serum anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) levels? BRCA1/2 mutation carriers do not show a lower serum AMH level in comparison to proven non-carriers, after adjustment for potential confounders. It has

  4. Double heterozygous mutations of MITF and PAX3 result in Waardenburg syndrome with increased penetrance in pigmentary defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T; Li, X; Huang, Q; Li, L; Chai, Y; Sun, L; Wang, X; Zhu, Y; Wang, Z; Huang, Z; Li, Y; Wu, H

    2013-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentary defects of the hair, skin, and iris. Heterozygous mutations of MITF and its transactivator gene PAX3 are associated with Waardenburg syndrome type II (WS2) and type I (WS1), respectively. Most patients with MITF or PAX3 mutations, however, show variable penetrance of WS-associated phenotypes even within families segregating the same mutation, possibly mediated by genetic background or specific modifiers. In this study, we reported a rare Waardenburg syndrome simplex family in which a pair of WS parents gave birth to a child with double heterozygous mutations of MITF and PAX3. Compared to his parents who carried a single mutation in either MITF or PAX3, this child showed increased penetrance of pigmentary defects including white forelock, white eyebrows and eyelashes, and patchy facial depigmentation. This observation suggested that the expression level of MITF is closely correlated to the penetrance of WS, and variants in transcription regulator genes of MITF may modify the relevant clinical phenotypes. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Prevalence of precore-defective mutant of hepatitis B virus in HBV carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niitsuma, H; Ishii, M; Saito, Y; Miura, M; Kobayashi, K; Ohori, H; Toyota, T

    1995-08-01

    Two hundred and seventy-three serum specimens from hepatitis B virus (HBV) carriers were examined for the presence of a characteristic one point mutation at nucleotide (nt) 1896 from the EcoRI site of the HBV genome in the precore region (the preC mutant) using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. This assay approach could detect preC mutants or wild-type sequences when either form constituted more than 10% of the total sample. Overall, 65.5% (76/116) of HBeAg-positive carriers had only the preC wild-type. All HBeAg-positive asymptomatic carriers (n = 14) had only the preC wild-type. In patients with chronic hepatitis B and in anti-HBe-positive asymptomatic carriers, increased prevalence of the preC mutant was associated with the development of anti-HBe antibodies and normalization of the serum alanine aminotransferase concentration. Furthermore, 27 (29.0%) of 93 HBeAg-negative carriers had unexpectedly preC wild-type sequences only. Direct sequencing of the HBV precore region of HBV specimens from 24 patients revealed no mutation at nt 1896, supporting the specificity of the RFLP analysis. These results suggest that RFLP analysis was accurate for the detection of the preC mutation and that the absence of serum HBeAg cannot be explained solely by the dominance of the preC mutant.

  6. Spontaneous mutation of Dock7 results in lower trabecular bone mass and impaired periosteal expansion in aged female Misty mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Phuong T; Bishop, Kathleen A; Maridas, David E; Motyl, Katherine J; Brooks, Daniel J; Nagano, Kenichi; Baron, Roland; Bouxsein, Mary L; Rosen, Clifford J

    2017-12-01

    Misty mice (m/m) have a loss of function mutation in Dock7 gene, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor, resulting in low bone mineral density, uncoupled bone remodeling and reduced bone formation. Dock7 has been identified as a modulator of osteoblast number and in vitro osteogenic differentiation in calvarial osteoblast culture. In addition, m/m exhibit reduced preformed brown adipose tissue innervation and temperature as well as compensatory increase in beige adipocyte markers. While the low bone mineral density phenotype is in part due to higher sympathetic nervous system (SNS) drive in young mice, it is unclear what effect aging would have in mice homozygous for the mutation in the Dock7 gene. We hypothesized that age-related trabecular bone loss and periosteal envelope expansion would be altered in m/m. To test this hypothesis, we comprehensively characterized the skeletal phenotype of m/m at 16, 32, 52, and 78wks of age. When compared to age-matched wild-type control mice (+/+), m/m had lower areal bone mineral density (aBMD) and areal bone mineral content (aBMC). Similarly, both femoral and vertebral BV/TV, Tb.N, and Conn.D were decreased in m/m while there was also an increase in Tb.Sp. As low bone mineral density and decreased trabecular bone were already present at 16wks of age in m/m and persisted throughout life, changes in age-related trabecular bone loss were not observed highlighting the role of Dock7 in controlling trabecular bone acquisition or bone loss prior to 16wks of age. Cortical thickness was also lower in the m/m across all ages. Periosteal and endosteal circumferences were higher in m/m compared to +/+ at 16wks. However, endosteal and periosteal expansion were attenuated in m/m, resulting in m/m having lower periosteal and endosteal circumferences by 78wks of age compared to +/+, highlighting the critical role of Dock7 in appositional bone expansion. Histomorphometry revealed that osteoblasts were nearly undetectable in m/m and marrow

  7. Cauli: a mouse strain with an Ift140 mutation that results in a skeletal ciliopathy modelling Jeune syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry A Miller

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cilia are architecturally complex organelles that protrude from the cell membrane and have signalling, sensory and motility functions that are central to normal tissue development and homeostasis. There are two broad categories of cilia; motile and non-motile, or primary, cilia. The central role of primary cilia in health and disease has become prominent in the past decade with the recognition of a number of human syndromes that result from defects in the formation or function of primary cilia. This rapidly growing class of conditions, now known as ciliopathies, impact the development of a diverse range of tissues including the neural axis, craniofacial structures, skeleton, kidneys, eyes and lungs. The broad impact of cilia dysfunction on development reflects the pivotal position of the primary cilia within a signalling nexus involving a growing number of growth factor systems including Hedgehog, Pdgf, Fgf, Hippo, Notch and both canonical Wnt and planar cell polarity. We have identified a novel ENU mutant allele of Ift140, which causes a mid-gestation embryonic lethal phenotype in homozygous mutant mice. Mutant embryos exhibit a range of phenotypes including exencephaly and spina bifida, craniofacial dysmorphism, digit anomalies, cardiac anomalies and somite patterning defects. A number of these phenotypes can be attributed to alterations in Hedgehog signalling, although additional signalling systems are also likely to be involved. We also report the identification of a homozygous recessive mutation in IFT140 in a Jeune syndrome patient. This ENU-induced Jeune syndrome model will be useful in delineating the origins of dysmorphology in human ciliopathies.

  8. Higher Quality of Molecular Testing, an Unfulfilled Priority: Results from External Quality Assessment for KRAS Mutation Testing in Colorectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tembuyser, L.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Normanno, N.; Delen, S.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Dequeker, E.M.

    2014-01-01

    Precision medicine is now a key element in clinical oncology. RAS mutational status is a crucial predictor of responsiveness to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor agents in metastatic colorectal cancer. In an effort to guarantee high-quality testing services in molecular pathology, the European

  9. Conformational alterations resulting from mutations in cytoplasmic domains of the alpha subunit of the Na,K-ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blostein, R; Daly, S E; MacAulay, Nanna

    1998-01-01

    This paper summarizes experiments concerned with the functional consequences of mutations in cytoplasmic regions of the alpha 1 subunit of the Na,K-ATPase, in particular the amino terminus, the first cytoplasmic loop between transmembrane segments M2 and M3, and the major cytoplasmic loop between...

  10. Familial partial lipodystrophy phenotype resulting from a single-base mutation in deoxyribonucleic acid-binding domain of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monajemi, Houshang; Zhang, Lin; Li, Gang; Jeninga, Ellen H.; Cao, Henian; Maas, Mario; Brouwer, C. B.; Kalkhoven, Eric; Stroes, Erik; Hegele, Robert A.; Leff, Todd

    2007-01-01

    CONTEXT: Familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD) results from coding sequence mutations either in LMNA, encoding nuclear lamin A/C, or in PPARG, encoding peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma). The LMNA form is called FPLD2 (MIM 151660) and the PPARG form is called FPLD3 (MIM

  11. Mutations in Plasmalemma Vesicle Associated Protein Result in Sieving Protein-Losing Enteropathy Characterized by Hypoproteinemia, Hypoalbuminemia, and HypertriglyceridemiaSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Elkadri

