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Sample records for mutant phenotypes link

  1. Defective DNA cross-link removal in Chinese hamster cell mutants hypersensitive to bifunctional alkylating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoy, C.A.; Thompson, L.H.; Mooney, C.L.; Salazar, E.P.

    1985-01-01

    DNA repair-deficient mutants from five genetic complementation groups isolated previously from Chinese hamster cells were assayed for survival after exposure to the bifunctional alkylating agents mitomycin C or diepoxybutane. Groups 1, 3, and 5 exhibited 1.6- to 3-fold hypersensitivity compared to the wild-type cells, whereas Groups 2 and 4 exhibited extraordinary hypersensitivity. Mutants from Groups 1 and 2 were exposed to 22 other bifunctional alkylating agents in a rapid assay that compared cytotoxicity of the mutants to the wild-type parental strain, AA8. With all but two of the compounds, the Group 2 mutant (UV4) was 15- to 60-fold more sensitive than AA8 or the Group 1 mutant (UV5). UV4 showed only 6-fold hypersensitivity to quinacrine mustard. Alkaline elution measurements showed that this compound produced few DNA interstrand cross-links but numerous strand breaks. Therefore, the extreme hypersensitivity of mutants from Groups 2 and 4 appeared specific for compounds the main cytotoxic lesions of which were DNA cross-links. Mutant UV5 was only 1- to 4-fold hypersensitive to all the compounds. Although the initial number of cross-links was similar for the three cell lines, the efficiency of removal of cross-links was lowest in UV4 and intermediate in UV5. These results suggest that the different levels of sensitivity are specifically related to different efficiencies of DNA cross-link removal. The phenotype of hypersensitivity to both UV radiation and cross-link damage exhibited by the mutants in Groups 2 and 4 appears to differ from those of the known human DNA repair syndromes

  2. A Mutator Phenotype Promoting the Emergence of Spontaneous Oxidative Stress-Resistant Mutants in Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lei; Sahin, Orhan; Tang, Yizhi; Zhang, Qijing

    2017-12-15

    Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of foodborne illnesses worldwide. As a microaerophilic organism, C. jejuni must be able to defend against oxidative stress encountered both in the host and in the environment. How Campylobacter utilizes a mutation-based mechanism for adaptation to oxidative stress is still unknown. Here we present a previously undescribed phenotypic and genetic mechanism that promotes the emergence of oxidative stress-resistant mutants. Specifically, we showed that a naturally occurring mutator phenotype, resulting from a loss of function mutation in the DNA repair enzyme MutY, increased oxidative stress resistance (OX R ) in C. jejuni We further demonstrated that MutY malfunction did not directly contribute to the OX R phenotype but increased the spontaneous mutation rate in the peroxide regulator gene perR , which functions as a repressor for multiple genes involved in oxidative stress resistance. Mutations in PerR resulted in loss of its DNA binding function and derepression of PerR-controlled oxidative stress defense genes, thereby conferring an OX R phenotype and facilitating Campylobacter survival under oxidative stress. These findings reveal a new mechanism that promotes the emergence of spontaneous OX R mutants in bacterial organisms. IMPORTANCE Although a mutator phenotype has been shown to promote antibiotic resistance in many bacterial species, little is known about its contribution to the emergence of OX R mutants. This work describes the link between a mutator phenotype and the enhanced emergence of OX R mutants as well as its underlying mechanism involving DNA repair and mutations in PerR. Since DNA repair systems and PerR are well conserved in many bacterial species, especially in Gram positives, the same mechanism may operate in multiple bacterial species. Additionally, we developed a novel method that allows for rapid quantification of spontaneous OX R mutants in a bacterial population. This method represents a technical

  3. TOMATOMA Update: Phenotypic and Metabolite Information in the Micro-Tom Mutant Resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikata, Masahito; Hoshikawa, Ken; Ariizumi, Tohru; Fukuda, Naoya; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    TOMATOMA (http://tomatoma.nbrp.jp/) is a tomato mutant database providing visible phenotypic data of tomato mutant lines generated by ethylmethane sulfonate (EMS) treatment or γ-ray irradiation in the genetic background of Micro-Tom, a small and rapidly growing variety. To increase mutation efficiency further, mutagenized M3 seeds were subjected to a second round of EMS treatment; M3M1 populations were generated. These plants were self-pollinated, and 4,952 lines of M3M2 mutagenized seeds were generated. We checked for visible phenotypes in the M3M2 plants, and 618 mutant lines with 1,194 phenotypic categories were identified. In addition to the phenotypic information, we investigated Brix values and carotenoid contents in the fruits of individual mutants. Of 466 samples from 171 mutant lines, Brix values and carotenoid contents were between 3.2% and 11.6% and 6.9 and 37.3 µg g(-1) FW, respectively. This metabolite information concerning the mutant fruits would be useful in breeding programs as well as for the elucidation of metabolic regulation. Researchers are able to browse and search this phenotypic and metabolite information and order seeds of individual mutants via TOMATOMA. Our new Micro-Tom double-mutagenized populations and the metabolic information could provide a valuable genetic toolkit to accelerate tomato research and potential breeding programs. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Characterizing visible and invisible cell wall mutant phenotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpita, Nicholas C.; McCann, Maureen C.

    2015-04-06

    About 10% of a plant's genome is devoted to generating the protein machinery to synthesize, remodel, and deconstruct the cell wall. High-throughput genome sequencing technologies have enabled a reasonably complete inventory of wall-related genes that can be assembled into families of common evolutionary origin. Assigning function to each gene family member has been aided immensely by identification of mutants with visible phenotypes or by chemical and spectroscopic analysis of mutants with ‘invisible’ phenotypes of modified cell wall composition and architecture that do not otherwise affect plant growth or development. This review connects the inference of gene function on the basis of deviation from the wild type in genetic functional analyses to insights provided by modern analytical techniques that have brought us ever closer to elucidating the sequence structures of the major polysaccharide components of the plant cell wall.

  5. Linking human diseases to animal models using ontology-based phenotype annotation.

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    Nicole L Washington

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Scientists and clinicians who study genetic alterations and disease have traditionally described phenotypes in natural language. The considerable variation in these free-text descriptions has posed a hindrance to the important task of identifying candidate genes and models for human diseases and indicates the need for a computationally tractable method to mine data resources for mutant phenotypes. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that ontological annotation of disease phenotypes will facilitate the discovery of new genotype-phenotype relationships within and across species. To describe phenotypes using ontologies, we used an Entity-Quality (EQ methodology, wherein the affected entity (E and how it is affected (Q are recorded using terms from a variety of ontologies. Using this EQ method, we annotated the phenotypes of 11 gene-linked human diseases described in Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM. These human annotations were loaded into our Ontology-Based Database (OBD along with other ontology-based phenotype descriptions of mutants from various model organism databases. Phenotypes recorded with this EQ method can be computationally compared based on the hierarchy of terms in the ontologies and the frequency of annotation. We utilized four similarity metrics to compare phenotypes and developed an ontology of homologous and analogous anatomical structures to compare phenotypes between species. Using these tools, we demonstrate that we can identify, through the similarity of the recorded phenotypes, other alleles of the same gene, other members of a signaling pathway, and orthologous genes and pathway members across species. We conclude that EQ-based annotation of phenotypes, in conjunction with a cross-species ontology, and a variety of similarity metrics can identify biologically meaningful similarities between genes by comparing phenotypes alone. This annotation and search method provides a novel and efficient means to identify

  6. Induction of mutagenized tomato populations for investigation on agronomic traits and mutant phenotyping

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    Rafiul Amin Laskar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Global demand for tomato production increased tremendously due to its diverse utility in raw, cooked and processed form of food. This necessitates the continued supply of highly nutritious and better yielding improved cultivars to the producers, considering the rapid changing agro-climatic condition. In this study, induced mutant tomato populations of widely recommended tomato genotype Arka Vikas (Sel-22 were generated using chemical mutagen ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS, hydrazine hydrates (HZ and their combined treatments. In the in vitro study, a gradual reduction in germination percentage and seedling height occurred with the increasing concentrations of mutagens. Combination of EMS and HZ caused maximum biological inhibition followed by EMS and HZ treatments alone in M1 generation. The rate of survival and fertility in M1 plants of tomato was found highly affected due to mutagenic treatment, in which sensitivity toward combined treatment was found highest followed by EMS and HZ. Inspection on induced phenotypic variations in individual plants of M2 population resulted in identification and isolation of wide range of mutants with altered phenotypes. Highest mutation frequency was resulted by combined mutagens followed by the EMS and HZ treatment. Agronomic trait analyses showed intra and inter treatment variations in three quantitative traits (Plant height, fertile branch per plant and fruits per plant of M2 mutagenized population. Assessment on rate of mutant recovery in M2 population showed highest mutant recovery is possible with combination treatments and then 0.02% HZ followed by 0.02% EMS. In the present study, phenotyping of the mutants revealed that vegetative organs (‘plant size’, ‘plant habit’ and ‘leaf morphology’ was the most sensitive category (69.33% to which most of the mutant belongs, followed by ‘fruit color and size’ (20.27% and ‘germination’ (9.79%. Comparative investigation on number of mutants and

  7. A comprehensive dataset of genes with a loss-of-function mutant phenotype in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Johnny; Meinke, David

    2012-03-01

    Despite the widespread use of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) as a model plant, a curated dataset of Arabidopsis genes with mutant phenotypes remains to be established. A preliminary list published nine years ago in Plant Physiology is outdated, and genome-wide phenotype information remains difficult to obtain. We describe here a comprehensive dataset of 2,400 genes with a loss-of-function mutant phenotype in Arabidopsis. Phenotype descriptions were gathered primarily from manual curation of the scientific literature. Genes were placed into prioritized groups (essential, morphological, cellular-biochemical, and conditional) based on the documented phenotypes of putative knockout alleles. Phenotype classes (e.g. vegetative, reproductive, and timing, for the morphological group) and subsets (e.g. flowering time, senescence, circadian rhythms, and miscellaneous, for the timing class) were also established. Gene identities were classified as confirmed (through molecular complementation or multiple alleles) or not confirmed. Relationships between mutant phenotype and protein function, genetic redundancy, protein connectivity, and subcellular protein localization were explored. A complementary dataset of 401 genes that exhibit a mutant phenotype only when disrupted in combination with a putative paralog was also compiled. The importance of these genes in confirming functional redundancy and enhancing the value of single gene datasets is discussed. With further input and curation from the Arabidopsis community, these datasets should help to address a variety of important biological questions, provide a foundation for exploring the relationship between genotype and phenotype in angiosperms, enhance the utility of Arabidopsis as a reference plant, and facilitate comparative studies with model genetic organisms.

  8. Emerging semantics to link phenotype and environment

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    Anne E. Thessen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the interplay between environmental conditions and phenotypes is a fundamental goal of biology. Unfortunately, data that include observations on phenotype and environment are highly heterogeneous and thus difficult to find and integrate. One approach that is likely to improve the status quo involves the use of ontologies to standardize and link data about phenotypes and environments. Specifying and linking data through ontologies will allow researchers to increase the scope and flexibility of large-scale analyses aided by modern computing methods. Investments in this area would advance diverse fields such as ecology, phylogenetics, and conservation biology. While several biological ontologies are well-developed, using them to link phenotypes and environments is rare because of gaps in ontological coverage and limits to interoperability among ontologies and disciplines. In this manuscript, we present (1 use cases from diverse disciplines to illustrate questions that could be answered more efficiently using a robust linkage between phenotypes and environments, (2 two proof-of-concept analyses that show the value of linking phenotypes to environments in fishes and amphibians, and (3 two proposed example data models for linking phenotypes and environments using the extensible observation ontology (OBOE and the Biological Collections Ontology (BCO; these provide a starting point for the development of a data model linking phenotypes and environments.

  9. Fluorometric assay for phenotypic differentiation of drug-resistant HIV mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qinchang; Yu, Zhiqiang; Kabashima, Tsutomu; Yin, Sheng; Dragusha, Shpend; El-Mahdy, Ahmed F. M.; Ejupi, Valon; Shibata, Takayuki; Kai, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    Convenient drug-resistance testing of viral mutants is indispensable to effective treatment of viral infection. We developed a novel fluorometric assay for phenotypic differentiation of drug-resistant mutants of human immunodeficiency virus-I protease (HIV-PR) which uses enzymatic and peptide-specific fluorescence (FL) reactions and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) of three HIV-PR substrates. This assay protocol enables use of non-purified enzyme sources and multiple substrates for the enzymatic reaction. In this study, susceptibility of HIV mutations to drugs was evaluated by selective formation of three FL products after the enzymatic HIV-PR reaction. This proof-of-concept study indicates that the present HPLC-FL method could be an alternative to current phenotypic assays for the evaluation of HIV drug resistance. PMID:25988960

  10. Fluorometric assay for phenotypic differentiation of drug-resistant HIV mutants

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Qinchang; Yu, Zhiqiang; Kabashima, Tsutomu; Yin, Sheng; Dragusha, Shpend; El-Mahdy, Ahmed F. M.; Ejupi, Valon; Shibata, Takayuki; Kai, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    Convenient drug-resistance testing of viral mutants is indispensable to effective treatment of viral infection. We developed a novel fluorometric assay for phenotypic differentiation of drug-resistant mutants of human immunodeficiency virus-I protease (HIV-PR) which uses enzymatic and peptide-specific fluorescence (FL) reactions and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) of three HIV-PR substrates. This assay protocol enables use of non-purified enzyme sources and multiple substrates f...

  11. Destabilizing protein polymorphisms in the genetic background direct phenotypic expression of mutant SOD1 toxicity.

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    Tali Gidalevitz

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetic background exerts a strong modulatory effect on the toxicity of aggregation-prone proteins in conformational diseases. In addition to influencing the misfolding and aggregation behavior of the mutant proteins, polymorphisms in putative modifier genes may affect the molecular processes leading to the disease phenotype. Mutations in SOD1 in a subset of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS cases confer dominant but clinically variable toxicity, thought to be mediated by misfolding and aggregation of mutant SOD1 protein. While the mechanism of toxicity remains unknown, both the nature of the SOD1 mutation and the genetic background in which it is expressed appear important. To address this, we established a Caenorhabditis elegans model to systematically examine the aggregation behavior and genetic interactions of mutant forms of SOD1. Expression of three structurally distinct SOD1 mutants in C. elegans muscle cells resulted in the appearance of heterogeneous populations of aggregates and was associated with only mild cellular dysfunction. However, introduction of destabilizing temperature-sensitive mutations into the genetic background strongly enhanced the toxicity of SOD1 mutants, resulting in exposure of several deleterious phenotypes at permissive conditions in a manner dependent on the specific SOD1 mutation. The nature of the observed phenotype was dependent on the temperature-sensitive mutation present, while its penetrance reflected the specific combination of temperature-sensitive and SOD1 mutations. Thus, the specific toxic phenotypes of conformational disease may not be simply due to misfolding/aggregation toxicity of the causative mutant proteins, but may be defined by their genetic interactions with cellular pathways harboring mildly destabilizing missense alleles.

  12. A Comprehensive Dataset of Genes with a Loss-of-Function Mutant Phenotype in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Johnny; Meinke, David

    2012-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) as a model plant, a curated dataset of Arabidopsis genes with mutant phenotypes remains to be established. A preliminary list published nine years ago in Plant Physiology is outdated, and genome-wide phenotype information remains difficult to obtain. We describe here a comprehensive dataset of 2,400 genes with a loss-of-function mutant phenotype in Arabidopsis. Phenotype descriptions were gathered primarily from manual curation of the scientific literature. Genes were placed into prioritized groups (essential, morphological, cellular-biochemical, and conditional) based on the documented phenotypes of putative knockout alleles. Phenotype classes (e.g. vegetative, reproductive, and timing, for the morphological group) and subsets (e.g. flowering time, senescence, circadian rhythms, and miscellaneous, for the timing class) were also established. Gene identities were classified as confirmed (through molecular complementation or multiple alleles) or not confirmed. Relationships between mutant phenotype and protein function, genetic redundancy, protein connectivity, and subcellular protein localization were explored. A complementary dataset of 401 genes that exhibit a mutant phenotype only when disrupted in combination with a putative paralog was also compiled. The importance of these genes in confirming functional redundancy and enhancing the value of single gene datasets is discussed. With further input and curation from the Arabidopsis community, these datasets should help to address a variety of important biological questions, provide a foundation for exploring the relationship between genotype and phenotype in angiosperms, enhance the utility of Arabidopsis as a reference plant, and facilitate comparative studies with model genetic organisms. PMID:22247268

  13. Mutation Breeding and Selection for Phenotypic Mutants in Standard Rice Varieties by Ion Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puddhanon, Prawit; Pintanon, Prateep; Chaithep, Waree; Songjuntuke, Ksan

    2009-07-01

    Full text: Effects of 80 keV ion beam (10 16 ion/cm 2 on mutations of RD6 and Sanpatong 1 rice varieties were studied in 2006. In order to obtain the phenotypic mutants, each variety was sown in the laboratory and under field conditions at Maejo University in 2007 dry season. Seed germination noticeably declined. For RD6, only 45.1% germinated in the laboratory, and 18.1% were established under the field condition. Similarly, 62.3% of Sanpatong 1 germinated in the laboratory and 31.4% established in the field. No phenotypic mutants were observed in the first generation (M 1 ). The M2 seeds were harvested separately from 3 panicles of each M plant in RD6 and Sanpatong1, totaling 810 and 1,878 lines, respectively. In 2007 rainy season, they were planted on a panicle to row basis. It was found that more phenotypic mutants were observed in the M 2 for Sanpatong 1 than for RD6. The mutant characters included dwarf plants, early maturity, male sterility and larger panicle sizes. As a result, about 420 within line selections were collected and the M 3 seeds were harvested for further field condition and gene markers evaluations

  14. Dictyostelium discoideum: mutants in the biosynthesis of the lipid-linked precursor of N-linked oligosaccharides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeze, H.; Willies, L.; Hamilton, S.

    1986-01-01

    The lysosomal enzymes of Dictyostelium discoideum share highly immunogenic oligosaccharides which contain multiple Man-6-SO 4 residues. Two mutant strains which lack the shared antigenic determinant were analyzed in an attempt to identify the primary defect in each. [ 3 H]Man labelled N-linked oligosaccharides of secreted glycoproteins were released by Endo/PNGaseF digestion and analyzed. Both of the mutant strains produced smaller, less sulfated oligosaccharides compared to the wild-type, yet both still contained considerable amounts of Man-6-SO 4 . The size of the precursor lipid-linked oligosaccharide from the wild-type is consistent with a Glc 3 Man 9 GlcNAc 2 structure, while those from both of the mutants have an oligosaccharide the size of Man 5 GlcNAc 2 . The authors conclude that both of the mutants are defective in the biosynthesis of the precursor oligosaccharide. Both oligosaccharides from the mutants contain a tri-mannosyl core and are not glucosylated. Two of the five Man residues are released by a 1,2 specific α mannosidase. Based on the size and mannosidase digestions the authors conclude that 4/5 of the Man residues on the α1,6 branch of the β-linked Man residues are missing. Thus, these residues must be required to define the shared antigenic determinant

  15. Multi-source and ontology-based retrieval engine for maize mutant phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the midst of this genomics era, major plant genome databases are collecting massive amounts of heterogeneous information, including sequence data, gene product information, images of mutant phenotypes, etc., as well as textual descriptions of many of these entities. While basic browsing and sear...

  16. Root and Nodulation Phenotypes of the Ethylene-Insensitive Sickle Mutant of Medicago truncatula

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    JOKO PRAYITNO

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The sickle (skl mutant of the model legume Medicago truncatula is an ethylene-sensitive mutant that have a ten-fold increase in nodule numbers. The nodulation and root phenotypes of the skl mutant were investigated and further characterised. The skl mutant had longer roots than the wild type, but when inoculated with Sinorhizobium, its root length was reduced to the level of wild type. Furthermore, lateral root numbers in uninoculated skl were similar to those in uninoculated wild type. However, when the root tips were decapitated, fewer lateral roots formed in skl than in wild type. Nodule numbers of the skl mutant were significantly reduced by low nitrate concentration (2.5 mM. These results suggest that skl mutant has alterations in both root and nodule development.

  17. The First Scube3 Mutant Mouse Line with Pleiotropic Phenotypic Alterations.

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    Fuchs, Helmut; Sabrautzki, Sibylle; Przemeck, Gerhard K H; Leuchtenberger, Stefanie; Lorenz-Depiereux, Bettina; Becker, Lore; Rathkolb, Birgit; Horsch, Marion; Garrett, Lillian; Östereicher, Manuela A; Hans, Wolfgang; Abe, Koichiro; Sagawa, Nobuho; Rozman, Jan; Vargas-Panesso, Ingrid L; Sandholzer, Michael; Lisse, Thomas S; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Ehrhard, Nicole; Elvert, Ralf; Gau, Christine; Hölter, Sabine M; Micklich, Katja; Moreth, Kristin; Prehn, Cornelia; Puk, Oliver; Racz, Ildiko; Stoeger, Claudia; Vernaleken, Alexandra; Michel, Dian; Diener, Susanne; Wieland, Thomas; Adamski, Jerzy; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Busch, Dirk H; Favor, John; Graw, Jochen; Klingenspor, Martin; Lengger, Christoph; Maier, Holger; Neff, Frauke; Ollert, Markus; Stoeger, Tobias; Yildirim, Ali Önder; Strom, Tim M; Zimmer, Andreas; Wolf, Eckhard; Wurst, Wolfgang; Klopstock, Thomas; Beckers, Johannes; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Hrabé de Angelis, Martin

    2016-12-07

    The vertebrate Scube (Signal peptide, CUB, and EGF-like domain-containing protein) family consists of three independent members, Scube1-3, which encode secreted cell surface-associated membrane glycoproteins. Limited information about the general function of this gene family is available, and their roles during adulthood. Here, we present the first Scube3 mutant mouse line (Scube3 N294K/N294K ), which clearly shows phenotypic alterations by carrying a missense mutation in exon 8, and thus contributes to our understanding of SCUBE3 functions. We performed a detailed phenotypic characterization in the German Mouse Clinic (GMC). Scube3 N294K/N294K mutants showed morphological abnormalities of the skeleton, alterations of parameters relevant for bone metabolism, changes in renal function, and hearing impairments. These findings correlate with characteristics of the rare metabolic bone disorder Paget disease of bone (PDB), associated with the chromosomal region of human SCUBE3 In addition, alterations in energy metabolism, behavior, and neurological functions were detected in Scube3 N294K/N294K mice. The Scube3 N294K/N294K mutant mouse line may serve as a new model for further studying the effect of impaired SCUBE3 gene function. Copyright © 2016 Fuchs et al.

  18. The First Scube3 Mutant Mouse Line with Pleiotropic Phenotypic Alterations

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    Helmut Fuchs

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The vertebrate Scube (Signal peptide, CUB, and EGF-like domain-containing protein family consists of three independent members, Scube1–3, which encode secreted cell surface-associated membrane glycoproteins. Limited information about the general function of this gene family is available, and their roles during adulthood. Here, we present the first Scube3 mutant mouse line (Scube3N294K/N294K, which clearly shows phenotypic alterations by carrying a missense mutation in exon 8, and thus contributes to our understanding of SCUBE3 functions. We performed a detailed phenotypic characterization in the German Mouse Clinic (GMC. Scube3N294K/N294K mutants showed morphological abnormalities of the skeleton, alterations of parameters relevant for bone metabolism, changes in renal function, and hearing impairments. These findings correlate with characteristics of the rare metabolic bone disorder Paget disease of bone (PDB, associated with the chromosomal region of human SCUBE3. In addition, alterations in energy metabolism, behavior, and neurological functions were detected in Scube3N294K/N294K mice. The Scube3N294K/N294K mutant mouse line may serve as a new model for further studying the effect of impaired SCUBE3 gene function.

  19. Molecular Determinants of Mutant Phenotypes, Inferred from Saturation Mutagenesis Data.

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    Tripathi, Arti; Gupta, Kritika; Khare, Shruti; Jain, Pankaj C; Patel, Siddharth; Kumar, Prasanth; Pulianmackal, Ajai J; Aghera, Nilesh; Varadarajan, Raghavan

    2016-11-01

    Understanding how mutations affect protein activity and organismal fitness is a major challenge. We used saturation mutagenesis combined with deep sequencing to determine mutational sensitivity scores for 1,664 single-site mutants of the 101 residue Escherichia coli cytotoxin, CcdB at seven different expression levels. Active-site residues could be distinguished from buried ones, based on their differential tolerance to aliphatic and charged amino acid substitutions. At nonactive-site positions, the average mutational tolerance correlated better with depth from the protein surface than with accessibility. Remarkably, similar results were observed for two other small proteins, PDZ domain (PSD95 pdz3 ) and IgG-binding domain of protein G (GB1). Mutational sensitivity data obtained with CcdB were used to derive a procedure for predicting functional effects of mutations. Results compared favorably with those of two widely used computational predictors. In vitro characterization of 80 single, nonactive-site mutants of CcdB showed that activity in vivo correlates moderately with thermal stability and solubility. The inability to refold reversibly, as well as a decreased folding rate in vitro, is associated with decreased activity in vivo. Upon probing the effect of modulating expression of various proteases and chaperones on mutant phenotypes, most deleterious mutants showed an increased in vivo activity and solubility only upon over-expression of either Trigger factor or SecB ATP-independent chaperones. Collectively, these data suggest that folding kinetics rather than protein stability is the primary determinant of activity in vivo This study enhances our understanding of how mutations affect phenotype, as well as the ability to predict fitness effects of point mutations. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  20. Mutants of GABA transaminase (POP2 suppress the severe phenotype of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (ssadh mutants in Arabidopsis.

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    Frank Ludewig

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The gamma-aminubutyrate (GABA shunt bypasses two steps of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and is present in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In plants, the pathway is composed of the calcium/calmodulin-regulated cytosolic enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD, the mitochondrial enzymes GABA transaminase (GABA-T; POP2 and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH. We have previously shown that compromising the function of the GABA-shunt, by disrupting the SSADH gene of Arabidopsis, causes enhanced accumulation of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs and cell death in response to light and heat stress. However, to date, genetic investigations of the relationships between enzymes of the GABA shunt have not been reported. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To elucidate the role of succinic semialdehyde (SSA, gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB and GABA in the accumulation of ROIs, we combined two genetic approaches to suppress the severe phenotype of ssadh mutants. Analysis of double pop2 ssadh mutants revealed that pop2 is epistatic to ssadh. Moreover, we isolated EMS-generated mutants suppressing the phenotype of ssadh revealing two new pop2 alleles. By measuring thermoluminescence at high temperature, the peroxide contents of ssadh and pop2 mutants were evaluated, showing that only ssadh plants accumulate peroxides. In addition, pop2 ssadh seedlings are more sensitive to exogenous SSA or GHB relative to wild type, because GHB and/or SSA accumulate in these plants. SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that the lack of supply of succinate and NADH to the TCA cycle is not responsible for the oxidative stress and growth retardations of ssadh mutants. Rather, we suggest that the accumulation of SSA, GHB, or both, produced downstream of the GABA-T transamination step, is toxic to the plants, resulting in high ROI levels and impaired development.

  1. klf2ash317 Mutant Zebrafish Do Not Recapitulate Morpholino-Induced Vascular and Haematopoietic Phenotypes.

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    Peter Novodvorsky

    Full Text Available The zinc-finger transcription factor Krϋppel-like factor 2 (KLF2 transduces blood flow into molecular signals responsible for a wide range of responses within the vasculature. KLF2 maintains a healthy, quiescent endothelial phenotype. Previous studies report a range of phenotypes following morpholino antisense oligonucleotide-induced klf2a knockdown in zebrafish. Targeted genome editing is an increasingly applied method for functional assessment of candidate genes. We therefore generated a stable klf2a mutant zebrafish and characterised its cardiovascular and haematopoietic development.Using Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALEN we generated a klf2a mutant (klf2ash317 with a 14bp deletion leading to a premature stop codon in exon 2. Western blotting confirmed loss of wild type Klf2a protein and the presence of a truncated protein in klf2ash317 mutants. Homozygous klf2ash317 mutants exhibit no defects in vascular patterning, survive to adulthood and are fertile, without displaying previously described morphant phenotypes such as high-output cardiac failure, reduced haematopoetic stem cell (HSC development or impaired formation of the 5th accessory aortic arch. Homozygous klf2ash317 mutation did not reduce angiogenesis in zebrafish with homozygous mutations in von Hippel Lindau (vhl, a form of angiogenesis that is dependent on blood flow. We examined expression of three klf family members in wildtype and klf2ash317 zebrafish. We detected vascular expression of klf2b (but not klf4a or biklf/klf4b/klf17 in wildtypes but found no differences in expression that might account for the lack of phenotype in klf2ash317 mutants. klf2b morpholino knockdown did not affect heart rate or impair formation of the 5th accessory aortic arch in either wildtypes or klf2ash317 mutants.The klf2ash317 mutation produces a truncated Klf2a protein but, unlike morpholino induced klf2a knockdown, does not affect cardiovascular development.

  2. The Immature Fiber Mutant Phenotype of Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum Is Linked to a 22-bp Frame-Shift Deletion in a Mitochondria Targeted Pentatricopeptide Repeat Gene

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    Gregory N. Thyssen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cotton seed trichomes are the most important source of natural fibers globally. The major fiber thickness properties influence the price of the raw material, and the quality of the finished product. The recessive immature fiber (im gene reduces the degree of fiber cell wall thickening by a process that was previously shown to involve mitochondrial function in allotetraploid Gossypium hirsutum. Here, we present the fine genetic mapping of the im locus, gene expression analysis of annotated proteins near the locus, and association analysis of the linked markers. Mapping-by-sequencing identified a 22-bp deletion in a pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR gene that is completely linked to the immature fiber phenotype in 2837 F2 plants, and is absent from all 163 cultivated varieties tested, although other closely linked marker polymorphisms are prevalent in the diversity panel. This frame-shift mutation results in a transcript with two long open reading frames: one containing the N-terminal transit peptide that targets mitochondria, the other containing only the RNA-binding PPR domains, suggesting that a functional PPR protein cannot be targeted to mitochondria in the im mutant. Taken together, these results suggest that PPR gene Gh_A03G0489 is involved in the cotton fiber wall thickening process, and is a promising candidate gene at the im locus. Our findings expand our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that modulate cotton fiber fineness and maturity, and may facilitate the development of cotton varieties with superior fiber attributes.

  3. Expression of ALS/FTD-linked mutant CCNF in zebrafish leads to increased cell death in the spinal cord and an aberrant motor phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Alison L; Don, Emily K; Rayner, Stephanie L; Lee, Albert; Laird, Angela S; Watchon, Maxinne; Winnick, Claire; Tarr, Ingrid S; Morsch, Marco; Fifita, Jennifer A; Gwee, Serene S L; Formella, Isabel; Hortle, Elinor; Yuan, Kristy C; Molloy, Mark P; Williams, Kelly L; Nicholson, Garth A; Chung, Roger S; Blair, Ian P; Cole, Nicholas J

    2017-07-15

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a rapidly progressive, fatal neurodegenerative disease characterised by the death of upper and lower motor neurons. Approximately 10% of cases have a known family history of ALS and disease-linked mutations in multiple genes have been identified. ALS-linked mutations in CCNF were recently reported, however the pathogenic mechanisms associated with these mutations are yet to be established. To investigate possible disease mechanisms, we developed in vitro and in vivo models based on an ALS-linked missense mutation in CCNF. Proteomic analysis of the in vitro models identified the disruption of several cellular pathways in the mutant model, including caspase-3 mediated cell death. Transient overexpression of human CCNF in zebrafish embryos supported this finding, with fish expressing the mutant protein found to have increased levels of cleaved (activated) caspase-3 and increased cell death in the spinal cord. The mutant CCNF fish also developed a motor neuron axonopathy consisting of shortened primary motor axons and increased frequency of aberrant axonal branching. Importantly, we demonstrated a significant correlation between the severity of the CCNF-induced axonopathy and a reduced motor response to a light stimulus (photomotor response). This is the first report of an ALS-linked CCNF mutation in vivo and taken together with the in vitro model identifies the disruption of cell death pathways as a significant consequence of this mutation. Additionally, this study presents a valuable new tool for use in ongoing studies investigating the pathobiology of ALS-linked CCNF mutations. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Natural variation of model mutant phenotypes in Ciona intestinalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Sordino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The study of ascidians (Chordata, Tunicata has made a considerable contribution to our understanding of the origin and evolution of basal chordates. To provide further information to support forward genetics in Ciona intestinalis, we used a combination of natural variation and neutral population genetics as an approach for the systematic identification of new mutations. In addition to the significance of developmental variation for phenotype-driven studies, this approach can encompass important implications in evolutionary and population biology. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we report a preliminary survey for naturally occurring mutations in three geographically interconnected populations of C. intestinalis. The influence of historical, geographical and environmental factors on the distribution of abnormal phenotypes was assessed by means of 12 microsatellites. We identified 37 possible mutant loci with stereotyped defects in embryonic development that segregate in a way typical of recessive alleles. Local populations were found to differ in genetic organization and frequency distribution of phenotypic classes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Natural genetic polymorphism of C. intestinalis constitutes a valuable source of phenotypes for studying embryonic development in ascidians. Correlating genetic structure and the occurrence of abnormal phenotypes is a crucial focus for understanding the selective forces that shape natural finite populations, and may provide insights of great importance into the evolutionary mechanisms that generate animal diversity.

  5. Natural Variation of Model Mutant Phenotypes in Ciona intestinalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Euan R.; Leccia, Nicola I.; Squarzoni, Paola; Tarallo, Raffaella; Alfano, Christian; Caputi, Luigi; D'Ambrosio, Palmira; Daniele, Paola; D'Aniello, Enrico; D'Aniello, Salvatore; Maiella, Sylvie; Miraglia, Valentina; Russo, Monia Teresa; Sorrenti, Gerarda; Branno, Margherita; Cariello, Lucio; Cirino, Paola; Locascio, Annamaria; Spagnuolo, Antonietta; Zanetti, Laura; Ristoratore, Filomena

    2008-01-01

    Background The study of ascidians (Chordata, Tunicata) has made a considerable contribution to our understanding of the origin and evolution of basal chordates. To provide further information to support forward genetics in Ciona intestinalis, we used a combination of natural variation and neutral population genetics as an approach for the systematic identification of new mutations. In addition to the significance of developmental variation for phenotype-driven studies, this approach can encompass important implications in evolutionary and population biology. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we report a preliminary survey for naturally occurring mutations in three geographically interconnected populations of C. intestinalis. The influence of historical, geographical and environmental factors on the distribution of abnormal phenotypes was assessed by means of 12 microsatellites. We identified 37 possible mutant loci with stereotyped defects in embryonic development that segregate in a way typical of recessive alleles. Local populations were found to differ in genetic organization and frequency distribution of phenotypic classes. Conclusions/Significance Natural genetic polymorphism of C. intestinalis constitutes a valuable source of phenotypes for studying embryonic development in ascidians. Correlating genetic structure and the occurrence of abnormal phenotypes is a crucial focus for understanding the selective forces that shape natural finite populations, and may provide insights of great importance into the evolutionary mechanisms that generate animal diversity. PMID:18523552

  6. Behavioral and other phenotypes in a cytoplasmic Dynein light intermediate chain 1 mutant mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Gareth T; Haas, Matilda A; Line, Samantha; Shepherd, Hazel L; Alqatari, Mona; Stewart, Sammy; Rishal, Ida; Philpott, Amelia; Kalmar, Bernadett; Kuta, Anna; Groves, Michael; Parkinson, Nicholas; Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham; Brandner, Sebastian; Bannerman, David; Greensmith, Linda; Hafezparast, Majid; Koltzenburg, Martin; Deacon, Robert; Fainzilber, Mike; Fisher, Elizabeth M C

    2011-04-06

    The cytoplasmic dynein complex is fundamentally important to all eukaryotic cells for transporting a variety of essential cargoes along microtubules within the cell. This complex also plays more specialized roles in neurons. The complex consists of 11 types of protein that interact with each other and with external adaptors, regulators and cargoes. Despite the importance of the cytoplasmic dynein complex, we know comparatively little of the roles of each component protein, and in mammals few mutants exist that allow us to explore the effects of defects in dynein-controlled processes in the context of the whole organism. Here we have taken a genotype-driven approach in mouse (Mus musculus) to analyze the role of one subunit, the dynein light intermediate chain 1 (Dync1li1). We find that, surprisingly, an N235Y point mutation in this protein results in altered neuronal development, as shown from in vivo studies in the developing cortex, and analyses of electrophysiological function. Moreover, mutant mice display increased anxiety, thus linking dynein functions to a behavioral phenotype in mammals for the first time. These results demonstrate the important role that dynein-controlled processes play in the correct development and function of the mammalian nervous system.

  7. The phenotype of FancB-mutant mouse embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Tae Moon; Ko, Jun Ho; Choi, Yong Jun; Hu, Lingchuan; Hasty, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by bone marrow failure, developmental defects and cancer. There are multiple FA genes that enable the repair of interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) in coordination with a variety of other DNA repair pathways in a way that is poorly understood. Here we present the phenotype of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells mutated for FancB. We found FancB-mutant cells exhibited reduced cellular proliferation, hypersensitivity to the crosslink...

  8. Aggregation of ALS-linked FUS mutant sequesters RNA binding proteins and impairs RNA granules formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takanashi, Keisuke; Yamaguchi, Atsushi, E-mail: atsyama@restaff.chiba-u.jp

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Aggregation of ALS-linked FUS mutant sequesters ALS-associated RNA-binding proteins (FUS wt, hnRNP A1, and hnRNP A2). • Aggregation of ALS-linked FUS mutant sequesters SMN1 in the detergent-insoluble fraction. • Aggregation of ALS-linked FUS mutant reduced the number of speckles in the nucleus. • Overproduced ALS-linked FUS mutant reduced the number of processing-bodies (PBs). - Abstract: Protein aggregate/inclusion is one of hallmarks for neurodegenerative disorders including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). FUS/TLS, one of causative genes for familial ALS, encodes a multifunctional DNA/RNA binding protein predominantly localized in the nucleus. C-terminal mutations in FUS/TLS cause the retention and the inclusion of FUS/TLS mutants in the cytoplasm. In the present study, we examined the effects of ALS-linked FUS mutants on ALS-associated RNA binding proteins and RNA granules. FUS C-terminal mutants were diffusely mislocalized in the cytoplasm as small granules in transiently transfected SH-SY5Y cells, whereas large aggregates were spontaneously formed in ∼10% of those cells. hnRNP A1, hnRNP A2, and SMN1 as well as FUS wild type were assembled into stress granules under stress conditions, and these were also recruited to FUS mutant-derived spontaneous aggregates in the cytoplasm. These aggregates stalled poly(A) mRNAs and sequestered SMN1 in the detergent insoluble fraction, which also reduced the number of nuclear oligo(dT)-positive foci (speckles) in FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) assay. In addition, the number of P-bodies was decreased in cells harboring cytoplasmic granules of FUS P525L. These findings raise the possibility that ALS-linked C-terminal FUS mutants could sequester a variety of RNA binding proteins and mRNAs in the cytoplasmic aggregates, which could disrupt various aspects of RNA equilibrium and biogenesis.

  9. Severity of mutant phenotype in a series of chlorophyll-deficient wheat mutants depends on light intensity and the severity of the block in chlorophyll synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falbel, T G; Meehl, J B; Staehelin, L A

    1996-10-01

    Analyses of a series of allelic chlorina mutants of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), which have partial blocks in chlorophyll (Chl) synthesis and, therefore, a limited Chl supply, reinforce the principle that Chl is required for the stable accumulation of Chl-binding proteins and that only reaction centers accumulate when the supply of Chl is severely limited. Depending on the rate of Chl accumulation (determined by the severity of the mutation) and on the rate of turnover of Chl and its precursors (determined by the environment in which the plant is grown), the mutants each reach an equilibrium of Chl synthesis and degradation. Together these mutants generate a spectrum of phenotypes. Under the harshest conditions (high illumination), plants with moderate blocks in Chl synthesis have membranes with very little Chl and Chl-proteins and membrane stacks resembling the thylakoids of the lethal xantha mutants of barely grown at low to medium light intensities (which have more severe blocks). In contrast, when grown under low-light conditions the same plants with moderate blocks have thylakoids resembling those of the wild type. The wide range of phenotypes of Chl b-deficient mutants has historically produced more confusion than enlightenment, but incomparable growth conditions can now explain the discrepancies reported in the literature.

  10. PhenoLink - a web-tool for linking phenotype to ~omics data for bacteria: application to gene-trait matching for Lactobacillus plantarum strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayjanov Jumamurat R

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Linking phenotypes to high-throughput molecular biology information generated by ~omics technologies allows revealing cellular mechanisms underlying an organism's phenotype. ~Omics datasets are often very large and noisy with many features (e.g., genes, metabolite abundances. Thus, associating phenotypes to ~omics data requires an approach that is robust to noise and can handle large and diverse data sets. Results We developed a web-tool PhenoLink (http://bamics2.cmbi.ru.nl/websoftware/phenolink/ that links phenotype to ~omics data sets using well-established as well new techniques. PhenoLink imputes missing values and preprocesses input data (i to decrease inherent noise in the data and (ii to counterbalance pitfalls of the Random Forest algorithm, on which feature (e.g., gene selection is based. Preprocessed data is used in feature (e.g., gene selection to identify relations to phenotypes. We applied PhenoLink to identify gene-phenotype relations based on the presence/absence of 2847 genes in 42 Lactobacillus plantarum strains and phenotypic measurements of these strains in several experimental conditions, including growth on sugars and nitrogen-dioxide production. Genes were ranked based on their importance (predictive value to correctly predict the phenotype of a given strain. In addition to known gene to phenotype relations we also found novel relations. Conclusions PhenoLink is an easily accessible web-tool to facilitate identifying relations from large and often noisy phenotype and ~omics datasets. Visualization of links to phenotypes offered in PhenoLink allows prioritizing links, finding relations between features, finding relations between phenotypes, and identifying outliers in phenotype data. PhenoLink can be used to uncover phenotype links to a multitude of ~omics data, e.g., gene presence/absence (determined by e.g.: CGH or next-generation sequencing, gene expression (determined by e.g.: microarrays or RNA

  11. Isolation of new gravitropic mutants under hypergravity conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Akiko Mori; Masatsugu Toyota; Masatsugu Toyota; Masayoshi Shimada; Mika Mekata; Tetsuya Kurata; Masao Tasaka; Miyo Terao Morita

    2016-01-01

    Forward genetics is a powerful approach used to link genotypes and phenotypes, and mutant screening/analysis has provided deep insights into many aspects of plant physiology. Gravitropism is a tropistic response in plants, in which hypocotyls and stems sense the direction of gravity and grow upwards. Previous studies of gravitropic mutants have suggested that shoot endodermal cells in Arabidopsis stems and hypocotyls are capable of sensing gravity (i.e., statocytes). In the present study, we ...

  12. The Arabidopsis mutant cev1 links cell wall signaling to jasmonate and ethylene responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Christine; Karafyllidis, Ioannis; Wasternack, Claus; Turner, John G

    2002-07-01

    Biotic and abiotic stresses stimulate the synthesis of jasmonates and ethylene, which, in turn, induce the expression of genes involved in stress response and enhance defense responses. The cev1 mutant has constitutive expression of stress response genes and has enhanced resistance to fungal pathogens. Here, we show that cev1 plants have increased production of jasmonate and ethylene and that its phenotype is suppressed by mutations that interrupt jasmonate and ethylene signaling. Genetic mapping, complementation analysis, and sequence analysis revealed that CEV1 is the cellulose synthase CeSA3. CEV1 was expressed predominantly in root tissues, and cev1 roots contained less cellulose than wild-type roots. Significantly, the cev1 mutant phenotype could be reproduced by treating wild-type plants with cellulose biosynthesis inhibitors, and the cellulose synthase mutant rsw1 also had constitutive expression of VSP. We propose that the cell wall can signal stress responses in plants.

  13. Isolation of New Gravitropic Mutants under Hypergravity Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Mori, Akiko; Toyota, Masatsugu; Shimada, Masayoshi; Mekata, Mika; Kurata, Tetsuya; Tasaka, Masao; Morita, Miyo T.

    2016-01-01

    Forward genetics is a powerful approach used to link genotypes and phenotypes, and mutant screening/analysis has provided deep insights into many aspects of plant physiology. Gravitropism is a tropistic response in plants, in which hypocotyls and stems sense the direction of gravity and grow upward. Previous studies of gravitropic mutants have suggested that shoot endodermal cells in Arabidopsis stems and hypocotyls are capable of sensing gravity (i.e., statocytes). In the present study, we r...

  14. Multiple antibiotic susceptibility of polyphosphate kinase mutants (ppk1 and ppk2 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 as revealed by global phenotypic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javiera Ortiz-Severín

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is known to be a multidrug resistant opportunistic pathogen. Particularly, P. aeruginosa PAO1 polyphosphate kinase mutant (ppk1 is deficient in motility, quorum sensing, biofilm formation and virulence FINDINGS: By using Phenotypic Microarrays (PM we analyzed near 2000 phenotypes of P. aeruginosa PAO1 polyP kinase mutants (ppk1 and ppk2. We found that both ppk mutants shared most of the phenotypic changes and interestingly many of them related to susceptibility toward numerous and different type of antibiotics such as Ciprofloxacin, Chloramphenicol and Rifampicin CONCLUSIONS: Combining the fact that ppk1 mutants have reduced virulence and are more susceptible to antibiotics, polyP synthesis and particularly PPK1, is a good target for the design of molecules with anti-virulence and anti-persistence properties.

  15. Multiparametric classification links tumor microenvironments with tumor cell phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojana Gligorijevic

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available While it has been established that a number of microenvironment components can affect the likelihood of metastasis, the link between microenvironment and tumor cell phenotypes is poorly understood. Here we have examined microenvironment control over two different tumor cell motility phenotypes required for metastasis. By high-resolution multiphoton microscopy of mammary carcinoma in mice, we detected two phenotypes of motile tumor cells, different in locomotion speed. Only slower tumor cells exhibited protrusions with molecular, morphological, and functional characteristics associated with invadopodia. Each region in the primary tumor exhibited either fast- or slow-locomotion. To understand how the tumor microenvironment controls invadopodium formation and tumor cell locomotion, we systematically analyzed components of the microenvironment previously associated with cell invasion and migration. No single microenvironmental property was able to predict the locations of tumor cell phenotypes in the tumor if used in isolation or combined linearly. To solve this, we utilized the support vector machine (SVM algorithm to classify phenotypes in a nonlinear fashion. This approach identified conditions that promoted either motility phenotype. We then demonstrated that varying one of the conditions may change tumor cell behavior only in a context-dependent manner. In addition, to establish the link between phenotypes and cell fates, we photoconverted and monitored the fate of tumor cells in different microenvironments, finding that only tumor cells in the invadopodium-rich microenvironments degraded extracellular matrix (ECM and disseminated. The number of invadopodia positively correlated with degradation, while the inhibiting metalloproteases eliminated degradation and lung metastasis, consistent with a direct link among invadopodia, ECM degradation, and metastasis. We have detected and characterized two phenotypes of motile tumor cells in vivo, which

  16. Human phenotypically distinct TGFBI corneal dystrophies are linked to the stability of the fourth FAS1 domain of TGFBIp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Runager, Kasper; Basaiawmoit, Rajiv Vaid; Deva, Taru

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the human TGFBI gene encoding TGFBIp have been linked to protein deposits in the cornea leading to visual impairment. The protein consists of an N-terminal Cys-rich EMI domain and four consecutive fasciclin 1 (FAS1) domains. We have compared the stabilities of wild-type (WT) human...... TGFBIp and six mutants known to produce phenotypically distinct deposits in the cornea. Amino acid substitutions in the first FAS1 (FAS1-1) domain (R124H, R124L, and R124C) did not alter the stability. However, substitutions within the fourth FAS1 (FAS1-4) domain (A546T, R555Q, and R555W) affected...... the overall stability of intact TGFBIp revealing the following stability ranking R555W>WT>R555Q>A546T. Significantly, the stability ranking of the isolated FAS1-4 domains mirrored the behavior of the intact protein. In addition, it was linked to the aggregation propensity as the least stable mutant (A546T...

  17. Identification of Atg2 and ArfGAP1 as Candidate Genetic Modifiers of the Eye Pigmentation Phenotype of Adaptor Protein-3 (AP-3) Mutants in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Fernandez, Imilce A; Dell'Angelica, Esteban C

    2015-01-01

    The Adaptor Protein (AP)-3 complex is an evolutionary conserved, molecular sorting device that mediates the intracellular trafficking of proteins to lysosomes and related organelles. Genetic defects in AP-3 subunits lead to impaired biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles (LROs) such as mammalian melanosomes and insect eye pigment granules. In this work, we have performed a forward screening for genetic modifiers of AP-3 function in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Specifically, we have tested collections of large multi-gene deletions--which together covered most of the autosomal chromosomes-to identify chromosomal regions that, when deleted in single copy, enhanced or ameliorated the eye pigmentation phenotype of two independent AP-3 subunit mutants. Fine-mapping led us to define two non-overlapping, relatively small critical regions within fly chromosome 3. The first critical region included the Atg2 gene, which encodes a conserved protein involved in autophagy. Loss of one functional copy of Atg2 ameliorated the pigmentation defects of mutants in AP-3 subunits as well as in two other genes previously implicated in LRO biogenesis, namely Blos1 and lightoid, and even increased the eye pigment content of wild-type flies. The second critical region included the ArfGAP1 gene, which encodes a conserved GTPase-activating protein with specificity towards GTPases of the Arf family. Loss of a single functional copy of the ArfGAP1 gene ameliorated the pigmentation phenotype of AP-3 mutants but did not to modify the eye pigmentation of wild-type flies or mutants in Blos1 or lightoid. Strikingly, loss of the second functional copy of the gene did not modify the phenotype of AP-3 mutants any further but elicited early lethality in males and abnormal eye morphology when combined with mutations in Blos1 and lightoid, respectively. These results provide genetic evidence for new functional links connecting the machinery for biogenesis of LROs with molecules implicated in

  18. Identification of Atg2 and ArfGAP1 as Candidate Genetic Modifiers of the Eye Pigmentation Phenotype of Adaptor Protein-3 (AP-3 Mutants in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imilce A Rodriguez-Fernandez

    Full Text Available The Adaptor Protein (AP-3 complex is an evolutionary conserved, molecular sorting device that mediates the intracellular trafficking of proteins to lysosomes and related organelles. Genetic defects in AP-3 subunits lead to impaired biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles (LROs such as mammalian melanosomes and insect eye pigment granules. In this work, we have performed a forward screening for genetic modifiers of AP-3 function in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Specifically, we have tested collections of large multi-gene deletions--which together covered most of the autosomal chromosomes-to identify chromosomal regions that, when deleted in single copy, enhanced or ameliorated the eye pigmentation phenotype of two independent AP-3 subunit mutants. Fine-mapping led us to define two non-overlapping, relatively small critical regions within fly chromosome 3. The first critical region included the Atg2 gene, which encodes a conserved protein involved in autophagy. Loss of one functional copy of Atg2 ameliorated the pigmentation defects of mutants in AP-3 subunits as well as in two other genes previously implicated in LRO biogenesis, namely Blos1 and lightoid, and even increased the eye pigment content of wild-type flies. The second critical region included the ArfGAP1 gene, which encodes a conserved GTPase-activating protein with specificity towards GTPases of the Arf family. Loss of a single functional copy of the ArfGAP1 gene ameliorated the pigmentation phenotype of AP-3 mutants but did not to modify the eye pigmentation of wild-type flies or mutants in Blos1 or lightoid. Strikingly, loss of the second functional copy of the gene did not modify the phenotype of AP-3 mutants any further but elicited early lethality in males and abnormal eye morphology when combined with mutations in Blos1 and lightoid, respectively. These results provide genetic evidence for new functional links connecting the machinery for biogenesis of LROs with

  19. Phenotypic characterization of glucose repression mutants of Saccharomyce cerevisiae usinge experiments with C-13-labelled glucose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vijayendran, Raghevendran; Gombert, A.K.; Christensen, B.

    2004-01-01

    techniques, which do not provide information about the integrated response a specific genetic modification has on the cellular function. In this study we have performed phenotypic characterization of several mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae through the use of experiments with C-13-labelled...

  20. Replicable in vivo physiological and behavioral phenotypes of the Shank3B null mutant mouse model of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhamne, Sameer C; Silverman, Jill L; Super, Chloe E; Lammers, Stephen H T; Hameed, Mustafa Q; Modi, Meera E; Copping, Nycole A; Pride, Michael C; Smith, Daniel G; Rotenberg, Alexander; Crawley, Jacqueline N; Sahin, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a clinically and biologically heterogeneous condition characterized by social, repetitive, and sensory behavioral abnormalities. No treatments are approved for the core diagnostic symptoms of ASD. To enable the earliest stages of therapeutic discovery and development for ASD, robust and reproducible behavioral phenotypes and biological markers are essential to establish in preclinical animal models. The goal of this study was to identify electroencephalographic (EEG) and behavioral phenotypes that are replicable between independent cohorts in a mouse model of ASD. The larger goal of our strategy is to empower the preclinical biomedical ASD research field by generating robust and reproducible behavioral and physiological phenotypes in animal models of ASD, for the characterization of mechanistic underpinnings of ASD-relevant phenotypes, and to ensure reliability for the discovery of novel therapeutics. Genetic disruption of the SHANK3 gene, a scaffolding protein involved in the stability of the postsynaptic density in excitatory synapses, is thought to be responsible for a relatively large number of cases of ASD. Therefore, we have thoroughly characterized the robustness of ASD-relevant behavioral phenotypes in two cohorts, and for the first time quantified translational EEG activity in Shank3B null mutant mice. In vivo physiology and behavioral assays were conducted in two independently bred and tested full cohorts of Shank3B null mutant ( Shank3B KO) and wildtype littermate control (WT) mice. EEG was recorded via wireless implanted telemeters for 7 days of baseline followed by 20 min of recording following pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) challenge. Behaviors relevant to the diagnostic and associated symptoms of ASD were tested on a battery of established behavioral tests. Assays were designed to reproduce and expand on the original behavioral characterization of Shank3B KO mice. Two or more corroborative tests were conducted within each

  1. Phenotypic characterization and inheritance of two foliar mutants in pea (Pisum Sativum L.): 'Reduced leaf size' and 'Orange leaf'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naidenova, N.; Vassilevska-Ivanova, R.; Tcekova, Z.

    2003-01-01

    Two foliar pea (Pisum sativum L.) mutants characterized by reduced leaf size (2/978) and orange leaf (2/1409 M) were established. Both mutants were described morphologically and their productivity potential , pollen viability and inheritance of the mutant traits were evaluated. The mutant 2/978 was identified after irradiation of dry seeds from cv Borek with 15 Gy fast neutrons and was related to the leaf mutation 'rogue'. Reciprocal crosses between mutant 2/978 and cv Borel were executed, and F 1 and F 2 generations were analyzed. The altered leaf trait was presented in all F 1 plants suggesting a dominant character. F 2 segregation data indicated that the trait was controlled by a single dominant gene. The mutant 2/1409M originated from the mutant 2/978 after irradiation with 50 Gy γ-rays. The main mutant's phenotypic characteristic was the orange-yellow coloration of leaves and plants. After of series of crosses it was established that induced chlorophyll mutation is monogenic, recessive and both mutant traits are independently inherited. Two mutants could be used as appropriate plant material for genetic and biological investigations

  2. Progranulin is neurotrophic in vivo and protects against a mutant TDP-43 induced axonopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela S Laird

    Full Text Available Mislocalization, aberrant processing and aggregation of TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43 is found in the neurons affected by two related diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and frontotemporal lobe dementia (FTLD. These TDP-43 abnormalities are seen when TDP-43 is mutated, such as in familial ALS, but also in FTLD, caused by null mutations in the progranulin gene. They are also found in many patients with sporadic ALS and FTLD, conditions in which only wild type TDP-43 is present. The common pathological hallmarks and symptomatic cross over between the two diseases suggest that TDP-43 and progranulin may be mechanistically linked. In this study we aimed to address this link by establishing whether overexpression of mutant TDP-43 or knock-down of progranulin in zebrafish embryos results in motor neuron phenotypes and whether human progranulin is neuroprotective against such phenotypes. Mutant TDP-43 (A315T mutation induced a motor axonopathy characterized by short axonal outgrowth and aberrant branching, similar, but more severe, than that induced by mutant SOD1. Knockdown of the two zebrafish progranulin genes, grna and grnb, produced a substantial decrease in axonal length, with knockdown of grna alone producing a greater decrease in axonal length than grnb. Progranulin overexpression rescued the axonopathy induced by progranulin knockdown. Interestingly, progranulin also rescued the mutant TDP-43 induced axonopathy, whilst it failed to affect the mutant SOD1-induced phenotype. TDP-43 was found to be nuclear in all conditions described. The findings described here demonstrate that progranulin is neuroprotective in vivo and may have therapeutic potential for at least some forms of motor neuron degeneration.

  3. The different phenotypes of phot- photosynthetic deficient mutants in Euglena gracilis: the frequency of production by ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolas, Paul; Heizmann, Philippe; Nigon, Victor

    1982-01-01

    In Euglena gracilis, pigment-less mutants appear spontaneously with a frequency of about 2-5x10 -3 . Ultraviolet-irradiation increases the proportion of chlorophyll-less colonies to an upper limit where green colonies represent 4x10 -4 of the surviving ones. This limit might indicate the occurrence of processes involving repair of the chloroplastic DNA. Most of the photosynthetic-deficient (phot - ) mutants induced by ultraviolet irradiation are characterized by the presence of a reduced number of chloroplast DNA molecules showing deletions (phi - class). Most of the phi - mutants present the phenotype phi - chlo - car - , where neither chlorophyll nor carotenoids are obvious: the phi - chlo - car + mutants, devoid of chlorophyll but containing carotenoids, are obtained among the phi - strains with a frequency lower than 10 -3 . The phot - mutants which belong to the cp - class are characterized by the maintenance of a great number of chloroplastic DNA molecules, where large deletions are absent: their occurrence after ultraviolet irradiation is low [fr

  4. PT-Flax (phenotyping and TILLinG of flax): development of a flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) mutant population and TILLinG platform for forward and reverse genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantreau, Maxime; Grec, Sébastien; Gutierrez, Laurent; Dalmais, Marion; Pineau, Christophe; Demailly, Hervé; Paysant-Leroux, Christine; Tavernier, Reynald; Trouvé, Jean-Paul; Chatterjee, Manash; Guillot, Xavier; Brunaud, Véronique; Chabbert, Brigitte; van Wuytswinkel, Olivier; Bendahmane, Abdelhafid; Thomasset, Brigitte; Hawkins, Simon

    2013-10-15

    Flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) is an economically important fiber and oil crop that has been grown for thousands of years. The genome has been recently sequenced and transcriptomics are providing information on candidate genes potentially related to agronomically-important traits. In order to accelerate functional characterization of these genes we have generated a flax EMS mutant population that can be used as a TILLinG (Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes) platform for forward and reverse genetics. A population of 4,894 M2 mutant seed families was generated using 3 different EMS concentrations (0.3%, 0.6% and 0.75%) and used to produce M2 plants for subsequent phenotyping and DNA extraction. 10,839 viable M2 plants (4,033 families) were obtained and 1,552 families (38.5%) showed a visual developmental phenotype (stem size and diameter, plant architecture, flower-related). The majority of these families showed more than one phenotype. Mutant phenotype data are organised in a database and can be accessed and searched at UTILLdb (http://urgv.evry.inra.fr/UTILLdb). Preliminary screens were also performed for atypical fiber and seed phenotypes. Genomic DNA was extracted from 3,515 M2 families and eight-fold pooled for subsequent mutant detection by ENDO1 nuclease mis-match cleavage. In order to validate the collection for reverse genetics, DNA pools were screened for two genes coding enzymes of the lignin biosynthesis pathway: Coumarate-3-Hydroxylase (C3H) and Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase (CAD). We identified 79 and 76 mutations in the C3H and CAD genes, respectively. The average mutation rate was calculated as 1/41 Kb giving rise to approximately 9,000 mutations per genome. Thirty-five out of the 52 flax cad mutant families containing missense or codon stop mutations showed the typical orange-brown xylem phenotype observed in CAD down-regulated/mutant plants in other species. We have developed a flax mutant population that can be used as an efficient

  5. The phenotype of FancB-mutant mouse embryonic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Moon; Ko, Jun Ho; Choi, Yong Jun; Hu Lingchuan; Hasty, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by bone marrow failure, developmental defects and cancer. There are multiple FA genes that enable the repair of interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) in coordination with a variety of other DNA repair pathways in a way that is poorly understood. Here we present the phenotype of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells mutated for FancB. We found FancB-mutant cells exhibited reduced cellular proliferation, hypersensitivity to the crosslinking agent mitomycin C (MMC), increased spontaneous and MMC-induced chromosomal abnormalities, reduced spontaneous sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), reduced gene targeting, reduced MMC-induced Rad51 foci and absent MMC-induced FancD2 foci. Since FancB is on the X chromosome and since ES cells are typically XY, FancB is an excellent target for an epistatic analysis to elucidate FA's role in ICL repair.

  6. Functional phenotypic rescue of Caenorhabditis elegans neuroligin-deficient mutants by the human and rat NLGN1 genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Calahorro

    Full Text Available Neuroligins are cell adhesion proteins that interact with neurexins at the synapse. This interaction may contribute to differentiation, plasticity and specificity of synapses. In humans, single mutations in neuroligin encoding genes lead to autism spectrum disorder and/or mental retardation. Caenorhabditis elegans mutants deficient in nlg-1, an orthologue of human neuroligin genes, have defects in different behaviors. Here we show that the expression of human NLGN1 or rat Nlgn1 cDNAs in C. elegans nlg-1 mutants rescues the fructose osmotic strength avoidance and gentle touch response phenotypes. Two specific point mutations in NLGN3 and NLGN4 genes, involved in autistic spectrum disorder, were further characterized in this experimental system. The R451C allele described in NLGN3, was analyzed with both human NLGN1 (R453C and worm NLG-1 (R437C proteins, and both were not functional in rescuing the osmotic avoidance behavior and the gentle touch response phenotype. The D396X allele described in NLGN4, which produces a truncated protein, was studied with human NLGN1 (D432X and they did not rescue any of the behavioral phenotypes analyzed. In addition, RNAi feeding experiments measuring gentle touch response in wild type strain and worms expressing SID-1 in neurons (which increases the response to dsRNA, both fed with bacteria expressing dsRNA for nlg-1, provided evidence for a postsynaptic in vivo function of neuroligins both in muscle cells and neurons, equivalent to that proposed in mammals. This finding was further confirmed generating transgenic nlg-1 deficient mutants expressing NLG-1 under pan-neuronal (nrx-1 or pan-muscular (myo-3 specific promoters. All these results suggest that the nematode could be used as an in vivo model for studying particular synaptic mechanisms with proteins orthologues of humans involved in pervasive developmental disorders.

  7. EMS mutant spectra generated by multi-parameter flow cytometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keysar, Stephen B. [Cell and Molecular Biology Graduate Program, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO (United States); Fox, Michael H., E-mail: michael.fox@colostate.edu [Cell and Molecular Biology Graduate Program, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO (United States); Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    2009-12-01

    The CHO A{sub L} cell line contains a single copy of human chromosome 11 that encodes several cell surface proteins including glycosyl phosphatidylinositol (GPI) linked CD59 and CD90, as well as CD98, CD44 and CD151 which are not GPI-linked. The flow cytometry mutation assay (FCMA) measures mutations of the CD59 gene by the absence of fluorescence when stained with antibodies against the CD59 cell surface protein. We have measured simultaneous mutations in CD59, CD44, CD90, CD98 and CD151 to generate a mutant spectrum for ionizing radiation. After treatment with ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) many cells have an intermediate level of CD59 staining. Single cells were sorted from CD59{sup -} regions with varying levels of fluorescence and the resulting clonal populations had a stable phenotype for CD59 expression. Mutant spectra were generated by flow cytometry using the isolated clones and nearly all clones were mutated in CD59 only. Interestingly, about 60% of the CD59 negative clones were actually GPI mutants determined by staining with the GPI specific fluorescently labeled bacterial toxin aerolysin (FLAER). The GPI negative cells are most likely caused by mutations in the X-linked pigA gene important in GPI biosynthesis. Small mutations of pigA and CD59 were expected for the alkylating agent EMS and the resulting spectra are significantly different than the large deletions found when analyzing radiation mutants. After analyzing the CD59{sup -} clonal populations we have adjusted the FCMA mutant regions from 1% to 10% of the mean of the CD59 positive peak to include the majority of CD59 mutants.

  8. The phenotype of FancB-mutant mouse embryonic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Moon; Ko, Jun Ho; Choi, Yong Jun; Hu Lingchuan [Department of Molecular Medicine and Institute of Biotechnology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 15355 Lambda Drive, San Antonio, TX 78245 (United States); Hasty, Paul, E-mail: hastye@uthscsa.edu [Department of Molecular Medicine and Institute of Biotechnology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 15355 Lambda Drive, San Antonio, TX 78245 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by bone marrow failure, developmental defects and cancer. There are multiple FA genes that enable the repair of interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) in coordination with a variety of other DNA repair pathways in a way that is poorly understood. Here we present the phenotype of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells mutated for FancB. We found FancB-mutant cells exhibited reduced cellular proliferation, hypersensitivity to the crosslinking agent mitomycin C (MMC), increased spontaneous and MMC-induced chromosomal abnormalities, reduced spontaneous sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), reduced gene targeting, reduced MMC-induced Rad51 foci and absent MMC-induced FancD2 foci. Since FancB is on the X chromosome and since ES cells are typically XY, FancB is an excellent target for an epistatic analysis to elucidate FA's role in ICL repair.

  9. A broad phenotypic screen identifies novel phenotypes driven by a single mutant allele in Huntington's disease CAG knock-in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine M Hölter

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in the HTT gene encoding huntingtin. The disease has an insidious course, typically progressing over 10-15 years until death. Currently there is no effective disease-modifying therapy. To better understand the HD pathogenic process we have developed genetic HTT CAG knock-in mouse models that accurately recapitulate the HD mutation in man. Here, we describe results of a broad, standardized phenotypic screen in 10-46 week old heterozygous HdhQ111 knock-in mice, probing a wide range of physiological systems. The results of this screen revealed a number of behavioral abnormalities in HdhQ111/+ mice that include hypoactivity, decreased anxiety, motor learning and coordination deficits, and impaired olfactory discrimination. The screen also provided evidence supporting subtle cardiovascular, lung, and plasma metabolite alterations. Importantly, our results reveal that a single mutant HTT allele in the mouse is sufficient to elicit multiple phenotypic abnormalities, consistent with a dominant disease process in patients. These data provide a starting point for further investigation of several organ systems in HD, for the dissection of underlying pathogenic mechanisms and for the identification of reliable phenotypic endpoints for therapeutic testing.

  10. Inherited phenotype instability of inflorescence and floral organ development in homeotic barley double mutants and its specific modification by auxin inhibitors and 2,4-D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šiukšta, Raimondas; Vaitkūnienė, Virginija; Kaselytė, Greta; Okockytė, Vaiva; Žukauskaitė, Justina; Žvingila, Donatas; Rančelis, Vytautas

    2015-03-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare) double mutants Hv-Hd/tw2, formed by hybridization, are characterized by inherited phenotypic instability and by several new features, such as bract/leaf-like structures, long naked gaps in the spike, and a wide spectrum of variations in the basic and ectopic flowers, which are absent in single mutants. Several of these features resemble those of mutations in auxin distribution, and thus the aim of this study was to determine whether auxin imbalances are related to phenotypic variations and instability. The effects of auxin inhibitors and 2,4-D (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) on variation in basic and ectopic flowers were therefore examined, together with the effects of 2,4-D on spike structure. The character of phenotypic instability and the effects of auxin inhibitors and 2,4-D were compared in callus cultures and intact plants of single homeotic Hv-tw2 and Hv-Hooded/Kap (in the BKn3 gene) mutants and alternative double mutant lines: offspring from individual plants in distal hybrid generations (F9-F10) that all had the same BKn3 allele as determined by DNA sequencing. For intact plants, two auxin inhibitors, 9-hydroxyfluorene-9-carboxylic acid (HFCA) and p-chlorophenoxyisobutyric acid (PCIB), were used. Callus growth and flower/spike structures of the Hv-tw2 mutant differed in their responses to HFCA and PCIB. An increase in normal basic flowers after exposure to auxin inhibitors and a decrease in their frequencies caused by 2,4-D were observed, and there were also modifications in the spectra of ectopic flowers, especially those with sexual organs, but the effects depended on the genotype. Exposure to 2,4-D decreased the frequency of short gaps and lodicule transformations in Hv-tw2 and of long naked gaps in double mutants. The effects of auxin inhibitors and 2,4-D suggest that ectopic auxin maxima or deficiencies arise in various regions of the inflorescence/flower primordia. Based on the phenotypic instability observed, definite

  11. Rapid mutation of Spirulina platensis by a new mutagenesis system of atmospheric and room temperature plasmas (ARTP and generation of a mutant library with diverse phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyue Fang

    Full Text Available In this paper, we aimed to improve the carbohydrate productivity of Spirulina platensis by generating mutants with increased carbohydrate content and growth rate. ARTP was used as a new mutagenesis tool to generate a mutant library of S. platensis with diverse phenotypes. Protocol for rapid mutation of S. platensis by 60 s treatment with helium driven ARTP and high throughput screening method of the mutants using the 96-well microplate and microplate reader was established. A mutant library of 62 mutants was then constructed and ideal mutants were selected out. The characteristics of the mutants after the mutagenesis inclined to be stable after around 9(th subculture, where the total mutation frequency and positive mutation frequency in terms of specific growth rate reached 45% and 25%, respectively. The mutants in mutant library showed diverse phenotypes in terms of cell growth rate, carbohydrate content and flocculation intensity. The positive mutation frequency in terms of cellular carbohydrate content with the increase by more than 20% percent than the wild strain was 32.3%. Compared with the wild strain, the representative mutants 3-A10 and 3-B2 showed 40.3% and 78.0% increase in carbohydrate content, respectively, while the mutant 4-B3 showed 10.5% increase in specific growth rate. The carbohydrate contents of the representative mutants were stable during different subcultures, indicating high genetic stability. ARTP was demonstrated to be an effective and non-GMO mutagenesis tool to generate the mutant library for multicellular microalgae.

  12. Isolation and characterization of X-linked mutants of Drosophila melanogaster which are sensitive to mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, J.B.; Golino, M.D.; Nguyen, T.D.; Green, M.M.

    1976-01-01

    Thirteen X-linked mutants have been isolated in Drosophila melanogaster which render male and homozygous female larvae sensitive to the mutagen methyl methanesulfonate. Their characterization and preliminary assignment to functional groups is described. Four of these mutants are alleles of mei-41. Like previously isolated alleles of this locus, these mutants reduce fertility and increase loss and nondisjunction of the X-chromosome in homozygous females. The remaining mutants have been tentatively assigned to six functional groups (two mutants to the mus(1)101 locus, two to mus(1)102, two to mus(1)103, and one each to mus(1)104, mus(1)105, and mus(1)106. Several of the complementation groups can be distinguished on the basis of nondisjunction and cross sensitivity to mutagens. Females homozygous for the mei-41, mus(1)101 and mus(1)102 mutants exhibit elevated levels of nondisjunction. Mutants belonging to complementation groups mei-41, mus(1)101, and mus(1)104 are sensitive to nitrogen mustard (HN2) in addition to their MMS sensitivity. Among these mutants there is currently a direct correlation between sensitivity to HN2, sensitivity to 2-acetylaminofluorene and a deficiency in post-replication repair. Only the mei-41 mutants are hypersensitive to uv radiation, although several of the mutants exhibit sensitivity to γ-rays. Semidominance is observed in female larvae of the mei-41, mus(1)104, and mus(1)103 mutants after exposure to high concentrations of MMS. The properties of the mutants generally conform to a pattern which has been established for related mutants in yeast

  13. Isolation of New Gravitropic Mutants under Hypergravity Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Akiko; Toyota, Masatsugu; Shimada, Masayoshi; Mekata, Mika; Kurata, Tetsuya; Tasaka, Masao; Morita, Miyo T

    2016-01-01

    Forward genetics is a powerful approach used to link genotypes and phenotypes, and mutant screening/analysis has provided deep insights into many aspects of plant physiology. Gravitropism is a tropistic response in plants, in which hypocotyls and stems sense the direction of gravity and grow upward. Previous studies of gravitropic mutants have suggested that shoot endodermal cells in Arabidopsis stems and hypocotyls are capable of sensing gravity (i.e., statocytes). In the present study, we report a new screening system using hypergravity conditions to isolate enhancers of gravitropism mutants, and we also describe a rapid and efficient genome mapping method, using next-generation sequencing (NGS) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based markers. Using the endodermal-amyloplast less 1 ( eal1 ) mutant, which exhibits defective development of endodermal cells and gravitropism, we found that hypergravity (10 g) restored the reduced gravity responsiveness in eal1 hypocotyls and could, therefore, be used to obtain mutants with further reduction in gravitropism in the eal1 background. Using the new screening system, we successfully isolated six ene ( enhancer of eal1 ) mutants that exhibited little or no gravitropism under hypergravity conditions, and using NGS and map-based cloning with SNP markers, we narrowed down the potential causative genes, which revealed a new genetic network for shoot gravitropism in Arabidopsis .

