WorldWideScience

Sample records for mutant pogo mouse

  1. Space shuttle pogo studies. [systems stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppolino, R. N.; Lock, M. H.; Rubin, S.

    1977-01-01

    Topics covered include: (1) pogo suppression for main propulsion subsystem operation; (2) application of quarter-scale low pressure oxidizer turbopump transfer functions; (3) pogo stability during orbital maneuvering subsystem operation; and (4) errors in frequency response measurements.

  2. EMMA—mouse mutant resources for the international scientific community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Phil; Sengerova, Jitka; Matteoni, Raffaele; Chen, Chao-Kung; Soulat, Gaetan; Ureta-Vidal, Abel; Fessele, Sabine; Hagn, Michael; Massimi, Marzia; Pickford, Karen; Butler, Richard H.; Marschall, Susan; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Pickard, Amanda; Raspa, Marcello; Scavizzi, Ferdinando; Fray, Martin; Larrigaldie, Vanessa; Leyritz, Johan; Birney, Ewan; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P.; Brown, Steve; Herault, Yann; Montoliu, Lluis; de Angelis, Martin Hrabé; Smedley, Damian

    2010-01-01

    The laboratory mouse is the premier animal model for studying human disease and thousands of mutants have been identified or produced, most recently through gene-specific mutagenesis approaches. High throughput strategies by the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) are producing mutants for all protein coding genes. Generating a knock-out line involves huge monetary and time costs so capture of both the data describing each mutant alongside archiving of the line for distribution to future researchers is critical. The European Mouse Mutant Archive (EMMA) is a leading international network infrastructure for archiving and worldwide provision of mouse mutant strains. It operates in collaboration with the other members of the Federation of International Mouse Resources (FIMRe), EMMA being the European component. Additionally EMMA is one of four repositories involved in the IKMC, and therefore the current figure of 1700 archived lines will rise markedly. The EMMA database gathers and curates extensive data on each line and presents it through a user-friendly website. A BioMart interface allows advanced searching including integrated querying with other resources e.g. Ensembl. Other resources are able to display EMMA data by accessing our Distributed Annotation System server. EMMA database access is publicly available at http://www.emmanet.org. PMID:19783817

  3. Auditory development in progressive motor neuronopathy mouse mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkenstein, Stefan; Brors, Dominik; Hansen, Stefan; Berend, Achim; Mlynski, Robert; Aletsee, Christoph; Dazert, Stefan

    2009-11-06

    The present study was performed to elucidate the hearing development in the progressive motor neuronopathy (pmn) mouse mutant. This mouse has been used as a model for human motoneuron disease. A missense mutation in the tubulin-specific chaperon E (Tbce) gene on mouse chromosome 13 was localized as the underlying genetic defect. The protein encoded by the Tbce gene is essential for the formation of primary tubulin complexes. Studies on motoneurons show disorganization in microtubules and disturbed axonal transport, followed by retrograde degeneration of the motoneurons. A similar pathomechanism is also possible for hearing disorders where disrupted microtubules could cause functional deficits in spiral ganglion neurons or in cochlear hair cells. Click auditory brainstem response (ABR) audiometry in homozygous pmn mutants showed a normal onset of hearing, but an increasing hearing threshold from postnatal day 26 (P26) on to death, compared to heterozygous mutants and wild-type mice. Histological sections of the cochlea at different ages showed a regular morphology. Additionally, spiral ganglion explants from mutant and wild-type mice were cultured. The neurite length from pmn mutants was shorter than in wild-type mice, and the neurite number/explant was significantly decreased in pmn mutants. We show that the pmn mouse mutant is a model for a progressive rapid hearing loss from P26 on, after initially normal hearing development. Heterozygous mice are not affected by this defect. With the knowledge of the well-known pathomechanism of this defect in motoneurons, a dysfunction of cellular mechanisms regulating tubulin assembling suggests that tubulin assembling plays an essential role in hearing function and maintenance.

  4. Generation of targeted mouse mutants by embryo microinjection of TALENs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wefers, Benedikt; Ortiz, Oskar; Wurst, Wolfgang; Kühn, Ralf

    2014-08-15

    Gene engineering for generating targeted mouse mutants is a key technology for biomedical research. Using TALENs as nucleases to induce targeted double-strand breaks, the mouse genome can be directly modified in zygotes in a single step, without the need for embryonic stem cells. Thereby, knockout and knockin alleles can be generated fast and efficiently by embryo microinjection of TALEN mRNAs and targeting vectors. In this article we present an introduction into the TALEN technology and provide protocols for the application of TALENs in mouse zygotes.

  5. NASA Experience with Pogo in Human Spaceflight Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Curtis E.

    2008-01-01

    An overview of more than 45 years of NASA human spaceflight experience is presented with respect to the thrust axis vibration response of liquid fueled rockets known as pogo. A coupled structure and propulsion system instability, pogo can result in the impairment of the astronaut crew, an unplanned engine shutdown, loss of mission, or structural failure. The NASA history begins with the Gemini Program and adaptation of the USAF Titan II ballistic missile as a spacecraft launch vehicle. It continues with the pogo experienced on several Apollo-Saturn flights in both the first and second stages of flight. The defining moment for NASA s subsequent treatment of pogo occurred with the near failure of the second stage on the ascent of the Apollo 13 mission. Since that time NASA has had a strict "no pogo" philosophy that was applied to the development of the Space Shuttle. The "no pogo" philosophy lead to the first vehicle designed to be pogo-free from the beginning and the first development of an engine with an integral pogo suppression system. Now, more than 30 years later, NASA is developing two new launch vehicles, the Ares I crew launch vehicle propelling the Orion crew excursion vehicle, and the Ares V cargo launch vehicle. A new generation of engineers must again exercise NASA s system engineering method for pogo mitigation during design, development and verification.

  6. Developmental genes during placentation: insights from mouse mutants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinhu a LU; Qiang WANG; Bingyan WANG; Fengchao WANG; Haibin WANG

    2011-01-01

    Placenta,a temporary organ first formed during the development of a new life is essential for the survival and growth of the fetus in eutherian mammals.It serves as an interface for the exchange of nutrients,gases and wastes between the maternal and fetal compartments.During the past decades,studies employing gene-engineered mouse mutants have revealed a wide range of signaling molecules governing the trophoblast development and function during placentation under various pathophysiological conditions.Here,we summarize the recent progress with particular respect to the involvement of developmental genes during placentation.

  7. Quantitative trait loci affecting phenotypic variation in the vacuolated lens mouse mutant, a multigenic mouse model of neural tube defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korstanje, Ron; Desai, Jigar; Lazar, Gloria; King, Benjamin; Rollins, Jarod; Spurr, Melissa; Joseph, Jamie; Kadambi, Sindhuja; Li, Yang; Cherry, Allison; Matteson, Paul G.; Paigen, Beverly; Millonig, James H.

    2008-01-01

    Korstanje R, Desai J, Lazar G, King B, Rollins J, Spurr M, Joseph J, Kadambi S, Li Y, Cherry A, Matteson PG, Paigen B, Millonig JH. Quantitative trait loci affecting phenotypic variation in the vacuolated lens mouse mutant, a multigenic mouse model of neural tube defects. Physiol Genomics 35: 296-30

  8. Thermal radiosensitization in radiation-sensitive mutant mouse leukemic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Toshikazu (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Dentistry)

    1994-06-01

    This study investigated thermal, radiation, and combined thermal radiation sensitization of mouse leukemic cells, L5178Y, and radiation-sensitive mutant cells, LX830. Radiation sensitivity (D[sub 0]) values were 0.41 Gy for LX830 and 1.39 Gy for L5178Y, with the ratio of D[sub 0] values in LX830 to in L5178Y being 3.4. Thus, LX830 was more radiosensitive than L5178Y. LX830 showed no shouldered survival curves. Although sublethal damage (SLD) repair was seen to the almost same degree in both LX830 and L5178Y, potential lethal damage (PLD) repair was scarcely observed in LX830. Both cell lines were similar in thermal sensitivity (T[sub 0]). Eosine staining suggested that cell killing due to hyperthermia had occurred in the interphase in both LX830 and L5178Y. L5178Y showed thermal sensitivity low in the G1 phase and high in the S phase; on the contrary, LX830 showed it high in the G1 phase and low in the S phase. Thermal radiosensitization was similar in both cell lines, although there was a great difference in radiation sensitivity between the cell lines. The difference in radiation sensitivity (D[sub 0]) between L5178Y and LX830 became small when radiation was given at the time of the maximum thermal resistance. This seemed to contribute to a decrease in radiation sensitivity in LX830. It can be concluded that thermal radiosensitization depends on thermal sensitivity and that radiation sensitivity decreases in radiation-sensitive cells when exposed to irradiation at the time of thermal resistance. (N.K.).

  9. Studying Hooke's Law by Using a Pogo Stick

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Perhaps the pogo stick was little Robert Hooke's favorite childhood toy, consisting of a stiff spring inserted in a tube fixed at the upper end and connected to a moveable rod at the other. Hand grips and a foot rest are connected to the tube. The idea is to jump on it taking advantage of the force provided by the spring when it is compressed.…

  10. A new conditional Apc-mutant mouse model for colorectal cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Robanus-Maandag, E C; Koelink, P J; Breukel, C; Salvatori, D. C. F.; Jagmohan-Changur, S. C.; Bosch, C. A. J.; Verspaget, H. W.; Devilee, P; Fodde, R.; Smits, R

    2010-01-01

    textabstractMutations of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene predispose individuals to familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), characterized by multiple tumours in the large intestine. Most mouse models heterozygous for truncating mutant Apc alleles mimic FAP, however, the intestinal tumours occur mainly in the small intestine. To model large intestinal tumours, we generated a new conditional Apc-mutant allele, Apc15lox, with exon 15 flanked by loxP sites. Similar survival of Apc1638N/15l...

  11. Generation of mouse mutants as tools in dissecting the molecular clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Sneha N; Edwards, Jessica K; Nolan, Patrick M

    2012-01-01

    Elucidation of the molecular basis of mammalian circadian rhythms has progressed dramatically in recent years through the characterization of mouse mutants. With the implementation of numerous mouse genetics programs, comprehensive sets of mutations in genes affecting circadian output measures have been generated. Although incomplete, existing arrays of mutants have been instrumental in our understanding of how the internal SCN clock interacts with the environment and how it conveys its rhythm to remote oscillators. The use of ENU mutagenesis has proven to be a significant contributor, generating mutations leading to subtle and distinct alterations in circadian protein function. In parallel, progress with mouse gene targeting allows one to study gene function in depth by ablating it entirely, in specific tissues at specific times, or by targeting specific functional domains. This has culminated in worldwide efforts to target every gene in the mouse genome allowing researchers to study multiple gene targeting effects systematically.

  12. [Phenotype analysis and mutant gene location of ventral yellow mouse (VY(Slac))].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Mei-Lian; Xu, Ping; Yin, Xiao-Shu; Yang, Wei-Wei; Gu, Mei-Er; Yu, Li-Ping; Liu, Gui-Jie; Wu, Bao-Jin

    2012-06-01

    The ventri-yellow pigmentation mouse (temporarily named VY(Slac)) arose spontaneously in the C57BL/6J inbred mouse strain, found and bred by Shanghai SLAC Laboratory Animal Co., Ltd. VY(Slac) presented a special phenotype marked by yellow coat on the ventral surface of neck and trunk that was without melanin deposition but maintained a normal structure. The number of melanocytes in epidermis and melanin in hair follicle of the abdominal skin of the mutant mouse were less than that of their background strain, while there was no significant difference between the dorsal skins of the two strains. This mutant phenotype was inherited as single-gene dominant inheritance, confirmed by genetic experiment, and there was no significant difference between VY(Slac) and B(6) for other biological parameters such as weight, anatomic and histological structures of major organs and blood physiology. When the linkage relationship between the genomic DNA samples of F(2) 48 mice (VY(Slac)D(2)F(1)×D(2)) and mutant phenotype were evaluated, the mutant gene was confirmed on chromosome 2 near D2Mit229. New microsatellite and SNP markers were selected to amplify genomic DNA samples of 196 F(2) mice and the mutant gene was narrowed down to 5.3 Mb region between rs13476833 and rs27310903 on chromosome 2. The preliminary results of our phenotype analysis and gene location provides a solid basis for further identification of this mutant gene.

  13. A calcium channel mutant mouse model of hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fenfen; Mi, Wentao; Hernández-Ochoa, Erick O; Burns, Dennis K; Fu, Yu; Gray, Hillery F; Struyk, Arie F; Schneider, Martin F; Cannon, Stephen C

    2012-12-01

    Hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HypoPP) is a familial skeletal muscle disorder that presents with recurrent episodes of severe weakness lasting hours to days associated with reduced serum potassium (K+). HypoPP is genetically heterogeneous, with missense mutations of a calcium channel (Ca(V)1.1) or a sodium channel (Na(V)1.4) accounting for 60% and 20% of cases, respectively. The mechanistic link between Ca(V)1.1 mutations and the ictal loss of muscle excitability during an attack of weakness in HypoPP is unknown. To address this question, we developed a mouse model for HypoPP with a targeted Ca(V)1.1 R528H mutation. The Ca(V)1.1 R528H mice had a HypoPP phenotype for which low K+ challenge produced a paradoxical depolarization of the resting potential, loss of muscle excitability, and weakness. A vacuolar myopathy with dilated transverse tubules and disruption of the triad junctions impaired Ca2+ release and likely contributed to the mild permanent weakness. Fibers from the Ca(V)1.1 R528H mouse had a small anomalous inward current at the resting potential, similar to our observations in the Na(V)1.4 R669H HypoPP mouse model. This "gating pore current" may be a common mechanism for paradoxical depolarization and susceptibility to HypoPP arising from missense mutations in the S4 voltage sensor of either calcium or sodium channels.

  14. A new conditional Apc-mutant mouse model for colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.C. Robanus-Maandag (Els); P.J. Koelink (Pim); C. Breukel (Cor); D.C.F. Salvatori (Daniela); S.C. Jagmohan-Changur (Shantie); C.A.J. Bosch (Cathy); H.W. Verspaget; P. Devilee (Peter); R. Fodde (Riccardo); M.J.M. Smits (Ron)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractMutations of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene predispose individuals to familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), characterized by multiple tumours in the large intestine. Most mouse models heterozygous for truncating mutant Apc alleles mimic FAP, however, the intestinal tumours occ

  15. Hush puppy: a new mouse mutant with pinna, ossicle, and inner ear defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pau, Henry; Fuchs, Helmut; de Angelis, Martin Hrabé; Steel, Karen P

    2005-01-01

    Deafness can be associated with abnormalities of the pinna, ossicles, and cochlea. The authors studied a newly generated mouse mutant with pinna defects and asked whether these defects are associated with peripheral auditory or facial skeletal abnormalities, or both. Furthermore, the authors investigated where the mutation responsible for these defects was located in the mouse genome. The hearing of hush puppy mutants was assessed by Preyer reflex and electrophysiological measurement. The morphological features of their middle and inner ears were investigated by microdissection, paint-filling of the labyrinth, and scanning electron microscopy. Skeletal staining of skulls was performed to assess the craniofacial dimensions. Genome scanning was performed using microsatellite markers to localize the mutation to a chromosomal region. Some hush puppy mutants showed early onset of hearing impairment. They had small, bat-like pinnae and normal malleus but abnormal incus and stapes. Some mutants had asymmetrical defects and showed reduced penetrance of the ear abnormalities. Paint-filling of newborns' inner ears revealed no morphological abnormality, although half of the mice studied were expected to carry the mutation. Reduced numbers of outer hair cells were demonstrated in mutants' cochlea on scanning electron microscopy. Skeletal staining showed that the mutants have significantly shorter snouts and mandibles. Genome scan revealed that the mutation lies on chromosome 8 between markers D8Mit58 and D8Mit289. The study results indicate developmental problems of the first and second branchial arches and otocyst as a result of a single gene mutation. Similar defects are found in humans, and hush puppy provides a mouse model for investigation of such defects.

  16. Reporter Gene Silencing in Targeted Mouse Mutants Is Associated with Promoter CpG Island Methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirov, Julia V; Adkisson, Michael; Nava, A J; Cipollone, Andreana; Willis, Brandon; Engelhard, Eric K; Lloyd, K C Kent; de Jong, Pieter; West, David B

    2015-01-01

    Targeted mutations in mouse disrupt local chromatin structure and may lead to unanticipated local effects. We evaluated targeted gene promoter silencing in a group of six mutants carrying the tm1a Knockout Mouse Project allele containing both a LacZ reporter gene driven by the native promoter and a neo selection cassette. Messenger RNA levels of the reporter gene and targeted gene were assessed by qRT-PCR, and methylation of the promoter CpG islands and LacZ coding sequence were evaluated by sequencing of bisulfite-treated DNA. Mutants were stratified by LacZ staining into presumed Silenced and Expressed reporter genes. Silenced mutants had reduced relative quantities LacZ mRNA and greater CpG Island methylation compared with the Expressed mutant group. Within the silenced group, LacZ coding sequence methylation was significantly and positively correlated with CpG Island methylation, while promoter CpG methylation was only weakly correlated with LacZ gene mRNA. The results support the conclusion that there is promoter silencing in a subset of mutants carrying the tm1a allele. The features of targeted genes which promote local silencing when targeted remain unknown.

  17. The scurfy mouse mutant has previously unrecognized hematological abnormalities and resembles Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    LYON, M. F.; Peters, J; Glenister, P H; Ball, S; Wright, E.

    1990-01-01

    The X chromosome-linked scurfy (sf) mutant of the mouse is recognized by the scaliness of the skin from which the name is derived and results in death of affected males at about 3-4 weeks of age. Consideration of known man-mouse homologies of the X chromosome prompted hematological studies, which have shown that the blood is highly abnormal. The platelet and erythrocyte counts are both reduced and become progressively lower relative to normal as the disease progresses. There is gastrointestin...

  18. Assessment of a systematic expression profiling approach in ENU-induced mouse mutant lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltmann, Matthias; Horsch, Marion; Drobyshev, Alexei; Chen, Yali; de Angelis, Martin Hrabé; Beckers, Johannes

    2005-01-01

    Comparative genomewide expression profiling is a powerful tool in the effort to annotate the mouse genome with biological function. The systematic analysis of RNA expression data of mouse lines from the Munich ENU mutagenesis screen might support the understanding of the molecular biology of such mutants and provide new insights into mammalian gene function. In a direct comparison of DNA microarray experiments of individual versus pooled RNA samples of organs from ENU-induced mouse mutants, we provide evidence that individual RNA samples may outperform pools in some aspects. Genes with high biological variability in their expression levels (noisy genes) are identified as false positives in pooled samples. Evidence suggests that highly stringent housing conditions and standardized procedures for the isolation of organs significantly reduce biological variability in gene expression profiling experiments. Data on wild-type individuals demonstrate the positive effect of controlling variables such as social status, food intake before organ sampling, and stress with regard to reproducibility of gene expression patterns. Analyses of several organs from various ENU-induced mutant lines in general show low numbers of differentially expressed genes. We demonstrate the feasibility to detect transcriptionally affected organs employing RNA expression profiling as a tool for molecular phenotyping.

  19. The First Scube3 Mutant Mouse Line with Pleiotropic Phenotypic Alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Fuchs

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The vertebrate Scube (Signal peptide, CUB, and EGF-like domain-containing protein family consists of three independent members, Scube1–3, which encode secreted cell surface-associated membrane glycoproteins. Limited information about the general function of this gene family is available, and their roles during adulthood. Here, we present the first Scube3 mutant mouse line (Scube3N294K/N294K, which clearly shows phenotypic alterations by carrying a missense mutation in exon 8, and thus contributes to our understanding of SCUBE3 functions. We performed a detailed phenotypic characterization in the German Mouse Clinic (GMC. Scube3N294K/N294K mutants showed morphological abnormalities of the skeleton, alterations of parameters relevant for bone metabolism, changes in renal function, and hearing impairments. These findings correlate with characteristics of the rare metabolic bone disorder Paget disease of bone (PDB, associated with the chromosomal region of human SCUBE3. In addition, alterations in energy metabolism, behavior, and neurological functions were detected in Scube3N294K/N294K mice. The Scube3N294K/N294K mutant mouse line may serve as a new model for further studying the effect of impaired SCUBE3 gene function.

  20. The First Scube3 Mutant Mouse Line with Pleiotropic Phenotypic Alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Helmut; Sabrautzki, Sibylle; Przemeck, Gerhard K H; Leuchtenberger, Stefanie; Lorenz-Depiereux, Bettina; Becker, Lore; Rathkolb, Birgit; Horsch, Marion; Garrett, Lillian; Östereicher, Manuela A; Hans, Wolfgang; Abe, Koichiro; Sagawa, Nobuho; Rozman, Jan; Vargas-Panesso, Ingrid L; Sandholzer, Michael; Lisse, Thomas S; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Ehrhard, Nicole; Elvert, Ralf; Gau, Christine; Hölter, Sabine M; Micklich, Katja; Moreth, Kristin; Prehn, Cornelia; Puk, Oliver; Racz, Ildiko; Stoeger, Claudia; Vernaleken, Alexandra; Michel, Dian; Diener, Susanne; Wieland, Thomas; Adamski, Jerzy; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Busch, Dirk H; Favor, John; Graw, Jochen; Klingenspor, Martin; Lengger, Christoph; Maier, Holger; Neff, Frauke; Ollert, Markus; Stoeger, Tobias; Yildirim, Ali Önder; Strom, Tim M; Zimmer, Andreas; Wolf, Eckhard; Wurst, Wolfgang; Klopstock, Thomas; Beckers, Johannes; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Hrabé de Angelis, Martin

    2016-12-07

    The vertebrate Scube (Signal peptide, CUB, and EGF-like domain-containing protein) family consists of three independent members, Scube1-3, which encode secreted cell surface-associated membrane glycoproteins. Limited information about the general function of this gene family is available, and their roles during adulthood. Here, we present the first Scube3 mutant mouse line (Scube3(N294K/N294K)), which clearly shows phenotypic alterations by carrying a missense mutation in exon 8, and thus contributes to our understanding of SCUBE3 functions. We performed a detailed phenotypic characterization in the German Mouse Clinic (GMC). Scube3(N294K/N294K) mutants showed morphological abnormalities of the skeleton, alterations of parameters relevant for bone metabolism, changes in renal function, and hearing impairments. These findings correlate with characteristics of the rare metabolic bone disorder Paget disease of bone (PDB), associated with the chromosomal region of human SCUBE3 In addition, alterations in energy metabolism, behavior, and neurological functions were detected in Scube3(N294K/N294K) mice. The Scube3(N294K/N294K) mutant mouse line may serve as a new model for further studying the effect of impaired SCUBE3 gene function. Copyright © 2016 Fuchs et al.

  1. Dopaminergic function in relation to genes associated with risk for schizophrenia: translational mutant mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Paula M; O'Tuathaigh, Colm M P; Papaleo, Francesco; Waddington, John L

    2014-01-01

    Mutant mice play an increasingly important role in understanding disease processes at multiple levels. In particular, they illuminate the impact of risk genes for disease on such processes. This article reviews recent advances in the application of mutant mice to study the intricacies of dopaminergic (DAergic) function in relation to the putative pathophysiology of psychotic illness, particularly schizophrenia, and antipsychotic drug action. It considers models for understanding the role(s) of risk genes, with a particular focus on DTNBP1 and NRG1, their interactions with environmental factors, and with each other (epistasis). In overview, it considers new schemas for understanding psychotic illness that integrate DAergic pathophysiology with developmental, social, and cognitive processes, and how mutant mouse models can reflect and inform on such schemas.

  2. Silencing neuronal mutant androgen receptor in a mouse model of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahashi, Kentaro; Katsuno, Masahisa; Hung, Gene; Adachi, Hiroaki; Kondo, Naohide; Nakatsuji, Hideaki; Tohnai, Genki; Iida, Madoka; Bennett, C Frank; Sobue, Gen

    2015-11-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), an adult-onset neurodegenerative disease that affects males, results from a CAG triplet repeat/polyglutamine expansions in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. Patients develop progressive muscular weakness and atrophy, and no effective therapy is currently available. The tissue-specific pathogenesis, especially relative pathological contributions between degenerative motor neurons and muscles, remains inconclusive. Though peripheral pathology in skeletal muscle caused by toxic AR protein has been recently reported to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of SBMA using mouse models, the role of motor neuron degeneration in SBMA has not been rigorously investigated. Here, we exploited synthetic antisense oligonucleotides to inhibit the RNA levels of mutant AR in the central nervous system (CNS) and explore its therapeutic effects in our SBMA mouse model that harbors a mutant AR gene with 97 CAG expansions and characteristic SBMA-like neurogenic phenotypes. A single intracerebroventricular administration of the antisense oligonucleotides in the presymptomatic phase efficiently suppressed the mutant gene expression in the CNS, and delayed the onset and progression of motor dysfunction, improved body weight gain and survival with the amelioration of neuronal histopathology in motor units such as spinal motor neurons, neuromuscular junctions and skeletal muscle. These findings highlight the importance of the neurotoxicity of mutant AR protein in motor neurons as a therapeutic target.

  3. Link between reduced nephron number and hypertension: studies in a mutant mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poladia, Deepali Pitre; Kish, Kayle; Kutay, Benjamin; Bauer, John; Baum, Michel; Bates, Carlton M

    2006-04-01

    Low birth weight (LBW) infants with reduced nephron numbers have significantly increased risk for hypertension later in life, which is a devastating health problem. The risk from a reduction in nephron number alone is not clear. Recently, using conditional knock-out approach, we have developed a mutant mouse with reduced nephron number in utero and no change in birth weight, by deleting fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (fgfr2) in the ureteric bud. Our purpose was to investigate the role of in utero reduced nephron number alone in absence of LBW as a risk for developing hypertension in adulthood. Using tail cuff blood pressure measurements we observed significant increases in systolic blood pressure in one year old mutant mice versus controls. We also detected cardiac end-organ injury from hypertension as shown by significant increases in normalized heart weights, left ventricular (LV) wall thickness, and LV tissue area. Two-dimensional echocardiography revealed no changes in cardiac output and therefore significant increases in systemic vascular resistance in mutants versus controls. We also observed increases in serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels and histologic evidence of glomerular and renal tubular injury in mutant mice versus controls. Thus, these studies suggest that our mutant mice may serve as a relevant model to study the link between reduction of nephron number in utero and the risk of hypertension and chronic renal failure in adulthood.

  4. Acoustic characterization of hydraulic systems: application to POGO Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, A.; Fortes-Patella, R.; Martinez Molina, J.-J.; Rebattet, C.; Brillault, R.; Kernilis, A.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents an experimental methodology for the evaluation of dynamic transfer matrices using three pressure sensors. The experimental study was carried out at the CREMHyG's acoustic test rig. The speed of sound in the pipe, as well as discharge fluctuations were evaluated from the pressure fluctuations measured during tests carried out under excitation of a modulator (piston). The method applied to reconstitute flow rate fluctuations from pressure sensors were validated by comparisons with piston displacement measurements. The transfer matrices for straight pipes and POGO corrective devices were identified based on electrical analogy. The identification method was validated by comparing the transfer matrix components to theoretical values. The results can be applied in the future, in the case of space rocket.

  5. A new conditional Apc-mutant mouse model for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robanus-Maandag, Els C; Koelink, Pim J; Breukel, Cor; Salvatori, Daniela C F; Jagmohan-Changur, Shantie C; Bosch, Cathy A J; Verspaget, Hein W; Devilee, Peter; Fodde, Riccardo; Smits, Ron

    2010-05-01

    Mutations of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene predispose individuals to familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), characterized by multiple tumours in the large intestine. Most mouse models heterozygous for truncating mutant Apc alleles mimic FAP, however, the intestinal tumours occur mainly in the small intestine. To model large intestinal tumours, we generated a new conditional Apc-mutant allele, Apc(15lox), with exon 15 flanked by loxP sites. Similar survival of Apc(1638N/15lox) and Apc(1638N/+) mice indicated that the normal function of Apc was not impaired by the loxP sites. Deletion of exon 15, encoding nearly all functional Apc domains and containing the polyadenylation signal, resulted in a mutant allele expressing low levels of a 74 kDa truncated Apc protein. Germ line Cre-mediated deletion of exon 15 resulted in Apc(Delta15/+) mice, showing a severe Apc(Min/+)-like phenotype characterized by multiple tumours in the small intestine and early lethality. In contrast, conditional Cre-mediated deletion of exon 15 specifically directed to the epithelia of distal small and large intestine of FabplCre;Apc(15lox/+) mice led to longer survival and to tumours that developed predominantly in the large intestine, mimicking human FAP-associated colorectal cancer and sporadic colorectal cancer. We conclude that the FabplCre;Apc(15lox/+) mouse should be an attractive model for studies on prevention and treatment of colorectal cancer.

  6. Increased apoptosis and hypomyelination in cerebral white matter of macular mutant mouse brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoichi Takikita

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hypomyelination in developing brain is often accompanied by congenital metabolic disorders. Menkes kinky hair disease is an X-linked neurodegenerative disease of impaired copper transport, resulting from a mutation of the Menkes disease gene, a transmembrane copper-transporting p-type ATPase gene (ATP7A. In a macular mutant mouse model, the murine ortholog of Menkes gene (mottled gene is mutated, and widespread neurodegeneration and subsequent death are observed. Although some biochemical analysis of myelin protein in macular mouse has been reported, detailed histological study of myelination in this mouse model is currently lacking. Since myelin abnormality is one of the neuropathologic findings of human Menkes disease, in this study early myelination in macular mouse brain was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Two-week-old macular mice and normal littermates were perfused with 4% paraformaldehyde. Immunohistochemical staining of paraffin embedded and vibratome sections was performed using antibodies against either CNPase, cleaved caspase-3 or O4 (marker of immature oligodendrocytes. This staining showed that cerebral myelination in macular mouse was generally hypoplastic and that hypomyelination was remarkable in internal capsule, corpus callosum, and cingulate cortex. In addition, an increased number of cleaved caspase-3 positive cells were observed in corpus callosum and internal capsule. Copper deficiency induced by low copper diet has been reported to induce oligodendrocyte dysfunction and leads to hypomyelination in this mouse model. Taken together, hypomyelination observed in this study in a mouse model of Menkes disease is assumed to be induced by increased apoptosis of immature oligodendrocytes in developing cerebrum, through deficient intracellular copper metabolism.

  7. Increased apoptosis and hypomyelination in cerebral white matter of macular mutant mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takikita, Shoichi; Takano, Tomoyuki; Narita, Tsutomu; Maruo, Yoshihiro

    2015-09-01

    Hypomyelination in developing brain is often accompanied by congenital metabolic disorders. Menkes kinky hair disease is an X-linked neurodegenerative disease of impaired copper transport, resulting from a mutation of the Menkes disease gene, a transmembrane copper-transporting p-type ATPase gene (ATP7A). In a macular mutant mouse model, the murine ortholog of Menkes gene (mottled gene) is mutated, and widespread neurodegeneration and subsequent death are observed. Although some biochemical analysis of myelin protein in macular mouse has been reported, detailed histological study of myelination in this mouse model is currently lacking. Since myelin abnormality is one of the neuropathologic findings of human Menkes disease, in this study early myelination in macular mouse brain was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Two-week-old macular mice and normal littermates were perfused with 4% paraformaldehyde. Immunohistochemical staining of paraffin embedded and vibratome sections was performed using antibodies against either CNPase, cleaved caspase-3 or O4 (marker of immature oligodendrocytes). This staining showed that cerebral myelination in macular mouse was generally hypoplastic and that hypomyelination was remarkable in internal capsule, corpus callosum, and cingulate cortex. In addition, an increased number of cleaved caspase-3 positive cells were observed in corpus callosum and internal capsule. Copper deficiency induced by low copper diet has been reported to induce oligodendrocyte dysfunction and leads to hypomyelination in this mouse model. Taken together, hypomyelination observed in this study in a mouse model of Menkes disease is assumed to be induced by increased apoptosis of immature oligodendrocytes in developing cerebrum, through deficient intracellular copper metabolism.

  8. Differential reactivity of mouse monoclonal anti-HBs antibodies with recombinant mutant HBs antigens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Azam Roohi; Yaghoub Yazdani; Jalal Khoshnoodi; Seyed Mohammad Jazayeri; William F Carman; Mahmood Chamankhah; Manley Rashedan; Fazel Shokri

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the reactivity of a panel of 8 mouse anti-hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) using a collection of 9 recombinant HBsAg mutants with a variety of amino acid substitutions mostly located within the "a" region.METHODS: The entire HBs genes previously cloned into a mammalian expression vector were transiently transfected into COS7 cells. Two standard unmutated sequences of the ayw and adw subtypes served as controls. Secreted mutant proteins were collected and measured by three commercial diagnostic immunoassays to assess transfection efficiency. Reactivity of anti-HBs mAbs with mutated HBsAgs was determined by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).RESULTS: Reactivity of anti-HBs mAbs with mutated HBsAgs revealed different patterns. While three mutants reacted strongly with all mAbs, two mutants reacted weakly with only two mAbs and the remaining proteins displayed variable degrees of reactivity towards different mAbs. Accordingly, four groups of mAbs with different but overlapping reactivity patterns could be envisaged. One group consisting of two mAbs (37C5-S7 and 35C6-S11) was found to recognize stable linear epitopes conserved in all mutants. Mutations outside the "a"determinant at positions 120 (P→S), 123(T→N) and 161(M→T) were found to affect reactivity of these mAbs.CONCLUSION: Our findings could have important implications for biophysical studies, vaccination strategies and immunotherapy of hepatitis B virus (HBV) mutants.

  9. Impaired eye-blink conditioning in waggler, a mutant mouse with cerebellar BDNF deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, S; Chen, L; Qiao, X; Knusel, B; Thompson, R F

    1998-01-01

    In addition to their trophic functions, neurotrophins are also implicated in synaptic modulation and learning and memory. Although gene knockout techniques have been used widely in studying the roles of neurotrophins at molecular and cellular levels, behavioral studies using neurotrophin knockouts are limited by the early-onset lethality and various sensory deficits associated with the gene knockout mice. In the present study, we found that in a spontaneous mutant mouse, waggler, the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was selectively absent in the cerebellar granule cells. The cytoarchitecture of the waggler cerebellum appeared to be normal at the light microscope level. The mutant mice exhibited no sensory deficits to auditory stimuli or heat-induced pain. However, they were massively impaired in classic eye-blink conditioning. These results suggest that BDNF may have a role in normal cerebellar neuronal function, which, in turn, is essential for classic eye-blink conditioning.

  10. The frissonnant mutant mouse, a model of dopamino-sensitive, inherited motor syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callizot, N; Guénet, J L; Baillet, C; Warter, J M; Poindron, P

    2001-06-01

    The frissonnant (fri) mutation is an autosomic recessive mutation which spontaneously appeared in the stock of C3H mice. fri mutant mice have locomotor instability and rapid tremor. Since tremor ceases when mutant mice have sleep or are anaesthetized, and because of their obvious stereotyped motor behavior, these mice could represent an inherited Parkinsonian syndrome. We show here that the fri/fri mouse fulfills two out of the three criteria required to validate an experimental model of human disease, that is isomorphism, homology and predictivity. Indeed, fri/fri mice present an important motor deficit accompanying visible tremor and stereotypies. They display some memory deficits as in human Parkinson's desease. l-Dopa and apomorphine (dopaminergic agonists), ropinirole (selective D2 agonist), and selegiline (an monoamino-oxidase B [MAO-B] inhibitor) improve their clinical status. However, neither anatomopathological evidence of nigrostriatal lesion, nor decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase production could be seen.

  11. Neuregulin 1 expression and electrophysiological abnormalities in the Neuregulin 1 transmembrane domain heterozygous mutant mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonora E Long

    Full Text Available The Neuregulin 1 transmembrane domain heterozygous mutant (Nrg1 TM HET mouse is used to investigate the role of Nrg1 in brain function and schizophrenia-like behavioural phenotypes. However, the molecular alterations in brain Nrg1 expression that underpin the behavioural observations have been assumed, but not directly determined. Here we comprehensively characterise mRNA Nrg1 transcripts throughout development of the Nrg1 TM HET mouse. In addition, we investigate the regulation of high-frequency (gamma electrophysiological oscillations in this mutant mouse to associate molecular changes in Nrg1 with a schizophrenia-relevant neurophysiological profile.Using exonic probes spanning the cysteine-rich, epidermal growth factor (EGF-like, transmembrane and intracellular domain encoding regions of Nrg1, mRNA levels were measured using qPCR in hippocampus and frontal cortex from male and female Nrg1 TM HET and wild type-like (WT mice throughout development. We also performed electrophysiological recordings in adult mice and analysed gamma oscillatory at baseline, in responses to auditory stimuli and to ketamine.In both hippocampus and cortex, Nrg1 TM HET mice show significantly reduced expression of the exon encoding the transmembrane domain of Nrg1 compared with WT, but unaltered mRNA expression encoding the extracellular bioactive EGF-like and the cysteine-rich (type III domains, and development-specific and region-specific reductions in the mRNA encoding the intracellular domain. Hippocampal Nrg1 protein expression was not altered, but NMDA receptor NR2B subunit phosphorylation was lower in Nrg1 TM HET mice. We identified elevated ongoing and reduced sensory-evoked gamma power in Nrg1 TM HET mice.We found no evidence to support the claim that the Nrg1 TM HET mouse represents a simple haploinsufficient model. Further research is required to explore the possibility that mutation results in a gain of Nrg1 function.

  12. Safety, efficacy and efficiency of laser-assisted IVF in subfertile mutant mouse strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming-Wen; Kinchen, Kristy L; Vallelunga, Jadine M; Young, Diana L; Wright, Kaleb D K; Gorano, Lisa N; Wasson, Katherine; Lloyd, K C Kent

    2013-01-01

    In the present report we studied the safety, efficacy and efficiency of using an infrared laser to facilitate IVF by assessing fertilization, development and birth rates after laser-zona drilling (LZD) in 30 subfertile genetically modified (GM) mouse lines. We determined that LZD increased the fertilization rate four to ten times that of regular IVF, thus facilitating the derivation of 26 of 30 (86.7%) GM mouse lines. Cryopreserved two-cell stage embryos derived by LZD-assisted IVF were recovered and developed to blastocysts in vitro at the same rate as frozen–thawed embryos derived by regular IVF. Surprisingly after surgical transfer to pseudopregnant recipients the birth rate of embryos derived by LZD-assisted IVF was significantly lower than that of embryos derived by regular IVF. However this result could be completely mitigated by the addition of 0.25 M sucrose to the culture medium during LZD which caused the oocyte to shrink in volume relative to the perivitelline space. By increasing the distance from the laser target site on the zona pellucida, we hypothesize that the hyperosmotic effect of sucrose reduced the potential for laser-induced cytotoxic thermal damage to the underlying oocytes. With appropriate preparation and cautious application, our results indicate that LZD-assisted IVF is a safe, efficacious and efficient assisted reproductive technology for deriving mutant mouse lines with male factor infertility and subfertility caused by sperm–zona penetration defects. PMID:23315689

  13. Novel DNA motif binding activity observed in vivo with an estrogen receptor α mutant mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Sylvia C; Li, Leping; Grimm, Sara A; Winuthayanon, Wipawee; Hamilton, Katherine J; Pockette, Brianna; Rubel, Cory A; Pedersen, Lars C; Fargo, David; Lanz, Rainer B; DeMayo, Francesco J; Schütz, Günther; Korach, Kenneth S

    2014-06-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) interacts with DNA directly or indirectly via other transcription factors, referred to as "tethering." Evidence for tethering is based on in vitro studies and a widely used "KIKO" mouse model containing mutations that prevent direct estrogen response element DNA- binding. KIKO mice are infertile, due in part to the inability of estradiol (E2) to induce uterine epithelial proliferation. To elucidate the molecular events that prevent KIKO uterine growth, regulation of the pro-proliferative E2 target gene Klf4 and of Klf15, a progesterone (P4) target gene that opposes the pro-proliferative activity of KLF4, was evaluated. Klf4 induction was impaired in KIKO uteri; however, Klf15 was induced by E2 rather than by P4. Whole uterine chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing revealed enrichment of KIKO ERα binding to hormone response elements (HREs) motifs. KIKO binding to HRE motifs was verified using reporter gene and DNA-binding assays. Because the KIKO ERα has HRE DNA-binding activity, we evaluated the "EAAE" ERα, which has more severe DNA-binding domain mutations, and demonstrated a lack of estrogen response element or HRE reporter gene induction or DNA-binding. The EAAE mouse has an ERα null-like phenotype, with impaired uterine growth and transcriptional activity. Our findings demonstrate that the KIKO mouse model, which has been used by numerous investigators, cannot be used to establish biological functions for ERα tethering, because KIKO ERα effectively stimulates transcription using HRE motifs. The EAAE-ERα DNA-binding domain mutant mouse demonstrates that ERα DNA-binding is crucial for biological and transcriptional processes in reproductive tissues and that ERα tethering may not contribute to estrogen responsiveness in vivo.

  14. In vivo regulation of phenylalanine hydroxylase in the genetic mutant hph-1 mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunasekera, Richard S; Hyland, Keith

    2009-11-01

    The hph-1 mouse has low liver activity of GTP cyclohydrolase 1, the rate limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)). BH(4) is the cofactor for phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) and in the early stages of life the hph-1 mouse is hyperphenylalaninemic. At approximately 15 days after birth the blood phenylalanine levels normalize. During this period the animals provide an in vivo model which can be used to study the regulatory effects of phenylalanine on PAH, and for related pediatric metabolic disease in humans; from birth to youth. We therefore, examined; liver PAH activity using BH(4) and 6-methyltetrahydropterin (6MPH(4)) as cofactor; PAH total enzyme concentration by Western blotting using the PH8 antibody, and PAH state of phosphorylation using the PH7 antibody from 4 to 18 days after birth. The findings were compared to the wild type animals that are not hyperphenylalaninemic during this period. PAH (6MPH(4)) activity and total protein (PH8 antibody) rose steadily in the hph-1 mice. In control mice, both activity and total protein fluctuated. The degree of phosphorylation of PAH in the mutants and the state of activation (as measured by the 6MPH(4)/BH(4) activity ratio) increased as phenylalanine levels rose, and decreased when they fell. Similar patterns were not seen in the control animals. These studies provide in vivo evidence that phenylalanine concentration regulates the activity of PAH in the hph-1 mouse and that this acts via a mechanism that includes phosphorylation of the PAH molecule. The kinetic values (K(m) and V(max)) for mouse PAH are also reported.

  15. Deciphering the mechanisms of developmental disorders: phenotype analysis of embryos from mutant mouse lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robert; McGuire, Christina; Mohun, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    The Deciphering the Mechanisms of Developmental Disorders (DMDD) consortium is a research programme set up to identify genes in the mouse, which if mutated (or knocked-out) result in embryonic lethality when homozygous, and initiate the study of why disruption of their function has such profound effects on embryo development and survival. The project uses a combination of comprehensive high resolution 3D imaging and tissue histology to identify abnormalities in embryo and placental structures of embryonic lethal lines. The image data we have collected and the phenotypes scored are freely available through the project website (http://dmdd.org.uk). In this article we describe the web interface to the images that allows the embryo data to be viewed at full resolution in different planes, discuss how to search the database for a phenotype, and our approach to organising the data for an embryo and a mutant line so it is easy to comprehend and intuitive to navigate.

  16. The phenotype of FancB-mutant mouse embryonic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Moon; Ko, Jun Ho; Choi, Yong Jun; Hu Lingchuan [Department of Molecular Medicine and Institute of Biotechnology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 15355 Lambda Drive, San Antonio, TX 78245 (United States); Hasty, Paul, E-mail: hastye@uthscsa.edu [Department of Molecular Medicine and Institute of Biotechnology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 15355 Lambda Drive, San Antonio, TX 78245 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by bone marrow failure, developmental defects and cancer. There are multiple FA genes that enable the repair of interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) in coordination with a variety of other DNA repair pathways in a way that is poorly understood. Here we present the phenotype of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells mutated for FancB. We found FancB-mutant cells exhibited reduced cellular proliferation, hypersensitivity to the crosslinking agent mitomycin C (MMC), increased spontaneous and MMC-induced chromosomal abnormalities, reduced spontaneous sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), reduced gene targeting, reduced MMC-induced Rad51 foci and absent MMC-induced FancD2 foci. Since FancB is on the X chromosome and since ES cells are typically XY, FancB is an excellent target for an epistatic analysis to elucidate FA's role in ICL repair.

  17. A forward genetic screen with a thalamocortical axon reporter mouse yields novel neurodevelopment mutants and a distinct emx2 mutant phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vock Vita M

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dorsal thalamus acts as a gateway and modulator for information going to and from the cerebral cortex. This activity requires the formation of reciprocal topographic axon connections between thalamus and cortex. The axons grow along a complex multistep pathway, making sharp turns, crossing expression boundaries, and encountering intermediate targets. However, the cellular and molecular components mediating these steps remain poorly understood. Results To further elucidate the development of the thalamocortical system, we first created a thalamocortical axon reporter line to use as a genetic tool for sensitive analysis of mutant mouse phenotypes. The TCA-tau-lacZ reporter mouse shows specific, robust, and reproducible labeling of thalamocortical axons (TCAs, but not the overlapping corticothalamic axons, during development. Moreover, it readily reveals TCA pathfinding abnormalities in known cortical mutants such as reeler. Next, we performed an unbiased screen for genes involved in thalamocortical development using random mutagenesis with the TCA reporter. Six independent mutant lines show aberrant TCA phenotypes at different steps of the pathway. These include ventral misrouting, overfasciculation, stalling at the corticostriatal boundary, and invasion of ectopic cortical cell clusters. An outcross breeding strategy coupled with a genomic panel of single nucleotide polymorphisms facilitated genetic mapping with small numbers of mutant mice. We mapped a ventral misrouting mutant to the Emx2 gene, and discovered that some TCAs extend to the olfactory bulbs in this mutant. Mapping data suggest that other lines carry mutations in genes not previously known for roles in thalamocortical development. Conclusions These data demonstrate the feasibility of a forward genetic approach to understanding mammalian brain morphogenesis and wiring. A robust axonal reporter enabled sensitive analysis of a specific axon tract inside the

  18. Expression of chicken vinculin complements the adhesion-defective phenotype of a mutant mouse F9 embryonal carcinoma cell

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    A mutant cell line, derived from the mouse embryonal carcinoma cell line F9, is defective in cell-cell adhesion (compaction) and in cell- substrate adhesion. We have previously shown that neither uvomorulin (E- cadherin) nor integrins are responsible for the mutant phenotype (Calogero, A., M. Samuels, T. Darland, S. A. Edwards, R. Kemler, and E. D. Adamson. 1991. Dev. Biol. 146:499-508). Several cytoskeleton proteins were assayed and only vinculin was found to be absent in mutant (5.51) cells...

  19. Glycine receptor mutants of the mouse: what are possible routes of inhibitory compensation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natascha eSchaefer

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Defects in glycinergic inhibition result in a complex neuromotor disorder in humans known as hyperekplexia (OMIM 149400 with similar phenotypes in rodents characterized by an exaggerated startle reflex and hypertonia. Analogous to genetic defects in humans, single point mutations, microdeletions, or insertions in the Glra1 gene but also in the Glrb gene underlie the pathology in mice. The mutations either localized in the α (spasmodic, oscillator, cincinnati, Nmf11 or the β (spastic subunit of the GlyR are much less tolerated in mice than in humans, leaving the question for the existence of different regulatory elements of the pathomechanisms in humans and rodents. In addition to the spontaneous mutations, new insights into understanding of the regulatory pathways in hyperekplexia or glycine encephalopathy arose from the constantly increasing number of knock-out as well as knock-in mutants of GlyRs. Over the last five years, various efforts using in vivo whole cell recordings provided a detailed analysis of the kinetic parameters underlying glycinergic dysfunction. Presynaptic compensation as well as postsynaptic compensatory mechanisms in these mice by other GlyR subunits or GABAA receptors, and the role of extra-synaptic GlyRs is still a matter of debate. A recent study on the mouse mutant oscillator, displayed a novel aspect for compensation of functionality by complementation of receptor domains that fold independently. This review focuses on defects in glycinergic neurotransmission in mice discussed with the background of human hyperekplexia en route to strategies of compensation.

  20. Simulated space radiation-induced mutants in the mouse kidney display widespread genomic change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turker, Mitchell S; Grygoryev, Dmytro; Lasarev, Michael; Ohlrich, Anna; Rwatambuga, Furaha A; Johnson, Sorrel; Dan, Cristian; Eckelmann, Bradley; Hryciw, Gwen; Mao, Jian-Hua; Snijders, Antoine M; Gauny, Stacey; Kronenberg, Amy

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to a small number of high-energy heavy charged particles (HZE ions), as found in the deep space environment, could significantly affect astronaut health following prolonged periods of space travel if these ions induce mutations and related cancers. In this study, we used an in vivo mutagenesis assay to define the mutagenic effects of accelerated 56Fe ions (1 GeV/amu, 151 keV/μm) in the mouse kidney epithelium exposed to doses ranging from 0.25 to 2.0 Gy. These doses represent fluences ranging from 1 to 8 particle traversals per cell nucleus. The Aprt locus, located on chromosome 8, was used to select induced and spontaneous mutants. To fully define the mutagenic effects, we used multiple endpoints including mutant frequencies, mutation spectrum for chromosome 8, translocations involving chromosome 8, and mutations affecting non-selected chromosomes. The results demonstrate mutagenic effects that often affect multiple chromosomes for all Fe ion doses tested. For comparison with the most abundant sparsely ionizing particle found in space, we also examined the mutagenic effects of high-energy protons (1 GeV, 0.24 keV/μm) at 0.5 and 1.0 Gy. Similar doses of protons were not as mutagenic as Fe ions for many assays, though genomic effects were detected in Aprt mutants at these doses. Considered as a whole, the data demonstrate that Fe ions are highly mutagenic at the low doses and fluences of relevance to human spaceflight, and that cells with considerable genomic mutations are readily induced by these exposures and persist in the kidney epithelium. The level of genomic change produced by low fluence exposure to heavy ions is reminiscent of the extensive rearrangements seen in tumor genomes suggesting a potential initiation step in radiation carcinogenesis.

  1. Evaluation of Planar-Cell-Polarity Phenotypes in Ciliopathy Mouse Mutant Cochlea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May-Simera, Helen

    2016-02-21

    In recent years, primary cilia have emerged as key regulators in development and disease by influencing numerous signaling pathways. One of the earliest signaling pathways shown to be associated with ciliary function was the non-canonical Wnt signaling pathway, also referred to as planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling. One of the best places in which to study the effects of planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling during vertebrate development is the mammalian cochlea. PCP signaling disruption in the mouse cochlea disrupts cochlear outgrowth, cellular patterning and hair cell orientation, all of which are affected by cilia dysfunction. The goal of this protocol is to describe the analysis of PCP signaling in the developing mammalian cochlea via phenotypic analysis, immunohistochemistry and scanning electron microscopy. Defects in convergence and extension are manifested as a shortening of the cochlear duct and/or changes in cellular patterning, which can be quantified following dissection from developing mouse mutants. Changes in stereociliary bundle orientation and kinocilia length or positioning can be observed and quantitated using either immunofluorescence or scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A deeper insight into the role of ciliary proteins in cellular signaling pathways and other biological phenomena is crucial for our understanding of cellular and developmental biology, as well as for the development of targeted treatment strategies.

  2. Lithium prevents parkinsonian behavioral and striatal phenotypes in an aged parkin mutant transgenic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieu, Christopher A; Dewey, Colleen M; Chinta, Shankar J; Rane, Anand; Rajagopalan, Subramanian; Batir, Sean; Kim, Yong-Hwan; Andersen, Julie K

    2014-12-03

    Lithium has long been used as a treatment for the psychiatric disease bipolar disorder. However, previous studies suggest that lithium provides neuroprotective effects in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease. The exact mechanism by which lithium exerts these effects still remains unclear. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of low-dose lithium treatment in an aged mouse model expressing a parkin mutation within dopaminergic neurons. We found that low-dose lithium treatment prevented motor impairment as demonstrated by the open field test, pole test, and rearing behavior. Furthermore, lithium prevented dopaminergic striatal degeneration in parkin animals. We also found that parkin-induced striatal astrogliosis and microglial activation were prevented by lithium treatment. Our results further corroborate the use of this parkin mutant transgenic mouse line as a model for PD for testing novel therapeutics. The findings of the present study also provide further validation that lithium could be re-purposed as a therapy for PD and suggest that anti-inflammatory effects may contribute to its neuroprotective mechanisms.

  3. A Small Indel Mutant Mouse Model of Epidermolytic Palmoplantar Keratoderma and Its Application to Mutant-specific shRNA Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Ya-Su; Shi, Pei-Liang; Chen, Xiao-Ling; Tang, Yue-Xiao; Wang, Yan-Fang; Liu, Rong-Rong; Luan, Xiao-Rui; Fang, Yu; Mei, Ru-Huan; Du, Zhen-Fang; Ke, Hai-Ping; Matro, Erik; Li, Ling-En; Lin, Zhao-Yu; Zhao, Jing; Gao, Xiang; Zhang, Xian-Ning

    2016-03-22

    Epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (EPPK) is a relatively common autosomal-dominant skin disorder caused by mutations in the keratin 9 gene (KRT9), with few therapeutic options for the affected so far. Here, we report a knock-in transgenic mouse model that carried a small insertion-deletion (indel) mutant of Krt9, c.434delAinsGGCT (p.Tyr144delinsTrpLeu), corresponding to the human mutation KRT9/c.500delAinsGGCT (p.Tyr167delinsTrpLeu), which resulted in a human EPPK-like phenotype in the weight-stress areas of the fore- and hind-paws of both Krt9(+/mut) and Krt9(mut/mut) mice. The phenotype confirmed that EPPK is a dominant-negative condition, such that mice heterozygotic for the K9-mutant allele (Krt9(+/mut)) showed a clear EPPK-like phenotype. Then, we developed a mutant-specific short hairpin RNA (shRNA) therapy for EPPK mice. Mutant-specific shRNAs were systematically identified in vitro using a luciferase reporter gene assay and delivered into Krt9(+/mut) mice. shRNA-mediated knockdown of mutant protein resulted in almost normal morphology and functions of the skin, whereas the same shRNA had a negligible effect in wild-type K9 mice. Our results suggest that EPPK can be treated by gene therapy, and this has significant implications for future clinical application.

  4. A mutant RNA pseudoknot that promotes ribosomal frameshifting in mouse mammary tumor virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, H; Tinoco, I

    1997-05-15

    A single A-->G mutation that changes a potential A.U base pair to a G.U pair at the junction of the stems and loops of a non-frameshifting pseudoknot dramatically increases its frameshifting efficiency in mouse mammary tumor virus. The structure of the non-frameshifting pseudoknot APK has been found to be very different from that of pseudoknots that cause efficient frameshifting [Kang,H., Hines,J.V. and Tinoco,I. (1995) J. Mol. Biol. , 259, 135-147]. The 3-dimensional structure of the mutant pseudoknot was determined by restrained molecular dynamics based on NMR-derived interproton distance and torsion angle constraints. One striking feature of the mutant pseudoknot compared with the parent pseudoknot is that a G.U base pair forms at the top of stem 2, thus leaving only 1 nt at the junction of the two stems. The conformation is very different from that of the previously determined non-frameshifting parent pseudoknot, which lacks the A.U base pair at the top of the stem and has 2 nt between the stems. However, the conformation is quite similar to that of efficient frameshifting pseudoknots whose structures were previously determined by NMR. A single adenylate residue intervenes between the two stems and interrupts their coaxial stacking. This unpaired nucleotide produces a bent structure. The structural similarity among the efficient frameshifting pseudoknots indicates that a specific conformation is required for ribosomal frameshifting, further implying a specific interaction of the pseudoknot with the ribosome.

  5. Developmental analysis of GFAP immunoreactivity in the cerebellum of the meander tail mutant mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishkat, H L; Schwartz, E; Jain, G; Eisenman, L M

    1996-08-01

    It is thought that Bergmann glial fibers assist in the inward migration of granule cells. Model systems in which there is a perturbation of either the migrating cells or the glial cell population have been useful in understanding the migratory process. In the meander tail mutant mouse, the anterior cerebellar region is agranular, whereas the posterior cerebellum is relatively unaffected by the mutation. This study presents a qualitative analysis of the development of cerebellar radial glia in mea/mea and +/mea mice aged from postnatal day 0 to adult, using an antibody against the glia specific antigen, glial fibrillary acidic protein. The results indicate a slight delay in the onset of immunoreactivity in the mea/mea cerebellum and abnormal glial formation in the anterior and posterior regions by postnatal day 5. At postnatal day 11, the full complement of labeled fibers appears to be present and although they appear abnormal in formation, they eventually reach the surface and terminate in oddly shaped and irregularly spaced endfeet. In adult mea/mea and +/mea mice, as compared to the early postnatal stages, there is a significant reduction in GFAP immunoreactive fibers. Cresyl violet stained adult mea/mea sections revealed the presence of ectopic granule cells in radial columns and small clumps at the surface of and within the molecular layer of the caudal cerebellum. Quantitative analyses revealed a 4- to 5-fold increase in the number of ectopic granule cells in lobule VIII of the mea/mea when compared with the +/mea cerebellum. These results suggest that the radial glia in the mea/mea cerebellum exhibit some uncharacteristic morphologies, but that these abnormalities are most likely the consequence of environmental alterations produced by the mutant gene.

  6. HIF-VEGF pathways are critical for chronic otitis media in Junbo and Jeff mouse mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T Cheeseman

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Otitis media with effusion (OME is the commonest cause of hearing loss in children, yet the underlying genetic pathways and mechanisms involved are incompletely understood. Ventilation of the middle ear with tympanostomy tubes is the commonest surgical procedure in children and the best treatment for chronic OME, but the mechanism by which they work remains uncertain. As hypoxia is a common feature of inflamed microenvironments, moderation of hypoxia may be a significant contributory mechanism. We have investigated the occurrence of hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF mediated responses in Junbo and Jeff mouse mutant models, which develop spontaneous chronic otitis media. We found that Jeff and Junbo mice labeled in vivo with pimonidazole showed cellular hypoxia in inflammatory cells in the bulla lumen, and in Junbo the middle ear mucosa was also hypoxic. The bulla fluid inflammatory cell numbers were greater and the upregulation of inflammatory gene networks were more pronounced in Junbo than Jeff. Hif-1α gene expression was elevated in bulla fluid inflammatory cells, and there was upregulation of its target genes including Vegfa in Junbo and Jeff. We therefore investigated the effects in Junbo of small-molecule inhibitors of VEGFR signaling (PTK787, SU-11248, and BAY 43-9006 and destabilizing HIF by inhibiting its chaperone HSP90 with 17-DMAG. We found that both classes of inhibitor significantly reduced hearing loss and the occurrence of bulla fluid and that VEGFR inhibitors moderated angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis in the inflamed middle ear mucosa. The effectiveness of HSP90 and VEGFR signaling inhibitors in suppressing OM in the Junbo model implicates HIF-mediated VEGF as playing a pivotal role in OM pathogenesis. Our analysis of the Junbo and Jeff mutants highlights the role of hypoxia and HIF-mediated pathways, and we conclude that targeting molecules in HIF-VEGF signaling pathways has therapeutic potential in the treatment of

  7. HIF-VEGF pathways are critical for chronic otitis media in Junbo and Jeff mouse mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T Cheeseman

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Otitis media with effusion (OME is the commonest cause of hearing loss in children, yet the underlying genetic pathways and mechanisms involved are incompletely understood. Ventilation of the middle ear with tympanostomy tubes is the commonest surgical procedure in children and the best treatment for chronic OME, but the mechanism by which they work remains uncertain. As hypoxia is a common feature of inflamed microenvironments, moderation of hypoxia may be a significant contributory mechanism. We have investigated the occurrence of hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF mediated responses in Junbo and Jeff mouse mutant models, which develop spontaneous chronic otitis media. We found that Jeff and Junbo mice labeled in vivo with pimonidazole showed cellular hypoxia in inflammatory cells in the bulla lumen, and in Junbo the middle ear mucosa was also hypoxic. The bulla fluid inflammatory cell numbers were greater and the upregulation of inflammatory gene networks were more pronounced in Junbo than Jeff. Hif-1α gene expression was elevated in bulla fluid inflammatory cells, and there was upregulation of its target genes including Vegfa in Junbo and Jeff. We therefore investigated the effects in Junbo of small-molecule inhibitors of VEGFR signaling (PTK787, SU-11248, and BAY 43-9006 and destabilizing HIF by inhibiting its chaperone HSP90 with 17-DMAG. We found that both classes of inhibitor significantly reduced hearing loss and the occurrence of bulla fluid and that VEGFR inhibitors moderated angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis in the inflamed middle ear mucosa. The effectiveness of HSP90 and VEGFR signaling inhibitors in suppressing OM in the Junbo model implicates HIF-mediated VEGF as playing a pivotal role in OM pathogenesis. Our analysis of the Junbo and Jeff mutants highlights the role of hypoxia and HIF-mediated pathways, and we conclude that targeting molecules in HIF-VEGF signaling pathways has therapeutic potential in the treatment of

  8. A new osteopetrosis mutant mouse strain (ntl) with odontoma-like proliferations and lack of tooth roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xincheng; Rios, Hector F; Jiang, Baichun; Xing, Lianping; Kadlcek, Renata; Greenfield, Edward M; Luo, Guangbin; Feng, Jian Q

    2009-12-01

    A new spontaneous mouse mutant (ntl) with autosomal-recessive osteopetrosis was characterized. These mice formed tartrate-resistant acid phosphate (TRAP)-positive osteoclasts but their osteoclasts had no ruffled border and did not resorb bone. These mice displayed no tooth eruption or tooth root formation. Adult mutant mice developed odontoma-like proliferations near the proximal ends of the incisors. Intraperitoneal injection of progenitor cells from the liver of 16.5 days postcoitum wild-type embryos into newborn mutants rescued the osteopetrosis phenotype, indicating that the defects were intrinsic to the osteoclasts. Our findings not only provide further support for a critical role of osteoclasts in tooth eruption and tooth root development, but also suggest that the perturbation of the homeostasis of the odontogenic precursors of the incisors is primarily responsible for the development of the odontoma-like proliferations in this osteopetrosis mutant. Genetic mapping has narrowed down the location of the mutant allele to a genetic interval of 3.2 cM on mouse chromosome 17.

  9. HPA axis dysregulation and behavioral analysis of mouse mutants with altered GR or MR function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolber, Benedict J.; Wieczorek, Lindsay; Muglia, Louis J.

    2009-01-01

    Corticosteroid receptors are critical for the maintenance of homeostasis after both psychological and physiological stress. To properly understand the different roles and interactions of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) during stress, it is necessary to dissect the role of corticosteroid signaling at both the system and sub-system level. A variety of GR transgenic mouse lines have recently been used to characterize the role of GR in the CNS as a whole and particularly in the forebrain. We will describe both the behavioral and cellular/molecular implications of disrupting GR function in these animal models and describe the implications of this data for our understanding of normal endocrine function and stress adaptation. MRs in tight epithelia have a long established role in sodium homeostasis. Recently however, evidence has suggested that limbic MRs also play an important role in psychological stress. Just as with GR, targeted mutations in MR induce a variety of behavioral changes associated with stress adaptation. In this review, we will discuss the implications of this work on MR. Finally, we will discuss the possible interaction between MR and GR and how future work using double mutants (through conventional means or virus based gene alteration) will be needed to fully understand how signaling through these two steroid receptors provides the adaptive mechanisms to deal with a variety of stressors. PMID:18609295

  10. Behavioral characterization of a mutant mouse strain lacking D-amino acid oxidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Ballard, Michael E; Basso, Ana M; Bratcher, Natalie; Browman, Kaitlin E; Curzon, Pete; Konno, Ryuichi; Meyer, Axel H; Rueter, Lynne E

    2011-02-02

    D-amino acid oxidase (DAO), an enzyme that degrades d-serine, has been suggested as a susceptibility factor for schizophrenia. Here we sought to understand more about the behavioral consequence of lacking DAO and the potential therapeutic implication of DAO inhibition by characterizing a mouse strain (ddY/DAO(-)) lacking DAO activity. We found that the mutant mice showed enhanced prepulse inhibition responses (PPI). Intriguingly, DAO-/- mice had increased sensitivity to the PPI-disruptive effect induced by the competitive NMDA antagonist, SDZ 220-581. In the 24-h inhibitory avoidance test, DAO-/- mice were not different from DAO+/+ mice during the recall. In Barnes Maze, we found that DAO-/- mice had a shortened latency to enter the escape tunnel. Interestingly, although these mice were hypoactive when tested in a protected open field, they showed a profound increase of activity on the edge of the unprotected open field of the Barnes Maze even with the escape tunnel removed. This increased edge activity does not appear to be related to a reduced level of anxiety given that there were no significant genotype effects on the measures of anxiety-like behaviors in two standard animal models of anxiety, elevated plus maze and novelty suppressed feeding. Our data suggest that DAO-/- mice might have altered functioning of NMDARs. However, these results provide only modest support for manipulations of DAO activity as a potential therapeutic approach to treat schizophrenia.

  11. The morphogenesis of herpes simplex virus type 1 in infected parental mouse L fibroblasts and mutant gro29 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Helle Lone; Norrild, Bodil

    2003-01-01

    Mutants of cell lines and viruses are important biological tools. The pathway of herpesvirus particle maturation and egress are contentious issues. The mutant gro29 line of mouse L cells is defective for egress of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) virions, and a candidate for studies of virus......-cell interactions. The properties of uninfected and HSV-1-infected L fibroblasts and gro29 cells investigated by protein assay, immunoblot, titration assay, immunofluorescence light microscopy and immunogold cryosection electron microscopy are reported. The ultrastructure of both HSV-1-infected L and gro29 cells...

  12. Comparison of the activities of wild type and mutant enhancing factor/mouse secretory phospholipase A2 proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bhakti M Kirtane; Rita Mulherkar

    2002-09-01

    Enhancing factor (EF) protein, an isoform of secretory phospholipase A2 (PLA2), was purified as a modulator of epidermal growth factor from the small intestine of the Balb/c mouse. It was for the first time that a growth modulatory property of sPLA2 was demonstrated. Deletion mutation analysis of EF cDNA carried out in our laboratory showed that enhancing activity and phospholipase activity are two separate activities that reside in the same molecule. In order to study the specific amino acids involved in each of these activities, two site-directed mutants of EF were made and expressed in vitro. Comparison of enhancing activity as well as phospholipase A2 activity of these mutant proteins with that of wild type protein helped in identification of some of the residues important for both the activities.

  13. Expression of chicken vinculin complements the adhesion-defective phenotype of a mutant mouse F9 embryonal carcinoma cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, M; Ezzell, R M; Cardozo, T J; Critchley, D R; Coll, J L; Adamson, E D

    1993-05-01

    A mutant cell line, derived from the mouse embryonal carcinoma cell line F9, is defective in cell-cell adhesion (compaction) and in cell-substrate adhesion. We have previously shown that neither uvomorulin (E-cadherin) nor integrins are responsible for the mutant phenotype (Calogero, A., M. Samuels, T. Darland, S. A. Edwards, R. Kemler, and E. D. Adamson. 1991. Dev. Biol. 146:499-508). Several cytoskeleton proteins were assayed and only vinculin was found to be absent in mutant (5.51) cells. A chicken vinculin expression vector was transfected into the 5.51 cells together with a neomycin-resistance vector. Clones that were adherent to the substrate were selected in medium containing G418. Two clones, 5.51Vin3 and Vin4, were analyzed by Nomarski differential interference contrast and laser confocal microscopy as well as by biochemical and molecular biological techniques. Both clones adhered well to substrates and both exhibited F-actin stress fibers with vinculin localized at stress fiber tips in focal contacts. This was in marked contrast to 5.51 parental cells, which had no stress fibers and no vinculin. The mutant and complemented F9 cell lines will be useful models for examining the complex interactions between cytoskeletal and cell adhesion proteins.

  14. Tauopathic changes in the striatum of A53T α-synuclein mutant mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Wills

    Full Text Available Tauopathic pathways lead to degenerative changes in Alzheimer's disease and there is evidence that they are also involved in the neurodegenerative pathology of Parkinson's disease [PD]. We have examined tauopathic changes in striatum of the α-synuclein (α-Syn A53T mutant mouse. Elevated levels of α-Syn were observed in striatum of the adult A53T α-Syn mice. This was accompanied by increases in hyperphosphorylated Tau [p-Tau], phosphorylated at Ser202, Ser262 and Ser396/404, which are the same toxic sites also seen in Alzheimer's disease. There was an increase in active p-GSK-3β, hyperphosphorylated at Tyr216, a major and primary kinase known to phosphorylate Tau at multiple sites. The sites of hyperphosphorylation of Tau in the A53T mutant mice were similar to those seen in post-mortem striata from PD patients, attesting to their pathophysiological relevance. Increases in p-Tau were not due to alterations on protein phosphatases in either A53T mice or in human PD, suggesting lack of involvement of these proteins in tauopathy. Extraction of striata with Triton X-100 showed large increases in oligomeric forms of α-Syn suggesting that α-Syn had formed aggregates the mutant mice. In addition, increased levels of p-GSK-3β and pSer396/404 were also found associated with aggregated α-Syn. Differential solubilization to measure protein binding to cytoskeletal proteins demonstrated that p-Tau in the A53T mutant mouse were unbound to cytoskeletal proteins, consistent with dissociation of p-Tau from the microtubules upon hyperphosphorylation. Interestingly, α-Syn remained tightly bound to the cytoskeleton, while p-GSK-3β was seen in the cytoskeleton-free fractions. Immunohistochemical studies showed that α-Syn, pSer396/404 Tau and p-GSK-3β co-localized with one another and was aggregated and accumulated into large inclusion bodies, leading to cell death of Substantia nigral neurons. Together, these data demonstrate an elevated state of

  15. A Novel Bmal1 Mutant Mouse Reveals Essential Roles of the C-Terminal Domain on Circadian Rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Noheon; Kim, Hee-Dae; Cheon, Solmi; Row, Hansang; Lee, Jiyeon; Han, Dong-Hee; Cho, Sehyung; Kim, Kyungjin

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian circadian clock is an endogenous biological timer comprised of transcriptional/translational feedback loops of clock genes. Bmal1 encodes an indispensable transcription factor for the generation of circadian rhythms. Here, we report a new circadian mutant mouse from gene-trapped embryonic stem cells harboring a C-terminus truncated Bmal1 (Bmal1GTΔC) allele. The homozygous mutant (Bmal1GTΔC/GTΔC) mice immediately lost circadian behavioral rhythms under constant darkness. The heterozygous (Bmal1+/GTΔC) mice displayed a gradual loss of rhythms, in contrast to Bmal1+/- mice where rhythms were sustained. Bmal1GTΔC/GTΔC mice also showed arrhythmic mRNA and protein expression in the SCN and liver. Lack of circadian reporter oscillation was also observed in cultured fibroblast cells, indicating that the arrhythmicity of Bmal1GTΔC/GTΔC mice resulted from impaired molecular clock machinery. Expression of clock genes exhibited distinct responses to the mutant allele in Bmal1+/GTΔC and Bmal1GTΔC/GTΔC mice. Despite normal cellular localization and heterodimerization with CLOCK, overexpressed BMAL1GTΔC was unable to activate transcription of Per1 promoter and BMAL1-dependent CLOCK degradation. These results indicate that the C-terminal region of Bmal1 has pivotal roles in the regulation of circadian rhythms and the Bmal1GTΔC mice constitute a novel model system to evaluate circadian functional mechanism of BMAL1.

  16. A quantitative method for defining high-arched palate using the Tcof1(+/-) mutant mouse as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Zachary R; Hague, Molly; Kurosaka, Hiroshi; Dixon, Jill; Dixon, Michael J; Trainor, Paul A

    2016-07-15

    The palate functions as the roof of the mouth in mammals, separating the oral and nasal cavities. Its complex embryonic development and assembly poses unique susceptibilities to intrinsic and extrinsic disruptions. Such disruptions may cause failure of the developing palatal shelves to fuse along the midline resulting in a cleft. In other cases the palate may fuse at an arch, resulting in a vaulted oral cavity, termed high-arched palate. There are many models available for studying the pathogenesis of cleft palate but a relative paucity for high-arched palate. One condition exhibiting either cleft palate or high-arched palate is Treacher Collins syndrome, a congenital disorder characterized by numerous craniofacial anomalies. We quantitatively analyzed palatal perturbations in the Tcof1(+/-) mouse model of Treacher Collins syndrome, which phenocopies the condition in humans. We discovered that 46% of Tcof1(+/-) mutant embryos and new born pups exhibit either soft clefts or full clefts. In addition, 17% of Tcof1(+/-) mutants were found to exhibit high-arched palate, defined as two sigma above the corresponding wild-type population mean for height and angular based arch measurements. Furthermore, palatal shelf length and shelf width were decreased in all Tcof1(+/-) mutant embryos and pups compared to controls. Interestingly, these phenotypes were subsequently ameliorated through genetic inhibition of p53. The results of our study therefore provide a simple, reproducible and quantitative method for investigating models of high-arched palate.

  17. A mutant of SWAP-70, a phosphatidylinositoltrisphosphate binding protein, transforms mouse embryo fibroblasts, which is inhibited by sanguinarine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhisa Fukui

    Full Text Available SWAP-70, a phosphatidylinositol trisphosphate (PtdIns(3,4,5P(3 binding protein, has been suggested to be involved in transformation of mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs as well as membrane ruffling after growth factor stimulation of the cells. A mutant, SWAP-70-374, was found to be able to bind to F-actin in vitro, whereas wild-type SWAP-70 failed to do so. This mutant was present at the plasma membrane without any stimulation while the wild-type protein was present only in the cytosol unless cells were stimulated with EGF. Expression of this mutant in MEFs resulted in morphologic transformation, fast growth, and loss of contact inhibition, suggesting that SWAP-70 with this mutation can transform the cells. ERK1/2 was activated in SWAP-70-374-transformed cells. Use of MEK inhibitors revealed that the ERK1/2 pathway does not affect the cell growth of MEFs but is responsible for loss of contact inhibition. To investigate the function of SWAP-70 further, drugs that can inhibit SWAP-70-dependent cell responses were screened. Among various drugs, sanguinarine was found to inhibit transformation of MEFs by SWAP-70-374. This drug was able to inhibit SWAP-70-mediated membrane ruffling as well, suggesting that its effect was closely related to the SWAP-70 signaling pathway. These results suggest that SWAP-70-374 can activate some signaling pathways, including the ERK1/2 pathway, to transform MEFs.