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Severe intestinal diseases observed in very young children are often the result of monogenic defects. We used whole-exome sequencing (WES to examine genetics in a patient with a distinct severe form of protein-losing enteropathy (PLE characterized by hypoproteinemia, hypoalbuminemia, and hypertriglyceridemia. Methods: WES was performed at the Centre for Applied Genomics, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada, and exome library preparation was performed with the Ion Torrent AmpliSeq RDY Exome Kit. Functional studies were based on the identified mutation. Results: Using WES we identified a homozygous nonsense mutation (1072C>T; p.Arg358* in the PLVAP (plasmalemma vesicle-associated protein gene in an infant from consanguineous parents who died at 5 months of age of severe PLE. Functional studies determined that the mutated PLVAP mRNA and protein were not expressed in the patient biopsy tissues, presumably secondary to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Pathological analysis showed that the loss of PLVAP resulted in disruption of endothelial fenestrated diaphragms. Conclusions: The PLVAP p.Arg358* mutation resulted in the loss of PLVAP expression with subsequent deletion of the diaphragms of endothelial fenestrae, which led to plasma protein extravasation, PLE, and ultimately death. Keywords: Endothelium, Fenestrae, Hypertriglyceridemia, Hypoalbuminemia, Hypoproteinemia, Very Early Onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Monogenic Diseases, Protein-Losing Enteropathy, Whole-Exome Sequencing

  12. Identification of Germline Genetic Mutations in Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salo-Mullen, Erin E.; O’Reilly, Eileen; Kelsen, David; Ashraf, Asad M.; Lowery, Maeve; Yu, Kenneth; Reidy, Diane; Epstein, Andrew S.; Lincoln, Anne; Saldia, Amethyst; Jacobs, Lauren M.; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Zhang, Liying; Kurtz, Robert; Saltz, Leonard; Offit, Kenneth; Robson, Mark; Stadler, Zsofia K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC) is part of several cancer predisposition syndromes; however, indications for genetic counseling/testing are not well-defined. We sought to determine mutation prevalence and characteristics that predict for inherited predisposition to PAC. Methods We identified 175 consecutive PAC patients who underwent clinical genetics assessment at Memorial Sloan Kettering between 2011–2014. Clinical data, family history, and germline results were evaluated. Results Among 159 PAC patients who pursued genetic testing, 24 pathogenic mutations were identified (15.1%; 95%CI, 9.5%–20.7%), including BRCA2(n=13), BRCA1(n=4), p16(n=2), PALB2(n=1), and Lynch syndrome(n=4). BRCA1/BRCA2 prevalence was 13.7% in Ashkenazi Jewish(AJ) (n=95) and 7.1% in non-AJ(n=56) patients. In AJ patients with strong, weak, or absent family history of BRCA-associated cancers, mutation prevalence was 16.7%, 15.8%, and 7.4%, respectively. Mean age at diagnosis in all mutation carriers was 58.5y(range 45–75y) compared to 64y(range 27–87y) in non-mutation carriers(P=0.02). Although BRCA2 was the most common mutation identified, no patients with early-onset PAC(≤50y) harbored a BRCA2 mutation and the mean age at diagnosis in BRCA2 carriers was equivalent to non-mutation carriers(P=0.34). Mutation prevalence in early-onset patients(n=21) was 28.6%, including BRCA1(n=2), p16(n=2), MSH2(n=1) and MLH1(n=1). Conclusion Mutations in BRCA2 account for over 50% of PAC patients with an identified susceptibility syndrome. AJ patients had high BRCA1/BRCA2 prevalence regardless of personal/family history, suggesting that ancestry alone indicates a need for genetic evaluation. With the exception of BRCA2-associated PAC, inherited predisposition to PAC is associated with earlier age at PAC diagnosis suggesting that this subset of patients may also represent a population warranting further evaluation. PMID:26440929

  13. [677T mutation of the MTHFR gene in adenomas and colorectal cancer in a population sample from the Northeastern Mexico. Preliminary results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Enciso, I; Martínez-Garza, S G; Rojas-Martínez, A; Ortiz-López, R; Bosques-Padilla, F; Calderón-Garcidueñas, A L; Zárate-Gómez, M; Barrera-Saldaña, H A

    2001-01-01

    Adequate intake of folates has been associated to low prevalence of colon cancer. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase enzyme (MTHFR) plays an important role in folate metabolism. The role of the 677 mutation at the MTHFR gene in the risk for colorectal cancer remains controversial. A recent report established that this mutation has a high prevalence in the healthy Mexican population. To analyze the prevalence of 677T MTHFR mutation in patients with colorectal cancer and controls without chronic gastrointestinal disorders. Seventy-four colorectal cancer, 32 adenomas and 110 normal samples were analyzed. Patients and controls were matched for sex and age. For each sample, DNA isolation, PCR, and mutation detection by restriction enzyme digestion were performed to determine the allele at the 677 position in the MTHFR gene. Genotype 677C/677C was found in 18.7, 20.3, and 30.9% in adenomas, cancer lesions and controls, respectively. Frequencies of the 677C/677T genotype were 59.4, 56.7, and 47.3%, in adenomas, cancer lesions, and controls, respectively. Genotype 677T/677T was found in 21.9, 23.0, and 21.8% in adenomas, cancer lesions, and controls, respectively. The odds ratio between genotypes carrying the mutation (T/T and C/T) and normal genotype (CC) was 1.81 (IC 95% 0.97-3.3), chi 2 = 3.5, p = 0.06. Our results showed that persons who carry the 677T mutation at MTHFR locus have a tendency for an increased risk for colorectal cancer. This study supports the basic concept that low levels of folic acid contribute with the colorectal cancer pathogenesis. Our lack of statistic significance may be due to reduced sample size.

  14. Hereditary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D-resistant rickets with alopecia resulting from a novel missense mutation in the DNA-binding domain of the vitamin D receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloy, Peter J.; Wang, Jining; Srivastava, Tarak; Feldman, David

    2009-01-01

    The rare genetic recessive disease, hereditary vitamin D resistant rickets (HVDRR), is caused by mutations in the vitamin D receptor (VDR) that result in resistance to the active hormone 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-(OH)2D3 or calcitriol). In this study, we examined the VDR from a young boy with clinical features of HVDRR including severe rickets, hypocalcemia, hypophosphatemia and partial alopecia. The pattern of alopecia was very unusual with areas of total baldness, adjacent to normal hair and regions of scant hair. The child failed to improve on oral calcium and vitamin D therapy but his abnormal chemistries and his bone x-rays normalized with intravenous calcium therapy. We found that the child was homozygous for a unique missense mutation in the VDR gene that converted valine to methionine at amino acid 26 (V26M) in the VDR DNA-binding domain (DBD). The mutant VDR was studied in the patient’s cultured skin fibroblasts and found to exhibit normal [3H]1,25-(OH)2D3 binding and protein expression. However, the fibroblasts were unresponsive to treatment with high concentrations of 1,25(OH)2D3 as demonstrated by their failure to induce CYP24A1 gene expression, a marker of 1,25(OH)2D3 responsiveness. We recreated the V26M mutation in the WT VDR and showed that in transfected COS-7 cells the mutation abolished 1,25(OH)2D3-mediated transactivation. The mutant VDR exhibited normal ligand-induced binding to RXRα and to the coactivator DRIP205. However, the V26M mutation inhibited VDR binding to a consensus vitamin D response element (VDRE). In summary, we have identified a novel V26M mutation in the VDR DBD as the molecular defect in a patient with HVDRR and an unusual pattern of alopecia. PMID:19815438

  15. An XPA gene splicing mutation resulting in trace protein expression in an elderly patient with xeroderma pigmentosum group A without neurological abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y; Endo, Y; Kusaka-Kikushima, A; Nakamaura, S; Nakazawa, Y; Ogi, T; Uryu, M; Tsuji, G; Furue, M; Moriwaki, S

    2017-07-01

    A certain relationship between XPA gene mutations and the severity of symptoms has been observed in patients with xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XP-A). Patients with mutations within the DNA-binding domain usually exhibit severe symptoms, whereas splicing mutations in the same domain sometimes cause very mild symptoms. This inconsistency can be explained by a small amount of functional XPA protein produced from normally spliced transcripts. We herein report the case of an adult Japanese patient with XP-A with unusually mild symptoms. We identified a homozygous c.529G>A mutation in exon 4 of the XPA gene, which resulted in aberrant splicing with a 29-bp deletion in exon 4 causing a frameshift. Intact mRNA was observable, but a Western blot analysis failed to detect any normal XPA protein. We therefore evaluated the DNA repair capacity in normal cells in which the XPA expression was artificially diminished. The repair capacity was still present in cells with trace levels of the XPA protein. The repair capacity of the cells derived from our patient with mild symptoms was poor by comparison, but still significant compared with that of the cells derived from a patient with XP-A with severe symptoms. These results provide strong evidence that a trace level of XPA protein can still exert a relatively strong repair capacity, resulting in only a mild phenotype. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  16. Identification of seven novel mutations including the first two genomic rearrangements in SLC26A3 mutated in congenital chloride diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höglund, P; Sormaala, M; Haila, S; Socha, J; Rajaram, U; Scheurlen, W; Sinaasappel, M; de Jonge, H; Holmberg, C; Yoshikawa, H; Kere, J