  14. Genotype-phenotype variations in five Spanish families with Norrie disease or X-linked FEVR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveiro-Alvarez, Rosa; Trujillo-Tiebas, Maria José; Gimenez-Pardo, Ascension; Garcia-Hoyos, Maria; Cantalapiedra, Diego; Lorda-Sanchez, Isabel; Rodriguez de Alba, Marta; Ramos, Carmen; Ayuso, Carmen

    2005-09-02

    Norrie disease (OMIM 310600) is a rare X-linked disorder characterized by congenital blindness in males. Approximately 40 to 50% of the cases develop deafness and mental retardation. X-linked familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (XL-FEVR) is a hereditary ocular disorder characterized by a failure of peripheral retinal vascularization. Both X-linked disorders are due to mutations in the NDP gene, which encodes a 133 amino acid protein called Norrin, but autosomal recessive (AR) and autosomal dominant (AD) forms of FEVR have also been described. In this study, we report the molecular findings and the related phenotype in five Spanish families affected with Norrie disease or XL-FEVR due to mutations of the NDP gene. The study was conducted in 45 subjects from five Spanish families. These families were clinically diagnosed with Norrie disease or similar conditions. The three exons of the NDP gene were analyzed by automatic DNA sequencing. Haplotype analyses were also performed. Two new nonsense mutations, apart from other mutations previously described in the NDP gene, were found in those patients affected with ND or X-linked FEVR. An important genotype-phenotype variation was found in relation to the different mutations of the NDP gene. In fact, the same mutation may be responsible for different phenotypes. We speculate that there might be other molecular factors that interact in the retina with Norrin, which contribute to the resultant phenotypes.

  15. Is auxin involved in the induction of genetic instability in barley homeotic double mutants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šiukšta, Raimondas; Vaitkūnienė, Virginija; Rančelis, Vytautas

    2018-02-01

    The triggers of genetic instability in barley homeotic double mutants are tweaky spike -type mutations associated with an auxin imbalance in separate spike phytomeres. Barley homeotic tweaky spike;Hooded (tw;Hd) double mutants are characterized by an inherited instability of spike and flower development, which is absent in the single parental constituents. The aim of the present study was to show that the trigger of genetic instability in the double mutants is the tw mutations, which are associated with an auxin imbalance in the developing spikes. Their pleiotropic effects on genes related to spike/flower development may cause the genetic instability of double mutants. The study of four double-mutant groups composed of different mutant alleles showed that the instability arose only if the mutant allele tw was a constituent of the double mutants. Application of auxin inhibitors and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) demonstrated the relationship of the instability of the double mutants and the phenotype of the tw mutants to auxin imbalance. 2,4-D induced phenocopies of the tw mutation in wild-type plants and rescued the phenotypes of three allelic tw mutants. The differential display (dd-PCR) method allowed the identification of several putative candidate genes in tw that may be responsible for the initiation of instability in the double mutants by pleiotropic variations of their expression in the tw mutant associated with auxin imbalance in the developing spikes. The results of the present study linked the genetic instability of homeotic double mutants with an auxin imbalance caused by one of the constituents (tw). The genetic instability of the double mutants in relation to auxin imbalance was studied for the first time. A matrocliny on instability expression was also observed.

  16. No evidence for cardiac dysfunction in Kif6 mutant mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Hameed

    Full Text Available A KIF6 variant in man has been reported to be associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes after myocardial infarction. No clear biological or physiological data exist for Kif6. We sought to investigate the impact of a deleterious KIF6 mutation on cardiac function in mice. Kif6 mutant mice were generated and verified. Cardiac function was assessed by serial echocardiography at baseline, after ageing and after exercise. Lipid levels were also measured. No discernable adverse lipid or cardiac phenotype was detected in Kif6 mutant mice. These data suggest that dysfunction of Kif6 is linked to other more complex biological/biochemical parameters or is unlikely to be of material consequence in cardiac function.

  17. A Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Mutant Expressing a Baculovirus Inhibitor of Apoptosis Gene in Place of Latency-Associated Transcript Has a Wild-Type Reactivation Phenotype in the Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ling; Perng, Guey-Chuen; Mott, Kevin R.; Osorio, Nelson; Naito, Julia; Brick, David J.; Carpenter, Dale; Jones, Clinton; Wechsler, Steven L.

    2005-01-01

    The latency-associated transcript (LAT) is essential for the wild-type herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) high-reactivation phenotype since LAT− mutants have a low-reactivation phenotype. We previously reported that LAT can decrease apoptosis and proposed that this activity is involved in LAT's ability to enhance the HSV-1 reactivation phenotype. The first 20% of the primary 8.3-kb LAT transcript is sufficient for enhancing the reactivation phenotype and for decreasing apoptosis, supporting this proposal. For this study, we constructed an HSV-1 LAT− mutant that expresses the baculovirus antiapoptosis gene product cpIAP under control of the LAT promoter and in place of the LAT region mentioned above. Mice were ocularly infected with this mutant, designated dLAT-cpIAP, and the reactivation phenotype was determined using the trigeminal ganglion explant model. dLAT-cpIAP had a reactivation phenotype similar to that of wild-type virus and significantly higher than that of (i) the LAT− mutant dLAT2903; (ii) dLAT1.5, a control virus containing the same LAT deletion as dLAT-cpIAP, but with no insertion of foreign DNA, thereby controlling for potential readthrough transcription past the cpIAP insert; and (iii) dLAT-EGFP, a control virus identical to dLAT-cpIAP except that it contained the enhanced green fluorescent protein open reading frame (ORF) in place of the cpIAP ORF, thereby controlling for expression of a random foreign gene instead of the cpIAP gene. These results show that an antiapoptosis gene with no sequence similarity to LAT can efficiently substitute for the LAT function involved in enhancing the in vitro-induced HSV-1 reactivation phenotype in the mouse. PMID:16160155

  18. Subunit-specific phenotypes of Salmonella typhimurium HU mutants.

    OpenAIRE

    Hillyard, D R; Edlund, M; Hughes, K T; Marsh, M; Higgins, N P

    1990-01-01

    Salmonella hupA and hupB mutants were studied to determine the reasons for the high degree of conservation in HU structure in bacteria. We found one HU-1-specific effect; the F'128 plasmid was 25-fold less stable in hupB compared with hupA or wild-type cells. F' plasmids were 120-fold more unstable in hupA hupB double mutants compared with wild-type cells, and the double mutant also had a significant alteration in plasmid DNA structure. pBR322 DNA isolated from hupA hupB strains was deficient...

  19. Quantitative trait loci affecting phenotypic variation in the vacuolated lens mouse mutant, a multigenic mouse model of neural tube defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korstanje, Ron; Desai, Jigar; Lazar, Gloria; King, Benjamin; Rollins, Jarod; Spurr, Melissa; Joseph, Jamie; Kadambi, Sindhuja; Li, Yang; Cherry, Allison; Matteson, Paul G.; Paigen, Beverly; Millonig, James H.

    Korstanje R, Desai J, Lazar G, King B, Rollins J, Spurr M, Joseph J, Kadambi S, Li Y, Cherry A, Matteson PG, Paigen B, Millonig JH. Quantitative trait loci affecting phenotypic variation in the vacuolated lens mouse mutant, a multigenic mouse model of neural tube defects. Physiol Genomics 35:

  20. Production of a Marfan cellular phenotype by expressing a mutant human fibrillin allele on a normal human or murine genetic background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldadah, Z.A.; Dietz, H.C. [Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Brenn, T. [Stanford Univ. Medical Center, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The Marfan Syndrome (MFS) is a heritable disorder of connective tissue caused by defects in fibrillin (FBN1), a 350 kD glycoprotein and principal component of the extracellular microfibril. Previous correlations of mutant transcript level and disease severity suggested a dominant negative model of MFS pathogenesis. To address this hypothesis we assembled an expression construct containing the mutant allele from a patient with severe MFS. This mutation causes skipping of FBN1 exon 2 and a frame shift, leading to a premature termination codon in exon 4. The predicted peptide would thus consist of 55 wild type and 45 missense amino acids. The construct was stably transfected into cultured human and mouse fibroblasts, and several clonal cell populations were established. Human and mouse cells expressing the truncated peptide exhibited markedly diminished fibrillin deposition and disorganized microfibrillar architecture by immunofluorescence. Pulse-chase analysis of these cells demonstrated normal levels of fibrillin synthesis but substantially decreased fibrillin deposition into the extracellular matrix. These data illustrate that expression of a mutant FBN1 allele, on a background of two normal alleles, is sufficient to disrupt normal fibrillin aggregation and reproduce the MFS cellular phenotype. This provides confirmation of a dominant negative model of MFS pathogenesis and may offer mutant allele knockout as a strategy for gene therapy. In addition, these data underscore the importance of the FBN1 amino-terminus in normal multimer formation and suggest that expression of the human extreme 5{prime} FBN1 coding sequence may be sufficient, in isolation, to produce an animal model of MFS. Indeed, transgenic mice harboring this mutant allele have been produced, and phenotype analysis is currently in progress.

  1. AcrA suppressor alterations reverse the drug hypersensitivity phenotype of a TolC mutant by inducing TolC aperture opening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Jon W.; Celaya-Kolb, Teresa; Pecora, Sara; Misra, Rajeev

    2010-01-01

    Summary In Escherichia coli, the TolC–AcrAB complex forms a major antibiotic efflux system with broad substrate specificity. During the complex assembly, the periplasmic helices and bottom turns of TolC are thought to interact with a hairpin helix of AcrA and hairpin loops of AcrB respectively. In the present study we show that a four-residue substitution in TolC’s turn 1, which connects outer helices 3 and 4 proximal to TolC’s periplasmic aperture, confers antibiotic hypersensitivity without affecting TolC-mediated phage or colicin infection. However, despite the null-like drug sensitivity phenotype, chemical cross-linking analysis revealed no apparent defects in the ability of the mutant TolC protein to physically interact with AcrA and AcrB. A role for TolC turn 1 residues in the functional assembly of the tripartite efflux pump complex was uncovered through isolating suppressor mutations of the mutant TolC protein that mapped within acrA and by utilizing a labile AcrA protein. The data showed that AcrA-mediated suppression of antibiotic sensitivity was achieved by dilating the TolC aperture/channel in an AcrB-dependent manner. The results underscore the importance of the periplasmic turn 1 of TolC in the functional assembly of the tripartite efflux complex and AcrA in transitioning TolC from its closed to open state. PMID:20132445

  2. Spectrum of induced floral mutants in Petunia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padmaja, V.; Sudhakar, P.

    1987-01-01

    A total of six floral mutants of garden Petunia isolated from the populations raised from the seed treatment with γ-rays, 2, 4-D and sodium azide are described. Five of the mutants viz. stellata, Campyloflora, Rubriflora mixed, Grandiflora and Albiflora mixed originated as segregants in M 2 generation while the chimeral floral phenotype was expressed in M 1 generation itself. Breeding behaviour of these horticulturally interesting altered floral phenotypes were studied in subsequent generations and appropriate conclusions were drawn regarding mode of inheritance of the mutant traits. 15 refs., 4 figures, 1 table. (author)

  3. Genetics of Ustilago violacea. I. Carotenoid mutants and carotenogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garber, E.D.; Baird, M.L.; Chapman, D.J.

    1975-01-01

    Wild-type strains of Ustilago violacea produce pink colonies on laboratory medium and yield white, orange, pumpkin, and yellow colonies after uv mutagenesis. The wild-type strains contain neurosporene and lycopene; one orange mutant, γ-carotene; and one yellow mutant, β-carotene. One white mutant had no detectable carotenoids. Diploid colonies heterozygous for wild type and orange, pumpkin, yellow, or white are phenotypically wild type. Diploid colonies heterozygous for yellow and orange are also phenotypically wild type. Diploid colonies heterozygous for white and orange; white and yellow; and white, yellow, and orange are phenotypically light orange, light yellow, and orange-yellow, respectively. The white mutants give a circular complementation map; the color mutants fit a linear complementation map. We propose a multienzyme of four identical dehydrogenases and one or two identical cyclases for carotenogenesis in this species. The white and color mutants represent structural mutations altering the conformation of the dehydrogenase or cyclase, respectively. Furthermore, cyclases may or may not aggregate in association with the dehydrogenase aggregate to form the multienzyme aggregate responsible for the color mutants

  4. Cloning a T-DNA-Linked Phosphate Gene that mediates Salt Tolerance on Mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Njoroge, N.C; Tremblay, L.; Lefebvre, D.D.

    2006-01-01

    T-DNA insertionally mutagenized seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana were used to unravel genetic mechanisms underlying salt tolerance in plants. Over a period of two weeks, kanamycin homozygous (KK) seeds of the mutant NN143 attain germination levels of 65% and 77% on 175mM Nacl and 300mM mannitol respectively. Under these conditions of osmotic stress, the wild type seeds were incapable of germination. The mutant was also capable of germination on a medium containing 2μM abscisic acid (ABA). After two weeks on 2μM ABA, it attained 100% germination and the wild type did not germinate. The ABA level in the mutant was 40% higher than the wild type. Segregation analysis indicated that salt tolerance in the mutant is T-DNA linked. Genetic analysis of the F1 and F2 generations indicated that the salt tolerance trait in the mutant is dominant. The putative salt tolerance gene of mutant NN143 was cloned by plasmid rescue and sequence data indicated involvement of a protein phosphatase. The possible mechanism underlying salt tolerance in the mutant is discussed.(author)

  5. Isolation of new gravitropic mutants under hypergravity conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Mori

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Forward genetics is a powerful approach used to link genotypes and phenotypes, and mutant screening/analysis has provided deep insights into many aspects of plant physiology. Gravitropism is a tropistic response in plants, in which hypocotyls and stems sense the direction of gravity and grow upwards. Previous studies of gravitropic mutants have suggested that shoot endodermal cells in Arabidopsis stems and hypocotyls are capable of sensing gravity (i.e., statocytes. In the present study, we report a new screening system using hypergravity conditions to isolate enhancers of gravitropism mutants, and we also describe a rapid and efficient genome mapping method, using Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP-based markers. Using the endodermal-amyloplast less 1 (eal1 mutant, which exhibits defective development of endodermal cells and gravitropism, we found that hypergravity (10 g restored the reduced gravity responsiveness in eal1 hypocotyls and could, therefore, be used to obtain mutants with further reduction in gravitropism in the eal1 background. Using the new screening system, we successfully isolated six ene (enhancer of eal1 mutants that exhibited little or no gravitropism under hypergravity conditions, and using NGS and map-based cloning with SNP markers, we narrowed down the potential causative genes, which revealed a new genetic network for shoot gravitropism in Arabidopsis.

  6. Sterile mutant of Verbena hybrida induced by heavy ion beam irradiation and wild species V. peruviana exhibit self-incompatible phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, H.; Hayashi, Y.; Abe, T.; Kanaya, T.; Suzuki, K.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Garden verbenas (Verbena hybrida) belonging to the Verbenaceae family are originated from interspecific hybridization among several species, many cultivars frequently produce seeds. Recently, a sterile mutant has been isolated in the verbena cultivar 'Coral Pink' of Temari series (Suntory Flowers Ltd., Tokyo, Japan) by mutation induction using heavy-ion beams at RIKEN Accelarator Research Facility (RARF, Saitama, Japan). We investigated pollen and ovule fertility assessed by acetocarmin staining, seed-set following controlled-pollination tests and behavior of pollen tubes in pistils with the sterile mutant of 'Coral Pink' (SC) and its original fertile one (FC). As the results, although SC has functional male and female gametes, few self-pollinated flowers carry out seed-set, leading to sterile phenotype. Additionally, the sterile mechanism of SC was compared with the wild species V. peruviana (VP) which is one of origin of Temari series and exhibits sterility. Interestingly, similar phenotype was observed in PV. We further investigated, therefore, whether there are differences on self-incompatible reaction between SC and VP. (author)

  7. Sterile mutant of Verbena hybrida induced by heavy ion beam irradiation and wild species V. peruviana exhibit self-incompatible phenotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, H; Hayashi, Y; Abe, T [RIKEN, Wako (Japan); Kanaya, T; Suzuki, K [Suntory Flowers Ltd., Higashiomi (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    Full text: Garden verbenas (Verbena hybrida) belonging to the Verbenaceae family are originated from interspecific hybridization among several species, many cultivars frequently produce seeds. Recently, a sterile mutant has been isolated in the verbena cultivar 'Coral Pink' of Temari series (Suntory Flowers Ltd., Tokyo, Japan) by mutation induction using heavy-ion beams at RIKEN Accelarator Research Facility (RARF, Saitama, Japan). We investigated pollen and ovule fertility assessed by acetocarmin staining, seed-set following controlled-pollination tests and behavior of pollen tubes in pistils with the sterile mutant of 'Coral Pink' (SC) and its original fertile one (FC). As the results, although SC has functional male and female gametes, few self-pollinated flowers carry out seed-set, leading to sterile phenotype. Additionally, the sterile mechanism of SC was compared with the wild species V. peruviana (VP) which is one of origin of Temari series and exhibits sterility. Interestingly, similar phenotype was observed in PV. We further investigated, therefore, whether there are differences on self-incompatible reaction between SC and VP. (author)

  8. Disparate peroxisome-related defects in Arabidopsis pex6 and pex26 mutants link peroxisomal retrotranslocation and oil body utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Kim L; Fleming, Wendell A; Kao, Yun-Ting; Wright, Zachary J; Venkova, Savina V; Ventura, Meredith J; Bartel, Bonnie

    2017-10-01

    Catabolism of fatty acids stored in oil bodies is essential for seed germination and seedling development in Arabidopsis. This fatty acid breakdown occurs in peroxisomes, organelles that sequester oxidative reactions. Import of peroxisomal enzymes is facilitated by peroxins including PEX5, a receptor that delivers cargo proteins from the cytosol to the peroxisomal matrix. After cargo delivery, a complex of the PEX1 and PEX6 ATPases and the PEX26 tail-anchored membrane protein removes ubiquitinated PEX5 from the peroxisomal membrane. We identified Arabidopsis pex6 and pex26 mutants by screening for inefficient seedling β-oxidation phenotypes. The mutants displayed distinct defects in growth, response to a peroxisomally metabolized auxin precursor, and peroxisomal protein import. The low PEX5 levels in these mutants were increased by treatment with a proteasome inhibitor or by combining pex26 with peroxisome-associated ubiquitination machinery mutants, suggesting that ubiquitinated PEX5 is degraded by the proteasome when the function of PEX6 or PEX26 is reduced. Combining pex26 with mutations that increase PEX5 levels either worsened or improved pex26 physiological and molecular defects, depending on the introduced lesion. Moreover, elevating PEX5 levels via a 35S:PEX5 transgene exacerbated pex26 defects and ameliorated the defects of only a subset of pex6 alleles, implying that decreased PEX5 is not the sole molecular deficiency in these mutants. We found peroxisomes clustered around persisting oil bodies in pex6 and pex26 seedlings, suggesting a role for peroxisomal retrotranslocation machinery in oil body utilization. The disparate phenotypes of these pex alleles may reflect unanticipated functions of the peroxisomal ATPase complex. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Mapping pathological phenotypes in Reelin mutant mice

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    Caterina eMichetti

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD are neurodevelopmental disorders with multifactorial origin characterized by social communication and behavioural perseveration deficits. Several studies showed an association between the reelin gene mutation and increased risk of ASD and a reduced reelin expression in some brain regions of ASD subjects, suggesting a role for reelin deficiency in ASD etiology. Reelin is a large extracellular matrix glycoprotein playing important roles during development of the central nervous system. To deeply investigate the role of reelin dysfunction as vulnerability factor in ASD, we investigated the behavioural, neurochemical and brain morphological features of reeler male mice. We recently reported a genotype-dependent deviation in ultrasonic vocal repertoire and a general delay in motor development in reeler pups. We now report that adult male heterozygous reeler mice did not show social behaviour and communication deficits during male-female social interactions. Wildtype and heterozygous mice also showed a typical light/dark locomotor activity profile, with a peak during the central interval of the dark phase. However, when faced with a mild stressful stimulus (a saline injection only heterozygous mice showed an over response to stress. At the end of the behavioural studies, we conducted high performance liquid chromatography and magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy to investigate whether reelin mutation influences brain monoamine and metabolites levels in regions involved in ASD. Low levels of dopamine in cortex and high levels of glutamate and taurine in hippocampus were detected in heterozygous mice, in line with clinical data collected on ASD children. Altogether, our data detected subtle but relevant neurochemical abnormalities in reeler mice supporting this mutant line, particularly male subjects, as a valid experimental model to estimate the contribution played by reelin deficiency in the global ASD

  10. Dissection of the complex phenotype in cuticular mutants of Arabidopsis reveals a role of SERRATE as a mediator.

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    Derry Voisin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in LACERATA (LCR, FIDDLEHEAD (FDH, and BODYGUARD (BDG cause a complex developmental syndrome that is consistent with an important role for these Arabidopsis genes in cuticle biogenesis. The genesis of their pleiotropic phenotypes is, however, poorly understood. We provide evidence that neither distorted depositions of cutin, nor deficiencies in the chemical composition of cuticular lipids, account for these features, instead suggesting that the mutants alleviate the functional disorder of the cuticle by reinforcing their defenses. To better understand how plants adapt to these mutations, we performed a genome-wide gene expression analysis. We found that apparent compensatory transcriptional responses in these mutants involve the induction of wax, cutin, cell wall, and defense genes. To gain greater insight into the mechanism by which cuticular mutations trigger this response in the plants, we performed an overlap meta-analysis, which is termed MASTA (MicroArray overlap Search Tool and Analysis, of differentially expressed genes. This suggested that different cell integrity pathways are recruited in cesA cellulose synthase and cuticular mutants. Using MASTA for an in silico suppressor/enhancer screen, we identified SERRATE (SE, which encodes a protein of RNA-processing multi-protein complexes, as a likely enhancer. In confirmation of this notion, the se lcr and se bdg double mutants eradicate severe leaf deformations as well as the organ fusions that are typical of lcr and bdg and other cuticular mutants. Also, lcr does not confer resistance to Botrytis cinerea in a se mutant background. We propose that there is a role for SERRATE-mediated RNA signaling in the cuticle integrity pathway.

  11. Dissecting phenotypic variation among AIS patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Minghua; Wang Jiucun; Zhang Zhen; Zhao Zhimin; Zhang Rongmei; Hu Xiaohua; Tan Tao; Luo Shijing; Luo Zewei

    2005-01-01

    We have created genital skin fibroblast cell lines directly from three patients in a Chinese family affected by androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). All patients in the family share an identical AR Arg 840 Cys mutant but show different disease phenotypes. By using the cell lines, we find that the mutation has not influenced a normal androgen-binding capacity at 37 deg C but has reduced the affinity for androgens and may cause thermolability of the androgen-receptor complex. The impaired nuclear trafficking of the androgen receptor in the cell lines is highly correlated with the severity of donors' disease phenotype. The transactivity of the mutant is substantially weakened and the extent of the reduced transactivity reflects severity of the donors' disease symptom. Our data reveal that although etiology of AIS is monogenic and the mutant may alter the major biological functions of its wild allele, the function of the mutant AR can also be influenced by the different genetic backgrounds and thus explains the divergent disease phenotypes

  12. Mutant heterosis in rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    In the variety TKM6 a high yielding semidwarf mutant has been induced. This TKM6 mutant was used in test crosses with a number of other varieties and mutants to examine the extent of heterosis of dwarfs in rice and to select superior crosses. An excerpt of the published data is given. It appears from the backcross of the mutant with its original variety, that an increase in number of productive tillers occurs in the hybrid, leading to a striking grain yield increase, while the semi-dwarf culm length (the main mutant character) reverts to the normal phenotype. In the cross with IR8 on the other hand, there is only a minimal increase in tiller number but a substantial increase in TGW leading to more than 30% yield increase over the better parent

  13. A link between thrifty phenotype and maternal care across two generations of intercrossed mice.

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    Bruno Sauce

    Full Text Available Maternal effects are causal influences from mother to offspring beyond genetic information, and have lifelong consequences for multiple traits. Previously, we reported that mice whose mothers did not nurse properly had low birth weight followed by rapid fat accumulation and disturbed development of some organs. That pattern resembles metabolic syndromes known collectively as the thrifty phenotype, which is believed to be an adaptation to a stressful environment which prepares offspring for reduced nutrient supply. The potential link between maternal care, stress reactivity, and the thrifty phenotype, however, has been poorly explored in the human and animal literature: only a couple of studies even mention (much less, test these concepts under a cohesive framework. Here, we explored this link using mice of the parental inbred strains SM/J and LG/J-who differ dramatically in their maternal care-and the intercrossed generations F1 and F2. We measured individual differences in 15 phenotypes and used structural equation modeling to test our hypotheses. We found a remarkable relationship between thrifty phenotype and lower quality of maternal behaviors, including nest building, pup retrieval, grooming/licking, and nursing. To our knowledge, this is the first study to show, in any mammal, a clear connection between the natural variation in thrifty phenotype and maternal care. Both traits in the mother also had a substantial effect on survival rate in the F3 offspring. To our surprise, however, stress reactivity seemed to play no role in our models. Furthermore, the strain of maternal grandmother, but not of paternal grandmother, affected the variation of maternal care in F2 mice, and this effect was mediated by thrifty phenotype in F2. Since F1 animals were all genetically identical, this finding suggests that maternal effects pass down both maternal care and thrifty phenotype in these mice across generations via epigenetic transmission.

  14. Non-linked inhibitory gene controls a disease mimicking mutant in rice [Oryza sativa L.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jambhulkar, S.J.; Joshua, D.C.; Goswamy, D.G.

    2001-01-01

    A gamma ray induced disease mimicking mutant called luchai lesion was isolated in the rice variety White Luchai 112. The appearance of small light red lesions and their development continued from seedling to flowering. The lesions appeared gradually on older leaves and their uncontrolled spread eventually lead to leaf senescence. They resembled the disease spots caused by Magnaporthe grisea. However, pathological studies ruled out the possibility of pathogen mediated disease symptoms. Genetic studies revealed that lesions were governed by a dominant gene; however, their expression was suppressed in presence of a non-linked inhibitory gene. It is hypothesised that the plant cells of the mutant are able to sense inbuilt spontaneous signals leading to lesion development, but in presence of an inhibitory gene the signals are suppressed by perturbation in the signal transduction pathway [it

  15. RAPD analysis on male sterility mutant of Lilium asiatic hybrids 'pollyanna' induced by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Yuehui; Zhao Xiangyun; Zhang Kezhong; Huang Shangwu; Lu Changxun

    2005-01-01

    RAPD analysis of 80 random 10-mer primers on Lilium Asiatic hybrids 'pollyanna' and its 20 phenotype male sterility mutants induced by irradiation was carried out. Of the tested primers, 31 primers could produced ideal amplification bands on all materials, 4 primers generated stable different polymorphic bands among 9 mutants and 'pollyanna'. Different polymorphic bands of 7-18 were found among 9 mutants and 'pollyanna'. It was showed that 9 mutants were phenotype male sterility mutant of 'pollyanna'. (authors)

  16. A METABOLIC SIGNATURE FOR LONG-LIFE IN THE C. ELEGANS MIT MUTANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Jeffrey A.; Mishur, Robert J.; Bhaskaran, Shylesh; Rea, Shane L.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Mit mutations that disrupt function of the mitochondrial electron transport chain can, inexplicably, prolong Caenorhabditis elegans lifespan. In this study we use a metabolomics approach to identify an ensemble of mitochondrial-derived α-ketoacids and α-hydroxyacids that are produced by long-lived Mit mutants but not by other long-lived mutants or by short-lived mitochondrial mutants. We show that accumulation of these compounds is dependent upon concerted inhibition of three α-ketoacid dehydrogenases that share dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DLD) as a common subunit, a protein previously linked in humans with increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease. When the expression of DLD in wild type animals was reduced using RNA interference we observed an unprecedented effect on lifespan - as RNAi dosage was increased lifespan was significantly shortened but, at higher doses, it was significantly lengthened, suggesting DLD plays a unique role in modulating length of life. Our findings provide novel insight into the origin of the Mit phenotype. PMID:23173729

  17. Xenopus pax6 mutants affect eye development and other organ systems, and have phenotypic similarities to human aniridia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Takuya; Fisher, Marilyn; Nakajima, Keisuke; Odeleye, Akinleye O; Zimmerman, Keith B; Fish, Margaret B; Yaoita, Yoshio; Chojnowski, Jena L; Lauderdale, James D; Netland, Peter A; Grainger, Robert M

    2015-12-15

    Mutations in the Pax6 gene cause ocular defects in both vertebrate and invertebrate animal species, and the disease aniridia in humans. Despite extensive experimentation on this gene in multiple species, including humans, we still do not understand the earliest effects on development mediated by this gene. This prompted us to develop pax6 mutant lines in Xenopus tropicalis taking advantage of the utility of the Xenopus system for examining early development and in addition to establish a model for studying the human disease aniridia in an accessible lower vertebrate. We have generated mutants in pax6 by using Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nuclease (TALEN) constructs for gene editing in X. tropicalis. Embryos with putative null mutations show severe eye abnormalities and changes in brain development, as assessed by changes in morphology and gene expression. One gene that we found is downregulated very early in development in these pax6 mutants is myc, a gene involved in pluripotency and progenitor cell maintenance and likely a mediator of some key pax6 functions in the embryo. Changes in gene expression in the developing brain and pancreas reflect other important functions of pax6 during development. In mutations with partial loss of pax6 function eye development is initially relatively normal but froglets show an underdeveloped iris, similar to the classic phenotype (aniridia) seen in human patients with PAX6 mutations. Other eye abnormalities observed in these froglets, including cataracts and corneal defects, are also common in human aniridia. The frog model thus allows us to examine the earliest deficits in eye formation as a result of pax6 lesions, and provides a useful model for understanding the developmental basis for the aniridia phenotype seen in humans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. First TILLING platform in Cucurbita pepo: a new mutant resource for gene function and crop improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente-Dólera, Nelly; Troadec, Christelle; Moya, Manuel; del Río-Celestino, Mercedes; Pomares-Viciana, Teresa; Bendahmane, Abdelhafid; Picó, Belén; Román, Belén; Gómez, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Although the availability of genetic and genomic resources for Cucurbita pepo has increased significantly, functional genomic resources are still limited for this crop. In this direction, we have developed a high throughput reverse genetic tool: the first TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes) resource for this species. Additionally, we have used this resource to demonstrate that the previous EMS mutant population we developed has the highest mutation density compared with other cucurbits mutant populations. The overall mutation density in this first C. pepo TILLING platform was estimated to be 1/133 Kb by screening five additional genes. In total, 58 mutations confirmed by sequencing were identified in the five targeted genes, thirteen of which were predicted to have an impact on the function of the protein. The genotype/phenotype correlation was studied in a peroxidase gene, revealing that the phenotype of seedling homozygous for one of the isolated mutant alleles was albino. These results indicate that the TILLING approach in this species was successful at providing new mutations and can address the major challenge of linking sequence information to biological function and also the identification of novel variation for crop breeding.

  19. Recombination Phenotypes of Escherichia coli greA Mutants

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    Poteete Anthony R

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The elongation factor GreA binds to RNA polymerase and modulates transcriptional pausing. Some recent research suggests that the primary role of GreA may not be to regulate gene expression, but rather, to promote the progression of replication forks which collide with RNA polymerase, and which might otherwise collapse. Replication fork collapse is known to generate dsDNA breaks, which can be recombinogenic. It follows that GreA malfunction could have consequences affecting homologous recombination. Results Escherichia coli mutants bearing substitutions of the active site acidic residues of the transcription elongation factor GreA, D41N and E44K, were isolated as suppressors of growth inhibition by a toxic variant of the bacteriophage lambda Red-beta recombination protein. These mutants, as well as a D41A greA mutant and a greA deletion, were tested for proficiency in recombination events. The mutations were found to increase the efficiency of RecA-RecBCD-mediated and RecA-Red-mediated recombination, which are replication-independent, and to decrease the efficiency of replication-dependent Red-mediated recombination. Conclusion These observations provide new evidence for a role of GreA in resolving conflicts between replication and transcription.

  20. Decreased internalisation of erbB1 mutants in lung cancer is linked with a mechanism conferring sensitivity to gefitinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, B S; Griffiths, G J; Benson, R; Kenyon, D; Lazzara, M; Swinton, J; Beck, S; Hickinson, M; Beusmans, J M; Lauffenburger, D; de Graaf, D

    2006-11-01

    A majority of gefitinib (IRESSA)-responsive tumours in non-small cell lung cancer have been found to carry mutations in ErbB1. Previously, it has been observed that internalisation-deficient ErbB1 receptors are strong drivers of oncogenesis. Using a computational model of ErbB1 trafficking and signalling, it is found that a deficiency in ErbB1 internalisation is sufficient to explain the observed signalling phenotype of these gefitinib-responsive ErbB1 mutants in lung cancer cell lines. Experimental tests confirm that gefitinib-sensitive cell lines with and without ErbB1 mutations exhibit markedly slower internalisation rates than gefitinib-insensitive cell lines. Moreover, the computational model demonstrates that reduced ErbB1 internalisation rates are mechanistically linked to upregulated AKT signalling. Experimentally it is confirmed that impaired internalisation of ErbB1 is associated with increased AKT activity, which can be blocked by gefitinib. On the basis of these experimental and computational results, it is surmised that gefitinib sensitivity is a marker of a reliance on AKT signalling for cell survival that may be brought about by impaired ErbB1 internalisation.

  1. Engineered disulfide bonds restore chaperone-like function of DJ-1 mutants linked to familial Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Todd; Clark, Lindsay; Ray, Soumya S

    2010-07-13

    Loss-of-function mutations such as L166P, A104T, and M26I in the DJ-1 gene (PARK7) have been linked to autosomal-recessive early onset Parkinson's disease (PD). Cellular and structural studies of the familial mutants suggest that these mutations may destabilize the dimeric structure. To look for common dynamical signatures among the DJ-1 mutants, short MD simulations of up to 1000 ps were conducted to identify the weakest region of the protein (residues 38-70). In an attempt to stabilize the protein, we mutated residue Val 51 to cysteine (V51C) to make a symmetry-related disulfide bridge with the preexisting Cys 53 on the opposite subunit. We found that the introduction of this disulfide linkage stabilized the mutants A104T and M26I against thermal denaturation, improved their ability to scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS), and restored a chaperone-like function of blocking alpha-synuclein aggregation. The L166P mutant was far too unstable to be rescued by introduction of the V51C mutation. The results presented here point to the possible development of pharmacological chaperones, which may eventually lead to PD therapeutics.

  2. Nonsense mutants in the bacteriophage T4D v gene

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    Minderhout, L van; Grimbergen, J; Groot, B de [Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands). Lab. voor Stralengenetica en Chemische Mutagenese; Cohen (J.A.) Instituut voor Radiopathologie en Stralenbescherming, Leiden (Netherlands))

    1975-09-01

    Ten UV-sensitive mutants of T4D with the v phenotype were isolated. Of these ten mutants, two are amber and two opal. In UV curves and in photoreactivation and multiplicity reactivation experiments the nonsense mutants show the v phenotype in su/sup -/ hosts and almost the T4/sup +/ phenotype in su/sup +/ hosts. The mutations are located between rl and e and are alleles of v/sub 1/. In crosses with irradiated and non-irradiated phages the recombinant frequency is not reduced by uvs5. Amber uvs5 propagated in CR63 su/sup +/ is with B su/sup -/ just as sensitive to UV as uvs5 propagated in B su/sup -/, which permits the conclusion that the capsid of T4 phage particles does not contain the v gene product.

  3. High-Resolution Phenotypic Landscape of the RNA Polymerase II Trigger Loop.

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    Chenxi Qiu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The active sites of multisubunit RNA polymerases have a "trigger loop" (TL that multitasks in substrate selection, catalysis, and translocation. To dissect the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA polymerase II TL at individual-residue resolution, we quantitatively phenotyped nearly all TL single variants en masse. Three mutant classes, revealed by phenotypes linked to transcription defects or various stresses, have distinct distributions among TL residues. We find that mutations disrupting an intra-TL hydrophobic pocket, proposed to provide a mechanism for substrate-triggered TL folding through destabilization of a catalytically inactive TL state, confer phenotypes consistent with pocket disruption and increased catalysis. Furthermore, allele-specific genetic interactions among TL and TL-proximal domain residues support the contribution of the funnel and bridge helices (BH to TL dynamics. Our structural genetics approach incorporates structural and phenotypic data for high-resolution dissection of transcription mechanisms and their evolution, and is readily applicable to other essential yeast proteins.

  4. Variations in dysfunction of sister chromatid cohesion in esco2 mutant zebrafish reflect the phenotypic diversity of Roberts syndrome

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    Stefanie M. Percival

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in ESCO2, one of two establishment of cohesion factors necessary for proper sister chromatid cohesion (SCC, cause a spectrum of developmental defects in the autosomal-recessive disorder Roberts syndrome (RBS, warranting in vivo analysis of the consequence of cohesion dysfunction. Through a genetic screen in zebrafish targeting embryonic-lethal mutants that have increased genomic instability, we have identified an esco2 mutant zebrafish. Utilizing the natural transparency of zebrafish embryos, we have developed a novel technique to observe chromosome dynamics within a single cell during mitosis in a live vertebrate embryo. Within esco2 mutant embryos, we observed premature chromatid separation, a unique chromosome scattering, prolonged mitotic delay, and genomic instability in the form of anaphase bridges and micronuclei formation. Cytogenetic studies indicated complete chromatid separation and high levels of aneuploidy within mutant embryos. Amongst aneuploid spreads, we predominantly observed decreases in chromosome number, suggesting that either cells with micronuclei or micronuclei themselves are eliminated. We also demonstrated that the genomic instability leads to p53-dependent neural tube apoptosis. Surprisingly, although many cells required Esco2 to establish cohesion, 10-20% of cells had only weakened cohesion in the absence of Esco2, suggesting that compensatory cohesion mechanisms exist in these cells that undergo a normal mitotic division. These studies provide a unique in vivo vertebrate view of the mitotic defects and consequences of cohesion establishment loss, and they provide a compensation-based model to explain the RBS phenotypes.

  5. Herpes simplex virus type 1 gene UL14: phenotype of a null mutant and identification of the encoded protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, C; Davison, A J; MacLean, A R; Taus, N S; Baines, J D

    2000-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) gene UL14 is located between divergently transcribed genes UL13 and UL15 and overlaps the promoters for both of these genes. UL14 also exhibits a substantial overlap of its coding region with that of UL13. It is one of the few HSV-1 genes for which a phenotype and protein product have not been described. Using mass spectrometric and immunological approaches, we demonstrated that the UL14 protein is a minor component of the virion tegument of 32 kDa which is expressed late in infection. In infected cells, the UL14 protein was detected in the nucleus at discrete sites within electron-dense nuclear bodies and in the cytoplasm initially in a diffuse distribution and then at discrete sites. Some of the UL14 protein was phosphorylated. A mutant with a 4-bp deletion in the central region of UL14 failed to produce the UL14 protein and generated small plaques. The mutant exhibited an extended growth cycle at low multiplicity of infection and appeared to be compromised in efficient transit of virus particles from the infected cell. In mice injected intracranially, the 50% lethal dose of the mutant was reduced more than 30,000-fold. Recovery of the mutant from the latently infected sacral ganglia of mice injected peripherally was significantly less than that of wild-type virus, suggesting a marked defect in the establishment of, or reactivation from, latent infection.

  6. Functional Loss of Bmsei Causes Thermosensitive Epilepsy in Contractile Mutant Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Hongyi; Cheng, Tingcai; Huang, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Mengting; Zhang, Yinxia; Dai, Fangyin; Mita, Kazuei; Xia, Qingyou; Liu, Chun

    2015-07-01

    The thermoprotective mechanisms of insects remain largely unknown. We reported the Bombyx mori contractile (cot) behavioral mutant with thermo-sensitive seizures phenotype. At elevated temperatures, the cot mutant exhibit seizures associated with strong contractions, rolling, vomiting, and a temporary lack of movement. We narrowed a region containing cot to ~268 kb by positional cloning and identified the mutant gene as Bmsei which encoded a potassium channel protein. Bmsei was present in both the cell membrane and cytoplasm in wild-type ganglia but faint in cot. Furthermore, Bmsei was markedly decreased upon high temperature treatment in cot mutant. With the RNAi method and injecting potassium channel blockers, the wild type silkworm was induced the cot phenotype. These results demonstrated that Bmsei was responsible for the cot mutant phenotype and played an important role in thermoprotection in silkworm. Meanwhile, comparative proteomic approach was used to investigate the proteomic differences. The results showed that the protein of Hsp-1 and Tn1 were significantly decreased and increased on protein level in cot mutant after thermo-stimulus, respectively. Our data provide insights into the mechanism of thermoprotection in insect. As cot phenotype closely resembles human epilepsy, cot might be a potential model for the mechanism of epilepsy in future.

  7. Astrocytes expressing ALS‐linked mutant FUS induce motor neuron death through release of tumor necrosis factor‐alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, Azadeh; McAvoy, Kevin; Krishnamurthy, Karthik; Trotti, Davide

    2018-01-01

    Mutations in fused in sarcoma (FUS) are linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative disease affecting both upper and lower motor neurons. While it is established that astrocytes contribute to the death of motor neurons in ALS, the specific contribution of mutant FUS (mutFUS) through astrocytes has not yet been studied. Here, we used primary astrocytes expressing a N‐terminally GFP tagged R521G mutant or wild‐type FUS (WTFUS) and show that mutFUS‐expressing astrocytes undergo astrogliosis, damage co‐cultured motor neurons via activation of an inflammatory response and produce conditioned medium (ACM) that is toxic to motor neurons in isolation. Time lapse imaging shows that motor neuron cultures exposed to mutFUS ACM, but not WTFUS ACM, undergo significant cell loss, which is preceded by progressive degeneration of neurites. We found that Tumor Necrosis Factor‐Alpha (TNFα) is secreted into ACM of mutFUS‐expressing astrocytes. Accordingly, mutFUS astrocyte‐mediated motor neuron toxicity is blocked by targeting soluble TNFα with neutralizing antibodies. We also found that mutant astrocytes trigger changes to motor neuron AMPA receptors (AMPAR) that render them susceptible to excitotoxicity and AMPAR‐mediated cell death. Our data provide the first evidence of astrocytic involvement in FUS‐ALS, identify TNFα as a mediator of this toxicity, and provide several potential therapeutic targets to protect motor neurons in FUS‐linked ALS. PMID:29380416

  8. A metabolic signature for long life in the Caenorhabditis elegans Mit mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Jeffrey A; Mishur, Robert J; Bhaskaran, Shylesh; Rea, Shane L

    2013-02-01

    Mit mutations that disrupt function of the mitochondrial electron transport chain can, inexplicably, prolong Caenorhabditis elegans lifespan. In this study we use a metabolomics approach to identify an ensemble of mitochondrial-derived α-ketoacids and α-hydroxyacids that are produced by long-lived Mit mutants but not by other long-lived mutants or by short-lived mitochondrial mutants. We show that accumulation of these compounds is dependent on concerted inhibition of three α-ketoacid dehydrogenases that share dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DLD) as a common subunit, a protein previously linked in humans with increased risk of Alzheimer's disease. When the expression of DLD in wild-type animals was reduced using RNA interference we observed an unprecedented effect on lifespan - as RNAi dosage was increased lifespan was significantly shortened, but, at higher doses, it was significantly lengthened, suggesting that DLD plays a unique role in modulating length of life. Our findings provide novel insight into the origin of the Mit phenotype. © 2012 The Authors Aging Cell © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/Anatomical Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  9. [Genetic control of the sensitivity of Aspergillus nidulans to mutagenic factors. VII. Inheritance of cross-sensitivity to different mutagenic factors by uvs-mutants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evseeva, G V; Kameneva, S V

    1977-01-01

    To study the inheritance of the sensitivity to UV, X-rays, methylmethanesulphonate (MMS), nitrosoguanidine (NG) and nitrous acid (NA) in five uvs mutants of Aspergillus nidulans, having multiple sensitivity to these factors, the sensitivity of recombinants obtained from crossing uvs mutants with uvs+ strain, resistant to all the factors analysed, and uvs leads to uvs+ revertants is investigated. Four uvs mutants (15, 17, 19 and 26) are found to have a nomogenic control of sensitivity to different mutagens. In one mutant (uvs11) the sensitivity to five factors is controlled by two non-linked mutations, one of them determining the sensitivity to UV, NG, NA, and the other--to X-rays and MMC. Phenotypic manifestations of uvs mutations is modified by cell genotype, both chromosomal and cytoplasmic factors being responsible for the modification. Phenotypic modification of uvs mutation results in the change to some (but not to all) mutagenic factors. It suggests, that not the product of uvs gene, but some other components of the reparation complex are modified. Otherwise, reparation of different DNA damages can be carried out by a single enzyme acting in different reparation complexes.

  10. Proteomic analysis uncovers a metabolic phenotype in C. elegans after nhr-40 reduction of function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohludka, Michal; Simeckova, Katerina; Vohanka, Jaroslav; Yilma, Petr; Novak, Petr; Krause, Michael W.; Kostrouchova, Marta; Kostrouch, Zdenek

    2008-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans has an unexpectedly large number (284) of genes encoding nuclear hormone receptors, most of which are nematode-specific and are of unknown function. We have exploited comparative two-dimensional chromatography of synchronized cultures of wild type C. elegans larvae and a mutant in nhr-40 to determine if proteomic approaches will provide additional insight into gene function. Chromatofocusing, followed by reversed-phase chromatography and mass spectrometry, identified altered chromatographic patterns for a set of proteins, many of which function in muscle and metabolism. Prompted by the proteomic analysis, we find that the penetrance of the developmental phenotypes in the mutant is enhanced at low temperatures and by food restriction. The combination of our phenotypic and proteomic analysis strongly suggests that NHR-40 provides a link between metabolism and muscle development. Our results highlight the utility of comparative two-dimensional chromatography to provide a relatively rapid method to gain insight into gene function

  11. Genetic localization and phenotypic expression of X-linked cataract (Xcat) in Mus musculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favor, J; Pretsch, W

    1990-01-01

    Linkage data relative to the markers tabby and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase are presented to locate X-linked cataract (Xcat) in the distal portion of the mouse X-chromosome between jimpy and hypophosphatemia. The human X-linked cataract-dental syndrome, Nance-Horan Syndrome, also maps closely to human hypophosphatemia and would suggest homology between mouse Xcat and human Nance-Horan Syndrome genes. In hemizygous males and homozygous females penetrance is complete with only slight variation in the degree of expression. Phenotypic expression in Xcat heterozygous females ranges from totally clear to totally opaque lenses. The phenotypic expression between the two lenses of a heterozygous individual could also vary between totally clear and totally opaque lenses. However, a correlation in the degree of expression between the eyes of an individual was observed. A variegated pattern of lens opacity was evident in female heterozygotes. Based on these observations, the site of gene action for the Xcat locus is suggested to be endogenous to the lens cells and the precursor cell population of the lens is concluded to be small. The identification of an X-linked cataract locus is an important contribution to the estimate of the number of mutable loci resulting in cataract, an estimate required so that dominant cataract mutagenesis results may be expressed on a per locus basis. The Xcat mutation may be a useful marker for a distal region of the mouse X-chromosome which is relatively sparsely marked and the X-linked cataract mutation may be employed in gene expression and lens development studies.

  12. ALS-linked mutant SOD1 proteins promote Aβ aggregates in ALS through direct interaction with Aβ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Ja-Young; Cho, Hyungmin; Park, Hye-Yoon; Rhim, Hyangshuk; Kang, Seongman

    2017-11-04

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive degeneration of motor neurons. Aggregation of ALS-linked mutant Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is a hallmark of a subset of familial ALS (fALS). Recently, intracellular amyloid-β (Aβ) is detected in motor neurons of both sporadic and familial ALS. We have previously shown that intracellular Aβ specifically interacts with G93A, an ALS-linked SOD1 mutant. However, little is known about the pathological and biological effect of this interaction in neurons. In this study, we have demonstrated that the Aβ-binding region is exposed on the SOD1 surface through the conformational changes due to misfolding of SOD1. Interestingly, we found that the intracellular aggregation of Aβ is enhanced through the direct interaction of Aβ with the Aβ-binding region exposed to misfolded SOD1. Ultimately, increased Aβ aggregation by this interaction promotes neuronal cell death. Consistent with this result, Aβ aggregates was three-fold higher in the brains of G93A transgenic mice than those of non Tg. Our study provides the first direct evidence that Aβ, an AD-linked factor, is associated to the pathogenesis of ALS and provides molecular clues to understand common aggregation mechanisms in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Furthermore, it will provide new insights into the development of therapeutic approaches for ALS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Hormones and phenotypic plasticity in an ecological context: linking physiological mechanisms to evolutionary processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lema, Sean C

    2014-11-01

    Hormones are chemical signaling molecules that regulate patterns of cellular physiology and gene expression underlying phenotypic traits. Hormone-signaling pathways respond to an organism's external environment to mediate developmental stage-specific malleability in phenotypes, so that environmental variation experienced at different stages of development has distinct effects on an organism's phenotype. Studies of hormone-signaling are therefore playing a central role in efforts to understand how plastic phenotypic responses to environmental variation are generated during development. But, how do adaptive, hormonally mediated phenotypes evolve if the individual signaling components (hormones, conversion enzymes, membrane transporters, and receptors) that comprise any hormone-signaling pathway show expressional flexibility in response to environmental variation? What relevance do these components hold as molecular targets for selection to couple or decouple correlated hormonally mediated traits? This article explores how studying the endocrine underpinnings of phenotypic plasticity in an ecologically relevant context can provide insights into these, and other, crucial questions into the role of phenotypic plasticity in evolution, including how plasticity itself evolves. These issues are discussed in the light of investigations into how thyroid hormones mediate morphological plasticity in Death Valley's clade of pupfishes (Cyprinodon spp.). Findings from this work with pupfish illustrate that the study of hormone-signaling from an ecological perspective can reveal how phenotypic plasticity contributes to the generation of phenotypic novelty, as well as how physiological mechanisms developmentally link an organism's phenotype to its environmental experiences. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. A Sordaria macrospora mutant lacking the leu1 gene shows a developmental arrest during fruiting body formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kück, Ulrich

    2005-10-01

    Developmental mutants with defects in fruiting body formation are excellent resources for the identification of genetic components that control cellular differentiation processes in filamentous fungi. The mutant pro4 of the ascomycete Sordaria macrospora is characterized by a developmental arrest during the sexual life cycle. This mutant generates only pre-fruiting bodies (protoperithecia), and is unable to form ascospores. Besides being sterile, pro4 is auxotrophic for leucine. Ascospore analysis revealed that the two phenotypes are genetically linked. After isolation of the wild-type leu1 gene from S. macrospora, complementation experiments demonstrated that the gene was able to restore both prototrophy and fertility in pro4. To investigate the control of leu1 expression, other genes involved in leucine biosynthesis specifically and in the general control of amino acid biosynthesis ("cross-pathway control") have been analysed using Northern hybridization and quantitative RT-PCR. These analyses demonstrated that genes of leucine biosynthesis are transcribed at higher levels under conditions of amino acid starvation. In addition, the expression data for the cpc1 and cpc2 genes indicate that cross-pathway control is superimposed on leucine-specific regulation of fruiting body development in the leu1 mutant. This was further substantiated by growth experiments in which the wild-type strain was found to show a sterile phenotype when grown on a medium containing the amino acid analogue 5-methyl-tryptophan. Taken together, these data show that pro4 represents a novel mutant type in S. macrospora, in which amino acid starvation acts as a signal that interrupts the development of the fruiting body.

  15. A new resource for characterizing X-linked genes in Drosophila melanogaster: systematic coverage and subdivision of the X chromosome with nested, Y-linked duplications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, R Kimberley; Deal, Megan E; Deal, Jennifer A; Garton, Russell D; Brown, C Adam; Ward, Megan E; Andrade, Rachel S; Spana, Eric P; Kaufman, Thomas C; Cook, Kevin R

    2010-12-01

    Interchromosomal duplications are especially important for the study of X-linked genes. Males inheriting a mutation in a vital X-linked gene cannot survive unless there is a wild-type copy of the gene duplicated elsewhere in the genome. Rescuing the lethality of an X-linked mutation with a duplication allows the mutation to be used experimentally in complementation tests and other genetic crosses and it maps the mutated gene to a defined chromosomal region. Duplications can also be used to screen for dosage-dependent enhancers and suppressors of mutant phenotypes as a way to identify genes involved in the same biological process. We describe an ongoing project in Drosophila melanogaster to generate comprehensive coverage and extensive breakpoint subdivision of the X chromosome with megabase-scale X segments borne on Y chromosomes. The in vivo method involves the creation of X inversions on attached-XY chromosomes by FLP-FRT site-specific recombination technology followed by irradiation to induce large internal X deletions. The resulting chromosomes consist of the X tip, a medial X segment placed near the tip by an inversion, and a full Y. A nested set of medial duplicated segments is derived from each inversion precursor. We have constructed a set of inversions on attached-XY chromosomes that enable us to isolate nested duplicated segments from all X regions. To date, our screens have provided a minimum of 78% X coverage with duplication breakpoints spaced a median of nine genes apart. These duplication chromosomes will be valuable resources for rescuing and mapping X-linked mutations and identifying dosage-dependent modifiers of mutant phenotypes.

  16. TGFβ affects collagen cross-linking independent of chondrocyte phenotype but strongly depending on physical environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastiaansen-Jenniskens, Y.M.; Koevoet, W.; Bart, A.C.W. de; Zuurmond, A.-M.; Bank, R.A.; Verhaar, J.A.N.; Groot, J. de; Osch, G.J.V.M. van

    2008-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) is often used in cartilage tissue engineering to increase matrix formation by cells with various phenotypes. However, adverse effects of TGFβ, such as extensive cross-linking in cultured fibroblasts, have also been reported. Our goal was to study effects of

  17. Identification of Mutant Genes and Introgressed Tiger Salamander DNA in the Laboratory Axolotl, Ambystoma mexicanum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcock, M Ryan; Vaughn-Wolfe, Jennifer; Elias, Alexandra; Kump, D Kevin; Kendall, Katharina Denise; Timoshevskaya, Nataliya; Timoshevskiy, Vladimir; Perry, Dustin W; Smith, Jeramiah J; Spiewak, Jessica E; Parichy, David M; Voss, S Randal

    2017-01-31

    The molecular genetic toolkit of the Mexican axolotl, a classic model organism, has matured to the point where it is now possible to identify genes for mutant phenotypes. We used a positional cloning-candidate gene approach to identify molecular bases for two historic axolotl pigment phenotypes: white and albino. White (d/d) mutants have defects in pigment cell morphogenesis and differentiation, whereas albino (a/a) mutants lack melanin. We identified in white mutants a transcriptional defect in endothelin 3 (edn3), encoding a peptide factor that promotes pigment cell migration and differentiation in other vertebrates. Transgenic restoration of Edn3 expression rescued the homozygous white mutant phenotype. We mapped the albino locus to tyrosinase (tyr) and identified polymorphisms shared between the albino allele (tyr a ) and tyr alleles in a Minnesota population of tiger salamanders from which the albino trait was introgressed. tyr a has a 142 bp deletion and similar engineered alleles recapitulated the albino phenotype. Finally, we show that historical introgression of tyr a significantly altered genomic composition of the laboratory axolotl, yielding a distinct, hybrid strain of ambystomatid salamander. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of identifying genes for traits in the laboratory Mexican axolotl.

  18. High-content screening of yeast mutant libraries by shotgun lipidomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarasov, Kirill; Stefanko, Adam; Casanovas, Albert

    2014-01-01

    To identify proteins with a functional role in lipid metabolism and homeostasis we designed a high-throughput platform for high-content lipidomic screening of yeast mutant libraries. To this end, we combined culturing and lipid extraction in 96-well format, automated direct infusion...... factor KAR4 precipitated distinct lipid metabolic phenotypes. These results demonstrate that the high-throughput shotgun lipidomics platform is a valid and complementary proxy for high-content screening of yeast mutant libraries....... nanoelectrospray ionization, high-resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry, and a dedicated data processing framework to support lipid phenotyping across hundreds of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants. Our novel approach revealed that the absence of genes with unknown function YBR141C and YJR015W, and the transcription...

  19. The Human Phenotype Ontology project: linking molecular biology and disease through phenotype data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohler, S.; Doelken, S.C.; Mungall, C.J.; Bauer, S.; Firth, H.V.; Bailleul-Forestier, I.; Black, G.C.M.; Brown, D.L.; Brudno, M.; Campbell, J.; FitzPatrick, D.R.; Eppig, J.T.; Jackson, A.P.; Freson, K.; Girdea, M.; Helbig, I.; Hurst, J.A.; Jahn, J.; Jackson, L.G.; Kelly, A.M.; Ledbetter, D.H.; Mansour, S.; Martin, C.L.; Moss, C.; Mumford, A.; Ouwehand, W.H.; Park, S.M.; Riggs, E.R.; Scott, R.H.; Sisodiya, S.; Vooren, S. van der; Wapner, R.J.; Wilkie, A.O.; Wright, C.F.; Silfhout, A.T. van; Leeuw, N. de; Vries, B. de; Washingthon, N.L.; Smith, C.L.; Westerfield, M.; Schofield, P.; Ruef, B.J.; Gkoutos, G.V.; Haendel, M.; Smedley, D.; Lewis, S.E.; Robinson, P.N.

    2014-01-01

    The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) project, available at http://www.human-phenotype-ontology.org, provides a structured, comprehensive and well-defined set of 10,088 classes (terms) describing human phenotypic abnormalities and 13,326 subclass relations between the HPO classes. In addition we have

  20. Short communication. A spontaneous mutant of L-202 rice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Yzaguire, A.; Padrones, T.

    2009-07-01

    A new spontaneous phenotype of the rice cultivar L-202 was found. Mendelian analysis indicates that it is a monogenic, recessive mutant. Its distinguishing features are: dark blue-green colour, short and narrow leaves, high tillering and relatively short height. The objectives of this study were: to characterize it, to determine if it is heritable and if so, its genetic basis. Its distinguishing features are: dark blue-green colour, short and narrow leaves, high tillering and relatively short height. Selfing the new phenotype resulted in a uniform progeny, with the traits of the parent plant (wild type). Crossing the new phenotype with the normal L-202 cultivar resulted in a uniform F1 hybrid generation, with the wild type. The F2 generation showed a mendelian segregation which did not depart significantly from three normal plants : one new phenotype. It is concluded that it is a monogenic, recessive mutant. (Author) 3 refs.

  1. Prevalence of sexual dimorphism in mammalian phenotypic traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Natasha A.; Mason, Jeremy; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Benjamini, Yoav; Bower, Lynette; Braun, Robert E.; Brown, Steve D.M.; Chesler, Elissa J.; Dickinson, Mary E.; Flenniken, Ann M.; Fuchs, Helmut; Angelis, Martin Hrabe de; Gao, Xiang; Guo, Shiying; Greenaway, Simon; Heller, Ruth; Herault, Yann; Justice, Monica J.; Kurbatova, Natalja; Lelliott, Christopher J.; Lloyd, K.C. Kent; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Mank, Judith E.; Masuya, Hiroshi; McKerlie, Colin; Meehan, Terrence F.; Mott, Richard F.; Murray, Stephen A.; Parkinson, Helen; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Santos, Luis; Seavitt, John R.; Smedley, Damian; Sorg, Tania; Speak, Anneliese O.; Steel, Karen P.; Svenson, Karen L.; Obata, Yuichi; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Tamura, Masaru; Kaneda, Hideki; Furuse, Tamio; Kobayashi, Kimio; Miura, Ikuo; Yamada, Ikuko; Tanaka, Nobuhiko; Yoshiki, Atsushi; Ayabe, Shinya; Clary, David A.; Tolentino, Heather A.; Schuchbauer, Michael A.; Tolentino, Todd; Aprile, Joseph Anthony; Pedroia, Sheryl M.; Kelsey, Lois; Vukobradovic, Igor; Berberovic, Zorana; Owen, Celeste; Qu, Dawei; Guo, Ruolin; Newbigging, Susan; Morikawa, Lily; Law, Napoleon; Shang, Xueyuan; Feugas, Patricia; Wang, Yanchun; Eskandarian, Mohammad; Zhu, Yingchun; Nutter, Lauryl M. J.; Penton, Patricia; Laurin, Valerie; Clarke, Shannon; Lan, Qing; Sohel, Khondoker; Miller, David; Clark, Greg; Hunter, Jane; Cabezas, Jorge; Bubshait, Mohammed; Carroll, Tracy; Tondat, Sandra; MacMaster, Suzanne; Pereira, Monica; Gertsenstein, Marina; Danisment, Ozge; Jacob, Elsa; Creighton, Amie; Sleep, Gillian; Clark, James; Teboul, Lydia; Fray, Martin; Caulder, Adam; Loeffler, Jorik; Codner, Gemma; Cleak, James; Johnson, Sara; Szoke-Kovacs, Zsombor; Radage, Adam; Maritati, Marina; Mianne, Joffrey; Gardiner, Wendy; Allen, Susan; Cater, Heather; Stewart, Michelle; Keskivali-Bond, Piia; Sinclair, Caroline; Brown, Ellen; Doe, Brendan; Wardle-Jones, Hannah; Grau, Evelyn; Griggs, Nicola; Woods, Mike; Kundi, Helen; Griffiths, Mark N. D.; Kipp, Christian; Melvin, David G.; Raj, Navis P. S.; Holroyd, Simon A.; Gannon, David J.; Alcantara, Rafael; Galli, Antonella; Hooks, Yvette E.; Tudor, Catherine L.; Green, Angela L.; Kussy, Fiona L.; Tuck, Elizabeth J.; Siragher, Emma J.; Maguire, Simon A.; Lafont, David T.; Vancollie, Valerie E.; Pearson, Selina A.; Gates, Amy S.; Sanderson, Mark; Shannon, Carl; Anthony, Lauren F. E.; Sumowski, Maksymilian T.; McLaren, Robbie S. B.; Swiatkowska, Agnieszka; Isherwood, Christopher M.; Cambridge, Emma L; Wilson, Heather M.; Caetano, Susana S.; Mazzeo, Cecilia Icoresi; Dabrowska, Monika H.; Lillistone, Charlotte; Estabel, Jeanne; Maguire, Anna Karin B.; Roberson, Laura-Anne; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Birling, Marie-Christine; Marie, Wattenhofer-Donze; Jacquot, Sylvie; Ayadi, Abdel; Ali-Hadji, Dalila; Charles, Philippe; André, Philippe; Le Marchand, Elise; El Amri, Amal; Vasseur, Laurent; Aguilar-Pimentel, Antonio; Becker, Lore; Treise, Irina; Moreth, Kristin; Stoeger, Tobias; Amarie, Oana V.; Neff, Frauke; Wurst, Wolfgang; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Ollert, Markus; Klopstock, Thomas; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Marschall, Susan; Brommage, Robert; Steinkamp, Ralph; Lengger, Christoph; Östereicher, Manuela A.; Maier, Holger; Stoeger, Claudia; Leuchtenberger, Stefanie; Yildrim, AliÖ; Garrett, Lillian; Hölter, Sabine M; Zimprich, Annemarie; Seisenberger, Claudia; Bürger, Antje; Graw, Jochen; Eickelberg, Oliver; Zimmer, Andreas; Wolf, Eckhard; Busch, Dirk H; Klingenspor, Martin; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Beckers, Johannes; Rathkolb, Birgit; Rozman, Jan; Wakana, Shigeharu; West, David; Wells, Sara; Westerberg, Henrik; Yaacoby, Shay; White, Jacqueline K.

    2017-01-01

    The role of sex in biomedical studies has often been overlooked, despite evidence of sexually dimorphic effects in some biological studies. Here, we used high-throughput phenotype data from 14,250 wildtype and 40,192 mutant mice (representing 2,186 knockout lines), analysed for up to 234 traits, and found a large proportion of mammalian traits both in wildtype and mutants are influenced by sex. This result has implications for interpreting disease phenotypes in animal models and humans. PMID:28650954

  2. Iris phenotypes and pigment dispersion caused by genes influencing pigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Michael G; Hawes, Norman L; Trantow, Colleen M; Chang, Bo; John, Simon W M

    2008-10-01

    Spontaneous mutations altering mouse coat colors have been a classic resource for discovery of numerous molecular pathways. Although often overlooked, the mouse iris is also densely pigmented and easily observed, thus representing a similarly powerful opportunity for studying pigment cell biology. Here, we present an analysis of iris phenotypes among 16 mouse strains with mutations influencing melanosomes. Many of these strains exhibit biologically and medically relevant phenotypes, including pigment dispersion, a common feature of several human ocular diseases. Pigment dispersion was identified in several strains with mutant alleles known to influence melanosomes, including beige, light, and vitiligo. Pigment dispersion was also detected in the recently arising spontaneous coat color variant, nm2798. We have identified the nm2798 mutation as a missense mutation in the Dct gene, an identical re-occurrence of the slaty light mutation. These results suggest that dysregulated events of melanosomes can be potent contributors to the pigment dispersion phenotype. Combined, these findings illustrate the utility of studying iris phenotypes as a means of discovering new pathways, and re-linking old ones, to processes of pigmented cells in health and disease.

  3. Testing the phenotype-linked fertility hypothesis in the presence and absence of inbreeding

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Forstmeier, W.; Ihle, M.; Opatová, Pavlína; Martin, K.; Knief, U.; Albrechtová, Jana; Albrecht, Tomáš; Kempenaers, B.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 5 (2017), s. 968-976 ISSN 1010-061X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP506/12/2472 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : display behaviour * mate choice * phenotype-linked fertility hypothesis * precopulatory traits * sexual selection * sperm abnormalities * sperm quality * sperm velocity Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Genetics and heredity (medical genetics to be 3) Impact factor: 2.792, year: 2016

  4. A KAS2 cDNA complements the phenotypes of the Arabidopsis fab1 mutant that differs in a single residue bordering the substrate binding pocket

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsson, A.S.; LaBrie, S.T.; Kinney, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    The fab1 mutant of Arabidopsis is partially deficient in activity of ß-ketoacyl-[acyl carrier protein] synthase II (KAS II). This defect results in increased levels of 16 : 0 fatty acid and is associated with damage and death of the mutants at low temperature. Transformation of fab1 plants with a c......DNA from Brassica napus encoding a KAS II enzyme resulted in complementation of both mutant phenotypes. The dual complementation by expression of the single gene proves that low-temperature damage is a consequence of altered membrane unsaturation. The fab1 mutation is a single nucleotide change...... chain to bend. For functional analysis the equivalent Leu207Phe mutation was introduced into the fabB gene encoding the E. coli KAS I enzyme. Compared to wild-type, the Leu207Phe protein showed a 10-fold decrease in binding affinity for the fatty acid substrate, exhibited a modified behavior during size...

  5. Transgenic fatal familial insomnia mice indicate prion infectivity-independent mechanisms of pathogenesis and phenotypic expression of disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihssane Bouybayoune

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Fatal familial insomnia (FFI and a genetic form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD178 are clinically different prion disorders linked to the D178N prion protein (PrP mutation. The disease phenotype is determined by the 129 M/V polymorphism on the mutant allele, which is thought to influence D178N PrP misfolding, leading to the formation of distinctive prion strains with specific neurotoxic properties. However, the mechanism by which misfolded variants of mutant PrP cause different diseases is not known. We generated transgenic (Tg mice expressing the mouse PrP homolog of the FFI mutation. These mice synthesize a misfolded form of mutant PrP in their brains and develop a neurological illness with severe sleep disruption, highly reminiscent of FFI and different from that of analogously generated Tg(CJD mice modeling CJD178. No prion infectivity was detectable in Tg(FFI and Tg(CJD brains by bioassay or protein misfolding cyclic amplification, indicating that mutant PrP has disease-encoding properties that do not depend on its ability to propagate its misfolded conformation. Tg(FFI and Tg(CJD neurons have different patterns of intracellular PrP accumulation associated with distinct morphological abnormalities of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi, suggesting that mutation-specific alterations of secretory transport may contribute to the disease phenotype.

  6. Repair-defective mutants of Alteromonas espejiana, the host for bacteriophage PM2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerler, B.R.; Wallace, S.S.

    1984-01-01

    The in vivo repair processes of Alteromonas espejiana, the host for bacteriophage PM2, were characterized, and UV- and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS)-sensitive mutants were isolated. Wild-type A. espejiana cells were capable of photoreactivation, excision, recombination, and inducible repair. There was no detecttable pyrimidine dimer-DNA N-glycosylase activity, and pyrimidine dimer removal appeared to occur by a pathway analogous to the Escherichia coli Uvr pathway. The UV- and MMS-sensitive mutants of A. espejiana included three groups, each containing at least one mutation involved with excision, recombination, or inducible repair. One group that was UV sensitive but not sensitive to MMS or X rays showed a decreased ability to excise pyrimidine dimers. Mutants in this group were also sensitive to psoralen plus near-UV light and were phenotypically analogous to the E. coli uvr mutants. A second group was UV and MMS sensitive but not sensitive to X rays and appeared to contain mutations in a gene(s) involved in recombination repair. These recombination-deficient mutants differed from the E. coli rec mutants, which are MMS and X-ray sensitive. The third group of A. espejiana mutants was sensitive to UV, MMS, and X rays. These mutants were recombination deficient, lacked inducible repair, and were phenotypically similar to E. coli recA mutants

  7. Epilepsy, Behavioral Abnormalities, and Physiological Comorbidities in Syntaxin-Binding Protein 1 (STXBP1 Mutant Zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian P Grone

    Full Text Available Mutations in the synaptic machinery gene syntaxin-binding protein 1, STXBP1 (also known as MUNC18-1, are linked to childhood epilepsies and other neurodevelopmental disorders. Zebrafish STXBP1 homologs (stxbp1a and stxbp1b have highly conserved sequence and are prominently expressed in the larval zebrafish brain. To understand the functions of stxbp1a and stxbp1b, we generated loss-of-function mutations using CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing and studied brain electrical activity, behavior, development, heart physiology, metabolism, and survival in larval zebrafish. Homozygous stxbp1a mutants exhibited a profound lack of movement, low electrical brain activity, low heart rate, decreased glucose and mitochondrial metabolism, and early fatality compared to controls. On the other hand, homozygous stxbp1b mutants had spontaneous electrographic seizures, and reduced locomotor activity response to a movement-inducing "dark-flash" visual stimulus, despite showing normal metabolism, heart rate, survival, and baseline locomotor activity. Our findings in these newly generated mutant lines of zebrafish suggest that zebrafish recapitulate clinical phenotypes associated with human syntaxin-binding protein 1 mutations.

  8. Functional Rescue of a Misfolded Drosophila melanogaster Dopamine Transporter Mutant Associated with a Sleepless Phenotype by Pharmacological Chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasture, Ameya; El-Kasaby, Ali; Szöllősi, Daniel; Asjad, H M Mazhar; Grimm, Alexandra; Stockner, Thomas; Hummel, Thomas; Freissmuth, Michael; Sucic, Sonja

    2016-09-30

    Folding-defective mutants of the human dopamine transporter (DAT) cause a syndrome of infantile dystonia/parkinsonism. Here, we provide a proof-of-principle that the folding deficit is amenable to correction in vivo by two means, the cognate DAT ligand noribogaine and the HSP70 inhibitor, pifithrin-μ. We examined the Drosophila melanogaster (d) mutant dDAT-G108Q, which leads to a sleepless phenotype in flies harboring this mutation. Molecular dynamics simulations suggested an unstable structure of dDAT-G108Q consistent with a folding defect. This conjecture was verified; heterologously expressed dDAT-G108Q and the human (h) equivalent hDAT-G140Q were retained in the endoplasmic reticulum in a complex with endogenous folding sensors (calnexin and HSP70-1A). Incubation of the cells with noribogaine (a DAT ligand selective for the inward-facing state) and/or pifithrin-μ (an HSP70 inhibitor) restored folding of, and hence dopamine transport by, dDAT-G108Q and hDAT-G140Q. The mutated versions of DAT were confined to the cell bodies of the dopaminergic neurons in the fly brain and failed to reach the axonal compartments. Axonal delivery was restored, and sleep time was increased to normal length (from 300 to 1000 min/day) if the dDAT-G108Q-expressing flies were treated with noribogaine and/or pifithrin-μ. Rescuing misfolded versions of DAT by pharmacochaperoning is of therapeutic interest; it may provide opportunities to remedy disorders arising from folding-defective mutants of human DAT and of other related SLC6 transporters. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Spectrum of mutant characters utilized in developing improved cultivars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donini, B.; Kawai, T.; Micke, A.

    1984-01-01

    Although about 500 cultivars are known to have been developed by using induced mutations, the range of mutant traits seems to be rather narrow. Mutant traits have mostly been used that can be detected visually on an individual plant basis. However, in the background of such mutants other valuable mutations have been found in later generations. In cross-breeding with mutants valuable characteristics occurred, which could not be predicted from the phenotypes of the parents. It is concluded that improved attributes in the released mutant varieties do not comprise the entire genetic variation that could derive from mutagenesis. Current selection techniques are inadequate to exploit the full potential of mutagenesis for plant breeding. (author)

  10. Poliovirus Mutants Resistant to Neutralization with Soluble Cell Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Gerardo; Peters, David; Racaniello, Vincent R.

    1990-12-01

    Poliovirus mutants resistant to neutralization with soluble cellular receptor were isolated. Replication of soluble receptor-resistant (srr) mutants was blocked by a monoclonal antibody directed against the HeLa cell receptor for poliovirus, indicating that the mutants use this receptor to enter cells. The srr mutants showed reduced binding to HeLa cells and cell membranes. However, the reduced binding phenotype did not have a major impact on viral replication, as judged by plaque size and one-step growth curves. These results suggest that the use of soluble receptors as antiviral agents could lead to the selection of neutralization-resistant mutants that are able to bind cell surface receptors, replicate, and cause disease.