  18. A mouse renin distal enhancer is essential for blood pressure homeostasis in BAC-rescued renin-null mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Keiji; Kanafusa, Sumiyo; Ushiki, Aki; Matsuzaki, Hitomi; Ishida, Junji; Sugiyama, Fumihiro; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi

    2014-10-01

    Renin is predominantly expressed in juxtaglomerular cells in the kidney and regulates blood pressure homeostasis. To examine possible in vivo functions of a mouse distal enhancer (mdE), we generated transgenic mice (TgM) carrying either wild-type or mdE-deficient renin BACs (bacterial artificial chromosome), integrated at the identical chromosomal site. In the kidneys of the TgM, the mdE contributed 80% to basal renin promoter activity. To test for possible physiological roles for the mdE, renin BAC transgenes were used to rescue the hypotensive renin-null mice. Interestingly, renal renin expression in the Tg(BAC):renin-null compound mice was indistinguishable between the wild-type and mutant BAC carriers. Surprisingly, however, the plasma renin activity and angiotensin I concentration in the mdE compound mutant mice were significantly lower than the same parameters in the control mice, and the mutants were consistently hypotensive, demonstrating that blood pressure homeostasis is regulated through transcriptional cis elements controlling renin activity.

  19. Development of new mouse lung tumor models expressing EGFR T790M mutants associated with clinical resistance to kinase inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Regales

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The EGFR T790M mutation confers acquired resistance to kinase inhibitors in human EGFR mutant lung adenocarcinoma, is occasionally detected before treatment, and may confer genetic susceptibility to lung cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To study further its role in lung tumorigenesis, we developed mice with inducible expression in type II pneumocytes of EGFR(T790M alone or together with a drug-sensitive L858R mutation. Both transgenic lines develop lung adenocarcinomas that require mutant EGFR for tumor maintenance but are resistant to an EGFR kinase inhibitor. EGFR(L858R+T790M-driven tumors are transiently targeted by hsp90 inhibition. Notably, EGFR(T790M-expressing animals develop tumors with longer latency than EGFR(L858R+T790M-bearing mice and in the absence of additional kinase domain mutations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These new mouse models of mutant EGFR-dependent lung adenocarcinomas provide insight into clinical observations. The models should also be useful for developing improved therapies for patients with lung cancers harboring EGFR(T790M alone or in conjunction with drug-sensitive EGFR kinase domain mutations.

  20. Knockin mouse with mutant Gα11 mimics human inherited hypocalcemia and is rescued by pharmacologic inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roszko, Kelly L; Bi, Ruiye; Gorvin, Caroline M

    2017-01-01

    in patients with autosomal-dominant hypocalcemia type 2 (ADH2), an inherited disorder of hypocalcemia, low parathyroid hormone (PTH), and hyperphosphatemia. We have generated knockin mice harboring the point mutation GNA11 c.C178T (p.Arg60Cys) identified in ADH2 patients. The mutant mice faithfully replicated...

  1. Weaver mutant mouse cerebellar granule cells respond normally to chronic depolarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Annette; Mogensen, Helle Smidt; Hack, N;

    1997-01-01

    We studied the effects of chronic K(+)-induced membrane depolarization and treatment with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) on cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) from weaver mutant mice and non-weaver litter-mates. The weaver mutation is a Gly-to-Ser substitution in a conserved region of the Girk2 G prote...

  2. Weaver mutant mouse cerebellar granule cells respond normally to chronic depolarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Annette; Mogensen, Helle Smidt; Hack, N

    1997-01-01

    We studied the effects of chronic K(+)-induced membrane depolarization and treatment with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) on cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) from weaver mutant mice and non-weaver litter-mates. The weaver mutation is a Gly-to-Ser substitution in a conserved region of the Girk2 G prote...

  3. A reeler mutant mouse with a new, spontaneous mutation in the reelin gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Tom E; Finsen, Bente; Goffinet, Andre M

    2002-01-01

    In one of our mouse colonies a reeler-like phenotype appeared spontaneously. The brain histology was identical to the known reeler phenotype. Northern and Western blot analysis and a complementation test showed that the defect is located to the reelin gene. Southern blot and PCR analysis together...

  4. A new model for non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae middle ear infection in the Junbo mutant mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Derek; Moxon, Richard; Purnell, Tom; Richter, Caroline; Williams, Debbie; Azar, Ali; Crompton, Michael; Wells, Sara; Fray, Martin; Brown, Steve D M; Cheeseman, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    Acute otitis media, inflammation of the middle ear, is the most common bacterial infection in children and, as a consequence, is the most common reason for antimicrobial prescription to this age group. There is currently no effective vaccine for the principal pathogen involved, non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). The most frequently used and widely accepted experimental animal model of middle ear infection is in chinchillas, but mice and gerbils have also been used. We have established a robust model of middle ear infection by NTHi in the Junbo mouse, a mutant mouse line that spontaneously develops chronic middle ear inflammation in specific pathogen-free conditions. The heterozygote Junbo mouse (Jbo/+) bears a mutation in a gene (Evi1, also known as Mecom) that plays a role in host innate immune regulation; pre-existing middle ear inflammation promotes NTHi middle ear infection. A single intranasal inoculation with NTHi produces high rates (up to 90%) of middle ear infection and bacterial titres (10(4)-10(5) colony-forming units/µl) in bulla fluids. Bacteria are cleared from the majority of middle ears between day 21 and 35 post-inoculation but remain in approximately 20% of middle ears at least up to day 56 post-infection. The expression of Toll-like receptor-dependent response cytokine genes is elevated in the middle ear of the Jbo/+ mouse following NTHi infection. The translational potential of the Junbo model for studying antimicrobial intervention regimens was shown using a 3 day course of azithromycin to clear NTHi infection, and its potential use in vaccine development studies was shown by demonstrating protection in mice immunized with killed homologous, but not heterologous, NTHi bacteria.

  5. A new model for non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae middle ear infection in the Junbo mutant mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Hood

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute otitis media, inflammation of the middle ear, is the most common bacterial infection in children and, as a consequence, is the most common reason for antimicrobial prescription to this age group. There is currently no effective vaccine for the principal pathogen involved, non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi. The most frequently used and widely accepted experimental animal model of middle ear infection is in chinchillas, but mice and gerbils have also been used. We have established a robust model of middle ear infection by NTHi in the Junbo mouse, a mutant mouse line that spontaneously develops chronic middle ear inflammation in specific pathogen-free conditions. The heterozygote Junbo mouse (Jbo/+ bears a mutation in a gene (Evi1, also known as Mecom that plays a role in host innate immune regulation; pre-existing middle ear inflammation promotes NTHi middle ear infection. A single intranasal inoculation with NTHi produces high rates (up to 90% of middle ear infection and bacterial titres (104-105 colony-forming units/µl in bulla fluids. Bacteria are cleared from the majority of middle ears between day 21 and 35 post-inoculation but remain in approximately 20% of middle ears at least up to day 56 post-infection. The expression of Toll-like receptor-dependent response cytokine genes is elevated in the middle ear of the Jbo/+ mouse following NTHi infection. The translational potential of the Junbo model for studying antimicrobial intervention regimens was shown using a 3 day course of azithromycin to clear NTHi infection, and its potential use in vaccine development studies was shown by demonstrating protection in mice immunized with killed homologous, but not heterologous, NTHi bacteria.

  6. A new model for non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae middle ear infection in the Junbo mutant mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Derek; Moxon, Richard; Purnell, Tom; Richter, Caroline; Williams, Debbie; Azar, Ali; Crompton, Michael; Wells, Sara; Fray, Martin; Brown, Steve D. M.; Cheeseman, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acute otitis media, inflammation of the middle ear, is the most common bacterial infection in children and, as a consequence, is the most common reason for antimicrobial prescription to this age group. There is currently no effective vaccine for the principal pathogen involved, non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). The most frequently used and widely accepted experimental animal model of middle ear infection is in chinchillas, but mice and gerbils have also been used. We have established a robust model of middle ear infection by NTHi in the Junbo mouse, a mutant mouse line that spontaneously develops chronic middle ear inflammation in specific pathogen-free conditions. The heterozygote Junbo mouse (Jbo/+) bears a mutation in a gene (Evi1, also known as Mecom) that plays a role in host innate immune regulation; pre-existing middle ear inflammation promotes NTHi middle ear infection. A single intranasal inoculation with NTHi produces high rates (up to 90%) of middle ear infection and bacterial titres (104-105 colony-forming units/µl) in bulla fluids. Bacteria are cleared from the majority of middle ears between day 21 and 35 post-inoculation but remain in approximately 20% of middle ears at least up to day 56 post-infection. The expression of Toll-like receptor-dependent response cytokine genes is elevated in the middle ear of the Jbo/+ mouse following NTHi infection. The translational potential of the Junbo model for studying antimicrobial intervention regimens was shown using a 3 day course of azithromycin to clear NTHi infection, and its potential use in vaccine development studies was shown by demonstrating protection in mice immunized with killed homologous, but not heterologous, NTHi bacteria. PMID:26611891

  7. Cox4i2, Ifit2, and Prdm11 Mutant Mice: Effective Selection of Genes Predisposing to an Altered Airway Inflammatory Response from a Large Compendium of Mutant Mouse Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsch, Marion; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Bönisch, Clemens; Côme, Christophe; Kolster-Fog, Cathrine; Jensen, Klaus T; Lund, Anders H; Lee, Icksoo; Grossman, Lawrence I; Sinkler, Christopher; Hüttemann, Maik; Bohn, Erwin; Fuchs, Helmut; Ollert, Markus; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; de Angelis, Martin Hrabĕ; Beckers, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    We established a selection strategy to identify new models for an altered airway inflammatory response from a large compendium of mutant mouse lines that were systemically phenotyped in the German Mouse Clinic (GMC). As selection criteria we included published gene functional data, as well as immunological and transcriptome data from GMC phenotyping screens under standard conditions. Applying these criteria we identified a few from several hundred mutant mouse lines and further characterized the Cox4i2tm1Hutt, Ifit2tm1.1Ebsb, and Prdm11tm1.1ahl lines following ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization and repeated OVA airway challenge. Challenged Prdm11tm1.1ahl mice exhibited changes in B cell counts, CD4+ T cell counts, and in the number of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavages, whereas challenged Ifit2tm1.1Ebsb mice displayed alterations in plasma IgE, IgG1, IgG3, and IgM levels compared to the challenged wild type littermates. In contrast, challenged Cox4i2tm1Hutt mutant mice did not show alterations in the humoral or cellular immune response compared to challenged wild type mice. Transcriptome analyses from lungs of the challenged mutant mouse lines showed extensive changes in gene expression in Prdm11tm1.1ahl mice. Functional annotations of regulated genes of all three mutant mouse lines were primarily related to inflammation and airway smooth muscle (ASM) remodeling. We were thus able to define an effective selection strategy to identify new candidate genes for the predisposition to an altered airway inflammatory response under OVA challenge conditions. Similar selection strategies may be used for the analysis of additional genotype-envirotype interactions for other diseases.

  8. Bilateral subcortical heterotopia with partial callosal agenesis in a mouse mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, G D; Azoulay, N G; Griffin, E G; Newbury, A; Koganti, L; Fujisaki, N; Takahashi, E; Grant, P E; Truong, D T; Fitch, R H; Lu, L; Williams, R W

    2013-04-01

    Cognition and behavior depend on the precise placement and interconnection of complex ensembles of neurons in cerebral cortex. Mutations that disrupt migration of immature neurons from the ventricular zone to the cortical plate have provided major insight into mechanisms of brain development and disease. We have discovered a new and highly penetrant spontaneous mutation that leads to large nodular bilateral subcortical heterotopias with partial callosal agenesis. The mutant phenotype was first detected in a colony of fully inbred BXD29 mice already known to harbor a mutation in Tlr4. Neurons confined to the heterotopias are mainly born in midgestation to late gestation and would normally have migrated into layers 2-4 of overlying neocortex. Callosal cross-sectional area and fiber number are reduced up to 50% compared with coisogenic wildtype BXD29 substrain controls. Mutants have a pronounced and highly selective defect in rapid auditory processing. The segregation pattern of the mutant phenotype is most consistent with a two-locus autosomal recessive model, and selective genotyping definitively rules out the Tlr4 mutation as a cause. The discovery of a novel mutation with strong pleiotropic anatomical and behavioral effects provides an important new resource for dissecting molecular mechanisms and functional consequences of errors of neuronal migration.

  9. Reduced anxiety and depression-like behaviours in the circadian period mutant mouse afterhours.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Keers

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Disruption of the circadian rhythm is a key feature of bipolar disorder. Variation in genes encoding components of the molecular circadian clock has been associated with increased risk of the disorder in clinical populations. Similarly in animal models, disruption of the circadian clock can result in altered mood and anxiety which resemble features of human mania; including hyperactivity, reduced anxiety and reduced depression-like behaviour. One such mutant, after hours (Afh, an ENU-derived mutant with a mutation in a recently identified circadian clock gene Fbxl3, results in a disturbed (long circadian rhythm of approximately 27 hours. METHODOLOGY: Anxiety, exploratory and depression-like behaviours were evaluated in Afh mice using the open-field, elevated plus maze, light-dark box, holeboard and forced swim test. To further validate findings for human mania, polymorphisms in the human homologue of FBXL3, genotyped by three genome wide case control studies, were tested for association with bipolar disorder. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Afh mice showed reduced anxiety- and depression-like behaviour in all of the behavioural tests employed, and some evidence of increased locomotor activity in some tests. An analysis of three separate human data sets revealed a gene wide association between variation in FBXL3 and bipolar disorder (P = 0.009. CONCLUSIONS: Our results are consistent with previous studies of mutants with extended circadian periods and suggest that disruption of FBXL3 is associated with mania-like behaviours in both mice and humans.

  10. Distinct roles of autophagy-dependent and -independent functions of FIP200 revealed by generation and analysis of a mutant knock-in mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Song; Wang, Chenran; Yeo, Syn; Liang, Chun-Chi; Okamoto, Takako; Sun, Shaogang; Wen, Jian; Guan, Jun-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Chen et al. generated a FIP200-4A mutant knock-in mouse model and found that specifically blocking FIP200 interaction with Atg13 abolishes autophagy in vivo. Analysis of the new mouse model showed that nonautophagic functions of FIP200 are sufficient to fully support embryogenesis by maintaining a protective role in TNFα-induced apoptosis. However, FIP200-mediated canonical autophagy is required to support neonatal survival and tumor cell growth.

  11. Developing Novel Automated Apparatus for Studying Battery of Social Behaviors in Mutant Mouse Models for Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    S.S., et al., Development of a mouse test for repetitive , restricted behaviors : relevance to autism . Behav Brain Res, 2008. 188(1): p. 178-94. 6...for autism spectrum disorders -in search of biomarkers Q3. Behav. Brain. Res. (2012). 30. Karvat, G. & Kimchi, T. Systematic autistic-like behavioral ...12 4 Introduction Genetic analyses to determine a specific heritable factor underlying susceptibility to autism spectrum disorders (ASD

  12. The kinetic mechanism of wild-type and mutant mouse dihydrofolate reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thillet, J; Adams, J A; Benkovic, S J

    1990-05-29

    A kinetic mechanism is presented for mouse dihydrofolate reductase that predicts all the steady-state parameters and full time-course kinetics. This mechanism was derived from association and dissociation rate constants and pre-steady-state transients by using stopped-flow fluorescence and absorbance measurements. The major features of this kinetic mechanism are as follows: (1) the two native enzyme conformers, E1 and E2, bind ligands with varying affinities although only one conformer, E1, can support catalysis in the forward direction, (2) tetrahydrofolate dissociation is the rate-limiting step under steady-state turnover at low pH, and (3) the pH-independent rate of hydride transfer from NADPH to dihydrofolate is fast (khyd = 9000 s-1) and favorable (Keq = 100). The overall mechanism is similar in form to the Escherichia coli kinetic scheme (Fierke et al., 1987), although several differences are observed: (1) substrates and products predominantly bind the same form of the E. coli enzyme, and (2) the hydride transfer rate from NADPH to either folate or dihydrofolate is considerably faster for the mouse enzyme. The role of Glu-30 (Asp-27 in E. coli) in mouse DHFR has also been examined by using site-directed mutagenesis as a potential source of these differences. While aspartic acid is strictly conserved in all bacterial DHFRs, glutamic acid is conserved in all known eucaryotes. The two major effects of substituting Asp for Glu-30 in the mouse enzyme are (1) a decreased rate of folate reduction and (2) an increased rate of hydride transfer from NADPH to dihydrofolate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Expression of the mouse metallothionein mutant ββ-cDNA in the lettuces (Lactuca sativa L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Mouse metallothionein (MT) domain mutant ββ-cDNA gene has been inserted into the plant expression vector pGPTVd35S which has herbicide (PPT)-resistance gene bar as a selective marker. The chimeric gene was introduced into the lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. cv Salinas 88) by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. PCR and Southern blot analysis of some putative transformants indicated that the introduced ββ-cDNA was integrated into lettuce genome and inheritted by sexual reproduction. The expression of ββ gene in lettuce plants was demonstrated by Northern and Western blot analysis. Meanwhile, the zinc content of the transformed lettuce plants is up to 400 μg/g dry weight, remarkably higher than the control plants.

  14. A Novel Bmal1 Mutant Mouse Reveals Essential Roles of the C-Terminal Domain on Circadian Rhythms.

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    Noheon Park

    Full Text Available The mammalian circadian clock is an endogenous biological timer comprised of transcriptional/translational feedback loops of clock genes. Bmal1 encodes an indispensable transcription factor for the generation of circadian rhythms. Here, we report a new circadian mutant mouse from gene-trapped embryonic stem cells harboring a C-terminus truncated Bmal1 (Bmal1GTΔC allele. The homozygous mutant (Bmal1GTΔC/GTΔC mice immediately lost circadian behavioral rhythms under constant darkness. The heterozygous (Bmal1+/GTΔC mice displayed a gradual loss of rhythms, in contrast to Bmal1+/- mice where rhythms were sustained. Bmal1GTΔC/GTΔC mice also showed arrhythmic mRNA and protein expression in the SCN and liver. Lack of circadian reporter oscillation was also observed in cultured fibroblast cells, indicating that the arrhythmicity of Bmal1GTΔC/GTΔC mice resulted from impaired molecular clock machinery. Expression of clock genes exhibited distinct responses to the mutant allele in Bmal1+/GTΔC and Bmal1GTΔC/GTΔC mice. Despite normal cellular localization and heterodimerization with CLOCK, overexpressed BMAL1GTΔC was unable to activate transcription of Per1 promoter and BMAL1-dependent CLOCK degradation. These results indicate that the C-terminal region of Bmal1 has pivotal roles in the regulation of circadian rhythms and the Bmal1GTΔC mice constitute a novel model system to evaluate circadian functional mechanism of BMAL1.

  15. Identification of 14-3-3σ mutation causing cutaneous abnormality in repeated-epilation mutant mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiutang; Lu, Qingxian; Estepa, Gabriela; Verma, Inder M.

    2005-01-01

    Repeated-epilation (Er) mutation in the mouse is inherited as an autosomal and semidominant mutation. Major defects in heterozygous adults and homozygous fetuses were associated with skin and were caused by abnormal ectodermal differentiation. Heterozygous mice are characterized by repeated hair loss and regrowth, and homozygous fetuses die at birth with severe abnormality in skin, limb, tail, and face. To identify the gene causing Er mutation, we have performed gene-expression profiles of skins and mouse embryonic fibroblasts from WT and mutant Er mice by using Affymetrix (Santa Clara, CA) chip analysis. By analyzing the candidate genes generated from gene-expression profiling, we identified a Sfn mutation in Er mice. A single nucleotide insertion in the Sfn (Stratifin, also called 14-3-3σ) coding region results in a truncated protein lacking 40 amino acid residues at the C terminus. The mutation is linked with phenotypes of Er-heterozygous and -homozygous mice. Ectopic overexpression of WT 14-3-3σ in Er/Er keratinocytes rescues defects in keratinocyte differentiation. Our study demonstrates that 14-3-3σ is a crucial regulator for skin proliferation and differentiation. PMID:16239341

  16. Neuroinflammation by cytotoxic T-lymphocytes impairs retrograde axonal transport in an oligodendrocyte mutant mouse.

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    Chi Wang Ip

    Full Text Available Mice overexpressing proteolipid protein (PLP develop a leukodystrophy-like disease involving cytotoxic, CD8+ T-lymphocytes. Here we show that these cytotoxic T-lymphocytes perturb retrograde axonal transport. Using fluorogold stereotactically injected into the colliculus superior, we found that PLP overexpression in oligodendrocytes led to significantly reduced retrograde axonal transport in retina ganglion cell axons. We also observed an accumulation of mitochondria in the juxtaparanodal axonal swellings, indicative for a disturbed axonal transport. PLP overexpression in the absence of T-lymphocytes rescued retrograde axonal transport defects and abolished axonal swellings. Bone marrow transfer from wildtype mice, but not from perforin- or granzyme B-deficient mutants, into lymphocyte-deficient PLP mutant mice led again to impaired axonal transport and the formation of axonal swellings, which are predominantly located at the juxtaparanodal region. This demonstrates that the adaptive immune system, including cytotoxic T-lymphocytes which release perforin and granzyme B, are necessary to perturb axonal integrity in the PLP-transgenic disease model. Based on our observations, so far not attended molecular and cellular players belonging to the immune system should be considered to understand pathogenesis in inherited myelin disorders with progressive axonal damage.

  17. Firefly Luciferase Mutants Allow Substrate-Selective Bioluminescence Imaging in the Mouse Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Spencer T; Mofford, David M; Reddy, G S Kiran Kumar; Miller, Stephen C

    2016-04-11

    Bioluminescence imaging is a powerful approach for visualizing specific events occurring inside live mice. Animals can be made to glow in response to the expression of a gene, the activity of an enzyme, or the growth of a tumor. But bioluminescence requires the interaction of a luciferase enzyme with a small-molecule luciferin, and its scope has been limited by the mere handful of natural combinations. Herein, we show that mutants of firefly luciferase can discriminate between natural and synthetic substrates in the brains of live mice. When using adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors to express luciferases in the brain, we found that mutant luciferases that are inactive or weakly active with d-luciferin can light up brightly when treated with the aminoluciferins CycLuc1 and CycLuc2 or their respective FAAH-sensitive luciferin amides. Further development of selective luciferases promises to expand the power of bioluminescence and allow multiple events to be imaged in the same live animal.

  18. Knockin mouse with mutant Gα11 mimics human inherited hypocalcemia and is rescued by pharmacologic inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszko, Kelly L.; Bi, Ruiye; Gorvin, Caroline M.; Xiong, Xiao-Feng; Inoue, Asuka; Thakker, Rajesh V.; Strømgaard, Kristian; Gardella, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins play critical roles in transducing extracellular signals generated by 7-transmembrane domain receptors. Somatic gain-of-function mutations in G protein α subunits are associated with a variety of diseases. Recently, we identified gain-of-function mutations in Gα11 in patients with autosomal-dominant hypocalcemia type 2 (ADH2), an inherited disorder of hypocalcemia, low parathyroid hormone (PTH), and hyperphosphatemia. We have generated knockin mice harboring the point mutation GNA11 c.C178T (p.Arg60Cys) identified in ADH2 patients. The mutant mice faithfully replicated human ADH2. They also exhibited low bone mineral density and increased skin pigmentation. Treatment with NPS 2143, a negative allosteric modulator of the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR), increased PTH and calcium concentrations in WT and mutant mice, suggesting that the gain-of-function effect of GNA11R6OC is partly dependent on coupling to the CASR. Treatment with the Gα11/q-specific inhibitor YM-254890 increased blood calcium in heterozygous but not in homozygous GNA11R60C mice, consistent with published crystal structure data showing that Arg60 forms a critical contact with YM-254890. This animal model of ADH2 provides insights into molecular mechanism of this G protein–related disease and potential paths toward new lines of therapy. PMID:28194446

  19. Mouse mtDNA mutant model of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun Shi; Sharpley, Mark S; Fan, Weiwei; Waymire, Katrina G; Sadun, Alfredo A; Carelli, Valerio; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N; Baciu, Peter; Sung, Eric; McManus, Meagan J; Pan, Billy X; Gil, Daniel W; Macgregor, Grant R; Wallace, Douglas C

    2012-12-04

    An animal model of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) was produced by introducing the human optic atrophy mtDNA ND6 P25L mutation into the mouse. Mice with this mutation exhibited reduction in retinal function by elecroretinogram (ERG), age-related decline in central smaller caliber optic nerve fibers with sparing of larger peripheral fibers, neuronal accumulation of abnormal mitochondria, axonal swelling, and demyelination. Mitochondrial analysis revealed partial complex I and respiration defects and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, whereas synaptosome analysis revealed decreased complex I activity and increased ROS but no diminution of ATP production. Thus, LHON pathophysiology may result from oxidative stress.

  20. Enhanced astrocytic nitric oxide production and neuronal modifications in the neocortex of a NOS2 mutant mouse.

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    Yossi Buskila

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been well accepted that glial cells in the central nervous system (CNS produce nitric oxide (NO through the induction of a nitric oxide synthase isoform (NOS2 only in response to various insults. Recently we described rapid astroglial, NOS2-dependent, NO production in the neocortex of healthy mice on a time scale relevant to neuronal activity. To explore a possible role for astroglial NOS2 in normal brain function we investigated a NOS2 knockout mouse (B6;129P2-Nos2(tm1Lau/J, Jackson Laboratory. Previous studies of this mouse strain revealed mainly altered immune responses, but no compensatory pathways and no CNS abnormalities have been reported. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To our surprise, using NO imaging in brain slices in combination with biochemical methods we uncovered robust NO production by neocortical astrocytes of the NOS2 mutant. These findings indicate the existence of an alternative pathway that increases basal NOS activity. In addition, the astroglial mutation instigated modifications of neuronal attributes, shown by changes in the membrane properties of pyramidal neurons, and revealed in distinct behavioral abnormalities characterized by an increase in stress-related parameters. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results strongly indicate the involvement of astrocytic-derived NO in modifying the activity of neuronal networks. In addition, the findings corroborate data linking NO signaling with stress-related behavior, and highlight the potential use of this genetic model for studies of stress-susceptibility. Lastly, our results beg re-examination of previous studies that used this mouse strain to examine the pathophysiology of brain insults, assuming lack of astrocytic nitrosative reaction.

  1. p62/SQSTM1 differentially removes the toxic mutant androgen receptor via autophagy and inclusion formation in a spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Hideki; Adachi, Hiroaki; Katsuno, Masahisa; Minamiyama, Makoto; Matsumoto, Shinjiro; Kondo, Naohide; Miyazaki, Yu; Iida, Madoka; Tohnai, Genki; Qiang, Qiang; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Yanagawa, Toru; Warabi, Eiji; Ishii, Tetsuro; Sobue, Gen

    2013-05-01

    Polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases are inherited neurodegenerative disorders that are caused by the expansion of trinucleotide CAG repeats in the causative genes. Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an inherited motor neuron disease that is caused by the expansion of a polyQ tract within the androgen receptor (AR). p62 is a ubiquitin- and light-chain 3-binding protein that is known to regulate the degradation of targeted proteins via autophagy and inclusion formation. In this study, we examined the effects of p62 depletion and overexpression on cultured cells and in a transgenic mouse model that overexpressed the mutant AR. Here, we demonstrate that depletion of p62 significantly exacerbated motor phenotypes and the neuropathological outcome, whereas overexpression of p62 protected against mutant AR toxicity in SBMA mice. Depletion of p62 significantly increased the levels of monomeric mutant AR and mutant AR protein complexes in an SBMA mouse model via the impairment of autophagic degradation. In addition, p62 overexpression improved SBMA mouse phenotypes by inducing cytoprotective inclusion formation. Our results demonstrate that p62 provides two different therapeutic targets in SBMA pathogenesis: (1) autophagy-dependent degradation and (2) benevolent inclusion formation of the mutant AR.

  2. A search for radiosensitive mouse mutants by use of the micronucleus technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Buul, P P; Tuinenburg-Bolraap, A; Searle, A G; Natarajan, A T

    1987-01-01

    In order to identify radiosensitive mutations in mice, 26 genetically well defined mutations in 26 different combinations of homozygous, hemizygous or heterozygous conditions, together with normal mice and mutagen-sensitive MS/Ae mice were analysed for the induction of micronuclei by X-rays in bone-marrow cells. For each mutant two doses of 0.5 and 1.0 Gy, two sampling times of 18 and 27 h after irradiation and unirradiated controls were studied. Using our criteria, homozygous contrasted allele of steel (Slcon), scabby (scb), viable dominant spotting (Wv), quaking (qk), fidget (fi) and postaxial hemimelia (px), heterozygous lurcher (Lc), hemizygous gyro (Gy), the compounds Slcon/grizzle-belly (SlgbH) and Wv/rump-white (Rw) and MS/Ae mice, were regarded as radiosensitive, with Slcon/Slcon the highest in rank order. Homozygous wabbler-lethal (wl) and wasted (wst) showed hyposensitivity which for the latter may be connected with enhanced cell killing.

  3. Mapping and interpretation of satellite magnetic anomalies from POGO data over the Antarctic region

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    P. T. Taylor

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available A satellite magnetic anomaly map made using the POGO magnetic field data is compared to three maps made using Magsat data. A total of 14 anomalies with magnitudes greater than 3 nT can be identified in all four of the maps poleward of 60°S latitude. Forward models of the Antarctic continental and oceanic lithosphere are produced which use magnetic crustal thickness based on seismic and heat flow data, and which also use the distribution of the Cretaceous Quiet Zone from marine geophysics. These simple models can explain significant parts of eight of the 14 identified anomalies. The remaining anomalies may be caused by lateral variations of magnetization, inadequate models of the magnetic crustal thickness, or remanent magnetizations in directions other than the present field. In addition, contamination of the magnetic anomaly maps by fields of time-varying external origin (and their corresponding internal parts is still a significant problem in the Antarctic region.

  4. The cytoplasmic NPM mutant induces myeloproliferation in a transgenic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ke; Sportoletti, Paolo; Ito, Keisuke; Clohessy, John G; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Kutok, Jeffery L; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2010-04-22

    Although NPM1 gene mutations leading to aberrant cytoplasmic expression of nucleophosmin (NPMc(+)) are the most frequent genetic lesions in acute myeloid leukemia, there is yet no experimental model demonstrating their oncogenicity in vivo. We report the generation and characterization of a transgenic mouse model expressing the most frequent human NPMc(+) mutation driven by the myeloid-specific human MRP8 promoter (hMRP8-NPMc(+)). In parallel, we generated a similar wild-type NPM trans-genic model (hMRP8-NPM). Interestingly, hMRP8-NPMc(+) transgenic mice developed myeloproliferation in bone marrow and spleen, whereas nontransgenic littermates and hMRP8-NPM transgenic mice remained disease free. These findings provide the first in vivo evidence indicating that NPMc(+) confers a proliferative advantage in the myeloid lineage. No spontaneous acute myeloid leukemia was found in hMPR8-NPMc(+) or hMRP8-NPM mice. This model will also aid in the development of therapeutic regimens that specifically target NPMc(+).

  5. Analysis of an ordered, comprehensive STM mutant library in infectious Borrelia burgdorferi: insights into the genes required for mouse infectivity.

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    Tao Lin

    Full Text Available The identification of genes important in the pathogenesis of Lyme disease Borrelia has been hampered by exceedingly low transformation rates in low-passage, infectious organisms. Using the infectious, moderately transformable B. burgdorferi derivative 5A18NP1 and signature-tagged versions of the Himar1 transposon vector pGKT, we have constructed a defined transposon library for the efficient genome-wide investigation of genes required for wild-type pathogenesis, in vitro growth, physiology, morphology, and plasmid replication. To facilitate analysis, the insertion sites of 4,479 transposon mutants were determined by sequencing. The transposon insertions were widely distributed across the entire B. burgdorferi genome, with an average of 2.68 unique insertion sites per kb DNA. The 10 linear plasmids and 9 circular plasmids had insertions in 33 to 100 percent of their predicted genes. In contrast, only 35% of genes in the 910 kb linear chromosome had incapacitating insertions; therefore, the remaining 601 chromosomal genes may represent essential gene candidates. In initial signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM analyses, 434 mutants were examined at multiple tissue sites for infectivity in mice using a semi-quantitative, Luminex-based DNA detection method. Examples of genes found to be important in mouse infectivity included those involved in motility, chemotaxis, the phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system, and other transporters, as well as putative plasmid maintenance genes. Availability of this ordered STM library and a high-throughput screening method is expected to lead to efficient assessment of the roles of B. burgdorferi genes in the infectious cycle and pathogenesis of Lyme disease.

  6. Developmental analysis of the external granular layer in the meander tail mutant mouse: do cerebellar microneurons have independent progenitors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napieralski, J A; Eisenman, L M

    1993-08-01

    The cerebellum of the meander tail mutant mouse (mea/mea) is characterized by an apparently normal cytoarchitecture posteriorly with an abrupt transition to an abnormal anterior region. Anteriorly, there is abnormal foliation, a drastic reduction in the granule cells (GC) population, disorganization of the Purkinje cells (PC), and a virtual absence of Bergmann glial processes. In this paper we analyze the prenatal and postnatal development of the cerebellum in the mea/mea and attempt to determine the phenotypic onset of the mutation in the anterior region. Hematoxylin and eosin stained sections reveal a morphological difference in the cerebellum of the mea/mea as early as embryonic day 16 characterized by a reduction in the external granule cell layer (EGL). The reduction in the EGL becomes increasingly apparent as development proceeds. This deficit in the EGL most probably results in the absence of GC, but it is unclear at this point whether reduced migration, proliferation, and/or increased cell death is the major factor. Interestingly, immunohistochemical staining with a monoclonal antibody against parvalbumin reveals that the basket and stellate cells, which are also thought to arise from the EGL, are present in the anterior region of the mea/mea cerebellum. These results suggest that the lack of GC in the meander tail is due to an early expressed abnormality of the EGL. However, the presence of the basket and/or stellate cells raises some interesting questions concerning the lineage of the cerebellar microneurons.

  7. [Influence of mutant genes on crystallin synthesis in the forming mouse lens. II. Fidget and ocular retardation genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakovlev, M I; Platonov, E S; Koniukhov, B V

    1977-01-01

    The beginning of synthesis and the localization of alpha- and gamma-crystallins in the developing lenses of the 10-13 and 15 days old mouse embryos of the genotypes fi/fi +/+, +/+ or/or, fi/fi or/or and +/+ +/+ were studied by means of indirect immunofluorescence. The synthesis of crystallins in the mutant embryos with the exception of the embryo +/+ or/or was shown to begin somewhat later than in the normal ones but to proceed in all defective lenses, irrespective of the degree of defect. Hence, the activation of the genes controlling the synthesis of alpha-crystallins begins at the early stages of lens development and the synthesis of these proteins proceeds even during the abnormal with the slowing down of the formation of primary lens fibers. In the cases of strong defects of morphogenesis in the fi/fi +/+ and, especially, fi/fi or/or, embryos gamma-crystallins were not detected. The synthesis of gamma-crystallins appears to begin at the final stages of lens fiber differentiation.

  8. Mutations of t-complex testis expressed gene 5 transcripts in the testis of sterile t-haplotype mutant mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yibing Han; Xue-Xiong Song; Huai-Liang Feng; Che-Kwok Cheung; Po-Mui Lam; Chi-Chiu Wang; Christophe John Haines

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To determine the possible roles of the t-complex testis expressed gene 5 (Tctex5) on sperm functions, the full-length sequence of mRNA was studied and compared in the testis between the normal wild-type and the sterile t-haplotype mutant mice. Methods: We applied rapid amplification of cDNA ends, Northern blot and reverse tran-scription polymerase chain reaction to analyze the full length of Tctex5 mRNAs isolated from testes of the wild-type and the t-haplotype mice. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was used to semi-quantitatively compare expression of Tctex5 transcripts in the 16 tissues and 9.5 day stage embryos in the wild-type mice. E-translation was applied to estimate the amino acid sequences. Results: One long and one short transcript of Tctex5 mRNA were discovered in mouse testis of wild-type (Tctex5long-+ and Tctex5short-+) and t-haplotype(Tctex5long-t and Tctex5short-t)mice,respectively. Being enhanced only in the testis, Tctex5long-t had 17 point mutations and one 15-bp-deletion in the exon 1 region, comparing with the Tctex5long-+, whereas the Tctex5short-t was similar to the Tctex5short-+. The short isoforms of Tctex5 rnRNAs in the two models encoded exactly the same peptides, but the long isoforms did not. The estimated peptide encoded by Tctex5long-t had significant mutations on putative sites of phosphorylation and PP1 binding.Conclusion: We established that mutations that occur in the Tctex5 long transcript of the t-haplotype mice are important for normal sperm function, whereas the short transcript of Tctex5 might have a conserved function among different tissues.

  9. POGO satellite orbit corrections: an opportunity to improve the quality of the geomagnetic field measurements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockmann, Reto; Christiansen, Freddy; Olsen, Nils; Jackson, Andrew

    2015-06-01

    We present an attempt to improve the quality of the geomagnetic field measurements from the Polar Orbiting Geophysical Observatory (POGO) satellite missions in the late 1960s. Inaccurate satellite positions are believed to be a major source of errors for using the magnetic observations for field modelling. To improve the data, we use an iterative approach consisting of two main parts: one is a main field modelling process to obtain the radial field gradient to perturb the orbits and the other is the state-of-the-art GPS orbit modelling software BERNESE to calculate new physical orbits. We report results based on a single-day approach showing a clear increase of the data quality. That single-day approach leads, however, to undesirable orbital jumps at midnight. Furthermore, we report results obtained for a much larger data set comprising almost all of the data from the three missions. With this approach, we eliminate the orbit discontinuities at midnight but only tiny quality improvements could be achieved for geomagnetically quiet data. We believe that improvements to the data are probably still possible, but it would require the original tracking observations to be found.

  10. Effects of deletion of mutant huntingtin in steroidogenic factor 1 neurons on the psychiatric and metabolic phenotype in the BACHD mouse model of Huntington disease.

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    Barbara Baldo

    Full Text Available Psychiatric and metabolic features appear several years before motor disturbances in the neurodegenerative Huntington's disease (HD, caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the huntingtin (HTT gene. Although the mechanisms leading to these aspects are unknown, dysfunction in the hypothalamus, a brain region controlling emotion and metabolism, has been suggested. A direct link between the expression of the disease causing protein, huntingtin (HTT, in the hypothalamus and the development of metabolic and psychiatric-like features have been shown in the BACHD mouse model of HD. However, precisely which circuitry in the hypothalamus is critical for these features is not known. We hypothesized that expression of mutant HTT in the ventromedial hypothalamus, an area involved in the regulation of metabolism and emotion would be important for the development of these non-motor aspects. Therefore, we inactivated mutant HTT in a specific neuronal population of the ventromedial hypothalamus expressing the transcription factor steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1 in the BACHD mouse using cross-breeding based on a Cre-loxP system. Effects on anxiety-like behavior were assessed using the elevated plus maze and novelty-induced suppressed feeding test. Depressive-like behavior was assessed using the Porsolt forced swim test. Effects on the metabolic phenotype were analyzed using measurements of body weight and body fat, as well as serum insulin and leptin levels. Interestingly, the inactivation of mutant HTT in SF1-expressing neurons exerted a partial positive effect on the depressive-like behavior in female BACHD mice at 4 months of age. In this cohort of mice, no anxiety-like behavior was detected. The deletion of mutant HTT in SF1 neurons did not have any effect on the development of metabolic features in BACHD mice. Taken together, our results indicate that mutant HTT regulates metabolic networks by affecting hypothalamic circuitries that do not involve the SF1 neurons

  11. Expression of mutant huntingtin in leptin receptor-expressing neurons does not control the metabolic and psychiatric phenotype of the BACHD mouse.

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    Sofia Hult Lundh

    Full Text Available Metabolic and psychiatric disturbances occur early on in the clinical manifestation of Huntington's disease (HD, a neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the huntingtin (HTT gene. Hypothalamus has emerged as an important site of pathology and alterations in this area and its neuroendocrine circuits may play a role in causing early non-motor symptoms and signs in HD. Leptin is a hormone that controls energy homeostasis by signaling through leptin receptors in the hypothalamus. Disturbed leptin action is implicated in both obesity and depression and altered circulating levels of leptin have been reported in both clinical HD and rodent models of the disease. Pathological leptin signaling may therefore be involved in causing the metabolic and psychiatric disturbances of HD. Here we tested the hypothesis that expression of mutant HTT in leptin receptor carrying neurons plays a role in the development of the non-motor phenotype in the BACHD mouse model. Our results show that inactivation of mutant HTT in leptin receptor-expressing neurons in the BACHD mouse using cross-breeding based on a cre-loxP system did not have an effect on the metabolic phenotype or anxiety-like behavior. The data suggest that mutant HTT disrupts critical hypothalamic pathways by other mechanisms than interfering with intracellular leptin signaling.

  12. Effects on hippocampus of lifelong absence of glucocorticoids in the pro-opiomelanocortin null mutant mouse reveal complex relationship between glucocorticoids and hippocampal structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostwald, Dirk; Karpac, Jason; Hochgeschwender, Ute

    2006-01-01

    In humans changes in serum cortisol levels have been observed with aging, stress, and with affective disorders such as major depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. Corticosteroids are known to influence hippocampal structure and function; specifically, plasma corticosteroid levels have been inversely correlated with hippocampal cell proliferation, cell death, and impaired memory function. The relationship between corticosteroids and structure and function of the hippocampus has been studied in experimental systems in adult animals by increasing or decreasing corticosterone levels through pharmacological supplementation and through surgical removal of the adrenal gland. Here, we utilized the genetically engineered pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) null mutant mouse, which because of the lack of all POMC peptides has no corticosterone from birth throughout life. The effect of this lifelong absence of corticosterone on the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus is a decrease in granule cell density, which correlated with a decrease in cell proliferation but not an increase in cell degeneration. Fine morphology of granule cells was unaltered. Analyses of gene expression revealed no changes in POMC null mutant vs wild-type hippocampus with respect to levels of expression of corticoid receptor genes or genes known to be regulated by corticosterone. Spatial learning as tested by the Morris water maze was not altered in the POMC null mutant mouse. Taken together with findings from other studies of the effects of altered levels of corticosteroids on the hippocampus, our results argue for a complex homeostasis in which disturbances of any one factor can offset the system in varying ways.

  13. Comparison of the X-gal- and P-gal-based systems for screening of mutant λlacZ phages originating from the transgenic mouse strain 40.6

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mientjes, E.J.; Steenwinkel, M.J.S.T.; Delft, J.H.M. van; Lohman, P.H.M.; Baan, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    The recent introduction of the phenyl-β-D-galactopyranoside (P-gal)-based positive-selection system for screening of λlacZ phages originating from the λlacZ transgenic mouse (Muta Mouse) has made the determination of mutant frequencies (MF) a much simpler task. Previously, MF data from these mice ha

  14. Alterations in grooming activity and syntax in heterozygous SERT and BDNF knockout mice: the utility of behavior-recognition tools to characterize mutant mouse phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyzar, Evan J; Pham, Mimi; Roth, Andrew; Cachat, Jonathan; Green, Jeremy; Gaikwad, Siddharth; Kalueff, Allan V

    2012-12-01

    Serotonin transporter (SERT) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are key modulators of molecular signaling, cognition and behavior. Although SERT and BDNF mutant mouse phenotypes have been extensively characterized, little is known about their self-grooming behavior. Grooming represents an important behavioral domain sensitive to environmental stimuli and is increasingly used as a model for repetitive behavioral syndromes, such as autism and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The present study used heterozygous ((+/-)) SERT and BDNF male mutant mice on a C57BL/6J background and assessed their spontaneous self-grooming behavior applying both manual and automated techniques. Overall, SERT(+/-) mice displayed a general increase in grooming behavior, as indicated by more grooming bouts and more transitions between specific grooming stages. SERT(+/-) mice also aborted more grooming bouts, but showed generally unaltered activity levels in the observation chamber. In contrast, BDNF(+/-) mice displayed a global reduction in grooming activity, with fewer bouts and transitions between specific grooming stages, altered grooming syntax, as well as hypolocomotion and increased turning behavior. Finally, grooming data collected by manual and automated methods (HomeCageScan) significantly correlated in our experiments, confirming the utility of automated high-throughput quantification of grooming behaviors in various genetic mouse models with increased or decreased grooming phenotypes. Taken together, these findings indicate that mouse self-grooming behavior is a reliable behavioral biomarker of genetic deficits in SERT and BDNF pathways, and can be reliably measured using automated behavior-recognition technology.

  15. Discovery of candidate disease genes in ENU-induced mouse mutants by large-scale sequencing, including a splice-site mutation in nucleoredoxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa K Boles

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available An accurate and precisely annotated genome assembly is a fundamental requirement for functional genomic analysis. Here, the complete DNA sequence and gene annotation of mouse Chromosome 11 was used to test the efficacy of large-scale sequencing for mutation identification. We re-sequenced the 14,000 annotated exons and boundaries from over 900 genes in 41 recessive mutant mouse lines that were isolated in an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU mutation screen targeted to mouse Chromosome 11. Fifty-nine sequence variants were identified in 55 genes from 31 mutant lines. 39% of the lesions lie in coding sequences and create primarily missense mutations. The other 61% lie in noncoding regions, many of them in highly conserved sequences. A lesion in the perinatal lethal line l11Jus13 alters a consensus splice site of nucleoredoxin (Nxn, inserting 10 amino acids into the resulting protein. We conclude that point mutations can be accurately and sensitively recovered by large-scale sequencing, and that conserved noncoding regions should be included for disease mutation identification. Only seven of the candidate genes we report have been previously targeted by mutation in mice or rats, showing that despite ongoing efforts to functionally annotate genes in the mammalian genome, an enormous gap remains between phenotype and function. Our data show that the classical positional mapping approach of disease mutation identification can be extended to large target regions using high-throughput sequencing.

  16. Calpastatin-mediated inhibition of calpains in the mouse brain prevents mutant ataxin 3 proteolysis, nuclear localization and aggregation, relieving Machado-Joseph disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Ana T; Gonçalves, Nélio; Koeppen, Arnulf; Déglon, Nicole; Kügler, Sebastian; Duarte, Carlos Bandeira; Pereira de Almeida, Luís

    2012-08-01

    Machado-Joseph disease is the most frequently found dominantly-inherited cerebellar ataxia. Over-repetition of a CAG trinucleotide in the MJD1 gene translates into a polyglutamine tract within the ataxin 3 protein, which upon proteolysis may trigger Machado-Joseph disease. We investigated the role of calpains in the generation of toxic ataxin 3 fragments and pathogenesis of Machado-Joseph disease. For this purpose, we inhibited calpain activity in mouse models of Machado-Joseph disease by overexpressing the endogenous calpain-inhibitor calpastatin. Calpain blockage reduced the size and number of mutant ataxin 3 inclusions, neuronal dysfunction and neurodegeneration. By reducing fragmentation of ataxin 3, calpastatin overexpression modified the subcellular localization of mutant ataxin 3 restraining the protein in the cytoplasm, reducing aggregation and nuclear toxicity and overcoming calpastatin depletion observed upon mutant ataxin 3 expression. Our findings are the first in vivo proof that mutant ataxin 3 proteolysis by calpains mediates its translocation to the nucleus, aggregation and toxicity and that inhibition of calpains may provide an effective therapy for Machado-Joseph disease.

  17. Proteomic analysis of wild-type and mutant huntingtin-associated proteins in mouse brains identifies unique interactions and involvement in protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culver, Brady P; Savas, Jeffrey N; Park, Sung K; Choi, Jeong H; Zheng, Shuqiu; Zeitlin, Scott O; Yates, John R; Tanese, Naoko

    2012-06-22

    Huntington disease is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat amplification in the gene huntingtin (HTT) that is reflected by a polyglutamine expansion in the Htt protein. Nearly 20 years of research have uncovered roles for Htt in a wide range of cellular processes, and many of these discoveries stemmed from the identification of Htt-interacting proteins. However, no study has employed an impartial and comprehensive strategy to identify proteins that differentially associate with full-length wild-type and mutant Htt in brain tissue, the most relevant sample source to the disease condition. We analyzed Htt affinity-purified complexes from wild-type and HTT mutant juvenile mouse brain from two different biochemical fractions by tandem mass spectrometry. We compared variations in protein spectral counts relative to Htt to identify those proteins that are the most significantly contrasted between wild-type and mutant Htt purifications. Previously unreported Htt interactions with Myo5a, Prkra (PACT), Gnb2l1 (RACK1), Rps6, and Syt2 were confirmed by Western blot analysis. Gene Ontology analysis of these and other Htt-associated proteins revealed a statistically significant enrichment for proteins involved in translation among other categories. Furthermore, Htt co-sedimentation with polysomes in cytoplasmic mouse brain extracts is dependent upon the presence of intact ribosomes. Finally, wild-type or mutant Htt overexpression inhibits cap-dependent translation of a reporter mRNA in an in vitro system. Cumulatively, these data support a new role for Htt in translation and provide impetus for further study into the link between protein synthesis and Huntington disease pathogenesis.

  18. Increased serotonergic innervation of lumbosacral motoneurons of rolling mouse Nagoya in correlation with abnormal hindlimb extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyanagi, Y; Sawada, K; Sakata-Haga, H; Jeong, Y-G; Fukui, Y

    2006-12-01

    Rolling Mouse Nagoya (RMN) carries a mutation in a gene encoding for alpha(1A) subunit of P/Q-type Ca(2+) channel (Ca(v)2.1). In addition to ataxia, this mutant mouse exhibits abnormal hindlimb extension, which is characterized by a sustained excessive tone of hindlimb extensor muscles. This study aimed to clarify whether serotonergic (5-HTergic) innervation of the spinal motoneurons was altered in RMN in relation to the abnormal hindlimb extension. The density of 5-HT immunoreactive fibres in the ventral horn of lumbar and sacral regions of spinal cord was significantly greater in RMN than in controls. Retrograde wheat germ agglutinin-conjugated horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) labelling combined with 5-HT immunostaining revealed that the number of 5-HT immunoreactive terminals adjoining femoris quadriceps motoneurons was about 2.5-fold greater in RMN than in controls. Furthermore, 5-HT immunostaining in the lumbar cord ventral horn was examined in three other Ca(v)2.1 mutant mice (tottering, leaner and pogo) as to whether or not they showed the abnormal hindlimb extension. Among these mutants, the increased density of 5-HT immunoreactive fibres was observed in correlation with the presence of the abnormal hindlimb extension. The results suggest an increased 5-HTergic innervation of the lumbosacral motoneurons in correlation with the abnormal hindlimb extension in RMN and other Ca(v)2.1 mutant mice. As 5-HT is known to induce the sustained membrane depolarizations without continuous excitatory synaptic inputs (plateau potentials) in spinal motoneurons, the increased 5-HTergic innervation may cause the sustained excitation of hindlimb extensor motoneurons, resulting in the abnormal hindlimb extension.

  19. Testing Current and Developing Novel Therapies for NF1-Mutant Sarcomas in a Genetically Engineered Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    1   AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0067 TITLE: Testing Current and Developing Novel Therapies for NF1 -Mutant Sarcomas in a Genetically Engineered...Mar 2014 - 14 Mar 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Testing Current and Developing Novel Therapies for NF1 - Mutant Sarcomas in a Genetically Engineered...Patients with Neurofibromatosis type 1 ( NF1 ) are at increased risk for developing malignant tumors of the connective tissue called soft-tissue sarcomas

  20. Comparison of PCR-based mutation detection methods and application for identification of mouse Sult1a1 mutant embryonic stem cell clones using pooled templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greber, Boris; Tandara, Helena; Lehrach, Hans; Himmelbauer, Heinz

    2005-05-01

    Reverse genetic approaches to generate mutants of model species are useful tools to assess functions of unknown genes. Recent work has demonstrated the feasibility of such strategies in several organisms, exploiting the power of chemical mutagenesis to disrupt genes randomly throughout the genome. To increase the throughput of gene-driven mutant identification, efficient mutation screening protocols are needed. Given the availability of sequence information for large numbers of unknown genes in many species, mutation detection protocols are preferably based on PCR. Using a set of defined mutations in the Hprt1 gene of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells, we have systematically compared several PCR-based point mutation and deletion detection methods available for their ability to identify lesions in pooled samples, which is a major criterion for an efficient large-scale mutation screening assay. Results indicate that point mutations are most effectively identified by heteroduplex cleavage using CEL I endonuclease. Small deletions can most effectively be detected employing the recently described "poison" primer PCR technique. Further, we employed the CEL I assay followed by conventional agarose gel electrophoresis analysis for screening a library of chemically mutagenized ES cell clones. This resulted in the isolation of several clones harboring mutations in the mouse Sult1a1 locus, demonstrating the high-throughput compatibility of this approach using simple and inexpensive laboratory equipment.

  1. Comparative Analyses of Transcriptional Profiles in Mouse Organs Using a Pneumonic Plague Model after Infection with Wild-Type Yersinia pestis CO92 and Its Braun Lipoprotein Mutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristi L. Galindo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We employed Murine GeneChips to delineate the global transcriptional profiles of the livers, lungs, and spleens in a mouse pneumonic plague infection model with wild-type (WT Y. pestis CO92 and its Braun lipoprotein (Δlpp mutant with reduced virulence. These organs showed differential transcriptional responses to infection with WT Y. pestis, but the overall host functional processes affected were similar across all three tissues. Gene expression alterations were found in inflammation, cytokine signaling, and apoptotic cell death-associated genes. Comparison of WT and Δlpp mutant-infected mice indicated significant overlap in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- associated gene expression, but the absence of Lpp perturbed host cell signaling at critical regulatory junctions resulting in altered immune response and possibly host cell apoptosis. We generated a putative signaling pathway including major inflammatory components that could account for the synergistic action of LPS and Lpp and provided the mechanistic basis of attenuation caused by deletion of the lpp gene from Y. pestis in a mouse model of pneumonic plague.

  2. Mouse mutants for the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ß2 subunit display changes in cell adhesion and neurodegeneration response genes.

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    Carol M Rubin

    Full Text Available Mice lacking expression of the ß2 subunit of the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (CHRNB2 display abnormal retinal waves and a dispersed projection of retinal ganglion cell (RGC axons to their dorsal lateral geniculate nuclei (dLGNs. Transcriptomes of LGN tissue from two independently generated Chrnb2-/- mutants and from wildtype mice were obtained at postnatal day 4 (P4, during the normal period of segregation of eye-specific afferents to the LGN. Microarray analysis reveals reduced expression of genes located on the cell membrane or in extracellular space, and of genes active in cell adhesion and calcium signaling. In particular, mRNA for cadherin 1 (Cdh1, a known axon growth regulator, is reduced to nearly undetectable levels in the LGN of P4 mutant mice and Lypd2 mRNA is similarly suppressed. Similar analysis of retinal tissue shows increased expression of crumbs 1 (Crb1 and chemokine (C-C motif ligand 21 (Ccl21 mRNAs in Chrnb2-/- mutant animals. Mutations in these genes are associated with retinal neuronal degeneration. The retinas of Chrnb2-/- mutants are normal in appearance, but the increased expression of these genes may also be involved in the abnormal projection patterns of RGC to the LGN. These data may provide the tools to distinguish the interplay between neural activity and molecular expression. Finally, comparison of the transcriptomes of the two different Chrnb2-/- mutant strains reveals the effects of genetic background upon gene expression.

  3. In vivo Editing of the Human Mutant Rhodopsin Gene by Electroporation of Plasmid-based CRISPR/Cas9 in the Mouse Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latella, Maria Carmela; Di Salvo, Maria Teresa; Cocchiarella, Fabienne; Benati, Daniela; Grisendi, Giulia; Comitato, Antonella; Marigo, Valeria; Recchia, Alessandra

    2016-11-22

    The bacterial CRISPR/Cas system has proven to be an efficient tool for genetic manipulation in various organisms. Here we show the application of CRISPR-Cas9 technology to edit the human Rhodopsin (RHO) gene in a mouse model for autosomal dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa. We designed single or double sgRNAs to knock-down mutant RHO expression by targeting exon 1 of the RHO gene carrying the P23H dominant mutation. By delivering Cas9 and sgRNAs in a single plasmid we induced an efficient gene editing in vitro, in HeLa cells engineered to constitutively express the P23H mutant RHO allele. Similarly, after subretinal electroporation of the CRISPR/Cas9 plasmid expressing two sgRNAs into P23H RHO transgenic mice, we scored specific gene editing as well as significant reduction of the mutant RHO protein. Successful in vivo application of the CRISPR/Cas9 system confirms its efficacy as a genetic engineering tool in photoreceptor cells.

  4. In vivo Editing of the Human Mutant Rhodopsin Gene by Electroporation of Plasmid-based CRISPR/Cas9 in the Mouse Retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carmela Latella

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial CRISPR/Cas system has proven to be an efficient tool for genetic manipulation in various organisms. Here we show the application of CRISPR-Cas9 technology to edit the human Rhodopsin (RHO gene in a mouse model for autosomal dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa. We designed single or double sgRNAs to knock-down mutant RHO expression by targeting exon 1 of the RHO gene carrying the P23H dominant mutation. By delivering Cas9 and sgRNAs in a single plasmid we induced an efficient gene editing in vitro, in HeLa cells engineered to constitutively express the P23H mutant RHO allele. Similarly, after subretinal electroporation of the CRISPR/Cas9 plasmid expressing two sgRNAs into P23H RHO transgenic mice, we scored specific gene editing as well as significant reduction of the mutant RHO protein. Successful in vivo application of the CRISPR/Cas9 system confirms its efficacy as a genetic engineering tool in photoreceptor cells.

  5. Centre of Excellence in Observational Oceanography: Nippon Foundation and POGO Supported Programme at the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumley, F. G.; Sathyendranath, S.; Frouin, R.; Knap, T.

    2008-05-01

    Building on previous experience in capacity building for ocean observations, the Nippon Foundation (NF) and the Partnership for Observations of the Global Oceans (POGO) have announced a new Centre of Excellence (C of E) at the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences (BIOS). The goals of the C of E are to expand the world-wide capacity and expertise to observe the oceans and to expand capacity-building projects and promote international collaboration and networking in ocean sciences. Over the past 104 years, BIOS has built a global reputation in blue-water oceanography, coral reef ecology, and the relationships between ocean health and human health coupled with high quality education programmes that provide direct, hands-on experience with BIOS-based research. The C of E at BIOS will build upon this model to establish a new, graduate-level education and training programme in operational oceanography. The 10 month Programme will offer course modules in ocean disciplines with a focus on observatory sciences complemented by hands-on training in observational methods and techniques based on the multi-disciplinary expertise of BIOS and BIOS-affiliated scientists who direct ongoing, ocean observational programmes such as: - Hydrostation S, since 1954; - Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study, since 1988; - Oceanic Flux Program sediment trap time-series, since 1978; - Bermuda Test-Bed and Science Mooring, since 1994; - Bermuda Microbial Observatory, since 1997; - Bermuda Bio-Optics Program, since 1992; - Atmospheric chemistry and air-sea fluxes, since 1990 Additional areas of BIOS research expertise will be incorporated in the C of E to broaden the scope of education and training. These include the nearshore observational network of the BIOS Marine Environmental Program and the environmental air-water chemistry network of the Bermuda Environmental Quality Program. A key resource of the C of E is the newly acquired 168 ft. research vessel, the RV Atlantic Explorer, which was

  6. Distinct Fiber Type Signature in Mouse Muscles Expressing a Mutant Lamin A Responsible for Congenital Muscular Dystrophy in a Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Barateau

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Specific mutations in LMNA, which encodes nuclear intermediate filament proteins lamins A/C, affect skeletal muscle tissues. Early-onset LMNA myopathies reveal different alterations of muscle fibers, including fiber type disproportion or prominent dystrophic and/or inflammatory changes. Recently, we identified the p.R388P LMNA mutation as responsible for congenital muscular dystrophy (L-CMD and lipodystrophy. Here, we asked whether viral-mediated expression of mutant lamin A in murine skeletal muscles would be a pertinent model to reveal specific muscle alterations. We found that the total amount and size of muscle fibers as well as the extent of either inflammation or muscle regeneration were similar to wildtype or mutant lamin A. In contrast, the amount of fast oxidative muscle fibers containing myosin heavy chain IIA was lower upon expression of mutant lamin A, in correlation with lower expression of genes encoding transcription factors MEF2C and MyoD. These data validate this in vivo model for highlighting distinct muscle phenotypes associated with different lamin contexts. Additionally, the data suggest that alteration of muscle fiber type identity may contribute to the mechanisms underlying physiopathology of L-CMD related to R388P mutant lamin A.

  7. Genetic ablation of the mammillary bodies in the Foxb1 mutant mouse leads to selective deficit of spatial working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radyushkin, Konstantin; Anokhin, Konstantin; Meyer, Barbara I; Jiang, Qiuhong; Alvarez-Bolado, Gonzalo; Gruss, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Mammillary bodies and the mammillothalamic tract are parts of a classic neural circuitry that has been implicated in severe memory disturbances accompanying Korsakoff's syndrome. However, the specific role of mammillary bodies in memory functions remains controversial, often being considered as just an extension of the hippocampal memory system. To study this issue we used mutant mice with a targeted mutation in the transcription factor gene Foxb1. These mice suffer perinatal degeneration of the medial and most of the lateral mammillary nuclei, as well as of the mammillothalamic bundle. Foxb1 mutant mice showed no deficits in such hippocampal-dependent tasks as contextual fear conditioning and social transmission of food preference. They were also not impaired in the spatial reference memory test in the radial arm maze. However, Foxb1 mutants showed deficits in the task for spatial navigation within the Barnes maze. Furthermore, they showed impairments in spatial working memory tasks such as the spontaneous alternation and the working memory test in the radial arm maze. Thus, our behavioural analysis of Foxb1 mutants suggests that the medial mammillary nuclei and mammillothalamic tract play a role in a specific subset of spatial tasks, which require combined use of both spatial and working memory functions. Therefore, the mammillary bodies and the mammillothalamic tract may form an important route through which the working memory circuitry receives spatial information from the hippocampus.

  8. Reduced oocyte activation and first cleavage rate after ICSI with spermatozoa from a sterile mouse chromosome mutant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baart, E.B.; Heijden, van der G.W.; Hoeven, van der F.A.; Bakker, R.; Cooper, T.G.; Boer, de P.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Male mice, heterozygous for two semi-identical reciprocal translocations T(1;13)70H and T(1;13)1Wa are usually sterile. We have investigated this oligoasthenoteratozoospermic mouse model using ICSI. METHODS: B6D2F1 oocytes were injected with epididymal or testicular sperm from fertile or

  9. Reduced oocyte activation and first cleavage rate after ICSI with spermatozoa from a sterile mouse chromosome mutant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baart, E.B.; Heijden, van der G.W.; Hoeven, van der F.A.; Bakker, R.; Cooper, T.G.; Boer, de P.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Male mice, heterozygous for two semi-identical reciprocal translocations T(1;13)70H and T(1;13)1Wa are usually sterile. We have investigated this oligoasthenoteratozoospermic mouse model using ICSI. METHODS: B6D2F1 oocytes were injected with epididymal or testicular sperm from fertile or

  10. Mice lacking Ras-GRF1 show contextual fear conditioning but not spatial memory impairments: convergent evidence from two independently generated mouse mutant lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele ed'Isa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Ras-GRF1 is a neuronal specific guanine exchange factor that, once activated by both ionotropic and metabotropic neurotransmitter receptors, can stimulate Ras proteins, leading to long-term phosphorylation of downstream signaling. The two available reports on the behavior of two independently generated Ras-GRF1 deficient mouse lines provide contrasting evidence on the role of Ras-GRF1 in spatial memory and contextual fear conditioning. These discrepancies may be due to the distinct alterations introduced in the mouse genome by gene targeting in the two lines that could differentially affect expression of nearby genes located in the imprinted region containing the Ras-grf1 locus. In order to determine the real contribution of Ras-GRF1 to spatial memory we compared in Morris Water Maze learning the Brambilla’s mice with a third mouse line (GENA53 in which a nonsense mutation was introduced in the Ras-GRF1 coding region without additional changes in the genome and we found that memory in this task is normal. Also, we measured both contextual and cued fear conditioning, which were previously reported to be affected in the Brambilla’s mice, and we confirmed that contextual learning but not cued conditioning is impaired in both mouse lines. In addition, we also tested both lines for the first time in conditioned place aversion in the Intellicage, an ecological and remotely controlled behavioral test, and we observed normal learning. Finally, based on previous reports of other mutant lines suggesting that Ras-GRF1 may control body weight, we also measured this non-cognitive phenotype and we confirmed that both Ras-GRF1 deficient mutants are smaller than their control littermates. In conclusion, we demonstrate that Ras-GRF1 has no unique role in spatial memory while its function in contextual fear conditioning is likely to be due not only to its involvement in amygdalar functions but possibly to some distinct hippocampal connections specific to

  11. Brainstem respiratory oscillators develop independently of neuronal migration defects in the Wnt/PCP mouse mutant looptail.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel Thoby-Brisson

    Full Text Available The proper development and maturation of neuronal circuits require precise migration of component neurons from their birthplace (germinal zone to their final positions. Little is known about the effects of aberrant neuronal position on the functioning of organized neuronal groups, especially in mammals. Here, we investigated the formation and properties of brainstem respiratory neurons in looptail (Lp mutant mice in which facial motor neurons closely apposed to some respiratory neurons fail to migrate due to loss of function of the Wnt/Planar Cell Polarity (PCP protein Vangl2. Using calcium imaging and immunostaining on embryonic hindbrain preparations, we found that respiratory neurons constituting the embryonic parafacial oscillator (e-pF settled at the ventral surface of the medulla in Vangl2(Lp/+ and Vangl2(Lp/Lp embryos despite the failure of tangential migration of its normally adjacent facial motor nucleus. Anatomically, the e-pF neurons were displaced medially in Lp/+ embryos and rostro-medially Lp/Lp embryos. Pharmacological treatments showed that the e-pF oscillator exhibited characteristic network properties in both Lp/+ and Lp/Lp embryos. Furthermore, using hindbrain slices, we found that the other respiratory oscillator, the preBötzinger complex, was also anatomically and functionally established in Lp mutants. Importantly, the displaced e-pF oscillator established functional connections with the preBötC oscillator in Lp/+ mutants. Our data highlight the robustness of the developmental processes that assemble the neuronal networks mediating an essential physiological function.

  12. Anatomical distributional defects in mutant genes associated with dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type C in an adenovirus-mediated mouse model

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    SeoJin Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type C (DI-CMTC is a dominantly inherited neuropathy that has been classified primarily based on motor conduction velocity tests but is now known to involve axonal and demyelination features. DI-CMTC is linked to tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (YARS-associated neuropathies, which are caused by E196K and G41R missense mutations and a single de novo deletion (153-156delVKQV. It is well-established that these YARS mutations induce neuronal dysfunction, morphological symptoms involving axonal degeneration, and impaired motor performance. The present study is the first to describe a novel mouse model of YARS-mutation-induced neuropathy involving a neuron-specific promoter with a deleted mitochondrial targeting sequence that inhibits the expression of YARS protein in the mitochondria. An adenovirus vector system and in vivo techniques were utilized to express YARS fusion proteins with a Flag-tag in the spinal cord, peripheral axons, and dorsal root ganglia. Following transfection of YARS-expressing viruses, the distributions of wild-type (WT YARS and E196K mutant proteins were compared in all expressed regions; G41R was not expressed. The proportion of Flag/green fluorescent protein (GFP double-positive signaling in the E196K mutant-type mice did not significantly differ from that of WT mice in dorsal root ganglion neurons. All adenovirus genes, and even the empty vector without the YARS gene, exhibited GFP-positive signaling in the ventral horn of the spinal cord because GFP in an adenovirus vector is driven by a cytomegalovirus promoter. The present study demonstrated that anatomical differences in tissue can lead to dissimilar expressions of YARS genes. Thus, use of this novel animal model will provide data regarding distributional defects between mutant and WT genes in neurons, the DI-CMTC phenotype, and potential treatment approaches for this disease.

  13. Spontaneous asj-2J mutant mouse as a model for generalized arterial calcification of infancy: a large deletion/insertion mutation in the Enpp1 gene.

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    Qiaoli Li

    Full Text Available Generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI, an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the ENPP1 gene, manifests with extensive mineralization of the cardiovascular system. The affected individuals in most cases die within the first year of life, and there is currently no effective treatment for this disorder. In this study, we characterized a spontaneous mutant mouse, asj-2J, as a model for GACI. These mice were identified as part of a phenotypic deviant search in a large-scale production colony of BALB/cJ mice at The Jackson Laboratory. They demonstrated a characteristic gait due to stiffening of the joints, with phenotypic similarity to a previously characterized asj ("ages with stiffened joints" mouse, caused by a missense mutation in the Enpp1 gene. Complementation testing indicated that asj-2J and asj were allelic. PCR-based mutation detection strategy revealed in asj-2J mice a large, 40,035 bp, deletion spanning from intron 1 to the 3'-untranslated region of the Enpp1 gene, coupled with a 74 bp insertion. This was accompanied with a significant reduction in the plasma PPi concentration and reduced PPi/Pi ratio. As a consequence, extensive aberrant mineralization affecting the arterial vasculature, a number of internal organs, and the dermal sheath of vibrissae, a progressive biomarker of the ectopic mineralization process, was demonstrated by a combination of micro computed tomography, histopathology with calcium-specific stains, and direct chemical assay of calcium. Comparison of the asj and asj-2J mice demonstrated that the latter ones, particularly when placed on an acceleration diet high in phosphate and low in magnesium, had more extensive mineralization. Thus, the asj-2J mouse serves as a novel model for GACI, a currently intractable disorder.

  14. Rad51c- and Trp53-double-mutant mouse model reveals common features of homologous recombination-deficient breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumiati, M; Munne, P M; Edgren, H; Eldfors, S; Hemmes, A; Kuznetsov, S G

    2016-09-01

    Almost half of all hereditary breast cancers (BCs) are associated with germ-line mutations in homologous recombination (HR) genes. However, the tumor phenotypes associated with different HR genes vary, making it difficult to define the role of HR in BC predisposition. To distinguish between HR-dependent and -independent features of BCs, we generated a mouse model in which an essential HR gene, Rad51c, is knocked-out specifically in epidermal tissues. Rad51c is one of the key mediators of HR and a well-known BC predisposition gene. Here, we demonstrate that deletion of Rad51c invariably requires inactivation of the Trp53 tumor suppressor (TP53 in humans) to produce mammary carcinomas in 63% of female mice. Nonetheless, loss of Rad51c shortens the latency of Trp53-deficient mouse tumors from 11 to 6 months. Remarkably, the histopathological features of Rad51c-deficient mammary carcinomas, such as expression of hormone receptors and luminal epithelial markers, faithfully recapitulate the histopathology of human RAD51C-mutated BCs. Similar to other BC models, Rad51c/p53 double-mutant mouse mammary tumors also reveal a propensity for genomic instability, but lack the focal amplification of the Met locus or distinct mutational signatures reported for other HR genes. Using the human mammary epithelial cell line MCF10A, we show that deletion of TP53 can rescue RAD51C-deficient cells from radiation-induced cellular senescence, whereas it exacerbates their centrosome amplification and nuclear abnormalities. Altogether, our data indicate that a trend for genomic instability and inactivation of Trp53 are common features of HR-mediated BCs, whereas histopathology and somatic mutation patterns are specific for different HR genes.

  15. Differential Expression of Claudin Family Proteins in Mouse Ovarian Serous Papillary Epithelial Adenoma in Aging FSH Receptor-Deficient Mutants

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    Jayaprakash Aravindakshan

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer is a deadly disease with long latency. To understand the consequences of loss of folliclestimulating hormone receptor (FSH-R signaling and to explore why the atrophic and anovulatory ovaries of follitropin receptor knockout (FORKO mice develop different types of ovarian tumors, including serous papillary epithelial adenoma later in life, we used mRNA expression profiling to gain a comprehensive view of misregulated genes. Using real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, protein analysis, and cellular localization, we show, for the first time, in vivo evidence that, in the absence of FSH-R signaling, claudin-3, claudin-4, and claudin-11 are selectively upregulated, whereas claudin-1 decreases in ovarian surface epithelium and tumors in comparison to wild type. In vitro experiments using a mouse ovarian surface epithelial cell line derived from wild-type females reveal direct hormonal influence on claudin proteins. Although recent studies suggest that cell junction proteins are differentially expressed in ovarian tumors in women, the etiology of such changes remains unclear. Our results suggest an altered hormonal environment resulting from FSH-R loss as a cause of early changes in tight junction proteins that predispose the ovary to late-onset tumors that occur with aging. More importantly, this study identifies claudin-11 overexpression in mouse ovarian serous cystadenoma.

  16. Absence of linkage of apparently single gene mediated ADHD with the human syntenic region of the mouse mutant coloboma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, E.J.; Rogan, P.K.; Domoto, M. [Pennsylvania State Univ. College of Medicine, Hershey, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-18

    Attention deficit disorder (ADHD) is a complex biobehavioral phenotype which affects up to 8% of the general population and often impairs social, academic, and job performance. Its origins are heterogeneous, but a significant genetic component is suggested by family and twin studies. The murine strain, coloboma, displays a spontaneously hyperactive phenotype that is responsive to dextroamphetamine and has been proposed as a genetic model for ADHD. Coloboma is a semi-dominant mutation that is caused by a hemizygous deletion of the SNAP-25 and other genes on mouse chromosome 2q. To test the possibility that the human homolog of the mouse coloboma gene(s) could be responsible for ADHD, we have carried out linkage studies with polymorphic markers in the region syntenic to coloboma (20p11-p12). Five families in which the pattern of inheritance of ADHD appears to be autosomal dominant were studied. Segregation analysis of the traits studied suggested that the best fitting model was a sex-influenced, single gene, Mendelian pattern. Several genetic models were evaluated based on estimates of penetrance, phenocopy rate, and allele frequency derived from our patient population and those of other investigators. No significant linkage was detected between the disease locus and markers spanning this chromosome 20 interval. 39 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. A sodium channel knockin mutant (NaV1.4-R669H) mouse model of hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fenfen; Mi, Wentao; Burns, Dennis K; Fu, Yu; Gray, Hillery F; Struyk, Arie F; Cannon, Stephen C

    2011-10-01

    Hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HypoPP) is an ion channelopathy of skeletal muscle characterized by attacks of muscle weakness associated with low serum K+. HypoPP results from a transient failure of muscle fiber excitability. Mutations in the genes encoding a calcium channel (CaV1.1) and a sodium channel (NaV1.4) have been identified in HypoPP families. Mutations of NaV1.4 give rise to a heterogeneous group of muscle disorders, with gain-of-function defects causing myotonia or hyperkalemic periodic paralysis. To address the question of specificity for the allele encoding the NaV1.4-R669H variant as a cause of HypoPP and to produce a model system in which to characterize functional defects of the mutant channel and susceptibility to paralysis, we generated knockin mice carrying the ortholog of the gene encoding the NaV1.4-R669H variant (referred to herein as R669H mice). Homozygous R669H mice had a robust HypoPP phenotype, with transient loss of muscle excitability and weakness in low-K+ challenge, insensitivity to high-K+ challenge, dominant inheritance, and absence of myotonia. Recovery was sensitive to the Na+/K+-ATPase pump inhibitor ouabain. Affected fibers had an anomalous inward current at hyperpolarized potentials, consistent with the proposal that a leaky gating pore in R669H channels triggers attacks, whereas a reduction in the amplitude of action potentials implies additional loss-of-function changes for the mutant NaV1.4 channels.