    2001-09-01

    Congenital chloride diarrhea (CLD) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by defective intestinal electrolyte absorption, resulting in voluminous osmotic diarrhea with high chloride content. A variety of mutations in the solute carrier family 26, member 3 gene (SLC26A3, previously known as CLD or DRA) are responsible for the disease. Since the identification of the SLC26A3 gene and the determination of its genomic structure, altogether three founder and 17 private mutations have been characterized within miscellaneous ethnic groups. We screened for mutations in seven unrelated families with CLD. The diagnoses were confirmed by fecal chloride measurements. The combined PCR-SSCP and sequencing analyses revealed altogether seven novel mutations including two missense mutations (S206P, D468V), two splicing defects (IVS12-1G>C, IVS13-2delA), one nonsense mutation (Q436X), one insertion/deletion mutation (2104-2105delGGins29-bp), and an intragenic deletion of SLC26A3 exons 7 and 8. Two previously identified mutations were also found. This is the first report of rearrangement mutations in SLC26A3. Molecular features predisposing SLC26A3 for the two rearrangements may include repetitive elements and palindromic-like sequences. The increasingly wide diversity of SLC26A3 mutations suggests that mutations in the SLC26A3 gene may not be rare events. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. BRCA Genetic Screening in Middle Eastern and North African: Mutational Spectrum and Founder BRCA1 Mutation (c.798_799delTT in North African

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelilah Laraqui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The contribution of BRCA1 mutations to both hereditary and sporadic breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC has not yet been thoroughly investigated in MENA. Methods. To establish the knowledge about BRCA1 mutations and their correlation with the clinical aspect in diagnosed cases of HBOC in MENA populations. A systematic review of studies examining BRCA1 in BC women in Cyprus, Jordan, Egypt, Lebanon, Morocco, Algeria, and Tunisia was conducted. Results. Thirteen relevant references were identified, including ten studies which performed DNA sequencing of all BRCA1 exons. For the latter, 31 mutations were detected in 57 of the 547 patients ascertained. Familial history of BC was present in 388 (71% patients, of whom 50 were mutation carriers. c.798_799delTT was identified in 11 North African families, accounting for 22% of total identified BRCA1 mutations, suggesting a founder allele. A broad spectrum of other mutations including c.68_69delAG, c.181T>G, c.5095C>T, and c.5266dupC, as well as sequence of unclassified variants and polymorphisms, was also detected. Conclusion. The knowledge of genetic structure of BRCA1 in MENA should contribute to the assessment of the necessity of preventive programs for mutation carriers and clinical management. The high prevalence of BC and the presence of frequent mutations of the BRCA1 gene emphasize the need for improving screening programs and individual testing/counseling.

  18. Acral peeling skin syndrome resulting from a homozygous nonsense mutation in the CSTA gene encoding cystatin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krunic, Aleksandar L; Stone, Kristina L; Simpson, Michael A; McGrath, John A

    2013-01-01

    Acral peeling skin syndrome (APSS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. We used whole-exome sequencing to identify the molecular basis of APSS in a consanguineous Jordanian-American pedigree. We identified a homozygous nonsense mutation (p.Lys22X) in the CSTA gene, encoding cystatin A, that was confirmed using Sanger sequencing. Cystatin A is a protease inhibitor found in the cornified cell envelope, and loss-of-function mutations have previously been reported in two cases of exfoliative ichthyosis. Our study expands the molecular pathology of APSS and demonstrates the value of next-generation sequencing in the genetic characterization of inherited skin diseases. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Mutation in Torenia fournieri Lind. UFO homolog confers loss of TfLFY interaction and results in a petal to sepal transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Katsutomo; Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Aida, Ryutaro; Shikata, Masahito; Abe, Tomoko; Ohtsubo, Norihiro

    2012-09-01

    We identified a Torenia fournieri Lind. mutant (no. 252) that exhibited a sepaloid phenotype in which the second whorls were changed to sepal-like organs. This mutant had no stamens, and the floral organs consisted of sepals and carpels. Although the expression of a torenia class B MADS-box gene, GLOBOSA (TfGLO), was abolished in the 252 mutant, no mutation of TfGLO was found. Among torenia homologs such as APETALA1 (AP1), LEAFY (LFY), and UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO), which regulate expression of class B genes in Arabidopsis, only accumulation of the TfUFO transcript was diminished in the 252 mutant. Furthermore, a missense mutation was found in the coding region of the mutant TfUFO. Intact TfUFO complemented the mutant phenotype whereas mutated TfUFO did not; in addition, the transgenic phenotype of TfUFO-knockdown torenias coincided with the mutant phenotype. Yeast two-hybrid analysis revealed that the mutated TfUFO lost its ability to interact with TfLFY protein. In situ hybridization analysis indicated that the transcripts of TfUFO and TfLFY were partially accumulated in the same region. These results clearly demonstrate that the defect in TfUFO caused the sepaloid phenotype in the 252 mutant due to the loss of interaction with TfLFY. © 2012 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Mutation of the regulatory phosphorylation site of tobacco nitrate reductase results in constitutive activation of the enzyme in vivo and nitrite accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillo, Cathrine; Lea, Unni S; Leydecker, Marie-Thérèse; Meyer, Christian

    2003-09-01

    In wild-type Nicotiana plumbaginifolia and other higher plants, nitrate reductase (NR) is rapidly inactivated/activated in response to dark/light transitions. Inactivation of NR is believed to be caused by phosphorylation at a special conserved regulatory Ser residue, Ser 521, and interactions with divalent cations and inhibitory 14-3-3 proteins. A transgenic N. plumbaginifolia line (S(521)) was constructed where the Ser 521 had been changed by site-directed mutagenesis into Asp. This mutation resulted in complete abolishment of inactivation in response to light/dark transitions or other treatments known to inactivate NR. During prolonged darkness, NR in wild-type plants is in the inactivated form, whereas NR in the S(521) line is always in the active form. Differences in degradation rate between NR from S(521) and lines with non-mutated NR were not found. Kinetic constants like Km values for NADH and NO3(-) were not changed, but a slightly different pH profile was observed for mutated NR as opposed to non-mutated NR. Under optimal growth conditions, the phenotype of the S(521) plants was not different from the wild type (WT). However, when plants were irrigated with high nitrate concentration, 150 mM, the transgenic plants accumulated nitrite in darkness, and young leaves showed chlorosis.

  1. Population genetic testing for cancer susceptibility: founder mutations to genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulkes, William D; Knoppers, Bartha Maria; Turnbull, Clare

    2016-01-01

    The current standard model for identifying carriers of high-risk mutations in cancer-susceptibility genes (CSGs) generally involves a process that is not amenable to population-based testing: access to genetic tests is typically regulated by health-care providers on the basis of a labour-intensive assessment of an individual's personal and family history of cancer, with face-to-face genetic counselling performed before mutation testing. Several studies have shown that application of these selection criteria results in a substantial proportion of mutation carriers being missed. Population-based genetic testing has been proposed as an alternative approach to determining cancer susceptibility, and aims for a more-comprehensive detection of mutation carriers. Herein, we review the existing data on population-based genetic testing, and consider some of the barriers, pitfalls, and challenges related to the possible expansion of this approach. We consider mechanisms by which population-based genetic testing for cancer susceptibility could be delivered, and suggest how such genetic testing might be integrated into existing and emerging health-care structures. The existing models of genetic testing (including issues relating to informed consent) will very likely require considerable alteration if the potential benefits of population-based genetic testing are to be fully realized.