  11. Defective glycinergic synaptic transmission in zebrafish motility mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromi Hirata

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycine is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the spinal cord and brainstem. Recently, in vivo analysis of glycinergic synaptic transmission has been pursued in zebrafish using molecular genetics. An ENU mutagenesis screen identified two behavioral mutants that are defective in glycinergic synaptic transmission. Zebrafish bandoneon (beo mutants have a defect in glrbb, one of the duplicated glycine receptor (GlyR β subunit genes. These mutants exhibit a loss of glycinergic synaptic transmission due to a lack of synaptic aggregation of GlyRs. Due to the consequent loss of reciprocal inhibition of motor circuits between the two sides of the spinal cord, motor neurons activate simultaneously on both sides resulting in bilateral contraction of axial muscles of beo mutants, eliciting the so-called ‘accordion’ phenotype. Similar defects in GlyR subunit genes have been observed in several mammals and are the basis for human hyperekplexia/startle disease. By contrast, zebrafish shocked (sho mutants have a defect in slc6a9, encoding GlyT1, a glycine transporter that is expressed by astroglial cells surrounding the glycinergic synapse in the hindbrain and spinal cord. GlyT1 mediates rapid uptake of glycine from the synaptic cleft, terminating synaptic transmission. In zebrafish sho mutants, there appears to be elevated extracellular glycine resulting in persistent inhibition of postsynaptic neurons and subsequent reduced motility, causing the ‘twitch once’ phenotype. We review current knowledge regarding zebrafish ‘accordion’ and ‘twitch once’ mutants, including beo and sho, and report the identification of a new α2 subunit that revises the phylogeny of zebrafish GlyRs.

  12. Defective Glycinergic Synaptic Transmission in Zebrafish Motility Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Hiromi; Carta, Eloisa; Yamanaka, Iori; Harvey, Robert J.; Kuwada, John Y.

    2009-01-01

    Glycine is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the spinal cord and brainstem. Recently, in vivo analysis of glycinergic synaptic transmission has been pursued in zebrafish using molecular genetics. An ENU mutagenesis screen identified two behavioral mutants that are defective in glycinergic synaptic transmission. Zebrafish bandoneon (beo) mutants have a defect in glrbb, one of the duplicated glycine receptor (GlyR) β subunit genes. These mutants exhibit a loss of glycinergic synaptic transmission due to a lack of synaptic aggregation of GlyRs. Due to the consequent loss of reciprocal inhibition of motor circuits between the two sides of the spinal cord, motor neurons activate simultaneously on both sides resulting in bilateral contraction of axial muscles of beo mutants, eliciting the so-called ‘accordion’ phenotype. Similar defects in GlyR subunit genes have been observed in several mammals and are the basis for human hyperekplexia/startle disease. By contrast, zebrafish shocked (sho) mutants have a defect in slc6a9, encoding GlyT1, a glycine transporter that is expressed by astroglial cells surrounding the glycinergic synapse in the hindbrain and spinal cord. GlyT1 mediates rapid uptake of glycine from the synaptic cleft, terminating synaptic transmission. In zebrafish sho mutants, there appears to be elevated extracellular glycine resulting in persistent inhibition of postsynaptic neurons and subsequent reduced motility, causing the ‘twitch-once’ phenotype. We review current knowledge regarding zebrafish ‘accordion’ and ‘twitch-once’ mutants, including beo and sho, and report the identification of a new α2 subunit that revises the phylogeny of zebrafish GlyRs. PMID:20161699

  13. Behavioral Actions of Alcohol: Phenotypic Relations from Multivariate Analysis of Mutant Mouse Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blednov, Yuri A.; Mayfield, R. Dayne; Belknap, John; Harris, R. Adron

    2012-01-01

    Behavioral studies of genetically diverse mice have proven powerful for determining relationships between phenotypes and have been widely used in alcohol research. Most of these studies rely on naturally occurring genetic polymorphisms among inbred strains and selected lines. Another approach is to introduce variation by engineering single gene mutations in mice. We have tested 37 different mutant mice and their wild type controls for a variety (31) of behaviors and have mined this dataset by K-means clustering and analysis of correlations. We found a correlation between a stress-related response (activity in a novel environment) and alcohol consumption and preference for saccharin. We confirmed several relationships detected in earlier genetic studies including positive correlation of alcohol consumption with saccharin consumption, and negative correlations with conditioned taste aversion and alcohol withdrawal severity. Introduction of single gene mutations either eliminated or greatly diminished these correlations. The three tests of alcohol consumption used (continuous two bottle choice, and two limited access tests: Drinking In the Dark and Sustained High Alcohol Consumption) share a relationship with saccharin consumption, but differ from each other in their correlation networks. We suggest that alcohol consumption is controlled by multiple physiological systems where single gene mutations can disrupt the networks of such systems. PMID:22405477

  14. Phenotypic characterization of adenovirus type 12 temperature-sensitive mutants in productive infection and transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hama, S; Kimura, G

    1980-01-01

    Eleven temperature-sensitive mutants of adenovirus type 12, capable of forming plaques in human cells at 33 C but not at 39.5 C, were isolated from a stock of a wild-type strain after treatment with either nitrous acid or hydroxylamine. Complementation tests in doubly infected human cells permitted a tentative assignment of eight of these mutants to six complementation groups. Temperature-shift experiments revealed that one mutant is affected early and most of the other mutants are affected late. Only the early mutant, H12ts505, was temperature sensitive in viral DNA replication. Infectious virions of all the mutants except H12ts505 and two of the late mutants produced at 33 C, appeared to be more heat labile than those of the wild type. Only H12ts505 was temperature sensitive for the establishment of transformation of rat 3Y1 cells. One of the late mutants (H12ts504) had an increased transforming ability at the permissive temperature. Results of temperature-shift transformation experiments suggest that a viral function affected in H12ts505 is required for "initiation" of transformation. Some of the growth properties of H12ts505-transformed cells were also temperature dependent, suggesting that a functional expression of a gene mutation in H12ts505 is required to maintain at least some aspects of the transformed state.

  15. Isolation of glutathione-deficient mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kistler, M.; Eckardt, F.; Summer, K.-H.

    1986-01-01

    Glutathione-deficient (gsh - ) mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were isolated after UV treatment using MNNG as selective agent. For genetic and biochemical characterization 5 mutant strains were chosen which exhibited considerably decreased residual GSH contents varying from 2 to 6% of the wild-type levels. All 5 isolates showed a 2:2 segregation of the gsh - :GSH + phenotypes alluding to a monogenic recessive mutation. Complementation analysis indicates that all gsh - mutants belong to one complementation group. (Auth.)

  16. Phenotypic and epistatic grouping of hypo- and hyper-rec mus mutants in Aspergillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafer, E; Chae, S K

    1994-03-01

    The mutants musK to musS of Aspergillus nidulans are sensitive to methyl-methanesulfonate (MMS) and several of them are meiotic-defective and alter mitotic recombination frequencies. All were found to be cross-sensitive to 4-nitro-quinoline-N-oxide (4-NQO) but unexpectedly none of them was hypersensitive to gamma-rays and few to UV light. Double mus; uvs mutants were constructed to test for interactions with uvs mutations of the four epistatic groups of Aspergillus, "UvsF", "UvsC", "UvsI", and "UvsB". All meiotic-defective mus mutations caused some lethal interactions, usually with uvsF. None of them showed epistasis with UvsF or UvsB group mutants and one, musO, may represent a new group. Three mus mutations that affect recombination were assigned to the UvsC group, namely musN and K, and also musL which is recombination-defective and closely resembles uvsC. While uvsC mutants are mutators and lack UV-mutagenesis, most mus mutants had no effects on mutation. Only musR, which appeared epistatic with uvsI, showed reduced UV-reversion frequencies similar to uvsI. The recombination-proficient mus mutants appeared to be epistatic with more than one group, but in several cases sensitivities were slight and overlaps insufficient to obtain corroborating results with MMS and 4-NQO.

  17. Human GLTP and mutant forms of ACD11 suppress cell death in the Arabidopsis acd11 mutant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nikolaj H T; McKinney, Lea V; Pike, Helen

    2008-01-01

    The Arabidopsis acd11 mutant exhibits runaway, programmed cell death due to the loss of a putative sphingosine transfer protein (ACD11) with homology to mammalian GLTP. We demonstrate that transgenic expression in Arabidopsis thaliana of human GLTP partially suppressed the phenotype of the acd11...

  18. Phenotypic, fermentation characterization, and resistance mechanism analysis of bacteriophage-resistant mutants of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus isolated from traditional Chinese dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Kaibo; Fang, Wei; Zheng, Baodong; Miao, Song; Huo, Guicheng

    2018-03-01

    Bacteriophage infection is a large factor in dairy industrial production failure on the basis of pure inoculation fermentation, and developing good commercial starter cultures from wild dairy products and improving the environmental vigor of starter cultures by enhancing their phage resistance are still the most effective solutions. Here we used a spontaneous isolation method to obtain bacteriophage-resistant mutants of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus strains that are used in traditional Chinese fermented dairy products. We analyzed their phenotypes, fermentation characteristics, and resistance mechanisms. The results showed that bacteriophage-insensitive mutants (BIM) BIM8 and BIM12 had high bacteriophage resistance while exhibiting fermentation and coagulation attributes that were as satisfying as those of their respective parent strains KLDS1.1016 and KLDS1.1028. According to the attachment receptor detection, mutants BIM8 and BIM12 exhibited reduced absorption to bacteriophage phiLdb compared with their respective bacteriophage-sensitive parent strains because of changes to the polysaccharides or teichoic acids connected to their peptidoglycan layer. Additionally, genes, including HSDR, HSDM, and HSDS, encoding 3 subunits of a type I restriction-modification system were identified in their respective parent strains. We also discovered that HSDR and HSDM were highly conserved but that HSDS was variable because it is responsible for the DNA specificity of the complex. The late lysis that occurred only in strain KLDS1.1016 and not in strain KLDS1.1028 suggests that the former and its mutant BIM8 also may have an activatable restriction-modification mechanism. We conclude that the L. bulgaricus BIM8 and BIM12 mutants have great potential in the dairy industry as starter cultures, and their phage-resistance mechanism was effective mainly due to the adsorption interference and restriction-modification system. Copyright © 2018 American Dairy Science

  19. Mutant power: using mutant allele collections for yeast functional genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Kaitlyn L; Kumar, Anuj

    2016-03-01

    The budding yeast has long served as a model eukaryote for the functional genomic analysis of highly conserved signaling pathways, cellular processes and mechanisms underlying human disease. The collection of reagents available for genomics in yeast is extensive, encompassing a growing diversity of mutant collections beyond gene deletion sets in the standard wild-type S288C genetic background. We review here three main types of mutant allele collections: transposon mutagen collections, essential gene collections and overexpression libraries. Each collection provides unique and identifiable alleles that can be utilized in genome-wide, high-throughput studies. These genomic reagents are particularly informative in identifying synthetic phenotypes and functions associated with essential genes, including those modeled most effectively in complex genetic backgrounds. Several examples of genomic studies in filamentous/pseudohyphal backgrounds are provided here to illustrate this point. Additionally, the limitations of each approach are examined. Collectively, these mutant allele collections in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the related pathogenic yeast Candida albicans promise insights toward an advanced understanding of eukaryotic molecular and cellular biology. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Highly variable penetrance of abnormal phenotypes in embryonic lethal knockout mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robert; Geyer, Stefan H.; Reissig, Lukas; Rose, Julia; Szumska, Dorota; Hardman, Emily; Prin, Fabrice; McGuire, Christina; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; White, Jacqui; Galli, Antonella; Tudor, Catherine; Tuck, Elizabeth; Mazzeo, Cecilia Icoresi; Smith, James C.; Robertson, Elizabeth; Adams, David J.; Mohun, Timothy; Weninger, Wolfgang J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Identifying genes that are essential for mouse embryonic development and survival through term is a powerful and unbiased way to discover possible genetic determinants of human developmental disorders. Characterising the changes in mouse embryos that result from ablation of lethal genes is a necessary first step towards uncovering their role in normal embryonic development and establishing any correlates amongst human congenital abnormalities. Methods: Here we present results gathered to date in the Deciphering the Mechanisms of Developmental Disorders (DMDD) programme, cataloguing the morphological defects identified from comprehensive imaging of 220 homozygous mutant and 114 wild type embryos from 42 lethal and subviable lines, analysed at E14.5. Results: Virtually all mutant embryos show multiple abnormal phenotypes and amongst the 42 lines these affect most organ systems. Within each mutant line, the phenotypes of individual embryos form distinct but overlapping sets. Subcutaneous edema, malformations of the heart or great vessels, abnormalities in forebrain morphology and the musculature of the eyes are all prevalent phenotypes, as is loss or abnormal size of the hypoglossal nerve. Conclusions: Overall, the most striking finding is that no matter how profound the malformation, each phenotype shows highly variable penetrance within a mutant line. These findings have challenging implications for efforts to identify human disease correlates. PMID:27996060

  1. Analysis of a Partial Male-Sterile Mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana Isolated from a Low-Energy Argon Ion Beam Mutagenized Pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Min; Bian Po; Wu Yuejin; Yu Zengliang

    2008-01-01

    A screen for Arabidopsis fertility mutants, mutagenized by low-energy argon ion beam, yielded two partial male-sterile mutants tc243-1 and tc243-2 which have similar phenotypes. tc243-2 was investigated in detail. The segregation ratio of the mutant phenotypes in the M2 pools suggested that mutation behaved as single Mendelian recessive mutations. tc243 showed a series of mutant phenotypes, among which partial male-sterile was its striking mutant characteristic. Phenotype analysis indicates that there are four factors leading to male sterility. a. Floral organs normally develop inside the closed bud, but the anther filaments do not elongate sufficiently to position the locules above the stigma at anthesis. b. The anther locules do not dehisce at the time of flower opening (although limited dehiscence occurs later). c. Pollens of mutant plants develop into several types of pollens at the trinucleated stage, as determined by staining with DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole), which shows a variable size, shape and number of nucleus. d. The viability of pollens is lower than that of the wild type on the germination test in vivo and vitro.

  2. Developmental delay in a Streptomyces venezuelae glgE null mutant is associated with the accumulation of α-maltose 1-phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Farzana; Bibb, Maureen J; Barclay, J Elaine; Findlay, Kim C; Bornemann, Stephen

    2016-07-01

    The GlgE pathway is thought to be responsible for the conversion of trehalose into a glycogen-like α-glucan polymer in bacteria. Trehalose is first converted to maltose, which is phosphorylated by maltose kinase Pep2 to give α-maltose 1-phosphate. This is the donor substrate of the maltosyl transferase GlgE that is known to extend α-1,4-linked maltooligosaccharides, which are thought to be branched with α-1,6 linkages. The genome of Streptomyces venezuelae contains all the genes coding for the GlgE pathway enzymes but none of those of related pathways, including glgC and glgA of the glycogen pathway. This provides an opportunity to study the GlgE pathway in isolation. The genes of the GlgE pathway were upregulated at the onset of sporulation, consistent with the known timing of α-glucan deposition. A constructed ΔglgE null mutant strain was viable but showed a delayed developmental phenotype when grown on maltose, giving less cell mass and delayed sporulation. Pre-spore cells and spores of the mutant were frequently double the length of those of the wild-type, implying impaired cross-wall formation, and spores showed reduced tolerance to stress. The mutant accumulated α-maltose 1-phosphate and maltose but no α-glucan. Therefore, the GlgE pathway is necessary and sufficient for polymer biosynthesis. Growth of the ΔglgE mutant on galactose and that of a Δpep2 mutant on maltose were analysed. In both cases, neither accumulation of α-maltose 1-phosphate/α-glucan nor a developmental delay was observed. Thus, high levels of α-maltose 1-phosphate are responsible for the developmental phenotype of the ΔglgE mutant, rather than the lack of α-glucan.

  3. Human liver cell trafficking mutants: characterization and whole exome sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Yuan

    Full Text Available The HuH7 liver cell mutant Trf1 is defective in membrane trafficking and is complemented by the casein kinase 2α subunit CK2α''. Here we identify characteristic morphologies, trafficking and mutational changes in six additional HuH7 mutants Trf2-Trf7. Trf1 cells were previously shown to be severely defective in gap junction functions. Using a Lucifer yellow transfer assay, remarkable attenuation of gap junction communication was revealed in each of the mutants Trf2-Trf7. Electron microscopy and light microscopy of thiamine pyrophosphatase showed that several mutants exhibited fragmented Golgi apparatus cisternae compared to parental HuH7 cells. Intracellular trafficking was investigated using assays of transferrin endocytosis and recycling and VSV G secretion. Surface binding of transferrin was reduced in all six Trf2-Trf7 mutants, which generally correlated with the degree of reduced expression of the transferrin receptor at the cell surface. The mutants displayed the same transferrin influx rates as HuH7, and for efflux rate, only Trf6 differed, having a slower transferrin efflux rate than HuH7. The kinetics of VSV G transport along the exocytic pathway were altered in Trf2 and Trf5 mutants. Genetic changes unique to particular Trf mutants were identified by exome sequencing, and one was investigated in depth. The novel mutation Ile34Phe in the GTPase RAB22A was identified in Trf4. RNA interference knockdown of RAB22A or overexpression of RAB22AI34F in HuH7 cells caused phenotypic changes characteristic of the Trf4 mutant. In addition, the Ile34Phe mutation reduced both guanine nucleotide binding and hydrolysis activities of RAB22A. Thus, the RAB22A Ile34Phe mutation appears to contribute to the Trf4 mutant phenotype.

  4. Defects of mutant DNMT1 are linked to a spectrum of neurological disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baets, Jonathan; Duan, Xiaohui; Wu, Yanhong; Smith, Gordon; Seeley, William W.; Mademan, Inès; McGrath, Nicole M.; Beadell, Noah C.; Khoury, Julie; Botuyan, Maria-Victoria; Mer, Georges; Worrell, Gregory A.; Hojo, Kaori; DeLeon, Jessica; Laura, Matilde; Liu, Yo-Tsen; Senderek, Jan; Weis, Joachim; Van den Bergh, Peter; Merrill, Shana L.; Reilly, Mary M.; Houlden, Henry; Grossman, Murray; Scherer, Steven S.; De Jonghe, Peter; Dyck, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    We report a broader than previously appreciated clinical spectrum for hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1E (HSAN1E) and a potential pathogenic mechanism for DNA methyltransferase (DNMT1) mutations. The clinical presentations and genetic characteristics of nine newly identified HSAN1E kinships (45 affected subjects) were investigated. Five novel mutations of DNMT1 were discovered; p.C353F, p.T481P, p.P491L, p.Y524D and p.I531N, all within the target-sequence domain, and two mutations (p.T481P, p.P491L) arising de novo. Recently, HSAN1E has been suggested as an allelic disorder of autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness and narcolepsy. Our results indicate that all the mutations causal for HSAN1E are located in the middle part or N-terminus end of the TS domain, whereas all the mutations causal for autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness and narcolepsy are located in the C-terminus end of the TS domain. The impact of the seven causal mutations in this cohort was studied by cellular localization experiments. The binding efficiency of the mutant DNMT proteins at the replication foci and heterochromatin were evaluated. Phenotypic characterizations included electromyography, brain magnetic resonance and nuclear imaging, electroencephalography, sural nerve biopsies, sleep evaluation and neuropsychometric testing. The average survival of HSAN1E was 53.6 years. [standard deviation = 7.7, range 43–75 years], and mean onset age was 37.7 years. (standard deviation = 8.6, range 18–51 years). Expanded phenotypes include myoclonic seizures, auditory or visual hallucinations, and renal failure. Hypersomnia, rapid eye movement sleep disorder and/or narcolepsy were identified in 11 subjects. Global brain atrophy was found in 12 of 14 who had brain MRI. EEGs showed low frequency (delta waves) frontal-predominant abnormality in five of six patients. Marked variability in cognitive deficits was observed, but the majority of patients (89%) developed

  5. Molecular analysis of waxy mutants in rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yatou, O.; Amano, E.

    1990-01-01

    Full text: The 'waxy' gene is a structural gene coding a glycosyl transferase which synthesises amylose in the endosperm tissue. 'Non-waxy' rice cultivars have an active gene and their amylose content is 18-25% depending upon gene performance and modifier genes. In 'waxy' rice, no amylose is found because the enzyme is absent. In mutants induced by gamma rays, neutrons, EI or EMS, amylose content ranged from 0 to 20%, i.e. there are intermediate phenotypes as well. Some of them had the same amount of the enzyme as a 'non-waxy' cultivar, even fully 'waxy' mutants showed a certain amount of the enzyme. This suggests that in mutants there may be no structural change in the enzyme gene but the enzyme produced might be less active. By molecular analysis of the mutants' genes it was found that only two mutants induced by thermal neutrons show structural alterations, the changes in other mutants are either too small to be detected by Southern analysis or are outside the structural gene in question. (author)

  6. Genome-scale metabolic model of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and the reconciliation of in silico/in vivo mutant growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Over the last decade, the genome-scale metabolic models have been playing increasingly important roles in elucidating metabolic characteristics of biological systems for a wide range of applications including, but not limited to, system-wide identification of drug targets and production of high value biochemical compounds. However, these genome-scale metabolic models must be able to first predict known in vivo phenotypes before it is applied towards these applications with high confidence. One benchmark for measuring the in silico capability in predicting in vivo phenotypes is the use of single-gene mutant libraries to measure the accuracy of knockout simulations in predicting mutant growth phenotypes. Results Here we employed a systematic and iterative process, designated as Reconciling In silico/in vivo mutaNt Growth (RING), to settle discrepancies between in silico prediction and in vivo observations to a newly reconstructed genome-scale metabolic model of the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, SpoMBEL1693. The predictive capabilities of the genome-scale metabolic model in predicting single-gene mutant growth phenotypes were measured against the single-gene mutant library of S. pombe. The use of RING resulted in improving the overall predictive capability of SpoMBEL1693 by 21.5%, from 61.2% to 82.7% (92.5% of the negative predictions matched the observed growth phenotype and 79.7% the positive predictions matched the observed growth phenotype). Conclusion This study presents validation and refinement of a newly reconstructed metabolic model of the yeast S. pombe, through improving the metabolic model’s predictive capabilities by reconciling the in silico predicted growth phenotypes of single-gene knockout mutants, with experimental in vivo growth data. PMID:22631437

  7. Lipid metabolic perturbation is an early-onset phenotype in adult spinster mutants: a Drosophila model for lysosomal storage disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebbar, Sarita; Khandelwal, Avinash; Jayashree, R; Hindle, Samantha J; Chiang, Yin Ning; Yew, Joanne Y; Sweeney, Sean T; Schwudke, Dominik

    2017-12-15

    Intracellular accumulation of lipids and swollen dysfunctional lysosomes are linked to several neurodegenerative diseases, including lysosomal storage disorders (LSD). Detailed characterization of lipid metabolic changes in relation to the onset and progression of neurodegeneration is currently missing. We systematically analyzed lipid perturbations in spinster (spin) mutants, a Drosophila model of LSD-like neurodegeneration. Our results highlight an imbalance in brain ceramide and sphingosine in the early stages of neurodegeneration, preceding the accumulation of endomembranous structures, manifestation of altered behavior, and buildup of lipofuscin. Manipulating levels of ceramidase and altering these lipids in spin mutants allowed us to conclude that ceramide homeostasis is the driving force in disease progression and is integral to spin function in the adult nervous system. We identified 29 novel physical interaction partners of Spin and focused on the lipid carrier protein, Lipophorin (Lpp). A subset of Lpp and Spin colocalize in the brain and within organs specialized for lipid metabolism (fat bodies and oenocytes). Reduced Lpp protein was observed in spin mutant tissues. Finally, increased levels of lipid metabolites produced by oenocytes in spin mutants allude to a functional interaction between Spin and Lpp, underscoring the systemic nature of lipid perturbation in LSD. © 2017 Hebbar et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  8. Shallow Boomerang-shaped Influenza Hemagglutinin G13A Mutant Structure Promotes Leaky Membrane Fusion*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Alex L.; Tamm, Lukas K.

    2010-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that an angled boomerang-shaped structure of the influenza hemagglutinin (HA) fusion domain is critical for virus entry into host cells by membrane fusion. Because the acute angle of ∼105° of the wild-type fusion domain promotes efficient non-leaky membrane fusion, we asked whether different angles would still support fusion and thus facilitate virus entry. Here, we show that the G13A fusion domain mutant produces a new leaky fusion phenotype. The mutant fusion domain structure was solved by NMR spectroscopy in a lipid environment at fusion pH. The mutant adopted a boomerang structure similar to that of wild type but with a shallower kink angle of ∼150°. G13A perturbed the structure of model membranes to a lesser degree than wild type but to a greater degree than non-fusogenic fusion domain mutants. The strength of G13A binding to lipid bilayers was also intermediate between that of wild type and non-fusogenic mutants. These membrane interactions provide a clear link between structure and function of influenza fusion domains: an acute angle is required to promote clean non-leaky fusion suitable for virus entry presumably by interaction of the fusion domain with the transmembrane domain deep in the lipid bilayer. A shallower angle perturbs the bilayer of the target membrane so that it becomes leaky and unable to form a clean fusion pore. Mutants with no fixed boomerang angle interacted with bilayers weakly and did not promote any fusion or membrane perturbation. PMID:20826788

  9. Tetracycline hypersensitivity of an ezrA mutant links GalE and TseB (YpmB to cell division

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela eGamba

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cell division in bacteria is initiated by the polymerization of FtsZ into a ring-like structure at midcell that functions as a scaffold for the other cell division proteins. In Bacillus subtilis, the conserved cell division protein EzrA is involved in modulation of Z-ring formation and coordination of septal peptidoglycan synthesis. Here, we show that an ezrA mutant is hypersensitive to tetracycline, even when the tetracycline efflux pump TetA is present. This effect is not related to the protein translation inhibiting activity of tetracycline. Overexpression of FtsL suppresses this phenotype, which appears to be related to the intrinsic low FtsL levels in an ezrA mutant background. A transposon screen indicated that the tetracycline effect can also be suppressed by overproduction of the cell division protein ZapA. In addition, tetracycline sensitivity could be suppressed by transposon insertions in galE and the unknown gene ypmB, which was renamed tseB (tetracycline sensitivity suppressor of ezrA. GalE is an epimerase using UDP-glucose and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine as substrate. Deletion of this protein bypasses the synthetic lethality of zapA ezrA and sepF ezrA double mutations, indicating that GalE influences cell division. The transmembrane protein TseB contains an extracytoplasmic peptidase domain, and a GFP fusion shows that the protein is enriched at cell division sites. A tseB deletion causes a shorter cell phenotype, indicating that TseB plays a role in cell division. Why a deletion of ezrA renders B. subtilis cells hypersensitive for tetracycline remains unclear. We speculate that this phenomenon is related to the tendency of tetracycline analogues to accumulate into the lipid bilayer, which may destabilize certain membrane proteins.

  10. Identical substitutions in magnesium chelatase paralogs result in chlorophyll deficient soybean mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    The soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) chlorophyll deficient line MinnGold is a spontaneous mutant characterized by yellow foliage. Map-based cloning and transgenic complementation revealed that the mutant phenotype is caused by a non-synonymous nucleotide substitution in the third exon of a Mg-chelat...

  11. Nonbehavioral Selection for Pawns, Mutants of PARAMECIUM AURELIA with Decreased Excitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schein, Stanley J.

    1976-01-01

    The reversal response in Paramecium aurelia is mediated by calcium which carries the inward current during excitation. Electrophysiological studies indicate that strontium and barium can also carry the inward current. Exposure to high concentrations of barium rapidly paralyzes and later kills wild-type paramecia. Following mutagenesis with nitrosoguanidine, seven mutants which continued to swim in the `high-barium' solution were selected. All of the mutants show decreased reversal behavior, with phenotypes ranging from extremely non-reversing (`extreme' pawns) to nearly wild-type reversal behavior (`partial' pawns). The mutations fall into three complementation groups, identical to the pwA, pwB, and pwC genes of Kung et al. (1975). All of the pwA and pwB mutants withstand longer exposure to barium, the pwB mutants surviving longer than the pwA mutants. Among mutants of each gene, survival is correlated with loss of reversal behavior. Double mutants (A–B, A–C, B–C), identified in the exautogamous progeny of crosses between `partial' mutants, exhibited a more extreme non-reversing phenotype than either of their single-mutant (`partial' pawn) parents.———Inability to reverse could be expected from an alteration in the calcium-activated reversal mechanism or in excitation. A normal calcium-activated structure was demonstrated in all pawns by chlorpromazine treatment. In a separate report (Schein, Bennett and Katz 1976) the results of electrophysiological investigations directly demonstrate decreased excitability in all of the mutants, a decrease due to an altered calcium activation. The studies of the genetics, the survival in barium and the electro-physiology of the pawns demonstrate that the pwA and pwB genes have different effects on calcium activation. PMID:1001878

  12. Isolation and characterisation of a dwarf rice mutant exhibiting defective gibberellins biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, S H; Gururani, M A; Lee, J W; Ahn, B-O; Chun, S-C

    2014-03-01

    We have isolated a severe dwarf mutant derived from a Ds (Dissociation) insertion mutant rice (Oryza sativa var. japonica c.v. Dongjin). This severe dwarf phenotype, has short and dark green leaves, reduced shoot growth early in the seedling stage, and later severe dwarfism with failure to initiate flowering. When treated with bioactive GA3 , mutants are restored to the normal wild-type phenotype. Reverse transcription PCR analyses of 22 candidate genes related to the gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis pathway revealed that among 22 candidate genes tested, a dwarf mutant transcript was not expressed only in one OsKS2 gene. Genetic analysis revealed that the severe dwarf phenotype was controlled by recessive mutation of a single nuclear gene. The putative OsKS2 gene was a chromosome 4-located ent-kaurene synthase (KS), encoding the enzyme that catalyses an early step of the GA biosynthesis pathway. Sequence analysis revealed that osks2 carried a 1-bp deletion in the ORF region of OsKS2, which led to a loss-of-function mutation. The expression pattern of OsKS2 in wild-type cv Dongjin, showed that it is expressed in all organs, most prominently in the stem and floral organs. Morphological characteristics of the dwarf mutant showed dramatic modifications in internal structure and external morphology. We propose that dwarfism in this mutant is caused by a point mutation in OsKS2, which plays a significant role in growth and development of higher plants. Further investigation on OsKS2 and other OsKS-like proteins is underway and may yield better understanding of the putative role of OsKS in severe dwarf mutants. © 2013 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  13. Auxin-dependent microtubule responses and seedling development are affected in a rice mutant resistant to EPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nick, P.; Yatou, O.; Furuya, M.; Lambert, A.M.

    1994-01-01

    Mutants in rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. japonica) were used to study the role of the cytoskeleton in signal-dependent morphogenesis. Mutants obtained by gamma ray irradiation were selected that failed to show inhibition of coleoptile elongation by the anti microtubular drug ethyl-N-phenylcarbamate (EPC). The mutation EPC-Resistant 31 (ER31), isolated from such a screen, caused lethality in putatively homozygous embryos. Heterozygotes exhibited drug resistance, impaired development of crown roots, and characteristic changes in the pattern of cell elongation: cell elongation was enhanced in mesocotyls and leaf sheaths, but inhibited in coleoptiles. The orientation of cortical microtubules changed correspondingly: for etiolated seedlings, compared with the wild-type, they were more transverse with respect to the long cell axis in mesocotyls and leaf sheaths, but more longitudinal in coleoptiles. In mutant coleoptiles, in contrast to wild-type, microtubules did not reorient in response to auxin, and their response to microtubule-eliminating and microtubule-stabilizing drugs was conspicuously reduced. In contrast, they responded normally to other stimuli such as gibberellins or red light. Auxin sensitivity as assayed by the dose-response for callus induction did not show any significant differences between wild-type and mutant. The mutant phenotype is interpreted in terms of an interrupted link between auxin-triggered signal transduction and microtubule reorientation. (author)

  14. Genetic and systems level analysis of Drosophila sticky/citron kinase and dFmr1 mutants reveals common regulation of genetic networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarnescu Daniela C

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Drosophila, the genes sticky and dFmr1 have both been shown to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and chromatin structure. These genes also genetically interact with Argonaute family microRNA regulators. Furthermore, in mammalian systems, both genes have been implicated in neuronal development. Given these genetic and functional similarities, we tested Drosophila sticky and dFmr1 for a genetic interaction and measured whole genome expression in both mutants to assess similarities in gene regulation. Results We found that sticky mutations can dominantly suppress a dFmr1 gain-of-function phenotype in the developing eye, while phenotypes produced by RNAi knock-down of sticky were enhanced by dFmr1 RNAi and a dFmr1 loss-of-function mutation. We also identified a large number of transcripts that were misexpressed in both mutants suggesting that sticky and dFmr1 gene products similarly regulate gene expression. By integrating gene expression data with a protein-protein interaction network, we found that mutations in sticky and dFmr1 resulted in misexpression of common gene networks, and consequently predicted additional specific phenotypes previously not known to be associated with either gene. Further phenotypic analyses validated these predictions. Conclusion These findings establish a functional link between two previously unrelated genes. Microarray analysis indicates that sticky and dFmr1 are both required for regulation of many developmental genes in a variety of cell types. The diversity of transcripts regulated by these two genes suggests a clear cause of the pleiotropy that sticky and dFmr1 mutants display and provides many novel, testable hypotheses about the functions of these genes. As both of these genes are implicated in the development and function of the mammalian brain, these results have relevance to human health as well as to understanding more general biological processes.

  15. The characteristics and stability of a range of Cox's Orange Pippin apple mutants showing different growth habits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacey, C.N.D.; Campbell, A.I.

    1979-01-01

    Seven hundred and fifty gamma-irradiated scions of Cox's Orange Pippin apple were grown to produce a V 1 generation and were then multiplied to produce a V 2 of 13158 individual trees. 272 obvious vegetative mutants, mainly dwarf or compact types, were found in this population and classified according to growth habit. These were propagated to produce clones of the mutant types (V 3 ) and a study of these clonal mutants as compared with their original (V 2 ) characteristics showed that while the vast majority of the selected mutants produced dwarf or compact clones, no clear indication of final cropping performance could be drawn from the original phenotype of the selected V 2 mutants. The majority of mutants produced were not of commercial value, and the main reasons for the rejection of V 3 clones depended, in many cases, on the phenotype of the V 2 selection. Thus while all types of V 2 mutant produced approximately the same proportion of acceptable trees, the reason for the rejection of the V 3 clones varies with the V 2 phenotype. Therefore selection can be carried out at an early stage in a mutation breeding programme to reduce the proportion of certain unwanted types such as mericlinal chimaeras as that otherwise are carried forward to yield trials. From the orchard trials of 82 mutant clones. 24 were short-listed for possible commercial introduction. All were derived from the less extreme mutant types. (Auth.)

  16. Engineering of plants with improved properties as biofuels feedstocks by vessel-specific complementation of xylan biosynthesis mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petersen Pia Damm

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cost-efficient generation of second-generation biofuels requires plant biomass that can easily be degraded into sugars and further fermented into fuels. However, lignocellulosic biomass is inherently recalcitrant toward deconstruction technologies due to the abundant lignin and cross-linked hemicelluloses. Furthermore, lignocellulosic biomass has a high content of pentoses, which are more difficult to ferment into fuels than hexoses. Engineered plants with decreased amounts of xylan in their secondary walls have the potential to render plant biomass a more desirable feedstock for biofuel production. Results Xylan is the major non-cellulosic polysaccharide in secondary cell walls, and the xylan deficient irregular xylem (irx mutants irx7, irx8 and irx9 exhibit severe dwarf growth phenotypes. The main reason for the growth phenotype appears to be xylem vessel collapse and the resulting impaired transport of water and nutrients. We developed a xylan-engineering approach to reintroduce xylan biosynthesis specifically into the xylem vessels in the Arabidopsis irx7, irx8 and irx9 mutant backgrounds by driving the expression of the respective glycosyltransferases with the vessel-specific promoters of the VND6 and VND7 transcription factor genes. The growth phenotype, stem breaking strength, and irx morphology was recovered to varying degrees. Some of the plants even exhibited increased stem strength compared to the wild type. We obtained Arabidopsis plants with up to 23% reduction in xylose levels and 18% reduction in lignin content compared to wild-type plants, while exhibiting wild-type growth patterns and morphology, as well as normal xylem vessels. These plants showed a 42% increase in saccharification yield after hot water pretreatment. The VND7 promoter yielded a more complete complementation of the irx phenotype than the VND6 promoter. Conclusions Spatial and temporal deposition of xylan in the secondary cell wall of

  17. New phenotypes generated by the G57R mutation of BUD23 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jyun-Liang; Yu, Hui-Chia; Chao, Ju-Lan; Wang, Chung; Cheng, Ming-Yuan

    2012-12-01

    BUD23 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes for a class I methyltransferase, and deletion of the gene results in slow growth and random budding phenotypes. Herein, two BUD23 mutants defective in methyltransferase activity were generated to investigate whether the phenotypes of the null mutant might be correlated with a loss in enzymatic activity. Expression at the physiological level of both D77A and G57R mutants was able to rescue the phenotypes of the bud23-null mutant. The result implied that the methyltransferase activity of the protein was not necessary for supporting normal growth and bud site selection of the cells. High-level expression of Bud23 (G57R), but not Bud23 or Bud23 (D77A), in BUD23 deletion cells failed to complement these phenotypes. However, just like Bud23, Bud23 (G57R) was localized in a DAPI-poor region in the nucleus. Distinct behaviour in Bud23 (G57R) could not be originated from a mislocalization of the protein. Over-expression of Bud23 (G57R) in null cells also produced changes in actin organization and additional septin mutant-like phenotypes. Therefore, the absence of Bud23, Bud23 (G57R) at a high level might affect the cell division of yeast cells through an as yet unidentified mechanism. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. The Janus-faced role of ezrin in "linking" cells to either normal or metastatic phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Daria; Fais, Stefano

    2009-11-15

    In the majority of eukaryotic cells, the ezrin, radixin and moesin (ERM) proteins are involved in many physiologic functions including regulation of actin cytoskeleton, control of cell shape, adhesion, motility and modulation of signal transduction pathways. In a previous study, we used a dominant negative ezrin-mutant to address ezrin involvement in remodeling of actin cytoskeleton and subsequently we depicted ezrin key role in melanoma cell migration and progression. Herein, we highlight recent advances on ezrin involvement in the metastatic phenomenon, including also some more neglected ezrin-related functions. Novel molecular processes driven by ezrin activation include: phagocytosis, acquisition of resistance to chemotherapeutics and triggering of programmed cell death signals. Recent data support an integrated role of ezrin also in development of tumor malignancy. On one hand, ezrin may be responsible of deranged execution of specific known functions such as adhesion and motility and on the other, it may also participate to unique metastatic determinants, through the establishment of aberrant linkages with tumor-related proteins. For instance, ezrin misslocalization, absence or deranged activity has started to be correlated with tumor progression in many tumors of different species, including humans. Concomitantly, ezrin may act simultaneously as a regulatory or deregulatory chaperon in both normal and tumor cells. It is still to be established whether this Janus-faced feature of ezrin is due to some unknown transforming Zelig-like property or to the fact that a tumor-associated molecule preferentially links to ezrin thus distracting it from its normal connections. However, the contribution of ezrin functional deregulation to the acquisition of the metastatic phenotype appears clear and ezrin or ezrin aberrant associations may represent good candidates for future anti-tumor therapies.

  19. Examining the virulence of Candida albicans transcription factor mutants using Galleria mellonella and mouse infection models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara eAmorim-Vaz

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to identify C. albicans transcription factors (TF involved in virulence. Although mice are considered the gold-standard model to study fungal virulence, mini-host infection models have been increasingly used. Here, barcoded TF mutants were first screened in mice by pools of strains and fungal burdens quantified in kidneys. Mutants of unannotated genes which generated a kidney fungal burden significantly different from that of wild-type were selected and individually examined in G. mellonella. In addition, mutants that could not be detected in mice were also tested in G. mellonella. Only 25 % of these mutants displayed matching phenotypes in both hosts, highlighting a significant discrepancy between the two models. To address the basis of this difference (pool or host effects, a set of 19 mutants tested in G. mellonella were also injected individually into mice. Matching fungal burden phenotypes were observed in 50 % of the cases, highlighting the bias due to host effects. In contrast, 33.4 % concordance was observed between pool and single strain infections in mice, thereby highlighting the bias introduced by the pool effect. After filtering the results obtained from the two infection models, mutants for MBF1 and ZCF6 were selected. Independent marker-free mutants were subsequently tested in both hosts to validate previous results. The MBF1 mutant showed impaired infection in both models, while the ZCF6 mutant was only significant in mice infections. The two mutants showed no obvious in vitro phenotypes compared with the wild-type, indicating that these genes might be specifically involved in in vivo adaptation.

  20. R Factor-Controlled Restriction and Modification of Deoxyribonucleic Acid: Restriction Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimori, Robert; Roulland-Dussoix, Daisy; Boyer, Herbert W.

    1972-01-01

    Restriction mutants of two different R factor-controlled host specificities (RI and RII) were isolated. All of the restriction mutants examined had a normal modification phenotype. No complementation was observed between the RI and RII host specificities. It is concluded that for each host specificity no protein subunit is shared by the restriction endonuclease and modification methylase. PMID:4565538

  1. The yeast complex I equivalent NADH dehydrogenase rescues pink1 mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Vilain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pink1 is a mitochondrial kinase involved in Parkinson's disease, and loss of Pink1 function affects mitochondrial morphology via a pathway involving Parkin and components of the mitochondrial remodeling machinery. Pink1 loss also affects the enzymatic activity of isolated Complex I of the electron transport chain (ETC; however, the primary defect in pink1 mutants is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that ETC deficiency is upstream of other pink1-associated phenotypes. We expressed Saccaromyces cerevisiae Ndi1p, an enzyme that bypasses ETC Complex I, or sea squirt Ciona intestinalis AOX, an enzyme that bypasses ETC Complex III and IV, in pink1 mutant Drosophila and find that expression of Ndi1p, but not of AOX, rescues pink1-associated defects. Likewise, loss of function of subunits that encode for Complex I-associated proteins displays many of the pink1-associated phenotypes, and these defects are rescued by Ndi1p expression. Conversely, expression of Ndi1p fails to rescue any of the parkin mutant phenotypes. Additionally, unlike pink1 mutants, fly parkin mutants do not show reduced enzymatic activity of Complex I, indicating that Ndi1p acts downstream or parallel to Pink1, but upstream or independent of Parkin. Furthermore, while increasing mitochondrial fission or decreasing mitochondrial fusion rescues mitochondrial morphological defects in pink1 mutants, these manipulations fail to significantly rescue the reduced enzymatic activity of Complex I, indicating that functional defects observed at the level of Complex I enzymatic activity in pink1 mutant mitochondria do not arise from morphological defects. Our data indicate a central role for Complex I dysfunction in pink1-associated defects, and our genetic analyses with heterologous ETC enzymes suggest that Ndi1p-dependent NADH dehydrogenase activity largely acts downstream of, or in parallel to, Pink1 but upstream of Parkin and mitochondrial remodeling.

  2. Oral treatment with Cu(II)(atsm) increases mutant SOD1 in vivo but protects motor neurons and improves the phenotype of a transgenic mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Blaine R; Lim, Nastasia K H; McAllum, Erin J; Donnelly, Paul S; Hare, Dominic J; Doble, Philip A; Turner, Bradley J; Price, Katherine A; Lim, Sin Chun; Paterson, Brett M; Hickey, James L; Rhoads, Timothy W; Williams, Jared R; Kanninen, Katja M; Hung, Lin W; Liddell, Jeffrey R; Grubman, Alexandra; Monty, Jean-Francois; Llanos, Roxana M; Kramer, David R; Mercer, Julian F B; Bush, Ashley I; Masters, Colin L; Duce, James A; Li, Qiao-Xin; Beckman, Joseph S; Barnham, Kevin J; White, Anthony R; Crouch, Peter J

    2014-06-04

    Mutations in the metallo-protein Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in humans and an expression level-dependent phenotype in transgenic rodents. We show that oral treatment with the therapeutic agent diacetyl-bis(4-methylthiosemicarbazonato)copper(II) [Cu(II)(atsm)] increased the concentration of mutant SOD1 (SOD1G37R) in ALS model mice, but paradoxically improved locomotor function and survival of the mice. To determine why the mice with increased levels of mutant SOD1 had an improved phenotype, we analyzed tissues by mass spectrometry. These analyses revealed most SOD1 in the spinal cord tissue of the SOD1G37R mice was Cu deficient. Treating with Cu(II)(atsm) decreased the pool of Cu-deficient SOD1 and increased the pool of fully metallated (holo) SOD1. Tracking isotopically enriched (65)Cu(II)(atsm) confirmed the increase in holo-SOD1 involved transfer of Cu from Cu(II)(atsm) to SOD1, suggesting the improved locomotor function and survival of the Cu(II)(atsm)-treated SOD1G37R mice involved, at least in part, the ability of the compound to improve the Cu content of the mutant SOD1. This was supported by improved survival of SOD1G37R mice that expressed the human gene for the Cu uptake protein CTR1. Improving the metal content of mutant SOD1 in vivo with Cu(II)(atsm) did not decrease levels of misfolded SOD1. These outcomes indicate the metal content of SOD1 may be a greater determinant of the toxicity of the protein in mutant SOD1-associated forms of ALS than the mutations themselves. Improving the metal content of SOD1 therefore represents a valid therapeutic strategy for treating ALS caused by SOD1. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/348021-11$15.00/0.

  3. Analysis of pools of targeted Salmonella deletion mutants identifies novel genes affecting fitness during competitive infection in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A Santiviago

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Pools of mutants of minimal complexity but maximal coverage of genes of interest facilitate screening for genes under selection in a particular environment. We constructed individual deletion mutants in 1,023 Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genes, including almost all genes found in Salmonella but not in related genera. All mutations were confirmed simultaneously using a novel amplification strategy to produce labeled RNA from a T7 RNA polymerase promoter, introduced during the construction of each mutant, followed by hybridization of this labeled RNA to a Typhimurium genome tiling array. To demonstrate the ability to identify fitness phenotypes using our pool of mutants, the pool was subjected to selection by intraperitoneal injection into BALB/c mice and subsequent recovery from spleens. Changes in the representation of each mutant were monitored using T7 transcripts hybridized to a novel inexpensive minimal microarray. Among the top 120 statistically significant spleen colonization phenotypes, more than 40 were mutations in genes with no previously known role in this model. Fifteen phenotypes were tested using individual mutants in competitive assays of intraperitoneal infection in mice and eleven were confirmed, including the first two examples of attenuation for sRNA mutants in Salmonella. We refer to the method as Array-based analysis of cistrons under selection (ABACUS.

  4. A Suppressor of the Menadione-Hypersensitive Phenotype of a Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli oxyR Mutant Reveals a Novel Mechanism of Toxicity and the Protective Role of Alkyl Hydroperoxide Reductase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vattanaviboon, Paiboon; Whangsuk, Wirongrong; Mongkolsuk, Skorn

    2003-01-01

    We isolated menadione-resistant mutants of Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli oxyR (oxyRXp). The oxyRR2Xp mutant was hyperresistant to the superoxide generators menadione and plumbagin and was moderately resistant to H2O2 and tert-butyl hydroperoxide. Analysis of enzymes involved in oxidative-stress protection in the oxyRR2Xp mutant revealed a >10-fold increase in AhpC and AhpF levels, while the levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and the organic hydroperoxide resistance protein (Ohr) were not significantly altered. Inactivation of ahpC in the oxyRR2Xp mutant resulted in increased sensitivity to menadione killing. Moreover, high levels of expression of cloned ahpC and ahpF in the oxyRXp mutant complemented the menadione hypersensitivity phenotype. High levels of other oxidant-scavenging enzymes such as catalase and SOD did not protect the cells from menadione toxicity. These data strongly suggest that the toxicity of superoxide generators could be mediated via organic peroxide production and that alkyl hydroperoxide reductase has an important novel function in the protection against the toxicity of these compounds in X. campestris. PMID:12591894

  5. Excision repair in MUT-mutants of Proteus mirabilis after UV-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoerl, K.; Mund, C.

    1977-01-01

    The behaviour of MUT-mutants of P.mirabilis to perform certain steps of excision repair after U.V.-irradiation is described. MUT-mutants introduce single-strand breaks in the DNA immediately after U.V.-irradiation, but their ability to excise pyrimidine dimers from the DNA is very diminished. Moreover, they are not able to accomplish the excision repair by rejoining of the single-strand breaks. The connection between the incomplete excision repair and the mutator phenotype of these mutants is discussed. (author)

  6. A “Forward Genomics” Approach Links Genotype to Phenotype using Independent Phenotypic Losses among Related Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Hiller

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Genotype-phenotype mapping is hampered by countless genomic changes between species. We introduce a computational “forward genomics” strategy that—given only an independently lost phenotype and whole genomes—matches genomic and phenotypic loss patterns to associate specific genomic regions with this phenotype. We conducted genome-wide screens for two metabolic phenotypes. First, our approach correctly matches the inactivated Gulo gene exactly with the species that lost the ability to synthesize vitamin C. Second, we attribute naturally low biliary phospholipid levels in guinea pigs and horses to the inactivated phospholipid transporter Abcb4. Human ABCB4 mutations also result in low phospholipid levels but lead to severe liver disease, suggesting compensatory mechanisms in guinea pig and horse. Our simulation studies, counts of independent changes in existing phenotype surveys, and the forthcoming availability of many new genomes all suggest that forward genomics can be applied to many phenotypes, including those relevant for human evolution and disease.

  7. Noise-induced Min phenotypes in E. coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Fange

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The spatiotemporal oscillations of the Escherichia coli proteins MinD and MinE direct cell division to the region between the chromosomes. Several quantitative models of the Min system have been suggested before, but no one of them accounts for the behavior of all documented mutant phenotypes. We analyzed the stochastic reaction-diffusion kinetics of the Min proteins for several E. coli mutants and compared the results to the corresponding deterministic mean-field description. We found that wild-type (wt and filamentous (ftsZ- cells are well characterized by the mean-field model, but that a stochastic model is necessary to account for several of the characteristics of the spherical (rodA- and phospathedylethanolamide-deficient (PE- phenotypes. For spherical cells, the mean-field model is bistable, and the system can get trapped in a non-oscillatory state. However, when the intrinsic noise is considered, only the experimentally observed oscillatory behavior remains. The stochastic model also reproduces the change in oscillation directions observed in the spherical phenotype and the occasional gliding of the MinD region along the inner membrane. For the PE- mutant, the stochastic model explains the appearance of randomly localized and dense MinD clusters as a nucleation phenomenon, in which the stochastic kinetics at low copy number causes local discharges of the high MinD(ATP to MinD(ADP potential. We find that a simple five-reaction model of the Min system can explain all documented Min phenotypes, if stochastic kinetics and three-dimensional diffusion are accounted for. Our results emphasize that local copy number fluctuation may result in phenotypic differences although the total number of molecules of the relevant species is high.

  8. Novel EDA mutation in X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia and genotype-phenotype correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, B; Lu, H; Xiao, X; Zhou, L; Lu, J; Zhu, L; Yu, D; Zhao, W

    2015-11-01

    X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED) is characterized by abnormalities of hair, teeth, and sweat glands, while non-syndromic hypodontia (NSH) affects only teeth. Mutations in Ectodysplasin A (EDA) underlie both XLHED and NSH. This study investigated the genetic causes of six hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) patients and genotype-phenotype correlation. The EDA gene of six patients with HED was sequenced. Bioinformatics analysis and structural modeling for the mutations were performed. The records of 134 patients with XLHED and EDA-related NSH regarding numbers of missing permanent teeth from this study and 20 articles were reviewed. Nonparametric tests were used to analyze genotype-phenotype correlations. In four of the six patients, we identified a novel mutation c.852T>G (p.Phe284Leu) and three reported mutations: c.467G>A (p.Arg156His), c.776C>A (p.Ala259Glu), and c.871G>A (p.Gly291Arg). They were predicted to be pathogenic by bioinformatics analysis and structural modeling. Genotype-phenotype correlation analysis revealed that truncating mutations were associated with more missing teeth. Missense mutations and the mutations affecting the TNF homology domain were correlated with fewer missing teeth. This study extended the mutation spectrum of XLHED and revealed the relationship between genotype and the number of missing permanent teeth. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. A novel zebrafish mutant with wavy-notochord: an effective biological index for monitoring the copper pollution of water from natural resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yau-Hung; Lin, Ji-Sheng

    2011-02-01

    We identified a novel zebrafish mutant that has wavy-notochord phenotypes, such as severely twisted notochord and posterior malformations, but has normal melanocytes. Histological evidences showed that proliferating vacuolar cells extended their growth to the muscle region, and consequently caused the wavy-notochord phenotypes. Interestingly, those malformations can be greatly reversed by exposure with copper, suggesting that copper plays an important role on wavy-notochord phenotypes. In addition, after long-term copper exposure, the surviving larvae derived from wavy-notochord mutants displayed bone malformations, such as twisted axial skeleton and osteophyte. These phenotypic changes and molecular evidences of wavy-notochord mutants are highly similar to those embryos whose lysyl oxidases activities have been inactivated. Taken together, we propose that (i) the putative mutated genes of this wavy-notochord mutant might be highly associated with the lysyl oxidase genes in zebrafish; and (ii) this fish model is an effective tool for monitoring copper pollution of water from natural resources. Copyright © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Defects of mutant DNMT1 are linked to a spectrum of neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baets, Jonathan; Duan, Xiaohui; Wu, Yanhong; Smith, Gordon; Seeley, William W; Mademan, Inès; McGrath, Nicole M; Beadell, Noah C; Khoury, Julie; Botuyan, Maria-Victoria; Mer, Georges; Worrell, Gregory A; Hojo, Kaori; DeLeon, Jessica; Laura, Matilde; Liu, Yo-Tsen; Senderek, Jan; Weis, Joachim; Van den Bergh, Peter; Merrill, Shana L; Reilly, Mary M; Houlden, Henry; Grossman, Murray; Scherer, Steven S; De Jonghe, Peter; Dyck, Peter J; Klein, Christopher J

    2015-04-01

    We report a broader than previously appreciated clinical spectrum for hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1E (HSAN1E) and a potential pathogenic mechanism for DNA methyltransferase (DNMT1) mutations. The clinical presentations and genetic characteristics of nine newly identified HSAN1E kinships (45 affected subjects) were investigated. Five novel mutations of DNMT1 were discovered; p.C353F, p.T481P, p.P491L, p.Y524D and p.I531N, all within the target-sequence domain, and two mutations (p.T481P, p.P491L) arising de novo. Recently, HSAN1E has been suggested as an allelic disorder of autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness and narcolepsy. Our results indicate that all the mutations causal for HSAN1E are located in the middle part or N-terminus end of the TS domain, whereas all the mutations causal for autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness and narcolepsy are located in the C-terminus end of the TS domain. The impact of the seven causal mutations in this cohort was studied by cellular localization experiments. The binding efficiency of the mutant DNMT proteins at the replication foci and heterochromatin were evaluated. Phenotypic characterizations included electromyography, brain magnetic resonance and nuclear imaging, electroencephalography, sural nerve biopsies, sleep evaluation and neuropsychometric testing. The average survival of HSAN1E was 53.6 years. [standard deviation = 7.7, range 43-75 years], and mean onset age was 37.7 years. (standard deviation = 8.6, range 18-51 years). Expanded phenotypes include myoclonic seizures, auditory or visual hallucinations, and renal failure. Hypersomnia, rapid eye movement sleep disorder and/or narcolepsy were identified in 11 subjects. Global brain atrophy was found in 12 of 14 who had brain MRI. EEGs showed low frequency (delta waves) frontal-predominant abnormality in five of six patients. Marked variability in cognitive deficits was observed, but the majority of patients (89%) developed

  11. Characterization of three Agrobacterium tumefaciens avirulent mutants with chromosomal mutations that affect induction of vir genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Metts, J; West, J; Doares, S H; Matthysse, A G

    1991-01-01

    Three Agrobacterium tumefaciens mutants with chromosomal mutations that affect bacterial virulence were isolated by transposon mutagenesis. Two of the mutants were avirulent on all hosts tested. The third mutant, Ivr-211, was a host range mutant which was avirulent on Bryophyllum diagremontiana, Nicotiana tabacum, N. debneyi, N. glauca, and Daucus carota but was virulent on Zinnia elegans and Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato). That the mutant phenotype was due to the transposon insertion was d...

  12. A methodology for evaluation of parent-mutant competition using a generalized non-linear ecosystem model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond L. Czaplewski

    1973-01-01

    A generalized, non-linear population dynamics model of an ecosystem is used to investigate the direction of selective pressures upon a mutant by studying the competition between parent and mutant populations. The model has the advantages of considering selection as operating on the phenotype, of retaining the interaction of the mutant population with the ecosystem as a...

  13. Homologous series of induced early mutants in indican rice. Pt.1. The production of homologous series of early mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiulan; Yang Hefeng; He Zhentian; Han Yuepeng; Liu Xueyu

    1999-01-01

    The percentage of homologous series of early mutants induced from the same Indican rice variety were almost the same (1.37%∼1.64%) in 1983∼1993, but the ones from the different eco-typical varieties were different. The early variety was 0.73%, the mid variety was 1.51%, and the late variety was 1.97%. The percentage of homologous series of early mutants from the varieties with the same pedigree and relationship were similar, but the one from the cog nation were lower than those from distant varieties. There are basic laws and characters in the homologous series of early mutants: 1. The inhibited phenotype is the basic of the homologous series of early mutants; 2. The production of the homologous series of early mutants is closely related with the growing period of the parent; 3. The parallel mutation of the stem and leaves are simultaneously happened with the variation of early or late maturing; 4. The occurrence of the homologous series of early mutants is in a state of imbalance. According to the law of parallel variability, the production of homologous series of early mutants can be predicted as long as the parents' classification of plant, pedigree and ecological type are identified. Therefore, the early breeding can be guided by the law of homologous series of early mutants

  14. Enhanced transpiration rate in the high pigment 1 tomato mutant and its physiological significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, R F; Aidar, S T; Azevedo, R A; Dodd, I C; Peres, L E P

    2011-05-01

    Tomato high pigment (hp) mutants represent an interesting horticultural resource due to their enhanced accumulation of carotenoids, flavonoids and vitamin C. Since hp mutants are known for their exaggerated light responses, the molecules accumulated are likely to be antioxidants, recruited to deal with light and others stresses. Further phenotypes displayed by hp mutations are reduced growth and an apparent disturbance in water loss. Here, we examined the impact of the hp1 mutation and its near isogenic line cv Micro-Tom (MT) on stomatal conductance (gs), transpiration (E), CO(2) assimilation (A) and water use efficiency (WUE). Detached hp1 leaves lost water more rapidly than control leaves, but this behaviour was reversed by exogenous abscisic acid (ABA), indicating the ability of hp1 to respond to this hormone. Although attached hp1 leaves had enhanced gs, E and A compared to control leaves, genotypic differences were lost when water was withheld. Both instantaneous leaf-level WUE and long-term whole plant WUE did not differ between hp1 and MT. Our results indicate a link between exaggerated light response and water loss in hp1, which has important implications for the use of this mutant in both basic and horticultural research. © 2011 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  15. Mutant alcohol dehydrogenase leads to improved ethanol tolerance in Clostridium thermocellum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Guss, Adam M [ORNL; Karpinets, Tatiana V [ORNL; Parks, Jerry M [ORNL; Smolin, Nikolai [ORNL; Yang, Shihui [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Klingeman, Dawn Marie [ORNL; Bhandiwad, Ashwini [Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel [ORNL; Raman, Babu [Dow Chemical Company, The; Shao, Xiongjun [Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth; Mielenz, Jonathan R [ORNL; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL; Keller, Martin [ORNL; Lynd, Lee R [Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a thermophilic, obligately anaerobic, Gram-positive bacterium that is a candidate microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into ethanol through consolidated bioprocessing. Ethanol intolerance is an important metric in terms of process economics, and tolerance has often been described as a complex and likely multigenic trait for which complex gene interactions come into play. Here, we resequence the genome of an ethanol-tolerant mutant, show that the tolerant phenotype is primarily due to a mutated bifunctional acetaldehyde-CoA/alcohol dehydrogenase gene (adhE), hypothesize based on structural analysis that cofactor specificity may be affected, and confirm this hypothesis using enzyme assays. Biochemical assays confirm a complete loss of NADH-dependent activity with concomitant acquisition of NADPH-dependent activity, which likely affects electron flow in the mutant. The simplicity of the genetic basis for the ethanol-tolerant phenotype observed here informs rational engineering of mutant microbial strains for cellulosic ethanol production.

  16. Phenotypic, genetic and molecular characterization of a maize low phytic acid mutant (lpa241)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilu, R.; Panzeri, D.; Gavazzi, G.

    2003-01-01

    -nutritional factor for animals, and isolation of maize low phytic acid (lpa) mutants provides a novel approach to study its biochemical pathway and to tackle the nutritional problems associated with it. Following chemical mutagenesis of pollen, we have isolated a viable recessive mutant named lpa 241 showing about...... 90% reduction of phytic acid and about a tenfold increase in seed-free phosphate content. Although germination rate was decreased by about 30% compared to wild-type, developement of mutant plants was apparentely unaffected. The results of the genetic, biochemical and molecular characterization...

  17. The agronomic characters of a high protein rice mutant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harn, C.; Won, J.L.; Choi, K.T.

    1975-01-01

    Mutant lines (M 5 -M 9 ) of macro-phenotypic traits from several varieties were screened for the protein content. Mutant 398 (M 9 ) is one of the high protein mutants selected from Hokwang. Three years' tests revealed that it has a high protein line under any condition of cultivation. Except for early maturity and short culmness, other agronomic and yield characters were similar to the original variety. There was no difference between the mutant 398 and its mother variety in grain shape and weight, and also the size and protein content of the embryo. The high protein content of the mutant is attributable to the increase of protein in the endosperm. About 150 normal-looking or a few days-earlier-maturing selections were made from Jinheung variety in the M 3 and screened for protein. Promising lines in terms of the plant type, yield and protein were obtained. (author)

  18. Identification of a Classical Mutant in the Industrial Host Aspergillus niger by Systems Genetics: LaeA Is Required for Citric Acid Production and Regulates the Formation of Some Secondary Metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Niu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The asexual filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is an important industrial cell factory for citric acid production. In this study, we genetically characterized a UV-generated A. niger mutant that was originally isolated as a nonacidifying mutant, which is a desirable trait for industrial enzyme production. Physiological analysis showed that this mutant did not secrete large amounts of citric acid and oxalic acid, thus explaining the nonacidifying phenotype. As traditional complementation approaches to characterize the mutant genotype were unsuccessful, we used bulk segregant analysis in combination with high-throughput genome sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for the nonacidifying phenotype. Since A. niger has no sexual cycle, parasexual genetics was used to generate haploid segregants derived from diploids by loss of whole chromosomes. We found that the nonacidifying phenotype was caused by a point mutation in the laeA gene. LaeA encodes a putative methyltransferase-domain protein, which we show here to be required for citric acid production in an A. niger lab strain (N402 and in other citric acid production strains. The unexpected link between LaeA and citric acid production could provide new insights into the transcriptional control mechanisms related to citric acid production in A. niger. Interestingly, the secondary metabolite profile of a ΔlaeA strain differed from the wild-type strain, showing both decreased and increased metabolite levels, indicating that LaeA is also involved in regulating the production of secondary metabolites. Finally, we show that our systems genetics approach is a powerful tool to identify trait mutations.

  19. Identification of a Classical Mutant in the Industrial Host Aspergillus niger by Systems Genetics: LaeA Is Required for Citric Acid Production and Regulates the Formation of Some Secondary Metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Jing; Arentshorst, Mark; Nair, P Deepa S; Dai, Ziyu; Baker, Scott E; Frisvad, Jens C; Nielsen, Kristian F; Punt, Peter J; Ram, Arthur F J

    2015-11-13

    The asexual filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is an important industrial cell factory for citric acid production. In this study, we genetically characterized a UV-generated A. niger mutant that was originally isolated as a nonacidifying mutant, which is a desirable trait for industrial enzyme production. Physiological analysis showed that this mutant did not secrete large amounts of citric acid and oxalic acid, thus explaining the nonacidifying phenotype. As traditional complementation approaches to characterize the mutant genotype were unsuccessful, we used bulk segregant analysis in combination with high-throughput genome sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for the nonacidifying phenotype. Since A. niger has no sexual cycle, parasexual genetics was used to generate haploid segregants derived from diploids by loss of whole chromosomes. We found that the nonacidifying phenotype was caused by a point mutation in the laeA gene. LaeA encodes a putative methyltransferase-domain protein, which we show here to be required for citric acid production in an A. niger lab strain (N402) and in other citric acid production strains. The unexpected link between LaeA and citric acid production could provide new insights into the transcriptional control mechanisms related to citric acid production in A. niger. Interestingly, the secondary metabolite profile of a ΔlaeA strain differed from the wild-type strain, showing both decreased and increased metabolite levels, indicating that LaeA is also involved in regulating the production of secondary metabolites. Finally, we show that our systems genetics approach is a powerful tool to identify trait mutations. Copyright © 2016 Niu et al.

  20. Spontaneous shaker rat mutant - a new model for X-linked tremor/ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Karla P; Paul, Sharan; Calì, Tito; Lopreiato, Raffaele; Karan, Sukanya; Frizzarin, Martina; Ames, Darren; Zanni, Ginevra; Brini, Marisa; Dansithong, Warunee; Milash, Brett; Scoles, Daniel R; Carafoli, Ernesto; Pulst, Stefan M

    2016-05-01

    The shaker rat is an X-linked recessive spontaneous model of progressive Purkinje cell (PC) degeneration exhibiting a shaking ataxia and wide stance. Generation of Wistar Furth (WF)/Brown Norwegian (BN) F1 hybrids and genetic mapping of F2 sib-sib offspring using polymorphic markers narrowed the candidate gene region to 26 Mbp denoted by the last recombinant genetic marker DXRat21 at 133 Mbp to qter (the end of the long arm). In the WF background, the shaker mutation has complete penetrance, results in a stereotypic phenotype and there is a narrow window for age of disease onset; by contrast, the F2 hybrid phenotype was more varied, with a later age of onset and likely non-penetrance of the mutation. By deep RNA-sequencing, five variants were found in the candidate region; four were novel without known annotation. One of the variants caused an arginine (R) to cysteine (C) change at codon 35 of the ATPase, Ca(2+) transporting, plasma membrane 3 (Atp2b3) gene encoding PMCA3 that has high expression in the cerebellum. The variant was well supported by hundreds of overlapping reads, and was found in 100% of all affected replicas and 0% of the wild-type (WT) replicas. The mutation segregated with disease in all affected animals and the amino acid change was found in an evolutionarily conserved region of PMCA3. Despite strong genetic evidence for pathogenicity, in vitro analyses of PMCA3(R35C) function did not show any differences to WT PMCA3. Because Atp2b3 mutation leads to congenital ataxia in humans, the identified Atp2b3 missense change in the shaker rat presents a good candidate for the shaker rat phenotype based on genetic criteria, but cannot yet be considered a definite pathogenic variant owing to lack of functional changes. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Construction of a mutagenesis cartridge for poliovirus genome-linked viral protein: isolation and characterization of viable and nonviable mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhn, R.J.; Tada, H.; Ypma-Wong, M.F.; Dunn, J.J.; Semler, B.L.; Wimmer, E.

    1988-01-01

    By following a strategy of genetic analysis of poliovirus, the authors have constructed a synthetic mutagenesis cartridge spanning the genome-linked viral protein coding region and flanking cleavage sites in an infectious cDNA clone of the type I (Mahoney) genome. The insertion of new restriction sites within the infectious clone has allowed them to replace the wild-type sequences with short complementary pairs of synthetic oligonucleotides containing various mutations. A set of mutations have been made that create methionine codons within the genome-linked viral protein region. The resulting viruses have growth characteristics similar to wild type. Experiments that led to an alteration of the tyrosine residue responsible for the linkage to RNA have resulted in nonviable virus. In one mutant, proteolytic processing assayed in vitro appeared unimpaired by the mutation. They suggest that the position of the tyrosine residue is important for genome-linked viral protein function(s)

  2. Suppression of the UV-sensitive phenotype of Escherichia coli recF mutants by recA(Srf) and recA(Tif) mutations requires recJ+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoms, B.; Wackernagel, W.

    1988-01-01

    Mutations in recA, such as recA801(Srf) (suppressor of RecF) or recA441(Tif) (temperature-induced filamentation) partially suppress the deficiency in postreplication repair of UV damage conferred by recF mutations. We observed that spontaneous recA(Srf) mutants accumulated in cultures of recB recC sbcB sulA::Mu dX(Ap lac) lexA51 recF cells because they grew faster than the parental strain. We show that in a uvrA recB+ recC+ genetic background there are two prerequisites for the suppression by recA(Srf) of the UV-sensitive phenotype of recF mutants. (i) The recA(Srf) protein must be provided in increased amounts either by SOS derepression or by a recA operator-constitutive mutation in a lexA(Ind) (no induction of SOS functions) genetic background. (ii) The gene recJ, which has been shown previously to be involved in the recF pathway of recombination and repair, must be functional. The level of expression of recJ in a lexA(Ind) strain suffices for full suppression. Suppression by recA441 at 30 degrees C also depends on recJ+. The hampered induction by UV of the SOS gene uvrA seen in a recF mutant was improved by a recA(Srf) mutation. This improvement did not require recJ+. We suggest that recA(Srf) and recA(Tif) mutant proteins can operate in postreplication repair independent of recF by using the recJ+ function

  3. A Functional Link between the Histone Demethylase PHF8 and the Transcription Factor ZNF711 in X-Linked Mental Retardation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleine-Kohlbrecher, Daniela; Christensen, Jesper; Vandamme, Julien

    2010-01-01

    X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) is an inherited disorder that mostly affects males and is caused by mutations in genes located on the X chromosome. Here, we show that the XLMR protein PHF8 and a C. elegans homolog F29B9.2 catalyze demethylation of di- and monomethylated lysine 9 of histone H3 (H......3K9me2/me1). The PHD domain of PHF8 binds to H3K4me3 and colocalizes with H3K4me3 at transcription initiation sites. Furthermore, PHF8 interacts with another XMLR protein, ZNF711, which binds to a subset of PHF8 target genes, including the XLMR gene JARID1C. Of interest, the C. elegans PHF8 homolog...... is highly expressed in neurons, and mutant animals show impaired locomotion. Taken together, our results functionally link the XLMR gene PHF8 to two other XLMR genes, ZNF711 and JARID1C, indicating that MR genes may be functionally linked in pathways, causing the complex phenotypes observed in patients...

  4. Sirenomelia phenotype in bmp7;shh compound mutants: a novel experimental model for studies of caudal body malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Allepuz, Carlos; González-Lamuño, Domingo; Ros, Maria A

    2012-01-01

    Sirenomelia is a severe congenital malformation of the lower body characterized by the fusion of the legs into a single lower limb. This striking external phenotype consistently associates severe visceral abnormalities, most commonly of the kidneys, intestine, and genitalia that generally make the condition lethal. Although the causes of sirenomelia remain unknown, clinical studies have yielded two major hypotheses: i) a primary defect in the generation of caudal mesoderm, ii) a primary vascular defect that leaves the caudal part of the embryo hypoperfused. Interestingly, Sirenomelia has been shown to have a genetic basis in mice, and although it has been considered a sporadic condition in humans, recently some possible familial cases have been reported. Here, we report that the removal of one or both functional alleles of Shh from the Bmp7-null background leads to a sirenomelia phenotype that faithfully replicates the constellation of external and internal malformations, typical of the human condition. These mutants represent an invaluable model in which we have analyzed the pathogenesis of sirenomelia. We show that the signaling defect predominantly impacts the morphogenesis of the hindgut and the development of the caudal end of the dorsal aortas. The deficient formation of ventral midline structures, including the interlimb mesoderm caudal to the umbilicus, leads to the approximation and merging of the hindlimb fields. Our study provides new insights for the understanding of the mechanisms resulting in caudal body malformations, including sirenomelia.

  5. Sirenomelia phenotype in bmp7;shh compound mutants: a novel experimental model for studies of caudal body malformations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Garrido-Allepuz

    Full Text Available Sirenomelia is a severe congenital malformation of the lower body characterized by the fusion of the legs into a single lower limb. This striking external phenotype consistently associates severe visceral abnormalities, most commonly of the kidneys, intestine, and genitalia that generally make the condition lethal. Although the causes of sirenomelia remain unknown, clinical studies have yielded two major hypotheses: i a primary defect in the generation of caudal mesoderm, ii a primary vascular defect that leaves the caudal part of the embryo hypoperfused. Interestingly, Sirenomelia has been shown to have a genetic basis in mice, and although it has been considered a sporadic condition in humans, recently some possible familial cases have been reported. Here, we report that the removal of one or both functional alleles of Shh from the Bmp7-null background leads to a sirenomelia phenotype that faithfully replicates the constellation of external and internal malformations, typical of the human condition. These mutants represent an invaluable model in which we have analyzed the pathogenesis of sirenomelia. We show that the signaling defect predominantly impacts the morphogenesis of the hindgut and the development of the caudal end of the dorsal aortas. The deficient formation of ventral midline structures, including the interlimb mesoderm caudal to the umbilicus, leads to the approximation and merging of the hindlimb fields. Our study provides new insights for the understanding of the mechanisms resulting in caudal body malformations, including sirenomelia.

