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Sample records for mutated stop codons

  1. Selective forces and mutational biases drive stop codon usage in the human genome: a comparison with sense codon usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotta, Edoardo

    2016-05-17

    The three stop codons UAA, UAG, and UGA signal the termination of mRNA translation. As a result of a mechanism that is not adequately understood, they are normally used with unequal frequencies. In this work, we showed that selective forces and mutational biases drive stop codon usage in the human genome. We found that, in respect to sense codons, stop codon usage was affected by stronger selective forces but was less influenced by neutral mutational biases. UGA is the most frequent termination codon in human genome. However, UAA was the preferred stop codon in genes with high breadth of expression, high level of expression, AT-rich coding sequences, housekeeping functions, and in gene ontology categories with the largest deviation from expected stop codon usage. Selective forces associated with the breadth and the level of expression favoured AT-rich sequences in the mRNA region including the stop site and its proximal 3'-UTR, but acted with scarce effects on sense codons, generating two regions, upstream and downstream of the stop codon, with strongly different base composition. By favouring low levels of GC-content, selection promoted labile local secondary structures at the stop site and its proximal 3'-UTR. The compositional and structural context favoured by selection was surprisingly emphasized in the class of ribosomal proteins and was consistent with sequence elements that increase the efficiency of translational termination. Stop codons were also heterogeneously distributed among chromosomes by a mechanism that was strongly correlated with the GC-content of coding sequences. In human genome, the nucleotide composition and the thermodynamic stability of stop codon site and its proximal 3'-UTR are correlated with the GC-content of coding sequences and with the breadth and the level of gene expression. In highly expressed genes stop codon usage is compositionally and structurally consistent with highly efficient translation termination signals.

  2. Immune-escape mutations and stop-codons in HBsAg develop in a large proportion of patients with chronic HBV infection exposed to anti-HBV drugs in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colagrossi, Luna; Hermans, Lucas E; Salpini, Romina

    2018-01-01

    structure of HBV genome, some immune-escape mutations or stop-codons in HBsAg can derive from drug-resistance mutations in RT. This study is aimed at gaining insight in prevalence and characteristics of immune-associated escape mutations, and stop-codons in HBsAg in chronically HBV-infected patients...

  3. A novel mutation in the FGB: c.1105C>T turns the codon for amino acid Bβ Q339 into a stop codon causing hypofibrinogenemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi, Rita; Brennan, Stephen; Meyer, Michael; Rojas, Héctor; Kanzler, Daniela; De Agrela, Marisela; Ruiz-Saez, Arlette

    2013-03-01

    Routine coagulation tests on a 14year-old male with frequent epistaxis showed a prolonged thrombin time together with diminished functional (162mg/dl) and gravimetric (122mg/dl) fibrinogen concentrations. His father showed similar aberrant results and sequencing of the three fibrinogen genes revealed a novel heterozygous nonsense mutation in the FGB gene c.1105C>T, which converts the codon for residue Bβ 339Q to stop, causing deletion of Bβ chain residues 339-461. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and RP-HPLC (reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography) of purified fibrinogen showed only normal Aα, Bβ, and γ chains, indicating that molecules with the truncated 37,990Da β chain were not secreted into plasma. Functional analysis showed impaired fibrin polymerization, fibrin porosity, and elasticity compared to controls. By laser scanning confocal microscopy the patient's fibers were slightly thinner than normal. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS) presented normal sialylation of the oligosaccharide chains, and liver function tests showed no evidence of liver dysfunction that might explain the functional abnormalities. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A novel homozygous stop-codon mutation in human HFE responsible for nonsense-mediated mRNA decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, Maria Carmela; Martelli, Giuseppe; Larocca, Marilena; Rossano, Rocco; Olivieri, Attilio

    2014-09-01

    HFE-hemochromatosis (HH) is an autosomal disease characterized by excessive iron absorption. Homozygotes for H63D variant, and still less H63D heterozygotes, generally do not express HH phenotype. The data collected in our previous study in the province of Matera (Basilicata, Italy) underlined that some H63D carriers showed altered iron metabolism, without additional factors. In this study, we selected a cohort of 10/22 H63D carriers with severe biochemical iron overload (BIO). Additional analysis was performed for studying HFE exons, exon-intron boundaries, and untranslated regions (UTRs) by performing DNA extraction, PCR amplification and sequencing. The results showed a novel substitution (NM_000410.3:c.847C>T) in a patient exon 4 (GenBankJQ478433); it introduces a premature stop-codon (PTC). RNA extraction and reverse-transcription were also performed. Quantitative real-time PCR was carried out for verifying if our aberrant mRNA is targeted for nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD); we observed that patient HFE mRNA was expressed much less than calibrator, suggesting that the mutated HFE protein cannot play its role in iron metabolism regulation, resulting in proband BIO. Our finding is the first evidence of a variation responsible for a PTC in iron cycle genes. The genotype-phenotype correlation observed in our cases could be related to the additional mutation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Stop Codon Reassignment in the Wild

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanova, Natalia [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Schwientek, Patrick [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Tripp, H. James [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Rinke, Christian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Pati, Amrita [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Huntemann, Marcel [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Visel, Axel [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Woyke, Tanja [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Kyrpides, Nikos [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Rubin, Edward [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.

    2014-03-21

    Since the discovery of the genetic code and protein translation mechanisms (1), a limited number of variations of the standard assignment between unique base triplets (codons) and their encoded amino acids and translational stop signals have been found in bacteria and phages (2-3). Given the apparent ubiquity of the canonical genetic code, the design of genomically recoded organisms with non-canonical codes has been suggested as a means to prevent horizontal gene transfer between laboratory and environmental organisms (4). It is also predicted that genomically recoded organisms are immune to infection by viruses, under the assumption that phages and their hosts must share a common genetic code (5). This paradigm is supported by the observation of increased resistance of genomically recoded bacteria to phages with a canonical code (4). Despite these assumptions and accompanying lines of evidence, it remains unclear whether differential and non-canonical codon usage represents an absolute barrier to phage infection and genetic exchange between organisms. Our knowledge of the diversity of genetic codes and their use by viruses and their hosts is primarily derived from the analysis of cultivated organisms. Advances in single-cell sequencing and metagenome assembly technologies have enabled the reconstruction of genomes of uncultivated bacterial and archaeal lineages (6). These initial findings suggest that large scale systematic studies of uncultivated microorganisms and viruses may reveal the extent and modes of divergence from the canonical genetic code operating in nature. To explore alternative genetic codes, we carried out a systematic analysis of stop codon reassignments from the canonical TAG amber, TGA opal, and TAA ochre codons in assembled metagenomes from environmental and host-associated samples, single-cell genomes of uncultivated bacteria and archaea, and a collection of phage sequences

  6. A Single Base Pair Mutation Encoding a Premature Stop Codon in the MIS type II receptor is Responsible for Canine Persistent Müllerian Duct Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiufeng; Wan, Shengqin; Pujar, Shashikant; Haskins, Mark E.; Schlafer, Donald H.; Lee, Mary M.; Meyers-Wallen, Vicki N.

    2008-01-01

    Müllerian Inhibiting Substance (MIS), a secreted glycoprotein in the Transforming Growth Factor-beta (TGF-beta) family of growth factors, mediates regression of the Müllerian ducts during embryonic sex differentiation in males. In Persistent Müllerian Duct Syndrome (PMDS), rather than undergoing involution, the Müllerian ducts persist in males, giving rise to the uterus, Fallopian tubes, and upper vagina. Genetic defects in MIS or its receptor (MISRII) have been identified in patients with PMDS. The phenotype in the canine model of PMDS derived from the miniature schnauzer breed is strikingly similar to that of human patients. In this model, PMDS is inherited as a sex-limited autosomal recessive trait. Previous studies indicated that a defect in the MIS receptor or its downstream signaling pathway was likely to be causative of the canine syndrome. In this study the canine PMDS phenotype and clinical sequelae are described in detail. Affected and unaffected members of this pedigree are genotyped, identifying a single base pair substitution in MISRII that introduces a stop codon in exon 3. The homozygous mutation terminates translation at 80 amino acids, eliminating much of the extracellular domain and the entire transmembrane and intracellular signaling domains. Findings in this model may enable insights to be garnered from correlation of detailed clinical descriptions with molecular defects, which are not otherwise possible in the human syndrome. PMID:18723470

  7. RESEARCH ARTICLE Codon usage vis-a-vis start and stop codon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prosen

    codon usage at start and stop site showed variation in codon selection in ..... pressure is 8.3%, 0.5% and 18.5% while the influence of other factors, for example natural ..... The codon Adaptation Index--a measure of directional synonymous.

  8. Codon usage vis-a-vis start and stop codon context analysis of three ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prosenjit Paul

    2018-02-20

    Feb 20, 2018 ... Keywords. codon; dinucleotide; selection; mutation; genome. Introduction ..... influence of other factors, for example natural selection, is 91.7%, 99.5% ..... measure of directional synonymous codon usage bias, and its potential ...

  9. Analysis of Low Frequency Protein Truncating Stop-Codon Variants and Fasting Concentration of Growth Hormone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Hallengren

    Full Text Available The genetic background of Growth Hormone (GH secretion is not well understood. Mutations giving rise to a stop codon have a high likelihood of affecting protein function.To analyze likely functional stop codon mutations that are associated with fasting plasma concentration of Growth Hormone.We analyzed stop codon mutations in 5451 individuals in the Malmö Diet and Cancer study by genotyping the Illumina Exome Chip. To enrich for stop codon mutations with likely functional effects on protein function, we focused on those disrupting >80% of the predicted amino acid sequence, which were carried by ≥ 10 individuals. Such mutations were related to GH concentration, measured with a high sensitivity assay (hs-GH and, if nominally significant, to GH related phenotypes, using linear regression analysis.Two stop codon mutations were associated with the fasting concentration of hs-GH. rs121909305 (NP_005370.1:p.R93* [Minor Allele Frequency (MAF = 0.8%] in the Myosin 1A gene (MYO1A was associated with a 0.36 (95%CI, 0.04 to 0.54; p=0.02 increment of the standardized value of the natural logarithm of hs-GH per 1 minor allele and rs35699176 (NP_067040.1:p.Q100* in the Zink Finger protein 77 gene (ZNF77 (MAF = 4.8% was associated with a 0.12 (95%CI, 0.02 to 0.22; p = 0.02 increase of hs-GH. The mutated high hs-GH associated allele of MYO1A was related to lower BMI (β-coefficient, -0.22; p = 0.05, waist (β-coefficient, -0.22; p = 0.04, body fat percentage (β-coefficient, -0.23; p = 0.03 and with higher HDL (β-coefficient, 0.23; p = 0.04. The ZNF77 stop codon was associated with height (β-coefficient, 0.11; p = 0.02 but not with cardiometabolic risk factors.We here suggest that a stop codon of MYO1A, disrupting 91% of the predicted amino acid sequence, is associated with higher hs-GH and GH-related traits suggesting that MYO1A is involved in GH metabolism and possibly body fat distribution. However, our results are preliminary and need replication in

  10. Disruption of the Opal Stop Codon Attenuates Chikungunya Virus-Induced Arthritis and Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jennifer E; Long, Kristin M; Whitmore, Alan C; Sanders, Wes; Thurlow, Lance R; Brown, Julia A; Morrison, Clayton R; Vincent, Heather; Peck, Kayla M; Browning, Christian; Moorman, Nathaniel; Lim, Jean K; Heise, Mark T

    2017-11-14

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus responsible for several significant outbreaks of debilitating acute and chronic arthritis and arthralgia over the past decade. These include a recent outbreak in the Caribbean islands and the Americas that caused more than 1 million cases of viral arthralgia. Despite the major impact of CHIKV on global health, viral determinants that promote CHIKV-induced disease are incompletely understood. Most CHIKV strains contain a conserved opal stop codon at the end of the viral nsP3 gene. However, CHIKV strains that encode an arginine codon in place of the opal stop codon have been described, and deep-sequencing analysis of a CHIKV isolate from the Caribbean identified both arginine and opal variants within this strain. Therefore, we hypothesized that the introduction of the arginine mutation in place of the opal termination codon may influence CHIKV virulence. We tested this by introducing the arginine mutation into a well-characterized infectious clone of a CHIKV strain from Sri Lanka and designated this virus Opal524R. This mutation did not impair viral replication kinetics in vitro or in vivo Despite this, the Opal524R virus induced significantly less swelling, inflammation, and damage within the feet and ankles of infected mice. Further, we observed delayed induction of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, as well as reduced CD4 + T cell and NK cell recruitment compared to those in the parental strain. Therefore, the opal termination codon plays an important role in CHIKV pathogenesis, independently of effects on viral replication. IMPORTANCE Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that causes significant outbreaks of viral arthralgia. Studies with CHIKV and other alphaviruses demonstrated that the opal termination codon within nsP3 is highly conserved. However, some strains of CHIKV and other alphaviruses contain mutations in the opal termination codon. These mutations alter the virulence

  11. Why has nature invented three stop codons of DNA and only one start codon?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křížek, Michal; Křížek, P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 304, Jul 7 (2012), s. 183-187 ISSN 0022-5193 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA100190803 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : DNA * RNA * stop codon * synchronization shift * drosophila genome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.351, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022519312001580

  12. Using Student Writing and Lexical Analysis to Reveal Student Thinking about the Role of Stop Codons in the Central Dogma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevost, Luanna B.; Smith, Michelle K.; Knight, Jennifer K.

    2016-01-01

    Previous work has shown that students have persistent difficulties in understanding how central dogma processes can be affected by a stop codon mutation. To explore these difficulties, we modified two multiple-choice questions from the Genetics Concept Assessment into three open-ended questions that asked students to write about how a stop codon…

  13. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of Helicobacter pylori dupA that lead to premature stop codons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Sílvia B; Costa, Rafaella F A; Anacleto, Charles; Rocha, Gifone A; Rocha, Andreia M C; Queiroz, Dulciene M M

    2012-06-01

     The detection of the putative disease-specific Helicobacter pylori marker duodenal ulcer promoting gene A (dupA) is currently based on PCR detection of jhp0917 and jhp0918 that form the gene. However, mutations that lead to premature stop codons that split off the dupA leading to truncated products cannot be evaluated by PCR. We directly sequence the complete dupA of 75 dupA-positive strains of H. pylori isolated from patients with gastritis (n = 26), duodenal ulcer (n = 29), and gastric carcinoma (n = 20), to search for frame-shifting mutations that lead to stop codon. Thirty-four strains had single nucleotide mutations in dupA that lead to premature stop codon creating smaller products than the predicted 1839 bp product and, for this reason, were considered as dupA-negative. Intact dupA was more frequently observed in strains isolated from duodenal ulcer patients (65.5%) than in patients with gastritis only (46.2%) or with gastric carcinoma (50%). In logistic analysis, the presence of the intact dupA independently associated with duodenal ulcer (OR = 5.06; 95% CI = 1.22-20.96, p = .02).  We propose the primer walking methodology as a simple technique to sequence the gene. When we considered as dupA-positive only those strains that carry dupA gene without premature stop codons, the gene was associated with duodenal ulcer and, therefore, can be used as a marker for this disease in our population. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Mutations in the codon for a conserved arginine-1563 in the COL4A5 collagen gene in Alport syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, J; Gregory, M C; Hertz, Jens Michael

    1993-01-01

    for arginine to the translation stop codon TGA. In Utah kindred 2123 and in the Danish kindred A13, there was a C-->T mutation in the noncoding strand changing the same codon to CAA for glutamine. Both mutations were confirmed by allele-specific hybridization on PCR-amplified DNA from other family members....

  15. Codon usage vis-a-vis start and stop codon context analysis of three ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    To understand the variation in genomic composition and its effect on codon usage, we performed the comparative analysis of codon usage and nucleotide usage in the genes of three dicots, Glycine max, Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago truncatula. The dicot genes were found to be A/T rich and have predominantly ...

  16. Reassigning stop codons via translation termination: How a few eukaryotes broke the dogma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkalaeva, Elena; Mikhailova, Tatiana

    2017-03-01

    The genetic code determines how amino acids are encoded within mRNA. It is universal among the vast majority of organisms, although several exceptions are known. Variant genetic codes are found in ciliates, mitochondria, and numerous other organisms. All revealed genetic codes (standard and variant) have at least one codon encoding a translation stop signal. However, recently two new genetic codes with a reassignment of all three stop codons were revealed in studies examining the protozoa transcriptomes. Here, we discuss this finding and the recent studies of variant genetic codes in eukaryotes. We consider the possible molecular mechanisms allowing the use of certain codons as sense and stop signals simultaneously. The results obtained by studying these amazing organisms represent a new and exciting insight into the mechanism of stop codon decoding in eukaryotes. Also see the video abstract here. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Mutation-selection models of codon substitution and their use to estimate selective strengths on codon usage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Ziheng; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2008-01-01

    Current models of codon substitution are formulated at the levels of nucleotide substitution and do not explicitly consider the separate effects of mutation and selection. They are thus incapable of inferring whether mutation or selection is responsible for evolution at silent sites. Here we impl...... codon usage in mammals. Estimates of selection coefficients nevertheless suggest that selection on codon usage is weak and most mutations are nearly neutral. The sensitivity of the analysis on the assumed mutation model is discussed.......Current models of codon substitution are formulated at the levels of nucleotide substitution and do not explicitly consider the separate effects of mutation and selection. They are thus incapable of inferring whether mutation or selection is responsible for evolution at silent sites. Here we...... implement a few population genetics models of codon substitution that explicitly consider mutation bias and natural selection at the DNA level. Selection on codon usage is modeled by introducing codon-fitness parameters, which together with mutation-bias parameters, predict optimal codon frequencies...

  18. Using Student Writing and Lexical Analysis to Reveal Student Thinking about the Role of Stop Codons in the Central Dogma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevost, Luanna B; Smith, Michelle K; Knight, Jennifer K

    2016-01-01

    Previous work has shown that students have persistent difficulties in understanding how central dogma processes can be affected by a stop codon mutation. To explore these difficulties, we modified two multiple-choice questions from the Genetics Concept Assessment into three open-ended questions that asked students to write about how a stop codon mutation potentially impacts replication, transcription, and translation. We then used computer-assisted lexical analysis combined with human scoring to categorize student responses. The lexical analysis models showed high agreement with human scoring, demonstrating that this approach can be successfully used to analyze large numbers of student written responses. The results of this analysis show that students' ideas about one process in the central dogma can affect their thinking about subsequent and previous processes, leading to mixed models of conceptual understanding. © 2016 L. B. Prevost et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2016 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  19. Stop codons in the hepatitis B surface proteins are enriched during antiviral therapy and are associated with host cell apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colledge, Danielle; Soppe, Sally; Yuen, Lilly; Selleck, Lucy; Walsh, Renae; Locarnini, Stephen; Warner, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    Premature stop codons in the hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface protein can be associated with nucleos(t)ide analogue resistance due to overlap of the HBV surface and polymerase genes. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the replication of three common surface stop codon variants on the hepatocyte. Cell lines were transfected with infectious HBV clones encoding surface stop codons rtM204I/sW196*, rtA181T/sW172*, rtV191I/sW182*, and a panel of substitutions in the surface proteins. HBsAg was measured by Western blotting. Proliferation and apoptosis were measured using flow cytometry. All three surface stop codon variants were defective in HBsAg secretion. Cells transfected with these variants were less proliferative and had higher levels of apoptosis than those transfected with variants that did not encode surface stop codons. The most cytopathic variant was rtM204I/sW196*. Replication of HBV encoding surface stop codons was toxic to the cell and promoted apoptosis, exacerbating disease progression. - Highlights: •Under normal circumstances, HBV replication is not cytopathic. •Premature stop codons in the HBV surface protein can be selected and enriched during nucleos(t)ide analogue therapy. •Replication of these variants can be cytopathic to the cell and promote apoptosis. •Inadequate antiviral therapy may actually promote disease progression.

  20. Stop codons in the hepatitis B surface proteins are enriched during antiviral therapy and are associated with host cell apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colledge, Danielle; Soppe, Sally; Yuen, Lilly; Selleck, Lucy; Walsh, Renae; Locarnini, Stephen, E-mail: stephen.locarnini@mh.org.au; Warner, Nadia

    2017-01-15

    Premature stop codons in the hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface protein can be associated with nucleos(t)ide analogue resistance due to overlap of the HBV surface and polymerase genes. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the replication of three common surface stop codon variants on the hepatocyte. Cell lines were transfected with infectious HBV clones encoding surface stop codons rtM204I/sW196*, rtA181T/sW172*, rtV191I/sW182*, and a panel of substitutions in the surface proteins. HBsAg was measured by Western blotting. Proliferation and apoptosis were measured using flow cytometry. All three surface stop codon variants were defective in HBsAg secretion. Cells transfected with these variants were less proliferative and had higher levels of apoptosis than those transfected with variants that did not encode surface stop codons. The most cytopathic variant was rtM204I/sW196*. Replication of HBV encoding surface stop codons was toxic to the cell and promoted apoptosis, exacerbating disease progression. - Highlights: •Under normal circumstances, HBV replication is not cytopathic. •Premature stop codons in the HBV surface protein can be selected and enriched during nucleos(t)ide analogue therapy. •Replication of these variants can be cytopathic to the cell and promote apoptosis. •Inadequate antiviral therapy may actually promote disease progression.

  1. Animal products and K-ras codon 12 and 13 mutations in colon carcinomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampman, E.; Voskuil, D.W.; Kraats, A.A. van; Balder, H.F.; Muijen, G.N.P. van; Goldbohm, R.A.; Veer, P. van 't

    2000-01-01

    K-ras gene mutations (codons 12 and 13) were determined by PCR-based mutant allele-specific amplification (MASA) in tumour tissue of 185 colon cancer patients: 36% harboured mutations, of which 82% were located in codon 12. High intakes of animal protein, calcium and poultry were differently

  2. Prion protein gene analysis in three kindreds with fatal familial insomnia (FFI): Codon 178 mutation and codon 129 polymorphism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medori, R.; Tritschler, H.J. (Universita di Bologna (Italy))

    1993-10-01

    Fatal familial insomnia (FFI) is a disease linked to a GAC(Asp) [yields] AAC(Asn) mutation in codon 178 of the prion protein (PrP) gene. FFI is characterized clinically by untreatable progressive insomnia, dysautonomia, and motor dysfunctions and is characterized pathologically by selective thalamic atrophy. The authors confirmed the 178[sup Asn] mutation in the PrP gene of a third FFI family of French ancestry. Three family members who are under 40 years of age and who inherited the mutation showed only reduced perfusion in the basal ganglia on single photon emission computerized tomography. Some FFI features differ from the clinical and neuropathologic findings associated with 178[sup Asn] reported elsewhere. However, additional intragenic mutations accounting for the phenotypic differences were not observed in two affected individuals. In other sporadic and familial forms of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and Gerstmann-Straeussler syndrome, Met or Val homozygosity at polymorphic codon 129 is associated with a more severe phenotype, younger age at onset, and faster progression. In FFI, young and old individuals at disease onset had 129[sup Met/Val]. Moreover, of five 178[sup Asn] individuals who are above age-at-onset range and who are well, two have 129[sup Met] and three have 129[sup Met/Val], suggesting that polymorphic site 129 does not modulate FFI phenotypic expression. Genetic heterogeneity and environment may play an important role in inter- and intrafamilial variability of the 178[sup Asn] mutation. 32 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Severe Hemophilia A in a Male Old English Sheep Dog with a C→T Transition that Created a Premature Stop Codon in Factor VIII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozier, Jay N; Kloos, Mark T; Merricks, Elizabeth P; Lemoine, Nathaly; Whitford, Margaret H; Raymer, Robin A; Bellinger, Dwight A; Nichols, Timothy C

    2016-01-01

    Animals with hemophilia are models for gene therapy, factor replacement, and inhibitor development in humans. We have actively sought dogs with severe hemophilia A that have novel factor VIII mutations unlike the previously described factor VIII intron 22 inversion. A male Old English Sheepdog with recurrent soft-tissue hemorrhage and hemarthrosis was diagnosed with severe hemophilia A (factor VIII activity less than 1% of normal). We purified genomic DNA from this dog and ruled out the common intron 22 inversion; we then sequenced all 26 exons. Comparing the results with the normal canine factor VIII sequence revealed a C→T transition in exon 12 of the factor VIII gene that created a premature stop codon at amino acid 577 in the A2 domain of the protein. In addition, 2 previously described polymorphisms that do not cause hemophilia were present at amino acids 909 and 1184. The hemophilia mutation creates a new TaqI site that facilitates rapid genotyping of affected offspring by PCR and restriction endonuclease analyses. This mutation is analogous to the previously described human factor VIII mutation at Arg583, which likewise is a CpG dinucleotide transition causing a premature stop codon in exon 12. Thus far, despite extensive treatment with factor VIII, this dog has not developed neutralizing antibodies (‘inhibitors’) to the protein. This novel mutation in a dog gives rise to severe hemophilia A analogous to a mutation seen in humans. This model will be useful for studies of the treatment of hemophilia. PMID:27780008

  4. CodonShuffle: a tool for generating and analyzing synonymously mutated sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge, Daniel Macedo de Melo; Mills, Ryan E.; Lauring, Adam S.

    2015-01-01

    Because synonymous mutations do not change the amino acid sequence of a protein, they are generally considered to be selectively neutral. Empiric data suggest, however, that a significant fraction of viral mutational fitness effects may be attributable to synonymous mutation. Bias in synonymous codon usage in viruses may result from selection for translational efficiency, mutational bias, base pairing requirements in RNA structures, or even selection against specific dinucleotides by innate i...

  5. Analysis of four families with the Stickler syndrome by linkage studies. Identification of a new premature stop codon in the COL2A1 gene in a family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonaventure, J.; Lasselin, C. [Hopital Necker, Paris (France); Toutain, A. [CHU Bretonneau, Tours (France)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The Stickler syndrome is an arthro-ophthalmopathy which associates progressive myopia with vitreal degeneration and retinal detachment. Cleft palate, cranio-facial abnormalities, deafness and osteoarthritis are often associated symptoms. Genetic heterogeneity of this autosomal dominant disease was consistent with its large clinical variability. Linkage studies have provided evidence for cosegregation of the disease with COL2A1, the gene coding for type II collagen, in about 50% of the families. Four additional families are reported here. Linkage analyses by using a VNTR located in the 3{prime} region of the gene were achieved. In three families, positive lod scores were obtained with a cumulative maximal value of 3.5 at a recombination fraction of 0. In one of these families, single strand conformation analysis of 25 exons disclosed a new mutation in exon 42. Codon for glutamic acid at position a1-803 was converted into a stop codon. The mutation was detected in DNA samples from all the affected members of the family but not in the unaffected. This result confirms that most of the Stickler syndromes linked to COL2A1 are due to premature stop codons. In a second family, an abnormal SSCP pattern of exon 34 was detected in all the affected individuals. The mutation is likely to correspond to a splicing defect in the acceptor site of intron 33. In one family the disease did not segregate with the COL2A1 locus. Further linkage studies with intragenic dimorphic sites in the COL10A1 gene and highly polymorphic markers close to the COL9A1 locus indicated that this disorder did not result from defects in these two genes.

  6. Readthrough of stop codons by use of aminoglycosides in cells from xeroderma pigmentosum group C patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuschal, Christiane; Khan, Sikandar G; Enk, Benedikt; DiGiovanna, John J; Kraemer, Kenneth H

    2015-04-01

    Readthrough of premature termination (stop) codons (PTC) is a new approach to treatment of genetic diseases. We recently reported that readthrough of PTC in cells from some xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XP-C) patients could be achieved with the aminoglycosides geneticin or gentamicin. We found that the response depended on several factors including the PTC sequence, its location within the gene and the aminoglycoside used. Here, we extended these studies to investigate the effects of other aminoglycosides that are already on the market. We reasoned that topical treatment could deliver much higher concentrations of drug to the skin, the therapeutic target, and thus increase the therapeutic effect while reducing renal or ototoxicity in comparison with systemic treatment. Our prior clinical studies indicated that only a few percent of normal XPC expression was associated with mild clinical disease. We found minimal cell toxicity in the XP-C cells with several aminoglycosides. We found increased XPC mRNA expression in PTC-containing XP-C cells with G418, paromomycin, neomycin and kanamycin and increased XPC protein expression with G418. We conclude that in selected patients with XP, topical PTC therapy can be investigated as a method of personalized medicine to alleviate their cutaneous symptoms. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  7. Triplet-Based Codon Organization Optimizes the Impact of Synonymous Mutation on Nucleic Acid Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbitt, Gregory A; Coppola, Erin E; Mortensen, Jamie S; Ekeren, Patrick X; Viola, Cosmo; Goldblatt, Dallan; Hudson, André O

    2018-02-01

    Since the elucidation of the genetic code almost 50 years ago, many nonrandom aspects of its codon organization remain only partly resolved. Here, we investigate the recent hypothesis of 'dual-use' codons which proposes that in addition to allowing adjustment of codon optimization to tRNA abundance, the degeneracy in the triplet-based genetic code also multiplexes information regarding DNA's helical shape and protein-binding dynamics while avoiding interference with other protein-level characteristics determined by amino acid properties. How such structural optimization of the code within eukaryotic chromatin could have arisen from an RNA world is a mystery, but would imply some preadaptation in an RNA context. We analyzed synonymous (protein-silent) and nonsynonymous (protein-altering) mutational impacts on molecular dynamics in 13823 identically degenerate alternative codon reorganizations, defined by codon transitions in 7680 GPU-accelerated molecular dynamic simulations of implicitly and explicitly solvated double-stranded aRNA and bDNA structures. When compared to all possible alternative codon assignments, the standard genetic code minimized the impact of synonymous mutations on the random atomic fluctuations and correlations of carbon backbone vector trajectories while facilitating the specific movements that contribute to DNA polymer flexibility. This trend was notably stronger in the context of RNA supporting the idea that dual-use codon optimization and informational multiplexing in DNA resulted from the preadaptation of the RNA duplex to resist changes to thermostability. The nonrandom and divergent molecular dynamics of synonymous mutations also imply that the triplet-based code may have resulted from adaptive functional expansion enabling a primordial doublet code to multiplex gene regulatory information via the shape and charge of the minor groove.

  8. Development of a Premature Stop Codon-detection method based on a bacterial two-hybrid system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayorga Luis S

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The detection of Premature Stop Codons (PSCs in human genes is very useful for the genetic diagnosis of different hereditary cancers, e.g. Familial Breast Cancer and Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC. The products of these PSCs are truncated proteins, detectable in vitro by the Protein Truncation Test and in vivo by using the living translation machinery of yeast or bacteria. These living strategies are based on the construction of recombinant plasmids where the human sequence of interest is inserted upstream of a reporter gene. Although simple, these assays have their limitations. The yeast system requires extensive work to enhance its specificity, and the bacterial systems yield many false results due to translation re-initiation events occurring post PSCs. Our aim was to design a recombinant plasmid useful for detecting PSCs in human genes and resistant to bacterial translation re-initiation interferences. Results A functional recombinant plasmid (pREAL was designed based on a bacterial two-hybrid system. In our design, the in vivo translation of fused fragments of the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase triggers the production of cAMP giving rise to a selectable bacterial phenotype. When a gene of interest is inserted between the two fragments, any PSC inhibits the enzymatic activity of the product, and translation re-initiation events post-PSC yield separated inactive fragments. We demonstrated that the system can accurately detect PSCs in human genes by inserting mutated fragments of the brca1 and msh2 gene. Western Blot assays revealed translation re-initiation events in all the tested colonies, implying that a simpler plasmid would not be resistant to this source of false negative results. The application of the system to a HNPCC family with a nonsense mutation in the msh2 gene correctly diagnosed wild type homozygous and heterozygous patients. Conclusion The developed pREAL is applicable to the

  9. PCR-RFLP to Detect Codon 248 Mutation in Exon 7 of "p53" Tumor Suppressor Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Liming; Ge, Chongtao; Wu, Haizhen; Li, Suxia; Zhang, Huizhan

    2009-01-01

    Individual genome DNA was extracted fast from oral swab and followed up with PCR specific for codon 248 of "p53" tumor suppressor gene. "Msp"I restriction mapping showed the G-C mutation in codon 248, which closely relates to cancer susceptibility. Students learn the concepts, detection techniques, and research significance of point mutations or…

  10. Genomic analysis of codon usage shows influence of mutation pressure, natural selection, and host features on Marburg virus evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrullah, Izza; Butt, Azeem M; Tahir, Shifa; Idrees, Muhammad; Tong, Yigang

    2015-08-26

    The Marburg virus (MARV) has a negative-sense single-stranded RNA genome, belongs to the family Filoviridae, and is responsible for several outbreaks of highly fatal hemorrhagic fever. Codon usage patterns of viruses reflect a series of evolutionary changes that enable viruses to shape their survival rates and fitness toward the external environment and, most importantly, their hosts. To understand the evolution of MARV at the codon level, we report a comprehensive analysis of synonymous codon usage patterns in MARV genomes. Multiple codon analysis approaches and statistical methods were performed to determine overall codon usage patterns, biases in codon usage, and influence of various factors, including mutation pressure, natural selection, and its two hosts, Homo sapiens and Rousettus aegyptiacus. Nucleotide composition and relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) analysis revealed that MARV shows mutation bias and prefers U- and A-ended codons to code amino acids. Effective number of codons analysis indicated that overall codon usage among MARV genomes is slightly biased. The Parity Rule 2 plot analysis showed that GC and AU nucleotides were not used proportionally which accounts for the presence of natural selection. Codon usage patterns of MARV were also found to be influenced by its hosts. This indicates that MARV have evolved codon usage patterns that are specific to both of its hosts. Moreover, selection pressure from R. aegyptiacus on the MARV RSCU patterns was found to be dominant compared with that from H. sapiens. Overall, mutation pressure was found to be the most important and dominant force that shapes codon usage patterns in MARV. To our knowledge, this is the first detailed codon usage analysis of MARV and extends our understanding of the mechanisms that contribute to codon usage and evolution of MARV.

  11. Mutations to Less-Preferred Synonymous Codons in a Highly Expressed Gene of Escherichia coli: Fitness and Epistatic Interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Hauber

    Full Text Available Codon-tRNA coevolution to maximize protein production has been, until recently, the dominant hypothesis to explain codon-usage bias in highly expressed bacterial genes. Two predictions of this hypothesis are 1 selection is weak; and 2 similar silent replacements at different codons should have similar fitness consequence. We used an allele-replacement strategy to change five specific 3rd-codon-position (silent sites in the highly expressed Escherichia coli ribosomal protein gene rplQ from the wild type to a less-preferred alternative. We introduced the five mutations within a 10-codon region. Four of the silent sites were chosen to test the second prediction, with a CTG to CTA mutation being introduced at two closely linked leucine codons and an AAA to AAG mutation being introduced at two closely linked lysine codons. We also introduced a fifth silent mutation, a GTG to GTA mutation at a valine codon in the same genic region. We measured the fitness effect of the individual mutations by competing each single-mutant strain against the parental wild-type strain, using a disrupted form of the araA gene as a selectively neutral phenotypic marker to distinguish between strains in direct competition experiments. Three of the silent mutations had a fitness effect of |s| > 0.02, which is contradictory to the prediction that selection will be weak. The two leucine mutations had significantly different fitness effects, as did the two lysine mutations, contradictory to the prediction that similar mutations at different codons should have similar fitness effects. We also constructed a strain carrying all five silent mutations in combination. Its fitness effect was greater than that predicted from the individual fitness values, suggesting that negative synergistic epistasis acts on the combination allele.

  12. Genotyping of K-ras codons 12 and 13 mutations in colorectal cancer by capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Ling; Chang, Ya-Sian; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Wu, Shou-Mei

    2009-06-26

    Point mutations of the K-ras gene located in codons 12 and 13 cause poor responses to the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR) therapy of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Besides, mutations of K-ras gene have also been proven to play an important role in human tumor progression. We established a simple and effective capillary electrophoresis (CE) method for simultaneous point mutation detection in codons 12 and 13 of K-ras gene. We combined one universal fluorescence-based nonhuman-sequence primer and two fragment-oriented primers in one tube, and performed this two-in-one polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PCR fragments included wild type and seven point mutations at codons 12 and 13 of K-ras gene. The amplicons were analyzed by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP)-CE method. The CE analysis was performed by using a 1x Tris-borate-EDTA (TBE) buffer containing 1.5% (w/v) hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) (MW 250,000) under reverse polarity with 15 degrees C and 30 degrees C. Ninety colorectal cancer patients were blindly genotyped using this developed method. The results showed good agreement with those of DNA sequencing method. The SSCP-CE was feasible for mutation screening of K-ras gene in populations.

  13. Two cloned β thalassemia genes are associated with amber mutations at codon 39

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergolizzi, Robert; Spritz, Richard A.; Spence, Sally; Goossens, Michel; Kan, Yuet Wai; Bank, Arthur

    1981-01-01

    Two β globin genes from patients with the β+ thalassemia phenotype have been cloned and sequenced. A single nucleotide change from CAG to TAG (an amber mutation) at codon 39 is the only difference from normal in both genes analyzed. The results are consistent with the assumption that both patients are doubly heterozygous for β+ and β° thalassemia, and that we have isolated and analyzed the β° thalassemia gene. Images PMID:6278453

  14. The mutational spectrum in Treacher Collins syndrome reveals a predominance of mutations that create a premature-termination codon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, S.J.; Gladwin, A.J.; Dixon, M.J. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom)

    1997-03-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development, the features of which include conductive hearing loss and cleft palate. The TCS locus has been mapped to human chromosome 5q31.3-32 and the mutated gene identified. In the current investigation, 25 previously undescribed mutations, which are spread throughout the gene, are presented. This brings the total reported to date to 35, which represents a detection rate of 60%. Of the mutations that have been reported to date, all but one result in the introduction of a premature-termination codon into the predicted protein, treacle. Moreover, the mutations are largely family specific, although a common 5-bp deletion in exon 24 (seven different families) and a recurrent splicing mutation in intron 3 (two different families) have been identified. This mutational spectrum supports the hypothesis that TCS results from haploin-sufficiency. 49 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Mutations at the cysteine codons of the recA gene of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisemann, J.M.; Weinstock, G.M.

    1988-01-01

    Each of the three cysteine residues in the Escherichia coli RecA protein was replaced with a number of other amino acids. To do this, each cysteine codon was first converted to a chain-terminating amber codon by oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis. These amber mutants were then either assayed for function in different suppressor strains or reverted by a second round of mutagenesis with oligonucleotides that had random sequences at the amber codon. Thirty-three different amino acid substitutions were obtained. Mutants were tested for three functions of RecA: survival following UV irradiation, homologous recombination, and induction of the SOS response. It was found that although none of the cysteines is essential for activity, mutations at each of these positions can affect one or more of the activities of RecA, depending on the particular amino acid substitution. In addition, the cysteine at position 116 appears to be involved in the RecA-promoted cleavage of the LexA protein

  16. Introducing COCOS: codon consequence scanner for annotating reading frame changes induced by stop-lost and frame shift variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butkiewicz, Mariusz; Haines, Jonathan L; Bush, William S

    2017-05-15

    Reading frame altering genomic variants can impact gene expression levels and the structure of protein products, thus potentially inducing disease phenotypes. Current annotation approaches report the impact of such variants in the context of altered DNA sequence only; attributes of the resulting transcript, reading frame and translated protein product are not reported. To remedy this shortcoming, we present a new genetic annotation approach termed Codon Consequence Scanner (COCOS). Implemented as an Ensembl variant effect predictor (VEP) plugin, COCOS captures amino acid sequence alterations stemming from variants that produce an altered reading frame, such as stop-lost variants and small insertions and deletions (InDels). To highlight its significance, COCOS was applied to data from the 1000 Genomes Project. Transcripts affected by stop-lost variants introduce a median of 15 amino acids, while InDels have a more extensive impact with a median of 66 amino acids being incorporated. Captured sequence alterations are written out in FASTA format and can be further analyzed for impact on the underlying protein structure. COCOS is available to all users on github: https://github.com/butkiem/COCOS. mariusz.butkiewicz@case.edu. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  17. Mutation at codon 442 in the rpoB gene of Mycobacterium leprae does not confer resistance to rifampicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavania, Mallika; Hena, Abu; Reja, Hasanoor; Nigam, Astha; Biswas, Nibir Kumar; Singh, Itu; Turankar, Ravindra P; Gupta, Ud; Kumar, Senthil; Rewaria, Latika; Patra, Pradip K R; Sengupta, Utpal; Bhattacharya, Basudeb

    2016-03-01

    Rifampicin is the major drug in the treatment of leprosy. The rifampicin resistance of Mycobacterium leprae results from a mutation in the rpoB gene, encoding the β subunit of RNA polymerase. As M. leprae is a non-cultivable organism observation of its growth using mouse food-pad (MFP) is the only Gold Standard assay used for confirmation of "in-vivo" drug resistance. Any mutation at molecular level has to be verified by MFP assay for final confirmation of drug resistance in leprosy. In the present study, M. leprae strains showing a mutation only at codon 442 Gln-His and along with mutation either at codon 424 Val-Gly or at 438 Gln-Val within the Rifampicin Resistance Determining Region (RRDR) confirmed by DNA sequencing and by high resolution melting (HRM) analysis were subjected for its growth in MFP. The M. leprae strain having the new mutation at codon 442 Gln-His was found to be sensitive to all the three drugs and strains having additional mutations at 424 Val-Gly and 438 Gln-Val were conferring resistance with Multi drug therapy (MDT) in MFP. These results indicate that MFP is the gold standard method for confirming the mutations detected by molecular techniques.

  18. Stop-gain mutations in PKP2 are associated with a later age of onset of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireia Alcalde

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC is a cardiac disease characterized by the presence of fibrofatty replacement of the right ventricular myocardium, which may cause ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Pathogenic mutations in several genes encoding mainly desmosomal proteins have been reported. Our aim is to perform genotype-phenotype correlations to establish the diagnostic value of genetics and to assess the role of mutation type in age-related penetrance in ARVC. METHODS AND RESULTS: Thirty unrelated Spanish patients underwent a complete clinical evaluation. They all were screened for PKP2, DSG2, DSC2, DSP, JUP and TMEM43 genes. A total of 70 relatives of four families were also studied. The 30 patients fulfilled definite disease diagnostic criteria. Genetic analysis revealed a pathogenic mutation in 19 patients (13 in PKP2, 3 in DSG2, 2 in DSP, and 1 in DSC2. Nine of these mutations created a truncated protein due to the generation of a stop codon. Familial assessment revealed 28 genetic carriers among family members. Stop-gain mutations were associated to a later age of onset of ARVC, without differences in the severity of the pathology. CONCLUSIONS: Familial genetic analysis helps to identify the cause responsible for the pathology. In discrepancy with previous studies, the presence of a truncating protein does not confer a worse severity. This information could suggest that truncating proteins may be compensated by the normal allele and that missense mutations may act as poison peptides.

  19. RNA editing makes mistakes in plant mitochondria: editing loses sense in transcripts of a rps19 pseudogene and in creating stop codons in coxI and rps3 mRNAs of Oenothera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, W; Brennicke, A

    1991-01-01

    An intact gene for the ribosomal protein S19 (rps19) is absent from Oenothera mitochondria. The conserved rps19 reading frame found in the mitochondrial genome is interrupted by a termination codon. This rps19 pseudogene is cotranscribed with the downstream rps3 gene and is edited on both sides of the translational stop. Editing, however, changes the amino acid sequence at positions that were well conserved before editing. Other strange editings create translational stops in open reading frames coding for functional proteins. In coxI and rps3 mRNAs CGA codons are edited to UGA stop codons only five and three codons, respectively, downstream to the initiation codon. These aberrant editings in essential open reading frames and in the rps19 pseudogene appear to have been shifted to these positions from other editing sites. These observations suggest a requirement for a continuous evolutionary constraint on the editing specificities in plant mitochondria. Images PMID:1762921

  20. Serial MRI in early Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease with a point mutation of prion protein at codon 180

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, S.; Sugino, M.; Shinoda, K.; Ohsawa, N.; Koizumi, N.; Ohta, T.; Kitamoto, T.; Tateishi, J.

    1995-01-01

    We report a 66-year-old woman with histologically diagnosed Creutzfeld-Jacob disease (CJD), followed with MRI from an early clinical stage. MRI demonstrated expansion of the high cortical signal on T2-weighted images, which differs from previous MRI reports of CJD. This patient followed an atypical clinical course: 16 months had passed before she developed akinetic mutism, and periodic sharp waves had not been detected on EEG after 2 years in spite of her akinetic mutism. Brain biopsy showed primary spongiform changes in the grey matter, and a point mutation of the prion protein gene at codon 180 was discovered using polymerase chain reaction direct sequencing and Tth 111 I cutting. This is the first case with the point mutation of the codon 180 variant with an atypical clinical course and characteristic MRI findings. (orig.)

  1. HRAS mutations in Costello syndrome: detection of constitutional activating mutations in codon 12 and 13 and loss of wild-type allele in malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estep, Anne L; Tidyman, William E; Teitell, Michael A; Cotter, Philip D; Rauen, Katherine A

    2006-01-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) is a complex developmental disorder involving characteristic craniofacial features, failure to thrive, developmental delay, cardiac and skeletal anomalies, and a predisposition to develop neoplasia. Based on similarities with other cancer syndromes, we previously hypothesized that CS is likely due to activation of signal transduction through the Ras/MAPK pathway [Tartaglia et al., 2003]. In this study, the HRAS coding region was sequenced for mutations in a large, well-characterized cohort of 36 CS patients. Heterogeneous missense point mutations predicting an amino acid substitution were identified in 33/36 (92%) patients. The majority (91%) had a 34G --> A transition in codon 12. Less frequent mutations included 35G --> C (codon 12) and 37G --> T (codon 13). Parental samples did not have an HRAS mutation supporting the hypothesis of de novo heterogeneous mutations. There is phenotypic variability among patients with a 34G --> A transition. The most consistent features included characteristic facies and skin, failure to thrive, developmental delay, musculoskeletal abnormalities, visual impairment, cardiac abnormalities, and generalized hyperpigmentation. The two patients with 35G --> C had cardiac arrhythmias whereas one patient with a 37G --> T transversion had an enlarged aortic root. Of the patients with a clinical diagnosis of CS, neoplasia was the most consistent phenotypic feature for predicating an HRAS mutation. To gain an understanding of the relationship between constitutional HRAS mutations and malignancy, HRAS was sequenced in an advanced biphasic rhabdomyosarcoma/fibrosarcoma from an individual with a 34G --> A mutation. Loss of the wild-type HRAS allele was observed, suggesting tumorigenesis in CS patients is accompanied by additional somatic changes affecting HRAS. Finally, due to phenotypic overlap between CS and cardio-facio-cutaneous (CFC) syndromes, the HRAS coding region was sequenced in a well-characterized CFC cohort

  2. Prophylactic thyroidectomy for asymptomatic 3-year-old boy with positive multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A mutation (codon 634).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesić, Maja D; Tancić-Gajić, Milina; Jesić, Milos M; Zivaljević, Vladan; Sajić, Silvija; Vujović, Svetlana; Damjanović, Svetozar

    2014-01-01

    The multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN 2A) syndrome, comprising medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), pheochromocytoma and primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is most frequently caused by codon 634 activating mutations of the RET (rearranged during transfection) proto-oncogene on chromosome 10. For this codon-mutation carriers, earlier thyroidectomy (before the age of 5 years) would be advantageous in limiting the potential for the development of MTC as well as parathyroid adenomas. This is a case report of 3-year-old boy from the MEN 2A family (the boy's father and grandmother and paternal aunt) in which cysteine substitutes for phenylalanine at codon 634 in exon 11 of the RET proto-oncogene, who underwent thyroidectomy solely on the basis of genetic information. A boy had no thyromegaly, thyroidal irregularities or lymphadenopathy and no abnormality on the neck ultrasound examination. The pathology finding of thyroid gland was negative for MTC. Two years after total thyroidectomy, 5-year-old boy is healthy with permanent thyroxine replacement. His serum calcitonin level is < 2 pg/ml (normal < 13 pg/ml), has normal serum calcium and parathyroid hormone levels and negative urinary catecholamines. Long-term follow-up of this patient is required to determine whether very early thyroidectomy improves the long-term outcome of PHPT. Children with familial antecedents of MEN 2A should be genetically studied for the purpose of determining the risk of MTC and assessing the possibilities of making prophylactic thyroidectomy before the age of 5 years.

  3. Prophylactic thyroidectomy for asymptomatic 3-year-old boy with positive multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A mutation (codon 634

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ješić Maja D.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN 2A syndrome, comprising medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC, pheochromocytoma and primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT is most frequently caused by codon 634 activating mutations of the RET (rearranged during transfection proto-oncogene on chromosome 10. For this codon-mutation carriers, earlier thyroidectomy (before the age of 5 years would be advantageous in limiting the potential for the development of MTC as well as parathyroid adenomas. Case Outline. This is a case report of 3-year-old boy from the MEN 2A family (the boy’s father and grandmother and paternal aunt in which cysteine substitutes for phenylalanine at codon 634 in exon 11 of the RET proto-oncogene, who underwent thyroidectomy solely on the basis of genetic information. A boy had no thyromegaly, thyroidal irregularities or lymphadenopathy and no abnormality on the neck ultrasound examination. The pathology finding of thyroid gland was negative for MTC. Two years after total thyroidectomy, 5-year-old boy is healthy with permanent thyroxine replacement. His serum calcitonin level is <2 pg/ml (normal <13 pg/ml, has normal serum calcium and parathyroid hormone levels and negative urinary catecholamines. Long-term follow-up of this patient is required to determine whether very early thyroidectomy improves the long-term outcome of PHPT. Conclusion. Children with familial antecedents of MEN 2A should be genetically studied for the purpose of determining the risk of MTC and assessing the possibilities of making prophylactic thyroidectomy before the age of 5 years.

  4. Listeria monocytogenes strains encoding premature stop codons in inlA invade mice and guinea pig fetuses in orally dosed dams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holch, Anne; Ingmer, Hanne; Licht, Tine Rask

    2013-01-01

    potential of a group of food-processing persistent L. monocytogenes strains encoding a premature stop codon in inlA (encoding internalin A) by using two orally dosed models, pregnant mice and pregnant guinea pigs. A food-processing persistent strain of L. monocytogenes invaded placentas (n = 58; 10...... % positive) and fetuses (3 % positive) of pregnant mice (n = 9 animals per strain), similar to a genetically manipulated murinized strain, EGD-e InlAm* (n = 61; 3 and 2 %, respectively). In pregnant guinea pigs (n = 9 animals per bacterial strain), a maternofetal strain (from a human fetal clinical fatal...... case) was isolated from 34 % of placenta samples (n = 50), whereas both food-processing persistent strains were found in 5 % of placenta samples (n = 36 or 37). One of the food-processing persistent strains, N53-1, was found in up to 8 % of guinea pig fetal liver and brain samples, whereas...

  5. c-Ha-ras BamHI RFLP in human urothelial tumors and point mutations in hot codons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weismanova, E; Skovraga, M.; Kaluz, S.

    1993-01-01

    High-molecular weights DNAs from 30 bladder and renal cell carcinomas (RCC) were isolated and the c-Ha-ras the c-Ha-ras gene BamHI RFLP was examined. Amplification of c-Ha-ras with normal localization with regard to the size of alleles was found only in the case. One of the normally localized c-Ha-ras allele termed RCC c-H-ras of a length of about 6.6 kbp was cloned and an oncogene-activating point mutation was identified using two restriction enzymes. After comparison of CfrI and Cfr10I cleavage maps of RCC c-Ha-ras to complete nucleotide sequences of EJ/T24 c-Ha-ras oncogene and its normal counterpart, a point mutation was identified within codon 11 or 12. The use of CfrI and Cfr10I is of value for clinical practice in identification of point mutations in c-Ha-ras PCR product in neoplasia accompanied by somatic mutation of c-Ha-ras. The correlation among c-Ha-ras allele, amplification/loss, presence of point mutation and progression of neoplasia is discussed. (author)

  6. BRCA2 Polymorphic Stop Codon K3326X and the Risk of Breast, Prostate, and Ovarian Cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.D. Meeks (Huong D.); H. Song (Honglin); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); J. Dennis (Joe); Q. Wang (Qing); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); D. Frost (Debra); L. McGuffog (Lesley); S.D. Ellis (Steve); B. Feng (Bingjian); S.S. Buys (Saundra); J.L. Hopper (John); M.C. Southey (Melissa); A. Tesoriero (Andrea); M. James (Margaret); F. Bruinsma (Fiona); I. Campbell (Ian); A. Broeks (Annegien); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); P.A. Fasching (Peter); O. Fletcher (Olivia); N. Johnson (Nichola); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); E. Riboli (Elio); S. Banerjee (Susana); U. Menon (Usha); I. Tomlinson (Ian); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); U. Hamann (Ute); F. Marme (Federick); A. Rudolph (Anja); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); L. Tihomirova (Laima); N. Tung (Nadine); J. Garber (Judy); D. Cramer (Daniel); K.L. Terry (Kathryn); E.M. Poole (Elizabeth); S. Tworoger (Shelley); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); A.K. Godwin (Andrew K.); P. Guénel (Pascal); T. Truong (Thérèse); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); F. Damiola (Francesca); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); C. Isaacs (Claudine); C. Maugard; S.E. Bojesen (Stig); H. Flyger (Henrik); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); A. Jensen (Allen); M. Kjaer (Michael); C.K. Høgdall (Claus); E. Høgdall (Estrid); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); M. Thomassen (Mads); J. Benítez (Javier); A. González-Neira (Anna); A. Osorio (Ana); M.D.L. Hoya (Miguel De La); P.P. Segura (Pedro Perez); O. Díez (Orland); C. Lazaro (Conxi); J. Brunet (Joan); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); L. Eunjung (Lee); E.M. John (Esther); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); D. Castillo (Danielle); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); P.A. Ganz (Patricia A.); R. Nussbaum (Robert); S. Chan (Salina); B.Y. Karlan (Beth Y.); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); A. Wu (Anna); S.A. Gayther (Simon); S.J. Ramus (Susan); W. Sieh (Weiva); A.S. Whittermore (Alice S.); A.N.A. Monteiro (Alvaro N.A.); C. Phelan (Catherine); M.B. Terry (Mary Beth); M. Piedmonte (Marion); K. Offit (Kenneth); M. Robson (Mark); D.A. Levine (Douglas); K.B. Moysich (Kirsten B.); R. Cannioto (Rikki); S.H. Olson (Sara); M.B. Daly (Mary B.); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); K.H. Lu (Karen); D. Liang (Dong); M.A.T. Hildebrant (Michelle A.T.); R.B. Ness (Roberta); F. Modugno (Francesmary); L. Pearce (Leigh); M.T. Goodman (Marc T.); P.J. Thompson (Pamela J.); H. Brenner (Hermann); K. Butterbach (Katja); A. Meindl (Alfons); E. Hahnen (Eric); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); T. Brüning (Thomas); C. Blomqvist (Carl); S. Khan (Sofia); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); L.M. Pelttari (Liisa); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); R. Butzow (Ralf); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); T. Dörk (Thilo); A. Lindblom (Annika); S. Margolin (Sara); J. Rantala (Johanna); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); A. Mannermaa (Arto); D. Lambrechts (Diether); P. Neven (Patrick); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); T. Van Maerken (Tom); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); P.U. Heitz; R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); P. Radice (Paolo); A. Viel (Alessandra); M. Barile (Monica); B. Peissel (Bernard); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); M. Montagna (Marco); C. Oliani (Cristina); A. Peixoto (Ana); P.J. Teixeira; A. Collavoli (Anita); B. Hallberg (Boubou); J.E. Olson (Janet); E.L. Goode (Ellen L.); S.N. Hart (Steven N.); H. Shimelis (Hermela); J.M. Cunningham (Julie); G.G. Giles (Graham); R.L. Milne (Roger); S. Healey (Sue); K. Tucker (Kathy); C.A. Haiman (Christopher A.); B.E. Henderson (Brian); M.S. Goldberg (Mark); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); J. Simard (Jacques); P. Soucy (Penny); D. Eccles (Diana); N. Le (Nhu); A.-L. Borresen-Dale (Anne-Lise); V. Kristensen (Vessela); H.B. Salvesen (Helga); L. Bjorge (Line); E.V. Bandera (Elisa); H. Risch (Harvey); W. Zheng (Wei); A. Beeghly-Fadiel (Alicia); H. Cai (Hui); K. Pykäs (Katri); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); J.A. Knight (Julia A.); S. Narod (Steven); P. Devilee (Peter); R. Winqvist (Robert); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); M.H. Greene (Mark H.); P.L. Mai (Phuong); J.T. Loud (Jennifer); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); M. Schoemaker (Minouk); K. Czene (Kamila); H. Darabi (Hatef); I. McNeish (Iain); N. Siddiquil (Nadeem); R. Glasspool (Rosalind); A. Kwong (Ava); S.K. Park (Sue K.); S.-H. Teo (Soo-Hwang); S.-Y. Yoon (Sook-Yee); K. Matsuo (Keitaro); N. Hosono (Naoya); Y.L. Woo (Yin Ling); Y. Gao; L. Foretova (Lenka); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport-Feurhauser (Christine); E. Friedman (Eitan); Y. Laitman (Yael); G. Rennert (Gad); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); P.J. Hulick (Peter); O.I. Olopade (Olufunmilayo I.); L. Senter (Leigha); E. Olah (Edith); J.A. Doherty (Jennifer A.); J.M. Schildkraut (Joellen); L.B. Koppert (Lisa); L.A.L.M. Kiemeney (Bart); L.F. Massuger (Leon); L.S. Cook (Linda S.); T. Pejovic (Tanja); J. Li (Jingmei); Å. Borg (Åke); A. Öfverholm (Anna); M.A. Rossing (Mary Anne); N. Wentzensen (N.); K. Henriksson (Karin); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); B. Pasini (Barbara); M. Shah (Mitul); M. Kabisch (Maria); D. Torres (Diana); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); J. Gronwald (Jacek); B.A. Agnarsson (Bjarni); J. Kupryjanczyk (Jolanta); J. Moes-Sosnowska (Joanna); F. Fostira (Florentia); I. Konstantopoulou (I.); S. Slager (Susan); M. Jones (Michael); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); A. Berchuck (Andrew); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.M. Dunning (Alison); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); P. Hall (Per); D.F. Easton (Douglas F.); F.J. Couch (Fergus); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); D. Goldgar (David)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The K3326X variant in BRCA2 (BRCA2∗c.9976A>T p.Lys3326∗rs11571833) has been found to be associated with small increased risks of breast cancer. However, it is not clear to what extent linkage disequilibrium with fully pathogenic mutations might account for this association.

  7. A L2HGDH initiator methionine codon mutation in a Yorkshire terrier with L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farias Fabiana HG

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria is a metabolic repair deficiency characterized by elevated levels of L-2-hydroxyglutaric acid in urine, blood and cerebrospinal fluid. Neurological signs associated with the disease in humans and dogs include seizures, ataxia and dementia. Case presentation Here we describe an 8 month old Yorkshire terrier that presented with episodes of hyperactivity and aggressive behavior. Between episodes, the dog’s behavior and neurologic examinations were normal. A T2 weighted MRI of the brain showed diffuse grey matter hyperintensity and a urine metabolite screen showed elevated 2-hydroxyglutaric acid. We sequenced all 10 exons and intron-exon borders of L2HGDH from the affected dog and identified a homozygous A to G transition in the initiator methionine codon. The first inframe methionine is at p.M183 which is past the mitochondrial targeting domain of the protein. Initiation of translation at p.M183 would encode an N-terminal truncated protein unlikely to be functional. Conclusions We have identified a mutation in the initiation codon of L2HGDH that is likely to result in a non-functional gene. The Yorkshire terrier could serve as an animal model to understand the pathogenesis of L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria and to evaluate potential therapies.

  8. Benzimidazole -Resistance in Haemonchus Contortus: New PCR-RFLP Method for the Detection of Point Mutation at Codon 167 of Isotype 1 Β-Tubulin Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Eslami

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to the lack of a suitable and economic test for the analysis of the polymorphism at codon 167, we developed a new PCR-RFLP technique, based on a modified forward primer (UT-HC167 MF-primer, to identify simultaneously the SNPs at codons 167 and 200 of isotype 1 β-tubu­lin gene of Haemonchus contortus.Methods: There already are several safe and easy methods for identification of point mutations at codons 198 and 200. Due to the lack of a reliable and easy method for the detection of the single nucleo­tide polymorphism (SNP at codon 167, we developed an innovative PCR-RFLP technique based on a modified forward primer (UT-HC167 MF-primer, in which the nucleotide T at the posi­tion 443 was substituted through a nucleotide A creating a restriction site for restriction endonuc­lease SnaB I in the nucleotide sequences including codon 167. A total of 138 adult male H. contortus were collected from three different geo-climatic areas of Iran. The isolated genomic DNA of each single worm was amplified by PCR using primers flanking codon 167. The PCR product (527 bp was then amplified by semi-nested PCR using the UT-HC167 MF-primer and the reverse primer achiev­ing a PCR product of 451 bp in length. This PCR product was subsequently digested with the restriction endonucleases SnaB I and TaaI for analysis of the mutations at codons 167 and 200, respec­tively.Results: All worms had two alleles encoding for phenylalanine (BZss homozygote for both codons.Conclusion: Using the UT-HC167 MF-primer and a suitable reverse primer designed upstream from codon 200, it is possible to amplify a PCR product which can be used for analysis of the SNPs at all three mentioned codons using RFLP.

  9. Persistent and transient Listeria monocytogenes strains from retail deli environments vary in their ability to adhere and form biofilms and rarely have inlA premature stop codons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingjin; Ray, Andrea J; Hammons, Susan R; Oliver, Haley F

    2015-02-01

    Based on recent risk assessments, up to 83% of listeriosis cases from deli meat in the United States are predicted to be from ready-to-eat deli meats contaminated during processing at retail grocery stores. Listeria monocytogenes is known to use sanitizer tolerance and biofilm formation to survive, but interplay of these mechanisms along with virulence potential and persistence mechanisms specific to deli environments had yet to be elucidated. In this study, 442 isolates from food and nonfood contact surfaces in 30 retail delis over 9 months were tested for inlA premature stop codons (PMSCs); inlA encodes InlA, which is necessary to cause listeriosis. A total of 96 isolates, composed of 23 persistent and 73 transient strains, were tested for adhesion and biofilm-forming ability and sanitizer tolerance. Only 10/442 isolates had inlA PMSCs (pdelis with other persistent strains. Most (7/10) PMSC-containing isolates were collected from food contact surfaces (pdelis (p<0.05). Persistent strains had enhanced adhesion on day 1 of a 5-day adhesion-biofilm formation assay. However, there was no significant difference in sanitizer tolerance between persistent and transient strains. Results suggest that foods contaminated with persistent L. monocytogenes strains from the retail environment are (1) likely to have wild-type virulence potential and (2) may persist due to increased adhesion and biofilm formation capacity rather than sanitizer tolerance, thus posing a significant public health risk.

  10. BRCA2 Polymorphic Stop Codon K3326X and the Risk of Breast, Prostate, and Ovarian Cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meeks, Huong D; Song, Honglin; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2016-01-01

    3326X variant carriers in relation to breast, ovarian, and prostate cancer risks, with weights defined as probability of not having a pathogenic BRCA2 variant. Using Cox proportional hazards modeling, we also examined the associations of K3326X with breast and ovarian cancer risks among 7183 BRCA1...... and for estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer (ORw = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.2 to 1.70, P = 3.4x10(-5) and ORw = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.28 to 1.76, P = 4.1x10(-5), respectively). For BRCA1 mutation carriers, there was a statistically significant inverse association of the K3326X variant with risk of ovarian cancer (HR = 0.......43, 95% CI = 0.22 to 0.84, P = .013) but no association with breast cancer. No association with prostate cancer was observed. CONCLUSIONS: Our study provides evidence that the K3326X variant is associated with risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers independent of other pathogenic variants in BRCA2...

  11. Human apolipoprotein B (apoB) mRNA: Identification of two distinct apoB mRNAs, an mRNA with the apoB-100 sequence and an apoB mRNA containing a premature in-frame translational stop codon, in both liver and intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higuchi, K.; Hospattankar, A.V.; Law, S.W.; Meglin, N.; Cortright, J.; Brewer, H.B. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Human apolipoprotein B (apoB) is present in plasma as two separate isoproteins, designated apoB-100 (512 kDa) and apoB-48 (250 kDa). ApoB is encoded by a single gene on chromosome 2, and a single nuclear mRNA is edited and processed into two separate apoB mRNAs. A 14.1-kilobase apoB mRNA codes for apoB-100, and the second mRNA, which codes for apoB-48, contains a premature stop codon generated by a single base substitution of cytosine to uracil at nucleotide 6,538, which converts the translated CAA codon coding for the amino acid glutamine at residue 2,153 in apoB-100 to a premature in-frame stop codon (UAA). Two 30-base synthetic oligonucleotides, designated apoB-Stop and apoB-Gln, were synthesized containing the complementary sequence to the stop codon (UAA) and glutamine codon (CAA), respectively. The combined results from these studies establish that both human intestine and liver contain the two distinct apoB mRNAs, an mRNA that codes for apoB-100 and an apoB mRNA that contains the premature stop codon, which codes for apoB-48. The premature in-frame stop codon is not tissue specific and is present in both human liver and intestine

  12. Prion protein with Y145STOP mutation induces mitochondria-mediated apoptosis and PrP-containing deposits in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hachiya, Naomi S.; Watanabe, Kota; Kawabata, Makiko Y.; Jozuka, Akiko; Kozuka, Yoshimichi; Sakasegawa, Yuji; Kaneko, Kiyotoshi

    2005-01-01

    A pathogenic truncation of an amber mutation at codon 145 (Y145STOP) in Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker disease (GSS) was investigated through the real-time imaging in living cells, by utilizing GFP-PrP constructs. GFP-PrP(1-144) exhibited an aberrant localization to mitochondria in mouse neuroblastoma neuro2a (N2a) and HpL3-4 cells, a hippocampal cell line established from prnp gene-ablated mice, whereas full-length GFP-PrP did not. The aberrant mitochondrial localization was also confirmed by Western blot analysis. Since GFP-PrP(1-121), as previously reported, and full-length GFP-PrP do not exhibit such mitochondrial localization, the mitochondrial localization of GFP-PrP(1-144) requires not only PrP residues 121-144 (in human sequence) but also COOH-terminal truncation in the current experimental condition. Subsequently, the GFP-PrP(1-144) induced a change in the mitochondrial innermembrane potential (ΔΨ m ), release of cytochrome c from the intermembrane space into the cytosol, and DNA fragmentation in these cells. Non-fluorescent PrP(1-144) also induced the DNA fragmentation in N2a and HpL3-4 cells after the proteasomal inhibition. These data may provide clues as to the molecular mechanism of the neurotoxic property of Y145STOP mutation. Furthermore, immunoelectron microscopy revealed numerous electron-dense deposits in mitochondria clusters of GFP-PrP(1-144)-transfected N2a cells, whereas no deposit was detected in the cells transfected with full-length GFP-PrP. Co-localization of GFP/PrP-immunogold particles with porin-immunogold particles as a mitochondrial marker was observed in such electron-dense vesicular foci, resembling those found in autophagic vacuoles forming secondary lysosomes. Whether such electron-dense deposits may serve as a seed for the growth of amyloid plaques, a characteristic feature of GSS with Y145STOP, awaits further investigations

  13. Levels of H-ras codon 61 CAA to AAA mutation: response to 4-ABP-treatment and Pms2-deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Barbara L; Delongchamp, Robert R; Beland, Frederick A; Heflich, Robert H

    2006-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) deficiencies result in increased frequencies of spontaneous mutation and tumor formation. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that a chemically-induced mutational response would be greater in a mouse with an MMR-deficiency than in the MMR-proficient mouse models commonly used to assay for chemical carcinogenicity. To accomplish this, the induction of H-ras codon 61 CAA-->AAA mutation was examined in Pms2 knockout mice (Pms2-/-, C57BL/6 background) and sibling wild-type mice (Pms2+/+). Groups of five or six neonatal male mice were treated with 0.3 micromol 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP) or the vehicle control, dimethylsulfoxide. Eight months after treatment, liver DNAs were isolated and analysed for levels of H-ras codon 61 CAA-->AAA mutation using allele-specific competitive blocker-PCR. In Pms2-proficient and Pms2-deficient mice, 4-ABP treatment caused an increase in mutant fraction (MF) from 1.65x10(-5) to 2.91x10(-5) and from 3.40x10(-5) to 4.70x10(-5), respectively. Pooling data from 4-ABP-treated and control mice, the approximately 2-fold increase in MF observed in Pms2-deficient as compared with Pms2-proficient mice was statistically significant (P=0.0207) and consistent with what has been reported previously in terms of induction of G:C-->T:A mutation in a Pms2-deficient background. Pooling data from both genotypes, the increase in H-ras MF in 4-ABP-treated mice, as compared with control mice, did not reach the 95% confidence level of statistical significance (P=0.0606). The 4-ABP treatment caused a 1.76-fold and 1.38-fold increase in average H-ras MF in Pms2-proficient and Pms2-deficient mice, respectively. Furthermore, the levels of induced mutation in Pms2-proficient and Pms2-deficient mice were nearly identical (1.26x10(-5) and 1.30x10(-5), respectively). We conclude that Pms2-deficiency does not result in an amplification of the H-ras codon 61 CAA-->AAA mutational response induced by 4-ABP.

  14. Comparative analysis of codon usage bias and codon context patterns between dipteran and hymenopteran sequenced genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanta K Behura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Codon bias is a phenomenon of non-uniform usage of codons whereas codon context generally refers to sequential pair of codons in a gene. Although genome sequencing of multiple species of dipteran and hymenopteran insects have been completed only a few of these species have been analyzed for codon usage bias. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we use bioinformatics approaches to analyze codon usage bias and codon context patterns in a genome-wide manner among 15 dipteran and 7 hymenopteran insect species. Results show that GAA is the most frequent codon in the dipteran species whereas GAG is the most frequent codon in the hymenopteran species. Data reveals that codons ending with C or G are frequently used in the dipteran genomes whereas codons ending with A or T are frequently used in the hymenopteran genomes. Synonymous codon usage orders (SCUO vary within genomes in a pattern that seems to be distinct for each species. Based on comparison of 30 one-to-one orthologous genes among 17 species, the fruit fly Drosophila willistoni shows the least codon usage bias whereas the honey bee (Apis mellifera shows the highest bias. Analysis of codon context patterns of these insects shows that specific codons are frequently used as the 3'- and 5'-context of start and stop codons, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Codon bias pattern is distinct between dipteran and hymenopteran insects. While codon bias is favored by high GC content of dipteran genomes, high AT content of genes favors biased usage of synonymous codons in the hymenopteran insects. Also, codon context patterns vary among these species largely according to their phylogeny.

