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Sample records for mutated primer-mediated pcr-rflp

  1. Prognostic value of IDH1 mutations identified with PCR-RFLP assay in acute myeloid leukemia patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsayed, Gh.M.; Zaher, A.; Elnoshokaty, E.H.; Nassar, H.R.; Moneer, M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Somatic mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (1DH1) gene occur frequently in primary brain tumors. Recently theses mutations were demonstrated in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). So far, assessment of these mutations relied on the DNA sequencing technique. Aim of the work: The aim of this study was to detect somatic mutations in IDH1 gene using mismatched primers suitable for endonuclease based detection, without the need for DNA sequencing, and to estimate its prognostic value, on patients with de novo AML. Methods: Residual DNA extracted from pretreatment bone marrow (BM) samples of 100 patients with de novo AML was used. The polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method (PCR-RFLP) was adapted to IDHl gene, codon 132 mutations screening. Results: The frequency of IDH1 mutations was 13%. In the non-acute promyelocytic leukemia group (non-APL), IDH1 mutations were significantly associated with FLT3-ITD negative patients (p = 0.03). Patients with 1DH1 mutations did not achieve complete remission (CR). There was a trend for shorter overall survival (OS) in patients with IDH1 mutation compared to those with wild type (p = 0.08). Conclusion: IDH1 mutations are recurring genetic alterations in AML and they may have unfavorable impact on clinical outcome in adult AML. The PCR-RFLP method allows for a fast, inexpensive, and sensitive method for the detection of IDF11 mutations in AML.

  2. Highly sensitive detection of the PIK3CAH1047R mutation in colorectal cancer using a novel PCR-RFLP method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Wan-Ming; Hu, Ting-Ting; Zhou, Lin-Lin; Feng, Yi-Ming; Wang, Yun-Yi; Fang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    The PIK3CA H1047R mutation is considered to be a potential predictive biomarker for EGFR-targeted therapies. In this study, we developed a novel PCR-PFLP approach to detect the PIK3CA H1047R mutation in high effectiveness. A 126-bp fragment of PIK3CA exon-20 was amplified by PCR, digested with FspI restriction endonuclease and separated by 3 % agarose gel electrophoresis for the PCR-RFLP analysis. The mutant sequence of the PIK3CA H1047R was spiked into the corresponding wild-type sequence in decreasing ratios for sensitivity analysis. Eight-six cases of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded colorectal cancer (CRC) specimens were subjected to PCR-RFLP to evaluate the applicability of the method. The PCR-RFLP method had a capability to detect as litter as 0.4 % of mutation, and revealed 16.3 % of the PIK3CA H1047R mutation in 86 CRC tissues, which was significantly higher than that discovered by DNA sequencing (9.3 %). A positive association between the PIK3CA H1047R mutation and the patients’ age was first found, except for the negative relationship with the degree of tumor differentiation. In addition, the highly sensitive detection of a combinatorial mutation of PIK3CA, KRAS and BRAF was achieved using individual PCR-RFLP methods. We developed a sensitive, simple and rapid approach to detect the low-abundance PIK3CA H1047R mutation in real CRC specimens, providing an effective tool for guiding cancer targeted therapy

  3. PCR-RFLP to Detect Codon 248 Mutation in Exon 7 of "p53" Tumor Suppressor Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Liming; Ge, Chongtao; Wu, Haizhen; Li, Suxia; Zhang, Huizhan

    2009-01-01

    Individual genome DNA was extracted fast from oral swab and followed up with PCR specific for codon 248 of "p53" tumor suppressor gene. "Msp"I restriction mapping showed the G-C mutation in codon 248, which closely relates to cancer susceptibility. Students learn the concepts, detection techniques, and research significance of point mutations or…

  4. Benzimidazole -Resistance in Haemonchus Contortus: New PCR-RFLP Method for the Detection of Point Mutation at Codon 167 of Isotype 1 Β-Tubulin Gene

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    A Eslami

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to the lack of a suitable and economic test for the analysis of the polymorphism at codon 167, we developed a new PCR-RFLP technique, based on a modified forward primer (UT-HC167 MF-primer, to identify simultaneously the SNPs at codons 167 and 200 of isotype 1 β-tubu­lin gene of Haemonchus contortus.Methods: There already are several safe and easy methods for identification of point mutations at codons 198 and 200. Due to the lack of a reliable and easy method for the detection of the single nucleo­tide polymorphism (SNP at codon 167, we developed an innovative PCR-RFLP technique based on a modified forward primer (UT-HC167 MF-primer, in which the nucleotide T at the posi­tion 443 was substituted through a nucleotide A creating a restriction site for restriction endonuc­lease SnaB I in the nucleotide sequences including codon 167. A total of 138 adult male H. contortus were collected from three different geo-climatic areas of Iran. The isolated genomic DNA of each single worm was amplified by PCR using primers flanking codon 167. The PCR product (527 bp was then amplified by semi-nested PCR using the UT-HC167 MF-primer and the reverse primer achiev­ing a PCR product of 451 bp in length. This PCR product was subsequently digested with the restriction endonucleases SnaB I and TaaI for analysis of the mutations at codons 167 and 200, respec­tively.Results: All worms had two alleles encoding for phenylalanine (BZss homozygote for both codons.Conclusion: Using the UT-HC167 MF-primer and a suitable reverse primer designed upstream from codon 200, it is possible to amplify a PCR product which can be used for analysis of the SNPs at all three mentioned codons using RFLP.

  5. Genotyping of friesian horses to detect a hydrocephalus-associated c.1423C>T mutation in B3GALNT2 using PCR-RFLP and PCR-PIRA methods: Frequency in stallion horses in México.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-Valdovinos, Miguel Angel; Galindo-García, Jorge; Sánchez-Chiprés, David; Duifhuis-Rivera, Theodor

    2017-04-01

    Hydrocephalus in Friesian horses is an autosomal recessive hereditary disease that can result in an abortion, a stillbirth, or euthanization of a newborn foal. Here, the hydrocephalus-associated c.1423C > T mutation in B3GALNT2 gene was detected with PCR-RFLP and PCR-PIRA methods for horse genotyping. A preliminary genotyping survey was performed on 83 randomly selected Friesian stallion horses to determine the current allele frequency in Mexico. The frequency of the mutant T allele was 9.6%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. SNP-RFLPing 2: an updated and integrated PCR-RFLP tool for SNP genotyping

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    Chang Hsueh-Wei

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP assay is a cost-effective method for SNP genotyping and mutation detection, but the manual mining for restriction enzyme sites is challenging and cumbersome. Three years after we constructed SNP-RFLPing, a freely accessible database and analysis tool for restriction enzyme mining of SNPs, significant improvements over the 2006 version have been made and incorporated into the latest version, SNP-RFLPing 2. Results The primary aim of SNP-RFLPing 2 is to provide comprehensive PCR-RFLP information with multiple functionality about SNPs, such as SNP retrieval to multiple species, different polymorphism types (bi-allelic, tri-allelic, tetra-allelic or indels, gene-centric searching, HapMap tagSNPs, gene ontology-based searching, miRNAs, and SNP500Cancer. The RFLP restriction enzymes and the corresponding PCR primers for the natural and mutagenic types of each SNP are simultaneously analyzed. All the RFLP restriction enzyme prices are also provided to aid selection. Furthermore, the previously encountered updating problems for most SNP related databases are resolved by an on-line retrieval system. Conclusions The user interfaces for functional SNP analyses have been substantially improved and integrated. SNP-RFLPing 2 offers a new and user-friendly interface for RFLP genotyping that can be used in association studies and is freely available at http://bio.kuas.edu.tw/snp-rflping2.

  7. SNP-RFLPing 2: an updated and integrated PCR-RFLP tool for SNP genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsueh-Wei; Cheng, Yu-Huei; Chuang, Li-Yeh; Yang, Cheng-Hong

    2010-04-08

    PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay is a cost-effective method for SNP genotyping and mutation detection, but the manual mining for restriction enzyme sites is challenging and cumbersome. Three years after we constructed SNP-RFLPing, a freely accessible database and analysis tool for restriction enzyme mining of SNPs, significant improvements over the 2006 version have been made and incorporated into the latest version, SNP-RFLPing 2. The primary aim of SNP-RFLPing 2 is to provide comprehensive PCR-RFLP information with multiple functionality about SNPs, such as SNP retrieval to multiple species, different polymorphism types (bi-allelic, tri-allelic, tetra-allelic or indels), gene-centric searching, HapMap tagSNPs, gene ontology-based searching, miRNAs, and SNP500Cancer. The RFLP restriction enzymes and the corresponding PCR primers for the natural and mutagenic types of each SNP are simultaneously analyzed. All the RFLP restriction enzyme prices are also provided to aid selection. Furthermore, the previously encountered updating problems for most SNP related databases are resolved by an on-line retrieval system. The user interfaces for functional SNP analyses have been substantially improved and integrated. SNP-RFLPing 2 offers a new and user-friendly interface for RFLP genotyping that can be used in association studies and is freely available at http://bio.kuas.edu.tw/snp-rflping2.

  8. Sensitive identification of mycobacterial species using PCR-RFLP on bronchial washings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidaka, E; Honda, T; Ueno, I; Yamasaki, Y; Kubo, K; Katsuyama, T

    2000-03-01

    In 98 patients (24 with active pulmonary tuberculosis [TB] lesions, 28 with cured TB lesions, and 46 with nontuberculous opacities [control group] in chest CT scans), we examined whether washing the bronchus after brushing the lesion, then applying polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) to the bronchial washings might be useful for diagnosing TB and nontuberculous mycobacteriosis (NTMosis). After biopsy and brushing with a bronchoscope, the bronchus connecting to the lesion was washed with 20 ml saline. The saline used for washing the brushes (5 ml; brushing sample), and 3 to 10 ml saline aspirated through the forceps channel (washing sample) were examined by PCR-RFLP, which proved able to identify Mycobacterium tuberculosis and seven species of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). The values obtained for the sensitivity of the PCR-RFLP with respect to the brushing sample, the washing sample, and both samples mixed together were 70, 76, and 91%, respectively, when only patients who were culture-positive or radiologically improved after antituberculous therapy were considered as showing true infection. A mixture of brushing and washing samples provides useful material for PCR and culture, and the PCR-RFLP used here is a good method for the simultaneous identification of several species of mycobacterium (including M. tuberculosis).

  9. Differentiation between a pathogenic and a non-pathogenic form of Gyrodactylus salaris using PCR-RFLP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kania, Per Walther; Jørgensen, Thomas Rohde; Buchmann, Kurt

    2007-01-01

    A new method based on PCR-RFLP is presented. It is able to differentiate between the Danish non-pathogenic form of Gyrodactylus salaris and the Norwegian pathogenic form.......A new method based on PCR-RFLP is presented. It is able to differentiate between the Danish non-pathogenic form of Gyrodactylus salaris and the Norwegian pathogenic form....

  10. Alkaline Extraction of DNA from Pathogenic Fungi for PCR-RFLP Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumoto, Masaru; Mishima, Shinobu; Matsuyama, Nobuaki; 松元, 賢; 松山, 宣明

    1997-01-01

    For the preparation of DNA samples from fungal mycelia alkaline extraction method was applied and assessed its usefulness for PCR-RFLP analysis. Using alkaline treatment protocols, 18S ribosomal DNAs (rDNA) derived from fungal genomic DNA of Pyricularia oryzae, P. zingiberi, Rhizoctonia solani and R. oryzae were PCR-amplified and digested with Hha I, Msp I and Hae ill. RFLP analysis with HhaI showed the divergent polymorphism between genus Pyricularia and Rhizoctonia. The alkaline DNA extract...

  11. PHYLOGENETIC RELATIONSHIPS AMONGST 10 Durio SPECIES BASED ON PCR-RFLP ANALYSIS OF TWO CHLOROPLAST GENES

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    Panca J. Santoso

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Twenty seven species of Durio have been identified in Sabah and Sarawak, Malaysia, but their relationships have not been studied. This study was conducted to analyse phylogenetic relationships amongst 10 Durio species in Malaysia using PCR-RFLP on two chloroplast DNA genes, i.e. ndhC-trnV and rbcL. DNAs were extracted from young leaves of 11 accessions from 10 Durio species collected from the Tenom Agriculture Research Station, Sabah, and University Agriculture Park, Universiti Putra Malaysia. Two pairs of oligonucleotide primers, N1-N2 and rbcL1-rbcL2, were used to flank the target regions ndhC-trnV and rbcL. Eight restriction enzymes, HindIII, BsuRI, PstI, TaqI, MspI, SmaI, BshNI, and EcoR130I, were used to digest the amplicons. Based on the results of PCR-RFLP on ndhC-trnV gene, the 10 Durio species were grouped into five distinct clusters, and the accessions generally showed high variations. However, based on the results of PCR-RFLP on the rbcL gene, the species were grouped into three distinct clusters, and generally showed low variations. This means that ndhC-trnV gene is more reliable for phylogenetic analysis in lower taxonomic level of Durio species or for diversity analysis, while rbcL gene is reliable marker for phylogenetic analysis at higher taxonomic level. PCR-RFLP on the ndhC-trnV and rbcL genes could therefore be considered as useful markers to phylogenetic analysis amongst Durio species. These finding might be used for further molecular marker assisted in Durio breeding program.

  12. Human papillomavirus detection and typing using a nested-PCR-RFLP assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coser, Janaina; Boeira, Thaís da Rocha; Fonseca, André Salvador Kazantzi; Ikuta, Nilo; Lunge, Vagner Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    It is clinically important to detect and type human papillomavirus (HPV) in a sensitive and specific manner. Development of a nested-polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (nested-PCR-RFLP) assay to detect and type HPV based on the analysis of L1 gene. Analysis of published DNA sequence of mucosal HPV types to select sequences of new primers. Design of an original nested-PCR assay using the new primers pair selected and classical MY09/11 primers. HPV detection and typing in cervical samples using the nested-PCR-RFLP assay. The nested-PCR-RFLP assay detected and typed HPV in cervical samples. Of the total of 128 clinical samples submitted to simple PCR and nested-PCR for detection of HPV, 37 (28.9%) were positive for the virus by both methods and 25 samples were positive only by nested-PCR (67.5% increase in detection rate compared with single PCR). All HPV positive samples were effectively typed by RFLP assay. The method of nested-PCR proved to be an effective diagnostic tool for HPV detection and typing.

  13. Identification of five sea cucumber species through PCR-RFLP analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yingchun; Zheng, Rong; Zuo, Tao; Wang, Yuming; Li, Zhaojie; Xue, Yong; Xue, Changhu; Tang, Qingjuan

    2014-10-01

    Sea cucumbers are traditional marine food and Chinese medicine in Asia. The rapid expansion of sea cucumber market has resulted in various problems, such as commercial fraud and mislabeling. Conventionally, sea cucumber species could be distinguished by their morphological and anatomical characteristics; however, their identification becomes difficult when they are processed. The aim of this study was to develop a new convenient method of identifying and distinguishing sea cucumber species. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I gene ( COI) was used to identifing five sea cucumber species ( Apostichopus japonicus, Cucumaria frondosa, Thelenota ananas, Parastichopus californicus and Actinopyga lecanora). A 692 bp fragment of COI was searched for BamHI, KpnI, PstI, XbaI and Eco31I restriction sites with DNAMAN 6.0, which were then used to PCR-RFLP analysis. These five sea cucumber species can be discriminated from mixed sea cucumbers. The developed PCR-RFLP assay will facilitate the identification of sea cucumbers, making their source tracing and quality controlling feasible.

  14. Genotyping of β-Lactoglobulin gene by PCR-RFLP in Sahiwal and Tharparkar cattle breeds

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    Gupta Neelam

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Improvement of efficiency and economic returns is an important goal in dairy farming, as in any agricultural enterprise. The primary goal of dairy industry has been to identify an efficient and economical way of increasing milk production and its constituents without increasing the size of the dairy herd. Selection of animals with desirable genotypes and mating them to produce the next generation has been the basis of livestock improvement and this would continue to remain the same in the coming years. The use of polymorphic genes as detectable molecular markers is a promising alternative to the current methods of trait selection once these genes are proven to be associated with traits of interest in animals. The point mutations in exon IV of bovine β-Lactoglobulin gene determine two allelic variants A and B. These variants were distinguished by Polymerase Chain Reaction and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP analysis in two indigenous Bos indicus breeds viz. Sahiwal and Tharparkar cattle. DNA samples (228 in Sahiwal and 86 in Tharparkar were analyzed for allelic variants of β-Lactoglobulin gene. Polymorphism was detected by digestion of PCR amplified products with Hae III enzyme, and separation on 12% non-denaturing gels and resolved by silver staining. Results The allele B of β-Lactoglobulin occurred at a higher frequency than the allele A in both Sahiwal and Tharparkar breeds. The genotypic frequencies of AA, AB, and BB in Sahiwal and Tharparkar breeds were 0.031, 0.276, 0.693 and 0.023, 0.733, 0.244 respectively. Frequencies of A and B alleles were 0.17 and 0.83, and 0.39 and 0.61 in Sahiwal and Tharparkar breeds respectively. The Chi-square test results (at one degree of freedom at one per cent level revealed that the Tharparkar population was not in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium as there was a continuous migration of animals in the herd studied, where as, the results are not significant for the Sahiwal

  15. PCR-RFLP Analysis of a fliC Gene Fragment in Avian Salmonella Isolates

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    Zohreh Ebrahimvandi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Salmonella are a genus of zoonotic bacteria of worldwide economic and health importance. Members of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica are mainly associated with warm-blooded vertebrates and are usually transmitted by ingestion of food or watercontaminated by infected feces. Objectives: The aim of this study was to apply a PCR-RFLP method based on the fliC gene to identify the serotypes of Salmonella isolates from Karaj, Iran. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 Salmonella isolates were serotyped by specific antisera. For the PCR-RFLP method based on the fliC gene, extracted DNA was used as the template for amplifying the fliC gene (1500 bp using specific primers. PCR products were subjected to digestion using HhaI restriction endonuclease. Results: This study determined 30 serotypes as Salmonella durban (56.6%, Salmonella uno (23.3%, Salmonella enteritidis (3.3%, Salmonella tinda (3.3%, Salmonella mjimweme (3.3%, Salmonella Thompson (3.3%, Salmonella sIIO8 (3.3 % and Salmonella sIIO7 (3.3%. Observations indicated that HhaI is able to discriminate Salmonella tinda and Salmonella thompson, yet Salmonella enteritidis, Salmonella durban and Salmonella mjimweme had the same pattern with this enzyme. Also Salmonella sIIO8, Salmonella sIIO7 and Salmonella uno showed the same pattern. Thus, regarding the size and the number of resulting fragments from this enzyme, four patterns were obtained for HhaI. Conclusion: A large number of Salmonella serotypes need to be analyzed by the PCR-RFLP method and different enzymes must be used to give reliable results.

  16. PCR-RFLP diagnostic method for identifying Globodera species in Slovenia

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    Sasa ŠIRCA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Species identification within the genus Globodera is based on the morphological and morphometrical characters of the cysts and second stage juveniles, and these are included in the majority of identification keys. Morphometrical methods are fast and can be applied to most of samples but they demand a trained and experienced specialist. Furthermore, some morphometrical characters may overlap between populations and beetwen species, leading to inaccurate identification. To confirm and complement the morphometrical identification of Globodera species molecular methods have been developed. Sequences of the internal transcribed spacer regions ITS1 and ITS2 of the rDNA gene cluster proved to be useful for identifying nematode species identification. A PCR-RFLP molecular method was used to identify Globodera rostochiensis, G. pallida, G. tabacum and G. achilleae. Globodera rostochiensis, G. pallida, G. tabacum and G. achilleae can be distinguished with PCR-RFLP analysis of the rDNA ITS fragment using five restriction enzymes. The RFLP patterns of G. rostochiensis, G. tabacum and G. achilleae were species-specific, while those of G. pallida varied. South American populations of G. pallida differed from other populations as their RFLP patterns were demonstrated to be distinct by in silico restriction of the ITS sequences deposited at NCBI.

  17. PCR-RFLP Using BseDI Enzyme for Pork Authentication in Sausage and Nugget Products

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    Y. Erwanto

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR–RFLP using BseDI restriction enzyme had been applied for identifying the presence of pork in processed meat (beef sausage and chicken nugget including before and after frying. Pork sample in various levels (1%, 3%, 5%, 10%, and 25 % was prepared in a mixture with beef and chicken meats and processed for sausage and nugget. The primers CYTb1 and CYTb2 were designed in the mitochondrial cytochrome b (cyt b gene and PCR successfully amplified fragments of 359 bp. To distinguish existence of porcine species, the amplified PCR products of mitochondrial DNA were cut by BseDI restriction enzyme. The result showed pig mitochondrial DNA was cut into 131 and 228 bp fragments. The PCR-RFLP species identification assay yielded excellent results for identification of porcine species. It is a potentially reliable technique for pork detection in animal food processed products for Halal authentication.

  18. Genotyping of the Holstein-Friesian crossbred cattle for CD18 gene using PCR-RFLP

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    A. S. Khade

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was undertaken in Holstein-Friesian (HF crossbred cattle with the objective to find out genotype of HF crossbred cattle for Bovine Leucocyte Adhesion Deficiency (BLAD by using PCR-RFLP. Materials and Methods: 50 blood samples were collected from HF crossbred cattle and subjected to PCR. The amplified PCR products were digested using Taq I restriction enzyme at 65 oC overnight. After restriction digestion, the final PCR products were electrophoresed on 2.5 % agarose gel. Results: All the 50 animals under present investigation were found to be normal as the amplified PCR product upon digestion with Taq I restriction enzyme, revealed two bands of 313 bp and 54 bp for normal animals. Conclusions: In the present investigation D128G carrier frequency was found to be 0 %. However, recent reports suggest that the mutant gene has already been observed in the HF crossbred cattle population of India, which makes it necessary to screen the animals to avoid the risk of spreading BLAD in the breeding cattle population.

  19. Bovine Papillomavirus in Brazil: Detection of Coinfection of Unusual Types by a PCR-RFLP Method

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    R. F. Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bovine papillomavirus (BPV is recognized as a causal agent of benign and malignant tumors in cattle. Thirteen types of BPV are currently characterized and classified into three distinct genera, associated with different pathological outcomes. The described BPV types as well as other putative ones have been demonstrated by molecular biology methods, mainly by the employment of degenerated PCR primers. Specifically, divergences in the nucleotide sequence of the L1 gene are useful for the identification and classification of new papillomavirus types. On the present work, a method based on the PCR-RFLP technique and DNA sequencing was evaluated as a screening tool, allowing for the detection of two relatively rare types of BPV in lesions samples from a six-year-old Holstein dairy cow, chronically affected with cutaneous papillomatosis. These findings point to the dissemination of BPVs with unclear pathogenic potential, since two relatively rare, new described BPV types, which were first characterized in Japan, were also detected in Brazil.

  20. Molecular typing of the actin gene of Trichomonas vaginalis isolates by PCR-RFLP in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, Zohreh; Sadraei, Javid; Kazemi, Bahram; Dalimi, Abdolhossein

    2015-12-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a human urogenital pathogen that causes trichomoniasis, the most common nonviral, parasitic sexually transmitted infection in the world. At present, little is known regarding the degree of strain variability of T. vaginalis. A classification method for T. vaginalis strains would be a useful tool in the study of the epidemiology, drug resistance, pathogenesis and transmission of T. vaginalis. Eight different types of actin genes have been identified by PCR-RFLP in T. vaginalis; the purpose of this study is to determine the genotypes of this parasite in Karaj city, Iran. Forty-five clinical T. vaginalis isolates from vaginal secretions and urine sediment were collected from Karaj city from 2012 through 2014. DNA was extracted and the actin gene was amplified by nested-PCR; all samples were positive. To determine the genetic differences, sequencing on seven samples was conducted. Then, all PCR products were digested with HindII, MseI, and RsaI restriction enzymes. Of 45 isolates, 23 samples (51.1%) were of actin genotype G, 11 samples (24.4%) of genotype E, six samples (13.3%) of genotype H, three samples (6.6%) of genotype I, and two samples (4.4%) were mixed genotypes of G and E. Genetic diversity of T. vaginalis isolates is notable. The actin genotype G may be the dominant genotype in Karaj city, Iran. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular identification of Indian crocodile species: PCR-RFLP method for forensic authentication*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meganathan, P R; Dubey, Bhawna; Haque, Ikramul

    2009-09-01

    South East Asian countries are known for illegal poaching and trade of crocodiles clandestinely, to be used in skin, medicinal, and cosmetic industries. Besides crocodiles being listed in the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, India has its Wildlife Protection Act, 1972 for conservation of crocodile species. Hitherto, lack of any rapid and reliable technique for examinations of crocodile-based crime exhibits such as skin, bones, etc. has been a major problem for an effective promulgation of law on illegal trade. DNA-based identification of species using PCR-RFLP technique for an apt identification of all the three Indian crocodile species namely, Crocodylus porosus, Crocodylus palustris and Gavialis gangeticus is presented here. A 628 bp segment of cytochrome b gene was amplified using novel primers followed by restriction digestion with three enzymes i.e., HaeIII, MboI, and MwoI, separately and in combination. The technique has produced a species-specific pattern for identifying the three crocodile species individually, which fulfills the requirement for its forensic application. It is expected that the technique will prove handy in identification of all the three Indian crocodile species and strengthen conservation efforts.

  2. PCR-RFLP Method to Identify Salmonid Species of Economic Importance

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    Andreea Dudu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The identification of different fish species by molecular methods has become necessary to avoid both the incorrect labelling of individuals involved in repopulation programmes and the commercial frauds on the fish market. Different fish species of great economical importance, like the salmonids, which are very much requested for their meat, can be identified using molecular techniques such as PCR-RFLP. The method is based on the amplification of a target region from the genome by PCR reaction followed by endonucleases digestion to detect the polymorphism of restriction fragments. In our study we analysed the following salmonid species from Romania: Salmo trutta fario, Salmo labrax, Salvelinus fontinalis, Onchorhynchus mykiss, Thymallus thymallus and Hucho hucho. In order to discriminate between the analysed species we amplified a fragment of mitochondrial genome comprising tRNAGlu/ cytochrome b/ tRNAThr/ tRNAPro/ D-loop/ tRNAPhe, followed by digestion with a specific restriction enzyme. The direct digestion of unpurified PCR products generated species-specific restriction patterns and proved to be a simple, reliable, inexpensive and fast method. Thus, it may be successfully utilized in specialized laboratories for the correct identification of the fish species for multiple purposes, including the traceability of fish food products.

  3. Comparison of PCR-RFLP pattern with sequencing analysis of the ITS region of Hyrcanain\\'s Tilia

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    Hamed Yousefzadeh

    2014-01-01

    T. hyrcana and T. rubra from Hyrcanian's origin, but it could not separate T. begonifloia from the other hyrcanian species. In this respect, derived results were similar to sequencing one. In conclusion, with regard to less expensive and less time consuming PCR-RFLP technique and high similarity between its result with sequencing, we recommend this method as a simple and economical method with relatively high efficiency studding plant phylogeny.

  4. Authentication of beef, carabeef, chevon, mutton and pork by a PCR-RFLP assay of mitochondrial cytb gene

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Deepak; Singh, S. P.; Karabasanavar, Nagappa S.; Singh, Rashmi; Umapathi, V.

    2012-01-01

    Authentication of meat assumes significance in view of religious, quality assurance, food safety, public health, conservation and legal concerns. Here, we describe a PCR-RFLP (Polymerase Chain Reaction- Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism) assay targeting mitochondrial cytochrome-b gene for the identification of meats of five most common food animals namely cattle, buffalo, goat, sheep and pig. A pair of forward and reverse primers (VPH-F & VPH-R) amplifying a conserved region (168–776 b...

  5. Typing clinical and animal environment Aspergillus fumigatus gliotoxin producer strains isolated from Brazil by PCR-RFLP markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleiro, C A; Pena, G A; Cavaglieri, L R; Coelho, I; Keller, L M; Dalcero, A M; Rosa, C A R

    2013-12-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus, a well-known human and animal pathogen causing aspergillosis, has been historically identified by morphological and microscopic features. However, recent studies have shown that species identification on the basis of morphology alone is problematic. The aim of this work was to confirm the taxonomic state at specie level of a set of clinical (human and animal) and animal environment A. fumigatus strains identified by morphological criteria applying a PCR-RFLP assay by an in silico and in situ analysis with three restriction enzymes. The A. fumigatus gliotoxin-producing ability was also determined. Previous to the in situ PCR-RFLP analysis, an in silico assay with BccI, MspI and Sau3AI restriction enzymes was carried out. After that, these enzymes were used for in situ assay. All A. fumigatus strains isolated from corn silage, human aspergillosis and bovine mastitis and high per cent of the strains isolated from cereals, animal feedstuff and sorghum silage were able to produce high gliotoxin levels. Also, all these strains identified by morphological criteria as A. fumigatus, regardless of its isolation source, had band patterns according to A. fumigatus sensu stricto by PCR-RFLP markers. Aspergillus fumigatus is a well-known human and animal pathogen causing aspergillosis. In this study, clinical (human and animal) and animal environment strains were able to produce high gliotoxin levels and had band profiles according to A. fumigatus sensu stricto by PCR-RFLP markers. The results obtained here suggest that strains involved in human and animal aspergillosis could come from the animal environment in which A. fumigatus is frequently found. Its presence in animal environments could affect animal health and productivity; in addition, there are risks of contamination for rural workers during handling and storage of animal feedstuffs. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. IDENTIFIKASI DAGING BABI MENGGUNAKAN METODE PCR-RFLP GEN Cytochrome b DAN PCR PRIMER SPESIFIK GEN AMELOGENIN (Pork Identification Using PCR-RFLP of Cytochrome b Gene and Species Specific PCR of Amelogenin Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuny Erwanto

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR–RFLP and species specific PCR methods had been applied for identifying pork in mixture of meat. Pork sample in various levels (1, 3, 5 and 10% was prepared in mixture with beef, chicken and mutton. The primary CYTb1 and CYTb2 were designed in the mitochondrial cytochrome b b (cytochrome b gene and PCR successfully amplified fragments of 359 bp. To distinguish pig species existence, the amplified PCR products of mitochondrial DNA were cut by BseDI restriction enzyme. The result showed that pig mitochondrial DNA was cut into 131 and 228 bp fragments. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR method based on the nucleotide sequence variation in the amelogenin gene has been chosen for the specific identification of pork DNAs in mixture meat. The primers designed generated specific fragments of 353 and 312 bp length for pork. The specificity of the primary designed was tested on 4 animal species including pig, cattle, chicken and goat species. Analysis of experimental mixture meat demonstrated that 1% of raw pork tissues could be detected using PCR-RFLP with BseDI restriction enzyme but detection using species-specific PCR showed the cross reactivity to beef, chicken and mutton. The cytochrome b PCR-RFLP species identification assay yielded excellent results for identification of pig species. PCR-RFLP is a potentially reliable technique for detection of the existence of pork in animal food product for Halal authentication. Keywords: Pork identification, cytochrome b, amelogenin, polymerase chain reaction   ABSTRAK   Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengaplikasikan metode deteksi daging babi dalam campuan daging dengan sapi, kambing dan ayam melalui PCR-RFLP dan PCR dengan primer spesifik untuk babi. Level kontaminasi daging babi dibuat sebesar 1, 3, 5 dan 10% dari total daging dalam campuran. Metode PCR-RFLP menggunakan sepasang primer yaitu gen cytochrome b dari mitokondria yang

  7. Software for optimization of SNP and PCR-RFLP genotyping to discriminate many genomes with the fewest assays

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    Wagner Mark C

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial forensics is important in tracking the source of a pathogen, whether the disease is a naturally occurring outbreak or part of a criminal investigation. Results A method and SPR Opt (SNP and PCR-RFLP Optimization software to perform a comprehensive, whole-genome analysis to forensically discriminate multiple sequences is presented. Tools for the optimization of forensic typing using Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP and PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP analyses across multiple isolate sequences of a species are described. The PCR-RFLP analysis includes prediction and selection of optimal primers and restriction enzymes to enable maximum isolate discrimination based on sequence information. SPR Opt calculates all SNP or PCR-RFLP variations present in the sequences, groups them into haplotypes according to their co-segregation across those sequences, and performs combinatoric analyses to determine which sets of haplotypes provide maximal discrimination among all the input sequences. Those set combinations requiring that membership in the fewest haplotypes be queried (i.e. the fewest assays be performed are found. These analyses highlight variable regions based on existing sequence data. These markers may be heterogeneous among unsequenced isolates as well, and thus may be useful for characterizing the relationships among unsequenced as well as sequenced isolates. The predictions are multi-locus. Analyses of mumps and SARS viruses are summarized. Phylogenetic trees created based on SNPs, PCR-RFLPs, and full genomes are compared for SARS virus, illustrating that purported phylogenies based only on SNP or PCR-RFLP variations do not match those based on multiple sequence alignment of the full genomes. Conclusion This is the first software to optimize the selection of forensic markers to maximize information gained from the fewest assays, accepting whole or partial genome sequence data as input. As

  8. PCR-RFLP as a useful tool for diagnosis of invasive mycoses in a healthcare facility in the North of Brazil

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    Diego Rayan Teixeira de Sousa

    2015-05-01

    Conclusion: The results showed that PCR-RFLP is a valuable tool for the identification of invasive mycoses that can be implemented in hospital laboratories, allowing for a high number of clinical analyses per day.

  9. Diversity analysis of Bemisia tabaci biotypes: RAPD, PCR-RFLP and sequencing of the ITS1 rDNA region

    OpenAIRE

    Rabello, Aline R.; Queiroz, Paulo R.; Simões, Kenya C.C.; Hiragi, Cássia O.; Lima, Luzia H.C.; Oliveira, Maria Regina V.; Mehta, Angela

    2008-01-01

    The Bemisia tabaci complex is formed by approximately 41 biotypes, two of which (B and BR) occur in Brazil. In this work we aimed at obtaining genetic markers to assess the genetic diversity of the different biotypes. In order to do that we analyzed Bemisia tabaci biotypes B, BR, Q and Cassava using molecular techniques including RAPD, PCR-RFLP and sequencing of the ITS1 rDNA region. The analyses revealed a high similarity between the individuals of the B and Q biotypes, which could be distin...

  10. Genotyping of Pasteurella multocida ovine and bovine isolates from Iran based on PCR-RFLP of ompH gene

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    A. Ghanizadeh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pasteurella multocida (P. multocida, A Gram-negative facultative anaerobic bacterium, is a causative animal pathogen in porcine atrophic rhinitis and avian fowl cholera. The outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria contains of many different protein in very high copy numbers. One of the major outer membrane, the H proteins have functional as high immunogenicity and antigenicity. In this study to increase information about epidemiology of ovine and bovine P. multocida, the 24 isolates from sheep and nine isolates from cattle were investigated by PCR-RFLP analysis of the ompH gene. In all 33 isolates, digestion of the amplified fragment of ompH gene by using EcoRI, cfoI and HindIII produced 3, 5 and 3 different restriction patterns respectively. Sixteen RFLP patterns were found among 33 investigated P.multocida isolates. This study showed that, the PCR RFLP based on ompH gene is potentially a useful method for typing of P. multocida isolates from sheep and cattle. The RFLP patterns of this gene exhibited extensive restriction site heterogeneity, which may be particularly suitable for fingerprinting of P. multocida isolates.Considering ompH protein as a protective immunogenic moiety of P.ultocida, the results of this study showed a heterogenic bacteria and this means the possibility to produce a multivalent vaccine to be protective against diseases caused by this organism in sheep and cattle in Iran.

  11. Development of a PCR-RFLP assay for the detection and differentiation of canine parvovirus and mink enteritis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuanmei; Yu, Yongle; Yang, Haiyan; Li, Guimei; Yu, Zekun; Zhang, Hongliang; Shan, Hu

    2014-12-15

    A polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay has been developed to detect and differentiate between canine parvovirus (CPV) and mink enteritis virus (MEV). Eight CPV and three MEV epidemic strains isolated from 28 pathological samples from dogs and minks suspected of being infected with parvovirus were amplified by PCR using a pair of specific primers designed based on the CPV-N strain (M19296). PCR amplified a fragment of 1016bp from the genomic DNA of both MEV and CPV. The MEV-derived fragment could be digested with the restriction enzyme BSP1407I into three fragments of 102bp, 312bp and 602bp, while the fragment amplified from the CPV genomic DNA was digested into only two fragments of 414bp and 602bp. The lowest DNA concentration of CPV and MEV that could be detected using this assay was 0.004μg/ml and 0.03μg/ml, respectively. The PCR-RFLP assay developed in the present study can, therefore, be used to detect and differentiate MEV from CPV with high specificity and sensitivity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Authentication of beef, carabeef, chevon, mutton and pork by a PCR-RFLP assay of mitochondrial cytb gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Deepak; Singh, S P; Karabasanavar, Nagappa S; Singh, Rashmi; Umapathi, V

    2014-11-01

    Authentication of meat assumes significance in view of religious, quality assurance, food safety, public health, conservation and legal concerns. Here, we describe a PCR-RFLP (Polymerase Chain Reaction- Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism) assay targeting mitochondrial cytochrome-b gene for the identification of meats of five most common food animals namely cattle, buffalo, goat, sheep and pig. A pair of forward and reverse primers (VPH-F & VPH-R) amplifying a conserved region (168-776 bp) of mitochondrial cytochrome-b (cytb) gene for targeted species was designed which yielded a 609 bp PCR amplicon. Further, restriction enzyme digestion of the amplicons with Alu1 and Taq1 restriction enzymes resulted in a distinctive digestion pattern that was able to discriminate each species. The repeatability of the PCR-RFLP assay was validated ten times with consistent results observed. The developed assay can be used in routine diagnostic laboratories to differentiate the meats of closely related domestic livestock species namely cattle from buffalo and sheep from goat.

  13. PCR-RFLP on β-tubulin gene for rapid identification of the most clinically important species of Aspergillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasri, Tuba; Hedayati, Mohammad Taghi; Abastabar, Mahdi; Pasqualotto, Alessandro C; Armaki, Mojtaba Taghizadeh; Hoseinnejad, Akbar; Nabili, Mojtaba

    2015-10-01

    Aspergillus species are important agents of life-threatening infections in immunosuppressed patients. Proper speciation in the Aspergilli has been justified based on varied fungal virulence, clinical presentations, and antifungal resistance. Accurate identification of Aspergillus species usually relies on fungal DNA sequencing but this requires expensive equipment that is not available in most clinical laboratories. We developed and validated a discriminative low-cost PCR-based test to discriminate Aspergillus isolates at the species level. The Beta tubulin gene of various reference strains of Aspergillus species was amplified using the universal fungal primers Bt2a and Bt2b. The PCR products were subjected to digestion with a single restriction enzyme AlwI. All Aspergillus isolates were subjected to DNA sequencing for final species characterization. The PCR-RFLP test generated unique patterns for six clinically important Aspergillus species, including Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus nidulans, Aspergillus terreus, Aspergillus clavatus and Aspergillus nidulans. The one-enzyme PCR-RFLP on Beta tubulin gene designed in this study is a low-cost tool for the reliable and rapid differentiation of the clinically important Aspergillus species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Analysis of ELA-DQB exon 2 polymorphism in Argentine Creole horses by PCR-RFLP and PCR-SSCP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas-Castagnasso, E E; Díaz, S; Giovambattista, G; Dulout, F N; Peral-García, P

    2003-08-01

    The second exon of equine leucocyte antigen (ELA)-DQB genes was amplified from genomic DNA of 32 Argentine Creole horses by PCR. Amplified DNA was analysed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). The PCR-RFLP analysis revealed two HaeIII patterns, four RsaI patterns, five MspI patterns and two HinfI patterns. EcoRI showed no variation in the analysed sample. Additional patterns that did not account for known exon 2 DNA sequences were observed, suggesting the existence of novel ELA-DQB alleles. PCR-SSCP analysis exhibited seven different band patterns, and the number of bands per animal ranged from four to nine. Both methods indicated that at least two DQB genes are present. The presence of more than two alleles in each animal showed that the primers employed in this work are not specific for a unique DQB locus. The improvement of this PCR-RFLP method should provide a simple and rapid technique for an accurate definition of ELA-DQB typing in horses.

  15. Molecular discrimination of Echinococcus granulosus and Echinococcus multilocularis by sequencing and a new PCR-RFLP method with the potential use for other Echinococcus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şakalar, Çağrı; Kuk, Salih; Erensoy, Ahmet; Dağli, Adile Ferda; Özercan, İbrahim Hanifi; Çetınkaya, Ülfet; Yazar, Süleyman

    2014-01-01

    To develop a novel polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) protocol using a new genomic marker sequence and a novel set of restriction enzymes in order to detect and discriminate 2 Echinococcus species, E. granulosus and E. multilocularis, found in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) human tissues. DNA was isolated from 11 FFPE human tissue samples positive for cystic echinococcosis or alveolar echinococcosis. A mitochondrial genomic marker region was amplified and sequenced using a novel primer pair and a new PCR-RFLP protocol was developed for the detection and discrimination of E. granulosus and E. multilocularis using a set of restriction enzymes including AccI, MboI, MboII, and TsoI. The selected marker region was amplified using DNA isolated from FFPE human tissue samples positive for cystic echinococcosis or alveolar echinococcosis and the discrimination of E. granulosus and E. multilocularis was accomplished by use of the novel PCR-RFLP method. In this PCR-RFLP protocol, use of any single restriction enzyme is enough for the discrimination of E. granulosus and E. multilocularis. The PCR-RFLP protocol can be potentially used for the discrimination of 5 other Echinococcus species: E. oligarthus, E. shiquicus, E. ortleppi, E. canadensis, and E. vogeli.

  16. Genetic Background and Population Genetics of Hungarian Brown Trout Populations Using PCR-RFLP and Microsatellite Markers

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    Ágnes Ősz

    2015-12-01

    4 University of West Hungary, Mosonmagyaróvár Vár 2., 9200 Mosonmagyaróvár, Hungary Based on the analyses of the mitochondrial DNA of several European brown trout populations, five evolutionary lineages of brown trout were indentified (Atlantic, Danubian, Mediterranean, Adriatic, Marble. The species is bred primarily for stock enhancement of natural waters, however the most hatchery-maintained broodstocks originate from the Atlantic lineage. Due to the hydrogeography of Hungary our stocks should theoretically belong to the Danubian lineage; however, this has not been investigated earlier by genetic studies. For our genetic analysis, 702 fin clips were collected from two brown trout broodstocks (Lillafüred and Szilvásvárad as well as populations of natural streams (Bán, Jósva, Kemence, Apátkút, Bittva and Kölöntés in Hungary. Sequencing of the control region in mitochondrial DNA, three PCR-RFLP (mitochondrial DNA control region, lactate dehydrogenase and somatolactin genes and five microsatellite markers were used to distinguish between Danubian and Atlantic lineages of brown trout. The proportion of the mitochondrial haplotype of the Danubian lineage was low, with the exception of the Apátkúti, Kölöntés streams and Szilvásvárad broodstock. Analyses of nuclear PCR-RFLP and microsatellites markers showed various distributions of alleles characteristic of the Atlantic or Danubian lineages, although the Atlantic genotype has dominated in all population. In case of the analyses of microsatellites the polymorphism varied greatly at all locations. In addition we found several alleles that were not described earlier in other populations. Those alleles probably would be typical of Hungarian brown trout populations. Overall the populations were effectively in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for both PCR-RFLP and microsatellite markers. The remarkably high proportion of allochthonous Atlantic alleles in the analyzed sites is a clear indicator of the import

  17. Aspergillus tubingensis and Aspergillus niger as the dominant black Aspergillus, use of simple PCR-RFLP for preliminary differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirhendi, H; Zarei, F; Motamedi, M; Nouripour-Sisakht, S

    2016-03-01

    This work aimed to identify the species distribution of common clinical and environmental isolates of black Aspergilli based on simple restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the β-tubulin gene. A total of 149 clinical and environmental strains of black Aspergilli were collected and subjected to preliminary morphological examination. Total genomic DNAs were extracted, and PCR was performed to amplify part of the β-tubulin gene. At first, 52 randomly selected samples were species-delineated by sequence analysis. In order to distinguish the most common species, PCR amplicons of 117 black Aspergillus strains were identified by simple PCR-RFLP analysis using the enzyme TasI. Among 52 sequenced isolates, 28 were Aspergillus tubingensis, 21 Aspergillus niger, and the three remaining isolates included Aspergillus uvarum, Aspergillus awamori, and Aspergillus acidus. All 100 environmental and 17 BAL samples subjected to TasI-RFLP analysis of the β-tubulin gene, fell into two groups, consisting of about 59% (n=69) A. tubingensis and 41% (n=48) A. niger. Therefore, the method successfully and rapidly distinguished A. tubingensis and A. niger as the most common species among the clinical and environmental isolates. Although tardy, the Ehrlich test was also able to differentiate A. tubingensis and A. niger according to the yellow color reaction specific to A. niger. A. tubingensis and A. niger are the most common black Aspergillus in both clinical and environmental isolates in Iran. PCR-RFLP using TasI digestion of β-tubulin DNA enables rapid screening for these common species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Genetic variation within and among Danish brown trout ( Salmo trutta L) hatchery strains, assessed by PCR-RFLP analysis of mitochondrial DNA segments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Møller; Mensberg, Karen-Lise Dons; Rasmussen, Gorm

    1997-01-01

    Eleven Danish brown trout hatchery strains were studied by PCR- RFLP analysis of the ND-I and ND-5/6 segments of the mitochondrial genome. For comparison, data from wild trout representing three Danish river systems also were included. Reduced variability in terms of nucleon diversity and number...

  19. Inter-laboratory evaluation of three flagellin PCR/RFLP methods for typing Campylobacter jejuni and C-coli: the CAMPYNET experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrington, Clare S.; Moran, L.; Ridley, A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To compare typeability, discriminatory ability, and inter-laboratory reproducibility of three flagellin PCR/RFLP(fla typing) methods previously described for Campylobacter. Methods and Results: The sample set(n = 100) was diverse, including both C. jejuni (n = 85) and C. coli (n = 15). Two ...

  20. Comparative evaluation of the nested ITS PCR against the 18S PCR-RFLP in a survey of bovine trypanosomiasis in Kwale County, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odongo, Steven; Delespaux, Vincent; Ngotho, Maina; Bekkele, Serkalem Mindaye; Magez, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    We compared the nested internal transcribed spacer (ITS) PCR and the 18S PCR-RFLP (restriction-fragment length polymorphism) pan-trypanosome assays in a cross-sectional survey of bovine trypanosomiasis in 358 cattle in Kwale County, Kenya. The prevalence of trypanosomiasis as determined by the nested ITS PCR was 19.6% (70/358) and by 18S PCR-RFLP was 16.8% (60/358). Of the pathogenic trypanosomes detected, the prevalence of Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma vivax was greater than that of Trypanosoma simiae The nested ITS PCR detected 83 parasite events, whereas the 18S PCR-RFLP detected 64; however, overall frequencies of infections and the parasite events detected did not differ between the assays (χ(2) = 0.8, df = 1, p > 0.05 and χ(2) = 2.5, df = 1, p > 0.05, respectively). The kappa statistic (0.8) showed good agreement between the tests. The nested ITS PCR and the 18S PCR-RFLP had comparable sensitivity, although the nested ITS PCR was better at detecting mixed infections (χ(2) = 5.4, df = 1, p < 0.05). © 2016 The Author(s).

  1. Differentiation of Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati based on PCR-RFLP analyses of rDNA-ITS and mitochondrial cox1 and nad1 regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikaeili, Fattaneh; Mathis, Alexander; Deplazes, Peter; Mirhendi, Hossein; Barazesh, Afshin; Ebrahimi, Sepideh; Kia, Eshrat Beigom

    2017-09-26

    The definitive genetic identification of Toxocara species is currently based on PCR/sequencing. The objectives of the present study were to design and conduct an in silico polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method for identification of Toxocara species. In silico analyses using the DNASIS and NEBcutter softwares were performed with rDNA internal transcribed spacers, and mitochondrial cox1 and nad1 sequences obtained in our previous studies along with relevant sequences deposited in GenBank. Consequently, RFLP profiles were designed and all isolates of T. canis and T. cati collected from dogs and cats in different geographical areas of Iran were investigated with the RFLP method using some of the identified suitable enzymes. The findings of in silico analyses predicted that on the cox1 gene only the MboII enzyme is appropriate for PCR-RFLP to reliably distinguish the two species. No suitable enzyme for PCR-RFLP on the nad1 gene was identified that yields the same pattern for all isolates of a species. DNASIS software showed that there are 241 suitable restriction enzymes for the differentiation of T. canis from T. cati based on ITS sequences. RsaI, MvaI and SalI enzymes were selected to evaluate the reliability of the in silico PCR-RFLP. The sizes of restriction fragments obtained by PCR-RFLP of all samples consistently matched the expected RFLP patterns. The ITS sequences are usually conserved and the PCR-RFLP approach targeting the ITS sequence is recommended for the molecular differentiation of Toxocara species and can provide a reliable tool for identification purposes particularly at the larval and egg stages.

  2. Differentiation of sheep pox and goat poxviruses by sequence analysis and PCR-RFLP of P32 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosamani, Madhusudan; Mondal, Bimalendu; Tembhurne, Prabhakar A; Bandyopadhyay, Santanu Kumar; Singh, Raj Kumar; Rasool, Thaha Jamal

    2004-08-01

    Sheep pox and Goat pox are highly contagious viral diseases of small ruminants. These diseases were earlier thought to be caused by a single species of virus, as they are serologically indistinguishable. P32, one of the major immunogenic genes of Capripoxvirus, was isolated and Sequenced from two Indian isolates of goat poxvirus (GPV) and a vaccine strain of sheep poxvirus (SPV). The sequences were compared with other P32 sequences of capripoxviruses available in the database. Sequence analysis revealed that sheep pox and goat poxviruses share 97.5 and 94.7% homology at nucleotide and amino acid level, respectively. A major difference between them is the presence of an additional aspartic acid at 55th position of P32 of sheep poxvirus that is absent in both goat poxvirus and lumpy skin disease virus. Further, six unique neutral nucleotide substitutions were observed at positions 77, 275, 403, 552, 867 and 964 in the sequence of goat poxvirus, which can be taken as GPV signature residues. Similar unique nucleotide signatures could be identified in SPV and LSDV sequences also. Phylogenetic analysis showed that members of the Capripoxvirus could be delineated into three distinct clusters of GPV, SPV and LSDV based on the P32 genomic sequence. Using this information, a PCR-RFLP method has been developed for unequivocal genomic differentiation of SPV and GPV.

  3. Differentiation of Leishmania (Viannia) panamensis and Leishmania (V.) guyanensis using BccI for hsp70 PCR-RFLP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalvo Alvarez, Ana Margarita; Nodarse, Jorge Fraga; Goodridge, Ivón Montano; Fidalgo, Lianet Monzote; Marin, Marcel; Van Der Auwera, Gert; Dujardin, Jean-Claude; Bernal, Iván Darío Velez; Muskus, Carlos

    2010-05-01

    Leishmania panamensis and Leishmania guyanensis are two species of the subgenus Viannia that are genetically very similar. Both parasites are usually associated with cutaneous leishmaniasis, but also have the potential to cause the mucocutaneous form of the disease. In addition, the study of foci and consequently the identification of vectors and probable reservoirs involved in transmission require a correct differentiation between both species, which is important at epidemiological level. We explored the possibility of identifying these species by using restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) in the gene coding for heat-shock protein 70 (hsp70). Previously, an hsp70 PCR-RFLP assay proved to be very effective in differentiating other Leishmania species when HaeIII is used as restriction enzyme. Based on hsp70 sequences analysis, BccI was found to generate species-specific fragments that can easily be recognized by agarose gel electrophoresis. Using the analysis of biopsies, scrapings, and parasite isolates previously grouped in a cluster comprising both L. panamensis and L. guyanensis, we showed that our approach allowed differentiation of both entities. This offers the possibility not only for identification of parasites in biological samples, but also to apply molecular epidemiology in certain countries of the New World, where several Leishmania species could coexist. Copyright 2009 Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Analysis of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP rs22114085 Associated with Canine Atopic Dermatitis by PCR-RFLP Method

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    Martina Miluchová

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Canine atopic dermatitis (cAD is a common inflammatory skin disease that is considered to be a naturally occurring, spontaneous model of human atopic dermatitis (eczema. The aim of the paper was to identify of the SNP rs22114085 in different dog breeds. The material involved 52 dogs from 5 different breeds. Canine genomic DNA was isolated from saliva by modified method with using DNAzol® and linear polyacrylamide (LPA carrier and from blood by using commercial kit NucleospinBlood and used in order to estimate rs22114085 SNP genotypes by PCR-RFLP method. The PCR products were digested with DdeI restriction enzyme. The C allele was distributed in Czech Pointer, Chihuahua, German Wirehaired Pointer with an allele frequency ranging from 0.4545 to 1.00. In the population of Czech Pointer we detected all genotypes CC, CT and TT with frequency in male 0.25, 0.5833 and 0.1667, and in female 0.2728, 0.3636 and 0.3636, subsequently. In German Wirehaired Pointer was detected homozygote genotype CC in male and heterozygote genotype CT in female with frequency 1 and 1. In Chihuahua was observed homozygote genotype CC and heterozygote genotype CT with frequency 0.3333 and 0.6667, subsequently. In Golden retriever and Pincher we detected genotype TT with frequency 1.

  5. Identification of Eastern United States Reticulitermes Termite Species via PCR-RFLP, Assessed Using Training and Test Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan C. Garrick

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Reticulitermes termites play key roles in dead wood decomposition and nutrient cycling in forests. They also damage man-made structures, resulting in considerable economic loss. In the eastern United States, five species (R. flavipes, R. virginicus, R. nelsonae, R. hageni and R. malletei have overlapping ranges and are difficult to distinguish morphologically. Here we present a molecular tool for species identification. It is based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification of a section of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene, followed by a three-enzyme restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP assay, with banding patterns resolved via agarose gel electrophoresis. The assay was designed using a large set of training data obtained from a public DNA sequence database, then evaluated using an independent test panel of Reticulitermes from the Southern Appalachian Mountains, for which species assignments were determined via phylogenetic comparison to reference sequences. After refining the interpretive framework, the PCR-RFLP assay was shown to provide accurate identification of four co-occurring species (the fifth species, R. hageni, was absent from the test panel, so accuracy cannot yet be extended to training data. The assay is cost- and time-efficient, and will help improve knowledge of Reticulitermes species distributions.

  6. Identification of Pit-1 Gen Using PCR-RFLP of Padjadjaran Sheep and Evaluate of Growth Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajoga, S. B. K.; Andriani, L.; Subhandiana, H.

    2018-02-01

    The objectives of this research were to evaluate variation of Pit-1 gen of Padjadjaran Sheep and evaluate of their growth rate. The data comprised of 15 lambs female and 15 lambs male records of 0 - 12 mouths old lambs. Variation of Padjadjaran Sheep PIT-1 gen was analyzed using PCR-RFLP and used primer by 5’-GAGGGATAATTACAAATGGTCC-3’ and 5’-TGTTAACAGCTGTGGGACACAC-3’, length fragment analyse using HinfI restriction enzyme. Presence or absence of deference bands in a PCR fragment of the result can be distinguished by differences in the electrophoretic migration of the fragment. The result showed that the variation Pit1 gene showed that there was in the position 345 bp, 137 bp and 115 bp. In this experiment the difference migration did occur in all samples (monomorphic), that was amplificated with reverse and forward primer. The average male birth weight (BW), weaning weight (WN) and Yearling Weight (YW) was 2.29 ±0.42kg 8.96 ±1,89 kg and 30.12 ±5,65 kg. The average female birth weight (BW), weaning weight (WN) and Yearling Weight (YW) was 2.33 ±0.49 kg; 8.23 ±1.99 kg and 26.11 ±5.50 kg. Correlation value between age and body weight was 0,99 for female and 0,97 for male. The highest body weight gain per month was 2.85 kg for female at the age of six months and 3.4 kg for male at the age of one year. The best equition of growth rate was Ŷ = 1,862 + 0,127X1 0,076X2

  7. PCR-RFLP analyses for studying the diversity of GH and Pit-1 genes in Slovak Simmental cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Trakovická

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was evaluation of growth hormone (GH and specific pituitary transcription factor (Pit-1 genes diversity in population of 353 Slovak Simmental cows. The analyses were based on single nucleotide polymorphisms GH/AluI and Pit-1/HinfI detections. A polymorphic site of GH gene (AluI has been linked to differences in circulating metabolites, metabolic hormones and milk yield. Bovine Pit-1 is responsible for pituitary development and hormone secreting gene expression, including GH gene. The Pit-1/HinfI locus was associated with growth, milk production and reproduction performance in cattle. Samples of genomic DNA were analyzed by PCR-RFLP method. Digestion of GH gene PCR products with restriction enzyme AluI revealed allele L and V with frequency 0.695 and 0.305, respectively. The digested Pit-1 gene PCR products with enzyme HinfI revealed alleles A (0.249 and B (0.751. Dominant genotypes were for GH gene heterozygous LV (0.47 and for Pit-1 gene homozygous BB (0.56 animals. The observed heterozygosity, effective allele numbers and polymorphism information content of GH/AluI and Pit-1/HinfI bovine loci population were 0.42/0.37, 1.73/1.59 and 0.33/0.30, respectively. The median polymorphic information content of loci was also transferred to the higher observed homozygosity in population (0.58/0.63. Keywords: cattle, growth hormone, leptin, PCR, Pit-1, polymorphism.