  2. A second mutation associated with apparent [beta]-hexosaminidase A pseudodeficiency: Identification and frequency estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Z.; Chabot, T.; Triggs-Raine, B.L. (Univ. of Manitoba, Winnepeg (Canada)); Natowicz, M.R.; Prence, E.M. (Shriver Center for Mental Retardation, Waltham, MA (United States) Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)); Kaback, M.M.; Lim-Steele, S.T.; Brown, D. (Children' s Hospital, San Diego, CA (United States) Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States))

    1993-12-01

    Deficient activity of [beta]-hexosaminidase A (Hex A), resulting from mutations in the HEXA gene, typically causes Tay-Sachs disease. However, healthy individuals lacking Hex A activity against synthetic substrates (i.e., individuals who are pseudodeficient) have been described. Recently, an apparently benign C[sub 739]-to-T (Arg247Trp) mutation was found among individuals with Hex A levels indistinguishable from those of carriers of Tay-Sachs disease. This allele, when in compound heterozygosity with a second [open quotes]disease-causing[close quotes] allele, results in Hex A pseudodeficiency. The authors examined the HEXA gene of a healthy 42-year-old who was Hex A deficient but did not have the C[sub 739]-to-T mutation. The HEXA exons were PCR amplified, and the products were analyzed for mutations by using restriction-enzyme digestion or single-strand gel electrophoresis. A G[sub 805]-to-A (Gly269Ser) mutation associated with adult-onset G[sub m2] gangliosidosis was found on one chromosome. A new mutation, C[sub 745]-to-T (Arg 249Trp), was identified on the second chromosome. This mutation was detected in an additional 4/63 (6%) non-Jewish and 0/218 Ashkenazi Jewish enzyme-defined carriers. Although the Arg249Trp change may result in a late-onset form of G[sub M2] gangliosidosis, any phenotype must be very mild. This new mutation and the benign C[sub 739]-to-T mutation together account for [approximately]38% of non-Jewish enzyme-defined carriers. Because carriers of the C[sub 739]-to-T and C[sub 745]-to-T mutations cannot be differentiated from carriers of disease-causing alleles by using the classical biochemical screening approaches, DNA-based analyses for these mutations should be offered for non-Jewish enzyme-defined heterozygotes, before definitive counseling is provided. 46 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Differential regulation of amyloid precursor protein sorting with pathological mutations results in a distinct effect on amyloid-β production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Chen; Wang, Jia-Yi; Wang, Kai-Chen; Liao, Jhih-Ying; Cheng, Irene H

    2014-11-01

    The deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, which is generated from amyloid precursor protein (APP), is the pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Three APP familial AD mutations (D678H, D678N, and H677R) located at the sixth and seventh amino acid of Aβ have distinct effect on Aβ aggregation, but their influence on the physiological and pathological roles of APP remain unclear. We found that the D678H mutation strongly enhances amyloidogenic cleavage of APP, thus increasing the production of Aβ. This enhancement of amyloidogenic cleavage is likely because of the acceleration of APPD678H sorting into the endosomal-lysosomal pathway. In contrast, the APPD678N and APPH677R mutants do not cause the same effects. Therefore, this study indicates a regulatory role of D678H in APP sorting and processing, and provides genetic evidence for the importance of APP sorting in AD pathogenesis. The internalization of amyloid precursor protein (APP) increases its opportunity to be processed by β-secretase and to produce Amyloid-β (Aβ) that causes Alzheimer's disease (AD). We report a pathogenic APPD678H mutant that enhances APP internalization into the endosomal-lysosomal pathway and thus promotes the β-secretase cleavage and Aβ production. This study provides genetic evidence for the importance of APP sorting in AD pathogenesis. © 2014 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  4. Homozygosity for a single base-pair mutation in the oocyte-specific GDF9 gene results in sterility in Thoka sheep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicel, Linda; Bishop, Stephen; Pong-Wong, Richardo

    2009-01-01

    and infertility in homozygotes. Analysis of homozygote ovarian morphology and a number of genes normally activated in growing follicles showed that GDF9 was not involved in oocyte activation, but in subsequent development of the follicle. This study highlights the importance of oocyte factors in regulating...... ovulation rate, although in some cases homozygous ewes are infertile. In the present study we present a detailed characterisation of a novel mutation in growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9), found in Icelandic Thoka sheep. This mutation is a single base change (A1279C) resulting in a non-conservative...... fertility and provides new information for structural analysis and investigation of the potentially important sites of dimerization or translational modifications required to produce biologically active GDF9. It also provides the basis for the utilisation of these animals to enhance sheep production...

  5. A pathogenic S250F missense mutation results in a mouse model of mild aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caine, Charlotte; Shohat, Meytal; Kim, Jeong-Ki; Nakanishi, Koki; Homma, Shunichi; Mosharov, Eugene V; Monani, Umrao R

    2017-11-15

    Homozygous mutations in the aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) gene result in a severe depletion of its namesake protein, triggering a debilitating and often fatal form of infantile Parkinsonism known as AADC deficiency. AADC deficient patients fail to produce normal levels of the monoamine neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin, and suffer a multi-systemic disorder characterized by movement abnormalities, developmental delay and autonomic dysfunction; an absolute loss of dopamine is generally considered incompatible with life. There is no optimal treatment for AADC deficiency and few truly good models in which to investigate disease mechanisms or develop and refine therapeutic strategies. In this study, we introduced a relatively frequently reported but mildly pathogenic S250F missense mutation into the murine Aadc gene. We show that mutants homozygous for the mutation are viable and express a stable but minimally active form of the AADC protein. Although the low enzymatic activity of the protein resulted in only modestly reduced concentrations of brain dopamine, serotonin levels were markedly diminished, and this perturbed behavior as well as autonomic function in mutant mice. Still, we found no evidence of morphologic abnormalities of the dopaminergic cells in mutant brains. The striatum as well as substantia nigra appeared normal and no loss of dopamine expressing cells in the latter was detected. We conclude that even minute levels of active AADC are sufficient to allow for substantial amounts of dopamine to be produced in model mice harboring the S250F mutation. Such mutants represent a novel, mild model of human AADC deficiency. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. A multiplex single nucleotide polymorphism typing assay for detecting mutations that result in decreased fluoroquinolone susceptibility in Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Song, Yajun

    2010-08-01

    OBJECTIVES: Decreased susceptibility to fluoroquinolones has become a major problem for the successful therapy of human infections caused by Salmonella enterica, especially the life-threatening typhoid and paratyphoid fevers. METHODS: By using Luminex xTAG beads, we developed a rapid, reliable and cost-effective multiplexed genotyping assay for simultaneously detecting 11 mutations in gyrA, gyrB and parE of S. enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A that result in nalidixic acid resistance (Nal(R)) and\\/or decreased susceptibility to fluoroquinolones. RESULTS: This assay yielded unambiguous single nucleotide polymorphism calls on extracted DNA from 292 isolates of Salmonella Typhi (Nal(R) = 223 and Nal(S) = 69) and 106 isolates of Salmonella Paratyphi A (Nal(R) = 24 and Nal(S) = 82). All of the 247 Nal(R) Salmonella Typhi and Salmonella Paratyphi A isolates were found to harbour at least one of the target mutations, with GyrA Phe-83 as the most common one (143\\/223 for Salmonella Typhi and 18\\/24 for Salmonella Paratyphi A). We also identified three GyrB mutations in eight Nal(S) Salmonella Typhi isolates (six for GyrB Phe-464, one for GyrB Leu-465 and one for GyrB Asp-466), and mutations GyrB Phe-464 and GyrB Asp-466 seem to be related to the decreased ciprofloxacin susceptibility phenotype in Salmonella Typhi. This assay can also be used directly on boiled single colonies. CONCLUSIONS: The assay presented here would be useful for clinical and reference laboratories to rapidly screen quinolone-resistant isolates of Salmonella Typhi and Salmonella Paratyphi A, and decipher the underlying genetic changes for epidemiological purposes.

  7. Compound Heterozygous Inheritance of Mutations in Coenzyme Q8A Results in Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia and Coenzyme Q10 Deficiency in a Female Sib-Pair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Jessie C; Whitford, Whitney; Swan, Brendan; Taylor, Juliet; Love, Donald R; Hill, Rosamund; Molyneux, Sarah; George, Peter M; Mackay, Richard; Robertson, Stephen P; Snell, Russell G; Lehnert, Klaus

    2017-11-21

    Autosomal recessive ataxias are characterised by a fundamental loss in coordination of gait with associated atrophy of the cerebellum. There is significant clinical and genetic heterogeneity amongst inherited ataxias; however, an early molecular diagnosis is essential with low-risk treatments available for some of these conditions. We describe two female siblings who presented early in life with unsteady gait and cerebellar atrophy. Whole exome sequencing revealed compound heterozygous inheritance of two pathogenic mutations (p.Leu277Pro, c.1506+1G>A) in the coenzyme Q8A gene (COQ8A), a gene central to biosynthesis of coenzyme Q (CoQ). The paternally derived p.Leu277Pro mutation is predicted to disrupt a conserved motif in the substrate-binding pocket of the protein, resulting in inhibition of CoQ 10 production. The maternal c.1506+1G>A mutation destroys a canonical splice donor site in exon 12 affecting transcript processing and subsequent protein translation. Mutations in this gene can result in primary coenzyme Q 10 deficiency type 4, which is characterized by childhood onset of cerebellar ataxia and exercise intolerance, both of which were observed in this sib-pair. Muscle biopsies revealed unequivocally low levels of CoQ 10, and the siblings were subsequently established on a therapeutic dose of CoQ 10 with distinct clinical evidence of improvement after 1 year of treatment. This case emphasises the importance of an early and accurate molecular diagnosis for suspected inherited ataxias, particularly given the availability of approved treatments for some subtypes.