  15. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease with a prion protein gene codon 180 mutation presenting asymmetric cortical high-intensity on magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Yuko; Kimura, Noriyuki; Hanaoka, Takuya; Aso, Yasuhiro; Hirano, Teruyuki; Murai, Hiroyuki; Satoh, Katsuya; Matsubara, Etsuro

    2015-01-01

    Here we report a genetically confirmed case of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with a prion protein gene codon 180 mutation presenting atypical magnetic resonance imaging findings. The present case exhibited an acute onset and lateralized neurologic signs, and progressive cognitive impairment. No myoclonus or periodic synchronous discharges on electroencephalography were observed. Diffusion-weighted images revealed areas of high signal intensity in the right frontal and temporal cortices at onset that extended to the whole cortex and basal ganglia of the right cerebral hemisphere at 3 months. Although the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was initially negative for neuron specific enolase, tau protein, 14-3-3 protein, and abnormal prion protein, the CSF was positive for these brain-derived proteins at 3 months after onset.

  16. Can K-ras codon 12 mutations be used to distinguish benign bile duct proliferations from metastases in the liver? A molecular analysis of 101 liver lesions from 93 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hruban, R. H.; Sturm, P. D.; Slebos, R. J.; Wilentz, R. E.; Musler, A. R.; Yeo, C. J.; Sohn, T. A.; van Velthuysen, M. L.; Offerhaus, G. J.

    1997-01-01

    It can be difficult to distinguish benign bile duct proliferations (BDPs) from well-differentiated metastatic peripancreatic adenocarcinomas on histological grounds alone. Most peripancreatic carcinomas harbor activating point mutations in codon 12 of the K-ras oncogene, suggesting that K-ras

  17. Small Mutations of the DMD Gene in Taiwanese Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Lin Hwa

    2008-06-01

    Conclusion: Most identified mutations either led to a predictable premature stop codon or resulted in splicing defects, which caused defective function of dystrophin. Our findings extend the mutation spectrum of the DMD gene. Molecular characterization of the affected families is important for genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis.

  18. Sequence-specific DNA alkylation targeting for Kras codon 13 mutation by pyrrole-imidazole polyamide seco-CBI conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rhys Dylan; Asamitsu, Sefan; Takenaka, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Makoto; Hashiya, Kaori; Kawamoto, Yusuke; Bando, Toshikazu; Nagase, Hiroki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-01-27

    Hairpin N-methylpyrrole-N-methylimidazole polyamide seco-CBI conjugates 2-6 were designed for synthesis by Fmoc solid-phase synthesis, and their DNA-alkylating activities against the Kras codon 13 mutation were compared by high-resolution denaturing gel electrophoresis with 225 base pair (bp) DNA fragments. Conjugate 5 had high reactivity towards the Kras codon 13 mutation site, with alkylation occurring at the A of the sequence 5'-ACGTCACCA-3' (site 2), including minor 1 bp-mismatch alkylation against wild type 5'-ACGCCACCA-3' (site 3). Conjugate 6, which differs from conjugate 5 by exchanging one Py unit with a β unit, showed high selectivity but only weakly alkylated the A of 5'-ACGTCACCA-3' (site 2). The hairpin polyamide seco-CBI conjugate 5 thus alkylates according to Dervan's pairing rule with the pairing recognition which β/β pair targets T-A and A-T pairs. SPR and a computer-minimized model suggest that 5 binds to the target sequence with high affinity in a hairpin conformation, allowing for efficient DNA alkylation. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Genome-wide comparative analysis of codon usage bias and codon context patterns among cyanobacterial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabha, Ratna; Singh, Dhananjaya P; Sinha, Swati; Ahmad, Khurshid; Rai, Anil

    2017-04-01

    With the increasing accumulation of genomic sequence information of prokaryotes, the study of codon usage bias has gained renewed attention. The purpose of this study was to examine codon selection pattern within and across cyanobacterial species belonging to diverse taxonomic orders and habitats. We performed detailed comparative analysis of cyanobacterial genomes with respect to codon bias. Our analysis reflects that in cyanobacterial genomes, A- and/or T-ending codons were used predominantly in the genes whereas G- and/or C-ending codons were largely avoided. Variation in the codon context usage of cyanobacterial genes corresponded to the clustering of cyanobacteria as per their GC content. Analysis of codon adaptation index (CAI) and synonymous codon usage order (SCUO) revealed that majority of genes are associated with low codon bias. Codon selection pattern in cyanobacterial genomes reflected compositional constraints as major influencing factor. It is also identified that although, mutational constraint may play some role in affecting codon usage bias in cyanobacteria, compositional constraint in terms of genomic GC composition coupled with environmental factors affected codon selection pattern in cyanobacterial genomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Panencephalopathic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with distinct pattern of prion protein deposition in a patient with D178N mutation and homozygosity for valine at codon 129 of the prion protein Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcon, Gabriella; Indaco, Antonio; Di Fede, Giuseppe; Suardi, Silvia; Finato, Nicoletta; Moretti, Valentino; Micoli, Sandro; Fociani, Paolo; Zerbi, Pietro; Pincherle, Alessandro; Redaelli, Veronica; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Giaccone, Giorgio

    2014-03-01

    Prion diseases include sporadic, acquired and genetic forms linked to mutations of the prion protein (PrP) gene (PRNP). In subjects carrying the D178N PRNP mutation, distinct phenotypes can be observed, depending on the methionine/valine codon 129 polymorphism. We present here a 53-year-old woman with D178N mutation in the PRNP gene and homozygosity for valine at codon 129. The disease started at age 47 with memory deficits, progressive cognitive impairment and ataxia. The clinical picture slowly worsened to a state of akinetic mutism in about 2 years and the disease course was 6 years. The neuropathologic examination demonstrated severe diffuse cerebral atrophy with neuronal loss, spongiosis and marked myelin loss and tissue rarefaction in the hemispheric white matter, configuring panencephalopathic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. PrP deposition was present in the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia and cerebellum with diffuse synaptic-type pattern of immunoreactivity and clusters of countless, small PrP deposits, particularly evident in the lower cortical layers, in the striatum and in the molecular layer of the cerebellum. Western blot analysis showed the presence of type 1 PrP(Sc) (Parchi classification). These findings underline the clear-cut distinction between the neuropathological features of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease associated with D178N PRNP mutation and those of fatal familial insomnia. © 2013 International Society of Neuropathology.

  1. Identification of colorectal cancer patients with tumors carrying the TP53 mutation on the codon 72 proline allele that benefited most from 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) based postoperative chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godai, Ten-i; Sakuma, Yuji; Tsuchiya, Eiju; Kameda, Yoichi; Akaike, Makoto; Miyagi, Yohei; Suda, Tetsuji; Sugano, Nobuhiro; Tsuchida, Kazuhito; Shiozawa, Manabu; Sekiguchi, Hironobu; Sekiyama, Akiko; Yoshihara, Mitsuyo; Matsukuma, Shoichi

    2009-01-01

    Although postoperative chemotherapy is widely accepted as the standard modality for Dukes' stage C or earlier stage colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, biomarkers to predict those who may benefit from the therapy have not been identified. Previous in vitro and clinical investigations reported that CRC patients with wild-type p53 gene (TP53)-tumors benefit from 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) based chemotherapy, while those with mutated TP53-tumors do not. However, these studies evaluated the mutation-status of TP53 by immunohistochemistry with or without single-strand conformation polymorphism, and the mutation frequency was different from study to study. In addition, the polymorphic status at p53 codon 72, which results in arginine or proline residues (R72P) and is thought to influence the function of the protein significantly, was not examined. To evaluate the significance of the TP53 mutation as a molecular marker to predict the prognosis of CRC patients, especially those who received postoperative chemotherapy, we examined the mutation by direct sequencing from fresh CRC tumors and evaluated the R72P polymorphism of the mutated TP53 by a combined mutant allele- and polymorphic allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The TP53 mutation occurred in 147 (70%) of 211 Japanese CRC tumors. The mutation was observed in 93 (63%) tumors on the R72 allele and in 54 (37%) tumors on the P72 allele. Although the alterations to TP53 have no prognostic significance for CRC patients overall, we found that Dukes' stage C CRC patients who did not receive postoperative chemotherapy and carried the mutated TP53-R72 showed significantly longer survival times than those with the mutated TP53-P72 when evaluated by overall survival (p = 0.012). Using a combined mutant allele- and polymorphic allele-specific PCR, we defined the codon 72 polymorphic status of the TP53 mutated allele in Japanese CRC patients. We raised a possibility that Dukes' stage C colorectal cancer

  2. Codon 61 mutations in the c-Harvey-ras gene in mouse skin tumors induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene plus okadaic acid class tumor promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiki, H; Suganuma, M; Yoshizawa, S; Kanazawa, H; Sugimura, T; Manam, S; Kahn, S M; Jiang, W; Hoshina, S; Weinstein, I B

    1989-01-01

    Three okadaic acid class tumor promoters, okadaic acid, dinophysistoxin-1, and calyculin A, have potent tumor-promoting activity in two-stage carcinogenesis experiments on mouse skin. DNA isolated from tumors induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) and each of these tumor promoters revealed the same mutation at the second nucleotide of codon 61 (CAA----CTA) in the c-Ha-ras gene, determined by the polymerase chain reaction procedure and DNA sequencing. Three potent 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-type tumor promoters, TPA, teleocidin, and aplysiatoxin, showed the same effects. These results provide strong evidence that this mutation in the c-Ha-ras gene is due to a direct effect of DMBA rather than a selective effect of specific tumor promoters.

  3. A common periodic table of codons and amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biro, J C; Benyó, B; Sansom, C; Szlávecz, A; Fördös, G; Micsik, T; Benyó, Z

    2003-06-27

    A periodic table of codons has been designed where the codons are in regular locations. The table has four fields (16 places in each) one with each of the four nucleotides (A, U, G, C) in the central codon position. Thus, AAA (lysine), UUU (phenylalanine), GGG (glycine), and CCC (proline) were placed into the corners of the fields as the main codons (and amino acids) of the fields. They were connected to each other by six axes. The resulting nucleic acid periodic table showed perfect axial symmetry for codons. The corresponding amino acid table also displaced periodicity regarding the biochemical properties (charge and hydropathy) of the 20 amino acids and the position of the stop signals. The table emphasizes the importance of the central nucleotide in the codons and predicts that purines control the charge while pyrimidines determine the polarity of the amino acids. This prediction was experimentally tested.

  4. A severe connatal form of Pelizaeus Merzbacher disease in a Czech boy caused by a novel mutation (725C>A, Ala242Glu) at the 'jimpy(msd) codon' in the PLP gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeman, Pavel; Paderova, Katerina; Benes, Vladimir; Sistermans, Erik A

    2002-02-01

    ) in the patient and in his mother and later also in his maternal grandmother. The same codon, but to valine (Ala242Val) is mutated in jimpy(msd) mouse, which is the frequently used animal model for PMD. Prenatal diagnosis for the next pregnancy has been offered to the family. The patient died recently at the age of 13 years due to respiratory failure. Our results support the data on the importance of this conserved amino acid alanine at codon 242.

  5. KRAS mutation testing in colorectal cancer: comparison of the results obtained using 3 different methods for the analysis of codons G12 and G13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihl, Michel P; Hoeller, Sylvia; Andreozzi, Maria Carla; Foerster, Anja; Rufle, Alexander; Tornillo, Luigi; Terracciano, Luigi

    2012-03-01

    Targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a new therapeutic option for patients with metastatic colorectal or lung carcinoma. However, the therapy efficiency highly depends on the KRAS mutation status in the given tumour. Therefore a reliable and secure KRAS mutation testing is crucial. Here we investigated 100 colorectal carcinoma samples with known KRAS mutation status (62 mutated cases and 38 wild type cases) in a comparative manner with three different KRAS mutation testing techniques (Pyrosequencing, Dideoxysequencing and INFINITI) in order to test their reliability and sensitivity. For the large majority of samples (96/100, 96%), the KRAS mutation status obtained by all three methods was the same. Only two cases with clear discrepancies were observed. One case was reported as wild type by the INFINITI method while the two other methods detected a G13C mutation. In the second case the mutation could be detected by the Pyrosequencing and INFINITI method (15% and 15%), while no signal for mutation could be observed with the Dideoxysequencing method. Additional two unclear results were due to a detection of a G12V with the INFINITI method, which was below cut-off when repeated and which was not detectable by the other two methods and very weak signals in a G12V mutated case with the Dideoxy- and Pyroseqencing method compared to the INFINITI method, respectively. In summary all three methods are reliable and robust methods in detecting KRAS mutations. INFINITI, however seems to be slightly more sensitive compared to Dideoxy- and Pyrosequencing.

  6. A detailed analysis of codon usage patterns and influencing factors in Zika virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Niraj K; Tyagi, Anuj

    2017-07-01

    Recent outbreaks of Zika virus (ZIKV) in Africa, Latin America, Europe, and Southeast Asia have resulted in serious health concerns. To understand more about evolution and transmission of ZIKV, detailed codon usage analysis was performed for all available strains. A high effective number of codons (ENC) value indicated the presence of low codon usage bias in ZIKV. The effect of mutational pressure on codon usage bias was confirmed by significant correlations between nucleotide compositions at third codon positions and ENCs. Correlation analysis between Gravy values, Aroma values and nucleotide compositions at third codon positions also indicated some influence of natural selection. However, the low codon adaptation index (CAI) value of ZIKV with reference to human and mosquito indicated poor adaptation of ZIKV codon usage towards its hosts, signifying that natural selection has a weaker influence than mutational pressure. Additionally, relative dinucleotide frequencies, geographical distribution, and evolutionary processes also influenced the codon usage pattern to some extent.

  7. Integrated sequence analysis pipeline provides one-stop solution for identifying disease-causing mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hao; Wienker, Thomas F; Musante, Luciana; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Kahrizi, Kimia; Najmabadi, Hossein; Ropers, H Hilger

    2014-12-01

    Next-generation sequencing has greatly accelerated the search for disease-causing defects, but even for experts the data analysis can be a major challenge. To facilitate the data processing in a clinical setting, we have developed a novel medical resequencing analysis pipeline (MERAP). MERAP assesses the quality of sequencing, and has optimized capacity for calling variants, including single-nucleotide variants, insertions and deletions, copy-number variation, and other structural variants. MERAP identifies polymorphic and known causal variants by filtering against public domain databases, and flags nonsynonymous and splice-site changes. MERAP uses a logistic model to estimate the causal likelihood of a given missense variant. MERAP considers the relevant information such as phenotype and interaction with known disease-causing genes. MERAP compares favorably with GATK, one of the widely used tools, because of its higher sensitivity for detecting indels, its easy installation, and its economical use of computational resources. Upon testing more than 1,200 individuals with mutations in known and novel disease genes, MERAP proved highly reliable, as illustrated here for five families with disease-causing variants. We believe that the clinical implementation of MERAP will expedite the diagnostic process of many disease-causing defects. © 2014 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  8. A novel homozygous no-stop mutation in G6PC gene from a Chinese patient with glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Lei-Lei; Li, Xin-Hua; Han, Yue; Zhang, Dong-Hua; Gong, Qi-Ming; Zhang, Xin-Xin

    2014-02-25

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder resulting in hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly and growth retardation. It is caused by mutations in the G6PC gene encoding Glucose-6-phosphatase. To date, over 80 mutations have been identified in the G6PC gene. Here we reported a novel mutation found in a Chinese patient with abnormal transaminases, hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly and short stature. Direct sequencing of the coding region and splicing-sites in the G6PC gene revealed a novel no-stop mutation, p.*358Yext*43, leading to a 43 amino-acid extension of G6Pase. The expression level of mutant G6Pase transcripts was only 7.8% relative to wild-type transcripts. This mutation was not found in 120 chromosomes from 60 unrelated healthy control subjects using direct sequencing, and was further confirmed by digestion with Rsa I restriction endonuclease. In conclusion, we revealed a novel no-stop mutation in this study which expands the spectrum of mutations in the G6PC gene. The molecular genetic analysis was indispensable to the diagnosis of GSD-Ia for the patient. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Prion protein amyloidosis with divergent phenotype associated with two novel nonsense mutations in PRNP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Casper; Parchi, Piero; Capellari, Sabina; Vermeij, Ad J.; Corrado, Patrizia; Baas, Frank; Strammiello, Rosaria; van Gool, Willem A.; van Swieten, John C.; Rozemuller, Annemieke J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Stop codon mutations in the gene encoding the prion protein (PRNP) are very rare and have thus far only been described in two patients with prion protein cerebral amyloid angiopathy (PrP-CAA). In this report, we describe the clinical, histopathological and pathological prion protein (PrPSc)

  10. Genome-wide analysis of codon usage bias in Ebolavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristina, Juan; Moreno, Pilar; Moratorio, Gonzalo; Musto, Héctor

    2015-01-22

    Ebola virus (EBOV) is a member of the family Filoviridae and its genome consists of a 19-kb, single-stranded, negative sense RNA. EBOV is subdivided into five distinct species with different pathogenicities, being Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV) the most lethal species. The interplay of codon usage among viruses and their hosts is expected to affect overall viral survival, fitness, evasion from host's immune system and evolution. In the present study, we performed comprehensive analyses of codon usage and composition of ZEBOV. Effective number of codons (ENC) indicates that the overall codon usage among ZEBOV strains is slightly biased. Different codon preferences in ZEBOV genes in relation to codon usage of human genes were found. Highly preferred codons are all A-ending triplets, which strongly suggests that mutational bias is a main force shaping codon usage in ZEBOV. Dinucleotide composition also plays a role in the overall pattern of ZEBOV codon usage. ZEBOV does not seem to use the most abundant tRNAs present in the human cells for most of their preferred codons. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA: Four new exonic mutations in patients with N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomatsu, Shunji; Fukuda, Seiji; Yamagishi, Atsushi [Gifu Univ. (Japan)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    We report four new mutations in Japanese patients with mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPSIVA) who were heterozygous for a common double gene deletion. A nonsense mutation of CAG to TAG at codon 148 in exon 4 was identified, resulting in a change of Q to a stop codon and three missense mutations: V (GTC) to A (GCC) at codon 138 in exon 4, P (CCC) to S (TCC) at codon 151 in exon 5, and P (CCC) to L (CTC) at codon 151 in exon 5. Introduction of these mutations into the normal GALNS cDNA and transient expression in cultured fibroblasts resulted in a significant decrease in the enzyme activity. V138A and Q148X mutations result in changes of restriction site, which were analyzed by restriction-enzyme assay. P151S and P151L mutations that did not alter the restriction site were detected by direct sequencing or allele specific oligohybridization. Detection of the double gene deletion was initially done using Southern blots and was confirmed by PCR. Haplotypes were determined using seven polymorphisms to the GALNS locus in families with the double gene deletion. Haplotype analysis showed that the common double gene deletion occurred on a single haplotype, except for some variation in a VNTR-like polymorphism. This finding is consistent with a common founder for all individuals with this mutation. 48 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated mutation revealed cytoplasmic tail is dispensable for IZUMO1 function and male fertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Young, Samantha A M; Miyata, Haruhiko; Satouh, Yuhkoh

    2016-01-01

    manipulation system of CRISPR/Cas9 to generate a point mutation resulting in a premature stop codon, producing mice with truncated IZUMO1. Mice without the cytoplasmic tail of IZUMO1 showed normal fertility but decreased the amount of protein, indicating that whilst this region is important for the expression...

  13. Genotype-Phenotype Correlation in NF1: Evidence for a More Severe Phenotype Associated with Missense Mutations Affecting NF1 Codons 844–848

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koczkowska, M. (Magdalena); Chen, Y. (Yunjia); Callens, T. (Tom); Gomes, A. (Alicia); Sharp, A. (Angela); Johnson, S. (Sherrell); Hsiao, M.-C. (Meng-Chang); Chen, Z. (Zhenbin); Balasubramanian, M. (Meena); Barnett, C.P. (Christopher P.); Becker, T.A. (Troy A.); Ben-Shachar, S. (Shay); D.R. Bertola (Débora Romeo); J.O. Blakeley (Jaishri O.); Burkitt-Wright, E.M.M. (Emma M.M.); Callaway, A. (Alison); Crenshaw, M. (Melissa); Cunha, K.S. (Karin S.); Cunningham, M. (Mitch); M.D. D'Agostino (Maria Daniela); K. Dahan (Karin); De Luca, A. (Alessandro); A. Destrée (Anne); Dhamija, R. (Radhika); Eoli, M. (Marica); Evans, D.G.R. (D. Gareth R.); Galvin-Parton, P. (Patricia); George-Abraham, J.K. (Jaya K.); K.W. Gripp (Karen); Guevara-Campos, J. (Jose); Hanchard, N.A. (Neil A.); Hernández-Chico, C. (Concepcion); Immken, L. (LaDonna); S. Janssens (Sandra); K.J. Jones (Kristi); Keena, B.A. (Beth A.); Kochhar, A. (Aaina); Liebelt, J. (Jan); Martir-Negron, A. (Arelis); Mahoney, M.J. (Maurice J.); I. Maystadt (Isabelle); McDougall, C. (Carey); M. McEntagart (Meriel); N.J. Mendelsohn; Miller, D.T. (David T.); G. Mortier (Geert); J. Morton (Jenny); Pappas, J. (John); S.R. Plotkin (Scott R.); Pond, D. (Dinel); Rosenbaum, K. (Kenneth); Rubin, K. (Karol); Russell, L. (Laura); Rutledge, L.S. (Lane S.); Saletti, V. (Veronica); Schonberg, R. (Rhonda); Schreiber, A. (Allison); Seidel, M. (Meredith); Siqveland, E. (Elizabeth); D.W. Stockton (David); Trevisson, E. (Eva); N.J. Ullrich (Nicole J.); M. Upadhyaya (Meena); A.S. Thornton (Andrew); H. Verhelst (H.); M.R. Wallace (Margaret); Yap, Y.-S. (Yoon-Sim); Zackai, E. (Elaine); Zonana, J. (Jonathan); Zurcher, V. (Vickie); K. Claes (Kathleen); Martin, Y. (Yolanda); B. Korf (Bruce); E. Legius (Eric); L.M. Messiaen (Ludwine)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractNeurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), a common genetic disorder with a birth incidence of 1:2,000–3,000, is characterized by a highly variable clinical presentation. To date, only two clinically relevant intragenic genotype-phenotype correlations have been reported for NF1 missense mutations

  14. Codon adaptation and synonymous substitution rate in diatom plastid genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Brian R; Sorhannus, Ulf; Fox, Martin

    2002-07-01

    Diatom plastid genes are examined with respect to codon adaptation and rates of silent substitution (Ks). It is shown that diatom genes follow the same pattern of codon usage as other plastid genes studied previously. Highly expressed diatom genes display codon adaptation, or a bias toward specific major codons, and these major codons are the same as those in red algae, green algae, and land plants. It is also found that there is a strong correlation between Ks and variation in codon adaptation across diatom genes, providing the first evidence for such a relationship in the algae. It is argued that this finding supports the notion that the correlation arises from selective constraints, not from variation in mutation rate among genes. Finally, the diatom genes are examined with respect to variation in Ks among different synonymous groups. Diatom genes with strong codon adaptation do not show the same variation in synonymous substitution rate among codon groups as the flowering plant psbA gene which, previous studies have shown, has strong codon adaptation but unusually high rates of silent change in certain synonymous groups. The lack of a similar finding in diatoms supports the suggestion that the feature is unique to the flowering plant psbA due to recent relaxations in selective pressure in that lineage.

  15. Complex Codon Usage Pattern and Compositional Features of Retroviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourav RoyChoudhury

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses infect a wide range of organisms including humans. Among them, HIV-1, which causes AIDS, has now become a major threat for world health. Some of these viruses are also potential gene transfer vectors. In this study, the patterns of synonymous codon usage in retroviruses have been studied through multivariate statistical methods on ORFs sequences from the available 56 retroviruses. The principal determinant for evolution of the codon usage pattern in retroviruses seemed to be the compositional constraints, while selection for translation of the viral genes plays a secondary role. This was further supported by multivariate analysis on relative synonymous codon usage. Thus, it seems that mutational bias might have dominated role over translational selection in shaping the codon usage of retroviruses. Codon adaptation index was used to identify translationally optimal codons among genes from retroviruses. The comparative analysis of the preferred and optimal codons among different retroviral groups revealed that four codons GAA, AAA, AGA, and GGA were significantly more frequent in most of the retroviral genes inspite of some differences. Cluster analysis also revealed that phylogenetically related groups of retroviruses have probably evolved their codon usage in a concerted manner under the influence of their nucleotide composition.

  16. Relative codon adaptation: a generic codon bias index for prediction of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jesse M; Erill, Ivan

    2010-06-01

    The development of codon bias indices (CBIs) remains an active field of research due to their myriad applications in computational biology. Recently, the relative codon usage bias (RCBS) was introduced as a novel CBI able to estimate codon bias without using a reference set. The results of this new index when applied to Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae led the authors of the original publications to conclude that natural selection favours higher expression and enhanced codon usage optimization in short genes. Here, we show that this conclusion was flawed and based on the systematic oversight of an intrinsic bias for short sequences in the RCBS index and of biases in the small data sets used for validation in E. coli. Furthermore, we reveal that how the RCBS can be corrected to produce useful results and how its underlying principle, which we here term relative codon adaptation (RCA), can be made into a powerful reference-set-based index that directly takes into account the genomic base composition. Finally, we show that RCA outperforms the codon adaptation index (CAI) as a predictor of gene expression when operating on the CAI reference set and that this improvement is significantly larger when analysing genomes with high mutational bias.

  17. A novel alpha-thalassemia nonsense mutation in HBA2: C.382 A > T globin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Mohammad; Bokharaei Merci, Hanieh; Galehdari, Hamid; Saberi, Ali Hossein; Kaikhaei, Bijan; Mohammadi-Anaei, Marziye; Ahmadzadeh, Ahmad; Shariati, Gholamreza

    2014-07-01

    In this study, a new alpha globin gene mutation on the α2-globin gene is reported. This mutation resulted in a Lys > stop codon substitution at position 127 which was detected in four individuals (three males and one female). DNA sequencing revealed this mutation in unrelated persons in Khuzestan province, Southwestern Iran of Lor ethnicity. This mutation caused no severe hematological abnormalities in the carriers. From the nature of substituted residues in α2-globin, it is widely expected that this mutation leads to unstable and truncated protein and should be detected in couples at risk for α-thalassemia.

  18. Gene expression, nucleotide composition and codon usage bias of genes associated with human Y chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Monisha Nath; Uddin, Arif; Chakraborty, Supriyo

    2017-06-01

    Analysis of codon usage pattern is important to understand the genetic and evolutionary characteristics of genomes. We have used bioinformatic approaches to analyze the codon usage bias (CUB) of the genes located in human Y chromosome. Codon bias index (CBI) indicated that the overall extent of codon usage bias was low. The relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) analysis suggested that approximately half of the codons out of 59 synonymous codons were most frequently used, and possessed a T or G at the third codon position. The codon usage pattern was different in different genes as revealed from correspondence analysis (COA). A significant correlation between effective number of codons (ENC) and various GC contents suggests that both mutation pressure and natural selection affect the codon usage pattern of genes located in human Y chromosome. In addition, Y-linked genes have significant difference in GC contents at the second and third codon positions, expression level, and codon usage pattern of some codons like the SPANX genes in X chromosome.

  19. Two novel cases of cerebral haemorrhages at the neonatal period associated with inherited factor VII deficiency, one of them revealing a new nonsense mutation (Ser52Stop).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giansily-Blaizot, Muriel; Aguilar-Martinez, Patricia; Briquel, Marie-Elisabeth; d'Oiron, Roseline; De Maistre, Emmanuel; Epelbaum, Serge; Schved, Jean-François

    2003-02-01

    Factor VII (FVII) is a plasma glycoprotein that plays a key role in the initiation of blood coagulation cascade. Inherited FVII deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder with a wide heterogeneous clinical pattern. The severe form may be associated with intracranial haemorrhages occurring closely to birth with a high mortality rate. In the present article, we report two novel cases of neonatal intracerebral bleeding associated with FVII activity levels below 1% of normal. FVII genotyping investigations revealed particular genotypes including the deleterious Cys135Arg mutation and a novel Ser52Stop nonsense mutation at the homozygous state. Both mutations, through different mechanisms, are expected to be inconsistent with the production of functional FVII. These putative mechanisms are discussed through a review of the literature on phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of cerebral haemorrhages in severe inherited FVII deficiency.

  20. Running the Stop Sign: Readthrough of a Premature UAG Termination Signal in the Translation of a Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Taurine Biosynthetic Enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Mary E M; Place, Allen R

    2017-06-03

    The UAG termination codon is generally recognized as the least efficient and least frequently used of the three universal stop codons. This is substantiated by numerous studies in an array of organisms. We present here evidence of a translational readthrough of a mutant nonsense UAG codon in the transcript from the cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase ( csad ) gene (ENSDARG00000026348) in zebrafish. The csad gene encodes the terminal enzyme in the taurine biosynthetic pathway. Taurine is a critical amino acid for all animals, playing several essential roles throughout the body, including modulation of the immune system. The sa9430 zebrafish strain (ZDB-ALT-130411-5055) has a point mutation leading to a premature stop codon (UAG) 20 amino acids 5' of the normal stop codon, UGA. Data from immunoblotting, enzyme activity assays, and mass spectrometry provide evidence that the mutant is making a CSAD protein identical to that of the wild-type (XP_009295318.1) in terms of size, activity, and amino acid sequence. UAG readthrough has been described in several species, but this is the first presentation of a case in fish. Also presented are the first data substantiating the ability of a fish CSAD to utilize cysteic acid, an alternative to the standard substrate cysteine sulfinic acid, to produce taurine.

  1. Whole-exome sequencing of a patient with severe and complex hemostatic abnormalities reveals a possible contributing frameshift mutation in C3AR1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leinøe, Eva; Nielsen, Ove Juul; Jønson, Lars

    2016-01-01

    -threatening coagulation disorder causing recurrent venous thromboembolic events, severe thrombocytopenia, and subdural hematomas. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a frameshift mutation (C3AR1 c.355-356dup, p.Asp119Alafs*19) resulting in a premature stop codon in C3AR1 (Complement Component 3a Receptor 1). Based...

  2. Codon cassette mutagenesis: a general method to insert or replace individual codons by using universal mutagenic cassettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegler-Ebo, D M; Docktor, C M; DiMaio, D

    1994-05-11

    We describe codon cassette mutagenesis, a simple method of mutagenesis that uses universal mutagenic cassettes to deposit single codons at specific sites in double-stranded DNA. A target molecule is first constructed that contains a blunt, double-strand break at the site targeted for mutagenesis. A double-stranded mutagenic codon cassette is then inserted at the target site. Each mutagenic codon cassette contains a three base pair direct terminal repeat and two head-to-head recognition sequences for the restriction endonuclease Sapl, an enzyme that cleaves outside of its recognition sequence. The intermediate molecule containing the mutagenic cassette is then digested with Sapl, thereby removing most of the mutagenic cassette, leaving only a three base cohesive overhang that is ligated to generate the final insertion or substitution mutation. A general method for constructing blunt-end target molecules suitable for this approach is also described. Because the mutagenic cassette is excised during this procedure and alters the target only by introducing the desired mutation, the same cassette can be used to introduce a particular codon at all target sites. Each cassette can deposit two different codons, depending on the orientation in which it is inserted into the target molecule. Therefore, a series of eleven cassettes is sufficient to insert all possible amino acids at any constructed target site. Thus codon cassettes are 'off-the-shelf' reagents, and this methodology should be a particularly useful and inexpensive approach for subjecting multiple different positions in a protein sequence to saturation mutagenesis.

  3. UPF1 silenced cellular model systems for screening of read-through agents active on β039 thalassemia point mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatori, Francesca; Pappadà, Mariangela; Breveglieri, Giulia; D'Aversa, Elisabetta; Finotti, Alessia; Lampronti, Ilaria; Gambari, Roberto; Borgatti, Monica

    2018-05-15

    Nonsense mutations promote premature translational termination, introducing stop codons within the coding region of mRNAs and causing inherited diseases, including thalassemia. For instance, in β 0 39 thalassemia the CAG (glutamine) codon is mutated to the UAG stop codon, leading to premature translation termination and to mRNA destabilization through the well described NMD (nonsense-mediated mRNA decay). In order to develop an approach facilitating translation and, therefore, protection from NMD, ribosomal read-through molecules, such as aminoglycoside antibiotics, have been tested on mRNAs carrying premature stop codons. These findings have introduced new hopes for the development of a pharmacological approach to the β 0 39 thalassemia therapy. While several strategies, designed to enhance translational read-through, have been reported to inhibit NMD efficiency concomitantly, experimental tools for systematic analysis of mammalian NMD inhibition by translational read-through are lacking. We developed a human cellular model of the β 0 39 thalassemia mutation with UPF-1 suppressed and showing a partial NMD suppression. This novel cellular model could be used for the screening of molecules exhibiting preferential read-through activity allowing a great rescue of the mutated transcripts.

  4. Codon 219 polymorphism of PRNP in healthy caucasians and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petraroli, R.; Pocchiari, M. [Instituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy)

    1996-04-01

    A number of point and insert mutations of the PrP gene (PRNP) have been linked to familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker disease (GSS). Moreover, the methionine/valine homozygosity at the polymorphic codon 129 of PRNP may cause a predisposition to sporadic and iatrogenic CJD or may control the age at onset of familial cases carrying either the 144-bp insertion or codon 178, codon 198, and codon 210 pathogenic mutations in PRNP. In addition, the association of methionine or valine at codon 129 and the point mutation at codon 178 on the same allele seem to play an important role in determining either fatal familial insomnia or CJD. However, it is noteworthy that a relationship between codon 129 polymorphism and accelerated pathogenesis (early age at onset or shorter duration of the disease) has not been seen in familial CJD patients with codon 200 mutation or in GSS patients with codon 102 mutation, arguing that other, as yet unidentified, gene products or environmental factors, or both, may influence the clinical expression of these diseases. 17 refs.

  5. [Identification of a novel GPR143 mutation in a Chinese family affected with X-linked ocular albinism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qi; Guan, Menglong; Wang, Ling; Liao, Yong; Li-Ling, Jesse; Wan, Huajing

    2017-04-10

    To detect mutation of GPR143 gene in a Chinese patient affected with ocular albinism. Peripheral blood samples were collected from the proband and his parents. The coding regions of the GPR143 gene were subjected to PCR amplification and Sanger sequencing. A previously unreported mutation (c.758T>A) was found in exon 6 of the GPR143 gene in the proband and his mother. The same mutation was not found in his father. As predicted, the mutation has resulted in a stop codon, causing premature termination of protein translation. A novel mutation of the GPR143 gene related to X-linked ocular albinism has been identified.

  6. [Novel CHST6 compound heterozygous mutations cause macular corneal dystrophy in a Chinese family].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yan-hua; Dang, Xiu-hong; Su, Hong; Zhou, Nan; Liang, Ting; Wang, Zheng; Huang, Shang-zhi

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to identify mutations of CHST6 gene in a Chinese family with macular corneal dystrophy (MCD) and to investigate the histopathological changes of MCD. Corneal button of the proband was obtained from penetrating keratoplasty for the treatment of severe corneal dystrophy. The sections and ultrathin sections of this specimen were examined under light microscope and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Genomic DNA was extracted from leukocytes in peripheral blood from the family members. The coding region of CHST6 was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The PCR products were analyzed by direct sequencing and restriction enzyme digestion. Histochemical study revealed positive results of colloidal iron stain. TEM revealed enlargement of smooth endoplasmic reticulum and the presence of intracytoplasmic vacuoles. Two mutations, Q298X Y358H, were identified in exon 3 of CHST6. Three patients were compound heterozygotes of these two mutations. The C892T transversion occurred at codon 298 turned the codon of glutamine to a stop codon; the T1072C transversion occurred at codon 358 caused a missense mutation, tyrosine to histidine. All six unaffected family members were heterozygotes. These two mutations were not detected in any of the 100 control subjects. The novel compound heterozygous mutation results in loss of CHST6 function and causes the occurrence of MCD. This is the first report of this gene mutation.

  7. Characterization of six mutations in Exon 37 of neurofibromatosis type 1 gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyaya, M.; Osborn, M.; Maynard, J.; Harper, P. [Institute of Medical Genetics, Cardiff, Wales (United Kingdom)

    1996-07-26

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is one of the most common inherited disorders, with an incidence of 1 in 3,000. We screened a total of 320 unrelated NF1 patients for mutations in exon 37 of the NF1 gene. Six independent mutations were identified, of which three are novel, and these include a recurrent nonsense mutation identified in 2 unrelated patients at codon 2281 (G2281X), a 1-bp insertion (6791 ins A) resulting in a change of TAG (tyrosine) to a TAA (stop codon), and a 3-bp deletion (6839 del TAC) which generated a frameshift. Another recurrent nonsense mutation, Y2264X, which was detected in 2 unrelated patients in this study, was also previously reported in 2 NF1 individuals. All the mutations were identified within a contiguous 49-bp sequence. Further studies are warranted to support the notion that this region of the gene contains highly mutable sequences. 17 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Revelation of Influencing Factors in Overall Codon Usage Bias of Equine Influenza Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Sandeep; Sood, Richa; Selvaraj, Pavulraj

    2016-01-01

    Equine influenza viruses (EIVs) of H3N8 subtype are culprits of severe acute respiratory infections in horses, and are still responsible for significant outbreaks worldwide. Adaptability of influenza viruses to a particular host is significantly influenced by their codon usage preference, due to an absolute dependence on the host cellular machinery for their replication. In the present study, we analyzed genome-wide codon usage patterns in 92 EIV strains, including both H3N8 and H7N7 subtypes by computing several codon usage indices and applying multivariate statistical methods. Relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) analysis disclosed bias of preferred synonymous codons towards A/U-ended codons. The overall codon usage bias in EIVs was slightly lower, and mainly affected by the nucleotide compositional constraints as inferred from the RSCU and effective number of codon (ENc) analysis. Our data suggested that codon usage pattern in EIVs is governed by the interplay of mutation pressure, natural selection from its hosts and undefined factors. The H7N7 subtype was found less fit to its host (horse) in comparison to H3N8, by possessing higher codon bias, lower mutation pressure and much less adaptation to tRNA pool of equine cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing the codon usage analysis of the complete genomes of EIVs. The outcome of our study is likely to enhance our understanding of factors involved in viral adaptation, evolution, and fitness towards their hosts. PMID:27119730

  9. Codon usage bias in phylum Actinobacteria: relevance to environmental adaptation and host pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Devi; Verma, Mansi; Behura, Susanta K; Lal, Rup

    2016-10-01

    Actinobacteria are Gram-positive bacteria commonly found in soil, freshwater and marine ecosystems. In this investigation, bias in codon usages of ninety actinobacterial genomes was analyzed by estimating different indices of codon bias such as Nc (effective number of codons), SCUO (synonymous codon usage order), RSCU (relative synonymous codon usage), as well as sequence patterns of codon contexts. The results revealed several characteristic features of codon usage in Actinobacteria, as follows: 1) C- or G-ending codons are used frequently in comparison with A- and U ending codons; 2) there is a direct relationship of GC content with use of specific amino acids such as alanine, proline and glycine; 3) there is an inverse relationship between GC content and Nc estimates, 4) there is low SCUO value (Actinobacteria, extreme GC content and codon bias are driven by mutation rather than natural selection; (2) traits like aerobicity are associated with effective natural selection and therefore low GC content and low codon bias, demonstrating the role of both mutational bias and translational selection in shaping the habitat and phenotype of actinobacterial species. Copyright © 2016 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Multiple Evolutionary Selections Involved in Synonymous Codon Usages in the Streptococcus agalactiae Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yan-Ping; Ke, Hao; Liang, Zhi-Ling; Liu, Zhen-Xing; Hao, Le; Ma, Jiang-Yao; Li, Yu-Gu

    2016-02-24

    Streptococcus agalactiae is an important human and animal pathogen. To better understand the genetic features and evolution of S. agalactiae, multiple factors influencing synonymous codon usage patterns in S. agalactiae were analyzed in this study. A- and U-ending rich codons were used in S. agalactiae function genes through the overall codon usage analysis, indicating that Adenine (A)/Thymine (T) compositional constraints might contribute an important role to the synonymous codon usage pattern. The GC3% against the effective number of codon (ENC) value suggested that translational selection was the important factor for codon bias in the microorganism. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that (i) mutational pressure was the most important factor in shaping codon usage of all open reading frames (ORFs) in the S. agalactiae genome; (ii) strand specific mutational bias was not capable of influencing the codon usage bias in the leading and lagging strands; and (iii) gene length was not the important factor in synonymous codon usage pattern in this organism. Additionally, the high correlation between tRNA adaptation index (tAI) value and codon adaptation index (CAI), frequency of optimal codons (Fop) value, reinforced the role of natural selection for efficient translation in S. agalactiae. Comparison of synonymous codon usage pattern between S. agalactiae and susceptible hosts (human and tilapia) showed that synonymous codon usage of S. agalactiae was independent of the synonymous codon usage of susceptible hosts. The study of codon usage in S. agalactiae may provide evidence about the molecular evolution of the bacterium and a greater understanding of evolutionary relationships between S. agalactiae and its hosts.

  11. Functional Versatility of AGY Serine Codons in Immunoglobulin Variable Region Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Detanico

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In systemic autoimmunity, autoantibodies directed against nuclear antigens (Ag often arise by somatic hypermutation (SHM that converts AGT and AGC (AGY Ser codons into Arg codons. This can occur by three different single-base changes. Curiously, AGY Ser codons are far more abundant in complementarity-determining regions (CDRs of IgV-region genes than expected for random codon use or from species-specific codon frequency data. CDR AGY codons are also more abundant than TCN Ser codons. We show that these trends hold even in cartilaginous fishes. Because AGC is a preferred target for SHM by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID, we asked whether the AGY abundance was solely due to a selection pressure to conserve high mutability in CDRs regardless of codon context but found that this was not the case. Instead, AGY triplets were selectively enriched in the Ser codon reading frame. Motivated by reports implicating a functional role for poly/autoreactive specificities in anti-viral antibodies, we also analyzed mutations at AGY in antibodies directed against a number of different viruses, and found that mutations producing Arg codons in anti-viral antibodies were indeed frequent. Unexpectedly, however, we also found that AGY codons mutated often to encode nearly all of the amino acids that are reported to provide the most frequent contacts with antigen (Ag. In many cases, mutations producing codons for these alternative amino acids in anti-viral antibodies were more frequent than those producing Arg codons. Mutations producing each of these key amino acids required only single-base changes in AGY. AGY is the only codon group in which 2/3rds of random mutations generate codons for these key residues. Finally, by directly analyzing x-ray structures of immune complexes from the RCSB protein database, we found that Ag-contact residues generated via somatic hypermutation occurred more often at AGY than at any other codon group. Thus, preservation of

  12. Inherited protein S deficiency due to a novel nonsense mutation in the PROS1 gene in the patient with recurrent vascular access thrombosis: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Jin Cho

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Vascular access thrombosis is one of the major causes of morbidity in patients maintained on chronic hemodialysis. Thrombophilia has been recognized as a risk factor of vascular access thrombosis. The authors report a case of inherited protein S deficiency associated with vascular access thrombotic events. DNA sequence analysis of the PROS1 gene identified a novel heterozygous nonsense mutation in exon 10 by transition of AAG (lysine to TAG (stop codon at codon 473 (c.1417A>T, p.K473X. Results from the study suggest that the inherited protein S deficiency due to a PROS1 gene mutation may cause vascular access thrombosis in hemodialysis patients.

  13. Profile of TP53 gene mutations in sinonasal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmila, Reetta; Bornholdt, Jette; Suitiala, Tuula

    2010-01-01

    databases for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (24%). Characteristically, in our SNC series, the mutations were scattered over a large number of codons, codon 248 being the most frequent target of base substitution. Codon 135 was the second most frequently mutated codon; this nucleotide position has...

  14. Codon Usage Bias and Determining Forces in Taenia solium Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xing; Ma, Xusheng; Luo, Xuenong; Ling, Houjun; Zhang, Xichen; Cai, Xuepeng

    2015-12-01

    The tapeworm Taenia solium is an important human zoonotic parasite that causes great economic loss and also endangers public health. At present, an effective vaccine that will prevent infection and chemotherapy without any side effect remains to be developed. In this study, codon usage patterns in the T. solium genome were examined through 8,484 protein-coding genes. Neutrality analysis showed that T. solium had a narrow GC distribution, and a significant correlation was observed between GC12 and GC3. Examination of an NC (ENC vs GC3s)-plot showed a few genes on or close to the expected curve, but the majority of points with low-ENC (the effective number of codons) values were detected below the expected curve, suggesting that mutational bias plays a major role in shaping codon usage. The Parity Rule 2 plot (PR2) analysis showed that GC and AT were not used proportionally. We also identified 26 optimal codons in the T. solium genome, all of which ended with either a G or C residue. These optimal codons in the T. solium genome are likely consistent with tRNAs that are highly expressed in the cell, suggesting that mutational and translational selection forces are probably driving factors of codon usage bias in the T. solium genome.

  15. Codon Usage Patterns of Tyrosinase Genes in Clonorchis sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Young-An

    2017-04-01

    Codon usage bias (CUB) is a unique property of genomes and has contributed to the better understanding of the molecular features and the evolution processes of particular gene. In this study, genetic indices associated with CUB, including relative synonymous codon usage and effective numbers of codons, as well as the nucleotide composition, were investigated in the Clonorchis sinensis tyrosinase genes and their platyhelminth orthologs, which play an important role in the eggshell formation. The relative synonymous codon usage patterns substantially differed among tyrosinase genes examined. In a neutrality analysis, the correlation between GC 12 and GC 3 was statistically significant, and the regression line had a relatively gradual slope (0.218). NC-plot, i.e., GC 3 vs effective number of codons (ENC), showed that most of the tyrosinase genes were below the expected curve. The codon adaptation index (CAI) values of the platyhelminth tyrosinases had a narrow distribution between 0.685/0.714 and 0.797/0.837, and were negatively correlated with their ENC. Taken together, these results suggested that CUB in the tyrosinase genes seemed to be basically governed by selection pressures rather than mutational bias, although the latter factor provided an additional force in shaping CUB of the C. sinensis and Opisthorchis viverrini genes. It was also apparent that the equilibrium point between selection pressure and mutational bias is much more inclined to selection pressure in highly expressed C. sinensis genes, than in poorly expressed genes.

  16. Analysis of codon usage patterns in Morus notabilis based on genome and transcriptome data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yan; Zou, Ziliang; Li, Hongshun; Xiang, Zhonghuai; He, Ningjia

    2017-06-01

    Codons play important roles in regulating gene expression levels and mRNA half-lives. However, codon usage and related studies in multicellular organisms still lag far behind those in unicellular organisms. In this study, we describe for the first time genome-wide patterns of codon bias in Morus notabilis (mulberry tree), and analyze genome-wide codon usage in 12 other species within the order Rosales. The codon usage of M. notabilis was affected by nucleotide composition, mutation pressure, nature selection, and gene expression level. Translational selection optimal codons were identified and highly expressed genes of M. notabilis tended to use the optimal codons. Genes with higher expression levels have shorter coding region and lower amino acid complexity. Housekeeping genes showed stronger translational selection, which, notably, was not caused by the large differences between the expression level of housekeeping genes and other genes.

  17. Analysis of transcriptome data reveals multifactor constraint on codon usage in Taenia multiceps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xing; Xu, Jing; Chen, Lin; Wang, Yu; Gu, Xiaobin; Peng, Xuerong; Yang, Guangyou

    2017-04-20

    Codon usage bias (CUB) is an important evolutionary feature in genomes that has been widely observed in many organisms. However, the synonymous codon usage pattern in the genome of T. multiceps remains to be clarified. In this study, we analyzed the codon usage of T. multiceps based on the transcriptome data to reveal the constraint factors and to gain an improved understanding of the mechanisms that shape synonymous CUB. Analysis of a total of 8,620 annotated mRNA sequences from T. multiceps indicated only a weak codon bias, with mean GC and GC3 content values of 49.29% and 51.43%, respectively. Our analysis indicated that nucleotide composition, mutational pressure, natural selection, gene expression level, amino acids with grand average of hydropathicity (GRAVY) and aromaticity (Aromo) and the effective selection of amino-acids all contributed to the codon usage in T. multiceps. Among these factors, natural selection was implicated as the major factor affecting the codon usage variation in T. multiceps. The codon usage of ribosome genes was affected mainly by mutations, while the essential genes were affected mainly by selection. In addition, 21codons were identified as "optimal codons". Overall, the optimal codons were GC-rich (GC:AU, 41:22), and ended with G or C (except CGU). Furthermore, different degrees of variation in codon usage were found between T. multiceps and Escherichia coli, yeast, Homo sapiens. However, little difference was found between T. multiceps and Taenia pisiformis. In this study, the codon usage pattern of T. multiceps was analyzed systematically and factors affected CUB were also identified. This is the first study of codon biology in T. multiceps. Understanding the codon usage pattern in T. multiceps can be helpful for the discovery of new genes, molecular genetic engineering and evolutionary studies.

  18. A Leu to Ile but not Leu to Val change at HIV-1 reverse transcriptase codon 74 in the background of K65R mutation leads to an increased processivity of K65R+L74I enzyme and a replication competent virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crumpacker Clyde S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major hurdle in the treatment of Human Immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 includes the development of drug resistance-associated mutations in the target regions of the virus. Since reverse transcriptase (RT is essential for HIV-1 replication, several nucleoside analogues have been developed to target RT of the virus. Clinical studies have shown that mutations at RT codon 65 and 74 which are located in β3-β4 linkage group of finger sub-domain of RT are selected during treatment with several RT inhibitors, including didanosine, deoxycytidine, abacavir and tenofovir. Interestingly, the co-selection of K65R and L74V is rare in clinical settings. We have previously shown that K65R and L74V are incompatible and a R→K reversion occurs at codon 65 during replication of the virus. Analysis of the HIV resistance database has revealed that similar to K65R+L74V, the double mutant K65R+L74I is also rare. We sought to compare the impact of L→V versus L→I change at codon 74 in the background of K65R mutation, on the replication of doubly mutant viruses. Methods Proviral clones containing K65R, L74V, L74I, K65R+L74V and K65R+L74I RT mutations were created in pNL4-3 backbone and viruses were produced in 293T cells. Replication efficiencies of all the viruses were compared in peripheral blood mononuclear (PBM cells in the absence of selection pressure. Replication capacity (RC of mutant viruses in relation to wild type was calculated on the basis of antigen p24 production and RT activity, and paired analysis by student t-test was performed among RCs of doubly mutant viruses. Reversion at RT codons 65 and 74 was monitored during replication in PBM cells. In vitro processivity of mutant RTs was measured to analyze the impact of amino acid changes at RT codon 74. Results Replication kinetics plot showed that all of the mutant viruses were attenuated as compared to wild type (WT virus. Although attenuated in comparison to WT virus

  19. Codon Deviation Coefficient: A novel measure for estimating codon usage bias and its statistical significance

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhang

    2012-03-22

    Background: Genetic mutation, selective pressure for translational efficiency and accuracy, level of gene expression, and protein function through natural selection are all believed to lead to codon usage bias (CUB). Therefore, informative measurement of CUB is of fundamental importance to making inferences regarding gene function and genome evolution. However, extant measures of CUB have not fully accounted for the quantitative effect of background nucleotide composition and have not statistically evaluated the significance of CUB in sequence analysis.Results: Here we propose a novel measure--Codon Deviation Coefficient (CDC)--that provides an informative measurement of CUB and its statistical significance without requiring any prior knowledge. Unlike previous measures, CDC estimates CUB by accounting for background nucleotide compositions tailored to codon positions and adopts the bootstrapping to assess the statistical significance of CUB for any given sequence. We evaluate CDC by examining its effectiveness on simulated sequences and empirical data and show that CDC outperforms extant measures by achieving a more informative estimation of CUB and its statistical significance.Conclusions: As validated by both simulated and empirical data, CDC provides a highly informative quantification of CUB and its statistical significance, useful for determining comparative magnitudes and patterns of biased codon usage for genes or genomes with diverse sequence compositions. 2012 Zhang et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  20. Codon Deviation Coefficient: a novel measure for estimating codon usage bias and its statistical significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Zhang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic mutation, selective pressure for translational efficiency and accuracy, level of gene expression, and protein function through natural selection are all believed to lead to codon usage bias (CUB. Therefore, informative measurement of CUB is of fundamental importance to making inferences regarding gene function and genome evolution. However, extant measures of CUB have not fully accounted for the quantitative effect of background nucleotide composition and have not statistically evaluated the significance of CUB in sequence analysis. Results Here we propose a novel measure--Codon Deviation Coefficient (CDC--that provides an informative measurement of CUB and its statistical significance without requiring any prior knowledge. Unlike previous measures, CDC estimates CUB by accounting for background nucleotide compositions tailored to codon positions and adopts the bootstrapping to assess the statistical significance of CUB for any given sequence. We evaluate CDC by examining its effectiveness on simulated sequences and empirical data and show that CDC outperforms extant measures by achieving a more informative estimation of CUB and its statistical significance. Conclusions As validated by both simulated and empirical data, CDC provides a highly informative quantification of CUB and its statistical significance, useful for determining comparative magnitudes and patterns of biased codon usage for genes or genomes with diverse sequence compositions.

  1. [Mutations of ACVRL1 gene in a pedigree with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jie-wei; Chen, Hui; Yang, Liu-qing; Zhu, Ai-lan; Wu, Yan-an; Li, Jian-wei

    2008-06-01

    To identify the activin A receptor type II-like 1 gene (ACVRL1) mutations in a Chinese family with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT2). The exons 3, 7 and 8 of ACVRL1 gene of the proband and her five family members were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the PCR products were sequenced. The proband had obvious telangiectasis of gastric mucosa, and small arteriovenous fistula in the right kidney. All the patients in the HHT2 family had iterative epistaxis or bleeding in other sites, and had telangiectasis of nasal mucosa, tunica mucosa oris and finger tips. ACVRL1 gene analysis confirmed that there is frameshift mutation caused by deletion of G145 in exon 3 in the 4 patients, but the mutation is absent in 2 members without HHT2. The HHT2 family is caused by a 145delG mutation of ACVRL1 gene, resulting in frameshift and a new stop codon at codon 53.

  2. The distribution of synonymous codon choice in the translation initiation region of dengue virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-hua Zhou

    Full Text Available Dengue is the most common arthropod-borne viral (Arboviral illness in humans. The genetic features concerning the codon usage of dengue virus (DENV were analyzed by the relative synonymous codon usage, the effective number of codons and the codon adaptation index. The evolutionary distance between DENV and the natural hosts (Homo sapiens, Pan troglodytes, Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti was estimated by a novel formula. Finally, the synonymous codon usage preference for the translation initiation region of this virus was also analyzed. The result indicates that the general trend of the 59 synonymous codon usage of the four genotypes of DENV are similar to each other, and this pattern has no link with the geographic distribution of the virus. The effect of codon usage pattern of Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti on the formation of codon usage of DENV is stronger than that of the two primates. Turning to the codon usage preference of the translation initiation region of this virus, some codons pairing to low tRNA copy numbers in the two primates have a stronger tendency to exist in the translation initiation region than those in the open reading frame of DENV. Although DENV, like other RNA viruses, has a high mutation to adapt its hosts, the regulatory features about the synonymous codon usage have been 'branded' on the translation initiation region of this virus in order to hijack the translational mechanisms of the hosts.

  3. Genomic composition factors affect codon usage in porcine genome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    j.khobondo

    2015-01-28

    Jan 28, 2015 ... The mutational bias hypothesis predicted that genes in the GC-rich regions of the genome ... observed codon divided by its expected frequency at equilibrium. An RSCU value close to 1 indicates lack of bias, ..... study our results points to preferred usage of both C or G and A or T at the synonyms sites as ...

  4. Evaluating codon bias perspective in barbiturase gene using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abdullah

    2014-01-08

    Jan 8, 2014 ... along with codon usage was done to reveal dynamics of gene evolution and expression ... analysis is a potent approach for detecting mutations, selection methods and finding rationale of biased and unbiased gene changes and hence, evolutionary ... in the perception of the molecular basics plus potential.

  5. Comparative studies on codon usage pattern of chloroplasts and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    different genomic organization and mutation pressures in nuclear and chloroplast genes. The results of Nc-plots and neutrality plots ... As an important organelle of plants, the chloroplast has its own genomic environment and ... leading to the suggestion that the translation mechanism and patterns of codon usage in ...

  6. Genome-wide analysis of codon usage bias in four sequenced cotton species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liyuan; Xing, Huixian; Yuan, Yanchao; Wang, Xianlin; Saeed, Muhammad; Tao, Jincai; Feng, Wei; Zhang, Guihua; Song, Xianliang; Sun, Xuezhen

    2018-01-01

    Codon usage bias (CUB) is an important evolutionary feature in a genome which provides important information for studying organism evolution, gene function and exogenous gene expression. The CUB and its shaping factors in the nuclear genomes of four sequenced cotton species, G. arboreum (A2), G. raimondii (D5), G. hirsutum (AD1) and G. barbadense (AD2) were analyzed in the present study. The effective number of codons (ENC) analysis showed the CUB was weak in these four species and the four subgenomes of the two tetraploids. Codon composition analysis revealed these four species preferred to use pyrimidine-rich codons more frequently than purine-rich codons. Correlation analysis indicated that the base content at the third position of codons affect the degree of codon preference. PR2-bias plot and ENC-plot analyses revealed that the CUB patterns in these genomes and subgenomes were influenced by combined effects of translational selection, directional mutation and other factors. The translational selection (P2) analysis results, together with the non-significant correlation between GC12 and GC3, further revealed that translational selection played the dominant role over mutation pressure in the codon usage bias. Through relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) analysis, we detected 25 high frequency codons preferred to end with T or A, and 31 low frequency codons inclined to end with C or G in these four species and four subgenomes. Finally, 19 to 26 optimal codons with 19 common ones were determined for each species and subgenomes, which preferred to end with A or T. We concluded that the codon usage bias was weak and the translation selection was the main shaping factor in nuclear genes of these four cotton genomes and four subgenomes.

  7. Probable relationship between partitions of the set of codons and the origin of the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Dino G; Gallardo, Mauricio O; Osorio, Manuel I

    2014-03-01

    Here we study the distribution of randomly generated partitions of the set of amino acid-coding codons. Some results are an application from a previous work, about the Stirling numbers of the second kind and triplet codes, both to the cases of triplet codes having four stop codons, as in mammalian mitochondrial genetic code, and hypothetical doublet codes. Extending previous results, in this work it is found that the most probable number of blocks of synonymous codons, in a genetic code, is similar to the number of amino acids when there are four stop codons, as well as it could be for a primigenious doublet code. Also it is studied the integer partitions associated to patterns of synonymous codons and it is shown, for the canonical code, that the standard deviation inside an integer partition is one of the most probable. We think that, in some early epoch, the genetic code might have had a maximum of the disorder or entropy, independent of the assignment between codons and amino acids, reaching a state similar to "code freeze" proposed by Francis Crick. In later stages, maybe deterministic rules have reassigned codons to amino acids, forming the natural codes, such as the canonical code, but keeping the numerical features describing the set partitions and the integer partitions, like a "fossil numbers"; both kinds of partitions about the set of amino acid-coding codons. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Screening for mutations in the uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase gene using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, L; Ged, C; Hombrados, I

    1999-01-01

    to exon skipping, and a 2-bp deletion (415-416delTA) resulting in a frameshift and the introduction of a premature stop codon. Heterologous expression and enzymatic studies of the mutant proteins demonstrate that the three mutations leading to shortening or truncation of the UROD protein have no residual......, confirming the heterogeneity of the underlying genetic defects of these diseases. We have established a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) assay for mutation detection in the UROD gene, enabling the simultaneous screening for known and unknown mutations. The established assay has proved able...

  9. Positive selection for unpreferred codon usage in eukaryotic genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galagan James E

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Natural selection has traditionally been understood as a force responsible for pushing genes to states of higher translational efficiency, whereas lower translational efficiency has been explained by neutral mutation and genetic drift. We looked for evidence of directional selection resulting in increased unpreferred codon usage (and presumably reduced translational efficiency in three divergent clusters of eukaryotic genomes using a simple optimal-codon-based metric (Kp/Ku. Results Here we show that for some genes natural selection is indeed responsible for causing accelerated unpreferred codon substitution, and document the scope of this selection. In Cryptococcus and to a lesser extent Drosophila, we find many genes showing a statistically significant signal of selection for unpreferred codon usage in one or more lineages. We did not find evidence for this type of selection in Saccharomyces. The signal of positive selection observed from unpreferred synonymous codon substitutions is coincident in Cryptococcus and Drosophila with the distribution of upstream open reading frames (uORFs, another genic feature known to reduce translational efficiency. Functional enrichment analysis of genes exhibiting low Kp/Ku ratios reveals that genes in regulatory roles are particularly subject to this type of selection. Conclusion Through genome-wide scans, we find recent selection for unpreferred codon usage at approximately 1% of genetic loci in a Cryptococcus and several genes in Drosophila. Unpreferred codons can impede translation efficiency, and we find that genes with translation-impeding uORFs are enriched for this selection signal. We find that regulatory genes are particularly likely to be subject to selection for unpreferred codon usage. Given that expression noise can propagate through regulatory cascades, and that low translational efficiency can reduce expression noise, this finding supports the hypothesis that translational

  10. Selection on start codons in prokaryotes and potential compensatory nucleotide substitutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belinky, Frida; Rogozin, Igor B; Koonin, Eugene V

    2017-09-29

    Reconstruction of the evolution of start codons in 36 groups of closely related bacterial and archaeal genomes reveals purifying selection affecting AUG codons. The AUG starts are replaced by GUG and especially UUG significantly less frequently than expected under the neutral expectation derived from the frequencies of the respective nucleotide triplet substitutions in non-coding regions and in 4-fold degenerate sites. Thus, AUG is the optimal start codon that is actively maintained by purifying selection. However, purifying selection on start codons is significantly weaker than the selection on the same codons in coding sequences, although the switches between the codons result in conservative amino acid substitutions. The only exception is the AUG to UUG switch that is strongly selected against among start codons. Selection on start codons is most pronounced in evolutionarily conserved, highly expressed genes. Mutation of the start codon to a sub-optimal form (GUG or UUG) tends to be compensated by mutations in the Shine-Dalgarno sequence towards a stronger translation initiation signal. Together, all these findings indicate that in prokaryotes, translation start signals are subject to weak but significant selection for maximization of initiation rate and, consequently, protein production.

  11. Features of Recent Codon Evolution: A Comparative Polymorphism-Fixation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongming Zhao

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Features of amino-acid and codon changes can provide us important insights on protein evolution. So far, investigators have often examined mutation patterns at either interspecies fixed substitution or intraspecies nucleotide polymorphism level, but not both. Here, we performed a unique analysis of a combined set of intra-species polymorphisms and inter-species substitutions in human codons. Strong difference in mutational pattern was found at codon positions 1, 2, and 3 between the polymorphism and fixation data. Fixation had strong bias towards increasing the rarest codons but decreasing the most frequently used codons, suggesting that codon equilibrium has not been reached yet. We detected strong CpG effect on CG-containing codons and subsequent suppression by fixation. Finally, we detected the signature of purifying selection against A∣U dinucleotides at synonymous dicodon boundaries. Overall, fixation process could effectively and quickly correct the volatile changes introduced by polymorphisms so that codon changes could be gradual and directional and that codon composition could be kept relatively stable during evolution.

  12. Different mutation patterns of atovaquone resistance to Plasmodium falciparum in vitro and in vivo: rapid detection of codon 268 polymorphisms in the cytochrome b as potential in vivo resistance marker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwöbel, Babett; Alifrangis, Michael; Salanti, Ali

    2003-01-01

    , we developed a detection method for the diagnostic of codon 268 polymorphisms as a potential atovaquone/proguanil resistance marker. A nested PCR with 3 different pairs of primers for the second round was designed. Each product was digested with restriction enzymes, capable to distinguish the wild...

  13. GATA3 mutation in a family with hypoparathyroidism, deafness and renal dysplasia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zi-Yang; Zhou, Qiao-Li; Ni, Shi-Ning; Gu, Wei

    2014-08-01

    The hypoparathyroidism, deafness and renal dysplasia (HDR) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder primarily caused by GATA3 gene mutation. We report here a case that both of a Chinese boy and his father had HDR syndrome which caused by a novel mutation of GATA3. Polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing was performed to detect the exons of the GATA3 gene for mutation analysis. Sequence analysis of GATA3 revealed a heterozygous nonsense mutation in this family: a mutation of GATA3 at exon 2 (c.515C >A) that resulted in a premature stop at codon 172 (p.S172X) with a loss of two zinc finger domains. We identified a novel nonsense mutation which will expand the spectrum of HDR-associated GATA3 mutations.

  14. A Simple Combinatorial Codon Mutagenesis Method for Targeted Protein Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belsare, Ketaki D; Andorfer, Mary C; Cardenas, Frida S; Chael, Julia R; Park, Hyun June; Lewis, Jared C

    2017-03-17

    Directed evolution is a powerful tool for optimizing enzymes, and mutagenesis methods that improve enzyme library quality can significantly expedite the evolution process. Here, we report a simple method for targeted combinatorial codon mutagenesis (CCM). To demonstrate the utility of this method for protein engineering, CCM libraries were constructed for cytochrome P450 BM3 , pfu prolyl oligopeptidase, and the flavin-dependent halogenase RebH; 10-26 sites were targeted for codon mutagenesis in each of these enzymes, and libraries with a tunable average of 1-7 codon mutations per gene were generated. Each of these libraries provided improved enzymes for their respective transformations, which highlights the generality, simplicity, and tunability of CCM for targeted protein engineering.

  15. Germline mutations of regulator of telomere elongation helicase 1, RTEL1, in Dyskeratosis congenita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballew, Bari J; Yeager, Meredith; Jacobs, Kevin; Giri, Neelam; Boland, Joseph; Burdett, Laurie; Alter, Blanche P; Savage, Sharon A

    2013-04-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) is an inherited bone marrow failure and cancer predisposition syndrome caused by aberrant telomere biology. The classic triad of dysplastic nails, abnormal skin pigmentation, and oral leukoplakia is diagnostic of DC, but substantial clinical heterogeneity exists; the clinically severe variant Hoyeraal Hreidarsson syndrome (HH) also includes cerebellar hypoplasia, severe immunodeficiency, enteropathy, and intrauterine growth retardation. Germline mutations in telomere biology genes account for approximately one-half of known DC families. Using exome sequencing, we identified mutations in RTEL1, a helicase with critical telomeric functions, in two families with HH. In the first family, two siblings with HH and very short telomeres inherited a premature stop codon from their mother who has short telomeres. The proband from the second family has HH and inherited a premature stop codon in RTEL1 from his father and a missense mutation from his mother, who also has short telomeres. In addition, inheritance of only the missense mutation led to very short telomeres in the proband's brother. Targeted sequencing identified a different RTEL1 missense mutation in one additional DC proband who has bone marrow failure and short telomeres. Both missense mutations affect the helicase domain of RTEL1, and three in silico prediction algorithms suggest that they are likely deleterious. The nonsense mutations both cause truncation of the RTEL1 protein, resulting in loss of the PIP box; this may abrogate an important protein-protein interaction. These findings implicate a new telomere biology gene, RTEL1, in the etiology of DC.

  16. Transient erythromycin resistance phenotype associated with peptidyl-tRNA drop-off on early UGG and GGG codons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macvanin, Mirjana; Gonzalez de Valdivia, Ernesto I; Ardell, David H

    2007-01-01

    -peptide-encoding sequence, we asked whether the codons UGG and GGG, which are known to promote peptidyl-tRNA drop-off at early positions in mRNA, would result in a phenotype of erythromycin resistance if located after this sequence. We find that UGG or GGG, at either position +4 or +5, without a following stop codon......, is associated with an erythromycin resistance phenotype upon gene induction. Our results suggest that, while a stop codon at +4 gives a tripeptide product (MIL) and erythromycin sensitivity, UGG or GGG codons at the same position give a tetrapeptide product (MILW or MILG) and phenotype of erythromycin...... resistance. Thus, the drop-off event on GGG or UGG codons occurs after incorporation of the corresponding amino acid into the growing peptide chain. Drop-off gives rise to a peptidyl-tRNA where the peptide moiety functionally mimics a minigene peptide product of the type previously associated...

  17. Revelation of Influencing Factors in Overall Codon Usage Bias of Equine Influenza Viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Kumar

    Full Text Available Equine influenza viruses (EIVs of H3N8 subtype are culprits of severe acute respiratory infections in horses, and are still responsible for significant outbreaks worldwide. Adaptability of influenza viruses to a particular host is significantly influenced by their codon usage preference, due to an absolute dependence on the host cellular machinery for their replication. In the present study, we analyzed genome-wide codon usage patterns in 92 EIV strains, including both H3N8 and H7N7 subtypes by computing several codon usage indices and applying multivariate statistical methods. Relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU analysis disclosed bias of preferred synonymous codons towards A/U-ended codons. The overall codon usage bias in EIVs was slightly lower, and mainly affected by the nucleotide compositional constraints as inferred from the RSCU and effective number of codon (ENc analysis. Our data suggested that codon usage pattern in EIVs is governed by the interplay of mutation pressure, natural selection from its hosts and undefined factors. The H7N7 subtype was found less fit to its host (horse in comparison to H3N8, by possessing higher codon bias, lower mutation pressure and much less adaptation to tRNA pool of equine cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing the codon usage analysis of the complete genomes of EIVs. The outcome of our study is likely to enhance our understanding of factors involved in viral adaptation, evolution, and fitness towards their hosts.