  18. Gene transfer of mutant mouse cholinesterase provides high lifetime expression and reduced cocaine responses with no evident toxicity.

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    Liyi Geng

    Full Text Available Gene transfer of a human cocaine hydrolase (hCocH derived from butyrylcholinesterase (BChE by 5 mutations (A199S/F227A/S287G/A328W/Y332G has shown promise in animal studies for treatment of cocaine addiction. To predict the physiological fate and immunogenicity of this enzyme in humans, a comparable enzyme was created and tested in a conspecific host. Thus, similar mutations (A199S/S227A/S287G/A328W/Y332G were introduced into mouse BChE to obtain a mouse CocH (mCocH. The cDNA was incorporated into viral vectors based on: a serotype-5 helper-dependent adenovirus (hdAD with ApoE promoter, and b serotype-8 adeno-associated virus with CMV promoter (AAV-CMV or multiple promoter and enhancer elements (AAV-VIP. Experiments on substrate kinetics of purified mCocH expressed in HEK293T cells showed 30-fold higher activity (U/mg with (3H-cocaine and 25% lower activity with butyrylthiocholine, compared with wild type BChE. In mice given modest doses of AAV-CMV-mCocH vector (0.7 or 3 × 10(11 particles plasma hydrolase activity rose 10-fold above control for over one year with no observed immune response. Under the same conditions, transduction of the human counterpart continued less than 2 months and antibodies to hCocH were readily detected. The advanced AAV-VIP-mCocH vector generated a dose-dependent rise in plasma cocaine hydrolase activity from 20-fold (10(10 particles to 20,000 fold (10(13 particles, while the hdAD vector (1.7 × 10(12 particles yielded a 300,000-fold increase. Neither vector caused adverse reactions such as motor weakness, elevated liver enzymes, or disturbance in spontaneous activity. Furthermore, treatment with high dose hdAD-ApoE-mCocH vector (1.7 × 10(12 particles prevented locomotor abnormalities, other behavioral signs, and release of hepatic alanine amino transferase after a cocaine dose fatal to most control mice (120 mg/kg. This outcome suggests that viral gene transfer can yield clinically effective cocaine hydrolase

  19. Sensitivity to isoflurane anesthesia increases in autism spectrum disorder Shank3(+/∆c) mutant mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changsheng; Schaefer, Michele; Gray, Christy; Yang, Ya; Furmanski, Orion; Liu, Sufang; Worley, Paul; Mintz, C David; Tao, Feng; Johns, Roger A

    Autism is a heterogeneous developmental disorder characterized by impaired social interaction, impaired communication skills, and restricted and repetitive behavior. The abnormal behaviors of these patients can make their anesthetic and perioperative management difficult. Evidence in the literature suggests that some patients with autism or specific autism spectrum disorders (ASD) exhibit altered responses to pain and to anesthesia or sedation. A genetic mouse model of one particular ASD, Phelan McDermid Syndrome, has been developed that has a Shank3 haplotype truncation (Shank3(+/Δc)). These mice exhibit important characteristics of autism that mimic human autistic behavior. Our study demonstrates that a Shank3(+/ΔC) mutation in mice is associated with a reduction in both the MAC and RREC50 of isoflurane and down regulation of NR1 in vestibular nuclei and PSD95 in spinal cord. Decreased expression of NR1 and PSD95 in the central nervous system of Shank3(+/ΔC) mice could help reduce the MAC and RREC50 of isoflurane, which would warrant confirmation in a clinical study. If Shank3 mutations are found to affect anesthetic sensitivity in patients with ASD, better communication and stricter monitoring of anesthetic depth may be necessary.

  20. The Cataract-linked Mutant Connexin50D47A Causes Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Mouse Lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthoud, Viviana M; Minogue, Peter J; Lambert, Paul A; Snabb, Joseph I; Beyer, Eric C

    2016-08-19

    Mice expressing connexin50D47A (Cx50D47A) exhibit nuclear cataracts and impaired differentiation. Cx50D47A does not traffic properly, and homozygous mutant lenses show increased levels of the stress-responsive αB-crystallins. Therefore, we assessed whether expression of Cx50D47A led to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the lens in vivo Although pharmacologic induction of ER stress can be transduced by three different pathways, we found no evidence for activation of the IRE1α or ATF6 pathways in Cx50D47A-expressing lenses. In contrast, heterozygous and homozygous Cx50D47A lenses showed an increase in phosphorylated PERK immunoreactivity and in the ratio of phosphorylated to total EIF2α (2.4- and 3.3-fold, respectively) compared with wild type. Levels of ATF4 were similar in wild type and heterozygous lenses but elevated in homozygotes (391%). In both heterozygotes and homozygotes, levels of calreticulin protein were increased (184 and 262%, respectively), as was Chop mRNA (1.9- and 12.4-fold, respectively). CHOP protein was increased in homozygotes (384%). TUNEL staining was increased in Cx50D47A lenses, especially in homozygous mice. Levels of two factors that may be pro-survival, Irs2 and Trib3, were greatly increased in homozygous lenses. These results suggest that expression of Cx50D47A induces ER stress, triggering activation of the PERK-ATF4 pathway, which potentially contributes to the lens pathology and leads to increased expression of anti-apoptotic factors, allowing cell survival.

  1. Genotype-specific differences between mouse CNS stem cell lines expressing frontotemporal dementia mutant or wild type human tau.

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    Miranda E Orr

    Full Text Available Stem cell (SC lines that capture the genetics of disease susceptibility provide new research tools. To assess the utility of mouse central nervous system (CNS SC-containing neurosphere cultures for studying heritable neurodegenerative disease, we compared neurosphere cultures from transgenic mice that express human tau with the P301L familial frontotemporal dementia (FTD mutation, rTg(tau(P301L4510, with those expressing comparable levels of wild type human tau, rTg(tau(wt21221. rTg(tau(P301L4510 mice express the human tau(P301L variant in their forebrains and display cellular, histological, biochemical and behavioral abnormalities similar to those in human FTD, including age-dependent differences in tau phosphorylation that distinguish them from rTg(tau(wt21221 mice. We compared FTD-hallmark tau phosphorylation in neurospheres from rTg(tau(P301L4510 mice and from rTg(tau(wt21221 mice. The tau genotype-specific phosphorylation patterns in neurospheres mimicked those seen in mice, validating use of neurosphere cultures as models for studying tau phosphorylation. Genotype-specific tau phosphorylation was observed in 35 independent cell lines from individual fetuses; tau in rTg(tau(P301L4510 cultures was hypophosphorylated in comparison with rTg(tau(wt21221 as was seen in young adult mice. In addition, there were fewer human tau-expressing cells in rTg(tau(P301L4510 than in rTg(tau(wt21221 cultures. Following differentiation, neuronal filopodia-spine density was slightly greater in rTg(tau(P301L4510 than rTg(tau(wt21221 and control cultures. Together with the recapitulation of genotype-specific phosphorylation patterns, the observation that neurosphere lines maintained their cell line-specific-differences and retained SC characteristics over several passages supports the utility of SC cultures as surrogates for analysis of cellular disease mechanisms.

  2. Complementation of a defect in the asparagine-linked glycosylation of a mouse FM3A mutant G258 cell line by spheroplast fusion of a human mega YAC clone 923f5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Takahisa; Moriya, Masayuki; Kataoka, Kensuke; Nishikawa, Yoshihisa

    2012-01-01

    Mouse G258 mutant stopped both cell growth and the synthesis of lipid-linked oligosaccharide at the Man(3)GlcNAc(2)-P-P-Dolichol at a restricted temperature with a single gene mutation. To clarify the lesion in the G258 mutant, we isolated human genomic DNA transformants of the G258 mutant, which recovered from both defects by way of cell hybridization with X-ray irradiated HeLa cells. We detected a common 1.3-kb product by inter-human specific sequence in the L1 (L1Hs) PCR in the transformants (Kataoka et al., Somat. Cell Mol. Genet., 24, 235-243 (1998)). In the present study, we screened a human mega yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) library by PCR with primers designed according to the 1.3-kb DNA, and selected YAC clone 923f5. Moreover, we found by spheroplast fusion that YAC clone 923f5 complemented both defects of the G258 mutant. Since the human counterpart of the yeast ALG11 gene is localized in the region, the G258 mutant might have a defect in the mouse ALG11 gene.

  3. Analysis of the light-sensitivity of the photoreceptor cells of the ataxia and male sterility (AMS) mouse, an Nna1 mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Asuka; Maruyama, Riruke; Harada, Yuji; Ishikawa, Noriyoshi; Harada, Takayuki

    2012-11-01

    We confirmed retinal degeneration in the ataxia and male sterility (AMS) mouse, a mutant of the Nna1 gene, and examined the photosensitivity of the photoreceptors to determine how closely related the intrinsic and extrinsic factors were in triggering photoreceptor cell death. The AMS mice reared in a dark environment did not show atrophy of the outer nuclear layer (ONL) before 4 weeks of age, but in the older mice, retinal atrophy progressed in the same manner as in the AMS mice housed under normal light conditions. Examining the sensitivity to intentional light stimulation revealed the atrophy of the AMS retina to be exacerbated by a weak light. After administering strong light irradiation, equally severe ONL atrophy occurred in both the wild-type and AMS mice. These results indicate that in addition to functional loss of Nna1, another injurious stimulation is necessary to trigger death signals in photoreceptor cells during the postnatal period, but the cells die gradually and autonomously in older age, and that the mutation makes the cells vulnerable to a weak light, but does not increase the number of cells sensitive to strong light stimulation. Thus, these two factors are mutually independent death triggers in AMS photoreceptor cells.

  4. Enamelin (Enam) is essential for amelogenesis: ENU-induced mouse mutants as models for different clinical subtypes of human amelogenesis imperfecta (AI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuya, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Kunihiko; Sezutsu, Hideki; Sakuraba, Yoshiyuki; Nagano, Junko; Shimizu, Aya; Fujimoto, Naomi; Kawai, Akiko; Miura, Ikuo; Kaneda, Hideki; Kobayashi, Kimio; Ishijima, Junko; Maeda, Takahide; Gondo, Yoichi; Noda, Tetsuo; Wakana, Shigeharu; Shiroishi, Toshihiko

    2005-03-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a group of commonly inherited defects of dental enamel formation, which exhibits marked genetic and clinical heterogeneity. The genetic basis of this heterogeneity is still poorly understood. Enamelin, the affected gene product in one form of AI (AIH2), is an extracellular matrix protein that is one of the components of enamel. We isolated three ENU-induced dominant mouse mutations, M100395, M100514 and M100521, which caused AI-like phenotypes in the incisors and molars of the affected individuals. Linkage analyses mapped each of the three mutations to a region of chromosome 5 that contained the genes encoding enamelin (Enam) and ameloblastin (Ambn). Sequence analysis revealed that each mutation was a single-base substitution in Enam. M100395 (Enam(Rgsc395)) and M100514 (Enam(Rgsc514)) were putative missense mutations that caused S to I and E to G substitutions at positions 55 and 57 of the translated protein, respectively. Enam(Rgsc395) and Enam(Rgsc514) heterozygotes showed severe breakage of the enamel surface, a phenotype that resembled local hypoplastic AI. The M100521 mutation (Enam(Rgsc521)) was a T to A substitution at the splicing donor site in intron 4. This mutation resulted in a frameshift that gave rise to a premature stop codon. The transcript of the Enam(Rgsc521) mutant allele was degraded, indicating that Enam(Rgsc521) is a loss-of-function mutation. Enam(Rgsc521) heterozygotes showed a hypomaturation-type AI phenotype in the incisors, possibly due to haploinsufficiency of Enam. Enam(Rgsc521) homozygotes showed complete loss of enamel on the incisors and the molars. Thus, we report here that the Enam gene is essential for amelogenesis, and that mice with different point mutations at Enam may provide good animal models to study the different clinical subtypes of AI.

  5. Aberrant calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) activity is associated with abnormal dendritic spine morphology in the ATRX mutant mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shioda, Norifumi; Beppu, Hideyuki; Fukuda, Takaichi; Li, En; Kitajima, Isao; Fukunaga, Kohji

    2011-01-05

    In humans, mutations in the gene encoding ATRX, a chromatin remodeling protein of the sucrose-nonfermenting 2 family, cause several mental retardation disorders, including α-thalassemia X-linked mental retardation syndrome. We generated ATRX mutant mice lacking exon 2 (ATRX(ΔE2) mice), a mutation that mimics exon 2 mutations seen in human patients and associated with milder forms of retardation. ATRX(ΔE2) mice exhibited abnormal dendritic spine formation in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Consistent with other mouse models of mental retardation, ATRX(ΔE2) mice exhibited longer and thinner dendritic spines compared with wild-type mice without changes in spine number. Interestingly, aberrant increased calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) activity was observed in the mPFC of ATRX(ΔE2) mice. Increased CaMKII autophosphorylation and activity were associated with increased phosphorylation of the Rac1-guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) T-cell lymphoma invasion and metastasis 1 (Tiam1) and kalirin-7, known substrates of CaMKII. We confirmed increased phosphorylation of p21-activated kinases (PAKs) in mPFC extracts. Furthermore, reduced protein expression and activity of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) was evident in the mPFC of ATRX(ΔE2) mice. In cultured cortical neurons, PP1 inhibition by okadaic acid increased CaMKII-dependent Tiam1 and kalirin-7 phosphorylation. Together, our data strongly suggest that aberrant CaMKII activation likely mediates abnormal spine formation in the mPFC. Such morphological changes plus elevated Rac1-GEF/PAK signaling seen in ATRX(ΔE2) mice may contribute to mental retardation syndromes seen in human patients.

  6. The novel mouse mutant, chuzhoi, has disruption of Ptk7 protein and exhibits defects in neural tube, heart and lung development and abnormal planar cell polarity in the ear

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    Paudyal Anju

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The planar cell polarity (PCP signalling pathway is fundamental to a number of key developmental events, including initiation of neural tube closure. Disruption of the PCP pathway causes the severe neural tube defect of craniorachischisis, in which almost the entire brain and spinal cord fails to close. Identification of mouse mutants with craniorachischisis has proven a powerful way of identifying molecules that are components or regulators of the PCP pathway. In addition, identification of an allelic series of mutants, including hypomorphs and neomorphs in addition to complete nulls, can provide novel genetic tools to help elucidate the function of the PCP proteins. Results We report the identification of a new N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU-induced mutant with craniorachischisis, which we have named chuzhoi (chz. We demonstrate that chuzhoi mutant embryos fail to undergo initiation of neural tube closure, and have characteristics consistent with defective convergent extension. These characteristics include a broadened midline and reduced rate of increase of their length-to-width ratio. In addition, we demonstrate disruption in the orientation of outer hair cells in the inner ear, and defects in heart and lung development in chuzhoi mutants. We demonstrate a genetic interaction between chuzhoi mutants and both Vangl2Lp and Celsr1Crsh mutants, strengthening the hypothesis that chuzhoi is involved in regulating the PCP pathway. We demonstrate that chuzhoi maps to Chromosome 17 and carries a splice site mutation in Ptk7. This mutation results in the insertion of three amino acids into the Ptk7 protein and causes disruption of Ptk7 protein expression in chuzhoi mutants. Conclusions The chuzhoi mutant provides an additional genetic resource to help investigate the developmental basis of several congenital abnormalities including neural tube, heart and lung defects and their relationship to disruption of PCP. The chuzhoi mutation

  7. From a cycloheptatrienylzirconium allyl complex to a cycloheptatrienylzirconium imidazolin-2-iminato "pogo stick" complex with imido-type reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glöckner, Andreas; Bannenberg, Thomas; Daniliuc, Constantin G; Jones, Peter G; Tamm, Matthias

    2012-04-02

    The reaction of the cycloheptatrienylzirconium half-sandwich complex [(η(7)-C(7)H(7))ZrCl(tmeda)] (1) (tmeda = N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine) with Li(Im(Dipp)N), generated from bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imidazolin-2-imine (Im(Dipp)NH) with methyllithium, yields the imidazolin-2-iminato complex [(η(7)-C(7)H(7))Zr(Im(Dipp)N)(tmeda)] (2). The corresponding tmeda-free complex [(η(7)-C(7)H(7))Zr(Im(Dipp)N)] (5) can be synthesized via the 1,3-bis(trimethylsilyl)allyl complex [(η(7)-C(7)H(7))Zr{η(3)-C(3)H(3)(TMS)(2)}(THF)] (3; TMS = SiMe(3)), which undergoes an acid-base reaction with Im(Dipp)NH to form 5 and 1,3-bis(trimethylsilyl)propene. 5 exhibits an unusual one-legged piano stool ("pogo stick") geometry with a particularly short Zr-N bond of 1.997(2) Å. Addition of 2,6-dimethylphenyl or tert-butyl isocyanide affords the complexes [(η(7)-C(7)H(7))Zr(Im(Dipp)N)(CNR)] (R = o-Xy, 6; R = t-Bu, 7), while the reaction with 2,6-dimethylphenyl isocyanate results in a [2 + 2] cycloaddition to form the ureato(1-) complex [(η(7)-C(7)H(7))Zr{Im(Dipp)N(C═O)N-o-Xy}] (8). 5 can also act as an initiator for the ring-opening polymerization of ε-caprolactone. These reactivity patterns together with density functional theory calculations reveal a marked similarity of the bonding in imidazolin-2-iminato and conventional imido transition-metal complexes.

  8. The mTOR kinase inhibitor Everolimus decreases S6 kinase phosphorylation but fails to reduce mutant huntingtin levels in brain and is not neuroprotective in the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington's disease

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    Frentzel Stefan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntington's disease (HD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion within the huntingtin gene. Mutant huntingtin protein misfolds and accumulates within neurons where it mediates its toxic effects. Promoting mutant huntingtin clearance by activating macroautophagy is one approach for treating Huntington's disease (HD. In this study, we evaluated the mTOR kinase inhibitor and macroautophagy promoting drug everolimus in the R6/2 mouse model of HD. Results Everolimus decreased phosphorylation of the mTOR target protein S6 kinase indicating brain penetration. However, everolimus did not activate brain macroautophagy as measured by LC3B Western blot analysis. Everolimus protected against early declines in motor performance; however, we found no evidence for neuroprotection as determined by brain pathology. In muscle but not brain, everolimus significantly decreased soluble mutant huntingtin levels. Conclusions Our data suggests that beneficial behavioral effects of everolimus in R6/2 mice result primarily from effects on muscle. Even though everolimus significantly modulated its target brain S6 kinase, this did not decrease mutant huntingtin levels or provide neuroprotection.

  9. DRPLA transgenic mouse substrains carrying single copy of full-length mutant human DRPLA gene with variable sizes of expanded CAG repeats exhibit CAG repeat length- and age-dependent changes in behavioral abnormalities and gene expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kazushi; Zhou, Jiayi; Sato, Toshiya; Takao, Keizo; Miyagawa, Tsuyoshi; Oyake, Mutsuo; Yamada, Mitunori; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Yuji; Goto, Jun; Tsuji, Shoji

    2012-05-01

    Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) is an autosomal dominant progressive neurodegenerative disorder with intellectual deterioration and various motor deficits including ataxia, choreoathetosis, and myoclonus, caused by an abnormal expansion of CAG repeats in the DRPLA gene. Longer expanded CAG repeats contribute to an earlier age of onset, faster progression, and more severe neurological symptoms in DRPLA patients. In this study, we have established DRPLA transgenic mouse lines (sublines) harboring a single copy of the full-length mutant human DRPLA gene carrying various lengths of expanded CAG repeats (Q76, Q96, Q113, and Q129), which have clearly shown motor deficits and memory disturbance whose severity increases with the length of expanded CAG repeats and age, and successfully replicated the CAG repeat length- and age-dependent features of DRPLA patients. Neuronal intranuclear accumulation of the mutant DRPLA protein has been suggested to cause transcriptional dysregulation, leading to alteration in gene expression and neuronal dysfunction. In this study, we have conducted a comprehensive analysis of gene expression profiles in the cerebrum and cerebellum of transgenic mouse lines at 4, 8, and 12 weeks using multiple microarray platforms, and demonstrated that both the number and expression levels of the altered genes are highly dependent on CAG repeat length and age in both brain regions. Specific groups of genes and their function categories were identified by further agglomerative cluster analysis and gene functional annotation analysis. Calcium signaling and neuropeptide signaling, among others, were implicated in the pathophysiology of DRPLA. Our study provides unprecedented CAG-repeat-length-dependent mouse models of DRPLA, which are highly valuable not only for elucidating the CAG-repeat-length-dependent pathophysiology of DRPLA but also for developing therapeutic strategies for DRPLA.

  10. Role of Cytokines During Epileptogenesis and in the Transition from the Interictal to the Ictal State in the Epileptic Mutant EL Mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Murashima, Yoshiya L.; Jiro Suzuki; Mitsunobu Yoshii

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Epileptic mutant EL mice show secondary generalized seizures. Seizure discharges initiate in the parietal cortex and generalize through the hippocampus. We have previously demonstrated an increase in the activity of inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS) as well as a decrease in the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the hippocampus of EL mice, suggesting that cell toxic free radicals are increased in the brain of EL mice. In parallel with this, neurotrophic factors were si...

  11. Contractile abnormalities of mouse muscles expressing hyperkalemic periodic paralysis mutant NaV1.4 channels do not correlate with Na+ influx or channel content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Brooke; Ammar, Tarek; Khogali, Shiemaa; DeJong, Danica; Barbalinardo, Michael; Nishi, Cameron; Hayward, Lawrence J; Renaud, Jean-Marc

    2014-06-01

    Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HyperKPP) is characterized by myotonic discharges that occur between episodic attacks of paralysis. Individuals with HyperKPP rarely suffer respiratory distress even though diaphragm muscle expresses the same defective Na(+) channel isoform (NaV1.4) that causes symptoms in limb muscles. We tested the hypothesis that the extent of the HyperKPP phenotype (low force generation and shift toward oxidative type I and IIA fibers) in muscle is a function of 1) the NaV1.4 channel content and 2) the Na(+) influx through the defective channels [i.e., the tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive Na(+) influx]. We measured NaV1.4 channel protein content, TTX-sensitive Na(+) influx, force generation, and myosin isoform expression in four muscles from knock-in mice expressing a NaV1.4 isoform corresponding to the human M1592V mutant. The HyperKPP flexor digitorum brevis muscle showed no contractile abnormalities, which correlated well with its low NaV1.4 protein content and by far the lowest TTX-sensitive Na(+) influx. In contrast, diaphragm muscle expressing the HyperKPP mutant contained high levels of NaV1.4 protein and exhibited a TTX-sensitive Na(+) influx that was 22% higher compared with affected extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus muscles. Surprisingly, despite this high burden of Na(+) influx, the contractility phenotype was very mild in mutant diaphragm compared with the robust abnormalities observed in EDL and soleus. This study provides evidence that HyperKPP phenotype does not depend solely on the NaV1.4 content or Na(+) influx and that the diaphragm does not depend solely on Na(+)-K(+) pumps to ameliorate the phenotype. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Mouse phenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Becker, Lore; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Da Silva-Buttkus, Patricia; Neff, Frauke; Götz, Alexander; Hans, Wolfgang; Hölter, Sabine M; Horsch, Marion; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Kemter, Elisabeth; Lengger, Christoph; Maier, Holger; Matloka, Mikolaj; Möller, Gabriele; Naton, Beatrix; Prehn, Cornelia; Puk, Oliver; Rácz, Ildikó; Rathkolb, Birgit; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Rozman, Jan; Wang-Sattler, Rui; Schrewe, Anja; Stöger, Claudia; Tost, Monica; Adamski, Jerzy; Aigner, Bernhard; Beckers, Johannes; Behrendt, Heidrun; Busch, Dirk H; Esposito, Irene; Graw, Jochen; Illig, Thomas; Ivandic, Boris; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Mempel, Martin; Neschen, Susanne; Ollert, Markus; Schulz, Holger; Suhre, Karsten; Wolf, Eckhard; Wurst, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin

    2011-02-01

    Model organisms like the mouse are important tools to learn more about gene function in man. Within the last 20 years many mutant mouse lines have been generated by different methods such as ENU mutagenesis, constitutive and conditional knock-out approaches, knock-down, introduction of human genes, and knock-in techniques, thus creating models which mimic human conditions. Due to pleiotropic effects, one gene may have different functions in different organ systems or time points during development. Therefore mutant mouse lines have to be phenotyped comprehensively in a highly standardized manner to enable the detection of phenotypes which might otherwise remain hidden. The German Mouse Clinic (GMC) has been established at the Helmholtz Zentrum München as a phenotyping platform with open access to the scientific community (www.mousclinic.de; [1]). The GMC is a member of the EUMODIC consortium which created the European standard workflow EMPReSSslim for the systemic phenotyping of mouse models (http://www.eumodic.org/[2]). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Polymorphic human (CTAT)n microsatellite provides a conserved linkage marker for mouse mutants causing cleft palate, vestibular defects, obesity and ataxia

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    Griffith, A.J.; Burgess, D.L.; Kohrman, D. [Univ. of MIchigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The Twirler mutation (Tw) causing cleft palate {plus_minus} cleft lip, vestibular defects and obesity is located within 0.5 cM of an ataxia locus (ax) on mouse chromosome 18. We identified a transgene-induced insertional mutation with vestibular and craniofacial defects that appears to be a new allele of Twirler. Mouse DNA flanking the transgene insertion site was isolated from a cosmid library. An evolutionarily conserved, zoo blot positive cosmid subclone was used to probe a human {lambda} genomic library. From the sequence of a highly homologous human {lambda} clone, we designed STS primers and screened a human P1 library. DNA from two positive P1 clones was hybridized with simple sequence probes, and a (CTAT){sub 12} repeat was detected. Analysis of 62 CEPH parents with primers flanking the repeat identified six alleles containing 9 to 14 copies of the repeat, at frequencies of 0.17, 0.17, 0.17, 0.27, 0.15 and 0.07, respectively. The observed heterozygosity was 49/62 with a calculated PIC value of 0.76. This polymorphic microsatellite marker, designated Umi3, was mapped to the predicted conserved human linkage group by analysis of somatic cell hybrid panels. The anticipated short distance between Umi3 and the disease genes will facilitate detection of linkage in small families. We would like to type appropriate human pedigrees with Umi3 in order to identify patients with inherited disorders homologous to the mouse mutations Twirler and ataxia.

  14. Perturbations of microRNA function in mouse dicer mutants produce retinal defects and lead to aberrant axon pathfinding at the optic chiasm.

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    Rita Pinter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During development axons encounter a variety of choice points where they have to make appropriate pathfinding decisions. The optic chiasm is a major decision point for retinal ganglion cell (RGC axons en route to their target in order to ensure the correct wiring of the visual system. MicroRNAs (miRNAs belong to the class of small non-coding RNA molecules and have been identified as important regulators of a variety of processes during embryonic development. However, their involvement in axon guidance decisions is less clear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report here that the early loss of Dicer, an essential protein for the maturation of miRNAs, in all cells of the forming retina and optic chiasm leads to severe phenotypes of RGC axon pathfinding at the midline. Using a conditional deletion approach in mice, we find in homozygous Dicer mutants a marked increase of ipsilateral projections, RGC axons extending outside the optic chiasm, the formation of a secondary optic tract and a substantial number of RGC axons projecting aberrantly into the contralateral eye. In addition, the mutant mice display a microphthalmia phenotype. CONCLUSIONS: Our work demonstrates an important role of Dicer controlling the extension of RGC axons to the brain proper. It indicates that miRNAs are essential regulatory elements for mechanisms that ensure correct axon guidance decisions at the midline and thus have a central function in the establishment of circuitry during the development of the nervous system.

  15. A series of N-terminal epitope tagged Hdh knock-in alleles expressing normal and mutant huntingtin: their application to understanding the effect of increasing the length of normal huntingtin’s polyglutamine stretch on CAG140 mouse model pathogenesis

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    Zheng Shuqiu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntington’s disease (HD is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease that is caused by the expansion of a polyglutamine (polyQ stretch within Huntingtin (htt, the protein product of the HD gene. Although studies in vitro have suggested that the mutant htt can act in a potentially dominant negative fashion by sequestering wild-type htt into insoluble protein aggregates, the role of the length of the normal htt polyQ stretch, and the adjacent proline-rich region (PRR in modulating HD mouse model pathogenesis is currently unknown. Results We describe the generation and characterization of a series of knock-in HD mouse models that express versions of the mouse HD gene (Hdh encoding N-terminal hemaglutinin (HA or 3xFlag epitope tagged full-length htt with different polyQ lengths (HA7Q-, 3xFlag7Q-, 3xFlag20Q-, and 3xFlag140Q-htt and substitution of the adjacent mouse PRR with the human PRR (3xFlag20Q- and 3xFlag140Q-htt. Using co-immunoprecipitation and immunohistochemistry analyses, we detect no significant interaction between soluble full-length normal 7Q- htt and mutant (140Q htt, but we do observe N-terminal fragments of epitope-tagged normal htt in mutant htt aggregates. When the sequences encoding normal mouse htt’s polyQ stretch and PRR are replaced with non-pathogenic human sequence in mice also expressing 140Q-htt, aggregation foci within the striatum, and the mean size of htt inclusions are increased, along with an increase in striatal lipofuscin and gliosis. Conclusion In mice, soluble full-length normal and mutant htt are predominantly monomeric. In heterozygous knock-in HD mouse models, substituting the normal mouse polyQ and PRR with normal human sequence can exacerbate some neuropathological phenotypes.

  16. Localization of the homolog of a mouse craniofacial mutant to human chromosome 18q11 and evaluation of linkage to human CLP and CPO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, A.J.; Burgess, D.L.; Kohrman, D.C.; Yu, J. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and others

    1996-06-15

    The transgene-induced mutation 9257 and the spontaneous mutation twirler cause craniofacial and inner ear malformations and are located on mouse chromosome 18 near the ataxia locus ax. To map the human homolog of 9257, a probe from the transgene insertion site was used to screen a human genomic library. Analysis of a cross-hybridizing human clone identified a 3-kb conserved sequence block that does not appear to contain protein coding sequence. Analysis of somatic cell hybrid panels assigned the human locus to 18q11. The polymorphic microsatellite markers D18S1001 and D18S1002 were isolated from the human locus and mapped by linkage analysis using the CEPH pedigrees. The 9257 locus maps close to the centromeres of human chromosome 18q and mouse chromosome 18 at the proximal end of a conserved linkage group. To evaluate the role of this locus in human craniofacial disorders, linkage to D18S1002 was tested in 11 families with autosomal dominant nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate and 3 families with autosomal dominant cleft palate only. Obligatory recombinants were observed in 8 of the families, and negative lod scores from the other families indicated that these disorders are not linked to the chromosome 18 loci. 23 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. An Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) mutant with enhanced BZLF1 expression causes lymphomas with abortive lytic EBV infection in a humanized mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shi-Dong; Yu, Xianming; Mertz, Janet E; Gumperz, Jenny E; Reinheim, Erik; Zhou, Ying; Tang, Weihua; Burlingham, William J; Gulley, Margaret L; Kenney, Shannon C

    2012-08-01

    Immunosuppressed patients are at risk for developing Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-positive lymphomas that express the major EBV oncoprotein, LMP1. Although increasing evidence suggests that a small number of lytically infected cells may promote EBV-positive lymphomas, the impact of enhanced lytic gene expression on the ability of EBV to induce lymphomas is unclear. Here we have used immune-deficient mice, engrafted with human fetal hematopoietic stem cells and thymus and liver tissue, to compare lymphoma formation following infection with wild-type (WT) EBV versus infection with a "superlytic" (SL) mutant with enhanced BZLF1 (Z) expression. The same proportions (2/6) of the WT and SL virus-infected animals developed B-cell lymphomas by day 60 postinfection; the remainder of the animals had persistent tumor-free viral latency. In contrast, all WT and SL virus-infected animals treated with the OKT3 anti-CD3 antibody (which inhibits T-cell function) developed lymphomas by day 29. Lymphomas in OKT3-treated animals (in contrast to lymphomas in the untreated animals) contained many LMP1-expressing cells. The SL virus-infected lymphomas in both OKT3-treated and untreated animals contained many more Z-expressing cells (up to 30%) than the WT virus-infected lymphomas, but did not express late viral proteins and thus had an abortive lytic form of EBV infection. LMP1 and BMRF1 (an early lytic viral protein) were never coexpressed in the same cell, suggesting that LMP1 expression is incompatible with lytic viral reactivation. These results show that the SL mutant induces an "abortive" lytic infection in humanized mice that is compatible with continued cell growth and at least partially resistant to T-cell killing.

  18. Habituation without NMDA receptor-dependent desensitization of Hering-Breuer apnea reflex in a Mecp2+/- mutant mouse model of Rett syndrome

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    Gang eSong

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Nonassociative learning is a basic neuroadaptive behavior exhibited in almost all animal species and sensory modalities but its functions and mechanisms in the mammalian brain are poorly understood. Previous studies have identified two distinct forms of nonassociative learning in the classic Hering-Breuer inflation reflex (HBIR induced apnea in rats: NMDA receptor (NMDAR-independent habituation in a primary vagal pathway and NMDAR-dependent desensitization in a secondary pontine pathway. Here, we show that abnormal nonassociative learning of the HBIR may underlie the endophenotypic tachypnea in an animal model of Rett syndrome (RTT, an autism-spectrum disorder caused by mutations in the X-linked gene encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2. Mecp2+/- symptomatic mice on a mixed-strain background demonstrated significantly increased resting respiratory frequency with shortened expiration and normal inspiratory duration compared with asymptomatic mutants and wild-type controls, a phenotype that is characteristic of girls with RTT. Low-intensity electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve elicited fictive HBIR with time-dependent habituation in both Mecp2+/- and wild-type mice. However, time-dependent desensitization of the HBIR was evidenced only in wild-type controls and asymptomatic mutant mice but was absent or suppressed in Mecp2+/- symptomatic mice or in wild-type mice after blockade of NMDAR with dizocilpine. Remarkably, ~50% of the Mecp2+/- mice developed these X-linked phenotypes despite somatic mosaicism. Such RTT-like respiratory endophenotypes in mixed-strain Mecp2+/- mice differed from those previously reported in Mecp2-/y mice on pure C57BL/6J background. These findings provide the first evidence indicating that impaired NMDAR-dependent desensitization of the HBIR may contribute to the endophenotypic tachypnea in RTT.

  19. Concomitant targeting of programmed death-1 (PD-1) and CD137 improves the efficacy of radiotherapy in a mouse model of human BRAFV600-mutant melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, Paula; Gadiot, Jules; Peeters, Marlies; Gasparini, Alessia; Deken, Marcel A; Yagita, Hideo; Verheij, Marcel; Borst, Jannie; Blank, Christian U; Verbrugge, Inge

    2016-06-01

    T cell checkpoint blockade with antibodies targeting programmed cell death (ligand)-1 (PD-1/PD-L1) and/or cytotoxic T lymphocyte-antigen 4 (CTLA-4) has improved therapy outcome in melanoma patients. However, a considerable proportion of patients does not benefit even from combined α-CTLA-4 and α-PD-1 therapy. We therefore examined to which extent T cell (co)stimulation and/or stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) could further enhance the therapeutic efficacy of T cell checkpoint blockade in a genetically engineered mouse melanoma model that is driven by PTEN-deficiency, and BRAFV600 mutation, as in human, but lacks the sporadic UV-induced mutations. Tumor-bearing mice were treated with different combinations of immunomodulatory antibodies (α-CTLA-4, α-PD-1, α-CD137) or interleukin-2 (IL-2) alone or in combination with SBRT. None of our immunotherapeutic approaches (alone or in combination) had any anti-tumor efficacy, while SBRT alone delayed melanoma outgrowth. However, α-CD137 combined with α-PD-1 antibodies significantly enhanced the anti-tumor effect of SBRT, while the anti-tumor effect of SBRT was not enhanced by interleukin-2, or the combination of α-CTLA-4 and α-PD-1. We conclude that α-CD137 and α-PD-1 antibodies were most effective in enhancing SBRT-induced tumor growth delay in this mouse melanoma model, outperforming the ability of IL-2, or the combination of α-CTLA-4 and α-PD-1 to synergize with SBRT. Given the high mutational load and increased immunogenicity of human melanoma with the same genotype, our findings encourage testing α-CD137 and α-PD-1 alone or in combination with SBRT clinically, particularly in patients refractory to α-CTLA-4 and/or α-PD-1 therapy.

  20. Gene expression profiling of loss of TET2 and/or JAK2V617F mutant hematopoietic stem cells from mouse models of myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameda, Takuro; Shide, Kotaro; Yamaji, Takumi; Kamiunten, Ayako; Sekine, Masaaki; Hidaka, Tomonori; Kubuki, Yoko; Sashida, Goro; Aoyama, Kazumasa; Yoshimitsu, Makoto; Abe, Hiroo; Miike, Tadashi; Iwakiri, Hisayoshi; Tahara, Yoshihiro; Yamamoto, Shojiro; Hasuike, Satoru; Nagata, Kenji; Iwama, Atsushi; Kitanaka, Akira; Shimoda, Kazuya

    2015-06-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are clinically characterized by the chronic overproduction of differentiated peripheral blood cells and the gradual expansion of malignant intramedullary/extramedullary hematopoiesis. In MPNs mutations in JAK2 MPL or CALR are detected mutually exclusive in more than 90% of cases [1,2]. Mutations in them lead to the abnormal activation of JAK/STAT signaling and the autonomous growth of differentiated cells therefore they are considered as "driver" gene mutations. In addition to the above driver gene mutations mutations in epigenetic regulators such as TET2 DNMT3A ASXL1 EZH2 or IDH1/2 are detected in about 5%-30% of cases respectively [3]. Mutations in TET2 DNMT3A EZH2 or IDH1/2 commonly confer the increased self-renewal capacity on normal hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) but they do not lead to the autonomous growth of differentiated cells and only exhibit subtle clinical phenotypes [4,6-8,5]. It was unclear how mutations in such epigenetic regulators influenced abnormal HSCs with driver gene mutations how they influenced the disease phenotype or whether a single driver gene mutation was sufficient for the initiation of human MPNs. Therefore we focused on JAK2V617F and loss of TET2-the former as a representative of driver gene mutations and the latter as a representative of mutations in epigenetic regulators-and examined the influence of single or double mutations on HSCs (Lineage(-)Sca-1(+)c-Kit(+) cells (LSKs)) by functional analyses and microarray whole-genome expression analyses [9]. Gene expression profiling showed that the HSC fingerprint genes [10] was statistically equally enriched in TET2-knockdown-LSKs but negatively enriched in JAK2V617F-LSKs compared to that in wild-type-LSKs. Double-mutant-LSKs showed the same tendency as JAK2V617F-LSKs in terms of their HSC fingerprint genes but the expression of individual genes differed between the two groups. Among 245 HSC fingerprint genes 100 were more highly expressed in double-mutant

  1. Optimising a balloon-borne polarimeter in the hard X-ray domain: From the PoGOLite Pathfinder to PoGO+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvin, M.; Jackson, M.; Kawano, T.; Kiss, M.; Kole, M.; Mikhalev, V.; Moretti, E.; Takahashi, H.; Pearce, M.

    2016-09-01

    PoGOLite is a balloon-borne hard X-ray polarimeter dedicated to the study of point sources. Compton scattered events are registered using an array of plastic scintillator units to determine the polarisation of incident X-rays in the energy range 20-240 keV. In 2013, a near circumpolar balloon flight of 14 days duration was completed after launch from Esrange, Sweden, resulting in a measurement of the linear polarisation of the Crab emission. Building on the experience gained from this Pathfinder flight, the polarimeter is being modified to improve performance for a second flight in 2016. Such optimisations, based on Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations, take into account the source characteristics, the instrument response and the background environment which is dominated by atmospheric neutrons. This paper describes the optimisation of the polarimeter and details the associated increase in performance. The resulting design, PoGO+, is expected to improve the Minimum Detectable Polarisation (MDP) for the Crab from 19.8% to 11.1% for a 5 day flight. Assuming the same Crab polarisation fraction as measured during the 2013 flight, this improvement in MDP will allow a 5σ constrained result. It will also allow the study of the nebula emission only (Crab off-pulse) and Cygnus X-1 if in the hard state.

  2. Optimising a balloon-borne polarimeter in the hard X-ray domain: from the PoGOLite Pathfinder to PoGO+

    CERN Document Server

    Chauvin, Maxime; Kawano, Takafumi; Kiss, Mózsi; Kole, Merlin; Mikhalev, Victor; Moretti, Elena; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Pearce, Mark

    2016-01-01

    PoGOLite is a balloon-borne hard X-ray polarimeter dedicated to the study of point sources. Compton scattered events are registered using an array of plastic scintillator units to determine the polarisation of incident X-rays in the energy range 20 - 240 keV. In 2013, a near circumpolar balloon flight of 14 days duration was completed after launch from Esrange, Sweden, resulting in a measurement of the linear polarisation of the Crab emission. Building on the experience gained from this Pathfinder flight, the polarimeter is being modified to improve performance for a second flight in 2016. Such optimisations, based on Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations, take into account the source characteristics, the instrument response and the background environment which is dominated by atmospheric neutrons. This paper describes the optimisation of the polarimeter and details the associated increase in performance. The resulting design, PoGO+, is expected to improve the Minimum Detectable Polarisation (MDP) for the Crab from ...

  3. Ex vivo, microelectrode analysis of conduction through the AV node of wild-type and Nkx2-5 mutant mouse hearts as guided by a Cx40-eGFP transgenic reporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazit, Avihu Z; Li, Alex; Choi, Jacob S; Miquerol, Lucile; Jay, Patrick Y

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Mutations of the cardiac transcription factor NKX2-5 cause hypoplastic development of the AV node and conduction block. How the anatomy of the mutant AV node relates to its function is unknown. We thus studied conduction through the AV nodal region in ex vivo preparations of wild-type and Nkx2-5(+/-) mouse hearts in which the central conduction system was highlighted by a transgenic Cx40-eGFP reporter. Fluorescence imaging guided electrode placement and pacing of the inferior and superior approaches to the AV node. Nkx2-5(+/-) hearts had a prolonged atrio-His interval compared to the wild type, consistent with previous in vivo observations. The conduction time to the His bundle from the Cx40(-) AV nodal region that is superior to and immediately adjacent to the Cx40(+) lower node is slightly, but not significantly greater in Nkx2-5(+/-) than wild-type hearts. A novel phenotype was also observed. Pacing the Cx40(-) inferior approach to the AV node with increasing stimulus strength led to progressive shortening of the stimulus-to-His conduction interval in wild-type but not Nkx2-5(+/-) hearts. The strength of pacing at the Cx40(-) superior approach had no effect on the conduction interval in either group. The prolonged AV delay in the Nkx2-5(+/-) heart appears to arise before the Cx40(+) lower node. Whether the pacing phenotype explains the mutant's conduction defect is uncertain, but the observation adds to a number of unique properties of the inferior approach to the AV node.

  4. AAV-mediated delivery of the transcription factor XBP1s into the striatum reduces mutant Huntingtin aggregation in a mouse model of Huntington's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuleta, Amparo [Biomedical Neuroscience Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Center for Molecular Studies of the Cell, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Vidal, Rene L. [Biomedical Neuroscience Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Neurounion Biomedical Foundation, Santiago (Chile); Armentano, Donna; Parsons, Geoffrey [Department of Molecular Biology, Genzyme Corporation, 49 New York Avenue, Framingham, MA 01701 (United States); Hetz, Claudio, E-mail: chetz@med.uchile.cl [Biomedical Neuroscience Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Center for Molecular Studies of the Cell, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Harvard School of Public Health, 651 Huntington Av., Boston, MA 02446 (United States); Neurounion Biomedical Foundation, Santiago (Chile)

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The contribution of ER stress to HD has not been directly addressed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of XBP1s using AAVs decreases Huntingtin aggregation in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We describe a new in vivo model of HD based on the expression of a large fragment of mHtt-RFP. -- Abstract: Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by mutations that expand a polyglutamine region in the amino-terminal domain of Huntingtin (Htt), leading to the accumulation of intracellular inclusions and progressive neurodegeneration. Recent reports indicate the engagement of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress responses in human HD post mortem samples and animal models of the disease. Adaptation to ER stress is mediated by the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), an integrated signal transduction pathway that attenuates protein folding stress by controlling the expression of distinct transcription factors including X-Box binding protein 1 (XBP1). Here we targeted the expression of XBP1 on a novel viral-based model of HD. We delivered an active form of XBP1 locally into the striatum of adult mice using adeno-associated vectors (AAVs) and co-expressed this factor with a large fragment of mutant Htt as a fusion protein with RFP (Htt588{sup Q95}-mRFP) to directly visualize the accumulation of Htt inclusions in the brain. Using this approach, we observed a significant reduction in the accumulation of Htt588{sup Q95}-mRFP intracellular inclusion when XBP1 was co-expressed in the striatum. These results contrast with recent findings indicating a protective effect of XBP1 deficiency in neurodegeneration using knockout mice, and suggest a potential use of gene therapy strategies to manipulate the UPR in the context of HD.

  5. Gaucher disease: transcriptome analyses using microarray or mRNA sequencing in a Gba1 mutant mouse model treated with velaglucerase alfa or imiglucerase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nupur Dasgupta

    Full Text Available Gaucher disease type 1, an inherited lysosomal storage disorder, is caused by mutations in GBA1 leading to defective glucocerebrosidase (GCase function and consequent excess accumulation of glucosylceramide/glucosylsphingosine in visceral organs. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT with the biosimilars, imiglucerase (imig or velaglucerase alfa (vela improves/reverses the visceral disease. Comparative transcriptomic effects (microarray and mRNA-Seq of no ERT and ERT (imig or vela were done with liver, lung, and spleen from mice having Gba1 mutant alleles, termed D409V/null. Disease-related molecular effects, dynamic ranges, and sensitivities were compared between mRNA-Seq and microarrays and their respective analytic tools, i.e. Mixed Model ANOVA (microarray, and DESeq and edgeR (mRNA-Seq. While similar gene expression patterns were observed with both platforms, mRNA-Seq identified more differentially expressed genes (DEGs (∼3-fold than the microarrays. Among the three analytic tools, DESeq identified the maximum number of DEGs for all tissues and treatments. DESeq and edgeR comparisons revealed differences in DEGs identified. In 9V/null liver, spleen and lung, post-therapy transcriptomes approximated WT, were partially reverted, and had little change, respectively, and were concordant with the corresponding histological and biochemical findings. DEG overlaps were only 8-20% between mRNA-Seq and microarray, but the biological pathways were similar. Cell growth and proliferation, cell cycle, heme metabolism, and mitochondrial dysfunction were most altered with the Gaucher disease process. Imig and vela differentially affected specific disease pathways. Differential molecular responses were observed in direct transcriptome comparisons from imig- and vela-treated tissues. These results provide cross-validation for the mRNA-Seq and microarray platforms, and show differences between the molecular effects of two highly structurally similar ERT

  6. Early in vivo Effects of the Human Mutant Amyloid-β Protein Precursor (hAβPPSwInd) on the Mouse Olfactory Bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusznák, Zoltán; Kim, Woojin Scott; Hsiao, Jen-Hsiang T; Halliday, Glenda M; Paxinos, George; Fu, YuHong

    2016-01-01

    The amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) has long been linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Using J20 mice, which express human AβPP with Swedish and Indiana mutations, we studied early pathological changes in the olfactory bulb. The presence of AβPP/amyloid-β (Aβ) was examined in mice aged 3 months (before the onset of hippocampal Aβ deposition) and over 5 months (when hippocampal Aβ deposits are present). The number of neurons, non-neurons, and proliferating cells was assessed using the isotropic fractionator method. Our results demonstrate that although AβPP is overexpressed in some of the mitral cells, widespread Aβ deposition and microglia aggregates are not prevalent in the olfactory bulb. The olfactory bulbs of the younger J20 group harbored significantly fewer neurons than those of the age-matched wild-type mice (5.57±0.13 million versus 6.59±0.36 million neurons; p = 0.011). In contrast, the number of proliferating cells was higher in the young J20 than in the wild-type group (i.e., 6617±425 versus 4455±623 cells; p = 0.011). A significant increase in neurogenic activity was also observed in the younger J20 olfactory bulb. In conclusion, our results indicate that (1) neurons participating in the mouse olfactory function overexpress AβPP; (2) the cellular composition of the young J20 olfactory bulb is different from that of wild-type littermates; (3) these differences may reflect altered neurogenic activity and/or delayed development of the J20 olfactory system; and (4) AβPP/Aβ-associated pathological changes that take place in the J20 hippocampus and olfactory bulb are not identical.

  7. An ENU-induced mouse mutant of SHIP1 reveals a critical role of the stem cell isoform for suppression of macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhu-Y N; Maxwell, Mhairi J; Ooms, Lisa M; Davies, Elizabeth M; Hilton, Adrienne A; Collinge, Janelle E; Hilton, Douglas J; Kile, Benjamin T; Mitchell, Christina A; Hibbs, Margaret L; Jane, Stephen M; Curtis, David J

    2011-05-19

    In a recessive ENU mutagenesis screen for embryonic lethality, we identified a mouse pedigree with a missense mutation of SHIP1 (SHIP1(el20)) leading to an amino acid substitution I641T in the inositol-5'-phosphatase domain that represses phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase signaling. Despite detectable expression of functional SHIP1 protein, the phenotype of homozygous SHIP1(el20/el20) mice was more severe than gene-targeted SHIP1-null (SHIP1(-/-)) mice. Compared with age-matched SHIP1(-/-) mice, 5-week-old SHIP1(el20/el20) mice had increased myeloid cells, serum IL-6 levels, marked reductions in lymphoid cells, and died by 7 weeks of age with infiltration of the lungs by activated macrophages. Bone marrow transplantation demonstrated that these defects were hematopoietic-cell-autonomous. We show that the el20 mutation reduces expression in SHIP1(el20/el20) macrophages of both SHIP1 and s-SHIP, an isoform of SHIP1 generated by an internal promoter. In contrast, SHIP1(-/-) macrophages express normal levels of s-SHIP. Compound heterozygous mice (SHIP1(-/el20)) had the same phenotype as SHIP1(-/-) mice, thus providing genetic proof that the more severe phenotype of SHIP1(el20/el20) mice is probably the result of concomitant loss of SHIP1 and s-SHIP. Our results suggest that s-SHIP synergizes with SHIP1 for suppression of macrophage activation, thus providing the first evidence for a role of s-SHIP in adult hematopoiesis.

  8. Connexin mutants and cataracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C Beyer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The lens is a multicellular, but avascular tissue that must stay transparent to allow normal transmission of light and focusing of it on the retina. Damage to lens cells and/or proteins can cause cataracts, opacities that disrupt these processes. The normal survival of the lens is facilitated by an extensive network of gap junctions formed predominantly of connexin46 and connexin50. Mutations of the genes that encode these connexins (GJA3 and GJA8 have been identified and linked to inheritance of cataracts in human families and mouse lines. In vitro expression studies of several of these mutants have shown that they exhibit abnormalities that may lead to disease. Many of the mutants reduce or modify intercellular communication due to channel alterations (including loss of function or altered gating or due to impaired cellular trafficking which reduces the number of gap junction channels within the plasma membrane. However, the abnormalities detected in studies of other mutants suggest that they cause cataracts through other mechanisms including gain of hemichannel function (leading to cell injury and death and formation of cytoplasmic accumulations (that may act as light scattering particles. These observations and the anticipated results of ongoing studies should elucidate the mechanisms of cataract development due to mutations of lens connexins and abnormalities of other lens proteins. They may also contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms of disease due to connexin mutations in other tissues.

  9. The pharmacological chaperone AT2220 increases the specific activity and lysosomal delivery of mutant acid alpha-glucosidase, and promotes glycogen reduction in a transgenic mouse model of Pompe disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richie Khanna

    Full Text Available Pompe disease is an inherited lysosomal storage disorder that results from a deficiency in acid α-glucosidase (GAA activity due to mutations in the GAA gene. Pompe disease is characterized by accumulation of lysosomal glycogen primarily in heart and skeletal muscles, which leads to progressive muscle weakness. We have shown previously that the small molecule pharmacological chaperone AT2220 (1-deoxynojirimycin hydrochloride, duvoglustat hydrochloride binds and stabilizes wild-type as well as multiple mutant forms of GAA, and can lead to higher cellular levels of GAA. In this study, we examined the effect of AT2220 on mutant GAA, in vitro and in vivo, with a primary focus on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER-retained P545L mutant form of human GAA (P545L GAA. AT2220 increased the specific activity of P545L GAA toward both natural (glycogen and artificial substrates in vitro. Incubation with AT2220 also increased the ER export, lysosomal delivery, proteolytic processing, and stability of P545L GAA. In a new transgenic mouse model of Pompe disease that expresses human P545L on a Gaa knockout background (Tg/KO and is characterized by reduced GAA activity and elevated glycogen levels in disease-relevant tissues, daily oral administration of AT2220 for 4 weeks resulted in significant and dose-dependent increases in mature lysosomal GAA isoforms and GAA activity in heart and skeletal muscles. Importantly, oral administration of AT2220 also resulted in significant glycogen reduction in disease-relevant tissues. Compared to daily administration, less-frequent AT2220 administration, including repeated cycles of 4 or 5 days with AT2220 followed by 3 or 2 days without drug, respectively, resulted in even greater glycogen reductions. Collectively, these data indicate that AT2220 increases the specific activity, trafficking, and lysosomal stability of P545L GAA, leads to increased levels of mature GAA in lysosomes, and promotes glycogen reduction in situ. As

  10. The pharmacological chaperone AT2220 increases the specific activity and lysosomal delivery of mutant acid alpha-glucosidase, and promotes glycogen reduction in a transgenic mouse model of Pompe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Richie; Powe, Allan C; Lun, Yi; Soska, Rebecca; Feng, Jessie; Dhulipala, Rohini; Frascella, Michelle; Garcia, Anadina; Pellegrino, Lee J; Xu, Su; Brignol, Nastry; Toth, Matthew J; Do, Hung V; Lockhart, David J; Wustman, Brandon A; Valenzano, Kenneth J

    2014-01-01

    Pompe disease is an inherited lysosomal storage disorder that results from a deficiency in acid α-glucosidase (GAA) activity due to mutations in the GAA gene. Pompe disease is characterized by accumulation of lysosomal glycogen primarily in heart and skeletal muscles, which leads to progressive muscle weakness. We have shown previously that the small molecule pharmacological chaperone AT2220 (1-deoxynojirimycin hydrochloride, duvoglustat hydrochloride) binds and stabilizes wild-type as well as multiple mutant forms of GAA, and can lead to higher cellular levels of GAA. In this study, we examined the effect of AT2220 on mutant GAA, in vitro and in vivo, with a primary focus on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-retained P545L mutant form of human GAA (P545L GAA). AT2220 increased the specific activity of P545L GAA toward both natural (glycogen) and artificial substrates in vitro. Incubation with AT2220 also increased the ER export, lysosomal delivery, proteolytic processing, and stability of P545L GAA. In a new transgenic mouse model of Pompe disease that expresses human P545L on a Gaa knockout background (Tg/KO) and is characterized by reduced GAA activity and elevated glycogen levels in disease-relevant tissues, daily oral administration of AT2220 for 4 weeks resulted in significant and dose-dependent increases in mature lysosomal GAA isoforms and GAA activity in heart and skeletal muscles. Importantly, oral administration of AT2220 also resulted in significant glycogen reduction in disease-relevant tissues. Compared to daily administration, less-frequent AT2220 administration, including repeated cycles of 4 or 5 days with AT2220 followed by 3 or 2 days without drug, respectively, resulted in even greater glycogen reductions. Collectively, these data indicate that AT2220 increases the specific activity, trafficking, and lysosomal stability of P545L GAA, leads to increased levels of mature GAA in lysosomes, and promotes glycogen reduction in situ. As such, AT2220 may

  11. Spinal cord pathology is ameliorated by P2X7 antagonism in a SOD1-mutant mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savina Apolloni

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been an increasing awareness of the role of P2X7, a receptor for extracellular ATP, in modulating physiopathological mechanisms in the central nervous system. In particular, P2X7 has been shown to be implicated in neuropsychiatry, chronic pain, neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation. Remarkably, P2X7 has also been shown to be a ‘gene modifier’ in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS: the receptor is upregulated in spinal cord microglia in human and rat at advanced stages of the disease; in vitro, activation of P2X7 exacerbates pro-inflammatory responses in microglia that have an ALS phenotype, as well as toxicity towards neuronal cells. Despite this detrimental in vitro role of P2X7, in SOD1-G93A mice lacking P2X7, the clinical onset of ALS was significantly accelerated and disease progression worsened, thus indicating that the receptor might have some beneficial effects, at least at certain stages of disease. In order to clarify this dual action of P2X7 in ALS pathogenesis, in the present work we used the antagonist Brilliant Blue G (BBG, a blood-brain barrier permeable and safe drug that has already been proven to reduce neuroinflammation in traumatic brain injury, cerebral ischemia-reperfusion, neuropathic pain and experimental autoimmune encephalitis. We tested BBG in the SOD1-G93A ALS mouse model at asymptomatic, pre-symptomatic and late pre-symptomatic phases of disease. BBG at late pre-onset significantly enhanced motor neuron survival and reduced microgliosis in lumbar spinal cord, modulating inflammatory markers such as NF-κB, NADPH oxidase 2, interleukin-1β, interleukin-10 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. This was accompanied by delayed onset and improved general conditions and motor performance, in both male and female mice, although survival appeared unaffected. Our results prove the twofold role of P2X7 in the course of ALS and establish that P2X7 modulation might represent a promising

  12. Decreased reactivation of a herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) latency-associated transcript (LAT) mutant using the in vivo mouse UV-B model of induced reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BenMohamed, Lbachir; Osorio, Nelson; Srivastava, Ruchi; Khan, Arif A; Simpson, Jennifer L; Wechsler, Steven L

    2015-10-01

    Blinding ocular herpetic disease in humans is due to herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) reactivations from latency, rather than to primary acute infection. The cellular and molecular immune mechanisms that control the HSV-1 latency-reactivation cycle remain to be fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine if reactivation of the HSV-1 latency-associated transcript (LAT) deletion mutant (dLAT2903) was impaired in this model, as it is in the rabbit model of induced and spontaneous reactivation and in the trigeminal ganglia (TG) explant-induced reactivation model in mice. The eyes of mice latently infected with wild-type HSV-1 strain McKrae (LAT((+)) virus) or dLAT2903 (LAT((-)) virus) were irradiated with UV-B, and reactivation was determined. We found that compared to LAT((-)) virus, LAT((+)) virus reactivated at a higher rate as determined by shedding of virus in tears on days 3 to 7 after UV-B treatment. Thus, the UV-B-induced reactivation mouse model of HSV-1 appears to be a useful small animal model for studying the mechanisms involved in how LAT enhances the HSV-1 reactivation phenotype. The utility of the model for investigating the immune evasion mechanisms regulating the HSV-1 latency/reactivation cycle and for testing the protective efficacy of candidate therapeutic vaccines and drugs is discussed.

  13. 野生型和突变型小鼠动力蛋白激活蛋白1真核表达载体的构建及其在小鼠足细胞中的表达%Construction of mouse wide-type and mutant dynactin-1 vectors and their expression in mouse podocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王春花; 李林; 傅鹏; 李金花; 原爱红; 孙向华; 蒋晓峰; 余晨

    2012-01-01

    Objective To construct mouse wide-type and mutant dynactin-1 expression vectors and investigate their expression in mouse podocytes. Methods Mouse cDNA was synthesized from mouse total RNA and was used as a template for PCR amplification to obtain full length dynactin-1 cDNA. The DNA fragment was then cloned into pcDNA3. 1( + )-FLAG and pEGFP-N1 vector to produce wide-type dynactin-1 vector. The mutant dynactin-1 was obtained by site-direct mutagenesis kit. All the constructs were verified by restriction enzyme digestion, sequenced, and then transfected into mouse podocyte clone 5 (MPC5). Western blotting analysis and immunofluorescence microscopy were employed to determine dynactin-1 protein expression. Results The amplified mouse dynactin-1 cDNA fragment was analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis and a single discrete band of the correct size (3. 8 kb) was observed. The vectors containing mouse dynactin-1 were subjected to restriction enzyme digestion and two vector fragments (pcDNA3.1[+]-FLAG(5. 4 kb) and pEGFP-N1[4. 7 kb] individually) and the 3. 8 kb insert fragment were observed by electrophoresis. The result of sequencing showed that the sequence of cloned dynactin-1 was identical to that reported in Genbank. Dynactin-1 protein band with the correct relative molecular weight was detected by Western blotting analysis, and immunofluorescence microscopy showed dynactin-1 protein expression in the cytoplasm of the mouse podocytes. Conclusion We have successfully constructed wide-type and mutant dynactin-1 vectors and expressed them in mouse podocytes, which provides a foundation for future research on dynactin-1.%目的 构建野生型和突变型小鼠动力蛋白激活蛋白1(dynactin-1)真核表达载体,并观察其在小鼠足细胞中表达.方法 以总RNA反转录合成的cDNA为模板,通过PCR扩增得到小鼠dynactin-1的全长cDNA,将该片段克隆到真核表达载体pcDNA3.1(+)-FLAG和pEGFP-N1;利用部位特异性突变插入方法构建突

  14. Intra-bone marrow-bone marrow transplantation slows disease progression and prolongs survival in G93A mutant SOD1 transgenic mice, an animal model mouse for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Shizuo; Ito, Hidefumi; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Adachi, Yasushi; Wate, Reika; Zhang, Jianhua; Nakano, Satoshi; Kusaka, Hirofumi; Ikehara, Susumu

    2009-11-03

    It has been reported that bone marrow transplantation (BMT) has clinical effects on not only hematopoietic diseases and autoimmune diseases but also solid malignant tumors and metabolic diseases. We have found that intra-bone marrow-bone marrow transplantation (IBM-BMT) is superior to conventional intravenous BMT, since IBM-BMT enables rapid recovery of donor hematopoiesis and reduces the extent of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). In this experiment, we examined the effects of IBM-BMT on symptomatic G93A mutant SOD1 transgenic mice (mSOD1 Tg mice), a model mouse line for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Symptomatic mSOD1 Tg mice (12 weeks old) were irradiated with 6Gyx2 at a 4-hour interval, one day before IBM-BMT. The mice were transplanted with bone marrow cells (BMCs) from 12-wk-old eGFP-transgenic C57BL/6 mice (eGFP Tg mice) or BMCs from 12-wk-old mSOD1 Tg mice. The ALS model mice transplanted with BMCs from eGFP Tg mice showed longer survival and slower disease progression than those transplanted with BMCs from mSOD1 Tg mice or untreated mSOD1 Tg mice. There was a significantly high number of eGFP(+) cells in the anterior horn of the spinal cord of the mSOD1 Tg mice transplanted with BMCs of eGFP Tg mice, some of which expressed Iba-1, a marker of microglia, although they did not differentiate into neural cells. These results suggest that the replacement with normal hematopoietic cells improved the neural cell environment, thereby slowing the progression of the disease.

  15. Hr 基因敲除小鼠模型的构建和表型分析%Construction of a Hr mutant knockout mouse model and phenotypic analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱奎成; 徐存拴; 陈莹莹; 王纯耀; 章金涛

    2016-01-01

    目的:建立基因敲除小鼠以深入研究无毛基因(hairless, Hr)的功能。方法利用类转录激活因子效应因子核酸酶(transcription activator-like effector nucleases,TALENs)技术,制备 Hr 基因敲除小鼠,观察基因敲除小鼠毛发生长发育规律,并取部分皮肤组织石蜡切片,显微镜下分析结果。结果获得一个在 Hr 基因编码区86~87位有2个碱基缺失的首建鼠,产生了 TGA 终止密码子。通过与野生型鼠杂交获得阳性子代,进行同窝交配,传至第2代小鼠14 d 开始脱发,30 d 左右毛发脱净,并终身保持无毛。皮肤组织学观察发现真皮内形成大小不等的包囊。研究结果表明成功建立的 Hr 基因敲除小鼠表现出毛发生长异常。结论证明了无毛基因与毛发生长发育的密切关系,为研究 Hr 基因的精确功能提供了良好的动物模型。%Objective To establish a Hr mutant knockout mouse model to study the function of Hr gene.Methods Transcription activator-like effector nucleases ( TALENs) technique was used to disrupt the mouse Hr locus,creating heritable mutations that eliminate Hr function to explore the effects of Hr on hair development and provide a good model to study the function of Hr gene.The phenotype of Hr -/- mice was observed after birth and skin histology of the transgenic mice was studied by light microscopy.Results It was shown that a F0 mouse with the 2 -bp deletion in Hr gene ranging from 86 to 87 base pairs was obtained.The male mice with clear deletion of the Hr fragment and with obvious frame shifting were mated with wild-type female mice, and F1 mice were achieved.The heterozygous males mated with females to generate the F2 homozygous mice.The first hair coat of Hr-/- mice developed normally.Beginning from 14 days after birth, however, there was a rapid hair loss.The mices were completely hairless except for a few vibrissae at 30 days. Histologically, two

  16. Dual contact pogo pin assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatch, Stephen McGarry

    2016-06-21

    A contact assembly includes a base and a pair of electrical contacts supported by the base. A first end of the first electrical contact corresponds to a first end of the base and is configured to engage a first external conductive circuit element. A first end of the second electrical contact also corresponds to the first end of the base and is configured to engage a second external conductive circuit element. The first contact and the second contact are electrically isolated from one another and configured to compress when engaging an external connector element. The base includes an aperture positioned on a second end of the base outboard of a second end of the first and second electrical contacts. The aperture presents a narrowing shape with a wide mouth distal the electrical contacts and a narrow internal through-hole proximate the electrical contacts.

  17. Production of a corneal opacity mouse by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis and chromosome mapping of the mutant gene%乙酰基亚硝基脲诱变的一种角膜混浊小鼠及其突变基因的染色体定位

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈兵; 糜婷; 倪俊达; 耿滕; 薛整风

    2014-01-01

    背景 乙酰基亚硝基脲(ENU)诱导小鼠基因突变是研究基因功能及建立人类疾病动物模型的一种有效手段. 目的 研究ENU诱变获得的1只角膜混浊小鼠角膜组织形态变化,并对其突变基因进行染色体定位.方法 选用8~10周龄的C57BL/6J (B6)雄鼠40只,腹腔内注射ENU.将注射后的雄鼠与同品系母鼠交配,在其后代小鼠中筛选眼部突变个体,并将突变个体与同品系小鼠配种以确定是否遗传.对ENU诱变获得1只角膜混浊小鼠的角膜行组织病理学观察.繁殖[(B6×D2) F1×B6] N2角膜混浊小鼠,用平均分布于小鼠染色体上的微卫星标记对N2小鼠染色体进行扫描.采用优势对数计分法(LOD)判定突变基因与微卫星是否连锁. 结果 将角膜呈现混浊小鼠与B6背景小鼠配种,在其59只后代中出现19只类似表型的突变小鼠.角膜组织病理学检查发现,该例角膜混浊小鼠角膜基质增厚,出现新生血管和炎性细胞浸润,成纤维细胞明显增多.突变基因与微卫星间的连锁分析发现,26个N2样品中突变基因与位于小鼠2号染色体63.42 cM处的D2Mi307位点发生3例交换,LOD值为3.79,该突变基因位于小鼠第2号染色体. 结论 成功获得角膜混浊小鼠并将其突变基因初步定位于2号染色体,有望为人类角膜混浊疾病研究提供一种新的小鼠模型.%Background N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced mouse mutagenesis is a powerful approach for the study of gene function and the generation of human disease models.Objective This study was to create the corneal morphologic change and map the mutant gene of a kind of corneal opacity in ENU mutagenesis in mouse.Methods ENU was intraperitoneally injected in forty C57BL/ 6J (B6) male mice aged 8-10 weeks old.The male mice were mated with the same strain female mice.Their progenies were screened for visible eye mutation,and the mutant mice were mated with the same strain mice to confirm the heredity of

  18. Intrinsic properties of lumbar motor neurones in the adult G127insTGGG superoxide dismutase-1 mutant mouse in vivo: evidence for increased persistent inward currents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meehan, Claire Francesca; Moldovan, Mihai; Marklund, Stefan L.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by a preferential loss of motoneurones. Previous publications using in vitro neonatal preparations suggest an increased excitability of motoneurones in various superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) mutant mice...

  19. Locomotor and oculomotor impairment associated with cerebellar dysgenesis in Zic3-deficient (Bent tail) mutant mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aruga, J.; Ogura, H.; Shutoh, F.; Ogawa, M.; Franke, B.; Nagao, S.; Mikoshiba, K.

    2004-01-01

    We examined the adult neural phenotypes of the Bent tail mutant mouse. The Bent tail mutant mouse was recently shown to lack a submicroscopic part of the X chromosome containing the Zic3 gene, which encodes a zinc-finger protein controlling vertebrate neural development. While nearly one-fourth of

  20. Neurobehavioral Mutants Identified in an ENU Mutagenesis Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, Melloni N. [University of Memphis; Dunning, Jonathan P [University of Memphis; Wiley, Ronald G [Vanderbilt University and Veterans Administration, Nashville, TN; Chesler, Elissa J [ORNL; Johnson, Dabney K [ORNL; Goldowitz, Daniel [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis

    2007-01-01

    We report on a behavioral screening test battery that successfully identified several neurobehavioral mutants among a large-scale ENU-mutagenized mouse population. Large numbers of ENU mutagenized mice were screened for abnormalities in central nervous system function based on abnormal performance in a series of behavior tasks. We developed and employed a high-throughput screen of behavioral tasks to detect behavioral outliers. Twelve mutant pedigrees, representing a broad range of behavioral phenotypes, have been identified. Specifically, we have identified two open field mutants (one displaying hyper-locomotion, the other hypo-locomotion), four tail suspension mutants (all displaying increased immobility), one nociception mutant (displaying abnormal responsiveness to thermal pain), two prepulse inhibition mutants (displaying poor inhibition of the startle response), one anxiety-related mutant (displaying decreased anxiety in the light/dark test), and one learning and memory mutant (displaying reduced response to the conditioned stimulus) These findings highlight the utility of a set of behavioral tasks used in a high throughput screen to identify neurobehavioral mutants. Further analysis (i.e., behavioral and genetic mapping studies) of mutants is in progress with the ultimate goal of identification of novel genes and mouse models relevant to human disorders as well as the identification of novel therapeutic targets.

  1. Mutations of nuclear localization signals in mNANOG generate dominant negative mutants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Juan; ZHANG XiaoFei; PEI DuanQing

    2009-01-01

    Mouse NANOG plays a critical role in maintaining self-renewal and pluripotency of embryonic stem cells.Yet,the precise mechanism of how mNANOG functions is still less known.Here,we report that mouse NANOG has two nuclear localization signals (NLS,RKQKMR and RMKCKR) which are respon-sible for the nuclear localization and transcriptional activity in the conserved homeobox domain.NLS mutants of mouse NANOG generate:3 mutants that are localized throughout the cells and lose the transectivation function.We further prove that all three NLS mutants may interact with the wild-type mouse NANOG like NANOG dimerization itself and inhibit the wild-type mouse NANOG activity,acting as dominant negative mutants.The NLS mutants of mouse NANOG may also inhibit activity of oct4 promoter in pluripotent cells,indicating that the NLS mutants can affect the endogenous mouse NANOG function in vivo.These data suggest that the NLS mutants of mouse NANOG may be used as a tool to regulate NANOG activity in pluripotent cells.

  2. Mutant p53: multiple mechanisms define biologic activity in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Paul Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The functional importance of p53 as a tumor suppressor gene is evident through its pervasiveness in cancer biology. The p53 gene is the most commonly altered gene in human cancer; however, not all genetic alterations are biologically equivalent. The majority of p53 alterations involve missense mutations that result in the production of mutant p53 proteins. Such mutant p53 proteins lack normal p53 function and may acquire novel functions, often with deleterious effects. Here, we review characterized mechanisms of mutant p53 gain of function in multiple model systems. In addition, we review mutant p53 addiction as emerging evidence suggests that tumors may depend on sustained mutant p53 activity for continued growth. We also discuss the role of p53 in stromal elements and their contribution to tumor initiation and progression. Lastly, current genetic mouse models of mutant p53 are reviewed and their limitations discussed.

  3. Native Mutant Huntingtin in Human Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapp, Ellen; Valencia, Antonio; Li, Xueyi; Aronin, Neil; Kegel, Kimberly B.; Vonsattel, Jean-Paul; Young, Anne B.; Wexler, Nancy; DiFiglia, Marian

    2012-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is caused by polyglutamine expansion in the N terminus of huntingtin (htt). Analysis of human postmortem brain lysates by SDS-PAGE and Western blot reveals htt as full-length and fragmented. Here we used Blue Native PAGE (BNP) and Western blots to study native htt in human postmortem brain. Antisera against htt detected a single band broadly migrating at 575–850 kDa in control brain and at 650–885 kDa in heterozygous and Venezuelan homozygous HD brains. Anti-polyglutamine antisera detected full-length mutant htt in HD brain. There was little htt cleavage even if lysates were pretreated with trypsin, indicating a property of native htt to resist protease cleavage. A soluble mutant htt fragment of about 180 kDa was detected with anti-htt antibody Ab1 (htt-(1–17)) and increased when lysates were treated with denaturants (SDS, 8 m urea, DTT, or trypsin) before BNP. Wild-type htt was more resistant to denaturants. Based on migration of in vitro translated htt fragments, the 180-kDa segment terminated ≈htt 670–880 amino acids. If second dimension SDS-PAGE followed BNP, the 180-kDa mutant htt was absent, and 43–50 kDa htt fragments appeared. Brain lysates from two HD mouse models expressed native full-length htt; a mutant fragment formed if lysates were pretreated with 8 m urea + DTT. Native full-length mutant htt in embryonic HD140Q/140Q mouse primary neurons was intact during cell death and when cell lysates were exposed to denaturants before BNP. Thus, native mutant htt occurs in brain and primary neurons as a soluble full-length monomer. PMID:22375012

  4. Short-term suppression of A315T mutant human TDP-43 expression improves functional deficits in a novel inducible transgenic mouse model of FTLD-TDP and ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Yazi D; van Hummel, Annika; Stevens, Claire H; Gladbach, Amadeus; Ippati, Stefania; Bi, Mian; Lee, Wei S; Krüger, Sarah; van der Hoven, Julia; Volkerling, Alexander; Bongers, Andre; Halliday, Glenda; Haass, Nikolas K; Kiernan, Matthew; Delerue, Fabien; Ittner, Lars M

    2015-11-01

    The nuclear transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) undergoes relocalization to the cytoplasm with formation of cytoplasmic deposits in neurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Pathogenic mutations in the TDP-43-encoding TARDBP gene in familial ALS as well as non-mutant human TDP-43 have been utilized to model FTD/ALS in cell culture and animals, including mice. Here, we report novel A315T mutant TDP-43 transgenic mice, iTDP-43(A315T), with controlled neuronal over-expression. Constitutive expression of human TDP-43(A315T) resulted in pronounced early-onset and progressive neurodegeneration, which was associated with compromised motor performance, spatial memory and disinhibition. Muscle atrophy resulted in reduced grip strength. Cortical degeneration presented with pronounced astrocyte activation. Using differential protein extraction from iTDP-43(A315T) brains, we found cytoplasmic localization, fragmentation, phosphorylation and ubiquitination and insolubility of TDP-43. Surprisingly, suppression of human TDP-43(A315T) expression in mice with overt neurodegeneration for only 1 week was sufficient to significantly improve motor and behavioral deficits, and reduce astrogliosis. Our data suggest that functional deficits in iTDP-43(A315T) mice are at least in part a direct and transient effect of the presence of TDP-43(A315T). Furthermore, it illustrates the compensatory capacity of compromised neurons once transgenic TDP-43 is removed, with implications for future treatments.