  8. Neuroimaging Correlates of Frontotemporal Dementia Associated with SQSTM1 Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis, Elkin; Ortiz, Alexandra; Eudave, Luis; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Borroni, Barbara; van der Zee, Julie; Gazzina, Stefano; Caroppo, Paola; Rubino, Elisa; D'Agata, Federico; Le Ber, Isabelle; Santana, Isabel; Cunha, Gil; Almeida, Maria R; Boutoleau-Bretonnière, Claire; Hannequin, Didier; Wallon, David; Rainero, Innocenzo; Galimberti, Daniela; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Pastor, Maria A; Pastor, Pau

    2016-05-07

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a progressive dementia characterized by focal atrophy of frontal and/or temporal lobes caused by mutations in the gene coding for sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1), among other genes. Rare SQSTM1 gene mutations have been associated with Paget's disease of bone, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and, more recently, frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). The aim of the study was to determine whether a characteristic pattern of grey and white matter loss is associated with SQSTM1 dysfunction. We performed a voxel-based morphometry (VBM) study in FTD subjects carrying SQSTM1 pathogenic variants (FTD/SQSTM1 mutation carriers; n = 10), compared with FTD subjects not carrying SQSTM1 mutations (Sporadic FTD; n = 20) and healthy controls with no SQSTM1 mutations (HC/SQSTM1 noncarriers; n = 20). The groups were matched according to current age, disease duration, and gender. After comparing FTD/SQSTM1 carriers with Sporadic FTD, a predominantly right cortical atrophy pattern was localized in the inferior frontal, medial orbitofrontal, precentral gyri, and the anterior insula. White matter atrophy was found in both medial and inferior frontal gyri, pallidum, and putamen. FTD/SQSTM1 carriers compared with HC/SQSTM1 noncarriers showed atrophy at frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes of both hemispheres whereas the MRI pattern found in Sporadic FTD compared with controls was frontal and left temporal lobe atrophy, extending toward parietal and occipital lobes of both hemispheres. These results suggest that fronto-orbito-insular regions including corticospinal projections as described in ALS are probably more susceptible to the damaging effect of SQSTM1 mutations delineatinga specific gene-linked atrophy pattern.

  9. Risk Profile of the RET A883F Germline Mutation: An International Collaborative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathiesen, Jes Sloth; Habra, Mouhammed Amir; Bassett, John Howard Duncan; Choudhury, Sirazum Mubin; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy Prakash; Howlett, Trevor A; Robinson, Bruce G; Gimenez-Roqueplo, Anne-Paule; Castinetti, Frederic; Vestergaard, Peter; Frank-Raue, Karin

    2017-06-01

    The A883F germline mutation of the rearranged during transfection (RET) proto-oncogene causes multiple endocrine neoplasia 2B. In the revised American Thyroid Association (ATA) guidelines for the management of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), the A883F mutation has been reclassified from the highest to the high-risk level, although no well-defined risk profile for this mutation exists. To create a risk profile for the A883F mutation for appropriate classification among the ATA risk levels. Retrospective analysis. International collaboration. Included were 13 A883F carriers. The intervention was thyroidectomy. Earliest age of MTC, regional lymph node metastases, distant metastases, age-related penetrance of MTC and pheochromocytoma (PHEO), overall and disease-specific survival, and biochemical cure rate. One and three carriers were diagnosed at age 7 to 9 years (median, 7.5 years) with a normal thyroid and C-cell hyperplasia, respectively. Nine carriers were diagnosed with MTC at age 10 to 39 years (median, 19 years). The earliest age of MTC, regional lymph node metastasis, and distant metastasis was 10, 20, and 20 years, respectively. Fifty percent penetrance of MTC and PHEO was achieved by age 19 and 34 years, respectively. Five- and 10-year survival rates (both overall and disease specific) were 88% and 88%, respectively. Biochemical cure for MTC at latest follow-up was achieved in 63% (five of eight carriers) with pertinent data. MTC of A883F carriers seems to have a more indolent natural course compared with that of M918T carriers. Our results support the classification of the A883F mutation in the ATA high-risk level. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  10. Breast cancer in patients carrying a germ-line CHEK2 mutation: Outcome after breast conserving surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Andreas; Doerk, Thilo; Sohn, Christof; Karstens, Johann H.; Bremer, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Women carrying mutations in the CHEK2 gene are at an increased breast cancer risk. Data about outcome and prognosis for these patients after standard multimodality treatment are scarce at present. Materials and methods: One-hundred and fifty (150) patients with non-metastasized early-stage breast cancer (T1-2) receiving postoperative radiotherapy following breast-conservative surgery at our department were included in this analysis. Carriers were identified using mutation-specific restriction enzyme-based screening assays in previous investigations. Twenty-five breast cancer patients were heterozygous for one of three CHEK2 gene mutations (I157T, n = 13; 1100delC, n = 10; IVS2+1G > A, n = 2). The comparison group consisted of 125 early-stage breast cancer patients without a CHEK2 gene mutation (non-carriers). Median follow-up was 87 months for the total cohort of patients. Results: Local recurrences occurred in 13 patients (carriers, 3 (12%); non-carriers, 10 (8%)) and distant metastases occurred in 27 patients (carriers, 8 (32%); non-carriers, 19 (15%)). Twenty-five patients had deceased (carriers, 8 (32%); non-carriers, 17 (14%)) with all but 3 deaths related to breast cancer. Actuarial 7-year local relapse-free survival was 86% in carriers versus 90% in non-carriers (p = 0.48). Actuarial metastasis-free, disease-free and overall survival at 7 years were 64% vs. 84% (p = 0.045), 59% vs. 78% (p = 0.07) and 69% vs. 87% (p = 0.10), respectively. In a multivariate step-wise Cox regression analysis presence of a CHEK2 mutation remained a borderline significant discriminator for metastasis-free survival (p = 0.048; OR = 0.4; 95% CI 0.2-1.0) next to T-stage (p = 0.001; OR 0.3; 95% CI 0.1-0.6). Conclusions: Heterozygosity for a germline CHEK2 mutation appears to represent an adverse prognostic factor in patients with early-stage breast cancer. If confirmed in larger studies these data may serve as a basis for future surveillance and treatment

  11. The use of high resolution melting analysis to detect Fabry mutations in heterozygous females via dry bloodspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Chang-Long; Liu, Mei-Ying; Yu, Hsiao-Chi; Chiang, Chiang-Chuan; Chiang, Hung; Suen, Jeng-Hung; Kao, Shu-Min; Huang, Yu-Hsiu; Wu, Tina Jui-Ting; Yang, Chia-Feng; Tsai, Fang-Chih; Lin, Ching-Yuang; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Chen, Hong-Duo; Niu, Dau-Ming

    2012-02-18

    As an X-linked genetic disorder, Fabry disease was first thought to affect males only, and females were generally considered to be asymptomatic carriers. However, recent research suggests that female carriers of Fabry disease may still develop vital organ damage causing severe morbidity and mortality. In the previous newborn screening, from 299,007 newborns, we identified a total of 20 different Fabry mutations and 121 newborns with Fabry mutations. However, we found that most female carriers are not detected by enzyme assays. A streamlined method for high resolution melting (HRM) analysis was designed to screen for GLA gene mutations using a same PCR and melting program. Primer sets were designed to cover the 7 exons and the Chinese common intronic mutation, IVS4+919G>A of GLA gene. The HRM analysis was successful in identifying heterozygous and hemizygous patients with the 20 surveyed mutations. We were also successful in using this method to test dry blood spots of newborns afflicted with Fabry mutations without having to determine DNA concentration before PCR amplification. The results of this study show that HRM could be a reliable and sensitive method for use in the rapid screening of females for GLA mutations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Physiological Levels of Pik3ca H1047R Mutation in the Mouse Mammary Gland Results in Ductal Hyperplasia and Formation of ERα-Positive Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikoo, Anjali; Roh, Vincent; Montgomery, Karen G.; Ivetac, Ivan; Waring, Paul; Pelzer, Rebecca; Hare, Lauren; Shackleton, Mark; Humbert, Patrick; Phillips, Wayne A.