  18. Codes in the codons: construction of a codon/amino acid periodic table and a study of the nature of specific nucleic acid-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyo, B; Biro, J C; Benyo, Z

    2004-01-01

    The theory of "codon-amino acid coevolution" was first proposed by Woese in 1967. It suggests that there is a stereochemical matching - that is, affinity - between amino acids and certain of the base triplet sequences that code for those amino acids. We have constructed a common periodic table of codons and amino acids, where the nucleic acid table showed perfect axial symmetry for codons and the corresponding amino acid table also displayed periodicity regarding the biochemical properties (charge and hydrophobicity) of the 20 amino acids and the position of the stop signals. The table indicates that the middle (2/sup nd/) amino acid in the codon has a prominent role in determining some of the structural features of the amino acids. The possibility that physical contact between codons and amino acids might exist was tested on restriction enzymes. Many recognition site-like sequences were found in the coding sequences of these enzymes and as many as 73 examples of codon-amino acid co-location were observed in the 7 known 3D structures (December 2003) of endonuclease-nucleic acid complexes. These results indicate that the smallest possible units of specific nucleic acid-protein interaction are indeed the stereochemically compatible codons and amino acids.

  19. Phenotypic variability in 49 cases of ESCO2 mutations, including novel missense and codon deletion in the acetyltransferase domain, correlates with ESCO2 expression and establishes the clinical criteria for Roberts syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vega, H; Trainer, A H; Gordillo, M

    2010-01-01

    Roberts syndrome (RBS) and SC phocomelia are caused by mutations in ESCO2, which codes for an acetyltransferase involved in the regulation of sister chromatid cohesion. Of 26 mutations described to date, only one missense mutation has been reported and all others are predicted to be truncating...

  20. Phenotypic variability in 49 cases of ESCO2 mutations, including novel missense and codon deletion in the acetyltransferase domain, correlates with ESCO2 expression and establishes the clinical criteria for Roberts syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vega, H.; Trainer, A.H.; Gordillo, M.; Crosier, M.; Kayserili, H.; Skovby, F.; Uzielli, M.L.G.; Schnur, R.E.; Manouvrier, S.; Blair, E.; Hurst, J.A.; Forzano, F.; Meins, M.; Simola, K.O.J.; Raas-Rothschild, A; Hennekam, R.C.M.; Jabs, E.W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Roberts syndrome (RBS) and SC phocomelia are caused by mutations in ESCO2, which codes for an acetyltransferase involved in the regulation of sister chromatid cohesion. Of 26 mutations described to date, only one missense mutation has been reported and all others are predicted to be

  1. Identification of Six Novel PTH1R Mutations in Families with a History of Primary Failure of Tooth Eruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risom, Lotte; Christoffersen, Line Borck; Daugaard-Jensen, Jette

    2013-01-01

    Primary Failure of tooth Eruption (PFE) is a non-syndromic disorder which can be caused by mutations in the parathyroid hormone receptor 1 gene (PTH1R). Traditionally, the disorder has been identified clinically based on post-emergent failure of eruption of permanent molars. However, patients...... undergone surgical and/or orthodontic interventions, and identified novel PTH1R mutations in all. Four of the six mutations were predicted to abolish correct mRNA maturation either through introduction of premature stop codons (c.947C>A and c.1082G>A), or by altering correct mRNA splicing (c.544......-26_544-23del and c.989G>T). The latter was validated by transfection of minigenes. The six novel mutations expand the mutation spectrum for PFE from eight to 14 pathogenic mutations. Loss-of-function mutations in PTH1R are also associated with recessively inherited Blomstrand chondrodysplasia. We compiled all...

  2. Efficient Reassignment of a Frequent Serine Codon in Wild-Type Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Joanne M; Reynolds, Noah M; Rivera, Keith; Connolly, Morgan; Guo, Li-Tao; Ling, Jiqiang; Pappin, Darryl J; Church, George M; Söll, Dieter

    2016-02-19

    Expansion of the genetic code through engineering the translation machinery has greatly increased the chemical repertoire of the proteome. This has been accomplished mainly by read-through of UAG or UGA stop codons by the noncanonical aminoacyl-tRNA of choice. While stop codon read-through involves competition with the translation release factors, sense codon reassignment entails competition with a large pool of endogenous tRNAs. We used an engineered pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase to incorporate 3-iodo-l-phenylalanine (3-I-Phe) at a number of different serine and leucine codons in wild-type Escherichia coli. Quantitative LC-MS/MS measurements of amino acid incorporation yields carried out in a selected reaction monitoring experiment revealed that the 3-I-Phe abundance at the Ser208AGU codon in superfolder GFP was 65 ± 17%. This method also allowed quantification of other amino acids (serine, 33 ± 17%; phenylalanine, 1 ± 1%; threonine, 1 ± 1%) that compete with 3-I-Phe at both the aminoacylation and decoding steps of translation for incorporation at the same codon position. Reassignments of different serine (AGU, AGC, UCG) and leucine (CUG) codons with the matching tRNA(Pyl) anticodon variants were met with varying success, and our findings provide a guideline for the choice of sense codons to be reassigned. Our results indicate that the 3-iodo-l-phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (IFRS)/tRNA(Pyl) pair can efficiently outcompete the cellular machinery to reassign select sense codons in wild-type E. coli.

  3. Mutation update on the CHD7 gene involved in CHARGE syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janssen, Nicole; Bergman, Jorieke E H; Swertz, Morris A

    2012-01-01

    , for example, the central nervous system, eye, ear, nose, and mediastinal organs, are variably involved. In this article, we review all the currently described CHD7 variants, including 183 new pathogenic mutations found by our laboratories. In total, we compiled 528 different pathogenic CHD7 alterations from......, predominantly arginine to stop codon mutations. We built a locus-specific database listing all the variants that is easily accessible at www.CHD7.org. In addition, we summarize the latest data on CHD7 expression studies, animal models, and functional studies, and we discuss the latest clinical insights...

  4. Herpes simplex virus type 1 strain KOS carries a defective US9 and a mutated US8A gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negatsch, Alexandra; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Fuchs, Walter

    2011-01-01

    The membrane protein encoded by the US9 gene of alphaherpesviruses plays an important role during virion assembly and transport in neurons. Here, we demonstrate that in herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) strain KOS, due to base substitutions, the predicted TATA-box of US9 is mutated, and a premature stop is present at codon 58 of US9, which contains 91 codons in other HSV-1 strains. The TATA-box mutation also removes the native stop codon of the adjacent US8A gene, leading to extension of the coding region from 160 to 191 codons. Northern blot analyses revealed reduced transcription of US9 in cells infected with HSV-1 KOS. Moreover, a US9-specific antiserum did not detect any gene products in Western blot and immunofluorescence analyses of KOS-infected cells, indicating that the truncated protein is not stable. In contrast, Western blot reactions of a pUS8A-specific antiserum confirmed enlargement of this protein in HSV-1 KOS.

  5. Diverse growth hormone receptor gene mutations in Laron syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, M A; Argente, J; Chernausek, S; Gracia, R; Guevara-Aguirre, J; Hopp, M; Pérez-Jurado, L; Rosenbloom, A; Toledo, S P; Francke, U

    1993-01-01

    To better understand the molecular genetic basis and genetic epidemiology of Laron syndrome (growth-hormone insensitivity syndrome), we analyzed the growth-hormone receptor (GHR) genes of seven unrelated affected individuals from the United States, South America, Europe, and Africa. We amplified all nine GHR gene exons and splice junctions from these individuals by PCR and screened the products for mutations by using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). We identified a single GHR gene fragment with abnormal DGGE results for each affected individual, sequenced this fragment, and, in each case, identified a mutation likely to cause Laron syndrome, including two nonsense mutations (R43X and R217X), two splice-junction mutations, (189-1 G to T and 71 + 1 G to A), and two frameshift mutations (46 del TT and 230 del TA or AT). Only one of these mutations, R43X, has been previously reported. Using haplotype analysis, we determined that this mutation, which involves a CpG dinucleotide hot spot, likely arose as a separate event in this case, relative to the two prior reports of R43X. Aside from R43X, the mutations we identified are unique to patients from particular geographic regions. Ten GHR gene mutations have now been described in this disorder. We conclude that Laron syndrome is caused by diverse GHR gene mutations, including deletions, RNA processing defects, translational stop codons, and missense codons. All the identified mutations involve the extracellular domain of the receptor, and most are unique to particular families or geographic areas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8488849

  6. Two naturally occurring mutations at the first and second bases of codon aspartic acid 156 in the proposed catalytic triad of human lipoprotein lipase. In vivo evidence that aspartic acid 156 is essential for catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, Y. H.; Bruin, T.; Tuzgol, S.; Wilson, B. I.; Roederer, G.; Liu, M. S.; Davignon, J.; Kastelein, J. J.; Brunzell, J. D.; Hayden, M. R.

    1992-01-01

    We are studying naturally occurring mutations in the gene for lipoprotein lipase (LPL) to advance our knowledge about the structure/function relationships for this enzyme. We and others have previously described 11 mutations in human LPL gene and until now none of these directly involves any of the

  7. Analysis of the synonymous codon usage bias in recently emerged enterovirus D68 strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karniychuk, Uladzimir U

    2016-09-02

    Understanding the codon usage pattern of a pathogen and relationship between pathogen and host's codon usage patterns has fundamental and applied interests. Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) is an emerging pathogen with a potentially high public health significance. In the present study, the synonymous codon usage bias of 27 recently emerged, and historical EV-D68 strains was analyzed. In contrast to previously studied enteroviruses (enterovirus 71 and poliovirus), EV-D68 and human host have a high discrepancy between favored codons. Analysis of viral synonymous codon usage bias metrics, viral nucleotide/dinucleotide compositional parameters, and viral protein properties showed that mutational pressure is more involved in shaping the synonymous codon usage bias of EV-D68 than translation selection. Computation of codon adaptation indices allowed to estimate expression potential of the EV-D68 genome in several commonly used laboratory animals. This approach requires experimental validation and may provide an auxiliary tool for the rational selection of laboratory animals to model emerging viral diseases. Enterovirus D68 genome compositional and codon usage data can be useful for further pathogenesis, animal model, and vaccine design studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Higher prevalence of KRAS mutations in colorectal cancer in Saudi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We studied retrospectively tumor samples of 83 Saudi metastatic CRC patients for KRAS mutations in codon 12 and codon 13, to evaluate the relevance of KRAS mutation positive colorectal cancers with metastatic sites. KRAS mutation was observed in 42.2% (35/83) patients with CRC. The most common mutations were in ...

  9. Identification of ALK germline mutation (3605delG) in pediatric anaplastic medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coco, Simona; De Mariano, Marilena; Valdora, Francesca; Servidei, Tiziana; Ridola, Vita; Andolfo, Immacolata; Oberthuer, André; Tonini, Gian Paolo; Longo, Luca

    2012-10-01

    The anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene has been found either rearranged or mutated in several neoplasms such as anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, non-small-cell lung cancer, neuroblastoma and anaplastic thyroid cancer. Medulloblastoma (MB) is an embryonic pediatric cancer arising from nervous system, a tissue in which ALK is expressed during embryonic development. We performed an ALK mutation screening in 52 MBs and we found a novel heterozygous germline deletion of a single base in exon 23 (3605delG) in a case with marked anaplasia. This G deletion results in a frameshift mutation producing a premature stop codon in exon 25 of ALK tyrosine kinase domain. We also screened three human MB cell lines without finding any mutation of ALK gene. Quantitative expression analysis of 16 out of 52 samples showed overexpression of ALK mRNA in three MBs. In the present study, we report the first mutation of ALK found in MB. Moreover, a deletion of ALK gene producing a stop codon has not been detected in human tumors up to now. Further investigations are now required to elucidate whether the truncated form of ALK may have a role in signal transduction.

  10. Unusual AIP mutation and phenocopy in the family of a young patient with acromegalic gigantism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, Syed Ali; Aldahmani, Khaled A; Penney, Lynette; Croul, Sidney E; Clarke, David B; Collier, David M; Iacovazzo, Donato; Korbonits, Márta

    2018-01-01

    Early-onset acromegaly causing gigantism is often associated with aryl-hydrocarbon-interacting receptor protein ( AIP ) mutation, especially if there is a positive family history. A15y male presented with tiredness and visual problems. He was 201 cm tall with a span of 217 cm. He had typical facial features of acromegaly, elevated IGF-1, secondary hypogonadism and a large macroadenoma. His paternal aunt had a history of acromegaly presenting at the age of 35 years. Following transsphenoidal surgery, his IGF-1 normalized and clinical symptoms improved. He was found to have a novel AIP mutation destroying the stop codon c.991T>C; p.*331R. Unexpectedly, his father and paternal aunt were negative for this mutation while his mother and older sister were unaffected carriers, suggesting that his aunt represents a phenocopy. Typical presentation for a patient with AIP mutation with excess growth and eunuchoid proportions.Unusual, previously not described AIP variant with loss of the stop codon.Phenocopy may occur in families with a disease-causing germline mutation.

  11. A new nonsense mutation in the NF1 gene with neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yimenicioğlu, Sevgi; Yakut, Ayten; Karaer, Kadri; Zenker, Martin; Ekici, Arzu; Carman, Kürşat Bora

    2012-12-01

    Neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder which combines neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) features with Noonan syndrome. NF1 gene mutations are reported in the majority of these patients. Sequence analysis of the established genes for Noonan syndrome revealed no mutation; a heterozygous NF1 point mutation c.7549C>T in exon 51, creating a premature stop codon (p.R2517X), had been demonstrated. Neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome recently has been considered a subtype of NF1 and caused by different NF1 mutations. We report the case of a 14-year-old boy with neurofibromatosis type 1 with Noonan-like features, who complained of headache with triventricular hydrocephaly and a heterozygous NF1 point mutation c.7549C>T in exon 51.

  12. Codon 201Gly Polymorphic Type of the DCC Gene is Related to Disseminated Neuroblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Tang Kong

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The deleted in colorectal carcinoma (DCC gene is a potential tumor- suppressor gene on chromosome 18821.3. The relatively high frequency of loss of heterozygosity (LOH and loss of expression of this gene in neuroblastoma, especially in the advanced stages, imply the possibility of involvement of the DCC gene in progression of neuroblastoma. However, only few typical mutations have been identified in this gene, indicating that other possible mechanisms for the inactivation of this gene may exist. A polymorphic change (Arg to Gly at DCC codon 201 is related to advanced colorectal carcinoma and increases in the tumors with absent DCC protein expression. In order to understand whether this change is associated with the development or progression of neuroblastoma, we investigated codon 201 polymorphism of the DCC gene in 102 primary neuroblastomas by polymerase chain reaction single-strand conformation polymorphism. We found no missense or nonsense mutations, but a polymorphic change from CGA (Arg to GGA (Gly at codon 201 resulting in three types of polymorphism: codon 201Gly type, codon 201Arg/Gly type, and codon 201Arg type. The codon 201Gly type occurred more frequently in disseminated (stages IV and IVs neuroblastomas (72% than in localized (stages I, II, and III tumors (48% (P=.035, and normal controls (38% (P=.024. In addition, the codon 201Gly type was significantly more common in tumors found clinically (65% than in those found by mass screening (35% (P=.002. The results suggested that the codon 201Gly type of the DCC gene might be associated with a higher risk of disseminating neuroblastoma.

  13. Codon usage is associated with the evolutionary age of genes in metazoan genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linial Nathan

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Codon usage may vary significantly between different organisms and between genes within the same organism. Several evolutionary processes have been postulated to be the predominant determinants of codon usage: selection, mutation, and genetic drift. However, the relative contribution of each of these factors in different species remains debatable. The availability of complete genomes for tens of multicellular organisms provides an opportunity to inspect the relationship between codon usage and the evolutionary age of genes. Results We assign an evolutionary age to a gene based on the relative positions of its identified homologues in a standard phylogenetic tree. This yields a classification of all genes in a genome to several evolutionary age classes. The present study starts from the observation that each age class of genes has a unique codon usage and proceeds to provide a quantitative analysis of the codon usage in these classes. This observation is made for the genomes of Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, and Drosophila melanogaster. It is even more remarkable that the differences between codon usages in different age groups exhibit similar and consistent behavior in various organisms. While we find that GC content and gene length are also associated with the evolutionary age of genes, they can provide only a partial explanation for the observed codon usage. Conclusion While factors such as GC content, mutational bias, and selection shape the codon usage in a genome, the evolutionary history of an organism over hundreds of millions of years is an overlooked property that is strongly linked to GC content, protein length, and, even more significantly, to the codon usage of metazoan genomes.

  14. New mutations of DAX-1 genes in two Japanese patients with X-linked congenital adrenal hypoplasia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanase, Toshihiko; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Oba, Koichi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)] [and others

    1996-02-01

    Congenital adrenal hypoplasia, an X-linked disorder, is characterized by primary adrenal insufficiency and frequent association with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. The X-chromosome gene DAX-1 has been most recently identified and shown to be responsible for this disorder. We analyzed the DAX-1 genes of two unrelated Japanese patients with congenital adrenal hypoplasia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism by using PCR amplification of genomic DNA and its complete exonic sequencing. In a family containing several affected individuals, the proband male patient had a stop codon (TGA) in place of tryptophan (TGG) at amino acid position 171. As expected, his mother was a heterozygous carrier for the mutation, whereas his father and unaffected brother did not carry this mutation. In another male patient with noncontributory family history, sequencing revealed a 1-bp (T) deletion at amino acid position 280, leading to a frame shift and, subsequently a premature stop codon at amino acid position 371. The presence of this mutation in the patients` genome was further confirmed by digestion of genomic PCR product with MspI created by this mutation. Family studies using MspI digestion of genomic PCR products revealed that neither parent of this individual carried the mutation. These results clearly indicate that congenital adrenal hypoplasia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism result from not only inherited but also de novo mutation in the DAX-1 gene. 31 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Codon usage bias: causative factors, quantification methods and genome-wide patterns: with emphasis on insect genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behura, Susanta K; Severson, David W

    2013-02-01

    Codon usage bias refers to the phenomenon where specific codons are used more often than other synonymous codons during translation of genes, the extent of which varies within and among species. Molecular evolutionary investigations suggest that codon bias is manifested as a result of balance between mutational and translational selection of such genes and that this phenomenon is widespread across species and may contribute to genome evolution in a significant manner. With the advent of whole-genome sequencing of numerous species, both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, genome-wide patterns of codon bias are emerging in different organisms. Various factors such as expression level, GC content, recombination rates, RNA stability, codon position, gene length and others (including environmental stress and population size) can influence codon usage bias within and among species. Moreover, there has been a continuous quest towards developing new concepts and tools to measure the extent of codon usage bias of genes. In this review, we outline the fundamental concepts of evolution of the genetic code, discuss various factors that may influence biased usage of synonymous codons and then outline different principles and methods of measurement of codon usage bias. Finally, we discuss selected studies performed using whole-genome sequences of different insect species to show how codon bias patterns vary within and among genomes. We conclude with generalized remarks on specific emerging aspects of codon bias studies and highlight the recent explosion of genome-sequencing efforts on arthropods (such as twelve Drosophila species, species of ants, honeybee, Nasonia and Anopheles mosquitoes as well as the recent launch of a genome-sequencing project involving 5000 insects and other arthropods) that may help us to understand better the evolution of codon bias and its biological significance. © 2012 The Authors. Biological Reviews © 2012 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  16. A novel mutation in the sterol 27-hydroxylase gene of a woman with autosomal recessive cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garuti Rita

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Article abstract Mutations of the gene encoding the mitochondrial enzyme sterol 27-hydroxylase (CYP27A1 gene cause defects in the cholesterol pathway to bile acids that lead to the storage of cholestanol and cholesterol in tendons, lenses and the central nervous system. This disorder is the cause of a clinical syndrome known as cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX. Since 1991 several mutations of the CYP27A1 gene have been reported. We diagnosed the clinical features of CTX in a caucasian woman. Serum levels of cholestanol and 7α-hydroxycholesterol were elevated and the concentration of 27-hydroxycholesterol was reduced. Bile alcohols in the urine and faeces were increased. The analysis of the CYP27A1 gene showed that the patient was a compound heterozygote carrying two mutations both located in exon 8. One mutation is a novel four nucleotide deletion (c.1330-1333delTTCC that results in a frameshift and the occurrence of a premature stop codon leading to the formation of a truncated protein of 448 amino acids. The other mutation, previously reported, is a C - > T transition (c. c.1381C > T that converts the glutamine codon at position 461 into a termination codon (p.Q461X. These truncated proteins are expected to have no biological function being devoid of the cysteine residue at position 476 of the normal enzyme that is crucial for heme binding and enzyme activity.

  17. Rapid identification of HEXA mutations in Tay-Sachs patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, Carole; Dussau, Jeanne; Azouguene, Emilie; Feillet, François; Puech, Jean-Philippe; Caillaud, Catherine

    2010-02-19

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) is a recessively inherited neurodegenerative disorder due to mutations in the HEXA gene resulting in a beta-hexosaminidase A (Hex A) deficiency. The purpose of this study was to characterize the molecular abnormalities in patients with infantile or later-onset forms of the disease. The complete sequencing of the 14 exons and flanking regions of the HEXA gene was performed with a unique technical condition in 10 unrelated TSD patients. Eleven mutations were identified, including five splice mutations, one insertion, two deletions and three single-base substitutions. Four mutations were novel: two splice mutations (IVS8+5G>A, IVS2+4delAGTA), one missense mutation in exon 6 (c.621T>G (p.D207E)) and one small deletion (c.1211-1212delTG) in exon 11 resulting in a premature stop codon at residue 429. The c.621T>G missense mutation was found in a patient presenting an infantile form. Its putative role in the pathogenesis of TSD is suspected as residue 207 is highly conserved in human, mouse and rat. Moreover, structural modelling predicted changes likely to affect substrate binding and catalytic activity of the enzyme. The time-saving procedure reported here could be useful for the characterization of Tay-Sachs-causing mutations, in particular in non-Ashkenazi patients mainly exhibiting rare mutations. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Phylogenetic inference with weighted codon evolutionary distances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criscuolo, Alexis; Michel, Christian J

    2009-04-01

    We develop a new approach to estimate a matrix of pairwise evolutionary distances from a codon-based alignment based on a codon evolutionary model. The method first computes a standard distance matrix for each of the three codon positions. Then these three distance matrices are weighted according to an estimate of the global evolutionary rate of each codon position and averaged into a unique distance matrix. Using a large set of both real and simulated codon-based alignments of nucleotide sequences, we show that this approach leads to distance matrices that have a significantly better treelikeness compared to those obtained by standard nucleotide evolutionary distances. We also propose an alternative weighting to eliminate the part of the noise often associated with some codon positions, particularly the third position, which is known to induce a fast evolutionary rate. Simulation results show that fast distance-based tree reconstruction algorithms on distance matrices based on this codon position weighting can lead to phylogenetic trees that are at least as accurate as, if not better, than those inferred by maximum likelihood. Finally, a well-known multigene dataset composed of eight yeast species and 106 codon-based alignments is reanalyzed and shows that our codon evolutionary distances allow building a phylogenetic tree which is similar to those obtained by non-distance-based methods (e.g., maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood) and also significantly improved compared to standard nucleotide evolutionary distance estimates.

  19. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Synonymous Codon Usage Patterns in Riemerella anatipestifer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jibin Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Riemerella anatipestifer (RA belongs to the Flavobacteriaceae family and can cause a septicemia disease in poultry. The synonymous codon usage patterns of bacteria reflect a series of evolutionary changes that enable bacteria to improve tolerance of the various environments. We detailed the codon usage patterns of RA isolates from the available 12 sequenced genomes by multiple codon and statistical analysis. Nucleotide compositions and relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU analysis revealed that A or U ending codons are predominant in RA. Neutrality analysis found no significant correlation between GC12 and GC3 (p > 0.05. Correspondence analysis and ENc-plot results showed that natural selection dominated over mutation in the codon usage bias. The tree of cluster analysis based on RSCU was concordant with dendrogram based on genomic BLAST by neighbor-joining method. By comparative analysis, about 50 highly expressed genes that were orthologs across all 12 strains were found in the top 5% of high CAI value. Based on these CAI values, we infer that RA contains a number of predicted highly expressed coding sequences, involved in transcriptional regulation and metabolism, reflecting their requirement for dealing with diverse environmental conditions. These results provide some useful information on the mechanisms that contribute to codon usage bias and evolution of RA.

  20. SHIFT: server for hidden stops analysis in frame-shifted translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Arun; Singh, Tiratha Raj

    2013-02-23

    Frameshift is one of the three classes of recoding. Frame-shifts lead to waste of energy, resources and activity of the biosynthetic machinery. In addition, some peptides synthesized after frame-shifts are probably cytotoxic which serve as plausible cause for innumerable number of diseases and disorders such as muscular dystrophies, lysosomal storage disorders, and cancer. Hidden stop codons occur naturally in coding sequences among all organisms. These codons are associated with the early termination of translation for incorrect reading frame selection and help to reduce the metabolic cost related to the frameshift events. Researchers have identified several consequences of hidden stop codons and their association with myriad disorders. However the wealth of information available is speckled and not effortlessly acquiescent to data-mining. To reduce this gap, this work describes an algorithmic web based tool to study hidden stops in frameshifted translation for all the lineages through respective genetic code systems. This paper describes SHIFT, an algorithmic web application tool that provides a user-friendly interface for identifying and analyzing hidden stops in frameshifted translation of genomic sequences for all available genetic code systems. We have calculated the correlation between codon usage frequencies and the plausible contribution of codons towards hidden stops in an off-frame context. Markovian chains of various order have been used to model hidden stops in frameshifted peptides and their evolutionary association with naturally occurring hidden stops. In order to obtain reliable and persuasive estimates for the naturally occurring and predicted hidden stops statistical measures have been implemented. This paper presented SHIFT, an algorithmic tool that allows user-friendly exploration, analysis, and visualization of hidden stop codons in frameshifted translations. It is expected that this web based tool would serve as a useful complement for

  1. The TREAT-NMD DMD Global Database: Analysis of More than 7,000 Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladen, Catherine L; Salgado, David; Monges, Soledad; Foncuberta, Maria E; Kekou, Kyriaki; Kosma, Konstantina; Dawkins, Hugh; Lamont, Leanne; Roy, Anna J; Chamova, Teodora; Guergueltcheva, Velina; Chan, Sophelia; Korngut, Lawrence; Campbell, Craig; Dai, Yi; Wang, Jen; Barišić, Nina; Brabec, Petr; Lahdetie, Jaana; Walter, Maggie C; Schreiber-Katz, Olivia; Karcagi, Veronika; Garami, Marta; Viswanathan, Venkatarman; Bayat, Farhad; Buccella, Filippo; Kimura, En; Koeks, Zaïda; van den Bergen, Janneke C; Rodrigues, Miriam; Roxburgh, Richard; Lusakowska, Anna; Kostera-Pruszczyk, Anna; Zimowski, Janusz; Santos, Rosário; Neagu, Elena; Artemieva, Svetlana; Rasic, Vedrana Milic; Vojinovic, Dina; Posada, Manuel; Bloetzer, Clemens; Jeannet, Pierre-Yves; Joncourt, Franziska; Díaz-Manera, Jordi; Gallardo, Eduard; Karaduman, A Ayşe; Topaloğlu, Haluk; El Sherif, Rasha; Stringer, Angela; Shatillo, Andriy V; Martin, Ann S; Peay, Holly L; Bellgard, Matthew I; Kirschner, Jan; Flanigan, Kevin M; Straub, Volker; Bushby, Kate; Verschuuren, Jan; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Béroud, Christophe; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2015-01-01

    Analyzing the type and frequency of patient-specific mutations that give rise to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an invaluable tool for diagnostics, basic scientific research, trial planning, and improved clinical care. Locus-specific databases allow for the collection, organization, storage, and analysis of genetic variants of disease. Here, we describe the development and analysis of the TREAT-NMD DMD Global database (http://umd.be/TREAT_DMD/). We analyzed genetic data for 7,149 DMD mutations held within the database. A total of 5,682 large mutations were observed (80% of total mutations), of which 4,894 (86%) were deletions (1 exon or larger) and 784 (14%) were duplications (1 exon or larger). There were 1,445 small mutations (smaller than 1 exon, 20% of all mutations), of which 358 (25%) were small deletions and 132 (9%) small insertions and 199 (14%) affected the splice sites. Point mutations totalled 756 (52% of small mutations) with 726 (50%) nonsense mutations and 30 (2%) missense mutations. Finally, 22 (0.3%) mid-intronic mutations were observed. In addition, mutations were identified within the database that would potentially benefit from novel genetic therapies for DMD including stop codon read-through therapies (10% of total mutations) and exon skipping therapy (80% of deletions and 55% of total mutations). PMID:25604253

  2. Codon usage bias and phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial ND1 gene in pisces, aves, and mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Arif; Choudhury, Monisha Nath; Chakraborty, Supriyo

    2018-01-01

    The mitochondrially encoded NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase core subunit 1 (MT-ND1) gene is a subunit of the respiratory chain complex I and involved in the first step of the electron transport chain of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). To understand the pattern of compositional properties, codon usage and expression level of mitochondrial ND1 genes in pisces, aves, and mammals, we used bioinformatic approaches as no work was reported earlier. In this study, a perl script was used for calculating nucleotide contents and different codon usage bias parameters. The codon usage bias of MT-ND1 was low but the expression level was high as revealed from high ENC and CAI value. Correspondence analysis (COA) suggests that the pattern of codon usage for MT-ND1 gene is not same across species and that compositional constraint played an important role in codon usage pattern of this gene among pisces, aves, and mammals. From the regression equation of GC12 on GC3, it can be inferred that the natural selection might have played a dominant role while mutation pressure played a minor role in influencing the codon usage patterns. Further, ND1 gene has a discrepancy with cytochrome B (CYB) gene in preference of codons as evident from COA. The codon usage bias was low. It is influenced by nucleotide composition, natural selection, mutation pressure, length (number) of amino acids, and relative dinucleotide composition. This study helps in understanding the molecular biology, genetics, evolution of MT-ND1 gene, and also for designing a synthetic gene.

  3. Abrupt onset of mutations in a developmentally regulated gene during terminal differentiation of post-mitotic photoreceptor neurons in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivette M Sandoval

    Full Text Available For sensitive detection of rare gene repair events in terminally differentiated photoreceptors, we generated a knockin mouse model by replacing one mouse rhodopsin allele with a form of the human rhodopsin gene that causes a severe, early-onset form of retinitis pigmentosa. The human gene contains a premature stop codon at position 344 (Q344X, cDNA encoding the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP at its 3' end, and a modified 5' untranslated region to reduce translation rate so that the mutant protein does not induce retinal degeneration. Mutations that eliminate the stop codon express a human rhodopsin-EGFP fusion protein (hRho-GFP, which can be readily detected by fluorescence microscopy. Spontaneous mutations were observed at a frequency of about one per retina; in every case, they gave rise to single fluorescent rod cells, indicating that each mutation occurred during or after the last mitotic division. Additionally, the number of fluorescent rods did not increase with age, suggesting that the rhodopsin gene in mature rod cells is less sensitive to mutation than it is in developing rods. Thus, there is a brief developmental window, coinciding with the transcriptional activation of the rhodopsin locus, in which somatic mutations of the rhodopsin gene abruptly begin to appear.

  4. Identification of the bovine Arachnomelia mutation by massively parallel sequencing implicates sulfite oxidase (SUOX in bone development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cord Drögemüller

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Arachnomelia is a monogenic recessive defect of skeletal development in cattle. The causative mutation was previously mapped to a ∼7 Mb interval on chromosome 5. Here we show that array-based sequence capture and massively parallel sequencing technology, combined with the typical family structure in livestock populations, facilitates the identification of the causative mutation. We re-sequenced the entire critical interval in a healthy partially inbred cow carrying one copy of the critical chromosome segment in its ancestral state and one copy of the same segment with the arachnomelia mutation, and we detected a single heterozygous position. The genetic makeup of several partially inbred cattle provides extremely strong support for the causality of this mutation. The mutation represents a single base insertion leading to a premature stop codon in the coding sequence of the SUOX gene and is perfectly associated with the arachnomelia phenotype. Our findings suggest an important role for sulfite oxidase in bone development.

  5. Identification of the Bovine Arachnomelia Mutation by Massively Parallel Sequencing Implicates Sulfite Oxidase (SUOX) in Bone Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drögemüller, Cord; Tetens, Jens; Sigurdsson, Snaevar; Gentile, Arcangelo; Testoni, Stefania; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Leeb, Tosso

    2010-01-01

    Arachnomelia is a monogenic recessive defect of skeletal development in cattle. The causative mutation was previously mapped to a ∼7 Mb interval on chromosome 5. Here we show that array-based sequence capture and massively parallel sequencing technology, combined with the typical family structure in livestock populations, facilitates the identification of the causative mutation. We re-sequenced the entire critical interval in a healthy partially inbred cow carrying one copy of the critical chromosome segment in its ancestral state and one copy of the same segment with the arachnomelia mutation, and we detected a single heterozygous position. The genetic makeup of several partially inbred cattle provides extremely strong support for the causality of this mutation. The mutation represents a single base insertion leading to a premature stop codon in the coding sequence of the SUOX gene and is perfectly associated with the arachnomelia phenotype. Our findings suggest an important role for sulfite oxidase in bone development. PMID:20865119

  6. A novel nuclear genetic code alteration in yeasts and the evolution of codon reassignment in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlhausen, Stefanie; Findeisen, Peggy; Plessmann, Uwe; Urlaub, Henning; Kollmar, Martin

    2016-07-01

    The genetic code is the cellular translation table for the conversion of nucleotide sequences into amino acid sequences. Changes to the meaning of sense codons would introduce errors into almost every translated message and are expected to be highly detrimental. However, reassignment of single or multiple codons in mitochondria and nuclear genomes, although extremely rare, demonstrates that the code can evolve. Several models for the mechanism of alteration of nuclear genetic codes have been proposed (including "codon capture," "genome streamlining," and "ambiguous intermediate" theories), but with little resolution. Here, we report a novel sense codon reassignment in Pachysolen tannophilus, a yeast related to the Pichiaceae. By generating proteomics data and using tRNA sequence comparisons, we show that Pachysolen translates CUG codons as alanine and not as the more usual leucine. The Pachysolen tRNACAG is an anticodon-mutated tRNA(Ala) containing all major alanine tRNA recognition sites. The polyphyly of the CUG-decoding tRNAs in yeasts is best explained by a tRNA loss driven codon reassignment mechanism. Loss of the CUG-tRNA in the ancient yeast is followed by gradual decrease of respective codons and subsequent codon capture by tRNAs whose anticodon is not part of the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase recognition region. Our hypothesis applies to all nuclear genetic code alterations and provides several testable predictions. We anticipate more codon reassignments to be uncovered in existing and upcoming genome projects. © 2016 Mühlhausen et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  7. Four novel germline mutations in the MLH1 and PMS2 mismatch repair genes in patients with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazer Haghighi, Mahdi; Radpour, Ramin; Aghajani, Katayoun; Zali, Narges; Molaei, Mahsa; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2009-08-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is the most common cause of early onset hereditary colorectal cancer. In the majority of HNPCC families, microsatellite instability (MSI) and germline mutation in one of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes are found. The entire coding sequence of MMR genes (MLH1, MLH2, MLH6, and PMS2) was analyzed using direct sequencing. Also, tumor tests were done as MSI and immunohistochemistry testing. We were able to find three novel MLH1 and one novel PMS2 germline mutations in three Iranian HNPCC patients. The first was a transversion mutation c.346A>C (T116P) and happened in the highly conserved HATPase-c region of MLH1 protein. The second was a transversion mutation c.736A>T (I246L), which caused an amino acid change of isoleucine to leucine. The third mutation (c.2145,6 delTG) was frameshift and resulted in an immature stop codon in five codons downstream. All of these three mutations were detected in the MLH1 gene. The other mutation was a transition mutation, c.676G>A (G207E), which has been found in exon six of the PMS2 gene and caused an amino acid change of glycine to glutamic acid. MSI assay revealed high instability in microsatellite for two patients and microsatellite stable for one patient. In all patients, an abnormal expression of the MMR proteins in HNPCC was related to the above novel mutations.

  8. Teaching the fluctuation test in silico by using mutate: a program to distinguish between the adaptive and spontaneous mutation hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal-Rodríguez, Antonio

    2012-07-01

    Mutate is a program developed for teaching purposes to impart a virtual laboratory class for undergraduate students of Genetics in Biology. The program emulates the so-called fluctuation test whose aim is to distinguish between spontaneous and adaptive mutation hypotheses in bacteria. The plan is to train students in certain key multidisciplinary aspects of current genetics such as sequence databases, DNA mutations, and hypothesis testing, while introducing the fluctuation test. This seminal experiment was originally performed studying Escherichia coli resistance to the infection by bacteriophage T1. The fluctuation test initiated the modern bacterial genetics that 25 years later ushered in the era of the recombinant DNA. Nowadays we know that some deletions in fhuA, the gene responsible for E. coli membrane receptor of T1, could cause the E. coli resistance to this phage. For the sake of simplicity, we will introduce the assumption that a single mutation generates the resistance to T1. During the practical, the students use the program to download some fhuA gene sequences, manually introduce some stop codon mutations, and design a fluctuation test to obtain data for distinguishing between preadaptative (spontaneous) and induced (adaptive) mutation hypotheses. The program can be launched from a browser or, if preferred, its executable file can be downloaded from http://webs.uvigo.es/acraaj/MutateWeb/Mutate.html. It requires the Java 5.0 (or higher) Runtime Environment (freely available at http://www.java.com). Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Codon usage bias analysis for the coding sequences of Camellia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sunny t

    2016-02-24

    Feb 24, 2016 ... suggested that codon usage bias is driven by selection, particularly for .... For example, as mentioned above, highly expressed genes tend to use fewer ... directional codon bias measure effective number of codons (ENc) was ...

  10. Identification of a novel mutation in a Chinese family with Nance-Horan syndrome by whole exome sequencing*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Nan; Chen, Yan-hua; Xie, Chen; Xu, Bai-sheng; Huang, Hui; Li, Xin; Yang, Yue-qing; Huang, Ying-ping; Deng, Jian-lian; Qi, Ming; Gu, Yang-shun

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) is a rare X-linked disorder characterized by congenital nuclear cataracts, dental anomalies, and craniofacial dysmorphisms. Mental retardation was present in about 30% of the reported cases. The purpose of this study was to investigate the genetic and clinical features of NHS in a Chinese family. Methods: Whole exome sequencing analysis was performed on DNA from an affected male to scan for candidate mutations on the X-chromosome. Sanger sequencing was used to verify these candidate mutations in the whole family. Clinical and ophthalmological examinations were performed on all members of the family. Results: A combination of exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing revealed a nonsense mutation c.322G>T (E108X) in exon 1 of NHS gene, co-segregating with the disease in the family. The nonsense mutation led to the conversion of glutamic acid to a stop codon (E108X), resulting in truncation of the NHS protein. Multiple sequence alignments showed that codon 108, where the mutation (c.322G>T) occurred, was located within a phylogenetically conserved region. The clinical features in all affected males and female carriers are described in detail. Conclusions: We report a nonsense mutation c.322G>T (E108X) in a Chinese family with NHS. Our findings broaden the spectrum of NHS mutations and provide molecular insight into future NHS clinical genetic diagnosis. PMID:25091991

  11. Identification of a novel mutation in a Chinese family with Nance-Horan syndrome by whole exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Nan; Chen, Yan-hua; Xie, Chen; Xu, Bai-sheng; Huang, Hui; Li, Xin; Yang, Yue-qing; Huang, Ying-ping; Deng, Jian-lian; Qi, Ming; Gu, Yang-shun

    2014-08-01

    Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) is a rare X-linked disorder characterized by congenital nuclear cataracts, dental anomalies, and craniofacial dysmorphisms. Mental retardation was present in about 30% of the reported cases. The purpose of this study was to investigate the genetic and clinical features of NHS in a Chinese family. Whole exome sequencing analysis was performed on DNA from an affected male to scan for candidate mutations on the X-chromosome. Sanger sequencing was used to verify these candidate mutations in the whole family. Clinical and ophthalmological examinations were performed on all members of the family. A combination of exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing revealed a nonsense mutation c.322G>T (E108X) in exon 1 of NHS gene, co-segregating with the disease in the family. The nonsense mutation led to the conversion of glutamic acid to a stop codon (E108X), resulting in truncation of the NHS protein. Multiple sequence alignments showed that codon 108, where the mutation (c.322G>T) occurred, was located within a phylogenetically conserved region. The clinical features in all affected males and female carriers are described in detail. We report a nonsense mutation c.322G>T (E108X) in a Chinese family with NHS. Our findings broaden the spectrum of NHS mutations and provide molecular insight into future NHS clinical genetic diagnosis.

  12. Translational read-through as an alternative approach for ocular gene therapy of retinal dystrophies caused by in-frame nonsense mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel-Wolfrum, Kerstin; Möller, Fabian; Penner, Inessa; Wolfrum, Uwe

    2014-09-01

    The eye has become an excellent target for gene therapy, and gene augmentation therapy of inherited retinal disorders has made major progress in recent years. Nevertheless, a recent study indicated that gene augmentation intervention might not stop the progression of retinal degeneration in patients. In addition, for many genes, viral-mediated gene augmentation is currently not feasible due to gene size and limited packaging capacity of viral vectors as well as expression of various heterogeneous isoforms of the target gene. Thus, alternative gene-based strategies to stop or delay the retinal degeneration are necessary. This review focuses on an alternative pharmacologic treatment strategy based on the usage of translational read-through inducing drugs (TRIDs) such as PTC124, aminoglycoside antibiotics, and designer aminoglycosides for overreading in-frame nonsense mutations. This strategy has emerged as an option for up to 30-50% of all cases of recessive hereditary retinal dystrophies. In-frame nonsense mutations are single-nucleotide alterations within the gene coding sequence resulting in a premature stop codon. Consequently, translation of such mutated genes leads to the synthesis of truncated proteins, which are unable to fulfill their physiologic functions. In this context, application of TRIDs facilitates the recoding of the premature termination codon into a sense codon, thus restoring syntheses of full-length proteins. So far, clinical trials for non-ocular diseases have been initiated for diverse TRIDs. Although the clinical outcome is not analyzed in detail, an excellent safety profile, namely for PTC124, was clearly demonstrated. Moreover, recent data demonstrated sustained read-through efficacies of nonsense mutations causing retinal degeneration, as manifested in the human Usher syndrome. In addition, a strong retinal biocompatibility for PTC124 and designer aminoglycosides has been demonstrated. In conclusion, recent progress emphasizes the

  13. Elevated Hb A₂ Levels in a Patient with a Compound Heterozygosity for the (β⁺) -31 (A > G) and (β⁰) Codon 17 (A > T) Mutations Together with a Single α-Globin Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panyasai, Sitthichai; Jaiping, Kanokwan; Pornprasert, Sakorn

    2015-01-01

    We report the molecular and hematological feature of a Thai woman who had clinical diagnosis of β-thalassemia intermedia (β-TI). Hemoglobin (Hb) high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis identified Hb A (64.4%), Hb F (12.3%) and Hb A2/E (15.9%) with small peaks of Hb Bart's (γ4) and Hb H (β4). She was initially diagnosed as EA Bart's disease, which occurs from combination of Hb H disease and Hb E (HBB: c.79G > A) trait. However, the Hb analysis using capillary electrophoresis (CE) demonstrated no Hb E, 68.5% Hb A, 15.5% Hb F and 16.0% Hb A2. DNA analysis showed a compound heterozygosity for (β(+)) -31 (A > G) (HBB: c.-81A > G) and (β(0)) codon 17 (A > T) (HBB: c.52A > T) mutations and deletional Hb H (- -(SEA)/-α(3.7)). Thus, she was finally diagnosed with a combination of Hb H disease and compound heterozygosity of β(+)/β(0)-thalassemia (β(+)/β(0)-thal). The β-globin mutations could affect not only hematological parameters but also elevate the Hb A2 levels. These effects could not be ameliorated by the coinheritance of Hb H disease. Therefore, a better understanding of the effects of this combination on hematological analysis data will be useful for providing accurate diagnosis, genetic counseling, prevention and control programs of β-thalassemia major (β-TM).

  14. Analysis of Hungarian patients with Rett syndrome phenotype for MECP2, CDKL5 and FOXG1 gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadzsiev, Kinga; Polgar, Noemi; Bene, Judit; Komlosi, Katalin; Karteszi, Judit; Hollody, Katalin; Kosztolanyi, Gyorgy; Renieri, Alessandra; Melegh, Bela

    2011-03-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is characterized by a relatively specific clinical phenotype. We screened 152 individuals with RTT phenotype. A total of 22 different known MECP2 mutations were identified in 42 subjects (27.6%). Of the 22 mutations, we identified 7 (31.8%) frameshift-causing deletions, 4 (18.2%) nonsense, 10 (45.5%) missense mutations and one insertion (4.5%). The most frequent pathologic changes were: p.Thr158Met (14.2%) and p.Arg133Cys (11.9%) missense, and p.Arg255Stop (9.5%) and p.Arg294Stop (9.5%) nonsense mutations. We also detected the c.925C >T (p.Arg309Trp) mutation in an affected patient, whose role in RTT pathogenesis is still unknown. Patients without detectable MECP2 defects were screened for mutations of cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) gene, responsible for the early-onset variant of RTT. We discovered two novel mutations: c.607G >T resulting in a termination codon at aa203, disrupting the catalytic domain, and c.1708G >T leading to a stop at aa570 of the C terminus. Both patients with CDKL5 mutation presented therapy-resistant epilepsy and a phenotype fitting with the diagnosis of early-onset variant of RTT. No FOXG1 mutation was detected in any of the remaining patients. A total of 110 (72.5%) patients remained without molecular genetic diagnosis that necessitates further search for novel gene mutations in this phenotype. Our results also suggest the need of screening for CDKL5 mutations in patients with Rett phenotype tested negative for MECP2 mutations.

  15. Neonatal epileptic encephalopathy caused by mutations in the PNPO gene encoding pyridox(am)ine 5'-phosphate oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Philippa B; Surtees, Robert A H; Champion, Michael P; Beesley, Clare E; Dalton, Neil; Scambler, Peter J; Heales, Simon J R; Briddon, Anthony; Scheimberg, Irene; Hoffmann, Georg F; Zschocke, Johannes; Clayton, Peter T

    2005-04-15

    In the mouse, neurotransmitter metabolism can be regulated by modulation of the synthesis of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate and failure to maintain pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) levels results in epilepsy. This study of five patients with neonatal epileptic encephalopathy suggests that the same is true in man. Cerebrospinal fluid and urine analyses indicated reduced activity of aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase and other PLP-dependent enzymes. Seizures ceased with the administration of PLP, having been resistant to treatment with pyridoxine, suggesting a defect of pyridox(am)ine 5'-phosphate oxidase (PNPO). Sequencing of the PNPO gene identified homozygous missense, splice site and stop codon mutations. Expression studies in Chinese hamster ovary cells showed that the splice site (IVS3-1g>a) and stop codon (X262Q) mutations were null activity mutations and that the missense mutation (R229W) markedly reduced pyridox(am)ine phosphate oxidase activity. Maintenance of optimal PLP levels in the brain may be important in many neurological disorders in which neurotransmitter metabolism is disturbed (either as a primary or as a secondary phenomenon).

  16. Codon usage and expression level of human mitochondrial 13 protein coding genes across six continents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Supriyo; Uddin, Arif; Mazumder, Tarikul Huda; Choudhury, Monisha Nath; Malakar, Arup Kumar; Paul, Prosenjit; Halder, Binata; Deka, Himangshu; Mazumder, Gulshana Akthar; Barbhuiya, Riazul Ahmed; Barbhuiya, Masuk Ahmed; Devi, Warepam Jesmi

    2017-12-02

    The study of codon usage coupled with phylogenetic analysis is an important tool to understand the genetic and evolutionary relationship of a gene. The 13 protein coding genes of human mitochondria are involved in electron transport chain for the generation of energy currency (ATP). However, no work has yet been reported on the codon usage of the mitochondrial protein coding genes across six continents. To understand the patterns of codon usage in mitochondrial genes across six different continents, we used bioinformatic analyses to analyze the protein coding genes. The codon usage bias was low as revealed from high ENC value. Correlation between codon usage and GC3 suggested that all the codons ending with G/C were positively correlated with GC3 but vice versa for A/T ending codons with the exception of ND4L and ND5 genes. Neutrality plot revealed that for the genes ATP6, COI, COIII, CYB, ND4 and ND4L, natural selection might have played a major role while mutation pressure might have played a dominant role in the codon usage bias of ATP8, COII, ND1, ND2, ND3, ND5 and ND6 genes. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that evolutionary relationships in each of 13 protein coding genes of human mitochondria were different across six continents and further suggested that geographical distance was an important factor for the origin and evolution of 13 protein coding genes of human mitochondria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  17. Mutational spectrum of Xeroderma pigmentosum group A in Egyptian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amr, Khalda; Messaoud, Olfa; El Darouti, Mohamad; Abdelhak, Sonia; El-Kamah, Ghada

    2014-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disease characterized by hyperphotosensitivity, DNA repair defects and a predisposition to skin cancers. The most frequently occurring type worldwide is the XP group A (XPA). There is a close relationship between the clinical features that ranged from severe to mild form and the mutational site in XPA gene. The aim of this study is to carry out the mutational analysis in Egyptian patients with XP-A. This study was carried out on four unrelated Egyptian XP-A families. Clinical features were examined and direct sequencing of the coding region of XPA gene was performed in patients and their parents. Direct sequencing of the whole coding region of the XPA gene revealed the identification of two homozygous nonsense mutations: (c.553C >T; p.(Gln185)) and (c.331G>T; p.(Glu111)), which create premature, stop codon and a homodeletion (c.374delC: p.Thr125Ilefs 15) that leads to frameshift and premature translation termination. We report the identification of one novel XPA gene mutation and two known mutations in four unrelated Egyptian families with Xermoderma pigmentosum. All explored patients presented severe neurological abnormalities and have mutations located in the DNA binding domain. This report gives insight on the mutation spectrum of XP-A in Egypt. This would provide a valuable tool for early diagnosis of this severe disease. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The prevalence of CHD7 missense versus truncating mutations is higher in patients with Kallmann syndrome than in typical CHARGE patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcos, Séverine; Sarfati, Julie; Leroy, Chrystel

    2014-01-01

    CONTEXT: Mutations in CHD7, a gene previously implicated in CHARGE (coloboma, heart defect, choanal atresia, retardation of growth and/or development, genital hypoplasia, ear anomalies) syndrome, have been reported in patients presenting with Kallmann syndrome (KS) or congenital hypogonadotropic...... hypogonadism (CHH). Most mutations causing CHARGE syndrome result in premature stop codons and occur de novo, but the proportion of truncating vs nontruncating mutations in KS and CHH patients is still unknown. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to determine the nature, prevalence, mode of transmission......, and clinical spectrum of CHD7 mutations in a large series of patients. DESIGN: We studied 209 KS and 94 CHH patients. These patients had not been diagnosed with CHARGE syndrome according to the current criteria. We searched for mutations in 16 KS and CHH genes including CHD7. RESULTS: We found presumably...

  19. Correlation matrix for quartet codon usage

    CERN Document Server

    Frappat, L; Sorba, Paul

    2005-01-01

    It has been argued that the sum of usage probabilities for codons, belonging to quartets, that have as third nucleotide C or A, is independent of the biological species for vertebrates. The comparison between the theoretical correlation matrix derived from these sum rules and the experimentally computed matrix for 26 species shows a satisfactory agreement. The Shannon entropy, weakly depending on the biological species, gives further support. Suppression of codons containing the dinucleotides CG or AU is put in evidence.

  20. Hereditary thrombophilia: identification of nonsense and missense mutations in the protein C gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romeo, G.; Hassan, H.J.; Staempfli, S.

    1987-01-01

    The structure of the gene for protein C, an anticoagulant serine protease, was analyzed in 29 unrelated patients with hereditary thrombophilia and protein C deficiency. Gene deletion(s) or gross rearrangement(s) was not demonstrable by Southern blot hybridization to cDNA probes. However, two unrelated patients showed a variant restriction pattern after Pvu II or BamHi digestion, due to mutations in the last exon: analysis of their pedigrees, including three or seven heterozygotes, respectively, with ∼50% reduction of both enzymatic and antigen level, showed the abnormal restriction pattern in all heterozygous individuals, but not in normal relatives. Cloning of protein C gene and sequencing of the last exon allowed the authors to identify a nonsense and a missense mutation, respectively. In the first case, codon 306 (CGA, arginine) is mutated to an inframe stop codon, thus generating a new Pvu II recognition site. In the second case, a missense mutation in the BamHI palindrome (GGATCC → GCATCC) leads to substitution of a key amino acid (a tryptophan to cysteine substitution at position 402), invariantly conserved in eukaryotic serine proteases. These point mutations may explain the protein C-deficiency phenotype of heterozygotes in the two pedigrees

  1. CodonLogo: a sequence logo-based viewer for codon patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Virag; Murphy, David P; Provan, Gregory; Baranov, Pavel V

    2012-07-15

    Conserved patterns across a multiple sequence alignment can be visualized by generating sequence logos. Sequence logos show each column in the alignment as stacks of symbol(s) where the height of a stack is proportional to its informational content, whereas the height of each symbol within the stack is proportional to its frequency in the column. Sequence logos use symbols of either nucleotide or amino acid alphabets. However, certain regulatory signals in messenger RNA (mRNA) act as combinations of codons. Yet no tool is available for visualization of conserved codon patterns. We present the first application which allows visualization of conserved regions in a multiple sequence alignment in the context of codons. CodonLogo is based on WebLogo3 and uses the same heuristics but treats codons as inseparable units of a 64-letter alphabet. CodonLogo can discriminate patterns of codon conservation from patterns of nucleotide conservation that appear indistinguishable in standard sequence logos. The CodonLogo source code and its implementation (in a local version of the Galaxy Browser) are available at http://recode.ucc.ie/CodonLogo and through the Galaxy Tool Shed at http://toolshed.g2.bx.psu.edu/.

  2. Waardenburg syndrome type II in a Chinese patient caused by a novel nonsense mutation in the SOX10 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Zhang, Tie-Song; Lin, Ken; Sun, Hao; Jiang, Hong-Chao; Yang, Yan-Li; Low, Fan; Gao, Ying-Qin; Ruan, Biao

    2016-06-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a congenital genetic disorder. It is the most common type of syndromic hearing impairment with highly genetic heterogeneity and proved to be related by 6 genes as follows: PAX3, MITF, SNAI2, EDN3, EDNRB and SOX10. This article aims to identify the genetic causes of a Chinese WS child patient. A Chinese WS child was collected for clinical data collection by questionnaire survey. DNA samples of proband and his parents were extracted from peripheral blood samples. Six candidate genes were sequenced by the Trusight One sequencing panel on the illumina NextSeq 500 platform. A novel nonsense heterozygous mutation was found in the coding region of exon 2 in the SOX10 gene of proband. The novel nonsense heterozygous mutation could cause the replacement of the 55th lysine codon by stop codon (484T > C, C142R) and further more possibly cause terminating the protein translation in advance. However, both proband's parents had no mutation of genes above mentioned. The gene mutation of SOX10 [NM_006941.3 c.163A > T] is a novel nonsense mutation. No record of this mutation has been found in dbSNP, HGMD, 1000 Genomes Project, ClinVar and ESP6500 databases. It meets the condition of PS2 of strong evidence in 2015 ACMG Standards and Guidelines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Ocular phenotypes associated with two mutations (R121W, C126X) in the Norrie disease gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellner, U; Fuchs, S; Bornfeld, N; Foerster, M H; Gal, A

    1996-06-01

    To describe the ocular phenotypes associated with 2 mutations in the Norrie disease gene including a manifesting carrier. Ophthalmological examinations were performed in 2 affected males and one manifesting carrier. Genomic DNA was analyzed by direct sequencing of the Norrie disease gene. Family I: A 29-year-old male had the right eye enucleated at the age of 3 years. His left eye showed severe temporal dragging of the retina and central scars. Visual acuity was 20/300. DNA analysis revealed a C-to-T transition of the first nucleotide in codon 121 predicting the replacement of arginine-121 by tryptophan (R121W). Both the mother and maternal grandmother carry the same mutation in heterozygous form. Family 2: A 3-month-old boy presented with severe temporal dragging of the retina on both eyes and subsequently developed retinal detachment. Visual acuity was limited to light perception. His mother's left eye was amaurotic and phthitic. Her right eye showed severe retinal dragging, visual acuity was reduced to 20/60. DNA analysis revealed a T-to-A transversion of the third nucleotide in codon 126 creating a stop codon (C126X). The mother and maternal grandmother were carriers. Mutations in the Norrie disease gene can lead to retinal malformations of variable severity both in hemizygous males and manifesting carriers.

  4. Neutral lipid-storage disease with myopathy and extended phenotype with novel PNPLA2 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Roberto; Pozzessere, Simone; Rastelli, Emanuele; Serra, Laura; Terracciano, Chiara; Gibellini, Manuela; Bozzali, Marco; Arca, Marcello

    2016-04-01

    Neutral lipid-storage disease with myopathy is caused by mutations in PNPLA2, which produce skeletal and cardiac myopathy. We report a man with multiorgan neutral lipid storage and unusual multisystem clinical involvement, including cognitive impairment. Quantitative brain MRI with voxel-based morphometry and extended neuropsychological assessment were performed. In parallel, the coding sequences and intron/exon boundaries of the PNPLA2 gene were screened by direct sequencing. Neuropsychological assessment revealed global cognitive impairment, and brain MRI showed reduced gray matter volume in the temporal lobes. Molecular characterization revealed a novel homozygous mutation in exon 5 of PNPLA2 (c.714C>A), resulting in a premature stop codon (p.Cys238*). Some PNPLA2 mutations, such as the one described here, may present with an extended phenotype, including brain involvement. In these cases, complete neuropsychological testing, combined with quantitative brain MRI, may help to characterize and quantify cognitive impairment. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Next Generation Sequencing approach to molecular diagnosis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy; identification of a novel mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimzadeh-Vesal, Reza; Teymoori, Atieh; Azimi-Nezhad, Mohsen; Hosseini, Forough Sadat

    2018-02-20

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD; MIM 310200) is one of the most common and severe type of hereditary muscular dystrophies. The disease is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. The dystrophin gene is associated with X-linked recessive Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy. This disease occurs almost exclusively in males. The clinical symptoms of muscle weakness usually begin at childhood. The main symptoms of this disorder are gradually muscular weakness. The affected patients have inability to standing up and walking. Death is usually due to respiratory infection or cardiomyopathy. In this article, we have reported the discovery of a new nonsense mutation that creates abnormal stop codon in the dystrophin gene. This mutation was detected using Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technique. The subject was a 17-year-old male with muscular dystrophy that who was suspected of having DMD. He was referred to Hakim medical genetics center of Neyshabur, IRAN. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Unusual AIP mutation and phenocopy in the family of a young patient with acromegalic gigantism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Ali Imran

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Early-onset acromegaly causing gigantism is often associated with aryl-hydrocarbon-interacting receptor protein (AIP mutation, especially if there is a positive family history. A15y male presented with tiredness and visual problems. He was 201 cm tall with a span of 217 cm. He had typical facial features of acromegaly, elevated IGF-1, secondary hypogonadism and a large macroadenoma. His paternal aunt had a history of acromegaly presenting at the age of 35 years. Following transsphenoidal surgery, his IGF-1 normalized and clinical symptoms improved. He was found to have a novel AIP mutation destroying the stop codon c.991T>C; p.*331R. Unexpectedly, his father and paternal aunt were negative for this mutation while his mother and older sister were unaffected carriers, suggesting that his aunt represents a phenocopy.

  7. Distribution of mutations in the PEX gene in families with X-linked hypophosphataemic rickets (HYP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, P S; Oudet, C L; Francis, F; Sinding, C; Pannetier, S; Econs, M J; Strom, T M; Meitinger, T; Garabedian, M; David, A; Macher, M A; Questiaux, E; Popowska, E; Pronicka, E; Read, A P; Mokrzycki, A; Glorieux, F H; Drezner, M K; Hanauer, A; Lehrach, H; Goulding, J N; O'Riordan, J L

    1997-04-01

    Mutations in the PEX gene at Xp22.1 (phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases, on the X-chromosome), are responsible for X-linked hypophosphataemic rickets (HYP). Homology of PEX to the M13 family of Zn2+ metallopeptidases which include neprilysin (NEP) as prototype, has raised important questions regarding PEX function at the molecular level. The aim of this study was to analyse 99 HYP families for PEX gene mutations, and to correlate predicted changes in the protein structure with Zn2+ metallopeptidase gene function. Primers flanking 22 characterised exons were used to amplify DNA by PCR, and SSCP was then used to screen for mutations. Deletions, insertions, nonsense mutations, stop codons and splice mutations occurred in 83% of families screened for in all 22 exons, and 51% of a separate set of families screened in 17 PEX gene exons. Missense mutations in four regions of the gene were informative regarding function, with one mutation in the Zn2+-binding site predicted to alter substrate enzyme interaction and catalysis. Computer analysis of the remaining mutations predicted changes in secondary structure, N-glycosylation, protein phosphorylation and catalytic site molecular structure. The wide range of mutations that align with regions required for protease activity in NEP suggests that PEX also functions as a protease, and may act by processing factor(s) involved in bone mineral metabolism.

  8. Identification of Mutations Underlying 20 Inborn Errors of Metabolism in the United Arab Emirates Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Rebeh, Imen; Hertecant, Jozef L.; Al-Jasmi, Fatma A.; Aburawi, Hanan E.; Al-Yahyaee, Said A.; Al-Gazali, Lihadh

    2012-01-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) are frequently encountered by physicians in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). However, the mutations underlying a large number of these disorders have not yet been determined. Therefore, the objective of this study was to identify the mutations underlying a number of IEM disorders among UAE residents from both national and expatriate families. A case series of patients from 34 families attending the metabolic clinic at Tawam Hospital were clinically evaluated, and molecular testing was carried out to determine their causative mutations. The mutation analysis was carried out at molecular genetics diagnostic laboratories. Thirty-eight mutations have been identified as responsible for twenty IEM disorders, including in the metabolism of amino acids, lipids, steroids, metal transport and mitochondrial energy metabolism, and lysosomal storage disorders. Nine of the identified mutations are novel, including two missense mutations, three premature stop codons and four splice site mutations. Mutation analysis of IEM disorders in the UAE population has an important impact on molecular diagnosis and genetic counseling for families affected by these disorders. PMID:22106832

  9. Identification of four novel mutations of the WFS1 gene in Iranian Wolfram syndrome pedigrees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahraman, Martha; Abbaszadegan, Mohammad Reza; Vakili, Rahim; Hosseini, Sousan; Fardi Golyan, Fatemeh; Ghaemi, Nosrat; Forghanifard, Mohammad Mahdi

    2016-12-01

    Wolfram syndrome is a rare neurodegenerative disorder with an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance characterized by various clinical manifestations. The related gene, WFS1, encodes a transmembrane glycoprotein, named wolframin. Genetic analyses demonstrated that mutations in this gene are associated with WS type 1. Our aim in this study was to sequence WFS1 coding region in Iranian Wolfram syndrome pedigrees. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood of 12 WS patients and their healthy parents. Exons 2-8 and the exon-intron junctions of WFS1 were sequenced. DNA sequences were compared to the reference using Sequencher software. Molecular analysis of WFS1 revealed six different mutations. Four novel and two previously reported mutations were identified. One novel mutation, c.1379_1381del, is predicted to produce an aberrant protein. A second novel mutation, c.1384G > T, encodes a truncated protein. Novel mutation, c.1097-1107dup (11 bp), causes a frameshift which results in a premature stop codon. We screened for the novel missense mutation, c.1010C > T, in 100 control alleles. This mutation was not found in any of the healthy controls. Our study increased the spectrum of WFS1 mutations and supported the role of WFS1 in susceptibility to WS. We hope that these findings open new horizons to future molecular investigations which may help to prevent and treat this devastating disease.

  10. Novel folliculin (FLCN) mutation and familial spontaneous pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, J-F; Shen, X-Q; Zhu, F; Tian, L

    2017-01-01

    Familial spontaneous pneumothorax is one of the characteristics of Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHDS), which is an autosomal dominant disease caused by the mutation of folliculin (FLCN). To investigate the mutation of FLCN gene in a familial spontaneous pneumothorax. Prospective case study. Clinical and genetic data of a Chinese family with four patients who presented spontaneous pneumothorax in the absence of skin lesions or renal tumors were collected. CT scan of patient's lung was applied for observation of pneumothorax. DNA sequencing of the coding exons (4-14 exons) of FLCN was performed for all 11 members of the family and 100 unrelated healthy controls. CT scan of patient's lung showed spontaneous pneumothorax. A mutation (c. 510C > G) that leads to a premature stop codon (p. Y170X) was found in the proband using DNA sequencing of coding exons (4-14 exons) of FLCN. This mutation was also observed in the other affected members of the family. A nonsense mutation of FLCN was found in a spontaneous pneumothorax family. Our results expand the mutational spectrum of FLCN in patients with BHDS. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Association of Physicians. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Essentiality, conservation, evolutionary pressure and codon bias in bacterial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilucca, Maddalena; Cimini, Giulio; Giansanti, Andrea

    2018-07-15

    Essential genes constitute the core of genes which cannot be mutated too much nor lost along the evolutionary history of a species. Natural selection is expected to be stricter on essential genes and on conserved (highly shared) genes, than on genes that are either nonessential or peculiar to a single or a few species. In order to further assess this expectation, we study here how essentiality of a gene is connected with its degree of conservation among several unrelated bacterial species, each one characterised by its own codon usage bias. Confirming previous results on E. coli, we show the existence of a universal exponential relation between gene essentiality and conservation in bacteria. Moreover, we show that, within each bacterial genome, there are at least two groups of functionally distinct genes, characterised by different levels of conservation and codon bias: i) a core of essential genes, mainly related to cellular information processing; ii) a set of less conserved nonessential genes with prevalent functions related to metabolism. In particular, the genes in the first group are more retained among species, are subject to a stronger purifying conservative selection and display a more limited repertoire of synonymous codons. The core of essential genes is close to the minimal bacterial genome, which is in the focus of recent studies in synthetic biology, though we confirm that orthologs of genes that are essential in one species are not necessarily essential in other species. We also list a set of highly shared genes which, reasonably, could constitute a reservoir of targets for new anti-microbial drugs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Mapping the Plasticity of the E. coli Genetic Code with Orthogonal Pair Directed Sense Codon Reassignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Margaret A; Biddle, Wil; Fisk, John Domenic

    2018-04-18

    The relative quantitative importance of the factors that determine the fidelity of translation is largely unknown, which makes predicting the extent to which the degeneracy of the genetic code can be broken challenging. Our strategy of using orthogonal tRNA/aminoacyl tRNA synthetase pairs to precisely direct the incorporation of a single amino acid in response to individual sense and nonsense codons provides a suite of related data with which to examine the plasticity of the code. Each directed sense codon reassignment measurement is an in vivo competition experiment between the introduced orthogonal translation machinery and the natural machinery in E. coli. This report discusses 20 new, related genetic codes, in which a targeted E. coli wobble codon is reassigned to tyrosine utilizing the orthogonal tyrosine tRNA/aminoacyl tRNA synthetase pair from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii. One at a time, reassignment of each targeted sense codon to tyrosine is quantified in cells by measuring the fluorescence of GFP variants in which the essential tyrosine residue is encoded by a non-tyrosine codon. Significantly, every wobble codon analyzed may be partially reassigned with efficiencies ranging from 0.8% to 41%. The accumulation of the suite of data enables a qualitative dissection of the relative importance of the factors affecting the fidelity of translation. While some correlation was observed between sense codon reassignment and either competing endogenous tRNA abundance or changes in aminoacylation efficiency of the altered orthogonal system, no single factor appears to predominately drive translational fidelity. Evaluation of relative cellular fitness in each of the 20 quantitatively-characterized proteome-wide tyrosine substitution systems suggests that at a systems level, E. coli is robust to missense mutations.

  13. Large-Scale Genomic Analysis of Codon Usage in Dengue Virus and Evaluation of Its Phylogenetic Dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar E. Lara-Ramírez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing number of dengue virus (DENV genome sequences available allows identifying the contributing factors to DENV evolution. In the present study, the codon usage in serotypes 1–4 (DENV1–4 has been explored for 3047 sequenced genomes using different statistics methods. The correlation analysis of total GC content (GC with GC content at the three nucleotide positions of codons (GC1, GC2, and GC3 as well as the effective number of codons (ENC, ENCp versus GC3 plots revealed mutational bias and purifying selection pressures as the major forces influencing the codon usage, but with distinct pressure on specific nucleotide position in the codon. The correspondence analysis (CA and clustering analysis on relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU within each serotype showed similar clustering patterns to the phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequences for DENV1–4. These clustering patterns are strongly related to the virus geographic origin. The phylogenetic dependence analysis also suggests that stabilizing selection acts on the codon usage bias. Our analysis of a large scale reveals new feature on DENV genomic evolution.

  14. Large-Scale Genomic Analysis of Codon Usage in Dengue Virus and Evaluation of Its Phylogenetic Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara-Ramírez, Edgar E.; Salazar, Ma Isabel; López-López, María de Jesús; Salas-Benito, Juan Santiago; Sánchez-Varela, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    The increasing number of dengue virus (DENV) genome sequences available allows identifying the contributing factors to DENV evolution. In the present study, the codon usage in serotypes 1–4 (DENV1–4) has been explored for 3047 sequenced genomes using different statistics methods. The correlation analysis of total GC content (GC) with GC content at the three nucleotide positions of codons (GC1, GC2, and GC3) as well as the effective number of codons (ENC, ENCp) versus GC3 plots revealed mutational bias and purifying selection pressures as the major forces influencing the codon usage, but with distinct pressure on specific nucleotide position in the codon. The correspondence analysis (CA) and clustering analysis on relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) within each serotype showed similar clustering patterns to the phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequences for DENV1–4. These clustering patterns are strongly related to the virus geographic origin. The phylogenetic dependence analysis also suggests that stabilizing selection acts on the codon usage bias. Our analysis of a large scale reveals new feature on DENV genomic evolution. PMID:25136631

  15. Automated design of degenerate codon libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Marco A; Daugherty, Patrick S

    2005-12-01

    Degenerate codon libraries are frequently used in protein engineering and evolution studies but are often limited to targeting a small number of positions to adequately limit the search space. To mitigate this, codon degeneracy can be limited using heuristics or previous knowledge of the targeted positions. To automate design of libraries given a set of amino acid sequences, an algorithm (LibDesign) was developed that generates a set of possible degenerate codon libraries, their resulting size, and their score relative to a user-defined scoring function. A gene library of a specified size can then be constructed that is representative of the given amino acid distribution or that includes specific sequences or combinations thereof. LibDesign provides a new tool for automated design of high-quality protein libraries that more effectively harness existing sequence-structure information derived from multiple sequence alignment or computational protein design data.