  5. Construction of Mouse Melanoma Cell Models of Wild-type Overexpression Connexin 43 and Site-specific Mutant Connexin 43%过表达及定点突变缝隙连接蛋白Cx43小鼠黑色素瘤细胞模型的构建

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李玢; 张广献; 刘娟; 赵青; 谭宇蕙; 吴映雅; 易华; 杜标炎

    2014-01-01

    目的:构建小鼠黑色素瘤细胞(B16)过表达野生型及点突变型缝隙连接蛋白43(Connexin43, Cx43)细胞模型,为以缝隙连接(Gap Junction, GJ)为靶点的中药复方、中药单药及药物单体的研究提供可靠阳性对照和阴性对照。方法构建野生型Cx43、突变型Cx43G21R、突变型Cx43G138R重组荧光蛋白融合慢病毒表达质粒,用定点突变技术获得Cx43G21R和Cx43G138R突变体,对上述3种质粒进行双酶切和测序鉴定,并分别包装病毒感染B16细胞,使B16细胞过表达野生型Cx43、突变型Cx43G21R、突变型Cx43G138R。 Western blot检测Cx43蛋白表达水平变化,荧光示踪法观察缝隙连接通讯(Gap Junction Intercellular Communication, GJIC)功能变化。结果①酶切及测序证明,成功构建 pLVCx43-mCherry、 pLVCx43-mCherryG21R、 pLVCx43-mCherryG138R重组荧光蛋白融合慢病毒表达质粒。②成功感染B16细胞并筛选稳定过表达Cx43、 Cx43G21R、Cx43G138R细胞株, Western blot检测显示上述细胞株Cx43蛋白表达均高于对照组。③过表达野生型Cx43后B16细胞GJIC功能较对照组增强;过表达突变型Cx43后B16细胞GJIC功能较对照组减弱。结论过表达野生型Cx43可增强B16细胞GJIC功能,过表达突变型Cx43可抑制B16细胞GJIC功能。%Objective To construct mouse B16 melanoma cell models of wild-type overexpression Cx43 and site-specific mutant Cx43, thus to provide reliable positive and negative control for the study of gap junction targeted Chinese herbal formula, Chinese medicine ingredient, and drug monomer. Methods We constructed the recombined fluorescent protein(mCherry) infused with Lentivirus expression plasmid of wild-type Cx43(pLVCx43-mCherry), mutant R (pLVCx43G21R-mCherry) and mutant Cx43G138R(pLVCx43 G138R-mCherry). The Cx43G21R and Cx43G138R mutants were obtained by site-specific mutagenesis. The three kinds of plasmid were performed double restriction

  6. Targeting Palmitoyl Acyltransferases in Mutant NRAS-Driven Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    regulation of synaptic and neuronal functions.17 A point mutation in DHHC21 was identified in the depilated (dep) mouse mutant, resulting in hair follicle ...and hair follicle differentiation. PLoS Genet. 5, e1000748. (19) Mansilla, F., Birkenkamp-Demtroder, K., Kruhoffer, M., Sorensen, F. B., Andersen, C...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0203 TITLE: Targeting Palmitoyl Acyltransferases in Mutant NRAS-Driven Melanoma PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Xu Wu

  7. Sensorimotor learning in Dab1(scm) (scrambler) mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalonde, R; Strazielle, C

    2011-04-15

    Homozygous Dab1(scm) mouse mutants with cell ectopias in cerebellar cortex and neocortex were compared with non-ataxic controls on two tests of motor coordination: rotorod and grid climbing. Even at the minimal speed of 4 rpm and unlike controls, none of the Dab1(scm) mutants reached criterion on the constant speed rotorod. In contrast, Dab1(scm) mutants improved their performances on the vertical grid over the course of the same number of trials. Thus, despite massive cerebellar degeneration, sensorimotor learning for equilibrium is still possible, indicating the potential usefulness of the grid-climbing test in determining residual functions in mice with massive cerebellar damage.

  8. The German Mouse Clinic: a platform for systemic phenotype analysis of mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, H; Gailus-Durner, V; Adler, T; Pimentel, J A Aguilar; Becker, L; Bolle, I; Brielmeier, M; Calzada-Wack, J; Dalke, C; Ehrhardt, N; Fasnacht, N; Ferwagner, B; Frischmann, U; Hans, W; Hölter, S M; Hölzlwimmer, G; Horsch, M; Javaheri, A; Kallnik, M; Kling, E; Lengger, C; Maier, H; Mossbrugger, I; Mörth, C; Naton, B; Nöth, U; Pasche, B; Prehn, C; Przemeck, G; Puk, O; Racz, I; Rathkolb, B; Rozman, J; Schäble, K; Schreiner, R; Schrewe, A; Sina, C; Steinkamp, R; Thiele, F; Willershäuser, M; Zeh, R; Adamski, J; Busch, D H; Beckers, J; Behrendt, H; Daniel, H; Esposito, I; Favor, J; Graw, J; Heldmaier, G; Höfler, H; Ivandic, B; Katus, H; Klingenspor, M; Klopstock, T; Lengeling, A; Mempel, M; Müller, W; Neschen, S; Ollert, M; Quintanilla-Martinez, L; Rosenstiel, P; Schmidt, J; Schreiber, S; Schughart, K; Schulz, H; Wolf, E; Wurst, W; Zimmer, A; Hrabé de Angelis, M

    2009-02-01

    The German Mouse Clinic (GMC) is a large scale phenotyping center where mouse mutant lines are analyzed in a standardized and comprehensive way. The result is an almost complete picture of the phenotype of a mouse mutant line--a systemic view. At the GMC, expert scientists from various fields of mouse research work in close cooperation with clinicians side by side at one location. The phenotype screens comprise the following areas: allergy, behavior, clinical chemistry, cardiovascular analyses, dysmorphology, bone and cartilage, energy metabolism, eye and vision, host-pathogen interactions, immunology, lung function, molecular phenotyping, neurology, nociception, steroid metabolism, and pathology. The German Mouse Clinic is an open access platform that offers a collaboration-based phenotyping to the scientific community (www.mouseclinic.de). More than 80 mutant lines have been analyzed in a primary screen for 320 parameters, and for 95% of the mutant lines we have found new or additional phenotypes that were not associated with the mouse line before. Our data contributed to the association of mutant mouse lines to the corresponding human disease. In addition, the systemic phenotype analysis accounts for pleiotropic gene functions and refines previous phenotypic characterizations. This is an important basis for the analysis of underlying disease mechanisms. We are currently setting up a platform that will include environmental challenge tests to decipher genome-environmental interactions in the areas nutrition, exercise, air, stress and infection with different standardized experiments. This will help us to identify genetic predispositions as susceptibility factors for environmental influences.

  9. Notch pathway is activated in cell culture and mouse models of mutant SOD1-related familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, with suppression of its activation as an additional mechanism of neuroprotection for lithium and valproate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S-Y; Ren, M; Jiang, H-Z; Wang, J; Jiang, H-Q; Yin, X; Qi, Y; Wang, X-D; Dong, G-T; Wang, T-H; Yang, Y-Q; Feng, H-L

    2015-08-20

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an idiopathic and lethal neurodegenerative disease that currently has no effective treatment. A recent study found that the Notch signaling pathway was up-regulated in a TAR DNA-binding protein-43 (TDP-43) Drosophila model of ALS. Notch signaling acts as a master regulator in the central nervous system. However, the mechanisms by which Notch participates in the pathogenesis of ALS have not been completely elucidated. Recent studies have shown that the mood stabilizers lithium and valproic acid (VPA) are able to regulate Notch signaling. Our study sought to confirm the relationship between the Notch pathway and ALS and whether the Notch pathway contributes to the neuroprotective effects of lithium and VPA in ALS. We found that the Notch pathway was activated in in vitro and in vivo models of ALS, and suppression of Notch activation with a Notch signaling inhibitor, N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl-L-alanyl)]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester (DAPT) and Notch1 siRNA significantly reduced neuronal apoptotic signaling, as evidenced by the up-regulation of Bcl-2 as well as the down-regulation of Bax and cytochrome c. We also found that lithium and VPA suppressed the Notch activation associated with the superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) mutation, and the combination of lithium and VPA produced a more robust effect than either agent alone. Our findings indicate that the Notch pathway plays a critical role in ALS, and the neuroprotective effects of lithium and VPA against mutant SOD1-mediated neuronal damage are at least partially dependent on their suppression of Notch activation.

  10. 一株识别肿瘤细胞上CD40突变体分子的单克隆抗体的研制及其生物学功能研究%Preparation and characterization of a mouse anti-human CD40 mutant monoclonal antibody

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑舒丹; 马泓冰; 高超; 汪家敏; 孙静; 罗先富; 张学光

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To prepare and characterize a mouse anti-human CD40 mutant monoclonal mAb. METHODS: Female BALB/c mice of 6-8 weeks old were immunized with CD40 mutant transfectant (L929-CD40mu) as immunogen. The spleen B cells of the mice were fused with Sp2/0 myeloma cells. The hybridoma cells were screened with CD40 mutant transfectant (L929-CD40mu) by FCM. Faststrip analysis was performed to identify Ig subclass of this mAb. The epitope recognized by this mAb was detected by Bio-5C11 competitive assay. Western blot technique was adopted to identify the mAb. The proliferation of tumor cells in vitro was analyzed by MTT assay and apoptosis of tumor cells in vitro was analyzed by PI-annexin V assay. RESULTS: One hybridoma cell line named 10C5 was obtained, which had the property of secreting anti-human CD40 mutant monoclonal antibody continuously and steadily. This mAb specifically recognized human CD40 mutant molecule and induced the apoptosis of tumor cells in vitro. CONCLUSION: One hybridoma cell line which can secret a mouse anti-human CD40 mutant mAb has been prepared successfully. This mAb can inhibit the growth of tumor cells expressing CD40 mutant and induce their apoptosis in vitro.%目的:以本科室发现肿瘤细胞上表达的CD40 787AA突变为基础,研制识别肿瘤细胞上CD40突变体分子的单克隆抗体(mAb),并对其生物学特性作初步分析.方法:以转人CD40突变体转基因细胞L929-CD40mu为免疫原,免疫6~8周龄的雌性BALB/c小鼠;采用B淋巴细胞融合技术,将免疫小鼠脾脏细胞与Sp2/0融合,以L929-CD40mu转基因细胞为抗体筛选阳性细胞,免疫荧光标记法对杂交瘤进行反复筛选和多次的克隆化培养;采用快速定性试纸法及竞争抑制结合试验分析该mAb的亚类及抗原识别位点;免疫印迹法对该mAb进行鉴定;采用MTT法分析mAb在体外对肿瘤细胞的抑制增殖效应以及PI-annexin V方法进行细胞凋亡测定.结果:获得1株稳定分泌鼠抗人CD40mu m

  11. High-throughput mouse phenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Hilary; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Brown, Steve D M

    2011-04-01

    Comprehensive phenotyping will be required to reveal the pleiotropic functions of a gene and to uncover the wider role of genetic loci within diverse biological systems. The challenge will be to devise phenotyping approaches to characterise the thousands of mutants that are being generated as part of international efforts to acquire a mutant for every gene in the mouse genome. In order to acquire robust datasets of broad based phenotypes from mouse mutants it is necessary to design and implement pipelines that incorporate standardised phenotyping platforms that are validated across diverse mouse genetics centres or mouse clinics. We describe here the rationale and methodology behind one phenotyping pipeline, EMPReSSslim, that was designed as part of the work of the EUMORPHIA and EUMODIC consortia, and which exemplifies some of the challenges facing large-scale phenotyping. EMPReSSslim captures a broad range of data on diverse biological systems, from biochemical to physiological amongst others. Data capture and dissemination is pivotal to the operation of large-scale phenotyping pipelines, including the definition of parameters integral to each phenotyping test and the associated ontological descriptions. EMPReSSslim data is displayed within the EuroPhenome database, where a variety of tools are available to allow the user to search for interesting biological or clinical phenotypes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. 肠球菌溶血素cyl基因原始株、变异株在小鼠腹膜炎中的毒力差异%Virulence Changes between EF A7 and EF A7 cyl Mutant in the Mouse Peritonitis Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋燕成; 张志珊; 强华

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to understand the pathogenic mechanisms of enterococcal hemolysin and establish the foundation to diagnose and control relevant diseases.Methods Take 30 clean grade ICR mice were randomly divided into ten groups,each 6,1 to 4 groups according to 10-fold gradient amount per 1 ml intraperitoneal injection of 5× 107 cfu/ml~5×1010 cfu/ml of EF A7,group 5 as a control group injected 0.5 ml saline,take another 30 clean grade ICR mice,intraperitoneal injection of 5×107 cfu/ml~5×1010 cfu/ml of EF A7 cyl mutant by the same measures,compared to the original strains of mice infected with mutant strain LD50,and a week after infection mortality was observed in mice daily. Another seven groups of mice with the same bacterial concentration (5×109 cfu/ml)were injected intraperitoneally EF A7 and EF A7 cyl mutant,after infection 6 h,12 h and 24 h comparing the number of leukocytes in peripheral blood of mice,re-spectively,the concentration of TNF-αin the acute phase of cytokines.Results In the mouse peritonitis models the 50% le-thal dose (LD50)of EF A7 cyl mutant was 100 times lower than enterococcus faecalis EF A7.The differences of the survival percentage of EF A7 cyl mutant groups and EF A7 groups have significance (P<0.05).As the changes in boold leukocytes numbers and the TNF-αlevel.Conclusion Cyl gene is probably a major virulence factor of Enterococcus and plays an impor-tant role in the mouse peritonitis model.%目的:通过研究肠球菌溶血素的毒力,为肠球菌的致病机制及其临床感染的诊断防治奠定基础。方法取30只清洁级 ICR小鼠,随机分为5组,每组6只,其中1~4组按10倍梯度以每只1 ml的量腹腔注射5×107 cfu/ml~5×1010 cfu/ml的 EF A7,第5组为对照组腹腔注射0.5 ml生理盐水。同样方法另取30只小鼠腹腔注射5×107 cfu/ml~5×1010 cfu/ml的 EF A7 cyl mutant,比较原始株、变异株感染小鼠的 LD50,并在感染后连续一

  13. Connexin mutant embryonic stem cells and human diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kiyomasa; Nishii; Yosaburo; Shibata; Yasushi; Kobayashi

    2014-01-01

    Intercellular communication via gap junctions allows cells within multicellular organisms to share small molecules. The effect of such interactions has been elucidated using mouse gene knockout strategies. Although several mutations in human gap junction-encoding connexin(Cx) have been described, Cx mutants in mice do not always recapitulate the human disease. Among the 20 mouse Cxs, Cx26, Cx43, and Cx45 play roles in early cardiac or placental development, and disruption of the genes results in lethality that hampers further analyses. Embryonic stem cells(ESCs) that lack Cx43 or Cx45 have made analysis feasible in both in vitro differentiated cell cultures and in vivo chimeric tissues. The success of mouse ESCs studies is leading to the use of induced pluripotent stem cells to learn more about the pathogenesis of human Cx diseases. This review summarizes the current status of mouse Cx disruption models and ESC differentiation studies, and discusses their implication for understanding human Cx diseases.

  14. Connexin mutant embryonic stem cells and human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishii, Kiyomasa; Shibata, Yosaburo; Kobayashi, Yasushi

    2014-11-26

    Intercellular communication via gap junctions allows cells within multicellular organisms to share small molecules. The effect of such interactions has been elucidated using mouse gene knockout strategies. Although several mutations in human gap junction-encoding connexin (Cx) have been described, Cx mutants in mice do not always recapitulate the human disease. Among the 20 mouse Cxs, Cx26, Cx43, and Cx45 play roles in early cardiac or placental development, and disruption of the genes results in lethality that hampers further analyses. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) that lack Cx43 or Cx45 have made analysis feasible in both in vitro differentiated cell cultures and in vivo chimeric tissues. The success of mouse ESCs studies is leading to the use of induced pluripotent stem cells to learn more about the pathogenesis of human Cx diseases. This review summarizes the current status of mouse Cx disruption models and ESC differentiation studies, and discusses their implication for understanding human Cx diseases.

  15. Secretos de Mutantes

    OpenAIRE

    Marín, Martha; Muñoz, Germán; Serrano, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    Apartándose de enfoques que consideran las culturas juveniles como ‘desviaciones sociales', ‘tribus urbanas' o ‘nuevos movimientos políticos', Secretos de mutantes bucea en culturas juveniles urbanas como la Skinhead, el Punk, el Metal, el Hardcore, el Grunge y el Hip Hop, explorándolas desde un punto de vista inédito: su dimensión de creación, para percibir los cruciales y casi desconocidos procesos que sus miembros llevan a cabo en estos vastos universos de experimentación. Esta obra se nut...

  16. 10. international mouse genome conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meisler, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    Ten years after hosting the First International Mammalian Genome Conference in Paris in 1986, Dr. Jean-Louis Guenet presided over the Tenth Conference at the Pasteur Institute, October 7--10, 1996. The 1986 conference was a satellite to the Human Gene Mapping Workshop and had approximately 50 attendees. The 1996 meeting was attended by 300 scientists from around the world. In the interim, the number of mapped loci in the mouse increased from 1,000 to over 20,000. This report contains a listing of the program and its participants, and two articles that review the meeting and the role of the laboratory mouse in the Human Genome project. More than 200 papers were presented at the conference covering the following topics: International mouse chromosome committee meetings; Mutant generation and identification; Physical and genetic maps; New technology and resources; Chromatin structure and gene regulation; Rate and hamster genetic maps; Informatics and databases; and Quantitative trait analysis.

  17. Porphyrin Interactions with Wild Type and Mutant Mouse Ferrochelatase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Gloria C.; Franco, Ricardo; Lu, Yi; Ma, Jian-Guo; Shelnutt, John A.

    1999-05-19

    Ferrochelatase (EC 4.99.1.1), the terminal enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway, catalyzes Fe2+ chelation into protoporphyrin IX. Resonance Raman and W-visible absorbance spectroscopes of wild type and engineered variants of murine ferrochelatase were used to examine the proposed structural mechanism for iron insertion into protoporphyrin by ferrochelatase. The recombinant variants (i.e., H207N and E287Q) are enzymes in which the conserved amino acids histidine-207 and glutamate-287 of murine ferrochelatase were substituted with asparagine and glutamine, respectively. Both of these residues are at the active site of the enzyme as deduced from the Bacillus subtilis ferrochelatase three-dimensional structure. Addition of free base or metalated porphyrins to wild type ferrochelatase and H207N variant yields a quasi 1:1 complex, possibly a monomeric protein-bound species. In contrast, the addition of porphyrin (either free base or metalated) to E287Q is sub-stoichiometric, as this variant retains bound porphyrin in the active site during isolation and purification. The specificity of porphyrin binding is confirmed by the narrowing of the structure-sensitive resonance Raman lines and the vinyl vibrational mode. Resonance Raman spectra of free base and metalated porphyrins bound to the wild type ferrochelatase indicate a nonplanar distortion of the porphyrin macrocycle, although the magnitude of the distortion cannot be determined without first defining the specific type of deformation. Significantly, the extent of the nonplanar distortion varies in the case of H207N- and E287Q-bound porphyrins. In fact, resonance Raman spectral decomposition indicates a homogeneous ruffled distortion for the nickel protoporphyrin bound to the wild type ferrochelatase, whereas both a planar and ruffled conformations are present for the H207N-bound porphyrin. Perhaps more revealing is the unusual resonance , 3 Raman spectrum of the endogenous E287Q-bound porphyrin, which has the structure-sensitive lines greatly upshifted relative to those of the free base protoporphyrin in solution. This could be interpreted as an equilibrium between protein conformers, one of which favors a highly distorted porphyrin macrocycle. Taken together these findings suggest that the mode of porphyrin distortion in murine ferrochelatase is different from that reported for yeast ferrochelatase, which requires metal binding for porphyrin distortion.

  18. A calcium channel mutant mouse model of hypokalemic periodic paralysis

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Fenfen; Mi, Wentao; Hernández-Ochoa, Erick O.; Burns, Dennis K.; Fu, Yu; Gray, Hillery F; Struyk, Arie F.; Martin F Schneider; Cannon, Stephen C.

    2012-01-01

    Hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HypoPP) is a familial skeletal muscle disorder that presents with recurrent episodes of severe weakness lasting hours to days associated with reduced serum potassium (K+). HypoPP is genetically heterogeneous, with missense mutations of a calcium channel (CaV1.1) or a sodium channel (NaV1.4) accounting for 60% and 20% of cases, respectively. The mechanistic link between CaV1.1 mutations and the ictal loss of muscle excitability during an attack of weakness in Hy...

  19. A calcium channel mutant mouse model of hypokalemic periodic paralysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wu, Fenfen; Mi, Wentao; Hernández-Ochoa, Erick O; Burns, Dennis K; Fu, Yu; Gray, Hillery F; Struyk, Arie F; Schneider, Martin F; Cannon, Stephen C

    2012-01-01

    Hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HypoPP) is a familial skeletal muscle disorder that presents with recurrent episodes of severe weakness lasting hours to days associated with reduced serum potassium (K+...

  20. ECB deacylase mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Frances H.; Shao, Zhixin; Zhao, Huimin; Giver, Lorraine J.

    2002-01-01

    A method for in vitro mutagenesis and recombination of polynucleotide sequences based on polymerase-catalyzed extension of primer oligonucleotides is disclosed. The method involves priming template polynucleotide(s) with random-sequences or defined-sequence primers to generate a pool of short DNA fragments with a low level of point mutations. The DNA fragments are subjected to denaturization followed by annealing and further enzyme-catalyzed DNA polymerization. This procedure is repeated a sufficient number of times to produce full-length genes which comprise mutants of the original template polynucleotides. These genes can be further amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and cloned into a vector for expression of the encoded proteins.

  1. Mouse embryos' fusion for the tetraploid complementation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gertsenstein, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Production of the germline-competent chimeras using genetically modified ES cell lines is an essential step in the establishment of novel mouse models. In addition chimeras provide a powerful tool to study the cell lineage and to analyze complex phenotypes of mutant mice. Mouse chimeras with tetraploid embryos are used to rescue extraembryonic defects, to analyze an impact of gene function on specific lineage, to study the interaction between embryonic and extraembryonic tissues, and to produce mutant embryos and mice for the phenotype analysis. Tetraploid embryos are generated by the fusion of two blastomeres of the mouse embryo. The applications of tetraploid complementation assay and the protocol are described below.

  2. Genes and Alcohol Consumption: Studies with Mutant Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayfield, Jody; Arends, Michael A.; Harris, R. Adron; Blednov, Yuri A.

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter, we review the effects of global null mutant and overexpressing transgenic mouse lines on voluntary self-administration of alcohol. We examine approximately 200 publications pertaining to the effects of 155 mouse genes on alcohol consumption in different drinking models. The targeted genes vary in function and include neurotransmitter, ion channel, neuroimmune, and neuropeptide signaling systems. The alcohol self-administration models include operant conditioning, two- and four-bottle choice continuous and intermittent access, drinking in the dark limited access, chronic intermittent ethanol, and scheduled high alcohol consumption tests. Comparisons of different drinking models using the same mutant mice are potentially the most informative, and we will highlight those examples. More mutants have been tested for continuous two-bottle choice consumption than any other test; of the 137 mouse genes examined using this model, 97 (72%) altered drinking in at least one sex. Overall, the effects of genetic manipulations on alcohol drinking often depend on the sex of the mice, alcohol concentration and time of access, genetic background, as well as the drinking test. PMID:27055617

  3. Genes and Alcohol Consumption: Studies with Mutant Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayfield, J; Arends, M A; Harris, R A; Blednov, Y A

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we review the effects of global null mutant and overexpressing transgenic mouse lines on voluntary self-administration of alcohol. We examine approximately 200 publications pertaining to the effects of 155 mouse genes on alcohol consumption in different drinking models. The targeted genes vary in function and include neurotransmitter, ion channel, neuroimmune, and neuropeptide signaling systems. The alcohol self-administration models include operant conditioning, two- and four-bottle choice continuous and intermittent access, drinking in the dark limited access, chronic intermittent ethanol, and scheduled high alcohol consumption tests. Comparisons of different drinking models using the same mutant mice are potentially the most informative, and we will highlight those examples. More mutants have been tested for continuous two-bottle choice consumption than any other test; of the 137 mouse genes examined using this model, 97 (72%) altered drinking in at least one sex. Overall, the effects of genetic manipulations on alcohol drinking often depend on the sex of the mice, alcohol concentration and time of access, genetic background, as well as the drinking test.

  4. How does the NPM1 mutant induce leukemia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Sportoletti

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available NPM1 is the most frequently mutated gene in AML and the role of the NPM1 mutant in acute myeloid leukemia along with its leukemogenic potential are still under investigation. NPM1 genetic alterations can contribute to leukemogenesis through the direct oncogenic effect of the mutant protein and the concomitant loss of one functional allele. Npm1 loss determines tumor development in the mouse while in human NPM1 maps in a chromosomal region frequently loss in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS. The NPM1 mutant cytoplasmic delocalization in leukemic blasts alters multiple cellular pathways through either loss or gain of function effects on different protein partners. Here we discuss the most relevant studies on the role of the NPM1 molecule in hematological malignancies and both in vitro and in vivo studies that are trying to elucidate the way by which the NPM1 mutation induces leukemia.

  5. p53 increases caspase-6 expression and activation in muscle tissue expressing mutant huntingtin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrnhoefer, Dagmar E; Skotte, Niels H; Ladha, Safia

    2014-01-01

    a role in the peripheral phenotypes, such as muscle wasting observed in HD. We assessed skeletal muscle tissue from HD patients and well-characterized mouse models of HD. Cleavage of the caspase-6 specific substrate lamin A is significantly increased in skeletal muscle obtained from HD patients as well...... as in muscle tissues from two different HD mouse models. p53, a transcriptional activator of caspase-6, is upregulated in neuronal cells and tissues expressing mutant huntingtin. Activation of p53 leads to a dramatic increase in levels of caspase-6 mRNA, caspase-6 activity and cleavage of lamin A. Using mouse......-6 expression and activation is exacerbated in cells and tissues of both neuronal and peripheral origin expressing mutant huntingtin (Htt). These findings suggest that the presence of the mutant Htt protein enhances p53 activity and lowers the apoptotic threshold, which activates caspase-6...

  6. Preclinical Mouse Models of Neurofibromatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-01

    arachnoidal cells is rate-limiting for meningioma development in the mouse. Genes & Development, 2002, 16:1060-1065. Kissil JL, Johnson KC, Eckman MS and...doubly mutant Nf1 and Wv hematopoietic cells. Blood 2003; 101: 1984-1986. Shannon, K.M. 35 Kissil JL, Wilker EW, Johnson KC, Eckman MS, Yaffe M, and... Paul E. McKeever, Shannon, K.M. 38 Megan Lim, Simon J. Conway, Luis F. Parada, Yuan Zhu, and Sean J. Morrison. 2007. The loss of Nf1 transiently

  7. Palliative care teaching in medical residency: a review of two POGO-e teaching products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Lionel S; Kandavelou, Karthikeyan; Khan, Nabeela

    2012-06-01

    This is a comparison review of GeriaSims and Care of the Aging Medical Patient (CHAMP) modules addressing issues in palliative and hospice medicine found in the Portal of Geriatric Online Education, a free on-line repository of geriatric educational materials for medical educators. GeriaSims is a self-directed teaching module designed to systematically address many of the important questions involved in caring for individuals with chronic progressive and life-limiting illnesses. It is well suited for physicians, particularly medical residents and fellows in-training, who provide care for medically complicated elderly and terminally ill individuals. The CHAMP module is designed to familiarize physician educators with palliative and hospice medicine basics to teach residents and fellows through didactic slides, although it can probably be adapted for use by residents and fellows if audio commentary accompanies the slides. Both modules address practical approaches to addressing palliative care in patients and their families. They are useful teaching tools that address an important learning need and can be readily used to supplement current residency curriculum in hospice and palliative medicine.

  8. Ultrasound biomicroscopy in mouse cardiovascular development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Daniel H.

    2004-05-01

    The mouse is the preferred animal model for studying mammalian cardiovascular development and many human congenital heart diseases. Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM), utilizing high-frequency (40-50-MHz) ultrasound, is uniquely capable of providing in vivo, real-time microimaging and Doppler blood velocity measurements in mouse embryos and neonates. UBM analyses of normal and abnormal mouse cardiovascular function will be described to illustrate the power of this microimaging approach. In particular, real-time UBM images have been used to analyze dimensional changes in the mouse heart from embryonic to neonatal stages. UBM-Doppler has been used recently to examine the precise timing of onset of a functional circulation in early-stage mouse embryos, from the first detectable cardiac contractions. In other experiments, blood velocity waveforms have been analyzed to characterize the functional phenotype of mutant mouse embryos having defects in cardiac valve formation. Finally, UBM has been developed for real-time, in utero image-guided injection of mouse embryos, enabling cell transplantation and genetic gain-of-function experiments with transfected cells and retroviruses. In summary, UBM provides a unique and powerful approach for in vivo analysis and image-guided manipulation in normal and genetically engineered mice, over a wide range of embryonic to neonatal developmental stages.

  9. January 2012 DMM Podcast: histopathology in high-throughput phenotyping of mutant mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Paul Schofield, of Cambridge University, discusses the advantages of including histopathological analysis in large-scale mouse mutant phenotyping pipelines. Narrated by Sarah E. Allan. To listen to this podcast, visit http://www.biologists.com/DMM/podcasts/index.html.

  10. Functionality of cryopreserved juvenile ovaries from mutant mice in different genetic background strains after allotransplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, K.Y.; Groot, de S.A.; Woelders, H.; Horst, van der G.T.J.; Themmen, A.P.N.; Colenbrander, B.; Fentener van Vlissingen, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    The rapid expansion of mutant mouse colonies for biomedical research has resulted in lack of space at laboratory animal facilities and increasing risks of losing precious lines. These challenges require cheap and effective methods in addition to freezing embryos and sperm to archive the expanding mu

  11. Targeting adhesion signaling in KRAS, LKB1 mutant lung adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konen, Jessica; Koo, Junghui; Robinson, Brian S.; Wiles, Walter Guy; Huang, Chunzi; Martin, W. David; Behera, Madhusmita; Smith, Geoffrey H.; Hill, Charles E.; Rossi, Michael R.; Sica, Gabriel L.; Rupji, Manali; Chen, Zhengjia; Kowalski, Jeanne; Kasinski, Andrea L.; Ramalingam, Suresh S.; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Marcus, Adam I.

    2017-01-01

    Loss of LKB1 activity is prevalent in KRAS mutant lung adenocarcinoma and promotes aggressive and treatment-resistant tumors. Previous studies have shown that LKB1 is a negative regulator of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK), but in vivo studies testing the efficacy of FAK inhibition in LKB1 mutant cancers are lacking. Here, we took a pharmacologic approach to show that FAK inhibition is an effective early-treatment strategy for this high-risk molecular subtype. We established a lenti-Cre–induced Kras and Lkb1 mutant genetically engineered mouse model (KLLenti) that develops 100% lung adenocarcinoma and showed that high spatiotemporal FAK activation occurs in collective invasive cells that are surrounded by high levels of collagen. Modeling invasion in 3D, loss of Lkb1, but not p53, was sufficient to drive collective invasion and collagen alignment that was highly sensitive to FAK inhibition. Treatment of early, stage-matched KLLenti tumors with FAK inhibitor monotherapy resulted in a striking effect on tumor progression, invasion, and tumor-associated collagen. Chronic treatment extended survival and impeded local lymph node spread. Lastly, we identified focally upregulated FAK and collagen-associated collective invasion in KRAS and LKB1 comutated human lung adenocarcinoma patients. Our results suggest that patients with LKB1 mutant tumors should be stratified for early treatment with FAK inhibitors.

  12. Susceptibility genes for schizophrenia: mutant models, endophenotypes and psychobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Tuathaigh, Colm M P; Desbonnet, Lieve; Moran, Paula M; Waddington, John L

    2012-01-01

    Schizophrenia is characterised by a multifactorial aetiology that involves genetic liability interacting with epigenetic and environmental factors to increase risk for developing the disorder. A consensus view is that the genetic component involves several common risk alleles of small effect and/or rare but penetrant copy number variations. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence for broader, overlapping genetic-phenotypic relationships in psychosis; for example, the same susceptibility genes also confer risk for bipolar disorder. Phenotypic characterisation of genetic models of candidate risk genes and/or putative pathophysiological processes implicated in schizophrenia, as well as examination of epidemiologically relevant gene × environment interactions in these models, can illuminate molecular and pathobiological mechanisms involved in schizophrenia. The present chapter outlines both the evidence from phenotypic studies in mutant mouse models related to schizophrenia and recently described mutant models addressing such gene × environment interactions. Emphasis is placed on evaluating the extent to which mutant phenotypes recapitulate the totality of the disease phenotype or model selective endophenotypes. We also discuss new developments and trends in relation to the functional genomics of psychosis which might help to inform on the construct validity of mutant models of schizophrenia and highlight methodological challenges in phenotypic evaluation that relate to such models.

  13. Rest mutant zebrafish swim erratically and display atypical spatial preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravec, Cara E; Li, Edward; Maaswinkel, Hans; Kritzer, Mary F; Weng, Wei; Sirotkin, Howard I

    2015-05-01

    The Rest/Nrsf transcriptional repressor modulates expression of a large set of neural specific genes. Many of these target genes have well characterized roles in nervous system processes including development, plasticity and synaptogenesis. However, the impact of Rest-mediated transcriptional regulation on behavior has been understudied due in part to the embryonic lethality of the mouse knockout. To investigate the requirement for Rest in behavior, we employed the zebrafish rest mutant to explore a range of behaviors in adults and larva. Adult rest mutants of both sexes showed abnormal behaviors in a novel environment including increased vertical swimming, erratic swimming patterns and a proclivity for the tank walls. Adult males also had diminished reproductive success. At 6 days post fertilization (dpf), rest mutant larva were hypoactive, but displayed normal evoked responses to light and sound stimuli. Overall, these results provide evidence that rest dysfunction produces atypical swimming patterns and preferences in adults, and reduced locomotor activity in larvae. This study provides the first behavioral analysis of rest mutants and reveals specific behaviors that are modulated by Rest.

  14. Multifunctional adaptive NS1 mutations are selected upon human influenza virus evolution in the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole E Forbes

    Full Text Available The role of the NS1 protein in modulating influenza A virulence and host range was assessed by adapting A/Hong Kong/1/1968 (H3N2 (HK-wt to increased virulence in the mouse. Sequencing the NS genome segment of mouse-adapted variants revealed 11 mutations in the NS1 gene and 4 in the overlapping NEP gene. Using the HK-wt virus and reverse genetics to incorporate mutant NS gene segments, we demonstrated that all NS1 mutations were adaptive and enhanced virus replication (up to 100 fold in mouse cells and/or lungs. All but one NS1 mutant was associated with increased virulence measured by survival and weight loss in the mouse. Ten of twelve NS1 mutants significantly enhanced IFN-β antagonism to reduce the level of IFN β production relative to HK-wt in infected mouse lungs at 1 day post infection, where 9 mutants induced viral yields in the lung that were equivalent to or significantly greater than HK-wt (up to 16 fold increase. Eight of 12 NS1 mutants had reduced or lost the ability to bind the 30 kDa cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF30 thus demonstrating a lack of correlation with reduced IFN β production. Mutant NS1 genes resulted in increased viral mRNA transcription (10 of 12 mutants, and protein production (6 of 12 mutants in mouse cells. Increased transcription activity was demonstrated in the influenza mini-genome assay for 7 of 11 NS1 mutants. Although we have shown gain-of-function properties for all mutant NS genes, the contribution of the NEP mutations to phenotypic changes remains to be assessed. This study demonstrates that NS1 is a multifunctional virulence factor subject to adaptive evolution.

  15. TAE226, a Bis-Anilino Pyrimidine Compound, Inhibits the EGFR-Mutant Kinase Including T790M Mutant to Show Anti-Tumor Effect on EGFR-Mutant Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Otani

    Full Text Available TAE226, a bis-anilino pyrimidine compound, has been developed as an inhibitor of focal adhesion kinase (FAK and insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR. In this study, we investigated the effect of TAE226 on non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC, especially focusing on the EGFR mutational status. TAE226 was more effective against cells with mutant EGFR, including the T790M mutant, than against cells with wild-type one. TAE226 preferentially inhibited phospho-EGFR and its downstream signaling mediators in the cells with mutant EGFR than in those with wild-type one. Phosphorylation of FAK and IGF-IR was not inhibited at the concentration at which the proliferation of EGFR-mutant cells was inhibited. Results of the in vitro binding assay indicated significant differences in the affinity for TAE226 between the wild-type and L858R (or delE746_A750 mutant, and the reduced affinity of ATP to the L858R (or delE746_A750 mutant resulted in good responsiveness of the L858R (or delE746_A750 mutant cells to TAE226. Of interest, the L858R/T790M or delE746_A750/T790M mutant enhanced the binding affinity for TAE226 compared with the L858R or delE746_A750 mutant, resulting in the effectiveness of TAE226 against T790M mutant cells despite the T790M mutation restoring the ATP affinity for the mutant EGFR close to that for the wild-type. TAE226 also showed higher affinity of about 15-fold for the L858R/T790M mutant than for the wild-type one by kinetic interaction analysis. The anti-tumor effect against EGFR-mutant tumors including T790M mutation was confirmed in mouse models without any significant toxicity. In summary, we showed that TAE226 inhibited the activation of mutant EGFR and exhibited anti-proliferative activity against NSCLCs carrying EGFR mutations, including T790M mutation.

  16. Mouse Model Resources for Vision Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungyeon Won

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for mouse models, with their well-developed genetics and similarity to human physiology and anatomy, is clear and their central role in furthering our understanding of human disease is readily apparent in the literature. Mice carrying mutations that alter developmental pathways or cellular function provide model systems for analyzing defects in comparable human disorders and for testing therapeutic strategies. Mutant mice also provide reproducible, experimental systems for elucidating pathways of normal development and function. Two programs, the Eye Mutant Resource and the Translational Vision Research Models, focused on providing such models to the vision research community are described herein. Over 100 mutant lines from the Eye Mutant Resource and 60 mutant lines from the Translational Vision Research Models have been developed. The ocular diseases of the mutant lines include a wide range of phenotypes, including cataracts, retinal dysplasia and degeneration, and abnormal blood vessel formation. The mutations in disease genes have been mapped and in some cases identified by direct sequencing. Here, we report 3 novel alleles of Crxtvrm65, Rp1tvrm64, and Rpe65tvrm148 as successful examples of the TVRM program, that closely resemble previously reported knockout models.

  17. Nif- Hup- mutants of Rhizobium japonicum.

    OpenAIRE

    Moshiri, F; Stults, L; Novak, P.; Maier, R J

    1983-01-01

    Two H2 uptake-negative (Hup-) Rhizobium japonicum mutants were obtained that also lacked symbiotic N2 fixation (acetylene reduction) activity. One of the mutants formed green nodules and was deficient in heme. Hydrogen oxidation activity in this mutant could be restored by the addition of heme plus ATP to crude extracts. Bacteroid extracts from the other mutant strain lacked hydrogenase activity and activity for both of the nitrogenase component proteins. Hup+ revertants of the mutant strains...

  18. Wild Accessions and Mutant Resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Sandal, Niels Nørgaard

    2014-01-01

    Lotus japonicus, Lotus burttii, and Lotus filicaulis are species of Lotus genus that are utilized for molecular genetic analysis such as the construction of a linkage map and QTL analysis. Among them, a number of mutants have been isolated from two wild accessions: L. japonicus Gifu B-129...

  19. Mutant TDP-43 does not impair mitochondrial bioenergetics in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamata, Hibiki; Peixoto, Pablo; Konrad, Csaba; Palomo, Gloria; Bredvik, Kirsten; Gerges, Meri; Valsecchi, Federica; Petrucelli, Leonard; Ravits, John M; Starkov, Anatoly; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2017-05-08

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Functional studies of mitochondrial bioenergetics have focused mostly on superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutants, and showed that mutant human SOD1 impairs mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, calcium homeostasis, and dynamics. However, recent reports have indicated that alterations in transactivation response element DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) can also lead to defects of mitochondrial morphology and dynamics. Furthermore, it was proposed that TDP-43 mutations cause oxidative phosphorylation impairment associated with respiratory chain defects and that these effects were caused by mitochondrial localization of the mutant protein. Here, we investigated the presence of bioenergetic defects in the brain of transgenic mice expressing human mutant TDP-43 (TDP-43(A315T) mice), patient derived fibroblasts, and human cells expressing mutant forms of TDP-43. In the brain of TDP-43(A315T) mice, TDP-43 mutant fibroblasts, and cells expressing mutant TDP-43, we tested several bioenergetics parameters, including mitochondrial respiration, ATP synthesis, and calcium handling. Differences between mutant and control samples were evaluated by student t-test or by ANOVA, followed by Bonferroni correction, when more than two groups were compared. Mitochondrial localization of TDP-43 was investigated by immunocytochemistry in fibroblasts and by subcellular fractionation and western blot of mitochondrial fractions in mouse brain. We did not observe defects in any of the mitochondrial bioenergetic functions that were tested in TDP-43 mutants. We detected a small amount of TDP-43(A315T) peripherally associated with brain mitochondria. However, there was no correlation between TDP-43 associated with mitochondria and respiratory chain dysfunction. In addition, we observed increased calcium uptake in mitochondria from TDP-43(A315T) mouse

  20. Activation of tumor cell proliferation by thyroid hormone in a mouse model of follicular thyroid carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid cancers are the most common malignancy of the endocrine system in humans. To understand the molecular genetic events underlying thyroid carcinogenesis, we have generated a mouse model that spontaneously develops follicular thyroid carcinoma similar to human thyroid cancer (ThrbPV/PV mouse). This mutant mouse harbors a dominantnegative mutated thyroid hormone receptor β (denoted PV). The PV mutation was identified in a patient with resistance to thyroid hormone (TH). ThrbPV/PV mice exh...

  1. Beethoven, a mouse model for dominant, progressive hearing loss DFNA36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreugde, Sarah; Erven, Alexandra; Kros, Corné J; Marcotti, Walter; Fuchs, Helmut; Kurima, Kiyoto; Wilcox, Edward R; Friedman, Thomas B; Griffith, Andrew J; Balling, Rudi; Hrabé De Angelis, Martin; Avraham, Karen B; Steel, Karen P

    2002-03-01

    Despite recent progress in identifying genes underlying deafness, there are still relatively few mouse models of specific forms of human deafness. Here we describe the phenotype of the Beethoven (Bth) mouse mutant and a missense mutation in Tmc1 (transmembrane cochlear-expressed gene 1). Progressive hearing loss (DFNA36) and profound congenital deafness (DFNB7/B11) are caused by dominant and recessive mutations of the human ortholog, TMC1 (ref. 1), for which Bth and deafness (dn) are mouse models, respectively.

  2. TDP-43 causes differential pathology in neuronal versus glial cells in the mouse brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Sen; Wang, Chuan-En; Wei, Wenjie; Gaertig, Marta A.; Lai, Liangxue; Li, Shihua; Li, Xiao-Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) are associated with familial forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Although recent studies have revealed that mutant TDP-43 in neuronal and glial cells is toxic, how mutant TDP-43 causes primarily neuronal degeneration in an age-dependent manner remains unclear. Using adeno-associated virus (AAV) that expresses mutant TDP-43 (M337V) ubiquitously, we found that mutant TDP-43 accumulates preferentially in neuronal cells in the postnatal mouse brain. We then ubiquitously or selectively expressed mutant TDP-43 in neuronal and glial cells in the striatum of adult mouse brains via stereotaxic injection of AAV vectors and found that it also preferentially accumulates in neuronal cells. Expression of mutant TDP-43 in neurons in the striatum causes more severe degeneration, earlier death and more robust symptoms in mice than expression of mutant TDP-43 in glial cells; however, aging increases the expression of mutant TDP-43 in glial cells, and expression of mutant TDP-43 in older mice caused earlier onset of phenotypes and more severe neuropathology than that in younger mice. Although expression of mutant TDP-43 in glial cells via stereotaxic injection does not lead to robust neurological phenotypes, systemic inhibition of the proteasome activity via MG132 in postnatal mice could exacerbate glial TDP-43-mediated toxicity and cause mice to die earlier. Consistently, this inhibition increases the expression of mutant TDP-43 in glial cells in mouse brains. Thus, the differential accumulation of mutant TDP-43 in neuronal versus glial cells contributes to the preferential toxicity of mutant TDP-43 in neuronal cells and age-dependent pathology. PMID:24381309

  3. eIF4E/Fmr1 double mutant mice display cognitive impairment in addition to ASD-like behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Thu N; Shah, Manan; Koo, So Yeon; Faraud, Kirsten S; Santini, Emanuela; Klann, Eric

    2015-11-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a group of heritable disorders with complex and unclear etiology. Classic ASD symptoms include social interaction and communication deficits as well as restricted, repetitive behaviors. In addition, ASD is often comorbid with intellectual disability. Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the leading genetic cause of ASD, and is the most commonly inherited form of intellectual disability. Several mouse models of ASD and FXS exist, however the intellectual disability observed in ASD patients is not well modeled in mice. Using the Fmr1 knockout mouse and the eIF4E transgenic mouse, two previously characterized mouse models of fragile X syndrome and ASD, respectively, we generated the eIF4E/Fmr1 double mutant mouse. Our study shows that the eIF4E/Fmr1 double mutant mice display classic ASD behaviors, as well as cognitive dysfunction. Importantly, the learning impairments displayed by the double mutant mice spanned multiple cognitive tasks. Moreover, the eIF4E/Fmr1 double mutant mice display increased levels of basal protein synthesis. The results of our study suggest that the eIF4E/Fmr1 double mutant mouse may be a reliable model to study cognitive dysfunction in the context of ASD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Altered cellular infiltration and cytokine levels during early Mycobacterium tuberculosis sigC mutant infection are associated with late-stage disease attenuation and milder immunopathology in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McMurray David N

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mouse virulence assessments of certain Mycobacterium tuberculosis mutants have revealed an immunopathology defect in which high tissue CFU counts are observed but the tissue pathology and lethality are reduced. M. tuberculosis mutants which grow and persist in the mouse lungs, but have attenuated disease progression, have the immunopathology (imp phenotype. The antigenic properties of these strains may alter the progression of disease due to a reduction in host immune cell recruitment to the lungs resulting in disease attenuation and prolonged host survival. Results In this study we focused on the mouse immune response to one such mutant; the M. tuberculosis ΔsigC mutant. Aerosol infection of DBA/2 and SCID mice with the M. tuberculosis ΔsigC mutant, complemented mutant and wild type strain showed proliferation of mutant bacilli in mouse lungs, but with decreased inflammation and mortality in DBA/2 mice. SCID mice shared the same phenotype as the DBA/2 mice in response to the ΔsigC mutant, however, they succumbed to the infection faster. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid analysis revealed elevated numbers of infiltrating neutrophils in the lungs of mice infected with wild type and complemented ΔsigC mutant strains but not in mice infected with the ΔsigC mutant. In addition, DBA/2 mice infected with the ΔsigC mutant had reduced levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IFN-γ in the lungs. Similarly, there was a reduction in proinflammatory cytokines in the lungs of SCID mice. In contrast to the mouse model, the ΔsigC mutant had reduced initial growth in guinea pig lungs. A possible mechanism of attenuation in the ΔsigC mutant may be a reduction in neutrophilic-influx in the alveolar spaces of the lungs, and decreased proinflammatory cytokine secretion. In contrast to mouse data, the M. tuberculosis ΔsigC mutant proliferates slowly in guinea pig lungs, a setting characterized by caseating necrosis. Conclusion Our

  5. Generation and Standardized, Systemic Phenotypic Analysis of Pou3f3L423P Mutant Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Kumar

    Full Text Available Increased levels of blood plasma urea were used as phenotypic parameter for establishing novel mouse models for kidney diseases on the genetic background of C3H inbred mice in the phenotype-driven Munich ENU mouse mutagenesis project. The phenotypically recessive mutant line HST011 was established and further analyzed. The causative mutation was detected in the POU domain, class 3 transcription factor 3 (Pou3f3 gene, which leads to the amino acid exchange Pou3f3L423P thereby affecting the conserved homeobox domain of the protein. Pou3f3 homozygous knockout mice are published and show perinatal death. Line Pou3f3L423P is a viable mouse model harboring a homozygous Pou3f3 mutation. Standardized, systemic phenotypic analysis of homozygous mutants was carried out in the German Mouse Clinic. Main phenotypic changes were low body weight and a state of low energy stores, kidney dysfunction and secondary effects thereof including low bone mineralization, multiple behavioral and neurological defects including locomotor, vestibular, auditory and nociceptive impairments, as well as multiple subtle changes in immunological parameters. Genome-wide transcriptome profiling analysis of kidney and brain of Pou3f3L423P homozygous mutants identified significantly regulated genes as compared to wild-type controls.

  6. Generation and Standardized, Systemic Phenotypic Analysis of Pou3f3L423P Mutant Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sudhir; Rathkolb, Birgit; Kemter, Elisabeth; Sabrautzki, Sibylle; Michel, Dian; Adler, Thure; Becker, Lore; Beckers, Johannes; Busch, Dirk H; Garrett, Lillian; Hans, Wolfgang; Hölter, Sabine M; Horsch, Marion; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Rácz, Ildikó; Rozman, Jan; Vargas Panesso, Ingrid Liliana; Vernaleken, Alexandra; Zimmer, Andreas; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Wolf, Eckhard; Aigner, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Increased levels of blood plasma urea were used as phenotypic parameter for establishing novel mouse models for kidney diseases on the genetic background of C3H inbred mice in the phenotype-driven Munich ENU mouse mutagenesis project. The phenotypically recessive mutant line HST011 was established and further analyzed. The causative mutation was detected in the POU domain, class 3 transcription factor 3 (Pou3f3) gene, which leads to the amino acid exchange Pou3f3L423P thereby affecting the conserved homeobox domain of the protein. Pou3f3 homozygous knockout mice are published and show perinatal death. Line Pou3f3L423P is a viable mouse model harboring a homozygous Pou3f3 mutation. Standardized, systemic phenotypic analysis of homozygous mutants was carried out in the German Mouse Clinic. Main phenotypic changes were low body weight and a state of low energy stores, kidney dysfunction and secondary effects thereof including low bone mineralization, multiple behavioral and neurological defects including locomotor, vestibular, auditory and nociceptive impairments, as well as multiple subtle changes in immunological parameters. Genome-wide transcriptome profiling analysis of kidney and brain of Pou3f3L423P homozygous mutants identified significantly regulated genes as compared to wild-type controls.

  7. Cystinosis (ctns) zebrafish mutant shows pronephric glomerular and tubular dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmonem, Mohamed A.; Khalil, Ramzi; Khodaparast, Ladan; Khodaparast, Laleh; Arcolino, Fanny O.; Morgan, Joseph; Pastore, Anna; Tylzanowski, Przemko; Ny, Annelii; Lowe, Martin; de Witte, Peter A.; Baelde, Hans J.; van den Heuvel, Lambertus P.; Levtchenko, Elena

    2017-01-01

    The human ubiquitous protein cystinosin is responsible for transporting the disulphide amino acid cystine from the lysosomal compartment into the cytosol. In humans, Pathogenic mutations of CTNS lead to defective cystinosin function, intralysosomal cystine accumulation and the development of cystinosis. Kidneys are initially affected with generalized proximal tubular dysfunction (renal Fanconi syndrome), then the disease rapidly affects glomeruli and progresses towards end stage renal failure and multiple organ dysfunction. Animal models of cystinosis are limited, with only a Ctns knockout mouse reported, showing cystine accumulation and late signs of tubular dysfunction but lacking the glomerular phenotype. We established and characterized a mutant zebrafish model with a homozygous nonsense mutation (c.706 C > T; p.Q236X) in exon 8 of ctns. Cystinotic mutant larvae showed cystine accumulation, delayed development, and signs of pronephric glomerular and tubular dysfunction mimicking the early phenotype of human cystinotic patients. Furthermore, cystinotic larvae showed a significantly increased rate of apoptosis that could be ameliorated with cysteamine, the human cystine depleting therapy. Our data demonstrate that, ctns gene is essential for zebrafish pronephric podocyte and proximal tubular function and that the ctns-mutant can be used for studying the disease pathogenic mechanisms and for testing novel therapies for cystinosis. PMID:28198397

  8. Apoc2 loss-of-function zebrafish mutant as a genetic model of hyperlipidemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Liu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Apolipoprotein C-II (APOC2 is an obligatory activator of lipoprotein lipase. Human patients with APOC2 deficiency display severe hypertriglyceridemia while consuming a normal diet, often manifesting xanthomas, lipemia retinalis and pancreatitis. Hypertriglyceridemia is also an important risk factor for development of cardiovascular disease. Animal models to study hypertriglyceridemia are limited, with no Apoc2-knockout mouse reported. To develop a genetic model of hypertriglyceridemia, we generated an apoc2 mutant zebrafish characterized by the loss of Apoc2 function. apoc2 mutants show decreased plasma lipase activity and display chylomicronemia and severe hypertriglyceridemia, which closely resemble the phenotype observed in human patients with APOC2 deficiency. The hypertriglyceridemia in apoc2 mutants is rescued by injection of plasma from wild-type zebrafish or by injection of a human APOC2 mimetic peptide. Consistent with a previous report of a transient apoc2 knockdown, apoc2 mutant larvae have a minor delay in yolk consumption and angiogenesis. Furthermore, apoc2 mutants fed a normal diet accumulate lipid and lipid-laden macrophages in the vasculature, which resemble early events in the development of human atherosclerotic lesions. In addition, apoc2 mutant embryos show ectopic overgrowth of pancreas. Taken together, our data suggest that the apoc2 mutant zebrafish is a robust and versatile animal model to study hypertriglyceridemia and the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of associated human diseases.

  9. Mutant laboratory mice with abnormalities in hair follicle morphogenesis, cycling, and/or structure: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Motonobu; Schneider, Marlon R; Schmidt-Ullrich, Ruth; Paus, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Human hair disorders comprise a number of different types of alopecia, atrichia, hypotrichosis, distinct hair shaft disorders as well as hirsutism and hypertrichosis. Their causes vary from genodermatoses (e.g. hypotrichoses) via immunological disorders (e.g. alopecia areata, autoimmune cicatrical alopecias) to hormone-dependent abnormalities (e.g. androgenetic alopecia). A large number of spontaneous mouse mutants and genetically engineered mice develop abnormalities in hair follicle morphogenesis, cycling, and/or hair shaft formation, whose analysis has proven invaluable to define the molecular regulation of hair growth, ranging from hair follicle development, and cycling to hair shaft formation and stem cell biology. Also, the accumulating reports on hair phenotypes of mouse strains provide important pointers to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying human hair growth disorders. Since numerous new mouse mutants with a hair phenotype have been reported since the publication of our earlier review on this matter a decade ago, we present here an updated, tabulated mini-review. The updated annotated tables list a wide selection of mouse mutants with hair growth abnormalities, classified into four categories: Mutations that affect hair follicle (1) morphogenesis, (2) cycling, (3) structure, and (4) mutations that induce extrafollicular events (for example immune system defects) resulting in secondary hair growth abnormalities. This synthesis is intended to provide a useful source of reference when studying the molecular controls of hair follicle growth and differentiation, and whenever the hair phenotypes of a newly generated mouse mutant need to be compared with existing ones. Copyright © 2012 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Bacterial mutants for enhanced succinate production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baart, G.J.E.; Beauprez, J.J.R.; Foulquie, M.M.R.; Heijnen, J.J.; Maertens, J.

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for obtaining enhanced metabolite production in micro-organisms, and to mutants and/or transformants obtained with said method. More particularly, it relates to bacterial mutants and/or transformants for enhanced succinate production, especially mutants and/

  11. Problem-Solving Test: Tryptophan Operon Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a problem-solving test that deals with the regulation of the "trp" operon of "Escherichia coli." Two mutants of this operon are described: in mutant A, the operator region of the operon carries a point mutation so that it is unable to carry out its function; mutant B expresses a "trp" repressor protein unable to bind…

  12. Distinct Rayleigh scattering from hot spot mutant p53 proteins reveals cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Ho Joon; Nguyen, Anh H; Kim, Yeul Hong; Park, Kyong Hwa; Kim, Doyoun; Kim, Kyeong Kyu; Sim, Sang Jun

    2014-07-23

    The scattering of light redirects and resonances when an electromagnetic wave interacts with electrons orbits in the hot spot core protein and oscillated electron of the gold nanoparticles (AuNP). This report demonstrates convincingly that resonant Rayleigh scattering generated from hot spot mutant p53 proteins is correspondence to cancer cells. Hot spot mutants have unique local electron density changes that affect specificity of DNA binding affinity compared with wild types. Rayleigh scattering changes introduced by hot-spot mutations were monitored by localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) shift changes. The LSPR λmax shift for hot-spot mutants ranged from 1.7 to 4.2 nm for mouse samples and from 0.64 nm to 2.66 nm for human samples, compared to 9.6 nm and 15 nm for wild type and mouse and human proteins, respectively with a detection sensitivity of p53 concentration at 17.9 nM. It is interesting that hot-spot mutants, which affect only interaction with DNA, launches affinitive changes as considerable as wild types. These changes propose that hot-spot mutants p53 proteins can be easily detected by local electron density alterations that disturbs the specificity of DNA binding of p53 core domain on the surface of the DNA probed-nanoplasmonic sensor.

  13. Characterization of mouse Dach2, a homologue of Drosophila dachshund.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, R J; Shen, W; Sandler, Y I; Heanue, T A; Mardon, G

    2001-04-01

    The Drosophila genes eyeless, eyes absent, sine oculis and dachshund cooperate as components of a network to control retinal determination. Vertebrate homologues of these genes have been identified and implicated in the control of cell fate. We present the cloning and characterization of mouse Dach2, a homologue of dachshund. In situ hybridization studies demonstrate Dach2 expression in embryonic nervous tissues, sensory organs and limbs. This pattern is similar to mouse Dach1, suggesting a partially redundant role for these genes during development. In addition, we determine that Dach2 expression in the forebrain of Pax6 mutants and dermamyotome of Pax3 mutants is not detectably altered. Finally, genetic mapping experiments place mouse Dach2 on the X chromosome between Xist and Esx1. The identification of human DACH2 sequences at Xq21 suggests a possible role for this gene in Allan-Herndon syndrome, Miles-Carpenter syndrome, X-linked cleft palate and/or Megalocornea.

  14. Nif- Hup- mutants of Rhizobium japonicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshiri, F; Stults, L; Novak, P; Maier, R J

    1983-01-01

    Two H2 uptake-negative (Hup-) Rhizobium japonicum mutants were obtained that also lacked symbiotic N2 fixation (acetylene reduction) activity. One of the mutants formed green nodules and was deficient in heme. Hydrogen oxidation activity in this mutant could be restored by the addition of heme plus ATP to crude extracts. Bacteroid extracts from the other mutant strain lacked hydrogenase activity and activity for both of the nitrogenase component proteins. Hup+ revertants of the mutant strains regained both H2 uptake ability and nitrogenase activity. Images PMID:6874648

  15. Mouse models in male fertility research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duangporn Jamsai; Moira K O'Bryan

    2011-01-01

    Limited knowledge of the genetic causes of male infertility has resulted in few treatment and targeted therapeutic options.Although the ideal approach to identify infertility causing mutations is to conduct studies in the human population,this approach has progressed slowly due to the limitations described herein.Given the complexity of male fertility,the entire process cannot be modeled in vitro.As such,animal models,in particular mouse models,provide a valuable alternative for gene identification and experimentation.Since the introduction of molecular biology and recent advances in animal model production,there has been a substantial acceleration in the identification and characterization of genes associated with many diseases,including infertility.Three major types of mouse models are commonly used in biomedical research,including knockout/knockin/gene-trapped,transgenic and chemical-induced point mutant mice.Using these mouse models,over 400 genes essential for male fertility have been revealed.It has,however,been estimated that thousands of genes are involved in the regulation of the complex process of male fertility,as many such genes remain to be characterized.The current review is by no means a comprehensive list of these mouse models,rather it contains examples of how mouse models have advanced our knowledge of post-natal germ cell development and male fertility regulation.

  16. Primary cilia are not required for normal canonical Wnt signaling in the mouse embryo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polloneal Jymmiel R Ocbina

    Full Text Available Sonic hedgehog (Shh signaling in the mouse requires the microtubule-based organelle, the primary cilium. The primary cilium is assembled and maintained through the process of intraflagellar transport (IFT and the response to Shh is blocked in mouse mutants that lack proteins required for IFT. Although the phenotypes of mouse IFT mutants do not overlap with phenotypes of known Wnt pathway mutants, recent studies report data suggesting that the primary cilium modulates responses to Wnt signals.We therefore carried out a systematic analysis of canonical Wnt signaling in mutant embryos and cells that lack primary cilia because of loss of the anterograde IFT kinesin-II motor (Kif3a or IFT complex B proteins (Ift172 or Ift88. We also analyzed mutant embryos with abnormal primary cilia due to defects in retrograde IFT (Dync2h1. The mouse IFT mutants express the canonical Wnt target Axin2 and activate a transgenic canonical Wnt reporter, BAT-gal, in the normal spatial pattern and to the same quantitative level as wild type littermates. Similarly, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs derived from IFT mutants respond normally to added Wnt3a. The switch from canonical to non-canonical Wnt also appears normal in IFT mutant MEFs, as both wild-type and mutant cells do not activate the canonical Wnt reporter in the presence of both Wnt3a and Wnt5a.We conclude that loss of primary cilia or defects in retrograde IFT do not affect the response of the midgestation embryo or embryo-derived fibroblasts to Wnt ligands.

  17. Identification of a Long Rice Spikelet Mutant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Xian-jun; WANG Bin; HAN Zan-ping; XIE Zhao-hui; MOU Chun-hong; WANG Xu-dong

    2004-01-01

    A spontaneously occurring rice (Oryza sativa L. ) mutant, characterized by homeotic conversion in glumes and stamens, was found in the progeny of a cross. The mutant showed long glumes and glumaceous lodicules and morphological transformation of stamens into pistils. Mutant florets consisted of 1 to 3 completely developed pistils, some pistilloid stamens with filaments, but tipped by bulged tissue and 0 to 3 stigmas. It seens that the mutant phenotype of the homeotic conversions in glumes and stamens is similar to that of the B loss-of-function mutants in Arabidopsis and Antirrhinum. The mutant is controlled by a single recessive gene as a segregation ratio of 3:1 (wild type to mutant plants) was observed in the F2 generation.

  18. GPNMB ameliorates mutant TDP-43-induced motor neuron cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahara, Yuki; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Ohuchi, Kazuki; Ito, Junko; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Hara, Hideaki

    2017-08-01

    Glycoprotein nonmetastatic melanoma protein B (GPNMB) aggregates are observed in the spinal cord of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients, but the detailed localization is still unclear. Mutations of transactive response DNA binding protein 43kDa (TDP-43) are associated with neurodegenerative diseases including ALS. In this study, we evaluated the localization of GPNMB aggregates in the spinal cord of ALS patients and the effect of GPNMB against mutant TDP-43 induced motor neuron cell death. GPNMB aggregates were not localized in the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive astrocyte and ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule-1 (Iba1)-positive microglia. GPNMB aggregates were localized in the microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2)-positive neuron and neurofilament H non-phosphorylated (SMI-32)-positive neuron, and these were co-localized with TDP-43 aggregates in the spinal cord of ALS patients. Mock or TDP-43 (WT, M337V, and A315T) plasmids were transfected into mouse motor neuron cells (NSC34). The expression level of GPNMB was increased by transfection of mutant TDP-43 plasmids. Recombinant GPNMB ameliorated motor neuron cell death induced by transfection of mutant TDP-43 plasmids and serum-free stress. Furthermore, the expression of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and phosphorylated Akt were decreased by this stress, and these expressions were increased by recombinant GPNMB. These results indicate that GPNMB has protective effects against mutant TDP-43 stress via activating the ERK1/2 and Akt pathways, and GPNMB may be a therapeutic target for TDP-43 proteinopathy in familial and sporadic ALS. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Mutant TDP-43 deregulates AMPK activation by PP2A in ALS models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirma D Perera

    Full Text Available Bioenergetic abnormalities and metabolic dysfunction occur in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS patients and genetic mouse models. However, whether metabolic dysfunction occurs early in ALS pathophysiology linked to different ALS genes remains unclear. Here, we investigated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK activation, which is a key enzyme induced by energy depletion and metabolic stress, in neuronal cells and mouse models expressing mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1 or TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43 linked to ALS. AMPK phosphorylation was sharply increased in spinal cords of transgenic SOD1G93A mice at disease onset and accumulated in cytoplasmic granules in motor neurons, but not in presymptomatic mice. AMPK phosphorylation also occurred in peripheral tissues, liver and kidney, in SOD1G93A mice at disease onset, demonstrating that AMPK activation occurs late and is not restricted to motor neurons. Conversely, AMPK activity was drastically diminished in spinal cords and brains of presymptomatic and symptomatic transgenic TDP-43A315T mice and motor neuronal cells expressing different TDP-43 mutants. We show that mutant TDP-43 induction of the AMPK phosphatase, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A, is associated with AMPK inactivation in these ALS models. Furthermore, PP2A inhibition by okadaic acid reversed AMPK inactivation by mutant TDP-43 in neuronal cells. Our results suggest that mutant SOD1 and TDP-43 exert contrasting effects on AMPK activation which may reflect key differences in energy metabolism and neurodegeneration in spinal cords of SOD1G93A and TDP-43A315T mice. While AMPK activation in motor neurons correlates with progression in mutant SOD1-mediated disease, AMPK inactivation mediated by PP2A is associated with mutant TDP-43-linked ALS.

  20. Behavioral phenotypes of genetic mouse models of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazdoba, T M; Leach, P T; Crawley, J N

    2016-01-01

    More than a hundred de novo single gene mutations and copy-number variants have been implicated in autism, each occurring in a small subset of cases. Mutant mouse models with syntenic mutations offer research tools to gain an understanding of the role of each gene in modulating biological and behavioral phenotypes relevant to autism. Knockout, knockin and transgenic mice incorporating risk gene mutations detected in autism spectrum disorder and comorbid neurodevelopmental disorders are now widely available. At present, autism spectrum disorder is diagnosed solely by behavioral criteria. We developed a constellation of mouse behavioral assays designed to maximize face validity to the types of social deficits and repetitive behaviors that are central to an autism diagnosis. Mouse behavioral assays for associated symptoms of autism, which include cognitive inflexibility, anxiety, hyperactivity, and unusual reactivity to sensory stimuli, are frequently included in the phenotypic analyses. Over the past 10 years, we and many other laboratories around the world have employed these and additional behavioral tests to phenotype a large number of mutant mouse models of autism. In this review, we highlight mouse models with mutations in genes that have been identified as risk genes for autism, which work through synaptic mechanisms and through the mTOR signaling pathway. Robust, replicated autism-relevant behavioral outcomes in a genetic mouse model lend credence to a causal role for specific gene contributions and downstream biological mechanisms in the etiology of autism.

  1. Live 4D optical coherence tomography for early embryonic mouse cardiac phenotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Andrew L.; Wang, Shang; Larin, Kirill V.; Overbeek, Paul A.; Larina, Irina V.

    2016-03-01

    Studying embryonic mouse development is important for our understanding of normal human embryogenesis and the underlying causes of congenital defects. Our research focuses on imaging early development in the mouse embryo to specifically understand cardiovascular development using optical coherence tomography (OCT). We have previously developed imaging approaches that combine static embryo culture, OCT imaging and advanced image processing to visualize the whole live mouse embryos and obtain 4D (3D+time) cardiodynamic datasets with cellular resolution. Here, we present the study of using 4D OCT for dynamic imaging of early embryonic heart in live mouse embryos to assess mutant cardiac phenotypes during development, including a cardiac looping defect. Our results indicate that the live 4D OCT imaging approach is an efficient phenotyping tool that can reveal structural and functional cardiac defects at very early stages. Further studies integrating live embryonic cardiodynamic phenotyping with molecular and genetic approaches in mouse mutants will help to elucidate the underlying signaling defects.

  2. Standardized, systemic phenotypic analysis of Umod(C93F and Umod(A227T mutant mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Kemter

    Full Text Available Uromodulin-associated kidney disease (UAKD summarizes different clinical features of an autosomal dominant heritable disease syndrome in humans with a proven uromodulin (UMOD mutation involved. It is often characterized by hyperuricemia, gout, alteration of urine concentrating ability, as well as a variable rate of disease progression inconstantly leading to renal failure and histological alterations of the kidneys. We recently established the two Umod mutant mouse lines Umod(C93F and Umod(A227T on the C3H inbred genetic background both showing kidney defects analogous to those found in human UAKD patients. In addition, disease symptoms were revealed that were not yet described in other published mouse models of UAKD. To examine if further organ systems and/or metabolic pathways are affected by Umod mutations as primary or secondary effects, we describe a standardized, systemic phenotypic analysis of the two mutant mouse lines Umod(A227T and Umod(C93F in the German Mouse Clinic. Different genotypes as well as different ages were tested. Beside the already published changes in body weight, body composition and bone metabolism, the influence of the Umod mutation on energy metabolism was confirmed. Hematological analysis revealed a moderate microcytic and erythropenic anemia in older Umod mutant mice. Data of the other analyses in 7-10 month-old mutant mice showed single small additional effects.

  3. Deafness and permanently reduced potassium channel gene expression and function in hypothyroid Pit1dw mutants

    OpenAIRE

    Mustapha, Mirna; Fang, Qing; Gong, Tzy-Wen; Dolan, David F.; Raphael, Yehoash; Camper, Sally A.; Duncan, R. Keith

    2009-01-01

    The absence of thyroid hormone (TH) during late gestation and early infancy can cause irreparable deafness in both humans and rodents. A variety of rodent models have been utilized in an effort to identify the underlying molecular mechanism. Here, we characterize a mouse model of secondary hypothyroidism, pituitary transcription factor 1 (Pit1dw), which has profound, congenital deafness that is rescued by oral TH replacement. These mutants have tectorial membrane abnormalities, including a pr...

  4. Mapping of multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min) to proximal chromosome 18 of the mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luongo, C.; Gould, K.A.; Moser, A.R. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States)); Su, Likuo; Kinzler, K.W.; Vogelstein, B. (Johns Hopkins Oncology Center, Baltimore, MD (United States)); Dietrich, W.; Lander, E.S. (MIT, Cambridge (United States))

    1993-01-01

    The Min (multiple intestinal neoplasia) mutation of the mouse has been mapped by analyzing the inheritance of restriction fragment length polymorphisms and simple sequence length polymorphisms in progeny from two intraspecific crosses segregating for the Min mutation. Min, a mutant allele of Apc, the mouse homo- log of the human APC (adenomatous polyposis coli) gene, maps to proximal chromosome 18. The synteny between Apc and Mcc, the mouse homolog of the human MCC (mutated in colorectal cancer) gene, is conserved between mouse and human, although the gene order in the Apc to Mcc interval is different from that in the APC to MCC interval. 29 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Gaze beats mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mateo, Julio C.; San Agustin, Javier; Hansen, John Paulin

    2008-01-01

    Facial EMG for selection is fast, easy and, combined with gaze pointing, it can provide completely hands-free interaction. In this pilot study, 5 participants performed a simple point-and-select task using mouse or gaze for pointing and a mouse button or a facial-EMG switch for selection. Gaze...... pointing was faster than mouse pointing, while maintaining a similar error rate. EMG and mouse-button selection had a comparable performance. From analyses of completion time, throughput and error rates, we concluded that the combination of gaze and facial EMG holds potential for outperforming the mouse....

  6. Screening for Stress Resistance Mutations in the Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallace S Chick

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Longevity is correlated with stress resistance in many animal models. However, previous efforts through the boosting of the antioxidant defense system did not extend life span, suggesting that longevity related stress resistance is mediated by other uncharacterized pathways. We have developed a high-throughput platform for screening and rapid identification of novel genetic mutants in the mouse that are stress-resistant. Selection for resistance to stressors occurs in mutagenized mouse embryonic stem (ES cells, which are carefully treated so as to maintain pluripotency for mouse production. Initial characterization of these mutant ES cells revealed mutations in Pigl, Tiam1, and Rffl, among others. These genes are implicated in glycosylphosphatidylinositol biosynthesis, NADPH oxidase function, and inflammation. These mutants: (1 are resistant to two different oxidative stressors, paraquat and the omission of 2-mercaptoethanol, (2 have reduced levels of endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS, (3 are capable of generating live mice, and (4 transmit the stress resistance phenotype to the mice. This strategy offers an efficient way to select for new mutants expressing a stress resistance phenotype, to rapidly identify the causative genes, and to develop mice for in vivo studies.