  8. Keragaman Genetik Gen Hormon Pertumbuhan (GH|MboII pada Itik Sikumbang Janti Menggunakan Penciri PCR-RFLP

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    T.D. Nova

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui keragaman gen hormon pertumbuhan (GH dengan enzim MboII pada itik Sikumbang Janti dengan menggunakan penciri PCR-RFLP (polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Penelitian ini menggunakan sebanyak 50 sampel darah itik Sikumbang Janti. Sampel darah itik Sikumbang Janti diambil melalui vena achilaris sebanyak ± 1 ml. DNA sampel darah diisolasi menggunakan protocol Genomik DNA Purification Kit (Promega. DNA total diamplifikasi menggunakan sepasang primer F : 5’-CTG GAG CAG GCA GGA AAA TT-3’ dan R: 5’-TCC AGG GAC AGT GAC TCA AC-3’ yang menghasilkan fragmen exon 1 gen GH dengan panjang 801 bp. Produk amplifikasi direstriksi dengan menggunakan MboII yang mengenali situs pemotongan GAAGA (N/8↓ . Dari 46 sampel hasil restriksi diperoleh dua posisi. Pada posisi 618 bp dengan genotip yaitu genotip heterozigot (+/- yang terdiri dari 3 pita (266 bp, 535 bp dan 801 bp, genotip homozigot (+/+ yang terdiri dari 3 pita (109 bp, 266 bp, 426 bp dan genotip homozigot (-/- yang terdiri dari 1 pita ( 801 dan terdapat dua tipe alel, yaitu alel (+ dan all (-, all (+ sebesar 0,79 dan alel (- sebesar 0,21. Sedangkan pada posisi 727 bp memiliki genotip yaitu genotip heterozigot (+/- yang terdiri dari 3 pita (109 bp, 266 bp, 426 bp, dan genotip homozigot (-/- yang terdiri dari 3 pita dan terdapat dua tipe alel, yaitu frekuensi alel (+ sebesar 0,61 dan frekuensi alel (- sebesar 0,39. Dari hasil penelitian ini dapat disimpulkan bahwa gen GH-MboII memiliki keragamanan yang tinggi serta menunjukkan adanya keseimbangan atau tidak menyimpang dari keseimbangan Hardy Weinberg pada posisi keragaman 618 bp dan pada posisi 727 dalam ketidakseimbangan Hardy Weinberg.

  9. Karakterisasi Molekuler Ikan Gurami Soang (Osphronemus goramy Lac. berbeda uuran menggunakan Pcr-Rflp Gen Sitokrom C Oksidase 1

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    Siti Nur Azizah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gourami (Osprhronemus goramy Lac. is a  freshwater fish that is  widely cultivated in Indonesia, particularly by fish farmer in Java. Soang strain has a faster growth rate than other strains. However, the fry that derived from a single cohort (generated from a single spawning shows various sizes even in the same age because they have different growth rate. Differences in growth rate may occur due to differences in metabolic capabilities especially cellular respiration. Different rate of respiration can be assumed to be due to differences in the genetic component, especially on their cytochrome c oxidase 1 gene (CO1. Therefore this study aimed to determine whether there are differences in PCR-RFLP marker CO1 gene among different sizes of gourami soang strain from the same cohort so that can be used to analyze genetic diversity. This study used survey method by applying purposive random sampling. Four restriction enzymes were used  during the  research. Molecular characters were defined descriptively based on the appearance of restriction fragment on agarose gel. The result showed that soang strain which used in this study had monomorphics allele on their CO1-HindIII. PstI, BamHI, and EcoRI, could not cut the PCR products and results no RFLP markers. So that genetic variation in the used CO1 gene fragment could not be detected using HindIII, Pst1, BamH1 and EcoR1 enzymes. The three different sizes of soang strain had similar alleles or homozygous, meaning that heterozigocity value was 0 (zero. Therefore, the CO1 gene in this study could not be used as molecular character to differentiate different sizes of gourami soang strain from the same cohort.

  10. Distribution and differential diagnosis of Entamoeba Histolytica from Entamoeba Dispar by the PCR-RFLP method in central Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooshyar, Hossein; Rezian, Mostafa; Kazemi, Bahram

    2003-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar are two morphologically indistinguishable human protozoan parasites that are genetically distinct species. The potential invasive pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica and non-invasive parasites Entamoeba dispar can be differentiated by molecular and other methods. We used Polymer Chain Reaction (PCR) to determine the ratio of two species in a population in central Iran.Human stool samples(n=12 148) were randomly collected in Tehran and Karaj and examined for E.histolytica/E.dispar cysts with direct and formalin-ether methods.Eighty -seven (0.7%) cases were positive, of which 49 (62.8%) isolates were successfully cultured in Robison's medium. A pair of oligonucleotide primers designed from sequence data for genomic DNA coding the 30-KD surface antigen of E.histolytica/E.dipar was used to amplify a 374 base-pair (bp) fragment. The restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) pattern obtained from a standard E.histolytica isolate had had two fragments (219 bp and 155bp), but the standard isolate of E. disparshowed three fragments (155, 152 and 67bp ). Differential diagonosis of 49 isolates of E. histolytica/ E. dispar from Tehran and Karaj using PCR-RFLP revealed that 46(93.9%) were E. were E. dispar while only 2(4.1%) were E. histolytica .One person (2%) had a mixed infection and showed both patterns The differential diagonosis of the potentially pathogenic parasite E.histolytica from the non-pathogenic E. dispar is of clinical and epidemiological importance. This study demonstrated E. dispar is much more prevalent than E.histolytica among the c yst passersin Tehran and Kraj in Central Iran. (author)

  11. Molecular discrimination of Echinococcus granulosus and Echinococcus multilocularis by sequencing and a new PCR-RFLP method with the potential use for other Echinococcus species

    OpenAIRE

    ŞAKALAR, Çağrı; KUK, Salih; ERENSOY, Ahmet; DAĞLI, Adile Ferda; ÖZERCAN, İbrahim Hanifi

    2015-01-01

    To develop a novel polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) protocol using a new genomic marker sequence and a novel set of restriction enzymes in order to detect and discriminate 2 Echinococcus species, E. granulosus and E. multilocularis, found in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) human tissues. Materials and methods: DNA was isolated from 11 FFPE human tissue samples positive for cystic echinococcosis or alveolar echinococcosis. A mitochondrial...

  12. Genetic Diversity and Phylogenetic Analysis of the Iranian Leishmania Parasites Based on HSP70 Gene PCR-RFLP and Sequence Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemati, Sara; Fazaeli, Asghar; Hajjaran, Homa; Khamesipour, Ali; Anbaran, Mohsen Falahati; Bozorgomid, Arezoo; Zarei, Fatah

    2017-08-01

    Despite the broad distribution of leishmaniasis among Iranians and animals across the country, little is known about the genetic characteristics of the causative agents. Applying both HSP70 PCR-RFLP and sequence analyses, this study aimed to evaluate the genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships among Leishmania spp. isolated from Iranian endemic foci and available reference strains. A total of 36 Leishmania isolates from almost all districts across the country were genetically analyzed for the HSP70 gene using both PCR-RFLP and sequence analysis. The original HSP70 gene sequences were aligned along with homologous Leishmania sequences retrieved from NCBI, and subjected to the phylogenetic analysis. Basic parameters of genetic diversity were also estimated. The HSP70 PCR-RFLP presented 3 different electrophoretic patterns, with no further intraspecific variation, corresponding to 3 Leishmania species available in the country, L. tropica, L. major, and L. infantum. Phylogenetic analyses presented 5 major clades, corresponding to 5 species complexes. Iranian lineages, including L. major, L. tropica, and L. infantum, were distributed among 3 complexes L. major, L. tropica, and L. donovani. However, within the L. major and L. donovani species complexes, the HSP70 phylogeny was not able to distinguish clearly between the L. major and L. turanica isolates, and between the L. infantum, L. donovani, and L. chagasi isolates, respectively. Our results indicated that both HSP70 PCR-RFLP and sequence analyses are medically applicable tools for identification of Leishmania species in Iranian patients. However, the reduced genetic diversity of the target gene makes it inevitable that its phylogeny only resolves the major groups, namely, the species complexes.

  13. Genetic variation in Pythium myriotylum based on SNP typing and development of a PCR-RFLP detection of isolates recovered from Pythium soft rot ginger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, D P; Smith, M K; Aitken, E A B

    2017-10-01

    Pythium myriotylum is responsible for severe losses in both capsicum and ginger crops in Australia under different regimes. Intraspecific genomic variation within the pathogen might explain the differences in aggressiveness and pathogenicity on diverse hosts. In this study, whole genome data of four P. myriotylum isolates recovered from three hosts and one Pythium zingiberis isolate were derived and analysed for sequence diversity based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). A higher number of true and unique SNPs occurred in P. myriotylum isolates obtained from ginger with symptoms of Pythium soft rot (PSR) in Australia compared to other P. myriotylum isolates. Overall, SNPs were discovered more in the mitochondrial genome than those in the nuclear genome. Among the SNPs, a single substitution from the cytosine (C) to the thymine (T) in the partially sequenced CoxII gene of 14 representatives of PSR P. myriotylum isolates was within a restriction site of HinP1I enzyme which was used in the PCR-RFLP for detection and identification of the isolates without sequencing. The PCR-RFLP was also sensitive to detect PSR P. myriotylum strains from artificially infected ginger without the need for isolation for pure cultures. This is the first study of intraspecific variants of Pythium myriotylum isolates recovered from different hosts and origins based on single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping of multiple genes. The SNPs discovered provide valuable makers for detection and identification of P. myriotylum strains initially isolated from Pythium soft rot (PSR) ginger by using PCR-RFLP of the CoxII locus. The PCR-RFLP was also sensitive to detect P. myriotylum directly from PSR ginger sampled from pot trials without the need of isolation for pure cultures. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. Incidence of Giardia lamblia Subspecies by PCR-RFLP in Stool Specimens of Hospitalized Children at Urmia Mutahhari Hospital, West Azerbaijan Province, Iran.

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    Khosro Hazrati Tappeh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Giardia lamblia is one of the most prevalent intestinal flagellate protozoa that infects a wide range of vertebrate hosts causing severe intestinal disorder in children.This study was performed to determine subspecies of G.lamblia by the PCR-RFLP method, targeting the glutamate dehydrogenase(gdhlocus, in hospitalized children at Urmia Mutahhari Hospital, West Azerbaijan Province,Iran and determining the infection transformational storages in this area.Overall, 720 stool specimens were collected from the hospitalized children, 34 samples were positive and Giardia cysts were detected under the microscope. Cysts were partially purified by the sucrose density gradient method and then washed with sterile distilled water to remove effectively the PCR inhibitors. Genomic DNA of G. lamblia isolates was extracted by freeze-thaw cycles followed by phenol/ chloroform/isoamyl alcohol method. The single step PCR-RFLP assay was used to differentiate the assemblages between A and B, which were found in humans. In this method, 432 bp expected size was amplified, and then for detection of subspecies, specific restriction RsaI and BspLI enzymes were used.Totally 34 samples were positive in terms of Giardia cyst out of 720 examined samples microscopically, so the parasite spread rate is reported 4.72%. Analysis PCR-RFLP on these samples revealed that 28 samples (93.3% have the genotype BIII and 2 samples (6.7% belong to the subgroup BIV.PCR-RFLP is a proper analytical method for determining the genotype among parasite types, using the glutamate dehydrogenizes zone's genes. Based on the results, an animal origin of infection cycle is suggested.

  15. MORPHOLOGY AND GENETIC DIVERSITY OF MITOCHONDRIAL DNA D-LOOP REGION USING PCR-RFLP ANALYSIS IN MAGELANG DUCK AND OTHER NATIVE DUCK

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    D. Purwantini

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the different of plumage colors on morphological diversityof Magelang duck and genetic diversity using PCR-RFLP mtDNA D-loop region analysis of Magelangduck and four others native duck population (Tegal, Mojosari, Bali and Alabio duck in Indonesia. Bloodsample was taken from 50 Magelang ducks and 20 of each native ducks. Morphological characteristicsof body measurement, production ability and egg quality of Magelang duck were analyzed usingCompletely Randomized Design with 11 plumage colors as treatments. PCR technique was administeredto amplify fragments in mtDNA D-loop region and PCR products were digested with endonucleaserestriction enzyme AluI and HaeIII. The result showed that morphology diversity of Magelang duck wasstatistically affected by different plumage colors. PCR-RFLP analysis using AluI and HaeIII restrictionenzyme resulted in six combinations of restriction fragment pattern shown in six haplotypes (A, B, C, D,E and F. Haplotype difference showed genetic diversity in the population of Magelang duck and theother native ducks. In conclusion, the different plumage colors affected morphology diversity ofMagelang duck. Genetic diversity of Indonesian native duck population could be identified by usingPCR-RFLP analysis on mtDNA D-loop region.

  16. Characterization of South American Snails of the Genus Biomphalaria (Basommatophora: Planorbidae and Schistosoma mansoni (Platyhelminthes: Trematoda in Molluscs by PCR-RFLP

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    Roberta Lima Caldeira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of snails of the genus Biomphalaria can be done using morphological characteristics which depends on the size of the snails and skill and knowledge of researcher. These methods sometimes are not adequate for identification of species. The PCR-RFLP, using the ITS region of the rDNA, has been used to identify Brazilian species of the genus Biomphalaria. Nevertheless, there is a lack of information about snails from other Latin American countries. In addition, some snails may be infected by Schistosoma mansoni and when submitted to PCR-RFLP they show molecular profiles different from those previously standardized for the other mollusc species. In this work the molecular profiles of 15 species and the subspecies were established by PCR-RFLP of ITS-rDNA with the enzyme DdeI. Moreover, the molecular profiles of host species, B. glabrata, B. straminea, B. tenagophila, and B. prona, infected by S. mansoni were also established. The molluscs were dissected to permit morphological identification. These results contribute to a correct identification of snails of the genus Biomphalaria and detection of these snails infected by S. mansoni.

  17. Molecular characterization of enteroinvasive Escherichia coli ipa genes by PCR-RFLP analysis Caracterização molecular do gene ipa de Escherichia coli enteroinvasora pela análise de PCR- RFLP

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    Adriana Gibotti

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, polymorphism in ipa genes was found in five out of nine EIEC serotypes studied. When SalI and HindII were used in RFLP-PCR assays many EIEC serotypes showed polymorphism in ipaB and ipaD. On the other hand, no polymorphism was observed in ipaA and ipaC in these strains. The polymorphism present in EIEC strains is serotype-dependent, since restriction patterns were conserved amongst strains belonging to the same serotype. When IpaB deduced amino acid sequences of S. flexneri M90T and FBC124-13 were compared, ten amino acids changes could be observed mainly in the amino-terminal region. The deduced EIEC IpaD amino-acid sequence presented 91% similarity with the Shigella strain. In this case, amino acid changes were spread out through the whole structure, except in the carboxyl-terminal region.No presente estudo, foi encontrado polimorfismo no gene ipa em cinco sorotipos de EIEC, de nove estudados. Quando enzimas de restrição SalI e HindII foram utilizadas no ensaio de PCR-RFLP, amostras de EIEC apresentaram polimorfismo em ipaB e ipaD. Por outro lado, não foram observados polimorfismos nos genes ipaA e ipaC nestas cepas, quando diversas enzimas de restrição foram utilizadas. O polimorfismo presente em cepas de EIEC é sorotipo-dependente, uma vez que os padrões de restrição foram conservados entre as cepas pertencentes ao mesmo sorotipo. Quando a seqüência deduzida de aminoácidos de IpaB de S. flexneri M90T e FBC124-13 foram comparadas, mudanças foram observadas em dez aminoácidos na região amino-terminal. A seqüência deduzida de aminoácidos de IpaD de EIEC apresentou similaridade de 91% com a cepa de Shigella. Neste caso, mudanças de aminoácidos ocorreram em toda a estrutura da molécula de IpaD, exceto na região carboxi-terminal.

  18. Determination of Molecular Genotyping of Ureaplasma SPP in Women with Genital Infections by 16S–23S rDNA PCR-RFLP Method

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    R. Mirnejad

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: So far, despite the wide range of methods such as analytic methods used for differentiation of Mycoplasma, the diagnosis of Mycoplasma species is still difficult. Generally the low-level discriminatory power of serological methods because of the rapid changes in size and phase of the dominant antigens in the immune cell surface of Mycoplasmas greatly limits their applicability to the typing of Mycoplasmas. On the contrary,molecular methods do not suffer from these drawbacks and can be used for typing of Mycoplasmas. The aim of this investigation was molecular identification and genotyping of ureaplasma SPP in women with genital infections by 16S–23S rDNA PCR-RFLP.Materials & Methods: Genital swabs were taken from 210 patients who referred to gynecology clinic of Rasool hospital in Tehran, Iran during December 2007 until June 2008. The swabs suspended in PBS, were immediately transferred to laboratory .Following DNA extraction, PCR assay was performed using a genus specific primer pair. These primer sets amplified a 559 bp fragment for Ureaplasma Spp. Samples containing bands of the expected size for Ureaplasma strains were subjected to digestion with different restriction endonuclease enzymes (AluI, Taq I, CacI8, BbsI, EcoRI. Results: Of the 210 samples, Ureaplasma Spp was isolated from 93 patients (44.3% by PCR and 69 samples by culture. In the present study only Biovar 1 (Ureaplasma parvum was isolated from clinical specimens and the results were confirmed using a cutting enzyme TaqI (enzyme specific species of ureaplasma SPP. The results of this analysis using PCR-RFLP and sequencing showed that all had the same genotype and shared identical sequence with the genome sequence of serovar 3 Ureaplasma parvum.Conclusion: Ureaplasma parvum is generally isolated from the genital samples. In this study all isolates were identical and no difference was found among the enzyme patterns of the bacteria after PCR-RFLP .So

  19. A novel PCR-RFLP assay for molecular characterization of Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato and closely related species in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaâbane-Banaoues, Raja; Oudni-M'rad, Myriam; M'rad, Selim; Amani, Hizem; Mezhoud, Habib; Babba, Hamouda

    2016-10-01

    Cystic echinococcosis, due to Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato (s. l.), currently affects three million people, especially in low-income countries and results in high livestock production loss. DNA-based methods demonstrated genetic variability of E. granulosus s. l., and five species were recognized to belong to the complex, including E. granulosus sensu stricto (s.s) (genotypes G1-G3), Echinococcus equinus (genotype G4), Echinococcus ortleppi (genotype G5), Echinococcus canadensis (genotypes G6-G10), and the lion strain Echinococcus felidis. The characterization of Echinococcus species responsible for human and animal echinococcosis is crucial to adapt the preventive measures against this parasitic disease. The sequencing approach is the gold standard for genotyping assays. Unfortunately, developing countries do not often have access to these techniques. Based on in silico RFLP tools, we described an accurate PCR-RFLP method for Echinococcus spp. characterization. The double digestion with the HaeIII and HinfI restriction enzymes of the PCR product from nad1 gene (1071 bp) led to a clear discrimination between E. granulosus s. l. and most closely related species (Echinococcus shiquicus and Echinococcus multilocularis).Molecular procedures and phylogenetic analysis confirmed the efficiency and the reproducibility of this simple and fast PCR-RFLP method. This technique is proved useful for fresh/unfixed and FF-PET tissues and enables large-scale molecular epidemiological screening in developing countries.

  20. Identification of Echinococcus Granulosus Strains in Isolated Hydatid Cyst Specimens from Animals by PCR-RFLP Method in West Azerbaijan – Iran

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    Haleh Hanifian

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was DNA extraction from protosco­lecses of Echinococcus granulosus and identification of these strains in West-Azerbai­jan Province, north western Iran.Methods: Thirty one livestock isolates from sheep and cattle were collected from abattoirs of the province. To investigate the genetic variation of the isolates, after DNA extraction by Glass beads-phenol chloroform method; PCR-RLFP analysis of rDNA-ITS1 was performed using three different restric­tion enzymes of Taq 1, Rsa 1 and Alu 1.Result: Amplified PCR products for all isolates were 1000bp band which is expected band in sheep strains (G1-G3 complex. The results of RFLP analy­sis also were the same for all isolates. PCR-RFLP patterns restriction en­zymes were identical as follows, Rsa1 bands under UV showed two bands approximately 655bp and 345bp. Alu1 bands were as follows: two approx­imately 800bp and 200bp and Taq1 did not cut any region and bands were approximately 1000 bp in all samples.Conclusions: Based on PCR-RFLP patterns of ITS1 fragment produced with endonucleases enzyme digestion in animal isolates, it can be concluded that a single strain of E. granulosus (sheep strain or G1-G3 complex is domi­nant genotype in this province

  1. Discrimination of the Thai rejuvenating herbs Pueraria candollei (White Kwao Khruea), Butea superba (Red Kwao Khruea), and Mucuna collettii (Black Kwao Khruea) using PCR-RFLP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiriyakarun, Suchaya; Yodpetch, Woraluk; Komatsu, Katsuko; Zhu, Shu; Ruangrungsi, Nijsiri; Sukrong, Suchada

    2013-07-01

    The tuberous roots of Pueraria candollei (White Kwao Khruea), Butea superba (Red Kwao Khruea) and Mucuna collettii (Black Kwao Khruea), which belong to the family Leguminosae, are used as rejuvenating herbs in traditional Thai medicine. Although all of these species have an indication for rejuvenation, each differs in its medicinal properties. Two varieties of P. candollei, var. mirifica and var. candollei, affect females, whereas B. superba and M. collettii exhibit effects on males. However, the identification of these roots according to the name "Kwao Khruea" is confusing due to the similarity in their features. Polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was utilised to identify plant origin. The partial matK gene was amplified and subjected to restriction enzyme digestion with DdeI and TaqI. The restriction fragments generated differed in number and size. To test the reliability of the method, an admixture of the different Kwao Khruea species containing equal amounts of DNA was tested. The results showed combined restriction patterns, and each species could be detected in the background of the others. The method was also used to authenticate eight different crude drugs sold as various types of Kwao Khruea in Thai markets. The results showed that the misidentification of commercial drugs remains a problem in crude drug markets. The PCR-RFLP analysis developed here provides a simple and accurate discrimination of these rejuvenating "Kwao Khruea" species.

  2. ITS1 PCR-RFLP Diagnosis and Characterization of Leishmania in Clinical Samples and Strains from Cases of Human Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in States of the Mexican Southeast

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    Amalia Monroy-Ostria

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available American cutaneous leishmaniasis includes a spectrum of clinical forms localized cutaneous, diffuse cutaneous, and mucocutaneous leishmaniasis which can be caused by different strains of Leishmania belonging to the L. mexicana or L. braziliensis complexes which may coexist in the same endemic area. We evaluated the PCR-RFLP assay of the ITS1 genes for direct identification of Leishmania species in 163 clinical samples and 21 Mexican isolates of Leishmania. In relation to the Mexican isolates of Leishmania 52% displayed a pattern similar to the L. (L. mexicana, 5% showed a mixed pattern compatible with L. (L. mexicana and L. (V. braziliensis, eight with L. (L. amazonensis and L. (L. mexicana, and one to L. (V. braziliensis. Most of the clinical samples, 109/116 (94%, gave a pattern similar to that of the L. mexicana, two clinical samples gave similar patterns to that of Leishmania braziliensis, and 5 samples gave patterns that suggest a coinfection of L. (L. mexicana and L. (V. braziliensis or L. (L. mexicana and L. (L. amazonensis. The ITS1 PCR-RFLP assay is a multipurpose tool for diagnosis of Leishmania from clinical samples and enables determination of the infecting species of New World Leishmania in the field in relatively short time and low cost.

  3. COMPARISON OF 16S rRNA-PCR-RFLP, LipL32-PCR AND OmpL1-PCR METHODS IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF LEPTOSPIROSIS

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    Tülin GÜVEN GÖKMEN

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Leptospirosis is still one of the most important health problems in developing countries located in humid tropical and subtropical regions. Human infections are generally caused by exposure to water, soil or food contaminated with the urine of infected wild and domestic animals such as rodents and dogs. The clinical course of leptospirosis is variable and may be difficult to distinguish from many other infectious diseases. The dark-field microscopy (DFM, serology and nucleic acid amplification techniques are used to diagnose leptospirosis, however, a distinctive standard reference method is still lacking. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to determine the presence of Leptospira spp., to differentiate the pathogenic L. interrogans and the non-pathogenic L. biflexa, and also to determine the sensitivity and specificity values of molecular methods as an alternative to conventional ones. A total of 133 serum samples, from 47 humans and 86 cattle were evaluated by two conventional tests: the Microagglutination Test (MAT and the DFM, as well as three molecular methods, the 16S rRNA-PCR followed by Restriction Fragment Lenght Polymorphism (RFLP of the amplification products 16S rRNA-PCR-RFLP, LipL32-PCR and OmpL1-PCR. In this study, for L. interrogans, the specificity and sensitivity rates of the 16S rRNA-PCR and the LipL32-PCR were considered similar (100% versus 98.25% and 100% versus 98.68%, respectively. The OmpL1-PCR was able to classify L. interrogans into two intergroups, but this PCR was less sensitive (87.01% than the other two PCR methods. The 16S rRNA-PCR-RFLP could detect L. biflexa DNA, but LipL32-PCR and OmpL1-PCR could not. The 16S rRNA-PCR-RFLP provided an early and accurate diagnosis and was able to distinguish pathogenic and non-pathogenic Leptospira species, hence it may be used as an alternative method to the conventional gold standard techniques for the rapid disgnosis of leptospirosis.

  4. Identification of Ancylostoma ceylanicum in children from a tribal community in Tamil Nadu, India using a semi-nested PCR-RFLP tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Santosh; Kaliappan, Saravanakumar Puthupalayam; Kattula, Deepthi; Roy, Sheela; Geldhof, Peter; Kang, Gagandeep; Vercruysse, Jozef; Levecke, Bruno

    2015-04-01

    It is generally assumed that hookworm infections in humans are caused by Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale. However, previous studies have also reported the presence of the animal hookworm A. ceylanicum in human stools. We determined hookworm infections in children in a tribal community in Tamil Nadu, India, using a semi-nested PCR-RFLP approach. The results indicate that human species account for a majority of the hookworm infections (N. americanus 39/41 [95%]; A. duodenale 6/41 [15%]), whereas the animal hookworm A. ceylanicum only accounts for a minority of the infections (5%; 2/41). The results emphasize the need to consider zoonotic ancylostomiasis while developing strategies to control hookworm infections. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Lab-on-a-Chip-Based PCR-RFLP Assay for the Detection of Malayan Box Turtle (Cuora amboinensis) in the Food Chain and Traditional Chinese Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asing; Ali, Md. Eaqub; Abd Hamid, Sharifah Bee; Hossain, M. A. Motalib; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Kader, Md. Abdul; Zaidul, I. S. M.

    2016-01-01

    The Malayan box turtle (Cuora amboinensis) (MBT) is a vulnerable and protected turtle species, but it is a lucrative item in the illegal wildlife trade because of its great appeal as an exotic food item and in traditional medicine. Although several polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays to identify MBT by various routes have been documented, their applicability for forensic authentication remains inconclusive due to the long length of the amplicon targets, which are easily broken down by natural decomposition, environmental stresses or physiochemical treatments during food processing. To address this research gap, we developed, for the first time, a species-specific PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay with a very short target length (120 bp) to detect MBT in the food chain; this authentication ensured better security and reliability through molecular fingerprints. The PCR-amplified product was digested with Bfa1 endonuclease, and distinctive restriction fingerprints (72, 43 and 5 bp) for MBT were found upon separation in a microfluidic chip-based automated electrophoresis system, which enhances the resolution of short oligos. The chances of any false negative identifications were eliminated through the use of a universal endogenous control for eukaryotes, and the limit of detection was 0.0001 ng DNA or 0.01% of the meat under admixed states. Finally, the optimized PCR-RFLP assay was validated for the screening of raw and processed commercial meatballs, burgers and frankfurters, which are very popular in most countries. The optimized PCR-RFLP assay was further used to screen MBT materials in 153 traditional Chinese medicines of 17 different brands and 62 of them were found MBT positive; wherein the ingredients were not declared in product labels. Overall, the novel assay demonstrated sufficient merit for use in any forensic and/or archaeological authentication of MBT, even under a state of decomposition. PMID:27716792

  6. Rapid differentiation of Staphylococcus aureus isolates harbouring egc loci with pseudogenes psient1 and psient2 and the selu or seluv gene using PCR-RFLP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collery, Mark M; Smyth, Cyril J

    2007-02-01

    The egc locus of Staphylococus aureus harbours two enterotoxin genes (seg and sei) and three enterotoxin-like genes (selm, seln and selo). Between the sei and seln genes are located two pseudogenes, psient1 and psient2, or the selu or seluv gene. While these two alternative sei-seln intergenic regions can be distinguished by PCR, to date, DNA sequencing has been the only confirmatory option because of the very high degree of sequence similarity between egc loci bearing the pseudogenes and the selu or seluv gene. In silico restriction enzyme digestion of genomic regions encompassing the egc locus from the 3' end of the sei gene through the 5' first quarter of the seln gene allowed pseudogene- and selu- or seluv-bearing egc loci to be distinguished by PCR-RFLP. Experimental application of these findings demonstrated that endonuclease HindIII cleaved PCR amplimers bearing pseudogenes but not those with a selu or seluv gene, while selu- or seluv-bearing amplimers were susceptible to cleavage by endonuclease HphI, but not by endonuclease HindIII. The restriction enzyme BccI cleaved selu- or seluv-harbouring amplimers at a unique restriction site created by their signature 15 bp insertion compared with pseudogene-bearing amplimers, thereby allowing distinction of these egc loci. PCR-RFLP analysis using these restriction enzymes provides a rapid, easy to interpret alternative to DNA sequencing for verification of PCR findings on the nature of an egc locus type, and can also be used for the primary identification of the intergenic sei-seln egc locus type.

  7. Lab-on-a-Chip-Based PCR-RFLP Assay for the Detection of Malayan Box Turtle (Cuora amboinensis) in the Food Chain and Traditional Chinese Medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asing; Ali, Md Eaqub; Abd Hamid, Sharifah Bee; Hossain, M A Motalib; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Kader, Md Abdul; Zaidul, I S M

    2016-01-01

    The Malayan box turtle (Cuora amboinensis) (MBT) is a vulnerable and protected turtle species, but it is a lucrative item in the illegal wildlife trade because of its great appeal as an exotic food item and in traditional medicine. Although several polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays to identify MBT by various routes have been documented, their applicability for forensic authentication remains inconclusive due to the long length of the amplicon targets, which are easily broken down by natural decomposition, environmental stresses or physiochemical treatments during food processing. To address this research gap, we developed, for the first time, a species-specific PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay with a very short target length (120 bp) to detect MBT in the food chain; this authentication ensured better security and reliability through molecular fingerprints. The PCR-amplified product was digested with Bfa1 endonuclease, and distinctive restriction fingerprints (72, 43 and 5 bp) for MBT were found upon separation in a microfluidic chip-based automated electrophoresis system, which enhances the resolution of short oligos. The chances of any false negative identifications were eliminated through the use of a universal endogenous control for eukaryotes, and the limit of detection was 0.0001 ng DNA or 0.01% of the meat under admixed states. Finally, the optimized PCR-RFLP assay was validated for the screening of raw and processed commercial meatballs, burgers and frankfurters, which are very popular in most countries. The optimized PCR-RFLP assay was further used to screen MBT materials in 153 traditional Chinese medicines of 17 different brands and 62 of them were found MBT positive; wherein the ingredients were not declared in product labels. Overall, the novel assay demonstrated sufficient merit for use in any forensic and/or archaeological authentication of MBT, even under a state of decomposition.

  8. Detection of the Single Nucleotide Polymorphism at Position rs2735940 in the Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase Gene by the Introduction of a New Restriction Enzyme Site for the PCR-RFLP Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sihua; Ding, Mingcui; Duan, Xiaoran; Wang, Tuanwei; Feng, Xiaolei; Wang, Pengpeng; Yao, Wu; Wu, Yongjun; Yan, Zhen; Feng, Feifei; Yu, Songcheng; Wang, Wei

    2017-09-01

    It has been shown that the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the rs2735940 site in the human telomerase reverse transcriptase ( hTERT ) gene is associated with increased cancer risk. The traditional method to detect SNP genotypes is polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). However, there is a limitation to utilizing PCR-RFLP due to a lack of proper restriction enzyme sites at many polymorphic loci. This study used an improved PCR-RFLP method with a mismatched base for detection of the SNP rs2735940. A new restriction enzyme cutting site was created by created restriction site PCR (CRS-PCR), and in addition, the restriction enzyme Msp I for CRS-PCR was cheaper than other enzymes. We used this novel assay to determine the allele frequencies in 552 healthy Chinese Han individuals, and found the allele frequencies to be 63% for allele C and 37% for allele T In summary, the modified PCR-RFLP can be used to detect the SNP of rs2735940 with low cost and high efficiency. © 2017 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  9. Genetic characterization of rhizobia isolated from Amazonas soils based on the technique of PCR-RFLP / Caracterização genética de rizóbio isolados de solos no Amazonas baseada na técnica de PCR-RFLP

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    Arlem Nascimento de Oliveira

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Few are the details concerning the molecular characterization of native rhizobia isolates from Amazonas soils. The aim of the present study was the genetic characterization of rhizobia isolated from nodules of cowpea using the method PCR-RFLP of the ribosome genes 16S rRNA and the restriction enzymes HinfI, MspI, and MboI. The analysis included 20 native isolates and ten reference strains from different origins. The results indicated a great genetic variability with the formation of eight groups in one dendrogram with a varied level of similarity.Poucas são as informações referentes à caracterização molecular de rizóbios nativos isolados de solos no Amazonas. Assim, o objetivo deste trabalho foi a caracterização genética de rizóbios isolados de nódulos de caupi usando o método PCR-RFLP dos genes ribossomais 16S rRNA e as enzimas de restrição HinfI, MspI, e MboI. A análise incluiu 20 isolados nativos e dez estirpes-referência de diferentes origens. Os resultados indicaram uma grande variabilidade genética com a formação de oito grupos em um dendrograma com um nível de similaridade variado.

  10. Detection of the mosquitocidal toxin genes encoding Cry11 proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis using a novel PCR-RFLP method Detección de genes que codifican proteínas mosquitocidas Cry11 de Bacillus thuringiensis mediante un método de PCR-RFLP novedoso

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    D. H. Sauka

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP method for detection of cry11 genes from Bacillus thuringiensis was established. Based on the analysis of conserved regions of the cry11 genes, 2 oligonucleotide primers were designed to amplify a 1459-bp fragment of the cry11Aa gene, and a 1471-bp of the cry11Ba and cry11Bb genes. The amplification products were digested with restriction endonuclease HinfI. Exotic B. thuringiensis strains and native isolates collected from soils, leaves and stored product dust of Argentina were analyzed to study the distribution of cry11 genes. The PCR-RFLP patterns revealed the detection of cry11 genes in 3 of 64 exotic strains and in 10 of 107 native B. thuringiensis isolates tested. Just the cry11Aa gene subclass was detected among these bacteria. Since the methodology was also developed to detect cry11Ba and cry11Bb genes, an experimental future confirmation will be required. Based on the results obtained, the PCR-RFLP method presented may be a valuable tool for specific detection of the mosquitocidal toxin genes encoding Cry11 proteins from B. thuringiensis.En el presente estudio se estableció una estrategia basada en la amplificación génica (PCR y el posterior análisis de restricción (RFLP para detectar todos los genes cry11 de Bacillus thuringiensis informados hasta ahora. De acuerdo con el análisis de las regiones conservadas en los genes cry11, se diseñaron dos cebadores para amplificar un fragmento de 1459 pb de los genes cry11Aa y un fragmento de 1471 pb de los genes cry11Ba y cry11Bb. Los productos de la amplificación fueron digeridos con la enzima de restricción HinfI. Se analizaron cepas exóticas de B. thuringiensis y aislamientos nativos de Argentina obtenidos a partir de muestras de suelos, hojas y polvillo de silos, para estudiar la distribución de los genes cry11. Los patrones de PCR-RFLP revelaron la presencia de genes cry11 en 3 de las 64 cepas ex

  11. Genomic-based restriction enzyme selection for specific detection of Piscirickettsia salmonis by 16S rDNA PCR-RFLP

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    Dinka eMandakovic

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The gram negative facultative bacterium P. salmonis is the etiological agent of Salmonid Rickettsial Septicaemia (SRS, a severe disease that causes important economic losses in the global salmon farmer industry. Despite efforts to control this disease, the high frequency of new epizootic events indicate that the vaccine and antibiotics treatments have limited effectiveness, therefore the preventive and diagnostic approaches must be improved. A comparison of several methodologies for SRS diagnostic indicate differences in their specificity and its capacity to detect other bacteria coexisting with P. salmonis in culture media (contamination and fish samples (coinfection, aspects relevant for research, vaccine development and clinical diagnostic. By computer-simulation analyses, we identified a group of restriction enzymes that generate unique P. salmonis 16S rDNA band patterns, distinguishable from all other bacteria. From this information, we designed and developed a PCR-RFLP (Polymerase Chain Reaction - Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism assay, which was validated using 16S rDNA universal primers and restriction enzyme PmaCI for the amplification and digestion, respectively. Experimental validation was performed by comparing the restriction pattern of P. salmonis with the restriction patterns generated by bacteria that cohabit with P. salmonis (fish bacterial isolates and culture media contaminants. Our results indicate that the restriction enzyme selection pipeline was suitable to design a more specific, sensible, faster and cheaper assay than the currently used P. salmonis detection methodologies.

  12. Identification of Pork Contamination in Meatballs of Indonesia Local Market Using Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP Analysis

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    Yuny Erwanto

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This research applied and evaluated a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP using cytochrome b gene to detect pork contamination in meatballs from local markets in Surabaya and Yogyakarta regions, Indonesia. To confirm the effectiveness and specificity of this fragment, thirty nine DNA samples from different meatball shops were isolated and amplified, and then the PCR amplicon was digested by BseDI restriction enzyme to detect the presence of pork in meatballs. BseDI restriction enzyme was able to cleave porcine cytochrome b gene into two fragments (131 bp and 228 bp. Testing the meatballs from the local market showed that nine of twenty meatball shops in Yogyakarta region were detected to have pork contamination, but there was no pork contamination in meatball shops in Surabaya region. In conclusion, specific PCR amplification of cytochrome b gen and cleaved by BseDI restriction enzymes seems to be a powerful technique for the identification of pork presence in meatball because of its simplicity, specificity and sensitivity. Furthermore, pork contamination intended for commercial products of sausage, nugget, steak and meat burger can be checked. The procedure is also much cheaper than other methods based on PCR, immunodiffusion and other techniques that need expensive equipment.

  13. Identification of Pork Contamination in Meatballs of Indonesia Local Market Using Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwanto, Yuny; Abidin, Mohammad Zainal; Sugiyono, Eko Yasin Prasetyo Muslim; Rohman, Abdul

    2014-10-01

    This research applied and evaluated a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) using cytochrome b gene to detect pork contamination in meatballs from local markets in Surabaya and Yogyakarta regions, Indonesia. To confirm the effectiveness and specificity of this fragment, thirty nine DNA samples from different meatball shops were isolated and amplified, and then the PCR amplicon was digested by BseDI restriction enzyme to detect the presence of pork in meatballs. BseDI restriction enzyme was able to cleave porcine cytochrome b gene into two fragments (131 bp and 228 bp). Testing the meatballs from the local market showed that nine of twenty meatball shops in Yogyakarta region were detected to have pork contamination, but there was no pork contamination in meatball shops in Surabaya region. In conclusion, specific PCR amplification of cytochrome b gen and cleaved by BseDI restriction enzymes seems to be a powerful technique for the identification of pork presence in meatball because of its simplicity, specificity and sensitivity. Furthermore, pork contamination intended for commercial products of sausage, nugget, steak and meat burger can be checked. The procedure is also much cheaper than other methods based on PCR, immunodiffusion and other techniques that need expensive equipment.

  14. Detection of a 4-bp Insertion/deletion Polymorphism within the Promoter of EGLN2 Using Mismatch PCR-RFLP and Its Association with Susceptibility to Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Mohammad; Danesh, Hiva; Bizhani, Fatemeh; Sattarifard, Hedieh; Hashemi, Seyed Mehdi; Bahari, Gholamreza

    2018-04-25

    It has been shown that a 4-bp insertion/deletion (ins/del) polymorphism of EGLN2 influences the risk of several cancers. However, to date, no study has inspected the impact of the 4-bp ins/del polymorphism on breast cancer (BC) risk. A case-control study, including 134 breast cancer patients and 154 healthy women, was here conducted to examine the possible association between EGLN2 4-bp ins/del polymorphism and BC risk in a southeast Iranian population. A mismatched polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was designed for genotyping of the variant. Our findings did not support any association between the 4-bp ins/del polymorphism and the risk of BC in the codominant, dominant, recessive and allele inheritance models tested. When links between the EGLN2 4-bp ins/del polymorphism and clinicopathological characteristics of the patients were evaluate the variant was only associated with HER2 status. More studies with larger sample sizes and diverse ethnicities are warranted to verify our finding. Creative Commons Attribution License

  15. Differentiation between Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus from Pure Culture and Aflatoxin-Contaminated Grapes Using PCR-RFLP Analysis of aflR-aflJ Intergenic Spacer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Khoury, A.; Atoui, A.; Lebrihi, A.; Rizk, T.; Lteif, R.; Kallassy, M.

    2011-01-01

    Aflatoxins (AFs) represent the most important single mycotoxin-related food safety problem in developed and developing countries as they have adverse effects on human and animal health. They are produced mainly by Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus. Both species have different aflatoxinogenic profile. In order to distinguish between A. flavus and A. parasiticus, gene-specific primers were designed to target the intergenic spacer (IGS) for the AF biosynthesis genes, aflJ and aflR. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products were subjected to restriction endonuclease analysis using BglII to look for restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs). Our result showed that both species displayed different PCR-based RFLP (PCR-RFLP) profile. PCR products from A. flavus cleaved into 3 fragments of 362, 210, and 102 bp. However, there is only one restriction site for this enzyme in the sequence of A. parasiticus that produced only 2 fragments of 363 and 311 bp. The method was successfully applied to contaminated grapes samples. This approach of differentiating these 2 species would be simpler, less costly, and quicker than conventional sequencing of PCR products and/or morphological identification. (author)

  16. An extremely sensitive nested PCR-RFLP mitochondrial marker for detection and identification of salmonids in eDNA from water samples

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    Laura Clusa

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Salmonids are native from the North Hemisphere but have been introduced for aquaculture and sport fishing in the South Hemisphere and inhabit most rivers and lakes in temperate and cold regions worldwide. Five species are included in the Global Invasive Species Database: rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, Atlantic salmon Salmo salar, brown trout Salmo trutta, brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis, and lake trout Salvelinus namaycush. In contrast, other salmonids are endangered in their native settings. Methods Here we have developed a method to identify salmonid species directly from water samples, focusing on the Iberian Peninsula as a case study. We have designed nested Salmonidae-specific primers within the 16S rDNA region. From these primers and a PCR-RFLP procedure the target species can be unequivocally identified from DNA extracted from water samples. Results The method was validated in aquarium experiments and in the field with water from watersheds with known salmonid populations. Finally, the method was applied to obtain a global view of the Salmonidae community in Nalón River (north coast of Spain. Discussion This new powerful, very sensitive (identifying the species down to 10 pg DNA/ml water and economical tool can be applied for monitoring the presence of salmonids in a variety of situations, from checking upstream colonization after removal of river barriers to monitoring potential escapes from fish farms.

  17. Prevalence of renal lesions in slaughtered cattle in Shiraz, Iran, and detection of Leptospira in them by nested PCR-RFLP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghadosi, Vahideh; Hosseinzadeh, Saeid; Shekarforoush, Seyed Shahram; Samiei, Azadeh

    2016-12-01

    Renal diseases in cattle are frequently not recognized due to the subclinical conditions. Some species of Leptospira are the main cause of infectious agents that damage the kidneys and lead to abortion and economic losses in cattle and are also of major concern in the public health. This study was aimed to assess the prevalence of renal lesions of slaughtered cattle in the Shiraz abattoir and to determine the correlation between rejected kidneys and infection with Leptospira using nested PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) techniques. Out of 1000 inspected animals, 205 (20.5 %) revealed the renal lesions. Chronic nephritis (7.5 %), white-spotted kidney (7.3 %), and petechial hemorrhage (3.5 %) were the most prevalent forms of the lesions. A direct correlation between increasing the age and significant increase in the rate of lesions was also observed (P = 0.03). Using nested PCR-RFLP assay, 40.8 % of the tested kidneys were turned to be infected to the pathogenic species of Leptospira. The risk of infection of the kidneys with white spot to pathogenic species of Leptospira (53.8 %) was more than that of the kidneys with other lesions (25.0 %) (P = 0.014). The odd ratio indicates that the kidneys with white spot lesions are likely to be infected with pathogenic species of Leptospira, five times greater than other lesions. This study showed that renal lesions especially white-spotted kidney, which were considerably associated with Leptospira in slaughtered cattle in Shiraz, were very high. This is important in terms of public health and in particular, increases the risk of transmission of disease to human specially in the high-risk careers including farmers, veterinarians, and abattoir workers.

  18. ANÁLISIS GENÓMICO DE PARVOVIRUS CANINO POR PCR - RFLP A PARTIR DE AISLAMIENTOS DE CASOS CLÍNICOS SINTOMÁTICOS TOMADOS EN BOGOTÁ - COLOMBIA -ESTUDIO PRELIMINAR-

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    Ángela Castillo

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Con el objetivo de detemúnar el genotipo del parvovirus canino (CPV circulante en Bogotá, se analizaron 56 muestras tomadas a conveniencia, de materia fecal y sangre de perros menores a un año con gastroenteritis hemorrágica presuntiva de parvovirosis, por reacción en cadena de la polirnerasa - huella genórnica (PCR - RFLP. Se obtuvieron fragmentos amplificados de DNA de 2.2 Kb por PCR de la cepa vacunal de CPV-2 y de cuatro muestras de heces, no se obtuvieron amplificados de las muestras de sangre. Los productos amplificados fueron digeridos por la enzima de restricción Rsa I pemútiendo la identificación de los genotipos CPV-2a y CPV-2b así como su diferenciación con el parvovirus tipo - 2 (CPV-2.

  19. A novel multiplex PCR-RFLP method for simultaneous detection of the MTHFR 677 C > T, eNOS +894 G > T and - eNOS -786 T > C variants among Malaysian Malays

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    Loo Keat

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperhomocysteinemia as a consequence of the MTHFR 677 C > T variant is associated with cardiovascular disease and stroke. Another factor that can potentially contribute to these disorders is a depleted nitric oxide level, which can be due to the presence of eNOS +894 G > T and eNOS −786 T > C variants that make an individual more susceptible to endothelial dysfunction. A number of genotyping methods have been developed to investigate these variants. However, simultaneous detection methods using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP analysis are still lacking. In this study, a novel multiplex PCR-RFLP method for the simultaneous detection of MTHFR 677 C > T and eNOS +894 G > T and eNOS −786 T > C variants was developed. A total of 114 healthy Malay subjects were recruited. The MTHFR 677 C > T and eNOS +894 G > T and eNOS −786 T > C variants were genotyped using the novel multiplex PCR-RFLP and confirmed by DNA sequencing as well as snpBLAST. Allele frequencies of MTHFR 677 C > T and eNOS +894 G > T and eNOS −786 T > C were calculated using the Hardy Weinberg equation. Methods The 114 healthy volunteers were recruited for this study, and their DNA was extracted. Primer pair was designed using Primer 3 Software version 0.4.0 and validated against the BLAST database. The primer specificity, functionality and annealing temperature were tested using uniplex PCR methods that were later combined into a single multiplex PCR. Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP was performed in three separate tubes followed by agarose gel electrophoresis. PCR product residual was purified and sent for DNA sequencing. Results The allele frequencies for MTHFR 677 C > T were 0.89 (C allele and 0.11 (T allele; for eNOS +894 G > T, the allele frequencies were 0.58 (G allele and 0.43 (T allele; and for eNOS −786 T > C, the allele

  20. Development of a PCR-RFLP method based on the transcription elongation factor 1-α gene to differentiate Fusarium graminearum from other species within the Fusarium graminearum species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmendia, Gabriela; Umpierrez-Failache, Mariana; Ward, Todd J; Vero, Silvana

    2018-04-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a destructive disease of cereals crops worldwide and a major food safety concern due to grain contamination with trichothecenes and other mycotoxins. Fusarium graminearum, a member of the Fusarium graminearum species complex (FGSC) is the dominant FHB pathogen in many parts of the world. However, a number of other Fusarium species, including other members of the FGSC, may also be present for example in Argentina, New Zealand, Ethiopia, Nepal, Unites States in cereals such as wheat and barley. Proper species identification is critical to research aimed at improving disease and mycotoxin control programs. Identification of Fusarium species is are often unreliable by traditional, as many species are morphologically cryptic. DNA sequence-based methods offer a reliable means of species identification, but can be expensive when applied to the analyses of population samples. To facilitate identification of the major causative agent of FHB, this work describes an easy and inexpensive method to differentiate F. graminearum from the remaining species within the FGSC and from the other common Fusarium species causing FHB in cereals. The developed method is based on a PCR-RFLP of the transcription elongation factor (TEF 1-α) gene using the restriction enzyme BsaHI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular detection and PCR-RFLP analysis using Pst1 and Alu1 of multidrug resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae causing urinary tract infection in women in the eastern part of Bangladesh

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    Golam Mahmudunnabi

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Klebsiella pneumoniae is the second leading causative agent of UTI. In this study, a rapid combined polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was developed to identify K. pneumoniae in women, infected with urinary tract infection in the Sylhet city of Bangladesh. Analysis of 11 isolates from women at the age range of 20–55 from three different hospitals were done firstly by amplification with K. pneumoniae specific ITS primers. All of the 11 collected isolates were amplified in PCR and showed the expected 136 bp products. Then, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of 11 isolates were conducted after PCR amplification by 16s rRNA universal primers, followed by subsequent digestion and incubation with two restriction enzymes, Pst1 and Alu1. Seven out of 11 isolates were digested by Pst1 restriction enzymes, six isolates digested by Alu1, and while others were negative for both enzymes. Data results reveal that, women at age between 25 and 50 were digested by both enzymes. A woman aged over than 50 was negative while bellow 20 was digested by only Pst1. The results could pave the tactic for further research in the detection of K. pneumoniae from UTI infected women. Keywords: Klebsiella pneumoniae, ITS-primer, MDR isolates, PCR-RFLP analysis

  2. Detection of undeclared animal by-products in commercial canine canned foods: Comparative analyses by ELISA and PCR-RFLP coupled with slab gel electrophoresis or capillary gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ming-Kun; Shih, Pei-Yin; Wei, Chia-Fong; Vickroy, Thomas W; Chou, Chi-Chung

    2016-03-30

    The potential presence of undeclared animal by-products in pet foods is not subject to routine examination. Previously published methods for species-based identification of animal by-products have not been used routinely owing to inconsistent results. The present study evaluated the utility of several approaches for accurate identification of animal by-products in 11 commercial brands of canine canned foods. Canine canned foods from several countries were analysed by ELISA, PCR-RFLP coupled with slab-gel electrophoresis (SGE) and capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE) to test for evidence of by-products derived from cattle, chicken, sheep or pig. While CGE-based analysis detected all (24) animal-derived by-products that were reported for the 11 test samples, SGE and ELISA detected only 22/24 (92%) and 14/24 (58%) of labelled by-products, respectively. In addition, undeclared animal by-products were found using all three analytical approaches with CGE detecting more positives (19) than SGE (17) or ELISA (5). Significant disparities were evident between the labelled contents and the detected content of animal by-products. CGE-based testing for PCR products appears to provide greater sensitivity and accuracy than either SGE or ELISA-based methods. As testing of commercial products becomes more reliable and mainstream, manufacturers will need to develop more thorough and accurate labelling protocols. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Detection of Leishmania infantum in naturally infected Lutzomyia longipalpis (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae) and Canis familiaris in Misiones, Argentina: the first report of a PCR-RFLP and sequencing-based confirmation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acardi, Soraya Alejandra; Liotta, Domingo Javier; Santini, María Soledad; Romagosa, Carlo Mariano; Salomón, Oscar Daniel

    2010-09-01

    In this study, a genotypification of Leishmania was performed using polimerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and sequencing techniques to identify species of Leishmania parasites in phlebotomine sand flies and dogs naturally infected. Between January-February of 2009, CDC light traps were used to collect insect samples from 13 capture sites in the municipality of Posadas, which is located in the province of Misiones of Argentina. Sand flies identified as Lutzomyia longipalpis were grouped into 28 separate pools for molecular biological analysis. Canine samples were taken from lymph node aspirates of two symptomatic stray animals that had been positively diagnosed with canine visceral leishmaniasis. One vector pool of 10 sand flies (1 out of the 28 pools tested) and both of the canine samples tested positively for Leishmania infantum by PCR and RFLP analysis. PCR products were confirmed by sequencing and showed a maximum identity with L. infantum. Given that infection was detected in one out of the 28 pools and that at least one infected insect was infected, it was possible to infer an infection rate at least of 0.47% for Lu. longipalpis among the analyzed samples. These results contribute to incriminate Lu. longipalpis as the vector of L. infantum in the municipality of Posadas, where cases of the disease in humans and dogs have been reported since 2005.

  4. Utilisation de la PCR-RFLP sur de l'ADN chloro-plastique pour l'étude des relations phylogénétiques au sein du genre Phaseolus

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    Baudoin JP.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic relationships among 74 accessions belonging to six species of Phaseolus are investigated using variation in chloroplast DNA assessed according to a PCR-RFLP protocol. Three fragments of chloroplast DNA are amplified using universal primers, and then digested with 10 restriction enzymes. Thirty-six haplotypes are identified on the basis of the polymorphism in fragment number and size. Three main phylogenetic groups, strongly supported through bootstrap analysis, are identified: (1 accessions from Phaseolus lunatus and Phaseolus xolocotzii; (2 accessions from Phaseolus glabellus; (3 accessions from Phaseolus vulgaris, Phaseolus polyanthus and Phaseolus coccineus. Within the third group, accessions of Phaseolus coccineus are scattered along the phylogenetic tree, which provides some evidence that coccineus accessions are paraphyletic with respect to Phaseolus vulgaris and Phaseolus polyanthus. An analysis of molecular variance applied on four species show that they are significantly differentiated with 79% of molecular variance among species and 21% within species. The results agree with previous investigations on chloroplast DNA variation in the genus Phaseolus, and suggest that PCRRFLP methods, which are technically less labour-intensive than previous methods, are of great value for phylogenetic investigations at the generic level.

  5. Identificação espécie-específica de carnes e produtos cárneos de origem bubalina e bovina pela técnica de PCR-RFLP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.V. Teixeira

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Para avaliar a viabilidade da metodologia da Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase associada com o Polimorfismo de Fragmentos de DNA (PCR-RFLP na identificação de fraude intencional e contaminação acidental em produtos cárneos de origem bubalina, in natura e processados, foram testadas amostras puras e amostras de carnes com misturas controladas, produzidas em laboratório, com adição de 1%, 5%, 10% e 50% de carne bovina em carne de búfalo, homogeneizada crua e em amostras autoclavada. Foram comparados, ainda, diferentes métodos de extração, usando um kit comercial e a técnica clássica, utilizando fenol/clorofórmio. O resultado estatístico foi obtido por tabela de contingência, analisada pelo teste do qui-quadrado (χ2 e do exato de Fisher. A especificidade encontrada foi altamente significativa (P<0,0001. Observou-se também sensibilidade altamente significativa nas diluições a partir de 10% (P<0,0001. A técnica tem alta especificidade e sensibilidade para detectar até mesmo contaminação de 1%, mas a repetibilidade desse resultado impede a aplicação oficial desse método para a inspeção de contaminação acidental, sendo recomendada somente para inspeção de fraude a partir de 10% de substituição. Em carnes autoclavadas, a eficácia do teste é menor. A técnica pode ser empregada para certificação de produto específico (selo de identidade de espécie.