  16. Universality and Shannon entropy of codon usage

    CERN Document Server

    Frappat, L; Sciarrino, A; Sorba, Paul

    2003-01-01

    The distribution functions of the codon usage probabilities, computed over all the available GenBank data, for 40 eukaryotic biological species and 5 chloroplasts, do not follow a Zipf law, but are best fitted by the sum of a constant, an exponential and a linear function in the rank of usage. For mitochondriae the analysis is not conclusive. A quantum-mechanics-inspired model is proposed to describe the observed behaviour. These functions are characterized by parameters that strongly depend on the total GC content of the coding regions of biological species. It is predicted that the codon usage is the same in all exonic genes with the same GC content. The Shannon entropy for codons, also strongly depending on the exonic GC content, is computed.

  17. Hand gesture recognition by analysis of codons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandra, Poornima; Shrikhande, Neelima

    2007-09-01

    The problem of recognizing gestures from images using computers can be approached by closely understanding how the human brain tackles it. A full fledged gesture recognition system will substitute mouse and keyboards completely. Humans can recognize most gestures by looking at the characteristic external shape or the silhouette of the fingers. Many previous techniques to recognize gestures dealt with motion and geometric features of hands. In this thesis gestures are recognized by the Codon-list pattern extracted from the object contour. All edges of an image are described in terms of sequence of Codons. The Codons are defined in terms of the relationship between maxima, minima and zeros of curvature encountered as one traverses the boundary of the object. We have concentrated on a catalog of 24 gesture images from the American Sign Language alphabet (Letter J and Z are ignored as they are represented using motion) [2]. The query image given as an input to the system is analyzed and tested against the Codon-lists, which are shape descriptors for external parts of a hand gesture. We have used the Weighted Frequency Indexing Transform (WFIT) approach which is used in DNA sequence matching for matching the Codon-lists. The matching algorithm consists of two steps: 1) the query sequences are converted to short sequences and are assigned weights and, 2) all the sequences of query gestures are pruned into match and mismatch subsequences by the frequency indexing tree based on the weights of the subsequences. The Codon sequences with the most weight are used to determine the most precise match. Once a match is found, the identified gesture and corresponding interpretation are shown as output.

  18. Dural ectasia and FBN1 mutation screening of 40 patients with Marfan syndrome and related disorders: role of dural ectasia for the diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attanasio, Monica; Pratelli, Elisa; Porciani, Maria Cristina; Evangelisti, Lucia; Torricelli, Elena; Pellicanò, Giannantonio; Abbate, Rosanna; Gensini, Gian Franco; Pepe, Guglielmina

    2013-07-01

    Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder of connective tissue caused by mutations in the gene encoding fibrillin-1 (FBN1), a matrix component of microfibrils. Dural ectasia, i.e. enlargement of the neural canal mainly located in the lower lumbar and sacral region, frequently occurs in Marfan patients. The aim of our study was to investigate the role of dural ectasia in raising the diagnosis of Marfan syndrome and its association with FBN1 mutations. We studied 40 unrelated patients suspected for MFS, who underwent magnetic resonance imaging searching for dural ectasia. In all of them FBN1 gene analysis was also performed. Thirty-seven patients resulted affected by Marfan syndrome according to the '96 Ghent criteria; in 30 of them the diagnosis was confirmed when revaluated by the recently revised criteria (2010). Thirty-six patients resulted positive for dural ectasia. The degree of dural ectasia was grade 1 in 19 patients, grade 2 in 11 patients, and grade 3 in 6 patients. In 7 (24%) patients, the presence of dural ectasia allowed to reach a positive score for systemic feature criterion. Twenty-four patients carried an FBN1 mutation, that were represented by 13 missense (54%), and 11 (46%) mutations generating a premature termination codon (PTC, frameshifts and stop codons). No mutation was detected in the remaining 16 (6 patients with MFS and 10 with related disorders according to revised Ghent criteria). The prevalence of severe (grade 2 and grade 3) involvement of dura mater was higher in patients harbouring premature termination codon (PTC) mutations than those carrying missense-mutations (8/11 vs 2/13, P = 0.0111). Our data emphasizes the importance of dural ectasia screening to reach the diagnosis of Marfan syndrome especially when it is uncertain and indicates an association between PTC mutations and severe dural ectasia in Marfan patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Analysis of synonymous codon usage patterns in the genus Rhizobium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinxin; Wu, Liang; Zhou, Ping; Zhu, Shengfeng; An, Wei; Chen, Yu; Zhao, Lin

    2013-11-01

    The codon usage patterns of rhizobia have received increasing attention. However, little information is available regarding the conserved features of the codon usage patterns in a typical rhizobial genus. The codon usage patterns of six completely sequenced strains belonging to the genus Rhizobium were analysed as model rhizobia in the present study. The relative neutrality plot showed that selection pressure played a role in codon usage in the genus Rhizobium. Spearman's rank correlation analysis combined with correspondence analysis (COA) showed that the codon adaptation index and the effective number of codons (ENC) had strong correlation with the first axis of the COA, which indicated the important role of gene expression level and the ENC in the codon usage patterns in this genus. The relative synonymous codon usage of Cys codons had the strongest correlation with the second axis of the COA. Accordingly, the usage of Cys codons was another important factor that shaped the codon usage patterns in Rhizobium genomes and was a conserved feature of the genus. Moreover, the comparison of codon usage between highly and lowly expressed genes showed that 20 unique preferred codons were shared among Rhizobium genomes, revealing another conserved feature of the genus. This is the first report of the codon usage patterns in the genus Rhizobium.

  20. Novel Mutation in the TSC2 Gene Associated with Prenatally Diagnosed Cardiac Rhabdomyomas and Cerebral Tuberous Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac rhabdomyomas are prenatal echocardiographic markers for tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC. TSC is caused by mutations in the genes TSC1 and TSC2. We report a 28-year-old, gravida 5, para 2, woman with an uncomplicated pregnancy until prenatal ultrasound at 34 weeks' gestation revealed fetal cardiac tumors. Ultrafast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI at 36 weeks' gestation showed cardiac rhab-domyomas and small subependymal tubers. At 39 weeks' gestation, a 2262 g female infant was delivered uneventfully. Postnatal echocardiography confirmed cardiac rhabdomyomas and MRI verified small cerebral subependymal tubers. Mutational analysis of TSC1 and TSC2 genes using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography and direct sequencing of the genes was performed and revealed that the parents had wildtype DNA, while the proband was heterozygous for a novel de novo nonsense mutation, c.4830 G > A, in exon 36 of the TSC2 gene, resulting in a change of codon 1610 TGG (tryptophan to TGA (stop codon. The mutation predicted a W1610X premature termination of the tuberin protein. These findings support an association between a TSC2 de novo nonsense mutation and prenatally detected cardiac rhabdomyomas and cerebral tuberous sclerosis. Familial molecular analysis of TSC1 and TSC2 in cases with prenatally diagnosed cardiac rhabdomyomas and cerebral tuberous sclerosis lesions is helpful in prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling.

  1. Influence of certain forces on evolution of synonymous codon usage bias in certain species of three basal orders of aquatic insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selva Kumar, C; Nair, Rahul R; Sivaramakrishnan, K G; Ganesh, D; Janarthanan, S; Arunachalam, M; Sivaruban, T

    2012-12-01

    Forces that influence the evolution of synonymous codon usage bias are analyzed in six species of three basal orders of aquatic insects. The rationale behind choosing six species of aquatic insects (three from Ephemeroptera, one from Plecoptera, and two from Odonata) for the present analysis is based on phylogenetic position at the basal clades of the Order Insecta facilitating the understanding of the evolution of codon bias and of factors shaping codon usage patterns in primitive clades of insect lineages and their subtle differences in some of their ecological and environmental requirements in terms of habitat-microhabitat requirements, altitudinal preferences, temperature tolerance ranges, and consequent responses to climate change impacts. The present analysis focuses on open reading frames of the 13 protein-coding genes in the mitochondrial genome of six carefully chosen insect species to get a comprehensive picture of the evolutionary intricacies of codon bias. In all the six species, A and T contents are observed to be significantly higher than G and C, and are used roughly equally. Since transcription hypothesis on codon usage demands A richness and T poorness, it is quite likely that mutation pressure may be the key factor associated with synonymous codon usage (SCU) variations in these species because the mutation hypothesis predicts AT richness and GC poorness in the mitochondrial DNA. Thus, AT-biased mutation pressure seems to be an important factor in framing the SCU variation in all the selected species of aquatic insects, which in turn explains the predominance of A and T ending codons in these species. This study does not find any association between microhabitats and codon usage variations in the mitochondria of selected aquatic insects. However, this study has identified major forces, such as compositional constraints and mutation pressure, which shape patterns of codon usage in mitochondrial genes in the primitive clades of insect lineages.

  2. A novel c.240_241insGG mutation in NDP gene in a family with Norrie disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andarva, Monavvar; Jamshidi, Javad; Ghaedi, Hamid; Daftarian, Narsis; Emamalizadeh, Babak; Alehabib, Elham; Taghavi, Shaghyegh; Pouriran, Ramin; Darvish, Hossein

    2018-03-01

    Norrie disease (ND) is a rare, X-linked recessive disorder with the main characteristic of early childhood blindness. The aim of the present study was to identify the genetic cause of the disease and the phenotypic characteristics of the patients in an Iranian family with four affected males with ND. Norrie disease pseudoglioma (NDP) gene was sequenced and clinical examination was performed on patients. A GG dinucleotide insertion in exon 3 (c.240_241insGG) of NDP was detected in all patients. The mutation caused a frameshift and an early stop codon (p.Phe81Glyfs*23). A novel mutation was found in the NDP gene in the affected males of the family. As the mutation was absent in the normal male members of the family, it should be the genetic cause of the disease. © 2017 Optometry Australia.

  3. Codon-optimized antibiotic resistance gene improves efficiency of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-10-01

    Oct 1, 2013 ... transient transformation and cell growth in selective culture were significantly increased by use of fgmR ... Our result shows that similarity in codon usage pattern is an important factor ... Codon adaptation index (CAI) (Sharp.

  4. Novel nonsense mutation of the endothelin-B receptor gene in a family with Waardenburg-Hirschsprung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrris, P; Carter, N D; Patton, M A

    1999-11-05

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) comprises sensorineural hearing loss, hypopigmentation of skin and hair, and pigmentary disturbances of the irides. Four types of WS have been classified to date; in WS type IV (WS4), patients additionally have colonic aganglionosis (Hirschsprung disease, HSCR). Mutations in the endothelin-3 (EDN3), endothelin-B receptor (EDNRB), and Sox10 genes have been identified as causative for WS type IV. We screened a family with a combined WS-HSCR phenotype for mutations in the EDNRB locus using standard DNA mutation analysis and sequencing techniques. We have identified a novel nonsense mutation at codon 253 (CGA-->TGA, Arg-->STOP). This mutation leads to a premature end of the translation of EDNRB at exon 3, and it is predicted to produce a truncated and nonfunctional endothelin-B receptor. All affected relatives were heterozygous for the Arg(253)-->STOP mutation, whereas it was not observed in over 50 unrelated individuals used as controls. These data confirm the role of EDNRB in the cause of the Waardenburg-Hirschsprung syndrome and demonstrate that in WS-HSCR there is a lack of correlation between phenotype and genotype and a variable expression of disease even within the same family. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. eCodonOpt: a systematic computational framework for optimizing codon usage in directed evolution experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Gregory L.; Maranas, Costas D.

    2002-01-01

    We present a systematic computational framework, eCodonOpt, for designing parental DNA sequences for directed evolution experiments through codon usage optimization. Given a set of homologous parental proteins to be recombined at the DNA level, the optimal DNA sequences encoding these proteins are sought for a given diversity objective. We find that the free energy of annealing between the recombining DNA sequences is a much better descriptor of the extent of crossover formation than sequence...

  6. Emergent Rules for Codon Choice Elucidated by Editing Rare Arginine Codons in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-20

    the successful 110 CGU con- versions with the 13 optimized codon substitutions to produce strain C123, in which all 123 AGR codons have been removed...culture medium consisted of LBL autoclaved with 1.5% (wt/vol) Bacto Agar (Fisher), containing the same concentrations of antibiotics as necessary. ColE1...controlling the ef- ficiency of protein translation. Cell 141(2):344–354. 15. Li GW (2015) How do bacteria tune translation efficiency? Curr Opin Microbiol

  7. Codon usage bias and the evolution of influenza A viruses. Codon Usage Biases of Influenza Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Emily HM

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The influenza A virus is an important infectious cause of morbidity and mortality in humans and was responsible for 3 pandemics in the 20th century. As the replication of the influenza virus is based on its host's machinery, codon usage of its viral genes might be subject to host selection pressures, especially after interspecies transmission. A better understanding of viral evolution and host adaptive responses might help control this disease. Results Relative Synonymous Codon Usage (RSCU values of the genes from segment 1 to segment 6 of avian and human influenza viruses, including pandemic H1N1, were studied via Correspondence Analysis (CA. The codon usage patterns of seasonal human influenza viruses were distinct among their subtypes and different from those of avian viruses. Newly isolated viruses could be added to the CA results, creating a tool to investigate the host origin and evolution of viral genes. It was found that the 1918 pandemic H1N1 virus contained genes with mammalian-like viral codon usage patterns, indicating that the introduction of this virus to humans was not through in toto transfer of an avian influenza virus. Many human viral genes had directional changes in codon usage over time of viral isolation, indicating the effect of host selection pressures. These changes reduced the overall GC content and the usage of G at the third codon position in the viral genome. Limited evidence of translational selection pressure was found in a few viral genes. Conclusions Codon usage patterns from CA allowed identification of host origin and evolutionary trends in influenza viruses, providing an alternative method and a tool to understand the evolution of influenza viruses. Human influenza viruses are subject to selection pressure on codon usage which might assist in understanding the characteristics of newly emerging viruses.

  8. A survey of new temperature-sensitive, embryonic-lethal mutations in C. elegans: 24 alleles of thirteen genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean M O'Rourke

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available To study essential maternal gene requirements in the early C. elegans embryo, we have screened for temperature-sensitive, embryonic lethal mutations in an effort to bypass essential zygotic requirements for such genes during larval and adult germline development. With conditional alleles, multiple essential requirements can be examined by shifting at different times from the permissive temperature of 15°C to the restrictive temperature of 26°C. Here we describe 24 conditional mutations that affect 13 different loci and report the identity of the gene mutations responsible for the conditional lethality in 22 of the mutants. All but four are mis-sense mutations, with two mutations affecting splice sites, another creating an in-frame deletion, and one creating a premature stop codon. Almost all of the mis-sense mutations affect residues conserved in orthologs, and thus may be useful for engineering conditional mutations in other organisms. We find that 62% of the mutants display additional phenotypes when shifted to the restrictive temperature as L1 larvae, in addition to causing embryonic lethality after L4 upshifts. Remarkably, we also found that 13 out of the 24 mutations appear to be fast-acting, making them particularly useful for careful dissection of multiple essential requirements. Our findings highlight the value of C. elegans for identifying useful temperature-sensitive mutations in essential genes, and provide new insights into the requirements for some of the affected loci.

  9. Preferred and avoided codon pairs in three domains of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tenson Tanel

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative synonymous codons are not used with equal frequencies. In addition, the contexts of codons – neighboring nucleotides and neighboring codons – can have certain patterns. The codon context can influence both translational accuracy and elongation rates. However, it is not known how strong or conserved the codon context preferences in different organisms are. We analyzed 138 organisms (bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes to find conserved patterns of codon pairs. Results After removing the effects of single codon usage and dipeptide biases we discovered a set of neighboring codons for which avoidances or preferences were conserved in all three domains of life. Such biased codon pairs could be divided into subtypes on the basis of the nucleotide patterns that influence the bias. The most frequently avoided type of codon pair was nnUAnn. We discovered that 95.7% of avoided nnUAnn type patterns contain out-frame UAA or UAG triplets on the sense and/or antisense strand. On average, nnUAnn codon pairs are more frequently avoided in ORFeomes than in genomes. Thus we assume that translational selection plays a major role in the avoidance of these codon pairs. Among the preferred codon pairs, nnGCnn was the major type. Conclusion Translational selection shapes codon pair usage in protein coding sequences by rules that are common to all three domains of life. The most frequently avoided codon pairs contain the patterns nnUAnn, nnGGnn, nnGnnC, nnCGCn, GUCCnn, CUCCnn, nnCnnA or UUCGnn. The most frequently preferred codon pairs contain the patterns nnGCnn, nnCAnn or nnUnCn.

  10. Novel insertion mutation in a non-Jewish Caucasian type 1 Gaucher disease patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choy, F.Y.M.; Humphries, M.L. [Univ. of Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Ferreira, P. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada)

    1997-01-20

    Gaucher disease is the most prevalent lysosomal storage disorder. It is autosomal recessive, resulting in lysosomal glucocerebrosidase deficiency. Three clinical forms of Gaucher disease have been described: type 1 (nonneuronopathic), type 2 (acute neuronopathic), and type 3 (subacute neuronopathic). We performed PCR-thermal cycle sequence analysis of glucocerebrosidase genomic DNA and identified a novel mutation in a non-Jewish type 1 Gaucher disease patient. It is a C insertion in exon 3 at cDNA nucleotide position 122 and genomic nucleotide position 1626. This mutation causes a frameshift and, subsequently, four of the five codons immediately downstream of the insertion were changed while the sixth was converted to a stop codon, resulting in premature termination of protein translation. The 122CC insertion abolishes a Cac81 restriction endonuclease cleavage site, allowing a convenient and reliable method for detection using RFLP analysis of PCR-amplified glucocerebrosidase genomic DNA. The mutation in the other Gaucher allele was found to be an A{r_arrow}G substitution at glucocerebrosidase cDNA nucleotide position 1226 that so far has only been reported among type 1 Gaucher disease patients. Since mutation 122CC causes a frameshift and early termination of protein translation, it most likely results in a meaningless transcript and subsequently no residual glucocerebrosidase enzyme activity. We speculate that mutation 122CC may result in a worse prognosis than mutations associated with partial activity. When present in the homozygous form, it could be a lethal allele similar to what has been postulated for the other known insertion mutation, 84GG. Our patient, who is a compound heterozygote 122CC/1226G, has moderately severe type 1 Gaucher disease. Her clinical response to Ceredase{reg_sign} therapy that began 31 months ago has been favorable, though incomplete. 30 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Codon cassette mutagenesis: a general method to insert or replace individual codons by using universal mutagenic cassettes.

    OpenAIRE

    Kegler-Ebo, D M; Docktor, C M; DiMaio, D

    1994-01-01

    We describe codon cassette mutagenesis, a simple method of mutagenesis that uses universal mutagenic cassettes to deposit single codons at specific sites in double-stranded DNA. A target molecule is first constructed that contains a blunt, double-strand break at the site targeted for mutagenesis. A double-stranded mutagenic codon cassette is then inserted at the target site. Each mutagenic codon cassette contains a three base pair direct terminal repeat and two head-to-head recognition sequen...

  12. Phenotypic spectrum associated with mutations of the mitochondrial polymerase gamma gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Rita; Hudson, Gavin; Ferrari, Gianfrancesco; Fütterer, Nancy; Ahola, Sofia; Lamantea, Eleonora; Prokisch, Holger; Lochmüller, Hanns; McFarland, Robert; Ramesh, V; Klopstock, Thomas; Freisinger, Peter; Salvi, Fabrizio; Mayr, Johannes A; Santer, Rene; Tesarova, Marketa; Zeman, Jiri; Udd, Bjarne; Taylor, Robert W; Turnbull, Douglass; Hanna, Michael; Fialho, Doreen; Suomalainen, Anu; Zeviani, Massimo; Chinnery, Patrick F

    2006-07-01

    Mutations in the gene coding for the catalytic subunit of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymerase gamma (POLG1) have recently been described in patients with diverse clinical presentations, revealing a complex relationship between genotype and phenotype in patients and their families. POLG1 was sequenced in patients from different European diagnostic and research centres to define the phenotypic spectrum and advance understanding of the recurrence risks. Mutations were identified in 38 cases, with the majority being sporadic compound heterozygotes. Eighty-nine DNA sequence changes were identified, including 2 predicted to alter a splice site, 1 predicted to cause a premature stop codon and 13 predicted to cause novel amino acid substitutions. The majority of children had a mutation in the linker region, often 1399G-->A (A467T), and a mutation affecting the polymerase domain. Others had mutations throughout the gene, and 11 had 3 or more substitutions. The clinical presentation ranged from the neonatal period to late adult life, with an overlapping phenotypic spectrum from severe encephalopathy and liver failure to late-onset external ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, myopathy and isolated muscle pain or epilepsy. There was a strong gender bias in children, with evidence of an environmental interaction with sodium valproate. POLG1 mutations cause an overlapping clinical spectrum of disease with both dominant and recessive modes of inheritance. 1399G-->A (A467T) is common in children, but complete POLG1 sequencing is required to identify multiple mutations that can have complex implications for genetic counselling.

  13. Common Β- Thalassaemia Mutations in

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Azarfam

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: β –Thalassaemia was first explained by Thomas Cooly as Cooly’s anaemia in 1925. The β- thalassaemias are hereditary autosomal disorders with decreased or absent β-globin chain synthesis. The most common genetic defects in β-thalassaemias are caused by point mutations, micro deletions or insertions within the β-globin gene. Material and Methods: In this research , 142 blood samples (64 from childrens hospital of Tabriz , 15 samples from Shahid Gazi hospital of Tabriz , 18 from Urumia and 45 samples from Aliasghar hospital of Ardebil were taken from thalassaemic patients (who were previously diagnosed .Then 117 non-familial samples were selected . The DNA of the lymphocytes of blood samples was extracted by boiling and Proteinase K- SDS procedure, and mutations were detected by ARMS-PCR methods. Results: From the results obtained, eleven most common mutations,most of which were Mediterranean mutations were detected as follows; IVS-I-110(G-A, IVS-I-1(G-A ،IVS-I-5(G-C ,Frameshift Codon 44 (-C,( codon5(-CT,IVS-1-6(T-C, IVS-I-25(-25bp del ,Frameshift 8.9 (+G ,IVS-II-1(G-A ,Codon 39(C-T, Codon 30(G-C the mutations of the samples were defined. The results showed that Frameshift 8.9 (+G, IVS-I-110 (G-A ,IVS-II-I(G-A, IVS-I-5(G-C, IVS-I-1(G-A , Frameshift Codon 44(-C , codon5(-CT , IVS-1-6(T-C , IVS-I-25(-25bp del with a frequency of 29.9%, 25.47%,17.83%, 7.00%, 6.36% , 6.63% , 3.8% , 2.5% , 0.63% represented the most common mutations in North - west Iran. No mutations in Codon 39(C-T and Codon 30(G-C were detected. Cunclusion: The frequency of the same mutations in patients from North - West of Iran seems to be different as compared to other regions like Turkey, Pakistan, Lebanon and Fars province of Iran. The pattern of mutations in this region is more or less the same as in the Mediterranean region, but different from South west Asia and East Asia.

  14. A novel nonsense mutation in the tyrosinase gene is related to the albinism in a capuchin monkey (Sapajus apella).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galante Rocha de Vasconcelos, Felipe Tadeu; Hauzman, Einat; Dutra Henriques, Leonardo; Kilpp Goulart, Paulo Roney; de Faria Galvão, Olavo; Sano, Ronaldo Yuiti; da Silva Souza, Givago; Lynch Alfaro, Jessica; de Lima Silveira, Luis Carlos; Fix Ventura, Dora; Oliveira Bonci, Daniela Maria

    2017-05-05

    Oculocutaneous Albinism (OCA) is an autosomal recessive inherited condition that affects the pigmentation of eyes, hair and skin. The OCA phenotype may be caused by mutations in the tyrosinase gene (TYR), which expresses the tyrosinase enzyme and has an important role in the synthesis of melanin pigment. The aim of this study was to identify the genetic mutation responsible for the albinism in a captive capuchin monkey, and to describe the TYR gene of normal phenotype individuals. In addition, we identified the subject's species. A homozygous nonsense mutation was identified in exon 1 of the TYR gene, with the substitution of a cytosine for a thymine nucleotide (C64T) at codon 22, leading to a premature stop codon (R22X) in the albino robust capuchin monkey. The albino and five non-albino robust capuchin monkeys were identified as Sapajus apella, based on phylogenetic analyses, pelage pattern and geographic provenance. One individual was identified as S. macrocephalus. We conclude that the point mutation C64T in the TYR gene is responsible for the OCA1 albino phenotype in the capuchin monkey, classified as Sapajus apella.

  15. Molecular Diagnosis of Analbuminemia: A New Case Caused by a Nonsense Mutation in the Albumin Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Minchiotti

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Analbuminemia is a rare autosomal recessive disorder manifested by the absence, or severe reduction, of circulating serum albumin (ALB. We report here a new case diagnosed in a 45 years old man of Southwestern Asian origin, living in Switzerland, on the basis of his low ALB concentration (0.9 g/L in the absence of renal or gastrointestinal protein loss, or liver dysfunction. The clinical diagnosis was confirmed by a mutational analysis of the albumin (ALB gene, carried out by single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP, heteroduplex analysis (HA, and DNA sequencing. This screening of the ALB gene revealed that the proband is homozygous for two mutations: the insertion of a T in a stretch of eight Ts spanning positions c.1289 + 23–c.1289 + 30 of intron 10 and a c.802 G > T transversion in exon 7. Whereas the presence of an additional T in the poly-T tract has no direct deleterious effect, the latter nonsense mutation changes the codon GAA for Glu244 to the stop codon TAA, resulting in a premature termination of the polypeptide chain. The putative protein product would have a length of only 243 amino acid residues instead of the normal 585 found in the mature serum albumin, but no evidence for the presence in serum of such a truncated polypeptide chain could be obtained by two dimensional electrophoresis and western blotting analysis.

  16. Molecular diagnosis of analbuminemia: a new case caused by a nonsense mutation in the albumin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagnino, Monica; Caridi, Gianluca; Haenni, Ueli; Duss, Adrian; Aregger, Fabienne; Campagnoli, Monica; Galliano, Monica; Minchiotti, Lorenzo

    2011-01-01

    Analbuminemia is a rare autosomal recessive disorder manifested by the absence, or severe reduction, of circulating serum albumin (ALB). We report here a new case diagnosed in a 45 years old man of Southwestern Asian origin, living in Switzerland, on the basis of his low ALB concentration (0.9 g/L) in the absence of renal or gastrointestinal protein loss, or liver dysfunction. The clinical diagnosis was confirmed by a mutational analysis of the albumin (ALB) gene, carried out by single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP), heteroduplex analysis (HA), and DNA sequencing. This screening of the ALB gene revealed that the proband is homozygous for two mutations: the insertion of a T in a stretch of eight Ts spanning positions c.1289 + 23-c.1289 + 30 of intron 10 and a c.802 G > T transversion in exon 7. Whereas the presence of an additional T in the poly-T tract has no direct deleterious effect, the latter nonsense mutation changes the codon GAA for Glu244 to the stop codon TAA, resulting in a premature termination of the polypeptide chain. The putative protein product would have a length of only 243 amino acid residues instead of the normal 585 found in the mature serum albumin, but no evidence for the presence in serum of such a truncated polypeptide chain could be obtained by two dimensional electrophoresis and western blotting analysis.

  17. Comprehensive analysis of the codon usage patterns in the envelope glycoprotein E2 gene of the classical swine fever virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Chen

    Full Text Available The classical swine fever virus (CSFV, circulating worldwide, is a highly contagious virus. Since the emergence of CSFV, it has caused great economic loss in swine industry. The envelope glycoprotein E2 gene of the CSFV is an immunoprotective antigen that induces the immune system to produce neutralizing antibodies. Therefore, it is essential to study the codon usage of the E2 gene of the CSFV. In this study, 140 coding sequences of the E2 gene were analyzed. The value of effective number of codons (ENC showed low codon usage bias in the E2 gene. Our study showed that codon usage could be described mainly by mutation pressure ENC plot analysis combined with principal component analysis (PCA and translational selection-correlation analysis between the general average hydropathicity (Gravy and aromaticity (Aroma, and nucleotides at the third position of codons (A3s, T3s, G3s, C3s and GC3s. Furthermore, the neutrality analysis, which explained the relationship between GC12s and GC3s, revealed that natural selection had a key role compared with mutational bias during the evolution of the E2 gene. These results lay a foundation for further research on the molecular evolution of CSFV.

  18. Genetic and codon usage bias analyses of polymerase genes of equine influenza virus and its relation to evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Bidhan Ch; Virmani, Nitin; Kumar, Naveen; Anand, Taruna; Pavulraj, S; Rash, Adam; Elton, Debra; Rash, Nicola; Bhatia, Sandeep; Sood, Richa; Singh, Raj Kumar; Tripathi, Bhupendra Nath

    2017-08-23

    Equine influenza is a major health problem of equines worldwide. The polymerase genes of influenza virus have key roles in virus replication, transcription, transmission between hosts and pathogenesis. Hence, the comprehensive genetic and codon usage bias of polymerase genes of equine influenza virus (EIV) were analyzed to elucidate the genetic and evolutionary relationships in a novel perspective. The group - specific consensus amino acid substitutions were identified in all polymerase genes of EIVs that led to divergence of EIVs into various clades. The consistent amino acid changes were also detected in the Florida clade 2 EIVs circulating in Europe and Asia since 2007. To study the codon usage patterns, a total of 281,324 codons of polymerase genes of EIV H3N8 isolates from 1963 to 2015 were systemically analyzed. The polymerase genes of EIVs exhibit a weak codon usage bias. The ENc-GC3s and Neutrality plots indicated that natural selection is the major influencing factor of codon usage bias, and that the impact of mutation pressure is comparatively minor. The methods for estimating host imposed translation pressure suggested that the polymerase acidic (PA) gene seems to be under less translational pressure compared to polymerase basic 1 (PB1) and polymerase basic 2 (PB2) genes. The multivariate statistical analysis of polymerase genes divided EIVs into four evolutionary diverged clusters - Pre-divergent, Eurasian, Florida sub-lineage 1 and 2. Various lineage specific amino acid substitutions observed in all polymerase genes of EIVs and especially, clade 2 EIVs underwent major variations which led to the emergence of a phylogenetically distinct group of EIVs originating from Richmond/1/07. The codon usage bias was low in all the polymerase genes of EIVs that was influenced by the multiple factors such as the nucleotide compositions, mutation pressure, aromaticity and hydropathicity. However, natural selection was the major influencing factor in defining the

  19. Identification of a novel BRCA1 nucleotide 4803delCC/c.4684delCC mutation and a nucleotide 249T>A/c.130T>A (p.Cys44Ser) mutation in two Greenlandic Inuit families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas van Overeem; Jønson, Lars; Albrechtsen, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Germ-line mutations in the tumour suppressor proteins BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to breast and ovarian cancer. We have recently identified a Greenlandic Inuit BRCA1 nucleotide 234T>G/c.115T>G (p.Cys39Gly) founder mutation, which at that time was the only disease-causing BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation...... identified in this population. Here, we describe the identification of a novel disease-causing BRCA1 nucleotide 4803delCC/c.4684delCC mutation in a Greenlandic Inuit with ovarian cancer. The mutation introduces a frameshift and a premature stop at codon 1572. We have also identified a BRCA1 nucleotide 249T......>A/c.130T>A (p.Cys44Ser) mutation in another Greenlandic individual with ovarian cancer. This patient share a 1-2 Mb genomic fragment, containing the BRCA1 gene, with four Danish families harbouring the same mutation, suggesting that the 249T>A/c.130T>A (p.Cys44Ser) mutation originates from a Danish...

  20. The Selective Advantage of Synonymous Codon Usage Bias in Salmonella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrit Brandis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The genetic code in mRNA is redundant, with 61 sense codons translated into 20 different amino acids. Individual amino acids are encoded by up to six different codons but within codon families some are used more frequently than others. This phenomenon is referred to as synonymous codon usage bias. The genomes of free-living unicellular organisms such as bacteria have an extreme codon usage bias and the degree of bias differs between genes within the same genome. The strong positive correlation between codon usage bias and gene expression levels in many microorganisms is attributed to selection for translational efficiency. However, this putative selective advantage has never been measured in bacteria and theoretical estimates vary widely. By systematically exchanging optimal codons for synonymous codons in the tuf genes we quantified the selective advantage of biased codon usage in highly expressed genes to be in the range 0.2-4.2 x 10-4 per codon per generation. These data quantify for the first time the potential for selection on synonymous codon choice to drive genome-wide sequence evolution in bacteria, and in particular to optimize the sequences of highly expressed genes. This quantification may have predictive applications in the design of synthetic genes and for heterologous gene expression in biotechnology.

  1. Differential trends in the codon usage patterns in HIV-1 genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aridaman Pandit

    Full Text Available Host-pathogen interactions underlie one of the most complex evolutionary phenomena resulting in continual adaptive genetic changes, where pathogens exploit the host's molecular resources for growth and survival, while hosts try to eliminate the pathogen. Deciphering the molecular basis of host-pathogen interactions is useful in understanding the factors governing pathogen evolution and disease propagation. In host-pathogen context, a balance between mutation, selection, and genetic drift is known to maintain codon bias in both organisms. Studies revealing determinants of the bias and its dynamics are central to the understanding of host-pathogen evolution. We considered the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV type 1 and its human host to search for evolutionary signatures in the viral genome. Positive selection is known to dominate intra-host evolution of HIV-1, whereas high genetic variability underlies the belief that neutral processes drive inter-host differences. In this study, we analyze the codon usage patterns of HIV-1 genomes across all subtypes and clades sequenced over a period of 23 years. We show presence of unique temporal correlations in the codon bias of three HIV-1 genes illustrating differential adaptation of the HIV-1 genes towards the host preferred codons. Our results point towards gene-specific translational selection to be an important force driving the evolution of HIV-1 at the population level.

  2. Novel APC gene mutations associated with protein alteration in diffuse type gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghatak, Souvik; Chakraborty, Payel; Sarkar, Sandeep Roy; Chowdhury, Biswajit; Bhaumik, Arup; Kumar, Nachimuthu Senthil

    2017-06-02

    The role of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene in mitosis might be critical for regulation of genomic stability and chromosome segregation. APC gene mutations have been associated to have a role in colon cancer and since gastric and colon tumors share some common genetic lesions, it is relevant to investigate the role of APC tumor suppressor gene in gastric cancer. We investigated for somatic mutations in the Exons 14 and 15 of APC gene from 40 diffuse type gastric cancersamples. Rabbit polyclonal anti-APC antibody was used, which detects the wild-type APC protein and was recommended for detection of the respective protein in human tissues. Cell cycle analysis was done from tumor and adjacent normal tissue. APC immunoreactivity showed positive expression of the protein in stages I, II, III and negative expression in Stages III and IV. Two novel deleterious variations (g.127576C > A, g.127583C > T) in exon 14 sequence were found to generate stop codon (Y622* and Q625*)in the tumor samples. Due to the generation of stop codon, the APC protein might be truncated and all the regulatory features could be lost which has led to the down-regulation of protein expression. Our results indicate that aneuploidy might occurdue to the codon 622 and 625 APC-driven gastric tumorigenesis, in agreement with our cell cycle analysis. The APC gene function in mitosis and chromosomal stability might be lost and G1 might be arrested with high quantity of DNA in the S phase. Six missense somatic mutations in tumor samples were detected in exon 15 A-B, twoof which showed pathological and disease causing effects based on SIFT, Polyphen2 and SNPs & GO score and were not previously reported in the literature or the public mutation databases. The two novel pathological somatic mutations (g.127576C > A, g.127583C > T) in exon 14 might be altering the protein expression leading to development of gastric cancer in the study population. Our study showed that mutations in the APC

  3. Stop smoking support programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smokeless tobacco - stop smoking programs; Stop smoking techniques; Smoking cessation programs; Smoking cessation techniques ... You can find out about smoking cessation programs from: Your ... Your employer Your local health department The National Cancer ...

  4. Has Human Evolution Stopped?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan R. Templeton

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been argued that human evolution has stopped because humans now adapt to their environment via cultural evolution and not biological evolution. However, all organisms adapt to their environment, and humans are no exception. Culture defines much of the human environment, so cultural evolution has actually led to adaptive evolution in humans. Examples are given to illustrate the rapid pace of adaptive evolution in response to cultural innovations. These adaptive responses have important implications for infectious diseases, Mendelian genetic diseases, and systemic diseases in current human populations. Moreover, evolution proceeds by mechanisms other than natural selection. The recent growth in human population size has greatly increased the reservoir of mutational variants in the human gene pool, thereby enhancing the potential for human evolution. The increase in human population size coupled with our increased capacity to move across the globe has induced a rapid and ongoing evolutionary shift in how genetic variation is distributed within and among local human populations. In particular, genetic differences between human populations are rapidly diminishing and individual heterozygosity is increasing, with beneficial health effects. Finally, even when cultural evolution eliminates selection on a trait, the trait can still evolve due to natural selection on other traits. Our traits are not isolated, independent units, but rather are integrated into a functional whole, so selection on one trait can cause evolution to occur on another trait, sometimes with mildly maladaptive consequences.

  5. Novel FAM20A mutation causes autosomal recessive amelogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volodarsky, Michael; Zilberman, Uri; Birk, Ohad S

    2015-06-01

    To relate the peculiar phenotype of amelogenesis imperfecta in a large Bedouin family to the genotype determined by whole genome linkage analysis. Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a broad group of inherited pathologies affecting enamel formation, characterized by variability in phenotypes, causing mutations and modes of inheritance. Autosomal recessive or compound heterozygous mutations in FAM20A, encoding sequence similarity 20, member A, have been shown to cause several AI phenotypes. Five members from a large consanguineous Bedouin family presented with hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta with unerupted and resorbed permanent molars. Following Soroka Medical Center IRB approval and informed consent, blood samples were obtained from six affected offspring, five obligatory carriers and two unaffected siblings. Whole genome linkage analysis was performed followed by Sanger sequencing of FAM20A. The sequencing unravelled a novel homozygous deletion mutation in exon 11 (c.1523delC), predicted to insert a premature stop codon (p.Thr508Lysfs*6). We provide an interesting case of novel mutation in this rare disorder, in which the affected kindred is unique in the large number of family members sharing a similar phenotype. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Reversion of the Arabidopsis rpn12a-1 exon-trap mutation by an intragenic suppressor that weakens the chimeric 5’ splice site [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/18y

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Kurepa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the Arabidopsis 26S proteasome mutant rpn12a-1, an exon-trap T-DNA is inserted 531 base pairs downstream of the RPN12a STOP codon. We have previously shown that this insertion activates a STOP codon-associated latent 5' splice site that competes with the polyadenylation signal during processing of the pre-mRNA. As a result of this dual input from splicing and polyadenylation in the rpn12a-1 mutant, two RPN12a transcripts are produced and they encode the wild-type RPN12a and a chimeric RPN12a-NPTII protein. Both proteins form complexes with other proteasome subunits leading to the formation of wild-type and mutant proteasome versions. The net result of this heterogeneity of proteasome particles is a reduction of total cellular proteasome activity. One of the consequences of reduced proteasomal activity is decreased sensitivity to the major plant hormone cytokinin. Methods: We performed ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenesis of rpn12a-1 and isolated revertants with wild-type cytokinin sensitivity. Results: We describe the isolation and analyses of suppressor of rpn12a-1 (sor1. The sor1 mutation is intragenic and located at the fifth position of the chimeric intron. This mutation weakens the activated 5' splice site associated with the STOP codon and tilts the processing of the RPN12a mRNA back towards polyadenylation. Conclusions: These results validate our earlier interpretation of the unusual nature of the rpn12a-1 mutation. Furthermore, the data show that optimal 26S proteasome activity requires RPN12a accumulation beyond a critical threshold. Finally, this finding reinforces our previous conclusion that proteasome function is critical for the cytokinin-dependent regulation of plant growth.

  7. Novel BRCA1 splice-site mutation in ovarian cancer patients of Slavic origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivokuca, Ana; Dragos, Vita Setrajcic; Stamatovic, Ljiljana; Blatnik, Ana; Boljevic, Ivana; Stegel, Vida; Rakobradovic, Jelena; Skerl, Petra; Jovandic, Stevo; Krajc, Mateja; Magic, Mirjana Brankovic; Novakovic, Srdjan

    2018-04-01

    Mutations in breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) lead to defects in a number of cellular pathways including DNA damage repair and transcriptional regulation, resulting in the elevated genome instability and predisposing to breast and ovarian cancers. We report a novel mutation LRG_292t1:c.4356delA,p.(Ala1453Glnfs*3) in the 12th exon of BRCA1, in the splice site region near the donor site of intron 12. It is a frameshift mutation with the termination codon generated on the third amino acid position from the site of deletion. Human Splice Finder 3.0 and MutationTaster have assessed this variation as disease causing, based on the alteration of splicing, creation of premature stop codon and other potential alterations initiated by nucleotide deletion. Among the most important alterations are frameshift and splice site changes (score of the newly created donor splice site: 0.82). c.4356delA was associated with two ovarian cancer cases in two families of Slavic origin. It was detected by next generation sequencing, and confirmed with Sanger sequencing in both cases. Because of the fact that it changes the reading frame of the protein, novel mutation c.4356delA p.(Ala1453Glnfs*3) in BRCA1 gene might be of clinical significance for hereditary ovarian cancer. Further functional as well as segregation analyses within the families are necessary for appropriate clinical classification of this variant. Since it has been detected in two ovarian cancer patients of Slavic origin, it is worth investigating founder effect of this mutation in Slavic populations.

  8. A codon window in mRNA downstream of the initiation codon where NGG codons give strongly reduced gene expression in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez de Valdivia, Ernesto I; Isaksson, Leif A

    2004-01-01

    and GGG, but not GGN or GNG (where N is non-G), are unique since they are associated with a very low gene expression also if located at positions +2, +3 and +5. All codons, including NGG, give a normal gene expression if placed at positions +7. The negative effect by the NGG codons is true for both...

  9. EDAR mutation in autosomal dominant hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia in two Swedish families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmitt-Egenolf Marcus

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED is a genetic disorder characterized by defective development of teeth, hair, nails and eccrine sweat glands. Both autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive forms of HED have previously been linked to mutations in the ectodysplasin 1 anhidrotic receptor (EDAR protein that plays an important role during embryogenesis. Methods The coding DNA sequence of the EDAR gene was analyzed in two large Swedish three-generational families with autosomal dominant HED. Results A non-sense C to T mutation in exon 12 was identified in both families. This disease-specific mutation changes an arginine amino acid in position 358 of the EDAR protein into a stop codon (p.Arg358X, thereby truncating the protein. In addition to the causative mutation two polymorphisms, not associated with the HED disorder, were also found in the EDAR gene. Conclusion The finding of the p.Arg358X mutation in the Swedish families is the first corroboration of a previously described observation in an American family. Thus, our study strengthens the role of this particular mutation in the aetiology of autosomal dominant HED and confirms the importance of EDAR for the development of HED.

  10. [Mutation screening of MITF gene in patients with Waardenburg syndrome type 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Yang, Shu-Zhi; Liu, Jun; Han, Bing; Wang, Guo-Jian; Zhang, Xin; Kang, Dong-Yang; Dai, Pu; Young, Wie-Yen; Yuan, Hui-Jun

    2008-04-01

    Warrgenburg syndrome type 2 (WS2) is the most common autosomal dominantly-inherited syndrome with hearing loss. MITF (microphthalmia associated transcription factor)is a basic-helix-loop-helix-luecine zipper (bHLHZip) factor which regulates expression of tyrosinase, and is involved in melanocyte differentiation. Mutations in MITF associated with WS2 have been identified in some but not all affected families. Here, we report a three-generation Chinese family with a point mutation in the MITF gene causing WS2. The proband exhibits congenital severe sensorineural hearing loss, heterochromia iridis and facial freckles. One of family members manifests sensorineural deafness, and the other patients show premature greying or/and freckles. This mutation, heterozygous deletion c.639delA, creates a stop codon in exon 7 and is predicted to result in a truncated protein lacking normal interaction with its target DNA motif. This mutation is a novel mutation and the third case identified in exon 7 of MITF in WS2. Though there is only one base pair distance between this novel mutation and the other two documented cases and similar amino acids change, significant difference is seen in clinical phenotype, which suggests genetic background may play an important role.

  11. Gene composer: database software for protein construct design, codon engineering, and gene synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorimer, Don; Raymond, Amy; Walchli, John; Mixon, Mark; Barrow, Adrienne; Wallace, Ellen; Grice, Rena; Burgin, Alex; Stewart, Lance

    2009-04-21

    To improve efficiency in high throughput protein structure determination, we have developed a database software package, Gene Composer, which facilitates the information-rich design of protein constructs and their codon engineered synthetic gene sequences. With its modular workflow design and numerous graphical user interfaces, Gene Composer enables researchers to perform all common bio-informatics steps used in modern structure guided protein engineering and synthetic gene engineering. An interactive Alignment Viewer allows the researcher to simultaneously visualize sequence conservation in the context of known protein secondary structure, ligand contacts, water contacts, crystal contacts, B-factors, solvent accessible area, residue property type and several other useful property views. The Construct Design Module enables the facile design of novel protein constructs with altered N- and C-termini, internal insertions or deletions, point mutations, and desired affinity tags. The modifications can be combined and permuted into multiple protein constructs, and then virtually cloned in silico into defined expression vectors. The Gene Design Module uses a protein-to-gene algorithm that automates the back-translation of a protein amino acid sequence into a codon engineered nucleic acid gene sequence according to a selected codon usage table with minimal codon usage threshold, defined G:C% content, and desired sequence features achieved through synonymous codon selection that is optimized for the intended expression system. The gene-to-oligo algorithm of the Gene Design Module plans out all of the required overlapping oligonucleotides and mutagenic primers needed to synthesize the desired gene constructs by PCR, and for physically cloning them into selected vectors by the most popular subcloning strategies. We present a complete description of Gene Composer functionality, and an efficient PCR-based synthetic gene assembly procedure with mis-match specific endonuclease

  12. Gene Composer: database software for protein construct design, codon engineering, and gene synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mixon Mark

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To improve efficiency in high throughput protein structure determination, we have developed a database software package, Gene Composer, which facilitates the information-rich design of protein constructs and their codon engineered synthetic gene sequences. With its modular workflow design and numerous graphical user interfaces, Gene Composer enables researchers to perform all common bio-informatics steps used in modern structure guided protein engineering and synthetic gene engineering. Results An interactive Alignment Viewer allows the researcher to simultaneously visualize sequence conservation in the context of known protein secondary structure, ligand contacts, water contacts, crystal contacts, B-factors, solvent accessible area, residue property type and several other useful property views. The Construct Design Module enables the facile design of novel protein constructs with altered N- and C-termini, internal insertions or deletions, point mutations, and desired affinity tags. The modifications can be combined and permuted into multiple protein constructs, and then virtually cloned in silico into defined expression vectors. The Gene Design Module uses a protein-to-gene algorithm that automates the back-translation of a protein amino acid sequence into a codon engineered nucleic acid gene sequence according to a selected codon usage table with minimal codon usage threshold, defined G:C% content, and desired sequence features achieved through synonymous codon selection that is optimized for the intended expression system. The gene-to-oligo algorithm of the Gene Design Module plans out all of the required overlapping oligonucleotides and mutagenic primers needed to synthesize the desired gene constructs by PCR, and for physically cloning them into selected vectors by the most popular subcloning strategies. Conclusion We present a complete description of Gene Composer functionality, and an efficient PCR-based synthetic gene

  13. Codon usage and amino acid usage influence genes expression level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Prosenjit; Malakar, Arup Kumar; Chakraborty, Supriyo

    2018-02-01

    Highly expressed genes in any species differ in the usage frequency of synonymous codons. The relative recurrence of an event of the favored codon pair (amino acid pairs) varies between gene and genomes due to varying gene expression and different base composition. Here we propose a new measure for predicting the gene expression level, i.e., codon plus amino bias index (CABI). Our approach is based on the relative bias of the favored codon pair inclination among the genes, illustrated by analyzing the CABI score of the Medicago truncatula genes. CABI showed strong correlation with all other widely used measures (CAI, RCBS, SCUO) for gene expression analysis. Surprisingly, CABI outperforms all other measures by showing better correlation with the wet-lab data. This emphasizes the importance of the neighboring codons of the favored codon in a synonymous group while estimating the expression level of a gene.

  14. Mutations of the RTEL1 Helicase in a Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson Syndrome Patient Highlight the Importance of the ARCH Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jullien, Laurent; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Kermasson, Laetitia; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Leblanc, Thierry; Soulier, Jean; Londono-Vallejo, Arturo; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Callebaut, Isabelle; Revy, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    The DNA helicase RTEL1 participates in telomere maintenance and genome stability. Biallelic mutations in the RTEL1 gene account for the severe telomere biology disorder characteristic of the Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome (HH). Here, we report a HH patient (P4) carrying two novel compound heterozygous mutations in RTEL1: a premature stop codon (c.949A>T, p.Lys317*) and an intronic deletion leading to an exon skipping and an in-frame deletion of 25 amino-acids (p.Ile398_Lys422). P4's cells exhibit short and dysfunctional telomeres similarly to other RTEL1-deficient patients. 3D structure predictions indicated that the p.Ile398_Lys422 deletion affects a part of the helicase ARCH domain, which lines the pore formed with the core HD and the iron-sulfur cluster domains and is highly specific of sequences from the eukaryotic XPD family members. © 2016 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  15. Insight into pattern of codon biasness and nucleotide base usage in serotonin receptor gene family from different mammalian species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dass, J Febin Prabhu; Sudandiradoss, C

    2012-07-15

    5-HT (5-Hydroxy-tryptamine) or serotonin receptors are found both in central and peripheral nervous system as well as in non-neuronal tissues. In the animal and human nervous system, serotonin produces various functional effects through a variety of membrane bound receptors. In this study, we focus on 5-HT receptor family from different mammals and examined the factors that account for codon and nucleotide usage variation. A total of 110 homologous coding sequences from 11 different mammalian species were analyzed using relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU), correspondence analysis (COA) and hierarchical cluster analysis together with nucleotide base usage frequency of chemically similar amino acid codons. The mean effective number of codon (ENc) value of 37.06 for 5-HT(6) shows very high codon bias within the family and may be due to high selective translational efficiency. The COA and Spearman's rank correlation reveals that the nucleotide compositional mutation bias as the major factors influencing the codon usage in serotonin receptor genes. The hierarchical cluster analysis suggests that gene function is another dominant factor that affects the codon usage bias, while species is a minor factor. Nucleotide base usage was reported using Goldman, Engelman, Stietz (GES) scale reveals the presence of high uracil (>45%) content at functionally important hydrophobic regions. Our in silico approach will certainly help for further investigations on critical inference on evolution, structure, function and gene expression aspects of 5-HT receptors family which are potential antipsychotic drug targets. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Synonymous Codon Usage Analysis of Thirty Two Mycobacteriophage Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Hassan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Synonymous codon usage of protein coding genes of thirty two completely sequenced mycobacteriophage genomes was studied using multivariate statistical analysis. One of the major factors influencing codon usage is identified to be compositional bias. Codons ending with either C or G are preferred in highly expressed genes among which C ending codons are highly preferred over G ending codons. A strong negative correlation between effective number of codons (Nc and GC3s content was also observed, showing that the codon usage was effected by gene nucleotide composition. Translational selection is also identified to play a role in shaping the codon usage operative at the level of translational accuracy. High level of heterogeneity is seen among and between the genomes. Length of genes is also identified to influence the codon usage in 11 out of 32 phage genomes. Mycobacteriophage Cooper is identified to be the highly biased genome with better translation efficiency comparing well with the host specific tRNA genes.

  17. Recessive mutations in SPTBN2 implicate β-III spectrin in both cognitive and motor development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Lise

    Full Text Available β-III spectrin is present in the brain and is known to be important in the function of the cerebellum. Heterozygous mutations in SPTBN2, the gene encoding β-III spectrin, cause Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 5 (SCA5, an adult-onset, slowly progressive, autosomal-dominant pure cerebellar ataxia. SCA5 is sometimes known as "Lincoln ataxia," because the largest known family is descended from relatives of the United States President Abraham Lincoln. Using targeted capture and next-generation sequencing, we identified a homozygous stop codon in SPTBN2 in a consanguineous family in which childhood developmental ataxia co-segregates with cognitive impairment. The cognitive impairment could result from mutations in a second gene, but further analysis using whole-genome sequencing combined with SNP array analysis did not reveal any evidence of other mutations. We also examined a mouse knockout of β-III spectrin in which ataxia and progressive degeneration of cerebellar Purkinje cells has been previously reported and found morphological abnormalities in neurons from prefrontal cortex and deficits in object recognition tasks, consistent with the human cognitive phenotype. These data provide the first evidence that β-III spectrin plays an important role in cortical brain development and cognition, in addition to its function in the cerebellum; and we conclude that cognitive impairment is an integral part of this novel recessive ataxic syndrome, Spectrin-associated Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia type 1 (SPARCA1. In addition, the identification of SPARCA1 and normal heterozygous carriers of the stop codon in SPTBN2 provides insights into the mechanism of molecular dominance in SCA5 and demonstrates that the cell-specific repertoire of spectrin subunits underlies a novel group of disorders, the neuronal spectrinopathies, which includes SCA5, SPARCA1, and a form of West syndrome.

  18. Translation initiation factor elF3 promotes programmed stop codon readthrough

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beznosková, Petra; Wagner, Susan; Jansen, Myrte Esmeralda; von der Haar, T.; Valášek, Leoš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 10 (2015), s. 5099-5111 ISSN 0305-1048 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-05394S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : EUKARYOTIC RELEASE FACTOR-1 * RNA RECOGNITION MOTIF * TICK FEVER VIRUS Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 9.202, year: 2015

  19. Phase 2a study of ataluren-mediated dystrophin production in patients with nonsense mutation Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard S Finkel

    Full Text Available Approximately 13% of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD have a nonsense mutation in the dystrophin gene, resulting in a premature stop codon in the corresponding mRNA and failure to generate a functional protein. Ataluren (PTC124 enables ribosomal readthrough of premature stop codons, leading to production of full-length, functional proteins.This Phase 2a open-label, sequential dose-ranging trial recruited 38 boys with nonsense mutation DMD. The first cohort (n = 6 received ataluren three times per day at morning, midday, and evening doses of 4, 4, and 8 mg/kg; the second cohort (n = 20 was dosed at 10, 10, 20 mg/kg; and the third cohort (n = 12 was dosed at 20, 20, 40 mg/kg. Treatment duration was 28 days. Change in full-length dystrophin expression, as assessed by immunostaining in pre- and post-treatment muscle biopsy specimens, was the primary endpoint.Twenty three of 38 (61% subjects demonstrated increases in post-treatment dystrophin expression in a quantitative analysis assessing the ratio of dystrophin/spectrin. A qualitative analysis also showed positive changes in dystrophin expression. Expression was not associated with nonsense mutation type or exon location. Ataluren trough plasma concentrations active in the mdx mouse model were consistently achieved at the mid- and high- dose levels in participants. Ataluren was generally well tolerated.Ataluren showed activity and safety in this short-term study, supporting evaluation of ataluren 10, 10, 20 mg/kg and 20, 20, 40 mg/kg in a Phase 2b, double-blind, long-term study in nonsense mutation DMD.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00264888.

  20. Efficient Coproduction of Mannanase and Cellulase by the Transformation of a Codon-Optimized Endomannanase Gene from Aspergillus niger into Trichoderma reesei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xianhua; Xue, Xianli; Li, Mengzhu; Gao, Fei; Hao, Zhenzhen; Huang, Huoqing; Luo, Huiying; Qin, Lina; Yao, Bin; Su, Xiaoyun

    2017-12-20

    Cellulase and mannanase are both important enzyme additives in animal feeds. Expressing the two enzymes simultaneously within one microbial host could potentially lead to cost reductions in the feeding of animals. For this purpose, we codon-optimized the Aspergillus niger Man5A gene to the codon-usage bias of Trichoderma reesei. By comparing the free energies and the local structures of the nucleotide sequences, one optimized sequence was finally selected and transformed into the T. reesei pyridine-auxotrophic strain TU-6. The codon-optimized gene was expressed to a higher level than the original one. Further expressing the codon-optimized gene in a mutated T. reesei strain through fed-batch cultivation resulted in coproduction of cellulase and mannanase up to 1376 U·mL -1 and 1204 U·mL -1 , respectively.

  1. Restriction digest screening facilitates efficient detection of site-directed mutations introduced by CRISPR in C. albicans UME6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Ben A; Smith, Olivia L; Pickerill, Ethan S; York, Mary K; Buenconsejo, Kristen J P; Chambers, Antonio E; Bernstein, Douglas A

    2018-01-01

    Introduction of point mutations to a gene of interest is a powerful tool when determining protein function. CRISPR-mediated genome editing allows for more efficient transfer of a desired mutation into a wide range of model organisms. Traditionally, PCR amplification and DNA sequencing is used to determine if isolates contain the intended mutation. However, mutation efficiency is highly variable, potentially making sequencing costly and time consuming. To more efficiently screen for correct transformants, we have identified restriction enzymes sites that encode for two identical amino acids or one or two stop codons. We used CRISPR to introduce these restriction sites directly upstream of the Candida albicans UME6 Zn 2+ -binding domain, a known regulator of C. albicans filamentation. While repair templates coding for different restriction sites were not equally successful at introducing mutations, restriction digest screening enabled us to rapidly identify isolates with the intended mutation in a cost-efficient manner. In addition, mutated isolates have clear defects in filamentation and virulence compared to wild type C. albicans . Our data suggest restriction digestion screening efficiently identifies point mutations introduced by CRISPR and streamlines the process of identifying residues important for a phenotype of interest.

  2. Stabilization of the genome of the mismatch repair deficient Mycobacterium tuberculosis by context-dependent codon choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanner, Roger M; Güthlein, Carolin; Springer, Burkhard; Böttger, Erik C; Ackermann, Martin

    2008-05-28

    The rate at which a stretch of DNA mutates is determined by the cellular systems for DNA replication and repair, and by the nucleotide sequence of the stretch itself. One sequence feature with a particularly strong influence on the mutation rate are nucleotide repeats. Some microbial pathogens use nucleotide repeats in their genome to stochastically vary phenotypic traits and thereby evade host defense. However, such unstable sequences also come at a cost, as mutations are often deleterious. Here, we analyzed how these opposing forces shaped genome stability in the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. M. tuberculosis lacks a mismatch repair system, and this renders nucleotide repeats particularly unstable. We found that proteins of M. tuberculosis are encoded by using codons in a context-dependent manner that prevents the emergence of nucleotide repeats. This context-dependent codon choice leads to a strong decrease in the estimated frame-shift mutation rate and thus to an increase in genome stability. These results indicate that a context-specific codon choice can partially compensate for the lack of a mismatch repair system, and helps to maintain genome integrity in this pathogen.

  3. Stabilization of the genome of the mismatch repair deficient Mycobacterium tuberculosis by context-dependent codon choice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ackermann Martin

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate at which a stretch of DNA mutates is determined by the cellular systems for DNA replication and repair, and by the nucleotide sequence of the stretch itself. One sequence feature with a particularly strong influence on the mutation rate are nucleotide repeats. Some microbial pathogens use nucleotide repeats in their genome to stochastically vary phenotypic traits and thereby evade host defense. However, such unstable sequences also come at a cost, as mutations are often deleterious. Here, we analyzed how these opposing forces shaped genome stability in the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. M. tuberculosis lacks a mismatch repair system, and this renders nucleotide repeats particularly unstable. Results We found that proteins of M. tuberculosis are encoded by using codons in a context-dependent manner that prevents the emergence of nucleotide repeats. This context-dependent codon choice leads to a strong decrease in the estimated frame-shift mutation rate and thus to an increase in genome stability. Conclusion These results indicate that a context-specific codon choice can partially compensate for the lack of a mismatch repair system, and helps to maintain genome integrity in this pathogen.

  4. Agutaynen Glottal Stop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quakenbush, J. Stephen

    A study investigated the phonemic and morphophonemic patterning of the glottal stop in Agutaynen, a Meso-Philippine language, and some comparison with two northern Philippine languages. Agutaynen glottal stop has as its sole origin a neutralization of contrast rule, the operation of which can be noted in three different linguistic environments.…

  5. A family of oculofaciocardiodental syndrome (OFCD) with a novel BCOR mutation and genomic rearrangements involving NHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Yukiko; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Miyamoto, Toshinobu; Nishiyama, Kiyomi; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Doi, Hiroshi; Miyake, Noriko; Ryoo, Na-Kyung; Kim, Jeong Hun; Yu, Young Suk; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2012-03-01

    Oculofaciocardiodental syndrome (OFCD) is an X-linked dominant disorder associated with male lethality, presenting with congenital cataract, dysmorphic face, dental abnormalities and septal heart defects. Mutations in BCOR (encoding BCL-6-interacting corepressor) cause OFCD. Here, we report on a Korean family with common features of OFCD including bilateral 2nd-3rd toe syndactyly and septal heart defects in three affected females (mother and two daughters). Through the mutation screening and copy number analysis using genomic microarray, we identified a novel heterozygous mutation, c.888delG, in the BCOR gene and two interstitial microduplications at Xp22.2-22.13 and Xp21.3 in all the three affected females. The BCOR mutation may lead to a premature stop codon (p.N297IfsX80). The duplication at Xp22.2-22.13 involved the NHS gene causative for Nance-Horan syndrome, which is an X-linked disorder showing similar clinical features with OFCD in affected males, and in carrier females with milder presentation. Considering the presence of bilateral 2nd-3rd toe syndactyly and septal heart defects, which is unique to OFCD, the mutation in BCOR is likely to be the major determinant for the phenotypes in this family.

  6. X-linked primary immunodeficiency associated with hemizygous mutations in the moesin (MSN) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagresle-Peyrou, Chantal; Luce, Sonia; Ouchani, Farid; Soheili, Tayebeh Shabi; Sadek, Hanem; Chouteau, Myriam; Durand, Amandine; Pic, Isabelle; Majewski, Jacek; Brouzes, Chantal; Lambert, Nathalie; Bohineust, Armelle; Verhoeyen, Els; Cosset, François-Loïc; Magerus-Chatinet, Aude; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric; Gandemer, Virginie; Monnier, Delphine; Heijmans, Catherine; van Gijn, Marielle; Dalm, Virgil A; Mahlaoui, Nizar; Stephan, Jean-Louis; Picard, Capucine; Durandy, Anne; Kracker, Sven; Hivroz, Claire; Jabado, Nada; de Saint Basile, Geneviève; Fischer, Alain; Cavazzana, Marina; André-Schmutz, Isabelle

    2016-12-01

    We investigated 7 male patients (from 5 different families) presenting with profound lymphopenia, hypogammaglobulinemia, fluctuating monocytopenia and neutropenia, a poor immune response to vaccine antigens, and increased susceptibility to bacterial and varicella zoster virus infections. We sought to characterize the genetic defect involved in a new form of X-linked immunodeficiency. We performed genetic analyses and an exhaustive phenotypic and functional characterization of the lymphocyte compartment. We observed hemizygous mutations in the moesin (MSN) gene (located on the X chromosome and coding for MSN) in all 7 patients. Six of the latter had the same missense mutation, which led to an amino acid substitution (R171W) in the MSN four-point-one, ezrin, radixin, moesin domain. The seventh patient had a nonsense mutation leading to a premature stop codon mutation (R533X). The naive T-cell counts were particularly low for age, and most CD8 + T cells expressed the senescence marker CD57. This phenotype was associated with impaired T-cell proliferation, which was rescued by expression of wild-type MSN. MSN-deficient T cells also displayed poor chemokine receptor expression, increased adhesion molecule expression, and altered migration and adhesion capacities. Our observations establish a causal link between an ezrin-radixin-moesin protein mutation and a primary immunodeficiency that could be referred to as X-linked moesin-associated immunodeficiency. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The standard genetic code and its relation to mutational pressure: robustness and equilibrium criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez Caceres, Jose Luis; Hong, Rolando; Martinez Ortiz, Carlos; Sautie Castellanos, Miguel; Valdes, Kiria; Guevara Erra, Ramon

    2004-10-01

    Under the assumption of even point mutation pressure on the DNA strand, rates for transitions from one amino acid into another were assessed. Nearly 25% of all mutations were silent. About 48% of the mutations from a given amino acid stream either into the same amino acid or into an amino acid of the same class. These results suggest a great stability of the Standard Genetic Code respect to mutation load. Concepts from chemical equilibrium theory are applicable into this case provided that mutation rate constants are given. It was obtained that unequal synonymic codon usage may lead to changes in the equilibrium concentrations. Data from real biological species showed that several amino acids are close to the respective equilibrium concentration. However in all the cases the concentration of leucine nearly doubled its equilibrium concentration, whereas for the stop command (Term) it was about 10 times lower. The overall distance from equilibrium for a set of species suggests that eukaryotes are closer to equilibrium than prokaryotes, and the HIV virus was closest to equilibrium among 15 species. We obtained that contemporary species are closer to the equilibrium than the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA) was. Similarly, nonpreserved regions in proteins are closer to equilibrium than the preserved ones. We suggest that this approach can be useful for exploring some aspects of biological evolution in the framework of Standard Genetic Code properties. (author)

  8. Deep intronic GPR143 mutation in a Japanese family with ocular albinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naruto, Takuya; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Endo, Takao; Hatsukawa, Yoshikazu; Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Imoto, Issei

    2015-06-10

    Deep intronic mutations are often ignored as possible causes of human disease. Using whole-exome sequencing, we analysed genomic DNAs of a Japanese family with two male siblings affected by ocular albinism and congenital nystagmus. Although mutations or copy number alterations of coding regions were not identified in candidate genes, the novel intronic mutation c.659-131 T > G within GPR143 intron 5 was identified as hemizygous in affected siblings and as heterozygous in the unaffected mother. This mutation was predicted to create a cryptic splice donor site within intron 5 and activate a cryptic acceptor site at 41nt upstream, causing the insertion into the coding sequence of an out-of-frame 41-bp pseudoexon with a premature stop codon in the aberrant transcript, which was confirmed by minigene experiments. This result expands the mutational spectrum of GPR143 and suggests the utility of next-generation sequencing integrated with in silico and experimental analyses for improving the molecular diagnosis of this disease.

  9. The relationship between codon usage bias and cold resistant genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barozai, M.Y.; Din, M.

    2014-01-01

    This research is based on synonymous codon usage which has been well-known as a feature that affects typical expression level of protein in an organism. Different organisms prefer different codons for same amino acid and this is called Codon Usage Bias (CUB). The codon usage directly affects the level or even direction of changes in protein expression in responses to environmental stimuli. Cold stress is a major abiotic factor that limits the agricultural productivity of plants. In the recent study CUB has been studied in Arabidopsis thaliana cold resistant and housekeeping genes and their homologs in rice (Oryza sativa) to understand the cold stress and housekeeping genes relation with CUB. Six cold resistant and three housekeeping genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and their homologs in rice, were subjected to CUB analysis. The three cold resistant genes (DREB1B, RCI and MYB15) showed more than 50% (52%, 61% and 66% respectively) similar codon usage bias for Arabidopsis thaliana and rice. On the other hand three cold resistant genes (MPK3, ICE1 and ZAT12) showed less than 50% (38%, 38% and 47% respectively) similar codon usage bias for Arabidopsis thaliana and rice. The three housekeeping genes (Actin, Tubulin and Ubiquitin) showed 76% similar codon usage bias for Arabidopsis thaliana and rice. This study will help to manage the plant gene expression through codon optimization under the cold stress. (author)

  10. Nucleotide composition bias and codon usage trends of gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-06-10

    Jun 10, 2015 ... In a wide variety of organisms, synonymous codons are selected with different ... In addition, a series of GC skew and AT skew data was calculated for codon positions 1, ..... bias from different perspectives. Interestingly .... This study was supported by programme for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative ...

  11. HSJ1-related hereditary neuropathies: novel mutations and extended clinical spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gess, Burkhard; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Schirmacher, Anja; Strom, Tim; Zitzelsberger, Manuela; Rudnik-Schöneborn, Sabine; Röhr, Dominik; Halfter, Hartmut; Young, Peter; Senderek, Jan

    2014-11-04

    To determine the nature and frequency of HSJ1 mutations in patients with hereditary motor and hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies. Patients were screened for mutations by genome-wide or targeted linkage and homozygosity studies, whole-exome sequencing, and Sanger sequencing. RNA and protein studies of skin fibroblasts were used for functional characterization. We describe 2 additional mutations in the HSJ1 gene in a cohort of 90 patients with autosomal recessive distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN) and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 (CMT2). One family with a dHMN phenotype showed the homozygous splice-site mutation c.229+1G>A, which leads to retention of intron 4 in the HSJ1 messenger RNA with a premature stop codon and loss of protein expression. Another family, presenting with a CMT2 phenotype, carried the homozygous missense mutation c.14A>G (p.Tyr5Cys). This mutation was classified as likely disease-related by several automatic algorithms for prediction of possible impact of an amino acid substitution on the structure and function of proteins. Both mutations cosegregated with autosomal recessive inheritance of the disease and were absent from the general population. Taken together, in our cohort of 90 probands, we confirm that HSJ1 mutations are a rare but detectable cause of autosomal recessive dHMN and CMT2. We provide clinical and functional information on an HSJ1 splice-site mutation and report the detailed phenotype of 2 patients with CMT2, broadening the phenotypic spectrum of HSJ1-related neuropathies. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  12. Four novel mutations in the lactase gene (LCT) underlying congenital lactase deficiency (CLD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torniainen, Suvi; Freddara, Roberta; Routi, Taina; Gijsbers, Carolien; Catassi, Carlo; Höglund, Pia; Savilahti, Erkki; Järvelä, Irma

    2009-01-22

    Congenital lactase deficiency (CLD) is a severe gastrointestinal disorder of newborns. The diagnosis is challenging and based on clinical symptoms and low lactase activity in intestinal biopsy specimens. The disease is enriched in Finland but is also present in other parts of the world. Mutations encoding the lactase (LCT) gene have recently been shown to underlie CLD. The purpose of this study was to identify new mutations underlying CLD in patients with different ethnic origins, and to increase awareness of this disease so that the patients could be sought out and treated correctly. Disaccharidase activities in intestinal biopsy specimens were assayed and the coding region of LCT was sequenced from five patients from Europe with clinical features compatible with CLD. In the analysis and prediction of mutations the following programs: ClustalW, Blosum62, PolyPhen, SIFT and Panther PSEC were used. Four novel mutations in the LCT gene were identified. A single nucleotide substitution leading to an amino acid change S688P in exon 7 and E1612X in exon 12 were present in a patient of Italian origin. Five base deletion V565fsX567 leading to a stop codon in exon 6 was found in one and a substitution R1587H in exon 12 from another Finnish patient. Both Finnish patients were heterozygous for the Finnish founder mutation Y1390X. The previously reported mutation G1363S was found in a homozygous state in two siblings of Turkish origin. This is the first report of CLD mutations in patients living outside Finland. It seems that disease is more common than previously thought. All mutations in the LCT gene lead to a similar phenotype despite the location and/or type of mutation.