  7. Deducing the stage of origin of Wilms' tumours from a developmental series of Wt1-mutant mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel L. Berry

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Wilms' tumours, paediatric kidney cancers, are the archetypal example of tumours caused through the disruption of normal development. The genetically best-defined subgroup of Wilms' tumours is the group caused by biallelic loss of the WT1 tumour suppressor gene. Here, we describe a developmental series of mouse models with conditional loss of Wt1 in different stages of nephron development before and after the mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET. We demonstrate that Wt1 is essential for normal development at all kidney developmental stages under study. Comparison of genome-wide expression data from the mutant mouse models with human tumour material of mutant or wild-type WT1 datasets identified the stage of origin of human WT1-mutant tumours, and emphasizes fundamental differences between the two human tumour groups due to different developmental stages of origin.

  8. Biochemical and histological characterization of tomato mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina C. Monteiro

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Biochemical responses inherent to antioxidant systems as well morphological and anatomical properties of photomorphogenic, hormonal and developmental tomato mutants were investigated. Compared to the non-mutant Micro-Tom (MT, we observed that the malondialdehyde (MDA content was enhanced in the diageotropica (dgt and lutescent (l mutants, whilst the highest levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 were observed in high pigment 1 (hp1 and aurea (au mutants. The analyses of antioxidant enzymes revealed that all mutants exhibited reduced catalase (CAT activity when compared to MT. Guaiacol peroxidase (GPOX was enhanced in both sitiens (sit and notabilis (not mutants, whereas in not mutant there was an increase in ascorbate peroxidase (APX. Based on PAGE analysis, the activities of glutathione reductase (GR isoforms III, IV, V and VI were increased in l leaves, while the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD isoform III was reduced in leaves of sit, epi, Never ripe (Nr and green flesh (gf mutants. Microscopic analyses revealed that hp1 and au showed an increase in leaf intercellular spaces, whereas sit exhibited a decrease. The au and hp1 mutants also exhibited a decreased in the number of leaf trichomes. The characterization of these mutants is essential for their future use in plant development and ecophysiology studies, such as abiotic and biotic stresses on the oxidative metabolism.Neste trabalho, analisamos as respostas bioquímicas inerentes ao sistema antioxidante, assim como propriedades morfológicas e anatômicas de mutantes fotomorfogenéticos e hormonais de tomateiro. Comparados ao não mutante Micro-Tom (MT, observamos que o conteúdo de malondialdeído (MDA aumentou nos mutantes diageotropica (dgt e lutescent (l, enquanto os maiores níveis de H2O2 foram encontrados nos mutantes high pigment 1 (hp1 e aurea (au. Análises de enzimas antioxidantes mostraram que todos os mutantes reduziram a atividade de catalase (CAT quando comparado a MT. A

  9. Standardized, systemic phenotypic analysis of Slc12a1I299F mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemter, Elisabeth; Rathkolb, Birgit; Becker, Lore; Bolle, Ines; Busch, Dirk H; Dalke, Claudia; Elvert, Ralf; Favor, Jack; Graw, Jochen; Hans, Wolfgang; Ivandic, Boris; Kalaydjiev, Svetoslav; Klopstock, Thomas; Rácz, Ildikó; Rozman, Jan; Schrewe, Anja; Schulz, Holger; Zimmer, Andreas; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Hrabe de Angelis, Martin; Wolf, Eckhard; Aigner, Bernhard

    2014-08-02

    Type I Bartter syndrome is a recessive human nephropathy caused by loss-of-function mutations in the SLC12A1 gene coding for the Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransporter NKCC2. We recently established the mutant mouse line Slc12a1I299F exhibiting kidney defects highly similar to the late-onset manifestation of this hereditary human disease. Besides the kidney defects, low blood pressure and osteopenia were revealed in the homozygous mutant mice which were also described in humans. Beside its strong expression in the kidney, NKCC2 has been also shown to be expressed in other tissues in rodents i.e. the gastrointestinal tract, pancreatic beta cells, and specific compartments of the ear, nasal tissue and eye. To examine if, besides kidney defects, further organ systems and/or metabolic pathways are affected by the Slc12a1I299F mutation as primary or secondary effects, we describe a standardized, systemic phenotypic analysis of the mutant mouse line Slc12a1I299F in the German Mouse Clinic. Slc12a1I299F homozygous mutant mice and Slc12a1I299F heterozygous mutant littermates as controls were tested at the age of 4-6 months. Beside the already published changes in blood pressure and bone metabolism, a significantly lower body weight and fat content were found as new phenotypes for Slc12a1I299F homozygous mutant mice. Small additional effects included a mild erythropenic anemia in homozygous mutant males as well as a slight hyperalgesia in homozygous mutant females. For other functions, such as immunology, lung function and neurology, no distinct alterations were observed. In this systemic analysis no clear primary effects of the Slc12a1I299F mutation appeared for the organs other than the kidneys where Slc12a1 expression has been described. On the other hand, long-term effects additional and/or secondary to the kidney lesions might also appear in humans harboring SLC12A1 mutations.

  10. Gene expression and behaviour in mouse models of HD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, K R; Brooks, S P; Dunnett, S B; Jones, L

    2012-06-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease, resulting in expansion of the CAG repeat in exon 1 of the HTT gene. The resulting mutant huntingtin protein has been implicated in the disruption of a variety of cellular functions, including transcription. Mouse models of HD have been central to the development of our understanding of gene expression changes in this disease, and are now beginning to elucidate the relationship between gene expression and behaviour. Here, we review current mouse models of HD and their characterisation in terms of gene expression. In addition, we look at how this can inform behaviours observed in mouse models of disease. The relationship between gene expression and behaviour in mouse models of HD is important, as this will further our knowledge of disease progression and its underlying molecular events, highlight new treatment targets, and potentially provide new biomarkers for therapeutic trials. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Mouse Model of Human Hereditary Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    models that recapitulate the human disease . Therefore, we introduced mutations in the endogenous mouse T7 cationic trypsinogen gene and obtained several...ACCOMPLISHMENTS: What were the major goals of the project? Our original proposal had three specific aims. Aim 1. Identify and biochemically characterize...pancreatitis in mutant mice which do not develop spontaneous disease (strains T7-D23del-Cre, T7-D23del-Neo, T7-K24R-Cre and T7- K24R-Neo), will be

  12. Degenerative hairlets on the vestibular sensory cells in mutant bustling (BUS/Idr) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, K; Hashimoto, R; Hanai, A; Yoshizaki, N; Yonezawa, S; Otani, H

    1997-01-01

    The bustling mouse (BUS/Idr: bus) is a mutant mouse strain which exhibits deafness, bustling/hyperkinetic behaviour and functional disorders seemingly related to the vestibular system. This phenotype develops in homozygous (bus/bus) mice and has been shown from cross experiments to be genetically induced by a single autosomal recessive gene. We previously detected, with light and electron microscopy, post-natal degeneration of the inner ear sensory cells in homozygotes. In the present study, we examined, by electron microscopy, the development of pathological changes in the sensory epithelia of the macula acustica and crista ampullaris of homozygous mice of various ages, paying special attention to the detailed morphology of the sensory hairlets. The homozygous mice exhibited specific pathological changes: a decrease in the number of hairs; disarrangement of the kinocilium-stereocilia pattern; and, fused and/or very large stereocilia. Homozygotes also frequently exhibited apical cytoplasmic herniation, or bleb of hair cells, as well as a degenerated kinocilium in the sensory epithelium. Heterozygotes showed similar changes, but to a lesser degree and frequency. As for the vestibular organs, similar pathological changes had developed at day, 17 of gestation. These pathological findings and onset suggest that the BUS mouse may be a mutant mouse strain distinct from other reported strains which display similar behaviour, and may be a useful animal model for the study of human degenerative vestibular disorders.

  13. Study on culturing Trichodema mutants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jian-ai; WANG Wei-ming

    2004-01-01

    @@ Trichodema mutants strains T5, T0803, T1010, T1003were cultured in different conditions and media, also in the presence of fungicides at 40 mg/kg (CK or procymidone + chlorothalonil, or maneb or phosethyl-Al) . The pH values of media were 5, 6, 7 and 8 and hyphae were grown at temperatures of 15, 20, 25 and 30 ℃. After being cultured for 3, 4, 5, or 6 days, the strains were transferred at a lower temperature to sporulate (20℃) Obtained data were analyzed statistically, with the orthogonal array and ranges (R) differing dependes on the treatments (R = 40.0,42.4, 48.0, 62.8,107.0). The results indicated that the most important factor was the nature of the strain (R =107.0), while the change in temperature and time of cultivation produced the lowest effect (R =40.0). Each factor variance was significant and A3B4C2D1E3 was the optimum combined condition, in which strain T1010 grew more quickly and sporulated most.

  14. CMPD: cancer mutant proteome database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Po-Jung; Lee, Chi-Ching; Tan, Bertrand Chin-Ming; Yeh, Yuan-Ming; Julie Chu, Lichieh; Chen, Ting-Wen; Chang, Kai-Ping; Lee, Cheng-Yang; Gan, Ruei-Chi; Liu, Hsuan; Tang, Petrus

    2015-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing, which centres on the protein coding regions of disease/cancer associated genes, represents the most cost-effective method to-date for deciphering the association between genetic alterations and diseases. Large-scale whole exome/genome sequencing projects have been launched by various institutions, such as NCI, Broad Institute and TCGA, to provide a comprehensive catalogue of coding variants in diverse tissue samples and cell lines. Further functional and clinical interrogation of these sequence variations must rely on extensive cross-platforms integration of sequencing information and a proteome database that explicitly and comprehensively archives the corresponding mutated peptide sequences. While such data resource is a critical for the mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of exomic variants, no database is currently available for the collection of mutant protein sequences that correspond to recent large-scale genomic data. To address this issue and serve as bridge to integrate genomic and proteomics datasets, CMPD (http://cgbc.cgu.edu.tw/cmpd) collected over 2 millions genetic alterations, which not only facilitates the confirmation and examination of potential cancer biomarkers but also provides an invaluable resource for translational medicine research and opportunities to identify mutated proteins encoded by mutated genes.

  15. Staphylococcus aureus Colonization of the Mouse Gastrointestinal Tract Is Modulated by Wall Teichoic Acid, Capsule, and Surface Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiki Misawa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus colonizes the nose, throat, skin, and gastrointestinal (GI tract of humans. GI carriage of S. aureus is difficult to eradicate and has been shown to facilitate the transmission of the bacterium among individuals. Although staphylococcal colonization of the GI tract is asymptomatic, it increases the likelihood of infection, particularly skin and soft tissue infections caused by USA300 isolates. We established a mouse model of persistent S. aureus GI colonization and characterized the impact of selected surface antigens on colonization. In competition experiments, an acapsular mutant colonized better than the parental strain Newman, whereas mutants defective in sortase A and clumping factor A showed impaired ability to colonize the GI tract. Mutants lacking protein A, clumping factor B, poly-N-acetyl glucosamine, or SdrCDE showed no defect in colonization. An S. aureus wall teichoic acid (WTA mutant (ΔtagO failed to colonize the mouse nose or GI tract, and the tagO and clfA mutants showed reduced adherence in vitro to intestinal epithelial cells. The tagO mutant was recovered in lower numbers than the wild type strain in the murine stomach and duodenum 1 h after inoculation. This reduced fitness correlated with the in vitro susceptibility of the tagO mutant to bile salts, proteases, and a gut-associated defensin. Newman ΔtagO showed enhanced susceptibility to autolysis, and an autolysin (atl tagO double mutant abrogated this phenotype. However, the atl tagO mutant did not survive better in the mouse GI tract than the tagO mutant. Our results indicate that the failure of the tagO mutant to colonize the GI tract correlates with its poor adherence and susceptibility to bactericidal factors within the mouse gut, but not to enhanced activity of its major autolysin.

  16. Expression of a Mutant kcnj2 Gene Transcript in Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Ivone U S; Skinner, Jonathan R; Shelling, Andrew N; Love, Donald R

    2013-01-01

    Long QT 7 syndrome (LQT7, also known as Andersen-Tawil syndrome) is a rare autosomal-dominant disorder that causes cardiac arrhythmias, periodic paralysis, and dysmorphic features. Mutations in the human KCNJ2 gene, which encodes for the subunit of the potassium inwardly-rectifying channel (IK1), have been associated with the disorder. The majority of mutations are considered to be dominant-negative as mutant proteins interact to limit the function of wild type KCNJ2 proteins. Several LQT7 syndrome mouse models have been created that vary in the physiological similarity to the human disease. To complement the LQT7 mouse models, we investigated the usefulness of the zebrafish as an alternative model via a transient approach. Initial bioinformatic analysis identified the zebrafish orthologue of the human KCNJ2 gene, together with a spatial expression profile that was similar to that of human. The expression of a kcnj2-12 transcript carrying an in-frame deletion of critical amino acids identified in human studies resulted in embryos that exhibited defects in muscle development, thereby affecting movement, a decrease in jaw size, pupil-pupil distance, and signs of scoliosis. These defects correspond to some phenotypes expressed by human LQT7 patients.

  17. The Knockout Mouse Project

    OpenAIRE

    Austin, Christopher P.; Battey, James F.; Bradley, Allan; Bucan, Maja; Capecchi, Mario; Collins, Francis S; Dove, William F.; Duyk, Geoffrey; Dymecki, Susan; Eppig, Janan T.; Grieder, Franziska B.; Heintz, Nathaniel; Hicks, Geoff; Insel, Thomas R; Joyner, Alexandra

    2004-01-01

    Mouse knockout technology provides a powerful means of elucidating gene function in vivo, and a publicly available genome-wide collection of mouse knockouts would be significantly enabling for biomedical discovery. To date, published knockouts exist for only about 10% of mouse genes. Furthermore, many of these are limited in utility because they have not been made or phenotyped in standardized ways, and many are not freely available to researchers. It is time to harness new technologies and e...

  18. Replacing the computer mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Dernoncourt, Franck

    2014-01-01

    In a few months the computer mouse will be half-a-century-old. It is known to have many drawbacks, the main ones being: loss of productivity due to constant switching between keyboard and mouse, and health issues such as RSI. Like the keyboard, it is an unnatural human-computer interface. However the vast majority of computer users still use computer mice nowadays. In this article, we explore computer mouse alternatives. Our research shows that moving the mouse cursor can be done efficiently ...

  19. An encyclopedia of mouse DNA elements (Mouse ENCODE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Snyder, Michael; Hardison, Ross; Ren, Bing; Gingeras, Thomas; Gilbert, David M; Groudine, Mark; Bender, Michael; Kaul, Rajinder; Canfield, Theresa; Giste, Erica; Johnson, Audra; Zhang, Mia; Balasundaram, Gayathri; Byron, Rachel; Roach, Vaughan; Sabo, Peter J; Sandstrom, Richard; Stehling, A Sandra; Thurman, Robert E; Weissman, Sherman M; Cayting, Philip; Hariharan, Manoj; Lian, Jin; Cheng, Yong; Landt, Stephen G; Ma, Zhihai; Wold, Barbara J; Dekker, Job; Crawford, Gregory E; Keller, Cheryl A; Wu, Weisheng; Morrissey, Christopher; Kumar, Swathi A; Mishra, Tejaswini; Jain, Deepti; Byrska-Bishop, Marta; Blankenberg, Daniel; Lajoie, Bryan R; Jain, Gaurav; Sanyal, Amartya; Chen, Kaun-Bei; Denas, Olgert; Taylor, James; Blobel, Gerd A; Weiss, Mitchell J; Pimkin, Max; Deng, Wulan; Marinov, Georgi K; Williams, Brian A; Fisher-Aylor, Katherine I; Desalvo, Gilberto; Kiralusha, Anthony; Trout, Diane; Amrhein, Henry; Mortazavi, Ali; Edsall, Lee; McCleary, David; Kuan, Samantha; Shen, Yin; Yue, Feng; Ye, Zhen; Davis, Carrie A; Zaleski, Chris; Jha, Sonali; Xue, Chenghai; Dobin, Alex; Lin, Wei; Fastuca, Meagan; Wang, Huaien; Guigo, Roderic; Djebali, Sarah; Lagarde, Julien; Ryba, Tyrone; Sasaki, Takayo; Malladi, Venkat S; Cline, Melissa S; Kirkup, Vanessa M; Learned, Katrina; Rosenbloom, Kate R; Kent, W James; Feingold, Elise A; Good, Peter J; Pazin, Michael; Lowdon, Rebecca F; Adams, Leslie B

    2012-08-13

    To complement the human Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project and to enable a broad range of mouse genomics efforts, the Mouse ENCODE Consortium is applying the same experimental pipelines developed for human ENCODE to annotate the mouse genome.

  20. Comparison of phenotypes between different vangl2 mutants demonstrates dominant effects of the Looptail mutation during hair cell development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Yin

    Full Text Available Experiments utilizing the Looptail mutant mouse, which harbors a missense mutation in the vangl2 gene, have been essential for studies of planar polarity and linking the function of the core planar cell polarity proteins to other developmental signals. Originally described as having dominant phenotypic traits, the molecular interactions underlying the Looptail mutant phenotype are unclear because Vangl2 protein levels are significantly reduced or absent from mutant tissues. Here we introduce a vangl2 knockout mouse and directly compare the severity of the knockout and Looptail mutant phenotypes by intercrossing the two lines and assaying the planar polarity of inner ear hair cells. Overall the vangl2 knockout phenotype is milder than the phenotype of compound mutants carrying both the Looptail and vangl2 knockout alleles. In compound mutants a greater number of hair cells are affected and changes in the orientation of individual hair cells are greater when quantified. We further demonstrate in a heterologous cell system that the protein encoded by the Looptail mutation (Vangl2(S464N disrupts delivery of Vangl1 and Vangl2 proteins to the cell surface as a result of oligomer formation between Vangl1 and Vangl2(S464N, or Vangl2 and Vangl2(S464N, coupled to the intracellular retention of Vangl2(S464N. As a result, Vangl1 protein is missing from the apical cell surface of vestibular hair cells in Looptail mutants, but is retained at the apical cell surface of hair cells in vangl2 knockouts. Similarly the distribution of Prickle-like2, a putative Vangl2 interacting protein, is differentially affected in the two mutant lines. In summary, we provide evidence for a direct physical interaction between Vangl1 and Vangl2 through a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches and propose that this interaction underlies the dominant phenotypic traits associated with the Looptail mutation.

  1. Conserved role of unc-79 in ethanol responses in lightweight mutant mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Speca

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which ethanol and inhaled anesthetics influence the nervous system are poorly understood. Here we describe the positional cloning and characterization of a new mouse mutation isolated in an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU forward mutagenesis screen for animals with enhanced locomotor activity. This allele, Lightweight (Lwt, disrupts the homolog of the Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans unc-79 gene. While Lwt/Lwt homozygotes are perinatal lethal, Lightweight heterozygotes are dramatically hypersensitive to acute ethanol exposure. Experiments in C. elegans demonstrate a conserved hypersensitivity to ethanol in unc-79 mutants and extend this observation to the related unc-80 mutant and nca-1;nca-2 double mutants. Lightweight heterozygotes also exhibit an altered response to the anesthetic isoflurane, reminiscent of unc-79 invertebrate mutant phenotypes. Consistent with our initial mapping results, Lightweight heterozygotes are mildly hyperactive when exposed to a novel environment and are smaller than wild-type animals. In addition, Lightweight heterozygotes exhibit increased food consumption yet have a leaner body composition. Interestingly, Lightweight heterozygotes voluntarily consume more ethanol than wild-type littermates. The acute hypersensitivity to and increased voluntary consumption of ethanol observed in Lightweight heterozygous mice in combination with the observed hypersensitivity to ethanol in C. elegans unc-79, unc-80, and nca-1;nca-2 double mutants suggests a novel conserved pathway that might influence alcohol-related behaviors in humans.

  2. Temperature-sensitive mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: isolation and preliminary immunological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooke, A M; Arroyo, P J; Oeschger, M P; Bellanti, J A

    1982-01-01

    The immunogenicity of two temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa immunotype 1, isolated and characterized for the development of a safe, live vaccine strain, was evaluated in a mouse protection model. One mutant, A/10/25, had a limited "coasting" property (i.e., continued replication for two divisions) at the nonpermissive temperature (36 degrees C), whereas the other mutant, E/9/9, continued replication for five generations after transfer to 36 degrees C. Groups of 3- to 5-week-old ICR mice were immunized intraperitoneally with various doses of the two ts mutants; at various times thereafter, the mice were challenged intraperitoneally with lethal doses of the parental wild type. The more extensive coaster, E/9/9, induced 100% protection at immunizing doses lower than those required for A/10/25 to induce the same protection (1 x 10(8) to 2 x 10(8) and 6 x 10(8) colony-forming units, respectively). Both ts strains induced significant protection for up to 5 weeks after immunization. The results of these studies suggest that the use of P. aeruginosa ts mutants might provide a novel approach to the prevention of P. aeruginosa colonization of patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:6815088

  3. Consequences of zygote injection and germline transfer of mutant human mitochondrial DNA in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong; Koilkonda, Rajeshwari D; Chou, Tsung-Han; Porciatti, Vittorio; Mehta, Arpit; Hentall, Ian D; Chiodo, Vince A; Boye, Sanford L; Hauswirth, William W; Lewin, Alfred S; Guy, John

    2015-10-20

    Considerable evidence supports mutations in mitochondrial genes as the cause of maternally inherited diseases affecting tissues that rely primarily on oxidative energy metabolism, usually the nervous system, the heart, and skeletal muscles. Mitochondrial diseases are diverse, and animal models currently are limited. Here we introduced a mutant human mitochondrial gene responsible for Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) into the mouse germ line using fluorescence imaging for tissue-specific enrichment in the target retinal ganglion cells. A mitochondria-targeted adeno-associated virus (MTS-AAV) containing the mutant human NADH ubiquinone oxidoreductase subunit 4 (ND4) gene followed by mitochondrial-encoded mCherry was microinjected into zygotes. Female founders with mCherry fluorescence on ophthalmoscopy were backcrossed with normal males for eight generations. Mutant human ND4 DNA was 20% of mouse ND4 and did not integrate into the host genome. Translated human ND4 protein assembled into host respiratory complexes, decreasing respiratory chain function and increasing oxidative stress. Swelling of the optic nerve head was followed by progressive demise of ganglion cells and their axons, the hallmarks of human LHON. Early visual loss that began at 3 mo and progressed to blindness 8 mo after birth was reversed by intraocular injection of MTS-AAV expressing wild-type human ND4. The technology of introducing human mitochondrial genes into the mouse germ line has never been described, to our knowledge, and has implications not only for creating animal models recapitulating the counterpart human disorder but more importantly for reversing the adverse effects of the mutant gene using gene therapy to deliver the wild-type allele.

  4. Consequences of zygote injection and germline transfer of mutant human mitochondrial DNA in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong; Koilkonda, Rajeshwari D.; Chou, Tsung-Han; Porciatti, Vittorio; Mehta, Arpit; Hentall, Ian D.; Chiodo, Vince A.; Boye, Sanford L.; Hauswirth, William W.; Lewin, Alfred S.; Guy, John

    2015-01-01

    Considerable evidence supports mutations in mitochondrial genes as the cause of maternally inherited diseases affecting tissues that rely primarily on oxidative energy metabolism, usually the nervous system, the heart, and skeletal muscles. Mitochondrial diseases are diverse, and animal models currently are limited. Here we introduced a mutant human mitochondrial gene responsible for Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) into the mouse germ line using fluorescence imaging for tissue-specific enrichment in the target retinal ganglion cells. A mitochondria-targeted adeno-associated virus (MTS-AAV) containing the mutant human NADH ubiquinone oxidoreductase subunit 4 (ND4) gene followed by mitochondrial-encoded mCherry was microinjected into zygotes. Female founders with mCherry fluorescence on ophthalmoscopy were backcrossed with normal males for eight generations. Mutant human ND4 DNA was 20% of mouse ND4 and did not integrate into the host genome. Translated human ND4 protein assembled into host respiratory complexes, decreasing respiratory chain function and increasing oxidative stress. Swelling of the optic nerve head was followed by progressive demise of ganglion cells and their axons, the hallmarks of human LHON. Early visual loss that began at 3 mo and progressed to blindness 8 mo after birth was reversed by intraocular injection of MTS-AAV expressing wild-type human ND4. The technology of introducing human mitochondrial genes into the mouse germ line has never been described, to our knowledge, and has implications not only for creating animal models recapitulating the counterpart human disorder but more importantly for reversing the adverse effects of the mutant gene using gene therapy to deliver the wild-type allele. PMID:26438859

  5. caBIG® Spotlight - Solving Research Problems: Analyze Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Transcriptional Profiles —

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read a case study to learn more about how Dr. Bradley Merrill of the University of Illinois at Chicago and his lab were able to perform their first gene expression array experiment comparing a mutant mouse embryonic stem cell line to a non-mutant control line using GenePattern, an application supported by the Molecular Analysis Tools Knowledge Center which provides bioinformatics tools for gene expression, proteomic and SNP analysis.

  6. Mouse Mutagenesis Using N-Ethyl-N-Nitrosourea (ENU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinger, Andrew P; Justice, Monica J

    2008-04-01

    INTRODUCTIONThis protocol describes chemical mutagenesis of male mice using N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), which is the most efficient method for obtaining mouse mutations in phenotype-driven screens. A fractionated dose of ENU, an alkylating agent, can produce a mutation rate as high as 1.5 × 10(-3) in male mouse spermatogonial stem cells. Treatment with ENU produces point mutations that provide a unique mutant resource: They reflect the consequences of single gene changes independent of position effects, provide a fine structure dissection of protein function, display a range of mutant effects from complete or partial loss of function to exaggerated function, and discover gene functions in an unbiased manner. After treatment with ENU, mice are mated in genetic screens designed to uncover mutations of interest. Screens for dominant, recessive, and modifying mutations can be performed.

  7. A new spontaneous mouse mutation in the Kcne1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letts, V A; Valenzuela, A; Dunbar, C; Zheng, Q Y; Johnson, K R; Frankel, W N

    2000-10-01

    A new mouse mutant, punk rocker (allele symbol Kcne1(pkr)), arose spontaneously on a C57BL/10J inbred strain background and is characterized by a distinctive head-tossing, circling, and ataxic phenotype. It is also profoundly and bilaterally deaf. The mutation resides in the Kcne1 gene on Chromosome (Chr) 16 and has been identified as a single base change within the coding region of the third exon. The C to T nucleotide substitution causes an arginine to be altered to a termination codon at amino acid position 67, and predictably this will result in a significantly truncated protein product. The Kcne1(pkr) mutant represents the first spontaneous mouse model for the human disorder, Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome, associated with mutations in the homologous KCNE1 gene on human Chr 21.

  8. Mutant huntingtin gene-dose impacts on aggregate deposition, DARPP32 expression and neuroinflammation in HdhQ150 mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Young

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is an autosomal dominant, progressive and fatal neurological disorder caused by an expansion of CAG repeats in exon-1 of the huntingtin gene. The encoded poly-glutamine stretch renders mutant huntingtin prone to aggregation. HdhQ150 mice genocopy a pathogenic repeat (∼150 CAGs in the endogenous mouse huntingtin gene and model predominantly pre-manifest HD. Treating early is likely important to prevent or delay HD, and HdhQ150 mice may be useful to assess therapeutic strategies targeting pre-manifest HD. This requires appropriate markers and here we demonstrate, that pre-symptomatic HdhQ150 mice show several dramatic mutant huntingtin gene-dose dependent pathological changes including: (i an increase of neuronal intra-nuclear inclusions (NIIs in brain, (ii an increase of extra-nuclear aggregates in dentate gyrus, (iii a decrease of DARPP32 protein and (iv an increase in glial markers of neuroinflammation, which curiously did not correlate with local neuronal mutant huntingtin inclusion-burden. HdhQ150 mice developed NIIs also in all retinal neuron cell-types, demonstrating that retinal NIIs are not specific to human exon-1 R6 HD mouse models. Taken together, the striking and robust mutant huntingtin gene-dose related changes in aggregate-load, DARPP32 levels and glial activation markers should greatly facilitate future testing of therapeutic strategies in the HdhQ150 HD mouse model.

  9. Mutant glycyl-tRNA synthetase (Gars ameliorates SOD1(G93A motor neuron degeneration phenotype but has little affect on Loa dynein heavy chain mutant mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth T Banks

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In humans, mutations in the enzyme glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS cause motor and sensory axon loss in the peripheral nervous system, and clinical phenotypes ranging from Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy to a severe infantile form of spinal muscular atrophy. GARS is ubiquitously expressed and may have functions in addition to its canonical role in protein synthesis through catalyzing the addition of glycine to cognate tRNAs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have recently described a new mouse model with a point mutation in the Gars gene resulting in a cysteine to arginine change at residue 201. Heterozygous Gars(C201R/+ mice have locomotor and sensory deficits. In an investigation of genetic mutations that lead to death of motor and sensory neurons, we have crossed the Gars(C201R/+ mice to two other mutants: the TgSOD1(G93A model of human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and the Legs at odd angles mouse (Dync1h1(Loa which has a defect in the heavy chain of the dynein complex. We found the Dync1h1(Loa/+;Gars(C201R/+ double heterozygous mice are more impaired than either parent, and this is may be an additive effect of both mutations. Surprisingly, the Gars(C201R mutation significantly delayed disease onset in the SOD1(G93A;Gars(C201R/+ double heterozygous mutant mice and increased lifespan by 29% on the genetic background investigated. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings raise intriguing possibilities for the study of pathogenetic mechanisms in all three mouse mutant strains.

  10. Accumulation of SOD1 mutants in postnatal motoneurons does not cause motoneuron pathology or motoneuron disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lino, Maria Maddalena; Schneider, Corinna; Caroni, Pico

    2002-06-15

    Transgenic mice expressing high levels of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS)-associated mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) under the control of a human SOD1 minigene (hMg) accumulate mutant protein ubiquitously and develop motoneuron disease. However, restricted expression of SOD1 mutants in neurons apparently does not cause motor impairments in mice. Here, we investigated the possible pathogenic roles of mutant SOD1 accumulation in motoneurons. First, we used a Thy1 expression cassette to drive high constitutive expression of transgene in postnatal mouse neurons, including upper and lower motoneurons. Second, we expressed human (h) SOD1(G93A) and hSOD1(G85R) as transgenes (i.e., two SOD1 mutants with aggressive pathogenic properties in inducing FALS). Third, in addition to clinical signs of disease, we monitored early signs of disease onset and pathogenesis, including muscle innervation, astrogliosis in the spinal cord, and accumulation of ubiquitinated deposits in motoneurons and astrocytes. We report that high-level expression and accumulation of the mutant proteins in neurons failed to produce any detectable sign of pathology or disease in these transgenic mice. Crossing hMg-SOD1(G93A) mice (Gurney et al., 1994) with Thy1-SOD1(G93A) mice produced double-transgenic mice with spinal cord SOD1(G93A) levels that were approximately twofold higher than in the hMg-SOD1(G93A) single transgenics but did not affect the onset or progression of pathology or motoneuron disease. The accumulation of mutant SOD1 in postnatal motoneurons is thus not sufficient and probably also not critical to induce or accelerate motoneuron disease in FALS mice. The pathogenic process in FALS may involve non-neuronal cells, and selective vulnerability of motoneurons to this process may lead to motoneuron pathology and disease.

  11. Structural mutants of dengue virus 2 transmembrane domains exhibit host-range phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Gwynneth S

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are over 700 known arboviruses and at least 80 immunologically distinct types that cause disease in humans. Arboviruses are transmitted among vertebrates by biting insects, chiefly mosquitoes and ticks. These viruses are widely distributed throughout the world, depending on the presence of appropriate hosts (birds, horses, domestic animals, humans and vectors. Mosquito-borne arboviruses present some of the most important examples of emerging and resurgent diseases of global significance. Methods A strategy has been developed by which host-range mutants of Dengue virus can be constructed by generating deletions in the transmembrane domain (TMD of the E glycoprotein. The host-range mutants produced and selected favored growth in the insect hosts. Mouse trials were conducted to determine if these mutants could initiate an immune response in an in vivo system. Results The DV2 E protein TMD defined as amino acids 452SWTMKILIGVIITWIG467 was found to contain specific residues which were required for the production of this host-range phenotype. Deletion mutants were found to be stable in vitro for 4 sequential passages in both host cell lines. The host-range mutants elicited neutralizing antibody above that seen for wild-type virus in mice and warrant further testing in primates as potential vaccine candidates. Conclusions Novel host-range mutants of DV2 were created that have preferential growth in insect cells and impaired infectivity in mammalian cells. This method for creating live, attenuated viral mutants that generate safe and effective immunity may be applied to many other insect-borne viral diseases for which no current effective therapies exist.

  12. Identification of 17 hearing impaired mouse strains in the TMGC ENU-mutagenesis screen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kermany, Mohammad [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital; Parker, Lisan [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital; Guo, Yun-Kai [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital; Miller, Darla R [ORNL; Swanson, Douglas J [ORNL; Yoo, Tai-June [Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN; Goldowitz, Daniel [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Zuo, Jian [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital

    2006-01-01

    The Tennessee Mouse Genome Consortium (TMGC) employed an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-mutagenesis scheme to identify mouse recessive mutants with hearing phenotypes. We employed auditory brainstem responses (ABR) to click and 8, 16, and 32 kHz stimuli and screened 285 pedigrees (1819 mice of 8-11 weeks old in various mixed genetic backgrounds) each bred to carry a homozygous ENU-induced mutation. To define mutant pedigrees, we measured P12 mice per pedigree in P2 generations and used a criterion where the mean ABR threshold per pedigree was two standard deviations above the mean of all offspring from the same parental strain. We thus identified 17 mutant pedigrees (6%), all exhibiting hearing loss at high frequencies (P16 kHz) with an average threshold elevation of 30-35 dB SPL. Interestingly, four mutants showed sex-biased hearing loss and six mutants displayed wide range frequency hearing loss. Temporal bone histology revealed that six of the first nine mutants displayed cochlear morphological defects: degeneration of spiral ganglia, spiral ligament fibrocytes or inner hair cells (but not outer hair cells) mostly in basal turns. In contrast to other ENU-mutagenesis auditory screens, our screen identified high-frequency, mild and sex-biased hearing defects. Further characterization of these 17 mouse models will advance our understanding of presbycusis and noise-induced hearing loss in humans.

  13. Loss of oxidation-reduction specificity in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-associated CuZnSOD mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafe, C; Testa, M P; Sheldon, P J; French, W P; Ellerby, L M; Bredesen, D E

    2000-10-01

    Both transgenic mouse and cell culture models of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS) support a gain-of-function effect for the mutations in copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) associated with FALS, but the nature of the function gained remains incompletely characterized. We previously reported an enhanced peroxidase activity for FALS-associated CuZnSOD mutants. Because one of the targets of such activity is CuZnSOD itself, we examined peroxide-mediated inactivation of wild-type and mutant CuZnSODs, and found that the mutants are more readily inactivated. Inactivation of the mutants was associated with fragmentation, which did not occur in the wild-type enzyme under these conditions. Furthermore, the reduction of the FALS-associated mutants by ascorbate was enhanced markedly when compared to the wild-type enzyme. The visible spectra of the mutants showed a consistent blue shift of the peak at 680 nm in the wild-type enzyme, suggesting an alteration in copper-site geometry. These results extend previous studies demonstrating enhanced peroxidase activity in the mutants, and suggest that the toxic function that leads to motor neuron degeneration may result from a loss of specificity of the redox reactions catalyzed by CuZnSOD.

  14. Oscillating perceptions: the ups and downs of the CLOCK protein in the mouse circadian system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jason P. Debruyne

    2008-12-01

    A functional mouse CLOCK protein has long been thought to be essential for mammalian circadian clockwork function, based mainly on studies of mice bearing a dominant negative, antimorphic mutation in the Clock gene. However, new discoveries using recently developed Clock-null mutant mice have shaken up this view. In this review, I discuss how this recent work impacts and alters the previous view of the role of CLOCK in the mouse circadian clockwork.

  15. The MOUSE Squad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borja, Rhea R.

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a New York city after-school program started by MOUSE (Making Opportunities for Upgrading Schools and Education), a national nonprofit group that teaches students how to fix computers, and equips them with the communication and problem-solving skills to help them in the working world. The MOUSE program is part of a trend…

  16. Large-scale RNA interference screening in mammalian cells identifies novel regulators of mutant huntingtin aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Yamanaka

    Full Text Available In polyglutamine (polyQ diseases including Huntington's disease (HD, mutant proteins containing expanded polyQ stretch form aggregates in neurons. Genetic or RNAi screenings in yeast, C. elegans or Drosophila have identified multiple genes modifying polyQ aggregation, a few of which are confirmed effective in mammals. However, the overall molecular mechanism underlying polyQ protein aggregation in mammalian cells still remains obscure. We here perform RNAi screening in mouse neuro2a cells to identify mammalian modifiers for aggregation of mutant huntingtin, a causative protein of HD. By systematic cell transfection and automated cell image analysis, we screen ∼ 12000 shRNA clones and identify 111 shRNAs that either suppress or enhance mutant huntingtin aggregation, without altering its gene expression. Classification of the shRNA-targets suggests that genes with various cellular functions such as gene transcription and protein phosphorylation are involved in modifying the aggregation. Subsequent analysis suggests that, in addition to the aggregation-modifiers sensitive to proteasome inhibition, some of them, such as a transcription factor Tcf20, and kinases Csnk1d and Pik3c2a, are insensitive to it. As for Tcf20, which contains polyQ stretches at N-terminus, its binding to mutant huntingtin aggregates is observed in neuro2a cells and in HD model mouse neurons. Notably, except Pik3c2a, the rest of the modifiers identified here are novel. Thus, our first large-scale RNAi screening in mammalian system identifies previously undescribed genetic players that regulate mutant huntingtin aggregation by several, possibly mammalian-specific mechanisms.

  17. Mutant TDP-43 deregulates AMPK activation by PP2A in ALS models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirma D Perera

    Full Text Available Bioenergetic abnormalities and metabolic dysfunctionoccur in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS patients and genetic mouse models. However, whether metabolic dysfunction occurs earlyin ALS pathophysiology linked to different ALS genes remains unclear.Here, we investigatedAMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK activation, which is a key enzyme induced by energy depletion and metabolic stress, inneuronal cells and mouse models expressing mutantsuperoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1or TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43 linked to ALS.AMPKphosphorylation was sharply increased in spinal cords of transgenic SOD1G93A mice at disease onset and accumulated incytoplasmic granules in motor neurons, but not in pre-symptomatic mice. AMPK phosphorylation also occurred in peripheraltissues, liver and kidney, in SOD1G93A mice at disease onset, demonstrating that AMPK activation occurs late and is not restricted to motor neurons. Conversely, AMPK activity was drastically diminished in spinal cords and brains of presymptomatic and symptomatictransgenic TDP-43A315T mice and motor neuronal cells expressing different TDP-43 mutants. We show that mutant TDP-43 induction of the AMPK phosphatase,protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A, is associated with AMPK inactivation in these ALS models. Furthermore, PP2A inhibition by okadaic acid reversed AMPK inactivation by mutant TDP-43 in neuronal cells. Our results suggest that mutant SOD1 and TDP-43 exert contrasting effects on AMPK activation which may reflect key differences in energy metabolism and neurodegeneration in spinal cords of SOD1G93A and TDP-43A315T mice. While AMPK activation in motor neurons correlateswith progressionin mutant SOD1-mediated disease, AMPK inactivation mediated by PP2Ais associated withmutant TDP-43-linked ALS.

  18. Mouse genome database 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data.

  19. Mouse, man, and meaning: bridging the semantics of mouse phenotype and human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, John M; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Beck, Tim; Gkoutos, Georgios V; Mungall, Chris; Schofield, Paul N

    2009-08-01

    Now that the laboratory mouse genome is sequenced and the annotation of its gene content is improving, the next major challenge is the annotation of the phenotypic associations of mouse genes. This requires the development of systematic phenotyping pipelines that use standardized phenotyping procedures which allow comparison across laboratories. It also requires the development of a sophisticated informatics infrastructure for the description and interchange of phenotype data. Here we focus on the current state of the art in the description of data produced by systematic phenotyping approaches using ontologies, in particular, the EQ (Entity-Quality) approach, and what developments are required to facilitate the linking of phenotypic descriptions of mutant mice to human diseases.

  20. Muscle development in mdx mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangain, J; Vrbova, G

    1984-01-01

    Mechanical and contractile properties of tibialis anterior (TA) muscles from X-linked muscular dystrophic (mdx) mutant mice at different stages of development are compared to those of muscles from normal control animals. There is no difference between the tension output, speeds of contraction and relaxation, and weight of TA muscles from mutant adults and normal control animals. However, it is found that in 3-4-week-old mutant animals, tension output and muscle weight are very much reduced, and half relaxation time is prolonged. Thus, during this stage of development, muscles from mdx mice do not function properly. Histological examination of these muscles provides further evidence that, in these animals, rapid muscle destruction occurs at a particular time of development and that it is followed by complete recovery. This new mutant therefore presents an interesting case of muscle destruction and rapid regeneration. However, it is not an adequate model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  1. Targeting ESR1-Mutant Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0359 TITLE: Targeting ESR1-Mutant Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Sarat Chandarlapaty CONTRACTING...31 Aug 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Targeting ESR1-Mutant Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0359 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...mutations found in breast cancer using both structural and cell based assays. We have now have evidence for the effects of the most recurrent

  2. Targeting ESR1-Mutant Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Introduction Approximately 70% of ER+ breast cancers harbor expression of the estrogen receptor and are dependent upon its activity for various aspects of the...resistance to current FDA approved ER antagonists, but that more potent and selective estrogen receptor antagonists will be sufficiently active to...antagonists and their potency against ER mutants both in vitro and in vivo . Targeting ESR1-Mutant Breast Cancer W81XWH-14-1-0359 9 4. Impact A) Impact

  3. Twist1 suppresses senescence programs and thereby accelerates and maintains mutant Kras-induced lung tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuoc T Tran

    Full Text Available KRAS mutant lung cancers are generally refractory to chemotherapy as well targeted agents. To date, the identification of drugs to therapeutically inhibit K-RAS have been unsuccessful, suggesting that other approaches are required. We demonstrate in both a novel transgenic mutant Kras lung cancer mouse model and in human lung tumors that the inhibition of Twist1 restores a senescence program inducing the loss of a neoplastic phenotype. The Twist1 gene encodes for a transcription factor that is essential during embryogenesis. Twist1 has been suggested to play an important role during tumor progression. However, there is no in vivo evidence that Twist1 plays a role in autochthonous tumorigenesis. Through two novel transgenic mouse models, we show that Twist1 cooperates with Kras(G12D to markedly accelerate lung tumorigenesis by abrogating cellular senescence programs and promoting the progression from benign adenomas to adenocarcinomas. Moreover, the suppression of Twist1 to physiological levels is sufficient to cause Kras mutant lung tumors to undergo senescence and lose their neoplastic features. Finally, we analyzed more than 500 human tumors to demonstrate that TWIST1 is frequently overexpressed in primary human lung tumors. The suppression of TWIST1 in human lung cancer cells also induced cellular senescence. Hence, TWIST1 is a critical regulator of cellular senescence programs, and the suppression of TWIST1 in human tumors may be an effective example of pro-senescence therapy.

  4. Cox4i2, Ifit2, and Prdm11 Mutant Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsch, Marion; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Bönisch, Clemens

    2015-01-01

    and repeated OVA airway challenge. Challenged Prdm11tm1.1ahl mice exhibited changes in B cell counts, CD4+ T cell counts, and in the number of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavages, whereas challenged Ifit2tm1.1Ebsb mice displayed alterations in plasma IgE, IgG1, IgG3, and IgM levels compared...... to the challenged wild type littermates. In contrast, challenged Cox4i2tm1Hutt mutant mice did not show alterations in the humoral or cellular immune response compared to challenged wild type mice. Transcriptome analyses from lungs of the challenged mutant mouse lines showed extensive changes in gene expression...... in Prdm11tm1.1ahl mice. Functional annotations of regulated genes of all three mutant mouse lines were primarily related to inflammation and airway smooth muscle (ASM) remodeling. We were thus able to define an effective selection strategy to identify new candidate genes for the predisposition...

  5. Diverse application of MRI for mouse phenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yijen L; Lo, Cecilia W

    2017-06-01

    Small animal models, particularly mouse models, of human diseases are becoming an indispensable tool for biomedical research. Studies in animal models have provided important insights into the etiology of diseases and accelerated the development of therapeutic strategies. Detailed phenotypic characterization is essential, both for the development of such animal models and mechanistic studies into disease pathogenesis and testing the efficacy of experimental therapeutics. MRI is a versatile and noninvasive imaging modality with excellent penetration depth, tissue coverage, and soft tissue contrast. MRI, being a multi-modal imaging modality, together with proven imaging protocols and availability of good contrast agents, is ideally suited for phenotyping mutant mouse models. Here we describe the applications of MRI for phenotyping structural birth defects involving the brain, heart, and kidney in mice. The versatility of MRI and its ease of use are well suited to meet the rapidly increasing demands for mouse phenotyping in the coming age of functional genomics. Birth Defects Research 109:758-770, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Mutant Enpp1asj mice as a model for generalized arterial calcification of infancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaoli Li

    2013-09-01

    Generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI, an autosomal recessive disorder, is characterized by early mineralization of blood vessels, often diagnosed by prenatal ultrasound and usually resulting in demise during the first year of life. It is caused in most cases by mutations in the ENPP1 gene, encoding an enzyme that hydrolyzes ATP to AMP and inorganic pyrophosphate, the latter being a powerful anti-mineralization factor. Recently, a novel mouse phenotype was recognized as a result of ENU mutagenesis – those mice developed stiffening of the joints, hence the mutant mouse was named ‘ages with stiffened joints’ (asj. These mice harbor a missense mutation, p.V246D, in the Enpp1 gene. Here we demonstrate that the mutant ENPP1 protein is largely absent in the liver of asj mice, and the lack of enzymatic activity results in reduced inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi levels in the plasma, accompanied by extensive mineralization of a number of tissues, including arterial blood vessels. The progress of mineralization is highly dependent on the mineral composition of the diet, with significant shortening of the lifespan on a diet enriched in phosphorus and low in magnesium. These results suggest that the asj mouse can serve as an animal model for GACI.

  7. Evaluation of Rett Syndrome Symptom Improvement by Metabolic Modulators in Mecp2-Mutant Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchovecky, Christie M; Hill, Misty G; Borkey, Jennifer M; Kyle, Stephanie M; Justice, Monica J

    2013-12-19

    Mouse models recapitulate many symptoms of Rett Syndrome, an X-linked disorder caused by mutations in methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2). The study of Mecp2-null male mice has provided insight into pathogenesis of the disorder-most recently, dysregulation of cholesterol and lipid metabolism. Perisymptomatic treatment with statin drugs successfully mitigates the effects of this metabolic syndrome, increases longevity, and improves motor function. Described here is a metabolic drug screening protocol and timeline for symptom evaluation in Mecp2-mutant mice. Specifically, mice are treated twice weekly with a compound of interest alongside subjective health assessments, bi-weekly body composition measurements, and blood chemistries. Throughout treatment, behavioral phenotyping tests are carried out at specific time points. This protocol is highly adaptable to other neurological diseases; however, the time for completion depends on the specific mutant model under study. The protocol highlights the use of techniques described in several different Current Protocols in Mouse Biology articles to carry out testing in a preclinical model. Curr. Protoc. Mouse Biol. 3:187-204 © 2013 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  8. Mutant Enpp1asj mice as a model for generalized arterial calcification of infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiaoli; Guo, Haitao; Chou, David W; Berndt, Annerose; Sundberg, John P; Uitto, Jouni

    2013-09-01

    Generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI), an autosomal recessive disorder, is characterized by early mineralization of blood vessels, often diagnosed by prenatal ultrasound and usually resulting in demise during the first year of life. It is caused in most cases by mutations in the ENPP1 gene, encoding an enzyme that hydrolyzes ATP to AMP and inorganic pyrophosphate, the latter being a powerful anti-mineralization factor. Recently, a novel mouse phenotype was recognized as a result of ENU mutagenesis - those mice developed stiffening of the joints, hence the mutant mouse was named 'ages with stiffened joints' (asj). These mice harbor a missense mutation, p.V246D, in the Enpp1 gene. Here we demonstrate that the mutant ENPP1 protein is largely absent in the liver of asj mice, and the lack of enzymatic activity results in reduced inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) levels in the plasma, accompanied by extensive mineralization of a number of tissues, including arterial blood vessels. The progress of mineralization is highly dependent on the mineral composition of the diet, with significant shortening of the lifespan on a diet enriched in phosphorus and low in magnesium. These results suggest that the asj mouse can serve as an animal model for GACI.

  9. Ectopic Mineralization and Conductive Hearing Loss in Enpp1asj Mutant Mice, a New Model for Otitis Media and Tympanosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Cong; Harris, Belinda S; Johnson, Kenneth R

    2016-01-01

    Otitis media (OM), inflammation of the middle ear, is a common cause of hearing loss in children and in patients with many different syndromic diseases. Studies of the human population and mouse models have revealed that OM is a multifactorial disease with many environmental and genetic contributing factors. Here, we report on otitis media-related hearing loss in asj (ages with stiffened joints) mutant mice, which bear a point mutation in the Enpp1 gene. Auditory-evoked brainstem response (ABR) measurements revealed that around 90% of the mutant mice (Enpp1asj/asj) tested had moderate to severe hearing impairment in at least one ear. The ABR thresholds were variable and generally elevated with age. We found otitis media with effusion (OME) in all of the hearing-impaired Enpp1asj/asj mice by anatomic and histological examinations. The volume and inflammatory cell content of the effusion varied among the asj mutant mice, but all mutants exhibited a thickened middle ear epithelium with fibrous polyps and more mucin-secreting goblet cells than controls. Other abnormalities observed in the Enpp1 mutant mice include over-ossification at the round window ridge, thickened and over-calcified stapedial artery, fusion of malleus and incus, and white patches on the inside of tympanic membrane, some of which are typical symptoms of tympanosclerosis. An excessive yellow discharge was detected in the outer ear canal of older asj mutant mice, with 100% penetrance by 5 months of age, and contributes to the progressive nature of the hearing loss. This is the first report of hearing loss and ear pathology associated with an Enpp1 mutation in mice. The Enpp1asj mutant mouse provides a new animal model for studying tympanosclerotic otitis and otitis media with effusion, and also provides a specific model for the hearing loss recently reported to be associated with human ENPP1 mutations causing generalized arterial calcification of infancy and hypophosphatemic rickets.

  10. Role of various enterotoxins in Aeromonas hydrophila-induced gastroenteritis: generation of enterotoxin gene-deficient mutants and evaluation of their enterotoxic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Jian; Kozlova, E V; Chopra, A K

    2002-04-01

    Three enterotoxins from the Aeromonas hydrophila diarrheal isolate SSU have been molecularly characterized in our laboratory. One of these enterotoxins is cytotoxic in nature, whereas the other two are cytotonic enterotoxins, one of them heat labile and the other heat stable. Earlier, by developing an isogenic mutant, we demonstrated the role of a cytotoxic enterotoxin in causing systemic infection in mice. In the present study, we evaluated the role of these three enterotoxins in evoking diarrhea in a murine model by developing various combinations of enterotoxin gene-deficient mutants by marker-exchange mutagenesis. A total of six isogenic mutants were prepared in a cytotoxic enterotoxin gene (act)-positive or -negative background strain of A. hydrophila. We developed two single knockouts with truncation in either the heat-labile (alt) or the heat-stable (ast) cytotonic enterotoxin gene; three double knockouts with truncations of genes encoding (i) alt and ast, (ii) act and alt, and (iii) act and ast genes; and a triple-knockout mutant with truncation in all three genes, act, alt, and ast. The identity of these isogenic mutants developed by double-crossover homologous recombination was confirmed by Southern blot analysis. Northern and Western blot analyses revealed that the expression of different enterotoxin genes in the mutants was correspondingly abrogated. We tested the biological activity of these mutants in a diet-restricted and antibiotic-treated mouse model with a ligated ileal loop assay. Our data indicated that all of these mutants had significantly reduced capacity to evoke fluid secretion compared to that of wild-type A. hydrophila; the triple-knockout mutant failed to induce any detectable level of fluid secretion. The biological activity of selected A. hydrophila mutants was restored after complementation. Taken together, we have established a role for three enterotoxins in A. hydrophila-induced gastroenteritis in a mouse model with the greatest

  11. Cell lineage of timed cohorts of Tbx6-expressing cells in wild-type and Tbx6 mutant embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Concepcion

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Tbx6 is a T-box transcription factor with multiple roles in embryonic development as evidenced by dramatic effects on mesoderm cell fate determination, left/right axis determination, and somite segmentation in mutant mice. The expression of Tbx6 is restricted to the primitive streak and presomitic mesoderm, but some of the phenotypic features of mutants are not easily explained by this expression pattern. We have used genetically-inducible fate mapping to trace the fate of Tbx6-expressing cells in wild-type and mutant embryos to explain some of the puzzling features of the mutant phenotype. We created an inducible Tbx6-creERT2 transgenic mouse in which cre expression closely recapitulates endogenous Tbx6 expression both temporally and spatially. Using a lacZ-based Cre reporter and timed tamoxifen injections, we followed temporally overlapping cohorts of cells that had expressed Tbx6 and found contributions to virtually all mesodermally-derived embryonic structures as well as the extraembryonic allantois. Contribution to the endothelium of major blood vessels may account for the embryonic death of homozygous mutant embryos. In mutant embryos, Tbx6-creERT2-traced cells contributed to the abnormally segmented anterior somites and formed the characteristic ectopic neural tubes. Retention of cells in the mutant tail bud indicates a deficiency in migratory behavior of the mutant cells and the presence of Tbx6-creERT2-traced cells in the notochord, a node derivative provides a possible explanation for the heterotaxia seen in mutant embryos.

  12. Enhancement of mouse sperm motility by trophinin-binding peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Seong

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trophinin is an intrinsic membrane protein that forms a complex in the cytoplasm with bystin and tastin, linking it microtubule-associated motor dynein (ATPase in some cell types. Previously, we found that human sperm tails contain trophinin, bystin and tastin proteins, and that trophinin-binding GWRQ (glycine, tryptophan, arginine, glutamine peptide enhanced motility of human sperm. Methods Immunohistochemistry was employed to determine trophinin protein in mouse spermatozoa from wild type mouse, by using spermatozoa from trophinin null mutant mice as a negative control. Multivalent 8-branched GWRQ (glycine, tryptophan, arginine, glutamine peptide or GWRQ-MAPS, was chemically synthesized, purified by HPLC and its structure was confirmed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Effect of GWRQ-MAPS on mouse spermatozoa from wild type and trophinin null mutant was assessed by a computer-assisted semen analyzer (CASA. Results Anti-trophinin antibody stained the principal (central piece of the tail of wild type mouse sperm, whereas the antibody showed no staining on trophinin null sperm. Phage particles displaying GWRQ bound to the principal piece of sperm tail from wild type but not trophinin null mice. GWRQ-MAPS enhanced motility of spermatozoa from wild type but not trophinin null mice. CASA showed that GWRQ-MAPS enhanced both progressive motility and rapid motility in wild type mouse sperm. Conclusions Present study established the expression of trophinin in the mouse sperm tail and trophinin-dependent effect of GWRQ-MAPS on sperm motility. GWRQ causes a significant increase in sperm motility.

  13. Enhanced hippocampal long-term potentiation and fear memory in Btbd9 mutant mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark P DeAndrade

    Full Text Available Polymorphisms in BTBD9 have recently been associated with higher risk of restless legs syndrome (RLS, a neurological disorder characterized by uncomfortable sensations in the legs at rest that are relieved by movement. The BTBD9 protein contains a BTB/POZ domain and a BACK domain, but its function is unknown. To elucidate its function and potential role in the pathophysiology of RLS, we generated a line of mutant Btbd9 mice derived from a commercial gene-trap embryonic stem cell clone. Btbd9 is the mouse homolog of the human BTBD9. Proteins that contain a BTB/POZ domain have been reported to be associated with synaptic transmission and plasticity. We found that Btbd9 is naturally expressed in the hippocampus of our mutant mice, a region critical for learning and memory. As electrophysiological characteristics of CA3-CA1 synapses of the hippocampus are well characterized, we performed electrophysiological recordings in this region. The mutant mice showed normal input-output relationship, a significant impairment in pre-synaptic activity, and an enhanced long-term potentiation. We further performed an analysis of fear memory and found the mutant mice had an enhanced cued and contextual fear memory. To elucidate a possible molecular basis for these enhancements, we analyzed proteins that have been associated with synaptic plasticity. We found an elevated level of dynamin 1, an enzyme associated with endocytosis, in the mutant mice. These results suggest the first identified function of Btbd9 as being involved in regulating synaptic plasticity and memory. Recent studies have suggested that enhanced synaptic plasticity, analogous to what we have observed, in other regions of the brain could enhance sensory perception similar to what is seen in RLS patients. Further analyses of the mutant mice will help shine light on the function of BTBD9 and its role in RLS.

  14. Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — MGI is the international database resource for the laboratory mouse, providing integrated genetic, genomic, and biological data to facilitate the study of human...

  15. Mouse Phenome Database (MPD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mouse Phenome Database (MPD) has characterizations of hundreds of strains of laboratory mice to facilitate translational discoveries and to assist in selection...

  16. Gamma ray-induced mutants as a tool for the production and characterisation of monoclonal antibodies against HLA-alloantigens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spring, B.; Pawelec, G.; Ziegler, A.

    1986-01-01

    To simplify the screening procedure for murine monoclonal antibodies specific for polymorphic HLA determinants, spleen cells from a mouse immunized with the human cell line BJAB-B95.8.6 were fused with NS1 mouse myeloma cells, and hybridoma supernatants were screened for their reactivity on BJAB-B95.8.6 and two gamma ray-induced HLA-loss mutants of this line. The use of these HLA-loss mutants allowed the rapid identification of two new allospecific MOABs designated TU160 and TU161. Serological as well as biochemical studies revealed TU160 to be specific for HLA=A2, and TU161 for HLA-B13 molecules, respectively. Both MOABs were determined to be antibodies of the IgG class and were able to precipitate their antigens from lysates of radioactively labeled cells.

  17. Phanerochaete mutants with enhanced ligninolytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakar, S.N.; Perez, A.; Gonzales, J.

    1993-06-01

    In addition to lignin, the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium has the ability to degrade a wide spectrum of recalcitrant organopollutants in soils and aqueous media. Although some of the organic compounds are degraded under nonligninolytic conditions, most are degraded under ligninolytic conditions with the involvement of the extracellular enzymes, lignin peroxidases, and manganese-dependent peroxidases, which are produced as secondary metabolites triggered by conditions of nutrient starvation (e.g., nitrogen limitation). The fungus and its enzymes can thus provide alternative technologies for bioremediation, biopulping, biobleaching, and other industrial applications. The efficiency and effectiveness of the fungus can be enhanced by increasing production and secretion of the important enzymes in large quantities and as primary metabolites under enriched conditions. One way this can be achieved is through isolation of mutants that are deregulated or are hyperproducers or supersecretors of key enzymes under enriched conditions. Through ultraviolet-light and gamma-rays mutagenesis we have isolated a variety of mutants, some of which produce key enzymes of the ligninolytic system under high-nitrogen growth conditions. One of the mutants produced 272 units (U) of lignin peroxidases enzyme activity per liter after nine days under high nitrogen. The mutant and the parent strains produced up to 54 U/L and 62 U/L, respectively, of the enzyme activity under low-nitrogen growth conditions during this period. In some experiments the mutant showed 281 U/L of enzyme activity under high nitrogen after 17 days.

  18. Acetylcholinesterase activity in the brain of dystonia musculorum (Dst(dt-J)) mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, C; Lalonde, R; Strazielle, C

    2012-01-01

    The dystonia musculorum (Dst(dt-J)) mutant mouse suffers from severe motor coordination deficits, characterized, among various symptoms, by a spastic ataxia and dystonic movements, indicating central defects in motor structures in addition to dystrophy of peripheral sensory tracts and partial degeneration of spinocerebellar tracts. Neurochemical alterations, notably in dopaminergic and noradrenergic systems, were previously observed in basal ganglia and cerebellum. A quantitative histochemical cartography of brain acetylcholinesterase activity in Dst(dt-J) mutants, in comparison with controls, revealed increases in the neostriatum, the habenula-interpeduncular pathway, the cholinergic pedunculopontine nucleus and its target structures, the thalamus, major regions of the basal ganglia, such as substantia nigra, ventral tegmental area, globus pallidum, and subthalamic nucleus, as well as in associated extrapyramidal regions, such as red nucleus, brainstem reticular formation, and superior colliculus. These acetylcholinesterase changes may play a role in motor deficits, particularly the dystonic symptomatology observed in the mutation.

  19. Deoxynybomycins inhibit mutant DNA gyrase and rescue mice infected with fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Elizabeth I; Bair, Joseph S; Nakamura, Bradley A; Lee, Hyang Y; Kuttab, Hani I; Southgate, Emma H; Lezmi, Stéphane; Lau, Gee W; Hergenrother, Paul J

    2015-04-24

    Fluoroquinolones are one of the most commonly prescribed classes of antibiotics, but fluoroquinolone resistance (FQR) is widespread and increasing. Deoxynybomycin (DNM) is a natural-product antibiotic with an unusual mechanism of action, inhibiting the mutant DNA gyrase that confers FQR. Unfortunately, isolation of DNM is difficult and DNM is insoluble in aqueous solutions, making it a poor candidate for development. Here we describe a facile chemical route to produce DNM and its derivatives. These compounds possess excellent activity against FQR methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococci clinical isolates and inhibit mutant DNA gyrase in-vitro. Bacteria that develop resistance to DNM are re-sensitized to fluoroquinolones, suggesting that resistance that emerges to DNM would be treatable. Using a DNM derivative, the first in-vivo efficacy of the nybomycin class is demonstrated in a mouse infection model. Overall, the data presented suggest the promise of DNM derivatives for the treatment of FQR infections.

  20. Brain beta-amyloid accumulation in transgenic mice expressing mutant superoxide dismutase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Bradley J; Li, Qiao-Xin; Laughton, Katrina M; Masters, Colin L; Lopes, Elizabeth C; Atkin, Julie D; Cheema, Surindar S

    2004-12-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in both the deposition and pathogenesis of beta-amyloid (Abeta) protein in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Accordingly, overexpression of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) in neuronal cells and transgenic AD mice reduces Abeta toxicity and accumulation. In contrast, mutations in SOD1 associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) confer enhanced pro-oxidative enzyme activities. We therefore examined whether ALS-linked mutant SOD1 overexpression in motor neuronal cells or transgenic ALS mice modulates Abeta toxicity or its accumulation in the brain. Aggregated, but not freshly solubilised, substrate-bound Abeta peptides induced degenerative morphology and cytotoxicity in motor neuron-like NSC-34 cells. Transfection of NSC-34 cells with human wild-type SOD1 attenuated Abeta-induced toxicity, however this neuroprotective effect was also observed for ALS-linked mutant SOD1. Analysis of the cerebral cortex, brainstem, cerebellum and olfactory bulb from transgenic SOD1G93A mice using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of acid-guanidine extracts revealed age-dependent elevations in Abeta levels, although not significantly different from wild-type mouse brain. In addition, brain amyloid protein precursor (APP) levels remained unaltered as a consequence of mutant SOD1 expression. We therefore conclude that mutant SOD1 overexpression promotes neither Abeta toxicity nor brain accumulation in these ALS models.

  1. Distinct synaptic and neurochemical changes to the granule cell-CA3 projection in Bassoon mutant mice

    OpenAIRE

    Dieni, Sandra; Nestel, Sigrun; Sibbe, Mirjam; Frotscher, Michael; Hellwig, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Proper synaptic function depends on a finely-tuned balance between events such as protein synthesis and structural organization. In particular, the functional loss of just one synaptic-related protein can have a profound impact on overall neuronal network function. To this end, we used a mutant mouse model harboring a mutated form of the presynaptic scaffolding protein Bassoon (Bsn), which is phenotypically characterized by: (i) spontaneous generalized epileptic seizure activity, representing...

  2. An ENU-mutagenesis screen in the mouse: identification of novel developmental gene functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wansleeben, C.; van Gurp, L.; Feitsma, H.; Kroon, C.; Rieter, E.; Verberne, M.; Guryev, V.; Cuppen, E.; Meijlink, F.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutagenesis screens in the mouse have been proven useful for the identification of novel gene functions and generation of interesting mutant alleles. Here we describe a phenotype-based screen for recessive mutations affecting embryonic development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mice we

  3. Male sex aggravates the phenotype in mouse models of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maass, AH; Maier, SKG

    2005-01-01

    The authors have created transgenic mouse models of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with mutations in either cardiac troponin T or myosin heavy chain. Mice mutant in myosin heavy chain develop significant cardiac hypertrophy at young adult age. Female mice keep that hypertrophic state, whereas male mice

  4. An ENU mutagenesis screen identifies novel and known genes involved in epigenetic processes in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daxinger, Lucia; Harten, Sarah K; Oey, Harald; Epp, Trevor; Isbel, Luke; Huang, Edward; Whitelaw, Nadia; Apedaile, Anwyn; Sorolla, Anabel; Yong, Joan; Bharti, Vandhana; Sutton, Joanne; Ashe, Alyson; Pang, Zhenyi; Wallace, Nathan; Gerhardt, Daniel J; Blewitt, Marnie E; Jeddeloh, Jeffrey A; Whitelaw, Emma

    2013-01-01

    We have used a sensitized ENU mutagenesis screen to produce mouse lines that carry mutations in genes required for epigenetic regulation. We call these lines Modifiers of murine metastable epialleles (Mommes). We report a basic molecular and phenotypic characterization for twenty of the Momme mouse lines, and in each case we also identify the causative mutation. Three of the lines carry a mutation in a novel epigenetic modifier, Rearranged L-myc fusion (Rlf), and one gene, Rap-interacting factor 1 (Rif1), has not previously been reported to be involved in transcriptional regulation in mammals. Many of the other lines are novel alleles of known epigenetic regulators. For two genes, Rlf and Widely-interspaced zinc finger (Wiz), we describe the first mouse mutants. All of the Momme mutants show some degree of homozygous embryonic lethality, emphasizing the importance of epigenetic processes. The penetrance of lethality is incomplete in a number of cases. Similarly ,abnormalities in phenotype seen in the heterozygous individuals of some lines occur with incomplete penetrance. Recent advances in sequencing enhance the power of sensitized mutagenesis screens to identify the function of previously uncharacterized factors and to discover additional functions for previously characterized proteins. The observation of incomplete penetrance of phenotypes in these inbred mutant mice, at various stages of development, is of interest. Overall, the Momme collection of mouse mutants provides a valuable resource for researchers across many disciplines.

  5. Male sex aggravates the phenotype in mouse models of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maass, AH; Maier, SKG

    2005-01-01

    The authors have created transgenic mouse models of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with mutations in either cardiac troponin T or myosin heavy chain. Mice mutant in myosin heavy chain develop significant cardiac hypertrophy at young adult age. Female mice keep that hypertrophic state, whereas male mice

  6. MASTR: A Technique for Mosaic Mutant Analysis with Spatial and Temporal Control of Recombination Using Conditional Floxed Alleles in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhimin Lao

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Mosaic mutant analysis, the study of cellular defects in scattered mutant cells in a wild-type environment, is a powerful approach for identifying critical functions of genes and has been applied extensively to invertebrate model organisms. A highly versatile technique has been developed in mouse: MASTR (mosaic mutant analysis with spatial and temporal control of recombination, which utilizes the increasing number of floxed alleles and simultaneously combines conditional gene mutagenesis and cell marking for fate analysis. A targeted allele (R26MASTR was engineered; the allele expresses a GFPcre fusion protein following FLP-mediated recombination, which serves the dual function of deleting floxed alleles and marking mutant cells with GFP. Within 24 hr of tamoxifen administration to R26MASTR mice carrying an inducible FlpoER transgene and a floxed allele, nearly all GFP-expressing cells have a mutant allele. The fate of single cells lacking FGF8 or SHH signaling in the developing hindbrain was analyzed using MASTR, and it was revealed that there is only a short time window when neural progenitors require FGFR1 for viability and that granule cell precursors differentiate rapidly when SMO is lost. MASTR is a powerful tool that provides cell-type-specific (spatial and temporal marking of mosaic mutant cells and is broadly applicable to developmental, cancer, and adult stem cell studies.

  7. Enhanced cellulase production in mutants of Thermomonospora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fennington, G.; Lupo, D.; Stutzenberger, F.

    1982-01-01

    Thermomonospora curvata, a thermophilic actinomycete, secretes multiple forms of endo-beta, 1-4-glucanase (EG) when grown on cellulose-mineral salts liquid medium. The EG activity (measured as carboxymethyl cellulose hydrolysis) was separated by ion exchange chromatography into three distinct components which differed in their kinetic properties. Exposure of T. curvata to ultraviolet light, N-nitrosoguanidine, or ethane methyl sulfonate produced mutants with enhanced EG production. Selection of colonies which cleared cellulose agar plants containing 2-deoxyglucose or glycerol yielded mutants having 1.5 to 2.6 times the extracellular EG and saccharifying activity (measured by filter-paper and cotton-fiber hydrolysis). The secretion of extracellular protein was increased proportionally in mutant cultures. (Refs. 40).

  8. High Persister Mutants in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather L Torrey

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis forms drug-tolerant persister cells that are the probable cause of its recalcitrance to antibiotic therapy. While genetically identical to the rest of the population, persisters are dormant, which protects them from killing by bactericidal antibiotics. The mechanism of persister formation in M. tuberculosis is not well understood. In this study, we selected for high persister (hip mutants and characterized them by whole genome sequencing and transcriptome analysis. In parallel, we identified and characterized clinical isolates that naturally produce high levels of persisters. We compared the hip mutants obtained in vitro with clinical isolates to identify candidate persister genes. Genes involved in lipid biosynthesis, carbon metabolism, toxin-antitoxin systems, and transcriptional regulators were among those identified. We also found that clinical hip isolates exhibited greater ex vivo survival than the low persister isolates. Our data suggest that M. tuberculosis persister formation involves multiple pathways, and hip mutants may contribute to the recalcitrance of the infection.

  9. Escherichia coli mutants with a temperature-sensitive alcohol dehydrogenase.

    OpenAIRE

    Lorowitz, W; Clark, D.

    1982-01-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli resistant to allyl alcohol were selected. Such mutants were found to lack alcohol dehydrogenase. In addition, mutants with temperature-sensitive alcohol dehydrogenase activity were obtained. These mutations, designated adhE, are all located at the previously described adh regulatory locus. Most adhE mutants were also defective in acetaldehyde dehydrogenase activity.

  10. Molecular genetic basis for the rhino mouse from Chinese KM subcolony

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Ming; XIONG Yuliang; WANG Wanyu; ZHANG Yaping

    2004-01-01

    Both the rhino mouse and hairless mouse resulted from hairless gene mutation, but they show different phenotypes of skin physiology. The rhino mouse has more similar histological characters to human papular alopecia. Therefore rhino mouse is a good experimental animal model for human papular alopecia. This study reports a hairless mouse named rhino KIZ, arose from KM colony in Kunming Institue of Zoology, by systematic studies on morphology, skin histopathology, gene sequence, pedigree and protein domain analysis. The results demonstrate that a C-to-T transition in exon 11 of hr gene (The mutant gene has been applied for a Chinese patent (patent No. 03135280)) results in the rhino KIZ. The rhino KIZ with clear genetic mechanism will be a useful animal model.

  11. Fine Mapping of a Deafness Mutation hml on Mouse Chromosome 10

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Yin Zheng; Belinda S Harris; Patricia F Ward-Bailey; Heping Yu; Roderick T Bronson; Muriel T Davisson; Kenneth R Johnson

    2004-01-01

    Objective To map a mouse deafness gene, identify the underlying mutation and develop a mouse model for human deafness. Methods Genetic linkage cross and genome scan were used to map a novel mutation named hypoplasia of the membranous labyrinth (hml), which causes hearing loss in mutant mice. Results ① hml was mapped on mouse Chr 10 (~43 cM from the centromere) suggests that the homologous human gene is on 12q22-q24, which was defined on the basis of known mouse-human homologies (OMIM, 2004). ② This study has generated 25 polymorphic microsatellite markers, placed 3 known human genes in the correct order in a high-resolution mouse map and narrowed the hml candidate gene region to a 500 kb area.

  12. Aging Kit mutant mice develop cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Ye

    Full Text Available Both bone marrow (BM and myocardium contain progenitor cells expressing the c-Kit tyrosine kinase. The aims of this study were to determine the effects of c-Kit mutations on: i. myocardial c-Kit(+ cells counts and ii. the stability of left ventricular (LV contractile function and structure during aging. LV structure and contractile function were evaluated (echocardiography in two groups of Kit mutant (W/Wv and W41/W42 and in wild type (WT mice at 4 and 12 months of age and the effects of the mutations on LV mass, vascular density and the numbers of proliferating cells were also determined. In 4 month old Kit mutant and WT mice, LV ejection fractions (EF and LV fractional shortening rates (FS were comparable. At 12 months of age EF and FS were significantly decreased and LV mass was significantly increased only in W41/W42 mice. Myocardial vascular densities and c-Kit(+ cell numbers were significantly reduced in both mutant groups when compared to WT hearts. Replacement of mutant BM with WT BM at 4 months of age did not prevent these abnormalities in either mutant group although they were somewhat attenuated in the W/Wv group. Notably BM transplantation did not prevent the development of cardiomyopathy in 12 month W41/W42 mice. The data suggest that decreased numbers and functional capacities of c-Kit(+ cardiac resident progenitor cells may be the basis of the cardiomyopathy in W41/W42 mice and although defects in mutant BM progenitor cells may prove to be contributory, they are not causal.

  13. Behavioral characterization of system xc- mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullagh, Elizabeth A; Featherstone, David E

    2014-05-15

    The slc7a11 gene encodes xCT, an essential component of 'system xc-', a plasma membrane exchanger that imports cystine and exports glutamate. Slc7a11 is expressed primarily in the brain, but its role there is not clear. We performed behavioral tests on two different strains of homozygous slc7a11 mutant mice ('sut' and 'xCT'), as well as heteroallelic offspring of these two strains ('xCT/sut') and their associated genetic backgrounds. Homozygous sut mutant males showed reduced spontaneous alternation in spontaneous alternation tasks as well as reduced movement in an open field maze, but xCT and xCT/sut strains did not show significant changes in these tasks compared to appropriate controls. Neither xCT nor sut mutants showed differences from controls in rotarod tests. Female behavioral phenotypes were independent of estrus cycle stage. To ensure that homozygous xCT, sut, and xCT/sut strains all represent protein null alleles, we measured whole brain xCT protein levels using immunoblots. xCT, sut and xCT/sut strains showed no detectable xCT protein expression, confirming them as null alleles. Previously published microdialysis experiments showed reduced striatal glutamate in xCT mutants. Using the same methods, we measured reduced interstitial glutamate levels in the striatum but not cerebellum of sut mutants. However, we detected no glutamate change in the striatum or cerebellum of sut/xCT mice. We detected no changes in whole brain EAAT-1, -2, or -3 expression. We conclude that the behavioral and chemical differences exist between slc7a11 mutant strains, but we were unable to definitively attribute any of these differences to loss of system xc-.