  6. Defective balancing ability and hyperactivity in the CLX (circling behavior linked to the X-chromosome) mutant rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuji, Jun-ichiro; Tanabe, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Ryo; Ooshima, Yojiro

    2003-12-01

    We have reported that the recently described circling behavior rat (CLX) is a hereditary mutant controlled by a single sex-linked recessive gene (gene symbol: clx). This mutant shows intermittent circle walking and/or running and head tossing with the neck twisted. The abnormal behavior begins to appear around weaning and continues throughout life. In the present study, behavioral tests were performed during the suckling and post-weaning periods and when the rats reached maturity, and the following peculiar abnormalities were revealed: (1) in the righting reflex test, the CLX young show a tendency to take a longer time to revert to normal posture; (2) in the negative geotaxis test, they had difficulty moving upward at 12 days of age; (3) in the air righting reflex test, they frequently fell on their backs or shoulders even after weaning; (4) almost none of the CLX rats showed nystagmus, which is invariably observed in normal rats after rotating stimulation, at 20 weeks of age; and (5) they showed hyperactivity in the open field test at the age of 5 or 6 weeks and a higher degree of locomotor activity in the home cage at the age of 7 and 15 weeks. These results suggest that CLX mutant rats may have some defect in vestibular function (balance sense) or abnormalities in an area of the central nervous system responsible for posture control, e.g., in the dopaminergic or GABAergic neurons.

  7. Msh2 acts in medium-spiny striatal neurons as an enhancer of CAG instability and mutant huntingtin phenotypes in Huntington's disease knock-in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Kovalenko

    Full Text Available The CAG trinucleotide repeat mutation in the Huntington's disease gene (HTT exhibits age-dependent tissue-specific expansion that correlates with disease onset in patients, implicating somatic expansion as a disease modifier and potential therapeutic target. Somatic HTT CAG expansion is critically dependent on proteins in the mismatch repair (MMR pathway. To gain further insight into mechanisms of somatic expansion and the relationship of somatic expansion to the disease process in selectively vulnerable MSNs we have crossed HTT CAG knock-in mice (HdhQ111 with mice carrying a conditional (floxed Msh2 allele and D9-Cre transgenic mice, in which Cre recombinase is expressed specifically in MSNs within the striatum. Deletion of Msh2 in MSNs eliminated Msh2 protein in those neurons. We demonstrate that MSN-specific deletion of Msh2 was sufficient to eliminate the vast majority of striatal HTT CAG expansions in HdhQ111 mice. Furthermore, MSN-specific deletion of Msh2 modified two mutant huntingtin phenotypes: the early nuclear localization of diffusely immunostaining mutant huntingtin was slowed; and the later development of intranuclear huntingtin inclusions was dramatically inhibited. Therefore, Msh2 acts within MSNs as a genetic enhancer both of somatic HTT CAG expansions and of HTT CAG-dependent phenotypes in mice. These data suggest that the selective vulnerability of MSNs may be at least in part contributed by the propensity for somatic expansion in these neurons, and imply that intervening in the expansion process is likely to have therapeutic benefit.

  8. Alterations in grooming activity and syntax in heterozygous SERT and BDNF knockout mice: the utility of behavior-recognition tools to characterize mutant mouse phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyzar, Evan J; Pham, Mimi; Roth, Andrew; Cachat, Jonathan; Green, Jeremy; Gaikwad, Siddharth; Kalueff, Allan V

    2012-12-01

    Serotonin transporter (SERT) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are key modulators of molecular signaling, cognition and behavior. Although SERT and BDNF mutant mouse phenotypes have been extensively characterized, little is known about their self-grooming behavior. Grooming represents an important behavioral domain sensitive to environmental stimuli and is increasingly used as a model for repetitive behavioral syndromes, such as autism and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The present study used heterozygous ((+/-)) SERT and BDNF male mutant mice on a C57BL/6J background and assessed their spontaneous self-grooming behavior applying both manual and automated techniques. Overall, SERT(+/-) mice displayed a general increase in grooming behavior, as indicated by more grooming bouts and more transitions between specific grooming stages. SERT(+/-) mice also aborted more grooming bouts, but showed generally unaltered activity levels in the observation chamber. In contrast, BDNF(+/-) mice displayed a global reduction in grooming activity, with fewer bouts and transitions between specific grooming stages, altered grooming syntax, as well as hypolocomotion and increased turning behavior. Finally, grooming data collected by manual and automated methods (HomeCageScan) significantly correlated in our experiments, confirming the utility of automated high-throughput quantification of grooming behaviors in various genetic mouse models with increased or decreased grooming phenotypes. Taken together, these findings indicate that mouse self-grooming behavior is a reliable behavioral biomarker of genetic deficits in SERT and BDNF pathways, and can be reliably measured using automated behavior-recognition technology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Phenotypic Screen for Functional Mutants of Human Adenosine Deaminase Acting on RNA 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuru; Havel, Jocelyn; Beal, Peter A

    2015-11-20

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) are RNA-editing enzymes responsible for the conversion of adenosine to inosine at specific locations in cellular RNAs. ADAR1 and ADAR2 are two members of the family that have been shown to be catalytically active. Earlier, we reported a phenotypic screen for the study of human ADAR2 using budding yeast S. cerevisiae as the host system. While this screen has been successfully applied to the study of ADAR2, it failed with ADAR1. Here, we report a new reporter that uses a novel editing substrate and is suitable for the study of ADAR1. We screened plasmid libraries with randomized codons for two important residues in human ADAR1 (G1007 and E1008). The screening results combined with in vitro deamination assays led to the identification of mutants that are more active than the wild type protein. Furthermore, a screen of the ADAR1 E1008X library with a reporter construct bearing an A•G mismatch at the editing site suggests one role for the residue at position 1008 is to sense the identity of the base pairing partner for the editing site adenosine. This work has provided a starting point for future in vitro evolution studies of ADAR1 and led to new insight into ADAR's editing site selectivity.

  10. Generation of gamma irradiation and EMS-induced mutant lines of the H7996 tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canama, Alma O.; Galvez, Hayde F.; Tongson, Eden Jane U.; Quilloy, Reynaldo B.; Hautea, Desiree M.

    2010-01-01

    Tomato (L.) is one of the most important vegetable crops grown worldwide for the fresh vegetable market and food processing industry. With the completion of the genome-sequencing projects in various crops, the major challenge will be determine the gene function. One approach is to generate and to analyze mutant phenotypes. The paper reports the generation of gamma-irradiated and ethy methane sulfonate (EMS)-treated mutant populations, identification and phenotypic characterization of dominant and visible mutations in tomato mutant lines. Mutant populations of tomato H7996 were created using physical (cobalt 60 gamma ray) and chemical EMS mutagens. Generally, based on high-throughput phenotypic characterization, mutations were observed on the plant habit, size, morphology, leaf and flower color and morphology and fruit characteristics. Specifically, the most common dominant and visible mutations noted in the M 1 generation were monopodial, compact, short internodes, multi-branch plant type, light yellow and ghost leaf coloration, tiny and long pedicel leaf morphology and small or short plant size. In the M2 generation, homogeneous and segregating M 2 families were selected to constitute the core set of visible tomato mutants. Initial bacterial wilt resistance (BWR) gene knockouts were also identified. The mutant lines will be used as a rich source of genetic materials for breeding and functional genomics of tomato. (author)

  11. Dosage effect of a Phex mutation in a murine model of X-linked hypophosphatemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Shoji; Gray, Amie K.; Bikorimana, Emmanuel; Econs, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH) is caused by mutations in the PHEX gene, which increase circulating levels of the phosphaturic hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). Since XLH is a dominant disease, one mutant allele is sufficient for manifestation of the disease. However, dosage effect of a PHEX mutation in XLH is not completely understood. To examine the effect of Phex genotypes, we compared serum biochemistries and skeletal measures between all five possible genotypes of a new murine model of XLH (PhexK496X or PhexJrt). Compared to sex-matched littermate controls, all Phex mutant mice had hypophosphatemia, mild hypocalcemia, and increased parathyroid hormone and alkaline phosphatase levels. Furthermore, mutant mice had markedly elevated serum Fgf23 levels due to increased Fgf23 expression and reduced cleavage of Fgf23. Although females with a homozygous Phex mutation were slightly more hypocalcemic and hypophosphatemic than heterozygous females, the two groups had comparable intact Fgf23 levels. Similarly, there was no difference in intact Fgf23 or phosphorus concentrations between hemizygous males and heterozygous females. Compared to heterozygous females, homozygous counterparts were significantly smaller and had shorter femurs with reduced bone mineral density, suggesting the existence of dosage effect in the skeletal phenotype of XLH. However, overall phenotypic trends in regards to mineral ion homeostasis were mostly unaffected by the presence of one or two mutant Phex allele(s). The lack of gene dosage effect on circulating Fgf23 (and thus, phosphorus) levels suggests that a Phex mutation may create the lower set point for extracellular phosphate concentrations. PMID:23700148

  12. Expression profiling of S. pombe acetyltransferase mutants identifies redundant pathways of gene regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wright Anthony PH

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histone acetyltransferase enzymes (HATs are implicated in regulation of transcription. HATs from different families may overlap in target and substrate specificity. Results We isolated the elp3+ gene encoding the histone acetyltransferase subunit of the Elongator complex in fission yeast and characterized the phenotype of an Δelp3 mutant. We examined genetic interactions between Δelp3 and two other HAT mutants, Δmst2 and Δgcn5 and used whole genome microarray analysis to analyze their effects on gene expression. Conclusions Comparison of phenotypes and expression profiles in single, double and triple mutants indicate that these HAT enzymes have overlapping functions. Consistent with this, overlapping specificity in histone H3 acetylation is observed. However, there is no evidence for overlap with another HAT enzyme, encoded by the essential mst1+ gene.

  13. Identification of a novel ga-related bush mutant in pumpkin (cucurbita moschata duchesne)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, T.; Cao, J.

    2015-01-01

    Pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata Duchesne) bush mutant plants were characterized by short stems. The sensitivity of pumpkin bush mutant plants to exogenous hormones was identified in this study. Results revealed that internode elongation of bush mutant plants could respond to gibberellins (GA4+7 and GA3), but not to indole acetic acid (IAA) and brassinosteroids (BR); by contrast, the mutant phenotype of bush mutant plants could not be fully rescued by GA4+7 and GA3. The internode of bush mutant plants yielded a lower KS expression level than that of vine plants. Therefore, pumpkin bush mutant plants were designated as GA-related mutant plants eliciting a partial response to GAs; the action of IAA and BR might not be involved in the internode growth of pumpkin bush mutant plants, specifically Cucurbita moschata Duch. (author)

  14. ALS mutant SOD1 interacts with G3BP1 and affects stress granule dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Jozsef; Kuang, Lisha; Barnett, Kelly R; Zhu, Brian Z; Shissler, Susannah C; Korotkov, Konstantin V; Hayward, Lawrence J; Kasarskis, Edward J; Zhu, Haining

    2016-10-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease. Mutations in Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) are responsible for approximately 20 % of the familial ALS cases. ALS-causing SOD1 mutants display a gain-of-toxicity phenotype, but the nature of this toxicity is still not fully understood. The Ras GTPase-activating protein-binding protein G3BP1 plays a critical role in stress granule dynamics. Alterations in the dynamics of stress granules have been reported in several other forms of ALS unrelated to SOD1. To our surprise, the mutant G93A SOD1 transgenic mice exhibited pathological cytoplasmic inclusions that co-localized with G3BP1-positive granules in spinal cord motor neurons. The co-localization was also observed in fibroblast cells derived from familial ALS patient carrying SOD1 mutation L144F. Mutant SOD1, unlike wild-type SOD1, interacted with G3BP1 in an RNA-independent manner. Moreover, the interaction is specific for G3BP1 since mutant SOD1 showed little interaction with four other RNA-binding proteins implicated in ALS. The RNA-binding RRM domain of G3BP1 and two particular phenylalanine residues (F380 and F382) are critical for this interaction. Mutant SOD1 delayed the formation of G3BP1- and TIA1-positive stress granules in response to hyperosmolar shock and arsenite treatment in N2A cells. In summary, the aberrant mutant SOD1-G3BP1 interaction affects stress granule dynamics, suggesting a potential link between pathogenic SOD1 mutations and RNA metabolism alterations in ALS.

  15. Screening and identification of respiration deficiency mutants of yeasts (Saccharomyces Cerevisiae) induced by heavy ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Shuhong; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Jin Genming; Wei Zengquan; Xie Hongmei; Zhang Hong

    2006-01-01

    A screen of respiration deficiency mutants of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae induced by 5.19 MeV/u 22 Ne 5- ion irradiation is studied. Some respiration deficiency mutants, which are white colony phenotype in the selective culture of TTC medium, are obtained. The mutants are effectively identified by means of a new and simplified restriction analysis method. (authors)

  16. Flower morphology of Dendrobium Sonia mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakinah Ariffin; Azhar Mohamad; Affrida Abu Hassan; Zaiton Ahmad; Mohd Nazir Basiran

    2010-01-01

    Dendrobium Sonia is a commercial hybrid which is popular as cut flower and potted plant in Malaysia. Variability in flower is important for new variety to generate more demands and choices in selection. Mutation induction is a tool in creating variability for new flower color and shape. In vitro cultures of protocorm-like bodies (PLBs) were exposed to gamma ray at dose 35 Gy. Phenotypic characteristics of the flower were observed at fully bloomed flower with emphasis on shape and color. Approximately 2000 regenerated irradiated plants were observed and after subsequent flowering, 100 plants were finally selected for further evaluation. Most of the color and shape changes are expressed in different combinations of petal, sepal and lip of the flower. In this work, 11 stable mutants were found different at flower phenotype as compared to control. Amongst these, four mutant varieties with commercial potential has been named as Dendrobium 'SoniaKeenaOval', Dendrobium 'SoniaKeenaRadiant', Dendrobium 'SoniaKeenaHiengDing' and Dendrobium 'Sonia KeenaAhmadSobri'. In this paper, variations in flower morphology and flower color were discussed, giving emphasis on variations in flower petal shape. (author)

  17. Pollen irradiation method to obtain mutants in cucumber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, S.; Amano, E.

    1988-01-01

    Seed irradiation for mutation induction in dioecious crops like cucumber is not very useful because chimerism of the mutated tissues makes the segregation of mutants in the M 2 generation nearly impossible. This problem does not exist with pollen irradiation. Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. var. Nishikisuyo) was used for a model experiment. The petals of male and female flowers were closed by pinching with binding wire before flowering to prevent pollination by insects. On the flowering day, the male flowers were collected and irradiated with 1kR to 10 kR of acute gamma rays (137-Cs), then used to pollinate the female flowers. The M 1 seeds thus obtained are not chimeric but heterozygous for induced mutations. When planted, no mutant phenotype appeared. Selfing within a plant lead to segregation of mutants in the M 2 generation. Seedling examination revealed eight mutants. One mutant line, in which the shape of leaves changed from pentagonal to round heart shape, was found under field conditions. The optimal dose for pollen irradiation seems to be between 2 kR and 4kR

  18. PHENOTYPIC CHARACTERISATION AND GENETIC ANALYSIS OF MUTANTS OF ASPERGILLUS NIDULANS RESISTANT TO THE FUNGICIDE TOLCLOFOS-METHYL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A CHIBANI

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous mutants of Aspergillus nidulans were recovered from 0,55.10+7  conidia incubated on synthetic medium supplemented with 100 mg tolclofos-methyl/ml. They differed considerably in morphology, growth rate, and level of resistance to two other fungicides. All mutants tested were cross-resistant to quintozene and vinclozolin; they produced fewer conidia than their wild-type parent. Some mutants required fungicides for maximum growth. Genetic analysis revealed that the mutants carried mutations in one gene located on linkage group III.

  19. Validation and discovery of genotype-phenotype associations in chronic diseases using linked data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Jyotishman; Kiefer, Richard; Freimuth, Robert; Chute, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates federated SPARQL queries over Linked Open Data (LOD) in the Semantic Web to validate existing, and potentially discover new genotype-phenotype associations from public datasets. In particular, we report our preliminary findings for identifying such associations for commonly occurring chronic diseases using the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) and Database for SNPs (dbSNP) within the LOD knowledgebase and compare them with Gene Wiki for coverage and completeness. Our results indicate that Semantic Web technologies can play an important role for in-silico identification of novel disease-gene-SNP associations, although additional verification is required before such information can be applied and used effectively.

  20. Disruption of the GDP-mannose synthesis pathway in Streptomyces coelicolor results in antibiotic hyper-susceptible phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlett, Robert; Anttonen, Katri; Read, Nicholas; Smith, Margaret C M

    2018-04-01

    Actinomycete bacteria use polyprenol phosphate mannose as a lipid linked sugar donor for extra-cytoplasmic glycosyl transferases that transfer mannose to cell envelope polymers, including glycoproteins and glycolipids. We showed recently that strains of Streptomyces coelicolor with mutations in the gene ppm1 encoding polyprenol phosphate mannose synthase were both resistant to phage φC31 and have greatly increased susceptibility to antibiotics that mostly act on cell wall biogenesis. Here we show that mutations in the genes encoding enzymes that act upstream of Ppm1 in the polyprenol phosphate mannose synthesis pathway can also confer phage resistance and antibiotic hyper-susceptibility. GDP-mannose is a substrate for Ppm1 and is synthesised by GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase (GMP; ManC) which uses GTP and mannose-1-phosphate as substrates. Phosphomannomutase (PMM; ManB) converts mannose-6-phosphate to mannose-1-phosphate. S. coelicolor strains with knocked down GMP activity or with a mutation in sco3028 encoding PMM acquire phenotypes that resemble those of the ppm1 - mutants i.e. φC31 resistant and susceptible to antibiotics. Differences in the phenotypes of the strains were observed, however. While the ppm1 - strains have a small colony phenotype, the sco3028 :: Tn5062 mutants had an extremely small colony phenotype indicative of an even greater growth defect. Moreover we were unable to generate a strain in which GMP activity encoded by sco3039 and sco4238 is completely knocked out, indicating that GMP is also an important enzyme for growth. Possibly GDP-mannose is at a metabolic branch point that supplies alternative nucleotide sugar donors.

  1. Neurodegeneration in drop-dead mutant drosophila melanogaster is associated with the respiratory system but not with Hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Lynn Sansone

    Full Text Available Mutations in the gene drop-dead (drd cause diverse phenotypes in adult Drosophila melanogaster including early lethality, neurodegeneration, tracheal defects, gut dysfunction, reduced body mass, and female sterility. Despite the identification of the drd gene itself, the causes of early lethality and neurodegeneration in the mutant flies remain unknown. To determine the pattern of drd expression associated with the neurodegenerative phenotype, knockdown of drd with various Gal4 drivers was performed. Early adult lethality and neurodegeneration were observed upon knockdown of drd in the tracheal system with two independent insertions of the breathless-Gal4 driver and upon knockdown in the tracheal system and elsewhere with the DJ717-Gal4 driver. Surprisingly, rescue of drd expression exclusively in the tracheae in otherwise mutant flies rescued the neurodegenerative phenotype but not adult lethality. Gut dysfunction, as measured by defecation rate, was not rescued in these flies, and gut function appeared normal upon tracheal-specific knockdown of drd. Finally, the hypothesis that tracheal dysfunction in drd mutants results in hypoxia was tested. Hypoxia-sensitive reporter transgenes (LDH-Gal4 and LDH-LacZ were placed on a drd mutant background, but enhanced expression of these reporters was not observed. In addition, manipulation of drd expression in the tracheae did not affect expression of the hypoxia-induced genes LDH, tango, and similar. Overall, these results indicate that there are at least two causes of adult lethality in drd mutants, that gut dysfunction and neurodegeneration are independent phenotypes, and that neurodegeneration is associated with tracheal expression of drd but not with hypoxia.

  2. Loss of Heterozygosity at an Unlinked Genomic Locus Is Responsible for the Phenotype of a Candida albicans sap4Δ sap5Δ sap6Δ Mutant

    OpenAIRE

    Dunkel, Nico; Morschhäuser, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    The diploid genome of the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans exhibits a high degree of heterozygosity. Genomic alterations that result in a loss of heterozygosity at specific loci may affect phenotypes and confer a selective advantage under certain conditions. Such genomic rearrangements can also occur during the construction of C. albicans mutants and remain undetected. The SAP2 gene on chromosome R encodes a secreted aspartic protease that is induced and required for growth of C. albicans wh...

  3. Isolation and characterization of Candida albicans morphological mutants derepressed for the formation of filamentous hypha-type structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, C.; Pomes, R.; Nombela, C.

    1990-01-01

    Several Candida albicans morphological mutants were obtained by a procedure based on a combined treatment with nitrous acid plus UV irradiation and a double-enrichment step to increase the proportion of mutants growing as long filamentous structures. Altered cell morphogenesis in these mutants correlated with an altered colonial phenotype. Two of these mutants, C. albicans NEL102 and NEL103, were selected and characterized. Mutant blastoconidia initiated budding but eventually gave rise to filamentous hypha-type formations. These filaments were long and septate, and they branched very regularly at positions near septa. Calcofluor white (which is known to bind chitin-rich areas) stained septa, branching zones, and filament tips very intensely, as observed under the fluorescence microscope. Wild-type hybrids were obtained by fusing protoplasts of strain NEL102 with B14, another morphological mutant previously described as being permanently pseudomycelial, indicating that genetic determinants responsible for the two altered phenotypes are different. The mutants characterized in this work seemed to sequentially express the morphogenic characteristics of C. albicans, from blastoconidia to hyphae, in the absence of any inducer. Further characterization of these strains could be relevant to gain understanding of the genetic control of dimorphism in this species

  4. High-throughput phenotyping allows for QTL analysis of defense, symbiosis and development-related traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Nina Eberhardtsen

    -throughput phenotyping of whole plants. Additionally, a system for automated confocal microscopy aiming at automated detection of infection thread formation as well as detection of lateral root and nodule primordia is being developed. The objective was to use both systems in genome wide association studies and mutant...... the analysis. Additional phenotyping of defense mutants revealed that MLO, which confers susceptibility towards Blumeria graminis in barley, is also a prime candidate for a S. trifoliorum susceptibility gene in Lotus....

  5. A double-mutant collection targeting MAP kinase related genes in Arabidopsis for studying genetic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shih-Heng; Krysan, Patrick J

    2016-12-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades are conserved in all eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis thaliana there are approximately 80 genes encoding MAP kinase kinase kinases (MAP3K), 10 genes encoding MAP kinase kinases (MAP2K), and 20 genes encoding MAP kinases (MAPK). Reverse genetic analysis has failed to reveal abnormal phenotypes for a majority of these genes. One strategy for uncovering gene function when single-mutant lines do not produce an informative phenotype is to perform a systematic genetic interaction screen whereby double-mutants are created from a large library of single-mutant lines. Here we describe a new collection of 275 double-mutant lines derived from a library of single-mutants targeting genes related to MAP kinase signaling. To facilitate this study, we developed a high-throughput double-mutant generating pipeline using a system for growing Arabidopsis seedlings in 96-well plates. A quantitative root growth assay was used to screen for evidence of genetic interactions in this double-mutant collection. Our screen revealed four genetic interactions, all of which caused synthetic enhancement of the root growth defects observed in a MAP kinase 4 (MPK4) single-mutant line. Seeds for this double-mutant collection are publicly available through the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center. Scientists interested in diverse biological processes can now screen this double-mutant collection under a wide range of growth conditions in order to search for additional genetic interactions that may provide new insights into MAP kinase signaling. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The use of RAPD fingerprinting to detect genetic variation of a selected signal grass mutant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Affrida Abu Hassan; Ghazali HAzhar Mohamad; Abdul Rahim Harun

    2002-01-01

    Signal grass (Brachiaria decumbens) has been used for many years as grazing pasture for ruminants but it may know to be toxic to small ruminants. Mutagenesis provides an alternative approach to create phenotypic variability in the grass that might be free from toxicity and allow greater selection potential for desired characteristics. The mutant of Brachiara decumbens, which was obtained through induced mutation by gamma irradiation at dose 900 Gh showed phenotypic changes in term of tiller number, leaf to stem ratio and internode length. The variations caused by irradiation were detected by Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. Decamer oligonucleotide primers were used to generate DNA profiles. 575 bp polymorphic DNA band was observed between control and the mutant. RAPD has been proven to be useful to detect polymorphism between mutants and the control. (Author)

  7. Phenotype of transgenic mice carrying a very low copy number of the mutant human G93A superoxide dismutase-1 gene associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey S Deitch

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a progressive neurodegenerative disease of the motor neuron. While most cases of ALS are sporadic, 10% are familial (FALS with 20% of FALS caused by a mutation in the gene that codes for the enzyme Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1. There is variability in sporadic ALS as well as FALS where even within the same family some siblings with the same mutation do not manifest disease. A transgenic (Tg mouse model of FALS containing 25 copies of the mutant human SOD1 gene demonstrates motor neuron pathology and progressive weakness similar to ALS patients, leading to death at approximately 130 days. The onset of symptoms and survival of these transgenic mice are directly related to the number of copies of the mutant gene. We report the phenotype of a very low expressing (VLE G93A SOD1 Tg carrying only 4 copies of the mutant G93ASOD1 gene. While weakness can start at 9 months, only 74% of mice 18 months or older demonstrate disease. The VLE mice show decreased motor neurons compared to wild-type mice as well as increased cytoplasmic translocation of TDP-43. In contrast to the standard G93A SOD1 Tg mouse which always develops motor weakness leading to death, not all VLE animals manifested clinical disease or shortened life span. In fact, approximately 20% of mice older than 24 months had no motor symptoms and only 18% of VLE mice older than 22 months reached end stage. Given the variable penetrance of clinical phenotype, prolonged survival, and protracted loss of motor neurons the VLE mouse provides a new tool that closely mimics human ALS. This tool will allow the study of pathologic events over time as well as the study of genetic and environmental modifiers that may not be causative, but can exacerbate or accelerate motor neuron disease.

  8. Spontaneous shaker rat mutant – a new model for X-linked tremor/ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla P. Figueroa

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The shaker rat is an X-linked recessive spontaneous model of progressive Purkinje cell (PC degeneration exhibiting a shaking ataxia and wide stance. Generation of Wistar Furth (WF/Brown Norwegian (BN F1 hybrids and genetic mapping of F2 sib-sib offspring using polymorphic markers narrowed the candidate gene region to 26 Mbp denoted by the last recombinant genetic marker DXRat21 at 133 Mbp to qter (the end of the long arm. In the WF background, the shaker mutation has complete penetrance, results in a stereotypic phenotype and there is a narrow window for age of disease onset; by contrast, the F2 hybrid phenotype was more varied, with a later age of onset and likely non-penetrance of the mutation. By deep RNA-sequencing, five variants were found in the candidate region; four were novel without known annotation. One of the variants caused an arginine (R to cysteine (C change at codon 35 of the ATPase, Ca2+ transporting, plasma membrane 3 (Atp2b3 gene encoding PMCA3 that has high expression in the cerebellum. The variant was well supported by hundreds of overlapping reads, and was found in 100% of all affected replicas and 0% of the wild-type (WT replicas. The mutation segregated with disease in all affected animals and the amino acid change was found in an evolutionarily conserved region of PMCA3. Despite strong genetic evidence for pathogenicity, in vitro analyses of PMCA3R35C function did not show any differences to WT PMCA3. Because Atp2b3 mutation leads to congenital ataxia in humans, the identified Atp2b3 missense change in the shaker rat presents a good candidate for the shaker rat phenotype based on genetic criteria, but cannot yet be considered a definite pathogenic variant owing to lack of functional changes.

  9. Spontaneous shaker rat mutant – a new model for X-linked tremor/ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Karla P.; Paul, Sharan; Calì, Tito; Lopreiato, Raffaele; Karan, Sukanya; Frizzarin, Martina; Ames, Darren; Zanni, Ginevra; Brini, Marisa; Dansithong, Warunee; Milash, Brett; Scoles, Daniel R.; Carafoli, Ernesto; Pulst, Stefan M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The shaker rat is an X-linked recessive spontaneous model of progressive Purkinje cell (PC) degeneration exhibiting a shaking ataxia and wide stance. Generation of Wistar Furth (WF)/Brown Norwegian (BN) F1 hybrids and genetic mapping of F2 sib-sib offspring using polymorphic markers narrowed the candidate gene region to 26 Mbp denoted by the last recombinant genetic marker DXRat21 at 133 Mbp to qter (the end of the long arm). In the WF background, the shaker mutation has complete penetrance, results in a stereotypic phenotype and there is a narrow window for age of disease onset; by contrast, the F2 hybrid phenotype was more varied, with a later age of onset and likely non-penetrance of the mutation. By deep RNA-sequencing, five variants were found in the candidate region; four were novel without known annotation. One of the variants caused an arginine (R) to cysteine (C) change at codon 35 of the ATPase, Ca2+ transporting, plasma membrane 3 (Atp2b3) gene encoding PMCA3 that has high expression in the cerebellum. The variant was well supported by hundreds of overlapping reads, and was found in 100% of all affected replicas and 0% of the wild-type (WT) replicas. The mutation segregated with disease in all affected animals and the amino acid change was found in an evolutionarily conserved region of PMCA3. Despite strong genetic evidence for pathogenicity, in vitro analyses of PMCA3R35C function did not show any differences to WT PMCA3. Because Atp2b3 mutation leads to congenital ataxia in humans, the identified Atp2b3 missense change in the shaker rat presents a good candidate for the shaker rat phenotype based on genetic criteria, but cannot yet be considered a definite pathogenic variant owing to lack of functional changes. PMID:27013529

  10. Characterization of Novel Sorghum brown midrib Mutants from an EMS-Mutagenized Population

    OpenAIRE

    Sattler, Scott E.; Saballos, Ana; Xin, Zhanguo; Funnell-Harris, Deanna L.; Vermerris, Wilfred; Pedersen, Jeffrey F.

    2014-01-01

    Reducing lignin concentration in lignocellulosic biomass can increase forage digestibility for ruminant livestock and saccharification yields of biomass for bioenergy. In sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) and several other C4 grasses, brown midrib (bmr) mutants have been shown to reduce lignin concentration. Putative bmr mutants isolated from an EMS-mutagenized population were characterized and classified based on their leaf midrib phenotype and allelism tests with the previously describe...

  11. Meiotic gene conversion mutants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. I. Isolation and characterization of PMS1-1 and PMS1-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, M.S.; Game, J.C.; Fogel, S.

    1985-01-01

    The PMS1 mutants, isolated on the basis of sharply elevated meiotic prototroph frequencies for two closely linked HIS4 alleles, display pleiotropic phenotypes in meiotic and mitotic cells. Two isolates carrying recessive mutations in PMS1 were characterized. They identify a function required to maintain low postmeiotic segregation (PMS) frequencies at many heterozygous sites. In addition, they are mitotic mutators. In mutant diploids, spore viability is reduced, and among survivors, gene conversion and postmeiotic segregation frequencies are increased, but reciprocal exchange frequencies are not affected. The conversion event pattern is also dramatically changed in multiply marked regions in PMS1 homozygotes. The PMS1 locus maps near MET4 on chromosome XIV. The PMS1 gene may identify an excision-resynthesis long patch mismatch correction function or a function that facilitates correction tract elongation. The PMS1 gene product may also play an important role in spontaneous mitotic mutation avoidance and correction of mismatches in heteroduplex DNA formed during spontaneous and UV-induced mitotic recombination. Based on meiotic recombination models emphasizing mismatch correction in heteroduplex DNA intermediates, this interpretation is favored, but alternative interpretations involving longer recombination intermediates in the mutants are also considered

  12. Morphological Characterization and Assessment of Genetic Variability, Character Association, and Divergence in Soybean Mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Malek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity is important for crop improvement. An experiment was conducted during 2011 to study genetic variability, character association, and genetic diversity among 27 soybean mutants and four mother genotypes. Analysis of variance revealed significant differences among the mutants and mothers for nine morphological traits. Eighteen mutants performed superiorly to their mothers in respect to seed yield and some morphological traits including yield attributes. Narrow differences between phenotypic and genotypic coefficients of variation (PCV and GCV for most of the characters revealed less environmental influence on their expression. High values of heritability and genetic advance with high GCV for branch number, plant height, pod number, and seed weight can be considered as favorable attributes for soybean improvement through phenotypic selection and high expected genetic gain can be achieved. Pod and seed number and maturity period appeared to be the first order traits for higher yield and priority should be given in selection due to their strong associations and high magnitudes of direct effects on yield. Cluster analysis grouped 31 genotypes into five groups at the coefficient value of 235. The mutants/genotypes from cluster I and cluster II could be used for hybridization program with the mutants of clusters IV and V in order to develop high yielding mutant-derived soybean varieties for further improvement.

  13. Mitotic chromosome transmission fidelity mutants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, F.; Gerring, S.L.; Connelly, C.; Hieter, P.

    1990-01-01

    The authors have isolated 136 independent EMS-induced mutations in haploid yeast strains that exhibit decreased chromosome transmission fidelity in mitosis. Eight-five percent of the mutations are recessive and 15% are partially dominant. Complementation analysis between MATa and MATα isolates identifies 11 chromosome transmission fidelity (CTF) complementation groups, the largest of which is identical to CHL1. For 49 independent mutations, no corresponding allele has been recovered in the opposite mating type. The initial screen monitored the stability of a centromere-linked color marker on a nonessential yeast chromosome fragment; the mitotic inheritance of natural yeast chromosome III is also affected by the ctf mutations. Of the 136 isolates identified, seven were inviable at 37 degree and five were inviable at 11 degree. In all cases tested, these temperature conditional lethalities cosegregated with the chromosome instability phenotype. Five additional complementation groups (ctf12 through ctf16) have been defined by complementation analysis of the mutations causing inviability at 37 degree. All of the mutant strains showed normal sensitivity to ultraviolet and γ-irradiation

  14. Effect of abscisic acid on stomatal opening in isolated epidermal strips of abi mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelfsema, MRG; Prins, HBA

    Abscisic acid-insensitive mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana L. var. Landsberg erecta were selected for their decreased sensitivity to ABA during germination. Two of these mutants, abi-1 and abi-2, display a wilty phenotype as adult plants, indicating disturbed water relations. Experiments were

  15. Structural and Functional Recovery of Sensory Cilia in C. elegans IFT Mutants upon Aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Cornils

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The majority of cilia are formed and maintained by the highly conserved process of intraflagellar transport (IFT. Mutations in IFT genes lead to ciliary structural defects and systemic disorders termed ciliopathies. Here we show that the severely truncated sensory cilia of hypomorphic IFT mutants in C. elegans transiently elongate during a discrete period of adult aging leading to markedly improved sensory behaviors. Age-dependent restoration of cilia morphology occurs in structurally diverse cilia types and requires IFT. We demonstrate that while DAF-16/FOXO is dispensable, the age-dependent suppression of cilia phenotypes in IFT mutants requires cell-autonomous functions of the HSF1 heat shock factor and the Hsp90 chaperone. Our results describe an unexpected role of early aging and protein quality control mechanisms in suppressing ciliary phenotypes of IFT mutants, and suggest possible strategies for targeting subsets of ciliopathies.

  16. Genotype-phenotype correlation in boys with X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Kristin; Schneider, Anne-Theres; Wohlfart, Sigrun; Kiesewetter, Franklin; Huttner, Kenneth; Johnson, Ramsey; Schneider, Holm

    2014-10-01

    X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED), the most frequent form of ectodermal dysplasia, is a genetic disorder of ectoderm development characterized by malformation of multiple ectodermal structures such as skin, hair, sweat and sebaceous glands, and teeth. The disease is caused by a broad spectrum of mutations in the gene EDA. Although XLHED symptoms show inter-familial and intra-familial variability, genotype-phenotype correlation has been demonstrated with respect to sweat gland function. In this study, we investigated to which extent the EDA genotype correlates with the severity of XLHED-related skin and hair signs. Nineteen male children with XLHED (age range 3-14 years) and seven controls (aged 6-14 years) were examined by confocal microscopy of the skin, quantification of pilocarpine-induced sweating, semi-quantitative evaluation of full facial photographs with respect to XLHED-related skin issues, and phototrichogram analysis. All eight boys with known hypomorphic EDA mutations were able to produce at least some sweat and showed less severe cutaneous signs of XLHED than the anhidrotic XLHED patients (e.g., perioral and periorbital eczema or hyperpigmentation, regional hyperkeratosis, characteristic wrinkles under the eyes). As expected, individuals with XLHED had significantly less and thinner hair than healthy controls. However, there were also significant differences in hair number, diameter, and other hair characteristics between the group with hypomorphic EDA mutations and the anhidrotic patients. In summary, this study indicated a remarkable genotype-phenotype correlation of skin and hair findings in prepubescent males with XLHED. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Mycothiol-Deficient Mycobacterium smegmatis Mutants Are Hypersensitive to Alkylating Agents, Free Radicals, and Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Mamta; Newton, Gerald L.; Ko, Mary; Martinez, Gladys J.; Fahey, Robert C.; Av-Gay, Yossef

    2002-01-01

    Mycothiol (MSH; 1d-myo-inosityl 2-[N-acetyl-l-cysteinyl]amido-2-deoxy-α-d-glucopyranoside) is the major low-molecular-weight thiol produced by mycobacteria. Mutants of Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2155 deficient in MSH production were produced by chemical mutagenesis as well as by transposon mutagenesis. One chemical mutant (mutant I64) and two transposon mutants (mutants Tn1 and Tn2) stably deficient in MSH production were isolated by screening for reduced levels of MSH content. The MSH contents of transposon mutants Tn1 and Tn2 were found to be less than 0.1% that of the parent strain, and the MSH content of I64 was found to be 1 to 5% that of the parent strain. All three strains accumulated 1d-myo-inosityl 2-deoxy-α-d-glucopyranoside to levels 20- to 25-fold the level found in the parent strain. The cysteine:1d-myo-inosityl 2-amino-2-deoxy-α-d-glucopyranoside ligase (MshC) activities of the three mutant strains were ≤2% that of the parent strain. Phenotypic analysis revealed that these MSH-deficient mutants possess increased susceptibilities to free radicals and alkylating agents and to a wide range of antibiotics including erythromycin, azithromycin, vancomycin, penicillin G, rifamycin, and rifampin. Conversely, the mutants possess at least 200-fold higher levels of resistance to isoniazid than the wild type. We mapped the mutation in the chemical mutant by sequencing the mshC gene and showed that a single amino acid substitution (L205P) is responsible for reduced MSH production and its associated phenotype. Our results demonstrate that there is a direct correlation between MSH depletion and enhanced sensitivity to toxins and antibiotics. PMID:12384335

  18. Analysis of mammalian gene function through broad based phenotypic screens across a consortium of mouse clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, David J; Adams, Niels C; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Antonio; Ali-Hadji, Dalila; Amann, Gregory; André, Philippe; Atkins, Sarah; Auburtin, Aurelie; Ayadi, Abdel; Becker, Julien; Becker, Lore; Bedu, Elodie; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Birling, Marie-Christine; Blake, Andrew; Bottomley, Joanna; Bowl, Mike; Brault, Véronique; Busch, Dirk H; Bussell, James N; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Cater, Heather; Champy, Marie-France; Charles, Philippe; Chevalier, Claire; Chiani, Francesco; Codner, Gemma F; Combe, Roy; Cox, Roger; Dalloneau, Emilie; Dierich, André; Di Fenza, Armida; Doe, Brendan; Duchon, Arnaud; Eickelberg, Oliver; Esapa, Chris T; El Fertak, Lahcen; Feigel, Tanja; Emelyanova, Irina; Estabel, Jeanne; Favor, Jack; Flenniken, Ann; Gambadoro, Alessia; Garrett, Lilian; Gates, Hilary; Gerdin, Anna-Karin; Gkoutos, George; Greenaway, Simon; Glasl, Lisa; Goetz, Patrice; Da Cruz, Isabelle Goncalves; Götz, Alexander; Graw, Jochen; Guimond, Alain; Hans, Wolfgang; Hicks, Geoff; Hölter, Sabine M; Höfler, Heinz; Hancock, John M; Hoehndorf, Robert; Hough, Tertius; Houghton, Richard; Hurt, Anja; Ivandic, Boris; Jacobs, Hughes; Jacquot, Sylvie; Jones, Nora; Karp, Natasha A; Katus, Hugo A; Kitchen, Sharon; Klein-Rodewald, Tanja; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Lalanne, Valerie; Leblanc, Sophie; Lengger, Christoph; le Marchand, Elise; Ludwig, Tonia; Lux, Aline; McKerlie, Colin; Maier, Holger; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Marschall, Susan; Mark, Manuel; Melvin, David G; Meziane, Hamid; Micklich, Kateryna; Mittelhauser, Christophe; Monassier, Laurent; Moulaert, David; Muller, Stéphanie; Naton, Beatrix; Neff, Frauke; Nolan, Patrick M; Nutter, Lauryl MJ; Ollert, Markus; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Pellegata, Natalia S; Peter, Emilie; Petit-Demoulière, Benoit; Pickard, Amanda; Podrini, Christine; Potter, Paul; Pouilly, Laurent; Puk, Oliver; Richardson, David; Rousseau, Stephane; Quintanilla-Fend, Leticia; Quwailid, Mohamed M; Racz, Ildiko; Rathkolb, Birgit; Riet, Fabrice; Rossant, Janet; Roux, Michel; Rozman, Jan; Ryder, Ed; Salisbury, Jennifer; Santos, Luis; Schäble, Karl-Heinz; Schiller, Evelyn; Schrewe, Anja; Schulz, Holger; Steinkamp, Ralf; Simon, Michelle; Stewart, Michelle; Stöger, Claudia; Stöger, Tobias; Sun, Minxuan; Sunter, David; Teboul, Lydia; Tilly, Isabelle; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P; Tost, Monica; Treise, Irina; Vasseur, Laurent; Velot, Emilie; Vogt-Weisenhorn, Daniela; Wagner, Christelle; Walling, Alison; Weber, Bruno; Wendling, Olivia; Westerberg, Henrik; Willershäuser, Monja; Wolf, Eckhard; Wolter, Anne; Wood, Joe; Wurst, Wolfgang; Yildirim, Ali Önder; Zeh, Ramona; Zimmer, Andreas; Zimprich, Annemarie

    2015-01-01

    The function of the majority of genes in the mouse and human genomes remains unknown. The mouse ES cell knockout resource provides a basis for characterisation of relationships between gene and phenotype. The EUMODIC consortium developed and validated robust methodologies for broad-based phenotyping of knockouts through a pipeline comprising 20 disease-orientated platforms. We developed novel statistical methods for pipeline design and data analysis aimed at detecting reproducible phenotypes with high power. We acquired phenotype data from 449 mutant alleles, representing 320 unique genes, of which half had no prior functional annotation. We captured data from over 27,000 mice finding that 83% of the mutant lines are phenodeviant, with 65% demonstrating pleiotropy. Surprisingly, we found significant differences in phenotype annotation according to zygosity. Novel phenotypes were uncovered for many genes with unknown function providing a powerful basis for hypothesis generation and further investigation in diverse systems. PMID:26214591

  19. A sorghum (Sorghum bicolor mutant with altered carbon isotope ratio.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govinda Rizal

    Full Text Available Recent efforts to engineer C4 photosynthetic traits into C3 plants such as rice demand an understanding of the genetic elements that enable C4 plants to outperform C3 plants. As a part of the C4 Rice Consortium's efforts to identify genes needed to support C4 photosynthesis, EMS mutagenized sorghum populations were generated and screened to identify genes that cause a loss of C4 function. Stable carbon isotope ratio (δ13C of leaf dry matter has been used to distinguishspecies with C3 and C4 photosynthetic pathways. Here, we report the identification of a sorghum (Sorghum bicolor mutant with a low δ13C characteristic. A mutant (named Mut33 with a pale phenotype and stunted growth was identified from an EMS treated sorghum M2 population. The stable carbon isotope analysis of the mutants showed a decrease of 13C uptake capacity. The noise of random mutation was reduced by crossing the mutant and its wildtype (WT. The back-cross (BC1F1 progenies were like the WT parent in terms of 13C values and plant phenotypes. All the BC1F2 plants with low δ13C died before they produced their 6th leaf. Gas exchange measurements of the low δ13C sorghum mutants showed a higher CO2 compensation point (25.24 μmol CO2.mol-1air and the maximum rate of photosynthesis was less than 5μmol.m-2.s-1. To identify the genetic determinant of this trait, four DNA pools were isolated; two each from normal and low δ13C BC1F2 mutant plants. These were sequenced using an Illumina platform. Comparison of allele frequency of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs between the pools with contrasting phenotype showed that a locus in Chromosome 10 between 57,941,104 and 59,985,708 bps had an allele frequency of 1. There were 211 mutations and 37 genes in the locus, out of which mutations in 9 genes showed non-synonymous changes. This finding is expected to contribute to future research on the identification of the causal factor differentiating C4 from C3 species that can be used

  20. Phenotypic and functional characterization of earthworm coelomocyte subsets: Linking light scatter-based cell typing and imaging of the sorted populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmann, Péter; Hayashi, Yuya; Bodó, Kornélia; Ernszt, Dávid; Somogyi, Ildikó; Steib, Anita; Orbán, József; Pollák, Edit; Nyitrai, Miklós; Németh, Péter; Molnár, László

    2016-12-01

    Flow cytometry is a common approach to study invertebrate immune cells including earthworm coelomocytes. However, the link between light-scatter- and microscopy-based phenotyping remains obscured. Here we show, by means of light scatter-based cell sorting, both subpopulations (amoebocytes and eleocytes) can be physically isolated with good sort efficiency and purity confirmed by downstream morphological and cytochemical applications. Immunocytochemical analysis using anti-EFCC monoclonal antibodies combined with phalloidin staining has revealed antigenically distinct, sorted subsets. Screening of lectin binding capacity indicated wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) as the strongest reactor to amoebocytes. This is further evidenced by WGA inhibition assays that suggest high abundance of N-acetyl-d-glucosamine in amoebocytes. Post-sort phagocytosis assays confirmed the functional differences between amoebocytes and eleocytes, with the former being in favor of bacterial engulfment. This study has proved successful in linking flow cytometry and microscopy analysis and provides further experimental evidence of phenotypic and functional heterogeneity in earthworm coelomocyte subsets. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. X-ray-sensitive mutants of Chinese hamster ovary cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeggo, P.A.; Kemp, L.M.

    1983-01-01

    A standard technique of microbial genetics, which involves the transfer of cells from single colonies by means of sterile toothpicks, has been adapted to somatic cell genetics. Its use has been demonstrated in the isolation of X-ray-sensitive mutants of CHO cells. 9000 colonies have been tested and 6 appreciably X-ray-sensitive mutants were isolated. (D 10 values 5-10-fold of wild-type D 10 value.) A further 6 mutants were obtained which showed a slight level of sensitivity (D 10 values less than 2-fold of wild-type D 10 value). The 6 more sensitive mutants were also sensitive to bleomycin, a chemotherapeutic agent inducing X-ray-like damage. Cross-sensitivity to UV-irradiation and treatment with the alkylating agents, MMS, EMS and MNNG, was investigated for these mutants. Some sensitivity to these other agents was observed, but in all cases it was less severe than the level of sensitivity to X-irradiation. Each mutant showed a different overall response to the spectrum of agents examined and these appear to represent new mutant phenotypes derived from cultured mammalian cell lines. One mutant strain, xrs-7, was cross-sensitive to all the DNA-damaging agents, but was proficient in the repair of single-strand breaks. (Auth.)

  2. A Medicago truncatula tobacco retrotransposon insertion mutant collection with defects in nodule development and symbiotic nitrogen fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pislariu, Catalina I; Murray, Jeremy D; Wen, JiangQi; Cosson, Viviane; Muni, RajaSekhara Reddy Duvvuru; Wang, Mingyi; Benedito, Vagner A; Andriankaja, Andry; Cheng, Xiaofei; Jerez, Ivone Torres; Mondy, Samuel; Zhang, Shulan; Taylor, Mark E; Tadege, Million; Ratet, Pascal; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Chen, Rujin; Udvardi, Michael K

    2012-08-01

    A Tnt1-insertion mutant population of Medicago truncatula ecotype R108 was screened for defects in nodulation and symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Primary screening of 9,300 mutant lines yielded 317 lines with putative defects in nodule development and/or nitrogen fixation. Of these, 230 lines were rescreened, and 156 lines were confirmed with defective symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Mutants were sorted into six distinct phenotypic categories: 72 nonnodulating mutants (Nod-), 51 mutants with totally ineffective nodules (Nod+ Fix-), 17 mutants with partially ineffective nodules (Nod+ Fix+/-), 27 mutants defective in nodule emergence, elongation, and nitrogen fixation (Nod+/- Fix-), one mutant with delayed and reduced nodulation but effective in nitrogen fixation (dNod+/- Fix+), and 11 supernodulating mutants (Nod++Fix+/-). A total of 2,801 flanking sequence tags were generated from the 156 symbiotic mutant lines. Analysis of flanking sequence tags revealed 14 insertion alleles of the following known symbiotic genes: NODULE INCEPTION (NIN), DOESN'T MAKE INFECTIONS3 (DMI3/CCaMK), ERF REQUIRED FOR NODULATION, and SUPERNUMERARY NODULES (SUNN). In parallel, a polymerase chain reaction-based strategy was used to identify Tnt1 insertions in known symbiotic genes, which revealed 25 additional insertion alleles in the following genes: DMI1, DMI2, DMI3, NIN, NODULATION SIGNALING PATHWAY1 (NSP1), NSP2, SUNN, and SICKLE. Thirty-nine Nod- lines were also screened for arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis phenotypes, and 30 mutants exhibited defects in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis. Morphological and developmental features of several new symbiotic mutants are reported. The collection of mutants described here is a source of novel alleles of known symbiotic genes and a resource for cloning novel symbiotic genes via Tnt1 tagging.

  3. The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium Web Portal, a unified point of access for knockout mice and related phenotyping data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koscielny, Gautier; Yaikhom, Gagarine; Iyer, Vivek; Meehan, Terrence F.; Morgan, Hugh; Atienza-Herrero, Julian; Blake, Andrew; Chen, Chao-Kung; Easty, Richard; Di Fenza, Armida; Fiegel, Tanja; Grifiths, Mark; Horne, Alan; Karp, Natasha A.; Kurbatova, Natalja; Mason, Jeremy C.; Matthews, Peter; Oakley, Darren J.; Qazi, Asfand; Regnart, Jack; Retha, Ahmad; Santos, Luis A.; Sneddon, Duncan J.; Warren, Jonathan; Westerberg, Henrik; Wilson, Robert J.; Melvin, David G.; Smedley, Damian; Brown, Steve D. M.; Flicek, Paul; Skarnes, William C.; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Parkinson, Helen

    2014-01-01

    The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) web portal (http://www.mousephenotype.org) provides the biomedical community with a unified point of access to mutant mice and rich collection of related emerging and existing mouse phenotype data. IMPC mouse clinics worldwide follow rigorous highly structured and standardized protocols for the experimentation, collection and dissemination of data. Dedicated ‘data wranglers’ work with each phenotyping center to collate data and perform quality control of data. An automated statistical analysis pipeline has been developed to identify knockout strains with a significant change in the phenotype parameters. Annotation with biomedical ontologies allows biologists and clinicians to easily find mouse strains with phenotypic traits relevant to their research. Data integration with other resources will provide insights into mammalian gene function and human disease. As phenotype data become available for every gene in the mouse, the IMPC web portal will become an invaluable tool for researchers studying the genetic contributions of genes to human diseases. PMID:24194600

  4. Autophagy and UPR in alpha-crystallin mutant knock-in mouse models of hereditary cataracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andley, Usha P; Goldman, Joshua W

    2016-01-01

    Knock-in mice provide useful models of congenital and age-related cataracts caused by α-crystallin mutations. R49C αA-crystallin and R120G αB-crystallin mutations are linked with hereditary cataracts. Knock-in αA-R49C+/- heterozygotes develop cataracts by 1-2months, whereas homozygote mice have cataracts at birth. The R49C mutation drastically reduces lens protein water solubility and causes cell death in knock-in mouse lenses. Mutant crystallin cannot function as a chaperone, which leads to protein aggregation and lens opacity. Protein aggregation disrupts the lens fiber cell structure and normal development and causes cell death in epithelial and fiber cells. We determined what aspects of the wild-type phenotype are age-dependently altered in the mutant lens. Wild-type, heterozygote (αA-R49C+/-), and homozygote (αA-R49C+/+) mouse lenses were assessed pre- and postnatally for lens morphology (electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry), and autophagy or unfolded protein response markers (immunoblotting). Morphology was altered by embryonic day 17 in R49C+/+ lenses; R49C+/- lens morphology was unaffected at this stage. Active autophagy in the lens epithelium of mutant lenses was indicated by the presence of autophagosomes using electron microscopy. Protein p62 levels, which are degraded specifically by autophagy, increased in αA-R49C mutant versus wild-type lenses, suggesting autophagy inhibition in the mutant lenses. The unfolded protein response marker XBP-1 was upregulated in adult lenses of αB-R120G+/+ mice, suggesting its role in lens opacification. Mutated crystallins alter lens morphology, autophagy, and stress responses. Therapeutic modulation of autophagic pathways may improve protein degradation in cataractous lenses and reduce lens opacity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Crystallin Biochemistry in Health and Disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The yeast THO/Sub2 complex is functionally linked to 3’-end processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Torben Heick

    In S. cerevisiae the RNA polymerase II-associated THO complex facilitates loading of the RNA-dependent ATPase Sub2p/UAP56 onto nascent transcripts. Mutation of individual THO components or Sub2p elicits dual transcription and mRNA nuclear export phenotypes. In addition Sub2p also has been...... close proximity to cleavage/polyadenylation site sequences. Moreover, yeast extracts prepared from THO deletion- or sub2 mutant-strains are deficient for pre-mRNA 3’-end cleavage in an in vitro system uncoupled from transcription. The molecular basis for the link between THO/Sub2 and 3’ end processing...

  6. The cellular and molecular etiology of the craniofacial defects in the avian ciliopathic mutant talpid2

    Science.gov (United States)

    talpid2 is an avian autosomal recessive mutant with a myriad of congenital malformations, including polydactyly and facial clefting. Although phenotypically similar to talpid3, talpid2 has a distinct facial phenotype and an unknown cellular, molecular and genetic basis. We set out to determine the e...

  7. X-ray survival characteristics and genetic analysis for nine saccharomyces deletion mutants that show altered radiation sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Game, John C.; Williamson, Marsha S.; Baccari, Clelia

    2004-01-07

    The availability of a genome-wide set of Saccharomyces deletion mutants provides a chance to identify all the yeast genes involved in DNA repair. Using X-rays, we are screening these mutants to identify additional genes that show increased sensitivity to the lethal effects of ionizing radiation. For each mutant identified as sensitive, we are confirming that the sensitivity phenotype co-segregates with the deletion allele and are obtaining multipoint survival-versus-dose assays in at least two haploid and one homozygous diploid strains. We present data for deletion mutants involving the genes DOT1, MDM20, NAT3, SPT7, SPT20, GCN5, HFI1, DCC1 and VID21/EAF1, and discuss their potential roles in repair. Eight of these genes have a clear radiation-sensitive phenotype when deleted, but the ninth, GCN5, has at most a borderline phenotype. None of the deletions confer substantial sensitivity to ultra-violet radiation, although one or two may confer marginal sensitivity. The DOT1 gene is of interest because its only known function is to methylate one lysine residue in the core of the histone H3 protein. We find that histone H3 mutants (supplied by K. Struhl) in which this residue is replaced by other amino-acids are also X-ray sensitive, seeming to confirm that methylation of the lysine-79 residue is required for effective repair of radiation damage.

  8. Analysis of mammalian gene function through broad-based phenotypic screens across a consortium of mouse clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Nicholson, George; Selloum, Mohammed; White, Jacqui; Morgan, Hugh; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Sorg, Tania; Wells, Sara; Fuchs, Helmut; Fray, Martin; Adams, David J; Adams, Niels C; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Antonio; Ali-Hadji, Dalila; Amann, Gregory; André, Philippe; Atkins, Sarah; Auburtin, Aurelie; Ayadi, Abdel; Becker, Julien; Becker, Lore; Bedu, Elodie; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Birling, Marie-Christine; Blake, Andrew; Bottomley, Joanna; Bowl, Mike; Brault, Véronique; Busch, Dirk H; Bussell, James N; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Cater, Heather; Champy, Marie-France; Charles, Philippe; Chevalier, Claire; Chiani, Francesco; Codner, Gemma F; Combe, Roy; Cox, Roger; Dalloneau, Emilie; Dierich, André; Di Fenza, Armida; Doe, Brendan; Duchon, Arnaud; Eickelberg, Oliver; Esapa, Chris T; El Fertak, Lahcen; Feigel, Tanja; Emelyanova, Irina; Estabel, Jeanne; Favor, Jack; Flenniken, Ann; Gambadoro, Alessia; Garrett, Lilian; Gates, Hilary; Gerdin, Anna-Karin; Gkoutos, George; Greenaway, Simon; Glasl, Lisa; Goetz, Patrice; Da Cruz, Isabelle Goncalves; Götz, Alexander; Graw, Jochen; Guimond, Alain; Hans, Wolfgang; Hicks, Geoff; Hölter, Sabine M; Höfler, Heinz; Hancock, John M; Hoehndorf, Robert; Hough, Tertius; Houghton, Richard; Hurt, Anja; Ivandic, Boris; Jacobs, Hughes; Jacquot, Sylvie; Jones, Nora; Karp, Natasha A; Katus, Hugo A; Kitchen, Sharon; Klein-Rodewald, Tanja; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Lalanne, Valerie; Leblanc, Sophie; Lengger, Christoph; le Marchand, Elise; Ludwig, Tonia; Lux, Aline; McKerlie, Colin; Maier, Holger; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Marschall, Susan; Mark, Manuel; Melvin, David G; Meziane, Hamid; Micklich, Kateryna; Mittelhauser, Christophe; Monassier, Laurent; Moulaert, David; Muller, Stéphanie; Naton, Beatrix; Neff, Frauke; Nolan, Patrick M; Nutter, Lauryl Mj; Ollert, Markus; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Pellegata, Natalia S; Peter, Emilie; Petit-Demoulière, Benoit; Pickard, Amanda; Podrini, Christine; Potter, Paul; Pouilly, Laurent; Puk, Oliver; Richardson, David; Rousseau, Stephane; Quintanilla-Fend, Leticia; Quwailid, Mohamed M; Racz, Ildiko; Rathkolb, Birgit; Riet, Fabrice; Rossant, Janet; Roux, Michel; Rozman, Jan; Ryder, Ed; Salisbury, Jennifer; Santos, Luis; Schäble, Karl-Heinz; Schiller, Evelyn; Schrewe, Anja; Schulz, Holger; Steinkamp, Ralf; Simon, Michelle; Stewart, Michelle; Stöger, Claudia; Stöger, Tobias; Sun, Minxuan; Sunter, David; Teboul, Lydia; Tilly, Isabelle; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P; Tost, Monica; Treise, Irina; Vasseur, Laurent; Velot, Emilie; Vogt-Weisenhorn, Daniela; Wagner, Christelle; Walling, Alison; Weber, Bruno; Wendling, Olivia; Westerberg, Henrik; Willershäuser, Monja; Wolf, Eckhard; Wolter, Anne; Wood, Joe; Wurst, Wolfgang; Yildirim, Ali Önder; Zeh, Ramona; Zimmer, Andreas; Zimprich, Annemarie; Holmes, Chris; Steel, Karen P; Herault, Yann; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Brown, Steve Dm

    2015-09-01

    The function of the majority of genes in the mouse and human genomes remains unknown. The mouse embryonic stem cell knockout resource provides a basis for the characterization of relationships between genes and phenotypes. The EUMODIC consortium developed and validated robust methodologies for the broad-based phenotyping of knockouts through a pipeline comprising 20 disease-oriented platforms. We developed new statistical methods for pipeline design and data analysis aimed at detecting reproducible phenotypes with high power. We acquired phenotype data from 449 mutant alleles, representing 320 unique genes, of which half had no previous functional annotation. We captured data from over 27,000 mice, finding that 83% of the mutant lines are phenodeviant, with 65% demonstrating pleiotropy. Surprisingly, we found significant differences in phenotype annotation according to zygosity. New phenotypes were uncovered for many genes with previously unknown function, providing a powerful basis for hypothesis generation and further investigation in diverse systems.

  9. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Sordaria macrospora Mutants Identifies Developmental Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowrousian, Minou; Teichert, Ines; Masloff, Sandra; Kück, Ulrich

    2012-02-01

    The study of mutants to elucidate gene functions has a long and successful history; however, to discover causative mutations in mutants that were generated by random mutagenesis often takes years of laboratory work and requires previously generated genetic and/or physical markers, or resources like DNA libraries for complementation. Here, we present an alternative method to identify defective genes in developmental mutants of the filamentous fungus Sordaria macrospora through Illumina/Solexa whole-genome sequencing. We sequenced pooled DNA from progeny of crosses of three mutants and the wild type and were able to pinpoint the causative mutations in the mutant strains through bioinformatics analysis. One mutant is a spore color mutant, and the mutated gene encodes a melanin biosynthesis enzyme. The causative mutation is a G to A change in the first base of an intron, leading to a splice defect. The second mutant carries an allelic mutation in the pro41 gene encoding a protein essential for sexual development. In the mutant, we detected a complex pattern of deletion/rearrangements at the pro41 locus. In the third mutant, a point mutation in the stop codon of a transcription factor-encoding gene leads to the production of immature fruiting bodies. For all mutants, transformation with a wild type-copy of the affected gene restored the wild-type phenotype. Our data demonstrate that whole-genome sequencing of mutant strains is a rapid method to identify developmental genes in an organism that can be genetically crossed and where a reference genome sequence is available, even without prior mapping information.

  10. Mutants of Streptomyces coeruleorubidus impaired in the biosynthesis of daunomycinone glycosides and related metabolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumauerova, M.; Stajner, K.; Pokorny, V.; Hostalek, Z.; Vanek, Z.

    1978-01-01

    Mutants of Streptomyces coeruleorubidus, blocked in the biosynthesis of anthracycline antibiotics of the daunomycine complex, were isolated from the production strains after treatment with UV light, γ-radiation, nitrous acid, and after natural selection; according to their different biosynthetic activity the mutants were divided into five phenotypic groups. Mutants of two of these groups produced compounds that had not yet been described in Streptomyces coeruleorubidus (aklavinone, 7-deoxyaklavinone, zeta-rhodomycinone and glycosides of epsilon-rhodomycinone). The mutants differed from the parent strains and also mutually in morphological characteristics but no direct correlation between these changes and the biosynthetic activity could be observed in most cases. (author)

  11. Absence-like and tonic seizures in aspartoacylase/attractin double-mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohma, Hiroshi; Kuramoto, Takashi; Matalon, Reuben; Surendran, Sankar; Tyring, Stephen; Kitada, Kazuhiro; Sasa, Masashi; Serikawa, Tadao

    2007-04-01

    The Spontaneously Epileptic Rat (SER), a double-mutant for tremor and zitter mutations, shows spontaneous occurrences of absence-like and tonic seizures. Several lines of evidence suggest that the combined effect of Aspa and Atrn mutations is the most likely cause of the epileptic phenotype of the SER. To address this issue, we produced a new double-mutant mouse line carrying both homozygous Aspa-knockout and Atrn(mg-3J) mutant alleles. The Aspa/Atrn double-mutant mice exhibited absence-like and tonic seizures that were characterized by the appearance of 5-7 Hz spike-wave-like complexes and low voltage fast waves on EEGs. These results demonstrate directly that the simultaneous loss of the Aspa and Atrn gene functions causes epileptic seizures in the mouse and suggest that both Aspa and Atrn deficiencies might be responsible for epileptic seizures in the SER.

  12. Phenotypic mixing and hiding may contribute to memory in viral quasispecies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novella Isabel S

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a number of recent experiments with food-and-mouth disease virus, a deleterious mutant, RED, was found to avoid extinction and remain in the population for long periods of time. Since RED characterizes the past evolutionary history of the population, this observation was called quasispecies memory. While the quasispecies theory predicts the existence of these memory genomes, there is a disagreement between the expected and observed mutant frequency values. Therefore, the origin of quasispecies memory is not fully understood. Results We propose and analyze a simple model of complementation between the wild type virus and a mutant that has an impaired ability of cell entry, the likely cause of fitness differences between wild type and RED mutants. The mutant will go extinct unless it is recreated from the wild type through mutations. However, under phenotypic mixing-and-hiding as a mechanism of complementation, the time to extinction in the absence of mutations increases with increasing multiplicity of infection (m.o.i.. If the RED mutant is constantly recreated by mutations, then its frequency at equilibrium under selection-mutation balance also increases with increasing m.o.i. At high m.o.i., a large fraction of mutant genomes are encapsidated with wild-type protein, which enables them to infect cells as efficiently as the wild type virions, and thus increases their fitness to the wild-type level. Moreover, even at low m.o.i. the equilibrium frequency of the mutant is higher than predicted by the standard quasispecies model, because a fraction of mutant virions generated from wild-type parents will also be encapsidated by wild-type protein. Conclusions Our model predicts that phenotypic hiding will strongly influence the population dynamics of viruses, particularly at high m.o.i., and will also have important effects on the mutation-selection balance at low m.o.i. The delay in mutant extinction and increase in mutant

  13. Intracellular localization and movement phenotypes of alfalfa mosaic virus movement protein mutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, M.; Jongejan, L.; Zheng, H.; Zhang, L.; Bol, J. F.

    2001-01-01

    Thirteen mutations were introduced in the movement protein (MP) gene of Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene and the mutant MP-GFP fusions were expressed transiently in tobacco protoplasts, tobacco suspension cells, and epidermal cells of tobacco leaves. In

  14. Phenotype-Genotype Association Analysis of ACTH-Secreting Pituitary Adenoma and Its Molecular Link to Patient Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renzhi Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH-secreting pituitary adenoma, also known as Cushing disease (CD, is rare and causes metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis due to hypercortisolism. However, the molecular pathogenesis of CD is still unclear because of a lack of human cell lines and animal models. Here, we study 106 clinical characteristics and gene expression changes from 118 patients, the largest cohort of CD in a single-center. RNA deep sequencing is used to examine genotypic changes in nine paired female ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas and adjacent nontumorous pituitary tissues (ANPT. We develop a novel analysis linking disease clinical characteristics and whole transcriptomic changes, using Pearson Correlation Coefficient to discover a molecular network mechanism. We report that osteoporosis is distinguished from the phenotype and genotype analysis. A cluster of genes involved in osteoporosis is identified using Pearson correlation coefficient analysis. Most of the genes are reported in the bone related literature, confirming the feasibility of phenotype-genotype association analysis, which could be used in the analysis of almost all diseases. Secreted phosphoprotein 1 (SPP1, collagen type I α 1 chain (COL1A1, 5′-nucleotidase ecto (NT5E, HtrA serine peptidase 1 (HTRA1 and angiopoietin 1 (ANGPT1 and their signalling pathways are shown to be involved in osteoporosis in CD patients. Our discoveries provide a molecular link for osteoporosis in CD patients, and may open new potential avenues for osteoporosis intervention and treatment.

  15. Characterization of X-linked Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia (XL-HED) Hair and Sweat Gland Phenotypes Using Phototrichogram Analysis and Live Confocal Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kyle B.; Goodwin, Alice F.; Landan, Maya; Seidel, Kerstin; Tran, Dong-Kha; Hogue, Jacob; Chavez, Miquella; Fete, Mary; Yu, Wenli; Hussein, Tarek; Johnson, Ramsey; Huttner, Kenneth; Jheon, Andrew H.; Klein, Ophir D.

    2015-01-01

    Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is the most common type of ectodermal dysplasia (ED), which encompasses a large group of syndromes that share several phenotypic features such as missing or malformed ectodermal structures, including skin, hair, sweat glands, and teeth. X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XL-HED) is associated with mutations in ectodysplasin (EDA1). Hypohidrosis due to hypoplastic sweat glands and thin, sparse hair are phenotypic features that significantly affect the daily lives of XL-HED individuals and therefore require systematic analysis. We sought to determine the quality of life of individuals with XL-HED and to quantify sweat duct and hair phenotypes using confocal imaging, pilocarpine iontophoresis, and phototrichogram analysis. Using these highly sensitive and non-invasive techniques, we demonstrated that 11/12 XL-HED individuals presented with a complete absence of sweat ducts and that none produced sweat. We determined that the thin hair phenotype observed in XL-HED was due to multiple factors, such as fewer terminal hairs with decreased thickness and slower growth rate, as well as fewer follicular units and fewer hairs per unit. The precise characterization of XL-HED phenotypes using sensitive and non-invasive techniques presented in our study will improve upon larger genotype-phenotype studies and in the assessment of future therapies in XL-HED. PMID:23687000

  16. Impaired cholesterol esterification in primary brain cultures of the lysosomal cholesterol storage disorder (LCSD) mouse mutant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, S.C.; Suresh, S.; Weintroub, H.; Brady, R.O.; Pentchev, P.G.

    1987-01-01

    Esterification of cholesterol was investigated in primary neuroglial cultures obtained from newborn lysosomal cholesterol storage disorder (LCSD) mouse mutants. An impairment in 3 H-oleic acid incorporation into cholesteryl esters was demonstrated in cultures of homozygous LCSD brain. Primary cultures derived from other phenotypically normal pups of the carrier breeders esterified cholesterol at normal levels or at levels which were intermediary between normal and deficient indicating a phenotypic expression of the LCSD heterozygote genotype. These observations on LCSD mutant brain cells indicate that the defect in cholesterol esterification is closely related to the primary genetic defect and is expressed in neuroglial cells in culture

  17. X-Linked Dystonia Parkinsonism: Clinical Phenotype, Genetics and Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond L. Rosales

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The clinical phenotype of X-Linked Dystonia Parkinsonism (XDP is typically one that involves a Filipino adult male whose ancestry is mostly traced in the Philippine island of Panay. Dystonia usually starts focally in the lower limbs or oromandibular regions, then spreads to become generalized eventually. Parkinsonism sets in later into the disease and usually in combination with dystonia. /DYT3/ and /TAF1/ are the two genes associated with XDP. An SVA retrotransposon insertion in an intron of /TAF1/ may reduce neuron-specific expression of the /TAF1/ isoform in the caudate nucleus, and subsequently interfere with the transcription of many neuronal genes. Polypharmacy with oral benzodiazepines, anticholinergic agents and muscle relaxants leaves much to be desired in terms of efficacy. The medications to date that may appear beneficial, especially in disabling dystonias, are zolpidem, muscle afferent block with lidocaine-ethanol and botulinum toxin type A. Despite the few cases undergoing deep brain stimulation, this functional surgery has shown the greatest promise in XDP. An illustrative case of XDP in a family depicts the variable course of illness, including a bout of “status dystonicus,” challenges in therapy, reckoning with the social impact of the disease, and eventual patient demise. Indeed, there remains some gaps in understanding some phenomenological, genetic and treatment aspects of XDP, the areas upon which future research directions may be worthwhile.

  18. Further studies on O2-resistant photosynthesis and photorespiration in a tobacco mutant with enhanced catalase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelitch, I.

    1990-01-01

    The increase in net photosynthesis in M 4 progeny of an O 2 -resistant tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) mutant relative to wild-type plants at 21 and 42% O 2 has been confirmed and further investigated. Self-pollination of an M 3 mutant produced M 4 progeny segregating high catalase phenotypes (average 40% greater than wild type) at a frequency of about 60%. The high catalase phenotype cosegregated precisely with O 2 -resistant photosynthesis. About 25% of the F 1 progeny of reciprocal crosses between the same M 3 mutant and wild type had high catalase activity, whether the mutant was used as the maternal or paternal parent, indicating nuclear inheritance. In high-catalase mutants the activity of NADH-hydroxypyruvate reductase, another peroxisomal enzyme, was the same as wild type. The mutants released 15% less photorespiratory CO 2 as a percent of net photosynthesis in CO 2 -free 21% O 2 and 36% less in CO 2 -free 42% O 2 compared with wild type. The mutant leaf tissue also released less 14 CO 2 per [1- 14 C]glycolate metabolized than wild type in normal air, consistent with less photorespiration in the mutant. The O 2 -resistant photosynthesis appears to be caused by a decrease in photorespiration especially under conditions of high O 2 where the stoichiometry of CO 2 release per glycolate metabolized is expected to be enhanced. The higher catalase activity in the mutant may decrease the nonenzymatic peroxidation of keto-acids such as hydroxypyruvate and glyoxylate by photorespiratory H 2 O 2

  19. The Arabidopsis thaliana mutant air1 implicates SOS3 in the regulation of anthocyanins under salt stress

    KAUST Repository

    Van Oosten, Michael James

    2013-08-08

    The accumulation of anthocyanins in plants exposed to salt stress has been largely documented. However, the functional link and regulatory components underlying the biosynthesis of these molecules during exposure to stress are largely unknown. In a screen of second site suppressors of the salt overly sensitive3-1 (sos3-1) mutant, we isolated the anthocyanin-impaired-response-1 (air1) mutant. air1 is unable to accumulate anthocyanins under salt stress, a key phenotype of sos3-1 under high NaCl levels (120 mM). The air1 mutant showed a defect in anthocyanin production in response to salt stress but not to other stresses such as high light, low phosphorous, high temperature or drought stress. This specificity indicated that air1 mutation did not affect anthocyanin biosynthesis but rather its regulation in response to salt stress. Analysis of this mutant revealed a T-DNA insertion at the first exon of an Arabidopsis thaliana gene encoding for a basic region-leucine zipper transcription factor. air1 mutants displayed higher survival rates compared to wild-type in oxidative stress conditions, and presented an altered expression of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes such as F3H, F3′H and LDOX in salt stress conditions. The results presented here indicate that AIR1 is involved in the regulation of various steps of the flavonoid and anthocyanin accumulation pathways and is itself regulated by the salt-stress response signalling machinery. The discovery and characterization of AIR1 opens avenues to dissect the connections between abiotic stress and accumulation of antioxidants in the form of flavonoids and anthocyanins. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  20. Arabidopsis mutant sk156 reveals complex regulation of SPL15 in a miR156-controlled gene network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shu; Gruber, Margaret Y; Yu, Bianyun; Gao, Ming-Jun; Khachatourians, George G; Hegedus, Dwayne D; Parkin, Isobel A P; Hannoufa, Abdelali

    2012-09-18

    The Arabidopsis microRNA156 (miR156) regulates 11 members of the SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN LIKE (SPL) family by base pairing to complementary target mRNAs. Each SPL gene further regulates a set of other genes; thus, miR156 controls numerous genes through a complex gene regulation network. Increased axillary branching occurs in transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing miR156b, similar to that observed in loss-of-function max3 and max4 mutants with lesions in carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases. Arabidopsis miR156b was found to enhance carotenoid levels and reproductive shoot branching when expressed in Brassica napus, suggesting a link between miR156b expression and carotenoid metabolism. However, details of the miR156 regulatory network of SPL genes related to carotenoid metabolism are not known. In this study, an Arabidopsis T-DNA enhancer mutant, sk156, was identified due to its altered branching and trichome morphology and increased seed carotenoid levels compared to wild type (WT) ecovar Columbia. Enhanced miR156b expression due to the 35S enhancers present on the T-DNA insert was responsible for these phenotypes. Constitutive and leaf primodium-specific expression of a miR156-insensitive (mutated) SPL15 (SPL15m) largely restored WT seed carotenoid levels and plant morphology when expressed in sk156. The Arabidopsis native miR156-sensitive SPL15 (SPL15n) and SPL15m driven by a native SPL15 promoter did not restore the WT phenotype in sk156. Our findings suggest that SPL15 function is somewhat redundant with other SPL family members, which collectively affect plant phenotypes. Moreover, substantially decreased miR156b transcript levels in sk156 expressing SPL15m, together with the presence of multiple repeats of SPL-binding GTAC core sequence close to the miR156b transcription start site, suggested feedback regulation of miR156b expression by SPL15. This was supported by the demonstration of specific in vitro interaction between DNA-binding SBP domain of SPL15

  1. Mutant prevention concentrations of four carbapenems against gram-negative rods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credito, Kim; Kosowska-Shick, Klaudia; Appelbaum, Peter C

    2010-06-01

    We tested the propensities of four carbapenems to select for resistant Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii mutants by determining the mutant prevention concentrations (MPCs) for 100 clinical strains with various ss-lactam phenotypes. Among the members of the Enterobacteriaceae family and A. baumannii strains, the MPC/MIC ratios were mostly 2 to 4. In contrast, for P. aeruginosa the MPC/MIC ratios were 4 to > or =16. The MPC/MIC ratios for beta-lactamase-positive K. pneumoniae and E. coli isolates were much higher (range, 4 to >16 microg/ml) than those for ss-lactamase-negative strains.