  13. Four novel mutations in the lactase gene (LCT underlying congenital lactase deficiency (CLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Höglund Pia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital lactase deficiency (CLD is a severe gastrointestinal disorder of newborns. The diagnosis is challenging and based on clinical symptoms and low lactase activity in intestinal biopsy specimens. The disease is enriched in Finland but is also present in other parts of the world. Mutations encoding the lactase (LCT gene have recently been shown to underlie CLD. The purpose of this study was to identify new mutations underlying CLD in patients with different ethnic origins, and to increase awareness of this disease so that the patients could be sought out and treated correctly. Methods Disaccharidase activities in intestinal biopsy specimens were assayed and the coding region of LCT was sequenced from five patients from Europe with clinical features compatible with CLD. In the analysis and prediction of mutations the following programs: ClustalW, Blosum62, PolyPhen, SIFT and Panther PSEC were used. Results Four novel mutations in the LCT gene were identified. A single nucleotide substitution leading to an amino acid change S688P in exon 7 and E1612X in exon 12 were present in a patient of Italian origin. Five base deletion V565fsX567 leading to a stop codon in exon 6 was found in one and a substitution R1587H in exon 12 from another Finnish patient. Both Finnish patients were heterozygous for the Finnish founder mutation Y1390X. The previously reported mutation G1363S was found in a homozygous state in two siblings of Turkish origin. Conclusion This is the first report of CLD mutations in patients living outside Finland. It seems that disease is more common than previously thought. All mutations in the LCT gene lead to a similar phenotype despite the location and/or type of mutation.

  14. Codon Bias Patterns of E. coli's Interacting Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maddalena Dilucca

    Full Text Available Synonymous codons, i.e., DNA nucleotide triplets coding for the same amino acid, are used differently across the variety of living organisms. The biological meaning of this phenomenon, known as codon usage bias, is still controversial. In order to shed light on this point, we propose a new codon bias index, CompAI, that is based on the competition between cognate and near-cognate tRNAs during translation, without being tuned to the usage bias of highly expressed genes. We perform a genome-wide evaluation of codon bias for E.coli, comparing CompAI with other widely used indices: tAI, CAI, and Nc. We show that CompAI and tAI capture similar information by being positively correlated with gene conservation, measured by the Evolutionary Retention Index (ERI, and essentiality, whereas, CAI and Nc appear to be less sensitive to evolutionary-functional parameters. Notably, the rate of variation of tAI and CompAI with ERI allows to obtain sets of genes that consistently belong to specific clusters of orthologous genes (COGs. We also investigate the correlation of codon bias at the genomic level with the network features of protein-protein interactions in E.coli. We find that the most densely connected communities of the network share a similar level of codon bias (as measured by CompAI and tAI. Conversely, a small difference in codon bias between two genes is, statistically, a prerequisite for the corresponding proteins to interact. Importantly, among all codon bias indices, CompAI turns out to have the most coherent distribution over the communities of the interactome, pointing to the significance of competition among cognate and near-cognate tRNAs for explaining codon usage adaptation. Notably, CompAI may potentially correlate with translation speed measurements, by accounting for the specific delay induced by wobble-pairing between codons and anticodons.

  15. Whole-Exome Sequencing Identified a Novel Compound Heterozygous Mutation of LRRC6 in a Chinese Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia Patient

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    Lv Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD is a clinical rare peculiar disorder, mainly featured by respiratory infection, tympanitis, nasosinusitis, and male infertility. Previous study demonstrated it is an autosomal recessive disease and by 2017 almost 40 pathologic genes have been identified. Among them are the leucine-rich repeat- (LRR- containing 6 (LRRC6 codes for a 463-amino-acid cytoplasmic protein, expressed distinctively in motile cilia cells, including the testis cells and the respiratory epithelial cells. In this study, we applied whole-exome sequencing combined with PCD-known genes filtering to explore the genetic lesion of a PCD patient. A novel compound heterozygous mutation in LRRC6 (c.183T>G/p.N61K; c.179-1G>A was identified and coseparated in this family. The missense mutation (c.183T>G/p.N61K may lead to a substitution of asparagine by lysine at position 61 in exon 3 of LRRC6. The splice site mutation (c.179-1G>A may cause a premature stop codon in exon 4 and decrease the mRNA levels of LRRC6. Both mutations were not present in our 200 local controls, dbSNP, and 1000 genomes. Three bioinformatics programs also predicted that both mutations are deleterious. Our study not only further supported the importance of LRRC6 in PCD, but also expanded the spectrum of LRRC6 mutations and will contribute to the genetic diagnosis and counseling of PCD patients.

  16. TP53 mutation and human papilloma virus status of oral squamous cell carcinomas in young adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braakhuis, B J M; Rietbergen, M M; Buijze, M; Snijders, P J F; Bloemena, E; Brakenhoff, R H; Leemans, C R

    2014-09-01

    Little is known about the molecular carcinogenesis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) in young adult patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the detailed TP53 mutation and human papilloma virus (HPV) status of OSCC in patients, younger than 45 years. TP53 mutations were determined with direct sequencing on paraffin-embedded carcinoma tissue from 31 young patients and compared with two older age OSCC reference groups: one from the same institute (N = 87) and an independent one (N = 675). Biologically active tumour HPV was detected by p16-immunohistochemistry followed by a HPV-DNA GP5 + /6 + -PCR. HPV16 was present in one OSCC (3%). TP53 mutations were found in 14 (45%) OSCC: five were missense and nine resulted in a truncated protein. Six of these latter were insertions or deletions of one or more nucleotides leading to frameshift, one was at a splice site and two resulted in a stop codon. The percentage of truncating mutations (64% of all mutations) was higher than that observed in the institute's reference group (44%, P = 0.23) and in the independent reference group (24%, P = 0.002). This study shows that TP53 mutations are common in OSCC of young adult patients; infection with biologically active HPV is rare. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Amino acid repeats avert mRNA folding through conservative substitutions and synonymous codons, regardless of codon bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sailen Barik

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A significant number of proteins in all living species contains amino acid repeats (AARs of various lengths and compositions, many of which play important roles in protein structure and function. Here, I have surveyed select homopolymeric single [(An] and double [(ABn] AARs in the human proteome. A close examination of their codon pattern and analysis of RNA structure propensity led to the following set of empirical rules: (1 One class of amino acid repeats (Class I uses a mixture of synonymous codons, some of which approximate the codon bias ratio in the overall human proteome; (2 The second class (Class II disregards the codon bias ratio, and appears to have originated by simple repetition of the same codon (or just a few codons; and finally, (3 In all AARs (including Class I, Class II, and the in-betweens, the codons are chosen in a manner that precludes the formation of RNA secondary structure. It appears that the AAR genes have evolved by orchestrating a balance between codon usage and mRNA secondary structure. The insights gained here should provide a better understanding of AAR evolution and may assist in designing synthetic genes.

  18. Amino acid repeats avert mRNA folding through conservative substitutions and synonymous codons, regardless of codon bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Sailen

    2017-12-01

    A significant number of proteins in all living species contains amino acid repeats (AARs) of various lengths and compositions, many of which play important roles in protein structure and function. Here, I have surveyed select homopolymeric single [(A)n] and double [(AB)n] AARs in the human proteome. A close examination of their codon pattern and analysis of RNA structure propensity led to the following set of empirical rules: (1) One class of amino acid repeats (Class I) uses a mixture of synonymous codons, some of which approximate the codon bias ratio in the overall human proteome; (2) The second class (Class II) disregards the codon bias ratio, and appears to have originated by simple repetition of the same codon (or just a few codons); and finally, (3) In all AARs (including Class I, Class II, and the in-betweens), the codons are chosen in a manner that precludes the formation of RNA secondary structure. It appears that the AAR genes have evolved by orchestrating a balance between codon usage and mRNA secondary structure. The insights gained here should provide a better understanding of AAR evolution and may assist in designing synthetic genes.

  19. Codon-Precise, Synthetic, Antibody Fragment Libraries Built Using Automated Hexamer Codon Additions and Validated through Next Generation Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Frigotto

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We have previously described ProxiMAX, a technology that enables the fabrication of precise, combinatorial gene libraries via codon-by-codon saturation mutagenesis. ProxiMAX was originally performed using manual, enzymatic transfer of codons via blunt-end ligation. Here we present Colibra™: an automated, proprietary version of ProxiMAX used specifically for antibody library generation, in which double-codon hexamers are transferred during the saturation cycling process. The reduction in process complexity, resulting library quality and an unprecedented saturation of up to 24 contiguous codons are described. Utility of the method is demonstrated via fabrication of complementarity determining regions (CDR in antibody fragment libraries and next generation sequencing (NGS analysis of their quality and diversity.

  20. Luminescent beam stop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Diane; Morton, Simon A.

    2017-10-25

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to beam stops. In one aspect, a device comprises a luminescent material, a beam stop plate, and an optical fiber. The luminescent material is a parallelepiped having a first side and a second side that are squares and having a third side that is a rectangle or a square. The first side and the second side are perpendicular to the third side. The beam stop plate is attached to the first side of the luminescent material. The optical fiber has a first end and a second end, with the first end of the optical fiber attached to the third side of the luminescent material.

  1. Significance of Coexisting Mutations on Determination of the Degree of Isoniazid Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunaratne, Galbokka Hewage Roshanthi Eranga; Wijesundera, Sandhya Sulochana; Vidanagama, Dhammika; Adikaram, Chamila Priyangani; Perera, Jennifer

    2018-04-23

    The emergence and spread of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) pose a threat to TB control in Sri Lanka. Isoniazid (INH) is a key element of the first-line anti-TB treatment regimen. Resistance to INH is mainly associated with point mutations in katG, inhA, and ahpC genes. The objective of this study was to determine mutations of these three genes in INH-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb) strains in Sri Lanka. Complete nucleotide sequence of the three genes was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and subjected to DNA sequencing. Point mutations in the katG gene were identified in 93% isolates, of which the majority (78.6%) were at codon 315. Mutations at codons 212 and 293 of the katG gene have not been reported previously. Novel mutations were recognized in the promoter region of the inhA gene (C deletion at -34), fabG1 gene (codon 27), and ahpC gene (codon 39). Single S315T mutation in the katG gene led to a high level of resistance, while a low level of resistance with high frequency (41%) was observed when katG codon 315 coexisted with the mutation at codon 463. Since most of the observed mutations of all three genes coexisted with the katG315 mutation, screening of katG315 mutations will be a useful marker for molecular detection of INH resistance of MTb in Sri Lanka.

  2. Codon size reduction as the origin of the triplet genetic code.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel V Baranov

    Full Text Available The genetic code appears to be optimized in its robustness to missense errors and frameshift errors. In addition, the genetic code is near-optimal in terms of its ability to carry information in addition to the sequences of encoded proteins. As evolution has no foresight, optimality of the modern genetic code suggests that it evolved from less optimal code variants. The length of codons in the genetic code is also optimal, as three is the minimal nucleotide combination that can encode the twenty standard amino acids. The apparent impossibility of transitions between codon sizes in a discontinuous manner during evolution has resulted in an unbending view that the genetic code was always triplet. Yet, recent experimental evidence on quadruplet decoding, as well as the discovery of organisms with ambiguous and dual decoding, suggest that the possibility of the evolution of triplet decoding from living systems with non-triplet decoding merits reconsideration and further exploration. To explore this possibility we designed a mathematical model of the evolution of primitive digital coding systems which can decode nucleotide sequences into protein sequences. These coding systems can evolve their nucleotide sequences via genetic events of Darwinian evolution, such as point-mutations. The replication rates of such coding systems depend on the accuracy of the generated protein sequences. Computer simulations based on our model show that decoding systems with codons of length greater than three spontaneously evolve into predominantly triplet decoding systems. Our findings suggest a plausible scenario for the evolution of the triplet genetic code in a continuous manner. This scenario suggests an explanation of how protein synthesis could be accomplished by means of long RNA-RNA interactions prior to the emergence of the complex decoding machinery, such as the ribosome, that is required for stabilization and discrimination of otherwise weak triplet codon

  3. A Turkish family with Nance-Horan Syndrome due to a novel mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tug, Esra; Dilek, Nihal F; Javadiyan, Shahrbanou; Burdon, Kathryn P; Percin, Ferda E

    2013-08-01

    Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS) is a rare X-linked syndrome characterized by congenital cataract which leads to profound vision loss, characteristic dysmorphic features and specific dental anomalies. Microcornea, microphthalmia and mild or moderate mental retardation may accompany these features. Heterozygous females often manifest similarly but with less severe features than affected males. We describe two brothers who have the NHS phenotype and their carrier mother who had microcornea but not cataract. We identified a previously unreported frameshift mutation (c.558insA) in exon 1 of the NHS gene in these patients and their mother which is predicted to result in the incorporation of 11 aberrant amino acids prior to a stop codon (p.E186Efs11X). We also discussed genotype-phenotype correlation according to relevant literature. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Mutation profile of all 49 exons of the human myosin VIIA gene, and haplotype analysis, in Usher 1B families from diverse origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adato, A; Weil, D; Kalinski, H; Pel-Or, Y; Ayadi, H; Petit, C; Korostishevsky, M; Bonne-Tamir, B

    1997-10-01

    Usher syndrome types I (USH1A-USH1E) are a group of autosomal recessive diseases characterized by profound congenital hearing loss, vestibular areflexia, and progressive visual loss due to retinitis pigmentosa. The human myosin VIIA gene, located on 11q14, has been shown to be responsible for Usher syndrome type 1B (USH1B). Haplotypes were constructed in 28 USH1 families by use of the following polymorphic markers spanning the USH1B locus: D11S787, D11S527, D11S1789, D11S906, D11S4186, and OMP. Affected individuals and members of their families from 12 different ethnic origins were screened for the presence of mutations in all 49 exons of the myosin VIIA gene. In 15 families myosin VIIA mutations were detected, verifying their classification as USH1B. All these mutations are novel, including three missense mutations, one premature stop codon, two splicing mutations, one frameshift, and one deletion of >2 kb comprising exons 47 and 48, a part of exon 49, and the introns between them. Three mutations were shared by more than one family, consistent with haplotype similarities. Altogether, 16 USH1B haplotypes were observed in the 15 families; most haplotypes were population specific. Several exonic and intronic polymorphisms were also detected. None of the 20 known USH1B mutations reported so far in other world populations were identified in our families.

  5. Hearing loss in a patient with the myopathic form of mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome and a novel mutation in the TK2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí, Ramon; Nascimento, Andrés; Colomer, Jaume; Lara, Mari C; López-Gallardo, Ester; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo; Montoya, Julio; Andreu, Antoni L; Briones, Paz; Pineda, Mercè

    2010-08-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndrome (MDS) is a devastating disorder of infancy caused by a significant reduction of the number of copies of mitochondrial DNA in one or more tissues. We report a Spanish patient with the myopathic form of MDS, harboring two mutations in the thymidine kinase 2 gene (TK2): a previously reported deletion (p.K244del) and a novel nucleotide duplication in the exon 2, generating a frameshift and premature stop codon. Sensorineural hearing loss was a predominant symptom in the patient and a novel feature of MDS due to TK2 mutations. The patient survived up to the age of 8.5 y, which confirms that survival above the age of 5 y is not infrequent in patients with MDS due to TK2 deficiency.

  6. Synonymous codon usage analysis of hand, foot and mouth disease viruses: A comparative study on coxsackievirus A6, A10, A16, and enterovirus 71 from 2008 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Weiheng; Li, Xue; Chen, Meili; Dai, Wenwen; Sun, Shiyang; Wang, Shuai; Sheng, Xin; Sun, Shixiang; Gao, Chen; Hou, Ali; Zhou, Yan; Sun, Bo; Gao, Feng; Xiao, Jingfa; Zhang, Zhewen; Jiang, Chunlai

    2017-09-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16) have been considered major pathogens of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) throughout the world for decades. In recent years, coxsackievirus A6 (CVA6) and coxsackievirus A10 (CVA10) have raised attention as two other serious pathogens of HFMD. The present study focused on the synonymous codon usage of four viruses isolated from 2008 to 2015, with particular attention on P1 (encoding capsid proteins) and P2-P3 regions (both encoding non-structural proteins) in the genomic RNA. Relative synonymous codon usage, effective number of codons, neutrality and correspondence were analyzed. The results indicated that these viruses prefer A/T at the third position in codons rather than G/C. The most frequent codons of 4 essential and 2 semi-essential amino acids, as well as a key amino acid of metabolic junctions (Glu) used in the four viruses are also the most frequently used in humans. Effective number of codons (ENC) values indicated weak codon usage bias in all the viruses. Relatively, the force of mutation pressure in the P1 region was found to be stronger than that in the P2-P3 region, and this force in the P1 region of CVA6 and EV71 was stronger than that of CVA10 and A16. The neutrality analysis results implied that mutation pressure plays a minor role in shaping codon bias of these viruses. Correspondence analysis indicated that the codon usage of EV71 strains varied much more than that of other viruses. In conclusion, the present study provides novel and comparative insight into the evolution of HFMD pathogens at the codon level. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. "Stop Diabetes Now!"

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes "Stop Diabetes Now!" Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents ... Tips for Seniors at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes Lifestyle changes that lead to weight loss—such ...

  8. Depression - stopping your medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000570.htm Depression - stopping your medicines To use the sharing features ... prescription medicines you may take to help with depression, anxiety, or pain. Like any medicine, there are ...

  9. Codon based co-occurrence network motifs in human mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod Shinde

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The nucleotide polymorphism in human mitochondrial genome (mtDNA tolled by codon position bias plays an indispensable role in human population dispersion and expansion. Herein, we constructed genome-wide nucleotide co-occurrence networks using a massive data consisting of five different geographical regions and around 3000 samples for each region. We developed a powerful network model to describe complex mitochondrial evolutionary patterns between codon and non-codon positions. It was interesting to report a different evolution of Asian genomes than those of the rest which is divulged by network motifs. We found evidence that mtDNA undergoes substantial amounts of adaptive evolution, a finding which was supported by a number of previous studies. The dominance of higher order motifs indicated the importance of long-range nucleotide co-occurrence in genomic diversity. Most notably, codon motifs apparently underpinned the preferences among codon positions for co-evolution which is probably highly biased during the origin of the genetic code. Our analyses manifested that codon position co-evolution is very well conserved across human sub-populations and independently maintained within human sub-populations implying the selective role of evolutionary processes on codon position co-evolution. Ergo, this study provided a framework to investigate cooperative genomic interactions which are critical in underlying complex mitochondrial evolution.

  10. Identification of six novel PTH1R mutations in families with a history of primary failure of tooth eruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risom, Lotte; Christoffersen, Line; Daugaard-Jensen, Jette; Hove, Hanne Dahlgaard; Andersen, Henriette Skovgaard; Andresen, Brage Storstein; Kreiborg, Sven; Duno, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Primary Failure of tooth Eruption (PFE) is a non-syndromic disorder which can be caused by mutations in the parathyroid hormone receptor 1 gene (PTH1R). Traditionally, the disorder has been identified clinically based on post-emergent failure of eruption of permanent molars. However, patients with PTH1R mutations will not benefit from surgical and/or orthodontic treatment and it is therefore clinically important to establish whether a given failure of tooth eruption is caused by a PTH1R defect or not. We analyzed the PTH1R gene in six patients clinically diagnosed with PFE, all of which had undergone surgical and/or orthodontic interventions, and identified novel PTH1R mutations in all. Four of the six mutations were predicted to abolish correct mRNA maturation either through introduction of premature stop codons (c.947C>A and c.1082G>A), or by altering correct mRNA splicing (c.544-26_544-23del and c.989G>T). The latter was validated by transfection of minigenes. The six novel mutations expand the mutation spectrum for PFE from eight to 14 pathogenic mutations. Loss-of-function mutations in PTH1R are also associated with recessively inherited Blomstrand chondrodysplasia. We compiled all published PTH1R mutations and identified a mutational overlap between Blomstrand chondrodysplasia and PFE. The results suggest that a genetic approach to preclinical diagnosis will have important implication for surgical and orthodontic treatment of patients with failure of tooth eruption.

  11. Identification of six novel PTH1R mutations in families with a history of primary failure of tooth eruption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotte Risom

    Full Text Available Primary Failure of tooth Eruption (PFE is a non-syndromic disorder which can be caused by mutations in the parathyroid hormone receptor 1 gene (PTH1R. Traditionally, the disorder has been identified clinically based on post-emergent failure of eruption of permanent molars. However, patients with PTH1R mutations will not benefit from surgical and/or orthodontic treatment and it is therefore clinically important to establish whether a given failure of tooth eruption is caused by a PTH1R defect or not. We analyzed the PTH1R gene in six patients clinically diagnosed with PFE, all of which had undergone surgical and/or orthodontic interventions, and identified novel PTH1R mutations in all. Four of the six mutations were predicted to abolish correct mRNA maturation either through introduction of premature stop codons (c.947C>A and c.1082G>A, or by altering correct mRNA splicing (c.544-26_544-23del and c.989G>T. The latter was validated by transfection of minigenes. The six novel mutations expand the mutation spectrum for PFE from eight to 14 pathogenic mutations. Loss-of-function mutations in PTH1R are also associated with recessively inherited Blomstrand chondrodysplasia. We compiled all published PTH1R mutations and identified a mutational overlap between Blomstrand chondrodysplasia and PFE. The results suggest that a genetic approach to preclinical diagnosis will have important implication for surgical and orthodontic treatment of patients with failure of tooth eruption.

  12. AUG is the only initiation codon in eukaryotes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, F; McKnight, G; Stewart, J W

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae indicates that AUG is the sole codon capable of initiating translation of iso-1-cytochrome c. This result with yeast and the sequence results of numerous eukaryotic genes indicate that AUG is the only initiation codon in eukaryotes; in contrast, results with Escherichia colia and bacteriophages indicate that both AUG and GUG are initiation codons in prokaryotes. The difference can be explained by the lack of the t/sup 6/ A hypermodified nucleoside (N-(9-(..beta..-D-ribofuranosyl)purin-6-ylcarbamoyl)threonine) in prokaryotic initiator tRNA and its presence in eukaryotic initiator tRNA.

  13. Identification of citrullinaemia carrier and detection of a new silent mutation at 240bp position in ASS1 gene of normal Holstein cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotikalapudi Rosaiah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The autosomal recessive genetic disorders are regularly investigated especially in Indian Holstein and Holstein Crossbred bulls before they entered in semen collection so that a defective gene should not be transmitted to future generations. Bovine citrullinaemia first reported in Australia is a metabolic disorder as one of the enzymes, Argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS involved in urea cycle is impaired in function. The mutation responsible for citrullinemia has been characterized as a single-base substitution at 256bp (C>T in coding exon 3 of argininosuccinate synthetase 1 (ASS1 gene, which converts the CGA (arginine at 86 codon to TGA (stop codon. A Holstein bull during routine molecular screening was found to be carrier for Citrullinaemia that was confirmed by sequencing. This is a fresh case of Citrullinaemia carrier in addition to three cases reported earlier in India. Partial sequencing of coding exon 3 of a normal Holstein revealed a new silent polymorphism at 240bp position that does not change amino acid (Sarine AGC>AGT at 80 codon within exon 3 of ASS1 gene. The sequence of exon 3 of ASS1 gene in a normal Holstein exhibiting a new polymorphism was submitted to NCBI with accession No. KF933365. The presence of citrullinaemia carriers in Indian Holstein, though in very low frequency, emphasizing to continue the investigation of mutant gene in cattle population.

  14. The Analysis Mutation Of The CARD 15 Gene Variants In Chronic Periodontis

    OpenAIRE

    Bahruddin Thalib, Dr.drg. M.Kes,Sp.Pros.

    2014-01-01

    As Conclusion, CARD 15 gene mutation with chronic periodontitis was found to have heterozygote mutation and homozygote mutation variants, and also found genetics variation that changed the composition of C??? T nucleotide at codon 802 in exon 4 amino acid changed from alanine to valine. Purpose of This study was to determine the variant of card 15 gene mutation with periodontitis chronic.

  15. Comparative Mitogenomics of Plant Bugs (Hemiptera: Miridae): Identifying the AGG Codon Reassignments between Serine and Lysine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei; Song, Fan; Cai, Wanzhi

    2014-01-01

    Insect mitochondrial genomes are very important to understand the molecular evolution as well as for phylogenetic and phylogeographic studies of the insects. The Miridae are the largest family of Heteroptera encompassing more than 11,000 described species and of great economic importance. For better understanding the diversity and the evolution of plant bugs, we sequence five new mitochondrial genomes and present the first comparative analysis of nine mitochondrial genomes of mirids available to date. Our result showed that gene content, gene arrangement, base composition and sequences of mitochondrial transcription termination factor were conserved in plant bugs. Intra-genus species shared more conserved genomic characteristics, such as nucleotide and amino acid composition of protein-coding genes, secondary structure and anticodon mutations of tRNAs, and non-coding sequences. Control region possessed several distinct characteristics, including: variable size, abundant tandem repetitions, and intra-genus conservation; and was useful in evolutionary and population genetic studies. The AGG codon reassignments were investigated between serine and lysine in the genera Adelphocoris and other cimicomorphans. Our analysis revealed correlated evolution between reassignments of the AGG codon and specific point mutations at the antidocons of tRNALys and tRNASer(AGN). Phylogenetic analysis indicated that mitochondrial genome sequences were useful in resolving family level relationship of Cimicomorpha. Comparative evolutionary analysis of plant bug mitochondrial genomes allowed the identification of previously neglected coding genes or non-coding regions as potential molecular markers. The finding of the AGG codon reassignments between serine and lysine indicated the parallel evolution of the genetic code in Hemiptera mitochondrial genomes. PMID:24988409

  16. Eight previously unidentified mutations found in the OA1 ocular albinism gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dufier Jean-Louis

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ocular albinism type 1 (OA1 is an X-linked ocular disorder characterized by a severe reduction in visual acuity, nystagmus, hypopigmentation of the retinal pigmented epithelium, foveal hypoplasia, macromelanosomes in pigmented skin and eye cells, and misrouting of the optical tracts. This disease is primarily caused by mutations in the OA1 gene. Methods The ophthalmologic phenotype of the patients and their family members was characterized. We screened for mutations in the OA1 gene by direct sequencing of the nine PCR-amplified exons, and for genomic deletions by PCR-amplification of large DNA fragments. Results We sequenced the nine exons of the OA1 gene in 72 individuals and found ten different mutations in seven unrelated families and three sporadic cases. The ten mutations include an amino acid substitution and a premature stop codon previously reported by our team, and eight previously unidentified mutations: three amino acid substitutions, a duplication, a deletion, an insertion and two splice-site mutations. The use of a novel Taq polymerase enabled us to amplify large genomic fragments covering the OA1 gene. and to detect very likely six distinct large deletions. Furthermore, we were able to confirm that there was no deletion in twenty one patients where no mutation had been found. Conclusion The identified mutations affect highly conserved amino acids, cause frameshifts or alternative splicing, thus affecting folding of the OA1 G protein coupled receptor, interactions of OA1 with its G protein and/or binding with its ligand.

  17. Nonsense mutations in the PAX3 gene cause Waardenburg syndrome type I in two Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shu-Zhi; Cao, Ju-Yang; Zhang, Rui-Ning; Liu, Li-Xian; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Xin; Kang, Dong-Yang; Li, Mei; Han, Dong-Yi; Yuan, Hui-Jun; Yang, Wei-Yan

    2007-01-05

    Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, pigmental abnormalities of the eye, hair and skin, and dystopia canthorum. The gene mainly responsible for WS1 is PAX3 which is involved in melanocytic development and survival. Mutations of PAX3 have been reported in familiar or sporadic patients with WS1 in several populations of the world except Chinese. In order to explore the genetic background of Chinese WS1 patients, a mutation screening of PAX3 gene was carried out in four WS1 pedigrees. A questionnaire survey and comprehensive clinical examination were conducted in four Chinese pedigrees of WS1. Genomic DNA from each patient and their family members was extracted and exons of PAX3 were amplified by PCR. PCR fragments were ethanol-purified and sequenced in both directions on an ABI_Prism 3100 DNA sequencer with the BigDye Terminator Cycle Sequencing Ready Reaction Kit. The sequences were obtained and aligned to the wild type sequence of PAX3 with the GeneTool program. Two nonsense PAX3 mutations have been found in the study population. One is heterozygous for a novel nonsense mutation S209X. The other is heterozygous for a previously reported mutation in European population R223X. Both mutations create stop codons leading to truncation of the PAX3 protein. This is the first demonstration of PAX3 mutations in Chinese WS1 patients and one of the few examples of an identical mutation of PAX3 occurred in different populations.

  18. Novel Munc13–4 mutations in children and young adult patients with haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, A; Cannella, S; Bossi, G; Gallo, F; Trizzino, A; Pende, D; Dieli, F; Bruno, G; Stinchcombe, J C; Micalizzi, C; De Fusco, C; Danesino, C; Moretta, L; Notarangelo, L D; Griffiths, G M; Aricò, M

    2006-01-01

    Familial haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterised by constitutive defects in cellular cytotoxicity resulting in fever, hepatosplenomegaly and cytopenia, and the outcome is fatal unless treated by chemoimmunotherapy followed by haematopoietic stem‐cell transplantation. Since 1999, mutations in the perforin gene giving rise to this disease have been identified; however, these account only for 40% of cases. Lack of a genetic marker hampers the diagnosis, suitability for transplantation, selection of familial donors, identification of carriers, genetic counselling and prenatal diagnosis. Mutations in the Munc13–4 gene have recently been described in patients with FHL. We sequenced the Munc13–4 gene in all patients with haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis not due to PRF1 mutations. In 15 of the 30 families studied, 12 novel and 4 known Munc13–4 mutations were found, spread throughout the gene. Among novel mutations, 2650C→T introduced a stop codon; 441del A, 532del C, 3082del C and 3226ins G caused a frameshift, and seven were mis sense mutations. Median age of diagnosis was 4 months, but six patients developed the disease after 5 years of age and one as a young adult of 18 years. Involvement of central nervous system was present in 9 of 15 patients, activity of natural killer cells was markedly reduced or absent in 13 of 13 tested patients. Chemo‐immunotherapy was effective in all patients. Munc13–4 mutations were found in 15 of 30 patients with FHL without PRF1 mutations. Because these patients may develop the disease during adolescence or even later, haematologists should include FHL2 and FHL3 in the differential diagnosis of young adults with fever, cytopenia, splenomegaly and hypercytokinaemia. PMID:16825436

  19. Codon and amino acid usage in two major human pathogens of genus Bartonella--optimization between replicational-transcriptional selection, translational control and cost minimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sabyasachi; Paul, Sandip; Chatterjee, Sanjib; Dutta, Chitra

    2005-01-01

    Intra-genomic variation in synonymous codon and amino acid usage in two human pathogens Bartonella henselae and B. quintana has been carried out through multivariate analysis. Asymmetric mutational bias, coupled with replicational-transcriptional selection, has been identified as the prime selection force behind synonymous codon selection--a characteristic of the genus Bartonella, not exhibited by any other alpha-proteobacterial genome. Distinct codon usage patterns and low synonymous divergence values between orthologous sequences of highly expressed genes from the two Bartonella species indicate that there exists a residual intra-strand synonymous codon bias in the highly expressed genes, possibly operating at the level of translation. In the case of amino acid usage, the mean hydropathy level and aromaticity are the major sources of variation, both having nearly equal impact, while strand-specific mutational pressure and gene expressivity strongly influence the inter-strand variations. In both species under study, the highly expressed gene products tend not to contain heavy and/or aromatic residues, following the cost-minimization hypothesis in spite of their intracellular lifestyle. The codon and amino acid usage in these two human pathogens are, therefore, consequences of a complex balance between replicational-transcriptional selection, translational control, protein hydropathy and cost minimization.

  20. Identification and codon reading properties of 5-cyanomethyl uridine, a new modified nucleoside found in the anticodon wobble position of mutant haloarchaeal isoleucine tRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Debabrata; Köhrer, Caroline; Su, Dan; Babu, I Ramesh; Chan, Clement T Y; Liu, Yuchen; Söll, Dieter; Blum, Paul; Kuwahara, Masayasu; Dedon, Peter C; Rajbhandary, Uttam L

    2014-02-01

    Most archaea and bacteria use a modified C in the anticodon wobble position of isoleucine tRNA to base pair with A but not with G of the mRNA. This allows the tRNA to read the isoleucine codon AUA without also reading the methionine codon AUG. To understand why a modified C, and not U or modified U, is used to base pair with A, we mutated the C34 in the anticodon of Haloarcula marismortui isoleucine tRNA (tRNA2(Ile)) to U, expressed the mutant tRNA in Haloferax volcanii, and purified and analyzed the tRNA. Ribosome binding experiments show that although the wild-type tRNA2(Ile) binds exclusively to the isoleucine codon AUA, the mutant tRNA binds not only to AUA but also to AUU, another isoleucine codon, and to AUG, a methionine codon. The G34 to U mutant in the anticodon of another H. marismortui isoleucine tRNA species showed similar codon binding properties. Binding of the mutant tRNA to AUG could lead to misreading of the AUG codon and insertion of isoleucine in place of methionine. This result would explain why most archaea and bacteria do not normally use U or a modified U in the anticodon wobble position of isoleucine tRNA for reading the codon AUA. Biochemical and mass spectrometric analyses of the mutant tRNAs have led to the discovery of a new modified nucleoside, 5-cyanomethyl U in the anticodon wobble position of the mutant tRNAs. 5-Cyanomethyl U is present in total tRNAs from euryarchaea but not in crenarchaea, eubacteria, or eukaryotes.

  1. Association of the p53 codon 72 polymorphism to gastric cancer risk in a high risk population of Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpizar-Alpizar, Warner; Sierra, Rafaela; Cuenca, Patricia; Une, Clas; Mena, Fernando; Perez-Perez, Guillermo Ignacio

    2005-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second most common cancer associated death cause worldwide. Several factors have been associated with higher risk to develop gastric cancer, among them genetic predisposition. The p53 gene has a polymorphism located at codon 72, which has been associated with higher risk of several types of cancer, including gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to determine the association of p53, codon 72 polymorphism, with the risk of gastric cancer and pre-malignant lesions in a high-risk population from Costa Rica. The genotyping was carried out by PCR-RFLP in a sample of 58 gastric cancer patients, 99 control persons and 41 individuals classified as group I and II, according to the Japanese histological classification. No association was found for p53, codon 72 polymorphism with neither the risk of gastric cancer nor the risk of less severe gastric lesions in the studied sample. Based on this study and taking into account other studies carried out with p53, codon 72 polymorphism, the role of this polymorphism in the development of gastric cancer remains unclear. De novo mutations on p53 gene produced during neoplastic development of this disease might play a greater role than germinal polymorphisms of this same gene. Other polymorphic genes have been associated with higher risk to develop gastric cancer. (author) [es

  2. Comparative analysis of codon usage bias in Crenarchaea and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ending codons even within the WWY (nucleotide ambiguity code) families in Crenarchaea ...... this work. Acknowledgements. Authors thank Mr Ajit Kumar Sahoo and Ms ... November J. A. 2002 Accounting for background nucleotide com-.

  3. Improved secretory production of calf prochymosin by codon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-12

    Sep 12, 2011 ... results show that codon optimization and disruption of the PMR1 gene synergistically stimulate the secretion of ... With developments in recombinant DNA technology, .... regulated, it is of importance to optimize the variables.

  4. Polymorphism at codon 36 of the p53 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, C A; Brown, D L; Mitsudomi, T; Ikagaki, N; Wong, A; Wasserman, R; Womer, R B; Biegel, J A

    1994-01-01

    A polymorphism at codon 36 in exon 4 of the p53 gene was identified by single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and direct sequencing of genomic DNA PCR products. The polymorphic allele, present in the heterozygous state in genomic DNAs of four of 100 individuals (4%), changes the codon 36 CCG to CCA, eliminates a FinI restriction site and creates a BccI site. Including this polymorphism there are four known polymorphisms in the p53 coding sequence.

  5. Identification of a de novo mutation of SOX10 in a Chinese patient with Waardenburg syndrome type IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Fenghe; Zhao, Min; Fan, Lynn; Zhang, Hongyan; Shi, Yang; Han, Rui; Qu, Chunyan

    2016-12-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a rare genetic disorder, characterized by the association of sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentation abnormalities. Four subtypes have been classified. The present study aimed to analyze the clinical feature and investigate the genetic cause for a Chinese case of Waardenburg type IV (WS4). The patient and his family members were subjected to mutation detection in the candidate gene SOX10 by Sanger sequencing. The patient has the clinical features of WS4, including sensorineural hearing loss, bright blue irides, premature graying of the hair and Hirschsprung disease. A novel heterozygous frameshift mutation, c.752_753ins7 (p.Gly252Alafs*31) in the exon 5 of SOX10 was detected in the patient, but not found in the unaffected family members and 100 normal controls. This mutation results in a premature stop codon 31 amino acid downstream. The novel mutation c.752_753ins7 (p.Gly252Alafs*31) arose de novo and was considered as the cause of WS4 in the proband. This study further characterized the molecular complexity of WS4 and provided a clinical case for genotype-phenotype correlation studies of different phenotypes caused by SOX10 mutations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A novel nonsense mutation of the GPR143 gene identified in a Chinese pedigree with ocular albinism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naihong Yan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to elucidate the molecular basis of ocular albinism type I in a Chinese pedigree. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Complete ophthalmologic examinations were performed on 4 patients, 7 carriers and 17 unaffected individuals in this five-generation family. All coding exons of four-point-one (4.1, ezrin, radixin, moesin (FERM domain-containing 7 (FRMD7 and G protein-coupled receptor 143 (GPR143 genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR, sequenced and compared with a reference database. Ocular albinism and nystagmus were found in all patients of this family. Macular hypoplasia was present in the patients including the proband. A novel nonsense hemizygous mutation c.807T>A in the GPR143 gene was identified in four patients and the heterozygous mutation was found in seven asymptomatic individuals. This mutation is a substitution of tyrosine for adenine which leads to a premature stop codon at position 269 (p.Y269X of GPR143. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report that p.Y269X mutation of GPR143 gene is responsible for the pathogenesis of familial ocular albinism. These results expand the mutation spectrum of GPR143, and demonstrate the clinical characteristics of ocular albinism type I in Chinese population.

  7. Point mutation in the MITF gene causing Waardenburg syndrome type II in a three-generation Indian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalwani, A K; Attaie, A; Randolph, F T; Deshmukh, D; Wang, C; Mhatre, A; Wilcox, E

    1998-12-04

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an autosomal-dominant neural crest cell disorder phenotypically characterized by hearing impairment and disturbance of pigmentation. A presence of dystopia canthorum is indicative of WS type 1, caused by loss of function mutation in the PAX3 gene. In contrast, type 2 WS (WS2) is characterized by normally placed medial canthi and is genetically heterogeneous; mutations in MITF (microphthalmia associated transcription factor) associated with WS2 have been identified in some but not all affected families. Here, we report on a three-generation Indian family with a point mutation in the MITF gene causing WS2. This mutation, initially reported in a Northern European family, creates a stop codon in exon 7 and is predicted to result in a truncated protein lacking the HLH-Zip or Zip structure necessary for normal interaction with its target DNA motif. Comparison of the phenotype between the two families demonstrates a significant difference in pigmentary disturbance of the eye. This family, with the first documented case of two unrelated WS2 families harboring identical mutations, provides additional evidence for the importance of genetic background on the clinical phenotype.

  8. Truncating Mutations of MAGEL2, a Gene within the Prader-Willi Locus, Are Responsible for Severe Arthrogryposis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejlachowicz, Dan; Nolent, Flora; Maluenda, Jérome; Ranjatoelina-Randrianaivo, Hanitra; Giuliano, Fabienne; Gut, Ivo; Sternberg, Damien; Laquerrière, Annie; Melki, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) is characterized by the presence of multiple joint contractures resulting from reduced or absent fetal movement. Here, we report two unrelated families affected by lethal AMC. By genetic mapping and whole-exome sequencing in a multiplex family, a heterozygous truncating MAGEL2 mutation leading to frameshift and a premature stop codon (c.1996delC, p.Gln666Serfs∗36) and inherited from the father was identified in the probands. In another family, a distinct heterozygous truncating mutation leading to frameshift (c.2118delT, p.Leu708Trpfs∗7) and occurring de novo on the paternal allele of MAGEL2 was identified in the affected individual. In both families, RNA analysis identified the mutated paternal MAGEL2 transcripts only in affected individuals. MAGEL2 is one of the paternally expressed genes within the Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) locus. PWS is associated with, to varying extents, reduced fetal mobility, severe infantile hypotonia, childhood-onset obesity, hypogonadism, and intellectual disability. MAGEL2 mutations have been recently reported in affected individuals with features resembling PWS and called Schaaf-Yang syndrome. Here, we show that paternal MAGEL2 mutations are also responsible for lethal AMC, recapitulating the clinical spectrum of PWS and suggesting that MAGEL2 is a PWS-determining gene. PMID:26365340

  9. The ter mutation in the rat Dnd1 gene initiates gonadal teratomas and infertility in both genders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northrup, Emily; Zschemisch, Nils-Holger; Eisenblätter, Regina; Glage, Silke; Wedekind, Dirk; Cuppen, Edwin; Dorsch, Martina; Hedrich, Hans-Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    A spontaneous mutation leading to the formation of congenital ovarian and testicular tumors was detected in the WKY/Ztm rat strain. The histological evaluation revealed derivatives from all three germ layers, thereby identifying these tumors as teratomas. Teratocarcinogenesis was accompanied by infertility and the underlying mutation was termed ter. Linkage analysis of 58 (WKY-ter×SPRD-Cu3) F2 rats associated the ter mutation with RNO18 (LOD = 3.25). Sequencing of candidate genes detected a point mutation in exon 4 of the dead-end homolog 1 gene (Dnd1), which introduces a premature stop codon assumed to cause a truncation of the Dnd1 protein. Genotyping of the recessive ter mutation revealed a complete penetrance of teratocarcinogenesis and infertility in homozygous ter rats of both genders. Morphologically non-tumorous testes of homozygous ter males were reduced in both size and weight. This testicular malformation was linked to a lack of spermatogenesis using immunohistochemical and histological staining. Our WKY-Dnd1(ter)/Ztm rat is a novel animal model to investigate gonadal teratocarcinogenesis and the molecular mechanisms involved in germ cell development of both genders.

  10. Coffin-Siris Syndrome with obesity, macrocephaly, hepatomegaly and hyperinsulinism caused by a mutation in the ARID1B gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vals, Mari-Anne; Õiglane-Shlik, Eve; Nõukas, Margit; Shor, Riina; Peet, Aleksandr; Kals, Mart; Kivistik, Paula Ann; Metspalu, Andres; Õunap, Katrin

    2014-11-01

    Coffin-Siris Syndrome (CSS, MIM 135900) is a rare genetic disorder, and mutations in ARID1B were recently shown to cause CSS. In this study, we report a novel ARID1B mutation identified by whole-exome sequencing in a patient with clinical features of CSS. We identified a novel heterozygous frameshift mutation c.1584delG in exon 2 of ARID1B (NM_020732.3) predicting a premature stop codon p.(Leu528Phefs*65). Sanger sequencing confirmed the c.1584delG mutation as a de novo in the proband and that it was not present either in her parents, half-sister or half-brother. Clinically, the patient presented with extreme obesity, macrocephaly, hepatomegaly, hyperinsulinism and polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), which have previously not been described in CSS patients. We suggest that obesity, macrocephaly, hepatomegaly and/or PCOS may be added to the list of clinical features of ARID1B mutations, but further clinical reports are required to make a definite conclusion.

  11. Coffin–Siris Syndrome with obesity, macrocephaly, hepatomegaly and hyperinsulinism caused by a mutation in the ARID1B gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vals, Mari-Anne; Õiglane-Shlik, Eve; Nõukas, Margit; Shor, Riina; Peet, Aleksandr; Kals, Mart; Kivistik, Paula Ann; Metspalu, Andres; Õunap, Katrin

    2014-01-01

    Coffin–Siris Syndrome (CSS, MIM 135900) is a rare genetic disorder, and mutations in ARID1B were recently shown to cause CSS. In this study, we report a novel ARID1B mutation identified by whole-exome sequencing in a patient with clinical features of CSS. We identified a novel heterozygous frameshift mutation c.1584delG in exon 2 of ARID1B (NM_020732.3) predicting a premature stop codon p.(Leu528Phefs*65). Sanger sequencing confirmed the c.1584delG mutation as a de novo in the proband and that it was not present either in her parents, half-sister or half-brother. Clinically, the patient presented with extreme obesity, macrocephaly, hepatomegaly, hyperinsulinism and polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), which have previously not been described in CSS patients. We suggest that obesity, macrocephaly, hepatomegaly and/or PCOS may be added to the list of clinical features of ARID1B mutations, but further clinical reports are required to make a definite conclusion. PMID:24569609

  12. Correcting the bias of empirical frequency parameter estimators in codon models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei Kosakovsky Pond

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Markov models of codon substitution are powerful inferential tools for studying biological processes such as natural selection and preferences in amino acid substitution. The equilibrium character distributions of these models are almost always estimated using nucleotide frequencies observed in a sequence alignment, primarily as a matter of historical convention. In this note, we demonstrate that a popular class of such estimators are biased, and that this bias has an adverse effect on goodness of fit and estimates of substitution rates. We propose a "corrected" empirical estimator that begins with observed nucleotide counts, but accounts for the nucleotide composition of stop codons. We show via simulation that the corrected estimates outperform the de facto standard estimates not just by providing better estimates of the frequencies themselves, but also by leading to improved estimation of other parameters in the evolutionary models. On a curated collection of sequence alignments, our estimators show a significant improvement in goodness of fit compared to the approach. Maximum likelihood estimation of the frequency parameters appears to be warranted in many cases, albeit at a greater computational cost. Our results demonstrate that there is little justification, either statistical or computational, for continued use of the -style estimators.

  13. The Effect of Codon Mismatch on the Protein Translation System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinglin Zhang

    Full Text Available Incorrect protein translation, caused by codon mismatch, is an important problem of living cells. In this work, a computational model was introduced to quantify the effects of codon mismatch and the model was used to study the protein translation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. According to simulation results, the probability of codon mismatch will increase when the supply of amino acids is unbalanced, and the longer is the codon sequence, the larger is the probability for incorrect translation to occur, making the synthesis of long peptide chain difficult. By comparing to simulation results without codon mismatch effects taken into account, the fraction of mRNAs with bound ribosome decrease faster along the mRNAs, making the 5' ramp phenomenon more obvious. It was also found in our work that the premature mechanism resulted from codon mismatch can reduce the proportion of incorrect translation when the amino acid supply is extremely unbalanced, which is one possible source of high fidelity protein synthesis after peptidyl transfer.

  14. The Effect of Codon Mismatch on the Protein Translation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dinglin; Chen, Danfeng; Cao, Liaoran; Li, Guohui; Cheng, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Incorrect protein translation, caused by codon mismatch, is an important problem of living cells. In this work, a computational model was introduced to quantify the effects of codon mismatch and the model was used to study the protein translation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. According to simulation results, the probability of codon mismatch will increase when the supply of amino acids is unbalanced, and the longer is the codon sequence, the larger is the probability for incorrect translation to occur, making the synthesis of long peptide chain difficult. By comparing to simulation results without codon mismatch effects taken into account, the fraction of mRNAs with bound ribosome decrease faster along the mRNAs, making the 5' ramp phenomenon more obvious. It was also found in our work that the premature mechanism resulted from codon mismatch can reduce the proportion of incorrect translation when the amino acid supply is extremely unbalanced, which is one possible source of high fidelity protein synthesis after peptidyl transfer.

  15. Distribution of ADAT-Dependent Codons in the Human Transcriptome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Àlbert Rafels-Ybern

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide modifications in the anticodons of transfer RNAs (tRNA play a central role in translation efficiency, fidelity, and regulation of translation, but, for most of these modifications, the details of their function remain unknown. The heterodimeric adenosine deaminases acting on tRNAs (ADAT2-ADAT3, or ADAT are enzymes present in eukaryotes that convert adenine (A to inosine (I in the first anticodon base (position 34 by hydrolytic deamination. To explore the influence of ADAT activity on mammalian translation, we have characterized the human transcriptome and proteome in terms of frequency and distribution of ADAT-related codons. Eight different tRNAs can be modified by ADAT and, once modified, these tRNAs will recognize NNC, NNU and NNA codons, but not NNG codons. We find that transcripts coding for proteins highly enriched in these eight amino acids (ADAT-aa are specifically enriched in NNC, NNU and NNA codons. We also show that the proteins most enriched in ADAT-aa are composed preferentially of threonine, alanine, proline, and serine (TAPS. We propose that the enrichment in ADAT-codons in these proteins is due to the similarities in the codons that correspond to TAPS.

  16. Inherited biallelic CSF3R mutations in severe congenital neutropenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triot, Alexa; Järvinen, Päivi M; Arostegui, Juan I; Murugan, Dhaarini; Kohistani, Naschla; Dapena Díaz, José Luis; Racek, Tomas; Puchałka, Jacek; Gertz, E Michael; Schäffer, Alejandro A; Kotlarz, Daniel; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Díaz de Heredia Rubio, Cristina; Ozdemir, Mehmet Akif; Patiroglu, Turkan; Karakukcu, Musa; Sánchez de Toledo Codina, José; Yagüe, Jordi; Touw, Ivo P; Unal, Ekrem; Klein, Christoph

    2014-06-12

    Severe congenital neutropenia (SCN) is characterized by low numbers of peripheral neutrophil granulocytes and a predisposition to life-threatening bacterial infections. We describe a novel genetic SCN type in 2 unrelated families associated with recessively inherited loss-of-function mutations in CSF3R, encoding the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) receptor. Family A, with 3 affected children, carried a homozygous missense mutation (NM_000760.3:c.922C>T, NP_000751.1:p.Arg308Cys), which resulted in perturbed N-glycosylation and aberrant localization to the cell surface. Family B, with 1 affected infant, carried compound heterozygous deletions provoking frameshifts and premature stop codons (NM_000760.3:c.948_963del, NP_000751.1:p.Gly316fsTer322 and NM_000760.3:c.1245del, NP_000751.1:p.Gly415fsTer432). Despite peripheral SCN, all patients had morphologic evidence of full myeloid cell maturation in bone marrow. None of the patients responded to treatment with recombinant human G-CSF. Our study highlights the genetic and morphologic SCN variability and provides evidence both for functional importance and redundancy of G-CSF receptor-mediated signaling in human granulopoiesis. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  17. Codon 972 polymorphism in the insulin receptor substrate-1 gene, obesity, and risk of noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigal, R.J.; Doria, A.; Warram, J.H.; Krolewski, A.S. [Joslin Diabetes Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Because of the role of insulin receptor substrate-1 in insulin action, the insulin receptor substrate-1 gene is a candidate gene for noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Modest associations between NIDDM and a GGG-AGG single base substitution (corresponding to a glycine-arginine amino acid substitution) in codon 972 of the gene have been found, but none reached statistical significance. To examine further how large a proportion of NIDDM cases could be caused by the mutation, we performed a stratified analysis combining the results from the 6 earlier studies and those from our panel of 192 unrelated NIDDM subjects and 104 healthy controls. In addition, we looked for a possibility that the codon 972 mutation plays a role only in the presence of certain conditions. Genomic DNA samples obtained from NIDDM cases and healthy controls were genotyped using a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism protocol modified for genomic DNA. The GGG{r_arrow}AGG substitution was found in 5.7% of the diabetic subjects (11 of 192) and 6.9% of the controls (7 of 104). The difference between groups was not statistically significant, and it was not different from the results of other studies. The Mantel-Haenszel summary odds ratio across all studies was 1.49 (P < 0.05; 95% confidence intervals, 1.01-2.2). This summary odds ratio is consistent with a small proportion of NIDDM cases ({approximately}3%) being caused by the mutation. Exploratory subgroup analyses on our panel suggested a clustering of NIDDM, the codon 972 mutation, and overweight, raising the hypothesis that the mutation may predispose to NIDDM only in the presence of excess body weight. 9 refs., 2 tabs.

  18. Coffin-Siris syndrome with café-au-lait spots, obesity and hyperinsulinism caused by a mutation in the ARID1B gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonmez, Fatma Mujgan; Uctepe, Eyyup; Gunduz, Mehmet; Gormez, Zeliha; Erpolat, Seval; Oznur, Murat; Sagiroglu, Mahmut Samil; Demirci, Huseyin; Gunduz, Esra

    2016-08-01

    Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) (MIM 135900) is characterized by developmental delay, severe speech impairment, distinctive facial features, hypertrichosis, aplasia or hypoplasia of the distal phalanx or nail of the fifth digit and agenesis of the corpus callosum. Recently, it was shown that mutations in the ARID1B gene are the main cause of CSS, accounting for 76% of identified mutations. Here, we report a 15 year-old female patient who was admitted to our clinic with seizures, speech problems, dysmorphic features, bilaterally big, large thumb, café-au-lait (CAL) spots, obesity and hyperinsulinism. First, the patient was thought to have an association of neurofibromatosis and Rubinstein Taybi syndrome. Because of the large size of the NF1 gene for neurofibromatosis and CREBBP gene for Rubinstein Taybi syndrome, whole exome sequence analysis (WES) was conducted and a novel ARID1B mutation was identified. The proband WES test identified a novel heterozygous frameshift mutation c.3394_3395insTA in exon 13 of ARID1B (NM_017519.2) predicting a premature stop codon p.(Tyr1132Leufs*67). Sanger sequencing confirmed the heterozygous c.3394_3395insTA mutation in the proband and that it was not present in her parents indicating de novo mutation. Further investigation and new cases will help to understand this phenomenon better.

  19. rpoB gene mutations among Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from extrapulmonary sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, Azar Dokht; Meghdadi, Hossein; Ghadiri, Ata A; Alami, Ameneh; Sina, Amir Hossein; Mirsaeidi, Mehdi

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze mutations occurring in the rpoB gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) isolates from clinical samples of extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB). Seventy formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples and fresh tissue samples from confirmed EPTB cases were analyzed. Nested PCR based on the rpoB gene was performed on the extracted DNAs, combined with cloning and subsequent sequencing. Sixty-seven (95.7%) samples were positive for nester PCR. Sequence analysis of the 81 bp region of the rpoB gene demonstrated mutations in 41 (61.2%) of 67 sequenced samples. Several point mutations including deletion mutations at codons 510, 512, 513 and 515, with 45% and 51% of the mutations in codons 512 and 513 respectively were seen, along with 26% replacement mutations at codons 509, 513, 514, 518, 520, 524 and 531. The most common alteration was Gln → His, at codon 513, presented in 30 (75.6%) isolates. This study demonstrated sequence alterations in codon 513 of the 81 bp region of the rpoB gene as the most common mutation occurred in 75.6% of molecularly confirmed rifampin-resistant strains. In addition, simultaneous mutation at codons 512 and 513 was demonstrated in 34.3% of the isolates. © 2018 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Concurrent mutation in exons 1 and 2 of the K-ras oncogene in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiorella Guadagni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The K-ras gene is frequently mutated in colorectal cancer and has been associated with tumor initiation and progression; approximately 90% of the activating mutations are found in codons 12 and 13 of exon 1 and just under 5% in codon 61 located in exon 2. These mutations determine single aminoacidic substitutions in the GTPase pocket leading to a block of the GTP hydrolytic activity of the K-ras p21 protein, and therefore to its constitutive activation. Point mutations in sites of the K-ras gene, other than codons 12, 13 and 61, and other types of genetic alterations, may occur in a minority of cases, such as in the less frequent cases of double mutations in the K-ras gene. However, all mutations in this gene, even those which occur in non-canonical sites or double mutations, are relevant oncogenic alterations in colorectal cancer and may underlie K-ras pathway hyperactivation. In the present study, we report the case of a patient with colorectal cancer presenting a concurrent point mutation in exons 1 and 2 of the K-ras gene, a GGT to TGT substitution (Glycine to Cysteine at codon 12, and a GAC to AAC substitution (Aspartic Acid to Asparagine at codon 57. In addition, we found in the same patient’s sample a silent polymorphism at codon 11 (Ala11Ala of exon 1. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011; Vol. 49, No. 4, pp. 729–733

  1. Whole genome sequencing reveals a de novo SHANK3 mutation in familial autism spectrum disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio I Nemirovsky

    Full Text Available Clinical genomics promise to be especially suitable for the study of etiologically heterogeneous conditions such as Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD. Here we present three siblings with ASD where we evaluated the usefulness of Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS for the diagnostic approach to ASD.We identified a family segregating ASD in three siblings with an unidentified cause. We performed WGS in the three probands and used a state-of-the-art comprehensive bioinformatic analysis pipeline and prioritized the identified variants located in genes likely to be related to ASD. We validated the finding by Sanger sequencing in the probands and their parents.Three male siblings presented a syndrome characterized by severe intellectual disability, absence of language, autism spectrum symptoms and epilepsy with negative family history for mental retardation, language disorders, ASD or other psychiatric disorders. We found germline mosaicism for a heterozygous deletion of a cytosine in the exon 21 of the SHANK3 gene, resulting in a missense sequence of 5 codons followed by a premature stop codon (NM_033517:c.3259_3259delC, p.Ser1088Profs*6.We reported an infrequent form of familial ASD where WGS proved useful in the clinic. We identified a mutation in SHANK3 that underscores its relevance in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

  2. Stopping the unstoppable

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    How do you stop two very high energy proton beams circulating in opposite directions around a 27-kilometre ring? The answer is the beam dumps. Two tunnels, pointing in opposite directions, are being constructed at point 6 of the LHC. These will allow the beams to be directed into two large beam dumps housed at the ends of the tunnels.

  3. Ready to stop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molitoris, Joseph; Dribe, Martin

    2016-01-01

    the Roteman Database for Stockholm, Sweden between 1878 and 1926 to examine the association of socioeconomic status and fertility and the adoption of stopping behaviour during the city's transition. Using piecewise constant hazard models and logistic regression, we find that a clear class pattern arises...

  4. Mutation of the PAX6 gene in a sporadic patient with atypical aniridia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, D.; Li, Y.; Traboulsi, E.I. [Wilmer Eye Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    A 28 year-old man presented with poor vision since childhood and gradual further decline of several years duration. His visual acuity measures 20/200 OD with -11.50 + 0.50 x 150 and 20/100 OS with -12.25 + 0.25 x 35. He had a fine nystagmus. His visual fields were full. There was a circumferential pannus with areas of corneal stromal opacification. The iris was hypoplastic with atypical colobomatous defects. The lenses had scattered cortical opacities. The intraocular pressures were normal. The optic nerves had cup disk ratios of 0.6 OU. The family history was negative for similar defects. A diagnosis of aniridia was made and blood was drawn for analysis of the PAX6 gene. PCR amplification of exon 5 showed heterozygous fragments with one allele being larger than normal. Direct DNA sequencing of the individual heterozygous allele showed a 41 base pair insertion at nucleotide 483 in exon 5 of the paired domain. This frameshift mutation changed codon 71 to a stop codon. The diagnosis of aniridia was confirmed in this atypical patient, who will need to be monitored for his high risk of glaucoma. The risk of developing Wilms` tumor in patients with mutations within the aniridia gene is presumably negligible since the neighboring Wilms` tumor gene is unaffected. The identification of intragenic mutations of the PAX6 gene in patients with sporadic aniridia modifies the management of such patients because of recognition of the increased risk of glaucoma and by reducing the necessity for frequent monitoring for the presence of Wilms` tumor.

  5. AON-mediated Exon Skipping Restores Ciliation in Fibroblasts Harboring the Common Leber Congenital Amaurosis CEP290 Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Gerard

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA is a severe hereditary retinal dystrophy responsible for congenital or early-onset blindness. The most common disease-causing mutation (>10% is located deep in intron 26 of the CEP290 gene (c.2991+1655A>G. It creates a strong splice donor site that leads to insertion of a cryptic exon encoding a premature stop codon. In the present study, we show that the use of antisense oligonucleotides (AONs allow an efficient skipping of the mutant cryptic exon and the restoration of ciliation in fibroblasts of affected patients. These data support the feasibility of an AON-mediated exon skipping strategy to correct the aberrant splicing.

  6. Fibrillin mutations in the Marfan syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, C.E.; Wang, M.; Wang, J.; Godfrey, M. [Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The Marfan syndrome (MFS) is an autosomal dominant heritable disorder of connective tissue manifested by variable and pleiotropic defect in the skeletal, ocular, and cardiovascular systems. We have recently begun to use intron-specific primers that have become available through the International Marfan Syndrome Consortium to screen for fibrillin mutations in MFS patients. Using the genomic PCR-based approach in addition to RT-PCR methodologies, we have identified several novel mutations. A single base insertion was identified in all affected individuals of one family. The insertion of an {open_quote}A{close_quote} at position 1891 in exon 15 causes a premature stop codon and thus a truncated polypeptide. The truncated protein of 617 amino acids has an expected molecular weight of 63 kD. Metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation studies are in progress. A C{r_arrow}T transition at position 1634 in exon 12 causing a 5th position Cys to Phe substitution in an EGF-like motif was observed in another MFS patient. Finally, we have identified a G{r_arrow}A transition at the +1 position of the donor splice site that causes the deletion of fibrillin exon 32 in a patient with the neonatal form of MFS. Exon 32 is a precursor EGF-like calcium binding motif that is located in a single stretch of 12 similar domains. We had previously identified the skipping of this exon due to an A{r_arrow}T transversion at the -2 position of the consensus acceptor splice site in another patient with neonatal MFS. The reason that the skipping of exon 32 causes a neonatal lethal MFS phenotype is presently unclear. These studies will help elucidate the role of diverse regions of fibrillin.

  7. The highly conserved codon following the slippery sequence supports -1 frameshift efficiency at the HIV-1 frameshift site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suneeth F Mathew

    Full Text Available HIV-1 utilises -1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting to translate structural and enzymatic domains in a defined proportion required for replication. A slippery sequence, U UUU UUA, and a stem-loop are well-defined RNA features modulating -1 frameshifting in HIV-1. The GGG glycine codon immediately following the slippery sequence (the 'intercodon' contributes structurally to the start of the stem-loop but has no defined role in current models of the frameshift mechanism, as slippage is inferred to occur before the intercodon has reached the ribosomal decoding site. This GGG codon is highly conserved in natural isolates of HIV. When the natural intercodon was replaced with a stop codon two different decoding molecules-eRF1 protein or a cognate suppressor tRNA-were able to access and decode the intercodon prior to -1 frameshifting. This implies significant slippage occurs when the intercodon is in the (perhaps distorted ribosomal A site. We accommodate the influence of the intercodon in a model of frame maintenance versus frameshifting in HIV-1.

  8. Confirmation of emergence of mutations associated with atovaquone-proguanil resistance in unexposed Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Happi, Christian T; Gbotosho, Grace O; Folarin, Onikepe A; Milner, Danny; Sarr, Ousmane; Sowunmi, Akintunde; Kyle, Dennis E; Milhous, Wilbur K; Wirth, Dyann F; Oduola, Ayoade MJ

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background In vitro and in vivo resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to atovaquone or atovaquone-proguanil hydrochloride combination has been associated to two point mutations in the parasite cytochrome b (cytb) gene (Tyr268Ser and Tyr268Asn). However, little is known about the prevalence of codon-268 mutations in natural populations of P. falciparum without previous exposure to the drug in Africa. Methods The prevalence of codon-268 mutations in the cytb gene of African P. falciparum...

  9. Homozygosity for a severe novel medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) mutation IVS3-1G > C that leads to introduction of a premature termination codon by complete missplicing of the MCAD mRNA and is associated with phenotypic diversity ranging from sudden neonatal death to asymptomatic status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korman, Stanley H; Gutman, Alisa; Brooks, Rivka

    2004-01-01

    Virtually all patients with medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD) are homozygous or compound heterozygous for the 985A > G mutation, which limits the study of a possible genotype/phenotype correlation. A newborn Palestinian infant died suddenly on the second day of life. A previo...

  10. The second activating glucokinase mutation (A456V)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christesen, Henrik B T; Jacobsen, Bendt B; Odili, Stella

    2002-01-01

    for mutations in candidate genes revealed a heterozygous glucokinase mutation in exon 10, substituting valine for alanine at codon 456 (A456V) in the proband and his mother. The purified recombinant glutathionyl S-transferase fusion protein of the A456V glucokinase revealed a decreased glucose S(0.5) (the...

  11. Molecular analysis of congenital goitres with hypothyroidism caused by defective thyroglobulin synthesis. Identification of a novel c.7006C>T [p.R2317X] mutation and expression of minigenes containing nonsense mutations in exon 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machiavelli, Gloria A; Caputo, Mariela; Rivolta, Carina M; Olcese, María C; Gruñeiro-Papendieck, Laura; Chiesa, Ana; González-Sarmiento, Rogelio; Targovnik, Héctor M

    2010-01-01

    Thyroglobulin (TG) deficiency is an autosomal-recessive disorder that results in thyroid dyshormonogenesis. A number of distinct mutations have been identified as causing human hypothyroid goitre. The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize new mutations in the TG gene in an attempt to increase the understanding of the genetic mechanism responsible for this disorder. A total of six patients from four nonconsanguineous families with marked impairment of TG synthesis were studied. Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, sequencing of DNA, genotyping, expression of chimeric minigenes and bioinformatic analysis were performed. Four different inactivating TG mutations were identified: one novel mutation (c.7006C>T [p.R2317X]) and three previously reported (c.886C>T [p.R277X], c.6701C>A [p.A2215D] and c.6725G>A [p.R2223H]). Consequently, one patient carried a compound heterozygous for p.R2223H/p.R2317X mutations; two brothers showed a homozygous p.A2215D substitution and the remaining three patients, from two families with typical phenotype, had a single p.R277X mutated allele. We also showed functional evidences that premature stop codons inserted at different positions in exon 7, which disrupt exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) sequences, do not interfere with exon definition and processing. In this study, we have identified a novel nonsense mutation p.R2317X in the acetylcholinesterase homology domain of TG. We have also observed that nonsense mutations do not interfere with the pre-mRNA splicing of exon 7. The results are in accordance with previous observations confirming the genetic heterogeneity of TG defects.

  12. SCREENING FOR GENETIC CHANGES AND CODON 129 POLYMORPHISM IN PRNP GENE IN HEALTHY SLOVENIAN POPULATION AND SPORADIC CASES OF CREUTZFELDT-JAKOB DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sava Smerkolj

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. Prion protein has an important role in development of prion diseases, fatal neurodegenerative disorders. As the codon 129 genotype of the prion protein gene (PRNP is a known susceptibility factor for the diseases, we wanted to determine its distribution in healthy Slovenian population and also in cases of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD. Furthermore, we wanted to screen the whole gene in order to establish the presence of genetic changes.Methods. We screened 350 DNA samples of healthy blood donors and 12 DNA samples of patients deceased of sCJD. After the amplification and conformation analysis had been done, the gene was sequenced using an automatic sequencer.Results. Methionine homozygotes comprised 46.8% of healthy population, valine homozygotes 12.1% and heterozygotes 41.1%; out of 12 sCJD patients 10 were methionine homozygotes (83.3%, 1 was valine homozygote (8.3% and 1 was heterozygote (8.3%.Found SNPs were combination of codon 76 change (228C > T and codon 84 change (252T > C in a single sample of healthy population, combination of codon 68 change (204T > C and codon 76 change (228C > T in two samples of healthy population and codon 117 change (351A > G in a healthy population sample and in a valine homozygote patient.Conclusions. In comparison to the pooled Caucasian population is genotype M/M frequency slightly increased on account of decreased genotype M/V frequency in healthy Slovenian population, suggesting a little higher risk for acquiring a new variant of CJD (vCJD, because up to date all confirmed vCJD cases except one heterozygote were methionine homozygotes. Codon 129 genotype distribution in sCJD can be described as disease-specific. The absence of pathogenic mutations in sCJD patients confirms the non-familial, sporadic disease form.