  14. Comprehensive behavioral analysis of ENU-induced Disc1-Q31L and -L100P mutant mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoji Hirotaka

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1 is considered to be a candidate susceptibility gene for psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression. A recent study reported that N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU-induced mutations in exon 2 of the mouse Disc1 gene, which resulted in the amino acid exchange of Q31L and L100P, caused an increase in depression-like behavior in 31 L mutant mice and schizophrenia-like behavior in 100P mutant mice; thus, these are potential animal models of psychiatric disorders. However, remaining heterozygous mutations that possibly occur in flanking genes other than Disc1 itself might induce behavioral abnormalities in the mutant mice. Here, to confirm the effects of Disc1-Q31L and Disc1-L100P mutations on behavioral phenotypes and to investigate the behaviors of the mutant mice in more detail, the mutant lines were backcrossed to C57BL/6JJcl through an additional two generations and the behaviors were analyzed using a comprehensive behavioral test battery. Results Contrary to expectations, 31 L mutant mice showed no significant behavioral differences when compared with wild-type control mice in any of the behavioral tests, including the Porsolt forced swim and tail suspension tests, commonly used tests for depression-like behavior. Also, 100P mutant mice exhibited no differences in almost all of the behavioral tests, including the prepulse inhibition test for measuring sensorimotor gating, which is known to be impaired in schizophrenia patients; however, 100P mutant mice showed higher locomotor activity compared with wild-type control mice in the light/dark transition test. Conclusions Although these results are partially consistent with the previous study in that there was hyperactivity in 100P mutant mice, the vast majority of the results are inconsistent with those of the previous study; this discrepancy may be explained by differences in the genetic background of the

  15. Comprehensive behavioral analysis of ENU-induced Disc1-Q31L and -L100P mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Hirotaka; Toyama, Keiko; Takamiya, Yoshihiro; Wakana, Shigeharu; Gondo, Yoichi; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi

    2012-02-20

    Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) is considered to be a candidate susceptibility gene for psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression. A recent study reported that N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced mutations in exon 2 of the mouse Disc1 gene, which resulted in the amino acid exchange of Q31L and L100P, caused an increase in depression-like behavior in 31 L mutant mice and schizophrenia-like behavior in 100P mutant mice; thus, these are potential animal models of psychiatric disorders. However, remaining heterozygous mutations that possibly occur in flanking genes other than Disc1 itself might induce behavioral abnormalities in the mutant mice. Here, to confirm the effects of Disc1-Q31L and Disc1-L100P mutations on behavioral phenotypes and to investigate the behaviors of the mutant mice in more detail, the mutant lines were backcrossed to C57BL/6JJcl through an additional two generations and the behaviors were analyzed using a comprehensive behavioral test battery. Contrary to expectations, 31 L mutant mice showed no significant behavioral differences when compared with wild-type control mice in any of the behavioral tests, including the Porsolt forced swim and tail suspension tests, commonly used tests for depression-like behavior. Also, 100P mutant mice exhibited no differences in almost all of the behavioral tests, including the prepulse inhibition test for measuring sensorimotor gating, which is known to be impaired in schizophrenia patients; however, 100P mutant mice showed higher locomotor activity compared with wild-type control mice in the light/dark transition test. Although these results are partially consistent with the previous study in that there was hyperactivity in 100P mutant mice, the vast majority of the results are inconsistent with those of the previous study; this discrepancy may be explained by differences in the genetic background of the mice, the laboratory environment, experimental protocols

  16. Subtype-specific reduction of olfactory bulb interneurons in Pax6 heterozygous mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Hasumi; Nomura, Tadashi; Suto, Fumikazu; Osumi, Noriko

    2009-09-01

    Interneurons in the olfactory bulb (OB) play essential roles in the processing of olfactory information. They are classified into several subpopulations by the expression of different neurochemical markers. Here we focused on a transcription factor Pax6, and examined its expression and function in distinct subtypes of OB interneurons. We identified Pax6 expression in specific subtypes of interneurons in the external plexiform layer (EPL). The number of these interneuron subtypes was dramatically decreased in Pax6 heterozygous mutant mice. These results indicate that Pax6 is required for differentiation and/or maintenance of EPL interneurons in the adult mouse OB.

  17. Targeting ESR1-Mutant Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    cell line, biochemical and structural biology techniques to uncover the best candidate drugs for the clinical targeting of these mutants. Targeting...ESR1-­‐Mutant  Breast  Cancer   W81XWH-­‐14-­‐1-­‐0360   4   2. Keywords Estrogen Receptor Acquired Drug Resistance Metastatic Breast...preparations for publication: 1) “ESR1 Somatic Mutations Y537S and D538G Confer Breast Cancer Endocrine Resistance by Stabilizing the Active AF-2 conformation

  18. Reversal of a full-length mutant huntingtin neuronal cell phenotype by chemical inhibitors of polyglutamine-mediated aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacDonald Marcy E

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntington's disease (HD is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder triggered by an expanded polyglutamine tract in huntingtin that is thought to confer a new conformational property on this large protein. The propensity of small amino-terminal fragments with mutant, but not wild-type, glutamine tracts to self-aggregate is consistent with an altered conformation but such fragments occur relatively late in the disease process in human patients and mouse models expressing full-length mutant protein. This suggests that the altered conformational property may act within the full-length mutant huntingtin to initially trigger pathogenesis. Indeed, genotype-phenotype studies in HD have defined genetic criteria for the disease initiating mechanism, and these are all fulfilled by phenotypes associated with expression of full-length mutant huntingtin, but not amino-terminal fragment, in mouse models. As the in vitro aggregation of amino-terminal mutant huntingtin fragment offers a ready assay to identify small compounds that interfere with the conformation of the polyglutamine tract, we have identified a number of aggregation inhibitors, and tested whether these are also capable of reversing a phenotype caused by endogenous expression of mutant huntingtin in a striatal cell line from the HdhQ111/Q111 knock-in mouse. Results We screened the NINDS Custom Collection of 1,040 FDA approved drugs and bioactive compounds for their ability to prevent in vitro aggregation of Q58-htn 1–171 amino terminal fragment. Ten compounds were identified that inhibited aggregation with IC50 HdhQ111/Q111 striatal cells. Conclusions At least some compounds identified as aggregation inhibitors also prevent a neuronal cellular phenotype caused by full-length mutant huntingtin, suggesting that in vitro fragment aggregation can act as a proxy for monitoring the disease-producing conformational property in HD. Thus, identification and testing of compounds that

  19. Zebrafish ift57, ift88, and ift172 intraflagellar transport mutants disrupt cilia but do not affect hedgehog signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunt, Shannon C; Haynes, Tony; Perkins, Brian D

    2009-07-01

    Cilia formation requires intraflagellar transport (IFT) proteins. Recent studies indicate that mammalian Hedgehog (Hh) signaling requires cilia. It is unclear, however, if the requirement for cilia and IFT proteins in Hh signaling represents a general rule for all vertebrates. Here we examine zebrafish ift57, ift88, and ift172 mutants and morphants for defects in Hh signaling. Although ift57 and ift88 mutants and morphants contained residual maternal protein, the cilia were disrupted. In contrast to previous genetic studies in mouse, mutations in zebrafish IFT genes did not affect the expression of Hh target genes in the neural tube and forebrain and had no quantitative effect on Hh target gene expression. Zebrafish IFT mutants also exhibited no dramatic changes in the craniofacial skeleton, somite formation, or motor neuron patterning. Thus, our data indicate the requirement for cilia in the Hh signal transduction pathway may not represent a universal mechanism in vertebrates.

  20. Zebrafish atoh8 mutants do not recapitulate morpholino phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Place, Elsie S.; Smith, James C.

    2017-01-01

    Atoh8 is a bHLH transcription factor expressed in pancreas, skeletal muscle, the nervous system, and cardiovascular tissues during embryological development. Although it has been implicated in the regulation of pancreatic and endothelial cell differentiation, the phenotypic consequences of Atoh8 loss are uncertain. Conclusions from knockout studies in the mouse differ widely depending on the targeting strategy used, while atoh8 knockdown by interfering morpholino oligonucleotides (morpholinos) in zebrafish has led to a range of developmental defects. This study characterised zebrafish embryos homozygous for atoh8sa1465, a loss-of-function allele of atoh8, in order to provide genetic evidence for the developmental role of Atoh8 in this species. Embryos homozygous for atoh8sa1465 present normal body morphology, swimbladder inflation, and heart looping, and survive to adulthood. These embryos do not develop pericardial oedema by 72 hpf and are not sensitised to the loss of Fog1 protein, suggesting that this previously described abnormality is not a specific phenotype. Vascular patterning and primitive haematopoiesis are unaffected in atoh8sa1465/sa1465 mutant embryos. Together, the data suggest that Atoh8 is dispensible for zebrafish development under standard laboratory conditions. PMID:28182631

  1. A Transgenic Mouse Model of Poliomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Satoshi; Nagata, Noriyo

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic mice (tg mice) that express the human poliovirus receptor (PVR), CD155, are susceptible to poliovirus and develop a neurological disease that resembles human poliomyelitis. Assessment of the neurovirulence levels of poliovirus strains, including mutant viruses produced by reverse genetics, circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus, and vaccine candidates, is useful for basic research of poliovirus pathogenicity, the surveillance of circulating polioviruses, and the quality control of oral live poliovirus vaccines, and does not require the use of monkeys. Furthermore, PVR-tg mice are useful for studying poliovirus tissue tropism and host immune responses. PVR-tg mice can be bred with mice deficient in the genes involved in viral pathogenicity. This report describes the methods used to analyze the pathogenicity and immune responses of poliovirus using the PVR-tg mouse model.

  2. Rapid Antibiotic Resistance Evolution of GASP Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiucen; Kim, Hyunsung; Pourmand, Nader; Austin, Robert

    2012-02-01

    The GASP phenotype in bacteria is due to a mutation which enables the bacteria to grow under high stress conditions where other bacteria stop growing. We probe using our Death Galaxy microenvironment how rapidly the GASP mutant can evolve resistance to mutagenic antibiotics compared to wild-type bacteria, and explore the genomic landscape changes due to the evolution of resistance.

  3. Generation and characterization of pigment mutants of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acer

    deleterious effects on living organisms (Shigaeva et al.,. 1994); they are also ... It was cultured at 25±0.5°C with a fluorescent light intensity of approximately 6 ... mutants) resulted in three new colonies characterized by different green colors ...

  4. A dominant semi dwarf mutant in rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ In the winter of 1997, a semi dwarf mutant was found in the F6 population of M9056/ R8018 xuan in Hainan Province. In the spring of 1998, the seeds were sown in Hefei, Anhui Province and the plant height of the population was measured at maturity.

  5. Nicotinamide ribosyl uptake mutants in Haemophilus influenzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Mark; Sauer, Elizabeta; Smethurst, Graeme; Kraiss, Anita; Hilpert, Anna-Karina; Reidl, Joachim

    2003-09-01

    The gene for the nicotinamide riboside (NR) transporter (pnuC) was identified in Haemophilus influenzae. A pnuC mutant had only residual NR uptake and could survive in vitro with high concentrations of NR, but could not survive in vivo. PnuC may represent a target for the development of inhibitors for preventing H. influenzae disease.

  6. Mutant PTEN in Cancer : Worse Than Nothing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leslie, Nick R; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    Tumor suppressors block the development of cancer and are often lost during tumor development. Papa et al. show that partial loss of normal PTEN tumor suppressor function can be compounded by additional disruption caused by the expression of inactive mutant PTEN protein. This has significant

  7. Colored HOMFLY polynomials can distinguish mutant knots

    CERN Document Server

    Nawata, Satoshi; Singh, Vivek Kumar

    2015-01-01

    We illustrate from the viewpoint of braiding operations on WZNW conformal blocks how colored HOMFLY polynomials with multiplicity structure can detect mutations. As an example, we explicitly evaluate the (2,1)-colored HOMFLY polynomials that distinguish a famous mutant pair, Kinoshita-Terasaka and Conway knot.

  8. Brucellosis vaccines: assessment of Brucella melitensis lipopolysaccharide rough mutants defective in core and O-polysaccharide synthesis and export.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David González

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The brucellae are facultative intracellular bacteria that cause brucellosis, one of the major neglected zoonoses. In endemic areas, vaccination is the only effective way to control this disease. Brucella melitensis Rev 1 is a vaccine effective against the brucellosis of sheep and goat caused by B. melitensis, the commonest source of human infection. However, Rev 1 carries a smooth lipopolysaccharide with an O-polysaccharide that elicits antibodies interfering in serodiagnosis, a major problem in eradication campaigns. Because of this, rough Brucella mutants lacking the O-polysaccharide have been proposed as vaccines. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To examine the possibilities of rough vaccines, we screened B. melitensis for lipopolysaccharide genes and obtained mutants representing all main rough phenotypes with regard to core oligosaccharide and O-polysaccharide synthesis and export. Using the mouse model, mutants were classified into four attenuation patterns according to their multiplication and persistence in spleens at different doses. In macrophages, mutants belonging to three of these attenuation patterns reached the Brucella characteristic intracellular niche and multiplied intracellularly, suggesting that they could be suitable vaccine candidates. Virulence patterns, intracellular behavior and lipopolysaccharide defects roughly correlated with the degree of protection afforded by the mutants upon intraperitoneal vaccination of mice. However, when vaccination was applied by the subcutaneous route, only two mutants matched the protection obtained with Rev 1 albeit at doses one thousand fold higher than this reference vaccine. These mutants, which were blocked in O-polysaccharide export and accumulated internal O-polysaccharides, stimulated weak anti-smooth lipopolysaccharide antibodies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results demonstrate that no rough mutant is equal to Rev 1 in laboratory models and question the notion that

  9. GAMPMS: Genetic algorithm managed peptide mutant screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Thomas; McDougal, Owen M; Andersen, Tim

    2015-06-30

    The prominence of endogenous peptide ligands targeted to receptors makes peptides with the desired binding activity good molecular scaffolds for drug development. Minor modifications to a peptide's primary sequence can significantly alter its binding properties with a receptor, and screening collections of peptide mutants is a useful technique for probing the receptor-ligand binding domain. Unfortunately, the combinatorial growth of such collections can limit the number of mutations which can be explored using structure-based molecular docking techniques. Genetic algorithm managed peptide mutant screening (GAMPMS) uses a genetic algorithm to conduct a heuristic search of the peptide's mutation space for peptides with optimal binding activity, significantly reducing the computational requirements of the virtual screening. The GAMPMS procedure was implemented and used to explore the binding domain of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) α3β2-isoform with a library of 64,000 α-conotoxin (α-CTx) MII peptide mutants. To assess GAMPMS's performance, it was compared with a virtual screening procedure that used AutoDock to predict the binding affinity of each of the α-CTx MII peptide mutants with the α3β2-nAChR. The GAMPMS implementation performed AutoDock simulations for as few as 1140 of the 64,000 α-CTx MII peptide mutants and could consistently identify a set of 10 peptides with an aggregated binding energy that was at least 98% of the aggregated binding energy of the 10 top peptides from the exhaustive AutoDock screening.

  10. Phanerochaete mutants with enhanced ligninolytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakar, S.N.; Perez, A.; Gonzales, J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    In addition to lignin, the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium has the ability to degrade a wide spectrum of recalcitrant organopollutants in soils and aqueous media. Most of the organic compounds are degraded under ligninolytic conditions with the involvement of the extracellular enzymes, lignin peroxidases, and manganese-dependent peroxidases, which are produced as secondary metabolites triggered by conditions of nutrient starvation (e.g., nitrogen limitation). The fungus and its enzymes can thus provide alternative technologies for bioremediation, biopulping, biobleaching, and other industrial applications. The efficiency and effectiveness of the fungus can be enhanced by increasing production and secretion of the important enzymes in large quantities and as primary metabolites under enriched conditions. One way this can be achieved is through isolation of mutants that are deregulated, or are hyperproducers or supersectors of key enzymes under enriched conditions. Through UV-light and [gamma]-ray mutagenesis, the authors have isolated a variety of mutants, some of which produce key enzymes of the ligninolytic system under high-nitrogen growth conditions. One of the mutants, 76UV, produced 272 U of lignin peroxidases enzyme activity/L after 9 d under high nitrogen (although the parent strain does not produce this enzyme under these conditions). The mutant and the parent strains produced up to 54 and 62 U/L, respectively, of the enzyme activity under low-nitrogen growth conditions during this period. In some experiments, the mutant showed 281 U/L of enzyme activity under high nitrogen after 17 d. 17 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  11. Mouse bladder wall injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chi-Ling; Apelo, Charity A; Torres, Baldemar; Thai, Kim H; Hsieh, Michael H

    2011-07-12

    Mouse bladder wall injection is a useful technique to orthotopically study bladder phenomena, including stem cell, smooth muscle, and cancer biology. Before starting injections, the surgical area must be cleaned with soap and water and antiseptic solution. Surgical equipment must be sterilized before use and between each animal. Each mouse is placed under inhaled isoflurane anesthesia (2-5% for induction, 1-3% for maintenance) and its bladder exposed by making a midline abdominal incision with scissors. If the bladder is full, it is partially decompressed by gentle squeezing between two fingers. The cell suspension of interest is intramurally injected into the wall of the bladder dome using a 29 or 30 gauge needle and 1 cc or smaller syringe. The wound is then closed using wound clips and the mouse allowed to recover on a warming pad. Bladder wall injection is a delicate microsurgical technique that can be mastered with practice.

  12. Apoptosis in the lens anlage of the heritable lens aplastic mouse (lap mouse).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aso, S; Tashiro, M; Baba, R; Sawaki, M; Noda, S; Fujita, M

    1998-08-01

    Adult homozygous lap mice show various eye abnormalities, such as aphakia, retinal disorganization, and dysplasia of the cornea and anterior chamber. In the fetal eye of a homozygous lap mouse, the lens placode seems to develop normally. However, the lens vesicle progresses abnormally to form a mass of cells without a cavity, and the mass vanishes soon afterward. We examined cell death in the lens anlage of this mutant. The lens anlagen of homozygous lap and normal mice from days 10 to 12 of gestation were observed by light microscopy after DNA end-labeling by immunohistochemistry and by transmission electron microscopy. By light microscopy, a slight frequency of cell death was detected in the lens anlage encircling the surface ectoderm and in the anlage or in the anlage of both homozygous lap mice and normal mice at day 10 of gestation. Cell death was seen in the lens anlage encircling the surface ectoderm in the normal mouse and sporadically in the anlage of the homozygous lap mouse at day 10.5 of gestation. Cell death was visible at the area of the lens vesicle attached to the surface ectoderm and encircling the surrounding surface ectoderm in the normal mouse, and in the lens anlage encircling the surface ectoderm and the apex areas of the lens anlage in the homozygous lap mouse at day 11 of gestation. At day 12 of gestation, almost no cell death was observed in the lens anlage of the normal mouse. However, extensive areas of cell death were still seen in the lens anlage at its apex, at the inner region, and encircling the surface ectoderm in the homozygous lap mouse. Electron microscopic observation showed that the dead cells observed in the lens anlagen by light microscopy in normal and lap mice are the result of apoptosis. In lap mice, cells with cytoplasmic condensation were observed mainly at days 10 and 10.5 of gestation. Many apoptotic bodies which had been phagocytosed by adjacent cells were seen predominantly at day 11 of gestation. At day 12 of

  13. Silencing mutant ataxin-3 rescues motor deficits and neuropathology in Machado-Joseph disease transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clévio Nóbrega

    Full Text Available Machado-Joseph disease (MJD or spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3 is an autosomal dominantly-inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by the over-repetition of a CAG codon in the MJD1 gene. This expansion translates into a polyglutamine tract that confers a toxic gain-of-function to the mutant protein--ataxin-3, leading to neurodegeneration in specific brain regions, with particular severity in the cerebellum. No treatment able to modify the disease progression is available. However, gene silencing by RNA interference has shown promising results. Therefore, in this study we investigated whether lentiviral-mediated allele-specific silencing of the mutant ataxin-3 gene, after disease onset, would rescue the motor behavior deficits and neuropathological features in a severely impaired transgenic mouse model of MJD. For this purpose, we injected lentiviral vectors encoding allele-specific silencing-sequences (shAtx3 into the cerebellum of diseased transgenic mice expressing the targeted C-variant of mutant ataxin-3 present in 70% of MJD patients. This variation permits to discriminate between the wild-type and mutant forms, maintaining the normal function of the wild-type allele and silencing only the mutant form. Quantitative analysis of rotarod performance, footprint and activity patterns revealed significant and robust alleviation of gait, balance (average 3-fold increase of rotarod test time, locomotor and exploratory activity impairments in shAtx3-injected mice, as compared to control ones injected with shGFP. An important improvement of neuropathology was also observed, regarding the number of intranuclear inclusions, calbindin and DARPP-32 immunoreactivity, fluorojade B and Golgi staining and molecular and granular layers thickness. These data demonstrate for the first time the efficacy of gene silencing in blocking the MJD-associated motor-behavior and neuropathological abnormalities after the onset of the disease, supporting the use of

  14. The nuage mediates retrotransposon silencing in mouse primordial ovarian follicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ai Khim; Lorthongpanich, Chanchao; Chew, Ting Gang; Tan, Chin Wee Godwin; Shue, Yan Ting; Balu, Sathish; Gounko, Natalia; Kuramochi-Miyagawa, Satomi; Matzuk, Martin M.; Chuma, Shinichiro; Messerschmidt, Daniel M.; Solter, Davor; Knowles, Barbara B.

    2013-01-01

    Mobilization of endogenous retrotransposons can destabilize the genome, an imminent danger during epigenetic reprogramming of cells in the germline. The P-element-induced wimpy testis (PIWI)-interacting RNA (piRNA) pathway is known to silence retrotransposons in the mouse testes. Several piRNA pathway components localize to the unique, germline structure known as the nuage. In this study, we surveyed mouse ovaries and found, for the first time, transient appearance of nuage-like structures in oocytes of primordial follicles. Mouse vasa homolog (MVH), Piwi-like 2 (PIWIL2/MILI) and tudor domain-containing 9 (TDRD9) are present in these structures, whereas aggregates of germ cell protein with ankyrin repeats, sterile alpha motif and leucine zipper (GASZ) localize separately in the cytoplasm. Retrotransposons are silenced in primordial ovarian follicles, and de-repressed upon reduction of piRNA expression in Mvh, Mili or Gasz mutants. However, these null-mutant females, unlike their male counterparts, are fertile, uncoupling retrotransposon activation from sterility. PMID:23924633

  15. Amuvatinib has cytotoxic effects against NRAS-mutant melanoma but not BRAF-mutant melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorenko, Inna V; Fang, Bin; Koomen, John M; Gibney, Geoffrey T; Smalley, Keiran S M

    2014-10-01

    Effective targeted therapy strategies are still lacking for the 15-20% of melanoma patients whose melanomas are driven by oncogenic NRAS. Here, we report on the NRAS-specific behavior of amuvatinib, a kinase inhibitor with activity against c-KIT, Axl, PDGFRα, and Rad51. An analysis of BRAF-mutant and NRAS-mutant melanoma cell lines showed the NRAS-mutant cohort to be enriched for targets of amuvatinib, including Axl, c-KIT, and the Axl ligand Gas6. Increasing concentrations of amuvatinib selectively inhibited the growth of NRAS-mutant, but not BRAF-mutant melanoma cell lines, an effect associated with induction of S-phase and G2/M-phase cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis. Mechanistically, amuvatinib was noted to either inhibit Axl, AKT, and MAPK signaling or Axl and AKT signaling and to induce a DNA damage response. In three-dimensional cell culture experiments, amuvatinib was cytotoxic against NRAS-mutant melanoma cell lines. Thus, we show for the first time that amuvatinib has proapoptotic activity against melanoma cell lines, with selectivity observed for those harboring oncogenic NRAS.

  16. The First Scube3 Mutant Mouse Line with Pleiotropic Phenotypic Alterations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Helmut; Sabrautzki, Sibylle; Przemeck, Gerhard K H

    2016-01-01

    The vertebrate Scube (Signal peptide, CUB, and EGF-like domain-containing protein) family consists of three independent members, Scube1-3, which encode secreted cell surface-associated membrane glycoproteins. Limited information about the general function of this gene family is available, and the...

  17. Delineating immune-mediated mechanisms underlying hair follicle destruction in the mouse mutant defolliculated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruge, Fiona; Glavini, Aikaterini; Gallimore, Awen M; Richards, Hannah E; Thomas, Christopher P; O'Donnell, Valerie B; Philpott, Michael P; Porter, Rebecca M

    2011-03-01

    Defolliculated (Gsdma3(Dfl)/+) mice have a hair loss phenotype that involves an aberrant hair cycle, altered sebaceous gland differentiation with reduced sebum production, chronic inflammation, and ultimately the loss of the hair follicle. Hair loss in these mice is similar to that seen in primary cicatricial, or scarring alopecias in which immune targeting of hair follicle stem cells has been proposed as a key factor resulting in permanent hair follicle destruction. In this study we examine the mechanism of hair loss in GsdmA3(Dfl)/+ mice. Aberrant expression patterns of stem cell markers during the hair cycle, in addition to aberrant behavior of the melanocytes leading to ectopic pigmentation of the hair follicle and epidermis, indicated the stem cell niche was not maintained. An autoimmune mechanism was excluded by crossing the mice with rag1-/- mice. However, large numbers of macrophages and increased expression of ICAM-1 were still present and may be involved either directly or indirectly in the hair loss. Reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry of sebaceous gland differentiation markers revealed reduced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), a potential cause of reduced sebum production, as well as the potential involvement of the innate immune system in the hair loss. As reduced PPARγ expression has recently been implicated as a cause for lichen planopilaris, these mice may be useful for testing therapies.

  18. Angiogenesis in Pituitary Adenomas: Human Studies and New Mutant Mouse Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of angiogenesis in pituitary tumor development has been questioned, as pituitary tumors have been usually found to be less vascularized than the normal pituitary tissue. Nevertheless, a significantly higher degree of vasculature has been shown in invasive or macropituitary prolactinomas when compared to noninvasive and microprolactinomas. Many growth factors and their receptors are involved in pituitary tumor development. For example, VEGF, FGF-2, FGFR1, and PTTG, which give a particular vascular phenotype, are modified in human and experimental pituitary adenomas of different histotypes. In particular, vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF, the central mediator of angiogenesis in endocrine glands, was encountered in experimental and human pituitary tumors at different levels of expression and, in particular, was higher in dopamine agonist resistant prolactinomas. Furthermore, several anti-VEGF techniques lowered tumor burden in human and experimental pituitary adenomas. Therefore, even though the role of angiogenesis in pituitary adenomas is contentious, VEGF, making permeable pituitary endothelia, might contribute to adequate temporal vascular supply and mechanisms other than endothelial cell proliferation. The study of angiogenic factor expression in aggressive prolactinomas with resistance to dopamine agonists will yield important data in the search of therapeutical alternatives.

  19. Histochemical studies on striated muscle fibres of the beige mutant mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, S

    1982-01-01

    A histological study of cylindric structures in skeletal muscle fibres from beige mice with the Chediak-Higashi syndrome was carried out. The muscle tissue was investigated morphologically with a differential interference contrast microscope and stained for glycogen, lipid, and basophile elements...

  20. A missense mutant myostatin causes hyperplasia without hypertrophy in the mouse muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Masumi; Yasue, Akihiro; Nishimatu, Shinichirou; Nohno, Tsutomu; Yamaoka, Takashi; Itakura, Mitsuo; Moriyama, Keiji; Ohuchi, Hideyo; Noji, Sumihare

    2002-04-26

    Myostatin, which is a member of the TGF-beta superfamily, is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle formation. Double-muscled Piedmontese cattle have a C313Y mutation in myostatin and show increased skeletal muscle mass which resulted from an increase of myofiber number (hyperplasia) without that of myofiber size (hypertrophy). To examine whether this mutation in myostatin gene affects muscle development in a dominant negative manner, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing the mutated gene. The transgenic mice exhibited dramatic increases in the skeletal muscle mass resulting from hyperplasia without hypertrophy. In contrast, it has been reported that a myostatin mutated at its cleavage site produces hypertrophy without hyperplasia in the muscle. Thus, these results suggest that (1) the myostatin containing the missense mutation exhibits a dominant negative activity and that (2) there are two types in the dominant negative form of myostatin, causing either hypertrophy or hyperplasia.

  1. Hippocampal interneuron loss in an APP/PS1 double mutant mouse and in Alzheimer's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takahashi, H.; Brasnjevic, I.; Rutten, B.P.; Kolk, N.M. van der; Perl, D.P.; Bouras, C.; Steinbusch, H.W.; Schmitz, C.; Hof, P.R.; Dickstein, D.L.

    2010-01-01

    Hippocampal atrophy and neuron loss are commonly found in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the underlying molecular mechanisms and the fate in the AD hippocampus of subpopulations of interneurons that express the calcium-binding proteins parvalbumin (PV) and calretinin (CR) has not yet been proper

  2. Preclinical Studies of Signaling Pathways in a Mutant Mouse Model of Hormone-Refractory Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    Boormans JL, Hermans KG, van Leenders GJ, Trapman J, Verhagen PC. 2008. An activating mutation in AKT1 in human prostate cancer. Int J Cancer 123...p110b in cell growth, metabolism and tumorigenesis. Nature 454: 776–779. Jia L, Landan G, Pomerantz M, Jaschek R, Herman P, Reich D, Yan C, Khalid O...stable blood-based markers for cancer detection. Proc Natl Acad Sci 105: 10513–10518. Montgomery RB, Mostaghel EA, Vessella R, Hess DL, Kalhorn TF, Higano

  3. Primordial germ cell proliferation is impaired in Fused Toes mutant embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bongki; Kim, Youngha; Sakuma, Rui; Hui, Chi-Chung; Rüther, Ulrich; Jorgensen, Joan S

    2011-01-15

    Over the first 4 days of their life, primordial germ cells invade the endoderm, migrate into and through the developing hindgut, and traverse to the genital ridge where they cluster and ultimately inhabit the nascent gonad. Specific signal-receptor combinations between primordial germ cells and their immediate environment establish successful migration and colonization. Here we demonstrate that disruption of a cluster of six genes on murine chromosome 8, as exemplified by the Fused Toes (Ft) mutant mouse model, results in severely decreased numbers of primordial germ cells within the early gonad. Primordial germ cell migration appeared normal within Ft mutant embryos; however, germ cell counts progressively decreased during this time. Although no difference in apoptosis was detected, we report a critical decrease in primordial germ cell proliferation by E12.5. The six genes within the Ft locus include the IrxB cluster (Irx3, -5, -6), Fts, Ftm, and Fto, of which only Ftm, Fto, and Fts are expressed in primordial germ cells of the early gonad. From these studies, we have discovered that the Ft locus on mouse chromosome 8 is associated with cell cycle deficits within the primordial germ cell population that initiates just before translocation into the genital ridge. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Developmentally-faithful and effective human erythropoiesis in immunodeficient and Kit mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Claudia; Abdulhay, Nour J; McFarland, Sean K; Munschauer, Mathias; Ulirsch, Jacob C; Chiarle, Roberto; Sankaran, Vijay G

    2017-09-01

    Immunodeficient mouse models have been valuable for studies of human hematopoiesis, but high-fidelity recapitulation of erythropoiesis in most xenograft recipients remains elusive. Recently developed immunodeficient and Kit mutant mice, however, have provided a suitable background to achieve higher-level human erythropoiesis after long-term hematopoietic engraftment. While there has been some characterization of human erythropoiesis in these models, a comprehensive analysis from various human developmental stages has not yet been reported. Here, we have utilized cell surface phenotypes, morphologic analyses, and molecular studies to fully characterize human erythropoiesis from multiple developmental stages in immunodeficient and Kit mutant mouse models following long-term hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell engraftment. We show that human erythropoiesis in such models demonstrates complete maturation and enucleation, as well as developmentally appropriate globin gene expression. These results provide a framework for future studies to utilize this model system for interrogating disorders affecting human erythropoiesis and for developing improved therapeutic approaches. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Colonization, mouse-style

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Searle Jeremy B

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Several recent papers, including one in BMC Evolutionary Biology, examine the colonization history of house mice. As well as background for the analysis of mouse adaptation, such studies offer a perspective on the history of movements of the humans that accidentally transported the mice. See research article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2148/10/325

  6. Mouse Leydig Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Syong Pan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cordycepin is a natural pure compound extracted from Cordyceps sinensis (CS. We have demonstrated that CS stimulates steroidogenesis in primary mouse Leydig cell and activates apoptosis in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells. It is highly possible that cordycepin is the main component in CS modulating Leydig cell functions. Thus, our aim was to investigate the steroidogenic and apoptotic effects with potential mechanism of cordycepin on MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells. Results showed that cordycepin significantly stimulated progesterone production in dose- and time-dependent manners. Adenosine receptor (AR subtype agonists were further used to treat MA-10 cells, showing that A1, A 2A , A 2B , and A3, AR agonists could stimulate progesterone production. However, StAR promoter activity and protein expression remained of no difference among all cordycepin treatments, suggesting that cordycepin might activate AR, but not stimulated StAR protein to regulate MA-10 cell steroidogenesis. Meanwhile, cordycepin could also induce apoptotic cell death in MA-10 cells. Moreover, four AR subtype agonists induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner, and four AR subtype antagonists could all rescue cell death under cordycepin treatment in MA-10 cells. In conclusion, cordycepin could activate adenosine subtype receptors and simultaneously induce steroidogenesis and apoptosis in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells.

  7. The Mouse SAGE Site: database of public mouse SAGE libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divina, Petr; Forejt, Jirí

    2004-01-01

    The Mouse SAGE Site is a web-based database of all available public libraries generated by the Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE) from various mouse tissues and cell lines. The database contains mouse SAGE libraries organized in a uniform way and provides web-based tools for browsing, comparing and searching SAGE data with reliable tag-to-gene identification. A modified approach based on the SAGEmap database is used for reliable tag identification. The Mouse SAGE Site is maintained on an ongoing basis at the Institute of Molecular Genetics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic and is accessible at the internet address http://mouse.biomed.cas.cz/sage/.

  8. A recessive genetic screen for components of the RNA interference pathway in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombly, Melanie I; Wang, Xiaozhong

    2010-01-01

    Several key components of the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway were identified in genetic screens performed in nonmammalian model organisms. To identify components of the mammalian RNAi pathway, we developed a recessive genetic screen in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. Recessive genetic screens are feasible in ES cells that are Bloom-syndrome protein (Blm-) deficient. Therefore, we constructed a reporter cell line in Blm-deficient ES cells to isolate RNAi mutants through a simple drug-selection scheme. This chapter describes how we used retroviral gene traps to mutagenize the reporter cell line and select for RNAi mutants. Putative RNAi mutants were confirmed using a separate functional assay. The location of the gene trap was then identified using molecular techniques such as Splinkerette PCR. Our screening strategy successfully isolated several mutant clones of Argonaute2, a vital component of the RNAi pathway.

  9. Characterization of a Legionella micdadei mip mutant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Connell, W A; Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Cianciotto, N P

    1995-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Legionella micdadei is dependent upon its ability to infect alveolar phagocytes. To better understand the basis of intracellular infection by this organism, we examined the importance of its Mip surface protein. In Legionella pneumophila, Mip promotes infection of both human m...... into the phagocyte. Similarly, the mutant was less able to parasitize Hartmannella amoebae. Taken together, these data argue that Mip specifically potentiates intracellular growth by L. micdadei....

  10. Some Mutant Forms of Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Takeuchi, Tatsu; Lewis, Zachary; Minic, Djordje

    2013-01-01

    We construct a `mutant' form of quantum mechanics on a vector space over the finite Galois field GF(q). We find that the correlations in our model do not violate the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) version of Bell's inequality, despite the fact that the predictions of this discretized quantum mechanics cannot be reproduced with any hidden variable theory. An alternative `mutation' is also suggested.

  11. Spontaneous Nif- mutants of Rhodopseudomonas capsulata.

    OpenAIRE

    Wall, J D; Love, J.; Quinn, S P

    1984-01-01

    Revertible, spontaneous Nif- mutants of Rhodopseudomonas capsulata have been shown to accumulate in cultures growing photosynthetically with an amino acid as the nitrogen source such that H2 is maximally produced. The majority of such strains carry mutations which are clustered in a short region of the chromosome, probably representing one or two genes. Because this cluster includes temperature-sensitive mutations, it is also likely that it identifies the structural gene of a polypeptide. The...

  12. Mouse hypospadias: A critical examination and definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Adriane Watkins; Cao, Mei; Shen, Joel; Cooke, Paul; Risbridger, Gail; Baskin, Laurence; Cunha, Gerald R

    2016-12-01

    Hypospadias is a common malformation whose etiology is based upon perturbation of normal penile development. The mouse has been previously used as a model of hypospadias, despite an unacceptably wide range of definitions for this malformation. The current paper presents objective criteria and a definition of mouse hypospadias. Accordingly, diethylstilbestrol (DES) induced penile malformations were examined at 60 days postnatal (P60) in mice treated with DES over the age range of 12 days embryonic to 20 days postnatal (E12-P20). DES-induced hypospadias involves malformation of the urethral meatus, which is most severe in DES E12-P10, DES P0-P10 and DES P5-P15 groups, and less so or absent in the other treatment groups. A frenulum-like ventral tether between the penis and the prepuce was seen in the most severely affected DES-treated mice. Internal penile morphology was also altered in the DES E12-P10, DES P0-P10 and DES P5-P15 groups (with little effect in the other DES treatment groups). Thus, adverse effects of DES are a function of the period of DES treatment and most severe in the P0-P10 period. In "estrogen mutant mice" (NERKI, βERKO, αERKO and AROM+) hypospadias was only seen in AROM+ male mice having genetically-engineered elevation is serum estrogen. Significantly, mouse hypospadias was only seen distally at and near the urethral meatus where epithelial fusion events are known to take place and never in the penile midshaft, where urethral formation occurs via an entirely different morphogenetic process.

  13. Mice mutant in the DM domain gene Dmrt4 are viable and fertile but have polyovular follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balciuniene, Jorune; Bardwell, Vivian J; Zarkower, David

    2006-12-01

    Proteins containing the DM domain, a zinc finger-like DNA binding motif, have been implicated in sexual differentiation in diverse metazoan organisms. Of seven mammalian DM domain genes, only Dmrt1 and Dmrt2 have been functionally analyzed. Here, we report expression analysis and targeted disruption of Dmrt4 (also called DmrtA1) in the mouse. Dmrt4 is widely expressed during embryonic and postnatal development. However, we find that mice homozygous for a putative null mutation in Dmrt4 develop essentially normally, undergo full sexual differentiation in both sexes, and are fertile. We observed two potential mutant phenotypes in Dmrt4 mutant mice. First, ovaries of most mutant females have polyovular follicles, suggesting a role in folliculogenesis. Second, 25% of mutant males consistently exhibited copulatory behavior toward other males. We also tested potential redundancy between Dmrt4 and two other gonadally expressed DM domain genes, Dmrt1 and Dmrt7. We observed no enhancement of gonadal phenotypes in the double mutants, suggesting that these genes function independently in gonadal development.

  14. Mutant chaperonin proteins: new tools for nanotechnology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y [SETI Institute, 515 N Whisman Road, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Paavola, C D [NASA Ames Research Center, Bioengineering Branch, Mail Stop 239-15, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Kagawa, H [SETI Institute, 515 N Whisman Road, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Chan, S L [SETI Institute, 515 N Whisman Road, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Trent, J D [NASA Ames Research Center, Bioengineering Branch, Mail Stop 239-15, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2007-11-14

    Much effort has gone into finding peptides that bind potentially useful nanoparticles, but relatively little effort has focused on the scaffolds that organize these peptides into useful nanostructures. Chaperonins are protein complexes with 14-18 protein subunits that self-assemble into double-ring complexes and function as scaffolds for peptides or amino acids that bind metallic and semiconductor quantum dots. The utility of chaperonins as scaffolds depends on their structure and their ability to self-assemble into double-rings and higher-order structures, such as filaments and two-dimensional arrays. To better understand the structure of chaperonins, we constructed a model of a group II chaperonin and, based on this model, genetically constructed five mutant subunits with significant deletions. We expressed these mutants as recombinant proteins and observed by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) that they all self-assembled into double rings. Our model predicted and TEM confirmed that these deletions did not significantly change the 17 nm diameter of the wild-type double rings, but decreased their height and opened their central cavities. Four of the five mutants formed higher-order structures: chains of rings, bundles of chains or filaments, and two-dimensional arrays, which we suggest can be useful nanostructures.

  15. Expression of mutant TDP-43 induces neuronal dysfunction in transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dickson Dennis W

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormal distribution, modification and aggregation of transactivation response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43 are the hallmarks of multiple neurodegenerative diseases, especially frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions (FTLD-U and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. Researchers have identified 44 mutations in the TARDBP gene that encode TDP-43 as causative for cases of sporadic and familial ALS http://www.molgen.ua.ac.be/FTDMutations/. Certain mutant forms of TDP-43, such as M337V, are associated with increased low molecular weight (LMW fragments compared to wild-type (WT TDP-43 and cause neuronal apoptosis and developmental delay in chick embryos. Such findings support a direct link between altered TDP-43 function and neurodegeneration. Results To explore the pathogenic properties of the M337V mutation, we generated and characterized two mouse lines expressing human TDP-43 (hTDP-43M337V carrying this mutation. hTDP-43M337V was expressed primarily in the nuclei of neurons in the brain and spinal cord, and intranuclear and cytoplasmic phosphorylated TDP-43 aggregates were frequently detected. The levels of TDP-43 LMW products of ~25 kDa and ~35 kDa species were also increased in the transgenic mice. Moreover, overexpression of hTDP-43M337V dramatically down regulated the levels of mouse TDP-43 (mTDP-43 protein and RNA, indicating TDP-43 levels are tightly controlled in mammalian systems. TDP-43M337V mice displayed reactive gliosis, widespread ubiquitination, chromatolysis, gait abnormalities, and early lethality. Abnormal cytoplasmic mitochondrial aggregates and abnormal phosphorylated tau were also detected in the mice. Conclusion Our novel TDP-43M337V mouse model indicates that overexpression of hTDP-43M337V alone is toxic in vivo. Because overexpression of hTDP-43 in wild-type TDP-43 and TDP-43M337V mouse models produces similar phenotypes, the mechanisms causing pathogenesis in the mutant

  16. The Mouse House: A brief history of the ORNL mouse-genetics program, 1947–2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Liane B.

    2013-10-01

    The large mouse genetics program at the Oak Ridge National Lab is often re-membered chiefly for the germ-cell mutation-rate data it generated and their uses in estimating the risk of heritable radiation damage. In fact, it soon became a multi-faceted research effort that, over a period of almost 60 years, generated a wealth of information in the areas of mammalian mutagenesis, basic genetics (later enriched by molecular techniques), cytogenetics, reproductive biology, biochemistry of germ cells, and teratology. Research in the area of germ-cell mutagenesis explored the important physical and biological factors that affect the frequency and nature of induced mutations and made several unexpected discoveries, such as the major importance of the perigametic interval (the zygote stage) for the origin of spontaneous mutations and for the sensitivity to induced genetic change. Of practical value was the discovery that ethylnitrosourea was a supermutagen for point mutations, making high-efficiency mutagenesis in the mouse feasible worldwide. Teratogenesis findings resulted in recommendations still generally accepted in radiological practice. Studies supporting the mutagenesis research added whole bodies of information about mammalian germ-cell development and about molecular targets in germ cells. The early decision to not merely count but propagate genetic variants of all sorts made possible further discoveries, such as the Y-Chromosome s importance in mammalian sex determination and the identification of rare X-autosome translocations, which, in turn, led to the formulation of the single-active-X hypothesis and provided tools for studies of functional mosaicism for autosomal genes, male sterility, and chromosome-pairing mechanism. Extensive genetic and then molecular analyses of large numbers of induced specific-locus mutants resulted in fine-structure physical and correlated functional mapping of significant portions of the mouse genome and constituted a valuable

  17. Mouse anatomy ontologies: enhancements and tools for exploring and integrating biomedical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayamizu, Terry F; Baldock, Richard A; Ringwald, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Mouse anatomy ontologies provide standard nomenclature for describing normal and mutant mouse anatomy, and are essential for the description and integration of data directly related to anatomy such as gene expression patterns. Building on our previous work on anatomical ontologies for the embryonic and adult mouse, we have recently developed a new and substantially revised anatomical ontology covering all life stages of the mouse. Anatomical terms are organized in complex hierarchies enabling multiple relationships between terms. Tissue classification as well as partonomic, developmental, and other types of relationships can be represented. Hierarchies for specific developmental stages can also be derived. The ontology forms the core of the eMouse Atlas Project (EMAP) and is used extensively for annotating and integrating gene expression patterns and other data by the Gene Expression Database (GXD), the eMouse Atlas of Gene Expression (EMAGE) and other database resources. Here we illustrate the evolution of the developmental and adult mouse anatomical ontologies toward one combined system. We report on recent ontology enhancements, describe the current status, and discuss future plans for mouse anatomy ontology development and application in integrating data resources.

  18. The variable expressivity and incomplete penetrance of the twist-null heterozygous mouse phenotype resemble those of human Saethre-Chotzen syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, P; Bolcato-Bellemin, A L; Danse, J M; Bloch-Zupan, A; Yoshiba, K; Stoetzel, C; Perrin-Schmitt, F

    1998-06-01

    Most targeted gene mutations are recessive and analyses of gene function often focus on homozygous mutant phenotypes. Here we describe parts of the expression pattern of M-twist in the head of developing wild-type mice and present our analysis of the phenotype of heterozygous twist- null animals at around birth and in adults. A number of twist -null heterozygous mice present skull and limb defects and, in addition, we observed other malformations, such as defects in middle ear formation and the xyphoïd process. Our study is of interest to understand bone formation and the role of M-twist during this process, as within the same animal growth of some bones can be accelerated while for others it can be delayed. Moreover, we show here that expressivity of the mouse mutant heterozygous phenotype is dependent on the genetic background. This information might also be helpful for clinicians, since molecular defects affecting one allele of the human H-twist ( TWIST ) gene were identified in patients affected with Saethre-Chotzen syndrome (SCS). Expressivity of this syndrome is variable, although most patients present craniofacial and limb malformations resembling those seen in mutant mice. Thus the mutant mouse twist -null strain might be a useful animal model for SCS. The twist -null mutant mouse model, combined with other mutant mouse strains, might also help in an understanding of the etiology of morphological abnormalities that appear in human patients affected by other syndromes.

  19. Isolation of a novel mutant from Bacillus subtilis natto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kazuo

    2006-01-01

    For the construction of strains with full probiotics function in intestines, deoxycholate resistant mutants were isolated from Bacillus subtilis natto. The partial characterization of the mutants was carried out and described.

  20. Deletion of Osr2 Partially Rescues Tooth Development in Runx2 Mutant Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, H.J.E.; Park, E.K.; Jia, S.; Liu, H.; Lan, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Tooth organogenesis depends on genetically programmed sequential and reciprocal inductive interactions between the dental epithelium and neural crest–derived mesenchyme. Previous studies showed that the Msx1 and Runx2 transcription factors are required for activation of odontogenic signals, including Bmp4 and Fgf3, in the early tooth mesenchyme to drive tooth morphogenesis through the bud-to-cap transition and that Runx2 acts downstream of Msx1 to activate Fgf3 expression. Recent studies identified Osr2 as a repressor of tooth development and showed that inactivation of Osr2 rescued molar tooth morphogenesis in the Msx1-/- mutant mice as well as in mice with neural crest–specific inactivation of Bmp4. Here we show that Runx2 expression is expanded in the tooth bud mesenchyme in Osr2-/- mutant mouse embryos and is partially restored in the tooth mesenchyme in Msx1-/-Osr2-/- mutants in comparison with Msx1-/- and wild-type embryos. Whereas mandibular molar development arrested at the bud stage and maxillary molar development arrested at the bud-to-cap transition in Runx2-/- mutant mice, both mandibular and maxillary molar tooth germs progressed to the early bell stage, with rescued expression of Msx1 and Bmp4 in the dental papilla as well as expression of Bmp4, p21, and Shh in the primary enamel knot in the Osr2-/-Runx2-/- compound mutants. In contrast to the Msx1-/-Osr2-/- compound mutants, which exhibit nearly normal first molar morphogenesis, the Osr2-/-Runx2-/- compound mutant embryos failed to activate the expression of Fgf3 and Fgf10 in the dental papilla and exhibited significant deficit in cell proliferation in both the dental epithelium and mesenchyme in comparison with the control embryos. These data indicate that Runx2 synergizes with Msx1 to drive tooth morphogenesis through the bud-to-cap transition and that Runx2 controls continued tooth growth and morphogenesis beyond the cap stage through activation of Fgf3 and Fgf10 expression in the dental

  1. Simultaneous analysis of multiple Mycobacterium tuberculosis knockdown mutants in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Blumenthal

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb represents one of the most persistent bacterial threats to human health and new drugs are needed to limit its impact. Conditional knockdown mutants can help validate new drug targets, but the analysis of individual mutants is laborious and time consuming. Here, we describe quantitative DNA tags (qTags and their use to simultaneously analyze conditional Mtb knockdown mutants that allowed silencing the glyoxylate and methylcitrate cycles (via depletion of isocitrate lyase, ICL, the serine protease Rv3671c, and the core subunits of the mycobacterial proteasome, PrcB and PrcA. The impact of gene silencing in multi-strain cultures was determined by measuring the relative abundance of mutant-specific qTags with real-time PCR. This achieved accurate quantification over a broad range of qTag abundances and depletion of ICL, Rv3671c, or PrcBA resulted in the expected impairment of growth of Mtb with butyrate as the primary carbon source, survival during oxidative stress, acid stress and starvation. The impact of depleting ICL, Rv3671c, or PrcBA in multi-strain mouse infections was analyzed with two approaches. We first measured the relative abundance of mutant-specific qTags in total chromosomal DNA isolated from bacteria that were recovered from infected lungs on agar plates. We then developed a two-step amplification procedure, which allowed us to measure the abundances of individual mutants directly in infected lung tissue. Both strategies confirmed that inactivation of Rv3671c and PrcBA severely reduced persistence of Mtb in mice. The multi-strain infections furthermore suggested that silencing ICL not only prevented growth of Mtb during acute infections but also prevented survival of Mtb during chronic infections. Analyses of the ICL knockdown mutant in single-strain infections confirmed this and demonstrated that silencing of ICL during chronic infections impaired persistence of Mtb to the extent that the pathogen

  2. Deletion of Osr2 Partially Rescues Tooth Development in Runx2 Mutant Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, H J E; Park, E K; Jia, S; Liu, H; Lan, Y; Jiang, R

    2015-08-01

    Tooth organogenesis depends on genetically programmed sequential and reciprocal inductive interactions between the dental epithelium and neural crest-derived mesenchyme. Previous studies showed that the Msx1 and Runx2 transcription factors are required for activation of odontogenic signals, including Bmp4 and Fgf3, in the early tooth mesenchyme to drive tooth morphogenesis through the bud-to-cap transition and that Runx2 acts downstream of Msx1 to activate Fgf3 expression. Recent studies identified Osr2 as a repressor of tooth development and showed that inactivation of Osr2 rescued molar tooth morphogenesis in the Msx1(-/-) mutant mice as well as in mice with neural crest-specific inactivation of Bmp4. Here we show that Runx2 expression is expanded in the tooth bud mesenchyme in Osr2(-/-) mutant mouse embryos and is partially restored in the tooth mesenchyme in Msx1(-/-)Osr2(-/-) mutants in comparison with Msx1(-/-) and wild-type embryos. Whereas mandibular molar development arrested at the bud stage and maxillary molar development arrested at the bud-to-cap transition in Runx2(-/-) mutant mice, both mandibular and maxillary molar tooth germs progressed to the early bell stage, with rescued expression of Msx1 and Bmp4 in the dental papilla as well as expression of Bmp4, p21, and Shh in the primary enamel knot in the Osr2(-/-)Runx2(-/-) compound mutants. In contrast to the Msx1(-/-)Osr2(-/-) compound mutants, which exhibit nearly normal first molar morphogenesis, the Osr2(-/-)Runx2(-/-) compound mutant embryos failed to activate the expression of Fgf3 and Fgf10 in the dental papilla and exhibited significant deficit in cell proliferation in both the dental epithelium and mesenchyme in comparison with the control embryos. These data indicate that Runx2 synergizes with Msx1 to drive tooth morphogenesis through the bud-to-cap transition and that Runx2 controls continued tooth growth and morphogenesis beyond the cap stage through activation of Fgf3 and Fgf10 expression

  3. 大鼠内耳胚胎和出生后的组织学研究(英)%Histological study on the embryonic and postnatal development of the in-ner ear of the mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@The mouse labyrinth is an excellent model for study-ing the morphogenesis and cytodifferentiation of the mam-malian inner ear' s postnatal developmental periods andthe availability of numerous genetic mutants with a variety of inner ear abnormalities. There are many genes affectingthe inner ear of the mouse, and some of these lead to le-sions which resemble lesions occurring in man.

  4. Transgenic mice expressing mutant Pinin exhibit muscular dystrophy, nebulin deficiency and elevated expression of slow-type muscle fiber genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hsu-Pin; Hsu, Shu-Yuan [Department of Anatomy, Chang Gung University Medical College, Taiwan (China); Wu, Wen-Ai; Hu, Ji-Wei [Transgenic Mouse Core Laboratory, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China); Ouyang, Pin, E-mail: ouyang@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Anatomy, Chang Gung University Medical College, Taiwan (China); Transgenic Mouse Core Laboratory, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China); Molecular Medicine Research Center, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Pnn CCD domain functions as a dominant negative mutant regulating Pnn expression and function. •Pnn CCD mutant Tg mice have a muscle wasting phenotype during development and show dystrophic histological features. •Pnn mutant muscles are susceptible to slow fiber type gene transition and NEB reduction. •The Tg mouse generated by overexpression of the Pnn CCD domain displays many characteristics resembling NEB{sup +/−} mice. -- Abstract: Pinin (Pnn) is a nuclear speckle-associated SR-like protein. The N-terminal region of the Pnn protein sequence is highly conserved from mammals to insects, but the C-terminal RS domain-containing region is absent in lower species. The N-terminal coiled-coil domain (CCD) is, therefore, of interest not only from a functional point of view, but also from an evolutionarily standpoint. To explore the biological role of the Pnn CCD in a physiological context, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing Pnn mutant in skeletal muscle. We found that overexpression of the CCD reduces endogenous Pnn expression in cultured cell lines as well as in transgenic skeletal muscle fibers. Pnn mutant mice exhibited reduced body mass and impaired muscle function during development. Mutant skeletal muscles show dystrophic histological features with muscle fibers heavily loaded with centrally located myonuclei. Expression profiling and pathway analysis identified over-representation of genes in gene categories associated with muscle contraction, specifically those related to slow type fiber. In addition nebulin (NEB) expression level is repressed in Pnn mutant skeletal muscle. We conclude that Pnn downregulation in skeletal muscle causes a muscular dystrophic phenotype associated with NEB deficiency and the CCD domain is incapable of replacing full length Pnn in terms of functional capacity.

  5. Four kinds of ENU-induced white spot mice and chromosome locations of the mutant genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Baojin; MAO Huihua; SHAO Yixiang; XUE Zhengfeng; LI Houda

    2003-01-01

    Phenotype-driven is the name for an approach used to study gene functions through mutagenesis, location and cloning of the mutant gene. In this study, 150 male C57BL/6J(B6) mice were treated with ENU and reproduced a total offspring of 3860. Of these descendants, 210 exhibited mutation phenotypes by screening, and more than 10 of them are hereditable. Four kinds of mutant mice, named Wbct, W-1Bao, W-2Bao, and W-3Bao, showed dominant hereditary white spot mutation with partial albinism on their belly, distal limbs and tail terminal. To map these mutant genes, 39 microsatellites, equally distributed on the mouse genome and with difference between B6 and DBA/2J (D2), were selected to scan the genome after discrimination of the white spots in the F2 mice [(B6×D2)×D2]. It is found that, the log odds score (LODS) between W-1Bao and D5Mit168 is 0.56, and the LODS of W-1Bao and D5Mit352 is 4.47. With the gradual application of microsatellites D5Mit290, D5Mit312, D5Mit308 and D5Mit356 that are close to the mutant gene, and the number of F2 mice going up to 537, the mutant W-1Bao is located between D5Mit356 and D5Mit308 on chromosome 5, about 42.19 cM from the centromere. In the same way, W-2Bao and W-3Bao are mapped nearby W-1Bao, and Wbct is located on chromosome 1, about 41.6 cM from the centromere. After searching for the mouse genome database (MGD) and performing a one-by-one study of all genes located on chromosome subregion, it is believed that the kit gene is an excellent candidate for the white spot mutations of W-1Bao, W-2Bao and W-3Bao.

  6. Partial Müllerian Duct Retention in Smad4 Conditional Mutant Male Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Fabrice G; Deng, Chuxia; Jamin, Soazik P

    2016-01-01

    Müllerian duct regression is a complex process which involves the AMH signalling pathway. We have previously demonstrated that besides AMH and its specific type II receptor (AMHRII), BMPR-IA and Smad5 are two essential factors implicated in this mechanism. Mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 4 (Smad4) is a transcription factor and the common Smad (co-Smad) involved in transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signalling pathway superfamily. Since Smad4 null mutants die early during gastrulation, we have inactivated Smad4 in the Müllerian duct mesenchyme. Specific inactivation of Smad4 in the urogenital ridge leads to the partial persistence of the Müllerian duct in adult male mice. Careful examination of the urogenital tract reveals that the Müllerian duct retention is randomly distributed either on one side or both sides. Histological analysis shows a uterus-like structure, which is confirmed by the expression of estrogen receptor α. As previously described in a β-catenin conditional mutant mouse model, β-catenin contributes to Müllerian duct regression. In our mutant male embryos, it appears that β-catenin expression is locally reduced along the urogenital ridge as compared to control mice. Moreover, the expression pattern is similar to those observed in control female mice. This study shows that reduced Smad4 expression disrupts the Wnt/β-catenin signalling leading to the partial persistence of Müllerian duct.

  7. Neurologic function during developmental and adult stages in Dab1(scm) (scrambler) mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquelin, C; Strazielle, C; Lalonde, R

    2012-01-01

    Homozygous Dab1(scm) mouse mutants with cell ectopias in cerebellar cortex, hippocampus, and neocortex were compared to non-ataxic controls on the SHIRPA primary screening battery on postnatal days 8, 15, and 22, as well as in the adult period. Dab1(scm) mutants were distinguished from non-ataxic controls as early as postnatal day 8 based on body tremor, gait anomalies, and body weight. On postnatal day 15, motor coordination deficits were evident on horizontal bar and inclined or vertical grid tests in association with a weaker grip strength. Likewise, mutants were distinguished from controls on drop righting and hindpaw clasping tests. Further differences were detected on postnatal day 22 in the form of fewer visual placing, touch escape, trunk curl, freezing, and vocalization responses, as well as squares traversed in the open-field. Evaluation at the adult age demonstrated similar impairments, indicative of permanent motor alterations. Neuronal metabolic activity was estimated by cytochrome oxidase histochemistry on cerebellar sections. Cerebellar cortical layers and efferent deep nuclei of Dab1(scm) mice appeared hypometabolic relative to non-ataxic mice despite normal metabolism in both regular and ectopic Purkinje cells.

  8. BET and BRAF inhibitors act synergistically against BRAF-mutant melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoluzzi, Luca; Hanniford, Douglas; Sokolova, Elena; Osman, Iman; Darvishian, Farbod; Wang, Jinhua; Bradner, James E; Hernando, Eva

    2016-06-01

    Despite major advances in the treatment of metastatic melanoma, treatment failure is still inevitable in most cases. Manipulation of key epigenetic regulators, including inhibition of Bromodomain and extra-terminal domain (BET) family members impairs cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo in different cancers, including melanoma. Here, we investigated the effect of combining the BET inhibitor JQ1 with the BRAF inhibitor Vemurafenib in in vitro and in vivo models of BRAF-mutant melanoma. We performed cytotoxicity and apoptosis assays, and a xenograft mouse model to determine the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of JQ1 in combination with Vemurafenib against BRAF-mutant melanoma cell lines. Further, to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of combined treatment, we conducted antibody arrays of in vitro drug-treated cell lines and RNA sequencing of drug-treated xenograft tumors. The combination of JQ1 and Vemurafenib acted synergistically in BRAF-mutant cell lines, resulting in marked apoptosis in vitro, with upregulation of proapoptotic proteins. In vivo, combination treatment suppressed tumor growth and significantly improved survival compared to either drug alone. RNA sequencing of tumor tissues revealed almost four thousand genes that were uniquely modulated by the combination, with several anti-apoptotic genes significantly down-regulated. Collectively, our data provide a rationale for combined BET and BRAF inhibition as a novel strategy for the treatment of melanoma.

  9. Deafness and permanently reduced potassium channel gene expression and function in hypothyroid Pit1dw mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Mirna; Fang, Qing; Gong, Tzy-Wen; Dolan, David F; Raphael, Yehoash; Camper, Sally A; Duncan, R Keith

    2009-01-28

    The absence of thyroid hormone (TH) during late gestation and early infancy can cause irreparable deafness in both humans and rodents. A variety of rodent models have been used in an effort to identify the underlying molecular mechanism. Here, we characterize a mouse model of secondary hypothyroidism, pituitary transcription factor 1 (Pit1(dw)), which has profound, congenital deafness that is rescued by oral TH replacement. These mutants have tectorial membrane abnormalities, including a prominent Hensen's stripe, elevated beta-tectorin composition, and disrupted striated-sheet matrix. They lack distortion product otoacoustic emissions and cochlear microphonic responses, and exhibit reduced endocochlear potentials, suggesting defects in outer hair cell function and potassium recycling. Auditory system and hair cell physiology, histology, and anatomy studies reveal novel defects of hormone deficiency related to deafness: (1) permanently impaired expression of KCNJ10 in the stria vascularis of Pit1(dw) mice, which likely contributes to the reduced endocochlear potential, (2) significant outer hair cell loss in the mutants, which may result from cellular stress induced by the lower KCNQ4 expression and current levels in Pit1(dw) mutant outer hair cells, and (3) sensory and strial cell deterioration, which may have implications for thyroid hormone dysregulation in age-related hearing impairment. In summary, we suggest that these defects in outer hair cell and strial cell function are important contributors to the hearing impairment in Pit1(dw) mice.

  10. Lamin A/C mutants disturb sumo1 localization and sumoylation in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Émilie Boudreau

    Full Text Available A-type lamins A and C are nuclear intermediate filament proteins in which mutations have been implicated in multiple disease phenotypes commonly known as laminopathies. A few studies have implicated sumoylation in the regulation of A-type lamins. Sumoylation is a post-translational protein modification that regulates a wide range of cellular processes through the attachment of small ubiquitin-related modifier (sumo to various substrates. Here we showed that laminopathy mutants result in the mislocalization of sumo1 both in vitro (C2C12 cells overexpressing mutant lamins A and C and in vivo (primary myoblasts and myopathic muscle tissue from the Lmna(H222P/H222P mouse model. In C2C12 cells, we showed that the trapping of sumo1 in p.Asp192Gly, p.Gln353Lys, and p.Arg386Lys aggregates of lamin A/C correlated with an increased steady-state level of sumoylation. However, lamin A and C did not appear to be modified by sumo1. Our results suggest that mutant lamin A/C alters the dynamics of sumo1 and thus misregulation of sumoylation may be contributing to disease progression in laminopathies.

  11. Modeled changes of cerebellar activity in mutant mice are predictive of their learning impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badura, Aleksandra; Clopath, Claudia; Schonewille, Martijn; de Zeeuw, Chris I.

    2016-11-01

    Translating neuronal activity to measurable behavioral changes has been a long-standing goal of systems neuroscience. Recently, we have developed a model of phase-reversal learning of the vestibulo-ocular reflex, a well-established, cerebellar-dependent task. The model, comprising both the cerebellar cortex and vestibular nuclei, reproduces behavioral data and accounts for the changes in neural activity during learning in wild type mice. Here, we used our model to predict Purkinje cell spiking as well as behavior before and after learning of five different lines of mutant mice with distinct cell-specific alterations of the cerebellar cortical circuitry. We tested these predictions by obtaining electrophysiological data depicting changes in neuronal spiking. We show that our data is largely consistent with the model predictions for simple spike modulation of Purkinje cells and concomitant behavioral learning in four of the mutants. In addition, our model accurately predicts a shift in simple spike activity in a mutant mouse with a brainstem specific mutation. This combination of electrophysiological and computational techniques opens a possibility of predicting behavioral impairments from neural activity.

  12. Comparative Global Gene Expression Profiles of Wild-Type Yersinia pestis CO92 and Its Braun Lipoprotein Mutant at Flea and Human Body Temperatures

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    Cristi L. Galindo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Braun/murein lipoprotein (Lpp is involved in inflammatory responses and septic shock. We previously characterized a Δlpp mutant of Yersinia pestis CO92 and found that this mutant was defective in surviving in macrophages and was attenuated in a mouse inhalation model of plague when compared to the highly virulent wild-type (WT bacterium. We performed global transcriptional profiling of WT Y. pestis and its Δlpp mutant using microarrays. The organisms were cultured at 26 and 37 degrees Celsius to simulate the flea vector and mammalian host environments, respectively. Our data revealed vastly different effects of lpp mutation on the transcriptomes of Y. pestis grown at 37 versus 26C. While the absence of Lpp resulted mainly in the downregulation of metabolic genes at 26C, the Y. pestis Δlpp mutant cultured at 37C exhibited profound alterations in stress response and virulence genes, compared to WT bacteria. We investigated one of the stress-related genes (htrA downregulated in the Δlpp mutant relative to WT Y. pestis. Indeed, complementation of the Δlpp mutant with the htrA gene restored intracellular survival of the Y. pestis Δlpp mutant. Our results support a role for Lpp in Y. pestis adaptation to the host environment, possibly via transcriptional activation of htrA.

  13. Restoration of testis function in hypogonadotropic hypogonadal mice harboring a misfolded GnRHR mutant by pharmacoperone drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janovick, Jo Ann; Stewart, M David; Jacob, Darla; Martin, L D; Deng, Jian Min; Stewart, C Allison; Wang, Ying; Cornea, Anda; Chavali, Lakshmi; Lopez, Suhujey; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat; Kang, Eunju; Lee, Hyo-Sang; Manna, Pulak R; Stocco, Douglas M; Behringer, Richard R; Conn, P Michael

    2013-12-24

    Mutations in receptors, ion channels, and enzymes are frequently recognized by the cellular quality control system as misfolded and retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or otherwise misrouted. Retention results in loss of function at the normal site of biological activity and disease. Pharmacoperones are target-specific small molecules that diffuse into cells and serve as folding templates that enable mutant proteins to pass the criteria of the quality control system and route to their physiologic site of action. Pharmacoperones of the gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR) have efficacy in cell culture systems, and their cellular and biochemical mechanisms of action are known. Here, we show the efficacy of a pharmacoperone drug in a small animal model, a knock-in mouse, expressing a mutant GnRHR. This recessive mutation (GnRHR E(90)K) causes hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (failed puberty associated with low or apulsatile luteinizing hormone) in both humans and in the mouse model described. We find that pulsatile pharmacoperone therapy restores E(90)K from ER retention to the plasma membrane, concurrently with responsiveness to the endogenous natural ligand, gonadotropin releasing hormone, and an agonist that is specific for the mutant. Spermatogenesis, proteins associated with steroid transport and steroidogenesis, and androgen levels were restored in mutant male mice following pharmacoperone therapy. These results show the efficacy of pharmacoperone therapy in vivo by using physiological, molecular, genetic, endocrine and biochemical markers and optimization of pulsatile administration. We expect that this newly appreciated approach of protein rescue will benefit other disorders sharing pathologies based on misrouting of misfolded protein mutants.

  14. Inducement and identification of an endosperm mutant in maize

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-30

    Nov 30, 2011 ... “super sweet” phenotype were derived from the mutated offspring. ... characteristics and distinguished molecular mechanism to the previous mutants of gene sh2, these three mutant lines are ...... Physical association of starch biosynthetic ... reduced seedling mutant in oilseed rape, Brassica napus, for.

  15. Male-like sexual behavior of female mouse lacking fucose mutarotase

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    Lim Dae-sik

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutarotases are recently characterized family of enzymes that are involved in the anomeric conversions of monosaccharides. The mammalian fucose mutarotase (FucM was reported in cultured cells to facilitate fucose utilization and incorporation into protein by glycosylation. However, the role of this enzyme in animal has not been elucidated. Results We generated a mutant mouse specifically lacking the fucose mutarotase (FucM gene. The FucM knockout mice displayed an abnormal sexual receptivity with a drastic reduction in lordosis score, although the animals were fertile due to a rare and forced intromission by a typical male. We examined the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPv of the preoptic region in brain and found that the mutant females showed a reduction in tyrosine hydoxylase positive neurons compared to that of a normal female. Furthermore, the mutant females exhibited a masculine behavior, such as mounting to a normal female partner as well as showing a preference to female urine. We found a reduction of fucosylated serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP in a mutant embryo relative to that of a wild-type embryo. Conclusions The observation that FucM-/- female mouse exhibits a phenotypic similarity to a wild-type male in terms of its sexual behavior appears to be due to the neurodevelopmental changes in preoptic area of mutant brain resembling a wild-type male. Since the previous studies indicate that AFP plays a role in titrating estradiol that are required to consolidate sexual preference of female mice, we speculate that the reduced level of AFP in FucM-/- mouse, presumably resulting from the reduced fucosylation, is responsible for the male-like sexual behavior observed in the FucM knock-out mouse.

  16. The mouse as a developmental model for cleft lip and palate research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritli-Linde, Amel

    2012-01-01

    Vertebrate and invertebrate model organisms are essential for deciphering biological processes. One of these, the mouse, proved to be a valuable model for understanding the etiopathogenesis of a vast array of human diseases, including congenital malformations such as orofacial clefting conditions. This small mammal's usefulness in cleft lip and palate research stems not only from the striking anatomical and molecular similarities of lip and palate development between human and mouse embryos, but also from its amenability to experimental and genetic manipulation. Using some recent studies as illustrative examples, this review describes different ways of generating and exploiting mouse models to study normal and abnormal development of the lip and palate. Despite a few surmountable disadvantages of using the mouse, numerous mutants have revealed a growing number of molecular key players and have pointed at a tight and complex molecular control during each step of lip and palate development.

  17. Genetically modified mouse models for premature ovarian failure (POF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagarlamudi, Krishna; Reddy, Pradeep; Adhikari, Deepak; Liu, Kui

    2010-02-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a complex disorder that affects approximately 1% of women. POF is characterized by the depletion of functional ovarian follicles before the age of 40 years, and clinically, patients may present with primary amenorrhea or secondary amenorrhea. Although some genes have been hypothesized to be candidates responsible for POF, the etiology of most of the cases is idiopathic, with the underlying causes still unidentified because of the heterogeneity of the disease. In this review, we consider some mutant mouse models that exhibit phenotypes which are comparable to human POF, and we suggest that the use of these mouse models may help us to gain a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying POF in humans.

  18. Segmentation of the mouse hippocampal formation in magnetic resonance images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Kay; Watson, Charles; Buckley, Rachel F; Kurniawan, Nyoman D; Yang, Zhengyi; Keller, Marianne D; Beare, Richard; Bartlett, Perry F; Egan, Gary F; Galloway, Graham J; Paxinos, George; Petrou, Steven; Reutens, David C

    2011-10-01

    The hippocampal formation plays an important role in cognition, spatial navigation, learning, and memory. High resolution magnetic resonance (MR) imaging makes it possible to study in vivo changes in the hippocampus over time and is useful for comparing hippocampal volume and structure in wild type and mutant mice. Such comparisons demand a reliable way to segment the hippocampal formation. We have developed a method for the systematic segmentation of the hippocampal formation using the perfusion-fixed C57BL/6 mouse brain for application in longitudinal and comparative studies. Our aim was to develop a guide for segmenting over 40 structures in an adult mouse brain using 30 μm isotropic resolution images acquired with a 16.4 T MR imaging system and combined using super-resolution reconstruction.

  19. Mouse models of ciliopathies: the state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic P. Norris

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The ciliopathies are an apparently disparate group of human diseases that all result from defects in the formation and/or function of cilia. They include disorders such as Meckel-Grüber syndrome (MKS, Joubert syndrome (JBTS, Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS and Alström syndrome (ALS. Reflecting the manifold requirements for cilia in signalling, sensation and motility, different ciliopathies exhibit common elements. The mouse has been used widely as a model organism for the study of ciliopathies. Although many mutant alleles have proved lethal, continued investigations have led to the development of better models. Here, we review current mouse models of a core set of ciliopathies, their utility and future prospects.

  20. Survival of Enterococcus faecalis in Mouse Peritoneal Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Gentry-Weeks, Claudia R.; Karkhoff-Schweizer, RoxAnn; Pikis, Andreas; Estay, Monica; Keith, Jerry M.

    1999-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis was tested for the ability to persist in mouse peritoneal macrophages in two separate studies. In the first study, the intracellular survival of serum-passaged E. faecalis 418 and two isogenic mutants [cytolytic strain FA2-2(pAM714) and non-cytolytic strain FA2-2(pAM771)] was compared with that of Escherichia coli DH5α by infecting BALB/c mice intraperitoneally and then monitoring the survival of the bacteria within lavaged peritoneal macrophages over a 72-h period. All ...

  1. An ENU-mutagenesis screen in the mouse: identification of novel developmental gene functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolien Wansleeben

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutagenesis screens in the mouse have been proven useful for the identification of novel gene functions and generation of interesting mutant alleles. Here we describe a phenotype-based screen for recessive mutations affecting embryonic development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mice were mutagenized with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU and following incrossing the offspring, embryos were analyzed at embryonic day 10.5. Mutant phenotypes that arose in our screen include cardiac and nuchal edema, neural tube defects, situs inversus of the heart, posterior truncation and the absence of limbs and lungs. We isolated amongst others novel mutant alleles for Dll1, Ptprb, Plexin-B2, Fgf10, Wnt3a, Ncx1, Scrib(Scrib, Scribbled homolog [Drosophila] and Sec24b. We found both nonsense alleles leading to severe protein truncations and mutants with single-amino acid substitutions that are informative at a molecular level. Novel findings include an ectopic neural tube in our Dll1 mutant and lung defects in the planar cell polarity mutants for Sec24b and Scrib. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Using a forward genetics approach, we have generated a number of novel mutant alleles that are linked to disturbed morphogenesis during development.