  2. A mycobacterial smc null mutant is proficient in DNA repair and long-term survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güthlein, Carolin; Wanner, Roger M; Sander, Peter; Böttger, Erik C; Springer, Burkhard

    2008-01-01

    SMC (structural maintenance of chromosomes) proteins play fundamental roles in various aspects of chromosome organization and dynamics, including repair of DNA damage. Mutant strains of Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis defective in SMC were constructed. Surprisingly, inactivation of smc did not result in recognizable phenotypes in hallmark assays characteristic for the function of these genes. This is in contrast to data for smc null mutants in other species.

  3. A Mycobacterial smc Null Mutant Is Proficient in DNA Repair and Long-Term Survival▿

    OpenAIRE

    Güthlein, Carolin; Wanner, Roger M.; Sander, Peter; Böttger, Erik C.; Springer, Burkhard

    2007-01-01

    SMC (structural maintenance of chromosomes) proteins play fundamental roles in various aspects of chromosome organization and dynamics, including repair of DNA damage. Mutant strains of Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis defective in SMC were constructed. Surprisingly, inactivation of smc did not result in recognizable phenotypes in hallmark assays characteristic for the function of these genes. This is in contrast to data for smc null mutants in other species.

  4. Loss of Trx-2 enhances oxidative stress-dependent phenotypes in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Manabu; Ootaka, Ryousuke; Ohkura, Chiaki; Kishita, Yoshihito; Seong, Ki-Hyeon; Matsuo, Takashi; Aigaki, Toshiro

    2010-08-04

    Overexpression of thioredoxin (TRX) confers oxidative stress resistance and extends lifespan in mammals and insects. However, less is known about phenotypes associated with loss of TRX. We investigated loss-of-function phenotypes of Trx-2 in Drosophila, and found that the mutant flies are hyper-susceptible to paraquat, a free radical generator, but not to hydrogen peroxide. They contain a high amount of protein carbonyl, which dramatically increases with age. Trx-2 mutants express high levels of anti-oxidant genes, such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione synthetase. This is the first demonstration of biochemical and physiological consequences caused by loss of Trx-2 in Drosophila. Copyright (c) 2010 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Generation and analysis of a barcode-tagged insertion mutant library in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Barcodes are unique DNA sequence tags that can be used to specifically label individual mutants. The barcode-tagged open reading frame (ORF) haploid deletion mutant collections in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe allow for high-throughput mutant phenotyping because the relative growth of mutants in a population can be determined by monitoring the proportions of their associated barcodes. While these mutant collections have greatly facilitated genome-wide studies, mutations in essential genes are not present, and the roles of these genes are not as easily studied. To further support genome-scale research in S. pombe, we generated a barcode-tagged fission yeast insertion mutant library that has the potential of generating viable mutations in both essential and non-essential genes and can be easily analyzed using standard molecular biological techniques. Results An insertion vector containing a selectable ura4+ marker and a random barcode was used to generate a collection of 10,000 fission yeast insertion mutants stored individually in 384-well plates and as six pools of mixed mutants. Individual barcodes are flanked by Sfi I recognition sites and can be oligomerized in a unique orientation to facilitate barcode sequencing. Independent genetic screens on a subset of mutants suggest that this library contains a diverse collection of single insertion mutations. We present several approaches to determine insertion sites. Conclusions This collection of S. pombe barcode-tagged insertion mutants is well-suited for genome-wide studies. Because insertion mutations may eliminate, reduce or alter the function of essential and non-essential genes, this library will contain strains with a wide range of phenotypes that can be assayed by their associated barcodes. The design of the barcodes in this library allows for barcode sequencing using next generation or standard benchtop cloning approaches. PMID:22554201

  6. Generation and analysis of a barcode-tagged insertion mutant library in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Bo-Ruei

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Barcodes are unique DNA sequence tags that can be used to specifically label individual mutants. The barcode-tagged open reading frame (ORF haploid deletion mutant collections in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe allow for high-throughput mutant phenotyping because the relative growth of mutants in a population can be determined by monitoring the proportions of their associated barcodes. While these mutant collections have greatly facilitated genome-wide studies, mutations in essential genes are not present, and the roles of these genes are not as easily studied. To further support genome-scale research in S. pombe, we generated a barcode-tagged fission yeast insertion mutant library that has the potential of generating viable mutations in both essential and non-essential genes and can be easily analyzed using standard molecular biological techniques. Results An insertion vector containing a selectable ura4+ marker and a random barcode was used to generate a collection of 10,000 fission yeast insertion mutants stored individually in 384-well plates and as six pools of mixed mutants. Individual barcodes are flanked by Sfi I recognition sites and can be oligomerized in a unique orientation to facilitate barcode sequencing. Independent genetic screens on a subset of mutants suggest that this library contains a diverse collection of single insertion mutations. We present several approaches to determine insertion sites. Conclusions This collection of S. pombe barcode-tagged insertion mutants is well-suited for genome-wide studies. Because insertion mutations may eliminate, reduce or alter the function of essential and non-essential genes, this library will contain strains with a wide range of phenotypes that can be assayed by their associated barcodes. The design of the barcodes in this library allows for barcode sequencing using next generation or standard benchtop cloning

  7. Cox4i2, Ifit2, and Prdm11 Mutant Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsch, Marion; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Bönisch, Clemens

    2015-01-01

    We established a selection strategy to identify new models for an altered airway inflammatory response from a large compendium of mutant mouse lines that were systemically phenotyped in the German Mouse Clinic (GMC). As selection criteria we included published gene functional data, as well as imm...

  8. Availability of Micro-Tom mutant library combined with TILLING in molecular breeding of tomato fruit shelf-life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Yoshihiro; Asamizu, Erika; Ariizumi, Tohru; Shirasawa, Kenta; Tabata, Satoshi; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    Novel mutant alleles of an ethylene receptor Solanum lycopersicum ETHYLENE RESPONSE1 (SlETR1) gene, Sletr1-1 and Sletr1-2, were isolated from the Micro-Tom mutant library by TILLING in our previous study. They displayed different levels of impaired fruit ripening phenotype, suggesting that these alleles could be a valuable breeding material for improving shelf life of tomato fruit. To conduct practical use of the Sletr1 alleles in tomato breeding, genetic complementation analysis by transformation of genes carrying each allele is required. In this study, we generated and characterized transgenic lines over-expressing Sletr1-1 and Sletr1-2. All transgenic lines displayed ethylene insensitive phenotype and ripening inhibition, indicating that Sletr1-1 and Sletr1-2 associate with the ethylene insensitive phenotype. The level of ethylene sensitivity in the seedling was different between Sletr1-1 and Sletr1-2 transgenic lines, whereas no apparent difference was observed in fruit ripening phenotype. These results suggested that it is difficult to fine-tune the extent of ripening by transgenic approach even if the weaker allele (Sletr1-2) was used. Our present and previous studies indicate that the Micro-Tom mutant library combined with TILLING could be an efficient tool for exploring genetic variations of important agronomic traits in tomato breeding.

  9. Availability of Micro-Tom mutant library combined with TILLING in molecular breeding of tomato fruit shelf-life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Yoshihiro; Asamizu, Erika; Ariizumi, Tohru; Shirasawa, Kenta; Tabata, Satoshi; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Novel mutant alleles of an ethylene receptor Solanum lycopersicum ETHYLENE RESPONSE1 (SlETR1) gene, Sletr1-1 and Sletr1-2, were isolated from the Micro-Tom mutant library by TILLING in our previous study. They displayed different levels of impaired fruit ripening phenotype, suggesting that these alleles could be a valuable breeding material for improving shelf life of tomato fruit. To conduct practical use of the Sletr1 alleles in tomato breeding, genetic complementation analysis by transformation of genes carrying each allele is required. In this study, we generated and characterized transgenic lines over-expressing Sletr1-1 and Sletr1-2. All transgenic lines displayed ethylene insensitive phenotype and ripening inhibition, indicating that Sletr1-1 and Sletr1-2 associate with the ethylene insensitive phenotype. The level of ethylene sensitivity in the seedling was different between Sletr1-1 and Sletr1-2 transgenic lines, whereas no apparent difference was observed in fruit ripening phenotype. These results suggested that it is difficult to fine-tune the extent of ripening by transgenic approach even if the weaker allele (Sletr1-2) was used. Our present and previous studies indicate that the Micro-Tom mutant library combined with TILLING could be an efficient tool for exploring genetic variations of important agronomic traits in tomato breeding. PMID:23136532

  10. Hypermutability of a UV-sensitive aphidicolin-resistant mutant of Chinese hamster fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, P.K.; Chang, C.; Trosko, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    An ultraviolet light (UV)-sensitive thymidine auxotroph of Chinese hamster V79 cells that exhibits pleiotropic effects such as a high level of deoxycytidine triphosphate, slow growth, sensitivity to cytidine, and high frequencies of site-specific bromodeoxyuridine-dependent chromosomal aberrations was selected by its resistance to aphidicolin. The UV-induced mutability of this mutant and one of its revertants, which retains some of the phenotypes listed above, was studied in 3 mutation assay systems. The results showed that the mutant was hypermutable for ouabain and diphtheria-toxin-resistant mutations compared to wild-type V79 cells at the same UV dose or the same survival level. The mutant exhibits a delayed expression of maximal frequency of induced 6-thioguanine-resistant mutants. When maximal frequencies are compared at the same UV dose, the mutant also has higher mutation frequencies at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus. The revertant was similar to the wild-type in UV sensitivity and mutability. (orig./AJ)

  11. Worm Phenotype Ontology: Integrating phenotype data within and beyond the C. elegans community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yook Karen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Caenorhabditis elegans gene-based phenotype information dates back to the 1970's, beginning with Sydney Brenner and the characterization of behavioral and morphological mutant alleles via classical genetics in order to understand nervous system function. Since then C. elegans has become an important genetic model system for the study of basic biological and biomedical principles, largely through the use of phenotype analysis. Because of the growth of C. elegans as a genetically tractable model organism and the development of large-scale analyses, there has been a significant increase of phenotype data that needs to be managed and made accessible to the research community. To do so, a standardized vocabulary is necessary to integrate phenotype data from diverse sources, permit integration with other data types and render the data in a computable form. Results We describe a hierarchically structured, controlled vocabulary of terms that can be used to standardize phenotype descriptions in C. elegans, namely the Worm Phenotype Ontology (WPO. The WPO is currently comprised of 1,880 phenotype terms, 74% of which have been used in the annotation of phenotypes associated with greater than 18,000 C. elegans genes. The scope of the WPO is not exclusively limited to C. elegans biology, rather it is devised to also incorporate phenotypes observed in related nematode species. We have enriched the value of the WPO by integrating it with other ontologies, thereby increasing the accessibility of worm phenotypes to non-nematode biologists. We are actively developing the WPO to continue to fulfill the evolving needs of the scientific community and hope to engage researchers in this crucial endeavor. Conclusions We provide a phenotype ontology (WPO that will help to facilitate data retrieval, and cross-species comparisons within the nematode community. In the larger scientific community, the WPO will permit data integration, and

  12. Bacillus subtilis mutants deficient in the adaptive response to simple alkylating agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morohoshi, F.; Munakata, N.

    1985-03-01

    Three mutant strains exhibiting hyper-sensitivity to N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, but not to methyl methanesulfonate, were selected by a replica method from mutagenized spores of Bacillus subtilis. All three were totally deficient in the adaptive response to N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine with regard to both lethality and mutagenesis. The activity to destroy O/sup 6/-methylguanine residues in the methylated DNA was not elevated in the mutant cells by the pretreatment with sublethal concentrations of N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. This deficiency corresponded to the persistance of O/sup 6/-methylguanine residues in the DNA of both control and pretreated mutant cells challenged with the drug. The lethal and mutagenic sensitivity of the mutant strains were observed only for methyl- or ethyl-nitroso compounds that are thought to be active as inducers and are also active in O-alkylation. Except for the insensitivity to methyl methanesulfonate, the phenotypes of these mutants look very similar to those of ada mutants isolated previously in Escherichia coli.

  13. The Drosophila Neurally Altered Carbohydrate Mutant Has a Defective Golgi GDP-fucose Transporter*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Christoph; Kotu, Varshika; Sharrow, Mary; Rendić, Dubravko; Pöltl, Gerald; Tiemeyer, Michael; Wilson, Iain B. H.; Jarvis, Donald L.

    2012-01-01

    Studying genetic disorders in model organisms can provide insights into heritable human diseases. The Drosophila neurally altered carbohydrate (nac) mutant is deficient for neural expression of the HRP epitope, which consists of N-glycans with core α1,3-linked fucose residues. Here, we show that a conserved serine residue in the Golgi GDP-fucose transporter (GFR) is substituted by leucine in nac1 flies, which abolishes GDP-fucose transport in vivo and in vitro. This loss of function is due to a biochemical defect, not to destabilization or mistargeting of the mutant GFR protein. Mass spectrometry and HPLC analysis showed that nac1 mutants lack not only core α1,3-linked, but also core α1,6-linked fucose residues on their N-glycans. Thus, the nac1 Gfr mutation produces a previously unrecognized general defect in N-glycan core fucosylation. Transgenic expression of a wild-type Gfr gene restored the HRP epitope in neural tissues, directly demonstrating that the Gfr mutation is solely responsible for the neural HRP epitope deficiency in the nac1 mutant. These results validate the Drosophila nac1 mutant as a model for the human congenital disorder of glycosylation, CDG-IIc (also known as LAD-II), which is also the result of a GFR deficiency. PMID:22745127

  14. MicroCT-based phenomics in the zebrafish skeleton reveals virtues of deep phenotyping in a distributed organ system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Matthew; Gistelinck, Charlotte A; Huber, Philippe; Lee, Jane; Thompson, Marjorie H; Monstad-Rios, Adrian T; Watson, Claire J; McMenamin, Sarah K; Willaert, Andy; Parichy, David M; Coucke, Paul; Kwon, Ronald Y

    2017-09-08

    Phenomics, which ideally involves in-depth phenotyping at the whole-organism scale, may enhance our functional understanding of genetic variation. Here, we demonstrate methods to profile hundreds of phenotypic measures comprised of morphological and densitometric traits at a large number of sites within the axial skeleton of adult zebrafish. We show the potential for vertebral patterns to confer heightened sensitivity, with similar specificity, in discriminating mutant populations compared to analyzing individual vertebrae in isolation. We identify phenotypes associated with human brittle bone disease and thyroid stimulating hormone receptor hyperactivity. Finally, we develop allometric models and show their potential to aid in the discrimination of mutant phenotypes masked by alterations in growth. Our studies demonstrate virtues of deep phenotyping in a spatially distributed organ system. Analyzing phenotypic patterns may increase productivity in genetic screens, and facilitate the study of genetic variants associated with smaller effect sizes, such as those that underlie complex diseases.

  15. Defining the requirements for the pathogenic interaction between mutant calreticulin and MPL in MPN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elf, Shannon; Abdelfattah, Nouran S; Baral, April J; Beeson, Danielle; Rivera, Jeanne F; Ko, Amy; Florescu, Natalie; Birrane, Gabriel; Chen, Edwin; Mullally, Ann

    2018-02-15

    Mutations in calreticulin ( CALR ) are phenotypic drivers in the pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms. Mechanistic studies have demonstrated that mutant CALR binds to the thrombopoietin receptor MPL, and that the positive electrostatic charge of the mutant CALR C terminus is required for mutant CALR-mediated activation of JAK-STAT signaling. Here we demonstrate that although binding between mutant CALR and MPL is required for mutant CALR to transform hematopoietic cells; binding alone is insufficient for cytokine independent growth. We further show that the threshold of positive charge in the mutant CALR C terminus influences both binding of mutant CALR to MPL and activation of MPL signaling. We find that mutant CALR binds to the extracellular domain of MPL and that 3 tyrosine residues within the intracellular domain of MPL are required to activate signaling. With respect to mutant CALR function, we show that its lectin-dependent function is required for binding to MPL and for cytokine independent growth, whereas its chaperone and polypeptide-binding functionalities are dispensable. Together, our findings provide additional insights into the mechanism of the pathogenic mutant CALR-MPL interaction in myeloproliferative neoplasms. © 2018 by The American Society of Hematology.

  16. Cell lineage of timed cohorts of Tbx6-expressing cells in wild-type and Tbx6 mutant embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Concepcion

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Tbx6 is a T-box transcription factor with multiple roles in embryonic development as evidenced by dramatic effects on mesoderm cell fate determination, left/right axis determination, and somite segmentation in mutant mice. The expression of Tbx6 is restricted to the primitive streak and presomitic mesoderm, but some of the phenotypic features of mutants are not easily explained by this expression pattern. We have used genetically-inducible fate mapping to trace the fate of Tbx6-expressing cells in wild-type and mutant embryos to explain some of the puzzling features of the mutant phenotype. We created an inducible Tbx6-creERT2 transgenic mouse in which cre expression closely recapitulates endogenous Tbx6 expression both temporally and spatially. Using a lacZ-based Cre reporter and timed tamoxifen injections, we followed temporally overlapping cohorts of cells that had expressed Tbx6 and found contributions to virtually all mesodermally-derived embryonic structures as well as the extraembryonic allantois. Contribution to the endothelium of major blood vessels may account for the embryonic death of homozygous mutant embryos. In mutant embryos, Tbx6-creERT2-traced cells contributed to the abnormally segmented anterior somites and formed the characteristic ectopic neural tubes. Retention of cells in the mutant tail bud indicates a deficiency in migratory behavior of the mutant cells and the presence of Tbx6-creERT2-traced cells in the notochord, a node derivative provides a possible explanation for the heterotaxia seen in mutant embryos.

  17. A phenotypic profile of the Candida albicans regulatory network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver R Homann

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is a normal resident of the gastrointestinal tract and also the most prevalent fungal pathogen of humans. It last shared a common ancestor with the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae over 300 million years ago. We describe a collection of 143 genetically matched strains of C. albicans, each of which has been deleted for a specific transcriptional regulator. This collection represents a large fraction of the non-essential transcription circuitry. A phenotypic profile for each mutant was developed using a screen of 55 growth conditions. The results identify the biological roles of many individual transcriptional regulators; for many, this work represents the first description of their functions. For example, a quarter of the strains showed altered colony formation, a phenotype reflecting transitions among yeast, pseudohyphal, and hyphal cell forms. These transitions, which have been closely linked to pathogenesis, have been extensively studied, yet our work nearly doubles the number of transcriptional regulators known to influence them. As a second example, nearly a quarter of the knockout strains affected sensitivity to commonly used antifungal drugs; although a few transcriptional regulators have previously been implicated in susceptibility to these drugs, our work indicates many additional mechanisms of sensitivity and resistance. Finally, our results inform how transcriptional networks evolve. Comparison with the existing S. cerevisiae data (supplemented by additional S. cerevisiae experiments reported here allows the first systematic analysis of phenotypic conservation by orthologous transcriptional regulators over a large evolutionary distance. We find that, despite the many specific wiring changes documented between these species, the general phenotypes of orthologous transcriptional regulator knockouts are largely conserved. These observations support the idea that many wiring changes affect the detailed architecture of

  18. A phenotypic profile of the Candida albicans regulatory network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homann, Oliver R; Dea, Jeanselle; Noble, Suzanne M; Johnson, Alexander D

    2009-12-01

    Candida albicans is a normal resident of the gastrointestinal tract and also the most prevalent fungal pathogen of humans. It last shared a common ancestor with the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae over 300 million years ago. We describe a collection of 143 genetically matched strains of C. albicans, each of which has been deleted for a specific transcriptional regulator. This collection represents a large fraction of the non-essential transcription circuitry. A phenotypic profile for each mutant was developed using a screen of 55 growth conditions. The results identify the biological roles of many individual transcriptional regulators; for many, this work represents the first description of their functions. For example, a quarter of the strains showed altered colony formation, a phenotype reflecting transitions among yeast, pseudohyphal, and hyphal cell forms. These transitions, which have been closely linked to pathogenesis, have been extensively studied, yet our work nearly doubles the number of transcriptional regulators known to influence them. As a second example, nearly a quarter of the knockout strains affected sensitivity to commonly used antifungal drugs; although a few transcriptional regulators have previously been implicated in susceptibility to these drugs, our work indicates many additional mechanisms of sensitivity and resistance. Finally, our results inform how transcriptional networks evolve. Comparison with the existing S. cerevisiae data (supplemented by additional S. cerevisiae experiments reported here) allows the first systematic analysis of phenotypic conservation by orthologous transcriptional regulators over a large evolutionary distance. We find that, despite the many specific wiring changes documented between these species, the general phenotypes of orthologous transcriptional regulator knockouts are largely conserved. These observations support the idea that many wiring changes affect the detailed architecture of the circuit, but

  19. Overexpression of mutant ataxin-3 in mouse cerebellum induces ataxia and cerebellar neuropathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nóbrega, Clévio; Nascimento-Ferreira, Isabel; Onofre, Isabel; Albuquerque, David; Conceição, Mariana; Déglon, Nicole; de Almeida, Luís Pereira

    2013-08-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), also known as spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3), is a fatal, dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by the polyglutamine-expanded protein ataxin-3. Clinical manifestations include cerebellar ataxia and pyramidal signs culminating in severe neuronal degeneration. Currently, there is no therapy able to modify disease progression. In the present study, we aimed at investigating one of the most severely affected brain regions in the disorder--the cerebellum--and the behavioral defects associated with the neuropathology in this region. For this purpose, we injected lentiviral vectors encoding full-length human mutant ataxin-3 in the mouse cerebellum of 3-week-old C57/BL6 mice. We show that circumscribed expression of human mutant ataxin-3 in the cerebellum mediates within a short time frame--6 weeks, the development of a behavioral phenotype including reduced motor coordination, wide-based ataxic gait, and hyperactivity. Furthermore, the expression of mutant ataxin-3 resulted in the accumulation of intranuclear inclusions, neuropathological abnormalities, and neuronal death. These data show that lentiviral-based expression of mutant ataxin-3 in the mouse cerebellum induces localized neuropathology, which is sufficient to generate a behavioral ataxic phenotype. Moreover, this approach provides a physiologically relevant, cost-effective and time-effective animal model to gain further insights into the pathogenesis of MJD and for the evaluation of experimental therapeutics of MJD.

  20. Zebrafish enpp1 mutants exhibit pathological mineralization, mimicking features of generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI and pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Apschner

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years it has become clear that, mechanistically, biomineralization is a process that has to be actively inhibited as a default state. This inhibition must be released in a rigidly controlled manner in order for mineralization to occur in skeletal elements and teeth. A central aspect of this concept is the tightly controlled balance between phosphate, a constituent of the biomineral hydroxyapatite, and pyrophosphate, a physiochemical inhibitor of mineralization. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of a zebrafish mutant, dragonfish (dgf, which is mutant for ectonucleoside pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 1 (Enpp1, a protein that is crucial for supplying extracellular pyrophosphate. Generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI is a fatal human disease, and the majority of cases are thought to be caused by mutations in ENPP1. Furthermore, some cases of pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE have recently been linked to ENPP1. Similar to humans, we show here that zebrafish enpp1 mutants can develop ectopic calcifications in a variety of soft tissues – most notably in the skin, cartilage elements, the heart, intracranial space and the notochord sheet. Using transgenic reporter lines, we demonstrate that ectopic mineralizations in these tissues occur independently of the expression of typical osteoblast or cartilage markers. Intriguingly, we detect cells expressing the osteoclast markers Trap and CathepsinK at sites of ectopic calcification at time points when osteoclasts are not yet present in wild-type siblings. Treatment with the bisphosphonate etidronate rescues aspects of the dgf phenotype, and we detected deregulated expression of genes that are involved in phosphate homeostasis and mineralization, such as fgf23, npt2a, entpd5 and spp1 (also known as osteopontin. Employing a UAS-GalFF approach, we show that forced expression of enpp1 in blood vessels or the floorplate of mutant embryos is sufficient to rescue the notochord

  1. A γA-Crystallin Mouse Mutant Secc with Small Eye, Cataract and Closed Eyelid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Hei Cheng

    Full Text Available Cataract is the most common cause of visual loss in humans. A spontaneously occurred, autosomal dominant mouse mutant Secc, which displayed combined features of small eye, cataract and closed eyelid was discovered in our laboratory. In this study, we identified the mutation and characterized the cataract phenotype of this novel Secc mutant. The Secc mutant mice have eyelids that remain half-closed throughout their life. The mutant lens has a significant reduction in size and with opaque spots clustered in the centre. Histological analysis showed that in the core region of the mutant lens, the fiber cells were disorganized and clefts and vacuoles were observed. The cataract phenotype was evident from new born stage. We identified the Secc mutation by linkage analysis using whole genome microsatellite markers and SNP markers. The Secc locus was mapped at chromosome 1 flanked by SNPs rs3158129 and rs13475900. Based on the chromosomal position, the candidate cataract locus γ-crystallin gene cluster (Cryg was investigated by sequencing. A single base deletion (299delG in exon 3 of Cryga which led to a frame-shift of amino acid sequence from position 91 was identified. As a result of this mutation, the sequences of the 3rd and 4th Greek-key motifs of the γA-crystallin are replaced with an unrelated C-terminal peptide of 75 residues long. Coincidentally, the point mutation generated a HindIII restriction site, allowing the identification of the CrygaSecc mutant allele by RFLP. Western blot analysis of 3-week old lenses showed that the expression of γ-crystallins was reduced in the CrygaSecc mutant. Furthermore, in cell transfection assays using CrygaSecc mutant cDNA expression constructs in 293T, COS-7 and human lens epithelial B3 cell lines, the mutant γA-crystallins were enriched in the insoluble fractions and appeared as insoluble aggregates in the transfected cells. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that the Secc mutation leads to the

  2. Andrographolide induces degradation of mutant p53 via activation of Hsp70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hirofumi; Hiraki, Masatsugu; Namba, Takushi; Egawa, Noriyuki; Baba, Koichi; Tanaka, Tomokazu; Noshiro, Hirokazu

    2018-05-22

    The tumor suppressor gene p53 encodes a transcription factor that regulates various cellular functions, including DNA repair, apoptosis and cell cycle progression. Approximately half of all human cancers carry mutations in p53 that lead to loss of tumor suppressor function or gain of functions that promote the cancer phenotype. Thus, targeting mutant p53 as an anticancer therapy has attracted considerable attention. In the current study, a small-molecule screen identified andrographlide (ANDRO) as a mutant p53 suppressor. The effects of ANDRO, a small molecule isolated from the Chinese herb Andrographis paniculata, on tumor cells carrying wild-type or mutant p53 were examined. ANDRO suppressed expression of mutant p53, induced expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 and pro-apoptotic proteins genes, and inhibited the growth of cancer cells harboring mutant p53. ANDRO also induced expression of the heat-shock protein (Hsp70) and increased binding between Hsp70 and mutant p53 protein, thus promoting proteasomal degradation of p53. These results provide novel insights into the mechanisms regulating the function of mutant p53 and suggest that activation of Hsp70 may be a new strategy for the treatment of cancers harboring mutant p53.

  3. Highly variable penetrance of abnormal phenotypes in embryonic lethal knockout mice [version 2; referees: 1 approved, 2 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Wilson

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Identifying genes that are essential for mouse embryonic development and survival through term is a powerful and unbiased way to discover possible genetic determinants of human developmental disorders. Characterising the changes in mouse embryos that result from ablation of lethal genes is a necessary first step towards uncovering their role in normal embryonic development and establishing any correlates amongst human congenital abnormalities. Methods: Here we present results gathered to date in the Deciphering the Mechanisms of Developmental Disorders (DMDD programme, cataloguing the morphological defects identified from comprehensive imaging of 220 homozygous mutant and 114 wild type embryos from 42 lethal and subviable lines, analysed at E14.5. Results: Virtually all mutant embryos show multiple abnormal phenotypes and amongst the 42 lines these affect most organ systems. Within each mutant line, the phenotypes of individual embryos form distinct but overlapping sets. Subcutaneous edema, malformations of the heart or great vessels, abnormalities in forebrain morphology and the musculature of the eyes are all prevalent phenotypes, as is loss or abnormal size of the hypoglossal nerve. Conclusions: Overall, the most striking finding is that no matter how profound the malformation, each phenotype shows highly variable penetrance within a mutant line. These findings have challenging implications for efforts to identify human disease correlates.

  4. Phenotypic and evolutionary implications of modulating the ERK-MAPK cascade using the dentition as a model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marangoni, Pauline; Charles, Cyril; Tafforeau, Paul; Laugel-Haushalter, Virginie; Joo, Adriane; Bloch-Zupan, Agnès; Klein, Ophir D.; Viriot, Laurent

    2015-06-01

    The question of phenotypic convergence across a signalling pathway has important implications for both developmental and evolutionary biology. The ERK-MAPK cascade is known to play a central role in dental development, but the relative roles of its components remain unknown. Here we investigate the diversity of dental phenotypes in Spry2-/-, Spry4-/-, and Rsk2-/Y mice, including the incidence of extra teeth, which were lost in the mouse lineage 45 million years ago (Ma). In addition, Sprouty-specific anomalies mimic a phenotype that is absent in extant mice but present in mouse ancestors prior to 9 Ma. Although the mutant lines studied display convergent phenotypes, each gene has a specific role in tooth number determination and crown patterning. The similarities found between teeth in fossils and mutants highlight the pivotal role of the ERK-MAPK cascade during the evolution of the dentition in rodents.

  5. Neural/Bayes network predictor for inheritable cardiac disease pathogenicity and phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghardt, Thomas P; Ajtai, Katalin

    2018-04-11

    The cardiac muscle sarcomere contains multiple proteins contributing to contraction energy transduction and its regulation during a heartbeat. Inheritable heart disease mutants affect most of them but none more frequently than the ventricular myosin motor and cardiac myosin binding protein c (mybpc3). These co-localizing proteins have mybpc3 playing a regulatory role to the energy transducing motor. Residue substitution and functional domain assignment of each mutation in the protein sequence decides, under the direction of a sensible disease model, phenotype and pathogenicity. The unknown model mechanism is decided here using a method combing neural and Bayes networks. Missense single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are clues for the disease mechanism summarized in an extensive database collecting mutant sequence location and residue substitution as independent variables that imply the dependent disease phenotype and pathogenicity characteristics in 4 dimensional data points (4ddps). The SNP database contains entries with the majority having one or both dependent data entries unfulfilled. A neural network relating causes (mutant residue location and substitution) and effects (phenotype and pathogenicity) is trained, validated, and optimized using fulfilled 4ddps. It then predicts unfulfilled 4ddps providing the implicit disease model. A discrete Bayes network interprets fulfilled and predicted 4ddps with conditional probabilities for phenotype and pathogenicity given mutation location and residue substitution thus relating the neural network implicit model to explicit features of the motor and mybpc3 sequence and structural domains. Neural/Bayes network forecasting automates disease mechanism modeling by leveraging the world wide human missense SNP database that is in place and expanding. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Deep Learning for Plant Phenotyping

    OpenAIRE

    Mori, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Plant Phenotyping is an emerging science which provides us the knowledge to better understand plants. Indeed, the study of the link between genetic background and environment in which plants develop can help us to determine cures for plants’ sicknesses and new ways to improve yields using limited resources. In this regard, one of the main aspects of Plant Phenotyping that were studied in the past, was Root Phenotyping, which is based on the study of the root architectures. In particular, toda...

  7. Characterization of a mutant rat kangaroo cell line with alterations in the cell cycle and DNA repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyaji E.N.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a positive selection system for isolating DNA replication and repair related mutants, we isolated a clone from a rat kangaroo cell line (PtK2 that has increased sensitivity to UV light. Characterization of this clone indicated normal post-replication repair after UV irradiation, and normal removal rates of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and pyrimidine(6-4pyrimidone photoproducts by excision repair. However, this cell line has decreased ability to make early incisions on damaged DNA, possibly indicating a defect in preferential repair of actively transcribed genes, and a slower cell proliferation rate, including a longer S-phase. This phenotype reinforces the present notion that control of key mechanisms in cell metabolism, such as cell cycle control, repair, transcription and cell death, can be linked.

  8. Engineering of plants with improved properties as biofuels feedstocks by vessel-specific complementation of xylan biosynthesis mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Pia; Lau, Jane; Ebert, Berit

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cost-efficient generation of second-generation biofuels requires plant biomass that can easily be degraded into sugars and further fermented into fuels. However, lignocellulosic biomass is inherently recalcitrant toward deconstruction technologies due to the abundant lignin and cross......-linked hemicelluloses. Furthermore, lignocellulosic biomass has a high content of pentoses, which are more difficult to ferment into fuels than hexoses. Engineered plants with decreased amounts of xylan in their secondary walls have the potential to render plant biomass a more desirable feedstock for biofuel production...... in the xylem vessels is sufficient to complement the irx phenotype of xylan deficient mutants, while maintaining low overall amounts of xylan and lignin in the cell wall. This engineering approach has the potential to yield bioenergy crop plants that are more easily deconstructed and fermented into biofuels....

  9. Reduced neuronal size and mTOR pathway activity in the Mecp2 A140V Rett syndrome mouse model [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sampathkumar Rangasamy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Rett syndrome (RTT is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutation in the X-linked MECP2 gene, encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2. We have created a mouse model (Mecp2 A140V “knock-in” mutant expressing the recurrent human MECP2 A140V mutation linked to an X-linked mental retardation/Rett syndrome phenotype. Morphological analyses focused on quantifying soma and nucleus size were performed on primary hippocampus and cerebellum granule neuron (CGN cultures from mutant (Mecp2A140V/y and wild type (Mecp2+/y male mice. Cultured hippocampus and cerebellar granule neurons from mutant animals were significantly smaller than neurons from wild type animals. We also examined soma size in hippocampus neurons from individual female transgenic mice that express both a mutant  (maternal allele and a wild type Mecp2 gene linked to an eGFP transgene (paternal allele. In cultures from such doubly heterozygous female mice, the size of neurons expressing the mutant (A140V allele also showed a significant reduction compared to neurons expressing wild type MeCP2, supporting a cell-autonomous role for MeCP2 in neuronal development. IGF-1 (insulin growth factor-1 treatment of neuronal cells from Mecp2 mutant mice rescued the soma size phenotype. We also found that Mecp2  mutation leads to down-regulation of the mTOR signaling pathway, known to be involved in neuronal size regulation. Our results suggest that i reduced neuronal size is an important in vitro cellular phenotype of Mecp2 mutation in mice, and ii MeCP2 might play a critical role in the maintenance of neuronal structure by modulation of the mTOR pathway. The definition of a quantifiable cellular phenotype supports using neuronal size as a biomarker in the development of a high-throughput, in vitro assay to screen for compounds that rescue small neuronal phenotype (“phenotypic assay”.

  10. A dominant-negative mutant inhibits multiple prion variants through a common mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fen Pei

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Prions adopt alternative, self-replicating protein conformations and thereby determine novel phenotypes that are often irreversible. Nevertheless, dominant-negative prion mutants can revert phenotypes associated with some conformations. These observations suggest that, while intervention is possible, distinct inhibitors must be developed to overcome the conformational plasticity of prions. To understand the basis of this specificity, we determined the impact of the G58D mutant of the Sup35 prion on three of its conformational variants, which form amyloids in S. cerevisiae. G58D had been previously proposed to have unique effects on these variants, but our studies suggest a common mechanism. All variants, including those reported to be resistant, are inhibited by G58D but at distinct doses. G58D lowers the kinetic stability of the associated amyloid, enhancing its fragmentation by molecular chaperones, promoting Sup35 resolubilization, and leading to amyloid clearance particularly in daughter cells. Reducing the availability or activity of the chaperone Hsp104, even transiently, reverses curing. Thus, the specificity of inhibition is determined by the sensitivity of variants to the mutant dosage rather than mode of action, challenging the view that a unique inhibitor must be developed to combat each variant.

  11. Screening of respiration deficiency mutants of yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) induced by ion irradiation and the mtDNA restriction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Shuhong; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Jin Genming; Wei Zengquan; Xie Hongmei; Ma Qiufeng; Gu Ying

    2005-01-01

    Screening of the respiration deficiency mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae induced by 5.19 MeV/u 22 Ne 5+ ion irradiation is reported in this paper. Some respiration deficiency mutants of white colony phenotype, in a condition of selective culture of TTC medium, were obtained. A new and simplified method based on mtDNA restriction analysis is described. The authors found that there are many obvious differences in mtDNAs between wild yeasts and the respiration deficiency mutants. The mechanism of obtaining the respiration deficiency mutants induced by heavy ion irradiation is briefly discussed. (authors)

  12. The late flowering phenotype of fwa mutants is caused by gain-of-function epigenetic alleles of a homeodomain gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soppe, W.J.J.; Jacobsen, S.E.; Alonso-Blanco, C.; Jackson, J.P.; Kakutani, T.; Koornneef, M.; Peeters, A.J.M.

    2000-01-01

    The transition to flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana is delayed in fwa mutant plants. FWA was identified by loss-of-function mutations in normally flowering revertants of the fwa mutant, and it encodes a homeodomain-containing transcription factor. The DNA sequence of wild-type and fwa mutant alleles

  13. The Sequences of 1504 Mutants in the Model Rice Variety Kitaake Facilitate Rapid Functional Genomic Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guotian; Jain, Rashmi; Chern, Mawsheng; Pham, Nikki T; Martin, Joel A; Wei, Tong; Schackwitz, Wendy S; Lipzen, Anna M; Duong, Phat Q; Jones, Kyle C; Jiang, Liangrong; Ruan, Deling; Bauer, Diane; Peng, Yi; Barry, Kerrie W; Schmutz, Jeremy; Ronald, Pamela C

    2017-06-01

    The availability of a whole-genome sequenced mutant population and the cataloging of mutations of each line at a single-nucleotide resolution facilitate functional genomic analysis. To this end, we generated and sequenced a fast-neutron-induced mutant population in the model rice cultivar Kitaake ( Oryza sativa ssp japonica ), which completes its life cycle in 9 weeks. We sequenced 1504 mutant lines at 45-fold coverage and identified 91,513 mutations affecting 32,307 genes, i.e., 58% of all rice genes. We detected an average of 61 mutations per line. Mutation types include single-base substitutions, deletions, insertions, inversions, translocations, and tandem duplications. We observed a high proportion of loss-of-function mutations. We identified an inversion affecting a single gene as the causative mutation for the short-grain phenotype in one mutant line. This result reveals the usefulness of the resource for efficient, cost-effective identification of genes conferring specific phenotypes. To facilitate public access to this genetic resource, we established an open access database called KitBase that provides access to sequence data and seed stocks. This population complements other available mutant collections and gene-editing technologies. This work demonstrates how inexpensive next-generation sequencing can be applied to generate a high-density catalog of mutations. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  14. Doxycyclin ameliorates a starvation-induced germline tumor in C. elegans daf-18/PTEN mutant background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Tim; Qi, Wenjing; Schindler, Verena; Runkel, Eva Diana; Baumeister, Ralf

    2014-08-01

    Managing available resources is a key necessity of each organism to cope with the environment. The nematode C. elegans responds to nutritional deprivation or harsh environmental conditions with a multitude of developmental adaptations, among them a starvation-induced quiescence at early larval development (L1). daf-18, the C. elegans homolog of the human tumor suppressor gene PTEN, is essential for the maintenance of survival and germline stem cell arrest during the L1 diapause. We show here that daf-18 mutants, independently to their failure to maintain G2 arrest of the primordial germ cells, develop a gonad phenotype after refeeding. This highly penetrant gonadal phenotype is further enhanced by a mutation in shc-1, encoding a protein homologous to the human adaptor ShcA. Features of this phenotype are a tumor-like phenotype encompassing hyper-proliferation of germ cell nuclei and disruption/invasion of the basement membrane surrounding the gonad. The penetrance of this phenotype is reduced by decreasing starvation temperature. In addition, it is also ameliorated in a dose-dependent way by exposure to the antibiotic doxycyclin either during starvation or during subsequent refeeding. Since, in eukaryotic cells, doxycyclin specifically blocks mitochondrial translation, our results suggest that daf-18 and shc-1;daf-18 mutants fail to adapt mitochondrial activity to reduced nutritional availability during early larval developing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Viral phenotype, antiretroviral resistance and clinical evolution in human immunodeficiency virus-infected children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellado, M J; Cilleruelo, M J; Ortiz, M; Villota, J; García, M; Perez-Jurado, M L; Barreiro, G; Martín-Fontelos, P; Bernal, A

    1997-11-01

    The syncytium-inducing (SI) viral phenotype and the emergence of viral strains resistant to zidovudine have been described in persons infected with HIV, and in some cases they have been associated with poor prognosis. HIV isolates obtained from 37 HIV-infected children were analyzed to determine whether the SI viral phenotype and the mutation on the 215 position of the reverse transcriptase (M215) could be used as markers of disease progression. We performed peripheral blood coculture mononuclear cells, and we analyzed the induction of syncytia using the MT-2 cell line. The emergence of mutations on the 215 position was determined by PCR. We found a statistically significant association (P < 0.05) between SI viral phenotype and (1) recurrent serious bacterial infections, (2) absolute CD4+ cell counts <2 SD, (3) progression to AIDS and (4) death. Sixty percent of the children treated with zidovudine developed 215 mutant viral strains without statistically significant association with clinical or immunologic findings. The SI viral phenotype was statistically associated with the presence of the 215 mutation (P < 0.05). SI viral phenotype is a marker associated with a poor clinical and immunologic progression of the disease and it may facilitate the emergence of mutant strains in children treated with zidovudine.

  16. Regulation of chloroplast biogenesis: the immutans mutant of Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodermel, Steven

    2015-11-16

    The immutans (im) variegation mutant of Arabidopsis is an ideal model to gain insight into factors that control chloroplast biogenesis. im defines the gene for PTOX, a plastoquinol terminal oxidase that participates in control of thylakoid redox. Here, we report that the im defect can be suppressed during the late stages of plant development by gigantea (gi2), which defines the gene for GIGANTEA (GI), a central component of the circadian clock that plays a poorly-understood role in diverse plant developmental processes. imgi2 mutants are late-flowering and display other well-known phenotypes associated with gi2, such as starch accumulation and resistance to oxidative stress. We show that the restoration of chloroplast biogenesis in imgi2 is caused by a developmental-specific de-repression of cytokinin signaling that involves crosstalk with signaling pathways mediated by gibberellin (GA) and SPINDLY (SPY), a GA response inhibitor. Suppression of the plastid defect in imgi2 is likely caused by a relaxation of excitation pressures in developing plastids by factors contributed by gi2, including enhanced rates of photosynthesis and increased resistance to oxidative stress. Interestingly, the suppression phenotype of imgi can be mimicked by crossing im with the starch accumulation mutant, sex1, perhaps because sex1 utilizes pathways similar to gi. We conclude that our studies provide a direct genetic linkage between GIGANTEA and chloroplast biogenesis, and we construct a model of interactions between signaling pathways mediated by gi, GA, SPY, cytokinins, and sex1 that are required for chloroplast biogenesis.

  17. A Medicago truncatula Tobacco Retrotransposon Insertion Mutant Collection with Defects in Nodule Development and Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pislariu, Catalina I.; D. Murray, Jeremy; Wen, JiangQi; Cosson, Viviane; Muni, RajaSekhara Reddy Duvvuru; Wang, Mingyi; A. Benedito, Vagner; Andriankaja, Andry; Cheng, Xiaofei; Jerez, Ivone Torres; Mondy, Samuel; Zhang, Shulan; Taylor, Mark E.; Tadege, Million; Ratet, Pascal; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Chen, Rujin; Udvardi, Michael K.

    2012-01-01

    A Tnt1-insertion mutant population of Medicago truncatula ecotype R108 was screened for defects in nodulation and symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Primary screening of 9,300 mutant lines yielded 317 lines with putative defects in nodule development and/or nitrogen fixation. Of these, 230 lines were rescreened, and 156 lines were confirmed with defective symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Mutants were sorted into six distinct phenotypic categories: 72 nonnodulating mutants (Nod−), 51 mutants with totally ineffective nodules (Nod+ Fix−), 17 mutants with partially ineffective nodules (Nod+ Fix+/−), 27 mutants defective in nodule emergence, elongation, and nitrogen fixation (Nod+/− Fix−), one mutant with delayed and reduced nodulation but effective in nitrogen fixation (dNod+/− Fix+), and 11 supernodulating mutants (Nod++Fix+/−). A total of 2,801 flanking sequence tags were generated from the 156 symbiotic mutant lines. Analysis of flanking sequence tags revealed 14 insertion alleles of the following known symbiotic genes: NODULE INCEPTION (NIN), DOESN’T MAKE INFECTIONS3 (DMI3/CCaMK), ERF REQUIRED FOR NODULATION, and SUPERNUMERARY NODULES (SUNN). In parallel, a polymerase chain reaction-based strategy was used to identify Tnt1 insertions in known symbiotic genes, which revealed 25 additional insertion alleles in the following genes: DMI1, DMI2, DMI3, NIN, NODULATION SIGNALING PATHWAY1 (NSP1), NSP2, SUNN, and SICKLE. Thirty-nine Nod− lines were also screened for arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis phenotypes, and 30 mutants exhibited defects in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis. Morphological and developmental features of several new symbiotic mutants are reported. The collection of mutants described here is a source of novel alleles of known symbiotic genes and a resource for cloning novel symbiotic genes via Tnt1 tagging. PMID:22679222

  18. Understanding mammalian genetic systems: the challenge of phenotyping in the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve D M Brown

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding mammalian genetic systems is predicated on the determination of the relationship between genetic variation and phenotype. Several international programmes are under way to deliver mutations in every gene in the mouse genome. The challenge for mouse geneticists is to develop approaches that will provide comprehensive phenotype datasets for these mouse mutant libraries. Several factors are critical to success in this endeavour. It will be important to catalogue assay and environment and where possible to adopt standardised procedures for phenotyping tests along with common environmental conditions to ensure comparable datasets of phenotypes. Moreover, the scale of the task underlines the need to invest in technological development improving both the speed and cost of phenotyping platforms. In addition, it will be necessary to develop new informatics standards that capture the phenotype assay as well as other factors, genetic and environmental, that impinge upon phenotype outcome.

  19. X-linked Alport syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jais, Jean Philippe; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Giatras, Iannis

    2003-01-01

    Alport syndrome (AS) is a type IV collagen hereditary disease characterized by progressive hematuric nephritis, hearing loss, and ocular changes. Mutations in the COL4A5 collagen gene are responsible for the more common X-linked dominant form of the disease characterized by much less severe disease...... in girls and women. A "European Community Alport Syndrome Concerted Action" (ECASCA) group was established to delineate the Alport syndrome phenotype in each gender and to determine genotype-phenotype correlations in a large number of families. Data concerning 329 families, 250 of them with an X...... to increase after the age of 60 yr in women. Because of the absence of genotype-phenotype correlation and the large intrafamilial phenotypic heterogeneity, early prognosis of the disease in X-linked Alport syndrome carriers remains moot. Risk factors for developing renal failure have been identified...

  20. Behaviour of UV-sensitive mutants of Proteus mirabilis to repair incision breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoerl, K.; Mund, C.

    1977-01-01

    In U.V.-sensitive mutants of P. mirabilis with the phenotype HCR, REC and EXR single-strand breaks appeared immediately after UV-irradiation. The behaviour of REC- and EXR-mutants was similar to the wildtype. The number of incision breaks observed by sedimentation analysis in these strains was very low. They could be joined during the excision repair process. From the ability of REC- and EXR-strains to rejoin most of the induced single-strand breaks it can be concluded that these strains have approximately the same capacity for excision repair as the wildtype. HCR-mutants of P. mirabilis produced single-strand breaks after UV-irradiation in contrast to HCR-mutants of E. coli. Therefore we suggest that HCR-mutants of P. mirabilis are not completely inhibited in the incision step. The single-strand breaks introduced in the DNA at the beginning of the repair process were not rejoined during further incubation. Experiments with toluenized cells led to the same results. The newly synthesized daughter DNA-strands of UV-irradiated HCR-mutants were of low molecular weight in comparison with those from unirradiated control cells during the repair period. This result is in agreement with the incapability of HCR-mutants to remove the pyrimidine dimers from the parental template strand. (author)

  1. Development mutants of anabaena doliolum defective in repair of UV-damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, D.N.; Singh, C.B.

    1980-01-01

    Nitrosoguanidine induced 'blue' pigment mutants of the blue-green alga anabaena doliolum were isolated. The blue-mutants on further characterization were grouped into three developmental phenotypes - (i) those forming doli-form blue-spores of heterogenous size i.e., Ad 011, (ii) those forming spheroidal cells in the stationary phase, some of which behave like spores on transfer to fresh medium i.e., Ad 012, and (iii) those showing no sporulation and conditionally producing abnormal cells in the presence of combined nitrogen only i.e., Ad 007. The former two classes of mutants showed the formation of abnormal cells irrespective of the presence or absence of combined nitrogen sources in the medium. The formation of abnormal cells in the filaments of the above mutants were distinguished by their larger size and irregular mode of division leading to true-branch formation. The comparative characterization of these mutant strains with the parental one showed sluggish growth, increased UV-sensitivity, almost unchanged photorepair capacity, a marked change in the pigment composition and relative resistance to nitrosoguanidine. Irregular cell division in both space and time in the mutant strains and their increased sensitivity to ultraviolet irradiation indicate the possible involvement of dark repair system in maintaining the precision of cell cylce in this alga. (orig.) 891 AJ/orig. 892 HIS

  2. Identification of a negative regulatory region for the exchange activity and characterization of T332I mutant of Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor 10 (ARHGEF10).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaya, Taro; Shibata, Satoshi; Tokuhara, Yasunori; Yamaguchi, Wataru; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Kawahara, Ichiro; Kogo, Mikihiko; Ohoka, Yoshiharu; Inagaki, Shinobu

    2011-08-26

    The T332I mutation in Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor 10 (ARHGEF10) was previously found in persons with slowed nerve conduction velocities and thin myelination of peripheral nerves. However, the molecular and cellular basis of the T332I mutant is not understood. Here, we show that ARHGEF10 has a negative regulatory region in the N terminus, in which residue 332 is located, and the T332I mutant is constitutively active. An N-terminal truncated ARHGEF10 mutant, ARHGEF10 ΔN (lacking amino acids 1-332), induced cell contraction that was inhibited by a Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632 and had higher GEF activity for RhoA than the wild type. The T332I mutant also showed the phenotype similar to the N-terminal truncated mutant. These data suggest that the ARHGEF10 T332I mutation-associated phenotype observed in the peripheral nerves is due to activated GEF activity of the ARHGEF10 T332I mutant.

  3. Identification of a Negative Regulatory Region for the Exchange Activity and Characterization of T332I Mutant of Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor 10 (ARHGEF10)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaya, Taro; Shibata, Satoshi; Tokuhara, Yasunori; Yamaguchi, Wataru; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Kawahara, Ichiro; Kogo, Mikihiko; Ohoka, Yoshiharu; Inagaki, Shinobu

    2011-01-01

    The T332I mutation in Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor 10 (ARHGEF10) was previously found in persons with slowed nerve conduction velocities and thin myelination of peripheral nerves. However, the molecular and cellular basis of the T332I mutant is not understood. Here, we show that ARHGEF10 has a negative regulatory region in the N terminus, in which residue 332 is located, and the T332I mutant is constitutively active. An N-terminal truncated ARHGEF10 mutant, ARHGEF10 ΔN (lacking amino acids 1–332), induced cell contraction that was inhibited by a Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632 and had higher GEF activity for RhoA than the wild type. The T332I mutant also showed the phenotype similar to the N-terminal truncated mutant. These data suggest that the ARHGEF10 T332I mutation-associated phenotype observed in the peripheral nerves is due to activated GEF activity of the ARHGEF10 T332I mutant. PMID:21719701

  4. Model-independent phenotyping of C. elegans locomotion using scale-invariant feature transform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelena Koren

    Full Text Available To uncover the genetic basis of behavioral traits in the model organism C. elegans, a common strategy is to study locomotion defects in mutants. Despite efforts to introduce (semi-automated phenotyping strategies, current methods overwhelmingly depend on worm-specific features that must be hand-crafted and as such are not generalizable for phenotyping motility in other animal models. Hence, there is an ongoing need for robust algorithms that can automatically analyze and classify motility phenotypes quantitatively. To this end, we have developed a fully-automated approach to characterize C. elegans' phenotypes that does not require the definition of nematode-specific features. Rather, we make use of the popular computer vision Scale-Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT from which we construct histograms of commonly-observed SIFT features to represent nematode motility. We first evaluated our method on a synthetic dataset simulating a range of nematode crawling gaits. Next, we evaluated our algorithm on two distinct datasets of crawling C. elegans with mutants affecting neuromuscular structure and function. Not only is our algorithm able to detect differences between strains, results capture similarities in locomotory phenotypes that lead to clustering that is consistent with expectations based on genetic relationships. Our proposed approach generalizes directly and should be applicable to other animal models. Such applicability holds promise for computational ethology as more groups collect high-resolution image data of animal behavior.

  5. Neurophysiological defects and neuronal gene deregulation in Drosophila mir-124 mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailiang Sun

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available miR-124 is conserved in sequence and neuronal expression across the animal kingdom and is predicted to have hundreds of mRNA targets. Diverse defects in neural development and function were reported from miR-124 antisense studies in vertebrates, but a nematode knockout of mir-124 surprisingly lacked detectable phenotypes. To provide genetic insight from Drosophila, we deleted its single mir-124 locus and found that it is dispensable for gross aspects of neural specification and differentiation. On the other hand, we detected a variety of mutant phenotypes that were rescuable by a mir-124 genomic transgene, including short lifespan, increased dendrite variation, impaired larval locomotion, and aberrant synaptic release at the NMJ. These phenotypes reflect extensive requirements of miR-124 even under optimal culture conditions. Comparison of the transcriptomes of cells from wild-type and mir-124 mutant animals, purified on the basis of mir-124 promoter activity, revealed broad upregulation of direct miR-124 targets. However, in contrast to the proposed mutual exclusion model for miR-124 function, its functional targets were relatively highly expressed in miR-124-expressing cells and were not enriched in genes annotated with epidermal expression. A notable aspect of the direct miR-124 network was coordinate targeting of five positive components in the retrograde BMP signaling pathway, whose activation in neurons increases synaptic release at the NMJ, similar to mir-124 mutants. Derepression of the direct miR-124 target network also had many secondary effects, including over-activity of other post-transcriptional repressors and a net incomplete transition from a neuroblast to a neuronal gene expression signature. Altogether, these studies demonstrate complex consequences of miR-124 loss on neural gene expression and neurophysiology.

  6. Phenotypical and biochemical characterisation of resistance for parasitic weed (Orobanche foetida Poir.) in radiation-mutagenised mutants of chickpea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmi, Ines; Mabrouk, Yassine; Brun, Guillaume; Delavault, Philippe; Belhadj, Omrane; Simier, Philippe

    2016-12-01

    Some radiation-mutagenised chickpea mutants potentially resistant to the broomrape, Orobanche foetida Poir., were selected through field trials. The objectives of this work were to confirm resistance under artificial infestation, in pots and mini-rhizotron systems, and to determine the developmental stages of broomrape affected by resistance and the relevant resistance mechanisms induced by radiation mutagenesis. Among 30 mutants tested for resistance to O. foetida, five shared strong resistance in both pot experiments and mini-rhizotron systems. Resistance was not complete, but the few individuals that escaped resistance displayed high disorders of shoot development. Results demonstrated a 2-3-fold decrease in stimulatory activity of root exudates towards broomrape seed germination in resistant mutants in comparison with non-irradiated control plants and susceptible mutants. Resistance was associated with an induction of broomrape necrosis early during infection. When infested, most of the resistant mutants shared enhanced levels of soluble phenolic contents, phenylalanine ammonia lyase activity, guaiacol peroxidase activity and polyphenol oxidase activity, in addition to glutathione and notably ascorbate peroxidase gene expression in roots. Results confirmed enhanced resistance in chickpea radiation-mutagenised mutants, and demonstrated that resistance is based on alteration of root exudation, presumed cell-wall reinforcement and change in root oxidative status in response to infection. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. The link between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease phenotypes and histological subtypes of lung cancer: a case–control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang W

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Wei Wang,* Mengshuang Xie,* Shuang Dou, Liwei Cui, Chunyan Zheng, Wei Xiao Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: COPD is considered an independent risk factor for lung cancer. COPD and lung cancer are both very heterogeneous diseases, and the study herein investigates the link between COPD phenotypes and specific histological subtypes of lung cancer.Methods: This case–control study comprised 2,283 patients with newly diagnosed pathological lung cancer and 2,323 non-lung cancer controls. All participants underwent pulmonary function tests. The diagnosis of COPD was based on Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease criteria. Subtypes of the two diseases were categorized according to 2015 World Health Organization classification of lung cancer and computer quantification of airway collapse on maximum expiratory flow volume. ORs were estimated using logistic regression analysis.Results: The prevalence of COPD was higher (32.8% in lung cancer patients compared to controls (16.0%. After adjustment for age, sex, body-mass index, and smoking status, the presence of COPD significantly increased the risk of lung cancer (OR 2.88, 95% CI 2.48–3.34 and all common histological subtypes (ORs 2.04–5.26. Both emphysema-predominant and non-emphysema-predominant phenotypes of COPD significantly increased the risk of lung cancer (OR 4.43, 95% CI 2.85–6.88; OR 2.82, 95% CI 2.40–3.31. Higher risk of squamous-cell carcinoma and small-cell lung cancer was observed in patients with the emphysema-predominant than the non-emphysema-predominant phenotype (OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.03–2.89; OR 3.74, 95% CI 1.64–8.53. Conclusion: COPD was an independent risk factor for lung cancer and all common histological subtypes. Both emphysema-predominant and non-emphysema-predominant phenotypes of COPD significantly increased the risk of lung cancer

  8. Autonomous and Non-autonomous Defects Underlie Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in BRAF-Mutant hiPSC-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Josowitz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Germline mutations in BRAF cause cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (CFCS, whereby 40% of patients develop hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM. As the role of the RAS/MAPK pathway in HCM pathogenesis is unclear, we generated a human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC model for CFCS from three patients with activating BRAF mutations. By cell sorting for SIRPα and CD90, we generated a method to examine hiPSC-derived cell type-specific phenotypes and cellular interactions underpinning HCM. BRAF-mutant SIRPα+/CD90− cardiomyocytes displayed cellular hypertrophy, pro-hypertrophic gene expression, and intrinsic calcium-handling defects. BRAF-mutant SIRPα−/CD90+ cells, which were fibroblast-like, exhibited a pro-fibrotic phenotype and partially modulated cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through transforming growth factor β (TGFβ paracrine signaling. Inhibition of TGFβ or RAS/MAPK signaling rescued the hypertrophic phenotype. Thus, cell autonomous and non-autonomous defects underlie HCM due to BRAF mutations. TGFβ inhibition may be a useful therapeutic option for patients with HCM due to RASopathies or other etiologies.

  9. Arabidopsis mutant sk156 reveals complex regulation of SPL15 in a miR156-controlled gene network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Shu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Arabidopsis microRNA156 (miR156 regulates 11 members of the SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN LIKE (SPL family by base pairing to complementary target mRNAs. Each SPL gene further regulates a set of other genes; thus, miR156 controls numerous genes through a complex gene regulation network. Increased axillary branching occurs in transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing miR156b, similar to that observed in loss-of-function max3 and max4 mutants with lesions in carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases. Arabidopsis miR156b was found to enhance carotenoid levels and reproductive shoot branching when expressed in Brassica napus, suggesting a link between miR156b expression and carotenoid metabolism. However, details of the miR156 regulatory network of SPL genes related to carotenoid metabolism are not known. Results In this study, an Arabidopsis T-DNA enhancer mutant, sk156, was identified due to its altered branching and trichome morphology and increased seed carotenoid levels compared to wild type (WT ecovar Columbia. Enhanced miR156b expression due to the 35S enhancers present on the T-DNA insert was responsible for these phenotypes. Constitutive and leaf primodium-specific expression of a miR156-insensitive (mutated SPL15 (SPL15m largely restored WT seed carotenoid levels and plant morphology when expressed in sk156. The Arabidopsis native miR156-sensitive SPL15 (SPL15n and SPL15m driven by a native SPL15 promoter did not restore the WT phenotype in sk156. Our findings suggest that SPL15 function is somewhat redundant with other SPL family members, which collectively affect plant phenotypes. Moreover, substantially decreased miR156b transcript levels in sk156 expressing SPL15m, together with the presence of multiple repeats of SPL-binding GTAC core sequence close to the miR156b transcription start site, suggested feedback regulation of miR156b expression by SPL15. This was supported by the demonstration of specific in vitro

  10. Genetic analyses of nonfluorescent root mutants induced by mutagenesis in soybean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, S.; Palmer, R.G.

    1987-01-01

    Nonfluorescent root mutants in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] are useful as markers in genetic studies and in tissue culture research. Our objective was to obtain mutagen-induced nonfluorescent root mutants and to conduct genetic studies with them. Thirteen nonfluorescent mutants were detected among 154016 seedlings derived from soybean lines treated with six mutagens. One of these mutants, derived from Williams treated with 20 kR gamma rays, did not correspond to any of the known (standard) nonfluorescent spontaneous mutants. This is the first mutagen-induced nonfluorescent root mutant in soybean. It was assigned Genetic Type Collection no. T285 and the gene symbol fr5 fr5. The fr5 allele was not located on trisomics A, B, or C and was not linked to five chlorophyll-deficient mutants (y9, y11, y12, y13, and y20-k2) or flower color mutant w1. The remaining nonfluorescent root mutants were at the same loci as known spontaneous mutants; i.e., four had the fr1 allele, five had the fr2 allele, and three had the fr4 allele

  11. Maternal topoisomerase II alpha, not topoisomerase II beta, enables embryonic development of zebrafish top2a-/- mutants

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sapetto-Rebow, Beata

    2011-11-23

    Abstract Background Genetic alterations in human topoisomerase II alpha (TOP2A) are linked to cancer susceptibility. TOP2A decatenates chromosomes and thus is necessary for multiple aspects of cell division including DNA replication, chromosome condensation and segregation. Topoisomerase II alpha is also required for embryonic development in mammals, as mouse Top2a knockouts result in embryonic lethality as early as the 4-8 cell stage. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the extended developmental capability of zebrafish top2a mutants arises from maternal expression of top2a or compensation from its top2b paralogue. Results Here, we describe bloody minded (blm), a novel mutant of zebrafish top2a. In contrast to mouse Top2a nulls, zebrafish top2a mutants survive to larval stages (4-5 day post fertilization). Developmental analyses demonstrate abundant expression of maternal top2a but not top2b. Inhibition or poisoning of maternal topoisomerase II delays embryonic development by extending the cell cycle M-phase. Zygotic top2a and top2b are co-expressed in the zebrafish CNS, but endogenous or ectopic top2b RNA appear unable to prevent the blm phenotype. Conclusions We conclude that maternal top2a enables zebrafish development before the mid-zygotic transition (MZT) and that zebrafish top2a and top2b are not functionally redundant during development after activation of the zygotic genome.

  12. Maternal topoisomerase II alpha, not topoisomerase II beta, enables embryonic development of zebrafish top2a-/- mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapetto-Rebow Beata

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic alterations in human topoisomerase II alpha (TOP2A are linked to cancer susceptibility. TOP2A decatenates chromosomes and thus is necessary for multiple aspects of cell division including DNA replication, chromosome condensation and segregation. Topoisomerase II alpha is also required for embryonic development in mammals, as mouse Top2a knockouts result in embryonic lethality as early as the 4-8 cell stage. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the extended developmental capability of zebrafish top2a mutants arises from maternal expression of top2a or compensation from its top2b paralogue. Results Here, we describe bloody minded (blm, a novel mutant of zebrafish top2a. In contrast to mouse Top2a nulls, zebrafish top2a mutants survive to larval stages (4-5 day post fertilization. Developmental analyses demonstrate abundant expression of maternal top2a but not top2b. Inhibition or poisoning of maternal topoisomerase II delays embryonic development by extending the cell cycle M-phase. Zygotic top2a and top2b are co-expressed in the zebrafish CNS, but endogenous or ectopic top2b RNA appear unable to prevent the blm phenotype. Conclusions We conclude that maternal top2a enables zebrafish development before the mid-zygotic transition (MZT and that zebrafish top2a and top2b are not functionally redundant during development after activation of the zygotic genome.

  13. Phenotypic heterogeneity in modeling cancer evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mahdipour-Shirayeh

    Full Text Available The unwelcome evolution of malignancy during cancer progression emerges through a selection process in a complex heterogeneous population structure. In the present work, we investigate evolutionary dynamics in a phenotypically heterogeneous population of stem cells (SCs and their associated progenitors. The fate of a malignant mutation is determined not only by overall stem cell and non-stem cell growth rates but also differentiation and dedifferentiation rates. We investigate the effect of such a complex population structure on the evolution of malignant mutations. We derive exactly calculated results for the fixation probability of a mutant arising in each of the subpopulations. The exactly calculated results are in almost perfect agreement with the numerical simulations. Moreover, a condition for evolutionary advantage of a mutant cell versus the wild type population is given in the present study. We also show that microenvironment-induced plasticity in invading mutants leads to more aggressive mutants with higher fixation probability. Our model predicts that decreasing polarity between stem and non-stem cells' turnover would raise the survivability of non-plastic mutants; while it would suppress the development of malignancy for plastic mutants. The derived results are novel and general with potential applications in nature; we discuss our model in the context of colorectal/intestinal cancer (at the epithelium. However, the model clearly needs to be validated through appropriate experimental data. This novel mathematical framework can be applied more generally to a variety of problems concerning selection in heterogeneous populations, in other contexts such as population genetics, and ecology.

  14. Mutant Prevention Concentrations of Four Carbapenems against Gram-Negative Rods▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credito, Kim; Kosowska-Shick, Klaudia; Appelbaum, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    We tested the propensities of four carbapenems to select for resistant Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii mutants by determining the mutant prevention concentrations (MPCs) for 100 clinical strains with various ß-lactam phenotypes. Among the members of the Enterobacteriaceae family and A. baumannii strains, the MPC/MIC ratios were mostly 2 to 4. In contrast, for P. aeruginosa the MPC/MIC ratios were 4 to ≥16. The MPC/MIC ratios for β-lactamase-positive K. pneumoniae and E. coli isolates were much higher (range, 4 to >16 μg/ml) than those for ß-lactamase-negative strains. PMID:20308376

  15. A thermo-sensitive purple leaf rice mutant--PLM12 and its genetical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Guanting; Wang Xianyu; Jin Wei

    2001-01-01

    PLM12 was a thermo-sensitive purple leaf mutant selected from Indica rice variety Luqingzao 1 treated with pingyangmycin in combination with γ-rays, and for display of its mutant character, a relatively high temperature was required. Compared with its original parent, many major agronomic traits of PLM12 changed to varied extents. Based on spikelet cutting experiment, it was believed that significant decreases in number of filled grains per panicle, fertility, and 1000-grain weight in PLM12 resulted mainly from a great decline in photosynthetic capacity and serious lack of photosynthate in purple leaves. It was indicated by genetic analysis that expression of the mutant phenotype in PLM12 was conditioned by a single recessive major nuclear gene and modified by several minor genes

  16. Exploring links between genotypes, phenotypes, and clinical predictors of response to early intensive behavioural intervention in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valsamma eEapen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD is amongst the most familial of psychiatric disorders. Twin and family studies have demonstrated a monozygotic concordance rate of 70–90%, dizygotic concordance of around 10% and more than a 20-fold increase in risk for first-degree relatives. Despite major advances in the genetics of autism, the relationship between different aspects of the behavioural and cognitive phenotype and their underlying genetic liability is still unclear. This is complicated by the heterogeneity of autism, which exists at both genetic and phenotypic levels. Given this heterogeneity, one method to find homogeneous entities and link these with specific genotypes would be to pursue endophenotypes. Evidence from neuroimaging, eye tracking and electrophysiology studies supports the hypothesis that, building on genetic vulnerability, ASD emerges from a developmental cascade in which a deficit in attention to social stimuli leads to impaired interactions with primary caregivers. This results in abnormal development of the neurocircuitry responsible for social cognition, which in turn adversely affects later behavioural and functional domains dependent on these early processes, such as language development. Such a model begets a heterogeneous clinical phenotype, and is also supported by studies demonstrating better clinical outcomes with earlier treatment. Treatment response following intensive early behavioural intervention in ASD is also distinctly variable; however, relatively little is known about specific elements of the clinical phenotype that may predict response to current behavioural treatments. This paper overviews the literature regarding genotypes, phenotypes and predictors of response to behavioural intervention in ASD and presents suggestions for future research to explore linkages between these that would enable better identification of, and increased treatment efficacy for, ASD.

  17. X-ray induced degradation of DNA in radiosensitive mutants of Anacystis nidulans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukas, K I; Vorontsova, G V; Groshev, V V; Shestakov, S V [Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR). Biologo-Pochvennyj Fakul' tet

    1975-01-01

    In irradiated Cyanophyceae (Anacystis nidulans) cells there occurs a process of DNA degeneration to acid-soluble products which is linked with protein synthesis and stimulated by caffeine and acriflavine. The degree of DNA degeneration increases with x-ray dose, is not very dependent on the composition of the incubation medium and is weakly linked with photosynthesis. In the cells of a radiation-resistant mutant the degree of DNA degeneration is slighter, and in the cells of radiosensitive mutants larger, than in ordinary cells. The role of DNA degradation in the radiation detruction of cells is discussed.

  18. Genetic control of some morphological mutants in sunflower [Helianthus annuus L.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabipour, A.; Sarrafi, A.; Yazdi-Samadi, B.