    2012-01-01

    PIK3CA, the gene coding for the p110α subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase, is frequently mutated in a variety of human tumors including breast cancers. To better understand the role of mutant PIK3CA in the initiation and/or progression of breast cancer, we have generated mice with a conditional knock-in of the common activating mutation, Pik3caH1047R, into one allele of the endogenous gene in the mammary gland. These mice developed a ductal anaplasia and hyperplasia by 6 weeks of age characterized by multi-layering of the epithelial lining of the mammary ducts and expansion of the luminal progenitor (Lin−; CD29lo; CD24+; CD61+) cell population. The Pik3caH1047R expressing mice eventually develop mammary tumors with 100% penetrance but with a long latency (>12 months). This is significantly longer than has been reported for transgenic models where expression of the mutant Pik3ca is driven by an exogenous promoter. Histological analysis of the tumors formed revealed predominantly ERα-positive fibroadenomas, carcinosarcomas and sarcomas. In vitro induction of Pik3caH1047R in immortalized mammary epithelial cells also resulted in tumor formation when injected into the mammary fat pad of immunodeficient recipient mice. This novel model, which reproduces the scenario of a heterozygous somatic mutation occurring in the endogenous PIK3CA gene, will thus be a valuable tool for investigating the role of Pik3caH1047R mutation in mammary tumorigenesis both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:22666336

  13. A splice donor mutation in NAA10 results in the dysregulation of the retinoic acid signaling pathway and causes Lenz microphthalmia syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmailpour, Taraneh; Riazifar, Hamidreza; Liu, Linan; Donkervoort, Sandra; Huang, Vincent H; Madaan, Shreshtha; Shoucri, Bassem M; Busch, Anke; Wu, Jie; Towbin, Alexander; Chadwick, Robert B; Sequeira, Adolfo; Vawter, Marquis P; Sun, Guoli; Johnston, Jennifer J; Biesecker, Leslie G; Kawaguchi, Riki; Sun, Hui; Kimonis, Virginia; Huang, Taosheng

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Lenz microphthalmia syndrome (LMS) is a genetically heterogeneous X-linked disorder characterised by microphthalmia/anophthalmia, skeletal abnormalities, genitourinary malformations, and anomalies of the digits, ears, and teeth. Intellectual disability and seizure disorders are seen in about 60% of affected males. To date, no gene has been identified for LMS in the microphthalmia syndrome 1 locus (MCOPS1). In this study, we aim to find the disease-causing gene for this condition. Methods and results Using exome sequencing in a family with three affected brothers, we identified a mutation in the intron 7 splice donor site (c.471+2T→A) of the N-acetyltransferase NAA10 gene. NAA10 has been previously shown to be mutated in patients with Ogden syndrome, which is clinically distinct from LMS. Linkage studies for this family mapped the disease locus to Xq27-Xq28, which was consistent with the locus of NAA10. The mutation co-segregated with the phenotype and cDNA analysis showed aberrant transcripts. Patient fibroblasts lacked expression of full length NAA10 protein and displayed cell proliferation defects. Expression array studies showed significant dysregulation of genes associated with genetic forms of anophthalmia such as BMP4, STRA6, and downstream targets of BCOR and the canonical WNT pathway. In particular, STRA6 is a retinol binding protein receptor that mediates cellular uptake of retinol/vitamin A and plays a major role in regulating the retinoic acid signalling pathway. A retinol uptake assay showed that retinol uptake was decreased in patient cells. Conclusions We conclude that the NAA10 mutation is the cause of LMS in this family, likely through the dysregulation of the retinoic acid signalling pathway. PMID:24431331

  14. Physiological levels of Pik3ca(H1047R mutation in the mouse mammary gland results in ductal hyperplasia and formation of ERα-positive tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali Tikoo

    Full Text Available PIK3CA, the gene coding for the p110α subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase, is frequently mutated in a variety of human tumors including breast cancers. To better understand the role of mutant PIK3CA in the initiation and/or progression of breast cancer, we have generated mice with a conditional knock-in of the common activating mutation, Pik3ca(H1047R, into one allele of the endogenous gene in the mammary gland. These mice developed a ductal anaplasia and hyperplasia by 6 weeks of age characterized by multi-layering of the epithelial lining of the mammary ducts and expansion of the luminal progenitor (Lin(-; CD29(lo; CD24(+; CD61(+ cell population. The Pik3ca(H1047R expressing mice eventually develop mammary tumors with 100% penetrance but with a long latency (>12 months. This is significantly longer than has been reported for transgenic models where expression of the mutant Pik3ca is driven by an exogenous promoter. Histological analysis of the tumors formed revealed predominantly ERα-positive fibroadenomas, carcinosarcomas and sarcomas. In vitro induction of Pik3ca(H1047R in immortalized mammary epithelial cells also resulted in tumor formation when injected into the mammary fat pad of immunodeficient recipient mice. This novel model, which reproduces the scenario of a heterozygous somatic mutation occurring in the endogenous PIK3CA gene, will thus be a valuable tool for investigating the role of Pik3ca(H1047R mutation in mammary tumorigenesis both in vivo and in vitro.

  15. Subtle abnormalities in contractile function are an early manifestation of sarcomere mutations in dilated cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lakdawala, Neal K; Thune, Jens J; Colan, Steven D

    2012-01-01

    Sarcomere mutations cause both dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM); however, the steps leading from mutation to disease are not well described. By studying mutation carriers before a clinical diagnosis develops, we characterize the early manifestations of sarcomere...... mutations in DCM and investigate how these manifestations differ from sarcomere mutations associated with HCM....

  16. Hand eczema, atopic dermatitis and filaggrin mutations in adult Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heede, Nina G.; Thuesen, Betina H.; Thyssen, Jacob P.

    2017-01-01

    in the general population, especially among individuals with a history of atopic dermatitis. Moreover, self-reported hand eczema and atopic dermatitis were associated with particularly high risk of disability pension among FLG mutation carriers [odds ratio (OR) 4.02 and 95% confidence interval (CI): 1...... with a genetically impaired skin barrier, were associated with disability pension, suggesting that FLG mutations carriers with a history of atopic dermatitis and hand eczema could benefit from early attention with respect to choice of occupation....... a questionnaire about skin symptoms and hand eczema. Socioeconomic variables, including disability pension, and information on work in risk occupations were retrieved from national registries. The reasons for granting disability pension were unknown. Results: Disability pension was associated with hand eczema...

  17. Increasing awareness and knowledge of lifestyle recommendations for cancer prevention in Lynch syndrome carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, A.; Visser, A.; Hoedjes, Meeke; Hurks, H.M.H.; Gómez García, E.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Kampman, E.

    2018-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) mutation carriers may reduce their cancer risk by adhering to lifestyle recommendations for cancer prevention. This study tested the effect of providing LS mutation carriers with World Cancer Research Fund-the Netherlands (WCRF-NL) health promotion materials on awareness and

  18. Oral contraceptives and breast cancer risk in the international BRCA1/2 carrier cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brohet, Richard M; Goldgar, David E; Easton, Douglas F

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE Earlier studies have shown that endogenous gonadal hormones play an important role in the etiology of breast cancer among BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. So far, little is known about the safety of exogenous hormonal use in mutation carriers. In this study, we examined the association between ...

  19. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from a symptomatic carrier of a S305I mutation in the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT)-gene causing frontotemporal dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nimsanor, Natakarn; Jørring, Ida; Rasmussen, Mikkel A.

    2016-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17q21.2 (FTDP-17) is an autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorder. Mutations in the gene coding the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) can cause FTDP-17 but the underlying mechanisms of the disease are still unknown. Induced...

  20. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from af pre-symptomatic carrier of a R406W mutation in microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) causing frontotemporal dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mikkel A.; Hjermind, Lena Elisabeth; Hasholt, Lis Frydenreich

    2016-01-01

    Skin fibroblasts were obtained from a 28-year-old pre-symptomatic woman carrying a R406W mutation in microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT), known to cause frontotemporal dementia. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSCs) were established by electroporation with episomal plasmids containing hOCT4...

  1. A frame-shift mutation of PMS2 is a widespread cause of Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clendenning, Mark; Senter, Leigha; Hampel, Heather

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: When compared to the other mismatch repair genes involved in Lynch syndrome, the identification of mutations within PMS2 has been limited (Lynch syndrome cases...... on immunohistochemical analysis. RESULTS: We have identified a frequently occurring frame-shift mutation (c.736_741del6ins11) in 12 ostensibly unrelated Lynch syndrome patients (20% of patients we have identified with a deleterious mutation in PMS2, n=61). These individuals all display the rare allele (population...... and Swedish ancestry. We estimate that there are >10,000 carriers of this mutation in the United States alone. The identification of both the mutation and the common haplotype in one Swedish control sample (n = 225), along with evidence that Lynch syndrome associated cancers are rarer than expected...