  6. Análisis de PCR-RFLP del gen de leptina y su asociación con características de la leche en ganado nativo (Bos indicus de Irán

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    Mojtaba Rezaei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Se utilizó una muestra ganadera experimental para la caracterización de los genes y las frecuencias genotípicas y evaluar la asociación entre los polimorfismos de longitud del fragmento de restricción BsaAI en el gen de leptina y las características lácteas. Se recolectaron muestras de sangre de 390 vacas proporcionadas por el censo ganadero de la provincia de Guilán en Irán. La extracción de ADN genómico se basó en el método modificado de precipitación salina. El fragmento de 522 bp que comprende la región parcial del exón 3 e intrón 2 del locus del gen de leptina se amplificó mediante PCR-RFLP e iniciadores específicos. La digestión del fragmento amplificado con la enzima de restricción BsaAI reveló dos alelos de A y B con frecuencias de 0.447 y 0.553, y tres genotipos de AA, AB, BB con frecuencias de 0.185, 0.526 y 0.289 en la población estudiada, respectivamente. El resultado del contenido de polimorfismo fue 0.372 y para heterocigosis 0.526. Los resultados demostraron que la población estudiada estaba en equilibrio Hardy-Weinberg. El análisis estadístico indicó que el polimorfismo LEP- BsaAI tiene un efecto significativo en la producción de leche, porcentaje de grasa y proteína de la leche ( P <0.01. Animales portadores del genotipo heterocigoto (AB produjeron 1.17 y 0.7 kg/d más leche que los animales homocigotos AA y BB, respectivamente. Los animales con el genotipo AA tuvieron mayor grasa (0.28 % y porcentaje de proteína (0.17 % que el genotipo AB. Tales resultados pueden utilizarse como criterios para facilitar la selección genética en los programas de cría animal.

  7. Comparison of Direct Sequencing, Real-Time PCR-High Resolution Melt (PCR-HRM) and PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) Analysis for Genotyping of Common Thiopurine Intolerant Variant Alleles NUDT15 c.415C>T and TPMT c.719A>G (TPMT*3C).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Wai-Ying; Ho, Chi-Chun; Poon, Wing-Tat

    2017-05-12

    Thiopurine intolerance and treatment-related toxicity, such as fatal myelosuppression, is related to non-function genetic variants encoding thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT) and Nudix hydrolase 15 (NUDT15). Genetic testing of the common variants NUDT15:NM_018283.2:c.415C>T (Arg139Cys, dbSNP rs116855232 T allele) and TPMT: NM_000367.4:c.719A>G (TPMT*3C, dbSNP rs1142345 G allele) in East Asians including Chinese can potentially prevent treatment-related complications. Two complementary genotyping approaches, real-time PCR-high resolution melt (PCR-HRM) and PCR-restriction fragment length morphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis were evaluated using conventional PCR and Sanger sequencing genotyping as the gold standard. Sixty patient samples were tested, revealing seven patients (11.7%) heterozygous for NUDT15 c.415C>T, one patient homozygous for the variant and one patient heterozygous for the TPMT*3C non-function allele. No patient was found to harbor both variants. In total, nine out of 60 (15%) patients tested had genotypic evidence of thiopurine intolerance, which may require dosage adjustment or alternative medication should they be started on azathioprine, mercaptopurine or thioguanine. The two newly developed assays were more efficient and showed complete concordance (60/60, 100%) compared to the Sanger sequencing results. Accurate and cost-effective genotyping assays by real-time PCR-HRM and PCR-RFLP for NUDT15 c.415C>T and TPMT*3C were successfully developed. Further studies may establish their roles in genotype-informed clinical decision-making in the prevention of morbidity and mortality due to thiopurine intolerance.

  8. Consistent absence of BRAF mutations in salivary gland carcinomas

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    Nooshin Mohtasham

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Malignant salivary gland tumors are rare entities. Despite advances in surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy, the rate of the mortality and five-year survival has not been improved markedly over the last few decades. The activation of EGFR- RAS-RAF signaling pathway contributes to the initiation and progression of many human cancers, promising a key pathway for therapeutic molecules. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate BRAF mutations in salivary gland carcinomas. Methods: We designed PCR- RFLP (Polymerase Chain Reaction -Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism and screened 50 salivary gland carcinomas (SGCs including mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC, adenoid cystic carcinoma (AdCC and polymorphous low grade adenocarcinoma (PLGA for the BRAF V600E mutation. Results: PCR-RFLP analyses demonstrated no mutation in BRAF exon 15 for SGC samples at position V600, which is the most commonly mutated site for BRAF in human cancer. Conclusions: According to our results SGCs didn’t acquire BRAF mutations that result in a constitutive activation of the signaling cascade downstream of EGFR, hence SGCs can be a good candidate for anti EGFR therapies.

  9. ASSOCIATION OF HFE GENE MUTATION IN THALASSEMIA MAJOR PATIENTS

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    Amit Kumar Tiwari

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Thalassemia major patients are dependent on frequent blood transfusion and consequently develop iron overload. HFE gene mutations (C282Y, H63D and S65C in hereditary haemochromatosis has been shown to be associated with iron overload. The study aims at finding the association of HFE gene mutations in β-thalassemia major patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS A descriptive observational pilot study was conducted including fifty diagnosed -thalassemia major cases. DNA analysis by PCR-RFLP method for HFE gene mutations was performed. RESULTS Only H63D mutation (out of three HFE gene mutations was detected in 8 out of 50 cases. Observed frequency of H63D mutation was 16%. While frequency of C282Y and S65C were 0% each. CONCLUSION The frequency of HFE mutation in -thalassemia major is not very common.

  10. Fly Diversity Revealed by PCR-RFLP of Mitochondrial DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asraoui, Jimmy F.; Sayar, Nancy P.; Knio, Khouzama M.; Smith, Colin A.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we describe an inexpensive, two-session undergraduate laboratory activity that introduces important molecular biology methods in the context of biodiversity. In the first session, students bring tentatively identified flies (order Diptera, true flies) to the laboratory, extract DNA, and amplify a region of the mitochondrial gene…

  11. Polymorphism of calpastatin gene in Arabic sheep using PCR- RFLP

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Calpastatin has been known as candidate gene in muscle growth efficiency and meat quality. This gene has been located to chromosome 5 of sheep. In order to evaluate the calpastatin gene polymorphism, random blood sample were collected from 111 Arabic ram sheep from different regions. The DNA extraction was ...

  12. Polymorphism of calpastatin gene in Arabic sheep using PCR- RFLP

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-08-04

    Aug 4, 2008 ... Calpastatin has been known as candidate gene in muscle growth efficiency and ... population, AA, AB, BB genotype have been identified with the 70.27, .... of cimaterol on rabbit growth and myofibrillar protein degradation.

  13. DNA polymorphism of butyrophilin gene by PCR-RFLP technique ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We used the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCRRFLP) technique to screen for DNA polymorphism in 109 cattle. In all cattle, we amplified an 863 fragment consisting of part of exon 8. The amplified fragment digested with HaeIII restriction endonuclease and subjected to electrophoretic ...

  14. Association of Exon 10A and 10B inactivating mutation of follicle stimulating hormone receptor gene (FSHR) and Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome in Vellore cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, Nishu; Kulkarni, Rucha; Ozalkar, Sharvari; Prabhu, Yogamaya D.; Renu, Kaviyarasi; Ramgir, Shalaka S.; Abilash, V. G.

    2017-11-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome is the most common heterogenous endocrine disorder in women. Follicle stimulating hormone receptor is associated with normal development as well as maturation of follicles and triggers estrogen production in granulosa cells of the ovary. Inactivating mutation in FSHR gene correlated with reduction of ovarian function in women is due to damage to receptor function. This study aims to investigate whether inactivating mutations, in follicle stimulating hormone receptor gene is related to polycystic ovarian morphology in women with PCOS. Genomic DNA isolated from 15 subjects from Sandhya Hospital, Vellore (10 patients with PCOS and 5 healthy controls) was taken for this study. Patient data included a clinical report, hormonal levels, and ovarian morphological details. DNA isolation was followed by DNA amplification by polymerase chain reaction using Exon 10 A and Exon 10 B primers. The PCR-RFLP analysis was performed using Dde1 restriction enzyme. Here we discuss inactivating mutation found in Exon 10 of FSHR gene in patients with PCOS.The absence of inactivating mutation was observed through PCR-RFLP study on Exon 10A and Exon 10B.

  15. Biochemical Diagnosis of Common Gene Mutations in Galactosemia

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    Farzaneh Mirzajani

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Galactosemia is an inborn error of galactose metabolism that is inherited in an autosomal recessive trait. Classical galactosemia is caused by deficient activity of the galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT enzyme that can result in galactosemia complications. Materials & Methods: 135 unrelated families, clinically suspected to galactosemia, were screened by qualitative measurement of galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT activity in blood RBCs by using Beutler method. Results: Deficient enzyme activity (classical galactosemia were confirmed in 16 families. All of these 16 families were submitted to the diagnosis of six common mutations in GALT gene including Q188R, K285N, S135L, L195P, X380R and Q169K by using PCR-RFLP method which resulted in detection of 68% of the mutated alleles. Eight patients were homozygote for Q188R mutation, while one patient homozygote for S135L mutation and one heterozygote for K285N mutation. Conclusion: Biochemnical diagnosis of Galactosemia in Grand infant hospital is very important and necessary.

  16. A novel AAT-deletion mutation in the coding sequence of the BCO2 gene in yellow-fat rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strychalski, Janusz; Brym, Paweł; Czarnik, Urszula; Gugołek, Andrzej

    2015-11-01

    The carcasses of yellow-fat rabbits may be attractive to modern consumers, because they have a relatively high content of biologically active compounds. One of the main candidate genes associated with the yellow-fat trait is β-carotene 9',10'-oxygenase (BCO2). This study is the first report of the novel AAT-deletion mutation at codon 248 of the BCO2 gene, which has been found in homozygous yellow-fat rabbits. The deletion mutation, located at the beginning of exon 6, results in the absence of asparagine in protein. We also developed a PCR-RFLP test that supports intravital genotyping of indel polymorphism based on genomic DNA.

  17. Comparative study of different methodologies to detect the JAK2 V617F mutation in chronic BCR-ABL1 negative myeloproliferative neoplasms

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    Alline Didone

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: A mutation in the JAK2 gene, V617F, has been identified in several BCR-ABL1 negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN: polycythemia vera (PV, essential thrombocythemia (ET, and primary myelofibrosis (PMF. Defining the presence or absence of this mutation is an essential part of clinical diagnostic algorithms and patient management. Here, we aimed to evaluate the performance of three PCR-based assays: Amplification Refractory Mutation System (ARMS, High-Resolution Melting analysis (HRM, and Sanger direct sequencing, and compare their results with those obtained by a PCR restriction fragment polymorphism assay (PCR-RFLP. Design and methods: We used blood samples from 136 patients (PV=20; PMF=20; ET=28, and other MPN suspected cases=68. Results: Comparable results were observed among the four assays in patients with PV, PMF, and MPN suspected cases. In patients with a diagnosis of ET, the JAK2 V617F mutation was detected in 67.8% of them by the PCR-ARMS and PCR-HRM assay and in 64% of them by the conventional Sanger sequence approach. The PCR-ARMS and PCR-HRM assays were 100% concordant. With these tests, only one of the 20 patients with ET and one of the three patients with clinically suspected MPN gave different results compared with those obtained by the PCR-RFLP. Conclusions: Our results have demonstrated that the PCR-ARMS and PCR-HRM assays could detect the JAK2 V617F mutation effectively in MPN patients, but PCR-HRM assays are rapid and the most cost-effective procedures. Keywords: Myeloproliferative, JAK2 V617F, Mutation, Wild type, Screening

  18. Iron overload and HFE gene mutations in Czech patients with chronic liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostalikova-Cimburova, Marketa; Kratka, Karolina; Stransky, Jaroslav; Putova, Ivana; Cieslarova, Blanka; Horak, Jiri

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the prevalence of HFE gene mutations in Czech patients with chronic liver diseases and the influence of the mutations on iron status. The presence of HFE gene mutations (C282Y, H63D, and S65C) analyzed by the PCR-RFLP method, presence of cirrhosis, and serum iron indices were compared among 454 patients with different chronic liver diseases (51 with chronic hepatitis B, 122 with chronic hepatitis C, 218 with alcoholic liver disease, and 63 patients with hemochromatosis). Chronic liver diseases patients other than hemochromatics did not have an increased frequency of HFE gene mutations compared to controls. Although 33.3% of patients with hepatitis B, 43% of patients with hepatitis C, and 73.2% of patients with alcoholic liver disease had elevated transferrin saturation or serum ferritin levels, the presence of HFE gene mutations was not significantly associated with iron overload in these patients. Additionally, patients with cirrhosis did not have frequencies of HFE mutations different from those without cirrhosis. This study emphasizes the importance, not only of C282Y, but also of the H63D homozygous genetic constellation in Czech hemochromatosis patients. Our findings show that increased iron indices are common in chronic liver diseases but {\\it HFE} mutations do not play an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic hepatitis B, chronic hepatitis C, and alcoholic liver disease.

  19. To Screen Inactivation Mutation of Exon 1 of FSHR Gene in Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome: A South Indian Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, Nishu; Yeole, Samiksha; Pradeep, Rashmi; Prabhu, Yogamaya D.; Renu, Kaviyarasi; Ramgir, Shalaka S.; Abilash, V. G.

    2017-11-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is an endocrine disorder. Irregular menstrual cycle, acne, facial hair and elevated androgen levels are the most common signs for PCOS. PCOS has an estimated prevalence of 4-12% among reproductive age women, thus making it a forerunner in female infertility. FSHR plays an important role in FSH signaling pathway making it an important gene for PCOS. In this study, we aim to focus on any association between the FSHR gene and PCOS. Our study was to evaluate any polymorphism of exon 1 of FSHR gene associated with PCOS.PCR-RFLP technique was performed on the PCOS samples. Hormonal changes were found in the patients. Exon 1 inactivation mutation of FSHR gene was not observed in the patient sample. A study of this association needs to be done using large sample size.

  20. Association of HFE gene mutations with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in the Iranian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saremi, L; Lotfipanah, S; Mohammadi, M; Hosseinzadeh, H; Sayad, A; Saltanatpour, Z

    2016-10-31

    To determine whether the HFE gene variants H63D and C282Y are associated with NAFLD in persons with type 2 diabetes, we conducted a case-control study including 145 case of NAFLD patients with a history of type 2 diabetes and 145 matching control. The genomic DNA was extracted from the peripheral venous blood and the genotyping of HFE gene mutations was analyzed using the PCR-RFLP technique. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 12.0 software by χ2 test, t test and ANOVA (P<0.05). Data showed no increased frequency of HFE mutations in persons with type 2 diabetes and no association between H63D mutation and NAFLD in the study population. Also, we analyzed index of physiological variables including FBS, lipid profile (TC, TG, LDL-C, and HDL-C), BMI, HbA1c, and micro albuminuria and Cr levels). Data showed there are no relationship between these indexes and HFE gene mutations and either NAFLD as a complication of diabetes. But our results showed a relationship between C282Y mutation and NAFLD in persons with type 2 diabetes. C282Y mutation might be a genetic marker of NAFLD in Iranian population.

  1. Characterization of beta-thalassemia mutations in patients from the state of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil

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    Zama Messala Luna da Silveira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available 35 unrelated individuals were studied for characterization as either heterozygous or homozygous for beta-thalassemia. Molecular analysis was done by PCR/RFLP to detect the mutations most commonly associated with beta-thalassemia (β0IVS-I-1, β+IVS-I-6, and β039. In the patients who showed none of these mutations, the beta-globin genes were sequenced. Of the 31 heterozygous patients, 13 (41.9% had the β+IVS-I-6 mutation, 15 (48.4% the β0IVS-I-1 mutation, 2 (6.5% the β+IVS-I-110 mutation and 1 (3.2% the β+IVS-I-5 mutation. IVS-I-6 was detected in the four homozygotes. The mutation in codon 39, often found in previous studies in Brazil, was not detected in the present case. This is the first study aiming at identifying mutations that determine beta-thalassemia in the state of Rio Grande do Norte.

  2. The p. N103K mutation of leptin (LEP gene and severe early onset obesity in Pakistan

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    Shabana

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity is a complex disorder and has been increasing globally at alarming rates including Pakistan. However, there is scarce research on understanding obesity genetics in Pakistan. Leptin is a hormone secreted by adipocytes in response to satiety and correlates with body weight. Any mutations in the LEP gene have an adverse effect on energy regulation pathway and lead to severe, early onset obesity. To date, only eight mutations have been described in the LEP gene of which p. N103K is one. METHODS: We aimed to analyze the prevalence of this mutation in Pakistani subjects. A total of 475 subjects were genotyped by PCR-RFLP analysis and their serum profiling was done. RESULTS: Results showed that this mutation was present only in one male child with early onset obesity (10 year. He had very low serum leptin levels suggestive of functional impact of the mutation. The prevalence of such mutations is, however, low due to the drastic effects on the energy regulation. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, LEP gene mutations contribute significantly to the monogenic forms of obesity and are important due to the availability of treatment options. Such mutations may exert their effect by directly affecting energy regulation pathway and are more prominent in the early stages of life only.

  3. Mutations in the coding regions of the hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha in Iranian families with maturity onset diabetes of the young

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    Tavakolafshari Jalil

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α is a nuclear receptor involved in glucose homeostasis and is required for normal β cell function. Mutations in the HNF4α gene are associated with maturity onset diabetes of the young type 1 (MODY1. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence and nature of mutations in HNF4α gene in Iranian patients with a clinical diagnosis of MODY and their family members. Twelve families including 30 patients with clinically MODY diagnosis and 21 members of their family were examined using PCR-RFLP method and in case of mutation confirmed by sequencing techniques. Fifty age and sex matched subjects with normal fasting blood sugar (FBS and Glucose tolerance test (GTT were constituted the control group and investigated in the similar pattern. Single mutation of V255M in the HNF4α gene was detected. This known mutation was found in 8 of 30 patients and 3 of 21 individuals in relatives. Fifty healthy control subjects did not show any mutation. Here, it is indicated that the prevalence of HNF4α mutation among Iranian patients with clinical MODY is considerable. This mutation was present in 26.6% of our patients, but nothing was found in control group. In the family members, 3 subjects with the age of ≤25 years old carried this mutation. Therefore, holding this mutation in this range of age could be a predisposing factor for developing diabetes in future.

  4. Investigation of FecB Mutation in Four Romanian Sheep Breeds

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    Sergiu-Emil Georgescu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Hyperprolific phenotype of Booroola sheep was first discovered in the Australian Merino breed. This phenotype is due to the action of a single autosomal gene that influences the number of ovulations per estrogenic cycle. Recent discoveries have revealed that high prolificacy in Booroola Merino sheep is the result of a mutation (FecB in the bone morphogenetic protein receptor 1B (BMPR-1B gene. This mutation is located in the highly conserved kinase domain of the bone morphogenetic protein receptor IB, and is characterized by precocious differentiation of ovarian follicles, leading to the production of large numbers of ovulatory follicles. Our objective was to develop an easy method to identify the FecB mutation in order to screen sheep populations in terms of prolificacy. We designed primers to amplify a 190 bp fragment from the BMPR-1B gene containing or lacking the mutation. The PCR product was cut with AvaII endonuclease and the restriction products were analysed by agarose gel electrophoresis. Using the PCR-RFLP technique, we established an easy and efficient method that can be used to screen the FecB mutation. Therefore, these new methods increase the panel of molecular tools available for sheep breeders to choose the most prolific genotypes for improving artificial selection.

  5. [Identification of an ideal noninvasive method to detect A3243G gene mutation in MELAS syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yi-nan; Fang, Fang; Yang, Yan-ling; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Song-tao; Xu, Yu-feng; Pei, Pei; Yuan, Yun; Bu, Ding-fang; Qi, Yu

    2008-12-16

    To identify a better non-invasive method to detect the carrier of mitochondrial A3243G mutation, a cause of mitochondrial encephalopathy-lactic acidosis-stroke like episode (MELAS) syndrome. DNA was extracted from the peripheral blood, urine, hair follicle, and saliva of 25 MELAS syndrome patients carrying A3243G mutation and their mothers and other maternal relatives, 33 persons in number, and the muscle tissues from 5 patients obtained by biopsy. A3243G mutation was detected by PCR-RFLP method, and the A3243G mutation ratio was identified by measuring the density of each band and calculation with the software AlphaEase 5.0. A3243G mutations were detected in all tissues of the 25 MELAS patients. The A3243G mutation ratio in urine was 62% +/- 9%, significantly higher than that in the blood [(36% +/- 10%), t = -11.13, P < 0.01]. A3243G mutations were detected in at least one tissue of the 28 maternal relatives. The A3243G mutation rates in their urine samples was 33.0% (5.0% - 70.4%), significantly higher than that in their blood samples [8.0% (0 - 33.3%), z = -4.197, P < 0.01]. There was no significant difference in A3243G mutation ratio among the samples of hair follicle, saliva, and blood. The A3243G mutation ratio in urine is significantly higher than those in blood samples of the patients and their maternal relatives. A noninvasive method, A3243G mutation ratio analysis of urine is superior to that in blood.

  6. Using PCR-RFLP Technology to Teach Single Nucleotide Polymorphism for Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Wang, Yan; Xu, Xiaofeng; Guan, Xingying; Bai, Yun

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies indicated that the aberrant gene expression of peroxiredoxin-6 (prdx6) was found in various kinds of cancers. Because of its biochemical function and gene expression pattern in cancer cells, the association between genetic polymorphism of Prdx6 and cancer onset is interesting. In this report, we have developed and implemented a…

  7. Genotyping species of the Sporothrix schenckii complex by PCR-RFLP of calmodulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues, Anderson Messias; de Hoog, G Sybren; de Camargo, Zoilo Pires

    Sporotrichosis is one of the most common subcutaneous mycosis in Latin America and is caused by 4 pathogenic thermodimorphic fungi in the genus Sporothrix. From both therapeutic and epidemiological perspectives, it is essential to identify the causative agents down to the species level. Traditional

  8. Practical Algorisms for PCR-RFLP-Based Genotyping of Echinococcus granulosus Sensu Lato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye-Jin; Yong, Tae-Soon; Shin, Myeong Heon; Lee, Kyu-Jae; Park, Gab-Man; Suvonkulov, Uktamjon; Kovalenko, Dmitriy; Yu, Hak Sun

    2017-12-01

    Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato (s.l.) is a causative agent of cystic echinococcosis or cystic hydatid disease in humans and domestic and wild animals. The disease is a serious health problem in countries associated with poverty and poor hygiene practices, particularly in livestock raising. We introduced a practical algorism for genotyping the parasite, which may be useful to many developing countries. To evaluate the efficiency of the algorism, we genotyped 3 unknown strains isolated from human patients. We found that unknowns 1 and 3 were included in G1, G2, and G3 genotypes group and unknown 2 was included in G4 genotype (Echinococcus equinus) according to the algorisms. We confirmed these results by sequencing the 3 unknown isolates cox1 and nad1 PCR products. In conclusion, these new algorisms are very fast genotype identification tools that are suitable for evaluating E. granulosus s.l. isolated from livestock or livestock holders, particularly in developing countries.

  9. Differentiation of Melipona quadrifasciata L. (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Meliponini subspecies using cytochrome b PCR-RFLP patterns

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    Rogério O. Souza

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Melipona quadrifasciata quadrifasciata and M. quadrifasciata anthidioides are subspecies of M. quadrifasciata, a stingless bee species common in coastal Brazil. These subspecies are discriminated by the yellow stripe pattern of the abdominal tergites. We found Vsp I restriction patterns in the cytochrome b region closely associated to each subspecies in 155 M. quadrifasciata colonies of different geographical origin. This mitochondrial DNA molecular marker facilitates diagnosis of M. quadrifasciata subspecies matrilines and can be used to establish their natural distribution and identify hybrid colonies.

  10. PCR-RFLP y RAPD para la tipificación de Leishmania neotropical

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    Ana Margarita Montalvo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. El análisis de la longitud de los fragmentos de restricción del producto amplificado y el estudio del ADN polimórfico amplificado al azar han demostrado ser herramientas útiles para la tipificación de Leishmania. Objetivos. Estudiar la utilidad de las técnicas moleculares para la identificación y tipificación de cepas de referencia de Leishmania spp. del Nuevo Mundo y valorar su aplicabilidad a muestras clínicas. Materiales y métodos. Se aplicó PCR para amplificar el gen que codifica la cisteíno-proteinasa B, y el análisis de la longitud de los fragmentos de restricción del producto amplificado utilizando ácido desoxirribonucleico de 16 cepas de referencia de Latinoamérica y de muestras clínicas de pacientes colombianos con leishmaniasis, y la técnica del ácido desoxirribonucleico polimórfico amplificado al azar utilizando ocho cepas de referencia. Se establecieron los patrones de bandas en cada caso. Resultados. Se obtuvo producto de amplificación en la PCR para Leishmania braziliensis, L. peruviana, L. panamensis y L. guyanensis. Para el resto, no fue posible amplificar el gen con los cebadores utilizados. La restricción mostró un patrón de bandas común para L. peruviana, L. guyanensis y L. panamensis, mientras L. braziliensis, presentaba un perfil individual único. El análisis de restricción del producto amplificado generó un patrón de bandas similar en los cinco pacientes estudiados, que se correspondía con el patrón generado por L. peruviana, L. guyanensis o L. panamensis. Mediante la amplificación al azar se obtuvieron patrones de bandas reproducibles con todas las cepas estudiadas, que posibilitaron la diferenciación. Se discuten las ventajas y limitaciones de ambos procederes. Conclusiones. El combinar ambas metodologías resultaría útil para identificar especies de importancia médica, tomando en cuenta sus ventajas y desventajas.

  11. PCR-RFLP method to distinguish Frankliniella occidentalis, Frankliniella intonsa, Frankliniella pallida and Frankliniella tenuicornis

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    Przybylska Arnika

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thrips from the genus Frankliniella (Thysanoptera, Thripidae are phytophagous on crops and wild plants. Some of them cause slight economic damage, however, others including F. occidentalis and F. intonsa are responsible for considerable losses in crop production. Moreover, they constitute a double threat for host plants by not only feeding on them but also vectoring viruses, some of which are on the quarantined list of the European Plant Protection Organization. The rapid detection and differentiation between more and less harmful Frankliniella species is, therefore, important in order to combat the pests at the time of their appearance. In this study, we have undertaken to develop a method of detecting F. occidentalis, F. intonsa, F. pallida, and F. tenuicornis. The protocol is based on PCR amplification of ITS1 rDNA fragments of these insects using universal primers pair giving products of slightly distinct length for studied insects. Restriction enzymes digestion which is easy to interpret, allows for visible differentiation of all these Frankliniella species. The method was shown to be species-specific and sensitive. Even single specimens in either the larvae or adult stage could be distinguished.

  12. PCR-RFLP analysis of mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b gene among Haruan (Channa striatus) in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Mohamamd Hafiz Abdul; Ismail, Patimah; Alias, Rozila; Muhammad, Norwati; Mat Jais, Abdul Manan

    2012-02-15

    Haruan (Channa striatus) is in great demand in the Malaysian domestic fish market. In the present study, mtDNA cyt b was used to investigate genetic variation of C. striatus among populations in Peninsular Malaysia. The overall population of C. striatus demonstrated a high level of haplotype diversity (h) and a low-to-moderate level of nucleotide diversity (π). Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) results showed a significantly different genetic differentiation among 6 populations (F(ST)=0.37566, P=0.01). Gene flow (Nm) was high and ranged from 0.32469 to infinity (∞). No significant relationship between genetic distance and geographic distance was detected. A UPGMA tree based on the distance matrix of net interpopulation nucleotide divergence (d(A)) and haplotype network of mtDNA cyt b revealed that C. striatus is divided into 2 major clades. The neutrality and mismatch distribution tests for all populations suggested that C. striatus in the study areas had undergone population expansion. The estimated time of population expansion in the mtDNA cyt b of C. striatus populations occurred 0.72-6.19 million years ago. Genetic diversity of mtDNA cyt b and population structure among Haruan populations in Peninsular Malaysia will be useful in fisheries management for standardization for Good Agriculture Practices (GAP) in fish-farming technology, as well as providing the basis for Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A MspI PCR-RFLP within bovin growth hormone gene and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2009-10-05

    Oct 5, 2009 ... total sperm (TS), fresh sperm motility (FSM), total fresh motile sperm (TFMS), post thaw ... cells by increasing the synthesis and/or modification of .... using GENMOD procedure by the following model: [. ] ∑. +. +. +. +. ++=. −. =.

  14. THE EFFECT OF HAEMOCHROMATOSIS MUTATION ON IRON OVERLOAD IN THALASSAEMIA MAJOR PATIENTS

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    Tapas Ranjan Behera

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Haemochromatosis is a genetic form of iron overload due to a defective HFE gene. Secondary iron overload is the main complication in transfusion-dependent thalassaemia major patients. This study aims at evaluating the degree of iron overload in β-thalassaemia major patients with and without HFE mutations (C282Y, H63D and S65C. MATERIALS AND METHODS A descriptive observational study was conducted including fifty diagnosed -thalassaemia major cases. Detailed clinical history and iron profile was estimated. DNA analysis by PCR-RFLP method for HFE gene mutations was performed. RESULTS After DNA analysis of all the thalassaemia major cases, two groups were identified, one with HFE gene mutation and other without HFE gene mutation. Iron profile of both the groups (with and without HFE gene mutation was estimated and compared. Only H63D mutation (out of three HFE gene mutations was detected in 16% cases (8 out of 50 cases, which comprised the group with mutation. Comparison of iron parameters between two groups (with and without HFE gene mutation showed significant difference in percent transferrin saturation (p=0.02, while other iron parameters (serum iron and serum ferritin did not show significant difference. CONCLUSION No significant difference between serum ferritin values (a marker of iron overload of groups with and without mutation (mean ferritin level 4641±2166 ng/mL and 4170±2461 ng/mL, respectively was found (p=0.61, in a patient population in whom transfusion protocol and proper chelation regimen was followed.

  15. Evaluation of prevalence's of pfdhfr and pfdhps mutations in Angola

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Malaria is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in Angola. The most vulnerable groups to Plasmodium falciparum infection are pregnant women and children under five years of age. The use of an intermittent preventive treatment (IPT) with sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP) in pregnant women was introduced in Angola in 2006 by the National Malaria Control Programme, and currently this strategy has been considered to be used for children malaria control. Considering the previous wide use of SP combination in Angola, together to the reported cases of SP treatment failure it is crucial the evaluation of the prevalence of five mutations in pfdhfr and pfdhps genes associated to P. falciparum resistance to SP before the introduction of S/P IPT in children. Methods The study was conducted in five provinces, with different transmission intensities: Huambo, Cabinda, Uíge, Kwanza Norte, and Malanje. The detection of the mutations in pfdhfr and pfdhps genes was carried out in 452 P. falciparum blood samples by PCR RFLP. Results For pfdhfr gene, 90,3% of the samples carried the mutation 51I, with 7.5% of mixed infections; 51% carried wild type allele 59C, with 29.2% mixed infections and; 99.1% of isolates harboured the mutant allele 108N. Concerning, pfdhps gene, 83,1% were mutant type 437G with 11% mixed infections , while 87% of the studied isolates were wild type for codon 540. Discussion This is the first representative epidemiological study of the whole Angola country on the prevalence of the genotypes associated with SP chemoresistance. A high frequency of individual mutations in both genes (51I and 108N in pfdhfr, and 437G in pfdhps) was found, besides a low prevalence of the quintuple mutation. Conclusion The data showed that the implementation IPT using SP in children needs to be reviewed. PMID:21288345

  16. Frequency of Hereditary Hemochromatosis (HFE) Gene Mutations in Egyptian Beta Thalassemia Patients and its Relation to Iron Overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enein, Azza Aboul; El Dessouky, Nermine A; Mohamed, Khalda S; Botros, Shahira K A; Abd El Gawad, Mona F; Hamdy, Mona; Dyaa, Nehal

    2016-06-15

    This study aimed to detect the most common HFE gene mutations (C282Y, H63D, and S56C) in Egyptian beta thalassemia major patients and its relation to their iron status. The study included 50 beta thalassemia major patients and 30 age and sex matched healthy persons as a control group. Serum ferritin, serum iron and TIBC level were measured. Detection of the three HFE gene mutations (C282Y, H63D and S65C) was done by PCR-RFLP analysis. Confirmation of positive cases for the mutations was done by sequencing. Neither homozygote nor carrier status for the C282Y or S65C alleles was found. The H63D heterozygous state was detected in 5/50 (10%) thalassemic patients and in 1/30 (3.3%) controls with no statistically significant difference between patients and control groups (p = 0.22). Significantly higher levels of the serum ferritin and serum iron in patients with this mutation (p = 001). Our results suggest that there is an association between H63D mutation and the severity of iron overload in thalassemic patients.

  17. Mutation spectrum of β-globin gene in thalassemia patients at Hasan Sadikin Hospital - West Java Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskoen, Ani Melani; Rahayu, Nurul S; Reniarti, Lelani; Susanah, Susi; Laksono, Bremmy; Fauziah, Prima Nanda; Zada, Almira; Hidayat, Dadang S

    2017-12-30

    Thalassemia is the most common hereditary haemolytic anemia in Southeast Asia, in which Indonesia is among countries that are at a high risk for thalassemia. It has been reported that mutation in the beta-globin gene is responsible in severe Thalassemia. However, the spectrum of beta-globin gene mutations in Indonesian population varies in different regions . Thus, this study aimed to identify the most prevalent mutation of Thalassemia patients from the Hasan Sadikin Hospital, Bandung, using this as a reference hospital for Thalassemia in West Java. The three most prevalent mutations of beta globin (IVS1nt5, Cd26 (HbE), and IVS1nt1), were conducted in the beginning of this study. Mutations of 291 samples were detected by PCR-RFLP in the Molecular Genetic Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine Universitas Padjadjaran, Bandung. The prevalence of the beta globin gene mutation types were 47.4% IVS1nt5 homozygote, 9.9% compound heterozygote IVS1nt5/HbE, 5.4% compound heterozygote IVS1nt5/IVS1nt1, 1.4% compound heterozygote HbE/IVS1nt1, 1% HbE homozygote, 14.4% Compound heterzygote IVS1nt5/… (no paired mutation), 2.06% compound heterozygote HbE/… (no paired mutation), 1.3% compound heterozygote IVS1nt1/… (no paired mutation), and 7 samples were unidentified. The thalassemia mutation IVS1nt5 homozygote is the most common mutation found in Thalassemia patients at Hasan Sadikin Hospital, Bandung. The samples with unidentified results might carry mutations other than the three that are observed in the present study.

  18. Isolated growth hormone deficiency in two siblings because of paternal mosaicism for a mutation in the GH1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubahara, Mayuko; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Niijima, Shin-ichi; Yamamoto, Michiyo; Kamijo, Takashi; Murata, Yoshiharu; Haruna, Hidenori; Okumura, Akihisa; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2012-03-01

    Mutations in the GH1 gene have been identified in patients with isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD). Mutations causing aberrant splicing of exon 3 of GH1 that have been identified in IGHD are inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, whereas other mutations in GH1 that have been identified in IGHD are inherited in an autosomal recessive manner.   Two siblings born from nonconsanguineous healthy parents exhibited IGHD. To elucidate the cause, GH1 in all family members was analysed.   Two novel mutations in GH1, a point mutation in intron 3 and a 16-bp deletion in exon 3, were identified by sequence analyses. The intronic mutation was present in both siblings and was predicted to cause aberrant splicing. The deletion was present in one of the siblings as well as the mother with normal stature and was predicted to cause rapid degradation of mRNA through nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. The point mutation was not identified in the parents' peripheral blood DNA; however, it was detected in the DNA extracted from the father's sperms. As a trace of the mutant allele was detected in the peripheral blood of the father using PCR-RFLP, the mutation is likely to have occurred de novo at an early developmental stage before differentiation of somatic cells and germline cells.   This is the first report of mosaicism for a mutation in GH1 in a family with IGHD. It is clear that the intronic mutation plays a dominant role in the pathogenesis of IGHD in this family, as one of the siblings who had only the point mutation was affected. On the other hand, the other sibling was a compound heterozygote for the point mutation and the 16-bp deletion and it may be arguable whether IGHD in this patient should be regarded as autosomal dominant or recessive. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. HFE H63D mutation frequency shows an increase in Turkish women with breast cancer

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    Guler Emine

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hereditary hemochromatosis gene HFE plays a pivotal role in iron homeostasis. The association between cancer and HFE hetero- or homozygosity has previously been shown including hepatocellular and nonhepatocellular malignancies. This study was performed to compare frequencies of HFE C282Y and H63D variants in Turkish women with breast cancer and healthy controls. Methods Archived DNA samples of Hacettepe University Oncology Institute were used in this study. The HFE gene was investigated by PCR-RFLP. Results All subjects studied were free from C282Y mutation. Thirty-nine patients had H63D mutation and were all heterozygous. H63D allele frequency was 22.2% (39/176 in the breast cancer patients, and 14% (28/200 in the healthy volunteers. Statistical analysis of cases with HFE H63D phenotype showed significant difference between breast cancer and healthy volunteers (P = 0.02. Conclusion Our results suggest that HFE H63D mutation frequencies were increased in the breast cancer patients in comparison to those in the general population. Also, odds ratios (odds ratio = 2.05 computed in this study suggest that H63D has a positive association with breast cancer.

  20. Diagnosis of Xeroderma Pigmentosum Groups A and C by Detection of Two Prevalent Mutations in West Algerian Population: A Rapid Genotyping Tool for the Frequent XPC Mutation c.1643_1644delTG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensenouci, Salima; Louhibi, Lotfi; De Verneuil, Hubert; Mahmoudi, Khadidja; Saidi-Mehtar, Nadhira

    2016-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. Considering that XP patients have a defect of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway which enables them to repair DNA damage caused by UV light, they have an increased risk of developing skin and eyes cancers. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of the prevalent XPA and XPC genes mutations-nonsense mutation (c.682C>T, p.Arg228X) and a two-base-pair (2 bp) deletion (c.1643_1644delTG or p.Val548Ala fsX25), respectively-in 19 index cases from 19 unrelated families in the West of Algeria. For the genetic diagnosis of XPA gene, we proceeded to PCR-RFLP. For the XPC gene, we validated a routine analysis which includes a specific amplification of a short region surrounding the 2 bp deletion using a fluorescent primer and fragment sizing (GeneScan size) on a sequencing gel. Among the 19 index cases, there were 17 homozygous patients for the 2 bp deletion in the XPC gene and 2 homozygous patients carrying the nonsense XPA mutation. Finally, XPC appears to be the major disease-causing gene concerning xeroderma pigmentosum in North Africa. The use of fragment sizing is the simplest method to analyze this 2 bp deletion for the DNA samples coming from countries where the mutation c.1643_1644delTG of XPC gene is prevalent.

  1. Inactivating Mutation screening of Exon 6 and Exon 10E of FSHR gene in women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome in Vellore population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, Nishu; Sapre, Madhura; Kale, Vaikhari; Prabhu, Yogamaya D.; Renu, Kaviyarasi; Ramgir, Shalaka S.; Abilash, V. G.

    2017-11-01

    Polycystic Ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is a major cause of infertility in females of reproducing age and is typified by oligo-anovulation, hyperandrogenism, hirsutism and polycystic ovaries. FSHR gene located on chromosome 2 p21 is responsible for the normal follicular development and any deletion or mutation in the gene affects the interaction of FSH with its receptor. Thus, it becomes the candidate gene for PCOS study. Inactivating mutation in FSHR gene limits the receptor’s function by creating a complete block, changing the receptor-ligand complex or the basic hormone signal transduction.To screen the inactivating mutations in Exon 6 and Exon 10E of FSHR gene in women diagnosed with PCOS.PCR-RFLP analysis indicated that there were no inactivating mutations found in Exon 6 and Exon 10E. Variations in hormone levels were seen amongst the PCOS patients. There were no inactivating mutations found in FSHR gene of the women diagnosed with PCOS according to the Rotterdam criteria in Vellore population.

  2. Alpha-synuclein A53T mutation is not frequent on a sample of Brazilian Parkinson’s disease patients

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    Gabriela S. Longo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD involves both genetic susceptibility and environmental factors, with focus on the mutation in the alpha-synuclein gene (SNCA.Objective To analyse the polymorphism SNCA-A53T in patients with familial PD (FPD and sporadic PD (SPD.Method A total of 294 individuals were studied, regardless of sex and with mixed ethnicity. The study group with 154 patients with PD, and the control group included 140 individuals without PD. The genotyping of SNCA-A53T was performed by PCR/RFLP. Significance level was p < 0.05.Results Among all patients, 37 (24% had FPD and 117 (75.9% had SPD. The absence of SNCA-A53T mutation was observed in all individuals.Conclusion SPD is notably observed in patients. However, the SNCA-A53T mutation was absent in all individuals, which does not differ controls from patients. This fact should be confirmed in a Brazilian study case with a more numerous and older population.

  3. The mitochondrial DNA 10197 G > A mutation causes MELAS/Leigh overlap syndrome presenting with acute auditory agnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Yinglin; Liu, Yuhe; Fang, Xiaojing; Li, Yao; Yu, Lei; Yuan, Yun; Wang, Zhaoxia

    2015-04-01

    Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes/Leigh (MELAS/LS) overlap syndrome is a mitochondrial disorder subtype with clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features that are characteristic of both MELAS and Leigh syndrome (LS). Here, we report an MELAS/LS case presenting with cortical deafness and seizures. Cranial MRI revealed multiple lesions involving bilateral temporal lobes, the basal ganglia and the brainstem, which conformed to neuroimaging features of both MELAS and LS. Whole mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequencing and PCR-RFLP revealed a de novo heteroplasmic m.10197 G > A mutation in the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 3 gene (ND3), which was predicted to cause an alanine to threonine substitution at amino acid 47. Although the mtDNA m.10197 G > A mutation has been reported in association with LS, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and dystonia, it has never been linked with MELAS/LS overlap syndrome. Our patient therefore expands the phenotypic spectrum of the mtDNA m.10197 G > A mutation.

  4. Mutational analysis of circulating tumor cells from colorectal cancer patients and correlation with primary tumor tissue.

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    Anna Lyberopoulou

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs provide a non-invasive accessible source of tumor material from patients with cancer. The cellular heterogeneity within CTC populations is of great clinical importance regarding the increasing number of adjuvant treatment options for patients with metastatic carcinomas, in order to eliminate residual disease. Moreover, the molecular profiling of these rare cells might lead to insight on disease progression and therapeutic strategies than simple CTCs counting. In the present study we investigated the feasibility to detect KRAS, BRAF, CD133 and Plastin3 (PLS3 mutations in an enriched CTCs cell suspension from patients with colorectal cancer, with the hypothesis that these genes` mutations are of great importance regarding the generation of CTCs subpopulations. Subsequently, we compared CTCs mutational status with that of the corresponding primary tumor, in order to access the possibility of tumor cells characterization without biopsy. CTCs were detected and isolated from blood drawn from 52 colorectal cancer (CRC patients using a quantum-dot-labelled magnetic immunoassay method. Mutations were detected by PCR-RFLP or allele-specific PCR and confirmed by direct sequencing. In 52 patients, discordance between primary tumor and CTCs was 5.77% for KRAS, 3.85% for BRAF, 11.54% for CD133 rs3130, 7.69% for CD133 rs2286455 and 11.54% for PLS3 rs6643869 mutations. Our results support that DNA mutational analysis of CTCs may enable non-invasive, specific biomarker diagnostics and expand the scope of personalized medicine for cancer patients.

  5. Direct sequencing of FAH gene in Pakistani tyrosinemia type 1 families reveals a novel mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijaz, Sadaqat; Zahoor, Muhammad Yasir; Imran, Muhammad; Afzal, Sibtain; Bhinder, Munir A; Ullah, Ihsan; Cheema, Huma Arshad; Ramzan, Khushnooda; Shehzad, Wasim

    2016-03-01

    Hereditary tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1) is a rare inborn error of tyrosine catabolism with a worldwide prevalence of one out of 100,000 live births. HT1 is clinically characterized by hepatic and renal dysfunction resulting from the deficiency of fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH) enzyme, caused by recessive mutations in the FAH gene. We present here the first report on identification of FAH mutations in HT1 patients from Pakistan with a novel one. Three Pakistani families, each having one child affected with HT1, were enrolled over a period of 1.5 years. Two of the affected children had died as they were presented late with acute form. All regions of the FAH gene spanning exons and splicing sites were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and mutation analysis was carried out by direct sequencing. Results of sequencing were confirmed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis. Three different FAH mutations, one in each family, were found to co-segregate with the disease phenotype. Two of these FAH mutations have been known (c.192G>T and c.1062+5G>A [IVS12+5G>A]), while c.67T>C (p.Ser23Pro) was a novel mutation. The novel variant was not detected in any of 120 chromosomes from normal ethnically matched individuals. Most of the HT1 patients die before they present to hospitals in Pakistan, as is indicated by enrollment of only three families in 1.5 years. Most of those with late clinical presentation do not survive due to delayed diagnosis followed by untimely treatment. This tragic condition advocates the establishment of expanded newborn screening program for HT1 within Pakistan.

  6. Correlation Between C677T and A1298C Mutations on the MTHFR Gene With Plasma Homocysteine Levels and Venous Thrombosis in Pregnant Women at Risk of Thrombosis

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    Kazem Ghaffari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Deep venous thrombosis (DVT is a common disease with a high morbidity, mortality and increase in miscarriages. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to assessment the correlation between C677T and A1298C mutations on the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR gene with total plasma homocysteine levels and deep venous thrombosis in pregnant women at risk of thrombosis. Patients and Methods: In this case-control study, 120 pregnant women with risk of DVT and 100 pregnant women without risk of DVT were included in the study. Assay for identification of MTHFR mutations was carried out by PCR-RFLP. Total plasma homocysteine was measured by ELISA method. Results: Homozygous (MM mutations of MTHFR C677T and A1298C were not associated with DVT in pregnant women with and without DVT, respectively. Plasma homocysteine levels were significantly higher in pregnant women with DVT (18.3 ± 5.9 μmol/L than in the pregnant women without DVT (8.9 ± 6.4 μmol/L in C677T and A1298C mutations on the MTHFR gene, respectively (P = 0.021. Conclusions: Our results showed that MTHFR C677T and MTHFR A1289C polymorphisms are not connected with total plasma homocysteine levels in pregnant women with and without DVT. Also, plasma homocysteine levels were significantly higher in pregnant women with DVT.

  7. JAK2V617F mutation is associated with special alleles in essential thrombocythemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Hui-Hua; Liu, Yi-Chang; Tsai, Hui-Jen; Lee, Ching-Ping; Hsu, Jui-Feng; Lin, Sheng-Fung

    2011-03-01

    Janus kinase 2 mutation (JAK2V617F) has been identified in myeloproliferative neoplasms. Furthermore, special single nucleoside polymorphisms (SNPs) have been found to be associated with the JAK2V617F mutation. Therefore, the associations among JAK2V617F and special SNPs and the allelic location between them were investigated in patients with essential thrombocythemia (ET). A total of 61 patients with ET and 106 healthy individuals were enrolled. The PCR-RFLP method was applied to investigate the pattern of three SNPs, rs10974944, rs12343867, and rs12340895. Allele-specific PCR was used to examine the allelic location between rs10974944 and JAK2V617F. Among the patients with ET, 34 (55.7%, 34/61) were JAK2V617F positive (heterozygous) while the other 27 (44.3%, 27/61) were negative, and there were no MPLW515L/K mutations noted. The pattern of special SNPs in JAK2V617F(+) was significantly different from that in normal individuals (p <0.05), while there was no difference between JAK2V617F(-) patients and normal individuals. Allele-specific PCR showed high association of a cis-location between the special G-allele of rs10974944 and JAK2V617F(+). Based on this small numbered study, the results show the association between special SNPs and JAK2V617F mutation and a cis-location between the special G-allelic form of rs10974944 and the JAK2V617F mutation. These data highlight a close relationship between them in patients with ET.

  8. Lack of association of C282Y and H63D mutations in the hemochromatosis (HFE) gene with diabetes mellitus type 2 in a case-control study of women in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, K B; Carvalho, M G; Coelho, F F; Rodrigues, I F; Soares, A L; Guimarães, D A; Fernandes, A P

    2009-10-27

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is one of the most common autosomal recessive diseases; it is characterized by excess absorption of iron. Clinically, the major challenge is to diagnose increased iron deposition before irreversible tissue damage has occurred. C282Y and H63D are the main mutations related to hereditary hemochromatosis; these mutations have been reported to be associated with increased risk of developing diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2). We investigated whether these mutations are associated with increased risk for the development of DM2 in women in Brazil. Seventy-two women with clinical diagnosis of DM2 under treatment with hypoglycemic agents and a control group composed of 72 women with no clinical history of diabetes were studied. The C282Y and H63D mutations were determined by PCR-RFLP. Significant differences were not observed for C282Y and H63D, when we compared diabetic and non-diabetic women. We suggest that mutations C282Y and H63D in the HFE gene are not significant risk factors for the development of DM2 in Brazilian women.

  9. Variations in the occurrence of specific rpoB mutations in rifampicin-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from patients of different ethnic groups in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Suhail; Al-Mutairi, Noura M; Mokaddas, Eiman

    2012-05-01

    Frequency of resistance-conferring mutations vary among isoniazid- and ethambutol-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates obtained from patients of various ethnic groups. This study was aimed to determine the occurrence of specific rpoB mutations in rifampicin-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates from tuberculosis patients of various ethnic groups in Kuwait. Rifampicin-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates (n=119) from South Asian (n=55), Southeast Asian (n=23), Middle Eastern (n=39) and other (n=2) patients and 107 rifampicin-susceptible isolates were tested. Mutations in rpoB were detected by DNA sequencing. Polymorphisms at katG463 and gyrA95 were detected by PCR-RFLP for genetic group assignment. None of rifampicin-susceptible but 116 of 119 rifampicin-resistant isolates showed rpoB mutation(s). Mutations among isolates from South Asian patients were distributed at rpoB516 (20%), rpoB526 (24%) and rpoB531 (27%) while 78 and 51 per cent of isolates from Southeast Asian and Middle Eastern patients, respectively, contained a mutated rpoB531. All isolates with rpoB N-terminal and cluster II mutations were obtained from Middle Eastern and South Asian patients. Most isolates from South Asian (84%) and Southeast Asian (70%) patients belonged to genetic group I while nearly all remaining isolates belonged to genetic group II. Isolates from Middle Eastern patients were distributed among genetic group I (46%), genetic group II (33%) and genetic group III (21%). The occurrence of specific rpoB mutations varied considerably in rifampicin-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates obtained from patients of different ethnic groups within the same country. The present data have important implications for designing region-specific rapid methods for detecting majority of rifampicin-resistant strains.

  10. Survey of chloroquine-resistant mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum pfcrt and pfmdr-1 genes in Hadhramout, Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamaga, Omar A A; Mahdy, Mohammed A K; Lim, Yvonne A L

    2015-09-01

    Malaria is still a major public health problem in Yemen. More than 95% of the malaria cases are due to Plasmodium ‎falciparum‎. Recently in Yemen, the antimalarial treatment policy was changed from chloroquine (CQ) to artemisinin combination therapy (ACTs). However, CQ is still available and prescribed in the Yemeni market. The persistence of CQ resistance will be prolonged if the shift to ACT and the simultaneous withdrawal of CQ are not rigorously implemented. The aim of the current survey is to detect chloroquine-resistant mutations in P. falciparum chloroquine-resistance transporter (pfcrt) and P. falciparum multi-drug resistance-1 (pfmdr1) genes. These data will be important for future monitoring and assessment of antimalarial drug policy in Yemen. Blood specimens were collected from 735 individuals from different districts of the Hadhramout province, Yemen by house-to-house visit. Mutation-specific nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) methods were used to investigate the mutations in the pfmdr1(codons 86 and 1246) and pfcrt (codons 76, 271, 326, 356 and 371) genes. The overall prevalence of pfcrt mutations at codons 76, 271, 326 and 371 were 50.4%, 58.7%, 54.3% and 44.9%, respectively. All isolates had wild-type pfcrt 356 allele. The majority of pfmdr1 86 alleles (83.3%) and all pfmdr1 1246 alleles were wild type. There was no association between pfcrt mutations and symptomatology, gender and age groups. In conclusion, point mutations in codons 76, 271, 326 and 371 of pfcrt of P. falciparum are high suggesting a sustained high CQ resistance even after 4 years of shifting to ACTs. These findings warrant complete withdrawal of CQ use from the Yemeni market for P. falciparum and careful usage of CQ for treating Plasmodium vivax. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Lack of evidence for the pathogenic role of iron and HFE gene mutations in Brazilian patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

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    M.M. Deguti

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The hypothesis of the role of iron overload associated with HFE gene mutations in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH has been raised in recent years. In the present study, biochemical and histopathological evidence of iron overload and HFE mutations was investigated in NASH patients. Thirty-two NASH patients, 19 females (59%, average 49.2 years, 72% Caucasians, 12% Mulattoes and 12% Asians, were submitted to serum aminotransferase and iron profile determinations. Liver biopsies were analyzed for necroinflammatory activity, architectural damage and iron deposition. In 31 of the patients, C282Y and H63D mutations were tested by PCR-RFLP. Alanine aminotransferase levels were increased in 30 patients, 2.42 ± 1.12 times the upper normal limit on average. Serum iron concentration, transferrin saturation and ferritin averages were 99.4 ± 31.3 g/dl, 33.1 ± 12.7% and 219.8 ± 163.8 µg/dl, respectively, corresponding to normal values in 93.5, 68.7 and 78.1% of the patients. Hepatic siderosis was observed in three patients and was not associated with architectural damage (P = 0.53 or with necroinflammatory activity (P = 0.27. The allelic frequencies (N = 31 found were 1.6 and 14.1% for C282Y and H63D, respectively, which were compatible with those described for the local population. In conclusion, no evidence of an association of hepatic iron overload and HFE mutations with NASH was found. Brazilian NASH patients comprise a heterogeneous group with many associated conditions such as hyperinsulinism, environmental hepatotoxin exposure and drugs, but not hepatic iron overload, and their disease susceptibility could be related to genetic and environmental features other than HFE mutations.

  12. Retinopathy of prematurity: mutations in the Norrie disease gene and the risk of progression to advanced stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, M Z; Devarajan, L V; Al-Essa, M; Srivastva, B S; Kumar, H; Azad, R; Rashwan, N

    2001-04-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a retinal vascular disease that occurs in infants with short gestational age and low birth weight and may lead to retinal detachment and blindness. Missense mutations in the Norrie disease (ND) gene have been associated with the risk of progression to advanced stages in cases of ROP from the US and also in clinically similar ND and familial exudative vitreoretinopathy. We have screened two ND gene mutations, namely A105T and Val60Glu, by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and allele-specific PCR methods, respectively, in 210 Kuwaiti premature newborns to replicate these findings in a different ethnic group. In the Kuwaiti premature newborn cohort, 115 of 210 babies had no eye problems and served as controls, while 95 were cases of ROP. In 71 of 95 ROP cases, the disease regressed spontaneously on or before stage 3, while in 24 of 95 ROP cases the disease progressed to advanced stages 4 and 5. In case of missense mutation (A105T), the AA genotype was detected in 96% of controls compared with 87% of ROP cases (NS); similarly no significant difference was found between spontaneously regressed ROP cases and those who progressed to advanced stages. For the Val60Glu mutation, no significant association was detected between the genotype and progression of ROP to advanced stages. Unlike data from the US, our findings from a Kuwaiti cohort of ROP cases and controls suggest a lack of association between the two ND gene mutations (A105T and Val60Glu) and ROP and the risk of progression of the disease to advanced stages.

  13. Características sociodemográficas de mujeres peruanas con virus papiloma humano detectado por PCR-RFLP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser Sullcahuaman-Allende

    Full Text Available Con el objetivo de determinar las características sociodemográficas del virus de pacientes con papiloma humano (VPH referidas al Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplásicas (INEN durante los años 2012-2014, se realizó la detección del VPH en células cervicales por reacción en cadena de la polimerasa (PCR. En 465 muestras cervicales se detectaron 151 (32,5% casos de VPH positivas. Los genotipos más frecuentes fueron VPH-16 (23,8% y VPH-6 (11,9%. La presencia de VPH fue mayor en mujeres de 17 a 29 años (OR 2,64, IC 95%:1,14-6,13 y solteras (OR 2,31, IC 95%: 1,37-3,91, la presencia de genotipos de VPH de alto riesgo fue mayor en solteras (OR 2,19, IC 95%: 1,04-4,62. En conclusión, mujeres jóvenes y solteras presentaron mayor frecuencia de casos VPH-positivos a quienes se debe enfatizar la participación en programas de tamizaje con métodos moleculares y citológicos combinados, a fin de detectar oportunamente el riesgo de desarrollar cáncer de cuello uterino

  14. The possibility of discriminating within the Bacillus cereus group using gyrB sequencing and PCR-RFLP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Gert B; Fisker, Niels; Sparsø, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Based on a combination of PCR and restriction endonuclease (RE) digestion (PCR-RE digestion), we have examined the possibility of differentiating members of the Bacillus cereus group. Fragments of the gyrB gene (362 bp) from pure cultures of 12 B. cereus, 25 B. thuringiensis, 25 B. mycoides and two......, it was not possible to discriminate between the B. cereus and the B. thuringiensis strains using the methods described....