    2004-01-01

    Inheritance study of induced mutants is an important tool in genetic and breeding programs. Sunflower is one of the most important oil crops for which mutant collection is meager. Seeds of sunflower line AS-613 were irradiated with gamma rays and mutant phenotypes were traced until M4 generation. In M5 generation, the following traits were studied: dwarfing, branching, leaf shape, albinism, rosette, lack of apex and alternative leaves. In most cases, the mutated characters were controlled by a single recessive gene, while in two cases they were controlled by two recessive genes. In M5 progenies, segregation for two albino, one alternative leaves, one dwarfism, 5 branching, one rosette, 2 lacks of apex and 5 leaf shape mutants was recorded. Amongst five cases of branching, one was controlled by two recessive genes, where at least one homozygote recessive locus was necessary for branching. In one case, the lack of apex was controlled by two recessive genes and even only one dominant allele could provoke the normal plant [it

  19. Mosaicism for dominant collagen 6 mutations as a cause for intrafamilial phenotypic variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donkervoort, Sandra; Hu, Ying; Stojkovic, Tanya; Voermans, Nicol C; Foley, A Reghan; Leach, Meganne E; Dastgir, Jahannaz; Bolduc, Véronique; Cullup, Thomas; de Becdelièvre, Alix; Yang, Lin; Su, Hai; Meilleur, Katherine; Schindler, Alice B; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Richard, Pascale; Butterfield, Russell J; Winder, Thomas L; Crawford, Thomas O; Weiss, Robert B; Muntoni, Francesco; Allamand, Valérie; Bönnemann, Carsten G

    2015-01-01

    Collagen 6-related dystrophies and myopathies (COL6-RD) are a group of disorders that form a wide phenotypic spectrum, ranging from severe Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy, intermediate phenotypes, to the milder Bethlem myopathy. Both inter- and intrafamilial variable expressivity are commonly observed. We present clinical, immunohistochemical, and genetic data on four COL6-RD families with marked intergenerational phenotypic heterogeneity. This variable expression seemingly masquerades as anticipation is due to parental mosaicism for a dominant mutation, with subsequent full inheritance and penetrance of the mutation in the heterozygous offspring. We also present an additional fifth simplex patient identified as a mosaic carrier. Parental mosaicism was confirmed in the four families through quantitative analysis of the ratio of mutant versus wild-type allele (COL6A1, COL6A2, and COL6A3) in genomic DNA from various tissues, including blood, dermal fibroblasts, and saliva. Consistent with somatic mosaicism, parental samples had lower ratios of mutant versus wild-type allele compared with the fully heterozygote offspring. However, there was notable variability of the mutant allele levels between tissues tested, ranging from 16% (saliva) to 43% (fibroblasts) in one mosaic father. This is the first report demonstrating mosaicism as a cause of intrafamilial/intergenerational variability of COL6-RD, and suggests that sporadic and parental mosaicism may be more common than previously suspected. © 2014 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  20. Linking genotypes database with locus-specific database and genotype-phenotype correlation in phenylketonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wettstein, Sarah; Underhaug, Jarl; Perez, Belen; Marsden, Brian D; Yue, Wyatt W; Martinez, Aurora; Blau, Nenad

    2015-03-01

    The wide range of metabolic phenotypes in phenylketonuria is due to a large number of variants causing variable impairment in phenylalanine hydroxylase function. A total of 834 phenylalanine hydroxylase gene variants from the locus-specific database PAHvdb and genotypes of 4181 phenylketonuria patients from the BIOPKU database were characterized using FoldX, SIFT Blink, Polyphen-2 and SNPs3D algorithms. Obtained data was correlated with residual enzyme activity, patients' phenotype and tetrahydrobiopterin responsiveness. A descriptive analysis of both databases was compiled and an interactive viewer in PAHvdb database was implemented for structure visualization of missense variants. We found a quantitative relationship between phenylalanine hydroxylase protein stability and enzyme activity (r(s) = 0.479), between protein stability and allelic phenotype (r(s) = -0.458), as well as between enzyme activity and allelic phenotype (r(s) = 0.799). Enzyme stability algorithms (FoldX and SNPs3D), allelic phenotype and enzyme activity were most powerful to predict patients' phenotype and tetrahydrobiopterin response. Phenotype prediction was most accurate in deleterious genotypes (≈ 100%), followed by homozygous (92.9%), hemizygous (94.8%), and compound heterozygous genotypes (77.9%), while tetrahydrobiopterin response was correctly predicted in 71.0% of all cases. To our knowledge this is the largest study using algorithms for the prediction of patients' phenotype and tetrahydrobiopterin responsiveness in phenylketonuria patients, using data from the locus-specific and genotypes database.

  1. Human SOD1 ALS Mutations in a Drosophila Knock-In Model Cause Severe Phenotypes and Reveal Dosage-Sensitive Gain- and Loss-of-Function Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahin, Aslı; Held, Aaron; Bredvik, Kirsten; Major, Paxton; Achilli, Toni-Marie; Kerson, Abigail G; Wharton, Kristi; Stilwell, Geoff; Reenan, Robert

    2017-02-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is the most common adult-onset motor neuron disease and familial forms can be caused by numerous dominant mutations of the copper-zinc superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene. Substantial efforts have been invested in studying SOD1-ALS transgenic animal models; yet, the molecular mechanisms by which ALS-mutant SOD1 protein acquires toxicity are not well understood. ALS-like phenotypes in animal models are highly dependent on transgene dosage. Thus, issues of whether the ALS-like phenotypes of these models stem from overexpression of mutant alleles or from aspects of the SOD1 mutation itself are not easily deconvolved. To address concerns about levels of mutant SOD1 in disease pathogenesis, we have genetically engineered four human ALS-causing SOD1 point mutations (G37R, H48R, H71Y, and G85R) into the endogenous locus of Drosophila SOD1 (dsod) via ends-out homologous recombination and analyzed the resulting molecular, biochemical, and behavioral phenotypes. Contrary to previous transgenic models, we have recapitulated ALS-like phenotypes without overexpression of the mutant protein. Drosophila carrying homozygous mutations rendering SOD1 protein enzymatically inactive (G85R, H48R, and H71Y) exhibited neurodegeneration, locomotor deficits, and shortened life span. The mutation retaining enzymatic activity (G37R) was phenotypically indistinguishable from controls. While the observed mutant dsod phenotypes were recessive, a gain-of-function component was uncovered through dosage studies and comparisons with age-matched dsod null animals, which failed to show severe locomotor defects or nerve degeneration. We conclude that the Drosophila knock-in model captures important aspects of human SOD1-based ALS and provides a powerful and useful tool for further genetic studies. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  2. Cloning, sequencing, disruption and phenotypic analysis of uvsC, an Aspergillus nidulans homologue of yeast RAD51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heemst, D; Swart, K; Holub, E F; van Dijk, R; Offenberg, H H; Goosen, T; van den Broek, H W; Heyting, C

    1997-05-01

    We have cloned the uvsC gene of Aspergillus nidulans by complementation of the A. nidulans uvsC114 mutant. The predicted protein UVSC shows 67.4% sequence identity to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad51 protein and 27.4% sequence identity to the Escherichia coli RecA protein. Transcription of uvsC is induced by methyl-methane sulphonate (MMS), as is transcription of RAD51 of yeast. Similar levels of uvsC transcription were observed after MMS induction in a uvsC+ strain and the uvsC114 mutant. The coding sequence of the uvsC114 allele has a deletion of 6 bp, which results in deletion of two amino acids and replacement of one amino acid in the translation product. In order to gain more insight into the biological function of the uvsC gene, a uvsC null mutant was constructed, in which the entire uvsC coding sequence was replaced by a selectable marker gene. Meiotic and mitotic phenotypes of a uvsC+ strain, the uvsC114 mutant and the uvsC null mutant were compared. The uvsC null mutant was more sensitive to both UV and MMS than the uvsC114 mutant. The uvsC114 mutant arrested in meiotic prophase-I. The uvsC null mutant arrested at an earlier stage, before the onset of meiosis. One possible interpretation of these meiotic phenotypes is that the A. nidulans homologue of Rad51 of yeast has a role both in the specialized processes preceding meiosis and in meiotic prophase I.

  3. Genetic Analysis of Streaked and Abnormal Floret Mutant st-fon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-xi CHEN

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A double mutant with streaked leaf and abnormal floret was found and temporarily named streaked leaf and floral organ number mutant (st-fon. For this mutant, besides white streak appeared on culm, leaves and panicles, the number of floral organs increased and florets cracked. The extreme phenotype was that several small florets grew from one floret or branch rachis in small florets extended and developed into panicles. By using transmission electron microscope to observe the ultrastructure of white histocytes of leaves at the seedling stage, the white tissues which showed abnormal plastids, lamellas and thylakoids could not develop into normal chloroplast, and the development of chloroplast was blocked at the early growth stage of plastid. Scanning electron microscope and paraffin section were also used to observe the development of floral organs, and the results indicated that the development of floral meristem was out of order and unlimited, whereas in the twisty leaves, vascular bundle sheath cells grew excessively, or some bubbly cells increased. Genetic analyses carried out by means of cross and backcross with four normal-leaf-color materials revealed that the mutant is of cytoplasm inheritance.

  4. [Cloning, mutagenesis and symbiotic phenotype of three lipid transfer protein encoding genes from Mesorhizobium huakuii 7653R].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanan; Zeng, Xiaobo; Zhou, Xuejuan; Li, Youguo

    2016-12-04

    Lipid transfer protein superfamily is involved in lipid transport and metabolism. This study aimed to construct mutants of three lipid transfer protein encoding genes in Mesorhizobium huakuii 7653R, and to study the phenotypes and function of mutations during symbiosis with Astragalus sinicus. We used bioinformatics to predict structure characteristics and biological functions of lipid transfer proteins, and conducted semi-quantitative and fluorescent quantitative real-time PCR to analyze the expression levels of target genes in free-living and symbiotic conditions. Using pK19mob insertion mutagenesis to construct mutants, we carried out pot plant experiments to observe symbiotic phenotypes. MCHK-5577, MCHK-2172 and MCHK-2779 genes encoding proteins belonged to START/RHO alpha_C/PITP/Bet_v1/CoxG/CalC (SRPBCC) superfamily, involved in lipid transport or metabolism, and were identical to M. loti at 95% level. Gene relative transcription level of the three genes all increased compared to free-living condition. We obtained three mutants. Compared with wild-type 7653R, above-ground biomass of plants and nodulenitrogenase activity induced by the three mutants significantly decreased. Results indicated that lipid transfer protein encoding genes of Mesorhizobium huakuii 7653R may play important roles in symbiotic nitrogen fixation, and the mutations significantly affected the symbiotic phenotypes. The present work provided a basis to study further symbiotic function mechanism associated with lipid transfer proteins from rhizobia.

  5. A Phex mutation in a murine model of X-linked hypophosphatemia alters phosphate responsiveness of bone cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Shoji; Austin, Anthony M; Gray, Amie K; Econs, Michael J

    2012-02-01

    Mutations in the PHEX gene cause X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH). Hypophosphatemia in XLH results from increased circulating levels of a phosphaturic hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), which inhibits renal phosphate reabsorption and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (calcitriol) synthesis. The current standard therapy for XLH--high-dose phosphate and calcitriol--further increases FGF23 concentrations, suggesting that patients with XLH may have an altered response to extracellular phosphate. To test for the presence of abnormal phosphate responsiveness, we compared serum biochemistries and femoral Fgf23 mRNA expression between wild-type mice, murine models of XLH (Phex(K496X)) and hyperphosphatemic tumoral calcinosis (Galnt3(-/-)), and Galnt3/Phex double-mutant mice. Phex mutant mice had not only increased Fgf23 expression but also reduced proteolytic cleavage of intact Fgf23 protein, resulting in markedly elevated intact Fgf23 levels and consequent hypophosphatemia. In contrast, despite markedly increased Fgf23 expression, Galnt3 knockout mice had significantly high proteolytic cleavage of Fgf23 protein, leading to low intact Fgf23 concentrations and hyperphosphatemia. Galnt3/Phex double-mutant mice had an intermediate biochemical phenotype between wild-type and Phex mutant mice, including slightly elevated intact Fgf23 concentrations with milder hypophosphatemia. Despite the hypophosphatemia, double-mutant mice attempted to reduce serum phosphate back to the level of Phex mutant mice by upregulating Fgf23 expression as much as 24-fold higher than Phex mutant mice. These data suggest that Phex mutations alter the responsiveness of bone cells to extracellular phosphate concentrations and may create a lower set point for "normal" phosphate levels.

  6. Phenotypic and functional characterization of earthworm coelomocyte subsets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelmann, Péter; Hayashi, Yuya; Bodo, Kornélia

    2016-01-01

    Flow cytometry is a common approach to study invertebrate immune cells including earthworm coelomocytes. However, the link between light-scatter- and microscopy-based phenotyping remains obscured. Here we show, by means of light scatter-based cell sorting, both subpopulations (amoebocytes...... amoebocytes and eleocytes, with the former being in favor of bacterial engulfment. This study has proved successful in linking flow cytometry and microscopy analysis and provides further experimental evidence of phenotypic and functional heterogeneity in earthworm coelomocyte subsets....

  7. Reduced starch granule number per chloroplast in the dpe2/phs1 mutant is dependent on initiation of starch degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinova, Irina; Fettke, Joerg

    2017-01-01

    An Arabidopsis double knock-out mutant lacking cytosolic disproportionating enzyme 2 (DPE2) and the plastidial phosphorylase (PHS1) revealed a dwarf-growth phenotype, reduced starch content, an uneven distribution of starch within the plant rosette, and a reduced number of starch granules per chloroplast under standard growth conditions. In contrast, the wild type contained 5-7 starch granules per chloroplast. Mature and old leaves of the double mutant were essentially starch free and showed plastidial disintegration. Several analyses revealed that the number of starch granules per chloroplast was affected by the dark phase. So far, it was unclear if it was the dark phase per se or starch degradation in the dark that was connected to the observed decrease in the number of starch granules per chloroplast. Therefore, in the background of the double mutant dpe2/phs1, a triple mutant was generated lacking the initial starch degrading enzyme glucan, water dikinase (GWD). The triple mutant showed improved plant growth, a starch-excess phenotype, and a homogeneous starch distribution. Furthermore, the number of starch granules per chloroplast was increased and was similar to wild type. However, starch granule morphology was only slightly affected by the lack of GWD as in the triple mutant and, like in dpe2/phs1, more spherical starch granules were observed. The characterized triple mutant was discussed in the context of the generation of starch granules and the formation of starch granule morphology.

  8. Preliminary Assessment About Genetic Diversity, The Stability Of Potential Mutants From Two Varieties Of Chrysanthemum Morifolium Ramat. (Bronze DOA And Purple Farm) Via Gamma Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Tuong Mien; Le Ngoc Trieu; Le Tien Thanh; Pham Van Nhi; Huynh Thi Trung

    2014-01-01

    The objects of radiation breeding were chosen, collected and in vitro propagated. The suitable modalities for acute and chronic irradiation the materials were determined. Two acute and one chronic irradiation series were executed. Thus, the irradiated materials were achieved to screening for the mutants. In this study, on farm, through screening 18 phenotypic mutants of both chrysanthemums were recorded and collected including 6 potential mutants that selected for next research based on their phenotypic differences to the originals, their aesthetic and low mosaic. These 6 potential mutants together with their original varieties were micro-propagated to induce the potential mutant lines for estimation on farm of mutant characteristic segregation rates. Six potential mutant lines of E2a, E2c, E28, E29, I7, I8 are morphologically and genetically different to their original varieties, possess the identification markers and aestheticism. They were morphologically stable on farm through 3 series of growing on farm at M1V3, M1V5 and M1V7 generations. In the genetic respect, they possessed the high stabilities through in vitro generations. All of these criteria show that, these mutant lines were already to be registered as temporary cultivars/varieties. (author)

  9. Isolation and characterization of xylitol-assimilating mutants of recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Tatsunori; Taguchi, Hisataka; Fujimori, Kazuhiro E; Sahara, Takehiko; Ohgiya, Satoru; Kamagata, Yoichi; Akamatsu, Takashi

    2016-10-01

    To clarify the mechanisms of xylitol utilization, three xylitol-assimilating mutants were isolated from recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains showing highly efficient xylose-utilization. The nucleotide sequences of the mutant genomes were analyzed and compared with those of the wild-type strains and the mutation sites were identified. gal80 mutations were common to all the mutants, and recessive to the wild-type allele. Hence we constructed a gal80Δ mutant and confirmed that the gal80Δ mutant showed a xylitol-assimilation phenotype. When the constructed gal80Δ mutant was crossed with the three isolated mutants, all diploid hybrids showed xylitol assimilation, indicating that the mutations were all located in the GAL80. We analyzed the role of the galactose permease Gal2, controlled by the regulatory protein Gal80, in assimilating xylitol. A gal2Δ gal80Δ double mutant did not show xylitol assimilation, whereas expression of GAL2 under the control of the TDH3 promoter in the GAL80 strain did result in assimilation. These data indicate that Gal2 was needed for xylitol assimilation in the wild-type strain. When the gal80 mutant with an initial cell concentration of A660 = 20 was used for batch fermentation in a complex medium containing 20 g/L xylose or 20 g/L xylitol at pH 5.0 and 30°C under oxygen limitation, the gal80 mutant consumed 100% of the xylose within 12 h, but xylitol within 100 h, indicating that xylose reductase is required for xylitol consumption in oxygen-limited conditions. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Mutations at the flavin binding site of ETF:QO yield a MADD-like severe phenotype in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Ema; Henriques, Bárbara J; Rodrigues, João V; Prudêncio, Pedro; Rocha, Hugo; Vilarinho, Laura; Martinho, Rui G; Gomes, Cláudio M

    2012-08-01

    Following a screening on EMS-induced Drosophila mutants defective for formation and morphogenesis of epithelial cells, we have identified three lethal mutants defective for the production of embryonic cuticle. The mutants are allelic to the CG12140 gene, the fly homologue of electron transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF:QO). In humans, inherited defects in this inner membrane protein account for multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD), a metabolic disease of β-oxidation, with a broad range of clinical phenotypes, varying from embryonic lethal to mild forms. The three mutant alleles carried distinct missense mutations in ETF:QO (G65E, A68V and S104F) and maternal mutant embryos for ETF:QO showed lethal morphogenetic defects and a significant induction of apoptosis following germ-band elongation. This phenotype is accompanied by an embryonic accumulation of short- and medium-chain acylcarnitines (C4, C8 and C12) as well as long-chain acylcarnitines (C14 and C16:1), whose elevation is also found in severe MADD forms in humans under intense metabolic decompensation. In agreement the ETF:QO activity in the mutant embryos is markedly decreased in relation to wild type activity. Amino acid sequence analysis and structural mapping into a molecular model of ETF:QO show that all mutations map at FAD interacting residues, two of which at the nucleotide-binding Rossmann fold. This structural domain is composed by a β-strand connected by a short loop to an α-helix, and its perturbation results in impaired cofactor association via structural destabilisation and consequently enzymatic inactivation. This work thus pinpoints the molecular origins of a severe MADD-like phenotype in the fruit fly and establishes the proof of concept concerning the suitability of this organism as a potential model organism for MADD. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Incomplete excision repair process after UV-irradiation in MUT-mutants of Proteus mirabillis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoerl, K.

    1977-01-01

    MUT-mutants of P. mirabilis seem to be able to perform the incision step in the course of excision repair. In contrast to the corresponding wildtype strains with MUT-mutants the number of single-strand breaks formed after UV-irradiation is independent of the UV-dose up to about 720 erg/mm 2 . Incubation in minimal medium over a longer time does not result in completion of excision repair; about 3-6 single-strand breaks in the DNA of these mutants remain open. Likewise, the low molecular weight of the newly synthesized daughter DNA confirms an incompletely proceeding or delayed repair process. As a possible reason for the mutator phenotype an alteration of the DNA-polymerase playing a role in excision and resynthesis steps of excision repair is discussed. (author)

  12. Accumulation of pathogenic ΔmtDNA induced deafness but not diabetic phenotypes in mito-mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakada, Kazuto; Sato, Akitsugu; Sone, Hideyuki; Kasahara, Atsuko; Ikeda, Katsuhisa; Kagawa, Yasuo; Yonekawa, Hiromichi; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2004-01-01

    Mito-mice carrying various proportions of deletion mutant mtDNA (ΔmtDNA) were generated by introduction of the ΔmtDNA from cultured cells into fertilized eggs of C57BL/6J (B6) strain mice. Great advantages of mito-mice are that they share exactly the same nuclear-genome background, and that their genetic variations are restricted to proportions of pathogenic ΔmtDNA. Since accumulation of ΔmtDNA to more than 75% induced respiration defects, the disease phenotypes observed exclusively in mito-mice carrying more than 75% ΔmtDNA should be due to accumulated ΔmtDNA. In this study, we focused on the expressions of hearing loss and diabetic phenotypes, since these common age-associated abnormalities have sometimes been reported to be inherited maternally and to be associated with pathogenic mutant mtDNAs. The results showed that accumulation of exogenously introduced ΔmtDNA was responsible for hearing loss, but not for expression of diabetic phenotypes in mito-mice

  13. ALS-associated mutant FUS induces selective motor neuron degeneration through toxic gain of function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Aarti; Lyashchenko, Alexander K; Lu, Lei; Nasrabady, Sara Ebrahimi; Elmaleh, Margot; Mendelsohn, Monica; Nemes, Adriana; Tapia, Juan Carlos; Mentis, George Z; Shneider, Neil A

    2016-02-04

    Mutations in FUS cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), including some of the most aggressive, juvenile-onset forms of the disease. FUS loss-of-function and toxic gain-of-function mechanisms have been proposed to explain how mutant FUS leads to motor neuron degeneration, but neither has been firmly established in the pathogenesis of ALS. Here we characterize a series of transgenic FUS mouse lines that manifest progressive, mutant-dependent motor neuron degeneration preceded by early, structural and functional abnormalities at the neuromuscular junction. A novel, conditional FUS knockout mutant reveals that postnatal elimination of FUS has no effect on motor neuron survival or function. Moreover, endogenous FUS does not contribute to the onset of the ALS phenotype induced by mutant FUS. These findings demonstrate that FUS-dependent motor degeneration is not due to loss of FUS function, but to the gain of toxic properties conferred by ALS mutations.

  14. Fine Mapping and Cloning of Leafy Head Mutant Gene pla1-5 in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong-neng FENG

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We identified a leafy head mutant pla1-5 (plastochron 1-5 from the progeny of japonica rice cultivar Taipei 309 treated with 60Co-γ ray irradiation. The pla1-5 mutant has a dwarf phenotype and small leaves. Compared with its wild type, pla1-5 has more leaves and fewer tillers, and it fails to produce normal panicles at the maturity stage. Genetic analysis showed that the pla1-5 phenotype is controlled by a single recessive nuclear gene. Using the map-based cloning strategy, we narrowed down the location of the target gene to a 58-kb region between simple sequence repeat markers CHR1027 and CHR1030 on the long arm of chromosome 10. The target gene cosegregated with molecular markers CHR1028 and CHR1029. There were five predicted genes in the mapped region. The results from sequencing analysis revealed that there was one base deletion in the first exon of LOC_Os10g26340 encoding cytochrome P450 CYP78A11 in the pla1-5 mutant, which might result in a downstream frame shift and premature termination. These results suggest that the P450 CYP78A11 gene is the candidate gene of PLA1-5.

  15. A Bystander Mechanism Explains the Specific Phenotype of a Broadly Expressed Misfolded Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Klabonski

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Misfolded proteins in transgenic models of conformational diseases interfere with proteostasis machinery and compromise the function of many structurally and functionally unrelated metastable proteins. This collateral damage to cellular proteins has been termed 'bystander' mechanism. How a single misfolded protein overwhelms the proteostasis, and how broadly-expressed mutant proteins cause cell type-selective phenotypes in disease are open questions. We tested the gain-of-function mechanism of a R37C folding mutation in an endogenous IGF-like C.elegans protein DAF-28. DAF-28(R37C is broadly expressed, but only causes dysfunction in one specific neuron, ASI, leading to a distinct developmental phenotype. We find that this phenotype is caused by selective disruption of normal biogenesis of an unrelated endogenous protein, DAF-7/TGF-β. The combined deficiency of DAF-28 and DAF-7 biogenesis, but not of DAF-28 alone, explains the gain-of-function phenotype-deficient pro-growth signaling by the ASI neuron. Using functional, fluorescently-tagged protein, we find that, in animals with mutant DAF-28/IGF, the wild-type DAF-7/TGF-β is mislocalized to and accumulates in the proximal axon of the ASI neuron. Activation of two different branches of the unfolded protein response can modulate both the developmental phenotype and DAF-7 mislocalization in DAF-28(R37C animals, but appear to act through divergent mechanisms. Our finding that bystander targeting of TGF-β explains the phenotype caused by a folding mutation in an IGF-like protein suggests that, in conformational diseases, bystander misfolding may specify the distinct phenotypes caused by different folding mutations.

  16. Deep Plant Phenomics: A Deep Learning Platform for Complex Plant Phenotyping Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubbens, Jordan R.; Stavness, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Plant phenomics has received increasing interest in recent years in an attempt to bridge the genotype-to-phenotype knowledge gap. There is a need for expanded high-throughput phenotyping capabilities to keep up with an increasing amount of data from high-dimensional imaging sensors and the desire to measure more complex phenotypic traits (Knecht et al., 2016). In this paper, we introduce an open-source deep learning tool called Deep Plant Phenomics. This tool provides pre-trained neural networks for several common plant phenotyping tasks, as well as an easy platform that can be used by plant scientists to train models for their own phenotyping applications. We report performance results on three plant phenotyping benchmarks from the literature, including state of the art performance on leaf counting, as well as the first published results for the mutant classification and age regression tasks for Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:28736569

  17. Genetic study of Pea (Pisum sativum L.) mutants with changed shape and/or dentation of leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naidenova, N.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the morphological differences between normal plants and mutants (due to irradiation) with different shape and/or dentation of leaflets and to evaluate their productivity and genetic potential. Dry seeds have been submitted to gamma irradiation with doses 100 Gy, 150 Gy and 200 Gy.The mutants studies in this research introduce an important source for further investigation of genetics of the mutant traits - dentation of leaflets, shape and especially flowering time that is controlled by genetically determined responses to photo period and temperature. Due to the clear phenotypic expression of the shape and leaves in some plants it is considered that the development of the leaves mutants is and important finding for pea genetics making tham valuable morphological markers for genetic investigations

  18. Properties of adenyl cyclase and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate receptor protein-deficient mutants of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, S.

    1976-01-01

    Several spontaneous cya and crp mutants of Escherichia coli have been selected as clones simultaneously resistant to phage lambda and nalidixic acid and characterized. Both cya and crp mutants have been found to grow as cocci with increased doubling times. They have increased resistance to some mutagens (methylmethanesulfonate, ultraviolet light, gamma rays), antibiotics (nalidixic acid, ampicillin), phages (lambda, T6), sublethal heat and hypotonic shock, and decreased resistance to neutral detergents (sodium dodecyl sulfate, sodium deoxycholate), a protein synthesis inhibitor (streptomycin), and a respiratory inhibitor (sodium azide). The nature of changes in cell parameters indicate fundamental alterations in the envelope structure of the cya and crp mutant cells. The new cya and crp mutants have been found to be multiply carbohydrate negative and nonmotile in conformity with similar previously isolated mutants. Studies of revertants and phi 80 cya + and phi 80 cya transductants indicated that the pleiotropic phenotype is related to a single mutational event at the cya or the crp locus in the mutants

  19. Variability in clinical phenotypes of PRPF8-linked autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa correlates with differential PRPF8/SNRNP200 interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, Pascal; Passarin, Olga; Munier, Francis L; Tran, Viet H; Vaclavik, Veronika

    2018-01-01

    To expand the genotype/phenotype correlations in patients with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) harboring PRPF8 variants. Two patients, a father and his daughter, harboring a novel p.PRPF8-Glu2331* variant, underwent ophthalmic examination at 3-year-interval, including fundus photography, fundus autofluorescence, optical coherence tomography, and ISCEV standard full field ERGs. All reported disease-causing PRPF8 variants were collected and localized in the PRPF8 and PRPF8/SNRNP200 protein structures. The p.PRPF8-Glu2331* variant results in a truncated PRPF8 protein lacking the last five C-terminal amino acids and caused in the two patients a severe clinical phenotype, with the macula being affected from the second decade on. All but two adRP-linked variants are located in the last exon 43 encoding the C-terminal tail of the C-terminal PRPF8 Jab1 domain. The p.PRPF8-Ser2118Phe and -Asn2280Lys variants encoded by exons 39 and 42, respectively, are located at the basis of the C-terminal tail. Frame-shift mutations and nonconservative amino acid changes in PRPF8 typically cause severe clinical phenotypes. The conservative missense variant p.PRPF8-Arg2310Lys that is not altering the global charge of the C-terminal tail, and variants located at the basis of the C-terminal tail show milder clinical phenotypes, in accordance with functional data on PRPF8/SNRNP200 interactions in yeast.

  20. Phenotypic effects of repeated psychosocial stress during adolescence in mice mutant for the schizophrenia risk gene neuregulin-1: a putative model of gene × environment interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbonnet, Lieve; O'Tuathaigh, Colm; Clarke, Gerard; O'Leary, Claire; Petit, Emilie; Clarke, Niamh; Tighe, Orna; Lai, Donna; Harvey, Richard; Cryan, John F; Dinan, Timothy G; Waddington, John L

    2012-05-01

    There is a paucity of animal models by which the contributions of environmental and genetic factors to the pathobiology of psychosis can be investigated. This study examined the individual and combined effects of chronic social stress during adolescence and deletion of the schizophrenia risk gene neuregulin-1 (NRG1) on adult mouse phenotype. Mice were exposed to repeated social defeat stress during adolescence and assessed for exploratory behaviour, working memory, sucrose preference, social behaviour and prepulse inhibition in adulthood. Thereafter, in vitro cytokine responses to mitogen stimulation and corticosterone inhibition were assayed in spleen cells, with measurement of cytokine and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA in frontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum. NRG1 mutants exhibited hyperactivity, decreased anxiety, impaired sensorimotor gating and reduced preference for social novelty. The effects of stress on exploratory/anxiety-related parameters, spatial working memory, sucrose preference and basal cytokine levels were modified by NRG1 deletion. Stress also exerted varied effect on spleen cytokine response to concanavalin A and brain cytokine and BDNF mRNA expression in NRG1 mutants. The experience of psychosocial stress during adolescence may trigger further pathobiological features that contribute to the development of schizophrenia, particularly in those with underlying NRG1 gene abnormalities. This model elaborates the importance of gene × environment interactions in the etiology of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Intermittent fasting uncovers and rescues cognitive phenotypes in PTEN neuronal haploinsufficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral-Costa, J V; Andreotti, D Z; Mello, N P; Scavone, C; Camandola, S; Kawamoto, E M

    2018-06-05

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is an important protein with key modulatory functions in cell growth and survival. PTEN is crucial during embryogenesis and plays a key role in the central nervous system (CNS), where it directly modulates neuronal development and synaptic plasticity. Loss of PTEN signaling function is associated with cognitive deficits and synaptic plasticity impairment. Accordingly, Pten mutations have a strong link with autism spectrum disorder. In this study, neuronal Pten haploinsufficient male mice were subjected to a long-term environmental intervention - intermittent fasting (IF) - and then evaluated for alterations in exploratory, anxiety and learning and memory behaviors. Although no significant effects on spatial memory were observed, mutant mice showed impaired contextual fear memory in the passive avoidance test - an outcome that was effectively rescued by IF. In this study, we demonstrated that IF modulation, in addition to its rescue of the memory deficit, was also required to uncover behavioral phenotypes otherwise hidden in this neuronal Pten haploinsufficiency model.

  2. Pattern of retinal morphological and functional decay in a light-inducible, rhodopsin mutant mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargini, Claudia; Novelli, Elena; Piano, Ilaria; Biagioni, Martina; Strettoi, Enrica

    2017-07-18

    Hallmarks of Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP), a family of genetic diseases, are a typical rod-cone-degeneration with initial night blindness and loss of peripheral vision, followed by decreased daylight sight and progressive visual acuity loss up to legal blindness. Great heterogeneity in nature and function of mutated genes, variety of mutations for each of them, variability in phenotypic appearance and transmission modality contribute to make RP a still incurable disease. Translational research relies on appropriate animal models mimicking the genetic and phenotypic diversity of the human pathology. Here, we provide a systematic, morphological and functional analysis of Rho Tvrm4 /Rho + rhodopsin mutant mice, originally described in 2010 and portraying several features of common forms of autosomal dominant RP caused by gain-of-function mutations. These mice undergo photoreceptor degeneration only when exposed briefly to strong, white light and allow controlled timing of induction of rod and cone death, which therefore can be elicited in adult animals, as observed in human RP. The option to control severity and retinal extent of the phenotype by regulating intensity and duration of the inducing light opens possibilities to exploit this model for multiple experimental purposes. Altogether, the unique features of this mutant make it an excellent resource for retinal degeneration research.

  3. Sharing mutants and experimental information prepublication using FgMutantDb (https://scabusa.org/FgMutantDb).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Thomas T; Basenko, Evelina; Harb, Omar; Brown, Neil A; Urban, Martin; Hammond-Kosack, Kim E; Bregitzer, Phil P

    2018-06-01

    There is no comprehensive storage for generated mutants of Fusarium graminearum or data associated with these mutants. Instead, researchers relied on several independent and non-integrated databases. FgMutantDb was designed as a simple spreadsheet that is accessible globally on the web that will function as a centralized source of information on F. graminearum mutants. FgMutantDb aids in the maintenance and sharing of mutants within a research community. It will serve also as a platform for disseminating prepublication results as well as negative results that often go unreported. Additionally, the highly curated information on mutants in FgMutantDb will be shared with other databases (FungiDB, Ensembl, PhytoPath, and PHI-base) through updating reports. Here we describe the creation and potential usefulness of FgMutantDb to the F. graminearum research community, and provide a tutorial on its use. This type of database could be easily emulated for other fungal species. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Cyclic-AMP metabolism in synaptic growth, strength and precision: Neural and behavioral phenotype-specific counterbalancing effects between dnc PDE and rut AC mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Atsushi; Wu, Chun-Fang

    2012-01-01

    Two classic learning mutants in Drosophila, rutabaga (rut) and dunce (dnc), are defective in cAMP synthesis and degradation, respectively, exhibiting a variety of neuronal and behavioral defects. We ask how the opposing effects of these mutations on cAMP levels modify subsets of phenotypes, and whether any specific phenotypes could be ameliorated by biochemical counter balancing effects in dnc rut double mutants. Our study at larval neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) demonstrate that dnc mutations caused severe defects in nerve terminal morphology, characterized by unusually large synaptic boutons and aberrant innervation patterns. Interestingly, a counterbalancing effect led to rescue of the aberrant innervation patterns but the enlarged boutons in dnc rut double mutant remained as extreme as those in dnc. In contrast to dnc, rut mutations strongly affect synaptic transmission. Focal loose-patch recording data accumulated over 4 years suggest that synaptic currents in rut boutons were characterized by unusually large temporal dispersion and a seasonal variation in the amount of transmitter release, with diminished synaptic currents in summer months. Experiments with different rearing temperatures revealed that high temperature (29–30 °C) decreased synaptic transmission in rut, but did not alter dnc and WT. Importantly, the large temporal dispersion and abnormal temperature dependence of synaptic transmission, characteristic of rut, still persisted in dnc rut double mutants. To interpret these results in a proper perspective, we reviewed previously documented differential effects of dnc and rut mutations and their genetic interactions in double mutants on a variety of physiological and behavioral phenotypes. The cases of rescue in double mutants are associated with gradual developmental and maintenance processes whereas many behavioral and physiological manifestations on faster time scales could not be rescued. We discuss factors that could contribute to the

  5. The Arabidopsis thiamin-deficient mutant pale green1 lacks thiamin monophosphate phosphatase of the vitamin B1 biosynthesis pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Wei-Yu; Liao, Jo-Chien; Wang, Hsin-Tzu; Hung, Tzu-Huan; Tseng, Ching-Chih; Chung, Tsui-Yun; Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun

    2017-07-01

    Thiamin diphosphate (TPP, vitamin B 1 ) is an essential coenzyme present in all organisms. Animals obtain TPP from their diets, but plants synthesize TPPde novo. We isolated and characterized an Arabidopsis pale green1 (pale1) mutant that contained higher concentrations of thiamin monophosphate (TMP) and less thiamin and TPP than the wild type. Supplementation with thiamin, but not the thiazole and pyrimidine precursors, rescued the mutant phenotype, indicating that the pale1 mutant is a thiamin-deficient mutant. Map-based cloning and whole-genome sequencing revealed that the pale1 mutant has a mutation in At5g32470 encoding a TMP phosphatase of the TPP biosynthesis pathway. We further confirmed that the mutation of At5g32470 is responsible for the mutant phenotypes by complementing the pale1 mutant with constructs overexpressing full-length At5g32470. Most plant TPP biosynthetic enzymes are located in the chloroplasts and cytosol, but At5g32470-GFP localized to the mitochondrion of the root, hypocotyl, mesophyll and guard cells of the 35S:At5g32470-GFP complemented plants. The subcellular localization of a functional TMP phosphatase suggests that the complete vitamin B1 biosynthesis pathway may involve the chloroplasts, mitochondria and cytosol in plants. Analysis of PALE1 promoter-uidA activity revealed that PALE1 is mainly expressed in vascular tissues of Arabidopsis seedlings. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of TPP biosynthesis genes and genes encoding the TPP-dependent enzymes pyruvate dehydrogenase, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and transketolase revealed that the transcript levels of these genes were upregulated in the pale1 mutant. These results suggest that endogenous levels of TPP may affect the expression of genes involved in TPP biosynthesis and TPP-dependent enzymes. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Efficient Identification of Causal Mutations through Sequencing of Bulked F2 from Two Allelic Bloomless Mutants of Sorghum bicolor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinping Jiao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor Moench, L. plant accumulates copious layers of epi-cuticular wax (EW on its aerial surfaces, to a greater extent than most other crops. EW provides a vapor barrier that reduces water loss, and is therefore considered to be a major determinant of sorghum's drought tolerance. However, little is known about the genes responsible for wax accumulation in sorghum. We isolated two allelic mutants, bloomless40-1 (bm40-1 and bm40-2, from a mutant library constructed from ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS treated seeds of an inbred, BTx623. Both mutants were nearly devoid of the EW layer. Each bm mutant was crossed to the un-mutated BTx623 to generated F2 populations that segregated for the bm phenotype. Genomic DNA from 20 bm F2 plants from each population was bulked for whole genome sequencing. A single gene, Sobic.001G228100, encoding a GDSL-like lipase/acylhydrolase, had unique homozygous mutations in each bulked F2 population. Mutant bm40-1 harbored a missense mutation in the gene, whereas bm40-2 had a splice donor site mutation. Our findings thus provide strong evidence that mutation in this GDSL-like lipase gene causes the bm phenotype, and further demonstrate that this approach of sequencing two independent allelic mutant populations is an efficient method for identifying causal mutations. Combined with allelic mutants, MutMap provides powerful method to identify all causal genes for the large collection of bm mutants in sorghum, which will provide insight into how sorghum plants accumulate such abundant EW on their aerial surface. This knowledge may facilitate the development of tools for engineering drought-tolerant crops with reduced water loss.

  7. Analysis of fast neutron-generated mutants at the Arabidopsis thaliana HY4 locus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruggemann, E.; Handwerger, K.; Essex, C.; Storz, G.

    1996-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is expected to produce mutants with deletions or other chromosomal rearrangements. These mutants are useful for a variety of purposes, such as creating null alleles and cloning genes whose existence is known only from their mutant phenotype; however, only a few mutations generated by ionizing radiation have been characterized at the molecular level in Arabidopsis thaliana. Twenty fast neutron-generated alleles of the Arabidopsis HY4 locus, which encodes a blue light receptor, CRY1, were isolated and characterized. Nine of the mutant alleles displayed normal genetic behavior. The other 11 mutant alleles were poorly transmitted through the male gametophyte and were lethal in homozygous plants. Southern blot analysis demonstrated that alleles of the first group generally contain small or moderate-sized deletions at HY4, while alleles of the second group contain large deletions at this locus. These results demonstrate that fast neutrons can produce a range of deletions at a single locus in Arabidopsis. Many of these deletions would be suitable for cloning by genomic subtraction or representational difference analysis. The results also suggest the presence of an essential locus adjacent to HY4. (author)

  8. Transgenic mice expressing mutant Pinin exhibit muscular dystrophy, nebulin deficiency and elevated expression of slow-type muscle fiber genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Hsu-Pin; Hsu, Shu-Yuan; Wu, Wen-Ai; Hu, Ji-Wei; Ouyang, Pin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Pnn CCD domain functions as a dominant negative mutant regulating Pnn expression and function. •Pnn CCD mutant Tg mice have a muscle wasting phenotype during development and show dystrophic histological features. •Pnn mutant muscles are susceptible to slow fiber type gene transition and NEB reduction. •The Tg mouse generated by overexpression of the Pnn CCD domain displays many characteristics resembling NEB +/− mice. -- Abstract: Pinin (Pnn) is a nuclear speckle-associated SR-like protein. The N-terminal region of the Pnn protein sequence is highly conserved from mammals to insects, but the C-terminal RS domain-containing region is absent in lower species. The N-terminal coiled-coil domain (CCD) is, therefore, of interest not only from a functional point of view, but also from an evolutionarily standpoint. To explore the biological role of the Pnn CCD in a physiological context, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing Pnn mutant in skeletal muscle. We found that overexpression of the CCD reduces endogenous Pnn expression in cultured cell lines as well as in transgenic skeletal muscle fibers. Pnn mutant mice exhibited reduced body mass and impaired muscle function during development. Mutant skeletal muscles show dystrophic histological features with muscle fibers heavily loaded with centrally located myonuclei. Expression profiling and pathway analysis identified over-representation of genes in gene categories associated with muscle contraction, specifically those related to slow type fiber. In addition nebulin (NEB) expression level is repressed in Pnn mutant skeletal muscle. We conclude that Pnn downregulation in skeletal muscle causes a muscular dystrophic phenotype associated with NEB deficiency and the CCD domain is incapable of replacing full length Pnn in terms of functional capacity

  9. Transgenic mice expressing mutant Pinin exhibit muscular dystrophy, nebulin deficiency and elevated expression of slow-type muscle fiber genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hsu-Pin; Hsu, Shu-Yuan [Department of Anatomy, Chang Gung University Medical College, Taiwan (China); Wu, Wen-Ai; Hu, Ji-Wei [Transgenic Mouse Core Laboratory, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China); Ouyang, Pin, E-mail: ouyang@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Anatomy, Chang Gung University Medical College, Taiwan (China); Transgenic Mouse Core Laboratory, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China); Molecular Medicine Research Center, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Pnn CCD domain functions as a dominant negative mutant regulating Pnn expression and function. •Pnn CCD mutant Tg mice have a muscle wasting phenotype during development and show dystrophic histological features. •Pnn mutant muscles are susceptible to slow fiber type gene transition and NEB reduction. •The Tg mouse generated by overexpression of the Pnn CCD domain displays many characteristics resembling NEB{sup +/−} mice. -- Abstract: Pinin (Pnn) is a nuclear speckle-associated SR-like protein. The N-terminal region of the Pnn protein sequence is highly conserved from mammals to insects, but the C-terminal RS domain-containing region is absent in lower species. The N-terminal coiled-coil domain (CCD) is, therefore, of interest not only from a functional point of view, but also from an evolutionarily standpoint. To explore the biological role of the Pnn CCD in a physiological context, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing Pnn mutant in skeletal muscle. We found that overexpression of the CCD reduces endogenous Pnn expression in cultured cell lines as well as in transgenic skeletal muscle fibers. Pnn mutant mice exhibited reduced body mass and impaired muscle function during development. Mutant skeletal muscles show dystrophic histological features with muscle fibers heavily loaded with centrally located myonuclei. Expression profiling and pathway analysis identified over-representation of genes in gene categories associated with muscle contraction, specifically those related to slow type fiber. In addition nebulin (NEB) expression level is repressed in Pnn mutant skeletal muscle. We conclude that Pnn downregulation in skeletal muscle causes a muscular dystrophic phenotype associated with NEB deficiency and the CCD domain is incapable of replacing full length Pnn in terms of functional capacity.

  10. Linking dynamic phenotyping with metabolite analysis to study natural variation in drought responses of Brachypodium distachyon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine H.C. Fisher

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Drought is an important environmental stress limiting the productivity of major crops worldwide. Understanding drought tolerance and possible mechanisms for improving drought resistance is therefore a prerequisite to develop drought-tolerant crops that produce significant yields with reduced amounts of water. Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium is a key model species for cereals, forage grasses and energy grasses. In this study, initial screening of a Brachypodium germplasm collection consisting of 138 different ecotypes exposed to progressive drought, highlighted the natural variation in morphology, biomass accumulation and responses to drought stress. A core set of ten ecotypes, classified as being either tolerant, susceptible or intermediate, in response to drought stress, were exposed to mild or severe (respectively 15% and 0% soil water content drought stress and phenomic parameters linked to growth and colour changes were assessed. When exposed to severe drought stress, phenotypic data and metabolite profiling combined with multivariate analysis revealed a remarkable consistency in separating the selected ecotypes into their different pre-defined drought tolerance groups. Increases in several metabolites, including for the phytohormones jasmonic acid and salicylic acid, and TCA-cycle intermediates, were positively correlated with biomass yield and with reduced yellow pixel counts; suggestive of delayed senescence, both key target traits for crop improvement to drought stress. While metabolite analysis also separated ecotypes into the distinct tolerance groupings after exposure to mild drought stress, similar analysis of the phenotypic data failed to do so, confirming the value of metabolomics to investigate early responses to drought stress. The results highlight the potential of combining the analyses of phenotypic and metabolic responses to identify key mechanisms and markers associated with drought tolerance in both the Brachypodium

  11. A Population of Deletion Mutants and an Integrated Mapping and Exome-seq Pipeline for Gene Discovery in Maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Shangang; Li, Aixia; Morton, Kyla; Avoles-Kianian, Penny; Kianian, Shahryar F.; Zhang, Chi; Holding, David

    2016-01-01

    To better understand maize endosperm filling and maturation, we used γ-irradiation of the B73 maize reference line to generate mutants with opaque endosperm and reduced kernel fill phenotypes, and created a population of 1788 lines including 39 Mo17 × F2s showing stable, segregating, and viable kernel phenotypes. For molecular characterization of the mutants, we developed a novel functional genomics platform that combined bulked segregant RNA and exome sequencing (BSREx-seq) to map causative mutations and identify candidate genes within mapping intervals. To exemplify the utility of the mutants and provide proof-of-concept for the bioinformatics platform, we present detailed characterization of line 937, an opaque mutant harboring a 6203 bp in-frame deletion covering six exons within the Opaque-1 gene. In addition, we describe mutant line 146 which contains a 4.8 kb intragene deletion within the Sugary-1 gene and line 916 in which an 8.6 kb deletion knocks out a Cyclin A2 gene. The publically available algorithm developed in this work improves the identification of causative deletions and its corresponding gaps within mapping peaks. This study demonstrates the utility of γ-irradiation for forward genetics in large nondense genomes such as maize since deletions often affect single genes. Furthermore, we show how this classical mutagenesis method becomes applicable for functional genomics when combined with state-of-the-art genomics tools. PMID:27261000

  12. Invasion strategies in clonal aquatic plants: Are phenotypic differences caused by phenotypic plasticity or local adaptation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Tenna; Lambertini, Carla; Olesen, Birgit

    2010-01-01

    conditions and plant morphological characteristics. Conclusions: The results indicate that at the current stage of spread into New Zealand, the primary adaptive strategy of these three invasive macrophytes is phenotypic plasticity. However, while limited, the possibility that genetic diversity between......Background and Aims: The successful spread of invasive plants in new environments is often linked to multiple introductions and a diverse gene pool that facilitates local adaptation to variable environmental conditions. For clonal plants, however, phenotypic plasticity may be equally important....... Methods: Field populations with a large phenotypic variety were sampled in a range of lakes and streams with different chemical and physical properties. The phenotypic plasticity of the species before and after cultivation was studied in a common garden growth experiment, and the genetic diversity...

  13. A study on genetic variation and selective effect of principal characters of hybrid progenies of macro-mutants in peanut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Qingrong

    1990-01-01

    In order to make good use of macro-mutants, we have studied the law of genetic variation and selective effect on the hybrid progenies of original varieties and of two macro-mutants with steady phenotypes. The results show that the hybrid progenies of the two experimental macro-mutants in the broad-sense heritability and the genetic advance of their main economical characters as well as the effect on selection are better than those of the hybrid progenies of the two original varieties. The selection rate from the macro-mutant hybrid progenies is 72.2% which is higher than that of the hybrid progenies of the two original varieties, and and a new prospecting strain has been obtained

  14. Alternating hemiplegia of childhood-related neural and behavioural phenotypes in Na+,K+-ATPase α3 missense mutant mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greer S Kirshenbaum

    Full Text Available Missense mutations in ATP1A3 encoding Na(+,K(+-ATPase α3 have been identified as the primary cause of alternating hemiplegia of childhood (AHC, a motor disorder with onset typically before the age of 6 months. Affected children tend to be of short stature and can also have epilepsy, ataxia and learning disability. The Na(+,K(+-ATPase has a well-known role in maintaining electrochemical gradients across cell membranes, but our understanding of how the mutations cause AHC is limited. Myshkin mutant mice carry an amino acid change (I810N that affects the same position in Na(+,K(+-ATPase α3 as I810S found in AHC. Using molecular modelling, we show that the Myshkin and AHC mutations display similarly severe structural impacts on Na(+,K(+-ATPase α3, including upon the K(+ pore and predicted K(+ binding sites. Behavioural analysis of Myshkin mice revealed phenotypic abnormalities similar to symptoms of AHC, including motor dysfunction and cognitive impairment. 2-DG imaging of Myshkin mice identified compromised thalamocortical functioning that includes a deficit in frontal cortex functioning (hypofrontality, directly mirroring that reported in AHC, along with reduced thalamocortical functional connectivity. Our results thus provide validation for missense mutations in Na(+,K(+-ATPase α3 as a cause of AHC, and highlight Myshkin mice as a starting point for the exploration of disease mechanisms and novel treatments in AHC.

  15. Statin use is not associated with improved progression free survival in cetuximab treated KRAS mutant metastatic colorectal cancer patients: results from the CAIRO2 study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krens, Lisanne L.; Simkens, Lieke H. J.; Baas, Jara M.; Koomen, Els R.; Gelderblom, Hans; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan

    2014-01-01

    Statins may inhibit the expression of the mutant KRAS phenotype by preventing the prenylation and thus the activation of the KRAS protein. This study was aimed at retrospectively evaluating the effect of statin use on outcome in KRAS mutant metastatic colorectal cancer patients (mCRC) treated with

  16. The inability of Bacillus licheniformis perR mutant to grow is mainly due to the lack of PerR-mediated fur repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Hoon; Yang, Yoon-Mo; Ji, Chang-Jun; Ryu, Su-Hyun; Won, Young-Bin; Ju, Shin-Yeong; Kwon, Yumi; Lee, Yeh-Eun; Youn, Hwan; Lee, Jin-Won

    2017-06-01

    PerR, a member of Fur family protein, is a metal-dependent H 2 O 2 sensing transcription factor that regulates genes involved in peroxide stress response. Industrially important bacterium Bacillus licheniformis contains three PerR-like proteins (PerR BL , PerR2, and PerR3) compared to its close relative Bacillus subtilis. Interestingly, unlike other bacteria including B. subtilis, no authentic perR BL null mutant could be established for B. licheniformis. Thus, we constructed a conditional perR BL mutant using a xylose-inducible promoter, and investigated the genes under the control of PerR BL . PerR BL regulon genes include katA, mrgA, ahpC, pfeT, hemA, fur, and perR as observed for PerR BS . However, there is some variation in the expression levels of fur and hemA genes between B. subtilis and B. licheniformis in the derepressed state. Furthermore, katA, mrgA, and ahpC are strongly induced, whereas the others are only weakly or not induced by H 2 O 2 treatment. In contrast to the B. subtilis perR null mutant which frequently gives rise to large colony phenotype mainly due to the loss of katA, the suppressors of B. licheniformis perR mutant, which can form colonies on LB agar, were all catalase-positive. Instead, many of the suppressors showed increased levels of siderophore production, suggesting that the suppressor mutation is linked to the fur gene. Consistent with this, perR fur double mutant could grow on LB agar without Fe supplementation, whereas perR katA double mutant could only grow on LB agar with Fe supplementation. Taken together, our data suggest that in B. licheniformis, despite the similarity in PerR BL and PerR BS regulon genes, perR is an essential gene required for growth and that the inability of perR null mutant to grow is mainly due to elevated expression of Fur.

  17. Selection Of Drought Resistant Mutants In Rice Using DNA Markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Duc Thanh; Le Thi Bich Thuy; Dang Thi Minh Lua

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, the marker - assisted selection (MAS) strategy have been used for selection of traits that are difficult and costly performed measurement and score. Selection for a well-developed root system could improve the drought resistance of rice as the plant would avoid water stress by absorbing water from the soil. There were several reports on map construction and identification of the markers tightly linked to morphological and physiological traits related to drought resistance in rice, in particular, root traits in upland and lowland rice (Champoux et al., 1995; Ray et al., 1996; Price et al., 1997, 2000; Yadav et al., 1997). In this report, we present the results on selection of drought resistance mutants in rice using the DNA markers tightly linked to root traits favorable for drought resistance. The mutant rice lines were obtained from irradiated seeds and calluses by gamma ray. The selection was performed at M2 mutants using the DNA markers linked to maximum root length (MRL), root weight to shoot weight ratio (RW/SR), and weight of deep root to shoot weight ratio (DRW/SR). The obtained results showed that there were many lines possessed drought resistant markers. In addition, there is a number of lines have altered genome. Several lines having drought markers proved to be more resistant to drought in green-house test. These lines could be useful for further test and development of drought resistant varieties. (author)

  18. Novel Escherichia coli umuD′ Mutants: Structure-Function Insights into SOS Mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLenigan, Mary; Peat, Thomas S.; Frank, Ekaterina G.; McDonald, John P.; Gonzalez, Martín; Levine, Arthur S.; Hendrickson, Wayne A.; Woodgate, Roger

    1998-01-01

    Although it has been 10 years since the discovery that the Escherichia coli UmuD protein undergoes a RecA-mediated cleavage reaction to generate mutagenically active UmuD′, the function of UmuD′ has yet to be determined. In an attempt to elucidate the role of UmuD′ in SOS mutagenesis, we have utilized a colorimetric papillation assay to screen for mutants of a hydroxylamine-treated, low-copy-number umuD′ plasmid that are unable to promote SOS-dependent spontaneous mutagenesis. Using such an approach, we have identified 14 independent umuD′ mutants. Analysis of these mutants revealed that two resulted from promoter changes which reduced the expression of wild-type UmuD′, three were nonsense mutations that resulted in a truncated UmuD′ protein, and the remaining nine were missense alterations. In addition to the hydroxylamine-generated mutants, we have subcloned the mutations found in three chromosomal umuD1, umuD44, and umuD77 alleles into umuD′. All 17 umuD′ mutants resulted in lower levels of SOS-dependent spontaneous mutagenesis but varied in the extent to which they promoted methyl methanesulfonate-induced mutagenesis. We have attempted to correlate these phenotypes with the potential effect of each mutation on the recently described structure of UmuD′. PMID:9721309

  19. GGCX-Associated Phenotypes: An Overview in Search of Genotype-Phenotype Correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Y. G. De Vilder

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-carboxylation, performed by gamma-glutamyl carboxylase (GGCX, is an enzymatic process essential for activating vitamin K-dependent proteins (VKDP with important functions in various biological processes. Mutations in the encoding GGCX gene are associated with multiple phenotypes, amongst which vitamin K-dependent coagulation factor deficiency (VKCFD1 is best known. Other patients have skin, eye, heart or bone manifestations. As genotype–phenotype correlations were never described, literature was systematically reviewed in search of patients with at least one GGCX mutation with a phenotypic description, resulting in a case series of 47 patients. Though this number was too low for statistically valid correlations—a frequent problem in orphan diseases—we demonstrate the crucial role of the horizontally transferred transmembrane domain in developing cardiac and bone manifestations. Moreover, natural history suggests ageing as the principal determinant to develop skin and eye symptoms. VKCFD1 symptoms seemed more severe in patients with both mutations in the same protein domain, though this could not be linked to a more perturbed coagulation factor function. Finally, distinct GGCX functional domains might be dedicated to carboxylation of very specific VKDP. In conclusion, this systematic review suggests that there indeed may be genotype–phenotype correlations for GGCX-related phenotypes, which can guide patient counseling and management.

  20. Defining disease phenotypes using national linked electronic health records: a case study of atrial fibrillation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine I Morley

    Full Text Available National electronic health records (EHR are increasingly used for research but identifying disease cases is challenging due to differences in information captured between sources (e.g. primary and secondary care. Our objective was to provide a transparent, reproducible model for integrating these data using atrial fibrillation (AF, a chronic condition diagnosed and managed in multiple ways in different healthcare settings, as a case study.Potentially relevant codes for AF screening, diagnosis, and management were identified in four coding systems: Read (primary care diagnoses and procedures, British National Formulary (BNF; primary care prescriptions, ICD-10 (secondary care diagnoses and OPCS-4 (secondary care procedures. From these we developed a phenotype algorithm via expert review and analysis of linked EHR data from 1998 to 2010 for a cohort of 2.14 million UK patients aged ≥ 30 years. The cohort was also used to evaluate the phenotype by examining associations between incident AF and known risk factors.The phenotype algorithm incorporated 286 codes: 201 Read, 63 BNF, 18 ICD-10, and four OPCS-4. Incident AF diagnoses were recorded for 72,793 patients, but only 39.6% (N = 28,795 were recorded in primary care and secondary care. An additional 7,468 potential cases were inferred from data on treatment and pre-existing conditions. The proportion of cases identified from each source differed by diagnosis age; inferred diagnoses contributed a greater proportion of younger cases (≤ 60 years, while older patients (≥ 80 years were mainly diagnosed in SC. Associations of risk factors (hypertension, myocardial infarction, heart failure with incident AF defined using different EHR sources were comparable in magnitude to those from traditional consented cohorts.A single EHR source is not sufficient to identify all patients, nor will it provide a representative sample. Combining multiple data sources and integrating information on treatment and

  1. The effect of waaL genes deletion from Yersinia enterocolitica O:3 genome on bacteria LPS’ phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shevchenko J. I.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To estimate WaaL ligase contribution in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS phenotype profile formation of Y. enterocolitica O:3 (YeO3 bacteria. Methods. The waaL-knock-out mutants were created by an allelic exchange strategy. The LPS phenotypes of created mutants were visualized by silver-stained DOC-PAGE and immunoblotting with specific outer core (core oligosaccharide, hexasaccharide, OC and O-polysaccharide (OPS or O-Ag monoclonal antibodies. Results. Deletion of waaLOS gene from YeO3 genome has a marked effect on OC ligation in either single or double mutants. The waaLPS deletion has an opposite effect on the OPS ligation – barely detected increasing of OPS bands. Conclusions. The LPS ligases of YeO3 exhibit relaxed donor substrate specificity. Under given conditions the effect of WaaLOS ligase is more significant for OC and OPS ligation onto lipid A than that of WaaLPS.

  2. Behavioral phenotypes of genetic mouse models of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazdoba, T M; Leach, P T; Crawley, J N

    2016-01-01

    More than a hundred de novo single gene mutations and copy-number variants have been implicated in autism, each occurring in a small subset of cases. Mutant mouse models with syntenic mutations offer research tools to gain an understanding of the role of each gene in modulating biological and behavioral phenotypes relevant to autism. Knockout, knockin and transgenic mice incorporating risk gene mutations detected in autism spectrum disorder and comorbid neurodevelopmental disorders are now widely available. At present, autism spectrum disorder is diagnosed solely by behavioral criteria. We developed a constellation of mouse behavioral assays designed to maximize face validity to the types of social deficits and repetitive behaviors that are central to an autism diagnosis. Mouse behavioral assays for associated symptoms of autism, which include cognitive inflexibility, anxiety, hyperactivity, and unusual reactivity to sensory stimuli, are frequently included in the phenotypic analyses. Over the past 10 years, we and many other laboratories around the world have employed these and additional behavioral tests to phenotype a large number of mutant mouse models of autism. In this review, we highlight mouse models with mutations in genes that have been identified as risk genes for autism, which work through synaptic mechanisms and through the mTOR signaling pathway. Robust, replicated autism-relevant behavioral outcomes in a genetic mouse model lend credence to a causal role for specific gene contributions and downstream biological mechanisms in the etiology of autism. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  3. X-ray induced degradation of DNA in radiosensitive mutants of Anacystis nidulans x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukas, K.I.; Vorontsova, G.V.; Groshev, V.V.; Shestakov, S.V.

    1975-01-01

    In irradiated Cyanophyceae (Anacystis nidulans) cells there occurs a process of DNA degeneration to acid-soluble products which is linked with protein synthesis and stimulated by caffeine and acriflavine. The degree of DNA degeneration increases with X-ray dose, is not very dependent on the composition of the incubation medium and is weakly linked with photosynthesis. In the cells of a radiation-resistant mutant the degree of DNA degeneration is slighter, and in the cells of radiosensitive mutants larger, than in ordinary cells. The role of DNA degradation in the radiation detruction of cells is discussed. (author)

  4. Programmed cell death in the leaves of the Arabidopsis spontaneous necrotic spots (sns-D mutant correlates with increased expression of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4B2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwenael M.D.J.-M. Gaussand

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available From a pool of transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana plants harboring an activator T-DNA construct, one mutant was identified that developed spontaneous necrotic spots (sns-D on the rosette leaves under aseptic conditions. The sns-D mutation is dominant and homozygous plants are embryo lethal. The mutant produced smaller rosettes with a different number of stomata than the wild-type. DNA fragmentation in the nuclei of cells in the necrotic spots and a significant increase of caspase-3 and caspase-6 like activities in sns-D leaf extracts indicated that the sns-D mutation caused programmed cell death (PCD. The integration of the activator T-DNA caused an increase of the expression level of At1g13020, which encodes the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4B2. The expression level of eIF4B2 was positively correlated with the severity of sns-D mutant phenotype. Overexpression of the eIF4B2 cDNA mimicked phenotypic traits of the sns-D mutant indicating that the sns-D mutant phenotype is indeed caused by activation tagging of eIF4B2. Thus, incorrect regulation of translation initiation may result in PCD.

  5. Dominant negative mutations of Caenorhabditis elegans daf-7 confer a novel developmental phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crook, Matt; Grant, Warwick N

    2013-06-01

    TGF-β signaling pathways are involved in the control of development in every member of the animal kingdom. As such, TGF-β ligands are widely divergent yet retain a set of core conserved features, specifically, a pre-protein cleavage site and several conserved ligand domain residues, the disruption of which produces a dominant negative phenotype. We have extended these observations into an invertebrate system by creating a series of loss-of-function Caenorhabditis elegans daf-7 transgenes. When we tested these mutant transgenes in a daf-7/+ background, we saw a molting and excretory canal phenotype. Members of both pathways downstream of daf-4 were required for this phenotype. Our results show that the basic mechanisms of TGF-β function are conserved across the animal kingdom. A subset of our daf-7 mutations also produced an unexpected and novel phenotype. Epistasis experiments demonstrated that both daf-3/-5 and sma-4/-9 were downstream of our mutant daf-7 transgenes, which suggests not only a role for DAF-7 in the control of molting and the development of the excretory system but also that daf-7 and dbl-1 signaling may converge downstream of their shared Type II receptor, daf-4. Our approach may unveil new roles in development for other invertebrate TGF-β ligands. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Connexin mutants and cataracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C Beyer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The lens is a multicellular, but avascular tissue that must stay transparent to allow normal transmission of light and focusing of it on the retina. Damage to lens cells and/or proteins can cause cataracts, opacities that disrupt these processes. The normal survival of the lens is facilitated by an extensive network of gap junctions formed predominantly of connexin46 and connexin50. Mutations of the genes that encode these connexins (GJA3 and GJA8 have been identified and linked to inheritance of cataracts in human families and mouse lines. In vitro expression studies of several of these mutants have shown that they exhibit abnormalities that may lead to disease. Many of the mutants reduce or modify intercellular communication due to channel alterations (including loss of function or altered gating or due to impaired cellular trafficking which reduces the number of gap junction channels within the plasma membrane. However, the abnormalities detected in studies of other mutants suggest that they cause cataracts through other mechanisms including gain of hemichannel function (leading to cell injury and death and formation of cytoplasmic accumulations (that may act as light scattering particles. These observations and the anticipated results of ongoing studies should elucidate the mechanisms of cataract development due to mutations of lens connexins and abnormalities of other lens proteins. They may also contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms of disease due to connexin mutations in other tissues.

  7. Transcriptome Comparative Profiling of Barley eibi1 Mutant Reveals Pleiotropic Effects of HvABCG31 Gene on Cuticle Biogenesis and Stress Responsive Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eviatar Nevo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Wild barley eibi1 mutant with HvABCG31 gene mutation has low capacity to retain leaf water, a phenotype associated with reduced cutin deposition and a thin cuticle. To better understand how such a mutant plant survives, we performed a genome-wide gene expression analysis. The leaf transcriptomes between the near-isogenic lines eibi1 and the wild type were compared using the 22-k Barley1 Affymetrix microarray. We found that the pleiotropic effect of the single gene HvABCG31 mutation was linked to the co-regulation of metabolic processes and stress-related system. The cuticle development involved cytochrome P450 family members and fatty acid metabolism pathways were significantly up-regulated by the HvABCG31 mutation, which might be anticipated to reduce the levels of cutin monomers or wax and display conspicuous cuticle defects. The candidate genes for responses to stress were induced by eibi1 mutant through activating the jasmonate pathway. The down-regulation of co-expressed enzyme genes responsible for DNA methylation and histone deacetylation also suggested that HvABCG31 mutation may affect the epigenetic regulation for barley development. Comparison of transcriptomic profiling of barley under biotic and abiotic stresses revealed that the functions of HvABCG31 gene to high-water loss rate might be different from other osmotic stresses of gene mutations in barley. The transcriptional profiling of the HvABCG31 mutation provided candidate genes for further investigation of the physiological and developmental changes caused by the mutant.

  8. Pilot study of large-scale production of mutant pigs by ENU mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, Tang; Cao, Chunwei; Shang, Haitao; Guo, Weiwei; Mu, Yanshuang; Yang, Shulin; Zhang, Ying; Zheng, Qiantao; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Xianlong; Liu, Yu; Kong, Qingran; Li, Kui; Wang, Dayu; Qi, Meng; Hong, Qianlong; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Xiupeng; Jia, Qitao; Wang, Xiao; Qin, Guosong; Li, Yongshun; Luo, Ailing; Jin, Weiwu; Yao, Jing; Huang, Jiaojiao; Zhang, Hongyong; Li, Menghua; Xie, Xiangmo; Zheng, Xuejuan; Guo, Kenan; Wang, Qinghua; Zhang, Shibin; Li, Liang; Xie, Fei; Zhang, Yu; Weng, Xiaogang; Yin, Zhi; Hu, Kui; Cong, Yimei; Zheng, Peng; Zou, Hailong; Xin, Leilei; Xia, Jihan; Ruan, Jinxue; Li, Hegang; Zhao, Weiming; Yuan, Jing; Liu, Zizhan; Gu, Weiwang; Li, Ming; Wang, Yong; Wang, Hongmei; Yang, Shiming; Liu, Zhonghua; Wei, Hong; Zhao, Jianguo; Zhou, Qi; Meng, Anming

    2017-06-22

    N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis is a powerful tool to generate mutants on a large scale efficiently, and to discover genes with novel functions at the whole-genome level in Caenorhabditis elegans, flies, zebrafish and mice, but it has never been tried in large model animals. We describe a successful systematic three-generation ENU mutagenesis screening in pigs with the establishment of the Chinese Swine Mutagenesis Consortium. A total of 6,770 G1 and 6,800 G3 pigs were screened, 36 dominant and 91 recessive novel pig families with various phenotypes were established. The causative mutations in 10 mutant families were further mapped. As examples, the mutation of SOX10 (R109W) in pig causes inner ear malfunctions and mimics human Mondini dysplasia, and upregulated expression of FBXO32 is associated with congenital splay legs. This study demonstrates the feasibility of artificial random mutagenesis in pigs and opens an avenue for generating a reservoir of mutants for agricultural production and biomedical research.

  9. Deficiency of the Arabidopsis helicase RTEL1 triggers a SOG1-dependent replication checkpoint in response to DNA cross-links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhubing; Cools, Toon; Kalhorzadeh, Pooneh; Heyman, Jefri; De Veylder, Lieven

    2015-01-01

    To maintain genome integrity, DNA replication is executed and regulated by a complex molecular network of numerous proteins, including helicases and cell cycle checkpoint regulators. Through a systematic screening for putative replication mutants, we identified an Arabidopsis thaliana homolog of human Regulator of Telomere Length 1 (RTEL1), which functions in DNA replication, DNA repair, and recombination. RTEL1 deficiency retards plant growth, a phenotype including a prolonged S-phase duration and decreased cell proliferation. Genetic analysis revealed that rtel1 mutant plants show activated cell cycle checkpoints, specific sensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents, and increased homologous recombination, but a lack of progressive shortening of telomeres, indicating that RTEL1 functions have only been partially conserved between mammals and plants. Surprisingly, RTEL1 deficiency induces tolerance to the deoxynucleotide-depleting drug hydroxyurea, which could be mimicked by DNA cross-linking agents. This resistance does not rely on the essential replication checkpoint regulator WEE1 but could be blocked by a mutation in the SOG1 transcription factor. Taken together, our data indicate that RTEL1 is required for DNA replication and that its deficiency activates a SOG1-dependent replication checkpoint. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  10. Diet-induced obesity increases the frequency of Pig-a mutant erythrocytes in male C57BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickliffe, Jeffrey K; Dertinger, Stephen D; Torous, Dorothea K; Avlasevich, Svetlana L; Simon-Friedt, Bridget R; Wilson, Mark J

    2016-12-01

    Obesity increases the risk of a number of chronic diseases in humans including several cancers. Biological mechanisms responsible for such increased risks are not well understood at present. Increases in systemic inflammation and oxidative stress, endogenous production of mutagenic metabolites, altered signaling in proliferative pathways, and increased sensitivity to exogenous mutagens and carcinogens are some of the potential contributing factors. We hypothesize that obesity creates an endogenously mutagenic environment in addition to increasing the sensitivity to environmental mutagens. To test this hypothesis, we examined two in vivo genotoxicity endpoints. Pig-a mutant frequencies and micronucleus frequencies were determined in blood cells in two independent experiments in 30-week old male mice reared on either a high-fat diet (60% calories from fat) that exhibit an obese phenotype or a normal-fat diet (10% calories from fat) that do not exhibit an obese phenotype. Mice were assayed again at 52 weeks of age in one of the experiments. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) was used as a positive mutation control in one experiment. ENU induced a robust Pig-a mutant and micronucleus response in both phenotypes. Obese, otherwise untreated mice, did not differ from non-obese mice with respect to Pig-a mutant frequencies in reticulocytes or micronucleus frequencies. However, such mice, had significantly higher and sustained Pig-a mutant frequencies (increased 2.5-3.7-fold, p obese mice (based on measurements collected at 30 weeks or 30 and 52 weeks of age). This suggests that obesity, in the absence of exposure to an exogenous mutagen, is itself mutagenic. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 57:668-677, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Characterization of novel Sorghum brown midrib mutants from an EMS-mutagenized population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattler, Scott E; Saballos, Ana; Xin, Zhanguo; Funnell-Harris, Deanna L; Vermerris, Wilfred; Pedersen, Jeffrey F

    2014-09-02

    Reducing lignin concentration in lignocellulosic biomass can increase forage digestibility for ruminant livestock and saccharification yields of biomass for bioenergy. In sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) and several other C4 grasses, brown midrib (bmr) mutants have been shown to reduce lignin concentration. Putative bmr mutants isolated from an EMS-mutagenized population were characterized and classified based on their leaf midrib phenotype and allelism tests with the previously described sorghum bmr mutants bmr2, bmr6, and bmr12. These tests resulted in the identification of additional alleles of bmr2, bmr6, and bmr12, and, in addition, six bmr mutants were identified that were not allelic to these previously described loci. Further allelism testing among these six bmr mutants showed that they represented four novel bmr loci. Based on this study, the number of bmr loci uncovered in sorghum has doubled. The impact of these lines on agronomic traits and lignocellulosic composition was assessed in a 2-yr field study. Overall, most of the identified bmr lines showed reduced lignin concentration of their biomass relative to wild-type (WT). Effects of the six new bmr mutants on enzymatic saccharification of lignocellulosic materials were determined, but the amount of glucose released from the stover was similar to WT in all cases. Like bmr2, bmr6, and bmr12, these mutants may affect monolignol biosynthesis and may be useful for bioenergy and forage improvement when stacked together or in combination with the three previously described bmr alleles. Copyright © 2014 Sattler et al.

  12. Differential effects of lesion mimic mutants in barley on disease development by facultative pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrann, Graham R. D.; Steed, , Andrew; Burt, Christopher; Nicholson, Paul; Brown, James K. M.