  2. PROGRANULIN MUTATIONS AFFECTS BRAIN OSCILLATORY ACTIVITY IN FRONTO-TEMPORAL DEMENTIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Vito Moretti

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: mild cognitive impairment (MCI is a clinical stage indicating a prodromal phase of dementia. This practical concept could be used also for fronto-temporal dementia (FTD. Progranulin (PGRN has been recently recognized as a useful diagnostic biomarker for fronto-temporal lobe degeneration (FTLD due to GRN null mutations. Electroencephalography (EEG is a reliable tool in detecting brain networks changes. The working hypothesis of the present study is that EEG oscillations could detect different modifications among FTLD stages (FTD-MCI versus overt FTD as well as differences between GRN mutation carriers versus non carriers in patients with overt FTD. Methods: EEG in all patients and PGRN dosage in patients with a clear FTD were detected. The cognitive state has been investigated through mini mental state examination (MMSE. Results: MCI-FTD showed a significant lower spectral power in both alpha and theta oscillations as compared to overt FTD. GRN mutations carriers affected by FTLD show an increase in high alpha and decrease in theta oscillations as compared to non-carriers.Conclusion: EEG frequency rhythms are sensible to different stage of FTD and could detect changes in brain oscillatory activity affected by GRN mutations

  3. Rosette growth of shoots in chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflora Tzvelev) as a result of in vitro propagation of plants and gamma irradiation used for mutation induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerzy, M.; Zalewska, M.; Lema, J.

    1999-01-01

    Rosette growth of chrysanthemum shoots in 'Mrs. R.C. Puling' was observed after in vitro propagation with explants obtained from vernalised and non-vernalised stock plants. The phenomenon was also observed as a result of the exposure of leaf explants to gamma radiation used for in vitro regeneration of plants in mutation induction. The higher the irradiation dose, the more considerable the rosette growth. Following the 4th pinching of shoot tips, only elongating growth of plants was observed

  4. Factor V Leiden mutation, prothrombin gene mutation, and deficiencies in coagulation inhibitors associated with Budd-Chiari syndrome and portal vein thrombosis: results of a case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, H. L.; Meinardi, J. R.; Vleggaar, F. P.; van Uum, S. H.; Haagsma, E. B.; van der Meer, F. J.; van Hattum, J.; Chamuleau, R. A.; Adang, R. P.; Vandenbroucke, J. P.; van Hoek, B.; Rosendaal, F. R.

    2000-01-01

    In a collaborative multicenter case-control study, we investigated the effect of factor V Leiden mutation, prothrombin gene mutation, and inherited deficiencies of protein C, protein S, and antithrombin on the risk of Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) and portal vein thrombosis (PVT). We compared 43 BCS

  5. Factor V Leiden mutation, prothrombin gene mutation, and deficiencies in coagulation inhibitors associated with Budd-Chiari syndrome and portal vein thrombosis : results of a case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, HLA; Meinardi, [No Value; Vleggaar, FP; van Uum, SHM; Haagsma, EB; van der Meer, FJM; van Hattum, J; Chamuleau, RAFM; Adang, RP; Vandenbroucke, JP; van Hoek, B; Rosendaal, FR

    2000-01-01

    In a collaborative multicenter case-control study, we investigated the effect of factor V Leiden mutation, prothrombin gene mutation, and inherited deficiencies of protein C, protein S, and antithrombin on the risk of Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) and portal vein thrombosis (PVT), We compared 43 BCS

  6. Origin, functional role, and clinical impact of Fanconi anemia FANCA mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castella, Maria; Pujol, Roser; Callén, Elsa; Trujillo, Juan P; Casado, José A; Gille, Hans; Lach, Francis P; Auerbach, Arleen D; Schindler, Detlev; Benítez, Javier; Porto, Beatriz; Ferro, Teresa; Muñoz, Arturo; Sevilla, Julián; Madero, Luis; Cela, Elena; Beléndez, Cristina; de Heredia, Cristina Díaz; Olivé, Teresa; de Toledo, José Sánchez; Badell, Isabel; Torrent, Montserrat; Estella, Jesús; Dasí, Angeles; Rodríguez-Villa, Antonia; Gómez, Pedro; Barbot, José; Tapia, María; Molinés, Antonio; Figuera, Angela; Bueren, Juan A; Surrallés, Jordi

    2011-04-07

    Fanconi anemia is characterized by congenital abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and cancer predisposition. To investigate the origin, functional role, and clinical impact of FANCA mutations, we determined a FANCA mutational spectrum with 130 pathogenic alleles. Some of these mutations were further characterized for their distribution in populations, mode of emergence, or functional consequences at cellular and clinical level. The world most frequent FANCA mutation is not the result of a mutational "hot-spot" but results from worldwide dissemination of an ancestral Indo-European mutation. We provide molecular evidence that total absence of FANCA in humans does not reduce embryonic viability, as the observed frequency of mutation carriers in the Gypsy population equals the expected by Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. We also prove that long distance Alu-Alu recombination can cause Fanconi anemia by originating large interstitial deletions involving FANCA and 2 adjacent genes. Finally, we show that all missense mutations studied lead to an altered FANCA protein that is unable to relocate to the nucleus and activate the FA/BRCA pathway. This may explain the observed lack of correlation between type of FANCA mutation and cellular phenotype or clinical severity in terms of age of onset of hematologic disease or number of malformations.

  7. Both Hemophilia Health Care Providers and Hemophilia A Carriers Report that Carriers have Excessive Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paroskie, Allison; Oso, Olatunde; DeBaun, Michael R.; Sidonio, Robert F

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Hemophilia A, the result of reduced factor VIII (FVIII) activity, is an X-linked recessive bleeding disorder. Previous reports of Hemophilia A carriers suggest an increased bleeding tendency. Our objective was to determine the attitudes and understanding of the Hemophilia A carrier bleeding phenotype, and opinions regarding timing of carrier testing from the perspective of both medical providers and affected patients. Data from this survey was used as preliminary data for an ongoing prospective study. Material and Methods An electronic survey was distributed to physicians and nurses employed at Hemophilia Treatment Centers (HTC), and Hemophilia A carriers who were members of Hemophilia Federation of America. Questions focused on the clinical understanding of bleeding symptoms and management of Hemophilia A carriers, and the timing and intensity of carrier testing. Results Our survey indicates that 51% (36/51) of providers compared to 78% (36/46) of carriers believe that Hemophilia A carriers with normal FVIII activity have an increased bleeding tendency (pHemophilia A carriers report a high frequency of bleeding symptoms. Regarding carrier testing, 72% (50/69) of medical providers recommend testing after 14 years of age, conversely 65% (29/45) of Hemophilia A carriers prefer testing to be done prior to this age (pHemophilia A carriers self-report a higher frequency of bleeding than previously acknowledged, and have a preference for earlier testing to confirm carrier status. PMID:24309601

  8. Common Mediterranean Fever (MEFV Gene Mutations Associated with Ankylosing Spondylitis in Turkish Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serbulent Yigit

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ankylosing spondylitis (AS is a common inflammatory rheumatic disease. Mediterranean fever (MEFV gene, which has already been identified as being responsible for familial Mediterranean fever (FMF, is also a suspicious gene for AS because of the clinical association of these two diseases. The aim of this study was to explore the frequency and clinical significance of MEFV gene mutations (M694V, M680I, V726A, E148Q and P369S in a cohort of Turkish patients with AS. Genomic DNAs of 103 AS patients and 120 controls were isolated and genotyped using polymerase chain reaction (PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP methods. There was a statistically significant difference of the MEFV gene mutation carrier rates between AS patients and healthy controls (p = 0.004, OR: 2.5, 95% CI: 1.32–4.76. This association was also observed in allele frequencies (p = 0.005, OR: 2.3, 95% CI: 1.27–4.2. A relatively higher frequency was observed for M694V mutation in AS patients than controls (10.7% versus 4.2% , p = 0.060. There were no significant differences between MEFV mutation carriers and non-carriers with respect to the clinical and demographic characteristics. The results of this study suggest that MEFV gene mutations are positively associated with a predisposition to develop AS.

  9. Screening for calreticulin mutations in a cohort of patients suspected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Of the 36 types of insertions and deletions identified, type 1 (a. 52-base pair deletion) and type 2 (a 5-base pair insertion) mutations account for >80% of CALR mutations.[7] Phenotypic differences between type 1 and type 2 carriers have been implicated. [3] All recurrent mutations cause a frameshift in the region encoding.