  15. Phylogenetic Analysis and Molecular Characterization of Xanthium sibiricum Using DNA Barcoding, PCR-RFLP, and Specific Primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasello, Salvatore; Heubl, Günther

    2017-07-01

    The fruits of Xanthium sibiricum have been widely used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of nasal sinusitis and headaches. The genus Xanthium (cocklebur) is a taxonomically complex genus. Different taxonomic concepts have been proposed, some including several species, others lumping the different taxa in a few extremely polymorphic species. Due to the morphological similarities between species, the correct authentication of X. sibiricum is very difficult. Therefore, we established a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method and diagnostic PCR based on nuclear internal transcribed spacer and chloroplast trnQ-rps16 barcodes to differentiate X. sibirium from related species.Results from the phylogenetic analyses based on sequence information from four marker regions (plastidal psbA-trnH and trnQ-rps16 and nuclear ITS and D35 ) support those taxonomic concepts accepting a reduced number of species, as four to five major clades are revealed in the phylogenetic reconstructions. X. sibiricum , together with some accessions from closely related taxa, is always supported as monophyletic, constituting a well-defined genetic entity. Allele-specific primer pairs for ITS and trnQ-rps16 were designed to amplify diagnostic products from the genomic DNA of X. sibiricum . Specific PCR in combination with digestion using the restriction enzyme Mse I allowed for the identification of X. sibiricum by producing specific restriction patterns. The results demonstrate that the applied techniques provide effective and accurate authentication of X. sibiricum . Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. A Comprehensive Experiment for Molecular Biology: Determination of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in Human REV3 Gene Using PCR-RFLP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Shao, Meng; Gao, Lu; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Sun, Zixuan; Zhou, Liping; Yan, Yongmin; Shao, Qixiang; Xu, Wenrong; Qian, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Laboratory exercise is helpful for medical students to understand the basic principles of molecular biology and to learn about the practical applications of molecular biology. We have designed a lab course on molecular biology about the determination of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in human REV3 gene, the product of which is a subunit of…

  17. Ochratoxigenic Black Species of Aspergilli in Grape Fruits of Northern Italy Identified by an Improved PCR-RFLP Procedure

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    Maria Lodovica Gullino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A collection of 356 isolates of Aspergillus spp. collected during 2006 and 2007 from grapevines in northern Italy were identified through Internal Transcribed Spacer based Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (ITS-RFLP and tested for ochratoxin A (OTA production. Restriction endonuclease digestion of the ITS products using the endonucleases HhaI, HinfI and RsaI, distinguished five different RFLPs. From each pattern, three samples were sequenced and the nucleotide sequences showed different species corresponding to Aspergillus niger, A. carbonarius, A. tubingensis, A. japonicus and A. aculeatus. By comparing the sequences of the ITS regions, also the uniseriate species A. japonicus and A. aculeatus could be differentiated by HinfI digestion of the ITS products. Among the aspergilli, A. niger was the major species associated with grapes during 2006 (57.4%, while A. carbonarius was the major species during 2007 (46.6%. All the strains of Aspergillus were tested for their ability to produce OTA on Yeast extract sucrose medium (YES, as it was tested as an optimal substrate for the evaluation of OTA production by black aspergilli. Out of 356 isolates, 63 (17.7% isolates produced OTA ranging from 0.05 to 3.0 µg mL−1. Most of the ochratoxigenic isolates were A. carbonarius (46 in both years, but also some strains of A. tubingensis (11 and A. japonicus (6 produced lower amounts of OTA.

  18. A comprehensive experiment for molecular biology: Determination of single nucleotide polymorphism in human REV3 gene using PCR-RFLP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Shao, Meng; Gao, Lu; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Sun, Zixuan; Zhou, Liping; Yan, Yongmin; Shao, Qixiang; Xu, Wenrong; Qian, Hui

    2017-07-08

    Laboratory exercise is helpful for medical students to understand the basic principles of molecular biology and to learn about the practical applications of molecular biology. We have designed a lab course on molecular biology about the determination of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in human REV3 gene, the product of which is a subunit of DNA polymerase ζ and SNPs in this gene are associated with altered susceptibility to cancer. This newly designed experiment is composed of three parts, including genomic DNA extraction, gene amplification by PCR, and genotyping by RFLP. By combining these activities, the students are not only able to learn a series of biotechniques in molecular biology, but also acquire the ability to link the learned knowledge with practical applications. This comprehensive experiment will help the medical students improve the conceptual understanding of SNP and the technical understanding of SNP detection. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(4):299-304, 2017. © 2017 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  19. A Novel Nonsense Mutation in the DMP1 Gene Identified by a Genome-Wide Association Study Is Responsible for Inherited Rickets in Corriedale Sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Hugh T.; Thompson, Keith G.; Rothschild, Max F.; Garrick, Dorian J.

    2011-01-01

    Inherited rickets of Corriedale sheep is characterized by decreased growth rate, thoracic lordosis and angular limb deformities. Previous outcross and backcross studies implicate inheritance as a simple autosomal recessive disorder. A genome wide association study was conducted using the Illumina OvineSNP50 BeadChip on 20 related sheep comprising 17 affected and 3 carriers. A homozygous region of 125 consecutive single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) loci was identified in all affected sheep, covering a region of 6 Mb on ovine chromosome 6. Among 35 candidate genes in this region, the dentin matrix protein 1 gene (DMP1) was sequenced to reveal a nonsense mutation 250C/T on exon 6. This mutation introduced a stop codon (R145X) and could truncate C-terminal amino acids. Genotyping by PCR-RFLP for this mutation showed all 17 affected sheep were “T T” genotypes; the 3 carriers were “C T”; 24 phenotypically normal related sheep were either “C T” or “C C”; and 46 unrelated normal control sheep from other breeds were all “C C”. The other SNPs in DMP1 were not concordant with the disease and can all be ruled out as candidates. Previous research has shown that mutations in the DMP1 gene are responsible for autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets in humans. Dmp1_knockout mice exhibit rickets phenotypes. We believe the R145X mutation to be responsible for the inherited rickets found in Corriedale sheep. A simple diagnostic test can be designed to identify carriers with the defective “T” allele. Affected sheep could be used as animal models for this form of human rickets, and for further investigation of the role of DMP1 in phosphate homeostasis. PMID:21747952

  20. A novel nonsense mutation in the DMP1 gene identified by a genome-wide association study is responsible for inherited rickets in Corriedale sheep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Zhao

    Full Text Available Inherited rickets of Corriedale sheep is characterized by decreased growth rate, thoracic lordosis and angular limb deformities. Previous outcross and backcross studies implicate inheritance as a simple autosomal recessive disorder. A genome wide association study was conducted using the Illumina OvineSNP50 BeadChip on 20 related sheep comprising 17 affected and 3 carriers. A homozygous region of 125 consecutive single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP loci was identified in all affected sheep, covering a region of 6 Mb on ovine chromosome 6. Among 35 candidate genes in this region, the dentin matrix protein 1 gene (DMP1 was sequenced to reveal a nonsense mutation 250C/T on exon 6. This mutation introduced a stop codon (R145X and could truncate C-terminal amino acids. Genotyping by PCR-RFLP for this mutation showed all 17 affected sheep were "T T" genotypes; the 3 carriers were "C T"; 24 phenotypically normal related sheep were either "C T" or "C C"; and 46 unrelated normal control sheep from other breeds were all "C C". The other SNPs in DMP1 were not concordant with the disease and can all be ruled out as candidates. Previous research has shown that mutations in the DMP1 gene are responsible for autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets in humans. Dmp1_knockout mice exhibit rickets phenotypes. We believe the R145X mutation to be responsible for the inherited rickets found in Corriedale sheep. A simple diagnostic test can be designed to identify carriers with the defective "T" allele. Affected sheep could be used as animal models for this form of human rickets, and for further investigation of the role of DMP1 in phosphate homeostasis.

  1. Human MTHFR-G1793A transition may be a protective mutation against male infertility: a genetic association study and in silico analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimian, Mohammad; Hosseinzadeh Colagar, Abasalt

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the association of the human methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR)-G1793A transition with male infertility using a case-control study, a meta-analysis and an in silico analysis. In the case-control study, 308 blood samples (169 infertile and 139 fertile men) were collected. MTHFR-G1793A genotyping was performed by PCR-RFLP. The study revealed a significant protective association between the GA genotype (OR: 0.3737, 95%CI: 0.1874-0.7452, p = 0.0052) and A allele (OR: 0.4266, 95%CI: 0.2267-0.8030, p = 0.0083) with male infertility. Meta-analysis showed that the G1793A transition might be a protective mutation against male infertility in both A vs. G (OR: 0.608, 95%CI: 0.466-0.792, p silico-analysis revealed that although G1793A could not make fundamental changes in the function and structure of MTHFR, it could modify the structure of the mRNA (Distance =0.1809, p = 0.1095; p < 0.2 is significant). The results suggest that G1793A substitution might be a protective genetic factor against male infertility. However, further case-control studies are required to provide a more robust conclusion.

  2. Evaluation of gestational diabetes mellitus risk in South Indian women based on MTHFR (C677T and FVL (G1691A mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Ali Khan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to scrutinize the extent to which single amino acid substitutions in the MTHFR and FVL genes affect the risk of GDM in pregnant women of South Indian descendant. This case-control study was implemented once the ethical approval has been obtained. Overall 237 women were recruited in this study: 137 had been diagnosed with GDM and the remaining 100 women were used as normal controls or non-GDM. The diagnosis of GDM was confirmed with biochemical analysis i.e., GCT and OGTT tests. Five milliliters of peripheral blood was collected and used for biochemical and molecular analyses. DNA was isolated and genotyping for MTHFR (C677T and FVL (G1691A mutations was performed using PCR-RFLP. FVL (G1691A locus was not polymorphic in the investigated sample. There was no significant difference in the allele and genotype frequencies of C677T polymorphism between GDM and non-GDM women (p=0.8892

  3. A novel nine base deletion mutation in NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase gene in an Indian family with recessive congenital methemoglobinemia-type-II

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    Prashant Warang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recessive hereditary methemoglobinemia (RCM associated with severe neurological abnormalities is a very rare disorder caused by NADH- cytochrome b5 reductase (cb5r deficiency (Type II. We report a case of 11 month old male child who had severe mental retardation, microcephaly and gross global developmental delay with methemoglobin level of 61.1%. The diagnosis of NADH-CYB5R3 deficiency was made by the demonstration of significantly reduced NADH-CYB5R3 activity in the patient and intermediate enzyme activity in both the parents. Mutation analysis of the CYB5R gene revealed a novel nine nucleotide deletion in exon 6 leading to the elimination of 3 amino acid residues (Lys173, Ser174 and Val 175. To confirm that this mutation was not an artifact, we performed PCR-RFLP analysis using the restriction enzyme Drd I. As the normal sequence has a restriction recognition site for Drd I which was eliminated by the deletion, a single band of 603-bp was seen in the presence of the homozygous mutation. Molecular modeling analysis showed a significant effect of these 3 amino acids deletion on the protein structure and stability leading to a severe clinical presentation. A novel homozygous 9 nucleotide deletion (p.K173–p.V175del3 is shown to be segregated with the disease in this family. Knowing the profile of mutations would allow us to offer prenatal diagnosis in families with severe neurological disorders associated with RCM — Type II.

  4. Associations of biochemical changes and maternal traits with mutation 1843 (C>T in the RYR1 gene as a common cause for porcine stress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popovski ZT

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Stress syndrome is usually caused by a mutation in the ryanodine receptor gene (ryr1 and it is widely studied in humans and swine populations. The protein product of this gene plays a crucial role in the regulation of calcium transport in muscle cells. A G>T mutation in the human ryr1 gene, which results in the replacement of a conserved arginine at position 614 where a leucine occurs at the same position as the previously identified Arg→Cys mutation reported in all cases of porcine stress syndrome (PSS. Porcine stress syndrome affects biochemical pathways in stress-susceptible individuals during a stress episode and some biochemical parameters that were used as markers for diagnostic purposes. Also, PSS has remarkable influence on the maternal characteristics of sows. This study dealt with different genotypes for PSS and its association with possible biochemical changes and maternal traits of sows. Seventy-three reproductive sows genotyped for PSS by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP were included in this survey. Sixty of them were stress-free (NN, 11 were heterozygous carriers (Nn and two animals were homozygous (nn for the 1843 (C>T mutation. Significant differences in non stress induced animals with different PSS genotypes were found in the values of creatine phoshokinase (CPK, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, alkaline phosphatase (AP and aspartate aminotransferase (AST. Regarding the maternal traits, our study showed that stress susceptible animals (nn have an increased number of stillborn piglets and a reduced number of newborn piglets compared with heterozygous and normal animals.

  5. Allele frequencies of hemojuvelin gene (HJV I222N and G320V missense mutations in white and African American subjects from the general Alabama population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohannon Sean B

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homozygosity or compound heterozygosity for coding region mutations of the hemojuvelin gene (HJV in whites is a cause of early age-of-onset iron overload (juvenile hemochromatosis, and of hemochromatosis phenotypes in some young or middle-aged adults. HJV coding region mutations have also been identified recently in African American primary iron overload and control subjects. Primary iron overload unexplained by typical hemochromatosis-associated HFE genotypes is common in white and black adults in Alabama, and HJV I222N and G320V were detected in a white Alabama juvenile hemochromatosis index patient. Thus, we estimated the frequency of the HJV missense mutations I222N and G320V in adult whites and African Americans from Alabama general population convenience samples. Methods We evaluated the genomic DNA of 241 Alabama white and 124 African American adults who reported no history of hemochromatosis or iron overload to detect HJV missense mutations I222N and G320V using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP technique. Analysis for HJV I222N was performed in 240 whites and 124 African Americans. Analysis for HJV G320V was performed in 241 whites and 118 African Americans. Results One of 240 white control subjects was heterozygous for HJV I222N; she was also heterozygous for HFE C282Y, but had normal serum iron measures and bone marrow iron stores. HJV I222N was not detected in 124 African American subjects. HJV G320V was not detected in 241 white or 118 African American subjects. Conclusions HJV I222N and G320V are probably uncommon causes or modifiers of primary iron overload in adult whites and African Americans in Alabama. Double heterozygosity for HJV I222N and HFE C282Y may not promote increased iron absorption.

  6. Liver steatosis correlates with iron overload but not with HFE gene mutations in chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorska, Katarzyna; Stalke, Piotr; Romanowski, Tomasz; Rzepko, Robert; Bielawski, Krzysztof Piotr

    2013-08-01

    Liver steatosis and iron overload, which are frequently observed in chronic hepatitis C (CHC), may contribute to the progression of liver injury. This study aimed to evaluate the correlation between liver steatosis and iron overload in Polish patients with CHC compared to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and HFE-hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) patients. A total of 191 CHC patients were compared with 67 NAFLD and 21 HH patients. Liver function tests, serum markers of iron metabolism, cholesterol and triglycerides were assayed. The inflammatory activity, fibrosis, iron deposits and steatosis stages were assessed in liver specimens. HFE gene polymorphisms were investigated by PCR-RFLP. Liver steatosis was associated with obesity and diabetes mellitus. This disease was confirmed in 76/174 (44%) CHC patients, most of whom were infected with genotype 1. The average grade of steatosis was higher in NAFLD patients. CHC patients had significantly higher iron concentrations and transferrin saturations than NAFLD patients. Compared with CHC patients, HH patients had higher values of serum iron parameters and more intensive hepatocyte iron deposits without differences in the prevalence and intensity of liver steatosis. In the CHC group, lipids accumulation in hepatocytes was significantly associated with the presence of serum markers of iron overload. No correlation between the HFE gene polymorphism and liver steatosis in CHC patients was found. Liver steatosis was diagnosed in nearly half of CHC patients, most of whom were infected with genotype 1. The intensity of steatosis was lower in CHC patients than that in NAFLD patients because of a less frequent diagnosis of metabolic syndrome. Only in CHC patients were biochemical markers of iron accumulation positively correlated with liver steatosis; these findings were independent of HFE gene mutations.

  7. S182 and STM2 gene missense mutations in sporadic alzheimer disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, Susumu; Matsushita, Sachio; Hasegawa, Yoshio; Muramatsu, Taro [Kurihama National Hospital, Yokosuka (Japan)] [and others

    1996-07-26

    The linkage of genes S182 and STM2 to early-onset or late-onset sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD) was not found in a group of 97 clinically-diagnosed AD patients and 46 autopsy-confirmed AD cases, using PCR-RFLP methods. 7 refs.

  8. Possible association of the Plasmodium falciparum T1526C resa2 gene mutation with severe malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durand Rémy

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum exports proteins that remodel the erythrocyte membrane. One such protein, called Pf155/RESA (RESA1 contributes to parasite fitness, optimizing parasite survival during febrile episodes. Resa1 gene is a member of a small family comprising three highly related genes. Preliminary evidence led to a search for clues indicating the involvement of RESA2 protein in the pathophysiology of malaria. In the present study, cDNA sequence of resa2 gene was obtained from two different strains. The proportion of P. falciparum isolates having a non-stop T1526C mutation in resa2 gene was evaluated and the association of this genotype with severity of malaria was investigated. Methods Resa2 cDNAs of two different strains (a patient isolate and K1 culture adapted strain was obtained by RT-PCR and DNA sequencing was performed to confirm its gene structure. The proportion of isolates having a T1526C mutation was evaluated using a PCR-RFLP methodology on groups of severe malaria and uncomplicated patients recruited in 1991–1994 in Senegal and in 2009 in Benin. Results A unique ORF with an internal translation stop was found in the patient isolate (Genbank access number : JN183870, while the K1 strain harboured the T1526C mutation (Genbank access number : JN183869 which affects the internal stop codon and restores a full length coding sequence. About 14% of isolates obtained from Senegal and Benin harboured mutant T1526C parasites. Some isolates had both wild and mutant resa alleles. The analysis excluding those mixed isolates showed that the resa2 T1526C mutation was found more frequently in severe malaria cases than in uncomplicated cases (p = 0.008. The association of the presence of the mutant allele and parasitaemia >4% was shown in multivariate analysis (p = 0.03 in the group of Beninese children. Conclusions All T1526C mutant parasites theoretically have the ability to give rise to a full-length RESA2 protein

  9. Association of folate intake, dietary habits, smoking and COX-2 promotor-765G > C polymorphism with K-ras mutation in patients with colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamal, M.M.; Youssef, O.Z.; Lotfy, A.N.; Elsaed, E.T.; Fawzy, M.M.T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Understanding the role of environmental and molecular influences on the nature and rate of K-ras mutations in colorectal neoplasms is crucial. COX-2 polymorphisms -765G > C may play a role in carcinogenic processes in combination with specific life-style conditions or dependent on the racial composition of a particular population. If mutational events play an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis sequence, one can hypothesize that modification of these events by life-style or other factors would be a useful prevention strategy. Aim of work: To explore the association between K-ras mutation and potential variables known or suspected to be related to the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) as well as determining the possible modulating effect of the COX-2 polymorphism, —765G > C. Subjects and methods: The study was conducted on 80 patients with colorectal cancer from Tropical Medicine and Gastrointestinal Tract endoscopy Departments and those attending clinic of the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University during the period extending from April 2009 to March 2010. Full history taking with emphasis on the risk factors of interest, namely age, sex, family history, smoking and dietary history. Serum CEA and CA19-9, RBCs folic acid and occult blood in stool were done to all samples. K-ras protooncogene mutation at codon 12 (exon 1) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) —765G > C polymorphism were determined by PCR-RFLP. Results: The K-ras mutation was positive in 23 (28.7%) patients. COX-2 polymorphism revealed GG in 62.5%, GC in 26.2 % and CC genotype was found in 11.3 % of cases. The mean red blood cell folic acid level was lower in the K-ras positive group (100.96 ± 51.3 ng/ml) than the negative group (216.6 ± 166.4 ng/ml), (P < 0.01). Higher folate levels were found in males than females (median = 173 ng/ml and 85 ng/ml; respectively, P = 0.002) with adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 0.984. Only, the RBCs folate (P = 0.0018) followed by gender (P = 0

  10. Association of folate intake, dietary habits, smoking and COX-2 promotor -765G>C polymorphism with K-ras mutation in patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Manal M; Youssef, Omar Z; Lotfy, Ahmed N; Elsaed, Eman T; Fawzy, May M T

    2012-09-01

    Understanding the role of environmental and molecular influences on the nature and rate of K-ras mutations in colorectal neoplasms is crucial. COX-2 polymorphisms -765G>C may play a role in carcinogenic processes in combination with specific life-style conditions or dependent on the racial composition of a particular population. If mutational events play an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis sequence, one can hypothesize that modification of these events by life-style or other factors would be a useful prevention strategy. To explore the association between K-ras mutation and potential variables known or suspected to be related to the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) as well as determining the possible modulating effect of the COX-2 polymorphism, -765G>C. The study was conducted on 80 patients with colorectal cancer from Tropical Medicine and Gastrointestinal Tract endoscopy Departments and those attending clinic of the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University during the period extending from April 2009 to March 2010. Full history taking with emphasis on the risk factors of interest, namely age, sex, family history, smoking and dietary history. Serum CEA and CA19-9, RBCs folic acid and occult blood in stool were done to all samples. K-ras protooncogene mutation at codon 12 (exon 1) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) -765G>C polymorphism were determined by PCR-RFLP. The K-ras mutation was positive in 23 (28.7%) patients. COX-2 polymorphism revealed GG in 62.5%, GC in 26.2 % and CC genotype was found in 11.3 % of cases. The mean red blood cell folic acid level was lower in the K-ras positive group (100.96±51.3 ng/ml) than the negative group (216.6±166.4 ng/ml), (P<0.01). Higher folate levels were found in males than females (median=173 ng/ml and 85 ng/ml; respectively, P=0.002) with adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 0.984. Only, the RBCs folate (P=0.0018) followed by gender (P=0.036) contributed significantly in the discrimination between patients prone to develop K

  11. Association of HFE gene C282Y and H63D mutations with liver cirrhosis in the Lithuanian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juzėnas, Simonas; Kupčinskas, Juozas; Valantienė, Irena; Šumskienė, Jolanta; Petrenkienė, Vitalija; Kondrackienė, Jūrate; Kučinskas, Laimutis; Kiudelis, Gediminas; Skiecevičienė, Jurgita; Kupčinskas, Limas

    2016-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is the end-stage disease of chronic liver injury. Due to differences in the natural course of chronic liver diseases, identification of genetic factors that influence individual outcomes is warranted. HFE-linked hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) predisposes disease progression to cirrhosis; however, the role of heterozygous C282Y or H63D mutations in the development of cirrhosis in the presence of other etiological factors is still debated. The aim of this study was to determine the association between heterozygous C282Y and H63D mutations and non-HH liver cirrhosis in Lithuanian population. The patient cohort consisted of 209 individuals. Diagnosis of cirrhosis was confirmed by clinical, laboratory parameters, liver biopsy, and radiological imaging. Control samples were obtained from 1005 randomly selected unrelated healthy individuals. HFE gene mutations were determined using the PCR-RFLP method. The most common causes of cirrhosis were hepatitis C (33.9%), hepatitis B (13.6%), and alcohol (25.8%). C282Y allele was associated with the presence of cirrhosis (OR=2.07; P=0.005); this was also observed under recessive model for C282Y (OR=2.06, P=0.008). The prevalence of C282Y allele was higher in cirrhotic men than in controls (7.0% vs. 2.8%, P=0.002). The carriage of H63D risk allele (OR=1.54; P=0.02), heterozygous C282Y/wt and homozygous H63D/H63D genotypes were associated with liver cirrhosis in males (OR=2.48, P=0.008, and OR=4.13, P=0.005, respectively). Heterozygous C282Y mutation of the HFE gene was associated with liver cirrhosis in the Lithuanian population. In gender-related analysis, heterozygous C282Y and homozygous H63D mutations were linked to liver cirrhosis in men, not in women. Copyright © 2016 The Lithuanian University of Health Sciences. Production and hosting by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  12. 4-Aminobiphenyl (4-ABP) - DNA Damage in Breast Tissue and Relationship to p53 Mutations and Polymorphisms of Metabolizing Genes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Niguidula, Nancy

    2000-01-01

    .... The analysis of the CYP1A2 gene is currently in progress. Due to the difficulty in obtaining large fragments of DNA from the tumor tissue sections required for PCR-RFLP, a new method is under development for genotyping NAT2...

  13. Mutações predisponentes à trombofilia em indivíduos de Minas Gerais - Brasil com suspeita clínica de trombose Predisposing thrombophilic mutations in individuals with clinical suspicion of thrombosis from Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina P. Guimarães

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available A trombose é reconhecidamente uma doença de caráter multifatorial. Sua ocorrência está intimamente relacionada à presença de fatores genéticos e adquiridos que concorrem isoladamente ou em associação para o seu desencadeamento. No entanto, a frequência dos fatores genéticos pode variar de acordo com a origem étnica e com outros aspectos epidemiológicos dos grupos de indivíduos e populações estudadas. No Brasil, dados referentes a indivíduos brasileiros e em especial do estado de Minas Gerais são escassos. O objetivo do presente estudo foi investigar a frequência das mutações fator V Leiden e G20210A no gene protrombina em 1.103 indivíduos com suspeita clínica de trombofilia, empregando a técnica da reação em cadeia da polimerase seguida de restrição enzimática (PCR-RFLP. Os dados foram analisados usando-se o programa Epi Info versão 6.04. A amostra consistiu de 76,16% mulheres e 23,84% homens, com média de idade de 43,06± 14,65. A mutação fator V Leiden foi observada em heterozigose em 7,52% dos indivíduos e em 0,36% em homozigose. A mutação G20210A no gene da protrombina apresentou-se em heterozigose em 5,90% dos indivíduos e em homozigose em 0,18%. O presente trabalho mostra a importância dos testes genéticos conforme o perfil da população analisada, ressaltando informações epidemiológicas da população brasileira e benefícios clínicos.Thrombosis is known to be a multifactorial disease. Its incidence is directly related to the presence of genetic and acquired factors that concur separately or in association to its appearance. However, the frequency of genetic factors can vary according to ethnic background and with other epidemiological aspects of populations. Data from Brazilian individuals and especially those from the State of Minas Gerais are scarce. The present study aims at investigating the frequencies of the factor v Leiden and the G20210G prothrombin gene mutations of 1103 individuals

  14. Genetic variation within and among Danish brown trout ( Salmo trutta L) hatchery strains, assessed by PCR-RFLP analysis of mitochondrial DNA segments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Møller; Mensberg, Karen-Lise Dons; Rasmussen, Gorm

    1997-01-01

    differentiation among strains (Phi(ST) = 0.23) was of the same order of magnitude as that observed among wild Danish trout populations. However, minimal differentiation (Phi(ST) = 0.01) was observed among the four quantitatively most important strains, supplying 80% of all hatchery trout stocked in Denmark. (C...... of haplotypes was observed in most hatchery strains. However, computer simulations showed that even with relatively large numbers of female spawners considerable loss of haplotypes could take place over time. Therefore, reduced variability in some of the strains did not necessarily indicate a critical loss...

  15. Long PCR-RFLP of 16S-ITS-23S rRNA genes: a high-resolution molecular tool for bacterial genotyping

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zeng, Yonghui; Koblížek, Michal; Li, Y. X.; Liu, Y. P.; Feng, F. Y.; Ji, J. D.; Jian, J. C.; Wu, Z. H.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 114, č. 2 (2013), s. 433-447 ISSN 1364-5072 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/03.0110 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : 16S-ITS-23S * bacterial genome * computer simulation Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.386, year: 2013

  16. PCR-RFLP de las regiones ITS-5.8S como herramienta de identificación de levaduras: ventajas y desventajas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis E. Segura G.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Las levaduras juegan un papel muy importante en los procesos de fermentación de bebidas yalimentos, por lo que es necesario identificarlas. A finales de los años 90 se propuso la técnica de análisis delpolimorfismo en la longitud de los fragmentos de restricción (RFLP de las regiones ITS-5.8S como una herramienta rápida y confiable para identificarlas. En este trabajo se analizaron 104 cepas de Saccharomyces cerevisiae de la colección de CIATEJ. Además se analizaron los patrones de bandas publicados hasta el momento para levaduras, lo que nos permitió establecer el parámetro de error de dicha técnica. A partir de este análisis se comprobó que esta técnica es rápida y confiable en la gran mayoría de los casos, sin embargo para algunas especies de levaduras existen ambigüedades en los patrones publicados o no permite diferenciar especies cercanas.

  17. Lab-on-a-chip-based PCR-RFLP assay for the confirmed detection of short-length feline DNA in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Md Eaqub; Al Amin, Md; Hamid, Sharifah Bee Abd; Hossain, M A Motalib; Mustafa, Shuhaimi

    2015-01-01

    Wider availability but lack of legal market trades has given feline meat a high potential for use as an adulterant in common meat and meat products. However, mixing of feline meat or its derivatives in food is a sensitive issue, since it is a taboo in most countries and prohibited in certain religions such as Islam and Judaism. Cat meat also has potential for contamination with of severe acute respiratory syndrome, anthrax and hepatitis, and its consumption might lead to an allergic reaction. We developed a very short-amplicon-length (69 bp) PCR assay, authenticated the amplified PCR products by AluI-restriction digestion followed by its separation and detection on a lab-on-a-chip-based automated electrophoretic system, and proved its superiority over the existing long-amplicon-based assays. Although it has been assumed that longer DNA targets are susceptible to breakdown under compromised states, scientific evidence for this hypothesis has been rarely documented. Strong evidence showed that shorter targets are more stable than the longer ones. We confirmed feline-specificity by cross-challenging the primers against 10 different species of terrestrial, aquatic and plant origins in the presence of a 141-bp site of an 18S rRNA gene as a universal eukaryotic control. RFLP analysis separated 43- and 26-bp fragments of AluI-digest in both the gel-image and electropherograms, confirming the original products. The tested detection limit was 0.01% (w/w) feline meat in binary and ternary admixed as well as meatball matrices. Shorter target, better stability and higher sensitivity mean such an assay would be valid for feline identification even in degraded specimens.

  18. Adana İlindeki Echinococcus granulosus İzolatlarının PCR-RFLP Yöntemi ile Genotiplendirilmesi

    OpenAIRE

    Eroglu, Fadime; Genç, Ahmet; Koltaş, İsmail Soner

    2018-01-01

    Amaç: Kistik ekinokokkozis Echinococcus granulosus larva formunun neden olduğu bir hastalıktır. Bu hastalık, ülkemizde tarım ekonomisini olumsuz etkilediği ve insanlarda yıllık cerrahi sayısında artışa neden olduğu için önemli derecede sosyo-ekonomik kayıplara neden olmaktadır. Bu çalışmada koyun ve insan kist sıvılarından izole edilen Echinococcus granulosus izolatlarını genotiplendirmek amaçlanmıştır.Gereç ve Yöntem: Türkiye’nin güneyinde bulunan Çukurova bölgesinde 50 koyundan ve 20 insand...

  19. Detection and identification of Leishmania spp.: application of two hsp70-based PCR-RFLP protocols to clinical samples from the New World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalvo, Ana M; Fraga, Jorge; Tirado, Dídier; Blandón, Gustavo; Alba, Annia; Van der Auwera, Gert; Vélez, Iván Darío; Muskus, Carlos

    2017-07-01

    Leishmaniasis is highly prevalent in New World countries, where several methods are available for detection and identification of Leishmania spp. Two hsp70-based PCR protocols (PCR-N and PCR-F) and their corresponding restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) were applied for detection and identification of Leishmania spp. in clinical samples recruited in Colombia, Guatemala, and Honduras. A total of 93 cases were studied. The samples were classified into positive or suspected of leishmaniasis according to parasitological criteria. Molecular amplification of two different hsp70 gene fragments and further RFLP analysis for identification of Leishmania species was done. The detection in parasitologically positive samples was higher using PCR-N than PCR-F. In the total of samples studied, the main species identified were Leishmania panamensis, Leishmania braziliensis, and Leishmania infantum (chagasi). Although RFLP-N was more efficient for the identification, RFLP-F is necessary for discrimination between L. panamensis and Leishmania guyanesis, of great importance in Colombia. Unexpectedly, one sample from this country revealed an RFLP pattern corresponding to Leishmania naiffi. Both molecular variants are applicable for the study of clinical samples originated in Colombia, Honduras, and Guatemala. Choosing the better tool for each setting depends on the species circulating. More studies are needed to confirm the presence of L. naiffi in Colombian territory.

  20. Genetic divergence and phylogenetic relationships in grey mullets (Teleostei: Mugilidae) based on PCR-RFLP analysis of mtDNA segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papasotiropoulos, V; Klossa-Kilia, E; Kilias, G; Alahiotis, S

    2002-04-01

    The genetic differentiation and phylogenetic relationships among five species of the Mugilidae family (Mugil cephalus, Chelon labrosus, Liza aurata, Liza ramada, and Liza saliens) were investigated at the mtDNA level, on samples taken from Messolongi lagoon-Greece. RFLP analysis of three PCR-amplified mtDNA gene segments (12s rRNA, 16s rRNA, and CO I) was used. Ten, eight, and nine restriction enzymes were found to have at least one recognition site at 12s rRNA, 16s rRNA, and CO I genes, respectively. Several fragment patterns were revealed to be species-specific, and thus they could be useful in species taxonomy as diagnostic markers, as well as for further evolutionary studies. Seven different haplotypes were detected. The greatest amount of genetic differentiation was observed at the interspecific level, while little variation was revealed at the intraspecific level. The highest values of nucleotide sequence divergence were observed between M. cephalus and all the other species, while the lowest was found between C. labrosus and L. saliens. Dendrograms obtained by the three different methods (UPGMA, Neighbor-Joining, and Dollo parsimony), were found to exhibit in all cases the same topology. According to this, the most distinct species is M. cephalus, while the other species are clustered in two separate groups, thefirst one containing L. aurata and L. ramada, the other L. saliens and C. labrosus. This last clustering makes the monophyletic origin of the genus Liza questionable.

  1. Discrimination of Trichophyton tonsurans and Trichophyton equinum by PCR-RFLP and by beta-tubulin and Translation Elongation Factor 1-alpha sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rezaei-Matehkolaei, A.; Makimura, K.; de Hoog, G.S.; Shidfar, M.R.; Satoh, K.; Najafzadeh, M.J.; Mirhendi, H.

    2012-01-01

    Trichophyton tonsurans and T. equinum are two closely related sister species of dermatophytes, but differ in their preferred hosts, i.e., humans or horses, respectively. Routine procedures for their identification depend on studies of their pheno-typic, physiological and biochemical characteristics,

  2. Genetic divergence between Auxis thazard and A. rochei based on PCR-RFLP analysis of mtDNA D-loop region

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    GirishKumar; Kunal, S.P.; Menezes, R.M.; Kocour, M.

    .07/2.3.00/30.0049 and CZ.1.05/2.1.00/01.0024 (CENAKVA) funded by Ministry of Education Youth and Sport (MEYS), Czech Republic. Moreover, the results of the project LO1205 were obtained with a financial support from the MEYS under the NPU I program. References...

  3. Genetic stock structure of frigate tuna (Auxis thazard) along Indian coast based on PCR-RFLP analyses of mtDNA D-Loop region

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    GirishKumar; Kunal, S.P.; Menezes, M.R.

    : 547-572. Pillai, N.G.K. and Mallia, J.V. 2007. Bibliography on Tunas. CMFRI Special Publication No. 92: 325 pp Pillai, P.P. and Gopakumar, G. 2003. In: M. Mohan Joseph, A.A. Jayaprakash, (Eds.), Status of exploited marine fishery resources...

  4. Genetic variation in Yellowfin Tuna Thunnus albacares (Bonnaterre, 1788) along Indian coast using PCR-RFLP analysis of mitochondrial DNA D–Loop region

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kunal, S.P.; GirishKumar; Menezes, M.R.

    stream_size 33493 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Int_J_Scient_Res_3_25.pdf.txt stream_source_info Int_J_Scient_Res_3_25.pdf.txt Content-Encoding UTF-8 Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 IJSR... - INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH 25 Volume : 3 | Issue : 1 | January 2014 • ISSN No 2277 - 8179 Research Paper Biology Swaraj Priyaranjan Kunal National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa 403004, India Girish Kumar National Institute...

  5. Genetic variation in skipjack tuna Katsuwonus pelamis (L.) using PCR-RFLP analysis of the mitochondrial DNA D-loop region

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Menezes, M.R.; Ikeda, M.; Taniguchi, N.

    Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research 34, 231–251. Sharp, G. D. & Pirages, S. W. (1978). The distribution of enzymes of red, white and heart muscle: distributional characteristics in selected scombrid fishes. In The Physiological Ecology of Tunas...

  6. Deletion mutations of bacteriophage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryo, Yeikou

    1975-01-01

    Resolution of mutation mechanism with structural changes of DNA was discussed through the studies using bacteriophage lambda. One of deletion mutations inductions of phage lambda is the irradiation of ultraviolet ray. It is not clear if the inductions are caused by errors in reparation of ultraviolet-induced damage or by the activation of int gene. Because the effective site of int gene lies within the regions unnecessary for existing, it is considered that int gene is connected to deletion mutations induction. A certain system using prophage complementarity enables to detect deletion mutations at essential hereditary sites and to solve the relations of deletion mutations with other recombination system, DNA reproduction and repairment system. Duplication and multiplication of hereditary elements were discussed. If lambda deletion mutations of the system, which can control recombination, reproduction and repairment of added DNA, are constructed, mutations mechanism with great changes of DNA structure can be solved by phage lambda. (Ichikawa, K.)

  7. Better plants through mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This is a public relations film describing problems associated with the genetic improvement of crop plants through induced mutations. Mutations are the ultimate source of genetic variation in plants. Mutation induction is now established as a practical tool in plant breeding. The Joint FAO/IAEA Division and the IAEA's laboratory at Seibersdorf have supported research and practical implementation of mutation breeding of both seed propagated and vegetatively propagated plants. Plant biotechnology based on in vitro culture and recombinant DNA technology will make a further significant contribution to plant breeding

  8. Freqüência da mutação gene da síndrome do estresse suíno e sua associação com características reprodutivas em marrãs híbridas Frequency of the porcine stress sindrome gene mutation and its association with reproductive traits in crossbred gilts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Eliza Facioni Guimarães

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi determinar a freqüência do gene causador da síndrome do estresse em suíno (PSS e sua associação com características reprodutivas em marrãs híbridas. Setenta e duas marrãs híbridas Landrace x Large White, provenientes de granjas comerciais localizadas na região de Ponte Nova - Minas Gerais, foram analisadas para a presença da mutação PSS. No diagnóstico da mutação feito por reação em cadeia da polimerase - polimorfismo de comprimento de fragmentos de restrição (PCR-RFLP, o fragmento de 659pb do gene ryr-1 foi amplificado e, nos mutantes a substituição de citosina por timina, que acarreta mudança de aminoácidos da proteína madura de arginina para cisteína nos animais afetados, foi identificado. Dados relativos ao número de leitões nascidos vivos, leitões nascidos com baixa viabilidade e leitões natimortos por leitegada, peso médio dos leitões ao nascer e repetições de cio foram analisados. Do total de marrãs analisadas, foram encontradas 13,88% de marrãs heterozigotas e nenhuma homozigota recessiva. Não houve efeito dos genótipos sobre as características analisadas.The objective of this work was to determine the frequency of the porcine stress sindrome (PSS gene mutation and its association with reproductive traits in crossbred gilts. Seventy two crossbred Landrace x Large White females from commercial farms of Ponte Nova region location - Minas Gerais State, were analyzed for the PSS mutation. The mutation diagnose was made by polimerase chain reaction - restriction fragment length polimorphism, where the 659pb fragment from the ryr-1 gene was amplifyied, and in the mutants the substitution of cytosine by thimine, that leads to the change in the mature protein amino acids from arginine to cysteine in the affected animals, was identified. Data relative to the number of piglets born alive, born alive with low viability and dead piglets per litter, average piglets born weight and

  9. Mutation and premating isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, R. C.; Thompson, J. N. Jr

    2002-01-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  10. Molecular analysis of diverse elements mediating VanA glycopeptide resistance in enterococci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palepou, M.F.I.; Adebiyi, A.M.A.; Tremlett, C.H.

    1998-01-01

    Differences were examined among 24 distinct elements mediating VanA-type glycopeptide resistance in enterococci isolated from hospital patients and non-human sources in the UK. The methods used included long-PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism (L-PCR RFLP) analysis and DNA hybridization...... characterized by the presence of an IS1216V/IS3-like/orf1 complex and a point mutation in vanX, both of which were absent from the other 23 groups of VanA elements. This finding is consistent with the dissemination of a stable resistance element. We conclude that L-PCR RFLP analysis, combined with DNA...

  11. Genetic Mutations in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many different types of genetic mutations are found in cancer cells. This infographic outlines certain types of alterations that are present in cancer, such as missense, nonsense, frameshift, and chromosome rearrangements.

  12. AIP mutations and gigantism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostomyan, Liliya; Potorac, Iulia; Beckers, Pablo; Daly, Adrian F; Beckers, Albert

    2017-06-01

    AIP mutations are rare in sporadic acromegaly but they are seen at a higher frequency among certain specific populations of pituitary adenoma patients (pituitary gigantism cases, familial isolated pituitary adenoma (FIPA) kindreds, and patients with macroadenomas who are diagnosed ≤30 years). AIP mutations are most prevalent in patients with pituitary gigantism (29% of this group were found to have mutations in AIP gene). These data support targeted genetic screening for AIP mutations/deletions in these groups of pituitary adenoma patients. Earlier diagnosis of AIP-related acromegaly-gigantism cases enables timely clinical evaluation and treatment, thereby improving outcomes in terms of excessive linear growth and acromegaly comorbidities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Allele frequency of hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HYPP) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-03-19

    Mar 19, 2014 ... polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) test. Based on the fact that the mutation originated in the stallion. “Impressive”, whose genetic material is known to have been used in Mexico, it is possible that HYPP have been disseminated among Mexican Quarter horses. Blood samples were obtained by random sampling ...

  14. Association of transforming growth factor-ß3 gene polymorphism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genotyping for the TGF-β3 gene using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method and BslI restriction endonuclease showed a mutation in 294-bp fragment located on the fourth intron of chromosome 5. Polymorphism in TGF-β3 gene was significantly (P < 0.1) associated with ...

  15. Allele frequency of hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HYPP) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In some cases, death can occur due to paralysis of the hearth or respiratory muscles. Detection of affected animals can be achieved by a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) test. Based on the fact that the mutation originated in the stallion “Impressive”, whose genetic material is ...

  16. Mutation breeding in peas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaranowski, J [Institute of Genetics and Plant Breeding, Academy of Agriculture, Poznan (Poland); Micke, A [Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Isotope and Radiation Applications of Atomic Energy for Food and Agricultural Development, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1985-02-01

    The pea as an ancient crop plant still today has wide uses and is an import source of food protein. It is also an important object for genetic studies and as such has been widely used in mutation induction experiments. However, in comparison with cereals this ancient crop plant (like several other grain legumes) has gained relatively little from advances in breeding. The review focuses on the prospects of genetic improvement of pea by induced mutations, discusses principles and gives methodological information. (author)

  17. Mutation breeding in peas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaranowski, J.; Micke, A.

    1985-01-01

    The pea as an ancient crop plant still today has wide uses and is an import source of food protein. It is also an important object for genetic studies and as such has been widely used in mutation induction experiments. However, in comparison with cereals this ancient crop plant (like several other grain legumes) has gained relatively little from advances in breeding. The review focuses on the prospects of genetic improvement of pea by induced mutations, discusses principles and gives methodological information. (author)

  18. Mutator activity in Schizophyllum commune

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shneyour, Y.; Koltin, Y. (Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). Dept. of Microbiology)

    1983-01-01

    A strain with an elevated level of spontaneous mutations and an especially high rate of reversion at a specific locus (pab/sup -/) was identified. The mutator trait is recessive. UV sensitivity and the absence of a UV-specific endonucleolytic activity were associated with the enhancement of the mutation rate in mutator strains. The endonuclease associated with the regulation of the mutation rate also acted on single-stranded DNA. The molecular weight of this enzyme is about 38,000 daltons.

  19. Are There Mutator Polymerases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Garcia-Diaz

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA polymerases are involved in different cellular events, including genome replication and DNA repair. In the last few years, a large number of novel DNA polymerases have been discovered, and the biochemical analysis of their properties has revealed a long list of intriguing features. Some of these polymerases have a very low fidelity and have been suggested to play mutator roles in different processes, like translesion synthesis or somatic hypermutation. The current view of these processes is reviewed, and the current understanding of DNA polymerases and their role as mutator enzymes is discussed.

  20. MUTATIONS IN CALMODULIN GENES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to an isolated polynucleotide encoding at least a part of calmodulin and an isolated polypeptide comprising at least a part of a calmodulin protein, wherein the polynucleotide and the polypeptide comprise at least one mutation associated with a cardiac disorder. The ...... the binding of calmodulin to ryanodine receptor 2 and use of such compound in a treatment of an individual having a cardiac disorder. The invention further provides a kit that can be used to detect specific mutations in calmodulin encoding genes....

  1. Mutation, somatic mutation and diseases of man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnet, F.M.

    1976-01-01

    The relevance of the intrinsic mutagenesis for the evolution process, genetic diseases and the process of aging is exemplified. The fundamental reaction is the function of the DNA and the DNA-enzymes like the DNA-polymerases in replication, repair, and transcription. These defects are responsible for the mutation frequency and the genetic drift in the evolution process. They cause genetic diseases like Xeroderma pigmentosum which is described here in detail. The accumulation of structural and functional mistakes leads to diseases of old age, for example to autoimmune diseases and immune suppression. There is a proportionality between the duration of life and the frequency of mistakes in the enzymatic repair system. No possibility of prophylaxis or therapy is seen. Methods for prognosis could be developed. (AJ) [de

  2. Mutations and chromosomal aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kihlman, B.A.

    1977-01-01

    The genetic changes of mutations and chromosomal aberrations are discussed. The consequences of both depend not only on the type of genetic change produced but also on the type of cell that is affected and on the development stage of the organism. (C.F.)

  3. Mutations in GABRB3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rikke S; Wuttke, Thomas V; Helbig, Ingo

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the role of mutations in GABRB3 encoding the β3 subunit of the GABAA receptor in individual patients with epilepsy with regard to causality, the spectrum of genetic variants, their pathophysiology, and associated phenotypes. METHODS: We performed massive parallel sequencing ...

  4. Kin Selection - Mutation Balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyken, J. David Van; Linksvayer, Timothy Arnold; Wade, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    selection-mutation balance, which provides an evolutionary null hypothesis for the statics and dynamics of cheating. When social interactions have linear fitness effects and Hamilton´s rule is satisfied, selection is never strong enough to eliminate recurrent cheater mutants from a population, but cheater...

  5. Detección molecular de VPH por PCR-RFLP en muestras del área ano-genital de hombres en el Estado Mérida, Venezuela

    OpenAIRE

    Quintero, Militza; Cruz, Jhon; Bastidas, Marco; Hernández, Danmarys; Rodríguez, Adriana; Puig, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Objetivo: Determinar el porcentaje de positividad y tipo de virus de papiloma humano en el área genitoanal de hombres, relación con la edad, sitio anatómico y tipo de muestra, en el Departamento de Biología, Laboratorio de Biología y Medicina Experimental Facultad de Ciencias. LABIOMEX Universidad de Los Andes. Métodos: Estudio descriptivo, transversal, de 882 muestras del área genito-anal de hombres que acudieron voluntariamente a la consulta para detección y tipificación de virus de papilom...

  6. Mutations in galactosemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichardt, J.K.V. [Univ. of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This Letter raises four issues concerning two papers on galactosemia published in the March 1995 of the Journal. First, table 2 in the paper by Elsas et al. incorrectly attributes seven galactose-l-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) mutations (S135L, L195P, K285N, N314D, R333W, R333G, and K334R). The table also fails to mention that others have reported the same two findings attributed to {open_quotes}Leslie et al.; Elsas et al. and in press{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}Leslie et al.; Elsas et al.{close_quotes} The first finding on the prevalence of the Q188R galactosemia mutation in the G/G Caucasian population has also been described by Ng et al., and the second finding on the correlation of the N314D GALT mutation with the Duarte variant was reported by Lin et al. Second, Elsas et al. suggest that the E203K and N314D mutations may {open_quotes}produce intra-allelic complementation when in cis{close_quotes}. This speculation is supported by the activity data of individual III-2 but is inconsistent with the activities of three other individuals I-1, II-1, and III-1 of the same pedigree. The GALT activity measured in these three individuals suggests a dominant negative effect of E203K in E203K-N314D chromosomes, since they all have less than normal activity. Thus, the preponderance of the data in this paper is at odds with the authors speculation. It is worth recalling that Lin et al. also identified four N314D GALT mutations on 95 galactosemic chromosomes examined. A similar situation also appears to be the case in proband III-1 (with genotype E203K-N314D/IVSC) in the Elsas et al. paper. 9 refs.

  7. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 45

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-07-01

    This issue of the Mutation Breeding newsletter contains 39 articles dealing with radiation induced mutations and chemical mutagenesis techniques in plant breeding programs with the aims of improving crop productivity and disease resistance as well as exploring genetic variabilities

  8. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 33

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-01-01

    This issue of the newsletter reports a number of research news and research abstracts on application of radiation induced mutation techniques to increase mutagenesis and mutation frequency in plant breeding projects.

  9. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 33

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This issue of the newsletter reports a number of research news and research abstracts on application of radiation induced mutation techniques to increase mutagenesis and mutation frequency in plant breeding projects

  10. Mutation breeding in pepper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daskalov, S [Plant Breeding Unit, Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Isotope and Radiation Applications of Atomic Energy for Food and Agricultural Development, Seibersdorf Laboratory, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1986-03-01

    Pepper (Capsicum sp.) is an important vegetable and spice crop widely grown in tropical as well as in temperate regions. Until recently the improvement programmes were based mainly on using natural sources of germ plasma, crossbreeding and exploiting the heterosis of F{sub 1} hybrids. However, interest in using induced mutations is growing. A great number of agronomically useful mutants as well as mutants valuable for genetic, cytological and physiological studies have been induced and described. In this review information is presented about suitable mutagen treatment procedures with radiation as well as chemicals, M{sub 1} effects, handling the treated material in M{sub 1}, M{sub 2} and subsequent generations, and mutant screening procedures. This is supplemented by a description of reported useful mutants and released cultivars. Finally, general advice is given on when and how to incorporate mutation induction in Capsicum improvement programmes. (author)

  11. Mutation breeding in pepper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daskalov, S.

    1986-01-01

    Pepper (Capsicum sp.) is an important vegetable and spice crop widely grown in tropical as well as in temperate regions. Until recently the improvement programmes were based mainly on using natural sources of germ plasma, crossbreeding and exploiting the heterosis of F 1 hybrids. However, interest in using induced mutations is growing. A great number of agronomically useful mutants as well as mutants valuable for genetic, cytological and physiological studies have been induced and described. In this review information is presented about suitable mutagen treatment procedures with radiation as well as chemicals, M 1 effects, handling the treated material in M 1 , M 2 and subsequent generations, and mutant screening procedures. This is supplemented by a description of reported useful mutants and released cultivars. Finally, general advice is given on when and how to incorporate mutation induction in Capsicum improvement programmes. (author)

  12. Mutated hilltop inflation revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Barun Kumar

    2018-05-01

    In this work we re-investigate pros and cons of mutated hilltop inflation. Applying Hamilton-Jacobi formalism we solve inflationary dynamics and find that inflation goes on along the {W}_{-1} branch of the Lambert function. Depending on the model parameter mutated hilltop model renders two types of inflationary solutions: one corresponds to small inflaton excursion during observable inflation and the other describes large field inflation. The inflationary observables from curvature perturbation are in tune with the current data for a wide range of the model parameter. The small field branch predicts negligible amount of tensor to scalar ratio r˜ O(10^{-4}), while the large field sector is capable of generating high amplitude for tensor perturbations, r˜ O(10^{-1}). Also, the spectral index is almost independent of the model parameter along with a very small negative amount of scalar running. Finally we find that the mutated hilltop inflation closely resembles the α -attractor class of inflationary models in the limit of α φ ≫ 1.

  13. Mutation breeding in jute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshua, D.C.

    1980-01-01

    Mutagenic studies in jute in general dealt with the morphological abnormalities of the M 1 generation in great detail. Of late, induction of a wide spectrum of viable mutations have been reported in different varieties of both the species. Mutations affecting several traits of agronomic importance such as, plant height, time of flowering, fibre yield and quality, resistance to pests and diseases are also available. Cytological analysis of a large collection of induced mutants resulted in the isolation of seven trisomics in an olitorius variety. Several anatomical parameters which are the components of fibre yield, have also received attention. Some mutants with completely altered morphology were used for interpreting the evolution of leaf shape in Tiliaceas and related families. A capsularis variety developed using mutation breeding technique has been released for cultivation. Several others, including derivatives of inter-mutant hybridization have been found to perform well at different locations in the All India Coordinated Trials. Presently, chemical mutagenesis and induction of mutants of physiological significance are receiving considerable attention. The induced variability is being used in genetic and linkage studies. (author)

  14. Calreticulin Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Lavi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available With the discovery of the JAK2V617F mutation in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph− myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs in 2005, major advances have been made in the diagnosis of MPNs, in understanding of their pathogenesis involving the JAK/STAT pathway, and finally in the development of novel therapies targeting this pathway. Nevertheless, it remains unknown which mutations exist in approximately one-third of patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL essential thrombocythemia (ET and primary myelofibrosis (PMF. At the end of 2013, two studies identified recurrent mutations in the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR using whole-exome sequencing. These mutations were revealed in the majority of ET and PMF patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL but not in polycythemia vera patients. Somatic 52-bp deletions (type 1 mutations and recurrent 5-bp insertions (type 2 mutations in exon 9 of the CALR gene (the last exon encoding the C-terminal amino acids of the protein calreticulin were detected and found always to generate frameshift mutations. All detected mutant calreticulin proteins shared a novel amino acid sequence at the C-terminal. Mutations in CALR are acquired early in the clonal history of the disease, and they cause activation of JAK/STAT signaling. The CALR mutations are the second most frequent mutations in Ph− MPN patients after the JAK2V617F mutation, and their detection has significantly improved the diagnostic approach for ET and PMF. The characteristics of the CALR mutations as well as their diagnostic, clinical, and pathogenesis implications are discussed in this review.