  2. Cofilin and Vangl2 cooperate in the initiation of planar cell polarity in the mouse embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffey, James P; Grego-Bessa, Joaquim; Liem, Karel F; Anderson, Kathryn V

    2013-03-01

    The planar cell polarity (PCP; non-canonical Wnt) pathway is required to orient the cells within the plane of an epithelium. Here, we show that cofilin 1 (Cfl1), an actin-severing protein, and Vangl2, a core PCP protein, cooperate to control PCP in the early mouse embryo. Two aspects of planar polarity can be analyzed quantitatively at cellular resolution in the mouse embryo: convergent extension of the axial midline; and posterior positioning of cilia on cells of the node. Analysis of the spatial distribution of brachyury(+) midline cells shows that the Cfl1 mutant midline is normal, whereas Vangl2 mutants have a slightly wider midline. By contrast, midline convergent extension fails completely in Vangl2 Cfl1 double mutants. Planar polarity is required for the posterior positioning of cilia on cells in the mouse node, which is essential for the initiation of left-right asymmetry. Node cilia are correctly positioned in Cfl1 and Vangl2 single mutants, but cilia remain in the center of the cell in Vangl2 Cfl1 double mutants, leading to randomization of left-right asymmetry. In both the midline and node, the defect in planar polarity in the double mutants arises because PCP protein complexes fail to traffic to the apical cell membrane, although other aspects of apical-basal polarity are unaffected. Genetic and pharmacological experiments demonstrate that F-actin remodeling is essential for the initiation, but not maintenance, of PCP. We propose that Vangl2 and cofilin cooperate to target Rab11(+) vesicles containing PCP proteins to the apical membrane during the initiation of planar cell polarity.

  3. Development and Function of the Mouse Vestibular System in the Absence of Gravity Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolgemuth, Debra J.

    2005-01-01

    The hypothesis that was tested in this research was that the absence of gravity perception, such as would occur in space, would affect the development and function of the vestibular and central nervous systems. Further, we postulated that these effects would be more significant at specific stages of post-natal development of the animal. We also proposed the use of molecular genetic approaches that would provide important information as to the hierarchy of gene function during the development and subsequent function of the vestibular system. The tilted (tlt) mutant mouse has been characterized as lacking the ability to provide sensory input to the gravity receptors. The tlt/tlt mutant mice were a particularly attractive model for the study of vestibular function since the primary defect was limited to the receptor part of the vestibular system, and there were no detectable abnormal phenotypes in other organ systems. The goal of the proposed studies was to assess immediate and delayed effects of the lack of gravity perception on the vestibular system. Particular attention was paid to characterizing primarily affected periods of vestibular morphogenesis, and to identifying downstream genetic pathways that are altered in the CNS of the tlt/tlt mutant mouse. The specific aims were: (1) to characterize the postnatal morphogenesis of the CNS in the tlt mutant mouse, using detailed morphometric analysis of isolated vestibular ganglia and brain tissue at different stages of postnatal development and assessment of apoptotic cell death; (2) to examine the expression of selected genes implicated by mutational analysis to be important in vestibular development or function by in situ hybridization or immunohistochemistry in the mutant mice; and (3) to identify other genes involved in vestibular development and function, using differential cloning strategies to isolate genes whose expression is changed in the mutant versus normal vestibular system.

  4. Distinctive Klf4 mutants determine preference for DNA methylation status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Hideharu; Wang, Dongxue; Steves, Alyse N.; Jin, Peng; Blumenthal, Robert M.; Zhang, Xing; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2016-09-04

    Reprogramming of mammalian genome methylation is critically important but poorly understood. Klf4, a transcription factor directing reprogramming, contains a DNA binding domain with three consecutive C2H2 zinc fingers. Klf4 recognizes CpG or TpG within a specific sequence. Mouse Klf4 DNA binding domain has roughly equal affinity for methylated CpG or TpG, and slightly lower affinity for unmodified CpG. The structural basis for this key preference is unclear, though the side chain of Glu446 is known to contact the methyl group of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) or thymine (5-methyluracil). We examined the role of Glu446 by mutagenesis. Substituting Glu446 with aspartate (E446D) resulted in preference for unmodified cytosine, due to decreased affinity for 5mC. In contrast, substituting Glu446 with proline (E446P) increased affinity for 5mC by two orders of magnitude. Structural analysis revealed hydrophobic interaction between the proline's aliphatic cyclic structure and the 5-methyl group of the pyrimidine (5mC or T). As in wild-type Klf4 (E446), the proline at position 446 does not interact directly with either the 5mC N4 nitrogen or the thymine O4 oxygen. In contrast, the unmethylated cytosine's exocyclic N4 amino group (NH2) and its ring carbon C5 atom hydrogen bond directly with the aspartate carboxylate of the E446D variant. Both of these interactions would provide a preference for cytosine over thymine, and the latter one could explain the E446D preference for unmethylated cytosine. Finally, we evaluated the ability of these Klf4 mutants to regulate transcription of methylated and unmethylated promoters in a luciferase reporter assay.

  5. Endonucleases: new tools to edit the mouse genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijshake, Tobias; Baker, Darren J; van de Sluis, Bart

    2014-10-01

    Mouse transgenesis has been instrumental in determining the function of genes in the pathophysiology of human diseases and modification of genes by homologous recombination in mouse embryonic stem cells remains a widely used technology. However, this approach harbors a number of disadvantages, as it is time-consuming and quite laborious. Over the last decade a number of new genome editing technologies have been developed, including zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated (CRISPR/Cas). These systems are characterized by a designed DNA binding protein or RNA sequence fused or co-expressed with a non-specific endonuclease, respectively. The engineered DNA binding protein or RNA sequence guides the nuclease to a specific target sequence in the genome to induce a double strand break. The subsequent activation of the DNA repair machinery then enables the introduction of gene modifications at the target site, such as gene disruption, correction or insertion. Nuclease-mediated genome editing has numerous advantages over conventional gene targeting, including increased efficiency in gene editing, reduced generation time of mutant mice, and the ability to mutagenize multiple genes simultaneously. Although nuclease-driven modifications in the genome are a powerful tool to generate mutant mice, there are concerns about off-target cleavage, especially when using the CRISPR/Cas system. Here, we describe the basic principles of these new strategies in mouse genome manipulation, their inherent advantages, and their potential disadvantages compared to current technologies used to study gene function in mouse models. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: From Genome to Function.

  6. Mutant prevention concentration and mutant selection window for 10 antimicrobial agents against Rhodococcus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghaus, Londa J; Giguère, Steeve; Guldbech, Kristen

    2013-10-25

    The objectives of this study were to determine the mutant prevention concentration (MPC), time above the MPC and mutant selection window for 10 antimicrobial agents against Rhodococcus equi and to determine if the combination of a macrolide with rifampin would decrease emergence of resistant mutants. Antimicrobial agents investigated (erythromycin, clarithromycin, azithromycin, rifampin, amikacin, gentamicin, enrofloxacin, vancomycin, imipenem, and doxycycline) were selected based on in vitro activity and frequency of use in foals or people infected with R. equi. Each antimicrobial agent or combination of agents was evaluated against four virulent strains of R. equi. MPC were determined using an agar plate assay. Pharmacodynamic parameters were calculated using published plasma and pulmonary pharmacokinetic variables. There was a significant (Pequi. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Isolation of Mouse Neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swamydas, Muthulekha; Luo, Yi; Dorf, Martin E; Lionakis, Michail S

    2015-08-03

    Neutrophils represent the first line of defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Indeed, patients with inherited and acquired qualitative and quantitative neutrophil defects are at high risk for developing bacterial and fungal infections and suffering adverse outcomes from these infections. Therefore, research aiming at defining the molecular factors that modulate neutrophil effector function under homeostatic conditions and during infection is essential for devising strategies to augment neutrophil function and improve the outcome of infected individuals. This unit describes a reproducible density gradient centrifugation-based protocol that can be applied in any laboratory to harvest large numbers of highly enriched and highly viable neutrophils from the bone marrow of mice both at the steady state and following infection with Candida albicans as described in UNIT. In another protocol, we also present a method that combines gentle enzymatic tissue digestion with a positive immunomagnetic selection technique or Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) to harvest highly pure and highly viable preparations of neutrophils directly from mouse tissues such as the kidney, the liver or the spleen. Finally, methods for isolating neutrophils from mouse peritoneal fluid and peripheral blood are included. Mouse neutrophils isolated by these protocols can be used for examining several aspects of cellular function ex vivo including pathogen binding, phagocytosis and killing, neutrophil chemotaxis, oxidative burst, degranulation and cytokine production, and for performing neutrophil adoptive transfer experiments.

  8. RIKEN mouse genome encyclopedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2003-01-01

    We have been working to establish the comprehensive mouse full-length cDNA collection and sequence database to cover as many genes as we can, named Riken mouse genome encyclopedia. Recently we are constructing higher-level annotation (Functional ANnoTation Of Mouse cDNA; FANTOM) not only with homology search based annotation but also with expression data profile, mapping information and protein-protein database. More than 1,000,000 clones prepared from 163 tissues were end-sequenced to classify into 159,789 clusters and 60,770 representative clones were fully sequenced. As a conclusion, the 60,770 sequences contained 33,409 unique. The next generation of life science is clearly based on all of the genome information and resources. Based on our cDNA clones we developed the additional system to explore gene function. We developed cDNA microarray system to print all of these cDNA clones, protein-protein interaction screening system, protein-DNA interaction screening system and so on. The integrated database of all the information is very useful not only for analysis of gene transcriptional network and for the connection of gene to phenotype to facilitate positional candidate approach. In this talk, the prospect of the application of these genome resourced should be discussed. More information is available at the web page: http://genome.gsc.riken.go.jp/.

  9. Mouse models in oncoimmunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitvogel, Laurence; Pitt, Jonathan M; Daillère, Romain; Smyth, Mark J; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-12-01

    Fundamental cancer research and the development of efficacious antineoplastic treatments both rely on experimental systems in which the relationship between malignant cells and immune cells can be studied. Mouse models of transplantable, carcinogen-induced or genetically engineered malignancies - each with their specific advantages and difficulties - have laid the foundations of oncoimmunology. These models have guided the immunosurveillance theory that postulates that evasion from immune control is an essential feature of cancer, the concept that the long-term effects of conventional cancer treatments mostly rely on the reinstatement of anticancer immune responses and the preclinical development of immunotherapies, including currently approved immune checkpoint blockers. Specific aspects of pharmacological development, as well as attempts to personalize cancer treatments using patient-derived xenografts, require the development of mouse models in which murine genes and cells are replaced with their human equivalents. Such 'humanized' mouse models are being progressively refined to characterize the leukocyte subpopulations that belong to the innate and acquired arms of the immune system as they infiltrate human cancers that are subjected to experimental therapies. We surmise that the ever-advancing refinement of murine preclinical models will accelerate the pace of therapeutic optimization in patients.

  10. Maternal topoisomerase II alpha, not topoisomerase II beta, enables embryonic development of zebrafish top2a-/- mutants

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sapetto-Rebow, Beata

    2011-11-23

    Abstract Background Genetic alterations in human topoisomerase II alpha (TOP2A) are linked to cancer susceptibility. TOP2A decatenates chromosomes and thus is necessary for multiple aspects of cell division including DNA replication, chromosome condensation and segregation. Topoisomerase II alpha is also required for embryonic development in mammals, as mouse Top2a knockouts result in embryonic lethality as early as the 4-8 cell stage. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the extended developmental capability of zebrafish top2a mutants arises from maternal expression of top2a or compensation from its top2b paralogue. Results Here, we describe bloody minded (blm), a novel mutant of zebrafish top2a. In contrast to mouse Top2a nulls, zebrafish top2a mutants survive to larval stages (4-5 day post fertilization). Developmental analyses demonstrate abundant expression of maternal top2a but not top2b. Inhibition or poisoning of maternal topoisomerase II delays embryonic development by extending the cell cycle M-phase. Zygotic top2a and top2b are co-expressed in the zebrafish CNS, but endogenous or ectopic top2b RNA appear unable to prevent the blm phenotype. Conclusions We conclude that maternal top2a enables zebrafish development before the mid-zygotic transition (MZT) and that zebrafish top2a and top2b are not functionally redundant during development after activation of the zygotic genome.

  11. Diminished but Not Abolished Effect of Two His351 Mutants of Anthrax Edema Factor in a Murine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Taoran; Zhao, Xinghui; Liu, Ju; Meng, Yingying; Feng, Yingying; Fang, Ting; Zhang, Jinlong; Yang, Xiuxu; Li, Jianmin; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Edema toxin (ET), which is composed of a potent adenylate cyclase (AC), edema factor (EF), and protective antigen (PA), is one of the major toxicity factors of Bacillus anthracis. In this study, we introduced mutations in full-length EF to generate alanine EF(H351A) and arginine EF(H351R) variants. In vitro activity analysis displayed that the adenylyl cyclase activity of both the mutants was significantly diminished compared with the wild-type EF. When the native and mutant toxins were administered subcutaneously in a mouse footpad edema model, severe acute swelling was evoked by wild-type ET, while the symptoms induced by mutant toxins were very minor. Systemic administration of these EF variants caused non-lethal hepatotoxicity. In addition, EF(H351R) exhibited slightly higher activity in causing more severe edema than EF(H351A). Our findings demonstrate that the toxicity of ET is not abolished by substitution of EF residue His351 by alanine or arginine. These results also indicate the potential of the mouse footpad edema model as a sensitive method for evaluating both ET toxicity and the efficacy of candidate therapeutic agents. PMID:26848687

  12. Maternal topoisomerase II alpha, not topoisomerase II beta, enables embryonic development of zebrafish top2a-/- mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapetto-Rebow Beata

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic alterations in human topoisomerase II alpha (TOP2A are linked to cancer susceptibility. TOP2A decatenates chromosomes and thus is necessary for multiple aspects of cell division including DNA replication, chromosome condensation and segregation. Topoisomerase II alpha is also required for embryonic development in mammals, as mouse Top2a knockouts result in embryonic lethality as early as the 4-8 cell stage. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the extended developmental capability of zebrafish top2a mutants arises from maternal expression of top2a or compensation from its top2b paralogue. Results Here, we describe bloody minded (blm, a novel mutant of zebrafish top2a. In contrast to mouse Top2a nulls, zebrafish top2a mutants survive to larval stages (4-5 day post fertilization. Developmental analyses demonstrate abundant expression of maternal top2a but not top2b. Inhibition or poisoning of maternal topoisomerase II delays embryonic development by extending the cell cycle M-phase. Zygotic top2a and top2b are co-expressed in the zebrafish CNS, but endogenous or ectopic top2b RNA appear unable to prevent the blm phenotype. Conclusions We conclude that maternal top2a enables zebrafish development before the mid-zygotic transition (MZT and that zebrafish top2a and top2b are not functionally redundant during development after activation of the zygotic genome.

  13. Characterisation of cuticular mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Faust, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    Plants are protected by the extracellular cuticle, which is made up of cutin, cutan and waxes. The cutin composition of a variety of plants has been known and models of the biosynthesis of cutin monomers exist but not many enzymes have been identified. It is generally accepted that a defect in the cuticle leads to an organ fusion phenotype. In the model plant A. thaliana many fusion mutants have been identified but the identification of genes involved have not lead to a complete picture of th...

  14. Aberrant brain microRNA target and miRISC gene expression in the anx/anx anorexia mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mercader, Josep M; González, Juan R; Lozano, Juan José

    2012-01-01

    The anorexia mouse model, anx/anx, carries a spontaneous mutation not yet identified and homozygous mutants are characterized by anorexia-cachexia, hyperactivity, and ataxia. In order to test if the microRNA function was altered in these mice, hypothalamus and cortex transcriptomes were evaluated...

  15. Mutation spectrum in FE1-MUTA(TM) Mouse lung epithelial cells exposed to nanoparticulate carbon black

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; White, Paul A; Gingerich, John

    2011-01-01

    It has been shown previously that carbon black (CB), Printex 90 exposure induces cII and lacZ mutants in the FE1-Muta(TM) Mouse lung epithelial cell line and causes oxidatively damaged DNA and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The purpose of this study was to determine the mutation...

  16. Illuminating p53 function in cancer with genetically engineered mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The key role of the p53 protein in tumor suppression is highlighted by its frequent mutation in human cancers and by the completely penetrant cancer predisposition of p53 null mice. Beyond providing definitive evidence for the critical function of p53 in tumor suppression, genetically engineered mouse models have offered numerous additional insights into p53 function. p53 knock-in mice expressing tumor-derived p53 mutants have revealed that these mutants display gain-of-function activities th...

  17. Using of AFLP to evaluate gamma-irradiated amaranth mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labajová Mária

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine which of several gamma-irradiated mutants of amaranth Ficha cultivar and K-433 hybrid are most genetically similar to their non-irradiated control genotypes, we performed amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP based analysis. A total of 40 selective primer combinations were used in reported analyses. First analyses of gamma-irradiated amaranth mutant lines were done used the AFLP. In the study, primers with the differentiation ability for all analysed mutant lines are reported. The very specific changes in the mutant lines´ non-coding regions based on AFLP length polymorphism were analysed. Mutant lines of the Ficha cultivar (C15, C26, C27, C82, C236 shared a genetic dissimilarity of 0,11 and their ISSR profiles are more similar to the Ficha than those of K-433 hybrid mutant lines. The K-433 mutant lines (D54, D279, D282 shared genetic dissimilarity of 0,534 but are more distinct to their control plant as a whole, as those of the Ficha mutant lines. Different AFLP fingerprints patters of the mutant lines when compared to the Ficha cultivar and K-433 hybrid AFLP profiles may be a consequence of the complex response of the intergenic space of mutant lines to the gamma-radiance. Although a genetic polymorphism was detected within accessions, the AFLP markers successfully identified all the accessions. The AFLP results are discussed by a combination of biochemical characteristics of mutant lines and their control genotypes.

  18. Distribution of soluble amino acids in maize endosperm mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toro Alejandro Alberto

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available For human nutrition the main source of vegetable proteins are cereal and legume seeds. The content of total soluble amino acids in mature endosperm of wild-type, opaque and floury maize (Zea mays L. mutants were determined by HPLC. The total absolute concentration of soluble amino acids among the mutants varied depending on the mutant. The o11 and o13 mutants exhibited the highest average content, whereas o10, fl3 and fl1 exhibited the lowest average content. In general, the mutants exhibited similar concentrations of total soluble amino acids when compared to the wild-type lines, with the clear exception of mutants o11 and fl1, with the o11 mutant exhibiting a higher concentration of total soluble amino acids when compared to its wild-type counterpart W22 and the fl1 mutant a lower concentration when compared to its wild-type counterpart Oh43. For methionine, the mutants o2 and o11 and wild-type Oh43 exhibited the highest concentrations of this amino acid. Significant differences were not observed between mutants for other amino acids such as lysine and threonine. The high lysine concentrations obtained originally for these mutants may be due to the amino acids incorporated into storage proteins, but not those present in the soluble form.

  19. Pharmacological NAD-Boosting Strategies Improve Mitochondrial Homeostasis in Human Complex I-Mutant Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felici, Roberta; Lapucci, Andrea; Cavone, Leonardo; Pratesi, Sara; Berlinguer-Palmini, Rolando; Chiarugi, Alberto

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are devastating genetic diseases for which efficacious therapies are still an unmet need. Recent studies report that increased availability of intracellular NAD obtained by inhibition of the NAD-consuming enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 or supplementation with the NAD-precursor nicotinamide riboside (NR) ameliorates energetic derangement and symptoms in mouse models of mitochondrial disorders. Whether these pharmacological approaches also improve bioenergetics of human cells harboring mitochondrial defects is unknown. It is also unclear whether the same signaling cascade is prompted by PARP-1 inhibitors and NR supplementation to improve mitochondrial homeostasis. Here, we show that human fibroblasts mutant for the NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) Fe-S protein 1 (NDUFS1) subunit of respiratory complex I have similar ATP, NAD, and mitochondrial content compared with control cells, but show reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. Interestingly, mutant cells also show increased transcript levels of mitochondrial DNA but not nuclear DNA respiratory complex subunits, suggesting activation of a compensatory response. At variance with prior work in mice, however, NR supplementation, but not PARP-1 inhibition, increased intracellular NAD content in NDUFS1 mutant human fibroblasts. Conversely, PARP-1 inhibitors, but not NR supplementation, increased transcription of mitochondrial transcription factor A and mitochondrial DNA-encoded respiratory complexes constitutively induced in mutant cells. Still, both NR and PARP-1 inhibitors restored mitochondrial membrane potential and increased organelle content as well as oxidative activity of NDUFS1-deficient fibroblasts. Overall, data provide the first evidence that in human cells harboring a mitochondrial respiratory defect exposure to NR or PARP-1, inhibitors activate different signaling pathways that are not invariantly prompted by NAD increases, but equally able to improve energetic

  20. A recombinant hypoallergenic parvalbumin mutant for immunotherapy of IgE-mediated fish allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swoboda, Ines; Bugajska-Schretter, Agnes; Linhart, Birgit; Verdino, Petra; Keller, Walter; Schulmeister, Ulrike; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Valent, Peter; Peltre, Gabriel; Quirce, Santiago; Douladiris, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G; Valenta, Rudolf; Spitzauer, Susanne

    2007-05-15

    IgE-mediated allergy to fish is a frequent cause of severe anaphylactic reactions. Parvalbumin, a small calcium-binding protein, is the major fish allergen. We have recently isolated a cDNA coding for carp parvalbumin, Cyp c 1, and expressed in Escherichia coli a recombinant Cyp c 1 molecule, which contained most IgE epitopes of saltwater and freshwater fish. In this study, we introduced mutations into the calcium-binding domains of carp parvalbumin by site-directed mutagenesis and produced in E. coli three parvalbumin mutants containing amino acid exchanges either in one (single mutants; Mut-CD and Mut-EF) or in both of the calcium-binding sites (double mutant; Mut-CD/EF). Circular dichroism analyses of the purified derivatives and the wild-type allergen showed that Mut-CD/EF exhibited the greatest reduction of overall protein fold. Dot blot assays and immunoblot inhibition experiments performed with sera from 21 fish-allergic patients showed that Mut-CD/EF had a 95% reduced IgE reactivity and represented the derivative with the least allergenic activity. The latter was confirmed by in vitro basophil histamine release assays and in vivo skin prick testing. The potential applicability for immunotherapy of Mut-CD/EF was demonstrated by the fact that mouse IgG Abs could be raised by immunization with the mutated molecule, which cross-reacted with parvalbumins from various fish species and inhibited the binding of fish-allergic patients' IgE to the wild-type allergen. Using the hypoallergenic carp parvalbumin mutant Mut-CD/EF, it may be possible to treat fish allergy by immunotherapy.

  1. Dearth and Delayed Maturation of Testicular Germ Cells in Fanconi Anemia E Mutant Male Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chun; Begum, Khurshida; Jordan, Philip W.; He, Yan; Overbeek, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    After using a self-inactivating lentivirus for non-targeted insertional mutagenesis in mice, we identified a transgenic family with a recessive mutation that resulted in reduced fertility in homozygous transgenic mice. The lentiviral integration site was amplified by inverse PCR. Sequencing revealed that integration had occurred in intron 8 of the mouse Fance gene, which encodes the Fanconi anemia E (Fance) protein. Fanconi anemia (FA) proteins play pivotal roles in cellular responses to DNA damage and Fance acts as a molecular bridge between the FA core complex and Fancd2. To investigate the reduced fertility in the mutant males, we analyzed postnatal development of testicular germ cells. At one week after birth, most tubules in the mutant testes contained few or no germ cells. Over the next 2–3 weeks, germ cells accumulated in a limited number of tubules, so that some tubules contained germ cells around the full periphery of the tubule. Once sufficient numbers of germ cells had accumulated, they began to undergo the later stages of spermatogenesis. Immunoassays revealed that the Fancd2 protein accumulated around the periphery of the nucleus in normal developing spermatocytes, but we did not detect a similar localization of Fancd2 in the Fance mutant testes. Our assays indicate that although Fance mutant males are germ cell deficient at birth, the extant germ cells can proliferate and, if they reach a threshold density, can differentiate into mature sperm. Analogous to previous studies of FA genes in mice, our results show that the Fance protein plays an important, but not absolutely essential, role in the initial developmental expansion of the male germ line. PMID:27486799

  2. Insulin and IGF-1 regularize energy metabolites in neural cells expressing full-length mutant huntingtin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naia, Luana; Ribeiro, Márcio; Rodrigues, Joana; Duarte, Ana I; Lopes, Carla; Rosenstock, Tatiana R; Hayden, Michael R; Rego, A Cristina

    2016-08-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder linked to the expression of mutant huntingtin. Bioenergetic dysfunction has been described to contribute to HD pathogenesis. Thus, treatment paradigms aimed to ameliorate energy deficits appear to be suitable candidates in HD. In previous studies, we observed protective effects of insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in YAC128 and R6/2 mice, two HD mouse models, whereas IGF-1 and/or insulin halted mitochondrial-driven oxidative stress in mutant striatal cells and mitochondrial dysfunction in HD human lymphoblasts. Here, we analyzed the effect of IGF-1 versus insulin on energy metabolic parameters using striatal cells derived from HD knock-in mice and primary cortical cultures from YAC128 mice. STHdh(Q111/Q111) cells exhibited decreased ATP/ADP ratio and increased phosphocreatine levels. Moreover, pyruvate levels were increased in mutant cells, most probably in consequence of a decrease in pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) protein expression and increased PDH phosphorylation, reflecting its inactivation. Insulin and IGF-1 treatment significantly decreased phosphocreatine levels, whereas IGF-1 only decreased pyruvate levels in mutant cells. In a different scenario, primary cortical cultures derived from YAC128 mice also displayed energetic abnormalities. We observed a decrease in both ATP/ADP and phosphocreatine levels, which were prevented following exposure to insulin or IGF-1. Furthermore, decreased lactate levels in YAC128 cultures occurred concomitantly with a decline in lactate dehydrogenase activity, which was ameliorated with both insulin and IGF-1. These data demonstrate differential HD-associated metabolic dysfunction in striatal cell lines and primary cortical cultures, both of which being alleviated by insulin and IGF-1.

  3. A homologous genetic basis of the murine cpfl1 mutant and human achromatopsia linked to mutations in the PDE6C gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Bo; Grau, Tanja; Dangel, Susann; Hurd, Ron; Jurklies, Bernhard; Sener, E. Cumhur; Andreasson, Sten; Dollfus, Helene; Baumann, Britta; Bolz, Sylvia; Artemyev, Nikolai; Kohl, Susanne; Heckenlively, John; Wissinger, Bernd

    2009-01-01

    Retinal cone photoreceptors mediate fine visual acuity, daylight vision, and color vision. Congenital hereditary conditions in which there is a lack of cone function in humans cause achromatopsia, an autosomal recessive trait, characterized by low vision, photophobia, and lack of color discrimination. Herein we report the identification of mutations in the PDE6C gene encoding the catalytic subunit of the cone photoreceptor phosphodiesterase as a cause of autosomal recessive achromatopsia. Moreover, we show that the spontaneous mouse mutant cpfl1 that features a lack of cone function and rapid degeneration of the cone photoreceptors represents a homologous mouse model for PDE6C associated achromatopsia. PMID:19887631

  4. Auxin physiology of the tomato mutant diageotropica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, S. G.; Rayle, D. L.; Cleland, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    The tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum, Mill.) mutant diageotropica (dgt) exhibits biochemical, physiological, and morphological abnormalities that suggest the mutation may have affected a primary site of auxin perception or action. We have compared two aspects of the auxin physiology of dgt and wild-type (VFN8) seedlings: auxin transport and cellular growth parameters. The rates of basipetal indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) polar transport are identical in hypocotyl sections of the two genotypes, but dgt sections have a slightly greater capacity for IAA transport. 2,3,5-Triiodobenzoic acid and ethylene reduce transport in both mutant and wild-type sections. The kinetics of auxin uptake into VFN8 and dgt sections are nearly identical. These results make it unlikely that an altered IAA efflux carrier or IAA uptake symport are responsible for the pleiotropic effects resulting from the dgt mutation. The lack of auxin-induced cell elongation in dgt plants is not due to insufficient turgor, as the osmotic potential of dgt cell sap is less (more negative) than that of VFN8. An auxin-induced increase in wall extensibility, as measured by the Instron technique, only occurs in the VFN8 plants. These data suggest dgt hypocotyls suffer a defect in the sequence of events culminating in auxin-induced cell wall loosening.

  5. Indy mutants: live long and prosper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart eFrankel

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Indy encodes the fly homologue of a mammalian transporter of di and tricarboxylatecomponents of the Krebs cycle. Reduced expression of fly Indy or two of the C. elegansIndy homologs leads to an increase in life span. Fly and worm tissues that play key roles inintermediary metabolism are also the places where Indy genes are expressed. One of themouse homologs of Indy (mIndy is mainly expressed in the liver. It has been hypothesizedthat decreased INDY activity creates a state similar to caloric restriction (CR. Thishypothesis is supported by the physiological similarities between Indy mutant flies on highcalorie food and control flies on CR, such as increased physical activity and decreases inweight, egg production, triglyceride levels, starvation resistance, and insulin signaling. Inaddition, Indy mutant flies undergo changes in mitochondrial biogenesis also observed inCR animals. Recent findings with mIndy knockout mice support and extend the findingsfrom flies. mIndy-/- mice display an increase in hepatic mitochondrial biogenesis, lipidoxidation and decreased hepatic lipogenesis. When mIndy-/- mice are fed high calorie foodthey are protected from adiposity and insulin resistance. These findings point to INDY as apotential drug target for the treatment of metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and obesity.

  6. Mouse genetics: Catalogue and scissors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Woong Lee

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic analysis of gene-specific knockout (KO mice hasrevolutionized our understanding of in vivo gene functions. Asthe use of mouse embryonic stem (ES cells is inevitable forconventional gene targeting, the generation of knockout miceremains a very time-consuming and expensive process. Toaccelerate the large-scale production and phenotype analyses ofKO mice, international efforts have organized global consortiasuch as the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMCand International Mouse Phenotype Consortium (IMPC, andthey are persistently expanding the KO mouse catalogue that ispublicly available for the researches studying specific genes ofinterests in vivo. However, new technologies, adoptingzinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs or Transcription Activator-LikeEffector (TALE Nucleases (TALENs to edit the mouse genome,are now emerging as valuable and effective shortcuts alternativefor the conventional gene targeting using ES cells. Here, weintroduce the recent achievement of IKMC, and evaluate thesignificance of ZFN/TALEN technology in mouse genetics.

  7. Mouse genetics: catalogue and scissors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Young Hoon; Baek, In-Jeoung; Seong, Je Kyung; Kim, Jin Soo; Lee, Han-Woong

    2012-12-01

    Phenotypic analysis of gene-specific knockout (KO) mice has revolutionized our understanding of in vivo gene functions. As the use of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells is inevitable for conventional gene targeting, the generation of knockout mice remains a very time-consuming and expensive process. To accelerate the large-scale production and phenotype analyses of KO mice, international efforts have organized global consortia such as the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) and International Mouse Phenotype Consortium (IMPC), and they are persistently expanding the KO mouse catalogue that is publicly available for the researches studying specific genes of interests in vivo. However, new technologies, adopting zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) or Transcription Activator-Like Effector (TALE) Nucleases (TALENs) to edit the mouse genome, are now emerging as valuable and effective shortcuts alternative for the conventional gene targeting using ES cells. Here, we introduce the recent achievement of IKMC, and evaluate the significance of ZFN/TALEN technology in mouse genetics.

  8. Gene editing in mouse zygotes using the CRISPR/Cas9 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wefers, Benedikt; Bashir, Sanum; Rossius, Jana; Wurst, Wolfgang; Kühn, Ralf

    2017-03-02

    The generation of targeted mouse mutants is a key technology for biomedical research. Using the CRISPR/Cas9 system for induction of targeted double-strand breaks, gene editing can be performed in a single step directly in mouse zygotes. This article covers the design of knockout and knockin alleles, preparation of reagents, microinjection or electroporation of zygotes and the genotyping of pups derived from gene editing projects. In addition we include a section for the control of experimental settings by targeting the Rosa26 locus and PCR based genotyping of blastocysts.

  9. The p53R172H Mutant Does Not Enhance Hepatocellular Carcinoma Development and Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahronian, Leanne G.; Driscoll, David R.; Klimstra, David S.; Lewis, Brian C.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is a highly deadly malignancy, accounting for approximately 800,000 deaths worldwide every year. Mutation of the p53 tumor suppressor gene is a common genetic change in HCC, present in 30% of cases. p53R175H (corresponding to p53R172H in mice) is a hotspot for mutation that demonstrates “prometastatic” gain-of-function in other cancer models. Since the frequency of p53 mutation increases with tumor grade in HCC, we hypothesized that p53R172H is a gain-of-function mutation in HCC that contributes to a decrease in tumor-free survival and an increase in metastasis. In an HCC mouse model, we found that p53R172H/flox mice do not have decreased survival, increased tumor incidence, or increased metastasis, relative to p53flox/flox littermates. Analysis of cell lines derived from both genotypes indicated that there are no differences in anchorage-independent growth and cell migration. However, shRNA-mediated knockdown of mutant p53 in p53R172H-expressing HCC cell lines resulted in decreased cell migration and anchorage-independent growth. Thus, although p53 mutant-expressing cells and tumors do not have enhanced properties relative to their p53 null counterparts, p53R172H-expressing HCC cells depend on this mutant for their transformation. p53 mutants have been previously shown to bind and inhibit the p53 family proteins p63 and p73. Interestingly, we find that the levels of p63 and p73 target genes are similar in p53 mutant and p53 null HCC cells. These data suggest that pathways regulated by these p53 family members are similarly impacted by p53R172H in mutant expressing cells, and by alternate mechanisms in p53 null cells, resulting in equivalent phenotypes. Consistent with this, we find that p53 null HCC cell lines display lower levels of the TA isoforms of p63 and p73 and higher levels of ΔNp63. Taken together these data point to the importance of p63 and p73 in constraining HCC progression. PMID:25885474

  10. Hereditary and histologic characteristics of the CF1/b cac mouse cataract model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Tomohiro; Nagai, Hiroaki; Kawashima, Takamune; Taniguchi, Yusuke; Koyabu, Nozomu; Takeshita, Ai; Kusakabe, Ken-Takeshi; Okada, Toshiya

    2014-10-01

    A substrain of mice originating from the CF1 strain (an outbred colony) reared at Osaka Prefecture University (CF1/b cac mice) develops cataracts beginning at 14 d old. Affected mice were fully viable and fertile and had developed cataracts by 22 d of age. The incidence of cataracts did not differ between male and female mice. Histologically, 14-wk-old CF1/b cac mice showed vacuolated lens epithelial cells, swollen lens fibers, many pyknotic nuclei, and vacuolation of the lens cortex. To elucidate the mode of inheritance, we analyzed heterozygous mutants hybrids generated from CF1/b cac and wildtype BALB/c mice and the offspring of the backcrossed heterozygous mutants. None of the heterozygous mutants was affected, but the ratio of affected to unaffected mice was 1:3 among the offspring of the heterozygous mutants. The initial genomewide screen of 20 affected backcrossed offspring (CF1/b cac × [CF1/b cac × BALB/c]) indicated that the mutant gene resides on chromosome 16. For further mapping, we used affected progeny of CF1/b cac × (CF1/b cac × MSM/Ms) mice. We concluded that the cataracts in CF1/b cac mice are inherited through an autosomal recessive mutation and that the mutant gene is located on mouse chromosome 16 between D16Mit5 and D16Mit92 and between D16Mit92 and D16Mit201. The mapping of the mutant gene of the CF1/b cac mice to mouse chromosome 16 provides the positional information necessary to identify the candidate gene responsible for the CF1/b cac phenotype.

  11. Mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with defects in acetate metabolism: isolation and characterization of Acn- mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCammon, M T

    1996-09-01

    The two carbon compounds, ethanol and acetate, can be oxidatively metabolized as well as assimilated into carbohydrate in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The distribution of acetate metabolic enzymes among several cellular compartments, mitochondria, peroxisomes, and cytoplasm makes it an intriguing system to study complex metabolic interactions. To investigate the complex process of carbon catabolism and assimilation, mutants unable to grow on acetate were isolated. One hundred five Acn- ("ACetate Nonutilizing") mutants were sorted into 21 complementation groups with an additional 20 single mutants. Five of the groups have defects in TCA cycle enzymes: MDH1, CIT1, ACO1, IDH1, and IDH2. A defect in RTG2, involved in the retrograde communication between the mitochondrion and the nucleus, was also identified. Four genes encode enzymes of the glyoxylate cycle and gluconeogenesis: ICL1, MLS1, MDH2, and PCK1. Five other genes appear to be defective in regulating metabolic activity since elevated levels of enzymes in several metabolic pathways, including the glyoxylate cycle, gluconeogenesis, and acetyl-CoA metabolism, were detected in these mutants: ACN8, ACN9, ACN17, ACN18, and ACN42. In summary, this analysis has identified at least 22 and as many as 41 different genes involved in acetate metabolism.

  12. Specific TP53 Mutants Overrepresented in Ovarian Cancer Impact CNV, TP53 Activity, Responses to Nutlin-3a, and Cell Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa K. Mullany

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary Action analyses of The Cancer Gene Atlas data sets show that many specific p53 missense and gain-of-function mutations are selectively overrepresented and functional in high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC. As homozygous alleles, p53 mutants are differentially associated with specific loss of heterozygosity (R273; chromosome 17; copy number variation (R175H; chromosome 9; and up-stream, cancer-related regulatory pathways. The expression of immune-related cytokines was selectively related to p53 status, showing for the first time that specific p53 mutants impact, and are related to, the immune subtype of ovarian cancer. Although the majority (31% of HGSCs exhibit loss of heterozygosity, a significant number (24% maintain a wild-type (WT allele and represent another HGSC subtype that is not well defined. Using human and mouse cell lines, we show that specific p53 mutants differentially alter endogenous WT p53 activity; target gene expression; and responses to nutlin-3a, a small molecular that activates WT p53 leading to apoptosis, providing “proof of principle” that ovarian cancer cells expressing WT and mutant alleles represent a distinct ovarian cancer subtype. We also show that siRNA knock down of endogenous p53 in cells expressing homozygous mutant alleles causes apoptosis, whereas cells expressing WT p53 (or are heterozygous for WT and mutant p53 alleles are highly resistant. Therefore, despite different gene regulatory pathways associated with specific p53 mutants, silencing mutant p53 might be a suitable, powerful, global strategy for blocking ovarian cancer growth in those tumors that rely on mutant p53 functions for survival. Knowing p53 mutational status in HGSC should permit new strategies tailored to control this disease.

  13. Defective kernel mutants of maize. I. Genetic and lethality studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuffer, M G; Sheridan, W F

    1980-08-01

    A planting of 3,919 M(1) kernels from normal ears crossed by EMS-treated pollen produced 3,461 M(1) plants and 3,172 selfed ears. These plants yielded 2,477 (72%) total heritable changes; the selfed ears yielded 2,457 (78%) recessive mutants, including 855 (27%) recessive kernel mutants and 8 (0.23%) viable dominant mutants. The ratio of recessive to dominant mutants was 201:1. The average mutation frequency for four known loci was three per 3,172 genomes analyzed. The estimated total number of loci mutated was 535 and the estimated number of kernel mutant loci mutated was 285. Among the 855 kernel mutants, 432 had a nonviable embryo, and 59 germinated but had a lethal seedling. A sample of 194 of the latter two types was tested for heritability, lethality, chromosome arm location and endosperm-embryo interaction between mutant and nonmutant tissues in special hyper-hypoploid combinations produced by manipulation of B-A translocations. The selected 194 mutants were characterized and catalogued according to endosperm phenotype and investigated to determine their effects on the morphology and development of the associated embryo. The possibility of rescuing some of the lethal mutants by covering the mutant embryo with a normal endosperm was investigated. Ninety of these 194 mutants were located on 17 of the 18 chromosome arms tested. Nineteen of the located mutants were examined to determine the effect of having a normal embryo in the same kernel with a mutant endosperm, and vice versa, as compared to the expression observed in kernels with both embryo and endosperm in a mutant condition. In the first situation, for three of the 19 mutants, the mutant endosperm was less extreme (the embryo helped); for seven cases, the mutant endosperm was more extreme (the embryo hindered); and for nine cases, there was no change. In the reverse situation, for four cases the normal endosperm helped the mutant embryo; for 14 cases there was no change and one case was inconclusive.

  14. Human anti-mouse antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, G G

    2000-06-01

    Human anti-mouse antibodies (HAMA) are human immunoglobulins with specificity for mouse immunoglobulins. This topic currently is of interest because of the increased use of monoclonal mouse antibodies as diagnostic reagents both for in vitro laboratory measurements and for in vivo imaging studies. Monoclonal mouse antibodies also are being used therapeutically. This short article reviews the production of HAMA in patients receiving monoclonal antibodies and illustrates the potential ways that HAMA can interfere with immunoassay measurements. Methods for measuring and neutralizing HAMA also are discussed.

  15. Mutants of downy mildew resistance in Lactuca sativa (lettuce).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubara, P A; Anderson, P A; Ochoa, O E; Michelmore, R W

    1994-07-01

    As part of our investigation of disease resistance in lettuce, we generated mutants that have lost resistance to Bremia lactucae, the casual fungus of downy mildew. Using a rapid and reliable screen, we identified 16 distinct mutants of Latuca sativa that have lost activity of one of four different downy mildew resistance genes (Dm). In all mutants, only a single Dm specificity was affected. Genetic analysis indicated that the lesions segregated as single, recessive mutations at the Dm loci. Dm3 was inactivated in nine of the mutants. One of five Dm 1 mutants was selected from a population of untreated seeds and therefore carried a spontaneous mutation. All other Dm1, Dm3, Dm5/8 and Dm7 mutants were derived from gamma- or fast neutron-irradiated seed. In two separate Dm 1 mutants and in each of the eight Dm3 mutants analyzed, at least one closely linked molecular marker was absent. Also, high molecular weight genomic DNA fragments that hybridized to a tightly linked molecular marker in wild type were either missing entirely or were truncated in two of the Dm3 mutants, providing additional evidence that deletions had occurred in these mutants. Absence of mutations at loci epistatic to the Dm genes suggested that such loci were either members of multigene families, were critical for plant survival, or encoded components of duplicated pathways for resistance; alternatively, the genes determining downy mildew resistance might be limited to the Dm loci.

  16. Forward genetic screen for auxin-deficient mutants by cytokinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lei; Luo, Pan; Di, Dong-Wei; Wang, Li; Wang, Ming; Lu, Cheng-Kai; Wei, Shao-Dong; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Tian-Zi; Amakorová, Petra; Strnad, Miroslav; Novák, Ondřej; Guo, Guang-Qin

    2015-07-06

    Identification of mutants with impairments in auxin biosynthesis and dynamics by forward genetic screening is hindered by the complexity, redundancy and necessity of the pathways involved. Furthermore, although a few auxin-deficient mutants have been recently identified by screening for altered responses to shade, ethylene, N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) or cytokinin (CK), there is still a lack of robust markers for systematically isolating such mutants. We hypothesized that a potentially suitable phenotypic marker is root curling induced by CK, as observed in the auxin biosynthesis mutant CK-induced root curling 1 / tryptophan aminotransferase of Arabidopsis 1 (ckrc1/taa1). Phenotypic observations, genetic analyses and biochemical complementation tests of Arabidopsis seedlings displaying the trait in large-scale genetic screens showed that it can facilitate isolation of mutants with perturbations in auxin biosynthesis, transport and signaling. However, unlike transport/signaling mutants, the curled (or wavy) root phenotypes of auxin-deficient mutants were significantly induced by CKs and could be rescued by exogenous auxins. Mutants allelic to several known auxin biosynthesis mutants were re-isolated, but several new classes of auxin-deficient mutants were also isolated. The findings show that CK-induced root curling provides an effective marker for discovering genes involved in auxin biosynthesis or homeostasis.

  17. Metabolic and Phenotypic Differences between Mice Producing a Werner Syndrome Helicase Mutant Protein and Wrn Null Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumailley, Lucie; Garand, Chantal; Dubois, Marie Julie; Johnson, F Brad; Marette, André; Lebel, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a premature aging disorder caused by mutations in a RecQ-family DNA helicase, WRN. Mice lacking part of the helicase domain of the WRN orthologue exhibit many phenotypic features of WS, including metabolic abnormalities and a shorter mean life span. In contrast, mice lacking the entire Wrn protein (i.e. Wrn null mice) do not exhibit a premature aging phenotype. In this study, we used a targeted mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approach to identify serum metabolites that are differentially altered in young Wrn helicase mutant and Wrn null mice. An antibody-based quantification of 43 serum cytokines and markers of cardiovascular disease risk complemented this study. We found that Wrn helicase mutants exhibited elevated and decreased levels, respectively, of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-18. Wrn helicase mutants also exhibited an increase in serum hydroxyproline and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, markers of extracellular matrix remodeling of the vascular system and inflammation in aging. We also observed an abnormal increase in the ratio of very long chain to short chain lysophosphatidylcholines in the Wrn helicase mutants underlying a peroxisome perturbation in these mice. Remarkably, the Wrn mutant helicase protein was mislocalized to the endoplasmic reticulum and the peroxisomal fractions in liver tissues. Additional analyses with mouse embryonic fibroblasts indicated a severe defect of the autophagy flux in cells derived from Wrn helicase mutants compared to wild type and Wrn null animals. These results indicate that the deleterious effects of the helicase-deficient Wrn protein are mediated by the dysfunction of several cellular organelles.

  18. Metabolic and Phenotypic Differences between Mice Producing a Werner Syndrome Helicase Mutant Protein and Wrn Null Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Aumailley

    Full Text Available Werner syndrome (WS is a premature aging disorder caused by mutations in a RecQ-family DNA helicase, WRN. Mice lacking part of the helicase domain of the WRN orthologue exhibit many phenotypic features of WS, including metabolic abnormalities and a shorter mean life span. In contrast, mice lacking the entire Wrn protein (i.e. Wrn null mice do not exhibit a premature aging phenotype. In this study, we used a targeted mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approach to identify serum metabolites that are differentially altered in young Wrn helicase mutant and Wrn null mice. An antibody-based quantification of 43 serum cytokines and markers of cardiovascular disease risk complemented this study. We found that Wrn helicase mutants exhibited elevated and decreased levels, respectively, of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-18. Wrn helicase mutants also exhibited an increase in serum hydroxyproline and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, markers of extracellular matrix remodeling of the vascular system and inflammation in aging. We also observed an abnormal increase in the ratio of very long chain to short chain lysophosphatidylcholines in the Wrn helicase mutants underlying a peroxisome perturbation in these mice. Remarkably, the Wrn mutant helicase protein was mislocalized to the endoplasmic reticulum and the peroxisomal fractions in liver tissues. Additional analyses with mouse embryonic fibroblasts indicated a severe defect of the autophagy flux in cells derived from Wrn helicase mutants compared to wild type and Wrn null animals. These results indicate that the deleterious effects of the helicase-deficient Wrn protein are mediated by the dysfunction of several cellular organelles.

  19. Inducible superoxide dismutase 1 aggregation in transgenic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mouse fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Bradley J; Lopes, Elizabeth C; Cheema, Surindar S

    2004-04-01

    High molecular weight detergent-insoluble complexes of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) enzyme are a biochemical abnormality associated with mutant SOD1-linked familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS). In the present study, SOD1 protein from spinal cords of transgenic FALS mice was fractionated according to solubility in saline, zwitterionic, non-ionic or anionic detergents. Both endogenous mouse SOD1 and mutant human SOD1 were least soluble in SDS, followed by NP-40 and CHAPS, with an eight-fold greater detergent resistance of mutant protein overall. Importantly, high molecular weight mutant SOD1 complexes were isolated with SDS-extraction only. To reproduce SOD1 aggregate pathology in vitro, primary fibroblasts were isolated and cultured from neonatal transgenic FALS mice. Fibroblasts expressed abundant mutant SOD1 without spontaneous aggregation over time with passage. Proteasomal inhibition of cultures using lactacystin induced dose-dependent aggregation and increased the SDS-insoluble fraction of mutant SOD1, but not endogenous SOD1. In contrast, paraquat-mediated superoxide stress in fibroblasts promoted aggregation of endogenous SOD1, but not mutant SOD1. Treatment of cultures with peroxynitrite or the copper chelator diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) alone did not modulate aggregation. However, DDC inhibited lactacystin-induced mutant SOD1 aggregation in transgenic fibroblasts, while exogenous copper slightly augmented aggregation. These data suggest that SOD1 aggregates may derive from proteasomal or oxidation-mediated oligomerisation pathways from mutant and endogenous subunits respectively. Furthermore, these pathways may be affected by copper availability. We propose that non-neural cultures such as these transgenic fibroblasts with inducible SOD1 aggregation may be useful for rapid screening of compounds with anti-aggregation potential in FALS.

  20. Mouse models of medulloblastoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaochong Wu; Paul A. Northcott; Sidney Croul; Michael D. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor. Despite its prevalence and importance in pediatric neuro-oncology, the genes and pathways responsible for its initiation, maintenance,and progression remain poorly understood. Genetically engineered mouse models are an essential tool for uncovering the molecular and cellular basis of human diseases, including cancer, and serve a valuable role as preclinical models for testing targeted therapies. In this review, we summarize how such models have been successfully applied to the study of medulloblastoma over the past decade and what we might expect in the coming years.

  1. Hypoplastic basement membrane of the lens anlage in the inheritable lens aplastic mouse (lap mouse).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aso, S; Baba, R; Noda, S; Ikuno, S; Fujita, M

    2000-04-01

    Adult homozygous lap mice show various eye abnormalities such as aphakia, retinal disorganization, and dysplasia of the cornea and anterior chamber. In the fetal eye of a homozygous lap mouse, the lens placode appears to develop normally. However, the lens vesicle develops abnormally to form a mass of cells without a cavity, and the mass vanishes soon afterward. Apoptotic cell death is associated with the disappearance of the lens anlage. We examined the basement membranes of the lens anlage of this mutant by immunohistochemical methods under light microscopy using antibodies against basement membrane components of the lens anlage, type IV collagen, fibronectin, laminin, heparan sulfate proteoglycan, and entactin and by transmission electron microscopy. Immunohistochemistry showed the distribution and intensity of antibody binding to the lens anlage to be almost the same for each these antibodies regardless of the stage of gestation or whether the anlagen were from normal BALB/c or lap mice. Thus, positive continuous reactions were observed around the exterior region of the lens anlage from day 10 of gestation for type IV collagen, fibronectin, laminin, heparan sulfate proteoglycan antibodies, and at least from day 11of gestation for entactin antibody. The basement membrane lamina densa of both normal and lap mice was shown by electron microscopy to be discontinuous at days 10 and 10.5 of gestation. However, by day 11 the lamina densa was continuous in the lens anlagen of normal mice but still discontinuous in the lap mice. By day 12 of gestation, the lamina densa had thickened markedly in normal mice, whereas in lap mice it remained discontinuous and its thinness indicated hypoplasia. These results indicate that, while all basement components examined are produced and deposited in the normal region of the lens anlage in the lap mouse, the basement membrane is, for some reason, imperfectly formed. The time at which hypoplasia of the basement membrane was observed

  2. Transgenic mouse models of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuno, M; Adachi, H; Inukai, A; Sobue, G

    2003-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a late-onset motor neuron disease characterized by proximal muscle atrophy, weakness, contraction fasciculations, and bulbar involvement. Only males develop symptoms, while female carriers usually are asymptomatic. A specific treatment for SBMA has not been established. The molecular basis of SBMA is the expansion of a trinucleotide CAG repeat, which encodes the polyglutamine (polyQ) tract, in the first exon of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. The pathologic hallmark is nuclear inclusions (NIs) containing the mutant and truncated AR with expanded polyQ in the residual motor neurons in the brainstem and spinal cord as well as in some other visceral organs. Several transgenic (Tg) mouse models have been created for studying the pathogenesis of SBMA. The Tg mouse model carrying pure 239 CAGs under human AR promoter and another model carrying truncated AR with expanded CAGs show motor impairment and nuclear NIs in spinal motor neurons. Interestingly, Tg mice carrying full-length human AR with expanded polyQ demonstrate progressive motor impairment and neurogenic pathology as well as sexual difference of phenotypes. These models recapitulate the phenotypic expression observed in SBMA. The ligand-dependent nuclear localization of the mutant AR is found to be involved in the disease mechanism, and hormonal therapy is suggested to be a therapeutic approach applicable to SBMA.

  3. A mouse model for Meckel syndrome type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Susan A; Collin, Gayle B; Bronson, Roderick T; Naggert, Jürgen K; Liu, Dong P; Akeson, Ellen C; Davisson, Muriel T

    2009-04-01

    Meckel-Gruber syndrome type 3 (MKS3; OMIM 607361) is a severe autosomal recessive disorder characterized by bilateral polycystic kidney disease. Other malformations associated with MKS3 include cystic changes in the liver, polydactyly, and brain abnormalities (occipital encephalocele, hydrocephalus, and Dandy Walker-type cerebellar anomalies). The disorder is hypothesized to be caused by defects in primary cilia. In humans, the underlying mutated gene, TMEM67, encodes transmembrane protein 67, also called meckelin (OMIM 609884), which is an integral protein of the renal epithelial cell and membrane of the primary cilium. Here, we describe a spontaneous deletion of the mouse ortholog, Tmem67, which results in polycystic kidney disease and death by 3 wk after birth. Hydrocephalus also occurs in some mutants. We verified the mutated gene by transgenic rescue and characterized the phenotype with microcomputed tomography, histology, scanning electron microscopy, and immunohistochemistry. This mutant provides a mouse model for MKS3 and adds to the growing set of mammalian models essential for studying the role of the primary cilium in kidney function.

  4. Analysis of mammalian gene function through broad based phenotypic screens across a consortium of mouse clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, David J; Adams, Niels C; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Antonio; Ali-Hadji, Dalila; Amann, Gregory; André, Philippe; Atkins, Sarah; Auburtin, Aurelie; Ayadi, Abdel; Becker, Julien; Becker, Lore; Bedu, Elodie; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Birling, Marie-Christine; Blake, Andrew; Bottomley, Joanna; Bowl, Mike; Brault, Véronique; Busch, Dirk H; Bussell, James N; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Cater, Heather; Champy, Marie-France; Charles, Philippe; Chevalier, Claire; Chiani, Francesco; Codner, Gemma F; Combe, Roy; Cox, Roger; Dalloneau, Emilie; Dierich, André; Di Fenza, Armida; Doe, Brendan; Duchon, Arnaud; Eickelberg, Oliver; Esapa, Chris T; El Fertak, Lahcen; Feigel, Tanja; Emelyanova, Irina; Estabel, Jeanne; Favor, Jack; Flenniken, Ann; Gambadoro, Alessia; Garrett, Lilian; Gates, Hilary; Gerdin, Anna-Karin; Gkoutos, George; Greenaway, Simon; Glasl, Lisa; Goetz, Patrice; Da Cruz, Isabelle Goncalves; Götz, Alexander; Graw, Jochen; Guimond, Alain; Hans, Wolfgang; Hicks, Geoff; Hölter, Sabine M; Höfler, Heinz; Hancock, John M; Hoehndorf, Robert; Hough, Tertius; Houghton, Richard; Hurt, Anja; Ivandic, Boris; Jacobs, Hughes; Jacquot, Sylvie; Jones, Nora; Karp, Natasha A; Katus, Hugo A; Kitchen, Sharon; Klein-Rodewald, Tanja; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Lalanne, Valerie; Leblanc, Sophie; Lengger, Christoph; le Marchand, Elise; Ludwig, Tonia; Lux, Aline; McKerlie, Colin; Maier, Holger; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Marschall, Susan; Mark, Manuel; Melvin, David G; Meziane, Hamid; Micklich, Kateryna; Mittelhauser, Christophe; Monassier, Laurent; Moulaert, David; Muller, Stéphanie; Naton, Beatrix; Neff, Frauke; Nolan, Patrick M; Nutter, Lauryl MJ; Ollert, Markus; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Pellegata, Natalia S; Peter, Emilie; Petit-Demoulière, Benoit; Pickard, Amanda; Podrini, Christine; Potter, Paul; Pouilly, Laurent; Puk, Oliver; Richardson, David; Rousseau, Stephane; Quintanilla-Fend, Leticia; Quwailid, Mohamed M; Racz, Ildiko; Rathkolb, Birgit; Riet, Fabrice; Rossant, Janet; Roux, Michel; Rozman, Jan; Ryder, Ed; Salisbury, Jennifer; Santos, Luis; Schäble, Karl-Heinz; Schiller, Evelyn; Schrewe, Anja; Schulz, Holger; Steinkamp, Ralf; Simon, Michelle; Stewart, Michelle; Stöger, Claudia; Stöger, Tobias; Sun, Minxuan; Sunter, David; Teboul, Lydia; Tilly, Isabelle; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P; Tost, Monica; Treise, Irina; Vasseur, Laurent; Velot, Emilie; Vogt-Weisenhorn, Daniela; Wagner, Christelle; Walling, Alison; Weber, Bruno; Wendling, Olivia; Westerberg, Henrik; Willershäuser, Monja; Wolf, Eckhard; Wolter, Anne; Wood, Joe; Wurst, Wolfgang; Yildirim, Ali Önder; Zeh, Ramona; Zimmer, Andreas; Zimprich, Annemarie

    2015-01-01

    The function of the majority of genes in the mouse and human genomes remains unknown. The mouse ES cell knockout resource provides a basis for characterisation of relationships between gene and phenotype. The EUMODIC consortium developed and validated robust methodologies for broad-based phenotyping of knockouts through a pipeline comprising 20 disease-orientated platforms. We developed novel statistical methods for pipeline design and data analysis aimed at detecting reproducible phenotypes with high power. We acquired phenotype data from 449 mutant alleles, representing 320 unique genes, of which half had no prior functional annotation. We captured data from over 27,000 mice finding that 83% of the mutant lines are phenodeviant, with 65% demonstrating pleiotropy. Surprisingly, we found significant differences in phenotype annotation according to zygosity. Novel phenotypes were uncovered for many genes with unknown function providing a powerful basis for hypothesis generation and further investigation in diverse systems. PMID:26214591

  5. Construction and Genetic Analysis of Murine Hepatitis Virus Strain A59 Nsp16 Temperature Sensitive Mutant and the Revertant Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-hui Chang; Bao-jun Luo; Pin Lu; Lei Lin; Xiao-yan Wu; Jing Li; Yi Hu; Qing-yu Zhu

    2011-01-01

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) are generally associated with respiratory and enteric infections and have long been recognized as important pathogens of livestock and companion animals. Mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) is a widely studied model system for Coronavirus replication and pathogenesis. In this study, we created a MHV-A59 temperature sensitive (ts) mutant Wu"-ts18(cd) using the recombinant vaccinia reverse genetics system. Virus replication assay in 17C1-1 cells showed the plaque phenotype and replication characterization of constructed Wu"-ts18(cd) were indistinguishable from the reported ts mutant Wu"-ts 18. Then we cultured the ts mutant Wu"-ts 18(cd) at non-permissive temperature 39.5℃, which "forced" the ts recombinant virus to use second-site mutation to revert from a ts to a non-ts phenotype. Sequence analysis showed most of the revertants had the same single amino acid mutation at Nsp16 position 43. The single amino acid mutation at Nsp16 position 76 or position 130 could also revert the ts mutant Wu"-ts 18 (cd) to non-ts phenotype, an additional independent mutation in Nsp13 position 115 played an important role on plaque size. The results provided us with genetic information on the functional determinants of Nsp16. This allowed us to build up a more reasonable model of CoVs replication-transcription complex.

  6. Visualizing allele-specific expression in single cells reveals epigenetic mosaicism in an H19 loss-of-imprinting mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginart, Paul; Kalish, Jennifer M; Jiang, Connie L; Yu, Alice C; Bartolomei, Marisa S; Raj, Arjun

    2016-03-01

    Imprinting is a classic mammalian epigenetic phenomenon that results in expression from a single parental allele. Imprinting defects can lead to inappropriate expression from the normally silenced allele, but it remains unclear whether every cell in a mutant organism follows the population average, which would have profound implications for human imprinting disorders. Here, we apply a new fluorescence in situ hybridization method that measures allele-specific expression in single cells to address this question in mutants exhibiting aberrant H19/Igf2 (insulin-like growth factor 2) imprinting. We show that mutant primary embryonic mouse fibroblasts are comprised of two subpopulations: one expressing both H19 alleles and another expressing only the maternal copy. Only in the latter cell population is Igf2 expression detected. Furthermore, the two subpopulations are stable in that cells do not interconvert between the two expression patterns. Combined small input methylation analysis and transcriptional imaging revealed that these two mutant subpopulations exhibit distinct methylation patterns at their imprinting control regions. Consistently, pharmacological inhibition of DNA methylation reduced the proportion of monoallelic cells. Importantly, we observed that the same two subpopulations are also present in vivo within murine cardiac tissue. Our results establish that imprinting disorders can display striking single-cell heterogeneity in their molecular phenotypes and suggest that such heterogeneity may underlie epigenetic mosaicism in human imprinting disorders.

  7. Plant genetics: increased outcrossing in hothead mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Peng; Chan, Simon W-L; Shah, Govind A; Jacobsen, Steve E

    2006-09-28

    Arising from: S. J. Lolle, J. L. Victor, J. M. Young & R. E. Pruitt 434, 505-509 (2005); Lolle et al. reply. Lolle et al. report that loss-of-function alleles of the HOTHEAD (HTH) gene in Arabidopsis thaliana are genetically unstable, giving rise to wild-type revertants. On the basis of the reversion of many other genetic markers in hth plants, they suggested a model in which a cache of extragenomic information could cause genes to revert to the genotype of previous generations. In our attempts to reproduce this phenomenon, we discovered that hth mutants show a marked tendency to outcross (unlike wild-type A. thaliana, which is almost exclusively self-fertilizing). Moreover, when hth plants are grown in isolation, their genetic inheritance is completely stable. These results may provide an alternative explanation for the genome wide non-mendelian inheritance reported by Lolle et al.

  8. Google: a narrativa de uma marca mutante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizete de Azevedo Kreutz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available As marcas mutantes já fazem parte de nossa realidade, embora ainda não totalmente percebidas e/ou aceitas como tal. O presente artigo busca refletir sobre a relevância dessas novas estratégias de comunicação e branding, identificando suas principais características. Para isso, utilizamos o método de estudo de caso, o Google, ancorado nos métodos de pesquisa bibliográfica e de internet. A escolha foi intencional, posto que a organização é referência em sua categoria, mecanismo de busca, e reflete essa estratégia comunicacional contemporânea. Como resultado, as informações obtidas nos possibilitam compreender essa tendência de comportamento de marca que busca a interação com seus públicos.

  9. Alterations in Striatal Synaptic Transmission are Consistent across Genetic Mouse Models of Huntington's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian M Cummings

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the identification of the gene responsible for HD (Huntington's disease, many genetic mouse models have been generated. Each employs a unique approach for delivery of the mutated gene and has a different CAG repeat length and background strain. The resultant diversity in the genetic context and phenotypes of these models has led to extensive debate regarding the relevance of each model to the human disorder. Here, we compare and contrast the striatal synaptic phenotypes of two models of HD, namely the YAC128 mouse, which carries the full-length huntingtin gene on a yeast artificial chromosome, and the CAG140 KI*** (knock-in mouse, which carries a human/mouse chimaeric gene that is expressed in the context of the mouse genome, with our previously published data obtained from the R6/2 mouse, which is transgenic for exon 1 mutant huntingtin. We show that striatal MSNs (medium-sized spiny neurons in YAC128 and CAG140 KI mice have similar electrophysiological phenotypes to that of the R6/2 mouse. These include a progressive increase in membrane input resistance, a reduction in membrane capacitance, a lower frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents and a greater frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in a subpopulation of striatal neurons. Thus, despite differences in the context of the inserted gene between these three models of HD, the primary electrophysiological changes observed in striatal MSNs are consistent. The outcomes suggest that the changes are due to the expression of mutant huntingtin and such alterations can be extended to the human condition.

  10. Alterations in striatal synaptic transmission are consistent across genetic mouse models of Huntington's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian M Cummings

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the identification of the gene responsible for HD (Huntington's disease, many genetic mouse models have been generated. Each employs a unique approach for delivery of the mutated gene and has a different CAG repeat length and background strain. The resultant diversity in the genetic context and phenotypes of these models has led to extensive debate regarding the relevance of each model to the human disorder. Here, we compare and contrast the striatal synaptic phenotypes of two models of HD, namely the YAC128 mouse, which carries the full-length huntingtin gene on a yeast artificial chromosome, and the CAG140 KI (knock-in mouse, which carries a human/mouse chimaeric gene that is expressed in the context of the mouse genome, with our previously published data obtained from the R6/2 mouse, which is transgenic for exon 1 mutant huntingtin. We show that striatal MSNs (medium-sized spiny neurons in YAC128 and CAG140 KI mice have similar electrophysiological phenotypes to that of the R6/2 mouse. These include a progressive increase in membrane input resistance, a reduction in membrane capacitance, a lower frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents and a greater frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in a subpopulation of striatal neurons. Thus, despite differences in the context of the inserted gene between these three models of HD, the primary electrophysiological changes observed in striatal MSNs are consistent. The outcomes suggest that the changes are due to the expression of mutant huntingtin and such alterations can be extended to the human condition.

  11. Burn mouse models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calum, Henrik; Høiby, Niels; Moser, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Severe thermal injury induces immunosuppression, involving all parts of the immune system, especially when large fractions of the total body surface area are affected. An animal model was established to characterize the burn-induced immunosuppression. In our novel mouse model a 6 % third-degree b......Severe thermal injury induces immunosuppression, involving all parts of the immune system, especially when large fractions of the total body surface area are affected. An animal model was established to characterize the burn-induced immunosuppression. In our novel mouse model a 6 % third......-degree burn injury was induced with a hot-air blower. The third-degree burn was confirmed histologically. At 48 h, a decline in the concentration of peripheral blood leucocytes was observed in the group of mice with burn wound. The reduction was ascribed to the decline in concentration of polymorphonuclear...... neutrophil leucocytes and monocytes. When infecting the skin with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a dissemination of bacteria was observed only in the burn wound group. Histological characterization of the skin showed an increased polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes dominated inflammation in the group of mice...

  12. Mutants of Cercospora kikuchii altered in cercosporin synthesis and pathogenicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upchurch, R.G.; Walker, D.C.; Rollins, J.A.; Ehrenshaft, M.; Daub, M.E. (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh (United States))

    1991-10-01

    The authors have obtained spontaneous and UV-induced stable mutants, altered in the synthesis of cercosporin, of the fungal soybean pathogen Cercospora kikuchii. The mutants were isolated on the basis of colony color on minimal medium. The UV-induced mutants accumulated, at most, 2% of wild-type cercosporin levels on all media tested. In contrast, cercosporin accumulation by the spontaneous mutants was strongly medium regulated, occurring only on potato dextrose medium but at concentrations comparable to those produced by the wild-type strain. UV-induced mutants unable to synthesize cercosporin on any medium were unable to incite lesions when inoculated onto the soybean host. Cercosporin was reproducibly isolated from all inoculated leaves showing lesions. Although cercosporin involvement in disease has been indirectly suggested by many previous studies, this is the first report in which mutants blocked in cercosporin synthesis have been used to demonstrate that cercosporin is a crucial pathogenicity factor for this fungal genus.

  13. Mutants of Cercospora kikuchii Altered in Cercosporin Synthesis and Pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upchurch, R G; Walker, D C; Rollins, J A; Ehrenshaft, M; Daub, M E

    1991-10-01

    We have obtained spontaneous and UV-induced stable mutants, altered in the synthesis of cercosporin, of the fungal soybean pathogen Cercospora kikuchii. The mutants were isolated on the basis of colony color on minimal medium. The UV-induced mutants accumulated, at most, 2% of wild-type cercosporin levels on all media tested. In contrast, cercosporin accumulation by the spontaneous mutants was strongly medium regulated, occurring only on potato dextrose medium but at concentrations comparable to those produced by the wild-type strain. UV-induced mutants unable to synthesize cercosporin on any medium were unable to incite lesions when inoculated onto the soybean host. Cercosporin was reproducibly isolated from all inoculated leaves showing lesions. Although cercosporin involvement in disease has been indirectly suggested by many previous studies, this is the first report in which mutants blocked in cercosporin synthesis have been used to demonstrate that cercosporin is a crucial pathogenicity factor for this fungal genus.

  14. Colony mutants of compatible nocardiae displaying variations in recombining capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownell, G H; Walsh, R S

    1972-03-01

    Colonial morphology mutants of Nocardia erythropolis were isolated following ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The alleles rou-1/smo-1 were located by recombinant analysis and found to be linked to previously mapped characters. On the basis of recombinant class type patterns obtained from various selective characters it was postulated that the rou-1 allele may span a region of unique nucleotides in the Mat-Ce genome. Recombination frequencies of rou-1 and smo-2 bearing mutants of the Mat-Ce mating type were found to differ by over 1000 fold. Attempts to demonstrate that low recombination frequencies produced by the Smo mutants were due to Rec(-) genes were unsuccessful. No increased sensitivity to either UV or X irradiation was observed by the Smo mutants. Acriflavine treatment of either Rou or Smo colony mutants failed to accelerate reversion or to alter the recombining potentials of the mutants.

  15. Screening and identification of mutants of Magnaporthe grisea by REMI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Ruyi; LIU Juan; ZHOU Yijun; FAN Yongjian; ZHENG Xiaobo

    2007-01-01

    The plasmid pUCATPH was used to establish a transformation system in wild-type isolate M131 of Magnaporthe grisea.Six hundred and thirty-nine transformants were obtained by restriction enzyme-mediated integration (REMI) with hygromycin B (hyg B) resistance as a tag.Morphological analysis of two of the REMI mutants confirmed that they produced little melanin under black light and continued for three generations.Pathogenicity identification of six mutants screened proved that they made pathogenicity changes on three sets of differential varieties with different resistance genes.Rep-PCR analyses showed that two morphological mutants and two pathogenicity mutants differed from wild-type isolate M131 at the molecular level.RFLP analyses were performed to study the four mutants at the molecular level and the integration sites of the plasmid DNA.The results showed that the plasmid was inserted into all four mutants and that the insertion sites were random.

  16. Von Willebrand Factor Abnormalities Studied in the Mouse Model: What We Learned about VWF Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Casari, Caterina; Lenting, Peter J.; Christophe, Olivier D.; Denis, Cécile V.

    2013-01-01

    Up until recently, von Willebrand Factor (VWF) structure-function relationships have only been studied through in vitro approaches. A powerful technique known as hydrodynamic gene transfer, which allows transient expression of a transgene by mouse hepatocytes, has led to an important shift in VWF research. Indeed this approach has now enabled us to transiently express a number of VWF mutants in VWF-deficient mice in order to test the relative importance of specific residues in different aspec...

  17. Does murine spermatogenesis require WNT signalling? A lesson from Gpr177 conditional knockout mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Su-Ren; Tang, J-X; Cheng, J-M; Hao, X-X; Wang, Y-Q; Wang, X-X; Liu, Y-X

    2016-01-01

    Wingless-related MMTV integration site (WNT) proteins and several other components of the WNT signalling pathway are expressed in the murine testes. However, mice mutant for WNT signalling effector β-catenin using different Cre drivers have phenotypes that are inconsistent with each other. The complexity and overlapping expression of WNT signalling cascades have prevented researchers from dissecting their function in spermatogenesis. Depletion of the Gpr177 gene (the mouse orthologue of Droso...

  18. Tissue-specific metabolic activation and mutagenicity of 3-nitrobenzanthrone in MutaMouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guosheng; Gingerich, John; Soper, Lynda; Douglas, George R; White, Paul A

    2008-10-01

    3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) is a mutagen and suspected human carcinogen detected in diesel exhaust, airborne particulate matter, and urban soil. We investigated the tissue specific mutagenicity of 3-NBA at the lacZ locus of transgenic MutaMouse following acute single dose or 28-day repeated-dose oral administration. In the acute high dose (50 mg/kg) exposure, increased lacZ mutant frequency was observed in bone marrow and colonic epithelium, but not in liver and bladder. In the repeated-dose study, a dose-dependent increase in lacZ mutant frequency was observed in bone marrow and liver (2- and 4-fold increase above control), but not in lung or intestinal epithelium. In addition, a concentration-dependent increase in mutant frequency (8.5-fold above control) was observed for MutaMouse FE1 lung epithelial cells exposed in vitro. 1-Nitropyrene reductase, 3-NBA reductase, and acetyltransferase activities were measured in a variety of MutaMouse specimens in an effort to link metabolic activation and mutagenicity. High 3-NBA nitroreductase activities were observed in lung, liver, colon and bladder, and detectable N-acetyltransferase activities were found in all tissues except bone marrow. The relatively high 3-NBA nitroreductase activity in MutaMouse tissues, as compared with those in Salmonella TA98 and TA100, suggests that 3-NBA is readily reduced and activated in vivo. High 3-NBA nitroreductase levels in liver and colon are consistent with the elevated lacZ mutant frequency values, and previously noted inductions of hepatic DNA adducts. Despite an absence of induced lacZ mutations, the highest 3-NBA reductase activity was detected in lung. Further studies are warranted, especially following inhalation or intratracheal exposures. Published 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Increased susceptibility to cortical spreading depression in the mouse model of familial hemiplegic migraine type 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Leo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Familial hemiplegic migraine type 2 (FHM2 is an autosomal dominant form of migraine with aura that is caused by mutations of the α2-subunit of the Na,K-ATPase, an isoform almost exclusively expressed in astrocytes in the adult brain. We generated the first FHM2 knock-in mouse model carrying the human W887R mutation in the Atp1a2 orthologous gene. Homozygous Atp1a2(R887/R887 mutants died just after birth, while heterozygous Atp1a2(+/R887 mice showed no apparent clinical phenotype. The mutant α2 Na,K-ATPase protein was barely detectable in the brain of homozygous mutants and strongly reduced in the brain of heterozygous mutants, likely as a consequence of endoplasmic reticulum retention and subsequent proteasomal degradation, as we demonstrate in transfected cells. In vivo analysis of cortical spreading depression (CSD, the phenomenon underlying migraine aura, revealed a decreased induction threshold and an increased velocity of propagation in the heterozygous FHM2 mouse. Since several lines of evidence involve a specific role of the glial α2 Na,K pump in active reuptake of glutamate from the synaptic cleft, we hypothesize that CSD facilitation in the FHM2 mouse model is sustained by inefficient glutamate clearance by astrocytes and consequent increased cortical excitatory neurotransmission. The demonstration that FHM2 and FHM1 mutations share the ability to facilitate induction and propagation of CSD in mouse models further support the role of CSD as a key migraine trigger.