    2015-01-01

    Lesion mimic mutants display spontaneous necrotic spots and chlorotic leaves as a result of mis-regulated cell death programmes. Typically these mutants have increased resistance to biotrophic pathogens but their response to facultative fungi that cause necrotrophic diseases is less well studied. The effect of altered cell death regulation on the development of disease caused by Ramularia collo-cygni, Fusarium culmorum and Oculimacula yallundae was explored using a collection of barley necrotic (nec) lesion mimic mutants. nec8 mutants displayed lower levels of all three diseases compared to nec9 mutants, which had increased R. collo-cygni but decreased F. culmorum disease symptoms. nec1 mutants reduced disease development caused by both R. collo-cygni and F. culmorum. The severity of the nec1-induced lesion mimic phenotype and F. culmorum symptom development was reduced by mutation of the negative cell death regulator MLO. The significant reduction in R. collo-cygni symptoms caused by nec1 was completely abolished in the presence of the mlo-5 allele and both symptoms and fungal biomass were greater than in the wild-type. These results indicate that physiological pathways involved in regulation of cell death interact with one another in their effects on different fungal pathogens. PMID:25873675

  13. Preliminary Assessment about Genetic Diversity, the Stability of Potential Mutants from Two Varieties of Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat. (Bronze Doa and Purple Farm) via Gamma Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Tuong Mien; Le Ngoc Trieu; Le Tien Thanh; Pham Van Nhi; Huynh Thi Trung

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evidence the efficiency of irradiation by gamma ray from 60 Co source on chrysanthemum artificial seeds, through that select a number of potential mutants from two varieties of Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat artificial seeds (Bronze and purple chrysanthemum). The experimental result showed that LD 50 for the Bronze Doa variety was 50 Gy and Purple Farm variety was 100 Gy. Irradiated in vitro artificial seeds were transferred into fresh MS medium and placed in the growth room with three replications at each of dose. The completed in vitro plants were transplanted into ex vitro condition in green house. After 30 days in the greenhouse, survival rate of plantlets were and growth in 20 Gy and 40 Gy for Purple chrysanthemum, while the number of survival Bronze chrysanthemum plantlets were reduced gradually toward the increasing of gamma doses. In this study, on farm, through screening 18 phenotypic mutants of both chrysanthemums were recorded and collected including 6 potential mutants that selected for next research based on their phenotypic differences to the originals, their aesthetic and low mosaic. These 6 potential mutants together with their original varieties were micro-propagated to induce the potential mutant lines for estimation on farm of mutant characteristic segregation rates. (author)

  14. Apoc2 loss-of-function zebrafish mutant as a genetic model of hyperlipidemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Liu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Apolipoprotein C-II (APOC2 is an obligatory activator of lipoprotein lipase. Human patients with APOC2 deficiency display severe hypertriglyceridemia while consuming a normal diet, often manifesting xanthomas, lipemia retinalis and pancreatitis. Hypertriglyceridemia is also an important risk factor for development of cardiovascular disease. Animal models to study hypertriglyceridemia are limited, with no Apoc2-knockout mouse reported. To develop a genetic model of hypertriglyceridemia, we generated an apoc2 mutant zebrafish characterized by the loss of Apoc2 function. apoc2 mutants show decreased plasma lipase activity and display chylomicronemia and severe hypertriglyceridemia, which closely resemble the phenotype observed in human patients with APOC2 deficiency. The hypertriglyceridemia in apoc2 mutants is rescued by injection of plasma from wild-type zebrafish or by injection of a human APOC2 mimetic peptide. Consistent with a previous report of a transient apoc2 knockdown, apoc2 mutant larvae have a minor delay in yolk consumption and angiogenesis. Furthermore, apoc2 mutants fed a normal diet accumulate lipid and lipid-laden macrophages in the vasculature, which resemble early events in the development of human atherosclerotic lesions. In addition, apoc2 mutant embryos show ectopic overgrowth of pancreas. Taken together, our data suggest that the apoc2 mutant zebrafish is a robust and versatile animal model to study hypertriglyceridemia and the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of associated human diseases.

  15. Phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthetase-independent NAD de novo synthesis in Escherichia coli: a new phenotype of phosphate regulon mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1996-01-01

    Phosphoribosyl diphosphate-lacking (Δprs) mutant strains of Escherichia coli require NAD, guanosine, uridine, histidine, and tryptophan for growth. NAD is required by phosphoribosyl diphosphate-lacking mutants because of lack of one of the substrates for the quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase...... reaction, an enzyme of the NAD de novo pathway. Several NAD-independent mutants of a host from which prs had been deleted were isolated; all of them were shown to have lesions in the pstSCAB-phoU operon, in which mutations lead to derepression of the Pho regulon. In addition NAD-independent growth...... was dependent on a functional quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase. The prs suppressor mutations led to the synthesis of a new phosphoryl compound that may act as a precursor for a new NAD biosynthetic pathway. This compound may be synthesized by the product of an unknown phosphate starvation-inducible gene...

  16. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate metabolism in synaptic growth, strength, and precision: neural and behavioral phenotype-specific counterbalancing effects between dnc phosphodiesterase and rut adenylyl cyclase mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Atsushi; Wu, Chun-Fang

    2012-03-01

    Two classic learning mutants in Drosophila, rutabaga (rut) and dunce (dnc), are defective in cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) synthesis and degradation, respectively, exhibiting a variety of neuronal and behavioral defects. We ask how the opposing effects of these mutations on cAMP levels modify subsets of phenotypes, and whether any specific phenotypes could be ameliorated by biochemical counter balancing effects in dnc rut double mutants. Our study at larval neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) demonstrates that dnc mutations caused severe defects in nerve terminal morphology, characterized by unusually large synaptic boutons and aberrant innervation patterns. Interestingly, a counterbalancing effect led to rescue of the aberrant innervation patterns but the enlarged boutons in dnc rut double mutant remained as extreme as those in dnc. In contrast to dnc, rut mutations strongly affect synaptic transmission. Focal loose-patch recording data accumulated over 4 years suggest that synaptic currents in rut boutons were characterized by unusually large temporal dispersion and a seasonal variation in the amount of transmitter release, with diminished synaptic currents in summer months. Experiments with different rearing temperatures revealed that high temperature (29-30°C) decreased synaptic transmission in rut, but did not alter dnc and wild-type (WT). Importantly, the large temporal dispersion and abnormal temperature dependence of synaptic transmission, characteristic of rut, still persisted in dnc rut double mutants. To interpret these results in a proper perspective, we reviewed previously documented differential effects of dnc and rut mutations and their genetic interactions in double mutants on a variety of physiological and behavioral phenotypes. The cases of rescue in double mutants are associated with gradual developmental and maintenance processes whereas many behavioral and physiological manifestations on faster time scales could not be rescued. We discuss

  17. Relationship of low phytate trait with seed germination and carbohydrates content in soybean mutant Gm-lpa-TW-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Fengjie; Dong Dekun; Li Baiquan; Fu Xujun; Zhu Danhua; Zhu Shenlong

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between the low phytate mutation with seed germination and carbohydrate content homozygous F 5 lines with/without lpa gene derived from mutant and different wild type parents were analyzed. The results showed that LPA (low phytic acid)/HPA (high phytic acid) lines developed in autumn had higher seed germination rate than that developed in spring. LPA lines had lower seed germination rate than HPA lines when they all developed in spring. However, in all crosses LPA lines with higher seed germination rate than mutant parent Gm-lpa-TW-1 was observed. No significant difference was detected between LPA and HPA lines when they developed in autumn. Homozygous LPA lines derived from vegetable soybean had lower seed germination than those from non-vegetable varieties. There was no significant difference in total carbohydrate content between LPA and HPA homozygous lines, but the sugar content of LPA homozygous lines was significant higher than HPA lines. On the contrary, oligosaccharides content with LPA lines were significant lower than those with HPA homozygous lines in all planting environment. It is concluded that seeds field germination rate were affected by low phytate mutation gene and planting environment, and lower seed germination rate phenotype of LPA lines could be improved by genetic method. Mutant Gm-lpa-TW-1 of LPA phenotype was genetic linkage with high sugar and low oligosaccharides phenotype, so it should be benefit to breed new soybean varieties with better quality. (authors)

  18. Identification of a Gravitropism-Deficient Mutant in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Yan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A gravitropism-deficient mutant M96 was isolated from a mutant bank, generated by ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS mutagenesis of indica rice accession ZJ100. The mutant was characterized as prostrate growth at the beginning of germination, and the prostrate growth phenotype ran through the whole life duration. Tiller angle and tiller number of M96 increased significantly in comparison with the wild type. Tissue section observation analysis indicated that asymmetric stem growth around the second node occurred in M96. Genetic analysis and gene mapping showed that M96 was controlled by a single recessive nuclear gene, tentatively termed as gravitropism-deficient M96 (gdM96, which was mapped to a region of 506 kb flanked by markers RM5960 and InDel8 on the long arm of chromosome 11. Sequencing analysis of the open reading frames in this region revealed a nucleotide substitution from G to T in the third exon of LOC_Os11g29840. Additionally, real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR analysis showed that the expression level of LOC_Os11g29840 in the stems was much higher than in the roots and leaves in M96. Furthermore, the expression level was more than four times in M96 stem than in the wild type stem. Our results suggested that the mutant gene was likely a new allele to the reported gene LAZY1. Isolation of this new allele would facilitate the further characterization of LAZY1.

  19. Pleiotropic effects of hemagglutinin amino acid substitutions of H5 influenza escape mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudneva, Irina A.; Timofeeva, Tatiana A.; Ignatieva, Anna V.; Shilov, Aleksandr A.; Krylov, Petr S.; Ilyushina, Natalia A.; Kaverin, Nikolai V.

    2013-01-01

    In the present study we assessed pleiotropic characteristics of the antibody-selected mutations. We examined pH optimum of fusion, temperatures of HA heat inactivation, and in vitro and in vivo replication kinetics of the previously obtained influenza H5 escape mutants. Our results showed that HA1 N142K mutation significantly lowered the pH of fusion optimum. Mutations of the escape mutants located in the HA lateral loop significantly affected H5 HA thermostability (P<0.05). HA changes at positions 131, 144, 145, and 156 and substitutions at positions 131, 142, 145, and 156 affected the replicative ability of H5 escape mutants in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Overall, a co-variation between antigenic specificity and different HA phenotypic properties has been demonstrated. We believe that the monitoring of pleiotropic effects of the HA mutations found in H5 escape mutants is essential for accurate prediction of mutants with pandemic potential. - Highlights: • HA1 N142K mutation significantly lowered the pH of fusion optimum. • Mutations located in the HA lateral loop significantly affected H5 HA thermostability. • HA changes at positions 131, 142, 144, 145, and 156 affected the replicative ability of H5 mutants. • Acquisition of glycosylation site could lead to the emergence of multiple pleiotropic effects

  20. Pleiotropic effects of hemagglutinin amino acid substitutions of H5 influenza escape mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudneva, Irina A.; Timofeeva, Tatiana A.; Ignatieva, Anna V.; Shilov, Aleksandr A.; Krylov, Petr S. [D.I. Ivanovsky Institute of Virology, 123098 Moscow (Russian Federation); Ilyushina, Natalia A., E-mail: Natalia.Ilyushina@fda.hhs.gov [FDA CDER, 29 Lincoln Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Kaverin, Nikolai V., E-mail: nik.kaverin@gmail.com [D.I. Ivanovsky Institute of Virology, 123098 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-15

    In the present study we assessed pleiotropic characteristics of the antibody-selected mutations. We examined pH optimum of fusion, temperatures of HA heat inactivation, and in vitro and in vivo replication kinetics of the previously obtained influenza H5 escape mutants. Our results showed that HA1 N142K mutation significantly lowered the pH of fusion optimum. Mutations of the escape mutants located in the HA lateral loop significantly affected H5 HA thermostability (P<0.05). HA changes at positions 131, 144, 145, and 156 and substitutions at positions 131, 142, 145, and 156 affected the replicative ability of H5 escape mutants in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Overall, a co-variation between antigenic specificity and different HA phenotypic properties has been demonstrated. We believe that the monitoring of pleiotropic effects of the HA mutations found in H5 escape mutants is essential for accurate prediction of mutants with pandemic potential. - Highlights: • HA1 N142K mutation significantly lowered the pH of fusion optimum. • Mutations located in the HA lateral loop significantly affected H5 HA thermostability. • HA changes at positions 131, 142, 144, 145, and 156 affected the replicative ability of H5 mutants. • Acquisition of glycosylation site could lead to the emergence of multiple pleiotropic effects.

  1. Phenotypic variation and characterization of mutant matting in shiitake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim Mahmood; Azhar Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Shiitake (Lentinula edodes) is an edible mushroom that has many uses such as: pharmaceutical, nutraceutical and cosmeceutical industries. In this study, we will induce Shiitake to create the genetic variation via exposing the spores of shiitake to gamma (γ) ray at different doses (0-700 Gy) then make the matting between two different monokaryon mycelium (MM). potato dextrose agar (PDA), this media will be used for spore germination and monokaryon mycelium subculturing during this study. The compatibility of the matting will be observed macroscopically (observing on the plates of PDA) and microscopically (by observing the clamps test under the microscope (Olympus brand)). The finding of this study, there is no significant changing in the growth performance of irradiated monokaryon mycelium in comparing with non-irradiated mycelium. From 108 matting only 15 were compatibles. This study, the physical mutagen will be used followed by mating as a normal stage of life cycle for creating potential strain of shiitake with alteration in phenotypic characterization of dikaryon mycelium (DM) as a compatible mating for two MM. (author)

  2. Genetic screens to identify new Notch pathway mutants in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giagtzoglou, Nikolaos

    2014-01-01

    Notch signaling controls a wide range of developmental processes, including proliferation, apoptosis, and cell fate specification during both development and adult tissue homeostasis. The functional versatility of the Notch signaling pathway is tightly linked with the complexity of its regulation in different cellular contexts. To unravel the complexity of Notch signaling, it is important to identify the different components of the Notch signaling pathway. A powerful strategy to accomplish this task is based on genetic screens. Given that the developmental context of signaling is important, these screens should be customized to specific cell populations or tissues. Here, I describe how to perform F1 clonal forward genetic screens in Drosophila to identify novel components of the Notch signaling pathway. These screens combine a classical EMS (ethyl methanesulfonate) chemical mutagenesis protocol along with clonal analysis via FRT-mediated mitotic recombination. These F1 clonal screens allow rapid phenotypic screening within clones of mutant cells induced at specific developmental stages and in tissues of interest, bypassing the pleiotropic effects of isolated mutations. More importantly, since EMS mutations have been notoriously difficult to map to specific genes in the past, I briefly discuss mapping methods that allow rapid identification of the causative mutations.

  3. Mutants induced in winter rye (Secale cereale L.): Short straw-mutant No. 2714 and late-senescence mutant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muszynski, S; Darlewska, M [Department of Plant Breeding and Seed Science, Warsaw Agricultural University, Warsaw (Poland)

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Mutants were induced by treating dormant seeds with ionizing radiation (fast neutrons) or chemicals (N-nitroso-N-ethyl urea or sodium azide). Among several mutants obtained, of special value is the short-straw mutant No. 2714 and a late senescent mutant. (author)

  4. Phenotypic heterogeneity in a bacteriophage population only appears as stress-induced mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yosef, Ido; Edgar, Rotem; Qimron, Udi

    2016-11-01

    Stress-induced mutagenesis has been studied in cancer cells, yeast, bacteria, and archaea, but not in viruses. In a recent publication, we present a bacteriophage model showing an apparent stress-induced mutagenesis. We show that the stress does not drive the mutagenesis, but only selects the fittest mutants. The mechanism underlying the observed phenomenon is a phenotypic heterogeneity that resembles persistence of the viral population. The new findings, the background for the ongoing debate on stress-induced mutagenesis, and the phenotypic heterogeneity underlying a novel phage infection strategy are discussed in this short manuscript.

  5. Arabidopsis thaliana cdd1 mutant uncouples the constitutive activation of salicylic acid signalling from growth defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Swadhin; Roy, Shweta; Shah, Jyoti; Van Wees, Saskia; Pieterse, Corné M; Nandi, Ashis K

    2011-12-01

    Arabidopsis genotypes with a hyperactive salicylic acid-mediated signalling pathway exhibit enhanced disease resistance, which is often coupled with growth and developmental defects, such as dwarfing and spontaneous necrotic lesions on the leaves, resulting in reduced biomass yield. In this article, we report a novel recessive mutant of Arabidopsis, cdd1 (constitutive defence without defect in growth and development1), that exhibits enhanced disease resistance associated with constitutive salicylic acid signalling, but without any observable pleiotropic phenotype. Both NPR1 (NON-EXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES1)-dependent and NPR1-independent salicylic acid-regulated defence pathways are hyperactivated in cdd1 mutant plants, conferring enhanced resistance against bacterial pathogens. However, a functional NPR1 allele is required for the cdd1-conferred heightened resistance against the oomycete pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. Salicylic acid accumulates at elevated levels in cdd1 and cdd1 npr1 mutant plants and is necessary for cdd1-mediated PR1 expression and disease resistance phenotypes. In addition, we provide data which indicate that the cdd1 mutation negatively regulates the npr1 mutation-induced hyperactivation of ethylene/jasmonic acid signalling. © 2011 The Authors. Molecular Plant Pathology © 2011 BSPP and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Mitochondrial Calcium Dysregulation Contributes to Dendrite Degeneration Mediated by PD/LBD-Associated LRRK2 Mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Manish; Callio, Jason; Otero, P Anthony; Sekler, Israel; Wills, Zachary P; Chu, Charleen T

    2017-11-15

    Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) contribute to development of late-onset familial Parkinson's disease (PD), with clinical features of motor and cognitive dysfunction indistinguishable from sporadic PD. Calcium dysregulation plays an important role in PD pathogenesis, but the mechanisms of neurodegeneration remain unclear. Recent reports indicate enhanced excitatory neurotransmission in cortical neurons expressing mutant LRRK2, which occurs before the well-characterized phenotype of dendritic shortening. As mitochondria play a major role in the rapid buffering of cytosolic calcium, we hypothesized that altered mitochondrial calcium handling contributes to dendritic retraction elicited by the LRRK2-G2019S and -R1441C mutations. In primary mouse cortical neurons, we observed increased depolarization-induced mitochondrial calcium uptake. We found that expression of mutant LRRK2 elicited transcriptional upregulation of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) and the mitochondrial calcium uptake 1 protein (MICU1) with no change in levels of the mitochondrial calcium antiporter NCLX. Elevated MCU and MICU1 were also observed in LRRK2-mutated patient fibroblasts, along with increased mitochondrial calcium uptake, and in postmortem brains of sporadic PD/PDD patients of both sexes. Transcriptional upregulation of MCU and MICU1 was caused by activation of the ERK1/2 (MAPK3/1) pathway. Inhibiting ERK1/2 conferred protection against mutant LRRK2-induced neurite shortening. Pharmacological inhibitors or RNAi knockdown of MCU attenuated mitochondrial calcium uptake and dendritic/neuritic shortening elicited by mutant LRRK2, whereas expression of a constitutively active mutant of NCLX that enhances calcium export from mitochondria was neuroprotective. These data suggest that an increased susceptibility to mitochondrial calcium dysregulation contributes to dendritic injury in mutant LRRK2 pathogenesis. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Cognitive dysfunction and dementia are

  7. Characterization of three Agrobacterium tumefaciens avirulent mutants with chromosomal mutations that affect induction of vir genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metts, J; West, J; Doares, S H; Matthysse, A G

    1991-02-01

    Three Agrobacterium tumefaciens mutants with chromosomal mutations that affect bacterial virulence were isolated by transposon mutagenesis. Two of the mutants were avirulent on all hosts tested. The third mutant, Ivr-211, was a host range mutant which was avirulent on Bryophyllum diagremontiana, Nicotiana tabacum, N. debneyi, N. glauca, and Daucus carota but was virulent on Zinnia elegans and Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato). That the mutant phenotype was due to the transposon insertion was determined by cloning the DNA containing the transposon insertion and using the cloned DNA to replace the wild-type DNA in the parent bacterial strain by marker exchange. The transposon insertions in the three mutants mapped at three widely separated locations on the bacterial chromosome. The effects of the mutations on various steps in tumor formation were examined. All three mutants showed no alteration in binding to carrot cells. However, none of the mutants showed any induction of vir genes by acetosyringone under conditions in which the parent strain showed vir gene induction. When the mutant bacteria were examined for changes in surface components, it was found that all three of the mutants showed a similar alteration in lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS from the mutants was larger in size and more heavily saccharide substituted than LPS from the parent strain. Two of the mutants showed no detectable alteration in outer membrane and periplasmic space proteins. The third mutant, Ivr-225, was missing a 79-kDa surface peptide. The reason(s) for the failure of vir gene induction in these mutants and its relationship, if any, to the observed alteration in LPS are unknown.

  8. Vph6 Mutants of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Require Calcineurin for Growth and Are Defective in Vacuolar H(+)-Atpase Assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Hemenway, C. S.; Dolinski, K.; Cardenas, M. E.; Hiller, M. A.; Jones, E. W.; Heitman, J.

    1995-01-01

    We have characterized a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant strain that is hypersensitive to cyclosporin A (CsA) and FK506, immunosuppressants that inhibit calcineurin, a serine-threonine-specific phosphatase (PP2B). A single nuclear mutation, designated cev1 for calcineurin essential for viability, is responsible for the CsA-FK506-sensitive phenotype. The peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerases cyclophilin A and FKBP12, respectively, mediate CsA and FK506 toxicity in the cev1 mutant strain. We demo...

  9. Deciphering the Mechanisms of Developmental Disorders (DMDD: a new programme for phenotyping embryonic lethal mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Mohun

    2013-05-01

    International efforts to test gene function in the mouse by the systematic knockout of each gene are creating many lines in which embryonic development is compromised. These homozygous lethal mutants represent a potential treasure trove for the biomedical community. Developmental biologists could exploit them in their studies of tissue differentiation and organogenesis; for clinical researchers they offer a powerful resource for investigating the origins of developmental diseases that affect newborns. Here, we outline a new programme of research in the UK aiming to kick-start research with embryonic lethal mouse lines. The ‘Deciphering the Mechanisms of Developmental Disorders’ (DMDD programme has the ambitious goal of identifying all embryonic lethal knockout lines made in the UK over the next 5 years, and will use a combination of comprehensive imaging and transcriptomics to identify abnormalities in embryo structure and development. All data will be made freely available, enabling individual researchers to identify lines relevant to their research. The DMDD programme will coordinate its work with similar international efforts through the umbrella of the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium [see accompanying Special Article (Adams et al., 2013] and, together, these programmes will provide a novel database for embryonic development, linking gene identity with molecular profiles and morphology phenotypes.

  10. Linking MedDRA®-coded Clinical Phenotypes to Biological Mechanisms by The Ontology of Adverse Events: A pilot study on Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors (TKIs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarntivijai, Sirarat; Zhang, Shelley; Jagannathan, Desikan G.; Zaman, Shadia; Burkhart, Keith K.; Omenn, Gilbert S.; He, Yongqun; Athey, Brian D.; Abernethy, Darrell R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A translational bioinformatics challenge lies in connecting population and individual’s clinical phenotypes in various formats to biological mechanisms. The Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA®) is the default dictionary for Adverse Event (AE) reporting in the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS). The Ontology of Adverse Events (OAE) represents AEs as pathological processes occurring after drug exposures. Objectives The aim is to establish a semantic framework to link biological mechanisms to phenotypes of AEs by combining OAE with MedDRA® in FAERS data analysis. We investigated the AEs associated with Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors (TKIs) and monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting tyrosine kinases. The selected 5 TKIs/mAbs (i.e., dasatinib, imatinib, lapatinib, cetuximab, and trastuzumab) are known to induce impaired ventricular function (non-QT) cardiotoxicity. Results Statistical analysis of FAERS data identified 1,053 distinct MedDRA® terms significantly associated with TKIs/mAbs, where 884 did not have corresponding OAE terms. We manually annotated these terms, added them to OAE by the standard OAE development strategy, and mapped them to MedDRA®. The data integration to provide insights into molecular mechanisms for drug-associated AEs is performed by including linkages in OAE for all related AE terms to MedDRA® and existing ontologies including Human Phenotype Ontology (HP), Uber Anatomy Ontology (UBERON), and Gene Ontology (GO). Sixteen AEs are shared by all 5 TKIs/mAbs, and each of 17 cardiotoxicity AEs was associated with at least one TKI/mAb. As an example, we analyzed ‘cardiac failure’ using the relations established in OAE with other ontologies, and demonstrated that one of the biological processes associated with cardiac failure maps to the genes associated with heart contraction. Conclusion By expanding existing OAE ontological design, our TKI use case demonstrates that the combination of OAE and Med

  11. Linking MedDRA(®)-Coded Clinical Phenotypes to Biological Mechanisms by the Ontology of Adverse Events: A Pilot Study on Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarntivijai, Sirarat; Zhang, Shelley; Jagannathan, Desikan G; Zaman, Shadia; Burkhart, Keith K; Omenn, Gilbert S; He, Yongqun; Athey, Brian D; Abernethy, Darrell R

    2016-07-01

    A translational bioinformatics challenge exists in connecting population and individual clinical phenotypes in various formats to biological mechanisms. The Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA(®)) is the default dictionary for adverse event (AE) reporting in the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS). The ontology of adverse events (OAE) represents AEs as pathological processes occurring after drug exposures. The aim of this work was to establish a semantic framework to link biological mechanisms to phenotypes of AEs by combining OAE with MedDRA(®) in FAERS data analysis. We investigated the AEs associated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting tyrosine kinases. The five selected TKIs/mAbs (i.e., dasatinib, imatinib, lapatinib, cetuximab, and trastuzumab) are known to induce impaired ventricular function (non-QT) cardiotoxicity. Statistical analysis of FAERS data identified 1053 distinct MedDRA(®) terms significantly associated with TKIs/mAbs, where 884 did not have corresponding OAE terms. We manually annotated these terms, added them to OAE by the standard OAE development strategy, and mapped them to MedDRA(®). The data integration to provide insights into molecular mechanisms of drug-associated AEs was performed by including linkages in OAE for all related AE terms to MedDRA(®) and the existing ontologies, including the human phenotype ontology (HP), Uber anatomy ontology (UBERON), and gene ontology (GO). Sixteen AEs were shared by all five TKIs/mAbs, and each of 17 cardiotoxicity AEs was associated with at least one TKI/mAb. As an example, we analyzed "cardiac failure" using the relations established in OAE with other ontologies and demonstrated that one of the biological processes associated with cardiac failure maps to the genes associated with heart contraction. By expanding the existing OAE ontological design, our TKI use case demonstrated that the combination

  12. Loss of circadian clock accelerates aging in neurodegeneration-prone mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Natraj; Rakshit, Kuntol; Chow, Eileen S; Wentzell, Jill S; Kretzschmar, Doris; Giebultowicz, Jadwiga M

    2012-03-01

    Circadian clocks generate rhythms in molecular, cellular, physiological, and behavioral processes. Recent studies suggest that disruption of the clock mechanism accelerates organismal senescence and age-related pathologies in mammals. Impaired circadian rhythms are observed in many neurological diseases; however, it is not clear whether loss of rhythms is the cause or result of neurodegeneration, or both. To address this important question, we examined the effects of circadian disruption in Drosophila melanogaster mutants that display clock-unrelated neurodegenerative phenotypes. We combined a null mutation in the clock gene period (per(01)) that abolishes circadian rhythms, with a hypomorphic mutation in the carbonyl reductase gene sniffer (sni(1)), which displays oxidative stress induced neurodegeneration. We report that disruption of circadian rhythms in sni(1) mutants significantly reduces their lifespan compared to single mutants. Shortened lifespan in double mutants was coupled with accelerated neuronal degeneration evidenced by vacuolization in the adult brain. In addition, per(01)sni(1) flies showed drastically impaired vertical mobility and increased accumulation of carbonylated proteins compared to age-matched single mutant flies. Loss of per function does not affect sni mRNA expression, suggesting that these genes act via independent pathways producing additive effects. Finally, we show that per(01) mutation accelerates the onset of brain pathologies when combined with neurodegeneration-prone mutation in another gene, swiss cheese (sws(1)), which does not operate through the oxidative stress pathway. Taken together, our data suggest that the period gene may be causally involved in neuroprotective pathways in aging Drosophila. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Integration of curated databases to identify genotype-phenotype associations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jianrong

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to rapidly characterize an unknown microorganism is critical in both responding to infectious disease and biodefense. To do this, we need some way of anticipating an organism's phenotype based on the molecules encoded by its genome. However, the link between molecular composition (i.e. genotype and phenotype for microbes is not obvious. While there have been several studies that address this challenge, none have yet proposed a large-scale method integrating curated biological information. Here we utilize a systematic approach to discover genotype-phenotype associations that combines phenotypic information from a biomedical informatics database, GIDEON, with the molecular information contained in National Center for Biotechnology Information's Clusters of Orthologous Groups database (NCBI COGs. Results Integrating the information in the two databases, we are able to correlate the presence or absence of a given protein in a microbe with its phenotype as measured by certain morphological characteristics or survival in a particular growth media. With a 0.8 correlation score threshold, 66% of the associations found were confirmed by the literature and at a 0.9 correlation threshold, 86% were positively verified. Conclusion Our results suggest possible phenotypic manifestations for proteins biochemically associated with sugar metabolism and electron transport. Moreover, we believe our approach can be extended to linking pathogenic phenotypes with functionally related proteins.

  14. Identifying Genes Controlling Ferulate Cross-Linking Formation in Grass Cell Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de O. Buanafina, Marcia Maria [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2013-10-16

    This proposal focuses on cell wall feruloylation and our long term goal is to identify and isolate novel genes controlling feruloylation and to characterize the phenotype of mutants in this pathway, with a spotlight on cell wall properties.

  15. Conserved role of unc-79 in ethanol responses in lightweight mutant mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Speca

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which ethanol and inhaled anesthetics influence the nervous system are poorly understood. Here we describe the positional cloning and characterization of a new mouse mutation isolated in an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU forward mutagenesis screen for animals with enhanced locomotor activity. This allele, Lightweight (Lwt, disrupts the homolog of the Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans unc-79 gene. While Lwt/Lwt homozygotes are perinatal lethal, Lightweight heterozygotes are dramatically hypersensitive to acute ethanol exposure. Experiments in C. elegans demonstrate a conserved hypersensitivity to ethanol in unc-79 mutants and extend this observation to the related unc-80 mutant and nca-1;nca-2 double mutants. Lightweight heterozygotes also exhibit an altered response to the anesthetic isoflurane, reminiscent of unc-79 invertebrate mutant phenotypes. Consistent with our initial mapping results, Lightweight heterozygotes are mildly hyperactive when exposed to a novel environment and are smaller than wild-type animals. In addition, Lightweight heterozygotes exhibit increased food consumption yet have a leaner body composition. Interestingly, Lightweight heterozygotes voluntarily consume more ethanol than wild-type littermates. The acute hypersensitivity to and increased voluntary consumption of ethanol observed in Lightweight heterozygous mice in combination with the observed hypersensitivity to ethanol in C. elegans unc-79, unc-80, and nca-1;nca-2 double mutants suggests a novel conserved pathway that might influence alcohol-related behaviors in humans.

  16. Phenotypic heterogeneity and mutational spectrum in a cohort of 45 Italian males subjects with X-linked ectodermal dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guazzarotti, L; Tadini, G; Mancini, G E; Giglio, S; Willoughby, C E; Callea, M; Sani, I; Nannini, P; Mameli, C; Tenconi, A A; Mauri, S; Bottero, A; Caimi, A; Morelli, M; Zuccotti, G V

    2015-04-01

    Ectodermal dysplasias (EDs) are a group of genetic disorders characterized by the abnormal development of the ectodermal-derived structures. X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia, resulting from mutations in ED1 gene, is the most common form. The main purpose of this study was to characterize the phenotype spectrum in 45 males harboring ED1 mutations. The study showed that in addition to the involvement of the major ectodermal tissues, the majority of patients also have alterations of several minor ectodermal-derived structures. Characterizing the clinical spectrum resulting from ED1 gene mutations improves diagnosis and can direct clinical care. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Mutants with Enhanced Nitrogenase Activity in Hydroponic Azospirillum brasilense-Wheat Associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereg Gerk, Lily; Gilchrist, Kate; Kennedy, Ivan R.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of a mutation affecting flocculation, differentiation into cyst-like forms, and root colonization on nitrogenase expression by Azospirillum brasilense is described. The gene flcA of strain Sp7 restored these phenotypes in spontaneous mutants of both strains Sp7 and Sp245. Employing both constitutive pLA-lacZ and nifH-lacZ reporter fusions expressed in situ, the colony morphology, colonization pattern, and potential for nitrogenase activity of spontaneous mutants and flcA Tn5-induced mutants were established. The results of this study show that the ability of Sp7 and Sp245 mutant strains to remain in a vegetative form improved their ability to express nitrogenase activity in association with wheat in a hydroponic system. Restoring the cyst formation and colonization pattern to the spontaneous mutant Sp7-S reduced nitrogenase activity rates in association with plants to that of the wild-type Sp7. Although Tn5-induced flcA mutants showed higher potentials for nitrogenase expression than Sp7, their potentials were lower than that of Sp7-S, indicating that other factors in this strain contribute to its exceptional nitrogenase activity rates on plants. The lack of lateral flagella is not one of these factors, as Sp7-PM23, a spontaneous mutant impaired in swarming and lateral-flagellum production but not in flocculation, showed wild-type nitrogenase activity and expression. The results also suggest factors of importance in evolving an effective symbiosis between Azospirillum and wheat, such as increasing the availability of microaerobic niches along the root, increased supply of carbon sources by the plant, and the retention of the bacterial cells in vegetative form for faster metabolism. PMID:10788397

  18. Potential translational targets revealed by linking mouse grooming behavioral phenotypes to gene expression using public databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Andrew; Kyzar, Evan J; Cachat, Jonathan; Stewart, Adam Michael; Green, Jeremy; Gaikwad, Siddharth; O'Leary, Timothy P; Tabakoff, Boris; Brown, Richard E; Kalueff, Allan V

    2013-01-10

    Rodent self-grooming is an important, evolutionarily conserved behavior, highly sensitive to pharmacological and genetic manipulations. Mice with aberrant grooming phenotypes are currently used to model various human disorders. Therefore, it is critical to understand the biology of grooming behavior, and to assess its translational validity to humans. The present in-silico study used publicly available gene expression and behavioral data obtained from several inbred mouse strains in the open-field, light-dark box, elevated plus- and elevated zero-maze tests. As grooming duration differed between strains, our analysis revealed several candidate genes with significant correlations between gene expression in the brain and grooming duration. The Allen Brain Atlas, STRING, GoMiner and Mouse Genome Informatics databases were used to functionally map and analyze these candidate mouse genes against their human orthologs, assessing the strain ranking of their expression and the regional distribution of expression in the mouse brain. This allowed us to identify an interconnected network of candidate genes (which have expression levels that correlate with grooming behavior), display altered patterns of expression in key brain areas related to grooming, and underlie important functions in the brain. Collectively, our results demonstrate the utility of large-scale, high-throughput data-mining and in-silico modeling for linking genomic and behavioral data, as well as their potential to identify novel neural targets for complex neurobehavioral phenotypes, including grooming. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Search for methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphisms in mutant figs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, M G F; Martins, A B G; Bertoni, B W; Figueira, A; Giuliatti, S

    2013-07-08

    Fig (Ficus carica) breeding programs that use conventional approaches to develop new cultivars are rare, owing to limited genetic variability and the difficulty in obtaining plants via gamete fusion. Cytosine methylation in plants leads to gene repression, thereby affecting transcription without changing the DNA sequence. Previous studies using random amplification of polymorphic DNA and amplified fragment length polymorphism markers revealed no polymorphisms among select fig mutants that originated from gamma-irradiated buds. Therefore, we conducted methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism analysis to verify the existence of variability due to epigenetic DNA methylation among these mutant selections compared to the main cultivar 'Roxo-de-Valinhos'. Samples of genomic DNA were double-digested with either HpaII (methylation sensitive) or MspI (methylation insensitive) and with EcoRI. Fourteen primer combinations were tested, and on an average, non-methylated CCGG, symmetrically methylated CmCGG, and hemimethylated hmCCGG sites accounted for 87.9, 10.1, and 2.0%, respectively. MSAP analysis was effective in detecting differentially methylated sites in the genomic DNA of fig mutants, and methylation may be responsible for the phenotypic variation between treatments. Further analyses such as polymorphic DNA sequencing are necessary to validate these differences, standardize the regions of methylation, and analyze reads using bioinformatic tools.

  20. Human glia can both induce and rescue aspects of disease phenotype in Huntington disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benraiss, Abdellatif; Wang, Su; Herrlinger, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    The causal contribution of glial pathology to Huntington disease (HD) has not been heavily explored. To define the contribution of glia to HD, we established human HD glial chimeras by neonatally engrafting immunodeficient mice with mutant huntingtin (mHTT)-expressing human glial progenitor cells...... chimeras are hyperexcitable. Conversely, normal glia can ameliorate disease phenotype in transgenic HD mice, as striatal transplantation of normal glia rescues aspects of electrophysiological and behavioural phenotype, restores interstitial potassium homeostasis, slows disease progression and extends...

  1. Photorepair mutants of Arabidopsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, C.Z.; Yee, J.; Mitchell, D.L.; Britt, A.B.

    1997-01-01

    UV radiation induces two major DNA damage products, the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) and, at a lower frequency, the pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidinone dimer (6-4 product). Although Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae produce a CPD-specific photolyase that eliminates only this class of dimer, Arabidopsis thaliana, Drosophila melanogaster, Crotalus atrox, and Xenopus laevis have recently been shown to photoreactivate both CPDs and 6-4 products. We describe the isolation and characterization of two new classes of mutants of Arabidopsis, termed uvr2 and uvr3, that are defective in the photoreactivation of CPDs and 6-4 products, respectively. We demonstrate that the CPD photolyase mutation is genetically linked to a DNA sequence encoding a type II (metazoan) CPD photolyase. In addition, we are able to generate plants in which only CPDs or 6-4 products are photoreactivated in the nuclear genome by exposing these mutants to UV light and then allowing them to repair one or the other class of dimers. This provides us with a unique opportunity to study the biological consequences of each of these two major UV-induced photoproducts in an intact living system

  2. Altered Phenotypes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Heterologous Expression of Basidiomycete Moniliophthora perniciosa SOD2 Gene

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    Sônia C. Melo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Heterologous expression of a putative manganese superoxide dismutase gene (SOD2 of the basidiomycete Moniliophthora perniciosa complemented the phenotypes of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae sod2Δ mutant. Sequence analysis of the cloned M. perniciosa cDNA revealed an open reading frame (ORF coding for a 176 amino acid polypeptide with the typical metal-binding motifs of a SOD2 gene, named MpSOD2. Phylogenetic comparison with known manganese superoxide dismutases (MnSODs located the protein of M. perniciosa (MpSod2p in a clade with the basidiomycete fungi Coprinopsis cinerea and Laccaria bicolor. Haploid wild-type yeast transformants containing a single copy of MpSOD2 showed increased resistance phenotypes against oxidative stress-inducing hydrogen peroxide and paraquat, but had unaltered phenotype against ultraviolet–C (UVC radiation. The same transformants exhibited high sensitivity against treatment with the pro-mutagen diethylnitrosamine (DEN that requires oxidation to become an active mutagen/carcinogen. Absence of MpSOD2 in the yeast sod2Δ mutant led to DEN hyper-resistance while introduction of a single copy of this gene restored the yeast wild-type phenotype. The haploid yeast wild-type transformant containing two SOD2 gene copies, one from M. perniciosa and one from its own, exhibited DEN super-sensitivity. This transformant also showed enhanced growth at 37 °C on the non-fermentable carbon source lactate, indicating functional expression of MpSod2p. The pro-mutagen dihydroethidium (DHE-based fluorescence assay monitored basal level of yeast cell oxidative stress. Compared to the wild type, the yeast sod2Δ mutant had a much higher level of intrinsic oxidative stress, which was reduced to wild type (WT level by introduction of one copy of the MpSOD2 gene. Taken together our data indicates functional expression of MpSod2 protein in the yeast S. cerevisiae.

  3. Behavioural effects of high fat diet in a mutant mouse model for the schizophrenia risk gene neuregulin 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm-hansen, S.; Low, J. K.; Zieba, J.

    2016-01-01

    on the behavioural phenotype of test mice and attenuated particular cognitive deficits of Nrg1 mutant females. This topic requires further investigations thereby also considering other dietary factors of relevance for schizophrenia as well as interactive effects of diet with medication and sex....

  4. An Efficient Stepwise Statistical Test to Identify Multiple Linked Human Genetic Variants Associated with Specific Phenotypic Traits.

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    Iksoo Huh

    Full Text Available Recent advances in genotyping methodologies have allowed genome-wide association studies (GWAS to accurately identify genetic variants that associate with common or pathological complex traits. Although most GWAS have focused on associations with single genetic variants, joint identification of multiple genetic variants, and how they interact, is essential for understanding the genetic architecture of complex phenotypic traits. Here, we propose an efficient stepwise method based on the Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test (for stratified categorical data to identify causal joint multiple genetic variants in GWAS. This method combines the CMH statistic with a stepwise procedure to detect multiple genetic variants associated with specific categorical traits, using a series of associated I × J contingency tables and a null hypothesis of no phenotype association. Through a new stratification scheme based on the sum of minor allele count criteria, we make the method more feasible for GWAS data having sample sizes of several thousands. We also examine the properties of the proposed stepwise method via simulation studies, and show that the stepwise CMH test performs better than other existing methods (e.g., logistic regression and detection of associations by Markov blanket for identifying multiple genetic variants. Finally, we apply the proposed approach to two genomic sequencing datasets to detect linked genetic variants associated with bipolar disorder and obesity, respectively.

  5. The genetics of green thorax, a new larval colour mutant, non-linked with ruby - eye locus in the malaria mosquito, Anopheles stephensi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanil, D; Shetty, N J

    2009-06-01

    Anopheles stephensi, an important vector of malaria continues to be distributed widely in the Indian subcontinent. The natural vigour of the species combined with its new tolerance, indeed resistance to insecticides has made it obligatory that we look for control methods involving genetic manipulation. Hence, there is an immediate need for greater understanding of the genetics of this vector species. One of the requirements for such genetic studies is the establishment of naturally occurring mutants, establishment of the genetic basis for the same and use of such mutants in the genetic transformation studies and other genetic control programme(s). This paper describes the isolation and genetic studies of a larval colour mutant, green thorax (gt), and linkage studies involving another autosomal recessive mutant ruby- eye (ru) in An. stephensi. After the initial discovery, the mutant green thorax was crossed inter se and pure homozygous stock of the mutant was established. The stock of the mutant ruby- eye, which has been maintained as a pure stock in the laboratory. Crosses were made between the wild type and mutant, green thorax to determine the mode of inheritance of green thorax. For linkage studies, crosses were made between the mutant green thorax and another autosomal recessive mutant ruby-eye. The percentage cross-over was calculated for the genes linkage relationship for gt and gt ru. Results of crosses between mutant and wild type showed that the inheritance of green thorax (gt) in An. stephensi is monofactorial in nature. The gt allele is recessive to wild type and is autosomal. The linkage studies showed no linkage between ru and gt. The mutant gt represents an excellent marker for An. stephensi as it is expressed in late III instar stage of larvae and is prominent in IV instar and pupal stages with complete penetrance and high viability. The said mutant could be easily identified without the aid of a microscope. This mutant can be used extensively to

  6. Antibodies with higher bactericidal activity induced by a Neisseria gonorrhoeae Rmp deletion mutant strain.

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    Guocai Li

    Full Text Available Neisseria gonorrhoeae (N. gonorrhoeae outer membrane protein reduction modifiable protein (Rmp has strong immunogenicity. However, anti-Rmp antibodies block rather than preserve the antibacterial effects of protective antibodies, which hampers the development of vaccines for gonococcal infections. We herein constructed an Rmp deletion mutant strain of N. gonorrhoeae by gene homologous recombination. The 261-460 nucleotide residues of Rmp gene amplified from N. gonorrhoeae WHO-A strain were replaced with a kanamycin-resistant Kan gene amplified from pET-28a. The resultant hybridized DNA was transformed into N. gonorrhoeae WHO-A strain. PCR was used to screen the colonies in which wild-type Rmp gene was replaced with a mutant gene fragment. Western blotting revealed that the Rmp deletion mutant strain did not express Rmp protein. Rmp deletion did not alter the morphological and Gram staining properties of the mutant strain that grew slightly more slowly than the wild-type one. Rmp gene mutated stably throughout 25 generations of passage. Antibody-mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity assay indicated that the antibodies induced by the mutant strain had evidently higher bactericidal activities than those induced by the wild-type strain. Further modification of the Rmp deletion mutant strain is still required in the development of novel live attenuated vaccines for gonorrhea by Opa genes deletion or screening of phenotypic variant strains that do not express Opa proteins.

  7. Signal transduction by normal isoforms and W mutant variants of the Kit receptor tyrosine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reith, A D; Ellis, C; Lyman, S D; Anderson, D M; Williams, D E; Bernstein, A; Pawson, T

    1991-09-01

    Germline mutations at the Dominant White Spotting (W) and Steel (Sl) loci have provided conclusive genetic evidence that c-kit mediated signal transduction pathways are essential for normal mouse development. We have analysed the interactions of normal and mutant W/c-kit gene products with cytoplasmic signalling proteins, using transient c-kit expression assays in COS cells. In addition to the previously identified c-kit gene product (Kit+), a second normal Kit isoform (KitA+) containing an in-frame insertion, Gly-Asn-Asn-Lys, within the extracellular domain, was detected in murine mast cell cultures and mid-gestation placenta. Both Kit+ and KitA+ isoforms showed increased autophosphorylation and enhanced association with phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3' kinase and PLC gamma 1, when stimulated with recombinant soluble Steel factor. No association or increase in phosphorylation of GAP and two GAP-associated proteins, p62 and p190, was observed. The two isoforms had distinct activities in the absence of exogenous soluble Steel factor; Kit+, but not KitA+, showed constitutive tyrosine phosphorylation that was accompanied by a low constitutive level of association with PI-3' kinase and PLC gamma 1. Introduction of the point substitutions associated with W37 (Glu582----Lys) or W41 (Val831----Met) mutant alleles into c-kit expression constructs abolished (W37) or reduced (W41) the Steel factor-induced association of the Kit receptor with signalling proteins in a manner proportional to the overall severity of the corresponding W mutant phenotype. These data suggest a diversity of normal Kit signalling pathways and indicate that W mutant phenotypes result from primary defects in the Kit receptor that affect its interaction with cytoplasmic signalling proteins.

  8. Characterization of mitomycin-C-sensitive mouse lymphoma L5178Y cell mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inaba, Hiroko; Shiomi, Naoko; Shiomi, Tadahiro; Sato, Koki; Yoshida, Michihiro.

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-six mutants showing high sensitivity to mytomicin-C (MMC) were isolated from mouse lymphoma L5178Y cells by a replica-plating technique. Twenty-five of the mutants were 5 - 10 times more sensitive to MMC than were parental cells, and showed normal sensitivity to U.V. light and x-rays. From a complementation analysis, 5 mutants (MC s ) isolated from independently mutagenized cell populations were classified into two groups. These mutants possessed recessive character for MMC-sensitivity and there were at least two genes involved in the MMC-sensitivity. As for DNA-damaging factors, such as photoadducts of 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) and 3-carbethoxysoralen (3-CPs), MC s mutants showed higher sensitivity to photoadducts of 8-MOP than to (3-CPs). MC s mutants were also highly sensitive to a DNA cross-linking agent, cisplatin. Characterization of the sensitivity of mouse MC s mutants was analogous to that of Fanconi's anemia (FA)-derived cells. Low concentrations (10 ng/ml) of MMC induced chromosome aberration in a high incidence in mouse MC s cells, as well as in FA cells. The frequency of MMC-induced chromosome aberrations was normal in hybrid cells between normal human diploid somatic cells and mouse mutants and between FA cells and mouse wild cells, and hereditary deficiency became normal by hybrization. (Namekawa, K.)

  9. A role for BELLRINGER in cell wall development is supported by loss-of-function phenotypes

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    Etchells J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homeodomain transcription factors play critical roles in metazoan development. BELLRINGER (BLR, one such transcription factor, is involved in diverse developmental processes in Arabidopsis, acting in vascular differentiation, phyllotaxy, flower and fruit development. BLR also has a redundant role in meristem maintenance. Cell wall remodelling underpins many of these processes, and BLR has recently been shown to regulate expression of PECTIN METHYL-ESTERASE 5 (PME5, a cell wall modifying enzyme in control of phyllotaxy. We have further explored the role of BLR in plant development by analysing phenotypes and gene expression in a series of plants over-expressing BLR, and generating combinatorial mutants with blr, brevipedicellus (bp, a member of the KNOX1 family of transcription factors that has previously been shown to interact with blr, and the homeodomain transcription factor revoluta (rev, required for radial patterning of the stem. Results Plants over-expressing BLR exhibited a wide range of phenotypes. Some were defective in cell size and demonstrated misregulation of genes predominantly affecting cell wall development. Other lines with more extreme phenotypes failed to generate lateral organs, consistent with BLR repressing transcription in the shoot apex. Cell wall dynamics are also affected in blr mutant plants, and BLR has previously been shown to regulate vascular development in conjunction with BP. We found that when bp and blr were combined with rev, a set of defects was observed that were distinct from those of bp blr lines. In these triple mutants xylem development was most strikingly affected, resulting in an almost complete lack of vessels and xylem parenchyma with secondary thickening. Conclusions Our data support a role for BLR in ordering the shoot apex and, in conjunction with BP and REV, playing a part in determining the composition and organisation of the vascular system. Microarray analysis strongly

  10. Sequence-Based Mapping and Genome Editing Reveal Mutations in Stickleback Hps5 Cause Oculocutaneous Albinism and the casper Phenotype

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    James C. Hart

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Here, we present and characterize the spontaneous X-linked recessive mutation casper, which causes oculocutaneous albinism in threespine sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus. In humans, Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome results in pigmentation defects due to disrupted formation of the melanin-containing lysosomal-related organelle (LRO, the melanosome. casper mutants display not only reduced pigmentation of melanosomes in melanophores, but also reductions in the iridescent silver color from iridophores, while the yellow pigmentation from xanthophores appears unaffected. We mapped casper using high-throughput sequencing of genomic DNA from bulked casper mutants to a region of the stickleback X chromosome (chromosome 19 near the stickleback ortholog of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 5 (Hps5. casper mutants have an insertion of a single nucleotide in the sixth exon of Hps5, predicted to generate an early frameshift. Genome editing using CRISPR/Cas9 induced lesions in Hps5 and phenocopied the casper mutation. Injecting single or paired Hps5 guide RNAs revealed higher incidences of genomic deletions from paired guide RNAs compared to single gRNAs. Stickleback Hps5 provides a genetic system where a hemizygous locus in XY males and a diploid locus in XX females can be used to generate an easily scored visible phenotype, facilitating quantitative studies of different genome editing approaches. Lastly, we show the ability to better visualize patterns of fluorescent transgenic reporters in Hps5 mutant fish. Thus, Hps5 mutations present an opportunity to study pigmented LROs in the emerging stickleback model system, as well as a tool to aid in assaying genome editing and visualizing enhancer activity in transgenic fish.

  11. Identification and genetic assay of a high-chlorophyll-content mutant in Rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Baofu; Chen Xifeng; Jin Yang; Gu Zhimin; Ma Bojun; Zhu Xudong

    2011-01-01

    A deep rice mutant ZM1120 was screened from the γ-rays irradiation mutation library of Zhonghua 11. Compared to the wild-type control, this mutant were darker (greener) in shoots and leaves, and after sowing 60 and 90 d, the content of chlorophyll were increased by 16.0% and 7.2%, respectively, and the content of carotenoid also increased by 23.1% and 24.2%, respectively. After sowing 90 d the net photosynthetic rate and transpiration rate were increased by 16.3% and 11.4%, respectively. The agronomical traits of this mutant significantly changed, and the traits of plant height, flag-leaf length, flag-leaf width, tiller number per plant, panicle length and setting rate decreased, but the grain length and 1000-grain weight increased by 7.9% and 2.6%. Genetic analysis revealed that the mutation phenotype was controlled by a single recessive nuclear gene, and further cloning and function assay will be useful for understanding the mechanism of photosynthesis and for rice breeding in future. (authors)

  12. Characteristics and genetic mapping of a lesion mimic mutant pl(t) in japonica rice variety zhejing 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Pingping; Zhang Xiaoming; Ye Shenghai; Zhao Ningchun; Lu Yanting; Liu Heqin; Jin Qingsheng; Yang Ling

    2010-01-01

    A lesion mimic mutant,obtained by radiation mutagenesis on the seeds of a japonica rice variety Zhejing 22, exhibited a lesion mimic phenotype during the whole growth stage under different environments. Genetic analysis indicated that the mutant trait was controlled by a single recessive gene named spl (t). Relying on simple sequence repeat (SSR) and recessive class analysis method to map the spl (t) gene with a F 2 population was constructed by crossing the mutant spl (t) with Zhenshan 97B.spl (t) was mapped in the interval of 0.8cM between RM7195 and RM27929 near centromere region on the short arm of chromosome 12.Blue trypan dye analyses indicated that the lesion mimic trait of the mutant was caused by the programmer cell death. Further study showed that the programmer cell death was caused by H 2 O 2 oxidative burst. By inoculation of bacterial leaf blight and blast strains, the resistances of the mutant were similar to the wild variety Zhejing 22. (authors)

  13. Increased Protein Stability and Decreased Protein Turnover in the Caenorhabditis elegans Ins/IGF-1 daf-2 Mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depuydt, Geert; Shanmugam, Nilesh; Rasulova, Madina; Dhondt, Ineke; Braeckman, Bart P

    2016-12-01

    In Caenorhabditis elegans, cellular proteostasis is likely essential for longevity. Autophagy has been shown to be essential for lifespan extension of daf-2 insulin/IGF mutants. Therefore, it can be hypothesized that daf-2 mutants achieve this phenotype by increasing protein turnover. However, such a mechanism would exert a substantial energy cost. By using classical 35 S pulse-chase labeling, we observed that protein synthesis and degradation rates are decreased in young adults of the daf-2 insulin/IGF mutants. Although reduction of protein turnover may be energetically favorable, it may lead to accumulation and aggregation of damaged proteins. As this has been shown not to be the case in daf-2 mutants, another mechanism must exist to maintain proteostasis in this strain. We observed that proteins isolated from daf-2 mutants are more soluble in acidic conditions due to increased levels of trehalose. This suggests that trehalose may decrease the potential for protein aggregation and increases proteostasis in the daf-2 mutants. We postulate that daf-2 mutants save energy by decreasing protein turnover rates and instead stabilize their proteome by trehalose. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America.

  14. UNTAGGED MUTATION IN RICE GAL4/VP16 TRANSCRIPTIONAL ACTIVATOR FACILITATED-ENHANCER TRAP LINES

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    Sri Koerniati

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available An enhancer trap system is an insertional mutagenesis based upon gene expression, instead of gene knock-out, so its insertion in genome is  expected not linked to any dramatic changes in plant phenotypes. Gene  knock-out, leading to lossof- function (LoF mutation, is a dominant  approach for rice functional genomic studies. The objective of this study was to find out whether Transcriptional Activator-Facilitated Enhancer Trap (TAFET T-DNA insertion inducing mutant phenotypes in rice TAFET population. Materials used in this experiment were T1 generation of 270 rice TAFET lines. Eight plants of each were grown in the greenhouse and observed for any mutant phenotypes. Phenotypic, histochemical, Southernblot analyses were carried out to define a mutant of pSKC66.1- 8e. Result showed that about 10% of the 270 lines produced chlorophyll-deficient  leaves, ranged from yellowish green (viridis, white stripe green zebra-like stripe to completely white (albino. Albino plants died after two weeks,  whilst white stripe or viridis mutants became normal in the next generation(T2. Another mutant was pSKC66.1-8e line which had floral dramatic phenotype change with various spikelet shapes and number of organs, and had a single twisted culm. The flower of mutant also had gus gene expression. Plants with wild type did not express gus gene and had six or more straight culms. Molecular, histochemical and phenotypic analyses of this particular line for three generations indicated that mutant phenotype was not due to the T-DNA insertion. Since there was approved that Tos17 is activated during tissue culture and induced mutant phenotype, this line might relate to Tos17 insertion, but it needs further investigation to gain such conclusion.

  15. Phenotype screening for genetically deermined age-onset disorders and increased longevity in ENU-mutagenized mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Dabney K [ORNL; Rinchik, Eugene M [ORNL; Moustaid-Moussa, Naima [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Miller, Darla R [ORNL; Williams, Robert [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Michaud III, Edward J [ORNL; Jablonski, Monica M. [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Elberger, Andrea [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Hamre, Kristin M. [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Smeyne, Richard [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital; Chesler, Elissa J [ORNL; Goldowitz, Daniel [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis

    2005-01-01

    With the goal of discovering genes that contribute to late-onset neurological and ocular disorders and also genes that extend the healthy life span in mammals, we are phenotyping mice carrying new mutations induced by the chemical N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU). The phenotyping plan includes basic behavioral, neurohistological, and vision testing in sibling cohorts of mice aged to 18 months, and then evaluation for markers of growth trajectory and stress response in these same cohorts aged up to 28 months. Statistical outliers are identified by comparison to test results of similar aged cohorts, and potential mutants are recovered for re-aging to confirm heritability of the phenotype.

  16. ENU mutagenesis reveals a novel phenotype of reduced limb strength in mice lacking fibrillin 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaynor Miller

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Fibrillins 1 (FBN1 and 2 (FBN2 are components of microfibrils, microfilaments that are present in many connective tissues, either alone or in association with elastin. Marfan's syndrome and congenital contractural arachnodactyly (CCA result from dominant mutations in the genes FBN1 and FBN2 respectively. Patients with both conditions often present with specific muscle atrophy or weakness, yet this has not been reported in the mouse models. In the case of Fbn1, this is due to perinatal lethality of the homozygous null mice making measurements of strength difficult. In the case of Fbn2, four different mutant alleles have been described in the mouse and in all cases syndactyly was reported as the defining phenotypic feature of homozygotes.As part of a large-scale N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU mutagenesis screen, we identified a mouse mutant, Mariusz, which exhibited muscle weakness along with hindlimb syndactyly. We identified an amber nonsense mutation in Fbn2 in this mouse mutant. Examination of a previously characterised Fbn2-null mutant, Fbn2(fp, identified a similar muscle weakness phenotype. The two Fbn2 mutant alleles complement each other confirming that the weakness is the result of a lack of Fbn2 activity. Skeletal muscle from mutants proved to be abnormal with higher than average numbers of fibres with centrally placed nuclei, an indicator that there are some regenerating muscle fibres. Physiological tests indicated that the mutant muscle produces significantly less maximal force, possibly as a result of the muscles being relatively smaller in Mariusz mice.These findings indicate that Fbn2 is involved in integrity of structures required for strength in limb movement. As human patients with mutations in the fibrillin genes FBN1 and FBN2 often present with muscle weakness and atrophy as a symptom, Fbn2-null mice will be a useful model for examining this aspect of the disease process further.

  17. Transcriptome profiling identifies genes and pathways deregulated upon floxuridine treatment in colorectal cancer cells harboring GOF mutant p53

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    Arindam Datta

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mutation in TP53 is a common genetic alteration in human cancers. Certain tumor associated p53 missense mutants acquire gain-of-function (GOF properties and confer oncogenic phenotypes including enhanced chemoresistance. The colorectal cancers (CRC harboring mutant p53 are generally aggressive in nature and difficult to treat. To identify a potential gene expression signature of GOF mutant p53-driven acquired chemoresistance in CRC, we performed transcriptome profiling of floxuridine (FUdR treated SW480 cells expressing mutant p53R273H (GEO#: GSE77533. We obtained several genes differentially regulated between FUdR treated and untreated cells. Further, functional characterization and pathway analysis revealed significant enrichment of crucial biological processes and pathways upon FUdR treatment in SW480 cells. Our data suggest that in response to chemotherapeutics treatment, cancer cells with GOF mutant p53 can modulate key cellular pathways to withstand the cytotoxic effect of the drugs. The genes and pathways identified in the present study can be further validated and targeted for better chemotherapy response in colorectal cancer patients harboring mutant p53.

  18. Evidence for a Broad Autism Phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. de Groot (Kristel); J.W. van Strien (Jan)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe broad autism phenotype implies the existence of a continuum ranging from individuals displaying almost no autistic traits to severely impaired diagnosed individuals. Recent studies have linked this variation in autistic traits to several domains of functioning. However, studies

  19. Genetic Analysis and Mapping of TWH Gene in Rice Twisted Hull Mutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-bo LI

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available A mutant with twisted hulls was found in a breeding population of rice (Oryza sativa L.. The mutant shows less grain weight and inferior grain quality in addition to twisted hulls. Genetic analysis indicated that the phenotype of mutant was controlled by a single recessive gene (temporarily designated as TWH. To map the TWH gene, an F2 population was generated by crossing the twh mutant to R725, an indica rice variety with normal hulls. For bulked segregant analysis, the bulk of mutant plants was prepared by mixing equal amount of plant tissue from 10 twisted-hull plants and the bulk of normal plants was obtained by pooling equal amount tissue of 10 normal-hull plants. Two hundred and seven pairs of simple sequence repeat (SSR primers, which are distributed on 12 rice chromosomes, were used for polymorphism analysis of the parents and the two bulks. The TWH locus was initially mapped close to the SSR marker RM526 on chromosome 2. Therefore, further mapping was performed using 50 pairs of SSR primers around the marker RM526. The TWH was delimited between the SSR markers RM14128 and RM208 on the long arm of chromosome 2 at the genetic distances of 1.4 cM and 2.7 cM, respectively. These results provide the foundation for further fine mapping, cloning and functional analysis of the TWH gene.

  20. Medial prefrontal cortex: genes linked to bipolar disorder and schizophrenia have altered expression in the highly social maternal phenotype

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    Brian E Eisinger

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The transition to motherhood involves CNS changes that modify sociability and affective state. However, these changes also put females at risk for postpartum depression and psychosis, which impairs parenting abilities and adversely affects children. Thus, changes in expression and interactions in a core subset of genes may be critical for emergence of a healthy maternal phenotype, but inappropriate changes of the same genes could put women at risk for postpartum disorders. This study evaluated microarray gene expression changes in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC, a region implicated in both maternal behavior and psychiatric disorders. Postpartum mice were compared to virgin controls housed with females and isolated for identical durations. Using the Modular Single-set Enrichment Test (MSET, we found that the genetic landscape of maternal mPFC bears statistical similarity to gene databases associated with schizophrenia (5 of 5 sets and bipolar disorder (BPD, 3 of 3 sets. In contrast to previous studies of maternal lateral septum and medial preoptic area, enrichment of autism and depression-linked genes was not significant (2 of 9 sets, 0 of 4 sets. Among genes linked to multiple disorders were fatty acid binding protein 7 (Fabp7, glutamate metabotropic receptor 3 (Grm3, platelet derived growth factor, beta polypeptide (Pdgfrb, and nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group D, member 1 (Nr1d1. RT-qPCR confirmed these gene changes as well as FMS-like tyrosine kinase 1 (Flt1 and proenkephalin (Penk. Systems-level methods revealed involvement of developmental gene networks in establishing the maternal phenotype and indirectly suggested a role for numerous microRNAs and transcription factors in mediating expression changes. Together, this study suggests that a subset of genes involved in shaping the healthy maternal brain may also be dysregulated in mental health disorders and put females at risk for postpartum psychosis with aspects of schizophrenia and BPD.

  1. Altered Regulation of Escherichia coli Biotin Biosynthesis in BirA Superrepressor Mutant Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravartty, Vandana

    2012-01-01

    Transcription of the Escherichia coli biotin (bio) operon is directly regulated by the biotin protein ligase BirA, the enzyme that covalently attaches biotin to its cognate acceptor proteins. Binding of BirA to the bio operator requires dimerization of the protein, which is triggered by BirA-catalyzed synthesis of biotinoyl-adenylate (biotinoyl-5′-AMP), the obligatory intermediate of the ligation reaction. Although several aspects of this regulatory system are well understood, no BirA superrepressor mutant strains had been isolated. Such superrepressor BirA proteins would repress the biotin operon transcription in vivo at biotin concentrations well below those needed for repression by wild-type BirA. We isolated mutant strains having this phenotype by a combined selection-screening approach and resolved multiple mutations to give several birA superrepressor alleles, each having a single mutation, all of which showed repression dominant over that of the wild-type allele. All of these mutant strains repressed bio operon transcription in vivo at biotin concentrations that gave derepression of the wild-type strain and retained sufficient ligation activity for growth when overexpressed. All of the strains except that encoding G154D BirA showed derepression of bio operon transcription upon overproduction of a biotin-accepting protein. In BirA, G154D was a lethal mutation in single copy, and the purified protein was unable to transfer biotin from enzyme-bound biotinoyl-adenylate either to the natural acceptor protein or to a biotin-accepting peptide sequence. Consistent with the transcriptional repression data, each of the purified mutant proteins showed increased affinity for the biotin operator DNA in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Surprisingly, although most of the mutations were located in the catalytic domain, all of those tested, except G154D BirA, had normal ligase activity. Most of the mutations that gave superrepressor phenotypes altered residues

  2. HFE genotype affects exosome phenotype in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrowczynski, Oliver D; Madhankumar, A B; Slagle-Webb, Becky; Lee, Sang Y; Zacharia, Brad E; Connor, James R

    2017-08-01

    Neuroblastoma is the third most common childhood cancer, and timely diagnosis and sensitive therapeutic monitoring remain major challenges. Tumor progression and recurrence is common with little understanding of mechanisms. A major recent focus in cancer biology is the impact of exosomes on metastatic behavior and the tumor microenvironment. Exosomes have been demonstrated to contribute to the oncogenic effect on the surrounding tumor environment and also mediate resistance to therapy. The effect of genotype on exosomal phenotype has not yet been explored. We interrogated exosomes from human neuroblastoma cells that express wild-type or mutant forms of the HFE gene. HFE, one of the most common autosomal recessive polymorphisms in the Caucasian population, originally associated with hemochromatosis, has also been associated with increased tumor burden, therapeutic resistance boost, and negative impact on patient survival. Herein, we demonstrate that changes in genotype cause major differences in the molecular and functional properties of exosomes; specifically, HFE mutant derived exosomes have increased expression of proteins relating to invasion, angiogenesis, and cancer therapeutic resistance. HFE mutant derived exosomes were also shown to transfer this cargo to recipient cells and cause an increased oncogenic functionality in those recipient cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Identification, cloning and characterization of sis7 and sis10 sugar-insensitive mutants of Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biddle Kelly D

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The levels of soluble sugars, such as glucose and sucrose, help regulate many plant metabolic, physiological and developmental processes. Genetic screens are helping identify some of the loci involved in plant sugar response and reveal extensive cross-talk between sugar and phytohormone response pathways. Results A forward genetic screen was performed to identify mutants with increased resistance to the inhibitory effects of high levels of exogenous sugars on early Arabidopsis seedling development. The positional cloning and characterization of two of these sugar insensitive (sis mutants, both of which are also involved in abscisic acid (ABA biosynthesis or response, are reported. Plants carrying mutations in SIS7/NCED3/STO1 or SIS10/ABI3 are resistant to the inhibitory effects of high levels of exogenous Glc and Suc. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses indicate transcriptional upregulation of ABA biosynthesis genes by high concentrations of Glc in wild-type germinating seeds. Gene expression profiling revealed that a significant number of genes that are expressed at lower levels in germinating sis7-1/nced3-4/sto1-4 seeds than in wild-type seeds are implicated in auxin biosynthesis or transport, suggesting cross-talk between ABA and auxin response pathways. The degree of sugar insensitivity of different sis10/abi3 mutant seedlings shows a strong positive correlation with their level of ABA insensitivity during seed germination. Conclusion Mutations in the SIS7/NCED3/STO1 gene, which is primarily required for ABA biosynthesis under drought conditions, confer a sugar-insensitive phenotype, indicating that a constitutive role in ABA biosynthesis is not necessary to confer sugar insensitivity. Findings presented here clearly demonstrate that mutations in ABI3 can confer a sugar-insensitive phenotype and help explain previous, mixed reports on this topic by showing that ABA and sugar insensitivity exhibit a strong positive correlation in

  4. Mighty Dwarfs: Arabidopsis autoimmune mutants and their usages in genetic dissection of plant immunity

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    Rowan Wersch

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Plants lack the adaptive immune system possessed by mammals. Instead they rely on innate immunity to defend against pathogen attacks. Genomes of higher plants encode a large number of plant immune receptors belonging to different protein families, which are involved in the detection of pathogens and activation of downstream defense pathways. Plant immunity is tightly controlled to avoid activation of defense responses in the absence of pathogens, as failure to do so can lead to autoimmunity that compromises plant growth and development. Many autoimmune mutants have been reported, most of which are associated with dwarfism and often spontaneous cell death. In this review, we summarize previously reported Arabidopsis autoimmune mutants, categorizing them based on their functional groups. We also discuss how their obvious morphological phenotypes make them ideal tools for epistatic analysis and suppressor screens, and summarize genetic screens that have been carried out in various autoimmune mutant backgrounds.

  5. A speculated ribozyme site in the herpes simplex virus type 1 latency-associated transcript gene is not essential for a wild-type reactivation phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Dale; Singh, Sukhpreet; Osorio, Nelson; Hsiang, Chinhui; Jiang, Xianzhi; Jin, Ling; Jones, Clinton; Wechsler, Steven L

    2010-01-01

    During herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) latency in sensory neurons, LAT (latency-associated transcript) is the only abundantly expressed viral gene. LAT plays an important role in the HSV-1 latency-reactivation cycle, because LAT deletion mutants have a significantly decreased reactivation phenotype. Based solely on sequence analysis, it was speculated that LAT encodes a ribozyme that plays an important role in how LAT enhances the virus’ reactivation phenotype. Because LAT ribozyme activity has never been reported, we decided to test the converse hypothesis, namely, that this region of LAT does not encode a ribozyme function important for LAT’s ability to enhance the reactivation phenotype. We constructed a viral mutant (LAT-Rz) in which the speculated ribozyme consensus sequence was altered such that no ribozyme was encoded. We report here that LAT-Rz had a wild-type reactivation phenotype in mice, confirming the hypothesis that the speculated LAT ribozyme is not a dominant factor in stimulating the latency-reactivation cycle in mice. PMID:18982533

  6. Genetic background of nonmutant Piebald-Virol-Glaxo rats does not influence nephronophthisis phenotypes

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    Yengkopiong JP

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Jada Pasquale Yengkopiong, Joseph Daniel Wani LakoJohn Garang Memorial University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Bor, Jonglei State, Republic of South SudanBackground: Nephronophthisis (NPHP, which affects multiple organs, is a hereditary cystic kidney disease (CKD, characterized by interstitial fibrosis and numerous fluid-filled cysts in the kidneys. It is caused by mutations in NPHP genes, which encode for ciliary proteins known as nephrocystins. The disorder affects many people across the world and leads to end-stage renal disease. The aim of this study was to determine if the genetic background of the nonmutant female Piebald-Virol-Glaxo (PVG/Seac-/- rat influences phenotypic inheritance of NPHP from mutant male Lewis polycystic kidney rats.Methods: Mating experiments were performed between mutant Lewis polycystic kidney male rats with CKD and nonmutant PVG and Wistar Kyoto female rats without cystic kidney disease to raise second filial and backcross 1 progeny, respectively. Rats that developed cystic kidneys were identified. Systolic blood pressure was determined in each rat at 12 weeks of age using the tail and cuff method. After euthanasia, blood samples were collected and chemistry was determined. Histological examination of the kidneys, pancreas, and liver of rats with and without cystic kidney disease was performed.Results: It was established that the genetic background of nonmutant female PVG rats did not influence the phenotypic inheritance of the CKD from mutant male Lewis polycystic kidney rats. The disease arose as a result of a recessive mutation in a single gene (second filial generation, CKD = 13, non-CKD = 39, Χ2 = 0.00, P ≥ 0.97; backcross 1 generation, CKD = 67, non-CKD = 72, Χ2 = 0.18, P > 0.05 and inherited as NPHP. The rats with CKD developed larger fluid-filled cystic kidneys, higher systolic blood pressure, and anemia, but there were no extrarenal cysts and disease did not lead to

  7. Agrobacterium tumefaciens T-DNA Integration and Gene Targeting in Arabidopsis thaliana Non-Homologous End-Joining Mutants

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    Qi Jia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the role of AtKu70 and AtKu80 in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and gene targeting, plant lines with a T-DNA insertion in AtKu80 or AtKu70 genes were functionally characterized. Such plant lines lacked both subunits, indicating that heterodimer formation between AtKu70 and AtKu80 is needed for the stability of the proteins. Homozygous mutants were phenotypically indistinguishable from wild-type plants and were fertile. However, they were hypersensitive to the genotoxic agent bleomycin, resulting in more DSBs as quantified in comet assays. They had lower end-joining efficiency, suggesting that NHEJ is a critical pathway for DSB repair in plants. Both Atku mutants and a previously isolated Atmre11 mutant were impaired in Agrobacterium T-DNA integration via floral dip transformation, indicating that AtKu70, AtKu80, and AtMre11 play an important role in T-DNA integration in Arabidopsis. The frequency of gene targeting was not significantly increased in the Atku80 and Atku70 mutants, but it was increased at least 10-fold in the Atmre11 mutant compared with the wild type.

  8. A Regulatory RNA Inducing Transgenerationally Inherited Phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lea Møller

    . The variation in Arabidopsis enables different regulatory networks and mechanisms to shape the phenotypic characteristics. The thesis describes the identification of regulatory RNA encoded by an enzyme encoding gene. The RNA regulates by inducing transgenerationally inherited phenotypes. The function of the RNA...... is dependent on the genetic background illustrating that polymorphisms are found in either interactors or target genes of the RNA. Furthermore, the RNA provides a mechanistic link between accumulation of glucosinolate and onset of flowering....