  15. Mutation breeding in chickpea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Chickpea is an important food legume in Turkey. Turkey is one of the most important gene centers in the world for legumes. The most widely known characteristic of chickpea is that it is an important vegetable protein source used in human and animal nutrition. However, the dry grains of chickpea, has 2-3 times more protein than our traditional food of wheat. In addition, cheakpea is also energy source because of its high carbohydrate content. It is very rich in some vitamin and mineral basis. In the plant breeding, mutation induction has become an effective way of supplementing existing germplasm and improving cultivars. Many successful examples of mutation induction have proved that mutation breeding is an effective and important approach to food legume improvement. The induced mutation technique in chickpea has proved successful and good results have been attained. Realizing the potential of induced mutations, a mutation breeding programme was initiated at the Nuclear Agriculture Section of the Saraykoey Nuclear Research and Training Center in 1994. The purpose of the study was to obtain high yielding chickpea mutants with large seeds, good cooking quality and high protein content. Beside this some characters such as higher adaptation ability, tolerant to cold and drought, increased machinery harvest type, higher yield, resistant to diseases especially to antracnose and pest were investigated too. Parents varieties were ILC-482, AK-7114 and AKCIN-91 (9 % seed moisture content and germination percentage 98 %) in these experiments. The irradiation doses were 0 (control), 50, 100, 150, 200, 250, 300, 350, 400, 500 ve 600 Gy for greenhouse experiments and 0 (control), 50, 100, 150, 200, 250, 300, 350 ve 400 Gy for field experiments, respectively. One thousand seeds for per treatment were sown in the field for the M 1 . At maturity, 3500 single plants were harvested and 20 seeds were taken from each M 1 plant and planted in the following season. During plant growth

  16. Induced mutations in citrus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiegel-Roy, P.; Vardi, Aliza

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Parthenocarpic tendency is an important prerequisite for successful induction of seedlessness in breeding and especially in mutation breeding. A gene for asynapsis and accompanying seedless fruit has been found by us in inbred progeny of cv. 'Wilking'. Using budwood irradiation by gamma rays, seedless mutants of 'Eureka' and 'Villafranca' lemon (original clone of the latter has 25 seeds) and 'Minneola' tangelo have been obtained. Ovule sterility of the three mutants is nearly complete, with some pollen fertility still remaining. A semi-compact mutant of Shamouti orange has been obtained by irradiation. A programme for inducing seedlessness in easy peeling citrus varieties and selections has been initiated. (author)

  17. Induced skeletal mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, P.B.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes a large-scale experiment that, by means of breeding tests, confirmed that many dominant skeletal mutations are induced by large-dose radiation exposure. The author also discusses: (1) the major advantages and disadvantages of the skeletal method in improving estimates of genetic hazard to man; (2) future uses of the skeletal method; (3) direct estimation of risk beyond the first generation using the skeletal method; and (4) the possibility of using the skeletal method as a quick and easy screen for chemical mutagens

  18. Mutation Breeding Newsletter. No. 39

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This newsletter contains brief articles on the use of radiation to induce mutations in plants; radiation-induced mutants in Chrysanthemum; disrupting the association between oil and protein content in soybean seeds; mutation studies on bougainvillea; a new pepper cultivar; and the use of mutation induction to improve the quality of yam beans. A short review of the seminar on the use of mutation and related biotechnology for crop improvement in the Middle East and Mediterranean regions, and a description of a Co-ordinated Research Programme on the application of DNA-based marker mutations for the improvement of cereals and other sexually reproduced crop species are also included. Two tables are given: these are based on the ''FAO/IAEA Mutant Varieties Database'' and show the number of mutated varieties and the number of officially released mutant varieties in particular crops/species. Refs and tabs

  19. Mutations induced in plant breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barriga B, P.

    1984-01-01

    The most significant aspects of the use of ionizing radiations in plant breeding are reviewed. Aspects such as basic principles of mutation, expression and selection in obtention of mutants, methods for using induced mutations and sucess achieved with this methodology in plant breeding are reviewed. Results obtained in a program of induced mutation on wheat for high content of protein and lysine at the Universidad Austral de Chile are presented. (Author)

  20. Mutations induced in plant breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barriga B, P. (Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia. Inst. de Produccion y Sanidad Vegetal)

    1984-10-01

    The most significant aspects of the use of ionizing radiations in plant breeding are reviewed. Aspects such as basic principles of mutation, expression and selection in obtention of mutants, methods for using induced mutations and sucess achieved with this methodology in plant breeding are reviewed. Results obtained in a program of induced mutation on wheat for high content of protein and lysine at the Universidad Austral de Chile are presented.

  1. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 43

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-10-01

    This issue of the Newsletter includes articles dealing with radiation induced mutation based plant breeding research findings aimed at improving productivity, disease resistance and tolerance of stress conditions

  2. Mutation breeding in mangosteen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Khalid Mohd Zain

    2002-01-01

    Mangosteen the queen of the tropical fruits is apomitic and only a cultivar is reported and it reproduces asexually. Conventional breeding is not possible and the other methods to create variabilities are through genetic engineering and mutation breeding. The former technique is still in the infantry stage in mangosteen research while the latter has been an established tool in breeding to improve cultivars. In this mutation breeding seeds of mangosteen were irradiated using gamma rays and the LD 50 for mangosteen was determined and noted to be very low at 10 Gy. After sowing in the seedbed, the seedlings were transplanted in polybags and observed in the nursery bed for about one year before planted in the field under old oil palm trees in Station MARDI, Kluang. After evaluation and screening, about 120 mutant mangosteen plants were selected and planted in Kluang. The plants were observed and some growth data taken. There were some mutant plants that have good growth vigour and more vigorous that the control plants. The trial are now in the fourth year and the plants are still in the juvenile stage. (Author)

  3. Mutation breeding in chickpea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagel, Z.; Tutluer, M. I.; Peskircioglu, H.; Kantoglu, Y.; Kunter, B.

    2009-01-01

    Chickpea is an important food legume in Turkey. Turkey is one of the most important gene centers in the world for legumes. Realizing the potential of induced mutations, a mutation breeding programme was initiated at the Nuclear Agriculture Section of the Saraykoy Nuclear Research and Training Center in 1994. The purpose of the study was to obtain high yielding chickpea mutants with large seeds, good cooking quality and high protein content. Beside this some characters such as higher adaptation ability, tolerant to cold and drought, increased machinery harvest type, higher yield, resistant to diseases especially to antracnose and pest were investigated too. Parent varieties were ILC-482, AK-7114 and AKCIN-91 had been used in these experiments. The irradiation doses were 0 (control), 50, 100, 150, 200, 250, 300, 350 and 400 Gy for field experiments, respectively. As a result of these experiments, two promising mutant lines were chosen and given to the Seed Registration and Certification Center for official registration These two promising mutants were tested at five different locations of Turkey, in 2004 and 2005 years. After 2 years of registration experiments one of outstanding mutants was officially released as mutant chickpea variety under the name TAEK-SAGEL, in 2006. Some basic characteristics of this mutant are; earliness (95-100 day), high yield capacity (180-220 kg/da), high seed protein (22-25 %), first pot height (20-25 cm), 100 seeds weight (42-48 g), cooking time (35-40 min) and resistance to Ascochyta blight.

  4. Studies on mutation techniques in rice breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cailian; Chen Qiufang; Jin Wei

    2001-01-01

    Synthetical techniques for improving rice mutation breeding efficiency were studied. The techniques consist of corresponding relationship between radiosensitivity and mutation frequency, choosing appropriate materials, combination of physical and chemical mutagens, mutagenic effects of the new mutagenic agents as proton, ions, synchronous irradiation and space mutation. These techniques and methods for inducing mutations are very valuable to increase inducing mutation efficiency and breeding level

  5. Mutation breeding in soybean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baradjanegara, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    In Indonesia, soybean is one of the important crop after rice. It is generally cultivated in the lowlands and rarely in the highlands. Seeds of soybean variety ORBA were treated with various doses of fast neutrons, gamma rays, EMS and NaN 3 with the aims of studying the mutagen effects in M-1 and M-2 generations and also to select mutants adapted to highland conditions. D-50 doses for gamma rays, fast neutrons and EMS were around 23 krad, 2,300 rad, 0.3%, respectively. Much higher chlorophyll mutation frequency was observed in EMS treatment of 0.3%. Seven mutants were shorter and four early mutants matured from 4 to 20 days earlier than the control plants. Two early mutants were quite adaptable in both the low and highlands and produced better yields than the parental material. (author)

  6. Founder Mutations in Xeroderma Pigmentosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Deborah; DiGiovanna, John J.; Kraemer, Kenneth H.

    2012-01-01

    In this issue, Soufir et al. report a founder mutation in the XPC DNA repair gene in 74% of families with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) in the Maghreb region (Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia) of northern Africa. These patients have a high frequency of skin cancer. The presence of this founder mutation provides an opportunity for genetic counseling and early diagnosis of XP. PMID:20463673

  7. Mutations causative of familial hypercholesterolaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Marianne; Watts, Gerald F; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    causing mutations in 98 098 participants from the general population, the Copenhagen General Population Study. METHODS AND RESULTS: We genotyped for LDLR[W23X;W66G;W556S] and APOB[R3500Q] accounting for 38.7% of pathogenic FH mutations in Copenhagen. Clinical FH assessment excluded mutation information......-cholesterol concentration to discriminate between mutation carriers and non-carriers was 4.4 mmol/L. CONCLUSION: Familial hypercholesterolaemia-causing mutations are estimated to occur in 1:217 in the general population and are best identified by a definite or probable phenotypic diagnosis of FH based on the DLCN criteria....... The prevalence of the four FH mutations was 0.18% (1:565), suggesting a total prevalence of FH mutations of 0.46% (1:217). Using the Dutch Lipid Clinic Network (DLCN) criteria, odds ratios for an FH mutation were 439 (95% CI: 170-1 138) for definite FH, 90 (53-152) for probable FH, and 18 (13-25) for possible FH...

  8. MPL mutations in myeloproliferative disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beer, Philip A.; Campbell, Peter J.; Scott, Linda M.

    2008-01-01

    Activating mutations of MPL exon 10 have been described in a minority of patients with idiopathic myelofibrosis (IMF) or essential thrombocythemia (ET), but their prevalence and clinical significance are unclear. Here we demonstrate that MPL mutations outside exon 10 are uncommon in platelet c......DNA and identify 4 different exon 10 mutations in granulocyte DNA from a retrospective cohort of 200 patients with ET or IMF. Allele-specific polymerase chain reaction was then used to genotype 776 samples from patients with ET entered into the PT-1 studies. MPL mutations were identified in 8.5% of JAK2 V617F......(-) patients and a single V617F(+) patient. Patients carrying the W515K allele had a significantly higher allele burden than did those with the W515L allele, suggesting a functional difference between the 2 variants. Compared with V617F(+) ET patients, those with MPL mutations displayed lower hemoglobin...

  9. Mutation induction by heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, J.; Stoll, U.; Schneider, E.

    1994-10-01

    Mutation induction by heavy ions is compared in yeast and mammalian cells. Since mutants can only be recovered in survivors the influence of inactivation cross sections has to be taken into account. It is shown that both the size of the sensitive cellular site as well as track structure play an important role. Another parameter which influences the probability of mutation induction is repair: Contrary to naive assumptions primary radiation damage does not directly lead to mutations but requires modification to reconstitute the genetic machinery so that mutants can survive. The molecular structure of mutations was analyzed after exposure to deuterons by amplification with the aid of polymerase chain reaction. The results-although preliminary-demonstrate that even with densely ionizing particles a large fraction does not carry big deletions which suggests that point mutations may also be induced by heavy ions.

  10. Mutation breeding in ornamental plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, S.K.

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Mutation induction produced a large number of new promising varieties in ornamental species. 37 new mutants of Chrysanthemum and 14 of rose have been developed by mutations and released for commercialisation. The mutations in flower colour/shape were detected as chimeras in M 1 V 1 , M 1 V 2 , M 1 V 3 generations. The mutation frequency varied with the cultivar and exposure to gamma rays. Comparative analysis of original cultivars and their respective induced mutants on cytomorphological, anatomical and biochemical characters are being carried out for better understanding of the mechanism involved in the origin and evolution of somatic flower colour/shape mutations. Cytological analysis with reference to chromosomal aberrations, chromosome number, ICV, INV and DNA content gave no differences between the original and mutant cultivars. Analysis of florets/petal pigments by TLC and spectrophotometric methods indicated both qualitative and quantitative changes. (author)

  11. Mutational meltdown in laboratory yeast populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeyl, C.; Mizesko, M.; Visser, de J.A.G.M.

    2001-01-01

    In small or repeatedly bottlenecked populations, mutations are expected to accumulate by genetic drift, causing fitness declines. In mutational meltdown models, such fitness declines further reduce population size, thus accelerating additional mutation accumulation and leading to extinction. Because

  12. Minisequencing mitochondrial DNA pathogenic mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carracedo Ángel

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are a number of well-known mutations responsible of common mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA diseases. In order to overcome technical problems related to the analysis of complete mtDNA genomes, a variety of different techniques have been proposed that allow the screening of coding region pathogenic mutations. Methods We here propose a minisequencing assay for the analysis of mtDNA mutations. In a single reaction, we interrogate a total of 25 pathogenic mutations distributed all around the whole mtDNA genome in a sample of patients suspected for mtDNA disease. Results We have detected 11 causal homoplasmic mutations in patients suspected for Leber disease, which were further confirmed by standard automatic sequencing. Mutations m.11778G>A and m.14484T>C occur at higher frequency than expected by change in the Galician (northwest Spain patients carrying haplogroup J lineages (Fisher's Exact test, P-value Conclusion We here developed a minisequencing genotyping method for the screening of the most common pathogenic mtDNA mutations which is simple, fast, and low-cost. The technique is robust and reproducible and can easily be implemented in standard clinical laboratories.

  13. Mutation breeding in malting barley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiraki, Makoto; Sanada, Matsuyoshi

    1984-03-01

    The released varieties of malting barley through mutation breeding is more than ten in number, including foreign varieties. In Japan four varieties has been released so far. We started mutation breeding in 1956 together with cross breeding that we employed before. Until now, Gamma 4, Amagi Nijo 1 and Fuji Nijo 2 have been produced from the direct use of induced mutations and Nirasaki Nijo 8 from the indirect use of them. Mutation breeding has been used mainly in the partial improvement of agronomic characteristics since the selection for malting quality was very complicated. As the variety bred by induced mutation is usually equivalent to the original variety in malting quality, both this new variety and the original one could be cultivated in the same area without any problem on later malt production. Particularly when one farmer cultivates barley in an extensive acreage, he can harvest at the best time according to the different maturing time of each variety. From these points of view, mutation breeding is an efficient tool in malting barley breeding. Mutagens we have used so far are X-rays, ..gamma..-rays, neutron and chemicals such as dES. From our experience in selection, the low dose of radiation and chemical mutagens are more effective in selection of point mutation than the high dose of radiation which tends to produce many abnormal but few practical mutants. (author).

  14. HNPCC: Six new pathogenic mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Epplen Joerg T

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC is an autosomal dominant disease with a high risk for colorectal and endometrial cancer caused by germline mutations in DNA mismatch-repair genes (MMR. HNPCC accounts for approximately 2 to 5% of all colorectal cancers. Here we present 6 novel mutations in the DNA mismatch-repair genes MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6. Methods Patients with clinical diagnosis of HNPCC were counselled. Tumor specimen were analysed for microsatellite instability and immunohistochemistry for MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 protein was performed. If one of these proteins was not detectable in the tumor mutation analysis of the corresponding gene was carried out. Results We identified 6 frameshift mutations (2 in MLH1, 3 in MSH2, 1 in MSH6 resulting in a premature stop: two mutations in MLH1 (c.2198_2199insAACA [p.N733fsX745], c.2076_2077delTG [p.G693fsX702], three mutations in MSH2 (c.810_811delGT [p.C271fsX282], c.763_766delAGTGinsTT [p.F255fsX282], c.873_876delGACT [p.L292fsX298] and one mutation in MSH6 (c.1421_1422dupTG [p.C475fsX480]. All six tumors tested for microsatellite instability showed high levels of microsatellite instability (MSI-H. Conclusions HNPCC in families with MSH6 germline mutations may show an age of onset that is comparable to this of patients with MLH1 and MSH2 mutations.

  15. Factor V Leiden Mutation and PT 20210 Mutation Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disorders Fibromyalgia Food and Waterborne Illness Fungal Infections Gout Graves Disease Guillain-Barré Syndrome Hashimoto Thyroiditis Heart ... Tested? To determine whether you have an inherited gene mutation that increases your risk of developing a ...

  16. Mutations induced by ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeifer, Gerd P.; You, Young-Hyun; Besaratinia, Ahmad

    2005-01-01

    The different ultraviolet (UV) wavelength components, UVA (320-400 nm), UVB (280-320 nm), and UVC (200-280 nm), have distinct mutagenic properties. A hallmark of UVC and UVB mutagenesis is the high frequency of transition mutations at dipyrimidine sequences containing cytosine. In human skin cancers, about 35% of all mutations in the p53 gene are transitions at dipyrimidines within the sequence 5'-TCG and 5'-CCG, and these are localized at several mutational hotspots. Since 5'-CG sequences are methylated along the p53 coding sequence in human cells, these mutations may be derived from sunlight-induced pyrimidine dimers forming at sequences that contain 5-methylcytosine. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) form preferentially at dipyrimidines containing 5-methylcytosine when cells are irradiated with UVB or sunlight. In order to define the contribution of 5-methylcytosine to sunlight-induced mutations, the lacI and cII transgenes in mouse fibroblasts were used as mutational targets. After 254 nm UVC irradiation, only 6-9% of the base substitutions were at dipyrimidines containing 5-methylcytosine. However, 24-32% of the solar light-induced mutations were at dipyrimidines that contain 5-methylcytosine and most of these mutations were transitions. Thus, CPDs forming preferentially at dipyrimidines with 5-methylcytosine are responsible for a considerable fraction of the mutations induced by sunlight in mammalian cells. Using mouse cell lines harboring photoproduct-specific photolyases and mutational reporter genes, we showed that CPDs (rather than 6-4 photoproducts or other lesions) are responsible for the great majority of UVB-induced mutations. An important component of UVB mutagenesis is the deamination of cytosine and 5-methylcytosine within CPDs. The mutational specificity of long-wave UVA (340-400 nm) is distinct from that of the shorter wavelength UV and is characterized mainly by G to T transversions presumably arising through mechanisms involving oxidized DNA

  17. ABCG2 in peptic ulcer: gene expression and mutation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salagacka-Kubiak, Aleksandra; Żebrowska, Marta; Wosiak, Agnieszka; Balcerczak, Mariusz; Mirowski, Marek; Balcerczak, Ewa

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the participation of polymorphism at position C421A and mRNA expression of the ABCG2 gene in the development of peptic ulcers, which is a very common and severe disease. ABCG2, encoded by the ABCG2 gene, has been found inter alia in the gastrointestinal tract, where it plays a protective role eliminating xenobiotics from cells into the extracellular environment. The materials for the study were biopsies of gastric mucosa taken during a routine endoscopy. For genotyping by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) at position C421A, DNA was isolated from 201 samples, while for the mRNA expression level by real-time PCR, RNA was isolated from 60 patients. The control group of healthy individuals consisted of 97 blood donors. The dominant genotype in the group of peptic ulcer patients and healthy individuals was homozygous CC. No statistically significant differences between healthy individuals and the whole group of peptic ulcer patients and, likewise, between the subgroups of peptic ulcer patients (infected and uninfected with Helicobacter pylori) were found. ABCG2 expression relative to GAPDH expression was found in 38 of the 60 gastric mucosa samples. The expression level of the gene varies greatly among cases. The statistically significant differences between the intensity (p = 0.0375) of H. pylori infection and ABCG2 gene expression have been shown. It was observed that the more intense the infection, the higher the level of ABCG2 expression.

  18. Radiation mutation breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Hi Sup; Kim, Jae Sung; Kim, Jin Kyu; Shin, In Chul; Lim, Young Taek

    1998-04-01

    In order to develop an advanced technical knowledge for the selection of better mutants, some of the crops were irradiated and the mutation rate, the survival rate and the method for selction of a mutant were studied. Furthermore, this study aimed to obtain basic data applicable to the development of genetic resources by evaluation and analysis the specific character for selection of the superior mutant and its plant breeding. 1. selection of the mutant with a superior resistance against environment in the principal crops 1) New varieties of mutant rices such as Wonpyeongbyeo, Wongwangbyeo, Winmibyeo, and heogseon chalbeyeo (sticky forma) were registered in the national variety list and made an application to crop variety protection right. They are under review now. 2) We also keep on studying on the number of a grain of 8 lines of excellent mutant rice for the purpose of improvement of breeding . 3) We selected 3 lines which have a resistance to pod and stem blight in large soybean, 31 lines with small grain size and higher yield, 112 lines of soybean of cooking, 7 lines of low lipoxygenase content, and 12 lines with decreased phytic acid content by 20 % compared to the previous level. 2. Selection of advanced Mugunwha (Rose of Sharon) mutant 1) Bagseul, a new variety of mutant, was developed and 30 plantlets of it are being proliferated. 2) Fifty-three lines of a mutant having a various morphologies were selected

  19. Radiation mutation breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hi Sup; Kim, Jae Sung; Kim, Jin Kyu; Shin, In Chul; Lim, Young Taek

    1998-04-01

    In order to develop an advanced technical knowledge for the selection of better mutants, some of the crops were irradiated and the mutation rate, the survival rate and the method for selction of a mutant were studied. Furthermore, this study aimed to obtain basic data applicable to the development of genetic resources by evaluation and analysis the specific character for selection of the superior mutant and its plant breeding. 1. selection of the mutant with a superior resistance against environment in the principal crops 1) New varieties of mutant rices such as Wonpyeongbyeo, Wongwangbyeo, Winmibyeo, and heogseon chalbeyeo (sticky forma) were registered in the national variety list and made an application to crop variety protection right. They are under review now. 2) We also keep on studying on the number of a grain of 8 lines of excellent mutant rice for the purpose of improvement of breeding . 3) We selected 3 lines which have a resistance to pod and stem blight in large soybean, 31 lines with small grain size and higher yield, 112 lines of soybean of cooking, 7 lines of low lipoxygenase content, and 12 lines with decreased phytic acid content by 20 % compared to the previous level. 2. Selection of advanced Mugunwha (Rose of Sharon) mutant 1) Bagseul, a new variety of mutant, was developed and 30 plantlets of it are being proliferated. 2) Fifty-three lines of a mutant having a various morphologies were selected.

  20. Mutation breeding in wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amer, I.M.

    2002-01-01

    The study aims to improve the productivity of wheat by using gamma ray (100 - 600 Gy) in mutation breading. Five local varieties were used and the program continued for the Sakha 69 for seven generations. Seeds irradiated with 600 Gy were not germinated in the field, while low doses (100-150 Gy) stimulated the root growth and spike length. The higher doses caused gradual decrease of growth with differences in varieties response. in the second generation, a genetic differences were noticed in most varieties using doses of 100-300 Gy, and the dispike was disappeared when 250 Gy was used. 79 plants from irradiated Sakha 69 were selected according to spike length and the number of grains and planted with the control to test the third generation. differences between the varieties were noticed and 8 mutants with high productivity were selected and evaluated in the fourth and fifth generations with the local variety. The mutants improve the productivity and in particular the mutants Nos.. (19-1), (14-3), and (30-2). The experiment showed the relation between the planting sites and the mutants in the sixth and seven generations

  1. Induced mutations in castor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesan, K.; Javad Hussain, H.S.; Vindhiyavarman, P.

    2001-01-01

    Castor (Ricinus communis L.) is an important oilseed crop in India. To create variability mutations were induced in two cultivars 'TMV5' (maturing in 130-140 days) and 'CO1' (perennial type). Gamma rays and diethyl sulphate and ethidium bromide were used for seed treatment. Ten doses, from 100 to 1000 Gy were employed. For chemical mutagenesis five concentrations of mutagenes from 10 to 50 mM were tried. No economic mutants could be isolated after treatment with the chemical mutagens. The following economic mutants were identified in the dose 300 Gy of gamma rays. Annual types from perennial CO 1 castor CO 1 is a perennial variety (8-10 years) with bold seeds (100 seed weight 90 g) and high oil content (57%). Twenty-one lines were isolated with annual types (160-180 days) with high yield potential as well as bold seeds and high oil content. These mutants, identified in M 3 generation were bred true in subsequent generations up to M 8 generation. Critical evaluation of the mutants in yield evaluation trials is in progress

  2. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1983-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  3. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 34

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents abstracts and short communications of research results on radiation and chemical induced mutation breeding projects. Positive traits such as disease resistance and increased productivity are highlighted.

  4. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 29

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1987-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  5. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1980-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  6. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  7. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  8. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  9. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  10. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  11. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 28

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1986-09-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and research abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  12. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 29

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  13. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  14. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1976-01-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  15. Mutation Breeding Newsletter. No. 37

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This newsletter contains a brief account of FAO/IAEA meetings held in 1990 on plant breeding involving the use of induced mutations. It also features a list of commercially available plant cultivars produced by such techniques. Refs and tabs

  16. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-08-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  17. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1981-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  18. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1977-01-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  19. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 34

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents abstracts and short communications of research results on radiation and chemical induced mutation breeding projects. Positive traits such as disease resistance and increased productivity are highlighted

  20. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 24

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1984-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and research abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  1. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 32

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  2. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 36

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents abstracts and short communications of research results on radiation and chemical induced mutation breeding projects. Positive traits such as disease resistance and increased productivity are highlighted.

  3. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1974-01-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  4. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  5. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  6. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-08-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  7. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1972-05-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  8. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  9. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 44

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-04-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents research reports on the role of radiation induced mutation and chemical mutagens in improving productivity, disease resistance; cold and salinity tolerance of various crops and ornamental plants

  10. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1972-05-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  11. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 25

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and research abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  12. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 32

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  13. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1975-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  14. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1982-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  15. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 28

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and research abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  16. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1981-03-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  17. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1980-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  18. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1976-09-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  19. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1974-08-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  20. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1978-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  1. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1975-08-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  2. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1977-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  3. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1979-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  4. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 36

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents abstracts and short communications of research results on radiation and chemical induced mutation breeding projects. Positive traits such as disease resistance and increased productivity are highlighted

  5. CHRNE Mutation and Congenital Myasthenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The CHRNE e1293insG mutation was identified in 14 (60% of 23 North African families with an early onset form of congenital myasthenic syndrome studied at centers in France, Tunisia, Algeria, and UK.

  6. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  7. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  8. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 24

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and research abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  9. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  10. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  11. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-03-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  12. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 27

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and research abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  13. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-10-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and research abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  14. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-03-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  15. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  16. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1979-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  17. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 30

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1987-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  18. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1982-01-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  19. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 26

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1985-10-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and research abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  20. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 25

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1985-01-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and research abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  1. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1983-01-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  2. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 27

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1986-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and research abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  3. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1973-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  4. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1978-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants.

  5. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 23

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  6. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  7. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  8. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-09-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  9. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  10. BRAF mutations in conjunctival melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ann-Cathrine; Dahl, Christina; Dahmcke, Christina M.

    2016-01-01

    with atypia. BRAF mutations were identified in 39 of 111 (35%) cases. The rate ratio of BRAF-mutated versus BRAF-wild-type melanoma did not change over time. BRAF mutations were associated with T1 stage (p = 0.007), young age (p = 0.001), male gender (p = 0.02), sun-exposed location (p = 0.01), mixed....../non-pigmented tumour colour (p = 0.02) and nevus origin (p = 0.005), but did not associate with prognosis. BRAF status in conjunctival melanoma and paired premalignant lesions corresponded in 19 of 20 cases. Immunohistochemistry detected BRAF V600E mutations with a sensitivity of 0.94 and a specificity of 1...

  11. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  12. Mutation breeding in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neto, A T; Menten, J O.M. [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Piracicaba (Brazil); Ando, A

    1980-03-01

    How mutation induction is used for plant breeding in Brazil is reported. For upland rice, the combined treatment with gamma-ray and mutagens (ethylene imine or ethylmethane sulfonate) has been used on the variety, Dourado Precoce, and some mutants with shortculm length and/or earliness without altering the productivity have been obtained. A project on the quantitative and qualitative protein improvement in upland rice was also started in 1979. In corn, the effect of gamma-irradiation on heterosis has been analyzed, and it was found that the single hybrids from two parental lines derived from irradiated seeds had increased ear productivity. For beans (Phaseolus yulgaris), gamma-irradiation and chemical mutagens have been used to induce the mutants with different seed color, disease resistance to golden mosaic virus and Xanthomonas phaseoli, earliness, high productivity and high protein content. Some mutants with partly improved characters have been obtained in these experiments. Two varieties of wheat tolerant to aluminum toxicity have been obtained, but the one showed high lodging due to its unfavorable plant height, and the other was highly susceptible to culm rust. Therefore, irradiation experiments have been started to improve these characters. The projects involving the use of gamma-irradiation have been tested to obtain the mutant lines insensitive to photoperiod and resistant to bud-blight in soybean, the mutant lines resistant to mosaic virus in papaya, the photoperiod-insensitive mutants in sorghum, the mosaic virus resistant and non-flowering mutants in sugar cane, and the Fusarium and nematode-resistant mutants in black pepper.

  13. Screening of three Mediterranean phenylketonuria mutations in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    as the most frequent mutation (Dahri et al. 2010). The. E280K mutation was also reported in Mediterranean popu- lations (Guldberg et al. 1993). Since Tunisia is a Mediter- ranean country, patients with PKU are presumed to have these mutations. The aim of this study was to assess prevalence of the three above mutations ...

  14. Signatures of mutational processes in human cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alexandrov, L.B.; Nik-Zainal, S.; Wedge, D.C.; Aparicio, S.A.; Behjati, S.; Biankin, A.V.; Bignell, G.R.; Bolli, N.; Borg, A.; Borresen-Dale, A.L.; Boyault, S.; Burkhardt, B.; Butler, A.P.; Caldas, C.; Davies, H.R.; Desmedt, C.; Eils, R.; Eyfjord, J.E.; Foekens, J.A.; Greaves, M.; Hosoda, F.; Hutter, B.; Ilicic, T.; Imbeaud, S.; Imielinsk, M.; Jager, N.; Jones, D.T.; Knappskog, S.; Kool, M.; Lakhani, S.R.; Lopez-Otin, C.; Martin, S.; Munshi, N.C.; Nakamura, H.; Northcott, P.A.; Pajic, M.; Papaemmanuil, E.; Paradiso, A.; Pearson, J.V.; Puente, X.S.; Raine, K.; Ramakrishna, M.; Richardson, A.L.; Richter, J.; Rosenstiel, P.; Schlesner, M.; Schumacher, T.N.; Span, P.N.; Teague, J.W.; Totoki, Y.; Tutt, A.N.; Valdes-Mas, R.; Buuren, M.M. van; Veer, L. van 't; Vincent-Salomon, A.; Waddell, N.; Yates, L.R.; Zucman-Rossi, J.; Futreal, P.A.; McDermott, U.; Lichter, P.; Meyerson, M.; Grimmond, S.M.; Siebert, R.; Campo, E.; Shibata, T.; Pfister, S.M.; Campbell, P.J.; Stratton, M.R.; Schlooz-Vries, M.S.; Tol, J.J. van; Laarhoven, H.W. van; Sweep, F.C.; Bult, P.; et al.,

    2013-01-01

    All cancers are caused by somatic mutations; however, understanding of the biological processes generating these mutations is limited. The catalogue of somatic mutations from a cancer genome bears the signatures of the mutational processes that have been operative. Here we analysed 4,938,362

  15. Common Β- Thalassaemia Mutations in

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Azarfam

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: β –Thalassaemia was first explained by Thomas Cooly as Cooly’s anaemia in 1925. The β- thalassaemias are hereditary autosomal disorders with decreased or absent β-globin chain synthesis. The most common genetic defects in β-thalassaemias are caused by point mutations, micro deletions or insertions within the β-globin gene. Material and Methods: In this research , 142 blood samples (64 from childrens hospital of Tabriz , 15 samples from Shahid Gazi hospital of Tabriz , 18 from Urumia and 45 samples from Aliasghar hospital of Ardebil were taken from thalassaemic patients (who were previously diagnosed .Then 117 non-familial samples were selected . The DNA of the lymphocytes of blood samples was extracted by boiling and Proteinase K- SDS procedure, and mutations were detected by ARMS-PCR methods. Results: From the results obtained, eleven most common mutations,most of which were Mediterranean mutations were detected as follows; IVS-I-110(G-A, IVS-I-1(G-A ،IVS-I-5(G-C ,Frameshift Codon 44 (-C,( codon5(-CT,IVS-1-6(T-C, IVS-I-25(-25bp del ,Frameshift 8.9 (+G ,IVS-II-1(G-A ,Codon 39(C-T, Codon 30(G-C the mutations of the samples were defined. The results showed that Frameshift 8.9 (+G, IVS-I-110 (G-A ,IVS-II-I(G-A, IVS-I-5(G-C, IVS-I-1(G-A , Frameshift Codon 44(-C , codon5(-CT , IVS-1-6(T-C , IVS-I-25(-25bp del with a frequency of 29.9%, 25.47%,17.83%, 7.00%, 6.36% , 6.63% , 3.8% , 2.5% , 0.63% represented the most common mutations in North - west Iran. No mutations in Codon 39(C-T and Codon 30(G-C were detected. Cunclusion: The frequency of the same mutations in patients from North - West of Iran seems to be different as compared to other regions like Turkey, Pakistan, Lebanon and Fars province of Iran. The pattern of mutations in this region is more or less the same as in the Mediterranean region, but different from South west Asia and East Asia.

  16. SQSTM1 Mutations and Glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd E Scheetz

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is the most common cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. One subset of glaucoma, normal tension glaucoma (NTG occurs in the absence of high intraocular pressure. Mutations in two genes, optineurin (OPTN and TANK binding kinase 1 (TBK1, cause familial NTG and have known roles in the catabolic cellular process autophagy. TKB1 encodes a kinase that phosphorylates OPTN, an autophagy receptor, which ultimately activates autophagy. The sequestosome (SQSTM1 gene also encodes an autophagy receptor and also is a target of TBK1 phosphorylation. Consequently, we hypothesized that mutations in SQSTM1 may also cause NTG. We tested this hypothesis by searching for glaucoma-causing mutations in a cohort of NTG patients (n = 308 and matched controls (n = 157 using Sanger sequencing. An additional 1098 population control samples were also analyzed using whole exome sequencing. A total of 17 non-synonymous mutations were detected which were not significantly skewed between cases and controls when analyzed separately, or as a group (p > 0.05. These data suggest that SQSTM1 mutations are not a common cause of NTG.

  17. Mutation breeding in Philippine fruits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espino, R.R.C.

    1987-09-01

    Studies were made to establish standard conditions for mutation induction by gamma-irradiation to be performed in combination with in-vitro culture for banana and citrus spp. Besides this, radio-sensitivity of seeds and/or plantlets of mango, sugar apple, soursop, lanzones and Jack fruit was investigated and primary observation on the occurrence of mutation was made. For the mutagenesis of banana shoot tip cultures, radio-sensitivity of plantlets derived from the culture as well as fresh-cultured shoots was examined and phenotypes indicative of mutation, such as chlorophyl streaking, slow growth, pigmentation and varied bunch orientation were recorded. Isozyme analysis for mutated protein structure was not conclusive. In the in-vitro culture of Citrus spp., seeds placed on fresh media as well as germinating seeds and two-leaf stage seedlings in test tubes were examined for their radio-sensitivity. Irradiated materials were propagated for further observation. In these two crops, basic methodology for mutation induction with combined use of in-vitro culture and gamma-irradiation was established. In mango, sugar apple, soursop, lanzones and Jack fruit, basic data on radiosensitivity were obtained. In mango, leaf abnormalities were observed after the treatment of scions

  18. Mutation in cultured mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, N.; Okada, S.

    1982-01-01

    Mammalian cell cultures were exposed to gamma-rays at various dose rates. Dose-rate effects were observed in cultured somatic cells of the mouse for cell killing and mutations resistant to 6-thioguanine (TGsup(r)) and to methotrexate (MTXsup(r)). Linear quadratic model may be applied to cell killing and TGsup(r) mutations in some cases but can not explain the whole data. Results at low doses with far low dose-rate were not predictable from data at high doses with acute or chronic irradiation. Radioprotective effects of dimethyl sulfoxide were seen only after acute exposure but not after chronic one, suggesting that damages by indirect action of radiations may be potentially reparable by cells. TGsup(r) mutations seem to contain gross structural changes whereas MTXsup(r) ones may have smaller alterations. (Namekawa, K.)

  19. Thalassemia mutations in Gaziantep, Turkey

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-02-22

    Feb 22, 2010 ... Table 3. Frequency of β-thalassemia mutations in the Eastern Mediterranean. Mutation. This study Turkey Cyprus Greece Syria Palestine Bulgaria Azerbaijan Iran Iraq. IVS 1.110 (G>A). 29.1. 39.3. 79.7. 42.1. 24.1. 17.6. 24.2. 20.2. 4.8 1.9. IVS 2.1 (G>A). 12.3. 4.7. -. 3.3. 4.2. 2.9. -. -. 33.9 18.3. IVS 1.1 (G>A).

  20. Energy parasites trigger oncogene mutation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorný, Jiří; Pokorný, Jan; Jandová, Anna; Kobilková, J.; Vrba, J.; Vrba, J. jr.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 10 (2016), s. 577-582 ISSN 0955-3002 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-12757S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:67985882 Keywords : cancer initiation * cell-mediated immunity * coherent electromagnetic states * genome somatic mutation * LDH virus * parasitic energy consumption Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.992, year: 2016

  1. Induced mutation of Dendrobium orchid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakinah Ariffin; Mohd Nazir Basiran

    2000-01-01

    Dendrobiiim orchids serve as the main orchid cut flower export of Malaysia. The wide range of colour and forms presently available in the market are obtained through hybridisation. Induced mutation breeding program was initiated on a commercial variety Dendrobium 'Sonia Kai' to explore the possibilities of obtaining new colour and forms. Matured seeds from self pollination were cultured and irradiated at 35 Gy at the protocorm-like bodies (PLBS) stage. Selection of induced mutations was done after the first flowering of the plants regenerated from the irradiated protocorms. Results showed changes in flower colour, shape and size. Most of these chances are expressed in different combinations in the petals, sepals and lip of the flowers. Thus, resulting. in a very wide spectrum of mutations. Some of these chances are not stable. To date, mutants that showed stable characteristics changes are grouped into 11 categories based on flower colour and form. These results show that the combination of its vitro technique and induced mutation can be applied in orchid breeding to produce new interesting and attractive variety for the market

  2. Mutational specificity of SOS mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Takeshi

    1986-01-01

    In an approach to the isolation of mutants of E. coli unable to produce mutations by ultraviolet light, the author has found new umuC-mutants. Their properties could be explained by ''SOS hypothesis of Radman and Witkin'', which has now been justified by many investigators. Analysis of the umuC region of E. coli chromosome cloned in pSK 100 has led to the conclusion that two genes, umuD and umuC, having the capacity of mutation induction express in the same mechanism as that of SOS genes, which is known to be inhibited by LexA protein bonding to ''SOS box'' found at promotor region. Suppressor analysis for mutational specificity has revealed: (i) umuDC-independent mutagens, such as EMS and (oh) 4 Cy, induce selected base substitution alone; and (ii) umuDC-dependent mutagens, such as X-rays and gamma-rays, induce various types of base substitution simultaneously, although they have mutational specificity. In the umuDC-dependent processes of basechange mutagenesis, the spectra of base substitution were a mixture of base substitution reflecting the specific base damages induced by individual mutagens and nonspecific base substitution. In conclusion, base substitution plays the most important role in umuDC-dependent mutagenesis, although mutagenesis of umuDC proteins remains uncertain. (Namekawa, K.)

  3. Mutated genes as research tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Green plants are the ultimate source of all resources required for man's life, his food, his clothes, and almost all his energy requirements. Primitive prehistoric man could live from the abundance of nature surrounding him. Man today, dominating nature in terms of numbers and exploiting its limited resources, cannot exist without employing his intelligence to direct natural evolution. Plant sciences, therefore, are not a matter of curiosity but an essential requirement. From such considerations, the IAEA and FAO jointly organized a symposium to assess the value of mutation research for various kinds of plant science, which directly or indirectly might contribute to sustaining and improving crop production. The benefit through developing better cultivars that plant breeders can derive from using the additional genetic resources resulting from mutation induction has been assessed before at other FAO/IAEA meetings (Rome 1964, Pullman 1969, Ban 1974, Ibadan 1978) and is also monitored in the Mutation Breeding Newsletter, published by IAEA twice a year. Several hundred plant cultivars which carry economically important characters because their genes have been altered by ionizing radiation or other mutagens, are grown by farmers and horticulturists in many parts of the world. But the benefit derived from such mutant varieties is without any doubt surpassed by the contribution which mutation research has made towards the advancement of genetics. For this reason, a major part of the papers and discussions at the symposium dealt with the role induced-mutation research played in providing insight into gene action and gene interaction, the organization of genes in plant chromosomes in view of homology and homoeology, the evolutionary role of gene duplication and polyploidy, the relevance of gene blocks, the possibilities for chromosome engineering, the functioning of cytroplasmic inheritance and the genetic dynamics of populations. In discussing the evolutionary role of

  4. Radiation-induced mutation at minisatellite loci

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubrova, Y.E.; Nesterov, V.N.; Krouchinsky, N.G.

    1997-01-01

    We are studying the radiation-induced increase of mutation rate in minisatellite loci in mice and humans. Minisatellite mutations were scored by multilocus DNA fingerprint analysis in the progeny of γ-irradiated and non-irradiated mice. The frequency of mutation in offspring of irradiated males was 1.7 higher that in the control group. Germline mutation at human minisatellite loci was studied among children born in heavily polluted areas of the Mogilev district of Belarus after the Chernobyl accident and in a control population. The frequency of mutation assayed both by DNA fingerprinting and by eight single locus probes was found to be two times higher in the exposed families than in the control group. Furthermore, mutation rate was correlated with the parental radiation dose for chronic exposure 137 Cs, consistent with radiation-induction of germline mutation. The potential use of minisatellites in monitoring germline mutation in humans will be discussed

  5. Recurrent LDL-receptor mutation causes familial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1995-05-05

    May 5, 1995 ... 3. eaudet . New. Recurrent LDL-receptor mutation causes familial hypercholesterolaemia in ... amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS)" and single- strand conformation .... Location. Afrikaner. Mixed race. ApaLl.

  6. Manual on mutation breeding. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The manual is a compilation of work done on the use of induced mutations in plant breeding, and presents general methods and techniques in this field. The use of chemical mutagens and ionizing radiations (X-rays, gamma rays, α- and β-particles, protons, neutrons) are described as well as the effects of these mutagens. The different types of mutations achieved can be divided into genome mutations, chromosome mutations and extra nuclear mutations. Separate chapters deal with mutation techniques in breeding seed-propagated species and asexually propagated plants (examples of development of cultivars given). Plant characters which can be improved by mutation breeding include yield, ripening time, growth habit, disease resistance and tolerance to environmental factors (temperature, salinity etc.). The use of mutagens for some specific plant breeding problems is discussed and attention is also paid to somatic cell genetics in connection with induced mutations. The manual contains a comprehensive bibliography (60 p. references) and a subject index

  7. Adaptive mutation: has the unicorn landed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, P L

    1998-01-01

    Reversion of an episomal Lac- allele during lactose selection has been studied as a model for adaptive mutation. Although recent results show that the mutations that arise during selection are not "adaptive" in the original sense, the mutagenic mechanism that produces these mutations may nonetheless be of evolutionary significance. In addition, a transient mutational state induced in a subpopulation of starving cells could provide a species with a mechanism for adaptive evolution. PMID:9560365

  8. Adaptive mutation: has the unicorn landed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, P L

    1998-04-01

    Reversion of an episomal Lac- allele during lactose selection has been studied as a model for adaptive mutation. Although recent results show that the mutations that arise during selection are not "adaptive" in the original sense, the mutagenic mechanism that produces these mutations may nonetheless be of evolutionary significance. In addition, a transient mutational state induced in a subpopulation of starving cells could provide a species with a mechanism for adaptive evolution.

  9. Urinary Tract Effects of HPSE2 Mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Stuart, H; Roberts, N; Hilton, E; McKenzie, E; Daly, S; Hadfield, K; Rahal, J; Gardiner, N; Tanley, S; Lewis, M; Sites, E; Angle, B; Alves, C; Lourenço, T; Rodrigues, M

    2015-01-01

    Urofacial syndrome (UFS) is an autosomal recessive congenital disease featuring grimacing and incomplete bladder emptying. Mutations of HPSE2, encoding heparanase 2, a heparanase 1 inhibitor, occur in UFS, but knowledge about the HPSE2 mutation spectrum is limited. Here, seven UFS kindreds with HPSE2 mutations are presented, including one with deleted asparagine 254, suggesting a role for this amino acid, which is conserved in vertebrate orthologs. HPSE2 mutations were absent in 23 non-neurog...

  10. Haploid rice plants in mutation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, S [Institute of Radiation Breeding, Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry, Ohmiya, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1970-03-01

    Studies were made on chlorophyll-deficient sectors and diploid-like sectors in haploid rice plants exposed to chronic gamma irradiation, and on germinal mutations in diploid strains derived from the haploid plants. The induction and elimination of somatic mutations in haploid plants and the occurrence of drastic germinal mutations in diploid strains from haploid plants are discussed. (author)

  11. Studies of human mutation rates: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neel, J.V.

    1988-01-01

    Progress was recorded between January 1 and July 1, 1987 on a project entitled ''Studies of Human Mutation Rates''. Studies underway include methodology for studying mutation at the DNA level, algorithms for automated analyses of two-dimensional polyacrylamide DNA gels, theoretical and applied population genetics, and studies of mutation frequency in A-bomb survivors

  12. Mitochondrial mutations drive prostate cancer aggression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hopkins, Julia F.; Sabelnykova, Veronica Y.; Weischenfeldt, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear mutations are well known to drive tumor incidence, aggression and response to therapy. By contrast, the frequency and roles of mutations in the maternally inherited mitochondrial genome are poorly understood. Here we sequence the mitochondrial genomes of 384 localized prostate cancer...... in prostate cancer, and suggest interplay between nuclear and mitochondrial mutational profiles in prostate cancer....

  13. Radiation induced chlorophyll mutations in rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bari, G.; Mustafa, G.; Soomro, A.M.; Baloch, A.W.

    1985-01-01

    Air dried grains of four local varieties of rice were treated with gamma-rays and fast neutrons for determining their mutagenic effectiveness through the occurence of chlorophyll mutations. Fast neutrons were more effective in inducing chlorophyll mutations and the rice variety Basmati 370 produced maximum number of mutations followed by varieties Sonahri Sugdasi, Jajai 77 and Sada Gulab. The highest frequency of chlorophyll mutations was that of albina types followed by striata types. The xantha, viridis and tigrina types of mutations were less frequent. (authors)

  14. Mutation Clusters from Cancer Exome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakushadze, Zura; Yu, Willie

    2017-08-15

    We apply our statistically deterministic machine learning/clustering algorithm *K-means (recently developed in https://ssrn.com/abstract=2908286) to 10,656 published exome samples for 32 cancer types. A majority of cancer types exhibit a mutation clustering structure. Our results are in-sample stable. They are also out-of-sample stable when applied to 1389 published genome samples across 14 cancer types. In contrast, we find in- and out-of-sample instabilities in cancer signatures extracted from exome samples via nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF), a computationally-costly and non-deterministic method. Extracting stable mutation structures from exome data could have important implications for speed and cost, which are critical for early-stage cancer diagnostics, such as novel blood-test methods currently in development.

  15. Gene mutations in hepatocellular adenomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raft, Marie B; Jørgensen, Ernö N; Vainer, Ben

    2015-01-01

    is associated with bi-allelic mutations in the TCF1 gene and morphologically has marked steatosis. β-catenin activating HCA has increased activity of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and is associated with possible malignant transformation. Inflammatory HCA is characterized by an oncogene-induced inflammation due...... to alterations in the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway. In the diagnostic setting, sub classification of HCA is based primarily on immunohistochemical analyzes, and has had an increasing impact on choice of treatment and individual prognostic assessment....... This review offers an overview of the reported gene mutations associated with hepatocellular adenomas together with a discussion of the diagnostic and prognostic value....

  16. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 41

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    This newsletter contains short descriptions of research methods for the use of radiation to induce mutations and facilitate plant breeding. This method is used to develop species of plants that can survive in harsh climates and thus provide a food supply for humans and animals. Some of the mutants discussed include a salt tolerant barley, a disease resistant shrub, a cold tolerant chickpea, a highly productive Canavalia virosa and productive tomato. Refs, figs and tabs

  17. The condensed mutation in sunflower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leclercq, P.

    1978-01-01

    Three inbred lines of sunflower were treated with gamma rays. In the progeny of one of these lines, the desired dwarf mutation appeared with a high frequency (23%). The dwarfing was accompanied by various undesirable characteristics (lateness, poor seed production, etc.), for which correction through genetic diversification and selection is in progress. The ratio capitulum diameter/stem height has increased from 1/8 up to 1/3 [fr

  18. Rare beneficial mutations can halt Muller's ratchet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balick, Daniel; Goyal, Sidhartha; Jerison, Elizabeth; Neher, Richard; Shraiman, Boris; Desai, Michael

    2012-02-01

    In viral, bacterial, and other asexual populations, the vast majority of non-neutral mutations are deleterious. This motivates the application of models without beneficial mutations. Here we show that the presence of surprisingly few compensatory mutations halts fitness decay in these models. Production of deleterious mutations is balanced by purifying selection, stabilizing the fitness distribution. However, stochastic vanishing of fitness classes can lead to slow fitness decay (i.e. Muller's ratchet). For weakly deleterious mutations, production overwhelms purification, rapidly decreasing population fitness. We show that when beneficial mutations are introduced, a stable steady state emerges in the form of a dynamic mutation-selection balance. We argue this state is generic for all mutation rates and population sizes, and is reached as an end state as genomes become saturated by either beneficial or deleterious mutations. Assuming all mutations have the same magnitude selective effect, we calculate the fraction of beneficial mutations necessary to maintain the dynamic balance. This may explain the unexpected maintenance of asexual genomes, as in mitochondria, in the presence of selection. This will affect in the statistics of genetic diversity in these populations.

  19. Rare and unexpected beta thalassemic mutations in Qazvin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    About 13 beta-globin mutations encompass 70 - 90% of mutation spectrum in Iran. These mutations are called common beta-globin mutations. The rest are rare or unknown mutations. The objective of this study was to identify and describe rare or unknown beta-globin mutations in Qazvin province. EDTAcontaining venous ...

  20. Rare and unexpected beta thalassemic mutations in Qazvin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-01-04

    Jan 4, 2010 ... About 13 beta-globin mutations encompass 70 - 90% of mutation spectrum in Iran. These mutations are called common beta-globin mutations. The rest are rare or unknown mutations. The objective of this study was to identify and describe rare or unknown beta-globin mutations in Qazvin province. EDTA-.

  1. Mutation breeding in vegetable crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Takashi

    1984-01-01

    Vegetables breed by seeds and vegetative organs. In main vegetables, the differentiation of clopping types, the adoption of monoculture and year-round production and shipment are carried out, adapting to various socio-economic and cultivation conditions. Protected agriculture has advanced mainly for fruit vegetables, and the seeds for sale have become almost hybrid varieties. Reflecting the situation like this, the demand for breeding is diversified and characteristic, and the case of applying mutation breeding seems to be many. The present status of the mutation breeding of vegetables is not yet well under way, but about 40 raised varieties have been published in the world. The characters introduced by induced mutation and irradiation were compact form, harvesting aptitude, the forms and properties of stems and leaves, anti-lodging property, the size, form and uniformity of fruits, male sterility and so on. The radiation sources used were mostly gamma ray or X-ray, but sometimes, combined irradiation was used. As the results obtained in Japan, burdocks as an example of gamma ray irradiation to seeds, tomatoes as an example of inducing the compound resistance against disease injury and lettuces as an example of internal beta irradiation are reported. (Kako, I.)

  2. Mutation Breeding for Crop Improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajbir, S. Sangwan

    2017-01-01

    Chromosomes contain genes responsible of different traits of any organism. Induced mutation using chemical mutagens and radiation to modify molecular structure of plants played a major role in the development of high genetic variability and help develop new superior crop varieties. The Mutation Breeding is applicable to all plants and has generated lot of agronomically interesting mutants, both in vegetatively and seed propagated plants. The technique is easy but long and challenging to detect, isolate and characterize the mutant and gene. A specific dose of irradiation has to be used to obtain desired mutants. However, with modern molecular technique, the gene responsible for mutation can be identified. The CRISPR-Cas9 allows the removal of a specific gene which is responsible of unwanted trait and replacing it with a gene which induces a desired trait. There have been more than 2700 officially released mutant varieties from 170 different plant species in more than 60 countries throughout the world and A more participatory approach, involving all stakeholders in plant breeding, is needed to ensure that it is demand/farmers driven.

  3. Induced mutations in sesame breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashri, A.

    2001-01-01

    The scope of induced mutations in sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) breeding is reviewed. So far in Egypt, India, Iraq, Rep. of Korea, and Sri Lanka, 14 officially released varieties have been developed through induced mutations: 12 directly and 2 through cross breeding (one using the 'dt45' induced mutant from Israel). For another variety released in China there are no details. The induced mutations approach was adopted primarily in order to obtain genetic variability that was not available in the germplasm collection. The mutagens commonly applied have been gamma rays, EMS and sodium azide. Sesame seeds can withstand high mutagen doses, and there are genotypic differences in sensitivity between varieties. The mutants induced in the above named countries and others include better yield, improved seed retention, determinate habit, modified plant architecture and size, more uniform and shorter maturation period, earliness, resistance to diseases, genic male sterility, seed coat color, higher oil content and modified fatty acids composition. Some of the induced mutants have already given rise to improved varieties, the breeding value of other mutants is now being assessed and still others can serve as useful markers in genetic studies and breeding programmes. (author)

  4. Germline APC mutations in hepatoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Adeline; Sisson, Rebecca; Gupta, Anita; Tiao, Greg; Geller, James I

    2018-04-01

    Conflicting reports on the frequency of germline adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene mutations in patients with hepatoblastoma (HB) have called into question the clinical value of APC mutation testing on apparently sporadic HB. An Institutional Review Board approved retrospective review of clinical data collected from patients with HB who received APC testing at our institution was conducted. All HB patients seen at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center were eligible for testing. Potential genotype/phenotype correlations were assessed. As of July 2015, 29 patients with HB had received constitutional APC testing. Four (14%) were found to have APC pathogenic truncations of the APC protein and in addition two (7%) had APC missense variants of unknown clinical significance. Two patients (7%) had family histories indicative of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Response to chemotherapy tracked differently in APC pathogenic cases, with a slower imaging response despite an equivalent or slightly faster α-fetoprotein (AFP) response. The prevalence of pathogenic APC variants in apparently sporadic HB may be higher than previously detected. Differences in time to imaging response, despite similar AFP response, may impact surgical planning. All patients with HB warrant germline APC mutation testing for underlying FAP. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Mutation induction by ion beams in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Atsushi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    The effect of ion beams such as C, He, and Ne ions was investigated on the mutation induction in plants with the expectation that ion beams of high linear energy transfer (LET) can frequently produce large DNA alternation such as inversion, translocation and large deletion rather than point mutation. Mutation frequency was investigated using Arabidopsis visible phenotype loci and was 8 to 33 fold higher for 220 MeV carbon ions than for electrons. Mutation spectrum was investigated on the flower color of chrysanthemum cv to find that flower mutants induced by ion beams show complex and stripe types rather than single color. Polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed to investigate DNA alteration of mutations. In conclusion, the characteristics of ion beams for the mutation induction are 1) high frequency, 2) broad mutation spectrum, and 3) novel mutants. (S. Ohno)

  6. Mutation induction by ion beams in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Atsushi

    2001-01-01

    The effect of ion beams such as C, He, and Ne ions was investigated on the mutation induction in plants with the expectation that ion beams of high linear energy transfer (LET) can frequently produce large DNA alternation such as inversion, translocation and large deletion rather than point mutation. Mutation frequency was investigated using Arabidopsis visible phenotype loci and was 8 to 33 fold higher for 220 MeV carbon ions than for electrons. Mutation spectrum was investigated on the flower color of chrysanthemum cv to find that flower mutants induced by ion beams show complex and stripe types rather than single color. Polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed to investigate DNA alteration of mutations. In conclusion, the characteristics of ion beams for the mutation induction are 1) high frequency, 2) broad mutation spectrum, and 3) novel mutants. (S. Ohno)

  7. Oncogene mutational profile in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang ZC

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Zi-Chen Zhang,1,* Sha Fu,1,* Fang Wang,1 Hai-Yun Wang,1 Yi-Xin Zeng,2 Jian-Yong Shao11Department of Molecular Diagnostics, 2Department of Experimental Research, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC is a common tumor in Southern China, but the oncogene mutational status of NPC patients has not been clarified. Using time-of-flight mass spectrometry, 238 mutation hotspots in 19 oncogenes were examined in 123 NPC patients. The relationships between mutational status and clinical data were assessed with a χ2 or Fisher's exact test. Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan–Meier method with the log-rank test. In 123 patients, 21 (17.1% NPC tumors were positive for mutations in eight oncogenes: six patients had PIK3CA mutations (4.9%, five NRAS mutations (4.1%, four KIT mutations (3.3%, two PDGFRA mutations (1.6%, two ABL mutations (1.6%, and one with simultaneous mutations in HRAS, EGFR, and BRAF (1%. Patients with mutations were more likely to relapse or develop metastasis than those with wild-type alleles (P=0.019. No differences or correlations were found in other clinical characteristics or in patient survival. No mutations were detected in oncogenes AKT1, AKT2, CDK, ERBB2, FGFR1, FGFR3, FLT3, JAK2, KRAS, MET, and RET. These results demonstrate an association between NPC and mutations in NRAS, KIT, PIK3CA, PDGFRA, and ABL, which are associated with patient relapse and metastasis. Keywords: NPC, oncogene, mutation

  8. Characterization of a mutation commonly associated with persistent stuttering: evidence for a founder mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedyna, Alison; Drayna, Dennis; Kang, Changsoo

    2010-01-01

    Stuttering is a disorder which affects the fluency of speech. It has been shown to have high heritability, and has recently been linked to mutations in the GNPTAB gene. One such mutation, Glu1200Lys, has been repeatedly observed in unrelated families and individual cases. Eight unrelated individuals carrying this mutation were analyzed in an effort to distinguish whether these arise from repeated mutation at the same site, or whether they represent a founder mutation with a single origin. Results show that all 12 chromosomes carrying this mutation share a common haplotype in this region, indicating it is a founder mutation. Further analysis estimated the age of this allele to be ~572 generations. Construction of a cladogram tracing the mutation through our study sample also supports the founder mutation hypothesis. PMID:20944643

  9. Predictable Phenotypes of Antibiotic Resistance Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopp, M; Andersson, D I

    2018-05-15

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria represent a major threat to our ability to treat bacterial infections. Two factors that determine the evolutionary success of antibiotic resistance mutations are their impact on resistance level and the fitness cost. Recent studies suggest that resistance mutations commonly show epistatic interactions, which would complicate predictions of their stability in bacterial populations. We analyzed 13 different chromosomal resistance mutations and 10 host strains of Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli to address two main questions. (i) Are there epistatic interactions between different chromosomal resistance mutations? (ii) How does the strain background and genetic distance influence the effect of chromosomal resistance mutations on resistance and fitness? Our results show that the effects of combined resistance mutations on resistance and fitness are largely predictable and that epistasis remains rare even when up to four mutations were combined. Furthermore, a majority of the mutations, especially target alteration mutations, demonstrate strain-independent phenotypes across different species. This study extends our understanding of epistasis among resistance mutations and shows that interactions between different resistance mutations are often predictable from the characteristics of the individual mutations. IMPORTANCE The spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria imposes an urgent threat to public health. The ability to forecast the evolutionary success of resistant mutants would help to combat dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Previous studies have shown that the phenotypic effects (fitness and resistance level) of resistance mutations can vary substantially depending on the genetic context in which they occur. We conducted a broad screen using many different resistance mutations and host strains to identify potential epistatic interactions between various types of resistance mutations and to determine the effect of strain

  10. MPL mutation profile in JAK2 mutation-negative patients with myeloproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wanlong; Zhang, Xi; Wang, Xiuqiang; Zhang, Zhong; Yeh, Chen-Hsiung; Uyeji, Jennifer; Albitar, Maher

    2011-03-01

    Mutations in the thrombopoietin receptor gene (myeloproliferative leukemia, MPL) have been reported in patients with JAK2 V617F-negative chronic myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs). We evaluated the prevalence of MPL mutations relative to JAK2 mutations in patients with suspected MPDs. A total of 2790 patient samples submitted for JAK2 mutation analysis were tested using real-time polymerase chain reaction and bidirectional sequencing of plasma RNA. JAK2 V617F-negative samples were tested for JAK2 exons 12 to 14 mutations, and those with negative results were then tested for mutations in MPL exons 10 and 11. Of the 2790 patients, 529 (18.96%) had V617F, 12 (0.43%) had small insertions or deletions in exon 12, and 7 (0.25%) had other JAK2 mutations in exons 12 to 14. Of the 2242 JAK2 mutation-negative patients, 68 (3.03%) had MPL mutations. W515L was the predominant MPL mutation (n=46; 68%), and 10 (15%) patients had other W515 variants. The remaining MPL mutations (n=12, 17%) were detected at other locations in exons 10 and 11 and included 3 insertion/deletion mutations. The S505N mutation, associated with familial MPD, was detected in 3 patients. Overall, for every 100 V617F mutations in patients with suspected MPDs, there were 12.9 MPL mutations, 2.3 JAK2 exon 12 mutations, and 1.3 JAK2 exons 13 to 14 mutations. These findings suggest that MPL mutation screening should be performed before JAK2 exons 12 to 14 testing in JAK2 V617F-negative patients with suspected MPDs.