  10. Mutations in PPIB (cyclophilin B) delay type I procollagen chain association and result in perinatal lethal to moderate osteogenesis imperfecta phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyott, Shawna M; Schwarze, Ulrike; Christiansen, Helena E; Pepin, Melanie G; Leistritz, Dru F; Dineen, Richard; Harris, Catharine; Burton, Barbara K; Angle, Brad; Kim, Katherine; Sussman, Michael D; Weis, Maryann; Eyre, David R; Russell, David W; McCarthy, Kevin J; Steiner, Robert D; Byers, Peter H

    2011-04-15

    Recessive mutations in the cartilage-associated protein (CRTAP), leucine proline-enriched proteoglycan 1 (LEPRE1) and peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerase B (PPIB) genes result in phenotypes that range from lethal in the perinatal period to severe deforming osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). These genes encode CRTAP (encoded by CRTAP), prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1 (P3H1; encoded by LEPRE1) and cyclophilin B (CYPB; encoded by PPIB), which reside in the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) and can form a complex involved in prolyl 3-hydroxylation in type I procollagen. CYPB, a prolyl cis-trans isomerase, has been thought to drive the prolyl-containing peptide bonds to the trans configuration needed for triple helix formation. Here, we describe mutations in PPIB identified in cells from three individuals with OI. Cultured dermal fibroblasts from the most severely affected infant make some overmodified type I procollagen molecules. Proα1(I) chains are slow to assemble into trimers, and abnormal procollagen molecules concentrate in the RER, and bind to protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and prolyl 4-hydroxylase 1 (P4H1). These findings suggest that although CYPB plays a role in helix formation another effect is on folding of the C-terminal propeptide and trimer formation. The extent of procollagen accumulation and PDI/P4H1 binding differs among cells with mutations in PPIB, CRTAP and LEPRE1 with the greatest amount in PPIB-deficient cells and the least in LEPRE1-deficient cells. These findings suggest that prolyl cis-trans isomerase may be required to effectively fold the proline-rich regions of the C-terminal propeptide to allow proα chain association and suggest an order of action for CRTAP, P3H1 and CYPB in procollagen biosynthesis and pathogenesis of OI.

  11. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene mutations: do they play a role in the aetiology of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, T E; Weiner Miller, P; Garrett, J E; Cutting, G R

    2002-05-01

    Previous work suggests that cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutations may be implicated in the aetiology of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergilosis (ABPA). To compare the frequency of CF gene mutations in asthmatics with ABPA of varying severity with asthmatics who were skin prick test (SPT)-positive to Aspergillus fumigatus (Af) without evidence of ABPA and asthmatics SPT-negative to Af. Thirty-one Caucasian patients with ABPA were identified, together with asthmatics SPT positive to Af without evidence of ABPA (n = 23) and SPT negative to Af (n = 28). Genomic DNA was tested for 16 CF mutations accounting for approximately 85% of CF alleles in Caucasian New Zealanders. Four (12.9%) ABPA patients were found to be carriers of a CF mutation (DeltaF508 n = 3, R117H n = 1), one (4.3%) asthmatic SPT positive to Af without ABPA (DeltaF508), and one (3.6%) asthmatic SPT negative to Af (R117H). All patients with a CF mutation had normal sweat chloride (< 40 mM). There was no significant difference between the frequency of CF mutations in the ABPA patients and asthmatics without ABPA. However, the frequency of CF mutations in the ABPA patients was significantly different (P = 0.0125) to the expected carrier rate in the general population. These results lend further support to a possible link between CF mutations and ABPA.

  12. Autonomous component carrier selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, Luis Guilherme Uzeda; Pedersen, Klaus; Mogensen, Preben

    2009-01-01

    management and efficient system operation. Due to the expected large number of user-deployed cells, centralized network planning becomes unpractical and new scalable alternatives must be sought. In this article, we propose a fully distributed and scalable solution to the interference management problem...... in local areas, basing our study case on LTE-Advanced. We present extensive network simulation results to demonstrate that a simple and robust interference management scheme, called autonomous component carrier selection allows each cell to select the most attractive frequency configuration; improving...... the experience of all users and not just the few best ones; while overall cell capacity is not compromised....

  13. Group medical visits in the follow-up of women with a BRCA mutation: design of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Annemiek; Prins, Judith B.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W. M.

    2011-01-01

    BRCA mutation carriers have a 40-80% life-time risk of developing breast cancer. They may opt for yearly breast cancer surveillance or for prophylactic mastectomy. Both options show increased survival rates. It is a complex choice to be made between these two options. As a result most women

  14. Impact of the factor V Leiden mutation on the outcome of pneumococcal pneumonia: a controlled laboratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, Marcel; van 't Veer, Cornelis; Roelofs, Joris Jth; Levi, Marcel; van der Poll, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Streptococcus (S.) pneumoniae is the most common cause of community-acquired pneumonia. The factor V Leiden (FVL) mutation results in resistance of activated FV to inactivation by activated protein C and thereby in a prothrombotic phenotype. Human heterozygous FVL carriers have been

  15. Mutation spectrum of 122 hemophilia A families from Taiwanese population by LD-PCR, DHPLC, multiplex PCR and evaluating the clinical application of HRM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Chieh-Ting

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemophilia A represents the most common and severe inherited hemorrhagic disorder. It is caused by mutations in the F8 gene, which leads to a deficiency or dysfunctional factor VIII protein, an essential cofactor in the factor X activation complex. Methods We used long-distance polymerase chain reaction and denaturing high performance liquid chromatography for mutation scanning of the F8 gene. We designed the competitive multiplex PCR to identify the carrier with exonal deletions. In order to facilitate throughput and minimize the cost of mutation scanning, we also evaluated a new mutation scanning technique, high resolution melting analysis (HRM, as an alternative screening method. Results We presented the results of detailed screening of 122 Taiwanese families with hemophilia A and reported twenty-nine novel mutations. There was one family identified with whole exons deletion, and the carriers were successfully recognized by multiplex PCR. By HRM, the different melting curve patterns were easily identified in 25 out of 28 cases (89% and 15 out of 15 (100% carriers. The sensitivity was 93 % (40/43. The overall mutation detection rate of hemophilia A was 100% in this study. Conclusion We proposed a diagnostic strategy for hemophilia A genetic diagnosis. We consider HRM as a powerful screening tool that would provide us with a more cost-effective protocol for hemophilia A mutation identification.

  16. Dynamics of malaria transmission and susceptibility to clinical malaria episodes following treatment of Plasmodium falciparum asymptomatic carriers: results of a cluster-randomized study of community-wide screening and treatment, and a parallel entomology study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiono, Alfred B; Guelbeogo, Moussa W; Sagnon, N Falé; Nébié, Issa; Sirima, Sodiomon B; Mukhopadhyay, Amitava; Hamed, Kamal

    2013-11-12

    In malaria-endemic countries, large proportions of individuals infected with Plasmodium falciparum are asymptomatic and constitute a reservoir of parasites for infection of newly hatched mosquitoes. Two studies were run in parallel in Burkina Faso to evaluate the impact of systematic identification and treatment of asymptomatic carriers of P. falciparum, detected by rapid diagnostic test, on disease transmission and susceptibility to clinical malaria episodes. A clinical study assessed the incidence of symptomatic malaria episodes with a parasite density >5,000/μL after three screening and treatment campaigns ~1 month apart before the rainy season; and an entomological study determined the effect of these campaigns on malaria transmission as measured by entomological inoculation rate. The intervention arm had lower prevalence of asymptomatic carriers of asexual parasites and lower prevalence of gametocyte carriers during campaigns 2 and 3 as compared to the control arm. During the entire follow-up period, out of 13,767 at-risk subjects, 2,516 subjects (intervention arm 1,332; control arm 1,184) had symptomatic malaria. Kaplan-Meier analysis of the incidence of first symptomatic malaria episode with a parasite density >5,000/μL showed that, in the total population, the two treatment arms were similar until Week 11-12 after campaign 3, corresponding with the beginning of the malaria transmission season, after which the probability of being free of symptomatic malaria was lower in the intervention arm (logrank p entomological inoculation rate was comparable in both arms, with September peaks in both indices. Community screening and targeted treatment of asymptomatic carriers of P. falciparum had no effect on the dynamics of malaria transmission, but seemed to be associated with an increase in the treated community's susceptibility to symptomatic malaria episodes after the screening campaigns had finished. These results highlight the importance of further

  17. A Novel Homozygous MYO7A Mutation: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa Ahmadi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available MYO7A is an unconventional myosin that is essential for ordinary hearing and vision; mutations in the MYO7A gene result in Usher syndrome type 1B and other disorders. In this manuscript, we reported a mutation (c.4705delA in exon 35, causing the alteration of a Ser amino acid to Ala at codon 1569 (p.H2027del located within the first FERMdomain of the human protein myosin VIIA. This mutation involved in the pathogenesis of hearing loss, congenital night blindness, muscular weakness, skin problem, and difficulty in keeping balance in the 13-year-old female. After checkup the patient’s DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and amplification was performed by PCR. Sequencing method was performed for identification of the mutation. The c.4705delA mutation in exon 35 was found in the patient in heterozygosis form; this means that her mother and father were carriers. This mutation is located on the tail of the myosinVIIA protein and is associated with several disorders.

  18. Study of Four Common Mutations of Familial Mediterranean Fever in North-West of Iran