  13. Differential functional readthrough over homozygous nonsense mutations contributes to the bleeding phenotype in coagulation factor VII deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branchini, A; Ferrarese, M; Lombardi, S; Mari, R; Bernardi, F; Pinotti, M

    2016-10-01

    Essentials Potentially null homozygous Factor(F)7 nonsense mutations are associated to variable bleeding symptoms. Readthrough of p.Ser112X (life-threatening) and p.Cys132X (moderate) stop codons was investigated. Readthrough-mediated insertion of wild-type or tolerated residues produce functional proteins. Functional readthrough over homozygous F7 nonsense mutations contributes to the bleeding phenotype. Background Whereas the rare homozygous nonsense mutations causing factor (F)VII deficiency may predict null conditions that are almost completely incompatible with life, they are associated with appreciable differences in hemorrhagic symptoms. The misrecognition of premature stop codons (readthrough) may account for variable levels of functional full-length proteins. Objectives To experimentally evaluate the basal and drug-induced levels of FVII resulting from the homozygous p.Cys132X and p.Ser112X nonsense mutations that are associated with moderate (132X) or life-threatening (112X) symptoms, and that are predicted to undergo readthrough with (132X) or without (112X) production of wild-type FVII. Methods We transiently expressed recombinant FVII (rFVII) nonsense and missense variants in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, and evaluated secreted FVII protein and functional levels by ELISA, activated FX generation, and coagulation assays. Results The levels of functional FVII produced by p.Cys132X and p.Ser112X mutants (rFVII-132X, 1.1% ± 0.2% of wild-type rFVII; rFVII-112X, 0.5% ± 0.1% of wild-type rFVII) were compatible with the occurrence of spontaneous readthrough, which was magnified by the addition of G418 - up to 12% of the wild-type value for the rFVII-132X nonsense variant. The predicted missense variants arising from readthrough abolished (rFVII-132Trp/Arg) or reduced (rFVII-112Trp/Cys/Arg, 22-45% of wild-type levels) secretion and function. These data suggest that the appreciable rescue of p.Cys132X function was driven by reinsertion of the wild

  14. Mutations in the small GTPase gene RAB39B are responsible for X-linked mental retardation associated with autism, epilepsy, and macrocephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannandrea, Maila; Bianchi, Veronica; Mignogna, Maria Lidia; Sirri, Alessandra; Carrabino, Salvatore; D'Elia, Errico; Vecellio, Matteo; Russo, Silvia; Cogliati, Francesca; Larizza, Lidia; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Tzschach, Andreas; Kalscheuer, Vera; Oehl-Jaschkowitz, Barbara; Skinner, Cindy; Schwartz, Charles E; Gecz, Jozef; Van Esch, Hilde; Raynaud, Martine; Chelly, Jamel; de Brouwer, Arjan P M; Toniolo, Daniela; D'Adamo, Patrizia

    2010-02-12

    Human Mental Retardation (MR) is a common and highly heterogeneous pediatric disorder affecting around 3% of the general population; at least 215 X-linked MR (XLMR) conditions have been described, and mutations have been identified in 83 different genes, encoding proteins with a variety of function, such as chromatin remodeling, synaptic function, and intracellular trafficking. The small GTPases of the RAB family, which play an essential role in intracellular vesicular trafficking, have been shown to be involved in MR. We report here the identification of mutations in the small GTPase RAB39B gene in two male patients. One mutation in family X (D-23) introduced a stop codon seven amino acids after the start codon (c.21C > A; p.Y7X). A second mutation, in the MRX72 family, altered the 5' splice site (c.215+1G > A) and normal splicing. Neither instance produced a protein. Mutations segregate with the disease in the families, and in some family members intellectual disabilities were associated with autism spectrum disorder, epileptic seizures, and macrocephaly. We show that RAB39B, a novel RAB GTPase of unknown function, is a neuronal-specific protein that is localized to the Golgi compartment. Its downregulation leads to an alteration in the number and morphology of neurite growth cones and a significant reduction in presynaptic buttons, suggesting that RAB39B is required for synapse formation and maintenance. Our results demonstrate developmental and functional neuronal alteration as a consequence of downregulation of RAB39B and emphasize the critical role of vesicular trafficking in the development of neurons and human intellectual abilities. Copyright (c) 2010 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A Novel Mutation in the CYP11B1 Gene Causes Steroid 11β-Hydroxylase Deficient Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia with Reversible Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A. Alqahtani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH due to steroid 11β-hydroxylase deficiency is the second most common form of CAH, resulting from a mutation in the CYP11B1 gene. Steroid 11β-hydroxylase deficiency results in excessive mineralcorticoids and androgen production leading to hypertension, precocious puberty with acne, enlarged penis, and hyperpigmentation of scrotum of genetically male infants. In the present study, we reported 3 male cases from a Saudi family who presented with penile enlargement, progressive darkness of skin, hypertension, and cardiomyopathy. The elder patient died due to heart failure and his younger brothers were treated with hydrocortisone and antihypertensive medications. Six months following treatment, cardiomyopathy disappeared with normal blood pressure and improvement in the skin pigmentation. The underlying molecular defect was investigated by PCR-sequencing analysis of all coding exons and intron-exon boundary of the CYP11B1 gene. A novel biallelic mutation c.780 G>A in exon 4 of the CYP11B1 gene was found in the patients. The mutation created a premature stop codon at amino acid 260 (p.W260∗, resulting in a truncated protein devoid of 11β-hydroxylase activity. Interestingly, a somatic mutation at the same codon (c.779 G>A, p.W260∗ was reported in a patient with papillary thyroid cancer (COSMIC database. In conclusion, we have identified a novel nonsense mutation in the CYP11B1 gene that causes classic steroid 11β-hydroxylase deficient CAH. Cardiomyopathy and cardiac failure can be reversed by early diagnosis and treatment.

  16. Investigation of RADTRAN Stop Model input parameters for truck stops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griego, N.R.; Smith, J.D.; Neuhauser, K.S.

    1996-01-01

    RADTRAN is a computer code for estimating the risks and consequences as transport of radioactive materials (RAM). RADTRAN was developed and is maintained by Sandia National Laboratories for the US Department of Energy (DOE). For incident-free transportation, the dose to persons exposed while the shipment is stopped is frequently a major percentage of the overall dose. This dose is referred to as Stop Dose and is calculated by the Stop Model. Because stop dose is a significant portion of the overall dose associated with RAM transport, the values used as input for the Stop Model are important. Therefore, an investigation of typical values for RADTRAN Stop Parameters for truck stops was performed. The resulting data from these investigations were analyzed to provide mean values, standard deviations, and histograms. Hence, the mean values can be used when an analyst does not have a basis for selecting other input values for the Stop Model. In addition, the histograms and their characteristics can be used to guide statistical sampling techniques to measure sensitivity of the RADTRAN calculated Stop Dose to the uncertainties in the stop model input parameters. This paper discusses the details and presents the results of the investigation of stop model input parameters at truck stops

  17. Optimally Stopped Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinci, Walter; Lidar, Daniel

    We combine the fields of heuristic optimization and optimal stopping. We propose a strategy for benchmarking randomized optimization algorithms that minimizes the expected total cost for obtaining a good solution with an optimal number of calls to the solver. To do so, rather than letting the objective function alone define a cost to be minimized, we introduce a further cost-per-call of the algorithm. We show that this problem can be formulated using optimal stopping theory. The expected cost is a flexible figure of merit for benchmarking probabilistic solvers that can be computed when the optimal solution is not known, and that avoids the biases and arbitrariness that affect other measures. The optimal stopping formulation of benchmarking directly leads to a real-time, optimal-utilization strategy for probabilistic optimizers with practical impact. We apply our formulation to benchmark the performance of a D-Wave 2X quantum annealer and the HFS solver, a specialized classical heuristic algorithm designed for low tree-width graphs. On a set of frustrated-loop instances with planted solutions defined on up to N = 1098 variables, the D-Wave device is between one to two orders of magnitude faster than the HFS solver.

  18. Comparison of codon usage bias across Leishmania and Trypanosomatids to understand mRNA secondary structure, relative protein abundance and pathway functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Abhishek; Sarkar, Ram Rup

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the variations in gene organization and its effect on the phenotype across different Leishmania species, and to study differential clinical manifestations of parasite within the host, we performed large scale analysis of codon usage patterns between Leishmania and other known Trypanosomatid species. We present the causes and consequences of codon usage bias in Leishmania genomes with respect to mutational pressure, translational selection and amino acid composition bias. We establish GC bias at wobble position that governs codon usage bias across Leishmania species, rather than amino acid composition bias. We found that, within Leishmania, homogenous codon context coding for less frequent amino acid pairs and codons avoiding formation of folding structures in mRNA are essentially chosen. We predicted putative differences in global expression between genes belonging to specific pathways across Leishmania. This explains the role of evolution in shaping the otherwise conserved genome to demonstrate species-specific function-level differences for efficient survival. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Analysis of amino acid and codon usage in Paramecium bursaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohra, Hideo; Fujishima, Masahiro; Suzuki, Haruo

    2015-10-07

    The ciliate Paramecium bursaria harbors the green-alga Chlorella symbionts. We reassembled the P. bursaria transcriptome to minimize falsely fused transcripts, and investigated amino acid and codon usage using the transcriptome data. Surface proteins preferentially use smaller amino acid residues like cysteine. Unusual synonymous codon and amino acid usage in highly expressed genes can reflect a balance between translational selection and other factors. A correlation of gene expression level with synonymous codon or amino acid usage is emphasized in genes down-regulated in symbiont-bearing cells compared to symbiont-free cells. Our results imply that the selection is associated with P. bursaria-Chlorella symbiosis. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. P-value based visualization of codon usage data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fricke Wolfgang

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Two important and not yet solved problems in bacterial genome research are the identification of horizontally transferred genes and the prediction of gene expression levels. Both problems can be addressed by multivariate analysis of codon usage data. In particular dimensionality reduction methods for visualization of multivariate data have shown to be effective tools for codon usage analysis. We here propose a multidimensional scaling approach using a novel similarity measure for codon usage tables. Our probabilistic similarity measure is based on P-values derived from the well-known chi-square test for comparison of two distributions. Experimental results on four microbial genomes indicate that the new method is well-suited for the analysis of horizontal gene transfer and translational selection. As compared with the widely-used correspondence analysis, our method did not suffer from outlier sensitivity and showed a better clustering of putative alien genes in most cases.

  1. Representation mutations from standard genetic codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aisah, I.; Suyudi, M.; Carnia, E.; Suhendi; Supriatna, A. K.

    2018-03-01

    Graph is widely used in everyday life especially to describe model problem and describe it concretely and clearly. In addition graph is also used to facilitate solve various kinds of problems that are difficult to be solved by calculation. In Biology, graph can be used to describe the process of protein synthesis in DNA. Protein has an important role for DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) or RNA (ribonucleic acid). Proteins are composed of amino acids. In this study, amino acids are related to genetics, especially the genetic code. The genetic code is also known as the triplet or codon code which is a three-letter arrangement of DNA nitrogen base. The bases are adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G) and cytosine (C). While on RNA thymine (T) is replaced with Urasil (U). The set of all Nitrogen bases in RNA is denoted by N = {C U, A, G}. This codon works at the time of protein synthesis inside the cell. This codon also encodes the stop signal as a sign of the stop of protein synthesis process. This paper will examine the process of protein synthesis through mathematical studies and present it in three-dimensional space or graph. The study begins by analysing the set of all codons denoted by NNN such that to obtain geometric representations. At this stage there is a matching between the sets of all nitrogen bases N with Z 2 × Z 2; C=(\\overline{0},\\overline{0}),{{U}}=(\\overline{0},\\overline{1}),{{A}}=(\\overline{1},\\overline{0}),{{G}}=(\\overline{1},\\overline{1}). By matching the algebraic structure will be obtained such as group, group Klein-4,Quotien group etc. With the help of Geogebra software, the set of all codons denoted by NNN can be presented in a three-dimensional space as a multicube NNN and also can be represented as a graph, so that can easily see relationship between the codon.

  2. How Can I Stop Cutting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Educators Search English Español How Can I Stop Cutting? KidsHealth / For Teens / How Can I Stop Cutting? ... in a soft, cozy blanket Substitutes for the Cutting Sensation You'll notice that all the tips ...

  3. Two novel mutations in thymidine kinase-2 cause early onset fatal encephalomyopathy and severe mtDNA depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesko, Nicole; Naess, Karin; Wibom, Rolf; Solaroli, Nicola; Nennesmo, Inger; von Döbeln, Ulrika; Karlsson, Anna; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2010-03-01

    Deficiency of thymidine kinase-2 (TK2) has been described in children with early onset fatal skeletal myopathy. TK2 is a mitochondrial deoxyribonucleoside kinase required for the phosphorylation of deoxycytidine and deoxythymidine and hence is vital for the maintenance of a balanced mitochondrial dNTP pool in post-mitotic tissues. We describe a patient with two novel TK2 mutations, which caused disease onset shortly after birth and death at the age of three months. One mutation (219insCG) generated an early stop codon, thus preventing the synthesis of a functional protein. The second mutation (R130W) resulted in an amino acid substitution, which caused a severe reduction (TK2 enzyme activity. These two novel TK2 mutations cause an extremely severe phenotype with overwhelming central nervous system symptoms not commonly seen in patients with TK2-deficiency. We conclude that the severe clinical presentation in this patient was due to a virtual lack of mitochondrial TK2 activity. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Functional analysis of a nonstop mutation in MITF gene identified in a patient with Waardenburg syndrome type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jie; Hao, Ziqi; Luo, Hunjin; He, Chufeng; Mei, Lingyun; Liu, Yalan; Wang, Xueping; Niu, Zhijie; Chen, Hongsheng; Li, Jia-Da; Feng, Yong

    2017-07-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an autosomal dominant inherited neurogenic disorder with the combination of various degrees of sensorineural deafness and pigmentary abnormalities affecting the skin, hair and eye. The four subtypes of WS were defined on the basis of the presence or absence of additional symptoms. Mutation of human microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) gene gives rise to WS2. Here, we identified a novel WS-associated mutation at the stop codon of MITF (p.X420Y) in a Chinese WS2 patient. This mutation resulted in an extension of extra 33 amino-acid residues in MITF. The mutant MITF appeared in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm, whereas the wild-type MITF was localized in the nucleus exclusively. The mutation led to a reduction in the transcriptional activities, whereas the DNA-binding activity was not altered. We show that the foremost mechanism was haploinsufficiency for the mild phenotypes of WS2 induced in X420Y MITF.

  5. Mutated PET117 causes complex IV deficiency and is associated with neurodevelopmental regression and medulla oblongata lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renkema, G H; Visser, G; Baertling, F; Wintjes, L T; Wolters, V M; van Montfrans, J; de Kort, G A P; Nikkels, P G J; van Hasselt, P M; van der Crabben, S N; Rodenburg, R J T

    2017-06-01

    The genetic basis of the many progressive, multi systemic, mitochondrial diseases that cause a lack of cellular ATP production is heterogeneous, with defects found both in the mitochondrial genome as well as in the nuclear genome. Many different mutations have been found in the genes encoding subunits of the enzyme complexes of the oxidative phosphorylation system. In addition, mutations in genes encoding proteins involved in the assembly of these complexes are known to cause mitochondrial disorders. Here we describe two sisters with a mitochondrial disease characterized by lesions in the medulla oblongata, as demonstrated by brain magnetic resonance imaging, and an isolated complex IV deficiency and reduced levels of individual complex IV subunits. Whole exome sequencing revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation resulting in a premature stop codon in the gene encoding Pet117, a small protein that has previously been predicted to be a complex IV assembly factor. PET117 has not been identified as a mitochondrial disease gene before. Lentiviral complementation of patient fibroblasts with wild-type PET117 restored the complex IV deficiency, proving that the gene defect is responsible for the complex IV deficiency in the patients, and indicating a pivotal role of this protein in the proper functioning of complex IV. Although previous studies had suggested a possible role of this protein in the insertion of copper into complex IV, studies in patient fibroblasts could not confirm this. This case presentation thus implicates mutations in PET117 as a novel cause of mitochondrial disease.

  6. A rare male patient with classic Rett syndrome caused by MeCP2_e1 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokaji, Narumi; Ito, Hiromichi; Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Naruto, Takuya; Takahashi, Rizu; Goji, Aya; Mori, Tatsuo; Toda, Yoshihiro; Saito, Masako; Tange, Shoichiro; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Kagami, Shoji; Imoto, Issei

    2018-03-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder typically affecting females. It is mainly caused by loss-of-function mutations that affect the coding sequence of exon 3 or 4 of methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2). Severe neonatal encephalopathy resulting in death before the age of 2 years is the most common phenotype observed in males affected by a pathogenic MECP2 variant. Mutations in MECP2 exon 1 affecting the MeCP2_e1 isoform are relatively rare causes of RTT in females, and only one case of a male patient with MECP2-related severe neonatal encephalopathy caused by a mutation in MECP2 exon 1 has been reported. This is the first reported case of a male with classic RTT caused by a 5-bp duplication in the open-reading frame of MECP2 exon 1 (NM_001110792.1:c.23_27dup) that introduced a premature stop codon [p.(Ser10Argfs*36)] in the MeCP2_e1 isoform, which has been reported in one female patient with classic RTT. Therefore, both males and females displaying at least some type of MeCP2_e1 mutation may exhibit the classic RTT phenotype. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Molecular analysis of lipoid proteinosis: identification of a novel nonsense mutation in the ECM1 gene in a Pakistani family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naeem Muhammad

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lipoid proteinosis is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by cutaneous and mucosal lesions and hoarseness appearing in early childhood that is caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the ECM1 gene located on chromosome 1q21. The aim of the study was to investigate the molecular genetic defect underlying lipoid proteinosis in a consanguineous Pakistani family. Methods Genotyping of seven members of the family was performed by amplifying microsatellite markers, tightly linked to the ECM1 gene. To screen for mutations in the ECM1 gene, all of its exons and splice junctions were PCR amplified from genomic DNA and analyzed by SSCP and sequenced directly in an ABI 3130 genetic analyzer. Results The results revealed linkage of the LP family to the ECM1 locus. Sequence analysis of the coding exons and splice junctions of the ECM1 gene revealed a novel homozygous mutation (c.616C > T in exon 6, predicted to replace glutamine with stop codon (p.Q206X at amino acid position 206. Conclusions The finding of a novel mutation in Pakistani family extends the body of evidence that supports the importance of ECM1 gene for the development of lipoid proteinosis.

  8. Identification of a novel NHS mutation in a Chinese family with Nance-Horan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Aijun; Li, Bingzhen; Wu, Lemeng; Yang, Liping; Chen, Ningning; Ma, Zhizhong

    2015-04-01

    To identiy the disease causing mutation in a Chinese family presenting with early-onset cataract and dental anomalies. A specific Hereditary Eye Disease Enrichment Panel (HEDEP) (personalized customization by MyGenostics, Baltimore, MD) based on targeted exome capture technology was used to collect the protein coding regions of 30 early-onset cataract associated genes, and high throughput sequencing was done with Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. The identified variant was confirmed with Sanger sequencing. A novel deletion in exon 4 (c.852delG) of NHS gene was identified; the identified 1 bp deletion altered the reading frame and was predicted to result in a premature stop codon after the addition of twelve novel amino acid (p.S285PfsX13). This mutation co-segregated in affected males and obligate female carriers, but was absent in 100 matched controls. Our findings broaden the spectrum of NHS mutations causing Nance-Horan syndrome and phenotypic spectrum of the disease in Chinese patients.

  9. Progressive retinal atrophy in Shetland sheepdog is associated with a mutation in the CNGA1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiik, A C; Ropstad, E O; Ekesten, B; Karlstam, L; Wade, C M; Lingaas, F

    2015-10-01

    Progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) is the collective name of a class of hereditary retinal dystrophies in the dog and is often described as the equivalent of retinitis pigmentosa in humans. PRA is characterized by visual impairment due to degeneration of the photoreceptors in the retina, usually leading to blindness. PRA has been reported in dogs from more than 100 breeds and can be genetically heterogeneous both between and within breeds. The disease can be subdivided by age at onset and rate of progression. Using genome-wide association with 15 Shetland Sheepdog (Sheltie) cases and 14 controls, we identified a novel PRA locus on CFA13 (Praw  = 8.55 × 10(-7) , Pgenome  = 1.7 × 10(-4) ). CNGA1, which is known to be involved in human cases of retinitis pigmentosa, was located within the associated region and was considered a likely candidate gene. Sequencing of this gene identified a 4-bp deletion in exon 9 (c.1752_1755delAACT), leading to a frameshift and a premature stop codon. The study indicated genetic heterogeneity as the mutation was present in all PRA-affected individuals in one large family of Shelties, whereas some other cases in the studied Sheltie population were not associated with this CNGA1 mutation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a mutation in CNGA1 causing PRA in dogs. © 2015 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  10. Albinism in the domestic cat (Felis catus) is associated with a tyrosinase (TYR) mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imes, DL; Geary, LA; Grahn, RA; Lyons, LA

    2006-01-01

    Summary Albino phenotypes are documented in a variety of species including the domestic cat. As albino phenotypes in other species are associated with tyrosinase (TYR) mutations, TYR was proposed as a candidate gene for albinism in cats. An Oriental and Colourpoint Shorthair cat pedigree segregating for albinism was analysed for association with TYR by linkage and sequence analyses. Microsatellite FCA931, which is closely linked to TYR and TYR sequence variants were tested for segregation with the albinism phenotype. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA from wild-type and albino cats identified a cytosine deletion in TYR at position 975 in exon 2, which causes a frame shift resulting in a premature stop codon nine residues downstream from the mutation. The deletion mutation in TYR and an allele of FCA931 segregated concordantly with the albino phenotype. Taken together, our results suggest that the TYR gene corresponds to the colour locus in cats and its alleles, from dominant to recessive, are as follows: C (full colour) > cb (burmese) ≥ cs (siamese) > c (albino). PMID:16573534

  11. Two recessive mutations in FGF5 are associated with the long-hair phenotype in donkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrand, Romain; Tiret, Laurent; Abitbol, Marie

    2014-09-25

    Seven donkey breeds are recognized by the French studbook. Individuals from the Pyrenean, Provence, Berry Black, Normand, Cotentin and Bourbonnais breeds are characterized by a short coat, while those from the Poitou breed (Baudet du Poitou) are characterized by a long-hair phenotype. We hypothesized that loss-of-function mutations in the FGF5 (fibroblast growth factor 5) gene, which are associated with a long-hair phenotype in several mammalian species, may account for the special coat feature of Poitou donkeys. To the best of our knowledge, mutations in FGF5 have never been described in Equidae. We sequenced the FGF5 gene from 35 long-haired Poitou donkeys, as well as from a panel of 67 short-haired donkeys from the six other French breeds and 131 short-haired ponies and horses. We identified a recessive c.433_434delAT frameshift deletion in FGF5, present in Poitou and three other donkey breeds and a recessive nonsense c.245G > A substitution, present in Poitou and four other donkey breeds. The frameshift deletion was associated with the long-hair phenotype in Poitou donkeys when present in two copies (n = 31) or combined with the nonsense mutation (n = 4). The frameshift deletion led to a stop codon at position 159 whereas the nonsense mutation led to a stop codon at position 82 in the FGF5 protein. In silico, the two truncated FGF5 proteins were predicted to lack the critical β strands involved in the interaction between FGF5 and its receptor, a mandatory step to inhibit hair growth. Our results highlight the allelic heterogeneity of the long-hair phenotype in donkeys and enlarge the panel of recessive FGF5 loss-of-function alleles described in mammals. Thanks to the DNA test developed in this study, breeders of non-Poitou breeds will have the opportunity to identify long-hair carriers in their breeding stocks.

  12. Retroactive Stop Loss Special Pay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pay (RSLSP), providing $500 for each month/partial month served in stop loss status. Service members served under stop loss must submit a claim for the special pay. Throughout the year, the services have or extension of service, became ineligible to receive retroactive stop loss special pay. There may be

  13. Second generation codon optimized minicircle (CoMiC) for nonviral reprogramming of human adult fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diecke, Sebastian; Lisowski, Leszek; Kooreman, Nigel G; Wu, Joseph C

    2014-01-01

    The ability to induce pluripotency in somatic cells is one of the most important scientific achievements in the fields of stem cell research and regenerative medicine. This technique allows researchers to obtain pluripotent stem cells without the controversial use of embryos, providing a novel and powerful tool for disease modeling and drug screening approaches. However, using viruses for the delivery of reprogramming genes and transcription factors may result in integration into the host genome and cause random mutations within the target cell, thus limiting the use of these cells for downstream applications. To overcome this limitation, various non-integrating techniques, including Sendai virus, mRNA, minicircle, and plasmid-based methods, have recently been developed. Utilizing a newly developed codon optimized 4-in-1 minicircle (CoMiC), we were able to reprogram human adult fibroblasts using chemically defined media and without the need for feeder cells.

  14. GMSB with light stops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado, Antonio [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame,225 Nieuwland Science Hall, IN 46556, Notre Dame (United States); Theory Division, Physics Department CERN,CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Garcia-Pepin, Mateo [Institut de Física d’Altes Energies, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona,08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Quiros, Mariano [ICREA at Institut de Física d’Altes Energies, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona,08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-08-31

    Gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking (GMSB) is an elegant mechanism to transmit supersymmetry breaking from the hidden to the MSSM observable sector, which solves the supersymmetric flavor problem. However, the smallness of the generated stop mixing requires superheavy stops to reproduce the experimental value of the Higgs mass. A possible way out is to extend the MSSM Higgs sector with singlets and/or triplets providing extra tree-level corrections to the Higgs mass. Singlets will not get any soft mass from GMSB and triplets will contribute to the ρ parameter which could be an issue. In this paper we explore the second possibility by introducing extra supersymmetric triplets with hypercharges Y=(0,±1), with a tree-level custodial SU(2){sub L}⊗SU(2){sub R} global symmetry in the Higgs sector protecting the ρ parameter: a supersymmetric generalization of the Georgi-Machacek model, dubbed as supersymmetric custodial triplet model (SCTM). The renormalization group running from the messenger to the electroweak scale mildly breaks the custodial symmetry. We will present realistic low-scale scenarios (with the NLSP being a Bino-like neutralino or the right-handed stau) based on general (non-minimal) gauge mediation and consistent with all present experimental data. Their main features are: i) Light (∼1 TeV) stops; ii) Exotic couplings (H{sup ±}W{sup ∓}Z and H{sup ±±}W{sup ∓}W{sup ∓}) absent in the MSSM and proportional to the triplets VEV, v{sub Δ}; and, iii) A possible (measurable) universality breaking of the Higgs couplings λ{sub WZ}=r{sub WW}/r{sub ZZ}≠1.

  15. Independent inactivation of arginine decarboxylase genes by nonsense and missense mutations led to pseudogene formation in Chlamydia trachomatis serovar L2 and D strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham David E

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlamydia have reduced genomes that reflect their obligately parasitic lifestyle. Despite their different tissue tropisms, chlamydial strains share a large number of common genes and have few recognized pseudogenes, indicating genomic stability. All of the Chlamydiaceae have homologs of the aaxABC gene cluster that encodes a functional arginine:agmatine exchange system in Chlamydia (Chlamydophilapneumoniae. However, Chlamydia trachomatis serovar L2 strains have a nonsense mutation in their aaxB genes, and C. trachomatis serovar A and B strains have frameshift mutations in their aaxC homologs, suggesting that relaxed selection may have enabled the evolution of aax pseudogenes. Biochemical experiments were performed to determine whether the aaxABC genes from C. trachomatis strains were transcribed, and mutagenesis was used to identify nucleotide substitutions that prevent protein maturation and activity. Molecular evolution techniques were applied to determine the relaxation of selection and the scope of aax gene inactivation in the Chlamydiales. Results The aaxABC genes were co-transcribed in C. trachomatis L2/434, during the mid-late stage of cellular infection. However, a stop codon in the aaxB gene from this strain prevented the heterologous production of an active pyruvoyl-dependent arginine decarboxylase. Replacing that ochre codon with its ancestral tryptophan codon rescued the activity of this self-cleaving enzyme. The aaxB gene from C. trachomatis D/UW-3 was heterologously expressed as a proenzyme that failed to cleave and form the catalytic pyruvoyl cofactor. This inactive protein could be rescued by replacing the arginine-115 codon with an ancestral glycine codon. The aaxC gene from the D/UW-3 strain encoded an active arginine:agmatine antiporter protein, while the L2/434 homolog was unexpectedly inactive. Yet the frequencies of nonsynonymous versus synonymous nucleotide substitutions show no signs of relaxed

  16. UV-induced tandem double mutations in the trpA gene of E. coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piechocki, R.; Langhammer, R.

    1980-01-01

    The ultraviolet light induction of tandem double mutations in a reverse mutation system was shown using trpA mutants which are characterized by the codon sequences GAA and AAG in codon position 211. Among 597 Trp + independent revertants of the trpA (AAG211) strain 3 full revertants were detected arising from UV-induced tandem double base exchanges. In the codon unit 211 full revertants due to single base exchanges are at least 20 times as frequent as full revertants due to tandem double base exchanges. (author)

  17. Detecting consistent patterns of directional adaptation using differential selection codon models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parto, Sahar; Lartillot, Nicolas

    2017-06-23

    Phylogenetic codon models are often used to characterize the selective regimes acting on protein-coding sequences. Recent methodological developments have led to models explicitly accounting for the interplay between mutation and selection, by modeling the amino acid fitness landscape along the sequence. However, thus far, most of these models have assumed that the fitness landscape is constant over time. Fluctuations of the fitness landscape may often be random or depend on complex and unknown factors. However, some organisms may be subject to systematic changes in selective pressure, resulting in reproducible molecular adaptations across independent lineages subject to similar conditions. Here, we introduce a codon-based differential selection model, which aims to detect and quantify the fine-grained consistent patterns of adaptation at the protein-coding level, as a function of external conditions experienced by the organism under investigation. The model parameterizes the global mutational pressure, as well as the site- and condition-specific amino acid selective preferences. This phylogenetic model is implemented in a Bayesian MCMC framework. After validation with simulations, we applied our method to a dataset of HIV sequences from patients with known HLA genetic background. Our differential selection model detects and characterizes differentially selected coding positions specifically associated with two different HLA alleles. Our differential selection model is able to identify consistent molecular adaptations as a function of repeated changes in the environment of the organism. These models can be applied to many other problems, ranging from viral adaptation to evolution of life-history strategies in plants or animals.

  18. EGFR and KRAS mutation coexistence in lung adenocarcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Manuel Leitão de Sousa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer deaths. The development of EGFR targeted therapies, including monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors have generated an interest in the molecular characterization of these tumours. KRAS mutations are associated with resistance to EGFR TKIs. EGFR and KRAS mutations have been considered as mutually exclusive. This paper presents three bronchial-pulmonary carcinomas, two adenocarcinomas and one pleomorphic sarcomatoid carcinoma, harboring EGFR and KRAS mutations. Case 1 corresponded to an adenocarcinoma with EGFR exon 21 mutation (L858R and KRAS codon 12 point mutation (G12V; case 2, a  mucinous adenocarcinoma expressed coexistence of EGFR exon 21 mutation (L858R and KRAS codon 12 point mutation (G12V; and case 3 a sarcomatoid carcinoma with EGFR exon 19 deletion – del 9bp and KRAS codon 12 point mutation (G12C - cysteine. Based on our experience and on the literature, we conclude that EGFR and KRAS mutations can indeed coexist in the same bronchial-pulmonary carcinoma, either in the same histological type or in different patterns. The biological implications of this coexistence are still poorly understood mainly because these cases are not frequent or currently searched. It is therefore necessary to study larger series of cases with the two mutations to better understand the biological, clinical and therapeutic implications.

  19. Establishment and comparison of three different codon optimization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-02-16

    C. elegan). It can raise the n-3/n-6 .... value) could help to judge the numbers of codon types. High level ..... function and health in mammal, especially in .... Generation of cloned transgenic pigs rich in omega-3 fatty acids. Nat.

  20. Translational selection on codon usage in the genus Aspergillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriarte, Andrés; Sanguinetti, Manuel; Fernández-Calero, Tamara; Naya, Hugo; Ramón, Ana; Musto, Héctor

    2012-09-10

    Aspergillus is a genus of mold fungi that includes more than 200 described species. Many members of the group are relevant pathogens and other species are economically important. Only one species has been analyzed for codon usage, and this was performed with a small number of genes. In this paper, we report the codon usage patterns of eight completely sequenced genomes which belong to this genus. The results suggest that selection for translational efficiency and accuracy are the major factors shaping codon usage in all of the species studied so far, and therefore they were active in the last common ancestor of the group. Composition and molecular distances analyses show that highly expressed genes evolve slower at synonymous sites. We identified a conserved core of translationally optimal codons and study the tRNA gene pool in each genome. We found that the great majority of preferred triplets match the respective cognate tRNA with more copies in the respective genome. We discuss the possible scenarios that can explain the observed differences among the species analyzed. Finally we highlight the biotechnological application of this research regarding heterologous protein expression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Establishment and comparison of three different codon optimization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    C. elegan). It can raise the n-3/n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) ratio in mammalian cells. To reveal the impact of different codon optimizations of fat1 gene in influencing the catalysis efficiency of n-6 PUFAs into n-3 PUFAs in mammalian ...

  2. TP53 codon 72 polymorphism in pigmentary phenotypes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-01-20

    Jan 20, 2012 ... pigmentation by acting as a transcription factor for other genes that are ... skin phototype I-II, burns after exposure to UVR and the development of .... morphisms of TP53 codon 72 with breast carcinoma risk: evidence from ...

  3. Codon usage determines translation rate in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Michael Askvad; Kurland, C G; Pedersen, Steen

    1989-01-01

    We wish to determine whether differences in translation rate are correlated with differences in codon usage or with differences in mRNA secondary structure. We therefore inserted a small DNA fragment in the lacZ gene either directly or flanked by a few frame-shifting bases, leaving the reading fr...

  4. Book Review: Stop, Write!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Thulesius

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This book on writing grounded theory is intended for the empirical GT researcher who wants to pursue his/her research until publication. It is the first book devoted entirely to such a crucial issue as writing grounded theory. Thus, Stop, Write: Writing Grounded Theory, is a practical book that fills a gap in GT methodology. In the first chapter of the book, Dr. Glaser says, “Stop unending conceptualization, unending data coverage, and unending listening to others who would egg you on with additional data, ideas and/or requirements or simply wait too long”. The book teaches the reader how to actually write a grounded theory by “simply” writing up the sorted memos. This requires efficient sorting that is dealt with in chapter two on Sorting Memos, which includes precious repetition from Theoretical Sensitivity (1978. How writing can be done effectively is outlined in chapter three The Working Paper. Then follows chapter four on how to rework the first draft with the different tasks of editing for language and professionalism. Thereafter Dr. Glaser discusses Writing Problems in chapter five where he gives useful guidance on how to overcome writing blocks and problems with supervisors and dissertation committees. The book also deals with publishing and with collaboration as experienced between Barney Glaser and the cofounder of grounded theory, Anselm Strauss.

  5. GMSB with Light Stops

    CERN Document Server

    Delgado, Antonio; Quiros, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking (GMSB) is an elegant mechanism to transmit supersymmetry breaking from the hidden to the MSSM observable sector, which solves the supersymmetric flavor problem. However the smallness of the generated stop mixing requires superheavy stops to reproduce the experimental value of the Higgs mass. Two possible ways out are: i) To extend GMSB by direct superpotential messenger-MSSM Yukawa couplings to generate sizeable mixing, thus reintroducing the flavor problem; ii) To extend the MSSM Higgs sector with singlets and/or triplets providing extra tree-level corrections to the Higgs mass. Singlets will not get any soft mass from GMSB and triplets will contribute to the $\\rho$ parameter which could be an issue. In this paper we explore the second way by introducing extra supersymmetric triplets with hypercharges $Y=(0,\\pm 1)$, with a tree-level custodial $SU(2)_L\\otimes SU(2)_R$ global symmetry in the Higgs sector protecting the $\\rho$ parameter: a supersymmetric generalization of ...

  6. A novel CYP27B1 mutation causes a feline vitamin D-dependent rickets type IA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grahn, Robert A; Ellis, Melanie R; Grahn, Jennifer C; Lyons, Leslie A

    2012-08-01

    A 12-week-old domestic cat presented at a local veterinary clinic with hypocalcemia and skeletal abnormalities suggestive of rickets. Osteomalacia (rickets) is a disease caused by impaired bone mineralization leading to an increased prevalence of fractures and deformity. Described in a variety of species, rickets is most commonly caused by vitamin D or calcium deficiencies owing to both environmental and or genetic abnormalities. Vitamin D-dependent rickets type 1A (VDDR-1A) is a result of the enzymatic pathway defect caused by mutations in the 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3)-1-alpha-hydroxylase gene [cytochrome P27 B1 (CYP27B1)]. Calcitriol, the active form of vitamin D(3), regulates calcium homeostasis, which requires sufficient dietary calcium availability and correct hormonal function for proper bone growth and maintenance. Patient calcitriol concentrations were low while calcidiol levels were normal suggestive of VDDR-1A. The entire DNA coding sequencing of CYP27B1 was evaluated. The affected cat was wild type for previously identified VDDR-1A causative mutations. However, six novel mutations were identified, one of which was a nonsense mutation at G637T in exon 4. The exon 4 G637T nonsense mutation results in a premature protein truncation, changing a glutamic acid to a stop codon, E213X, likely causing the clinical presentation of rickets. The previously documented genetic mutation resulting in feline VDDR-1A rickets, as well as the case presented in this research, result from novel exon 4 CYP27B1 mutations, thus exon 4 should be the initial focus of future sequencing efforts.

  7. Translation Initiation from Conserved Non-AUG Codons Provides Additional Layers of Regulation and Coding Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivaylo P. Ivanov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurospora crassa cpc-1 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae GCN4 are homologs specifying transcription activators that drive the transcriptional response to amino acid limitation. The cpc-1 mRNA contains two upstream open reading frames (uORFs in its >700-nucleotide (nt 5′ leader, and its expression is controlled at the level of translation in response to amino acid starvation. We used N. crassa cell extracts and obtained data indicating that cpc-1 uORF1 and uORF2 are functionally analogous to GCN4 uORF1 and uORF4, respectively, in controlling translation. We also found that the 5′ region upstream of the main coding sequence of the cpc-1 mRNA extends for more than 700 nucleotides without any in-frame stop codon. For 100 cpc-1 homologs from Pezizomycotina and from selected Basidiomycota, 5′ conserved extensions of the CPC1 reading frame are also observed. Multiple non-AUG near-cognate codons (NCCs in the CPC1 reading frame upstream of uORF2, some deeply conserved, could potentially initiate translation. At least four NCCs initiated translation in vitro. In vivo data were consistent with initiation at NCCs to produce N-terminally extended N. crassa CPC1 isoforms. The pivotal role played by CPC1, combined with its translational regulation by uORFs and NCC utilization, underscores the emerging significance of noncanonical initiation events in controlling gene expression.

  8. A Frameshift Mutation in the Cubilin Gene (CUBN) in Border Collies with Imerslund-Gräsbeck Syndrome (Selective Cobalamin Malabsorption)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owczarek-Lipska, Marta; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Drögemüller, Cord; Lutz, Sabina; Glanemann, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Imerslund-Gräsbeck syndrome (IGS) or selective cobalamin malabsorption has been described in humans and dogs. IGS occurs in Border Collies and is inherited as a monogenic autosomal recessive trait in this breed. Using 7 IGS cases and 7 non-affected controls we mapped the causative mutation by genome-wide association and homozygosity mapping to a 3.53 Mb interval on chromosome 2. We re-sequenced the genome of one affected dog at ∼10× coverage and detected 17 non-synonymous variants in the critical interval. Two of these non-synonymous variants were in the cubilin gene (CUBN), which is known to play an essential role in cobalamin uptake from the ileum. We tested these two CUBN variants for association with IGS in larger cohorts of dogs and found that only one of them was perfectly associated with the phenotype. This variant, a single base pair deletion (c.8392delC), is predicted to cause a frameshift and premature stop codon in the CUBN gene. The resulting mutant open reading frame is 821 codons shorter than the wildtype open reading frame (p.Q2798Rfs*3). Interestingly, we observed an additional nonsense mutation in the MRC1 gene encoding the mannose receptor, C type 1, which was in perfect linkage disequilibrium with the CUBN frameshift mutation. Based on our genetic data and the known role of CUBN for cobalamin uptake we conclude that the identified CUBN frameshift mutation is most likely causative for IGS in Border Collies. PMID:23613799

  9. One-Stop Dispensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houlind, Morten Baltzer; McNulty, Helle Bach Ølgaard; Treldal, Charlotte

    2018-01-01

    (1) Objective: To assess hospital medication costs and staff time between One-Stop Dispensing (OSD) and the Traditional Medication System (TMS), and to evaluate patient perspectives on OSD. (2) Methods: The study was conducted at Hvidovre Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark in an elective...... gastric surgery and acute orthopedic surgery department. This study consists of three sub-studies including adult patients able to self-manage medication. In Sub-study 1, staff time used to dispense and administer medication in TMS was assessed. Medication cost and OSD staff time were collected in Sub......-study 2, while patient perspectives were assessed in Sub-study 3. Medication costs with two days of discharge medication were compared between measured OSD cost and simulated TMS cost for the same patients. Measured staff time in OSD was compared to simulated staff time in TMS for the same patients...

  10. Current stopping power analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, L.E.

    1983-01-01

    Modified Bethe-Bloch stopping power theory permits fairly accurate calculation of energy losses over a broad interval of projectile velocity v = νc insofar as several parameters appearing in the revised Bethe-Bloch formula have been corectly evaluated. Since the parameters cannot in general be ascertained by calculation from first principles, fits of theory to measurement remain the best method of evaluation. The parameters alluded to are: the target mean excitation energy; the shell correction scaling parameters; the composite single free parameter of the Barkas (projectile-z 3 ) effect correction formalism, and the strength of the correction term; the high velocity density effect correction parameter; and the low velocity charge state parameter. These parameters are discussed

  11. Analysis of phylogeny and codon usage bias and relationship of GC content, amino acid composition with expression of the structural nif genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Sunil Kanti; Kundu, Sudip; Das, Rabindranath; Roy, Sujit

    2016-08-01

    Bacteria and archaea have evolved with the ability to fix atmospheric dinitrogen in the form of ammonia, catalyzed by the nitrogenase enzyme complex which comprises three structural genes nifK, nifD and nifH. The nifK and nifD encodes for the beta and alpha subunits, respectively, of component 1, while nifH encodes for component 2 of nitrogenase. Phylogeny based on nifDHK have indicated that Cyanobacteria is closer to Proteobacteria alpha and gamma but not supported by the tree based on 16SrRNA. The evolutionary ancestor for the different trees was also different. The GC1 and GC2% analysis showed more consistency than GC3% which appeared to below for Firmicutes, Cyanobacteria and Euarchaeota while highest in Proteobacteria beta and clearly showed the proportional effect on the codon usage with a few exceptions. Few genes from Firmicutes, Euryarchaeota, Proteobacteria alpha and delta were found under mutational pressure. These nif genes with low and high GC3% from different classes of organisms showed similar expected number of codons. Distribution of the genes and codons, based on codon usage demonstrated opposite pattern for different orientation of mirror plane when compared with each other. Overall our results provide a comprehensive analysis on the evolutionary relationship of the three structural nif genes, nifK, nifD and nifH, respectively, in the context of codon usage bias, GC content relationship and amino acid composition of the encoded proteins and exploration of crucial statistical method for the analysis of positive data with non-constant variance to identify the shape factors of codon adaptation index.

  12. Dysfunctional growth hormone receptor in a strain of sex-linked dwarf chicken: evidence for a mutation in the intracellular domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, S K; Cogburn, L A; Burnside, J

    1994-09-01

    The sex-linked dwarf (dwdw) chicken represents a valuable animal model for studying GH insensitivity and the consequence of mutations in the GH receptor (GHR) gene. We have recently reported undetectable hepatic GH-binding activity and an aberrantly sized transcript in a strain of dwdw chickens obtained from Arbor Acre Farms, Inc. (Glastonbury, CT, USA). Southern blot analysis of the chicken GHR (cGHR) gene revealed a restriction-fragment length polymorphism in HindIII and EcoRI digests of genomic DNA in this strain of dwdw chicken. In order to localize the molecular mutation, we analysed the gene structure and determined the complete sequence of the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) of the normal cGHR. With the use of this information, we located a large deletion in the 3' end of the cGHR gene of the Connecticut (CT) strain of dwdw chicken. This deletion (1773 bp) contained 27 highly conserved amino acids of the 3' end of the coding region, the in-frame stop codon, a less frequently used poly(A) signal that is normally found 445 bp downstream of the stop codon, and a large portion of the 3' UTR. Because of this deletion, 27 novel amino acids were substituted and the open reading frame was extended for an additional 26 amino acids before reaching the transcriptional termination site. The predicted amino acid sequence of the novel carboxyl-terminus of the dwdw cGHR is largely hydrophobic with a polylysine tail, whereas the carboxyl-terminus of the wild-type (DwDw) cGHR is composed of hydrophilic amino acids.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Codon-triplet context unveils unique features of the Candida albicans protein coding genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira José L

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evolutionary forces that determine the arrangement of synonymous codons within open reading frames and fine tune mRNA translation efficiency are not yet understood. In order to tackle this question we have carried out a large scale study of codon-triplet contexts in 11 fungal species to unravel associations or relationships between codons present at the ribosome A-, P- and E-sites during each decoding cycle. Results Our analysis unveiled high bias within the context of codon-triplets, in particular strong preference for triplets of identical codons. We have also identified a surprisingly large number of codon-triplet combinations that vanished from fungal ORFeomes. Candida albicans exacerbated these features, showed an unbalanced tRNA population for decoding its pool of codons and used near-cognate decoding for a large set of codons, suggesting that unique evolutionary forces shaped the evolution of its ORFeome. Conclusion We have developed bioinformatics tools for large-scale analysis of codon-triplet contexts. These algorithms identified codon-triplets context biases, allowed for large scale comparative codon-triplet analysis, and identified rules governing codon-triplet context. They could also detect alterations to the standard genetic code.

  14. A CNGB1 frameshift mutation in Papillon and Phalene dogs with progressive retinal atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saija J Ahonen

    Full Text Available Progressive retinal degenerations are the most common causes of complete blindness both in human and in dogs. Canine progressive retinal atrophy (PRA or degeneration resembles human retinitis pigmentosa (RP and is characterized by a progressive loss of rod photoreceptor cells followed by a loss of cone function. The primary clinical signs are detected as vision impairment in a dim light. Although several genes have been associated with PRAs, there are still PRAs of unknown genetic cause in many breeds, including Papillons and Phalènes. We have performed a genome wide association and linkage studies in cohort of 6 affected Papillons and Phalènes and 14 healthy control dogs to map a novel PRA locus on canine chromosome 2, with a 1.9 Mb shared homozygous region in the affected dogs. Parallel exome sequencing of a trio identified an indel mutation, including a 1-bp deletion, followed by a 6-bp insertion in the CNGB1 gene. This mutation causes a frameshift and premature stop codon leading to probable nonsense mediated decay (NMD of the CNGB1 mRNA. The mutation segregated with the disease and was confirmed in a larger cohort of 145 Papillons and Phalènes (PFisher = 1.4×10(-8 with a carrier frequency of 17.2 %. This breed specific mutation was not present in 334 healthy dogs from 10 other breeds or 121 PRA affected dogs from 44 other breeds. CNGB1 is important for the photoreceptor cell function its defects have been previously associated with retinal degeneration in both human and mouse. Our study indicates that a frameshift mutation in CNGB1 is a cause of PRA in Papillons and Phalènes and establishes the breed as a large functional animal model for further characterization of retinal CNGB1 biology and possible retinal gene therapy trials. This study enables also the development of a genetic test for breeding purposes.

  15. Ectopic expression of AID in a non-B cell line triggers A:T and G:C point mutations in non-replicating episomal vectors.

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    Tihana Jovanic

    Full Text Available Somatic hypermutation (SHM of immunoglobulin genes is currently viewed as a two step process initiated by the deamination of deoxycytidine (C to deoxyuridine (U, catalysed by the activation induced deaminase (AID. Phase 1 mutations arise from DNA replication across the uracil residue or the abasic site, generated by the uracil-DNA glycosylase, yielding transitions or transversions at G:C pairs. Phase 2 mutations result from the recognition of the U:G mismatch by the Msh2/Msh6 complex (MutS Homologue, followed by the excision of the mismatched nucleotide and the repair, by the low fidelity DNA polymerase eta, of the gap generated by the exonuclease I. These mutations are mainly focused at A:T pairs. Whereas in activated B cells both G:C and A:T pairs are equally targeted, ectopic expression of AID was shown to trigger only G:C mutations on a stably integrated reporter gene. Here we show that when using non-replicative episomal vectors containing a GFP gene, inactivated by the introduction of stop codons at various positions, a high level of EGFP positive cells was obtained after transient expression in Jurkat cells constitutively expressing AID. We show that mutations at G:C and A:T pairs are produced. EGFP positive cells are obtained in the absence of vector replication demonstrating that the mutations are dependent only on the mismatch repair (MMR pathway. This implies that the generation of phase 1 mutations is not a prerequisite for the expression of phase 2 mutations.

  16. Detection of mutation in isoniazid-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from tuberculosis patients in Belarus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bostanabad S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency, location and type of katG mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains isolated from patients in Belarus. Forty two isoniazid-resistant isolates were identified from sputum of 163 patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. Drug susceptibility testing was determined by using CDC standard conventional proportional method and BACTEC system. Standard PCR method for detection of isoniazid resistance associated mutations was performed by katG gene amplification and DNA sequencing. Most mutations were found in katG gene codons 315, 316 and 309. Four types of mutations were identified in codon 315: AGC→ACC ( n = 36 85%, AGC→AGG ( n = 1 2.3%, AGC→AAC ( n = 2 4.7%, AGC→GGC ( n = 1 2.3%. One type of mutation was found in codon 316: GGC→AGC ( n = 1841.4%, four types of mutations were detected in codon 309: GGT→GGT ( n = 716.1%, GGT→GCT ( n = 49.2%, GGT→GTC ( n = 36.9%, GGT→GGG ( n = 12.7%. The highest frequency of mutations sharing between primary and secondary infections was found in codon 315.

  17. The impact of KRAS mutations on VEGF-A production and tumour vascular network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueras, Agnès; Arbos, Maria Antonia; Quiles, Maria Teresa; Viñals, Francesc; Germà, Josep Ramón; Capellà, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    The malignant potential of tumour cells may be influenced by the molecular nature of KRAS mutations being codon 13 mutations less aggressive than codon 12 ones. Their metabolic profile is also different, with an increased anaerobic glycolytic metabolism in cells harbouring codon 12 KRAS mutations compared with cells containing codon 13 mutations. We hypothesized that this distinct metabolic behaviour could be associated with different HIF-1α expression and a distinct angiogenic profile. Codon13 KRAS mutation (ASP13) or codon12 KRAS mutation (CYS12) NIH3T3 transfectants were analyzed in vitro and in vivo. Expression of HIF-1α, and VEGF-A was studied at RNA and protein levels. Regulation of VEGF-A promoter activity was assessed by means of luciferase assays using different plasmid constructs. Vascular network was assessed in tumors growing after subcutaneous inoculation. Non parametric statistics were used for analysis of results. Our results show that in normoxic conditions ASP13 transfectants exhibited less HIF-1α protein levels and activity than CYS12. In contrast, codon 13 transfectants exhibited higher VEGF-A mRNA and protein levels and enhanced VEGF-A promoter activity. These differences were due to a differential activation of Sp1/AP2 transcription elements of the VEGF-A promoter associated with increased ERKs signalling in ASP13 transfectants. Subcutaneous CYS12 tumours expressed less VEGF-A and showed a higher microvessel density (MVD) than ASP13 tumours. In contrast, prominent vessels were only observed in the latter. Subtle changes in the molecular nature of KRAS oncogene activating mutations occurring in tumour cells have a major impact on the vascular strategy devised providing with new insights on the role of KRAS mutations on angiogenesis

  18. A novel fragile X syndrome mutation reveals a conserved role for the carboxy-terminus in FMRP localization and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okray, Zeynep; de Esch, Celine E F; Van Esch, Hilde; Devriendt, Koen; Claeys, Annelies; Yan, Jiekun; Verbeeck, Jelle; Froyen, Guy; Willemsen, Rob; de Vrij, Femke M S; Hassan, Bassem A

    2015-04-01

    Loss of function of the FMR1 gene leads to fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common form of intellectual disability. The loss of FMR1 function is usually caused by epigenetic silencing of the FMR1 promoter leading to expansion and subsequent methylation of a CGG repeat in the 5' untranslated region. Very few coding sequence variations have been experimentally characterized and shown to be causal to the disease. Here, we describe a novel FMR1 mutation and reveal an unexpected nuclear export function for the C-terminus of FMRP. We screened a cohort of patients with typical FXS symptoms who tested negative for CGG repeat expansion in the FMR1 locus. In one patient, we identified a guanine insertion in FMR1 exon 15. This mutation alters the open reading frame creating a short novel C-terminal sequence, followed by a stop codon. We find that this novel peptide encodes a functional nuclear localization signal (NLS) targeting the patient FMRP to the nucleolus in human cells. We also reveal an evolutionarily conserved nuclear export function associated with the endogenous C-terminus of FMRP. In vivo analyses in Drosophila demonstrate that a patient-mimetic mutation alters the localization and function of Dfmrp in neurons, leading to neomorphic neuronal phenotypes. © 2015 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  19. A New Nonsense Mutation in CDKL5 Gene in a Male Patient with Early Onset Refractory Epilepsy: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soudeh Ghafouri-Fard

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background The X-linked cyclin-dependent kinase like 5 (CDKL5/STK9 gene has been shown to be responsible for a severe encephalopathy condition characterized by early onset of epilepsy and severe developmental delay. CDKL5 mutations have been shown to be more frequent among female patients. Results Here we report a 6- month male patient, second child of a healthy non consanguineous in the Iranian population. He has been affected by early onset epileptic refractory seizures and developmental delay. Whole-exome sequencing (WES has revealed a base substitution c.173T>A in CDKL5 gene, resulting in the formation of stop codon p.L58X. This mutation resides in the catalytic domain of the corresponding protein and is expected to result in premature RNA break down with no CDKL5 resulting protein. Conclusion   The present report highlights the importance of CDKL5 mutation analysis in male patients affected with early onset refractory epilepsy.

  20. A nonsense mutation of γD-crystallin associated with congenital nuclear and posterior polar cataract in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yi; Li, Jinyu; Zhu, Yanan; Xia, Yan; Wang, Wei; Yu, Yinhui; Yao, Ke

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize the disease-causing mutations in a Chinese family with congenital nuclear and posterior polar cataracts. Clinical data of patients in the family were recorded using slit-lamp photography and high definition video. Genomic DNA samples were extracted from the peripheral blood of the pedigree members and 100 healthy controls. Mutation screening was performed in the candidate genes by bi-directional sequencing of the amplified products. The congenital cataract phenotype of the pedigree was identified by slit-lamp examinations and observation during surgery as nuclear and posterior polar cataracts. Through the sequencing of the candidate genes, a heterozygous c. 418C>T change was detected in the coding region of the γD-crystallin gene (CRYGD). As a result of this change, a highly conserved arginine residue was replaced by a stop codon (p. R140X). This change was discovered among all of the affected individuals with cataracts, but not among the unaffected family members or the 100 ethnically matched controls. This study identified a novel congenital nuclear and posterior polar cataract phenotype caused by the recurrent mutation p. R140X in CRYGD.

  1. A nonsense mutation in cGMP-dependent type II protein kinase (PRKG2) causes dwarfism in American Angus cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koltes, James E; Mishra, Bishnu P; Kumar, Dinesh; Kataria, Ranjit S; Totir, Liviu R; Fernando, Rohan L; Cobbold, Rowland; Steffen, David; Coppieters, Wouter; Georges, Michel; Reecy, James M

    2009-11-17

    Historically, dwarfism was the major genetic defect in U.S. beef cattle. Aggressive culling and sire testing were used to minimize its prevalence; however, neither of these practices can eliminate a recessive genetic defect. We assembled a 4-generation pedigree to identify the mutation underlying dwarfism in American Angus cattle. An adaptation of the Elston-Steward algorithm was used to overcome small pedigree size and missing genotypes. The dwarfism locus was fine-mapped to BTA6 between markers AFR227 and BM4311. Four candidate genes were sequenced, revealing a nonsense mutation in exon 15 of cGMP-dependant type II protein kinase (PRKG2). This C/T transition introduced a stop codon (R678X) that truncated 85 C-terminal amino acids, including a large portion of the kinase domain. Of the 75 mutations discovered in this region, only this mutation was 100% concordant with the recessive pattern of inheritance in affected and carrier individuals (log of odds score = 6.63). Previous research has shown that PRKG2 regulates SRY (sex-determining region Y) box 9 (SOX9)-mediated transcription of collagen 2 (COL2). We evaluated the ability of wild-type (WT) or R678X PRKG2 to regulate COL2 expression in cell culture. Real-time PCR results confirmed that COL2 is overexpressed in cells that overexpressed R678X PRKG2 as compared with WT PRKG2. Furthermore, COL2 and COL10 mRNA expression was increased in dwarf cattle compared with unaffected cattle. These experiments indicate that the R678X mutation is functional, resulting in a loss of PRKG2 regulation of COL2 and COL10 mRNA expression. Therefore, we present PRKG2 R678X as a causative mutation for dwarfism cattle.

  2. Codon Distribution in Error-Detecting Circular Codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Fimmel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In 1957, Francis Crick et al. suggested an ingenious explanation for the process of frame maintenance. The idea was based on the notion of comma-free codes. Although Crick’s hypothesis proved to be wrong, in 1996, Arquès and Michel discovered the existence of a weaker version of such codes in eukaryote and prokaryote genomes, namely the so-called circular codes. Since then, circular code theory has invariably evoked great interest and made significant progress. In this article, the codon distributions in maximal comma-free, maximal self-complementary C3 and maximal self-complementary circular codes are discussed, i.e., we investigate in how many of such codes a given codon participates. As the main (and surprising result, it is shown that the codons can be separated into very few classes (three, or five, or six with respect to their frequency. Moreover, the distribution classes can be hierarchically ordered as refinements from maximal comma-free codes via maximal self-complementary C3 codes to maximal self-complementary circular codes.

  3. Codon Distribution in Error-Detecting Circular Codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fimmel, Elena; Strüngmann, Lutz

    2016-03-15

    In 1957, Francis Crick et al. suggested an ingenious explanation for the process of frame maintenance. The idea was based on the notion of comma-free codes. Although Crick's hypothesis proved to be wrong, in 1996, Arquès and Michel discovered the existence of a weaker version of such codes in eukaryote and prokaryote genomes, namely the so-called circular codes. Since then, circular code theory has invariably evoked great interest and made significant progress. In this article, the codon distributions in maximal comma-free, maximal self-complementary C³ and maximal self-complementary circular codes are discussed, i.e., we investigate in how many of such codes a given codon participates. As the main (and surprising) result, it is shown that the codons can be separated into very few classes (three, or five, or six) with respect to their frequency. Moreover, the distribution classes can be hierarchically ordered as refinements from maximal comma-free codes via maximal self-complementary C(3) codes to maximal self-complementary circular codes.

  4. UDI STOP Femminicidio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Crivelli

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available L'UDI, Unione Donne in Italia, ha collaborato con l'Osservatorio dei Processi Comunicativi a un numero monografico della rivista scientifica M@gm@ dal titolo "Violenza maschile e femminicidio". Il numero monografico vuole mettere a disposizione le analisi, l’esperienza e la storia nostra e delle nostre interlocutrici, come contributo al nostro comune lavoro di sensibilizzazione, contrasto alla violenza maschile sulle donne – femminicidio. “UDI STOP femminicidio” è da anni la nostra campagna contro la violenza di genere, la collaborazione con l’Osservatorio dei Processi Comunicativi è parte integrante di questo sforzo. Il primo e dichiarato dei nostri progetti politici è il contrasto alla cultura e al potere ideologico che consente il femminicidio, la subordinazione culturale e sociale, la percezione della donna come oggetto di dominio, la riduzione in schiavitù di tante donne, comprese molte donne prostitute... Sappiamo di non voler tradire una “responsabilità di genere” che deve necessariamente concretizzarsi in tanti “gesti responsabili”, nella lunga pazienza quotidiana che consente la sedimentazione di un cambiamento radicale nelle coscienze. Vogliamo continuare ad essere l’associazione che coniuga insieme la soggettività personale e l'assunzione diretta di responsabilità, della progettualità a lungo termine che non trova “contraddittorio” misurarsi con la solidarietà concreta e quotidiana con le altre donne, nel tentativo di far nascere le nuove maniere di pensare.

  5. Control of ribosome traffic by position-dependent choice of synonymous codons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitarai, Namiko; Pedersen, Steen

    2013-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) encodes a sequence of amino acids by using codons. For most amino acids, there are multiple synonymous codons that can encode the amino acid. The translation speed can vary from one codon to another, thus there is room for changing the ribosome speed while keeping the amino...... acid sequence and hence the resulting protein. Recently, it has been noticed that the choice of the synonymous codon, via the resulting distribution of slow- and fast-translated codons, affects not only on the average speed of one ribosome translating the mRNA but also might have an effect on nearby...... ribosomes by affecting the appearance of 'traffic jams' where multiple ribosomes collide and form queues. To test this 'context effect' further, we here investigate the effect of the sequence of synonymous codons on the ribosome traffic by using a ribosome traffic model with codon-dependent rates, estimated...

  6. Glycogen branching enzyme (GBE1) mutation causing equine glycogen storage disease IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Tara L; Valberg, Stephanie J; Adelson, David L; Abbey, Colette A; Binns, Matthew M; Mickelson, James R

    2004-07-01

    Comparative biochemical and histopathological evidence suggests that a deficiency in the glycogen branching enzyme, encoded by the GBE1 gene, is responsible for a recently identified recessive fatal fetal and neonatal glycogen storage disease (GSD) in American Quarter Horses termed GSD IV. We have now derived the complete GBE1 cDNA sequences for control horses and affected foals, and identified a C to A substitution at base 102 that results in a tyrosine (Y) to stop (X) mutation in codon 34 of exon 1. All 11 affected foals were homozygous for the X34 allele, their 11 available dams and sires were heterozygous, and all 16 control horses were homozygous for the Y34 allele. The previous findings of poorly branched glycogen, abnormal polysaccharide accumulation, lack of measurable GBE1 enzyme activity and immunodetectable GBE1 protein, coupled with the present observation of abundant GBE1 mRNA in affected foals, are all consistent with the nonsense mutation in the 699 amino acid GBE1 protein. The affected foal pedigrees have a common ancestor and contain prolific stallions that are likely carriers of the recessive X34 allele. Defining the molecular basis of equine GSD IV will allow for accurate DNA testing and the ability to prevent occurrence of this devastating disease affecting American Quarter Horses and related breeds.

  7. Synonymous codon ordering: a subtle but prevalent strategy of bacteria to improve translational efficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu-Qing Shao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In yeast coding sequences, once a particular codon has been used, subsequent occurrence of the same amino acid tends to use codons sharing the same tRNA. Such a phenomenon of co-tRNA codons pairing bias (CTCPB is also found in some other eukaryotes but it is not known whether it occurs in prokaryotes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we focused on a total of 773 bacterial genomes to investigate their synonymous codon pairing preferences. After calculating the actual frequencies of synonymous codon pairs and comparing them with their expected values, we detected an obvious pairing bias towards identical codon pairs. This seems consistent with the previously reported CTCPB phenomenon, since identical codons are certainly read by the same tRNA. However, among co-tRNA but non-identical codon pairs, only 22 were often found overrepresented, suggesting that many co-tRNA codons actually do not preferentially pair together in prokaryotes. Therefore, the previously reported co-tRNA codons pairing rule needs to be more rigorously defined. The affinity differences between a tRNA anticodon and its readable codons should be taken into account. Moreover, both within-gene-shuffling tests and phylogenetic analyses support the idea that translational selection played an important role in shaping the observed synonymous codon pairing pattern in prokaryotes. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, a high level of synonymous codon pairing bias was detected in 73% investigated bacterial species, suggesting the synonymous codon ordering strategy has been prevalently adopted by prokaryotes to improve their translational efficiencies. The findings in this study also provide important clues to better understand the complex dynamics of translational process.

  8. Nitrogen Research Programme STOP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erisman, J.W.; Van der Eerden, L.

    2000-01-01

    Nitrogen pollution is one of the main threats to the environment now in the Netherlands as well as other parts of Europe. In order to address the main gaps on the issues of nitrogen pollution related to the local scale, the Ministries of Housing, Physical Planning and Environment (VROM) and of Agriculture, Nature Management and Fisheries (LNV) have initiated a research programme, the Dutch Nitrogen Research Programme (STOP), which aims to provide a scientific basis to develop and implement policy on a local scale for the realisation and conservation of the EHS ('Dutch Mainframe of Natural Landscapes'). The results of the programme show that the description of emissions from manure in the field is difficult to describe and show large uncertainties. On the contrary, emissions from housings could be modelled well, if local actual data were available. The OPS model to describe the dispersion and deposition was evaluated with the measurements and the limitations were quantified. It appears that the model works well on the long term, whereas on the short term (hours) and short distance (tenths of meters) there is large uncertainty, especially in complex terrain. Critical loads for nitrogen for ecosystems were evaluated. Furthermore, the effect of management options was quantified. A method to determine critical loads as a function of soil conditions, such as acidification and water availability was derived. This resulted in a combination of the soil model SMART and the so-called 'nature planner' (Natuurplanner). It was concluded that the combination of SMART, the nature planner and OPS provide a good tool to develop and support policy on the local scale. 4 refs

  9. Possible association of the Plasmodium falciparum T1526C resa2 gene mutation with severe malaria

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    Durand Rémy

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum exports proteins that remodel the erythrocyte membrane. One such protein, called Pf155/RESA (RESA1 contributes to parasite fitness, optimizing parasite survival during febrile episodes. Resa1 gene is a member of a small family comprising three highly related genes. Preliminary evidence led to a search for clues indicating the involvement of RESA2 protein in the pathophysiology of malaria. In the present study, cDNA sequence of resa2 gene was obtained from two different strains. The proportion of P. falciparum isolates having a non-stop T1526C mutation in resa2 gene was evaluated and the association of this genotype with severity of malaria was investigated. Methods Resa2 cDNAs of two different strains (a patient isolate and K1 culture adapted strain was obtained by RT-PCR and DNA sequencing was performed to confirm its gene structure. The proportion of isolates having a T1526C mutation was evaluated using a PCR-RFLP methodology on groups of severe malaria and uncomplicated patients recruited in 1991–1994 in Senegal and in 2009 in Benin. Results A unique ORF with an internal translation stop was found in the patient isolate (Genbank access number : JN183870, while the K1 strain harboured the T1526C mutation (Genbank access number : JN183869 which affects the internal stop codon and restores a full length coding sequence. About 14% of isolates obtained from Senegal and Benin harboured mutant T1526C parasites. Some isolates had both wild and mutant resa alleles. The analysis excluding those mixed isolates showed that the resa2 T1526C mutation was found more frequently in severe malaria cases than in uncomplicated cases (p = 0.008. The association of the presence of the mutant allele and parasitaemia >4% was shown in multivariate analysis (p = 0.03 in the group of Beninese children. Conclusions All T1526C mutant parasites theoretically have the ability to give rise to a full-length RESA2 protein

  10. A nonsense mutation in the beta-carotene oxygenase 2 (BCO2 gene is tightly associated with accumulation of carotenoids in adipose tissue in sheep (Ovis aries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boman Inger A

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sheep carcasses with yellow fat are sporadically observed at Norwegian slaughter houses. This phenomenon is known to be inherited as a recessive trait, and is caused by accumulation of carotenoids in adipose tissue. Two enzymes are known to be important in carotenoid degradation in mammals, and are therefore potential candidate genes for this trait. These are beta-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase 1 (BCMO1 and the beta-carotene oxygenase 2 (BCO2. Results In the present study the coding region of the BCMO1 and the BCO2 gene were sequenced in yellow fat individuals and compared to the corresponding sequences from control animals with white fat. In the yellow fat individuals a nonsense mutation was found in BCO2 nucleotide position 196 (c.196C>T, introducing a stop codon in amino acid position 66. The full length protein consists of 575 amino acids. In spite of a very low frequency of this mutation in the Norwegian AI-ram population, 16 out of 18 yellow fat lambs were found to be homozygous for this mutation. Conclusion In the present study a nonsense mutation (c.196C>T in the beta-carotene oxygenase 2 (BCO2 gene is found to strongly associate with the yellow fat phenotype in sheep. The existence of individuals lacking this mutation, but still demonstrating yellow fat, suggests that additional mutations may cause a similar phenotype in this population. The results demonstrate a quantitatively important role for BCO2 in carotenoid degradation, which might indicate a broad enzyme specificity for carotenoids. Animals homozygous for the mutation are not reported to suffer from any negative health or development traits, pointing towards a minor role of BCO2 in vitamin A formation. Genotyping AI rams for c.196C>T can now be actively used in selection against the yellow fat trait.

  11. A splice acceptor mutation in C. elegans daf-19/Rfx disrupts functional specialization of male-specific ciliated neurons but does not affect ciliogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Kristen L; Rowneki, Mazhgan; Killian, Darrell J

    2015-04-01

    RFX transcription factors are master regulators of ciliogenesis in diverse animal species. The sole Caenorhabditis elegans RFX homolog, DAF-19, plays at least two roles in the formation of functional cilia. The DAF-19(C) isoform is required for ciliogenesis and the DAF-19(M) isoform is required for the functional specialization of a subset of male-specific ciliated neurons called PKD neurons. Here we report the identification of a novel mutation, daf-19(sm129), which disrupts the functional specification of PKD neurons and thus suggests that daf-19m activity is compromised. However, ciliogenesis is not disrupted in daf-19(sm129) mutants suggesting that daf-19c activity is retained. The sm129 mutation disrupts a splice acceptor site adjacent to an exon common to the daf-19c and daf-19m isoforms resulting in aberrant splicing in a proportion of transcripts. While aberrant splicing of daf-19c to upstream cryptic sites results in in-frame and functional products, a large proportion of daf-19m mRNAs include the entire upstream intron, which introduces a frameshift and stop codons. At least 15% of disease-causing mutations affect splicing of the gene bearing the mutation, thus it is important to understand the consequences of splice site mutations on gene function. However, predicting the effects of a splice site mutation remains difficult and experimental determination is still required. Using daf-19(sm129) as a model, our results suggest that this problem is exacerbated when a splice acceptor mutation is used by multiple isoforms of the same gene because the effects on each isoform can be dramatically different. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Novel mutations of CYP3A4 in Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, K P; Lin, Y Y; Cheng, C L; Lai, M L; Lin, M S; Siest, J P; Huang, J D

    2001-03-01

    Human cytochrome P450 3A4 is a major P450 enzyme in the liver and gastrointestinal tract. It plays important roles in the metabolism of a wide variety of drugs, some endogenous steroids, and harmful environmental contaminants. CYP3A4 exhibits a remarkable interindividual activity variation as high as 20-fold. To investigate whether the interindividual variation in CYP3A4 levels can be partly explained by genetic polymorphism, we analyzed DNA samples from 102 Chinese subjects by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis for novel point mutation in the CYP3A4 coding sequence and promoter region. Using PCR and directed sequencing method to establish the complete intron sequence of CYP3A4 from leukocytes, the complete genomic sequence from exon 1 through 13 of CYP3A4 was determined and published in the GenBank database (accession no. AF209389). CYP3A4-specific primers were designed accordingly. After PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism and restriction fragment length polymorphism screening, we found three novel mutations; two are point mutations and one is insertion. The first variant allele (CYP3A4*4), an Ile118Val change, was found in 3 of 102 Chinese subjects. The next allele (CYP3A4*5), which causes a Pro218Arg amino acid change, was found in 2 of 102 subjects. We found an insertion in A(17776), designated as CYP3A4*6, which causes frame shift and an early stop codon in exon 9, in one heterozygous subject. We also investigated the CYP3A4 activity in these mutant subjects by measuring the morning spot urinary 6beta-hydroxycortisol to free cortisol ratio with the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. When compared with healthy Chinese population data, the 6beta-hydroxycortisol to free cortisol ratio data suggested that these alleles (CYP3A4*4, CYP3A4*5, and CYP3A4*6) may decrease the CYP3A4 activity. Incidences of these mutations in Chinese subjects are rare. The prevalence of these point mutations in other ethnic

  13. LHC Availability 2017: Technical Stop 1 to Technical Stop 2

    CERN Document Server

    Todd, Benjamin; Apollonio, Andrea; Walsh, David John; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    This document summarises the LHC machine availability for the period of Technical Stop 1 (TS1) to Technical Stop 2 (TS2) in 2017. This period was dedicated to proton physics with a bunch spacing of 25ns. This note has been produced and ratified by the Availability Working Group which has complied fault information for the period in question using the Accelerator Fault Tracker.