  11. Calreticulin Mutations in Bulgarian MPN Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Ivan; Hadjiev, Evgueniy; Alaikov, Tzvetan; Spassova, Sylva; Stoimenov, Angel; Naumova, Elissaveta; Shivarov, Velizar; Ivanova, Milena

    2018-01-01

    Somatic mutations in JAK2, MPL and CALR are recurrently identified in most of the cases with Philadelphia chromosome negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). We applied four molecular genetic methods for identification of CALR exon 9 mutations, including high resolution melt (HRM) analysis, Sanger sequencing, semiconductor target genes sequencing and whole exome sequencing. A total of 78 patients with myeloid malignancies were included in the study. We identified 14 CALR exon 9 mutated cases out of 78 studied patients with myeloid malignancies. All mutated patients were diagnosed with MPN being either PMF (n = 7) or ET (n = 7). Nine cases had type 1 mutations and 5 cases had type 2 mutations. CALR exon 9, MPL exon 10 and JAK2 p. V617F were mutually exclusive. There were no statistically significant differences in the hematological parameters between the cases with CALR and JAK2 or MPL mutations. Notably, all four techniques were fully concordant in the detection of CALR mutations. This is one of the few reports on the CALR mutations frequency in South-eastern populations. Our study shows that the frequency and patterns of these mutations is identical to those in the patients' cohorts from Western countries. Besides we demonstrated the utility of four different methods for their detection.

  12. Mutation Spectrum and Phenotypic Features in Noonan Syndrome with PTPN11 Mutations: Definition of Two Novel Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atik, Tahir; Aykut, Ayca; Hazan, Filiz; Onay, Huseyin; Goksen, Damla; Darcan, Sukran; Tukun, Ajlan; Ozkinay, Ferda

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the spectrum of PTPN11 gene mutations in Noonan syndrome patients and to study the genotype-phenotype associations. In this study, twenty Noonan syndrome patients with PTPN11 mutations were included. The patients underwent a detailed clinical and physical evaluation. To identify inherited cases, parents of all mutation positive patients were analyzed. Thirteen different PTPN11 mutations, two of them being novel, were detected in the study group. These mutations included eleven missense mutations: p.G60A, p.D61N, p.Y62D, p.Y63C, p.E69Q, p.Q79R, p.Y279C,p.N308D, p.N308S, p.M504V, p.Q510R and two novel missense mutations: p.I56V and p.I282M. The frequency of cardiac abnormalities and short stature were found to be 80 % and 80 %, respectively. Mental retardation was not observed in patients having exon 8 mutations. No significant correlations were detected between other phenotypic features and genotypes. By identifying genotype-phenotype correlations, this study provides information on phenotypes observed in NS patients with different PTPN11 mutations.

  13. Induced Mutations in Thai Rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klakhaeng, Kanchana

    2014-01-01

    Rice is the primary source of food for more than half of the world's population. It benefits greatly from technological inputs in the area of breeding such as induced mutation. Induced mutation can produce mutants with significant improvement in plant type, maturity, yields and protein ratio when compared to the parent. These improved traits enable the mutants to fit into farming systems with either shorter or longer growing seasons. Three induced mutant rice varieties, including RD6, RD10 and RD15, are well accepted by farmers and consumers in Thailand. RD6 and RD15 were aromatic, photosensitive varieties which were derived from KDML105 by acute irradiation of 20 and 15 kilorad gamma ray, respectively. After induced mutation, pedigree selection was applied. RD6 showed drought tolerance and also good grain quality including softness and good aroma with a higher average yield than the famous glutinous variety, San-Pah-Tong. Additionally, it was resistant to blast and brown spot diseases with an average yield of 4.19 tons/ha. RD15 showed drought tolerance and resistance to brown spot disease with the highest yield of 3.5 tons/ha. These two mutant varieties are currently the most famous aromatic rice varieties in Thailand. On the other hand, RD10 is a glutinous, photoperiod insensitive rice variety which was derived from RD1 by irradiation of 1 kilorad fast neutrons. RD10 showed good grain quality such as softness and stickiness with the yield of 4.25 tons/ha. As an on-going project, recommended rice varieties were irradiated with electron beam for anaerobic germination ability, submergence tolerance, stagnant-flood tolerance and also internode elongation.

  14. Induced mutations for crop improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micke, A.; Donini, B.; Maluszynski, M.

    1990-01-01

    Mutation induction has become an established tool in plant breeding to supplement existing germ plasma and to improve cultivars in certain specific traits. Hundreds of improved varieties have been released to farmers for many different crop species, demonstrating the economic value of the technology. Limitations arise mainly from the large mutagenized populations to be screened and from the unsatisfactory selection methods. Both limitations may be eased to some extent by advances in techniques of plant in-vitro culture. (author). Refs, 1 fig., 7 tabs

  15. EGFR mutation frequency and effectiveness of erlotinib

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Britta; Hager, Henrik; Sorensen, Boe S

    2014-01-01

    mutation (S768I), and two complex mutations. Seven percent of the patients were never smokers. The differences in median progression-free survival and overall survival between the mutated group and the wild-type group were 8.0 vs. 2.5 months, p...-1 vs. 2-3) and line of treatment (1st vs. 2nd and 3rd) had no influence on outcome in EGFR-mutated patients. CONCLUSION: We found a higher frequency of EGFR mutations than expected in a cohort with less than 10% never smokers. The outcome after treatment with erlotinib was much better in patients......OBJECTIVES: In 2008, we initiated a prospective study to explore the frequency and predictive value of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in an unselected population of Danish patients with non-small cell lung cancer offered treatment with erlotinib, mainly in second-line. MATERIALS...

  16. Mutation, Witten index, and quiver invariant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Heeyeon [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics,31 Caroline Street North, Waterloo, N2L 2Y5, Ontario (Canada); Lee, Seung-Joo [Department of Physics, Robeson Hall, Virginia Tech,Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Yi, Piljin [School of Physics, Korea Institute for Advanced Study,Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-20

    We explore Seiberg-like dualities, or mutations, for N=4 quiver quantum mechanics in the context of wall-crossing. In contrast to higher dimensions, the 1d Seiberg-duality must be performed with much care. With fixed Fayet-Iliopoulos constants, at most two nodes can be mutated, one left and the other right, mapping a chamber of a quiver into a chamber of a mutated quiver. We delineate this complex pattern for triangle quivers and show how the Witten indices are preserved under such finely chosen mutations. On the other hand, the quiver invariants, or wall-crossing-safe part of supersymmetric spectra, mutate more straightforwardly, whereby a quiver is mapped to a quiver. The mutation rule that preserves the quiver invariant is different from the usual one, however, which we explore and confirm numerically.

  17. Mutation, Witten index, and quiver invariant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Heeyeon; Lee, Seung-Joo; Yi, Piljin

    2015-01-01

    We explore Seiberg-like dualities, or mutations, for N=4 quiver quantum mechanics in the context of wall-crossing. In contrast to higher dimensions, the 1d Seiberg-duality must be performed with much care. With fixed Fayet-Iliopoulos constants, at most two nodes can be mutated, one left and the other right, mapping a chamber of a quiver into a chamber of a mutated quiver. We delineate this complex pattern for triangle quivers and show how the Witten indices are preserved under such finely chosen mutations. On the other hand, the quiver invariants, or wall-crossing-safe part of supersymmetric spectra, mutate more straightforwardly, whereby a quiver is mapped to a quiver. The mutation rule that preserves the quiver invariant is different from the usual one, however, which we explore and confirm numerically.

  18. A NEW MUTATION OPERATOR IN GENETIC PROGRAMMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha Purohit

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new type of mutation operator, FEDS (Fitness, Elitism, Depth, and Size mutation in genetic programming. The concept behind the new mutation operator is inspired from already introduced FEDS crossover operator to handle the problem of code bloating. FEDS mutation operates by using local elitism replacement in combination with depth limit and size of the trees to reduce bloat with a subsequent improvement in the performance of trees (program structures. We have designed a multiclass classifier for some benchmark datasets to test the performance of proposed mutation. The results show that when the initial run uses FEDS crossover and the concluding run uses FEDS mutation, then not only is the final result significantly improved but there is reduction in bloat also.

  19. The Mutational Robustness of Influenza A Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Visher

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A virus' mutational robustness is described in terms of the strength and distribution of the mutational fitness effects, or MFE. The distribution of MFE is central to many questions in evolutionary theory and is a key parameter in models of molecular evolution. Here we define the mutational fitness effects in influenza A virus by generating 128 viruses, each with a single nucleotide mutation. In contrast to mutational scanning approaches, this strategy allowed us to unambiguously assign fitness values to individual mutations. The presence of each desired mutation and the absence of additional mutations were verified by next generation sequencing of each stock. A mutation was considered lethal only after we failed to rescue virus in three independent transfections. We measured the fitness of each viable mutant relative to the wild type by quantitative RT-PCR following direct competition on A549 cells. We found that 31.6% of the mutations in the genome-wide dataset were lethal and that the lethal fraction did not differ appreciably between the HA- and NA-encoding segments and the rest of the genome. Of the viable mutants, the fitness mean and standard deviation were 0.80 and 0.22 in the genome-wide dataset and best modeled as a beta distribution. The fitness impact of mutation was marginally lower in the segments coding for HA and NA (0.88 ± 0.16 than in the other 6 segments (0.78 ± 0.24, and their respective beta distributions had slightly different shape parameters. The results for influenza A virus are remarkably similar to our own analysis of CirSeq-derived fitness values from poliovirus and previously published data from other small, single stranded DNA and RNA viruses. These data suggest that genome size, and not nucleic acid type or mode of replication, is the main determinant of viral mutational fitness effects.

  20. POLE somatic mutations in advanced colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Joana; Pinto, Carla; Pinto, Diana; Pinheiro, Manuela; Silva, Romina; Peixoto, Ana; Rocha, Patrícia; Veiga, Isabel; Santos, Catarina; Santos, Rui; Cabreira, Verónica; Lopes, Paula; Henrique, Rui; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2017-12-01

    Despite all the knowledge already gathered, the picture of somatic genetic changes in colorectal tumorigenesis is far from complete. Recently, germline and somatic mutations in the exonuclease domain of polymerase epsilon, catalytic subunit (POLE) gene have been reported in a small subset of microsatellite-stable and hypermutated colorectal carcinomas (CRCs), affecting the proofreading activity of the enzyme and leading to misincorporation of bases during DNA replication. To evaluate the role of POLE mutations in colorectal carcinogenesis, namely in advanced CRC, we searched for somatic mutations by Sanger sequencing in tumor DNA samples from 307 cases. Microsatellite instability and mutation analyses of a panel of oncogenes were performed in the tumors harboring POLE mutations. Three heterozygous mutations were found in two tumors, the c.857C>G, p.Pro286Arg, the c.901G>A, p.Asp301Asn, and the c.1376C>T, p.Ser459Phe. Of the POLE-mutated CRCs, one tumor was microsatellite-stable and the other had low microsatellite instability, whereas KRAS and PIK3CA mutations were found in one tumor each. We conclude that POLE somatic mutations exist but are rare in advanced CRC, with further larger studies being necessary to evaluate its biological and clinical implications. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Mutation direction by irradiation in rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cailian; Chen Qiufang; Jin Wei; Lu Yimei

    2001-01-01

    The mutation directions of rice were studied. The results indicated that the mutation directions of rice induced by 14 C were invert correlation to their genetic backgrounds of tested rice varieties, i.e. early mature and short stem varieties produced later mature and higher stem mutation; late mature and high stem varieties produced earlier mature and shorter stem mutation; the varieties of middle maturity and height produced both direction mutations of earlier and later maturity or shorter and higher stem. The mutation directions induced by 14 C were also related to treated doses and stages. Frequency of earlier maturity mutation by protons treatment were higher than those induced by other mutagens. Frequency of later maturity by γ-rays were higher than those induced by other mutagens. Frequency of short stem mutation by synchronous irradiation (soft X-rays) were higher than those induced by other mutagens. Frequency of beneficial mutation induced by proton treatment were higher than those induced by γ-rays

  2. Epilepsy caused by CDKL5 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrén, Maija; Gaily, Eija; Tengström, Carola; Lähdetie, Jaana; Archer, Hayley; Ala-Mello, Sirpa

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 gene (CDKL5) have been identified in female patients with early onset epileptic encephalopathy and severe mental retardation with a Rett-like phenotype. Subsequently CDKL5 mutations were shown to be associated with more diverse phenotypes including mild epilepsy and autism without epilepsy. Furthermore, CDKL5 mutations were found in patients with Angelman-like phenotype. The severity of epilepsy associated with CDKL5 mutations was recently shown to correlate with the type of CDKL5 mutations and epilepsy was identified to involve three distinct sequential stages. Here, we describe the phenotype of a severe form of neurodevelopmental disease in a female patient with a de novo nonsense mutation of the CDKL5 gene c.175C > T (p.R59X) affecting the catalytic domain of CDKL5 protein. Mutations in the CDKL5 gene are less common in males and can be associated with a genomic deletion as found in our male patient with a deletion of 0.3 Mb at Xp22.13 including the CDKL5 gene. We review phenotypes associated with CDKL5 mutations and examine putative relationships between the clinical epilepsy phenotype and the type of the mutation in the CDKL5 gene. © 2010 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Mutation studies on garden roses: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, S.K.

    1997-01-01

    Most of the modern roses are the result of hybridization, selection and spontaneous mutation. For floriculture trade, there is always demand and necessity for new varieties due to change in taste and fashion. Mutation breeding is an established method for crop improvement. Induced somatic mutation breeding holds promise for effective improvement and have high potential for bringing about genetic improvement and it has led to a great burst of flower colour, form, pattern and other variations in rose by using ionizing radiations. The details of prospects and utilization of induced mutation breeding technique for developing new rose varieties have been compiled. (author)

  4. Repair-resistant mutation in Neurospora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadler, D.; Macleod, H.; Loo, M.

    1987-01-01

    Chronic UV treatment produces severalfold fewer mutations in Neurospora conidia than does the same total dose of acute UV. Experiments were designed to determine the conditions required for chronic UV mutagenesis. Measurement of the coincidence frequency for two independent mutations revealed the existence of a subset of cells which are mutable by chronic UV. Analysis of forward mutation at the mtr locus showed that the genetic alterations produced by chronic UV were virtually all point mutants, even though the assay system could detect alterations or deletions extending into neighboring genes. A significant fraction of the mutants produced by acute UV were multigenic deletions. The size of the dose-rate effect (acute UV mutation frequency divided by chronic UV mutation frequency) was compared for several different mutation assay systems. Forward mutations (recessive lethals and mtr) gave values ranging from four to nine. For events which were restricted to specific molecular sites (specific reversions and nonsense suppressor mutations), there was a wider range of dose-rate ratios. This suggests that chronic UV mutation may be restricted to certain molecular sequences or configurations

  5. Mutation breedings in ornamental plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubara, Hisao

    1984-01-01

    Several methods of obtaining somatic mutant plants by γ-ray irradiation on pieces of tissues as in vitro adventitious bud technique or small cutting methods with repeated pruning are described. 1) The irradiation to the adventitious buds in the small pieces of organ cultured in vitro and to the small cuttings are employed. Culture beds of agar or of Japanese Kanuma soil were used in vitro culture. In these experiments, Japanese Kanuma soil bed in in vitro culture worked well for root development and transplant of the induced mutants. 2) Combination with in vitro culture and repeated pruning technique were used for isolation and fixation of solid somatic mutant from small sectorial mutation induced by irradiation. This method was successful for begonia, chrysanthemum, aberia and winter daphne. 3) These data indicates that most of the induced mutant plants were non-chimeric, while a few others were chimeric. Among the new varieties, ''Gin-Sei'', ''Ryoku-Ha'', ''Big-Cross'', ''Kaede-Iron'', ''Mei-Fu-Hana-Tsukubane-Utsugi'' and ''Daphne-γ-3'' are non-chimeric, and ''Mini-Mini-Iron'' and ''Orange-Iron'' are chimeric. Moreover, these new varieties have remarkably differed in size and in color pattern from original variety. From the experimental results of somatic mutation, it is indicated that plant tissue culture have enormous potential in radiation breeding and in rapid propagation of the somatic mutant. (author)

  6. Mutation breeding in vegetable crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Takashi

    1984-03-01

    Vegetables breed by seeds and vegetative organs. In main vegetables, the differentiation of clopping types, the adoption of monoculture and year-round production and shipment are carried out, adapting to various socio-economic and cultivation conditions. Protected agriculture has advanced mainly for fruit vegetables, and the seeds for sale have become almost hybrid varieties. Reflecting this situation, the demand for breeding is diversified and characteristic. The present status of mutation breeding of vegetables is not yet well under way, but reports of about 40 raised varieties have been published in the world. The characters introduced by induced mutation and irradiation are compact form, harvesting aptitude, the forms and properties of stems and leaves, anti-lodging property, the size, form and uniformity of fruits, male sterility and so on. The radiation sources used were mostly gamma ray or X-ray, but sometimes, combined irradiation was used. Results obtained in Japan include: burdocks as an example to gamma ray irradiation of seeds; tomatoes as an example of inducing compound resistance against disease injury; and lettuce as an example of internal beta irradiation. (Kako, I.).

  7. A new polymorphism in goat β-lactoglobulin promoter region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirella Graziano

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available An individual variability in β-lactoglobulin content has been previously observed in Girgentana goat milk by HPLC analysis. To identify eventual mutations affecting the transcription level of the gene, the prooter region was characterized in goats showing an anomalous phenotype, consisting in a reduced content of β-lactoglobulin respect to α-lactoalbumine. A single nucleotide substitution not previously reported has been detected. A PCR-RFLP procedure was developed for fast detection of the mutation in different goat breeds: Girgentana, Garganica, Sarda, Alpine, Montefalcone and Saanen. The Montefalcone goat showed the highest frequency of the mutation, confirming one more the peculiarity of this breed.

  8. Mutation Analysis in Classical Phenylketonuria Patients Followed by Detecting Haplotypes Linked to Some PAH Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghanian, Fatemeh; Silawi, Mohammad; Tabei, Seyed M B

    2017-02-01

    Deficiency of phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) enzyme and elevation of phenylalanine in body fluids cause phenylketonuria (PKU). The gold standard for confirming PKU and PAH deficiency is detecting causal mutations by direct sequencing of the coding exons and splicing involved sequences of the PAH gene. Furthermore, haplotype analysis could be considered as an auxiliary approach for detecting PKU causative mutations before direct sequencing of the PAH gene by making comparisons between prior detected mutation linked-haplotypes and new PKU case haplotypes with undetermined mutations. In this study, 13 unrelated classical PKU patients took part in the study detecting causative mutations. Mutations were identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing in all patients. After that, haplotype analysis was performed by studying VNTR and PAHSTR markers (linked genetic markers of the PAH gene) through application of PCR and capillary electrophoresis (CE). Mutation analysis was performed successfully and the detected mutations were as follows: c.782G>A, c.754C>T, c.842C>G, c.113-115delTCT, c.688G>A, and c.696A>G. Additionally, PAHSTR/VNTR haplotypes were detected to discover haplotypes linked to each mutation. Mutation detection is the best approach for confirming PAH enzyme deficiency in PKU patients. Due to the relatively large size of the PAH gene and high cost of the direct sequencing in developing countries, haplotype analysis could be used before DNA sequencing and mutation detection for a faster and cheaper way via identifying probable mutated exons.

  9. Spontaneous mutation by mutagenic repair of spontaneous lesions in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastings, P.J.; Quah, S.-K.; Borstel, R.C. von

    1976-01-01

    It is stated that strains of yeast carrying mutations in many of the steps in pathways repairing radiation-induced damage to DNA have enhanced spontaneous mutation rates. Most strains isolated because they have enhanced spontaneous mutation carry mutations in DNA repair systems. This suggests that much spontaneous mutation arises by mutagenic repair of spontaneous lesions. (author)

  10. Rice breeding with induced mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1968-06-01

    The Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Atomic Energy in Food and Agriculture decided in 1964 to organize a co-ordinated research programme on the use of induced mutations in rice breeding. The programme was organized within the framework of activities of the International Rice Commission. This is a report of the Third Co-ordination Meeting of the participants, which was held in Taipei, 5-9 June 1967. As the projects, which together make up the co-ordinated programme, are at different stages of progress, the report contains a variety of papers including completed studies, field and progress reports, and highlights of the discussions with some additional recommendations prepared by the participants. Refs, figs and tabs.

  11. Molecular methods for the detection of mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, C; Marcelino, L A; Conde, A R; Saraiva, C; Giphart-Gassler, M; De Nooij-van Dalen, A G; Van Buuren-van Seggelen, V; Van der Keur, M; May, C A; Cole, J; Lehmann, A R; Steinsgrimsdottir, H; Beare, D; Capulas, E; Armour, J A

    2000-01-01

    We report the results of a collaborative study aimed at developing reliable, direct assays for mutation in human cells. The project used common lymphoblastoid cell lines, both with and without mutagen treatment, as a shared resource to validate the development of new molecular methods for the detection of low-level mutations in the presence of a large excess of normal alleles. As the "gold standard, " hprt mutation frequencies were also measured on the same samples. The methods under development included i) the restriction site mutation (RSM) assay, in which mutations lead to the destruction of a restriction site; ii) minisatellite length-change mutation, in which mutations lead to alleles containing new numbers of tandem repeat units; iii) loss of heterozygosity for HLA epitopes, in which antibodies can be used to direct selection for mutant cells; iv) multiple fluorescence-based long linker arm nucleotides assay (mf-LLA) technology, for the detection of substitutional mutations; v) detection of alterations in the TP53 locus using a (CA) array as the target for the screening; and vi) PCR analysis of lymphocytes for the presence of the BCL2 t(14:18) translocation. The relative merits of these molecular methods are discussed, and a comparison made with more "traditional" methods.

  12. Mutation update for the PORCN gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lombardi, Maria Paola; Bulk, Saskia; Celli, Jacopo; Lampe, Anne; Gabbett, Michael T.; Ousager, Lillian Bomme; van der Smagt, Jasper J.; Soller, Maria; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Mannens, Marcel A. M. M.; Smigiel, Robert; Hennekam, Raoul C.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the PORCN gene were first identified in Goltz-Gorlin syndrome patients in 2007. Since then, several reports have been published describing a large variety of genetic defects resulting in the Goltz-Gorlin syndrome, and mutations or deletions were also reported in angioma serpiginosum,

  13. Gene mutations in children with chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, H

    2001-01-01

    In the last few years, several genes have been identified as being associated with hereditary and idiopathic chronic pancreatitis (CP), i.e. PRSS1, CFTR and SPINK1. In this study, we investigated 164 unrelated children and adolescents with CP for mutations in disease-associated genes by direct DNA sequencing, SSCP, RFLP and melting curve analysis. In 15 patients, we detected a PRSS1 mutation (8 with A16V, 5 with R122H, 2 with N29I), and in 34 patients, a SPINK1 mutation (30 with N34S, 4 with others). SPINK1 mutations were predominantly found in patients without a family history (29/121). Ten patients were homozygous for N34S, SPINK1 mutations were most common in 'idiopathic' CP, whereas patients with 'hereditary' CP predominantly showed a PRSS1 mutation (R122H, N29I). In patients without a family history, the most common PRSS1 mutation was A16V (7/121). In conclusion, our data suggest that CP may be inherited in a dominant, recessive or multigenetic manner as a result of mutations in the above-mentioned or as yet unidentified genes. This challenges the concept of idiopathic CP as a nongenetic disorder and the differentiation between hereditary and idiopathic CP. Therefore, we propose to classify CP as either 'primary CP' (with or without a family history) or 'secondary CP' caused by toxic, metabolic or other factors.

  14. 'A' by Aspergillus terreus through mutation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The highest drug yielding isolate FCBP-58 was subjected to both physical and chemical mutation to increase the biosynthetic capabilities of Cyclosporin 'A'. In this study, mutation was carried out by ultraviolet radiation (254 nm) and alkylating agent ethylmethane sulphonate (EMS). UV 5 min time treatment was proved to be ...

  15. TFAP2B mutation and dental anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanasubsinn, Natchaya; Sittiwangkul, Rekwan; Pongprot, Yupada; Kawasaki, Katsushige; Ohazama, Atsushi; Sastraruji, Thanapat; Kaewgahya, Massupa; Kantaputra, Piranit Nik

    2017-08-01

    Mutations inTFAP2B has been reported in patients with isolated patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) and Char syndrome. We performed mutation analysis of TFAP2B in 43 patients with isolated PDA, 7 patients with PDA with other congenital heart defects and 286 patients with isolated tooth agenesis with or without other dental anomalies. The heterozygous c.1006G>A mutation was identified in 20 individuals. Those mutation carriers consisted of 1 patient with term PDA (1/43), 16 patients with isolated tooth agenesis with or without other dental anomalies (16/286; 5.6%), 1 patient with PDA and severe valvular aortic stenosis and tooth agenesis (1/4) and 2 normal controls (2/100; 1%). The mutation is predicted to cause an amino-acid substitution p.Val336Ile in the TFAP2B protein. Tfap2b expression during early mouse tooth development supports the association of TFAP2B mutation and dental anomalies. It is hypothesized that this incidence might have been the result of founder effect. Here we report for the first time that TFAP2B mutation is associated with tooth agenesis, microdontia, supernumerary tooth and root maldevelopment. In addition, we also found that TFAP2B mutations, the common causes of PDA in Caucasian, are not the common cause of PDA in Thai population.

  16. Expanding CEP290 mutational spectrum in ciliopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Travaglini, Lorena; Brancati, Francesco; Attie-Bitach, Tania; Audollent, Sophie; Bertini, Enrico; Kaplan, Josseline; Perrault, Isabelle; Iannicelli, Miriam; Mancuso, Brunella; Rigoli, Luciana; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Swistun, Dominika; Tolentino, Jerlyn; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Valente, Enza Maria; Zankl, A.; Leventer, R.; Grattan-Smith, P.; Janecke, A.; D'Hooghe, M.; Sznajer, Y.; van Coster, R.; Demerleir, L.; Dias, K.; Moco, C.; Moreira, A.; Kim, C. Ae; Maegawa, G.; Petkovic, D.; Abdel-Salam, G. M. H.; Abdel-Aleem, A.; Zaki, M. S.; Marti, I.; Quijano-Roy, S.; Sigaudy, S.; de Lonlay, P.; Romano, S.; Touraine, R.; Koenig, M.; Lagier-Tourenne, C.; Messer, J.; Collignon, P.; Wolf, N.; Philippi, H.; Kitsiou Tzeli, S.; Halldorsson, S.; Johannsdottir, J.; Ludvigsson, P.; Phadke, S. R.; Udani, V.; Stuart, B.; Magee, A.; Lev, D.; Michelson, M.; Ben-Zeev, B.; Fischetto, R.; Benedicenti, F.; Stanzial, F.; Borgatti, R.; Accorsi, P.; Battaglia, S.; Fazzi, E.; Giordano, L.; Pinelli, L.; Boccone, L.; Bigoni, S.; Ferlini, A.; Donati, M. A.; Caridi, G.; Divizia, M. T.; Faravelli, F.; Ghiggeri, G.; Pessagno, A.; Briguglio, M.; Briuglia, S.; Salpietro, C. D.; Tortorella, G.; Adami, A.; Castorina, P.; Lalatta, F.; Marra, G.; Riva, D.; Scelsa, B.; Spaccini, L.; Uziel, G.; del Giudice, E.; Laverda, A. M.; Ludwig, K.; Permunian, A.; Suppiej, A.; Signorini, S.; Uggetti, C.; Battini, R.; Di Giacomo, M.; Cilio, M. R.; Di Sabato, M. L.; Leuzzi, V.; Parisi, P.; Pollazzon, M.; Silengo, M.; de Vescovi, R.; Greco, D.; Romano, C.; Cazzagon, M.; Simonati, A.; Al-Tawari, A. A.; Bastaki, L.; Mégarbané, A.; Sabolic Avramovska, V.; de Jong, M. M.; Stromme, P.; Koul, R.; Rajab, A.; Azam, M.; Barbot, C.; Martorell Sampol, L.; Rodriguez, B.; Pascual-Castroviejo, I.; Teber, S.; Anlar, B.; Comu, S.; Karaca, E.; Kayserili, H.; Yüksel, A.; Akcakus, M.; Al Gazali, L.; Sztriha, L.; Nicholl, D.; Woods, C. G.; Bennett, C.; Hurst, J.; Sheridan, E.; Barnicoat, A.; Hennekam, R.; Lees, M.; Blair, E.; Bernes, S.; Sanchez, H.; Clark, A. E.; DeMarco, E.; Donahue, C.; Sherr, E.; Hahn, J.; Sanger, T. D.; Gallager, T. E.; Dobyns, W. B.; Daugherty, C.; Krishnamoorthy, K. S.; Sarco, D.; Walsh, C. A.; McKanna, T.; Milisa, J.; Chung, W. K.; de Vivo, D. C.; Raynes, H.; Schubert, R.; Seward, A.; Brooks, D. G.; Goldstein, A.; Caldwell, J.; Finsecke, E.; Maria, B. L.; Holden, K.; Cruse, R. P.; Swoboda, K. J.; Viskochil, D.

    2009-01-01

    Ciliopathies are an expanding group of rare conditions characterized by multiorgan involvement, that are caused by mutations in genes encoding for proteins of the primary cilium or its apparatus. Among these genes, CEP290 bears an intriguing allelic spectrum, being commonly mutated in Joubert

  17. p53 mutations promote proteasomal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Moshe; Kotler, Eran

    2016-07-27

    p53 mutations occur very frequently in human cancer. Besides abrogating the tumour suppressive functions of wild-type p53, many of those mutations also acquire oncogenic gain-of-function activities. Augmentation of proteasome activity is now reported as a common gain-of-function mechanism shared by different p53 mutants, which promotes cancer resistance to proteasome inhibitors.

  18. MT-CYB mutations in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Christian M; Aidt, Frederik H; Havndrup, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a characteristic of heart failure. Mutations in mitochondrial DNA, particularly in MT-CYB coding for cytochrome B in complex III (CIII), have been associated with isolated hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We hypothesized that MT-CYB mutations might play an important...... and m.15482T>C; p.S246P were identified. Modeling showed that the p.C93Y mutation leads to disruption of the tertiary structure of Cytb by helix displacement, interfering with protein-heme interaction. The p.S246P mutation induces a diproline structure, which alters local secondary structure and induces...... of HCM patients. We propose that further patients with HCM should be examined for mutations in MT-CYB in order to clarify the role of these variants....

  19. Mutation update for the PORCN gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lombardi, Maria Paola; Bulk, Saskia; Celli, Jacopo

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the PORCN gene were first identified in Goltz-Gorlin syndrome patients in 2007. Since then, several reports have been published describing a large variety of genetic defects resulting in the Goltz-Gorlin syndrome, and mutations or deletions were also reported in angioma serpiginosum......, the pentalogy of Cantrell and Limb-Body Wall Complex. Here we present a review of the published mutations in the PORCN gene to date and report on seven new mutations together with the corresponding clinical data. Based on the review we have created a Web-based locus-specific database that lists all identified...... variants and allows the inclusion of future reports. The database is based on the Leiden Open (source) Variation Database (LOVD) software, and is accessible online at http://www.lovd.nl/porcn. At present, the database contains 106 variants, representing 68 different mutations, scattered along the whole...

  20. Survival of mutations arising during invasions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Judith R

    2010-03-01

    When a neutral mutation arises in an invading population, it quickly either dies out or 'surfs', i.e. it comes to occupy almost all the habitat available at its time of origin. Beneficial mutations can also surf, as can deleterious mutations over finite time spans. We develop descriptive statistical models that quantify the relationship between the probability that a mutation will surf and demographic parameters for a cellular automaton model of surfing. We also provide a simple analytic model that performs well at predicting the probability of surfing for neutral and beneficial mutations in one dimension. The results suggest that factors - possibly including even abiotic factors - that promote invasion success may also increase the probability of surfing and associated adaptive genetic change, conditioned on such success.

  1. The CDC Hemophilia B mutation project mutation list: a new online resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tengguo; Miller, Connie H; Payne, Amanda B; Craig Hooper, W

    2013-11-01

    Hemophilia B (HB) is caused by mutations in the human gene F9. The mutation type plays a pivotal role in genetic counseling and prediction of inhibitor development. To help the HB community understand the molecular etiology of HB, we have developed a listing of all F9 mutations that are reported to cause HB based on the literature and existing databases. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Hemophilia B Mutation Project (CHBMP) mutation list is compiled in an easily accessible format of Microsoft Excel and contains 1083 unique mutations that are reported to cause HB. Each mutation is identified using Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS) nomenclature standards. The mutation types and the predicted changes in amino acids, if applicable, are also provided. Related information including the location of mutation, severity of HB, the presence of inhibitor, and original publication reference are listed as well. Therefore, our mutation list provides an easily accessible resource for genetic counselors and HB researchers to predict inhibitors. The CHBMP mutation list is freely accessible at http://www.cdc.gov/hemophiliamutations.

  2. Mutational specificity of γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoebee, Barbara.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the study described in this thesis was to get more information on the mutagenic properties of radiation-induced DNA modifications and the possible mechanisms involved in radiation-induced mutagenesis, principally by investigating the kinds of mutations by DNA sequence analysis. The mutations were analyzed after γ-irradiation of recombinant bacteriophage M13 and plasmide pUC DNA in diluted aqueous solutions, followed by transfection or transformation to E. coli cells, in which the damaged DNA molecules are repaired and replicated. Error-prone repair, misrepair or bypass of lesions during replication may lead to the introduction of mutations. Both the M13 and the plasmid DNA used in our mutation studies contain a mutation target sequence, which makes an easy selection and sequence analysis of mutant DNA molecules possible. Under the radiation conditions used, e.g. irradiation of diluted aqueous DNA solutions, only DNA damage occurs introduced by the water derived OH* and H* radicals and the hydrated electrons. By using different gas conditions during irradiation the relative yields of these reaction species can be manipulated, which opens up the opportunity to determine their effects separately. The mutation spectrum obtained in double-stranded (ds) M13DNA after irradiation under oxic conditions and the mutation spectrum obtained under the same conditions and in the same mutation target but cloned in plasmid DNA, are described. The mutation specificity under anoxic conditions in ds M13DNA is given. Results obtained after irradiation of ds M13DNA under N 2 conditions are discussed together with experiments with single-stranded DNA. Similarities and differences between radiation-induced mutation spectra obtained by other groups and those presented in this thesis are discussed. (author). 155 refs.; 134 figs.; 16 tabs

  3. Spectrum of mutations in homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia in India, with four novel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setia, Nitika; Saxena, Renu; Arora, Anjali; Verma, Ishwar C

    2016-12-01

    Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a rare but serious, inherited disorder of lipid metabolism characterized by very high total and LDL cholesterol levels from birth. It presents as cutaneous and tendon xanthomas since childhood, with or without cardiac involvement. FH is commonly caused by mutations in three genes, i.e. LDL receptor (LDLR), apolipoprotein B (ApoB) and PCSK9. We aimed to determine the spectrum of mutations in cases of homozygous FH in Asian Indians and evaluate if there was any similarity to the mutations observed in Caucasians. Sixteen homozygous FH subjects from eleven families were analyzed for mutations by Sanger sequencing. Large rearrangements in LDLR gene were evaluated by multiplex ligation probe dependent amplification (MLPA) technique. Ten mutations were observed in LDLR gene, of which four mutations were novel. No mutation was detected in ApoB gene and common PCSK9 mutation (p.D374Y). Fourteen cases had homozygous mutations; one had compound heterozygous mutation, while no mutation was detected in one clinically homozygous case. We report an interesting "Triple hit" case with features of homozygous FH. The spectrum of mutations in the Asian Indian population is quite heterogeneous. Of the mutations identified, 40% were novel. No mutation was observed in exons 3, 9 and 14 of LDLR gene, which are considered to be hot spots in studies done on Asian Indians in South Africa. Early detection followed by aggressive therapy, and cascade screening of extended families has been initiated to reduce the morbidity and mortality in these patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Development of Trombay pulse crop varieties mutation through induced mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhole, V.J.; Reddy, K.S.

    2016-01-01

    The food prices including pulses were beginning to increase from 2008, something that was not expected to happen before 2020. It was due to climate change, a scarcity of good arable land, water and nutrients. With these obstacles, we must produce almost double than what we are producing now to achieve food security by 2050. It can be achieved through crop improvement. Crop improvement is the art and science of changing the genetic make of crop plant in desire direction through various method of plant breeding. Mutation breeding is one of the techniques which utilize the physical and chemical mutagens to create genetic variability. Till date more than 3200 mutant varieties have been developed worldwide in which two physical mutagens i.e. X-rays and gamma rays have major contributions. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre is one of the leading institutes in India where nuclear energy is used for crop improvement, which resulted in to development of 43 improved high yielding varieties in different crops including 19 varieties of pulse crops. These varieties are contributing significantly to production of pulses and ultimately to national food security. (author)

  5. Benchmarking infrastructure for mutation text mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Artjom; Riazanov, Alexandre; Hindle, Matthew M; Baker, Christopher Jo

    2014-02-25

    Experimental research on the automatic extraction of information about mutations from texts is greatly hindered by the lack of consensus evaluation infrastructure for the testing and benchmarking of mutation text mining systems. We propose a community-oriented annotation and benchmarking infrastructure to support development, testing, benchmarking, and comparison of mutation text mining systems. The design is based on semantic standards, where RDF is used to represent annotations, an OWL ontology provides an extensible schema for the data and SPARQL is used to compute various performance metrics, so that in many cases no programming is needed to analyze results from a text mining system. While large benchmark corpora for biological entity and relation extraction are focused mostly on genes, proteins, diseases, and species, our benchmarking infrastructure fills the gap for mutation information. The core infrastructure comprises (1) an ontology for modelling annotations, (2) SPARQL queries for computing performance metrics, and (3) a sizeable collection of manually curated documents, that can support mutation grounding and mutation impact extraction experiments. We have developed the principal infrastructure for the benchmarking of mutation text mining tasks. The use of RDF and OWL as the representation for corpora ensures extensibility. The infrastructure is suitable for out-of-the-box use in several important scenarios and is ready, in its current state, for initial community adoption.

  6. The SHOX region and its mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capone, L; Iughetti, L; Sabatini, S; Bacciaglia, A; Forabosco, A

    2010-06-01

    The short stature homeobox-containing (SHOX) gene lies in the pseudoautosomal region 1 (PAR1) that comprises 2.6 Mb of the short-arm tips of both the X and Y chromosomes. It is known that its heterozygous mutations cause Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis (LWD) (OMIM #127300), while its homozygous mutations cause a severe form of dwarfism known as Langer mesomelic dysplasia (LMD) (OMIM #249700). The analysis of 238 LWD patients between 1998 and 2007 by multiple authors shows a prevalence of deletions (46.4%) compared to point mutations (21.2%). On the whole, deletions and point mutations account for about 67% of LWD patients. SHOX is located within a 1000 kb desert region without genes. The comparative genomic analysis of this region between genomes of different vertebrates has led to the identification of evolutionarily conserved non-coding DNA elements (CNE). Further functional studies have shown that one of these CNE downstream of the SHOX gene is necessary for the expression of SHOX; this is considered to be typical "enhancer" activity. Including the enhancer, the overall mutation of the SHOX region in LWD patients does not hold in 100% of cases. Various authors have demonstrated the existence of other CNE both downstream and upstream of SHOX regions. The resulting conclusion is that it is necessary to reanalyze all LWD/LMD patients without SHOX mutations for the presence of mutations in the 5'- and 3'-flanking SHOX regions.

  7. Mutational robustness of gene regulatory networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aalt D J van Dijk

    Full Text Available Mutational robustness of gene regulatory networks refers to their ability to generate constant biological output upon mutations that change network structure. Such networks contain regulatory interactions (transcription factor-target gene interactions but often also protein-protein interactions between transcription factors. Using computational modeling, we study factors that influence robustness and we infer several network properties governing it. These include the type of mutation, i.e. whether a regulatory interaction or a protein-protein interaction is mutated, and in the case of mutation of a regulatory interaction, the sign of the interaction (activating vs. repressive. In addition, we analyze the effect of combinations of mutations and we compare networks containing monomeric with those containing dimeric transcription factors. Our results are consistent with available data on biological networks, for example based on evolutionary conservation of network features. As a novel and remarkable property, we predict that networks are more robust against mutations in monomer than in dimer transcription factors, a prediction for which analysis of conservation of DNA binding residues in monomeric vs. dimeric transcription factors provides indirect evidence.

  8. Sequential acquisition of mutations in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makishima, Hideki

    2017-01-01

    Recent progress in next-generation sequencing technologies allows us to discover frequent mutations throughout the coding regions of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), potentially providing us with virtually a complete spectrum of driver mutations in this disease. As shown by many study groups these days, such driver mutations are acquired in a gene-specific fashion. For instance, DDX41 mutations are observed in germline cells long before MDS presentation. In blood samples from healthy elderly individuals, somatic DNMT3A and TET2 mutations are detected as age-related clonal hematopoiesis and are believed to be a risk factor for hematological neoplasms. In MDS, mutations of genes such as NRAS and FLT3, designated as Type-1 genes, may be significantly associated with leukemic evolution. Another type (Type-2) of genes, including RUNX1 and GATA2, are related to progression from low-risk to high-risk MDS. Overall, various driver mutations are sequentially acquired in MDS, at a specific time, in either germline cells, normal hematopoietic cells, or clonal MDS cells.

  9. Benchmarking infrastructure for mutation text mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Experimental research on the automatic extraction of information about mutations from texts is greatly hindered by the lack of consensus evaluation infrastructure for the testing and benchmarking of mutation text mining systems. Results We propose a community-oriented annotation and benchmarking infrastructure to support development, testing, benchmarking, and comparison of mutation text mining systems. The design is based on semantic standards, where RDF is used to represent annotations, an OWL ontology provides an extensible schema for the data and SPARQL is used to compute various performance metrics, so that in many cases no programming is needed to analyze results from a text mining system. While large benchmark corpora for biological entity and relation extraction are focused mostly on genes, proteins, diseases, and species, our benchmarking infrastructure fills the gap for mutation information. The core infrastructure comprises (1) an ontology for modelling annotations, (2) SPARQL queries for computing performance metrics, and (3) a sizeable collection of manually curated documents, that can support mutation grounding and mutation impact extraction experiments. Conclusion We have developed the principal infrastructure for the benchmarking of mutation text mining tasks. The use of RDF and OWL as the representation for corpora ensures extensibility. The infrastructure is suitable for out-of-the-box use in several important scenarios and is ready, in its current state, for initial community adoption. PMID:24568600

  10. New mutations affecting induced mutagenesis in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, C W; Krauss, B R; Christensen, R B

    1985-01-01

    Previously isolated mutations in baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, that impair induced mutagenesis were all identified with the aid of tests that either exclusively or predominantly detect base-pair substitutions. To avoid this bias, we have screened 11 366 potentially mutant clones for UV-induced reversion of the frameshift allele, his4-38, and have identified 10 mutants that give much reduced yields of revertants. Complementation and recombination tests show that 6 of these carry mutations at the previously known REV1, REV1 and REV3 loci, while the remaining 4 define 3 new genes, REV4 (2 mutations), REV5 and REV6. The rev4 mutations are readily suppressed in many genetic backgrounds and, like the rev5 mutation, impart only a limited deficiency for induced mutagenesis: it is likely, therefore that the REV4+ and REV5+ gene functions are only remotely concerned with this process. The rev6 mutants have a more general deficiency, however, as well as marked sensitivity to UV and an increased spontaneous mutation rate, properties that suggest the REV6 gene is directly involved in mutation induction. The REV5 gene is located about 1 cM proximal to CYC1 on chromosome X.

  11. Mutations in the Norrie disease gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuback, D E; Chen, Z Y; Craig, I W; Breakefield, X O; Sims, K B

    1995-01-01

    We report our experience to date in mutation identification in the Norrie disease (ND) gene. We carried out mutational analysis in 26 kindreds in an attempt to identify regions presumed critical to protein function and potentially correlated with generation of the disease phenotype. All coding exons, as well as noncoding regions of exons 1 and 2, 636 nucleotides in the noncoding region of exon 3, and 197 nucleotides of 5' flanking sequence, were analyzed for single-strand conformation polymorphisms (SSCP) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of genomic DNA. DNA fragments that showed altered SSCP band mobilities were sequenced to locate the specific mutations. In addition to three previously described submicroscopic deletions encompassing the entire ND gene, we have now identified 6 intragenic deletions, 8 missense (seven point mutations, one 9-bp deletion), 6 nonsense (three point mutations, three single bp deletions/frameshift) and one 10-bp insertion, creating an expanded repeat in the 5' noncoding region of exon 1. Thus, mutations have been identified in a total of 24 of 26 (92%) of the kindreds we have studied to date. With the exception of two different mutations, each found in two apparently unrelated kindreds, these mutations are unique and expand the genotype database. Localization of the majority of point mutations at or near cysteine residues, potentially critical in protein tertiary structure, supports a previous protein model for norrin as member of a cystine knot growth factor family (Meitinger et al., 1993). Genotype-phenotype correlations were not evident with the limited clinical data available, except in the cases of larger submicroscopic deletions associated with a more severe neurologic syndrome.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. JAK and MPL mutations in myeloid malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tefferi, Ayalew

    2008-03-01

    The Janus family of non-receptor tyrosine kinases (JAK1, JAK2, JAK3 and tyrosine kinase 2) transduces signals downstream of type I and II cytokine receptors via signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs). JAK3 is important in lymphoid and JAK2 in myeloid cell proliferation and differentiation. The thrombopoietin receptor MPL is one of several JAK2 cognate receptors and is essential for myelopoiesis in general and megakaryopoiesis in particular. Germline loss-of-function (LOF) JAK3 and MPL mutations cause severe combined immunodeficiency and congenital amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia, respectively. Germline gain-of-function (GOF) MPL mutation (MPLS505N) causes familial thrombocytosis. Somatic JAK3 (e.g. JAK3A572V, JAK3V722I, JAK3P132T) and fusion JAK2 (e.g. ETV6-JAK2, PCM1-JAK2, BCR-JAK2) mutations have respectively been described in acute megakaryocytic leukemia and acute leukemia/chronic myeloid malignancies. However, current attention is focused on JAK2 (e.g. JAK2V617F, JAK2 exon 12 mutations) and MPL (e.g. MPLW515L/K/S, MPLS505N) mutations associated with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). A JAK2 mutation, primarily JAK2V617F, is invariably associated with polycythemia vera (PV). The latter mutation also occurs in the majority of patients with essential thrombocythemia (ET) or primary myelofibrosis (PMF). MPL mutational frequency in MPNs is substantially less (<10%). In general, despite a certain degree of genotype - phenotype correlations, the prognostic relevance of harbouring one of these mutations, or their allele burden when present, remains dubious. Regardless, based on the logical assumption that amplified JAK-STAT signalling is central to the pathogenesis of PV, ET and PMF, several anti-JAK2 tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been developed and are currently being tested in humans with these disorders.

  13. Petroleum pollution and mutation in mangroves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klekowski, E.J. Jr.; Corredor, J.E.; Morell, J.M.; Del Castillo, C.A.

    1994-01-01

    Chlorophyll-deficiency has often been used as a sensitive genetic end-point in plant mutation research. The frequency of trees heterozygous for nuclear chlorophyll-deficient mutations was determined for mangrove populations growing along the southwest coast of Puerto Rico. The frequency of heterozygotes was strongly correlated with the concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the underlying sediment and with both acute and chronic petroleum pollution. Although epidemiological studies can seldom prove causation, a strong correlation is certainly compatible with a cause-effect relationship. Our results suggest that the biota of oil-polluted habitats may be experiencing increased mutation. (Author)

  14. Molecular mechanisms of induced-mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Takeshi

    1985-01-01

    The outcome of recent studies on mechanisms of induced-mutations is outlined with particular emphasis on the dependence of recA gene function in Escherichia coli. Genes involved in spontaneous mutation and x-ray- and chemical-induced mutation and genes involved in adaptive response are presented. As for SOS mutagenesis, SOS-induced regulation mechanisms and mutagenic routes are described. Furthermore, specificity of mutagens themselves are discussed in relation to mechanisms of base substitution, frameshift, and deletion mutagenesis. (Namekawa, K.)

  15. Prevalent mutations in fatty acid oxidation disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, N; Andresen, B S; Bross, P

    2000-01-01

    UNLABELLED: The mutational spectrum in a given disease-associated gene is often comprised of a large number of different mutations, of which a single or a few are present in a large proportion of diseased individuals. Such prevalent mutations are known in four genes of the fatty acid oxidation...... of the disease in question and determination of the carrier frequency in the general population may help in elucidating the penetrance of the genotype. This is exemplified in disorders of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation....

  16. Energy parasites trigger oncogene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorný, Jiří; Pokorný, Jan; Jandová, Anna; Kobilková, Jitka; Vrba, Jan; Vrba, Jan

    2016-10-01

    Cancer initialization can be explained as a result of parasitic virus energy consumption leading to randomized genome chemical bonding. Analysis of experimental data on cell-mediated immunity (CMI) containing about 12,000 cases of healthy humans, cancer patients and patients with precancerous cervical lesions disclosed that the specific cancer and the non-specific lactate dehydrogenase-elevating (LDH) virus antigen elicit similar responses. The specific antigen is effective only in cancer type of its origin but the non-specific antigen in all examined cancers. CMI results of CIN patients display both healthy and cancer state. The ribonucleic acid (RNA) of the LDH virus parasitizing on energy reduces the ratio of coherent/random oscillations. Decreased effect of coherent cellular electromagnetic field on bonding electrons in biological macromolecules leads to elevating probability of random genome reactions. Overlapping of wave functions in biological macromolecules depends on energy of the cellular electromagnetic field which supplies energy to bonding electrons for selective chemical bonds. CMI responses of cancer and LDH virus antigens in all examined healthy, precancerous and cancer cases point to energy mechanism in cancer initiation. Dependence of the rate of biochemical reactions on biological electromagnetic field explains yet unknown mechanism of genome mutation.

  17. MUTATION BREEDING AS MALNUTRITION IN NIGE TATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    userpc

    span, early maturing, high nutritional composition and yields with l is study ... Mutation (a change in genetic material of organism) ... 2001), modified plant architecture, closed capsules ... found in the mutants of wheat inbred lines originated ...

  18. Progress of mutation breeding in Thailand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purivirojkul, Watchara; Vithayatherarat, Pradab [Pathumthani Rice Research Center (Thailand)

    2001-03-01

    The objectives in rice improvement in Thailand are to improve not only for high yielding and good grain quality but also for resistance to diseases and insects and tolerance to biotic stresses. Brief history of research and progress in rice mutation breeding in Thailand is presented. It includes the varieties of method such as using gamma rays, fast neutron and chemical mutagens, for example EMS (ethylmethane sulfonate) and EI (ethylene imine) for mutation works. Among all, improvements of Pathumthani 60 for short-statured plant type, RD23 for blast resistance, Basmati 370 for short-statured plant type, and Pra Doo Daeng for short-statured plant type and awnless grain are reported. To conclude, it is important to find the adequate doses of mutagen treatments that give maximum mutation frequencies, to know the optimal treatments or proper selection methods and to have well-defined objectives to create the success of mutation breeding. (S. Ohno)

  19. Radiation-induced mutations in mammals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehling, U.H.

    1993-01-01

    The aims of the proposed project are to provide a better basis for extrapolation of animal data to man. Genetic endpoint, strain and species comparisons are made, which will provide critical experimental data regarding strategies in extrapolating laboratory animal data to man. Experiments were conducted to systematically compare the spontaneous and radiation-induced mutation rates for recessive specific-locus, dominant cataract and enzyme activity alleles in the mouse as well as a comparison of the mutation rate in the mouse and hamster for dominant cataract and enzyme activity alleles. The comparison of the radiation-dose response for recessive specific-locus and dominant cataract mutations are extended. Selected mutations are characterized at the genetic, biochemical and molecular levels. (R.P.) 5 refs., 3 tabs

  20. Progress of mutation breeding in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purivirojkul, Watchara; Vithayatherarat, Pradab

    2001-01-01

    The objectives in rice improvement in Thailand are to improve not only for high yielding and good grain quality but also for resistance to diseases and insects and tolerance to biotic stresses. Brief history of research and progress in rice mutation breeding in Thailand is presented. It includes the varieties of method such as using gamma rays, fast neutron and chemical mutagens, for example EMS (ethylmethane sulfonate) and EI (ethylene imine) for mutation works. Among all, improvements of Pathumthani 60 for short-statured plant type, RD23 for blast resistance, Basmati 370 for short-statured plant type, and Pra Doo Daeng for short-statured plant type and awnless grain are reported. To conclude, it is important to find the adequate doses of mutagen treatments that give maximum mutation frequencies, to know the optimal treatments or proper selection methods and to have well-defined objectives to create the success of mutation breeding. (S. Ohno)

  1. IFITM5 mutations and osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2016-03-01

    Interferon-induced transmembrane protein 5 (IFITM5) is an osteoblast-specific membrane protein that has been shown to be a positive regulatory factor for mineralization in vitro. However, Ifitm5 knockout mice do not exhibit serious bone abnormalities, and thus the function of IFITM5 in vivo remains unclear. Recently, a single point mutation (c.-14C>T) in the 5' untranslated region of IFITM5 was identified in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta type V (OI-V). Furthermore, a single point mutation (c.119C>T) in the coding region of IFITM5 was identified in OI patients with more severe symptoms than patients with OI-V. Although IFITM5 is not directly involved in the formation of bone in vivo, the reason why IFITM5 mutations cause OI remains a major mystery. In this review, the current state of knowledge of OI pathological mechanisms due to IFITM5 mutations will be reviewed.