  20. Expression of Caytaxin protein in Cayman Ataxia mouse models correlates with phenotype severity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine M Sikora

    Full Text Available Caytaxin is a highly-conserved protein, which is encoded by the Atcay/ATCAY gene. Mutations in Atcay/ATCAY have been identified as causative of cerebellar disorders such as the rare hereditary disease Cayman ataxia in humans, generalized dystonia in the dystonic (dt rat, and marked motor defects in three ataxic mouse lines. While several lines of evidence suggest that Caytaxin plays a critical role in maintaining nervous system processes, the physiological function of Caytaxin has not been fully characterized. In the study presented here, we generated novel specific monoclonal antibodies against full-length Caytaxin to examine endogenous Caytaxin expression in wild type and Atcay mutant mouse lines. Caytaxin protein is absent from brain tissues in the two severely ataxic Atcay(jit (jittery and Atcay(swd (sidewinder mutant lines, and markedly decreased in the mildly ataxic/dystonic Atcay(ji-hes (hesitant line, indicating a correlation between Caytaxin expression and disease severity. As the expression of wild type human Caytaxin in mutant sidewinder and jittery mice rescues the ataxic phenotype, Caytaxin's physiological function appears to be conserved between the human and mouse orthologs. Across multiple species and in several neuronal cell lines Caytaxin is expressed as several protein isoforms, the two largest of which are caused by the usage of conserved methionine translation start sites. The work described in this manuscript presents an initial characterization of the Caytaxin protein and its expression in wild type and several mutant mouse models. Utilizing these animal models of human Cayman Ataxia will now allow an in-depth analysis to elucidate Caytaxin's role in maintaining normal neuronal function.

  1. Preliminary study on a gravity-insensitive rice mutant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金静; 朱诚; 张红心; 孙宗修

    2004-01-01

    A gravity-insensitive mutant was isolated from rice (Oryza sativa L. Cv. Zhonghua 11) transformed by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The mutant's shoot growth (prostrate growth) was insensitive to gravity; whereas root growth displayed a normal positive gravitropism.Histological observation of root caps and leaf sheaths indicated that there was no significant difference in the number and size of amyloplasts in cells of the mutant and cells of the wild type

  2. Preliminary study on a gravity-insensitive rice mutant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金静; 朱诚; 张红心; 孙宗修

    2004-01-01

    A gravity-insensitive mutant was isolated from rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Zhonghua 11) transformed by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The mutant's shoot growth (prostrate growth) was insensitive to gravity; whereas root growth displayed a normal positive gravitropism. Histological observation of root caps and leaf sheaths indicated that there was no significant difference in the number and size of amyloplasts in cells of the mutant and cells of the wild type.

  3. [Eremothecium ashbyii mutants resistant to 2,6-diaminopurine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, A I; Beburov, M Iu; Zhdanov, V G

    1975-01-01

    3 groups of Eremothecium ashbyii mutants resistant to 5-10(-3) M 2,6-diaminopurine (DAP) ahve been obtained. The mutants of the 1st group (Dap-r) are selected from the initial susceptible strain by the ability to grow in the presence of 5-10(-3) M DAP. The mutants of the 2nd group (Azg-Dap-r) are selected in the selective background of two analogues of 5-10(-3) M DAP and 10(-4) M 8-azaguanine (AG). The mutants of the 3rd group (Azg-r - DAP-r) are isolated from the mutant Azg-r 34 resistant to 10(-4) M AG. The results of studying cross-resistance of mutants to DAP, AG and 8-azaadenine (AA) show that Dap-r and Azg-Dap-r mutants in contrast to Azg-r - Dap-r, have common phenotypic properties and can grow only on the analogues of adenine. DAP, but not AA, eliminates the inhibitory effect of AG on the growth of these mutants. This effect is probably due to deaminating DAP to guanine. Mutants Azg-r - Dap-r retain the initial resistance to 10(-4) M AG, but are susceptible to higher concentrations of AG and in this case DAP does not eliminate the inhibitory effect of AG. In all mutants obtained the effectiveness of the incorporation of 14C-adenine (but not 14C-guanine) is sharply reduced, thus indicating the absence of adenosine-monophosphate pyrophosphorylase activity. The mutants do not excrete purine-like compounds into the medium. In the course of the continuous growth of mutants in the presence of DAP but not of guanine the red intracellular pigment is formed which seems to be a complex of riboflavin with DAP. A disturbance in the synthesis of adenosine monophosphate pyrophosphorylase does not influence practically the level of the synthesis of riboflavin in E. ashbyii.

  4. Fatty acid biosynthesis in novel ufa mutants of Neurospora crassa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich-Tanrikulu, M; Stafford, A E; Lin, J T; Makapugay, M I; Fuller, G; McKeon, T A

    1994-10-01

    New mutants of Neurospora crassa having the ufa phenotype have been isolated. Two of these mutants, like previously identified ufa mutants, require an unsaturated fatty acid for growth and are almost completely blocked in the de novo synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids. The new mutations map to a different chromosomal location than previously characterized ufa mutations. This implies that at least one additional genetic locus controls the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids in Neurospora.

  5. The "Goldilocks Effect" in Cystic Fibrosis: identification of a lung phenotype in the cftr knockout and heterozygous mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Bates Jason HT; Lundblad Lennart KA; Craig Cohen J; Levitzky Michael; Larson Janet E

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Cystic Fibrosis is a pleiotropic disease in humans with primary morbidity and mortality associated with a lung disease phenotype. However, knockout in the mouse of cftr, the gene whose mutant alleles are responsible for cystic fibrosis, has previously failed to produce a readily, quantifiable lung phenotype. Results Using measurements of pulmonary mechanics, a definitive lung phenotype was demonstrated in the cftr-/- mouse. Lungs showed decreased compliance and increased a...

  6. Characterization of host-range mutants of cyanophage N-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, T A; Kaur, B

    1997-10-01

    Fifteen host-range (h) mutants of cyanophage N-1 were characterized with reference to their efficiency of plating, time of appearance, morphology and size of plaques on Nostoc muscorum and its three phage-resistant (Nm 1/N-1, Nm 2/N-1 and Nm 8/N-1) mutants. While phage N-1 did not adsorb to the three phage-resistant mutants, the h mutants differed one from the other in having lower or higher adsorption rate constants on N. muscorum or the phage-resistant mutants. The inability of majority of h mutants isolated on Nm 1/N-1 to grow in Nm 8/N-1 was shown to be due to a failure of adsorption. The h mutants also differed one from the other in their reversion (back mutation) frequencies. The lethal doses (LD37) required to kill 37% of free phage particles after UV-irradiation, heating and ethylenediamine tetraacetate (EDTA) treatment greatly varied. Most of the h mutants were found to be considerably more sensitive to UV and thermic inactivation than N-1 while they were resistant to EDTA. The h mutants except five of them were unable to multiply at 40 degrees C. The significance of these features is discussed.

  7. plenty, a novel hypernodulation mutant in Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Chie; Funayama-Noguchi, Sachiko; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi

    2010-09-01

    Nitrogen fixation in nodules that contain symbiotic rhizobial bacteria enables legumes to thrive in nitrogen-poor soils. However, this symbiosis is energy consuming. Therefore, legumes strictly control nodulation at both local and systemic levels. Mutants deficient in such controls exhibit a range of phenotypes from non-nodulation to hypernodulation. Here, we isolated a novel hypernodulation mutant from the M(2) progeny derived from Lotus japonicus MG-20 seeds mutagenized by irradiation with a carbon ion beam. We named the mutant 'plenty' because it formed more nodules than the wild-type MG-20. The nodulation zone in the plenty mutant was wider than that in the wild type, but not as enhanced as those in other previously reported hypernodulation mutants such as har1, klv or tml of L. japonicus. Unlike these hypernodulation mutants, the plenty mutant developed nodules of the same size as MG-20. Overall, the plenty mutant exhibited a unique phenotype of moderate hypernodulation. However, a biomass assay indicated that this unique pattern of hypernodulation was a hindrance to host plant growth. The plenty mutant displayed some tolerance to external nitrates and a normal triple response to ethylene. Grafting experiments demonstrated that the root of plenty was responsible for its hypernodulation phenotype. Genetic mapping indicated that the PLENTY gene was located on chromosome 2.

  8. Induction and selection of citrus mutant by gamma-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Jung; Oh, Seung Kyu; Lee, Hyo Yeon [Jeju National University, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    We have subjected to gamma-irradiation to citrus buds and then grafted onto mature citrus tree. Mutant citrus branch lines have been induced. As a result of first selection, we found the several mutant lines showing interesting phenotypes such as higher sugar content. We have selected several branches showing good qualities such as higher sweetness and/or lower acidity. Some branch lines showed over 13 .deg. Brix sugar content and below 0.9% acidity. Other mutant branch lines showed the changes of shape, size, peel thickness, and fiber contents or distribution of fruits. The results suggest that gamma-irradiation is an effective tool for induction of citrus mutant lines.

  9. Selective targeting of mutant adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Theodoropoulos, Panayotis C; Eskiocak, Ugur; Wang, Wentian; Moon, Young-Ah; Posner, Bruce; Williams, Noelle S; Wright, Woodring E; Kim, Sang Bum; Nijhawan, Deepak; De Brabander, Jef K; Shay, Jerry W

    2016-10-19

    Mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene are common in colorectal cancer (CRC), and more than 90% of those mutations generate stable truncated gene products. We describe a chemical screen using normal human colonic epithelial cells (HCECs) and a series of oncogenically progressed HCECs containing a truncated APC protein. With this screen, we identified a small molecule, TASIN-1 (truncated APC selective inhibitor-1), that specifically kills cells with APC truncations but spares normal and cancer cells with wild-type APC. TASIN-1 exerts its cytotoxic effects through inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis. In vivo administration of TASIN-1 inhibits tumor growth of CRC cells with truncated APC but not APC wild-type CRC cells in xenograft models and in a genetically engineered CRC mouse model with minimal toxicity. TASIN-1 represents a potential therapeutic strategy for prevention and intervention in CRC with mutant APC.

  10. Gankyrin expression during mouse embryogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦建民; 刘淑琴; 曾锦章; 李慎菁; 付晓勇; 邱秀华; 吴孟超; 王红阳

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To observe the gene expression of Gankyrin during mouse embryogenesis and reveal the gene biological significance during organs and tissues formation. Methods: The expressions of Gankyrin mRNA in various organs and tissues were detected by in situ hybridization at indicated times during embryogenesis. Results: The expression of Gankyrin mRNA in mouse day 12.5 embryo was mainly in midbrain, interbrain and endbrain; in mouse day 14.5 embryo mainly in midbrain, aorta, liver, gonad, cranium and rib; in mouse day 16.5 embryo mainly in cranium, rib and vertebra;and in mouse day 18.5 embryo mainly in cranium, rib and intestinal mucosa. Conclusion: Gankyrin gene probably participates in the development of the neural tissues (such as midbrain, interbrain and endbrain etc. ), aorta, liver and gonad, intestinal mucosa and bone tissues, which may be closely associated with the function of the organs and tissues.

  11. Rapamycin Prevents the Development and Progression of Mutant Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Lung Tumors with the Acquired Resistance Mutation T790M

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeru Kawabata

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer in never-smokers is an important disease often characterized by mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, yet risk reduction measures and effective chemopreventive strategies have not been established. We identify mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR as potentially valuable target for EGFR mutant lung cancer. mTOR is activated in human lung cancers with EGFR mutations, and this increases with acquisition of T790M mutation. In a mouse model of EGFR mutant lung cancer, mTOR activation is an early event. As a single agent, the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin prevents tumor development, prolongs overall survival, and improves outcomes after treatment with an irreversible EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI. These studies support clinical testing of mTOR inhibitors in order to prevent the development and progression of EGFR mutant lung cancers.

  12. Conformational control inhibition of the BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase, including the gatekeeper T315I mutant, by the switch-control inhibitor DCC-2036

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wayne W.; Wise, Scott C.; Kaufman, Michael D.; Ahn, Yu Mi; Ensinger, Carol L.; Haack, Torsten; Hood, Molly M.; Jones, Jennifer; Lord, John W.; Lu, Wei Ping; Miller, David; Patt, William C.; Smith, Bryan D.; Petillo, Peter A.; Rutkoski, Thomas J.; Telikepalli, Hanumaiah; Vogeti, Lakshminarayana; Yao, Tony; Chun, Lawrence; Clark, Robin; Evangelista, Peter; Gavrilescu, L. Cristina; Lazarides, Katherine; Zaleskas, Virginia M.; Stewart, Lance J.; Van Etten, Richard A.; Flynn, Daniel L.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Acquired resistance to ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) through ABL1 kinase domain mutations, particularly the gatekeeper mutant T315I, is a significant problem for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients. Using structure-based drug design, we developed compounds that bind to residues (Arg386/Glu282) ABL1 uses to switch between inactive and active conformations. The lead “switch-control” inhibitor, DCC-2036, potently inhibits both unphosphorylated and phosphorylated ABL1 by inducing a type II inactive conformation, and retains efficacy against the majority of clinically relevant CML resistance mutants, including T315I. DCC-2036 inhibits BCR-ABL1T315I-expressing cell lines, prolongs survival in mouse models of T315I-mutant CML and B-lymphoblastic leukemia, and inhibits primary patient leukemia cells expressing T315I in vitro and in vivo, supporting its clinical development in TKI-resistant Ph+ leukemia. PMID:21481795

  13. A Neisseria meningitidis NMB1966 mutant is impaired for invasion of respiratory epithelial cells, survival in human blood and for virulence in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming-Shi; Chow, Noel Y S; Sinha, Sunita; Halliwell, Denise; Finney, Michelle; Gorringe, Andrew R; Watson, Mark W; Kroll, J Simon; Langford, Paul R; Webb, Steven A R

    2009-02-01

    We sought to determine whether NMB1966, encoding a putative ABC transporter, has a role in pathogenesis. Compared to its isogenic wild-type parent strain Neisseria meningitidis MC58, the NMB1966 knockout mutant was less adhesive and invasive for human bronchial epithelial cells, had reduced survival in human blood and was attenuated in a systemic mouse model of infection. The transcriptome of the wild-type and the NMB1966 mutant was compared. The data are consistent with a previous functional assignment of NMB1966 being the ABC transporter component of a glutamate transporter operon. Forty-seven percent of all the differentially regulated genes encoded known outer membrane proteins or pathways generating complex surface structures such as adhesins, peptidoglycan and capsule. The data show that NMB1966 has a role in virulence and that remodelling of the outer membrane and surface/structures is associated with attenuation of the NMB1966 mutant.

  14. A candidate mouse model for Hartnup disorder deficient in neutral amino acid transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symula, D J; Shedlovsky, A; Guillery, E N; Dove, W F

    1997-02-01

    The mutant mouse strain HPH2 (hyperphenylalaninemia) was isolated after N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis on the basis of delayed plasma clearance of an injected load of phenylalanine. Animals homozygous for the recessive hph2 mutation excrete elevated concentrations of many of the neutral amino acids in the urine, while plasma concentrations of these amino acids are normal. In contrast, mutant homozygotes excrete normal levels of glucose and phosphorus. These data suggest an amino acid transport defect in the mutant, confirmed in a small reduction in normalized values of 14C-labeled glutamine uptake by kidney cortex brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV). The hyperaminoaciduria pattern is very similar to that of Hartnup Disorder cases also show niacin deficiency symptoms, of Hartnup Disorder cases also show niacin deficiency symptoms, which are thought to be multifactorially determined. Similarly, the HPH2 mouse exhibits a niacin-reversible syndrome that is modified by diet and by genetic background. Thus, HPH2 provides a candidate mouse model for the study of Hartnup Disorder, an amino acid transport deficiency and a multifactorial disease in the human.

  15. GATA4 and GATA6 control mouse pancreas organogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Manuel; Delgado, Irene; Soria, Bernat; Martín, Francisco; Rojas, Anabel

    2012-01-01

    Recently, heterozygous mutations in GATA6 have been found in neonatal diabetic patients with failed pancreatic organogenesis. To investigate the roles of GATA4 and GATA6 in mouse pancreas organogenesis, we conditionally inactivated these genes within the pancreas. Single inactivation of either gene did not have a major impact on pancreas formation, indicating functional redundancy. However, double Gata4/Gata6 mutant mice failed to develop pancreata, died shortly after birth, and displayed hyperglycemia. Morphological defects in Gata4/Gata6 mutant pancreata were apparent during embryonic development, and the epithelium failed to expand as a result of defects in cell proliferation and differentiation. The number of multipotent pancreatic progenitors, including PDX1+ cells, was reduced in the Gata4/Gata6 mutant pancreatic epithelium. Remarkably, deletion of only 1 Gata6 allele on a Gata4 conditional knockout background severely reduced pancreatic mass. In contrast, a single WT allele of Gata4 in Gata6 conditional knockout mice was sufficient for normal pancreatic development, indicating differential contributions of GATA factors to pancreas formation. Our results place GATA factors at the top of the transcriptional network hierarchy controlling pancreas organogenesis. PMID:23006330

  16. Herpes simplex virus/Sleeping Beauty vector-based embryonic gene transfer using the HSB5 mutant: loss of apparent transposition hyperactivity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Silva, Suresh; Mastrangelo, Michael A; Lotta, Louis T; Burris, Clark A; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Ivics, Zoltán; Bowers, William J

    2010-11-01

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system has been successfully used as a gene delivery tool in nonviral and viral vector platforms. Since its initial reconstruction, a series of hyperactive mutants of SB have been generated. Questions remain as to whether the enhanced in vitro activities of these SB transposase mutants translate to the in vivo setting, and whether such increased integration efficiencies will ultimately compromise the safety profile of the transposon platform by raising the risk of genomic insertional mutagenesis. Herein, we compared the in vivo impact of a herpes simplex virus (HSV) amplicon-vectored "wild-type" SB transposase (SB10) and a "hyperactive" SB mutant (HSB5), codelivered in utero with the HSVT-βgeo transposable reporter amplicon vector to embryonic day 14.5 C57BL/6 mice. The SB10 and HSB5 transposases do not disparately affect the viability and development of injected mouse embryos. Quantitation of brain-resident βgeo expression on postnatal day 21 revealed that mice receiving HSB5 exhibited only a trending increase in transgene expression compared with the SB10-infused group, an outcome that did not mirror the marked enhancement of HSB5-mediated transposition observed in vitro. These findings indicate that in vivo application of hyperactive SB mutants, although not differentially genotoxic to the developing mouse embryo, does not necessarily provide a significant therapeutic advantage over the employment of a lesser active SB when delivered in the context of the HSV/SB amplicon platform.

  17. Diesel exhaust particles are mutagenic in FE1-MutaMouse lung epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Møller, Peter; Cohn, Corey Alexander;

    2008-01-01

    The particulate phase of diesel engine exhaust is likely carcinogenic. However, the mechanisms of diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) induced mutagenicity/carcinogenicity are still largely unknown. We determined the mutant frequency following eight repeated 72 h incubations with 37.5 or 75 microg....../ml DEP (NIST SRM 1650) in the FE1-MutaMouse lung epithelial cell line. We measured DEP-induced acellular and intracellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and compared with ROS production induced by carbon black, which we have previously shown is mutagenic in this cell line [N.R. Jacobsen, A.......T. Saber, P. White, P. Moller, G. Pojana, U. Vogel, S. Loft, J. Gingerich, L. Soper, G.R. Douglas, H. Wallin. Increased mutant frequency by carbon black, but not quartz, in the lacZ and cII transgenes of mutamouse lung epithelial cells, Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 48(6) (2007) 451-461]. The mutant frequency...

  18. Mouse anesthesia and analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Sean; Pacharinsak, Cholawat

    2015-03-02

    Providing anesthesia and analgesia for mouse subjects is a common and critical practice in the laboratory setting. These practices are necessary for performing invasive procedures, achieving prolonged immobility for sensitive imaging modalities (magnetic resonance imaging for instance), and providing intra- and post-procedural pain relief. In addition to facilitating the procedures performed by the investigator, the provision of anesthesia and analgesia is crucial for the preservation of animal welfare and for humane treatment of animals used in research. Furthermore, anesthesia and analgesia are important components of animal use protocols reviewed by Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees, requiring careful consideration and planning for the particular animal model. In this article, we provide technical outlines for the investigator covering the provision of anesthesia by two routes (injectable and inhalant), guidelines for monitoring anesthesia, current techniques for recognition of pain, and considerations for administering preventative analgesia. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  19. Accumulation of mutant alpha1-antitrypsin Z in the endoplasmic reticulum activates caspases-4 and -12, NFkappaB, and BAP31 but not the unfolded protein response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidvegi, Tunda; Schmidt, Bela Z; Hale, Pamela; Perlmutter, David H

    2005-11-25

    In alpha(1)-antitrypsin (alpha1AT) deficiency, a polymerogenic mutant form of the secretory glycoprotein alpha1AT, alpha1ATZ, is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of liver cells. It is not yet known how this results in liver injury in a subgroup of deficient individuals and how the remainder of deficient individuals escapes liver disease. One possible explanation is that the "susceptible" subgroup is unable to mount the appropriate protective cellular responses. Here we examined the effect of mutant alpha1ATZ on several potential protective signaling pathways by using cell lines with inducible expression of mutant alpha1AT as well as liver from transgenic mice with liver-specific inducible expression of mutant alpha1AT. The results show that ER retention of polymerogenic mutant alpha1ATZ does not result in an unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR can be induced in the presence of alpha1ATZ by tunicamycin excluding the possibility that the pathway has been disabled. In striking contrast, ER retention of nonpolymerogenic alpha1AT mutants does induce the UPR. These results indicate that the machinery responsible for activation of the UPR can distinguish the physical characteristics of proteins that accumulate in the ER in such a way that it can respond to misfolded but not relatively ordered polymeric structures. Accumulation of mutant alpha1ATZ does activate specific signaling pathways, including caspase-12 in mouse, caspase-4 in human, NFkappaB, and BAP31, a profile that was distinct from that activated by nonpolymerogenic alpha1AT mutants.

  20. Pharmacological inhibitors of c-KIT block mutant c-KIT mediated migration of melanocytes and melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posch, Christian; Moslehi, Homayoun; Sanlorenzo, Martina; Green, Gary; Vujic, Igor; Panzer-Grümayer, Renate; Rappersberger, Klemens; Ortiz-Urda, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the receptor tyrosine kinase c-KIT (KIT) are frequent oncogenic alterations in melanoma and are predominantly detected in tumors of acral, mucosal, and chronically sun-damaged skin. Research indicates that melanocytes with aberrant KIT signaling can be found in the distant periphery of the primary tumor; However, it is hitherto unknown whether KIT might confer a migratory advantage, thereby enabling genetically abnormal cells to populate a distal area. In this study, we investigated the role of mutant KIT in melanocyte- and melanoma cell migration using KIT mutant lines as well as genetically manipulated murine and primary human melanocytes. Our results revealed that melanocytes, stably transduced with mutant KIT closed a gap inflicted on cell monolayers faster than wild-type controls. Similarly, KIT mutant human melanoma lines were able to populate a larger area in a 3D in vitro skin model compared to KIT wild type and BRAF mutant lines. Genomic profiling revealed that genes associated with increased cell-dispersal of KIT mutant variants were linked to a statistically significant up-regulation of 60 migratory genes (z-score 1.334; p=0.0001). In addition, in vivo experiments harnessing a mouse xenograft model of early melanoma development demonstrated rapid lateral migration of KIT mutant cells compared to respective controls. The specific kinase inhibitors imatinib and nilotinib, could abrogate this migratory advantage in vitro and in vivo. Our work suggests that KIT inhibition might help to target migratory active, KIT mutant melanoma cells, thus representing a potential strategy to reduce spread and local recurrence. PMID:27322141

  1. Nonspecific airway reactivity in a mouse model of asthma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collie, D.D.; Wilder, J.A.; Bice, D.E.

    1995-12-01

    Animal models are indispensable for studies requiring an intact immune system, especially for studying the pathogenic mechanisms in atopic diseases, regulation of IgE production, and related biologic effects. Mice are particularly suitable and have been used extensively for such studies because their immune system is well characterized. Further, large numbers of mutants or inbred strains of mice are available that express deficiencies of individual immunologic processes, inflammatory cells, or mediator systems. By comparing reactions in such mice with appropriate control animals, the unique roles of individual cells or mediators may be characterized more precisely in the pathogenesis of atopic respiratory diseases including asthma. However, given that asthma in humans is characterized by the presence of airway hyperresponsiveness to specific and nonspecific stimuli, it is important that animal models of this disease exhibit similar physiologic abnormalities. In the past, the size of the mouse has limited its versatility in this regard. However, recent studies indicate the feasibility of measuring pulmonary responses in living mice, thus facilitating the physiologic evaluation of putative mouse models of human asthma that have been well charcterized at the immunologic and patholigic level. Future work will provide details of the morphometry of the methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction and will further seek to determine the relationship between cigarette smoke exposure and the development of NS-AHR in the transgenic mouse model.

  2. The mouse Gene Expression Database (GXD): 2017 update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, Jacqueline H.; Smith, Constance M.; Hayamizu, Terry F.; McCright, Ingeborg J.; Xu, Jingxia; Law, Meiyee; Shaw, David R.; Baldarelli, Richard M.; Beal, Jon S.; Blodgett, Olin; Campbell, Jeff W.; Corbani, Lori E.; Lewis, Jill R.; Forthofer, Kim L.; Frost, Pete J.; Giannatto, Sharon C.; Hutchins, Lucie N.; Miers, Dave B.; Motenko, Howie; Stone, Kevin R.; Eppig, Janan T.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.; Ringwald, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The Gene Expression Database (GXD; www.informatics.jax.org/expression.shtml) is an extensive and well-curated community resource of mouse developmental expression information. Through curation of the scientific literature and by collaborations with large-scale expression projects, GXD collects and integrates data from RNA in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, northern blot and western blot experiments. Expression data from both wild-type and mutant mice are included. The expression data are combined with genetic and phenotypic data in Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) and made readily accessible to many types of database searches. At present, GXD includes over 1.5 million expression results and more than 300 000 images, all annotated with detailed and standardized metadata. Since our last report in 2014, we have added a large amount of data, we have enhanced data and database infrastructure, and we have implemented many new search and display features. Interface enhancements include: a new Mouse Developmental Anatomy Browser; interactive tissue-by-developmental stage and tissue-by-gene matrix views; capabilities to filter and sort expression data summaries; a batch search utility; gene-based expression overviews; and links to expression data from other species. PMID:27899677

  3. MouseCyc: a curated biochemical pathways database for the laboratory mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Evsikov, Alexei V.; Dolan, Mary E.; Genrich, Michael P; Patek, Emily; Bult, Carol J.

    2009-01-01

    Linking biochemical genetic data to the reference genome for the laboratory mouse is important for comparative physiology and for developing mouse models of human biology and disease. We describe here a new database of curated metabolic pathways for the laboratory mouse called MouseCyc . MouseCyc has been integrated with genetic and genomic data for the laboratory mouse available from the Mouse Genome Informatics database and with pathway data from other organisms, including human.

  4. Mutant p53 promotes tumor progression and metastasis by the endoplasmic reticulum UDPase ENTPD5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogiatzi, Fotini; Brandt, Dominique T; Schneikert, Jean; Fuchs, Jeannette; Grikscheit, Katharina; Wanzel, Michael; Pavlakis, Evangelos; Charles, Joël P; Timofeev, Oleg; Nist, Andrea; Mernberger, Marco; Kantelhardt, Eva J; Siebolts, Udo; Bartel, Frank; Jacob, Ralf; Rath, Ariane; Moll, Roland; Grosse, Robert; Stiewe, Thorsten

    2016-12-27

    Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene are the most frequent genetic alteration in cancer and are often associated with progression from benign to invasive stages with metastatic potential. Mutations inactivate tumor suppression by p53, and some endow the protein with novel gain of function (GOF) properties that actively promote tumor progression and metastasis. By comparative gene expression profiling of p53-mutated and p53-depleted cancer cells, we identified ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 5 (ENTPD5) as a mutant p53 target gene, which functions as a uridine 5'-diphosphatase (UDPase) in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to promote the folding of N-glycosylated membrane proteins. A comprehensive pan-cancer analysis revealed a highly significant correlation between p53 GOF mutations and ENTPD5 expression. Mechanistically, mutp53 is recruited by Sp1 to the ENTPD5 core promoter to induce its expression. We show ENTPD5 to be a mediator of mutant p53 GOF activity in clonogenic growth, architectural tissue remodeling, migration, invasion, and lung colonization in an experimental metastasis mouse model. Our study reveals folding of N-glycosylated membrane proteins in the ER as a mechanism underlying the metastatic progression of tumors with mutp53 that could provide new possibilities for cancer treatment.

  5. Suppressor Mutations for Presenilin 1 Familial Alzheimer Disease Mutants Modulate γ-Secretase Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futai, Eugene; Osawa, Satoko; Cai, Tetsuo; Fujisawa, Tomoya; Ishiura, Shoichi; Tomita, Taisuke

    2016-01-01

    γ-Secretase is a multisubunit membrane protein complex containing presenilin (PS1) as a catalytic subunit. Familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) mutations within PS1 were analyzed in yeast cells artificially expressing membrane-bound substrate, amyloid precursor protein, or Notch fused to Gal4 transcriptional activator. The FAD mutations, L166P and G384A (Leu-166 to Pro and Gly-384 to Ala substitution, respectively), were loss-of-function in yeast. We identified five amino acid substitutions that suppress the FAD mutations. The cleavage of amyloid precursor protein or Notch was recovered by the secondary mutations. We also found that secondary mutations alone activated the γ-secretase activity. FAD mutants with suppressor mutations, L432M or S438P within TMD9 together with a missense mutation in the second or sixth loops, regained γ-secretase activity when introduced into presenilin null mouse fibroblasts. Notably, the cells with suppressor mutants produced a decreased amount of Aβ42, which is responsible for Alzheimer disease. These results indicate that the yeast system is useful to screen for mutations and chemicals that modulate γ-secretase activity.

  6. aroA-Deficient Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Is More Than a Metabolically Attenuated Mutant

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    Sebastian Felgner

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains are believed to act as powerful live vaccine carriers that are able to elicit protection against various pathogens. Auxotrophic mutations, such as a deletion of aroA, are commonly introduced into such bacteria for attenuation without incapacitating immunostimulation. In this study, we describe the surprising finding that deletion of aroA dramatically increased the virulence of attenuated Salmonella in mouse models. Mutant bacteria lacking aroA elicited increased levels of the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α after systemic application. A detailed genetic and phenotypic characterization in combination with transcriptomic and metabolic profiling demonstrated that ΔaroA mutants display pleiotropic alterations in cellular physiology and lipid and amino acid metabolism, as well as increased sensitivity to penicillin, complement, and phagocytic uptake. In concert with other immunomodulating mutations, deletion of aroA affected flagellin phase variation and gene expression of the virulence-associated genes arnT and ansB. Finally, ΔaroA strains displayed significantly improved tumor therapeutic activity. These results highlight the importance of a functional shikimate pathway to control homeostatic bacterial physiology. They further highlight the great potential of ΔaroA-attenuated Salmonella for the development of vaccines and cancer therapies with important implications for host-pathogen interactions and translational medicine.

  7. MicroRNA-31 initiates lung tumorigenesis and promotes mutant KRAS-driven lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Mick D; Boyd, Kelli L; Moyo, Tamara; Mitra, Ramkrishna; Duszynski, Robert; Arrate, Maria Pia; Chen, Xi; Zhao, Zhongming; Blackwell, Timothy S; Andl, Thomas; Eischen, Christine M

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA (miR) are important regulators of gene expression, and aberrant miR expression has been linked to oncogenesis; however, little is understood about their contribution to lung tumorigenesis. Here, we determined that miR-31 is overexpressed in human lung adenocarcinoma and this overexpression independently correlates with decreased patient survival. We developed a transgenic mouse model that allows for lung-specific expression of miR-31 to test the oncogenic potential of miR-31 in the lung. Using this model, we observed that miR-31 induction results in lung hyperplasia, followed by adenoma formation and later adenocarcinoma development. Moreover, induced expression of miR-31 in mice cooperated with mutant KRAS to accelerate lung tumorigenesis. We determined that miR-31 regulates lung epithelial cell growth and identified 6 negative regulators of RAS/MAPK signaling as direct targets of miR-31. Our study distinguishes miR-31 as a driver of lung tumorigenesis that promotes mutant KRAS-mediated oncogenesis and reveals that miR-31 directly targets and reduces expression of negative regulators of RAS/MAPK signaling.

  8. Synthetic Lethal Targeting of ARID1A-Mutant Ovarian Clear Cell Tumors with Dasatinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Rowan E; Brough, Rachel; Bajrami, Ilirjana; Williamson, Chris T; McDade, Simon; Campbell, James; Kigozi, Asha; Rafiq, Rumana; Pemberton, Helen; Natrajan, Rachel; Joel, Josephine; Astley, Holly; Mahoney, Claire; Moore, Jonathan D; Torrance, Chris; Gordan, John D; Webber, James T; Levin, Rebecca S; Shokat, Kevan M; Bandyopadhyay, Sourav; Lord, Christopher J; Ashworth, Alan

    2016-07-01

    New targeted approaches to ovarian clear cell carcinomas (OCCC) are needed, given the limited treatment options in this disease and the poor response to standard chemotherapy. Using a series of high-throughput cell-based drug screens in OCCC tumor cell models, we have identified a synthetic lethal (SL) interaction between the kinase inhibitor dasatinib and a key driver in OCCC, ARID1A mutation. Imposing ARID1A deficiency upon a variety of human or mouse cells induced dasatinib sensitivity, both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that this is a robust synthetic lethal interaction. The sensitivity of ARID1A-deficient cells to dasatinib was associated with G1-S cell-cycle arrest and was dependent upon both p21 and Rb. Using focused siRNA screens and kinase profiling, we showed that ARID1A-mutant OCCC tumor cells are addicted to the dasatinib target YES1. This suggests that dasatinib merits investigation for the treatment of patients with ARID1A-mutant OCCC. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(7); 1472-84. ©2016 AACR.

  9. Sustained Pax6 Expression Generates Primate-like Basal Radial Glia in Developing Mouse Neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Fong Kuan; Fei, Ji-Feng; Mora-Bermúdez, Felipe; Taverna, Elena; Haffner, Christiane; Fu, Jun; Anastassiadis, Konstantinos; Stewart, A Francis; Huttner, Wieland B

    2015-08-01

    The evolutionary expansion of the neocortex in mammals has been linked to enlargement of the subventricular zone (SVZ) and increased proliferative capacity of basal progenitors (BPs), notably basal radial glia (bRG). The transcription factor Pax6 is known to be highly expressed in primate, but not mouse, BPs. Here, we demonstrate that sustaining Pax6 expression selectively in BP-genic apical radial glia (aRG) and their BP progeny of embryonic mouse neocortex suffices to induce primate-like progenitor behaviour. Specifically, we conditionally expressed Pax6 by in utero electroporation using a novel, Tis21-CreERT2 mouse line. This expression altered aRG cleavage plane orientation to promote bRG generation, increased cell-cycle re-entry of BPs, and ultimately increased upper-layer neuron production. Upper-layer neuron production was also increased in double-transgenic mouse embryos with sustained Pax6 expression in the neurogenic lineage. Strikingly, increased BPs existed not only in the SVZ but also in the intermediate zone of the neocortex of these double-transgenic mouse embryos. In mutant mouse embryos lacking functional Pax6, the proportion of bRG among BPs was reduced. Our data identify specific Pax6 effects in BPs and imply that sustaining this Pax6 function in BPs could be a key aspect of SVZ enlargement and, consequently, the evolutionary expansion of the neocortex.

  10. Whole mouse cryo-imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David; Roy, Debashish; Steyer, Grant; Gargesha, Madhusudhana; Stone, Meredith; McKinley, Eliot

    2008-03-01

    The Case cryo-imaging system is a section and image system which allows one to acquire micron-scale, information rich, whole mouse color bright field and molecular fluorescence images of an entire mouse. Cryo-imaging is used in a variety of applications, including mouse and embryo anatomical phenotyping, drug delivery, imaging agents, metastastic cancer, stem cells, and very high resolution vascular imaging, among many. Cryo-imaging fills the gap between whole animal in vivo imaging and histology, allowing one to image a mouse along the continuum from the mouse -> organ -> tissue structure -> cell -> sub-cellular domains. In this overview, we describe the technology and a variety of exciting applications. Enhancements to the system now enable tiled acquisition of high resolution images to cover an entire mouse. High resolution fluorescence imaging, aided by a novel subtraction processing algorithm to remove sub-surface fluorescence, makes it possible to detect fluorescently-labeled single cells. Multi-modality experiments in Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Cryo-imaging of a whole mouse demonstrate superior resolution of cryo-images and efficiency of registration techniques. The 3D results demonstrate the novel true-color volume visualization tools we have developed and the inherent advantage of cryo-imaging in providing unlimited depth of field and spatial resolution. The recent results continue to demonstrate the value cryo-imaging provides in the field of small animal imaging research.

  11. Chemotyping of yeast mutants using robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, K J; El-Alama, M; Stein, G; Bradshaw, C; Slonimski, P P; Maundrell, K

    1999-07-01

    By now, the EUROFAN programme for the functional analysis of genes from the yeast genome has attained its cruising speed. Indeed, several hundreds of yeast mutants with no phenotype as tested by growth on standard media and no significant sequence similarity to proteins of known function are available through the efforts of various laboratories. Based on the methodology initiated during the pilot project on yeast chromosome III (Yeast 13, 1547-1562, 1997) we adapted it to High Throughput Screening (HTS), using robotics. The first 100 different gene deletions from EUROSCARF, constructed in an FY1679 strain background, were run against a collection of about 300 inhibitors. Many of these inhibitors have not been reported until now to interfere in vivo with growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the present paper we provide a list of novel growth conditions and a compilation of 49 yeast deletants (from chromosomes II, IV, VII, X, XIV, XV) corresponding to 58% of the analysed genes, with at least one clear and stringent phenotype. The majority of these deletants are sensitive to one or two compounds (monotropic phenotype) while a distinct subclass of deletants displays a hyper-pleiotropic phenotype with sensitivities to a dozen or more compounds. Therefore, chemotyping of unknown genes with a large spectrum of drugs opens new vistas for a more in-depth functional analysis and a more precise definition of molecular targets.

  12. Pharmacological correctors of mutant CFTR mistrafficking

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    Nicoletta ePedemonte

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The lack of phenylalanine 508 (∆F508 mutation in the CFTR Cl- channel represents the most frequent cause of cystic fibrosis (CF, a genetic disease affecting multiple organs such lung, pancreas, and liver. ∆F508 causes instability and misfolding of CFTR protein leading to early degradation in the endoplasmic reticulum and accelerated removal from the plasma membrane. Pharmacological correctors of mutant CFTR protein have been identified by high-throughput screening of large chemical libraries, by in silico docking of virtual compounds on CFTR structure models, or by using compounds that affect the whole proteome (e.g. histone deacetylase inhibitors or a single CFTR-interacting protein. The presence of multiple defects caused at the CFTR protein level by ∆F508 mutation and the redundancy of quality control mechanisms detecting ∆F508-CFTR as a defective protein impose a ceiling to the maximal effect that a single compound (corrector may obtain. Therefore, treatment of patients with the most frequent CF mutation may require the optimized combination of two drugs having additive or synergic effects.

  13. Histopathology reveals correlative and unique phenotypes in a high-throughput mouse phenotyping screen

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    Hibret A. Adissu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Mouse Genetics Project (MGP at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute aims to generate and phenotype over 800 genetically modified mouse lines over the next 5 years to gain a better understanding of mammalian gene function and provide an invaluable resource to the scientific community for follow-up studies. Phenotyping includes the generation of a standardized biobank of paraffin-embedded tissues for each mouse line, but histopathology is not routinely performed. In collaboration with the Pathology Core of the Centre for Modeling Human Disease (CMHD we report the utility of histopathology in a high-throughput primary phenotyping screen. Histopathology was assessed in an unbiased selection of 50 mouse lines with (n=30 or without (n=20 clinical phenotypes detected by the standard MGP primary phenotyping screen. Our findings revealed that histopathology added correlating morphological data in 19 of 30 lines (63.3% in which the primary screen detected a phenotype. In addition, seven of the 50 lines (14% presented significant histopathology findings that were not associated with or predicted by the standard primary screen. Three of these seven lines had no clinical phenotype detected by the standard primary screen. Incidental and strain-associated background lesions were present in all mutant lines with good concordance to wild-type controls. These findings demonstrate the complementary and unique contribution of histopathology to high-throughput primary phenotyping of mutant mice.

  14. Histopathology reveals correlative and unique phenotypes in a high-throughput mouse phenotyping screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adissu, Hibret A; Estabel, Jeanne; Sunter, David; Tuck, Elizabeth; Hooks, Yvette; Carragher, Damian M; Clarke, Kay; Karp, Natasha A; Newbigging, Susan; Jones, Nora; Morikawa, Lily; White, Jacqueline K; McKerlie, Colin

    2014-05-01

    The Mouse Genetics Project (MGP) at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute aims to generate and phenotype over 800 genetically modified mouse lines over the next 5 years to gain a better understanding of mammalian gene function and provide an invaluable resource to the scientific community for follow-up studies. Phenotyping includes the generation of a standardized biobank of paraffin-embedded tissues for each mouse line, but histopathology is not routinely performed. In collaboration with the Pathology Core of the Centre for Modeling Human Disease (CMHD) we report the utility of histopathology in a high-throughput primary phenotyping screen. Histopathology was assessed in an unbiased selection of 50 mouse lines with (n=30) or without (n=20) clinical phenotypes detected by the standard MGP primary phenotyping screen. Our findings revealed that histopathology added correlating morphological data in 19 of 30 lines (63.3%) in which the primary screen detected a phenotype. In addition, seven of the 50 lines (14%) presented significant histopathology findings that were not associated with or predicted by the standard primary screen. Three of these seven lines had no clinical phenotype detected by the standard primary screen. Incidental and strain-associated background lesions were present in all mutant lines with good concordance to wild-type controls. These findings demonstrate the complementary and unique contribution of histopathology to high-throughput primary phenotyping of mutant mice.

  15. New types of Escherichia coli recombination-deficient mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freifelder, D

    1976-11-01

    A set of Escherichia coli mutants deficient in intramolecular recombination and different from those previously found is described. All have temperature-sensitive lethal mutations. The mutants have been characterized with respect to the following properties: the Pap phenotype, deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis, sensitivity to ultraviolet light, ability to support the growth of phage lambda, filament formation, and mutation frequency.

  16. Characterization of Gibberellin Receptor Mutants of Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter M.Chandler; Carol A.Harding; Anthony R.Ashton; Mark D.Mulcair; Nicholas E.Dixon; Lewis N.Mander

    2008-01-01

    The sequence of Gidl (a gene for a gibberellin (GA) receptor from rice) was used to identify a putative orthoIogue from barley.This was expressed in E.coil,and produced a protein that was able to bind GA in vitro with both structural specificity and saturability.Its potential role in GA responses was investigated using barley mutants with reduced GA sensitivity (gsel mutants).Sixteen different gsel mutants each carried a unique nucleotide substitution in this sequence.In all but one case,these changes resulted in single amino acid substitutions,and,for the remaining mutant,a substitution in the 5' untranslated region of the mRNA is proposed to interfere with translation initiation.There was perfect linkage in segregating populations between new mutant alleles and the gsel phenotype,leading to the conclusion that the putative GID1 GA receptor sequence in barley corresponds to the Gsel locus.Determination of endogenous GA contents in one of the mutants revealed enhanced accumulation of bioactive GA1,and a deficit of C20 GA precursors.All of the gsel mutants had reduced sensitivity to exogenous GA3,and to AC94377 (a GA analogue) at concentrations that are normally 'saturating',but,at much higher concentrations,there was often a considerable response.The comparison between barley and rice mutants reveals interesting differences between these two cereal species in GA hormonal physiology.

  17. Mutants of Pseudomonas putida affected in poly-3-hydroxyalkanoate synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, Q; Kessler, B; van der Leij, F; Witholt, B.

    1998-01-01

    The generation and characterization of Pseudomonas putida KT2442 mutants affected in poly-3-hydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthesis are reported. The mutants from P. putida KT2442 carrying several copies of the PHA-polymerase-encoding gene (phaC) were isolated via N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine chemi

  18. A Mutant Hunt Using the C-Fern (Ceratopteris Richardii)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calie, Patrick J.

    2005-01-01

    A modification of the popular C-Fern system, the tropical fern Ceratopteris richardii is developed in which students plate out a genetically mixed set of fern spores and then select for specific mutants. This exercise can provide students with an experience in plant mutant selection and can be used as a platform to expose students to a diverse…

  19. Characterization of peroxisome-deficient mutants of Hansenula polymorpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Xuqiu; Titorenko, Vladimir I.; Klei, Ida J. van der; Sulter, Grietje J.; Haima, Peter; Waterham, Hans R.; Evers, Melchior; Harder, Willem; Veenhuis, Marten; Cregg, James M.

    1995-01-01

    In the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha, approximately 25% of all methanol-utilization-defective (Mut(-)) mutants are affected in genes required for peroxisome biogenesis (PER genes). Previously, we reported that one group of pel mutants, termed Pim(-), are characterized by the presence of

  20. Absence of Pneumocystis dihydropteroate synthase mutants in Brittany, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gal, Solène; Robert-Gangneux, Florence; Perrot, Maëla; Rouillé, Amélie; Virmaux, Michèle; Damiani, Céline; Totet, Anne; Gangneux, Jean-Pierre; Nevez, Gilles

    2013-05-01

    Archival Pneumocystis jirovecii specimens from 84 patients monitored at Rennes University Hospital (Rennes, France) were assayed at the dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) locus. No patient was infected with mutants. The results provide additional data showing that P. jirovecii infections involving DHPS mutants do not represent a public health issue in Brittany, western France.

  1. Alopecia in a viable phospholipase C delta 1 and phospholipase C delta 3 double mutant.

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    Fabian Runkel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inositol 1,4,5trisphosphate (IP(3 and diacylglycerol (DAG are important intracellular signalling molecules in various tissues. They are generated by the phospholipase C family of enzymes, of which phospholipase C delta (PLCD forms one class. Studies with functional inactivation of Plcd isozyme encoding genes in mice have revealed that loss of both Plcd1 and Plcd3 causes early embryonic death. Inactivation of Plcd1 alone causes loss of hair (alopecia, whereas inactivation of Plcd3 alone has no apparent phenotypic effect. To investigate a possible synergy of Plcd1 and Plcd3 in postnatal mice, novel mutations of these genes compatible with life after birth need to be found. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We characterise a novel mouse mutant with a spontaneously arisen mutation in Plcd3 (Plcd3(mNab that resulted from the insertion of an intracisternal A particle (IAP into intron 2 of the Plcd3 gene. This mutation leads to the predominant expression of a truncated PLCD3 protein lacking the N-terminal PH domain. C3H mice that carry one or two mutant Plcd3(mNab alleles are phenotypically normal. However, the presence of one Plcd3(mNab allele exacerbates the alopecia caused by the loss of functional Plcd1 in Del(9olt1Pas mutant mice with respect to the number of hair follicles affected and the body region involved. Mice double homozygous for both the Del(9olt1Pas and the Plcd3(mNab mutations survive for several weeks and exhibit total alopecia associated with fragile hair shafts showing altered expression of some structural genes and shortened phases of proliferation in hair follicle matrix cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The Plcd3(mNab mutation is a novel hypomorphic mutation of Plcd3. Our investigations suggest that Plcd1 and Plcd3 have synergistic effects on the murine hair follicle in specific regions of the body surface.

  2. Antioxidant treatment promotes prostate epithelial proliferation in Nkx3.1 mutant mice.

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    Erin E Martinez

    Full Text Available Discordant results in preclinical and clinical trials have raised questions over the effectiveness of antioxidants in prostate cancer chemoprevention. Results from the large-scale Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT showed that antioxidants failed to prevent, and in some cases promoted, prostate cancer formation in men without a history of the disease. One possible explanation for these alarming results is the notion that the effects of antioxidant treatment on the prostate are modified by specific, intrinsic genetic risk factors, causing some men to respond negatively to antioxidant treatment. Loss of expression of the homeobox transcription factor NKX3.1 in the prostate is frequently associated with human prostate cancer. Nkx3.1 mutant mice display prostatic hyperplasia and dysplasia and are used as a model of the early stages of prostate cancer initiation. While the mechanisms by which Nkx3.1 loss promotes prostate tumorigenicity are not completely understood, published data have suggested that elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS associated with Nkx3.1 loss may be a causative factor. Here we have tested this hypothesis by treating Nkx3.1 mutant mice with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC for 13 weeks post-weaning. Surprisingly, while NAC treatment decreased ROS levels in Nkx3.1 mutant mouse prostates, it failed to reduce prostatic epithelial hyperplasia/dysplasia. Rather, NAC treatment increased epithelial cell proliferation and promoted the expression of a pro-proliferative gene signature. These results show that ROS do not promote proliferation in the Nkx3.1-null prostate, but instead inhibit proliferation, suggesting that antioxidant treatment may encourage prostate epithelial cell proliferation early in prostate tumorigenesis. Our findings provide new insight that may help explain the increased prostate cancer risk observed with vitamin E treatment in the SELECT trial and emphasize the need for preclinical studies

  3. Mouse models of the fragile x premutation and the fragile X associated tremor/ataxia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsaker, Michael R; Arque, Gloria; Berman, Robert F; Willemsen, Rob; Hukema, Renate K

    2012-01-01

    The use of mutant mouse models of neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disease is essential in order to understand the pathogenesis of many genetic diseases such as fragile X syndrome and fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS). The choice of which animal model is most suitable to mimic a particular disease depends on a range of factors, including anatomical, physiological, and pathological similarities; presence of orthologs of genes of interest; and conservation of basic cell biological and metabolic processes. In this chapter, we will discuss two mouse models of the fragile X premutation which have been generated to study the pathogenesis of FXTAS and the effects of potential therapeutic interventions. Behavioral, molecular, neuropathological, and endocrine features of the mouse models and their relation to human FXTAS are discussed.

  4. Understanding mammalian genetic systems: the challenge of phenotyping in the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve D M Brown

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding mammalian genetic systems is predicated on the determination of the relationship between genetic variation and phenotype. Several international programmes are under way to deliver mutations in every gene in the mouse genome. The challenge for mouse geneticists is to develop approaches that will provide comprehensive phenotype datasets for these mouse mutant libraries. Several factors are critical to success in this endeavour. It will be important to catalogue assay and environment and where possible to adopt standardised procedures for phenotyping tests along with common environmental conditions to ensure comparable datasets of phenotypes. Moreover, the scale of the task underlines the need to invest in technological development improving both the speed and cost of phenotyping platforms. In addition, it will be necessary to develop new informatics standards that capture the phenotype assay as well as other factors, genetic and environmental, that impinge upon phenotype outcome.

  5. Assessment of behaviors modeling aspects of schizophrenia in Csmd1 mutant mice.

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    Margaret G Distler

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a debilitating psychotic disorder that affects up to 1.5% of the population worldwide. Two recent studies in humans identified genome-wide significant associations between schizophrenia and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in an intron of CSMD1. The effect of deleting CSMD1 on mouse behavior is unknown. The present study utilized mice with a mutant Csmd1 allele in which the first exon had been ablated (KO mice. All Csmd1 transcripts that included the first exon were absent in the brains of KO mice, but there was persistent expression of at least one other transcript that does not include the first exon. Wild type (WT, heterozygous (HET, and KO mice were assessed using several well-established behavioral paradigms that model aspects of schizophrenia. Csmd1 KO mice did not differ from wild-type littermates for sensorimotor gating (measured as prepulse inhibition, social interaction, anhedonia (measured by sucrose preference, or sensitivity to the locomotor stimulant effects of the dopaminergic agent d-amphetamine. These data demonstrate that loss of Csmd1 transcripts that include the first exon does not alter multiple well-established behaviors that model aspects of schizophrenia. The SNP most strongly associated with schizophrenia in humans is between exons 3 and 4; therefore, ablation of exon 1 appeared to be a logical animal model. Nevertheless, future studies should consider alternative mouse models including gain-of-function mutations, and loss-of-function mutations that target alternative transcripts of Csmd1.

  6. Study on the Parameters of Specific Immune of BALB/c-Mutant Hairless Mice%BALB/c突变无毛小鼠免疫学特性指标的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王冬平; 李善如; 栾蓉晖; 李桂军

    2003-01-01

    The mutant gene of BALB/c-mutant hairless mice was assigned to chromosome 11, Genetic markers which have been tested suggested that the mutation is a new genetic locus that affected the skin and hair structure of the mouse The mutation was named uncoved, with the symbol Uncv . Uncv has been accepted by International Naming Committee of Mice, and the gene information of Uncv has been receipted by the mice's genebank . The skin is the biggest organ of the body , and is also the main physiological barrier between vivo and vitro . The skin is albe to produce and keep the part immunoresponses , inflammation . Many immunoresponses are related to the skin . The dissecting and breeding of the mutant mice show that their immune organs are normal and they can adopt to the general conditions. Objective To further study the mutant gene' s immune function of the BALB/c-mutant hairless mice . Method We tested the parameters of the immune system about two-day-old、two-month-old hairless mice and mutant sparse coat mice . After testing the parameters of CD4 + 、 CD3 + 、 CD8 + 、 CD19 + through flow cytometry and testing the IgG by ELISA. Results we found that CD19+ 、CD4+/CD8+ of male are higher than female about two-week-old mutant mice with sparse coat , but CD8+ of female is higher than the male, CD4+/CD8+ of male F2 sparse coat mice is higher than the female, CD19+ 、IgG of male mutant hairless mice is higher than the female . There were no significant differences among the male and the female about the two-month-old mutant hairless mice and the mutant sparse coat mice, CD4 + of male F2 two-month-old mutant hairless mice is higher than the female . Otherwise , we also found that the celluar immunity and humoral immunity of both two-week-old and two-month-old hairless mice are lower than the mutant sparse coat mice; only the celluar immunity of F2 mutant hairless mice is lower than the mutant sparse coat mice , but the humoral immunity is higher . The experiment suggest

  7. Poliovirus Mutants Resistant to Neutralization with Soluble Cell Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Gerardo; Peters, David; Racaniello, Vincent R.

    1990-12-01

    Poliovirus mutants resistant to neutralization with soluble cellular receptor were isolated. Replication of soluble receptor-resistant (srr) mutants was blocked by a monoclonal antibody directed against the HeLa cell receptor for poliovirus, indicating that the mutants use this receptor to enter cells. The srr mutants showed reduced binding to HeLa cells and cell membranes. However, the reduced binding phenotype did not have a major impact on viral replication, as judged by plaque size and one-step growth curves. These results suggest that the use of soluble receptors as antiviral agents could lead to the selection of neutralization-resistant mutants that are able to bind cell surface receptors, replicate, and cause disease.

  8. High-Throughput, Signature-Tagged Mutagenic Approach To Identify Novel Virulence Factors of Yersinia pestis CO92 in a Mouse Model of Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Fitts, Eric C.; Erova, Tatiana E.; Kozlova, Elena V.; Kirtley, Michelle L.; Tiner, Bethany L.; Andersson, Jourdan A.

    2015-01-01

    The identification of new virulence factors in Yersinia pestis and understanding their molecular mechanisms during an infection process are necessary in designing a better vaccine or to formulate an appropriate therapeutic intervention. By using a high-throughput, signature-tagged mutagenic approach, we created 5,088 mutants of Y. pestis strain CO92 and screened them in a mouse model of pneumonic plague at a dose equivalent to 5 50% lethal doses (LD50) of wild-type (WT) CO92. From this screen, we obtained 118 clones showing impairment in disseminating to the spleen, based on hybridization of input versus output DNA from mutant pools with 53 unique signature tags. In the subsequent screen, 20/118 mutants exhibited attenuation at 8 LD50 when tested in a mouse model of bubonic plague, with infection by 10/20 of the aforementioned mutants resulting in 40% or higher survival rates at an infectious dose of 40 LD50. Upon sequencing, six of the attenuated mutants were found to carry interruptions in genes encoding hypothetical proteins or proteins with putative functions. Mutants with in-frame deletion mutations of two of the genes identified from the screen, namely, rbsA, which codes for a putative sugar transport system ATP-binding protein, and vasK, a component of the type VI secretion system, were also found to exhibit some attenuation at 11 or 12 LD50 in a mouse model of pneumonic plague. Likewise, among the remaining 18 signature-tagged mutants, 9 were also attenuated (40 to 100%) at 12 LD50 in a pneumonic plague mouse model. Previously, we found that deleting genes encoding Braun lipoprotein (Lpp) and acyltransferase (MsbB), the latter of which modifies lipopolysaccharide function, reduced the virulence of Y. pestis CO92 in mouse models of bubonic and pneumonic plague. Deletion of rbsA and vasK genes from either the Δlpp single or the Δlpp ΔmsbB double mutant augmented the attenuation to provide 90 to 100% survivability to mice in a pneumonic plague model at 20

  9. High-throughput, signature-tagged mutagenic approach to identify novel virulence factors of Yersinia pestis CO92 in a mouse model of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Fitts, Eric C; Sha, Jian; Erova, Tatiana E; Kozlova, Elena V; Kirtley, Michelle L; Tiner, Bethany L; Andersson, Jourdan A; Chopra, Ashok K

    2015-05-01

    The identification of new virulence factors in Yersinia pestis and understanding their molecular mechanisms during an infection process are necessary in designing a better vaccine or to formulate an appropriate therapeutic intervention. By using a high-throughput, signature-tagged mutagenic approach, we created 5,088 mutants of Y. pestis strain CO92 and screened them in a mouse model of pneumonic plague at a dose equivalent to 5 50% lethal doses (LD50) of wild-type (WT) CO92. From this screen, we obtained 118 clones showing impairment in disseminating to the spleen, based on hybridization of input versus output DNA from mutant pools with 53 unique signature tags. In the subsequent screen, 20/118 mutants exhibited attenuation at 8 LD50 when tested in a mouse model of bubonic plague, with infection by 10/20 of the aforementioned mutants resulting in 40% or higher survival rates at an infectious dose of 40 LD50. Upon sequencing, six of the attenuated mutants were found to carry interruptions in genes encoding hypothetical proteins or proteins with putative functions. Mutants with in-frame deletion mutations of two of the genes identified from the screen, namely, rbsA, which codes for a putative sugar transport system ATP-binding protein, and vasK, a component of the type VI secretion system, were also found to exhibit some attenuation at 11 or 12 LD50 in a mouse model of pneumonic plague. Likewise, among the remaining 18 signature-tagged mutants, 9 were also attenuated (40 to 100%) at 12 LD50 in a pneumonic plague mouse model. Previously, we found that deleting genes encoding Braun lipoprotein (Lpp) and acyltransferase (MsbB), the latter of which modifies lipopolysaccharide function, reduced the virulence of Y. pestis CO92 in mouse models of bubonic and pneumonic plague. Deletion of rbsA and vasK genes from either the Δlpp single or the Δlpp ΔmsbB double mutant augmented the attenuation to provide 90 to 100% survivability to mice in a pneumonic plague model at 20

  10. Rescue of retinal morphology and function in a humanized mouse at the mouse retinol-binding protein locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Shen, Jingling; Wakana, Shigeharu; Araki, Kimi; Yamamura, Ken-Ichi; Lei, Lei; Li, Zhenghua

    2017-01-30

    Retinol-binding protein RBP4 is the specific carrier for retinol in the blood. We previously produced a Rbp4-deficient (Rbp4(-/-)) mouse that showed electroretinogram (ERG) abnormalities, accompanied by histological and electron-microscopic changes such as fewer synapses in the inner plexiform layer in the central retina. To address whether human RBP4 gene expression can rescue the phenotypes observed in Rbp4(-/-) mice, we produced a humanized (Rbp4(hRBP4orf/ hRBP4orf)) mouse with a human RBP4 open reading frame in the mouse Rbp4 locus using a Cre-mutant lox recombination system. In Rbp4(hRBP4orf/hRBP4orf) mice, the tissue-specific expression pattern of hRBP4orf was roughly the same as that of mouse Rbp4. ERG and morphological abnormalities observed in Rbp4(-/-) mice were rescued in Rbp4(hRBP4orf/hRBP4orf) mice as early as 7 weeks of age. The temporal expression pattern of hRBP4orf in the liver of Rbp4(hRBP4orf/hRBP4orf) mice was similar to that of mouse Rbp4 in Rbp4(+/+)mice. In contrast, hRBP4orf expression levels in eyes were significantly lower at 6 and 12 weeks of age compared with mouse Rbp4 but were restored to the control levels at 24 weeks. The serum hRBP4 levels in Rbp4(hRBP4orf/hRBP4orf) mice were approximately 30% of those in Rbp4(+/+) at all ages examined. In accordance with this finding, the plasma retinol levels remained low in Rbp4(hRBP4orf/hRBP4orf) mice. Retinol accumulation in the liver occurred in control and Rbp4(hRBP4orf/hRBP4orf) mice but was higher in Rbp4(hRBP4orf/hRBP4orf) mice at 30 weeks of age. Mouse transthyretin expression was not altered in Rbp4(-/-) or Rbp4(hRBP4orf/hRBP4orf) mice. Taken together, 30% of the serum RBP4 level was sufficient to correct the abnormal phenotypes observed in Rbp4(-/-) mice.Laboratory Investigation advance online publication, 30 January 2017; doi:10.1038/labinvest.2016.156.

  11. Phenotypic Characterization of a Female Sterile Mutant in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A female sterile mutant, derived from a spontaneous mutation, wasfirst discovered in rice (Oryza sativa L. ssp.indica) restorer line 202R. With normal flowering, the mutant exhibits an extremely Iow seed-setting rate. When the mutant is crossed as a pollen donor, the seeds set normally; whereas when it is used as a pollen receiver,no seeds are obtained even with mixed pollen grains of different varieties sprinkled over the stigmas. The floret of the mutant, consisting of six stamens and one pistil, looks the same as that of the wild type in the malefemale organs, except that less than 10% of the mutant florets have three stigmas on the ovary. Although the mutant has a low seed-setting rate, Its pollen fertility is approximately 87.1%, which is equal to that of the wild type. In addition, more than 90% of the mature embryo sacs of the mutant have complete inner structures. At every stage after pollination, the sperm, embryo, and endosperm are not found in the mutant embryo sac,whereas the disintegration of the egg cell that does not accomplish fertilization is visible. Through observations with a fluorescence microscope, we have found that the pollen grains germinate normally, whereas the pollen tube abnormally elongates in the style-transmitting tissue. The mutant pollen tubes display various defects in the style, such as slower elongation, conversed elongation, distorted elongation, swollen tips, or branched tips. As a result, the growth of the pollen tubes ceases in the style, and, therefore, the pollen tubes cannot reach the embryo sac and the process of double fertilization is blocked. Based on these observations,we conclude that this mutant, designated as fs-202R, is a novel type of female sterile mutation in rice, which causes the arrest of the elongation of the pollen tube.

  12. Isolation and Characterization of mAMSA-hypersensitive Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogojina, Anna T.; Nitiss, John L.

    2008-01-01

    Topoisomerase II (Top2) is the primary target for active anti-cancer agents. We developed an efficient approach for identifying hypersensitive Top2 mutants and isolated a panel of mutants in yeast Top2 conferring hypersensitivity to the intercalator N-[4-(9-acridinylamino)-3-methoxyphenyl]methanesulphonanilide (mAMSA). Some mutants conferred hypersensitivity to etoposide as well as mAMSA, whereas other mutants exhibited hypersensitivity only to mAMSA. Two mutants in Top2, changing Pro473 to Leu and Gly737 to Val, conferred extraordinary hypersensitivity to mAMSA and were chosen for further characterization. The mutant proteins were purified, and their biochemical activities were assessed. Both mutants encode enzymes that are hypersensitive to inhibition by mAMSA and other intercalating agents and exhibited elevated levels of mAMSA-induced Top2:DNA covalent complexes. While Gly737 → Val Top2p generated elevated levels of Top2-mediated double strand breaks in vitro, the Pro473 → Leu mutant protein showed only a modest increase in Top2-mediated double strand breaks but much higher levels of Top2-mediated single strand breaks. In addition, the Pro473 → Leu mutant protein also generated high levels of mAMSA-stabilized covalent complexes in the absence of ATP. We tested the role of single strand cleavage in cell killing with alleles of Top2 that could generate single strand breaks, but not double strand breaks. Expression in yeast of a Pro473 → Leu mutant that could only generate single strand breaks conferred hypersensitivity to mAMSA. These results indicate that generation of single strand breaks by Top2-targeting agents can be an important component of cell killing by Top2-targeting drugs. PMID:18723844

  13. Mutant human myocilin induces strain specific differences in ocular hypertension and optic nerve damage in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Colleen M; Luan, Tomi; Zhang, Zhang; Putliwala, Tasneem; Wordinger, Robert J; Millar, J Cameron; John, Simon W M; Pang, Iok-Hou; Clark, Abbot F

    2012-07-01

    Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is a causative risk factor for the development and progression of glaucoma. Glaucomatous mutations in myocilin (MYOC) damage the trabecular meshwork and elevate IOP in humans and in mice. Animal models of glaucoma are important to discover and better understand molecular pathogenic pathways and to test new glaucoma therapeutics. Although a number of different animal models of glaucoma have been developed and characterized, there are no true models of human primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). The overall goal of this work is to develop the first inducible mouse model of POAG using a human POAG relevant transgene (i.e. mutant MYOC) expression in mouse eyes to elevate IOP and cause pressure-induced damage to the optic nerve. Four mouse strains (A/J, BALB/cJ, C57BL/6J, and C3H/HeJ) were used in this study. Ad5.MYOC.Y437H (5 × 10(7) pfu) was injected intravitreally into one eye, with the uninjected contralateral eye serving as the control eye. Conscious IOP measurements were taken using a TonoLab rebound tonometer. Optic nerve damage was determined by scoring PPD stained optic nerve cross sections. Retinal ganglion cell and superior colliculus damage was assessed by Nissl stain cell counts. Intravitreal administration of viral vector Ad5.MYOC.Y437H caused a prolonged, reproducible, and statistically significant IOP elevation in BALB/cJ, A/J, and C57BL/6J mice. IOPs increased to approximately 25 mm Hg for 8 weeks (p death or superior colliculus damage at the 8-week time point in any of the strains tested. These results demonstrate strain dependent responses to Ad5.MYOC.Y437H-induced ocular hypertension and pressure-induced optic nerve damage. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Mapping pathological phenotypes in reelin mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michetti, Caterina; Romano, Emilia; Altabella, Luisa; Caruso, Angela; Castelluccio, Paolo; Bedse, Gaurav; Gaetani, Silvana; Canese, Rossella; Laviola, Giovanni; Scattoni, Maria Luisa

    2014-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) are neurodevelopmental disorders with multifactorial origin characterized by social communication deficits and the presence of repetitive behaviors/interests. Several studies showed an association between the reelin gene mutation and increased risk of ASD and a reduced reelin expression in some brain regions of ASD subjects, suggesting a role for reelin deficiency in ASD etiology. Reelin is a large extracellular matrix glycoprotein playing important roles during development of the central nervous system. To deeply investigate the role of reelin dysfunction as vulnerability factor in ASD, we assessed the behavioral, neurochemical, and brain morphological features of reeler male mice. We recently reported a genotype-dependent deviation in the ultrasonic vocal repertoire and a general delay in motor development of reeler pups. We now report that adult male heterozygous (Het) reeler mice did not show social behavior and communication deficits during male-female social interactions. Wildtype and Het mice showed a typical light/dark locomotor activity profile, with a peak during the central interval of the dark phase. However, when faced with a mild stressful stimulus (a saline injection) only Het mice showed an over response to stress. In addition to the behavioral studies, we conducted high performance liquid chromatography and magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy to investigate whether reelin mutation influences brain monoamine and metabolites levels in regions involved in ASD. Low levels of dopamine in cortex and high levels of glutamate and taurine in hippocampus were detected in Het mice, in line with clinical data collected on ASD children. Altogether, our data detected subtle but relevant neurochemical abnormalities in reeler mice supporting this mutant line, particularly male subjects, as a valid experimental model to estimate the contribution played by reelin deficiency in the global ASD neurobehavioral phenotype.

  15. Ethanol production using nuclear petite yeast mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutter, A.; Oliver, S.G. [Department of Biomolecular Sciences, UMIST, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-31

    Two respiratory-deficient nuclear petites, FY23{Delta}pet191 and FY23{Delta}cox5a, of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were generated using polymerase-chain-reaction-mediated gene disruption, and their respective ethanol tolerance and productivity assessed and compared to those of the parental grande, FY23WT, and a mitochondrial petite, FY23{rho}{sup 0}. Batch culture studies demonstrated that the parental strain was the most tolerant to exogenously added ethanol with an inhibition constant. K{sub i}, of 2.3% (w/v) and a specific rate of ethanol production, q{sub p}, of 0.90 g ethanol g dry cells{sup -1} h{sup -1}. FY23{rho}{sup 0} was the most sensitive to ethanol, exhibiting a K{sub i} of 1.71% (w/v) and q{sub p} of 0.87 g ethanol g dry cells{sup -1} h{sup -1}. Analyses of the ethanol tolerance of the nuclear petites demonstrate that functional mitochondria are essential for maintaining tolerance to the toxin with the 100% respiratory-deficient nuclear petite, FY23{Delta}pet191, having a K{sub i} of 2.14% (w/v) and the 85% respiratory-deficient FY23{Delta}cox5a, having a K{sub i} of 1.94% (w/v). The retention of ethanol tolerance in the nuclear petites as compared to that of FY23{rho}{sup 0} is mirrored by the ethanol productivities of these nuclear mutants, being respectively 43% and 30% higher than that of the respiratory-sufficient parent strain. This demonstrates that, because of their respiratory deficiency, the nuclear petites are not subject of the Pasteur effect and so exhibit higher rates of fermentation. (orig.)

  16. Mapping pathological phenotypes in Reelin mutant mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina eMichetti

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD are neurodevelopmental disorders with multifactorial origin characterized by social communication and behavioural perseveration deficits. Several studies showed an association between the reelin gene mutation and increased risk of ASD and a reduced reelin expression in some brain regions of ASD subjects, suggesting a role for reelin deficiency in ASD etiology. Reelin is a large extracellular matrix glycoprotein playing important roles during development of the central nervous system. To deeply investigate the role of reelin dysfunction as vulnerability factor in ASD, we investigated the behavioural, neurochemical and brain morphological features of reeler male mice. We recently reported a genotype-dependent deviation in ultrasonic vocal repertoire and a general delay in motor development in reeler pups. We now report that adult male heterozygous reeler mice did not show social behaviour and communication deficits during male-female social interactions. Wildtype and heterozygous mice also showed a typical light/dark locomotor activity profile, with a peak during the central interval of the dark phase. However, when faced with a mild stressful stimulus (a saline injection only heterozygous mice showed an over response to stress. At the end of the behavioural studies, we conducted high performance liquid chromatography and magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy to investigate whether reelin mutation influences brain monoamine and metabolites levels in regions involved in ASD. Low levels of dopamine in cortex and high levels of glutamate and taurine in hippocampus were detected in heterozygous mice, in line with clinical data collected on ASD children. Altogether, our data detected subtle but relevant neurochemical abnormalities in reeler mice supporting this mutant line, particularly male subjects, as a valid experimental model to estimate the contribution played by reelin deficiency in the global ASD

  17. Mouse models for cancer research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Lynette Moore; Ping Ji

    2011-01-01

    Mouse models of cancer enable researchers to leamn about tumor biology in complicated and dynamic physiological systems. Since the development of gene targeting in mice, cancer biologists have been among the most frequent users of transgenic mouse models, which have dramatically increased knowledge about how cancers form and grow. The Chinese Joumnal of Cancer will publish a series of papers reporting the use of mouse models in studying genetic events in cancer cases. This editorial is an overview of the development and applications of mouse models of cancer and directs the reader to upcoming papers describing the use of these models to be published in coming issues, beginning with three articles in the current issue.

  18. Computer Workstation: Pointer/Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safety and Health Program Recommendations It's the Law Poster REGULATIONS Law and Regulations Standard Interpretations Training Requirements ... when evaluating your computer workstation. Pointer Placement Pointer Size, Shape, and Settings Pointer/Mouse Quick Tips Keep ...

  19. Effects on murine behavior and lifespan of selectively decreasing expression of mutant huntingtin allele by supt4h knockdown.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Min Cheng

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Production of protein containing lengthy stretches of polyglutamine encoded by multiple repeats of the trinucleotide CAG is a hallmark of Huntington's disease (HD and of a variety of other inherited degenerative neurological and neuromuscular disorders. Earlier work has shown that interference with production of the transcription elongation protein SUPT4H results in decreased cellular capacity to transcribe mutant huntingtin gene (Htt alleles containing long CAG expansions, but has little effect on expression of genes containing short CAG stretches. zQ175 and R6/2 are genetically engineered mouse strains whose genomes contain human HTT alleles that include greatly expanded CAG repeats and which are used as animal models for HD. Here we show that reduction of SUPT4H expression in brains of zQ175 mice by intracerebroventricular bolus injection of antisense 2'-O-methoxyethyl oligonucleotides (ASOs directed against Supt4h, or in R6/2 mice by deletion of one copy of the Supt4h gene, results in a decrease in mRNA and protein encoded specifically by mutant Htt alleles. We further show that reduction of SUPT4H in mouse brains is associated with decreased HTT protein aggregation, and in R6/2 mice, also with prolonged lifespan and delay of the motor impairment that normally develops in these animals. Our findings support the view that targeting of SUPT4H function may be useful as a therapeutic countermeasure against HD.

  20. Hand gestures mouse cursor control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian-Avram Vincze

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the implementation of a human-computer interface for controlling the mouse cursor. The test reveal the fact: a low-cost web camera some processing algorithms are quite enough to control the mouse cursor on computers. Even if the system is influenced by the illuminance level on the plane of the hand, the current study may represent a start point for some studies on the hand tracking and gesture recognition field.

  1. Combinational deletion of three membrane protein-encoding genes highly attenuates yersinia pestis while retaining immunogenicity in a mouse model of pneumonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiner, Bethany L; Sha, Jian; Kirtley, Michelle L; Erova, Tatiana E; Popov, Vsevolod L; Baze, Wallace B; van Lier, Christina J; Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Andersson, Jourdan A; Motin, Vladimir L; Chauhan, Sadhana; Chopra, Ashok K

    2015-04-01

    Previously, we showed that deletion of genes encodi