  14. Molecular characterization of the llama FGF5 gene and identification of putative loss of function mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daverio, M S; Vidal-Rioja, L; Frank, E N; Di Rocco, F

    2017-12-01

    Llama, the most numerous domestic camelid in Argentina, has good fiber-production ability. Although a few genes related to other productive traits have been characterized, the molecular genetic basis of fiber growth control in camelids is still poorly understood. Fibroblast growth factor 5 (FGF5) is a secreted signaling protein that controls hair growth in humans and other mammals. Mutations in the FGF5 gene have been associated with long-hair phenotypes in several species. Here, we sequenced the llama FGF5 gene, which consists of three exons encoding 813 bp. cDNA analysis from hair follicles revealed the expression of two FGF5 alternative spliced transcripts, in one of which exon 2 is absent. DNA variation analysis showed four polymorphisms in the coding region: a synonymous SNP (c.210A>G), a single base deletion (c.348delA), a 12-bp insertion (c.351_352insCATATAACATAG) and a non-sense mutation (c.499C>T). The deletion was always found together with the insertion forming a haplotype and producing a putative truncated protein of 123 amino acids. The c.499C>T mutation also leads to a premature stop codon at position 168. In both cases, critical functional domains of FGF5, including one heparin binding site, are lost. All animals analyzed were homozygous for one of the deleterious mutations or compound heterozygous for both (i.e. c.348delA, c.351_352insCATATAACATAG/c.499T). Sequencing of guanaco samples showed that the FGF5 gene encodes a full-length 270-amino acid protein. These results suggest that FGF5 is likely functional in short-haired wild species and non-functional in the domestic fiber-producing species, the llama. © 2017 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  15. Recurrent loss of sex is associated with accumulation of deleterious mutations in Oenothera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollister, Jesse D; Greiner, Stephan; Wang, Wei; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Yong; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Wright, Stephen I; Johnson, Marc T J

    2015-04-01

    Sexual reproduction is nearly universal among eukaryotes. Theory predicts that the rarity of asexual eukaryotic species is in part caused by accumulation of deleterious mutations and heightened extinction risk associated with suppressed recombination and segregation in asexual species. We tested this prediction with a large data set of 62 transcriptomes from 29 species in the plant genus Oenothera, spanning ten independent transitions between sexual and a functionally asexual genetic system called permanent translocation heterozygosity. Illumina short-read sequencing and de novo transcript assembly yielded an average of 16.4 Mb of sequence per individual. Here, we show that functionally asexual species accumulate more deleterious mutations than sexual species using both population genomic and phylogenetic analysis. At an individual level, asexual species exhibited 1.8 × higher heterozygosity than sexual species. Within species, we detected a higher proportion of nonsynonymous polymorphism relative to synonymous variation within asexual compared with sexual species, indicating reduced efficacy of purifying selection. Asexual species also exhibited a greater proportion of transcripts with premature stop codons. The increased proportion of nonsynonymous mutations was also positively correlated with divergence time between sexual and asexual species, consistent with Muller's ratchet. Between species, we detected repeated increases in the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous divergence in asexual species compared with sexually reproducing sister taxa, indicating increased accumulation of deleterious mutations. These results confirm that an important advantage of sex is that it facilitates selection against deleterious alleles, which might help to explain the dearth of extant asexual species. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Biochemical features of genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with valine-to-isoleucine substitution at codon 180 on the prion protein gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yoko; Sanjo, Nobuo; Hizume, Masaki; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Ohgami, Tetsuya; Satoh, Katsuya; Hamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Yamada, Masahito; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Yokota, Takanori

    2018-02-19

    Valine-to-isoleucine substitution at codon 180 of the prion protein gene is only observed in patients with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and accounts for approximately half of all cases of genetic prion disease in Japan. In the present study, we investigated the biochemical characteristics of valine-to-isoleucine substitution at codon 180 in the prion protein gene, using samples obtained from the autopsied brains of seven patients with genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease exhibiting this mutation (diagnoses confirmed via neuropathological examination). Among these patients, we observed an absence of diglycosylated and monoglycosylated forms of PrP res at codon 181. Our findings further indicated that the abnormal prion proteins were composed of at least three components, although smaller carboxyl-terminal fragments were predominant. Western blot analyses revealed large amounts of PrP res in the cerebral neocortices, where neuropathological examination revealed marked spongiosis. Relatively smaller amounts of PrP res were detected in the hippocampus, where milder spongiosis was observed, than in the cerebral neocortex. These findings indicate that abnormal prion proteins in the neocortex are associated with severe toxicity, resulting in severe spongiosis. Our findings further indicate that the valine-to-isoleucine substitution is not a polymorphism, but rather an authentic pathogenic mutation associated with specific biochemical characteristics that differ from those observed in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Complete motif analysis of sequence requirements for translation initiation at non-AUG start codons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz de Arce, Alexander J; Noderer, William L; Wang, Clifford L

    2018-01-25

    The initiation of mRNA translation from start codons other than AUG was previously believed to be rare and of relatively low impact. More recently, evidence has suggested that as much as half of all translation initiation utilizes non-AUG start codons, codons that deviate from AUG by a single base. Furthermore, non-AUG start codons have been shown to be involved in regulation of expression and disease etiology. Yet the ability to gauge expression based on the sequence of a translation initiation site (start codon and its flanking bases) has been limited. Here we have performed a comprehensive analysis of translation initiation sites that utilize non-AUG start codons. By combining genetic-reporter, cell-sorting, and high-throughput sequencing technologies, we have analyzed the expression associated with all possible variants of the -4 to +4 positions of non-AUG translation initiation site motifs. This complete motif analysis revealed that 1) with the right sequence context, certain non-AUG start codons can generate expression comparable to that of AUG start codons, 2) sequence context affects each non-AUG start codon differently, and 3) initiation at non-AUG start codons is highly sensitive to changes in the flanking sequences. Complete motif analysis has the potential to be a key tool for experimental and diagnostic genomics. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Development of a codon optimization strategy using the efor RED reporter gene as a test case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Chee-Hoo; Yarkoni, Orr; Ajioka, James; Wan, Kiew-Lian; Nathan, Sheila

    2018-04-01

    Synthetic biology is a platform that enables high-level synthesis of useful products such as pharmaceutically related drugs, bioplastics and green fuels from synthetic DNA constructs. Large-scale expression of these products can be achieved in an industrial compliant host such as Escherichia coli. To maximise the production of recombinant proteins in a heterologous host, the genes of interest are usually codon optimized based on the codon usage of the host. However, the bioinformatics freeware available for standard codon optimization might not be ideal in determining the best sequence for the synthesis of synthetic DNA. Synthesis of incorrect sequences can prove to be a costly error and to avoid this, a codon optimization strategy was developed based on the E. coli codon usage using the efor RED reporter gene as a test case. This strategy replaces codons encoding for serine, leucine, proline and threonine with the most frequently used codons in E. coli. Furthermore, codons encoding for valine and glycine are substituted with the second highly used codons in E. coli. Both the optimized and original efor RED genes were ligated to the pJS209 plasmid backbone using Gibson Assembly and the recombinant DNAs were transformed into E. coli E. cloni 10G strain. The fluorescence intensity per cell density of the optimized sequence was improved by 20% compared to the original sequence. Hence, the developed codon optimization strategy is proposed when designing an optimal sequence for heterologous protein production in E. coli.

  19. Switches in Genomic GC Content Drive Shifts of Optimal Codons under Sustained Selection on Synonymous Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu; Tamarit, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The major codon preference model suggests that codons read by tRNAs in high concentrations are preferentially utilized in highly expressed genes. However, the identity of the optimal codons differs between species although the forces driving such changes are poorly understood. We suggest that these questions can be tackled by placing codon usage studies in a phylogenetic framework and that bacterial genomes with extreme nucleotide composition biases provide informative model systems. Switches in the background substitution biases from GC to AT have occurred in Gardnerella vaginalis (GC = 32%), and from AT to GC in Lactobacillus delbrueckii (GC = 62%) and Lactobacillus fermentum (GC = 63%). We show that despite the large effects on codon usage patterns by these switches, all three species evolve under selection on synonymous sites. In G. vaginalis, the dramatic codon frequency changes coincide with shifts of optimal codons. In contrast, the optimal codons have not shifted in the two Lactobacillus genomes despite an increased fraction of GC-ending codons. We suggest that all three species are in different phases of an on-going shift of optimal codons, and attribute the difference to a stronger background substitution bias and/or longer time since the switch in G. vaginalis. We show that comparative and correlative methods for optimal codon identification yield conflicting results for genomes in flux and discuss possible reasons for the mispredictions. We conclude that switches in the direction of the background substitution biases can drive major shifts in codon preference patterns even under sustained selection on synonymous codon sites. PMID:27540085

  20. Chloroplast DNA codon use: evidence for selection at the psb A locus based on tRNA availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, B R

    1993-09-01

    Codon use in the three sequenced chloroplast genomes (Marchantia, Oryza, and Nicotiana) is examined. The chloroplast has a bias in that codons NNA and NNT are favored over synonymous NNC and NNG codons. This appears to be a consequence of an overall high A + T content of the genome. This pattern of codon use is not followed by the psb A gene of all three genomes and other psb A sequences examined. In this gene, the codon use favors NNC over NNT for twofold degenerate amino acids. In each case the only tRNA coded by the genome is complementary to the NNC codon. This codon use is similar to the codon use by chloroplast genes examined from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Since psb A is the major translation product of the chloroplast, this suggests that selection is acting on the codon use of this gene to adapt codons to tRNA availability, as previously suggested for unicellular organisms.

  1. Identification of two HEXA mutations causing infantile-onset Tay-Sachs disease in the Persian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighi, Alireza; Rezazadeh, Jamileh; Shadmehri, Azam Ahmadi; Haghighi, Amirreza; Kornreich, Ruth; Desnick, Robert J

    2011-09-01

    The β-hexosaminidase A (HEXA) mutations in the first reported cases of infantile Tay-Sachs disease in the Persian population were identified in two unrelated consanguineous families. The clinical diagnoses of the affected infants were confirmed by their markedly deficient levels of HEXA activity in plasma or peripheral leukocytes. The specific causative mutation in each family was determined by sequencing the HEXA alleles in both sets of related parents. Two mutations were identified: c.1A>G (p.MIV), which obliterated the initiating methionine in codon 1, and c.1177C>T (p.R393X), which predicted a termination codon or nonsense mutation.

  2. Codon bias and gene ontology in holometabolous and hemimetabolous insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlini, David B; Makowski, Matthew

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between preferred codon use (PCU), developmental mode, and gene ontology (GO) was investigated in a sample of nine insect species with sequenced genomes. These species were selected to represent two distinct modes of insect development, holometabolism and hemimetabolism, with an aim toward determining whether the differences in developmental timing concomitant with developmental mode would be mirrored by differences in PCU in their developmental genes. We hypothesized that the developmental genes of holometabolous insects should be under greater selective pressure for efficient translation, manifest as increased PCU, than those of hemimetabolous insects because holometabolism requires abundant protein expression over shorter time intervals than hemimetabolism, where proteins are required more uniformly in time. Preferred codon sets were defined for each species, from which the frequency of PCU for each gene was obtained. Although there were substantial differences in the genomic base composition of holometabolous and hemimetabolous insects, both groups exhibited a general preference for GC-ending codons, with the former group having higher PCU averaged across all genes. For each species, the biological process GO term for each gene was assigned that of its Drosophila homolog(s), and PCU was calculated for each GO term category. The top two GO term categories for PCU enrichment in the holometabolous insects were anatomical structure development and cell differentiation. The increased PCU in the developmental genes of holometabolous insects may reflect a general strategy to maximize the protein production of genes expressed in bursts over short time periods, e.g., heat shock proteins. J. Exp. Zool. (Mol. Dev. Evol.) 324B: 686-698, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Spectrum of K ras mutations in Pakistani colorectal cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murtaza, B.N.; Bibi, A. [School of Biological Sciences, University of the Punjab, Quaid-i-Azam Campus, Lahore (Pakistan); Rashid, M.U.; Khan, Y.I. [Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Johar Town, Lahore (Pakistan); Chaudri, M.S. [Services Institute of Medical Sciences, Lahore (Pakistan); Shakoori, A.R. [School of Biological Sciences, University of the Punjab, Quaid-i-Azam Campus, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2013-11-29

    The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) is increasing daily worldwide. Although different aspects of CRC have been studied in other parts of the world, relatively little or almost no information is available in Pakistan about different aspects of this disease at the molecular level. The present study was aimed at determining the frequency and prevalence of K ras gene mutations in Pakistani CRC patients. Tissue and blood samples of 150 CRC patients (64% male and 36% female) were used for PCR amplification of K ras and detection of mutations by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, and nucleotide sequencing. The K ras mutation frequency was found to be 13%, and the most prevalent mutations were found at codons 12 and 13. A novel mutation was also found at codon 31. The dominant mutation observed was a G to A transition. Female patients were more susceptible to K ras mutations, and these mutations were predominant in patients with a nonmetastatic stage of CRC. No significant differences in the prevalence of K ras mutations were observed for patient age, gender, or tumor type. It can be inferred from this study that Pakistani CRC patients have a lower frequency of K ras mutations compared to those observed in other parts of the world, and that K ras mutations seemed to be significantly associated with female patients.

  4. Spectrum of K ras mutations in Pakistani colorectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murtaza, B.N.; Bibi, A.; Rashid, M.U.; Khan, Y.I.; Chaudri, M.S.; Shakoori, A.R.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) is increasing daily worldwide. Although different aspects of CRC have been studied in other parts of the world, relatively little or almost no information is available in Pakistan about different aspects of this disease at the molecular level. The present study was aimed at determining the frequency and prevalence of K ras gene mutations in Pakistani CRC patients. Tissue and blood samples of 150 CRC patients (64% male and 36% female) were used for PCR amplification of K ras and detection of mutations by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, and nucleotide sequencing. The K ras mutation frequency was found to be 13%, and the most prevalent mutations were found at codons 12 and 13. A novel mutation was also found at codon 31. The dominant mutation observed was a G to A transition. Female patients were more susceptible to K ras mutations, and these mutations were predominant in patients with a nonmetastatic stage of CRC. No significant differences in the prevalence of K ras mutations were observed for patient age, gender, or tumor type. It can be inferred from this study that Pakistani CRC patients have a lower frequency of K ras mutations compared to those observed in other parts of the world, and that K ras mutations seemed to be significantly associated with female patients

  5. IMPACTS OF BUS STOP IMPROVEMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-23

    Improving bus stops by providing shelters, seating, signage, and sidewalks is relatively inexpensive and popular among riders and local officials. Making such improvements, however, is not often a priority for U.S. transit providers because of compet...

  6. A whistle-stop tour of statistics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Everitt, Brian

    2012-01-01

    "Preface according to my Penguin English dictionary, whistle-stop, used before a noun means 'consisting of brief stops in several places' and this whistle-stop tour of statistics does just that, with...

  7. Sweet Spots and Door Stops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Michael; Tsui, Stella; Leung, Chi Fan

    2011-01-01

    A sweet spot is referred to in sport as the perfect place to strike a ball with a racquet or bat. It is the point of contact between bat and ball where maximum results can be produced with minimal effort from the hand of the player. Similar physics can be applied to the less inspiring examples of door stops; the perfect position of a door stop is…

  8. Probing Light Stops with Stoponium

    CERN Document Server

    Batell, Brian

    2015-01-01

    We derive new limits on light stops from diboson resonance searches in the $\\gamma\\gamma$, $Z \\gamma$, $ZZ$, $WW$ and $hh$ channels from the first run of the LHC. If the two-body decays of the light stop are mildly suppressed or kinematically forbidden, stoponium bound states will form in $pp$ collisions and subsequently decay via the pair annihilation of the constituent stops to diboson final states, yielding striking resonance signatures. Remarkably, we find that stoponium searches are highly complementary to direct collider searches and indirect probes of light stops such as Higgs coupling measurements. Using an empirical quarkonia potential model and including the first two $S$-wave stoponium states, we find that in the decoupling limit $m_{\\widetilde t_1} \\lesssim 130$ GeV is excluded for any value of the stop mixing angle and heavy stop mass by the combination of the latest resonance searches and the indirect constraints. The $\\gamma \\gamma$ searches are the most complementary to the indirect constraint...

  9. 50 Detecting adenosine triphosphatase 6 point mutations that may ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mutations at codons for the key residues Lys 260, Leu263, Gln266, Ser769 .... agarose gel and visualized under UV transillumination after treatment with ..... Li, W., Mo, W., Shen, D., Sun, L., Wang, J., Lu, S., Gitschier, J.M. & Zhou, B. (2005) Yeast ... Nagamune, K., Beatty, W.L., & Sibley, D. (2007) Artemisinin induces Calcium ...

  10. INVESTIGATION OF RANGES AND FREQUENCY OF MUTATIONS IN THE embB GENE IN MYCOBACTERIUMTUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATED WITH RESISTANCE TO ETHAMBUTOL USING REAL-TIME POLYMERASE CHAINREACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. S. Аlyapkinа

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on real-time allele-specific polymerase chain reaction, the ranges of potential mutations in codons of 306 and 405 of the embBgene in Mycobacterium tuberculosis associated with resistance to ethambutol were investigated. 5 different mutations were detected in codon 306 and 3 mutations were found in codon 406 of the embB gene. The detected mutations were confirmed by sequencing and mass spectrometry. By analyzing the frequency of detected mutations of , the set of reagents was developed for rapid testing of susceptibility tuberculous mycobacteria to ethambutol by multi-competitive allele-specific real-time PCR. Out of 107 tested specimens of clinical isolates, mutations of the embB gene of M. tuberculosis were detected in 49 (45.8% specimens, and no mutations were found in 58 (52.2% specimens. 39 (36.4% specimens had mutations in codon 306 of the embB gene, and 9 (8.4% specimens had a mutation in codon 406, and 1 (0.9% specimen had mutations in both codons 306 and 406. The high level of agreement in the results of molecular genetic and bacteriological tests (84% proved the significance of mutations in codons 306 and 406 of the embB gene in M. tuberculosis and the need for their identification in order to detect ethambutol resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. When using molecular genetic tests, the sensitivity level made 75.8%, while the specificity of standard culture-based methods makes 95.6%.

  11. Translational Control of the SigR-Directed Oxidative Stress Response in Streptomyces via IF3-Mediated Repression of a Noncanonical GTC Start Codon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeney, Morgan A; Chandra, Govind; Findlay, Kim C; Paget, Mark S B; Buttner, Mark J

    2017-06-13

    The major oxidative stress response in Streptomyces is controlled by the sigma factor SigR and its cognate antisigma factor RsrA, and SigR activity is tightly controlled through multiple mechanisms at both the transcriptional and posttranslational levels. Here we show that sigR has a highly unusual GTC start codon and that this leads to another level of SigR regulation, in which SigR translation is repressed by translation initiation factor 3 (IF3). Changing the GTC to a canonical start codon causes SigR to be overproduced relative to RsrA, resulting in unregulated and constitutive expression of the SigR regulon. Similarly, introducing IF3* mutations that impair its ability to repress SigR translation has the same effect. Thus, the noncanonical GTC sigR start codon and its repression by IF3 are critical for the correct and proper functioning of the oxidative stress regulatory system. sigR and rsrA are cotranscribed and translationally coupled, and it had therefore been assumed that SigR and RsrA are produced in stoichiometric amounts. Here we show that RsrA can be transcribed and translated independently of SigR, present evidence that RsrA is normally produced in excess of SigR, and describe the factors that determine SigR-RsrA stoichiometry. IMPORTANCE In all sigma factor-antisigma factor regulatory switches, the relative abundance of the two proteins is critical to the proper functioning of the system. Many sigma-antisigma operons are cotranscribed and translationally coupled, leading to a generic assumption that the sigma and antisigma factors are produced in a fixed 1:1 ratio. In the case of sigR - rsrA , we show instead that the antisigma factor is produced in excess over the sigma factor, providing a buffer to prevent spurious release of sigma activity. This excess arises in part because sigR has an extremely rare noncanonical GTC start codon, and as a result, SigR translation initiation is repressed by IF3. This finding highlights the potential significance

  12. Second stop and sbottom searches with a stealth stop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Hsin-Chia; Li, Lingfeng; Qin, Qin [Department of Physics, University of California,Davis, California 95616 (United States)

    2016-11-29

    The top squarks (stops) may be the most wanted particles after the Higgs boson discovery. The searches for the lightest stop have put strong constraints on its mass. However, there is still a search gap in the low mass region if the spectrum of the stop and the lightest neutralino is compressed. In that case, it may be easier to look for the second stop since naturalness requires both stops to be close to the weak scale. The current experimental searches for the second stop are based on the simplified model approach with the decay modes t̃{sub 2}→t̃{sub 1}Z and t̃{sub 2}→t̃{sub 1}h. However, in a realistic supersymmetric spectrum there is always a sbottom lighter than the second stop, hence the decay patterns are usually more complicated than the simplified model assumptions. In particular, there are often large branching ratios of the decays t̃{sub 2}→b̃{sub 1}W and b̃{sub 1}→t̃{sub 1}W as long as they are open. The decay chains can be even more complex if there are intermediate states of additional charginos and neutralinos in the decays. By studying several MSSM benchmark models at the 14 TeV LHC, we point out the importance of the multi-W final states in the second stop and the sbottom searches, such as the same-sign dilepton and multilepton signals, aside from the traditional search modes. The observed same-sign dilepton excesses at LHC Run 1 and Run 2 may be explained by some of our benchmark models. We also suggest that the vector boson tagging and a new kinematic variable may help to suppress the backgrounds and increase the signal significance for some search channels. Due to the complex decay patterns and lack of the dominant decay channels, the best reaches likely require a combination of various search channels at the LHC for the second stop and the lightest sbottom.

  13. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Is Resistant to Isoniazid at a Slow Growth Rate by Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in katG Codon Ser315.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose E Jeeves

    Full Text Available An important aim for improving TB treatment is to shorten the period of antibiotic therapy without increasing relapse rates or encouraging the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. In any M. tuberculosis population there is a proportion of bacteria that are drug-tolerant; this might be because of pre-existing populations of slow growing/non replicating bacteria that are protected from antibiotic action due to the expression of a phenotype that limits drug activity. We addressed this question by observing populations of either slow growing (constant 69.3h mean generation time or fast growing bacilli (constant 23.1h mean generation time in their response to the effects of isoniazid exposure, using controlled and defined growth in chemostats. Phenotypic differences were detected between the populations at the two growth rates including expression of efflux mechanisms and the involvement of antisense RNA/small RNA in the regulation of a drug-tolerant phenotype, which has not been explored previously for M. tuberculosis. Genotypic analyses showed that slow growing bacilli develop resistance to isoniazid through mutations specifically in katG codon Ser315 which are present in approximately 50-90% of all isoniazid-resistant clinical isolates. The fast growing bacilli persisted as a mixed population with katG mutations distributed throughout the gene. Mutations in katG codon Ser315 appear to have a fitness cost in vitro and particularly in fast growing cultures. Our results suggest a requirement for functional katG-encoded catalase-peroxide in the slow growers but not the fast-growing bacteria, which may explain why katG codon Ser315 mutations are favoured in the slow growing cultures.

  14. Eukaryotic evolutionary transitions are associated with extreme codon bias in functionally-related proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Hudson

    Full Text Available Codon bias in the genome of an organism influences its phenome by changing the speed and efficiency of mRNA translation and hence protein abundance. We hypothesized that differences in codon bias, either between-species differences in orthologous genes, or within-species differences between genes, may play an evolutionary role. To explore this hypothesis, we compared the genome-wide codon bias in six species that occupy vital positions in the Eukaryotic Tree of Life. We acquired the entire protein coding sequences for these organisms, computed the codon bias for all genes in each organism and explored the output for relationships between codon bias and protein function, both within- and between-lineages. We discovered five notable coordinated patterns, with extreme codon bias most pronounced in traits considered highly characteristic of a given lineage. Firstly, the Homo sapiens genome had stronger codon bias for DNA-binding transcription factors than the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, whereas the opposite was true for ribosomal proteins--perhaps underscoring transcriptional regulation in the origin of complexity. Secondly, both mammalian species examined possessed extreme codon bias in genes relating to hair--a tissue unique to mammals. Thirdly, Arabidopsis thaliana showed extreme codon bias in genes implicated in cell wall formation and chloroplast function--which are unique to plants. Fourthly, Gallus gallus possessed strong codon bias in a subset of genes encoding mitochondrial proteins--perhaps reflecting the enhanced bioenergetic efficiency in birds that co-evolved with flight. And lastly, the G. gallus genome had extreme codon bias for the Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor--which may help to explain their spontaneous recovery from deafness. We propose that extreme codon bias in groups of genes that encode functionally related proteins has a pathway-level energetic explanation.

  15. Mutation analysis of genes that control the G1/S cell cycle in melanoma: TP53, CDKN1A, CDKN2A, and CDKN2B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto, José Luis; Cabrera, Carmen M; Serrano, Salvio; López-Nevot, Miguel Ángel

    2005-01-01

    The role of genes involved in the control of progression from the G1 to the S phase of the cell cycle in melanoma tumors in not fully known. The aim of our study was to analyse mutations in TP53, CDKN1A, CDKN2A, and CDKN2B genes in melanoma tumors and melanoma cell lines We analysed 39 primary and metastatic melanomas and 9 melanoma cell lines by single-stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP). The single-stranded technique showed heterozygous defects in the TP53 gene in 8 of 39 (20.5%) melanoma tumors: three new single point mutations in intronic sequences (introns 1 and 2) and exon 10, and three new single nucleotide polymorphisms located in introns 1 and 2 (C to T transition at position 11701 in intron 1; C insertion at position 11818 in intron 2; and C insertion at position 11875 in intron 2). One melanoma tumor exhibited two heterozygous alterations in the CDKN2A exon 1 one of which was novel (stop codon, and missense mutation). No defects were found in the remaining genes. These results suggest that these genes are involved in melanoma tumorigenesis, although they may be not the major targets. Other suppressor genes that may be informative of the mechanism of tumorigenesis in skin melanomas should be studied

  16. Adrenocorticotropin-dependent precocious puberty of testicular origin in a boy with X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita due to a novel mutation in the DAX1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenice, S; Latronico, A C; Brito, V N; Arnhold, I J; Kok, F; Mendonca, B B

    2001-09-01

    Primary adrenal insufficiency is a rare condition in pediatric age, and its association with precocious sexual development is very uncommon. We report a 2-yr-old Brazilian boy with DAX1 gene mutation whose first clinical manifestation was isosexual gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty. He presented with pubic hair, enlarged penis and testes, and advanced bone age. T levels were elevated, whereas basal and GnRH-stimulated LH levels were compatible with a prepubertal pattern. Chronic GnRH agonist therapy did not reduce T levels, supporting the diagnosis of gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty. Testotoxicosis was ruled out after normal sequencing of exon 11 of the LH receptor gene. At age 3 yr he developed clinical and hormonal features of severe primary adrenal insufficiency. The entire coding region of the DAX1 gene was analyzed through direct sequencing. A nucleotide G insertion between nucleotides 430 and 431 in exon 1, resulting in a novel frameshift mutation and a premature stop codon at position 71 of DAX-1, was identified. Surprisingly, steroid replacement therapy induced a clear decrease in testicular size and T levels to the prepubertal range. These findings suggest that chronic excessive ACTH levels resulting from adrenal insufficiency may stimulate Leydig cells and lead to gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty in some boys with DAX1 gene mutations.

  17. Control of ribosome traffic by position-dependent choice of synonymous codons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitarai, Namiko; Pedersen, Steen

    2013-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) encodes a sequence of amino acids by using codons. For most amino acids, there are multiple synonymous codons that can encode the amino acid. The translation speed can vary from one codon to another, thus there is room for changing the ribosome speed while keeping the amino acid sequence and hence the resulting protein. Recently, it has been noticed that the choice of the synonymous codon, via the resulting distribution of slow- and fast-translated codons, affects not only on the average speed of one ribosome translating the mRNA but also might have an effect on nearby ribosomes by affecting the appearance of ‘traffic jams’ where multiple ribosomes collide and form queues. To test this ‘context effect’ further, we here investigate the effect of the sequence of synonymous codons on the ribosome traffic by using a ribosome traffic model with codon-dependent rates, estimated from experiments. We compare the ribosome traffic on wild-type (WT) sequences and sequences where the synonymous codons were swapped randomly. By simulating translation of 87 genes, we demonstrate that the WT sequences, especially those with a high bias in codon usage, tend to have the ability to reduce ribosome collisions, hence optimizing the cellular investment in the translation apparatus. The magnitude of such reduction of the translation time might have a significant impact on the cellular growth rate and thereby have importance for the survival of the species. (paper)

  18. Stringent Nucleotide Recognition by the Ribosome at the Middle Codon Position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Accurate translation of the genetic code depends on mRNA:tRNA codon:anticodon base pairing. Here we exploit an emissive, isosteric adenosine surrogate that allows direct measurement of the kinetics of codon:anticodon University of California base formation during protein synthesis. Our results suggest that codon:anticodon base pairing is subject to tighter constraints at the middle position than at the 5′- and 3′-positions, and further suggest a sequential mechanism of formation of the three base pairs in the codon:anticodon helix.

  19. Stringent Nucleotide Recognition by the Ribosome at the Middle Codon Position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Shin, Dongwon; Ng, Martin; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y; Tor, Yitzhak; Cooperman, Barry S

    2017-08-29

    Accurate translation of the genetic code depends on mRNA:tRNA codon:anticodon base pairing. Here we exploit an emissive, isosteric adenosine surrogate that allows direct measurement of the kinetics of codon:anticodon University of California base formation during protein synthesis. Our results suggest that codon:anticodon base pairing is subject to tighter constraints at the middle position than at the 5'- and 3'-positions, and further suggest a sequential mechanism of formation of the three base pairs in the codon:anticodon helix.

  20. Postmortem diagnosis of Marfan syndrome in a case of sudden death due to aortic rupture: Detection of a novel FBN1 frameshift mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunyun; Chen, Shu; Wang, Rongshuai; Huang, Sizhe; Yang, Mingzhen; Liu, Liang; Liu, Qian

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the sudden death of a 36-year-old Chinese man, a medicolegal autopsy was performed, combining forensic pathological examinations and genetic sequencing analysis to diagnose the cause of death. Genomic DNA samples were extracted from blood and subjected to high-throughput sequencing. Major findings included a dilated aortic root with a ruptured and dissected aorta and consequent tamponade of the pericardial sac. Moreover, arachnodactyly and other skeletal deformities were noted. By sequencing the fibrillin-1 gene (FBN1), five genetic variations were found, including four previously known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and a novel frameshift mutation, leading to the diagnosis of Marfan syndrome. The frameshift mutation (c.4921delG, p.glu1641llysFsX9) detected in exon 40 led to a stop codon after the next 8 amino acids. The four SNPs included a splice site mutation (c.3464-5 G>A, rs11853943), a synonymous mutation (p.Asn625Asn, rs25458), and two missense mutations (p.Pro1148Ala, rs140598; p.Cys472Tyr, rs4775765). Genetic screening was recommended for the relatives as it was reported that the father and brother of the deceased had died at the ages of 40 and 25, respectively, from sudden cardiac failure. The son of the deceased lacked the relevant mutations. This report emphasizes the important contribution of medicolegal postmortem analysis on the molecular pathogenesis study of Marfan syndrome and early diagnosis of at-risk relatives. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Abiotic stress leads to somatic and heritable changes in homologous recombination frequency, point mutation frequency and microsatellite stability in Arabidopsis plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Youli; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2011-01-01

    In earlier studies, we showed that abiotic stresses, such as ionizing radiation, heavy metals, temperature and water, trigger an increase in homologous recombination frequency (HRF). We also demonstrated that many of these stresses led to inheritance of high-frequency homologous recombination, HRF. Although an increase in recombination frequency is an important indicator of genome rearrangements, it only represents a minor portion of possible stress-induced mutations. Here, we analyzed the influence of heat, cold, drought, flood and UVC abiotic stresses on two major types of mutations in the genome, point mutations and small deletions/insertions. We used two transgenic lines of Arabidopsis thaliana, one allowing an analysis of reversions in a stop codon-containing inactivated β-glucuronidase transgene and another one allowing an analysis of repeat stability in a microsatellite-interrupted β-glucuronidase transgene. The transgenic Arabidopsis line carrying the β-glucuronidase-based homologous recombination substrate was used as a positive control. We showed that the majority of stresses increased the frequency of point mutations, homologous recombination and microsatellite instability in somatic cells, with the frequency of homologous recombination being affected the most. The analysis of transgenerational changes showed an increase in HRF to be the most prominent effect observed in progeny. Significant changes in recombination frequency were observed upon exposure to all types of stress except drought, whereas changes in microsatellite instability were observed upon exposure to UVC, heat and cold. The frequency of point mutations in the progeny of stress-exposed plants was the least affected; an increase in mutation frequency was observed only in the progeny of plants exposed to UVC. We thus conclude that transgenerational changes in genome stability in response to stress primarily involve an increase in recombination frequency.

  2. Use of ade1 and ade2 mutations for development of a versatile red/white colour assay of amyloid-induced oxidative stress in saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharathi, Vidhya; Girdhar, Amandeep; Prasad, Archana; Verma, Meenkshi; Taneja, Vibha; Patel, Basant K

    2016-12-01

    Mutations in adenine biosynthesis pathway genes ADE1 and ADE2 have been conventionally used to score for prion [PSI + ] in yeast. If ade1-14 mutant allele is present, which contains a premature stop codon, [psi - ] yeast appear red on YPD medium owing to accumulation of a red intermediate compound in vacuoles. In [PSI + ] yeast, partial inactivation of the translation termination factor, Sup35 protein, owing to its amyloid aggregation allows for read-through of the ade1-14 stop codon and the yeast appears white as the red intermediate pigment is not accumulated. The red colour development in ade1 and ade2 mutant yeast requires reduced-glutathione, which helps in transport of the intermediate metabolite P-ribosylaminoimidazole carboxylate into vacuoles, which develops the red colour. Here, we hypothesize that amyloid-induced oxidative stress would deplete reduced-glutathione levels and thus thwart the development of red colour in ade1 or ade2 yeast. Indeed, when we overexpressed amyloid-forming human proteins TDP-43, Aβ-42 and Poly-Gln-103 and the yeast prion protein Rnq1, the otherwise red ade1 yeast yielded some white colonies. Further, the white colour eventually reverted back to red upon turning off the amyloid protein's expression. Also, the aggregate-bearing yeast have increased oxidative stress and white phenotype yeast revert to red when grown on media with reducing agent. Furthermore, the red/white assay could also be emulated in ade2-1, ade2Δ, and ade1Δ mutant yeast and also in an ade1-14 mutant with erg6 gene deletion that increases cell-wall permeability. This model would be useful tool for drug-screening against general amyloid-induced oxidative stress and toxicity. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Risk modeling and screening for BRCA1 mutations among Filipino breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nato, Alejandro Q. Jr.

    2003-03-01

    Breast cancer susceptibility gene, type 1(BRCA1) has been thought to be responsible for ∼45% of families with multiple breast carcinomas and for ∼80% of breast and ovarian cancer families. In this study, we investigated 34 familial Filipino breast cancer (BC) patients to: (a) estimate breast cancer risks and BRCA1/2 mutation carrier probabilities using risk assessment and prior probability models, respectively; (b) screen for putative polymorphisms at selected smaller exons of BRCA1 by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis; (c) screen for truncated mutations at BRCA1 exon 11 by radioactive protein truncation test (PTT); and (d) estimate posterior probabilities upon incorporation of screening results. SSCP analysis revealed 8 unique putative polymorphisms. Low prevalence of unique putative polymorphisms at exon 2, 5, 17, and 22 may indicate probable mutations. Contrastingly, high prevalence of unique putative polymorphisms at exons 13, 15, and 16 may suggest true polymorphisms which are biologically insignificant. PTT, DHPLC, and sequence analyses revealed a novel mutation in exon 11 involving GT insertion that resulted to a stop codon which generated a 29.7 kDa truncated protein product. This is the second documented mutation in BRCA1 exon 11 in a Filipino BC patient since 1998. Initial genotype-phenotype correlations in Filipino BC patients may be elucidated based on screening tests performed. Our results corroborate the findings of a study on unselected incident Filipino BC cases where the reported prevalence of BRCA1 mutation is low. The higher prevalence of putative polypmorphisms may be attributed to the increased stringency in patient prospecting. The Gail, Claus, and BRCAPRO models can be utilized to estimate BC risk in unaffected high-risk individuals but validation is needed. Most of the BRCAPRO and Myriad.com prior probability estimates coincide with the presence of BRCA1 mutation and/or putative polymorphisms. This pioneering

  4. Risk modeling and screening for BRCA1 mutations among Filipino breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nato, Jr, Alejandro Q

    2003-03-01

    Breast cancer susceptibility gene, type 1(BRCA1) has been thought to be responsible for {approx}45% of families with multiple breast carcinomas and for {approx}80% of breast and ovarian cancer families. In this study, we investigated 34 familial Filipino breast cancer (BC) patients to: (a) estimate breast cancer risks and BRCA1/2 mutation carrier probabilities using risk assessment and prior probability models, respectively; (b) screen for putative polymorphisms at selected smaller exons of BRCA1 by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis; (c) screen for truncated mutations at BRCA1 exon 11 by radioactive protein truncation test (PTT); and (d) estimate posterior probabilities upon incorporation of screening results. SSCP analysis revealed 8 unique putative polymorphisms. Low prevalence of unique putative polymorphisms at exon 2, 5, 17, and 22 may indicate probable mutations. Contrastingly, high prevalence of unique putative polymorphisms at exons 13, 15, and 16 may suggest true polymorphisms which are biologically insignificant. PTT, DHPLC, and sequence analyses revealed a novel mutation in exon 11 involving GT insertion that resulted to a stop codon which generated a 29.7 kDa truncated protein product. This is the second documented mutation in BRCA1 exon 11 in a Filipino BC patient since 1998. Initial genotype-phenotype correlations in Filipino BC patients may be elucidated based on screening tests performed. Our results corroborate the findings of a study on unselected incident Filipino BC cases where the reported prevalence of BRCA1 mutation is low. The higher prevalence of putative polypmorphisms may be attributed to the increased stringency in patient prospecting. The Gail, Claus, and BRCAPRO models can be utilized to estimate BC risk in unaffected high-risk individuals but validation is needed. Most of the BRCAPRO and Myriad.com prior probability estimates coincide with the presence of BRCA1 mutation and/or putative polymorphisms. This

  5. Stop. Write! Writing Grounded Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barney G. Glaser, PhD, Hon. PhD

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The message in this book, the dictum in this book, is to stop and write when the Grounded Theory (GT methodology puts you in that ready position. Stop unending conceptualization, unending data coverage, and unending listening to others who would egg you on with additional data, ideas and/or requirements or simply wait too long. I will discuss these ideas in detail. My experience with PhD candidates is that for the few who write when ready, many do not and SHOULD. Simply put, many write-up, but many more should.

  6. Could stops lighten the top?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilal, A.; Ellis, J.; Fogli, G.L.

    1990-01-01

    The analysis of the presently available electroweak data including radiative corrections in the standard model suggests that the top quark weighs more than the Z 0 . We examine whether squark loops in the minimal supersymmetric model, particularly those involving stops (partners of the top quark), could reduce substantially the preferred range of top quark masses. Given the present lower bounds on squark masses, we find that stop effects can reduce the central value of m t by at most a few GeV, although they do make a very heavy top quark increasingly unlikely. (orig.)

  7. Nonsense mutations in the human β-globin gene affect mRNA metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baserga, S.J.; Benz, E.J. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A number of premature translation termination mutations (nonsense mutations) have been described in the human α- and β-globin genes. Studies on mRNA isolated from patients with β 0 -thalassemia have shown that for both the β-17 and the β-39 mutations less than normal levels of β-globin mRNA accumulate in peripheral blood cells. (The codon at which the mutation occurs designates the name of the mutation; there are 146 codons in human β-globin mRNA). In vitro studies using the cloned β-39 gene have reproduced this effect in a heterologous transfection system and have suggested that the defect resides in intranuclear metabolism. The authors have asked if this phenomenon of decreased mRNA accumulation is a general property of nonsense mutations and if the effect depends on the location or the type of mutation. Toward this end, they have studied the effect of five nonsense mutations and two missense mutations on the expression of human β-globin mRNA in a heterologous transfection system. In all cases studied, the presence of a translation termination codon correlates with a decrease in the steady-state level of mRNA. The data suggest that the metabolism of a mammalian mRNA is affected by the presence of a mutation that affects translation

  8. Codon and amino-acid distribution in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.K.; Yang, S.I.; Kwon, Y.H.; Lee, E.I.

    2005-01-01

    According to the Zipf's law, the distribution of rank-ordered frequency of words in the natural language can be modelled on the power law. In this paper, we examine the frequency distribution of 64 codons over the coding and non-coding regions of 88 DNA from EMBL and GenBank database, using exponential fitting. Also, we regard 20 amino-acids as vocabulary, perform the same frequency analysis to the same database and show that amino-acids can be used as biological meaningful words for Zipf's approach. Our analysis suggests that a natural language structure may exist not only in the coding region of DNA but in the non-coding one of DNA

  9. Protein evolution via amino acid and codon elimination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goltermann, Lise; Larsen, Marie Sofie Yoo; Banerjee, Rajat

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Global residue-specific amino acid mutagenesis can provide important biological insight and generate proteins with altered properties, but at the risk of protein misfolding. Further, targeted libraries are usually restricted to a handful of amino acids because there is an exponential...... correlation between the number of residues randomized and the size of the resulting ensemble. Using GFP as the model protein, we present a strategy, termed protein evolution via amino acid and codon elimination, through which simplified, native-like polypeptides encoded by a reduced genetic code were obtained...... simultaneously), while retaining varying levels of activity. Combination of these substitutions to generate a Phe-free variant of GFP abolished fluorescence. Combinatorial re-introduction of five Phe residues, based on the activities of the respective single amino acid replacements, was sufficient to restore GFP...

  10. The p16INK4alpha/p19ARF gene mutations are infrequent and are mutually exclusive to p53 mutations in Indian oral squamous cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, K; Munirajan, A K; Krishnamurthy, J; Bhuvarahamurthy, V; Mohanprasad, B K; Panishankar, K H; Tsuchida, N; Shanmugam, G

    2000-03-01

    Eighty-seven untreated primary oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) associated with betel quid and tobacco chewing from Indian patients were analysed for the presence of mutations in the commonly shared exon 2 of p16INK4alpha/p19ARF genes. Polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and sequencing analysis were used to detect mutations. SSCP analysis indicated that only 9% (8/87) of the tumours had mutation in p16INK4alpha/p19ARF genes. Seventy-two tumours studied here were previously analysed for p53 mutations and 21% (15/72) of them were found to have mutations in p53 gene. Only one tumour was found to have mutation at both p53 and p16INK4alpha/p19ARF genes. Thus, the mutation rates observed were 21% for p53, 9% for p16INK4alpha/p19ARF, and 1% for both. Sequencing analysis revealed two types of mutations; i) G to C (GCAG to CCAG) transversion type mutation at intron 1-exon 2 splice junction and ii) another C to T transition type mutation resulting in CGA to TGA changing arginine to a termination codon at p16INK4alpha gene codon 80 and the same mutation will alter codon 94 of p19ARF gene from CCG to CTG (proline to leucine). These results suggest that p16INK4alpha/p19ARF mutations are less frequent than p53 mutations in Indian oral SCCs. The p53 and p16INK4alpha/p19ARF mutational events are independent and are mutually exclusive suggesting that mutational inactivation of either p53 or p16INK4alpha/p19ARF may alleviate the need for the inactivation of the other gene.

  11. Simulated evolution applied to study the genetic code optimality using a model of codon reassignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, José; Monteagudo, Angel

    2011-02-21

    As the canonical code is not universal, different theories about its origin and organization have appeared. The optimization or level of adaptation of the canonical genetic code was measured taking into account the harmful consequences resulting from point mutations leading to the replacement of one amino acid for another. There are two basic theories to measure the level of optimization: the statistical approach, which compares the canonical genetic code with many randomly generated alternative ones, and the engineering approach, which compares the canonical code with the best possible alternative. Here we used a genetic algorithm to search for better adapted hypothetical codes and as a method to guess the difficulty in finding such alternative codes, allowing to clearly situate the canonical code in the fitness landscape. This novel proposal of the use of evolutionary computing provides a new perspective in the open debate between the use of the statistical approach, which postulates that the genetic code conserves amino acid properties far better than expected from a random code, and the engineering approach, which tends to indicate that the canonical genetic code is still far from optimal. We used two models of hypothetical codes: one that reflects the known examples of codon reassignment and the model most used in the two approaches which reflects the current genetic code translation table. Although the standard code is far from a possible optimum considering both models, when the more realistic model of the codon reassignments was used, the evolutionary algorithm had more difficulty to overcome the efficiency of the canonical genetic code. Simulated evolution clearly reveals that the canonical genetic code is far from optimal regarding its optimization. Nevertheless, the efficiency of the canonical code increases when mistranslations are taken into account with the two models, as indicated by the fact that the best possible codes show the patterns of the

  12. Simulated evolution applied to study the genetic code optimality using a model of codon reassignments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monteagudo Ángel

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As the canonical code is not universal, different theories about its origin and organization have appeared. The optimization or level of adaptation of the canonical genetic code was measured taking into account the harmful consequences resulting from point mutations leading to the replacement of one amino acid for another. There are two basic theories to measure the level of optimization: the statistical approach, which compares the canonical genetic code with many randomly generated alternative ones, and the engineering approach, which compares the canonical code with the best possible alternative. Results Here we used a genetic algorithm to search for better adapted hypothetical codes and as a method to guess the difficulty in finding such alternative codes, allowing to clearly situate the canonical code in the fitness landscape. This novel proposal of the use of evolutionary computing provides a new perspective in the open debate between the use of the statistical approach, which postulates that the genetic code conserves amino acid properties far better than expected from a random code, and the engineering approach, which tends to indicate that the canonical genetic code is still far from optimal. We used two models of hypothetical codes: one that reflects the known examples of codon reassignment and the model most used in the two approaches which reflects the current genetic code translation table. Although the standard code is far from a possible optimum considering both models, when the more realistic model of the codon reassignments was used, the evolutionary algorithm had more difficulty to overcome the efficiency of the canonical genetic code. Conclusions Simulated evolution clearly reveals that the canonical genetic code is far from optimal regarding its optimization. Nevertheless, the efficiency of the canonical code increases when mistranslations are taken into account with the two models, as indicated by the

  13. Nuclear stopping in transmission experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glazov, Lev G.; Sigmund, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Energy-loss spectra, mean and peak energy loss, and straggling due to elastic nuclear scattering have been studied theoretically as a function of target thickness and deflection angle of an initially monochromatic and well-collimated ion beam. The goal of this work has been to provide a generally valid scheme for nuclear-stopping corrections, allowing to determine electronic-stopping forces from energy-loss spectra measured in transmission geometry. Calculations have been based on the generalized Bothe-Landau theory of energy loss and multiple scattering. Our peak energy losses at zero emergence angle show close (∼10%) agreement with predictions of Fastrup et al. on the basis of the Bohr-Williams theory. However, predicted mean and peak energy losses are found to more sensitively depend on the underlying interatomic potential than unrestricted, i.e. angle-integrated mean or peak energy losses. Both elastic energy loss and multiple scattering are known to obey scaling laws involving only two combinations of the pertinent variables and atomic parameters. The dependence on deflection angle and foil thickness of mean and peak energy loss obeys a simple combination of these scaling laws. Comments are made on potential errors due to uncertainties in the nuclear-stopping correction applied in the literature with specific reference to central papers in low-velocity stopping

  14. Stop searches in flavourful supersymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Crivellin, Andreas; Tunstall, Lewis C.

    2016-01-01

    Natural realisations of supersymmetry require light stops ${\\tilde t}_1$, making them a prime target of LHC searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. Depending on the kinematic region, the main search channels are ${\\tilde t_1}\\to t \\tilde \\chi^0_1$, ${\\tilde t_1}\\to W b \\tilde \\chi^0_1$ and ${\\tilde t_1}\\to c \\tilde \\chi^0_1$. We first examine the interplay of these decay modes with ${\\tilde c_1}\\to c \\tilde \\chi^0_1$ in a model-independent fashion, revealing the existence of large regions in parameter space which are excluded for any ${\\tilde t_1}\\to c \\tilde \\chi^0_1$ branching ratio. This effect is then illustrated for scenarios with stop-scharm mixing in the right-handed sector, where it has previously been observed that the stop mass limits can be significantly weakened for large mixing. Our analysis shows that once the LHC bounds from ${\\tilde c_1}\\to c \\tilde \\chi^0_1$ searches are taken into account, non-zero stop-scharm mixing leads only to a modest increase in the allowed regions of parameter...

  15. Correlated ion stopping in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwicknagel, G.; Deutsch, C.

    1997-01-01

    The basic features of correlated ion stopping in plasmas are demonstrated by employing two opposite extremes of cluster structures, a statistical model with a spatial ion distribution of Gaussian shape and the highly regular configuration of N-ion chains and cubic boxes. In the case of the ion chains the resonant character of correlated stopping due to the interference of the excited wake fields is discussed in detail. The general behavior of correlation effects is summarized and its dependence on the ratio of cluster size and interion spacing to the screening length in the plasma, as well as the ratio of the cluster velocity to the mean electron velocity in the target, is stressed out. The validity and applicability of the dielectric response formalism used for describing correlated stopping is critically reviewed. A scheme is presented to extend the linear formalism to weak nonlinear situations that occur, in particular, for small highly charged clusters at moderate or low velocities. For the Gaussian cluster a fit formula is given, which allows a fast and accurate calculation of the enhancement of stopping due to correlation effects and applies for all degrees of degeneracy of the electrons and arbitrary cluster velocities. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  16. Remote Shutoff Stops Runaway Lawnmower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grambo, Alan A.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how electronics students at Central Nine Career Center designed a kill switch circuit to stop a runaway lawnmower. This project is ideal for a career center since the electronics/robotics, small engines and horticulture classes can all work together on their respective parts of the modification, installation…

  17. Reparametrizations with given stop data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin

    2009-01-01

    In [1] we performed a systematic investigation of reparametrizations of continuous paths in a Hausdorff space that relies crucially on a proper understanding of stop data of a (weakly increasing) reprametrizations of the unit interval. I am grateful to Marco Grandis (Genova) for pointing out to me...

  18. Reparametrizations with given stop data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin

    In [1], we performed a systematic investigation of reparametrizations of continuous paths in a Hausdorff space that relies crucially on a proper understanding of stop data of a (weakly increasing) reparametrization of the unit interval. I am indebted to Marco Grandis (Genova) for pointing out tome...

  19. Stopping Power for Degenerate Electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singleton, Jr., Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-16

    This is a first attempt at calculating the BPS stopping power with electron degeneracy corrections. Section I establishes some notation and basic facts. Section II outlines the basics of the calculation, and in Section III contains some brief notes on how to proceed with the details of the calculation. The remaining work for the calculation starts with Section III.

  20. Plagiarism: Can It Be Stopped?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, G. Jay

    2011-01-01

    Plagiarism can be controlled, not stopped. The more appropriate question to ask is: What can be done to encourage students to "cheat" correctly by doing the assignment the way it was intended? Cheating by college students continues to reach epidemic proportions on selected campuses, as witnessed by the recent episode at Central Florida University,…

  1. Stop researching transformational leadership! Now!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.G. Tummers (Lars)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Intro__ Researchers all over the world, stop with your research on transformational leadership! Now! This could be the provocative conclusion after reading the recent article of Profs. Daan van Knippenberg and Sim Sitkin in The Academy of Management Annals (2013). These

  2. Stop researching transformational leadership! Now!

    OpenAIRE

    Tummers, Lars

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Intro__ Researchers all over the world, stop with your research on transformational leadership! Now! This could be the provocative conclusion after reading the recent article of Profs. Daan van Knippenberg and Sim Sitkin in The Academy of Management Annals (2013). These leadership professors write about the problems surrounding transformational leadership.

  3. Persisting roughness when deposition stops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Moshe; Edwards, S F

    2004-12-01

    Useful theories for growth of surfaces under random deposition of material have been developed by several authors. The simplest theory is that introduced by Edwards and Wilkinson (EW), which is linear and soluble. Its nonlinear generalization by Kardar, Parisi, and Zhang (KPZ) resulted in many subsequent studies. Yet both EW and KPZ theories contain an unphysical feature. When deposition of material is stopped, both theories predict that as time tends to infinity, the surface becomes flat. In fact, of course, the final surface is not flat, but simply has no gradients larger than the gradient related to the angle of repose. We modify the EW and KPZ theories to accommodate this feature and study the consequences for the simpler system which is a modification of the EW equation. In spite of the fact that the equation describing the evolution of the surface is not linear, we find that the steady state in the presence of noise is not very different in the long-wavelength limit from that of the linear EW equation. The situation is quite different from that of EW when deposition stops. Initially there is still some rearrangement of the surface, but that stops as everywhere on the surface the gradient is less than that related to the angle of repose. The most interesting feature observed after deposition stops is the emergence of history-dependent steady-state distributions.

  4. Tourette Syndrome: Help Stop Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... work on Tourette Syndrome Tourette Association information on bullying What it’s like to have Tourette – Mary tells her story What children wish people knew about Tourette Syndrome CDC Children’s Mental Health StopBullying.gov Features Media Sign up for Features ...

  5. Truncating mutation in the NHS gene: phenotypic heterogeneity of Nance-Horan syndrome in an asian Indian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramprasad, Vedam Lakshmi; Thool, Alka; Murugan, Sakthivel; Nancarrow, Derek; Vyas, Prateep; Rao, Srinivas Kamalakar; Vidhya, Authiappan; Ravishankar, Krishnamoorthy; Kumaramanickavel, Govindasamy

    2005-01-01

    A four-generation family containing eight affected males who inherited X-linked developmental lens opacity and microcornea was studied. Some members in the family had mild to moderate nonocular clinical features suggestive of Nance-Horan syndrome. The purpose of the study was to map genetically the gene in the large 57-live-member Asian-Indian pedigree. PCR-based genotyping was performed on the X-chromosome, by using fluorescent microsatellite markers (10-cM intervals). Parametric linkage analysis was performed by using two disease models, assuming either recessive or dominant X-linked transmission by the MLINK/ILINK and FASTLINK (version 4.1P) programs (http:www.hgmp.mrc.ac.uk/; provided in the public domain by the Human Genome Mapping Project Resources Centre, Cambridge, UK). The NHS gene at the linked region was screened for mutation. By fine mapping, the disease gene was localized to Xp22.13. Multipoint analysis placed the peak LOD of 4.46 at DSX987. The NHS gene mapped to this region. Mutational screening in all the affected males and carrier females (heterozygous form) revealed a truncating mutation 115C-->T in exon 1, resulting in conversion of glutamine to stop codon (Q39X), but was not observed in unaffected individuals and control subjects. conclusions. A family with X-linked Nance-Horan syndrome had severe ocular, but mild to moderate nonocular, features. The clinical phenotype of the truncating mutation (Q39X) in the NHS gene suggests allelic heterogeneity at the NHS locus or the presence of modifier genes. X-linked families with cataract should be carefully examined for both ocular and nonocular features, to exclude Nance-Horan syndrome. RT-PCR analysis did not suggest nonsense-mediated mRNA decay as the possible mechanism for clinical heterogeneity.

  6. Identification of the second mutation of BADH2 gene derived from rice mutant lines induced by gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I Ishak

    2016-01-01

    The BADH2 gene acts as suppressor of 2-acetyl-1-pyrolline (2AP) biosynthesis in plants. 2AP is the volatile compound which provides fragrance in rice. Biosynthesis of 2AP occurs when BADH2 loses its function as suppressor gene. Aromatic rice cultivars naturally incur mutation of BADH2 gene at 8 bp. In this experiment, aromatic mutant rice lines derived from irradiation of Sintanur cultivar by gamma rays with dose of 100 Gy were studied in molecular level. These mutant lines were characterized at the M10 plantgeneration under the assumption that genetically these aromatic mutant rice lines were homozygotic. Several primers related to aroma in rice have been used for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in a thermal cycler instrument. Gel electrophoreses were carried out using 1.5% agarose in TAE buffer. DNA fragments at 254 bp and 355 bp (base pair) were taken and amplified by primer for nucleotide sequencing of these fragments. Molecular identification and characterization after electrophoresis showed that the mutant line from AR1020 can be differentiated from AR.1080 at 254 bp. Nucleotide sequence data from of these DNA fragments showed that point mutations (deletions and substitutions) occurred at the BADH2 gene in exon 7; those are called second mutation and were caused by gamma rays effects. The Sintanur variety was used as check cultivar and its DNA sequence was compared to that of the AR.1020 mutant line. The results from both DNA sequences (from cv. Sintanur and AR.1020) derived from fragments at 254 bp show that point mutations occurred within exon 7 and earlier stop codon occurred in the AR.1020 mutant rice line. Further, the use of EA primer in PCR resulted in detection of deletion and substitution of nucleotides in the AR.1020 mutant line. (author)

  7. Using Drosophila melanogaster as a model for genotoxic chemical mutational studies with a new program, SnpSift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Mark Ruden

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a new program SnpSift for filtering differential DNA sequence variants between two or more experimental genomes after genotoxic chemical exposure. Here, we illustrate how SnpSift can be used to identify candidate phenotype-relevant variants including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, multiple nucleotide polymorphisms (MNPs, insertions and deletions (InDels in mutant strains isolated from genome-wide chemical mutagenesis of Drosophila melanogaster. First, the genomes of two independently-isolated mutant fly strains that are allelic for a novel recessive male-sterile locus generated by genotoxic chemical exposure were sequenced using the Illumina next-generation DNA sequencer to obtain 20- to 29-fold coverage of the euchromatic sequences. The sequencing reads were processed and variants were called using standard bioinformatic tools. Next, SnpEff was used to annotate all sequence variants and their potential mutational effects on associated genes. Then, SnpSift was used to filter and select differential variants that potentially disrupt a common gene in the two allelic mutant strains. The potential causative DNA lesions were partially validated by capillary sequencing of PCR-amplified DNA in the genetic interval as defined by meiotic mapping and deletions that remove defined regions of the chromosome. Of the five candidate genes located in the genetic interval, the Pka-like gene CG12069 was found to carry a separate premature stop codon mutation in each of the two allelic mutants whereas the other 4 candidate genes within the interval have wild-type sequences. The Pka-like gene is therefore a strong candidate gene for the male-sterile locus. These results demonstrate that combining SnpEff and SnpSift can expedite the identification of candidate phenotype-causative mutations in chemically-mutagenized Drosophila strains. This technique can also be used to characterize the variety of mutations generated by genotoxic

  8. A novel germ-line point mutation in RET exon 8 (Gly(533)Cys) in a large kindred with familial medullary thyroid carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Adriana Madeira Alvares da [UNIFESP; Maciel, Rui Monteiro de Barros [UNIFESP; Dias-da-Silva, Magnus Régios [UNIFESP; Toledo, Silvia Regina Caminada de [UNIFESP; De Carvalho, Marcos B.; Cerutti, Janete Maria [UNIFESP

    2003-01-01

    Familial medullary thyroid carcinoma is related to germ-line mutations in the RET oncogene, mainly in cysteine codon 10 or 11, whereas noncysteine mutations in codons 13 - 15 are rare. We now report a new missense point mutation in exon 8 of the RET gene (1597G-->T) corresponding to a Gly(533)Cys substitution in the cystein-rich domain of RET protein in 76 patients from a 6-generation Brazilian family with 229 subjects, with ascendants from Spain. It is likely that the mutation causes familia...

  9. Identification of a novel mutation in the human growth hormone receptor gene (GHR) in a patient with Laron syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennero, Isabelle; Edouard, Thomas; Rashad, Mona; Bieth, Eric; Conte-Aurio, Françoise; Marin, Françoise; Tauber, Maithé; Salles, Jean Pierre; El Kholy, Mohamed

    2007-07-01

    Deletions and mutations in the growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene are the underlying etiology of Laron syndrome (LS) or growth hormone (GH) insensitivity syndrome (GHIS), an autosomal recessive disease. Most patients are distributed in or originate from Mediterranean and Middle-Eastern countries. Sixty mutations have been described so far. We report a novel mutation in the GHR gene in a patient with LS. Genomic DNA sequencing of exon 5 revealed a TT insertion at nucleotide 422 after codon 122. The insertion resulted in a frameshift introducing a premature termination codon that led to a truncated receptor. We present clinical, biochemical and molecular evidence of LS as the result of this homozygous insertion.

  10. The mutation frequency of 8-oxo-7,8 dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) situated in a multiply damaged site: comparison of a single and two closely opposed 8-oxodG in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malyarchuk, S.G.; Youngblood, R.C.; Landry, A.M.; Quillin, E.; Harrison, L.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: A multiply damaged site (MDS) is defined as >= two lesions within a distance of 10-15 base pairs (bp). MDS generated by ionizing radiation contains oxidative base damage, and in vitro studies have indicated that if the base damage is less than 3 bp apart, repair of one lesion is inhibited until repair of the lesion in the opposite strand is completed. Inhibition of repair could result in an increase in the mutation frequency of the base damage. We have designed an assay to determine whether a closely opposed lesion causes an increase in adenine insertion opposite an 8-oxodG in bacteria. The double-stranded oligonucleotides (with no damage, each single 8-oxodG or the MDS) were ligated into the firefly luciferase coding region of a reporter vector and transformed into wild type or MutY-deficient bacteria. The MDS contained an 8-oxodG in the transcribed strand (T) and a second 8-oxodG immediately 5' to this lesion in the non-transcribed strand (NT). During two rounds of replication, insertion of adenine opposite the 8-oxodG in the T or NT strand results in a translation termination codon at position 444 or 445, respectively. In wild-type bacteria, we detected a translation stop at a frequency of 0.15% (codon 444) and 0.09% (codon 445) with a single 8-oxodG in the T or NT strand, respectively. This was enhanced ∼3 fold when single lesions were replicated in MutY-deficient bacteria. Positioning an 8-oxodG in the T strand within the MDS enhanced the mutation frequency by ∼2 fold in wild-type bacteria and 8 fold in Mut Y-deficient bacteria, while the mutation frequency of the 8-oxodG in the NT strand increased by 6 fold in Mut Y-deficient bacteria. This enhancement of mutation frequency supports the in vitro MDS studies, which demonstrated the inability of base excision repair to completely repair closely opposed lesions

  11. The Frequency and Type of K-RAS Mutations in Mexican Patients With Colorectal Cancer: A National Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas-Ramos, Susana G; Alcázar-González, Gregorio; Reyes-Cortés, Luisa M; Torres-Grimaldo, Abdiel A; Calderón-Garcidueñas, Ana L; Morales-Casas, José; Flores-Sánchez, Patricia; De León-Escobedo, Raúl; Gómez-Díaz, Antonio; Moreno-Bringas, Carmen; Sánchez-Guillén, Jorge; Ramos-Salazar, Pedro; González-de León, César; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo A

    2017-06-01

    Current metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) therapy uses monoclonal antibodies against the epidermal growth factor receptor. This treatment is only useful in the absence of K-RAS gene mutations; therefore the study of such mutations is part of a personalized treatment. The aim of this work is to determine the frequency and type of the most common K-RAS mutations in Mexican patients with metastatic disease by nucleotide sequencing. We studied 888 patients with mCRC from different regions of Mexico. The presence of mutations in exon 2, codons 12 and 13, of the K-RAS gene was determined by nucleotide sequencing. Patients exhibited K-RAS gene mutations in 35% (310/888) of cases. Mutation frequency of codons 12 and 13 was 71% (221/310) and 29% (89/310), respectively. The most common mutation (45.7%) in codon 12 was c.35G>A (p.G12D), whereas the one in codon 13 was c.38G>A (p.G13D) (78.7%). Given the frequency of K-RAS mutations in Mexicans, making a genetic study before deciding to treat mCRC patients with monoclonal antibodies is indispensable.

  12. LUNG TUMOR KRAS AND TP53 MUTATIONS IN NON-SMOKERS REFLECT EXPOSURE TO PAH-RICH COAL COMBUSTION EMISSIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract We determined the TP53 and codon 12 KRAS mutations in lung tumors from 24 nonsmokers whose tumors were associated with exposure to smoky coal. Among any tumors studied previously, these showed the highest percentage of mutations that (a) were G -+ T transver...

  13. Large-scale analyses of synonymous substitution rates can be sensitive to assumptions about the process of mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aris-Brosou, Stéphane; Bielawski, Joseph P

    2006-08-15

    A popular approach to examine the roles of mutation and selection in the evolution of genomes has been to consider the relationship between codon bias and synonymous rates of molecular evolution. A significant relationship between these two quantities is taken to indicate the action of weak selection on substitutions among synonymous codons. The neutral theory predicts that the rate of evolution is inversely related to the level of functional constraint. Therefore, selection against the use of non-preferred codons among those coding for the same amino acid should result in lower rates of synonymous substitution as compared with sites not subject to such selection pressures. However, reliably measuring the extent of such a relationship is problematic, as estimates of synonymous rates are sensitive to our assumptions about the process of molecular evolution. Previous studies showed the importance of accounting for unequal codon frequencies, in particular when synonymous codon usage is highly biased. Yet, unequal codon frequencies can be modeled in different ways, making different assumptions about the mutation process. Here we conduct a simulation study to evaluate two different ways of modeling uneven codon frequencies and show that both model parameterizations can have a dramatic impact on rate estimates and affect biological conclusions about genome evolution. We reanalyze three large data sets to demonstrate the relevance of our results to empirical data analysis.

  14. A Novel Nonsense Mutation in the DMP1 Gene Identified by a Genome-Wide Association Study Is Responsible for Inherited Rickets in Corriedale Sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Hugh T.; Thompson, Keith G.; Rothschild, Max F.; Garrick, Dorian J.

    2011-01-01

    Inherited rickets of Corriedale sheep is characterized by decreased growth rate, thoracic lordosis and angular limb deformities. Previous outcross and backcross studies implicate inheritance as a simple autosomal recessive disorder. A genome wide association study was conducted using the Illumina OvineSNP50 BeadChip on 20 related sheep comprising 17 affected and 3 carriers. A homozygous region of 125 consecutive single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) loci was identified in all affected sheep, covering a region of 6 Mb on ovine chromosome 6. Among 35 candidate genes in this region, the dentin matrix protein 1 gene (DMP1) was sequenced to reveal a nonsense mutation 250C/T on exon 6. This mutation introduced a stop codon (R145X) and could truncate C-terminal amino acids. Genotyping by PCR-RFLP for this mutation showed all 17 affected sheep were “T T” genotypes; the 3 carriers were “C T”; 24 phenotypically normal related sheep were either “C T” or “C C”; and 46 unrelated normal control sheep from other breeds were all “C C”. The other SNPs in DMP1 were not concordant with the disease and can all be ruled out as candidates. Previous research has shown that mutations in the DMP1 gene are responsible for autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets in humans. Dmp1_knockout mice exhibit rickets phenotypes. We believe the R145X mutation to be responsible for the inherited rickets found in Corriedale sheep. A simple diagnostic test can be designed to identify carriers with the defective “T” allele. Affected sheep could be used as animal models for this form of human rickets, and for further investigation of the role of DMP1 in phosphate homeostasis. PMID:21747952

  15. SLC3A1 and SLC7A9 mutations in autosomal recessive or dominant canine cystinuria: a new classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brons, A-K; Henthorn, P S; Raj, K; Fitzgerald, C A; Liu, J; Sewell, A C; Giger, U

    2013-01-01

    Cystinuria, one of the first recognized inborn errors of metabolism, has been reported in many dog breeds. To determine urinary cystine concentrations, inheritance, and mutations in the SLC3A1 and SLC7A9 genes associated with cystinuria in 3 breeds. Mixed and purebred Labrador Retrievers (n = 6), Australian Cattle Dogs (6), Miniature Pinschers (4), and 1 mixed breed dog with cystine urolithiasis, relatives and control dogs. Urinary cystinuria and aminoaciduria was assessed and exons of the SLC3A1 and SLC7A9 genes were sequenced from genomic DNA. In each breed, male and female dogs, independent of neuter status, were found to form calculi. A frameshift mutation in SLC3A1 (c.350delG) resulting in a premature stop codon was identified in autosomal-recessive (AR) cystinuria in Labrador Retrievers and mixed breed dogs. A 6 bp deletion (c.1095_1100del) removing 2 threonines in SLC3A1 was found in autosomal-dominant (AD) cystinuria with a more severe phenotype in homozygous than in heterozygous Australian Cattle Dogs. A missense mutation in SLC7A9 (c.964G>A) was discovered in AD cystinuria in Miniature Pinschers with only heterozygous affected dogs observed to date. Breed-specific DNA tests were developed, but the prevalence of each mutation remains unknown. These studies describe the first AD inheritance and the first putative SLC7A9 mutation to cause cystinuria in dogs and expand our understanding of this phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous disease, leading to a new classification system for canine cystinuria and better therapeutic management and genetic control in these breeds. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  16. Low incidence of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2C revealed by a mutation study in Japanese patients clinically diagnosed with DMD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maruyama Koichi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2C (LGMD2C is an autosomal recessive muscle dystrophy that resembles Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. Although DMD is known to affect one in every 3500 males regardless of race, a widespread founder mutation causing LGMD2C has been described in North Africa. However, the incidence of LGMD2C in Japanese has been unknown because the genetic background remains uncharacterized in many patients clinically diagnosed with DMD. Methods We enrolled 324 patients referred to the Kobe University Hospital with suspected DMD. Mutations in the dystrophin or the SGCG genes were analyzed using not only genomic DNA but also cDNA. Results In 322 of the 324 patients, responsible mutations in the dystrophin were successfully revealed, confirming DMD diagnosis. The remaining two patients had normal dystrophin expression but absence of γ-sarcoglycan in skeletal muscle. Mutation analysis of the SGCG gene revealed homozygous deletion of exon 6 in one patient, while the other had a novel single nucleotide insertion in exon 7 in one allele and deletion of exon 6 in the other allele. These mutations created a stop codon that led to a γ-sarcoglycan deficiency, and we therefore diagnosed these two patients as having LGMD2C. Thus, the relative incidence of LGMD2C among Japanese DMD-like patients can be calculated as 1 in 161 patients suspected to have DMD (2 of 324 patients = 0.6%. Taking into consideration the DMD incidence for the overall population (1/3,500 males, the incidence of LGMD2C can be estimated as 1 per 560,000 or 1.8 per million. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate a low incidence of LGMD2C in the Japanese population.