  2. Modification of mutation frequency in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vashishat, R.K.; Kakar, S.N.

    1976-01-01

    In a reverse mutation system, using haploid, histidine-requirinq strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the frequency of uv-induced prototrophs increased if the post-irradiation minimal medium was supplemented with limited amounts of histidine. Addition of natural amino acids or RNA bases in the post-irradiation minimal medium, with or without histidine, also increased the uv-induced mutation frequency. Thus, post-irradiation conditions favouring protein and RNA synthesis, are effective in increasing uv-induced mutations in yeast. As compared to uv light, nitrous acid was more effective in inducing reversions in this strain and the frequency increased if the treated cells were plated on minimal medium supplemented with limited amounts of histidine. However, the addition of amino acids or RNA bases decreased the number of revertants. An additional inclusion of histidine reversed the suppressive effect of these metabolites. The mutation induction processes are thus different or differently modifiable in uv and nitrous acid. (author)

  3. Jak2 46/1 Haplotype Is Associated With Jak2 V617f--positive Myeloproliferative Neoplasms In Brazilian Patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Macedo, L C; Santos, B C; Pagliarini-e-Silva, S; Pagnano, K B B; Rodrigues, C; Quintero, F C; Ferreira, M E; Baraldi, E C; Ambrosio-Albuquerque, E P; Sell, A M; Visentainer, J E L

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to verify the association between the JAK2 46/1 haplotype (V617F positive) and some hematological parameters in BCR-ABL-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (cMPNs) in our population. The blood samples obtained from the patients with cMPN were genotyped for the JAK2 V617F mutation and JAK2 rs10974944 SNP screening using a PCR-RFLP assay. The JAK2 V617F mutation was detected in 80.15% of patients. The G variant of rs10974944 was more frequent in all MPNs, especially t...

  4. Induced mutations - a tool in plant research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    These proceedings include 34 papers and 18 brief descriptions of poster presentations in the following areas as they are affected by induced mutations: advancement of genetics, plant evolution, plant physiology, plant parasites, plant symbioses, in vitro culture, gene ecology and plant breeding. Only a relatively small number of papers are of direct nuclear interest essentially in view of the mutations being induced by ionizing radiations. The papers of nuclear interest have been entered as separate and individual items of input

  5. Learning resistance mutation pathways of HIV

    OpenAIRE

    Ramon, Jan; Dubrovskaya, Snezhana; Blockeel, Hendrik

    2007-01-01

    We propose a novel machine learning algorithm for learning mutation pathways of viruses from a population of viral DNA strands. More specifically, given a number of sequences, the algorithm constructs a phylogenetic tree that expresses the ancestry of the sequences, and at the same time builds a model describing dependencies between mutations that is consistent with the data as well as the phylogenetic tree. Our approach extends existing approaches for phylogenetic tree construction by not as...

  6. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in human tumor cells

    OpenAIRE

    LI, HUI; HONG, ZE-HUI

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria play significant roles in cellular energy metabolism, free radical generation and apoptosis. The dysfunction of mitochondria is correlated with the origin and progression of tumors; thus, mutations in the mitochondrial genome that affect mitochondrial function may be one of the causal factors of tumorigenesis. Although the role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations in carcinogenesis has been investigated extensively by various approaches, the conclusions remain controversial to ...

  7. Identifying driver mutations in sequenced cancer genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raphael, Benjamin J; Dobson, Jason R; Oesper, Layla

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput DNA sequencing is revolutionizing the study of cancer and enabling the measurement of the somatic mutations that drive cancer development. However, the resulting sequencing datasets are large and complex, obscuring the clinically important mutations in a background of errors, nois...... patterns of mutual exclusivity. These techniques, coupled with advances in high-throughput DNA sequencing, are enabling precision medicine approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of cancer....

  8. Mutation Rates of STR Systems in Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kim Emil; Bøttcher, Susanne Gammelgaard; Christensen, Susanne

    Danish paternity cases in the period 1999 to 2005 were investigated regarding mutation rates in STR loci. STR-typing was performed by the Applied Biosystems AmplfStr Profiler Plus kit in the period 1999 to early 2005, hereafter named the PP9, and by Applied Biosystems AmplfStr Identifier kit for ...... and kits. Sex and STR locus specific mutation rates were estimated with 95% confidence limits by the method of Clopper and Pearson (1934)....

  9. Factor V Leiden mutation in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Susan Murphy

    2004-01-01

    Normal maternal adaptation to pregnancy significantly increases the risk for thrombus formation. Inherited thrombophilias further increase risk for deep venous thrombosis and adverse outcome in pregnancy. Factor V Leiden mutation is the most common inherited thrombophilia, occurring in approximately 5% of the White and 1% of the Black populations. Nurses should be knowledgeable about screening for and diagnosis of factor V Leiden mutation, risk reduction counseling, recommended care of the affected patient, and implications of anticoagulant therapy during the perinatal period.

  10. Mutation induction in plants by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This training film deals with the use of x-rays, gamma rays and fast neutrons for mutation induction in plants. Specific features of different types of ionizing radiation and of biological materials are outlined and methods demonstrated which control modifying factors and warrant an efficient physical mutagenesis. The first step of mutation breeding aims at an enhanced level of genetic variation which forms the basis for mutant selection and use in plant breeding

  11. Use of induced mutations in soybean breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakri, A.H.; Jalani, B.S.; Ng, K.F.

    1981-01-01

    Artificial induction of mutation in plants is carried out using #betta#-irradiation and ethyl metanesulphonate (EMS) to expand the genetic variability of locally-grown soybean. This aspect of mutation breeding complements of conventional breeding approach undertaken by the Joint Malaysia Soybean Breeding Project group. Recovery of agronomically-important mutants such as earliness, lateness, bigger seed size and improved plant architecture were recorded. The significance of these findings is discussed. (author)

  12. Latex allergy and filaggrin null mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Berit C; Meldgaard, Michael; Hamann, Dathan

    2011-01-01

    to aeroallergens and it is possible that filaggrin null mutations also increase the risk of latex allergy. The aim of this paper was to examine the association between filaggrin null mutations and type I latex allergy. Methods Twenty latex allergic and 24 non-latex allergic dentists and dental assistants...... in the cases in this study may not have occurred through direct skin contact but through the respiratory organs via latex proteins that are absorbed in glove powder and aerosolized...

  13. Mutation breeding of autotetraploid Achimenes cultivars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broertjes, C.

    1976-01-01

    Colchicine-induced autotetraploids of three Achimenes cultivars were irradiated with X-rays or fast neutrons. The results were compared, in one cultivar, with those of the irradiated diploid form. The mutation frequency after irradiation of the autotetraploid was a 20-40 fold higher as compared to the corresponding diploid. These results may open new possibilities for mutation breeding, though they are hard to explain. Several promising mutants were selected. (author)

  14. Exploring the common molecular basis for the universal DNA mutation bias: Revival of Loewdin mutation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Liang-Yu; Wang, Guang-Zhong; Ma, Bin-Guang; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → There exists a universal G:C → A:T mutation bias in three domains of life. → This universal mutation bias has not been sufficiently explained. → A DNA mutation model proposed by Loewdin 40 years ago offers a common explanation. -- Abstract: Recently, numerous genome analyses revealed the existence of a universal G:C → A:T mutation bias in bacteria, fungi, plants and animals. To explore the molecular basis for this mutation bias, we examined the three well-known DNA mutation models, i.e., oxidative damage model, UV-radiation damage model and CpG hypermutation model. It was revealed that these models cannot provide a sufficient explanation to the universal mutation bias. Therefore, we resorted to a DNA mutation model proposed by Loewdin 40 years ago, which was based on inter-base double proton transfers (DPT). Since DPT is a fundamental and spontaneous chemical process and occurs much more frequently within GC pairs than AT pairs, Loewdin model offers a common explanation for the observed universal mutation bias and thus has broad biological implications.

  15. The Oenothera plastome mutator: effect of UV irradiation and nitroso-methyl urea on mutation frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, B.B.; Sokalski, M.B.

    1991-01-01

    Oenothera plants homozygous for a recessive plastome mutator allele (pm) showed spontaneous mutation frequencies for plastome genes that are 200-fold higher than spontaneous levels. Mutations occurred at high frequencies in plants grown in the field, in a glasshouse, or as leaf tip cultures under fluorescent light, indicating that the plastome mutator activity is UV-independent. However, the chlorotic sectors became visible at an earlier stage of development when seedlings were irradiated, compared to seedlings that were not exposed to UV. These results imply that the rate of sorting-out was increased by the irradiation treatment, possibly due to a decrease in the effective number of multiplication-competent plastids, or a reduction in the extent of cytoplasmic mixing. Nitroso-methyl urea treatment of seeds had a dramatic effect on mutation frequency in both wild-type and plastome mutator samples. When the background mutation rates were low, the combination of the plastome mutator nucleus and the chemical mutagenesis treatment resulted in a synergistic effect, suggesting that the plastome mutator may involve a cpDNA repair pathway. (author)

  16. Diploid yeast cells yield homozygous spontaneous mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, M. S.; Bruschi, C. V.; Brushi, C. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    A leucine-requiring hybrid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, homoallelic at the LEU1 locus (leu1-12/leu1-12) and heterozygous for three chromosome-VII genetic markers distal to the LEU1 locus, was employed to inquire: (1) whether spontaneous gene mutation and mitotic segregation of heterozygous markers occur in positive nonrandom association and (2) whether homozygous LEU1/LEU1 mutant diploids are generated. The results demonstrate that gene mutation of leu1-12 to LEU1 and mitotic segregation of heterozygous chromosome-VII markers occur in strong positive nonrandom association, suggesting that the stimulatory DNA lesion is both mutagenic and recombinogenic. In addition, genetic analysis of diploid Leu+ revertants revealed that approximately 3% of mutations of leu1-12 to LEU1 result in LEU1/LEU1 homozygotes. Red-white sectored Leu+ colonies exhibit genotypes that implicate post-replicational chromatid breakage and exchange near the site of leu1-12 reversion, chromosome loss, and subsequent restitution of diploidy, in the sequence of events leading to mutational homozygosis. By analogy, diploid cell populations can yield variants homozygous for novel recessive gene mutations at biologically significant rates. Mutational homozygosis may be relevant to both carcinogenesis and the evolution of asexual diploid organisms.

  17. The Mutations Associated with Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruti Parvari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiomyopathy is an important cause of heart failure and a major indication for heart transplantation in children and adults. This paper describes the state of the genetic knowledge of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM. The identification of the causing mutation is important since presymptomatic interventions of DCM have proven value in preventing morbidity and mortality. Additionally, as in general in genetic studies, the identification of the mutated genes has a direct clinical impact for the families and population involved. Identifying causative mutations immediately amplifies the possibilities for disease prevention through carrier screening and prenatal testing. This often lifts a burden of social isolation from affected families, since healthy family members can be assured of having healthy children. Identification of the mutated genes holds the potential to lead to the understanding of disease etiology, pathophysiology, and therefore potential therapy. This paper presents the genetic variations, or disease-causing mutations, contributing to the pathogenesis of hereditary DCM, and tries to relate these to the functions of the mutated genes.

  18. Apparent directional selection by biased pleiotropic mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoshinari

    2010-07-01

    Pleiotropic effects of deleterious mutations are considered to be among the factors responsible for genetic constraints on evolution by long-term directional selection acting on a quantitative trait. If pleiotropic phenotypic effects are biased in a particular direction, mutations generate apparent directional selection, which refers to the covariance between fitness and the trait owing to a linear association between the number of mutations possessed by individuals and the genotypic values of the trait. The present analysis has shown how the equilibrium mean value of the trait is determined by a balance between directional selection and biased pleiotropic mutations. Assuming that genes act additively both on the trait and on fitness, the total variance-standardized directional selection gradient was decomposed into apparent and true components. Experimental data on mutation bias from the bristle traits of Drosophila and life history traits of Daphnia suggest that apparent selection explains a small but significant fraction of directional selection pressure that is observed in nature; the data suggest that changes induced in a trait by biased pleiotropic mutation (i.e., by apparent directional selection) are easily compensated for by (true) directional selection.

  19. Study on space mutation breeding of rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Jianlong; Lin Yizi; Xi Yongan; Jiang Xingcun; Li Jinguo

    1997-01-01

    Air-dried seeds of rice variety ZR9 were carried by high altitude balloon (HAB) and recoverable satellite (RS) for space mutation. Mutagentic effects of high altitude environment (HAE) of 30∼38 km and outer space environment (OSE) of 218∼326 km above sea level on rice plant were studied. The results indicated that the germination percentage (GP) of seeds was obviously lower than that of the controls. the mutation in plant height (PH) and growth period duration (GPD) of SP 1 carried by HAB were induced. However, the GP of seeds and characters of SP 1 carried by RS had no evident change. More stronger segregation of major characters such as PH, GPD and length of panicle, appeared in the two SP 2 generations resulting from HAB and RS. And their mutation frequency were 4.31% and 4.10% respectively. Mutation lines selected from the two mutation progenies improved significantly in PH, GPD, disease resistance and yield. Therefore, space mutation could be considered as a new breeding method

  20. TOX3 mutations in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Owain Jones

    Full Text Available TOX3 maps to 16q12, a region commonly lost in breast cancers and recently implicated in the risk of developing breast cancer. However, not much is known of the role of TOX3 itself in breast cancer biology. This is the first study to determine the importance of TOX3 mutations in breast cancers. We screened TOX3 for mutations in 133 breast tumours and identified four mutations (three missense, one in-frame deletion of 30 base pairs in six primary tumours, corresponding to an overall mutation frequency of 4.5%. One potentially deleterious missense mutation in exon 3 (Leu129Phe was identified in one tumour (genomic DNA and cDNA. Whilst copy number changes of 16q12 are common in breast cancer, our data show that mutations of TOX3 are present at low frequency in tumours. Our results support that TOX3 should be further investigated to elucidate its role in breast cancer biology.

  1. Higher prevalence of KRAS mutations in colorectal cancer in Saudi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We studied retrospectively tumor samples of 83 Saudi metastatic CRC patients for KRAS mutations in codon 12 and codon 13, to evaluate the relevance of KRAS mutation positive colorectal cancers with metastatic sites. KRAS mutation was observed in 42.2% (35/83) patients with CRC. The most common mutations were in ...

  2. Experimental evolution and the dynamics of genomic mutation rate modifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynes, Y; Sniegowski, P D

    2014-11-01

    Because genes that affect mutation rates are themselves subject to mutation, mutation rates can be influenced by natural selection and other evolutionary forces. The population genetics of mutation rate modifier alleles has been a subject of theoretical interest for many decades. Here, we review experimental contributions to our understanding of mutation rate modifier dynamics. Numerous evolution experiments have shown that mutator alleles (modifiers that elevate the genomic mutation rate) can readily rise to high frequencies via genetic hitchhiking in non-recombining microbial populations. Whereas these results certainly provide an explanatory framework for observations of sporadically high mutation rates in pathogenic microbes and in cancer lineages, it is nonetheless true that most natural populations have very low mutation rates. This raises the interesting question of how mutator hitchhiking is suppressed or its phenotypic effect reversed in natural populations. Very little experimental work has addressed this question; with this in mind, we identify some promising areas for future experimental investigation.

  3. The risk of extinction - the mutational meltdown or the overpopulation

    OpenAIRE

    Malarz, K.

    2006-01-01

    The phase diagrams survival-extinction for the Penna model with parameters: (mutations rate)-(birth rate), (mutation rate)-(harmful mutations threshold), (harmful mutation threshold)-(minimal reproduction age) are presented. The extinction phase may be caused by either mutational meltdown or overpopulation. When the Verhulst factor is responsible for removing only newly born babies and does not act on adults the overpopulation is avoided and only genetic factors may lead to species extinction.

  4. The risk of extinction - the mutational meltdown or the overpopulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malarz, Krzysztof

    2007-04-01

    The phase diagrams survival-extinction for the Penna model with parameters: (mutations rate)-(birth rate), (mutation rate)-(harmful mutations threshold), (harmful mutation threshold)-(minimal reproduction age) are presented. The extinction phase may be caused by either mutational meltdown or overpopulation. When the Verhulst factor is responsible for removing only newly born babies and does not act on adults the overpopulation is avoided and only genetic factors may lead to species extinction.

  5. New mutations in APOB100 involved in familial hypobetalipoproteinemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brusgaard, Klaus; Kjaersgaard, Lars; Hansen, Anne-Birthe Bo

    2011-01-01

    Familial hypolipoproteinemia (FHBL) is characterized by an inherited low plasma level of apolipoprotein B containing lipoproteins. FHBL may be caused by mutations of APOB. Individuals with FHBL typically have intestinal malabsorption and frequently suffer from a deficiency of fat-soluble vitamins....... Most mutations that cause FHBL are APOB truncating mutations. Here we describe a patient with FHBL caused by a novel truncating mutation together with a novel missense mutation....

  6. Recurrent and founder mutations in the PMS2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsic, J; Senter, L; Liyanarachchi, S; Clendenning, M; Vaughn, C P; Jenkins, M A; Hopper, J L; Young, J; Samowitz, W; de la Chapelle, A

    2013-03-01

    Germline mutations in PMS2 are associated with Lynch syndrome (LS), the most common known cause of hereditary colorectal cancer. Mutation detection in PMS2 has been difficult due to the presence of several pseudogenes, but a custom-designed long-range PCR strategy now allows adequate mutation detection. Many mutations are unique. However, some mutations are observed repeatedly across individuals not known to be related due to the mutation being either recurrent, arising multiple times de novo at hot spots for mutations, or of founder origin, having occurred once in an ancestor. Previously, we observed 36 distinct mutations in a sample of 61 independently ascertained Caucasian probands of mixed European background with PMS2 mutations. Eleven of these mutations were detected in more than one individual not known to be related and of these, six were detected more than twice. These six mutations accounted for 31 (51%) ostensibly unrelated probands. Here, we performed genotyping and haplotype analysis in four mutations observed in multiple probands and found two (c.137G>T and exon 10 deletion) to be founder mutations and one (c.903G>T) a probable founder. One (c.1A>G) could not be evaluated for founder mutation status. We discuss possible explanations for the frequent occurrence of founder mutations in PMS2. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. Volatility of Mutator Phenotypes at Single Cell Resolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott R Kennedy

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutator phenotypes accelerate the evolutionary process of neoplastic transformation. Historically, the measurement of mutation rates has relied on scoring the occurrence of rare mutations in target genes in large populations of cells. Averaging mutation rates over large cell populations assumes that new mutations arise at a constant rate during each cell division. If the mutation rate is not constant, an expanding mutator population may contain subclones with widely divergent rates of evolution. Here, we report mutation rate measurements of individual cell divisions of mutator yeast deficient in DNA polymerase ε proofreading and base-base mismatch repair. Our data are best fit by a model in which cells can assume one of two distinct mutator states, with mutation rates that differ by an order of magnitude. In error-prone cell divisions, mutations occurred on the same chromosome more frequently than expected by chance, often in DNA with similar predicted replication timing, consistent with a spatiotemporal dimension to the hypermutator state. Mapping of mutations onto predicted replicons revealed that mutations were enriched in the first half of the replicon as well as near termination zones. Taken together, our findings show that individual genome replication events exhibit an unexpected volatility that may deepen our understanding of the evolution of mutator-driven malignancies.

  8. MEN1 redefined, a clinical comparison of mutation-positive and mutation-negative patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Laat, Joanne M.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Pieterman, Carolina R. C.; Oostveen, Maria P.; Hermus, Ad R.; Dekkers, Olaf M.; de Herder, Wouter W.; van der Horst-Schrivers, Anouk N.; Drent, Madeleine L.; Bisschop, Peter H.; Havekes, Bas; Vriens, Menno R.; Valk, Gerlof D.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is diagnosed when two out of the three primary MEN1-associated endocrine tumors occur in a patient. Up to 10-30 % of those patients have no mutation in the MEN1 gene. It is unclear if the phenotype and course of the disease of mutation-negative patients is

  9. MEN1 redefined, a clinical comparison of mutation-positive and mutation-negative patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Laat, Joanne M; van der Luijt, Rob B; Pieterman, Carolina R C; Oostveen, Maria P; Hermus, Ad R; Dekkers, Olaf M; de Herder, Wouter W; van der Horst-Schrivers, Anouk N; Drent, Madeleine L; Bisschop, Peter H; Havekes, Bas; Vriens, Menno R; Valk, Gerlof D

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is diagnosed when two out of the three primary MEN1-associated endocrine tumors occur in a patient. Up to 10-30 % of those patients have no mutation in the MEN1 gene. It is unclear if the phenotype and course of the disease of mutation-negative

  10. MEN1 redefined, a clinical comparison of mutation-positive and mutation-negative patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Laat, Joanne M.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Pieterman, Carolina R. C.; Oostveen, Maria P.; Hermus, Ad R.; Dekkers, Olaf M.; de Herder, Wouter W.; van der Horst-Schrivers, Anouk N.; Drent, Madeleine L.; Bisschop, Peter H.; Havekes, Bas; Vriens, Menno R.; Valk, Gerlof D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is diagnosed when two out of the three primary MEN1-associated endocrine tumors occur in a patient. Up to 10-30 % of those patients have no mutation in the MEN1 gene. It is unclear if the phenotype and course of the disease of mutation-negative

  11. PIK3CA mutations frequently coexist with RAS and BRAF mutations in patients with advanced cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Janku

    Full Text Available Oncogenic mutations of PIK3CA, RAS (KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF have been identified in various malignancies, and activate the PI3K/AKT/mTOR and RAS/RAF/MEK pathways, respectively. Both pathways are critical drivers of tumorigenesis.Tumor tissues from 504 patients with diverse cancers referred to the Clinical Center for Targeted Therapy at MD Anderson Cancer Center starting in October 2008 were analyzed for PIK3CA, RAS (KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF mutations using polymerase chain reaction-based DNA sequencing.PIK3CA mutations were found in 54 (11% of 504 patients tested; KRAS in 69 (19% of 367; NRAS in 19 (8% of 225; and BRAF in 31 (9% of 361 patients. PIK3CA mutations were most frequent in squamous cervical (5/14, 36%, uterine (7/28, 25%, breast (6/29, 21%, and colorectal cancers (18/105, 17%; KRAS in pancreatic (5/9, 56%, colorectal (49/97, 51%, and uterine cancers (3/20, 15%; NRAS in melanoma (12/40, 30%, and uterine cancer (2/11, 18%; BRAF in melanoma (23/52, 44%, and colorectal cancer (5/88, 6%. Regardless of histology, KRAS mutations were found in 38% of patients with PIK3CA mutations compared to 16% of patients with wild-type (wtPIK3CA (p = 0.001. In total, RAS (KRAS, NRAS or BRAF mutations were found in 47% of patients with PIK3CA mutations vs. 24% of patients wtPIK3CA (p = 0.001. PIK3CA mutations were found in 28% of patients with KRAS mutations compared to 10% with wtKRAS (p = 0.001 and in 20% of patients with RAS (KRAS, NRAS or BRAF mutations compared to 8% with wtRAS (KRAS, NRAS or wtBRAF (p = 0.001.PIK3CA, RAS (KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF mutations are frequent in diverse tumors. In a wide variety of tumors, PIK3CA mutations coexist with RAS (KRAS, NRAS and BRAF mutations.

  12. Spectrum of mutations in RARS-T patients includes TET2 and ASXL1 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpurka, Hadrian; Jankowska, Anna M; Makishima, Hideki; Bodo, Juraj; Bejanyan, Nelli; Hsi, Eric D; Sekeres, Mikkael A; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P

    2010-08-01

    While a majority of patients with refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts and thrombocytosis harbor JAK2V617F and rarely MPLW515L, JAK2/MPL-negative cases constitute a diagnostic problem. 23 RARS-T cases were investigated applying immunohistochemical phospho-STAT5, sequencing and SNP-A-based karyotyping. Based on the association of TET2/ASXL1 mutations with MDS/MPN we studied molecular pattern of these genes. Two patients harbored ASXL1 and another 2 TET2 mutations. Phospho-STAT5 activation was present in one mutated TET2 and ASXL1 case. JAK2V617F/MPLW515L mutations were absent in TET2/ASXL1 mutants, indicating that similar clinical phenotype can be produced by various MPN-associated mutations and that additional unifying lesions may be present in RARS-T. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Introduction of Molecular Diagnosis of Hemochromatosis Type 1 in Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismael Aramís Cervera García

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: hemochromatosis type 1 is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder, which should be diagnosed during its preclinical phase in order to prevent severe organ damage. Objective: to establish the diagnosis of hemochromatosis type 1 in Cuba, and calculate its frequencies in patients with hepatopathies. Methods: an analytic cross-sectional study was conducted including 65 patients with liver disease, who were referred to the laboratory of Molecular Biology of the National Medical Genetics Center by clinical geneticists. A PCR-RFLP analysis was used for detecting the C282Y and H63D mutations in the HFE gene. Results: PCR-RFLP analysis was standardized for the detection of C282Y and H63D mutations. Frequencies of C282Y and H63D mutations in the HFE gene in patients with hepatopathies were 6.3% and 18.2% respectively. Conclusions: molecular diagnosis of C282Y and H63D mutations in the HFE gene causing hemochromatosis type 1 contributed to the identification of 28 carriers in the 65 patients who were studied, as well as a homozygous individual for the H63D mutation, which shows the high prevalence of these mutations in Cuban patients with liver disease.

  14. Identifying pathways affected by cancer mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iengar, Prathima

    2017-12-16

    Mutations in 15 cancers, sourced from the COSMIC Whole Genomes database, and 297 human pathways, arranged into pathway groups based on the processes they orchestrate, and sourced from the KEGG pathway database, have together been used to identify pathways affected by cancer mutations. Genes studied in ≥15, and mutated in ≥10 samples of a cancer have been considered recurrently mutated, and pathways with recurrently mutated genes have been considered affected in the cancer. Novel doughnut plots have been presented which enable visualization of the extent to which pathways and genes, in each pathway group, are targeted, in each cancer. The 'organismal systems' pathway group (including organism-level pathways; e.g., nervous system) is the most targeted, more than even the well-recognized signal transduction, cell-cycle and apoptosis, and DNA repair pathway groups. The important, yet poorly-recognized, role played by the group merits attention. Pathways affected in ≥7 cancers yielded insights into processes affected. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Induced mutations in pomoid trees breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamed, Faysal

    1986-01-01

    Induction of mutations in fruit trees by ionizing radiation complements a cross-breeding program. The objectives are: 1) the improvements of methods of induction, identification and selection of useful mutations, and 2) the initiation of useful mutations either for immediate use as improved cultivars or as a parent material for conventional cross-breeding. The induction of mutants in pomoid fruits, with special emphasis on apple, was realized by gamma-ray treatment of dormant scions subsequently propagated on a rootstoch in the nursery. The aim was to obtain compacts, presuming the feasibility of selecting compact shoots formed by the irradiated scions in the first vegetative generation and also assuming that chance of finding (e.g. fruit mutants) would be thus increased rather than lessened. Selection was carried out on one-season old shoots, formed on the same material for two or three seasons, by using a cut-back at the end of the first and second season. The procedure was highly effective. Moderate exposures, resulting in 60% survival gave high mutation frequencies. Buds 6-10 on the primary shoot gave higher frequencies of recognizable mutations than either buds 1-5 or 11-15. Preliminary results seem to indicate that, at least in some apple cultivars, there is opportunity to obtain compact growth types with good biological characteristics. 8 refs. (author)

  16. Mutation breeding in rice in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swaminathan, M S; Siddiq, E A; Singh, C B; Pai, R A [Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi (India)

    1970-03-01

    Mutation research was continued in rice with the following aims; (a) to enhance the frequency and spectrum of mutations in indica and japonica rice varieties; (b) to change the grain quality of the japonica variety, Tainan-3, into the indica type; (c) to improve the grain quality of the indica variety, IR-8; (d) to increase the recombination frequency in japonica-indica hybrids. Both nitrosoguanidine and 5-MeV fast neutrons gave a high mutation frequency. The japonica variety was more sensitive to all mutagens than the indica types. Chemical mutagens had no particular advantage over ionizing radiations with reference to either mutation frequency or spectrum. Mutants with indica type of grain occurred readily in Tainan-3 in all treatments. Such mutants had a larger grain length/width ratio and were more resistant to alkali digestion. Fine grain types with better cooking quality occurred in the M{sub 2} populations of IR-8. These mutants are likely to render this high-yielding variety more popular. A wide range of chlorophyll and viable mutations occurred in IR-8 and Tainan-3. Some of these, like those involving dwarfing and slow senescence, are of economic interest, besides those affecting grain quality. Recombination frequency can be influenced in japonica x indica hybrids through the irradiation of F{sub 1} sporocytes. The precise influence varies with the stage at which the plant is irradiated, the dose given and the loci involved. (author)

  17. Mechanisms of mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Ross L

    2009-12-01

    In recent years, a series of studies have provided genetic insight into the pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). It is now known that JAK2V617F mutations are present in 90% of patients with polycythaemia vera (PV), 60% of patients with essential thrombocytosis (ET) and 50% of patients with myelofibrosis (MF). Despite the high prevalence of JAK2V617F mutations in these three myeloid malignancies, several questions remain. For example, how does one mutation contribute to the pathogenesis of three clinically distinct diseases, and how do some patients develop these diseases in the absence of a JAK2V617F mutation? Single nucleotide polymorphisms at various loci and somatic mutations, such as those in MPLW515L/K, TET2 and in exon 12 of JAK2, may also contribute to the pathogenesis of these MPNs. There are likely additional germline and somatic genetic factors important to the MPN phenotype. Additional studies of large MPN and control cohorts with new techniques will help identify these factors.

  18. Common Variable Immunodeficiency Caused by FANC Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekinaka, Yujin; Mitsuiki, Noriko; Imai, Kohsuke; Yabe, Miharu; Yabe, Hiromasa; Mitsui-Sekinaka, Kanako; Honma, Kenichi; Takagi, Masatoshi; Arai, Ayako; Yoshida, Kenichi; Okuno, Yusuke; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Miyano, Satoru; Muramatsu, Hideki; Kojima, Seiji; Hira, Asuka; Takata, Minoru; Ohara, Osamu; Ogawa, Seishi; Morio, Tomohiro; Nonoyama, Shigeaki

    2017-07-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most common adult-onset primary antibody deficiency disease due to various causative genes. Several genes, which are known to be the cause of different diseases, have recently been reported as the cause of CVID in patients by performing whole exome sequencing (WES) analysis. Here, we found FANC gene mutations as a cause of adult-onset CVID in two patients. B cells were absent and CD4 + T cells were skewed toward CD45RO + memory T cells. T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) and signal joint kappa-deleting recombination excision circles (sjKRECs) were undetectable in both patients. Both patients had no anemia, neutropenia, or thrombocytopenia. Using WES, we identified compound heterozygous mutations of FANCE in one patient and homozygous mutation of FANCA in another patient. The impaired function of FANC protein complex was confirmed by a monoubiquitination assay and by chromosome fragility test. We then performed several immunological evaluations including quantitative lymphocyte analysis and TRECs/sjKRECs analysis for 32 individuals with Fanconi anemia (FA). In total, 22 FA patients (68.8%) were found to have immunological abnormalities, suggesting that such immunological findings may be common in FA patients. These data indicate that FANC mutations are involved in impaired lymphogenesis probably by the accumulation of DNA replication stress, leading to CVID. It is important to diagnose FA because it drastically changes clinical management. We propose that FANC mutations can cause isolated immunodeficiency in addition to bone marrow failure and malignancy.

  19. BRAF mutation in hairy cell leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ahmadzadeh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available BRAF is a serine/threonine kinase with a regulatory role in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathway. A mutation in the RAF gene, especially in BRAF protein, leads to an increased stimulation of this cascade, causing uncontrolled cell division and development of malignancy. Several mutations have been observed in the gene coding for this protein in a variety of human malignancies, including hairy cell leukemia (HCL. BRAF V600E is the most common mutation reported in exon15 of BRAF, which is observed in almost all cases of classic HCL, but it is negative in other B-cell malignancies, including the HCL variant. Therefore it can be used as a marker to differentiate between these B-cell disorders. We also discuss the interaction between miRNAs and signaling pathways, including MAPK, in HCL. When this mutation is present, the use of BRAF protein inhibitors may represent an effective treatment. In this review we have evaluated the role of the mutation of the BRAF gene in the pathogenesis and progression of HCL.

  20. Fanconi anemia founder mutation in Macedonian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madjunkova, Svetlana; Kocheva, Svetlana A; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana

    2014-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder clinically characterized by developmental abnormalities, progressive bone marrow failure (BMF) and profound cancer predisposition. Approximately 65% of all affected individuals have mutation in the FANCA (Fanconi anemia complementation group A) gene. The mutation spectrum of the FANCA gene is highly heterogeneous. FA-A is usually associated with private FANCA mutations in individual families. We describe 3 unrelated patients with FA with a similar clinical presentation: BMF, renal anomalies and café-au-lait pigmentation without major skeletal abnormality. The molecular analysis of the FANCA gene using the FA MLPA kit P031-A2/P032 FANCA, showed homozygous deletion of exon 3 in all 3 patients. Molecular analysis of the flanking regions of exon 3 precisely defined unique deletion of 2,040 bp and duplication of C (1788_3828dupC). These are the first 3 patients homozygous for deletion of FANCA exon 3 described to date. Although not related, the patients originated from the same Gypsy-like ethnic population. We conclude that c.190-256_283 + 1680del2040 dupC mutation in the FANCA gene is a founder mutation in Macedonian FA patients of Gypsy-like ethnic origin. Our finding has very strong implications for these patients in formulating diagnostic and carrier-screening strategy for BMF and FA and to enable comprehensive genetic counseling. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Deleterious mutation accumulation in organelle genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, M; Blanchard, J L

    1998-01-01

    It is well established on theoretical grounds that the accumulation of mildly deleterious mutations in nonrecombining genomes is a major extinction risk in obligately asexual populations. Sexual populations can also incur mutational deterioration in genomic regions that experience little or no recombination, i.e., autosomal regions near centromeres, Y chromosomes, and organelle genomes. Our results suggest, for a wide array of genes (transfer RNAs, ribosomal RNAs, and proteins) in a diverse collection of species (animals, plants, and fungi), an almost universal increase in the fixation probabilities of mildly deleterious mutations arising in mitochondrial and chloroplast genomes relative to those arising in the recombining nuclear genome. This enhanced width of the selective sieve in organelle genomes does not appear to be a consequence of relaxed selection, but can be explained by the decline in the efficiency of selection that results from the reduction of effective population size induced by uniparental inheritance. Because of the very low mutation rates of organelle genomes (on the order of 10(-4) per genome per year), the reduction in fitness resulting from mutation accumulation in such genomes is a very long-term process, not likely to imperil many species on time scales of less than a million years, but perhaps playing some role in phylogenetic lineage sorting on time scales of 10 to 100 million years.

  2. Impact of Fluoroquinolone Resistance Mutations on Gonococcal Fitness and In Vivo Selection for Compensatory Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Anjali N.; Begum, Afrin A.; Wu, Hong; D'Ambrozio, Jonathan A.; Robinson, James M.; Shafer, William M.; Bash, Margaret C.; Jerse, Ann E.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Quinolone-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae (QRNG) arise from mutations in gyrA (intermediate resistance) or gyrA and parC (resistance). Here we tested the consequence of commonly isolated gyrA91/95 and parC86 mutations on gonococcal fitness. Methods. Mutant gyrA91/95 and parC86 alleles were introduced into wild-type gonococci or an isogenic mutant that is resistant to macrolides due to an mtrR−79 mutation. Wild-type and mutant bacteria were compared for growth in vitro and in competitive murine infection. Results. In vitro growth was reduced with increasing numbers of mutations. Interestingly, the gyrA91/95 mutation conferred an in vivo fitness benefit to wild-type and mtrR−79 mutant gonococci. The gyrA91/95, parC86 mutant, in contrast, showed a slight fitness defect in vivo, and the gyrA91/95, parC86, mtrR−79 mutant was markedly less fit relative to the parent strains. A ciprofloxacin-resistant (CipR) mutant was selected during infection with the gyrA91/95, parC86, mtrR−79 mutant in which the mtrR−79 mutation was repaired and the gyrA91 mutation was altered. This in vivo–selected mutant grew as well as the wild-type strain in vitro. Conclusions. gyrA91/95 mutations may contribute to the spread of QRNG. Further acquisition of a parC86 mutation abrogates this fitness advantage; however, compensatory mutations can occur that restore in vivo fitness and maintain CipR. PMID:22492860

  3. The spectrum of mutation produced by low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morley, Alexander A.; Turner, David R.

    2004-01-01

    Inherited mutations are the basis of evolution and acquired mutations in humans are important in ageing, cancer and possibly various forms of tissue degeneration. Mutations are responsible for many of the long-term effects of radiation. However, sensitive direct detection of mutations in humans has been difficult. The aims of the project were to develop methods for the sensitive enumeration of mutations in DNA, to measure mutation frequencies in a wide variety of tissue types and to quantify the mutational effect of direct oxidative damage produced by radiation, at both high and low doses. The project was successful in developing a sensitive method which could detect mutations directly in the genetic material, DNA at a sensitivity of 1 mutated molecule in 1000000000 unmutated molecules. However a number of methodological problems had to be overcome and lack of ongoing funding made it impossible to fulfill all of the aims of the project

  4. Distinct pattern of p53 mutations in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spruck, C H; Rideout, W M; Olumi, A F

    1993-01-01

    A distinct mutational spectrum for the p53 tumor suppressor gene in bladder carcinomas was established in patients with known exposures to cigarette smoke. Single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis of exons 5 through 8 of the p53 gene showed inactivating mutations in 16 of 40 (40%) bladder...... tumors from smokers and 13 of 40 (33%) tumors from lifetime nonsmokers. Overall, 13 of the 50 (26%) total point mutations discovered in this and previous work were G:C-->C:G transversions, a relatively rare mutational type in human tumors. In six tumors, identical AGA (Arg)-->ACA (Thr) point mutations...... double mutations, four of which were tandem mutations on the same allele. No double mutations were found in tumors from nonsmoking patients. None of the mutations in smokers were G:C-->T:A transversions, which would be anticipated for exposure to the suspected cigarette smoke carcinogen 4-aminobiphenyl...

  5. Splice Site Mutations in the ATP7A Gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjørringe, Tina; Tümer, Zeynep; Møller, Lisbeth Birk

    2011-01-01

    Menkes disease (MD) is caused by mutations in the ATP7A gene. We describe 33 novel splice site mutations detected in patients with MD or the milder phenotypic form, Occipital Horn Syndrome. We review these 33 mutations together with 28 previously published splice site mutations. We investigate 12...... mutations for their effect on the mRNA transcript in vivo. Transcriptional data from another 16 mutations were collected from the literature. The theoretical consequences of splice site mutations, predicted with the bioinformatics tool Human Splice Finder, were investigated and evaluated in relation...... to in vivo results. Ninety-six percent of the mutations identified in 45 patients with classical MD were predicted to have a significant effect on splicing, which concurs with the absence of any detectable wild-type transcript in all 19 patients investigated in vivo. Sixty-seven percent of the mutations...

  6. Mutations in FLNB cause boomerang dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicknell, L S; Morgan, T; Bonafé, L; Wessels, M W; Bialer, M G; Willems, P J; Cohn, D H; Krakow, D; Robertson, S P

    2005-07-01

    Boomerang dysplasia (BD) is a perinatal lethal osteochondrodysplasia, characterised by absence or underossification of the limb bones and vertebrae. The BD phenotype is similar to a group of disorders including atelosteogenesis I, atelosteogenesis III, and dominantly inherited Larsen syndrome that we have recently shown to be associated with mutations in FLNB, the gene encoding the actin binding cytoskeletal protein, filamin B. We report the identification of mutations in FLNB in two unrelated individuals with boomerang dysplasia. The resultant substitutions, L171R and S235P, lie within the calponin homology 2 region of the actin binding domain of filamin B and occur at sites that are evolutionarily well conserved. These findings expand the phenotypic spectrum resulting from mutations in FLNB and underline the central role this protein plays during skeletogenesis in humans.

  7. Selection-Mutation Dynamics of Signaling Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Hofbauer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the structure of the rest points of signaling games and their dynamic behavior under selection-mutation dynamics by taking the case of three signals as our canonical example. Many rest points of the replicator dynamics of signaling games are not isolated and, therefore, not robust under perturbations. However, some of them attract open sets of initial conditions. We prove the existence of certain rest points of the selection-mutation dynamics close to Nash equilibria of the signaling game and show that all but the perturbed rest points close to strict Nash equilibria are dynamically unstable. This is an important result for the evolution of signaling behavior, since it shows that the second-order forces that are governed by mutation can increase the chances of successful signaling.

  8. Radiation-induced mutations and plant breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqvi, S.H.M.

    1985-01-01

    Ionizing radiation could cause genetic changes in an organism and could modify gene linkages. The induction of mutation through radiation is random and the probability of getting the desired genetic change is low but can be increased by manipulating different parameters such as dose rate, physical conditions under which the material has been irradiated, etc. Induced mutations have been used as a supplement to conventional plant breeding, particularly for creating genetic variability for specific characters such as improved plant structure, pest and disease resistance, and desired changes in maturity period; more than 200 varieties of crop plants have been developed by this technique. The Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission has used this technique fruitfully to evolve better germplasm in cotton, rice, chickpea, wheat and mungbean; some of the mutants have become popular commercial varieties. This paper describes some uses of radiation induced mutations and the results achieved in Pakistan so far

  9. Mutation induction of orchids by ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Affrida Abu Hassan; Zaiton Ahmad; Sakinah Ariffin; Oono, Yutaka; Hase, Yoshihiro; Shikazono; Naoya; Narumi, Issay; Tanaka, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Mutation induction using ionizing radiation provides an effective alternative means for improvement of orchids. In this study, ion beams were used because they have much higher linear energy transfer (LET) than X-rays or gamma rays, and subsequently lead to higher mutation frequency and broad mutation spectrum. The proto corm-like bodies (PLBs) of three orchid species (Dendrobium crumenatum, Dendrobium mirbellianum) were irradiated at various doses with 320 MeV 12 C 6+ ions accelerated by Azimuthally Varying Field (AVF) cyclotron at JAEAs Takasaki Ion Accelerators for Advanced Radiation Application (TIARA). The optimum irradiation condition and the effect of irradiation on each species were studied, particularly on flower colour and morphology, flowering habit and insect resistance. Dose effects on plantlet regeneration for each species were also obtained. Some morphological changes were observed in flowers of Dendrobium crumenatum, whilst one insect resistant mutant was obtained in Dendrobium mirbellianum. (author)

  10. Effect of Mutations on HP Lattice Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Guangjie; Vogel, Thomas; Landau, David; Li, Ying; Wüst, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Using Wang-Landau sampling with approriate trial moves[2], we investigate the effect of different types of mutations on lattice proteins in the HP model. While exact studies have been carried out for short HP proteins[3], the systems we investigate are of much larger size and hence not accessible for exact enumerations. Based on the estimated density of states, we systematically analyse the changes in structure and degeneracy of ground states of particular proteins and measure thermodynamic quantities like the stability of ground states and the specific heat, for example. Both, neutral mutations, which do not change the structure and stability of ground states, as well as critical mutations, which do change the thermodynamic behavior qualitatively, have been observed. Research supported by NSF

  11. Precise estimates of mutation rate and spectrum in yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuan O.; Siegal, Mark L.; Hall, David W.; Petrov, Dmitri A.

    2014-01-01

    Mutation is the ultimate source of genetic variation. The most direct and unbiased method of studying spontaneous mutations is via mutation accumulation (MA) lines. Until recently, MA experiments were limited by the cost of sequencing and thus provided us with small numbers of mutational events and therefore imprecise estimates of rates and patterns of mutation. We used whole-genome sequencing to identify nearly 1,000 spontaneous mutation events accumulated over ∼311,000 generations in 145 diploid MA lines of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. MA experiments are usually assumed to have negligible levels of selection, but even mild selection will remove strongly deleterious events. We take advantage of such patterns of selection and show that mutation classes such as indels and aneuploidies (especially monosomies) are proportionately much more likely to contribute mutations of large effect. We also provide conservative estimates of indel, aneuploidy, environment-dependent dominant lethal, and recessive lethal mutation rates. To our knowledge, for the first time in yeast MA data, we identified a sufficiently large number of single-nucleotide mutations to measure context-dependent mutation rates and were able to (i) confirm strong AT bias of mutation in yeast driven by high rate of mutations from C/G to T/A and (ii) detect a higher rate of mutation at C/G nucleotides in two specific contexts consistent with cytosine methylation in S. cerevisiae. PMID:24847077

  12. Mutation induction by ion beams in arabidopsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Atsushi

    1999-01-01

    An investigation was made on characteristics of ion beams for the biological effects and the induction of mutation using Arabidopsis plant as a model plant for the molecular genetics. Here, the characteristics of mutation at the molecular level as well as new mutants induced by ion beams were described. The ast and sep1 were obtained from the offspring of 1488 carbon ion-irradiated seeds respectively. The uvi1-uvi4 mutants were also induced from 1280 M 1 lines. Thus, ion beams can induce not only known mutants such as tt, gl and hy but also novel mutants with high frequency. Even in the tt phenotype, two new mutant loci other than known loci were found. In chrysanthemum, several kinds of single, complex or stripped flower-color mutants that have been never induced by γirradiation, indicating that ion beams could produce a variety of mutants with the same phenotype. In conclusion, ion beams for the mutation induction are characterized by 1) to induce mutants with high frequency, 2) to show broad mutation spectrum and 3) to produce novel mutants. For these reasons, chemical mutagens such as EMS and low LET ionizing radiation such as X-rays and γ-rays will predominantly induce many but small modifications or DNA damages on the DNA strands. As the result, several point mutations will be produced on the genome. On the contrary, ion beams as a high LET ionizing radiation will not cause so many but large and irreparable DNA damage locally, resulting in production of limited number of null mutation. (M.N.)

  13. Radiation induced mutations for plant selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, H.

    1994-01-01

    The successful use of plant breeding for improving crops requires the existence of genetic variation of useful traits. Unfortunately, the desired variation is often lacking. However, radiation can be used to induce mutations and thereby generate genetic variation from which desired mutants may be selected. Mutation induction has become a proven way of creating variation within a crop variety. It offers the possibility of inducing desired attributes that either cannot be expressed in nature or have been lost during evolution. More than 1700 mutant cultivars of crop plants with significantly improved attributes such as increased yield, improved quality, disease and stress resistance, have been released worldwide in the last thirty years. The Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture has contributed to these achievements through the promotion of research and development in mutation breeding techniques using nuclear and related biotechnological methods and the provision of in plant breeding is then transferred to Member States of the IAEA and the FAO through training in mutation breeding methods and the provision of technical advice. Moreover, radiation treatment services are provided to foster applications of nuclear techniques in crop improvement programmes of member states and more specifically to render direct support to plant breeders by efficient generation of mutations. Plant materials are standardized prior to radiation exposure to warrant reproducibility of the induced effects within practical limits and a radiosensitivity test is implemented to affirm useful doses for applied objectives of a request. This review deals with irradiation methods applied at the IAEA laboratories for the efficient induction of mutations in seeds, vegetative propagules and tissue and cell cultures and the establishment of genetically variable populations upon which selection of desired traits can be based. 3 tabs., 18 refs. (author)

  14. Mutation induction by ion beams in arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Atsushi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1999-07-01

    An investigation was made on characteristics of ion beams for the biological effects and the induction of mutation using Arabidopsis plant as a model plant for the molecular genetics. Here, the characteristics of mutation at the molecular level as well as new mutants induced by ion beams were described. The ast and sep1 were obtained from the offspring of 1488 carbon ion-irradiated seeds respectively. The uvi1-uvi4 mutants were also induced from 1280 M{sub 1} lines. Thus, ion beams can induce not only known mutants such as tt, gl and hy but also novel mutants with high frequency. Even in the tt phenotype, two new mutant loci other than known loci were found. In chrysanthemum, several kinds of single, complex or stripped flower-color mutants that have been never induced by {gamma}irradiation, indicating that ion beams could produce a variety of mutants with the same phenotype. In conclusion, ion beams for the mutation induction are characterized by 1) to induce mutants with high frequency, 2) to show broad mutation spectrum and 3) to produce novel mutants. For these reasons, chemical mutagens such as EMS and low LET ionizing radiation such as X-rays and {gamma}-rays will predominantly induce many but small modifications or DNA damages on the DNA strands. As the result, several point mutations will be produced on the genome. On the contrary, ion beams as a high LET ionizing radiation will not cause so many but large and irreparable DNA damage locally, resulting in production of limited number of null mutation. (M.N.)

  15. In vitro technology for mutation breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    The ultimate aim of the Co-ordinated Research Programme on In Vitro Technology for Mutation Breeding is to provide new effective tools for plant breeders to construct new cultivars, thus increasing agricultural production of food, feed and industrial raw material, particularly in developing countries. The participants of the research co-ordination meetings considered the potential of new advances of agricultural biotechnology, especially the use of in vitro techniques for mutation breeding. They discussed and co-ordinated plans in conjunction with the impact on plant breeding of novel technologies, such as use of somaclonal variation, cell hybridization and molecular genetics

  16. Towards linked open gene mutations data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background With the advent of high-throughput technologies, a great wealth of variation data is being produced. Such information may constitute the basis for correlation analyses between genotypes and phenotypes and, in the future, for personalized medicine. Several databases on gene variation exist, but this kind of information is still scarce in the Semantic Web framework. In this paper, we discuss issues related to the integration of mutation data in the Linked Open Data infrastructure, part of the Semantic Web framework. We present the development of a mapping from the IARC TP53 Mutation database to RDF and the implementation of servers publishing this data. Methods A version of the IARC TP53 Mutation database implemented in a relational database was used as first test set. Automatic mappings to RDF were first created by using D2RQ and later manually refined by introducing concepts and properties from domain vocabularies and ontologies, as well as links to Linked Open Data implementations of various systems of biomedical interest. Since D2RQ query performances are lower than those that can be achieved by using an RDF archive, generated data was also loaded into a dedicated system based on tools from the Jena software suite. Results We have implemented a D2RQ Server for TP53 mutation data, providing data on a subset of the IARC database, including gene variations, somatic mutations, and bibliographic references. The server allows to browse the RDF graph by using links both between classes and to external systems. An alternative interface offers improved performances for SPARQL queries. The resulting data can be explored by using any Semantic Web browser or application. Conclusions This has been the first case of a mutation database exposed as Linked Data. A revised version of our prototype, including further concepts and IARC TP53 Mutation database data sets, is under development. The publication of variation information as Linked Data opens new perspectives

  17. Towards linked open gene mutations data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappa, Achille; Splendiani, Andrea; Romano, Paolo

    2012-03-28

    With the advent of high-throughput technologies, a great wealth of variation data is being produced. Such information may constitute the basis for correlation analyses between genotypes and phenotypes and, in the future, for personalized medicine. Several databases on gene variation exist, but this kind of information is still scarce in the Semantic Web framework. In this paper, we discuss issues related to the integration of mutation data in the Linked Open Data infrastructure, part of the Semantic Web framework. We present the development of a mapping from the IARC TP53 Mutation database to RDF and the implementation of servers publishing this data. A version of the IARC TP53 Mutation database implemented in a relational database was used as first test set. Automatic mappings to RDF were first created by using D2RQ and later manually refined by introducing concepts and properties from domain vocabularies and ontologies, as well as links to Linked Open Data implementations of various systems of biomedical interest. Since D2RQ query performances are lower than those that can be achieved by using an RDF archive, generated data was also loaded into a dedicated system based on tools from the Jena software suite. We have implemented a D2RQ Server for TP53 mutation data, providing data on a subset of the IARC database, including gene variations, somatic mutations, and bibliographic references. The server allows to browse the RDF graph by using links both between classes and to external systems. An alternative interface offers improved performances for SPARQL queries. The resulting data can be explored by using any Semantic Web browser or application. This has been the first case of a mutation database exposed as Linked Data. A revised version of our prototype, including further concepts and IARC TP53 Mutation database data sets, is under development.The publication of variation information as Linked Data opens new perspectives: the exploitation of SPARQL searches on

  18. Present state and problems of mutation breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balint, A. (Agrartudomanyi Egyetem, Goedoelloe (Hungary))

    1983-09-01

    The major achievements and problems of mutation breeding are discussed according to recent international references. Examples for the production of microorganism resistant tobacco, maize, cabbage, disease resistant sugar cane and some freeze resistant plants are listed. Special opportunities offered by mutation to increase photosynthesis and to improve yields are discussed. The significance of the new techniques to produce induced mutants by means of tissue cultures, to fix N/sub 2/ for leguminosae and to affect the activities of N/sub 2/ fixing microorganisms is emphasized.

  19. Induced mutations for disease resistance in wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerny, J.; Hanis, M.; Hanisova, A.; Knytl, V.; Sasek, A.

    1983-01-01

    Mutation induction has been used over a period of 20 years to obtain mutants of wheat with improved disease resistance. 34 wheat cultivars have been treated with X-rays, gamma rays, thermal neutrons or EMS. A great number of mutants were selected. Their mutational origin was verified by electrophoretic analysis of gliadin spectra. Resistances have been confirmed over several generations. None of the mutants have been released yet for commercial cultivation because of shortcomings in yield or susceptibility to other diseases. The use of mutants in cross-breeding is considered. (author)

  20. The study of human mutation rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neel, J.V.

    1992-01-01

    We will describe recent developments regarding the question of induced mutations in the survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. As part of that work we, describe some developments with respect to the Amerindian blood samples collected under DoE sponsorship between 1964 and 1982. Then developments regarding the application of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) to the study of genetic variation and mutation affecting protein characteristics. In particular, we will report on the identification and isolation of genes of especial interest as reflected in the behavior of the proteins which they encode

  1. Mutation profiles of phenylketonuria in Quebec populations: Evidence of stratification and novel mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozen, R.; Mascisch, A.; Scriver, C.R. (McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada)); Lambert, M. (Hopital Ste-Justine, Montreal (Canada)); Laframboise, R. (Centre Hospitalier Universite Laval, Quebec (Canada))

    1994-08-01

    Independent phenylketonuria (PKU) chromosomes (n=109) representing 80% of a proband cohort in Quebec province carry 18 different identified mutations in 20 different mutation/haplotype combinations. The study reported here, the third in a series on Quebec populations, was done in the Montreal region and predominantly on French Canadians. It has identified three novel mutations (A309D, D338Y, and 1054/1055delG [352fs]) and one unusual mutation/RFLP haplotype combination (E280K on Hp 2). The relative frequencies and distribution of PKU mutations were then compared in three regions and population subsets (eastern Quebec, French Canadian; western Quebec, French Canadian; and Montreal, non-French Canadian). The distributions of the prevalent and rare mutations are nonrandom and provide evidence for genetic stratification. The latter and the presence of eight unusual mutation/haplotype combinations in Quebec families with European ancestries (the aforementioned four and M1V, 165T, S349P, and R408W on Hp 1) corroborate demographic and anthropologic evidence, from elsewhere, for different origins of French Canadians in eastern and western Quebec. 29 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  2. Molecular evaluation of a novel missense mutation & an insertional truncating mutation in SUMF1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udhaya H Kotecha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Multiple suphphatase deficiency (MSD is an autosomal recessive disorder affecting the post translational activation of all enzymes of the sulphatase family. To date, approximately 30 different mutations have been identified in the causative gene, sulfatase modifying factor 1 (SUMF1. We describe here the mutation analysis of a case of MSD. Methods: The proband was a four year old boy with developmental delay followed by neuroregression. He had coarse facies, appendicular hypertonia, truncal ataxia and ichthyosis limited to both lower limbs. Radiographs showed dysostosis multiplex. Clinical suspicion of MSD was confirmed by enzyme analysis of four enzymes of the sulphatase group. Results: The patient was compound heterozygote for a c.451A>G (p.K151E substitution in exon 3 and a single base insertion mutation (c.690_691 InsT in exon 5 in the SUMF1 gene. The bioinformatic analysis of the missense mutation revealed no apparent effect on the overall structure. However, the mutated 151-amino acid residue was found to be adjacent to the substrate binding and the active site residues, thereby affecting the substrate binding and/or catalytic activity, resulting in almost complete loss of enzyme function. Conclusions: The two mutations identified in the present case were novel. This is perhaps the first report of an insertion mutation in SUMF1 causing premature truncation of the protein.