  9. Intermediate rough Brucella abortus S19Δper mutant is DIVA enable, safe to pregnant guinea pigs and confers protection to mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalsiamthara, Jonathan; Gogia, Neha; Goswami, Tapas K; Singh, R K; Chaudhuri, Pallab

    2015-05-21

    Brucella abortus S19 is a smooth strain used as live vaccine against bovine brucellosis. Smooth lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is responsible for its residual virulence and serological interference. Rough mutants defective of LPS are more attenuated but confers lower level of protection. We describe a modified B. abortus S19 strain, named as S19Δper, which exhibits intermediate rough phenotype with residual O-polysaccharide (OPS). Deletion of perosamine synthetase gene resulted in substantial attenuation of S19Δper mutant without affecting immunogenic properties. It mounted strong immune response in Swiss albino mice and conferred protection similar to S19 vaccine. Immunized mice produced higher levels of IFN-γ, IgG2a and thus has immune response inclined towards Th1 cell mediated immunity. Sera from immunized animals did not show agglutination reaction with RBPT antigen and thus could serve as DIVA (Differentiating Infected from Vaccinated Animals) vaccine. S19Δper mutant displayed more susceptibility to serum complement mediated killing and sensitivity to polymyxin B. Pregnant guinea pigs injected with S19Δper mutant completed full term of pregnancy and did not cause abortion, still birth or birth of weak offspring. S19Δper mutant with intermediate rough phenotype displayed remarkable resemblance to S19 vaccine strain with improved properties of safety, immunogenicity and DIVA capability for control of bovine brucellosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of CCS on the accumulation of FALS SOD1 mutant-containing aggregates and on mitochondrial translocation of SOD1 mutants: implication of a free radical hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ha Kun; Chung, Youn Wook; Chock, P Boon; Yim, Moon B

    2011-05-15

    Missense mutations of SOD1 are linked to familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS) through a yet-to-be identified toxic-gain-of-function. One of the proposed mechanisms involves enhanced aggregate formation. However, a recent study showed that dual transgenic mice overexpressing both G93A and CCS copper chaperone (G93A/CCS) exhibit no SOD1-positive aggregates yet show accelerated FALS symptoms with enhanced mitochondrial pathology compared to G93A mice. Using a dicistronic mRNA to simultaneously generate hSOD1 mutants, G93A, A4V and G85R, and hCCS in AAV293 cells, we revealed: (i) CCS is degraded primarily via a macroautophagy pathway. It forms a stable heterodimer with inactive G85R, and via its novel copper chaperone-independent molecular chaperone activity facilitates G85R degradation via a macroautophagy-mediated pathway. For active G93A and A4V, CCS catalyzes their maturation to form active and soluble homodimers. (ii) CCS reduces, under non-oxidative conditions, yet facilitates in the presence of H(2)O(2), mitochondrial translocation of inactive SOD1 mutants. These results, together with previous reports showing FALS SOD1 mutants enhanced free radical-generating activity, provide a mechanistic explanation for the observations with G93A/CCS dual transgenic mice and suggest that free radical generation by FALS SOD1, enhanced by CCS, may, in part, be responsible for the FALS SOD1 mutant-linked aggregation, mitochondrial translocation, and degradation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. A Constitutively Mannose-Sensitive Agglutinating Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Typhimurium Strain, Carrying a Transposon in the Fimbrial Usher Gene stbC, Exhibits Multidrug Resistance and Flagellated Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Hsun Wu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Static broth culture favors Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium to produce type 1 fimbriae, while solid agar inhibits its expression. A transposon inserted in stbC, which would encode an usher for Stb fimbriae of a non-flagellar Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium LB5010 strain, conferred it to agglutinate yeast cells on both cultures. RT-PCR revealed that the expression of the fimbrial subunit gene fimA, and fimZ, a regulatory gene of fimA, were both increased in the stbC mutant when grown on LB agar; fimW, a repressor gene of fimA, exhibited lower expression. Flagella were observed in the stbC mutant and this phenotype was correlated with the motile phenotype. Microarray data and RT-PCR indicated that the expression of three genes, motA, motB, and cheM, was enhanced in the stbC mutant. The stbC mutant was resistant to several antibiotics, consistent with the finding that expression of yhcQ and ramA was enhanced. A complementation test revealed that transforming a recombinant plasmid possessing the stbC restored the mannose-sensitive agglutination phenotype to the stbC mutant much as that in the parental Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium LB5010 strain, indicating the possibility of an interplay of different fimbrial systems in coordinating their expression.

  12. Invasion strategies in clonal aquatic plants: are phenotypic differences caused by phenotypic plasticity or local adaptation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riis, Tenna; Lambertini, Carla; Olesen, Birgit; Clayton, John S.; Brix, Hans; Sorrell, Brian K.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims The successful spread of invasive plants in new environments is often linked to multiple introductions and a diverse gene pool that facilitates local adaptation to variable environmental conditions. For clonal plants, however, phenotypic plasticity may be equally important. Here the primary adaptive strategy in three non-native, clonally reproducing macrophytes (Egeria densa, Elodea canadensis and Lagarosiphon major) in New Zealand freshwaters were examined and an attempt was made to link observed differences in plant morphology to local variation in habitat conditions. Methods Field populations with a large phenotypic variety were sampled in a range of lakes and streams with different chemical and physical properties. The phenotypic plasticity of the species before and after cultivation was studied in a common garden growth experiment, and the genetic diversity of these same populations was also quantified. Key Results For all three species, greater variation in plant characteristics was found before they were grown in standardized conditions. Moreover, field populations displayed remarkably little genetic variation and there was little interaction between habitat conditions and plant morphological characteristics. Conclusions The results indicate that at the current stage of spread into New Zealand, the primary adaptive strategy of these three invasive macrophytes is phenotypic plasticity. However, while limited, the possibility that genetic diversity between populations may facilitate ecotypic differentiation in the future cannot be excluded. These results thus indicate that invasive clonal aquatic plants adapt to new introduced areas by phenotypic plasticity. Inorganic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous were important in controlling plant size of E. canadensis and L. major, but no other relationships between plant characteristics and habitat conditions were apparent. This implies that within-species differences in plant size can be explained

  13. Construction and functional analysis of Trichoderma harzianum mutants that modulate maize resistance to the pathogen Curvularia lunata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lili; Fu, Kehe; Yu, Chuanjin; Ma, Jia; Li, Yaqian; Chen, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) was used to generate an insertional mutant library of the mycelial fungus Trichoderma harzianum. From a total of 450 mutants, six mutants that showed significant influence on maize resistance to C. lunata were analyzed in detail. Maize coated with these mutants was more susceptible to C. lunata compared with those coated with a wild-type (WT) strain. Similar to other fungal ATMT libraries, all six mutants were single copy integrations, which occurred preferentially in noncoding regions (except two mutants) and were frequently accompanied by the loss of border sequences. Two mutants (T66 and T312) that were linked to resistance were characterized further. Maize seeds coated with T66 and T312 were more susceptible to C. lunata than those treated with WT. Moreover, the mutants affected the resistance of maize to C. lunata by enhancing jasmonate-responsive gene expression. T66 and T312 induced maize resistance to C. lunata infection through a jasmonic acid-dependent pathway.

  14. The pht4;1-3 mutant line contains a loss of function allele in the Fatty Acid Desaturase 7 gene caused by a remnant inactivated selection marker-a cautionary tale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Anders K; Andersson, Mats X

    2017-01-01

    A striking and unexpected biochemical phenotype was found in an insertion mutant line in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana . One of two investigated insertion mutant lines in the gene encoding the phosphate transporter PHT4;1 demonstrated a prominent loss of trienoic fatty acids, whereas the other insertion line was indistinguishable from wild type in this aspect. We demonstrate that the loss of trienoic fatty acids was due to a remnant inactive negative selection marker gene in this particular transposon tagged line, pht4;1-3 . This constitutes a cautionary tale that warns of the importance to confirm the loss of this type of selection markers and the importance of verifying the relationship between a phenotype and genotype by more than one independent mutant line or alternatively genetic complementation.

  15. Laminin alpha2 deficiency and muscular dystrophy; genotype-phenotype correlation in mutant mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, L T; Zhang, X U; Kuang, W

    2003-01-01

    2, lacking domain VI. Interestingly, all mutants lack laminin alpha2 in peripheral nerve. We have demonstrated previously, that overexpression of the human laminin alpha2 in skeletal muscle in dy(2J)/dy(2J) and dy(W)/dy(W) mice under the control of a striated muscle-specific creatine kinase promoter......Deficiency of laminin alpha2 is the cause of one of the most severe muscular dystrophies in humans and other species. It is not yet clear how particular mutations in the laminin alpha2 chain gene affect protein expression, and how abnormal levels or structure of the protein affect disease. Animal...

  16. Genetic Segregation Analysis of a Rapeseed Dwarf Mutant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang, G.; Yu, S.; Zhang, T.; Zhao, J.; Lei, S.; Du, C.

    2016-01-01

    Dwarf resources in Brassica napus are very important for developing high-yield cultivars through dwarf-type and lodging-resistant breeding. However, few dwarf varieties have been available for this species. Here, we reported a new rapeseed dwarf mutant GRC1157, which exhibits obvious phenotypic variations on dwarf. Six generations (P /sub 1/, P/sub 1/, F/sub 1/, F/sub 1/, B/sub 1/, and B/sub 1/) were produced from a cross between dwarf mutant GRC1157 and an elite tall-type line XR16 to analyze genetic inheritances of plant height (PH), numbers of the 1st valid branch (VBN), main inflorescence length (MIL), pod numbers per main inflorescence (MPN), pod length (PL) and seed numbers per pod (PSN) using the mixed major gene plus polygene inheritance model. The genetic analysis shows different traits were controlled by different inheritance models: PH and PL by two pairs of additive-dominant-epistatic major genes plus additive-dominant-epistatic polygenes, MPN and PSN by two-pair additive-dominant-epistatic major genes plus additive-dominant polygenes, MIL by two-pair additive-dominant-epistatic major genes and VBN by one-pair additive-dominant major genes plus additive-dominant-epistatic polygenes. Furthermore, positive correlations between PH and some other traits were observed, suggesting that some traits may be co-regulated by several linkage or same loci/genes. In addition, high heritability (40.35-93.7 percent) were found for five traits (except VBN) in different segregating generations, indicating these traits were mainly affected by hereditary factors and suitable for early artificial selection. In sum, the dwarf mutant GRC1157 can serve as a valuable resource for rapeseed dwarf breeding and the genetic analysis in this study provided a foundation for further mapping and cloning dwarf genes in mutant GRC1157. (author)

  17. Two DD-carboxypeptidases from Mycobacterium smegmatis affect cell surface properties through regulation of peptidoglycan cross-linking and glycopeptidolipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Satya Deo; Pal, Shilpa; Kumar N, Ganesh; Bansal, Ankita; Mallick, Sathi; Ghosh, Anindya S

    2018-05-07

    During the peptidoglycan (PG) maturation of mycobacteria, the glycan strands are interlinked by both 3-3 (between two meso-DAP) and 4-3 cross-links (between D-ala and meso-DAP), though there is a predominance (60-80%) of 3-3 cross-links. The DD-CPases act on pentapeptides to generate tetrapeptides that are used by LD-transpeptidases as substrates to form 3-3 cross-links. Therefore, DD-CPases play a crucial role in mycobacterial PG cross-link formation. However, the physiology of DD-CPases in mycobacteria is relatively unexplored. Here, we deleted two DD-CPase genes, msmeg_2433 , and msmeg_2432 , both individually and in combination, from Mycobacterium smegmatis mc 2 155. Though the single DD-CPase deletions had no significant impact on the mycobacterial physiology, many interesting functional alterations were observed in the double deletion mutant, viz. , a predominance in PG cross-link formation was shifted from 3-3 cross-links to 4-3, cell surface glycopeptidolipid (GPL) expression was reduced and susceptibility towards β-lactams and anti-tubercular agents was enhanced. Moreover, the existence of the double mutant within murine macrophages was better as compared to the parent. Interestingly, the complementation with any one of the DD-CPase genes could restore the wild-type phenotype. In a nutshell, we infer that the altered ratio of 4-3: 3-3 PG cross-links might have influenced the expression of surface GPLs, colony morphology, biofilm formation,, drug susceptibility and subsistence of the cells within macrophages. Importance The glycan strands in mycobacterial peptidoglycan (PG) are interlinked by both 3-3 and 4-3 cross-links. The DD-CPases generate tetrapeptides by acting on the pentapeptides, and LD-transpeptidases use tetrapeptides as substrates to form 3-3 cross-links. Here, we showed that simultaneous deletions of two DD-CPases alter the nature of PG cross-linking from 3-3 cross-links to 4-3 cross-links. The deletions subsequently decrease the expression

  18. Rasd2 Modulates Prefronto-Striatal Phenotypes in Humans and 'Schizophrenia-Like Behaviors' in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitucci, Daniela; Di Giorgio, Annabella; Napolitano, Francesco; Pelosi, Barbara; Blasi, Giuseppe; Errico, Francesco; Attrotto, Maria Teresa; Gelao, Barbara; Fazio, Leonardo; Taurisano, Paolo; Di Maio, Anna; Marsili, Valentina; Pasqualetti, Massimo; Bertolino, Alessandro; Usiello, Alessandro

    2016-02-01

    Rasd2 is a thyroid hormone target gene, which encodes for a GTP-binding protein enriched in the striatum where, among other functions, it modulates dopaminergic neurotransmission. Here we report that human RASD2 mRNA is abundant in putamen, but it also occurs in the cerebral cortex, with a distinctive expression pattern that differs from that present in rodents. Consistent with its localization, we found that a genetic variation in RASD2 (rs6518956) affects postmortem prefrontal mRNA expression in healthy humans and is associated with phenotypes of relevance to schizophrenia, including prefrontal and striatal grey matter volume and physiology during working memory, as measured with magnetic resonance imaging. Interestingly, quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that RASD2 mRNA is slightly reduced in postmortem prefrontal cortex of patients with schizophrenia. In the attempt to uncover the neurobiological substrates associated with Rasd2 activity, we used knockout mice to analyze the in vivo influence of this G-protein on the prepulse inhibition of the startle response and psychotomimetic drug-related behavioral response. Data showed that Rasd2 mutants display deficits in basal prepulse inhibition that, in turn, exacerbate gating disruption under psychotomimetic drug challenge. Furthermore, we documented that lack of Rasd2 strikingly enhances the behavioral sensitivity to motor stimulation elicited by amphetamine and phencyclidine. Based on animal model data, along with the finding that RASD2 influences prefronto-striatal phenotypes in healthy humans, we suggest that genetic mutation or reduced levels of this G-protein might have a role in cerebral circuitry dysfunction underpinning exaggerated psychotomimetic drugs responses and development of specific biological phenotypes linked to schizophrenia.

  19. Multi-Level Integration of Environmentally Perturbed Internal Phenotypes Reveals Key Points of Connectivity between Them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirupama Benis

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The genotype and external phenotype of organisms are linked by so-called internal phenotypes which are influenced by environmental conditions. In this study, we used five existing -omics datasets representing five different layers of internal phenotypes, which were simultaneously measured in dietarily perturbed mice. We performed 10 pair-wise correlation analyses verified with a null model built from randomized data. Subsequently, the inferred networks were merged and literature mined for co-occurrences of identified linked nodes. Densely connected internal phenotypes emerged. Forty-five nodes have links with all other data-types and we denote them “connectivity hubs.” In literature, we found proof of 6% of the 577 connections, suggesting a biological meaning for the observed correlations. The observed connectivities between metabolite and cytokines hubs showed higher numbers of literature hits as compared to the number of literature hits on the connectivities between the microbiota and gene expression internal phenotypes. We conclude that multi-level integrated networks may help to generate hypotheses and to design experiments aiming to further close the gap between genotype and phenotype. We describe and/or hypothesize on the biological relevance of four identified multi-level connectivity hubs.

  20. miR-199a Links MeCP2 with mTOR Signaling and Its Dysregulation Leads to Rett Syndrome Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keita Tsujimura

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rett syndrome (RTT is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by MECP2 mutations. Although emerging evidence suggests that MeCP2 deficiency is associated with dysregulation of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR, which functions as a hub for various signaling pathways, the mechanism underlying this association and the molecular pathophysiology of RTT remain elusive. We show here that MeCP2 promotes the posttranscriptional processing of particular microRNAs (miRNAs as a component of the microprocessor Drosha complex. Among the MeCP2-regulated miRNAs, we found that miR-199a positively controls mTOR signaling by targeting inhibitors for mTOR signaling. miR-199a and its targets have opposite effects on mTOR activity, ameliorating and inducing RTT neuronal phenotypes, respectively. Furthermore, genetic deletion of miR-199a-2 led to a reduction of mTOR activity in the brain and recapitulated numerous RTT phenotypes in mice. Together, these findings establish miR-199a as a critical downstream target of MeCP2 in RTT pathogenesis by linking MeCP2 with mTOR signaling.

  1. Reduced expression of AtNUP62 nucleoporin gene affects auxin response in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeglin, Martin; Fuglsang, Anja Thoe; Luu, Doan Trung

    2016-01-01

    seedlings and at the adult stage in stipules of cauline leaves. The atnup62-1 mutant, harbouring a T-DNA insertion in intron 5, was identified as a knock-down mutant. It displayed developmental phenotypes that suggested defects in auxin transport or responsiveness. Atnup62 mutant plantlets were found...... to be hypersensitive to auxin, at the cotyledon and root levels. The phenotype of the AtNUP62-GFP overexpressing line further supported the existence of a link between AtNUP62 and auxin signalling. Furthermore, the atnup62 mutation led to an increase in the activity of the DR5 auxin-responsive promoter, and suppressed...

  2. Wnt signaling pathway involvement in genotypic and phenotypic variations in Waardenburg syndrome type 2 with MITF mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue-Ping; Liu, Ya-Lan; Mei, Ling-Yun; He, Chu-Feng; Niu, Zhi-Jie; Sun, Jie; Zhao, Yu-Lin; Feng, Yong; Zhang, Hua

    2018-05-01

    Mutation in the gene encoding microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) lead to Waardenburg syndrome 2 (WS2), an autosomal dominantly inherited syndrome with auditory-pigmentary abnormalities, which is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. Haploinsufficiency may be the underlying mechanism for WS2. However, the mechanisms explaining the genotypic and phenotypic variations in WS2 caused by MITF mutations are unclear. A previous study revealed that MITF interacts with LEF-1, an important factor in the Wnt signaling pathway, to regulate its own transcription through LEF-1-binding sites on the MITF promoter. In this study, four different WS2-associated MITF mutations (p.R217I, p.R217G, p.R255X, p.R217del) that are associated with highly variable clinical features were chosen. According to the results, LEF-1 can activate the expression of MITF on its own, but MITF proteins inhibited the activation. This inhibition weakens when the dosage of MITF is reduced. Except for p.R217I, p.R255X, p.R217G, and p.R217del lose the ability to activate TYR completely and do not inhibit the LEF-1-mediated activation of the MITF-M promoter, and the haploinsufficiency created by mutant MITF can be overcome; correspondingly, the mutants' associated phenotypes are less severe than that of p.R217I. The dominant negative of p.R217del made it have a second-most severe phenotype. This study's data imply that MITF has a negative feedback loop of regulation to stabilize MITF gene dosage that involves the Wnt signaling pathway and that the interaction of MITF mutants with this pathway drives the genotypic and phenotypic differences observed in Waardenburg syndrome type 2 associated with MITF mutations.

  3. A genetic screen for vascular mutants in zebrafish reveals dynamic roles for Vegf/Plcg1 signaling during artery development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covassin, L D; Siekmann, A F; Kacergis, M C; Laver, E; Moore, J C; Villefranc, J A; Weinstein, B M; Lawson, N D

    2009-05-15

    In this work we describe a forward genetic approach to identify mutations that affect blood vessel development in the zebrafish. By applying a haploid screening strategy in a transgenic background that allows direct visualization of blood vessels, it was possible to identify several classes of mutant vascular phenotypes. Subsequent characterization of mutant lines revealed that defects in Vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegf) signaling specifically affected artery development. Comparison of phenotypes associated with different mutations within a functional zebrafish Vegf receptor-2 ortholog (referred to as kdr-like, kdrl) revealed surprisingly varied effects on vascular development. In parallel, we identified an allelic series of mutations in phospholipase c gamma 1 (plcg1). Together with in vivo structure-function analysis, our results suggest a requirement for Plcg1 catalytic activity downstream of receptor tyrosine kinases. We further find that embryos lacking both maternal and zygotic plcg1 display more severe defects in artery differentiation but are otherwise similar to zygotic mutants. Finally, we demonstrate through mosaic analysis that plcg1 functions autonomously in endothelial cells. Together our genetic analyses suggest that Vegf/Plcg1 signaling acts at multiple time points and in different signaling contexts to mediate distinct aspects of artery development.

  4. Wild-type and A315T mutant TDP-43 exert differential neurotoxicity in a Drosophila model of ALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Patricia S.; Boehringer, Ashley; Zwick, Rebecca; Tang, Jonathan E.; Grigsby, Brianna; Zarnescu, Daniela C.

    2011-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein TDP-43 has been linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) both as a causative locus and as a marker of pathology. With several missense mutations being identified within TDP-43, efforts have been directed towards generating animal models of ALS in mouse, zebrafish, Drosophila and worms. Previous loss of function and overexpression studies have shown that alterations in TDP-43 dosage recapitulate hallmark features of ALS pathology, including neuronal loss and locomotor dysfunction. Here we report a direct in vivo comparison between wild-type and A315T mutant TDP-43 overexpression in Drosophila neurons. We found that when expressed at comparable levels, wild-type TDP-43 exerts more severe effects on neuromuscular junction architecture, viability and motor neuron loss compared with the A315T allele. A subset of these differences can be compensated by higher levels of A315T expression, indicating a direct correlation between dosage and neurotoxic phenotypes. Interestingly, larval locomotion is the sole parameter that is more affected by the A315T allele than wild-type TDP-43. RNA interference and genetic interaction experiments indicate that TDP-43 overexpression mimics a loss-of-function phenotype and suggest a dominant-negative effect. Furthermore, we show that neuronal apoptosis does not require the cytoplasmic localization of TDP-43 and that its neurotoxicity is modulated by the proteasome, the HSP70 chaperone and the apoptosis pathway. Taken together, our findings provide novel insights into the phenotypic consequences of the A315T TDP-43 missense mutation and suggest that studies of individual mutations are critical for elucidating the molecular mechanisms of ALS and related neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:21441568

  5. Molecular basis of proton uptake in single and double mutants of cytochrome c oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, Rowan M; Caplan, David; Pomes, Regis [Molecular Structure and Function, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, M5G 1X8 (Canada); Fadda, Elisa, E-mail: pomes@sickkids.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Galway (Ireland)

    2011-06-15

    Cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain, utilizes the reduction of dioxygen into water to pump protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane. The principal pathway of proton uptake into the enzyme, the D channel, is a 2.5 nm long channel-like cavity named after a conserved, negatively charged aspartic acid (D) residue thought to help recruiting protons to its entrance (D132 in the first subunit of the S. sphaeroides enzyme). The single-point mutation of D132 to asparagine (N), a neutral residue, abolishes enzyme activity. Conversely, replacing conserved N139, one-third into the D channel, by D, induces a decoupled phenotype, whereby oxygen reduction proceeds but not proton pumping. Intriguingly, the double mutant D132N/N139D, which conserves the charge of the D channel, restores the wild-type phenotype. We use molecular dynamics simulations and electrostatic calculations to examine the structural and physical basis for the coupling of proton pumping and oxygen chemistry in single and double N139D mutants. The potential of mean force for the conformational isomerization of N139 and N139D side chains reveals the presence of three rotamers, one of which faces the channel entrance. This out-facing conformer is metastable in the wild-type and in the N139D single mutant, but predominant in the double mutant thanks to the loss of electrostatic repulsion with the carboxylate group of D132. The effects of mutations and conformational isomerization on the pKa of E286, an essential proton-shuttling residue located at the top of the D channel, are shown to be consistent with the electrostatic control of proton pumping proposed recently (Fadda et al 2008 Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1777 277-84). Taken together, these results suggest that preserving the spatial distribution of charges at the entrance of the D channel is necessary to guarantee both the uptake and the relay of protons to the active site of the enzyme. These findings highlight the interplay

  6. Molecular basis of proton uptake in single and double mutants of cytochrome c oxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, Rowan M; Caplan, David; Pomes, Regis; Fadda, Elisa

    2011-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain, utilizes the reduction of dioxygen into water to pump protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane. The principal pathway of proton uptake into the enzyme, the D channel, is a 2.5 nm long channel-like cavity named after a conserved, negatively charged aspartic acid (D) residue thought to help recruiting protons to its entrance (D132 in the first subunit of the S. sphaeroides enzyme). The single-point mutation of D132 to asparagine (N), a neutral residue, abolishes enzyme activity. Conversely, replacing conserved N139, one-third into the D channel, by D, induces a decoupled phenotype, whereby oxygen reduction proceeds but not proton pumping. Intriguingly, the double mutant D132N/N139D, which conserves the charge of the D channel, restores the wild-type phenotype. We use molecular dynamics simulations and electrostatic calculations to examine the structural and physical basis for the coupling of proton pumping and oxygen chemistry in single and double N139D mutants. The potential of mean force for the conformational isomerization of N139 and N139D side chains reveals the presence of three rotamers, one of which faces the channel entrance. This out-facing conformer is metastable in the wild-type and in the N139D single mutant, but predominant in the double mutant thanks to the loss of electrostatic repulsion with the carboxylate group of D132. The effects of mutations and conformational isomerization on the pKa of E286, an essential proton-shuttling residue located at the top of the D channel, are shown to be consistent with the electrostatic control of proton pumping proposed recently (Fadda et al 2008 Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1777 277-84). Taken together, these results suggest that preserving the spatial distribution of charges at the entrance of the D channel is necessary to guarantee both the uptake and the relay of protons to the active site of the enzyme. These findings highlight the interplay

  7. Molecular basis of proton uptake in single and double mutants of cytochrome c oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Rowan M.; Caplan, David; Fadda, Elisa; Pomès, Régis

    2011-06-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain, utilizes the reduction of dioxygen into water to pump protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane. The principal pathway of proton uptake into the enzyme, the D channel, is a 2.5 nm long channel-like cavity named after a conserved, negatively charged aspartic acid (D) residue thought to help recruiting protons to its entrance (D132 in the first subunit of the S. sphaeroides enzyme). The single-point mutation of D132 to asparagine (N), a neutral residue, abolishes enzyme activity. Conversely, replacing conserved N139, one-third into the D channel, by D, induces a decoupled phenotype, whereby oxygen reduction proceeds but not proton pumping. Intriguingly, the double mutant D132N/N139D, which conserves the charge of the D channel, restores the wild-type phenotype. We use molecular dynamics simulations and electrostatic calculations to examine the structural and physical basis for the coupling of proton pumping and oxygen chemistry in single and double N139D mutants. The potential of mean force for the conformational isomerization of N139 and N139D side chains reveals the presence of three rotamers, one of which faces the channel entrance. This out-facing conformer is metastable in the wild-type and in the N139D single mutant, but predominant in the double mutant thanks to the loss of electrostatic repulsion with the carboxylate group of D132. The effects of mutations and conformational isomerization on the pKa of E286, an essential proton-shuttling residue located at the top of the D channel, are shown to be consistent with the electrostatic control of proton pumping proposed recently (Fadda et al 2008 Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1777 277-84). Taken together, these results suggest that preserving the spatial distribution of charges at the entrance of the D channel is necessary to guarantee both the uptake and the relay of protons to the active site of the enzyme. These findings highlight the interplay

  8. Neurobehavioral performances and brain regional metabolism in Dab1(scm) (scrambler) mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquelin, C; Lalonde, R; Jantzen-Ossola, C; Strazielle, C

    2013-09-01

    As disabled-1 (DAB1) protein acts downstream in the reelin signaling pathway modulating neuronal migration, glutamate neurotransmission, and cytoskeletal function, the disabled-1 gene mutation (scrambler or Dab1(scm) mutation) results in ataxic mice displaying dramatic neuroanatomical defects similar to those observed in the reeler gene (Reln) mutation. By comparison to non-ataxic controls, Dab1(scm) mutants showed severe motor coordination impairments on stationary beam, coat-hanger, and rotorod tests but were more active in the open-field. Dab1(scm) mutants were also less anxious in the elevated plus-maze but with higher latencies in the emergence test. In mutants versus controls, changes in regional brain metabolism as measured by cytochrome oxidase (COX) activity occurred mainly in structures intimately connected with the cerebellum, in basal ganglia, in limbic regions, particularly hippocampus, as well as in visual and parietal sensory cortices. Although behavioral results characterized a major cerebellar disorder in the Dab1(scm) mutants, motor activity impairments in the open-field were associated with COX activity changes in efferent basal ganglia structures such as the substantia nigra, pars reticulata. Metabolic changes in this structure were also associated with the anxiety changes observed in the elevated plus-maze and emergence test. These results indicate a crucial participation of the basal ganglia in the functional phenotype of ataxic Dab1(scm) mutants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A novel mutation in the X-linked cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) gene associated with a severe Rett phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprovieri, T; Conforti, F L; Fiumara, A; Mazzei, R; Ungaro, C; Citrigno, L; Muglia, M; Arena, A; Quattrone, A

    2009-02-15

    Mutations in the X-linked cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) gene have recently been reported in patients with severe neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by early-onset seizures, infantile spasms, severe psychomotor impairment and very recently, in patients with Rett syndrome (RTT)-like phenotype. Although the involvement of CDKL5 in specific biological pathways and its neurodevelopmental role have not been completely elucidated, the CDKL5 appears to be physiologically related to the MECP2 gene. Here we report on the clinical and CDKL5 molecular investigation in a very unusual RTT case, with severe, early-neurological involvement in which we have shown in a previous report, a novel P388S MECP2 mutation [Conforti et al. (2003); Am J Med Genet A 117A: 184-187]. The patient has had severe psychomotor delay since the first month of life and infantile spasms since age 5 months. Moreover, at age 5 years the patient suddenly presented with renal failure. The severe pattern of symptoms in our patient, similar to a CDKL5 phenotype, prompted us to perform an analysis of the CDKL5, which revealed a novel missense mutation never previously described. The X-inactivation assay was non-informative. In conclusion, this report reinforces the observation that the CDKL5 phenotype overlaps with RTT and that CDKL5 analysis is recommended in patients with a seizure disorder commencing during the first months of life.

  10. Contribution of NMDA receptor hypofunction in prefrontal and cortical excitatory neurons to schizophrenia-like phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory R Rompala

    Full Text Available Pharmacological and genetic studies support a role for NMDA receptor (NMDAR hypofunction in the etiology of schizophrenia. We have previously demonstrated that NMDAR obligatory subunit 1 (GluN1 deletion in corticolimbic interneurons during early postnatal development is sufficient to confer schizophrenia-like phenotypes in mice. However, the consequence of NMDAR hypofunction in cortical excitatory neurons is not well delineated. Here, we characterize a conditional knockout mouse strain (CtxGluN1 KO mice, in which postnatal GluN1 deletion is largely confined to the excitatory neurons in layer II/III of the medial prefrontal cortex and sensory cortices, as evidenced by the lack of GluN1 mRNA expression in in situ hybridization immunocytochemistry as well as the lack of NMDA currents with in vitro recordings. Mutants were impaired in prepulse inhibition of the auditory startle reflex as well as object-based short-term memory. However, they did not exhibit impairments in additional hallmarks of schizophrenia-like phenotypes (e.g. spatial working memory, social behavior, saccharine preference, novelty and amphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion, and anxiety-related behavior. Furthermore, upon administration of the NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801, there were no differences in locomotor activity versus controls. The mutant mice also showed negligible levels of reactive oxygen species production following chronic social isolation, and recording of miniature-EPSC/IPSCs from layer II/III excitatory neurons in medial prefrontal cortex suggested no alteration in GABAergic activity. All together, the mutant mice displayed cognitive deficits in the absence of additional behavioral or cellular phenotypes reflecting schizophrenia pathophysiology. Thus, NMDAR hypofunction in prefrontal and cortical excitatory neurons may recapitulate only a cognitive aspect of human schizophrenia symptoms.

  11. Contribution of NMDA receptor hypofunction in prefrontal and cortical excitatory neurons to schizophrenia-like phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rompala, Gregory R; Zsiros, Veronika; Zhang, Shuqin; Kolata, Stefan M; Nakazawa, Kazu

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacological and genetic studies support a role for NMDA receptor (NMDAR) hypofunction in the etiology of schizophrenia. We have previously demonstrated that NMDAR obligatory subunit 1 (GluN1) deletion in corticolimbic interneurons during early postnatal development is sufficient to confer schizophrenia-like phenotypes in mice. However, the consequence of NMDAR hypofunction in cortical excitatory neurons is not well delineated. Here, we characterize a conditional knockout mouse strain (CtxGluN1 KO mice), in which postnatal GluN1 deletion is largely confined to the excitatory neurons in layer II/III of the medial prefrontal cortex and sensory cortices, as evidenced by the lack of GluN1 mRNA expression in in situ hybridization immunocytochemistry as well as the lack of NMDA currents with in vitro recordings. Mutants were impaired in prepulse inhibition of the auditory startle reflex as well as object-based short-term memory. However, they did not exhibit impairments in additional hallmarks of schizophrenia-like phenotypes (e.g. spatial working memory, social behavior, saccharine preference, novelty and amphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion, and anxiety-related behavior). Furthermore, upon administration of the NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801, there were no differences in locomotor activity versus controls. The mutant mice also showed negligible levels of reactive oxygen species production following chronic social isolation, and recording of miniature-EPSC/IPSCs from layer II/III excitatory neurons in medial prefrontal cortex suggested no alteration in GABAergic activity. All together, the mutant mice displayed cognitive deficits in the absence of additional behavioral or cellular phenotypes reflecting schizophrenia pathophysiology. Thus, NMDAR hypofunction in prefrontal and cortical excitatory neurons may recapitulate only a cognitive aspect of human schizophrenia symptoms.

  12. The rem mutations in the ATP-binding groove of the Rad3/XPD helicase lead to Xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne syndrome-like phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Moyano, Emilia; Moriel-Carretero, María; Montelone, Beth A; Aguilera, Andrés

    2014-12-01

    The eukaryotic TFIIH complex is involved in Nucleotide Excision Repair and transcription initiation. We analyzed three yeast mutations of the Rad3/XPD helicase of TFIIH known as rem (recombination and mutation phenotypes). We found that, in these mutants, incomplete NER reactions lead to replication fork breaking and the subsequent engagement of the homologous recombination machinery to restore them. Nevertheless, the penetrance varies among mutants, giving rise to a phenotype gradient. Interestingly, the mutations analyzed reside at the ATP-binding groove of Rad3 and in vivo experiments reveal a gain of DNA affinity upon damage of the mutant Rad3 proteins. Since mutations at the ATP-binding groove of XPD in humans are present in the Xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne Syndrome (XP-CS), we recreated rem mutations in human cells, and found that these are XP-CS-like. We propose that the balance between the loss of helicase activity and the gain of DNA affinity controls the capacity of TFIIH to open DNA during NER, and its persistence at both DNA lesions and promoters. This conditions NER efficiency and transcription resumption after damage, which in human cells would explain the XP-CS phenotype, opening new perspectives to understand the molecular basis of the role of XPD in human disease.

  13. Gr and hp-1 tomato mutants unveil unprecedented interactions between arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis and fruit ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chialva, Matteo; Zouari, Inès; Salvioli, Alessandra; Novero, Mara; Vrebalov, Julia; Giovannoni, James J; Bonfante, Paola

    2016-07-01

    Systemic responses to an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus reveal opposite phenological patterns in two tomato ripening mutants depending whether ethylene or light reception is involved. The availability of tomato ripening mutants has revealed many aspects of the genetics behind fleshy fruit ripening, plant hormones and light signal reception. Since previous analyses revealed that arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis influences tomato berry ripening, we wanted to test the hypothesis that an interplay might occur between root symbiosis and fruit ripening. With this aim, we screened seven tomato mutants affected in the ripening process for their responsiveness to the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Funneliformis mosseae. Following their phenological responses we selected two mutants for a deeper analysis: Green ripe (Gr), deficient in fruit ethylene perception and high-pigment-1 (hp-1), displaying enhanced light signal perception throughout the plant. We investigated the putative interactions between ripening processes, mycorrhizal establishment and systemic effects using biochemical and gene expression tools. Our experiments showed that both mutants, notwithstanding a normal mycorrhizal phenotype at root level, exhibit altered arbuscule functionality. Furthermore, in contrast to wild type, mycorrhization did not lead to a higher phosphate concentration in berries of both mutants. These results suggest that the mutations considered interfere with arbuscular mycorrhiza inducing systemic changes in plant phenology and fruits metabolism. We hypothesize a cross talk mechanism between AM and ripening processes that involves genes related to ethylene and light signaling.

  14. PtAUREO1a and PtAUREO1b knockout mutants of the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum are blocked in photoacclimation to blue light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Marcus; Serif, Manuel; Jakob, Torsten; Kroth, Peter G; Wilhelm, Christian

    2017-10-01

    Aureochromes are blue light receptors specifically found in photosynthetic Stramenopiles (algae). Four different Aureochromes have been identified in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum (PtAUREO 1a, 1b, 1c, and 2). Since blue light is necessary for high light acclimation in diatoms, it has been hypothesized that Aureochromes might play an important role in the light acclimation capacity of diatoms. This hypothesis was supported by an RNAi knockdown line of PtAUREO1a, which showed a phenotype different from wild type cells when grown in either blue or red light. Here, we show for the first time the phenotype and the photoacclimation reaction of TALEN-mediated knockout mutants of PtAUREO1a and PtAUREO1b, clearly proving the necessity of Aureochromes for light acclimation under blue light. However, both mutants do also show specific differences in their respective phenotypes. Hence, PtAUREO1a and 1b are not functionally redundant in photoacclimation to blue light, and their specific contribution needs to be clarified further. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. A strong loss-of-function mutation in RAN1 results in constitutive activation of the ethylene response pathway as well as a rosette-lethal phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woeste, K. E.; Kieber, J. J.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    A recessive mutation was identified that constitutively activated the ethylene response pathway in Arabidopsis and resulted in a rosette-lethal phenotype. Positional cloning of the gene corresponding to this mutation revealed that it was allelic to responsive to antagonist1 (ran1), a mutation that causes seedlings to respond in a positive manner to what is normally a competitive inhibitor of ethylene binding. In contrast to the previously identified ran1-1 and ran1-2 alleles that are morphologically indistinguishable from wild-type plants, this ran1-3 allele results in a rosette-lethal phenotype. The predicted protein encoded by the RAN1 gene is similar to the Wilson and Menkes disease proteins and yeast Ccc2 protein, which are integral membrane cation-transporting P-type ATPases involved in copper trafficking. Genetic epistasis analysis indicated that RAN1 acts upstream of mutations in the ethylene receptor gene family. However, the rosette-lethal phenotype of ran1-3 was not suppressed by ethylene-insensitive mutants, suggesting that this mutation also affects a non-ethylene-dependent pathway regulating cell expansion. The phenotype of ran1-3 mutants is similar to loss-of-function ethylene receptor mutants, suggesting that RAN1 may be required to form functional ethylene receptors. Furthermore, these results suggest that copper is required not only for ethylene binding but also for the signaling function of the ethylene receptors.

  16. Breeding for blast-disease-resistant and high-yield Thai jasmine rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. KDML 105) mutants using low-energy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahadtanapuk, S.; Teraarusiri, W.; Phanchaisri, B.; Yu, L.D.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •N-ion beam bombarded Thai jasmine rice seeds to induce mutation. •Mutants with blast-disease resistance and high yield were screened. •Gene involved in the blast-disease resistance was analyzed. •The gene responsible for the resistance was linked to Spotted leaf protein 11. -- Abstract: Low-energy ion beam was applied on mutation induction for plant breeding of blast-disease-resistant Thai jasmine rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. KDML 105). Seeds of the wild-type rice were bombarded in vacuum by nitrogen ion beam at energy of 60–80 keV to a beam fluence range of 2 × 10 16 –2 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 . The ion-bombarded rice seeds were grown in soil for 2 weeks as transplanted rice in plastic pots at 1 seedling/pot. The seedlings were then screened for blast resistance by Pyricularia grisea inoculation with 10 6 spores/ml concentrations. The blast-resistant rice mutant was planted up to F6 generation with the consistent phenotypic variation. The high percentage of the blast-disease-resistant rice was analyzed with DNA fingerprint. The HAT-RAPD (high annealing temperature-random amplified polymorphic DNA) marker revealed the modified polymorphism fragment presenting in the mutant compared with wild type (KDML 105). The cDNA fingerprints were investigated and the polymorphism fragment was subcloned into pGEM-T easy vector and then sequenced. The sequence of this fragment was compared with those already contained in the database, and the fragment was found to be related to the Spotted leaf protein 11 (Spl11)

  17. Distinct neurobehavioural effects of cannabidiol in transmembrane domain neuregulin 1 mutant mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonora E Long

    Full Text Available The cannabis constituent cannabidiol (CBD possesses anxiolytic and antipsychotic properties. We have previously shown that transmembrane domain neuregulin 1 mutant (Nrg1 TM HET mice display altered neurobehavioural responses to the main psychoactive constituent of cannabis, Δ(9-tetrahydrocannabinol. Here we investigated whether Nrg1 TM HET mice respond differently to CBD and whether CBD reverses schizophrenia-related phenotypes expressed by these mice. Adult male Nrg1 TM HET and wild type-like littermates (WT received vehicle or CBD (1, 50 or 100 mg/kg i.p. for 21 days. During treatment and 48 h after withdrawal we measured behaviour, whole blood CBD concentrations and autoradiographic receptor binding. Nrg1 HET mice displayed locomotor hyperactivity, PPI deficits and reduced 5-HT(2A receptor binding density in the substantia nigra, but these phenotypes were not reversed by CBD. However, long-term CBD (50 and 100 mg/kg selectively enhanced social interaction in Nrg1 TM HET mice. Furthermore, acute CBD (100 mg/kg selectively increased PPI in Nrg1 TM HET mice, although tolerance to this effect was manifest upon repeated CBD administration. Long-term CBD (50 mg/kg also selectively increased GABA(A receptor binding in the granular retrosplenial cortex in Nrg1 TM HET mice and reduced 5-HT(2A binding in the substantia nigra in WT mice. Nrg1 appears necessary for CBD-induced anxiolysis since only WT mice developed decreased anxiety-related behaviour with repeated CBD treatment. Altered pharmacokinetics in mutant mice could not explain our findings since no genotype differences existed in CBD blood concentrations. Here we demonstrate that Nrg1 modulates acute and long-term neurobehavioural effects of CBD, which does not reverse the schizophrenia-relevant phenotypes.

  18. Rasd2 Modulates Prefronto-Striatal Phenotypes in Humans and ‘Schizophrenia-Like Behaviors' in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitucci, Daniela; Di Giorgio, Annabella; Napolitano, Francesco; Pelosi, Barbara; Blasi, Giuseppe; Errico, Francesco; Attrotto, Maria Teresa; Gelao, Barbara; Fazio, Leonardo; Taurisano, Paolo; Di Maio, Anna; Marsili, Valentina; Pasqualetti, Massimo; Bertolino, Alessandro; Usiello, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Rasd2 is a thyroid hormone target gene, which encodes for a GTP-binding protein enriched in the striatum where, among other functions, it modulates dopaminergic neurotransmission. Here we report that human RASD2 mRNA is abundant in putamen, but it also occurs in the cerebral cortex, with a distinctive expression pattern that differs from that present in rodents. Consistent with its localization, we found that a genetic variation in RASD2 (rs6518956) affects postmortem prefrontal mRNA expression in healthy humans and is associated with phenotypes of relevance to schizophrenia, including prefrontal and striatal grey matter volume and physiology during working memory, as measured with magnetic resonance imaging. Interestingly, quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that RASD2 mRNA is slightly reduced in postmortem prefrontal cortex of patients with schizophrenia. In the attempt to uncover the neurobiological substrates associated with Rasd2 activity, we used knockout mice to analyze the in vivo influence of this G-protein on the prepulse inhibition of the startle response and psychotomimetic drug-related behavioral response. Data showed that Rasd2 mutants display deficits in basal prepulse inhibition that, in turn, exacerbate gating disruption under psychotomimetic drug challenge. Furthermore, we documented that lack of Rasd2 strikingly enhances the behavioral sensitivity to motor stimulation elicited by amphetamine and phencyclidine. Based on animal model data, along with the finding that RASD2 influences prefronto-striatal phenotypes in healthy humans, we suggest that genetic mutation or reduced levels of this G-protein might have a role in cerebral circuitry dysfunction underpinning exaggerated psychotomimetic drugs responses and development of specific biological phenotypes linked to schizophrenia. PMID:26228524

  19. Mutant genes in pea breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swiecicki, W.K.

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Mutations of genes Dpo (dehiscing pods) and A (anthocyanin synthesis) played a role in pea domestication. A number of other genes were important in cultivar development for 3 types of usage (dry seeds, green vegetable types, fodder), e.g. fn, fna, le, p, v, fas and af. New genes (induced and spontaneous), are important for present ideotypes and are registered by the Pisum Genetics Association (PGA). Comparison of a pea variety ideotype with the variation available in gene banks shows that breeders need 'new' features. In mutation induction experiments, genotype, mutagen and method of treatment (e.g. combined or fractionated doses) are varied for broadening the mutation spectrum and selecting more genes of agronomic value. New genes are genetically analysed. In Poland, some mutant varieties with the gene afila were registered, controlling lodging by a shorter stem and a higher number of internodes. Really non-lodging pea varieties could strongly increase seed yield. But the probability of detecting a major gene for lodging resistance is low. Therefore, mutant genes with smaller influence on plant architecture are sought, to combine their effect by crossing. Promising seem to be the genes rogue, reductus and arthritic as well as a number of mutant genes not yet genetically identified. The gene det for terminal inflorescence - similarly to Vicia faba - changes plant development. Utilisation of assimilates and ripening should be better. Improvement of harvest index should give higher seed yield. A number of genes controlling disease resistance are well known (eg. Fw, Fnw, En, mo and sbm). Important in mass screening of resistance are closely linked gene markers. Pea gene banks collect respective lines, but mutants induced in highly productive cultivars would be better. Inducing gene markers sometimes seems to be easier than transfer by crossing. Mutation induction in pea breeding is probably more important because a high number of monogenic features are

  20. Fanconi anemia group A and C double-mutant mice: functional evidence for a multi-protein Fanconi anemia complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Meenakshi; Battaile, Kevin P; Bateman, Raynard; Lax, Timothy P; Rathbun, Keany; Reifsteck, Carol; Bagby, Grover; Finegold, Milton; Olson, Susan; Grompe, Markus

    2002-07-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder associated with defects in at least eight genes. The biochemical function(s) of the FA proteins are unknown, but together they define the FA pathway, which is involved in cellular responses to DNA damage and in other cellular processes. It is currently unknown whether all FA proteins are involved in controlling a single function or whether some of the FA proteins have additional roles. The aim of this study was 1) to determine whether the FA group A and group C genes have identical or partially distinct functions, and 2) to have a better model for human FA. We generated mice with a targeted mutation in fanca and crossed them with fancc disrupted animals. Several phenotypes including sensitivity to DNA cross linkers and ionizing radiation, hematopoietic colony growth, and germ cell loss were analyzed in fanca-/-, fancc-/-, fanca/fancc double -/-, and controls. Fibroblast cells and hematopoietic precursors from fanca/fancc double-mutant mice were not more sensitive to MMC than those of either single mutant. fanca/fancc double mutants had no evidence for an additive phenotype at the cellular or organismal level. These results support a model where both FANCA and FANCC are part of a multi-protein nuclear FA complex with identical function in cellular responses to DNA damage and germ cell survival.

  1. Transcriptomic analysis of swarm motility phenotype of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium mutant defective in periplasmic glucan synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movement of food-borne pathogens on moist surfaces enables them to migrate towards more favorable niches and facilitate their survival for extended periods of time. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium mutants defective in OPG synthesis are unable to exhibit motility on moist surfaces (swarming) ...

  2. Evolution of molecular phenotypes under stabilizing selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nourmohammad, Armita; Schiffels, Stephan; Lässig, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Molecular phenotypes are important links between genomic information and organismic functions, fitness, and evolution. Complex phenotypes, which are also called quantitative traits, often depend on multiple genomic loci. Their evolution builds on genome evolution in a complicated way, which involves selection, genetic drift, mutations and recombination. Here we develop a coarse-grained evolutionary statistics for phenotypes, which decouples from details of the underlying genotypes. We derive approximate evolution equations for the distribution of phenotype values within and across populations. This dynamics covers evolutionary processes at high and low recombination rates, that is, it applies to sexual and asexual populations. In a fitness landscape with a single optimal phenotype value, the phenotypic diversity within populations and the divergence between populations reach evolutionary equilibria, which describe stabilizing selection. We compute the equilibrium distributions of both quantities analytically and we show that the ratio of mean divergence and diversity depends on the strength of selection in a universal way: it is largely independent of the phenotype’s genomic encoding and of the recombination rate. This establishes a new method for the inference of selection on molecular phenotypes beyond the genome level. We discuss the implications of our findings for the predictability of evolutionary processes. (paper)

  3. Effects of icotinib on advanced non-small cell lung cancer with different EGFR phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Huiyun; Liu, Rong; Li, Shengjie; Fang, Hui; Wang, Ziwei; Huang, Sheng; Zhou, Jianying

    2014-09-01

    Icotinib is the first oral epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor, which has been proven to exert significant inhibitory effects on non-small cell lung cancer in vitro. Clinical evidence has showed that the efficacy of Icotinib on retreating advanced non-small cell lung cancer is comparable to Gefitinib. However, different phenotypes of EGFR can affect the therapeutic outcomes of EGFR tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor. Therefore, our study focused on efficacy and safety of Icotinib in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer of different EGPR phenotypes. Clinical data of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer who received Icotinib treatment from August, 2011 to May, 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used for survival analysis and comparison. 18 wild-type EGFR and 51 mutant type were found in a total of 69 patients. Objective response rate of patients with mutant type EGFR was 54.9 % and disease control rate was 86.3 %. Objective response rate of wild-type patients was 11.1 % (P = 0.0013 vs mutant type), disease control rate was 50.0 % (P = 0.0017). Median progression-free survival (PFS) of mutant type and wild-type patients were 9.7 and 2.6 months, respectively (P Icotinib included rash, diarrhea, itching skin with occurrence rates of 24.6 % (17/69), 13.0 % (9/69), and 11.6 % (8/69), respectively. Most adverse reactions were grade I-II. Icotinib has great efficacy in EGFR mutated patients, making it an optimal regimen to treat EGFR mutated patients. Furthermore, most of adverse reactions associated with Icotinib treatment were tolerable.

  4. Promotion of growth by Coenzyme Q10 is linked to gene expression in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Alexandra; Niklowitz, Petra; Menke, Thomas; Döring, Frank

    2014-10-03

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ, ubiquinone) is an essential component of the respiratory chain, a cofactor of pyrimidine biosynthesis and acts as an antioxidant in extra mitochondrial membranes. More recently CoQ has been identified as a modulator of apoptosis, inflammation and gene expression. CoQ deficient Caenorhabditis elegans clk-1 mutants show several phenotypes including a delayed postembryonic growth. Using wild type and two clk-1 mutants, here we established an experimental set-up to study the consequences of endogenous CoQ deficiency or exogenous CoQ supply on gene expression and growth. We found that a deficiency of endogenous CoQ synthesis down-regulates a cluster of genes that are important for growth (i.e., RNA polymerase II, eukaryotic initiation factor) and up-regulates oxidation reactions (i.e., cytochrome P450, superoxide dismutase) and protein interactions (i.e., F-Box proteins). Exogenous CoQ supply partially restores the expression of these genes as well as the growth retardation of CoQ deficient clk-1 mutants. On the other hand exogenous CoQ supply does not alter the expression of a further sub-set of genes. These genes are involved in metabolism (i.e., succinate dehydrogenase complex), cell signalling or synthesis of lectins. Thus, our work provides a comprehensive overview of genes which can be modulated in their expression by endogenous or exogenous CoQ. As growth retardation in CoQ deficiency is linked to the gene expression profile we suggest that CoQ promotes growth via gene expression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A mutant of a mutant of a mutant of a ...: Irradiation of progressive radiation-induced mutants in a mutation-breeding programme with Chrysanthenum morifolium RAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broertjes, C.; Koene, P.; Veen, J.W.H. van.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation-induced sports in Chrysanthemum morifolium RAM. have been reported for several years. It has become an everyday practice to produce flower-colour mutants from outstanding cross-breeding products, even before they are distributed for the commercial production of cut flowers. One of the most successful and recent examples is that of cv. Horim, of which hundreds of mutants were produced by successive use of radiation-induced mutants in the mutation-breeding programme. Over about 4 years a variety of flower-colour mutants was obtained, not only largely including the outstanding characteristics of the original cultivar but sometimes even with an appreciable improvement in quality and yield. It is expected that the latter types, the Miros group, will soon completely supersede the spontaneous or raditation-induced Horim sports and mutants and take over the leading position of the Horim group in the production of all-year-round (AYR) cut-flowers. (orig.)

  6. CARMA2sh and ULK2 control pathogen-associated molecular patterns recognition in human keratinocytes: psoriasis-linked CARMA2sh mutants escape ULK2 censorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudiero, Ivan; Mazzone, Pellegrino; D'Andrea, Luca E; Ferravante, Angela; Zotti, Tiziana; Telesio, Gianluca; De Rubis, Gabriele; Reale, Carla; Pizzulo, Maddalena; Muralitharan, Shanmugakonar; Vito, Pasquale; Stilo, Romania

    2017-02-23

    The molecular complexes formed by specific members of the family of CARMA proteins, the CARD domain-containing adapter molecule BCL10 and MALT1 (CBM complex) represent a central hub in regulating activation of the pleiotropic transcription factor NF-κB. Recently, missense mutations in CARMA2sh have been shown to cause psoriasis in a dominant manner and with high penetrancy. Here, we demonstrate that in human keratinocytes CARMA2sh plays an essential role in the signal transduction pathway that connects pathogen-associated molecular patterns recognition to NF-κB activation. We also find that the serine/threonine kinase ULK2 binds to and phosphorylates CARMA2sh, thereby inhibiting its capacity to activate NF-κB by promoting lysosomal degradation of BCL10, which is essential for CARMA2sh-mediated NF-κB signaling. Remarkably, CARMA2sh mutants associated with psoriasis escape ULK2 inhibition. Finally, we show that a peptide blocking CARD-mediated BCL10 interactions reduces the capacity of psoriasis-linked CARMA2sh mutants to activate NF-κB. Our work elucidates a fundamental signaling mechanism operating in human keratinocytes and opens to novel potential tools for the therapeutical treatment of human skin disorders.

  7. Isolation and cross-sensitivity of X-ray-sensitive mutants of V79-4 hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, N.J.; Cox, R.; Thacker, J.

    1987-01-01

    The V79-4 Chinese hamster line was mutagenized and surviving clones screened for X-ray sensitivity using a replica microwell technique. One slightly sensitive clone and 3 clearly sensitive clones were isolated from approximately 5000 screened, and designated irs 1 to irs 4. The 3 more sensitive clones showed different responses to the genotoxic agents mitomycin C (MMC), ethyl methanesulphonate (EMS) and ultraviolet light (UV). irs 1 showed considerable sensitivity to all the agents tested, in the order MMC >> EMS > UV. irs 2 and irs 3 had similar sensitivities to EMS and to UV (EMS > UV) but irs 3 was more sensitive than irs 2 to MMC. None of these mutants is identical in phenotype to previously published mutants. (Auth.)

  8. Genetic mapping of the barley lodging resistance locus Erectoides-k

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Peter Skov; Dockter, Christoph; Lundqvist, Udda

    2016-01-01

    ’ is a semi-dwarf barley cultivar known for its culm stability and resistance to lodging. In total, eight allelic ert-k mutants are known that show different phenotypic strength concerning culm length and spike architecture. They represent alternatives to the widely used, but pleiotropic ‘Green Revolution...... provides a solid foundation for the identification of the underlying mutations causing the ert-k lodging-resistant phenotype. In addition, the linked markers could be used to follow the ert-k mutant genotype in marker-assisted selection of new lodging-resistant barley cultivars....

  9. Rapid identification of lettuce seed germination mutants by bulked segregant analysis and whole genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Heqiang; Henry, Isabelle M; Coppoolse, Eric R; Verhoef-Post, Miriam; Schut, Johan W; de Rooij, Han; Vogelaar, Aat; Joosen, Ronny V L; Woudenberg, Leo; Comai, Luca; Bradford, Kent J

    2016-11-01

    Lettuce (Lactuca sativa) seeds exhibit thermoinhibition, or failure to complete germination when imbibed at warm temperatures. Chemical mutagenesis was employed to develop lettuce lines that exhibit germination thermotolerance. Two independent thermotolerant lettuce seed mutant lines, TG01 and TG10, were generated through ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenesis. Genetic and physiological analyses indicated that these two mutations were allelic and recessive. To identify the causal gene(s), we applied bulked segregant analysis by whole genome sequencing. For each mutant, bulked DNA samples of segregating thermotolerant (mutant) seeds were sequenced and analyzed for homozygous single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Two independent candidate mutations were identified at different physical positions in the zeaxanthin epoxidase gene (ABSCISIC ACID DEFICIENT 1/ZEAXANTHIN EPOXIDASE, or ABA1/ZEP) in TG01 and TG10. The mutation in TG01 caused an amino acid replacement, whereas the mutation in TG10 resulted in alternative mRNA splicing. Endogenous abscisic acid contents were reduced in both mutants, and expression of the ABA1 gene from wild-type lettuce under its own promoter fully complemented the TG01 mutant. Conventional genetic mapping confirmed that the causal mutations were located near the ZEP/ABA1 gene, but the bulked segregant whole genome sequencing approach more efficiently identified the specific gene responsible for the phenotype. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. The deoxyhypusine synthase mutant dys1-1 reveals the association of eIF5A and Asc1 with cell wall integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Carrilho Galvão

    Full Text Available The putative eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A is a highly conserved protein among archaea and eukaryotes that has recently been implicated in the elongation step of translation. eIF5A undergoes an essential and conserved posttranslational modification at a specific lysine to generate the residue hypusine. The enzymes deoxyhypusine synthase (Dys1 and deoxyhypusine hydroxylase (Lia1 catalyze this two-step modification process. Although several Saccharomyces cerevisiae eIF5A mutants have importantly contributed to the study of eIF5A function, no conditional mutant of Dys1 has been described so far. In this study, we generated and characterized the dys1-1 mutant, which showed a strong depletion of mutated Dys1 protein, resulting in more than 2-fold decrease in hypusine levels relative to the wild type. The dys1-1 mutant demonstrated a defect in total protein synthesis, a defect in polysome profile indicative of a translation elongation defect and a reduced association of eIF5A with polysomes. The growth phenotype of dys1-1 mutant is severe, growing only in the presence of 1 M sorbitol, an osmotic stabilizer. Although this phenotype is characteristic of Pkc1 cell wall integrity mutants, the sorbitol requirement from dys1-1 is not associated with cell lysis. We observed that the dys1-1 genetically interacts with the sole yeast protein kinase C (Pkc1 and Asc1, a component of the 40S ribosomal subunit. The dys1-1 mutant was synthetically lethal in combination with asc1Δ and overexpression of TIF51A (eIF5A or DYS1 is toxic for an asc1Δ strain. Moreover, eIF5A is more associated with translating ribosomes in the absence of Asc1 in the cell. Finally, analysis of the sensitivity to cell wall-perturbing compounds revealed a more similar behavior of the dys1-1 and asc1Δ mutants in comparison with the pkc1Δ mutant. These data suggest a correlated role for eIF5A and Asc1 in coordinating the translational control of a subset of m

  11. Enamel protein regulation and dental and periodontal physiopathology in MSX2 mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molla, Muriel; Descroix, Vianney; Aïoub, Muhanad; Simon, Stéphane; Castañeda, Beatriz; Hotton, Dominique; Bolaños, Alba; Simon, Yohann; Lezot, Frédéric; Goubin, Gérard; Berdal, Ariane

    2010-11-01

    Signaling pathways that underlie postnatal dental and periodontal physiopathology are less studied than those of early tooth development. Members of the muscle segment homeobox gene (Msx) family encode homeoproteins that show functional redundancy during development and are known to be involved in epithelial-mesenchymal interactions that lead to crown morphogenesis and ameloblast cell differentiation. This study analyzed the MSX2 protein during mouse postnatal growth as well as in the adult. The analysis focused on enamel and periodontal defects and enamel proteins in Msx2-null mutant mice. In the epithelial lifecycle, the levels of MSX2 expression and enamel protein secretion were inversely related. Msx2+/- mice showed increased amelogenin expression, enamel thickness, and rod size. Msx2-/- mice displayed compound phenotypic characteristics of enamel defects, related to both enamel-specific gene mutations (amelogenin and enamelin) in isolated amelogenesis imperfecta, and cell-cell junction elements (laminin 5 and cytokeratin 5) in other syndromes. These effects were also related to ameloblast disappearance, which differed between incisors and molars. In Msx2-/- roots, Malassez cells formed giant islands that overexpressed amelogenin and ameloblastin that grew over months. Aberrant expression of enamel proteins is proposed to underlie the regional osteopetrosis and hyperproduction of cellular cementum. These enamel and periodontal phenotypes of Msx2 mutants constitute the first case report of structural and signaling defects associated with enamel protein overexpression in a postnatal context.

  12. X-linked Alport syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jais, J P; Knebelmann, B; Giatras, I

    2000-01-01

    Alport syndrome (AS) is a type IV collagen hereditary disease characterized by the association of progressive hematuric nephritis, hearing loss, and, frequently, ocular changes. Mutations in the COL4A5 collagen gene are responsible for the more common X-linked dominant form of the disease....... Considerable allelic heterogeneity has been observed. A "European Community Alport Syndrome Concerted Action" has been established to delineate accurately the AS phenotype and to determine genotype-phenotype correlations in a large number of families. Data concerning 329 families, 250 of them with an X...

  13. Search for C4 developmental mutants in Panicum maximum Jacq

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fladung, M.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Mutant plants are useful tools for studying developmental processes in defined genetic backgrounds by comparing them with their respective wild type forms. In this sense, developmental mutants or mutations involved in the establishment of certain leaf or flower specific traits are of special interest. In particular, the evolution of C 4 photosynthesis from C 3 precursors was accompanied by severe developmental changes in leaf morphology and anatomy. Our search of such mutants was followed by the idea to approach the evolution of the C 4 syndrome from a mutagenic point of view. Variants affecting normal development of the C 4 leaf anatomy may, in fact, represent possible regressive steps in C4 photosynthesis. Seeds of the C4 grass Panicum maximum Jacq. were mutagenized using ethylmethanesulfonate (EMS) and putative variants were isolated in the M2 generation by visual inspection. Main selection characteristics were whole plant, leaf morphology and pigmentation, and growth characteristics. The choice of a polyploid species for mutagenesis experiments was based on the need of detecting rare mutants, which are possibly lethal when using a diploid plant species. These variants could be of regulatory nature, affecting both morphology and physiology of C 4 photosynthesis early in leaf development. In total, nearly 100 variants were isolated and grown to maturity. Main isolated variants, which conforms to the prediction mentioned above, were as following: large interveinal space-1 and -3 (lis1, lis3), abnormal bundle sheath (abs), midribless (mbl) and variegated leaf -1 (var1). The variant lis1 was a short plant with leaves smaller than the wild type, and had a leaf lamina with a crinkly surface. Photosynthetically, lis1 indicates a clear regression from the C 4 to the C 3 photosynthesis type, which was correlated in the leaf lamina with an increase in the distance between small veins. The variant lis3 was not similar phenotypically to lis1, but it also had very

  14. Isolation of a novel mutant gene for soil-surface rooting in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanzawa, Eiko; Sasaki, Kazuhiro; Nagai, Shinsei; Obara, Mitsuhiro; Fukuta, Yoshimichi; Uga, Yusaku; Miyao, Akio; Hirochika, Hirohiko; Higashitani, Atsushi; Maekawa, Masahiko; Sato, Tadashi

    2013-11-20

    Root system architecture is an important trait affecting the uptake of nutrients and water by crops. Shallower root systems preferentially take up nutrients from the topsoil and help avoid unfavorable environments in deeper soil layers. We have found a soil-surface rooting mutant from an M2 population that was regenerated from seed calli of a japonica rice cultivar, Nipponbare. In this study, we examined the genetic and physiological characteristics of this mutant. The primary roots of the mutant showed no gravitropic response from the seedling stage on, whereas the gravitropic response of the shoots was normal. Segregation analyses by using an F2 population derived from a cross between the soil-surface rooting mutant and wild-type Nipponbare indicated that the trait was controlled by a single recessive gene, designated as sor1. Fine mapping by using an F2 population derived from a cross between the mutant and an indica rice cultivar, Kasalath, revealed that sor1 was located within a 136-kb region between the simple sequence repeat markers RM16254 and 2935-6 on the terminal region of the short arm of chromosome 4, where 13 putative open reading frames (ORFs) were found. We sequenced these ORFs and detected a 33-bp deletion in one of them, Os04g0101800. Transgenic plants of the mutant transformed with the genomic fragment carrying the Os04g0101800 sequence from Nipponbare showed normal gravitropic responses and no soil-surface rooting. These results suggest that sor1, a rice mutant causing soil-surface rooting and altered root gravitropic response, is allelic to Os04g0101800, and that a 33-bp deletion in the coding region of this gene causes the mutant phenotypes.

  15. Allele-specific Gene Silencing of Mutant mRNA Restores Cellular Function in Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Noguchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD is an inherited muscle disorder characterized clinically by muscle weakness, distal joint hyperlaxity, and proximal joint contractures. Sporadic and recessive mutations in the three collagen VI genes, COL6A1, COL6A2, and COL6A3, are reported to be causative. In the sporadic forms, a heterozygous point mutation causing glycine substitution in the triple helical domain has been identified in higher rate. In this study, we examined the efficacy of siRNAs, which target point mutation site, on specific knockdown toward transcripts from mutant allele and evaluated consequent cellular phenotype of UCMD fibroblasts. We evaluated the effect of siRNAs targeted to silence-specific COL6A1 alleles in UCMD fibroblasts, where simultaneous expression of both wild-type and mutant collagen VI resulted in defective collagen localization. Addition of mutant-specific siRNAs allowed normal extracellular localization of collagen VI surrounding fibroblasts, suggesting selective inhibition of mutant collagen VI. Targeting the single-nucleotide COL6A1 c.850G>A (p.G284R mutation responsible a sporadic autosomal dominant form of UCMD can potently and selectively block expression of mutant collagen VI. These results suggest that allele-specific knockdown of the mutant mRNA can potentially be considered as a therapeutic procedure in UCMD due to COL6A1 point mutations.

  16. Linking high-resolution metabolic flux phenotypes and transcriptional regulation in yeast modulated by the global regulator Gcn4p

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moxley, Joel F.; Jewett, Michael Christopher; Antoniewicz, Maciek R.

    2009-01-01

    . However, the potential of systems biology approaches is limited by difficulties in integrating metabolic measurements across the functional levels of the cell despite their being most closely linked to cellular phenotype. To address this limitation, we developed a model-based approach to correlate m......RNA and metabolic flux data that combines information from both interaction network models and flux determination models. We started by quantifying 5,764 mRNAs, 54 metabolites, and 83 experimental C-13-based reaction fluxes in continuous cultures of yeast under stress in the absence or presence of global regulator...... of metabolic flux (i.e., use of different reaction pathways) by transcriptional regulation and metabolite interaction density (i.e., level of pairwise metabolite-protein interactions) as a key biosynthetic control determinant. Furthermore, this model predicted flux rewiring in studies of follow...

  17. Reduction of FR900525 using an S-(2-aminoethyl) l-cysteine-resistant mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Shiho; Futase, Ayako; Yokoyama, Tatsuya; Ueda, Satoshi; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2017-06-01

    FK506 (tacrolimus), a macrolide compound with immunosuppressant activity, has been proven to have clinical importance and has been manufactured industrially since 1993 by using mutants with high FK506-production ability; these mutants have been developed from the wild strain Streptomyces tsukubaensis No. 9993. FR900525 is one of the by-products of FK506 production. However, there was no effective industrial method to separate FR900525 from FK506 due to the structural similarity between the two compounds. Therefore, reducing the level of FR900525 was a serious problem in the industrial strain A. In this study, we aimed to reduce the FR900525 production. We first determined that pipecolic acid level was a critical parameter for controlling FR900525 production in strain A. S-(2-Aminoethyl) l-cysteine (AEC)-resistant mutants has been reported to increase lysine productivity successfully in a variety of lysine-producing microorganisms. Therefore, next, we applied a selection of AEC-resistant mutants to enhance pipecolic acid biosynthesis. Finally, four AEC-resistant mutants were obtained from strain A using ultraviolet irradiation, and three of them showed less FR900525 productivity compared to the parental strain A. Our findings indicated that AEC resistance was effective phenotype marker for increasing pipecolic acid productivity and for reducing FR900525 production in S. tsukubaensis. Thus, our study provides an efficient method for reducing FR90025 level during FK506 biosynthesis. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Early nodule senescence is activated in symbiotic mutants of pea (Pisum sativum L.) forming ineffective nodules blocked at different nodule developmental stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serova, Tatiana A; Tsyganova, Anna V; Tsyganov, Viktor E

    2018-04-03

    Plant symbiotic mutants are useful tool to uncover the molecular-genetic mechanisms of nodule senescence. The pea (Pisum sativum L.) mutants SGEFix - -1 (sym40), SGEFix - -3 (sym26), and SGEFix - -7 (sym27) display an early nodule senescence phenotype, whereas the mutant SGEFix - -2 (sym33) does not show premature degradation of symbiotic structures, but its nodules show an enhanced immune response. The nodules of these mutants were compared with each other and with those of the wild-type SGE line using seven marker genes that are known to be activated during nodule senescence. In wild-type SGE nodules, transcript levels of all of the senescence-associated genes were highest at 6 weeks after inoculation (WAI). The senescence-associated genes showed higher transcript abundance in mutant nodules than in wild-type nodules at 2 WAI and attained maximum levels in the mutant nodules at 4 WAI. Immunolocalization analyses showed that the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate accumulated earlier in the mutant nodules than in wild-type nodules. Together, these results showed that nodule senescence was activated in ineffective nodules blocked at different developmental stages in pea lines that harbor mutations in four symbiotic genes.

  19. Hyperphosphatasia with mental retardation syndrome, expanded phenotype of PIGL related disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruqaiah Altassan

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Hypomorphic mutations in six different genes involved in the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI biogenesis pathway are linked to Mabry syndrome (hyperphosphatasia with mental retardation syndrome, HPMRS. This report on the third affected family with a HPMRS phenotype caused by mutations in PIGL, confirming the seventh GPI biogenesis gene linked to HPMRS. Two siblings presented with the main features of HPMRS; developmental delay, cognitive impairment, seizure disorder, skeletal deformities, and high alkaline phosphatase. We identified two heterozygous mutations in the PIGL gene (P.Trp20Ter and p.Arg88Cys. PIGL mutations have been linked to another distinctive neuroectodermal disorder: CHIME syndrome. The clinical picture of our patients expands the spectrum of PIGL-related phenotypes. Keywords: GPI biogenesis, Hyperphosphatasia mental retardation syndrome (HPMRS, Mabry syndrome, PIGL gene, CHIME syndrome

  20. Phenotypic Analysis and Virulence of Candida albicans LIG4 Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andaluz, Encarnación; Calderone, Richard; Reyes, Guadalupe; Larriba, Germán

    2001-01-01

    In previous studies, we reported the isolation and preliminary characterization of a DNA ligase-encoding gene of Candida albicans. This gene (LIG4) is the structural and functional homologue of both yeast and human ligase IV, which is involved in nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) of DNA double-strand breaks. In the present study, we have shown that there are no other LIG4 homologues in C. albicans. In order to study the function of LIG4 in morphogenesis and virulence, we constructed gene deletions. LIG4 transcript levels were reduced in the heterozygote and were completely absent in null strains. Concomitantly, the heterozygote showed a pronounced defect in myceliation, which was slightly greater in the null strain. This was true with several solid and liquid media, such as Spider medium, medium 199, and 2% glucose–1% yeast extract–2% Bacto Peptone, at several pHs. Reintroduction of the wild-type allele into the null mutant partially restored the ability of cells to form hyphae. In agreement with the positive role of LIG4 in morphogenesis, we detected a significant rise in mRNA levels during the morphological transition. LIG4 is not essential for DNA replication or for the repair of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation or UV light, indicating that these lesions are repaired primarily by homologous recombination. However, our data show that the NHEJ apparatus of C. albicans may control morphogenesis in this diploid organism. In addition, deletion of one or both copies of LIG4 resulted in attenuation of virulence in a murine model of candidiasis. PMID:11119499

  1. Microevolution of Candida albicans in macrophages restores filamentation in a nonfilamentous mutant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Wartenberg

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Following antifungal treatment, Candida albicans, and other human pathogenic fungi can undergo microevolution, which leads to the emergence of drug resistance. However, the capacity for microevolutionary adaptation of fungi goes beyond the development of resistance against antifungals. Here we used an experimental microevolution approach to show that one of the central pathogenicity mechanisms of C. albicans, the yeast-to-hyphae transition, can be subject to experimental evolution. The C. albicans cph1Δ/efg1Δ mutant is nonfilamentous, as central signaling pathways linking environmental cues to hyphal formation are disrupted. We subjected this mutant to constant selection pressure in the hostile environment of the macrophage phagosome. In a comparatively short time-frame, the mutant evolved the ability to escape macrophages by filamentation. In addition, the evolved mutant exhibited hyper-virulence in a murine infection model and an altered cell wall composition compared to the cph1Δ/efg1Δ strain. Moreover, the transcriptional regulation of hyphae-associated, and other pathogenicity-related genes became re-responsive to environmental cues in the evolved strain. We went on to identify the causative missense mutation via whole genome- and transcriptome-sequencing: a single nucleotide exchange took place within SSN3 that encodes a component of the Cdk8 module of the Mediator complex, which links transcription factors with the general transcription machinery. This mutation was responsible for the reconnection of the hyphal growth program with environmental signals in the evolved strain and was sufficient to bypass Efg1/Cph1-dependent filamentation. These data demonstrate that even central transcriptional networks can be remodeled very quickly under appropriate selection pressure.

  2. Genetic analysis of tachyzoite to bradyzoite differentiation mutants in Toxoplasma gondii reveals a hierarchy of gene induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upinder; Brewer, Jeremy L; Boothroyd, John C

    2002-05-01

    Developmental switching in Toxoplasma gondii, from the virulent tachyzoite to the relativ