  17. A novel nonsense mutation in the DMP1 gene identified by a genome-wide association study is responsible for inherited rickets in Corriedale sheep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Zhao

    Full Text Available Inherited rickets of Corriedale sheep is characterized by decreased growth rate, thoracic lordosis and angular limb deformities. Previous outcross and backcross studies implicate inheritance as a simple autosomal recessive disorder. A genome wide association study was conducted using the Illumina OvineSNP50 BeadChip on 20 related sheep comprising 17 affected and 3 carriers. A homozygous region of 125 consecutive single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP loci was identified in all affected sheep, covering a region of 6 Mb on ovine chromosome 6. Among 35 candidate genes in this region, the dentin matrix protein 1 gene (DMP1 was sequenced to reveal a nonsense mutation 250C/T on exon 6. This mutation introduced a stop codon (R145X and could truncate C-terminal amino acids. Genotyping by PCR-RFLP for this mutation showed all 17 affected sheep were "T T" genotypes; the 3 carriers were "C T"; 24 phenotypically normal related sheep were either "C T" or "C C"; and 46 unrelated normal control sheep from other breeds were all "C C". The other SNPs in DMP1 were not concordant with the disease and can all be ruled out as candidates. Previous research has shown that mutations in the DMP1 gene are responsible for autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets in humans. Dmp1_knockout mice exhibit rickets phenotypes. We believe the R145X mutation to be responsible for the inherited rickets found in Corriedale sheep. A simple diagnostic test can be designed to identify carriers with the defective "T" allele. Affected sheep could be used as animal models for this form of human rickets, and for further investigation of the role of DMP1 in phosphate homeostasis.

  18. Bm-muted, orthologous to mouse muted and encoding a subunit of the BLOC-1 complex, is responsible for the otm translucent mutation of the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haokun; Kiuchi, Takashi; Wang, Lingyan; Kawamoto, Munetaka; Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio; Banno, Yutaka; Katsuma, Susumu; Shimada, Toru

    2017-09-20

    "Tanaka's mottled translucent" (otm) is a mutation of the silkworm Bombyx mori that exhibits translucent skin during larval stages. We performed positional cloning of the gene responsible for otm and mapped it to a 364-kb region on chromosome 5 that contains 22 hypothetical protein-coding genes. We performed RNA-seq analysis of the epidermis and fat body of otm larvae and determined that the gene BGIBMGA002619 may be responsible for the otm mutation. BGIBMGA002619 encodes the biosynthesis of lysosome-related organelles complex 1 (BLOC-1) subunit 5, whose ortholog is responsible for the Muted mutant in mouse. Accordingly, we named this gene Bm-muted. We discovered that the expression of Bm-muted in the epidermis and fat body of otm mutants was dramatically suppressed compared with the wild type. We determined the nucleotide sequences of the full-length cDNA and genomic region corresponding to Bm-muted and found that a 538-bp long DNA sequence similar to B. mori transposon Organdy was inserted into the 3' end of the first intron of Bm-muted in two otm strains. The Bm-muted cDNA of otm mutants lacked exon 2, and accordingly generated a premature stop codon in exon 3. In addition, short interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of this gene caused localized partial translucency of larval skin. These data indicate that the mutation in Bm-muted caused the otm-mutant phenotype. We propose that the insertion of Organdy caused a splicing disorder in Bm-muted in the otm mutant, resulting in a null mutation of Bm-muted. This mutation is likely to cause deficiencies in urate granule formation in epidermal cells that result in translucent larval skin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Identification and verification of a pathogenic MLH1 mutation c.1145dupA in a Lynch syndrome family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Feifei

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome (LS, an autosomal-dominant disorder with an increased risk of predominantly colorectal and endometrial cancers, is caused by germ-line mutations in mismatch repair genes. The identification of germ-line mutations that predispose to cancer is important to further our understanding of tumorigenesis, guide patient management and inform the best practice for healthcare. A 45-year-old woman with atypical endometrial hyperplasia who suffered colon cancer at the age of 30 years underwent hysterectomy and genetic counseling. Pedigree analysis revealed her family fulfilling the Amsterdam I criteria. Next-generation sequencing was offered to the patient. A mutation in the MLH1 gene, c.1145dupA, was identified and verified by Sanger sequencing. In addition, her nine family members were tested for the mutation. Two were affected (colon cancer at the age of 43 years and 45 years and one healthy relative carried the same mutation in the MLH1 gene. The mutation resulted in a frame-shift (p.Met383Aspfs*12 located in exon12, as well as a polypeptide truncation of 393 amino acids by the formation of a premature stop codon. An immunohistochemistry analysis of endometrial hyperplasia tissues revealed defects in MLH1 and PMS2 protein expression in the patient. Based on the 2015 American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG guideline, we report this MLH1 c.1145dupA variation to be a pathogenic mutation that contributes to a strongly increased cancer risk in this LS family. Proper screening suggestions were offered to the three affected patients and the healthy carrier. To the best of our knowledge, this germ-line mutation of MLH1 was previously submitted to the Leiden Open Variation Database (LOVD database, but no comprehensive evidence or supporting observations were reported previously in the literature. The present report found a single nucleotide insertion in exon12 of the MLH1 gene, which can be considered causative of Lynch phenotype

  20. Identification of seven haplotypes of the caprine PrP gene at codons 127, 142, 154, 211, 222 and 240 in French Alpine and Saanen breeds and their association with classical scrapie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barillet, F; Mariat, D; Amigues, Y; Faugeras, R; Caillat, H; Moazami-Goudarzi, K; Rupp, R; Babilliot, J M; Lacroux, C; Lugan, S; Schelcher, F; Chartier, C; Corbière, F; Andréoletti, O; Perrin-Chauvineau, C

    2009-03-01

    In sheep, susceptibility to scrapie is mainly influenced by polymorphisms of the PrP gene. In goats, there are to date few data related to scrapie susceptibility association with PrP gene polymorphisms. In this study, we first investigated PrP gene polymorphisms of the French Alpine and Saanen breeds. Based on PrP gene open reading frame sequencing of artificial insemination bucks (n=404), six encoding mutations were identified at codons 127, 142, 154, 211, 222 and 240. However, only seven haplotypes could be detected: four (GIH(154)RQS, GIRQ(211)QS, GIRRK(222)S and GIRRQP(240)) derived from the wild-type allele (G(127)I(142)R(154)R(211)Q(222)S(240)) by a single-codon mutation, and two (S(127)IRRQP(240) and GM(142)RRQP(240)) by a double-codon mutation. A case-control study was then implemented in a highly affected Alpine and Saanen breed herd (90 cases/164 controls). Mutations at codon 142 (I/M), 154 (R/H), 211 (R/Q) and 222 (Q/K) were found to induce a significant degree of protection towards natural scrapie infection. Compared with the baseline homozygote wild-type genotype I(142)R(154)R(211)Q(222)/IRRQ goats, the odds of scrapie cases in IRQ(211)Q/IRRQ and IRRK(222)/IRRQ heterozygous animals were significantly lower [odds ratio (OR)=0.133, PFrench Alpine and Saanen breeds were low (0.5-18.5 %), which prevent us from assessing the influence of all the possible genotypes in natural exposure conditions.

  1. Progress in understanding heavy-ion stopping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigmund, P., E-mail: sigmund@sdu.dk [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Pharmacy, University of Southern Denmark, DK-5230 Odense M (Denmark); Schinner, A. [Institut für Experimentalphysik, Johannes Kepler Universität, A-4040 Linz (Austria)

    2016-09-01

    We report some highlights of our work with heavy-ion stopping in the energy range where Bethe stopping theory breaks down. Main tools are our binary stopping theory (PASS code), the reciprocity principle, and Paul’s data base. Comparisons are made between PASS and three alternative theoretical schemes (CasP, HISTOP and SLPA). In addition to equilibrium stopping we discuss frozen-charge stopping, deviations from linear velocity dependence below the Bragg peak, application of the reciprocity principle in low-velocity stopping, modeling of equilibrium charges, and the significance of the so-called effective charge.

  2. Progress in understanding heavy-ion stopping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigmund, P.; Schinner, A.

    2016-01-01

    We report some highlights of our work with heavy-ion stopping in the energy range where Bethe stopping theory breaks down. Main tools are our binary stopping theory (PASS code), the reciprocity principle, and Paul’s data base. Comparisons are made between PASS and three alternative theoretical schemes (CasP, HISTOP and SLPA). In addition to equilibrium stopping we discuss frozen-charge stopping, deviations from linear velocity dependence below the Bragg peak, application of the reciprocity principle in low-velocity stopping, modeling of equilibrium charges, and the significance of the so-called effective charge.

  3. A 20 bp Duplication in Exon 2 of the Aristaless-Like Homeobox 4 Gene (ALX4 Is the Candidate Causative Mutation for Tibial Hemimelia Syndrome in Galloway Cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertram Brenig

    Full Text Available Aristaless-like homeobox 4 (ALX4 gene is an important transcription regulator in skull and limb development. In humans and mice ALX4 mutations or loss of function result in a number of skeletal and organ malformations, including polydactyly, tibial hemimelia, omphalocele, biparietal foramina, impaired mammary epithelial morphogenesis, alopecia, coronal craniosynostosis, hypertelorism, depressed nasal bridge and ridge, bifid nasal tip, hypogonadism, and body agenesis. Here we show that a complex skeletal malformation of the hind limb in Galloway cattle together with other developmental anomalies is a recessive autosomal disorder most likely caused by a duplication of 20 bp in exon 2 of the bovine ALX4 gene. A second duplication of 34 bp in exon 4 of the same gene has no known effect, although both duplications result in a frameshift and premature stop codon leading to a truncated protein. Genotyping of 1,688 Black/Red/Belted/Riggit Galloway (GA and 289 White Galloway (WGA cattle showed that the duplication in exon 2 has allele frequencies of 1% in GA and 6% in WGA and the duplication in exon 4 has frequencies of 23% in GA and 38% in WGA. Both duplications were not detected in 876 randomly selected German Holstein Friesian and 86 cattle of 21 other breeds. Hence, we have identified a candidate causative mutation for tibial hemimelia syndrome in Galloway cattle and selection against this mutation can be used to eliminate the mutant allele from the breed.

  4. Codon usage regulates protein structure and function by affecting translation elongation speed in Drosophila cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fangzhou; Yu, Chien-Hung; Liu, Yi

    2017-08-21

    Codon usage biases are found in all eukaryotic and prokaryotic genomes and have been proposed to regulate different aspects of translation process. Codon optimality has been shown to regulate translation elongation speed in fungal systems, but its effect on translation elongation speed in animal systems is not clear. In this study, we used a Drosophila cell-free translation system to directly compare the velocity of mRNA translation elongation. Our results demonstrate that optimal synonymous codons speed up translation elongation while non-optimal codons slow down translation. In addition, codon usage regulates ribosome movement and stalling on mRNA during translation. Finally, we show that codon usage affects protein structure and function in vitro and in Drosophila cells. Together, these results suggest that the effect of codon usage on translation elongation speed is a conserved mechanism from fungi to animals that can affect protein folding in eukaryotic organisms. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. A single sequence context cannot satisfy all non-AUG initiator codons in yeast†

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Tzu-Ling

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed that ALA1 (encoding alanyl-tRNA synthetase and GRS1 (encoding glycyl-tRNA synthetase respectively use ACG and TTG as their alternative translation initiator codons. To explore if any other non-ATG triplets can act as initiator codons in yeast, ALA1 was used as a reporter for screening. Results We show herein that except for AAG and AGG, all triplets that differ from ATG by a single nucleotide were able to serve as initiator codons in ALA1. Among these initiator codons, TTG, CTG, ACG, and ATT had ~50% initiating activities relative to that of ATG, while GTG, ATA, and ATC had ~20% initiating activities relative to that of ATG. Unexpectedly, these non-AUG initiator codons exhibited different preferences toward various sequence contexts. In particular, GTG was one of the most efficient non-ATG initiator codons, while ATA was essentially inactive in the context of GRS1. Conclusion This finding indicates that a sequence context that is favorable for a given non-ATG initiator codon might not be as favorable for another.

  6. Comparative evolutionary genomics of Corynebacterium with special reference to codon and amino acid usage diversities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Shilpee; Sarkar, Indrani; Roy, Ayan; Mohapatra, Pradeep K Das; Mondal, Keshab C; Sen, Arnab

    2018-02-01

    The present study has been aimed to the comparative analysis of high GC composition containing Corynebacterium genomes and their evolutionary study by exploring codon and amino acid usage patterns. Phylogenetic study by MLSA approach, indel analysis and BLAST matrix differentiated Corynebacterium species in pathogenic and non-pathogenic clusters. Correspondence analysis on synonymous codon usage reveals that, gene length, optimal codon frequencies and tRNA abundance affect the gene expression of Corynebacterium. Most of the optimal codons as well as translationally optimal codons are C ending i.e. RNY (R-purine, N-any nucleotide base, and Y-pyrimidine) and reveal translational selection pressure on codon bias of Corynebacterium. Amino acid usage is affected by hydrophobicity, aromaticity, protein energy cost, etc. Highly expressed genes followed the cost minimization hypothesis and are less diverged at their synonymous positions of codons. Functional analysis of core genes shows significant difference in pathogenic and non-pathogenic Corynebacterium. The study reveals close relationship between non-pathogenic and opportunistic pathogenic Corynebaterium as well as between molecular evolution and survival niches of the organism.

  7. Gaining insights into the codon usage patterns of TP53 gene across eight mammalian species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarikul Huda Mazumder

    Full Text Available TP53 gene is known as the "guardian of the genome" as it plays a vital role in regulating cell cycle, cell proliferation, DNA damage repair, initiation of programmed cell death and suppressing tumor growth. Non uniform usage of synonymous codons for a specific amino acid during translation of protein known as codon usage bias (CUB is a unique property of the genome and shows species specific deviation. Analysis of codon usage bias with compositional dynamics of coding sequences has contributed to the better understanding of the molecular mechanism and the evolution of a particular gene. In this study, the complete nucleotide coding sequences of TP53 gene from eight different mammalian species were used for CUB analysis. Our results showed that the codon usage patterns in TP53 gene across different mammalian species has been influenced by GC bias particularly GC3 and a moderate bias exists in the codon usage of TP53 gene. Moreover, we observed that nature has highly favored the most over represented codon CTG for leucine amino acid but selected against the ATA codon for isoleucine in TP53 gene across all mammalian species during the course of evolution.

  8. ChloroMitoCU: Codon patterns across organelle genomes for functional genomics and evolutionary applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sablok, Gaurav; Chen, Ting-Wen; Lee, Chi-Ching; Yang, Chi; Gan, Ruei-Chi; Wegrzyn, Jill L; Porta, Nicola L; Nayak, Kinshuk C; Huang, Po-Jung; Varotto, Claudio; Tang, Petrus

    2017-06-01

    Organelle genomes are widely thought to have arisen from reduction events involving cyanobacterial and archaeal genomes, in the case of chloroplasts, or α-proteobacterial genomes, in the case of mitochondria. Heterogeneity in base composition and codon preference has long been the subject of investigation of topics ranging from phylogenetic distortion to the design of overexpression cassettes for transgenic expression. From the overexpression point of view, it is critical to systematically analyze the codon usage patterns of the organelle genomes. In light of the importance of codon usage patterns in the development of hyper-expression organelle transgenics, we present ChloroMitoCU, the first-ever curated, web-based reference catalog of the codon usage patterns in organelle genomes. ChloroMitoCU contains the pre-compiled codon usage patterns of 328 chloroplast genomes (29,960 CDS) and 3,502 mitochondrial genomes (49,066 CDS), enabling genome-wide exploration and comparative analysis of codon usage patterns across species. ChloroMitoCU allows the phylogenetic comparison of codon usage patterns across organelle genomes, the prediction of codon usage patterns based on user-submitted transcripts or assembled organelle genes, and comparative analysis with the pre-compiled patterns across species of interest. ChloroMitoCU can increase our understanding of the biased patterns of codon usage in organelle genomes across multiple clades. ChloroMitoCU can be accessed at: http://chloromitocu.cgu.edu.tw/. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  9. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your fingers and from your nails to your face and mouth. To help you stop biting your ... re inclined to bite may help solve the problem. Try to gradually stop biting your nails: Some ...

  10. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Mohs AUC MyDermPath+ Psoriasis Patient education resources ... Try to gradually stop biting your nails: Some doctors recommend taking a gradual approach to break the habit. Try to stop biting ...

  11. Coexistence of K-ras mutations and HPV infection in colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tezol Ayda

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of the ras genes or association with human papillomavirus infection have been extensively studied in colorectal cancer. However, the correlation between K-ras mutations and HPV in colorectal cancer has not been investigated yet. In this study we aimed to investigate the presence of K-ras mutations and their correlation with HPV infection in colon cancer. Methods K-ras mutations were analyzed by a mutagenic PCR assay and digestion with specific restriction enzymes to distinguish the wild-type and mutant codons. HPV infection was analyzed by PCR amplification and hybridization with specific probes by Southern blotting. Stattistical analyses were performed by the chi-square and Fisher's exact tests Results HPV gene fragments were detected in 43 tumors and 17 normal tissue samples. HPV 18 was the prevalent type in the tumor tissue. A mutation at codon 12 of the K-ras gene was present in 31 patients. 56% of the HPV-positive tumors also harbored a K-ras mutation. Codon 13 mutations were not observed. These data indicate that infection with high risk HPV types and mutational activation of the K-ras gene are frequent events in colorectal carcinogenesis. Conclusion Our findings suggest that mutational activation of the K-ras gene is a common event in colon carcinogenesis and that HPV infection may represent an important factor in the development of the premalignant lesions leading to the neoplastic phenotype.

  12. Novel mutations of endothelin-B receptor gene in Pakistani patients with Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabeen, Raheela; Babar, Masroor Ellahi; Ahmad, Jamil; Awan, Ali Raza

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in EDNRB gene have been reported to cause Waardenburg-Shah syndrome (WS4) in humans. We investigated 17 patients with WS4 for identification of mutations in EDNRB gene using PCR and direct sequencing technique. Four genomic mutations were detected in four patients; a G to C transversion in codon 335 (S335C) in exon 5 and a transition of T to C in codon (S361L) in exon 5, a transition of A to G in codon 277 (L277L) in exon 4, a non coding transversion of T to A at -30 nucleotide position of exon 5. None of these mutations were found in controls. One of the patients harbored two novel mutations (S335C, S361L) in exon 5 and one in Intronic region (-30exon5 A>G). All of the mutations were homozygous and novel except the mutation observed in exon 4. In this study, we have identified 3 novel mutations in EDNRB gene associated with WS4 in Pakistani patients.

  13. RAPID DETECTION OF -THALASSEMIA MUTATIONS IN THAILAND USING MULTIPLEX ARMS

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    D. Shimbhu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The number of mutations underlining b-thalassemia generate a wide variety of different clinical phenotypes. An understanding of the genotype is important for medical personnel in order to provide proper counseling to patients and their families. Characterization of these mutations should aid the planning of a prenatal diagnosis program for bthalassemia. The heterogeneity of the mutations makes it difficult and time consuming to identify the mutation in some individuals. We developed a single-tube multiplex amplification refractory mutation system (multiplex ARMS to identify common ethnic- specific b-thalassemia mutations. Confirmation of multiplex ARMS results was carried out using direct sequencing. Three thousand three hundred twenty two people from Phitsanulok province were screened for the b-thalassemia trait by quantitation of HbA2 with microcolumn chromatography and the genotypes of mutations were characterized using multiplex ARMS and direct sequencing. We found that the deletion at codons 41/42 (-TCTT was the most frequent (48%, codon 17 (A®T (30%, -28 (A®G (6% and IVS-I-1(G®T (6% were the second and third in frequency respectively. A -87 (C®A mutation (4%, IVS II-654 (C®T (2%, codons 71/72 (+A (2% and codon 35 (C®A mutations (2% were also found. These techniques were found to be a valuable tool for analysis of b-thalassemia mutations because they are accurate, simple, and speedy in operation. The application for the diagnosis of severe thalassemia in high-risk pregnancies is promising.

  14. Preoperative RAS Mutational Analysis Is of Great Value in Predicting Follicular Variant of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Sook Hwang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma (FVPTC, particularly the encapsulated subtype, often causes a diagnostic dilemma. We reconfirmed the molecular profiles in a large number of FVPTCs and investigated the efficacy of the preoperative mutational analysis in indeterminate thyroid nodules. BRAF V600E/K601E and RAS mutational analysis was performed on 187 FVPTCs. Of these, 132 (70.6% had a point mutation in one of the BRAF V600E (n=57, BRAF K601E (n=11, or RAS (n=64 genes. All mutations were mutually exclusive. The most common RAS mutations were at NRAS codon 61. FNA aspirates from 564 indeterminate nodules were prospectively tested for BRAF and RAS mutation and the surgical outcome was correlated with the mutational status. Fifty-seven and 47 cases were positive for BRAF and RAS mutation, respectively. Twenty-seven RAS-positive patients underwent surgery and all except one patient had FVPTC. The PPV and accuracy of RAS mutational analysis for predicting FVPTC were 96% and 84%, respectively. BRAF or RAS mutations were present in more than two-thirds of FVPTCs and these were mutually exclusive. BRAF mutational analysis followed by N, H, and KRAS codon 61 mutational analysis in indeterminate thyroid nodules would streamline the management of patients with malignancies, mostly FVPTC.

  15. Clinical and mutational characteristics of Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients based on a comprehensive database in South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan-Ni; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Yan, Lei; He, Jin; Lin, Min-Ting; Chen, Wan-Jin; Wang, Ning

    2017-08-01

    The development of clinical trials for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) in China faces many challenges due to limited information about epidemiological data, natural history and clinical management. To provide these detailed data, we developed a comprehensive database based on registered DMD patients from South China and analysed their clinical and mutational characteristics. The database included DMD registrants confirmed by clinical presentation, family history, genetic detection, prognostic outcome, and/or muscle biopsy. Clinical data were collected by a registry form. Mutations of dystrophin were detected by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and Sanger sequencing. Currently, 132 DMD patients from 128 families in South China have been registered, and 91.7% of them were below 10 years old. In mutational detection, large deletions were the most frequent type (57.8%), followed by small deletion/insertion mutations (14.1%), nonsense mutations (13.3%), large duplications (10.9%), and splice site mutations (3.1%). Clinical analysis revealed that most patients reported initial symptoms between 1 and 3 years of age, but the diagnostic age was more frequently between 6 and 8 years. 81.4% of patients were ambulatory. Baseline cardiac assessments at diagnosis were conducted in 39.4% and 29.5% of patients by echocardiograms and electrocardiograms, respectively. Only 22.7% of registrants performed baseline respiratory assessments. A small numbers of patients (20.5%) were treated with glucocorticoids. 13.3% of patients were eligible for stop codon read-through therapy, and 48.4% of patients would potentially benefit from exon skipping. The top five exon skips applicable to the largest group of registrants were skipping of exons 51 (14.8% of total mutations), 53 (12.5%), 45 (7.0%), 55 (4.7%), and 44 (3.9%). In conclusion, our database provided information on the natural history, diagnosis and management status of DMD in South China, as well as potential

  16. Why does sleep stop migraine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigal, Marcelo E; Hargreaves, Richard J

    2013-10-01

    The relationship between sleep and migraine headaches is complex. Changes in sleep patterns can trigger migraine attacks, and sleep disorders may be associated with increased migraine frequency. Furthermore, migraine patients and their doctors very consistently report that sleep relieves already established migraine attacks. Herein we will try to answer the question, "Why does sleep stop migraine?" Since evidence for this relationship is largely based on empirical clinical observation, we will not provide a clinical review of the association. Instead, we will focus on the pathophysiology of migraine attacks and its intersections with sleep biology.

  17. Contribution of single amino acid and codon substitutions to the production and secretion of a lipase by Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoczinski, Pia; Volkenborn, Kristina; Fulton, Alexander; Bhadauriya, Anuseema; Nutschel, Christina; Gohlke, Holger; Knapp, Andreas; Jaeger, Karl-Erich

    2017-09-25

    Bacillus subtilis produces and secretes proteins in amounts of up to 20 g/l under optimal conditions. However, protein production can be challenging if transcription and cotranslational secretion are negatively affected, or the target protein is degraded by extracellular proteases. This study aims at elucidating the influence of a target protein on its own production by a systematic mutational analysis of the homologous B. subtilis model protein lipase A (LipA). We have covered the full natural diversity of single amino acid substitutions at 155 positions of LipA by site saturation mutagenesis excluding only highly conserved residues and qualitatively and quantitatively screened about 30,000 clones for extracellular LipA production. Identified variants with beneficial effects on production were sequenced and analyzed regarding B. subtilis growth behavior, extracellular lipase activity and amount as well as changes in lipase transcript levels. In total, 26 LipA variants were identified showing an up to twofold increase in either amount or activity of extracellular lipase. These variants harbor single amino acid or codon substitutions that did not substantially affect B. subtilis growth. Subsequent exemplary combination of beneficial single amino acid substitutions revealed an additive effect solely at the level of extracellular lipase amount; however, lipase amount and activity could not be increased simultaneously. Single amino acid and codon substitutions can affect LipA secretion and production by B. subtilis. Several codon-related effects were observed that either enhance lipA transcription or promote a more efficient folding of LipA. Single amino acid substitutions could improve LipA production by increasing its secretion or stability in the culture supernatant. Our findings indicate that optimization of the expression system is not sufficient for efficient protein production in B. subtilis. The sequence of the target protein should also be considered as an

  18. Identification of the translational start site of codon-optimized mCherry in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Carroll, Paul; Muwanguzi-Karugaba, Julian; Melief, Eduard; Files, Megan; Parish, Tanya

    2014-01-01

    Background Fluorescent proteins are used widely as reporter genes in many organisms. We previously codon-optimized mCherry for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and generated expression constructs with high level expression in mycobacteria with multiple uses in vitro and in vivo. However, little is known about the expression of fluorescent proteins in mycobacteria and the translational start codon for mCherry has not been experimentally determined. Results We determined the translational start site ...

  19. Novel genetic linkage of rat Sp6 mutation to Amelogenesis imperfecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muto Taro

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI is an inherited disorder characterized by abnormal formation of tooth enamel. Although several genes responsible for AI have been reported, not all causative genes for human AI have been identified to date. AMI rat has been reported as an autosomal recessive mutant with hypoplastic AI isolated from a colony of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat strain, but the causative gene has not yet been clarified. Through a genetic screen, we identified the causative gene of autosomal recessive AI in AMI and analyzed its role in amelogenesis. Methods cDNA sequencing of possible AI-candidate genes so far identified using total RNA of day 6 AMI rat molars identified a novel responsible mutation in specificity protein 6 (Sp6. Genetic linkage analysis was performed between Sp6 and AI phenotype in AMI. To understand a role of SP6 in AI, we generated the transgenic rats harboring Sp6 transgene in AMI (Ami/Ami + Tg. Histological analyses were performed using the thin sections of control rats, AMI, and Ami/Ami + Tg incisors in maxillae, respectively. Results We found the novel genetic linkage between a 2-bp insertional mutation of Sp6 gene and the AI phenotype in AMI rats. The position of mutation was located in the coding region of Sp6, which caused frameshift mutation and disruption of the third zinc finger domain of SP6 with 11 cryptic amino acid residues and a stop codon. Transfection studies showed that the mutant protein can be translated and localized in the nucleus in the same manner as the wild-type SP6 protein. When we introduced the CMV promoter-driven wild-type Sp6 transgene into AMI rats, the SP6 protein was ectopically expressed in the maturation stage of ameloblasts associated with the extended maturation stage and the shortened reduced stage without any other phenotypical changes. Conclusion We propose the addition of Sp6 mutation as a new molecular diagnostic criterion for the

  20. Novel genetic linkage of rat Sp6 mutation to Amelogenesis imperfecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is an inherited disorder characterized by abnormal formation of tooth enamel. Although several genes responsible for AI have been reported, not all causative genes for human AI have been identified to date. AMI rat has been reported as an autosomal recessive mutant with hypoplastic AI isolated from a colony of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat strain, but the causative gene has not yet been clarified. Through a genetic screen, we identified the causative gene of autosomal recessive AI in AMI and analyzed its role in amelogenesis. Methods cDNA sequencing of possible AI-candidate genes so far identified using total RNA of day 6 AMI rat molars identified a novel responsible mutation in specificity protein 6 (Sp6). Genetic linkage analysis was performed between Sp6 and AI phenotype in AMI. To understand a role of SP6 in AI, we generated the transgenic rats harboring Sp6 transgene in AMI (Ami/Ami + Tg). Histological analyses were performed using the thin sections of control rats, AMI, and Ami/Ami + Tg incisors in maxillae, respectively. Results We found the novel genetic linkage between a 2-bp insertional mutation of Sp6 gene and the AI phenotype in AMI rats. The position of mutation was located in the coding region of Sp6, which caused frameshift mutation and disruption of the third zinc finger domain of SP6 with 11 cryptic amino acid residues and a stop codon. Transfection studies showed that the mutant protein can be translated and localized in the nucleus in the same manner as the wild-type SP6 protein. When we introduced the CMV promoter-driven wild-type Sp6 transgene into AMI rats, the SP6 protein was ectopically expressed in the maturation stage of ameloblasts associated with the extended maturation stage and the shortened reduced stage without any other phenotypical changes. Conclusion We propose the addition of Sp6 mutation as a new molecular diagnostic criterion for the autosomal recessive AI patients

  1. Codon 129 polymorphism of prion protein gene in is not a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease

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    Jerusa Smid

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Interaction of prion protein and amyloid-b oligomers has been demonstrated recently. Homozygosity at prion protein gene (PRNP codon 129 is associated with higher risk for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. This polymorphism has been addressed as a possible risk factor in Alzheimer disease (AD. Objective To describe the association between codon 129 polymorphisms and AD. Methods We investigated the association of codon 129 polymorphism of PRNP in 99 AD patients and 111 controls, and the association between this polymorphism and cognitive performance. Other polymorphisms of PRNP and additive effect of apolipoprotein E gene (ApoE were evaluated. Results Codon 129 genotype distribution in AD 45.5% methionine (MM, 42.2% methionine valine (MV, 12.1% valine (VV; and 39.6% MM, 50.5% MV, 9.9% VV among controls (p>0.05. There were no differences of cognitive performance concerning codon 129. Stratification according to ApoE genotype did not reveal difference between groups. Conclusion Codon 129 polymorphism is not a risk factor for AD in Brazilian patients.

  2. Optimal Stopping with Information Constraint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lempa, Jukka

    2012-01-01

    We study the optimal stopping problem proposed by Dupuis and Wang (Adv. Appl. Probab. 34:141–157, 2002). In this maximization problem of the expected present value of the exercise payoff, the underlying dynamics follow a linear diffusion. The decision maker is not allowed to stop at any time she chooses but rather on the jump times of an independent Poisson process. Dupuis and Wang (Adv. Appl. Probab. 34:141–157, 2002), solve this problem in the case where the underlying is a geometric Brownian motion and the payoff function is of American call option type. In the current study, we propose a mild set of conditions (covering the setup of Dupuis and Wang in Adv. Appl. Probab. 34:141–157, 2002) on both the underlying and the payoff and build and use a Markovian apparatus based on the Bellman principle of optimality to solve the problem under these conditions. We also discuss the interpretation of this model as optimal timing of an irreversible investment decision under an exogenous information constraint.

  3. A Frameshift Mutation in KIT is Associated with  White Spotting in the Arabian Camel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Holl

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available While the typical Arabian camel is characterized by a single colored coat, there are rare populations with white spotting patterns. White spotting coat patterns are found in virtually all domesticated species, but are rare in wild species. Theories suggest that white spotting is linked to the domestication process, and is occasionally associated with health disorders. Though mutations have been found in a diverse array of species, fewer than 30 genes have been associated with spotting patterns, thus providing a key set of candidate genes for the Arabian camel. We obtained 26 spotted camels and 24 solid controls for candidate gene analysis. One spotted and eight solid camels were whole genome sequenced as part of a separate project. The spotted camel was heterozygous for a frameshift deletion in KIT (c.1842delG, named KITW1 for White spotting 1, whereas all other camels were wild‐type (KIT+/KIT+. No additional mutations unique to the spotted camel were detected in the EDNRB, EDN3, SOX10, KITLG, PDGFRA, MITF, and PAX3 candidate white spotting genes. Sanger sequencing of the study population identified an additional five kITW1/KIT+ spotted camels. The frameshift results in a premature stop codon five amino acids downstream, thus terminating KIT at the tyrosine kinase domain. An additional 13 spotted camels tested KIT+/KIT+, but due to phenotypic differences when compared to the KITW1/KIT+ camels, they likely represent an independent mutation. Our study suggests that there are at least two causes of white spotting in the Arabian camel, the newly described KITW1 allele and an uncharacterized mutation.

  4. A novel HSF4 gene mutation (p.R405X causing autosomal recessive congenital cataracts in a large consanguineous family from Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheema Abdul

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary cataracts are most frequently inherited as autosomal dominant traits, but can also be inherited in an autosomal recessive or X-linked fashion. To date, 12 loci for autosomal recessive cataracts have been mapped including a locus on chromosome 16q22 containing the disease-causing gene HSF4 (Genbank accession number NM_001040667. Here, we describe a family from Pakistan with the first nonsense mutation in HSF4 thus expanding the mutational spectrum of this heat shock transcription factor gene. Methods A large consanguineous Pakistani family with autosomal recessive cataracts was collected from Quetta. Genetic linkage analysis was performed for the common known autosomal recessive cataracts loci and linkage to a locus containing HSF4 (OMIM 602438 was found. All exons and adjacent splice sites of the heat shock transcription factor 4 gene (HSF4 were sequenced. A mutation-specific restriction enzyme digest (HphI was performed for all family members and unrelated controls. Results The disease phenotype perfectly co-segregated with markers flanking the known cataract gene HSF4, whereas other autosomal recessive loci were excluded. A maximum two-point LOD score with a Zmax = 5.6 at θ = 0 was obtained for D16S421. Direct sequencing of HSF4 revealed the nucleotide exchange c.1213C > T in this family predicting an arginine to stop codon exchange (p.R405X. Conclusion We identified the first nonsense mutation (p.R405X in exon 11 of HSF4 in a large consanguineous Pakistani family with autosomal recessive cataract.

  5. A novel mutation affecting the arginine-137 residue of AVPR2 in dizygous twins leads to nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and attenuated urine exosome aquaporin-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinrichs, Gitte R; Hansen, Louise H; Nielsen, Maria R

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the vasopressin V2 receptor gene AVPR2 may cause X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus by defective apical insertion of aquaporin-2 in the renal collecting duct principal cell. Substitution mutations with exchange of arginine at codon 137 can cause nephrogenic syndrome...... of inappropriate antidiuresis or congenital X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. We present a novel mutation in codon 137 within AVPR2 with substitution of glycine for arginine in male dizygotic twins. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus was demonstrated by water deprivation test and resistance to vasopressin...

  6. Optimal control of gene mutation in DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Juanyi; Li, Jr-Shin; Tarn, Tzyh-Jong

    2012-01-01

    We propose a molecular-level control system view of the gene mutations in DNA replication from the finite field concept. By treating DNA sequences as state variables, chemical mutagens and radiation as control inputs, one cell cycle as a step increment, and the measurements of the resulting DNA sequence as outputs, we derive system equations for both deterministic and stochastic discrete-time, finite-state systems of different scales. Defining the cost function as a summation of the costs of applying mutagens and the off-trajectory penalty, we solve the deterministic and stochastic optimal control problems by dynamic programming algorithm. In addition, given that the system is completely controllable, we find that the global optimum of both base-to-base and codon-to-codon deterministic mutations can always be achieved within a finite number of steps.

  7. Absolute in vivo translation rates of individual codons in Escherichia coli: The two glutamic acid codons GAA and GAG are translated with a threefold difference in rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M.A.; Pedersen, Steen

    1991-01-01

    We have determined the absolute translation rates for four individual codons in Escherichia coli. We used our previously described system for direct measurements of in vivo translation rates using small, in-frame inserts in the lacZ gene. The inserts consisted of multiple synthetic 30 base-pair D...

  8. Zebrafish usp39 mutation leads to rb1 mRNA splicing defect and pituitary lineage expansion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yesenia Ríos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Loss of retinoblastoma (Rb tumor suppressor function is associated with human malignancies. Molecular and genetic mechanisms responsible for tumorigenic Rb downregulation are not fully defined. Through a forward genetic screen and positional cloning, we identified and characterized a zebrafish ubiquitin specific peptidase 39 (usp39 mutation, the yeast and human homolog of which encodes a component of RNA splicing machinery. Zebrafish usp39 mutants exhibit microcephaly and adenohypophyseal cell lineage expansion without apparent changes in major hypothalamic hormonal and regulatory signals. Gene expression profiling of usp39 mutants revealed decreased rb1 and increased e2f4, rbl2 (p130, and cdkn1a (p21 expression. Rb1 mRNA overexpression, or antisense morpholino knockdown of e2f4, partially reversed embryonic pituitary expansion in usp39 mutants. Analysis of pre-mRNA splicing status of critical cell cycle regulators showed misspliced Rb1 pre-mRNA resulting in a premature stop codon. These studies unravel a novel mechanism for rb1 regulation by a neuronal mRNA splicing factor, usp39. Zebrafish usp39 regulates embryonic pituitary homeostasis by targeting rb1 and e2f4 expression, respectively, contributing to increased adenohypophyseal sensitivity to these altered cell cycle regulators. These results provide a mechanism for dysregulated rb1 and e2f4 pathways that may result in pituitary tumorigenesis.

  9. Optimally stopped variational quantum algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinci, Walter; Shabani, Alireza

    2018-04-01

    Quantum processors promise a paradigm shift in high-performance computing which needs to be assessed by accurate benchmarking measures. In this article, we introduce a benchmark for the variational quantum algorithm (VQA), recently proposed as a heuristic algorithm for small-scale quantum processors. In VQA, a classical optimization algorithm guides the processor's quantum dynamics to yield the best solution for a given problem. A complete assessment of the scalability and competitiveness of VQA should take into account both the quality and the time of dynamics optimization. The method of optimal stopping, employed here, provides such an assessment by explicitly including time as a cost factor. Here, we showcase this measure for benchmarking VQA as a solver for some quadratic unconstrained binary optimization. Moreover, we show that a better choice for the cost function of the classical routine can significantly improve the performance of the VQA algorithm and even improve its scaling properties.

  10. How to stop global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldenberg, J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on how to stop global warming. At the Toronto Conference on Climate Change in 1988, the world's industrialized nations agreed on a goal of cutting greenhouse gas emissions 20 percent by the year 2005. This would not stabilize atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases but would at least slow their accumulation. Although difficult to achieve, the Toronto goal is certainly reachable. Newer, more efficient technologies can lower energy consumption without effecting economic output. CFC- substitutes can provide refrigeration. In fact, an international carbon tax of just $1 per barrel of oil, or $6 per ton of coal, would generate more than enough revenue to pay for the necessary fuel-saving measures. This tax could result from an international agreement similar to the 1987 Montreal Protocol, which obliges its signatories to cut down on production of CFCs

  11. Frameshift mutations in infectious cDNA clones of Citrus tristeza virus: a strategy to minimize the toxicity of viral sequences to Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satyanarayana, Tatineni; Gowda, Siddarame; Ayllon, Maria A.; Dawson, William O.

    2003-01-01

    The advent of reverse genetics revolutionized the study of positive-stranded RNA viruses that were amenable for cloning as cDNAs into high-copy-number plasmids of Escherichia coli. However, some viruses are inherently refractory to cloning in high-copy-number plasmids due to toxicity of viral sequences to E. coli. We report a strategy that is a compromise between infectivity of the RNA transcripts and toxicity to E. coli effected by introducing frameshift mutations into 'slippery sequences' near the viral 'toxicity sequences' in the viral cDNA. Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) has cDNA sequences that are toxic to E. coli. The original full-length infectious cDNA of CTV and a derivative replicon, CTV-ΔCla, cloned into pUC119, resulted in unusually limited E. coli growth. However, upon sequencing of these cDNAs, an additional uridinylate (U) was found in a stretch of U's between nts 3726 and 3731 that resulted in a change to a reading frame with a stop codon at nt 3734. Yet, in vitro produced RNA transcripts from these clones infected protoplasts, and the resulting progeny virus was repaired. Correction of the frameshift mutation in the CTV cDNA constructs resulted in increased infectivity of in vitro produced RNA transcripts, but also caused a substantial increase of toxicity to E. coli, now requiring 3 days to develop visible colonies. Frameshift mutations created in sequences not suspected to facilitate reading frame shifting and silent mutations introduced into oligo(U) regions resulted in complete loss of infectivity, suggesting that the oligo(U) region facilitated the repair of the frameshift mutation. Additional frameshift mutations introduced into other oligo(U) regions also resulted in transcripts with reduced infectivity similarly to the original clones with the +1 insertion. However, only the frameshift mutations introduced into oligo(U) regions that were near and before the toxicity region improved growth and stability in E. coli. These data demonstrate that

  12. Missense and nonsense mutations in melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R gene of different goat breeds: association with red and black coat colour phenotypes but with unexpected evidences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davoli Roberta

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Agouti and Extension loci control the relative amount of eumelanin and pheomelanin production in melanocytes that, in turn, affects pigmentation of skin and hair. The Extension locus encodes the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R whose permanent activation, caused by functional mutations, results in black coat colour, whereas other inactivating mutations cause red coat colour in different mammals. Results The whole coding region of the MC1R gene was sequenced in goats of six different breeds showing different coat colours (Girgentana, white cream with usually small red spots in the face; Maltese, white with black cheeks and ears; Derivata di Siria, solid red; Murciano-Granadina, solid black or solid brown; Camosciata delle Alpi, brown with black stripes; Saanen, white; F1 goats and the parental animals. Five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were identified: one nonsense mutation (p.Q225X, three missense mutations (p.A81V, p.F250V, and p.C267W, and one silent mutation. The stop codon at position 225 should cause the production of a shorter MC1R protein whose functionality may be altered. These SNPs were investigated in a larger sample of animals belonging to the six breeds. The Girgentana breed was almost fixed for the p.225X allele. However, there was not complete association between the presence of red spots in the face and the presence of this allele in homozygous condition. The same allele was identified in the Derivata di Siria breed. However, its frequency was only 33%, despite the fact that these animals are completely red. The p.267W allele was present in all Murciano-Granadina black goats, whereas it was never identified in the brown ones. Moreover, the same substitution was present in almost all Maltese goats providing evidence of association between this mutation and black coat colour. Conclusion According to the results obtained in the investigated goat breeds, MC1R mutations may determine eumelanic and pheomelanic

  13. Characterization of a novel oncogenic K-ras mutation in colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akagi, Kiwamu; Uchibori, Ryosuke; Yamaguchi, Kensei; Kurosawa, Keiko; Tanaka, Yoichiro; Kozu, Tomoko

    2007-01-01

    Activating mutations of RAS are frequently observed in subsets of human cancers, indicating that RAS activation is involved in tumorigenesis. Here, we identified and characterized a novel G to T transversion mutation of the K-ras gene at the third position of codon 19 (TTG) which substituted phenylalanine for leucine in 3 primary colon carcinomas. Biological and biochemical activity was examined using transformed NIH3T3 cells expressing mutant or wild-type K-ras. Transformants harboring the K-ras mutation at codon 19 showed proliferative capacity under serum-starved conditions, less contact inhibition, anchorage-independent growth, tumorigenicity in nude mice and elevation of active Ras-GTP levels. These results indicated that this novel mutation possesses high oncogenic activity

  14. Identification of a nonsense mutation at amino acid 584-arginine of platelet glycoprotein IIb in patients with type I glanzmann thrombasthenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Jianming; Xu Wenfeng; Wang Xiaodong; Wu Qingyu; Qi Zhengwu; Ruan Changgeng

    1993-08-01

    Using southern blot, the restriction digests of genomic DNAs in eleven patients with Glanzmann thrombasthenia from ten unrelated kindred were probed with a platelet full-length GP IIb cDNA. An abnormal 2.3 kb Taq I fragment and two 1.65 kb and 0.65 kb fragments with reduced band intensity were found in the genes of two affected siblings from a family originated in city Huang Yan of Zhejiang Province. The Taq I digest of the abnormal gene was further probed with three portions of GP IIb cDNA, revealing that the heterozygous mutation was present in the region around exons 15 ∼ 17 of the GP IIb gene. Two primers for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were then designed, and a 394 bp PCR product was generated and sequenced, indicating that a stop codon was substituted for an Arg codon at amino acid position 584 of GP IIb, and brought about a premature termination of translation and production of a shortened protein. The Western blot analysis showed that GP IIb and GP IIIa at the platelet surface were apparently deficient, it may be ascribed to the rapid turn-over of GP IIIa uncomplexed with the truncated GP II b. The abnormal 2.3 kb Tag I fragment was used as a specific genetic marker to detect the carrier status of the patient's family. The abnormal allele was proved to be derived from the mother, the two affected siblings are double heterozygotes carrying two different GP II b-defective alleles and one clinically unaffected sister has also inherited this defective allele, while the father carries another unidentified recessive abnormal GP IIb-defective allele

  15. Stop Negative Thinking Effects for Drug Dependence

    OpenAIRE

    Windiarti, Sri Endang; Indriati, Indriati; Surachmi, Fajar

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of therapy stop thinking negatively against drug addiction in Rehabilitation Orphanage Rumah Damai Gunung Pati Semarang. This research is quasy experiment with pretest - posttes without the control group design. Thirty respondents were taken to the reseach sujects. Stop thinking negative therapy before and after thebehavior of drug addiction there are differences (t = 0.00), so it can be stated that the therapy stop thinking negatively inf...

  16. Are Stopped Strings Preferred in Sad Music?

    OpenAIRE

    David Huron; Caitlyn Trevor

    2017-01-01

    String instruments may be played either with open strings (where the string vibrates between the bridge and a hard wooden nut) or with stopped strings (where the string vibrates between the bridge and a performer's finger pressed against the fingerboard). Compared with open strings, stopped strings permit the use of vibrato and exhibit a darker timbre. Inspired by research on the timbre of sad speech, we test whether there is a tendency to use stopped strings in nominally sad music. Specifica...

  17. Measurement of stopping power of heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitahara, Tetsuo

    1981-01-01

    The stopping power of heavy ions is discussed. In the low energy region, heavy ions keep some of their orbital electrons, and have equilibrium electron charge. The stopping power of penetrating particles depends on this effective charge. At present, it is hard to estimate this effective charge theoretically, accordingly, the estimation is made experimentally. Another difficulty in this estimation is that the Born approximation is not effective for heavy ions. In the low energy region, electronic stopping and nuclear stopping contribute to the stopping power. For the electronic stopping, a formula for the stopping power was given by Lindhard et al. The experimental values were obtained at GSI, and are inconsistent with the estimation by the Lindhard's formula. In the high energy region, where the Born approximation can be used, the Bethe's formula is applied, but the experimental data are scarce. Oscillations are seen in the Z dependence graph of the experimental stopping cross sections. Experimental works on the stopping power have been done. The differential and the integral methods were carried out. (Kato, T.)

  18. Molecular mimicry of human tRNALys anti-codon domain by HIV-1 RNA genome facilitates tRNA primer annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher P; Saadatmand, Jenan; Kleiman, Lawrence; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2013-02-01

    The primer for initiating reverse transcription in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is tRNA(Lys3). Host cell tRNA(Lys) is selectively packaged into HIV-1 through a specific interaction between the major tRNA(Lys)-binding protein, human lysyl-tRNA synthetase (hLysRS), and the viral proteins Gag and GagPol. Annealing of the tRNA primer onto the complementary primer-binding site (PBS) in viral RNA is mediated by the nucleocapsid domain of Gag. The mechanism by which tRNA(Lys3) is targeted to the PBS and released from hLysRS prior to annealing is unknown. Here, we show that hLysRS specifically binds to a tRNA anti-codon-like element (TLE) in the HIV-1 genome, which mimics the anti-codon loop of tRNA(Lys) and is located proximal to the PBS. Mutation of the U-rich sequence within the TLE attenuates binding of hLysRS in vitro and reduces the amount of annealed tRNA(Lys3) in virions. Thus, LysRS binds specifically to the TLE, which is part of a larger LysRS binding domain in the viral RNA that includes elements of the Psi packaging signal. Our results suggest that HIV-1 uses molecular mimicry of the anti-codon of tRNA(Lys) to increase the efficiency of tRNA(Lys3) annealing to viral RNA.

  19. Characterization of mutations and loss of heterozygosity of p53 and K-ras2 in pancreatic cancer cell lines by immobilized polymerase chain reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwards Jeremy

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of known mutations in a cell population is important for clinical applications and basic cancer research. In this work an immobilized form of the polymerase chain reaction, referred to as polony technology, was used to detect mutations as well as gene deletions, resulting in loss of heterozygosity (LOH, in cancer cell lines. Specifically, the mutational hotspots in p53, namely codons 175, 245, 248, 249, 273, and 282, and K-ras2, codons 12, 13 and 61, were genotyped in the pancreatic cell line, Panc-1. In addition LOH analysis was also performed for these same two genes in Panc-1 by quantifying the relative gene copy number of p53 and K-ras2. Results Using polony technology, Panc-1 was determined to possess only one copy of p53, which possessed a mutation in codon 273, and two copies of K-ras2, one wildtype and one with a mutation in codon 12. To further demonstrate the general approach of this method, polonies were also used to detect K-ras2 mutations in the pancreatic cell lines, AsPc-1 and CAPAN-1. Conclusions In conclusion, we have developed an assay that can detect mutations in hotspots of p53 and K-ras2 as well as diagnose LOH in these same genes.

  20. HNPCC: Six new pathogenic mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Epplen Joerg T

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC is an autosomal dominant disease with a high risk for colorectal and endometrial cancer caused by germline mutations in DNA mismatch-repair genes (MMR. HNPCC accounts for approximately 2 to 5% of all colorectal cancers. Here we present 6 novel mutations in the DNA mismatch-repair genes MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6. Methods Patients with clinical diagnosis of HNPCC were counselled. Tumor specimen were analysed for microsatellite instability and immunohistochemistry for MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 protein was performed. If one of these proteins was not detectable in the tumor mutation analysis of the corresponding gene was carried out. Results We identified 6 frameshift mutations (2 in MLH1, 3 in MSH2, 1 in MSH6 resulting in a premature stop: two mutations in MLH1 (c.2198_2199insAACA [p.N733fsX745], c.2076_2077delTG [p.G693fsX702], three mutations in MSH2 (c.810_811delGT [p.C271fsX282], c.763_766delAGTGinsTT [p.F255fsX282], c.873_876delGACT [p.L292fsX298] and one mutation in MSH6 (c.1421_1422dupTG [p.C475fsX480]. All six tumors tested for microsatellite instability showed high levels of microsatellite instability (MSI-H. Conclusions HNPCC in families with MSH6 germline mutations may show an age of onset that is comparable to this of patients with MLH1 and MSH2 mutations.

  1. Slow, stopped and stored light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, G.; Scully, M.

    2005-01-01

    Light that can been slowed to walking pace could have applications in telecommunications, optical storage and quantum computing. Whether we use it to estimate how far away a thunderstorm is, or simply take it for granted that we can have a conversation with someone on the other side of the world, we all know that light travels extremely fast. Indeed, special relativity teaches us that nothing in the universe can ever move faster than the speed of light in a vacuum: 299 792 458 ms sup - sup 1. However, there is no such limitation on how slowly light can travel. For the last few years, researchers have been routinely slowing light to just a few metres per second, and have recently even stopped it dead in its tracks so that it can be stored for future use. Slow-light has considerable popular appeal, deriving perhaps from the importance of the speed of light in relativity and cosmology. If everyday objects such as cars or people can travel faster than 'slow' light, for example, then it might appear that relativistic effects could be observed at very low speeds. Although this is not the case, slow light nonetheless promises to play an important role in optical technology because it allows light to be delayed for any period of time desired. This could lead to all-optical routers that would increase the bandwidth of the Internet, and applications in optical data storage, quantum information and even radar. (U.K.)

  2. Stopping atoms with diode lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watts, R.N.; Wieman, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    The use of light pressure to cool and stop neutral atoms has been an area of considerable interest recently. Cooled neutral atoms are needed for a variety of interesting experiments involving neutral atom traps and ultrahigh-resolution spectroscopy. Laser cooling of sodium has previously been demonstrated using elegant but quite elaborate apparatus. These techniques employed stabilized dye lasers and a variety of additional sophisticated hardware. The authors have demonstrated that a frequency chirp technique can be implemented using inexpensive diode lasers and simple electronics. In this technique the atoms in an atomic beam scatter resonant photons from a counterpropagating laser beam. The momentum transfer from the photons slows the atoms. The primary difficulty is that as the atoms slow their Doppler shift changes, and so they are no longer in resonance with the incident photons. In the frequency chirp technique this is solved by rapidly changing the laser frequency so that the atoms remain in resonance. To achieve the necessary frequency sweep with a dye laser one must use an extremely sophisticated high-speed electrooptic modulator. With a diode laser, however, the frequency can be smoothly and rapidly varied over many gigahertz simply by changing the injection current

  3. Mitochondrial DNA Mutation Associated with Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Douglas C.; Singh, Gurparkash; Lott, Marie T.; Hodge, Judy A.; Schurr, Theodore G.; Lezza, Angela M. S.; Elsas, Louis J.; Nikoskelainen, Eeva K.

    1988-12-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is a maternally inherited disease resulting in optic nerve degeneration and cardiac dysrhythmia. A mitochondrial DNA replacement mutation was identified that correlated with this disease in multiple families. This mutation converted a highly conserved arginine to a histidine at codon 340 in the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 gene and eliminated an Sfa NI site, thus providing a simple diagnostic test. This finding demonstrated that a nucleotide change in a mitochondrial DNA energy production gene can result in a neurological disease.

  4. Electron and Positron Stopping Powers of Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 7 NIST Electron and Positron Stopping Powers of Materials (PC database for purchase)   The EPSTAR database provides rapid calculations of stopping powers (collisional, radiative, and total), CSDA ranges, radiation yields and density effect corrections for incident electrons or positrons with kinetic energies from 1 keV to 10 GeV, and for any chemically defined target material.

  5. Addressing production stops in the food industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Zaza Nadja Lee; Herbert, Luke Thomas; Jacobsen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the challenges in the food industry which causes the production lines to stop, illustrated by a case study of an SME size company in the baked goods sector in Denmark. The paper proposes key elements this sector needs to be aware of to effectively address production stops......, and gives examples of the unique challenges faced by the SME food industry....

  6. Perceptual assessment of fricative--stop coarticulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repp, B H; Mann, V A

    1981-04-01

    The perceptual dependence of stop consonants on preceding fricatives [Mann and Repp, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 69, 548--558 (1981)] was further investigated in two experiments employing both natural and synthetic speech. These experiments consistently replicated our original finding that listeners, report velar stops following [s]. In addition, our data confirmed earlier reports that natural fricative noises (excerpted from utterances of [st alpha], [sk alpha], [(formula: see text)k alpha]) contain cues to the following stop consonants; this was revealed in subjects' identifications of stops from isolated fricative noises and from stimuli consisting of these noises followed by synthetic CV portions drawn from a [t alpha]--[k alpha] continuum. However, these cues in the noise portion could not account for the contextual effect of fricative identity ([formula: see text] versus [sp) on stop perception (more "k" responses following [s]). Rather, this effect seems to be related to a coarticulatory influence of a preceding fricative on stop production; Subjects' responses to excised natural CV portions (with bursts and aspiration removed) were biased towards a relatively more forward place of stop articulation when the CVs had originally been preceded by [s]; and the identification of a preceding ambiguous fricative was biased in the direction of the original fricative context in which a given CV portion had been produced. These findings support an articulatory explanation for the effect of preceding fricatives on stop consonant perception.

  7. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of hangnails, or other triggers, such as boredom, stress, or anxiety. By figuring out what causes you to bite your nails, you can figure out how to avoid these situations and develop a plan to stop. Just knowing when you’re inclined to bite may help solve the problem. Try to gradually stop biting ...

  8. All in One Stop? The Accessibility of Work Support Programs at One-Stop Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richer, Elise; Kubo, Hitomi; Frank, Abbey

    The accessibility of work support programs at one-stop centers was examined in a study during which 33 telephone directors or managers of one-stop centers in 22 states were interviewed by telephone. The interviews established the existence of extensive differences between one-stop centers from the standpoint of all aspects of their operation,…

  9. Rare codons effect on expression of recombinant gene cassette in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aghil Esmaeili-Bandboni

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To demonstrate the sensitivity of expression of fusion genes to existence of a large number of rare codons in recombinant gene sequenced. Methods: Primers for amplification of cholera toxin B, Shiga toxin B and gfp genes were designed by Primer3 software and synthesized. All of these 3 genes were cloned. Then the genes were fused together by restriction sites and enzymatic method. Two linkers were used as a flexible bridge in connection of these genes. Results: Cloning and fusion of cholera toxin B, Shiga toxin B and gfp genes were done correctly. After that, expression of the recombinant gene construction was surveyed. Conclusions: According to what was seen, because of the accumulation of 12 rare codons of Shiga toxin B and 19 rare codons of cholera toxin B in this gene cassette, the expression of the recombinant gene cassette, in Escherichia coli BL21, failed.

  10. ANT: Software for Generating and Evaluating Degenerate Codons for Natural and Expanded Genetic Codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engqvist, Martin K M; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-08-21

    The Ambiguous Nucleotide Tool (ANT) is a desktop application that generates and evaluates degenerate codons. Degenerate codons are used to represent DNA positions that have multiple possible nucleotide alternatives. This is useful for protein engineering and directed evolution, where primers specified with degenerate codons are used as a basis for generating libraries of protein sequences. ANT is intuitive and can be used in a graphical user interface or by interacting with the code through a defined application programming interface. ANT comes with full support for nonstandard, user-defined, or expanded genetic codes (translation tables), which is important because synthetic biology is being applied to an ever widening range of natural and engineered organisms. The Python source code for ANT is freely distributed so that it may be used without restriction, modified, and incorporated in other software or custom data pipelines.

  11. Complete mitochondrial genome sequences of three bats species and whole genome mitochondrial analyses reveal patterns of codon bias and lend support to a basal split in Chiroptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meganathan, P R; Pagan, Heidi J T; McCulloch, Eve S; Stevens, Richard D; Ray, David A

    2012-01-15

    Order Chiroptera is a unique group of mammals whose members have attained self-powered flight as their main mode of locomotion. Much speculation persists regarding bat evolution; however, lack of sufficient molecular data hampers evolutionary and conservation studies. Of ~1200 species, complete mitochondrial genome sequences are available for only eleven. Additional sequences should be generated if we are to resolve many questions concerning these fascinating mammals. Herein, we describe the complete mitochondrial genomes of three bats: Corynorhinus rafinesquii, Lasiurus borealis and Artibeus lituratus. We also compare the currently available mitochondrial genomes and analyze codon usage in Chiroptera. C. rafinesquii, L. borealis and A. lituratus mitochondrial genomes are 16438 bp, 17048 bp and 16709 bp, respectively. Genome organization and gene arrangements are similar to other bats. Phylogenetic analyses using complete mitochondrial genome sequences support previously established phylogenetic relationships and suggest utility in future studies focusing on the evolutionary aspects of these species. Comprehensive analyses of available bat mitochondrial genomes reveal distinct nucleotide patterns and synonymous codon preferences corresponding to different chiropteran families. These patterns suggest that mutational and selection forces are acting to different extents within Chiroptera and shape their mitochondrial genomes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Utilisation of ISA Reverse Genetics and Large-Scale Random Codon Re-Encoding to Produce Attenuated Strains of Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus within Days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fabritus, Lauriane; Nougairède, Antoine; Aubry, Fabien; Gould, Ernest A; de Lamballerie, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale codon re-encoding is a new method of attenuating RNA viruses. However, the use of infectious clones to generate attenuated viruses has inherent technical problems. We previously developed a bacterium-free reverse genetics protocol, designated ISA, and now combined it with large-scale random codon-re-encoding method to produce attenuated tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), a pathogenic flavivirus which causes febrile illness and encephalitis in humans. We produced wild-type (WT) and two re-encoded TBEVs, containing 273 or 273+284 synonymous mutations in the NS5 and NS5+NS3 coding regions respectively. Both re-encoded viruses were attenuated when compared with WT virus using a laboratory mouse model and the relative level of attenuation increased with the degree of re-encoding. Moreover, all infected animals produced neutralizing antibodies. This novel, rapid and efficient approach to engineering attenuated viruses could potentially expedite the development of safe and effective new-generation live attenuated vaccines.

  13. De novo assembly and next-generation sequencing to analyse full-length gene variants from codon-barcoded libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Namjin; Hwang, Byungjin; Yoon, Jung-ki; Park, Sangun; Lee, Joongoo; Seo, Han Na; Lee, Jeewon; Huh, Sunghoon; Chung, Jinsoo; Bang, Duhee

    2015-09-21

    Interpreting epistatic interactions is crucial for understanding evolutionary dynamics of complex genetic systems and unveiling structure and function of genetic pathways. Although high resolution mapping of en masse variant libraries renders molecular biologists to address genotype-phenotype relationships, long-read sequencing technology remains indispensable to assess functional relationship between mutations that lie far apart. Here, we introduce JigsawSeq for multiplexed sequence identification of pooled gene variant libraries by combining a codon-based molecular barcoding strategy and de novo assembly of short-read data. We first validate JigsawSeq on small sub-pools and observed high precision and recall at various experimental settings. With extensive simulations, we then apply JigsawSeq to large-scale gene variant libraries to show that our method can be reliably scaled using next-generation sequencing. JigsawSeq may serve as a rapid screening tool for functional genomics and offer the opportunity to explore evolutionary trajectories of protein variants.

  14. Listeria monocytogenes Isolates Carrying Virulence-Attenuating Mutations in Internalin A Are Commonly Isolated from Ready-to-Eat Food Processing Plant and Retail Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VAN Stelten, A; Roberts, A R; Manuel, C S; Nightingale, K K

    2016-10-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a human foodborne pathogen that may cause an invasive disease known as listeriosis in susceptible individuals. Internalin A (InlA; encoded by inlA) is a virulence factor that facilitates crossing of host cell barriers by L. monocytogenes . At least 19 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in inlA that result in a premature stop codon (PMSC) have been described worldwide. SNPs leading to a PMSC in inlA have been shown to be causally associated with attenuated virulence. L. monocytogenes pathogens carrying virulence-attenuating (VA) mutations in inlA have been commonly isolated from ready-to-eat (RTE) foods but rarely have been associated with human disease. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of VA SNPs in inlA among L. monocytogenes from environments associated with RTE food production and handling. More than 700 L. monocytogenes isolates from RTE food processing plant (n = 409) and retail (n = 319) environments were screened for the presence of VA SNPs in inlA. Overall, 26.4% of isolates from RTE food processing plant and 32.6% of isolates from retail environments carried a VA mutation in inlA. Food contact surfaces sampled at retail establishments were significantly (P < 0.0001) more likely to be contaminated by a L. monocytogenes isolate carrying a VA mutation in inlA (56% of 55 isolates) compared with nonfood contact surfaces (28% of 264 isolates). Overall, a significant proportion of L. monocytogenes isolated from RTE food production and handling environments have reduced virulence. These data will be useful in the revision of current and the development of future risk assessments that incorporate strain-specific virulence parameters.

  15. GNAq mutations are not identified in papillary thyroid carcinomas and hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassol, Clarissa A; Guo, Miao; Ezzat, Shereen; Asa, Sylvia L

    2010-12-01

    Activating mutations of GNAq protein in a hotspot at codon 209 have been recently described in uveal melanomas. Since these neoplasms share with thyroid carcinomas a high frequency of MAP kinase pathway-activating mutations, we hypothesized whether GNAq mutations could also play a role in the development of thyroid carcinomas. Additionally, activating mutations of another subtype of G protein (GNAS1) are frequently found in hyperfunctioning thyroid adenomas, making it plausible that GNAq-activating mutations could also be found in some of these nodules. To investigate thyroid papillary carcinomas and thyroid hyperfunctioning nodules for GNAq mutations in exon 5, codon 209, a total of 32 RET/PTC, BRAF, and RAS negative thyroid papillary carcinomas and 13 hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules were evaluated. No mutations were identified. Although plausible, GNAq mutations seem not to play an important role in the development of thyroid follicular neoplasms, either benign hyperfunctioning nodules or malignant papillary carcinomas. Our results are in accordance with the literature, in which no GNAq hotspot mutations were found in thyroid papillary carcinomas, as well as in an extensive panel of other tumors. The molecular basis for MAP-kinase pathway activation in RET-PTC/BRAF/RAS negative thyroid carcinomas remains to be determined.

  16. A splice mutation in the PHKG1 gene causes high glycogen content and low meat quality in pig skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junwu Ma

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Glycolytic potential (GP in skeletal muscle is economically important in the pig industry because of its effect on pork processing yield. We have previously mapped a major quantitative trait loci (QTL for GP on chromosome 3 in a White Duroc × Erhualian F2 intercross. We herein performed a systems genetic analysis to identify the causal variant underlying the phenotype QTL (pQTL. We first conducted genome-wide association analyses in the F2 intercross and an F19 Sutai pig population. The QTL was then refined to an 180-kb interval based on the 2-LOD drop method. We then performed expression QTL (eQTL mapping using muscle transcriptome data from 497 F2 animals. Within the QTL interval, only one gene (PHKG1 has a cis-eQTL that was colocolizated with pQTL peaked at the same SNP. The PHKG1 gene encodes a catalytic subunit of the phosphorylase kinase (PhK, which functions in the cascade activation of glycogen breakdown. Deep sequencing of PHKG1 revealed a point mutation (C>A in a splice acceptor site of intron 9, resulting in a 32-bp deletion in the open reading frame and generating a premature stop codon. The aberrant transcript induces nonsense-mediated decay, leading to lower protein level and weaker enzymatic activity in affected animals. The mutation causes an increase of 43% in GP and a decrease of>20% in water-holding capacity of pork. These effects were consistent across the F2 and Sutai populations, as well as Duroc × (Landrace × Yorkshire hybrid pigs. The unfavorable allele exists predominantly in Duroc-derived pigs. The findings provide new insights into understanding risk factors affecting glucose metabolism, and would greatly contribute to the genetic improvement of meat quality in Duroc related pigs.

  17. A splice mutation in the PHKG1 gene causes high glycogen content and low meat quality in pig skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Junwu; Yang, Jie; Zhou, Lisheng; Ren, Jun; Liu, Xianxian; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Bin; Zhang, Zhiyan; Ma, Huanban; Xie, Xianhua; Xing, Yuyun; Guo, Yuanmei; Huang, Lusheng

    2014-10-01

    Glycolytic potential (GP) in skeletal muscle is economically important in the pig industry because of its effect on pork processing yield. We have previously mapped a major quantitative trait loci (QTL) for GP on chromosome 3 in a White Duroc × Erhualian F2 intercross. We herein performed a systems genetic analysis to identify the causal variant underlying the phenotype QTL (pQTL). We first conducted genome-wide association analyses in the F2 intercross and an F19 Sutai pig population. The QTL was then refined to an 180-kb interval based on the 2-LOD drop method. We then performed expression QTL (eQTL) mapping using muscle transcriptome data from 497 F2 animals. Within the QTL interval, only one gene (PHKG1) has a cis-eQTL that was colocolizated with pQTL peaked at the same SNP. The PHKG1 gene encodes a catalytic subunit of the phosphorylase kinase (PhK), which functions in the cascade activation of glycogen breakdown. Deep sequencing of PHKG1 revealed a point mutation (C>A) in a splice acceptor site of intron 9, resulting in a 32-bp deletion in the open reading frame and generating a premature stop codon. The aberrant transcript induces nonsense-mediated decay, leading to lower protein level and weaker enzymatic activity in affected animals. The mutation causes an increase of 43% in GP and a decrease of>20% in water-holding capacity of pork. These effects were consistent across the F2 and Sutai populations, as well as Duroc × (Landrace × Yorkshire) hybrid pigs. The unfavorable allele exists predominantly in Duroc-derived pigs. The findings provide new insights into understanding risk factors affecting glucose metabolism, and would greatly contribute to the genetic improvement of meat quality in Duroc related pigs.

  18. Superantigenic activity of emm3 Streptococcus pyogenes is abrogated by a conserved, naturally occurring smeZ mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire E Turner

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes M/emm3 strains have been epidemiologically linked with enhanced infection severity and risk of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS, a syndrome triggered by superantigenic stimulation of T cells. Comparison of S. pyogenes strains causing STSS demonstrated that emm3 strains were surprisingly less mitogenic than other emm-types (emm1, emm12, emm18, emm28, emm87, emm89 both in vitro and in vivo, indicating poor superantigenic activity. We identified a 13 bp deletion in the superantigen smeZ gene of all emm3 strains tested. The deletion led to a premature stop codon in smeZ, and was not present in other major emm-types tested. Expression of a functional non-M3-smeZ gene successfully enhanced mitogenic activity in emm3 S. pyogenes and also restored mitogenic activity to emm1 and emm89 S. pyogenes strains where the smeZ gene had been disrupted. In contrast, the M3-smeZ gene with the 13 bp deletion could not enhance or restore mitogenicity in any of these S. pyogenes strains, confirming that M3-smeZ is non-functional regardless of strain background. The mutation in M3-smeZ reduced the potential for M3 S. pyogenes to induce cytokines in human tonsil, but not during invasive infection of superantigen-sensitive mice. Notwithstanding epidemiological associations with STSS and disease severity, emm3 strains have inherently poor superantigenicity that is explained by a conserved mutation in smeZ.

  19. The effect of gentamicin-induced readthrough on a novel premature termination codon of CD18 leukocyte adhesion deficiency patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amos J Simon

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Leukocyte adhesion deficiency 1 (LAD1 is an inherited disorder of neutrophil function. Nonsense mutations in the affected CD18 (ITB2 gene have rarely been described. In other genes containing such mutations, treatments with aminoglycoside types of antibiotics (e.g., gentamicin were reported to partially correct the premature protein termination, by induction of readthrough mechanism.Genetic analysis was performed on 2 LAD1 patients. Expression, functional and immunofluorescence assays of CD18 in the patients were used to determine the in-vivo and