  3. Recurrent APC gene mutations in Polish FAP families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pławski Andrzej

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The molecular diagnostics of genetically conditioned disorders is based on the identification of the mutations in the predisposing genes. Hereditary cancer disorders of the gastrointestinal tracts are caused by mutations of the tumour suppressor genes or the DNA repair genes. Occurrence of recurrent mutation allows improvement of molecular diagnostics. The mutation spectrum in the genes causing hereditary forms of colorectal cancers in the Polish population was previously described. In the present work an estimation of the frequency of the recurrent mutations of the APC gene was performed. Eight types of mutations occurred in 19.4% of our FAP families and these constitute 43% of all Polish diagnosed families.

  4. [Observation and analysis on mutation of routine STR locus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiu-yang; Feng, Wei-jun; Yang, Qin-gen

    2005-05-01

    To observe and analyze the characteristic of mutation at STR locus. 27 mutant genes observed in 1211 paternity testing cases were checked by PAGE-silver stained and PowerPlex 16 System Kit and validated by sequencing. Mutant genes locate on 15 loci. The pattern of mutation was accord with stepwise mutation model. The mutation ratio of male-to-female was 8:1 and correlated to the age of father. Mutation rate is correlated to the geometric mean of the number of homogeneous repeats of locus. The higher the mean, the higher the mutation rate. These loci are not so appropriate for use in paternity testing.

  5. Roles of Mitochondrial DNA Mutations in Stem Cell Ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianhong Su

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations accumulate in somatic stem cells during ageing and cause mitochondrial dysfunction. In this review, we summarize the studies that link mtDNA mutations to stem cell ageing. We discuss the age-related behaviours of the somatic mtDNA mutations in stem cell populations and how they potentially contribute to stem cell ageing by altering mitochondrial properties in humans and in mtDNA-mutator mice. We also draw attention to the diverse fates of the mtDNA mutations with different origins during ageing, with potential selective pressures on the germline inherited but not the somatic mtDNA mutations.

  6. Revertant mutation releases confined lethal mutation, opening Pandora's box: a novel genetic pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Ogawa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available When two mutations, one dominant pathogenic and the other "confining" nonsense, coexist in the same allele, theoretically, reversion of the latter may elicit a disease, like the opening of Pandora's box. However, cases of this hypothetical pathogenic mechanism have never been reported. We describe a lethal form of keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID syndrome caused by the reversion of the GJB2 nonsense mutation p.Tyr136X that would otherwise have confined the effect of another dominant lethal mutation, p.Gly45Glu, in the same allele. The patient's mother had the identical misssense mutation which was confined by the nonsense mutation. The biological relationship between the parents and the child was confirmed by genotyping of 15 short tandem repeat loci. Haplotype analysis using 40 SNPs spanning the >39 kbp region surrounding the GJB2 gene and an extended SNP microarray analysis spanning 83,483 SNPs throughout chromosome 13 in the family showed that an allelic recombination event involving the maternal allele carrying the mutations generated the pathogenic allele unique to the patient, although the possibility of coincidental accumulation of spontaneous point mutations cannot be completely excluded. Previous reports and our mutation screening support that p.Gly45Glu is in complete linkage disequilibrium with p.Tyr136X in the Japanese population. Estimated from statisitics in the literature, there may be approximately 11,000 p.Gly45Glu carriers in the Japanese population who have this second-site confining mutation, which acts as natural genetic protection from the lethal disease. The reversion-triggered onset of the disesase shown in this study is a previously unreported genetic pathogenesis based on Mendelian inheritance.

  7. Asymptotics of steady states of a selection–mutation equation for small mutation rate

    KAUST Repository

    Calsina, Àngel

    2013-12-01

    We consider a selection-mutation equation for the density of individuals with respect to a continuous phenotypic evolutionary trait. We assume that the competition term for an individual with a given trait depends on the traits of all the other individuals, therefore giving an infinite-dimensional nonlinearity. Mutations are modelled by means of an integral operator. We prove existence of steady states and show that, when the mutation rate goes to zero, the asymptotic profile of the population is a Cauchy distribution. © Royal Society of Edinburgh 2013.

  8. Asymptotics of steady states of a selection–mutation equation for small mutation rate

    KAUST Repository

    Calsina, À ngel; Cuadrado, Sí lvia; Desvillettes, Laurent; Raoul, Gaë l

    2013-01-01

    We consider a selection-mutation equation for the density of individuals with respect to a continuous phenotypic evolutionary trait. We assume that the competition term for an individual with a given trait depends on the traits of all the other individuals, therefore giving an infinite-dimensional nonlinearity. Mutations are modelled by means of an integral operator. We prove existence of steady states and show that, when the mutation rate goes to zero, the asymptotic profile of the population is a Cauchy distribution. © Royal Society of Edinburgh 2013.

  9. Hermann Muller and Mutations in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    dropdown arrow Site Map A-Z Index Menu Synopsis Hermann Muller and Mutations in Drosophila Resources with University of Texas. In Austin his experiments on fruit flies (Drosophila) first showed that exposure to September to spend a year at the only Drosophila laboratory in Europe which was doing parallel work

  10. PMS2 mutations in childhood cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, Michel; Hayward, Bruce E; Charlton, Ruth; Taylor, Graham R; Glaser, Adam W; Picton, Susan; Cole, Trevor R; Maher, Eamonn R; McKeown, Carole M E; Mann, Jill R; Yates, John R; Baralle, Diana; Rankin, Julia; Bonthron, David T; Sheridan, Eamonn

    2006-03-01

    Until recently, the PMS2 DNA mismatch repair gene has only rarely been implicated as a cancer susceptibility locus. New studies have shown, however, that earlier analyses of this gene have had technical limitations and also that the genetic behavior of mutant PMS2 alleles is unusual, in that, unlike MLH1 or MSH2 mutations, PMS2 mutations show low heterozygote penetrance. As a result, a dominantly inherited cancer predisposition has not been a feature reported in families with PMS2 mutations. Such families have instead been ascertained through childhood-onset cancers in homozygotes or through apparently sporadic colorectal cancer in heterozygotes. We present further information on the phenotype associated with homozygous PMS2 deficiency in 13 patients from six families of Pakistani origin living in the United Kingdom. This syndrome is characterized by café-au-lait skin pigmentation and a characteristic tumor spectrum, including leukemias, lymphomas, cerebral malignancies (such as supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors, astrocytomas, and glioblastomas), and colorectal neoplasia with an onset in early adult life. We present evidence for a founder effect in five families, all of which carried the same R802-->X mutation (i.e., arginine-802 to stop) in PMS2. This cancer syndrome can be mistaken for neurofibromatosis type 1, with important management implications including the risk of the disorder occurring in siblings and the likelihood of tumor development in affected individuals.

  11. Germline KRAS mutations cause Noonan syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubbert, S.; Zenker, M.; Rowe, S.L.; Boll, S.; Klein, C.; Bollag, G.; Burgt, I. van der; Musante, L.; Kalscheuer, V.M.M.; Wehner, L.E.; Nguyen, H.; West, B.; Zhang, K.Y.; Sistermans, E.A.; Rauch, A.; Niemeyer, C.M.; Shannon, K.; Kratz, C.P.

    2006-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (MIM 163950) is characterized by short stature, facial dysmorphism and cardiac defects. Heterozygous mutations in PTPN11, which encodes SHP-2, cause approximately 50% of cases of Noonan syndrome. The SHP-2 phosphatase relays signals from activated receptor complexes to downstream

  12. The mutation spectrum in RECQL4 diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siitonen, H. Annika; Sotkasiira, Jenni; Biervliet, Martine; Benmansour, Abdelmadjid; Capri, Yline; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Crandall, Barbara; Hannula-Jouppi, Katariina; Hennekam, Raoul; Herzog, Denise; Keymolen, Kathelijn; Lipsanen-Nyman, Marita; Miny, Peter; Plon, Sharon E.; Riedl, Stefan; Sarkar, Ajoy; Vargas, Fernando R.; Verloes, Alain; Wang, Lisa L.; Kääriäinen, Helena; Kestilä, Marjo

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the RECQL4 gene can lead to three clinical phenotypes with overlapping features. All these syndromes, Rothmund-Thomson (RTS), RAPADILINO and Baller-Gerold (BGS), are characterized by growth retardation and radial defects, but RAPADILINO syndrome lacks the main dermal manifestation,

  13. Periodic cluster mutations and related integrable maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fordy, Allan P

    2014-01-01

    One of the remarkable properties of cluster algebras is that any cluster, obtained from a sequence of mutations from an initial cluster, can be written as a Laurent polynomial in the initial cluster (known as the ‘Laurent phenomenon’). There are many nonlinear recurrences which exhibit the Laurent phenomenon and thus unexpectedly generate integer sequences. The mutation of a typical quiver will not generate a recurrence, but rather an erratic sequence of exchange relations. How do we ‘design’ a quiver which gives rise to a given recurrence? A key role is played by the concept of ‘periodic cluster mutation’, introduced in 2009. Each recurrence corresponds to a finite dimensional map. In the context of cluster mutations, these are called ‘cluster maps’. What properties do cluster maps have? Are they integrable in some standard sense?In this review I describe how integrable maps arise in the context of cluster mutations. I first explain the concept of ‘periodic cluster mutation’, giving some classification results. I then give a review of what is meant by an integrable map and apply this to cluster maps. Two classes of integrable maps are related to interesting monodromy problems, which generate interesting Poisson algebras of functions, used to prove complete integrability and a linearization. A connection to the Hirota–Miwa equation is explained. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical devoted to ‘Cluster algebras in mathematical physics’. (review)

  14. Rice breeding with induced mutations in France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marie, R [Station d' Amelioration des Plantes, Institut National de Recherches Agronomiques, Montpellier (France)

    1970-03-01

    Mutation experiments with rice at Montpellier yielded strains with improved lodging resistance, grain size, maturing time, milling quality and other characters. The general performance of these mutant strains was tested in field trials. Further mutagenic treatments were made to improve the high-yielding short grain varieties with regard to grain quality and seed dormancy. (author)

  15. Impact of mutation breeding in rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutger, J.N.

    1992-01-01

    More cultivars have been developed in rice through the use of mutation breeding than in any other crop. Direct releases of mutants as cultivars began some 30 years ago, and now total 198 cultivars. During the last 20 years, increasing use has been made of induced mutants in cross-breeding programs, leading to 80 additional cultivars. Principal improvements through mutation breeding have been earlier maturity, short stature, and grain character modifications. Rice has been a popular subject of mutagenesis because it is the world's leading food crop, has diploid inheritance, and is highly self-pollinated. In recent years induced mutation has been exploited to develop breeding tool mutants, which are defined as mutants that in themselves may not have direct agronomic application but may be useful genetic tools for crop improvement. Examples include the eui gene, hull colour mutants, normal genetic male steriles, and environmentally sensitive genetic male steriles. The environmentally sensitive genetic male steriles, especially those in which male sterility can be turned on or off by different photoperiod lengths, show promise for simplifying hybrid rice seed production both in China and the USA. Future applications of mutation in rice include induction of unusual endosperm starch types, plant types with fewer but more productive tillers, dominant dwarfs, dominant genetic male steriles, extremely early maturing mutants, nutritional mutants, and in vitro-derived mutants for tolerance to herbicides or other growth stresses. Refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  16. Abetalipoproteinemia: A novel mutation of microsomal triglyceride ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hager Barakizou

    2016-01-25

    Jan 25, 2016 ... Abetalipoproteinemia: A novel mutation of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) gene in a young Tunisian patient. Hager Barakizou a,. *, Souha Gannouni a. , Khalil Messaoui a. , Mathilde Difilippo b. ,. Agne`s Sassolas b. , Fethi Bayoudh a a Department of Pediatrics, Military Hospital of Tunis, ...

  17. Acromelic frontonasal dysostosis and ZSWIM6 mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twigg, Stephen R F; Ousager, Lilian Bomme; Miller, Kerry A

    2016-01-01

    Acromelic frontonasal dysostosis (AFND) is a distinctive and rare frontonasal malformation that presents in combination with brain and limb abnormalities. A single recurrent heterozygous missense substitution in ZSWIM6, encoding a protein of unknown function, was previously shown to underlie this...... sequencing of DNA isolated from a variety of tissues, which each contain different levels of mutation. This has important implications for genetic counselling....

  18. KRAS and BRAF mutations in anal carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serup-Hansen, Eva; Linnemann, Dorte; Høgdall, Estrid

    2015-01-01

    the frequency and the prognostic value of KRAS and BRAF mutations in a large cohort of patients with anal cancer. One hundred and ninety-three patients with T1-4N0-3M0-1 anal carcinoma were included in the study. Patients were treated with curative (92%) or palliative intent (8%) between January 2000...

  19. Mutational Analysis of Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erstad, Derek J. [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Cusack, James C. Jr., E-mail: jcusack@mgh.harvard.edu [Division of Surgical Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2014-10-17

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive cutaneous neuroendocrine malignancy that is associated with a poor prognosis. The pathogenesis of MCC is not well understood, and despite a recent plethora of mutational analyses, we have yet to find a set of signature mutations implicated in the majority of cases. Mutations, including TP53, Retinoblastoma and PIK3CA, have been documented in subsets of patients. Other mechanisms are also likely at play, including infection with the Merkel cell polyomavirus in a subset of patients, dysregulated immune surveillance, epigenetic alterations, aberrant protein expression, posttranslational modifications and microRNAs. In this review, we summarize what is known about MCC genetic mutations and chromosomal abnormalities, and their clinical significance. We also examine aberrant protein function and microRNA expression, and discuss the therapeutic and prognostic implications of these findings. Multiple clinical trials designed to selectively target overexpressed oncogenes in MCC are currently underway, though most are still in early phases. As we accumulate more molecular data on MCC, we will be better able to understand its pathogenic mechanisms, develop libraries of targeted therapies, and define molecular prognostic signatures to enhance our clinicopathologic knowledge.

  20. CLRN1 mutations cause nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, M.I.; Kersten, F.F.J.; Azam, M.; Collin, R.W.J.; Hussain, A.; Shah, S.T.; Keunen, J.E.E.; Kremer, J.M.J.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Qamar, R.; Hollander, A.I. den

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the mutations in the CLRN1 gene in patients from 2 consanguineous Pakistani families diagnosed with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP). DESIGN: Case-series study. PARTICIPANTS: Affected and unaffected individuals of 2 consanguineous Pakistani families and 90

  1. Mutational Analysis of Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erstad, Derek J.; Cusack, James C. Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive cutaneous neuroendocrine malignancy that is associated with a poor prognosis. The pathogenesis of MCC is not well understood, and despite a recent plethora of mutational analyses, we have yet to find a set of signature mutations implicated in the majority of cases. Mutations, including TP53, Retinoblastoma and PIK3CA, have been documented in subsets of patients. Other mechanisms are also likely at play, including infection with the Merkel cell polyomavirus in a subset of patients, dysregulated immune surveillance, epigenetic alterations, aberrant protein expression, posttranslational modifications and microRNAs. In this review, we summarize what is known about MCC genetic mutations and chromosomal abnormalities, and their clinical significance. We also examine aberrant protein function and microRNA expression, and discuss the therapeutic and prognostic implications of these findings. Multiple clinical trials designed to selectively target overexpressed oncogenes in MCC are currently underway, though most are still in early phases. As we accumulate more molecular data on MCC, we will be better able to understand its pathogenic mechanisms, develop libraries of targeted therapies, and define molecular prognostic signatures to enhance our clinicopathologic knowledge

  2. Mitochondrial Mutations in Subjects with Psychiatric Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Sequeira (Vasco); S.M. Rollins; C. Magnan (Christophe); M. van Oven (Mannis); P. Baldi (Pierre); R.M. Myers (Richard M.); J.D. Barchas (Jack D.); A.F. Schatzberg (Alan F); S.J. Watson (Stanley J); H. Akil (Huda); W.E. Bunney (William E.); M.P. Vawter (Marquis)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractA considerable body of evidence supports the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in psychiatric disorders and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are known to alter brain energy metabolism, neurotransmission, and cause neurodegenerative disorders. Genetic studies focusing on common nuclear

  3. Mitochondrial mutations and polymorphisms in psychiatric disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Sequeira (Vasco); M.V. Martin (Maureen); S.M. Rollins; E.A. Moon (Emily); W.E. Bunney (William E); F. MacCiardi (Fabio); S. Lupoli (Sara); G.D. Smith; J. Kelsoe (John); C.N. Magnan (Christophe); M. van Oven (Mannis); P. Baldi (Pierre); D.C. Wallace; M.P. Vawter (Marquis)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractMitochondrial deficiencies with unknown causes have been observed in schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) in imaging and postmortem studies. Polymorphisms and somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were investigated as potential causes with next generation sequencing of

  4. Genetic mutations associated with status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, M; Shorvon, S

    2015-08-01

    This paper reports the results of a preliminary search of the literature aimed at identifying the genetic mutations reported to be strongly associated with status epilepticus. Genetic mutations were selected for inclusion if status epilepticus was specifically mentioned as a consequence of the mutation in standard genetic databases or in a case report or review article. Mutations in 122 genes were identified. The genetic mutations identified were found in only rare conditions (sometimes vanishingly rare) and mostly in infants and young children with multiple other handicaps. Most of the genetic mutations can be subdivided into those associated with cortical dysplasias, inborn errors of metabolism, mitochondrial disease, or epileptic encephalopathies and childhood syndromes. There are no identified 'pure status epilepticus genes'. The range of genes underpinning status epilepticus differs in many ways from the range of genes underpinning epilepsy, which suggests that the processes underpinning status epilepticus differ from those underpinning epilepsy. It has been frequently postulated that status epilepticus is the result of a failure of 'seizure termination mechanisms', but the wide variety of genes affecting very diverse biochemical pathways identified in this survey makes any unitary cause unlikely. The genetic influences in status epilepticus are likely to involve a wide range of mechanisms, some related to development, some to cerebral energy production, some to diverse altered biochemical pathways, some to transmitter and membrane function, and some to defects in networks or systems. The fact that many of the identified genes are involved with cerebral development suggests that status epilepticus might often be a system or network phenomenon. To date, there are very few genes identified which are associated with adult-onset status epilepticus (except in those with preexisting neurological damage), and this is disappointing as the cause of many adult

  5. Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer : Identification of mutation carriers and assessing pathogenicity of mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, RC; Sijmons, RH; Berends, MJW; Ou, J; Hofstra, RNW; Kleibeuker, JH

    2004-01-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), also referred to as Lynch syndrome, is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that is characterized by susceptibility to colorectal cancer and extracolonic malignancies, in particular endometrial cancer. HNPCC is caused by pathogenic mutations

  6. The Versatile Mutational Resistome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla López-Causapé

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the most striking features of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is its outstanding capacity for developing antimicrobial resistance to nearly all available antipseudomonal agents through the selection of chromosomal mutations, leading to the failure of the treatment of severe hospital-acquired or chronic infections. Recent whole-genome sequencing (WGS data obtained from in vitro assays on the evolution of antibiotic resistance, in vivo monitoring of antimicrobial resistance development, analysis of sequential cystic fibrosis isolates, and characterization of widespread epidemic high-risk clones have provided new insights into the evolutionary dynamics and mechanisms of P. aeruginosa antibiotic resistance, thus motivating this review. Indeed, the analysis of the WGS mutational resistome has proven to be useful for understanding the evolutionary dynamics of classical resistance pathways and to describe new mechanisms for the majority of antipseudomonal classes, including β-lactams, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, or polymixins. Beyond addressing a relevant scientific question, the analysis of the P. aeruginosa mutational resistome is expected to be useful, together with the analysis of the horizontally-acquired resistance determinants, for establishing the antibiotic resistance genotype, which should correlate with the antibiotic resistance phenotype and as such, it should be useful for the design of therapeutic strategies and for monitoring the efficacy of administered antibiotic treatments. However, further experimental research and new bioinformatics tools are still needed to overcome the interpretation limitations imposed by the complex interactions (including those leading to collateral resistance or susceptibility between the 100s of genes involved in the mutational resistome, as well as the frequent difficulties for differentiating relevant mutations from simple natural polymorphisms.

  7. The Versatile Mutational Resistome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Causapé, Carla; Cabot, Gabriel; Del Barrio-Tofiño, Ester; Oliver, Antonio

    2018-01-01

    One of the most striking features of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is its outstanding capacity for developing antimicrobial resistance to nearly all available antipseudomonal agents through the selection of chromosomal mutations, leading to the failure of the treatment of severe hospital-acquired or chronic infections. Recent whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data obtained from in vitro assays on the evolution of antibiotic resistance, in vivo monitoring of antimicrobial resistance development, analysis of sequential cystic fibrosis isolates, and characterization of widespread epidemic high-risk clones have provided new insights into the evolutionary dynamics and mechanisms of P. aeruginosa antibiotic resistance, thus motivating this review. Indeed, the analysis of the WGS mutational resistome has proven to be useful for understanding the evolutionary dynamics of classical resistance pathways and to describe new mechanisms for the majority of antipseudomonal classes, including β-lactams, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, or polymixins. Beyond addressing a relevant scientific question, the analysis of the P. aeruginosa mutational resistome is expected to be useful, together with the analysis of the horizontally-acquired resistance determinants, for establishing the antibiotic resistance genotype, which should correlate with the antibiotic resistance phenotype and as such, it should be useful for the design of therapeutic strategies and for monitoring the efficacy of administered antibiotic treatments. However, further experimental research and new bioinformatics tools are still needed to overcome the interpretation limitations imposed by the complex interactions (including those leading to collateral resistance or susceptibility) between the 100s of genes involved in the mutational resistome, as well as the frequent difficulties for differentiating relevant mutations from simple natural polymorphisms.

  8. Gamma ray induced somatic mutations in rose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, S.K.

    1989-01-01

    Budwood of 32 rose cultivars (Rosa spp.) was exposed to 3-4 krad of gamma rays and eyes were grafted on Rosa indica var. odorata root stock. Radiosensitivity with respect to sprouting, survival and plant height, and mutation frequency varied with the cultivar and dose of gamma rays. Somatic mutations in flower colour/shape were detected as chimera in 21 cultivars. The size of the mutant sector varied from a narrow streak on a petal to a whole flower and from a portion of a branch to an entire branch. 14 mutants were detected in M 1 V 1 , four in M 1 V 2 and three in M 1 V 3 . Maximum number of mutations was detected following 3 krad treatment. Eyes from mutant branches were grafted again on root stock and non-chimeric mutants were aimed at by vegetative propagation. Mutants from 11 cultivars only could be isolated in pure form. Isolation of non-chimeric mutants sometimes is difficult due to weak growth of a mutant branch. In such a case, all normal looking branches are removed to force a better growth of the mutant branch. It is advisable to maintain irradiated plants at least for four years with drastic pruning in each year. Nine mutants viz. 'Sharada', 'Sukumari', 'Tangerine Contempo', 'Yellow Contempo', 'Pink Contempo', 'Striped Contempo', 'Twinkle', 'Curio' and 'Light Pink Prize' have already been released as new cultivars for commercialization [ref. MBNL No. 23 and 31] and others are being multiplied and assessed. The mutation spectrum appears to be wider for the cultivars 'Contempo' and 'Imperator'. Pigment composition of the original variety is relevant for the kind of flower colour mutations that can be induced

  9. PPIB mutations cause severe osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Fleur S; Nesbitt, Isabel M; Zwikstra, Eline H; Nikkels, Peter G J; Piersma, Sander R; Fratantoni, Silvina A; Jimenez, Connie R; Huizer, Margriet; Morsman, Alice C; Cobben, Jan M; van Roij, Mirjam H H; Elting, Mariet W; Verbeke, Jonathan I M L; Wijnaendts, Liliane C D; Shaw, Nick J; Högler, Wolfgang; McKeown, Carole; Sistermans, Erik A; Dalton, Ann; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Pals, Gerard

    2009-10-01

    Deficiency of cartilage-associated protein (CRTAP) or prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1(P3H1) has been reported in autosomal-recessive lethal or severe osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). CRTAP, P3H1, and cyclophilin B (CyPB) form an intracellular collagen-modifying complex that 3-hydroxylates proline at position 986 (P986) in the alpha1 chains of collagen type I. This 3-prolyl hydroxylation is decreased in patients with CRTAP and P3H1 deficiency. It was suspected that mutations in the PPIB gene encoding CyPB would also cause OI with decreased collagen 3-prolyl hydroxylation. To our knowledge we present the first two families with recessive OI caused by PPIB gene mutations. The clinical phenotype is compatible with OI Sillence type II-B/III as seen with COL1A1/2, CRTAP, and LEPRE1 mutations. The percentage of 3-hydroxylated P986 residues in patients with PPIB mutations is decreased in comparison to normal, but it is higher than in patients with CRTAP and LEPRE1 mutations. This result and the fact that CyPB is demonstrable independent of CRTAP and P3H1, along with reported decreased 3-prolyl hydroxylation due to deficiency of CRTAP lacking the catalytic hydroxylation domain and the known function of CyPB as a cis-trans isomerase, suggest that recessive OI is caused by a dysfunctional P3H1/CRTAP/CyPB complex rather than by the lack of 3-prolyl hydroxylation of a single proline residue in the alpha1 chains of collagen type I.

  10. Wolfram syndrome: new mutations, different phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concetta Aloi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Wolfram Syndrome (WS is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by Diabetes Insipidus, Diabetes Mellitus, Optic Atrophy, and Deafness identified by the acronym "DIDMOAD". The WS gene, WFS1, encodes a transmembrane protein called Wolframin, which recent evidence suggests may serve as a novel endoplasmic reticulum calcium channel in pancreatic β-cells and neurons. WS is a rare disease, with an estimated prevalence of 1/550.000 children, with a carrier frequency of 1/354. The aim of our study was to determine the genotype of WS patients in order to establish a genotype/phenotype correlation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We clinically evaluated 9 young patients from 9 unrelated families (6 males, 3 females. Basic criteria for WS clinical diagnosis were coexistence of insulin-treated diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy occurring before 15 years of age. Genetic analysis for WFS1 was performed by direct sequencing. Molecular sequencing revealed 5 heterozygous compound and 3 homozygous mutations. All of them were located in exon 8, except one in exon 4. In one proband only an heterozygous mutation (A684V was found. Two new variants c.2663 C>A and c.1381 A>C were detected. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study increases the spectrum of WFS1 mutations with two novel variants. The male patient carrying the compound mutation [c.1060_1062delTTC]+[c.2663 C>A] showed the most severe phenotype: diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy (visual acuity 5/10, deafness with deep auditory bilaterally 8000 Hz, diabetes insipidus associated to reduced volume of posterior pituitary and pons. He died in bed at the age of 13 years. The other patient carrying the compound mutation [c.409_424dup16]+[c.1381 A>C] showed a less severe phenotype (DM, OA.

  11. Mitochondrial mutations in subjects with psychiatric disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Sequeira

    Full Text Available A considerable body of evidence supports the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in psychiatric disorders and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations are known to alter brain energy metabolism, neurotransmission, and cause neurodegenerative disorders. Genetic studies focusing on common nuclear genome variants associated with these disorders have produced genome wide significant results but those studies have not directly studied mtDNA variants. The purpose of this study is to investigate, using next generation sequencing, the involvement of mtDNA variation in bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, major depressive disorder, and methamphetamine use. MtDNA extracted from multiple brain regions and blood were sequenced (121 mtDNA samples with an average of 8,800x coverage and compared to an electronic database containing 26,850 mtDNA genomes. We confirmed novel and rare variants, and confirmed next generation sequencing error hotspots by traditional sequencing and genotyping methods. We observed a significant increase of non-synonymous mutations found in individuals with schizophrenia. Novel and rare non-synonymous mutations were found in psychiatric cases in mtDNA genes: ND6, ATP6, CYTB, and ND2. We also observed mtDNA heteroplasmy in brain at a locus previously associated with schizophrenia (T16519C. Large differences in heteroplasmy levels across brain regions within subjects suggest that somatic mutations accumulate differentially in brain regions. Finally, multiplasmy, a heteroplasmic measure of repeat length, was observed in brain from selective cases at a higher frequency than controls. These results offer support for increased rates of mtDNA substitutions in schizophrenia shown in our prior results. The variable levels of heteroplasmic/multiplasmic somatic mutations that occur in brain may be indicators of genetic instability in mtDNA.

  12. Contribution of TARDBP mutations to sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoud, H; Valdmanis, P N; Kabashi, E; Dion, P; Dupré, N; Camu, W; Meininger, V; Rouleau, G A

    2009-02-01

    Mutations in the TARDBP gene, which encodes the TAR DNA binding protein (TDP-43), have been described in individuals with familial and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We screened the TARDBP gene in 285 French sporadic ALS patients to assess the frequency of TARDBP mutations in ALS. Six individuals had potentially deleterious mutations of which three were novel including a Y374X truncating mutation and P363A and A382P missense mutations. This suggests that TARDBP mutations may predispose to ALS in approximately 2% of the individuals followed in this study. Our findings, combined with those from other collections, brings the total number of mutations in unrelated ALS patients to 17, further suggesting that mutations in the TARDBP gene have an important role in the pathogenesis of ALS.

  13. Rapid detection of RB1 recurrent mutations in retinoblastoma by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In about half of the patients, one mutation is inherited via the germinal cells, while in the .... mutational hot spots in the RB1 gene, making genetic testing complex and challenging ... by direct sequencing. High normal background in sequenc-.

  14. TERT promoter mutations are highly recurrent in SHH subgroup medulloblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Remke (Marc); E.A. Ramaswamy; M. Peacock (Munro); D.J.H. Shih (David J.); C. Koelsche (Christian); P.A. Northcott (Paul A.); N. Hill (Nadia); S. Cavalli (Silvia); M. Kool (Marcel); X. Wang (Xin); S. Mack (Stephen); M. Barszczyk (Mark); A.S. Morrissy (A. Sorana); X. Wu (Xiaochong); S. Agnihotri (Sameer); P. Luu (Phan); D. Jones (David); L. Garzia (Livia); A.M. Dubuc (Adrian); N. Zhukova (Nataliya); R. Vanner (Robert); J.M. Kros (Johan); P.J. French (Pim); E.G. van Meir (Erwin); R. Vibhakar (Rajeev); K. Zitterbart (Karel); J.A. Chan (Jennifer); L. Bognár (László); A. Klekner (Almos); B. Lach (Boleslaw); S. Jung (Shin); F. Saad (Fred); L.M. Liau (Linda); S. Albrecht (Steffen); M. Zollo (Maurizio); M.K. Cooper (Michael); R.C. Thompson (Reid); O. Delattre (Olivier); F. Bourdeaut (Franck); F.F. Doz (François); M. Garami (Miklós); P. Hauser (Peter); C.G. Carlotti (Carlos); T.E. Van Meter (Timothy); L. Massimi (Luca); D. Fults (Daniel); L.W. Pomeroy (Laura); T. Kumabe (Toshiro); Y.S. Ra (Young Shin); J.R. Leonard (Jeffrey); S.K. Elbabaa (Samer); J. Mora (Jaume); J.B. Rubin (Joshua); Y.-J. Cho (Yoon-Jae); R.E. McLendon (Roger); D.D. Bigner (Darell); C.G. Eberhart (Charles); M. Fouladi (Maryam); R.J. Wechsler-Reya (Robert); R. Faria (Rui); S.E. Croul (Sidney); A. Huang (Anding); E. Bouffet (Eric); C.E. Hawkins (Cynthia); M. Dirks (Maaike); W.A. Weiss (William); U. Schüller (Ulrich); A. Pollack (Aaron); P. Rutkowski (Piotr); D. Meyronet (David); A. Jouvet (Anne); M. Fèvre-Montange (Michelle); N. Jabado (Nada); M. Perek-Polnik (Marta); W.A. Grajkowska (Wieslawa); S.-K. Kim (Seung-Ki); J.T. Rutka (James); E. Malkin (Elissa); U. Tabori (Uri); S.M. Pfister (Stefan); A. Korshunov (Andrey); A. von Deimling (Andreas); M.D. Taylor (Michael)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractTelomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations were recently shown to drive telomerase activity in various cancer types, including medulloblastoma. However, the clinical and biological implications of TERT mutations in medulloblastoma have not been described. Hence, we sought

  15. a photoreceptor gene mutation in an indigenous black african family

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MUTATION IN AN INDIGENOUS. BLACK AFRICAN FAMILY WITH. RETINITIS PIGMENTOSA. IDENTIFIED USING A RAPID. SCREENING APPROACH FOR. COMMON RHODOPSIN. MUTATIONS. JGreenberg, T Franz, R Goliath, R Ramesar. Hereditary retinal degenerations may be subdivided into those affecting ...

  16. Mutated Genes in Schizophrenia Map to Brain Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Matters NIH Research Matters August 12, 2013 Mutated Genes in Schizophrenia Map to Brain Networks Schizophrenia networks ... have a high number of spontaneous mutations in genes that form a network in the front region ...

  17. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in mutator mice confer respiration defects and B-cell lymphoma development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Mito

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutator mice are proposed to express premature aging phenotypes including kyphosis and hair loss (alopecia due to their carrying a nuclear-encoded mtDNA polymerase with a defective proofreading function, which causes accelerated accumulation of random mutations in mtDNA, resulting in expression of respiration defects. On the contrary, transmitochondrial mito-miceΔ carrying mtDNA with a large-scale deletion mutation (ΔmtDNA also express respiration defects, but not express premature aging phenotypes. Here, we resolved this discrepancy by generating mtDNA mutator mice sharing the same C57BL/6J (B6J nuclear background with that of mito-miceΔ. Expression patterns of premature aging phenotypes are very close, when we compared between homozygous mtDNA mutator mice carrying a B6J nuclear background and selected mito-miceΔ only carrying predominant amounts of ΔmtDNA, in their expression of significant respiration defects, kyphosis, and a short lifespan, but not the alopecia. Therefore, the apparent discrepancy in the presence and absence of premature aging phenotypes in mtDNA mutator mice and mito-miceΔ, respectively, is partly the result of differences in the nuclear background of mtDNA mutator mice and of the broad range of ΔmtDNA proportions of mito-miceΔ used in previous studies. We also provided direct evidence that mtDNA abnormalities in homozygous mtDNA mutator mice are responsible for respiration defects by demonstrating the co-transfer of mtDNA and respiration defects from mtDNA mutator mice into mtDNA-less (ρ(0 mouse cells. Moreover, heterozygous mtDNA mutator mice had a normal lifespan, but frequently developed B-cell lymphoma, suggesting that the mtDNA abnormalities in heterozygous mutator mice are not sufficient to induce a short lifespan and aging phenotypes, but are able to contribute to the B-cell lymphoma development during their prolonged lifespan.

  18. Fundus albipunctatus associated with compound heterozygous mutations in RPE65

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schatz, Patrik; Preising, Markus; Lorenz, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    To describe a family with an 18-year-old woman with fundus albipunctatus and compound heterozygous mutations in RPE65 whose unaffected parents and 1 female sibling harbored single heterozygous RPE65 mutations.......To describe a family with an 18-year-old woman with fundus albipunctatus and compound heterozygous mutations in RPE65 whose unaffected parents and 1 female sibling harbored single heterozygous RPE65 mutations....

  19. Radiation in relation to mutation rate, mutational damage and human ill-health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, P.B.

    1976-09-01

    The effect of radiation in increasing the frequency of gene mutations is now reasonably understood. We discuss first how an increase in the mutation rate is reflected in the mutational damage expressed in populations. It is shown that the mutational damage, assessed by the loss of fitness in a population or the number of eventual gene extinctions, is equal to the number of new mutations arising per generation or the mutation rate. In a population of stable size, a dose of 1 rem given to 10 6 people leads to roughly 600 gene extinctions when summed over all ensuing generations if the dose is applied to only one generation; this number of extinctions will occur in each succeeding generation if the dose is given to every generation. However, the concept of genetic extinction, although quantifiable, is of limited value in assessing radiation risks since its impact on human ill-health is very speculative. In particular, no estimate can be made of the total cost of effects which are minor in each individual in which they arise, but which, because they are so minor, persist in the population for many generations. The best current estimate is for 14-140 obvious defects in the first few generations following exposure of 10 6 people to a dose of 1 rem. (auth.)

  20. Chloroplast mutations induced by 9-aminoacridine hydrochloride are independent of the plastome mutator in Oenothera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GuhaMajumdar, M; Baldwin, S; Sears, B B

    2004-02-01

    Oenothera plants homozygous for the recessive plastome mutator allele ( pm) show chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) mutation frequencies that are about 1,000-fold higher than spontaneous levels. The pm-encoded gene product has been hypothesized to have a function in cpDNA replication, repair and/or mutation avoidance. Previous chemical mutagenesis experiments with the alkylating agent nitroso-methyl urea (NMU) showed a synergistic effect of NMU on the induction of mutations in the pm line, suggesting an interaction between the pm-encoded gene product and one of the repair systems that corrects alkylation damage. The goal of the experiments described here was to examine whether the pm activity extends to the repair of damage caused by non-alkylating mutagens. To this end, the intercalating mutagen, 9-aminoacridine hydrochloride (9AA) was tested for synergism with the plastome mutator. A statistical analysis of the data reported here indicates that the pm-encoded gene product is not involved in the repair of the 9AA-induced mutations. However, the recovery of chlorotic sectors in plants derived from the mutagenized seeds shows that 9AA can act as a mutagen of the chloroplast genome.

  1. Induced mutations in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) II. frequency and spectrum of chlorophyll mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharkwal, M.C.

    1998-01-01

    A comparative study of frequency and spectrum of chlorophyll mutations induced by two physical (gamma rays, fast neutrons) and two chemical mutagens (NMU, EMS) in relation to the effects in M1 plants and induction of mutations in M2 was made in four chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) varieties, two desi (G 130 & H 214) one Kabuli (C 104) and one green seeded (L 345). The treatments included three doses each of gamma rays (400, 500 & 600 Gy) and fast neutrons (5, 10 & 15 Gy) and two concentrations with two different durations of two chemical mutagens, NMU [0.01% (20h), & 0.02% (8h)] and EMS [0.1% (20h) & 0.2% (8h)]. The frequencies and spectrum of three different kinds of induced chlorophyll mutations in the order albina (43.5%), chlorina (27.3%) and xantha (24.2%) were recorded. Chemical mutagens were found to be efficient in inducing chlorophyll mutations in chickpea. Highest frequency of mutations was observed in green seeded var. L 345 (83% of M1 families and 19.9/1000 M2 plants). Kabuli var. C 104 was least responsive for chlorophyll mutations

  2. Eigen's Error Threshold and Mutational Meltdown in a Quasispecies Model

    OpenAIRE

    Bagnoli, F.; Bezzi, M.

    1998-01-01

    We introduce a toy model for interacting populations connected by mutations and limited by a shared resource. We study the presence of Eigen's error threshold and mutational meltdown. The phase diagram of the system shows that the extinction of the whole population due to mutational meltdown can occur well before an eventual error threshold transition.

  3. Evolutionary invasion and escape in the presence of deleterious mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Loverdo

    Full Text Available Replicators such as parasites invading a new host species, species invading a new ecological niche, or cancer cells invading a new tissue often must mutate to adapt to a new environment. It is often argued that a higher mutation rate will favor evolutionary invasion and escape from extinction. However, most mutations are deleterious, and even lethal. We study the probability that the lineage will survive and invade successfully as a function of the mutation rate when both the initial strain and an adaptive mutant strain are threatened by lethal mutations. We show that mutations are beneficial, i.e. a non-zero mutation rate increases survival compared to the limit of no mutations, if in the no-mutation limit the survival probability of the initial strain is smaller than the average survival probability of the strains which are one mutation away. The mutation rate that maximizes survival depends on the characteristics of both the initial strain and the adaptive mutant, but if one strain is closer to the threshold governing survival then its properties will have greater influence. These conclusions are robust for more realistic or mechanistic depictions of the fitness landscapes such as a more detailed viral life history, or non-lethal deleterious mutations.

  4. Screening for calreticulin mutations in a cohort of patients suspected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Of the 36 types of insertions and deletions identified, type 1 (a. 52-base pair deletion) and type 2 (a 5-base pair insertion) mutations account for >80% of CALR mutations.[7] Phenotypic differences between type 1 and type 2 carriers have been implicated. [3] All recurrent mutations cause a frameshift in the region encoding.

  5. SDHAF2 mutations in familial and sporadic paraganglioma and phaeochromocytoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bayley, J.P.M.; Kunst, H.P.M.; Cascon, A.; Sampietro, M.L.; Gaal, J.; Korpershoek, E.; Hinojar-Gutierrez, A.; Timmers, H.J.L.M.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Hermsen, M.A.; Suarez, C.; Hussain, A.K.; Vriends, A.H.; Hes, F.J.; Jansen, J.C.; Tops, C.M.; Corssmit, E.P.; Knijff, P. de; Lenders, J.W.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Devilee, P.; Dinjens, W.N.; Krijger, R.R. de; Robledo, M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Paragangliomas and phaeochromocytomas are neuroendocrine tumours associated frequently with germline mutations of SDHD, SDHC, and SDHB. Previous studies have shown the imprinted SDHAF2 gene to be mutated in a large Dutch kindred with paragangliomas. We aimed to identify SDHAF2 mutation

  6. Spectrum of small mutations in the dystrophin coding region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prior, T.W.; Bartolo, C.; Pearl, D.K. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD and BMD) are caused by defects in the dystrophin gene. About two-thirds of the affected patients have large deletions or duplications, which occur in the 5` and central portion of the gene. The nondeletion/duplication cases are most likely the result of smaller mutations that cannot be identified by current diagnostic screening strategies. We screened {approximately} 80% of the dystrophin coding sequence for small mutations in 158 patients without deletions or duplications and identified 29 mutations. The study indicates that many of the DMD and the majority of the BMD small mutations lie in noncoding regions of the gene. All of the mutations identified were unique to single patients, and most of the mutations resulted in protein truncation. We did not find a clustering of small mutations similar to the deletion distribution but found > 40% of the small mutations 3` of exon 55. The extent of protein truncation caused by the 3` mutations did not determine the phenotype, since even the exon 76 nonsense mutation resulted in the severe DMD phenotype. Our study confirms that the dystrophin gene is subject to a high rate of mutation in CpG sequences. As a consequence of not finding any hotspots or prevalent small mutations, we conclude that it is presently not possible to perform direct carrier and prenatal diagnostics for many families without deletions or duplications. 71 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Three novel and two known androgen receptor gene mutations ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    gene mutations associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome in sex-reversed XY female patients. J. Genet. ... signal and a C-terminal. Keywords. androgen insensitivity syndrome; androgen receptor; truncation mutation; N-terminal domain; XY sex reversal. .... and an increased risk of gonadal tumour. Mutations in SRY.

  8. DNA mutation motifs in the genes associated with inherited diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Růžička

    Full Text Available Mutations in human genes can be responsible for inherited genetic disorders and cancer. Mutations can arise due to environmental factors or spontaneously. It has been shown that certain DNA sequences are more prone to mutate. These sites are termed hotspots and exhibit a higher mutation frequency than expected by chance. In contrast, DNA sequences with lower mutation frequencies than expected by chance are termed coldspots. Mutation hotspots are usually derived from a mutation spectrum, which reflects particular population where an effect of a common ancestor plays a role. To detect coldspots/hotspots unaffected by population bias, we analysed the presence of germline mutations obtained from HGMD database in the 5-nucleotide segments repeatedly occurring in genes associated with common inherited disorders, in particular, the PAH, LDLR, CFTR, F8, and F9 genes. Statistically significant sequences (mutational motifs rarely associated with mutations (coldspots and frequently associated with mutations (hotspots exhibited characteristic sequence patterns, e.g. coldspots contained purine tract while hotspots showed alternating purine-pyrimidine bases, often with the presence of CpG dinucleotide. Using molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations, we analysed the global bending properties of two selected coldspots and two hotspots with a G/T mismatch. We observed that the coldspots were inherently more flexible than the hotspots. We assume that this property might be critical for effective mismatch repair as DNA with a mutation recognized by MutSα protein is noticeably bent.

  9. Hemochromatosis C282Y gene mutation as a potential susceptibility ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    G.M. Mokhtar

    2017-08-12

    Aug 12, 2017 ... Background: Hereditary hemochromatosis is the most frequent cause of primary iron overload that is associated with HFE gene's mutation especially the C282Y mutation. The interaction between hemoglo- bin chain synthesis' disorders and the C282Y mutation may worsen the clinical picture of beta-.

  10. Dihydropteroate synthase gene mutations in Pneumocystis and sulfa resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Laurence; Crothers, Kristina; Atzori, Chiara

    2004-01-01

    in the dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) gene. Similar mutations have been observed in P. jirovecii. Studies have consistently demonstrated a significant association between the use of sulfa drugs for PCP prophylaxis and DHPS gene mutations. Whether these mutations confer resistance to TMP-SMX or dapsone plus trimethoprim...

  11. Dietary factors and Truncating APC Mutations in Sporadic Colorectal Adenomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diergaarde, B.; Tiemersma, E.W.; Braam, H.; Muijen, van G.N.P.; Nagengast, F.M.; Kok, F.J.; Kampman, E.

    2005-01-01

    Inactivating mutations in APC are thought to be early, initiating events in colorectal carcinogenesis. To gain insight into the relationship between diet and inactivating APC mutations, we evaluated associations between dietary factors and the occurrence of these mutations in a Dutch case-control

  12. Dietary factors and truncating APC mutations in sporadic colorectal adenomas.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diergaarde, B.; Tiemersma, E.W.; Braam, H.; Muijen, G.N.P. van; Nagengast, F.M.; Kok, F.J.; Kampman, E.

    2005-01-01

    Inactivating mutations in APC are thought to be early, initiating events in colorectal carcinogenesis. To gain insight into the relationship between diet and inactivating APC mutations, we evaluated associations between dietary factors and the occurrence of these mutations in a Dutch case-control

  13. Diversity of ARSACS mutations in French-Canadians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiffault, I; Dicaire, M J; Tetreault, M; Huang, K N; Demers-Lamarche, J; Bernard, G; Duquette, A; Larivière, R; Gehring, K; Montpetit, A; McPherson, P S; Richter, A; Montermini, L; Mercier, J; Mitchell, G A; Dupré, N; Prévost, C; Bouchard, J P; Mathieu, J; Brais, B

    2013-01-01

    The growing number of spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (SACS) gene mutations reported worldwide has broadened the clinical phenotype of autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS). The identification of Quebec ARSACS cases without two known SACS mutation led to the development of a multi-modal genomic strategy to uncover mutations in this large gene and explore phenotype variability. Search for SACS mutations by combining various methods on 20 cases with a classical French-Canadian ARSACS phenotype without two mutations and a group of 104 sporadic or recessive spastic ataxia cases of unknown cause. Western blot on lymphoblast protein from cases with different genotypes was probed to establish if they still expressed sacsin. A total of 12 mutations, including 7 novels, were uncovered in Quebec ARSACS cases. The screening of 104 spastic ataxia cases of unknown cause for 98 SACS mutations did not uncover carriers of two mutations. Compounds heterozygotes for one missense SACS mutation were found to minimally express sacsin. The large number of SACS mutations present even in Quebec suggests that the size of the gene alone may explain the great genotypic diversity. This study does not support an expanding ARSACS phenotype in the French-Canadian population. Most mutations lead to loss of function, though phenotypic variability in other populations may reflect partial loss of function with preservation of some sacsin expression. Our results also highlight the challenge of SACS mutation screening and the necessity to develop new generation sequencing methods to ensure low cost complete gene sequencing.

  14. ENG mutational mosaicism in a family with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, Pernille M; Kjeldsen, Anette D; Ousager, Lilian Bomme

    2018-01-01

    mutation using Sanger sequencing. Analyzing her DNA by NGS HHT panel sequencing when extracted from both peripheral blood leukocytes, and cheek swabs, identified the familial ENG mutation at low levels. CONCLUSION: We provide evidence of ENG mutational mosaicism in an individual presenting with clinical...

  15. Association between AA-NAT gene polymorphism and reproductive performance in sheep

    OpenAIRE

    Ding-ping,Bai; Cheng-jiang,Yu; Yu-lin,Chen

    2012-01-01

    Arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT) is critical enzyme in Melatonin (MLT) biosynthesis for MLT regulating the animal seasonal breeding. In this study, DNA sequencing methods were applied to detect the polymorphisms of the AA-NAT gene in 179 Chinese sheep belonging to two non-seasonal reproduction breeds and two seasonal reproduction breeds. One mutation at exon 3 (NM_001009461:c.486A > G) was firstly described at the sheep AA-NAT locus. Hence, we described the SmaI PCR-RFLP m...

  16. [Study of gene mutation in 62 hemophilia A children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Q; Liu, A G; Zhang, L Q; Zhang, A; Wang, Y Q; Wang, S M; Lu, Y J; Wang, X

    2017-11-02

    Objective: To analyze the mutation type of FⅧ gene in children with hemophilia A and to explore the relationship among hemophilia gene mutation spectrum, gene mutation and clinical phenotype. Method: Sixty-two children with hemophilia A from Department of Pediatric Hematology, Tongji Hospital of Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology between January 2015 and March 2017 were enrolled. All patients were male, aged from 4 months to 7 years and F Ⅷ activity ranged 0.2%-11.0%. Fifty cases had severe, 10 cases had moderate and 2 cases had mild hemophilia A. DNA was isolated from peripheral blood in hemophilia A children and the target gene fragment was amplified by PCR, in combination with the second generation sequencing, 22 and 1 introns were detected. Negative cases were detected by the second generation sequencing and results were compared with those of the international FⅧ gene mutation database. Result: There were 20 cases (32%) of intron 22 inversion, 2 cases (3%) of intron 1 inversion, 18 cases (29%) of missense mutation, 5 cases (8%) of nonsense mutation, 7 cases (11%) of deletion mutation, 1 case(2%)of splice site mutation, 2 cases (3%) of large fragment deletion and 1 case of insertion mutation (2%). No mutation was detected in 2 cases (3%), and 4 cases (7%) failed to amplify. The correlation between phenotype and genotype showed that the most common gene mutation in severe hemophilia A was intron 22 inversion (20 cases), accounting for 40% of severe patients, followed by 11 cases of missense mutation (22%). The most common mutation in moderate hemophilia A was missense mutation (6 cases), accounting for 60% of moderate patients. Conclusion: The most frequent mutation type in hemophilia A was intron 22 inversion, followed by missense mutation, again for missing mutation. The relationship between phenotype and genotype: the most frequent gene mutation in severe hemophilia A is intron 22 inversion, followed by missense

  17. Induced mutations for human welfare through agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, S.A.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Use of induced mutation for crop improvement started in 1920's. It gained momentum in 1960's when IAEA and FAO started training and guidance and funds were made available for undertaking mutation breeding. IARI established a Gamma Garden and a separate institution was carved by name 'Nuclear Research Laboratory' in 1970's. ICAR Institutes and State Agriculture Universities started using this facility for crop improvement. Similarly, BARC started extending its help for irradiating the seed material specially X-rays and it became one of the major source of generating variability for crop improvement. Induced mutation has resulted in development of more than 3000 varieties of different food, feed, fruit, vegetables and flowers. Apart from direct use of mutants as cultivars, mutants have played a vital role in creating useful variation for application in basic research and gene discovery. It has helped in increasing yield through use of heterosis by inducing male sterility. It has been used for creating useful variation for changing grain composition to improve nutrition and grain quality parameters, for tolerance against abiotic and biotic stresses. Gene sequencing and related technologies have opened up new application of induced mutations. In model organisms induced mutations provide new opportunities for identification of genes/bio-chemical, cellular, developmental or functional pathways. The use of stable isotopes in basic research is of fundamental use in crop improvement. Apart from crop improvement the nuclear technology has been used for numerous other applications in Agriculture such as soil fertility, plant nutrition, use of fertilizer and irrigation, control of insect pest and storage. In recent decades BARC has come in a big way through funding for projects to State Agricultural Universities and ICAR Institutes and has signed MoU's with few of the Agriculture Universities for testing and popularizing their identified field crop varieties in

  18. Targeted next-generation sequencing extends the phenotypic and mutational spectrums for EYS mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Shun; Tian, Yuanyuan; Chen, Xue; Zhao, Chen

    2016-01-01

    We aim to determine genetic lesions with a phenotypic correlation in four Chinese families with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Medical histories were carefully reviewed. All patients received comprehensive ophthalmic evaluations. The next-generation sequencing (NGS) approach targeting a panel of 205 retinal disease-relevant genes and 15 candidate genes was selectively performed on probands from the four recruited families for mutation detection. Online predictive software and crystal structure modeling were also applied to test the potential pathogenic effects of identified mutations. Of the four families, two were diagnosed with RP sino pigmento (RPSP). Patients with RPSP claimed to have earlier RP age of onset but slower disease progression. Five mutations in the eyes shut homolog (EYS) gene, involving two novel (c.7228+1G>A and c.9248G>A) and three recurrent mutations (c.4957dupA, c.6416G>A and c.6557G>A), were found as RP causative in the four families. The missense variant c.5093T>C was determined to be a variant of unknown significance (VUS) due to the variant's colocalization in the same allele with the reported pathogenic mutation c.6416G>A. The two novel variants were further confirmed absent in 100 unrelated healthy controls. Online predictive software indicated potential pathogenicity of the three missense mutations. Further, crystal structural modeling suggested generation of two abnormal hydrogen bonds by the missense mutation p.G2186E (c.6557G>A) and elongation of its neighboring β-sheet induced by p.G3083D (c.9248G>A), which could alter the tertiary structure of the eys protein and thus interrupt its physicochemical properties. Taken together, with the targeted NGS approach, we reveal novel EYS mutations and prove the efficiency of targeted NGS in the genetic diagnoses of RP. We also first report the correlation between EYS mutations and RPSP. The genotypic-phenotypic relationship in all Chinese patients carrying mutations in the EYS

  19. Characteristics of gene mutation in Chinese patients with hereditary hemochromatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LYU Tingxia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the characteristics of gene mutation in Chinese patients with hereditary hemochromatosis (HH. MethodsA total of 9 patients with HH who visited Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University from January 2013 to December 2015 were enrolled. The genomic DNA was extracted, and PCR amplification and Sanger sequencing were performed for all the exons of four genotypes of HH, i.e., HFE (type Ⅰ, HJV (type ⅡA, HAMP (type ⅡB, TFR2 (type Ⅲ, and SLC40A1 (type Ⅳ to analyze gene mutations. A total of 50 healthy subjects were enrolled as control group to analyze the prevalence of identified gene mutations in a healthy population. ResultsOf all patients, 2 had H63D mutation of HFE gene in type Ⅰ HH, 1 had E3D mutation of HJV gene in type ⅡA HH, 2 had I238M mutation of TFR2 gene in type Ⅲ HH, and 1 had IVS 3+10 del GTT splice mutation of SLC40A1 gene in type Ⅳ HH. No patients had C282Y mutation of HFE gene in type Ⅰ HH which was commonly seen in European and American populations. Five patients had no missense mutation or splice mutation. In addition, it was found in a family that a HH patient had E3D mutation of HJV gene, H63D mutation of HFE gene, and I238M mutation of TFR2 gene, but the healthy brother and sister carrying two of these mutations did not had the phenotype of HH. ConclusionHH gene mutations vary significantly across patients of different races, and non-HFE-HH is dominant in the Chinese population. There may be HH genes which are different from known genes, and further investigation is needed.

  20. Avoiding dangerous missense: thermophiles display especially low mutation rates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W Drake

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Rates of spontaneous mutation have been estimated under optimal growth conditions for a variety of DNA-based microbes, including viruses, bacteria, and eukaryotes. When expressed as genomic mutation rates, most of the values were in the vicinity of 0.003-0.004 with a range of less than two-fold. Because the genome sizes varied by roughly 10(4-fold, the mutation rates per average base pair varied inversely by a similar factor. Even though the commonality of the observed genomic rates remains unexplained, it implies that mutation rates in unstressed microbes reach values that can be finely tuned by evolution. An insight originating in the 1920s and maturing in the 1960s proposed that the genomic mutation rate would reflect a balance between the deleterious effect of the average mutation and the cost of further reducing the mutation rate. If this view is correct, then increasing the deleterious impact of the average mutation should be countered by reducing the genomic mutation rate. It is a common observation that many neutral or nearly neutral mutations become strongly deleterious at higher temperatures, in which case they are called temperature-sensitive mutations. Recently, the kinds and rates of spontaneous mutations were described for two microbial thermophiles, a bacterium and an archaeon. Using an updated method to extrapolate from mutation-reporter genes to whole genomes reveals that the rate of base substitutions is substantially lower in these two thermophiles than in mesophiles. This result provides the first experimental support for the concept of an evolved balance between the total genomic impact of mutations and the cost of further reducing the basal mutation rate.